Citation
Final project

Material Information

Title:
Final project design concept plan, rural park design, City of Firestone, Colorado
Alternate title:
Design concept plan, rural park design, City of Firestone, Colorado
Alternate title:
Park development concept plan for Firestone, Colorado
Creator:
Miles, Gary R
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
approximately 175 pages in various pagings : illustrations, charts, maps (some folded), folded plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Parks -- Planning -- Colorado -- Firestone ( lcsh )
Landscape architecture -- Colorado -- Firestone ( lcsh )
Landscape architecture ( fast )
Parks -- Planning ( fast )
Colorado -- Firestone ( fast )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
On cover: Park development concept plan for Firestone, Colorado.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Landscape Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
prepared by Gary R. Miles.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09246236 ( OCLC )
ocm09246236
Classification:
LD1190.A77 1980 .M54 ( lcc )

Full Text
MILBs
PARK
DEVELOPMENT
CONCEPT
PLAN
for
FIRESTONE,
COLORADO
May 1980
ARCHIVES
LD
1190 A77 1980 M54
Prepared
by=
Gary Miles UCD/MLA
AURARIA LIBRARY
U1A701 T7BS3D3


TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION /VP fA6E- ONE /
SUMMARY OF INTRODUCTION LV\^0 fi'l'l*
A. Participants ii
B. The Area ii
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
A. Purpose of the Project
B. Design Objectives
c. Budget 'b.
DESIGN PROCESS
A. Critical task figure 1 diagram I-
SECTION TWO
EXISTING RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES
A. Regional 4
Figure 2 Regional proximity \0-
Figure 3 SCORP Context ll-
B. TRI-AREA
c. Local
NO ACTION ALTERNATIVE n.
SECTION THREE
A BASE DATA ANALYSIS
Figure k TRI-AREA Land Use
Figure 5 TRI-AREA Recreation
Figure 6 FIRESTONE Land Use (GrrouothJ
Figure 7 Utilities Constraints {limiting- factor,^)
Figure 8 Subsidence
Figure 9 Site Inventory
Figure 10 Site Analysis
I £=> 24-'2G.
40-


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I would like to thank the following people, organizations
and businesses for their participation and donations of information
in the form of booklets, maps, and other, and time involved; without
it this project would not have been possible.
I would especially like to thank the people of Firestone
who helped with this study particularly Jim Christiansen, Grant Hatcliff,
Minute Paul, and Gladys Mascarenas.
Businesses:
Globe Enterprises Harvey Young Palmer Gillespie Tom Brunn Denver, Colorado
Hogan and Olhausen Consulting Engineer J.L. Walker Dave Shupe Loveland
Agencies
CGS W. Rahe Junge HCRS Mike Arabe
CCAH Lee Betson USGS -
Mined Land Reclamation
Colo. Dept.of Natural Resources
David E. Shelton
Individuals
E. Alan Rollinger, Land Scape Design, Denver, Colorado National Park Service: Advisory Committee Roy Slat Kavitz, W. Wayne, Gardner, J. Oshea, Bob Dinkley, University of Colorado: Gail Gunter, Daniel Bazil Young, Mark Murphy


SECTION
ONE


SUMMARY OF INTRODUCTION
Participants
1. Client/Sponsor: Planning Commission, Town of Firestone, Colo.
2. Student Project Coordinator/Designer: Gary R. Miles, B.L.A., University of Colorado at Denver, School of Landscape Architecture, Masters Candidate.
3. Citizens Action Group: Chairman, Jim Christiansen
k.
Project Advisors: Roy National Park Service; National Park Service; National Park Service; National Park Service; University of Colorado
Slatkavitz, B.L.A., A.S.L.A.,
James M. O'Shea, B.L.A., A.S.L.A. W. Wayne Gardner, B.L.A.
Robert Dunkley, B.L.A.
Gail Gunter, B.L.A.
Student Advisor
5. University: University of Colorado, College of Environmental Design, Graduate School of Landscape Architecture.
The Area
The Town of Firestone is located approximately 25 miles north of Denver, Colorado and is associated with an area referred to locally as the Tri-Area.
The towns in the Tri-Area, Firestone, Frederick and Dacono, were settled by coal miners around the turn of the century. Most of them were European immigrants.
The entire Tri-Area is imprinted with abandoned subsurface coal mines. The surrounding area is flat rolling prairie and irrigated farmland that is dotted with oil and natural gas production equipment.
Interstate 25 opened a major access corridor into Denver in I960 and sporadic growth ensued.
Large annexations of farm land has occurred, but development there is hampered because of oil and gas well development and limitations of the sanitation system and available water.
Growth in Firestone from 1975 to 1980; however, has increased its population from approximately 500 to approximately 1200 persons, and current construction is continuing, although slowed by the affect of current high home loan interest rates.


The influx of population is generally, white middle class, young, married couples with children. This increase in population has outgrown the small, one half block by one half block park, and created a demand for development of recreational opportunities.
An inventory of the existing park recreation opportunities is included in the appendix, Figure
An inventory of regional recreation opportunities appears in figure 2.


DESIGN PROCESS
Phase I: Develop Program Need and Criteria
Step 1: Assemble Base Data Natural Elements
Soils (surficial/subsurficial)
Climatology
Wildlife
Topography, flood plain Vegetation Water bodies Views, features, sounds
Man Made Elements
Existing and Proposed Land Use (Tri-Area)
Mine locations
Recreational Opportunities (Regional, Local) Utilities/sewer, electric, gas, and others Establish funding alternatives search
Historical and Archeological Factors Ordinances Zoning
Legal Boundaries
Step 2: Establish Citizen Advisory Group Establish Funding Committee
Phase II: Assemble and evaluate Determine recommendations
Step 1: Analysis of Base Data
Step 2: Develop Base Maps and Record Analysis
Step 3: Review with Thesis Advisory Group CAG -Firestone Planning Commission
Phase III: Develop Program Alternatives/Relationships
Step 1: Compare with social/demographic Recreation Survey
Step 2: Compare with standard


PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Purpose of the Project
The primary objectives are to demonstrate and continue to expand my level of ability relative to the practice of landscape architecture. To accomplish this objective, the Town of Firestone park design problem was selected because it represents a typical professional problem which offers a diversity of opportunities to put into practice the variety of skills and knowledge which characterize a professional landscape architect.
The project represents an overall measure of ones abilities to
* develop and implement a problem solving approach
* apply the principles and elements of design in developing plans that are functional as well as aesthetically pleasing
* prepare preliminary and final cost estimates and project reports
* communicate and interact with all concerns (college staff as well as client)
Design Objectives
* Document a need for a park through a survey of social demographic recreation requirements
* Establish spatial allocations to fulfill suryey results
* Provide citizen input into planning and decision making.
* Encourage Community support and co-operation to develop funding efforts and construction of the final design.
* Research and report on sources of supplemental funding.
* Maximize potential design for local community construction.
* Develop pride in the project within the community to reduce vandalism.
a. develop vandal resistant designs
b. develop townlogo graphic
Budget
Preliminary estimate ................... ... .$600.00
Actual Expenditures
Travel (mileage). ............ ... .................
Film (slides) ........................................
Telephone.............................................
Graphic supplies......................................
Typing................................................
Reproduction..........................................
Maps and reports......................................
Time (hours)
Proposal, research and development....................
Basemaps and Graphics .................... ......
Final report writing..................................
Maps and Graphics................................
Travel time ..........................................
TOTAL


LOCATION FIGURE 2


Phase IV:
Select alternative and refine
Step 1: Develop draft report
Submit to Final Rroject Review Committee
Step 2: Develop final Graphics
Step 3: Refine final report
Phase V: Present Final Project Report


SECTION TWO


PARKS AND RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES
100 Mile Radius
Pawnee National Grassland
Rocky Mountain National Park scenic hiking, fishing, horseback camping
Boony Reservoir camping, fishing, swimming, boating Jackson Reservoir swimming, boating, fishing, camping
50 Mile Radius
Carter /Lory Reservoir camping, picnic, hiking, boating BarbourPonds camping, picnic, horseback, row boating.
Boyd Lake camping, swimming, boating, concessions
Barr Lake State Park,- nature trail, Horseback, hiking, sail boating
Denver Metro area Cherry Creek Reservoir, all other amenities
TRI-AREA
Dacono Public swimming poo^; play lot
Frederick: Public Park; picnic with shelter and z* tables 1 basket ball court with two baskets; open space and young plantings, (approx. 1/2 city block total park area)
Public Schools:
Elementary large playground, small play lot, baseball diamond (sand lot) gymnasium
Highschool Football field surrounded by cinder track, basket ball courts, gymnasium
Firestone: Zf picnic tables, no shelter, one regulation size tennis
court with two baskets; play area with swings, climbing aparatus sand; drinking fountain, paths; established large trees; no open space.
SCORP (State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan)
The Town of Firestone is located in Weld County, Colorado. Weld County and Larimer County comprise SCORP Area II.
The SCORP Plan is the States analysis of a demand survey and assessment of need for each of fifty-six outdoor recreation activities in each of the States thirteen planning regions.
The town of Firestone is in a SCORP Area II subregion catagorized as sandhills sagebrush. Specific to only the overall region however, were found demands for recreation in ice skating on a rink; swimming in a pool; picnicing at a picnic area; game playing on a playground on marked fields, and in open spaces; hiking on trails; bicycling on trails or paths.


SCORP Area II
Regional population 233*650
% State population 8.5
Growthrate 1970-75 30.4
% of population residing
urban metro 56.k
rural farm 32.8
% of population median income
under $5,000 35.2
between $5-10,000 37.8
over $10,000 27.0
For further information see Appendix in this report.
Firestone comprises less than 1% of the SCORP Area II populatio High competition for match-in-grant funding exists state-wide and Firestone has little political leverage when applying for priority funding.
Until a new series of procedures is adopted, a January 1972 amendment to the 1970 Comprehensive Plan will be upheld. This amendment defines minimum recreation facility needs for any political subdivision or public agency with recreation responsibilities. Regional needs simply do not depict the local situation accurately enough in all cases. Contingent upon local support, they are to include necessary land acquisition, and consist of:
". one picnic area, one playground, minimal walk and bike paths, minimal open space and one ball field (single or combination type), all with adequate capacity for local needs.
for the above agencies, where a population greater than 1,500 is involved, these additional needs are recognized: tennis courts, basketball courts, one swimming pool, and one rodeo arena."
This project is designed to fulfill this mandate.


I
I
<
p
SCORP PROXIMITY FIGURE 3


12
No Action Alternative
Population is continuing to rise and the cost and availability of petroleum products creates a situation of increased nearhome recreation opportunities. A no action stance will not satisfy current or future needs of the community. Recreation requirements have surpassed the capacity of the existing city park, requiring the use of facilities and areas outside the Town of Firestone. As the population increases larger numbers of people will be influenced by the cost and availability of fuels thereby creating greater demands on properties such as the proposed park. Existing facilities in the Tri-Area are inadequate and currently in over-demand, if the Firestone park is not developed, the result will be a health and welfare hazard.



REGIONAL
RECREATION
FIGURED
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DENVER.
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SECTION III


Off-site factors
Land Use Patterns
Land to the south is mixed with multifamily residence directly adjacent and single family indirectly located two blocks south and east. Projected construction for the multifamily area is 72 apartments and 60 townhouses that comprises 27% of the 40 acres being developed. 101 single family residences are projected for development comprising 64.5% of the 40 acres. The park comprise the remaining 8.5% of the Globe Annexation.
Directly adjacent to the west is a 5 acre parcel of non-annexed land. Currently this parcel is unoccupied and laying fallow.
A substantial portion of this land is severely undermined by abandoned coal mines with a 150 to 200 foot depth of cover; use for this area under Colorado regulation is open space.
Adjacent to the north is the Zadel Annexation. The current projected use for this land is 1 acre residential. Due to subsidence hazard the property immediately to the north is also open space oriented and would compliment development of the Globe 3.4 acres.
Property on the east is non-annexed agricultural. Globe enterprises holds an option 40 acres in this area and open space will again be a prime factor due to undermining subsidence hazard. Oil and gas production equipment are also located in this area.
The character of the Globe annexation is typical of residential development. It is contrasted against the older part of town by the lack of mature vegetation such as trees, shrubs, lawns and fences, and a general "newlook".
A link to the Tri-Area Hike/Bike Trail System will occur through this neighborhood along 5th Street and would have a link to the existing park in Firestone, connect to the Globe Park and then continue north through the Zadel Annexation. The trail system on the South would link to the highschool in Frederick, swimming in Dacono and a variety of other activities and experiences. This trail system would provide an access corridor through the Tri-Area and in essence would eliminate the auto-pedestrian and bike conflict.
Major traffic routes are along Grant Avenue on the north and 1st Street (5 blocks west of the proposed new park site).
Drainage in the Firestone area is essentially to the west through the town to an area near the railroad track where it enters an intermittent streambed and is carried off to the north.
Access to the park from the town is achieved for the most part along low traffic residential sidewalks. Globe enterprises is providing for some access through the multi-family residential area.


Wildlife
The variety of wildlife on and near the site is minimal due to its location to the town, lack of a source of water and the low vegetation. Endangered species on the site are non-existent although sitings of overflights of the Perigren Falcon and Whooping Cranes are documented.
In a conversation with Robert J. Tully, Chief, Wildlife Management, Colorado Division of Wildlife; he expressed the opinion that development of the park would act as a positive element. Addition of plant materials such as trees, shrubs and grasses etc. would enhance a wider variety of wildlife. Trees would encourage a wider variety of birds to visit and nest on the site, shrubs and prairie type grasses would provide security and habitat for field mice, moles and other wildlife, providing a natural element to the park experience.


Environmental Factors
A. Climatology
Mean
Mean
Mean
Mean
Mean
Mean
Mean
Mean
Mean
Mean
average, annual precipitation 10-15 inches
average, annual snowfall 40-60 inches
average, July temperature +70 F. extreme +104 F.
average, January temperature +25 F. extreme -10 F,
average annual number of clear days 140-130
Summer noon sun angle 73 1/2
23 1/2
(storms) NE $ 15 W
Winter noon sun angle Winter wind direction Summer wind direction
average sunshine 70% of available hours
B. Surficial Soil Analysis
(Coming from Hogan and Olhausen, Loveland, Colorado)
C. Subsurface soil conditions on adjacent property
The subsurface soil conditions are fairly uniform consisting of topsoil, sandy clay or clayey sand varying in depths of 2 to 9 feet overlying the sandstone or claystone bedrock. The sandy clay and clayey sand are very similar in appearance and only an experienced soil engineer can tell the difference. The material is fine grained, dry and has some 1/2" to 1" stones. It is medium dense and is nonexpansive. The sandstone is hard, has claystone lenses (which are expansive) and is lightly cemented. The sandstone becomes firmer with depth. No water was observed in any of the borings during the drilling operation.
Foundation Recommendations
The selection of the Foundation type for given situation and structure is governed by two basic considerations. First, the foundation must be designed so as to be safe against shear failure in the underlying soils; and second, differential settlement or other vertical movement of the foundation must be controlled at a reasonable level.
Two basic controlls are available in selecting the foundation type and allowable loads. These are the standard penetration test and consolidation-swell testing.
The sandy clay or clayey sand overburden is an excellent strata on which to place foundations. It is non-swelling and has excellent strength characteristics in its natural state. It is recommended that structures placed on this strata are designed for a maximum soil bearing pressure of 1,500 psf. At this bearing pressure settlement of the soil


/l/b-
will not exceed maximum allowed by Uniform Building Code. Should foundation soils become saturated then settlement will become excessive. Great care should be taken to provide positive drainage away from structures during and after the construction phase.
"Slabs should be constructed "free floating", isolated from all bearing members, reinforced with wire mesh, and joined frequently. Slabs on grade should be underlain with a k inch layer of clean gravel or crushed rock to help distribute floor loads and provide a capillary break. Positive drainage should be provided for the gravel underlayment to prevent pooling of water beneath the slab. Slabs should be under lain with a vapor barrier.
Backfill around the outside perimeter of the structure should be compacted at an optimum moisture or above, to at least 90% of standard proctor density as determined by ASTM Test D698.
Since soil conditions have been known to change radically within short distances, Hogan and Olhausen recommend that a soils engineer inspect all excavations prior to placing concrete.
For engineering characteristics, see appendix.
Influencing Factors and Consequences
See: Site Analysis Figure 8
A variety of constraints affect the development of the park.
The number one constraint is the ATT communication line that bisects the site. Depth of cover over this line is k to 4 1/2 feet, and must be kept at that minimum. No structures can be built on or within the 16 foot right-of-way, and no excavation should be attempted without careful examination and location of the line due to the $20,000 a minute repair cost should the ATT Line be severed.
Another major influence is the abandoned subsurface coal mine. Unpredictable subsidence is likely to occur at its worst near them, therefore placement of structures is not recommended within 150 feet although placement anywhere on this site requires careful subsurface examination, and is strongly encouraged by the Colorado Geological Survey. Floating structures on the surface is the procedure recommended by the engineering firm of Hogan and Olhausen, Loveland, Colorado.
The third major constraint is budget. Due to a lack of money its essential that the town establish a 501 (c) (3) tax exempt foundation to channel tax deductable donations. It is also necessary to organize^ publicize^nd implement a variety of fund raising activities. It is further proposed that the town establish a citizen construction group to defray labor costs and establish community pride in preservation of the park.


FINAL
PROJECT
Gary Miles
UNIVERSIT Y COLOR ADO DENVER
(G
SCHOOl Of l ANDSC APi ARCHITECTURE
TRI-AREA
FIGURE 5
MAY 1980
MAP DATA COURTESY Tri-Area Comp Plan U.S.G.S.



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FINAL PROJECT Gary Miles
UNIVERSIT Y COLOR ADO DENVER
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Water rights have not been obtained for the park. A serious attempt to acquire sufficient water to establish and maintain a park is necessary and should be begun immediately.
I
The possibility of the potential for reopening the coal mines was explored. The Colorado Mined Land Reclamation completed a study of the area recently and concluded that resumption of coal mining was remote.
The existing site, 3 1/2 acres, is not large enough to satisfy a variety of recreation needs if development occurs. Therefore it is recommended that the citizens actively pursue the aquisition of the adjacent non-annexed 5 acres.
PARK DEFICITS AND CONCLUSIONS
Regardless of which standard is used, the Town of Firestone has a minimum of 8 acres deficit and a maximum 12 acre deficit and within the Tri-Area a 20.5 acre minimum deficit exists.
The 3.48 acres currently under study is atleast a beginning in the over coming of this deficit, and can provide for a variety of activities.
RECREATION SURVEY
To best determine spatial allowance and recreation activities requirements,a survey was conducted in the Town of Firestone in the month of February and May, 1980


34-
city OF FIRESTONE PRIORITY LIST
1. Picnic Tables and Benches Grass for Playing and Sitting Playground for Children
2. A Place to Enjoy Nature's Beauty
3. Sitting areas to watch children play
4. An open informal playing area
5. Soft-ball field with backstop and fence Tennis Courts
6. Shelter from Sun and Wind
7. A quiet place to rest and relax
8. A place to sit and enjoy other people's activities 9 Bar-B-Q- pits
10. Walking paths
11. Horseshoe Pits
12. Sitting Areas away from Children
13. Bicycling Paths
An Informal Jr. Football/soccer field
14. Coin Operated Night Lights
15. Jogging Paths
16. Area for outdoor concerts/dancing Shuffle Board
17



SUMMARY OF THE RECREATION SURVEY
70 percent of the population is in the most active age group, 875 people between the ages of 6 years and 1+0 years of age. The difference in age levels necessitates a wide variety of activities are required, some are active some are passive. Within the past four years 6k percent of the families moved to Firestone. One-third of this group moved into the Town within the last year. 88 percent of the households surveyed indicated a desire to remain in ti e neighborhood. This figure indicates a highly stable population.
65 percent of the families surveyed indicated a desire and willingness to participate in the construction of the park.
65 percent of the families surveyed used the existing Town Park. 33 percent indicated usage on a year-round basis and 67 percent used the park in the summertime only. Indicating a need for more open space.
Specific park oriented needs were surveyed. The users expressed a high degree of need for the following: picnic tables,
and benches, a place to enjoy nature's beauty, a playground for children with seating for adults, an open informal play area, a soft-ball field with a back-stop and fencing, shelter from sun and wind, and a quiet place to rest and relax.
Other expressed needs and a prioritized list can be found in the appendix of this report.
Park User
The majority of the people in Firestone are classified as white middle class, medium income, American. Their interests in recreation and park activities include baseball, football, tennis, general open space, plat lot and picnicing. This group is interested in these activities and would use the area on a year round basis. A high percentage of the people surveyed expressed strong feelings of responsibility toward improvement of their area. The community has a history of designing and implementing projects, and a great potential exists that this group would follow through implementation of the new park project, as 90% of the residents own their own home currently.


SECTION FOUR


PROGRAM
Entry Control Building Paths
Open Space Playground Parking Picnicing Playfield (s)
(Maintenance, RR)
Plants
Screening
Basketball
Tennis
Horseshoe Pit Football
PROGRAM RELATIONSHIPS
1. Restroom/Maintenance
A. Path
B. Parking
2. Picnicing Playfields/Open Space
A. D. Playground
B. Restroom E. Paths
c. Parking F. Plants
3. Screening
A. Parking D. Noise
B. Playfield E. Picnicing
c. Poor views
k. Basketball
A. Parking
B. Restroom
c. Path
5. Tennis
A. Parking
B. Restroom
c. Path
6. Horseshoe Pit
A. Parking c. Restroom
B. Picnicing D. Path
7. Football
A. Parking
B. Path
c. Restroom
8. Restroom
A. Visibility
B, Equal Access
C. Access (Maintenance)
9. Maintenance Area
A. Entry Control
B. Access


Design Concept
A very high degree of interest has been expressed in the need for a baseball diamond (night lighted), picnic areas v/ith bar-b-que facilities, a childrens play area, tennis courts? basketball courts, trees and shrubs and general use open space, with trees and shrubs.
It is generally expressed that the baseball diamond, childrens play area and picnic area would receive the highest and most immediate use.
The current 3.^-8 acres is not sufficient to fulfill current needs.therefore, an effort must be undertaken to obtain the adjacent 5 acres of non-annexed land and the park design should be accomplished that takes this factor into consideration for future expansion. Use areas should be age group seperated to minimize conflicts.
An organizational system must be established which will allow organized sports, picnicing, open space activities and childs play area to occur simultaneously without competition for space. Their various noise levels and physical presence should be best located as to each specific need, and land use efficiency.
Maintenance, staffing and operation of the park in a prearranged methodology must be established to insure that success of the park.
Summertime educational experiences are an opportunity that should be explored and developed to fulfill the wants and needs of the community. Potential exists for arts and crafts for adults and children, visiting concerts,and band wagons, art fairs, square dancing and so on. Community interest should be established and specific goals should be developed.
Off street parking should be provided to insure the safety of the users.
Views into and off the site should be provided to ensure security and to minimize vandalism, and to maximize the views of the town and front range.
Due to the noise associated with active sports, all organized sports should be located where their impact is least disruptive to the community.
Childrens play activities should be placed where they are accessible to highest numbers of users visible from as many places as possible in a separate space from major recreation activities, and direct access to restrooms. Bike racks should be provided.
Buffers between use areas should be provided to assure use and spatial separation and definition.


Relation of Park to Surrounding
The park should act as a buffer between the conflicting land uses of residential homes and agriculture,as well as oil and gas production.
Linkage to the Tri-Area trail system should be ensured to provide an access safety corridor and greenbelt between the communities.
Future open space development should be planned to provide linkage and continuity to the community.
Relation of Use Areas to Site
Since the site contains relatively moderate slopes, positive drainage should be provided to discourage subsidence. However organized activities should be located on the flatest slopes to reduce grading costs if possible.
Picnic and open space areas should be placed to act as a buffer from the childrens play area and the high activity area, with direct access to parking restrooms, and trash receptacles.
Parking areas should be located to provide direct access to picnic and open space areas while seperated from the childrens play area.
Internal circulation should reflect site use and orientation to spatial allocations, while providing a series or variety of experiences.
Spatial Experiences
Due to the different experiences in use zones, compartmentalizing these use units with planting masses or in topographic pockets with planting material can serve to reinforce use and intended views and circulation.
Plant Material Selection
Plant material can and should be used to provide order and variety to the user, but be compatable with the high plains arrid situation in which it exists. A large variety of native and adaptive plant material is available to provide an experience of color, form and texture to the design, however, due to the smallness of the area scale becomes an important factor^as well as grouping of plant material versus a haphazard spotting of trees and other plants. A table of watering requirements and a listing of native plants appears in the appendix of this report.
Location Uses
The two major determinants of location uses is the subsidence potential and the 16 foot ATT right-of-way. The careful placement of structures, paved surfaces, and excavations must be fully explored. Severance of the ATT Communication Line is prohibitively costly and placement of structures near the abandoned subsurface coal mines is discouraged.


Summary
Careful attention to spatial functions, with order and variety that respond to surface patterns and an organized use system linked by an overlap of uses can be established to provide a wide variety of recreational needs for the Town of Firestone. Paving and surface materials for specific use areas appears in the appendix of this report.


mi>M\ 1qcAfall L PROVIDE FOR VARIETY IN USE
SECTION A no scale
CONCEPTUAL SKETCHES
O

Play lot
u
Dyw.
PROVIDE UNIQUENESS
5

1 fraiudi
SECTION B
no scale
SCREEN CONFLICTS
Cl^l inr |r



Funding:
Design Funds
Application will be made by the Town of Firestone later in the year to the National Endowment for the Arts in Design Program, for a grant for funds to obtain working drawings and specifications.
Construction and Equipment Funds
The following list is a compilation of potential sources of funding:
Colorado Humanities Program Boulder 422-7298 Exxon Company Barbara Maniscalo 778-3550 HUD (Housing and Urban Development)
Coors Foundation Gates Foundation Storage Technology Atlantic Richfield Stearns Rogers Johns-Manville Public Service Company Western Electric Martin Marietta
Samsonite (Comprehensive Education and Training Act)
CETA/DOL (Department of Labor)
CCAH (Colorado Council/Arts and Humanities, Lee Betton)
HUD Programs
Open Space and Urban Beautification Grants/Rehabilitation Aids and Programs
Specific Uses: Provide parks and other recreation, conservation and scenic areas or preserve historic places. Urban beautificatc and improvement includes such activities as street landscaping, park improvements, tree planting and up grading of malls and squares.
Relocation payments are provided for individuals, families and businesses displaced by land acquisition. Terms: up to 50 percent reimbursed for park and recreation areas.
Who may apply: State and local agencies.
Specific Requirements: Assisted open space activities must be part of an area-wide open-space acquisition and development program which, in turn is consistent with area wide comprehensive planning.
Related Programs: Urtan Renewal; Urban Planning Assistance; Outdoor Recreation and Parks Programs of Department of Interior; Neighborhood Facilities Program of HUD.


IV ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT
i
The park site currently is fallow undeveloped arrid, high plains land subject to wind and runoff erosion. Development of a park with associated plant material would serve to enhance the site through soil stabilization. Development of positive drainage on this relatively flat site would act as a positive_element in not creating a subsidence situation. The runoff from this site would contribute to down line subsurface aquifer recharge system that it is associated with. The creation of open space with plant material would further enhance the wild life corridor in and through the area.
Construction impact would be minimized due to the type and scope of development proposed for the site as well as activities prescribed.
SUMMARY CONCLUSION
At the outset of this project a variety of tasks and procedures had to be established and individual roles identified-However, since cooperation and dedication of the people to see it happen is essentially the core of this final product.
The next phase of the project is the development plan and details, of which Grant-in-aid Funding should be applied for to cover the costs involved, and a copy of this report will be submitted to the State of Colorado for consideration and review for the Land, Water, Conservation, Funding Match In Grant Aid.
Further alternative funding sources will be persued vigorously to see that implementation will occur.




APPENDIX


SITE DESCRIPTION
1. Legal Description:
Considering the North line of the Northeast Quarter of said section as bearing East and with all bearings contained herein relative thereto:
A Parcel of Land
Beginning at the Northwest corner of said Northeast Quarter; thence along the North line of said Northeast Quarter East 330.00 feet; thence parallel with the Northsouth centerline of said Section 30 South 00O/3837" East 30.00 feet to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING: thence continuing South 00 38'37" East 594.17 feet to the beginning of a curve concave to the Northwest having a central angle of 45oo,oo" and a radius of 120.00 feet, a radial line through said point bears South 00 38,37" East; thence Northeasterly along the arc of said curve 94.25 feet to the end of said curve; thence tangent from said curve North 44 21*23 East 123.83 feet to the beginning of a tangent curve concave to the Southeast having a central angle of 45 02'27" and a radius of 180.00 feet; hence Northeasterly along the arc of said curve 141.50 feet to the end of said curve, a radial line through said end of curve bears North 00 36'10" West; thence parallel with the North-South centerline of the Northwest Quarter of said Northeast Quarter 00 36'10" West ifl5.37 feet; thence parallel with the North line of said Northeast Quarter West 300.14 feet more or less to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING.
The above-described parcel contains 3.43 acres, more or less
2. The site features a sandy, clay or clayey sand with undefined standing mixed grasses and weeds. Access is currently from the North of Grant Avenue. The site is biscented from North to South by an A.TT. burried powerline right-of-way.
ENGINEERING CHARACTERISTICS
Engineering Characteristics of Soil
Stability when loaded Fair
Stability when frozen Poor
Drainage Fair
As bearing for foundation or road Fair
As bearing for permanent roads Poor
As a material for light roads if stabilized For adobe construction Good
to Good to Good
to Good to Fair Good
Other Characteristics
Value as subgrade when not subject to frost Potential Frost action Permeability when compacted
Shearing strength when compacted and saturated Compressibility when compacted and saturated Workability as construction material
Poor to Fair
slight to high
impervious
Good to Fair
Low
Good


Source
PARK STANDARDS
Facility
Acres/people
Standard size of site
Chapin playground 1 acre/800 5-10 acres
local park 1 acre/1000 2 or more acres
rec-center 1 acre/1000 15 to 20 acres
playfield 1 acre/800 10-30-acres
techiara & local park 1.22 acres/1000
Koppleman Regional Park 3.5 acres/1000
and Recreation
Association
(NPRA)
Pocket Park Neigh. Park Comm. Park Regional Park baseball diamond so ftball tennis court basketball swimming comm, center Golf Course
I acre/1000
2.5 acres/1000
2.5 acres/1000
20.5 acres/1000
II field/600 1 field/3000 1 court/500 1 court/500
15 ft. 2/3 % pop. 1 center/10,000 18 holes/25,000
1+ acres 5-10 acres 5-10 acres +50 acres
Future growth and land useSee future development plan (s) for Firestone, Frederick, Dacono, Alan M. Voorhees & Assoc. Inc. Denver, 1972


Tri-Area Occupational Relationships 1975 Soutce: Tri-Area comprehensive plan 1977
Professional Technical 15.9%
Management, Administration 8.0%
Sales 7.6%
Clerical 3.5%
Craftsman incl. Transport 25.1%
Laborer (non-farm) 13.3%
Farm occupations .3%
Service 10.1%
Tri-Area Ethnic Breakdown 1976
Source: The Ethnic breakdown of St. Vrain Valley Schools
Oct, 1976 Tri-Area Comprehensive Plan
Student Enrollment Jr. High Elementary
Indian 3 2
Black 0 1
Asian 1 8
Hispanic 78 171
White 215
Total Minority 82 (27.6%) 182 (29.5%)


RECOMMENDED SURFACINGS FOR RECREATION AREAS RELATED TO DENSITY
Kind of Area
General Recreation Area
Special play areas: Child service play Games Courts
Underplay Apperatus
Crafts, storytelling
Outdoor parties, dancing, roller skating etc.
Local play areas for small children
For all age groups
Sitting Areas
Low & Moderate Density
Turf, natural soil
80% turf, 20% concrete Bitinimous Concrete,
Portland Cement, Concrete Sandclay, Turf
Light loam, sand, tari bark, saw dust, shavings, turf
Any smooth hard surface
Any smooth hard surface
Turf, natural soil, and smooth hard surface
Turf, bituminous concrete, Portland Cement, Concrete
Bituminous Concrete, Portland Cement, Brick Precast Concrete Slabs Flagstone
High Density
Bitinimous concrete, sandclay natural soil
80% turf, 20% concrete Bitinimous Concrete Portland Cement, Concrete Sandclay-Cork asphalt
Light loam, sand, tari bark, saw dust, shavings
Any hard surface or turf
Any hard smooth surface
Principally smooth hard surface-some turf
Bituminous Concrete Cork, Asphalt, Portland Cement
Concrete


NATIVE PLANTING
Due to severe water availability, the arrid condition and poor high*alkaline soils, a planting design utilizing native plants accustomed to the Colorado soils and climate is recommended. Establishment of the plant material is less difficult and less costly in the long term, and the use of native plants could reduce consumption of water by 25 percent.
Plant water requirements
Schedule #1 little watering
1st year soak every two weeks 2nd year soak every three weeks 3rd year soak once a month
I+th year water only during extended dry periods
Schedule #2 some watering
1st year soak every two weeks 2nd year soak every two weeks 3rd year soak every three or four weeks
Schedule #3 much watering
1st year soak twice a week 2nd year soak once a week 3rd year soak every two weeks
Native and apt plants
Decidious trees (N-native) (A-apt)
Common Hackberry Celtis Occidentalis (N)
Russian Olive Elaeangus angustifolia (A)
Narrowleaf Popular Populus angustifolia (N)
Plains Popular Populus sargenti (N)
Lance leaf Popular Populus acuninata (N)
Quaking Aspen Populus tremuloides (N)
American Plum Prunus Americana (N)
Peach leaf Willow Salix amygdaloides (N)
Evergreen trees
One-seed juhiper juniperous monosperm (N)
Rocky Mountain Juniper Juniperous Scopulorum (N)l
Colorado Spruce Picea pungeus (N) 3 Bristlecone Pine Pinus aristata (N) 2 Colorado Pinon Pine Pinus cebroides edulis (N) 1 Ponderosa Pine Pinus ponderosa (N) 1 Douglas Fir Pseudotsuga taxifolia (N) 2
water schedule
2
1
3
3
3
2
2
3
1


Decidious Shrubs
Rocky Mountain Maple Acer glabrutn (N) 2
Amur Maple Acer ginnala (N) 2
Tatarian Maple Acer tataricum (N) 2
Indigobush Amorpha Amorpha fruiticosa (N) 1-2-3
Sagebrush Artemesia Sp (N) 1
True Mountain Mahogeny Cercocarpus montanus (N) 1 Colorado Redosier Dogwood Cornus stolonifera Colorado ensis (N) 3 Yellowstem Dogwood Cornus stolonifera flaviramea (A) 3 Mountain Ninebark Physocarpus monogynus (N) 2
Bush Cinguefoil Potentilla fruiticosa (N) 2
Sand Cherry Prunus besseyi (N) 3
Western Chokecherry Prunus virginiana demissa (N) 2
Gambel (scrub) Oak Quercus garabeli (N) 2
Rocky Mountain Sumac Rhus glabra cismontana (N) 1 Three leaf (skunkbush) Sumac Rhustrilobata (N) 1
Whitestem Gooseberry Ribes inerme (N) 3
Wildrose Rosa Sp. (N) 1
Thimbelberry (Boulder Respberry) Rubus deliciousus (N) 2
Evergreen and Broadleaf shrubs
Curl leaf Mountain mahoganey Cercocarpus ledifolia (N) 1
Mountain Common Juniper Juniperus communis saxitalis (N) 2
Oregongrape Mahonia aquifolia (A) 3
Mugo Pine Pinus mugho mugus (A) 2
Ground Covers
KiumKinnick (Bearberry) Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (N) 2
Russytoes Antemaria sp. (N) 2
Clematis Clematis sp. (N) 2
Barrel cactus Echinocactus sp. (N) 1
Pin cushion cactus Mamillaria sp. (N) 1
Prickly Pear Cactus Opinita sp. (N) 1
Small soapweed (Spanish Bayonet) yucca glauca (N) 1
Grasses
Giantreed Arundo donax (A) 3
Blue Avena (Animated oatgrass) Avena Sterilis (A) 2 Buffalograss Buchloe dactyloides (N) 2
Side Oats gamma Bouteloua curtipenda (N) 2
Blue Grama Bouteloua gracilis (N) 2
Blue Fescue Festuca ovina glavca (A) 2
Pampasgrass Cortaderia selloana (A) 2 **
* Does well in drought
** Wind break or fenceton
** Subject to winterburn in southern exposure


APPENDIX
TO
TOWN OF FIRESTONE, COLORADO


V
lb
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 (303) 629-2755
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE DESIGN VI FINAL PROJECT GUIDELINES
I. Project Qualifications:
1. The project must be~V'publ icr in nature and involve a client.
Public means for a public agency or body and the "plan" or project wi 11 be ,used_or.-.benefiX_the_publ iCy
2. The project should be one that would not be done if you were not available to do it It should not be a project that would have been done by a professional office. The client or sponsor should also agree that if the project goes to development or implementation "A professional ^hould be involved prior to any work proceeding."
3. You must have an expert advisor'to work with you in addition to your client and department faculty.
4. You may have a sponsor that may pay all direct expenses, but you may
r, not receive any personnal financial benefits. Sponsor and client
may be the same. *. /
5. The project must have some form of public involvement^ ex. public
! meetings, neighborhood action groups, advisory groups, etc.
II. Project Report Content
1. Summary Statement
A description of the basic project,(physical and social) along with the basic concepts or hypothesis used to derive the solution, also a brief description of the proposed solution.
2. Historical Review
A. A review of the history of the area and land use type.
B. A description of the potential future of the area or project without your proposed action (no action alternative).
3. Methodology
A. A description of the methodology including dates, process, techniques, proceedures and personnal responsibilities descriptions.
B. Bibliography of similar methodologies.
4. Design Criteria
A clear statement of the design criteria developed through public participation, analysis, and literature search.
5. Site analysis
A description of the physical factor that will effect the project and how you expect to respond to them.
6. A plan
A specfic plan that shows what the project is to be like when comoleted. If:
A. Site oriented: an illustrated plan with sketches.
B. Land use oriented: a land use plan with detailed description of land use t'/De and development standards.


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE DESIGN VI FINAL PROJECT GUIDELINES Page 2
Page 17
C. Process: a clear description of the process and designation of responsibilities.
7. Implementation:
A clear description of how the plan should be implemented including as appropriate: schedules, cost or budget estimates, personnel.
8. Impact Analysis:
This will include an objective assessment of the social, economic, or ecological impact of the project as compared to the "No action" alternative.
III. Dates and Deadlines
1. Project approved November 15, 1979
2. Project proposal December 19, 1979
3. Review appointments every two weeks from January 21.
4. Jury review submittal May 2, 1980.
5. Final jury, review and approval May 12, 1980.
6. Imcompletes filed by May 14, 1980.
IV. Documentation standards
You will be expected to meet certain minimum standards for preparing
your final project report for approval. The failure to do so will be
considered grounds for returning the document for revision before
approval.
1. Reproduction: All documents will be prepared in such a manner that it can be easily reproduced in quantity by oziald, zerox, or photographic methods. You will retain all originals on file and submit only copies for review. Submit 1_ copy to the department by final review.
2. Index: All reports, studies and sets of drawings or maps will have a table of contents or index system indicating the location of all sections of texts or graphics.
3. Cover sheet: All reports, studies, or set of maps will have a protective cover sheet front and back. Project name and document name will appear on the front sheet, or cover.
4. Title page: All reports and studies will have inside title sheets that contain the following: Project name, document name, client name and address, your name, class, instructor, advisor, university name and submittal date.
5. Titles: All graphics and major sections of text shall have clear descriptive titles, readable at a minimum of one meter distance.
In all cases the titles shall be larger than or separate from the text.
6. Text: All text should be clear to the average reader and conform to the basic rules of grammar and spelling. All text shall be readable at 3' (three feet) min. or intended presentation distance. All lettering within a block of text shall be consistant in size and character. Lettering styles can be freehand with guidelines, typed, transfer typed, or leroy. The styles can be mixed but should read
* as a consistant whole.


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE DESIGN VI FINAL PROJECT GUIDELINES Page 3
7. Sources: All information used on maps, reports, or studies shall be referenced as to sources. Reference-cited format will be used for reference credit in all studies and reports (Campbell, 1974). The submittal of unreferenced material will be considered plagerism and be treated- as such.
8. Project boundary: The project boundary shall appear on all maps of the project area and be so labelled.
9. Scale, North and Contours: All maps will have a labelled and graphi scale and north arrow. On all topographic maps the contour interval will be indicated and at least every fifth contour labelled.
10. Binding: All multiple page documents shall be securely bound.
The binding will hold when the pages are severely shaken and will allow the document to be layed open without difficulty.
11. Graphic: All graphics shall be clear and easily read by a layman. All graphics should be of a.quality equal to or better than those on closed reserve, under the instructor's name in the library.
12. Process Clarity: All documents shall be prepared and presented in such a manner that the process and values used to develop them will be apparent to anyone read it.


rage
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 (303) 629-2755
THESIS PROJECT PROPOSAL GUIDELINES LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE DESIGN STUDIO 5
I. SUMMARY INTRODUCTION
A. Situation summary
1. Who: major participants
2. What: what are you doing
3. Where: project area location (location map)
B. Purpose
1. Purpose of document
2. Purpose of project
C. Objectives
1. Educational objectives (what you will learn)
2. Project objective (what the project will do for people)
II. SITUATION STATEMENT
A. Goal Statement
The goal is the first and most general statement in the process used to define what the client sees and feels as the needs to be fulfilled and the good to be obtained by doing the proposed project. The goal statement should describe the hoped-for results, and maybe even the ideal situation.
B. Objectives
Objectives are statements that describe in specific, observable and measurable terms, what the final design is to dc_ for the people. Objectives are a clarification of the goals and several objectives may be needed to make one goal clear.
C. Site
Describe the obvious physical features on and near the site. If available, include legal property boundary, topographic map, location map, landforms description, access, vegetation and any major off-site features. This should be done from what is known now without extensive information collection.
D. Uses
Describe the existing and proposed uses of the site. The condition of the existing uses can serve as a good indication as to the site's potential and should be described. Unless the client is absolutely certain of the proposed use, list a range of feasible uses that will be considered in preparing the site analysis and program.
E. Reasons For The Project
The "why" or reasons for wanting to change the existing situation are essential. The reasons vary from site to site, but working with the client, define all known or assumed reasons. Consider such things as
changing situation, change in demand, new funding, education, problems to be overcome or opportunities to be taken advantage of.


Page 2
Page 20
F. No Action
The value or need for a project can sometimes best be determined only by describing what happens if the project is not done. This is done by projecting into the future the existing conditions. If the consequences are acceptable, maybe the project shouldn't be done.
Describe the social and physical consequence of "no action" in terms that people (normal) will understand. Let them know what will happen if nothing is done.
G. Apparent Opportunities
Describe any apparent opportunities that you can take advantage of to do this project. Examples: Available funding, existing community support, outstanding site features, etc.
An opportunity is anything that will provide a chance to change things for the better. By defining the opportunities you will emphasize the positive nature of the design.
Most design situations are not voids, but have features, experiences or qualities that can be considered good or positive. It is good for the designer to develop a design around these features rather than 1) be only problem oriented or 2) try to impose an alien solution on the site.
H. Problems
List all of the problems that you will encounter while working on the project. These can be problems that you will have to work with, whether it is your job to create a physical design solution for them or not.
Defining the problems to be solved is about three-fourths (3/4) of the job, so spend some time defining them accurately. Unfortunately, most problems are not readily apparent when you start so list all the symptoms that you or the client can recognize and then set up a way to collect the information that will allow you to define the problem.
I. Users
Describe potential user's or method of identifying them during project.
III. ORGANIZATION
A. Responsibility
Every person associated with the project has a responsibility. The determination and statement of those responsibilities is the essence or project organization. The designers and the client must agree on the role of each participant at the beginning to avoid inefficiency, chaos, ill-feeling and confusion.
There should be a clear description of the functions each individual is to carry out and the standards of performance to be met in doing the job. There should also be a provision describing what is to be done if the standard of performance is not met.
1. Landscape Architect's Responsibility
Briefly describe those things that the landscape architect (you) will be responsible for at each phase of the project. These responsibilities may include:
a. landscape architect/client coordination and meeting
b. quality, quantity and content of information to be prepared
A V*


Page 3
Page 21
c. meeting deadline dates.
d. billing rate procedures (student terms-cost sharing)
e. services or task to be provided.
If a team is involved, the above should clearly be stated for each member.
2. Client Responsibility
The client's involvement is essential to the design process and the landscape architect should take the time and care to explain how they can participate and what is expected of them. This may include outlining to the client the following:
a. meeting attendance and participation.
b. information to be supplied.
c. responsibility for approval of the various phases of the process.
B. Document
Define as accurately as possible the documents or other material the designer will furnish the client at the end of each phase of the project including content quantity and quality.
C. Resources, Equipment and Staff
A list of all the information, maps, major material and staff personnel needed to get the project done. Description of availability of such information, material, personnel, etc. Include such items as support services, staff, space and equipment. For those not immediately available, give a short description of the best method for obtaining them.
D. Files
The ease with which information can be used in a project is based on the system for storing and retrieving it. Describe the method for storing and using maps and written material. Consider such things as uniform size and scale of material, cross referencing, indexing, physical storage, quantity of information to be handled, who is to use it and length of time the information is to be used.
E. Graphic Format
During nearly every project there will be a need to produce reports, drawings and presentation documents. The purpose and format of these should be established at the beginning so that all work produced can fit this format with a minimum of reworking. This section should show sheet layout format and size, graphic quality, reproduction, audience, method of presentation, filing, logo and storage should be considered in the choice of format. You will have a report format.
F. Budget
1. Income sources: dates amounts and accounting and billing procedures.
2. Budget estimate: The design/planning budget should show the approximate cost for each phase of design process and the factors that are bases of estimates (personnel, reproduction, overhead, for example).


Page 4
Page 22
G. Schedule
This section should contain a list of all the tasks necessary to complete the planning of the project, the time that they should start and finish to insure the project is completed on time.
The tasks and documents involved in a project are sometimes sequential and can be completed in a step-by-step manner, though more likely tasks will take place simultaneously. Therefore, the schedule should be set up so that a user can see what tasks are interdependent and their relationship to a fixed time table.
The schedule will be used to monitor progress of the project's design so it should also be set up to show actions that have been completed ahead or behind schedule. You might want to make it easy to update and change.
IV. REFERENCES
A. Designers
1. Resume
2. Description of why you are uniquely qualified to do the project (less than a page)
B. Advisor
1. Resume or short description of qualification.
C. Bibliography:
A list of reference material pertinent to this methodology or project type. Referance cited format.
r


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James F. Wilbur
Attorney At Law 800 Emery P.O. Box 118 Longmont, CO 80501
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December 18, 1979
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MEMORANDUM

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TO: Board of Trustees < Town of Firestone 'ji Firestone, CO 80520
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SUBJECT: SUBSIDENCE AREAS.
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I.' In General.
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Longmont 772-7057 Metro 449-3738
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There exists within the current corporate limits of the Town of Firestone a considerable amount of land that may be subject to subsidence because of underground mining that has occurred in the area in the past.
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.V . Some building has already occurred over old mines and these areas may or may not have further subsidence t thereby creating possible dangerous conditions to existing buildings. Other areas, while not yet developed, are undermined and could present dangerous conditions if new development is allowed to occur thereon.
nor does it have any regulations requiring any special consideration of subsidence problems. It is thus suggested that there are at least three categories in which to place land that is undermined:
' it . ", t
j 1.) Land which is already developed and has ex-
isting buildings or other structures.
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Alternatives. ,. .
There are several alternatives that could be used in
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Board of Trustees Town of Firestone December 18, 1979 Page 2 -
dealing with the possible subsidence problems within the Town of Firestone. The first and simplest alternative would be simply to do nothing at all and let nature take its course. I would suggest that this is the least desirable of all alternatives in that the Town is now aware of the possible problems and should take some step to protect against dangerous conditions.
The second alternative would be to have an absolute prohibition against any further permanent structures being constructed in areas subject to subsidence, therefore limiting the use of such property to agricultural, open space, parking, open storage, and other similar uses. Existing developments built on possible subsidence areas could be grandfathered and probably could be made legal nonconforming uses but it might be possible to disallow any improvements or rebuilding of these legal nonconforming uses. In those areas which are currently. platted but are undeveloped but in a possible subsidence area, special precautions could be required to minimize the possibility of damage by subsidence and waiver of liability statements could be required as a prerequisite to any issuance of a building permit.
V j i !.
A somewhat less stringent but perhaps just as an effective , method would be to follow the general plan that Weld
^ County uses. It is my understanding that in Weld County,
''7'- ji' an area shown to be in a possible subsidence location ( is, subject to a special procedure whereby the County
classifies the area as one of three categories. Those . < categories range from a very severe category where no
, building would be allowed to a very mild area where a
. ;i: ' V; building would be allowed even though it is in a sub-
;<:>; sidence area if special engineering precautions were j t taken.
* 1 **i i'^v- 1 V"; ' f j* * ^
V Regardless of the alternative chosen, unless you want - to do nothing at all, a mapping program should be in-
. - -:0 stituted which would give an accurate depiction of where
. - the subsidence areas actually lie within the corporate
limits. In conjunction with the current mapping program, X'j,'- there should also be a requirement of any further annex-, ations that they furnish detailed subsidence area inform-
, ation. s
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1. '
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A'-'M: -i|-. '; -.'My y . ;
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' rage 27
a f
, ' Board of Trustees
I v Town of Firestone
December 18, 1979 Page 3

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: III. Board of Trustees1 Decision.
Since the Town Engineer and I have received instructions from the Board to proceed with this matter, it would be appreciated if you would give your consideration to the above referenced alternatives. I feel that the Board must choose the general alternative that they wish to fallow so that the Engineer and my-
not desirable by the Town. Once the policy decision is made, I can commence drafting of the actual program
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Respectfully submitted, n
S&ssA'sr
F. Wilbur, ;torney at Law
JFW;ss
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V cc: John McCarty
' .415 Coffman Street
'V; y, y I Longmont, CO 80 501
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recreational supply, demand, and needs for the particular region
or in some cases, county. Each of the qualifiers below is
preceded by the abbreviation used to represent it in need tables
found later in this chapter.
CS CONCENTRATED SUPPLY
Indicates a CONCENTRATED SUPPLY, or POOR DISTRIBUTION of a facility. An example of this situation frequently occurs with the total supply of a region's trail systems being concentrated in a National Forest or Park.
NE NONEXPRESSED DEMAND
The demand survey methodology measured actual participation in outdoor recreation activities. The NONEXPRESSED DEMAND qualifier was used by review groups in situations where participation may not have been accurately surveyed. The LACK OF FACILITY on which to participate; an existing OVERUSE situation; or the POOR CONDITION of existing facilities were common explanations for the nonexpressed demand situation.
AC ACCESS
Indicates difficulty of ACCESS to the facility supply because of distance, or lack of transportation. This comment closely relates to the CONCENTRATED SUPPLY qualifier.
PR PRIVATE LAND OWNERSHIP
Indicates that a high percentage of the supply shown for a facility exists under PRIVATE OWNERSHIP. Private facilities and resources such as golf courses and hunting lands, etc., may be physically and financially INACCESSIBLE to the general public. In some situations, private lands also block or inhibit access to existing public suppliers.
CL/ECO CLIMATE, TRANSFERABLE DEMAND
TR
The CLIMATE (CL) of the area produces a variable supply of the facility (snow, for example) or makes the use of a facility uncertain or unsafe. The ECOLOGY (ECO) of the area may not be suitable for an
5-3


activity to take place. The qualifier may also 5 indicate that demand for a certain activity is
TRANSFERRED (TR) elsewhere due to climate, topography, or lack of natural facilities such as lakes, streams, or mountains.
MU MULTIPLE-USE
Indicates that there is a MULTIPLE-USE conflict in the use of existing supply. For example, snowmobiling and cross-country skiing represent conflicting demands for what may be a limited supply of trails.
As discussed in Chapter 3, the concept of activity days and
the presentation of numerical activity day data was at first
difficult for those attending local meetings to work with. However,
the literal substitution of one activity day figure for another was
not the critical element of review meetings. Instead, the primary
concern was accurate identification of facility needs: Is this
facility needed, or isn't it? About how many times greater is the
demand than the supply? The process sought a consensus about
relative numbers and changes needed. When the group could not,
or did not want to supply a numerical estimate of supply, demand
or need, other abbreviations (below) were used and appear as
revised "data" on the regional needs summary pages.
The review indicated the State's need figure was too high or too low (with 'plus' or 'minus' signs remaining the same).
The actual situation indicates a siqnificantly higher or lower estimate than reported in State data.
The review indicate a need for the activity, or facility, where the original data had reported a surplus supply. However, the review group could not estimate or quantify this need in terms of activity days.
Represents a demand figure, rather than need figure. This symbol is used in situations where
(HIGH) (LOW)
(XHIGH) (XLOW) (NEED)
(D)
5-4


CHAPTER 5
REGIONAL NEEDS
The State's analysis of values obtained through the 1971 supply inventory and the 1973-74 demand survey resulted in an assessment of need for each of fifty-six outdoor recreation activities, in each of the State's thirteen planning regions.
Demand (participation) figures in activity days were subtracted from supply values, also in activity days. A resulting positive value indicated that the supply of a particular facility exceeded the demand for it, and there was therefore, no need for that
facility. A negative result suqqest.ed that demand exceeded supply, and indicated a need for the facility. Regional and statewide supply, demand, and needs values for the 56 activity categories were
included in the 1974 Interim Plan and are contained in the appendix
to this volume.
THE REVIEW PROCESS
An important purpose of coordination meetings at the regional and county levels was the revision of needs data originally published in the 1974 Interim Plan. (Chapters 3 and 7 also discuss this coordination process.) The strictly mathematical needs previously used were revised significantly to reflect local and regional input.
It was necessary to coordinate at the regional level for several reasons: (1) participation data collected during the 1973-74 demand survey are usually statistically reliable at the
5-1


regional level but might not be at the county or local level;
(2) time and budget restrictions limited the number of visits planning staff could make to individual counties and municipalities; and (3) meetings organized by the Councils of Governments and regional planning offices reinforce their roles as coordinating, clearinghouse agencies for the multi-county areas. It should be made clear that even though meetings were held at the regional offices, and the data presented in this plan relate to entire regions, county and local officials and planners attended the meetings with the regional staff. Discussions, and input received there relate a great amount of detail about local needs and issues in addition to regional and State issues.
The format for the statewide data review meetings was based on experience gained through a similar review process conducted within the eight county Region 3 planning area. (All data for Region 3 are contained in Volume Two of this Plan, the Region Three Parks Recreation and Open Space Plan. This chapter presents both the original, state-determined values for need, as well as the revised need figures derived through the statewide coordination meetings.
The original and revised figures for supply and demand are contained in the technical supplement to this volume.)
The notations listed below consolidate frequently repeated remarks, or qualifications to data reviewed during the meetings.
They serve to complete the statement, "The data reports this for this activity, but .". In supplementing statistical data, these comments or "qualifiers" present a more accurate picture of
5-2


met first) at this scale of analysis is difficult. Many different agencies, each with different kinds of interests, programs, and funds, share in the responsibility of meeting the State's recreation needs. High priority actions for one agency may be low priority for another. Private enterprise, quite appropriately, does not take action with the same priorities in mind as apply to the Land and Water Conservation Fund program.
The overall goal is to meet all needs as it is possible to meet them. Needs identified in this plan may be modified in several ways, as conditions, or knowledge, change.
REGIONAL DESCRIPTIONS AND SUMMARY TABLES
Tables contained in the remainder of this chapter present a description of the region, and a summary of its recreation needs.
A brief environmental, socio-economic data summary of each region is included to provide a context for interpretation of the area's recreational needs and capabilities, and includes data such as population, population density, Federal land ownership, income, and growth rate. Also listed are the region's primary recreation resources, and ongoing local planning efforts. Need summary tables follow the descriptions, and list activities, the original and revised need figures for each activity, and comments and qualifiers that supplement the statistics.
The variables selected to be included in the socio-economic portion of the regional descriptions are those considered most relevant to an overview of recreation interests, and readily available in a relatively nondisputable form. (Admittedly this is not
5-7


a complete list of variables acting-with the recreation system.)
A brief analysis of how several of these variables might be interpreted is included in the following discussion of income, growth rate, density, and Federal recreation land ownership.
Income Level of income influences participation in recreation activities in a variety of ways. Low income, or lack of income to spend on leisure time activities may have several results. A lack of transportation to available facilities is a prime influence. This is particularly critical when public transportation is not available and when facilities are dispersed over great distances. There may be a total dependancy on local recreation resources to reduce travel, restaurant, and fuel costs. Often participation requires an investment in equipment: tents, bags, boats, bicycles, etc. There is little chance of participation in special activities, or those requiring equipment rental fees, such as skis and lift tickets. The low-income family may be pressed for leisure time due to necessity of working a longer work week. Finally, all of the above reduce the opportunity for exposure to recreation, the outdoors generally, and the physical and psychological benefits that can be derived from that exposure.
Growth Rate A region's population may be declining, stable, or accelerating. An extremely high growth rate over the past fifteen years can be expected to result in pressures for use of existing facilities and a demand for new ones. A marked decrease
5-8


in population may be attributed to changes in a number of interrelated variables. The significance to recreation relates primarily to a lowered tax base, and resultant difficulty or inability to maintain facilities or provide new ones.
Density The people/square mile ratio is an indication of crowding and one measure of need for open space. A low density ratio may indicate relatively abundant open space, though not necessarily indicate developed facilities or public parks. Low density implies distance between populations and opportunities. Access problems and the need for private transportation result, intensifying the need for facilities at local levels. Higher densities reflect more urbanized populations, along with a greater tax base, more concentrated facilities, and improved chances of public or shared transportation. At the same time, high densities suggest greater pressures for use of facilities and less open space.
Closely related to density is the Urban/Rural population percentage rate. While both variables represent useful data learning where populations are and in what densities -- an analysis of recreation in Colorado must never lose sight of the tremendous mobility of the recreating public, both out-of-state visitors and Colorado residents traveling within the State. Information on the nonresident recreationist is essential in evaluating a particular area's needs. The technical supplement to this Plan, contains a summary of origin-based demand information: where do people come from who are recreating in a particular place.
5-9


Amount of Federal Recreation Land Ownership In some cases, more than fifty percent of a region's area is owned by the Federal government. This can provide an important supply of some of the opportunities and facilities desired by residents of a region. Depending on the degree to which the land has been developed, scenic value, accessibility, etc, Federal land may attract tremendous numbers of tourists. This holds particular economic significance to "gateway" towns with large numbers of tourists and dollars of expenditure. At the same time, temporary population explosions may drain local services such as law enforcement, health, and emergency care. A high percentage of Federal ownership also reduces the tax base at the county level, and similarly reduces the county's capability of providing those same services. The technical supplement to this volume contains more information on Federal lands and facility supply.
Sections contained within the regional descriptions entitled "Regional Environmental Analysis" are taken from the Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation's draft State Parks Plan. This report classifies natural environments on the basis of their similarity of vegetative cover and landform. The types identified are as follows: .

1. High plains grassland
2. Sandhills sagebrushland high plains characterized by rolling sandhills with a cover of grasses and sagebrush.
3. Floodplain forest vegetation occuring along the floodplains of major rivers and their tributaries.
5-10


4. Foothills pinyon-juniper woodland
5. Foothills oakbrushlands
6. Foothills pine woodland
7. Montane forest forests of lodgepole pine, Douglas
fir and aspen are the dominant cover in lower mountainous areas.
8. Sub-Alpine forest Engleman spruce, alpine fir, aspen and lodgepole pine characterize this forest, occurring in higher mountainous areas.
9. Alpine tundra rugged high country above timber!ine consists of meadow, barren rocky areas, and alpine tundra.
10. Mountain park grassland high mountain parks.
11. Intermountain sagebrush lands mountain parks and other predominantly flat expanses dominated by sagebrush.
12. Plateau oakbrush lands upper elevations of the rugged canyon-mesa country, characterized by oakbrush cover.
13. Plateau pinyon-juniper woodland lower elevations of the rugged canyon mesa country of the Colorado plateau, characterized by pinyon-juniper woodlands.
14. Salt desert shrublands
15. San Luis Valley brushlands the floor of the San Luis Valley is characterized by a cover of bitterbrush.
16. Sand dunes
In addition to the draft State Parks Plan, materials compiled by the State Division of Planning were referenced for the regional descriptions. Much of this information is obtained from the 1970 census.
Regional and county needs are presented on the following pages.
The illustration below identifies and describes the contents of the tables. For a complete explanation of the symbols used, refer to the preceding text of this chapter.
5-11


---5£MPUE----
V? (nee
In ^
SURPLUS (-) LACK OF
SUPPLY
SUPPLY
FOUR-WHEEL I MG (continued)
- ON REGULAR ROADS ((D)) 196,083
A t^AAAMP
TIWs]
MOUNTAIN CLIMBING
- TECHNICAL (ROPES) 25,926,262
(NEED)
SWIMMING
- LAKE
- POOL
---(^62,866
^0 NEED)
-93,390
- STREAM
NO N^PT027,598
aiFfUf)
NOTES
AC. NEED FOR ACCESS ROADS. TRAILHEADS f SUPPORT FACILITIES
CL. SUPPLY TOO COLD: MANY LAKES ARE DOME -TIC WATER SUPPLY PR. PUBLIC SUPPLY NEEDED IN TOWNS, INDOOR POOLS
PICNICKING
- AT A PICNIC AREA
-299,244
NEED ACCESSIBLE ARE'S OFF HIGHWAYS
CAMP ING
IN THE OPEN 98,
NO ££.V^lt7Kl TO pprm utM6t\
PR.

IN A CAMPGROUND -477,151 ESPECIALLY TRAILER
SITES. NEED FOR PRIVATE CAMPGROUNDS
IN THE OPEN 116,988,820
- IN A SPECIAL CAMP 186,776 NEED FOR SPECIAL
FOR GROUPS BOATING (NEED) GROUP FACILITIES
- WATER-SKIING 32,259 (pr) PUBLIC SUPPORT
(INCLUDING THE BOAT) A k^CILITIES
- FAST POWER BOATING 2,899,668 EXISTING SUPPLY IS PRIVATE AND COSTLY
- SLOW POWER BOATING (AND BOAT FISHING) 3,665,754 eeviefJ ooMMeU', ANP &WAUfM3^
- SAILING 246,494 ^ §
- CANOE/RAFT, IN STREAM 727,088 (NEED) NEED FOR PARKING AREAS AT DROP OFF AND PICKUP POINTS
5-12


Region Two
PLANNING INFORMATION COUNTIES Larimer and Weld
POPULATION INFORMATION
1975 REGIONAL POPULATION: 233,650 % OF STATE POPULATION: 8.5
GROWTH RATE 1960-1970: up 42.6% 1970-1975: up 30.4% DENSITY 27 /SQ. MILE % OF POPULATION RESIDING URBAN/METRO: 56.4 RURAL FARM: 10.8 RURAL NON-FARM: 32.8
% OF POPULATION HAVING MEDIAN INCOME UNDER $5,000 35.2
BETW. $5-10,000 37.8
OVER $10,000 27.0
LAND/GEOGRAPHY
REGIONAL LAND AREA: 6,613 SQ MILES; 6.4 % OF STATE LAND AREA ACRES OF PUBLIC RECREATION LAND:1,208,389 ACRES
THIS REPRESENTS 5 % OF PUBLIC RECREATION LAND IN STATE AND 28.5% OF LAND IN REGION MAJOR TRADE CENTERS: Ft. Collins, Greeley MAJOR INDUSTRIES: Agriculture, mineral resources
MAJOR RECREATION RESOURCES
Rocky Mountain National Park Pawnee National Grasslands Roosevelt National Forest Horsetooth and Carter Reservoirs
Boyd Lake, Barbour Ponds, and Lory State Recreation Areas Potential Undeveloped: Red-rock canyon mesas, South Platte River, Foothills/hogback
REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS
This Front Range region is experiencing rapid growth and urbanization. While 28% of its land area is open for public recreation, this land is concentrated on the region's western edge and provides primarily mountain-oriented and cold water reservoir recreation.
The high plains grassland, montane forest, inter-mountain sagebrushland, sub-alpine forest and alpine tundra environmental types are well represented in this region by Federal national forest and national grasslands administered by the U. S. Forest Service. The sandhills sagebrushland on private lands is not threatened by imminent loss. A stretch of the


Region Two
PLANNING INFORMATION (cont.)
South Platte flood plains forest would be opened to public use by the Narrows Reservoir Project. However, the foothills pine woodland is not well represented by public lands and is threatened by residential subdivisions. An interesting sub-type of the foothills pine woodland occurs in this region in red rock canyon mesa country between Interstate 25 and U. S. 287 north of Fort Collins.
AGENCIES, PROGRAMS AND CONTACTS
* Regional
Council of Governments established in November, 1973. Contains 35 member jurisdictions; 33 municipal and 2 counties.
Professional staff of four persons.
Initial segment of ongoing regional comprehensive plan completed in September, 1972.
Other recreation documents include Larimer-Weld Regional
Open Space Study and Comprehensive Plan (April, 1973); Functional Open Space Plan (September, 1974).
Contact: , '
Mr. Richard MacRavey Larimer-Weld Regional COG 201 E. Fourth St. Room 201 Loveland, CO 80537
* Weld County
Comprehensive Plan completed January, 1973, and includes open space, parks and recreation information.
Contact:
Roy Jost
1516 Hospital Road Greeley, CO 80631 353-2212
* City of Greeley
Comprehensive Plan completed June, 1971.
Contact:
Sam Sasaki Planning Department Civic Center Greeley, CO 80631 353-6123
City of Greeley Recreation Department (est. 1959)
Contact:
Leon Kuhn Civic Center Greeley, CO 80631 353-6123
5-22


Region Two
PLANNING INFORMATION (cont.)
Reports: Greeley Comprehensive Plan, Recreation Plan,
Open Space Plan.
* Larimer County
The county comprehensive plan will be completed in March, 1976, and will contain some general parks, open space, and recreation information.
Contact:
Jan Schroeder
Larimer County Planning Department
P.0. Box 1428
Fort Collins, CO 80521
221-2100
Larimer County Recreation Board Elton Collins, Chairman 4200 West County Road, 38E Ft. Collins, CO 80521
Reports: Larimer County Open Space and Recreation Plan (to be completed early 1976)
The Board administers Horsetooth, Flatiron, and Pinewood Reservoirs, and Carter Lake.
* Wei 1inqton
Comprehensive Plan completed October, 1972, and includes parks, recreation and open space information. Contact:
Sharon May 3738 Cleveland Wellington, CO 80549 568-3979
A full time program was established in July, 1975. *
* Berthoud
Comprehensive Plan contains some parks, recreation and open space information.
* Fort Collins
A full time program was established in January, 1966. Contact:
H. R. Phillips 145 E. Mountain Avenue Ft. Collins, CO 80521 484-4220, ext. 245
5-23


Region Two
PLANNING INFORMATION (cont.)
Contact: (cont.)
Ted Rodenbeck
P.0. Box 580
Ft. Collins, CO 80521
484-4220
Reports: Open Space Plan, Southeast Greenbelt Project, Bikeway and Trail maps.
* Estes Park
Comprehensive Plan, completed in 1973 and currently being revised, will contain some parks, open space and recreation information.
Recreation District: Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Recreation District handles all recreational activity in this area.
* Loveland
Comprehensive Plan completed in June, 1972, and contains parks, recreation and open space information.
Reports: Loveland Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan of 1972, Norwest Subplanning Section, completed in 1972.
5-24


Region Two
NEEDS SUMMARY IN ACTIVITY DAYS FOR LARIMER COUNTY
NEED
(+) SURPLUS SUPPLY
(-) LACK OF SUPPLY
HIKING ACROSS OPEN COUNTRY 16,228,214 CS
- ON TRAILS -2,307,359 (-5,024,242) CS, NE (URBAN AREAS)
- ON ROADS OR SIDEWALKS (D)3,881,260 (D)(1,164,378)
HORSEBACK RIDING ALONG ROADS (D) 154,608 CS
- ON TRAILS 971 ,263 (NEED) CS, PR
- ACROSS OPEN COUNTRY 38,211,635
BICYCLING ON TRAILS OR PATHS 46,963 (-3,673,976)
- ACROSS OPEN COUNTRY -84,150 (NO NEED)
- ON ROADS OR SIDEWALKS (0)4,377,577 (D) (656,637)
MOTORCYCLING ON ROADS (D)357,726
- ON TRAILS 914,955
- ACROSS OPEN COUNTRY (AND FOUR-WHEELING-OPEN) -363,019 (LOW) CS. NEED FOR DESIGNATED AREAS
DRIVING FOR FUN ON REGULAR ROADS AND IN PARK OR RECREATION AREAS (0)14,653,025
FOUR-WHEELING ON TRAILS OR 4-WHEEL ROADS 2,096,822
5-25


Region Two, NEEDS (2)
Larimer County
NEED NOTES
(+) SURPLUS SUPPLY
(-) LACK OF SUPPLY
FOUR-WHEELING (continued) ON REGULAR ROADS (D)242,706
MOUNTAIN CLIMBING TECHNICAL (ROPES) 3,097,711 CS
SWIMMING LAKE 1 ,193,358 (NEED) NE, NEED FOR CONTROLLED FACILITY
- POOL -462,628 CS, PRIMARY CONC. ... URBAN AREAS
- STREAM 43,562 (164,158)
PICNICKING - AT A PICNIC AREA - IN THE OPEN -1 ,730,191 (-2,460,287) 10,064,964 (10,795,060) CS, NE HIGH NEED FOR GROU'' CAMPING FACILITY
CAMPING IN A CAMPGROUND -1,771,795
- IN THE OPEN 43,344,227
- IN A SPECIAL CAMP FOR GROUPS -470,492
BOATING WATER-SKIING (INCLUDING THE BOAT) -180,098
- FAST POWER BOATING 847,529
- SLOW POWER BOATING (AND BOAT FISHING) 2,225,141
SAILING 358,384
- CANOE/RAFT, IN STREAM 6,090 (-6,090) 1
5-26


Kegion iwo, NttUb (3J
Larimer County
NEED NOTES
(+) SURPLUS SUPPLY (-) LACK OF SUPPLY
BOATING (continued) CANOE/RAFT, IN LAKE -73,125
GAME PLAYING ON PLAYGROUND 715,853 (NEED)
- ON MARKED-OFF FIELDS 1,874,263 (NEED)
- IN OPEN SPACES 39,911,766
TENNIS -429,901 NE
GOLF ALL EXCEPT MINIATURE -366,420
- MINIATURE -200,585
FISHING STREAM 2,211,134
- LAKE, FROM SHORE 45,039,622 (HIGH) PR. NEED FOR PUBLIC
- ICE FISHING 3,003,467
SHOOTING/HUNTING ANY TYPE OF HUNTING 0 (325,000) PR. NEED FOR PUBLIC
- TRAP, SKEET SHOOTING, OTHER TARGET SHOOTING -145,564
SKIING DOWNHILL SKIING -600,967 CS
- CROSS COUNTRY ON TRAILS (AND SNOWSHOEING ON TRAILS) 3,507,124 (NEED) cs NEED FOR TRAILS
SEPARATE FROM SNOV MOBILE TRAILS
5-27


Region Two, NEEDS (4)
Larimer County
NEED
(+) SURLUS SUPPLY
(-) LACK OF SUPPLY
SKIING (continued) CROSS COUNTRY IN OPEN (AND SNOWSHOEING-OPEN) 1 5,278,830
SNOWMOBILING ON TRAILS 421,378 (388,995)
- IN THE OPEN 288,376 (NEED)
SLEDDING, TOBOGANNING, AND TUBING 392,172 (NEED)
ICE-SKATING ON LAKE OR STREAM -37,300
- ON A RINK 0 (HIGH NEED)
OTHER
- SPECIFY
A. ARCHERY
B. GOLF-DRIVING RANGE
C. PASSIVE ACTIVITIES SUCH AS PHOTOGRAPHY, BIRDWATCHING
NOTES
CS
NEED FOR TRAILS AND AREA SEPARATE FROM CROSS COUNTRY SKI AREAS
CS, NE
NEED IN URBAN AREA'"
NE
P
5-28


I-UK WtLU LUUNIY
NEED NOTES
(+) SURPLUS SUPPLY
(-) LACK OF SUPPLY_______________
HIKING
- ACROSS OPEN COUNTRY 961,639
- ON TRAILS -242,950
- ON ROADS OR SIDEWALKS (D)2,674,789
HORSEBACK RIDING
- ALONG ROADS (D)183,388
- ON TRAILS 29,973 NEED THROUGHOUT
(NEED) COUNTY, CONNECTING
TOWNS
- ACROSS OPEN COUNTRY 95,461
BICYCLING
- ON TRAILS OR PATHS 170,729 NE. NEED FOR TRAIL
(NEED) EXISTING PATHS ARE ON STREETS
- ACROSS OPEN COUNTRY 203,569
- ON ROADS OR SIDEWALKS (D)4,218,378
MOTORCYCLING
- ON ROADS (D)53,972 A CLUB ACTIVITY.
- ON TRAILS 202,834 TRAILS AND OPEN
(NEED) COUNTRY SHOULD BE
COMBINED IN ONE AR!
- ACROSS OPEN COUNTRY -43,819 EXISTING SUPPLY IS
(AND FOUR-WHEELING-OPEN) PRIVATE.
DRIVING FOR FUN
- ON REGULAR ROADS AND IN (D)2,373,367
PARK OR RECREATION AREAS FOUR-WHEELING
- ON TRAILS OR 4-WHEEL -3,369 ALSO A CLUB ACTIVI
ROADS SHOULD BE COMBINED WITH OPEN COUNTRY
CATEGORY.
5-29


Region Two, NEEDS (2)
VJeld County
NEED
(+)
____________________________________JJL
FOUR-WHEELING (continued)
- ON REGULAR ROADS
MOUNTAIN CLIMBING
- TECHNICAL (ROPES)
SWIMMING
- LAKE
- POOL
- STREAM
PICNICKING
- AT A PICNIC AREA
- IN THE OPEN
CAMPING
- IN A CAMPGROUND
- IN THE OPEN
- IN A SPECIAL CAMP FOR GROUPS
BOATING
- WATER-SKIING (INCLUDING THE BOAT)
- FAST POWER BOATING
- SLOW POWER BOATING (AND BOAT FISHING)
- SAILING
- CANOE/RAFT, IN STREAM
SURPLUS SUPPLY LACK OF SUPPLY NOTES
(D) 142,301
0 TR.
313,053 PR. NE.
(NEED)
-329,737 CS. NEED PARTICUL/ .
(-362,120) IN TOWNS OTHER THAN GREELEY.
-32,383 DEMAND TRANSFERREI I
(NO NEED) POOL SWIMMING. EXlsl ING STREAMS ARE IRRIGATION DITCHE!
-4,738 (LOW)
10,063,343 PRIMARILY A DEMAN
-182,201 FOR TRAILER SITES. NE FOR TENTS AT NATURAL SITES ALO
7,232,085 PLATTE RIVER.
1,452 NE.
(NEED) -10,345
MOST WATER BODIES ARE IRRIGATION
298,040 NE. RESERVOIRS ANn
i (NEED) PR. NE FOR ALL ACTIVITIES.
609,828 NE. PRESENTLY DEMAN
(NEED) MUST GO TO LARIME COUNTY.
14,845 NE.
(NEED)
1,106 NE- ^
(NEED)
5-30
\


mciu v*uimuy
NEED
(+) SURPLUS SUPPLY
(-) LACK OF SUPPLY
NOTES
BOATING (continued)
- CANOE/RAFT, IN LAKE
GAME PLAYING
- ON PLAYGROUND
- ON MARKED-OFF FIELDS
- IN OPEN SPACES
TENNIS
GOLF
- ALL EXCEPT MINIATURE
- MINIATURE
FISHING
- STREAM
- LAKE, FROM SHORE
- ICE FISHING
SHOOTING/HUNTING
- ANY TYPE OF HUNTING
- TRAP, SKEET SHOOTING, OTHER TARGET SHOOTING
SKIING
- DOWNHILL SKIING
- CROSS COUNTRY ON TRAILS (AND SNOWSHOEING ON TRAILS)
0 (NEED) NE
2,022,849 (NEED)
1,020,801 (NEED)
2,191,967 (NEED)
-310,587
-100,041 PR. CS. NE.
-40,611 SHOULD BE PRIVATEL SUPPLIED
-7,742 (NO NEED)
1,446,587 (NEED) PR. NE.
313,842 TR.
-334,624 LEASED, PR. TR. NE FOR LOWER COST, PUBLIC FACILITY.
37,476 (NEED)
-12,884 (NO NEED) TR.
0 CL.
5-31
f


weia county
NEED (+) H SURPLUS SUPPLY LACK OF SUPPLY NOTES 'll
SKIING (continued) CROSS COUNTRY IN OPEN (AND SNOWSHOEING-OPEN) 0 TR.
SNOWMOBILING ON TRAILS 4,873 CL. TR.
- IN THE OPEN . 1,956 CL. TR.
SLEDDING, TOBOGANNING, AND TUBING 62,440 TR TO LARIMER COl 1
ICE-SKATING ON LAKE OR STREAM 88,917 TR. .
- ON A RINK 15,627 (NEED) NE.
OTHER SPECIFY ->


STATE OF COLORADO
PARKS AND OUTDOOR RECREATION BOARD
Policy No. Ill-A-200
Subject: Land and Water Conservation Program Policy
Approved
18 September 1979
WHEREAS, the Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation is authorized to enter into and administer agreements with the United States, or any appropriate agency thereof, for the planning, acquisition, and development of projects involving participating federal-aid funds on behalf of the state, any county, city, or other political subdivision if such state, county, city or other political subdivision gives necessary assurances to the Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation that it has available sufficient funds to meet its share of the cost of the project and that the acquired or developed areas will be operated and maintained in perpetuity at its expense for public outdoor recreation use, and
WHEREAS, certain Land and Water Conservation Fund monies are allocated each year to the State of Colorado, for the purpose of increasing the recreational opportunities of the citizens of and visitors to the State of Colorado, by means of acquisition and development projects in cooperation with local political subdivisions and various state divisions, agencies, or institutions,
The Colorado Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation shall attempt to improve the overall recreational opportunities and recognizes the responsibility of providing the general public with maximum opportunities for outdoor recreational experiences by proper and effective administration of the Land and Water Conservation Program. The Board, in an effort to provide the Division with guidelines for the administration of the Land and Water Conservation Program, hereby adopts the following policies:
POLICY #1
The Colorado Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation shall be the clearinghouse for all regular Land and Water Conservation Fund or Contingency Fund projects submitted for Land and Water Conservation funding by all state and local subdivision sponsors.
GUIDELINE #1A
State legislators, Joint Budget Committee, and the Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service shall be notified of this procedure by the Governor's office.
GUIDELINE #1B
Application deadline for all Land and Water Conservation Fund projects will be set yearly by the Director and all projects must be submitted by that date for consideration.
GUIDELINE #1C
Applications for Contingency Funding shall be separated from regular funding applications and sent immediately to the Federal Government. Emergency contingency requests shall be handled separately as federal guidelines outline.


POLICY #2
The Land and Water Conservation Fund money shall be apportioned (both state and local projects) among and within the five geographical regions of the state, both on a per capita basis and consistent with the needs identified in the Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP). The local and state distribution shall be made on a 50/50 basis.
GUIDELINE #2A
It is desirable to distribute Land and Water Conservation Fund monies as fairly as possible. The Colorado Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation, based on staff recommendations, will distribute the fund geographically within each region.
GUIDELINE #2B
In regions where a large state project or contingency project is funded, it is permissible to allocate funds over and above the percentage for the region on a per capita basis. Adjustments may be made the following year or years to bring the total funding based on the region's accumulative total to the determined level.
GUIDELINE #2C
METRO REGION: Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Jefferson, Gilpin, Clear
Creek, Douglas, and Denver counties.
NORTHEAST REGION: SOUTHEAST REGION:
NORTHWEST REGION: SOUTHWEST REGION:
Larimer, Weld, Morgan, Logan, Washington, Sedgwick, Phillips, and Yuma counties.
Baca, Las Animas, Huerfano, Custer, Pueblo, Otero, Bent, Prowers, Crowley, Kiowa, Cheyenne, Kit Carson, Lincoln, Elbert, El Paso, Teller, Fremont, Chaffee, Lake, and Park counties.
Moffat, Routt, Jackson, Grand, Rio Blanco, Garfield, Eagle, Summit, Pitkin, and Mesa counties.
Montezuma, La Plata, Archuleta, Conejos, Costilla, Alamosa, Rio Grande, Mineral, Hinsdale, San Juan, Dolores, San Miguel, Ouray, Montrose, Gunnison, Saguache, and Delta counties.
GUIDELINE #2D
The percentages will be adjusted as the population distribution changes. POLICY #3
All projects approved shall conform with the Colorado Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) as approved by the state and accepted by the Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service.
GUIDELINE #3A
Project Rating System to be used for evaluation of projects is attached.
-2-


POLICY #4
All projects (state and local) considered by the Colorado Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation for Land and Water Conservation Fund assistance shall be evaluated by the attached Project Rating system adopted by the Colorado Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation (see GUIDELINE 3A).
GUIDELINE #4A
The Project Rating system has a substantial bearing on how outdoor recreation funds are ultimately expended. This process is flexible. The priorities do not preempt the rights of local agencies to assess their needs or to contribute to needs identification in SCORP. It does, hopefully, provide the direction for the Colorado Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation in allocating funds. All aspects of project proposals are to be considered, because standards cannot effectively measure all aspects of need. The staff of the Division shall professionally evaluate the priority for the proposed project within each region. This final product shall then be presented to the Director of the Division who shall submit it to the Colorado Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation.
GUIDELINE #4B
An evaluation team established under the direction of the LWCF Program Administrator and composed of the Planning staff, Grants staff, Regional Managers, and other expertise needed shall professionally evaluate the need for proposed project(s) in each region.
GUIDELINE #4C
Projects shall be evaluated and prioritized by using the rating system articulated in GUIDELINE #3A.
GUIDELINE #4D
The Project Rating System by which state and local projects are to be evaluated among and within each region has been set forth along with the expressed right of LWCF Grants staff to make adjustments to the results of the evaluation as their final recommendations for funding with the Division Director's approval.
GUIDELINE #4E
The Colorado Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation is ultimately responsible for the allocation of Land and Water Conservation Funds and shall rely on professional staff recommendations of the review of the projects and should not be involved in the project ranking process.
POLICY #5
The Colorado Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation reserves the right to partially fund project applications.
GUIDELINE #5A
Application shal 1 .contain sufficiently detailed cost estimates for a logical cut-off point should partial funding be considered.
GUIDELINE #5B
The Colorado Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation will accept phased projects. Projects may be designed as staged or phased projects, but eacn phase must be submitted and approve3~on its individual merit against all other regionaT~~projects submitted for~funding during that funding cycle.
-3-


POLICY #6
Land acquisition projects will not be favored over development projects.,
POLICY #7
The Colorado Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation will accept applications submitted by School Districts or related to school property for Land and Water Conservation Fund assistance.
GUIDELINE #7A
School projects are eligible provided the acquired or developed facilities will be used primarily by the general public with school use being secondary.
POLICY #8
An application shall not be submitted for both rpgular and contingency funds at the same time.
GUIDELINE #8A
Afcontingency proje~cf)should be classified as one of the following:
a. Emergency.
b. Large in scope
c. Special in nature
GUIDELINE #8B
Contingency projects shall be submitted in normal procedural process except for emergencies.
GUIDELINE #8C
If an application fails to receive contingency funding, it may be considered for assistance from the regular appropriations at the next meeting of the Board when funds might be allocated.
POLICY #9
A. Donation Acquisition Projects:
The Board encourages the donation of real property to project sponsors by private land owners. The appraised value of the donation is eliaible for matching by the sponsor~for ~the~~d^~eTfli3ffieht ot that si te ~o7~acqui -frtTorPof land adjacent to the donated land.
B. Donation Development Projects:
The value~oT donated services, labor, equipment, and materials shall not be eligible on a matching basis.
POLICY #10
Force account labor or equipment will not be allowed as eligihlp itpms exrgjrt_jn the~~case of emplo~yees or equipment hired exclusively and only for the purpose of rompletiTTg'TFelwork on the funded project^ "
POLICY #11
Local overhead expenses are not eligible for reimbursement.
-4-


POLICY #12
On-site construction must begin within one year_after receipt of signed LWCF fundinq~~aqreement. Land_acquTsition projects shall be-completed within one year.
POLICY #13
All project changes must be justified.
aT All changes in projectTTte-shall be approved by the Board.
b. All major changes in project scope shall be approved by~thi~~Board.
c. All transfers of funds resulting from a project underrun shall be
POLICY #14
There shall be no intermingling of state trails monies with LWCF. Applicant should make decision as to which funds to apply for.
POLICY #15
First time applicants whose projects rank as exce1Jent or good in the rating systern shall be given preference for funding.
POLICY #16
Local sponsors shall submit their projects in priority to the Land and Water Conservation staff. Slate agencies shall submit state projects in priority to theJLandand Water Conservation staff to be evaluated by the same evaluation
GUIDELINE #16A
A list of state projects shall be submitted to the Department of Natural Resources during the budget process with recommendations from the Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation concerning specific projects to be funded in order of priority and with a total amount of money to be allocated to state projects.
POLICY #17
To receive and encourage maximum citizen participation and input to the Board of Parks and Outdoor kecreation and the Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation PIari_iSCQRP), the _Board shal 1 name a ten mem5er~commiTtee ofTnvoTved local entities representing each of the five"regions-and charglfThTs committeeTwith IfuTres po n s Tb LI TtjT'O f provi dTng tfie~~Board with a review or the cur rent paTlTaTid recreatTon needs of the state as related to btUKp. -----------------------------
approved by the~~Board.
j>rocess_

-5-


PROJECT RATING SYSTEM
GUIDELINE #3A
Administration
The administration of the Division of
_of th^JProject Parks and Outdoor
Rating
jSystgifr
shall consist of the Director
_________ _____ Recreation and the Grants Program Admin-
iTtraToFwho shal 1 professionally evaluate the applications and apply their judgment and _personaQnowledge considering the summary of the team_of eval-uators compose?Iof_the Grants staff, the Planning SupervTs~Q£Land staff, and the Regional Manager for the projects in his regionThese applTcations shall then be evaluated by regTorTand recommended for" funding allocations based on the following criteria:
Local Need
Regional Need .State Need
.Fair Share Funding
History of funding within that region .Emergencies
.Dona ti ons_
The Administration will also:
.Prepare tentative apportionment totals for each region and then prepare the total dollar amount which has been allocated to each sponsor. .Perform inspections as required.
The Administration shall rate the individual projects into one of the following categories:
___________ EXCELLENT ___________GOOD ________________FAIR
The Administration shall separate the projects into one of the following: ___________________ REGULAR FUNDING _________CONTINGENCY REQUEST
COMMENTS:


CRITERIA TOOL (GUIDELINE #3A)
GRANTS STAFF
(ON SITE EVALUATION AND DISCUSSION WITH LOCAL APPLICANT)
STRONGLY
AGREE AGREE DISAGREE
1. Applicant has fulfilled requirements on previous Land and Water
Conservation Fund Projects? ______ __________ _______
2. Pro.iect does not duplicat.p similar under-utilized facilities within close proximity without a specific demonstration of need.
3. Applicant will have the legal right to commence project immediately.
4. Leases. right-a£^wav. other legal constraints or intrusions will not have an adverse effect on the pro.iect.
5. Applicant has a history of financial responsibility.
6. The political subdivision will suffer a loss if acquisition is not funded aFTFns time.
7. Population/growth factors will create more expensive or extensive project it this pro.iect is not funded now?
8. Site is adaptable with design and/or proposed usage.
9. Project is compatible with neighborhood.
10. Existing facilities need renovations to provide proper opportunities.
11. Applicant and/or co-sponsoring agencies have joint agreements for project use.
12. Design or usage is creative or unique.
EXCELLENT
GOOD
FAIR
STRONGLY
DISAGREE
COMMENTS:


CRITERIA TOOL (GUIDELINE #3A) REGIONAL MANAGER
STRONGLY
AGREE AGREE DISAGREE
1. Project is part of applicant's plan. ______ __________ ________
2. Project will protect a natural resource. ______ __________ ________
3. Population and growth factors will not create more expensive and
extensive projects if this project is not funded. ______ __________ ________
4. (site is adaptable to the design and/or proposed usaTge^ ______ __________ ________
5. Similar facilities are not available or accessible within close proximity. _________ __________ ________
6. Project will reljeve over-use of closest facilities. ______ __________ ________
7. Proposed renovation to existing facilities is necessary for maximum
recreational opportunities. ______ __________ ________
8. Applicant and/or co-sponsoring agencies have joint agreements for
project use. ______ __________ ________
9. Project would not increase on-site pollution or have an adverse effect on the environment
10. Design or usage is creative or unique. ______ __________ ________
11. Project will restore, enhance, improve, or preserve the recreational
opportunities of the community. ______ __________ ________
EXCELLENT
GOOD
FAIR
STRONGLY
DISAGREE
COMMENTS:


LWCF PROJECT CRITERIA
RATING SYSTEM
PLANNING SECTION
**Very High Importance *High Importance
SA = Strongly Agree A = Agree D = Disagree SD = Strongly Disagree
1.
2.
3.
4.

5.
*
tip.
J5SO
. bT
MtTO KMOW AREA ^TAMPW^ **Project is documented as a regional high prioritvneed in SCORP (1976).
Project is directly related to the 1978 top ** UBZP> TO Ll^r
*Project is directly related to the 1979 Action Plan Issue List. **kft=o ^
Project is directly related to needs identified by Governor's Policy, Legislative Direction oF a staTewlde programT (coj^rado.'sJHuman Settlement Policies will be the only applicabfe~Ttem used^ for 1979 application^
**Project_is_a^documented need in a 1 ocal 3-5 year pi an or pi arming statements (documentation mu^E Resubmitted with applicatlnn.-gtroto copies of pertinent pages will be sufficient).
Project is a site specific need documented in a local 3-5 year plan or planning statement (cfocumentation must be snhmitt.pd with applica-tTonT^photo copies of pertinent pages will be sylficient).
**Proiect is ranked as a high priority project by the sponsor (priority list must accompany~~ applicationK
Priority Score
1 or single submission =~~$A
2 = A
3 = D
4 or below = SD
Project is aCdocumented need in a county o£> treat onaT UTarD~Tdocumentation must be submitted with application, pficfto copies of pertinent pages will be sufficient).
**r.niint,y that. prnjpr.t_is. located in if; experj-encing rapid growth.
Growth Factor Score
Above 15% = SA
11 15% = A
6 10% = D
Below 6% = SD
SA A D SD


SA A D SD
10.
11
S
peMO' /
12.
13.
//Vl(W 14.
Project is located in a densely populated county.
Density Score
15.
300+ people/sq. mile ! SA
200 299 " A
100 199 " D
0-99 SD
Project serves all age groups
Age Groups Numbered Served Score
Over 65 4 SA
45-64 3 A
25-44 2 D
24 & under 1 SD
Project Sponsors Population is large
Population Score
500,000 + SA
250,000 500,000 A
50,000 250,000 D
0 50,000 SD
No. of Activities Score
8 +
6 or 7 A
4 or 5 D
0 to 3 SD
Activities List
Hiking Trap/Skeet/Target
Horseback Riding Shooting
Bicycling Tennis
Motorcycling Golf
4-Wheeling Downhill Skiing
Technical Mountain X-Country Skiing
Climbing Snowmobiling
Swimming Snowshoeing
Picnicking Ice Skating
Camping Other Leisure Acti
Boating Game Playing (football,
soccer, baseball, etc.)
Many Seasons of Use are Proposed
Seasons Score
4 SA
3 A
2 D
1 SD
Proposed facilities will be lighted
(Only Agree or Disagree are applicable)
-2-


SA A D SD
16. Active participation is proposed by the project.
Activity Type Participation 'Participation/Spectator Spectator
Score
~SK
A
D
17.
Project has water based amenity/recreation value.
Score
"2
Categories
500 acres or more, flat water 0-500 acres, flat water, or perennial stream, creek, or
S river
itermittent stream, creek, or river
> water element
S7T
D
SD
18.
19.
/

20.
21
L ixmtr
22.
Proposed project is appropriate site. Project is for acquisition in a for the phys densely
populated county.
Population Density Score
300 + people/sq. mile SA
100 299 people/sq. mile A
'oM- 0-99 D
Project is for development in a sparsely
populated county.
Population Density Score
0-99 people/sq. mile SA
100 299 A
300 + D
Proiect SDonsor has not received a larqe
share _Qf..L&WLF. monies (oer capita, from
beqinnina of oronram).
Past Per Capita Funds Score
$0.00 1.99 SA
2.00 3.99 A
4.00 5.99 D
6.00 + SD
Project is for rennovation of an existing
facility.
EXCELLENT GOOD
FAIR
COMMENTS:


STATE OF COLORADO Richard D. Lamm, Governor
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES Harris D. Sherman, Executive Director
DIVISION OF PARKS AND OUTDOOR RECREATION
1313 SHERMAN 618, DENVER, CO. 80203 GEORGE T. O'MALLEY, JR.. Director
PARKS AND OUTDOOR RECREATION BOARD: Sara 0. Duncan, Chairman Richard G. Beidleman, Vice-Chairman
. . Howard R. Alden, Secretary
October 16, 1979 Clarke Ballinger, Member
Phil Eggleston, Member
MEMORANDUM
TO: Project Sponsors
FROM: George T. O'Malley, Jr:
RE: LWCF Project Criteria Rating System Planning Section
--Tn7./^/
Please note the 3 pages under the above heading. This is a Planning document and all information concerning this section should be directed to Bob Carlson or Paul Mungan of the Planning Section at the above address, telephone number 839-3437.
You are also advised of the opportunity to expedite the reimbursement process by providing your own audit. If you wish to facilitate reimbursement when your project is completed, please notify Don West or Marilynn Anderson in the Grants Section and they will assist you.


October 1979
TO: POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS OF THE STATE OF COLORADO
FROM: George T. O'Malley, Jr., Director of the Colorado Division of Parks and
Outdoor Recreation
RE: Information Required to Complete Project Proposals for the Land and
Water Conservation Program
INTRODUCTION
Your application to participate in the Land and Water Conservation Program for fiscal year 1981 must be received by Land and Water Conservation, attention Mr.
Don West, Colorado Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation, 1313 Sherman St.,
Rm 618, Denver, Colorado 80203, no later than 5:00 p.m., December 31, 1979.
Prior applications which were not funded and have been returned, must be resubmitted for consideration, using the forms and requirements contained herein.
(A-95 clearances must be reprocessed if comments are more than 1 year old)
Projects will be reviewed by this Division for adherence to the Grants-in-Aid Manual, and the policy of the Colorado Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation.
The anticipated State's share of the Fund will be allocated by the Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation. You will be notified of Board action on your project by approximately May 15, 1980. This notification does not constitute approval of the project.
Work must not begin on development projects until after final approval has been granted by the Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service, and a completely executed agreement has been returned to you. Requisition nr land -donaiiorLDixilects must not be paid for or title taken,_until-after approval is granted)and the signed-contract returned to you. Failure to comply with the above requirements will void your project. Acquisition projects including land donations must be appraised according to the Uniform Standards for Federal Land Acquisitions and the appraisal report approved by this office prior to a written offer to purchase (see P.L. 91-646, Section 301). Property owners must be afforded an opportunity to accompany the appraiser during his inspection of the site and the report should indicate whether or not he did. Option payments or advance approval to purchase and take title may be granted under certain urgent conditions if requested and justified in writing.
In either case, contact this office for details. (Telephone 839-3437)
LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND ACT OF 1965
This Federal legislation provides matching funds on a reimbursible basis for up to 50% of total eligible expenditures for acquisition and development of approved outdoor recreation projects. Twenty-five percent of the Federal funds allocated to the state must be available for community projects. Seventy-five percent of the allocation may be made available for state projects.
UNIFORM RELOCATION ASSISTANCE AND REAL PROPERTY ACQUISITION POLICIES ACT OF 1970, 84 STAT. 1894 (1970) PUBLIC LAW 91^646:
Under Section 210, no Federal grants will be approved after July 1, 1972, for acquisition projects within a State which will result in the displacement of any person unless statutes and implementing policies of the project sponsor comply with Sections 202, 203, 204, and 205 of the Relocation Act. Similarly, Section 305 requires that subsequent to July 1, 1972, to be eligible for Federal grant assistance, compliance with Sections 301, 302, 303, and 304 is necessary. Authorized relocation costs are shared 50-50 on a reimbursible basis with the participant (project sponsor). If property was acquired, with or without Federal assistance, on or after January 2, 1971, such property is not eligible for Land and Water Conservation development funds unless assurance can be given that the
(over)


applicant complied with the requirements of this act. (A form for this purpose will be furnished by this office.)
AVAILABLE FUNDS
The availability of funds is dependent upon Congress and the passing of the Appropriation Bill. Funds, therefore, may not become available until several months after the beginning of the fiscal year October 1. A project cannot be approved until funds are made available by Congress and apportioned to the States by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior.
SUGGESTED METHODS OF PAYMENT
Construction may begin as soon as you receive a fully executed contract. It is suggested that you complete your entire project, make final payment, and submit the final and total expenditure report after which time you will be reimbursed for 50% of approved total costs after final inspection, contract compliance review and an audit of expenditures.
Successful applicants must comply with the requirements of the Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service GRANTS-IN-AID MANUAL. It is available on a 3-year subscription basis from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
BASIC REQUIREMENTS
1. Project must be in the public interests for outdoor recreation and may include acquisition of land, waters, or Iona term interest in land and waterllar development of outdoor recreation facilities for individual active partin'pation to strengthen__the health and viTaTitv or the citizens of the United~States_.
2. Projects must reflect the needs of all ethnic groups within a community as well as tl\e special needs-.to accommodate the disadvantaged and dis?bTed~ To tiffs end, pie membership of "recreation advisory committees or boards mcref include
W~baT^ced"re'PresentatiQn of the community to assure compliance~wfth'Federal _requirements^ Public hearings can aid to give confidence that your project is tru 1 y in the pubTfc interests
Projects, must be sponsored and submitted by a subdivision of government such as a town or city, county, recreation district, school district, state agency or Indian Tribe.'
At the time of project application, the sponsoring agency must either own the land in fee title or have a 25-year renewable lease which is non-cancellable at will.
The sponsoring agency must have available 100% of the total cost of the project! This must b^a^aTTabTe^prior to approval by the Board of Parks and Outdoor Recreation.
Operation and maintenance must be provided for by the sponsoring agency.
Playgrounds and outdoor recreation facilities on public school grounds for joint school/general public use are encouraged provided the facilities are not part of the normal and usual program and responsibility of educational institutions. Facilities needed to meet the physical education and athletic program requirements of a school shall not receive Fund assistance.
^8. The sponsoring agency must have developed the plans for its proposed project to the point where the project scope can be described and reasonable estimates of costs made.
Mtor c 3.
4.
C 5.
c
6.
7.


October 1979
LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND PROGRAM PLANNING REVIEW REQUIREMENTS (ALL PROJECTS)
Notification of intent (Form SOC-1 and SOC-5) to apply for Federal matching assistance from the Land and Water Conservation Fund must be filed with the Colorado Division of Planning Office in accordance with Office of Management and Budget, Circular A-95. Forms SOC-1 and SOC-5 are attached as are listings of State, Metro and Regional clearinghouses.
In addition, all sponsors of projects, including State agencies, must comply with requirements established by the Regional Clearinghouse having jurisdiction as shown on the attached list of Colorado A-95 Clearinghouses, dated October 1979.
The notification of your intent to apply for Land and Water funds should be mailed to the appropriate clearinghous^JjQ days prior tcp ittina vour application to the Division, of Parks and Outdoor The comments of the clearinghouse should accompany
If these comments have not been received
Recreation.
Cyour project application.
1 in time to meet the December 31 deadline, please furnish the date I cognizant clearinghouses were notified per items 3.(c) and 3.(d) on ( the project proposal form and supply a copy of the comments/clearance
^wben received.
We encourage local area planning to reflect joint use of outdoor rec-reation facilities when such use is feasible.


12 STATE IDENTIFIER 3-13
01

CARO TYPE 14
NON-STATE ASSISTANCE
COLORADO
CLEARINGHOUSE I.D.15 52
DATE REC'D. 23 26
APPLICANT 28-72
I.D. 73-80
ADDRESS
CONTACT PERSON & PHONE
02
PROJECT TITLE 15-80
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
impact location City:
County:
-j
I
03
FEDERAL
ASSISTANCE (FUNDS IN-KIND ETC.)
15-22 STATE 23-30 LOCAL GOVT. 31-38 OTHER
39-46 TOTAL
CAT 55-59 15.400 FED PROGRAM AMOUNT & TITLE 60-67 $ Land & Water Conservation Fund
CAT 15-19 FED PROGRAM AMOUNT & TITLE 23-30
CAT 31-35 FED PROGRAM AMOUNT & TITLE 39-46
CAT 47-51 FED PROGRAM AMOUNT & TITLE 55-62
SOURCE OF OTHER FUNDS IN LINE 03
47 54
04
A NEW B- RENEWAL C- REVISION D-CONTINUATION E-AUGMENTATION F NOTICE OF INTENT G PRE APPLICATION
TYPE
68
F
REVISION REQUESTED A-INCREASE DOLLARS B DECREASE DOLLARS C INCREASE DURATION D DECREASE DURATION E CANCELLATION F OTHER
69
70
FEDERAL AGENCY TO RECEIVE REQUEST
N/A
STATE GRANTOR (IF APPLICABLE)
Colo. Div. of Parks & Outdoor Recreatior
REQUIRED MATCHING FEDERAL 15-17 FIRST YEAR q^q PERCENTAGE STATE 18-20 S LOCAL 21-23 STARTING DATE YEAR 42-43IMONTH 44-45IDAY 46-47 80 1 10 1 01
ENDING DATE YEAR 48 49 MONTH 50-51 DAY 52-53 82 09 30
SECOND YEAR TEDERAL24-26 N/A STATE 5725 N/A LOCAL 3532 N/A
THIRD YEAR FEDERAL 33-35 N/A STATE 3688 N/A LOCAL 3£4T N/A INDIRECT COSTS 5£55 N/A
NOTICE/KWOM<1X(XXSUBMITTED TO: STATE LEVEL: REGIONAL/METROPOLITAN CLEARINGHOUSE(S): 1 -2-3- OVERHEAO COSTS 6535 N/A
DOLLAR MATCH 66-73
IN-KIND MATCH 74-79 N/A
05
DATE OF APPLICATION TO GRANTOR IS PROJECT UNOER A 95 REQUIREMENTS? WILL ADDITIONAL EMPLOYEES BE NEEDED? HAVE MATCHING FUNDS BEEN APPROVED?
YES X NO______
YES ____NO____
YES ____NO _2L
KNOWLEDGE AND BELIEF
CERTIFYING REPRESENTATIVE
DATE
06 AUTO 15 1 16-17 TEGlOf 18-19 4 20-21 c 22-23 OUNt'i 24-25 7 26-27 CITY 28-33 CITY 34-39 CITY 42F45 U.S. CflNfi. 6 46-47 48-49 UST 50-51
COLO SEN. dist: COLO HOI JSEDIST. TYPE OTHER GRANT OR CODE. . NQI CE OF AWARD MADE
64-66


66-80
KEY WORD
15-31
KEYWORD
07
SOC-1 DEC. 76


INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARATION OF FORM SOC-1
i
GENERAL:
Complete only the items within heavy lines (type or print), except that State agencies will fill out State Identifier block for the State Clearinghouse and CIRA. The Division of Planning, Department of Local Affairs will insert State Identifier for applicants other than State Agencies.
For notices requiring clearinghouse processing, send:
One copy to the State Clearinghouse.
One copy to each Metropolitan/Regional Clearinghouse that will be impacted.
State agency applicants submitting proposals that do not require A-9S review should tion Reception Agency (CIRA).
When entering dollar amounts, round to the nearest whole dollar. Do not use dollar
submit one copy only to the Central Inform signs or punctuation.
SPECIFIC:
(Other than self-explanatory items)
02 Contact Person A Phone -- Individual who is accessible and can answer questions pertaining to this application.
Project Description A concise narrative description of the nature, purpose and beneficiaries of the project MUST APPEAR in this block. This is not meant to replace the narrative which normally accompanies the proposal, but will give th reviewer a general idea of the proposal. Items which are VERY USEFUL: Effect of this proposal on the local area an local funding sources; population to be served; administrative versus service costs; whether the proposal is only on phase of a greater project covering many years; new jobs to be created by this project. If additional information is, deemed necessary, continue on a second sheet. On certain notices, information pertaining to: organizations that support the proposal; environmental information that may be required (use SOC-5); source of State or Local funds used t" match; and whether or not the application is part of an approved State plan, may be of assistance in speeding the re s process and avoid further requests for additional information. (Can you answer: WOULD I HAVE ENOUGH INFORMATION TO JUDGE THIS PROPOSAL?)
Impact Location -- City(ies) and county(ies) of impact.
03 Assistance -- Amount of assistance requested or utilized. Show total of dollars plus in-kind value by source.
CAT 5S-5i/Federal Program Amount and Title -- Enter Catalog number, dollar amount requested from this proqram, and title listed in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance. If catalog number has not been assigned, list Public Law or other reference in space utilized for Program Title. Amount should always precede title. Leave unknown parts blank
Type of Application -- Place applicable letter in space "68". "F" Notice of Intent should not be used once a grant has b ;
awarded. Use letters "B" through "E as follows:
"B" Beneval: An extension for an additional funding/budget period for a project having no projected completion date but for which support must be renewed each year.
"C" Revision: A modification to project nature or scope which may result in funding change (increase/decrease) .
"D" Continuation: An extension for an additional funding/budget period for a project the agency initially agreed to fund for a definite number of years.
"E Augmentation: A requirement for additional funds for a project previously awarded funds in the same funding/bud< period. Project nature and scope unchanged.
04 CAT/Federal Program Amount and Title -- Three lines are available if more than one source of Federal Funds is applicable.
Total of all sources should equal amount under 03 Federal.
05 Required Matching Percentages -- Enter percent (rounded off) expressed as three (3) digits (020, 080, 100, etc.) for Federal
State or Local participation in this project. Fox this purpose, anything other than Federal or State is considered Local. Entries are for the first (twelve months or less that this form relates to), second or third year (when appl' cable). Note that "first year" does not necessarily relate to the beginning of the total project.
Dollar Match/In-Kind Match -- Whenever matching funds are included in line 03, the total of State and Local Government fu------s
should be entered as "dollar" or "in-kind" in these blocks. If both State and Local Government are applicable in one block, place "(S)" or *(L)" in front of the appropriate amount.
Certification Block The individual responsible for filling out this form should sign and date this block before releas Space is available below the signature line to enter title of person signing.
DO NOT FILL IN LINES 06 AND 07. ENTRIES HILL BE MADE BY THE CENTRAL INFORMATION RECEPTION AGENCY (CIRA).