Citation
A new facility for the College of Architecture and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver

Material Information

Title:
A new facility for the College of Architecture and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver a thesis project
Creator:
Phillips-Hungerford, Susan E
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Buildings ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, School of Architecture and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Susan E. Phillips-Hungerford.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
20858480 ( OCLC )
ocm20858480
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1986 .P54 ( lcc )

Full Text
A NEW FACILITY FOR THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
A THESIS PROJECT BY
SUSAN E. PHILLIPS-HUNGERFORD
1 DECEMBER 1986


The Thesis of _______Susan E. Phillips-Hungerford is approved.
Crandon Gustafson, Principal Advisor
University of Colorado at Denver Spring, 1987


contents
introduction
thesis statement
history
project background
site analysis
climate analysis
zoning analysis
code analysis
program
spatial requirements and analysis
bibliography
appendix


















































introduction













































INTRODUCTION
This thesis over the course of the semester has evolved from a rather untidy smattering of ideas surrounding an empty basin to a more concise conceptual base, with a focus on a particular building typology, the academic hall and an understanding of the preconceived notion of said type.
S.E.P.
1 December 1986 Denver, Colorado




THESIS STATEMENT
In my thesis proposal I proposed that I would look at the whole picture, the relationships that buildings have with their environments. As I delved deeper into my subject and the picture became more focused, I expanded this first premise to include the building itself, I have a building type to explore. The typology of the academe. The two are inseparable, the site and the building and the building itself. Mario Botta puts it more eloquently than I,
"Each work of architecture has its own "environnement", which for the sake of convenience, may be defined as its territory. Between architecture and territory a constant mutual dependency is established right from the earliest stages of the design."
He continues,
"Between architecture and "environnement" (built or natural, it doesn't matter which) a real exchange (give and take) takes place, which is reciprocal and continuous. I believe that the quality of any architectural endeavor directly hinges upon the intensity of this exchange."
Originally my site was an expansive no man's land in lower downtown Denver. An empty basin rimmed with images, past and present, dynamic and static, real and imagined. I have concentrated on a portion of this site, the corner of 14th and Larimer Street on Cherry Creek, an appropriate place for such an academic edifice. Larimer Street is the oldest street in Denver, it has surveyed silently the comings and goings of a fledgling city. It is steeped in history, as much history as one can gather in one-hundred years. It has context, texture, a richness and variety that is lacking in other, newer parts of Denver. Yet it is on the edge. One mere block was saved from the wrecking ball. Across the creek Auraria was not so lucky, it was leveled. A new and unsypathetic college campus was built.
This is not an exercise in historic preservation, but in historic understanding. The spirit of the place was lost across the creek. The Europeans talk of a collective memory, a collective typology. They are a homogeneous people, their history is hundreds of years. Denver is a young place, with


a variety of peoples. There is a heritage here, a collective memory, but the traditions are younger and not entrenched. The Europeans have to deal with this memory, dig through it to find the spirit, the essence and then design buildings that express and embrace it. Mario Botta talks to this,
"One such misunderstanding that periodically crops up in the assessment of the relations between architecture and "environnement" stems from the idea that all new architecture is subordinate to the presumed superiority of the existing values of the context in which it is to be built. It interprets the existing context and the equilibrium of its setting as a static factor, laden with values and testimonies that on most occaisions (and let this not be said in irony) emerge or are rediscovered in the imminence of, and are prompted by, future dangers identified with the proposed action itself."
I have such a situation here on Larimer Street. The design should celebrate the history of the place. Yet does not have to be layered in vernacular Victoriana. This is where the building as building type emerges. Once one has a clear understanding of how to express the site/building relationship, the concepts of typology, metaphor, symbol come to the fore.
Arnell, Peter, (1979) Architecture and Urbanism, (June)1979.pp. 51-54.


HISTORY OF DENVER AND ENVIRONS: LARIMER STREET
The history of Denver is the history of Larimer Street. Larimer Street was laid out as the first street of the new town of Denver, November 22, 1858 by General William H. Larimer, Jr. of the Denver City Town Company. The streets were laid out parallel to the waterways, Cherry Creek and the South Platt, hence the streets did not follow the compass points. Responding to local mining custom, that claims do not cross a stream, the Denver city line stopped at Cherry Creek.
Larimer, an old hand at starting new towns, secured a stage company, the Pike's Peak Express out of Kansas Territory. The first stage arrived May 7th, 1859, insuring Denver's foothold on the edge of the plains and dooming rival towns like Auraria to insignificance. Transporatation links were a fledging towns' lifeline.
The population fo Denver had risen to 5,000 by the mid 1860's. Larimer Street was lined with one and one half story structures and was linked to Auraria by a wooden bridge that doubled as a "hanging tree" when such occaissons arose.
The arrival of the railroad and the discovery of silver in the nearby Rockies in the 1870's had the effect of septupling Denver's population. The 1880 census set the population at 35,629 souls. Larimer Street was a barometer of Denver's booms and busts.
This boom brought many significant buildings to Larimer Street. In 1880 Mr. Horace Tabor, Lt. Governor and silver magnate hired Chicago architect,
Frank E. Edbrooke to design an office block on the corner of 16th and Larimer.
It rose five storys, built of grey limestone, a glorious piece, setting the stage for Denver's gilded years. Other buildings soon followed suit, all on Larimer Street, The Windsor Hotel likened to the Astor in New York City, the Tremont in Boston, and the Palace in San Francisco. The Barclay, an office




block, whose claim to fame was subterranean baths, Turkish, Russian, Roman and electric. The State Legislature met at the Barkley until the 1930's when the State Capitol was built.
William Thayer, in his book, Marvels of the New West (1888), compared Larimer Street to New York City's Broadway for "enterprise, stability and rush. In Denver, eastern solidity, tact and forethought seem to be mixed up with Western dash, in about equal parts. The result is a bustling, thriving, inspiring scene."
Larimer Street was the place to shop, dine and lounge. One might run across a Rothschild, Vanderbilt, Gould, or Guggenheim at tea, or perhaps the Grand Duke Alexis of Russia might have been seen strolling about.
To confirm Larimer Street's pre-eminence, the city government chose the site at the corner of 14th and Larimer, along Cherry Creek (my site) to build the new City Hall, this "Fortress of the People" was completed in 1883.
The crash of 1893 put an end to all that glittered, including Colorado's silver which was demonetized that same year by the Federal Government. The "Silver State" sank into a state of gloom. 16th Street was gaining a reputation for retail and similarily, 17th Street for finance. By the 1890's Larimer Street had fallen on hard times, it had become skidrow. A third of Denver's forty gambling casinos were on Larimer Street, between 14th and 19th Streets.
The area was rampant with rats, gamblers, conmen, prostitutes, murderers and theives.
In 1893, the newly elected Governor, Davis H. White pledged to purge Denver of this rifraff. His first task was to fire the corrupt police force, who flatly refused and with 200 other characters of the underworld sat armed and entrenched in the City Hall. The Governor called in the State Militia, 400 strong. They surrounded the City Hall, hteir gatlin guns aimed true. The "City Hall War" had begun. Rumor had it, that Soapy Smith (a colorful Larimer Street conman) yelled from the towers of the City Hall, while waving sticks of


dynamite to the Governor and militia below,"I'm closer to heaven than you gentlemen, but if you come any closer, you may get there first." The Governor backed down and went to court, where he lost. So much for reform.
The street continued to deteriorate, the Legislature left the Barclay and moved to the newly built Capitol, the City Government soon followed in 1932, moving to the new City and County building in the Civic Center. The Police Department remained until 1950 when the City Hall was demolished to make way for a parking lot. The banks moved to the new financial hub on 17th street. Time and winter took its toll on the inhabitants and buildings alike. All that remained were the ever present tamale vendors and the Tivoli Beer wagons making their way up Larimer Street and back.
Post World War II saw a boom for Denver, but not for Larimer Street. In 1950 between 11th and 23rd Streets there were forty-six bars and liquor stores, fifty-seven flop houses, seventeen pawn shops, twenty-two second hand shops and ten missions.
The newly formed Downtown Denver Improvement Association reviewed the situation and urged that skidrow be demolished. In their opinion, the buildings were firetraps and the flop houses provided an open invitation to tramps around the country.
In 1958 D.U.R.A. (Denver Urban Renewal Authority) was created to implement such plans. The Skyline Urban Renewal Project was one that was implemented. Thirty blocks were to be demolished, between Speer Boulevard, Curtis Street,
20th Street and the alley between Market and Larimer Streets. Demolition began in June of 1969.
There were those who fought the wrecking ball. In 1967 the Denver Landmark Preservation Commission was set up. It was their task to identify historic sites and to see to the administering of ordinance provisions for maintaining them. The first of these was the 1400 block of Larimer Street, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.


Larimer Street Associates, a private citizens group formed in 1963, led by Dana Crawford and a vision of what Larimer Street once was and with hard work could be again, took on the job of restoration and rehabilitation. They accomplished their task and Larimer Street is a viable, active street again and a model for similar projects around the city.
All that remains at the corner of Larimer and 14th is the bell of the old City Hall and a parking lot with a wonderful view beyond of the Rockies. A poignant reminder of the colorful history of Larimer Street.


lity Side
Larimer Street, present condition




Larimer Street early days l860's.


Larimer Street 1890's


Denver Urban Renewal Authority
View of soon lo be demolished Auraria from the top of Brooks Towers. May 1973.


)
\E---The Denver Post-
'*-** ^ r. >, I
LOOKING BACK
Vanished
indmarks
ie by one they go, and ly photographs can recall e Denver of yesterday
-Sept. 20, 1959
Cannons once threatened old city hall but it suffered routine destruction in 1950.
b ENVERS ancient buildings, leftovers from a period when the city was young and architecture bizarre, are appearing, replaced by apartments, of-i buildings and parking lots.
A few remain. One is the former Llm-riale Hotel at 14th St. and Court PI., built 1892 by E. J. Binford for $65,000. It had rooms in Tuscan Renaissance style, stone balconies, tiled and carved fireplaces every room, a gold-and white dining room the fifth floor and a roof garden. It now headquarters for the Community Chest Denvers Auditorium, more than half-a-ntury old, has undergone major remodel-g. It opened in July, 1908, with the Demo- atic national convention, which nominated William Jennings Bryan for president for e third and last time.
One structure that has vanished, pictured .re, was the old city hall at 14th and Larimer Sts. It was the site of the "civil
STATE HISTOR1CA1
war" of 1894, when Gov. Davis H. (Bloody Bridles) Waite brought in Colorado National Guard troops and pointed cannon at the building in an attempt to remove two city fire and police board members. The situation nearly exploded, but the governor calmed down and took his complaint to court.
The stately building, erected in 1883 at a cost of $225,000, became a fire station when the city government moved into its present building in 1932. It was torn down in 1950 to make way for a parking lot.
'er Post
pt. 20, 1559 r' Sec.
>4
EUILDINSS CITY HALL, 1BS^
CITIES & TO.vKS DENVER
Old City Hall at lUth & Larimer Streets, later Police Hall












project background i

.











































fl^U&TT /NP
r-1
^.-iV^vApp ^pAPOATE ^pH^l pe'SipN ^UKP HAUL .
interview with 2hp y^T ^tti&bkt
<5T1P1P ; ^ -fz> fe^E- ; All pi^si^liaIes
TTT^iO Q -pf ^ hp^T <3
L?UN^ *u) f3w Ap£A pf^vipep j ^ITT ^PlP !^ ^TllL lE^P A^ A ^^E(2ATlH£ H^pE.
' PI/IL pPAp./ M^T WrtBl^B A£AP f>TPH£&
&b£>\oV&&,u^M6 ^a/ipep materials?
fz^f- IKTPpAPTVM BETWEEN fcr^lpUNE^ W
l,£/W Y^- ^T/PBMT^.
' HV/^ : L^Y : INl ^LP IN WlNTEf2-.
UWflhte '-&ast>) t\sr W^TH U^HT, &\*&>T. i^A^O.
ALL fAPlUTlE^ Aj^E L?^ATEP IN ^NE £>UIIP/M<£ = uh^a^Yi o\jf^^^ \e^pfl review ^ape, a-pmin,
^VEpP{i?WpE:p |M 011)PiP /U/i2 la* ^MALL, 0^
^TUpeKTP? sm/ilp mte^e &V£f^.
'(j9T)P£HT fKEVl^Lf ($ f?l0p IM WA|?eHP(/^e)
-&LPIK0 "zBPTPN.
Ayplp^wM


HALL/
Rf. TLAK Tfrl^rL
t^pM AlA a^upNAL JAM H71 EVALVATPM ' \G> N&UTKAL A^H" £(iMP HALl"
M NAlLUBp.
t?ee^Kfcp ; ^feMEp \V2.
AMt , ANPFEW^/ANP^^M /
'^Ti ^&AM (3. -mg TIME..
^MTEMr^PAF'f IANPMAFE--
E-TUPIO EXflsplEMCE: the L£A^Hlh&
PE^lfSM/ AlP ^TVPENTe ^tfcULD BE /Nl <3f/pE.
<^TVPio ^ INHAT /p>H MN tv WITH &J£\]£1\JFAL
MA} ME^H. EN^IMEEplM^.
' PEts^pgp Pf FA^ULTf fp^VlPEP t2^p-
fft&ULTf ^pfl^Ee ^VEMlNAf- £l£+fT ^Ff-
TTtE 1UpU> -TpAYe" ; flf3S<^DE Kfc? A FALL INl3EfTEp. FELT ^ME.
^f/PE^ M^T U^P Pt/E 1* ^p!ME;
LWEp.
* 4F ^TUPEMTP? t^LP iM -p fA| -f^p-
0<$6ft iP fLN£ INA^ -2 PI l NflW feftJAP ^1N££ fLANNEp^ E? NflT P&^lpE 4fT\)PI£ 3f/£B.) Umax 4^ ^tupemt^, ie palopt| t ^taff]


&mp HALL , ^
l*m = 64-o ^tupeM'Rp 'Lc?o ip? M^r gtvppJ + 2*0 6TAFF aw3 FA^OLlTf.
^^UUT'^TUPl^ TfVVf£> a LEVELS ^^Jr^r ^MVEpTEP -p r <3 £>/pE-
u>ui^e np^r ft^p. &vtv\o-XVOWWoioe^ W0F£&tizf fA^T &\FET£ft\A, ^n/tPl^ /m) OLN<^^OOV\.
*^AU G l£E> i£ ^TU PENT
NMl £\JE "fc 6ttAM6£^ ijl '
'^N6£fT fOEXie>lUT[ [^ KBAU'Z&P (2 TTH
<3TUPf£; 6U&G>fid?y{Q? ^ zffH^ES A^E P|XEP.
^HC&fT 1TWK; pt/E 1 Wp^Ao^xb pM&iclBQ.
KO IM BETWEEN £fA2E£> (ihlFPfzMAL) ^ PIN tff *W
> O0P6E ^lLVETTI TI4E peGl6rM |<2> i/NeeUEVAELE..
TttEjzE WA^ /T? ^M^IPEfe/VTVH WHAT WWLP EE Ttt£ 11
* ^1E6lfUKE^ llTTEpMIX(M£ : LA /W li^PAK PE91^M Y^3/ AftfH y-z ^2 ftANKEf^ M^--IttE ^E^TUpE ^fAMP <2VJP\C ^SfA^E- j L^T
AT TttE ^U/PIC ^[T^pT LEVEL.
'EHTFj i Pl^MAb /W -= AM ABAMl^MMEP
IMA^E H ^EET.1'
*^NzUIPM6j erATE(AEKT^ '
Hp ^KlTlKlUlTY W/WEl^H^p^P; M^r ENE^Y EfE^lfrVT*/ M.fE ^pLE Np|i/M
hf? ^fE^lAP fLAz-EO HAVE LP llAA&E.


a FpM Af&ti\n&TVlze /U^BAN uj THE HAfz^P
PAMfU^ &Y loVb oRA16 p-40 ~47
I1T] AlA fMAL.
HApVAHP ^AMfU£ ^f^WTH -
rrm HtfpTH £AMf\j£> i^b THE OEMTE)2. ^APl/ATB
^TVPiEO. THE ^H?Ej=T ^FAPUATE BPlMTT^H FEeEAj^Oi 3fE£lAU2Ep ^TUPIE^ j Ffs^M THE MEPEVIL^MEPIEVAl) efE6lAll3>M ^ ^HTTNENTU-OtslNEpGlTlE^ [M ^MTHA^T tz> THE UNPEpgf^APl/ATE EN6U£H ^?UL^E [NTEcSfATED LlVlM<&
*m3 UcJ^mQi PATlM<$ Fj^M THE FEMAieeAH^E IPEAE 4s- THE f^UHPED MAH.
frb'L "A POTENTIAL PUEMT A^FP L0UI& KAHN P P£> A ^P5NIAL Ei/llPlMcb E^F HfM- MHH ^AlP tfE o^UbVhi' V Vo tr- WHEN A^KEP IE HE VWLP pf^MMENP ec>ME-Bpp'f WHz? ^liLDt KAHN PEpUEP 7'Y^,
OEFFE^Hi ETT HE P1EP ^ME TIME ASP.*
O=£0M MApHN
A CCLVaOno^ £>Y 'WTTfcH'j' P- AM^HlApfrS.



Y/OE
NEW PAMEK
A £TPe -p Apm-lTE^TlpE W UpMM ^^^4 PU'ZAPETH MILL^
HBAl ftMEH mb UH t^M/YAPP l/N/IVE^^TTf P£P^5> IT74
TpJMPl/U- JAIMES ttlLLtpU^B.
"&pl(J(r ffiVt" ?V$&T R?pMAL pAMp£> ApTEp 1g'&frbJn0ti
AtPVpjfL ^IV\L WAp- 2Nt? PApAITi^M/ A 2Mt? f^lV ^p
vvm ^peeM.
* PE^T ^>p im ^ ^AW UMflANKeP 0^\M1W
PH MAErrE^. riAM ^P 7^1 t=p (JMlpY AUH& ^rn\JX Apr^ TpAPnvM
£W it wa*^ (Are.)
- [W£? dAVIE^ MM^te ^/ft4
Ep?/A P£p(^p ^p BMUziN^ t^zTpAJp-n)£i|\[67 ^p UMPEp$RWAT£
INrt?? [* (W MflPEEEP Ttp
Eh&U^H; iJNNEp^rtlE^.
&>H&£\s&t> f'r tae i;MN^pgmy in] rtVMAM A^AIT^pnJpp EXfeplEN^P A5 WELO M> ^MI^U ~Wp ^HiE Ep^M pXf^PD aW ^AMB'RIP&E. AIMING AT TflP iN^Vl^/APITf/ Ttte
l^j^uiApiTiE^ m2 ^d^c^avx&z ^p Tire pentjpip^ tS£UH 01G6£. A MDCTU^P ^p ^Tfl£^>
fiE £0NTplVEP A METAffpp R?p tflOT^lf.
* rm=p? PITT laS-ETT^ A ^NTNlll/M gfwe<* *Ati ^esi^nep E?p tne pepe^teian
^K TPE M^VE.
* 6(^W1Tt ^AWpi/^ |AP> ^IPTEp ff*M PXfANSlPH ^NPPNTPATl^M / i^N^ENTpATHS M^MEMPMT &?TP VEftlPUlAp W PPPe^rpiAM. YAbE'^ piANMlN& ATTlTipE fW? ^KAH$EP rp^M -me ^pANpmse T> AH ATHTUPP. ^p- UlAApWdUE PlE^^Urf."


f.'Z tAt£ i/MNFI^Tf A^T IT61 fAVL PU^LfH.
'A W^;AK£fz- ^feAM UK&^ (= feAVHAl/^ TKI^j l£? A gML#iM<2 ^ (KKE6UtAf^ MA^c25H^/ NAvjUnUfeVEL&C?, IN^ ^ ^ITT£> om? #fo?AN TBXTTFED
=zA)fiFA6B<<7 TttE *f= THE-
EARPf IW^. ^VICTIM af A£5?K, F^IPE/TT MANBPU^]/ KB/U>WuN0 ^ EN^uE^T ^MfTvAIMT^.)
'tEt it H4£? a flasamfc; A 64msfw£T @ TH£- A MHi^E^-lfT WFET /W FUFN/N^ THB UHEUf*
ApT /M7Z? A


UNIVERSITY
vJKiviep^ne^
FfAPE ^UAR^ AM l/WN l/NlVE^fTf
ETfANP^
£UTTi WEIN9]Z^A
A REf^lcr PN THE £2WMIL> fh^^CAU EXfANSPN /f= (JfcgAN U/slNEpSlTlE^
£ASEP A 6A1TE ^tTUPY TUB W^%BL INHmnJTE TBC&^OlOe^ EWATONAL EVlPlTlEG LA^AT£R!£ fT UI^I^AM 1/NlV Yiv ^ /OP OblN YET ESl&LL ^/Ep- ttAlf ^Tl/PEMT P^FT/LATVN.
U^AN UNlV ATTpAPT^ A£Pb%l &1LITY
-tz> ATP AlPTUpAL/ IV^VSIFIAL/ FINAN&AL W PE^EAfAp L>Tp#, EAPUPTf MEM^E^ f=fcZ>M
TirE ^MMl/Nliy, ^pfEp^ WtPENT g^p-f 6f£ATEf- ^UTSIpE LEAf-NlN^ ^ff^pTVNlTI^.
* 106ATVN #^T>t A torib A ^AN&.
UKW Ap-e uMvtOCJP&P, ttz>W Tp EKpAKlPr
AY Hg
pl4 tfapttpN/tl i/NlV Ap.E 4 stz^ie^
MAXIMUM) SAW pi/E -p E^NPMIPA?
A pl^E IN HEIGHT/ ESTE^IALLY IM UR&AN ^ENTEj^ 7
i
IN -Hl Ape (£f=T TP U?w&p. wp^/ XU? EAOJLTy £|=fPE^ ApE ^ 72>p TP EXfEPlTE ELEMATPp-Tf^AFFI^.


fAi/L OTOLITH tub 'pdt- AfT Aj^HI TBPTJEB BV!LP|N£
* : HAUL
TYAPB
2IM^ T^TTE^, NEW mi
IAJIUP1K0 1^4-)
^MMENT# '^XTEp-MAL r^&O
tTlpTATEP THAT THl<2 mUPlH& TUBM THE- . W
peiATB p THE M^pBpN BUlEplN^ A^ W&U-
hf? cflGs&&R THAT IT mMi£& P \ALB UNWE^iTf, THE ittTppNAL PEMANPBP AM PNVI^/TMB/YT
^IT/me Bf. VAPfT^ ATTIVITIP^ '/iHipH Wim BB P1VEN Ff?M ^ M£fc£W£ By Tl£ fc£=j=!MEP SfA^ WITHIN r M THE Y&4&3 ^ BY/ tT ^ flzf£P *f= -B^PP T^WEf^
^NNEPTED BY BpiPP[M£ TTABP AM ^fBM
P^UpI (PHANPBP pVE Y Tlf^ i^LATMte). 77tB NAfl^W ADP10 TfA^Bv HAVE BeEM P^mPlTBP/ W 7HB bh&b *F ATTENTION PAIP p> MtfPpVO 5&PAFAV*H, U&HT &?N1p?L MAti PNMAPY.


tyl# ANTIN'.IBP.
Tftfc rA^JL PUJ^Lfft
INTfpfrftfTVH ^ie>YL M^LY" na^T ^AflVK^ : ^fcptiAf^P vtfiVlAP \tf/ ^MMEHF> £>| fAVL rpA^Bp pmt^f^
N^VM tyz+l WA^IM^-pH. 117^
f. 1 mi^r^T TTWTUpE V'm TT£
pe^N ^eNe^Ai^ ,' 1TO iMib^nati^Map ^ttylb
P/rMrteP pte^NAU^M; Yet bmp^h eept that
^&\o\\ku=M rfwipte a &iatn&4 in A&a\-
ITBcPIUpE-


-?>: T liNfiiii t AmTiTy>
-'Or ^vV*V*m*****s,*a* EMfflBBMB*
3c %£99BBM>i
8S^'3>":
afer *;§ ||j
.- -? vSgx!t^
;-_ -., V II IHH HIM [l~i¥~l IT ITT1
' 'a - wm Bvl58l win
csp&l i 1*^ P^^^^2,:'.
ap%P-::£ :j ; |Hjj 14; II
ga^2Sss
hvz _a'a) /.; o hrtp auf
f. falDPlftt,
Ifl
A / *y



n Mif.r ir

'I'ho cross section in perspective (seen from (Impel Street) shows the auditorium in the lower basement, and the library with reading room and magazine section above. At entrance level, the large exhibition hall lies on various levels reached by groups of stairs. Above: the large drafting room with its galleries at various heights. The painters studios are situated underneath the roof.
View of large drafting room. [>


1lans A-I: A second ba.setiu.-ni, 1> lirst base,met C ground Hoor, I) lirst upper Hoof, E *<-<<> upper Hoor, K third upper Hoor, (! fourtb apj Hoor, II lift It upper Hoor, 1 sixth upper Ho Key to plans A-C: 1 storage, 2 metal worksite m toplight, 4 plastics, 5 class orderly. (5 installs 7 electric vault, 8 electrical switches, !) gr.-tpl drawing studio, 10 picture storage, 11 porte storage, 12 lecture room, 13 wood workshop, mezzanine, 15 photographic studio, Hi lift mop room, 17 compositors. 18 plans design ilraxvi office, l!) architects archives, 20 darkroom, bookbinding, 22 interior courtyard, 23 void a! auditorium, 24 printing shop, 25 studio, 2> 27 reading room 28 entrance, 20 hall, 30 liiiirm 31 magazines, l|2 study, 33 librarian.
Key to plans D-I: l reception, 2 skylight, 3: e hibition, 4 classroom, 5 void above reading root 6 mezzanine, library, 7 kitchen, 8 lounge, 9 exit bition room with Jury-alcove, 10 conferem room, 11 offices, 1.2 secretaries, 13 assistants. I bridge, 15 anteroom, 1(3 dean, 17 rehearsal ha. IS seminar, l!) jury, 20 drafting room. 21 mod construction, 22 tuition, 23 sketches, 24 pain?it studio, 25 workroom, 2(3 storage, 27 terrace, : guestroom, 29 lifedrawing.






=f, frt :=t F=
n 1 | r''
Lawrence St.
14th St.
SITE


c


c

1


Lawrence St.


^vbsU-ead-^.j





climate analysis


.



















6AJ'C7\l'i [ I I U-U* l ' *1 *(
yE%M£t> tfJM ftAWS^Ai'^ l^&4.
CLIMATE BACK.-)
Denver is located on the eastern slope of the central Rocky Mountains. The central business district is located near the confluence of the Platte River and Cherry Creek.
The climate is characterized by mild average temperatures with wide daily and seasonal extremes, light to moderate winds, low relative humidity, light precipitation, and considerable sunshine. The average monthly temperature ranges from 73.3 degrees in July to 30.4 degrees in January.
The occasional Chinook winds are often responsible for the mild winter temperatures. Precipitation averages 15.5 in. per year. Annual snowfall is about 62, but persistent snow cover is atypical. March is the snowiest month. More than 50% of the annual precipitation occurs between April and July. Thunderstorms are a frequent happening on early summer afternoons. By autumn, the summer thunderstorms are over, severe weather is infrequent and there is a greater possible percentage of sunshine.
In the city center of Denver, the combination of paved surfaces, buildings and air pollution combine to alter the local climate. In the summer, the city is usually hotter than the surrounding suburbs or countryside. The winter air pollution, often caused by temperature inversions, interfers with the receipt of solar radiation and the visual and physical health of the residents.
CLIMATIC ANALYSIS Denver, Colorado
39.45 North 104.52 West 5230 feet 38
Latitude Long itude Altitude


Average yearly temperature 50.2 F
r Average relative humidity 40%
- Average yearly precipitation 14.53 inches
- Degree days
Heating 6016
Cooling 623
Percent of possible sunshine/year 53%
1
J
}
39
1


HEATING AND COOLING CHART
SUN ANGLE


CLIMATIC DATA
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE [ F
AVERAGE PRECIPITATION l Inches)
AVERAGE SNOWFALL {inches!
i f m a
m j j a
n
% POSSIBLE SUNSHINE |%]
j f m a m j j a
n
TOTAL-70%


IUAL FREQUENCES OF WINDS OF VARIOUS VELOCITIES AT STAPLETON AIRPORT, DENVER COLORADO
legend
wind speed
trongesc Wind 4 -12mph ft*#
X 13-24mph
_rom northwest every sooth of year 24mph OS I
irth and northwest wind arctic air from Canada and Alaska
uth and southeast wind warm, moist air from Gulf of Mexico
uth and souchwest wind warm, dry air from Mexico
it wind Pacific air modified by passage over Rocky Mountains .
ver Is located in the belt of the prevailing westerlies.
The Frigary Wind
From the south every month of the year
The Secondary Wind From north-northwest in winter Proa north-eaat in spring and msoer Prom north in fall




zoning analysis













prvnn i nu-w[

goaSag (SOiaaS
Project Haae: FA^'IUTf fPjZ j>0\A£&£ tfz t*5& flMM& Locution: 14'tV,___/7/J___U/'l MEfe.___£Vt------------------------------
W=MMEI2. #fi'~P%ht>0
Applicable Zoning Ordinance: t?feMVgy- e> 1
Zoning Check By:

h^L
Date: [ hD Vjp
Section Page Item
^1-A76 .42M? Proposed uses J^ETAlL; .&&MAT.M* L
IN^TI-niTIcrM [MbCEP iiefc]________________________
Present Zoning Classification -7 7
11_
cf\ ~t 77.fi1. 4/2-£~£)J Applicable Allowable Uses A |CT A Lo77-1,__
blaJepAiN7 iN6, P, r^gf r. ci ar-g ,
£AT!,Kfr HAuu_____
EfcNTlNte EpP- K/feTlM£C f1^M£ fDpTAfitM^Tc
4f AR^
__________ ______ Zone Change Required? ______________________
Minimum Lot Size
area: .* ZfbUtL_L^T,11__________________________
width: _________________________________________
5A frftP 4^1 A
*A-bbo JL
Minimum Yard Requirements
front: l£z,
______L£7' fteteffT"___________________ll
/
7K ' ^
,-.7t


srJ\4-
AA-'bhD A'ftir'l
both sides: _______________
allowances for overhangs:
llaxiatua FAB %11 Af-EA /fr 20 HE L£E_______________
Available Bonuses fE&MUJM ^ MEM-MO 2-ED
Aft'rtfrg, EN6Lfl£Et? Aptf-APE y\-p£:vJM ,
5^-%fro 4014-
UW IfeXlEL U^V-T Ag&V,-Wr-gP^pVMD
PMHINa.feMgmep PDAiA_____________
lfaxiaus Height
feet:
gLjn TU: -^'c.'r
f<> 'c*. c,0 f r
O'-
stories:
Bulk Planes

^L-A-C Off street Parking
^ ^ ^ -r/- A (f fq(j spaces by use: V^DD < \-'~\*A>P ?--
AEX16LE V 4^4-^ -----------------------------------------------------------
rqd spaces for project NlPT 4-N^VJM_________________
parking permitted in setbacks?. *___________________
2


Open Space Requirements
Landscaping Kqmts.
Fences _____________________
Sign Restrictions '/
AO-^ 4-. | Other Special Bquiraaant ^AXv-OT AOAr:'-.
eTEEETvg PfcONtfc. 3




i j'i I I "r
L?* ~ '/ \ l ^ l I 4 U- |
14 11
aisaiLaiisjs jm3 suaas
Project A ^ 1CA\ l Tf^m
. 1
Location :jAl2 ________AA*- M1
^ W hAT l! 1U' MWcte MAIAAa c^A £- rcv'i&fr , 1 ____________
Applicable Code W*we- AITV fl//i A-AY i f_^ irA/llA-____!, 1 A .
Code Check Byi_Aj~!!_______________________ Date:^£_iil____'Hi
Section Pane
fPA
^ r I
tapip -t A- A Cy I)
c-p A < t ^': I
"lAPP- r ^ Cb-l4-
1Afc>/pr r P-
Item
Fire zone _________
Occupancy classification
Principle & '*-____ _______M
Others (specify ) A / -'
n/a
(/AilVL.r
rn.
n/a
Construction type X ^ A -7J-
Occupancy separations required_______________________ n/a
to (>? -V I hours
to hours
to hours
to hours
to hours
iA^LIr P P 5 14-
A. A
Changes in occupancy_________________________________
Maximum allowable floor area UMUMlTrP A X
ppp $ a y
If adjacent to open area on two or more sides v ('"r
If over one story A,A? At' ^rA___________
If sprinldered l M l [ M1TPP__________________________
Increases for fire separations ^ ?______________
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
1


AA£>Ur
1YL
bC'h
types)



^ A S.' \^ Maximum allowable height X z. AM UM ;: n/a
Feet ~T(P£ r : 7Z>'____________________________________n/a
Stories__________' __________________________________n/a
^3(96> 5 4? A
le>*f
4-6'
Towers. spires, steeples ___VlAT'.Lr___________ n/a
'Iq! WdC IP
Fire resistance of exterior vails (see occupancy 2c construction
North South East West _
% FfEE ^MAi PL
H Setbacks requiring protection of openings in exterior wails n/a North 2.0 1______________________________________________________________
South East West .
A A> Location within city/ location on property A A. I.-____
-4p PA U/*> r,K^c:p- X' 4^-,' -
Use of Public Property
n/a
n/a
Y5-
Doors prohibited from swinging into city property?. Restrictions on marquees, conopies, etc. MAt
mjL^z £miihj sw-
£>

Other projections A-- lY.A 'A 1
Windows required in rooms A'
Window area____________________
m?
n/a
Enclosed or semi-enclosed courts size rqd
5 m- A- 2- 'PA 2 A Ventilation requirements AgA A 1;f~ 6"Z-7A n/a
Minimum ceiling heights in rooms
2
1 '(
n/a


m in; a
Ltd
<7
4A*-'
lA&te n A
/"[.[ 'L
HOC
Minimum floor tret of rooms Fire resistive requirements^ 1M M\PMGT')r 1 *= n/a n/a
Fxterior hearing walk A hrs
Interior hearing walk ^ 2 (V's hrs
Fxterior non-hearing walk A hrs
Structural frame ' o "2. (A+N hrs
Permanent partitions ^ hrs
Exit corridor walls hrs
Vertical openings A hrs
Floors ! Air'; hrs
Roofs 2. 1 fcV hrs
e>/
Exterior doors / "r hrs
3/t
Exit doors ^ frames / ^ hrs
Inner court walls ? hrs
Mezzanine floors (area allowed) i hrs

Roof coverings hrs
Roiler room enclosure ' hrs
Structural requirements n /a
Framework A hrs
Stairs £-* h rs
Floors hrs
Roofs C- hrs
Partitions hrs
^p ? \ ^o~ 1 Exits
t^Lfc ^'A
Occupancy ______________ Basis _________ Actual Load
u&£Arf fgfnrNo c-tg^iro >. ^oih.jn%z>c\\
3


J
fytbo'l Y-0
'b'sjc'l M ???>C£-
/aac&*lmk\G >^ <2+g<'^r- j
E^HlftlT \LOQ\rC; > P?'? 2+fe*!^- 3,
2^'^ >^ ffeg^HO 2t^lTO-v.
//o ^ r-p-i?'
[£U tA / jjO_
"
\CA 4 '
1 i 1
Number of exits required
n/a


Minimum width of exits 1. < v L/?'--1 - -; n/a
4- MVT \*~\i&\ ,r, -f £/>' /*= 1! ".
Exit separation arrangement VI f N1 ? V 7'. 1 - n/a

^21
Maximum allowable travel distance to exit l?2£.1 With sprinklers 1
Qhl f2 Exit sequence (through adjoining or accessory areas) _
Vg£, Jnrr Api^iM1^ for,; ^>,.
5^215T- -f7 ;W fevL^:__________
Exit doors________________________________
Minimum width & height ^ X c~' ________
Maximum leaf width *4 ;___________________
n/a
n/a
Width required for number of occupants
n/a
Sviag IM t?lpg^n^M /f- TB/WS-
Change in floor level at door ^7 Exit Corridors___________________
Required width MlN 4-^-Required height V ^ 4 1
H
JV1A<
Dead end corridors length
4
io' vav
n/a



^1
II ii
3*3 *!
^IP
H-ll
20705 H vt-io
35-!£
**>-w
i &Z>-\P
Openings / K.EA M,W *- \-j>',,.
Stairs___________________________________________
Min. width _________occ. load of___
___________________________occ. load of___
___________________________occ. load of__________
___________________________occ. load of__________
Maximum riser allowed 7 ^ (/_____________________
Minimum tread allowed __10 11____________________
Winding, circular, spiral stairs_________________
i, ^ pipr//-Tg___________________________
Landings__________________________________,______
. Minimum width rqd. Wli^ ^ h~ ____
Maximum width rqd. f___________________________
I /O I_ *1
Vertical distance between landings 1 07_______
Handicap refuge space 2^" X 4"Z'1________________
_____ n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Stair to roof rqd.? 4- ~t~ ^P&-\trO j S 1 P' n/a
Stair to basement restrictions V 1 ~-P ^ n/a
Stair enclosure rqd.? f EfZ________________________
Stair headroom ____L!______________________________
Handrails__________________________________________
Rqd at each side? ___________________________
Intermediate rails rqd.? ^ ___________________
Max. width between interior rails _________________
Rqd height Ag11 -I /> A E-^ve retaA&
Max openings in rails ~____________________________
Height above nosing ____________
n/a
n/a
n/a

j-
5


ww
Extension of railing ///}__AAHAh.1
t
Projection from wall 1". ^_____________________________________
Exceptions *~AA ~ Wi &'1 u. ~~ < ^______^~AlL'_______________
?-Zh'\rl
^b9?0A
^\rL 'bh\c?
&>&>
"'* ' 1 1 t ......
CVNevt a 4)
^ to
£> A4- (cAd?p 64 &
A4-|.'2.

A4-,A
Horizontal exit requirements AAT___££__A r-£Zy .: n/a
feyciT,__i trp- Eigfc Muro________________________
Ramps _____________________________________________ n/a
Width £>AM£ A£> A-lf7WAyA_____________________
Maximum slope 1 (*2- AL>^lC ~4? AfcA i^£~
Landings lJKiTE^^E^IAT&7^ ; *=r' l.F; i--""
Handraiis ^MFA, Ifrgr. EXTisNP I'
Exit signs rqd. lUAlMIMATrP ___________________
Toilet room requirements (code utilized?) t r 1 A- f"U ln/a
.Js?
Fixture requirements (basis?) AUfiAA'ty lA-. r- n/a
Women PS; AA- W/ PS ',7 L-'- / ~____________
Men \*Bi£- \w/vl£- ; / FEj£ Ap l/fdV.A,~ i I n-K J.; ; _/ /
Drinking fountains__- r7 AU)0^~ 4-' n/a
Showers_____________________________________________n/a
Handicapped Requirements ALL: Mli££L i-L ~ A£ AIP'-A-Site -AMfe As-'S-SSSIF t/V'S.______________________
Accessible Routes' A/A ^ Z-PA g - A' !.'
6


A4.n
^4- ^ Accessible bathrooms _U'A'1__r^.LT________1L_1_2__!
/ n U. ._____________
4s C.TAU^ )g^.____________________________________
Accessible housing _____________________________________/nTa')
Number of units_________________________________________
Minimum requirements ___________________________________
Special rqmts. not listed
n/a
t'


I











program


PROJECTED SPACE REQUIREMENTS
College of Architecture and Planning: New Facility
SPACE AMOUNT SUBTOTAL
Design Studios Graduate School Architecture 150 @ 50 sq. ft. ea. 7,500 sq. ft.
Landscape Architecture 60 @ " 3,000
Interior Design 60 @ " 3,000
Planning 60 @ " 3,000
Undergraduate School 150 @ " 7,500
16,500 sq. ft.
Classrooms Auditorium 2,000 sq. ft.
4 Seminar rooms 20 students @ 10 sq. ft. ea. 800
4 Classrooms 50 students @ 10 sq. ft. ea. 2,000
4,800 sq. ft.
Support Facilities Library : offices 2 @ 125 sq. ft. 250 sq. ft.
check station 200
slide library (100,000 si.) 625
study/stacks (47,000 vol.) 5,925
7,000 sq. ft.
Computer Facility 1,500 sq. ft.
Technical Center (wood/model shop, 6,000
photography, reproduction, plant materials, storage and check out for equipmentr offices for staff)
Archival Storage 800 sq. ft.
Exhibit/ Gallery 4,000
Student Commons 1,000
20,300 sq.ft.
Administration Dean's office 2 @ 200 sq. ft. 400 sq. ft.
Director's office 5 @ 180 sq. ft. 900
Faculty offices 28 @ 130 sq. ft. 3,640
Faculty (part time) 14 @ 100 sq. ft. 1,400
Staff 5 @ 100 sq. ft. 500
Records, Xerox,storage 250
Faculty Conference 300
Faculty Lounge 200
Reception, Waiting 250
Students Organizations 300
8,140 sq. ft.


Total
+ 25 % for Circulation (restrooms, etc.) + 15 % for Mechanical
57,240 sq. ft 14,060 8,436
79,736 sq.ft.
Retail and Commercial Gallery Parking for 200 vehicles (maximum)
10.000 sq. ft
80.000
Project Total Building Total
168,000 sq. ft 89,736 sq. ft


Program Addenda
Retail And Commercial Gallery
12,500 sq. ft.
Parking Garage
( The parking garage is across the creek and underground.)
72,400 sq.ft.


spatial requirements









and
analysis







area
space c?xvp\0e>
n a
i
lusers- activities
#4 'JKrr all p^oipiih&t
P£7>M £qtJtX-A
i spatial qualities
XLEAI £>!!_! TY
NATUpAL L!AmT vemtilaji^M
} A,-* ^
W 6le.ni0>-;EO
* ail^w hx 'fh\o£t',' 1: */ 5 v/- !MTE^A^ri A*
B1J
physical requirements
* MNp^V/O-
/^p=M PMM
, ft^7\/|A£ t'JZ'-s'X'. Jr'.L- AV1 notes and diagrams
't~VicAAL£ f=/M
! -i! fc.
r
"*T

,Al'pr^'! r ^r
' X<
7^X7
A
rr [;
*\
, WpEU
£>tw;
1 .^1 A. '
T' fc.f. m>. ,*~r ^ '
, c ! V * -V V
r V-
FVUIT'-'
l
' blH £* lIlTSpt^CIPUMf^'f C'Jp'JC
f Sf.p: LA^r
-r .1 fc? !


space wi aarea
BMlNAft z&u'
f'*>*?*' r 5 r
_ .c- .;. -i f * *.

users* activities
-<£*AP W ^TVmn^ /FA^UtTf /*V5?T LF
* Lp^-P-PA Pp '' P! A> <7" A'

, 1M pfc? MTU £?A j fjpfe f M.
spatial qualities
* S^^c*r\'t\uX .'C^LA'fPD
u<£HAMA
* V(0/e!L!TY
physical requirements
Avp>!^ vi^al %r, ft
ony\t> A7!£! I WPP Y/AUJA /V/J ftVA NAW.l
W'i'w. i
A ^piTl^HAi
notes and diagrams
r,

ll- i
r
-A/-ULTV
. / \C- ^ w \ J
A '
1
pAtT^!
TT
(2A1C
^---- >* a pA^c y ^ v;o ^
> pur rf^p;-j"
4
Oj !JA!r
r


area
'\**o Xj
space Ll^js-AP-t
(lt\OL ^LIPE UBfAfiV
t
users' activities
e\VP£HV>,BWUTY
- -e-m^Y
m spatial qualities
HAlupAL W INWC^YT
aw rot>Y Yet Aj
!Oot-ATEt>
physical requirements
E/TSfept2- UM'tVM (htziMBTEjz , -f Of/YE W/9YWt> ATWm'l!^- PW;
. AJKtoe.iE.iUTY
notes and
diagrams
^EMINAP- £MC-7 ^ ' 6 -r
AMtNAL ''.-fc/YE: 14 f ^ 1 i i \ r A :r
J IfA^t-Tf
Y^v'-r'Ys, t/
L

>W7k?ztzTA?l£
^viWr


space
area
users* activities
* , f-A
spatial qualities
* , ^PT;\y Ma) i'.Sf : ^
physical requirements
/ '

A^e'-lfcit-rY

> s
r MaTT^ \r-;S> r/S'A; .'.. jo
notes and diagrams
t-
I^HHIAAL ^EHTEP-

OEMlMAP- £M
v/
- ^
T V
AAut>/p


space
''Jr-'
j J
[area
6,^
n
users* activities
/ .' PARITY
, ftt^^PPPY ftziHTtfc, M*t>EL MIL&U-&, nfrV^*^!'! A
i spatial qualities
'ApP^vlATH mA PPFk"!PM'' ^FAPp:
, PPP U^)
physical requirements
,/£b fpk. \J£p: : ^PPM.'AAL pAMPU'M^ ^ 1
py^pp ^P UAp'/ 'PF
^r- ifp *> r>PTP E^P-pM^r*
j .4TPMIA7 :^;!
notes and diagrams
*p
*~p
f-"*
TfhPffH !^PL PPMTFF-- ^ " /
^Mf^SENTO : nppL't^/. M^PP'u -r^! /l~?- ply v
Avt-P':^ ^P l/MPEti "-p *<*= -5. ^'PM-A',
/' t* V/ Cp-CL. A^> A P'P^'Iz /fflb ly\./|+Z7 _P- '"'; >t.> js*J -
NiYA.Y ^PNTPR NlPPP-:.' -p V -FTvr^V

p ,'rl
Yyapapp
M^ptA
' 0t?|2A^pL.
pf; ^>7<7Pt ? 4 '-<1'
~ "t
PL
<£|*AfTT1 /
' 7Y-PP
* fLVf fL: hVAf")r.
-1 n'r: ^:^-
e ty\| jr f
11 i ; ;
UAPf UJ^'
PFAJP Vn-'
/ /L&?Y /'-fYr^-
wArrrA'


I
fr
a space
ZXftfrlT / GULEff aarea 4,^
users- activities
PA^ilCTY VI^ITIhte LpHLA
spatial qualities
a^NtilataM
'^texi&iwTY
physical requirements
WALf / WALL-
- MMZA&IM f^FTiT^M^
notes and diagrams
'p>'fte!T amJ (^U^pY
1? ftuu>vi f^p. y\tL!^c-, ^imuuw^- a aw
!tf[4^-A^ ,/A} u>K£
! A£MiNAA-
1
f
r
faj&ri&tz
*
t ......y- W
Y /(MLl^pv *v~
1

/
/
A
T~ ^ ,
^\\JP\&
\r
A[f


area
space 4t users* activities
- efVP^KT'3 t frVAJDY
spatial qualities
'WJpAL UA-'7" v^Mfzf-T

physical requirements
, ! pe ! N<3 A&eA
^v&NntATi^M MlfcW
<9 /t
\ x"-- CP '
\K Ac
notes and diagrams
' W/ppEOENT ^!U(Tf Wf
UUN^ . Tfl-F :
Tt~i
\0 f fr hi?'.Y -W pi^FA -'!'' ^
Flfbfe/'KY
L- Tfc----^
I
1 V T~- -
y A K *



V'Mrvirf- tAr
V



space APMIN i^Tp-AT^N
larea &\Ac> Z
lusers* activities
' fA^iry /A^Uhl'^sA^P^
< aHFef&tteB, 16,
i spatial qualities
/ HATTbAP UAaT iNViTiMc^ /
j
i physical requirements
, WVB/toUB wi ^MAMBNT ^TH AA YPT tfefflpAL Lfi&V'tt
notes and diagrams
-1 f>M IM.! CTCA 7 ; A > /
r
r I
7
i \
-r
* 1-fft
i i j l

=/*fHIfAi,: yi'k'r^-'r i>\ irT;" :
j. i|i lU7 i.' * / '
r) "Tft/V"!
! I
TAJA/b "r ',JI; A. Vy'IT "f
! i^-bAbY'' f/" '/9V/A A ? A
fbf A AW
\nj mir-.ir-
<^V fVeUp/FfcIVAT£ ~ fpNAfl £
7akaaumap &::&< ' p&an > ^:rr/-. it a
Vlb?ietfe^_p|£^E TfjP &OVJE&& AM INTctTT'A
/ PEAW ' ... W/7^E 'rV-U!^
v A<*VT Pi?AH i '
^ TA
RsJhA
,t>\&£0'yagr
^Tf
AAA,
A' A'
A£^BTApr f-
AA^ULTY ^
v
( u?cn&e
>
v pa^fzp^


space fc£TA\L aw?
larea
v, !:i.';


users- activities
(SEUBfiAL fOPH^ / SnVPBNT-O FAsi/t;
nr /iPM!M!-',-Tte,-A.7;^M
/
spatial qualities
VIZI&IUTJ-
Natural MffT ,
'lt\t£iZr/\AE Vi!^rpSET physical requirements
(A^fc WINP^WO <2 fp-AMT
Ai-^/e pAiznti^N-v'/^fEM fvaH
notes and diagrams
-tfle fFtA-IL !E> TftH f!SJE 'ItiAT nV.£(?IN6 Tfte F-'.'.Trp ftMt ^pN&p 4" /4-n> av.5 LApIMFp
"fits FpAiJt WlLt- Au&* ** A Ms-// ^ r!f:
aUJc&t.../ A MINT
U
L-
n, ^f
7 ITEAfJrE
ruANMIN-E-
i
<£Mi f'P"MTF




BIBLIOGRAPHY
A-5 Denver, Inc., Master Plan for the Auraria Higher Education Center,
Denver, Colorado. 1973.
American Institute of Architects, Architectural Graphic Standards, John Wiley and Sons, 7th Edition, New York. 1980.
Chaing, Willie T., "University of Colorado, Graduate School of Design and Planning: Thesis Project", Willie t. Chaing. 1980.
Dallas, Sandra, Gold and Gothic, Lick Skillet Press, Smith-Brooks Printing Company, Denver.
Denver Building Code: 1982.
_________(1959) Denver Post, September 20, 1959.
Hanson, Douglas, "Lawrence at Larimer, an Urban Hotel and Retail Center: Thesis Project", Douglas Hanson. 1984.
"Indiana Architect',' Publication of the Indiana A.I.A., Competition for the
College of Architecture and Planning Addition at Ball State June 1981.
Noel, Thomas J., Denver's Larimer Street Main Street, Skid Row and Urban Renaissance,Publication of Historic Denver, Inc. 1981.
Smith, Joseph Emerson, (1941)"The Fortress of the People", Rocky Mountain News, January 26, 1941.
Stephens, Suzanne, (1981) "Symbolic Statements", Progressive Architecture 62 (March): pp. 73-75.
Wharton, J.E., History of the City of Denver, Byers and Daily, Printers, News Office, Denver. 1909.
Reprints of photographs, courtesy of the Denver Historical Society.










Summary Statement
I approached this project from two directions. I wished to respond to the dynamics of the site and the dynamics of the program. I felt that the synthesis of the two would create a ffroup dynamic, which might be that of harmony, juxtaposition or contrast. My project lies somewhere between harmony and contrast.
The site being adjacent to the Historic district of Larimer Square had historic precident, it was a remote piece of the Aurar-ia Campus, the Ivory Tower, it was also a piece of the urban fabric of downtown Denver. All these pieces required a response.
The building for the College of Architecture and Planning needed that peculiar expression of timeless architecture that says "I am the academy, I am a symbol, I express the visions of utopia, the leading edge, the "Western Edge"."
The site gave the building a rotated grid in response to the grids of the city, the campus, the creek. The proportions and scale are broken down respecting those of the historic district. The massing, the forms the articulation respond to the program, what an architecture building wants to be, what this specific architecture building wants to be.
In conclusion, I feel the building accomplishes what I set out to do, with I hope a bit of grace and profundity.
Susan E. Phillips-Hungerford
Denver, Colorado 15 May 1987


Larimer Street
Market Street
Speer Boulevard






H I K ])
\ 1* A ^
v L 0 o
s 'V \1 1) 1 0
\




i I F T II F l 0 0 U 1> L A N T E C II N I C A I
\



/
/




~lr
: D O.. D O O': ; -a :;-J r:
3 : -4 1 r i 1 -4-fi h i f. | -
1 1 - ! 3 1 '
i J I
n ^ nn!H tV ri L.rf 1 * 1i ut
j J i
fiHi
=\r=\r^.
t
SBSBE
"in
M: =;

m
M A 11 K 15 T S T 11 15 U T 1! L 12 V A 1 1 0 AT
L A 11 I M 12 11 S 1 11 12 12 T 1! L 12 V A 1 I 0 N


1 4 T II S T II 15 I T E L E V A T I 0 N
I


I


HVAC Systems
Building description! Institutional type, 90,000 sq. ft., seven stories, north-south orientation
Building Location! Denver, Colorado Longitude! 10^ deg. west Latitude! 39 deg. north
Altitude! 5*280 ft.
Mechanical System description!
The system is a built-up fan-coil system which is located on the roof of the seventh floor in the elevator penthouse. It suppli cold air to each floor thru ducts found in the cores. A main cold air supply air duct loops around the building core with cold supply branches running to the variable air volume boxes (perimeter boxes have reheat coils). Air volume varies from full cooling to partial cooling, to heating when the hot water controller and reheat coils are energized, all controlled by thermostats.
System Components!
There are two centrifugal water chillers which supply chilled water to the cooling coils of the built-up fan-coil system and are controlled by a 3-wav valve with cold plenum reset from solar compenstaed outside air.- An economizer system controlled by enthalpy controllers uses outside air to cool discharge air without the use of the chillers.
Heat is supplied by two gas fired boilers, from which hot water is pumped to the reheat coils for zone control with a 2-way valve at each reheat coil. Hot water supply temperature is reset from outside air temperature thru a 3-way valve.
Equipmenti
2 refrigeration water chillers 2 hot water boilersi forced draft gas fired 2 fan units
variable volume boxes; single inlet variable volume with reheat as required on the exterior zones
cooling tower; two cell type with sump heaters and winterized protection


equipment continued
return ducts located in the mechanical cores
temperature controls* pneumatic type, the system is
started up automatically by a seven day tiem clock controlling the heat-up every morning until the building comes up to temperature, A second time clock controls the refrigeration and the rest of the system during normal business hours. Thermostats are direct acting and there are key operated time clock by-pass timers provided for off hour operation, for the studios and the library, and evening classes.
Special Heating and Cooling Requirements
There is a retail space of 12,000 square feet and an auditorium of 5000 square feet. These spaces are on separt-ate autonomous systems. Four pipe systems with outside condenser units that have their own controls and heating and coolinsr requirements.


Se'
' I
CD
O


I
i: i
\
god fcro rum
(1 11 0 U i\ 1)
F L 0 O 11 1> L A N
1\ 1:1 <>
The retail space and the lecture hall are served by separate heating systems.


I !
I !
! 12 C 0 N 1)
F L 0 0 11 P L A N F A C IJ L 1 Y
Return and supply air ducts are located in the mechanical core.


w *
\\ v>

0
0 V'
y \> 1

S
\
0
13.V
o^
a^d
\.oc
g.^V
otv
o*

po
*es
, ?
e^v
\me
te*
po
%es
pa^e
Typical la, reheat coils.
\





I F T II F L 0 11 I* L A N
T i: C II N I C A I
I


I X T Ii F L 0 0 R
1* L A N
S IJ 1 P 0




DENVER
Denver is the thriving center of the energy rich Rocky Mountain Region, rapidly expanding with new businesses and development. The delightfully moderate climate, the expanding economy, and the extensive year-round recreational activities make Denver a popular and highly desirable relocation choice for businesses and for employees.
Business has maintained a strong commitment to the Denver Central Business District, the heaviest concentration of employment, financial, and retail activities in the region. The new Sixteenth Street Mall, 13 blocks in length with public transportation available from end to end, is the major retail district of the Rocky Mountain West. The Mall transport terminal is two blocks from Larimer Square. Seventeenth Street, the ten block financial capital of the West, has grown tremendously in the past few years. Skyscrapers have exploded into the Denver skyline, creating the space needed for the growing commercial and corporate activity. This boom has created 13.2 million square feet of office space with an additional 3.4 million now under construction. Retail space has also increased, and is now at 5.9 million square feet.
The population of Colorado has grown to three million with much of this growth in Denver and its suburbs. The Denver Central Business District boasts a daytime population of 100,000 people. In addition, Auraria campus, southwest of Larimer Square, has an enrollment of 40,000 students. Northwest of the Square, great transformations have occurred where the lower downtown warehouse district is fast becoming a fashionable area for relocating office space and housing. Denver will soon have a new 300,000 square foot convention center, topped by a 1,000 room hotel surrounding Union Station, the key building in this district.
Not only has Denvers resident population grown, so has its visitor population. The tourists visiting this state numbered twelve million last year. To accommodate them, Denver offers 11,000 hotel rooms, with an additional 1,350 rooms to be completed in 1983. Set in an expanding central location, Larimer Square draws a solid mix of conventioneers, business people, tourists, students, and after-theatre diners. As Denver grows, so grows the popularity of Larimer Square as the finest entertainment and shopping area in Colorado.


HISTORY
Denver made quite a name for itself in the Old West. The notorious early days of gold and silver, boom and bust, rags to riches and shoot em up are almost gone, but its colorful, glamorous past lives on in Larimer Square. Founded in 1858, by General William E. Larimer, Denver City consisted of only one block during its first yearLarimer Streets 1400 block. This original site blossomed into the very heart of Denvers activities. False-fronted stores, saloons, hotels, and dry goods stores sprang up on Larimer Street to meet the needs of the pioneers and gold seekers. By 1860, Denver City had one hundred fifty homes clustered around the Larimer Square area.
Today, over one-hundred twenty years later, Larimer Square has again become the thriving center of activity for Denver.
Larimer Square, on Denvers famed Larimer Street, between Fourteenth and Fifteenth Streets, consists of eighteen Victorian buildings constructed in the Nineteenth Century, and renovated to recapture the gay and boisterous spirit of Denvers youthful era. In May of 1965, Larimer Square investors began renovation of Denvers most historic block. In 1971, Larimer Square was proclaimed Denvers first Landmark Preservation District, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. Cultural, social, artistic and musical events dot Denvers calendar year, bringing thousands to Larimer Square.
Within this renovated landmark of historic Denver are one hundred thousand square feet of office space above one hundred thousand square feet of retail shops.
City Side