Citation
The shoe factory

Material Information

Title:
The shoe factory a new nucleus for a small midwestern city
Creator:
Weidmann, Nanon Adair
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
84, [9] leaves : illustrations, maps, color photograph, plans ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Buildings -- Remodeling for other use ( lcsh )
Real estate development -- Illinois -- Belleville ( lcsh )
Buildings -- Remodeling for other use ( fast )
Real estate development ( fast )
Illinois -- Belleville ( fast )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 83).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture.
Statement of Responsibility:
Nanon Adair Weidmann.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
10814092 ( OCLC )
ocm10814092
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1984 .W424 ( lcc )

Full Text
r>*TE DUE


the shoe_________foctorq
a new aucleus for a small Midwestern city
*** AN ARCHITECTURAL THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING, UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER IN PARTIAL FULLFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE ***
\r(A\
NANON ADAI^W^MANN


the
THE THESIS OF NANON A. WEIDMANN IS APPROVED.
ADVISOR
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER DECEMBER 5, 1983
shoe foctoru I


ihe
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION 1 9
SITE 10-18
CONTEXT 19-24
MASTER PLAN 25-26
PRESERVATION 27- 31
CLIMATE 32-38
CODE 39-47
ZONING 48-55
CLINIC 56-64
MUSEUM 65 76
PIE PANTRY 77-82
BIBLIOGRAPHY 83 -84
APPENDIX
Shoe foctoru I contents


hjo)3oj dogs dgT
"37rt0&p OKYZaA, N - NlVW l*b3A\


The Belleville Shoe Manufacturing Company is vacating its Main and Walnut site to consolidate operations in the more-spacious and efficient Carlisle Road plant.
This program posits two ideas: the developers idea of what should go in the vacated site and the architect's concept of what form that idea should take.
The author is both developer and architect for this project.
Jhe Shoe fact orU [introduction


L"Assured that she was not quite mad in her belief that a small American town might be lovely aswell as useful in buying wheat and selling plows, she sat brooding, her thin fingers playing a tattoo on her cheeks. She saw in Gopher Prairie a Georgian city hall: warm brick walls with white shutters, a fanlight, a wide hall and curving stair. She saw it the common home and inspiration not only of the town but of the country about. It should contain the court-room (she couldn't get herself to put in a jail), a public library, a collection of excellent prints, rest-room and model kitchen for farmwives, theater, lecture room, free community ballroom, farm-bureau, gymnasium.J Forming about it and influenced by it as medieval villages gathered about the castle, she saw a new Georgian town as graceful and beloved as Annapolis or that bowery Alexandria to which Washington rode.
All this the Thanatopsis Club was to accomplish with no difficulty whatever, since its several husbands were the controllers of business and politics. She was proud of herself for this practical view."
Sinclair Lewis, Main Street
Ihe
Three essential elements for a new city are contained within this passage:
1) the dreamer
2) the dream (a challenging and
regionally-focussed blend of
culture, community and business) and
3) the governmental forces and enterprising individuals who can shape the dream.
This project deals specifically with the dream. One site in a city is needed to germinate those ideas. The Belleville Shoe Manufacturing Company offers such a site. A new "city nucleus" will be created on the site which will provide the environment for a lively exchange of human activity while answering the city's and the site owner's economic needs.
Why it is necessary to affect a change in the city's makeup, be it Gopher Prairie, Belleville, Illinois, or elsewhere, should be answered on two levels: economic and social.
ECONOMIC BASIS
Belleville is typical, of many small, Midwestern cities. It has a Main Street which at one time was the colorful stage for trade, play, industry, and saucy gossip. The city square was the center of activity, framed by the Belleville House, home of "Belleville white asparagus", a creamy delicacy.
BelleviIlians reviewed the city's comings and goings from their store-top perches, their homes.
Shoe fOCt 01*11 I introduction
2


After the fifties and sixties when Main Street had its last facelift, the downtown fell into decline. Shops lost their customers to a shopping mall north of town. Traffic on the relatively pedestrian-scaled Main Street became abominable. Shop owners who once lived above their stores vacated them to create more offi ce space.
What Belleville has today is a fairly efficiently-run city. Parking shortages have been mitigated. Traffic can circumnavigate Main Street through a oneway coupler system. Businessmen enjoy quick and hearty meals at restaurants on their blocks.
Main Street however, lacks character. While a few stores have restored their brick and iron facades, many of the buildings still carry the metal panels of the fifties which are now dingy and corroded. These former facelifts are double insults. While looking crumby, they enshroud the names and histories of the buildings behind.
Office space has been the mainstay of the downtown economy but their prosperity in the form of faceless new office buildings took as much from the city's identity as it gave back in efficiency and clean 1 i v i n g .
the
SOCIAL BASIS
It is most easy to evaluate city decisions economically. Results in dollar figures are measurable. Whether society would be healthier, happier, better with a different urban fabric is much less objective.
Rather than the rich mix of business with pleasure, expectation with serendipity, there is a singleness of purpose. There is no setting for that chance meeting between normal patterns and new experiences. This fact is symptomatic of our increasingly-specialized world.
Secondly, much of the built history that represents Belleville's values and that sparks the inages of oral history is being lost. Those values and stories are part and parcel of Belleville's identity.
A medieval existence, a city gathered around a castle, church, and town hall, is irretrievable, and it is impertinent to a "Main Street city". Present needs at current volumes demand a much more extended city. Given Belleville's Main Street, it is possible to create a broader stage for human interaction while improving downtown's economic health. It is within the site of the shoe factory that this new image may begin to emerge.
Shoe fact or U [introduction
3


THE PROJECT
The three ingredients for realizing the dream of an economic and social mix are:
1) business
2) cultural focus
3) social hub
Specifically, in this project,those have been translated into:
1) a health clinic, 23,784 sq. ft.
2) a regional, industrial history museum, 9,420 sq. ft., and
3) a restaurant, already known for its bakery, menu and warm atmosphere, 4,400 sq. ft.
Total project square footage is 37,604.
Available square footage within the existing factory buildings is 39,148.
This does not imply a perfect match inasmuch as some of the existing square footage is not particularly responsive to project needs and therefore may be "space-banked" for future use.
There are also three critical challenges which will have direct effects on how much of the existing space is used:
1) to deal constructively with the visual gap in Main Street, now created by the factory parking lot,
2) to create a strong interaction among the site's three uses, and
3) to develop an effective dialogue between Main Street and the neighborhood beyond.
_ihe
THE PROCESS
A first step was to identify Belleville's needs: high quality office space, more-efficient medical services, low-income housing. Its cultural amenities include theaters, a philharmonic society, an active historic society with two historic district homes on display, an excellent library system, and several galleries. St. Louis, being only a few miles west, is relied upon for its extended market, cultural features and entertainment spots. In these areas, Belleville cannot compete with St. Louis. It was important to keep in mind the scale and character of the project inasmuch as many grandiose rehabilitation schemes of high-end boutiques and elegant restaurants have been snuffed out due to lack of local support.
THE CLINIC
Demographic studies found that the east end of Belleville, near the shoe factory, is one of the higher housing growth areas. It is also the location of a
substantial older population. Both of these groups, young families and the elderly, are in the high-user category for health clinics. Two hospitals service the Belleville area: Memorial, on the west end and St. Elizabeths, centrally located. Whereas several medical clinics are linked to Memorial,
St. Elizabeths is linked primarily to private practitioners. This fact, along
Shoe fnctoru I introduction


ihe Shoe foctoru [introduction


6\TE H^PITAL LlMkAttt
PHASED
COUPLER SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT
ihe Shoe foctoru I introduction


with the recent closing of a Scott Air Force Base clinic makes a strong case for a clinic near St. Elizabeths.
Other site advantages were the closeness of the site to the hospital: less than a mile, or one and a half minutes on the coupler system, and the downtown location's offering of shopping and dining opportunities for the clinic staff.
Health maintenance organizations, h.m.o.s, have a good record for delivering medical services efficiently and inexpensively. The clinic was therefore modelled after the Health Care Group, a St. Louis-based h.m.o. A conservative estimate is that it would serve 7.5% of St. Clair County's population, thus responding to the perceived needs of that populus.
the
THE MUSEUM
Since the mid-1800's Belleville has been the industrial and commercial center of Southern Illinois. The vital railroad and river networks to which Belleville was connected provided avenues for worldwide distribution of industrial goods produced in the area. By the turn of the century, the area boasted eight breweries, dozens of mills, stove fabricators, foundries, coal mines, glass factories and footwear manufacturers. Companies like Ball Jar and Anheuser Busch had their beginnings in Belleville. Some of these companies, like the Belleville Shoe Manufacturing Company, continue in business today, often in their fourth or fifth generation of family operation. It is a fascinating heritage on which to focus a museum and the shoe factory is an appropriate house for the idea.
"Made in Belleville" will be the opening exhibit of the museum. It will recreate the exhibit of the same title displayed in the Commercial Building in 1912. The "Belleville Daily Advocate", February 6,1912, reports: "The Star Brewery's pretentious exhibit follows. Four massive pillars made of beer kegs, sit at the four corners of this exhibit. Each pillar is surmounted by an electric light and inside the brass railing is a copper pagoda surmounted with a star, the trade mark of the company. The pagoda revolves and gives the visitor a chance to see the various brews made at the brewery."
Shoe foctoru | introduction
7


fefeJj'.WI2. Sweats
MADE IN BELLEVILLE SHOW IS SUCCESS FHOI BEGIH1I1G
tefiirt n Vnt Ear Sm ) Bfj ud Sim toursfid latebvt iKHtl Ivi
sieves mmmn
Itn k k)
to Ut m*
4)
Kki rjlhluj rnxu U|vW tv abeam engine t Iteing Hawn at Ibe Maklr En HrfWtne" liuiir rrtrirt t* betas IhVI in ike ('uainm-iil halUflng it Miiiu *um1 liigh atrcela in cucuoctfcai tilth (be BtiUe couvehttoa ( (be Ke-t.ill ilerthautir' AamucUMoo. The
iirlu k TiirwUj momlujr aim! although
*]| ]ML /JiUltltt Hit -*1 . E9*
I* til. tle *eetv |>mtrated rtlle.
Liu unUrrutg. iW UitMUm -w
In ||M. ,-aat .iu.Ui an riblhll legality Hbit and UMCf ('Mi|aftjr xik m-nm t*w vrtHr^nur^rnr M *Teet nngr*- troftcnrtilf Tlila !* Ibe Uuioi m4 Walbcf fr-ttin
U. m! rrlvf7 of 11>. Bohrrtm JukuMon ltuiM| JkUwr rumptux. TW BfUcrW*
Jkv'fC* UkTie'lMtf'attoijM of n tV
buailu AWik BL tlUar BriO U.----
tw Mar ifflni rs-
liltill tuJUian Kunr iHNlrt pjll&n.
dnram to arr tbn,nrtou hwn M9rt
nl Ibr limrrrj-. . j
T1 Srrvr -- -- Trnrr fTnMtmu'i
r\klbkt ruanr wit. Nm wf b* arm
la ib rrulrr
t*rraiirw'
rm
Wnrk^ [tan ttUXT ijt IW IWUni.llr
llwrBBto Maa+arW
plDt. | tk>*..itroU from thr nmoMovt twllna; i-Jt-it. awl hath tia w twit^iiw- Mwa I tiiBiatgi id
m!.-. 0V < iiyaa Mudhi. r.i: bh'W WinaTlM r*br Truai tw 5**y. 'rtw^ao-T
t <<>|r r. mat rrtluf rrropn, Hm from tv ft-t'ia.n Ht>f Kur-rpr.
>tl|mn;'n pin.11. i-n.I.-un^ firm-
r/ia IV kurto- i miinlrt
At I Ip-, t^ft ui lUt- ^UllU CltliliKI "* Ih hrtr rablhtt M 1W Hi IS
>Tlw .Slpte Mini U*tw I'Mkiul. (ui:. tuwvil hr l.lr r III Hut frwu thr
IVmlrro lin k I T) All Ibr lark itriukr 'imilr Ml llu* \Vr.lrrn am nbplbu tit fl lttmiTIVr mulim-r ami a>rmil Ill-Mi i.f till- .-iitri rtlMllic runtU-T u.il
"I lif llu- linn in in rvklrtu-r.
! I >Mowing llil In ibr -uil.u lunm.t j nr lllul. Itir-u rlliilrll.; I ifbou >i.r
J Mii.l II .Hsr I uqiauv. until 0.1 .
TTiTmT^brrrTiinmr TT^iwiBf;
Ikitur u all ktratu- n**ff htnrr TTorW.
Ml' run. lit hrnt!l!|£ MUat InrtTiti; ntlitvm; it a, II biunukr^ Ttia,.,,,
j I'nMi'tiii- >{*.. Miiitao ilriubuf ru-
t.b.it 41 itrf iiihen> -umiIU-*, Ki-Mmi*
Milliitjr ('oiti|Mii>. iltiunk ut all ayrtn. Itvuww H*mt t'kktttviki. toA tnM mvi YHHI MittluUe lHNtt<*^JU^e vrtiAt-t*l f pi|anj. Ueratl\e Um
mid lber umh ; Ilartimauii II fi Kela XoH MITfa. -n< naTh- tt **. iMatnlanl IVrUk r LlittJ of ImiiMiiis lrIt k. ||arrtM.at
Uxor .Nliiliug <'eut|utny. fluui> *( all
LIIHIm. Itvlieriltf Brietc t miaftaoy |bluiii
ih.iI fa#.r ltrlrk of ererjr trind.
w t^ llitrli XriH t ahtr 1^ Ihr Intltd Utu will be fiMiiul the exhibit # ih. llariWM Mdlilur >V*rka. It it#
. *,ta .f 4 Jnuibo Vujnm- aiwt wtraar j dixl BetterUte therefore The
j t-xhilHi maa too Uffr to get hi4bK IIh* iMitUlmg. but It ttraeta the rjrr
r iIhhxmmimI* of iKMwerahy. |
It will be at the Hid.' la rw-lfo.* iiu-'' atH.a that tli Aoqreulra t* the rfoot log delegate* irtu be rtveo. Karti kb-legate t to metre a card aim!
| i|u bla t>re*eiitattH of the card *
| the utea U chgrirr of the Mtairealm In the r , I*** Mfovelr. vhleftr-U vi pair ut ailk j h Jhe shoe foctorii
I introduction
8


THE RESTAURANT
Marilyn opened her restaurant and pie bakery in 1976 on Main and Church streets. At the time, it seated 20. Today Marilyn's seats 120. It is the kind of restaurant that is already bustling a 10 in the morning, where you can sit and sip coffee while listening to the story of "when young Henry Ford came to town looking for backers for his idea and didn't get a penny" or the one about "George Knoebel who lived in the old Kronthal where he tried to provide central steam heat for the whole town, running it through wooden pipes buried in Main Street".
Marilyn's food is as delicious as it could be described.
Hally, the present owner/manager of the Pie Pantry states that her restaurant has grown as much as it can in their present locale. The kitchen is painfully undersized and the storage is so overtaxed that a rear stairway was taken over for expansion. Besides business people, shoppers and a few theater-goers, the Pie Pantry depends heavily on the "Scott Air Force Base traffic". The base houses its many out-of-town service people across the street from the shoe factory.
All of these factors combined to make Marilyn's Pie Pantry the logical choice for the project restaurant. Present diner capacity was increased by 20% while service areas and storage was almost doubled in the new program.
the
OBJECTIVE
The mere grouping of these functions on one site does not assure the "chance" meeting between normal patterns and new experiences. It is within the purview of the program to suggest how that could be accomplished and the responsibility of the design to translate that into reality.
Shoe foctoru 1 introduction
9


AREA AND NEIGHBORHOOD DESCRIPTION
Located in St. Clair County, the subject area is in the southwest part of the state of Illinois, thirteen miles from St. Louis, Missouri.
The sub city 1im of the
pnncipa Except f light i primaril deep to tial nei
ject neighborhood lies within the its of Belleville, six blocks east square on East Main Street, the 1 street in the downtown area, or the subject site which is zoned ndustrial, East Main Street is y a commercial strip, one block the north and south with residen-ghborhoods beyond.
ihe shoe foctoru f
site
1C


0ITE Amaly^i^
\yiht£*2
A
N
jlMW Nf>Kt (trviMir/)
<0 PEJE>IJZA&tE YIE\Y^
UNPE^lfcApUE YlE\\^
lot, motel, tire *Anrt)
Ihe shoe foctoru I
site


extant
a factory b mill c infill d boiler
3
c
(0
£
east a street
r-so
the shoe factory
site


SITE DESCRIPTION
East Main Street Walnut Street East A Street East line
frontage in feet
247.8
297.7
231.08 278.35
TOTAL SQUARE FOOTAGE = 68,964
=1.58 ACRES
area in square feet
Rooftop 21503
Asphalt 26995
Broken asphalt 7242
Concrete 540
Brick 1492
Grass 11192
68,964
ihe
BUILDING DESCRIPTION
Building "a" (1909 shoe factory):
2 1/2-story, red brick built-up roof 50 '-6 x 250 '-0"
37,875 sq. ft.
Basement: -1/2 out of ground
-perimeter windows (aluminum) -floor-to-ceiling = 12'-0" -concrete floor -open joist ceiling
First and Second floors:
-double-hung windows
(south and west--aluminum) (east and north--wood) -floor-to-ceiling 12 '-0" -mixed hard maple and
pine over t & g flooring -open joist ceiling (sec. fir.) -t & g ceiling (third fir.)
General Comments:
-all walls 18" thick exposed brick
-sprinkler system throughout -4 electric service inlets (200 600 amperes)
-heat provided by gas-fired American Standard Hot Water Boiler
-three sets of wooden stairs -five clerestories -a fire wall divides the building into two parts -the building is structually sound.
site
shoe factorial
13


the shoe factor


BUILDING DESCRIPTION (cont.)
Building "b" (1907 hosiery mill):
2-story, red brick mopped paper roof 60 0" x 109 '-0" with a rear extension 36 '-6" x 35 -0 small cellar toward the front and a full basement in the rear 16,911 sq. ft.
Basement: -concrete floor
-no natural light
First and Second floors:
-double-hung wooden and aluminum windows (1/2 and 1/2)
-floor-to-ceiling = 12 '-0" -open joist ceilings -skylight in the central section
-mixed hardwood and pine flooring
General Comments:
-sprinkler system throughout -one 600 ampere service -gas-fired American Standard Boiler -the rear of the building exhibits severe subsidence but the rest of the building is sound -the front facade is faced with buff-colored brick
Ihe
Building "c
(1980 office infill):
General
Building
General
shoe
one-story 18'-0" x 2 2 '- 0"
408 sq. ft.
Comments:
-this addition and the contiguous fire hydrant shed may be considered expendablethey are pejorative elements in the historic context
1" (formerly the boiler house):
1 1/2-story, red brick built-up roofing 29 '-9 x 40 '-4" w/ 2 offsets2'-0" x 6'-8" and 6 '-8" x 15 '-3" with an open shed attachment to the rear 1273 sq. ft.
Comments:
-concrete floor -clerestories in front section
-presently this is being used for storage only -chemical cleaning would be required
-some foundation work and tuck-pointing is required -open shed is in poor
condition and should be removed
foctorn


V wo-1 Vi C&iCAn^ Vwill
ihe shoe


lld U?iW
the
shoe foctoru I
site
17


BUILDING DESCRIPTION (CONT.)
SUMMARY:
Remove the infill office, the fire hydrant shed, the rear section of the mill building (subsidence), the boiler shed, and 600 running feet of 6 foot chain link fence (site's perimeter fence), leaving:
gross useable square footage: 39,148
(not including 5870 sq. ft. of basement in mill building)
-Floor elevations from factory "a" to mill "b"
drop 2 101
considered
and should in design.
be
ihe
-The entire site will require new paving and landscaping, save the pear, tulip and two cedar trees.
-Both the mill and factory buildings are an the National Register as part of Belleville's Historic District. Extreme care should be exercised to comply with D.O.I guidelines for rebavi1itation so that the project may be eligible for tax credits.
-Present assessed value of the buildings and land is $280,000.
-See Appendix for legal description.
site
shoe factorial
18


Comtext _
The issue of context is a multifarious one--offering not only tangible realities such as the character of surrounding buildings, material availability and site access, but also the essence of a site's potential. The first is measurable, the second represents a quality that is realized through careful study of present interactions between the site and its users. This observation develops an intuition for what a site "could be" and in combination with a sensitivity to what an area needs, begins to define the future image. Supposition and reality are both necessary tools for design.
Site essence and image are dealt with primarily in the introduction. The following descriptions, maps and pictures will attempt to piece together the momentary "givens" of the site:
Ihe
Main Street
--Belleville's East Main Street is a built continuum, primarily in commercial use.
--Most buildings are 2 to 3 stories tall, fronting on the sidewalk which has recently been widened in places to provide for pedestrian seating areas, landscaping and gas-1ight-fashioned 1ampposts.
--Dating from the mid-to-late 1800's, the buildings are built of locally-produced, red brick but many of the individual facades belie their original styles with metal or wood facings.
--Toward the square, the half-block to the north and south of Main Street is primarily parking, with some commercial buildings. Further east, the second halves of the "Main Street blocks" are taken up with storage buildings for the commercial establishments.
--Residential use starts on the north side of "A" Street. Often, these residences face into the unfriendly backs of the storage buildings.
Further discussion of these Belleville Historic District residences may be found in the historical section.
shoe
factory.
context
19


T gA'N ^ IT EM
To Cciupv^VLt
P3WS3|r7
LP n i
i*2er?>
i2- i^tzoe fkini.')
EA^T
ihe shoe factory
context


Exi^TIM^ TE^rFl iTP^Rl
Hdd o
ifiHm
Instituted in 1976, the coupler system has expidited traffic flow around the CBD. Two-way traffic on Main Street has been relieved to the point where a healthy balance between pedestrian and automobile has been restored.
Ilimi1
&
t ^ way
OV\t \V*V
frajjid.
The relationship of the site to these two traffic systems guarantees excellent access for both the pedestrian and the car .
the
shoe factorial
context


Land o^e.
id 7^- i p
j-x£L _ ,
:_:i j H-EEL: Hit LUse ]a sO
?£&*-
ihe
shoe
factory.
context
22


<301L ^UfZVEY
--Urban land is so altered by cuts and fills needed for urban works that identification of the soils is not feasible.
--Paved areas and buildings make up more than 75% of the area. The increased runoff from paved areas aggravates flooding problems.
--1 to 7 percent slopes
--This complex consists of silty, nearly level to sloping Fayette soils that have been partly disturbed by urban development.
--These soils have slight limitations for many urban uses.
NOTE: There is no evidence of undermining
in Belleville's downtown area.
_______________________the
Refer to appendix for site-specific
soils report.
shoe factory
context


24


The. Ma^teiz- Plan £eileviux

^>V>C' The consummate expression of a good master plan is the future city--an efficient, balanced and beautiful milieu for human exchange.
That a comprehensive plan is often shaped by formless phrases such as, "changing needs", "highest quality of life", and widest possible range of goods and services" limits its effectiveness as a planning tool. Yet, it often embodies the values, the politics and the history that are germane to future growth.
Belleville is no exception. Where its goals are in concert with the aims of this project, they are briefly outlined. Well-planned growth is difficult to affect in piecemeal fashion. A master plan is a matrix which can order growth and therefore it is vital to reference it here.
Ihe
--The Master distinct, that is preserved.
Plan recommends that the German flavor and heritage uniquely Belleville, be
Central Business District
--Maintain the downtown as the viable and identifiable center of Belleville.
--Aesthetic appeal of the downtown area should be enhanced through fix-up projects, new landscaping, clean-up projects and civic-sponsored improvement programs.
--Cultural and recreational events such as concerts, lectures and exhibits, as well as street dances, which will attract potential customers, stimulate "round the clock" activity in the CBD, and provide diversity, should be encouraged .
Shoe foctoru Imaster plan


Ha^T£*2. VLAH
Highways
--Specifically encourage adequate off-street parking for all new development and redevelopment to enable the city to reduce its street and road investments, maintenance costs and to increase traffic flow.
--To upgrade and improve existing residential streets.
Commercial and Industrial Development
--To encourage the location and development of business and industries that will be responsible members of the community, and that will enhance the quality of life.
--The appearance of existing commercial development should be improved through adoption of a sign ordinance by the city restricting the type, size and location of advertising signs.
the
Open Space Standards
--Where commercial development is to be located close to a residential area, a dense planting strip or other buffering areas of at least 20 feet in width should be used to insulate adjacent residential uses. In addition, plantings; masonry walls; solid fences; high, dense foliage; or other buffering screens should be provided and featured as part of the land-scaping treatment of the center.
Sign Standards
--No free-standing sign should extend more than 30 feet above the elevation of the adjacent street or the elevation of the average finished ground elevation along the side of the building facing the street, whichever is highest.
-- Sign illumination and other arrangements should be so arranged as to not cast light directly from any source of illumination onto any public right-of-way or onto property in any residential district.
Land Use
--In the interest of maintaining a functional community, a wider range of housing types and commercial facilities should be encouraged; the quality of these uses rather than mere quantity should be stressed.
[master plan
shoe factoriL


At2C,W\rtCT orV>
ihe shoe
fQCtOrU | Preservation


gTei-LEVlU-g. Hi^tDÂ¥-\Q iPi^TP-w^r
i^~55pp|[p^^^^
a
r r li i" LLJJ,
V l tl
nr (Â¥ -
ci e=J lircrc
a
Q
c?

m a
!
r
L_ Lh,
Incorporating much of the east side of Belleville, the Belleville Historic District circumscribes almost an entire century of building. The fabric of the district is remarkably continuous, exhi-bitting the simple, solid craftsmanship and the local red brick which were the hallmarks of Belleville's architecture. Most prevalent are rectilinear houses which adopted styling of various decades as fashion dictated.
Ihe
The section of Main Street, however, included in the district, represents the commercial and industrial elements which have always been the nucleus of Belleville life. Belleville Shoe remains the singular, most important industrial site within the district, both for its centrality in the distric and its uncluttered neoclassical details, characteristic of turn-of-the-century factory designs.
shoe foctoru I
[preservation
28


BELLEVILLE HISTORIC DISTRICT
In attempting to obtain certified historic structure designation for the two buildings, now within Belleville's registered historic district, the owner and designer should be aware of the following incentives and disincentives. The Tax Reform Act of 1976 and the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 have enjoined:
a. The denial of incentives for demolishing historic buildings (denial of deduction of expenditures or losses resulting from demolishing the structure; denial of accelerated depreciation for any replacement building constructed on the site of a demolished historic structure).
b. A 25 percent investment tax credit for rehabilitation of historic commercial, industrial and rental residential buildings which can be combined with (c) below.
c. A 15-year cost recovery period for the adjusted basis of the historic building .
the
d. The certified historic structure must be substantially rehabilitated with costs exceeding the greater of $5,000 or the adjusted basis of the building (actual cost minus any depreciation already taken).
e. The monetary test to qualify for the tax credit must be met within a 24 month period or, for phased projects where architectural plans and specifications are completed before the rehabilitation begins, over a 60-month period.
f. 75 percent of the existing exterior walls must remain in place as external walls in the rehabilitation process.
g. Generally, if a qualified rehabilitated building is held by the taxpayer for longer than five years after the rehabilitation is completed and the building is placed in service, there is no recapture of the ITC.
Shoe foctoru preservation
29



| RIH
imgVIig^HoE CQ.l
The Secretary of the Interior "s "Standards for Rehabilitation":
"Rehabilitation means the process of returning a property to a state of utility, through repair or alteration, which makes possible an efficient contemporary use while preserving those portions and features of the propery which are significant to its historic, architectural, and cultural values."
1. Every reasonable effort shall be made to provide a compatible use for a property which requires minimal alteration of the building, structure, or site and its environment, or to use a property for its originally intended purpose.
2. The distinguishing original qualities or character of a building, structure, or site and its environment shall not be destroyed. The removal or alteration of any historic material or distinctive architectural features should be avoided when possible.
3. All buildings, structures, and sites shall be recognized as products of their own time.
_______________________the
4. Changes which may have taken place in the course of time are evidence of the history and development of a building, structure, or site and its environment.
These changes may have acquired significance in their own right, and this significance shall be recognized and respected.
5. Distinctive stylistic features or examples of skilled craftsmanship which characterize a building, structure or site shall be treated with sensitivity.
6. Deteriorated architectural features shall be repaired rather than replaced, wherever possible.
7. The surface cleaning of structures shall be undertaken with the gentlest means possible.
8. Contemporary design for alterations and additions to existing properties shall not be discouraged when such alterations and additions do not destroy significant historical, architectural or cultural material, and such design is compatible with the size, scale, color, material, and character of the property, neighborhood or environment.
9. Wherever possible, new additions or alterations to structures shall be done in such a manner that if such additions or alterations were to be removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the structure would be unimpaired.
Shoe foctoru {preservation
30


EmEE^Y C£>wz>zv>sA*rcic>M
(ire HtVT£>t2.i RECOMMENDATIONS:
1. Water should be explored as a microclimate modifier of the site.
2. Any deciduous planting that can be provided around the buildings will moderate summer solar radiation gain.
3. Ground reflections should be designed (where controllable) to enhance the effects of solar radiation.
4. Evergreens, if planted on the north side of the buildings, will mitigate the chilling effects of winter winds.
5. Given flat, parapet roofs, economic viability of solar water heating may be analyzed. (It would not create a visual impact.)
the
6. The potential for allowing the existing dark roof to radiate energy to the floor below should be examined in the event that space is load dominated. If additional radiant heat is undesirable, the roof surface should be lightened.
7. Unless a mechanically-controlled atmosphere is preferred, for the clinic, all attempts should be made to ease or restore operation of the clerestories.
8. Heat loss, heat gain and air infiltration should be carefully studied to determine if window or door modifications should be undertaken. If improved thermal performance is necessary, the techniques to do so should be compatible with the character of the building and should not damage window or door frames. (Storm windows may be used.)
9. If aluminum is used in windows or doors, it should be in a color compatible with the original element and trim.

Shoe foctoru preservation
3


CLIMATIC- AUAJ-Y^l^
NOTE ON DATA SOURCE:
Climatic data for the subject site was obtained from the National Weather Service in St. Louis, Missouri and from the weather station at Scott Air Force Base. While Scott is closer to the site (6 miles east vs. 20 miles west to St. Louis) its data did not include high and low relative humidity nor wind directions. A close comparison of the available information from the two stations showed little difference. Scott Air Force Base is a few decimals centigrade cooler in the colder months and is a few percentage points lower in average relative humidity than St. Louis. The two elevations are within 80 feet of each other. For thoroughness I have opted to employ the St. Louis data.
ihe
Maloney
LOCATION ST. LOUIS
LONGITUDE LATITUDE 90.: 38.: * )
AL T ITUBE 535
TABLE 1. CL I MAT IC DATA < DEG C
MONTH MAX MIN RANG I!
, .IAN 4.3 -5.3 9.6
FEB 6.7 -3.4 10.1
MAE 11 6 .8 10.8
APR 19.4 7.7 11.6
MAY 24.4 13 11.3
JUN 29.3 18.2 11 1
JUL 31.3 20.4 10.8
AUG 30.6 19.5 1.1 .1
SEP 267 OCT 21 NOV 12.2 15 11.6
7 M J. 2.1 .1. .1 O 10.1
DEC 5.. 9 -3.1 9
HIGH = 31.3 LOU = -5.3
AMT = 1.3 AMR = 36.5
shoe factorial
climate


6UMAT16 ANALY6>fe konQ
TABLE 2 Cl. .IMA r :i 0 DATA (EH,PEE C I P r UIN D
MONTH MAX MIN AVE G EA IN UP US
JAN CO 1 ! 71. 77 4 1.8 NU U
FEB 82 66 74 4 2.1 NU u
M h E 82 60 71 4 3 UNU NE
APR 79 53 66 3 3.9 UNO U
M A Y 83 56 69-5 3 3.. 9 S SU
JON 84 C 1-' -...* vJ 69 .. 5 3 44 s SE
J GL- 86 b 6> 71 4 3.7 n V.) N
AUS 89 58 73 .. 5 4 2.9 b NU
SEP 91. 6 1 76 4 2.9 s SU
OCT 86 60 73 4 2 8 s SU
NOV 85 68 76 5 4 2.5 s S
DEC 85 74 79.5 4 O UNU U
TOTAL 35.. 9
.... .. ..
UumiclTv <^rovp- l i-j- ave. V-W : \c?e/lo\v 30%
7 J v r z 50-00%
3 50 70%
4 * above-10/
ihe
TABLE 3 DIAGNOSIS
- -
< -DAY- > <-- NIGMT ----- >STEI s
MAX UP LOU MIN UP LOU D N
..JAN 4.3 24 18 -5.4 18 C C
FEB 6.6 24 1.8 -3.5 18 G c
MAE 1.1.6 24 18 .8 18 C c
APE 19.3 2 6 19 7.6 1.9 0 c
MAY 24.3 26 19 1.3 19 0 0
JON 29.2 26 19 1.8 .. 2 1 9 1-1 0
JUI... 31. 2 24 .1.8 20.3 1.8 H II
AUG 30.6 24 18 19.5 1.8 II H
SEP 26.7 24 18 15 1.8 H 0
OCT 21 24 1.8 9 1. 1 8 0 c
NOV 12.1 24 18 2 18 C c
DEC 5.9 24 1.8 -3.1 1.8 c c
AMT belovy I06
Gok^o-fort 1Wi i +<5: Day Mi^ht
Humility c\rovp- \ 21-30 12-21
f J f Z 20-27 12-20
3 H-2U> 12-H
4 |g>-24 12-I&
shoe foctoru I
climate


£UHATTIE Ugr£^
TABLE 4 INDICATORS
MONTH HI U 2 H 3 A1. A2 A3
JAN 0 0 0 0 0 1
FEB 0 0 0 0 0 1
MAR 0 0 0 0 0 1.
APR 0 0 0 1 0 0
MAY 0 0 0 1. 0 0
JUN 0 0 0 1 0 0
JUI... 1 0 0 0 0 0
AUG 1 0 0 0 0 0
SEP 1. 0 0 0 0 0
OCT 0 1 0 0 0 0
NOV 0 0 0 0 0 1.
DEC 0 0 0 0 0 1
TOTAL 3 1 0 3 0 r .J
Appl i^blc- wk6n= TVitrwuJ PainjiJJ UuiMidU+y aronc Mta+VAy Mean 12^?.
JTicX u>XX thv Kli^Vrt T 1
Air movtvrifcVN-l'^ ; 1 H 4
W 2,*
A-m. td&Arttidc \42. o 4
Pain pv&kdTm n VT&jt-vWM H V
TWtrwW bn. y\cce^arn 1 A>i 1,2,3
KO Out-duor y
^Acxpi^vi X O >,2 >i ffeteAtcn |vui^ cAA A "b C
the

Orient WtWfw**, ov\ ea^-wobA fo rakxc/s o^o*7>ur*- .
Ua
a.v\ k
d-lcv^-Hon^ *t>Voul^ ^oiio.
jzl/X VO<5V"-Ho
shoe foctoru 1
climate
34


CLIMATIC AMALX^fe (coni')
X{ \viw?| i<* YillAcA ov\\\i jor
pt ^ ycav) ^>^xcjl WKve^i Wv*j IW ^j- boilA/visy? Ux>U lc^ le<^ -jkui 0?-Hvwk the. W^Ut.
but Ta^uk? 1 ^ 2. k ij-
^u*fy
vorwjU, J*j^ \^>u£. '
Ihe
^c>vvvv ^?U^>uL?( lc?£- Ic^unke^
\v/ WfH^ovv^ \e> fUe. W>i/-tt/i
\o pramofc' ^-Wviplc cxc&~>
vev^tf U-h'ztvi.
Me^ iuWi (ze>-4cflo Ousted) c**c. r^-Wlu in ftnd- $.|
\V<2-U ^ -Vl^- w \ViY\Ao*s*z> ^Viou\A \pc. at
wm^vvoW ^Ue.
shoe foctoru f
climate


ClUAA'UC CcmiX
Xva \iyv\a\ W>uU \>t> m*v>ivc <3 Wxr fame 1
min.
p^l 4>W>U W W^V\t, W61U M^aUtai,
£lW ^U^uM WjlArC. 1<3\V \UaryvidA
CA-
^M\y.
the
shoe foctoriLOEE
36


CLIMATIC ANALYSIS (cont.)
SUMMARY:
The greater St. Louis area's climate is characterized by mild to hot summer temperatures and brisk but seldomly severe winters.
Heating degree days generally out-number cooling degree days by 4:1. Summer winds come from the south and are therefore warm. Winter winds come out of the north and northwest. These bring cold temperatures at a slightly higher velocity than the summer breezes bring warm air.
Unfortunately, cloudy weather predominates during the winter months when high radiation levels, incident on a vertical surface, are most advantageous.
Hummidity levels are in the high range, Group 4, during all months except April, May and June (Group 3).
Temperatures fall within the comfort range in April, May, June (nights), September nights and October days. The balance of the summer is hot and October through April are cold.
Based on the above and attendant analysis, two catagories of building design recommendations emerge:
the
Summer design conditions and Winter design conditions.
SUMMER
To take advantage of the winds out of the south, windows are especially important on the north and south facades. Cross ventilation will approximate the comfort zone on these hot, summer days. During times of exceptionally low wind velocity, a dehumidifier or high velocity fans would improve interior cooling.
On days of extreme heat and high humidity, an air conditioning system will probably be necessary.
WINTER
Because
paned windows, the roof), inf minimum of air be most effective here.
ion pen etration is inhi
winter conditions, conse
t likely be the key e leme
iency. Caulking, doubl
good i nsulation (R -30
i1tratio n limitation and
changes (1 per hour ) wi
in
a
Humidity is to comfort's advantage in the winter and could be encouraged through the mechanical system as long as condensation does not become an issue (see "health clinic" section for desired humidities).
shoe foctoru f
climate
37


SUMMARY (cont.):
The northwest sections of the building are susceptible to heat loss since the prevailing winds come from those directions. Increased insulation should be considered here and if heating is organized in a zoning system, this zone should receive special attention.
SUBJECT SITE ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES
Extant buildings are oriented along the north-south axis. This limits the extent of any passive solar applications. Little surface area is exposed to the north and therefore it is well-shaped for winter conditions. The site's urban setting further mitigates winter wind conditions but exacerbates the pre-heating of summer winds.
High ceilings will serve well to stratify hot summer air and the many clerestories will vent the second story.
In the skin-dominated sections of the building, moveable insulation (ceilings that may be lowered in winter?) could be considered. Removing structures between the buildings will increase the breezes' cooling potential.
the
Special note: If it is determined that portions of the buildings are load-dominated and portions are skin-dominated, careful attention should be paid to the interplay of the areas.
shoe foctoru f
climate
38


Application! Tb ^
^TPOCTUPe^
UNIFORM BUILDING CODE
SECTION 104
a.
General. Buildi which additions, are made shall requirements of cilities except vided in this sec
ngs and s alteration comply wi this code as specif tion.
tructures to s or repairs
th all the
for new fa-
ical1y pro-
b. Additions, Alterations or Repairs.
Additions, alterations or repairs may be made to any bulding or structure wuthout requiring the existing building or structure to comply with all the requirements of this code provided the addition, alteration or repair conforms to that requirement for a new building or structure. Additions, alterations or repairs shall not cause an existing building or structure to become unsafe or overloaded.
ihe
Alterations or repairs to an existing building or structure which are non-structural and do not adversely affect any structural member or any part of the building or structure having required fire resistance may be made with the same materials of which the building or structure is constructed.
EXCEPTION: The installation or replacement of glass shall be as required for new installations.
c. Historic Buildings. Repairs, alterations and additions necessary for the preservation, restoration, rehabilitation of continued use of a building or structure may be made without conformance to all the requirements of this code when authorized by the building official provided:
1. The building or structure has been designated by official action of the legally constituted authority of this jurisdiction as having special historical or architectural significance .
2. Any unsafe conditions as described in this code are corrected.
3 The will life tion
shoe
restored building or structure be no more hazardous based on safety, fire safety and sanita-than the existing building.
foctorii
code
39


tMiya? OcovVP^c'i
SECTION 503
a. General. When a building houses more than one occupancy, each portion of the building shall conform to the requirements for the occupancy housed therein.
b. Forms of Occupancy Separations. Occupancy separations shall be vertical or horizontal or both or when necessary, of such other form as may be required to afford a complete sepatation between the variuos occupancy divisions in the building. Where the occupancy separation is horizontal, structural members supporting the sepatation shall be protected by equivalent fire-resistive construction.
Ihe
c. Types of Occupancy Separations.
1. A "three-hour fire-resistive occu-
pancy separation" shall be of not less than three-hour fire-resistive construction. All openings in walls forming such separation shall be protected by a fire assembly having a three-hour fire-protection rating. The total width of all openings in any three-hour fire-resistive occupancy separation wall in any one story shall not exceed 25 percent of the length of the wall in that story and no single
opening shall have an area greater than 120 square feet.
2. A "two-hour fire-resistive occupancy separation" shall be of not less than two-hour fire-resistive construction. All openings in such separation shall be protected by a fire assembly having a one and one-half hour fire-protection rating.
3. A "one-hour fire-resistive occupancy separation" shall be of not less than one-hour fire-resistive construction. All openings in such separation shall be protected by a fire assembly having a one-hour fire-protection rating.
shoe foctoru I code
40




i If Bia |
f a // 0 / ft i s
/ 8 ! 1 li i
/ a 1 i:
H v
is&w\
SECTION 504
a. General. For the purpose of this section, the center line of an adjoining street or alley shall be considered an adjacent property line.
b. Fire Resistance of Walls. Exterior walls shall have fire resistance and opening protection as set forth in Table No. 5-A, Part III, and in accor-
Ihe
dance with such additional provisions as are set forth in Part IV and Part VII. Distance shall be measured at right angles from the property line. The above provision shall not apply to walls at right angles to the property line.
Buildings on Same Property and Buildings Containing Courts. For the purpose of determinimg the required wall and opening protection, buildings on the same property and court walls of buildings over one story in height shall be assumed to have a property line between them.
When a new building is to be erected on the same property with an existing building, the assumed property line from the existing building shall be the distance to the property line for each occupancy as set forth in Table No. 5-A and Part IV.
code
shoe foctoriLl
41


AILOWA&LE. FLODZ AEEA*?
SECTION 505
a. Area Separation Walls. Each portion of a building separated by one or more area separation walls may be considered a separate building, provided the area separation walls meet the following requirements:
1. Area separation walls shall be not less than four-hour fire-resistive construction in Types I, II-F.R, III, and IV buildings and two-hour fire-resistive construction in Types II One-hour, II-N or V buildings. The total width of all openings in such walls shall not exceed 25 percent of the length of the wall in each story. All openings shall be protected by a fire assembly giving a three-hour fire-protection rating in four-hour fire-resistive walls and one and one-half-hour fire-protection rating in two-hour fire-resistive walls.
Ihe
Flgfc - ^Oe^TlTUrtQNl
SECTION 508
Where one-hour fire-resistive construction throughout is required by this code, an approved automatic sprinkler system, as specified in Chapter 38, may be substituted, provided such system is not otherwise required.
EXCEPTION: Such substitution shall not
waive nor reduce required fire-resistive construction for:
1. Occupancy separations
2. Exterior wall protection due to proximity of property lines
3. Area separations
4. Shaft enslosures
5. Corridors
6. Stair enclosures
7. Exit passageways
8. Type of construction separation
code
shoe foctoru 1
42


fc,e^uiig.£M£NT^ fbg A
SECTION 601
Group A Occupancies shall be:
Division 3. Any building or portion of a building having an assembly room with an occupant load of less than 300 without a stage.
SECTION 603 Location on Property:
Buildings housing Group A Occupancies shall front directly upon or have access to a public street not less than 20 feet in width. The main entrance to the building shall be located on the public street or on the access way.
Ihe
fce&OlgfcMEMT? (aV-ov? 1.

Group I Occupancies shall be:
Division 2. Nursing homes for ambulatory patients, homes for childrem six years of age or over (each accommodating more than five persons).
SECTION 1005
Light, Ventilation and Sanitation:
All portions of Group I Occupancies customarily used by human beings shall be provided with natural light by means of exterior glazed openings with an area equal to one-tenth of the total floor area, and natural ventilation by means of exterior openings with an area not less than one-twentieth of the total floor area, or shall be provided with artificial light and a mechanically operated ventilating system as specified in Section 605.
code
shoe factoru
43


£XlT^ 4 QCC-\} FAMT
SECTION 3301
General:
a. Definitions. For the purpose of this chapter, certain terms are defined as follows:
EXIT is a continuous and unobstructed means of egress to a public way and shall include intervening doors, doorways, corridors, exterior exit balconies, ramps, stairways, smokeproof enclosures, horizontal exits, exit passageways, exit courts and yards.
EXIT PASSAGEWAY is an enclosed means of egress connecting a required exit or exit court with a public way.

Ihe
SECTION 3302
Exits Required:
a. Width. The total width of exits in feet shall be not less than the total occupant load served divided by 50. Such width of exits shall be divided approximately equally among the separate exits.
b. Arrangements of Exits. If only two exits are required they shall be placed a distance apart equal to not less than one-half of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be served measured in a straight line between exits.
c. Distance to Exits. The maximum distance of travel from any point to an exterior exit door, horizontal exit, exit passageway or an enclosed stairway in a building shall not exceed 200 feet in a building equipped with an automatic sprinkler system system throughout .
code
shoe foctoru f
44



SECTION 3303
Doors:
a .
Swing. Exit doors shall swing direction of exit travel when an occupant load of 50 or more.
in the serving
b. Width and Height. Every required exit doorway shall be of a size as to permit the installation of a door not less than 3 feet in width and not less than 6 feet 8 inches in height. When installed in exit doorways, exit doors shall be capable of opening at least 90 degrees and shall be so mounted that the clear width of the exitway is not less than 32 inches.
c. Change in Floor Level at Doors. Regardless of the occupant load, there shall be a floor or landing on each side of the door. The floor or landing shall be not more than 1 inch lower than the threshold of the doorway.
Ihe
SECTION 3304
Corridors and Exterior Exit Balconies:
a. Width. Every corridor serving an occupant load of 10 or more shall be not less in width than 44 inches.
b. Height. Corridors and exterior exit balconies shall have a clear height of not less than 7 feet measured to the lowest projection from the ceiling.
code
shoe foctoru I
45



SECTION 3305
Stairways:
a. Width. Stairways serving an occupant load of more than 50 shall be not less in width than 44 inches. Handrails may project into the required width a distance of 3 1/2 inches from each side of a stairway.
b. Rise and Run. The rise of every step in a stairway shall be not less than 4 inches nor greater than 7 1/2 inches. The run shall be not less than 10 inches as measured horizontally between the vertical planes of the furthermost projection of adjacent treads.
c. Landings. Every landing shall have a dimension measured in the direction of travel equal to the width of the stairway .
the
SECTION 3306
Ramps:
a. Slope. Ramps required by Table No. 33-A shall not exceed a slope of one vertical to 12 horizontal. The slope of other ramps shall not exceed one vertical to 8 horizontal.
SECTION 3308 Exit Enclosures:
a. Openings into Enclosures. There shall be no openings into exit enclosures except exit doorways and openings in exterior walls.
SECTION 3310 Exit Courts:
a. General. Every exit court shall
discharge into a public way or exit passageway.
shoe foctoru I code


TABLE NO. 3 3-A MINIMUM EGRESS AND ACCESS REQUIREMENTS
Use Minimum of two exits other than elevators are required where number of occupants is over Square feet per occupant Access by a ramp or an elevator must be provided for the physically handicapped as indicated
1 . Assembly areas, concentrated use (without fixed seats) 50 7 YES
2 . Assembly areas, less-concentrated use: Dining rooms Drinking establishments Exhibit rooms 50 15 YES
3 . Hospitals and sanitariums-- Nursing homes 5 80 YES
4 . Kitchen --commercial 30 200 NO
5 . Library reading room 50 50 YES
6 . Offices 30 100 YES
the shoe foctoru 1 code
47


e^onjr- of aeiea^_____________________
ZONING ORDINANCE
CITY OF BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS
SECTION 3-9
Except as specifically provided otherwise, in all residential and commercial zoning districts, where over fifty percent (50%) of the lots on one side of a street between intersections (that is, one block) are developed with buildings that do not meet the minimum front yard setback area, then a front yard setback that conforms with the established building line in that block may be permitted.
Ihe
W/ATE *2 £-ONkDfp
- YcAH2-
Fteoitcr Hyvrotz-id,
SECTION 5-10
Downstream property owners, watercourses, channels, or conduits shall not receive storm water runoff from proposed upstream developments at a higher peak flow rate than would have resulted from the same storm event occurring over the site of the proposed development with the land in its natural, undeveloped conditions, nor shall storm water runoff exceed the capacity of the natural drainage system.
shoe foctoru f
zoning
48


WA-TEg- Vim&FF- Uovxt')
On (
U?^5vn r^wcir4-
c. fLAT U)T^'OZ'<^mrep5
Cor oiW £ify Erv^i>^r-'^{7fvr)ve^ vntUio^')
____________________________________Ihe
--Storm water detention facilities shall have sufficient capacity to store flows up to the 100-year 24-hour rainstorm.
For purposes of designing adequate on-site detention facilities, the Illinois State Water Survey rainfall data for this region shall be used.
--The provisions of SECTION 5-10 shall be applicable in the following areas:
Any commercial, industrial, institutional or utility development having a gross aggregate of one (1) acre or more.
zoning
shoe foctoru 1
49


LI61HT INtXfeTKY Vh,th2s,t
SECTION 4-8
Reg
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f .
uirements Minimum lot area: None
Minimum lot width: None
Minimum lot depth: None
Minimum 1. From lot setback: front lot line: 25 ft.
2. From side lot line: 25 ft.
3. From rear lot line: 25 ft.
Maximum building height: 100 ft.
Maximum percentage of lot coverage (w/ built-structures, paving, roofing, etc,) : 75 percent
ihe
Permitted Uses:
Any use permitted in a Commercial District, unless otherwise prohibited by this section.
Permitted Uses (Commercial District):
a. Hospitals
b. The sale of foods and beverages of all kinds, including sale for consumption on the premises
c. The sale of general merchandise, including sale in department stores
d. Service establishments of all types
e. Amusement and recreation: assembly hall, theatre, or other social or recreation center provided the place or building in which it is operated is sufficiently sound insulated to effectively confine the noise to the premises
f. multi-family dwel1ings--provided they meet all the requirements of the "B-l" District
Permitted Uses
(Multi-family Residence District "B-l"):
a. Multi-family dwellings
b. Row houses
zoning
shoe factory.
50


Opf- ^T^EET PAEK-lMfr |
OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING SECTION 6-1
Existing Parking/Loading Facilities:
a. Whenever the use of any structure or premises is intensified through addition of dwelling units, increased floor area, greater seating capacity, etc., additional parking and loading facilities commensurate with such increases in use-intensity shall be provided.
b.
Whenever ture is parking provided new use.
the existing use of a struc-changed to a different use, or loading facilities shall be as required herein for such
Ihe
PARKING AREA DESIGN STANDARDS
SECTION 6-2
Spaces:
a. Each required parking space shall be at least ten (10) feet wide and twenty feet long, and shall have at least seven feet (7) of vertical clearance. Every space shall be situated so that no part of any parked vehicle overhangs the public right-of-way.
b. Markings shall be laid and restored as often as necessary to clearly delineate each parking space.
Interior Aisles:
a. Aisles designed for two-way traffic shall be at least twenty-two (22) feet wide. One-way aisles designed for sixty (60) degree parking shall be at least eighteen (18) feet wide, and for forty-five (45) degree parking shall be at least fourteen (14) feet wide.
Access Ways:
a. Parking areas shall be designed so that ingress to or egress from a parking space is from an aisle or driveway, not directly from the public right-of-way.
zoning
shoe foctoru I
51


OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING (CONT.)
Access Way (cont.)
b. No access way to any parking area shall be located within twenty-five (25) feet of any corner formed by the intersection of the rights-of-way of two or more streets. At intersections where traffic control devices are installed the Administrator may increase this requirement as necessary to prevent hazards.
c. Parking areas, access ways (including residential driveways) and public streets shall be aligned to form--as closely as feasible--right angles.
d. The access way to every parking lot located in any commercial destrict or in the Industrial District shall be at least twenty-four (24) feet wide unless two one-way drives, each twelve (12) feet wide, are provided.
Lighting:
a. Any light(s) used to illuminate any parking area shall be arranged or shielded so as to confine direct light rays within the parking area boundary lines to the greatest extent practicable .
the
Landscaping:
a. In order to reduce heat and glare, to minimize blowing of dust and trash, and to reduce the oppressive visual effects of large open parking areas, landscaping shall be provided and maintained within every parking lot that contains twenty (20) or more parking spaces. A minimum of 5 percent of the total parking lot area shall be set aside for said landscaping.
b. A landscaping plan (either a separate document or an element of a more inclusive development plan) shall accompany every application for an initial certificate of zoning compliance to develop any parking lot that will contain twenty (20) or more spaces.
c. The landscaping plan shall include the following information:
1. proposed type, amount, size and spacing of plantings, including trees, shrubbery, and ground cover;
2. proposed size, construction materials, and drainage of landscaped islands or planting beds; and
3. sketch indicationg proposed spatial relationships of landscaped areas, parking spaces, automobile circulation, and pedestrian movement.
zoning
shoe factory 1
52


LOCATION OF PARKING
SECTION 6-3
Commercial and Industrial Districts:
a. Parking lots accessory to any commercial or industrial use located in any commercial district or in the Industrial District shall be located within five hundred (500) feet of the use served; provided, that no portion of any such parking lot shall extend into any residential districts.
b. Commercial uses in the Central Business District shall be exempt from the parking requirements of this ordinance if they are located within five hundred (500) feet of a municipal parking lot.
the
Parking Lots and Driveways Abutting Residence District: a. Whenever a parking lot or a driveway to a parking lot is hereafter established on other than a residence district so as to abut the side or rear line of a lot in a residence district, a solid masonry wall, shrubbery, planting or a substantial sightly fence not less than five (5) feet high and not more than eight (8) feet high shall be constructed and maintained along said side or rear lot line up to, but not beyond the setback building line. In addition, in all use districts, the lighting, including any permitted illuminated sign, on any parking lot or driveway shall be arranged so that there will be no annoying glare directed or reflected toward residence buildings or residence districts.
zoning
shoe factorial
53


DESIGN AND LOCATION OF OFFSTREET LOADING FACILITIES
SECTION 6-4
Size of Space:
a. Every required off-street loading space shall be at least twelve (12) feet wide and forty-five (45) feet long exclusive of aisle and maneuver space, and shall have verticle clearance of at least fourteen (14) feet. In no case shall a vehicle being loaded or unloaded overhang into the public right-of-way.
Surfacing:
a. Every off-street loading area shall be improved with a compacted stone base at least seven (7) inches thick, surfaced with at least two (2) inches of asphaltic concrete.
Buffer Strips:
a. No loading space or area for vehicles over two ton cargo capacity shall be developed closer than twenty-five (25) feet to the lot line of any lot located in any residential district unless such space/area is completely enclosed by walls, a solid fence, or closely planted shrubery at least ten (10) feet in height and of sufficient density to block the view from the residential property.
the
Location:
a. Every off-street loading space that is required or provided shall be located on the same parcel of land as the use serves, and not closer than fifty (50) feet to the intersection of the rights-of-way of two or more streets and not on required front yards.
COMPUTATION OF REQUIRED PARKING/LOADING SPACES
SECTION 6-5
a. In computing parking or loading space requirements on the basis of building floor area, the gross floor area shall be used.
b. Whenever it is necessary to translate gross parking lot area into number of parking spaces, three hundred and seventy-five (375) square feet of gross area shall be deemed one parking space.
c. If computation of the number of parking or loading spaces required by this ordinance results in a fractional space, any fraction of one-half or more shall be counted as one space.
d. No space or portion thereof needed to satisfy the minimum applicable requirement for number of off-street parking or loading spaces shall be counted as part of the off-street parking or loading spaces required for another structure or use.
zoning
shoe foctorq
54


NUMBER OF PARKING AND LOADING SPACES REQUIRED
SECTION 6-6
USE PARKING SPACES REQUIRED
a. Educational, Institutional Recreational:
Churches, auditoriums 1 space per 4 seats in the largest seat ing area.
Libraries, museums 1 space per 500 sq. ft. of floor area
b. Commercial, Office, Services:
Note: All commercial and service uses 1 space per 300 sq. ft. of floor area.
ihe shoe
LOADING SPACES REQUIRED (if any)
Not applicable
On review by the Administrator
To 10,000 sq. ft. of floor area...
1 space; more than
10.000 sq. ft. ...
1 space plus 1 additional space per
50.000 sq. ft. of floor area in excess of 10,000 sq. ft.
factor
55


Belleville
SPACE REQUIREMENTS:
square footage
INTERNAL MEDICINE 4018-4508
PEDIATRICS 2518-2578
OB-GYN 2220
TRIAGE (i.m.) 40
TRIAGE (ped.) 40
RADIOLOGY 560
LAB 570
CONSULTATION 30
SOCIAL WORK 150
OPTICAL SHOP 400
PHARMACY/CASHIER 600
PHARMACY WAITING RM. 400
MEDICAL RECORDS 1000
CENTRAL SUPPLY/STORAGE 500
CONFERENCE/LIBRARY 200
LOUNGE/VENDING 300
MAINT./SECURITY/RECEIVING 300
MAIN RECEPTION, SWITCHBOARD, APPTS. 320
PUBLIC RESTROOMS 80
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 380
CIRCULATION 2500-3000
EST. GROSS AREA:
17126-18176 sq.ft
NET SQ. FOOTAGE*
12,856
BLDG. MULTIPLIER* (HIGH)
1 8
BLDG. GROSS AREA:
23,784 sq.ft
NOTE: The 2 gross area figures represent a range of values which are dependent upon variables such as room configurations, design efficiency and parsimonious room sizing. The resolution of these variables, through design, should produce a result that falls within these parameters.
* REFER TO ning", p.
"Ambulatory Facilities Plan-50, 59. (see Bibliography)
shoe factory.
clinic


FXriEMT FUaY£HA<*T
Ihe shoe foctoru I
clinic
57


TEAM CONCEPT
Studies have shown that teams of 6-8 doctors and nurse practitioners are the optimum numbers for service efficiency. These teams may be grouped together, in which case nurse station, reception, supply and treatment square footage will take the higher figures. At no time should more than 2 teams be grouped inasmuch as the scale of the spaces becomes unmanageable and inhuman.
- 0£-
the
TJZJA&it COUOtfT
shoe
foctorii
clinic


MEDICINE
Space Requirements:
square footage
EXAM 28 @ 80 sq.ft.* 2240
CONSULT 12 @ 80 sq.ft. NURSE STATION (1-2 960
depending on team split) 150-300
RECEPTION (1-2) 300-500
UTILITY ROOM (should be shared) 80
SUPPLY 20-30
TREATMENT (2/ team or 3
if together) @ 90 sq.ft. 180-270 HEALTH EDUCATION ROOM 48
RESTROOMS 40-80
TOTAL: 4018-4508 sq.ft.
*NOTE: It is estimated that four of the
M.D.s will use three exam rooms simultaneously or that a third exam room may be shared by several doctors as "swing space".
the

* NtfTf* cUwio Vajb b Vlnuf
Q^ordJciDv&> wtv^owe^i rc>ov** dumW\
^ byvunjLo , vzam rocvn^ ^U<5ul/
Ue. \vt bvb
shoe foctoru f
clinic
59


RADIOLOGY
Space Requirements:
OFFICE
RECEPTION
DARKROOM
PROCEDURE
DRESSING
BARIUM
TOTAL:
LAB
Space Requirements:
OFFICE/LAB
EXAM
SUPPLY
TOTAL:
square footage 100 90 60 240 20 50
560 sq.ft.
square footage
500
40
30
570 sq.ft.
Ihe


IA& ru>WCUP&T
shoe factorial
clinic


PEDIATRICS
Space Requirements:
square footage
EXAM (6 doctors)* 18 rooms @ 70 sq.ft. 1260
CONSULT 6 rooms @ 108 sq.ft. 648
NURSE STATION 100
UTILITIES 80
TREATMENT 160
RECEPTION (w/out playground: 140 sq.ft.) (w/ outside playground: 80 sq.ft.) 80-140
WORK ROOM 80
SUPPLY 20
RESTROOMS (2) 40
HEALTH EDUCATION 50
TOTAL: 2518-2578 sq.ft.
NOTE: Consult rooms may be reduced if
nurse practitioners used.
*NOTE: It is estimated that all 6 doctors
will utilize 3 exam rooms each.
Ihe

* The HeotlHn will We jz>r
video* e>v
^W^Lule^, hy^iev^e, |ck\A ,
to r wc new co wM?.
CV\i\drlY) nuA roovy\ to j?Ui* wkilo \V*iK ivv^ \^r "tV>e ^ shoe foctoru I clinic


TYPICAL EXAM ROOM FURNISHINGS
EXAM TABLE EXAM STOOL SPHYGMOMANOMETER OTOSCOPE/OPHTHALMOSCOPE EXAM LIGHT
SCALE (optional in Ped.
--could be in hall) WASTE CAN CABINET WORK HAND-WASH SINK WRITING SURFACE PATIENT CHAIR MIRROR/COAT HOOK CUBICLE CURTAIN
TYPICAL CONSULTATION FURNISHINGS
. DESK
DESK CHAIR ARM CHAIRS TACK BOARD SHELVING FILE CABINET DICTATION TELEPHONE COAT HOOK X-RAY VIEW
the
TYP16AL EXAM gaaM
Tillouttz Ff
left buce *
* pzDFL LEFT' WAMP&P

shoe factory
6;


OB-GYN
Space Requirements:
square footage
EXAM (15 0 80 sq.ft.) 1200
CONSULT (6 0 120 sq.ft.) 720
NURSE STATION 60
TREATMENT (1 ) 100
RECEPTION 70
WORK ROOM 70
TOTAL: 2220 sq.ft
GENERAL
EXAM ROOMS/ MD 2-3
(see individual sections)
WAITING ROOM SEATS/ MD 4-6
PARKING SPACES/ MD 4
the


O&V* Y&DVv\
COY*
A-(x> \VA\\fviA VZVPKV) / M.t?.
# A l^arV-iv^ /m.P.
shoe factory f
clinic


ADMINISTRATION
Space Requirements:
SECRETARY MEDICAL DIRECTOR TOTAL:
square footage 80 300
380 sq.ft.
AviM,tUC\&7
&HoTE: far t>\
MUSEUM 'bcch'r*-
the
OTUtXZ-
l^>\v \y^ axiA ^sidYc \vor V^>yal^ -
shoe
foctoru I clinic



SPACE REQUIREMENTS
square footage
MUSEUM DISPLAY 8,000
STAFF/ACQUISITIONING 5 00
LIBRARY/CONFERENCE/STAFF AND VOLUNTEER LUNCH ROOM 200
RESTROOMS 70
COLLECTION STORAGE 500
CURATOR 100
SECRETARY 50
TOTAL: 9,420
Ihe
IMAGE
--The shoe factory's presence should be retained as exemplary of turn-of-the-century industrial interiors.
--Displays should closely approximate the objects industrial settings--and should avoid showing pictures, tools, and machinery as enutities out of context.
A permanent exhibit should weave the chronology of the area's industrial development.
--Wherever possible, exhibits should be workable, tools handleable so that visitors can approach the experience of the laborers.
--As many of the senses should be engaged as is possible.
Shoe foctoru 1 museum


Museum
1 igzzaagazaBZ
CUUlC
'>>>?>.>u nrr.
MlKeuM
^nmmminminunmiir
emi^Y
--Entry should be shared by the museum and the health clinic.
--Entry should be large enough to contain groups of 40 at a time.
--Visual contact between the clinic and the museum is important.
Desirable Linkages:
consultation--museum display
(limited)
waiting room--museum display
waiting room--acquisitioning
(1imited)
entry/exit--museum display
the
Museum
YZUY):
shoe foctoru I museu
m


Museum (tent-}
E.x.WiWt'

--Display areas should be divided by a few fixed partitions, with other areas delineated by a system of moveable partitions.
--After the initial "Made in Belleville" exhibit is struck, 25 percent of the display space will be given over to changing exhibits.
--Most of the outdoor display will be permanent.
the
A system of overhead lighting should be designed for highlighting.
--Individual displays will need lighting from underneath.
U
tZXZQITTir

^ini

--Some exhibits will require 2-story spaces
museum
shoe factory.
67


sssssssss^s:
Ccoy\t)

--Delivery dock and collection storage should be capable of handling large pieces.

--Pre-existing freight elevators may be utilized to transport displays from floor to floor, if necessary.
the
--The library, although a multi-purpose room, should be cheery and have visual access to the outside.
-- Eight to ten people should be able to sit comfortably to facilitate committee and board meetings or research groups.

Staff members or the secretary may occasionally need to oversee the exhibit area.
shoe
foctorii
museum


Museum CcqM.']
Lecture hall ammenities:
--Removeable, stackable chairs will be provided so that space may be used for a variety of purposes.
--Floor should be flat or should have slight incline.
--Space should accommodate film screen, lecturer podium, or panel discussion, and seating for approximately 120 people.
--Performance area = 200 sq. ft.
--Lecture hall should have access to outdoor overflow space of Pie Pantry for summer receptions.
Ihe
museum
shoe factory,
69


Museum Icnrt-}
Some companies and products to include: MILLS
Harrison Mills
Ringold and Wilkinson Mill
Hinckley Mill
Rapier Mill
Crown Mill
Knoebel Mill
Reuss Mill
Corliss engine grater hand mill band mill grist mill
COAL MINING
St. Louis and O'fallon Coal Co. Roya 1
Walnut Hill Superior Mining Co.
Peabody Coal Co.
Ihe
BREWERIES
STAG
STAR
ANHEUSER-BUSCH STOELZLE'S WESTERN EIMER NEBRASKA
stoneware w/ wired-down cork stoppers beer varieties
MANUFACTURERS
Gumlach Mfg. Co.
Esler and Ropiequet Mfg. Co. Jordan Shoe Co.
Belleville Shoe Mfg. Co. Belleville Mfg. Co.
Key Shop
cider and wine mills double-movement grain drills Belleville Sulky Hay Rake Rotary Forced Feed Drill sewing machines cooperage
Shoe fOCtOKU I museum



GLASS FACTORIES Ball Jar Co.
Adolphus Busch Glass Mfg. Co.
Part Glass Co.
Belleville Glass Co.
blob-top w/ pontfilled scarred bottoms blown-in-the-mold crown top bottles snap-case punty
swing-type stopper crown-top bottle
CIGAR MANUFACTURING
John Bur, 167 Spring St.
August Furhan, 37 W. Main St.
Daniel Fisher, 142 First North St. Charles Goerlizz, 49 High St. and
29 Second South St. Martin Henkemeyer, 19 Public Square
cigar rolling presses
the
MACHINE WORKS & FOUNDARIES
Belleville Nail Co.
Pump and Skein Co.
Harrison Machine Works West Main Street Machine Shop and Brass Foundary Rogers Excelsior Foundary Gaylord Foundary
Union Machine Shop and Brass Foundary Orbon Stove Works Empire Stoves
Cox & Roberts Thresher
Belleville Separator
steam hammer
letter-copying presses
jack screws
steam pumps
steam engines
boilers
Eureka plow
Eclipse plow
spikes
two-penny fine nail drill castings stove castings pulley castings hollow wave coal mine machining iron railing brewery machinery stoves
shoe foctoru I museum
71


ihe shoe factor u n
museum
THE BELLEVILLE BRANCH OF THE ANHEUSER-BUSCH BREWING ASSOCIATION.
LOCATED ON CORNER OF PORT LAN D AND A STREETS
Mtx^euM
7


Museum
THE JORDAN SHOE COMPANY.
Manufacturers of Boys and Mens McKay Shoes.
EAST MAIN STREET. BELLEVILLE.
ihe shoe factory


Museum Cu>v\\^)
rNr.INt BUILDING. HARRISON WORKS THRESHING THE CAGE IN A COAL A COAl TRAIN. BOILER WORKS. H ARRI SON CO.
lilt Al f RY COAL MINL. MACHINES. MINL. HOISTING APPARATUS. COAl MINT
THE INDUSTRIAL LIFE
OF BELLEVILLE.
There are something like ihirtv coal mines in ami nhotu the t ity machinery in the woihl.
Belleville, making tins a mo>t
11111>ort:int centre for this prcxluct.
It has also one of the largest manufactories ol threshing
ihe shoe foctorq
| museum


Mu^euh Cccv\\.')
THE INDUSTRIAL LIFE OF BELLEVILLE.
Uelleville i< dittinrtly a maiutiaciuiiii;; city, its imhi'trirs are l>th \ arir| ami extensive. There are a iiumhrr oi siovr foumleries, two tiiauitfaemrics engaged largely in making gluts everal concerns pr.ilii 'iui; InEks hi all dt* sliaJ ami vaurtirs t<- |1111 t hv modern I milder*.
Ihe shoe foctoru f
museum
7Z


m Cc&v\\-')
VIEW OF THE EXCELSIOR FOUNDRY COMPANYS WORKS.
Established actin' Royers Foundry in l*WOt and incorporated as the F.xceUior Foundry in IMPS with Mr. K. P. Royers as President and Mr. Geo. P. M. Royers Senet.uy. Their son ialtie* iron castings, corn mills, feed mills and boiler fronts.
PARTIAL VIEW OF THE WORKS OF THE BELLEVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY.
l-.st.i'lislnd in IvV.. KN-tn>.i! I > |'.imii'iii establish! hi I"*". Th< pit tint slum s tin- Pow ei llousr on tin- 1# it. \\ ( li tin Rftmt I louse on the riylu.
_____________________Jhe Shoe foctoru I museum
76


Marilyn^ Pie Pantky
33332.
SPACE REQUIREMENTS
square footage
INDOOR DINING 1500
(seats 100)
OUTDOOR DINING 450
(seats 30)
OUTDOOR OVERFLOW AREA 450
KITCHEN 800
KITCHEN DRY STORAGE 165
KITCHEN WALK-IN COOLER 20
SCULLERY 140
BAKERY 600
BAKERY STORAGE 60
RESTROOMS 90
GLASS MANAGEMENT 125
4400 sq. ft.
TOTAL:
the
PlNER- fU>\V- 6UAC.T
shoe foctoru 1 pje Pantry
77


Pie
\\c>wc^ay\:
UHn*vl
| PeUVEEY VoOt- "1
Shoe foctoru I P'e pantry


Pie. Fan Tig.y
Scullery ammenities:
--deep double sink
--glass/dish washer
--storage shelves (1' x 10')
for towels, detergents, utensils
--towel rack
--drying racks
--vent to control steam build-up
the
Glass management ammenities:
--coffee and tea makers
--storage shelves for glasses and supplies
--soda dispenser
--counter top
--water tap
--glass washer
--refrigerator
Shoe foctoru 1 pie pantry
79


Pit &*ngNf foavtp
\L\ \cV\Ck\
------ Il'^Vlt \o M&durrtc traj-jic.
W VitA'vy Vva.Jj'ft'
the
<^IA^VZ1UM i
Shoe foctoru I Pie pantry


Vxt PANTT2.Y Leant')
V
--Tables should be spaced closely to create a feeling of coziness but not so tight as to congest traffic.
--Interior decor and furnishings should be simple. Any colors should be warm. Wood for trim and muted plaids for upholstery is encouraged.
--Ceilings should be kept as low as is possible and lighting should be incandescent .
--Some space should be designed to hold "favorite lore and legend" cards and to display historic photographs of area industry.
Ihe
--There should be a strong visual link between indoor and outdoor dining or between indoor dining and pedestrian movement.
--Fresh pie scents should pervade the dining area and customers should find that scent strongest at the pie rack/check-out counter.
| pie pantry
shoe factor'll
81


Pit FXUTTZY CcowO
--Outdoor dining should be in a sunny location, shielded from the elements.
--If possible, an "overflow" patio space should be provided to accommodate parties and receptions.
--Bright umbrella hoods should provide dashes of color and protection from the sun.
the
--If framed by brick walls, careful attention should be given to the paving of the outdoor dining area to assure a complimentary relationship.
--Water elements and landscaping should be incorporated to modify the microclimate .
--The control point for the outdoor dining should be the hostess desk/check-out. All other access to the area should be carefully limited.
shoe foctoru |p|e Pantry


BIBLIOGRAPHY
"Ambulatory Facilities Planning", Medical Directors Division, Group Health Assoc, of America, Inc., New York, June 1979, p. 1-68, 99-114.
ASHRAE Handbook 1977 Fundamentals,
ASHRAE, New York, 1977, ch. 8, 22-24.
"Belleville, Illinois Illustrated", Reid-Filch Publishing Co., St. Louis, MO, 1905, p. 1-35.
History of St. Clair County, 111inois,
Brink, McDonough & Co., Philadelphia,
1881, p. 183-319.
Koenigsberger, O.H., et al, Manual of Tropical Housing and Building, Longman Group Ltd,. London, 1973, p. 237-246.
"Local Climatological Data", National Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin., St. Louis, 1981 .
"Master Plan--Belleville, Illinois", Southwestern Illinois Metropolitan and Regional Planning Commission with City of Belleville Plan Commission, Belleville,
111., April 1975, sect. 1-1 thru 6-6.
Mueller, Terry L., "Port Glass Co. 1902-1910", Belleville, Illinois, p. 1-17.
"National Register of Historic Places Inventory--Nomination Form: Belleville Historic District", U.S. Dept, of the Interior, Washington DC, Nov. 76, p. 1-4.
________________________the
Passive Solar Design Handbook, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington DC, vol. II and III, p. 247, III, ch. II-V, II, 1982 .
Szokolay, S.V., Environmental Science Handbook, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1980, p. 205.
"Tax Incentives for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings", U.S. Dept, of the Interior, Washington DC, 1982, p. 1-3.
Thomas Vonier Assoc., Inc., "Energy Conservation and Solar Energy for Historic Buildings", Technical Preservation Services Division, National Park Service, D.O.I., Washington DC, Nov. 1981, p. 1-23.
"Uniform Building Code", International Conference of Building Officials,
Whittier, Calif., 1979, chpts.
1,5,6,10,33.
Wallace, D.L., "Soil Survey of St. Clair County, Illinois", U.S. Dept, of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, Springfield, 111., Oct. 1978, p. 25-26,44, my #36.
"Zoning Ordinance #3675". City of Belleville, Illinois, December 17, 1979, Sect. 3-6.
Shoe foctoru [bibliography
83


INT£RV.IEMS
Frank Bauers, architect, Notre Dame Medical Center, Belleville, 111., Oct. 31,1983.
Hally, owner/manager of Marilyn's Pie Pantry, E. Main and Church St., Belleville, 111., Nov. 4, 1983.
Jim Jolly, manager,. First National Bank Business Properties, Belleville, 111., Oct. 16, 1983.
Louis Kahn, M.D., chief administrator, Medical Care Group, Audubon St. @ Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, MO, Nov. 2, 1983.
Jill Baer, M.D., pediatrician, ibid.
Staff members, ibid.
Ron Noble, developer, builder, Noble Construction Company, Belleville, 111., Nov. 1-3, 1983.
Tom Wobbe, director, Belleville Center Inc., Belleville, 111., Aug. 18, 1983.
ihe
NEWSPAPERS
(for industrial history research) Advocate:
Oct. 16, 1874, Feb. 28, 1902, July 3, 1874.
Daily Advocate:
Oct. 20, 1920, Oct. 10, 1922, June 5, 1936, April 5, 1936, April 6,
1939, Feb. 6, 1912, Aug. 8, 1914, Sept. 25, 1920, Jan 18, 1921, July 21, 1932, July 3, 1874, Oct. 2,
1913, April 4, 1916, March 4, 1911, June 1, 1909.
Special thanks to tireless researchers: Mom and Dad
Shoe foctoru I bibliography
84



£>\^ 4U-*'' -v^plVTJ
'"H'vU
dX-J^-faz-kC' 4^-*^ CCW.VVU3V\ j=kt6£-
l\A^pl'WLh?>i Uvo(- £Vtic^ ^j- 41^ "brnTW
U^f
4
4^t U^rvu^j U-t- <£**.*? \AXjscd> L?l^1 -|^
0 ^ 4* \^AaXmJu^, . -^W, 1 'I LA'U
(a31a^U^ iV 1^7 \/iX4jIc^ {$ j=*>Se- <^{dv-VLaJjVx* -jta6^
W-Cx- ^4 ^AA^Ja CX^OaAA\C^ CAAa. i^ot h
v\eM$ Wv\vj< 4w^ A^3"Vv> Hxov\
'\is\C'

4kd kvi<0
^tU<5x4 .
^iV66^

j^H^vwb d>|
^ u
wcWi OclkW jz^ ^ -h^ A Lj oJHc^uaJtyc k K.-*
UJPt<-M V)0ArC b 4Ux 9tcpj*>4
juviu* u^'fln 4tic
M^*v\ ^?fvd£4 J, u#vj24 uvuJt it>
L
^UA
Wl'vuf-
^>-
c>\
a&A &l \l\t^
V~ c
ru
^ ihrvw
CM~La l-e
jj^yu-U s
^-<- e^u4 "
if^
ftw I'Vt.Vi^f,'^^ ^
In*, l*~ ^ ^ ft 4w ,f is P^,^ fe
a. p, hvo **x* W J -=e*~vJL ^X TW.
^W6 ^ ^ cau^u^dJ >W bj- C&duJ4 0 {tu^ X 4^
W^WU^ >Co\]\n jtA^ ~TVie
tdu -.efcr^ cr~
4^6, zAlh^ArvJJl
vMc^', u* liL, ^ ^
,s a tU*- i<^TV ^ HjUa^uJ' H 4di_ ^Uvs^ cj ^Vc
^l^Vi Vl ^ fiW^K / 4Ujl(^K^'Z3A-' 4^- o f" ^>|" -Hu-. r~W *, rh, (j6tvVut*^-it'>
la-/t .. -fl/TTW! ^ /THjjVT^^UaJ (OU^V-'UjlW. fp l4^e; -Ho ^ -........ Q

Ca
&-vg\aas\^[ uylu (jl~
o j- cLoaUa cLrwjc. &AaJI VU-^^ua/vv
ip
rtMsn
^Lcl(A^dUoJi twfaAif^liJlYc. fp 14^^ ^k^-Ho
he shoe foctoru,
I

J



_ ii _r ,.ui i i
ittf
r i. nr \ t
- _L] M
SECTION
SOUTH ELEVATION
EAST ELEVATION scale 1 10
THE SHOE FACTORY
o new nucleus for a 1 Thesis for the Masters of Architecture Degree University of Colorado Denver
~tT. small mlduiestern cltg Spring 1984 Nanon Adair Weidmann


WEST ELEVATION
NORTH ELEVATION
WEST ELEVATION
EAST ELEVATION
NORTH ELEVATION scale 1 10


walnut street
SITE
scale
PLAN
r- 20'
street
restaurant
clinic
museum
main street


AXOnometRic


wiMwuiaiAJ
TH£4i £HAl4 l&£ AVBA£fic^c.
Of THE W a* OP HAU4E* *sl the UiaTPP'C. pi^TltJ^T EA4W *NE WILL *6 PIA4EP AT PNE P* THE 'HlUfi P*JHP TAfccEC l|4 THE ^#TH6A^r THE P'OV Utf4 WILL fcE ^ifTFtE ^TALPAi{7 vSK4PJ Of
TH'4 ^TtfAid|HTEA^ THEME-OA4.lt pap pi 14 ^HT^UFER*>
restaurant seating
H.A-


ft
BASEMENT PLAN
scale
1" 10


walnut street
---TTTT
east main street
ft
r-io
FIRST FLOOR PLAN
scale


A
SECOND FLOOR PLAN scale 1 10


itnuvM