Citation
Hidden Village

Material Information

Title:
Hidden Village a residential community
Creator:
Wager, David
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
66 unnumbered leaves : charts, maps, color photographs, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Architecture, Domestic -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Golden ( lcsh )
Cluster housing -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Golden ( lcsh )
Architecture, Domestic ( fast )
Cluster housing ( fast )
Colorado -- Golden ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 64-66).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
David Wager.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
12078024 ( OCLC )
ocm12078024
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1984 .W335 ( lcc )

Full Text
dden Village


HIDDEN VILLAGE A RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning. University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture
David Wager
Fall 198A


ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
AURARIA LIBRARY
The Thesis of David Wager is approved.
Gary Long Faculty Advisor
Ron Rinker Principal Advisor
University of Colorado at Denver
December 12, 1984


A very special thanks to my wife Debra for her unwavering and continuous support through this long arduous process. Clearly, I could not have accomplished this without her help and love.
Time eternal
renders all,
like the universe,
infinite,
or,
infinitesimally small


Table of Contents


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Int roduction...................I
Thesis Statement................II
Advisors........................Ill
History.........................IV
I
Site............................V
Occupants.......................VI
Codes...........................VII
Solution........................VIII
Bibliography....................IX


I
ntroaucTion


INTRODUCTION/DISCUSSION
The front range of Colorado lies in a truelly unique ecological zone. Lieing at the juncture of the Great High Plains and the Rocky Mountains this transitional zone reflects a wide variety in terrain as well as in flora and fauna. Like other visually attractive areas of the United States this area is feeling the pressures of encroaching development. It appears that, in the world that we now live in, (with the present demographic shifts occuring and the consequential demand for housing in this area), little can be done to stop this process but, given time perhaps this rapidly reducing visual resource can be developed in a manner that many can share in rather than just a priviliged few.
To the West of Highway (93) and to the South of Highway (6) in Golden lies a unique, geomorphica 11y beautiful parcel of ground. Originally comprised of many separate parcels the individual segments have been purchased with the express entent of forming a large mult-use community, named the Gleneagle Community Development. The new owner of this large approximately (205) acres site is The Acquest Group.


hesis Statemen


SCOPE AND LIMITS OF THIS THESIS PROPOSAL
I intend to use that portion of the Gleneagle Community site designated as Parcel F. This portion has been named "Hidden Village" and will be refered to as such from this point on. I will further reduce the scope of this program and consequential presentation to that portion of Parcel F "Hidden Village" that lies to the south and that has been designated to contain (21) attached homes. This portion of the Gleneagle Community is approximately (5.3) acres and will contain (21) individual homes. I intend to design attachedor detached cluster homes that are integrated with the community and the site. Each cluster home shall contain approximately (1800) sq. ft. of living area and will be a maximum (3) story height.


Advisors


ADVISORS
My major faculty advisor will be Bob Kindig.
Resource advisors will be-Gary Long Architect Ron Rinker Architect
Roy Finney (President President Acquest Group.) Anton Hodgers, (Custom Home Builder).


siory


HISTORY
Community
A brief history of Golden reflects it's terrritorial heritage and historic links to mining in this state. Golden was founded by Thomas Golden in 1863. A town plat was filed in that year and included apart of an 1859 plat. Golden was first cal led"Golden City and was established by the Boston Company. Golden was the Territorial capital in the years fropm 1862 to 1867. The Colorado School of Mines was established in Golden as a part of Randal's University in 1871 and was deeded to the state in 1874.
Site
The site, as previously mentioned, was owned by a variety of individuals. Principal owners today ar e:
THE ACQUEST GROUP 44 Union Blvd.
Lakewood CO 80228 Roy Finney Richard L.Lunnon
Developer is
ASTOR REALTY 44 Union Blvd.
Lakewood, CO 80228
Roy Finney, Vice President
PROJECT BACKGROUND Development
In the spring of 1982 I was made aware of a rezoning application for the entire (205) acre parcel of ground. Since this site lies just outside of the city limits of Golden. Colorado, the applicant and owner successfully applied for and received preliminary approval for a change in zoning status from agricultural to P.U.D., as well as a commitment for annexation into the City of Golden. Final approval for the multi-family community invisioned by the Acquest Group was received on June 13. 1982.


Developmental Issues/Reasoning
This community will be comprised of several different parcels, each with a separate distinct use. Approximately (30) acres will be commercial/office (75) acres will become single family residential, (40) acres will become multifamily (5) acres will be school and the remainder will become park open space containing a trail system linked to the adjacent Jefferson County Open Space trail system. What makes this project interesting is that this site lies in the foothills of the Front Range and contains many geomorphic features, (rock out-croppings severe grade changes- ect), that will be integrated into the final design concept and will become physical divisions between each separate parcel as well as each separate use of the total site.
This site, as noted previously lies in a very unique eco/geomorphic zone. Refered to as the "Foothills" region this transitional zone lies between the Great Plains and the Rocky Mountains. The surface features of this area reflect this transitional nature. Many different species of plant and animal life found in either the Lower Montane regions or the Plains Region abound and interact at this transitional site. Successful design statagies and solutions will need to sensitively incorporate this ecological variety into the overall design solution.








Site


SITE
Site lies in the City of Golden, Jefferson County, State of Colorado. Legal description is:
Project lies on the Southwest corner of the intersection of Highways 6 & 93 and runs South to the North boundary of the Heritage Dells Subdivision Filing #3, West to the Jefferson County Open Space "Front Range", Kinney Run Parcel. Site is bounded on the North by Highway 6 and is bounded on the East by Highway 93. Total site is (205) acres, with my specific multifamily site (5.3) acres. Multifamily site will be site "B" of the Multifamily sites A,B.C and D. My assumptions are that the overall site condition and developments will allow my clusterhomes to be designed on that portion of my site that I select.
CLIMATOLOGICAL
Golden lies approximately (15) miles to the west of Denver. This proximal location results in Golden sharing the same general weather conditions, with some small deviations. Most notably, Golden, experiences more severe winds year round and heavier snow falls during the winter months then does Denver. Please keep in mind these (2) modifications when reading the following narative Denver Metro Climatological Summary.
This site lies at the base of the Rocky Mountains and is consequently influenced by the weather patterns that develope and are a result of this geographic location, the air masses present and the belt of "westerlies" that are a part of this area. The Denver metro area enjoys a mild, sunny semi-arid climate year round. Temperature extremes are generally episodic in nature and of short duration.


Isolated from any moisture producing sources and surrounded by the Rocky Mountains the Denver Metro area enjoys low humidity, low average precipitation and many sunny days.
Air masses from (4) principal sources affect Denver's climate. Humid Pacific air modified through passsage over mountains to the west, cold Artie air from Canada and Alaska, warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and dry, warm air from the desert southwest. The principal climatological patterns found in the Denver area are a result of the interaction of these various air masses.
The spring months are the wettest, cloudiest and most windy times of the year. Nearly (37%) of the yearly moisture falls in the early spring months in the form of snowfall. Periods of extremely high winds are recorded during this same spring period. Gusts in excess of (100) M.P.H. and steady winds of (20-30) M.P.H. are frequently recorded during this early spring period. Average daytime temperatures range from (50-60) degress F to nightly lows of (20-30) degress F.
Summer months are generally sunny warm and arid. Precipitation, roughly (32%) of the yearly total, comes in the form of afternoon thunderstorms. Prevailing winds during this part of the year are from the south and average between (3-10) M.P.H., with gusts infrequently exceeding (55) M.P.H.. Average daytime temperatures range from (75-85) degrees F to (50-55) degrees F at night.
The fall is the most moderate season in the year. Few thunderstorms, snow showers and/or invasions of excessively cold or hot air invade the region, resulting in a very pleasant, uniformly comfortable season. Precipitation during this period accounts foe less than (20%) of the yearly total. Winds are generally westerly with gusts exceeding (20-30) M.P.H. Average daytime temperatures range from (60-70) degrees F to nightime lows of (35-45) degrees F.


I
Winter in this region can is occasionally quite severe, but short in duration. Most of the frigid Arctic air masses surge to the plains regions to the east of this are, providing for a very moderate climate. Precipitation frequency is higher than that of the autumn months and is deposited in the form of snow. This contributes about (11%) to the yearly total. Winds from the west are modified in their descent over the Rocky Mountains and raise the ambient air temperature through a Chinook warming effect. Gusts exceeding (50) M.P.H. are recorded during the winter months. Average daytime temperatures range from (40-50) degrees F to nightime lows of (25-35) degress F.
SOIL REPORT
The soil report prepared by Chen and Associates for the 6200 zone city water line, which crosses the site, provides an overview of soil conditons that can be expected. In summation, the soil report reflects formations consisting of claystone, sandstone with an overlay oc clay, sand and silt. The soils at this site are relatively non-expansive.


Average Temperature
Heating Degree Days
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug S.pt Oct Nov Dec Annual Season July Aug S.pt Oct Nov 0k Jan Fab Mar Apr May June Total
194 3 33.7 39.5 35.7 54.3 52.9 65.9 75.6 74.3 63.2 53.0 40.7 34.3 51.9 1962-63 0 19 112 35? 703 961 1417 768 846 442 156 so 5020
194 4 30.7 32.4 33.4 42.3 58.0 67.0 71.5 72.8 63.0 54.3 40.7 30.7 49.7 1963-64 6 7 29 229 690 1125 1059 1082 982 545 230 72 6056
1945 31.0 33.5 41.4 41.0 56.5 61.4 72.* 71.5 59.9 53.9 41.3 30.4 49.6 1964-65 0 16 123 375 743 98 1 921 1044 1108 411 245 63 6030
1946 31.4 35.7 44.6 55.1 51.4 64.2 74.6 71.2 63.4 48.2 33.6 37.6 51.2 1965-66 6 7 296 302 645 92 4 1122 1017 691 604 204 a? 5900
1947 30.8 28.8 36.3 45.8 55.6 67.0 72.5 72.8 66.2 55.6 33.0 33.1 49.4 1966-67 0 9 61 391 699 1018 954 83? 679 498 388 135 5664
1948 26.4 26.6 31.4 51.6 58. 7 66.4 72.6 72.8 66.7 51.3 36.4 29.6 49.2 1967-68 4 16 108 389 729 1186 1086 885 751 655 343 38 6190
1949 16.3 30.6 39.5 49.2 57.0 65.0 72.4 71.4 63.2 49.5 40.6 32.5 49.6 1968-69 10 35 145 399 871 1114 925 821 1011 378 204 144 6057
1950 29.4 38.6 38.1 47.7 53.0 66.6 68.9 68.9 60.5 59.9 39.1 36.3 50.6 1969-70 2 0 56 801 769 99 8 1061 734 969 632 200 78 6300
1951 26.9 33.9 35.8 43.8 57.3 60.9 73.5 70.7 61.5 48.2 38.1 29.0 48.3 1970-71 0 0 190 584 770 97 7 1018 95 8 817 508 329 25 6104
1952 34.9 3 5.0 33.8 48.2 56.8 72.0 73.1 72.3 65.6 53.3 32.3 32.6 50.0 1971-72 24 0 273 4 79 771 1019 1063 832 621 486 2*6 4 5618
1953 39.6 32.7 43.6 42.8 53.4 69.7 74.n 71.2 66.0 54.4 43.1 31.4 51.0 1972-73 42 15 107 397 960 1239 1162 820 771 646 290 56 6505
1954 36.3 43.7 35.3 53.6 57.2 69.3 76.0 72.7 65.7 52.5 44.3 34.7 53.5 1973-74 8 0 166 321 758 1029 1277 831 671 507 137 67 5772
1955 27.2 27.1 36.5 50.1 59.0 64.0 75.5 71.1 63.9 59.0 36.2 35.4 50.2 1974-75 0 9 199 381 803 104 3 1024 957 8S2 621 332 05 6306
1956 34.0 27.7 40.1 45.5 60.9 73.4 72.2 69.7 65.5 55.9 37.2 35.7 51.5 1975-76 0 4 195 363 840 843 1006 740 859 469 25V 64 5637
1957 25.8 40.7 39.1 41.4 53.9 65.9 73.5 72.6 61.4 51.4 36.0 39.6 50.2 1976-77 0 7 142 509 759 90 7 1105 749 771 414 137 0 5500
19Se 32.9 37.4 32.8 44.6 61.7 68.1 70.3 73.6 64.4 53.9 40.6 35.8 51.4 1977-78 2 16 38 358 737 92 0 1206 936 665 435 335 07 5733
1959 30.0 30.2 37.6 45.6 56.2 70.9 72.6 73.0 61.1 48.1 37.6 36.5 50.0 1970-79 0 20 96 366 811 124 5 1450 854 751 473 313 01 6460
I960 27.6 24.8 38.1 50.5 57.2 68.3 73.2 73.4 65.0 52.0 39.5 26.5 49.7 1979-00 0 20 50 347 941 93 9 1204 376 828 514 247 9 5903
1961 31.7 35.2 38.9 46.0 55.7 66.1 71.5 72.2 56.3 50.0 34.7 27.7 48.9 1900-01 0 4 56 386 683 731 853 01 727 260 243 26 4770
1962 19.5 29.9 34.6 50.3 59.8 65.5 72.9 72.5 62.4 53.4 41.3 33.8 49.7 1981-02 0 12 19 375 570 898 1071 1 8 733 522 306 92 5516
1963 19.1 37.3 37.3 50.n 60.9 66.7 74.8 60.7 65.9 57.9 41.7 28.5 50.8 1982-83 3 0 151 487 875 1050
1964 30.6 27.4 33.0 46.6 50.8 64.0 75.8 70.4 62.5 52.7 40.0 33.2 49.7
1965 35.0 27.4 29.0 51.2 57.1 63.9 72.7 70.2 55.7 55.1 43.3 35.0 49.6
1966 28.6 28.4 42.5 44.6 50.7 64.0 76.9 70.0 65.0 52.2 41.5 31.9 50.5 Cooling Degree Days

I960 29.7 34.2 40.6 43.0 53.9 67.8 71.7 60.1 60.9 51.9 35.7 20.9 40.9 Year Jan Fab Mar Apr May June July Aug Sapt Oct Nov Dae Total
30.6 38.6 33.5 43.7 72.0 73.9 59.5 45.9 39.1 33.3 49.5 1969 0 0 0 35 44 312 284 46 0 0 0 721
1970 0 0 0 0 16 93 222 282 40 0 0
1971 32.1 30.6 38.5 47.8 54.2 69.0 70.6 72.0 57.5 49.4 39.1 31.9 49.5
1972 30.5 36.2 44.0 48.5 57.0 68.3 70.2 71.0 62.1 52.1 32.9 24.9 49.9 1971
1973 27.3 35.5 39.9 43.2 55.6 67.5 71.0 73.5 59.9 54.5 39.5 31.6 49.9 1972 0 207
1974 23.7 35.2 47.9 74.7 69.5 59.4 52.4 30.0 31.2 50.5 1973 0 0 0 1
1975 31.7 37.3 70.0 59.5 53.2 36.0 37.5 49.4 1974 0 0 0 0 36 176 307
1975 0 0 c 0 246
1976 32.3 39.3 37.1 49.2 56.7 66.3 75.3 70.2 61.8 48.4 39.5 35.5 51.0
1977 29.2 38.0 39.9 51.1 60.7 71.9 74.3 70.2 53.3 40.3 35.1 52.5 1976 0 0 0
1978 25.8 31.4 43.3 50.3 54.4 66.9 74.7 65.0 53.1 37.8 24.6 49.7 197? 0 0 0 2
1979 18.0 34.2 40.5 73.7 69.5 66.3 53.8 33.3 3.5 49.5 1970 0 0
1980 26.0 34.5 38.0 47.7 57.1 71.9 76.4 73.2 65.8 52.4 41.9 41.2 52.2 1979 0 0 0
1980 0 0 0 2 10
1901 37.3 36.2 41.2 56.4 57.1 7P.4 72.0 52.6 45.9 35.8 54.1
1902 30.3 32.0 5S.I 72.7 73.1 61.7 35.7 30.9 49.3 1981 0 0 0 195 346 1
RECORD 1902 0 0 0 0 42 247 257
MEAN 30.0 32.9 38.7 47.6 56.7 66.7 72.8 71.3 62.8 51.6 39.6 32.4 50.3
MAX 42.7 45.4 51.3 60.3 69.4 80.6 86.6 85.0 77.0 65.5 52.6 45.1 63.5
MIN 17.3 20.3 26.1 34.0 44.0 52.0 58.9 57.6 48.6 37.7 26.6 19.7 37.0
Precipitation
Snowfall
Year Jan Fab Mar Apr May June July Aug S.pt Oct Nov Dec Annual S.ason | July | Aug |spt| Oct | Nov | Dec Jan Fab Mar Apr May June HI
1943 0.23 0.12 0.43 1 .04 2.96 1.22 0.72 1.28 0.07 0.27 0.41 0.37 9.12 1943-44 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 2.3 3.0 12.1 3.3 28.1 23.6 7.7 0.0 81.1
1944 1.08 0.25 2.89 3.92 1.73 0.92 3.34 0.46 T 0.06 0.52 0.37 15.54 1944-45 0.0 0.0 0.0 a.o S.S 5.9 12.2 6.2 3.0 23.0 T 0.0 55 .6
1945 0.70 0.49 0.13 2.55 2.32 2.02 2.19 2.55 1.17 0.78 0.40 0.09 15.39 1945-46 0.0 0.0 7 2.3 3.0 0.8 10.2 4.6 3.2 T 0.8 0.0 25.7
1946 0.64 0.27 0.52 2.09 1.45 0.82 1.60 1.30 1.18 0.00 2.97 0.04 14.34 1946-47 O.C 0.0 0.4 3.8 39.1 0.7 7.3 12.3 12.0 4.7 1.3 T 81.6
194 7 0.37 0.87 1.04 1.3C 4.61 2.76 1.52 1.27 0.91 3.41 0.73 0.27 19.06 1947-40 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.1 6.4 6.4 23.7 7.3 22.0 5.5 T 0.0 74.4
1948 1.44 0.44 1.71 2.52 1.64 1 .94 0.80 0.41 0.45 0.16 0.65 0.26 12.62 1940-49 0.0 0.0 o.a 0.0 6.7 4.0 20.5 0.4 14.2 12.7 T 0.0 60.1
1949 1.17 0.03 2.29 1.46 3.31 4.27 1.35 0.92 0.28 1.36 0.01 0.33 16.78 1949-50 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.2 0.0 6. 3 8.8 2.9 5.4 9.0 13.6 0.0 52.9
1950 0.47 0.20 0.31 2.90 2.00 3.32 0.56 0.27 1.56 0.12 1.00 0.32 13.93 1950-51 o.a 0.0 0.0 0.0 11.9 5.9 15.7 10.5 17.6 12.9 0.0 0.3 74.0
1951 0.83 0.78 1.47 2.01 1.70 2.27 0.83 4.47 0.97 2.16 1.17 0.69 19.43 1951-52 0.0 0.0 4.2 7.7 14.5 11.2 0.3 in.2 25.2 11.2 T 0.0 04.5
1952 0.01 0.68 2.12 2.75 3.06 0.12 1 .06 1.41 0.54 0.18 1.31 0.19 13.43 1952-53 O.C O.C o.a 1.2 14.5 3. 1 7.4 16.5 11 .8 12.0 1.7 0.0 68.2
1953 0.39 1.39 1.15 1.29 2.66 1.46 1.98 1.25 0.20 0.44 1.00 1.02 14.23 1953-54 o.a 0.0 O.C 0.1 7.2 14.4 2.7 0.6 6.3 7.6 2.6 0.0 41.5
1954 0.23 0.04 0.49 0.88 0.60 0.66 1.99 0.51 0.77 0.06 0.57 0.71 7.51 1954-55 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 3.9 0. 6 3.5 12.2 19.5 4.9 0.0 0.0 53.0
1955 0.23 0.65 1.14 0.48 2.47 1.39 2.99 2.41 2.72 0.66 0.56 0.15 16.05 1955-56 a.a o.a 0.0 4.1 7.3 2.9 6.3 10.5 13.0 3.7 T 0.0 47.8
1956 0.39 0.77 0.89 0.72 2.36 0.44 4.17 1.83 0.01 0.27 1.25 0.62 13.72 1956-57 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.6 21.3 6. 3 5.3 1.6 8.9 25.5 8.6 0.0 78.3
1957 0.32 0.73 1.09 4.13 7.31 1 .09 1 .29 2.03 0.42 2.62 0.49 0.06 21.58 1957-58 o.a 0.0 T 3.9 3.0 0.8 0.9 12.0 14.4 14.1 0.0 0.0 57.1
1958 0.73 1.00 1.40 1.73 4.46 1.47 3.50 1.17 1.51 0.37 0.74 0.64 18.80 1958-59 a.a 0.0 T 2.6 9.7 7. 7 17.4 1 7.5 26.8 17.6 T 0.0 99.3
1959 1.24 1.31 2.85 1.35 3.33 0 .44 0.83 0.25 1.82 2.46 0.40 0.26 16.54 1959-60 a.a 0.0 12.9 11.8 5.3 2. 7 10.7 10.3 9.0 9.3 T 0.0 80.0
I960 0.77 1.66 0.89 2.56 2.27 0.63 1.31 0.06 0.38 2.46 0.49 1.50 14.90 1960-61 o.a o.a o.a 4.6 5.1 17.0 1.0 7.9 29.2 S.6 6.4 0.0 80.6
1961 0.07 0.66 2.51 1.06 4.12 1.11 1.60 1.21 4.67 0.77 0.93 0.30 19.01 1961-62 0.0 0.0 5.8 6.2 11.4 3.8 17.2 11.3 6.0 10.0 0.0 a.o 72.5
1962 1.33 1.05 0.52 1.10 0.04 1 .5? 0.54 0.46 0.19 0.05 0.68 0.17 0.45 1962-63 c.o 0.0 0.7 0.0 5.0 1.2 9.1 ?.l 18.0 0.2 0.0 0.0 36.3
1963 0.71 0.55 2.52 1.25 0.31 0.45 0.51 12.23 1963-64 0.0 a.o 0.0 1.1 3.5 5.9 2.6 12.7 18.4 12.1 1.0 0.0 57.3
1964 0.26 1.04 1.38 1 .25 2.53 0.82 0.72 0.27 0.41 0.18 0.88 0.40 10.14 1964-65 0.0 0.0 0.0 T 6.0 4. 4 13.2 17.1 14.9 0.3 T 0.0 55.9
1965 1.00 1.27 1.20 1.05 1.02 4.14 6.41 1.06 2.58 0.45 0.36 0.53 21.07 1965-66 0.0 0.0 5.5 c.o 5.5 5.6 3.6 14.6 2.8 6.4 2.9 0.0 46.9
1966 0.30 1.28 0.32 1.46 0.34 1 .41 1.Q4 2.06 1.15 0.96 0.32 0.17 10.81 1966-67 0.0 0.0 T 8.3 3.0 1. 9 9.9 *.4 6.6 3.6 3.0 0.0 40.7
1967 0.64 0.39 0.79 3.95 4.77 4.69 3.25 0.83 0.60 1.13 1.01 1.06 23.31 1967-68 0.0 0.0 a.o 1.7 9.4 13. 1 3.0 7.3 9.2 15.1 .0.0 58.8
1968 0.51 0.74 0.85 2.39 0.71 0.50 1.34 2.53 0.59 0.75 0.71 0.51 12.13 1968-69 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 5.0 6. 9 2.8 4.2 13.2 T 0.0 0.0 33.3
1969 0.17 0.43 1.10 1.33 6.12 2.99 1.61 0.79 1.67 4.17 0.62 0.32 21.52 1969-70 0.0 0.0 0.0 31.2 5.1 3. 1 0.9 0.3 20.5 4.7 0.0 65.6
1970 0.10 0.01 1.34 0.47 0.64 3.83 1.67 0.54 2.47 0.88 1.19 0.09 13.73 1970-71 0.0 0.0 4.6 5.9 9.2 0. 9 8.6 11.9 9.6 6.0 T 0.0 56.7
1971 0.35 0.78 0.53 1.98 1.34 0.23 1.20 0.05 2.85 0.44 0.16 0.25 10.96 1971-72 0.0 0.0 17.2 3.1 1.4 8.4 10.9 9.1 7.1 17.2 0.0 0.0 74.4
147? 0.36 0.44 0.50 3.52 0.49 2 .94 0.63 2.71 2.07 0.62 1.69 0.70 16.07 1972-73 0.0 0.0 0.0 9.7 19.4 9.8 12.1 3.0 15.1 24.0 1.0 0.0 94.9
1973 1.31 0.16 1.76 3.73 5.06 0.20 2.47 1.20 2.85 0.47 0.83 2.84 22.96 1973-74 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.3 9.3 30.8 8.2 10.3 12.6 17.0 0.0 T 91.5
1974 1.03 0.82 1.32 2.28 0.06 2.01 2.34 0.16 0.90 1.66 1.06 0.29 14.03 1974-75 0.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 11.9 2. 1 3.6 4.0 14.3 10.9 6.1 o.a 55.7
1475 0.23 0.37 1.19 1.14 2.00 2.11 2.78 2.00 0.24 0.30 1.08 0.47 15.51 1975-76 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.7 15.2 7. 3 3.2 6.4 10.7 1.2 0.0 0.0 54.7
1976 0.19 0.54 1.34 1.27 1.34 0.63 2.31 2.50 1.88 0.93 0.32 0.16 13.41 1976-77 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.2 4.5 3. 1 2.4 3.1 9.6 4.7 0.0 0.0 34.6
1477 0.16 0.27 1.24 2.13 0.34 2.98 1.00 0.10 0.48 0.59 0.03 10.34 1977-78 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.3 4.1 0. 7 S.S 6.2 8.6 *6 13.5 0.0 46.S
1470 0.27 0.27 1.07 1.82 3.46 1.17 0.54 0.26 0.07 l.S o.so 0.82 11.70 1970-79 0.0 0.0 T 2.7 6.9 1.2 9.1 3.0 10.2 8.1 8.2 0.0 T3.2
1474 0.34 0.4? 1.25 1.41 3.53 2.39 0.01 5.05 0.36 1.20 1.66 1.06 20.36 1979-00 0.0 0.0 a.o 2.7 22.3 16. 5 12.3 9.6 12.1 10.0 0.0 85.5
1980 0.64 0.45 1.15 2.54 2.73 0.09 2.93 1.65 0.63 0.10 0.66 0.10 13.67 1900-01 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.5 7.1 1.2 4.1 4.3 24.0 2.9 T 0.0 45.1
1401 0.29 0.35 2.27 1.01 3.76 0.63 0.90 1.16 0.35 0.79 0.42 0.66 12.59 1901-02 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.0 3.3 9. 9 4.0 1.8 2.1 2.0 T 0.0 26.7
1982 0.32 0.09 0.10 0.3* 3.40 2.26 0.97 1.16 1.30 1.51 0.47 2.34 14.45 1982-03 1.2
RCCORO
MEAN 0 4 7 0.57 1.11 1.98 2.42 1 .49 1.69 1.42 1.10 1.00 0.67 0.63 14.55 MEAN 0.0 0.0 1.6 3.6 7.0 7.0 7.9 7.5 12.8 9.1 1.6 59.1
# Indicates a station move or relocation of instruments. See Station Location table.
Record mean values above are means through the current year for the period beginning in 1872 for temperature and precipitation, 1935 for snowfall. Temperature and precipitation are from City Office locations through 1934. Heating degree days are from City Office locationa through June 1939. Snowfall if from City Office locations through Ji*\e 1934. Otherwise the data are from Airport locations.


Meteorological Data For The
Current Year
Station: OENVER, COLORAOO STAPLE TON INTERNATIONAL AR Standaid lima uwd: MOUNTAIN Latitude. j9* 6' H Longitudt: )oa 52 N Eievation (ground) : (22 ,et* *9m I9R2
t DATA CORRECTED AFTER PUBLICATION Of THE MONTHLY ISSUE.
# Winds under Fastest Mile heading are Fastest Observed 1-Minute winds with directions In compass points.
Normals, Means, And Extremes
NORMALS. MEANS. AND EXTREMES TABLE NOTE(S): 1. Extreme wind data is through 1981.
(a) Length of record, years, through the current year unless otherwise noted, based on January data.
(b) 70* and above at Alaskan stations.
* Less than one half.
T Trace.
NORMALS Based on record for the 1941-1970 period.
DATE OF AN EXTREME The most recent In cases of multiple occurrence.
PREVAILING WIND DIRECTION Record through 1963.
WIND DIRECTION Numerals Indicate tens of degrees clockwise from true north. 00 indicates calm.
FASTEST MILE MIND Speed Is fastest observed 1-mlnute value when the direction Is In tens of degrees.
Means and extremes above are from existing and comparable exposures. Annual extremes have been exceeded at other sites in the locality as follows:
TfBBegR ture j* CgclRltatlon
Highest: 105 in Aug. 1878. Maximum monthly : 8.57 in May 1876.
Minimum monthly : 0.00 in Dec. 1881. Maximum in 24 hours: 6.S3 in May 1876.
Wind Snowfal1
Fastest mile: 65 W in May 1933. Rajomum monthly : 57.4: in Dec. 1913.


ANNUAL WIND ROSE STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT DENVER, COLORADO
N


GEOPHYSICAL/GEOMORPHIC DATA
This site was formed through the evolutionary interaction between geomorphic ( p 1 atectonic ) upheaval that formed the Rocky Mountains and the processes that have since shaped this site (ie erosion and major episodic climatic changes). Major sedimentary deposits lie at the north portion of the site suggesting that and inland sea at one time shaped this region. A minor earthquake fault, the Golden Fault, lies through the center of the project and is mophically defined by the hogback running north and south through the site. This fault has no recently recorded activity' is understood to be geophysically inactive and as a result does not contribute toward an increase in the earthquake zone rating.
This site has many desirable features that are a result of the interaction of the community that exists and the topography. The most prominent topographic features that visually define the site are the hogback and consequential revine formed from the hogback to the base of Lookout Mountain. These prominent surface features combine to create a truely unique and beautiful site. Not only does the hogback provide for a visually interesting backdrop, but, it also performs an interesting funtion for this site. Since Highway 93 parallels the hogback and the hogback rises significantly higher than the highway (2) very important qualitative functions are created. First, the visual sight lines to the highway are blunted and, secondly (importantly), traffic noise is significantly reduced to the revine. Since the revine areas will contain the majority of the development this latter function mitigates a major site problem and provides for a qualitative enhancement which, generally can only be found in extremely rural areas. In other words, the major drawbacks of enhanced and facilities (ie low visual
high noise levels), are geomorphology of this site.
major transportation quality and extremly mitigated do to the


VEGETATION
The Glen Eagle Development Is located within a region classified as the "Grassland Lower Mountain Ecotone Region (MARR 1967), with ecosystem links to the Plains. However, visits to the site have revealed that past agricultural use and recent adjacent development have left little trace of undistubed land. A few vegetative species that were inventoried are:
Common Name
Arnica
Aster
Barley
Big Bluestem Canadian Thistle Cheat Grass Dandelion Fringed Sage Prairie Clover Prickly pear cactus Sage Sedge
Skunk Brush Smooth Brome Yucca
Spike Rush Vetch
Wax Currant Western Wheatgrass Wheat
Wooly Loco
Botanic name
Arnica spp.
Aster spp.
Hordeum vulgare Andropogon Cirsium arvense Bromus tectorum Traxacum officinale Salvia spp.
Trifolium pratense Sporobolus cryptandrus Artemesia tridentata Cares spp.
Ruhs trilobbata Bromo inermis Yucca glauca Eleocharis spp.
Vicia sativa Ribes creum Agropyron smithii Tritium aestivum Astragalus mollossimus
* All scientific nomemclature from Weber (1972)


WILDLIFE
The variety of wildlife inhabiting any area is directly related to the amount, types and varieties of vegetation and the nature of the habitat present. Each species has its own qualitative as well as quantitative requirements for food, water, terrritory and habitat. This site provides a number of different species with habitat suitable to each. Although, not prime undisturbed habitat, many species have been noted on-site. Few non avian species now inhabit this area, however, the following species have been observed at this site:
AVIAN
Common name
Scientific name
Chipping Sparrow Barn Owl Horned Lark Magpie
Morning Dove Purple Martin Red-winged Blackbird Red-tailed Hawk Robin Swa11ow
Western Meadowlark
Tachyineta thalissina Sternella neglecta
Eremophilia alpestris Pica pica Aenaidur macroura Progne subis
Geliaus phoeniceus Buteo jamaicensis Turdus migratorius
Spizella passerina Tyto alba
SMALL MAMMALS
Common name
Scientific name
Masked shrew Deer Mouse
Meadow Jumping Mouse Prairie Vole Striped Skunk Western Harvest Mouse Jack Rabbit Wood rat
Sorex cinerfeue Peromyscus maniclatus Zapus hudsonicus Microtus ochrogaster Mephitis mephetis Reithrodonomys megalotis
Lepus townsedii Neotoma cincera


LARGE MAMMALS
Common name
Scient if ic name
Coyote Mule Deer
Canis latrans Odocoileus hemiomus
REPTILIAN
Common name
Scientific name
Bull snake
Prarie Rattle Snake
Western Garter Snake
Thamnophis elegans
Pitoupus melanleuscus
This site maintains a healthy and varied species population. Some of the habitat for these species will be destroyed and altered by the development. A desired objective will be to limit the scope of disruption whenever possible, leaving as many areas undisturbed and integrating the human population into the existing ecosystem as carefully and deftly as is possible.
COMMUNITY
The city of Golden will most directly influence the Gleneagle development. Proposed and existing developments that are proximate and that will influence this development are surrounding residential, office and commercial developments. A brief listing follows:
Interplaza West Energy Park Heritage Dells Heritage Squa re Parf et
The Wall Co.
Golden Ridge Condominiums Kinney Run Condominiums Brown Pa s cha11 Victorio
Interstate Denver West


SITE ESTHETICS
As mentioned previously this site contains many visually exciting aspects. Rock outcroppings, steep revines, gently rolling hills leading to the rather abrupt Lookout Mountain region, are but a few of the notable visual elements contained at this site. The varied terrain forms a most interesting visual pallet. Excellent views abound, with the most notable lieing orth along the Foothills toward Boulder and ast overlooking downtown Denver. The Southern views are restricted do to the nature of the site, although this turns out to be a favorable feature mitigating perhaps the worst view toward the adjacent single family development Hetitage Dells.
Recommendations
Every attempt must be made to preserve and if possible enhance, the natural beauty of this site. Views are many and should be capitalized upon. There are many natural elements that might be used to integrate the various subdevelopments within this site. The very nature of this location demands a subtle, yet deft and experienced design solution.


SITE CONDITIONS
Traffic:
Bordered by Highways 93 and 6 the Gleneagle site will be greatly impacted by the traffic patterns and volume of these two major arterials. Ingress and egress will only occur from Highway 93. Emergency access will be allowed from Highway 6. See chart (1) for a graphical presentation of a report conducted by Robert W. Felsberg of PRC Voorhees, which addresses overall traffic patterns and systems.
Critical design criteria are:
i) Excessive slope conditions
ii). Egress and ingress
iii). Adjacent traffic volume and patterns
iv). Views
v). Areas of prime open space vi ) Flood plain vii). The trail system link.
Entire development traffic system will be dedicated to The City of Golden, for Public maintenance, after completion.
Flood Plain:
Floods in this area are the result of intense short duration storm systems. Flash flooding could occur on this site and the Army Corp of Engineers has identified the (100) year flood plain.


TABLE |
ESTIMATED TBAfriC 6 EMULATION
Area hand Use Sira Dally Trip Generation Rate Dally Vehicle Trip* P.M. Peak Hour Trafllc
to* Out - Total
Village Center Curaerclal 18,000 a.f. 60/1000 a.f. 2,280 117 117 274
Village Point 01 lice 112,100 a.r. 12.1/1000 a.f. 1.181 18 212 210
Soul li VIII ace Mult l-Famlly Ri.-sldrntl.il 27 d.u. 1.1/d.u. 1.430 98 4! 140
Hidden VIIIsire Multt-Famt1y Kentdent f*il 101 d.u. 1. 1 /-i.U. IIS 16 16 12
Village Clon Multi Family Residential 14 d.u. 1. 1 Al a U. 271 20 8 28
1111 Itilde Single-Family Residential R6 d.u. O.OAl.u. 660 60 H
lake VIIInge Mult l-F.iml ly Re 11 dent l.tl 82 d.u. 1.1/d.u. 420 Z'l o_ ..
Total 7.111 41H .V.
y Sourcei Trip Generation. Inntltutc of TraonportatInn Engineers, Revised 1*79, unlcn oihervUc noted.
11 T.M. Peak Hour as t of Dally Traffic: Conrercl.il I2t
Office I6Z
Residential IOZ
F.M. Fcak Hour Directional AsairiptIons: . In Out
Comaerrlal soz SOZ
**. Office 1ST 81Z
Residential 70Z 10Z
y Aaaimca that approximately one-half of the vehl-lo trips associated with this smalt chopping area are generated internally by the residential unltu or the adjacent office space.


Utilities :
Water
Water will be provided by the City of Golden, subject to the following* Requirments of Title 13, Golden Revised Ordinances of 1965, as amendeded, and including but not limited to, design criteria. EQR fees, and capital construction costs, and other cost responsibilities.
Sewe r:
Sewer will also be provided by The City of Golden subject to the preceding definitions.
Electrical/Gas:
Will provided by the Public Service Company of Colorado, through easement rights granted.
Site Lighting-
Basic areas that require lighting in this development are:
i. Streets collectors and arterials
ii. Cluster entries/drives
iii. Individual entries/waIks
iv. Open space
Given the predetermined linear road scheme, general illumination would require the use of fixtures placed at intervals allowing for proper and safe night time illumination along major collectors and subcollectors. Generally, garage unit and/or wall hung fixtures will not provide the necessary illumination required at this low density- requiring the use of pole or pedestal mounted units along the roadways. It is important to reduce the shadow areas and/or the higher than normal levels of illumination in major radius or other points along the routes that will require negotiating at a higher level.


Amenities:
The Gleneagle P.U.D. has integrated within its bounds an extensive group of amnenities. They include
i). A pedestrian trail sytem linkage with the existing Jefferson County Open-space Trail system will be constructed and dedicated to The City of Golden. (4.23 acres).
ii). A clubhouse/pool area.
iii). The construction of an on-site lake.
iv). A mini-park (.67 acres).
v). The retention of large contiguous areas of open-space.
vi). School (5.0) acres.


Occupants


OCCUPANTS
Occupant Profile:
A recent market study for the area has revealed that the projected Clusterhome buyer is most likely to be a member of one or more of the following groups:
Empty nesters:
These families are identified as couples that have no children living at home. Frequently these family groups are (35) years or older, have one professional still active in his/her profession. There are generally (2) people per household in these families.
Adult families
These families are identified as couples that have one or more children still liviong at home. Heads of these households are also generally (35) years or older. Typically, there are (2-4) people per hosehold.
Professional families:
These family groups are identified as couples comprised of one or two professionals that have no children at home. Heads of these households are generally (25-35) years old.


Recomendations
Safety/Security:
Clearly, of primary concern is the matter of safety. Of paramount concern then is that all design and constructed elements work in a unified manner toward this goal. Second in importance to the homeowner would be the matter of security. Each individual and the community as a whole must share in a real, definable sense of security. The design of the entry areas and of each individual home must provide for this sense of a secure and safe home.
Identity/Character
Each homeowner will demand that his/her home have an individual identity and/or character. Often times, this need contrasts sharply with the desire of all to live in a community that also has a "sense of community". Generally, it has been acceptable in Architectural terms to acheive this "sense of community" by through the use of cohesive design elements forged into a solid and unified whole, with some obvious sacrifice toward the individuality of each member.
Individual/Community
Each homeowner will desire privacy at times and also will wish to not be private at times. These mutually exclusive events should be taken into account for designed into each individual home, each individual cluster and the community as a whole. Privacy can be broken down into two types: intra-househoId, within the individual household, and intro-household privacy, privacy from others within the community. The design solution should take into account this need and should provide for those times when an individual desires to be private and/or have privacy, (privacy both within and outside of the home) and yet provide for those times and opportunities when an individual wishes to interact with others.


COMMUNITY LAYOUT
General:
The Gleneagle master plan calls for the following interrelated uses throughout the development. I have briefly listed the various parcels, their proposed uses, design guidelines, and other pertinent design parameters for thae proposed development to allow the reader a more comprehensive evaluation of the nature and scope of the total development. Again, my thesis will deal only with a portion of the total development called: "HIDDEN VILLAGE".
i). VILLAGE POINT
Intent/Character: Provide small, residential
scale office facilities as a transitional zone and to complement to adjacent off-site office/commercial development.
Pe rmi tted uses 1
Business and professional offices, medical and dental clinics, reasearch and design facilities, restrauant facilities serving food and/or fermented beverages indooors and outdoors.
ii). VILLAGE CENTER
Intent/Character : Provide retail service to the immediate areas.
Permitted uses- Retail specialty shops, not to exceed 2500 sq.ft..


iii). SOUTH VILLAGE
Permitted uses: Multi-family residential
Density units per acre- (12)
Maximum units per bldg.: (12)
Total acreage (19.58)
Total number of units: ( 235)
Minimum separation1 (25')
Parking spaces per unit: (2.5)
Maximum building height: (35')
Maximum building coverage-Floor area ratio: FAR (45%)
Open space ratio: OSR (72%)
Livability space ratio' LSR (42%)
Required recreational coverage: RSR (6%)
iv). VILLAGE GLEN
Permitted uses: Multi-family residential
Density units per acre: (8)
Maximum units per bldg.: (45)
Total acreage: (5.65)
Total number of units: (45)
Minimum separation: (15')
Parking spaces per unit (2.5)
Maximum building height: (35')
Maximum building coverage: Floor area ratio1 FAR (26%)
Open space ratio OSR (74%)
Livability space ratio: LSR (48%)
Required recreational coverage: RSR (3%)


v). LAKE VILLAGE
Permitted uses: Multi-family residential
Density: units per acre: Maximum units per bldg: Total acreage Total number of units Minimum separation: Parking: spaces per unit Maximum building height: Maximum building coverage' Floor area ratio:
Open space ratio: Livability space ratio:
FAR
OSR
LSR
Required Recreational coverage: RSR
(7)
(8)
(12.1)
(85)
(20')
(3)
(35')
(32%)
(73%)
(46%)
(5%)
vii). HIDDEN VILLAGE
Permitted uses: Single family attached (cluster homes)
Density units per acre (6)
Maximum units per building (3)
Total acreage (17.5)
Total number of units (105)
Minimum separation: (20')
Parking spaces per unit (3)
Maximum building height: (35')
Maximum building coverage: Floor area ratio: FAR (35%)
Open space artio: OSR (73%)
Livability space ratio LSR (45%)
Maximum Recreational Coverage1 RSR (4%)
vi). HILLSIDE
Permitted uses- Single family detached Density: units per acre- (3)
Total acreage: (20.2)
Minimum lot size: sq. footage: (9000-12000)
Minimum setback See construction envelope


ZONING REQUIREMENTS
A P U.D.approval was granted by the City of Golden on the Gleneagle Community provided that the preceding development guidelines be adhered to and followed.
Clearly the proposed Gleneagle Community Development is an example of a fully developed and integrated community. This integration occurs'at many levels and represents an exhaustive analysis of many interrelated and many seemingly unrelated functions, yielding the proposed Gleneagle Community Master Plan as submitted and accepted.
BUILDING GROUP LAYOUT
General
A maximum of three individual units per building will be allowed on this site. Each unit will need parking for (2.5) autos. Each unit should have vehicular accessibilty and individual driveways would be desirable. Additional guest- parking proximate to the home is neeed. Each unit should have a private, separate entrance and exit. Each unit should have a private exterior space, contiguous with the home.
INDIVIDUAL LAYOUT General
Each unit should have an integrated, efficient floor plan. A floor plan that can be lived _i n and not "lived around". Each home should be energy sensitive, and utilize energy in and efficient manner. Each home should reflect and be integrated into the surrounding site and community. Each unit should have approximately (1800) sq. feet of living space and have the following rooms:


Living room1 Family room Kitchen
Bedrooms: (2-4) including a master bedroom
Baths- (2-3) including one adjacent to the master bath
Adequate storage and closet space A garage (detached or attached)


LI







CODE EXAMINATION AND DISCUSSION
The City of Golden maintains a close inspection program of all construction within their jurisdiction. They attempt to enforce compliance to their respective code laws and regulations. Central to the building code ordinances is the 1982 edition of the Uniform Building Code. Principal requirements deal with safety size, heat ventilation and facilities Following is a brief listing of the various codes utilized in Golden.
General/Structural
The City of Golden uses the 1982 Uniform Building Code as their general construction code guideline. Specific amendments are contained and outlined in the stautory ordinance no. 916 adopted April 7, 1983.
Plumbing
The City of Golden uses the 1982 Uniform Plumbing code as amended by ordinance no. 916. as published by the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials.
Electrical
The City of Golden uses the 1981 National Electric Code as amended by ordinance no. 916 as published by the National Fire Protection Association.
Mechanical
The City of Golden uses the 1982 Uniform Mechanical Code as amended by ordinace no. 916. as published by the International Conference of Building Officials
Grading
The City of Golden uses Appendix (70) of the 1982 Uniform Building Code as amended by ordinance no. 916.


LIGHT, VENTILATION AND SANITATION
Light
Natural light shall be provided for all habitable rooms through one or more windows skylights or any combination that face legal open spaces that have a total of ten (10) sq. feet of opening. The amount of light must equal what would pass through clear glass equal in area to (10%) of the floor area of that room. Kitchen light may be in the form of artificial light.
Ventilation:
All habitable areas, except kitchens shall be provided with ventilation in either of the following manners
Natural ventilation through operable windows or other openings in exterior walls- roof through
operable parts of skylights ventilation area equal to twentieth of the total habitable space and at least of operable area.
providing not less floor area of five (5) square
total clear than one-each feet


Mechanical can be used if the equipment and/or system devised provides at least two air changes per hour either of outdoor air. or a mixture of outdoor and recirculated air.
Kitchens shall be provided with natural and/or mechanical ventilation exhausting not less than one hundred and fifty (150) cfm directly to the exterior.
Location in Respect to Grade^ Level:
Floor level of habitable space shall be not more than four (4) feet below the average adjoining finished grade. No habitable space shall be located in cellars except that below-grade space is permitted as habitable space where in conforminty with the following conditions:
1. The grade adjoining one exterior wall for the entire width of the habitable space is at or lower than the floor level of the habitable space
2. The depth is not more than four (4) times the height and
3. Such space conforms to all other requirements for habitable space.
ROOM SIZE
Habitable Rooms
A dwelling unit shall contain at least one habitable space which shall have a minimum floor area of one hundred fifty (150) square feet with a minimum horizontal dimensions of ten (10) feet. Other habitable spaces except kitchen, shall have a minimum floor area of eighty (80) square feet with a minimum horizontal dimension of seven (7) feet.


Habitable space shall have a minimum height of seven (7) feet, six (6) inches except that for habitable space under a sloping roof the minimum height in at least fifty (50) percent of the floor area shall be seven (7) feet six (6) inches and the area where the height is less than five (5) feet shall not be considered in computing required floor area.
Where exposed beams project below the ceiling of habitable space, and such beams occupy an area of five (5) percent or more of-the area of the ceiling- the height of the space shall be measured from finished floor to the underside of the beams; where the ration is less that five (5) percent-the height shall be measured to the ceiling and the height to the underside of beams shall be not less than seven (7) feet.
Nonhabitable rooms
General
Nonhabitable space shall be provided with light and ventilation adequate for the intended use of each space. Bathrooms and toilet rooms shall have provisions for privacy.
Bathrooms toilet rooms kitchenettes corridors and recreation rooms shall have a minimum height of seven (7) f eet.
Light
Kitchenettes bathrooms, and toilet rooms shall be provided with light of sufficient intensity and so distributed as to permit the maintenance of sanitary conditions and the safe use of the space and the appliances, equipment, and fixtures.
Ventilation
Kitchenettes bathrooms and toilet rooms shall be provided with ventilation in accordance with either of the following1
Natural ventilation as set forth in section A 2002-21. except that such openable areas shall be not less than one and one-half (1 1/2) square feet for bathrooms or toilet rooms and not less that three (3) square feet for kitchenettes or


Mechanical ventilation exhausting not less than twenty five (25) c f in for bathrooms and toilet rooms and not less than one hundred and fifty (150) cfm for kitchenettes. Ventilation for bathrooms and toilet rooms may be by means of wind-driven or gravity-operated devices or by mechanical equipment.
STAIRS
General
Stairs, both interior and exterior, shall be arranged and constructed to provide safe ascent and descent. A fixed stair shall be provided where travel is required between two stories, each of which contains a habitable space or a recreation room, and between the first story and basement of cellar.
Disappearing or folding stairs may be used between an above-grade story and an attic without a habitable space or recreation room.
Treads
Minimum widths of treads shall be nine (9) inches, plus one and one-eighth (1 1/8) inch nosing or
closed riser type, or nine (9) inches for open riser type, except that treads fo folding or disappearing stairs intended for occasional use only shall have a minimum width of six (6) inches.
Winder treads at converging ends of winders, exclusive of minimum (1) inch nosings, shall be not less than four (4) inches wide unless the winders are guarded at the converging ends by continuous handrails which prevent walking where the tread widths are less than six (6) inches. If the winder treads are without a minimum one (1) inch nosing, the treads in these locations shall be not less than five (5) inches and seven (7) inches, respectively.
Winder tread widths at a distance of eighteen (18) inches from the converging ends shall be not less than the tread widths as set forth in paragraph a of this section.


Treads shall be level and all other than winder treads shall be uniform in width with no variation exceeding one-eighth (1/8) inch in any one run of stairs.
Risers
Maximum height of risers shall be eight and one-quarter (8 1/4) inches except that the maximum
height of risers of folding or d i sapperari ng staris exterior stairs to basements or cellars and of other stairs intended ofr accasional use only shall be nine (9) inches
There shall be no variation exceeding one-eighth (1/8) inch in the height of risers in any one run of stairs.
Width
Widths of stairs connecting habitable space shall be not less than two (2) feet eight (8) inches clear between handrails or between hand rail and opposite wall surface except that stairs from a second story to third story and stairs to a basement and to a cellar shall not be less than two (2) feet six (6) inches clear between handrails or between handrail and opposite wall surface.
Headroom
The minimum clear headroom over any portion of any fixed stair tread shall be not less than six (6) feet six (6) inches measured vertically from the surface of the tread excerpt that the minimum shall be not less than six (6) feet four (4) inches over stairs from a second story to a third story and over stairs to a basement or to a cellar.
a


Handrails and Railings
Stairs or steps of more than three risers shall have a handrail or railing parallel to the stair slope on at least one side Where one or both sides of such stairs or steps are open railings shall be provided on open sides
Window openings on stairs or landings and well openings shall be guarded by railings or other equivalent protection.
Landings platforms and porches more than eighteen (18) inches above the adjacent floor or grade level shall be provided with railings on the open sides except where openings are required for access
Top surfaces of handrails and railings shall be not less than thirty (30) inches nor more than thrity-six (36) inches in height above the floor or tread level. On stair runs the height shall be measured directly above the riser face. Clearance between handrail and supporting w a 11 shall not be less than one and one half (1 1/2)
inches.


EXITS
General Requirements^
Exit stairways may serve in common two dwelling units as set forth in section A 402-3.4.
In addition to the primary exit from a recreation room or a habitable space except kitchens there shall be provided in each such space at least one opening for emergency use.
Openings for Emergency Use:
Openings for emergency use shall include doors or openable parts of windows located so as to provide unobstructed egress to legal open spaces.
Such openings shall not impede egress in an emergency, shall have a minimum area of four (4) square feet, with a minimum dimension of eighteen (18) inches with bottom of openings no higher than three (3) feet six (6) inches above finished floor in all above-grade stories and no higher than four (4) feet six (6) inches where required in basement and cellar.
Width of_ Interior Exist Stairs:
Interior exit stairs in dwellings more than two stories in height shall be at least three (3) feet wide and in all other respects shall comply with section A-205.
DESIGN LOADS
General Requirements^
A building and all part thereof shall be of sufficient strength to support the design loads and to resist the deformations caused by such loads to which they may be subjected without exceeding the allowable stresses as described in section A-305. Such loads shall include the dead load and the following imposed loads where applicable- live, snow, wind soil pressure including surcharge, hydrostatic head and impact loads.


Live Loads:
General
Loads set forth in table A 304-2.2 do not include unusual concentrations such as but not limited to, storage units floor-to-ceiling bookracks, and elevator machine loads. Where such loads occur, suitable provisions shall be make for their support.
Where such unusual concentrations do not occur, structural members, and flooring spanning between the supporting structural members, shall be designed to suppo-rt the uniformly distributed loads or the concentrated loads set forth in table A 304-2.2, whichever produce the greater stress.
Uniformly distributed live loads on beams or girders when such structural member supports one hundred and fifty (150) square feet or more of roof area or floor area per floor, may be reduced as f ollows:
When the dead load is not more than twenty five (25) psf. the reduction shall be not more than twenty (20) percent.
When the dead load exceeds twenty five (25) psf and the live load does not exceed one hundred (100) psf the reduction shall be not more than the least of the following three criteria
60 percent
0.08 percent for each square foot of area s uppor ted
100 percent times (dead load psf plus live load psf) divided by (4.33 times live load psf).
For columns, girders supporting columns, bearing walls, and foundation walls supporting one hundred and fifty (150) square feet or more of roof area or floor area per floor the uniformly distributed live loads on these members shall be not less than the following percentages of the total live loads on the following levels.


80 percent of the roof
80 percent on the floor immediately below the roof
75 percent on the third floor below the roof
70 percent on the fourth floor below the roof
Uniformly Distributed and Concentrated Live Loads:
Uniformly distributed and concentrated live loads shall be the greatest loads induced by the intended occupancy and use but in no case less than the minimum live load in conformity with table A 304-2.2. Where a concentrated load is not given load shall be at least two hundred and fifty (250) pounds on area one (1) inch in diameter two hundred (200) pounds on an area one
(1) inch in diameter two thousand (2000) pounds on an area thirty (30) inches square.
Party walls shall be made smoketight at their junction with exterior walls and the exterior wall shall be protected with noncombustible construction for a distance of at least eighteen (18) inches on each side of the party wall. In lieu of such protection at the end of party walls in type five (5) construction the party wall shall project through the exterior wall at least six (6) inches.
Where combustible members, such as joists and beams are framed into party walls such combustible material below and at the sides and ends of such members shall be made fire resistant.
Fire Resi£tantj_
The fire-resistance rating of pary walls between one-story one- and two-family dwellings without a basement shall be at least one (1) hour.
The fire-resistance ratings of party walls between one and two-family dwellings shall be at least two
(2) hours except as set forth in paragraph A of this section.
The fire-resistance ratings of party walls between one and two-family dwellings and buildings containing nonresidentia 1 occupancies of low. moderate or high hazard classification shall be at least 2, 3 or 4 hours respectively.


ENERGY REQUIREMENTS
General
I will attempt to provide a highly insulated, energy efficient building. Solar applications will, howerver, be limited to passive devices and/or methods. Daylighting design formats will be incorporated into this design to provide (35 50%) of the necessary lighting requirments necessary .
All buildings shall comply with the requirements of the Code for Energy Conservation In New Building Construction published by the International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO), the Southern Building Code Congress I n t e rnationa1 (SBCCI), Building Officials and Code Administrators International (BOCA), National Conference of States on Building Codes and Standards, Inc. (NCSBCS).


Solution


SOLUTION
The design solution follows. Specific design criteria answered include, but are not limited to the following items
Safety
Sense of Community Sense of Individuality Buyer Profile Site Limitations Environmental Concerns Topographic Limitations Code and Zoning Requirements Life Cycle Costs
Long Term Landscaping Requirements
Privacy
Public Space
Automobile Egress and Ingress Fire Safety
Historic Expression of Residential Architecture
Many compromises were necessitated by physical site constraints, (ie road placement drainage swales). However, a successful solution was arrived at through the integration of the preceding variety of design elements and criteria. The topography was successfully utilized with a minimum amount of surface excavation and is expressed and used as a design element for this solution. The "village" concept is dramatically emhanced and reflected in this solution through the use of the minimimally distururbed surface topography.
The twenty four (24) foot building element used throughout, also contributes toward this more human-scaled residential development. This module structurally allows for the adaptation of each individual unit to each individual site, (a primary design goal). Each individual module is functionally represented in each residential unit; each time in a new plan arrangement. This module not only reflects the historomorhic relationships evidenced in older "real" villages, but the use of this module greatly aided the village concept in this new residential development and further strenghtened the design solution.
Four floor plan arrangements were designed, each reflecting a particular buyer profile. Again, each plan was to be individually "sited" refecting the buyers options, views, energy requirements and concerns. and the site purchased. This


optimization of the buyer, his/her needs, wants and specific site determinates greatly enhances the variety of each individual residential unit as well as the community in general.
Material choices of stone exteriors, slate roofs, glue laminate beams and hard wood flooring should greatly reduce the life cycle costs of this development. Collectively, construction materials also impact and contribute toward the "village" design concept.
Landscaping was to be left in a natural, (lower maintenance) mode in all areas of th site except the enclosed (stone wall enclosures) front courtyards. This design element should also aid in the reduction of the community lifecycle costs, as well as contribute dramatically toward a visual integration of the community and terrain, again a primary design goal.


Highway 93
L
ViHaoe.Cente- t
ooatbyniag;
Highway 6

Development Plan
North

Vicinity Map
A
Site



Plan D
Entry Details
Plan-C
Conceptual Only


Plan A
Isometric


Plan B
scale 1/8 :1'
Section B-B

Isometric




Plan D
Isometric


2x10 wood rafters
Wall Section
10* batt insulation rooting slate
wood sleepers/sheathmg
6 mil vapor barrier S 1/2* batt insulation 2* ridgid msulatio, brlcn nwoi air space 2x6 stud
insulated joist space 2x10 floor joust
vapor barrier
batt insulation (crawl space) 2 ndgid Insulation c.i.p. concrete insulation
Details.
Section (finish detail)






ograpny


ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
Design for L Th£ Resident s View o^f Mu 11 -
Family Housing, Becker. Franklin D. 1978 Harper & Row, Ithicaa NY. Research centering on how satisfied tenents and owners were with size, arrangements, materials, and other physical factors reflected in their multi-family residences.
Income Housing in the Suburbs An Analysis for the Da_y_tojnx Ohij> Rp.g.ip.1! Guen, Nina and Claude, Praeger Publishers, NY, New York, 1972. Research performed in Dayton, Ohio investigating the interrelationship between low income housing and moderate income housing. This text details tradeoffs that would effectively integrate the two seemingly different types of housing.
T^h£ J o_y_ o_f_ ^u^ldi^nj' Res po _r g t_h£ Conn e c t ij)n
Between Architects and Builders, Wilson, Forrest, Litton Education Publishing, Inc. NY, New York, 1979. An examination of the modern relationship between Builder and Designer. This is a philosophic examination of the designer in America today, how we historically got here, where we are going and how we might mend this schism between builder/designer.
Building Design for Energy E c onomy The Ove Arup Partnership, The Construction Press, 1980. Good technical text on energy, it's use and misuse in construction today.
Underground Buildings Wells. Malcolm, Brick House Publishing Co., Andover, Mass., 1977. Underground houses examined. This book has a lot of nice diagrams and pictures as well as some interesting and basic text.


New Danish Architecture Faber, Tobias, Fredrick A. Praeger, Publishers, New York-Washington, 1968.
Wonderful picture/idea book on contemporary Danish Architecture, residential, commercial and industrial.
W £ t_h o ut Arc li £_t £c ££ Rudofsky, Bernard, Museum of Modern Art, N.Y., New York, 1964. Great picture book on historic Architecture designed and constructed without Architects, (as we know them today).
M.5£s. Architects Live £n Plumb Barbara, The Viking Press, New York, 1977. Color pictures and some rather esoteric- material combined in one text. Reasonable idea book.
Inside Today s Home Faulkner, Ray and Sarah, Holt, Reinhardt and Winston, New York, 1975., A good book detailng most aspects of residential interior design. Basic principals as well as some history. Many black and white photos.
Taos Ac[ob£ Spanish Colonial and T£££_i _t £_r ££_1 A £ £h i _t£ £ t u ££ Housing £ h e F ami^ly Great Britain Dept, of the Environment, Cahners Books, Boston Mass., 1974. A through examination of layouts needed in the residential environment. Very basic and extremely pragmatic. Covers space requirments for everything from children's play to parking a car in a garage. Great text.
£££££ D£awing, Doyle, Michael, Van Nos tt rand Reinhold Co. New York, 1981. Wonderful book on the basics of how to color renderings. Very specific and pragmatic. Great text, wonderful drawings and a delight to use.


Design Drawing Experiences, Lockard. William, Pepper Publishing, Tucson, Arizona, 1976. Good introductory text as wellas something I continually go back to for the basics that we all forget. Covers many aspects of drawing from line weight to perspective construction in an easily digested format.
New Techniques of Architectural Rend ering Second Edition, Jacoby, Helmut. Van Nostrand Reinhold Co.
New York, 1981.
£f £a_rm a__n£ Vi__ll.a_
A r £h£ t ££_t u ££ Loudon, J.C., Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, Green, London. England. 1863. This is a delightful text filled with old english prose detailing in a very specific manner farm, cottage and villa architecture. It is worth reading just to view the over (2,000) engravings present. It is also, clearly, the definitive text on the evolution of farm architecture in England.
English Cottages and Farmhouses, Cooke, Olive, Thames and Hudson, London, England, 1982. This book is filled with wonderful photos of EEnglish rural architecture. The photos detail many specific construction aspects of that type of architecture with a very poetic view. Text is difficult and laboriuos to read but is worth the effort.
P_r£e£i Architecture ^39, Murotani, Bunji, 1983. Process Architecture Publishing Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan. Modern Mexican Architecture at it's best. Great photos worth the wait to get.