Citation
Y.W.C.A. of Metropolitan Denver

Material Information

Title:
Y.W.C.A. of Metropolitan Denver
Creator:
Read, Leslie A
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
107 leaves : illustrations (1 color), charts (1 folded), forms, map, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Buildings ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Interior Design, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
[by Leslie A. Read].

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
13107573 ( OCLC )
ocm13107573
Classification:
LD1190.A75 1985 .R423 ( lcc )

Full Text
£EAfc>
Y. W. C. A.




THESIS APPROVAL:
An Interior Design Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning at the University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Interior Design.
The Thesis of Leslie A. Read is approved:
Advisor
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING-MASTER'S IN INTERIOR DESIGN MAY, 1985


THANK YOU:
* to all the Y.W.C.A. staff and volunteer members who participated in the "Squatter's Session" and who offered all their valuable advice. Special thanks to Alys Novak, Lynn Brown, Alice West and Judy Mays.
* to my friend and member of the Y.W.C.A. Board of Directors Jane Comstock for her suggestion at doing this in the first place and for her support. To David Brown, A.I.A. who formed the Long Range Planning Questionnaire and who helped with the "Squatter's Session."
* to my thesis advisors Don Sherman, Virginia DuBrucq and Chris Nims.
* to Mark T. Read for cooking, etc.l.


TABLE OF CONTENTS:
PART ONE:
Organization of the Program_________________________________5
* Agenda of Facility Planning Committee Meetings
*YWCA Background and History
^Philosophy of Core Building and Outreach Programs
The New Site______________________________________________24
*site map
^Zoning and Floor Area Ratio (FAR)
*Code Search Check List *Site Plan ^Building Plan *Site Summary
PART TWO: The Program
Goals______________________________________________________33
*time frame schedule
Facts_____________________________________________________ 42
*organization chart
Concepts___________________________________________________48
Needs______________________________________________________57
^summary of square footage needs ^adjacencies
Problem Statements
^general facility *H.P.E.R. Locker Area *H.P.E.R. Swimming Pool
Addendum________________________________________________76
*Y.W.C.A Long Range Programming Questionnaires


ORGANIZATION OF THF PROfiRAh:
The organization of this program is divided into two parts. The
first, half includes:
A. ) The agenda of Facility Planning Committee meetings for the YWCA beginning in the Spring of 1984.
B. ) A recent background and history considering the goals and purpose of the YWCA and how these would affect the choice/decision of a new YWCA facility.
C. ) The two major philosophies which are considered in this thesis include
1. ) the YWCA's need for a home base of general offices and, for purposes only of this thesis, a Health, Physical Education and Recreation Center (HPER) and
2. ) the need to satisfy certain community outreach goals.
D. ) Since the YWCA is a non-profit organization it is imperative that they project an image which is clear and visible to the core city as well as to the surrounds which they contact through outreach. A graphic identity and system for written/marketing communications is of utmost importance.
E. ) The new site considered in this thesis is a renovation of the Rocky Mountain Banknote Building at 1088 Delaware, built in 1912, located at the Southwestern edge of the "Golden Triangle." This chapter will consider reasons for this hypothetical site choice, as well as a map of neighbors. A code search check list concerning recreational facilities for this building appears in this section as well as the current zoning of the building and the Floor Area Ratio (FAR) for the zone B-8.
F. ) The methodology employed in idea generation involved not only being a member of the Facility Planning Committee but also circulating a questionnaire (see addendum for a sample copy) and conducting a


"squatter's session modeled after Pena's method and matrix. This session was held on September 8, 1984 and the results of this session are what comprise the second part of this program.
The second half of the program: depicts graphically and verbally the goals, facts, concepts, needs and responsive problem statements for the formulation of a hypothetical design scheme for the YWCA.


A.) The Agenda of Facility Planning Committee Meetings:
Februanj 25. 1984:
* possible future sites
* review of Cabrini retreat meetings
* service focus
* critical values
* target populations
development of questionnaire (see addendum)
1. ) personnel > permanent
> temporary/volunteer
2. ) support space >aroup
> project support
3. ) equipment
4. ) adiacencu information
>this questionnaire was circulated to all the program directors:
A. Division of Children and Families Services
B. Finance
C. Financial Development/Membership /Volunteer Devel.
D. Health, Physical Education and Recreation
E. Administration and Women's Resource Center
F. Employment and Educational Services
G. Executive Director
>finanicial situation
>what should be centralized and what should be decentralized.
Mag 29, 1984:
Combination meeting of Long Range Planning and Facilities Planning Committees.
Main questions: Residences? Legal Help? Pool? Child Care??


August 9. 1984:
Design and schedule "Squatter's Session".
Questionnaire was completed and returned.
September 8. 1984:
"Squatter's Session" at the YWCA involving 25 key staff, volunteers and members as well as the President of the board of Directors, the Executive Director and all department heads. The broad scope of the YWCA was fully represented in idea generation...the results of which appear in the second half of this program.


B.) YWCA Background and History:
Following the Cabrini Retreat in August, 1983 Alys Novak, the President of the Board of Directors, wrote the following historical summary outlining key milestones in the past and listing priority programs and directions for the future. This retreat was one of the key steps toward the beginning of a search for a new facility for the YWCA.


LONG-RANGE STRATEGIC PLAN
OVERVIEW *
for the
YWCA of Metropolitan Denver August, 1983
The YWCA has served the needs of women for 128 yearsinternationally since its beginnings in England in 1855. .nationally since the founding of a chapter in New York City in 1857. .and in Colorado since 1900 when a branch was begun in Denver.
*
From the start the YWCA has always set the pace in anticipating and responding to the changing needs of women. The challenge, therefore, for the Denver YWCA's long-range strategic plan for the 1980's is to reflect that heritage. More specifically, it must focus the organization's attention on interpreting the YWCA's goal to empower women and its mission to eliminate racism in the terms of the times; i.e., to understand and meet today's and tomorrow's needs in the ways that best fit contemporary women.
As the decade of the 80's began, the Long Range Strategic Planning Committee of the Denver YWCA began a number of efforts that lay the foundation for such a dymanic plan. In particular, these efforts recognized that planning is a "forever" process in that there must be a continuous parallel effort to plan simultaneously for both today and tomorrow. That is, planning for day-to-day operations must be synchronized with a long-range strategic plan that keeps the organization on target as it moves into the future along a specific path.
This report summarizes these planning efforts and presents the results as an initial blueprint to guide the agency over the next few years. The report's four sections are:
ONCE UPON A TIME: The History of the YWCA and Women in America
The History of the Long-Range Strategic Planning Committee and the Mission Statement
ONCE UPON A TODAY: Matching our Purpose and Position in the "Marketplace"
Understanding our Public and its Needs Focusing our Attention on Priority Programs
ONCE UPON A TOMORROW: Facing the Questions, Options, Choices
Focusing on Theme, Target, Program, Facility, Finance Confronting the Constraints Moving from Strategy to Tactics
ONCE UPON A TEAM: Making it Happen with Personal Commitment and Team Effort


This is designed to serve as a decision-making tool for the Board of Directors. Accompanied by an evluation form, it asks each board member to rate the plan's suggested strategies and to provide other suggestions and comments; to rank order these strategies by priority of effort; to indicate method of choice for turning the strategy into tacticsinto a step-by-step action plan; and to identify the method and topic of key interest for each board member and thus her "count me in" commitment to participating in making sure the plan turns into reality.
Once Upon a Time
THE HISTORY OF THE YWCA AND WOMEN IN AMERICA
If the internal roles of the women of America and the YWCA for the past century are intuitively dissected, a series of themes develop. From the very beginning for example, the YWCA encouraged women and children (and thus families) to work at and enjoy better health. First, physical health was addressed, then social factors and finally emotional-mental health were stressed in agency programs. Places to swim in the inter-city, summer camp, classes for crafts-learning (with an invisible support group) were/are strongly supported by the national and local YWCA organizations.
Other major YWCA themes coincide with the history of women in America. Indeed, nationally women were called upon during each decade to make growth spurts because of societal pressures and changes. These growth themes for women on the move were:
1900: The American Women worked in the crucial areas of child labor
laws, temperance movements and sufferage efforts. She was called to a period of
AWAKENING
1910: A time for the American Woman to sit back and start to reorganize. She was called to
BAND TOGETHER
1920: A time for the American Woman to see the sights outside the home.
To pick up her skirts and start to swing. She was called to
EXPLORE HER WORLD
1930: The economic depression hit the American Woman hard. Suddenly her man and family needed her for their basic survival. Some women found work because their husbands could not. She was called to sacrifice and
TO LOVE
1940: The war to end all wars ended the American Woman's chance to be unaware of the total world around her. She took on the role of Rosie the Riveter and Nelly the Nurse and Bonnie the Bandage Roller. She was called to
BE DARING


1950:
The men came home and wanted to live like before the war. The American Woman became the home manager ever aware that life was not really like before. She was called to protect everyone and to
BE ALL CARING
1960: This decade became a time for education. The American Woman looked inside herself and found the need for more information, especially about herself. She was called to a time of
LEARNING
1970: The American Woman looked around and found other women had been . on the same journey. They too had new insights and feelings about
the changing role of women. Now was the time for her to be called to
SHARING
1980: The world runs faster than a computer and decisions and choices become the tasknever-endingof the American Woman. Now, as never before, she must make the choices that keep the values and add to the strengths of her world and keep herself and her loved ones healthy in all ways. She is called to
CREATING
The heritage of the local metro Denver YWCA calls us to continue being the caring, creative vehicle of change we have always been. The YWCA in Denver has had the role of nuturing many projects and changes as Denver grew. We helped to get started both the Travelers Aid and the Big Sisters organizations.
We started the health and exercise classes for which Denver was known (when people came for the clean air) We have been a pioneer in the area of nontradition jobs for women and in health care for the breast cancer patient. Our present thrust into the area of child-care information shows we still can see and fill a need in our community of women in pioneering, innovative ways.
We were/are women on the move.
THE HISTORY OF THE LONG-RANGE STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE AND THE MISSION STATEMEJ
In 1978-79 a committee was formed to help develop the future direction of the metro Denver YWCA. This committee put in a lot of time and effort and produced a questionnaire that was sent to a wide sample of current YWCA members asking about the amount of their involvement and about their expectations from the Denver association. This document is still valid and was used by the current committee to develop this planning report.
Next, an association-wide planning session was held at a weekend retreat in 1980. The seeds of this meeting and later meetings also became part of this draft plan by pinpointing the program priorities of the association.
The current committee began in 1981 to build a Mission Statement to guide the association's efforts. This statement now is the focal point of every decision and program being planned and implemented by the association.


The statement reads:
"The mission of the YWCA of Metropolitan Denver is to empower women of diverse backgrounds, ages and ethnic groups by acting as a catalyst in the community and by stimulating personal, physical and educational growth in the lives of individual women."
The next steps were data-gathering to learn more about the potential of the priority programs and developing "dreams" to envision the future for the metro Denver YWCA.
This report consolidates all these steps and findings into a draft strategic plan. The final plan will serve as the blueprint to carry the association into its future.
4
Once Upon a Today
MATCHING OUR PURPOSE AND POSITION IN THE MARKETPLACE
As of the 1980 census, there were 821,558 females in metropolitan Denver, of which 602,681 were 18 years and over. This population can be segmented by their demographic characteristics. .age, income, race, marital status, employment status, occupation, housing, location, parental status. .
In sum,- however, it can be said that the female population of Denver is diverse and represents a number of needs that might be met by the YWCA.
There are some new vital statistics for women, though, that help to focus our strategic planning efforts. These are:
Over 60% of the adult women in Colorado are working in the formal labor force as of 1982; this is up from 38% in 1970.
+6% of the employed women in Colorado are single, widowed, divorced or separated and work to support themselves and often their families.
One out of every three marriages ends in divorce.
56 is the average age for widowhood.
Over 40% of all black families in the U.S. were headed by women in 1979;
30% of black women lived below the poverty level in 1978.
A woman can expect to work an average of 34 years.
66% of mothers of school-age children are employed outside the home.
More than 50% of mothers of pre-school age children are employed outside the home.
t
Keeping these new statistics in mind will help the YWCA in Denver to focus on precisely how it can serve its public best. It will be impossible for it to serve all the needs of all 821,000 females, as well as impractical. There is competition of services and duplication of services to consider. In short, to best serve the YWCA must position itself in the "marketplace" as a provider of certain specific services that can best fulfill for certain target audiences. Otherwise, it will not survive and succeed in a very dynamic, changing world.


Thus, it makes sense for the YWCA to borrow from the world of business in terms of using some of its techniques to market itself successfully. One of the key tools to borrow is the concept of a marketing plan that can provide structure for the strategic plan.
First, marketing is defined as simply recognizing people's wants and needs and then determining how to best fulfill them. A marketing plan thus involves market research, product/program development, sales strategy, marketing communications, field sales, installation and delivery, operations and administration, and client service. In non-profit agency terms, this just means identifying through research what are the needs of Denver women that the YWCA can best fulfill and then developing/providing those services in the "right" package, at the "right" price, in the "right" place, and via the "right" promotion.
This kind of approach will give the YWCA both an -internal and external focus of attention. Fir&t, we look outside to see what's needed; then we develop, promote, sell and service to that needand we keep on using this approach so we're always targeted to the right audience with the right service.
Such an approach provides accountability and performance standards all based on what the public needsand wants. It helps us budget and staff as well as plan.
UNDERSTANDING OUR PUBLIC AND WHAT IT NEEDS
As part of its planning effort, the YWCA recently conducted a market planning survey that provided updated information about what the public needs/wants. Initial data indicate that although many women in Denver are currently not involved with the YWCA, the factors that would encourage their interest and participation are:
More information about the organization Classes more conveniently located The types of classes of real interest to the survey population are:
Health and fitness
r
Self-improvement
Speakers on topics of current interest
The most important factors in determining whether they would take classes are:
Location Cost
Time of day class is offered
A significant percentage of the survey group is employed outside the home. Thus, classes in the late afternoon and evenings are preferred.
These data are preliminary but confirm the new statistics about the movement of women into the work force with full force, as well as the old perceptions of the YWCA as a place to go for physical and personal health help.


FOCUSING OUR ATTENTION ON PRIORITY PROGRAMS
Recognizing the shift in woman's place in the world yet her continuing need to be a "healthy" woman in all ways, the YWCA's planning efforts narrowed down to four priority program thrusts. These are: Health, Physical Fitness and Recreation; Children and Families; Employment; and Women's Resource Centers. These programs appear to be both constant and contemporary needs of Denver women.
A combination of staff, board committee members, volunteers and outside resources provided information about the program areas in terms of their potential. More specifically, we learned about the competition in the marketplace, the trends related to these programs, and the opportunities for developing innovative services related to these program areas. *
The reports on these four priority programs are now summarized.
*Health, Physical Fitness and Recreation
In terms of competition, there are 132 recreation centers/program sites in the Denver area that offer these kind of services. These are subsidized centers; e.g., Denver Parks programs. In addition, in the Denver area there are over 85 fitness facilities such as Nautilus, Spas, sport complexes and gymnasiums. There are also an undetermined number of churches with full gymnasium facilities. Aerobics centers keep popping up all over town.
In terms of hospital/health care delivery, there are several wellness and health promotion programs being offered through the medical industry.
These programs are offered for hospital employees, the community at large, and for business/industry. About 27 hospitals in the region offer classes at their sites on health, parenting, child care, fitness and nutrition, drug and alcohol abuse.
The trend toward wellness and preventitive health care has, however, been financially difficult for the providers. So far there seems to be great public relations benefits but not big dollar payoffs.
There does seem to be a new movement toward specific sites for breast diagnostic centers. This could be a competitive plus or minus for the YWCA, i.e., we use the movement as an opportunity for collaboration.
In terms of other new marketing opportunities, some gaps in this program area in the community are:
YOUTH PHYSICAL FITNESS: Evidence nationally and locally indicates that fitness levels of children have declined or made only slight improvement. Denver seems to have a gap in providing programs for children not athletically inclined or not interested in popular programs like soccer. Handicapped youth programs are also limited. Also missing: preteen girls' programs, especially for the overweight; stress programs; school aerobics programs.
ADULT HEALTH: The current trend toward adult fitness is strongly projected. The 80's are going to be the "time of the body" and any quality program directed toward increasing fitness should be successful. The community can support more programs, especially those marketed to meeting the new needs of contemporary women such as working schedules.


FITNESS WITH/IN INDUSTRY: Industrial fitness is another concept that is sweeping the country. Locally large corporations have built on-site gyms and/or fitness complexes to support employee fitness. They are also offering incentives to employees to take advantage of these programs.
Missing: such programs for smaller companies.
HOLISTIC AND PREVENTITIVE HEALTH: Several local health practitioners feel this movement is catching on signficantly in Denver because of its exercise emphasis. Perhaps the YWCA could work with the health care delivery system to offer specific health education programs. Example: self-care and self-management of one's health.
HEALTH MAINTENANCE FOR THE AGING: Senior citizen programs have suffered severely in budget cut programs through the over-65 population will grow tremendously in the years ahead. This is a group needing innovative services.
OTHER TARGET GROUPS: Single-parent families, especially those with teenagers, could benefit from before/after school programs. Possibility: Putting on "road shows" for schools on health topics, providing health education sessions, working together to find creative funding on parenting. .topics .and supplying through the schools, churches. .
In terms of innovation, other new services the YWCA might offer in the future include:
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE SERVICE: This approach would serve organizations rather than individuals. For example, by assisting a private swimming pool with identification and selection of life guards, the YWCA could provide a useful service. In a double-play, this approach could be used with corporations with on-site program space as well as serving as a decentralized facility site for the YWCA.
HIGH TECHNOLOGIES: The development of the high technology of electronic and multi-media communication, video cassettes, video disks, picture phones, and home computers opens another avenue for this kind of programming. By providing HPER services through technological means, participants would have the freedom to choose the time and conditions under which they learn new skills and to store and retrieve massive amounts of information about recreation opportunities. Opportunity: the YWCA could produce video tapes for participants to take home after being in a class. These also could be available for trainers in other facilities, for corporations. .
FACILITY: Space is needed for HPER programs, which are income-generators.
It seems the continued thrust in fitness would help support a YWCA facility(s) in the Denver area. Such a center(s) would also reinforce the traditional perception of the YWCA being a "health place."
*Children and Families
Regarding this traditional thrust of the YWCA, it appears that the Denver agency already has an innovative service in placeits Child Care Information Network. Started in June 1981, it is a prime example of the ability of volunteers to creat a program responding to the needs voiced by an organization's members. The network has grown to include various services meeting the needs of both the providers and the consumers of child care.


These are: Information and Referral Network; the Shoestring Connection newsletter; the Substitute Employment Service; Volunteer Training Manual; Convention Care; Equipment Exchange; Consultation.
The key to such a program: Because is it a resource to working parents, it provides easy access to a major audience. That is, the agency now can target this group for marketing other YWCA programs; e.g. health. The network already has a database of more than 2000 users, with demographic information. This list becomes a gold mine for target marketing.
The program should continue to provide tremendous visibility for the YWCA.
It introduces many working women to the YWCA, women we can draw upon for volunteer efforts and membership. It offers quite an opportunity for a very credible outreach program with many facets.
*
In the future new marketing opportunities for the' network include more iicus on corporate efforts. Example: The YWCA could go to companies not only for funding dollars but also with seminars provided in-house for employees.
In terms of competition, there appears to be no direct developing services that will be fee-based as well as going after corporate and foundation funds.
In addition, self-generating income should be sought via a variety of permanent services such as directories, child-care "tip" books, and so forth.
*Emp loyment
The Program Committee of the YWCA formed a task force to examine these questions: (1) Should the YWCA have an employment program; (2) What kind of program, and (3) How should the program be implemented. The employment programming study was in response to a national, traditional interest. That is, it is a national aim that member associations and the National Board establish programs in employmen and support programs will include both service and advocacy in one or more of these areas; career awareness and planning, basic education and counseling, job training in nontraditional fields, job marketing, pay equity, networking, income security, child care and combatting sexual harassment.
As a result of this effort, the task force developed a list of the employment services' and advocacy groups in Denver. The list is extensive, ranging from single services like Mi Casa to multiple services, such as those offered at 41 colleges, 32 community, business and secretarial colleges, 108 industrial and technical trade schools, 4 medical and dental assistant schools, public and private schools. .
The list is so extensive, in fact, that nothing in the survey "blinked" and said to the task force: "This is really lacking, really needed in terms of a program" Indeed, many sources told the group that the greatest need was for coalitions of employment services, and warned against duplicating services.
The hottest marketing opportunity in this area: the need for a resource directory. There is a lack of a referral service to all the available programs. Indeed, the Child Care Information Network may be able to provide access to hearing about opportunities for employment and this might become a new information service. The YWCA also can serve as advocates for other programs via a referral service. In sum, the YWCA could be the "glue" in terms of providing information and advocacy in employment programs.


There are some opportunities on the horizon for providing short-term counseling and workshops on "hot topics." Examples: workshops for women who want to work at home in their own cottage business; workshops on computers.
An innovative marketing idea: providing self-run media devices on employment resources throughout the community on a fee-basis.
*Women's Resource Centers
An outside resource, JoAnne Birge of Women of Colorado, Inc. provided information on the status of women's resource centers in metro Denver.
She noted that there are many women's groups and centers in the community; however, there is no one place that is the place for linking women into all the community connections.
She sees this as a good gap that the YWCA could fillwithout causing turf problems with the other groups. The idea: a physical place with paid staff where women could drop in for a cup of coffee, use a library of resources, talk to each other, get support and information, get health/exercise services.
This core-city center would offer something for each woman in the community and provide a common ground for all groups. A possible theme: "In this place we address you first as woman" and such services as information and recreation could provide the commonality.
It is possible that such a center could serve as a place for many women's groups to come together in coalition, a sharing approach. The YWCA might be able to lease rooms to the other groups, or perhaps a joint-venture partnership could be developed.
It appears that the YWCA would be ahead of its time in Denver, once again, if it could get women's groups to come together with them and provide a Woman's Place. They might even provide other joint services such as a consolidated newsletter. There are models in other communities.
Such thoughts have been put forth in the past without fruition. The timing seems better now because women's groups are more mature and thus less competitive. Spearheading such an effort could be an important role that the YWCA could play in the community; it would fuel coalition among women. It also would support the visibility of womenand the YWCA in Denver.
Once Upon a Tomorrow FACING THE QUESTIONS, OPTIONS, CHOICES
This report reflects what the Long-Range Strategic Planning Committee heard from YWCA board members, staff and volunteers as well as outside resources as it gathered data about the world in which today's Denver woman exists and the trends that are impacting her. Some exciting ideas were heard from the past and the present and some were suggested for the future.
The metro Denver YWCA has a fine heritage to build onto grow on. And it can do so by taking advantage of this legacy, the talents of its women resources and the community resources and by maximizing tools from other arenas, such as marketing approaches that help us position ourselves for performance.


The challenge now is to zero in on the few unique ways we can best serve specific segments of the public. We must ask ourselves what is needed most, what can we do better than others to fulfill this need, what can we do to get it done. In sum, looking at all the options, we must face the question: what do we choose to do that makes us special, unique, different in the eyes of the world in which we must serve?
FOCUSING ON THEME, TARGET, PROGRAM, FACILITY, FINANCE
It seems that the essence of the strategic plan that has been building through several years of YWCA effort has a definite, clear theme. The theme:
THE YWCA OF METRO DENVER IS THE WOMEN'S CONNECTING POINT
*
IN DENVERIT'S WOMEN HELPING WOMEN.
The YWCA already is a connection place in the best information-sharing way woman to woman. Through such present efforts as the Child Care Information Network and the Legal Information service, and the suggestions for providing information services in the future relating to employment and health. .the connection link becomes quite distinct. It may be the hook the YWCA can hang its hat onfor all to see and understand. It would represent the WHAT the YWCA is all about and the WHY and the WHO.
Such a theme would help the YWCA to focus its activities. For example, it could become the impetus for constantly researching the community for women's needs and resources, thus allowing two benefits to occur:
1. The metro Denver YWCA builds a significant Information Data Bank that can be shared with any and all women and that can be analyzed to identify which needs are unmet and thus programs can be developed and marketed successfully to specific target groups.
2. The metro Denver YWCA becomes the connection for Denver women, the place to contact to get referrals to appropriate community resources and the place to go to get the unique services/programs provided by the YWCA.
9
This type of connection via information and the human touch fits contemporary trends, as indicated in the book "Megatrends," which discusses an evolution from an industrial society to an information society. It would also allow the YWCA to provide some unique information resources (referral links through computers, traditional publishing devices such as directories. .) as well as to provide some unique new programs that link the YWCA directly into a community need.
For example, the YWCA as the connecting point could provide:
Health information in different ways; e.g., going directly to the woman at work, to the woman with breast cancer at community centers.
Employment information via audio-visual directories located in community centers, and through "need now" workshops on hot topics


Child care and family/parenting information via the referral network already in place as well as expanded into other services, such as a source book on "the care and feeding of Colorado children"
Resource materials and support via a Woman's Place core-city center that could link individual women to community resources and to the YWCA and link women to women and link women's groups via a computer data base, resource library, referral hot lines
Identity and Image are created by such a place and services that demonstrate the theme of a CONNECTING PLACE visibly and creatively
In sum, the YWCA needs a theme song to broadcast throughout the community that positions the agency in the public's mind as the place where women on the move can connect with the resource they need/want.
As a key target audience, it is recommended that the metro Denver YWCA increasingly focus on the needs of the working woman and increasingly focus on the needs of the minority/third world woman. By targeting to such key market segments, the theme can be reinforced with specific women with specific needs. In addition, the YWCA can and should continue to serve any and all women through a "generic" supply of services. However, it should focus major attention on key groups in terms of programs, promotion, facility and finance; e.g., membership and fund drives. This emphasis will also be a most effective way to target its continued development of volunteer resources.
The target group could be further defined as Women on the Move, which is an historic definition for the YWCA. The phrase describes all women moving into new situations, such as into the work force, into motherhood, into a new age span. .who have a need for the kind of supportive information and program that the YWCA can provide. With such a target audience, the information connectioi theme could be underscored by such messages as: "Where are you in your growth path? How can we help you grow best, in the healthiest way. .by linking you to the appropriate community resource. .by providing some unique program. .by giving you the information you need?"
Other examples: Women recovering from breast cancer, women eager to learn about computers, women needing other women for support and information when they move to Denver. .all are women on the move.
In terms of program, the theme and target can then be woven together to specifically address the priority needs already identified (Employment,
Health, Children and Families, Women's Resource Centers) in ways that precisely match the selected population. Again, the emphasis is on focused attention rather than diffused effort.
In regard to facility, such an approach would reinforce the suggestion that the YWCA aim to build/acquire a core-city center building that would serve as the primary meeting ground/headquarters for the association. However, it would also develop and maintain strong satellite centerswith a YWCA clear, permanent identitythroughout the metropolitan area.
Totally, then, these combined efforts point the way to the most effective financial development programs. That is, this approach positions the YWCA's efforts in terms of how to seek the right kind of members in the right way, the right kind of United Way funding, the right kind of foundation/ grant monies and the right kind of self-supporting efforts, such as incomegenerating endeavors.


CONFRONTING THE CONSTRAINTS
Once the YWCA Board has made a commitment to a final strategic plan, the next step is identifying what barriers may be in the way of implementing the strategy and fulfilling the goals. These might range from traditional viewpoints to people-power needs. By focusing on these challenges, the plan will evolve into a set of workable tactics that become action and success tasks.
MOVING FROM STRATEGY TO TACTICS
There are a variety of ways that the strategic plan can be fleshed out into times, tasks, actions. .One way is to have a work session(s) in which the Board, staff, volunteers, consultants. .hammer out the details. Other ways include assigning task forces to do the detail work or the Executive Director and the staff, or the committees. A recommended way is to involve an outside consultant to facilitate a session to insure an objective viewpoint and an efficient discussion that moves effectively through issues to consensus and into practical proposals for implementation.
Once Upon a Team
MAKING IT HAPPEN WITH PERSONAL COMMITMENT AND TEAM EFFORT
The final strategic plan can only succeed through the personal commitment of individualsthose on the Board, on the staff, in the committees, as volunteers, in the community who care enough to make it happen. These individuals then must blend into a team that moves forward together in a concerted manner to win mutual goals.
The next step, therefore, is the most crucial. This is the time for the Board to choose its strategy and then, for each YWCA individual advocate to say: "Count me in, count on me. I commit to the YWCA of metro Denver by commitment to the plan. But more important, I commit to enactment of the plan by committing myself to accomplishing certain assignments that will implement the plan in specific timeframes.
"I, as a woman on the move, will help move the YWCA into the future in a planned, successful way to the benefit of the community."


C.) Philosophy of Core Building and Outreach:
By means of market research the YWCA's goals are to identify the needs of Denver women and then develop and provide programs so that they reach the women in need of these services.
This programmatical approach gives the YWCA both an internal as well as an external focus of attention. A certain philosophy of a "home base" comprises a place to gather and a place to house the major programs of:
* Health, Physical Education and Recreation
* Employment and Educational Services
* Division of Children and Families Services
* Administration and the Womens Resource.
Center
as well as staff and executice offices and various support space to these functions.
This home base facility has to offer an individual identity to the YWCA. It should be in or near downtown, with free and accessible parking, accessible to RTD and the building should be designed with flexibility. These terms, although general, were all used to describe that building which would house programs that would draw women to the center and which would be located centrally enough for this interaction and a sense of belonging" to actually happen.
In addition to the home base housing the various program offices and HPER there is the need for program activities to be located at various spots throughout Denver and its environs....decentralized program space How will this decentralization/outreach affect the central building? How will the impact of the outreach programs affect the needs of the central YWCA building? How will this decentralized facility become visible and understood by the community??


D.) Projected Image:
In considering the three major reasons of:
1. ) the non-profit status of the YWCA
2. ) the need for outreach activities
3. ) the need for high visibility in the community
I feel that it is necessary to devise a consice, bold, clear and consistent graphics solution to aid in interior/exterior signage and any paper correspondence communication. Signage that extends out to the community through outreach programs, whether these be on vans taking equipment to outreach designations or simple location signs at, perhaps, a school in Aurora, they should all quickly and easily read the YWCA. This should be an integral part of any design package for the YWCA. It will also be an integral part of my thesis. The interior design and the graphics scheme should support each other rather than be designed "to fit."


F.) The New Site:
A hypothetical site was chosen to accomodate the design requirements of this program. My purpose, aside from fullfilling my thesis requirements is that it will serve as a possible example of space planning for existing YWCA programs, staff and executive offices and a Health, Physical Education and Recreation area, although the programmatic requirements for the YWCA core building call for oniy_staff/executive office space and support functions without a full blown HPER. The Facilities Planning Committee concluded that the building and adjacencies must be flexible enough to accomodate a total HPER if the YWCA wanted to phase in a design addition of that magnitude. For this thesis a HPER will be included.
The site, which I have chosen for this thesis, is a renovation of the old Rocky Mountain Banknote Building at 1088 Delaware. This building, which was built in 1912, is located at the southwestern edge of the golden triangle. Refer to the map on the following page. It is bounded on the southwest by Speer Boulevard and a recently built and occupied high density housing complex with a high volume gocery market. To the east by three-quarters of a mile are the major activity centers of the Denver Art Museum, the City and County Building, the Denver Public Library, the State Capitol, the Colorado State Historical Museum and the Capitol Annex Judicial/Heritage Center all surrounding Civic Center Park and all connected by the Fourteenth Avenue Parkway belt which leads directly to the vicinity of the Rock Mountain Banknote Building. Also anchoring that high activity center is the new east side RTD terminal connecting to the sixteenth street mall. Directly to the south is Denver General Hospital and the continuation of the Speer Boulevard Greenway Park and bicycle path.
To the north by a mile is the Convention Center, the Denver Center for the Performing Arts and the Auraria Campus. All of these areas are highly accessible by bus, car and bicycle.




cm?
-26


ZONING:
B-8: The current zoning of the Rocky Mountain Bank Note Building, 1088 Delaware Street, lots 1 6 of Block 34 is B-8. B-8 is the zone for high-intensity commercial districts. Anything may be built here with the exception of heavy manufacturing and junk yards!
Floor Area Ratio (FAR): _The FAR for zone B-8 cannot exceed four (4) times the area of the zone lot size. Lots 1 -6 of Block 34 are each 25' x 134.07'. The entire zone lot dimension is 150 x 134.07 resulting in a zone lot size of 20,110.5 Square Feet. Four (4) times this amount = 80,442 divided by the original square footage of the building 26,698.25 states that three (3) stories, at least, could be added to this building depending on design considerations regarding premiums. Design premiums such as enclosed or unenclosed spaces as plazas, arcades, low level lit areas can add to the allowable additional square feet. Parking requirements are not taken into consideration in these calculations.


CODE SFARCH CHFCK LIST:
Projer.t. vfsA/<£A,________________________Type /&-Z
Search by /Q&V&=>
Pats MAES It gg 'HggTOOSy .
1. APPLICABLE BUILDING CODES 2. ZONE 3. FIRE ZONE 4 OCCUPANCY
City X founty______ B>"$ ^ A"2-J /P"2
Fire Marshall__urc X
2. OTHER REGULATIONS
State Board of HealthAstate Dept. Educ..
3. FLOOR AREA (Chapter 5 and Table 5-C)
Construction Type____Uf 1 H£>U£._____
Occupancy Type________________A-T]£.J
Basic Allow. Floor Area (505a)-L2£222_{l
Fire Zone 3 incr. x .33 (505a_EfflUpfS_
Added Stories Increase (505h) n/cu Side Separation F.A. Incr.(506b)__zzi__ ^ 2 sides______________ tZCpffiZ.$
3 sides___________________________
4 sides___________________________
Group G Unlimited (506 c)______________
Fire Sprinkler Increase (506 di AfffiOO.
group E-5, G
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TOTAL ALLOWABLE AREA ^Q^iQ-

Actual Building Area: Existing Proposed Future Total
_________ SBgi. __________37333.


4. OCCUPANT LOADS (Chapter 33 & Table 33-A)
Story ftLL-__________
Occupancy Group______
Area_________________
Sq. Ft. per Occupant_
Total Persons per Floor.

I ft, (pfQtn'tn
.
___\2M-
___
ldLo( -tea
Total Number of Persons in Ruilding [ZM-___________i£37
5. EXIT REQUIREMENTS (Chapter 33) /W-l p-2-
* Exits Required Each Floor______2.
* Exits Required Total Building___2.
Required Exit Width__________ 2A--&'
Ramps Required______________
Corridor Widths_____________44*
Dead End Corridor limit 2-01
Corridor Construction_______1 itS2UEk
Door Rating___________________
Stairway Width______________4-4-*
Z
2.
,3-74'___
X&L______
J2£>!.___
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ELEVENTH AVE.- two way*^
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BUILDING PLAN t


SITF SUMMARY:
Type of existing building:
One story with balcony, masonry office/warehouse building
Location:
1088 Delaware Street, Denver, CO Ownership:
Gart Brothers Sporting Goods Stores (presently used as a warehouse)
Site Area:
20,110.5 Square Feet Building Area:
26,698.25 Square Feet gross building area Zoning:
B-8: High Intensity Commercial




Multi-use of portions of the facility is imperative.
The YWCA needs to be a visible symbol in the community.



"We don't know if we need a full blown HPER but we want the option to expand into that area if we need to."
In order to keep maintenence costs at a minimum the building must be energy efficient (some solar design).


vet circulation
lunch
room
Attention must be paid to locations of wet/dry areas.
Odor production areas should be clustered


RESOURCE CENTER
DANCE STUDIO
CONFERENCE
NEED FOR VISUAL AND ACCOUSTICAL PRIVACY
Possibility of building being revenue generating.


Adjacencies to departments, goals and systems should be paid attention to.


GOALS:
- to be the connecting place for Denver women information center and meeting place.
- A central facility with pool... can-members supoport?
- More emphasis on women's health issues.
- Location near RTD routes not far from 1-25
- Handicap access access that does not highlight disability.
- Convention Center child-care.
- Attractive, welcoming appearance.
- Accessible to mass transit, autos, bicycles, walking centralized.
- Multi-purpose rooms.
- Gathering room, women's lounge.
- Child care space.
- Long lasting materials with low upkeep costs.
- Far from YMCA!
- Image of building fun, non-threatening, quality image but not heavily "prestige or status".
- Quality signage controlled at home offices and at outreach.
- Views and/or natural light for everyone.
- A very attractive entrance/lobby.
- Pay attention to income generating purposes of building; let it pay for itself.
- Phased in space; start small and add on as funds grow.
- Solar or energy efficient building.
- Price ourselves below competition.


Decrease United Way dependency become more self-supporting. Be in new facility June 1, 1987 YWCA 100th Birthday.
Create firm time schedule for proceeding.




Current LEASE is up:
ZONING:
R-3 or R-4 zoning minimum.


Handicap access to all parts of the facility is necessary.
THE ONE IMPERATIVE:
Locate where it is accessible to all women and comfortable for all persons of color.


u
Ol


ra
m
low McssM?
Average YWCA 12,000 40,000 Square Feet...
28,000 Square Feet Average @ $55-00/SF
////////
nTTTl T
Parking Required
(# spaces x 350 Square feet each)


FACTS:
- Need R-3 or R-4 zoning minimum.
- NO residences and NO restaurant.
- "One Imperative" locate where it is accessible to all women and comfortable for all persons of color.
- Must have image of place where women of different ages, races, types can come togetherlike both mother and daughter.
- Building should meet the needs of programs as prescribed by the long range strategic plan (see addendum).
- 11 major committees who meet volunteer/staff
- Space now= 6500 Square Feet too small.
- Current lease up: June 1, 1987.
- $400,000 Available now.
- We are 3 -4 years away from being able to run a capital campaign.
- We need to be a visible symbol in the community.
- A capital Campaign takes 18 months minimum.




The YWCA must project a regional identity and impact.


Building should convey the feeling that it provides "space for women."
Need a building that represents an "ecclectic" point of view DIVERSITY.


Landcaped as a park: trees and maybe a fountain.
Furniture designed by women.


Possibility of an atrium space with trees.
Study the possibility of expansion and development.


YWCA
Rather than paying cash for a building Have a developer provide it & the YWCA can "lease to Buy." If it's a renovation the developer can get the tax credits and pass the savings to the Y.
OPTIONS
a BUY
s LEASE 13 BUILD


Membership climbs by 65 %!!
Projected membership increase... Facility to encourage growth of membership.
2nd::
phase 3rd phase:::
|:::: lst pha;
.e : i

Build in phases...expand over time.


CONCEPTS:
- Rent spaces to women's businesses capitalize on idea of women's skills traditional & non-traditional.
- Professional image.
- Prioritize Departments: phase 1 & phase 2.
- Need a building that represents an ecclectic point of view diversity.
- Lounge or club for the professional woman.
- A stage/theatre.
- Attention should be paid to locating near PLANNED and EXISTING large activity centers.
- Fitness facility health club memberships ... income generating.
- Inside : quadrangle area of grass/ flowers for gatherings & receptions.
- Regional identity and impact.
- Building should convey feeling that it provides "space for women."
- Appeal to singles.
- Decentralize/outreach through vans with YWCA symbol that goes from area to area... marketing graphics.
- Open atrium to walk into places to eat & meet, art gallery, sit & refresh.
- Furniture designed and made by women.
- Swimming midnight to 2 a.m. has proven successful.
- Landscaped as a park.
- Don't overemphasize fitness fad.
- Need to evaluate jiont ventures on basis of YWCA policies.
- Don't look like a strile office complex.


- Building that can be expanded to accomodate full HPER.
- Parking adjacency important.
- Staged moves.
- Build with extra space that is leased and then available for growth.
- Financial factlittle fundraising expertise or identity now so use facility as concrete way to begin getting contributions.
- Increase emphasis on affiliation with national YWCA.
- Identify with graphic & signage all "decentralized" activities. Develop graphic program.
- Appealing environment for seniors.
- Offerings for men as well.
- Downtown or near downtown for centralized offices.
- Athletic use by men and women.
- Expand HPER rapidly.
- Flexibility to provide for space changes in major program areas.
- Make money by renting space to other Women's groups for meetings, exhibits etc.
- Integrate into multi -use development retail & office to attract both working & non-working women.
- Increase membership income vary member benefits.
- Idea of selling services to businesses like exercise facilities meeting rooms; ie. sell organizational memberships = becomes fringe benefit for them.
- Library/information center for resource materials books and computer.
- Reading Room / library.
- Kitchen needs to be next to space for rental.




All offices need access to windows or light.
SECURITY: LOCKED EQUIPMENT AND STORAGE


Locate near RTD routes and consider major traffic routes for accessibility.


SUMMARY of SQUARE FOOTAGE NEEDS:
Total Space Needs
1987 1995 2005
1 1,000 SF 16,000 SF 21,000 SF
Break Down
The following square footage requirements were derived from a questionnaire completed by all department heads. The questionnaire was formulated by David Brown AIA and myself with the Facilities Planning Committee on February 25, 1984 see addendum for a copy of the questionnaire.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR:
Now 1 987 1QQ5 2005
1 x 120 1 x 120 1 x 48 1 x 120 1 x 48 1 x 120 1 x 48
120 SF 168 SF 168 SF 168 SF


FINANCE:
Now 1987 1995 2005
1 x 100 1 x 100 1 x 100 1 x 100
1 x 36 1 x 48 1 x 48 1 x 48
1 x 36 1 x 36 1 x 36
136 SF 184 SF 184 SF 184 SF
P. R. : Now 1987 1995 2005
1 x 100 1 x 100 1 x 100 1 x 100
1 x 36 1 x 80 1 x 36 1 x 80 1 x 48 1 x 36
100 SF 136 SF 216 SF 264 SF


EMPLOYMENT & EDUCATION
Now 1987 1995 2005
1 x 100 1 x 100 1 x 100 1 x 100
1 x 48 2 x 48 4 x 48 8 x 48
3 x 36 2 x 36 4 x 36 8 x 36
256 SF 268 SF 436 SF 772 SF
CHILDREN & FAMILIES:
Now 1987 1995 2005
1 x 100 1 x 100 1 x 100 1 x 100
1 x 48 7 x 48 9 x 48 9 X 48
2 x 36 1 x 36 1 x 36 1 X 36
220 SF 472 SF 568 SF 568 SF
H. P. E. R.:
Now 1987 1995 2005
1 x 100 1 x 100 2 x 100 2 x 100
2 x 36 1 x 64 1 x 64
1 x 48 2 x 48
3 x 36 6 x 36
2 x 600 2 x 600 2 x 600 2 x 600
muHi-purp. rooms i
1300 SF 1336 SF 1620 SF 1776 SF
Limited GYM
FULL GYM: 14,000 SF thru 2005.


FINANCIAL DEVELOPMENT/liEMBERSHIP/VOLUNT.:
Now 1987 1995 2005
1 x 100 1 X 64 1 X 48 5 X 36 1 x 100 1 x 64 3 x 48 8 x 36 1 x 100 1 x 64 4 x 48 12 x 36 1 x 100 1 x 64 4 x 48 16 x 36
392 SF 596 SF 788 SF 932 SF
ADMINISTRATION:
Now 1987 1995 2005
El PI FT PT FT PT FI PT
1 x 100 1 x 36 3x 48 1 x 100 1 x 36 4 x 48 1 x 100 2 x 36 6 x 48 1 x 100 2 x 36 8x48
280 SF 328 SF 460 SF 556 SF


SUPPORT SYSTEMS:
Now 1987 1995 2005 AREA:
120 200 250 300 Reception
120 200 250 300 Mail Room
0 80 120 150 Copy Area
120 200 300 400 Storage
100 150 200 200 Resource CTR.
150 150 300 300 Child Care
890 1308 1880 2206 TOT. SF
CONFERENCE/CLASSROOMS:
Now 1987 1995 2005 AREA:
1- 600 2 1200 4 2400 7 4200 50 users/600 SF
2 -600 5 1500 7-2100 9 2700 25 users/300 SF
1 200 1 200 2 400 3 600 1 5 users/200 SF
1-120 3 360 3 360 4 480 8 users/120 SF
1520 3260 5260 7980 TOTAL S. F.


Adjacency Coding:
link
refers to: must be adjacent to due to constant interaction.
link
refers to: must be on the same floor due to meetings more than once daily.
refers to: May be on another floor, but must be in the same building.
ADJACENCIES: Division of Chilren and Families Services:
Cf
Shoestring Connection,.
(Special Needs Child
Manager reports to Lynn Brown Executive Director


ADJACENCIES: Finance Division:
Nancy Small
Support
Staff
Administration
Manager reports to Lynn Brown Executive Director
ADJACENCIES: Division of Financial Development/Member ship/Volunteer
Manager reports to Lynn Brown Executive Director Ado Schmidt-Tieszen is Assistant Ex.


AD.IACFNCIFS: H. P. F. R. Division:
Maureen Marqevanne
Exec.
Director
Public Relations & Marketi ng
(^Financial Develop
Manager reports to Lynn Brown Executive Director.
ADJACENCIES: Administration & Women's Resource Center:
Manager Reports to Lynn Brown Executive Director


ADJACENCIES: Employment and Educational Services:
Tricia Gallegos
Family &
Child Services
Manager
Admi nistration (incl. Financial)
HPER
Manager reports to Lynn Brown Executive Director
ADJACENCIES: Office of the Executive Director:
Division DirectorsI
Executive Director reports to the Board of Directors


NFFDS:
- mail room for bulk mailings
- supplies room
- computer room near mail room and work room
- copy room
- Board with list of all directors good signage
- Arts and Crafts room non-carpet
- Resource Center with more space.
- Easy access for maintenence of pool
- Security: locked equipment and storage
- Good phone system
- Place for brown baggers
- Reception area lobby warm, open and friendly
- Sufficient cooling and air conditioning
- Meeting Rooms
- Bike Racks
- Display area for art work
- Pay phones
- Dance studioi with wood floors, bars and mirrors.
- Bathroom facilities for men.
- On premises janitorial and maintenence
- Library sitting room and study room
- Restful lighting
- Record keeping space
- Rooms for classes
- Storage Rooms
- Windows for everyone
- Showers w/ HPER
- Tack surface in meeting area
- Large accounting office portioned off for privacy and a large table for ledgers and spread sheets
- Lighting/signage around building and parking lot.
- Directors of volunteers located near reception lobby.
- Efficient workspace for part-time employees
- kitchen
- HPER director adjacent to the pool
- Computer room near the accountant
- Should have stair access between floors as well as elevator
- Internal Communication System
- Practical space with bathroom for children
- Child care area for volunteers
- Art Gallery that is not just a hallway
- Ability to have revolving art work another area for pluralism




GENERAL FACILITY:
FORM:
- To design a facility that represents the one national imperative of the YWCA- To thrust our collective power toward the elimination of racism wherever it exists and by any means necessary." the building must be ethnic, handicap and class free."
- Ease of conversion and flexibility within reasonable cost parameters should be made possible without hampering the main design objective.
-To Incorporate some of the outdoors in the interiors possibility of an atrium space or a courtyard.
- This facility must be a welcoming one and at the same time take Into account the safety of entrance.
- A well planned graphic/signage program is essential in combination with the interior design for both in-house signage as well as outreach.
FUNCTION:
- The space must provide for the ease of operation of both major philosophical functions: outreach and in-house instruction.
- To provide for a home-base for administrative functions as well as future expansion needs.
- The space must elicit ease of communication between administrative lines as well as help to accomplish the primary objectives of the four major departments: Employment and Educational Services, Division of Families and Children Services, Health Physical Education and Recreation and the Women's Resource Center.
ECONOMY:
- Since life cycle costs are a major concern it is imperative to design an energy efficient building utilizing some solar energy.
- Maintenence and security needs should be lessened through design as much as possible.


H.P.E.R. LOCKER AREA:
USERS:
- women, girls, men and boys.
ACTIVITIES:
- cleaning and dressing before and after entrance to the pools in addition to the storage of belongings while in the pool facility.
GOALS:
-To provide for storage of a variety of belongings including the storage of wheelchairs and other orthopedic devices.
- To provide for the security of belongings either through keys, padlocks or coin-operated locks.
-To provide for a non-secured hang-up clothes area.
-To provide for a waiting area for parents and friends.
- To provide facilities for the above for a female to male ratio of 2 to 1 and for any given time to expect a maximum attendence of 60 people and a normal peak load of 20 people. (These figures provided by the Bay County, Michigan YWCA).
DESIGN CRITERIA:
Adequate space must be provided for
-storing coats boots and umbrellas
-sufficient number of lockers
-some individual dressing booths for women
-Hairdryers in men's and women's areas
- Circulation space
-Dressing space
-Make-up space
-Showers, both gang and individual
-Drying-off space
-Wet" toilet for swimmers
-Dry" toilets and washbasins
-Wheelchair and other handicapped participant facilities.



7
DRV
VET
->


H.P.E.R. SWIMMING POOL:
USERS:
- same as lockers ACTIVITIES:
- Teaching, recreation, fitness, competition swimming and observing. GOALS:
- In addition to recreation and swimming to provide for competition swim use with spectator space.
- To provide for a childrens pool adjacent to the competition pool.
- To provide for storage of pool accessories and handicap items.
-To provide for visual control from the HPER desk.
DESIGN CRITERIA:
- Attention must be paid to the safety of floor finishes.
- Pay attention to the affects of lighting both natural and artificial.
- Height of ceiling must be at least 15 higher than the diving board.
_ Adequate circulation space surrounding the pool.
- Major participant locker room exists should exit at the shallow end of the pool.
** As the SQUATTER'S SESSION did not program for a HPER facility the above information concerning lockers and the swimming pool area referred to A Building Manuak for the YWCA Part 2: Design Guidelines for New or Renovated Buildings. 1981. bv Iris Alex. AIA. Published bv the NAtional Board of the Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A.




YWCA OF METROPOLITAN DENVER
MEETING NOTICE
TO: Facilities Search Committee
From: Alice West, Chair Judy Mays, Staff
We have scheduled a committe meeting for:
August 9, 1984
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Room 18, at the YW
The Squatters meeting has been scheduled for September 8, 1984, the time and place to be decided.
See you on the 9th.
1038 BANNOCK STREET DENVER. COLORADO 80204 (303) 825-7141
A Member Association of the YIVG4 of the U.S.A. A United Way Agency


YWCA STAFF NEEDS:
One large multi-purpose room for group meetings, training, etc.
Holds 100-150 people.
One gymnasium and adjoining storage area for exercise classes, weighttraining classes. Shower and locker room facilities as well as restrooms and dressing area in close proximity.
Playroom/nursery to accommodate up to 25 children, toys, small table and chairs, and play area. Playlot close to room, fenced, room for play equipment and structures. Restrooms and drinking fountains close at hand.
Storage area for equipment.
Kitchen with cabinet and storage space, refrigerator and electrical outlets exhaust fan and eating area.
Three medium sized meeting rooms (at least) to accommodate 50-75 people, for meetings and classes.
Room to serve as Resource Library near entrance, away from play area and exercise classes for research and study. Table and chairs as well as room for publication display area.
Reception area with room to hold 6-10 guests (seating area), room to place up-coming events information and reception desk, with a partitioned area separating guests from receptionist (counter area to conduct business).
Large administration area to hold support staff, administrative and form files, mail area for bulk mailings as well as copy machine area. Room to hold all office supplies as well as paper supplies. Area for financial support staff should be fairly close in proximity.
Individual offices to hold 16 professional staff (giving us room for
growth as expansion occurs and to allow for short-term staff persons involved
in grant work). Restrooms located close to individual offices and administrative
area.
Building should be accessible to handicapped persons.
Ample free parking should adjoin building. Should be accessible to RTD routes.


YWCA OF METROPOLITAN DENVER
YOUR PRESENCE IS REQUESTED!
at the "SQUATTERS'S SESSION' for the YWCA Artchitectural Programming on September 8, 1984 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
We are asking you to become an integral part of this planning session for the future home of the YWCA because of your expertise and knowledge of particular aspects of our organization.
This list was a difficult one to come up with, but we feel we have arrived at a representative sample of the YWCA members, volunteers, staff and board. The ideal would have been everyone.
The enclosed few sheets explain the essentials of what an architectural programming session is all about. Please read through them if you have time. Regardless, the process will become evident quickly the day of the session. It should be a dynamic process and one that will result in a finalized architectural program concerning the needs and wants of the YWCA.
This is not a duplication of the Cabrini session, but rather a culmination of all our previous brainstromings
s
* We will meet in Room 8 at the YWCA from 8:30a. to 4:30p.
* PLEASE RSVP, as it is necessary that people from all facets of the YWCA be represented. Call 825-7141.
* This session will last all day so please attend in comfortable clothes and bring a sack lunch. Coffee and tea will be provided and there will be doughnuts for the breaks.
See you soon!
Alice West, Chair Facilities Search Committee
Alys Novak, President Board of Directors
1038 BANNOCK STREET DENVER. COLORADO 80204 (303) 825-7141
A Member Association of the YIVOI of the U.S.A. A United Way Agency


YWCA "SQUATTER'S SESSION': SEPTEMBER 8. 1 Q84
Programming the requirements of a proposed building involves relatively few & simple principles regardless of how complex the structure.
Programming concerns FIVE steps:
1. Establish GOALS what does the YWCA want to achieve and
why ?
2. Collect & Analyse FACTS what is it all about ?
3. Uncover & Test CONCEPTS how does the client want to
' achieve the goals ?
4. Determine NEEDS how much money space & quality ?
5- State the PROBLEM what are the significant conditions
and the general directions the design of the building's interior should take?


These five steps should be regarded simultaneously with the following four major considerations:
1. FUNCTION - 1. people 2. activities 3. relationships / adjacencies
2 FORM - 1. site 2. environment 3. quality
ECONOMY - 1. initial budget 2. operating costs / energy costs 3. life cycle costs
4. TIME - 1. past 2. present 3. future
s
Programming, therefore, involves an organized method of inquiry_____a
five-step process____interacting with four considerations.


" If programming is problem seeking, then design is problem solving -Pena, 1977:15
FRAMEWORK SQUATTER'S SESSION of approximately 20 30 people to
represent all levels of the YWCA including the membership.
a Squatter's Session is a dynamic group process in which all members of the session participate to fill in the matrix below. This is done verbally, through discussion and then is recorded on 5 x 7 cards and placed in the corresponding matrix area.
PROBLEM
GOALS FACTS CONCEPTS NEEDS STATEMENT
FUNCTION FORM ECONOMY TIME

this matrix takes / ip a whole wa 11 )

%
All four considerations interact at each step. These interactions provide a framework to classify and document information.
The framework can be used as a checklist for missing information.
EE: Pena, Villiam : Problem Seeking : An architectural programming primer, Cahners Books
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