Citation
Rangeview High School

Material Information

Title:
Rangeview High School
Creator:
Walker, Brad A
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
127 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, charts, plans ; 22 x 29 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Rangeview High School (Aurora, Colo.) -- Designs and plans ( lcsh )
School buildings -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Aurora ( lcsh )
School buildings ( fast )
Colorado -- Aurora ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 125-127).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Brad A. Walker.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
08674346 ( OCLC )
ocm08674346
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1981 .W34 ( lcc )

Full Text
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN AURARIA LIBRARY
JRAD A. WALKER THESIS PROJECT
RAINIGE VIEW HIGH SCHOOL
COLLEGE
OF ENVIRONMENT AL DESIGN
fl+P UNIVERSITY
M9o OF COLORADO AT DENVER
A72
1981
W34


table of contents
Page Numbers
1 .GENERAL THESIS INFORMATION ...................................................~^~3
2.STTE
Regional Plan ............................................................... U
Site Aeneas ................................................................. $
Regional Vehicular Traffic .................................................. 6
Existing Development ........................................................ 7
Neighborhood ................................................................ 8
Distri ct School a .......................................................... 9
Topography and Drainage ..................................................... 10
Setbacks and Restrictions ................................................... 11-12
Utilities ................................................................... 13
Views ....................................................................... 1li
Soils Test Locations ....................................................... 10
Site Section Grach .......................................................... 16
Soils Coniitions and Foundation Recommendations ............................. 17-19
3. CLIMATE
Climate Summary Of Denver, Colorado ......................................... 20-22
Solar Angles ................................................................ 23
Monthly Dinunal Bioclimatic Analysis .................................... 2li-29
Monthly Diurnal Bioclimatic Synthesis ....................................... 30-31
Monthly Diurnal Bioclimatic Graph ......................................... 3?
h. SITE PLANNING
Site Resume ................................................................. 33
Site Comnonents ................................................ 3ls-36
Si te Matrix ................................................................ 37
Site Plan Alternatives (A through E ) .................................... ?8-li?
Site Com" .pent Diagram ..................................................... Ii3
Site PI m Diagram ........................................................... Illi
Schematic Site Section ...................................................... Ii0
0. BUILDING
Rangeview High School Program ............................................... li6-03
Totals ................................................................ 0)i
Building Code and Zoning Requirements ....................................... 00-69


TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd)
Page Numbers
6. STRUCTURAL- MECHANICAL SYSTEMS
To Be Completed Fall, T9B1
7. DRAWINGS
To Be Completed Fall, 1901
8. PHOTOGRAPHS
To Be Completed Fall, 1981
9. CONFERENCES AND INTERVIEWS ..
10. RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY
70-7U
75-77


l\IOIJL\flAl&JO=IIMI
SIS3H1


GENERAL THESIS INFORMATION
PROJECT
Rangeview High School 17598 East Iliff Ave.
Aurora, Colorado
CLIENT
Aurora Public Schools 1085 Peoria St.
Aurora, Colorado
ARCHITECT
Roland M. Johnson and Associates 12385 East Cornell Ave.
Aurora., Colorado
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER
KKBNA
7)i56 West 5th Ave.
Denver, Colorado
MECHANICAL ENGINEER
Becket/ Harmon/ Carrier/ Day Inc.
1U33 17th st.
Denver, Colorado
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
Garland D. Cox Associates 1825 Lawrence Suite 200 Denver, Colorado
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
During May 1981, Aurora Public Schools released contract bidding for the proposed Rangeview High School. The school will be located at 17598 East Iliff Ave. (near Buckley Rd. and Iliff). The site


GENERAL THESIS INFORMATION (Contd)
is situated on a southwest facing slope. The school will eventually be surrounded by single family residences but is now somewhat isolated. Designed by Rowland Johnson and Associates, the school will be approximately 218,000 ft and serve 1800 students. Preliminary gromdwork began during May 1981.
Fundamental program allocations include........
(1) Two gymnasiums and locker facilities
(2) Pool '
(3) Administrative areas
(li) Auditorium (including two lecture halls, student council and drama rooms)
(?) Auto, metal and wood shops, library and audio visual facilities
(6) Instrumental and choral facilities
(7) Commons area, lounge and kitchen.
The site rill also include.......
(1) Football field (no stadium)
(2) Baseball field
(3) Softball field
()j) Handball courts
(?) Soccer field
(6) Parking for- approximately It 10 spaces THESIS PRESENTATION
The thesis pro.iect will be based on the program, site, and specific features of langeview High School. The assumption will be made that Aurora Public Schools will act as client and for the purpose of my thesis, I ill act as architect. Grapic presentation will include site plan, oor plans, elevations, building sections, perspectives and appropriate structural, mechanical and electrical explanations (in accordance with systems synthesis requirements). Models will be made to present building form, building context, and illumination solutions. All data, notes, calculations, rduced drawings, and photograp hs will be submitted in a typewritten 8L; by 11 bound format.
INSTRUCTOR
Mr. G. K. Vette"
ADVISORY HOARD
Mr. David Decker, Architect, acting as design consultant (experience in school building design)


GENERAL THESIS INFORMATION (Cont'd)
Mr. Bill Dilatush, Architect, acting as project process consultant and design consultant Mr. John Prosser, Architect, acting as design consultant
Dr. Donald Woolard, Architect, acting as consultant for energy efficient design SUPPLEMENTAL ADVISORY BOARD
Mr. Donald Rice, Architect and designer of Rangeview High School, acting eg correspondent for design issues 1
Mr. David Hartenback, Aurora Public Schools, acting as client correspondent
Mr. Wayne Smith, Director of construction, acting as source of project documents
FACULTY ADVISORY BOARD
Mr. Gary Long, Architect and acting as mechanical consultant -Dr. D.C. Holder, Engineer and acting as structural consultant
PERSONAL STATEMENT
Rang.eview High School will give me an excellent opportunity to utilize skills already acquired during my architectural education. Futhermore, it will be challenging as a project to work on for the next seven months. I have an excellent group of professional advisors. Their experience and expertis will be very beneficial for the process and product of my thesis project.


I


IMMlS
1685
08259 (£> The Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Company 1980


VICINITY MAP
ACCESS
, 1 dJLleS
NORTH


RFTiTONAL VEHICULAR TRAFFIC
Street No. Lanes (Total) Parking Accommodations (Overflow)
S. Telluride St. 2 Parallel parking on east shoulder
E. Evans Ave. 2 Parallel parking on north side
E. Iliff Ave. h < Parallel parking both sides
S. Buckley Rd. h No parking
S. Tower Rd. To be p 2 lane road noon completion
E. Jewell Ave. Typical residential parking
E. Mississippi Ave. h No parking
S. Chambers Rd. h No parking
E. Yale Ave. 2 Typical residential parking
E. Mexico 2
Uravan St. 2
E. Hampden Ave. 6 No parking


VICINITY .MAP c*.Lfc,_ 1 MILE.
EXISTING DEVELOPMENT EAST OF
I 2-2-5
NORTH


VICINITY MAP i>C+\jL |- 1 HIL.E-
NEIGHBORHOOD (16 MONTH PROJECTION)
NORTH


VICINITY MAP
DISTRICT SCHOOLS
r
n ile
NORTH


A *
Hlf> V (


'** Mill


SITE SETBACKS AND RESTRICTIONS
The site is zoned as a Planned Community Zoned District (P.C.Z.D.).
A P.C.Z.D. in this case is considered as a parallel district.
This parallel district is sanctioned by the Aurora Planning Department and Aurora Public Schools.
<
In this situation, Aurora Public Schools can waive setbacks and restrictions established by the Aurora Planning Department. Final drawings are not required to be approved by the Aurora Planning Department.
The only restrictions on the site are the 10'-0" utility and Phillips Petroleum Easements (see next page). The central 60'-0" (including gas lines) is an agricultural easement. Crops can be grown up to this respective line. The cogent easement for construction is the entire lbO'-O". No construction is permitted within that restriction. However, parking and landscaping can be planned over the entire easement up to the property line. The petroleum line was U'-O" below present grade. It has been lowered lh'-O" below that level for the new school to be built.


* X A |


v a.
a




SOILS CONDITIONS AND FOUNDATION RECOMMENDATIONS
Prepared By: The Fisherman Company
10600 W. Alameda Suite L-7 Lakewood, Colorado 80226
Prepared For: Aurora Public Schools 1369 Buckley Rd.
Aurora, Colorado 80011
April 2k, 1981
Conclusions:
1. The soils consist of an upper layer of topsoil ranging from 6 to 12 inches in thickness underlain by stiff, sandy, expansive clays over claystone and sandstone bedrock at depths of 3 to 12 feet below existing ground surface within the building area. In the southwest portion of the site, bedrock was not encountered to depths of 20 feet below ground surface.
2. Ground water was not encountered in any of the borings at the time of drilling. When measured up to 1 week after drilling, all borings were still dry.
3. The upper level clays and claystone bedrock exhibit moderate to very high potential for expansion upon an increase in moisture content. The samples tested expanded up to 8 percent under a load of £00 psf when wetted. Swell pressures up to 30 ksf were exhibited in the swell-consolidation tests.
U. The site slopes downward toward the southwest. There is a swale and drainage area across the
northern portion of the site which flows southwesterly toward Toll Gate Creek. Considerable site grating will be required in order to prepare the building area for the proposed floor elevation.
As currently planned, up to 12 feet of cut will be involved in the building area with up to 18 feet of fill. Area grading will be required for playing fields, football fields, tennis courts, parking and bus access. Cuts up to 15 feet in depth with fills up to 20 feet in depth are planned throughout the site. 5
5. In our opinion, the proposed high school building should be founded with straight shaft drilled piers bottomed in the underlying bedrock. Design criteria for this foundation alternative are presented in the body of the report.


SOILS CONDITIONS AND FOUNDATION RECOMMENDATIONS (ContM)
6. There will be deep cuts and fills underlying proposed floor elevations. The laboratory testing indicates the upper soils exhibit high swell potential. Heave of slabs-on-grade can be expected in cut areas. There is potential for settlement in deep fill areas. There is potential for settlement in deep fill areas. Conventional slab-on-grade support we do not believe, will be feasible at this site because of the differential conditions. We recommend two possible floor slab systems at this site. In our opinion, the least risk of floor slab movement can be realized using a properly designed structural floor system. An alternative to the structural floor system would be the use of non-expansive fill to a depth of 8 feet below the bottom of slabs-on-grade. Incorporated with the 8 feet of non-expansive fill, would be a deep interceptor trench drain around the perimeter or the building. Also an underfloor drain system will be required. These floor slab alternatives are discussed in the body of the report.
7. Surface drainage is important both to the performance of the foundations, floor slabs and paved parking areas. Surface drainage recommendations are presented.
8. Area site grading should include stripping of topsoil and stockpiling these materials for surfacing of playing fields and landscaped areas. Within the paved parking and driveway areas, as well as the tennis court and basketball court areas, we recommend planning on placing at least 12 inches of non-expansive sand fill to reduce required oavement sections. This recommendation is based upon the understanding that non-expansive fill will be inexpensively available.
Based on the assumption of 1 foot of non-expansive granular materials for subgrade support, we recommend 8 inches of base course topped by 3 inches of asphaltic concrete. If the non-expansive materials are not used, then a thicker section of gravel and asphaltic concrete will be needed. This alternative is discussed.
9. We recommend the tennis courts include at least 6 inches of base course topped by 3 inches of asphaltic concrete considering the 1 foot of non-expansive granular fill as subgrade materials.
A similar pavement section is recommended in the basketball court area. These sections will also have to be increased if the non-expansive fill is not used.
10. The upper soils consist of silty, sandy clays and claystone and sandstone bedrock. We recommend permanent cut and fill slopes be no steeper than 3 horizontal to 1 vertical. These slopes should also be protected from erosion by vegetation or some similar technique.
11. We believe temporary excavation slopes should be no steeper than 1:1. Slopes steeper than 1:1 will probably slough and ravel into excavations.


SOILS CONDITIONS AND FOUNDATION RECOMMEiTOATIONS (Cont'd)
In our opinion, the natural soils can be excavated with conventional trenching or backhoe equipment for utility lines. As mentioned above, excavation slopes and utility trenches will most likely cave back to 1:1 unless supported by sheeting and bracing. In the bedrock areas, trenches can be nearly vertically sided for temporary excavations except where jointing and fracture patterns could be a problem. These problems are discussed further in the body of the report.


SITE SECTION GRAPH
s^[cjj.6>iUw <^p>pe l-ev^iy? iaIill. &e e->
/.T^f6^iu IS. £UAY, SHLTY, ^LI^iHTLT AMJdY, <2ft£AJl£; MT, PAI^K E^Wkl.
e>,^LAY i-6? -bii-rrv; g.hUp^ge WAreR, uJa6 gWA^uWrEf^ep ikJ the as^it-l^4? AT the tmie priu


3.CLISVIATE


CLIMATIC SUMMARY OF DENVER COLORADO
ASSETS:
1, The Sun: Adds radiant warmth when too cold for comfort,
2, Diurnal Swing: Extreme temperatures can be flattened to yield constant temeratures,
3, Moisture: Humidity can provide comfort by evaporative cooling,
'4. Wind: Natural ventilation can provide cooling when too hot for comfort,
LIABILITIES:
1, Wind; Winter northerly winds can strip heat away from buildings,
2, The Sun: Causes over heating in the summer months,
3, Temperature: Predominantly a cold climate,
RESPONSES TO CLIMATIC VARIABLES The Sun As An Asset:
1, Get sun (or light) in the building, this can be done by:
a) Direct
b) Diffuse
c) Reflect
2, There are more clear days from September to March ( when the sun is loy, and needed) than in the summer when the sun is high,
3, Activity spaces directly linked to direct sun (light) should be positioned on the south or oriented to take advantage of fall, winter sun.
Diurnal Swing As An Asset:
1, Keep heat in and the cold out; or cool in and heat out. This is done by:
a) Insulated windows, roofs5 etc, ( inside or outside)
b) Use of massive building materials as insulators/ or temperature monitor


c) Use berming or partial underground *
d) Apply time lag effect.
Moisture As An Asset:
1, Locate pools or water to catch in coming breezes to provide evaporative
cooling, <
2, Raise humidity on site by having lots of vegetation,
3, Interior planting or terrariums are desirable inside for interior humidification.
Wind As An Asset:
1, Provide cross ventilation by single loading or rooms exposed to the outdoors,
2, Provide ridge vents or turbines to cobl ceiling spaces,
3 Consider double roof to maximize air movement and prevent solar heat gain, Zf. Induce ventilation ( open spaces). Note Wind rose map,,.
Wind As A Liability:
1, Need to protect the building and openings from cold winter winds. This can be done using the following: vegetation, berming other buildings, building forms- roofs, landscaping, exterior walls,
2, Maximize volume and minimize surfaces where winds are a libility.
Sun As A Libility:
1, East-West exposures and glazing should


2, East- West exposures offer extreme conditions of short duration for light and heat, difficulity in control,
3# Exterior shading devices offer the best protection,
if, Insulate the roof or a double roofing can protect against heat gain, 5* Use light colored roofs/walls to reflect the sun ( ie, heat).
Temperature (Cold) As A Liability:
i
1, Main entrances should be avoided from the north side of the building-ice buildup,
2, Store heat through:
a) Mass
b) Insulation
c) Air lock entry
d) Double, triple glaze.
84 Fig 41
Time-lag and decrement factor


4D NL
THE SITE HAS 100X SOLAR EXPOSURE
SOLAR ANGLES
(MAZRIA)
ALTITUDE ANGLES


MONTHLY DIURNAL BIOCLIMATIC ANALYSIS
Denver, Colorado
Night Time Data (4 AM)
Month Wind (Mean fpm) Mean Rel. Humidity Average 0_ Temp. F Possible % Sun Solar Radiation BTU/sq. ft. Avg. Sky Cover Avg. Monthly Precip.
Jan. 950.4 47.1% 23.5 0 0 0.75 in.
Feb. 765.6 39.5% 22.3 0 < 0 1.0 in.
Mar. 721.6 36.8% 29.3 0 0 1.2 in.
April 836 33.7% 38.6 0 0 2.1 in.
May 704 37.6% 46.2 0 0 3.0 in.
June 959.2 33.8% 52.5 0 0 1.75 in.
July 739.2 27.0% 61.0 0 0 1.9 in.
Aug. 660 35.7% 58.6 0 0 1.75 in.
Sept. . 633.6 24.2 % 50.0 0 0 1.0 in.
Oct. 668.8 29.0% 39.8 0 0 1.0 in.
Nov. 642.4 46.3% 31.6 0 0 0.75 in.
Dec. 616.0 42.7% 23.7 0 0 0.60 in.


MONTHLY DIURNAL BIOCLIMATIC ANALYSIS
Month Wind (Mean fpm) Mean Rel. Humidity Denver, Colorado Morning Data (10 AM) Average Possible Temp F % Sun Solar Radiation BTU/sq.ft. Avg. Sky Cover Avg. Monthly Precip.
Jan. 906.4 50% 34.6 68% 116.8 5.1% 0.75 in.
Feb. 968 47.3% 37.8 75% 138.6 5.7% 1.0 in.
Mar. 862.4 43.1% 47.0 85% 205.1 5.8% 1.2 in.
April 932.8 41.6% 53.7 78% 224.1 5.7% 2.1 in.
May 862.4 50.3% 62.5 65% 245.4 5.8% 3.0 in.
June 976.8 44% 70.9 68% 262.5 4.5 % 1.75 in.
July 827.2 34.9% 80.3 72% 263.4 4.6% 1.9 in.
Aug. 668.8 47.4 77.3 72% 240.3 4.6% 1.75 in.
Sept. . 695.2 41.6% 67.8 85% 213.9 4.1% 1.0 in.
Oct. 774.4 45% 55.8 75% 165.6 4.2% 1.0 in.
Nov. 739.2 61.5% 42.3 58% 117.3 5.8% 0.75 in.
Dec. 853.6 51.3% 35.5 72% 100.7 5.3% 0.60 in.


MONTHLY DIURNAL BIOCLIMATIC ANALYSIS
Denver, Colorado Afternoon Data (4 PM)
Month Wind (Mean fpm) Mean Rel. Humidity Average Temp. F Possible % Sun Solar Radiation BTU/sq.ft. Avg. Sky Cover Avg. Monthly Precip.
Jan. 906.4 64.8% 34.2 68% 36.44 5.1% 0.75 in.
Feb. 968 63.3% 39.4 75% i 48.3 5.7% 1.0 in.
Mar. 862.4 66.2% 46.1 85% 113.3 5.8% 1.2 in.
April 932.8 62.6% 57.5 78% 150.27 5.7% 2.1 in.
May 862.4 74.8% 66.4 65% 169.9 5.8% 3.0 in.
June 976.8 69.5% 74.4 68% 184.4 4.5% 1.75 in.
July 827.2 58.9% 80.5 72% 182.2 4.6% 1.9 in.
Aug. 668.8 70.1% 78.6 72% 156.9 4.6% 1.75 in.
Sept. 695.2 60.3% 75.3 85% 123.5 4.1% 1.0 in.
Oct. 714.4 60.9% 61.7 75% 57.7 4.2% 1.0 in.
Nov. 739.2 76.3% 44.7 58% 36.5 5.8% 0.75 in.
Dec. 853.6 72.8% 37.2 72% 22.9 5.3% 0.60 in.


MONTHLY DIURNAL BIOCLIMATIC ANALYSIS
Denver, Colorado Evening Data (10 PM)
Month Wind (Mean fpm) Mean Rel. Humidity Average Temp. F Possible % Sun Solar Radiation BTU/sq.ft. Avg. Sky Cover Avg. Monthly Precip.
Jan. 950.7 67.6 % 24.1 0 0
Feb. 765.6 57.8% 25.9 0 i 0
Mar. 721.6 62.1% 32.2 0 0
April 836 52.9% 44.8 0 0
May 704.0 58.2% 53.8 0 0
June 959.2 52.2% 61.0 0 0
July 739.2 CO r* Aug. 660.0 56.2% 65.3 0 0
Sept. . 633.6 45.8% 57.9 0 0
Oct. 668.8 54.2% 42.8 0 0
Nov. 642.4 70.7% 34.9 0 0
Dec. 616.0 68.7% 26.6 0 0 _ _


MONTHLY DIURNAL BIOCLIMATIC ANALYSIS
Denver, Colorado
BTU/Sq. Ft. Calculations for Specific Times of Day
Qk = Average Max. Hourly Total Horizontal Radiation w = IT/Id Id = Day Length
t = Time of Day (solar noon = 0 hrs., symmetrical about noon IE 10 AM = 2 AM) Qt = Radiation for specific hour of day for specific month
From Sillman; Q(t) = Qk cos wt
Month Qk (BTU/Sq.Ft.) Id(Hrs.) t (Hrs i.) w =iT/ld Qt
Jan. 148 7:30 AM to 5 PM = 9.5 10 AM _ 2 .3305 116.8
4 PM = 4 36.44
Feb. 173.4 6:45 AM to 5:30 PM = 9.75 10 AM - 2 .3221 138.6
4 PM = 4 48.3
Mar. 226.5 6 AM to 6 PM = 12 10 AM = 2 .2617 205.1
4 PM = 4 113.3
April 251.5 5:30 AM to 6:45 PM = 13.5 10 AM = 2 .2326 224.77
4 PM = 4 150.27
May 272.4 5 AM to 6:45 PM = 14.0 10 AM = 2 .2243 245.44
4 PM = 4 169.9
June 288.3 4:45 AM to 7:30 PM = 14.75 10 AM = 2 .2129 262.5
4 PM = 4 184.4
July 292.4 14 10 AM = 2 .2243 263.4
4 PM = 4 182.4
Aug. 262.7 13.5 10 AM = 2 .2326 240.3
4 PM = 4 156.9


MONTHLY DIURNAL BIOCLIMATIC ANALYSIS
Denver, Colorado
BTU/Sq. Ft. Calculations for Specific Times of Day (Cont'd)
Month Qk (BTU/Sq.Ft.) Id(Hrs.) t(Hrs.) w =777 Id Qt
Sept. 247.0 12 10 AM = 2 4 PM = 4 .2617 213.9 123.5
Oct. 207.1 9.75 ,10 AM = 2 4 PM = 4 .3221 165.6 57.7
Nov. 148.6 9.5 10 AM = 2 4 PM = 4 .3305 117.3 36.5
Dec. 131.5 7:30 AM to 4:30 PM = 9 10 AM = 2 4 PM = 4 .3489 100.7 22.9
NOTE
Radiation values are changing substantially from 10 AM to A PM (excluding seasonal storms)


Month Time of Day
Jan. 4 AM
10 AM
4 PM
10 PM
Feb. 4 AM
10 AM
4 PM
10 PM.
Mar. 4 AM
10 AM
4 PM
10 PM
April 4 AM
10 AM
4 PM
10 PM
May 4 AM
10 AM
4 PM
10 PM
June 4 AM
10 AM
4 PM
10 PM
MONTHLY DIURNAL BIOCLIMATIC SYNTHESIS
Denver, Colorado
Data for Each Month at Specific Times of Day
Analysis
85% sun (need 130%)= 75% sun (need 130%)=
75% sun (need 110%)= 75% sun (need 130%)=
BTU/sq.ft.
No sun (need 130%) 85% sun (need 85%) 85% sun (need 90%) No sun (need 130%)
No sun (need 110%) 78% sun (need 70%) 78% sun (need 70%) No sun (need 100%)
No sun (need 100%) 65% sun (need 30%) 65% sun (need 20%) No sun (need 65%)
=130% deficit; no radiation (need 195 BTU/sq.ft.)
= 0% deficit; 205 BTU/sq.ft.(need 138 BTU/sq.ft.) = 5% deficit: 113 BTU/sq.ft.(need 150 BTU/sq.ft.) = 130% deficit; no radiation (need 195 BTU/sq.ft.)
= 110% deficit; no radiation (need 170 BTU/sq.ft.) = 170 deficit
100% deficit; no radiation (need 155 BTU/sq.ft.)
35% surplus; 245 BTU/sq.ft.(need 45 BTU/sq.ft.) 45% surplus; 170 BTU/sq.ft.(need 30 BTU/sq.ft.) = 65% deficit; no radiation (need 100 BTU/sq.ft.) =
No sun (need 38%) = 38% deficit; no radiation (need 60 BTU/sq.ft.) =
No sun (need 30%) = 30% deficit; no radiation (need 40 BTU/sq.ft.) =
= 215 def icit
= 74 deficit
)=153 def icit
= 200 def icit
= 195 deficit
= 32 def icit
= 142 deficit
= 180 deficit
= 195 deficit
= 67 deficit
= 37 deficit
= 195 def icit
= 170 deficit
)=114 surplus
= 40 surplus
= 155 deficit
= 155 def icit
= 200 surplus
140 surplus
100 def icit
60 deficit
262.5 surplus
184.4 surplus
40 deficit


MONTHLY DIURNAL BIOCLIMATIC SYNTHESIS Denver, Colorado
Data for Each Month at Specific Times of Day (Cont'd) Month Time of Day Analysis
BTU/sq.ft.
July 4 AM
10 AM
4 PM
10 PM
Aug. 4 AM
10 AM
4 PM
10 PM
Sept. 4 AM
10 AM
4 PM
10 PM
Oct. 4 AM
10 AM
4 PM
10 PM
Nov. 4 AM
10 AM
4 PM
10 PM
Dec. 4 AM
10 AM
4 PM
10 PM
No sun (need 38%) = 38% deficit; no radiation (need 60 BTU/sq.ft.) = 60 deficit
72% sun (shade,50 fpm) = 72% surplus; 263.4 BTU/sq.ft. (need none) = 263.4 Surplus
72% sun (shade 100 fpm)= 72% surplus; 182.2 BTU/sq.ft. (need none) = 182.2 surplus
No sun (need none) = Balance; no radiation (need none) = Balance
No sun (need 40%) = 40% deficit; no radiation (need 66 BTU/sq.ft.) = ^6 deficit
72% sun (shade,50 fpm) = 72% sun surplus; 240.3 BTU/sq.ft.(need none)=240.3 surplus 72% sun (shade,100 fpm)= 72% surplus; 156.9 BTU/sq.ft. (need none) =156.9 surplus No sun (need 20%) = 20% deficit; no radiation (need 33 BTU/sq.ft.) = J3 deficit
No sun (need 80%) = 80% deficit; no radiation (need 132 BTU/sq.ft.) = 132 deficit 85% sun (need shade) = 85% surplus; 213.9 BTU/sq.ft. (need none) = 213.9 surplus 85% sun (need shade) = 85% surplus: 123.5 BTU/sq.ft. (need none) = 123.5 surplus No sun (need 35%) = 35% deficit; no radiation (need 45 BTU/sq.ft.) = 45 deficit
No sun (need 110%)= 110% deficit; no radiation (need 165 BTU/sq.ft.) = 165 deficit 75% sun (need 55%) = 20% surplus; 165.6 BTU/sq.ft. (need 75 BTU/sq.ft.)=90 surplus
75% sun (need 30%) = 45% deficit; 57.7 BTU/sq.ft.(need 35 BTU/sq.ft.) = 22 surplus
No sun (need 110%)= 110% deficit; no radiation (need 165 BTU/sq.ft.) = 165 deficit
No sun (need 130%) = 130% deficit; no radiation (need 170 BTU/sq.ft.) =170 deficit 58% sun (need 110%) = 52% deficit; 117.3 BTU/sq.ft.(need 160 BTU/sq.ft.)=43 deficit 58% sun (need 100%) = 42% deficit; 36.5 BTU/sq.ft.(need 155 BTU/sq.ft.)=119 deficit No sun (need 120%) = 120% deficit; no radiation (need 180 BTU/sq.ft.) = 180 deficit
No sun (need 140%) = 140% deficit; no radiation (need 210 BTU/sq.ft.) = 210 deficit 72% sun (need 110%) =38% deficit: 100.7 BTU/sq.ft.(need 170 BTU/sq.ft)= 70 deficit 72% sun (need 110%) = 38% deficit; 22.9 BTU/sq.ft.(need 170 BTU/sq.ft.)=147 deficit No sun (need 140%)= 140% deficit; no radiation (need 220 BTU/sq.ft.) = 220 deficit


4. SITE PLAIMIMIIMO


SITE RESUME
SITE SQUARE FOOTAGE l,lili7,550 sq. ft. (gross area)
- 207,000 so. ft. (petroleum easement)
l,2li0,^00 sq. ft. (28.5 acres) net area for construction
Note: A portion of the Phillips Petroleum easement is restricted for construction.
Parking and landscaping are permitted on the entire easement. (See Site Plan Setbacks end Restrictions).
This net area includes all area for construction within the property lines. There are no construction setbacks (from property lines) imposed upon the Aurora School District. (See Site Setbacks and Restrictions).
SITE COMPONENTS (Listed largest to smallest)
SQUARE FOOTAGE
1. Parking (IjOO spaces) 261,900 sq. ft
2. Football field and track (l) 232,320 sq. ft
3. Rangeview High School 218,000 so. ft
h. Baseball field (1) 1)40,625 sq. ft
5. Soccer field (1) 81,000 sq. ft
6. Softball field (1) 55,225 so. ft
7. Tennis courts (6 @ 7200 sq. ft./ea.) U3,200 sq. ft
8. Handball courts (6 @ 1058 sq. ft./ea.) 6,3U8 sq. ft
9. Tractor garage (3 garages) l,8oo sq. ft
10. Storage 1,800 sq. ft



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aiMiamne's







RANGEVIEW HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM
Category
A. CLASSROOMS
1. Classroom (Science)
2. Classroom (Shop)
Space
Area (Square Feet)
Total Area = 11,HR9
Classroom/Lab (8 Q 1000/Ea.) 8,000
Prep/Work i 1,2?6
Storage 2?^
Chemicals 225
Comouter COO
Staff 7)i U
Greenhouse (h 75/Ea.) ' 7 00
Total Area 11. ^5
Auto Shop 3,?00
Storage JjOO
Welding 100
Tools loo
Offi ce ICO
Toilet 50
Metal Woiking 1,800
Storage 1 31 .
Tools 112,
Finish (Share Woodworking) Woodworking
Project Storage
Storage
Finish
Comprehensive Shop
Drafting/Electronics
Departmental Office
Storage
Display
(11?.5)
1.500 262.5
131.5
112.5
1.500 1*225
?6?,5
250
87.5


RANGEVIEW HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM (ContM)
Category
Space
Area (Square Feet)
3. Classroom (Language/Social Studies)
Total Area 10,71?
ij. Classroom (General)
5. Classroom (Math)
6. Classroom (Art)
Social Studies Classrooms (8 9 750/Ea.) 6,000
Language Classrooms (3 9 750/Ea.) 2,?50
Language Lab 760
Conference (3 9 187.5/Ea.) 56?.5
Unassigned Classroom Si?.5
Staff h50
Storage 187.5
Total Area 1Q,?00
9,000
600
2?5
p?6
160
Total Area _7}766
Math Classrooms (8 9 750/Ea.) 6,000
Resource Room 687.5
Staff 360
Conference 166.25
Storage ??6
Computer Room 337.5
Total Area ** 7,068
Classrooms (12 9 750/Ea.) Staff
Storage Work Area Conf erence
Ceramics 1,728
Outdoor Deck (700)
Throwing 160
Clay Storage 75
Jewelry 1,638


RANGEVTEVJ HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM (Cont'd)
Category Space
6. Classroom (Art) Contd
Area (Square Feet)
7. Classroom (Business)
8. Classroom (Music)
Drawing/Painting l,$li0
Photography ?00
Dark Room 3?$
Storage 62
Storage (2 @ 2$/Ea.') $0
Staff 200
Display $0
Total Area $.87$
Typing/Shorthand (2 @ 1000/Ea.)
Office Practice
Accounting
Classroom
Staff
Computer Room Resource Center Storage
2,000 1,31?.5
7$0
687.$
31?.$
31?.$
2$0
2$0
Total Area * $,827
Choral l,$h0
Storage/Library 300
Office 187.$
Instrumental Music 1,687.$
Piano Theory/Music Appreciation 1,000
Office 187.$
Practice Room (3 @ 100/Ea.) 300
Instrument Storage 2$0
Departmental Office 200
Uniform Storage 17$


MNGEVIEW HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM (Cont'd)
Category
9. Classroom (Home Economics)
b. physical EDUCATION 1. P.E. (Gymnasium)
2. P.E. (Locker Facilities)
N I
L
Space Area (Square Fee-t ) Total Area 3,6p
Sewing 878
Foods Lab 880
Storage 178
Living 1.87.
Storage POO
Sinks 8o
Classroom 700
Departmental Office Hi 80
Storage 178
CLASSROOM TOTAL AREA 7U,31)i
Total Area 28,800
Main Gym IP,680
Gym and Gymnastic Area 6,600
Auxiliary P.E. Room 1,800
Wrestling Room 1,600
Weight Room 1,300
Office 180
Storage 1P8
Storage (shared) 1,378
Total Area 10,77h
Boys locker Room 1,600
Coaches Office 1.00
Toilets Showers 180
Storage ?8o
Showers ?8o
Toilets 180


RANGEVIEW HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM (Cont'd)
Category Space
2. P.E. (Locker Facilities) Cont'd
Athletic Locker Room (Boys) Coaches Office
Toilets Showers Storage Showers Toilets
Girls Locker Room Coaches Office
Toilets Showers Showers Storage Toilets
Area (Square Feet)
1,600
!i00
ISO
ISO
17$
ISO
1687.6
306
156
280
176
ISO
Athletic Locker Room (Girls) 1,0S0
Showers ?S0
Coaches Office 175
Showers Toilets 1?S
Storage 176
Toilets ISO
Training Room )i00
3. P.E. (Pool Facilities)
Total Area 10,100
Pool Area (Pool h,S7S) Pool Equipment and Office Office
9,500
)i60
ISO Ij6, )i7)i
PHYSICAL EDUCATION TOTAL AREA


RANGEVIEW HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM (ContM)
Category Soace
C. AUDITORIUM FACILITIES
Auditorium PI atform Orchestra Pit Storage (3 @ 225/Sa.) Dressing (2 300/En.) Control Room (Slides, etc.) Lecture Hall (2 1?00/Ea.) Student Council Storage Drama
Storage
AUDITORIUM TOTAL AREA
Area (Square Feet) Total Area 11 13.76?
)j, 050 2,M7 700 675 600 300
2, )j00 1.200 100 1,200 100
13,762
D. COMMOFS/CAFETERIA
Commons Area Total Area 13,).'87 5,737
Kitchen Area Dry Storage 800
Dishwashing 620
Refrip. Sto. 360
Lockers/Toilets 2h0
Trash 215
Receiving 180
Office 120
Net Area 2,535 3.^00 (Gross)
Serving (5 counters) 3.8^
COMMONS/C^FTFPIA T0mAI .AREA
1 2 JR'


RANOISVIFW HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM (Cont.'d)
Category
E. LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER
Space Area (Square Feet)
Total Area 8SI 7
Stacks 2,2<0
Closets ( 3 50/Ea.) 150
Periodical Reading 1,050
Work Area < 700
Periodicals 300
Classroom 750
Stud10 62<
Storage ( 2 fi) 50/Ea.) 100
A.V. Storage 500
Media Production too
Counseling ( h @ 100/Ea.) ISO
Career Counseling 300
Control ??<
Conference Room 187.5
Vi ewing 1<0
Dark Room 100
Drafting 7<
D..T. <0
LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER TOTAL AREA
Ml
F. ADMINISTRATIVE
Counselor Offices (2 250/Ea.) (h @ 100/Ea.) Secretary
Shop
Office Recention Secretary,'
Data Processing
Total Area * 7,87<
<00
hoo
2<0
6nn
1.50
37<
?00
5

RANGEVIEW HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM (ContM)
Category
F. ADMINISTRATIVE (Contd)
Space
Area (Square Feet)
Student Store
Assistant Principal (2 22$/Ea.) Storage
Production Room ,
Assistant Principal (2 1$0/Ea.) Monitor Room Bookkeeping Vault Ci inic Principal
Teacher Conference
Attendance
Conference
Lounpe
Work Room
Poo 0 ban 37f> 300 ion 1 $o 1$0 300 300 300 ?R0 2?$ 22$ 1 SO
ADMINISTRATIVE TOTAL .AREA
7.87$
G. MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL, RESTROOMS
Total Area * 5,178
Mechanical Room Mechanical Room Restrooms (8 200/Ea.) Electrical
2,000
900
1,600
67$
5,17$
MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL, RESTROOMS TOTAL AREA


RANGEVIEW HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM (Confrt)
TOTAL AREAS
1. Classroom 7U,31)i
2. P.E. !i6,)!7)j
3. Auditorium 13,762
U. Commons Cafeteria 5,737 + 7,750 13,1,87
5. Learning Resource 8,317
6. Administrative 7,875
156.1,7U sq. ft. Total Net Area
Assuming 218,000 sq. ft. Gross Area Net to Gross = 7?%


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS General Information
Applicable Building Code: 1979 Uniform Building Code
Applicable Zoning Ordinance: Aurora, (Parallel District with Aurora Public Schools)
Zoning Classification: Public Land
Floor Area Ratio/Building sq. ft. Limits: 75% to 80% net/gross is optimum (Rangeview H. S. is to be constructed at 72%).
Building Height Limits: 50 feet (Although Aurora Public Schools can wave this restriction, a two
story building is suggested).
Building Setback Requirements: See Phillips Petroleum Easement. All other setbacks can be waved by Aurora Public Schools.
Off-Street Parking Requirements: Suggest 500 spaces @ 20% students driving or 1800 x and 1 administrator/faculty/staff per 100 students
(Rangeview H. S. provides 400 spaces)
.2 = 360 = 180
540 spaces
Driveway and Curb Cut Requirements: Comparison of Busing Study Data
Min. Width Lineal Ft. (36 Buses) (For 1800 Students Area Per Bus(Sq. Ft.) Including Circulation
Parallel single file 12 ft. 0 in. 1,584 528
Parallel free access 25 ft. 0 in. 2,736 1,900
30 peel-off 55 ft. 0 in. 860 1,320
30 free access 65 ft. 0 in. 860 1,572
45 peel-off 65 ft. 0 in. 620 1,100
45 free access 85 ft. 0 in. 620 1,440
60 peel-off 85 f t. 0 in. 510 1,164
60 free access 115 ft. 0 in. 510 1,584


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS
1. BUILDING CLASSIFICATION
A. Occupancy Groups, Occupant Load and Exit Requirements
Use Occupancy Group Division Sq. Ft. Sq. Ft./ Occupant Occupant Load Exit Width (Ft.) No. (3'-0") Exits
1. Auditorium (No supplemental spaces) A 2 4,050 < 7 578 11 4
2. Lecture Room A 3 1,200 7 171 3.4 2
3. Main Gymnasium A 2.1 12,650 7 1,807 36 12
4. P.E. Gymnasium A 3 6,600 15 440 8.8 3
5. Cafeteria/Commons A 2.1 5,737 15 382 7.6 3
6. Classroom (Typ.) E 1 750 20 37.5 .75 1
7. Classroom (Typ.) E 1 1,500 20 75 1.5 1
8. Kitchen E 1 7,750 200 38.75 .775 1
9. Library E 1 8,312 50 166 3.32 2
10. Locker Room (Typ.) E 1 2,900 50 58 1.16 1
11. Mechanical E 1 5,157 300 17.19 0.34 1
12. Administrative E 1 7,875 100 78.7 1.5 1
14. Shops (Total) H 3 11,325 50 226.5 4.35 2
15. Pool A 3 4,575 50(Pool) 91.5 1.83
4,925 15(Deck) 330 6.6 3 (Total)


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (contd)
1. BUILDING CLASSIFICATION (cont'd)
A. Occupancy Groups, Occupant Load, and Exit Requirements (contd)
Use
Occupancy
Group
Division Sq. Ft,
Sq. Ft./ Occupant Occupant Load
Exit
Width (Ft.)
No. (3-0") Exits
16. Other
100
Note: All spaces require access by means of a ramp or elevator for physically handicapped excluding kitchen and mechanical rooms.
B. Type of Construction
At this point in time (8-81) I will assume that the building will be Type 1 construction.
C. Location on Property (Table 5-A)
Use Occupancy Group Division Fire Resistance of Exterior Walls Openings in Exterior Walls
Auditorium Main Gymnasium Cafeteria/Commons A 2 2.1 2 hours less than 10 feet, 1 hour elsewhere Not permitted less than 5 feet, protected less than 10 feet.
Lecture Room P. E. Gymnasium Pool A 3 2 hours less than 5 feet, 1 hour elsewhere Not permitted less than 5 feet, protected less than 10 feet.
Classroom (Typ.) Kitchen Library E 1 2 hours less than 5 feet, 1 hour less than 10 feet. Not permitted less than 5 feet, protected less than 10 feet.
Locker Room (Typ.)
Mechanical
Administrative


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
1. BUILDING CLASSIFICATION (cont'd)
C. Location on Property (Table 5-A) (cont'd)
Use Occupancy Group Division Fire Resistance of Exterior Walls Openings in Exterior Walls
Shops H 3 4 hours less than 5 feet, 2 hours less than 10 feet, 1 hour less than 20 feet Not permitted less than 5 feet, protected less than 20 feet
Section 504(b): - Distances shall be measured at right angles from property line.
- Projections beyond the exterior wall shall not extend beyond:
1. A point one third the distance to the property line from an exterior wall; or
2. A point one-third the distance from an assumed vertical plane located where fire-resistive protection of openings is first required due to location on property, whiever is least restrictive.
. - When openings in exterior walls are required to be protected due to distance from
property line, the sum of the area of such openings shall not exceed 50% of the total area in the wall for each story.
Section 1803(a) Exterior Walls:
- Non bearing walls fronting on streets or yards having a width of at least 40 ft. may be of unprotected non combustible construction.
D. Floor Area
- For Type 1 Construction, floor area allowed is unlimited (Aurora Public Schools have established a building program).


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
2. DETAILED OCCUPANCY REQUIREMENTS
Group A Occupancies
Stages and Platforms
Section 3901 (a) General: There shall be one or more ventilators constructed of metal or other non combustible material near the center and above the highest part of any working stage raised above the stage roof and having total ventilation area equal to at least 5% of the floor area within the stage walls.
Section 3903 Rooms Accessory to Stage: In buildings having a stage, the dressing room sections, workshops and storerooms shall be located on the stage side of the proscenium wall.
Section 3904 Proscenium Walls: The stage shall be separated from the auditorium by a proscenium wall of not less than 4 ft. above the roof over the auditorium.
Proscenium walls may have, in addition to the main proscenium opening, one opening at the orchestra pit level, and not more than 2 openings at stage level, each of which shall not be more than 25 sq. ft. in area.
Section 3907 Stage Exits: At least one exit not less than 36 inches wide shall be provided from each side of the stage opening directly or by means of a passage way (not less than 36 inches in width)to a street or exit court. An exit stair not less than 2 ft. 6 in. wide shall be provided for egress from each fly gallery. Each tier of dressing rooms shall be provided with at least two means of egress not less than 2 ft. 6 in. wide. The stairs required in this section need not be enclosed.
Section 603 Location on Property: Buildings housing Group A Occupancies shall front directly upon or have access to a public street not less than 20 ft. in width. The access to the public street shall be a minimum 20 ft. r.o.w. unobstructed and maintained only as access to the public street. The main entrance to the building shall be located on the public street or access way. The main assembly floor of Division 1 Occupancies shall be located at or near adjacent ground level.
Section 605 Light, Ventilation, Sanitation: All enclosed portions of Group A Occupancies customarily used by human beings and all dressing rooms shall be provided with natural light by means of exterior glazed openings with an area not less than one-tenth of the total floor area, and natural ventilation by means of openable exterior openings with an area of not less than one-twentieth of the floor area or shall be provided with artificial light and a mechanically operated ventilating system. The mechanically operated ventilating system shall


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
2. DETAILED OCCUPANCY REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
Group A Occupancies (cont'd)
Section 605 Light, Ventilation, Sanitation (cont'd):
supply a minimum of 5 cubic ft. per minute of outside air with a total circulated of not less than 15 cubic ft. per minute per occupant for all portions of the building and such system shall be kept continuously in operation when the building is occupied. If the velocity of the air at the register exceeds 10 ft./sec., the register shall be placed more than 8 ft. above the floor directly beneath.
There shall be at least one lavatory for each two water closets for each sex, and at least one drinking fountain for each floor level.
Group E Occupancies
Section 805 Location on Property: Same as specified for Group A Occupancies (Section 603).
Section 805 Light, Ventilation, Sanitation:
- Same as Specified for Group A Occupancies (Section 603).
Water Closets shall be provided on the basis of the following ratio:
Boys Girls
- Secondary Schools 1:100 1:45
- In addition, urinals shall be provided for boys 1:30.
There shall be provided at least one lavatory for each two water closets or urinals and at least one drinking fountain per floor.
Group H Occupancies
Section 905 Light, Ventilation,
Sanitation:
Same as specified for Group A Occupancies (Section 603).


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
2. DETAILED OCCUPANCY REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
Group H Occupancies (cont'd)
Section 905 Light, Ventilation, Sanitation (cont'd):
- In all buildings or portions of buildings where flammable liquids are used, exhaust ventilation shall be provided sufficient to produce four complete air changes per hour.
Such exhaust ventilation shall be taken from a point at or near floor level.
- In all buildings used for repair or handling of automobiles operating under their own power, ventilation shall be provided capable of exhausting a minimum of one cfm per square foot. Additionally, each engine repair stall shall be equipped with an exhaust pipe extension duct, extending to the outside of the building, which if over 10 ft. in length,shall mechanically exhaust 300 cfm. Connecting offices and waiting rooms shall be supplied with conditioned air under positive pressure.
- Every building or portion thereof where persons are employed shall be provided with at least one w.c. Separate facilities shall be provided for each sex when the number of employees exceeds four and both sexes are employed.
- All water closets shall be provided with an exterior window at least 3 sq. ft. in area for the first toilet facility (fully openable) or a vertical duct not less than 100 sq. in. in area for the first toilet facility, with an additional 50 sq. in. for each additional toilet facility; or mechanically operated exhaust system, which is connected to the light switch, capable of providing a complete air change every 15 minutes. Such systems shall
be vented to the outside air and at the point of discharge shall be at least 5 ft. from any openable window.
Section 909 Explosion Venting:
(a) In addition to the general occupancy requirements of this chapter, every room where flammable dusts are stored, used, manufactured or processed and may be in suspension in the air, shall conform to this section.
(b) Wall and ceiling surfaces shall be smooth. Ledges shall be beveled at 60% to horizontal.
(d) Area Vents: Effective venting devices equal in area to at least one square foot for each 80 cubic ft. of volume shall be provided for every flammable dust collection or storage container having volume exceeding 250 cubic ft.
Venting devices shall be located in walls facing yards 30 ft. or more in width or located in roofs where there are no show loads.


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
3. DETAILED CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS Water Closet Compartments and Showers
Section 1711 (b) Toilet Facilities:
Each w.c. stool shall be located in a clear space not less than 30 inches in width and
have a clear space in front of the stool of at least 24 inches.
All doorways to toilet rooms must have doors of unobstructed width of at least 30 inches. Each toilet room shall have the following:
1. A clear space of at least 44 inches oti each side of doors providing access
to toilet rooms. The distance shall be measured at right angles to the face of the door in the closed position. Not more than one door can encroach into the 44 inch space.
2. Excluding dwelling units, a clear space within the toilet room of sufficient size to inscribe a circle of not less than 60 inches. Doors in any position may encroach into this space by not more than 12 inches.
3. A clear space not less than 42 inches wide and 48 inches long in front of at least one w.c. stool for use of handicapped. Except for door swing, a clear unobstructed access not less than 44 inches in width.
(d) Shower Areas:
Showers in all occupancies shall be finished to a height of not less than 70 inches from the drain inlet.


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
4. EXIT REQUIREMENTS Exits Required
Section 3302 (a) Number of Exits:
- Every building or usable portion thereof shall have a least one exit or not less than two for those required by table 33-A.
- In all occupancies, floors above the first story having an occupant load not less than 10 shall have not less than two exits.
- Every story or portion thereof having an occupadt load of 501 to 1000 shall have no less than 3 exits.
- Every story or portion thereof having an occupant load of 1000 or more shall have no less than 4 exits.
- Basements and occupied roofs shall be provided with exits as required for stories.
Floors above the second story and basements shall have not less than 2 exits except when used exclusively for service.
- The total exit width required from any story of a building shall be determined by using the occupant load of that story plus the percentages of occupant loads that exit through the level under consideration as follows:
1. Fifty percent of the occupant load in the first adjacent story above.
2. Twenty five percent of the occupant load in the story immediately above the first adjacent floor.
(c) Arrangements of Exits:
- If only 2 exits are required, they shall be placed a distance apart equal to not less than one half the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be served in a straight line between exits.
- Where 3 or more exits are required they shall be arranged a reasonable distance apart so that if one becomes blocked the others will be available.
(d) Distance to Exits:
The maximum distance of travel between any point to an exterior exit door, horizontal exit, exit passageway or enclosed stairway in a building not equipped with an automatic sprinkler system throughout shall not exceed 150 ft.,or 200 ft. if equipped with an automatic sprinkler throughout. These distances may be increased 100 ft. if the last 150 ft. is within a corridor, complying with section 3304.


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
4. EXIT REQUIREMENTS (contd)
Exits Required (cont'd)
(e) Exits Through Adjoining or Accessory Areas:
Exits from a room may open into an adjoining or intervening room or area, provided it is an accessory to the area served and provides a direct means of egress to an exit corridor, exit stairway, exterior exit, horizontal exit, exterior exit balcony or exit passageway. >
- Exits are not to pass through kitchens, storerooms, restrooms, closets or spaces used for similar spaces.
- Foyers, lobbies, and reception rooms constructed as required for corridors shall not be construed as intervening looms.
(f) Entrances to Buildings:
Main exits requiring access by physically handicapped shall be usable by individuals in wheelchairs and be on a level that would make elevators accessible where provided.
Corridors and Exit Balconies
Section 3304 (b) Width:
Every corridor serving 10 or more occupants shall be not less than 44 inches.
(c) Height:
Corridors and exit balconies shall have not less than 7' clearance.
(d) Access to Exits:
When more than one exit is required they shall be arranged so it is possible to go in either direction from any point in a corridor to a separate exit, except for dead ends not exceeding 20 ft. in length.
Stairways
Section 3305 (b) Width: Stairways serving an occupant load of 50 or more shall not be less than 44 inches. Stairways serving 50 or less may be 36 inches wide.


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
4. EXIT REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
Stairways (cont'd)
(c) Rise and Run:
The rise of every step shall be not less than 4 inches or greater than 72 inches.
Run shall not be less than 10 inches.
(g) Landings:
Every landing shall have a dimension measured in the direction of travel equal to the width of the stairway. A doorswing over the landing shall not reduce the width of the landing to one-half its required width at any position of its swing or by more than 7 inches when fully open.
(i) Distance Between Landings:
There shall not be more than 12 feet vertically between landings.
(p) Headroom:
Every required stairway shall have a headroom clearance of not less than 6 ft. 6 inches.
Ramps
Section 3306 (b) Width:
The width of ramps shall be as required for stairways.
(c) Slope:
- Ramps required by table 33-A shall not exceed a slope of 1 vertical to 12 horizontal. The slope of other ramps shall not exceed 1 vertical to 8 horizontal.
(d) Landings:
Ramps having slopes greater than 1 vertical to 15 horizontal shall have landings top and bottom, and at least one intermediate landing for each 5 ft. or rise. Top and intermediate landings shall have a dimension measured in the direction of run of not less than 5 ft. Landings at the bottom shall have the minimum dimension of 6 ft.
- Doors in any position shall not reduce the minimum dimension of the landing to less than 42 in. and shall not reduce the required width by more than 3*5 in. when fully open.


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
4. EXIT REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
Horizontal Exit
Section 3307 (c) Discharge Areas:
A horizontal exit shall lead into a floor area having capacity for an occupant load not less than the occupant load served by such exit. Capacity is determined by allowing 3 sq. ft. of floor area per ambulatory occupant and 30 sp. ft. per nonambulatory occupant. The area to which a horizontal exit leads shall have exits other than horizontal exits.
Exit Enclosures
Section 3308 (c) Openings in Enclosures:
There shall be no openings into exit enclosures except exit doorways and openings in exit walls.
Section 3309 (2) Vestibule Size:
The vestibule shall have a minimum dimension of 44 inches in width and 72 inches in the direction of travel.
Exit Court
Section 3310 (b) Width:
Exit court minimum widths shall be determined in accordance with provision of Section 3302 based on tributary occupant load. Minimum width is 44 inches. Minimum unobstructed height is 7 ft.
Aisles
Section 3313 (b) Width:
- Every aisle shall be at least 3 ft. if serving one side and 3 ft. 6 in. if serving both sides.
- With continental seating (3314) side aisles shall be not less than 44 inches in width.
(c) Distance to exit: See 3302 (d)


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
4. EXIT REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
Aisles (cont'd)
Section 3313 (d) Aisle Spacing:
- With standard seating (3314) aisles shall be located so not more than six intervening seats between any seat and an aisle.
- With continental seating (3314) the number of intervening seats may be increased to 29 where exit doors are provided along side aisles at a rate of one pair of exit doors for each 5 rows of seats. Such exit doors shall provide a minimum clear width of 66 inches.
Section 3314 (e) Cross Aisles:
- Aisles shall terminate in a cross aisle, foyer, or exit. The width of the aisle shall not be less than the sum of the required width of the widest aisle plus 50% of the total required width of the remaining aisles leading thereto. In Groups A and E, aisles shall not provide a dead end of greater than 20 ft.
(f) Vomitories:
- Vomitories connecting the foyer or main exit with the cross aisles shall have a total width not less than the sum of the required width of the widest aisles leading thereto plus 50% of the total required width of the remaining aisles leading thereto.
(g) Slope:
The slope portion of aisles shall not exceed 1 foot fall in 8 feet, except as permitted in Section 3306 (c). The slope for all handicapped access shall be 1 foot fall in 12 feet.
Section 3313 (h) Steps:
- No steps shall be used in an aisle when the change in elevation can be achieved by proper slope. No single step or riser shall be used in any aisle.
Seat Spacing
Section 3314: With standard seating the spacing of rows of seats shall provide a space of not less than 12 inches from the back of one seat to the most forward projection of the one behind it.
- With continental seating, the spacing of rows of seats shall provide clear width as follows
18 inches clear for rows of 18 seats or less
20 inches clear for rows of 35 seats or less
21 inches clear for rows of 45 seats or less
22 inches clear for rows of 46 seats or more


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (cont'd) 4. EXIT REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
Exits: Group A Divisions 2, 2.1 and 3
Section 3315 (a) Main Exit:
- Every Group A occupancy shall be provided a main exit.
- The exit shall be sufficient to accommodate one-half the total occupant load and shall not be less than the total required width of all aisles, exit passageways and stairs leading thereto and shall connect to a stairway or ramp leading to a public way.
(b) Side Exits:
Every auditorium shall be provided with side exits. Each side exit shall be sufficient width to accommodate one-third of the occupant load served. Side exits shall open directly to a public way or into an exit court, approved stairway, exterior stairway, or exit passageway leading to a public way. Side exits will be accessible from a cross aisle.
(c) Balcony Exits:
Every balcony having an occupant load of more than ten shall have ab least 2 exits. Balcony exits shall open directly on an exterior stairway or onto an approved stairway or ramp. When there is more than one balcony, exits shall open into an exterior or enclosed stairway or ramp. Balcony exits shall be accessible from a cross aisle.
Exits: Group E Occupancies
Section 3317 (b) Separate Exit System:
Every room with an occupant load of 300 or more shall have one of its exits in a separate exit system. When 3 or more exits are required, no more than 2 exits shall enter into the same separate exit system.
(c) Distance to Exits:
No point in a room shall be more than 75 feet from a minimum protection as provided by an exit corridor, enclosed stairway, or exterior of building.
Exception: In buildings not more than 2 floors in height, an increase of 90 ft.
if permitted when the building is protected throughout by detectors of products of combustion other than heat. When the building is protected throughout by an automatic sprinkler system, the distance may increase to 110 ft. For buildings over 2 floors in height, sprinkler provisions only shall apply.


BUILDING CODE AND ZONING REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
4. EXIT REQUIREMENTS (cont'd)
Exits: Group E Occupancies (cont'd)
2. No point in an unsprinkled building shall be more than 150 ft. from either an exterior exit door, horizontal exit, exit passageway, or enclosed stairway, all measured along the line of travel. In a building with an automatic sprinkler system throughout, this distance may be increased to 225 ft. In buildings with not more than 2 stories and protected with detectors of products of combustion other than heat, the distance may be increased to 175 ft.
(d) Interior rooms may exit through adjoining rooms providing the total distance of travel to an exit corridor does not exceed that specified in Subsection (c). Such paths of exit shall not pass through kitchens, storerooms, restrooms, closets, laboratories or shops.
Foyers and lobbies constructed as exit corridors shall not be construed as an adjoining room.
Section 3317 (e) Corridors and Exit Balconies
The width of a corridor in Group E, Division 1 Occupancy shall be the width required by Section 3302, plus 2 ft.,but no corridor shall be less than 6 ft. wide.
Exception: When the number of occupants is less than 100 the corridor may be 44 inches. There shall be no change in elevation of less than 2 ft. in a corridor unless ramps are used.
(f) Exits Serving Auditoriums in Group E, Division 1 Occupancy:
An exit serving both an auditorium and other rooms need provide only for the capacity of whichever requires greater width.
(g) Stairs: Each floor above or below ground level shall have not less than 2 exits and the required exit width shall be equally divided between such stairs, providing no stair serving more than 100 shall be less than 5 ft. clear width.
Exception: This does not apply for room of maintenance or storage.
(i) Basement Rooms: Exit stairways from a basement shall open directly to the exterior of the building without entering a first floor corridor.
Exits: Group H Occupancies
Section 3318 Every portion of a Group H Occupancy having a floor area of 200 sq. ft. or more shall be served by at least 2 separate exits.


6. STRUCTURAL AND
MECHANICAL


\
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SYNTHESIS
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