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Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1968-1969

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Title:
Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1968-1969 Catalog, Community College of Denver
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Community College of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
Community College of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Community College of Denver
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Auraria Library
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Community College of Denver Collections

Full Text
e nvet
am m u n
It
1968-69
CATALOG


COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER
Location of First Campus


521
1968-69
CATALOG
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER 1001 East 62nd Avenue Denver, Colorado 80216
CATALOG NUMBER ONE MAY, 1968


1001 East 62nd Avenue Denver, Colorado 80216
Telephones:
Prior to June 15, 1968 892-3151
After June 15, 1968 Admissions: 287-0197 Administrative: 288-2551
Established by the
1967 General Assembly of the State of Colorado Under the Jurisdiction of the
Colorado State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational
Education
Representation in the
Colorado Association of Junior College Presidents
An Institutional Member of the American Association of Junior Colleges
A Member of the
Council of North Central Junior Colleges
Applicant for Correspondent Membership in the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Denver Area Council for Community Colleges....................................................5
1968-69 Calendar............................................................................6-7
General Information........................................................................810
History of the College.................................................8
Objectives of the College..............................................8
Degrees Offered........................................................9
Accreditation .........................................................9
Student Services..........................................................................10-11
Admissions, Records and Registration .................................10
Counseling Services...................................................10
Financial Aid and Placement ..........................................10
Health Services ......................................................11
Student Activities....................................................11
Veterans Eligibility ................................................11
Admissions Information ...................................................................1213
Admissions Policy ....................................................12
Applications for Admission ...........................................12
Tuition...............................................................12
Fees..................................................................12
Residency Policy .....................................................12
Refunds...............................................................13
General Regulations ......................................................................1317
Credit Hours..........................................................13
Course Load ..........................................................13
Classification of Students............................................13
Attendance............................................................14
Adds and Drops or Withdrawals ........................................14
Adding Courses .......................................................14
Dropping Courses......................................................14
Withdrawal from College...............................................14
Dismissal ............................................................14
Evaluation and Grading................................................14
Grade Point Average...................................................15
Incomplete Grade......................................................16
Graduation Requirements ..............................................16
Requests for Transcripts .............................................17
Course Numbers........................................................17
General Studies Programs..................................................................1922
Arts..................................................................21
Science...............................................................21
General Education ....................................................21
Developmental Education ..............................................22


Learning Materials Center .................................................................22
Occupational Studies Programs...........................................................2376
Division of Business and Management Occupations...................2539
Division of Community Service and Personal Service Occupations 4148
Division of Health Occupations....................................4953
Division of Industrial Occupations................................5576
Course Descriptions ...................................................................77146
Division of Business and Management Occupations...................79-89
Division of Communications and Arts ..............................9198
Division of Community Service and Personal Service Occupations 99108
Division of Health Occupations..................................109113
Division of Industrial Occupations..............................115134
Division of Science and Mathematics.............................135140
Division of Social Sciences.....................................141146
Administration .......................................................................147148
Map of Campus Location......................................................Inside Back Cover


THE DENVER AREA COUNCIL
FOR
COMMUNITY COLLEGES
r. Robert P. Davison.....................................................Chairman
rapahoe County)
rs. H. C. Engdahl........................................................Vice-Chairman
efferson County)
rs. Harold V. Anderson......................................................Secretary
oulder County)
r. Harry Bath .....................................................Member
dams County)
r. Richard W. Wright......................................................Member
enver County)
5


Fall Quarter
August 19
September 11,12,13 & 16 September 17 September 18 & 19 September 20 September 23 November 1 November 28 & 29 December 12 December 13 & 14
Winter Quarter
December 16 January 2 & 3 January 6 February 10 March 14 March 15
Spring Quarter
March 17 March 24 & 25 March 26 May 1 May 30 June 5 June 6
Summer Quarter
June 9 June 16 June 17 June 18 July 4 July 24 August 27 August 28
* Registration for Day Classes Registration for Evening Classes
Applications for Fall Quarter Due Faculty Meetings Orientation for New Students Registration *
InstructorsAdministrators Meetings
Classes Begin
Mid-Term
Thanksgiving Intermission Quarter Ends Evaluation
New Student Applications Due Registration *
Classes Begin Mid-Term Quarter Ends Evaluation
New Student Applications Due Registration *
Classes Begin Mid-Term
Memorial Day Holiday Quarter Ends Evaluation
New Student Applications Due Orientation for New Students Registration *
Classes Begin Holiday Mid-Term Quarter Ends Evaluation
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
6


1968-69 CALENDAR 1968
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
DECEMBER
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH
S M T W T F S S M T w T F S S M T W T F S
12 3 4 1 1
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
APRIL MAY JUNE
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
27 28 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30
JULY AUGUST
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S

1 2 3 4 5 1 2
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31
(Shaded areas indicate classes not in session)
1969
7


GENERAL INFORMATION
History of the College
The 1967 Colorado General Assembly, in the enactment of House Bill 1448, established a state system of community colleges under a State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education. The first college to be created under the State Board, by the passage of House Bill 1449, was the Community College of Denver.
The five-member governing council of the Community College of Denver, officially named the Denver Area Council for Community Colleges, was appointed by the Governor and held its organization meeting on September 27, 1967.
The initial task of the Council was to engage the services of a president. Candidates were interviewed in October, and Dr. Leland B. Luchsinger was named as the first president of the Community College of Denver on November 1, 1967, Dr. Luchsinger reported for full-time service late in December.
Deans were appointed in the following order: Dr. Theodore E. Albers, Dean, Student Personnel Services, appointed January 19, 1968; Dr. Joseph K. Bailey, Dean, Occupational Studies, appointed March 8, 1968; Mr. E. Theodore Archuleta, Dean, Business Services; and Dr. John H. Swenson, Dean, General Studies, appointed April 5, 1968. Division directors and instructors are being employed as this first catalog goes to press.
Proposals for a temporary site and facilities for the initial campus, calling for a lease-purchase arrangement, were solicited in April, 1968. The proposal accepted provided for two relocatable prefabricated steel buildings to be erected on a six and one-fourth acre site at the intersection of East 62nd Avenue and Downing Street.
The Community College of Denver, will initially enroll students in September, 1968. The institution will offer 45 occupational programs ranging in length from three months to twenty-one months duration. Programs which require various periods of time for completion and which impart differentiating skills and knowledges are offered in fulfillment of the commitment of the College to give appropriate emphasis to the various facets of occupational education.
A five-year master plan is being developed, thereby assuring orderly growth and integration of course offerings and the proper location and facilities for each of the permanent campuses.
Objectives of the College
The Community College of Denver is a comprehensive state community college established within a five-county area of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver and Jefferson Counties to help meet the educational needs of youth and adults. More interested in what the student is ready to do than in what he has done, the College is open to all who can profit from the instruction for which they enroll and will offer:
1. Occupational courses and programs of several weeks to two years duration the satisfactory completion of which may lead to job entry in an occupation of the students choice or advancement in a current job.
8


2. Pre-professional and liberal arts courses which, upon completion of the first and second years, will enable a student to transfer to a four- year college or university and earn a baccalaureate degree.
3. Other education opportunities for youth and adults, both credit and non-credit, including developmental programs, cultural opportunities and community services.
4. An emphasis on meeting the individual needs of the learners including the provision of specialized learning laboratories and a student-oriented learning materials center.
5. A comprehensive guidance program staffed by counselors who are genuinely concerned with the educational, vocational, and personal welfare of students.
Degrees Offered
The Associate Degree will be given to students successfully completing two-year programs. For shorter programs, Certificates of Achievement and Certificates of Completion will be awarded.
Limitations on Programs and Course Offerings
The availability of the offerings described in the Catalog is subject to sufficient enrollments. The College must retain the customary right to cancel programs or course offerings where enrollments are insufficient to permit the offerings on an educationally sound and economically efficient basis.
During the first year of its operation, 1968-69, the College will limit its offerings to the first year of the various programs and courses. Information given in the GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAMS, OCCUPATIONAL STUDIES PROGRAMS and COURSE DESCRIPTIONS sections of this Catalog concerning second-year offerings is included to facilitate the program planning of students.
Accreditation
The Community College of Denver is under the jurisdiction of the Colorado State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education. The Community Colleges Division of the State Board is presently requesting letters from officials of four-year colleges and universities in Colorado stating that transfer credit will be granted to students who have successfully completed appropriate courses at the several colleges operating under the State Board. Students who plan to transfer to baccalaureate programs at four-year institutions can be confident that college-parallel credits earned at the Community College of Denver will transfer without difficulty.
Application has been made for Correspondent Membership in the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, an association which accredits all institutions of higher education in this area. This procedure will facilitate full accreditation by the North Central Association in the shortest possible time.
Location and Facilities of Initial Campus
The first campus of the Community College of Denver is located at 1001 East 62nd Avenue just outside the north central boundary of the City of Denver, approximately five miles from the state capitol in the downtown Denver area. The site is ideally situated with respect to various population concentrations, existing public school facilities and programs and highway and street networks. The map inside the back cover gives additional details about the location of the College.
9


Prior to the completion of permanent campus facilities, the College will be housed principally in two new fabricated steel buildings especially designed for the beginning student body. An office of the College will also be opened in the city of Denver to facilitate the provision of appropriate College services to the inner-city area.
STUDENT SERVICES
The Student Services staff assists with admissions, records and registration, counseling services, financial aid, job placement, health services, student activities, and veterans eligibility.
Admissions, Records and Registration
Detailed information on admissions requirements and procedures is given in the next section of the catalog. Prior to the beginning of each quarter, each student whose application for admission has been accepted will receive registration information and a scheduled period for registration. In so far as possible, pre-registration procedures will be directed toward minimizing the complexities and time involved in the formal registration process.
A system of record keeping assures the student of a complete and confidential file of information on previous educational experience, credits earned at the Community College of Denver, test data and other information. Transcripts of appropriate records are available to the student without charge.
As a part of the admission process, new full-time students are asked to participate in a one-day orientation program which will deal with registration procedures, student services, programs of study, and College policies and regulations.
Counseling Services
The College is committed to the provision of a comprehensive guidance program staffed by specially selected counselors who are genuinely concerned with the interests, achievements, aspirations and goals of students. After the student application is received, students are assisted in the selection of a program by a counselor. Counseling services will continue to be available thereafter to assist students with educational, vocational, and personal matters.
Counselors aid students in clarifying their occupational objectives. Interest inventories can be administered and reference made to the extensive occupational information which is available to students. In order to aid the student in planning for his future education, an extensive collection of college catalogs is maintained in the Counseling Office. The professionally trained counseling staff will work with students experiencing personal or emotional problems or may refer them to the appropriate agency or service for specialized assistance. All students are encouraged to utilize the services provided by their counselors. Counselors are available for all part-time, full-time day, and extended- day students at the College.
Entrance examinations and test scores are not required for admission to the College. However, testing services are available and test results are interpreted to students and used appropriately by counselors in assisting students.
The entire faculty of the College is guidance oriented and has a major commitment to help each individual student pursue a course of study planned to fulfill his goals. In order to accomplish this, instructors are committed to assisting students on an individual basis. Students are encouraged to confer with their instructors when problems or questions arise.
Financial Aid and Placement
The Office of Student Services will endeavor to help deserving students obtain financial assistance in meeting their college expenses and assist students in finding full-time employment in occupations for which they have been prepared at the Community College of Denver.
10


Possibilities for financial assistance include loans, scholarships, tuition waivers, and part-time employment including work-study programs. The awarding of financial aid is based primarily on need and interested students should apply to the Dean of Student Services prior to registration.
The staff of the Office of Student Services and instructors in the area of Occupational Studies maintain close contact with business and industry concerning job opportunities and a record of available positions, both full- and part-time, is kept in the Office of Student Services.
Health Services
College officials recognize the basic importance of good health to happy and productive citizenship and wish to encourage students in the development and maintenance of good health practices. Although initially the College will not provide an infirmary, a registered nurse will be available part-time to assist students with health problems and college authorities will retain the general consulting services of a physician. A student accident and sickness insurance program is available to students at low cost.
Student Activities
The College will cooperate in the development of those student- initiated activities which supplement the more formal instructional program by providing constructive experiences which will stimulate personal growth and social development and add to the students enjoyment of life. Opportunities for the development of leadership, cooperative planning, and special interests must be fostered through participation in these activities. All student activities will be coordinated through the Office of Student Services.
Veterans Eligibility
Prospective students who are eligible for veterans benefits should make application for benefits at the Veterans Administration Regional Office. Immediately upon receipt of an application, the Veterans Administration will mail the veteran information acknowledging the claim and providing a claim number. After processing the application the V. A. will issue eligible veterans a Certificate of Eligibility valid only at the institution named and only for the objective indicated. The prospective student should bring the Certificated of Eligibility to the Office of Admissions and Records at the time of initial registration.
11


ADMISSIONS INFORMATION
Admissions Policy
The College will admit high school graduates, non-graduates of high school who are 18 years of age or older, and any other person who can profit from the instruction for which he enrolls. However, admission to the College does not assure acceptance of an individual student in a particular course or program. Some students may be requested to enroll in special courses for correction of scholastic or other deficiencies.
Applications for Admission
Persons planning to enroll within one year following their graduation from high school are requested to submit the Standard Colorado Application for Admission Form, Parts I and II, which are available from high school counselors or the College. Part II is to be sent by the high school at the request of the applicant.
Other persons should submit Application for Admission Form SS1, which is available from the College.
All persons seeking the Associate Degree, who have had previous college attendance, must arrange for a current official transcript of their college credits to be sent to the Community College of Denver.
The College does not require a physical examination as a general condition of admission but reserves the right to require evidence of good health in individual instances when such seems appropriate.
Entrance examinations are not required as a condition for admission to the College.
A $10 pre-payment of tuition must accompany each application for admission to the College unless enrollment for fewer than four quarter hours credit or its equivalent is planned. No portion of this pre- payment is refundable if the student does not matriculate.
Applications should be submitted as soon as possible prior to the due date for each quarter shown in the College calendar. When the necessary materials and payment have been received the applicant will be notified of his admission status.
Fees will not be charged for the Colleges initial quarter of operation, but a fee structure may be developed for subsequent quarters. However, in some cases students will be required to purchase certain individual supplies and materials and rent uniforms.
Residency Policy
At the time of application for admission, students are classified for tuition purposes as Colorado residents or Out-of-State residents according to the provisions of Colorado law and policies of the College. The classification remains unchanged in the absence of satisfactory evidence to the contrary, and students are held responsible for reporting changes in residency status to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Tuition
Ten or more quarter hours of credit Nine or fewer quarter hours of credit
Colorado Residents Out-of-State Residents
$30 per quarter $250 per quarter
$ 3 per Qtr. hour $ 25 per Qtr. hour
Fees
12


Refunds
A refund of 75 per cent of the tuition charge is made to either full-time or part-time students who withdraw from College during the first ten days of classes. No refunds are made after that time, nor are refunds made if students drop a partial course load at any time.
Programs and Course Offerings May Be Withdrawn
The College retains the right to cancel programs or course offerings where enrollments are insufficient.
GENERAL REGULATIONS
Students entering college for the first time might need to be reminded of the added responsibilities of attending college. They should recognize that the College must have a minimum number of rules if its objectives are to be accomplished. Regulations are based upon respect for the rights of others and observance of civil and moral laws. All who enroll in the Community College of Denver must realize that success rests upon personal efforts, attitudes, honor, integrity, and common sense and that attendance at this institution is a privilege.
Credit Hours
Generally, one credit hour is earned by attending a non-laboratory class for a fifty-minute period, once a week, for a full quarter. In a laboratory course, one credit hour is granted for, from two to four, fifty-minute periods per week in a laboratory.
Course Load
The normal course load for a full-time student is fifteen credit hours. Special permission must be obtained from the faculty advisors and the Dean of Student Services to register for more than eighteen credit hours.
It is recommended that employed students consult with a counselor about their course load. Classification of Students
Full-time a student who carries twelve or more credit hours.
Part-time a student who carries less than twelve credit hours.
First year (Freshman) a student who has completed fewer than forty-five credit hours.
Second year (Sophomore) a student who has completed forty-five or more credit hours, but has not received an associate degree or has not qualified for upper division classification in a four-year college or university.
Special a student who is enrolled for courses but is not pursuing a degree or certificate of achievement.
13


Attendance
College officials believe that regular class attendance is necessary if a student is to receive maximum benefits from his work, and students are expected to attend all sessions of the classes for which they are registered. The individual instructor may determine that the quality of a students work has been adversely affected by absence or tardiness.
Students should explain the reason for absence to their instructors. The student is responsible for making up work missed because of any absence.
Adds and Drops or Withdrawals
Adds and drops are to be held to a minimum. Forms for adding and dropping can be secured from the Admissions and Records Office or the Counseling Office. Adds and drops are approved by the instructor and counselor, and are to be used only to improve the students instructional program.
If a student is withdrawing from college, he must complete Drop forms for all classes on his program. Failure to complete the Drop forms will interfere with receiving any refunds that may be due, and may result in a failing grade for the course.
Adding Courses
Students are expected to complete their registration during the registration period, if not before. However, a student may add a course during the first two weeks of the course. An Add form must be completed and turned in to the Admissions and Records Office by the student. Students may not add a course after this two week period.
Dropping Courses
A student is expected to complete the courses for which he is registered. He may formally drop a course up to and including the week following midterm. The letters WP(Withdrawal Passing) will appear on his record. Drop forms must be completed and turned in to the Admission and Records Office by the student.
If a student withdraws from a course after the week following midterm, either the letters WP or WF (Withdrawal Failing) depending upon the instructors evaluation of the students status at the time, will appear on the students record. A Drop form must be completed any time a student withdraws from a class.
Withdrawal from College
If for some reason a student must withdraw from college (withdrawal meaning dropping all classes), the student may claim a seventy-five percent refund of tuition paid if the withdrawal is made during the first ten days classes meet. Application for refund must be made through the Office of Admissions and Records.
Dismissal
In the case of serious breaches of acceptable conduct, or in the case of a repetitive pattern of poor conduct, a student may be dismissed from the College.
Evaluation and Grading
The Community College of Denver is philosophically committed to a program that focuses on the student and activities that foster his learning. Student evaluation, when properly conducted, is seen as one of these activities. Proper evaluation is considered to be a continuous process involving a variety of evaluative methods and techniques which assure a reasonably fair appraisal of student accomplishments.
14


A system of evaluation and a means of letting the student know the degree of progress he is making can be achieved in numerous ways. One means is by proper evaluation and by assignment of grades, completion of credit hours, and accumulation of grade points. The grade symbols listed below have the meanings indicated.
Grades
A superior B excellent C average D inferior F failure
1 incomplete credit withheld IF incomplete failing IP incomplete passing WF withdrawal failing WP withdrawal passing
Grade-Point Average
Honor points or grade points measure the achievement of the student for the number of credit hours he has attempted.
A student who enrolls in college for the first time usually is not familiar with the terms grade points and grade-point average. Grade points are determined by multiplying the grade points per credit hour by the credit hour value of the course attempted. The following example will enable the student to compute his grade-point average.
Grade points per credit hour
4
3
2
1
0
Course Credit Hours Attempted Final Grade Grade Points
English 3 B 3 grade points (3x3) equals 9
History 3 F 0 grade points (0x3) equals 0
Mathematics 3 C 2 grade points (2x3) equals 6
Electronics 2 A 4 grade points (4x2) equals 8
Physics 5 C 2 grade points (2x5) equals 10
Physical Education 1 D 1 grade point (lxl) equals 1
17 34
Divide the total grade points by the total credit hours attempted, for example 34 divided by 17 equals 2.00 grade-point average.
The cumulative grade-point average is the total number of grade points earned divided by the number of credit hours attempted. It includes the number of credit hours of F, even though no grade points are allowed for this grade. When a course is repeated, the original grade and the number of credit hours attempted are not removed from the students permanent record. The repeated course and the second grade received in the course are entered on the students permanent academic record, but in the case of a course that was failed initially, the credit hours attempted are only entered on the permanent record for the initial enrollment.
Grades are issued at mid-term for new students and, at the end of each quarter for all students. The mid-term grade is an indication of student progress and does not become a part of his permanent record. Both mid-term and final grades are mailed to the home address of the student.
15


Incomplete Grade T Credit Withheld
If for some reason a student has not completed all the requirements of a course as determined by the instructor, the instructor may issue an incomplete grade I. The student has until the end of the next quarter to complete the requirements of the course. If the requirements are not met during the quarter following the term the incomplete was given, the grade automatically becomes an IP, (Incomplete-Passing), or IF, (Incomplete-Failing), depending upon the instructors evaluation of the students status at the time.
Graduation Requirements
Commencement ceremonies for all Community College of Denver graduates are held in the month of June. The conferring of associate degrees, the granting of certificates of achievement and the giving of honors highlight the graduation exercises.
To receive the ASSOCIATE DEGREE a student must:
1 Complete a minimum of ninety credit hours ( the last fifteen must be earned at the Community College of Denver), including the specific subject or course requirements in the selected program. Certain programs may require more than the minimum of ninety credit hours and these must also be completed.
2- Earn a minimum cumulative grade-point average at the Community College of Denver of 2.0.
3- Complete three credit hours of English.
4- Filfe the Application for Graduation form at the time of registering for the final quarter. This form is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
To receive the CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT a student must:
1. Complete a minimum of forty-five credit hours ( the last fifteen must be earned at the Community College of Denver), including the specific subject matter or course requirements of the selected program. Certain programs may require more than the minimum of forty-five credit hours and these must also be completed.
2. Earn a minimum cumulative grade-point average at the Community College of Denver of 2.0.
3. Complete three credit hours in speech or English.
4. File the Application for Graduation form at the time of registering for the final quarter. This form is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Certificate of Completion
The College offers many short courses, conferences, work shops, and seminars. These will vary in length from one to two meetings of short duration to units necessitating many clock hours accumulated over a period of several weeks. Successful completion of short courses of this type will result in the granting of a Certificate of Completion.
16


Requests for Transcripts
A student requesting that a transcript of his grades be sent to an educational institution or to a prospective employer must complete the appropriate form in the Admissions and Records Office. There is no charge for this service, provided the student has fulfilled all financial obligations to the Community College of Denver.
Course Numbers
Course numbers consist of prefix letters, which constitute an abbreviation of the subject area or program, and a series of three digits, the first of which has the following meaning:
The digit of a course number indicates its classification according to the year it should be taken.
(a) Courses numbered 100 to 199 are usually taken during the first year of college; in most cases they are pre-requisite courses.
(b) Courses numbered 200 to 299 are usually taken during the second year of college.
17


GENERAL
STUDIES
PROGRAMS
19


GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAMS
The General Studies Programs are intended to provide educational opportunities in support of the students selected career emphasis in Occupational Studies, in preparation for transfer to a four-year college or university and in general and developmental education interests.
Students enrolled in Occupational Studies Programs may enroll in General Studies courses to meet the specific requirements of particular occupational curricula and to select desired elective courses.
Students who intend to transfer to a four-year college or university should review the general requirements presented in the following Arts and Science programs. These programs as outlined are to serve as guidelines only. Students are advised to review the catalog of the particular college to which they plan to transfer in order to determine specific course requirements. Copies of catalogs for other Colorado colleges, universities, and out-of-state schools are available in the Office of Student Services. The associate degree is awarded by the Community College of Denver upon successful completion of the requirements in Arts and Science.
Arts
The following pattern of courses for students concentrating in Liberal Arts, Education, Literature or Business Administration is one which meets the requirements of the first two years of work in most four-year colleges and universities.
First Year Credit hours Second Year Credit hours
English Language 9 Literature 9
Social Science 9 Social Science 9
Foreign Language 15 Foreign Language 9
Mathematics 9 Science 15
Art or Music 3 Electives 3-6
Electives 3
48 45-48
Science
The following pattern of courses for students concentrating in the Sciences, Mathematics, Forestry
and Conservation, Education, Engineering or the several medical fields is one which meets the
requirements of the first two years of work in most four-year colleges and universities.
First Year Credit hours Second Year Credit hours
English Language 9 Foreign Language or 9-15
Literature
Social Science 9 Social Science 6
Mathematics 9 Mathematics 9
Science 15 Science 15
Electives 6 Electives 3-6
48 42-51
General Education
The General Education program is especially suitable for those students who wish to gain broad understandings in various content fields and are not concerned specifically with acquiring job-entry skills or securing college-parallel credit. The associate degree is awarded upon successful completion of the requirements in General Education. The following broad guidelines are intended to provide opportunity for students to advance their own intellectual, cultural and personal development according to their needs and interests.
21


First Year Credit hours Second Year Credit hours
English Language 9 Literature 9-12
Social Science 9 Social Science 15-18
Mathematics or Science 9-15 Foreign Language or Elective 9-15
Foreign Language or Elective 9-15 Art or Music 3-6
Art or Music 3-6
Minimum 45 Minimum 45
Developmental Education
The program of studies in Developmental Education is intended to be highly individualized in order to provide opportunity for students to strengthen and develop their learning skills, to complete high school diploma equivalency requirements or to prepare for entry into Occupational or General Studies programs. Student needs are diagnosed and individual programs are planned, including study in learning laboratories and participation in fundamental and preparatory classes. The following program opportunities will be available according to individual needs.
Learning Laboratories:
Mathematics
Reading
Speech-Listening
Writing
Fundamental and Preparatory Courses:
English Language (basic written communication)
Mathematics (fundamentals of arithmetic, algebra,and geometry)
Science (basic life sciences and physical science)
Social Science (fundamentals of world and U.S. history,
U.S. government, and consumer economics)
Electives (selected courses from Occupational andGeneral Studies programs)
LEARNING MATERIALS CENTER
The Learning Materials Center (LMC) includes the Colleges library and audiovisual facilities. The LMC provides faculty and students with educational material in many media: books, periodicals, films, filmstrips, microfilm, slides, tapes, records and transparencies.
The library is arranged to provide a pleasant relaxed atmosphere for students to study, browse and carry our research assignments. Students may study in individual carrels or work together in small groups. Members of the LMC staff are always available to assist students in obtaining needed learning materials. Interlibrary loan agreements supplement the LMCs collection with materials from the Colorado State Library and other public, college and university libraries.
The audiovisual department handles all faculty requests for educational media and materials. A preview room is available for viewing films and filmstrips that are used in classes and assigned by instructors. Tape recorders also are available for preparing taped presentations or for listening to selected recordings.
22


OCCUPATIONAL
STUDIES
PROGRAMS
23


DIVISION
OF
BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS
25


ACCOUNTING
First Year
rirst Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Quarter Cr. Hrs. Third Quarter Cr. Hr:
[nglish Composition 111 3 English Composition English Composition
112 3 113 3
[ntroduction to
lusiness 104 3 Principles of Market- Business Machines 10j 1 3
ing 213 3
lathematics for Busi- Accounting 112 3
less and Industry 110 3 Accounting 111 3
Unit Record Equip-
Typing 102 3 Introduction to Data ment 113 3
Processing 101 3
ilective 3 Social Science
15 College Algebra 111 3 Elective 3
15 15
Second Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
'ourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs.
Iffice Procedures Business Organization Fundamentals of
ind Administration 204 3 and Management 209 3 Economics 109 3
iccounting 113 3 Principles of Govern- Statistics for Busi- 3
mental Accounting and ness and Industry 120
[nit Record Equip-lent 114 3 Budgeting 220 3 Introduction to Ac-
Computer Programming counting Systems 215 3
lusiness Law 207 3 115 3 Income Tax Account-
'sychology of Personal levelopment 107 3 Elective 3 ing 211 3
15 Work Experience 3 Elective or Work
15 Experience _3
15
Imployment Opportunities: Completion of this program leads to employment oppor-:unities as an accountant in business and industrial concerns or at various level n governmental agencies.
Total Credit Hours: 90
26


BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
First Year
First Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Quarter Cr. Hrs. Third Quarter Cr Hr:
Introduction to Principles of Market- Fundamentals of
Business 104 3 ing 213 3 Economics 109 3
English Composition 111 3 English Composition English Composition
112 3 113 3
Mathematics for Busi-
ness and Industry 110 3 Accounting 112 3 Accounting 113 3
Accounting 111 3 Psychology of Per- Introduction to Data
sonal Development 107 3 Processing 101 3
Elective 3
15 College Algebra 111 3 Elective 3
15 15
Fourth Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Year Fifth Quarter Cr. Hrs. Sixth Quarter Cr. Hrs
Business Organization Personnel Admin- Human Relations in
and Management 209 3 istration 216 3 Business and In-
dustry 100 3
Statistics for Business Business Finance 205 3
and Industry 120 3 Office Management 2013
Computer Program-
Office Procedures and ming 115 3 Business Policies
Administration 204 3 210 3
Business Law 207 3
Technical Writing 110 3 Elective or Work
Elective or Work Experience 6
Elective 3 Experience 3 15
15 15
Employment Opportunities: Supervisory and administrative or managerial trainee opportunities in a variety of businesses or industries.
Total Credit Hours: 90
27


DATA PROCESSING
Six-Month Program
Cr. Cr.
Pirst Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs
[introduction to Data Unit Record Equipment 114 3
Processing 101 3 Accounting 112 3
Introductory Algebra 105 3 Computer Programming 115 3
Cyping 102 or Key Punch laboratory 102 3 Key Punch Laboratory 102 or Work Experience 3
Jnit Record Equipment 113 3 Elective 3
Accounting 111 3 15
15
Smployment Opportunities: Employment by firms handling a large volume of data, reporting, record keeping, and other paperwork. Employment by manufacturing, wholesale and retail, and utility firms as Key Punch, Sorting Machine or Tab-llating Machine Operator.
Total Credit Hours: 30
28


DATA PROCESSING
First Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
First Quarter___________Hrs. Second Quarter___________Hrs. Third Quarter__________Hrs
English Elective 3 Introduction to Busi- Technical Writ-
ness 104 3 ing 110 3
Mathematics Elective 3 English Elective 3 Accounting 112 3
Accounting 111 3 Mathematics Elective 3 Unit Record Equip-
Introduction to Data ment 114 3
Processing 101 3 Unit Record Equipment 113 3 Computer Program-
Elective 3 ming 115 3
15 Elective 3
15 Mathematics Elective 3
15
Fourth Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Year Fifth Quarter Cr. Hrs. Sixth Quarter Cr. Hrs
Statistics for Business Business Organization Office Procedures and
and Industry 120 3 and Management 209 3 Administration 204 3
Sociology Elective 3 Fundamentals of Psychology of Personal
Economics 109 3 Development 107 or
Data Processing Appli- Human Relations in Busi-
cations 220 3 Data Processing ness and Industry 100 3
Systems 223 3
Computer Program- Programming Sys-
ming 116 3 Computer Program- terns 222 3
ming 117 3
Elective 3 Elective 3
15 Social Science Elective
or Work Experience 3 Work Experience 3
15 15
Employment Opportunities: Entry occupations include data processing applications data systems and procedures analyses, and computer programming in private businesses, industrial firms, governmental agencies and educational institutions.
Total Credit Hours: 90
29


GENERAL CLERICAL
Nine Months Program
First Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Quarter Cr, Hrs. Third Quarter Cr. Hrs.
Introduction to Business 104 3 Clerical Recordkeeping and Accounting 100 3 Introduction to Data Processing 101 3
English Fundamentals 106 3 English Fundamentals 107 3 Business Machines 103 3
Alphabetic Shorthand 101 3 Alphabetic Shorthand Speed Building 103 3 Human Relations in Business and Industry 100 3
Typing 102 3 Typing 104 or Office Practice 202 3 English Fundamentals 108 3
Elective 3 15 Elective 3 15 Elective 3 15
Employment Opportunities: Various businesses, industries, governmental agencies, banks, institutions and private offices which employ general clerical personnel to carry on many office functions.
Total Credit Hours: 45
30


KEY PUNCH
Three Months Program
Cr.
First Quarter________________________Hrs.
Typing 102 3
Key Punch Laboratory 102 3
Introduction to Data Processing 101 3
Human Relations in Business and Industry 100 3
Unit Record Equipment 113 or Elective _3
15
Employment Opportunities: Employment as key punch operator for business, industrial or governmental agencies.
Total Credit Hours: 15
31


MERCHANDISING
(DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION)
First Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
First Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs,
Introduction to Business 104 3 Salesmanship 225 3 Salesmanship 226 3
English Composi- English Composi- English Composi-
tion 111 3 tion 112 3 tion 113 3
Principles of Principles of Lettering and
Marketing 213 3 Advertising 200 3 Layout 100 3
Accounting 111 3 Typing 102 or Intro- Mathematics
duction to Data Processing 101 3 Elective 3
Elective 3 Accounting 112 3 Elective 3
15 Second Year 15 15
Cr. Cr. Cr.
?ourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs,
3usiness Organi- Sales Manage- Human Relations
nation and Manage- ment 227 3 in Business and
nent 209 3 Industry 100 3
?rinciples of Psychology of Per- Techniques of Fash-
ferchandising 215 3 sonal Development 107 3 ion Merchandising 230 or Principles of Buying 211 3
advertising Principles of Personal Short-
>esign 203 3 Retailing 217 3 hand 111 3
lusiness Law 207 3 Elective 3 Elective 3
Elective or Work Work Experience 3 Work Experience 3
Ixper ience 3
15 15 15
Imployment Opportunities: Sales, supervision and managerial trainee
pportunities in a variety of retail, wholesal e and marketing businesses.
Total Credit Hours: 90
32


MERCHANDISING
(DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION)
Nine Month Program
Cr.
First Quarter_________Hrs.
Introduction to Business 104 3
Salesmanship 225 3
Accounting III 3
Business Communications 131 3
Psychology of Personal Development 107 _3
15
Second Quarter Cr. Hrs
Accounting 112 3
Salesmanship 226 3
Principles of Advertising 200 3
Business Communications 132 3
Work Experience 3
15
Cr.
Third Quarter______Hrs.
Principles of Merchandising 215 3
Clerical Recordkeeping and Accounting 100 3
Business Communications 133 3
Mathematics Elective 3
Work Experience 3
15
Employment Opportunities: Entry level employment in a sales position in retail, wholesale and marketing businesses.
Total Credit Hours: 45
33


OFFICE ADMINISTRATION
First Year
First Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Quarter Cr. Hrs. Third Quarter Cr. Hrs.
Introduction to Business 104 3 Accounting 111 3 Accounting 112 3
English Composition 111 3 English Composition 112 3 English Composition 113 3
Mathematics Elective 3 Office Practice 202 or Typing 102 3 Introduction to Data Processing 101 3
Typing 102 3 Filing and Records Control 105 3 Psychology of Per sonal Development 107 3
Elective 3 15 Mathematics Elective 3 15 Elective 3 15
Second Year
Fourth Quarter Cr. Hrs. Fifth Quarter Cr. Hrs. Sixth Quarter Cr. Hrs.
Business Organization and Management 209 or Personnel Administration 216 3 Office Procedures and Administration 204 3 Human Relations in Business and Industry 100 3
Statistics for Business and Industry 120 3 Fundamentals of Economics 109 3 Principles of Marketing 213 3
Accounting 113 3 Business Machines 103 3 Case Studies in Administrative Assistance 212 3
Unit Record Equipment 113 or Computer Programming 115 3 Personal Shorthand 111 3 Business Law 207 3
Elective 3 15 Elective or Work Experience 3 15 Elective or Work Experience 3 15
Employment Opportunities: trainee opportunities in a Supervisory and administrative or managerial variety of businesses and industries.
Total Credit Hours: 90
34


SECRETARIAL-MEDICAL
First Year
First Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Quarter Cr. Hrs. Third Quarter Cr. Hrs.
Introduction to Business 104 3 Mathematics 3 Secretarial Accounting 110 3
Business Communication 131 3 Business Communica tion 132 3 Business Communication 133 3
Gregg Shorthand Principles 106 3 Gregg Shorthand Principles 107 3 Gregg Shorthand Speed Development 108 3
Typing 100 3 Typing 102 3 Typing 104 3
Anatomy and Physiology 123 4 16 Anatomy and Physiology 124 4 16 Human Relations in Business and Industry 100 3 15
Second Year
Fourth Quarter Cr. Hrs. Fifth Quarter Cr. Hrs. Sixth Quarter Cr. Hrs.
Introduction to Data Processing 101 3 Health Science Terminology 100 3 First Aid 101 2
Shorthand Transcription 109 3 Office Procedures Administration 204 and 3 Medical Secretarial Procedures and Records 114 3
Nursing Procedures and Professional Ethics 105 3 Business Machines 103 3 Medical Dictation and Transcription 112 3
Office Management 201 3 Elective 3 Case Studies in Administrative Assistance 212 3
Social Science Elective 3 15 Work Experience 3 L5 Elective 3 14
Employment Opportunities: Prepares for secretarial positions assisting professionals in the medical field. Employment in hospitals, clinics, and physicians' offices.
Total Credit Hours: 91
35


SECRETARIAL SCIENCE
First Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
First Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs
Introduction to Mathematics Secretarial Ac-
Business 104 3 Elective 3 counting 110 or Accounting 111 3
Gregg Shorthand Principles 106 3 English Elective 3 English Elective 3
Typing 100 3 Gregg Shorthand Gregg Shorthand
Principles 107 3 Speed Development 108 3
English Elective 3 Typing 102 3 Typing 104 3
Elective 3 Social Science Psychology of Per-
Elective 3 sonal Development 107 3
15 Second Year 15 15
Cr. Cr. Cr.
Fourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs.
Business Organiza- Fundamentals of Human Relations
tion and Manage- Economics 109 3 in Business and
ment 209 or Accounting 112 3 Industry 100 3
Introduction to Data Office Procedures Machine Trans-
Processing 101 3 and Administration cription 110 3
204 3
Shorthand Trans- Secretarial Pro- Specialized Pro-
cription 109 3 cedures 200 3 fessional Dictation 205 3
Business Law 207 3 Business Machines Case Studies in
103 3 Administrative Assistance 212 3
Elective 3 Elective or Work Elective or Work
Experience 3 Experience 3
15 15 15
Employment Opportunities: Business, industry, banks, institutions, private
offices and governmental agencies seeking highly trained secretarial personnel to perform the more responsible functions in operating an office.
Total Credit Hours: 90
36


STENOGRAPHIC
Nine Month Program
Students who have studied Gregg Shorthand and can pass a proficiency test at 60 words per minute may elect to continue the Gregg program indicated below. All students who have had no previous shorthand training, or those not electing the above option, will be assigned to Stenoscript Shorthand.
Cr. Cr. Cr.
First Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs,
Introduction to Business 104 3 Mathematics for Business and Industry 110 3 Secretarial Accounting 110 3
English Elective 3 English Elective 3 Machine Transcription 110 3
Gregg Shorthand Principles 107 or Alphabetic Shorthand 101 3 Gregg Shorthand Speed Development 108 or Alphabetic Shorthand Speed Building 103 3 Shorthand Transcription 109 3
Typing 102 3 Typing 104 or Office Practice 202 3 Secretarial Procedures 200 3
Business Machines 103 3 15 Introduction to Data Processing 101 3 15 Psychology of Per sonal Development 107 3 15
Employment Opportunities: Various businesses, industries, governmental agencies, banks, institutions, and private offices employing clerk-typists to carry on many office functions.
Total Credit Hours: 45
37


STENOGRAPHIC
One Year Program
Students who have studied Gregg Shorthand and can pass a proficiency test at 60 words per minute may elect to continue the Gregg program indicated below. All students who have had no previous shorthand training, or those not electing the above option, will be assigned to Stenoscript Shorthand.
Cr. Cr. Cr.
First Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs,
Introduction to Business 104 3 Mathematics for Business and Industry 110 3 Secretarial Accounting 110 3
English Elective 3 English Elective 3 English Elective 3
Gregg Shorthand Principles 107 or Alphabetic Shorthand 101 3 Gregg Shorthand Speed Development 108 or Alphabetic Shorthand Speed Building 103 3 Shorthand Transcription 109 3
Typing 102 3 Typing 104 3 Secretarial Procedures 200 3
Elective 3 15 Elective 3 15 Elective or Work Experience 3 15
Fourth Quarter Cr. Hrs.
Introduction to Data Processing 101 3
Business Machines 103 3
Machine Transcription 110 3
Psychology of Personal Development 107 3
Work Experience 3 15
Employment Opportunities: Various businesses, industries, governmental agencies, banks, institutions, and private offices employing clerk-typists to carry on many office functions.
Total Credit Hours: 60
38


TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT
Eighteen-Month Program
The program provides a good foundation in traffic principles, develops technical proficiency in the use of tariffs and rates, and provides an understanding of rules and laws pertaining to shipment of freight by the various transportation media.
The curriculum provides a combination of courses in the field of transportation, courses directly applicable to transportation, and general studies courses required for an Associate Degree. The program consists of 90 credit hours in the following broad categories:
The Field of Transportation 9 credit hours
Transportation Economics and Management 9 credit hours
Transportation Regulations 9 credit hours
General Business in Transportation 9 credit hours
International Trade 9 credit hours
Related Studies 20 credit hours
Applicable General Studies 25 credit hours
Total Credit Hours 90
Employment Opportunities: Those who complete the curriculum are prepared for positions in traffic, claims, shipping, receiving, and as freight-rate special ists as well as many other transportation positions such as agents, sales representatives, and consultants.
39


DIVISION
OF
COMMUNITY AND PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
41


BUILDING MAINTENANCE
Three Month Program
First Quarter Cr. Hrs.
First Aid 101 2
Safety and Orientation 100 1
Operational Tasks 102 5
Floor Maintenance 104 2
Equipment and Materials 106 2
Heating and Ventilation 108 2
Maintenance of Grounds 110 1
Security and Protective
Measures 112 1
16
Employment Opportunities: This program has been designed to prepare for employment in building maintenance. Those who complete the curriculum are prepared for positions in schools, offices, public institutions, and all types of businesses or industries demanding custodial work.
Total Credit Hours: 16
42


CHILD CARE
First Year
First Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Quarter Cr. Hrs. Third Quarter Cr. Hrs.
English Elective 3 Fundamentals of Speaking 102 3 Methods of Teaching the Young Child 106 4
Child Growth and Development 101 3 Child Growth and Development 102 3 Nutrition 108 2
First Aid 101 2 General Psychology 111 3 Supervised Student Participation 105 5
Creative Activities 102 3 Supervised Student Participation 103 5 General Psychology 112 3
Literature for Children 145 3 14 Elective 3 17 14
Fourth Quarter
* Internship 5
Fifth Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Year Sixth Quarter Cr. Hrs. Seventh Quarter Cr. Hrs.
General Psychology 113 3 Family and Community Relations 110 4 Family and Community Relations 112 4
Methods of Teaching the Young Child 108 4 Business Organization and Management 209 3 Child Guidance Techniques 105 3
Music for Children 145 3 Social Science Elective 3 Supervised Student Participation 111 5
Supervised Student Participation 107 5 15 Supervised Student Participation 109 5 15 Elective 3 15
Employment Opportunities: The nationwide trend is for mothers with small children to join the nation's work force. The pre-school children of these mothers will be taken care of in some type of childrens' center. Graduates of this program will be ready to work in day care centers, nursery schools, kindergartens nd child development centers.
Total Credit Hours: 95
* Not required for students who have had adequate applicable work experience.
43


CULINARY ARTS (Food Services)
Twenty-One Month Program
First Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
First Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs.
Developmenta1 Developmental Clerical Recordkeeping
English 102 3 Mathematics 100 3 and Accounting 100 3
Sanitation and Meal Planning and Principals of
Safety 100 3 Service 106 4 Merchandising 215 3
Basic Food Food
Science 104 3 Nutrition 108 2 Production 202 5
Basic Food Basic Food
Preparation 101 5 Preparation 103 5 Basic Baking 110 2
14 Second Year 14 13
Cr.
Fourth Quarter Hrs.
Internship 5
Seminar _2
Cr. Cr. Cr.
Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs. Seventh Quarter Hrs.
Business Organization Personnel Adminis- Food and Beverage
and Management 209 3 tration 216 3 Management 206 3
Food Production Food and Beverage Human Relations in Busi-
204 5 Control 205 4 ness Industry 100 3
Food and Beverage Advanced Food Advanced Food
Purchasing 201 4 Production 208 5 Production 209 5
Psychology of Case Studies in
Personal Develop- Administration
ment 107 3 Elective 3 Assistance 212 3
Elective 3
15 15 17
Employment Opportunities: The demand for trained people in the culinary arts field is becoming critical. The first-year program provides the individual with a salable skill qualifying him for employment as a cook or other related position in the field. Provision for experience in chef training and management careers are employment objectives of the second-year program. Graduates will find unlimited opportunities in hotels, motels, restaurants, institutions and other organizations where food service is offered.
Total Credit Hours: 95
44


FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
First Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
First Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs.
Introduction to Fire Science 100 3 Fire Company Organization and Procedure 104 3 Fire Hydraulics 108 3
Introduction to Fire Supression 102 3 Fire Fighting Tactics and Strategy 106 3 Fire Apparatus and Equipment 110 3
Mathematics Elective 3 Technical Writing 110 3 Blueprint Reading 115 3
English Fundamentals 106 3 English Fundamentals 107 3 Fundamentals of Speaking 102 3
Fundamental Chemistry 101 3 15 Introductory Algebra 3 105 or College or Algebra 111 5 15 or 17 Fundamental Physics 101 3 15
Second Year
Fourth Quarter Cr. Hrs. Fifth Quarter Cr. Hrs. Cr. Sixth Quarter Hrs.
Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 202 3 Property and Casualty Insurance 220 3 Fire Protection Equip ment and Systems 212 3
Related Codes and Ordinances 204 3 Rescue Practices 206 3 Fire Department Administration 214 3
Hazardous Materials 208 3 Hazardous Materials 209 3 Fire Investigation 218 3
Introduction to Chemistry 111 5 Social Science Elective 3 Building Construction Fire Protection 216 for 3
Human Relations in ness and Industry Busi- 100 3 17 Psychology of Personal Development 107 3 15 Elective 3 15
Employment Opportunities: Program is designed to prepare for initial entrance
into employment or advancement with municipalities, industrial firms, or other employers requiring fire protection personnel. May be employed by insurance companies as salesmen, fire insurance adjusters, or bureau raters.
Total Credit Hours: 92 or 94
45


LIBRARY TECHNOLOGY
First Year
irst Quarter
Cr. Hrs.
Second Quarter
Cr.
Hrs. Third Quarter
Cr.
Hrs.
library Usage 102 3 Library Practice 104 4 Library Practice 106 4
fundamentals of Introduction to Lit- World Literature 147 3
speaking 102 3 erature 141 3 Business Machines 103 3
typewriting 102 3 Typewriting 104 3
Psychology of Personal
English Fundamentals English Fundamentals Development 107 3
L06 3 107 3 Introduction to Lit-
lathematics Elective 3 Elective 3 erature 143 3
15 16 16
Second Year
'ourth Quarter
Cr.
Hrs.
Fifth Quarter
Cr.
Hrs.
Sixth Quarter
Cr.
Hrs.
library Practice 200 4 Fundamentals of Music Appreciation
Economics 109 3 100 3
forld Literature 148 3 Literature for Human Relations in
Introduction to Pol- Children 145 3 Business and Industry
itical Science 100 3 World Literature 149 3 100 3
)ffice Procedures and Juvenile Delinquency
idministration 204 3 Art Appreciation 100 3 123 3
fork Experience 3 Work Experience 3 Introduction to Data
16 15 Processing 101 4
Work Experience _3
16
Imployment Opportunities: Will include assisting librarians with the classifying md cataloging of books and serving clientele in public libraries, particularly ,n libraries maintained by public and private schools, colleges, and universities; ;overnmental agencies, educational and research associations, and business and .ndustrial firms.
Total Credit Hours: 94
46


TEACHER ASSISTING
Nine-Month Program
Cr. Cr. Cr.
rst Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs
:acher Aide Tech- Teacher Aide Tech- Teacher Aide Tech-
ques 100 3 niques 102 3 niques 104 3
:neral Psychology 111 3 General Psychology 112 3 Arts and Crafts 106 3
isic Health Typewriting 102 3 General Psychology
:ience 130 4 First Aid 101 2 113 3
iglish Fundamentals Fundamentals of
16 3 English Fundamentals 107 3 Speaking 102 3
istructional Media 14 Work Experience 4
id Materials 108 3 16
16
lployment Opportunities: The demand for trained assistants or aides in the teac ig field is steadily increasing. Jobs are available in nursery schools, day-car inters, after-school enrichment programs, hospital nurseries, children's psychi-:ric clinics and baby clinics in hospitals.
Total Credit Hours: 46
47


URBAN HORTICULTURE
Twenty-One Month Program First Year
Cr. Cr. Cr
First Quarter Hrs . Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hr
Introduction to Urban Ornamental Horti- Ornamental Horti-
Horticulture 100 2 culture Science 106 4 culture Operations 110 3
Ornamental Plant Urban Horticulture
Materials 102 4 Mechanics 108 4 Soils and Fertilizers 112 4
Mathematics Elective 3 English Fundamentals 107 3 Landscape Planning
English Fundamentals 106 3 Fundamentals of 114 3
Speaking 102 3 Fundamentals of
Basic Plant Science 104 4 14 Economics 109 3
16 Salesmanship 225 3
16
Second Year
Fourth Quarter
Internship (8 hours credit)
Cr. Cr. Cr
?ifth Quarter Hrs . Sixth Quarter Hrs. Seventh Quarter Hr
lisease and Pests - Nursery Production and Special Problems 215 3
identification and Management 207 4
Control 201 4 Horticulture Equipment Turf Production and Maintenance 213 4
landscape Maintenance >03 3 and Facilities 209 3 Psychology of Personal
lerchandising Horti- Greenhouse Manage- Development 107 3
:ulture Products 205 3 ment 211 4 Work Experience 4
clerical Recordkeeping Business Organization 14
ind Accounting 100 3 and Management 209 3
14
iuman Relations in Busi-less and Industry 100 3
16
Smployment Opportunities: The urban horticulture industry provides many career jpportunities for well-trained and ambitious young people. This program provide :raining in basic urban horticulture the first year with a provision for special Lzing in the nursery, landscape, and turf industries the second year.
Total Credit Hours: 98
48


DIVISION
OF
HEALTH OCCUPATIONS
49


DENTAL ASSISTING
First Year
Cr. Cr. Cr,
First Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs,
Basic Health Advanced Dental Principles of Operatory
Science 130 4 Science 140 4 Procedures 130 4
Orientation to Developmental Riysical Science
Dental Assisting Mathematics 100 3 103 3
110 1 English Composition Fundamentals of
English Composition 112 3 Speaking 102 3
111 3 Office Procedures Clinical Practice
Dental Science and Administra- and Work Ex-
120 4 tion 204 3 perience 4
Elective 3 Elective 3
16 Second Year 16 14
Cr. Cr. Cr.
Fourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs,
Dental Office Dental Materials Human Relations in
Procedures 210 4 200 3 Business and Industry 100 3
Principles of Advanced Dental
Dental Laboratory Laboratory Pro- First Aid 101 2
Procedures 215 3 cedures 220 4 Social Science-
Dental Roentgen- Psychology of Elective 3
ology 205 3 Personal Development 107 3 Clinical Practice
Clinical Practice and Work Experience 4 Clinical Practice and Work Experience 6
and Work Experience 6
14 16 14
Employment Opportunities: The program is designed to prepare students to become direct assistants to dentists in general and specialized practice. In addition to the responsibilities of chairside assisting, the dental assistant will have office responsibilities and laboratory duties.
Total Credit Hours: 90
50


INHALATION THERAPY
Twenty-one month program
An Associate Degree Program in Inhalation Therapy will be offered beginning the Fall Quarter, 1968, concluding with the Spring Quarter, 1970. Included in the program will be the Summer Quarter, 1969, which will be entirely devoted to clinical practice and work experience. The program will be implemented jointly by the Community College of Denver and the General Rose Memorial Hospital School of Inhalation Therapy.
The program is structured to meet the recommendations of the American Registry for Inhalation Therapists upon completion of the two-year program. The program will consist of 105 credit hours in the following broad categories:
Health Science 33 credit hours
Inhalation Therapy
Theory and Application 48 credit hours
Science, mathematics and
other applicable general
studies 24 credit hours
The program is also structured so as to prepare for employment upon completion
of specific phases of the curriculum.
Curriculum Completed First two quarters
First year (including summer sessions)
Full seven quarters
Employment Potential
Assistant Respiratory Therapy Technician
Respiratory Therapy Technician
Inhalation Therapist and Associate Degree
Employment Opportunities: The program in Inhalation Therapy Technology is designed to prepare therapists to work under the supervision of a physician responsible for inhalation therapy departments in health service agencies.
The therapist operates, maintains, and administers the equipment used in .patient care and is employed in hospitals, medical and research laboratories.
51


NURSE ASSISTING
Three-Month Program
This program is designed for those individuals who are able to perform nurse's assistant activities safely, appropriately and comfortably. The nurse's assistant assists with patient care under the direction and supervision of a registered professional nurse. The Nurse Assistant Program is one quarter in length and consists of the following broad areas of curriculum
Cr.
First Quarter- Hrs.
The Nurse's Assistant and her job
130 1
Basic Personal Care 110 5
Patients Requiring Special Types of Care 140 3
Home Health Care 120 6
Employment Opportunities: Graduates will qualify for service in hospitals, extended care facilities, nursing homes, and home-care agencies. Persons who qualify for a more advanced program, will be counseled to enter practical technical or professional nursing programs.
Total Credit Hours: 15
52


RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY (X-RAY) Thirty-Three Month Program
First Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
First Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs.
Introductory
English Elective 3 English Elective 3 Algebra 105 3
Basic Health Anatomy and Anatomy and
Science 130 4 Physiology 123 4 Physiology 124 4
Health Science Mathematics
Terminology 100 3 Elective 3 Nursing Procedures and Professional
Principles of X-Ray Principles of X-Ray Ethics 105 3
Techniques 100 3 Techniques 105 3 Principles of X-Ray
Elective 3 First Aid 101 2 Techniques 106 5
16 Fourth Quarter 15 15
10 weeks Cr.
Hrs.
Clinical X-Ray Experience 220 (in hospital) 7
Second Year
Cr. Cr. Cr,
Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs. Seventh Quarter Hrs.
Fundamentals of Principles of X-Ray Principles of X-Ray
Speaking 102 3 Techniques 200 3 Techniques 205 3
Principles of X-Ray Applied X-Ray Applied X-Ray
Techniques 107 5 Techniques 210 4 Techniques 215 6
Radiation Physics 105 4 Chemistry 111 5 Elective 3
Psychology of Personal
Development 107 3 Elective 3
15 15 12
Third Year
Internship: 12 months
(full time in hospital)
Spring Quarter
Review for Registry 225 3 hours credit Total Credit Hours: 98
Employment Opportunities: The program is designed to prepare persons for employment opportunities in clinics, physicians' offices, government health facilities and research laboratories. The program is being conducted in cooperation with Penver hospitals.
53


DIVISION
OF
INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS
55


APPLIANCE REPAIR
Nine-Month Program
First Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Quarter Cr. Hrs. Third Quarter Cr. Hrs.
Basic Electricity Small Appliance Ser- Large Appliance
100 4 vice and Repair 110 4 Service and
Repair 105 4
Blueprint Reading Psychology of Personal
115 3 Development 107 3 Basic Mechanisms
210 3
Fundamentals of Electives 6
Welding 100 3 Elective 3
Mathematics Work Experience 6
Elective 3
English Elective 3
16 13 16
Employment Opportunities: Servicing household and industrial appliances. Students are qualified to enter service departments of appliance sales firms or to be self employed.
Total Credit Hours: 45
56


AUTO BODY SERVICE
Nine-Month Program
Cr. Cr.
First Quarter________Hrs._____Second Quarter_______Hrs. Third Quarter
Cr.
Hrs.
Auto Body Welding and Fabri- Automobile Re-
Repair 100 4 cation 105 6 finishing 115 4
Automobile Re- Auto Body Wheel Balancing and
finishing 105 4 Repair 110 4 Alignment 120 4
Fundamentals of Human Relations in Psychology of
Welding 100 3 Business and Personal
Industry 100 3 Development 107 3
English Elective 3 Mathematics Fundamentals of
Elective 3 Speaking 102 3
Elective 3
14 16~ 17
Employment Opportunities: Body repairman or helper, painter or painter's helper in automobile dealership, independent body shop, or automotive maintenance department of business or industry.
Total Credit Hours: 47
57


AUTO BODY SERVICE
First Year
First Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Quarter Cr. Hrs. Third Quarter Cr. Hrs.
Auto Body Repair Welding and Fabri- Automobile Re-
100 4 cation 105 6 finishing 115 4
Automobile Re- Auto Body Repair Wheel Balancing and
finishing 105 4 110 4 Alignment 120 4
Fundamentals of Mathematics Psychology of
Welding 100 3 Elective 3 Personal
Development 107 3
English Elective 3 Human Relations in
Business and In- Fundamentals of
dustry 100 3 Speaking 102 3
Elective 3 Elective 3
14 19 17
Second Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
Fourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs.
Frame and Unit Major Body Frame and Unit Body
Body Straighten- Repair 210 4 Sectioning Methods
ing 205 4 Collision Esti- 215 4
Sociology Elective 3 mating 200 4 Body Rebuilding Methods 220 4
Automotive Air Conditioning 220 3 Typewriting 100 3 Labor Relations
Elective 3 108 3
Technical Writing 110 3 Work Experience 3 Work Experience 4
Elective 3
16 17 15
Employment Opportunities: Automobile body repairman and/or painter in an automobile dealership, independent body shop or maintenance department of business and industry; or may be employed as insurance adjuster trainee, manager trainee, order writer in dealership, salesman in automotive supply house.
Total Credit Hours: 98
58


AUTOMOTIVE MECHANICS
Nine-Month Program
Cr. Cr. Cr.
irst Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs.
nglish Elective 3 Mathematics Psychology of Per-
Elective 3 sonal Development
asic Ignition 107 3
00 3 Power Plants 160 4 Charging Systems
undamentals of Wheel Balancing and 125 3
elding 100 3 Alignment 120 4 Transmission and
ngines and Carburetion and Power Trains 140 3
arburetion 105 3 Tune-up 150 3 Basic Service
rake Systems Elective 3 Repair 210 3
10 3 Elect ive 3
15 17 15
mployment Opportunities: Entry mechanic in a service station or dealership.
ay specialize by applying six hours of electives on electrical systems. engine
nd carburetion or alignment and brakes.
Total Credit Hours: 47
59


AUTOMOTIVE MECHANICS
First Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
First Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs.
English Elective 3 Mathemtatics Psychology of Personal
Elective 3 Development 107 3
Basic Ignition 100 3 Bower Plants 160 4 Charging Systems
Fundamentals of 125 3
Welding 100 3 Wheel Balancing and Alignment 120 4 Transmission and
Engines and Carburetion 105 3 Carburetion and Power Trains 140 3
Tune-up 150 3 Engine Rebuilding
Brake Systems 110 3 Elective 3 130 3
Elective 3
15 Second Year 17 15
Cr. Cr. Cr.
Fourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs.
Dynamometer Engine Diagnosis Diagnosis and
Operation 205 4 215 4 Repair 200 4
Suspension Systems Automotive Air Labor Relations
230 3 Conditioning 220 3 108 3
Technical Writing Basic Service Automatic Trans-
110 3 Repair 210 3 missions 225 3
Introductory Algebra Social Science Work Experience 3
105 3 Elective 3
Elective 3 Work Experience 3
16 16 13
Employment Opportunities: Entry into automotive service field as a line mechan: in a dealership or service station. Often find employment in specialty shops r< building engines, transmissions, or charging systems. Many opportunities also in automotive parts, sales or as a manufacturer's service representative. This program is a good foundation for the potential service manager or garage foremai
Total Credit Hours: 92
60


CIVIL TECHNOLOGY
DRAFTING
MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY
A CORE PROGRAM for
Building Construction Technology, Civil Technology, Drafting and Design Technology, Highway Technology, Mechanical Design Technology, Mechanical Production Technology
Course descriptions for the six technological programs listed above are described under Civil Technology, Drafting, Mechanical Technology
First Year
The first year is devoted to a core curriculum which is prerequisite to options in Drafting and Design Technology, Civil Technology, Building Construction Technology, Highway Technology, Mechanical Design Technology, and Mechanical Production Technology.
Cr. Cr. Cr.
First Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs.
English Elective 3 Mathematics Technical Writing
Elective 3 110 3
Mathematics Elective 3 Technical Mathematics
Drawing 105 3 Elective 3
Technical Drawing 100 3 Basic Electricity Technical Drawing
100 4 110 3
Elementary Surveying 100 3 Manufacturing Pro- Fundamental Physics
cesses 105 4 101 5
Measurements 100 3 Psychology of Per- Electronics Devices
sonal Development 107 3 115 4
15 17 18
Employment Opportunities: If employment is desired at the end of the core curr: culum, the student is prepared for many jobs in manufacturing and construction industries.
Total Credit Hours: 50
61


BUILDING CONSTRUCTION (option)
Second Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
Fourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs.
Introduction to Labor Relations Human Relations in
Data Processing 108 3 Business and In-
101 3 Soils and Founda- dustry 100 3
Estimating Con- tions 225 3 Building Service
struction Costs 209 3 Contracts and Systems 201 5
Specifications Architectural Draft
Architectural 205 3 ing and Design
Drafting and Design 200 3 Architectural 203 3
Drafting and Technical Project
Structural Draft- Design 201 3 240 5
ing and Design 225 3 Structural Drafting and Design 226 3
Donst ruction Methods and Equipment 203 3
15 15 16
Employment Opportunities: Job opportunities for building construction technicians are found in many areas of the construction field. These may be described is: maintenance foreman, construction assistant, building supply salesman, assistant to plant engineers, architectural draftsman and structural draftsman.
Credit Hours Core Program: 50 Credit Hours Second Year: 46
Total Credit Hours 96
62


CIVIL TECHNOLOGY (option)
Second Year
Cr.
fourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter
Cr. Cr.
Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs.
[ntroduction to Data
frocessing 101 3
Drainage and
leology 207 3
Estimating Construction Costs 209 3
Structural Drafting and Design 225 3
advanced Surveying 200 4
16
Structural Drafting
and Design 226 3
Route Surveys and Design 220 4
Labor Relations
108 3
Fundamentals of Hydraulics and Pneumatics 205 3
Construction Methods and Equipment 203 3
16
Human Relations in
Business and Industry 100 3
Structural Drafting and Design 230 4
Photogrammetry
215 4
Technical Project 240 5
16
Employment Opportunities: The Civil Technician is prepared with a broad background in civil engineering principles, related technical training, mathematics, science and communications. The graduate is qualified to fill positions as rivil draftsmen, assistants to engineers, estimators, purchasing agents, buildin naterial salesmen, and laboratory technicians.
Credit hours Core Program: 50 Credit Hours second year: 48
Total Credit Hours 98
63


DRAFTING AND DESI (option)
Second Year
Cr.
Fourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter
Cr. Cr.
Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs.
Introduction to Data Fundament als of Human Relations in
Erocessing 101 3 Hydraulics and Business and In-
Pneumatics 205 3 dustry 100 3
Structural Drafting and Design 225 3 Labor Relations Topographic Drawing
108 3 230 5
Machine Drafting and Design 220 4 Structural Draft- Electro-Mechanical
ing and Design 226 3 Drafting 216 3
Architectural Drafting and Design 200 3 Architectural Technical Project
Drafting and 240 4
Elective 3 Design 201 3
Electro-Mech Drafting 215 3
Iff 15 nr
Employment Opportunities: Drafting and Design technicians are concerned with preparation of drawings for design proposals, for experimental models and items for production use. These technicians perform many aspects of design in a specialized field, such as the developing of the design of a section, sub-assembly or major component. Investigating design factors and availability of materials and equipment, production methods and facilities are frequent assignments. Technicians in this classification will often supervise the preparation of working drawings and design based upon engineers original design concepts or specific ideas.
Credit hours Core program: 50 Credit hours second year: 46
96
64


HIGHWAY (option)
Second Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
'ourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs.
introduction to Route Surveys and Human Relations in
lata Processing Design 219 3 Business and In-
.01 3 dustry 100 3
Construction Methods
irainage and and Equipment 203 3 Route Surveys and
leology 207 3 Highway Materials Design 220 4
advanced Survey- 213 3 Reinforced Concrete
.ng 200 4 Labor Relations Construction 217 4
iighway Materials 108 3 Technical Project
>11 3 Soils and 240 5
Estimating Construction Costs >09 3 Foundations 225 3
16 15 16
Employment Opportunities: The Highway Technology Program provides the graduate d.th a broad background in civil engineering principles, related technical sraining, mathematics, science, and communications. The graduate is qualified :o fill positions as highway surveyors, highway engineering aides, estimators, purchasers of rights of way, sales of building materials, laboratory technicians construction equipment salesmen, and photogrammetrists.
Credit hours Core Program: 50 Credit hours second year: 47
~97
65


MECHANICAL DESIGN (option)
Second Year
Cr. Cr.
Fourth Quarter_______Hrs._____Fifth Quarter________Hrs. Sixth Quarter
Cr.
Hrs
Introduction to Data Processing 101 3
Properties of Materials 230 4
Machine Drafting and Design 220 4
Industrial Specifications 210 4
15
Fundamentals of Hydraulics and Pneumatics 205 3
Electro-Mechanical Drafting 215 3
Labor Relations
108 3
Estimating Manufacturing Costs 200 3
Tool Design 250 4
16
Human Relations in
Business and Industry 100 3
Tool Design 251 4
Basic Mechanisms 210 4
Technical Project 240 5
16
Employment Opportunities: The graduate of this course is prepared to enter employment either as design and detail draftsmen or as an assistant to an industrial engineer in the various phases of factory planning and operation. Job opportunities include such functions as production planning, methods, standards, quality control, plant safety and cost analysis.
Credit hours Core Program: 50 Credit hours second year: 47
"97
66


MECHANICAL PRODUCTION (option)
Second Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
'ourth Quarter Hrs, Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs,
introduction to Processing 101 Data 3 Fundamentals of Hydraulics and Pneumatics 205 3 Human Relations in Business and Industry 100 3
Properties of laterials 230 4 Labor Relations 108 3 Basic Mechanisms 210 4
duality Control 235 3 Estimating Manufacturing Costs 200 3 Production Planning and Control 225 4
fethods and Operation inalysis 215 4 Plant Layout and Material Handling 220 3 Technical Project 240 5
llective 2 16 Methods and Operation Analysis 216 3 15 16
mployment Opportunities: Graduates of this program are prepared to enter mployment as assistants to industrial engineers in the various phases of actory planning and operation. Such functions as production planning, methods, tandards, quality control, cost analysis and plant safety may be included.
Credit hours Core Program: 50 Credit hours second year: 97
67


COMMERCIAL ART
First Year
Cr. Cr. Cr,
First Quarter Hrs, Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs
English Elective 3 Basic Design 106 3 Fundamentals of Speaking 102 3
Technical Drawing 100 3 English Elective 3 Rendering 105 3
Basic Design 105 3 Lettering 103 3 Principles of Advertising 200 3
Mathematics Elective 3 Basic Drawing 101 3 Basic Drawing 102 3
Lettering and Human Relations in Elective 3
Layout 100 3 Business and
Industry 100 3
15 Second Year 15 15
Cr. Cr. Cr.
Fourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs
Basic Photography Advertising De- Advertising
211 3 sign 201 3 Photography 213 3
Advertising Design Graphics (Print- Rendering 205 3
101 3 making) 200 3
Psychology of Personal Visual Merchan- Spot 11lustra-
Development 107 3 dising 203 3 tion 209 3
Electives 6 Elective 3 Advertising Theory
and Production 207 3
Work Experience 3 Work Experience 4
15 15 16
Employment Opportunities: The program is organized to develop skills in design, layout, lettering, typography, spot illustration, production, art service and studio procedures. Graduates are qualified to accept positions as designers, layout men, letterers, paste-up and mechanical men in advertising agencies, art studios, art services, department stores, publishing houses, packaging services and product manufacturers. Graduates of this curriculum have advanced to the position of art director, assistant art director, layout specialist and consultant, package designer and studio supervisor.
Total Credit Hours: 95
68


ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY First Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
First Quarter Hrs. Second Quarter Hrs. Third Quarter Hrs,
English Elective 3 English Elective 3 Fundamentals of Speaking 102 3
Basic Electricity Circuit Analysis, Electronic
100 4 A C and D C 101 4 Amplifiers 110 4
Mathematics Elective 3 Mathematics Elective 3 Mathematics Elective 3
Electronic Devices Labor Relations 108 3 Technical Drawing
115 4 110 3
Elective 3 Human Relations in
Business and
Industry 100 3
14 Second Year 16 16
Cr. Cr. Cr.
Fourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs,
Fundamental Physics Introduction to Control Circuits
101 3 Computers 220 4 and Systems 205 4
Instruments and Technical Writing Electronic Design
Measurements 215 4 110 3 and Fabrication 210 3
Communication Psychology of Per- Fundamentals of
Circuits 103 4 sonal Development 107 3 Economics 109 3
Blueprint Reading Communication Introduction to New
115 3 Systems 200 4 Electronic Devices 225 2
Elective 3 Elective 3 Work Experience 3
17 17 15
Employment Opportunities: The objective of the total curriculum in Electronic Technology is to produce a competent electronics technician. The electronics technician must be capable of working and communicating with engineers, scientists, and production personnel in his specialized work. Job opportunities are as research and development technicians, sales and service technicians, operations technicians, assembly technicians and communications technicians. The program will provide the knowledge for the technician to advance into positions of increasing responsibility.
Total Credit Hours: 95 69


MACHINE SHOP
Nine Month Program
First Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Quarter Cr. Hrs. Third Quarter Cr. Hrs,
English Elective 3 Basic Applied Manufacturing
Mathematics 103 3 Processes 110 4
Basic Applied Blueprint Reading Machine Mainten-
Mathematics 102 3 120 3 ance 115 4
Measurements 100 3 Layout and Bench Inspection of Shop
Assembly 101 4 Products 120 3
Layout and Bench Manufacturing Pro- Heat Treatment and
Assembly 100 4 cesses 105 4 Testing 125 3
Blueprint Reading Structure of Metals Psychology of
115 3 107 3 Personal Develop -
ment 107 3
16 17 17
Employment Opportunities: The first year is designed to give learners the
opportunity to acquire basic skills and the related information necessary to gain employment and build a profitable career in the machine shop industry. Trainee is qualified to enter an occupation as a machinist helper, tool room attendant, machine tool inspector, as well as other areas including apprentice able occupations.
Total Credit Hours: 50
70


MACHINE SHOP
First Year
First Quarter Cr. Hrs. Second Quarter Cr. Hrs. Third Quarter Cr. Hrs.
English Elective 3 Basic Applied Mathe- Manufacturing
matics 103 3 Processes 110 4
Basic Applied Mathe- Blueprint Reading 120 3 Machine Main-
matics 102 3 tenance 115 4
Measurements 100 3 Layout and Bench Inspection of Shop
Assembly 101 4 Products 120 3
Layout and Bench Manufacturing Pro- Heat Treatment
Assembly 100 4 cesses 105 4 and Testing 125 3
Blueprint Reading 115 i 3 Structure of Metals Psychology of
107 3 Personal Develop-
ment 107 3
16 17 17
Second Year
Cr. Cr. Cr.
Fourth Quarter Hrs. Fifth Quarter Hrs. Sixth Quarter Hrs.
Manufacturing Pro- Quality Control Pattern Making
cesses 205 4 235 3 235 3
Practical Automation Estimating Manufac- Toolmaking 240 4
210 3 turing Costs 200 3
Industrial Specifi- Pattern Making 220 3 Human Relations in
cations 210 4 Business and
Industry 100 3
Inspection of Shop Manufacturing Pro- Work Experience 6
Products 215 3 cesses 225 4
Labor Relations 108 3 Toolmaking 230 4
17 17 16
Employment Opportunities: The graduate will have the necessary skills to work
directly with machine shop equipment. He will be capable of working from blue'
prints or written specifications, applying the knowledge of mechanics, shop mathematics, metal properties, and layout machining procedures.
Total Credit Hours: 100
71


RADIO AND TELEVISION REPAIR
Nine Month Program
First Quarter Cr. Hrs. Cr. Second Quarter Hrs . Third Quarter Cr. Hrs.
English Elective 3 Receiving Circuits Fundamentals of
and Vacuum Tubes 105 5 Speaking 102 3
Mathematics Elective 3 Mathematics Elective 3 Human Relations in
Business and
Industry 100 3
Fundamentals of Power Supplies, Tuning Television Theory !
Radio and Electrical and Loudspeakers 110 4 Servicing and
Theory 100 5 Repair 130 6
Technical Drawing 100 3 Radio-Telegraph, Tele- Technical
phone Transmitters 120 3 Project 240 3
Elective 3
14 18 15
Employment Opportunities: The Radio and Television 1 Repair Program is
designed so the student will be able to enter employment after completing the
prescribed program. Employment areas are associated with FM radio, AM radio, television servicing, and electronic equipment and repair. The third class FCC license may be acquired after completing this program.
Total Credit Hours: 47
72


COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
77


DIVISION
OF
BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS
79


ACCOUNTING
\
cct. Ill Accounting ........................................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite or co-requisite: Introduction to Business 104
n introductory study of accounting principles to acquaint the student with he theory and logic that underlie accounting procedures. Course coverage ncludes the accounting cycle, financial statements, controlling account, pecial columnar journals, and fundamental data processing applications,
3 hours per week, plus lab as needed)
cct. 112 Accounting ........................................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Accounting 111
continuation of accounting principles as they pertain to ownership, income nd expense, and cost aspects of,business enterprise. Special emphasis is laced on the interpretation of accounting data. Course content is related to he partnership and corporate forms of business organization, (3 hours per week, lus lab as needed)
.cct. 113 Accounting .......................................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Accounting 112
his intermediate accounting course treats the specialized phases of accounting uch as the processing of cash and temporary investments, receivables, inven-ories, long-term investments, plant and equipment, intangible deferred charges, iabilities, capital stock and surplus, and complex financial statements.
3 hours per week, plus lab as needed)
icct. 114 Accounting (Cost Accounting) .......................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Accounting 112
. study of the fundamental elements of production costs and their distribu-ion. Concepts and procedures applicable to job order, process, and standard ost systems are covered. Emphasis is placed on the use and interpretation of ost data for managerial decision-making, (3 hours per week)
icct. 100 Clerical Recordkeeping and Accounting ............... 3 credit hours
lie purpose of this course is to equip students with basic vocational skills hat are common to clerical office jobs in which record keeping is involved, nstruction covers cashier's records, checks and bank statements, petty cash, etail sales clerk records, payroll records, recording receipts and disburse-lents for a small business, etc. The course concludes with a simple overview if the bookkeeping cycle and the format for common financial statements,
3 hours per week, plus lab as needed)
80


Acct. 211 Income Tax Accounting
3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Accounting 113 or equivalent
Practice in the application of the Internal Revenue Code to the determination of income taxes for individuals. Familiarization with the Code provisions for businesses, with Colorado income tax laws and with resources available for use in preparation of returns, (3 hours per week)
Acct. 215 Introduction to Accounting Systems .................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Accounting 113 and Introduction to Data Processing
Installation and control of systems of accounting in various organizations and situations. Analysis of cases and research in types of tools available for implementation of an accounting system or procedure. (3 hours per week)
Acct. 220 Principles of Governmental Accounting
and Budgeting ...................................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Accounting 113
Orientation in the concepts of budgetary control as a matter of law and public administration theory. Accounting principles and procedures necessary to implement budgetary controls. (3 hours per week)
Acct. 110 Secretarial Accounting ............................... 3 credit hours
This study of the basic elements of accounting for the secretarial student includes the handling of cash receipts and disbursements, and payroll records for various small business enterprises. A summary treatment of the accounting cycle and the preparation of financial statements is provided. (3 hours per week, plus lab as needed)
MANAGEMENT
Mgt. 203 Advertising Design ................................. 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Principles of Advertising 200
A combination of classroom instruction and laboratory practice in layout, copy writing, program planning, and project work adapted to several graphic media. Opportunities for individual creative advertising are afforded. (3 hours per week)
Mgt, 205 Business Finance .................................... 3 credit hours
Examines the sources of short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term funds for a business. Principles and motives of financial management are stressed. Designed primarily for second-year students and community businessmen. (3 hour per week)
81


Mgt. 207 Business Law
3 credit hours
Introduction to ordinary legal aspects of business transactions including such topics as contracts, agency, and negotiable instruments. Designed to give a general understanding of the understanding of the subject and to provide information useful in determining the need for professional counse. (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 103 Business Machines ..................................... 3 credit hours
Instruction in the basic mathematical processes -- addition, subtraction, multiplication, division --on modern calculating machines of both listing and non-listing types. Instruction in operation and use of duplicating and transcribing machinery and equipment. Emphasis throughout the course is on machine applications to mathematical problem-solving in business and industry,
(5 hours per week)
Mgt, 209 Business Organization and Management ................. 3 credit hours
Reviews the primary purposes and responsibilities of business, legal forms of ownership, types of organizational structure, and the promotion and operation of business. This is followed by an application of these principles to the areas of personnel, production, plant and equipment, working conditions, and
the relations between the business, the community, and society. (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 210 Business Policies ..................................... 3 credit hours
A study of policy construction and its relationship to effective management, sound personnel administration, and financial stability. Various areas previously studied are related to policy decision-making through the use of case studies. (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 212 Case Studies in Administrative Assistance ............ 3 credit hours
This is an upper level course for secretarial science and office administration students, though it has value implications for all business majors. Using the case study-seminar approach, it encourages critical thinking and decisionmaking in those office situations where a person must project himself into the capacity of his own supervisor, associate, or staff employee in determining a course of action or an appropriate response. (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 115 Computer Programming.................................. 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Introduction to Data Processing 101 and Introductory Algebra 105 or Statistics For Business and Industry 120
A basic course in programming of electronic computers for those who plan to be programmers or those whose work may be closely related to computer applications in business and industry. Covers problems of data processing, characteristics of computers, and computer programming and coding. (3 hours per week, plus lab practice)
82


Mgt. 116 Computer Programming
3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Computer Programming 115
Continuation of Computer Programming. Aims at achievement of proficiency with programming input and output devices; machine-aided coding; program optimizing; file maintenance; computer problem planning and report writing. (3 hours per week)
Mgt, 117 Computer Programming .................................. 3 credit hours
Study of a pertinent programming language and further study of the disk system and its applications. Monitor concepts are introduced. (3 hours per week, plus lab practice.)
Mgt. 220 Data Processing Applications .......................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Unit Record Equipment 114
Illustrates the use of data processing equipment in various types and sizes of business operations. Form design, card design, and flowcharting skills are ieveloped. Unit record equipment utilization for accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll, and inventory control will be studies with case problems in ;ach area. Each student is assigned a laboratory problem necessitating flow-parting, card and form design, and control panel wiring to produce the required reports. (3 hours per week plus practice)
lgt, 221 Data Processing Field Project (Credit to be determined)
(by the instructor )
Prerequisite: Data Processing Applications 220
(n independent studies course in which students develop a project of their own .onception (approved by the instructor.) The project undertaken must result in i finished, usable product. The design of the system will include data :ollection, processing, and implementation. (3 hours per week)
Igt. 223 Data Processing Systems ............................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Computer Programming 115
i study of data processing systems and procedures, including analysis of arious existing data processing applications in business and industry. Exam-nes decision systems as communications networks and evaluates information from ost-value standpoint. Considers design of systems according to logic of easible equipment. (3 hours per week)
gt. 104 Introduction to Business ............................... 3 credit hours
. survey of the structure and functions of the American business system, fovides an overview of business organization, finance, managerial control, roduction, distribution, personnel, and the interdependence of business and overnment, (3 hours per week)
83


Mgt. 101 Introduction to Data Processing
3 credit hours
An introduction to basic methods, techniques, and systems of manual, mechanical, and electronic data processing. Covers manual and machine accounting equipment and systems, punched tape or integrated data processing, and electronic or automatic data processing, (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 102 Key Punch Laboratory .................................. 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Typing 100 and 102 or proficiency test
A practice course in the operation of the card punch machine and verifier. If the student reaches employable levels prior to the completion of the quarter, he may be given other tape equipment instruction as conditions warrant. (3 houi per week plus practice as needed)
Mgt. 201 Office Management ..................................... 3 credit hours
The emphasis in this course is on the functions of the office and office organization; work in the office, office layout, equipment, supplies, and forms; personnel problems in the office; and costs and control of office work.
(3 hours per week)
Mgt, 202 Office Practice ....................................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Typing 102
Training is given in efficient office methods, business routines, extensive typing of diverse business forms and correspondence, plus short units on indexing and filing, transcribing machines, liquid and stencil duplicating, etc. Electric typewriters are used in this course. (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 204 Office Procedures and Administration .................. 3 credit hours
Develops a knowledge of office services and procedures in order to foster an understanding of the interrelationship of office functions, office services, and office facilities. Presents methods of recognizing and solving office communication problems, and an awareness of successful human relations, changing technologies and philosophies of business, and the technical terminology used in business. (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 216 Personnel Administration .............................. 3 credit hours
A study of the principles and techniques of personnel management, including an examination of managerial practices in the selection, development, and motivation of employees. Considers factors underlying employee participation in policy formation; the effect of the work environment; administration of wages, salaries, and benefits; and the evaluation of personnel programs. (3 hours per week)
84


Mgt. 200 Principles of Advertising
3 credit hours
An introductory course handling the theory, practice, and techniques in advertising. Considers the role of advertising and sales promotion in our economy, and includes a general survey of the kinds and purposes of different media, the psychological implications of typical appeals, and limited student practice in promotional programming. (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 211 Principles of Buying .............................. 3 credit hours
Designed for the student who wishes to specialize in this area, the course covers both principles and practices in the buying field. Professional buyers from the Metropolitan area will be invited to teach various units and lead discussions of typical buying problems. (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 213 Principles of Marketing ............................... 3 credit hours
Marketing as an institution and as a managerial variable is studied in this course. Covers a survey of the distributive fields, their function, and interrelationship. (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 215 Principles of Merchandising ........................... 3 credit hours
A practical examination of the total process of merchandising, including the selection, buying, pricing, advertising, display, and analysis associated with the handling of merchandise, (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 217 Principles of Retailing................................ 3 credit hours
Designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of retail store organization and management, including store location, layout, buying, pricing, and operation. (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 222 Programming Systems ................................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Computer Programming 117
A study of software development beginning with the organization of assembly languages, then learning to use such systems as COBOL, report generators, and nonitors. (3 hours per week)
'lgt. 227 Sales Management ..................................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Salesmanship 225 and Salesmanship 226
A study of sales management, the methods, techniques, and problems involved, and the relationship of sales management to the total business operation.
(3 hours per week)
85


Mgt. 225 Salesmanship
3 credit hours
Covers the fundamentals of selling from the determination of customer needs to the close of the sale. Treats such factors as customer problems, merchandisin knowledge, and personality traits of successful salesmen. (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 226 Salesmanship .......................................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Salesmanship 225
A continuation of the introductory course; this phase of the sequence studies techniques and psychological factors involved in business transactions with emphasis on sales demonstrations and classroom practice. (3 hours per week)
Mgt. 230 Techniques of Fashion Merchandising ................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Principles of Merchandising 215
A specialized course concentrating on the dynamic field of fashion. It examines the factors to be weighed in selecting fashion goods, considering all the sub-markets, the short and long-term trends, creative techniques of promotion, and cost factors. (5 hours per week)
Mgt. 113 Unit Record Equipment ................................. 3 credit hours
Instruction, demonstration, and machine practice on the card punch, sorter, interpreter, reproducer, collator, and tabulator. Lecture and wiring practice covering reading brushes, reproducing brushes, punch magnets and brushes, counters, selectors, typebars, and comparing brushes. (3 hours per week plus lab practice)
Mgt. 114 Unit Record Equipment ................................. 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Unit Record Equipment 113
Lecture and control panel wiring of selected accounting machines, covering detail printing, group printing, counter operation, summary punching, X and digit selection, field selection, total transfer, cross-footing, and carriage control. (3 hours per week plus lab practice)
SECRETARIAL
Sec, 101 Alphabetical Shorthand ................................ 3 credit hours
An accelerated introductory course for those not electing Gregg Shorthand Principles, Covers the theory of ABC Stenoscript Shorthand, a totally alphabetical system. Provides both reading and writing techniques and introduces short dictation exercises at minimum speeds. (3 hours per week plus practice hours as directed)
86


lec. 103 Alphabetical Shorthand Speed Building
3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Alphabetical Shorthand 101
levelops speed in taking business letter dictation at employable levels and ntroduces typed transcription. Basic rules of sentence structure, punctu-tion, capitalization, etc., are reviewed in preparation for job-entrance tests nd Civil Service Examinations. Spelling improvement is integrated with the ourse content. (3 hours per week plus practice hours as directed)
ec. 105 Filing and Records Control............................. 3 credit hours
he primary aim of this course is toacquaint the student with the rules, pro-edures, and techniques of filing that are so important to every business orker. It includes a knowledge of the principles of records management.
3 hours per week)
tec. 106 Gregg Shorthand Principles ........................... 3 credit hours
ntroduces the theory of Gregg Shorthand, Diamond Jubilee Series, and develops eading speeds from book plates and handwritten notes. Shorthand writing of amiliar matter demonstrating all Gregg principles is developed to average peeds of 60 to 80 words per minute. Unfamiliar material of short duration is ntroduced. This course is intended for students who have had no previous regg Shorthand instruction, or for those whose proficiency examinations indi-ate a need for basic retrieval. (3 hours per week plus practice as directed)
ec. 107 Gregg Shorthand Principles ............................ 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Gregg Shorthand 106 or proficiency examination
ainforces basic theory principles and develops the ability to take dictation f both familiar and unfamiliar' matter. Transcription at the typewriter is ntroduced and special attention is placed on building shorthand vocabulary.
3 hours per week plus lab)
ac. 108 Gregg Shorghand Speed Development ..................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Shorthand 107 or proficiency examination
ntensive dictation practice from programmed multi-channel laboratory equipment armits the student to reach optimum speeds in shorthand skill. A compre-ansive review is provided in punctuation, spelling, letter style, and vocabu-ary improvement. (3 hours per week plus 6 to 8 hours of lab practice)
ac. 110 Machine Transcription.................................. 3 credit hours
itensive practice in the use of magnetic tape and belt transcribing machines l the preparation of business correspondence. Includes a review of letter :yles, rules of transcription and punctuation, and the mechanics of producing lilable letters at high production rates. Experience on several models of Lectric typewriters will be provided. (3 hours per week)
87


Sec. 112 Medical Dictation and Transcription
3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Shorthand Transcription 109 and Typing 102 (Latter course may be taken concurrently.)
A specialized course for medical reporting and transcription in the offices of physicians and hospitals. Trainee will acquire familiarity with the terminolo, necessary for medical correspondence, case history records, autopsy protocols, etc. Stress is placed on mastering meanings, spelling, and shorthand forms established for medical terms. Dictation content is related to body systems and the effects of disease, injury, or abnormal functioning of the body system Individual taped, programmed dictation is used extensively in this course.
(3 hours per week plus lab as needed)
Sec. 114 Medical Secretarial Procedures and Records ............ 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Typing 102
Centers on the functional and environmental aspects of medical secretarial wor in a general practitioner's or specialist's office. Medical reporting, corres pondence, record keeping and retrieval, appointment scheduling, bookkeeping, insurance reporting, processing patients, etc,, are covered in this course.
(3 hours per week plus lab as needed)
Sec. Ill Personal Shorthand..................................... 3 credit hours
Designed primarily for managerial, professional, and baccalaureate candidates, this course will provide an accelerated method of taking notes, using a totall alphabetical shorthand system. Techniques in listening, organizing, outlining conducting research, and reporting will be integrated with the basic objective of learning to record lectures and data rapidly. (3 hours per week plus practice as needed)
Sec. 200 Secretarial Procedures ................................ 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Typing 104
Designed to introduce the student to the secretarial field and to acquaint the student with the duties of a secretary. Units are covered on organization of secretarial work, incoming and outgoing mail, dictating processes, postal and shipping services, telegrams, indexing and filing, etc. (3 hours per week)
Sec. 109 Shorthand Transcription .............................. 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Gregg Shorthand Speed Development 108
Optimum speed and accuracy in dictation and transcription are fully realized in this course, with emphasis on the production of mailable letters. Total business proficiency is expected, and attention is directed to the ability to take dictation for longer periods and to transcribe job assignments at employable production rates. (3 hours per week plus lab as needed)
88


Sec. 205 Specialized Professional Dictation
3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Gregg Shorthand Speed Development 108 and Shorthand Transcription 109
This program familiarizes the student with the specific vocabulary related to a field of special secretarial interest: Law, medicine, education, etc. Programmed tapes selected and transmitted through personal listening stations provide highly individualized instruction for this course. (3 hours per week)
Sec. 100 Typing ................................................ 3 credit hours
A beginning course for those who have had no previous instruction in typing. Introduces the keyboard and machine parts, and develops correct techniques for attaining acceptable levels of speed and accuracy. While primary emphasis is placed on straight-copy skills, the course covers a range of basic typing applications: reports, manuscripts, business communications, tabulation problems, and common business forms. Designed to meet the needs of students with vocational as well as non-business objectives. (3 hours per week plus lab as needed)
Sec. 102 Typing ................................................ 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Typing 100 or proficiency
Reinforces skills acquired in Typing, identifies and handles individual typing deficiencies, and covers a comprehensive program of vocational typing applications. Serves as a refresher course for those who have not used their typing skills for an extended period of time and strengthens their speed and accuracy. (3 hours per week plus practice as needed)
Sec. 104 Typing ................................................ 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Typing 102 or proficiency
Emphasizes the attainment of high professional levels in speed and accuracy, especially in the rate of production output in those activities frequently performed by a secretary or full-time typist. Typing projects will be selected to meet the individual objectives and needs of students enrolled in this class.
(3 hours per week plus practice as needed)
89


DIVISION
OF
COMMUNICATIONS AND ARTS
91


ART
Art 100 Art Appreciation ....................................... 3 credit hou
A study of the world's art masterpieces for the purpose of developing the stu dent's own criteria for the evaluation and greater appreciation of art works and their meaning in men's lives. (3 hours per week)
Art 101 Basic Drawing .......................................... 3 credit hou
An introductory course in drawing utilizing a variety of media and techniques Essentials of visual form, analysis of structure and texture are studied with reference to pictorial presentation of still life, the human figure, landscap and contemporary life scenes. (6 hours per week)
Art 102 Basic Drawing .......................................... 3 credit hou
Continuation of Art 101 with intensified practice and skill development in ad' tional media. (6 hours per week)
Art 105 Basic Design ........................................... 3 credit hou
Introduction to basic elements of design such as line, form, texture and colo Experimentation with two-dimensional problems in design. (6 hours per week)
Art 106 Basic Design ........................................... 3 credit hou
Continuation of Art 105. Experimentation with three-dimensional design. Structural composition. Use of materials and tools of sculpture and ceramics (6 hours per week)
NOTE: Courses in history of art, watercolor and oil painting may be offered
during the 1968-69 academic year if there is sufficient student demand These courses will be offered during 1969-70.
92


ENGLISH
ading Laboratory .................................................. Non-Credit
e laboratory is intended to provide opportunity for students to improve their sic reading skills. Reading problems and deficiencies will be diagnosed and dividual and group programs will be developed to allow students to progress at eir own rate of development.
iting Laboratory .................................................. Non-Credit
agnostic and development experiences in basic writing skills. Emphasizes the actical use of fundamental grammatical structure, punctuation, and correct elling in common written communications through individual and group induction and writing exercises.
g. 100 Developmental Reading ...................................... 3 credit houri
phasis on improving reading speed and comprehension and vocabulary development, ading techniques and study skills appropriate to academic materials are de-loped. Course work may be supplemented with reading laboratory experiences cording to individual needs. (3 hours per week)
g. 102 Developmental English ................................ 3 credit hours
vides instruction and practice intended to improve the student's writing skills, phasis on writing correct and intelligible expository paragraphs and brief re-rts. Preparatory for minimal job-entry requirements or further study of English ndamentals appropriate to the student's career emphasis. (3 hours per week)
g. 106 English Fundamentals ................................. 3 credit hours
glish Fundamentals 106, 107 and 108 constitute a three-quarter sequence which phasizes the practical application of the English language for those students rolled in non-transfer programs. The first quarter will stress preparation 1 presentation of both oral and written compositions. (3 hours per week)
;. 107 English Fundamentals ................................. 3 credit hours
itinuation of Eng. 106 with emphasis on the preparation of short essays,
:umented reports and letters of application. (3 hours per week)
g. 108 English Fundamentals ................................. 3 credit hours
itinuation of Eng. 107. Written and oral application of English fundamentals :h particular reference to the student's probable future needs. (3 hours per 5k)
93


Eng. 110 Technical Writing
3 credit hours
Treats specifically the writing problems of those engaged in or preparing for managerial or business fields that require specific vocabulary, format style, statistical support or other prescribed requirements. Practice and evaluation, using established criteria, will be provided. (3 hours per week)
Eng. Ill English Composition .................................. 3 credit hour:
English Composition 111, 112 and 113 constitute a three-quarter sequence designed for students intending to transfer to a four-year degree granting institution. The student will prepare themes frequently to develop skill in expository writing. (3 hours per week)
Eng. 112 English Composition .................................. 3 credit hours
Continuation of Eng. Ill with further study and practice in written composition emphasizing logical organization and clarity of expression. (3 hours per week)
Eng. 113 English Composition .................................. 3 credit hours
Continuation of Eng. 112 with emphasis on the use of library materials and research writing. (3 hours per week)
Eng. 131 Business Communications .............................. 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Eng. 108 or equivalent.
Presents a comprehensive coverage of English fundamentals, especially those needed in written communications directly pertinent to daily business activiti< Intensive practice in the mechanics of language used by management and office personnel is provided. The aspects of business writing most often included in job-entrance and government tests, as well as the errors most commonly made by office workers, are treated in detail. Instruction in correct transcription and typing style is correlated with this curriculum. (3 hours per week)
Eng. 132 Business Communications ............................. 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Eng. 131 or equivalent.
Applies the techniques of written communication to situations that require problem solving and an understanding of human relations. Students will compos< and evaluate the various kinds of business letters that commonly pass between a businessman and his customers, dealers, and associates. Business reports, inter-office bulletins, news releases, and other forms of business composition will receive attention. The legal and ethical responsibilities involved in written communications will be considered. (3 hours per week)
94


g. 133 Business Communications
3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Eng. 131 or equivalent.
rious applications of the writing, speaking and listening skills in business mmunications are covered in this course. Oral business reporting for staff stings, public speaking, correct telephone usage, techniques in business nation, listening for notetaking, and other commercial facets of written oral communications are practiced. (3 hours per week)
g. 141 Introduction to Literature Poetry and Drama ...........3 credit hours
introduction to the study of poetic and dramatic literature. Designed to ve an understanding of literature through reading and discussion of selected rks. (3 hours per week)
g. 143 Introduction to Literature Short Story and Novel ......3 credit hours
troductory study of selected short stories and novels as forms of literature, hours per week)
g. 145 Literature for Children ................................. 3 credit hours
general survey of the illustrated books, prose and poetry suitable for the mg child. Emphasis on the evaluation and selection of quality literature different age groups. Intended for library and elementary education career jhasis and for interested parents. (3 hours per week)
g. 147 World Literature ........................................ 3 credit hours
introductory study of masterpieces of world literature from the time of cient Greece through the Renaissance period. (3 hours per week)
g. 148 World Literature ........................................ 3 credit hours
gnificant literary works from the Renaissance through the 19th century. (3 hour r week)
g. 149 World Literature ........................................3 credit hours
udy of contemporary world literature in the 20th century. (3 hours per week)
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
IE: Students who plan to take a second year of a foreign language, either at the Community College of Denver or at some other institution of higher learning, must successfully complete the entire first year three-quarter sequence of that particular language.
95


FRENCH
French 111 First-Year French .................................... 5 credit hours
A beginning course in the French language with emphasis on pronunciation, speak ing and understanding, supplemented by grammar, reading and writing. (5 hours per week)
French 112 First-Year French .................................... 5 credit hours
Continuation of French 111. (5 hours per week)
French 113 First-Year French .................................... 5 credit hours
Continuation of French 112. (5 hours per week)
SPANISH
Spanish 111 First-Year Spanish .................................. 5 credit hours
The beginning course in Spanish emphasizing pronunciation, speaking, and understanding the spoken language and developing basic skill in reading and written
communication. (5 hours per week)
Spanish 112 First-Year Spanish .................................. 5 credit hours
Continuation of Spanish 111. (5 hours per week)
Spanish 113 First-Year Spanish .................................. 5 credit hours
Continuation of Spanish 112 (5 hours per week)
MUSIC
Music 100 Music Appreciation ................................... 3 credit hours
An introduction to music and appreciation of its value in men's lives. Investigation of the basic elements of music, their functions, and the varying styles of music. Instruction will emphasize major works of music through the use of recordings. (3 hours per week)
Music 130 Band ................................................. 1 credit hour
Performance of standard band literature. The course is open to regular student and to the public upon permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credi up to a maximum of three quarter hours. (2 hours per week)
Music 140 Chorus ............................................... 1 credit hour
Performance of choral literature ranging from the classics to modern compositio Open to regular students and to the public upon permissionof the instructor. M be repeated for credit up to a maximum of three quarter hours. (2 hours per we
96


SPEECH
Speech-Listening Laboratory ....................................... Non-Credit
rovides opportunity for students to develop and improve their basic skills in speaking and listening. Practical exercises in correct pronunciation, iccepted oral expression and the perception and interpretation of meaning in speech. Individual problems and deficiencies in speaking are identified and sorrective programs developed. Recording and playback equipment is utilized.
Speech 100 Developmental Speech ................................ 3 credit hours
[mprovement of vocabulary, spoken grammar, pronunciation and articulation, lay be combined with speech-listening laboratory experiences as needed. Pre-saratory for minimal job-entry requirements or further study of fundamentals >f speaking appropriate to the student's career emphasis. (3 hours per week)
Speech 102 Fundamentals of Speaking ............................ 3 credit hours
instruction and intensive practice in essential speech processes and skills. Irganization and effective oral presentation of reports and speeches related :o the student's career interests. (3 hours per week)
Speech 110 Public Speaking and Debate .......................... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Speech 102 or equivalent.
introduction to basic theory of public speaking, logical analyses, persuasion ind refutation. Experience in the preparation and delivery of speeches, argu-nentative discourse and formal debate.
97


PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Phys. Ed. 101 First Aid ...................................... 2 credit hours
Outlined by the American Red Cross, this course consists of lectures, assigned readings and practice work in First Aid. A certificate is awarded to each student completing the course. (2 hours per week)
PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY COURSES
Note: Due to limited facilities and equipment during the 1968-69 school
year, it may not be possible for the College to offer all of the Physical Education activity courses listed here.
Phys. Ed. 110 Group Activities (Men) ....................... 1 credit hour
Participation and instruction in such activities as basketball, soccer and touch football. (2 hours per week)
Phys. Ed. 112 Group Activities (Women) ..................... 1 credit hour
Participation in activities designed to develop poise, improve physical fitness and teach some of the skills of various team sports. (2 hours per week)
Phys. Ed. 120 Conditioning Activities ....................... 1 credit hour
(2 hours per week)
Phys. Ed. 121 Archery........................................ 1 credit hour
(2 hours per week)
Phys. Ed. 122 Bowling ....................................... 1 credit hour
(2 hours per week)
Phys. Ed. 123 Golf .......................................... 1 credit hour
(2 hours per week)
Phys. Ed. 124 Swimming ...................................... 1 credit hour
(2 hours per week)
Phys. Ed. 125 Tennis ........................................ 1 credit hour
(2 hours per week)
98


DIVISION
OF
COMMUNITY AND PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
99


BUILDING MAINTENANCE
B. Maint. 100 Safety and Orientation ........................... 1 credit hour
Safety procedures as applied to building maintenance. Orientation to the occupation including basic human relations. (2 hours per week)
B. Maint. 102 Operational Tasks ............................... 5 credit hours
Involves a study of making work schedules such as grouping, routine jobs and frequency, job-time requirements and scheduling. Emphasis on dusting, mopping stairway cleaning, lavatory cleaning, furniture cleaning, glass cleaning, acoustical tile cleaning, chalkboard care and cleaning, light fixture cleaning and insect and rodent control. (15 hours per week)
B. Maint. 104 Floor Maintenance ............................... 2 credit hours
Considers types of floors and their proper care. Studies the various types of cleaners and use of equipment. (3 hours per week)
B. Maint. 106 Equipment and Materials ......................... 2 credit hours
A study of all types of equipment and materials used by custodians. Also involves the purchasing of equipment and supplies. (3 hours per week)
B. Maint. 108 Heating and Ventilation ......................... 2 credit hours
A study of the various types of heating and ventilation equipment and necessai preventive maintenance. (3 hours per week)
B. Maint. 110 Maintenance of Grounds .......................... 1 credit hour
Equipment, methods, and use of various chemicals in the proper care of outside grounds. (3 hours per week)
B. Maint. 112 Security and Protective Measures ................ 1 credit hour
A study of various devices, methods and measures used in the security and protection of buildings and facilities. (1 hour per week)
100


CHILD CARE
Ihild C. 102 Creative Activities ............................. 3 credit hours
iasic instruction in the use of tools for creating and maintaining play equip-lent and for work with young children. Emphasis is placed on ways to use reative activities to stimulate learning experiences for children. (3 hours ier week)
hild C. 103, 105, 107, 109, and 111
Supervised Student Participation ............... 5 credit hours
his course is required for five quarters during which student will acquire 00 clock hours of participation. Students will receive experience in day are centers, kindergartens, Head Start Programs, and other types of pre-chool programs. They will work in both the large and small centers. (10 ours per week)
hild C. 106 Methods of Teaching The Young Child .............. 4 credit hours
heory and method of teaching the young child in relation to his development nd behavior patterns. (9 hours per week)
hild C. 108 Methods of Teaching The Young Child .............. 4 credit hours
asic philosophy and methods in teaching the child two to six years of age. mphasis on the use of various materials and aids in teaching. (9 hours per eek)
hild C. 110 Family and Community Relations ................... 4 credit hours
his course is designed to help the student understand the importance of good orking relationships with adults, community leaders, employers. Also ways o establish connections for effective use of community resources. The course ives a basic understanding of the dynamics of family interaction and their ffects upon the child. (9 hours per week)
hild C. 112 Family and Community Relations ................... 4 credit hours
continuation of Family and Community Relations. Emphasis is placed on the roblems of population, international relations, automation, the urban commun-ty, longevity, and leisure. (9 hours per week)
101


CULINARY ARTS
C. Arts 100 Sanitation and Safety ............................. 3 credit hour!
Sanitation in the industry. Bacteriology, housekeeping, pest control.
Safety procedures and programs. (3 hours per week)
C. Arts 208 Advanced Food Production .......................... 5 credit hour:
Perfecting the techniques of food preparation in a complete meal including: appetizer, soups, salads, entrees, vegetables, sauces, and garnishes. Art of cold buffet. A la carte service and detailed use of French menu terminology. (15 hours per week)
C. Arts 209 Advanced Food Production .......................... 5 credit hour:
A continuation of Advanced Food Production. (15 hours per week)
C. Arts 110 Basic Baking ...................................... 2 credit hour:
Equipment and composition of ingredients used in a hotel, restaurant, or modern pastry shop. Arrangement and display, storing, selling, freezing of baked goods. Production procedures, service, weights, and measures. Basic recipes for bread, rolls, and cakes. (3 hours per week)
C. Arts 101 Basic Food Preparation ............................ 5 credit hour
Lecture, demonstration and participation in basic quantity food preparation. Theory of grilling, frying, broiling, and sauteeing with a thorough understanding of use and maintenance of equipment and the duties performed at each station. Lecture and demonstration on meat cuts, basic salad dressings and sauces. (15 hours per week)
C. Arts 103 Basic Food Preparation ............................ 5 credit hour
Organization of food preparation and station assignments. Preparation of stocks, broths, consommes, and various finished soups. Preparation of various sauces, and finished meat dishes, seafood, hors d'oeuvres and canape Continuation of meat cuts and purchases with demonstration on hotel cuts.
(15 hours per week)
C. Arts 104 Basic Food Science ................................ 3 credit hour
A study of the composition of food groups, their content of basic substances Study of the effects and action of chemicals used as catalysts, flavoring, and preservatives. The effects of cooking and refrigeration. Cause and prevention of food spoilage and food-borne disease. (3 hours per week)
102


. Arts 205 Food and Beverage Control
4 credit hours
pplication of food control systems for various types of feeding arrangements nd operations. Preparation of butcher tests. Pre-cost, pre-control, and echniques. Inventory turnover controls. Monthly reports and adjustments, se of forecasting and sales histories. Beverage cost controls used in otels, motels, restaurants and clubs. Wine cellar operations, perpetual nventories, and bar control. Sales and cost distributions. (6 hours per eek)
. Arts 206 Food and Beverage Management ...................... 3 credit hours
course designed for those who have a desire to prepare themselves for dvancement in the field. A blending of the knowledges and skills in food, ts preparation, its merchandising, and service, plus additional knowledges f financial and business practices. (3 hours per week)
. Arts 201 Food and Beverage Purchasing ...................... 4 credit hours
study of the marketing world and how it operates. Language of buying and ow to use it in carefully written, precise specifications and in verbal ealings with market agents. Buying of fresh fruits and vegetables, processed ruits and vegetables, dairy products, cereal products, beverages, poultry ad eggs, fish and shellfish, meats, and alcoholic beverages. (6 hours per aek)
. Arts 202 Food Production ................................... 5 credit hours
reparation and service of complete menus. Menu planning, plate composition 3 related to haute cuisine in hotels and restaurants. French menu termin-
Logy. (15 hours per week)
. Arts 204 Food Production ................................... 5 credit hours
continuation of Food Production. (15 hours per week)
. Arts 106 Meal Planning and Service ......................... 4 credit hours
>al and service planning for all phases of food service; snack bar, cafeteria, jffee shop, restaurant, and banquet. Making production schedules and order Lsts. Use of personnel, operating reports, and portion control. (5 hours sr week)
Arts 108 Nutrition ......................................... 2 credit hours
rientation in nutritional values, their effect on the human body, how they jply to commercial food service, and procedures necessary in assuring these ilues are preserved through food preparation and service. (2 hours per week)
103


FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
F.S.T. 100 Introduction to Fire Science ....................... 3 credit hours
Philosophy and history of fire protection; history of loss of life and property by fire; review of municipal fire defenses; study of the organization and function of Federal, State, County, and private fire protection agencies; survey of professional fire protection career opportunities.
(3 hours per week)
F.S.T. 102 Introduction to Fire Suppression ................... 3 credit hours
Fire suppression organization; fire suppression equipment; characteristics and behavior of fire; fire hazard properties of ordinary materials; building design and construction; extinguishing agents; basic fire fighting tactics; public relations. (3 hours per week)
F.S.T. 202 Fundamentals of Fire Prevention .................... 3 credit hours
Organization and function of the fire prevention organization; inspections; surveying and mapping procedures; recognition of fire hazards; engineering a solution of the hazard; enforcement of the solution; public relations as affected by fire prevention. (3 hours per week)
F.S.T. 106 Fire Fighting Tactics and Strategy ................. 3 credit hours
Review of fire chemistry, equipment, and manpower; basic fire fighting tactic and strategy; methods of attack; pre-planning fire problems. (3 hours per we
F.S.T. 212 Fire Protection Equipment and Systems .............. 3 credit hours
Portable fire extinguishing equipment; sprinkler systems; protection systems for special hazards; fire alarm and detection systems. (3 hours per week)
F.S.T. 204 Related Codes and Ordinances ....................... 3 credit hours
Familiarization with national, state, and local laws and ordinances which influence the field of fire prevention. (3 hours per week)
F.S.T. 108 Fire Hydraulics .................................... 3 credit hours
Review of basic mathematics; hydraulic laws and formulas as applied to _£he fire service; application of formulas and mental calculation to hydraulic problems; water supply problem; underwriters' requirements for pumps.
(3 hours per week)
F.S.T. 110 Fire Apparatus and Equipment ....................... 3 credit hours
Driving laws, driving technique, construction and operation of pumping engines, ladder trucks, aerial platforms, specialized equipment, apparatus maintenance. (3 hours per week)
104


'.S.T. 104 Fire Company Organization and Procedure ........... 3 credit hours
eview of fire department organization; fire company organization; the company fficer; personnel administration; communications; fire equipment; maintenance; raining; fire prevention; fire fighting; company fire fighting capability; ecords and reports. (3 hours per week)
.S.T. 206 Rescue Practices ................................... 3 credit hours
escue practices, the human body, emergency care of victims, childbirth, rtificial respiration, toxic gases, chemicals and diseases, radioactive azards, rescue problems, and techniques. (3 hours per week)
.S.T. 208 Hazardous Materials ................................ 3 credit hours
review of basic chemistry; storage, handling, laws, standards, and fire ighting practices pertaining to hazardous materials. (3 hours per week)
S.T. 209 Hazardous Materials ............................... 3 credit hours
second semester course in hazardous materials covering storage, handling, aws, standards, and fire fighting practices with emphasis on fire fighting nd control at the company officer level. (3 hours per week)
S.T. 214 Fire Department Administration .................... 3 credit hours
onsideration of basic concepts and principles of administration applicable o the organization and administration of an efficient fire department.
3 hours per week)
.S.T. 216 Building Construction for Fire Protection .......... 3 credit hours
undamental building construction and design; fire protection features; pecial considerations. (3 hours per week)
.S.T. 218 Fire Investigation ................................. 3 credit hours
ntroduction to arson and incendiarism, arson laws, and types of incendiary ires. Methods of determining fire cause, recognizing and preserving evidence, nterviewing and detaining witnesses. Procedures in handling juveniles, court rocedure and giving court testimony. (3 hours per week)
S.T. 220 Property and Casualty Insurance ................. 3 credit hours
n analysis of the fire insurance rating structure. Elements involved in stablishing insurance rates. The grading system for cities and towns, the lassification of cities and towns, and hazard factors in occupancy, construction and exposures. (3 hours per week)
105


LIBRARY TECHNOLOGY
Lib. Tech. 102 Library Usage .................................. 3 credit hours
A general course in the use of books and libraries. Students receive instruct] and practice in the arrangement of books, use of card catalog, Readers Guide, the most commonly used reference sources, and the study of the various types of reference tools. (3 hours per week)
Lib. Tech. 104 Library Practice ............................... 4 credit hours
An introduction to techniques and information needed by supportive staff in libraries; widely used circulation schemes, quick reference tools, and major bibliographies; use of card catalog and preparing catalogue cards. (6 hours per week)
Lib. Tech. 106 Library Practice ............................... 4 credit hours
Emphasis on circulation preparation and maintenance of library materials.
(6 hours per week)
Lib. Tech. 200 Library Practice ............................... 4 credit hours
Order of books, binding preparation, financial records and library administration. (6 hours per week)
TEACHER ASSISTING
T. Aide 100 Teacher Aide Techniques ........................... 3 credit hours
Techniques of showing and explaining interesting and constructive art work, songs, games, music, dances, sand and water play for nursery and elementary school children. (3 hours per week)
T. Aide 102 Teacher Aide Techniques ....................... 3 credit hours
Relationship of the teacher aide to the professional teacher and administrator. Limitations of the teacher aide; further development of the teacher aide techniques. (3 hours per week)
T. Aide 104 Teacher Aide Techniques ....................... 3 credit hours
Problems concerning the student. More specific treatment of methods for assisting the teacher, such as, grading papers, bulletin boards, observation of student behavior patterns, and classroom supervision. (3 hours per week)
T. Aide 106 Arts and Crafts ............................. 3 credit hours
An elementary approach to drawing, cutting, pasting, painting, making play dough, papier-mache, potatoe printing, paper construction and art work with non-ferrous metals. (3 hours per week)
T. Aide 108 Instructional Media and Materials ............. 3 credit hours
A practical and comprehensive approach to the applications of visual materials and auditory aids. (3 hours per week)
106


URBAN HORTICULTURE
U. Hort. 100 Introduction to Urban Horticulture ............... 2 credit hours
A study of the urban horticulture industry with an overview of job opportunities and business operations. (2 hours per week)
U. Hort. 102 Ornamental Plant Materials ....................... 4 credit hours
The basic production and management of ornamental plants, shrubs, and trees.
(3 hours per week plus laboratory)
U. Hort. 104 Basic Plant Science .............................. 4 credit hours
A study of the fundamental principles of plant growth. (3 hours per week plus laboratory)
U. Hort. 106 Ornamental Horticulture Science .................. 4 credit hours
A study of the growth and development of ornamental plants. (3 hours per week plus laboratory)
U. Hort. 108 Urban horticulture Mechanics ..................... 4 credit hours
Selection, adjustment, and repair of engines, mowers, and other specialized equipment used in production nurseries, landscape construction, and maintenance operations. (3 hours per week plus laboratory)
U. Hort. 110 Ornamental Horticulture Operations ............... 3 credit hours
A study of the elements of business management as applied to horticulture operations. (3 hours per week)
U. Hort. 112 Soils and Fertilizers ............................ 4 credit hours
The properties and management of soils in relation to plant growth with emphasis on the principles of soil fertility, and practices of fertilizer use. (3 hours per week plus laboratory)
U. Hort. 114 Landscape Planning ............................... 3 credit hours
Practical experience in drafting, basic principles of landscape design and computation. (3 hours per week)
U. Hort. 201 Disease and Pest Indentification and Control ... 4 credit hours
The identification of disease, insects, and their prevention and control. Special consideration will be given to the use of insecticides and other chemicals. (3 hours per week plus laboratory)
107


U. Hort. 203 Landscape Maintenance
3 credit hours
The principles and cultural practices used for caring for annuals, biennials, and perennials, shrubs, and trees. (3 hours per week)
U. Hort. 205 Merchandising Horticulture Products ............. 3 credit hours
The principles and practices of retailing as related to the horticulture industry. (3 hours per week)
U. Hort. 207 Nursery Production and Management ............... 4 credit hours
The principles and practices of germination, seeding, planting, transplanting and culture of nursery materials. The course also includes the management of men, materials, and money that apply to the industry. (3 hours per week plus laboratory)
U. Hort. 209 Horticulture Equipment and Facilities ........... 3 credit hours
An in-depth study of production and merchandising equipment and facilities.
(3 hours per week)
U. Hort. 211 Greenhouse Management ........................... 4 credit hours
The management of enclosed structures for regulating plant growth. (3 hours per week)
U. Hort. 213 Turf Production and Maintenance ................. 4 credit hours
The principles and practices involved in the establishment and maintenance of lawns and turf for parks, playgrounds, golf courses, and home grounds.
(3 hours per week plus laboratory)
108


DIVISION
OF
HEALTH OCCUPATIONS
109


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at SolrNet.Impl.SolrConnection.Post(String relativeUrl, String s) in d:\BuildAgent-01\work\e4797f8bddc217f4\SolrNet\Impl\SolrConnection.cs:line 84
at SolrNet.Impl.SolrBasicServer`1.SendAndParseHeader(ISolrCommand cmd) in d:\BuildAgent-01\work\e4797f8bddc217f4\SolrNet\Impl\SolrBasicServer.cs:line 112
at SobekCM.Engine_Library.Solr.v5.v5_Solr_Controller.Update_Index(String SolrDocumentUrl, String SolrPageUrl, SobekCM_Item Resource, Boolean Include_Text) in C:\GitRepository\SobekCM-Web-Application\SobekCM_Engine_Library\Solr\v5\v5_Solr_Controller.cs:line 59
at SobekCM.Engine_Library.Solr.Solr_Controller.Update_Index(String SolrDocumentUrl, String SolrPageUrl, SobekCM_Item Resource, Boolean Include_Text) in C:\GitRepository\SobekCM-Web-Application\SobekCM_Engine_Library\Solr\Solr_Controller.cs:line 33
at SobekCM.Library.MySobekViewer.New_Group_And_Item_MySobekViewer.complete_item_submission(SobekCM_Item Item_To_Complete, Custom_Tracer Tracer) in C:\GitRepository\SobekCM-Web-Application\SobekCM_Library\MySobekViewer\New_Group_And_Item_MySobekViewer.cs:line 857