Citation
Crow Canyon Center for American Archaeology

Material Information

Title:
Crow Canyon Center for American Archaeology architecture as an heuristic device
Creator:
Testa, Matthew M
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
117, [8] pages : illustrations, maps (some folded), plans (some folded) ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Archaeology -- Research -- Colorado -- Crow Canyon ( lcsh )
Research parks -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Crow Canyon ( lcsh )
Archaeology -- Research ( fast )
Research parks ( fast )
Colorado -- Crow Canyon ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 119-120).
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Architecture and planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Matthew M. Testa.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
16721694 ( OCLC )
ocm16721694
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1987 .T467 ( lcc )

Full Text
resm
CROW CANYON CENTER
for
AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHITECTURE AS AN HEURISTIC DEVICE
An Architectural Thesis Presented to the
College of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of
Master of Architecture
Matthew M. Testa Spring 1987


The thesis of Matthew Testa is approved.
John Prosser, Committee Chairman
David Decker, Principal Advisor
University of Colorado at Denver
May 5,1987


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I would like to thank the people at the Crow Canyon Center for Archaeology, in particular Sandy Thompson and Roberta Leicester for sharing their beautiful site and their goals with me; Mike Mulhern and Tom Savory of the Mulhern Group and Bob Smith and Marcia Vallier of DHM for allowing me to use information already gathered for the preparation and design of the thesis; Paul Heath for all the time that he spent talking with me about people and how we learn; John Prosser for the way he can point out the thread that ties things together through the centuries and cultures; and finally, Dave Decker, for his help with this project and the time he has spent with me over the past couple years helping me to understand more about architecture and, when I needed reminding, that architecture is fun.


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Preface
Thesis Statement 1
Program Statement 18
Site Information 32
Spatial Analysis 37
Zoning Check 102
Building Code Check 103
Conclusion 117
Bibliography 119
Appendix A Design Project Drawing Reproductions
Appendix B Mechanical System Summary
Appendix C Lighting Summary & Diagram
Appendix D Typical Wall Section, Corridor Section and Building Material Summary


INTRODUCTION
Circumstances create the opportunity to explore architectural issues. In this case, they are as follows first, the re-inhabiting of an historical site provides a motivation and rationale for using past architectural organization and imagery; second, an insight into a previous culture might arise from responding to the same site conditions; third, how succesful can the marriage be of diverse architectural organization, style and technology?; fourth, as a student of architecture, what will be learned from this excercise that can be applied to future design problems?
The design statement used for the design project is as follows: Crow Canyon is a place for the study of the Anasazi culture and is significant because of context -historical, environmental and social. The architectural expression of this significance should embody qualities which tie the contemporary Center architecture to the past as it re-inhabits a site in the land of the Anasazi.
The design opportunity is provided by a functional desire stated in the main body of the thesis statement. While the design statement is dealt with during the design process, the reasoning behind the desired functional quality is discussed in the main text of the thesis statement.


THESIS STATEMENT
This project is an effort to create an architecture that supports a number of processes that are occuring at the Archaeology Center. The Center is a permanent archaeological teaching and research campus. Professional and student participants will engage in the excavation, documentation, and survey of sites and the processing and curation of research specimens and records. Laboratory and display facilities are necessary to these processes and the size of participating groups requires that research facilities be sized to accomodate not only the process itself but the student groups. The remoteness of the excavation sites determines the Center's location and results in a level of isolation for the Center and tends to create an inward looking community. Participants and some staff will be housed at the Center. As well as taking part in the research activities of the Center, presentations, lectures and other activities are part of the educational program. The nature of the experience is a recreational instruction where the participant is actively seeking a rewarding experience exclusive of typical recreational activiities and has already established an attitude for exploration and discovery of another culture and in turn will, intentionally or not, egage in reflecting on their own lifestyle, culture and role in society.
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The Center should succeed in three aspects.. One, it must succeed as a facility in terms of programmatic functions. It is a physical support facility for continuing excavations nearby, supplying basic living shelter requirements, specialized technical facilities and a display facility open to the daily visitor. Two, it is to be a physical expression of the philososphy that encourages the study of past people and cultures and consequentially provides information about contemporary and future societies. Three, it is the desire that the architecture be a heuristic device for the educational program pursued by the Center. The third desire is the architectural potential being investigated and discussed.
Unlike a city lot that someone occupies, the Center is leaving society and seeking he land where the Anasazi lived. The advantages and physical necessity of having a nearby support facility is the motivation for providing the facility. The opportunity for using the architecture for purposes beyond simple programmatic functions exists because it is re-inhabiting an Anasazi site. The isolation of a new community that exists for the sole purpose of studying the culture that previously existed on this site creates a unique situation for layering additional significance into the architecture. The participant in the educational program is a lay person who patronizes archaeology through the educational program instituted here, supporting both the professional research process here by providing labor as well as injecting money into the Center.
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Students are partaking in an actiivity that is initialized through an act of faith. Personal emotional experience is the primary vehicle for personal gain, in that, a positive emotional experience where the participant believes that he has contributed to a necessary process and has an enriching personal experience on which to reflect in the future and that will benefit him for the rest of his life.
The scholarly context within which this program is occuring is also of importance because the nature of archaeological research has changed in the last thirty years providing the opportunity for new experiences.
"During the 50's another significant shift in archaeological thinking occured. A group of archaeologists sparked by Walter Taylor and the anthroplogist Leweis Binford began posing a different set of research questions which focused on non-material culture. New archaeologists focused on the environmental system, the human biological system, and the cutural system. They became very interested in the way in which human beings adapted to their surrounding environment. They shifted from an inductive approach to a deductive approach. They designed their research based on a specific set of problem questions which they sought to prove or disprove through the analysis of the data gleaned from the site."
(Berger 1982:35).
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Re-enactment is a tool used for the testing of hypotheses. When we are trying to learn more about something we create a situation where we can repeat the processes or conditions that were present for the event we have in question. When necessary we produce a medium in which the test can be carried out. Models are made and studied. All of this is a practice of providing an environment that we control and where we can observe the processes performed.. The ultimate goal is usually to apply what we have learned elsewhere. Ideally we have a control and an experimental condition where we test one against the other.
Anthropologists have long gone to the "trouble" of creating new works of pottery, flint knapping, leather goods, weaving, structures, graves, metalwork, etc. by the methods utilized by the culture under study in an attempt to gain insight to the research at hand.
An archaeological group has built new Hopewell and Mississipian civilization graves by what they believe are the processes used by the culture to study the people, process and grave structure itself. In five to ten years after they have studied the process, they will uncover the grave constructed and then compare the model grave to real Mississipian graves excavated in various archaeological digs.
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The activity provides both the opportunity to study the process of mound building (that is, what were the techniques used), to observe people participating in the activity, and to discuss the experience. How many people does it take to build a dirt mound so high and so wide, using reed baskets and digging sticks with the dirt supply 100 yards from the mound site? Does this mound compare favaorably with ancient mounds discovered? Five or ten years from now when this control mound is excavated with the proper procedures, how do the features of the control mound compare to the features of the real mound? The values are obvious to the professional researcher. What can we gain as lay people participating in this experiment and will these people apply what has been learned to other applications?
A common type of historic information display today is the living museum concept. Williamsburg and Jamestown, Virginia; Mystic, Connecticut; Four Mile House, Colorado and similar institutions are examples of this type of information display. The situation allows two types of goals to be accomplished. One, the researcher can study newly created artifacts, devices, textiles and so on, that have been manufactured by the processes of that time period. Linen woven on an authentic loom from flax that was grown on the plantation and spun on a reproduction spinning wheel is atypical
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example of living museum fare. Clocks, furniture, metal objects and other items are made in front of the on-lookers very eyes, and yes, this is how it was done then, can you imagine living like that? The educational value is based on observation see it done, touch it, smell, take pictures of it and buy a piece like it at the museum shop. For the daily visitor, the experience of performing the task is not part of the experience and a fleeting and perhaps erroneous impression is created. This description is not to demean the value of this sort of learning experience, but to show how very different the Center's experience will be.
The living museum experience is a shadow of a participation program.
The archaeological activities and research processes described previously are the types of activites that participants will have the opportunity to experience. The difference in the Center's activity sequence is that the participant is a lay researcher taking part in a delineated deductive process. As they engage in sometimes arduous and tedious physical labor in the American Southwest sun, they learn about the Anasazi culture, then instruction and discussion continues in the labs and during lectures. On another level concurrent with this intellectual pursuit, they are contemplating other aspects. When you are crouching in a space that is too small, next
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to a recent stranger, what crosses your mind as you consider the number of people who lived, so long ago, in this newly excavated "house".
While the archaeological value of these excercises is ample return for time and money expended, the opportunity exists to have the experience create an even greater impact.
Some type of catalyst or equivalent device would be needed to compound the benefits of an already full program. At the Center, the opportunity to learn is there, but devices to enhance, stimulate and encourage the discovery and investigative processes would bolster the educational program. Successful techniques usually involve making a personal impression. Architecture in this case is a vehicle for personal impressions. A way to bring the archaeological and anthropological experience into the everyday environmental experience of each participant is to make the architecture an extension of the information from the field. Providing a contemporary architecture that, as a living environment, is an extension of the field and lab experience and where the experiences are brought to mind, perhaps into focus, provides the opportunity to add another aspect to architecture. In this case, another programmatic function which is a heuristic tool. Not only can the Center be a satisfying, day- to- day architectural experience, but serve a programmatic function on a non-physical level.
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While evening lectures will provide a context for the day's learning to fit into, what tools can an educator use to re-enforce all the new lessons presented? Generally, one learns when the experience is sufficiently different to make a lasting impression. A convenient and effective vehicle in this case is the Center, which is a combined living and working environment, because while provision for the basic needs is universal, the way it is packaged is determined by culture. It is possible to say that to learn about another culture, participants will live the way that culture lived. It is not necessary to go to the extreme of replicating an entire culture to learn. That is not the intent or goal in this case. It is not desirable to make the participants uncomfortable, the goal is to "stir their pot", continue to peak their curiousity and cause them to reflect on new experiences.
The concept is to create an analogous architecture where the spaces carry cultural connotations and overtones through the space dimensions and organization of the spaces. The basis for creating a different experience is this: culture shapes architecture.
"people with very different attitudes and ideals respond to varied physical environments. These responses vary from place to place because of changes and differences in the
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interplay of social, cultural, ritual, economic, and physical factors. ...Because building a house is a cultural phenomenon, its form and organization are greatly influenced by the cultural milieu to which it belongs. ... the house became more than shelter for primitive man, and almost from the beginning 'function' was much more than a physical or utilitarian concept.
... If provision of shelter is the passive function of the house, then its positive purpose is the creation of an environment best suited to the way of life of a people in other words, a social unit of space." (Rappaport 1969: 46).
If you house one culture in an architecture created by another, the experience will be sufficiently different to create a lasting impression "...virtually everything that man is and does is associated with the experience of space" (Hall 1966:171). When combined with instruction as to why the architecture is different, the environment stimulates the process of discovery, therefore, the architecture becomes the heuristic device.
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The archaeological processes and questions mentioned earlier have provided a method for understanding the Anasazi culture through their ruins. I am using the Mug House of Mesa Verde as an example from which to create the analogous environment [Fig. 1].
"In primitive sociteties, cooperative work groups and economic units affect the size and shape of dwellings and their relationships in a village layout. The archaeologist can often identify space clusters probably occupied by some of these units, and he may even be able to estimate their size.. .Four levels of complexity are recognizable: (1) Clusters or suites of three to nine contiguous rooms with some adjacent outdoor space in an area or courtyard quite prbably represent household living quarters [Fig.2-4], (2) Several households, or one unusually large household cluster, may share a single courtyard space and are called courtyard units [Fig.5-6]. (3) The total plan of the ruin further suggests a dual division, both on the layout of routes of access between the two parts and in the nature of construction seen in their kivas. (4) Finally Mug House forms the nucleus of a larger community,... (Rohn 1971: 31.)
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'7 Suite A?//.
FIG. 2- SUITE & AREAS
FIG.4- MULTI-LEVEL SUITE, BALCONY & AREA
(Rohm 971:35) FIG 4



FIG. 5 COURTYARD ADJACENT TO SUITES & AREAS
(Rohn 1971:34)
FIG. 6 COURTYARD ADJACENT TO SUITES & AREAS
(Rohn 1971:38)
38 Early Courtyard Unit B.
!__* 1111


Having dealt with the organization which can be drawn into the new architecture, some of the physical attributes from Mug House should be considered. Rooms are relatively small, rectangular spaces, while areas and courtyards have no regular shape or size. Areas and courtyards are shaped by bordering rooms, retaining walls and specially built walls. Construction of the rooms was consistent in terms of shape, floor area and headroom. (Rohn 1971: 43). These features existed within the context of a natural environment that dictated where building could and could not take place resulting in the characteristic organic overall form of the entire form of villages and community.
This identification of spaces and organization provide a format readily adaptable to a the Center's housing and working areas. In the education program, participants are repeatedly divided into groups of ten to fifteen, in turn groups are combined to deal with various tasks.
"Thus any group of individuals who share the economic workload and occupy jointly one house or cluster of contiguous spaces that are well demarcated and into which outsiders do not freeely intrude may be called a
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household... .The primary criteria used in delimiting suites center around mutual accessibilty of their component spaces and relative isolation of these same spaces from other room blocks. Throughout the ruin, doorways tend to connect clusters of rooms and outdoor areas around one large nuclear area. (Rohn 1971: 31).
With the program already organizing itself about small working groups, the group dynamic basis for fitting into the architecture exists from the outset. In a very short time, groups will have an identity based on duties, living area, etc. Organizing around nuclear areas also provides forums for social interaction on a structured basis. Associations betweeen groups based on relationship to specific common areas will develop.
"Rivalry and competition within a community are often organized and regulated by a division of community members into two groups." (Rohn 1971: 39).
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Although I cannot see why there should be rivalry, there could certainly develop some self-comparisons between groups as smaller groups are assigned to work together on one task while other groups tend to other tasks. There could also be some friendly competitions based on work or tasks accomplished. A more practical application in this project would be to use this as the method for separating the visiting researchers quarters from the participants.
Finally, there will be the opportunity for participants while reflecting upon their experience to establish some self-identity. "A community consists of persons who because of the proximity of their dwellings or because of various economic, social, and religious activities associate with one another on virtually a day-to-day basis. This means that communities can be recognized from geographical anad situational data." (Rohn 1971: 40). During their stay the participants and staff will view themselves as part of an identifiable community because of shared experience. This is the sort of impression that has a lasting effect.
Using the deductive process of study as the starting point (where information has led thinking from the general to the particular), a housing structure designed to reflect the
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Anasazi culture can be used to promote an inductive learning process where particulars, in this case the qualities of the pueblo architecture, can be drawn into general concepts.
"One of the premises inherited from the last century is that the mind and memory are somehow at odds with the body... The experience of our bodies, of what we touch and smell, of how well we are "centered," as dancers say, is not locked into the immediate present but can be recollected through time. The importance of memory as a part of our existence in the environment has frequently been denied in this century and by some is even now rather an embarassedly characterized as 'nostalgia' and dismissed again." (Bloomer 1977: x).
"Buildings and settlements are the visible expression of relative importance attached to diffrerent aspects of life and the varying ways of perceving reality." (Rappaport 1969: 47)
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Based on the role that architecture plays in every individual's life experience, it seems that it is an appropriate device to use in this case where the programmatic function is to study cultures. The end purpose of all study and research is to advance civilization through expanding the body of knowledge. Professional research and scholarly endeavors fullfill this need. In the case of the participants, there is the opportunity to send a personally interpreted knowledge derived from first hand experience immediately back into the mainstream of society. If we carry our experiences in our bodies due to three- dimensional experience, then hopefully some insight gained from this cultivated community will find its way into daily life as similar environments trigger memories. In the end, the cycling of this experience through memory and into the conscious will continually be an enriching experience, in part as a result of architecture.
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PROGRAM STATEMENT
The Crown Canyon Center for American Archaeology is a research and educational facility located near Cortez, Colorado immediately northwest of Mesa Verde National Park in the heart of the Four Corners region. As well as providing facilities for professional research activity, the Center provides programs for students ranging in age from eleven and up.
The Center conducts research in the Euroamerican historical record spanning 12,000 years in southwestern Colorado, the most prominent aspect of which is the Anasazi civilation that created the prehistoric pueblo architecture. Excavations and surveys will be as far ranging as Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona but the primary sites (Sand Canyon Pueblo and the Duckfoot Sites) are 15 miles and one mile away respectively, from the Center. Approximately 50 lay participants can be accomodated at a time under the current program.
Generally, the lay person interested in archaeology has no oportunity to
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participate in excavtions. Programs undertaken through the Center provide the opportunity to partake of this experience as well as other activites typically part of archaeological methodology and in the process enlarge their sense of the great diversity of human experience that is part of Colorado and Southwestern history.
Facilities required to fulfill the goals of the Center are a laboratory for processing and analyzing specimens, a museum to display specimens gathered by the Center and housing for the program participants.
MUSEUM
The museum will be the main public building catering to the daily visitors.
It will also have spaces designed to facilitate the Center program activities, but it is the primary building for presenting the Center to the public which is also the Center's principle fund source. It is essential that
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the Center have a museum that explains what it does, how it does it and the results of that effort.
Crow Canyon is within 15 miles of the Mesa Verde National Park gate, so there is likelihood that the Center will be included on the agenda of tourists visiting the Four Corners area. Assuming an annual Mesa Verde visitor total of 650,000, an allowance should be made for 65,000 annual visitors to Crow Canyon. Allowing for an eight month season (240 days) and a seven hour day an average visitor per hour number is 38.69. Rounding up to 40 visitors and tripling that number for a peak capacity visitor rate, the Center should design for a capacity of 120 visitors at peak times.
Providing 4,000 square feet for exhibition space will allow a maximum of flexibility for curators and display design. Other spaces in the musuem such as the auditorium will also have visitors so that not all visitors at a peak time will be in the exhibit areas simultaneously.
The museum will also house the principle Center administrative offices, a reception area for fund raising and similar functions, and a museum shop.
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LABORATORY BUILDING
The Laboratory Building has a dual function First, it provides the facilities required to conduct modern, regional-scale, archaeological research. This includes office space for staff, and spaces for processing, analysis, and curation of research specimens and records. The second function id to provide opportunities for program participants to share in the research process and/or to take part in other educational programs that can best be presented in the lab building. Student use in the laboratory building will take place primarily in the Specimen Processing and Analysis Labs, and these rooms must be sized to accomodate this use. A small conference/meeting room will also be available in the Laboratory Building.
Design of the spaces should never be too highly specilized or inflexible because as the programs evolve modification of spaces might be required.
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HOUSING
Housing must accomodate two categories of users: (1) visiting researchers and (2) program participants. A group housing or hostel type of housing would be appropriate for the program participants while apartments of some type would be necessary for researchers. A single dining hall for the entire housing complex will be required. Programs are usually a week long so that should be accounted for in sizing rooms, common areas and clothin storage space.
Visiting researchers will fall into two types, those with and those without families. Small apartments for a researcher with spouse or that can be shared by single researchers are in order, as are apartments with bedroom space to accomodate children.
The educational programs can handle up to 52 participants at a time. Group housing must allow for this as an ideal while realizing that it is not always possible to equaling balance head count between sexes. Some flexibility for odd numbers should be designed into the space.
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SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS
MUSEUM:
EXHIBIT SPACE 4000
LECTURE HALL/AUDITORIUM
(60 PEOPLE @ 10 SQ FT PER PERSON = 600 SQ FT SEATING PLUS 200 SQ FT ACTIVITY/LECTERN AREA 800 MEETING ROOM/CONFERENCE SEMINAR 285
MUSEUM SALES (STORE) 200
RECEPTION/HOSTING/KITCHENETTE 100
LOBBY 400
EXHIBIT PREP AREA/SHORT TERM STORAGE COLLECTION 400 OFFICE 250
subtotal 6785
JANITORIAL (2 FLOORS 25 SQ FT/FL) 50
RESTROOMS 250
BUILDING SYSTEMS (estimate 5% typ. mech plus 2% special
systems electrical, security, fire detection) 7% 500
CIRCULATION 15% (for moving between areas)
15% of 4000 (seat of the pants) 1018
TOTAL MUSEUM BUILDING SPACE 8603
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DIAGRAM MUSEUM COMPLEX


LABORATORY : taken from specifications supplied by Crow Canyon
Specimen Processing Lab 450
Analysis/Teaching Lab 900
Lab Director's Office
Outer Office 100
Inner Office 150
Survey Room 140
Curation Space 600
Conference/Seminar Room 285
Archeology office/Research Complex
Permanent Staff Offices 450
Drafting/Copying Room 200
Computer Room 100
Studio/Darkroom 200
Temporary Staff Office 160
Service Spaces (inside)
Bathrooms 160
Janitorial Closet 24
Hallways 120
Stairways 60
Entryway//Foyer 100
BUILDING TOTAL 4145
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diagram laboratory complex
service.


HOUSING:
LIST OF HOUSING COMPLEX SPACES:
LOBBY/ RECEIVING DESK 1 50
HOUSING OFFICE 150
LARGE COMMON AREA (20 SQ FT/PERSON 25) 500
DINING HALL FOR CENTER 78 DINERS (6 TO TABLE)
100 SOW FT PER TABLE 13 TABLES PLUS 200 1500
KITCHEN (estimate from hostel info) 350
READING ROOM w/ small library 400
HOUSEKEEPING AREA 150
COMMON AREAS HOUSING COMPLEX 3200
SINGLES' APT. (4)
SLEEPING AREA 180
STUDY 48
BATH 63
LIVING AREA 100
AREA OF ONE APARTMENT 391
TOTAL AREA FOUR APT.'S 1,564
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FAMILY APARTMENT (2)
2 BEDROOMS @ 180 ea. 360
BATH 63
LIVING ROOM 144
STUDY 48
AREA OF ONE APT. 615
TOTAL AREA FOR TWO APT.'S 1,230
GROUP OR HOSTEL DIVISION (4 groups @ 12 ea. plus counselor.)
Assume 6 to a room for 8 rooms plus sleeping apartment for counselor/leader.
SLEEPING AREA 2 @ 240 ea. 480
GROUP COMMON AREA 50
BATH 200
LEADER APT. 150
AREA OF ONE GROUP APT. 880
TOTAL AREA OF FOUR APT.'S 3520
HOUSING SUMMARY:
SINGLES APT.'S (4) 1,564
FAMILY APT.'S (2) 1,230
GROUP HOUSING 3,520
COMMON AREAS FOR HOUSING COMPLEX 3,200
TOTAL HOUSING AREA 9,514
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DIAGRAM HOUSING COMPLEX
LAE>
/**!£>


PARKING (square feet)
VISITORS 120 with 3 per car 40 @ 350 14,000
PARTICIPANTS 25 car spaces @ 350 8,750
RESIDENT RESEARCHERS 12 @350 4,200
STAFF AND BUSINESS 15 @350 5,250
TOTAL AREA OF PARKING 32,200
TOTAL BUILDING SPACE SUMMARY: Museum 8,603
Laboratory Space 4,145
Housing 9,514
CROW CANYON CENTER BUILDINGS TOTAL 22,262
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SITE
Crow Canyon is west of Cortez in Montezuma County, State of Colorado, U.S. and is located at approximately latitude 37 degrees 22 minutes N. and longitude 108 degrees 38 minutes W at an elevation of 6200 feet. The property is 93 acres (roughly 1500 feet by 2700 feet) and is bounded on the north by County Road K. Mesa Verde is easily visible to the south and east from many parts of the property and Ute Mountain is visible from the west end of the property.
The property is covered with juniper, pinon pine and sagebrush. Some short grasses and other low growing vegetation complete the vegetation. The east end of the property is creek bottom bordered by a low cliff formation formed by the creek. The ground rises rapidly from the creek and becomes somethin of a plateau in effect, overlooking the creek bottom. From a small promontory, one can overlook the creek and through a small draw that frames part of Mesa Verde. In the upper parts of the property, vegetation is tall and dense enough to prevent one from viewing distance except from specific spots.
Wildlife crossing the property includes deer and elk, as well as many small ground rodents and hares.
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Materials found in the soil survey were grael base course, silty and sandy clays, clayey sands, shale, sandstone strata and sandstone bedrock. Following are excerpts from the investigation performed by Tech, Inc. of Farmington, NM.
SUBSURFACE CONDITIONS
The following materials were encountered by the test
borings:
1) GRAVEL BASE COURSE
2) SILTY AND SANDY CLAYS, CLAYEY SANDS, SHALE, AND
SANDSTONE STRATA
3) SANDSTONE BEDROCK
The Gravel Base Course, which was encountered at the ground
surface in Borings 1, 2, 4, and 7 averaged approximately 6
inches in thickness.
The soils encountered in all of the test borings were Clayey Sands and Sandy Clays. Shale was also encountered in several of the test borings. The test borings showed Sandstone Strata in varied degrees of thickness. The log of the test borings and the laboratory test results are shown in the attached sheets. According to the Unified Soil Classification System (USCS), the soil in this strata classifies as SC-SANDY CLAYS.
No groundwater was encountered in the test borings.
FOUNDATION RECOMMENDATIONS
Considering the proposed construction and the subsurface conditions encountered, spread footings bearing on the natural soils should be suitable to support the proposed structure. The footings should be designed for a maximum allowable net bearing pressure of 2,000 pounds per square foot. If bearing on natural soil and if bearing on sandstone, 4,000 pounds per square foot. All exterior footings should be bottomed at least 32 inches below the finished exterior grade to protect against frost penetration.
Footings placed on other than sandstone and sized for the recommended bearing pressure could experience settlements on the order of 1/2 to 5/8 inch. Differential settlements should be on
the order of 1/4 inch.
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We recommend that continuous wall footings have a minimum width of 16 inches; and isolated spread footings have a minimum width of 24 inches. Continuous foundation walls should be
reinforced both top and bottom to allow spanning supported lengths of at least 5 feet.
It should also be noted that any excavation below a depth of approximately 4 feet below the existing ground surface may encounter sandstone.
We also recommend that for the structure, all foundations be placed entirely on soils or entirely on sandstone. This will prevent a condition of excess differential settlement which could occur if part of the foundation bears on soil and part on sandstone. Additionally, if all footings will bear on soil, probes should be taken to insure that at least 12 inches of soil exists between the bottom of the footing and the top of sandstone.
As the soil under the slabs or floor has low to moderately expansive potential, introduction of water under the slab may cause small results in movements of up to 1/4 inch. The following recommendations are made:
1. Remove the soil to a suitable sandstone strata and then
use non expansive backfill under the slab. The
compacted soil should have an allowable maximum bearing pressure of 3i000 pounds per square inch.
2. Design a structural floor with a crawl space.
3. Eliminate pressured water lines under the slab.
4. Isolate the slab from the structure foundation system and provide architectural detailing that would accommodate the anticipated movements discussed above.
It is recommended that foundation excavation be inspected by a soils engineer and the excavation be deepened if loose or disturbed soils are encountered. Additionally, if the soil conditions are significantly different than those presented in this report, this firm should be contacted for verification and/or supplemental recommendations.
Thickened slab sections could be utilized below lightly loaded interior partitions provided that loads do not exceed 700 pounds per linear foot and provided that all fill is constructed according to the procedures presented herein. Slab sections should be thickened over a minimum width of 12 inches. The slab thickness and reinforcement shall be consistent with structural requirements.
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To reduce the potential for distress by differential foundation movements, all continuous footings, masonry, and stem walls should be reinforced. Masonry walls should be constructed using frequent grout cores on close spacing along with horizontal and vertical reinforcement to redistribute stresses in the event of minor differential movement. Frequent use of control joints at openings or other discontinuities is recommended to control cracking. Use 1/2 to 1 inch expanded styrofoam in all expansion joints to lessen the stresses caused by differential settlements.
LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES FOUNDATION WALLS
Foundation walls are normally designed to be fairly rigid (un-yielding) and should therefore be designed for "at rest" lateral soil pressures.
Foundation wall backfill should consist of free-drainage Sands meeting the criteria specified in the "Sitework" section of this report. The fill material should be placed in 8 inch maximum loose lifts and compacted with light equipment to 90 percent of the maximum dry density at a moisture content within 2 percent of the optimum moisture content, as determined by the Standard Proctor Test (ASTM: D-698).
The following soil parameter should be used for foundation wall design.
Soil Unit Weight 120 lbs/cu ft
Active Earth Pressure Coefficient (Ka) 0.33
Passive Earth Pressure Coefficient (Kp) 3.0
At Rest Earth Pressure Coefficient (Kp) 0.50
Angle of Internal Friction 30
Cohesion 0
Coefficient of Sliding Friction
(foundation and earth) 0.4
Additional surcharge loads should be added, if appropriate.
(Dale 1985:2-4)
-35-


The climate is a temperate one with the greatest problem arising from wet soil. This determines when a dig can continue and generally keeps the field season between April and November, however a good rain or snow can close down the excavation at any time.
The daily maximum mean temperature (all degrees in F) is 64.6, daily minimum mean 33.4, monthly 49.0. Extremes in temperature are a record 101 degrees with a record -27. Mean number of days (for maximum) 90 degrees and above 32, 32 degreees and below -11; mean number of days (for minimum) 32 degrees and below -178, 0 degrees and below 8. The mean yearly precipitation is 12.58. (For more detailed precipitation information see following table.)
CORTEZ. CO liSf 1 9 7 5 J7 ll' N 18* 3' W 77ET
MUOONfAHIM 0*ni
(Ruffner 1980:103)
-36-


FOUR CORNER AREA
UTAH
COLORADO
SAND CANYON
CROW'S* / C0RTEr CANYON / CENTER /
MESA VERDE NATIONAL
ARIZONA
NEW MEXICO
ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OF DHM
CROW CANYON CENTER
LOCATION MAP


AERIAL VIEW SOUTH ACROSS PROPERTY
CANYON CENTER
ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OF DHM


SPATIAL ANALYSIS
(ALPHABETICAL ORDER)
I
K
-37-


ANALYSIS /TEACHING LAB
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THIS IS A "CLEAN" LAB, PAPER RECORDS AND CLEAN SPECIMENS ARE HANDLED AND STORES HERE. USED YEAR-ROUND BY STUDENTS, RESEARCHERS AND STAFF.
UP TO 30 STUDENTS AT FOLDING TABLES MOVEABLE PARTITION TO DIVIDE ROOM IN TWO


900 sq ft
I
ACTIVITY
ANALYSIS AND DOCUMENTATION OF SPECIMENS, DEMONSTRATIONS, LECTURES
USE OF MEASURING INSTRUMENTS, MICROSCOPES.
STORAGE UNTIL CURATION
NOTES & REMARKS
8-8x3 FOLDING TABLES
30 FOLDING CHAIRS
150- 175 LIN. FT. OF 18" SHELVING
STORAGE SPACE FOR MICROSCOPES,
PROJECTORS, BALANCES, CALIPERS,
STUDY COLLECTIONS
50 LIN FT. 12" SHELVES FOR SUPPLIES
10 15 LIN. FT. BOOKSHELVES FOR
LAB MANUALS AND REFERENCES
ACCESS ZONE
i
PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE
LITTLE
I
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN

NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION
NEEDS
NATURAL
REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
GaiE$5^aAL
'T^C. pestgAgs'Le-
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
SYSTEMS
HVAC
ELECTRICITY
odtlsd^, WM-L£ BOOR-
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
NORMAL
PLUMBING

FIRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION
SECURITY
r SPECIAL
I! NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
L SPECIAL
NONE
'J NORMAL
SPECIAL
P NONE
YES
I NO
YES
L NO
U YES
n NO


CENTER / MUSEUM OFFICES
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THE CENTER DIRECTOR AND STAFF IS HERE AS WELL AS THE STAFF RELATED DIRECTLY TO THE MUSEUM.
A HIGHER QUALITY HERE IS APPROPRIATE FOR PUBLLIC IMAGE.
OTHE^
#


250 sq ft
ACTIVITY
TYPICAL OFFICE
NOTES & REMARKS
I
I
ACCESS ZONE fifeuc -rc> office frur urvur iwim PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL TA^ UGHflKiG REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY CIRCUITS PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO


LARGE COMMON AREA
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THE GATHERING PLACE FOR THE CAMPUS PARTICIPANTS. EVERYONE WANDERS IN AND OUT, A PLACE TO MEET FOR GOING SOMEWHERE.


500 sq ft
ACTIVITY
TALK, INFORMAL, SOCIAL MEETING PLACE
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
| RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE ft LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT TO 4 CAMPUS NONE
f OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY I NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
| NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
YES
NO
1 YES
NO
YES
1 NO


COMPUTER ROOM
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
A VERY UTILITARIAN, EFFICIENT WORK STATION
DURABLE AND EASILY CLEANED ADJACENCIES NOT TOO IMPORTANT
R&'T CPr
OFFICE


100 sq ft
ACTIVITY
SINGLE USER OF MICRO COMPUTER
NOTES & REMARKS
WATCH FOR EASE OF SERVICE AND HANDLING OF CABLING
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ODOUklG* ELECTRICITY OD LASTED 0£_ r^b\c/\TtD cwcurr PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
1 SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
0 YES
NO
YES
1 NO


CONFERENCE / SEMINAR
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THIS SERVES AS THE LAB'S IN-HOUSE MEETING AREA
INFORMAL, FOLDING TABLES FOR VERSATILITY, MULTI-PURPOSE HANDLE UP TO 20 PERSONS IN MEETINGS, CLASSES, PRESENTATIONS CAN BE FAIRLY ISOLATED


285 sq ft
ACTIVITY
CLASSROOM, PRESENTATIONS INFORMAL
B
NOTES & REMARKS
BLACK BOARD
PROJECTION SCREEN
50 LIN. FT., 12" DEEP BOOKSHELVES
FOLDING TABLES
I


CURATION SPACE
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
STORAGE OF ARTIFACTS FOR UP TO 10 YEARS.
SOME RESEARCH WILL OCCUR HERE, SO SOME ACCOMODATION SHOULD BE MADE FOR PEOPLE TO WORK.
PROVIDE DESK AND WORK TABLE
LA£>


600 sq ft
ACTIVITY
PRIMARILY HIGH GRADE STORAGE -SECURE, STABLE ENVIRONMENT
NOTES & REMARKS
34 LIN. FT. OF 36" SHELVING, 12" HIGH SHELVES
WORKTABLE
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
c RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE L LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN : j NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
I DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS L NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC -Spe*u=- ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY I NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
'] NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
i SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
i YES
NO
f. YES
L NO


DINING HALL
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
PARTICIPANTS EAT HERE 2 3 TIMES A DAY.
MEETINGS AND GATHERINGS IN EVENINGS RECREATION; ALMOST A COMPLETE MULTI-PURPOSE. INFORMAL, RELAXED FOR LARGE GROUPS.
STAFF AND INVITED GUESTS EAT HERE TOO


1,500 sq ft
ACTIVITY
EATING/MEETINGS
RECREATION
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE
VIEW OUT VIEW IN
ILLUMINATION NATURAL
NEEDS
ARTIFICIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
CcMTRPl
SYSTEMS HVAC
ELECTRICITY
PLUMBING
FIRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY
I
I
PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
LITTL~
MODERATE
great"
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
REQUIRED
!
i
i
DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL
none"
YES NO YES NO YES NO


DRAFTING / COPYING ROOM
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
TWO SEPARATE AREAS MUST BE CREATED
COPIER AREA WILL NOT CHANGE MUCH ONCE SET UP DRAFTING AND SUPPLIES WILL CHANGE SOME (FLEXIBILITY) ADJACENCY NOT TOO IMPORTANT


200 sq ft
ACTIVITY
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
1 PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT J NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
i DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS B NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC 1=£ GoFlER, ELECTRICITY fbvl&E-(ztov Fee cop(^R_ PLUMBING RRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY u NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
i NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
1 YES
NO
i YES
NO
1 YES
NO


EXHIBIT PREPARATION
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
OPEN FLEXIBLE SPACE WITH ROOM TO STORE SUPPLIES AND SPECIMENS.
WORK BENCH AND DESK OR DRAWING BOARD ROOM.
A MODERATELY DIRTY ROOM. ALLOW GOOD CLEANING WHILE SAFEGUARDING SPECIMENS.
cb:
4^
fcxtti&rr ^dok


ACTIVITY
SMALL SHOP FOR DESIGNING AND BUILDING EXHIBITS.
SHORT TERM STORAGE OF SPECIMENS BEING PREPPED FOR EXHIBIT OR FOR RETURN TO PERMANENT STORAGE.
NOTES & REMARKS
THIS ROOM WILL BE USED MOSTLY DURING THE OFFSEASON WHILE PREPARING NEXT SEASON'S EXHIBIT.
400 sq ft
ACCESS ZONE 1 PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
1 GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS /&1UTY "to ARTIFICIAL ccwd. 1 REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
I TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS UKiT 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC -fXWST "POST ELECTRICITY TOOLS PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
C SPECIAL
NONE
fl NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
YES
NO
1 I YES
NO
YES
NO


EXHIBIT SPACE
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THIS IS THE PRINCIPLE PUBLIC SPACE FOR DAILY VISITORS. IT WILL BE A CHANGING DISPLAY OF THE CENTERS WORK AND IN SOME WAYS IS THE OBLIGATION TO THE PUBLIC FROM THE CENTER AND IN MANY WAYS IS THE PRIMARY PUBLIC RELATIONS TOOL IMAGE AND CREDIBILITY ARE DESIGN ISSUES.
NATURAL LIGHT IS ESSENTIAL.


4000 sqft
ACTIVITY
People viewing exhibits.
The issue is circulation.
Restrict access to other areas while allowinf staff freee access after hours.
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
I RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
1 GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN : j NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
f TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS cmrf3DL_ nofz&- I NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC CcUT^L- KiOlSfe- ELECTRICITY HjDD£_ CXJTVET^. PLUMBING RRE DETECRON FIRE SUPPRESSION -^p02vr>io'Doc?S?iRITY HDO2J==>. ALARH- E NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
I NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
j YES
I 1 NO
YES
NO
YES
NO


FAMILY APARTMENT
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THESE APARTMENTS ARE AN ATTEMPT TO ACCOMODATE RESEARCHERS W/ FAMILIES WHO MIGHT NOT OTHERWISE BE ABLE TO PARTICIPATE. IN EXCHANGE THEY BECOME PART OF THE HOUSING COMPLEX POPULATION
PROVIDE A PROVACY TO HELP MAINTAIN THE NUCLEAR FAMILY. EAT AT DINING HALL HOWEVER


615 sq ft
ACTIVITY
MAINTAIN FAMILY I.D.
NOTES & REMARKS
I
ACCESS ZONE
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE
VIEW OUT
VIEW IN
PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
LITTLE
MODERATE
I
ILLUMINATION
NEEDS
NATURAL
ARTIFICIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
SYSTEMS HVAC
ELECTRICITY PLUMBING
FIRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY
GREAT
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
1
I
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
YES
1
i:
NO
YES
NO


GROUP APT/HOSTEL
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THIS AREA SHOULD INCORPORATE AS MANY ASPECTS AS POSSIBLE OF ANASAZI ORGANIZATION AND SENSE OF SIZE.
GROUPS COME & GO ON A WEEKLY BASIS AND AS GROUPS STAY IN CLOSE PROXOMITY TO ONE ANOTHER MOST OF THE TIME
ATTENTION SHOULD BE GIVEN A SENSE OF PRIVACY AND CARE GIVEN TO EFFECTS OF SPACE ON TIGHT GROUPINGS


eaunit 1460 sq ft
ACTIVITY
SLEEPING, BATHING SMALL GROUP CONVERSATION
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE 1 PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE V LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
OPTIONAL
1 REQUIRED
VIEW IN 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC r>|££CT ILL ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO


HOUSEKEEPING AREA
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
UTILITY SPACE LAUNDRY AND SUPPLIES FOR CLEANING AND UPKEEP FOR INTERIORS


150 sq ft
ACTIVITY
RUN LAUNDRY
STORE EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE i PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE 1 LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT iJ NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
I DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
z SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS K NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC EXHAUST "TO OUT^it^ ELECTRICITY Z2DY "TO> PLUMBING VJOl&L. NORMAL
' SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
! SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
M SPECIAL
K NONE
FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY YES
NO
YES
I NO
YES
1 NO


HOUSING OFFICE
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THE HDQTRS FOR HOUSING & THE INFORMATION SPOT FOR PARTICIPANTS
SOMEONE USUALLY ON DUTY TROUBLE SHOOTING STARTS HERE


150 sq ft
ACTIVITY
GENERAL OFFICE PURCHASING, SCHEDULING INFORMATION
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE
VIEW OUT
VIEW IN
ILLUMINATION
NEEDS
NATURAL
ARTIFICIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
SYSTEMS HVAC
ELECTRICITY
PLUMBING
FIRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY
PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
little"
MODERATE
GREAT
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NORMAL
SPECIAL
_______NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
_______NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE*
________YES
_________NO_
________YES
_________NO_
________YES
NO


KITCHEN
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
EFFICIENCY AND ESAY CLEANING
GOOG SIMPLE FOOD TO BE SERVED IN QUANTITY
AHEAD OF MEAL PREP NEED STORAGE
OFF SEASON, ANYONE MIGHT COOK MAKE ACCESIBLE


350 sq ft
ACTIVITY
COOKING FOR GROUPS AND FOR RECEPTIONS HOSTED BY CENTER
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
I OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN I NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
I DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS J NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC
D103CT
Coo LI M ELECTRICITY
Z2D TD
PLUMBING
I>1
FIRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION
SECURITY
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
*
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
I
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO


LAB BATHROOMS
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
JUST ENOUGH W.C.S AND URINALS TO HANDLE FIELD CREWS NO SHOWERS, HOUSING IS CLOSE BY


160 sq ft
ACTIVITY
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
1 PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
1 GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
OPTIONAL
1 REQUIRED
VIEW IN NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL I REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
1 UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
1 SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
1 YES
NO
f YES
NO
I YES
NO


LAB DIRECTOR'S OFFICE
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
MAKE 2 SPACES OUTER 100 SQ FT FOR GENERAL
INNER 150 SQ FT STORAGE OF CRITICAL DOCUMENTS
THE OUTER SPACE WILL BE THE LAB HEADQUARTERS


250 sq ft
ACTIVITY
GENERAL OFFICE WORK AND STORAGE OF CRITICAL RECORDS AND DOCUMENTS
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE
PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE
VIEW OUT
ID IS lJ&d
LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
NONE
OPTIONAL
VIEW IN
ILLUMINATION
NEEDS
NATURAL
ARTIFICIAL
REQUIRED
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
NORMAL
SYSTEMS HVAC
ELECTRICITY PLUMBING
FIRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY
SPECIAL
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
I
NONE
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO


LECTURE / AUDITORIUM
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THE "SHOWCASE" PRESENTATION AREA. LECTURES DURING THE DAY TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC, MAJOR EVENING PRESENTATIONS TO PARTICIPANTS.
CONSIDER KIVA-LIKE DESIGN INFLUENCE.
PRIMARY ACCESS FROM LOBBY, PROVIDE SERVICE ACCESS.
UGstmuG %
%

ACCESS


800 sq ft
ACTIVITY
LECTURES, PRESENTATIONS, PROJECTOR SHOWS
NOTES & REMARKS
re: VIEW IN, OUT- IT MIGHT BE NICE TO SEE THE SPACE FROM THE LOBBY OR PART OF THE EXHIBIT AREA.
ACCESS ZONE
PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE
LITTLE
VIEW OUT
MODERATE
great"
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION
NEEDS
NATURAL
ARTIFICIAL
REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
UUAMfUFlCT> YOlCjSL
NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS
HlGtt CUgSL.
HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING
FIRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY
NORMAL
SPECIAL
i

NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO


LOBBY / RECEIVING DESK
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
PARTICIPANTS CHECK IN & OUT SCHEDULES AND INFO POSTED MAIN ENTRANCE TO HOUSING COMPLEX


150 sq ft
ACTIVITY
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE
VIEW OUT
VIEW IN
Eg-ofLl' i /M5IDfe_ 4
FblMT^S, |^|_______________
ILLUMINATION NATURAL
NEEDS
ARTIFICIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
SYSTEMS
HVAC
ELECTRICITY
PLUMBING
RRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY
KiiGHT fefelL-?
PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
1 PUBLIC
K LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
NONE
I OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
r REQUIRED
1 DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
I TYPICAL
SPECIAL
n NORMAL
c SPECIAL
1 NORMAL
Wr- SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
I NONE
NORMAL
I SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
YES
i NO
YES
r NO


MECHANICAL & SYSTEMS
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
A SYSTEM W/ FLEXIBLE CAPABILITIES IS NEEDED DUE TO DIVERSE SPACES TO BE SERVED.
EQUIPMENT SHOULD BE KEPT OUT OF SIGHT.
EITHER HERE OR SOMEWHERE TANKS AND GAUGE EQUIPMENT FOR FIRE SUPPRESSION.
ALARM PANELS FOR SECURITY AND FIRE.


500 sq ft
ACTIVITY
LIMITED ACCESS FOR PREVENTING MAINTENANCE AND MONITORING OF FIRE & SECURITY SYSTEMS.
NOTES & REMARKS
7% of assigned
ACCESS ZONE | PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
fl PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT fl NONE
OPTIONAL
f REQUIRED
VIEW IN j NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL £MBS|EliCX LIGHT REQUIRED
1 DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS Yie^rioM. isoL^rt^M. 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY WGM \IOlXKGB-I4MG PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
9 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
9 NORMAL
SPECIAL
9 NONE
YES
3 NO
YES
NO
YES
K NO


MEETING ROOM
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
HIGH APPEARANCE W/O EXTRAVAGANCE BOARD MEETINGS AND OTHER CENTER BUSINESS
RECEIVING OF VIP'S
LOCATE ONE LEVEL REMOVED FROM MOST PUBLIC SPACE

I
Ko^T
TbfrUC
7nU£-
I
I
I


285 sq ft
ACTIVITY
MEETINGS OF BUSINESS TYPE. PROVIDE MODERATE PRESENTATION FACILITIES.
ALOS SIDEBOARD FOR SERVING.
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE h PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE 1 LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN | NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL 1 REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
1 TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY fl NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
ft NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
1 YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO


MUSEUM SALES
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
LOCATE AT LOBBY SO THAT TRAFFIC LEAVING ANY FUNCTION MUST PASS BY.
GOOD CIRCULATION A MUST, SHOULD NEVER SEEM SO CROWDED AS TO DETER POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS.

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200 sq ft
ACTIVITY
STORAGE AND SALE OF MOMENTOS AND LITERATURE TO DAILY VISITORS AND PARTICIPANTS.
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
1 RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE I LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT I NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN p NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
p TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
p NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
1 SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
f YES
NO
1 YES
NO


PERMANENT STAFF OFFICES
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
MADE UP OF THREE OFFICES EACH TO BE QUIET, WORKING/WRITING AREAS
PROVIDE DESK, SIDE CHAIRS, LAYOUT TABLE, FILING CABINETS, COMPUTERS, BOOKSHELVES FOR PERSONAL LIBRARIES
TO
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ACTIVITY
QUIET AREA FOR PERSONAL WORK. LIMITED ACCESS
NOTES & REMARKS
450 sq ft
ACCESS ZONE L PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE L LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN r: NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL 1 REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS i NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
i NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
i SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
i YES
NO
i YES
NO


PUBLIC RESTROOMS
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
SERVICEABLE AND DURABLE W/O BEING SHODDY


2 @ 100 ea
200 sq ft
ACTIVITY
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE
VIEW OUT
VIEW IN
ILLUMINATION NATURAL
NEEDS
ARTIFICIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
SYSTEMS HVAC
X>\^ZT J=*+VkU^T
ELECTRICITY
&PI-
PLUMBING
CAFFES
FIRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY
PRIVATE
i RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
'j NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
j NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
r UNDESIRABLE
L TYPICAL
r SPECIAL
NORMAL
SPECIAL
p NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
c NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
p NO
1 YES
NO
L YES
NO


READING ROOM
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
QUIET, GENEROUS COMFORT AND ONE OF THE FEW MORE PRIVATE AREAS AMPLE SEATING W/ VARIETY FOR SINGLES, COUPLES AND SMALL GROUPS AVOID "LIBRARY" FEEL
LOCATE SO IT IS AWAY FROM CROWD BUT NOT ISOLATED


400 sq ft
ACTIVITY
READING AND SMALL QUIET TALK
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE
PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE
;
PUBLIC
VIEW OUT
VIEW IN
LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
NONE
OPTIONAL
ILLUMINATION
NEEDS
NATURAL
REQUIRED jj DESIRABLE
^Ofr L
GCOD
ARTIFICIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
REQUIRED
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SYSTEMS
HVAC
ELECTRICITY
PLUMBING
I
SPECIAL
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
I NONE
FIRE DETECTION 1 YES
NO
FIRE SUPPRESSION YES
f NO
SECURITY YES
f NO


RECEPTION / KITCHEN
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
"OFFICIAL" FUNCTIONS, FUND RAISERS TO BE HELD HERE.
SOME LIMITED ACCESS TO OTHER AREAS DESIRABLE, BASICALLY THE SERVING AREA FRO FUNCTIONS, PEOPLE WILL ALSO ROAM.


100 sq ft
ACTIVITY
PROMARILY PREP OF THINGS TO HAPPEN IN DINING HALL KITCHEN. THIS KITCHEN TO FACILITATE SRVING IN SPIFFIER DIGS.
NOTES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
1 RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE 1 LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL 1 REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
1 UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS ' NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC A/c fbSSl&t£- I NORMAL
SPECIAL
ELECTRICITY PLUMBING VAST £3^ FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NONE
M NORMAL
SPECIAL
I NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
YES
I NO
YES
NO
1 YES
NO


"SINGLES" APARTMENTS
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
NEITHER THE HILTON NOR A MONK'S CELL
THE SPACE IS TO PROVIDE ANOTHER LEVEL OF PRIVACY FOR VISITING RESEARCHERS GET AWAY FROM THE LAB, OFFICE, COMMON AREAS, AND PARTICIPANTS
FOR SINGLETONS, COUPLES & SHARED BACHELOR DIGS (ARCHAEOLOGY JOKE).


ACTIVITY
BASIC LIVING QUARTERS WITHOUT KITCHEN. EAT AT DINING HALL
NOTES & REMARKS
TRY FOR SOLAR APPLICATIONS AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE IN HOUSING
ea unit 391 sq ft
ACCESS ZONE J PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
OPTIONAL
r A REQUIRED
VIEW IN r A NONE
OPTIONAL
_ REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL r! REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
P J UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS h NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY r J NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
| NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
'j YES
NO
t YES
NO
YES
I NO


SPECIMEN PROCESSING LAB
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THE RECEIVING ROOM FOR SPECIMENS. 10-12 STUDENTS AT A TIME ARE HERE UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 1 OR 2 STAFF
PROVIDE 2 WORK STATIONS W/ SINKS (4 DBL SINKS PER STATION)
IT IS A "DIRTY" LAB AND SHOULD HAVE EASILY CLEANED SURFACES
LOADING DOCK & OVERHEAD DOOR REQ'D
GOOD ACCESS TO ANALYSIS LAB


450 sq ft
ACTIVITY
FIRST STOP FOR SPECIMENS BROUGHT FROM FIELD CLEANING, SORTING, AND DRYING OF SPECIMENS.
NOTES & REMARKS
LIMITED USE OF HCL.
PROVIDE FOE ACID STORAGE WORK STATIONS ACID-RESISTANT PLUMBING ACID RESISTANT
BODY AND/OR EYE SHOWER
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
H i MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT u NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL L!G*+r wr bk ^i u DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
i TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC tfCOEfo f=3fL AC\C> uSEl ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY HROH OUTSIDE 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
i! SPECIAL
NONE
1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
r] YES
I NO
YES
NO
1 YES
NO