Citation
A criminal justice center

Material Information

Title:
A criminal justice center
Creator:
Thorn, Lawrence Twyford
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
70, [10] leaves : illustrations (including 1 color, some folded), charts, maps, plans (some folded) ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Correctional institutions -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Eagle County ( lcsh )
Prisons -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Eagle County ( lcsh )
Criminal justice, Administration of -- Planning -- Colorado -- Eagle County ( lcsh )
Correctional institutions ( fast )
Criminal justice, Administration of -- Planning ( fast )
Prisons ( fast )
Colorado -- Eagle County ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 68-69).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Lawrence Twyford Thorn.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
11308147 ( OCLC )
ocm11308147
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1984 .T58 ( lcc )

Full Text
THofcA/


archives
LD
1190
A72
1981+
T58


A Criminal Justice Center
ur
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture.
Lawrence Twyford Thorn Spring 1984'


The Thesis of Lawrence Twyford Thorn is approved.
University of Colorado at Denver May 1984-


INTRODUCTION
The author selects as a thesis problem a criminal justice center. The requirements of the project include courts, jail and sheriff's office. It is located in a small mountain community surrounded by large recreational areas and adjacent to a major inter-state highway. The specific location of the project is in the center of the community on the site of an existing criminal justice facility.
There is a need for such a facility within the community due to several factors. The local economy is based on a tourist industry. This industry has grown rapidly in the last twenty years since the opening of large recreational areas. Population has also grown with the development of the tourist industry. This parallel growth is expected to continue for at least the next twenty years. Nearly thirty percent of the communitys population falls within the ages from twenty to twenty-nine years. National statistics reveal that this age group is involved in the criminal justice system as either plaintiff or defendant more than any other age group. Also, the present criminal justice facilities are regarded, by constitutional standards, as substandard representing a health and safety risk to inmates and facility staff. The combination of a.growing population which includes a substantial segment of young persons of an age group particularly involved in the criminal justice system and the existence of inadequate correctional facilities establishes the


need for a new criminal justice facility.
The relevance of a thesis project dealing with the design of a criminal justice facility becomes evident when viewing recent national trends. State and federal commissions are projected to spend almost eighty billion dollars on the design and construction of criminal justice facilities over the next decade. This building activity comes in response to recent crisis in criminal justice facilities such as riots, fires and overcrowding. The Supreme Court,acting on these problems, has recently established minimum standards of safety and healthcare as provided for by the Constitution. Correctional officials themselves, recognize the need for better facility design:
Most of this country's jails are inadequate, obsolete and generally lacking in basic necessities. They are constructed along traditional jail plans which have changed very little since the beginning of the 17th Century. More recently constructed jails are based on obsolete concepts.
They have been designed primarily for dangerous or violent offenders who make up only a small portion of the jail population. For the most part, their out-moded design reflects a punitive philosophy which emphasizes only the concepts of security and control. Predominantly, their physical shells are warehouses for incarceration rather than effective tools for resolving social problems. Unqualified incarceration has generally resulted only in further social alienation and anti-social behavior.
Jail Architecture. 1975?P-7 National Sheriff's Association
The recognition of the need for better designed criminal justice facilities by the state and federal commissions, the Supreme Court and correction officials indicate the importance of studying such design.


The author approaches this problem of designing a criminal justice facility from the standpoint of a reformer. He holds the belief that the physical design of the correctional facility can help to improve the conditions of the inmate and correction officer and their interaction, while still insuring the safety of the community. His goal is to create a humane design in which inmate and correction officer can exist safely for the purpose of reform of offenders and thus prevention of future offenses. He realizes that changes in human behavior can not be observed through completion of this project, nonetheless, internal and external form and function can serve as tangible evidence to his intentions. Also of importance to the author is the aspect of the criminal justice facility as a public image set within a community. He wishes to express the image of the criminal justice facility as a symbol of an important community responsibility -the administration of justice and humane incarceration. Traditionally, the criminal justice facility has been either removed from-the community physically, which serves to isolate the citizen from the criminal justice process, or else the criminal justice center has stood within the community as an image of inhumane severity.
The author proposes a solution aimed at accomplishing three main objectives: first is to insure the safety of the community, corrections staff and inmates; second is to create a humane environment for the interaction of staff and inmate and third to create a public image which will serve to encourage community envolvement in the criminal justice process.


TRAFFIC ACCESS
Access to the site is primarily by way of Broad and Capitol Streets, 5th and 6th Avenues. Major access to the community is by way of inter-state highway. The regional airport is five miles from the site. The nearest medical facility is thirty miles from the site. The nearest metropolitan area is 130 miles away.
UTILITIES
Utilities accessable to the site include: telephone, gas, electric, water and sewer.
SOILS AND TOPOGRAPHY
The site slopes gently from east to west at a rate of approximately 10 feet in 650 feet. The soil is primarily clay loam with high shrink/swell potential, low bearing strength, slow permeability and moderate frost activity. There is high corrosivity for steel and low corrosivity for concrete.
VEGETATION
Vegetation includes trees such as Quaking Aspen, Ponderosa Pine, Lodge Pole Pine and Pinion. Low ground covers include Rocky Mountain Juniper, Cotton Wood and Goat Willow.
7








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CLIMATE DATA
WINDS
Winds are generally northwesterly and can be severe in winter. The low building density of the site's adjoining areas provides little protection from these winds.
PRECIPITATION
Yearly precipitation is low except in the form of snow. There is an average of 10. 3A inches of precipitation per year ranging from 1.02 inches in August to .5$ inches in February. The region recieves, on average, 48.A inches of snow per year with the largest amounts in December and January. Snow covers the ground on an average of 24# of the days of the year.
HUMIDITY
t
Humidity levels are low, especially during the winter months.
TEMPERATURE
Temperature levels vary greatly from summer to winter. Winter temperatures are often bitter. The coldest months are December through March. January is the coldest month. The warmest months are June through September. July is the warmest month.
SOLAR ORIENTATION
The site is located at 40 north latitude. Low building and vegetation density surrounding the site facilitates good solar access and minimizes shadows.
8


1942-1980
Monthly precip. max
Monthly precip. aver
Monthly precip. min
Colorado climate center fort collins
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC

4.68
Ol26
2.88 n 2.06 0 2.28 2.72 2.55 2.45 2.64 u2.91
1.47 & ^1Q2_ a, 1.00 1.58
.94 .63 .80 ^.85 .81 .92 99 V .86 .66 .86

.17 .17 .16
*.08 .09 .08 *.09
Q .02
*.01
*00 *00
1 \
aver yearly total : I0.34 in
measured in inches
precipition data Eagle,CO


1942-1980
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC YEAR
Highest temp
Monthly mean max
Monthly mean ave
Monthly mean min
100
90
0
70
0
SO
40
SO
20
10
0
-10
Lowest temp i -20 -so
- 40
- so
>8
332
TH3
2.4
-81
62
rfk
24.1
8.3
-46
71
32.2
17.6
-26
80
583
41.7
283

0
88.2
.510.
QajLz

99
79.6
55T
3877
23
£
66.9
45.5
29
1ST
9X2
63.5
43.8
26
93
765
665
* 14
84
645
4.8
2S.C
IT
47.3
31.0
14.6
29
61
355
JOJ.
4.5

99
6&Q
42.2
24.4
-51
temperature data Eagle, CO
o
. farenheit


I
1942-1980 Colorado climate center fort collins
.Monthly deg. day max
Monthly deg. day aver
Monthly deg. day min
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC
2000 o 1750 1500 1250 1000 750 500 250 100

1680 O 1682
1441 01441 1311 01260 S>1400
*1181 1153 f|107 . . ^1020 1014
*927 *794 837 811 *857
PT $78 0537 8)620
§>423 277 0266 0438 (f)281 446
168 135 *157

50 62 l>67
OK *34
0 ~T S>23 Aj
base 65 f
degree days Eagle,CO


1942-1980 Colorado climate center, fort collins
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC
Monthly snow max 40
Monthly snow aver.
Monthly snow min


45.0 47.7

D21-1
ft)11* J19.4 17.9 16.4 014.5 o160 10'0
6-3 |)7.1 3- *)11 nl.5 o CO O 1-7 <8>5-5

e-2 .4
.00 .0 00 .00 A - .00 /&V A .00 .00 .00 .00 00



* /
aver yearly total: 48.8ini
measured in inches
snow fall data Eagle ,CO


CODES / REQUIREMENTS
CODES
Codes used in this project will be the Uniform Building Code, American Correctional Association Standards For Adult Local Detention FacilitiesT Life Safety Code Handbook and any other pertinent manuals. Specific guidelines from these manuals are refered to in the building program section of this booklet.
9




3.10
|A PUBLIC AKF.A
3.10.01 Purpose: lo permit a wider scope of development polfnlial for public or governmental uses.
3.10.02 Uses by Right: Public At vj Uses u- hen* li-ted:
(1) Office (provided all activity i:- conducted within a building) for conducl
of: '
1. a business or profession,
2. j>ublki* ; f rv;** .
(2) Hospitals/Climc,
(3) Police.
(4) Fire,
(5) Library,
(6) Sheriff's Office,
(7) - Restaurant,
(8) Park.
(9) Greenbelt,
(10) Church
(11) Community Building,
(12) Day Nursery,
(13) Day School,
(14) School.
(15) Auditorium,
(16) Art Gallery,
(17) Museum,
(18) Nursing Home
(19) Convalescent Home
3.10.03 Uses, Conditional:
(1) Residential.
3.10.04 Minimum Parking Standards: The number of parking spaces required shall be determined by the Town Council. Cash in lieu of spacer may be required for centralised parking facilities. General guideline is one space per 300 square feet.
3.10.05 Minimum Lot Area: 7500 square feet and as further provided under Supplementary Regulations.
3.10.06 Maximum lot Coverage : 50 percent by build.ngs, or a total of 70 percent
including coverage by all other impervious materials.
3.10.07 Maximum Floor Area Ratio: 1.0: l .0 and as further provided under Supplementary Regulations.
/
7.10.08 Minimum Setback :
(a) Front Yard:
(b) Rear Yard:
(c) Side Yard:
arterial street: 75 feel from street centerline
or 50 feet from front property line, whichever is greater;
local street: 30 feel from street centerline
or 25 leet from front property line, whichever is greater;
Commercial uses 25 feet, for lots adjacent to residential uses 25 feel; for lots with residential occupancy 25 feet;
12*A feel or 4 the hoight of the principal building, whichever is greater.
3.10.09 Maximum Height of Buildings: 40 feet.
3.10.10 Minimum Use Standards: All such uses as listed in the PA zone shall
comply with the following requirements:
(a) service and repair operations .hall be conducted within a building;
(b) all storage of materials shall be within a building or obscured from view from surrounding properties by a fence;
(c) loading and unloading of vehicles shall be conducted on private property and not on any street or alley;
(d) no dust, noi-e, odor, glare or vibration shall be projected beyond the lot,
(e) all outside storage abutting or facing a lot in a residential or commercial zone shall be enclosed by a sight-obscuring fence. The fence shall obstruct the storage from view on the sides of the property abutting or facing a lot in a residential or commercial zone. The fence shall be of such material and design as will not dctrucl from adjacent residences and shall be built according lo plans submitted by the owner to and appiovt d by the Town.
ZONING REQUIREMENTS


Page 20
3.05 R/M RESIDENTIAL/MEDIUM DENSITY
3.05.01 Purpose: To allow higher density residential development in close proximity to existing determinants and where complete (acilities are available.
3.05.02 Uses, by Right:
(1) Dwellings, single family, two family and multiple family, and
customary accessory uses or property accessory to uses of the lot for residential purposes and fences, hedges, walls and similar landscape features.
3.05.03 Uses, Conditional:
(1) Cluster Subdivision in accordance with the provisions of Section 4.01.10, Supplementary Regulations, except that the minimum individual lot area for any use shall be 4,000 square feet and the gross project density shall not exceed 8 dwelling units for each acre of net developable land;
(2) Park;
(3) Greenbelt;
(4) Church;
(5) Community Building;
(6) Day Nursery;
(7) Fire Station;
(8) Postal Substation;
(9) School;
3.05.04 Uses, Special:
(1) Commercial personal services limited to the following types; barber or beauty shop, coffee shop, grocery store, laundromat, delicatessen, automobile service station without repair facilities;
(2) Mobile Home Park;
(3) Home Occupation;
(4) Signs accessory to a Special Use;
(5) Utilities, including water storage, treatment and major distribution lines, and sewage treatment facilities;
(6) Utility Substation;
(7) Office (provided all activity is provided in a building) for conduct of:
(1) a business or profession
(2) studio for conduct of arts or crafts;
3,3 5'05 Minimum Lot Ares: 6.000 square feet per dwelling unit and as further
restricted under Supplementary Regulations.
3,5,06 Maximum Lot Coverage: (1) buildings: 40 percent
(2) All other impervious materials: 20 percent
Page 21
3. 05.07 Maximum Floor Area Ratio: 0.80:1.0 and as further restricted under Supplementary Regulations.
3.0^.08 Minimum Setbacks:
(1) Front Yard: arterial street: 75 feet from road centerline or
50 feet from front property line, whichever is greater;
local street: 50 feet from road centerline or
25 feet from front property line, whichever is greater;
(2) Rear Yard: 1 2\i feet or Vi the height of any building on the lot,
whichever is greater;
(3) Side Yard: 12Vi feet of Vi the height of any building on the lot,
whichever is greater.
3.05.00
Maximum Building Height:
35 feet


program summary
Description
SF Proposed
Comments
Jail (50 bed) .................14,120
Sallyport ..................... 1,000*
Outdoor rec.................... 1,500*
s
Sheriff's Dept..................6,937
Courts......................... 8,020
D.A............................ 1,540
Public Defender ................. 630
Probation Officer ............... 500
Shared spaces ................. 2,000
*(not included in program) *(not included in program)
Total
33,750


SHARED SPACES
Description Usable SF No. of Rms.
Public entry/lobby
Lounge
Food service
Maintenance/Bldg.Mgr
Central record storage ....
Net SF w -Ji VJ1 0 0
Plus 25# Gross
Gross


objectives
SHARED SPACES PUBLIC ENTRY/LOBBY
objectives
This area will provide clear indication of location of different departments. It should provide a welcome environment to the public.
functions/ activies
Functions should include display, the providing of information and directions.
users
General public and staff in non-security departments.
codes / requirments
13


SHARED SPACES LOUNGE AND FOOD SERVICE
objectives
This area will provide waiting and food services for public and building staff on breaks. It should be quiet and comfortable. It should provide tables and chairs.
functions/ activies
Functions will include purchase of food from vending machines, sitting and eating, conversations, disposal of paper waste and smoking.(tobacco only!)
users
Building staff, public, visiting groups.
codes / requirments
14


SHARED SPACES CENTRAL RECORDS STORAGE
objectives
This area will provide a central repository for infrequently used records from the courts, district attorney, jail, sheriff's department and others in a fire proof vault.
functions/ activies
Functions will include filing of records, cataloging and indexing information, storage of microfiche and maintenance of archival information.
users
Courts, district attorney, sheriff's department, public defender, probation officer, staff in charge of records,attorneys, public (on a limited basis).
codes/ requirments


parking summary
PARKING REQUIREMENTS
staff visitors total
Jail 12 8
Sheriff........................20............... 4........24
Courts 6 1.... 58 7
Probation 1.... ..... 4
Public Defender.... 2 3
Maintenance p
Sheriff's Patrol...
Inmate vehicles....
OthfiT staff........ ,.... 3
Deliverytmisc
Impounded vehicles (evidence)
Totals 63 55 147


jail
SUMMARY Description Intake/Release .... Administration ... Staff Facilities Security/Control Reception/Visiting
Residential .......
Medical ...........
Programs/Recreation
Food Service ......
Laundry ...........
Sallyport .........
Outdoor Recreation
Net SF ............
Plus 25# Gross ....
Gross .............
INTAKE/RELEASE Description Booking/Release .. Interview Rooms ...
Photo Area ........
Dressing/Shower ....
Storage ...........
Property Storage .
Usable SF
Remarks
1,105
420
(Share with Sheriff)
. 144
. 240
.5,650 250 .1,000 868 . 207
.1,000* .1.500* .9,884 -^256 14,120
50 Cells
*(Not included in subtotal of building area)
Usable SF No. of Rms. Remarks
... . .1. . I .'I' .. I
300..........1
100..........2
15.......... 1 (Part of booking)
40.......... 1 (Serves as Lav.)
125...........1 (Uniforms,Mattres-
ses, personal items, 125...........1 lockers,etc.)
17


INTAKE/RELEASE conti...
Description Usable SF No. of Rms. Remarks
Holding Cell ..... 80
Holding Cell 160
Special Holding Cell ...
Net SF
Plus 25# Gross .. 474
Gross
ADMINISTRATION/STAFF
Clerical
Jail Admin. Office
Work Release Office .... 125
Staff Lounge (Share with Sheriff)
Staff Locker/Toilets (Share with Sheriff)
Net SF
Plus 25# Gross
Gross
SECURITY/CONTROL
Central Control ..... 144
Net SF
Plus 25# Gross
Gross
206


RESIDENTIAL AREAS conti...
Description Usable SF No. of
Gross.......................8,071
MEDICAL
"Kvam Room ...... 120 1
Infirmary 70
Medication ................. 20 1
Toilet/Shower .............. 40 1
Net SF 250 107
Plus 25# Gross
Gross ...................... 357
PROGRAMS/RECREATION
Counseling/Interview Room Multi-purpose/Dining Room .. Storage .................... 100 1
400 1
100 1
T(ibrary .................... 100 1
Indoor Recreation 250
Toilets 50
Outdoor Recreations 1
Net SF 1 ,000
Plus 25$ Gross 429
Gross 1 ,429
Rms. Remarks
(Dining for 33 persons)
(May be alcove or part of multipurpose room)
(Men and Women's)
(Not included in Usable SF)
19


RECEPTION/WAITING
Description
Waiting
Receptionist
Usable SP
No. of Rms.
Visiting Booth 240.. 4
Net SP 240
Plus 25$ Gross 105
Gross 543
RESIDENTIAL AREAS
Maximum Security Cells 420..
Segregation/Discipline Cells ! ..70.. ^
Medium Security Cells
Minimum Security Cells 1,120..
Trustees ................... 350.. 5
Pemale Cells 280..
Work Release ............... 420.. 6
Dav Rooms .................. 1,750.. 80
Showers .................... 160.. 5
Work Release Toilet/Showers. 100..
Shift Commend ..............
Staff Work Area 100..
Clothing Storage ....
Staff Toilet 40..
Net SF 5,650
Plus 25# Gross 2,421
Remarks
(Share with Sheriff) (Share with Sheriff)
area)


FOOD SERVICE
Description Usable SF No. of Rras. Remarks
Receiving Dock (Secure sallyport-
Dry Storage not included in SF)
T?-p PP'T.O'P ... 48 1
f!rn1 p-p ................ ... 48 1
Vegetable Preparation 64
Hnnki no* .......... ... ... 144 1
Baking
SpttH no* . ... 48 1
Manager's Area
Secure Utensil Storage ... 16
Serving Line
Dining (Included in multipurpose room)
Toilet
Dishwashing
Janitor Closet
Net SF Plus 25# Gross Gross ... 122
21


LAUNDRY
Description Usable SF No. of Rms.
Sorting/Receiving
Machine Room .......... 144..... ... 1
Supply Storage JL5 y\
Net S3?
Plus 25# Gross ........ .02.
Gross
Remarks


objectives
JAIL SUMMARY
objectives
To provide a safe, secure and humane facility for the management of persons charged with or convicted of offences. To insure public safety. Inmates shall leave in no worse physical or psychological condition than when they entered.
functions/ activies
Major areas include: intake/release, administration, staff facilities, secure/control, reception/visiting, residential, medical, programs/recreation, food service, maintenance, laundry, sallyport.
users
Staff: correctional officers; Inmates: pretrial detainees,
sentenced males and females, youth, only for holding; Visitors; Support agencies: such as social services, mental health and health nurses, ministers, etc.
codes/ requirments
Uniform Building Code
American Correctional Association Jail Standards
Life Safety Code Manual


JAIL IM*AKS/RELEASE
objectives
Provide sufficient areas for persons during booking process. Provide positive, not hostile atmosphere fcr persons brought in for booking.
functions/ activies
Booking procedures: paperwork, photos, fingerprinting,
breathalizer tests,interviews, bonding, phone calls, searches, storage of personal items, detox holding cells.
users
Detainees, orderly and disorderly; booking officers; arresting officer.
codes/ requirments
ACA 5098, 5315, 5317, 5149, 51^3, 5144, 5145, 5100 5099.


JAIL ADMINISTRATION/STAFF
objectives
Provide sufficient space for jail administration to insure efficient management of the facility.
functions/ activies
Offices for jail administrators and personnel; staff lockers and restrooms;work release administration; clerical stations; storage of prisoner files and processing forms.
users
Jail administrators; jail staff; clerks; work release administrators.
codes/ requirments
ACA 5092, 5011, 5004,
5008, 5111,
5010,
5205


JAIL SECURITY/CONTROL
objectives
Provide for security and control of the jail areas, the residential and program areas in particular. Minimize the need for electronic monitoring.
functions/ activies
Monitoring point for all areas of the jail facility. Communications control point for residential and program areas. Serves as control point for all entry to and exit from residential area. Staffed by one person full-time. Designed to enhance staff person1s alertness.
users
Correctional officer assigned to security only.
codes / requirments
ACA 5205.


JAIL -RECEPTION/VISITING
objectives
This area will provide a receptive and friendly entrance while insuring security of the facility.
functions/ activies
It will function for the purpose of receiving visitors, recording times, names and the nature of the visit by the receptionist. It will control the flow of visitors, provide waiting area with seating. It will provide areas for visiting in contain ed private booths, with no contact between visitor and inmate.
users
General public, visitors to jail, visitors to jail to visit inmates.
codes/ requirments
There shall be handicap access to reception area ACA 5315, 5316.


JAIL RESIDENTIAL AREA
objectives
This area will house pretrial detainees and sentenced inmates. It will permit classification of individuals according to sex, security risk and age. It will provide a safe, secure and humane environment for the inmate and staff. It will minimize the number of staff required to maintain efficient operation.
functions/ activies
The functions will include providing appropriate spaces for all living functions: sleeping, dressing, bathing, relaxing, reading, conversation, etc. It will provide work areas and security posts for staff members.
users
Correction officers, pretrial and sentenced inmates, visitors during controlled contact visitation in select areas.
I
codes / requirments
> ACA 5122, 5123, 5372, 5126, 5127, 514-9, 5209
I
28


JAIL MEDICAL
objectives
This area will provide in-house medical support facilities for examinations, first aid, and segregation of sick inmates.
It will minimize the need for hospital use. It will meet the needs of handicapped and temporarily-disabled inmates.
functions/ activies
The functions will include private examinations, dispensing of medication, temporary observation administration of first-aid, lying down and sleeping.
users
Doctor and/or nurse, inmate (one at a time), Correctional officer/paramedic.
codes / requirments
UBC 3302, 705 AMA 1978
ACA 5168, 5170, 5174, 5161, 5181, 5176


JAIL PROGRAMS/RECREATION
objectives
This axea will strive to reduce tension and stress, improve behavior within the jail, provide incentives for good behavior, provide educational or enjoyment opportunities while incarcerated, provide religious meetings, etc.
functions/ activies
Functions will include counseling, reading, religious services, active games, TV, etc. Organized programs by the staff will also take place here.
users
Pretrial and sentenced inmates, correctional staff, visitors in controled settings.
codes / requirments
ACA 5118, 5352, 5354, 5357, 5363, 5364, 5367, 5359, 5361, 5308, 5311, 5370, 5119, 5356, 5150.
UBC 705


JAIL FOOD SERVICE
objectives
This area will prepare and serve three meals per day per inmate. It will serve to encourage interaction between inmates and staff during meals. It will also provide meals for staff members.
functions/ activies
Functions will include reception and storage of food, preparation of food, serving of meals to minimum and medium security inmates and serving of meals in the day room for maximum security inmates. It will orovide for the storage of diner ware and utensils. It will provide for the cleaning of these items.
users
Inmates, staff, visitors on special occassions.
codes / requirments
ACA 5199, 5203, 5112, 5190, 5"!97, 5120.


JAIL LAUNDRY
objectives
This area will provide clean uniforms and bedding for inmates. It will provide clean towels and kitchen uniforms. It will also provide vocational opportunity.
functions/ activies
Functions will include collection, sorting, washing, folding, storage and distribution of laundry.
users
Operated by trustees with supervision from correctional officers.
codes / requirments
ACA 5^5, 5147, 5115, 51-11, 5101.


adjacencies
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33


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sheriff's department
k
Description Net SF Proposed
Administration
Records/Dispatch
Civil
Patrol
Detectives
Misc (Includes property room, armory,storage,training and locker rooms.)
Net SF
Plus 25# Gross ^733
Gross 6,936
RECORDS / DISPATCH Description Usable SF No. of Rms.
Records
Dispatch
toilet
Net SF
Plus 25# Gross
Gross 967


ADMINISTRATION
Description Usable SF No. of Rms. Remarks
Sheriff's Office 175 1
Under Sheriff's Office .... 125 1
Standard office
Reception/waiting
Administrative Secretary .. 105.............. 1
Clerical 65 1
Conference Room
Net SF
Plus 25# Gross
Gross ,...1,260
CIVIL DIVISION Description Supervisor's Office ...
Clerks (with reception area)
Field Deputy Station ..
Net SF
Plus 25# Gross
Gross


PATROL DIVISION
Description Usable SF No. of Rms. Remarks
Captain's Office
Squad Room
Sergeant's Office ..... i
Interview Room ........ 80 1
Uniform Room
Exercize Room (Shared with jail)
Net SP
Plus 25% Gross
Gross
DETECTIVE DIVISION Description
Squad Room
Lt. Office
Interview Room 1 ...... 4-8 1
Interview Room 2 ...... 100 1
Lab/Photo Lab 150 1
Net SF
Plus 25# Gross - 221
Gross
41


MISCELLANEOUS
Description Usable SP No. of Rms. Remarks
Property/Evidence Room 400
Armory
Supply Storage ..
Training Room Locker Rooms/Showers up facility)
Men
Women
Net SF
Plus 25# Gross
Gross
42


objectives
SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT GENERAL
objectives
This department will provide law enforcement services through out the community; patrol the county and state roadways, conduct investigations, report to complaints and aid in civil cases.
The sheriff's department is responsible for the operation of the jail and is interdependent with it.
functions/ activies
The functions include: patrol responsible for field work; detectives responsible for investigation; civil responsible for summons, impoundments, divorces, etc.; records and dispatch -responsible for records and information sources.
users
Sheriff's staff, deputies, detectives, correctional officers, public.
codes / requirments


objectives
SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATION
objectives
Administration will provide management to the department through the sheriff and undersheriff It should be accessable to the general public for discussions and complaints. It should be central within the department.
functions/ activies
Functions include meetings, phone conversations and desk related work.
users
Sheriff, undersheriff, secretary, clerical assistance, department staff and general public.
codes/ requirments


SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT RECORDS AND DISPATCH
objectives
This department will provide clerical services and record keeping services.
functions/ activies
Functions will include filing of information, data collection, tabulation and report preparation, 24-hour dispatching service and assistance to the general public, detectives andpatrol on a variety of questions.
users
Dispatchers and clerical technicians, other departmental staff, general public on request.
codes / requirnrients


SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT CIVIL DIVISION
objectives
This department has substantial involvement with the community as it handles the serving of summonses, small claims, divorces,etc. Clerical assistance and booking services are required.
functions/ activies
Functions include the process of paperwork, phone conversation, money collection and response to public inquiries.
users
Civil officers, clerical/secretarial assistance, general public.
codes/ requirments


SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT PATROL DIVISION
objectives
This division serves to provide patrol and law enforce ment to all unincorporated areas.
functions/ activies
Functions needed to support division objectives include check-ins and out at department headquarters, desk area for report filing,phone conversations and record keeping.
users
Road Deputies.
codes/ requirments


SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT DETECTIVE DIVISION
objectives
This office will be sufficient in size to accommodate the detectives in conducting investigations.
functions / activies
Functions include conducting investigations,collection of evidence, phone conversation, interviews and interrogations. Also polygraph tests will be administered, photographs taken and reports written.
users
Detectives, witnesses and offenders, patrol officers and secretarial support personnel.
codes / requirments


SHERIFFS DEPARTMENT MISCELLANEOUS AREAS
objectives
These areas serving the sheriff's office include property and evidence storage, armorv, supply storage, training room (including line-up facility;, men's and women's locker/showers (shared with jail).
functions/ activies
Functions include the storage of property, evidence, arms and ammunition. Spaces will be provided for meetings and training as well as changing rooms for officers and staff.
users
Members of sheriff's department and jail staff.
codes/ requirments


adjacencies




courts
V *
SUMMARY
Description Usable SR No. of Rms. Remarks
District Court ....1,400 1
County Court ....1,000 1
Jury Rooms .... 320 1
Restroom Judge, Jury .... 40............ 1
Judge's Chambers .... 400 2
Conference .... 150 1
Judge's Secretary 135 1
Recorder Stations .... 100 1
Clerks ....1,200 1 (combined county/ district courts)
Attorney/Client Conf. . .... 100 1
Attorney/Client Conf. . .... 140 1
Law Library ....1,000 1
Coat Storage 30 2
Net SR ....6,015
Plus 25# Gross ...2,,005
Gross 8,020


objectives
COURTS SUMMARY
objectives
This section of the facility will provide for the operation of the courts, from administrative and clerical through Jury trials.
functions/ activies
Functions will include the administration of district and county courts.
users
Judges, court clerks, court reporters, clerical assistants, court administrator, attorneys, general public and Jail inmates.
codes / requirments


COURTS COURTROOMS
objectives
These spaces will accommodate judges, attorneys, witnesses, audience and others attending trials and hearings in a setting that is comfortable. It should be of appropriate size, have adequate lighting and acoustics.
functions/ activies
Functions will include hearings and trials,including testimony and discussion, review of exhibits and the reading of materials.
users
Judges, attorneys, court reporter, jail staff and general public.
codes/ requirments


COURTS JURY ROOMS
objectives
These rooms will provide the jury with small conference room for reviewing case evidence and discussing information.
functions/ activies
Functions will include reading, conversations, reviewing evidence and exhibits, snacking and dining when necessary. It will include direct access to private toilets.
users
Jury members.
codes / requirments


COURTS JUDGES* CHAMBERS
objectives
This area will provide the judges with offices in which to read, conduct meetings, interviews and prepare materials.
functions/ activies
Functions will include reading, writing, talking, phone conversations. It should be a controlled environment, free of sounds outside of room.
users
Judges, attorneys, clerks, court reporters, general public upon invitation.
codes / requirments


COURTS CLERKS' OFFICES
objectives
These offices will provide a work area for the court clerks and staffs for the administration of court activities. The space
should be pleasant, designed to minimize the tensions frequently involved with the busy court schedules.
functions/ activies
Functions will include phone conversations, preparation of court materials, receiving fees, filing and storage of documents and conversations with public.
users
Court clerks, clerical assistants.
codes / requirments


COURTS LAW LIBRARY
objectives
This library will provide reference material and quiet work/ study area.
functions/ activies
Functions will include reading, research and writing.
users
Lawyers, court staff, judges.
codes / requirments


69
sapueDolpD
*?> 'j*


district attorneys
SUMMARY Description Usable SF O O
Chief Deputy D.A. Office 175
Deputy D.A. Office 5
Conf./Library
Reception ................ i 180 1
Secretarial Pool
Net SF
Plus 25# Gross > 385-
Gross
Remarks


objectives
DISTRICT ATTORNEY
objectives
The District Attorney's office provides support for the State in administration of Its laws.
functions/ activies
Functions include interviews, conversation with other attorneys, reading, writing, dictating, etc. A receptionist screens visitors, answers phone calls and receives mail.
A legal secretary conducts research, types,holds phone conversations and schedules meetings for the attorney.
users
District attorneys, lawyers, research assistants, secretaries public, sheriff's department.
codes/ requirments



A"3tVaOiJ-V
SapU9DDlDD


probation
SUMMARY
Description Usable SF No. of Rms. Remarks
Probation Officers ....
Secretary
Net SF
Plus 25# Gross
Gross
63


adjacencies

64


public defender
v
SUMMARY Description Usable SF No. of Rms. Remarks
Public Defender Office 180 1
Public Defender Office ....125 1
Public Defender Office 221 "i
Net SF 480
Plus 25# Gross ....160
Gross 640
65


objectives
PUBLIC DEFENDER
objectives
This office provides legal assistance to persons who might not otherwise receive it.
functions/ activies
Activities of the attorneys include interviews, phone conversations, reading, writing and dictating. A receptionist/ secretary will screen visitors and schedule meetings. A secretary types and functions similar tasks as the receptionist.
users
Public defender attorneys, secretaries, other attorneys, sheriff's department staff, clients.
codes / requirments


objectives
PROBATION
objectives
The probation office will provide pre-sentence research to the courts and parole-probation monitoring activities to the courts to sentenced individual.
functions/ activies
Functions includes interviews, phone conversations, report preparation and typing.
users
Probation officers, secretaries, persons on probation.
codes / requirments


BIBLIOGRAPHY
BOOKS
American Correctional Association. Standards For Correctional Institutions. 2nd ed. College Park, Md. 1981.
Bowker, Lee H. Prisoner Subcultures. Lexington Books. Lexington, Mass. 1977.
Carrey, Louis P. Introduction to Correctional Science. McGraw-Hill. New Yorki: 19&0.
Chaneles, Sol. The Open Prison : Saving Their Lives and Our Money. Dial Press. New York. 19*73.
Evans, Robin. The Fabrication of Virtue : English Prison Architecture. 1750-1840. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge. 1982.
Eyman, Joy S. Prisons and Women : A Practical Guide to Administration Problems. Charles C. Thomas. Sringfield, Illinois. 1971.
Goldsmith, Seth B. Prison Health : Travesty of Justice. 1 Prodist. New York. 1975.
Grupp, Stanley E., Ed. Theries of Punishment. Indiana University Press. Bloomington, Indiana. 1971
Gunn, John ; Graham Robertson et al. Psychiatric Aspects of Imprisonment. Academic Press. London. 1978.
Harris, Janet. Crisis In Corrections : The Prison Problem. McGraw-Hill. New York]! 1975.
Huff, C. Ronald, Ed. Contemporary Corrections : Social Control and Conflict. American Society of Criminology. Sage Publications. Beverly Hills. 1977.
Moynahan, James M. and Earle K. Stewart. The American Jail :
Its Development and Growth. Nelson-Hall. Chicago. 1980.
Murton, Thomas 0. The Dilemma of Prison Reform. Holt, Rinehart and Winston. New YorlET 1976.
Nagel, William G. The New Red Barn : A Critical Look at the Modern American Prison. Walker and Co. New York."^T973.


Reid, Sue Titus. The Correctional System : An Introduction.
Holt, Rinehart and Winston. New York. 19&1.
Richmond, Mark S. Classification of Jail Prisoners. U.S.
Bureau of Prisons. Washington D.C. 19?1
United Nations Social Defence Research Institute. Prison Architecture : An International Survey of Representative Closed Institutions and Analysis of Current Trends in Prison Design, 'the Architectural Press Ltd. London. 1975.
United States Bureau of Prisons. Handbook of Correctional Institution Design and Construction. 1949. publisher and city NA.
Wayson, Billy L. et al. Local Jails : The New Correctional Dilemma. Lexington Books. Lexington, Mass. 1977.
CODES
American Correctional Association. Standards For Adult Local Detention Facilities. 2nd. ed. Washington D.C. 1981.
International Conference of Building Officials. Uniform Building Code. Whittier, Ca. 1976.
Lathrop, James K.,Ed. Life Safety Code Handbook. 2nd. ed.
National Fire Protection Association, Inc. Quincy, Mass.
1981.
REFERENCES
Callender, John Hancock, Ed. Time-Saver Standards For Architectural Design Data. 6th. ed. McGraw-Hill. New York.
r3Eol-----------------
Ramsey, G. Charles and Harold R. Sleeper. Architectural Graphic Standards. Joseph N. Boaz Ed. 6th. ed. Wiley and Sons. New York. T980.
69


STUDIES
The Citizen's Criminal Justice Advisory Committee and Gersten-berger Ass. Needs Assessment and Building Program ;
Criminal Justice Center. Eagle, Colorado. l96l, rev. 1982.
The Citizen's Criminal Justice Advisory Committee and Morter,
Fisher, Arnold, AIA. Criminal Justice Center Site Evaluation Study. Eagle, Colorado"! 19&1 -
70


CONCLUSION
To fulfill the statement of my thesis through this design l.lhave done several things. 1 have made the function al aspects of this program work on all levels: through structure with a reinforced concrete and steel sj^stem; through mechanics with an active solar hot water heating system and the necessary space provision to accommodate it; through circulation with a clear floor plan which segregates inmates from public users in a secure and comfortable manner.
Aesthetically I have made the gesture of embracing the community through the use of a gently curving arcade and two entry towers. I have softened the lines of the building by proposing the use of earth tone colors and a soft stucco finish. Yet I have been careful to maintain an image of dignity and rationality, signifying the lofty implications of law and justice.
On humanitarian grounds 1 have provided a jail floor plan which provides exterior views for each cell, ample dayroom space, proper segregation of inmates and a safe system of control for jail staff which ultimately insures the safety of inmates and community. Specific effort was made to provide sufficient natural light and space within the parameters of security allowed by law.and budget.
1 selected the central most area of town as the site


of this project for several reasons: traditionally the county court house is found in the center ("be it geographic or commercial) of the county seat. It is usually the most grand of the communities buildings, expressing the importance of its function. The court house is traditionally the organizing element of the community. It is where speeches are delivered on holidays, honors bestowed and parades originated or terminated. It is a symbol of good citizenship and civic pride. To have pieced this facility in the industrial park along Interstate 70 as proposed by the Eagle County Commissioners would be to:promote development along the highway corridor, 'pay further hommage to growing American community disrootedness and exacerbate public alienation from the criminal justice system.
Failure to utilize this site would be to pass up the opportunity to organize the Town of Eagle at present and for future development.
In conclusion I believe that I have attempted to accomplish those aspects of this problem which i set out in my thesis statement. I would hope that future students, would use the information here to further the exploration of socially relevant projects*




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