Citation
University of Colorado recreation complex

Material Information

Title:
University of Colorado recreation complex
Creator:
Wait, Doborah Lynn
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
80, [7] leaves : charts, forms, maps, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Recreation centers -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Boulder ( lcsh )
Leisure ( lcsh )
Buildings ( fast )
Leisure ( fast )
Recreation centers ( fast )
Colorado -- Boulder ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 79-80).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Deborah Lynn Wait.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
13279316 ( OCLC )
ocm13279316
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1985 .W337 ( lcc )

Full Text
(/>AJT

)


UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO RECREATION COMPLEX
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture
DEBORAH LYNN WAIT
Fall 1985


The Thesis of Deborah Lynn Wait is approved.
University of Colorado at Denver Fall 1985


TO MARK


PROJECT DESCRIPTION
TYPE: UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO RECREATION COMPLEX
LOCATION: BOULDER, COLORADO
SIZE: 50,950 SQUARE FEET
OWNER: UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
USES: DAYCARE
RESTAURANT
READING & STUDY ROOM SENIORS' MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM CERAMICS POOL
RACKETBALL
GYMNASIUM
AMPHITHEATRE


TABLE OF CONTENTS
X. INTRODUCTION
HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE OF LEISURE AND RECREATION
LEISURE IN AMERICA
THESIS AND ISSUES
II. SITE ANALYSIS MACRO-ENVIRONMENT MICRO-ENVIRONMENT SITE DESCRIPTION SITE PHOTOGRAPHS CONTEXT ACCESS
PHYSICAL FEATURES
DRAINAGE, FLOOD POTENTIAL, AND RUNOFF UTILITIES
II
I.
SOILS REPORT
1-16
17-25
26-32
IV. CLIMATE ANALYSIS 36-43
SUMMARY
PRECIPITATION INFORMATION WIND DATE SOLAR ACCESS


V. ZONING 44
VI. CODES 45-55
VII. SPACE CHARACTERISTICS 56-78
SUMMARY OF SPACES SPACE CHARACTERISTICS
VIII. REFERENCES 79-80


Historical Perspective of Leisure and Recreation
Primitive man did not conceive of work and leisure
as two distinct categories. Day was not separated into
periods of work and rest as in our industrial society. When
work was required, all participated for the requisite period
of time. Extended leisure followed.
To every member of the community falls his share of labor and play, his opportunity for participation in the important rites and mysteries; the orientation of life is physiologically and socially toward long periods of leisurely work, interspersed with occasional periods of intensive effort.1
Furthermore, work in primitive society was varied and creative rather than narrowly specialized as in much of modern industry. The infusion of rites and customs into daily labor lent it an air of celebration and lessened the distinction between pleasure and the practical.
Play activities, on the other hand, were not separated from daily societal duties. Play took the form of religious ritual, education of the young, or it was a source of tribal communication and cohesiveness.^
The fusion of work and play worked well in a society whose primary goal was survival. As human societies became more complex, the two elements became polarized. It is in the Mediterranean region where Western civilization began that the first examples of leisure and recreation can be found.


2
The concept of leisure came to being in ancient Athens. The word leisure stems from the Latin licere, meaning "to be permitted." The etymology of the term shows quite literally that leisure means freedom of action. Athens' slave-supported democracy made leisure possible as the opportunity was now available for a certain class to devote its time to activities other than those needed for survival. The Greek philosophers created a leisure ideal based not on material consumption but on the pursuit of spiritual and intellectual enlightenment. Aristotle in particular stressed the value of schole, the Greek equivalent of leisure.^ The Aristotelian ideal was that man's time should primarily be spent in self-discovery and the development of true spiritual and intellectual freedom. In fact, the common Greek term for work was ascholia, or the absence of leisure. it is significant to note that Greeks defined work as non-leisure, whereas we do the opposite, defining leisure as non-work. In Athens, leisure was primary and work derivative; with us it is the other way around.
It could be said that if the Greeks conceived of leisure, the Romans invented recreation. Theirs was the first society to manifest the expansionist work ethic that culminated 2000 years later in the industrial West. The dominant values of Roman society included power, productivity, growth, and hard work. A Roman Senator, Cato the Elder, admonished Roman farmers:


3
When it rains, look for something to be done indoors.
Do not lie around, but clean up, for cessation of work is not accompanied by a cessation of expenses ^
Leisure to the Romans (and later to our ancestors the Puritans) primarily meant rest from work.
The term recreation stems from the Latin recreatio, meaning "restoration" or "recovery." The word's etymology therefore implies the replenishment of bodily energy expended on work, literally the re-creation of energy. Through this definition comes the first anticipation of the modern concept of recreation. Unlike leisure, recreation connotes a set of activities in which many disparate people may participate, not merely the members of a leisure class or philosophical elite. Because the structure of Roman society was not unlike ours, it is there that mass recreation first became a possibility. Unfortunately, the prevalent forms of recreation were oriented to sensual, gaudy forms of entertainment. The vicarious enjoyment of bloodshed and brutality was in total contrast to the intellectual pursuits and concept of fair play espoused by the Greeks. As Thomas Kando writes,
The vulgarity of Roman recreation has often been deplored and contrasted with the nobility of the preceding Greek civilization, where people often engaged in active, fair, competitive sports. Mass leisure, today so often indicted for its appeal to the basest human impulses and for its unedifying character, first became a reality in ancient Rome.
The modern concept of recreation did not develop
directly from the Roman tradition. It first passed through


4
its own Dark Age, which did not correspond to the Dark Ages of history. Whereas medieval society merely abandoned the extravagance and brutality of Roman mass recreation, nineteenth century industrialized society saw the disappearance of recreation for the working classes in any societal form. The force of economic expansionism imposed subhuman living and working conditions on most of the population. Conditions in North America were somewhat better than those in Europe due to an abundance of space and natural resources. Leisure may have been enjoyed by a small upper crust, but the rest of society spent most of its non-working time attending only to biological needs such as sleeping and eating.
Not until the twentieth century did the concept of recreation become applicable in a broad social sense.
Towards the end of the nineteenth century, a "recreation movement" had emerged in America. In essence, it had two manifestations: (1) an increasing public awareness of
recreational needs and the ensuing governmental budgeting toward those needs, and (2) a definition of recreation as pertaining to sports and the outdoors.
It is important to note that well into the twentieth century the concepts of leisure and recreation remained distinct from each other. Recreation, unlike leisure, always connoted some form of physical activitynot quiet, rest, or contemplation. Also unlike the leisure ideal, recreation always involved activities in contradistinction to work.


5
Finally, recreation referred to sports and outdoor activities and almost never to activities that required intellectual energy.
Our society is now realizing that leisure and
recreation may be one entity. A leading French sociologist,
Jeffre Dumazedier, proves in his definition of leisure that
the juxtaposition of the two is occurring:
Leisure is activityapart from the obligations of work, family or societyto which the individual turns at will, for either relaxation, diversion, or broadening his knowledge and his spontaneous social participation, the free exercise of his creative capacity.9
Recreative leisure is seen as an integral part of the human
totality and as important a part of an identity as one's
work. Through a synthesis of work and the Greek conception
of leisure, a pattern can emerge that allows each individual
the maximum opportunity for enjoyment and development.


6
Leisure in America
Alvin Toffler has suggested that we live in a transient society in which established institutions, social relationships, and traditional values are cracking under the pressure of change.10 The high speed of social and technological change erodes the foundations of societal behavior, causing an individual to become alienated and anxiety-ridden. Human beings function best when they understand society's processes and are able to participate in them. The relationship between family, work, education and leisure has become fragmented and disjointed. Man's relationships to things and to people are increasingly temporary There is a need for a web of human relationships which will provide a stable, unified, personal and enduring basis for community life.
Leisure and recreation services, as a part of community life, may provide the needed buffer against the shock of too-rapid change. Opportunities are created for continued self development and for being creative. The ability to relate to others fosters a sense of self and growth in interpersonal relationships. Recreation which builds cooperation among people and encourages respect for and sensitivity to others helps develop a sense of community Without an affirmation of mutual commitment to common values and concerns, individuals who live together feel no responsi bility to each other. Recreation and leisure can assume a


7
vital role as a medium for group interaction. As Murphy states,
There is a growing concern for improving the outmoded processes of human interaction, redefining success and achievement in intrinsic terms, and building a community base founded upon concern for human development and the quality of the environment.11
The most recent phase of the recreation movement has emphasized the individual and the need to create services that aid in human development, be that physical or intellectual. Murphy calls this an ecologically-based perspective, concerned primarily with the inter-relationships among people and with the environment.13 As both work and leisure are now areas of fulfillment and identification, each setting should focus on the individual as a totality.
This approach involves a redefinition of recreation and leisure. They can no longer be viewed as separate entities of one's life, disengaged segments of one's personality. Leisure is the receptive condition of the whole personality. "Leisure is both the occasion and the capacity of the whole personality to open up to all stimuli from within and without."13 The personality is not passive or detached, but actively engaged. To provide the needed alternatives for this engagement, recreation must expand to include the Greek concept of leisure along with the more familiar American concept of recreation. As David Gray states in "The Un-Hostile Park," an urban recreation area


. must provide a diversity of settings in order to attract the diversity of users who seek sun and shade, openness and seclusion, activity and contemplation 14


9
Thesis and Issues
There was a child went forth every day, and the first object he looked upon and received with wonder, pity, love or dread, that object he became.
Part of him for the day, or a certain part of the day, or for many years,
or stretching cycles of years.
Walt Whitman
Just as climate and the terrain of the land restrict behavior and suggest specific modes of adaption, the buildings and spaces of the architectural environment likewise restrict behavior and make certain responses more likely. It is becoming increasingly clear that architectural settings help shape our experience and behavior and that the architectural environment represents a third environment between us and the world.
Everything that exists in our environment has the power to affect some part of us. Although architecture can be a powerful influence upon human behavior, it is nonetheless mediated by other variables. Baum states that architectural designs have consequences for experience and behavior, but the effects of a given design are manifested by complex interactions with other physical, social, and psychological dynamics.For this reason, M. Edwards suggests that we should design environments that will support a wide range of behaviors and social networks.17
In view of the concepts addressed earlier in this thesis, a built environment offering alternatives of leisure and recreation insures its usefulness independent of societal evolu^tion. Architecture supporting the broad-based leisure/recreation concept will necessarily contain


10
variety and alternatives. Such an environment satisfies not
only the varying leisure needs of each individual but the
changing social demands for recreational experience.
Complexity offers alternatives and choice and the tools of the growth process. Psychologists tell us that rich environments make for healthy personalities Limit the environment and you limit the man.
Architectural design greatly influences the degree to which the built environment encourages positive social interaction. Research shows that one of the most stressful aspects of urban life is the lack of control an individual has over the quality and quantity of his contacts with other human beings. In his discussion of the experience of living in cities, Milgram uses the concept of overload to link an individual's experience to demographic circumstances such as density and the number of people one must encounter. Overload refers to a situation in which an individual experiences too much, causing withdrawal of the individual from the environment.15 As Paul Friedburg asserts,
. we learn as we grow older to shut off more and more of our sensesto respond selectively and narrowly. The urban adult learns to turn off, not to experience life Depending on its qualities, the environment can cause people to close themselves off in defense, or open themselves up to its richness and to one another.20
In addition to being an arena of personal fulfillment, one's leisure enjoyments are a counteraction against the bombardment of stresses caused by societal life. One of the most important aspects of that which is defined as


11
leisure/recreation is the element of choice. Kraus counts
as the first essential element of recreation "the element
of free choice, as opposed to compulsion or obligation, as
with work."21 An individual should have not only the power
to choose his type of leisure, but a sense of control
regarding the milieu in which it is performed. Baum states,
Although architectural environments should support wide ranges of behavior, they should facilitate social interaction under positive conditions, permitting people to get to know one another while maintaining a comfortable level of social control ... By including semiprivate spaces and by promoting the development of social groups ., buildings and groups of buildings can foster healthy and satisfying user experience.22
The thesis that architecture should support a wide range of activities and can facilitate social interaction may be manifested through the built form in numerous ways. For this project, the major manifestation will be one of integration. Integration among people, facilities, and spaces can make possible the union of leisure and recrea-
tio
n.
Integration among people
The quality, location, and size of spaces can provide an environment conducive to activities for individuals, small groups, or large gatherings.
The designed areas should also allow for the alternative between passive and active roles within the recreational experience. Some people need to be alone, others participate passively by observing,


12
and still others are actively involved. By providing a mixture of these alternatives in the built structure, there can be an integration of those with like interests and also an opportunity for interplay between people of all ages.
Integration of facilities
The juxtaposition and sequence of certain facilities can make possible a greater benefit than would be realized by their separation. Conversely, certain elements should be separated for maximum benefit.
For example, dining and its contingent noise would be less welcome near a reading area than adjacent to areas of activity. As Friedburg points out,
"the proximity of any two facilities sets up a dynamic that can work either for or against each of them."23 Furthermore, the manner in which facilities are arranged can create social links between age groups. An example might be the companionship fostered through the close proximity of young and elderly activity areas.
Interplay between spaces
The concept of movement through space is of great architectural import. The behavior of people in a spacehow they move through it and hc*w it affects
themis a product of both the built structure and


13
the created spaces. Expanding that idea even further, any space is conditioned not only by the structure at its perimeter but by the spaces around it.
There must be an ordered and cohesive sequence of space-s so that the multi-faceted uses of the recreation complex are understandable to the individual. The spaces should also offer the opportunity for the whole range of leisure activities while existing as a visually cohesive whole. While the richness and diversity of the alternatives offered should be mirrored in the built form, the individual should be quickly aware of those alternatives and their placement.
An important corollary to interior spatial planning is the relationship of indoor to outdoor spaces.
A progression from interior to exterior will be created via intermediate courtyards and covered areas. Rooftop activities will be offered and natural light used whenever possible.
The link between leisure and nature cannot be underestimated. Nature is the ideal contradiction to urban life. To provide many opportunities for exposure to the natural world enrichens and enlivens all leisure activities.


In summary, recreation and leisure are no longer
separate entities, and recreation/leisure has ceased to be
one-dimensional part of our lives. As stated by Paul Haun
in Recreation: A Medical Viewpoint;
Recreation provides a balance and rhythm which has the potential of integration, of giving man complete instinctual, emotional, intellectual, and social coherence.24
It follows that the structures supporting such activities should not be the one-dimensional sports facilities they so often become. Both the concept of recreation and the built structure should be grounded in the concept of integration-integration between young and old, active and passive, intellectual and athletic, natural and man-made environments. In this manner, recreation may serve to synchronize man's interactions with his environment.


FOOTNOTES
1-Kraus, Richard, Recreation and Leisure in Modern Society (New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1971), pp. 129 130.
2Ibid., p. 132
2Kando, Thomas, Leisure and Popular Culture in Transition (St. Louis: The C. V. Mosby Company, 1980),
p. 22.
^deGrazia, Of Time, Work and Leisure (New York: Anchor Books, 1964).
^Kando, op. cit., p. 22.
6Ibid., p. 3.
7Guinagh, Kevin and Alfred P. Donjahn, "Cato on Agriculture" from Latin Literature in Translation (New York Longmans, Green and Co., 1942), pp. 165-167.
^Kando, op. cit., p. 26.
^Dumazedier, Joffre, Toward a Society of Leisure (New York: Free Press, 1962)"^ pp. 16-17.
l^Toffler, Alvin, Future Shock (New York: Random House, 1970).
-^Murphy, James F., Recreation and Leisure Services (Iowa: Wm. C. Brown Company^ 1975), p. 63.
12Ibid., pp. 51-52.
l^Martin, Alexander Reid, "Man's Leisure and His Health," Quest, Monograph 5 (1965), p. 28.
l^Gray, David, "The Un-Hostile Park," Reflections on the Recreation and Park Movement (Iowa: Wm. C. Brown Company, 1973) p~. 238.
l^Baum, Andrew and Stuart Valins, Architecture and Social Behavior: Psychological Studies of Social Density (New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1977), pp. 2-3.


16
16jbid., p. 3.
l^Edwards, Michael, Psychology and the Built Environ-ment (New York: Wiley and Sons, 1974).
18Friedburg, Paul, Play and Interplay (London: The MacMillan Company, 1970), p. 30.
l^Milgram, Stephen, "The Experience of Living in Cities," Science, 1970, p. 167.
20priedburg, op. cit., p. 103.
2lKraus, op. cit., p.
22Baum, op. cit., p. 7.
23Friedburg, op. cit., p. 162.
2^Haun, Paul, Recreation: A Medical Viewpoint (New Columbia University Press, 1965) p. 47.
York:


17
MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
Boulder, a community of some 80,000 residents, is integrally linked to the University of Colorado at Boulder, which has a student population of 23,000. However, Boulder is not a "university town" solely dependent on the University for its cultural and intellectual life. The leisure opportunities offered in Boulder are numerous, lively, and varied.
As well as being the home of a fine university, Boulder is at the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. There is a strong appreciation for the natural environment and vigorous spirit supporting a healthy physical existence. The possibilities for an individual to be involved in any sort of physical activity are almost without limit.
An interview with Ken Ramsey of Boulder Parks and Recreation revealed that the only problem with the recreation centers within Boulder is that they are over-programmed and over-used. The addition of the All Age Recreation Complex would be welcomed by the community.
Boulder is an ideal setting for the integrated concept of recreation. It is a community powered by the pursuit of intellectual excellence and a healthy enjoyment of the physical environment. That which is a way of life within Boulder could have concrete manifestation in a recreation complex that supports the gamut of leisure possibilities and forges a stronger link between the University and resident population.


81________________________________
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19
MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
It is entirely conceivable, that such a recreation complex could be constructed on the site chosen. It would in fact be a sensible addition to the future plans drawn up for the area. These plans call for various types of professorial retirement housing adjacent to the student dormitories of the Williams Village Towers area.
The housing and the recreation complex would be funded by the University. Similar to the present University recreation facilities, all students, faculty, and faculty families could use the complex. This would not only provide a much-needed addition to the strained University facilities, it would also be the point of contact between users of all ages, from student to the retired professor. The major issues affecting the chosen site and the relationship of the University and community to this site are as follows:
(1) The Williams Village Towers and the surrounding acreage are owned by the University of Colorado. The great majority of University facilities are approximately one mile west. The design of the Boulder campus is distinctive and cohesive, utilizing red tile roofs and masonry or concrete structures in an Italian Renaissance manner. A visual link can be created between the architecture of the complex and the University without copying the existing University style. In this way, a visual message will be created that denotes the grounds and exterior functions are public domain (as with the University) and that the interior functions are for the University segment of Boulder's population.


20
(2) As a corollary to the preceding issue, the treatment and use of the exterior grounds is the basis for the crucial community link.
Bike and jogging/walking paths will connect the complex to the nearby residential area. Covered seating pavilions will provide mountain views, opportunities for activity viewing, or a space for card playing by the elderly. Parents with young children or teenagers desiring some increment of privacy would also be prime users of these outdoor pavilions. Earth forms, exterior landscaped "rooms" and planned areas of varying sizes will complement the natural landscape and be available for any type of gathering. Even the berming covering the major parking area could be used as a sledding slope in the winter. In essence, all outdoor land forms and spaces will be designed for public use and therefore forge a new link with the community/University structure.
(3) The site is at the major access point to the University area. Entering on the Boulder Turnpike, one sees the red-tiled University roofs ahead, an unobstructed view of the Flatirons on the left, and the recreation complex site on the right. By being sensitive to all existing physical factors, a sense of integration, celebration, and gateway can be created.



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26
SOILS AND FOUNDATION INVESTIGATION FOR WILLIAMS GREENS BOULDER, COLORADO
PURPOSE
This report presents results of a soils and foundation investigation for medium and high density residential buildings to be located south of Baseline Road approximately between 32nd and 3&th Streets, Boulder, Colorado. The investigation was made to gain preliminary knowledge as to types of soils in the area and to determine the best type, depth and design criteria that would be appropriate for the foundation system of the proposed buildings. Factual data gathered during the field and laboratory work are summarized in Figures 1 and 2, and Table 1 attached. The results of the investigation and our opinions which are based on this investigation and our experience in the area are given below.
PROPOSED STRUCTURES
As currently planned, there will be three large five-story buildings and many one-story buildings. A golf course is also planned from the building area to the Boulder Turnpike. We expect the large buildings to develop moderately high foundation loads. The one-story structures should develop no unusual loads. If the actual plans differ appreciably from the above description, we should be notified so that our recommendations can be reviewed and revised if necessary.
SITE CONDITIONS
The site of the proposed construction is undeveloped. The ground surface at the site generally slopes to the north. Bear Canyon Creek enters the site on the southern side and wanders through and leaves at the northeast corner. No bedrock outcrops or other bodies of water were noted on or near the site.


27
SUBSOILS
A total of eight borings were made at the site. Four of these borings were drilled to bedrock, which was encountered at bS to 55 feet. In the six borings performed on the west side of Bear Canyon Creek, a 5 to 7 foot thick layer of sandy clay was underlain by approximately 10 to 20 feet of sands with various amounts of clay, silt and gravel through out'. These sandy materials were in turn underlain by a firm to stiff silty clay changing to a very hard claystone. Boring E, one of the two borings performed on the east side of Bear Canyon Creek, consisted primarily of sands down to 30 feet except for two thin layers of clay lying between three and eight feet below the ground surface. Boring F, also on the east side of Bear Conyon Creek, consisted entirely of clays. A more complete description of the subsoils for the borings is given in Figure 2 and a summary of the soil properties is shown on Table
GROUNDWATER CONDITIONS
Groundwater level observations were taken as the borings were being advanced. The groundwater table is relatively shallow at the site, being approximately 8 to 10 feet below the ground surface presently.
The actual level of the groundwater table at the site can be expected to fluctuate somewhat throughout the year, depending on variations in precipitation, surface runoff and flow fluctuations of Bear Canyon Creek.
FOUNDATION RECOMMENDATIONS Drilled Piers
In our opinion, the best foundation system for the five-story building is straight or belled piers drilled a minimum of b feet into competent, unweathered, hard bluish grey, claystone bedrock. Piers should be designed for an end bearing pressure of 50,000 psf and a side shear of 5,000 psf based on the area in competent claystone bedrock.
Minimum dead load pressure should be 10,000 psf based on the end bearing pressures only. Where difficulty is experienced in obtaining the desired minimum load, shear rings may be provided and the pier reinforced to take


28
the difference between the desired and obtainable load in tension.
A 3_inch minimum void space should be provided beneath the grade beams between the piers to assure effective concentration of the loads upon the piers. Grade beams should be centered on the piers and the tops of the piers should not be enlarged. The grade beams spanning the piers should be designed for appropriate loading conditions and reinforced accordingly.
It will almost certainly be necessary to case the pier holes to seal off the water and prevent caving. Casings may be pulled during the placement of the concrete or left in place. If any water remains in the holes, a positive head should be maintained on the concrete and a means of escape for water provided during the placement so as not to create voids in the piers.
Shallow Spread Footings
The one-story structures can be founded on conventional spread footings or a combination of conventional spread footings and pad type spread footings bearing on the medium dense natural, undisturbed clayey sands and gravels lying immediately below the topsoil. These footings should be designed for a uniform soil pressure not to exceed 2,000 psf using dead load plus anticipated live load. The foundation walls should be well reinforced top and bottom. We recommend using minimum amount of steel equivalent to that required for a simply supported span of 12 feet. Groundwater may be encountered during construction of the footings at this depth. The groundwater table would have to be lowered to a point where the footings would not become inundated during pouring or initial set of the concrete. We do not believe that subsequent inundation will adversely affect the utilization of the building.
As an alternative, footings can be constructed on structural fill placed on natural soils. Prior to placement of fill, the ground surface should be stripped of all topsoil, organic material and debris, down to the


29
clayey sands. After stripping of the topsoil material, structural fill can be placed and should consist of well-graded, free draining granular material placed in lifts not to exceed 9inches in loose thickness and compacted to a minimum of 100% of maximum density as determined by tne Standard Moisture Density Relationship ASTM D698-7O. Allowable soil bearing pressure using this technique will depend on the minimum thickness of fill above the natural grade and the width and configuration of the footings. In general, the allowable bearing capacity at the top of the fill will be such that the net load at the bottom of the fill is 2,000 psf on the natural soils. In calculating this, the angle of spread for the loads can be taken as ^5 for high quality granular fill. The density of the fill will be about 130 psf.
The structural fill should extend for 1 foot from all footing lines for each foot of fill depth. All exterior footings should have sufficient cover for frost protection.
ALTERNATIVE FOUNDATION SYSTEM FOR PROPOSED 5-ST0RY BUILDINGS
The shallow footing system as described above can also be used for the proposed 5_story buildings although some noticeable settlement of the buildings may occur. The larger size footings expected to be required for the moderately heavy loads from these large buildings is the characteristic which may cause some settlement to occur. We recommend that the foundation and structure of the buildings be as stiff as is practical.
As a minimum, the system should be reinforced both top and bottom equivalent to that required for a simply supported beam spanning 20 feet. Other criteria are as described above.
Pile type foundation systems are a technically feasible alternative, but we understand that they would likely be prohibitively costly.
SLABS-ON-GRADE
Because of the swelling potential of the silty clay soils and possibility of differences in settlement between the foundation system and the slabs,


30
construction details should accomodate the movement of the slab with respect to the walls without damage to the strucutre. We recommend the following precautions be taken in connection with the slabs-on-grade:
1. Separate slabs from foundation elements with two layers of tempered hardboard with a silicone lubricant between. These details should be used around the perimeter slabs adjacent to footing walls and around any interior columns and load bearing partitions.
2. Moderately reinforce slabs with reinforcement continuously through interior slab joints.
3- Provide a 2-inch minimum air space above or below any interior nonload bearing partitions with molding to cover.
Any pipes rising through the slab should be provided with flexible couplings or other means to allow slab movement without damage to internal piping.
5- Equipment or other building appurtenances constructed on the slab should be designed so that slab movement will not damage them.
Following the recommendations given will not prevent relative movement of the floor slabs but will reduce potential damages for a relatively smal1 investment.
WETTING OF FOUNDATION SOILS 1
Wetting and excessive drying of foundation soils should be prevented during and after construction. The following methods of preventing wetting of foundation soils are recommended:
1. Mechanically compact all fill around the building (including backfill). Compaction by ponding or saturation must not be permitted.
2. Provide an adequate grade for rapid runoff of surface water away from the structure (5% if practicable).
31 Discharge roof downspouts and other water collection systems well beyond the limits of the backfill.


31
k. Ob serve anc
be indicate
GROUNDWATER PRf
No bel low grade
site. First f
3 fee' t above t:
channe1 .
CERTI FI CAT ION
We recommend t
prior to cons-
the f oundat i or
of the soils
provi de a cer
- : comply with any other usual precautions which may .e: during design and construction.
-C7ECTI0N
;reas should be incorporated in any structures on this or levels should as high as practical and at least : maximum water levels expected in the Bear Canyon Creek
inspect the c-''-jnstruction at various stages to assure that the foundation system requirements are being met.
LIMITATIONS
The limitied "umber of borings in this soils and foundation investigation were spaced r/2 obtain a reasonably accurate knowledge of the subsoils, however variations in subsoils not indicated by the borings are always possible. Tr^refre we recommend that the subsoils exposed by the excavations be ir'-pected by an engineer knowledgeable in foundation soils before any fill is placed to confirm that the soils actually are as indicated by th- borings.
The construction of any drilled piers and placement of compaction of any significant thickness of structural fill should be under the inspection of a qualified soi Is engineer.


EXTENSIVE EXCAVATIONS
The presence of thick deposits of soft, sensitive clays and of saturated sands in combination with a high ground water table makes extensive excavations on this site inadvisable. In particular, our opinion is that the size of excavation which would be required to form a reasonably effective detention storage facility for Bear Canyon Creek on this site would be so severly complicated by the soil conditions that the excavation would be practically unfeasible.
v' r\

*o
0 o u u *
14239
:
A
VjfS.rfM x#/
Respectfully Submitted,
SCOTT, COX AND ASSOCIATES, INC.
By
Edward l. Serr, PE-LS
Attachments


36
REGIONAL CLIMATE
ALTITUDE: 5,445 feet
LATITUDE: 40 North
LONGITUDE: 105 16' West
Boulder is classified as having a semi-arid, highland mountain climate. Mild, sunny weather is the norm; extremely hot or cold weather is of short duration. Because Boulder is in the "rain-shadow" of the Rocky Mountains, it has a low relative humidity and light rainfall.
"Rain-shadow" effects are caused by closeness to mountain ranges.
The major manifestation is the twice-daily change in air masses. The cool mountain air flows down from the mountains in the evening, causing a west-to-east prevailing wind. As the valley air warms during the day, it rises and is drawn back to the mountains in an upslope, east-to-westerly wind.
The geography of the Front Range results in three major climatic influences:
(1) Continental polar air from the North and Northwest coupled with the "rain-shadow" effect produces dry, cold winter conditions.
(2) Warm, dry Southwest air produces dry, hot summers mediated by the cool mountain air flow in the evenings.
(3) Maritime tropical air masses originating in the Gulf of Mexico travel up from the South and Southeast. These air masses produce the heavy "upslope" snows of the Spring. It is at this time of year that Boulder receives most of its precipitation.
The prevailing wind and temperature conditions of Boulder may be encapsulated as follows. Summer winds are out of the Southwest; winter winds originate in the Northwest. The warmest average temperatures (85F) occur in July. This is followed by a dry, warm period in July, August, and September. The coolest average temperatures (31F) occur in January,


accompanied by
dry, cold period covering December, January, and
February.


38
PREC
IPITATION
WINTER: Between the months of December and February, Boulder receives
approximately 11% of the total annual precipitation, usually in the form of snow.
SP
RING:
February, March, April, and May receive the major portion of annual precipitation: 40% of rain or snow accumulation. Upslope conditions produce heavy, wet snow, resulting in Spring flooding. Heavy thunderstorms in the foothills and high mountain areas may cause flash floods.
SUMMER: Winds from the south and southwest bring warm, dry air during
the summer months. Clear mornings are often followed by increasing cloudiness and local thundershowers at midafternoon. This cloud cover ameliorates the summer heat and produces cool evenings.
AUTUMN: Autumn has less precipitation than Summer, resulting in 20%
of the annual total. This period of time between summer showers and winter snow has the greatest possible percentage of sunshine of any season.


39
WIND
NO
LMAL WIND CONDITIONS
The prevailing wind in Boulder changes direction daily. Cool mountain air flows down at the rate of approximately seven to twelve miles per hour in the evenings and mornings in a west-to-east direction. As the day warms, the direction of the breeze changes to flow in an east-to-westerly fashion. Along the Front Range, the north and west sides of a building are the most subject to wind effects. Winds can decrease the exterior film of still air that normally surrounds a building and so increase the heating and cooling loads. By removing water vapor, wind also increases the need for humidifying the interior air.


40
CHINOOK WINDS
Boulder is subject to a phenomenon normal to a number of regions that lie in the lee of major mountain barriers. Pacific cold-fronts move toward the west side of the Rocky Mountains, deepening with time. Sporadically, surges of cold air spill over the continental divide and travel down the canyons at high speeds.
From late Autumn into early Spring, this condition can produce westerly wind gusts from 70 to 130 miles per hour. As Boulder is only 30 miles due east from the 12,000-foot Continental Divide, it is subject to some of the more spectacular windstorms of this variety. The building site chosen is in an area unprotected from the strongest of the wind gusts. The western side should be designed so as not to have large expanses of glazing and the roof should be structurally attached to the ground.
Information regarding wind from "The Boulder, Colorado Wind Measuring Network," A. J. Bedard, Jr., NOAA Laboratory.


"oUN^MIHEr-
£APIATI<2Nn
(T&TU/PAf'-'SP.
Tt-MF? C F5**)
>e£-LAri\yp
HUMIIPIT'1
c/O

CLIMAT& ^t^PH
41


-wri^


COLORADO
43
HEATING DEGREE DAY NORMALS (BASE G5 DEG F)
STATION JUL AUG SEP XT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN m
AKRON FAA AIRPORT 0 9 145 44 7 884 1122 1221 988 915 587 279 7b 881 1
ALAMOSA W SO R 40 100 303 857 1074 1457 1519 1182 1035 732 453 185 8717
ALLENSPAR K 157 217 404 873 984 1190 1285 1095 1125 881 805 323 8899
ASPEN 95 150 346 851 1029 1339 1378 1182 1118 798 524 282 8850
BAILEY 108 1 b5 354 848 978 1187 1237 1058 1057 777 530 25-8 8353
BONNY DAM 0 7 22 391 807 1079 1194 932 877 495 219 49 8172
ROUI DFR 0 b 130 357 714 908 1004 804 775 483 220 59 5480
BUENA VIS TA 47 1 1b 285 577 938 1184 1218 1075 983 720 459 184 7 7 34
BURLINGTON 6 5 108 384 782 1017 1110 871 803 459 200 38 5743
BYERS 5 N t 0 7 139 438 840 1079 1 178 924 888 552 288 78 8389
CANON CIT Y 0 9 81 301 fa 39 831 91 1 734 707 4 1 1 1 79 33 4838
CEDAREDGE 0 13 129 434 825 1128 1 184 921 815 534 288 70 8321
CENTER 4 SSW 98 150 312 839 1058 1420 1513 1179 1017 714 448 202 8 7 48
CHEESMAN 50 85 242 533 887 1079 1188 991 958 881 428 180 7240
CHERRY CREEK DAM 7 8 154 431 792 1011 1118 890 849 558 284 80 8180
CHEYENNE WELLS 0 7 108 388 774 1039 1125 885 812 459 193 38 5806
COCHETOPA CREEK 120 185 399 741 1140 1584 1708 1420 1243 858 580 307 1 0285
COLORADO NAT MON 0 b 80 348 777 1104 1 1 78 898 775 453 194 28 5837
COLORADO SPRINGS WSO 8 25 1b2 440 819 1042 1122 910 880 584 298 78 6346
CORTEZ 0 11 115 434 813 1 132 1181 921 828 555 292 88 6350
CRESTED BUTTE 231 28b 477 775 1 178 1550 1815 1378 1318 978 880 390 1 0834
DEL NORTE 78 118 2 82 587 954 1283 1381 1084 987 878 428 192 7992
DENVER WSFO //R 0 0 135 4 1 4 789 1004 1101 879 837 528 253 74 6014
DILLON 1 : 273 332 513 80b 1187 1435 1518 1305 1298 972 704 435 1 0754
DURANGO 9 34 193 493 837 1153 1218 958 882 800 388 125 6848
EADS 0 0 78 339 759 1020 1122 848 758 399 181 30 5512
EAGLE FAA AP 33 *80 288 82b 1028 1407 1448 1148 1014 705 431 171 8377
ESTES PARK 10b 148 342 814 918 1110 1189 1005 1023 782 521 248 7966
FORT COLLINS 5 1 1 171 488 848 1073 1181 930 877 558 281 82 6483
FORT LEWI s bO 1 1 1 294 595 957 1249 1324 1103 1042 750 499 221 8205
FORT MORGAN 0 b 140 438 887 1158 1283 989 874 518 224 47 6520
FRUITA 0 0 101 412 825 1175 1258 913 758 450 1 78 28 6092
GLENWOOD SPRINGS 1 N b 34 188 493 891 1228 1283 1000 877 573 312 103 6968
GRAND JUNCTION WSO //R 0 0 b5 325 782 1138 1225 882 718 403 148 1 9 5683
GRAND LAKE 1 NW 282 338 519 815 1191 1482 1538 1322 1293 989 701 438 1 0888
GRAND LAKE 6 SSW 214 2b4 488 775 1128 1473 1593 1389 1318 951 854 384 1 0591
GREAT SAND DUNES NM 4b 97 255 577 972 1271 1333 1088 995 893 428 150 7903
GREELEY CSC 0 0 149 450 881 1128 1240 948 858 5 22 238 52 6442
GREEN MOUNTAIN DAM 103 141 327 839 1038 1389 1454 1235 1147 780 502 245 9000
GUNNISON 11 1 188 393 719 1119 1590 1714 1422 1231 818 543 278 10122
HAYDEN 38 77 289 823 1017 1389 1488 1229 1125 708 4 22 178 8583
HERMIT 7 ESE II 27 b 335 519 815 1218 1590 1859 1397 1380 1008 719 450 1 1 366
HOLLY 0 0 90 332 753 1032 1132 880 747 374 137 21 54 78
HOLYOKE 0 0 1 1 2 409 818 1079 1 1 78 921 853 489 211 44 6112
JOHN MARTIN DAM 0 0 49 294 720 1001 1101 812 694 347 1 1 7 13 5148
KASSLER 0 0 1 1 3 370 735 952 1042 837 808 501 242 82 5660
KAUFFMAN 4 SSE R 1b 22 188 493 885 1107 1218 989 949 803 320 97 686 7
LA JUNTA FAA AIRPORT 0 0 59 308 735 1011 1110 829 729 370 125 15 5289
LAKEWOOD 0 10 145 399 785 955 1057 848 822 531 274 79 5883
LAMAR 0 0 84 319 750 1028 1125 840 722 384 128 12 5350
LAS ANIMA s 0 0 45 298 729 998 1101 820 898 348 102 9 5146
LITTLE HILLS 3b 91 30b 845 999 1302 1355 1098 1017 714 453 191 8207
LONGMONT 2 ESE 0 b 182 453 843 1082 1 1 94 938 874 548 258 78 6432
MESA VERDE NAT PARK 0 7 99 381 774 1054 1110 898 837 552 282 47 6039
MONTE VISTA 104 1 30 309 828 1038 14 17 1488 1 1 70 1023 708 453 202 8668


ZONING
As this site is owned by the University of Colorado, it or Public Established. Under the PE nomenclature, there are
is zoned PE no zoning
strictures


Rev. March 1983
45
4.10 soppuanarrARY information________________________260.
4.10.3 SLP BUILDING CODE CHECKLIST
Project Name AU_ C£*At^L-Ey. project No.____________
Location gOuUggig., CJOt-xD(ZJ*S30_________________________________________
LU-+I ejOU-caiH^ doce- I9&2 ETDrriOH'
Applicable Code Name asiir*t>gM Fgc=eg^i et ui ty *a~THlsMZC>b> 19
Code Check by OETiSOF2^^ UjAiT" Date 4
1. Fire Zone SECTION
2 Occupancy Classification
Principal Occupancy Tasl-e: £=>A
Others (Specify) ^ O^St~VWUrS DAi El.->


3. Occupancy Separation required 1 Hours
1 K) ft 0 H * Hours
Ei-' Ep to 1 Hours
to 1 Hours
to Hours
4. Construction Type ^ £>4AR 1£>


Rev.
4.10
SUPPLKMBNEART INFORMATION (Coat'd)
4.10.3 SLP BOTLDBIG COPK CHKaU.TST (Cont'd)
5. Maximum allowable Basic Floor Area: UHLlMhEO____________
If adjacent to open area on
6*7. (7., \/47. u-4io4 mihihom
two or more sides: UJiQTU *20 pce-T*______
200'/. OF &JZBJK FfeKJMiTTEO T=CL.
If over one story: qm& *>rogg|
If sprinkiered: UHLiHiteD___________________________
6. Maximum allowable height:
Feet _______T - ________________________
Stories I- UMUHir&P___________________________________
7. Fire Resistance of exterior wall (See Occupancy Type and Construction Type)
8. Openings in exterior walls: (See Occupancy Type and Construction Type)
^Li_ £M<^UDb£POfZ-TlOHt> bl^UL FKOVICED U/
n^upAi- u^h-T- ey-T- ^ie.HiH hot l. TUA.K V\0 OF TOTA.L- FLOOp-
9. Windows required in rooms:
Window area required:
10.
Enclosed or semi-enclosed courts size required
HAe-l^l-VT MIlS-Ol-ErAg-GFeHlH^
f2~\ lam - -z,- 4 ^TOigE-'t^_______go'___________
MIH,
_JOO m
March 1983 ____261.
6QG
6oe^
60b
TEJgaLg^ ^>'P TSx&l-t- ^
6oS
T^La ne>


Revised March 1983
(1 )
A
4.10.3
4.10 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION (Cont'd)
SLP BUILDING CODK OUCCXT.TST: (Cont' d)
HO POpTlOri L-E-'b^ THATH
11. Minimum ceiling height in rooms: CE>'-Q" Tove^ *=£>%
12. Minimum floor area of rooms: _________
13. Fire resistive requirements:
Exterior bearing walls ________4 Hours
Interior bearing walls Hours
Exterior non-bearing walls C*Xl~ i 4 Hours
Structural frame Hours
Permanent partitions 1 Hours
Vertical openings 2 Hours
Floors -2 Hours
Roofs £=&A- ie>o£) 2 Hours
Exterior doors ($££- 1 Hours
Exterior windows 1 Hours
Inner court walls Hours
Ai£A t.WU- IHOT Mezzanine floors (area allowed) e*ceex:> A> of= 1 Hours
CP pOOH it-+ WHtH IT LoOfSO
Roof coverings A ce fe? 1 Hours
Boiler room enclosure 1 Hours
14. Structural requirements:
-6Tf&UC.TUpsVU_ 6TEB- 0(2. IfZ&H/ 2JEJHFO(ZCJ&C> Framework s, ggiKPOfejg-ep ma^qhfz.-y ^ Hours
F'UATTDftM'o - .a>KC.pert, l-OH yTEB-
Stairs-T|ZEAc>^ * co-tc-, i,-==a~&&i______Hours
, UrtDEfZAtCe. WOOD f=L-Ce> fZjr-VG. ^
Floors t;ili ej-d uu/ hoh- ooMeu^TiaL&. a-Hours
0(2. R(2^=TDPT!E-CO
HOT&-- K&&CD NOT g>&
PfZOVID>&C? |IH F=UOOp-^> U4.UEH
Ax- op. i^eLoU uE^ei-
IM ^VMHA-blA
47
262.
140*5 te? 1^0$ Ig?
TA&L-E. 1*5-A
17-a
17 "A 17-A
n-A
17-A. 17-A
17- A
^eq. is>o(*
I&Q2
i&oS*
igo4


Rev. March 1983
u ) 4.10 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION (Cont'd) 263.

.10.3 SLP BUILDING COOK CHKCXI.IST: (Cont'd)
Roofs g£Of=-e. AHO TVr&lp- KEHSe^ THAH 26>' A&CX/E. AH'I' FLOOfZ. HAT 5E OF UHl^ZoreOTEES HOH a>MS>U^Tl6L£ M£T6fZtM.t> KCL PA £ CCA. HCEE THAh i&', U&t^? THAH 2*5' {JOUTS SECTION 1 e-Oda.
AgOve iXH^ PLCGfS., 1ZCOF HHALL HAVE 1 l^OOp. U&lUHLj
Partitions HOH- coMi&LfeTiftiE, Figg- fgg^^TAMT Hours |
15. Exits:
Occupancy load basis (square feet per occupant)
Occupancy Type
Mih.of 2 e*itt> paso-o u0*'
C7IHIK6, fgQPM6>________
^VMHA^IUH ^ApA^E./PAfZkHH^ l^gAoiHOj BtcOM SO
t^Cw'Y<^Af2&- ~7
-TOOL-tP 60
Number of exits required:
OLL- LOAD PALTCfZ.
I*t
!*=
200
60

50 PC^. TOCU, 1*5 OH TT C kt
Ta^LE.
Minimum vridth of exits:
TOTAL tUICTH OF EKIT5 (H FEET ^HALL. HOT e=E- . 6606 b
LJS/55 THAN THE TOTAL OUO-UFAHT UOAO ^e.5Z-VETP (Oiv/itoer? *a>^f ^ 0>.
Exit separation arrangement:
if= ohl^ 'Z e*\r*z> rz.er?o.; -=>hali_ e>e_ plaoed
A a-bTAHte. AFAtZ-T EQUAL. TO HOT LE^= THAH
WAV-. OVEfZALL. diagonal DIMEH*=iON OF fcLD^. ^f2- Af2jp.A TO
ig*& oop-veo.
^2 LENGTH OF


Revised March 1983
'---<
( ) k_^d
4.10.3
4.10 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION (Cont'd)
SLP BUILDING CODE CHMXI.TST: (Cont' d)
49
264.
Maximum allowable travel distance to exit With sprinklers ^0>C> SECTION
Allowable exit sequence: jxr ue*.*=>T *&0/o cp izeQ'D>. exi-Pr> >20 -OOATTEfD
to t2=e- eeAtwer? mitwoot th^coCs|H cjr&-x-osr siAbCfa.
£vtlT-^ CPEhitM^ IHTO £>J=OC>tl''*lt'+C>i iMTEpv£MlHii| V3COH OP-AfZEA £,L-l_OU&C> lE TO AQ£A -LE-paL'EJb ^-¥0 ltD*=A=. G>l pueTOT
HEAH'p iCP e^pUE/b-^ -p3 EXIT". Exit doors: Minimum width allowed ^ F£Er ^o4 e.
Maximon leaf width allowed 4 PEJ^T % Width required for No. of occupants
Hot le/be> ti-uah t&t'a.l. occupaht
load Ee.*2.v&o o/vid&o ^ O
I O O
- IN P^OTE^TEO
n-VtZOU^HOUT" U4 / AOTOHA.T1C- 'bppj tH W-l_E-fZ-
^'bsns-M, TO>i-==-r.£.Hce_- r=^c>T\ ahy f?dikt iis fZ-ooM TT? fey-i-r e*.-re-fZj£Dfe. t-i/s-'-f i&e_ HO ^e-e-T-
Exit corridors:
Minimum allowable width ^^ ____________ '^^OeS~ b>
Required to have exit at each end of corridor? ___________
uweri 2 ex'T*b (zetp'o, except *=ep. mw-emd
Dead end corridors all lowed? s-fe^ Maximm length 2Q/ e.


Rev. March 1983

4.10 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION (Cont'd)
265.
4.10.3 SLP BUILDING POPE CHWT3CT.TST (Cont'd)
Wall fire resistance required
1

16. Stairs:
Minimum width 44" For occ. load of ^ 0> +
SECTION
Doors and frames fire resistance required: 20 hih 3'^aPt~> b vaw4eH oopfRipop. ha* 1 jauwriH^
a^OCa b
'sz>Co" 6^>'-0"Vor occ. load of 4*9 op: i=~&uejg. For occ. load of
Maximum riser allowed Her le^tmah mot
Minimum tread allowed Herr ue--^> TM-a>tH IQ'1 Are winders allowed? He?
Lee-
Landings:
o>iMeH-tic>H ir-t -c>nz.jeepoH = t?£Avem = Minimum size miotm 01=- _____________
UUeH ^PT2.I (ZU-iA'f (4A^= WpUU^H-T'
Maximum size required ruh ; herr sveeso 4
Maximum vertical distance between landings 12
Minimum vertical distance between landings ____________
HOT THArt -50"
Required height of rails hot Mcgg. tw4 -w______________
Handrails:
Required at each side?
Ateo^e- Hoy H
Intermediate rails required at stairs &&" wide 'te.*? Maximum width between int. rails SQUal Exceptions applicable _____________________________

3.

-1
^*>06? i

3-^OOa i
'3-5bOL2 1


Revised March 1983
( )
bL A
4.10.3
4.10 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION (Cont'd)
SLP BUILDING CODE CHKCP.TST: (Cont'd)
51
266.
SECTION
Height above nosing Bsd.asters required? 4*2-"
Intermediate rail required? iff" ____________ ^^OCp
Maximum post spacing allowed__________________________ ____________
Handrails return to wall at ends?
Handrails extend beyond stair 6; (at le^t <=>h&-
l4AHDpAIL AT OTW TCP fcOITOW') Stair to roof required?
Stair to basement restrictions

Stair access to roof required? UHLE^b prop '^'bCG?
UA-fe ^LCPE- <^pZ-eATEf2. "TV4AH 4 'H- l£-
Access to roof required? Me6(4AH6AU
Stair enclosure required? YE^ Hours £
e.y;6&PflOHib' MOT p&Q'Ch- T=Op- -=SrAn pU-LAf^
£*CALCTCJ2- 'fce-pviw^ oHLif C>Nt ACb-AAC-'&H-T' FLQOp
AHC= HCT AOMlHECT15^ U-l^ £Ap.p4 DOp^ <£=p_ <£T^ipiAANf=: <^fZ.V l Mp PLOO (2.-== .
Horizontal exit requirements (if applicable)_________________ I
Ramps:
Maximum slope to use as exit ^
Handrails required %Q7&
HA.61(-UTLii^& THM1 Ivl^. -s.HA.LL ha.le_ -sXXME.
^HDpAlLfe A-b pepC>. FOP-^TAIfZWA^ eXCLE-PT
I HTEP-M EDI AfE. HAWDpAI U^=* fZEQ O -


Kev. March 1983

4.10
SOPPLSfXHTAKY INFORMATION (Cont'd)
267.
4.10.3 SLP BUILDING CODE CHECKLIST (Cont'd)
SECTION
Exit signs required? WP. air -^4
U4/ £00. LOAD OF *50+"
Balcony rails? __________________________________
AUU. EHCL00 PLOO(Z.; KCOP OPE-HiH, OPEN Where required?* <^la2&o of -esreMp*., gAMFsj 11-11
lAHDlK^, 0!ALXOHieP= op t=D(204e Height required kot~ thah 4'2" J>
IT-il
Balusters or intermediate rails required o.c. max. ____________
17. Penthouses:
Area limitations HO MQfS.fr tham /. op- a, ^(pOI t
^UFFOfZ-TIM-li, fZOCDp
Height limitations mot Exo&feO ^2&'
StoOl
Use limitations ro ^>4E4--ns<2. mcoU. sq-mre o^S-
VEteT- -=-V4Ap=T *=>t=ej'+IH-(^i IH- f2COF
Construction requirements gjcT. uall^ [ zcof pusogs
S^pOl
pUE-Q'O. PC|2 MA-IH FOf2.-nOH OF- feL-OCaj. EXOjgFTlOM &CT. U-ta.L-L.'s AHD pcoFb +tS 1 PpOM A-CUAS-EHT ft. >E OF Ot-VE. WOU^-
Fipe oa+bTpoopcH
18. Parapet walls:
Where required Al.l. ^TE.piop. \. ts>£*cx-~ ) i709.
Height *30 i M-repjbeoriort of gQOF 4 uoa>u_ _______
<50ePAdE-
19. Fire extinguishing systems:
Sprinkiers required L-it-VEM- PL-COp- ^-p&A fexCfSF-Qfb 3&D l
1,500
Dry standpipes required_ Location


Revised March 1983
( )
N- A
4.10.3
4.10 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION (Coat'd)
SLP B03XDIMG COOT CHECKLIST: (Cont' d)
53
268.
SECTION
Number required______________
Number outlets required______
Hose required________________
Siamese connections required
Wet standpipes required n8 nqke jgeQ'D. S^-
Number required (hose run)__________________________ ____________
Location
Fire extinguishers required ___________________________
20. Toilet roan requirements: Code utilized? \C-fZ>o
Fixture count requirements: Aj==peHOi^ O
Men: Basis Actual
Lavatories *2
Water closets
Urinals *2
Women:
Lavatories 2
Water closets 4
Drinking fountain requirements ^ C I F=Of2. EA04 ICO f


Rev. March 1983

4.10 SOFPLBMBfX&Kr INFORMATION (Cont'd)
269.
4.10.3 SLP BUILDING CODE CHECKLIST (Cont'd)
SECTION
Showers Walls 4 recruired? 1 r=c%z- &aov S PfepfeOH^ U^=>OSA, pOOt WOOTU, HAp-D*, KOH- A6SO(2.BeHT ^opFA^E- ^51
l Floors 4AM£ A ISbOVE. IO
Compart Mioe- -Handica ments LlA-rB|2CLO&e-r?> hot i_e^=> thah *sO 11
6LSA^ 'UPALE (H- FPOMT OP 6EE, -S=lAfeET4=>
PfZOM F&O&piAl- f2e^i*=b.TE42.
AtC-e-4=^\elt-|-r*Y TTA HDA
21. Skylights:
Locations THAH ^S0 T=tzoM UCfSi-zaHTAL- \
Separation -gferwe-eis -eOFropr^ -ahau, mot
ey eeeo '2*^ Maximum size
Maximum aggregate area in room
Curb height at* uea^T 4" a&o^e. of ^odf-
Elevators and escalators: Maximum number in each shaft
Ventilate penthouse?
Machine room wall construction


55
Revised March 1983
C)
>s-^i 4.10 S0FPLZHBITXR7 IHFORMATIOH (Coat'd)__270.
4.10.3 gr-P grrr-n-nc COOT CH1B'n.IST: (Cont'd)
23. 0m of public pro party:
Doors prohibitad fraa swinging into city proparty?
Marquees, canopies, etc.: tx>op^> Oaj-h E.uUMt^ 1 Fo£>r
Support from building? SM-ng-EJ-^
Material restrictions lamihated ,
Distance above flit mc^etbam pet pspm Efe-roc i2/
le^7 thaj-1 ffe. to ooiz&- £>'
Maximum distance of extension over walk not ue^. twan /2.'-Q'1
Maximum height (Vmi6tMe>^ au_ mot exceed
Drainage -roUAfEo >i
Other projections: Minimum height above "ground" + O"
l l CP CLEAp&H 6J= Maximum allowable proj action . upto 4'0
Bay window, porch, balconies
Cornices, etc.
24. Fire alarm: s Reguired basis iLu c,j2coP EL coo. ua/ cco. t fco9 -OAO OVEg. 50
Type AUTOHMIO AOTlVA-p0r^
25. Emergency lights or power reguired exit-e -eba-ll. ee lit 3^bl'^p
U_1 / HOT UE^ THAH 1 PT-6AHDLE- AT FUCOp- LEVEU Wf4IL-& feL-CiZ,
lt OCOOPlEO. rowep MO^T EbE. -eo'P'PLJ &O -^ejpApATe--
OifSEOITE- Cp. -=>C30f2-C&4, CT= fOWEp.-
26. Access doors required in exterior vails without openings? Z.
~^/4 Hoop, nee. ppptec-tiQH fg^cnH^_________________
SECTION
4E>ol
4*5>o^


SUMMARY OF PROGRAMMED SPACES
SPACE DESCRIPTION AREA
Entry, Lobby, Lounge 3,500 sq
Reception, Control 300
Public Restrooms 600
Staff Office Storage 150
Daycare (Play Area Adjacent) 2,000
Restrooms for Daycare 160
Restaurant (Patio Adjacent) 3,200
Kitchen for Restaurant 2,000
Reading Room 3,500
Multi-purpose/Seniors Area (Patio Adjacent) 1,700
Ceramics and Wet Crafts (Patio Adjacent) 1,700
Pool Area (25 meter lap pool w/l-meter and 3-meter boards, glass-enclosed sun terrace, outside sun deck 7,200
Pool Storage 350
Pool Filter Room 200
Women's Lockers, Showers & Saunas 750
Men's Lockers, Showers & Saunas 750
Gymnasium (basketball court, running track, sport deck, sunning deck) 8,700
Racketball Courts (4) 3,200
Spectator Gallery for Racketball 800
TOTAL NET ASSIGNABLE SPACE 40,760 sq.
UNASSIGNABLE SPACE
25% of net 10,190 sq.
(sails, circulation, mechanical and electrical spaces)
TOTAL BUILT AREA 50,950 sq.
56
ft.
ft.
ft.
f t.
NOTE: ALSO INCLUDED: Outdoor Amphitheatre


__________________CHAgACTE-I^ISTlC^
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1200 sq. ft. with high ceiling
MATUig.& OP
The primary function of this area is to provide an open space at the complex's main entrance where people may unite, wait, or sit.
It will be a focal point for people needing direction to an area or gathering for an event.
HUMfoBte.
1 to 150 ^RATIAL.
As the main entrance to the complex, the Lobby/ Lounge should be inviting. It should draw the individual in and orient him to the rest of the complex. There should be a strong orientation to the outdoors and have a vitality indicative of possibilities within the building. Congestion should be minimized.
PUNCTl^MAL gE-LAn^NeKl^
Immediately adjacent to reception/control, public restrooms, staff office and storage, and within close proximity of the daycare area, cafe, pool, and multi-purpose rooms. Must be centrally located within complex. Strong relationship to outdoors, exterior circulation and parking. Should be accessible to all.


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Natural daylighting desirable. Zone lighting at sitting areas is separately controlled.
40 footcandles overall with up to 60 foot-candles in reading areas.


RECEPTION/CONTROL SIZE
400 sg. ft.
NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
The reception/control area is both a key to public relations and a control point for the entire building. It serves as the information center, equipment checkout center, and point of supervision.
NUMBER INVOLVED 2 to 5
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
Space consists of two distinct areas:
(1) Counter between the workers and building users; (2) A secured area for equipment storage and clerical use. Visual control to lobby/ lounge to be maintained at all times. The area should be open and appealing.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Directly adjacent to lobby/lounge. Front portion of area accessible to entire lobby while office and storage portion are completely secure from public.
LIGHTING
70 footcandles in clerical areas, accent lighting at counter. Natural daylighting desirable.


PUBLIC RESTROOMS
SIZE
2000 sq. 1,000 sq
ft. (1,000 sq. ft. ft. for women)
for men
/
NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
Men's and women's restrooms for area's workers
and users.
NUMBER INVOLVED 1 to 12, each room.
PLUMBING
Women6 water closets*, 5 lavatories Men3 water closets*, 4 urinals, 4 lavatories Includes one accessible by handicapped in each room.
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS Clean, hygienic, well-lit.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Adjacent to lobby/lounge. To be used by people using multi-purpose/seniors rooms, cafe, and crafts rooms.
LIGHTING 30 footcandles.


61
STAFF OFFICE
SIZE
500 sq,
ft.
NATURE OF ACTIVITY
This is the office area that (1) receives the public', and (2) serves as a gathering space for the employees of the complex. There should also be a waiting area for those waiting to see the staff.
NUMBER INVOLVED 3 to 5.
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
Pleasant working area which is inviting to both staff and the public.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Adjacent to lobby/lounge area. Easily accessible to all, including handicapped. Easy to find once in building.
LIGHTING
70 footcandles, with natural light desirable.


62
DAYCARE
SIZE
1,240 sq. ft.
NATURE OF ACTIVITY
A child care area for users of the facility. Age ranges from infant to eight. Activities include drama, games, handcrafts, education. Activities made to suit wide range of ages. Small restroom also provided for children.
NUMBER INVOLVED Up to 25.
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
The room should be cheerful, bright, open, and encouraging creative play. It should be flexible enough to accommodate different sized groups. The space opens onto an outdoor play area.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Located adjacent to exterior space which serves as outdoor play area. Located near to the lobby/lounge. Accessible to all users of complex.
LIGHTING
Natural daylighting. In specific areas for reading, drawing, 30 footcandles.


63
RES
TAURANT
SIZE
2000 sq. ft. (with 2000 sq. ft. kitchen)
NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
A gathering and eating space for all users of the complex.
NUMBER INVOLVED
Up to 60 (not including outdoor patio)
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
Oriented to the outside and to the vitality of the activities within the complex. Should provide comfortable areas for diners who want meals, or coffee drinkers who want to sit and read. The view to the Flatirons should be exploited in this area and in the outdoor patio.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Located near center of complex and lobby/lounge so access to outside circulation and parking is good. Should be accessible to outside service court for deliveries that are unobtrusive to users of complex.
LIGHTING
Natural daylighting. In kitchen60 footcandles.


READING & COMPUTER AREA
SIZE
5,000 sq. ft.
NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
An area for study, relaxation, reading, and computer work for the public and students at the university.
NUMBER INVOLVED Up to 150
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
There should be a variety of spaces, from individual study carrels to nooks for quiet conversation to tables for spread-out studying. There should be an orientation to the outside for viewing. Patio adjacent is desirable. Computers in separate area.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Should be located in a quiet part of the complex but accessible to the public.
LIGHTING
Natural lighting desirable. Up to 60 foot-candles in reading and computer areas. Computers should be kept away from direct sunlight.


MULTI-PURPOSE/SENIORS
SIZE
3,000 sq. ft.
NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
As the name implies, these rooms need to be very flexible to accommodate a wide range of activities. They should be designed to accommodate such activities as dry drafts, club meetings, dancing, lectures, classes, craft displays, and slide shows. Senior citizens may use these areas for their own gatherings as access will be conducive to handicapped and infirm.
NUMBER INVOLVED 20 tO 200.
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
Very flexible spaces. Divided into 1 to 3 rooms for varied group sizes. Adjacent to outdoor patio. Possibly near to children's play area.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Very close to lobby/lounge and public restrooms. All room's access controlled by reception/ control desk. Handicapped access required as well as easy access from exterior circulation and parking.
LIGHTING
Variable lighting, with up to 70 footcandles. Natural light desirable. Capability of making space completely dark.


CERAMICS & WET CRAFTS
SIZE
3,000 sq.
ft.
NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
A space for enjoying creative, constructive ceramics and other wet crafts such as painting individually or in groups. There will be two distinct areasthe wet crafts room and kiln room.
NUMBER INVOLVED Up to 60
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
Flexible spaces, cheerful and conducive to relaxed activities. Painting and ceramics areas distinct.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Convenient to lobby/lounge with control at reception/control desk. Should avoid direct contact with very noisy areas. Possibly adjacent to outdoor patio/work area.
LIGHTING
Natural daylight desirable but no direct sunlight. Even levels of illumination with daylight characteristics.
PLUMBING
Three compartment sinks in wet crafts area.


67
POOL AREA
SIZE
14,500 sq. ft.
NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
Basic swimming and diving instruction, swimming for fun, therapy, competitive swimming and diving, water polo, and spectating. University groups may use the pool area for swimming and diving practice. Glass-enclosed sun room for winter sunning.
NUMBER INVOLVED
From 25 to 200 participants. Up to 60 spectators.
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
Large, spacious, open to exterior through glazing. High ceiling with view to Flatirons if possible.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Directly adjacent to showers and locker rooms. Adjacent to sun terrace, adult pool play area, children's pool play area. Interior adjacencies are pool storage, pool offices, pool filter room and lobby/lounge. All entries barrier free. Refer to graphics on following pages for size requirements.
SURFACE TREATMENTS
Non-skid deck, water resistant wall finishes, sound control material on walls. Pool marked with lane markers, turnabout squares, depth indicators and distance marks.
POOL ELEMENT SIZES
25 meter lap pool with 3 meter diving ell Shallow learning poolapproximately 1500 sq. ft. Sun roomapproximately 2000 sq. ft.
Whirlpool areaapproximately 1000 sq. ft.


LIGHTING
Adjustable lighting with 70 footcandles maximum. No light fixtures over the water.
The light source should be placed to avoid glare on the water. Natural daylighting is desirable with consideration to avoiding glare and reflection on the water's surface.
PLUMBING
Drinking fountains and floor drains in deck area.
HVAC
Controlling humidity is essential. Introducing dry heated air and removing moist air produce a comfortable environment. Temperature must be kept constant and at a minimum of 80. When spectators are present or the capacity is at the maximum in the summer, the temperature should be lower. Air velocity should be kept low to avoid chilling wet skin. The entire pool area should be isolated because of its high humidity.


69
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POOL STORAGE
SIZE
500 sq. ft.
NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
Pool storage for deck, maintenance, safety, and racing equipment.
NUMBER INVOLVED None
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS Durable, closed, secure room
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Directly adjacent to pool room and to exterior if possible. Accessible only to pool personnel.
LIGHTING 30 footcandles


POOL OFFICES
SIZE
500 sq. ft. NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
Office space for instructors, visual supervision of pool, and separate first aid room.
NUMBER INVOLVED 1 or 2
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
Pleasant office environment visible to and from pool areas.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Directly adjacent to pool. Accessible from pool area.
LIGHTING 50 footcandles.


POOL FILTER ROOM
SIZE
400 sq. ft.
NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
Pool filtration and chlorination equipment
NUMBER INVOLVED 1
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS Secure, durable, enclosed area
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Direct access to pool area. Direct access to exterior service area for delivery of chlorine and other chemicals.
LIGHTING 30 footcandles
PLUMBING
Sink and floor drain HVAC
Exhaust fans to exterior.


73
LOCKER ROOMS
SIZE
500 sq. ft. for men, 500 sq. ft. for women.
NUMBER INVOLVED
80-100 men, 80-100 women
SPATIATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
Brightly colored, clean, sanitary rooms.
Should be plenty of room for people to dress and move about. Visually removed from public areas.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Entry to locker rooms should be from a point which is easily controlled by reception/control. Directly adjacent to locker rooms are restrooms for lockers. In very close proximity are the pool and various physical activity areas. Locker room should be barrier-free.
FURNISHINGS & EQUIPMENT
105 lockers for each men and women:
(4312" x 12" x 72")
(62 12" x 12" x 36")
Fixed benches in front of all lockers, wall mirrors. Countertops with mirrors and hairdryers .
SURFACE TREATMENTS
Non-skid water resistant flooring, ceramic walls, acoustically treated waterproof ceiling.
Refer to following pages for graphics of size requirements and typical shower and locker room layouts.
LIGHTING
20 footcandles


SHOWER ROOMS & SAUNAS
SIZE
625 sq. ft. 1250 sq. ft.
for men, total.
625 sq.
ft.
for women
NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
Showering before entering and leaving pool areas, showering after using physical activities areas. A drying area is to be provided prior to entering locker room area. Separate saunas required for men and women.
NUMBER INVOLVED
Up to 8 each shower area and 4 in each drying area. 10 in each sauna area.
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
Bright, clean, hygienic. See following pages for sauna layouts.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Adjacent to restrooms, drying area, locker rooms, and physical activity areas. Directly adjacent to poolswimmers must pass directly by showers prior to entering pool. Sauna directly adjacent to shower area. Barrier free to all users of pool and physical activities areas.
SURFACE TREATMENTS
Non-slip, water-resistant floors, ceramic walls and acoustically treated, waterproof ceilings. Saunas redwood covered surfaces throughout.
LIGHTING 30 footcandles
PLUMBING
Floor drains, 8 shower heads each room.
HVAC
Ventilation required to remove vapors, no air conditioning.


LARGE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ROOM SIZE
5,000 sq. ft.

NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
Activities in this room include trampoline, volleyball, fitness, gymnastics, indoor jogging, badminton, and large group activities.
NUMBER INVOLVED Up to 150
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
This room should above all be flexible.
Several different games may be played simultaneously. The ceiling should be a minimum of 15 feet high but not so high as to create a cavernous effect.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Adjacent to locker rooms and storage. Control over entry should be through reception/control desk. All access should be barrier free.
SURFACE TREATMENTS
Wood flooring, hard wall surfaces which have no projections.
LIGHTING
70 footcandles distributed over entire floor area. Natural light desirable with special care taken to minimize glare or reflection.
Care must also be taken so that direct sunlight does not interfere with activities.
HVAC
Provide air movement at rate of three air changes per hour and at the same time change entire air volume once per hour with outside air. Ability to open area to outside during warm months desirable.


76
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77
RACKETBALL COURTS SIZE
4 courts at 800 sq. ft. apiece 3,200 sq. ft. total NATURE OF ACTIVITIES
Four courts for racketball or handball games with an 800 sq. ft. spectator or waiting gallery.
NUMBER INVOLVED Up to 4 per court.
SPATIAL CHARACTERISTICS
Well lit, very formal, rigid space required for handball or racketball. See next page for graphics of size requirements.
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Close to locker rooms. Accessibility to the four courts needs to come from several directions. (1) Controlled access to each individual court by the users, and (2) access to a corridor located directly above (at least 12 feet high), which may be used by an instructor or spectators.
SURFACE TREATMENTS
Hard plaster ceilings and walls, hardwood flooring. Glazing for natural lighting. All surfaces must be flush.
SIZE REQUIREMENTS
Each court is to be 20' x 40' x 20' high at the front and minimum of 12' high at rear. Circulation space required above for instructional use and additional spectator viewing.


LIGHTING
Even lighting required for participant's safety. 100 footcandles. Natural lighting desirable in court area, indirect natural light fine for spectator corridor above.
ACOUSTICS
Entire area should be acoustically removed from other activities.
HVAC
Well-ventilated space required. Eight air changes per hour with complete volume changed with outdoor air once per hour.


79
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Baum, Andrew and Stuart Valins. Architecture and Social Behavior. New Jersey: Laurence Erlbaum Assoc.,
1977.
Crowe, Sylvia. Space for Living. Netherlands: Djambatan N. V., 1961.
DeChiara, Joseph and John Callender. Time Saver Standards for Building Types. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1980.
Edwards, Michael. Psychology and the Built Environment.
New York: Wiley and Sons, 1974.
Friedburg, Paul. Play and Interplay. London: The MacMillan Co., 1970.
Gaillard, Marc. Architectures des Sports. Paris: Editions du Moniteur, 1982.
Goldenburg, Leon. Housing for the Elderly. London:
Garland STPM Press, 1981.
Gray, David. "The Un-Hostile Park," Reflections on the
Recreation and Park Movement. Iowa: Wm. C. Brown Company, 1973.
Haun, Paul. Recreation: A Medical Viewpoint. New York: Columbia University Press, 19(55.
Martin, Alexander Reid. "Man's Leisure and His Health,"
Quest, Monograph 5, 1965.
Mazria, Edward. The Passive Solar Energy Book. Pennsylvania: Rodale Press, 1979.
Milgram, Steven. "The Experience of Living in Cities," Science. 1970.
Murphy, James F. Recreation and Leisure Services. Iowa:
Wm. C. Brown Co., 1975.
National Recreation and Park Association. Outdoor Recrea-tion Space Standards. Washington, D. C.: NRPA,
1965.


80
Norberg-Schulz, Christian. Existence, Space & Architecture New York: Praeger Publishers, 1971.
Ramsey and Sleeper. Architectural Graphic Standards. New York: Wiley and Sons, 1981.
Sport Council. Handbook of Sports and Recreational Building Design. London: The Architectural Press, 1981.
Toffler, Alvin. Future Shock. New York: Random House, 1970.
Uniform Building Code. International Conference of Building Officials, T979 Edition.




FIRST FLOOR PLAN


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