Citation
The middle school of Greencastle, Indiana

Material Information

Title:
The middle school of Greencastle, Indiana
Creator:
Gillim, Parvin D
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
141 leaves : illustrations, charts, maps (some folded), plans (including 1 folded) ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
School buildings -- Designs and plans -- Indiana -- Greencastle ( lcsh )
School buildings ( fast )
Indiana -- Greencastle ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 140-141).
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
developed by Parvin D. Gillim.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
13775142 ( OCLC )
ocm13775142
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1986 .G527 ( lcc )

Full Text
An architectural thesis presented to the
College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver
in partial fullfillment of the requirements
for the degree of Master of Architecture.
Parvin D. Gillim III Spring, 1986


The thesis of Parvin D. Gillim III is approved:


I wish to acknowledge the following people for their help and support in developing this project.
* Joel Bloom of the InterDesign Group in Indianapolis
* Greencastle School Corporation
* City of Greencastle, Indiana
* Gary Merideth of RNL in Denver
* Prof. Robert Kindig
* Prof. Davis Holder
* Anthony Lewis
A very special "thank you" goes to my father and mother, Dr. and Mrs Parvin D. Gillim, for their constant encouragement of my endeavors.


CONTENTS
page
Forward ...............................................1
I. Introduction ..........................................2
General Information ...............................5
II. Thesis Statement ......................................8
Conclusion ........................................14
III. History ..............................................16
Corporation Structure .............................19
IV. Site .................................................20
Utilities .........................................25
Views of the Area .................................30
V. Zoning ...............................................45
VI. Climate ............................................. 48
Sun Angle and Shading .............................52
Solar Radiation ...................................55
Bibliography .................................... 60
VII. Specifications .......................................61
Program of Studies ................................63
Requirements for the Basic Core Subjects ..........66
Requirements for the Special Areas .............82
Instructional Support Spaces .....................100
Summary of Facilities ............................112
Other Considerations ............................117
VIII. Codes ...............................................121
IX. Design ..............................................130
Model Photos .....................................137
X. Bibliography ........................................139


1
"Every child goes to school 1n a building that looks like a duplicating-machine replacement-parts wholesale distribution warehouse. Not even the school commissioners, who commissioned 1t and approved the plans, can figure out how it happened. The main thing is to try to avoid having to explain it to the parents."
Tom Wolf
From Bauhaus to Our House (1981, pg 3)


INTRODUCTION


The project is a proposed middle school building which will house the sixth, seventh, and eighth grades of the Greencastle Community School Corporation located in Greencastle, Indiana. The school will be designed to house a student population in excess of 450 with an overall floor area of 100,000 square feet.
The school is an actual project now being undertaken by the InterDesign Group Inc. of Indianapolis, Indiana. Approval has been given by both the Greencastle School Corporation (a letter of approval is provided in this section) and the InterDesign Group to develop this thesis around a hypothetical design for the new middle school building.
The purpose of this study is to determine a language of characteristics of both an aesthetic and functional nature which will identify a building as a school in the eyes of the public.


4
GREENCASTLE COMMUNITY SCHOOLS OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT
P. O BOX 4BO GREENCASTLE. INDIANA 46135
August 26, 1985
Mr. Parvin D. Gillim 1754 B Park Avenue Denver, CO 80218
Dear Mr. Gillim:
The Board of School Trustees of the Greencastle Community School Corporation met in special session on August 22, 1985.
This letter is to inform you that at that meeting the Board voted to grant you permission to obtain information on the development of the new middle school as you progress toward your masters degree at the University of Colorado.
Sincerely,
JLP/ras


GENERAL INFORMATION
GREENCASTLE HIGH SCHOOL (Total acreage: 45 acres) (Includes
approximately 12 acres recently purchased for the new middle school to be built at the high school site]
910 Ev Washington Street Greencastle, IN 46135
Enrollment: 538
Administrators: 4
Teaching Staff: 35
Non-teaching Staff: 25
GREENCASTLE MIDDLE SCHOOL (Total acreage: Approximately 2 acres)
110 S. Spring Avenue Greencastle, IN 46135
Enrollment: 413
Administrators: 3
Teaching Staff: 22
Non-teaching Staff: 10 !
Northeast Elementary School (Total acreage: Approximately 20 acres) 500 Linwood Drive Greencastle, IN . 46135
Enrollment: 304
Administrators: 1
Teaching Staff: 14
Non-teaching Staff: 4
JONES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (Total acreage: Approximately 3 acres)
209 W. Liberty Street Greencastle, IN 46135
Enrollment: 264
Administrators: 1
Teaching Staff: 12
Non-teaching Staff: 5


RIDPATH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (Total acreage: Approximately 2.5 acres) 405 Howard Street Greencastle, IN 46135
Enrollment: 276
Administrators: 1
Teaching Staff:' 12
Non-teaching Staff: 4
MILLER ELEMENTARY (CLOSED DUE TO DECLINING ENROLLMENT AT THE END OF THE
1980-1981 SCHOOL YEAR) (Total Acreage: Approximtely 2.5 acres) 522 Anderson Street Greencastle, IN 46135
TRANSPORTATION:
18 Buses Transport 1,148 students Round trip mileage of all regular routes is 662.5 miles per day.
CAFETERIA SERVICES:
Greencastle High School: Cooking cafeteria which provides prepared
food to Northeast Elementary, Ridpath Elementary and the Middle School
Jones Elementary: Cooking cafeteria
Northeast Elementary School: Serving Cafeteria only
Ridpath Elementary School: Serving Cafeteria only
Middle School: Serving Cafeteria with some preparation for alternate menu.


Jones Boundaries: East: Monon railway tracks to Hill Street
West side of Spring Avenue with a line extending north from Spring Avenue north through the State Highway Garage and following State Road 231 North, including Frazier Street
South: Both sides of Hill Street to Spring Avenue
Northeast Boundaries:
South: North side of Washington Street and
Commercial Place with a line extending to Edgewood Lake
West: East Side of Spring Avenue from Washingtoi
Street with a line extending through the State Highway Garage and continuing nori east of State Road 231 North
North: Everything east of State Road 231 North
State Highway Garage
Washington
Hill
CO
c
Ridpath Boundaries:
West: Monon railway tracks to Hill Street
North: South of Hill Street to Spring Avenui South of Washington Street to Spring Avenue except for Commercial Place

Each elementary school has its own attendance area. Pupils are required to attend the school serving th area. The senior and junior high schools serve the entire district. Maps of the school districts are located in the central office and each school offio Elementary transported pupils may be assigned to schools according to space available and to facilit balancing of classes.


STATEMENT


9
Tabula Rasa vs Intuitlonism
From birth till death, the animal becomes aware of a multitude of objects and concepts both tangible and intangible. Recognition and association memory is the backbone of existence in the cognitive sense. Above all other animal life, the human being has the greatest ability to generate concepts through its process of association. For example, the word, BUILDING, will immediately create impressions in the reader's mind as to shape, size, number, material, etc. Associations will be drawn to define the concept of "building". The point to emphasize is that you, the reader, had the concept defined only by the images and Ideas stored in your memory and only generally defined because "building" was not labeled as to a type. The word, "building", would mean absolutely nothing if associations could not be made to recognizable concepts. This is not to say that your generated concept of "building" was necessarily a replica of one which was stored in memory through visual experience. This merely points out that the concept was developed through a composite of images in memory that were associated with the word, "building". A concept can only be defined through what is known. As was mentioned, the human being has the ability to manipulate this knowledge and create derivatives which develop new concepts but the brain cannot develop a non-associative concept. In essence, this 1s arguing intuition by the premise that direct knowledge and insight cannot be gained without associative interference.
Let me qualify the word "building" as to a certain type OFFICE BUILDING. What came to mind: square, rectangle, tall, repetitive, ribbon like windows, flat roof?
m 0 0 m
m 0 Ei m
El & G9 0
m m m El
EH m m IS
& m Ei 0

3
JjL
\// /' / / ///,'£, /
[L-ic / // / s / s s r
Definitely, there were certain images that developed around the concept. One associates certain characteristics of a building form with the function of that building because of the environmental images that have become typical to that function. From warehouse to house, mental images are generated through associations to one's visual and conceptual experiences.
What of the words "SCHOOL", "SCHOOL BUILDING", or "MIDDLE SCHOOL BUILDING"? It is interesting that the images may not be nearly as well defined. Here 1s an experiment look at the pictures that follow and choose which function, A or B, the structure actually houses.


10
A) Factory for Clark Equipment Co., Jackson, MI
B) Shanondale Middle School, Shanondale, OH
A) Herbert Hoover Junior High School, San Francisco, CA
B) Plant 31 / Pump Division Westinghouse Corp. Wheeling, WV
A) Offices and Research Center of the Clayton Equipment Corp., Tempi, AZ
B) Green River High School, Green River, UT


11
A) Westwood High School, Westwood, MA
B) Offices for the Michigan State Liquor Commission, MI
The true functions are as follows: 1. A, 2. A, 3. B, 4. B. The point of this exercise was to make the reader aware that the Image of the school building 1s not clear cut because many of Its visual characteristics 1n today's environment are very similar to other buildings whose functions are much different. The thesis then becomes:
From a strictly visual standpoint, what are the characteristics of the school building, more specifically the middle school building, which will clearly define Its function and set 1t apart from other building types? These characteristics must be based on the premise of what has been initially proposed as to the associations the brain performs for conceptual recognition of the buildings function. The characteristics must exist 1n the present cognitive vocabulary but be defined and arranged to express the essence of school and possibly even middle school.
The thesis rests on analyzing the public's present vocabulary associated with the concept of school and developing a scheme whose form expresses Its very function middle school.
Experience Becomes a Vocabulary
As has been said, characteristics of a building's form become associated with a building's function. It 1s never just one characteristic which will define the general function but rather a series of characteristics such as shape, height, entrance, windows, roof, finish, ornamentation, even environment. A middle school 1s no exception to this vocabulary of characteristics. The vocabulary seems to develop around one's experiences since visual association draws from the visual memory. It 1s safe to assume that ones vocabulary for building function Identification develops from previous visual experiences associated with that function.
It becomes apparent that 1f one can determine the public's visual experiences, analyzing the vocabulary becomes simple. The fact 1s, no one person's experiences, thus the vocabulary of characteristics, are


12
the same as anothers because such factors as age, demography, and background are ever changing. The question then becomes, how can any building be similarly identified by the majority of the public? The answer lies 1n determining broad generalized characteristics common to the building type regardless of the period, location, or context.
It would seem that within the architecture of a building whose function 1s that of a school, and other buildings with similar institutional functions, that form and other characteristics are definitely dictated by function. Identification of a building type, specifically school, rests on a subconscious analysis of individual but general characteristics developing Into a conscious realization of the use. In terms of a middle school, careful analysis of the general characteristic elements associated with the function is in order.
Shape and Size
In analyzing the general shape, the school never seems to go above two or three stories. Geometrically, it is made up of squares, rectangles, and 90 degree adjacencies.
In terms of structure and space, most school buildings do not require any more than two or three stories of space and are recently being confined to one. The single story school seems to have evolved not just from the standpoint of economics and square footage but also to meet the functional considerations of fire codes, handicapped access, and circulation. With incorporation of schools, the trend 1s also more toward the centrally located residential and rural sites which many times can accommodate a rolling single story structure. The economics of keeping to 90 degree geometries rest in the standardization of both structural and educational norms, standardized details, labor, and conventional classroom settings.
Entrance
Entrance is certainly not peculiar to the school building. However, some subtle identifiers occur in the relationship of the entrance to the rest of the structure such as extreme prominence, a central location, its breakup of the facade, and even color in some Instances. The entrance may have a covered walkway connecting 1t to a drive-up for buses.


13
3L
These entrance characteristics can also be found in many offices, theatres, hotels, and sometimes factories. Therefore, the entrance alone can 1n no way identify the building use but the characteristics are a part of the image composite associated with the school building.
Windows
The windows are a characteristic of a building which can tell a great deal about function. First, they can immediately define the number of floors and their location in a structure. Second, a series of windows can easily identify a space. Similar series of windows will undoubtedly appear as similar spaces which indicate similar functions.
In school buildings, the window itself identifies some very distinct characteristics. For instance, windows are always broken up into individual units and never occur in pure ribbons. This 1s largely due to the necessity for windows which have the capacity to be Individually opened or closed. This capacity becomes important because it allows natural ventilation, one is able to perceive the outdoors with more than just the sense of sight, and interior daylighting can be structured through the use of individual blinds. Another factor peculiar to the school window is that many times the fenestrations used as windows are opaque at the bottom section to prevent the seated student from being distracted by the outdoor environment. This occurs most often in the schools that utilize pre-fabricated window walls.
Roof
The roof of most recent school architecture 1s flat. Again, this 1s a generalized characteristic found with many other building functions. The worth of a flat roof lies mostly in economics.


Pitched roofs are occasionally found in the older buildings but very rarely 1n the more recently built schools. It 1s Interesting to note that the pitched roof 1s more often associated with the residential structure. This may identify an older line of thought where school was looked upon as a time of transition and that a more comfortable atmosphere was achieved if subtle hints of home-Hfe were provided (note that the term then was schoolhouse and not school building). Today, the line of thought is more towards preparing the student for a career and thus a more institutional roof is in order.
0 0 0 Q
LmDQD
Finish
The finish of the school building is very universal and a strong identifier. Undoubtedly, the common brick is the most widely use finish for schools. Again, this characteristic occurs mainly for economic reasons. However, the use of brick may also harken back to the early images of the "little red brick schoolhouse".
Conclusion
The characteristics that have been outlined are very general and do not even scratch the surface of the intricate vocabulary that our cognitive ability thrives on. The goal was to identify some general characteristics which are universal to the vocabulary that is associated with the concept of the school building. It 1s obvious that these general characteristics occur 1n many other buildings whose function 1s not that of a school. The key is that when the characteristics occur together 1n one structure, a synergism occurs and the proper associative concept is arrived at.
The description of characteristics seems to dictate that the


appearance of a school building predominantly rests on function and economics. The singular functions such as the gymnasium, classroom, entrance, hallways, etc., come together as the composite function of school. When the singular functions are not visually apparent from the exterior then confusion results as to the composite function. Many of the spaces that occur within an office or a warehouse can be paralleled to those 1n a school; for Instance, a series of offices may appear as a series of classrooms. This parallelism 1s the root of the associative confusion and the reason why clarity of function becomes so Important. The design of a school building which expresses Its use clearly rests on breaking down Its form Into the purest functional elements. A warehouse or a school will always appear similar so long as the discrete functional Issues are Ignored; warehouses have singular functions, schools do not.


HISTORY


Chapter II
THE GREENCASTLE COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

The Philosophy.--The public schools have been provided by organized society in this country for the purpose of assisting and guiding children in their growth toward maturity. This implies the development of the capacities of each individual child to that point where he will achieve with maximum satisfaction to himself and profit to society, the objectives of self-realization, social-competence, economic efficiency and civic responsibility. The elementary, middle', and high school have their unique contributions to make to the child as he passes through the thirteen years of formal education provided by the Greencastle Community Schools. There is, however, some over-lapping in each level, and this contributes to the development of the individual in all four phases of growth. The similarities in the approach to the educational task on these levels are much greater than the differences, but there is, of necessity, a difference of emphasis and method based upon the psychological and physiological age. It must be understood that the education of our boys' and girls should include all experience, all learning, all growth and all self-development. Education in this community must be geared to meet the needs of the boys and girls that we serve.
Since education is to include the total experiences of the child, the educational system should reflect the daily life and activity of the community, state, nation, and world and should impart the necessary information that will create better living in an American Democracy. As members of the School Board, as Administration and Faculty Members, we must so pledge ourselves to carry out a well-rounded program of activities which will meet the growing needs of our boys and girls to meet the needs of a complex society.
The School.--The General Assembly of Indiana has established a state system of schools. The City of Greencastle, Greencastle Township, and Madison Township have been designated as a school corporation.
The School Corporation of the Greencastle Community Schools is a community school corporation taking place July 1, 1964, under the Acts of 1959, Chapter 202.
The History.Under the provisions of the Indiana School Law of 1852 incorporated towns and cities could establish their own public schools. Greencastle took advantage of this law and in 1853 organized the Greencastle Public School System. John Hanna, Mayor, appointed Delana Eckels* Russell Hathaway and Daniel Sigler members of the first School Board. Before any new building got underway, several of the churches were used for public school purposes.
The first 2nd Ward building, located on the present site, was completed in 1867 at a cost of $15,000. The first 1st Ward building was erected in 1869 at a cost of $19,500. In 1877 the 3rd Ward building was constructed. In 1884 a building for colored pupils was completed on Hanna Street with later as many as sixteen pupils enrolled. (These polored


18
children were from families brought from the Southern States to vote in a certain Indiana election.) It continued as a seperate school until 1894 tfhen segregation was ended in Greencastle, at which time it became another public grade school. In 1899 the Hanna Street School became known as 3rd and the 3rd Ward school became the High School.
The high school was initially housed in the old Seminary Building, panted from Asbury University in 1867. The building was also known as the Central School House. In 1867 the high school was placed in the new 2nd Ward building. -In 1870 it was returned to the Seminary Building, but in 1872 it was moved to 2nd Ward. In 1899 the high school was placed in the 3rd Ward Building located on Elm Street.
Although started, a grammar and secondary private and parochial schools were never successful, enrollment falling off sharply after the
years.
In 1918 the present middle school building, costing $4it,000 was occupied. The downtown high school gym was completed in 1926 at a cost of $85,000 with a seating capacity of 2,564. The present Miller building was completed in 1928 at a cost of $60,000. The Jones School was dedicated in 1954 and cost $375,321. In 1956 a five acre tract of land was purchased from Dr. Longden to be used for athletic purposes. Later this was expanded to twenty acres. The contract was let January 29, 1958, for the new high school building costing $1,500,000. This school was completed in 1959.
In 1961 the Ridpath building was completed at a cost of $347,000. In 1964 the Northeast School was completed at a cost of $515,000. In January of 1966 additions to Miller and Ridpath Schools were contracted at a--eost of $383,822. In 1967 the new High School Project was initiated on land donated to the school by the Frande Stone Company. This project includes a field house with a 5,500 seating capacity, auditorium, and Olympic size swimming pool. Construction cost is approximately two and one half million dollars. The addition of the land from the France Stone Company expands the high school campus to thirty-three acres. Miller Elementary was closed #t the end of the 1980-81 school year.
The Attendance Areas--Each elementary school has its own attendance area. Pupils are required to attend the school serving the area, except under special circumstances with the approval of both principals. The middle and high schools serve the entire district. Maps of the school districts are located in the central office and each school office.

The Board of School Trustees changes attendance areas when necessary to better accomodate upuils. The opening of a new school or the closing of a school normally calls for the establishment of new attendance areas.


0




20
SITE


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II


25
UTILITIES


30
VIEWS OF THE AREA


31
In this sub-section, the numbered photos correspond to points on the site map where the photo was taken. Refer between photos and the site map to get composite image of the area.












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39










46
The new middle school site is designated on the zoning map with a star. It is located in a district designated as R! which states the following:
The following uses shall be permitted in any Rl District, plus such other uses as the Board may deem to be similar in nature.
All uses shall be subject to the Property Development Standards.
Uses permitted:
Accessory structures, including Private garages Dwelling, farm Dwelling, single-family Farm, general
Public park or recreational facilities School, public or private
This information was obtained from the City of Greencastle.


CLIMATE


49
General Climatic Data
This sub-section provides the most general of climatic data for the region of Greencastle, Indiana located 39 degrees and 39 minutes North by 86 degrees and 51 minutes West. The information in this sub-section includes temperature, humidity, rainfall, wind direction. This data is used in many of the calculations for determining the type of construction used in the building elements. The information given below is general raw data while that in the remainder of the sub-section is generated through the use of the "Climat" program as listed in the bibliography at the end of the section.
GREENCASTLE 1 E. IN 1 951-1974 39 397 N 86 Si' W 833 FT
TEMPERATURE <*F> PRECIPITATION TOTALS (INCHES)
MEANS EXTREMES MEAN OF UMBER ?AYS SNOW. SLEET MEAN NUMBER OF DAYS
MONTH MAX MIN . MAXIMUM MONTHLY u Ul
DAILY MAXIMUM DAILY MINIMUM x z ? RECORD HIGHEST Of < M > > 2 RECORD LOWEST YEAR DAY 90* AND ABOVE H % ul cc J2* AND BELOW 0* AND BELOW MEAN CREATES MONTHLY K < CREATES DAILY YEAR DAY z < ul X cc < Ul >- 2t SS < u. > > < a ! o i t X s 8
JAN 35.6 16.0 26. 68 52 1 -19 72 16 0 12 27 4 2.68 6.32 69 2.68 65 2 6.8 16.6 48 14.0 68 15 i
FEB 40.0 21.1 30.6 73 57 26 -20 31 2 0 7 25 2 2.28 6.21 71 2.26 56 25 7.1 19.4 61 14.0 65 26 0
MAR 4 9,6 2*.6 39.6 3 7* 9 -3 60 1 0 2 20 0 3.50 8.12 63 2.41 63 5 5.8 19.8 60 14.0 60 4 1
APR 63.9 41. 52.9 Q 54 26 17 72 0 0 6 0 4.02 8.39 64 2.47 56 3 .7 5.0 41 3.0 61 17 1
MAY 14.1 51.1 62.7 93 6? 11 28 66 10 1 0 0 0 4.42 11.12 68 3.95 68 24 .0 1
JUN 3.5 60.4 72.0 109 54 27 40 56 2 7 0 0 0 4.77 10.30 57 6.50 57 22 .0 1
JULY 7.0 63.6 75.3 107 54 IS 47 72 5 11 0 0 0 4.09 9.04 51 4.63 62 14 .0 1
AUG 5.1 61.6 73.7 102* 64 4 40 65 29 9 0 0 0 1.43 7.12 74 2.82 67 3 .0 1
SEPT 79. 54 67.3 106 54 6 32 51 29 4 0 0 0 1.59 11.02 62 6.24 67 14 .0 1
OCT 61.1 43.9 56.0 93 53 4 19* 62 26 0 0 4 0 2.59 5.47 67 2.30 54 11 .1 1.2 62 l
NOV 51.2 32.* 42.1 79* 66 1 -2 51 30 0 2 16 0 3.23 6.75 72 2.80 72 2 2.3 8.0 69 6.0 69 1* 1
DEC 39.3 23.2 31.2 70 54 21 -14 51 16 0 25 1 1.14 7.25 57 2.16 56 7 6.4 29.6 73 14.0 71 21 1
YEAR 63.2 ILL. Uhl U!L 111 Ul 15 -20 FE HILL Lii .22 1 HAY 11.12|66 JUN 22 DEC *1 DEC "I* i_LL Lii 2' Lii
ALSO ON EARLIER dates
Degree Days
Jan Feb Mar 1051 893 725
Apr May Jun 375 140 16
Jul Aug Sep 0 0 59
Oct Nov Dec 247 642 986
Total: 5134


50
LOCATION GREENCASTLE IN
LONGITUDE 39 DEG 39 MIN NORTH
LAT ITUDE 86 DEG 51 MIN WEST
ALTITUDE 835 FEET :
TABLE i CL. I MAT IC DATA (DEG C)
MONTH MAX MIN RANGE
JAN 1.9 -7.8 9.7 :
FEB 4.4 -6. 1 10 5 TABLE l
MAR 9. 7 -1.4 11.1 DEG. c = Degree cel 5 i ue.
APR 17. 7 5. 4 i o 1 jL. it JL. MAX Maxi mum.
MAY n -y -.y X- n 10.6 12. 7 MIN = Minimum.
JUN 28.6 15.7 12.8 AMT r= Annual Mean T emperature
JUL 30. 5 17.5 13 AMR Annual Mean Range.
AUG 29,8 16 4 13. 4
SEP 26. 5 12.6 13.8
OCT 20 LJ 6f 13. 4
NOV 10. 6 . 5 10. 1
DEC 4 ~4 9 8.9
HIGH = 30 . 5 LOW = -7.8
AMT = 11 AMR = 38.3
TABLE 2 CLIMATIC DATA (RH,PRECIP,WIND)
MONTH MAX MIN AVE G RAIN WP WS
JAM 79 68 73.5 4 2. 68 NW
FEB 78 6 5 71.5 4 2.28 WNW . TABLE 2
MAR 79 62 70. 5 4 c:r WNW AVE = Average.
APR 77 5 5 66 y. 4.02 SW G Humidity Group.
MAY 81 57 69 y. 4.42 sw RAIN = Rainfall.
JUN 82 57 69.5 T 4.77 sw WP = Prevailing Wind
JUL 87 60 73.5 4 4.08 sw WS = Secondary Wind.
AUG 89 59 74 4 3.43 sw
SEP 89 58 73.5 3. 59 sw
OCT 86 56 71 4 2.59 sw
NOV 85 6> t> 75. 5 4 -;> O M x'.. sw
DEC 82 71 76.5 4 3. 1 4 sw
TOTAL 41 73


51
TABL E 3 DIAGNO 'SIS
< DAY \ , <___r TIGHT >81 I'E, ESS
MAX UP LOW MIN UP LOW D N
J AN 1.8 24 IS -7. 9 18 C C
FEB 4.4 24 18 -6. 1 18 C C TABLE 3
MAR 9.6 24 18 -1.4 18 c c UP = = Upper comfort
APR 17.7 26 19 5. 4 i 9 c c LOW = Lower comfort
MAY 2 3. 2. 2 6j 19 10. 6 19 0 c D = Day stress.
JUN oq l. Ot. j:.. O m K.J X~ K..} 19 15.6 19 H 0 N = Night stress.
JUL 30.5 24 18 17. 5 18 H 0
AUG 29.7 24 18 16.3 18 H 0
SEP 26.5 24 18 12.6 IS H 0
OCT 20 24 18 6. 5 18 0 c
NOV 10.6 24 18 cr u) 18 c c
DEC 4 24 18 cr IS c c
1evel.
1evel. C = Cole H = Hat,
TABLE 4 Ii\ DI CAT ORS

MONTH H1 H 2 H3 A1 A2 A3

JAN 0 0 0 o 0 1
FEB 0 0 o 0 0 1
MAR 0 o o 0 0 1
APR 0 0 0 1 0 1
MAY 0 o 0 i o 0
JUN 0 0 0 i o 0
JUL 1 o 0 0 o 0
AUG 1 o 0 0 0 o
SEP 1 0 o o o 0
OCT o 1 o 0 0 o
NOV o 0 0 0 0 1
DEC 0 0 0 0 o 1
TOTAL j. 0 -> o 6
TABLE 4
HI..3 = Humid groupings. A1..3 = Arid groupings.


Sun Angle and Shading
This sub-section provides information for determining sun exposure and shading needs. The information includes a sun angle chart for the longitude/latitude of Greencastle, Indiana and also an overlay for determining shadow angles used in shading determinations. This information is directly from the book Manual of Tropical Housing and Building Part One: Climatic Design as listed in the bibliography at the end of the section.


£S


55
Solar Radiation
This sub-section provides solar radiation data for the site of Greencastle, Indiana located 39 degrees and 39 minutes North by 86 degrees and 51 minutes West. This information will be important in determining the heat gain of a building and the sizing of the HVAC system. The average solar radiation on a horizontal surface is given below while the solar radiation on a vertical surface is determined through the information provided on the following pages of this sub-section. The information in this sub-section is directly from The Passive Solar Energy Book as listed in the bibliography at the end of the section.
Average Solar Radiation on a Horizontal Surface (BTU/day-sq.ft.)
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov
31.3 33.9 43.0 54.1 64.9 74.8 79.6 77.4 70.6 59.3 44.2
Dec
33.4


56
Fig. V-18: Alignment example for a vertical surface facing 45 west of south. Hourly Radiation Totals
To determine the winter-clear day, hourly totals of heat energy, in Btu's per hour, striking each square foot of surface area:
1. Select the proper mask based on the slope of the surface (horizontal, 30, 60 and vertical).
2. Select the proper sun chart for the latitude of your location (if your location is in between latitudes, choose the closest one).
3. Keeping the base lines aligned, set the pointer (center axis) of the mask on the azimuth angle that the surface faces to the east or west of true south.
4. Select the month you want to take the reading and use that sun's path to read the values.
5. Select the hour of the month in which you want the reading: the intersection of the hour line and the sun path will locate the position of


The Passive Solar Energy Book
the sun. Read the number of Btu's for that sun's position from the radiation mask. If the point where you want the reading falls between radiation lines, interpolate to find the value.
Note: Because the value of atmospheric moisture content varies greatly across the United States, the solar intensity numbers need to be adjusted depending upon your location. A correction called the Clearness Factor must be applied to the clear-day values. The map in figure V-19 shows lines of equal clearness for winter conditions. Find the line and corresponding Clearness Factor closest to your area and multiply it by the hourly solar intensity numbers from the mask.
Fig. V-19: Map of clearness adjustment factors.
Source: ASHRAE, Handbook of Fundamentals, 1972.
Daily Radiation Totals
To determine the total daily amount of heat energy striking a surface, simply follow the procedure for hourly totals for each hour on the sun chart and total these to get the daily total. If the hourly totals have not been adjusted for your area, then adjust the daily total by multiplying it by the appropriate adjustment factor from the map.


Ln
00
altitude angles


60
Bibliography Specific to this Section
1. Koenigsberger, O. H., Ingersoll, T. A., Mayhew, A., Szokola, S. V. Manual of Tropical Housing and Building Part One: Climatic Design. London, Longman, 1974.
2. Mazria, Edward. The Passive Solar Energy Book. Penn., Rodale Press, 1979.
3. NOAA. Climates of the States. Colo., Gale Research,
1980.
4. Ruffner, James A., and Blair, Frank E.. The Weather Almanac. Colo., Gale Research, 1974.
5. "Climat/Cliraate Assesment", Program for the Apple Computer.
Don Stafford Woolard.


SPECIFICATIONS


62
This section is directly from the document, "Final Draft of Educational Specifications". It was prepared for the Greencastle Community Schools by Dr. John C. Hill of the Bureau of School Services, Indiana State University. (Presented July 1985)


PROGRAM OF STUDIES


64
To attain the program goals in grades 6 through 8, the instructional program will emphasize acquisition of basic skills and knowledge and will include three years of language arts, mathematics, social studies and science for all pupils. The program of studies in these four basic areas of learning are to be personalized to assist each pupil in the development of a positive self-image, individualized to focus on the needs of each student, correlated to maintain learning across subject areas, and transitional to coordinate learning from the elementary school to the high school.
To meet the individualized needs of pupils in grades 7 and 8, extra strength academic studies are to be provided in the aural analysis of music, mathematics and everyday living, creative literature, science plus, literary appreciation, independent art projects, teen cuisine, reader's theater, getting to know your world, computer keyboarding, computer literacy, and other selected topics.
The program of studies for the middle school will include experiences for all pupils in the fields of art, music, industrial arts, home economics and health. To attain the goal of exploration, students may elect to participate in one-semester experiences in journalism, creative writing, dramatics, photography, video, arts and crafts, chorus, science research, computer science, special projects, library science, radio, cooking, and other selected experiences.
The social and physical needs of all pupils will be met in formal experiences in physical education, athletics, instrumental and choral music, and other activities designed to meet the needs of middle school age youth.
The proposed building is to be self-containedthat is, all programs and experiences planned for these pupils are to be delivered within this


65
facility and not be dependent on other facilities in the school corporation. However, there are two exceptions, namely, the existing swimming pool and the auditorium located in MacAnnally Center are to serve both middle school and high school students.
The program of studies for middle school pupils is planned to function within a daily schedule of eight periods approximately 45 minutes in length. Each pupil will be assigned the basic core of four subjectslanguage arts, social studies, mathematics and science. Each student will also participate in physical and health education and in practical and fine arts--home economics, industrial arts, music and art. All students will participate in the extra strength academic program, and may elect to participate in the exploratory program and the instrumental/choral music program.


66
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE
BASIC CORE SUBJECTS


Language Arts
67
The language arts program mill serve all students in grades 6, 7 and 8. Sixth grade students are to be provided two (2) periods, or 90 minutes, of language arts instruction per day. Seventh and eighth grade students are to be provided one (1) period, or 45 minutes, of language arts instruction per day. In addition, students in grades 6, 7 and 8 may elect to participate in the language arts departments exploratory program offerings, and seventh and eighth grade students participate in the department's extra strength academic program offerings. The exploratory program consists of one-semester experiences in such topics as journalism/creative writing, dramatics, library science, and other selected topics. The extra strength academics program consists of six weeks experiences in such topics as creative literature, literary appreciation, reader's theater, and other selected topics.
Instructional classroom space is to be provided for approximately 400 students who will be divided into 16 sections of approximately 25 pupils per
section. Based on an eight-period day, classroom requirements for the language arts program are as follows:
Sixth Grade
Regular classes Exploratory program Teacher planning
11 periods per day 2 periods per day 2 periods per day
Seventh Grade
Regular classes Exploratory program Extra strength academics Teacher planning
6 periods per day 3 periods per day 2 periods per day 2 periods per day
Eighth Grade
Regular classes Exploratory program Extra strength academics
Teacher planning___________________________________________
Totals grades 6-8 39 periods per day
39 t 8 = 4.85 or 5 minimum classrooms required for language arts
6 periods per day 3 periods per day 1 period per day 1 period per day


Sixth, seventh, and eighth grade language arts includes the teaching of literature, composition, grammar, reading, and spelling. Although the direct teaching of skills is necessary, broad units of instruction provide opportunities for practicing skills in situations requiring communicating ideas. Grammatical concepts are taught both directly and incidentally and are applied to the improvement of speaking and writing. Spalling is taught directly each week. Students are introduced to the resources of the library, and individual reading is encouraged.
The goals of the language arts program are to improve student skills in reading, writing, grammar, spelling, speaking, listening, and to acquire new knowledge, skills and understanding through literature, dramatics, and library research. Classroom activities include discussions, recitation, drill, speaking, listening, reading, and study in both large (25) and small (2-6) groups. Audio-visual aids are to be utilized, including overhead, slide, film, filmstrip, and opaque projection and with microcomputers.
It is recommended that each of these five (5) classrooms contain space for a large group area (30 student stations with armchair desks with a wire basket type book box), space for small groups (one table and 6 chairs), and space for individual student activities (five (5) study carrels each with one duplex outlet, light and book holder and five (5) straight back chairs). It is further recommended that each classroom have a walk-in storage closet, lighted and lockable, for storage of books, loose materials, coats and contain space for two (2) four-drawer file cabinets.
Specific requirements for each language arts classroom are:
(1) Lighting50 to 60 f. c. at desk levelwith bank switching with dinner control
(2) Two (2) duplex outlets each wall
(3) Carpeted floor preferred
(4) Magnetic chalkboard with chartrail on two (2) walls (front, side)minimum total 32 linear feet


69
(5) Tackboard (back wall)--minimum 12 linear feet
(6) Room darkening capability
(7) Open shelving for book storage
(8) Teacher desk with chairlockable desk
(9) Wall-mounted AV screen
(10) Two-way intercom with office
(11) Wall-mounted clock (rear wall)
Other considerations include:
(1) Locate language arts classroom away from noise-producing activities
(2) Locate language arts classrooms near to or adjacent to the Instructional Materials Center and social studies classrooms
(3) Locate classrooms on an exterior wall with windows above eye level when students are seated


Social Studies
The social studies program will serve all students in grades 6, 7, and 8. All sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students are to be provided one (1) period, or 45 minutes, of regular social studies instruction per day. In addition, students in grades 7 and 8 may elect to participate in the social studies department's exploratory program offerings, and seventh and eighth grade students will participate in the department's extra strength academic offerings. The exploratory program consists of a one-semester experience in such topics as on your own and other selected topics. The extra strength academics program consists of six week experiences in such topics as getting to know your world and other selected topics.
Instructional classroom space is to be provided for approximately 400
students who will be divided into 16 sections of approximately 25 pupils per
section. Based on an eight period day, studies program are as follows:
Sixth Grade
Regular classes Teacher planning
Seventh Grade
Regular classes Exploratory program Teacher planning
Eighth Grade
Regular classes Exploratory program Extra strength academics Teacher planning____________
Totals grades 6-8
22 f 8 = 2. 75 or 3 minimum classr
classroom requirements for the social
5 periods per day 1 period per day
6 periods per day 1 period per day 1 period per day
5 periods per day 1 period per day 1 period per day
________1 period per day
22 periods per day required for social studies
The social studies program provides experiences for sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students in the following areas: (1) sixth grade world studies, a historical and geographical approach; (2) seventh grade geography, a cultural approach; and (3) eighth grade United States history. Each grade also provides a weekly current events video program.


The goals of the social studies program include the acquisition of knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the world in which we live. Skill acquisition includes map reading, globe use, reading, writing, spelling, and speaking. Audio-visual aids are extensively utili2ed as well as maps, charts, globes, models, and other print media.
It is recommended that each of these three (3) classrooms contain space for a large group area (30 student stations with flat surface armchair desk with a wire basket type book box) and space for small groups (3 tables with 4 chairs for each table). It is further recommended that each classroom have a walk-in storage closet, lighted and lockable, for storage of books, maps, charts, globes, other loose materials, coats and contain space for two (2) four-drawer file cabinets.
Specific requirements for each social studies classroom are:
(1) Lighting50 to 60 f.c. at desk levelwith bank switching and dimmer control
(2) Two (2) duplex outlets each wall
(3) Carpeted floor preferred
(4) Magnetic chalkboard with chartrail on one (1) wall (front) minimum total 20 linear ft.chartrail, side wall, minimum 16 linear ft.
(5) Tackboard (back wall)minimum 12 linear ft.
(6) Room darkening capability
(7) Open shelving for book storage
(8) Teacher desk with chairlockable desk
(9) Wall-mounted AV screen
(10) Two-way intercom with office
(11) Wall-mounted clock (rear wall)
(12) Cable TV outlet
(13) Display window with shelving adjacent to door, facing hall
Other considerations include:
(1) Locate social studies classrooms away from noise-producing activities
(2) Locate social studies classrooms near to or adjacent to the Instructional Materials Center and language arts classrooms
(3) Locate classrooms on an exterior wall with windows above eye level when students are seated.


7*.
Mathematics and Computer Science
The mathematics program will serve all students in grades 6, 7, and 8. Each grade level has one advanced section, four regular sections and one remedial section per day. The remedial section is further subdivided into one basic and one Chapter One class in each grade. In addition, students in grades 6, 7, and 8 may elect to participate in the mathematics department's exploratory program offerings, and seventh and eighth grade students participate in the department's extra strength academic program offerings. The exploratory program consists of one-semester experiences in such topics as computer science and other selected topics. The extra strength academics program features two seventh grade courses consisting of six week units where students are exposed to topics ranging from the stock market to calculator exercises, and one eighth grade course devoted to working with computers.
Instructional classroom space is to be provided for approximately 400 students who will be divided into 16 sections of approximately 25 pupils per section. Based on an eight period day, classroom requirements for the mathematics program are as follows:
Sixth Grade
Regular classes Exploratory program Teacher planning
6 periods per day 1 period per day 1 period per day
Seventh Grade
Regular classes Exploratory program Extra strength academics Teacher planning
6 periods per day
1 period per day
2 periods per day 1 period per day
Eighth Grade
Regular classes Exploratory program Extra strength academics Teacher planning_________
6 periods per day 1 period per day
1 period per day
2 periods per day
Totals grades 6-8
28 periods per day
28 f 8 = 3. 5 or 4 minimum classrooms required for mathematics


73
The goals of the mathematics program are to improve skills in all operation of whole numbers, decimals and fractions, consumer math, measurement, geometry, and the exploration of rational numbers. In addition, the eighth grade advanced section is taught an introductory algebra course for the entire year.
Classroom activities include demonstration, drill work at student desks and at the chalkboard, discussions, large (25 students) and small group (2-6 students) work and individualized instruction.
It is recommended that each of these four (4) classrooms contain space for a large group area (30 student stations with armchair desks with a wire basket type book box), space for small groups (two (2) tables with six straight back chairs for each table), and three (3) microcomputer stations for individual student work. It is further recommended that each classroom have a walk-in storage closet, lighted and lockable, for storage of books, loose materials, coats, and contain space for two (2) four-drawer file cabinets.
Specific requirements for each mathematics classroom are:
(1) Lighting50 to 60 f.c. at desk levelwith bank switching with dimmer control
(2) Two (2) duplex outlets each wall
(3) Carpeted floor preferred
(4) Magnetic chalkboard with chartrail on two (2) wallsminimum total 50 linear ft.rectangular coordinates on one panel
(5) Tackboardminimum 12 linear fat.
(6) Room darkening capability
(7) 12 linear feet adjustable book shelving
(8) Teacher desk (lockable) and chair
(9) Kail-mounted screen for AV use
(10) Two-way intercom with office
(11) Kail-mounted clock on rear wall
(12) Kiring for cable television
It is further recommended that a computer laboratory be developed adjacent to the mathematics classrooms. This laboratory should contain 30


74
pupil stations, each with an individual student computer station and one (1) computer teaching station for the instructor.
Specific requirements for the microcomputer laboratory are:
(1) Lighting50 to 50 f. c. at desk levelwith oanr; switching and dimmer control
(2) Antimagnetic carpet preferred
(3) Melamine surface wall-mounted writing board located on front wall (minimum 24 linear feet)
(4) Tackboardminimum 16 linear feet
(5) Room darkening capability
(6) 36 linear feet adjustable book shelving
(7) Two (2) four-drawer file cabinets for storage of software discs and manuals
(8) Wall-mounted AV screen
(9) Wall-mounted clock located on back wall
(10) Tables with straight back chairs for 30 student computer stations with one (1) duplex outlet for each computer station
(11) One (1) table for computer teaching station with one (1) duplex outlet
(12) Two (2) duplex outlets each wall
(13) Two-way intercom with office
(14) Two (2) ceiling-mounted 25-inch-high resolution TV monitors connected to instructor's computer station
(15) The 30 student microcomputer stations are to be networked with the instructor's station
Other considerations include:
(1) Locate mathematics/computer science classrooms near science classrooms
(2) Locate away from noise-producing activities
Science
The science program will serve all students in grades 6, 7, and 8. All sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students are provided one (1) period, or 45 minutes, of regular science instruction per day. In addition, students in grades 5, 7 and 8 may elect to participate in the science department's exploratory program offerings, and students in grades 7 and 8 will participate in the science department's extra strength academics program.
Instructional classroom space is to be provided for approximately 400 students who will be divided into 16 sections of approximately 25 students


per section. Based on an eight period day, classroom requirements for the
science program are as follows:
75
Sixth Grade
Regular classes Exploratory program Teacher planning
5 periods per day 1 period per day 1 period per day
Seventh Grade Regular classes Exploratory program Extra strength academics Teacher Planning
5 periods per day 1 period per day 1 period per day 1 period per day
Eighth Grade
Regular classes Exploratory program Extra strength academics Teacher planning_________
5 periods per day 1 period per day 1 period per day 1 period per day
Totals 6-8 23 periods per day
23 t 8 = 2.875 or 3 minimum classrooms required for science
The present science program provides experiences for sixth grade students in general science, for seventh grade students in physical science, and for eighth grade students in general science. The science faculty proposes to adopt a program of experiences for students that would offer life science in the sixth grade, physical science in the seventh grade, and earth science in the eighth grade.
The program goal for each grade level is to teach each grade's respective curriculum with as much hands-on laboratory experience as possible approximately once a week. Knowledge and skills of science are provided by the use of lecture/demonstration teaching, discussions, student demonstrations and laboratory experiences for both large groups (25-30 students) and small groups (2-6 students). Audio-visual aids such as film and slide projection, overhead transparencies, VTR, television, maps, charts, and models are frequently utilized.
It is proposed that three (3) classrooms be developed, one designed and stocked for biological science, another for physical science, and a third for


earth science. A separate 36-student station laboratory should also be developed and accessible to the three classrooms. It is recommended that each of the three (3) classrooms contain space for 30 student stations and one (1) teaching station/demonstration table.
Specific requirements for each science classroom are as follows:
(1) Lighting50 to 60 f. c. at desk level with bank switching and dimmer control
(2) Minimum two (2) duplex outlets each wall for physical science and earth science rooms
Minimum four (4) duplex outlets each wall for biological science room
(3) Carpeted floors except for vinyl tile around lecture/ demonstration table
(4) Magnetic chalkboard with chartrailminimum 16 linear feet located behind lecture/demonstration table
(5) Tackboard12 to 16 linear feet
(6) Demonstration table with gas, electricity, water, and provisions for vertical apparatuspower ventedlocated at front of each room
(7) Wall-mounted AV screenlocated on front wall
(8) Room darkening capability
(9) Two-way intercom to office
(10) Cable TV outlet
(11) Overhead lighting with dimmer switch
(12) 30 student stations at 15 tables (2 students per table) in earth science room
30 student stations at 30 armchair desks with wire basket book box in biological and physical science rooms
(13) Perimeter walls lined with storage base cabinets with counter tops
(14) Open front adjustable book storage, 60 linear feet of shelving
(15) Teacher wardrobe storage cabinet
(16) One (1) four-drawer lockable file cabinet
Specific requirements for the science laboratory are as follows:
(1) Lighting50 to 60 f.c. at table level
(2) Vinyl tile floor
(3) 36 student stations at nine (9) four-student labssit-down lab with stools, stand-up work height for middle school age students
(4) Power vented exhaust in lab
(5) Safety shower with eye wash
(6) Recessed fire extinguishers and fire blanket
(7) Safety shut-off switches for gas, water, electricity
(8) First aid cabinet
(9) Perimeter wall lockable storage cabinets for glassware, microscopes, and other equipment
(10) Safety goggle storage cabinet
(11) Refrigerator


(12) Laundry tub
(13) Book storage cabinet, adjustable shelving, 60 linear feet
(14) Built-in automatic weather sensing stationwind, temperature, air pressure, etc.
(15) Tackboard12 linear feet
(16) Chalkboard with maprail12 linear feet (V7) Wall-mounted AV screen
(18) Two-way intercom to officelocated in science lab
(19) Lockable storage room adjacent to labfor storage of large equipment, hazardous chemicals, plant stands, glassware, animal cages, charts, etc. power vented
(20) A greenhouse to be located adjacent to the science lab with direct access to the outside and to the science lab
A darkroom for developing and printing pictures is to be developed as a
part of the science suite. It is suggested that the darkroom have two (2)
separate workrooms, one for film processing and the second for printing.
The film developing room would need:
(1) A sink and running water
(2) Storage cabinets (counter-top) for developing chemicals, film, and equipment
(3) Racks for hanging negatives to dry
(4) Separate entrance from other darkroom
(5) Entrance into the developing room
(6) Outside warning light when developing is in process
(7) Paper towel dispenser
(8) Print drier
(9) Five (5) new camera outfits (flash, lens, and case)
(10) Developing station with enlarger and trays
The photo printing room would need:
(1) Counter space for enlarger and developing trays, photo paper dispenser, paper cutter, and drierphoto table
(2) A large sink, running water, and paper towel dispenser
(3) Racks to hang negatives
(4) Separate entrance
(5) Entrance into film developing room
(6) Outside entrance warning light when developing is in progress
(7) Cabinet storage for chemicals, paper, developed pictures, cameras, flash, tripod, etc.
Other considerations for science include:
(1) South orientation for greenhouse
(2) Locate adjacent to math/computer science
(3) Locate near an outside exit for access to nature study areas of building site


Developmental Studies (Special Education)
The developmental studies department provides special education ex-
78
periences for middle school age students with programs for the mildly mentally handicapped, the learning disabled, and the speech/language handicapped. Psychometric testing, occupational therapy, and special education counseling services are also provided. The total number of middle school age students served by the developmental studies department will range between 38 and 45, or approximately 10 to 12 percent of the school's total enrollment.
The MiMH program will serve approximately 20 students per year.
The LD program will serve approximately 22 students per year.
The speech/language handicapped program will serve approximately 10
to 14 students per year.
One classroom is required and dedicated to serve students enrolled in the mildly mentally handicapped (MiMH ) program. An individual education plan (IEP) is prepared for each MiMH student, and much of the program of experience for these students is delivered in this classroom. However, most of these pupils are mainstreamed into selected classes such as music, art, industrial arts, home economics, physical education, etc., depending on the individual student's IEP.
MiMH classroom activities include both large group (20-25 students), small group (2-6 students), and extensive teacher directed individual student drill, practice, testing, and study. It is recommended that this classroom contain 25 pupil stations at armchair desks with wire basket type book box. five (5) individual student study carrels, and two (2) tables for small group study. AV equipment, including film and filmstrip projection, overhead projection, will be used for group instruction, and microcomputers will be used by individual students for drill, practice and testing.


Specific requirements of the MiMH classroom are as follows:
(1) Lighting50 to 50 f.c. at desk levelwith bank switching and dimmer control
(2) Wire mold 110 V grounded outlets around perimeter of room
(3) Carpeted floor preferred
(4) Magnetic chalkboard with chartrail on two (2) wallsfront, side wallsminimum total 48 linear feet
(5) Tackboardminimum 16 linear feet
(6) Room darkening capability
(7) Wall-mounted AV screen
(8) Two-way intercom to office
(9) Wall-mounted clock, rear wall
(10) Teacher desk with chair, lockable desk
(11) Teacher wardrobe storage unit, lockable
(12) Open shelving for book storage, minimum 60 linear feet of adjustable shelving
(13) Sink with bubbler
(14) Teacher aide's desk with chair
(15) Student armchair desks for 25 students
(16) One (1) rectangular table with six (6) chairs
(17) One (1) kidney shaped table with four (4) chairs
(18) Five (5) individual student study carrels with five (5) chairs
(19) Two (2) movable room dividers (4 x 6')
(20) Two (2) four-drawer file cabinets
One classroom is also required and dedicated to serve students enrolled in the learning disabilities (LD) program. Students enrolled in the LD program are delivered instruction individually and in small groups of up to six (6) students. These are regular class students who have been identified as having a specific learning disability and who are assigned to this classroom for specific short-term instruction. Specific individual and small group teacher directed instruction is provided for these students in math, English, reading, auditory and visual activities, and understanding themselves and others. Student activities include drill work, sensory exercises, fine motor exercises, and individual work and study. AV equipment, including film and filmstrip projection, overhead projection, and opaque projection, will be used in this classroom. In addition, students will be assigned practice, drill and testing activities on microcomputers.


Specific requirements for the LD classroom are as follows:
(1) Lighting50 to 60 f. c. at desk levelwith bank switching with dimmer control
(2) Wire mold 110 V grounded outlets around perimeter of room
(3) Carpeted floor preferred
(4) Hagnetic chalkboard with chartrail on two (2) wallsfront, side wallsminimum total 48 linear feet
(5) Room darkening capability
(6) Wall-mounted AV screen
(7) Two-way intercom to office
(8) Wall-mounted clock, rear wall
(9) Teacher desk with chair, lockable desk
(10) Teacher wardrobe storage unit, lockable
(11) Open shelving for book storage, minimum 60 linear feet of adjustable shelving
(12) Teacher aide's desk with chair
(13) Student armchair desks for ten (10) students
(14) One (1) rectangular table with six (6) chairs
(15) One (1) kidney shaped table with four (4) chairs
(16) Five (5) individual student study carrels with five (5) chairs
(17) Two (2) movable room dividers (4 x 6')
(18) Two (2) four-drawer file cabinets
A storage, conference, time-out, testing, and preparation room should be developed and located between the MiMH and LD classrooms. Direct access should be provided to this room from each of these two classrooms. It is also recommended that windows be placed between the two classrooms and the storage room to provide visual supervision of students assigned to time-out, testing, and other activities in this room.
Specific requirements for this storage room are as follows:
(1) Lighting50 to 60 f.c. at desk level with switching at both access doors
(2) One (1) grounded duplex outlet each wall
(3) Two (2) rectangular tables, with four (4) chairs each table
(4) Two (2) storage cabinets
(5) Open shelving for books, minimum 60 linear feet adjustable shelving
A fourth space is required to serve the speech/language handicapped program and to be shared with the psychometrist for testing and to serve the occupational therapy program. Approximately 10 to 14 students are served by the speech/language therapist, and approximately 3 students are served in


the occupational therapy program. Psychometric testing occurs on a referral basis, and all special education students are retested on a three-year interval.
The speech/language program goals are to identify, provide remediation and therapy for speech/language handicapped students. Instruction is provided on an individual basis. The goal for the occupational therapy program is to improve gross and fine motor abilities of selected students. Specific exercises are taught to improve hand-eye coordination, gross motor movements, fine motor movements, and self-help skills.
One classroom can be shared for serving the speech/language program, the occupational therapy program, and the psychometric testing program.
Specific requirements for this classroom are as follows:
(1) Lighting50 to 50 f.c. at desk level with dimmer control
(2) Acoustics-treatment of walls, ceiling, and floorscarpeted floor preferredeliminate all sound intrusion from halls, mechanical equipment, etc.
(3) One (1) grounded duplex outlet each wall
(4) Magnetic chalkboard5 to 8 linear feet
(5) Mirror, wall-mountedminimum 2' x 3'
(6) One (1) table with six (6) chairs
(7) One (1) desk, lockable, with chair
(8) One (1) teachers storage wardrobe unit
(9) Two-way intercom to office
(10) Telephone
(11) Book shelvingminimum 30 linear feet adjustable shelving
(12) One (1) four-drawer file cabinet
(13) One (1) speech therapy table with two (2) chairs
(14) One (1) testing table with two (2) chairs
Other considerations for the Developmental Studies Department in-
clude:
(1) Locate away from noise-producing activities
(2) Locate spaces for MiMH, LD, storage and S/H adjacent to or in close proximity to each other and preferably near other academic classrooms in the building.


82
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE
SPECIAL AREAS


All middle school students will participate in the fine and practical arts program and the health and physical education program. The fine and practical arts program consists of student experiences in art, music, home economics and industrial arts.
Sixth grade students have nine weeks of instruction in each of the four areas of instructionart, music, industrial arts, and home economics. Seventh grade pupils have 18 weeks of instruction in music and 18 weeks in home economics or industrial arts, and eighth grade students have 18 weeks of instruction in art and 18 weeks in home economics or industrial arts.
All sixth, seventh and eighth grade students are provided 9 weeks of physical education and 9 weeks of health education each semester.
Elective experiences in choral and instrumental music are also available for sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students.
Art
Space requirements for the art program are (1) an area for art history, discussion and demonstration and for two-dimensional production work such as designing, drawing and painting, and (2) an area for three-dimensional work such as sculpture, pottery, paper mache, and other crafts. The art program serves four (4) sixth grade class sections of approximately 25 students each and five (5) eighth grade class sections ranging in size from 27 to 30 students.
The art program provides experiences for students in art history and appreciation using audio-visuals, print media and models, and hands-on work with wood, wire, plaster, paint, paper, clay, leather, textiles, etc. in such activities as drawing, painting, weaving, pottery, silk screen, paper mache, ceramics, etc.


Specific requirements for the discussion/demonstration/drawing/ painting area are as follows:
(1) Lighting60 to 70 f.c. at work level with bank switching and dimmer control
(2) 30 student drawing desks with flat surface
(3) Two (2) clean-up sinkswith soap and towel dispensers
(4) Base cabinets for storage of painting supplies, art paper, drawing materials, etc.
(5) Good visual access to outside, prefer north orientation with door access to outside
(6) Chalkboard with chartrail20 linear feet
(7) Prefer hard wood or vinyl tile floor
(8) Two (2) duplex outlets each wall
(9) Storage cabinets for 36 drawing boards and for student projects
(10) Room darkening capability
(11) Wall-mounted AV screen
(12) Two-way intercom to office
(13) Teacher desk/chair
(14) Open adjustable shelves for book storagemin. 30 linear feet
(15) Wall-mounted clock
(16) Exhibit cabinets and/or wall cabinets
(17) Base cabinets for storage of projects, etc. with counter top
(18) Tackboard with display strip aboveminimum 20 linear feet
Specific requirements for the ceramics, crafts, sculpture area are as follows:
(1) Lighting60 to 70 f.c. at work level with bank switching
(2) Six (6) student tables 4 by 6
(3) Two (2) deep-basin sinks with clay traps
(4) Two (2) duplex outlets each wall
(5) Base cabinets with counter top for storage of ceramic materials and supplies
(6) Base cabinet with counter top for storage of wet ceramics locate away from heat source
(7) Cabinet for student supplies
(8) Drying shelves
(9) Four (4) potters wheels
(10) Drying rack for print making
(11) Sealed concrete floor with floor drains preferred
(12) A small separate room, adequately ventilated, for housing the kiln with appropriate electrical and gas services
(13) Exterior door to a concrete slab for use with a raku kiln with a small firing pit
Other considerations for art include:
(1) Adequate ventilation
(2) Locate adjacent to industrial arts and/or science for shared use of a darkroom


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(3) Concern for aesthetics in art classroom
(4) Need for an art materials storage/teacher planning room to include a desk/chair, wardrobe cabinet, table/chair, file cabinets, storage cabinets and shelving for supplies
Music
The middle school music program provides experiences in general music, choral music, and instrumental (band) music. The primary purpose of the general music program is to provide sixth and seventh grade students with an overview of music in the areas of theory, style and instruction in the art of listening. A secondary purpose is to encourage students to explore music as a recreational skill. The goals of the general music program are to provide a basic knowledge of music literacy in the areas of musical notation, style, analysis, theatre and listening. Sixth grade students are provided 9 weeks of general music and are grouped in 4 sections ranging in si2e from 23 to 26 students. Seventh grade pupils are provided 18 weeks of general music instruction and are grouped in 4 sections ranging in size from 28 to 30 students.
The choral music program provides an elective opportunity for middle school pupils to the art of vocal music and choral singing. This program provides opportunities for students to participate in public performances, musical theatre and solo and ensemble contests. Currently, four chorcil units are provided for students, two sixth grade, one seventh grade and one eighth grade. These sections have been limited to a maximum of 50 students due to a limitation of existing space. It is suggested that space be designed to accommodate 75 students per section.
The instrumental music (band) program provides elective opportunities for middle school students to participate in one of four performing groups, a sixth grade band ranging in size from 35 to 50 students, a seventh grade band ranging in size from 35 to 40 students, an eighth grade band ranging in size


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from 30 to 35 students, and a jazz band ranging in size from 15 to 25 students. Band students may also elect to participate in the instrumental solo and ensemble contests. Classroom activities include group rehearsals, lecture, analysis at blackboard, listening recording films/filmstrip/video/ audio tapes, written work (workbooks/tests) and individual and/or small group rehearsals.
Space is recommended for music activities to include (1) a large room to serve the general music/choral music program, (2) a large room to serve the instrumental music program, and (3) several smaller spaces to serve the music faculty, practice rooms and storage for music, instruments and other supplies.
Specific requirements for the general music/choral music program are as follows:
(1) Lighting60 to 70 f.c. at desk level with bank switching and dimmer control
(2) Student seating30 chairs with folding tablet arms and wire basket book box, 45 straight back posture-correct stacking chairs
(3) hagnetic chalkboard with chartrailmin. 16 linear feet with 8 feet lined and 8 feet unlined
(4) Tackboardmin. 20 linear feet
(5) Tackrail around perimeter of room for mounting pictures, etc.
(6) Room darkening capability
(7) Wall-mounted AV screen
(8) Wire mold for 110 volt access around perimeter of room
(9) Flat floor areano permanent risers
(10) Record/tape storage cabinet
(11) Open adjustable shelving for book storagemin. 60 linear feet
(12) Piano
(13) Stereo sound recording/playback equipmentphonograph, reel to reel, tape, cassette
(14) Two-way intercom to office
(15) Wall-mounted clockrear wall
(16) Drinking fountain or water cooler (rear or side of room)
Specific requirements for the instrumental (band) room are as follows:
(1) Lighting60 to 70 f.c. at stand level
(2) 60 straight back posture-correct chairs
(3) Built-in risersmin. 6 inch rise, 4 ft. depth, 5 levels
prefer half-moon design, entry to room from top level


(4) Prefer carpeted floor
(5) Wire mold for 110 volt access around perimeter of room
(6) Magnetic chalkboard with chartrailmin. 16 linear feet with 8 ft. lined, 8 ft. unlined
(7) Tackboardmin. 20 linear feet
(8) Tackrail around perimeter of room for mounting pictures, etc.
(9) Record/tape storage cabinet
(10) Large instrument storage (rear of room) for percussion
(11) Uniform storage cabinet (60 uniforms)
(12) Piano
(13) Stereo sound recording/playback equipment (built-in)2 microphone jacks front wall (turntable, cassette, reel to reel tape) compatible components
(14) Two-way intercom to office
(15) Wall-mounted clock-rear wall
(16) Water cooler/drinking fountain (locate rear/side wall)
(17) Instrument storage cabinets/lockers (students supply padlocks) located adjacent to rehearsal room
(18) Large eye-level cabinet adjacent to director's stand for tuning/rehearsal equipment
(19) Locate with double door access to hall and near outside exit with ramp, adjacent parking area
(20) Acoustically treated room, prefer non-parallel walls, sound separation from other rooms, ceiling height 12 to 16 feet
(21) Music folder storagebuilt-in wall adjacent to music library, built-in labeling
Other specific requirements for music are:
(1) Music office/library/instrument repair
a. rehearsal rooms visible from office
b. practice rooms visible from office
c. desks/chairs for three (3) instructors
d. open adjustable book shelvesmin. 60 linear feet
e. twelve (12) legal-size file cabinets for music storage
f. telephone
g. tables or sorting rack for sorting music
h. large sink with base cabinet/counter top for instrument repairprefer to separate this space in a closed alcove
(2) Practice rooms
a. three (3) small individual practice rooms with space for piano, chair, stand, and wall-mounted full-length mirror, proper acoustics
b. one (1) ensemble practice room (8-12) students with chairs/stands
Home Economics Education
The program of study in home economics education consists of consumer and homemaking education which enables students to acquire knowledge and develop understandings, attitudes, and skills relevant to personal, home and


family life and to prepare for personal and leadership development through the eighth grade organization called 3-H. The curriculum in homemaking education is designed to meet the needs, interests, and abilities of both male and female students.
All sixth grade boys and girls are enrolled in co-ed classes and study personal relationships, foods and nutrition, personal grooming, and simple hand sewing. The class length is Q weeks.
Seventh grade girls are enrolled in homemaking for a semester. Their curriculum includes interpersonal relations, child care, consumer education, food preparation and some nutrition. Boys may cross over to this class instead of industrial arts.
Eighth grade girls also take homemaking education for a semester. Again, the crossover is available. The emphasis in this grade level is consumer education, textiles and clothing construction.
The exploratory class fifth hour is open to 7th and 8th grade boys on alternating day. It is project oriented and allows for great individual differences in ability, interests, skills and creativiety. It is made up of one nine-weeks of crafts and one nine-weeks of cooking. The crafts may require either hand work or sewing machine skills. The cooking phase is planning and preparation of both single dish items and meals.
"Teen Cuisine" is the eighth grade girls 8th period class. It is for six weeks and is ability grouped. The curriculum consists of influences on food tastes, menu planning principles, nutrition, caloric intake, menu form, setting the table in many different styles of service, and finally the planning and preparing of a complete meal in groups utilizing all of these areas.
The teachers for this area of study consist of a full-time teacher and a half-day teacher who presently teaches three (3) homemaking classes. Scheduling for these classes is rather difficult since no two classes of the


same grade level can effectively be held at the same time. Seventh and eighth grade classes are usually in five sections. The full-time teacher teachers seven classes per day.
Methods of instruction used by both teachers include small and large group activities, discussion, lecture, demonstration, individual work, and laboratory experiences. Resource people are often used as well.
Space for the home economics education program mill require:
(1) A foods and nutrition classroom and laboratory
(2) A textiles and clothing classroom and laboratory
(3) A storage room
(4) A laundry room
(5) An outdoor area and grill
Specific requirements for the foods and nutrition classroom and laboratory are:
Classroom Area
(1) 24 individual student desks with wire basket book box
(2) 16 foot blackboardlocated in front of discussion area
(3) Two (2) bulletin boardseach about 8* x 4' on side walls
(4) Room darkening capacity
(5) Lighting50 to 60 f. c. at work level, bank switching with dimmer control
(6) Tile flooring preferred
(7) Teacher desk and chair
(8) Master clockable to be viewed by teacher
(9) Two-way intercom to main office
(10) Television and cable wired
(11) Wall-mounted AV screen
(12) Recessed fire extinguisher
(13) Duplex outlets every 8-10 linear feet
(14) Shelving provided for both open and closed library material displays
(15) Small table for special displays, etc.
Laboratory Area
(1) Six (6) kitchen units each equipped withi a double bowl
stainless steel sink and gas or electric range. Each unit would be about 10-12* in length arranged in a combination island and perimeter style similar to the present design. No spray hoses would be available in the kitchens. Overhead cabinets would be available in perimeter kitchens only so as not to block the view of the teacher. Counter surfaces would be easy-clean and mar-proof. Cabinets would be made of medium-toned wood. Two (2) electrical outlets would be available in each kitchen. The floor covering would be tile. Each unit would have a small breakfast table to seat up to


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four (4) people. Each kitchen would be equipped with small equipment necessary to carry out group projects.
(2) One (1) unit kitchen consisting of a double bowl stainless steel sink and garbage disposal with ample counter space for the teacher to prepare and store individual food trays, large equipment not housed in the other kitchens, linen storage, etc. This would be accessible to the students but not used by them. A built-in dishwasher would be included in this kitchen to take care of dishes used by the teacher in demonstrations, etc.
(3) Food pantry with lockable door
(4) Mobile demonstration counter with adjustable mirror
(5) Enclosed storage space for additional equipment and books
(6) Two (2) refrigerators with freezer spaceone having an ice maker, both frost-free. Both should have lockable doors.
(7) Utility storage area (broom, dustpans, cleaning supplies)
(8) 220 volt service to appropriate appliances
(9) Two (2) microwave ovensone located in each area of 3 kitchens
(10) One (1) bulletin board
(11) Window view available near kitchens but not classroom area
(12) Hooks and chains available for hanging live plants
(13) Utility cart
(14) Booster hot water heater
Specific requirements for the textiles and clothing classroom and laboratory are:
Classroom Area
(1) Ten (10) student tables able to seat 4 people each and also be used as cutting tables. They would need to be about 60 wide and 48 or more in length. Not all tables would be used as student tables, so only 24 chairs would be needed.
(2) 16 foot blackboardlocated in front of room
(3) Two (2) bulletin boardseach about 8' x 4*
(4) Room darkening capacity
(5) Lighting60 to 70 f. c. at work level, bank switching with dimmer control
(6) Tile flooring preferred
(7) Teacher desk and chair
(8) Master clockable to be seen by teacher
(9) Two-way intercom to main office
(10) Television and cable wired
(11) Wall-mounted AV screen
(12) Wall outlets every 8-10 linear feet
(13) Adjustable shelving for pattern books, etc.
(14) Small table for special displays
Laboratory Area
(1) Twenty (20) sewing machines and cabinets to matcheighteen , (18) machines should have straight-stitch and zigzag
stitches, two (2) machines could be electronic machines.
These should be located on two walls with individual outlets and at least 3' between machines including stool to match each machine cabinet


(2) Two (2) pressing areas with ironing boards and irons
(3) Fitting room with triple mirror and fitting stand. It should include a small table to place clothes on. This room should house at least 4 students and the teacher at the same time.
A folding door would allow for privacy.
(4) Wardrobe for unfinished garments to be hung in
(5) Lavoratory and paper towel dispenser
(6) Storage cabinets-3 cabinets to store the individual tote drawer cases
(7) Other storage cabinetsspace and shelving to house irons, pressing equipment, fabric swatches, student books, small equipment, etc.
(8) Safety light indicator on outlets used for irons
(9) Recessed fire extinguisher
(10) One (1) bulletin board
(11) Tile flooring preferred
Other requirements:
Student Organization Center. This space would be used by the 3-H Club for storage of the small materials used by them. This could easily be a storage cabinet in the clothing room. It would not be a separate room.
Storage Area. This area should be general storage included in the two major rooms or incorporated in the laundry room. This might include space for prepared bulletin boards to re-use. It could also be general storage for all homemaking testbooks which we issue and store, or this area again could be included in the two major rooms.
Laundry. This space should permit small group instruction. It is to be used by the homemaking department only. It should include:
(1) Automatic washing machine
(2) Automatic clothes dryer with outside vent
(3) Small cabinet space to store laundry supplies
(4) Small table to sort and fold linens on
(5) Tile flooring preferred
(6) Adequate lighting
(7) Accessible by students from the clothing and foods rooms
Outdoor Area and Grill. The department would like to incorporate
outdoor cooking in both the fifth and eighth hour classes. We would like to be located near the science department so that we might share the outdoor area of tables and benches mentioned in their report. It would necessitate


the installation of an outdoor grill and a door from the foods room to this area. The 3-H Club and Science Club could also use this combined area for their annual picnic and swim party.
Industrial Arts
The industrial arts program is designed to provide experiences for students in grades 6, 7, and 8 in the areas of drafting, printing, wordworking, electricity, metalworking, and power and small engines. The goal of the program is to introduce students to industry in its various forms and to provide hands-on experiences with tools, equipment and materials. In addition, students are taught safe work habits, proper planning, problem solving, and design differences so they may become better informed consumers of industrial products.
The program serves five (5) sixth grade sections, nine weeks each, ranging in size from 12 to 15 students; four (4) seventh grade sections, eighteen weeks each, ranging in size from 14 to 18 students; and five (5) eighth grade sections, eighteen weeks each, ranging in size from 13 to 15 students. In addition, exploratory program experiences are offered to seventh and eighth grade students in offset printing and extra strength academics for eighth grade students in basic manufacturing and mass production.
Space requirements for industrial arts are as follows:
(1) Space for general instruction, planning, and graphic arts
(2) Space for three (3) instructional labs:
a. woods
b. power mechanics/small engines/metals
c. drafting and electricity/electronics
Specific requirements for the general instruction, planning, and graphic arts lab are as follows:
(1) Lighting60 to 70 f. c. at task level with grid protection of
fixtures


(2) Ceiling height--8 ft. minimum
(3) Three (3) 24" by 10" work surfaces with storage below
(4) Standing height desk for teacher
(5) Twenty (20) armchiar desks for students with wire basket book box
(6) Chalkboard with chartrail-minimum 16 linear feet
(7) Tackboardminimum 8 linear feet
(8) Clean-up sink with towel/soap dispensersdrinkning fountain adjacent
(9) Wall-mounted clock
(10) Floor model offset press with cabinet
(11) Table top offset press with cabinet
(12) Two (2) type banks
(13) Doors with safety glass windows to hall and adjacent labs
(14) Offset developing sink with water supply/drain
(15) Plat storage cabinet
(16) Lockable storage (150 sq. ft.) with shelving, two (2)
4-drawer file cabinets and two (2) upright steel cabinets
(17) Duplex 110V electrical service every 4' around perimeter of room
(18) Space and storage for the following equipment:
a. Proof pres
b. Flip-top platemaker
c. Electrostatic platemaker
d. Paper stitcher
e. Paper drill
f. Waxer
g. Padding press
h. Paper folder
i. Three (3) free-standing light tables
j. 23" paper cutter
k. Paper jagger
l. Two (2) computers with disk drive and typesetting printer
(19) Dark room (150 sq. ft.) equipped with:
a. Horizontal process camera
b. Safelights and ventilation
c. Halftone flash lamp
d. Temperature controlled developing sink with hot and cold water supply/drains
e. Light trapping door
f. Filtered windows for viewing rest of lab from inside
g. 24 by 96 work surface with storage below
h. Locable film storage cabinet
i. PMT processor
j. Film cutter
k. Mounted clock
l. Two (2) electrical outlets on each wall
m. Provisions for hanging film drying line
n. 220 volt service for camera
(20) Prefer vinyl tile floor
(21) Two-way intercom to office


Specific requirements for the drafting and electricity/electronics lab are as follows:
(1) Lighting50 to 50 f.c. at desk level with bank switching and dimmer control
(2) Teacher desk (lockable) with chair
(3) Chalkboard with chartrailminimum 20 linear feet
(4) Tackboardminimum 8 linear feet
(5) One (1) demonstration table3 by 8'
(6) Two (2) duplex outlets each wall
(7) Room darkening capability
(8) Wall-mounted AV screen
(9) Wall-mounted clock (rear wall)
(10) Viewing windows to adjacent labs
(11) Direct access to main hallway
(12) Locate this classroom away from metals, power and woods labs
(13) Two-way intercom to office
(14) Vinyl tile floor preferred
(15) Twenty (20) drafting tables with storage below and 20 chairs or stools
(16) Twelve (12) inch high tackboard above chalkboardminimum 20 linear feet
(17) Steel lockable storage cabinet for materials/supplies
(18) Ten (10) two-student electricity work stations with 110V service, experimenters, lockable storage and 20 stools
(19) One (1) steel up-right storage cabinet
(20) Doors with safety glass windows to hall and adjacent labs
Specific requirements for the woodworking lab are as follows:
(1) Lighting50 to 70 f.c. at task level with grid protection of fixtures
(2) Ceiling height min. of 12 feet
(3) Six (6) four-student work benches with storage below and two
(2) duplex (110V) electrical outlets on each bench
(4) Standing height desk for teacher
(5) Chalkboard with chartrailmin. 8 linear feet
(6) Tackboardmin. 8 linear feet
(7) Clean-up sink with towel/soap dispensersdrinking fountain adjacent
(8) Wall-mounted clock
(9) Wood storage rack
(10) Lockable storage cabinet for hand tools and portable electric tools
(11) Storage cabinet for 20 pairs of safety glasses
(12) Door access to outside, sufficient size for lumber access
(13) Dust collecting equipment
(14) Safety electrical power cut-off switch
(15) Adequate space/electrical power for use of the following equipment:
a. 14M band saw
b. 6" jointer
c. 10" radial armsaw
d. Two (2) 24" scroll saws


e. 13" by 6 planer
f. 7" pedestal grinder/finisher
g. miter box saw
(16) Prefer sealed concrete floor with non-slip surface
(17) Two-way intercom to office
Specific requirements for the power mechanic/small engine/metals lab are as follows:
(1) Lighting60 to 70 f.c. at task level with grid protection of fixtures
(2) Ceiling height min. of 12 feet
(3) Two (2) 2' by 16' benches with four (4) heavy duty 4" vices each bench
(4) Standing height desk for teacher
(5) Chalkboard with chartrailmin. 8 linear feet
(6) Tackboardmin. 8 linear feet
(7) Clean-up sink with towel/soap dispensersdrinking fountain adjacent
(8) Slall-mounted clock
(9) Sheet metal bench with stake pockets and mounted box and pan brake
(10) Lockable cabinet for storage of metal working hand tools
(11) Storage cabinet for 20 pairs of safety glasses
(12) Doors with safety glass windows to hall, outside and adjacent labs
(13) Electrical outlets spaced 4* apart on all walls, located 42" above floor
(14) Safety electrical power cut-off switch
(15) Foundry area: foundry furnace, two (2) moulding benches, four (4) sets tools with storage area, proper ventilation for pouring on oil tempered sand
(16) Forging area: forge with 3 anvils on bases, tools and storage area
(17) 36 small lockers for project storage
(18) 220 volt service for spot/arc welders
(19) Natural gas service to forge and foundry
(20) Adequate space/electrical service for use of the following equipment
a. Four (4) floor model drill presses
b. Sheet metal shearer
c. Metal cutting band saw
d. Free-standing spot welder
e. Oxyacetylene torch and welding outfit on a portable cart
f. Arc welder and a small welding booth
g. Three (3) small floor model metal lathes
h. Two (2) floor model 7" grinders
(21) Prefer sealed concrete floor with non-slip surface
(22) Two-way intercom to office
(23) Six (6) 24 by 96" workbenches with two (2) mounted vises and mountings for small engine test stand each bench
(24) Locable took cabinet with 10 sets of small engine tools
(25) Three (3) engine storage cabinets
(26) 8' by 10' overhead door to outside service drive


(27) Powered vent system for exhaust gases
(28) Adequate space/electrical service for use of the following equipment:
a. Floor model drill press
b. Bench-mounted arbor press
c. Parts cleaning unit with solvent pump
d. Valve and seat refacer
Other considerations:
(1) Three (3) built-in lockable display cases with adjustable sheves and cork board in hallway adjacent to industrial arts area
(2) Safety lines around all fixed equipment
(3) Comply with Indiana OSHA standards
(4) Air compressor with supply lines to power, metals, woods, and graphic arts labs
Health and Physical Education
The health and physical education programs provide experiences for all sixth, seventh, eighth and developmental studies pupils enrolled in the middle school. Health and physical education are taught in 9-week blocks, 9 weeks of one alternating with 9 weeks of the other. There are 15 sections each of health and physical education, 5 sections for each grade level, ranging in si2e from 20 to 31 students.
The health program goal is to improve the students' knowledge of all aspects of human life. The program includes the teaching of the care and function of the human body, nutrition, awareness of environmental hazards to health and the responsibility for their control, the study of drugs and their beneficial and harmful use, common safety practices and emergency procedures, selecting health products, understanding local, state and national health problems, and promoting self-understanding and personal well-being. Instructional activities include the use of lecture, demonstration, discussion, visual aids and models.
The goal of the physical education program is to contribute to the physical development of the student. The program includes experiences to im-


prove physical fitness, motor skills, knowledge of sports, social aspects and general health. Instructional activities include exercises, games, sportsmanship and fair play in such activities as running, tumbling, rope climbing, gymnastics, wrestling, swimming, exercise, and games such as volleyball, softball, basketball, relay races, etc. Spectator basketball, wresting, and volleyball games will be conducted in the gymnasium. Seating on motorized folding bleachers for 600 spectators is required.
The middle school's athletic program will provide opportunities for boys to participate in football, basketball, baseball, wrestling, swimming, and track and for girls to participate in basketball, volleyball, softball and track.
Space requirements for the health and physical education programs include the following:
(1) Two (2) classroom for health
(2) One (1) gymnasium for physical education with two (2) teaching stations
(3) Wrestling/weight training room
(4) Two (2) dressing/shower rooms for students
(5) Two (2) physical education instructors/officials shower/dressing rooms
(6) One (1) storage room for equipment and uniforms
(7) One (1) laundry room
(8) One (1) concession stand
Specific requirements for the two (2) health classrooms are as follows:
(1) Lighting50 to 60 f.c. at desk level with bank switching and dimmer control
(2) Two (2) magnetic chalkboards with chartrailsmin. 40 linear feet (on 2 walls, front/side)
(3) Tackboardmin. 20 linear feet
(4) Prefer carpeted floor
(5) Room darkening capability
(6) Wall-mounted AV screen
(7) Two (2) duplex outlets each wall
(8) Armchair desks with wire basket book box for 30 students
(9) Teacher desk (lockable) with chair
(10) Two-way intercom to office
(11) Wall-mounted clock (rear wall)
(12) Open adjustable book shelvingmin. 60 linear feet


(13) Wire for cable TV
(14) Walk-in closet with coat storage, shelves and space for two (2) four-drawer file cabinets
Specific requirements for the gymnasium are as follows:
(1) Sufficient floor area for two (2) physical education classes to be held simultaneously, with curtain divider
(2) Motorized bleachers to accommodate seating of 600 spectators
(3) Full-size basketball floor (84 by 50*) with rectangular glass backboards that can be moved to the ceiling when not in use
(4) two (2) cross-court basketball courts (1 per teaching station) with rectangular wooden backboards that can be moved to the ceiling when not in use
(5) Adequate overhead lighting with fixture protection
(6) Score boards, one each end of court, for use with basketball, volleyball, and wrestling
(7) Volleyball court (30' x 60') with permanent floor anchors for net, located on basketball playing floor
(8) Four (4) volleyball courts with floor anchors, two (2) each teaching station
(9) Two (2) gymnastic areas (1 each teaching station) with permanent floor anchors for equipment such as parallel bars, side horse, balance beam, etc.
(10) Wall-mounted clock
(11) Two-way intercom to office
(12) Water coolersmin. of two (2)
(13) Built-in PA system with record/tape/cassette player/amplifier
(14) Adequate duplex outletsmin. two (2) each wall
(15) Prefer wood gym floor
(16) A small room for wrestling/weight training located as a portion of the gym floor to contain 30* by 30* wrestling mats and four (4) wight training stations
Specific requirements for the two locker rooms are as follows:
(1) Direct access to gym and to outdoor PE areas
(2) Lockers for 300 students with locks, each room
(3) Bench seating to accommodate 40 students, each room
(4) Shower room with two (2) four head gang showers, each room
(5) Restroomsboys' to include two (2) partitioned toilets, two (2) urinals, two (2) sinks; girls' to include four (4) partitioned toilets, two (2) sinks
(6) One (1) drinking fountain, each room
(7) Duplex electrical outlets, two (2) each room
(8) Two (2) mirrors, each room
(9) Chalkboard6 linear feet, each room
(10) Tackboard6 linear feet, each room
(11) Four (4) blow dryers, each room


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Specific requirements for the two instructors/officials shower/ dressing rooms are as follows:
(1) One (1) room adjacent to boys' shower room, the other adjacent to the girls' shower room
(2) Shower, sink, toilet, each room
(3) Clock and intercom to office
(4) Desk/chair
(5) Window to locker/shower room for supervision with drape
(6) Six (6) built-in lockers (full-length) each room
(7) Small tackboard, each office
(8) File cabinet/book shelves, each room
(9) Prefer carpeted floor
(10) Lockable doors, each room
Other space requirements for physical education/athletics are as follows:
(1) Storage roomdirect access to gym with double doors for storage of equipment such as gymnastics apparatus, tumbling mats, volleyball standards, etc.
(2) Laundry room with commercial washer/dryer, uniform storage, towels, with access to both locker rooms
(3) A concession stand located adjacent to gym and spectator seating
(4) Scorers bench with score board/PA controls in gym


INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT SPACES


Library (IHC)
101
The primary function of schools is to transmit knowledge. Libraries are repositories of knowledge; however, libraries are becoming more than repositories for books. Libraries in which the new educational concepts, technological media, and learning materials can be integrated with the older carriers of knowledge are becoming known as instructional materials centers (IMC).
What do faculty and students do in an IMC?
Find answers to specific questions that arise from the teaching process or from curiosity
Go alone or as a member of a committee sent to get information
Carry out study assignments; that is, spend a specific amount of time studying in the IMC
-- Find material for projects such as a written report, a book report, a debate brief or a research paper
-- Learn how to use the key of an IMCcard catalogs, bibliographies, indexes, reference books, etc.
Look at a motion picture film, filmstrips, or other audio-visual materials
Study with a teaching machine, listen to a phonograph record, listen and/or record voice for language study
Read just for the fun of readingone book or a hundred
Browse through current magazines and newspapers
Look at the new book shelf
Talk with other students individually or in groups
Meet with other students or teachers to review or plan the next days learning activities
Clearly, the IMC must be a repository of information in a wide variety of forms and have the physical means by which students and teachers can pursue knowledge independently or in small groups. The physical facilities of the IMC may be viewed from three perspectives(1) those designed for the library-teaching staff, (2) those designed for the students or consumers, and (3) those designed for housing the instructional materials or col-
lections.


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(1) Facilities for the INC Staff. Three (3) areas of the IMC should be specifically designed for the staff. These spaces and their function are:
a. Circulation AreaThe circulation area should be located close to the entrance/exit, should include a charging desk, space to return IMC materials, a book cart to assist in shelving IMC materials, space for a computer to control circulation (statistics, records, overdues, etc.), and a small book shelf to hold items placed on reserve.
b. Office and Workroom for IMC PersonnelThe office and workroom should open onto main reading/study area, but separated by a lockable door and a glass partition to allow adequate supervision. Needs a desk with a typewriter, a telephone, possibly a computer, a shelf list file, many cabinets (some lockable), a long carefully planned counter with knee hole space beneath or a large work table, drawers, a sink, shelves for storage of materials to be repaired, processed or stored away from open access shelves. Should be large enough to accommodate approximately 5 people.
c. Storagefor audio-visual equipment and materials. This room is home base for the school's collection of portable audio-visual equipment and material. It should be located with direct access to a central corridor and to the IMC. Furnishings should be designed to specifically accommodate the school's media collection and would include storage shelves for equipment, space for mobile carts and cabinets for films, filmstrips, slides and other materials. A vinyl tile floor is preferred in this storage room.
(2) Facilities for the Students. The IMC should provide study area for 15 percent of the total anticipated enrollment of the middle school or space for approximately 68 to 70 students. These spaces may take several formsa lecture discussion area to seat 30 students, a reading/study area for 30 students seated at tables, and 10 individual (4 dry, 6 wet) study carrels for independent study and for listening, viewing, and using a variety of audio-visual/microcomputer equipment. The facilities should be carpeted.


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A radio/TV production room for use by students is to be developed as a part of the IMC. This room should be sound controlled where radio/TV programs can be taped, edited and viewed. The production room should have one wall with 3 ft. high shelf, long enouogh to accommodate 2 VTRs, 2 monitors, and other editing equipment (perhaps in lockable cabinets or the whole room lockable), a walk-in closet for storage of VTRs on carts, camera, types, etc. (also lighted and lockable), one area suitable for taping interviews to include desk, chairs, and a backdrop, two tables along unused walls for student use in writing and organizing. Also include access to cable TV.
(3) Facilities for Storing and Displaying the Materials Collections. Storage is required for the book collection, the reference collection, the periodical collection and the professional collection. The present collections total approximately 7,800 books, two daily newspapers, 30 current periodicals, and back issues of these 30 magazines for a period of three years.
Space will be required for approximately 10, 000 to 12, 000 volumes for the book collections. Adjustable shelving to house the book collection should be located adjacent to the student reading/study area.
A reference area should be located near the charging desk (circulation area) and include the card catalog and/or computer terminal if the catalog is computerized, an index table, shelving for encyclopedias and other reference materials, one or more dictionary stands, and one atlas stand.


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The storage area for current and back issues of periodicals should be located neai the charging desk (circulation area) and provide racks for display of current periodicals (newspapers/maga2ines), and shelving for boxed back issues. In addition, file cabinets are also to be provided for storage of vertical file materials.
The professional collection will include books, journals and other instructional materials. A small section of adjustable shelving, display racks and files are needed to house this collection.
Cither considerations for the IMC include:
(1) Design an attractive, inviting, functional environment for the IMC to serve as the focal point of the building
(2) Locate near language arts, social studies, and science classrooms in a quiet part of the building
(3) Carpeted floors are essential
(4) Be concerned about placement of IMC functions to allow for supervision by the one professional staff member assigned to this IMC
(5) Provide one (1) duplex outlet to serve each 150 sq. ft. of floor area
(6) A lighted display case(s) should be located near the entrance to the IMC
(7) Several small tackboards should be located in various places throughout the IMC. such as in the circulation area, the office area, the reading/study area and the professional collections area
(8) Lighting50 to 60 f.c. at task level with bank switching
Administration
The school principal, assistant principal, athletic director, and two
(2) secretaries are to be housed in the administrative offices. Space is required for a principal's office, an assistant principal's office, an athletic director's office, and a reception/secretarial area for serving these offices. The assistant principal and his/her secretary serve the attendance/discipline/bookkeeping/bookstore functions for the school;


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therefore, it is recommended that direct hall access be provided for these functions. In addition, space is required for a storage room for student files, office equipment, vault, materials and supplies, and a bookstore, a restroom, a faculty workroom, and a discipline time-out room for students.
Specific requirements for the principals office are as follows:
(1) Accessible to secretarial station/teacher workroom
(2) Locate on outside wall with window to observe outdoor areas used by students
(3) Adequate space for principal's desk/chair, a table with five
(5) or six (6) chairs and four (4) comfortable chairs for visitors
(4) Carpeted floor preferred
(5) Telephone and intercom to secretary
(6) Two (2) file cabinets, one letter/one legal size
(7) Bookcase with adjustable shelves
(8) Small bulletin board
Specific requirements for the principal's office reception/ secretarial area are:
(1) Direct access to hall adjacent to the school's main entrance
(2) Space with four (4) to six (6) chairs for school patrons, etc. in reception area
(3) Counter separating reception area/secretarial station with storage below
(4) Two (2) secretarial desks with chairs
(5) Two (2) self-correcting typewriters
(6) Microcomputer, printer and desk
(7) PA system console connected to teaching stations, custodial and food services areas
(8) Telephone system with intercom to principal, assistant principal, guidance, nurse, etc.
(9) Two (2) desk-top printing calculators
(10) Small bulletin board
(11) Electronic display system for group messages to be read by students
(12) Carpeted floor preferred
Specific storage requirements for the office are as follows:
(1) Space and facilities for housing student records and other school records in file cabinets, money in a safe or vault, and office/instructional supplies and materials
(2) Shelving for material storage (paper, grade books, office supplies, lost/found items, etc.)
(3) File storage for student records, correspondence, reports, etc.
(4) Secure, safe, lockable inside room


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Specific requirements for the assistant principal's office are as follows:
(1) Desk/chair
(2) Four (4) comfortable chairs for visitors
(3) Convenient to main office (direct hall access as well as direct access to secretarial station)
(4) One (1) four-drawer lockable file cabinet
(5) Telephone with intercom to secretary
(6) One (1) bookcase with adjustable shelves
(7) Carpeted floor preferred
Specific requirements for the student bookstore are as follows:
(1) Counter with overhead door access to hall
(2) Visual control of bookstore and direct access by assistant principal's secretary from her workstation
(3) Adjustable shelving for books, supplies with minimum 360 linear feet of adjustable shelving
(4) Vinyl tile floor preferred
(5) Lockable, secure bookstore
Specific requirements for the discipline (time-out) in-school suspension room are as follows:
(1) Locate near assistant principal's office
(2) Glass window for visual supervision
(3) Five (5) or six (6) study carrels for students
(4) Private area, free of disruptions
(5) Vinyl tile floor preferred
Specific requirements for the faculty workroom are as follows:
(1) This room is to serve several functions for faculty, namely:
(a) class preparation
(b) conferencing for groups up to 10 or 12
(c) faculty mail service (mailboxes for 30 faculty/staff)
(d) communications (telephone/bulletin board)
(e) faculty lunch room
(2) This room should be located in the administration suite and have space for material production (copier, mimeo, spirit duplicator, and the laminating press)
(3) The faculty workroom should contain the following:
(a) tackboardmin. of 20 linear feet
(b) teacher/staff mailboxes for 30 personsminimum width of mailboxes 9"
(c) sink with base cabinet/duplex outlets for microwave oven, refrigerator
(d) space/electrical service for soft drink machine
(e) four (4) large study carrels (wet)
(f) two (2) self-correcting typewriters
(g) one (1) microcomputer with printer and table
(h) two (2) tables each with six (6) chairs


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(i) telephone booth
(j) prefer carpeted floor
(k) wall-mounted clock
(l) duplicating equipment (Xerox, mimeo, spirit duplicator) Specific requirements for the athletic director's office are as
follows:
(1) Locate in administration suite
(2) Prefer carpeted floor
(3) Desk/chair and two (2) side chairs
(4) Teacher wardrobe/storage closet
(5) Two (2) four-drawer file cabinets
(6) Bulletin boards (3 walls)
(7) Telephone with intercom
(8) Wall clock
(9) Two (2) duplex outlets
(10) Typing table and typewriter
Other Requirements. Two (2) restrooms (one men, one women) should be located in the administrative office suite and accessible to faculty/staff.
Guidance
The guidance department serves all students enrolled in grades 6, 7, and 8 at the middle school. The counselor(s) provide services for small groups, large groups (classroom) and individual students. The department is responsible for all group testing, referrals for special education testing, vocational guidance and student scheduling.
Space required to serve the guidance program includes an office for the counselor, a waiting area and a conference room. These spaces should be located adjacent to the administrative office, but with a separate entrance. It is also suggested that the guidance suite be connected to the acfcninis-trative offices via an interior hallway to provide access to the pupil records vault.
Specific requirements for the guidance/waiting area are as follows:
(1) Direct access to main hall
(2) Seating for four (4) to six (6) students
(3) Tackboardmin. 8 linear feet
(4) One (1) duplex outlet each wall
(5) Microcomputer with printer, table and chair


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(6) Prefer carpeted floor
Specific requirements for the guidance counselor's office are as follows:
(1) Lighting--40 to 50 f. c. at task level
(2) Tackboardsmall (4* x 4)
(3) Desk/chair
(4) Typewriter and table
(5) Four (4) chairs for students/patrons
(6) Telephone with intercom
(7) Adjustable bookshelvingmin. 30 linear feet
(8) Wall-mounted clock
(9) One (1) duplex outlet each wall
(10) Prefer carpeted floor
(11) Window to exterior
(12) Storage closet (lockable) with space for iwu ) Tour-drawer file cabinets, storage shelves for guidance materials and supplies, and coat storage
Specific requirements for the conference room are as follows:
(1) Lighting50 to 60 f. c. with dimmer switch
(2) Room darkening capability
(3) One (1) duplex outlet each wall
(4) Wall-mounted AV screen
(5) Prefer carpeted floor
(6) Table(s) with seating for 12 to 15 students
(7) Accessible to guidance as well as other administrative offices
Health Services
The health services suite should be located adjacent to the principal's office waiting area/secretarial station. This suite will provide space for the school nurse to conduct visual testing, provide emergency treatment, conduct conferences with students and parents, examining students, and isolation cots for sick students.
Space will be required for a nurse's office/examining room and for two
(2) isolation cots with two (2) restrooms.
Specific requirements for the nurse's office/examining room are as follows:
(1) Lighting50 to 60 f. c.
(2) One (1) duplex outlet each wall
(3) Desk (lockable) with chair