Citation
Campus master plan and new creative arts facility

Material Information

Title:
Campus master plan and new creative arts facility Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania
Creator:
Saridakis, Anthony Michael
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
156 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, maps, plans (some folded) ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Campus planning -- Pennsylvania -- Carlisle ( lcsh )
Buildings ( fast )
Campus planning ( fast )
Pennsylvania -- Carlisle ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Anthony Michael Saridakis.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
08674343 ( OCLC )
ocm08674343
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1981 .S37 ( lcc )

Full Text
DICKINSON COLLEGE CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA
master's THESIS IN ARCHITECTURE
ANTHONY MICHAEL SARIDAKIS
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO


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To Mother and Dad



Dickinson College, founded in 1773, is located on a historic campus, near the center of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, a community of 20,000. Dickinson is a private, 4-year, co-education-al, liberal arts college with an enrollment of under 2000 students. The school's emphasis on education as a total experience, fosters an atmosphere of intellectual development combined with emotional, cultural, and social growth. In compliance with this assign, my program is generated by the desire to improve the educational and environmental quality of Dickinson College.
I have selected the New Creative Arts Facility for Dickinson as the design problem that will serve as vehicle for my study. I intend for this project to summarize my personal philosophy of design and demonstrate my ability to translate that philosophy into physical form. Clarification of my personal design theory and its supporting design process will be demonstrated through my response to this problem; that is, my ability to transform program requirements into physical form and space.
The Dickinson College project was selected after considering my predetermined goals and objectives for the thesis project. Some of the criteria I established for the thesis project are as follows. The "essence" of the project should be design; the end product should



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Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 1971, designed by The Architects Collaborative, represents the first stage of the College Arts Center for Dickinson College. This facility is equipped for three separate performances or as a theatre in the round. The New Creative Arts Building (42,000 sq.ft.) will be the second and final phase of the center. It will house facilities for music, dance, painting, graphics, sculpture, and photography; as well as exhibition and lounge and administration spaces. The facilities are currently strewn about the campus in inadequate, "left-over" space. With the New Arts Building, campus reorganization will be required. My studies for the New Arts Building include an evaluation and proposal for the campus plan. They are one, inseparable problem.
The Dickinson campus is more than history. In 1803, architect, Benjamin H. Latrobe set the stage of a quiet drama when he presented to the college his design for "Old West", which he would later refer to as being, "amoung the most gratifying exertions of (his) art." Compelled by the ideal of use, structure, and beauty as a single design principle, the architecture of Latrobe is as timeless as the ideals that formed it. A campus masterplan and design for the New Arts Building must allign with Latrobe's pedagogy. Clearly, the issue to address is a complete integration of three basic aspects of design; functional planning,
construction, and beauty.



The mountains and rivers dominating Pennsylvania's natural landscape are a major influence in determining its use by man. The man-made boundaries that made it nearly rectangular in shape are totally decimated by the Allegheny Section of the Appalachian Mountain System. Running across the state from southwest to northeast, it leaves only a triangle of Piedmont and Coastal Plain in the southeast, with Philadelphia and environs at its extreme point. Northward and westward of this diagonal spine, a rugged plateau region falls almost at lake front into the Lake Erie Lowland.
In the eastern part of the state, the Delaware is fed mainly by the Lehigh and Schuylkill Rivers. The Susquehanna, draining the largest section of the state, is a wide, shallow stream that meanders finally into Maryland and the Chesapeake Bay. The Ohio system in the west has several tributaries within the state during its course by way of the Mississippi into the Gulf of Mexico. Minor systems lead into Lake Erie in the northwest and the Potomac from the southwest.
The Appalachian Ridge and Valley Region, running southwestward across the state to the west of the Piedmont, comprises a series of parallel ridges and valleys, including the long, wide Cumberland Valley, an area of rich limestone soils and prosperous farms. This


valley was important in America's early westward movement, and remains a part of the mainstay of the state's agriculture industry.
Nearly centered within the Cumberland Valley is Carlisle, a small farming center and industrial town. Small scale older buildings, frequent open spaces, and the low impact of the automobile make a pleasant environment for Carlisle in general and Dickinson College in specific. The extensive use of natural materials (abundant limestone, local brick, timber), colors and textures, further enhance the intamacy of scale.


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Denny Hall
Communications and Development Bernard Center for the Humanities lacob Tome Scientific Bldg V\est College Dana Hall of Biology Media Center Althouse Science B'dg Boiler Hall Biddle House
11 Holland Union Bldg
12 Montgomery House
13 Spahr Library
14 Art Bldg
J5 Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium
16 Kisner-Woodvsard Hall
17 McKennev Hall
18 Phi Delta Theta i=*~19 Phi Kappa Psi
20 Phi Kappa Sigma 21 Alpha Chi Rho 22 Sigma Alpha Epsilon ~ 23 Sigma Chi v£5*24 Kappa Sigma
25 Theta Chi 2b Beta Theta Pi
27 Phi Epsilon Pi
28 Lite Sports Learning Center, under construction Women s Athletic Field Herman Bosler Biddle Athletic Field Malcolm Hall Mathews House Morgan Hall
34 Strayer House
35 Witwer Hall 3b Faculty Club
37 Adams Hall
38 Draver Hall
39 Todd Hall
40 Admissions Bldg
41 Sellers House
42 South College Computer Center
43 Alumni Gymnasium
44 President s House
45 Reed Hal!
P Parking
C College Housing


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TOPOGRAPHY The terrain of the project site is essentially flat. There is an 8 ft
gain in elevation from the N.W. corner to the S.E. corner of the property. This slope running diagonally across the site is 2.7 percent. The average slope from the S.E. comer (high point) to the S.W. corner is 2.8 percent grade. The average slope from the S.W. comer to the N.W, comer (low point) is 1,1 percent grade, a 3 ft. drop in elevation. Mild changes in elevation are constant across the site.
GEOLOGY The geology of the Cumberland Valley is comprised of rich limestone soils and loose gravels. The project site is not located over any known faults, areas subject to subsidence, or expansive clay conditions which would threaten the site's development potential.
SOILS Soils in the project area are predominately composed of limestone and gravels. At present, there have been no soil boring tests. The existence of large, stone and concrete buildings adjacent to the site indicates the suitability of underlying soils capable of supporting significant development.


VEGETATION Various shade trees including maple, elm and oak predominate the campus
and the site. Large, mature oaks, approximately 35 to 45 ft. in height, line Louther Street. Also along the north boundary of the site is a strip of newly planted conifers, all less than 10 ft. in height. Broadleaves of varing age and heights are dispersed through the site. A low hedge lines the west border, and four large conifers (40 ft.) line the south border of the site.
HYDROLOGY The surface drainage occurs across the site from the S.E. to the N.W. While test borings have not yet been made, local conditions indicate ground water to be about 8 to 12 ft, below the surface. Therefore, the conclusion has been made that ground water is not expected to present any substantial constraints on development.
ANIMAL LIFE The only animal life present on the campus is domestic pets, squirrels, and the local variety of birds.


UM
"The two aspects, the most unpleasant in our climate are the North East and the North West. The extreme cold of the North West winds in winter, and their dryness, which causes a rapid evaporation so thoroughly chills the walls of every house, exposed to them, that when the wind, as is almost always the case, changes afterwards to the West and South West and becomes warmer and moister, the water is precipitated upon the walls from the air, by their coldness, as upon the outside of a glass of cold water in warm weather, and they soon stream with humidity. The North East winds bring along rain and.sleet, and their violence drives the moisture into every wall of which the material will permit it. The unpleasantness of the winds is aggravated by the suddenness with which the Northwest commonly succeeds the North East. I have stated these things, which are indeed known to every body, in order to explain a law, which is thereby imposed upon the Architecture of our Country:
It is, to reserve the Southern aspects of every building in the erection of which the choice is free, for the inhabited apartments, and to occupy the Northern aspects by communications, as stairs, lobbies, halls, vestibules, etc.
This law governs the designs herewith presented to you."
Benjamin H. Latrobe


Pennsylvania is generally considered to have a humid continental type of climate, but the varied physiographic features have a marked effect on the weather and climate of the various sections within the state. The prevailing westerly winds carry most of the weather disturbances that affect Pennsylvania from the interior of the continent, so that the Atlantic Ocean has only limited influence upon the climate of the state. Coastal storms do, at times, affect the day-to-day weather, especially in eastern sections and occasionally in the Cumberland Valley. Storms of tropical origin may have effect within the state, causing flooding in some instances. Floods may occur during any month of the year in Pennsylvania, although they occur with greater frequency in the spring months of March and April. They may result from heavy rains during any season. Generally, the most widespread flooding occurs during the winter and spring when associated with heavy rains, or heavy rains combined with snowmelt. Serious local flooding sometimes results from ice jams during the spring thaw. Heavy local thunderstorm rains cause severe flash flooding during summer months. Floods may be expected at least once in most years.
Precipitation is fairly evenly distributed throughout the year. Annual amounts generally range between 40 to 45 inches. Greatest ammounts usually occur in spring and summer months, while February is the driest month, having about 2 inches less than the wettest
months


Temperatures generally remain between 0 and 100. Summers are generally warm night as well as day. High temperatures, 90 or above, occur on the average of 10 to 20 days per year. During the coldest months temperatures average near the freezing point with daily minimum readings sometimes near 0 or below. From about July 1 to the middle of September this area occasionally experiences uncomfortably warm periods, 4 to 5 days to a week in length, during which light wind movement and high relative humidity make conditions oppressive. In general, the winters are comparatively mild, with an average of less than 100 days with minimum temperatures below the freezing point.




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GENERAL STATEMENTS
The Dickinson College planning effort in uniquely free of the pressures which normally generate the need to planj facing imminent growth, requiring a "bricks and mortar" approach and dealing with a short time framework. This planning program is generated solely by the desire to Improve the educational quality of Dickinson College.
Dickinson has recently completed a fairly intensive period of new construction, providing much needed new facilities. The program that has evolved from the college and the Delta Group is based on a thorough analysis of each building and space to determine the efficiency, capacity and appropriateness of the current use. From this effort, intelligent alternatives in terms of space reassignment, rehabilitation, modification, as well as new construction can be evaluated over time, to meet specific space needs and changing educational nhilosophy.


It is the inter-relationship between the new facilities and spaces, the older campus areas and the adjacent community that will be primarily dealt with in the physical design aspect, to improve the future landscape and architectural character, pedestrian and vehicular movement systems, and the overall campus design structure.
The following elements are the guidelines for the development of the Campus Plant
a) Historic, strongly symbolic and noteworthy exterior spaces and buildings shall be protected and upgraded,
b) The physical and functional linking of the east and west campus areas should
be accomplished through acquisition, street closures and/or changes in land use,
c) "Intermingling" of learning and living activities can occur as a result of this flexible planning, and through the preservation of the small scale, old


(and even somewhat inefficient) houses. The desired human interation can thus be strengthened, while retaining an informal character.
The development of a strong internal pedestrian system, free of vehicular conflicts, with both active and passive outdoor spaces, should be another major goal.
An expanded, efficient and unobtrusive parking system, as well as an Improved service and traffic plan is also needed.
An intensive landscape development program, including a coordinated paving, lighting, furnishings, planting and graphics system should be initiated. A maintenance and replacement program should be Integral to this effort.
A campus Fine Arts program, utilizing permanent elements and changeable art


exhibits of professional and student work, should be developed as an integral part of the campus design structure.
Imbedded in all the planning and design efforts, should be a strong sense of creating an environment conducive to human interaction and learning, respectful of the past as well as looking to the future. The proper use of resources, both natural and financial, should be an integral element of the plan.


THE CONCEPTUAL PLAN
The plan on the facing page is the result of combining an Intensive analysis of the physical and visual campus environment with the objectives of the campus community for the future character of Dickinson College.
It is not a "master plan," which sets forth a definitive, rigid plan for growth. It is simply a design study to test the accommodation of the program developed by the college through the development of improved, relocated or new site and building facilities.
The relationship of the campus to the adjacent community has been carefully considered in this study, as the quality and character of both the campus and the neighborhood are interdependent. Many alternatives for achieving the stated goals were studied. Many are still viable choices.


This plan simply expresses the first choices, based on current conditions
Flexibility is therefore a basic ingredient of this ongoing effort.


SITE RELATED PROGRAM ITEMS
ITEM 1
a)
b)
c)
ITEM 2
a)
Pedestrian Circulation
Develop pedestrian walkway system to accommodate functional requirements while respecting axles, vistas and other aesthetic factors.
Develop plazas at points of intersection and other key areas to reduce congestion, promote human interaction and enhance spatial variety.
Special treatment of pedestrian crosswalks to minimize hazards at street crossings.
Bicycle Circulation
Special consideration shall be given to width and alignment of walkways
used as bike routes


b)
c)
ITEM 3
a)
b)
Provide centralized covered shelter in housing areas for overnight parking of bicycles.
Bicycles racks of one design for short term use at locations where the need is apparent throughout the campus.
Vehicular Circulation *
Close alleys on Nisbet campus to all vehicles except service and emergency to allow development of major pedestrian walkway. Provide service access from east-west alley to ATS Auditorium. *
Close Church Avenue between South College and South West Streets to all vehicles except service and emergency to allow development of pedestrian walkway.*
* Accompanying map


c) Close Pomfret Street between Orange and Belvedere Streets, one block of Glendale Street and alley between High Street and Pomfret Street to allow athletic field expansion. *
d) Close alleys between Conway Street and Wilson Street to allow development of pedestrian walkway linking housing to Biddle Field. *
e) If future expansion of the campus were to occur to the north of Louther it may be advantageous to close all or a portion of Louther Street from Cherry to North West Street.
f) Screen visually objectionable service areas with walls and/or planting at the following locationsi
1. Holland Union Building
2. Heating Plant and Althouse
3. Morgan Hall
4. Adams Hall
Accompanying map


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Eliminate parking north of auditorium
h) Eliminate parking to rear of Old West.
i) Acquire properties between Biddle Avenue East and Conway Street, converting predominately commercial area into open space linkage, parking and court games.
ITEM 4 Utilities
a) Detailed study, evaluation and specific recommendations followed program finalization.
b) Inventory and analysis to date indicate existing service appears adequate for all program recommendations. This assumes Borough continues to implement storm drainage improvements.


ITEM 5
Physical Education, Intercollegiate Sports, Intramural, and Recreation
a) Ideally, acquire commercial area, church, and residential areas in vicinity of Lacrosse Field to expand and to meet size and orientation requirements for athletic fields. Provides*
1. New baseball diamond, overlapped with field hockey
2. New soccer field, overlapped with lacrosse
3. Area at Biddle Field now occupied by baseball and soccer becomes available for instruction and intramural
4. Ideal orientation on all relocated fields
5. Parking for 116 cars
b) Alternately, acquire open area northwest of railroad for athletic field expansion.
c) Continue to allow spontaneous, Informal recreation to occur in close proximity to housing and in other open space areas.


ITEM 6
Furnishings and Features
a) Adopt a design study of all site furnishings to achieve a design consistency and determine locations for same. This would include benches, litter receptacles, information boards and kiosks, bollards, etc.
b) Establish a fine arts acquisition program and outdoor exhibit program.
c) Preserve existing walls and gates. Repair as required.
d) Lighting recommendations to be held pending further study. Such recommendations will include suggestion of light types and level of illumination for various areas.
e) Adopt a campus graphics study to achieve consistency of signage. This would include building identification, area designations, and campus regulatory
signs.


ITEM 7 Vegetation *
a) Zone 1 Old Mature Landscape
1. Requires careful management and replacement program
2. Continual thinning necessary for turf maintenance
3. Avoid low, dense planting to continue open lines of vision
4. Groundcover required in areas of dense shade
b) Zone 2 Semi-Mature Landscape
1. Generally very healthy, vigorous plant material
2. Avoid over planting open areas to preserve informal recreation and turf quality
c) Zone 3 Immature Landscape
1. Lacks strong definition of space
2, Overly enthusiastic use of shrubs, rocks etc. (inconsistent with older campus character)
* Accompanying map


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d) Zone k Underdeveloped Landscape
1. Potential for reinforcing spatial character and edge screening with new planting
BUILDING RELATED PROGRAMS NOT RANKED BY PRIORITY
ITEM 8 Reorganization recommendation with new physical education facilities *
a) New Physical Education Center
1. Acquisition of parcel of land west of Cherry Street, south of railroad
2. Construction of new physical education center to serve individual recreation, intramural, Instructional and Intercollegiate athletics. This could be a multi stage development.
3. Facilities includet
* Accompanying map


a. Gymnasium floors (1 competition court or 3 intramural courts)
b. Swimming pool (6 lanes, 25 meters) and diving pool. Possible retractable roof and movable walls for indoor and outdoor use
c. Mat areas
d. Court areas, handball, squash, bowling, etc,
e. Physical education classrooms, offices, lockers, and ancillory function
f. Modern dance
Net sq. ft. subtotal Circulation 80^
15,000 sq, ft.
9.000 sq, ft,
4.000 sq. ft.
5.000 sq. ft.
14.000 sq. ft.
1.000 sq. ft.
48.000
38.000 _______
86,000 sq. ft.


4. Relocate all existing programs from Alumni Gym
Alumni Gym (19.800 net assignable square feet)
1. Renovate Alumni Hall for use as a general purpose classroom building
2. Stair egress and construction upgraded to comply with code (2 year shutdown approximately) (24,800 NASF)
3. Design to allow staging for later conversion to instructional media support facilities
4. Construction of mezzanine level for offices and small space requirements
5. Temporary relocation of Military Science from Denny Hall. Upon renovation of Denny, return Military Science to original location
6. Temporary relocation of Mathematics and Computer Science from South College. Upon renovation of South College, return Math and Computer Science to original location


c) South College (7,350 NASF)
1. Demolish squash court addition
2. Temporary relocation of Math to Alumni, Upon renovation of South College return Math to original location
d) Denny Hall
1, Relocate to Alumni Hall temporarily*
a. History
b. Political Science
c. Sociology Anthropology
d. American Studies
2. Complete renovation of Denny Hall as general purpose classrooms (approximate 2 year shutdown). Building with some first floor area allocated toward community related functions. Renovation should maintain character of architectural style, in particular, stained glass, open trussed spaces, wood detailing around entries, etc. Restore clock toward and bell system.


3. Stair egress and construction require upgrading to comply with code and occupancy requirements,
k. Relocate Social Sciences listed above to Denny Hall after renovation.
Alumni Hall
l. Conversion of building to instructional media support facility
a. Minor space reorganization
b. Addition of hardware required
2, Creation of instructional media support facility
a. Audio-visual library
b. Teaching labs
c. Future closed circuit TV studio
d. Small conference center with access to TV, audio-visuals and computer
3. Relocation of Psychology Education Department from Reed Hall


f) Reed Hall (4600 NASF)
1. Relocation of Psychology Education Department from Reed Hall to Alumni Hall
2. Convert to special interest housing
g) President's House complete renovation and restoration ITEM 9 Reorganization required with new Creative Arts facilities*
a) New Creative Arts Center (42,000 sq. ft.)
1. Acquisition of residential plot east of Klsner Woodward on Louther Street as a building site for creative arts
2. Acquisition of land parcel on north side of Louther adjacent to railroad as shown to accommodate displaced parking (provision for approximately 130 cars)
3. Construction of new Creative Arts Center on the site west and/or north of the existing auditorium, to includei
* Accompanying map


a. Music
b. Ceramics
c. Painting
d. Sculpture
e. Graphics
f. Photography
4. Relocate Music Department fromi
a. Bosler Hall
b. Practice House
c. Sellers House
5. Relocate Fine Arts fromi
a. Bosler Hall
b. Art Building
Bosler Hall
1. Relocate to new Creative Arts Centeri


a. Fine arts
b. Music
2, Remaining area of Bosler Hall to be shared with Humanities and Social Sciences where over-crowding occurs
c) Fine Arts building - demolish
1. Relocate studios to new Creative Arts Center
2. Develop open space as campus green/sculpture garden
3. Land dedicated for possible library expansion (below grade)
d) Music building
1, Renovate and reuse as campus pub
2. Relocate music practice rooms to new Creative Arts Center
e) Sellers House
1. Relocate music practice rooms to new Creative Arts Center


2. Renovate and reuse as special interest housing (approximate capacity is 17 persons)
ITEM 10 New Laboratory Space *
a) Construction of new laboratory space connected to and north of Althouse
1. Relocate from Althouse the entire Geology Department
a. Increase area from 7,000 sq. ft. to 12,000 NASF
2. Provide additional lab facility for Environmental Sciences
b. Possible use of space vacated by Geology
3. Possible future location for all Physics facilities (18,000 NASF could be provided if required)
*+. Acquire land behind Dana Hall at Locust Avenue to receive displaced parking (approximately 10*+ cars)
* Accompanying map


ITEM 11
Tome Scientific
a) No addition to Tome recommended at any time 1. Space adjacent is inviolate 2. Aesthetically unacceptable to expand existing building
b) Renovation required to upgrade stair egress and construction to comply with code
ITEM 12 Reduction of population density in dormitory housing *
a) Fraternity Quad 1. Reduce density by eliminating four beds per building (total reduction ^0 beds)
* Accompanying map


Morgan Hall
1. Reduce population density of dormitory from 195 persons a 160 SF/P to 125 persons 250 SF/P
Montgomery Hall
1. Demolish (loss of 28 existing beds)
Biddle House/Matthews Hall/Todd Hall
1. Add sprinkler system to allow third floor occupancy
2. Continue to use as student housing (total gain of 26 beds)
New dormitory housing
1. Civen a constant enrollment, the recommended reduction of density in existing dormitory space would require accommodation of 82 beds.


a. Fraternity Quad -40
b. Morgan -57
c. Montgomery -28
d. Mathews/Todd/Blddle +26
e. Sellers +1?
f. Heed +20
-62
2. Acquire properties west of Malcolm Hall and west of Kisner Woodward
3. Construct a new dormitory facility requiring approximately 12,000 gross sq. ft. with a capacity of 48 beds
4. Increase number of off-campus beds by 14 through purchase of more houses adjacent to campus on north side of Louther Street and South College Street
5. Alternative to numbers 3 and 4i Acquire rest home south of Malcolm Hall and renovate which provides sufficient space for
82 beds


ITEM 13 West College no prerequisite program item
a) Building in violation of code for stair egress and construction requirements. Impact of code may be minimized by historic signlfigance of building
b) Maintain functions as they exist with intermingling of administrative, student service, and instructional type space.
ITEM 14 Maintenance Building No prerequisite program item *
a) Acquire building presently occupied by the State Highway Department on West North Street and relocate entire maintenance facility
b) Alternative acquisition in the event that a) is not available 1 coal yard property north of railroad, for construction of new maintenance facilities
* Accompanying map


ITEM 15
Kisner Woodward no prerequisite program item
a) Provide entrance on the south side of dormitory to pedestrian walkway ITEM 16 Saphr Library no prerequisite program item
a) Reorganize grade level reading room and desk to accommodate an entrance on north side of library relating to the new pedestrian walkway
b) Compact, accessible and humidity controlled space should be provided for dead storage of uncirculated volumes
1. Basement of Alumni Hall, renovated for instructional media (50,000 75,000 volumes requiring 5*000 7*5000 sq. ft.)
2. Basement of Bosler Hall, renovate existing clay room (maximum 40,000 volumes)
3. Space within proposed Creative Arts Center (50,000 75*000
volumes


4. Construction of new storage facility
ITEM 1? Rental properties (existing) no prerequisite program item
a) Properties on south side of Church Street east of South College Hall should be retained to facilitate potential closing of Church Street
b) Other rental properties (Louther Street between Cherry and North West Streets and east side of South College Street to Strayer House) should be retained
ITEM 18 New dormitory housing no prerequisite program item *
a) If total student enrollment were to increase to 2,000, an increase of 240 beds would be required assuming that the current percentage of 33^
* Accompanying map


students are housed in dormitory space. Accommodation of this increase would require 60,000 gross sq. ft. new dormitory housing
Additional acquisition between Conway Street and Mooreland Avenue, including Todd home, for new dorms and parking
1. Todd home with renovation +?4
2. Addition to Todd home -*40
3. New dormitory housing
+126


CONCLUSION
As this is only a summary of the program and conceptual plan, the planning process and the interaction which produced these conclusions is not documented in this report.
Extensive analysis of the natural campus environment was completed. The vegetation, soils, slopes, geology, drainage, and climatic factors were included in this phase. Vehicular and pedestrian movement, service needs and parking also were analyzed.
The architectural value and functional characteristics of each building on the campus were evaluated in order to realistically develop the urogram. The visual and physical character of the campus landscape, in terms of paving, furnishings, lighting, planting and the other elements which contribute to the campus were also evaluated.
Finally, a detailed investigation and analysis of the underground utilities was completed to provide information as to the adequacy and capacity of the existing services.


In addition to the analysis of the campus, a high degree of student, faculty, administration, and community involvement was sought during the planning process. Detailed questionnaires and interviews were used to discuss and define the analysis, goals, alternatives and priorities.
The site and building related program elements presented in this conceptual campus plan express the general goals as Dickinson College begins its third century of service.




'A'


Fine Arts 22,400 sq.ft
Music 7,800
Lounge 1,500
Sub-total 31,700
Lavatories, corridor, 10,300
mechanical, storage
Total 42,000 sq.ft
Efficiency: moderate 65%
Concepts: Flexibility
Maximum use of space
Building emphasis on human values
Student identity with other students and college
Open design
Indoor extended to outdoor environment


ACTIVITY USE
Lounge (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Lounge and reception
USERS Students Faculty Public
LOCATION Central (within building) Departments interface college and public Proximity to entrance
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Single space Size: 1500 sq.ft. Natural light desirable Furnishings for lounge and reception Separatie kitchenette required
CONCEPTS Image of departments and college Flexibility Living Room


ACTIVITY USE
Mechanical Room (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Mechanical Equiptment
USERS Service Personnel
LOCATION Central Proximity to service
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Single space Size: 1200 sq.ft. Fire control required Separaration required Service access required
CONCEPTS Efficiency Servant


ACTIVITY USE
Lavatories (4)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Lavatory Toilet
USERS Students Faculty Public
LOCATION Central
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Size: 200 sq.ft, (each) 3 toilets each 3 sinks each 2 janitor closets Good ventilation required
CONCEPTS Efficient Health Durable


ACTIVITY USE
Corridors
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Circulation
USERS Students Faculty Public
LOCATION Connection of all spaces
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Size: 8000 sq.ft. Good lighting required Good acoustics required Possible mixed use
CONCEPTS Efficiency Street Unity


ACTIVITY USE
Fine Arts Department Office (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Reception Secretarial
USERS Students Faculty Public
LOCATION Central Department interface with students Department interface with faculty Department interface with public
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Single office Size: 400 sq.ft. Natural light desirable Good ventilation required Furnishings and equiptment for reception and secretarial tasks
CONCEPTS Flexibility Department organizer Efficiency Image of department


ACTIVITY USE
Fine Arts Faculty Offices (4)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Private counsel Personal office tasks
USERS Faculty member
LOCATION Faculty interface with students Faculty interface with faculty Faculty interface with department Faculty interface with public
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Single office Size: 300 sq.ft, (each) Natural light desirable Good ventilation required Furnishings
CONCEPTS Flexibility for individual needs and expression Image of faculty member and department


ACTIVITY USE Fine Arts Department Slide Library (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Research Documentation and cataloguing Slide preparation Slide viewing Storage
USERS Students Faculty
LOCATION Central (within department) Proximity to photography facilities
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Single space Size: 1000 sq.ft. Control of natural light required Good ventilation required Equiptment and furnishings for slide preparation, cataloguing, research
CONCEPTS Information and resource center


ACTIVITY USE
Fine Arts Department Lecture Hall (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES
USERS
. LOCATION
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
Lecture Slide viewing Meeting
Students
Faculty
Students interface with faculty Students interface with students Proximity to slide library
Single space Size: 1500 sq.ft.
Seating capacity: 200
Control of natural light required
Good ventilation required
Equiptment and furnishings for slide presentation required Meeting hall Learning source
CONCEPTS


ACTIVITY USE
Fine Arts Department Seminar Room (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES
USERS
LOCATION
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
Conference Seminar meetings
Students
Faculty
Central (within department)
Single space Size: 400 sq.ft.
Acoustical privacy required
Furnishings and equiptment for conference and slide viewing
Control of natural light required
Good ventilation required
Flexibility
Privacy
Meeting place
CONCEPTS


ACTIVITY USE
Fine Arts Department Storage (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Storage of records, equipment, materials
USERS Faculty
LOCATION Proximity to department office
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Single space Size: 200 sq.ft. Moisture control required Access control required
CONCEPTS Security Efficiency Convenience


ACTIVITY USE Photography Studio (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Class meetings Studio tasks: cut film, dry film, cut paper, mount prints, copy work
USERS Students Faculty
LOCATION Proximity to dark room and copy camera Students interface with faculty
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Single space Size: 500 sq.ft. Good ventilation required Control of natural light required Equiptment: film cutter, dryer, paper cutter, mounter, copy stand, back drop
CONCEPTS Efficiency Flexibility Meeting place Work space


ACTIVITY USE
Photography Darkroom (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES
USERS
LOCATION
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
Film and print processing Instruction
Students
Faculty
Proximity to photography studio Student interface with faculty
Single space Equiptment: wash sink, wash tub,
Size: 500 sq.ft. trays, cabinettes,
Good ventilation required enlarger, sink, drying area
Thermal control required Dust control required Control of light required
Efficiency
CONCEPTS


ACTIVITY USE
Copy Camera Room (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Operation and storage of copy camera
USERS Students Faculty
LOCATION Proximity to photography studio
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Single space Good ventilation required Dust control required Control of light required Control of access required
CONCEPTS Security Efficiency Controlled environment


ACTIVITY USE
Printmaking/Graphics Studio (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES
Etching, silkscreen, lithograph, woodcut Design, preparation, edition Class meeting
USERS
Students
Faculty
LOCATION
Proximity to photography facilities Students interface with faculty
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
CONCEPTS
3 separate spaces: etching, Size: 1000 sq.ft, (total) Capacity: 10 (total)
Good ventilation required Natural light desirable Equiptment: (etching) hood,
Flexibility
Efficiency
Health
Safety
lithography, silkscreen
shower, 2 service sinks, 4 paper sinks,
3 presses, shelving, cabinettes, work benches, (litho) hood, service sink, litho sinks, shelving, cabinettes, benches, (silkscreen) hood, screen rack, screen presses, screen tub, shelving, service sink, benches, cabinettes


ACTIVITY USE
Painting Studio (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Figure and stillife painting Design Color study Class meeting
USERS Students Faculty
LOCATION Classroom proximity with outdoors Students interface with faculty Students interface with students
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Single space Good ventilation required Size: 1250 sq.ft. Storage required Capacity: 20 Service sink required Natural required Control of light required Control of privacy required
CONCEPTS Flexibility Extension to outdoor environment Control Durability Meeting place


ACTIVITY USE
Drawing/Design Studio (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES
USERS
LOCATION
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
CONCEPTS
Figure drawing Technical drawing Design
Class meetings
Students
Faculty
Students interface with faculty Students interface with students Proximity with outdoors
Single space Size: 1250 sq.ft.
Natural light required
Control of natural light required
Control of privacy required
Sinks required Storage required
Flexibility
Control
Meeting Place
Extension to outdoor environment


ACTIVITY USE
Welding Studio (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES
USERS
LOCATION
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
Welding Metal Work
Students
Faculty
Proximity to sculpture studio Proximity to wood shop
Single space Equiptment:
Size: 400 sq.ft.
Capacity: 2
Control of light required Good ventilation required Separation and access control
Safety
Control
Separation
Efficiency
vacume system, tanks welding machine, torches, ceiling suspension rack
CONCEPTS


ACTIVITY USE
Wood Shop (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES
USERS
LOCATION
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
CONCEPTS
Wood work
Students
Faculty
Proximity to studios
Single space Equiptment:
Size: 750 sq.ft.
Capacity: 7
Acoustical control required
Control of light required
Good ventilation required
Efficiency
Safety
Separation
Control
vacume system, drill press, table circular saw, drill panel sander, lathe, lathe panel, work benches, cabinettes, table jig saw, band saw, router jointer, hand tool panel, overhead lumber storage, cupboai


ACTIVITY USE Ceramic Studio (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Class meeting Pottery and ceramic sculpture Clay mixing and storage Glaze mixing and glazing Firing
USERS Students Faculty
LOCATION Students interface with faculty Students interface with students Proximity to outdoors
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS 4 separate spaces: clay mix, studio, glazing, firing Size: 1500 sq.ft, (total) Natural light required Dust control required Separation required Equiptment: sinks, clay mixer, 8 wheels, 2 electric kilns, 1 gas kiln,
CONCEPTS Flexibility shelving, storage Control


ACTIVITY USE
Sculpture Studio (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES
USERS
LOCATION
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
CONCEPTS
Figure and stillife modeling Design
Finished sculpture
Students
Faculty
Student interface with faculty Student interface with student Proximity to wood shop and welding studio Proximity to outdoors
Single space Size: 1000 sq.ft.
Natural light required Dust control required Separation required
Equiptment: Suspension rack, ceiling vacume, sinks, storage,
Flexibility casting room (400 sq.ft.)
Control
Extension to the outdoor environment


ACTIVITY USE
Studio Storage (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Storage of tools, equiptment, and materials
USERS Students Faculty
LOCATION Proximity to studios
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS One. or two spaces Size: 1000 sq.ft, (total) Moisture control required Access control required
CONCEPTS Security Efficiency Convenience


ACTIVITY USE
Honors Studios (4)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Independent studio work
USERS Students
LOCATION Proximity to class studios
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Size: 200 sq.ft, (each) Natural light required Separation
CONCEPTS Independent study Privacy


ACTIVITY USE
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES
USERS
LOCATION
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
CONCEPTS
Temporary Exhibition Space (1)
Exhibition of works
Students
Faculty
Public
Department interface with students Department interface with faculty Department interface with public
Single space Size: 2000 sq.ft.
Control of light required Thermal control required Spatial flexibility required Security required Flexibility Neutral environment Control Security


ACTIVITY USE
Permanent Exhibition Space (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Exhibition of permanent art collection
USERS Students Faculty Public
LOCATION Department interface with students Department interface with faculty Department interface with public
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Single space Size: 2000 sq.ft. Control of light required Thermal control required Spatial flexibility required Security required
CONCEPTS Flexibility Neutral environment Control Security


ACTIVITY USE
Exhibition Storage (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Storage of art work and display furnishings
USERS Students Faculty
LOCATION Proximity to two exhibition spaces
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Single space Size: 1000 sq.ft. Moisture control required Access control required
CONCEPTS Security Efficiency Convenience


ACTIVITY USE Music Department Office (1)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES Reception Secretarial
USERS Students Faculty Public
LOCATION Central Public interface with department Students interface with department Faculty interface with department
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Single office Size: 400 sq.ft. Natural light desirable Good ventilation required Furnishings and equiptment for reception and secretarial tasks
CONCEPTS Flexibility Department organizer Efficiency Image of department


ACTIVITY USE
Music Faculity Offices (4)
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES
USERS
LOCATION
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
Private counsel Personal office tasks
Faculty member
Faculty interface with students Faculty interface with faculty Faculty interface with department Faculty interface with public
Single office
Size: 300 sq.ft, (each)
Acoustical quality desirable Natural light desirable Good ventilation required Furnishings
Flexibility for individual needs and expression Image of faculty member and department
CONCEPTS