Citation
Arts, drama, and music complex

Material Information

Title:
Arts, drama, and music complex Columbia Basin College
Creator:
Rice, Scott H
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
90, [12] leaves : illustrations, charts, map, photographs (some color), plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Centers for the performing arts -- Designs and plans -- Washington (State) -- Pasco ( lcsh )
Buildings ( fast )
Centers for the performing arts ( fast )
Washington (State) -- Pasco ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 88-89).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Scott H. Rice.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
11279337 ( OCLC )
ocm11279337
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1984 .R525 ( lcc )

Full Text
ARTS, DRAMA, AND MUSIC COMPLEX Columbia Basin College
Pasco, Washington
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for The Degree of Master of Architecture.
Scott H. Nice Spring 19S4
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
AURARIA LIBRARY


The Thesis of Scott H. Rice is approved.
Cabell Childress Principle Advisor
Advisor
University of Colorado at Denver
Date; i£>.


CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION 1
SITE ANALYSIS ' 3
History 3
Site Description 3
Vicinity Map 5
Site Map 6
Soils Report 7
Architectural Context and Site Photograghs 8
CLIMATIC ANALYSIS 19
Climatological Summary 19
Climatic Data 20
Sun Angles 24
CODE ANALYSES 33
Zoning 33
Building 33
Handicap 38
Plumbing 39
ARCHITECTURAL PROGRAM 40
Space Allotments 40
Adjacency Matrices 43
Space Characteristics: Administration 48
Art Department 50
Drama Department 56
Music Department 66
ENERGY/CONSERVATION ANALYSIS 71
Preliminary Balance Point Temperature Analysis 71
Rules of Thumb for Design 76
Local Fuel Costs 77
Available Illumination Analysis 78
Rules of Thumb for Daylighting 80
PRE-DESIGN COST ESTIMATE 81
APPENDIX 82
Acoustical Guidelines 83
Site Lines and Seating Guidelines 85
Bibliography 88
Further References 90
DESIGN SOLUTION 91
CONCLUSION
99


INTRODUCTION
As a result of the industrial revolution modern architecture provided entirely man-made and artificially supported environments.
The "pioneers of the modern movement" strived to make an architectural transformation from what they considered overly ornamented buildings derived from 19th century architecture to more sterile surroundings.
In the early 1970's energy conservation became a diametrically opposed issue to the glass box and its artificial environment within.
Designers began to question the reliance of buildings on elaborate mechanical and lighting systems, which inherently gobbled up available energy. The two extreme responses to this historical background are
(1) to ignore the "old" style of Modern Architecture and synthesise images and reactions from a part of history to generate a building, and
(2) to add solar oriented technical aspects to Modern Architecture.
The intent of the thesis project is to explore the socially affirmative response of images and reactions to technical aspects of energy conscious architecture. The exploration of the integration of energy conscious design and architectural style is a major concern. It is my belief that the integration is possible, and that todays buildings which elicit an "energy building look" are passing fads of the time, although the energy issue is not a temporary situation itself. A further concern is the relationship of the various elements of traditional architectural language and their relationship to new elements of language generated by energy conscious design. A sensitive and integrated solution to both historical architectural language and elements of energy should be attainable. This solution would be more satisfying in that traditional language would exist in harmony with contemporary energy related elements.
An additional intention is to devote particular attention to the effects and integration of energy conscious architecture with the architectural language of performing and fine arts buildings.
Historical 1y, performing and fine arts buildings have a sculptural form in order to "announce their use. This clean and artistic expression of form must not be compromised by energy related requirements of the building. Further, public and collegiate facilities make statements for different bodies; public buildings represent a specific locale while collegiate buildings represent views and values of the stats and the college. A collegiate fine arts building must represent the college and be appealing to the public at the same time because the building is generally used by both.
The thesis project consists of the design of an art-drama-music complex for an existing community college. The building, approximately 39,000 square feet, is to accomodate faculty offices, classrooms and workshops, and display and support areas for the three college departments. The theatre, to be used by both the college and the public is to have a combination proscenium/thrust stage.
The art-dramamusic division of the college feels that it has a special role regarding the commitment of the college to serve the needs of the community. The division has definite cultural benefits which it can offer to or share with the community. At the same time, community response is a definite contribution to the students education by
1


providing stimulation and challenge. The ability to attract audiences is important to the development of the division programs. This thesis project provides and opportunity to explore the integration of the colleges commitment to education and to the community through the architectural form and order of its new fine arts building.
2


SITE ANALYSIS
HISTORY
The Tri Cities is composed of three cities: Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland. All three have grown drastically since the commencement o-f WW II due to the US government's location of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation immediately north of Richland at that time. Several large corporations are located at Hanford; these corporations employ a large number of the local population to do research in many scientific areas. Due to this research oriented atmosphere of the area it is apparent that there -is a lack of interest in the arts.
Columbia Basin College is one of two higher education facilities in a 60 mile radius of the Tri Cities. The other higher education facility, the Graduate Center, primarily serves as an educational support to the local science oriented concerns. Interest in performing arts is supported by CBC along with a local acting group, the Columbia Basin Symphony, several corporation symphonies, and a local concert series, all of whom presently use existing facilities at local junior and senior high schools. Fine arts is supported on a higher education level only by CBC. No other public performing or fine art facilities exist at the present time.
Columbia Basin College is a community college, but also offers several bachelor degree programs in cooperation with two state colleges. At the present time there is an equivalent of over 4000 full time students enrolled at the college. Nearly all students take some courses within the divisions of performing and fine arts. It is the feeling of the college that all students should be able to major in any of the areas of music, art, drama, or speech. To do so, the college must provide adequate facilities to assist students in reaching their educational potential.
Due to the intellectual orientation of the community and the interest of the student body, the potential exists to develop a facility that has far reaching effects on those that live, work and study in the area.
SITE DESCRIPTION
The building site is located in Pasco, Washington on the Columbia Basin College Campus immediately northwest of the intersection of Highway 12 and 20th Avenue, immediatedly west of the existing college 1 i brary.
The campus is located in a semi-desert climatic area in south central Washington. The site itself is relatively barren and flat.
The site slopes gently toward the south at approx i matel y 37.. Views in all directions, when not obstructed by college buildings, are of basically flat land with sparse growth of sage and weeds. Low lying mountains are seen in the distance to both the south and the west.
Existing structures on the site consist of one and two-story
3


buildings. Most o-f these buildings are -from the modern architecture period.
The existing master plan concept o-f the college is to continue toward the full development of a 5,000 student campus. When that goal has been reached steps will be taken to start development of a complementary campus of similar size; the new campus may be located across the Columbia River in an adjacent county directly to the west.
A site map is in a later section. For existing utility locations and contours see large scale drawings (not attached).
4



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SOILS REPORT
Surface Conditions:
The site consists essentially of an open field with a sparse growth of grass. The site is relatively flat with a slight slope to the south of approx i matel y 3/.. The site appears to be entirely undeveloped.
Subsurface conditions:
The subsurface conditions of the site consist of floodplain deposits of silty sand overlying coarser alluvium, as described below:
Stratum 1 Silty sands from the surface to a depth of 1 to 6 feet; moderately loose with medium compressibi1ity. The material does not have a good potential for the support of footings, although if compacted to high density structural fill would provide excellent support of foundations and pavements. Due to its silty nature it is somewhat susceptable to frost.
Stratum 2 The underlying material consists of poorly graded coarse grain sands. The material has low compressibi1ity and is therefore suitable for the support of high concentrated loads. It is also free draining so is a suitable vapor barrier to prevent saturation of Stratum 1.
Groundwater:
Free groundwater currently exists at a depth of approximately 10 feet. This is below the interface of Stratum 1 and Stratum 2. Should the water table rise above the interface, the capillary potential of Stratum 1 could cause saturation of the floor slab and pavement subgrades.
Conclusions:
Compressibility Stratum 1, due to its silty nature possesses moderate compressibility. Therefore, shallow footings founded in compacted Stratum 1 material should not experience extensive sett 1ement.
Subgrade Drainage Stratum 1 has a moderate capillary potential; Stratum 2 is sufficiently permeable to provide excellent subsurface drainage. Stratum 2 can act as a vapor barrier provided the groundwater level does not rise appreciably. If the groundwater level were to rise to the interface of Stratum 1 and Stratum 2 capillary action would cause saturation of the pavement and slab subgrade. This could result in effevescence and frost heave.
Pavement Support Stratum 1 will be an excellent support of concentrated loads due to vehicular traffic vehicles provided no saturation of the stratum is water table.
Lateral Farces active and passive earth pressures close to code values.
Bearing Pressures Stratum 1 has the potential of providing sufficient shear strength for footings if compacted as required.
material for and service
the
caused by a raised
are reasonably
7


Recommendations: '
A possibility of differences in loading magnitudes between the theatre area and adjacent one-story areas of the structure exist. Therefore, it is recommended that the theatre footings bear on structural fill to limit settling while the footings for the lighter parts of the structure bear on Stratum 1 as is. If the areas adjacent to the theatre area are designed as two or three-story portions of the building the footings in these areas should also rest on structural fill. Settlement of the theatre area could also be limited by founding the footings on Stratum 2 at higher bearing pressures. Since Stratum 1 does not have a collapsing potential, floor slabs may rest on unexcavated material.
Building Foundations:
Shallow isolated and continuous footings should be designed as fol1ows:
FOOTING TYPE MIN. DEPTH MIN. WIDTH ALLOW. BEARING
Continuous wall 24" 13" 2200 psf
Isolated column 24 " 24" 2400 psf
The above recommended bearing pressures are intended to include dead loads plus sustained live loads, and may exclude temporary live loads (less than one month duration) as well as subterranean footing weight. The bearing pressure may be increased by 1/3 when the temporary effects of wind and seismic forces are included.
Floor Slabs:
To provide a barrier for capillary water, and to dissipate concentrated floor loads, floor slabs should be underlain by a 4"course of open-graded rock.
ARCHITECTURAL CONTEXT AND SITE PHOTOGRAPHS
The college was founded in 1958, at which time several of the existing buildings were constructed. Others in the immediate area of the new building site have been contructed since the early 1970s. The new fine arts building will be on the most western part of the "educational" portion of the campus (playing fields beyond).
The layout of the campus seems to radiate from the library (which is round) but seems to lack strong order.
Style:
The predominant general style is modern. The technical education (photos 25-26, see following pages) and student union buildings (22-24) have some large elements appearing to be of a stylized classical language. Other elements in these buildings are cubic and are integrated into the main body of each building.
8


The older buildings, math science, administration, library and parts o-f the physical education building (4,5,7,9-12) appear to be conservative for their time. They are reminiscent of earlier works (late 20s and 30s) by Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe; functionalism and strong ordering prevai1 to some degree. Forms include elongated, circular and cubic volumes.
Several buildings around the campus have colorful murals an one of their sides (3,6,19). These murals are on both old and new buildings.
Scale:
The buildings on campus are primarily one-story. These one-story buildings are low and elongated. The newer Student Union (22-24) and Technical Education (25-26) buildings are multi-story. Massive masonry elements are integrated into the design of these two newer buildings.
It follows that as the college continues to grow the scale of the buildings continue to become more grand.
Materi al:
The major (and newer) buildings on campus are of split face or painted masonry block. Most of the newer one-story buildings have wood or stucco exteriors. Some of these buildings have various combinations of the above material.
\
9


1. Visitor entry to col 1ege.

( 1




View of campus from freeway and Court Street.
3. Entry at
Administration Bui 1di ng.


4. Front o-f
{
6. Utility Building with mural.
11


tiath/Sci ence Building.

8. Building site from southwest.

9. South side of P.E. Bui 1di ng.



View -from building site to Library.
View east between Math/Science and Library buildings.
12. "Mall" between
Math/Science and F'.E. buildings.


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16.
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View northwest from building site.

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View north from building site to Industrial Building
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View northeast from building site to Student Union Bui 1di ng.
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19. Business Building
4
20. Building Sits -from northwest.
21.

View northeast into court of Student Union Building.


r
r
i

West elevation of Student Union Bui 1di ng.



24. View north of Student Bui 1di ng.
North (back) elevation of Student Union Building.
of entry Union



View northeast to Technical Education Bui 1di ng.
Front o-f Vocational Bui 1 ding.
View northeast to Technical Education Bui 1di ng.


CLIMATIC ANALYSIS
CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY
Pasco, Washington is located in the main valley o-f the Columbia River. Local typography is relatively -flat resulting in little influence on the climate.
The climate is relatively mild and dry. The moderate climate is due to the prevailing flow of air from over the Pacific Ocean. It has characteristics of both maritime and continental climates, modified by the Cascade Mountains. The maritime influence is strongest in winter when the prevailing westerlies are the strongest and mast steady. Summers are dry and rather hot, and winters cool with only light snowfall. Cold spells are caused by outbreaks of frigid air from over Canada. They are broken by Chinooks, a flow of warmer air from over the ocean. Summer hot spells are caused by a northward drift of warm dry air. Most summers have about 4 days with temperatures above 100. Annual precipi tation over the city usually ranges between 6 and 16 inches. Snowfall is light, the average seasonal fall being 20-30 inches. Precipitation is quite light because the prevailing flow of air from over the ocean loses much of its moisture while crossing the Cascade Mountains.
Humidity is moderate most of the time. Highest humidity, near 100 percent, is generally during periods of fog in late fall and winter. Lowest humidity, near 10 percent, usually occurs in hot summer afternoons. There is considerable diurnal variation in the warmer months. In July the average humidity is about 68 percent at 4 a.m. and 25 percent at 4 p.m. In January the averages are about 32 percent at 4 a.m. and 71 percent at 4 p.m.
Winds are generally quite light but occasional damaging windstorms and duststorms may be expected. Winds average about 7 m.p.h. for the year, with somewhat higher speeds in late spring and summer and lower speeds in winter. Winds come primarily from the west. Periods of air stagnation also occur.
Summers are sunny, with about 85 percent of possible sunshine. Winters are generally cloudy, with only a third of the possible sunshi ne.
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SUN ANGLES
The -following charts are from the Solar Shading program from Building Energy Performance Software by D. Stafford Wcclard. The charts include Altitude, azimuth, horizontal shading angles (H3A), and vertical shading angles (VSA).
LOCATION = PASCO ORIENTATION = 90 SOLAR TIME
LATITUDE = 46.19 LONGITUDE = 119.16
MONTH = 1 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ USA HSA
7,4 = SUNRISE
8 4.4 125.4 5.4 35.4
9 12.2 137.2 17.6 47.2
10 18.3 150.4 33.8 60.4
11 22.3 164.8 57.4 74.8
12 23.7 180 90 90
13 22.3 195.2 0 0
14 18.3 209.6 0 0
15 12.2 2 2 2.8 0 0
16 4.4 234.6 0 0
16.6 = SUNSET
LOCATION = PASCO SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 270 LATITUDE = 46.19 LONGITUDE = MONTH = 1 DAY = 21 119.16
HR AL AZ USA HSA
N i 1 1 = SUNRISE
8 4.4 125.4 0 0
9 2 2 137.2 0 0
10 18.3 150.4 0 0
11 22.3 164.8 0 0
12 23.7 180 0 0
13 O O *7 n w 195.2 57.4 -74.
14 18.3 209.6 33.8 -60.
15 12.2 222 n 3 17.6 -47.
16 4.4 234.6 5.4 -35.
16.6 = SUNSET
LOCATION = PASCO SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION ISO
LATITUDE = 46.19 LONGITUDE = 119.16 MONTH = 1 DAY =21
HR 7,4 AL = SUNRISE AZ USA HSA
3 4.4 125.4 7.6 -54.6
9 1 ?2 137.2 16.4 -42.8
10 13.3 150.4 20.9 -29.6
11 22.3 16 4 8 23 -15.2
12 23.7 130 23.7 0
13 nn ? 4. n 195.2 23 15.2
14 18.3 209.6 20.9 29.6
15 1 2 2 222.8 16.4 42.3
16 16. 4.4 6 = SUNSET 234.6 7.6 54.6
24


LOCATION = PASCO SOLAR TIME LOCATION = PASCO SOLAR TIME
ORIENTATION = 90 ORIENTATION = 270
LATITUDE = 46.19 -ONGITUDE = 119.16 LATITUDE = 46. 19 LONG ITUDE = 119.16
MONTH = 2 DAY = 21 MONTH = 2 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ USA HSA HR AL AZ USA HSA
6.7 = SUNRISE 6.7 = SUNRISE
7 2 108.6 2.1 18.6 7 P 108.6 0 0
3 11.5 119.9 13.2 29.9 8 11.5 119.9 0 0
9 19.9 132.5 26.1 42.5 9 19.9 132.5 o 0
10 26.6 146.7 42.4 56.7 10 26.6 146.7 0 0
11 31 162.3 63.3 72.3 11 31 162.8 0 0
12 32.6 180 90 90 12 32.6 130 0 0
13 31 197.2 0 0 13 31 197.2 63.8 -72
14 26.6 213.3 0 0 14 26.6 213.3 42.4 -56.
15 19.9 227.5 0 0 15 19.9 O '*) "7 c*. 4. A.. / 26.1 -42
16 11.5 240.1 0 0 16 11.5 240.1 13.2 -29
17 2 251.4 0 0 17 2 251.4 2.1 -18
17. 3 = SUNSET 17. 3 = SUNSET
LOCATION = PASCO SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION ~ 130
LATITUDE = 46.19 LONGITUDE = 119.16
MONTH := 2 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ USA HSA
6.7 = SUNRISE
~r 2 108.6 6.3 -71 4
8 11.5 119.9 OO '? -60.1
9 19.9 132.5 28.1 -47.5
10 26.6 146.7 30.9 -33.3
11 31 162.3 32.2 1 7 n \. /
12 32.6 180 32.6 0
13 31 197.2 32.2 17.2
14 26.6 213.3 30.9 33.3
15 19.9 227.5 28.1 47.5
16 11.5 240.1 no o *4 JU. M A - 60.1
17 O 251.4 6.3 71.4
17. 3 = SUNSET
25


LOG ATION = PASCO SOL AR TIME LOCATION = PASCO SOL AR TIME
ORIENTATION = 90 OR I ENTATION = 270
LATITUDE = 46.19 LONGITUDE = 119.16 LATITUDE = 46. .19 LONGITUDE = 119.16
MONTH = 4 DAY = 21 MONTH = 4 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ USA HSA HR AL AZ USA HSA
5.1 = SUNRISE 5.1 = SUNRISE
6 8.3 81.9 8.4 -8.1 6 8.3 81.9 0 0
7 18.7 92.7 13.7 2.7 7 18.7 92.7 0 0
8 28.9 104.2 29.7 14.2 8 28.9 104.2 0 0
9 38.6 117.5 42 27.5 9 38.6 117.5 0 0
10 47.1 134 56.2 44 10 47.1 134 0 0
11 53.1 155 72.4 65 11 53.1 155 0 0
12 55.4 130 90 90 12 55.4 180 0 0
13 53.1 205 0 0 13 53.1 205 72.4 -65
14 47.1 226 0 0 14 47.1 226 56.2 -44
15 38.6 242.5 0 0 15 38 6 242.5 42 -27,
1 17 18.7 267.3 0 0 17 18.7 267.3 13.7 _2 ;
18 3.3 278 1 0 0 18 8.3 278.1 8.4 8.1
18.9 = SUNSET 18.9 = SUNSET
LOCATION = PASCO ORIENTATION = 180 LATITUDE = 46.19 MONTH = 4 SOLAR TIME LONGITUDE = DAY =21 119.16
HR AL AZ USA HSA
5.1 = SUNRISE
6 8.3 31.9 0 0
7 18.7 92.7 82.2 -87.3
8 28.9 104. 2 66.1 -75.8
9 38.6 117. 5 60 -62.5
10 47.1 134 57.1 -46
11 53.1 155 55.8 -25
12 c* is* /. .. *4 ISO 55.4 0
13 53.1 205 55.3 25
14 47.1 226 57.1 46
15 38.6 242. 5 60 62.5
16 28.9 255. 3 66.1 75.8
17 18.7 267. 3 82.2 87.3
18 CD 3 C*l 278. 1 0 0
18. 9 = SUNSET


LOCATION = PASCO ORIENTATION = 90 LATITUDE = 46.19
SOLAR TIME LONGITUDE ~ 119.16
LOCATION = PASCO ORIENTATION = 270 LATITUDE = 46.19
SOLAR TIME LONGITUDE = 119.16
MONTH 5 HR AL DAY AZ = 21 VSA HSA
4.5 5 = SUNRISE 4.6 65.5 5.1 -24.5
6 14.4 75.8 14.8 -14.2
7 24.6 86 24.7 -4
8 35 97 35.2 7
9 45.1 109.9 46.3 19.9
10 54.2 126.6 59.9 36.6
11 61.2 149.7 74.5 59.7
12 63.9 180 90 90
13 61.2 210.3 0 0
14 54.2 233.4 0 0
15 45.1 250.1 0 0
16 35 263 0 0
17 24.6 274 0 0
18 144 284.2 0 0
19 4.6 294.5 0 0
19. 5 = SUNSET
MONTH = 5 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ USA HSA
4.5 = SUNRISE
5 4.6 65.5 0 0
6 14.4 75.8 0 0
*r / 24.6 86 0 0
8 35 97 0 0
9 45.1 109.9 0 0
10 54.2 126.6 0 0
11 61.2 149.7 0 0
12 63.9 180 0 0
13 61.2 210.3 74.5 -59.
14 54.2 233.4 59.9 -36.
15 45.1 250.1 468 -19
16 35 263 35.2 '7 /
17 24.6 274 24.7 4
18 14.4 284.2 14.8 14.2
19 4.6 294.5 5.1 24 5
19. 5 = SUNSET
LOCATION = PASCO SOLAR TIME
ORIENTATION = 180
LAT ITUDE 46 ,19 LONG ITUDE = 119.16
MONTH = 5 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ VSA HSA
4.5 = SUNRISE
5 4.6 65.5 0 0
6 14.4 75 8 0 0
7 24.6 86 0 0
8 35 97 80.1 83
9 45.1 109.9 71.2 -70.1
10 54.2 126.6 66.3 -53.4
11 61.2 149.7 64.6 -30.3
12 63.9 180 63.9 0
13 61.2 210.3 64.6 30.3
14 54.2 233.4 66.3 53.4
15 45.1 250.1 71.2 70.1
16 35 263 80.1 33
17 24.6 274 0 0
18 14.4 284.2 0 0
19 4.6 294.5 0 0
19. 5 SUNSET
28


LOCATION = PASCO SOL AR TIME LOCATION = PASCO SOL AR TIME
ORIENTATION ~ 90 ORIENTATION - 270
LATITUDE = 46 .19 LONGITUDE = 119.16 LATITUDE = 46 . 19 LONGITUDE = 119.16
MONTH = 9 DAY = 21 MONTH = 9 DAY = 21
HR AL A Z VSA HSA HR AL AZ USA HSA
6 = SUNRISE 6 ~ SUNRISE
7 10.2 101.1 10.4 11 1 7 10.2 101. 1 0 0
8 20.1 112.8 21.6 22.8 8 20.1 112.: 8 0 0
9 29.1 125.9 34.6 35.9 9 29.1 125. 9 0 0
10 36.7 141.4 50.1 51.4 10 36.7 141. 4 0 0
11 41.8 159.7 68.8 69.7 11 41.8 159. 7 0 0
12 43.6 180 90 90 12 43.6 130 0 0
13 41.8 200.3 0 0 13 41.8 200. 3 68.8 -69.
14 36.7 218.6 0 0 14 36.7 218. 6 50.1 -51.
15 29.1 234.1 0 0 15 29.1 234. 1 34.6 -35.
16 20.1 247.2 0 0 16 20.1 247. n 21.6 ~ o 2
17 10.2 258.9 0 0 17 10.2 258.' 9 10.4 -ii.
18 -.1 269.9 .1 0 18 -.1 269.' 9 0 -.i
18 = SUNSET 18 = SUNSET

LOCATION = PASCO SOLAR TIME
ORIENTATION = 180
LATITUDE = 46. 19 LONGITUDE 119.16
MONTH = 9 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ VS A HSA
6 SUNRISE
7 10.2 101.1 43 -78.9
8 20.1 112.8 43.4 -67.2
9 29 1 125.9 43.5 -54.1
10 36.7 141.4 43.6 -38.6
11 41.3 159.7 43.6 -20.3
12 43.6 180 43.6 0
13 41.8 200.3 43.6 20.3
14 36.7 213.6 43.6 38.6
15 29.1 234.1 43.5 54.1
16 20.1 247.2 43.4 67.2
17 10.2 258.9 43 78.9
18 -.1 269.9 0 39.9
18 = SUNSET
29


LOCATION = PASCO ORIENTATION 90 LATITUDE = 46.19 MONTH = 1.0
SOLAR TIME
LONGITUDE = 119.16 DAY =21
LOCATION = PASCO ORIENTATION = 270 LATITUDE = 46.19 MONTH = 10
SOLAR TIME
LONGITUDE = 119.16 DAY =21
HR AL AZ USA HSA HR 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 N i 6.8 = SUNRISE 6.8 = SUNRISE
7 1.6 108.9 1.7 18.9 7 1.6 108.9 0 0
8 11. 1 120.2 12.8 30.2 ' 8 11.1 120.2 0 0
9 19.4 132.8 25.6 42.8 9 19.4 132.8 0 0
10 26.1 147 41.9 57 10 26.1 147 0 0
11 30.5 162.9 63.5 72.9 11 30.5 162.9 0 0
12 32.1 180 90 90 12 32.1 180 0 0
13 30.5 197.1 0 0 13 30.5 197.1 63.5 -72.
14 261 213 0 0 14 26.1 213 41.9 -57
1 5 19.4 227.2 0 0 15 19.4 227.2 25.6 -42.
1.6 11.1 239.8 0 0 16 11.1 239.8 12.3 -30.
17 1.6 251.1 0 0 17 1.6 251.1 1.7 -18.
17. 2 = SUNSET 17. 2 = SUNSET
LOCATION = PASCO SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 180 LATITUDE = 46.19 LONGITUDE = MONTH = 10 DAY = 21 119.16
HR AL AZ USA HSA
6.8 = SUNRISE
7 1.6 108.9 5 -71.1
8 11.1 120.2 21.2 -59.8
9 19.4 132.3 27.4 -47.2
10 26.1 147 30.3 -33
11 30.5 162.9 31.7 -17.1
12 32.1 180 32.1 0
13 30.5 197.1 31.7 17.1
14 26.1 213 30.3 33
15 19.4 227.2 27.4 47.2
16 11.1 239.3 21.2 59.8
17 1.6 251.1 5 71.1
17. 2 = SUNSET
30


LOCATION = PASCO SOL AR TIME
ORIENTATION = 90
LATITUDE = 46.19 LONGITUDE = 119.16
MON TH = 11 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ USA HSA
7.5 = SIJNRI SE
8 4.1 125.5 5.1 35. 5
9 11.9 137.4 17.3 47. 4
10 IS 150.5 33.5 60. 5
11 22 164.3 57.1 74. a
12 23.4 180 90 90
13 22 195.2 0 0
14 18 209.5 0 0
15 11.9 n n n z. V.. a., a., n *../ 0 0
16 4.1 234.5 0 0
16.5 = SUNSET
LOCATION = PASCO SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = ISO
LATITUDE = 46. 19 LONGITUDE = 119.16
MONTH =11 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ VSA HSA
7.5 = SUNRISE
8 4.1 125.5 7.1 -54.5
9 11.9 137.4 16 -42.6
10 18 150.5 20.5 -29.5
11 O'? 164.8 22.7 -15.2
12 23.4 180 23.4 0
13 22 195.2 22.. 7 15.2
14 IS 209.5 20.5 29.5
15 11.9 222.6 16 42.6
16 4.1 234.5 7.1 54.5
16. 5 = SUNSET
LOCATION = PASCO SOLAR TIME'
ORIENTATION = 270
LATITUDE = 46, ,19 LONGI TUDE = 119.16
MONTH =11 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ USA HSA
7.5 = SUNRISE
3 4.1 125.5 0 0
9 11.9 137.4 0 0
10 18 150.5 0 0
11 2? 164.8 0 0
12 23.4 180 0 0
13 22 195.2 57.1 -74
14 18 209.5 33.5 -60
15 11.9 222.6 17.3 -47
16 4.1 234 5 5.1 -35
16. 5 = SUNSET
31


CODE ANALYSES
ZONING CODE REQUIREMENTS Pasco Zoning Code, 19S3 Edition
A. Zone: R-l
B. Building Height:
25' maximum...appeal, assumed 45 maximum.
C. Minimum Lot Area:
7,200 S.F. minimum.
D. Density:
Low density residential... appeal, assumed UBC occupancy group A.i acceptable.
E. Lot Coverage:
407. of total lot area in building foot print.
F. Yard Requirements:
Front setback: 20
Side yard setbacks: 5
Rear yard setback: equal to height at building
G. Parking Requirements:
One parking space per sight patrons, or one feet of bench seating, or (if no fixed seat of gross floor area. Regular parking space compact parking space sice: 7-6" x !5-0" total parking in compact parking. Guideline parking space in parking lot.
space per 12
s) one spac e p
sice: 9 -0 H v
with a i-isr./ ^ _J / fT> e* X
1i naal
7r
18!
assume
O a r 0 "; of per
H. Fences, Walls, Hedges:
Front yard: 3--6 maximum height.
Side and rear yards: 6~0" maximum height.
BUILDING CODE REQUIREMENTS Uniform Building Cods, 1982 Edition
I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED BUILDING
A. Name of Building Being Anaylzed: Performing Arts Building
B, Area: 39,243 Sq. Ft. Q Predesign Phase (See space allotment for
33


breakdown)
C. Capacity o-f Bldg.: 1441 people
D. Number o-f Stories Required by Program: 2 S< 3
II
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
GENERAL CODE REQUIREMENTS
Fire Zone in which project is located (I, II or III) Pasco-same as) III U.B.C.
Occupancy Group: Mixed as per U.B.C. Sect. 503 a
(II city of
Type of Construction (See Table 5-C S< Sec. 506) 5D)
Seismic Zone: 2 Wind Load: 20 psf Snow Load: 25 lbs/sf Uniform Loads:
AREA COMMENTS
Assembly areas
I (U.C.B. Table
LIVE LOAD
Exit Facilities, pub' Offices Schools
Fixed seats 50 psf
Moveable seats 100
Stage areas and
end osed p 1 atf arms 125
100
50
40
Cl assrooms
Storage Light
Heavy
III. SPECIFIC CODE REQUIREMENTS: (BASED ON SECTIONS I, II III
ABOVE)
A. Requirements Based on Occupancy:
Front on or direct access to minimum 20 public street w/minimum 20 .
Right-of-way uobstructed access t.o street.
Main entrance to front on street or access way.
Dampers in ducts @ occupancy separations.
One lavatory per 2 toilets for each sex.
One D.F. per floor.
See Sec. 605 for mecb.
125
250
34


Requirements based on type of construction:
1. General: Entire building must be Type I construction to qualify. (Table 5-A, 5D)
Structural elements steel, iron, concrete, masonry.
2. Specific: One hour part, only for offices at corridor for 30 occupants.
All parapets shall have coping of 26 gauge minimum metal or approved material.
Projections from walls shall be of noncombustible materials. Elevator shafts serving more than 2 floors shall be vented to o.s. Guardrails 42" if 30" above floor & 6 sphere cant go through.
3. Fire ratings are as follows:
PART OF BUILDING FIRE RATING REQUIRED REMARKS
Ex ter i or Bearing Walls Type 1, 4 hr 6 1/2" th. grade A concrete
Inter!or Bearing Wal 1 s 3 hr
Ext. Non-Beari ng Wal 1 s 4 hr
Structural Frame 3 hr
Partitions Permanent 1 hr Fire retardant wood ok.
Verti cal Openings 2 hr Not required if serving only one adjacent floor and not connected to openings serving other floors Openings into shafts 1 hr for 1 hr rated walls and 1 1/2 hr for hr rated walls.
FIocr5 2 hr If wood sleepers under wood floor, maximum open space under floor' 100 SF
Roofs 2 hr Nonstructural roofs and members may be unprotected. Noncombustib.1 e material required if ceiling more than 25 high.
Exteri or Doors and Wi ndcws 3/4 hr 3/4 hr fire assembly protection if less than 20 from adjacent property lines or buildings. No
openings less than 5 from


bui1di ngs.
Interior Court
Walls 4 hr
No openings where width less than
C. Floor Construction:
Mezzanine -Floors may be wood or unprotected steel. (See notes in Table 3 VI C> .
D. Roo-f Construction:
More than 25' above -floor may be unprotected noncombustable material, between IS 25", Roof structure requires 1 hr. protecti on.
E. Stairs Exits; (See table below)
1. Occupant load (calculate using Table 33-A Section 3301)
Area of bldg, in S.F.: 39,243; 1441 people.
Allowable S.F./Person or seating capacity: 425 fixed seats.
2. Minimum number of exits required from building (Section 3302):
4.
Two exits if more than 10 people on a floor; 2 exits if more than 50 occupants in a classroom.
3. Total width of exits required (Section 3302):
Occupant load/50 = 1441 pecple/50 = 29 lineal feet.
4. Total Width of exits from each story (Section 3302): See table below.
5. If only two exits are required they shall be placed a distance apart equal to not less than one half of the greatest diagonal of the room. Where three or more exits are required they shall be arranged a reasonable distance apart so that if one becomes blocked others will be available.
No point in an unsprinklered building may be more than 150 feet away from an exit. The distance is 200 feet for sprinklered buildings of Type I or Type II construction.
6. Doors:
Minimum 36" wide clear; exits Min 30" high.
Swing in direction of exit travel if over 50 occupants.
7. Corridors:
Minimum 6 wide in Music, Art & Drama Buildings.
Minimum 44" wide otherwise.
Class A Finish N.F.P.A.
20' max dead end corridor.
8. Stairs:
Minimum 44" wide or 40 1/2" face-to-face of handrail, maximum R = 7 1/2", maximum T = 10".
Landing length equal to stair width, 4?-0 maximum 12" maximum vertical between landings.
Handrails each side on stairs over 44" wide.
1 Hr. enclosure in Drama Office buildings (if serving more
36


than one adjacent -Floor.
1 stair up to rooF in Office Building (it 4 stories or more). Stair requirements also for Theatre Aisles w/ risers and treads.
9. Seating:
Standard seating space 12" minimum from back of seat t.o most forward projection of seat immediately behind.
Continental seating 18" clear row of 18 or less, 20" clear for 35 or less, 21" clear row of 45 or less, 22" 46 or less, 24" for 60 or more.
General: Benches 18" per person! self-rising seats are
measured with seats up.
10. Exits based on Occupancy:
Exit courts can have no openings where court is less than 10 wi de.
Main exit 1/2 of occupant load or equal to all aisle stairs b. exitways leading to it, whichever is greater and then must have stair or ramp to public way side exits of auditoriums on each side...to handle 1/3 of occupancy each reached by cross aisle
2 exits from offices if 30 or more occupants, 2 exits from all other areas if 50 or more occupancy.
F. Skylights:
Of noncombustible material if surface less than 45 degree angle, skylight to be 4" minimum above roof surface. Wire or tempered glass.
See Section 3401 for glass in floor or sidewalks used for lighting.
G. Fire Extinguishing Systems:
Automatic system required at: Dressing rooms, workshops storerooms, areas accessory to stages; Stage, Tie 8< Fly Galleries; all space back of proscenium; any space under enclosed stairway to be used; basements larger than 1500 sf.
Also required if floor areas over 1500 sf S< there is not provided 20 sf of opening (38" min width) every 50 lineal feet or fraction thereof; if over 75 deep need openings on two sides.
H. Miscellaneous:
Aisles: Side aisle 36" minimum if one each side, 42" minimum if
serving both sides.
To increase 1 1/2 per 5 over minimum from farthest point to exit.
Continental side aisles minimum 44".
Maximum of 150 line of travel to exit, 200 feet if sprinklered.
Standard spacing maximum of 6 seats to side aisle.
Cont. spacing maximum 5 rows of seats per pair of exit doors.
Cross aisle, foyer or exit for receiving side aisles. Maximum slope of aisles 1:8.
Cross aisle width = widest aide & 50V. of total required width of other aisles, dead end 20 maximum.
37


Corridor Glass: 1/4 wire glass fixed steel frames.
Total glass maximum 25"/. of corridor wall. Balconies: With occupancy over 11, 2 exits directly to exterior or
approved stairway.
If more than one balcony exits to exterior or enclosed stair.
OCCUPANCY LOAD DETERMINATION AND EXIT WIDTHS
Department Area Occup 3rd FI 2nd FI Mezz 1st FI Bui 1di ng
Admi n 4116 49 2 & 2 e 2
3-0" 3 -0" 3 -0 "
Art 9912 420 2 @ i a 3 @
3 -0 " 3 -0" 3 -0"
Drama 18662 758 2 @ 1 @ 5 a
3 0 " 3 0" T ? .O 11
Musi c 6558 240 2 a 1 2
3 -0 " 3 -0" 3 -0 "
TOTALS 39248 SF 29 lin ft
HANDICAP REQUIREMENTS
(State requirements from An Illustrated Handbook for Barrier Free Design; Washington State Rules and Regulations".)
A. Parking:
Spaces to be 12 wide with minimum 3-0" curb cut (as required). Maximum travel distance 200.
B. Walks:
Continuous surface uninterrupted by changes in level unless with a ramp. Minimum landing of 60"x60" if door swings over landing; other landing 36"x60" minimum.
Landings at bottom of each ramp 72" in length minimum.
Ramps over 1 in 20 slope must be provided with a handrail.
C. Entrances:
At least one primary entrance to each building must be usable by the handicapped.
D. Doors:
18" clear on opening side of door on side where door opens out. Minimum clear width 32".
E. Floors:
Floors must be on a common level throughout a given story, unless
38


connected by ramps.
All public use spaces an each -floor must be accessible by the handi c ap ped.
F. Toilet Rooms:
At least one toilet room on each floor must be accessible by the handicapped. An unobstructed space defined by a 60" diameter circle must be provided (exception: toilet rooms with one water closet only may have an unobstructed space of 36"x60").
Sink height to be 31" to 33" with a 22" clear space for wheelchairs clearance underneath.
G. Drinking Fountains:
At least one drinking fountain accessible to the handicapped.
per floor (where required) must be Mounting height to be 32".
PLUMBING CODE REQUIREMENTS Uniform Plumbing Code. 1982 Edition
A. Number of Occupants:
50/i of occupant load for each sex.
B. Toilet Room Location:
Employee toilets to be near their work areas.
C. Handicap Requirements:
All toilet rooms required by code shall have at. least one toilet, lavatory, and miscellaneous accessories accessable by the handicapped; clear space beyond the room door opening shall be not less than 60 inches in diameter. Minimum toilet compartment sis 42"x72" with door swinging out. At least one drinking fountain be accessable to the handicapped.
See Handicap Code Requirements for further requirements.
PLUMBING FIXTURE COUNT
Department Des. M 1 oad F Toilet M s F Uri nal Lavat M ry i r D.F.
Admi nstrati on 8 8 1 1 1 1 i 1/f 1
Art 119 119 '-h 4 4 jT 3 3
Drama 275 275 2 n rs 2 1
Musi c 90 90 1 3 2 2 2
39
r+ f9


ARCHITECTURAL PROGRAM
SPACE ALLOTMENTS
ADMINISTRATION:
Entry 100 S.F.
Reception 600
Di rector 200
Conference Gffices 3 120 S.F. ea. 240
1 @ 140
2 @ 130 820
Lounge 2 200 400
Storage 2 @ 200 400
Toilets 6 @ 30 180
subtotal 2940
Ci rculat i on T ot a 1 (407. ot 2940) 1176 4116 S.F.
ART DEPARTMENT: Lobby/gal 1ery (some open 2 stories) 1000 S.F
Sculpture studio (some open 2 stories) 1050
Pottery studio 350
Pottery storage 800
Kiln room 250
Weidi ng/metals (incl. crystal furnace) 400
Woodshop 700
Jewelry 200
Photogr ap hy/pr i ntshop 350
Painting studio (w/ models platform) 1400
Graphics studio Offices 3 120 S.F. ea. 360
subtotal 3260
Ci rcul at i on (207. of 8260) (incl. jan. and stor.) -1652 .
Total 9912 S
40


MUSIC DEPARTMENT:
Lobby 300 S.F.
Piano and group practice 400
Vocal/theory room 965
Band room 1230
Instrument storage 200
Individual practice rooms
7 ii 55 S.F. ea.
7 @ 65 S.F. ea. 740
Listening rooms
3 047 S.F. ea. 141
Music Library 530
OfTices 3 0 120 S.F. ea. 360
Toilets 500
subtotal 5465
Circulation <207. of 5465) .1093
Total 6553 S.F.
DRAMA DEPARTMENT:
Lobby 1100 S.F.
Balcony lobby 500
Publi ci ty 140
Box office 60
Eooking office 120
Coats 130
Toilets (public) 550
Theatre, 425 fixed seats
(incl. balcony seating) 3400
Thrust stage 13'x36 Trap/orchestra 15'x25' 650
(under thrust stage) 375
Stage 28'x45' stage loft height 50' 1250
proscenium opening width 36'+-proscenium opening height 13+-
Stage loft storage 400
Stage ancillary space 600
Stage storage 600
Dressing, mens 320
Dressing, women's 350
Green room 200
Lighting/sound booth 130
Projection booth 30
Costume shop, scenery storage 1200
Scenery shop 900
Offices 3 @ 120 S.F. Speech/Iecture rooms ea. 360
3 !i 800 S.F. ea. 2400
Mechani cal 1500
41


Jani tcri al 100
subtotal 16965
Circulation (10V. Total of 16965) 1697 1S662 S.F.
TOTAL SQUARE FOOTAGE 39,243 S.F,
42


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47


SPACE CHARACTERISTICS
ADMINISTRATION
Reception:
Use:
Reception area -for those with business with the division or in need o-f information and -for students needing course advising. Secretarial area -for director's secretary and -far support and clerical staff. Faculty mail boxes are located here. Some informal discussion may take place in this area.
Character:
Possibly open plan; simple and organised space with some privacy
so students will feel free to At the same time first time receiving person. Spaces for near major circulation and
for staff. Area should be informal travel through to faculty offices, visitors should be able to find the informal talking should be provided away from staff work areas.
Ori entati on:
Reception should be easily seen from major building areas. It should serve as a buffer for faculty and director offices beyond. Furnishings and Equipment:
Faculty mail boxes, information counter, three desks and chairs, files, copier.
Li ghti ng:
Daylighting desired, task lighting required.
Special Surfaces:
Floors should be carpeted, entry area should be desirable surface. Dividers and ceilings should be acoustically treated.
Directors Office:
Use:
Administrative area and meeting area for small groups. Security is of some importance.
Character:
This office should be nicest of all in the building but not pretentious. Daylighting with nice views of interior or exterior of building while still maintaining privacy is desired. Furnishings and Equipment:
Six chairs and conference table, desk and chair, backbar, bookshelves on one wall.
Environmental Controls:
Acoustically treated walls.
Li ghti ng:
Daylighting required.
Conference:
Use:
Meeting and presentation room for faculty and others. Room to handle 16-18 people. Room should accommodate both round table meeting and visual aid presentations.
Character:
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Space should be a comfortable atmosphere and be -flexible -for various meeting types.
Orientation:
Should be capable of being closed off for acoustical and visual privacy. Entry should be near counter opposite chalkboard/scrsen. Might be near lounge, kitchenette for easy service of drinks, etc. Furnishings and Equipment:
Conference table and 12-16 chairs, combination
chalkboard/projection screen with counter and storage opposite. Lighting:
Daylighting from one side or from above is desirable.
Faculty offices:
Use:
Most faculty offices to be used by full-time faculty member, one or two may be used by visiting staff. Offices will be used for general preparation and study. Security is of some importance. Character:
Simple, easily organised, fairly compact with room for 2-3 visitors. Views to parts of building interior or exterior would be a plus.
Li ghti ng:
Daylighting required.
Environmental Controls:
Acoustically treated walls and plenum space required.
Note: Faculty offices in departments are to be used in a similar
manner and should have the same character. Furnishings and equipment might include space for objects and materials specific to that department in addition to the items listed above under "furnishings and equipment.
Lounge:
Use:
To be used by faculty and staff for relaxation and eating. Light cooking should be accomodated as well as coffee making.
Character:
Environment should be relaxing and inviting. Views to the outside would be beneficial.
Ori entati on:
One lounge might be near the conference room for easy service to that room. The lounges should be away from the public domain.
One lounge should be located as centrally as possible amidst faculty offices and staff working areas.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Table and chairs for 6-3, couch or chairs for 3-4, sink in counter, refrigerator and small cook top.
Storage:
Use:
Storage of office materials and of some teaching materials. May be used at times for teaching preparation.
Character:
Flexible and easily organized.
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Furnishings and Equipment:
Varies. Storage shels'es, -files, worktable. Li ghti ng:
Task lighting as required.
ART DEPARTMENT
General:
All studios should have a spartan character, as well as being exciting places to be and work.. The studios are essentially 1 aboratories? they should encourage -freedom to explore and to be messy if need be.
All studios should be equipped with lighting appropriate for art work and color rendering to facilitate classes meeting in the evenings. The IES Handbook recommends for best color rendering, the following: large sources of relativly low luminance; lighting similar to an overcast north sky; and higher lighting levels for interpreting darker colors (up to 200-300 ft.c.) than for interpreting lighter colors (approximately 30 ft.c,).
Windows in all studios are required to provide for distant focusing of the eye during strenous work periods.
Display areas should be provided in studios to encourage work of increasing quality due to comparison of work. Other display areas should be provided for special interest displays allowing for a change of view (i.e., break from work).
Lobby:
Use:
Serve as transition from public domain to art department. Might serve as both transition from public to art work areas and public to gallery. Large enough for 20-30 students to congregate while others pass through. Informal study area.
Character:
Inviting, open so adjacent areas easy to locate. Should have an art atmosphere about it by utilising art display areas or coves. Furnishings and Equipment:
Room directory as required. Lounge type seating.
Environmental Controls:
Acoustic design to respond to noise generation of students: standard HVAC.
Lighting:
Daylighting a possiblity; medium light levels in general with some task lighting.
Special Surfaces:
Wall surfaces should be durable due to high level of student activity. Masonry a possiblity.
Gal 1ery:
Use:
Both student/faculty artwork and traveling show artwork will be
50


displayed. The gallery is also to be used by other departments (primarily music and drama) -for receptions. Flexibilty must be maintained to display all types of artwork (sculpture, ceramics, metalwork, painting, etc.). An outdoor gallery can be considered as a partial option, in which case the overal1 gallery space should be larger. The gallery must be secure to insure safety of artwork..
be able to see outside. Might provide ways for small areas or "hints" of display from adjacent outdoor display area is part of the design this most be visibly and functionally connected to the
spaces.
Ori entati on:
People should people to see rooms. If an likely should gal 1ery.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Movable panels for display of hung work and division of Provision for wall hangings. Movable display cases. Environmental Controls:
Standard HVAC. Care must be taken in gallery.
Lighting:
Flexibility for daylighting a must light. Spot lighting with dimmers Special Surfaces:
Floors should be wood. Walls should be a neutral material with picture hanging capability built in.
in regard to ultraviolet light
but with control requi red.
of ultraviolet
Sculpture Studio:
Use:
Studio to be used by 20 students per class period. Size of projects range from small desk top pieces to tall pieces of work needing a two-story space to produce. Class time consists of usually short group meeting periods and faculty demonstrations and longer hands on work periods with one-on-one instruction input. Character:
Space should be bright and relatively simple. Space must be flexible in order to provide changeable work areas. Work benches should be movable and service sinks out of general work area. The space should be conducive to concentrating on the work at hand. Orientation: _
Space should be near other noise producing art areas but each should be buffered.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Work benches, minimum 1 per 2 students, in-room storage cabinets for sculpting tools. Display area to be provided. At least one double sink with same adjacent counter space to be provided. Environmental Controls:
Ventilation fans/'filter to treat dust producing area.
Lighting:
Natural light is important. Lighting levels should be high to support detail work.
Special Surfaces:
Floors to be concrete or terrazzo. Ceilings and/or walls should be acoustically treated.
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Pottery Studio:
Use:
Twenty students per class period to do work including hand shaped objects and wheel turned objects.
Character:
Space should be bright and relatively simple. Traffic areas should be well-defined with work areas "protected" from the flow of traffic. Potters wheels should be against the wall separated from the work bench area.
Orientation:
Space should be near other noise producing art areas but each should buffered.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Twenty potters wheels, 10 movable work benches. Double sink with hot and cold water and adjacent counter space. Display area for potter work.
Environmental Controls:
Standard HVAC with ventilation fan and filter for dust control.
Li ght i ng:
Natural light is important. Color rendering important so natural light and proper artificial light must be provided. Lighting levels should be high to support detail work.
Special Surfaces:
Floors to be vinyl/asbestos tile, hardened concrete or terrazzo. Floor drain required. Ceiling and/or walls should be acoustically treated.
Pottery Storage:
Use:
Storage of student projects and storage of potters clay. Character:
Simple, utility space, easily organized and cleaned.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Shelving for student projects should be mast accessible and must be sturdy.
Environmental Controls:
Standard HVAC.
Lighting:
Artificial or daylighted.
Special Surfaces:
Floors should be concrete with floor drains for wet use of clay.
Kiln Room:
Use:
Pottery studio students to use the kiln on a sporadic basis. Projects are fired in the kiln and then removed for short time storage.
Character:
Must function as a safe space. Ample working space should surround kiln area. Room should be bright and organized.
Ori entati on:
Must be open to pottery studio and instructors office to facilitate instructor supervision,
Furnishings and Equipment:
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Potters kiln with required safety area around the kiln (verify required area).
Environmental Controls:
Standard HVAC with separate cooling control. Exhaust to handle high heat production of kiln or return air to carry off the heat. Lighting:
High levels to insure safe operations.
Special Surfaces:
All surfaces to be nonflammable. Floor should be hardened concrete or terraczo.
Welding/Metals Studio:
Use:
The welding and metals area is used for the production of metal art objects by students. Classes are small (8-10 students).
welding furnace. storage
metals, melting metals Work is somewhat messy of student aprons.
i s be
a
open
to
Activities include: cutting and and forming objects in a crystal and space should be provided for Character:
Space should be open for safety. Six to eight work tables with plenty of work area (approx. 36 sq. ft./table). Work areas (cutting with tools, metals melting and furnace areas) to be well def i ned.
Ori entati on:
Work areas are the primary space, crystal furnace area secondary space. Furnace and welding/cutting areas to facilitate instructor supervision.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Cutting torches, welding machine, metal storage, cabinets, heavy duty work benches, crystal furnace (in area separate from basic work area). Student storage lockers.
Environmental Controls:
Exhaust hoods over crystal furnace and cutting and welding areas. Air circulation must be good. Acoustical treatment to respond to cutting and welding.
Li ghti ng:
Natural light important. Light level work. An option is to have generally 1i ghti ng.
Special Surfaces:
Floor to be hardened concrete. Walls protection from damage from metal objects, nonf1ammable.
shculd be high for detail lower light level with task
should be masonry for Surfaces to be
Wood Shop:
Use:
Students will be producing small objects by carving and by using hand and power tools. Projects to be carried thru from conception to appreciation of finish. Classes consist of 12-15 students.
Adjacent areas should consist of a small dust free finishing room (60 SF), a small project storage area (60 SF) and small material storage area (80 SF) .
Character:
Space should be open and bright, the area should be desirable with
53


a warm feeling. Machine use and work areas should he well-defined.
Dri entati on:
Power tool work areas must be well defined and separated from other work areas for safety.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Power tools, table saw, drill press, jointer, two lathes. Additional equipment: hand tool storage cabinets, 12 work benches (36 SF for each bench).
Environmental Controls:
Ventilation fans and filters to handle high dust concentration.
Li ghti ng:
Natural daylight desired.
Special Surfaces:
Floors to be wood. Walls should be masonry for durability. Walls and ceilings should be acoustically treated.
Jewelry:
Use:
Students produce jewelry consisting of metal, stone and glass materials. Work spaces should be small but well lit for detail work. Classes consist of 12-15 students.
Character:
Space should have an organized character, be flexible to allow for group meetings and then work periods.
Orientation:
Views to outside for intermittent eye rest.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Small material and student project storage area.
Li ghti ng:
Daylight supplemented with overhead and task lighting.
Special Surfaces:
Floors should be vinyl/asbestos.
Photography/Pri ntshop:
Use:
The photography lab will be used by 2-4 students at a time with sign-up for use. Photography classes (lectures) will be held in another area on campus. The photography lab will also be used by art students for photographing their projects. Therefore, the photo lab should include a small photo studio.
The printshop is to be used by art students learning printing techniques and by the drama department on a sporadic basis for the paste-up and printing of some of their publicity brochures. Character:
The photo studio, printing room and darkroom should be well-defined work ares, as open as possible to each other.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Photo studio lights, stands, backdrops, table, photo copy stand. Darkroom two copy stands and dry mounting press on "dry table", one set of developing trays and print washer on "wet table", film drying cabinet.
Printshop plate burner, copier, paper cutter, folder, sink in counter with adjacent counter space, light table and paper
54


storage.
Environmental Controls:
Photo studio Standard HVAC.
Darkroom Exhaust -fan required.
Printshop Exhaust -fan required.
Lighting:
Photo studio Arti-ficial light only.
Darkroom Arti-fical light and safe lights.
Printshop Natural light desired but not required.
Special Surfaces:
All floors should be vinyl/asbestos. Walls in darkroom should be dark.
Painting and Graphic Studios:
Use:
Painting and drawing objects displayed in the center on the floor or on a raised platform. Studios should t-e designed for a minimum of 30 students. Class periods consist of some lecture time, some sporadic instruction throughout class period and work time.
During most of the class period students are seated at their benches but room should be spacious enough for group gatherings to look at examples of work.
Character:
Room must be wel1-1ighted, bright and cheerful. The space should be relatively simple and not too obtrusive. The studios should be spacious to produce a feeling of freedom to work and explore.
ri entati on:
All areas of each studio must be spacious enough to have a good view of the respective raised platform. Room should be inward focusing to object being rendered and to display areas of past war k.
Furnishings and Equipment:
One raised platform per studio; platform to be movable (to be placed in center of room or against a wall). Movable benches for each studio (25-35 per studio). Double sink in painting studio? single sink in drawing studio.
Environmental Controls:
Standard HVAC.
Li ghti ng:
Daylighting is required and should be done thru skylighting or clerestory windows with reflective surfaces so lighting comes down from above. Care must be taken in overhead lighting design sc shadows will be produced on object being drawn or painted.
Special Surfaces:
Floors should be vinyl / aapsstos in both studios. Walls should have a fairly high reflectivity.
Offices: See administrative section for description. In addition:
Use:
Offices also used for storage of some projects.
55


DRAMA DEPARTMENT
General:
The new facilities will increase the courses offered from the college catalog from 40% to a potential of 100%. It is realized that with these additional facilities an increased number of performances will result in more time and responsibilities for the department staff.
The college wishes to have a combination thrust/prosceniurn stage in order to supply a space where the audience can have an intimate interaction with the performers (which is important to the college) and yet have the "standard" theatre arrangement of a proscenium. The college also specifically states that they do not want a theatre designed as .a multi-purpose facility but should be designed conducive to professional drama, music and lecture events.
The majority of the department is broken up into two parts, the "public" or front part and the backstage or work area. A typical organization chart is as follows:
Lobby:
Use:
Gathering space prior to and during intermission of perfarmances. It also will be used for circulation space during class hours, and as such may be an informal gathering and study area. The space should provide queuing area for ticketing. The vestibule area should have telephones.
Character:
Primarily the area should be easy to move through. The space should be gracious and contain the highest aesthestics of the entire building. Public use areas (toilets, coat check, etc.) should be easily discernabie. The ticket office should be in a prominent area. The main accessway from the lobby to the theatre should be open (no doers) if acoustics will allow.

56


Gri entatian:
Should have easy, direct access -from public parking areas and -from major traffic paths leading from other areas of the campus. Must have major direct access to outside. Easy access to balcony 1obby.
Furnishings & Equipment:
Seating plush yet durable in groups varying from 6-10 to approximately 60-80. Seating areas may be used to define other gathering areas. Drinking fountain should be in eyeshot.
Publicity boards.
Environmental Controls:
High ventilation requirement. Air lock entry.
Special Surfaces:
Floors should be carpeted. Walls may have interesting
architectural detail. Entry doors should be glass for safety.
Balcony Lobby:
Use:
This is an ancillary space to the "main" lobby and serves as a drama rehearsal space and for informal meetings.
Character:
The space should be similar to but less formal than the main lobby. If used as a combination 1obby/rehearsal area the rehearsal equipment should be easily moved (i.e. movable platform and chai rs).
Qri entation:
Easy access to main lobby area.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Similar to lobby (see above) with less seating approximately 20-40.
Environmental Controls:
High ventilation required. Acoustical treatment of walls and ceiling to enhance rehearsal area and cut sound transmission. Lighting:
Similar to lobby (see above).
Special Surfaces:
Similar to lobby (see above).
Pub1i c i ty:
Use:
Office to be used by students and staff for preparation of publicity drives for events. The space will be used in conjunction with the printshop in the art department on a limited basi s.
Character:
Typical office space, see offices in Administration section.
Or ientat i on:
Area should not be part of the public lobby area although possibly adjacent to it.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Eight lineal feet of storage for past brochures and miscellaneous materials. Eight feet of work counters.
Lighting:
Natural light desirable? task lighting required.
57


E; Orfice;
Use:
Sales of tickets including distribution of tickets reserved prior to pickup.
Character:
Secure area with windows to serve the public. Preferably two windows, one -for reserved tickets and one for current seats. Queuing area should be unobtrusive in lobby space.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Ticket rack on back wall, counter space at windows.
Li ghti ng:
Artifical lighting satisfactory.
Booking Office:
Use:
The space will be used by scheduling events for the booking and publicity. Character:
Typical office space, see Ori entat i on:
Should be adjacent to box Lighting:
Natural light desirable.
the person in charge of organizing and theatre. Close relationship between
offices in Administrative section, office and publicity areas.
Coats:
Use:
Check-in area for coats and other personal effects. It will be manned prior to the beginning of a performance, at the intermission and at the end.
Character:
Should have a secure yet open to view character.
Ori entati on:
The space should be directly linked to the lobby. Articles stored should be in view from the check-in counter.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Check-in counter of sufficient width to prevent the building up of queuing lines <10-14 feet); hanging space with hat, glove and bag storage above.
Li ghti ng:
The check-in counter should be highlighted with scft lighting.
Toilets (Fublic)
Character:
Rooms should be easily cleaned and well lighted.
Ori entati on:
Not imperative that entry to men's and womens restrooms be in the same immediate area. Both a mens and a womens room should be on the same floor? it is most desirous that both be contiguous with the main level lobby and with the balcony lobby.
Furnishings and Equipment:
At least one of the womens restrooms should contain a lounge area with places to sit or lie down.
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Environmental Controls:
High ventilation required.
Lighting:
No daylight desired.
Theatre:
Use:
The theatre space is to be used -for a variety of activities including drama (musicals and plays), mime, lectures, choral and band groups. Primarily the space will be used -far drama productions and the department wishes the space to be -flexible (thrust and proscenium combination).
Character:
Above all, the theatre is to be intimate. When the thrust stage is not being used the space will inherently be less intimate, this is alright. Acoutstics should be more amenable to drama productions than to music; i-f easily moved partitions or other elements can make the mix more complete that would be appropriate. Acoustics, in addition to intimacy, will have an influence on the shape o-f the house. In general, the volume should be high (high ceilings). The house should include a balcony to enhance intimacy and keep the audience as close to the stage as possible. The seating arrangement should insure a uni-form effect on the total audience by the performers.
Ori entati on:
Excellent sight lines and acoustics must be provided for all seats. Aisles should probably be at the sides of the seating space, indicating continental seating as a better solution (in comparison to standard seating). It may be advisable to have a center aisle serving the seating furthest from the stage where the row would most likely be longest.
Since the theatre is a combination thrust stage and proscenium stage, care must be taken to insure good sight lines for both since performers will be further back from the audience and possibly hidden by the proscenium wall if improperly designed.
See Stage and Thrust Stage Sections and Site Lines and Seating Guidelines for further information.
Environmental Controls:
HVAC system to provide medium to high ventilation of space and must do so quietly. High quality acoustics imperative; see Acoustics Guidelines. Reminder: Drama acoustics to take precedence over music acoustics.
Li ghti ng:
No natural light permitted. Artificial lighting to consist of general house lighting and detailed theatre lighting (see Lighting/Sound booth section). Lights to be controlled remotely from stage ancillary space and light/sound booth.
Furnishings & Equipment:
Fixed seating for 425 people. Seats may be on sloping or stepped f1oor.
See Thrust Stage, Stage, Trap/Orchestra pit, Proscenium, Light/Sound booth and Projection Booth Sections for more informati on.
59


Special Surfaces:
Aisles to be carpeted. Seating areas may be carpeted or on hard surfaces for ease in cleaning. See Acoustical Guidelines.
Note: For acoustics see Acoustical Guidelines.
For sight lines see Sight Lines and Seating Guidelines
Thrust Stage:
Use:
Performing space partially surrounded by the audience, usually on three sides. Primary use of space is for dramatic presentations. Orchestra pit below for dramatic presentations utilizing the proscenium.
Character:
The thrust stage must be open and flat. Stage height is dependent on type of seating arrangement. Performers are in same space as audience. Performance effect less uniform than with proscenium stage but more intimate.
The thrust stage shape may be a semi-circle a quadri1ateral or a polygon. The character is as follows:
Orientation:
Simple exits required from thrust stage.
Environmental Controls:
Incorporated in theatre house HVAC system. This type of stage may generate a Greek theatre shape for acoustic reasons (steep seating).
Li ght i ng:
No natural lighting; all artificial lighting coordinated at 1ighting/sound booth.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Floor to be easily removable at trap/orchestra pit. One solution is to have floor panels on a structural grid system that may simply be removed, leaving the structural grid. See Trap/Orchestra Pit Section below.
Special Surfaces:
Floor should be wood (wood on sleepers over concrete).
Note: May be desirable to provide for alternate orchestra area for thrust stage performances.
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Trap/Orchestra Pit:
Use:
Dual use of band area for dramatic production and as an entry and acting area for some productions. Separate trap openings may also be provided.
Character:
A hole, it is sunken below the stage floor to keep players out of eyeshot of audience. Area should be dark.
Ori entati on:
Director of musicians must be able to see stage floor. Conflict of design interest may be keeping musicians out of eyeshot while aso wanting Greek style theatre for thrust stage.
Environmental Controls:
HVAC to be part of house HAVC system. Walls to be sound reflective.
Li ghti ng:
Task lighting only (i.e. sheet music reading lighting).
Note: See Thrust Stage "Special Equipment" for possible removable
floor solution. A second, more costly and more efficient solution would be the "flexible thrust" operating as follows:
fg.o6c.3MiUm u/&a?rriobL
Pit
The system is quickly changed due to mechanical operation. Its installation is dependent on long term cost benefits.
Stage:
Use:
For performance of traditional dramatic presentations. Also, will be used for speaking engagements and music performances. The stage is split up into the acting area and the scenery and storage areas. See Stage Loft Storage, Stage Ancillary Space and Stage Storage Sections for further discussion.
Character:
The space must be flexible and be able to have a variety of lighting and moods. The performance is a "show" as opposed to more audience interaction with a thrust stage. The character is as follows:

61


Dri entation:
The stage is farmed by the proscenium opening that splits the performers and the audience.
The stage may be augmented with some type of balconies at each side of the proscenium to provide more flexibility in theatrical perforinances? these areas may be used for Romeo and Juliet type situations and for special instrumental accompaniment.. The area under the stage should allow free movement to traps, etc. A passage of some kind should allow performers to get from one side to the other.
Environmental Controls:
Ventilation must prevent high heat buildup due to lighting.
Li ght i ng:
No natural lights. Lighting to be in fly area and in ceiling area of house; controls for lighting to be both on stage and in lighting booth. General lighting areas also include apron, areas upstage from proscenium arch and auxiliary acting areas.
Special Equipment:
Apron The floor area in front of the proscenium should be 8 wide minimum. Floor should be wood.
Battens Permanent steel pipe 6" (for lights, backdrops, teasers, etc.) in fly area.
Cyclcrama Continuous curtain enclosing the stage from one side of the proscenium to the other. Not a shell. The top of the cylorama should not be seen from the audience in the front seats the cyclorama should allow the movement of scenery back and forth.
Doors For scenery the doors should be 8x14 high minimum. Others should be 7-3 feet wide double doors.
Gridiron Used to raise and lower scenery. Minimum height from floor is two times proscenium opening height plus 8 feet. It should also allow scenery to be stored out of sight. Working space above grid should be 4-7'.
Orchestra Pit See Trap/Orchestra pit Section.
Proscenium The proscenium is the wall between audience and performers and contains the opening to "frame" production on the stage. Widths of proscenium in feet (minimum, usual, maximum) for drama: 26, 30 to 35, 40; for musical productions: 30, 40, 50; for music presentations: 40, 50, 55. Shell Acoustical projector for lectures concerts and recitals. Light in the shell ceiling should provide 60-70 footcandles with no glare experienced by the audience.
Special Surfaces:
Floors should be wood (wood on sleepers on concrete). .
Stage Loft Storage and Stage Storage:
Use:
Storage of stage scenery and equipment.
Character:
Ceilings should be as high as possible 14-13 feet minimum.
Traffic must move simply.
Orientation:
The storage spaces must be adjacent to both the storage and the scene shop area.
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Stage Ancillary Space:
Use:
The wings of the stage? the area where performers, scenery and props wait to go on stage. Also used for some set design construction.
Character:
Open, with easy traffic movement.
Ori entat i on:
Accessible to scenery shop, storage area and dressing rooms.
Lighti ng:
General lighting, no natural light allowed from this space to stage.
Special Surfaces:
Floor similar to stage (wood).
Dressing Rooms, Mens and Womens:
Use:
Changing room for performers. Should have toilets and a shower. Character:
Easily organised to accomodate the number of people using it. Furnishings and Equipment:
Seating at make-up tables with mirrors on wall. Costume storage. Environmental Controls:
Medium ventilation.
Li ghti ng:
Natural light acceptable. Task lighting at mirrors.
Green Room:
Use:
Assembly space for choruses and cast. Social gathering space for the cast. Audience allowed here on certain occasions.
Character:
A nice space for entertaining and also a workspace for group interaction and last minute make-up.
ri entati on:
Near stage, preferably on the same level with access to audience areas.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Lounge furniture, full length mirrors, provision for serving food (counter with sink, refrigerator and stove top), possibly a kitchenette.
Environmental Controls:
Standard HVAC.
Lighting:
Natural light desirable.
Special Surfaces:
Carpeted floors.
Lighting/Sound Booth:
Use:
Work area for the control of lighting and acoustics during performances.
Character:
Simple and efficient. Space should be designed t.o allow
63


technicians to move about during performances without disturbing the audience.
Orientation;
The space should be unobtrusive to the audience. Work areas to be oriented toward performance area.
Li ghti ng:
No natural light desired in theatre space. Lighting to consist of downlights either in ceiling slots, lightbridge and/or catwalks, or spotlights in wall slots. Lighting mounted on towers from stage wings may be used, backlighting from the ceiling and back of theatre and footlights hitting on the cycloraina and music shell.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Sound control equipment will be selected and installed by the col 1ege.
Projection Booth;
Use:
Used in some productions for film and slide projection.
Ori entati on:
Should be located so as not to allow any interference of image by audience. Ideally should be at same height as screen. May be located so as to adjoin the speech/1ecture rooms.
Environmental Controls:
Acoustically controlled room to prevent sound from projection equipment from being objectionable.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Projection Equipment to consist of slide projectors and 16mm projector; storage for reels and trays.
Lighting:
Task lighting.
Costume Shop, Scenery Storage:
Use: Production space for costumes, see below; adjacent scenery
storage for costumes and small scenery storage.
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Character:
Costume shop production space; scenery storage simply a storeroom.
Qri entati on:
See below -for possible costume shop layout:

C04TJM2- son
J


rloop f^UA.si
Furnishings and Equipment:
Cutting tables (2 at 3:<7) sewing machines and tables (3 at 3x5) dyeing equipment, 40 of hanging equipment for costume storage. Lighting: Natural light desirable; task lighting in costume shop
area.
Scenery Shop:
Use:
Center of most dramatic activities which includes carpentry, electrical, painting work and handling of road show props. Character:
Space should be light, open and safe. Work areas should be well-defined. Ceiling height 20 minimum, should be high enough for all vertical scenery.
Ori entati on:
Power tool work areas must be well-defined and separated from other work areas for safety. The space should be adjacent to the stage ancillary area for additional scenery assembly space. Furnishings and Equipment:
Paint frame (height 20-25 feet), table saw, radial saw, 20 of work bench, hand tool storage.
Environmental Controls:
Ventilation fan and filter to handle dust.
Li ghti ng:
Daylighting required; daylight should be diffuse.
Special Surfaces:
Floors to be wood, walls should be masonry for durability.
Off i ces:
See Administrative Section for description.
Speech/1ecture Rooms:
Use:
Speech classes for 35-40 students.
65


Character:
Room to be acoustically and spatially supportive o-f speech and 1 ec t ur e.
Qri entati on:
Seating, and possibly the room itself, must be oriented toward a primary presentation area. Good visibility depends on the seating arrangement.; the viewing area is approximately at a 45 degree angle -from the centerline o-f the room starting at the podium. A possible solution would be to have 3 lecture rooms rotating o-f-f in a fan shape -from a common preparation room. May use same projection booth as theatre.
Environmental Controls:
Acoustics must be conducive to easy listening. The reverberation times should be low.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Raised lecture area, podium, 40 movable drop arm seats.
Li ghti ng:
Daylighting preferred.
Special surfaces:
Floors to be flat and carpeted.
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
General:
Four staff musi c.
members teach-all
aspects of music
including applied
Note: For music acoustics see
For elements of theatre Stage Section.
Acoustical Guidelines, related to music see Theatre
and
Lobby
Use:
Serves as transition from public domain to music department. A small informal seating area for 10-15 students is desirable. Character:
Should be open and bright with easy identification of various music room locations.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Room directory is required. Compact and durable seating area for
10-15 people. Environmental Controls: Acoustically treated might interfere with Li ghti ng:
Dayliqhting desired; Special Surfaces:
Wall surfaces should activity. Masonry a
to handle noise from people in space which classes being held.
medium to low light levels overall.
be durable due to high level of student pQ55ibi1ity.
A
66


Piano and Group Practice:
Use:
Class instruction in piano and small group vocal practice. Room to be used by 12 students -for piano and 20 students for vocal
The piano SF ea.).
practice class may use two grand pianos at a
Vocal practice area may height should be 10-11
groups, time < 45 Character:
Simple room with well-defined piano area, be defined with portable risers. Ceiling feet.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Grand pianos (2 at times), portable risers, 20 lecture seats, lectern, blackboard and bulletin board, music cabinet and space for audio equipment (recorder and stereo). '
Environmental Controls:
Reflection of sound should be kept walls will be appropriate. Return and walls, not in doors. Ceilings acoustically treated and insulated
to a minimum. Non-parallel air ducts must be in ceiling and walls should be walls to prevent sound
transmission to and from other rooms.
Lighting:
Natural light desirable (light should not hit pianos kept in the room). Lighting at typical classroom level with both natural and artifical light Special Surfaces:
Floors should be vinyl asbestos tile or similar. Ceilings should alternate between hard and "soft" surfaces to provide some sound reflectivity.
Vocal Rehearsal Room:
Use:
Music theory classes, vocal classes and rehearsals will be held here. This or another area may serve as the gathering place for vocal groups prior to performing on stage.
Character:
Room should have a flat floor, or risers in part of room furthest from entry, and 6' wide door for piano to be moved in and out. Front wall should be heavily sound absorbant to simulate singing to an audience. The character of the room should be similar to the performing area of the theatre. Traffic should flow at the perimeter of the main seating area.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Movable drop arm type seats, directors platform, music ruled chalkboard, projection screen, stereo, tape recorder, and portable risers. Permanent risers should be 6"10" high and 40" wide (approximately 15 SF per person).
Ori entati on:
The room and risers should be organised around the director's platform location and blackboard/projection screen. No aisle in risers at center of room.
Environmental Controls:
Natural light required. Soundproof walls also required (may be adjacent to storage area to help cut down sound transmission). Ceiling height does not need to be as high as the band room but
67


should be 1 12^ minimum (this means approximately 15 SF/persor.) Lighting:
Natural lighting is preferred. No glass should be behind the director.
Special Surfaces:
Riser area may be carpeted, nose of treads should have different materials to delineate them if fixed seating is not used.
Ceilings should be approximately 507. reflective and 507. absorbant. Front wall should be absorbant.
Option: The vocal room may be designed as a combination
choral/recital room. If this is done, fixed seating should be provided (of the theatre type) and there should be provided 125 C.F. minimum of volume per seat.
Band Rehearsal Room:
Use:
The room is to be used for band, orchestra, brass and woodwind ensemble, chamber music groups and sectional rehearsals.
Character:
The space should be open and light. The space should have a flat floor or risers in the part of the room away from the entry and 6 wide doors for easy moving of piano in and out. The use of risers means the ceiling needs to be higher. Ceiling height should be 14-18 average (the ceiling should probably not be parallel to the floor). No student should sit against a wall or stand within 7 1/2 feet of the ceiling. The front wall should be absorbant to simulate playing before live audiences.
Ori entati on:
The room should be organised around the area used by the director with good sight lines for people seated.
Environmental Controls:
Natural ventilation if possible.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Movable seats and music stands, portable directors platform, piano storage area for large instruments not being used to afford them temporary protection, chalkboard with music ruling and bulletin board. Permanent risers should be 6"-10" high and 60" wide except the back rise which should be 8-10 feet (approximately 20 SF per person).
Li ghti ng:
Natural lighting perferred.
Special Surfaces:
Floors should be hard, nose of riser treads should have safety lines. Ceilings should be approximately 507. reflective and 507 absorbant. Front wall should be absorbant.
Instrument Storage:
Use:
Storage of school owned instruments and of primary large student instruments with a provision for some smaller student instruments. Also includes storage of choir robes (6072) with provision for more future storage, May serve as sound transmission and buffer between music rooms. High security area.
68


Character:
Simple and wel1-organized. School instrument storage should be separated from student storage; separate choir robe area. Easy traffic flow required.
Or i entation:
Should accomodate supervision from instructor's office.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Instrument repair area sink in counter, workbench with Bunsen burner, counter for instrument repair. Storage area Adjustable music equipment and storage cabinets and choir robe storage cabinets.
Li ghti ng:
Provide task lighting at instrument and repair area.
Individual Practice Rooms:
Use: /
Musical instrument and voice practice by music majors, those on secondary instruments and theory students. Some one-on-one advanced instruction.
Character:
The rooms, by nature, are small (55-65 SF> and may be organized in compact clusters. The rooms are generally trepezoidal so as to enhance sound quality. The smallness of the rooms may be counteracted by windows in wall between room and hallway. Orientation:
Rooms being used for practice on school instruments should be located near the large group room where they are used for ease of moving. Supervision for most rooms not critical although rooms with pianos and school instruments should be open to view.
Furnishings and Equipment:
One chair and music stand per room. Upright pianos in six rooms. Environmental Controls:
Sound transmission filters in air ducts. Return air ducts to be in ceilings or walls. Nonparallel walls should be used to prevent reflection of sound. Construction must, ensure adequate transmission loss. No outside windows are required; on the other hand, natural light would enhance the space if windows are provided.
Lighting:
Standard lighting with natural light augmentation optional.
Listening Rooms:
Use:
Space for students to listen to tapes and records and to edit tapes.
Character:
See individual practice rooms.
Or i entati on:
Rooms should be near music library and open for supervision, Furnishings and Equipment:
Work counter with sound equipment, two chairs.
Environmental Controls:
See individual practice rooms.
I
69


Li ghti ng:
See individual practice roams.
Music Library:
Use:
Primarily used tor storage with access by faculty; students will use the space with faculty permission. Storage of sheet music, tapes and records. Some reading and research will take place. Sheet music may be distributed from this room at times.
Character:
Space should be simple, bright and clean. Storage and study area should be separated and well-defined.
Ori entati on:
Preferable to have visual contact with faculty offices for security.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Lockable storage for equipment, music stacks and record storage. Table and four chairs. Through-the-wal1 storage cabinet for distribution of sheet music to students with work counter on library side.
Lighti ng:
Natural light in research and study area. Sunlight should not hit storage areas.
Special Surfaces:
Carpet on floors.
Faculty Offices:
See ADMINISTRATION for general information. In addition: Use:
Offices also used for some instruction.
Furnishings and Equipment:
Personal files and music storage.
Environmental Controls:
Acoustically treated walls.
Special Surfaces:
Floor's should be hard surface.


ENERGY/CONSERVATION ANALYSIS
PRELIMINARY BALANCE POINT TEMPERATURE ANALYSIS:
The -following method of analysis is from INSIDED'JT. section 3.6, by Brown and Reynolds.
The following six tables summarize the internal heat gains of the five basic areas of the project (administrati on, art department, theatre and thrust stage area with and without an audience, remainder of the drama department, and music department). The summaries are rough estimates only.
Building Area: Administration
Col. 1 Col. Col 3 Col . 4 Cci s1
Heat Source Area (Sf ) x Unit / sf x Btuh / uni t = Btuh Total
People (number of people=35) 245 8575
Li ghts 4116 1.5 watts/sf 3.41 21055
Machines 800 1 watt/sf 3. 41 2728
32358/4116
Total Btuh / sf in area: 7.9
Building Area: Art Department (gallery not occupied)
Col 1 Col . Col 3 Col . 4 Col 5
Heat Source Area (s. f. ) Unit / s.f. Btuh / un i t Btuh Total
People (number of people=278) 275 ave. 76450
Lights 3112 2.6 w/sf 3.41 71900
Machines
8
2.5 hp est. 2544 Btuh/hp.,50900.
199250/9912 sf
Total Btuh / sf in area: 20.1
71


Building Area: Drama Department (excluding Theatre and Thrust stage)
Col. 1 Col 2 Col 3 Col . 4 Col 5
Heat Source Area (s.f.) Unit / s.f. Btuh / unit Btuh Total
People (number of people=3 33) 250 83250
Li ghts 9630 2 r? 3.41 72600
Machines (none, mechanical load exhausted as required) 155350/14612 sf
Total Btuh / sf i n area: 10.7
Bui 1di nq Area: Theatre and Thrust Stage with audience present
Col 1 Col 2 Col. 3 Col . 4 Col 5
Heat Source Area (s.f.) Unit / s.f. Btuh / unit Btuh Total
People (number of peopl e=4: n*sr.\ me; 95625
Li ghts 4050 1 3.41 13310
Machines 200 1 3. 41 680 110115/4050 sf
Total Btuh / sf i n area: 27.2
Bui 1di nq Area: Theatre and Thrust Stage with drama class only
Col 1 Col 2 Col 3 Col . 4 Col. 5
Heat Source Area (s.f.) Unit / s.f. Btuh / unit Btuh Total
Peop1e (number of people=30) 2/5 3250
Li ghts 4050 1 3.41 13310
Machines 200 1 3. 41 680 22740/4050 sf
Total Btuh / sf i n area: 5.6
\
72


Building Area: Music Department
Col 1 Heat Source Col 2 Area (s. Col f.> Unit y / s. f. Col. Btuh 4 / unit Col 5 Btuh Total
People (number of people= =240) 250 60000
Li ghts 6553 3.41 49200
Machines 100 i 3. 41 340
10954(3/6550 s-f
Total Btuh / s-f in area: 16.7
Approximate volumes -for the -five areas are as -follows:
Admi nistrati on Art Department Theatre and Thrust Stage Remainder o-f Drama Dept. Music Department
37000 cf 105000 c-f B1000 c-f 165000 cf 71000 cf
The skin to volume ratios below are for low skin/volume ratios characteristic of a cube shaped building and high skin/volume ratios characteristic of an oblong shaped building.
Admi ni strati on (30! ' x40 x30 hi gh) . 146
(25- x75 x 20 hi gh) . 159
Art Department (51 x51 x 40 hi gh) . 102
(30 * 1 x86 x40' hi gh) . 113
Theatre/Thrust (56 x56 x25 hi gh) . 108
Remainder of Drama Department
(65 x65r x40 high) .088
(40 x 152" x25 high) .095
Music Department
<42 x42 x40 high) .142
(40 x88* x20 high) .120
See next page for graphical analysis of balance point temperatures for each space in relation to monthly average high and low temperatures.
73


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74


Summary of Balance Point Temperature Analysis:
Admi ni strati on:
The skin/volume ratio will not affect the BPT appreciably.
Cooling and heating seasons are appro::imately the same. The skin/volume ratio should be medium for this area.
Percentages of internal gains: lighting 657.
people and machines 357
Heating will be the more dominate formgiver, fallowed by daylighting and then cooling.
Art Department:
The skin/volume ratio will not affect the BPT appreciably.
Cooling is more important than heating, with the primary heating season being December thru February. The skin/volume ratio of this area should be high (larger amounts of building wall exposed).
Percentages of internal gains: lighting 367
people and machines 647
Coaling will have the greatest influence on form. Daylighting will be a dominate formgiver here because of it being required for art classes, and because windows will act as "efficient" heat losers. Windows of 107 of the floor area would be appropriate.
Drama Department (excluding theatre and thrust stage):
The skin/volume ratio will not affect the BPT appreciably.
Cooling is slightly more important than heating, with the primary heating season being November thru March. The skin/volume ratio should be medium to balance out the heating and cooling requirements.
Percentage of internal gains: lighting 477
people and machines 537
Cooling will have a greater influence on form than heating.
Windows of medium size would be beneficial.
Theatre and Thrust Stage:
The main problem in this space is the high need for heating when the space is being used for rehearsals versus a high need for cooling required during times the space is being used for a performance. The skin/volume ratio is fairly fixed due to the required shape for the theatre. Cooling is the dominant problem; cooling will be required throughout the year during performances. Heating will only be required as a pre-performance warm up and/or when the space is being used for rehearsals and classes. The conflict of skin/volume ratio must be resolved by weighing the
75


help it will give to the heavier energy 1oad (heating during rehearsals or cooling during performances!,
Percentages of internal 1i ghti ng people
gains when occupied by the audience:
Percentages of internal 1ighting
people and machines
gains when used for class or rehearsal:
53%
42%
\
Cooling will have the greatest influence on form. Space warmup must be handled without the direct introduction of daylight.
Music Department:
The skin/volume ratio has a small effect here. Cooling is slightly more important than heating, with the primary heating season being in December and January. The skin/volume ratio should be medium to balance out the heating and cooling requi rements.
Percentages of internal gains: lighting 47%
people and machines 53%
Cooling will have the greatest influence on form, followed by daylighting and then heating. Windows of medium size, in the range of 5% of the floor area, would be appropriate.
RULES OF THUMB FDR SCHEMATIC DESIGN:
1. Shading devices should be installed so as to protect from direct sunlight except during months when heating is needed, as indicated in above "summary of balance point analysis".
2. The optimum building shape in this case is one that gains the least amount of heat in the spring, summer, and fall months. A building elongated along the E-W axis will minimize heat gain on the east and west walls due to their narrower dimensions.
3. Massive materials in the internal space will lower the temperature fluxuations due to heat gains and loses. The more surface area of a given amount mass the more the tempering effect.
4. Massive materials should be located in areas with the higher heat gains in order to pick up the excess heat (instead of having to mechanically move it from hotter areas to mass located in cooler areas). The mass does not need to be in direct light if there is any light for heat gain in the space.
5. A solar collection area of 18% to 36% of the floor area can be
76


expected to reduce the annual heating 1 oad of a building in Pasco by 247. to 317, or if R-9 night insulation is used by 49'/. to 70V.. %^ 6. The orientation o-f the solar glazing should lie between 20 degrees east and 32 degrees west o-f true south.
RULES OF THUMB FOR DESIGN DEVELOPMENT:
1. Size solar collection glazing in each space to raise the 24-hour average internal temperature into the comfort range on a clear January day.
2. A mix of conservation and passive solar strategies will produce the maximum energy savings for a given initial investment. This allows both energy conservation and passive solar to work in their most cost-effective range. An optimal mix is achieved when the incremental cost/benefit of each conservation option is just equal to the incremental cost/benefit of the passive solar strategy being used.
LOCAL FUEL COSTS:
Basic Energy Costs (institutional prices):
Electri city Natural gas
first 4000 therms remainder Oil
$.035 per kwh
$.54 per therm $.508 per therm $1,045 per g Typical Efficiency Rates:
Electri ci ty Natural gas Oil
1007.
807.
657.
Converted Energy Costs (dol1ars/mi11ion Btu): Cost
Electricity
($.035/(1000 x 3.41 Btu/watt)) x 1000000 = $1.02
Natural gas
($.54/100000 Btu/therm) x .8 eff. x 1000000 = .43
Oil
($1,045/140000 Btu/gal) x .65 eff. x 1000000 = .48
General Equation for Cost of Auxiliary Heat:
cost of backup heat = cost of heating fuel/furnace efficiency
77


AVAILABLE ILLUMINATION ANALYSIS:
The -following analysis is from INSIDEOUT. section 3.5, by Brown and Reynolds.
Comparisons of the cloudy and clear day graphs give an indication that the climate is predominantly cloudy, with June thru August being predominantly clear.
The "available illumination" graph is a summary of the data below and available exterior footcandles from the south for cloudy days for the indicated months and from the south and north for clear days for June.
According to Brown and Reynolds lots of window penetration (totaling approx i matel y 207. of the total floor area) will produce indoor daylight levels of about 107. of the outdoor levels. Conversely, few window penetrat i ons (total window area of approximatel y 27. of the total floor area) will produce indoor daylight levels of about 17. of the outdoor levels. With this in mind, required exterior illumination levels are as follows:
Task Recommended ft.c. (i nteri or) Min Required Ex If interior=107 exterior level terior Illumination If interior=17 exterior level
Art studios 75 750 7500
Classrooms 75 750 7500
Conference 30 300 3000
Circulation 10 100 1000
Di splays 30 300 3000
Drafting 75 750 7500
Lecture Rms 100 1000 10000
Lobbies 15 150 1500
Music Rms 70 700 7000
Off i ces 50 500 5000
Shops 75 750 7500
Toilets 20 200 2000
Summary:
To meet the minimum task lighting inside on a December day (overcast) at least 107. of the available exterior illumination would be required. Areas requiring general lighting will have ample daylight during winter months. High requirements far light will never be totally met in the winter.
In most a^eas exterior illumination of 27. thru south windows and 57. thru north windows will meet the minimum task light requirements on the brightest days (in June with clear skies). In those areas requiring more light the windows can simply be sized a little larger.
78


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RULES OF THUMB FOR DAYLIGHTING
1. Daylight entering a building is affected by: orientation, building canfiguration, glazing, and sun and shade control.
2. Daylight in a building is affected by: canfiguration of the room, surfaces (wall reflectance and texture), color, furniture, and maintenance.
3. Daylighting concepts include: side lighting, top lighting, angled beam (direct from the sun), indirect (reflected by light shelves, etc.).
Side lighting techniques include: windows with vertical view apertures, windows with vertical non-view apertures, light shelf systems, and clerestories.
4. Building configuration guidelines are as follows:
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80


PRE-DESIGN COST ESTIMATE
A. Building Costs 39,248 sf @ $52.85/sf
assuming moderate construction costs:
Admi ni stration Art Dept.
Drama Dept. Music Dept.
4116 @ $46.00/sf 9912 @ $55.20/sf 18662 @ $50. 60/sf 6558 0 $47.80/sf
Weighted Average $50.80/sf
Location Factor 1.04 for Pasco
Average Cost $52.S5/sf
P. Fixed Equipment (10% of line A)
where percentages are as follows: Administration 4116 0 3%
Art Dept. 9912 0 207.
Drama Dept. 18662 0 87.
Music Dept. 6558 0 67.
Weighted Average 10%
C. Site Development (207. of line A)
where percentage is as follows: school, suburban site 20%
$2,074,600
207,500
414,9(30
D. Total Construction Cost (lines A+B+C) $2,697,000
or $68.72/sf
c b__ m Site Acquisition NA
F. Movable Equipment (14% of line A) 290,400
where percentage is as follows:
col 1eges 14%
G. Professional Fees (8% of line A) 166,000
H. Contingencies (10% of line D) 269,700
I. Administration Costs (17. of line D) 27,000
J. Total Budget Required (line D and lines E thru J) $3,450,100
or $87.90/sf
81


APPENDI X
82


ACOUSTICAL GUIDELINES
The sound energy throughout the listening area of the theatre should be uniform.
The theatre should be free of acoustical defects (echoes, long delayed reflections., flutter echoes, sound concentrations, distortion, sound shadow, and room resonance),
a. Avoid parallel walls to prevent flutter echo.
b. Diverging side walls can provide appropriate reflections.
c. Avoid concave surfaces to prevent sound concentrations.
d. Difference in distance of direct and indirect sound should be 50 maximum to prevent echoes (a delay of .058 seconds is perceived as an echo).
Extraneous noises should be minimized (from HVAC systems and adjoining spaces).
Volume per seat ratios (minimum, optimum. Rooms for speech 80,
Concert halls 220,
Multipurpose auditorium 180,
max i mi mum) 110, 150 275, 380 250, 300
are:
Seating should be arranged for speech in 140 degree angle from speaker.
Maximum distance from stage to furthest seating should be 75, 50 preferred.
Direct sound will flow to a listener when seating is gradually rising as you move away from the stage (an 3 degree angle of e1evation is mini mum).
Ce;iling height should range from 1/3 to 2/3 of the width of the space. The higher ceiling is favorable for music performances.
The length to width ratio should be between 1.2 to 1 and 2 to 1 ,
The balcony must be situated in such a way as to provide a high opening and shallow depth (depth should be maximum 2 times the height from bottom of balcony to floor below).
The design of the rear wall will effect the acoustics. To prevent echo: space the connection between ceiling and rear wall or use
absorptive material on rear wall or tilt rear wall. The rear wall should be kept to a miniumum height.
Music practice rooms should not have parallel walls.
Seats should be upholstered to give some acoustical absorptance as a person would.
A high degree of floor slope usually enhances acoustics.
33


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84


SITE LINES AND SEATING GUIDELINES
Theatre:
1. Fleer and balcony slopes along with seat positions must be designed so as to provide a view of the entire performing area.
2. Angles of view vertically and horizontally must be done if appropriate. Seating should allow for the audience to see the performers feet. Seating should be good for both thrust and proscenium stage (in the horizontal).
3. Be aware of two-row and one-row vision. One-row vision (i.e. seeing over the head of the person in front of you) is acceptable if rows steeply pitched, otherwise tworow vision is required (i.e. seeing between the two persons in front of you, one on your left and one on your right).
4. Guardrails at balconies must be located so as not to obstruct the vi ew.
5. Upper rows should be located so that the top of the proscenium arch does not obstruct the view of the bottom seven feet of the back
wal 1 .
6. Radius of curvature for rows of seats is equal to dimension from proscenium opening to back wall of theatre.
7. See next page for basic site lines.
8. See next page for basic dimensions for plotting floor slope.
9. See following pages for calculations of seating capacities and required dimensions.
85



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86


- Nuroberi of Soabs (Shock Size*) for Any Row Length
Row Laa^Ui £*.-. j la. 19' 20' 21* J2 Raw Laasj Wi Pc-1*. | :#l 1? 20' 21" 22 i flaw Laytft ; Pt..In.j In. 19 20* k 22 Canyth 1 !a. 19- xr\ 2i* 2T
5- C m 3 fiFT 137 6 | !5- * | 196 7 j 5 4 :i- 3 4_is_ JL
5- l 31 2 1 1 n- s 133 S 2 hrr 197 6 4 * 5 ! 2!- * ( 256 7 6 11 i
5- 2 42 1 2 TiFT 139 4 3 16- 6 133 5 5 3 6 ; 21. s 1 a? 6 LUlL 2
5- 3 62 3 ; 11- 8 140 3 4 IS- 7 T 199 4 6 Li_ 7 | 21- 5 i s. JL. ;l 9 3
5- 4 64 2 1 Httt 141 t 16- 8 200 3 7 1 8 : 21- 7 | as 4 0 u. <
5- 5 65 5 2 HFF 142 1 5 16- 8 201 2 8 l S 21- 8 | 1CA 3 19 7 :
5- 6 66 3 : ii-ii 143 7 16-10 202 1 3 I---5 I 261 2 ll 6 L_
5- 7 11 2 I 12. a 144 6 1 16-11 m 10 1 21-10 . 162 1 12 5 J
5- s 1 2 12- 1 145 5 2 !7- 0 204 9 1 21-11 2S3 13 4 3
5- 5 M 3 12- 2 MS 4 3 17- 1 205 i 2 22.0 . 264 : 1 1 3 2
6- 7 79 4 12- 3 147 4 17- 2 206 7 J 22. 1 i 265 11 2 ; 2 10
6- t 30 3 i 1 12- 4 1W 2 5 17- 3 207 6 4 22- 2 ! 2i 10 3 ;* n
8. i hr 2 t 12- 5 MS 1 5 17- 4 208 5 s 33-3 ! 267 9 4 12
6.10 82 1 3 12- 6 J50 ; 17- 5 209 < 5 j 26S 8 *
6-11 *3 4 12- 7 151 " s n-1 17- 5 210 3 7 22-S Lm 14 7
7- 0 w 3 1 12- 8 152 s 2 17- J 211 2 8 . 22-6 ! 273 13 1 if 7
7- i as 2 2 12- 9 153 * 3 17- 8 212 II 5 22- 7 ! 2?i 12 !
7- ! s- 1 t 12-13 154 ..... 3 < 1;. 3 213 10 i_l_ 10 22- i 1 272 11 3<4
7- 3 87 4 12-31 155 8 2 s 17-10 214 9 2 9 1 srj ! 273 10 4 ] 3 10
y. 4 S3 3 1 13- 0 156 7 1 I $ 17-11 15 8 3 3 3 ! 274 9 5*2 11
7- 5 89 2 ? 13- 1 157 6 2 7 \i- 0 ru 7 4 7 s 1 22-11 I -'S 8 ft] 12
7- 6 90 l 13- 2 158 5 3 hrr :> b < 6 & 23- 0 1 77S 7 7 13
> $ 91 4 13- 3 159 i 4 18- 2 213 5 6 5 i 73- 1 1 271 6 8
11* 2 58 5 13- 4 150 3 S 18- 3 211 4 7 4 s 1 23- 2 1 278 5 9 11 2
8- 3 99 4 1 13- 5 III 6 IE- 4 221 4 4 1 23- 3 * SO 10 3
H- 4 iOO 3 2 13- S 152 1 7 18- 5 :n 2 9 2 8 ! 23- 4 1 250 3 11 9 4
8- 5 101 2 3 13- 7 153 a 18- 5 :n 1 13 1 9 23- 5 i Zsl 2 12 8 5
8- 6 02 1 4 13- S 164 7 ! ifi- 7 223 U 13 23- 6 m 1 i3 7 5
8- 7 103 13- 9 155 0 2 18- 8 224 10 i 23. 2 ; :2 14 {
8- 8 i04 l 1 13-10 Itt : 5 2 18- 3 225 5 2 1 23- S 234 13 -I4F *
8- 3 105 2 2 13-11 167 4 4 18-10 225 8 ! 23-9 . 235 12 till
8-10 lOi 2 5 14- 0 158 3 < i3-!l 227 7 4 23-10 i?6 ii j!j_ 10
2-11 107 1 4 :*. t 163 2 1 19- 0 228 6 s 23-11 : 237 to ii ii
3- 0 1S3 5 14- 2 170 1 7 19- i 229 5 6 24- 0 258 C S!l 13
9- 1 ia 4 171 1 19- 2 230 4 7 24- l i is 8 S Ll.
8- 7 110 3 2 14- 4 172 1 1 19- 3 231 12 3 S 24- 2 * m 7 1
S- 3 nrn ? 7 14- 5 173 6 2 19- 4 232 11 Ij2 9 24- 3 SI 6 1
S- 4 1 < 14- 6 174 5 3 19- S 233 10 10 24- 4 2S2 5 3
S- 5 Hi S 14- 7 1ft 1 4 1=- s 234 9 3 11 24- 5 293 4 10
9- 9 51? i 14- i 176 > 2 3 5 19- 7 235 s 4 13 1 21. s 294 3
9-SO US s 1 14- 9 177 3 2 5 19- 3 236 ; 5 3 3 24- 7 2S? 2 12
S-li 119 i 2 14-10 178 * 1 1 19- 9 237 6 s s 3 24- % 2796 1 13
1C- 0 120 7 3 14-11 179 * 5 ! 19-13 213 5 7 1 7 4 24- 9 29? 1*
10- 1 121 2 4 IS- J 130 3 6 1S-11 229 * 8 6 5 24-10 25$ n I
iO- i i 5 IS- 1 181 2 7 20- 0 2*C 3 9 5 5 74 -11 299 1? 2
!0- 3 223 ' 15- 2 182 1 8 £0- I 241 2 10 * 7 25- 0 XX3 11 3
13- 4 124 5 1 15- 3 183 9 20- 2 24 2 1 11 3 9 25- i 301 10 4
125 l 2 15- 4 134 s 1 ; 20- 3 243 12 2 9 25- 2 Sic 3 5
10. 6 126 3 3 15- 5 185 1 2 20- 4 214 11 ill 10 25- 3 303 9 5
-13- 7 J?7 2 * a- r 136 S 3 20- 5 245 19 2 11 25- 4 X.4 7
iO- 8 128 2 5 IS- 1 18/ 5 4 20- 5 2*6 3 3 25- S 305 6 8
!0- 9 129 1 S 15- ! 188 4 S 20- 7 247 8 4 25- 6 :-c 5 5
10-10 130 S 1 15- 9 ir 3 5 20- ! 2*3 7 5 25- 7 307 4 IQ
;o-;i 131 2 ! 15-10 IW t 7 1 20- 3 243 6 6 25- 8 X6 3 ; .1
11. c 132 3 3 a-u 131 1 8 I 20-10 250 13 ! 5 7 2S- 9 :09
11- 1 133 2 * 1 18- 3 132 20-11 251 jL ill 3 25-10 310 { 13
11.2 134 1 5 191 10 ! 1 21- C 252 II 2 3 9 25-11 311 14
n- 3 135 6 16- 2 m 9 1 j 1 2 21- 1 253 10 j 3l2 10
11- 4 136 IS- 3 195 & 2 6 1 3 21- 2 254 3 | 4 { 1 !l
sm Aliwtn CCOmm :* additional.
Sat-L Silft: C£.'W W#4 l!*Own Sejft ara alto ava-labi# id" 23' & 2*" wia. >6' ut* not Limit j-.a of
Matt to O' rows f comfc't.
Ow* a of Sa*tj: Not a that fet &>$* 'Cvt ran and t^iraa 20* may ba uvad, ot, twe 21" and tia 22" DRd Iinot ;aata cK EXAMPLE A: 7'-0" i 54'-S" or 47C3 -f tq. ft- bew taouy 20" ioofc, 34" bock fo bock?
1. Rqwi: In Table I. 36" col., at
37'-0" depth. No rot It
Itu C'CtJ-ovan (I row at f'ont.
4 at rad') = 5
o'a-lsbla I' matt 24
2. Aide*: Table II. ne-es-.a in aide
width par 'ow 0.75": 0.7S i 24
Total increase = i'-6"
Min. aitla 3*-0"
Mai *i*i = 4-6"
3. Statin*} Schama: Select tentative
C"a"a. 2 aula* 2 dead-end
tat* &a"ki 1 cant*r bant, from tropes zoda. dead and to*** "'ay b 7 iaaM long. can'r' -owt I*
iaat. In T'abia IV I*20" tea's ~ 23'- 7" 770" taatt = M'-tl" 1 TO" tae* = i I'-ll" From (2) lOOva. I aisles 0"
Total w.-dth = $6'- S Saa't par row 23
A To*al No. of Seats: {Table III) f
0. 28 :* = i
EXAMPLE V: Sivao capacity of 472 eH. what ii'i aaditartam Plneaatloai 7
Thu pfoc> ft# convarta of "A".
Seating Capacities, I -32 Rewt
N*. at' flaw* 7 S**a 14 Sant. 23 3aa Na. ot R^a 7 M S* 28 W.
1 7 14 28 17 119 236 475
2 14 3 56 13 128 252 5C4
3 21 42 84 n 133 2fo 532
4 28 56 112 23 140 230 560
5 35 70 140 21 147 734 usa
6 IS6 22 154 308 515
7 *5 st i 96 U 151 322 644
5 56 112 224 24 168 336 W
9 63 125 252 25 175 ;cc
10 70 140 m 26 342 364 728
11 J? 154 303 27 133 378 75*5
12 54 163 335 396 X2 'W
13 Si ir 364 23 733 406 812
14 oi >32 30 210 420 840
15 105 210 423 31 217 434 j
16 112 224 443 32 224 U4
RULE of THUMB hr SEATING AREA:
Allow ?!^ sq.ft per Seat, including Aisles and Cross-overs.
Thu i aifricwntly accurate for pteUmxxary planning.
- Depth DImen*ton (Ft.-In.) for Varicuf Spacing*
No. Overall Oacch for Saat Spc**g i Back (0 back ) f ;
flow* 32 33* 34* 35' 36* 37- 23* 39' 40* ! 41 42*
l 2-8 2-9 2-10 2-11 3-0 3-1 3- 2 3-3 34 2- 5 3-6
2 5-4 5-6 5- 8 5-iO 6-0 6- 2 6- 4 6-5 S.i 6-30 7-0
i 8-0 8-3 8- 5 8- 9 9-0 9 3 3- 6 9-9 10-0 10. j 13-6
4 10-8 11-0 11- 4 11- 8 12-0 12- 4 12- 8 13-0 13-4 13- 3 14-0
5 13-4 13-9 14- 2 14- 7 15-0 15- 5 15-13 16-3 16-8 17- 1 17-6
6 16-0 16-6 17- 0 17- 6 !$-0 13- 6 13- 0 19-6 20-0 20- S 21-0
7 18-1 19-3 19-10 20- 5 21-0 21- 7 22- 2 22-9 23-4 23-11 24-6
8 ?!-4 22-0 22- 1 23- 4 24-0 24- 8 23- 4 26-0 26-8 27- 4 78-0
9 ?-0 24-9 25- 6 26- 3 27-3 27- 9 6 3-1 30-0 30- 9 31-6
19 26-3 27-5 23- 4 29- 2 50-0 33-10 31 3 32-6 33-4 Ji- 2 35-0
11 29-4 30 3 31- 2 32- l 33-0 33-11 24-10 35-9 36-8 37- 7 38-5 |
ll 32-0 33-0 34- 3 35- 0 36-C 37- 0 a- 0 J9-3 40-0 41- 0 *2-0
n 34-3 35-3 36-10 37-11 n-o a- i 41- 2 *2-3 43-4 - 5 45-5
14 37-4 38-6 33- i 40-13 <2-0 - 2 . *5-6 46-8 47-10 49-0
15 40-0 41-3 42- 6 43- 9 45-0 46- 3 47- 5 *8-9 50-0 51- 3 12-6
If 42-8 44-0 45- 4 *5- 3 *4-0 49- 4 X- ! 52-0 53-4 54- 8 56-0
17 45-4 46-9 - 2 49- 7 51-0 52- 5 53-10 55-3 5c-8 58- 1 5i-b
18 43-3 49-6 51- a 52- 6 54-0 a. 0 57- 0 58-6 50-0 Si- 6 sj-a
19 SOI 52-3 53-10 55- 5 57-0 £6- 7 5C- 2 Si- 53-4 54-11 6c-5
20 53-4 55-0 56* 4 58- 4 50-3 61- 3 52- < iS-0 56-8 68- 4 70-0
21 %-a 57-3 S3- 6 Cl- 3 63-0 64- 9 66- 6 66-3 70-0 71- 3 73-6
22 58-1 63-6 62- 4 54. 2 56-0 57-10 59- 8 71-6 73-4 75- 2 77-0
23 51-4 i3-3 65- 2 57- 1 59-3 70-11 72-30 74-9 75-8 ;a- 7 80-6
24 64-0 66-C 68- D 70- 0 72-0 74- 3 76- 0 78-0 £3-0 82- 0 54-0
25 66-3 £8-9 70-10 72-11 75-0 77- 1 79- 7 81-3 53-4 85- 5 87-6
26 69-4 71-6 73- 8 75-13 73-0 S3- 2 32- 4 S4-6 36-8 55-13 91-0
27 72-0 74-3 76- 6 73- J 81-0 83- 3 £- 6 87-9 90-0 52- 3 94. c
23 74-8 77-0 79- 4 31- 8 34-0 86- 4 a- i Si-0 93-4 35- 8 9S-0
29 77.1 79-9 12- 2 84- 7 87-0 39- 5 91.10 94-3 96-8 39- 1 101-6
3C SC-0 1 32-6 35- 0 87- 5 M-0 92- 5 95- 0 57-6 100-0 102- 6 06-0
31 82 -J I 5S-3 87-10 90- 5 93-0 95- 7 98- 2, IOC-3 103-4 135-11 108-6
n 85-4 | a-c 9C- 8 93- 4 af-a 58- ! 101- 4 104-0 106-8 109- 4 112-0
87


BIBLIOGRAPHY
Brawn, G. New York.
2., John Reynolds, et al. Insidgout. John Wiley and Sons,
1982.
Budinger, Fred C. "Soils Report -For River View High School", Finley, Washington. Spokane, Washington. July 17, 1977.
De Chiara, Joseph, John Callender. Time Saver Standards for Building Types. McGraw-Hill, New york. 1980. Pages 205-210, 233-235, 352-392.
Doelle, Leslie L. Environmental Acoustics. McGraw-Hi11, New York. 1972.
Kaufman, John E. IES Lighting Handbook, Reference and Applications volumes. Illuminating Engineers Society of North America, New York. 1981.
Koenigsberger, 0. H., et al. Manual of Tropical Housing and Building: Climatic Design. Longman Group Limited. London, 1974.
Maori a, Ed, J. Douglas Balcomb. Passive Solar Associates: Handbook. Unpublished. Copyright 1980 by Passive Solar Associates.
MeCueP William. Tri Cities architect. Private communication.
October, 1983.
Morse, Bruce. Interviews with Spokane architectural firm. September, 1983.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Climatalooical Data. Annual" Summary: Washington 1982. Nat i on a1 C1i mati c Data Cent er. Asheville, North Carolina, 1982.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Comparative Climatic Data. National Climatic Data Center. Asheville, North Carolina. August, 1982.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Temperature, Heating and Cooling Degree Days and 80". National Climatic Data Center. Asheville, January, 1982.
"Daily Normals of Precipitation 1951-North Carolina.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Data: Monthly Summaries 1932", Climatic Data Center. Asheville,
Administration. "Local Climatalogical for Yakima, Washington. National North Carolina, Published Monthly,
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "Local Climatalogical Data: Annual Summary 1982", for Walla Walla and Yakima, Washington. National Climatic Data Center. Asheville, North Carolina, 1982.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
"Summary of Hourly
88


Observations", -for Yakima, Washington. National Climatic Data Center. Asheville, North Carolina, Published Monthly.
Neth, Ted. Interview with CBC arts division chairperson. October, 1983.
Palmer, Mickey The Archi t.ect? s Guide to Facility Programming. McGraw-Hill, New York. 1981.
Pena, William. Problem Seeking. Cahners Books International, Boston. 1977.
Strychax, Stanley, etal. Means Square Foot Costs. 1982 edition.
Means Co., Inc., Kingston, Maine. 1982.
Szokalay, S. V. Environmental Science Handbook. Construction Press, Ltd, Lancaster, England, 1980.
89


FURTHER REFERENCES
American Theatre Planning Beard. Theatre Check 1 i s t. Wesleyan University press, Middletown, Connecticut. 1969.
Architectural Record, Editors of. Buildings for the Arts. McGraw-Hill, New York. 1978.
Beranek, Leo Leroy. Music. Acoustics and Architecture. Robert E. Krieger Publishing, Huntington, New York. 1962.
Canty, Donald. Editor. Issue Discussing Natural Light. AIA Journal. September, 1979. Pages 49-92.
El-Shishini, Linda Boring. Campus Buildings That Work. North American Publishing Co., Philadelphia. 1972.
Hayes, John, Dennis Andrejko. 9th National Passive Solar Conference, Preprint Edition. ASES Publications Office, New York. 1983.
Izenour, George. Theatre Design. Mcgraw-Hill, New York. 1977.
Lam, William. Perception and Lighting as Formal vers for Architecture. Mcgraw-Hill, New York. 1977,
Parkin, Peter. Acoustics. Noise and Buildings. Trinity Press, London. 1979.
Schmartz, Mildred F. "Art for Arts Sake". Architectural Record. May 1983. Pages 120-129.
90




NVTJ SIldlAEVO




MUSIC
ART
\ V l.l.I.l.l...I.i,i,i i
v \ \ / ,
v' v\ _________________ / .:
! I---- ir \ .
< N \
THEATRE
ADMIN
DRAMA
LEGEND
ADMIN
ART
DRAMA
ruCH/UCTVM
MUSIC
t NIKTICI ROOM
VOCRL/WIOPY
OTHER


SECOND LEVEL
THIRD LEVEL


ATRIUM SECTION


NORTH ELEVATION
EAST ELEVATION


WEST ELEVATION


SUMMER DAY
MECHANICAL