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Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1973-1974

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Title:
Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1973-1974
Creator:
Community College of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
Community College of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Source Institution:
Community College of Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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9842420 ( OCLC )

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library
Community College of Denver Collections

Full Text
Community College of Denver
Auraria Campus North Campus Red Rocks Campus
73 74 iVo- j. ech
ARCHIVES AURARIA LIBRARY


From


COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER
1975=74
^mfeneral atalog
GENERAL INFORMATION
THE DENVER AREA COUNCIL FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES
Mrs. H. C. Engdahl, Chairman........Jefferson County
Tracy J. Smith, Vice Chairman.........Adams County
Mrs. Harold V. Anderson, Secretary .. .Boulder County
H. J. Bleakley, Member..............Arapahoe County
Mr. Richard W. Wright, Member.........Denver County
Denver Area Council: Front Row, left to right, Mrs. Lila Engdahl and Mrs. Harold V. Anderson. Back Row, left to right, Tracy J. Smith, Richard W. Wright and H. J. Bleakley.
Dr. Leland B. Luchsinger, President, Community College of Denver. Multi-Campus.
Dr. G. Owen Smith, Vice President. Red Rocks Campus.
Dr. Donald H. Godbold, Vice President. Auraria Campus.
Dr. John Swenson, Vice President. North Campus.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
NO.
1973-74 COLLEGE CALENDAR ..................... 2
KEY TO COURSE PREFIX LETTERS................. 16
GENERAL INFORMATION........................... 3
Admissions Information ................... 7
Tuition and Fees.......................... 4
Student Services ......................... 7
Denver MDTA Skill Center................. 12
Center for the Physically Disadvantaged.. 14
GENERAL STUDIES ............................. 17
Division of Communications and Arts...... 19
Division of Science and Mathematics...... 35
Division of Social Sciences.............. 43
Consortium of Ethnic Studies............. 51
PAGE
NO.
OCCUPATIONAL STUDIES........................... 57
Division of Business and
Management Occupations................... 57
Division of Community and Personal Services Occupations ..................... 77
Division of Health Occupations............109
Division of Industrial Occupations........125
INDEX..........................................163
SEE PAGE 16 FOR KEY TO PREFIX LETTERS
CODING FOR LOCATION OF COURSES ON THE RESPECTIVE CAMPUSES IS AS FOLLOWS:
A .... AURARIA CAMPUS N . NORTH CAMPUS R .. RED ROCKS CAMPUS
1201 Acoma Street 1001 E. 62nd Ave. 12600 West 6th Ave.


1973-74 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER STUDENT CALENDAR
1973 1974
JANUARY
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
l 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31
FEBRUARY
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
l 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28
MARCH
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
l 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 j 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
APR 1 L
SUN MON TUE WEO THU FRI SAT
l 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 MAY
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
l 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31
JUNE
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
l 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 . 20 21 22 23
TT 2? 27 28 29 30
J U LY
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
l 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
AUGUST
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
l 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31
SEPTEMBER
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
li
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
1 24 25 26 27 28 29
OCTOBER
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
l 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31
NOVEMBER
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
l 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30
DECEMBER
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
l
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
JANUARY
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 Tr
7 8 TIT
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31
FEBRUARY
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28
MARCH
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31
APRIL
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30
MAY
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31
JUNE
SUN MON TUE WEO THU FRI SAT 1 8
2 3 4 5 6 7
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30
J U LY
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31
AUGUST
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
SEPTEMBER
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30
OCTOBER
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31
NOVEMBER
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
DECEMBER
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
SPRING QUARTER 1973
March 19* March 29 May 28 June 7
Registration Classes Begin School Closed Quarter Ends
SUMMER QUARTER 1973
June 12*
June 20 July 2 August 30
FALL QUARTER
Registration Classes Begin School Closed Quarter Ends
1973
September 19-20* Registration September 24 Classes Begin
November 21 School Closed
December 6 Quarter Ends
WINTER QUARTER 1974
January 2-3* Registration January 7 Classes Begin Memorial Day Holiday March 20 Quarter Ends
Independence Day
SPRING QUARTER 1974
March 27-28* Registration
April 1 Classes Begin
May 27 School Closed Memorial Day
June 12 Quarter Ends
Thanksgiving Recess
SUMMER QUARTER 1974
June 18* June 20 July 4 August 29
Registration Classes Begin
School Closed Independence Day Quarter Ends
Contact campus of your choice for specific dates. Early registration may take place on some campuses.
2


GENERAL INFORMATION
History of the College
The 1967 Colorado General Assembly, in the enactment of House Bill 1448, established a state system of community colleges under a State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education. The first college to be created under the State Board, by the passage of House Bill 1449, was the Community College of Denver. The new law called for the establishment of three campuses, in successive years beginning in the fall of 1968, to serve primarily the area of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver and Jefferson counties.
The five-member governing council of the Community College of Denver, officially named the Denver Area Council for Community Colleges, was appointed by the Governor and held its organizational meeting on September 27, 1967. The initial task of the Council was to engage the services of a president. Dr. Leland B. Luchsinger was appointed by the Council as the first president of the Community College of Denver on November 1, 1967.
The first campus of the Community College of Denver, designated as the North Campus, was established in relocatable buildings on a six and one-fourth acre temporary site at the intersection of East 62nd Avenue and Downing Street in the fall of 1968. Eighteen hundred and sixty one students were registered. The campus was expanded during the summer and fall of 1969 to provide additional facilities for new programs and in anticipation of increased enrollment during the next academic year. In the fall for 1969, 2,800 students were registered. Additional facility expansions were made in 1970 and 1971 to accommodate fall enrollment increases to approximately 3,650 students in the fall of 1972.
A permanent site of 160 acres for the North Campus, located at 112th Avenue between Federal and Sheridan Boulevards, has been procured through an appropriation by the Colorado legislature and the efforts of the Community College of Denver Foundation. Physical planning money for the site is being requested of the legislature.
In the fall of 1969, the West Campus, now named the Red Rocks Campus, was established on a temporary site located at 1209 Quail Street in two relocatable buildings. The initial registration for the fall of 1969 was 780 students. The Red Rocks Campus has expanded its facilities and steadily increased in enrollment to a fall 1972 enrollment of 3,000 students.
Program plans for a permanent campus, which will eventually serve more than 10,000 students, have been developed, and the 1970 session of the Colorado General Assembly has also provided facility planning money for the construction of the first permanent buildings beginning in 1971. The first phase of construction on the new site at West 6th and Indiana was completed in the spring of 1973.
A third campus was opened in downtown Denver in the fall of 1970, now named the Auraria Campus. The campus was initially located in temporary renovated
facilities located at 12th and Acoma Street. Seven hundred and ninety three students were enrolled in the fall of 1970. A steady increase in enrollment has occurred since the opening of the campus. Facilities of the campus were expanded during the summer of 1972. In the fall of 1972, 1,700 students were registered.
The downtown campus received its name as the Auraria Campus in conjunction with its planned permanent location as a part of the Auraria Higher Education Center. The Center is to be located on approximately 167 acres in the Auraria Urban Renewal Subdivision, to be shared by Metropolitan State College and the Denver Center of Colorado University. Plans indicate that occupancy of the first phase of permanent buildings on the site will take place in 1976.
Objectives of the College
The Community College of Denver is a comprehensive state community college established within the five-county area of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver and Jefferson Counties to help meet the educational needs of youth and adults. More interested in what the student is ready to do than in what he has done, the College is open to all who can profit from the instruction for which they enroll. The program of offerings includes:
1. Occupational courses and programs of several weeks to two years duration, the satisfactory completion of which may lead to job entry in an occupation of the students choice or advancement in a current job.
2. Pre-professional and liberal arts courses which, upon completion of the first and second years, will enable a student to transfer to a four-year college or university and earn a baccalaureate degree.
3. Other education opportunities for youth and adults, both credit and non-credit, including developmental programs, cultural opportunities and community services.
4. An emphasis on meeting the individual needs of the learners including the provision of specialized learning laboratories and a student-oriented learning materials center.
5. A comprehensive guidance program staffed by counselors who are genuinely concerned with the educational, vocational and personal welfare of students.
Accreditation
The Community College of Denver is under the jurisdiction of the Colorado State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education. The Community Colleges Division of the State Board has received letters from officials of four-year colleges and universities in Colorado stating that transfer credit will be granted to students who have successfully completed appropriate courses at the several colleges operating
3


under the State Board. Students who plan to transfer to baccalaureate programs at four-year institutions can be confident that college-parallel credits earned at the Community College of Denver will transfer without difficulty if students do acceptable work at the four-year institution.
The campuses now have Correspondent or Recognized Candidacy Status in the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the association which accredits all institutions of higher education in this area. This indicates that the institution has given evidence of sound planning, has the resources to implement these plans, and has indicated an intent to work toward accreditation.
Location of Campuses of the College
The temporary location of the Red Rocks Campus of the Community College of Denver is at 1209 Quail Street in Jefferson County, approximately four miles west of the west central boundary of the City of Denver and just north of the Denver Federal Center.
The temporary location of the North Campus of the Community College of Denver is at 1001 East 62nd Avenue in Adams County, just outside the north central boundary of the City of Denver, approximately five miles from the State Capitol in the downtown Denver area.
The temporary location of the Auraria Campus of the Community College of Denver is at 1201 Acoma Street, Lincoln and 1200 Broadway, in Denver County, which is in the heart of the central downown business district of Denver.
Limitations of Catalog Information
This catalog should not be considered a contract between the Community College of Denver and any prospective student. The College must retain the customary right to cancel programs or course offerings where enrollments are insufficient to permit them on an educationally sound and economically efficient basis or to alter them for other reasons. Similarly, published charges for tuition and fees are subject to change as circumstances may require.
Tuition
The tuition for state supported institutions is determined by the Colorado General Assembly and is subject to change.
As of the printing of this catalog, the tuition for 1973-74 has not been determined.
Please call the office of Admissions on any of our three campuses for information pertaining to tuition. Tuition and fees may be altered at any time prior to the first day of registration for any quarter.
Fees
A student Services Fee in the amount of 50 cents per credit hour up to a maximum of $6.00 is charged to all enrolled students. This money is used for various student activities including student publications, operation of student government, cultural activities, recreational activities, clubs and organizational activities.
Expenditure of student fee monies is generally made with the approval of the student government. Students enrolled in certain courses may be required to purchase individual supplies and materials and to rent uniforms.
Residence Classification for Tuition Purposes
At the time of application for admission, students are classified for tuition purposes as Colorado residents or out-of-state residents according to provisions of Colorado law.
Any student who has been classified as a nonresident and who believes he can qualify as a resident may secure from the Registrar an application form for in-state status. A copy of the regulations governing residence classification is a part of the application.
The final decision regarding tuition status rests with the institution. All questions regarding residency classification should be addressed to the Registrar.
Student Rights and Responsibilities
Admission to the College implies a recognition by the student that he should respect the rights of others, and that he should observe moral and civil laws. Interference with the normal process of education in the classroom or elsewhere on the campus will be regarded as unacceptable conduct which warrants suspension and/or dismissal from the school. The success of the college in attaining its objectives is conditioned by the good will, integrity and honor of its students.
The Denver Area Council has approved a document which contains a Definition of Education, a Joint Statement on Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities of Students, and Rules of Procedure in Student Disciplinary Matters. This document provides guidelines necessary to insure the rights of all members of the college community. Each campus has its specific due process procedures which support the concept of fair play. These procedures are included in the Student Handbook.
Credit Hours
Generally, one credit hour is earned by attending a non-laboratory class for a fifty-minute period, once a week, for a full quarter. In a laboratory course, one credit hour is granted for from two to four, fifty-minute periods per week in a laboratory.
Course Load
The normal course load for a full-time student is fifteen credit hours. Special permission must be obtained from the Dean of Student Services or his authorized representative to register for more than eighteen credit hours.
Counselors are available to consult with students about their course load.
Classification of Students
For record and reporting purposes, students are classified as follows:
Full-time a student who carries twelve or more
credit hours.
4


Part-time a student who carries less than twelve credit hours.
First-year (Freshman) a student who has completed fewer than forty-five credit hours.
Second-year (Sophomore) a student who has completed forty-five or more credit hours, but has not received an associate degree or has not qualified for upper division classification in a four-year college or university.
Unclassified a student who has earned a degree (associate, bachelors, etc.) or who has qualified for upper division classification at a four-year college or university.
Financial Obligations of Students
The financial obligations of students to the College such as payments for tuition, fees, and books are due and payable on the published specified date or at the times the obligations are incurred. In unusual circumstances of an emergency nature, where it may be impossible for a student to pay the total charges at the proper time, special arrangements may be considered for approval by the Director of Business Services.
A student is not considered officially registered until his class schedule has been processed by the Business Office.
Students who owe money to the college from a previous quarter will not be allowed to register in subsequent quarters until their financial indebtedness is paid.
Attendance
College officials believe that regular class attendance is necessary if a student is to receive maximum benefits from his work. Students are expected to attend all sessions of the classes for which they are registered. Students who anticipate absences are requested to discuss these in advance with instructors.
Adding and Dropping Courses
Students wishing to adjust their schedules should be familiar with the College policy which reads: The deadline for adds will be the 15th full day of instruction. The deadline for drops will be on the date two weeks prior to the end of the quarter. Exceptions to this policy may be made only upon approval by the appropriate division director and instructional dean.
This policy does not preclude adjustments (arranging for change of courses in the interest of the students), nor does it preclude initial enrollment of new students during the course of the quarter in conformity with the continuous registration philosophy of the College.
Foreign Students
The Community College of Denver is authorized by the U.S. immigration Service to admit non-immigrant alien students.
Foreign students who wish to enroll at the Community College of Denver are required to submit the following documents:
1. An official application for admission to the Community College of Denver.
2. Two official copies of the appropriate high school, college or equivalent transcript. (See requirements under transcripts.) One copy must be an English translation. The other transcript should be in the original language.
3. Evidence of proficiency in the English language as documented by verbal discourse, or use of the Test of English as a Foreign Language.
For information on the test write to:
Test of English as a Foreign Language Educational Testing Service Box 899
Princeton, New Jersey 08540 U.S.A.
4. A statement of the financial resources to provide for the students stay in the United States.
Form I-20A will not be issued to any foreign student until all the above documents are on file in the Office of Admissions and Records.
Tuition and fee charges for foreign students are the same as for out-of-state registrants. (See tuition and fee schedule.)
Readmission of Former Students
Former students who are returning to the College after an absence of one or more quarters, summer quarter excepted, must make application for readmission. Students who have attended other colleges since last attending the Community College of Denver may be requested to submit a transcript of all college credits.
Withdrawal Procedure
Students are admitted to the Community College of Denver under the assumption that they will remain until the end of the quarter or longer, unless unforeseen circumstances necessitate their withdrawal from the institution. When the student finds it necessary to initiate a complete withdrawal from the College, he should follow the procedures indicated below:
1. Obtain a withdrawal form from the Office of Admissions
2. Fill in the appropriate information
3. Fulfill all financial obligations to the College incurred with the Business Office, Financial Aid Office, Bookstore, or the Learning Materials Center
4. Conduct an exit interview with a counselor
5. Return withdrawal form to the Office of Admissions
6. Return identification card to the Registrar upon request
5


A student who is in any way financially obligated to the College through a tuition deferment, emergency student loan, National Defense Loan, etc., or who has failed to account for College property in his possession will be denied a transcript of record and registration for subsequent sessions until he has made a satisfactory settlement with the College.
Tuition Refunds
No refunds are possible after the tenth day of class nor are refunds made if students drop a partial course load at any time.
The student may claim a seventy-five percent refund of tuition paid if a complete withdrawal is made before the eleventh day of classes of the new quarter. Tuition refund request forms are available in the Office of Admissions and Records. No tuition refunds of less than $1.00 will be made.
Unusual circumstances concerning refunds should be referred to the Dean of Student Services.
Allowance of Credit
Within the strict limitations of an established policy, enrolled students are permitted to apply for an allowance of credit for demonstrated knowledge or competency they have attained through previous study and experience. This procedure includes both the challenging of courses which coincide with the students major program and career objectives, as well as allowance of credit through the CLEP Examinations.
To challenge a course, the student must be recommended by the division concerned, be subject to a fee, and take a comprehensive examination.
The College recognizes the CLEP Examination as well as selected Subject Examinations. Up to 45 hours of college credit may be awarded through the CLEP General Examinations. Additional credit may be earned by attaining successful scores on CLEP subject matter examinations. The Registrars Office should be consulted for details concerning College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Examinaions.
Evaluation and Grading
The Community College of Denver is philosophically committed to a program that focuses on the student and on activities that foster his learning. Student evaluation, when properly conducted, is regarded as one of these activities. Although the College utilizes continuous and varied means of evaluating a students progress, it has departed from tradition in adopting a system of grading. The system emphasizes accomplishment rather than penalty for failure and employes
only the grade symbols listed below.
Grade Quality of Work Grade Points
Symbol Denoted by Symbol Per Credit Hour
A Superior 4
B Excellent 3
C Average 2
D Below Average 1
If a student earns a grade of D, he may elect either
to have it recorded on his permanent record or dis-
regarded. Learning accomplishment at a level which is judged to be failing receives no credit and is not recorded on the permanent record. If an incomplete (I) is given it must be made up during the following quarter to earn credit.
Grades are issued at the end of each quarter for all students, and grade slips will be mailed approximately one week after the last day of each quarter.
Grade Point Average
Under this system, grade points measure the achievement of the student for the number of credit hours he has completed at an accomplished level of D or above. They are determined by multiplying the grade points per credit hour by the credit hour value of the course completed.
The following example will enable the student to compute his grade-point average:
Completed Final
Course Credit Hours Grade Grade Points
English 3 B 3 grade points (3x3) equals 9
Mathematics 3 C 2 grade points (3x2) equals 6
Electronics 2 A 4 grade points (2x4) equals 8
Physics 5 C 2 grade points (5x2) equals 10
Physical Education 1 D 1 grade point (1x1) equals 1
14 34
Total grade points are divided by total credit hours to compute the grade-point average. For example, 34 divided by 14 equals a 2.43 grade-point average.
The cumulative grade-point average is the total number of grade points recorded divided by the total number of credit hours.
Degrees and Certificates Offered
The Associate Degree is awarded to students successfully completing two-year programs. For shorter programs, Certificates of Achievement and Certificates of Completion are granted.
Graduation Requirements
To receive the ASSOCIATE DEGREE
a student must:
1. Complete a minimum of ninety quarter hours, including the specific subject or course requirements in the selected program. Certain programs may require more than the minimum of ninety quarter hours and these must also be completed.
2. Earn an overall grade point average of 2.0 in all credit counted toward the degree.
3. Complete three quarter hours of English.
4. Complete at least fifteen hours in residence at the Community College of Denver. (In mitigating circumstances, certain portions of this requirement may be waived by the Dean of Student Services.)
6


5. File the Application for Graduation form at the time when registering for the final quarter. This form is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
To receive the CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT a student must:
1. Complete the specified subject matter or course requirements of an approved program as set forth in the catalog. For programs longer than one quarter in duration, the last fifteen credit hours must be earned at the Community College of Denver.
2. Earn an overall grade-point average of 2.0 in all credit counted toward the certificate.
3. Complete three credit hours in speech or English in programs of longer than one quarter in duration.
4. File the Application for Graduation form when registering for the final quarter. This form is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Certificate of Completion
The College offers many short courses, conferences, workshops and seminars. These will vary in length from one to two meetings of short duration to units necessitating many clock hours accumulated over a period of several weeks. Successful completion of short courses of this type will result in the granting of a Certificate of Completion.
A Certificate of Completion may also be granted upon the successful completion of a course or courses in fulfillment of an educational objective leading to job-entry level employment as developed in conjunction with an advisor or counselor and approved by the respective division director leading to job entry employment. In order to receive this Certificate the applicant must file the Application for Graduation form at the time of registering for the final quarter. This form is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Transfer of Credit
If a student wishes to have previous college credits applied toward the degree requirements, he must submit official copies of previous college transcripts to the Registrars Office no later than the time of registration for the quarter he plans to graduate. Official transcripts are those bearing the official seal of the College and mailed to the Registrars Office by the sending institution.
Requests for Transcripts by Students
A student requesting that a transcript of his record be sent to an educational institution or to a prospective employer must complete the appropriate form which may be obtained from the Admissions and Records Office. The College assesses no fee for this service; however, no transcript will be provided for a student who has not fulfilled all financial obligations to the
College or who has not provided transcripts as requested by the College.
Course Numbers
Course numbers consist of prefix letters, which constitute an abbreviation of the subject area or program, and a series of three digits, the first of which indicates its classification according to the year it should be taken. Usually, course numbers below 100 are designed for developmental education; numbers from 100-199 are usually taken during the first year of college since they are prerequisite courses. Courses numbered 200-299 are usually taken during the second year of college.
STUDENT SERVICES
In addition to the programs of study available at the College, a number of related or special, services are provided for the assistance of students and others who may be interested.
Admissions, Records and Registration
Detailed information and admissions requirements and procedures are given in a previous section of the catalog.
Registration for classes is conducted in a manner which is designed for the convenience of students.
A system of record keeping assures the student of a complete and confidential file of information on previous educational experience, credits earned at the Community College of Denver, test data and other information.
Admissions Policy
The College will admit high school graduates, nongraduates of high school who are eighteen years of age or older, and any other person who can profit from the instruction for which t\e enrolls. However, admission to the College does nof assure acceptance of an individual student in a particular course or program. Some students may be requested to enroll in special courses at the College for correction of scholastic or other deficiencies.
The College does not require a physical examination as a general condition of admission but reserves the right to require evidence of good health in individual instances when such seems appropriate. Physical disabilities and chronic illnesses should be indicated to the Admissions Office.
Entrance examinations are not required as a condition for admission to the College.
Students are served more adequately when applications and transcripts of previously earned credits are submitted in advance of counseling appointments, advising, and registration for classes.
Admissions Procedure:
Submit an official application for admission to the Community College of Denver, available from the
7


Registrars Office. Transcripts of previous high school or college credits are not required, except as follows:
1. Persons planning to receive a degree or certificate from the College, who wish previous college credits to be considered, must submit official copies of those previous college transcripts to the Registrars Office no later than the time of registration for the quarter in which they plan to graduate. Only official transcripts will be accepted. Copies should be mailed directly to the Registrars Office from the sending institution.
2. The College reserves the right to request transcripts of students in cases where it is felt that the student can be better served through use of his transcripts.
3. Foreign students should refer to Foreign Student requirements on page 5.
These documents become the property of the College and will not be released to the student or transferred to other institutions. The students subsequent registration is contingent upon receipt of all required documents.
Counseling Services
The Counseling Division is dedicated to helping people. A qualified professional staff is available both days and evenings for exploration with students individually or in groups, of such areas as educational planning, measurement of aptitudes, interests and abilities, career plans, academic difficulties, marriage adjustment and interpersonal relationships.
The counseling staff is committed to the confidentiality of information on any student. NO CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION IS EVER GIVEN TO ANY INDIVIDUAL OR ORGANIZATION without the written consent of the student.
Any student desiring assistance from the Counseling Staff is encouraged to contact the counseling office.
Orientation:
New students are invited to attend an Orientation Session. At the session, the group is given a short general over-view of the college, the staff, the instructional divisions, and the various programs available.
Advising:
The entire faculty of the College is guidance oriented and has a major commitment to help each individual student pursue a course of study planned to fulfill his goals.
Students are assisted by the instructional staff and/or counselor in developing his program of study and selection of classes each quarter.
It is the students responsibility to:
1. Meet with an instructor or counselor to discuss the most appropriate classes for his career objective.
2. Discuss his program and classes prior to each registration and work out his class schedule.
3. Contact an instructor or counselor when problems arise in the program. The instructor or counselor should also be informed if he changes his program of study.
4. Make certain he is fulfilling the departments requirements for graduation.
STUDENTS WHO HAVE NOT SELECTED A PROGRAM OF STUDY, OR ARE UNCERTAIN OF THE PROGRAM THEY WANT TO FOLLOW, ARE URGED TO CONTACT THE COUNSELING OFFICE.
8


Testing:
No entrance examinations or tests are required for admission to the College. Individuals contemplating transfer to another college are encouraged to take the ACT or SAT required by such institutions and have a copy of the results sent to the Community College. The college provides a testing program to assist students in determining their interests, aptitudes, and level of competency in certain subject matter areas. With these data, counselors are able to aid the individual student in planning his educational program and to make appropriate use of the resources available to him.
Career Center:
Within the Student Services complex, a Career Center is maintained. This area has available occupational information, a collection of college catalogs, and materials to assist students in making informed career decisions. A counselor who has major responsibility in assisting students with career plans is in charge of the Center.
Housing:
Students who attend the Community College of Denver commute. The College does not operate a residence hall program. Students are expected to arrange their own housing. Those desiring help may contact the Counseling Office.
Self-Exploration:
A three-credit seminar is offered to assist students in self-exploration and understanding and interpersonal relationships. The content will depend in part on the needs and desires of the students.
Financial Aid
The Offices of Financial Aid on each campus of the College endeavor to help deserving students obtain financial assistance in meeting their college related expenses. The College participates in several federal, state and institutional financial aid programs including loans, grants and work-study jobs. The College uses the American College Testing Program Financial Needs Analysis in determining the financial need of students applying for aid.
Student loans are available through the National Direct Student Loan Program, Federal Nursing Student Loan Program and the Guaranteed Loan Program. Each represents a long-term, low-interest loan repayable after the student completes his education or terminates his student status.
Grants are available through the Educational Opportunity Grant (EOG) Program, Federal Nursing Scholarship Program and the Colorado Student Grant (CSG) Program. EOG grants are awarded to students from low-income families demonstrating financial need. Grants range from $200 to $1,000 per academic year.
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Federal Nursing Scholarship Funds are available only on North Campus to full-time nursing students and range up to $1,500 depending upon need and availability of funds. CSG grants are awarded to students from low to medium income families to pay for tuition and books.
Part-time jobs are available through the College Work-Study and the Colorado Work-Study Programs. These programs are for students from low-income families and permit the student to earn a portion of his educational expense through part-time employment on the campus.
Health Services
College officials recognize the importance of good health for happy and productive study. The Student Health Service is designed to foster and maintain proper attitudes and habits of personal and community health. Various programs and activities related to current health problems are planned each quarter. These programs are designed to educate students, faculty, and staff of todays health problems and the means of preventive health measures.
A registered nurse is available to assist students with minor emergencies, treatment of minor illnesses, referrals, health information and other health related problems. A consulting physician is also available to students once a week.
No group accident and sickness insurance program is available to students. Students should make arrangements for individual coverage with their own insurors. Students are encouraged to utilize the health services of the college.
Job Development and Placement
The Job Development and Placement Offices on the respective campuses, instructors, and division directors in the area of Occupational Studies maintain close contact with business and industry concerning job opportunities and training needs, and a record of available positions, both full and part-time, is kept in the Job Development and Placement Offices. This office coordinates all of the Colleges efforts to assist students in obtaining suitable full-time employment in occupations for which they have been prepared at the College. The Services include assistance in resume development. Other services are: application aids, job interview aids, summer employment, and volunteer listings. Students interested in full-time and part-time jobs should contact the Job Development and Placement Office on their Campus and complete an application for employment.
Student Activities
The College cooperates in the development of those student-initiated activities which supplement the more formal instructional program. Such activities are expected to provide constructive experiences which will stimulate personal growth and social development and add to the students enjoyment of life. Opportunities for the development of leadership, cooperative plan-
ning and special interests are fostered through participation in these activities. All student activities are coordinated through the Office of Student Activities.
The student activity programs involve students in self-government, participation in the College decisionmaking process, student leadership programs and conferences, student-selected clubs and organizations, and an intramural program in physical education and recreation.
Veterans Educational Benefits
The Community College of Denver is approved for education and training under various Veterans Administration programs. Students who are eligible for Veterans benefits should make application for benefits at the Veterans Administration Regional Office. A student approved for educational benefits by the Veterans Administration will be issued a Certificate of Eligibility which he should bring to the Office of Admissions and Records at the time of his initial registration.
Students using Veterans benefits must report immediately to the Office of Admissions and Records any changes in their program of studies.
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If a veteran fails to notify the Registrars Office of a reduction in his credit hours during a given quarter, he will automatically be reduced at the end of the quarter and recertified to the Veterans Administration, effective the first day of the quarter in question. For further information, contact the Registrars Office, Division of Veterans Affairs.
Students receiving G.l. benefits are required to notify the Registrars Office, Division of Veterans Affairs, of any change in their training status.
Selective Service
It is the responsibility of enrolled students to keep the Selective Service Local Boards informed of their current status. The Office of Admissions and Records has selective service information for the student. No student status information is sent to the Selective Service Boards unless requested by the student.
Business Services
The Office of Business Services of the College is responsible for a number of functions which support the instructional and other services provided by the College. Included among these are assistance with budget preparation, collection of tuition and fees, financial accounting and reporting, preparation of payrolls, purchasing of equipment and supplies, and maintenance and operation of buildings and grounds.
Bookstore
The College Bookstores market books, stationery, supplies, accessory items, and a minimal variety of nonprescription medicines (aspirins, etc.). At the completion of each quarter, books are repurchased if they
are to be used the following quarter. All prices on texts offered for sale are determined by the publisher.
Food Services
Automated food service is provided on all campuses in the food vending area. The North Campus provides cafeteria service as well.
Community Services
The style and emphasis of Community Services is determined by those community needs and interests which the college can develop jesources to serve. Through Community Services, the' resources of the college are extended to meet community needs and to help in the solution of community and individual problems. In turn, the needs and know-how of the community are channeled to college programs so they may better reflect current community conditions. This double-door action between college and community will enhance the growth of both by decreasing the boundaries between instruction and service, between classroom and community-based learning, and between paper and human problem-solving. The long range goals of the Community Services Program include:
1. Educational Expansion Function. Programming a variety of educational, upgrading and new career opportunities which reach beyond the traditional limitations of college credit restrictions; e.g., institutes, seminars, tours, short courses, contractual in-plant training, etc.
2. Educational Extension Function. Increasing the accessibility of the regular courses and curricula of the college by extending their availability to the community at large; e.g., evening classes, TV courses, Weekend college, neighborhood extension centers.
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3. Social Outreach Function. Organizing programs to increase the earning power, educational level, and political influence of the disadvantaged; e.g., ADC mothers, unemployed males, educationally deprived youth, and welfare recipients.
4. Civic Action Functions. Participating in cooperative efforts with local government, business, industry, professions, religious and social groups to increase the resources of the community to deal with major problems confronting the community; e.g., community self-studies, urban beautification, community chest drives, and air pollution.
5. Leisure-time Activity Function. Expanding opportunities for community members to participate in a variety of recreational activities, e.g., sports instruction, outdoor education, summer youth programs, and senior citizen activities.
6. Community Analysis Function. Collecting and analyzing significant data which reflect existing and emerging needs of the community and which can serve as a basis for developing the community service program of the college; e.g., analyzing census tracts, analyzing man-power data, conducting problem-oriented studies, identifying roles and goals of organizations.
7. Staff Consultation Function. Identifying, developing and making available the consulting skills of the faculty in community development activities; e.g., consulting with small business, advising on instructional materials, designing community studies, instruction in group leadership, and laboratory testing.
8. Public Forum Function. Developing activities designed to stimulate interest in understanding of local, national, and world problems; e.g., public affairs pamphlets, town meetings, and TV symposia.
9. Cultural Development Function. Expanding opportunities for community members to participate in a variety of cultural activities; e.g., fine arts series, art festivals, artists in residence, and community theater.
10. Conference Planning Function. Providing professional assistance to community groups in the planning of conferences, institutes and workshops; e.g., registration procedures, program development, and conference evaluations.
11. Facility Utilization Function. Encouraging community use of college facilities by making them readily accessible, by facilitating the scheduling process, and by designing them for multi-purpose activities when appropriate; e.g., campus tours, centralized scheduling office, conference rooms, and auditorium design.
12. Developmental Counseling Function. Providing community members with opportunities for self-discovery and development through individual and group counseling processes, e.g., aptitude-interest testing, individual interviews, career information, job placement, and family life.
Evening Classes
The instructional program of the College includes a large number of evening course offerings, scheduled between 5:00 and 11:00 p.m. five evenings a week. These often make it possible for adults to help satisfy cultural and hobby interests which they may have, in addition to pursuing the regular degree and certificate programs through evening study.
The Denver MDTA Skill Center
The Denver MDTA Skill Center is integrated into the Community College of Denver.
The Skill Center is authorized under the Manpower Development and Training Act of 1962 as amended. It is funded by H.E.W. through the State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education.
Unemployed and underemployed individuals are referred to the Skill Center for training to job entry level through regular Community College classes.
LEARNING MATERIALS CENTER
As an instructional and supportive division to the total curriculum of the College, the Learning Materials Center (LMC) functions simultaneously as a learning center, instructional/resources laboratory, and a library.
To realistically serve the many different needs and interests of students and faculty, the LMC is designed to circulate a wide range of educational print and non-print media.
Inter-library loans are available through the LMC from the Denver Bibliographical Center for Research and other educational institutions. The Book Catalog of the Jefferson County Public Libraries is available for use by students and faculty on the Red Rocks Campus.
Professional and supportive personnel are available for consultation and media production services.
INSTRUCTIONAL LABORATORIES
To serve the needs of all CCD students and to assure success in career training, the Community College of Denver provides specialized instructional laboratories at all three campuses. These laboratories offer instruction through specialized equipment thereby enabling students to develop basic learning skills. Mastery of these skills will assure students of successful completion of course assignments as well as high school diplomacy equivalency requirements. Moreover, the instructional laboratories will enable students to qualify for and maintain productive employment. Instruction in such basic skills as writing, reading, spelling, or arithmetic in addition to tutorial support supplementing various instructional programs is provided by the College. Instructional laboratories are open to all students at CCD whether enrolled in occupational or general studies programs.
The procedure in the instructional laboratory is to diagnose the students skill deficiency and pre-
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scribe a plan to bolster the lack of basic skills. Thereafter, the student will participate in a highly individualized program in close contact with instructors qualified to help with his specific problem. For example, should a student in carpentry lack a proficiency in math or reading which inhibits his ability to perform simple mathematical computations or to read and translate measurements, the lab will analyze and diagnose this skill problem. Then, through individualized planned instruction, the student will be helped by trained instructors until his lack of knowledge and skill is rectified.
There is no established timetable for completion in the instructional laboratory. The achievement of proficiency in basic learning skills cannot be related to academic quarters, clock hours or traditional forms of scheduling. Enrolled students are permitted to use the instructional laboratories frequently and for as long as they wish during each time of use.
The following program opportunities for all CCD students are available according to individual needs:
COMMUNICATIONS (READING, WRITING, SPEAKING, LISTENING)
MATHEMATICS (FUNDAMENTALS OF ARITHMETIC, ALGEBRA, AND GEOMETRY)
SCIENCE (BASIC LIFE SCIENCES AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE)
SOCIAL SCIENCES (FUNDAMENTALS OF WORLD AND U.S. HISTORY, U.S. GOVERNMENT, GEOGRAPHY, AND CONSUMER ECONOMICS)
COMMUNITY SERVICES
The Community Service Programs of the Community College of Denver are determined largely by the needs and interests of residents in the service areas of the three campuses. The Community Service Offices are responsible for identifying community problems which can be met with education and community development resources of the College. Functions of this outreach of campus resource responsibility include: (1) community analysis including development of advisory groups to identify needs; (2) the extension of credit courses and supportive services into the community to make them more accessible to residents; (3) the development of programs such as non-credit courses, workshops, public forums, conferences, and in-plant contractual training which reach beyond traditional credit offering limitations; (4) the organization of programs which respond to the needs of new
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constituencies and groups lacking resources such as women, senior citizens, institutionalized persons, minority and low income groups, etc.; (5) cooperating with local agencies, businesses, churches, and other community organizations to increase resources aimed at community problem-solving.
SERVICEMEN S OPPORTUNITY COLLEGE
In recognition of the unique educational problems confronting active duty servicemen in obtaining their educational goals, the Community College of Denver has been officially designated as a Servicemens Opportunity College. By completing 15 quarter hours in a degree program at the Community College of Denver, the serviceman may transfer the remaining 75 hours from other Servicemens Opportunity Colleges, other accredited institutions, CLEP examinations and/or institutional challenge examinations completed prior to or after attending the Community College of Denver. Before transferring to another institution, the serviceman may contract for a degree from the Community College of Denver for any work remaining beyond the initial 15 hours. This work may be completed at other Servicemens Opportunity Colleges, or other accredited institutions.
Each campus of the Community College of Denver has a counselor who serves as a Servicemens Counselor. This counselors prime responsibility is to assist servicemen in achieving their educational goals.
COLLEGIATE CENTER FOR THE PHYSICALLY DISADVANTAGED
Proposed Program
Currently plans are being developed to establish a comprehensive support-service for all physically handicapped Community College of Denver students. The proposed facility will be situated at the Red Rocks Campus. Projected plans indicate that effective January 1974, all physically handicapped students will have an opportunity to pursue any existing CCD program. Satisfactory completion will lead to one of the following certifications: Associate Degree, Certificate of Achievement, or Certificate of Completion. If adequate finances for this Center are not provided, only the current programs for the Hearing Impaired will be maintained at the North Campus.
Disability Groups Served
This new program will be directed towards secondary and post-secondary candidates, and will provide educational services for the following physical disabilities:
AMPUTATIONS
BLINDNESS/VISUAL PROBLEMS
PARAPLEGIA
DEAFNESS
CARDIAC AND VASCULAR
CEREBRAL PALSY
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MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS DEFORMITIES SPEECH DISORDERS ASTHMA/RESPIRATORY DISABLING CONDITIONS SELECTED MULTIPLE HANDICAPS
Support Services Offered
Depending upon the candidates disability, the following support services will be offered:
TUTORIAL ASSISTANCE READERS AND BRAILLE TRANSCRIBERS SPECIAL COUNSELORS NOTETAKERS AND TESTORS SPECIALIZED MEDIA EQUIPPED RESOURCE CENTERS PERIPHERAL THERAPY AND NURSING SERVICE PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING SERVICE INTERPRETING (FOR THE DEAF) PARAPROFESSIONAL AID CURRICULUM ADAPTATION MODIFICATION OF ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS PLACEMENT SERVICE FOR THE HANDICAPPED LIAISON WITH REHABILITATION CENTERS ON-SITE PROSTHETIC REPAIR SERVICE INTER-CAMPUS BUS SERVICE FOR THE HANDICAPPED
Educational Objectives
The thrust of this proposed project is to direct handicapped candidates toward the greatest degree of employable competency that the physical limitations of their particular disability will allow.
An in-depth analysis of all occupational programs available at the three-campus complex will be undertaken to identify programs suitable to each kind of handicapping condition. Curriculum modification will be implemented to meet each candidates specific potential. Equipment adaptation or the provision of supplementary equipment will be arranged.
Conceptual Basis for the Program
It is the philosophy of the Community College of Denver that handicapped adults should be given the same opportunities for occupational training as their able-bodied counterparts. In addition, CCD maintains the belief that many more handicapped individuals should and could be employed than are in the present labor market. CCD maintains also that the physically handicapped can be trained more effectively, at less expenditure, in the same classroom with their nonhandicapped peers, rather than in isolated special schools. To facilitate this philosophy, CCD is making certain that ancillary classroom services are available for all physically handicapped students.
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KEY TO COURSE PREFIX LETTERS
AB Auto Body Service AC Accounting
AE Appliance and Refrigeration Mechanics AM Automotive Mechanics AN Anthropology AR Art
AT Architectural Technology AV Audio-Visual Technology B Biology
BE Biomedical Equipment Technology Bl Building Inspection BL Bricklaying C Chemistry CA Carpentry
CC Early Childhood Education and Management CH Chinese
Cl Classroom Instructional Assisting
CJ Criminal Justice
CM Commercial Art
CT Civil Technology
D Drafting
DA Dental Assisting
DM Diesel Mechanics
DP Data Processing
EC Economics
EG English
EG (Manual Communication)
EH Institutional Housekeeping
EM Appliance and Refrigeration Mechanics
EO Heavy Equipment Operation
ET Electronics Technology
EV Environmental Control Technology
F Food Service
FP Fluid Power
FR French
FS Fire Science Technology
G Earth Science
GA Graphic Arts
GC Counseling
GE Geography
GR German
HE Health Education
HI Hearing Impaired
HM Hotel-Motel Management
HS History
HU Humanities
I Information Media Technology
1C Inventory Control
IE Commercial Industrial Electricity
IM Industrial Management
IN Insurance
IT Respiratory (Inhalation) Therapy Technology JL Journalism LA Para-Legal
LI Literature
LT Library Technology
M Mathematics
MG Management
Ml Mineral Industry Technology
MO Medical Insurance Clerk
MS Machine Shop
MU Music
N Nursing
NA Nurse Assisting
NT Nuclear Medicine Technology
OA Optometric Assisting
OM Business Machine Technology
P Physics
PE Physical Education
PH Philosophy
PL Plumbing
PR Public Relations
PS Political Science
PT Commercial Photography
PY Psychology
QA Quality Assurance
R Radiation Therapy Technology
RA Radio and Television Service
RD Reading
RE Real Estate
RL Recreational Leadership
RT Radiologic Technology
RU Russian
S Speech
SC Secretarial Science
SE Sports Crafts and Specialty Area Mechanics SI Science SK Skill Center SO Sociology SP Spanish
SR Senior Citizen Activity Assisting
SS Social Science
ST Surgical Technology
SU Surveying
SW Social Worker Assisting
TE Traffic Engineering Technology
Tl Technical Illustration
TT Traffic and Transportation
TV Television Service Technology
UH Urban Horticulture
UP Urban Planning Technology
VM Vending Machine Technology
VN Practical Nursing
WC Ward Clerk
WE Welding and Fabrication
WW Water-Wastewater Technology
XT General Diagnostic (X-Ray)
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GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAMS
CONTENTS
General Information 18 Division of Communication and Arts §| 19
Division of Science and Mathematics 35 Division of Social Sciences § 43
Consortium of Ethnic Studies
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GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAMS
The General Studies Programs are intended to provide educational opportunities in support of a students selected career emphasis in Occupational Studies, in preparation for transfer to a four-year college or university and in general and developmental education interests.
Students enrolled in Occupational Studies Programs may enroll in General Studies courses to meet the specific requirements of a particular occupational curriculum and to select desired elective courses.
Students who intend to transfer to a four-year college or university should review the catalog of the particular institution to which they plan to transfer in order to determine specific course requirements. Copies of catalogs for other Colorado colleges, universities, and out-of-state schools may be obtained through the Office of Student Services. Students are urged to seek the advice of the division directors and faculty members in the selection of transfer courses in their areas of interest.
The Associate Degree is awarded by the Community College of Denver upon the successful completion of the requirements for the degree. The general requirements for the Associate Degree are listed on Page 6. In addition, a General Studies student must meet the specific requirements in one of the four areas of emphasis listed below:
1. Arts This is designed for the student whose major emphasis of study is in Communication and Arts and/or Social Sciences and is intended for transfer to a four-year college or university in his area of interest.
Degree Requirements
Successful completion of a minimum of ninety (90) quarter hours of credit in transfer course
work including the following:
a. EG 111, 112, and 113..................... 9 hours
b. Nine (9) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Communication and Arts* (in addition to EG 111,
112, and 113) ..................... 9 hours
c. Twelve (12) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Science
and Mathematics .............12 hours
d. Twelve (12) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Social
Sciences ..........................12 hours
e. Electives that fit in with the
students transfer program...............48 hours
TOTAL ..........................90 hours
Excluding course work in physical education.
2. Science This is designed for the student whose major emphasis of study is in Science
or Mathematics and is intended for transfer to a four-year college or university in his area of interest.
Degree Requirements
Successful completion of a minimum of ninety (90) quarter hours of credit in transfer course
work including the following:
a. EG 111, 112, and 113..................... 9 hours
b. Nine (9) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Communication and Arts* (in addition to EG
111, 112, and 113)........................9 hours
c. Thirty (30) quarter hours of course
work in the Division of Science and Mathematics .......................30 hours
d. Twelve (12) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Social
Sciences ..........................12 hours
e. Electives that fit in with the
students transfer program...............30 hours
TOTAL ..........................90 hours
Excluding course work in physical education.
3. Business This is designed for the student whose major emphasis of study is in Business and may be used for transfer to a four-year college or university school of business.
Degree Requirements
Successful completion of a curriculum designed for transfer to a four-year college or university (see page 106 in the Division of Business and Management Occupations Section of the catalog).
4. General Education This is designed for the student who completes a broad program of courses without the constraints of specialization characteristic of the other programs in General Studies and is not designed for transfer.
Degree Requirements
Successful completion of a minimum of ninety (90) quarter hours of credit in course work including the following: a. Six (6) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Communica-
tion and Arts* ...................... 6 hours
b. Six (6) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Science
and Mathematics ..................... 6 hours
c. Six (6) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Social
Sciences ............................ 6 hours
d. Electives in General Studies........30 hours
e. Electives of the students
choosing ............................42 hours
TOTAL ..........................90 hours
'Excluding course work in physical education.
NOTE: Students who can submit evidence that their successful completion of ninety (90) quarter hours of course work constitutes a completely transferable curriculum for transfer into a specific program at a four-year college or university need not complete the specific requirements listed above in order to be considered for the Associate Degree.
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DIVISION OF COMMUNICATION AND ARTS
CONTENTS
Art A, N, R
Chinese A, N, R
English A, N, R
Beginning Manual Communications A, N, R
French A, N,R
German j A, N, R
Humanities A, N, R Instructional Labs | A, N, R Journalism j A, N, R Literature A, N, R
Music | A, N, R
Physical Education A, N, R
Reading A, N, R
Russian A, N, R
Speech A, N,R
Skill Center Instructional Program A, N, R
Spanish | A, N, R Independent Study A, N, R


DIVISION OF COMMUNICATION AND ARTS
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Where a course descrition does not indicate the campus by the key A, N or R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
AR 100 Art Appreciation (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
A study of the worlds art masterpieces, various aspects and types of art works as a basis for broadening knowledge and appreciation of the subject.
AR 101 Basic Drawing (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
Freehand drawing covering a selection of subject, proportion, perspective, line, texture, value and composition. Media includes pencil, conte crayon, charcoal and ink. (6 hours per week)
AR 102 Basic Drawing (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 101 or permission of instructor
Drawing fundamentals with a stronger emphasis on the idea or concept of drawing, introduction of color into drawing and a wider selection of drawing media. (6 hours per week)
AR 103 Basic Drawing (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 101 or 102 or permission of instructor
Drawing in varied and mixed media, emphasizing experimentation. Broad range of size and material stressing composition and concept. Introduction to drawing human figure. (6 hours per week)
AR 105 Basic Design (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Fundamentals of form, color, visual perception, principles of composition, organization and structure introduced with experimentation in two-dimensional problems in design. (6 hours per week)
AR 106 Basic Design (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 105 or permission of instructor
Continuation of AR 105 with problems in form, color, visual perception, principles of composition, organization and structure in both two and three dimensional design. (6 hours per week)
AR 107 Basic Design (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 105 or 106 or permission of instructor
Advanced problems in two and three dimensional design. (6 hours per week)
AR 110 Art of the Southwest (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
The architecture, painting and sculpture of the American Southwest from pre-Colombian civilization to present times. Emphasis is on regional adaptation and assimilation of art forms brought about by the different cycles of conquest.
AR 111 Introduction to Art, A Survey of Masterpieces of the World (A, N, R)...............................3 credit hours
The course is designed for students interested in general awareness of art and art appreciation. A study of the worlds masterpieces from Prehistoric to Gothic period with brief exposure to some studio experiences if appropriate.
AR 112 Introduction to Art, A Survey of Masterpieces of the World (A, N, R)..............................3 credit hours
A continuation of AR 111, from Early Renaissance through Rococo periods.
AR 113 Introduction to Art, A Survey of Masterpieces of the World (A, N, R)..............................3 credit hours
A continuation of AR 112, from New Classic through Contemporary periods.
AR 181 Ethnic Studies in Art, The
American Southwest (A, N, R) .3 credit hours
Special studies of the Art of the American Southwest from pre-Colombian civilizations to present times as it relates to the Chicano.
AR 182 Ethnic Studies in Art, The Art of Africa and Black Americans
(A, N, R).....................3 credit hours
Special studies of the Art of Africa from ancient to present times as it relates to contemporary Black American artists.
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AR 183 Ethnic Studies in Art, The Art of the Orient and the American Oriental (A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
Special studies of Oriental Art from ancient to present times as it relates to contemporary American Oriental artists.
AR 184 Ethnic Studies in Art, The
American Indians (A, N, R)..3 credit hours
Special Studies of the Art of the American Indian from ancient to present times as it relates to contemporary American Indian artists.
AR 201 Second Year Drawing (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 103 or permission of instructor Advanced problems in freehand drawing. Emphasis on experimentation using a variety of media and greater emphasis on drawing the human figure. (6 hours per week)
AR 202 Second Year Drawing (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 201 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 201. (6 hours per week)
AR 203 Second Year Drawing (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 202 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 202. (6 hours per week)
AR 211 Basic Water Colors
and Watermedia (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
Introduction to transparent and opaque water color media through problems in creative design involving landscape and still life. (6 hours per week)
AR 212 Basic Water Colors
and Watermedia (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 211 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 211. (6 hours per week)
AR 213 Basic Water Colors
and Watermedia (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 212 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 211 and 212. (6 hours per week)
AR 215 Figure Drawing I (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
Beginning drawing of the human figure with a variety of drawing media and an introduction to human anatomy. (6 hours per week)
AR 216 Figure Drawing II (A, N, R).. .3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 215 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 215. (6 hours per week)
AR 217 Figure Drawing III (A, N, R).... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 216 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 216. (6 hours per week)
AR 221 Oil and Acrylic Painting
(A, N, R) .....................3 credit hours
Introduction to oil or acrylic painting with basic investigation of the materials of the painter and their employment In control of form and space through the use of color and other elements of design. (6 hours per week)
AR 222 Oil and Acrylic Painting
(A, N, R)......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 221 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 221. (6 hours per week)
AR 223 Oil and Acrylic Painting
(A, N, R) .....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 222 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 221 and 222. (6 hours per week)
AR 231 Ceramics I (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
Opportunity for students to discover their potential in design as applied to pottery. Various methods of building and glazing ceramic forms are made possible through laboratory experiences. (6 hours per week)
AR 232 Ceramics II (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 231 or permission of instructor (6 hours per week)
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AR 233 Ceramics III (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 232 or permission of instructor (6 hours per week)
AR 235 Textile Design and Weaving I
(A, N, R).......................2 credit hours
Historical development of looms, weaving and textile design techniques, studio experience in weaving, batik and other textile design. (4 hours per week)
AR 236 Textile Design and Weaving II
(A, N, R) ......................2 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 235 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 235. (4 hours per week)
AR 237 Textile Design and Weaving III
(A, N, R) ......................2 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 236 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 236. (4 hours per week)
AR 241 History of Art (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Earliest Stone Age to the Roman Era: Painting, sculpture, architecture, minor arts.
AR 242 History of Art (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Beginning of the Roman Era to the 18th Century: Architecture, painting, sculpture, minor arts.
AR 243 History of Art (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Eighteenth Century to Contemporary. European and American, Primitive African and Oceanic: Architecture, painting, minor arts.
AR 245 Printmaking I (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 105, 106, 107 Basic Design or permission of instructor A study of basic hand printing techniques: Lithography, etching, wood engraving, block printing and silkscreen printing. (6 hours per week)
AR 246 Printmaking II (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 245 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 245. (6 hours per week)
AR 247 Printmaking III (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 246 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 246. (6 hours per week)
AR 251 Metalsmithing and Jewelry I
(A, N, R) ......................3 credit hours
Jewelry design, basic construction and surface treatment techniques in sterling silver. (6 hours per week)
AR 252 Metalsmithing and Jewelry II
(A, N, R) ......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 251 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 251. (6 hours per week)
AR 253 Metalsmithing and Jewelry III
(A, N, R) ......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 252 or permission of instructor (6 hours per week)
AR 255 Basic Sculpture I (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: One year of basic design or permission of instructor
A creative approach to three dimensional design in sculpture; modeling, assembling, and construction in a variety of materials. (6 hours per week)
AR 256 Basic Sculpture II (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 255 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 255. (6 hours per week)
AR 257 Basic Sculpture III (A, N, R) .3 credit hours
Continuation of AR 256. (6 hours per week)
AR 261 Second Year Painting (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 213 and 223 or permission of instructor
A continuation of AR 213 and 223. This course provides an opportunity for the advanced student to work with water color, oil and acrylic, or mixed media through problems involving landscape, still life, abstraction and non-objective painting. (6 hours per week)
AR 262 Second Year Painting (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 261 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 261. (6 hours per week)
AR 263 Second Year Painting (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 262 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 262. (6 hours per week)
AR 271 Second Year Ceramics I
(A, N, R)......................3 credit hours
A continuation of AR 233. This course provides an opportunity for advanced ceramics in second year, creative design in wheel thrown pottery forming processes and glaze compositions. (6 hours per week)
AR 272 Second Year Ceramics II
(A, N, R)......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 271 or permission of instructor (6 hours per week)
AR 273 Second Year Ceramics III
(A, N, R)......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 272 or permission of instructor (6 hours per week)
CHINESE
CH 100 Basic Applied Chinese
(A, N, R).....................2 credit hours
Course designed for those who wish to learn basic conversational patterns for enjoyment and travel or for simple business needs. Language background helpful but not essential. (2 hours per week, plus laboratory)
CH111 First Year Chinese (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Designed to develop basic principles of grammar and syntax; reading and writing of simple Chinese, correct pronunciation and rudimentary conversation.
CH 112 First Year Chinese (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 111
CH 113 First Year Chinese (A, N, R) .5 credit hours
Prerequisite: 112
Continuation and Expansion of CH 112 & additional reading materials.
CH211 Intermediate Chinese (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
This course will (1) review and reinforce skills and knowledge gained in first year Chinese, (2) develop fur-
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ther skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, (3) develop sense of linguistic structure and increase vocabulary and (4) provide readings in plays, short stories and poems.
CH 212 Intermediate Chinese (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 211 Continuation and Expansion of CH 211.
CH213 Intermediate Chinese (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 211 Continuation and Expansion of 212.
CH 214 Conversation and
Composition Chinese (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 213 or demonstration of sufficient language skills
Conversation and Composition Chinese is designed to increase vocabulary and develop oral and written proficiency at the intermediate level through discussions, reports and situation dialogues.
CH215 Conversation and
Composition Chinese (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of CH 214.
CH 216 Conversation and
Composition Chinese (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of CH 215.
CH 241 Contemporary Chinese
Short Stories (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
Selected examples of most representative authors.
CH 242 Contemporary Chinese
Theatre (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
Selected plays representative of the Chinese stage today.
CH 243 Contemporary Chinese
Novel (A, N, R)...............3 credit hours
Selected contemporary novels.
ENGLISH
IL 090 Communications Laboratory (A, N, R)
This program is designed to guide and assist students who have difficulty in any of the communication skills especially in reading, spelling, written composition and oral communication (including listening). Through counseling and tests these laboratory experiences help the student recognize his problem, define it, and then, through highly individualized teaching, work toward some meaningful solution of that problem in order to prepare him to go on with his college work.
EG 095 Comprehensive Business
Communications (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
A special course designed for the short-term business students who must improve their skill in the mechanics of transcribing business letters. Intensive practice in proofreading and correcting business correspondence will be provided. (5 class hours per week, plus lab assignments as directed by the instructor).
EG 096 English as a Second
Language (A, N, R)..............5 credit hours
This course is designed to lead the student to mastery of the sound system of English along with the mastery of the devices which English uses structurally and the fundamental matters of word order and the patterns of form. (5 hours per week)
EG 100 Study Skills (A, N, R).........1 credit hour
Objectives are to introduce basic study skills.
EG 102 Workshop in Language
Fundamentals (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
The course is designed to give the student basic writing skills. The course will cover basic grammar, punctuation and syntax. Ample exercise and individualized instruction will ensure student progress in the development of fundamental writing skills needed in college or work world.
EG 106 Occupational
Communication (A, N, R)......3 credit hours
Designed to develop the occupational students skills and understanding in reading and writing. Special emphasis is placed on business and industrial needs. EG 106 develops these skills in written communication and focuses on the students abilities to read and write within his chosen field.
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EG 107 Occupational
Communication (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
Designed to develop the students abilities in oral communication (speaking and listening) in his chosen field.
EG 108 Occupational
Communication (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
The focus is on introductory technical writing and will cover letters, progress reports and informal technical reports.
EG 111 English Composition (A, N, R)..3 credit hours
Designed to introduce the student to the broad field of communication and to develop ability in the writing of short papers and reports through the application of the techniques of clear thinking: definition, classification, structure and process analysis, and comparison/ contrast.
EG 112 English Composition (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: EG 111 or equivalent
Designed to teach the student to write reports and research papers. The emphasis is on the library paper: (1) defining the problem, (2) collecting data, (3) organizing logical sequence, (4) recording (footnoting, editing, typing, etc.).
EG 113 English Composition (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Designed to develop the students understanding of creative forms in all areas of communication. This includes (1) introduction to the characteristics of creativity, (2) meaningful forms of creative expression and application and (3) experiences in the search for personal expression, with particular emphasis on contemporary involvement. EG 111 and 112 are not prerequisites for EG 113.
EG 114 Creative Writing (A, N, R)......3 credit hours
The writing of creative papers and the creative process generally. Students are exposed to a variety of techniques primarily applicable to creative forms; poetry, essays, short stories, and others.
EG 131 Business
Communications I (A, N, R).... 3 credit hours
Presents essential principles involved in preparing business letters and other types of business communications purpose, style, structure and use of correct, forceful English. Intensive practice in the mechanics of language and vocabulary used by management and office personnel is provided.
EG 132 Business
Communications II (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: EG#I31 or equivalent Applies the business technique to communications that require problem solving and an understanding of human relations in a business situation. Students will compose and evaluate the various kinds of business letters that are commonly used by businessmen. Business reports, inter-office bulletins, news releases and other forms of business composition will receive attention. The legal and ethical responsibilities involved in written communication will be discussed.
EG 133 Business
Communications III (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: EG 132 or equivalent Applications of the writing, speaking and listening skills learned in EG 131 and 132 (Business Communications) are covered in this course. Oral business reporting for staff meetings, public speaking, correct telephone usage, techniques in business dictation, listening for notetaking and other business facets of written and oral communications are practiced.
EG 200 Advanced
Composition (A, N, R)........3 credit hours
The techniques of clear thinking and organization as implemented by the basic concepts of EG 111 and EG 112 applied to expository writing with special attention to syntactic and rhetorical development.
EG 201 Survey of
Communication (A, N, R)......3 credit hours
Focuses on the development of basic communication habits as aids to better communication. The communication model, levels of communicative interdependence, empathy, origin of meanings, general semantics, dimensions of observations and judgments are studied as a new approach to human understanding and improvement of human relations.
EG 214 Advanced Creative
Writing (A, N, R) ...........3 credit hours
An advanced course in creative writing. The course will channel individual student potential into advanced creative expression, self-enrichment with resultant publishable materials.
EG 220 The Rhetoric of Social
Protest (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
An analytical and critical study of the rhetoric of social protest in America with special emphasis on activism.
EG 250 Technical Writing (A, N, R).... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Successful completion of a sequence of 3 quarters of Occupational Communication, or Business Communications or English Composition or equivalent
Designed as a professional introductory course in technical writing. This course will teach the student to prepare a formal technical report for the printer through (1) the development of definition and analyses, (2) the definition of problems, (3) collection and organization of data, (4) mastery of structure, style and mechanics of the written report, and (5) the use of graphics.
EG MANUAL
EG 151 Beginning Manual
Communications (A, N, R)...3 credit hours
A beginning course in the language of signs. Emphasis is on the development of receptive and expressive skills in the use of the manual alphabet, together with practice in the use of basic signs.
EG 152 Intermediate Manual
Communications (A, N, R)...3 credit hours
Refinement of skills developed in the beginning Manual Communications course. Extensive practice in the use
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of the sign language, with development of colloquial expressions. Increased practice in the reading of signs and fingerspelling.
EG 153 Advanced Manual
Communications (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
Introduction to the role of sign languages as a medium for interpreting. Simulated interpreting situations will provide the vehicle for the development of fluid manual communication skills.
EG 251 Specialized Manual
Communications (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
This course, designed for students already familiar with the language of signs, will provide a number of different interpreting situations for observation and practice in order to develop a broad scope of interpreting skills.
EG 252 Supervised Practicum in
Interpreting-I (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
Using actual classroom situations, students will have the opportunity to apply their interpreting skills by translating lectures for deaf students enrolled in a variety of courses; observation and evaluation will be conducted by professional interpreters. (5 hours per week)
EG 253 Supervised Practicum in
Interpreting-ll (A, N, R)......6 credit hours
A concluding course to bring together all of the many facets of interpreting; continuation of professionally guided classroom and laboratory interpreting for the deaf. (12 or more hours per week as determined by the Coordinator)
FRENCH
FR 100 Basic Applied French (A, R, N) 2 credit hours
Designed for those who wish to learn basic conversational patterns for enjoyment and for travel or for simple business needs. Language background helpful but not essential. (2 hours per week, plus laboratory)
FR 101 Basic Applied French (A, N, R) 2 credit hours
Continuation of FR 100.
FR 102 Basic Applied French (A, N, R) .2 credit hours
Continuation of FR 101.
FR 111 First Year French (A, N, R).... 5 credit hours
Designed to develop basic principles of grammar and syntax; reading and writing of simple French, correct pronunciation and rudimentary conversation.
FR 112 First Year French (A, N, R).... 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: FR 111 Continuation and Expansion of FR 111.
FR 113 First Year French (A, N, R).... 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: FR 112
Continuation and Expansion of FR 112 and additional reading materials.
FR 211 Intermediate French (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FR 113 or equivalent This course will (1) review and reinforce skills and knowledge gained in first year French, (2) develop
further skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, (3) develop sense of linguistic structure and increase vocabulary and (4) provide readings in plays, short stories and poems.
FR 212 Intermediate French (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FR 211 Continuation and Expansion of FR 211.
FR 213 Intermediate French (A, N, R). .3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FR 212 Continuation and Expansion of FR 212.
FR214 Conversation and
Composition French (A, N, R) .3 credit hours
Prerequisites: FR 213 or demonstration of sufficient language skills
Conversation and Composition French is designed to increase vocabulary and develop oral and written proficiency at the intermediate level through discussions, reports, and situation dialogues.
FR 215 Conversation and
Composition French (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of FR 214.
FR 216 Conversation and
Composition French (A, N, R). .3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of FR 215.
FR 241 Contemporary French
Short Stories (A, N, R)........3 credit hours
Selected examples of most representative authors.
FR 242 Contemporary French
Theatre (A, N, R)..............3 credit hours
Selected plays representative of the French Stage.
FR 243 Contemporary French
Novel (A, N, R)................3 credit hours
Selected contemporary novels.
GERMAN
GR 100 Basic Applied
German (A, N, R)............2 credit hours
This course is for those who wish to learn basic conversational patterns for enjoyment, for travel, or for simple business needs.
GR 101 Basic Applied
German (A, N, R) ...........2 credit hours
Continuation of GR 100.
GR 102 Basic Applied
German (A, N, R)............2 credit hours
Continuation of GR 101.
GR 111 First Year German (A, N, R). .5 credit hours
Designed to develop basic principles of grammar and syntax; reading and writing of simple German, correct pronunciation and rudimentary conversation.
GR112 German II (A, N, R)............5 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of GR 111.
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GR 113 German III (A, N, R)............5 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of GR 112 and additional reading materials.
GR 211 Intermediate German (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
This course will (1) review and reinforce skills and knowledge gained in first year German, (2) develop further skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, (3) develop sense of linguistic structure and increase vocabulary and (4) provide readings in plays, short stories and poems.
GR 212 Intermediate German (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of GR 211.
GR 213 Intermediate German (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of GR 212.
GR 214 Conversation and Composition
German (A, N, R)..............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: 213 or demonstration of sufficient language skills
Conversation and Composition German is designed to increase vocabulary and develop oral and written proficiency at the intermediate level through discussions, reports, and situation dialogues.
GR215 Conversation and
Composition German (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of GR 214.
GR 216 Conversation and
Composition German (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of GR 215.
GR 241 Contemporary German
Short Stories (A, N, R)......3 credit hours
Selected examples of most representative authors.
GR 242 Contemporary German
Theatre (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
Selected plays representative of the German stage today.
GR 243 Contemporary German
Novel (A, N, R)................3 credit hours
Selected contemporary novels.
HUMANITIES
HU 145 Chicano Culture (A, N, R)....3 credit hours
Story of the Chicano from pre-Colombian to contemporary times. Includes the study of the social, cultural, political, and economic heritage of the Chicano and his contribution to American society.
HU 146 Black Culture (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Role of the Black man in American culture and traditions which give rise to current dilemma confronting the American community.
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JOURNALISM
HU 147 Folklore of Mexico and
the Southwest (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Study of the Indian Folklore of Mexico and the Southwest and its fusion with Hispanic Folklore. (3 hours per week)
HU 201 Pop Culture (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
A close look at the assumptions made by mass-produced artifacts: movies, TV, magazines, comics, books and an effort to judge them. Students find out whats really going on by means of field trips, individual projects, and discussions.
HU 202 The Movies (Cinema) (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
This course provides intensive study of the movies considered the newest art, as a unique 20th century form of communication, and as a reflection of the values and problems of our time. Students will see short movies weekly, will attend several features, and will conduct a research project.
HU 211 Humanities (A, N, R)............5 credit hours
Based on a comparative study of world mythology, religion, and symbolism and the arts that they have produced.
HU 212 Humanities (A, N, R)............5 credit hours
A comparative study of the arts and crafts of the world and the ways in which they influenced human development and the ways in which human development has influenced them.
HU 213 Humanities (A, N, R)............5 credit hours
A comparative study of the general themes and methodology of Western and Eastern philosophies and the cultural patterns that form their matrix.
HU 215 Ideas in a Changing
Society (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
An inter-disciplinary course dealing with current issues placed in historical and ideological perspective. The instructor will be aided by qualified guest speakers and specialists who will discuss various intellectual disciplines, including religion, philosophy, psychology, sociology, education, politics and civil rights.
HU 241 Comparative Culture
Spanish (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
Study of Spain from the Middle Ages to the 19th Century through the media of slides, records, art books, tapes, films and lectures.
HU 242 Comparative Culture
Spanish (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
A continued study of Spain, stressing the 19th and 20th Centuries. Early Latin-American development will be investigated. This course will stress the multi-media approach.
HU 243 Conmparative Culture
Spanish (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
A continued study with emphasis on Latin-American independence and the course of development to the present time. Multi-media approach will be used.
JL 221 Introduction to
Journalism (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
An introduction to the basic principles of journalism. This is an applied course and will involve work on a college publication or a minimum of 3 hours of class, plus 3 hours of laboratory per week.
JL 222 Introduction to
Journalism (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: JL 221 A continuation of JL 221.
JL 223 Introduction to
Journalism (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: JL 222 A continuation of JL 222.
LITERATURE
L1125 The Black Writer
in America (A, N, R) 4 credit hours
A beginning course in the study of Black literature, which includes the methods of evaluation and analysis essential for understanding and appreciating the literary contribution of the Black writer in America.
L1141 Introduction to
Literature (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Short story an overview and selected readings.
L1142 Introduction to
Literature (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Novel an overview and selected readings.
L1143 Introduction to
Literature (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Poetry an overview and selected readings.
L1144 Afro-American
Literature (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Study of the contribution of Afro-American writers to American literature and civilization.
L1145 Literature for
Children (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
A general survey of prose and poetry suitable for young people.
L1147 Contemporary Chicano Literature
in Translation (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
A contemporary look at the Southwest through the works of its authors. Attention to the writings of the present and how they underline the Chicanos search for an identity.
LI 231 Ethnic Literature
in America (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of Black writers in America. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, comparison and genre.
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LI 232 Ethnic Literature
in America (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of Chicano writers in America. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, comparison and genre.
LI 233 Ethnic Literature
in America (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of Oriental writers in America. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, comparison and genre.
LI 234 Ethnic Literature
in America (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of the American Indian. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations and genre.
LI 241 Survey of American
Literature (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
By study of major authors, this quarter will emphasize representative themes and works that reflect the literature of the American Experience from the beginning through the Civil War.
LI 242 Survey of American
Literature (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
By in-depth study of major authors, this quarter will emphasize representative themes and works that reflect the literature of the American Experience from the Civil War to World War I.
LI 243 Survey of American
Literature (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
By in-depth study of major authors, this quarter will emphasize representative themes and works that reflect the literature of the American Experience from World War I to the present.
LI 247 English Literature (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Critical insights into the major works from the Anglo-Saxon up to the Elizabethan Period.
LI 248 English Literature (A, N, R).....3 credit hours
This quarter concentrates on major works of the Elizabethan Period to the Romantic Period.
LI 249 English Literature (A, N, R).....3 credit hours
This quarter concentrates on the Romantic Period to the present.
LI 261 World Literature
Asia (A, N, R) ...............3 credit hours
A study of development of Asiatic literature.
LI 262 World Literature Western
Europe (A, N, R)..............3 credit hours
A study of development of Western European literature.
LI 263 World Literature Eastern
Europe (A, N, R)..............3 credit hours
A study of development of Eastern European literature.
LI 264 World Literature
Africa (A, N, R)..............3 credit hours
A study of development of African literature.
LI 265 World Literature Latin
America (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
A study of development of Latin American literature.
MUSIC
MU 100 Music Appreciation (A, N, R). .3 credit hours
General overview of music from its inception to the present day. Some general and detailed knowledge of composers, compositions, periods, styles, etc.
MU 111 Theory and Harmony (A, N, R) .5 credit hours
Study of theory and harmony of music dealing with scales, meter, rhythm, intervals, chord structure, voice leading, chord succession and part writing. Course completion will require keyboard work and laboratory work in sight-singing and ear-training, outside of class time. (4 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) A basic music test will be administered. Those students with a deficiency will be REQUIRED TO COMPLETE AN INTENSIVE 4-WEEK WORKSHOP (no credit) concurrently.
MU 112 Theory and Harmony (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 111
Continued study of harmony and theory with emphasis on diatonic and secondary seventh chords. Sight-singing aptitude and ability to take musical dictation. Course completion will require keyboard work and laboratory work in siqht-singing and ear-training, outside of class time. (4 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)
MU 113 Theory and Harmony (A, N, R).5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 112
Continued work with the materials of the first two quarters with emphasis on harmonizing sopranos, beginning modulation and some creative writing. Course completion will require keyboard work and laboratory work in sight-singing and ear-training, outside of class time. (4 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)
MU 120 Music of Mexico and
the Southwest (A, N, R)........3 credit hours
An examination of selected works in Mexican music from pre-Colombian time to present, concentrating on regional works and on Twentieth Century composers and their relationship to Chicano society.
MU 130 Band (A, N, R)...................1 credit hour
Study of instrumental styles and literature from marches to large contemporary works. Can be repeated up to six hours credit.
MU 140 Chorus (A, N, R).................1 credit hour
Study of choral literature from the classics to the modern day and from religious through secular music. Special emphasis on rhythm and tone. Can be repeated up to 6 hours credit.
MU 145 Music for Children (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Introductory study of the fundamentals of music. Emphasis is placed on selection of activities and methods for musical participation by the children rather than on perfection of performance skills. (A general survey of materials, activities and instruments pertinent to the area.)
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MU 151,152,153 Piano Class for the
Keyboard Beginner (A, N, R) 1 credit hour
For students with no formal keyboard training. Will lead to an understanding of the instrument, its limits, its possibilities. Appropriate literature will be used. Will require at least three hours outside practice per week.
MU 155 Woodwind Methods (A, N, R). .1 credit hour
A course designed to introduce the methods of playing standard woodwind instruments. Fingering, tone production, care of instrument and representative literature will be stressed. At least two hours of outside practice per week is required.
MU 156 Brass Methods (A, N, R)..........1 credit hour
A course designed to introduce the methods of playing standard brass instruments. Fingering, tone production, care of instrument and representative literature will be stressed. At least two hours of outside practice per week is required.
MU 157 String Methods (A, N, R).........1 credit hour
A course designed to introduce the methods of playing standard string instruments. Fingering, tone production, care of instrument and representative literature will be stressed. At least two hours of outside practice per week is required.
MU 158 Percussion Methods (A, N, R) .1 credit hour
A course designed to introduce the methods of playing standard percussion instruments. Fingering, tone production, care of instrument and representative litera-
ture will be stressed. At least two hours of outside practice per week is required.
MU 161,162,163 Voice Class (A, N, R) .1 credit hour
For students with no formal vocal training. Will lead to an understanding of the vocal instrument, its limits, its possibilities. Appropriate literature will be used. Will require at least three hours outside practice per week.
MU 165,166,167 Guitar Class (A, N, R) 1 credit hour
For students with no formal guitar training. Will lead to arr understanding of the instrument, its limits, its possibilities. Appropriate literature will be used. Will require at least three hours outside practice per week.
MU 171,172,173 Applied
Music (A, N, R)................2 credit hours
Emphasis on an instrument, to increase or maintain individuals ability to perform. Literature pertinent to the chosen instrument will be studied and performed. One-half hour lessons will necessitate at least 6 hours individual practice per week. Weekly class session may be required of all applied music students.
MU 205 Elementary
Conducting (A, N, R)...........2 credit hours
Introduction to conducting patterns and techniques.
MU 206 Instrumental
Conducting (A, N, R)...........2 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 205
Further work on conducting emphasizing individual work on instrumental music.
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MU 207 Choral Conducting (A, N, R). 2 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 205
Further work on conducting, emphasizing individual work on choral music.
NOTE: MU 205, 206, 207 (needed for those transfer students preparing for music major or minor) may also be used for teacher aides.
MU 211 Advanced Theory
and Harmony (A, N, R)..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 113 or equivalent A continuation of Theory and Harmony MU 113 emphasizing traditional harmonies, chromatic harmony and embellishments. Course completion will require keyboard work and laboratory work in sight-singing and ear-training, outside of class time.
MU 212 Advanced Theory
and Harmony (A, N, R)..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 211 or equivalent Continuation of MU 211 emphasizing modern harmonies. Course completion will require keyboard work and laboratory work in sight-singing and ear-training, outside of class time.
MU 213 Advanced Theory
and Harmony (A, N, R)..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 212 or equivalent Continuation of MU 212 emphasizing original composition and analysis. Course completion will require keyboard work and laboratory work in sight-singing and ear-training, outside of class time.
MU 241 Introduction to Music (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
A study of musical styles, forms, developments, literature and composers by historical periods. Outside listening to records required. For music majors and qualified non-music majors, by consent of instructor. Antiquity through Baroque.
MU 242 Introduction to Music (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 241
Continuation of MU 241, emphasizing Classical and Romantic.
MU 243 Introduction to Music (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 242
Continuation of MU 242, emphasizing Impressionistic and Contemporary.
MU 251 Piano Class for Advanced
Keyboard Beginner (A, N, R) . 1 credit hour
Prerequisite MU 151, 152, and 153 or equivalent. Completion will lead to more technical expertise and development of confidence and style. Ensemble playing will be stressed with work in transposition and improvisation. Will require at least 3 hours outside practice per week.
MU 252 Piano Class for Advanced
Keyboard Beginner (A, N, R) 1 credit hour
Prerequisite: MU 251 or equivalent.
Completion will lead to more technical expertise and development of confidence and style. Ensemble playing will be stressed with work in transposition and improvisation. Will require at least 3 hours outside practice per week.
MU 253 Piano Class for Advanced
Keyboard Beginner (A, N, R) .. .1 credit hour
Prerequisite: MU 252 or equivalent.
Completion will lead to more technical expertise and development of confidence and style. Ensemble playing will be stressed with work in transposition and improvisation. Will require at least 3 hours outside practice per week.
MU 271, 272, 273 2nd Year
Applied Music (A, N, R).........2 credit hours
Emphasis on an instrument, to increase or maintain individuals ability to perform. Literature pertinent to the chosen instrument will be studied and performed. One-half hour lessons will necessitate at least 6 hours individual practice per week. Weekly class session may be required of all applied music students.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE 101 First Aid (A, N, R)................1 credit hour
The Standard American Red Cross First Aid Course; a basic course stressing the prevention of accidents and proper care of accident victims. The student will qualify for the Standard American Red Cross Certificate (card) upon satisfactory completion of the course.
PE 110 Group Activities
Men (A, N, R)...................1 credit hour
This course is designed to offer participation and instruction in such activities as soccer, touch football and basketball.
PE 112 Group Activities
Women (A, N, R).................1 credit hour
Participation in activities designed to develop poise, improve physical fitness and teach skills of various team sports.
PE 120 Beginning Conditioning
Activities (A, N, R)............1 credit hour
A slimnastics program with emphasis on fundamental movements, body mechanics and conditioning exercises on mats.
PE 121 Intermediate Conditioning
Activities (A, N, R)............1 credit hour
Continuation of PE 120.
PE 122 Beginning Archery (A, N, R) 1 credit hour
Class designed to teach basic skills and techniques including target competition, field shooting, equipment used and terminology.
PE 123 Intermediate Archery (A, N, R) .1 credit hour
Continuation prerequisite PE 122.
PE 124 Beginning Bowling (A, N, R) 1 credit hour
Designed to instruct students in basic skills of bowling. This course will provide instruction in the recreational activity.
PE 125 Intermediate Bowling (A, N, R) .1 credit hour
Continuation Prerequisite PE 124.
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PE 126 Beginning Golf (A, N, R)...........1 credit hour
Introduction to golf, its origin and development, with
emphasis on basic skills and techniques.
PE 127 Intermediate Golf (A, N, R) 1 credit hour
Continuation Prerequisite PE 126.
PE 128 Swimming (A, N, R).................1 credit hour
Emphasis is on skill and proficiency in beginning, intermediate and advanced swimming.
A. Lifesaving and Water Safety.......1 credit hour
Red Cross lifesaving and water safety instructors certification. Prerequisites: PE 128 and 128 B.
B. Water Related Activities 1 credit hour
Emphasis is on skill and proficiency in a variety of aquatic activities; including water polo, water
basketball and other water contests. Prerequisite: PE 128.
PE 129 Tennis (A, N, R)...................1 credit hour
A course offering instruction in beginning tennis techniques.
PE 130 Modern Dance (A, N, R) 1 credit hour
Emphasis on modern dance techniques. Vocabulary of movement and skills to develop elasticity, balance and coordination of the body.
PE 131 Social and Folk Dance (A, N, R) 1 credit hour
Emphasis on fundamental rhythms and basic structure of social and folk dances.
PE 132 Skiing (A, N, R)..................1 credit hour
Course will offer basic instruction in skiing, including beginning, intermediate and advanced lessons. Classes will be held at major ski areas, and rental charge will be required for this course.
PE 133 Intermediate Skiing (A, N, R) 1 credit hour
Prerequisite: PE 132 Continuation of PE 132.
PE 134 Scuba Diving (A, N, R)............1 credit hour
Course designed to offer basic instruction in scuba diving. Aqua charges will be required for participants in this class and individuals must furnish own scuba diving equipment or rent.
PE 135 Ice Skating (A, N, R).............1 credit hour
A course providing instruction in the recreational activity of ice skating.
PE 136 Self-Defense (A, N, R)............1 credit hour
Class offered to teach basic skill and technique on the art of self-defense.
PE 137 Horsemanship (A, N, R)............1 credit hour
Beginning instruction in Western style riding and horsemanship.
PE 138 Canoeing (A, N, R)................1 credit hour
Course will offer basic strokes of canoeing, principles of water safety and self-rescue.
PE 139 Yoga (A, N, R) 1 credit hour
Basic concepts of ancient Eastern training of body, mind and spirit through physical culture, proper breathing and meditation techniques.
PE 140 Tumbling-Gymnastics (A, N, R). 1 credit hour
Practical experience and sequential development of stunts, tumbling and apparatus activities.
PE 142 Basic Mountaineering (A, N, R) 1 credit hour
Basic instruction in mountain climbing safety and survival.
NOTE: PE courses may be repeated to gain and develop proficiency.
READING
RD 101 Skills for College
Reading I (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
Promote reading efficiency through development of skills and improved comprehension.
RD 102 Skills for College
Reading II (A, N. R) 3 credit hours
Emphasis on practicing various skills of efficient reading. Individual and group needs will be recognized in comprehension skills, study reading techniques, vocabulary development, skimming/skanning skills and flexibility.
RD120 Speed Reading (A, N, R) 2 credit hours
Speed reading is designed to increase speed, develop a more flexible reading pace and promote better comprehension.
RD 200 College Reading (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
This course is designed for students who have normal reading ability or better than normal but would like to improve their speed and comprehension as well as develop analytical techniques.
RUSSIAN
RU 100 Basic Applied
Russian (A, N, R) .............2 credit hours
To learn basic phrases and terms enabling the student to function minimally in specific situations.
RU 111 First Year Russian (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Designed to develop basic principles of grammar and syntax; reading and writing of simple Russian, correct pronunciation and rudimentary conversation.
RU 112 First Year Russian (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of RU 111.
RU 113 First Year Russian (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of RU 112 and additional reading materials.
RU211 Intermediate Russian (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
This course will (1) review and reinforce skills and knowledge gained in first year Russian, (2) develop further skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, (3) develop sense of linguistic structure and increase vocabulary and (4) provide readings in plays, short stories and poems.
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RU 212 Intermediate Russian (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: RU 211 Continuation and Expansion of RU 211.
RU 213 Intermediate Russian (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: RU 212 Continuation and Expansion of RU 212.
RU 214 Conversation and Composition
Russian (A, N. R)..............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: RU 213 or demonstration of sufficient language skills
Conversation and Composition Russian is designed to increase vocabulary and develop oral and written proficiency at the intermediate level through discussions,
reports, and situation dialogues.
RU215 Conversation and Composition
Russian (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of RU 214.
RU 216 Conversation and Composition
Russian (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of RU 215.
RU 241 Contemporary Russian
Short Stories (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Selected examples of most representative authors.
RU 242 Contemporary Russian
Theatre (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
Selected plays representative of the Russian stage today.
RU 243 Contemporary Novel (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Selected contemporary novels.
SPEECH
S 102 Motivational Speech (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
To teach basic principles of sales and persuasive speech as applied to specific occupations and problems.
S 110 Introduction to Speech (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
A beginning course in communication and public speaking. Completion of course requirements in language, speaking poise, speech composition, mastery of listening techniques and ability to express ideas in order to enable students to become more effective speakers.
S 111 Introduction to
Theatre Arts (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
Drama program introduces the student to the basic principles of acting, scenery and costume construction, elementary problems of production and sales and promotion.
S 112 Introduction to
Theatre Arts (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
Continuation of S 111.
S 113 Introduction to
Theatre Arts (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
Continuation of S 112.
S131 Forensic Activity (A, N, R)........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: S 110 or equivalent Course will acquaint students with techniques of debate and extemporaneous speaking. Debate activities are encouraged.
S 132 Forensic Activity (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: S 110 or equivalent Course will acquaint students with techniques used in oratory and in oral interpretation.
S 133 Oral Interpretation of
Literature (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
Emphasis on learning to select, analyze and perform poetry, drama, fiction and non-fiction for the beginner.
S 134 Reader's Theatre (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: S 133
For the advanced student of oral interpretation. Emphasis on learning to select, cut, cast, produce and direct small scale production.
S210 Advanced Public
Speaking (A. N, R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: S 110
The study of advanced persuasion techniques including those skills necessary for argumentation. Improving the ability to analyze problems logically with emphasis on persuasion. Investigation of two-way and group discussion skills to determine the best methods of problem solving.
S 221 Survey of Theatre (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
Survey of great plays, playwrights, performers and critics. Includes weekly workshops on fundamentals of play-reading, acting, and dramatic production. Features historical backgrounds of dramatic creativity both lecture and film.
S 222 Survey of Theatre (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
Continuation of S 221.
S 223 Survey of Theatre (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
Continuation of S 222.
S 231 Theatre Improvisation (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
Students who have already had experience in theatre and theatre courses will review the history of improvisation in theatre and have experience in the various techniques and approaches through actual production.
SKILL CENTER INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM
Though designed primarily to assist Skill Center students in pre-vocational preparation, any student who can benefit from individualized work in the following courses is welcome to enroll.
SK 100 Reading Improvement (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
In order to determine special needs, each student's reading ability will first be diagnosed and evaluated. Adequate word attack and comprehension skills will be developed. Where appropriate, training to increase speed will be given. Special attention will be paid to developing good study techniques with all students. (Minimum 3 hours per week)
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SK101 Pre-Vocational
Mathematics (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
An individualized program designed to prepare the student for the entering level of math required for his occupation. For students whose curricula call for math courses, specific preparation will be given for Developmental Math, Math for Business and Industry, Introductory Algebra and Accounting III. (Minimum 3 hours per week)
SK 102 Pre-Vocational
Communication (A, N, R)........3 credit hours
This course will focus on advancing the students standard English expression in written and oral skills. After his present level is evaluated, the fundamentals of standard writing will be taught, concentrating on his least strong areas. This may include: capitalization, punctuation, parts of speech, and agreement of predicate and subject. Vocational goals and habits will be stressed in oral English. (Minimum 3 hours per week)
SK 103 Spelling (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Students usually succeed through the use of new and different spelling techniques, although work on root words, endings, and occupational terms are included. (Minimum 3 hours per week)
SK 104 Occupational
Information (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
This course will develop awareness of occupational information. Stress will be on thinking, oral communication and listening to others ideas to develop better social awareness as it applies to the job and everyday
life. (Minimum 3 hours per week)
SK 105 GED Preparation (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
SK 106 Study Skills (A, N, R)..........2 credit hours
SPANISH
SP 100 Basic Applied
Spanish (A, N, R)...........2 credit hours
For those who wish to learn basic conversational Spanish for enjoyment or for travel or for simple business needs.
SP 101 Basic Applied
Spanish (A, N, R)..............2 credit hours
Continuation of SP 100.
SP 102 Basic Applied
Spanish (A, N, R)..............2 credit hours
Continuation of SP 101.
SP 111 First Year Spanish (A, N, R).... 5 credit hours
Designed to develop basic principles of grammar and syntax; reading and writing of simple Spanish, correct pronunciation and rudimentary conversation.
SP 112 First Year Spanish (A, N, R).... 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 111
Continuation and Expansion of SP 111.
SP 113 First Year Spanish (A, N, R)... .5 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 112
Continuation and Expansion of SP 112 and additional reading materials.
SP 121 Spanish to the
Chicano (A, N, R)..............5 credit hours
Designed for the bi-lingual Chicano student. Instruction takes into consideration the interference of English in the development of the Spanish language skills for the student.
SP122 Spanish to the
Chicano (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Continuation of SP 121.
SP 123 Spanish to the
Chicano (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Continuation of SP 122.
SP 211 Intermediate Spanish (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
This course will (1) review and reinforce skills and knowledge gained in first year Spanish, (2) develop further skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, (3) develop sense of linguistic structure and increase vocabulary, and (4) provide reading in plays, short stories and poems.
SP212 Intermediate Spanish (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 112 or SP 113 Continuation of Expansion of SP 211.
SP213 Intermediate Spanish (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of SP 212.
SP 214 Conversation and Composition
Spanish (A, N, R) .............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 213 or demonstration of sufficient language skills
Conversation and Composition Spanish is designed to increase vocabulary and develop oral and written proficiency at the intermediate level through discussions, repots, and situation dialogues.
SP215 Conversation and
Composition Spanish (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of SP 214.
SP 216 Conversation and
Composition Spanish (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of SP 215.
SP 241 Contemporary Spanish
Short Stories (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Selected examples of most representative authors.
SP 242 Contemporary Spanish
Theatre (A, N, R) .............3 credit hours
Selected plays representative of the Spanish stage today.
SP 243 Contemporary Spanish
Novel (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Selected contemporary novels.
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SP 260 Spanish for Office
Personnel (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 113 or equivalent proficiency A course designed primarily for students enrolled in the International Secretarial Program, and students meeting the above prerequisite. Deals with the commercial Spanish language used in both domestic and foreign offices.
SP 261 Spanish for Office
Personnel (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 260
Continuation of Spanish 260. Develops a sound business vocabulary and introduces correct translation demanded when acting as an official interpreter for both written and oral business communications.
SP 262 Spanish for Office
Personnel (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 261
Continuation of Spanish 261. Emphasizes practical applications through project work. Students will be
involved with representatives from import-export firms, government offices, foreign consulates, and embassies.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
299 Independent Study (A, N, R) 1 to 3 credit hours
Independent study (Course No. 299) is available in each of the major areas within the Division of Communication and Arts (i.e., English, foreign language, speech, etc.) except physical education and communications laboratory. The course provides opportunity for the serious-minded student to engage in intensive study and research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Prerequisite for enrollment is permission of the Director of the Division of Communication and Arts and the assigned instructor. The number of quarter hours of credit (1-3) will be determined by the Division Director.
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DIVISION OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
CO NT
Biology | Chemistry Earth Science Mathematics Physics Science
ENTS
A, N, R A, N, R A
A, N, R A, N, R N, R
Independent Study
A, N, R


DIVISION OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Where a course description does not indicate the campus by the key A, N or R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
BIOLOGY
B 099 Biology Learning Center (A, N, R). Non-credit
This center is designed for the student desiring assistance with any difficulty or project relating to biology. The center is supervised by members of the biology faculty; students may avail themselves of this facility voluntarily or may be referred by an instructor. A schedule of the times the center is staffed will be posted each quarter.
B 100 Basic Human Biology (A, N) 4 credit hours
A survey course for Health Occupations students and others needing an understanding of basic biological and chemical concepts as applied to the human body. The basic cellular and chemical aspects of life are related to a brief survey of body organ systems. Primarily for students planning to enroll in B 123 Human Anatomy and Physiology. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 110 Introduction to the
Environment (A, R)............3 credit hours
A study of ecosystems, population dynamics, mans impact upon ecosystems, and possible solutions to the problems posed to man in his environment. (3 hours of lecture per week, no laboratory)
B 111 General Biology (A, N, R)........5 credit hours
Biology 111, 112, 113 constitutes a three-quarter course in general college biology. A study of living organisms emphasizing their environmental and evolutionary relationships and origins. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 112 General Biology (A, N, R)........5 credit hours
A functional view of the organismic, cellular, and molecular aspects of life. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
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B 113 General Biology (A, N, R).........5 credit hours
The life processes of reproduction, genetics, development, and mechanisms of evolution. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 120 Environment and Change (R) .3 credit hours
A study of wildlife, forests, grassland and soil in relationship to man. The nature of man, his belief and value systems, and his technology, will be evaluated in relationship to change in the environment. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
B 123 Human Anatomy and
Physiology (A, N)................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 100 or C 101 or consent of instructor A detailed study of the gross and microscopic anatomical structure of the human body and of the relationship of these structures to their function. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 124 Human Anatomy and
Physiology (A, N)................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 123
A continuation of B 123. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 130 Basic Health (N, R)................4 credit hours
A survey of the basic issues of human interrelationships and diseases which affect personal, family, and community health. (4 hours of lecture per week, no laboratory)
B 140 Introduction to
Microbiology (A, N)..............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 124
An introduction to microbiology with an emphasis on epidemiology and its relationship to the health science occupations. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 150 Biology of the Human Races (A) 3 credit hours
The biological aspects of race formation will be considered, including the genetic foundations, the range of human variability and race mixtures, and the usefulness of biological factors in understanding racial problems. (3 hours of lecture per week, no laboratory)
B 211 General Zoology (R)................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 113
A survey of the invertebrate animals, their biology, structure and relationship to other animal groups. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 212 General Zoology (R)................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 211
A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and natural history of the vertebrate animals. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 221 General Botany (R).................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 113
A survey of the plant kingdom including life cycles, habitats, relationships and evolutionary aspects of the major plant divisions. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 222 General Botany (R)..................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 221
A study of seed plants, the conifers and flowering plants, their structure and functions. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 231 Environmental Biology (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 111 and B 113 or consent of instructor
An introduction to the principles of ecology, population dynamics and genetics, and evolutionary mechanisms. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week; Saturday field trips may replace laboratories)
B 232 Cell Biology (A, N, R)..............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 112 or consent of instructor An introduction to the cell as the fundamental unit of function and structure in all living systems. Morphological and physiological characteristics common to all cells will be emphasized. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 233 Developmental Biology (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 113 and B 232 or consent of instructor
An introduction to the chanaes occurring during organ-ismic development and differentiation; gene action, biochemical regulation, and environmental factors will be stressed. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 240 General Microbiology (N, R) 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 113 or B 133 or consent of instructor
A survey of major microbial groups with special emphasis on bacteria. Emphasis is on basic principles and techniques in microbiology as well as identification, structure, function and role in nature and disease. {3 hours of lecture and 6 hours of laboratory per week)
CHEMISTRY
C 099 Chemistry Learning
Center (A, N, R)..................non-credit
This center is designed for the student desiring assistance with any difficulty or project relating to chemistry. The center is supervised by members of the chemistry faculty; students may avail themselves of this facility voluntarily or may be referred by an instructor. A schedule of the times the center is staffed will be posted each quarter.
C 101 Fundamentals of
Chemistry (A, N, R) 4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent, M 105 or equivalent suggested
A first course in the fundamentals of chemistry designed for non-science majors, students in occupational programs, or students with no high school chemistry. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C 102 Fundamentals of
Chemistry (A, N, R)............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 101
A continuation of C 101. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
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C 103 Fundamental Organic
Chemistry (A, N, R).............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 101
A brief introduction to organic and biological chemistry. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C 109 Applied Chemistry (R).............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or M 103
A basic applied course designed to provide the background in chemistry needed for course work in particular occupational programs. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C111 General College
Chemistry (A, N, R).............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or C 102, M 106 or equivalent, or consent of instructor C 111, 112, and 113 constitute a three-quarter se-qential course in the principles of college chemistry. Designed for science majors and students in preprofessional programs. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C112 General College
Chemistry (A, N, R).............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 111 or equivalent Continuation of C 111. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C113 General College
Chemistry (A, N, R).............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 112 or equivalent Continuation of C 112. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C211 Organic Chemistry (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 113 or equivalent C211, 212, and 213 are a three-quarter sequential course in organic chemistry designed primarily for science majors, premedical and predental students and others who desire a knowledge of the chemistry of organic compounds. A structural and mechanistic approach to syntheses, properties and behavior of chemically and biologically important compounds is stressed. Laboratory emphasis is on basic techniques, synthetic procedures and modern instrumental analyses. (3 hours of lecture and 6 hours of laboratory per week)
C 212 Organic Chemistry (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 211
Continuation of C211. (3 hours of lecture and 6 hours of laboratory per week)
C213 Organic Chemistry (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 212
Continuation of C 212. (3 hours of lecture and 6 hours of laboratory per week)
EARTH SCIENCE
G 099 Geology Learning Center (R).........non-credit
This center is designed for the student desiring assistance with any difficulty or project relating to geology. The center is supervised by members of the geology faculty; students may avail themselves of this facility
voluntarily or may be referred by an instructor. A schedule of the times the center is staffed will be posted each quarter.
G 111 Physical Geology (R).................4 credit hours
G 111 and G 112 are introductory courses exploring our physical environment. An understanding of the rocks and minerals of the earths crust and the role of mountain building, volcanoes, earthquakes, landslides, streams, glaciers, and the wind in shaping the land surface is emphasized. Laboratories include studies of Rocky Mountain geology through field investigations, field trips, and tours of local geology museums. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
G 112 Physical Geology (R).................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: G 111
Continuation of G 111. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
G 113 Historical Geology (R)...............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: G 112 or consent of instructor This course exposes the student to a broad look at geological history of our planet as it is preserved in the earths crust. Class discussion, laboratory, field investigations, field trips, guest speakers, and tours probe the history and evolution of life as unfolded by fossilized plant and animal remains. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
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G 115 Environmental Geology of
Colorado (R) ....................4 credit hours
A non-technical course focusing on local geological environmental problems including landslides, the Bentonite problem, construction sites, pollution of water sources, and strip mining. Environmental problem areas will be observed in the field. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
G211 Colorado Minerals and
Rocks (R) .......................4 credit hours
An exploration into the origin, occurrence, and physical properties of crystals, minerals, and rocks found mainly in Colorado. Modern equipment, including the spectrometer, is used to study and identify specimens. The geologic and mineralogical setting of Colorado aids in the interpretation of the origin and emplacement of precious metals, gems, and nonmetallic mineral deposits. Heavy emphasis is placed on field trips and tours to famous Colorado mining areas and mineral localities. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory or field trip per week)
G 212 Colorado Minerals and
Rocks (R)........................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: G 211
A continuation of G 211 with emphasis on the recognition, origin, and significance of the Colorado rocks. Collecting trips will be taken in the Rockies to obtain specimens for laboratory study (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory or field trip per week)
G 214 Geology of Colorado (R)............3 credit hours
An introduction to the origin, development, and significance of Colorados prairies, peaks, and plateaus; the role of glaciers, running water, wind surface movements, and volcanoes in shaping the topography; and mineral resources and their conservation. Numerous field trips, tours, and practical laboratory problems are planned. (2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory or field trip per week)
MATHEMATICS
M 099 Mathematics Learning
Center (A, N, R) non-credit
This center is designed for the student desiring assistance with any difficulty or activity related to mathematics. The center is supervised by members of the mathematics faculty; students may avail themselves of this facility voluntarily or may be referred by an instructor. A schedule of the times the center is staffed will be posted each quarter.
M 100 Introduction to
Mathematics (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
This course is designed for students who need a comprehensive review of arithmetic. Topics include the fundamental operations of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percentages, proportion, operations with signed numbers and equations. (3 hours per week)
M 101 Pre-Algebra (R).................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent This course is for students who need exposure to some mathematical concepts beyond arithmetic before en-
rolling in algebra. Topics include operations with signed numbers, formulas, literal expressions, and solutions of equations. By arrangement with the Division of Science and Mathematics. (3 hours per week)
M 102 Applied Mathematics I (A, N, R) .3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent FOR INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS This course is directed toward the application of the fundamental mathematical operations needed to solve problems related to these occupations. Topics include fractions, decimals, percentage, ratio and proportion, powers and roots, weights and measures. (3 hours per week)
M 103 Applied Mathematics II (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 102 FOR INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS The development and application of mathematical skills relating to geometry and formula manipulation. (3 hours per week)
M 104 Applied Mathematics III
(A, N, R).......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 103 FOR INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS The development and application of mathematical skills relating to basic applied trigonometry. Computations with logarithms. (3 hours per week)
M 105 Introductory Algebra (A, N, R) 4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent A first course in algebra designed for the student who has had less than one year of high school algebra or for those who need a review. Manipulation of algebraic expressions, solving first degree equations in one and two variables, factoring, solving fractional equations, graphing and verbal problem solving. (4 hours per week)
M 106 Intermediate Algebra (A, N, R). 4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 105 or successful completion of 11/2 years of high school algebra Introduction to sets, introduction to an axiomatic approach to the set of real numbers, extension of exponents, radicals, first and second degree equations in one variable, solving equations by completing the square and quadratic formula, functions and graphs, and logarithms. (4 hours per week)
M 107 Introduction to Geometry
(A, N, R).......................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 106 or 2 years of high school algebra Designed to extend the mathematical skills developed in M 105 and M 106. The topics to be included are logic, geometry, and basic trigonometry. (4 hours per week)
M 109 Mini-Math Review (N)...............1 credit hour
Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in HE 109 or consent of instructor
A brief review of the basic skills and underlying concepts of fractions, decimals, and percents. Individual student needs are diagnosed through initial testing, and material is structured to meet these needs. (10 hours per quarter)
39


M 110 Mathematics for Business
(A, N, R).......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent FOR BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS
Consists of an integrated development of the concepts and computational skills of arithmetic that are commonly used in business. Topics covered are percentages, fractions, ratios and proportions, graphs, interest, banking, insurance and taxes. (3 hours per week)
M 111 College Algebra (A, N, R)..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: Successful completion of two years of high school algebra or M 106 or equivalent Sets, operations on sets, an axiomatic approach to the set of real numbers, absolute value, inequalities, algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions, solving first and second degree equations and equalities, solutions of systems of equations, sequences, permutations and combinations, and mathematical induction. (5 hours per week)
M 112 Trigonometry and Functions
(A, N, R).......................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 111 or equivalent Topics include trigonometric functions, identities, graphs, logarithms, solutions of triangles, and complex numbers. Functions as mappings, associations and ordered pairs. Theory of equations and further solutions to systems of equations. (5 hours per week)
M 113 Calculus I (A, N, R)...............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 112
Introduction to single variable calculus and analytic geometry. The concepts introduced will be motivated by geometric and physical interpretations. (5 hours per week)
M 117 Mathematics for
Electronics I (N) ..............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent The development and application of mathematical skills needed in electronics. Topics covered include: powers of ten, slide rule, evaluation and solution of equations, fractions, basic trigonometry, vectors and phasors, ratio, proportion, percent and logarithms. (5 hours per week)
M 118 Mathematics for
Electronics II (N)..............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 117
Further development of the mathematical skills needed in electronics. This course is a continuation of M 117. Topics covered include: review of percent, graphs, exponents and radicals, solving equations used in electronics, and logarithms. (3 hours per week)
M 120 Statistics for Business and
Industry (A, N, R)..............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 105 or equivalent Designed to provide an opportunity for the business student to develop critical and functional understandings of statistical data. Attention is given to the basic concepts of statistical mehodology and procedures which are used as media in the business world. The principles of statistical investigation, technique in data presentation, measures of central tendency, etc., are
studied in their practical business application. (3 hours per week)
M 121 Fundamentals of Modern
Mathematics (A, N, R) ...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 105 or equivalent NOT FOR SCIENCE OR MATHEMATICS MAJORS The M 121, 122, and 123 sequence is designed for students who desire a greater knowledge of some of the techniques and concepts of modern mathematics. Sets, Venn diagrams, truth tables, deductive proofs, number bases other than ten. (3 hours per week)
M 122 Fundamentals of Modern
Mathematics (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 121
NOT FOR SCIENCE OR MATHEMATICS MAJORS An introduction to groups and modulo arithmetic. Decimals, structure of arithmetic, properties of the natural numbers, integers, and rational numbers. (3 hours per week)
M 123 Fundamentals of Modern
Mathematics (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 122
NOT FOR SCIENCE OR MATHEMATICS MAJORS Properties of real numbers, inequalities, absolute value, exponents, and roots. Solutions of equations and inequalities of first and second degree in one or two variables. Introduction to finite probability, permutations and combination. (3 hours per week)
M 130 Finite Probability (N).............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 111 or the equivalent Counting, introduction to probability models, conditional probability, mean variance, standard deviation of a variable, histograms, binomial, hypergeometric and normal random variables. (3 hours per week)
M 140 Slide Rule and
Calculator (A, N, R).............1 credit hour
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent A course designed to introduce students to the slide rule and to the calculator as calculating devices. (10 hours of instruction)
M 150 Mathematics of Finance (N) . 3 credit hours
Introduction to the concepts and processes involved in problems relating to amortization, sinking funds, present worth, investments, depreciation, business equations, graphs, elementary statistics. (3 hours per week)
M 211 Calculus II (A, N, R)..............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 113
Extension and further development of concepts of single variable calculus and analytic geometry studied in M 113. Applications of differentiation and integration; techniques of integration. (5 hours per week)
M 212 Calculus III (A, N, R).............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 211
The completion of the traditional subject matter of single variable calculus not covered in M 113 and M 211. In this course and in M 213 an introduction to vector analysis, multivariable calculus, and solid analytic geometry will be presented. Also covered are three-dimensional vector space and infinite series. (5 hours per week)
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M 213 Calculus IV (A, N, R)...............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 212
Continuation and completion of topics listed under M 212. (5 hours per week)
M 220 Introduction to Linear
Algebra (A, N, R).................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 113
This course is designed to be an introduction to some basic concepts encountered in linear algebra. Matrices, matrix algebra, finite dimensional vector spaces, systems of linear equations, linear transformations. (4 hours per week)
M 230 Introduction to Statistics (N) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 130 and M 113 Continuous random variables and distributions, random sampling, central limit theorem, point estimation, interval estimation, and hypothesis testing. (3 hours per week)
PHYSICS
P 099 Physics Learning
Center (A, N, R)...................non-credit
This center is designed for the student desiring assistance with any difficulty or project relating to physics. The center is supervised by members of the physics faculty; students may avail themselves of this facility voluntarily or may be referred by an instructor. A schedule of the times the center is staffed will be posted each quarter.
P 100 Survey of Physical
Science (R) ....................3 credit hours
A core physical science course for health science students and others who need an understanding of the scientific method and the nature of the physical sciences. Emphasis is on observation, experimentation, and quantitative results drawn from chemistry and physics. (2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
P 101 Fundamental Physics (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or M 100 or equivalent
An introduction to some of the more important basic concepts of physics with applications to practical problems relating to various occupational programs. Primarily for occupational students and non-science majors. Recommended as a preparatory course for students with inadequate background in physics who wish to take P 111, 112, and 113. (3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week)
P 102 Physics for Instrumentation I
(A) ............................3 credit hours
A study of the basic principles of physics, emphasizing mechanics and heat, with particular emphasis on those principles embodied in the design of mechanical indicating and sensing devices.
P 105 Radiation Physics (N, R)..........4 credit hours
Provides the student with both specialized information on X-ray equipment and the theoretical background to
make it meaningful. Covered are: fundamentals of electrical and radiation physics and the basic principles underlying the operation of X-ray equipment and auxiliary devices. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
P 111 College Physics (A, N, R)..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 111 or consent of instructor A noncalculus study of kinematics, linear and rotational dynamics, conservation of energy and momentum, and topics in special relativity. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
P112 College Physics (A, N, R)...........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: P 111 or equivalent and M 112 or concurrent enrollment in M 112 A continuation of P 111. Topics include properties of matter, wave motion, thermal phenomena, optics, and electricity and magnetism. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
P113 College Physics (A, N, R)...........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: P 112
A continuation of P 112. Topics include atomic and nuclear structure, behavior of gases, liquids, and solids, oscillations, electromagnet waves, and matter waves. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
P 114 College Physics Calculus
Supplement (N) ..................2 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 113
Application of calculus to the physical concepts discussed in P 111 which must be taken concurrently. (2 hours per week)
P 115 College Physics Calculus
Supplement (N) ..................2 credit hours
Corequisite: M 211
Application of calculus to the physical concepts discussed in P 112 which must be taken concurrently. (2 hours per week)
P 116 College Physics Calculus
Supplement (N) ..................2 credit hours
Prerequisite: P 115 Corequisite: M 212
Application of calculus to the physical concepts discussed in P 111 and P 112. (2 hours per week)
P 131 General Physics I (R)..............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 113 or consent of instructor P 131, 132, and 133 constitute a three-quarter sequential investigation of classical physics at the calculus level. This course is designed for students majoring in the sciences, engineering, or in mathematics. Topics of interest the first quarter will be vectors, motion, forces and torques, linear and angular momentum, and energy. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
P132 General Physics II (R)..............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: P 132
Corequisite: M 211 or consent of instructor Classical thermodynamics through the concept of entropy, wave motion with application to the study of sound. Simple harmonic motion. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
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P133 General Physics III (R)............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: P 132
Corequisite: M 212 or consent of instructor Electric and magnetic fields and their properties, Maxwells equations, electromagnetic waves, and physical optics. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
P 204 Concepts of Modern Physics (R). 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: P 133 or consent of instructor Relativity, with emphasis on the special theory, Uncertainty Principle and the theory of measurement, quantum mechanics with applications in the areas of atomic, nuclear, and solid-state physics. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
SCIENCE
S1105 The Metric System:
A Mini Course (N)...............1 credit hour
An introduction to the metric system designed to allow a person to become proficient in the metric system of measurement and to convert between the English and the metric system. Metric units of length, volume, and mass will be covered as well as temperature measurements in Centigrade and Kelvin Systems. (1 hour per week)
51110 The Black Scientist
Contributes (A) 3 credit hours
Auraria Campus only See Consortium of Ethnic Studies, page 55.
51111 Science for the Earth
Citizen (N) ...................4 credit hours
The course will be centered on the ideas and consequences of physics with forays into geology, chemistry, astronomy, biology, and technology. Understanding in the following areas will be sought: the general nature of the universe and our location in it, the thin skin of the earth and life which evolved on it, nature of the senses through which man experiences the world; the technology science has fathered (computers, transportation, communication devices), problems that have developed (air pollution, nuclear power), what scientists do, and the incredible beauty of the EARTH. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of labortory per week)
51112 Science for the Earth
Citizen (N) ...................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SI 111 or consent of instructor Continuation of SI 111. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
51113 Science for the Earth
Citizen (N) 4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SI 112 or consent of instructor Continuation of SI 112. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
S1121 Environmental Science (R) 4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 105 or consent of instructor SI 121, 122, 123 is intended to be a survey of various aspects of our environment. The descriptions given for SI 121, 122, and 123 suggest the scope of the investigation. All areas of interest will be studied from a physical rather than a biological point of view. The
physics and some chemistry of the problem will be emphasized.
SI 121 deals with the basic physics, chemistry, and geology necessary for an adequate description of our atmosphere and earth. Air and water pollution problems will be investigated with emphasis on sources of pollution and methods of detection. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
51122 Environmental Science (R).......4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SI 121
The basic physics of heat, energy, and wave motion will be discussed. Thermal and sound pollutions will be studied. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
51123 Environmental Science (R).......4 credit hours
Prerequisite: S1121
The physical problems relating to population, mass transportation, and communications will be studied. Radiation and public safety will then be discussed. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
SI 131 Environment and the Urban
Institution (N) ...............3 credit hours
A three-quarter sequence intended to study the nature of environmental abuses and to attempt correction of such abuses caused by an urban institution. The community college campus will serve as a case study laboratory. Primary emphasis will be on corrective action which can be repeated in other urban institutions. Specific topics included the first quarter are energy use, transportation, and air pollution. Sequence may be taken for Social Science credit as GE 131, 132, 133 but cannot be counted in both divisions at the same time. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
51132 Environment and the Urban
Institution (N) ...............3 credit hours
Continuation of SI 131. Specific topics to be included are solid wastes and water pollution. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
51133 Environment and the Urban
Institution (N) ...............3 credit hours
Continuation of SI 131 and 132. Specific topics to be included are pesticides, herbicides, and aesthetics. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
INDEPENDENT STUDY
299 Independent Study (A, N, R)... 1 to 3 credit hours
Students majoring in one of the areas of the Division of Science and Mathematics may enroll in Independent Study (Course No. 299)
This enables the serious-minded student to engage in intensive library and/or laboratory research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified member of the Division faculty. To be eligible the student must have successfully completed one or more second year courses in the subject matter area in which he is majoring and give evidence that he can successfully engage in independent study. Independent Study carries 1-3 hours credit involving a minimum of 3-9 hours per week. Permission to enroll must be obtained from the instructor under whose direction the independent study will be carried out and from the Director of the Division.
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DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
CONTENTS
Anthropology A, N, R
Counseling A, N, R
Economics A, N, R
Geography A, N, R
History A, N, R
Philosophy A, N, R
Political Science A, N, R
Psychology A, N, R
Sociology A, N, R
Social Science A, N, R
Independent Study A, N, R
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DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Where a course description does not indicate the campus by the key A, N or R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
ANTHROPOLOGY
AN 111 Cultural Anthropology (A, N, R).3 credit hours
An introductory study of the nature of culture and cultural development in the paleolithic, neolithic and modern ages. (3 hours per week)
AN 112 Cultural Anthropology (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
A continuation of AN 111 with emphasis on the relationships among the cultural sub-systems of language, social organization, technology and ideology. (3 hours per week)
AN 113 Cultural Anthropology (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
A continuation of AN 112 with an anthropological approach to current topics of socio-cultural concern such as race, drugs, nationalism, violence and environment. (3 hours per week)
AN 201 Physical Anthropology (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
An introductory study of the fossil record, living animals and cultural factors as they relate to the evolution of man. (3 hours per week)
AN 202 Physical Anthropology (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
A continuation of AN 201 with emphasis on human variation, human biology and the mechanics of evolution. (3 hours per week)
AN 220 Introduction to
Archeology (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
An introductory study of methods, techniques and theories of archeological investigation. Selected culture areas are used as examples. (3 hours per week)
AN 230 Ethnography of the North
American Indian (A, N, R)....3 credit hours
A survey of the major Indian cultures of North America. Environmental and historical relationships are included. (3 hours per week)
COUNSELING
GC 100 Self-Exploration and
Understanding (A, N, R).....3 credit hours
This seminar is designed as a type of discussion group to help provide the student with the opportunity to gain self-understanding and acceptance. Good mental health for each student and how it may be achieved is emphasized. The importance of being sensitive to our own individual psychological needs and the needs of others is given considerable attention. Other topics of student concern may be discussed.
ECONOMICS
EC 107 Consumer Economics (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
A one-quarter survey of the American economic system from the point of view of the consumer, including such topics as personal and household finance, consumer credit, taxes, insurance, mortgages, social security, medicare and medicaid. (3 hours per week)
EC 108 Labor Relations (A, N, R)......3 credit hours
A study of the development, structure, and philosophy of American trade unionism including collective bargaining, the role of government, productivity and wages, unemployment and automation. (3 hours per week)
EC 109 Applied Economics (A, N, R). .3 credit hours
A one quarter study of those aspects of basic economics that relate to the role of the small businessman and the wage earner. Problem solving techniques which have proven successful in the market place will be explored and individualized. (3 hours per week)
EC 251 Economic History of
Europe (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
An evaluation of the rise of the modern European economic systems from the earliest days to the present. The study includes feudalism, mercantilism, capitalism, socialism, communism, and the rise of industrial Europe and the Common Market.
EC 252 Economic History of the
United States (A, N, R)....... 3 credit hours
A study of the rise of the modern economic system of the United States from colonial times to the present. The study includes the impact of agriculture, industry
and capitalism on the nation.
EC 161 Black Economics (A)...........4 credit hours
Auraria Campus only. See Consortium of Ethnic Studies, page 53.
EC 162 Black Community Economics
and Federal Taxes (A)........3 credit hours
Auraria Campus only. See Consortium of Ethnic Studies, page 53.
EC 170 Economic History of the
Southwest (A) ...............3 credit hours
Auraria Campus only. See Consortium of Ethnic Studies, page 53.
EC 211 Principles of Economics
(A, N, R)....................3 credit hours
The principles and theory of economics, emphasizing the American economic system but including interna-
44


tional economics and economic growth. Principles of money, banking, public finance, distribution of income, pricing and allocation of resources, volume of economic activity, etc. (3 hours per week)
EC 212 Principles of Economics
(A, N, R)........................3 credit hours
Continuation of EC 211. (3 hours per week)
EC 213 Principles of Economics
(A, N, R)........................3 credit hours
Continuation of EC 212. (3 hours per week)
GEOGRAPHY
GE111 Fundamentals of Geography
(A, N, R).....................5 credit hours
Systematically investigates the relationship between man and his physical environment. The course will include a study of earth form, earth-sun relationships, meteorology, climatology, mineralogy, landforms, soils, and vegetation. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
GE112 Fundamentals of Geography
(A, N, R).....................5 credit hours
Continuation of GE 111. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
GE113 Fundamentals of Geography
(A. N, R).....................5 credit hours
Continuation of GE 112. The third quarter will be an investigation of the human elements of geography. The basic principles of urban geography, economic geography, conservation, settlement patterns, and population problems will be examined. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
GE 200 World Regional Geography
(A, N, R).....................3 credit hours
A world perspective of the interrelationship between man and his environment.
GE 201 Continuation of GE 200
(A, N, R).....................3 credit hours
GE 210 Economic Geography (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
An examination of world economic activities in relation to physical and cultural environments.
GE 220 Human Ecology (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
Study of problems facing man in the conservation, use, and management of physical environments. Topics analyzed include the impact of urban development, technological advancement, and the conservation of resources.
GE 230 Urban Geography (A, N, R). . 3 credit hours
Introductory study of geographic factors related to the development of modern urban areas: population growth, land use, environmental deterioration, and future planning.
HISTORY
HS 107 Hang-Ups and Happenings in
American History (A, N, R) .. .3 credit hours
A one quarter topical survey of American History from its origin to 1971.
HS 110 History of Chicano People
(A, N, R).......................3 credit hours
Discussion of contemporary social, cultural, political and economic problems of the Chicano people and the study of these problems in relation to their historical roots.
HS 111 History of World Civilization
(A, N, R).......................4 credit hours
The first of a three quarter sequence covering the historical development of world civilizations from ancient times to the present. The cultures examined dur-inq the quarter include South Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia. Emphasis will be placed on India, China, Japan, and Southeast Asia.
HS112 History of World Civilization
(A, N, R).......................4 credit hours
No prerequisites. The cultures, examined during the quarter are Moslem, Slavic and European. Emphasis will be placed on the Middle East, East Central Europe, Soviet Union, and Western Europe.
HS 113 History of World
Civilization (A, N, R)..........4 credit hours
No prerequisite. The cultures examined during the quarter will include the Americas, Latin America, and Africa with emphasis on Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa.
HS 115 The Making of the Modern
World (A, N, R).................3 credit hours
No prerequisite. A series of studies on the nations of today. A study of modern Europe with emphasis on The Soviet Union, Germany, France and England.
HS 116 The Making of the Modern
World (A, N, R).................3 credit hours
No prerequisite. A study of the rise of modern Africa and Latin America from recent colonial times.
HS117 The Making of the Modern
World (A, N, R).................3 credit hours
No prerequisite. A study of modernization of Asia and Latin America and its impact on the modern world.
HS 120 History of the Black
People (A, N, R)................3 credit hours
The historical development of the Black people of the world. Tracing this development from the early African civilizations through the American slave systems to the modern day Black cultures of the U.S.
HS 121 History of the Indians of
the West (A, N, R)..............3 credit hours
A study of the Indians west of the Mississippi River from prehistoric times to the present.
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HS 125 Black Civilization
Africa (A, N, R)...............3 credit hours
Culture and development of the area of Africa from earliest times to the present. Includes tribes, slavery, colonization and the new independent nations.
HS126 Black Civilization
Americas to 1865 (A, N, R) .. 3 credit hours
The culture and development of Black people in the Americas through the American Civil War. This includes black people in Brazil, Surinam, the Caribbean, and the United States.
HS 127 Black Civilization
Americas Since 1865 (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
Continuation of HS 126 with emphasis on culture and development following the American Civil War.
HS130 History of the Southwest
United States (A, N, R)........3 credit hours
The cultural and historical development of what is now the Southwestern United States.
HS 145 Chicano Civilization
Spain (A, N, R)................3 credit hours
The development of culture and the history of Spain from Roman times to the present including a brief study of efforts in colonization. This course covers the origin and power of the Catholic Church, the government, and the social structure of Spain.
HS 146 Chicano Civilization
Early Colonies (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
The expansion of Spanish power into the New World and Asia from the 15th century to 1800. This covers the changes in culture, in society brought about by colonization. It traces the expansion of the power of Spain to its peak.
HS 147 Chicano Civilization
Independence to Present
(A, N, R)......................3 credit hours
The fall of the Spanish Empire, the rise of the new nations and the problems that they face today. This covers North and South America and Asia in relation to Spanish heritage and Modern Society.
HS 150 Contemporary World History
(A, N, R)......................3 credit hours
The culture and history of modern man since 1900 with critical emphasis on international problems of war, world government, conflicting economic and political ideologist (fascism, communism, socialism) and the emergence of nationalism.
HS211 The History of the United
States to 1789 (A, N, R)......3 credit hours
The Colonial and Revolutionary period of American History to 1789.
HS212 History of the United States
1789 to 1877 (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
Post Revolutionary period to the Civil War Reconstruction, 1789-1877.
HS213 History of the United States
(A, N, R).......................3 credit hours
The New Nation, 1877 to the present.
HS 220 Colorado History (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
The historical development of Colorado with emphasis on the cultural, political and economic; from pre-historic Indians to modern missile factories.
HS 225 The Black People and the
American Frontier (A, N, R) .3 credit hours
This course examines the role of Black people in the winning of the West. It covers colonial days, black settlers, homesteaders, cowboys, gunfighters, and soldiers in the Indian Wars.
HS 226 The Urban History of the
Black People (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
This course examines the Black city dweller in relation to other people including the Irish, Spanish, Italian, etc. This provides the basis for an examination of the Black in the city through demographic and social comparisons with other minority groups past and present.
HS 246 A History of Mexico (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
The historical and cultural development of Mexico from pre-history to the present. This includes an examination of present day politics and society of Mexico.
HS 250 The History of Democratic
Ideas (A, N, R)................3 credit hours
A study of individual and social freedom culminating in Americas Jeffersonian ideals, including utopian and revolutionary ideas and experiments.
HS 251 The History of Cities (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
A study of cities in the United States in their beginning and developmental stages since the Colonial period.
HS 261 Cultural History of China
(A, N, R)......................3 credit hours
This course will examine Chinese Civilization and culture from prehistoric times to the present. Special emphasis will be given to Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism and Communist society today.
HS 262 Cultural History of China II
(A, R) ........................3 credit hours
(1644 to the present)
Auraria Campus only. See Consortium of Ethnic
Studies, page 54.
HS 265 Cultural History of Japan
(A, N, R)......................3 credit hours
The course will briefly survey Japanese traditional society and culture. Emphasis will be placed on recent historical developments from theTokugawa Shogunate and the Mejii Reforms to the present. Japanese national character, religion (particularly Zen) and the arts will be examined.
HS 267 Cultural History of India
(A, N, R)......................3 credit hours
This course will examine the roots of Indian Civilization as well as the intense impact major invasions had on India, from the growth of Hinduism to the development of Western Democracy. The influence India has had on other cultures will also be studied.
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HS 269 Cultural History of Southeast
Asia (A) ......................3 credit hours
Auraria Campus only. See Consortium of Ethnic Studies page 54,
HS 271 History of England
Early Years (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
The culture and development of England to Henry VII.
HS 272 History of England
Early Years (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
England from Henry VII to Anne, 1485-1713.
HS 273 History of England
Modern Times (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
The expansion and decline of Great Britain from Anne to the present time, 1713-1973.
PHILOSOPHY
PH 100 Constructing a Life Philosophy
(A, N, R)......................3 credit hours
Constructing a clearer personal life philosophy by considering alternatives and achieving a better understanding of what it means to live the examined life.
PH 111 Introduction to Philosophy
(A, N, R)......................3 credit hours
A study of philosophy and its usefulness, of methods of inquiry, man and his place in the world, and of the different schools of philosophy. (3 hours per week)
PH 112 Introduction to Philosophy
(A, N, R) .....................3 credit hours
(Continuation of PH 111) A study of the realm of values and the life worth living, ethics, oriental philosophies, religions, and social issues. (3 hours per week)
PH 120 The Faiths by Which Men
Live (A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Great religions of the Far East such as Hinduism, Bud-dism, Confucionism, Taoism, etc. Attention will be given to the beliefs and convictions men use as they seek to interpret experience and find meaning and direction in life, and to the role of religion in the development of culture.
PH 121 The Faiths by Which Men
Live (A, N, R).................3 credit hours
A continuation of PH 120 with attention given to the religions identified with the Middle East and Western Civilization such as Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Some of the modern challenges to religion such as humanism, Marxism, secularism will be explored as we consider recent developments in the field of religion.
PH 220 Ethics: Learning to Cope
With Life (A, N, R) ...........3 credit hours
Utilizing the resources of philosophy and ethics to achieve greater competence in living creatively with the problems and possibilities of the contemporary world. (3 hours per week)
PH 230 Logic (A, N, R) ..................3 credit hours
A study of the principles and practices of reflective thinking and problem solving, of the proposition and
syllogism, of evidence and evaluation, and the various approaches to the scientific method of reasoning processes. The aim is the achievement of more precise and creative thinking. (3 hours per week)
POLITICAL SCIENCE
PS 111 Introduction to Political
Science (A, N, R) .............3 credit hours
Approaches to the study of politics: man as political animal; the nature and use of power; the role of ideology.
PS 112 Introduction to Political
Science (A, N, R) .............3 credit hours
Approaches to the study of politics: the relationship between political behavior and governmental structures.
PS 113 American National
Government (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Present day American government interpreted in the light of constitutional and other influences; emphasis on the role of institutions, individuals, and groups in forming American political behavior.
PS 114 American State and Local
Government (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Governmental structure and political behavior in states and municipalities; urban problems and the role of government in their solution.
PS 161 Political Leadership (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
A study of group process, parliamentary procedure, recruiting, campaigning, publicity, legislation and administration through classroom and laboratory experience.
PS 162 Practical Politics (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Introduction to political action at the local, state and/or national level.
PS 201 Comparative Politics (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Introductory survey and analysis of political behavior and institutions in the 20th century: problems of the over developed world, including Europe, the Soviet Union, Japan, and the United States.
PS 202 Comparative Politics (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Introductory survey and analysis of political behavior and institutions in the 20th century: problems of the "under-developed world, including Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
PS 203 International Relations
(A, N, R) 3 credit hours
The international political system and the effects of geography, history, culture, ideology, domestic politics, foreign policies, diplomacy, international law, and international organizations upon it.
PS 241 Political Woman (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Emphasis on the social psychological and economic status of women in the contemporary United States: the role of politics in supporting and attacking that status; the womens movement in the 19th century and today.
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PS 251 Chicano Political Experience
(A, N, R) .....................3 credit hours
A critical evaluation of leading issues affecting Chi-canos in American society. Includes a survey of social, cultural, and political organizations within the community.
PS 261 Black Political
Thought (A, N, R) .............4 credit hours
Carries the development of black political thought from Frederick Douglass to the present, making the student aware of the forces which direct the black man in his struggle to achieve personal and community goals.
PS 262 Black Political
Experience (A, N, R) ..........4 credit hours
A survey of the role played (or not played) by the Black man in the development of American political institutions. An analysis of the impact of these institutions upon Black life in America. Specific attention given to the Presidency, Congress, and the Supreme Court in an attempt to surface the Black perspective on these bodies.
PSYCHOLOGY
PY 100 Human Relations in Business
and Industry (A, N, R) ........3 credit hours
Primarily focuses on the personal problems encountered by employees in a business relationship with fellow employees and with the employer. Deals with the effect of these problems on others and various methods of handling them or minimizing their effect.
PY 107 Psychology of Personal
Development (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
The study of the individual and the social factors which contribute to the development of both healthy and unhealthy personalities.
PY 111 General Psychology (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
A broad overview of the general field and fundamental principles of psychology. Will study areas of perception, motivation, emotion, learning maturation, social, individual differences, etc.
PY 112 General Psychology (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Continuation of PY 111.
PY 113 General Psychology (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
Continuation of PY 112.
PY 123 Child Guidance
Techniques (A, N, R) .........3 credit hours
A study of acceptable methods and techniques of working with children.
PY 200 Psychology of the
Deaf (A, N, R) ...............3 credit hours
This course is intended to provide an overview of the field, with particular emphasis on communications, testing measurement of the hearing-impaired, research in the field of deafness, and special methods used in the education of deaf children with psychological ramifications.
PY 210 Social Psychology (A, N, R).... 3 credit hours
Social factors which influence the behavior of the individual as he interacts with others. Consideration of such problems as leadership fashions, prejudice, public opinion and social attitudes.
PY 220 Educational Psychology
(A, N, R).....................3 credit hours
This is a study of psychology as applied to the teacher-learner situation whh emphasis on the principles of motivation learning, intelligence, heredity, growth, environment and individual differences.
PY 221 Developmental Psychology (Child
Growth & Devel.) (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Study of early childhood including genetic background, prenatal life, motor-sensory development and the preschool period. Covers all aspects of growth and development: physical, emotional, social, and intellectual.
PY 222 Developmental Psychology (Child
Growth and Devel.) (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Continuation of PY 221.
PY 223 Developmental Psychology (Adolescence, adulthood, and old age)
(A, N, R) ....................3 credit hours
Developmental psychology with emphasis on adolescence, adulthood, and old age.
PY 230 Abnormal Psychology (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Causes, description and theories of severe personality and behavior disorders.
PY 240 Personality (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Psychological theories which deal with the development, structure, and functioning of the normal personality.
PY 250 Psychology of Prejudice
(A, N, R).....................3 credit hours
A course designed to assist students so that they understand in depth the basic causes of prejudice and the etiology of prejudicial behavior. Experiences are provided for greater understanding of people and processes for abating or ameliorating the degree of prejudice by the individual,
PY 255 Black Psychology (A, N, R) . 3 credit hours
This course is designed to enable the student to identify the psychological factors of racism that influence the development of the Black personality.
PY 260 Chicano Psychology (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
This course is designed to develop an understanding from a psychological viewpoint of the impact of the Chicano experience on the Chicano personality.
48


PY 270 Industrial Psychology (A, N, R) .3 credit hours
Presents psychological material relevant to the industrial setting including employee selection, training, testing, evaluation, assumptions of management about human motivation, job satisfactions, work efficiency, fatigue and human engineering.
SOCIOLOGY
SO 107 Sociology of Personal
Development (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
Basic principles of sociology investigating behavior, cultural institutions, interaction, and social change. Tailored to meet the needs and concerns of those students seeking to acquire familiarity with the social world in which they live (3 hours per week)
SO 108 Social Problems (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
Issues confronting the individual, groups and society are explored. Ranging from alienation to xenophobia, the issues will be examined for their causes, their possible inter-relationships, and their consequences upon various sectors of society. Particular emphasis will be given to issues of direct concern to the student. (3 hours per week)
SO 111 Introduction to Sociology
(A, N, R) .....................3 credit hours
Basic principles of sociology are introduced: investigating social behavior, man culture, institutions, social interaction and social change. Theoretical principles are introduced and applied to field projects where students seek to acquire familiarity with the community as a laboratory. (3 hours per week)
SO 112 Introduction to Sociology
(A, N, R) .....................3 credit hours
The issues, concepts and understandings treated in SO 111 are developed by treating major issues and concerns through the writings of major sociologists. Theoretical principles dealing with power, interaction, deviance, etc. are explored in depth. (3 hours per week)
SO 113 Introduction to Sociology
(A, N, R) .....................3 credit hours
Methods and techniques of investigating and for developing understanding of society are given primary focus here. The student spends sizable periods outside of the classroom undertaking methods of research appropriate to different situations depending on the instructors orientation. (3 hours per week)
SO 220 Marriage and the Family
(A, N, R) .....................3 credit hours
Designed for all students, the purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of the social role of marriage and family living, and to promote stable marital relations. Special emphasis is placed on courtship and preparation for marriage, conflict situations and adjustments between husband and wife, parent-child relationships, the family in the community and other factors related to successful family life. (3 hours per week)
SO 230 Juvenile Delinquency
(A, N, R) .....................3 credit hours
Sociological and cultural aspects of late childhood and adolescence. Problems of the individual in his social environment and group forces which lead to maladjustment. Sociological principles for working with youth from the viewpoint of parent, teacher, police, social
worker and youth organization leader. (3 hours per week)
SO 135 Sociology of Medical Care
(A, N, R) ......................3 credit hours
A systematic attempt to relate sociological concepts to the fields of physical health and illness. An overview of socio-cultural aspects of the institution we know as medicine. Includes the community and medical care, medical education, the hospital as a social institution, and concepts of medical practice.
SO 140 Field Work in Barrio Studies
(A, N, R) ......................3 credit hours
Field study observation of selected barrios, institutions, and agencies will be conducted under supervision, after some preparatory instruction to acquaint the student with the barrio.
SO 151 The Chicano and the Schools
(A, N, R) ......................3 credit hours
Problems of Chicano students adapting to the schools and the teachers response to them. Includes observation of school facilities and classroom techniques.
SO 152 Urbanization and the Chicano
(A, N, R) ......................3 credit hours
Study of rural folk values of the Chicano and their erosion in the urban setting. Includes an analysis of changing values within the Chicano community.
SO 200 Urban Sociology (A, N, R) .3 credit hours
City and metropolitan growth are examined in terms of the human factors and social issues involved. Social structures, forms and processes of interaction, residential and institutional patternings, are looked at as these relate to urban planning, community change, transitional neighborhoods and urban tensions. (3 hours per week)
SO 210 Social Planning in the Urban
Setting (A, N, R)...............3 credit hours
Urban planning centering on human factors and social issues. The emphasis will be on projected city life, including the transitional neighborhood and urban tension. 3 hours per week)
SO 211 Current Social Issues
(A, N, R) ......................3 credit hours
Introductory consideration of some major current social issues designed to improve the student's ability to understand and systematically investigate concerns vital to everyday life. Issues to be treated will include the major Ps of poverty, power, pollution, and population; conflict, intergroup relations, social change and alienation. (3 hours per week)
SO 212 Current Social Issues (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Increased emphasis is given here to the interrelationship of issues. The issues to be dealt with are primarily of a national and international flavor. (3 hours per week)
SO 213 Field Practicum: Community
Studies (A, N, R) ..............3 credit hours
Aimed at the service professions (social work, etc.) as well as those adults interested in becoming involved in ongoing social change activities, the course seeks through guided field experiences to aid the student in developing the perspectives, skills and methods vital to activating and carrying through community organ-
49


ization, community development, and field study programs.
SO 220 Minority Groups in American
Society (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
The processes and consequences of labeling whereby certain groups come to be defined as minorities and treated in particular ways are studied. (3 hours per week)
SO 223 Youth in Society (A, N, R)......3 credit hours
Presentation of issues and patterns of behavior confronting youth in society: drugs, crime, formation of gangs, relations with adults, education, political involvement, alienation, the creation of counter-cultures, racial tensions and cultural factors affecting individual and group action. The impact of the mass media, advertising, and the arts upon youth groups and the impact of youth groups upon these areas are examined. The role of the above-30 and the elderly in a youth-oriented society are explored. (3 hours per week)
SO 225 Racism and American
Institutions (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
This course is designed to analyze American institutions in relationship to racism. The historical development of racism and what it has done to influence the American way of life will be the foundation of this class.
SO 230 Hispano Culture (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Designed for all students. The purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of the cultural attainments and activities of the Hispanic Culture. The emphasis will be on the arts, music, religious beliefs, traditions, language, and how all these relate to contemporary cultural patterns.
SO 240 Sociology of the Black
Community (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Fundamental concepts and theories of sociology with comparative emphasis on the Black man, his culture, and contributions to American culture.
SO 241 Sociology of the Chicano
Community (A, N, R) ..........3 credit hours
Fundamental concepts and theories of sociology with comparative emphasis on the Chicano and his culture in America.
SOCIAL SCIENCE
SS 101 Field Experience in Community
Organizations I (A, N, R).....3 credit hours
Students enrolled in this course will perform human service work in community organizations, programs, and agencies of their choice subject to the approval of the instructor. By doing so, they will gain job experience, community service opportunity, and have an avenue to test career interests in a reality setting. Field experience sites will be developed through mutual agreement of the student, the community organization, and supervising instructor. (1 hour of lecture and 4-6 hours of field experience per week)
SS 102 Field Experience in Community
Organizations II (A, N, R)....3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Field Experience in Community Organizations I
Continuation of Field Experience. (1 hour of lecture and 4-6 hours of field experience per week)
SS 103 Field Experience in Human
Services (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Field Experience I, II, or acceptable field work.
An evaluation of community needs and resources based on the students previous field experiences and through direct readings. The emphasis will be toward change methodology and related skills and techniques. (3 hours per week)
SS 211 The Social and Political Environment
of the 20th Century (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
An interdisciplinary approach to study of the problems confronting the twentieth-century American. Consideration will be given to such issues as urbanization, alienation, war, technological change, violence and protest movements, values, and the quest for personal identity and significance. (3 hours per week)
SS 212 The Social and Political Environment
of the 20th Century (A, N, R) .3 credit hours
Continuation of SS 211. (3 hours per week)
SS 213 The Social and Political Environment
of the 20th Century (A, N, R).. .3 credit hours
Continuation of SS 212. (3 hours per week)
SS 260 Research Methods in the
Social Sciences (A, N, R).....3 credit hours
An interdisciplinary course designed to aid the student develop the skills, methods and techniques of research required for systematically exploring the social-psychological world in which he lives. An introduction to statistical methods including validity, reliability, correlation and other forms of analysis is also undertaken.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
299 Independent Study (A, N, R) .1 to 3 credit hours
Independent Study (Course No. 299) is available in each of the major areas within the Division of Social Sciences (i.e. history, political science, sociology, etc.). The course provides opportunity for the serious-minded student to engage in intensive study and research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Prerequisite for enrollment is permission of the Director of the Division of Social Sciences and the assigned instructor. The number of quarter hours of credit (1-3) will be determined by the Division Director.
50


CONSORTIUM OF ETHNIC STUDIES
AURARIA CAMPUS ONLY
(THE COURSES LISTED UNDER THE CONSORTIUM OF ETHNIC STUDIES COUNT FOR CREDIT TOWARD THE ASSOCIATE ARTS DEGREE.)
CONTENTS
Anthropology A
Biology A
Chinese
A
Economics
A
History
A
Humanities
A
Literature
A, N, R
Music
A
Political Science
A
Psychology A
Science
A
Sociology 1 A
Spanish A, N, R
51


CONSORTIUM OF ETHNIC STUDIES
AURARIA CAMPUS ONLY
ANTHROPOLOGY
AN 201 Physical Anthropology (A) ... 3 credit hours
An introductory study of the fossil record, living animals and cultural factors as they relate to the evolution of man. (3 hours per week)
AN 202 Physical Anthropology (A) 3 credit hours
A continuation of AN 201 with emphasis on human variation, human biology and the mechanics of evolution. (3 hours per week)
AN 230 Ethnography of the North
American Indian (A).........3 credit hours
A survey of the major Indian cultures of North America. Environmental and historical relationships are included. (3 hours per week)
ART
AR 181 Ethnic Studies in Art, The
American Southwest (A).......3 credit hours
Special Studies of the Art of the American Southwest from pre-Colombian civilizations to present times as it relates to the Chicano.
AR 182 Ethnic Studies in Art, The Art of
Africa and Black Americans (A). 3 credit hours
Special Study of the Art of Africa from ancient to present times as it relates to contemporary Black American Artists.
AR 183 Ethnic Studies in Art, The Art of the Orient and the
American Oriental (A) .......3 credit hours
Special Studies of Oriental Art from Ancient to present times as it relates to contemporary American Oriental Artists.
AR 184 Ethnic Studies in Art, The
American Indians (A).........3 credit hours
Special Studies of the Art of the American Indian from ancient to present times as it relates to contemporary American Indian Artists.
BIOLOGY
B 150 Biology of the Human Races (A) 3 credit hours
The biological aspects of race formation will be considered, including the genetic foundations, the range of human variability and race mixtures, and the usefulness of biological factors in understanding racial problems. (3 hours of lecture per week, no laboratory)
CHINESE
CH 100 Basic Applied Chinese (A)... .2 credit hours
Course designed for those who wish to learn basic con-
versational patterns for enjoyment and travel or for simple business needs. Language background helpful but not essential. (2 hours per week, plus laboratory)
CH 111 First Year Chinese...............5 credit hours
Designed to develop basic principles of grammar and syntax; reading and writing of simple Chinese, correct pronunciation and rudimentary conversation.
CH112 First Year Chinese (A).............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 111
CH113 First Year Chinese (A).............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 112
Continuation and Expansion of CH 112 and additional reading materials.
CH211 Intermediate Chinese (A)............3 credit hours
This course will (1) review and reinforce skills and knowledge gained in first year Chinese, (2) develop further skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing, (3) develop sense of linguistic structure and increase vocabulary and (4) provide readings in plays, short stories and poems.
CH212 Intermediate Chinese (A)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 211 Continuation and Expansion of CH 211.
CH 213 Intermediate Chinese (A)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 212
Continuation and Expansion of CH 212.
CH 214 Conversation and Composition
Chinese (A) ..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 213 or demonstration of sufficient language skills.
Conversation and Composition Chinese is designed to increase vocabulary and develop oral and written proficiency at the intermediate level through discussions, reports, and situation dialogues.
CH 215 Conversation and Composition
Chinese (A) ..................3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of CH 214.
CH 216 Conversation and Composition
Chinese (A) ...................3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of CH 215.
CH 241 Contemporary Chinese
Short Stories (A) ............3 credit hours
Selected examples of most representative authors.
CH 242 Contemporary Chinese
Theatre (A) ...................3 credit hours
Selected plays representative of the Chinese stage today.
CH 243 Contemporary Chinese
Novel (A) .....................3 credit hours
52


ECONOMICS
EC 107 Consumer Economics (A)........3 credit hours
A one-quarter survey of the American economic system from the point of view of the consumer, including such topics as personal and household finance, consumer credit, taxes, insurance, mortgages, social security, medicare and medicaid. (3 hours per week)
EC 161 Black Economics (A)...........4 credit hours
Introduction to the concepts of labor, land, capital, ownership and control of economic institutions as they have affected and continue to affect the lives of Black and poor Americans. The course will span the concepts of slavery to the idea of Black Power.
EC 162 Black Community Economics
and Federal Taxes (A)........3 credit hours
Individual economic stability and development are essential for the little man in the community before he can make any meaningful attempt to utilize his educational skills. This course is designed to give some basic understanding of four areas of taxes and credit.
EC 170 Economic History of the
Southwest (A) ...............3 credit hours
Introduction to the concepts of labor, land, capital, ownership and control of economic institutions as they have affected and continue to affect the lives of the Chicano and poor Americans.
HISTORY
HS 107 Hang-ups and Happenings in
American History (A) 3 credit hours
A one-quarter inquiry into problems and events in American history.
HS 110 History of Chicano People (A). 3 credit hours
Discussion of contemporary social, cultural, political and economic problems of the Chicano people and the study of these problems in relation to their historical roots.
HS 120 History of the Black
People (A) ....................3 credit hours
The historical development of the Black peoples of the world. Tracing this development from the early African civilization through the American slave systems to the modern day Black cultures of the U.S.
HS121 History of the Indians
of the West (A)................3 credit hours
A study of the Indians west of the Mississippi River from prehistoric times to the present.
HS125 Black Civilization Africa (A) 3 credit hours
Culture and development of the area of Africa from earliest times to the present. Includes tribes, slavery, colonialism and the new independent nations.
HS 126 Black Civilization
Americas to 1865 (A)...........3 credit hours
The culture and the development of the Black people in the Americas through the American Civil War. This
includes Black people in Brazil, Surinam, the Caribbean, and the United States.
HS 127 Black Civilization
Americas Since 1865 (A)........3 credit hours
The culture and development of the Black people in the Americas following the American Civil War. This includes the Black nations and people in South and Central America, the Indies and the U.S.
HS 130 History of the Southwest
United States (A)..............3 credit hours
The cultural and historical development of what is now the Southwestern United States.
HS 145 Chicano Civilization
Spain (A) .....................3 credit hours
The development of culture and the history of Spain from Roman times to the present including a brief study of efforts and colonization, and the colonies that Spain owns today. This course covers the origin and power of the Catholic Church, the government, and the social structure of Spain.
HS 146 Chicano Civilization
Early Colonies (A) ............3 credit hours
The expansion of Spanish power into the New World and Asia from the 15th Century to 1800. This covers the changes in culture, as society brought about, by colonization. It traces the expansion of the power of Spain to its peak.
HS 147 Chicano Civilization
Independence to Present (A) 3 credit hours
The fall of the Spanish Empire, the rise of the new nations and the problems that they face today. This covers North and South America and Asia in relation to Spanish heritage and modern Society.
HS 150 Contemporary World
History (A) ...................3 credit hours
The culture and history of modern man since 1900. A study of the important events in the world including the wars, peace, the depression, and the cold war. Maior historical developments in world history during the 20th Century, with critical emphasis on international problems of war, world government, conflicting economic and political ideologies (fascism, communism, socialism) and the emergence of nationalism.
HS 225 The Black People and the
Black People (A) 3 credit hours
This course examines the role of the Black people and the winning of the West. It covers colonial days, Black settlers, homesteaders, cowboys, gunfighters, and soldiers in the Indian Wars.
HS 226 The Urban History of the
Black People (A)...............3 credit hours
This course examines the black city dweller in relation to other people including the Irish, Spanish, Italian, etc. This provides the basis for an examination of the Blacks in the city through demographic and social comparisons with other minority groups at different times.
HS 261 Cultural History of China (A) 3 credit hours
This course will examine Chinese Civilization and culture from pre-historic times to the present. Special
53


emphasis will be given to Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism and Community society today.
HS 262 Cultural History of China II
(1644 to the present) (A)........3 credit hours
The course will deal with modem Chinese history, beginning with a brief survey of Chinese society from the 17th to the 19th century when the convergence of Chinese and Western history ended Chinese seclusion. More emphasis will be placed on examining the interplay of foreign and domestic elements which gave rise to revolutionary changes in every aspect of Chinese society up to the present.
HS 265 Cultural History of Japan (A). .3 credit hours
The course will briefly survey Japanese traditional society and culture. More emphasis will be placed on more recent historical developments from the Toku-gawa Shogunate and the Meiji Reforms to the present. Japanese national character, religion (particularly Zen) and the arts will be examined.
HS 267 Cultural History of India (A) 3 credit hours
This course will examine the roots of Indian civilization as well as the intense impact major invasions had on India, from the growth of Hinduism to the development of Western democracy. The influence India has had on other cultures will also be studied.
HS 269 Cultural History of
Southeast Asia (A)...............3 credit hours
Special emphasis on anthropologic-political structure. This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to explore the complex and diverse cultures of southeast Asia and its variety of racial and linguistic groups. The cross cultural influence of India and China as well as the Western World will be carefully examined.
HUMANITIES
HU 145 Chicano Culture (A)............3 credit hours
Story of the Chicano from pre-Colombian to contemporary times. Includes the study of the social, cultural, political and economic heritage of the Chicano and his contributions to American society.
HU 147 Folklore of Mexico and
the Southwest (A)............3 credit hours
HU 241 Comparative Culture-
Spanish (A, N) ..............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 213
Study of Spain from the Middle Ages to the 19th Century through the media of slides, records, art books, tapes, films and lectures. (3 hours per week)
HU 242 Comparative Culture-
Spanish (A, N) ..............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 213
A continued study of Spain, stressing the 19th and 20th Centuries. Early Latin-American development will be investigated. This course will stress the multi-media approach. (3 hours per week)
HU 243 Comparative Culture-
Spanish (A, N) ................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 213
A continued study with emphasis on Latin-American independence and the course of development to the present time. Multi-media approach will be used. (3 hours per week)
LITERATURE
L1125 The Black Writer in America (A) .4 credit hours
A beginning course in the study of Black literature, which includes the methods of evaluation and analysis essential for understanding and appreciating the literary contributions of the Black Writer in America.
L1144 Afro-American Literature (A, R) .3 credit hours
Study of the contribution of Afro-American writers to American literature and civilization.
L1147 Contemporary Chinese Literature
in Translation (A)............3 credit hours
A contemporary look at the Southwest through the works of its authors. Attention to the writings of the present and how it underlines the Chicanos search for an identity.
LI 220 The Rhetoric of Social
Protest (A) ....................3 credit hours
An analytical and critical study of the rhetoric of social protest in America with special emphasis on racial agitation.
LI 231 Ethnic Literature in America
(A, N, R).....................3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of Black writers in America. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, comparison and genre.
LI 232 Ethnic Literature in America
(A, N, R) ......................3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of Chicano writers In America. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, comparison and genre.
LI 233 Ethnic Literature in America
(A, N, R).....................3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of Oriental writers in America. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, comparison and genre.
LI 234 Ethnic Literature in America
(A, N, R) ......................3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of the American Indian. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations and genre.
MUSIC
MU 120 Music of Mexico and the
Southwest (A) .............3 credit hours
An examination of selected works in Mexican music from pre-Colombian time to present, concentrating on regional works and on Twentieth Century composers and their relationship to Chicano society.
54


POLITICAL SCIENCE
PS 251 Chicano Political
Experience (A) ................3 credit hours
A critical evaluation of leading issues affecting Chi-canos in American society. Includes a survey of social, cultural and political organizations within the community.
PS 261 Black Political Thought (A) 4 credit hours
Carries the development of Black political thought from Frederick Douglass to the present, making the student aware of the forces which direct the Black man in his struggle to achieve personal and community goals.
PS 262 Black Political Experience (A). 4 credit hours
A survey of the role played (or not played) by the Black man in the development of American political institutions. An analysis of the impact of these institutions upon Black life in America. Specific attention given to the Presidency, Congress, and the Supreme Court in an attempt to surface the Black perspective on these bodies.
PSYCHOLOGY
PY 250 Psychology of Prejudice (A). . 3 credit hours
A course designed to assist students so that they understand in depth the basic causes of prejudice and the etiology of prejudicial behavior. Experiences are provided for greater understanding of people and processes for abating or ameliorating the degree of prejudice by the individual.
PY 255 Black Psychology (A)...........3 credit hours
This course is designed to enable the student to identify the psychological factors of racism that influence the development of the Black personality.
PY 260 Chicano Psychology (A).........3 credit hours
This course is designed to develop an understanding from a psychological viewpoint of the impact of the Chicano situation on the Chicano personality.
SCIENCE
S1110 Black Men in Science (A) 3 credit hours
A survey of the contribution of the Black man to the scientific world, with in-depth studies of some of the major figures. (3 lectures per week, no laboratory)
SOCIOLOGY
SO 140 Field Work in Barrio
Studies (A)..................3 credit hours
Field study observation of selected barrios, institutions, and agencies to be conducted under supervision and after preparatory instruction to acguaint students with the barrio.
SO 151 The Chicano and the
Schools (A) .................3 credit hours
Problems of Chicano students adapting to the schools and the teachers response to them. Includes observation of school facilities and classroom technigues.
SO 152 Urbanization and the
Chicano (A) ..................3 credit hours
Study of rural folk values of the Chicano and their erosion in the urban setting. Includes an analysis of the changing values within the Chicano community.
SO 220 Minority Groups in American
Society (A) ..................3 credit hours
The processes and conseguences of labeling whereby certain groups come to be defined as minorities and treated in particular ways are studied. Various groups including homosexuals, prostitutes, dance musicians, race and ethnic minorities are treated. (3 hours per week)
SO 225 Racism and American
Institutions (A) .............3 credit hours
This course is designed to analyze American institutions in relationship to racism. The historical development of racism and what it has done to influence the American way of life will be the foundation of this class.
SO 230 Hispano Culture (A).............3 credit hours
Designed for all students. The purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of the cultural attainments and activities of the Hispanic Culture. The emphasis will be on the arts, music, religious beliefs, traditions, language, and how all these relate to contemporary cultural patterns.
SO 240 Sociology of the Black
Community (A) ................3 credit hours
Fundamental concepts and theories of sociology with comparative emphasis on the Black man, his culture, and contributions to American culture.
SO 241 Sociology of the Chicano
Community (A) ................3 credit hours
Fundamental concepts and theories of sociology with comparative emphasis on the Chicano and his culture in America.
SPANISH
SP 100 Basic Applied Spanish (R) 2 credit hours
For those who wish to learn basic conversational Spanish for enjoyment or travel or for simple business needs.
SP 111 First Year Spanish (A, N, R) 5 credit hours
Designed to develop basic principles of grammar and syntax; reading and writing of simple Spanish, correct pronunciation and rudimentary conversation.
SP 112 First Year Spanish (A, N, R).... 5 credit hours
Prereguisite: SP 111 Continuation and Expansion of SP 111.
SP 113 First Year Spanish (A, N, R).... 5 credit hours
Prereguisite: SP 112
Continuation and Expansion of SP 112 and additional reading materials.
SP 121 Spanish to the Chicano (A).... 5 credit hours
Designed for the bi-vocal Chicano student. Instruction takes into consideration the interference of English in
55


the development of the Spanish language skills for the student.
SP 122 Spanish to the Chicano (A).... 5 credit hours
Continuation of SP 121.
SP 123 Spanish to the Chicano (A).... 5 credit hours
Continuation of SP 122.
SP211 Intermediate Spanish (A, N, R) .3 credit hours
This course will (1) review and reinforce skills and knowledge gained in first year Spanish, (2) develop further skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, (3) develop sense of linguistic structure and increase vocabulary, and (4) provide reading in plays, short stories and poems.
SP212 Intermediate Spanish (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 112 or 113 Continuation and Expansion of SP 211.
SP 213 Intermediate Spanish (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of SP 212.
SP214 Conversation and Composition
Spanish (A) ...................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 213 or demonstration of sufficient language skills
Conversation and Composition Spanish is designed to increase vocabulary and develop oral and written pro-
ficiency at the intermediate level through discussions, reports, and situation dialogues.
SP215 Conversation and
Composition Spanish (A) .....3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of SP 214.
SP 216 Conversation and
Composition Spanish (A) .....3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of SP 215.
SP 241 Contemporary Spanish
Short Stories (A) ...........3 credit hours
Selected examples of most representative authors.
SP 242 Contemporary Spanish
Theater (A) ................. 3 credit hours
Selected plays representative of the Spanish stage today.
SP 243 Contemporary Spanish
Novel (A) ...................3 credit hours
Selected contemporary novels particularly appealing to modern youth.
56


DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS
Accounting | A, N. R
Business Management § A, N, R
Credit Management | A
Data Processing-Programmer N
Data Processing-Operations Technician N
General Clerical A, N, R
Insurance A
Industrial Management R
International Secretarial N
Key Punch ( N
Legal Secretarial | A
Marketing Management A, N, R
Medical Secretarial | A, N
Office Administration | N, R
Public Administration R
Real Estate R
Secretarial Science A, N, R
Stenographic 1 A, N, R
Word-Processing Typist I N, R
Transportation and Traffic Management A


DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS
DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS FOR THE TRANSFER STUDENT
A student whose primary purpose in attending Community College of Denver is preparation for transfer to another institution should familiarize himself with that institutions lower-division requirements. Although many institutions award two full years of credit to any transfer student who has earned an Associate degree, others grant transfer credit only for courses which meet their specific program requirements.
Several institutions do set up rigid requirements for completion of a specified number of credit hours in areas such as the sciences, humanities, language, and/or mathematics. Some encourage business majors to select only the basic business courses (typically introduction to business, mathematics, accounting, marketing, and principles of economics) during the first two years.
The Associate degree for the transfer student in Business is awarded by the Community College of Denver upon successful completion of the general requirements set forth on page 9 and a program of studies designed in conference with the business faculty advisor.
A student who is interested primarily in earning an Associate degree while preparing for a business career should follow the program suggested in this catalog for his area of specialization. If this student decides later to continue at a four-year institution, he should be able to transfer those credits which are applicable to the program he selects. In many instances, unless he changes his major, he will receive full transfer credit for all courses satisfactorily completed at the Community College of Denver. In those instances in which a Community College of Denver course is classified at the senior institution as an upper-division course, the student may receive only elective credit for the completed course.
ACCOUNTING (A, N, R)
NINE-MONTH PROGRAM
Cr.
Hrs.
First Quarter
AC 111 Accounting ............................. 5
EG 131 Business Communications ................ 3
MG 105 Introduction to Business................ 3
M110 Business Math .......................... 3
EC 109 or 211.................................... 3
17
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting ............................. 5
EG 132 Business Communications ................ 3
SC 103 Business Machines ...................... 3
Data Processing Elective1........................ 3
Typing Elective1 ............................. 4
18
Third Quarter Hrrs
AC 113 Accounting ............................ 5
EG 133 Business Communications ............... 3
MG 222 Office Management...................... 3
MG 240 Business Finance ...................... 3
Business or Accounting Elective1..............3-5
17-19
Selection of electives must be made in conference with faculty advisor.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Completion of this course leads to employment opportunities in clerical bookkeeping positions related to the accounting field.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 52-54
ACCOUNTING1 (A, N, R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter H4.
AC 111 Accounting ................................ 5
EG 131 Business Communications ................... 3
MG 105 Introduction to Business.................. 3
M110 Math for Business............................ 3
Social Science Elective2.......................... 3
17
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting .............................. 5
EG 132 Business Communications ................. 3
SC 103 Business Machines........................ 3
Data Processing Elective2......................... 3
Math Elective:
M 120 Business Statistics or
M 150 Math of Finance.......................... 3
" 17
Third Quarter
AC 113 Accounting .............................. 5
EG 113 Business Communications ................. 3
AC 213 Cost Accounting ......................... 5
Data Processing Elective3........................3-5
16-18
Fourth Quarter
AC 211 Intermediate Accounting ................. 5
Math Elective2 ..................................4-5
MG 210 Business Law 1........................... 3
MG 240 Business Finance 1....................... 3
Elective2 ........................................ 3
18-19
Fifth Quarter
AC212 Intermediate Accounting ....,............... 5
MG 211 Business Law II.......................... 3
EC 211 Prin. of Economics....................... 3
Elective2 .......................................3-5
14-16
'Students intending to transfer to a 4-year institution read page .., Division of Business and management Programs for the Transfer Student.
2Selection of Electives must be made in conference with faculty advisor.
'Business Elective at Auraria Campus.
58


Sixth Quarter £rs
MG 201 Business Org. & Mgt...................... 3
EC 212 Prin. of Economics....................... 3
Accounting Elective4 ........................... 5
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience or Elective.......3-6
14-17
'Accounting Elective must be made in conference with faculty advisor. These include: AC 214 COST ACCOUNTING II, AC 215 INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS, AC 217 INCOME TAX, AC 220 PRINCIPLES OF GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING AND BUDGETING.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES: Completion of this program leads to employment opportunities in bookkeeping and initial accounting positions in business and industrial concerns or at various levels in governmental agencies.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 95-106
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT1 (A, N, R)
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter
AC 111 Accounting .................
EG 131 Business Communications MG 105 Introduction to Business.. .
SC 103 Business Machines...........
Math Elective4 ....................
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting .............
EG 132 Business Communications M 120 Statistics for Business.... DP 111 Prin. of Bus. Data Proc. .. Elective2......................
Third Quarter
AC 113 Accounting .................
EG 133 Business Communications DP 112 Advanced Prin. of Bus. DP... MG 201 Business Org. & Management
Fourth Quarter
MG 203 Prin. of Marketing I. .
MG 210 Business Law I..........
EC 108 Labor Relations.........
EC211 Prin. of Economics.... MG 221 Personnel Management
Fifth Quarter
MG 240 Business Finance I................
MG 211 Business Law II...................
EC 212 Prin. of Economics................
MG 204 Prin. of Marketing II.............
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience of Elective
Sixth Quarter
MG 241 Business Finance II.............
MG 250 Business Policies ..............
EC 213 Prin. of Economics..............
Management Elective3...................
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience or Elective
Cr.
Hrs.
... 5 ... 3 ... 3 ... 3 .3-5 17-19
. .. 5 ... 3 ... 3 ... 3 ... 3 17
. 5
... 3 5 ... 3 16
. .. 3 ... 3 .. 3 ... 3 3
15
... 3 ... 3 ... 3 ... 3 ... 3
15
... 3 ... 3 3 ... 3 ... 3 15
'Students intending to transfer to a 4-year institution read page 58, "Division of Business and Management Programs for the Transfer Student."
-Selection of electives must be made in conference with advisor. :lRecommended electives are MG 222 OFFICE MANAGEMENT, MG 217 SALES MANAGEMENT, MG 239 WAGE AND SALARY ADMINISTRATION, MG 220 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT, and AC 213 COST ACCOUNTING.
'Recommended electives are M 110 MATH FOR BUSINESS, M 105 INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA. M 106 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA, M 150 MATH OF FINANCE, M 111 COLLEGE ALGEBRA.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 95-97
CREDIT MANAGEMENT (A) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter Hc£
MG 130 Credit Fundamentals ...................... 3
MG 105 Introduction to Business.................. 3
AC 111 Accounting ............................... 5
M110 Math for Business........................... 3
EG 131 Business Communications .................. 3
17
Second Quarter
MG 131 Credit Fundamentals...................... 3
M 120 Business Statistics ..................... 3
AC 112 Accounting .............................. 5
EG 132 Business Communications ................. 3
Social Science Elective1.......................... 3
17
Third Quarter
MG 132 Credit Fundamentals.................... 3
MG 201 Business Org. & Management............... 3
AC 113 Accounting ............................ 5
EG 133 Business Communications ............... 3
Science Elective1 ............................. 3
17
Fourth Quarter
MG 230 Credit Procedures ..................... 3
EC 211 Prin. of Economics..................... 3
MG 210 Business Law 1......................... 3
PD 111 Prin. of Business DP................... 3
Elective1 ...................................... 3
15
Fifth Quarter
MG 221 Personnel Management ................... 3
MG 222 Office Management ...................... 3
MG 240 Business Finance 1...................... 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience or Elective2........ 3
Elective1 .......................................3
15
Sixth Quarter
MG 231 Credit Counseling ...................... 3
MG 232 Credit Reporting ....................... 3
Business Elective1 ............................. 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience or
BU 299 Independent Study2 ....................... 6
15
'Consult faculty advisor for recommended electives.
-BU 299 (Independent Study) or Elective may be chosen only in event appropriate work station is not available.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 96
59


DATA PROCESSING-PROGRAMMER (N) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter Hcrrs
DP 111 Prin. of Bus. Data Proc...................... 3
MG 105 Intro, to Bus................................ 3
Math Elective:
DP 121 Applied Computer Math I M 111 College Algebra
Communications Elective1 ........................... 3
Elective2 .......................................... 3
17
Second Quarter
DP 112 Adv. Prin. of Bus. Data Proc................. 5
Math Elective ...................................... 5
DP 122 Applied Computer Math II M 112 Trig, and Functions
Communications Elective1............................ 3
AC 111 Accounting ................................. 5
18
Third Quarter
DP Elective Group I3.............................. 5
Communications Elective1............................ 3
AC 112 Accounting .................................. 5
Business Elective2 ................................. 3
16
Fourth Quarter
DP Elective Group I3.............................. 5
DP Elective Group II4............................. 5
Business Elective2.................................. 3
Social Science Elective2 ........................... 3
16
Fifth Quarter
DP Elective Groups II4............................ 5
DP 231 Systems Analysis I .......................... 3
Business Electives2 ................................ 6
Social Science Elective2............................ 3
17
Sixth Quarter
DP 232 Systems Analysis II.......................... 3
M150 Math of Finance or
M 120 Statistics for Bus............................ 3
Electives...........................................10
16
Communications Electives:
EG 111 English Composition EG 112 English Composition EG 113 English Composition EG 131 Business Communications EG 132 Business Communications EG 133 Business Communications EG 250 Technical Writing S 110 Introduction to Speech S210 Advanced Public Speaking
Consult advisor for recommended electives to fulfill these requirements.
Data Processing Electives Group (:
DP 213 Assembler Language I DP 216 Coboll DP 221 Fortran IV, I DP 224 PL/I, I
Data Processing Electives Group II:
DP 214 Assembler Language II DP 217 Cobol II DP 222 Fortran IV, II DP 225 PL/I, II
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 100
DATA PROCESSING-OPERATIONS TECHNICIAN
(N)
NINE-MONTH PROGRAM
First Quarter Hcrrs
DP 111 Prin. of Business Data Proc............... 3
EG 131 Business Communications ................... 3
MG 105 Introduction to Business................... 3
M 110 Math for Business........................... 3
Social Science Elective........................... 3
15
Second Quarter
DP 112 Advanced Prin. of Bus.
Data Processing ....................... 5
DP 130 Computer Operations I ..................... 5
Business Electives1 .............................. 3
EG 132 Business Communications ................... 3
16
Third Quarter
DP 125 Data Processing Records Control............ 3
DP 131 Computer Operations II..................... 5
Business Electives1 .............................. 6
Elective1 ........................................ 3
17
Consult Advisor for recommended electives to fulfill these requirements.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 48
GENERAL CLERICAL (A, N, R)
12-MONTH PROGRAM
First Quarter
MG 105 Introduction to Business.... EG 131 Business Communications .. SC 110 Typing (or by placement).... M 100 Developmental Math or
M110 Math for Business ...........
SC 105 Filing and Records Control...
Second Quarter
AC 109 Bookkeeping and Accounting EG 132 Business Communications .. SC 111 Typing II or (by placement)..
Business Elective..................
SC 103 Business Machines...........
Cr.
Mrs.
3
3
4
3
3
~16
, 5 3 4 3 3
18
Third Quarter
SC 112 Intermediate Typing (or
by placement) .......................... 4
SC 130 Machine Transcription 1.................. 3
EG 133 Business Communications ................... 3
DP 111 Principles of Data Proc.................... 3
Business Elective ................................. 3
Fourth Quarter
SC 113 Production Typing .......................... 4
SC 131 Machine Transcription II.................... 3
PY 100 Human Relations in Business &
Industry or
PY107 Psychology of Personal Dev................... 3
SC 200 Office Procedures........................... 5
SC 100 Duplicating Machines........................ 2
17
This course could be completed in less than 12 months If typing background is sufficient.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 67
60


INSURANCE (A) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter Hcrrs
AC 111 Accounting ................................. 5
MG 105 Introduction to Business.................... 3
M 110 Math for Business............................ 3
IN 110 Introduction to Insurance................... 3
PY 107 Psychology of Personal Dev.................. 3
Cr.
Hrs.
Math Elective .............................................4-5
M 105 Introductory Algebra M 106 Inter. Algebra M111 College Algebra
Social Science Elective.................................... 3
18-19
Third Quarter
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting ................
IN 123 Property and Liability ....
MG 210 Business Law I.............
IN 121 Life and Health Insurance EC 211 Prin. of Economics.........
17
5
3
3
3
3
V7
Third Quarter
AC 113 Accounting .............................. 5
IN 133 Life and Property Insurance Law.......... 3
EC 212 Prin. of Economics....................... 3
IN 131 Business Insurance ...................... 3
Fourth Quarter
EG 131 Business Communications ................ 3
MG 203 Prin. of Marketing 1.................... 3
IN 205 Analysis of Insurance Functions......... 3
IN 203 Prin. of Risk Management................ 3
MG 110 Salesmanship ........................... 3
15
IM 104 Work Simplification & Cost Control............ 3
M 120 Stat. for Bus. & Ind........................... 3
DP 111 Prin. of Bus. Data. Proc...................... 3
EC 109 Applied Economics............................. 3
MG 201 Bus. Org. & Mgt............................... 3
15
SECOND YEAR
Fourth Quarter £
IM 201 Employee Dev.............................. 3
S 110 Intro, to Speech........................... 3
EC 108 Labor Relations .......................... 3
EG 133 Bus. Comm................................. 3
IM 202 Theory & Application of Behav. Sci........ 3
15
Fifth Quarter
MG 221 Personnel Management ................... 3
MG 240 Bus. Fin................................. 3
MG 210 Bus. Law 1.............................. 3
MG 222 Off. Mgt................................. 3
Elective ......................................... 3
Fifth Quarter
EG 132 Business Communications .................. 3
MG 204 Prin. of Marketing II..................... 3
IN 221 Insurance & Taxation...................... 3
IN 223 Insurance and Property Loss Adjusting..... 3
Elective1 ....................................... 3
15
Sixth Quarter
MG 222 Office Management......................... 3
MG 220 Small Business Management................. 3
MG 240 Business Finance 1........................ 3
IN 231 Estate Planning & Life Insurance.......... 3
Elective1 ....................................... 3
15
'Consult counselor or faculty advisor for recommended electives.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 93
15
Sixth Quarter
IM 203 Mgt. by Objectives............................ 3
Social Science Elective.............................. 3
MG 239 Wage and Salary Adm........................... 3
Electives ........................................... 6
15
AC 113 is not a required prerequisite for MG 240 in the Industrial Management Program.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: This program is designed for persons in the field of supervision; however, other students electing to pursue the program should be able to seek employment in the areas of government service, public utilities and industry.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 94-96
INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM FIRST YEAR
First Quarter Cr.
M 110 Math for Bus 3
AC 111 Accounting 5
EG 131 Bus. Com 3
IM 103 Industrial Safety 3
IM 101 Elements of Supervision 3
17
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting 5
PY 107 Psych, of Personal Dev 3
EG 132 Bus. Comm 3
INTERNATIONAL SECRETARIAL1 (N) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter £r.
MG 105 Introduction to Business................... 3
Spanish (by placement)2........................... 5
Spanish Typing (by placement)..................... 4
SC 110 SC 111
EG 131 Business Communications ................... 3
PY 100 Human Relations in Business................ 3
18
61


Second Quarter jfc
M 110 Math for Business......................... 3
SC 125 Gregg Shorthand .......................... 4
Spanish (by placement)2.......................... 5
Typing3 ........................................... 4
SC 111, SC 112 or SC 113
EG 132 Business Communications .................. 3
19
Third Quarter
AC 111 Accounting ............................... 5
SC 126 Gregg Shorthand .......................... 4
Spanish (by placement)2.......................... 5
SC 132 Machine Transcription, Spanish............ 3
17
Fourth Quarter
SC 260 Office Practice l-Spanish................. 3
MG 201 Business Org. & Management................ 3
SC 127 Shorthand Speed Building.................. 4
SC 105 Filing & Records Control.................. 3
Elective4 ....................................... 3
16
Fifth Quarter
SC 261 Office Practice ll-Spanish ............... 3
SC 128 Shorthand Transcription .................. 4
SC 123 Spanish Gregg Shorthand................... 4
Electives4 ...................................... 6
17
Sixth Quarter
SC 262 Office Practice 11 l-Spanish.............. 3
SC 259 International Secretarial Procedures..... 3
SC 124 Spanish Shorthand Transcription........... 4
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience or
BU 299 Independent Study5 ....................... 3
13
Students intending to transfer to a 4-year institution read page 58. Division of Business and Management Programs for the Transfer Student.
-Students will be placed at a foreign language level suited to their competency at entrance, First year courses are 5 credit hours, typing will be given a proficiency examination to determine proper
Students who have had previous instruction and/or experience in Second year courses are 3 credit hours, placement.
4Consult advisor for recommended elective.
5BU 299 (Independent Study) or elective may be chosen only in event appropriate work station is not available.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 94-100
KEY PUNCH (N)
THREE-MONTH PROGRAM* Cr
Hrs.
DP 102 Key Punch Laboratory......................... 8
MG 105 Introduction to Business..................... 3
DP 125 Data Processing Records Control.............. 3
DP 111 Principles of Business DP.................... 3
17
Can be completed in three months only if typing speed is 45 words per minute. In order to enroll in Key Punch Laboratory, student pass a typing test with 45 wpm within a 5 error limitation.
LEGAL SECRETARIAL (A)
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter
MG 105 Introduction to Business.................... 3
SC 110 Typing I1................................... 4
English Elective:2 EG 131 Bus. Comm.
EG 111 Eng. Comp.
M 110 Math for Business & Industry................. 3
Social Science Elective2 ......................... 3
16
Second Quarter
SC 125 Gregg Shorthand Prin.1.................... 4
SC 111 Typing II................................. 4
English Elective:2 EG 132 Bus. Comm.
EG 112 Eng. Comp................................ 3
SC 103 Business Machines......................... 3
Elective:2 ...................................... 3
17
Third Quarter
DP 111 Prin. of Business, Data Proc.............. 3
SC 126 Gregg Shorthand Principles................ 4
SC 112 Intermediate Typing....................... 4
English Elective:2
EG 133 Business Communications
EG 113 English Composition ..................... 3
MG 210 Business Law, I ........................... 3
17
Fourth Quarter
SC 127 Shorthand Speedbuilding .................. 4
SC 113 Prod. Typing ............................. 4
SC 200 Office Procedures ........................ 5
MG 211 Business Law, II........................... 3
16
Fifth Quarter
S 128 Shorthand Transcription ..................... 4
AC 111 Accounting ............................... 5
SC 210 Legal Secretarial Procedures
& Terminology.......................... 3
BU 297 Cooperative Work Experience
or Elective ........................... 3
MG 201 Business Org. & Mgt........................ 3
18
Sixth Quarter
SC 206 Legal Dictation & Trans................... 3
SC 130 Machine Trans. 1.......................... 3
Economics Elective:2
EC 109 Applied Econ.
EC 211 Prin. of Econ........................... 3
BU 297 Cooperative Work Experience
or Business Elective.................. 3
AC 112 Accounting .............................. 5
17
Students who have had previous instruction and/or experience in typing and shorthand will be given proficiency examinations to determine proper placement.
Consult faculty advisor or counselor for recommended electives.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 100
62


MARKETING MANAGEMENT1 (A, N, R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter £rs
AC 111 Accounting ............................. 5
MG 105 Introduction to Business................ 3
EG 131 Business Communications .................. 3
M 110 Math for Business......................... 3
14
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting ............................. 5
DP 111 Prin. of Business DP...................... 3
EG 132 Business Communications ................ 3
MG 115 Principles of Advertising............... 3
MG 110 Salesmanship ............................ 3
17
Third Quarter
AC 113 Accounting ............................. 5
MG 201 Business Organization & Mgt............. 3
MG 217 Sales Management ....................... 3
EG 133 Business Communications ................ 3
M 150 Math of Finance .......................... 3
17
Fourth Quarter
MG 203 Prin. of Marketing I.................... 3
MG 210 Business Law 1.......................... 3
MG 240 Business Finance........................ 3
EC 211 Prin. of Economics........................ 3
M 120 Business Statistics ....................... 3
15
Fifth Quarter
MG 204 Prin. of Marketing II................... 3
MG 221 Personnel Management.................... 3
MG 215 Prin. of Retailing...................... 5
MG 211 Business Law II......................... 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience3.................... 3
17
Sixth Quarter
MG 216 Principles of Buying.................... 3
MG 250 Business Policies....................... 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience3.................. 3
Electives2 ..................................... 6
15
'Students intending to transfer to a 4-year institution read page 58. Division of Business and management Programs for the Transfer Student.
-Consult faculty advisor for recommended electives.
'BU 299 (Independent Study) or Elective may be chosen in event appropriate work station is not available.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Sales, -supervision and managerial trainee opportunities in a variety of retail, wholesale and marketing businesses.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 95
MEDICAL SECRETARIAL (A, N) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter Hrs
MG 105 Introduction to Business.................. 3
SC 110 Typing I1................................. 4
M110 Math for Business........................... 3
EG 131 Business Communications .................. 3
B 100 Basic Human Biology........................ 4
17
Second Quarter
SC 125 Gregg Shorthand Principles1
SC 111 Typing II ..................
SC 103 Business Machines...........
EG 132 Business Communications SC 105 Filing & Records Control...
Third Quarter
SC 126 Gregg Shorthand Principles
SC 112 Intermediate Typing..........
EG 133 Business Communications
Psychology Elective.................
DP 111 Principles of Business DP.
Fourth Quarter
SC 127 Shorthand Speed Building. AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accounting SC 130 Machine Transcription I... SC 113 Production Typing ............
Fifth Quarter
SC 128 Shorthand Transcription
SC 200 Office Procedures........
SC 100 Duplicating Machines SC 131 Machine Transcription II HE 100 Medical Terminology ..
Sixth Quarter
MG 222 Office Management..........
MF 210 Business Law I.............
MO 110 Intro to Health Insurance or
Business Elective......
BU 297 Cooperative Work Experience Elective .........................
Cr.
Hrs.
.. 4 .. 4 .. 3 .. 3
-J3
T7
.. 4 ... 4 ... 3 3
J3
T7
... 4 ... 5 ... 3
... 4
76
... 4 ... 5 ... 2 ... 3 ... 2
"l6
... 3 ... 3
... 3 ... 3 ... 3
15-16
'If a student has shorthand and typewriting background, it is recommended that he challenge the introductory courses and enroll in the courses at his proficiency level.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 98-99
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION' (N, R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter Hrs.
MG 105 Introduction to Business.................... 3
EG 131 Business Communications .................... 3
Math Elective:2
M110 Math for Business M 105 Introductory Algebra
M 106 Intermediate Algebra ..................3-4
Typing (by placement)3 SC 110 Typing SC 111 Typing
SC 112 Typing ................................ 4
PY 100 Human Relations in Business............... 3
16-17
Second Quarter
AC 111 Accounting ................................. 5
EG 132 Business Communications .................. 3
63


Math Elective:2 h's.
M 150 Math of Finance M 105 Introductory Algebra M 106 Intermediate Algebra
M 111 College Algebra (5 cr. hrs.)...........3-5
SC 200 Office Procedures or
SC 112 Typing .................................4-5
SC 103 Business Machines ....................... 3
18-21
Third Quarter
AC 112 Accounting .............................. 5
EG 133 Business Communications ................. 3
DP 111 Principles of Business DP................. 3
MG 201 Business Org. & Management or
IM 101 Elements of Supervision................... 3
SC 105 Filing & Records Control................. 3
T7
Fourth Quarter
AC 113 Accounting .............................. 5
DP 112 Advanced Prin. of Bus. DP................ 5
PY 107 Psychology of Pers. Dev................... 3
Economics Elective:2
EC 109 Applied Economics or
EC 211 Principles of Economics............... 3
Ti
Fifth Quarter Hre.
MG 222 Office Management........................ 3
MG 221 Personnel Management .................... 3
MG 120 Small Business Management................ 3
Social Science Elective2........................ 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience or Elective'...... 3
?5
Sixth Quarter
MG 250 Business Policies ....................... 3
MG 210 Business Law 1........................... 3
Electives2 ..................................... 6
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience or
BU 299 Independent Study4 ...................... 3
75
1 Students intending to transfer to a 4-year institution read page 58. Division of Business and Management Programs for the Transfer Student.
-Consult faculty advisor for recommended electives.
^Students who have had previous instruction and/or experience in typing will be given a proficiency examination to determine proper placement.
VU 299 or elective may be chosen only in event appropriate work station is not available.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Supervisory and administrative or managerial trainee opportunities in a variety of business and industries.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 97-101
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
FIRST YEAR
First Quarter Cr. Hrs.
AC 111 Accounting 5
EG 131 Bus. Comm 3
M 110 Math for Bus. & Ind 3
MG 105 Intro, to Bus 3
PS 111 Intro, to Pol. Sci 3
17
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting ........................... 5
EG 132 Bus. Comm................................ 3
Math Elective....................................4-5
M 105 Intro. Algebra M 106 Inter. Algebra M111 College Algebra
PS 113 American National Govt................... 3
EC 109 or 211.................................... 3
18-19
Third Quarter
AC 113 Accounting ........................... 5
EG 133 Bus. Comm,
or
S110 Intro, to Speech........................... 3
M 120 Stat. for Bus. & Ind........................ 3
MG 201 Bus. Org. & Mgt......................... 3
PS 114 American State & Local Govt................ 3
f7
64


SECOND YEAR
SECOND YEAR
Fourth Quarter
AC 220 Prin. of Govt. Acctg. & Budget
MG 210 Bus. Law I......................
MG 221 Personnel Mgt...................
PR 209 Public Relations ...............
Elective ..............................
Fifth Quarter
GE 230 Urban Geography........
MG 211 Bus. Law II............
MG 239 Wage and Salary Adm. PY 100 Hum. Rel. in Bus. & Ind SO 107 Sociology of Per. Dev. .
Cr.
Hrs.
3 3 3 3 _3 T5
. 3 3 3 3 ,_3
T5
Sixth Quarter
EC 108 Labor Relations................................ 3
MG 240 Bus. Fin....................................... 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Exp. or
Electives1 ........................................... 6
Social Science Elective............................... 3
15
'Electives will be chosen when an appropriate work station or internship cannot be provided.
General College Requirements: A minimum of credits in related areas. This is a two-year program which will cross several disciplines.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: This program is designed to equip the graduate with the tools which are necessary to function at various levels of government. Included in these tools are those which will prepare the student for administrative positions as well as the technician level.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 97-98
Fourth Quarter Hrs.
RE 201 Prin. of Ins................................. 3
MG 110 Salesmanship ................................ 3
RE 202 Real Estate Appraisal..................... 3
RE 203 Real Estate Trends........................ 3
Elective2 .......................................... 2
15
Fifth Quarter
MG 201 Bus. Org. & Mgt.
EC 109 Applied Economics ......................... 3
M 120 Stat. for Bus. & Ind....................... 3
Social Science Elective2 ......................... 3
BU 299 Independent Study3 ........................_3
15
Sixth Quarter
RE 204 Land Resources ............................ 3
PS 114 American State & Local Government......... 3
SW 106 Special Social Problems................... 3
Elective2 ........................................ 3
BU 299 Independent Study3 ........................ 3
15
'Students may elect to take EG 111, English Composition. However, all students in the program must take EG-132.
-These electives should be chosen from course offerings dealing with demographic elements of mobility, population, and income distribution.
'With the counsel of both the instructor and persons in the real estate field, this course should be utilized to study for real estate exams.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 95
SECRETARIAL SCIENCE (A, N, R)
REAL ESTATE (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
FIRST YEAR
First Quarter tJrrs.
MG 105 Intro, to Bus............................. 3
English Elective1
EG 131 Bus. Comm.
EG 111 Eng. Comp............................. 3
AC 111 Accounting ............................. 5
RE 101 Real Estate Prin. & Practices........... 3
PY 100 Hum. Rel. in Bus. & Ind................. 3
17
Second Quarter
M 110 Math for Bus............................... 3
EG 132 Bus. Comm............................... 3
AC 112 Accounting ............................. 5
Elective ........................................ 3
PY 111 Gen. Psychology........................._3
17
Third Quarter
SC 110 Typing I ............................... 4
SC 103 Bus. Machines........................... 3
EG 133 Bus. Comm,
or
S110 Intro to Speech............................. 3
RE 103 Real Estate Fin......................... 3
RE 104 Real Estate Law......................... 3
T6
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter h4'.
MG 105 Introduction to Business.................. 3
SC 110 Typing I (or by placemen^1................ 4
EG 131 Business Communications ................... 3
M110 Business Mathematics......................... 3
Social Science Elective..........................._3
T6
Second Quarter
SC 125 Gregg Shorthand Principles2 ............... 4
SC 111 Typing II ................................. 4
EG 132 Business Communications ................... 3
SC 103 Business Machines.......................... 3
SC 105 Filing & Records Control................... 3
T7
Third Quarter
SC 126 Gregg Shorthand Principles................. 4
SC 112 Intermediate Typing........................ 4
EG 133 Business Communications ................... 3
Psychology Elective............................... 3
DP 111 Principles of Bus. Data Proc.............. 3
17
'If a student has typewriting background, it is recommended that he challenge the introductory course in typewriting and enroll in the appropriate course during the second or third quarter.
-If a student has sufficient shorthand background, it is recommended that he challenge the introductory course and delay enrollment into the sequence.
65


Fourth Quarter Hrs.
SC 127 Shorthand Speed Building.................. 4
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accounting, or
AC 111 Accounting ............................... 5
SC 130 Machine Transcription 1................... 3
SC 113 Production Typing ........................ 4
Economics Elective .............................._3
19
Fifth Quarter
SC 128 Shorthand Transcription .................. 4
AC 111 Accounting or
AC 112 Accounting ............................. 5
SC 200 Office Procedures ...................... 5
SC 100 Duplicating Machines.................... 2
SC 131 Machine Transcriptions II..............._3
T9
Sixth Quarter
MG 222 Office Management....................... 3
MG 210 Business Law 1.......................... 3
Business Elective ............................... 3
BU 297 Cooperative Work Experience............... 3
Elective ........................................ 3
15
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 103
WORD-PROCESSING TYPIST (N, R) First Quarter
SC 111 Typing II......................
EG 131 Business Communications .......
SC 105 Filing & Records Control.......
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accounting.......
Second Quarter
SC 112 Intermediate Typing .... EG 131 Business Communications SC 130 Machine Transcription I..
DP 111 Prin. of Business DP.....
Business Elective...............
Third Quarter
SC 113 Production Typing .......
SC 200 Office Procedures .......
SC 131 Machine Transcription II.. EG 133 Business Communications
ct.
Hrs.
. 4
. 3 3
,_5
15
. 4 3 3 3 ,_3
T6
. 4
. 5 3 3
"l5
This program may be completed in 9 months only if student enters with a typing skill of at least 25 wpm.
STENOGRAPHIC (A, N, R) TWELVE MONTH PROGRAM-
First Quarter Hrs.
MG 105 Introduction to Business.................. 3
EG 131 Business Communications .................. 3
Shorthand1 ...................................... 4
SC 125 Gregg, or SC 120 Alpha
Typewriting1 SC 110 Typing 1..................... 4
M110 Math for Business........................... 3
TT
Second Quarter
EG 132 Business Communications .................. 3
Shorthand:1 ..................................... 4
SC 126 Gregg, or SC 121 Alpha
Typewriting' SC 111 Typing II.................... 4
SC 105 Filing & Records Control.................. 3
SC 103 Business Machines......................... 3
TT
Third Quarter
SC 112 Intermediate Typewriting.................. 4
SC 127 Shorthand Speed Building.................. 4
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accounting.................. 5
DP 111 Prin. of Business DP...................... 3
Psychology Elective.............................. 3
T9
Fourth Quarter
SC 113 Production Typing ........................ 4
SC 128 Shorthand Transcription .................. 4
SC 130 Machine Transcription I................... 3
SC 200 Office Procedures ........................ 5
BU 297 Cooperative Work Exp...................... 3
T9
1 If a student has shorthand and typing background, it is recommended that he challenge the introductory courses and enroll in the courses at his proficiency level.
-Can be completed in less than 12 months if student has previous training in shorthand and typewriting.
TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT (A)
Cr.
Hrs.
4
4
3
3-4
3
17-18
... 4 ... 4 ... 3
3-5
... 3 17-19
Third Quarter
TT 103 Commercial Transportation III.............. 4
TT 132 Mgt. Tools & Concepts III............... 4
English Elective1................................. 3
EG 133 Business Communications EG 113 English Composition
Economics Elective1............................... 3
Elective1 ........................................ 3
Second Quarter
TT 102 Commercial Transportation II. .
TT 131 Mgt. Tools & Concepts II.........
English Elective1.......................
EG 132 Business Communications
EG 112 English Composition
EG 107 Occupational Communication
Math Elective1 .........................
M 102 Applied Math I M 105 Introductory Algebra M 106 Intermediate Algebra M 111 College Algebra EC 108 Labor Relations..................
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter
TT 101 Commercial Transportation I.. .
TT 130 Mgt. Tools & Concepts I.........
English Elective1......................
EG 131 Business Communications EG 111 English Composition EG 106 Occupational Communication
Math Elective1 ........................
M 110 Math for Business M 105 Introductory Algebra M 106 Intermediate Algebra MG 105 Introduction to Business........
66


Fourth Quarter Hcrrs
TT 120 International Trade 1....................... 4
TT110 Transportation Reg. 1...................... 4
TT 141 Econ. of Trans. 1.............................. 2
TT 105 Traf. Mgt. & Phy. Dist. I...................... 2
MG 201 Bus. Org. & Mgt.............................. 3
Elective1 ............................................2-3
17-18
Fifth Quarter
TT 121 International Trade II......................... 4
TT111 Trans. Reg. II ................................. 4
TT 142 Econ. of Trans. II............................. 2
TT 105 Traf. Mgt. & Phy. Dist. II..................... 2
MG 203 Prin. of Marketing 1........................... 3
Elective1 ...........................................2-3
17-18
Sixth Quarter
TT 122 International Trade III..................... 4
TT 143 Econ. of Trans. Ill............................ 2
TT 112 Trans. Reg. Ill............................. 4
TT 106 Traf. Mgt. & Phy. Dist. II..................... 2
MG 210 Business Law 1........................... 3
Elective1 ...........................................2-3
17-18
Consult faculty advisor for recommended electives.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 103-109
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Where a course description does not indicate the campus by the key A, N, R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
ACCOUNTING
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accounting
(A, N, R)....................5 credit hours
This study of the basic elements of accounting for the secretarial student includes the handling of cash receipts and disbursements, accounts receivable and accounts payable and the five basic journals. Study of the accounting cycle and the preparation of financial statements is provided. Practice set is required. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 110 Payroll & Machine
Accounting (R) ..............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 109 Bookkeeping &
Accounting or AC 111 Accounting or consent of the instructor
An in-depth study of various payroll systems including the study of related law and practices. Includes practice in preparation of payrolls and computation of deduction. Emphasis is placed on actual preparation of payroll projects by hand, pegboard system and the accounting machine. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 111 Accounting (A, N, R)...............5 credit hours
Prerequisite, Corequisite or equivalent:
MG 105 Introduction to Business; M 110
Mathematics for Business
An introductory study of accounting principles to acquaint the student with the theory and logic that underlie accounting procedures. Course content includes basic accounting structure, the accounting cycle, processing sales and cash receipts, processing purchases and cash payments, summarizing and reporting, receivables and payables, and merchandise inventory. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 112 Accounting (A, N, R)...............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 111 Accounting A continuation of accounting principles as they pertain to deferrals and accruals, plant assets and intangible assets, systems and controls, payroll systems, systems design and automated data processing, concepts and principles, partnerships, and corporation organization and operations. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 113 Accounting (A, N, R)...............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 112 Accounting A study of accounting principles, theory and logic relating to corporations. Special emphasis is given to stockholders equity, earnings and dividends, longterm obligations and investments, departments and branches, management reports and special analysis, fund, fund statement and cash flow, consolidated statements and other statements, and financial statement analysis. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 211 Intermediate Accounting
(A, N, R).......................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 113 Accounting and
DP 111 Principles of Business Data Processing In-depth study of the fundamental accounting process with emphasis on the financial statement (income statement, retained earning statement and balance sheet), working capital (cash and liabilities), receivable forecast, inventories and current liabilities as related to a corporate form of business organization. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 212 Intermediate Accounting
(A, N, R).......................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 211 Intermediate Accounting In-depth study of the fundamental accounting process with emphasis on non-current assets, liabilities and owners equity as related to a corporate form of business organization. Includes in-depth study of financial statement analysis, ratios and measurement, and fund flow. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 213 Accounting (Cost Accounting)
(A, N, R).......................5 credit hours
Prerequisite or Corequisite: AC 113
Accounting or equivalent
A study of the fundamental elements of production costs and their distribution. Concepts and procedures applicable to job order, process and standard cost systems are presented. Orientation on the use and interpretation of cost data by management. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
67


AC 214 Cost Accounting li (R)...........5 credit hours
(Red Rocks Campus only)
Prerequisite: AC 213 Accounting or equivalent A study of Standard, Joint and Marginal Costing, covering cost variances, by-products, scrap, and spoiled defective goods. Emphasis is on budgeting, analysis of cost data and managerial decision making tools including the break-even point and gross point analysis. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 215 Introduction to Accounting
Systems .......................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 113 Accounting and DP 112
Advanced Principles of Business Data Processing A study of the integration of computers and accounting, the installation and control of accounting systems in various business applications, and an analysis of tools available for implementation of an accounting system study. Analysis of case problems and applications are an essential part of the course. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 217 Individual Income Tax
Accounting ....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 113 Accounting or equivalent Practice in the application of the Internal Revenue Code and Colorado Income Tax Law to determine individual income tax. Coverage is restricted to individual income taxation and includes the basic concepts of returns, exemptions, exclusions and inclusions of gross income, itemized and standard deductions, payment of tax liability, recognition of gains and losses. Selected practical problems will be solved through student research of the Code provided by the Commerce Clearing House tax service. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 218 Individual Income Tax
Accounting II .................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 217 Individual Income Tax
Accounting or equivalent
An introduction to basic concepts of state returns and partnerships, corporation and fiduciary returns will be included. A continuation of the basic concepts of individual income tax preparation. Coverage will include installment and deferred payment sales, dividends, inventories, deductions for expense, depreciation and investment credits, depletion, deduction for bad debts, income averaging. Emphasis will be placed on selected practical problems through student research of the Code provided by the Commerce Clearing House tax service. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 220 Principles of Governmental
Accounting and Budget..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 113 Accounting Orientation in the concept of fund and budgetary controls as a matter of law and public administration at the County, City, State and Federal Level. Includes forecast of requirements and anticipated revenue, the anticipated expenditures and the actual revenue and expenditures. Accounting principles and procedures to implement budget forecasts, and actual enactment of the budget. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
BUSINESS
BU110 Business Mathematics............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent Development of abilities in reading, analyzing, and solving problems related to business situations and basic to study in the areas of management, accounting, data processing, and secretarial science. Course emphasizes quantitative skills as applied in actual business practice. Operation of calculating machines will be introduced so that they may be used to solve problems. (5 hours per week)
BU 131 Business Language .............3 credit hours
Presents essential principles involved in preparation of business correspondence, including purpose, style, structure and use of correct, forceful business language. Intensive practice is provided in the mechanics of language and the vocabulary used by management and office personnel. (3 hours per week)
BU 132 Business Correspondence ... .3 credit hours
Prerequisite: BU 131 or equivalent Stresses the development of written business correspondence that requires problem solving and an understanding of human relations in a business situation. Students will compose and evaluate the various kinds of written correspondence that are commonly used by businessmen. Inter-office bulletins, news releases, and other forms of business composition will receive attention. The legal and ethical responsibilities involved in written communication will be discussed. (3 hours per week)
BU 133 Oral and Written Business
Reporting ...................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: BU 132 or equivalent Develops ability in preparing written business reports for staff meetings and conferences. In addition, emphasis is placed upon techniques of oral presentation, correct telephone usage, business dictation procedures, and effective listening. (3 hours per week)
BU 297 Cooperative Work
Experience ...............1 to 6 credit hours
In some program areas, cooperative work experience is a part of the course study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved, with a College instructor providing general co-ordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the Division Director.
BU 299 Independent Study...........1 to 3 credit hours
Provides an opportunity for the mid-management or transfer student to engage in intensive study and research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Conditions for electing this course will be evaluated by the Director of the Division of Business and Management Occupations, who will assist in selecting an advisor and determining the amount of credit to be granted for successful completion of the work.
68


5 credit hours
DATA PROCESSING
DP 102 Key Punch Laboratory
(F, W, S, SS) (N)..............8 credit hours
Prerequisite: Typing speed of 45 wpm with 5 error maximum
A practice course in the operation of the card punch machine and verifier. If the student reaches employable levels prior to the completion of the quarter, he may be given other tape equipment instruction as conditions permit. Because of conflicting keyboard arrangements, it is recommended that students avoid scheduling SC 103, Business Machines, concurrently with Key Punch Laboratory. (15 hours per week, plus lab as directed by instructor)
DP 111 Principles of Business Data Processing (F, W, S, SS)
(A, N, R) .....................3 credit hours
An introduction to basic method, techniques, and systems of manual, mechanical, unit record, and electronic data processing. Objective of this course is to give the student a general understanding of the field of data processing. (3 hours per week)
DP 112 Advanced Principles of
Business Data Processing
(F, W, S, SS) (N)..............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 111
A basic course in computer programming which includes the use of simple flow charts, decision tables, and logic techniques to acquaint the student with the logical necessities of programming. The student is exposed to machine language, assembly language, and the general principles of a computer operating system. (5 hours per week)
DP 114 Report Program Generator
(F, S).........................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 112
Coding and execution of simple business programs using RPG. (5 hours per week)
DP 115 Basic (W, SS)....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 112
Coding and execution of simple business program using BASIC. (3 hours per week)
DP 121 Applied Computer
Mathematics (F, W, S) (N)......5 credit hours
Application of data processing techniques to simple business mathematics problems. (5 hours per week)
DP 122 Applied Computer
Mathematics II (F, W, S) (N). 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 121
Continuation of DP 121 using more advanced applications. (5 hours per week)
DP 125 Data Processing Records
Control (F, W, S, SS) (6)......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 111
A basic course designed to give the student an understanding of the scheduling, documentation, recording, and security procedures needed for efficient control of data and data files. (3 hours per week)
DP 130 Computer Operations I (W, S) (N)
Prerequisite: DP 111 An introduction to the basic techniques of computer operations including the handling and maintenance of input/output devices and console operations for a batched job environment. (Meets 10 hours per week)
DP 131 Computer Operations II
(S, SS) (N)....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 130
Continuation of DP 130. On introduction to computer operation in a multiprogramming environment. (Meets 10 hours per week)
DP 213 Assembled Language I
(F, S) (N).....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 112
Coding and execution of simple business programs using assembler language. (5 hours per week)
DP 214 Assembler Language II
(W, SS) (N).....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 213
Continuation of DP 213 using more advanced applications. (5 hours per week)
DP 216 Cobol I (F, S) (N).................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 112
Coding and execution of simple business programs using COBOL. (5 hours per week)
DP 217 Cobol II (W, SS) (N)...............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 216
Continuation of DP 216 using more advanced applications. (5 hours per week)
DP 221 Fortran IV, I (F) (N)..............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 112
Coding and execution of simple business programs using Fortran IV. (5 hours per week)
DP 222 Fortran IV, II (W) (N).............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 221
Continuation of DP 221 using more advanced applications. (5 hours per week)
DP 224 PL/II (F) (N)......................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 112
Coding and execution of simple business programs using PL/I. (5 hours per week)
DP 225 PL/I II (W) (N)....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 224
Continuation of DP 224 using more advanced applications. (5 hours per week)
DP 231 Systems Analysis I (W) (N) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Completion of a two quarter programming language sequence.
Courses DP 231 and DP 232 constitute a two quarter sequence in which the student will be given a problem to analyze, define, and solve by data processing techniques using a programming language. (3 hours per week)
DP 232 Systems Analysis II (S) (N). .. .3 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 231; Continuation of DP 231 (3 hours per week)
69


INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT
(Red Rocks only)
IM 101 Elements of Supervision (R) 3 credit hours
This course will provide instruction in the basic elements of planning, organizing, directly, and controlling. An exposure to the current theories of motivation will also be included. (3 hours per week)
IM 103 Industrial Safety (R)............3 credit hours
A survey of Workmens Compensation regulations and the first-line supervisors responsibility in this area. The course will stress the importance of on-the-job safety training. (3 hours per week)
IM 104 Work Simplification and
Cost Control (R)...............3 credit hours
A course covering the accepted methods of work measurement and their relationship to the control of costs. Topics will include incentive programs, motion study, etc. (3 hours per week)
IM 201 Employee Development (R) . 3 credit hours
A course designed to acquaint the student with the various on-the-job methods of training. The course will cover vestibule, coaching, counseling, and the use of evaluation in training. (3 hours per week)
IM 202 Theory and Application of
Behavioral Sciences (R)........3 credit hours
A study of the supervising aspect of management. The course will consider, in depth, the ideas of persons such as Maslow, Argyris, McGregor, etc. Also, an exposure to "sensitivity" training will be included. (3 hours per week)
IM 203 Management by Objectives (R) 3 credit hours
A course designed to make a student aware of a method of management which will enable him to make decisions based on an immediate goal. It is to include case studies in its approach to this subject. (3 hours per week)
INSURANCE
(Auraria only)
IN 110 Introduction to Insurance (A). .3 credit hours
This course deals with the basic principles of insurance and risk. Various kinds of insurance are discussed; the primary objective of the course is an orientation to the many kinds of insurance and their purposes. (3 hours per week)
IN 121 Principles of Life and
Health Insurance (A)...........3 credit hours
Nature and functions of life insurance, annuities, and health insurance with particular attention to types of policies and their provisions, programming, rate making, reserves, taxation, regulation, and company organization and management. (3 hours per week)
IN 123 Principles of Property and
Liability Insurance (A)........3 credit hours
The more important property and casualty insurance policies, and, from the insurers viewpoint, problems of rate making, underwriting, loss, adjustment, reinsur-
ance, financial statements and reserves, loss prevention, and insurance surveys. Variations among various property and casualty lines, including fire, marine, automobile, workmens compensation, liability, and bonding. (3 hours per week)
IN 131 Business Insurance (A)...........3 credit hours
Various kinds of insurance for the business firm are studied. The special needs of the individual proprietor, partnerships, and cooperations receive attention. Special disability insurance, life insurance on key men, and split dollar plans are discussed. (3 hours per week)
IN 133 Life and Property
Insurance Law (A)..............3 credit hours
This course applies basic principles of business law to the life and property insurance field. Special attention is given to the law of contract and agency, law of liability, the life insurance contract, policy provisions, settlement options and beneficiary designations. (3 hours per week)
IN 203 Principles of Risk
Management (A) ................3 credit hours
This course defines the major categories of risk and how insurance handles each. It also reviews the basic theories of risk management. (3 hours per week)
IN 205 Analysis of Insurance
Functions (A) .................3 credit hours
This course covers in detail an analysis of the various insurance functions especially applicable to property and casualty insurance. Some of the topics covered will be underwriting practices, loss prevention, rate making. (3 hours per week)
IN 221 Insurance and Taxation (A) .3 credit hours
The effect of income, estate, and gift taxation on an insurance program are discussed in this course. These taxes are considered for the individual and the business enterprise also. (3 hours per week)
IN 223 Principles of Insurance and
Property Loss Adjusting (A)... 3 credit hours
Reviews basic concepts in loss adjusting as well as defining practical applications of loss adjusting. (3 hours per week)
IN 231 Estate Planning and Life
Insurance (A) .................3 credit hours
Topics studied include: disposition of property in estates and trusts, administration of estates, federal estate taxation, federal gift taxation, planning through trusts and will, and the place of life insurance in estate planning. (3 hours per week)
MANAGEMENT
MG 105 Introduction to Business
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
A survey of the structure and functions of the American business system. Provides an overview of business organization, finance, managerial, control, production, distribution, personnel, and the interdependence of business and government. (3 hours per week)
70


MG 110 Salesmanship (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
Covers the fundamentals of selling from the determination of customer needs to the close of the sale. Treats such factors as customer problems, merchandising knowledge, and personality traits of successful salesmen. (3 hours per week)
MG 115 Principles of Advertising
(A, N, R).....................3 credit hours
An introductory course handling the theory, practice and techniques in advertising. Considers the role of advertising and sales promotion in our economy, and includes a general survey of the kinds and purposes of different media, the psychological implications of typical appeals, and limited student practice in promotional programming. (3 hours per week)
MG 130 Credit Fundamentals (A)..........3 credit hours
A comprehensive study of the background of credit, how it came into being, securing new business, controlling the account, and collecting the account. This first quarter concentrates on retail credit and treats the development and mechanics of installment credit. (3 hours per week)
MG 131 Credit Fundamentals (A)..........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 130
A continuation of MG 130, this quarter develops the background, function, and growth of wholesale and industrial credit, including a brief resume of the procedures used in securing, approving, and collecting such accounts. Also acquaints the student with the domestic and international media through which the American credit system operates. (3 hours per week)
MG 132 Credit Fundamentals (A)..........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 130
Covers the principles of mortgage lending as related to credit. Also includes a thorough explanation of foreclosure and bankruptcy and how these factors affect mortgage loan credit. Offers in detail the various methods of securing new business by savings and loan associations and mortgage bankers. (3 hours per week)
MG 201 Business Organization and
Management (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105 and BU 110 A study of policy construction and its relationship to effective management, sound personnel administration, and financial stability. Various areas previously studied are related to policy decision-making through the use of case studies. (3 hours per week)
MG 203 Principles of Marketing
(A, N, R).....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105, BU 110 Marketing as an institution and as a managerial variable is studied in this course. Covers a survey of the distributive fields, their function, and interrelationship. (3 hours per week)
MG 204 Principles of Marketing
(A, N, R).....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 203
A continuation of MG 203. Covers pricing policies, promotional activities, marketing in special fields, and market analysis. Especially suited to students planning career objectives in the field of distribution. (3 hours per week)
MG 210 Business Law I (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105
Introduction of ordinary legal aspects of business transactions involving such topics as legal rights and duties, law of contracts, negotiable instruments. Designed to give a general understanding and development of basic legal logic in business situations through the use of principles and cases and information useful in determining the need for professional counsel. (3 hours per week)
MG 211 Business Law II (A, N, R)........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 210
Continuation of Business Law I. Course includes further study in law of sales, bailments, agency, real estate, insurance, business organization and social welfare legislation. Primarily designed for students planning careers in accounting, credit, management, and other fields related to business law. Extensive use of case material. (3 hours per week)
MG 215 Principles of Retailing
(A, N, R).....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105 and BU 110 Designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of retail store organization and management, including store location, layout, buying, pricing operation, advertising, display, and analysis associated with handling of merchandise. (5 hours per week)
MG 216 Principles of Buying (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105, MG 203, BU 110 Designed for the student who wishes to specialize in this area, the course covers both principles and practices in the buying field. Professional buyers from the Metropolitan area will be invited to teach various units and lead discussions of typical buying problems. (3 hours per week)
MG 217 Sales Management (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 110 and Corequisite: MG 201 A study of sales management, the methods, techniques, and problems involved, and the relationship of sales management to the total business operation. (3 hours per week)
MG 220 Small Business
Management (N) ...............3 credit hours
Prerequisites: MG 201 and MG 203 A study of small business and its importance in the American economy. Problems of small business operation will be analyzed through the use of case studies. A business stimulation game will be an integral part of this course. (3 hours per week)
MG 221 Personnel Management
(A, N, R).....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105 and MG 201 A study of the principles and techniques of personnel management, including an examination of managerial practices in the selection, development, and motivation of employees. Considers factors underlying employee participation in policy formation; the effect of the work environment; administration of wages, salaries, and benefits; and the evaluation of personnel programs. (3 hours per week)
71


MG 222 Office Management (A, N, R). .3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105
Emphasis is placed on the functions of the office and office organization, work in the office, office layout, equipment, supplies, and forms, personnel problems in the office, and costs and control of office work. Course presents methods of recognizing and solving office communication problems and awareness of successful human relations, changing technologies and philosophy of business and the technical terminology used in business. (3 hours per week)
MG 230 Credit Procedures (A).............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 132
Concerns itself with the actual operation of a credit department. Includes a comprehensive evaluation of such things as credit approval and credit identification, authorization, accounts receivable procedure, collection fundamentals and methods, and rehabilitating the delinquent account. (3 hours per week)
MG 231 Credit Counseling and
Account Handling (A)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 230
Techniques in interviewing and counseling credit applicants. (3 hours per week)
MG 232 Credit Reporting (A)..............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 230
Courses will provide up-to-date procedures of the
credit reporting industry. Details involved in the securing and maintaining ????
MG 239 Wage and Salary
Administration (R) ............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 221 or consent of instructor Systematic administration of wages and salaries as a means of motivation and control in business and other enterprises. Job analysis, descriptions and specifications, job evaluation methods, wage structure, community wage and salary surveys, principles and administration of wage incentive plans and their effectiveness. (3 hours per week)
MG 240 Business Finance I (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105, Econ. 109 or 211, AC 113 Reviews functions and roles of the various financial institutions as they interact with the individual consumer and the economic environment. Studies the impact of fiscal and monetary policy on the business environment. Designed as an introductory course in finance. (3 hours per week)
MG 241 Business Finance II (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 240
Examines the sources and uses of short term, intermediate term, and long term funds for a business. Principles and motives of corporate financial management are stressed. Designed primarily for second year students and community businessmen. (3 hours per week)
MG 250 Business Policies (A, N, R) .3 credit hours
Prerequisites: MG 105 and MG 201 and 12 Hrs.
Mgt. Courses
A study of policy construction and its relationship to effective management, sound personnel administration, and financial stability. Various areas previously studied
are related to policy decision-making through the use of case studies. (3 hours per week)
PR 209 Public Relations (R).............3 credit hours
Introduction to procedures and practice in writing institutional news, features and editorials for public information media. (3 hours per week)
REAL ESTATE
RE 101 Real Estate Principles
and Practices (R)..............3 credit hours
A fundamental real estate course covering the economic, legal, financial, marketing, managerial and operational aspects of real estate. The day by day operations and roles of the broker covering listings, prospecting, advertising, financing, etc. will be surveyed. (3 hours per week)
RE 103 Real Estate Finance (R)...........3 credit hours
Analysis of real estate financing, including lending policies and problems in financial transactions in residential, commerical and special purpose properties. Methods of financing properties is emphasized. (3 hours per week)
RE 104 Real Estate Law (R)...............3 credit hours
Law of real property, transfers, deed, leases, escrows, etc. Law as it affects brokers and salesmen. This course is oriented toward the law as it applies in Colorado (3 hours per week)
RE 201 Principles of Insurance (R). .3 credit hours
Basic course in insurance, risk and risk bearing, and insurance regulation as it applies to the real estate field. (3 hours per week)
RE 202 Real Estate Appraisal (R).........3 credit hours
An introductory course covering the purposes of appraisals, the appraisal process and the different approaches, methods and techniques used to determine the value of various types of property. (3 hours per week)
RE 203 Real Estate Trends (R)............3 credit hours
An attempt will be made to recognize current attitudes, trends in uses for real estate and change in utilization. (3 hours per week)
RE 204 Land Resources (R)................3 credit hours
Physical, economic and institutional factors that affect, condition and control mans use of these resources. (3 hours per week)
SECRETARIAL
SC 100 Duplicating Machines (A, N, R) 2 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 112 Typing or equivalent Provides instruction and practice in the operation of spirit duplicators, mimeograph machines, and thermal and photocopy machines. Also includes the preparation of stencils, master, and various media associated with these machines. (2 hours per week plus lab as needed)
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SC 103 Business Machines (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
Prerequisite or Corequisite: M 100
Developmental Math
Fundamental instruction in the basic mathematical process addition, subtraction, multiplication, division on full-key, and printing calculators. Following basic familiarization on a variety of makes and models, the student will return to the 10-key machines to develop employable proficiency at high levels of speed and accuracy. (Also, the student will be introduced to specialized machine processes such as employing constants, using machine memory devices, figuring lapsed time, chain discounts, mark-ups and mark-downs, percentages of increase and decrease etc. (5 hours per week plus a minimum of 2 practice hours)
SC 105 Filing and Records
Control (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
This course acquaints the student with the rules, procedures, and techniques of filing that are vital to every business worker. The course also covers the principles of records management and control. (3 hours per week)
SC 110 Typing I (A, N, R)...............4 credit hours
A beginning course for those who have had no previous instruction in typing. Introduces the keyboard and machine parts, and develops correct techniques for attaining acceptable levels of speed and accuracy. While primary emphasis is placed on straight-copy skills, the course covers a range of basic typing applications: letters, manuscripts, tabulation problems, and common business forms. This course is designed to meet the needs of students with vocational as well as nonbusiness objectives. (5 hours per week, plus lab as needed)
SC 111 Typing II (A, N, R)..............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 110 or equivalent
Typing speed of 25 words per minute This course is a continuation of SC 110. The course is also designed for those who have taken some limited typing instruction but need to have their basic skills restored before they can persue intermediate typing (SC 112). The student is encouraged to develop speed and accuracy skills to a higher degree before entering the next phase of the typing sequence. (5 hours per week plus lab as needed)
SC 112 Intermediate Typing (A, N, R). 4 credit hours
Typing speed of 35 words per minute Reinforces skills acquired in typing, identifies and handles individual typing deficiencies and covers a comprehensive program of vocational typing applications. Emphasis is placed upon production typing as it relates to office situations. (5 hours per week plus lab as directed)
SC 113 Production Typing (A, N, R) .4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 112 or equivalent
Typing speed of 45 words per minute Emphasizes attainment of high professional levels in speed and accuracy, especially in the rate of production output in those activities frequently performed by a secretary or full-time typist. The course concentrates on building production skills and preparation for office employment using proper business forms. Emphasis is placed upon problem typing in the following areas: general, technical, accounting, professional, govern-
ment, and executive. This is the terminal course in the typing sequence. (5 hours per week plus lab as directed)
SC 120 Alphabetical Shorthand
Principles I (A, N).............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 110 or equivalent This is an accelerated introductory shorthand course for those students preferring an alphabetic rather than a symbol system. The course covers the theory of ABC Stenoscript Shorthand, a totally alphabetical system. Both reading and writing techniques are stressed, and the student is introduced to short dictation exercises at minimum speeds. (10 hours per week plus lab as directed)
SC 120A Alphabetic Shorthand
Principles I (R) ..............2 credit hours
This is an introductory course for those students preferring an alphabetic rather than a symbol system. The course covers the theory of ABC Stenoscript Shorthand, a totally alphabetic system. Both reading and writing techniques are stressed, and typewritten transcription is introduced. (5 hours per week, plus lab as directed)
SC 120B Alphabetic Shorthand
Principles I (R) ..............2 credit hours
This course is a continuation of SC 120A. The course is also designed for those students indicating a need for basic review and reinforcement of ABC Stenoscript Shorthand theory before continuing with advanced dictation and transcription. Familiar material is dictated for speed ranges of 50-70 words per minute. Tran-
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scription at the typewriter is further developed, and dictation of unfamiliar material is introduced. (5 hours per week, plus lab practice as needed)
SC 121 Alphabetic Shorthand
Principles II (A, N, R).........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 120 or proficiency examination This course develops speed in taking dictation from 70-90 words per minute. Typewritten transcription is further developed. The basic rules of sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization, etc. are reviewed in preparation for job entrance tests and Civil Service Examination. Spelling improvement is integrated with the course content. It is suggested that students plan to follow this course with SC 127 Shorthand Speedbuilding. (5 hours per week plus lab practice as directed)
SC 123 Spanish Gregg Shorthand
Principles (N) .................4 credit hours
See course description for SC 125. This course will introduce the theory of Gregg Shorthand in Spanish. Designed for International Secretarial Program. (5 hours per week)
SC 124 Spanish Shorthand
Transcription (N) ..............4 credit hours
See course description for SC 128. Continuation of SC 123. Designed for International Secretarial students. (5 hours per week)
SC 125 Gregg Shorthand
Principles (A, N)...............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 110 or equivalent Introduces the theory of Gregg Shorthand, Diamond Jubilee Series, and develops reading speeds from book plates and handwritten notes. Shorthand writing of familiar matter demonstrating all Gregg Principles is developed to average speeds of 60 words a minute. This course is intended for students who have had no previous Gregg Shorthand instruction, or for those whose proficiency examination indicate a need for basic review and reinforcement. (10 hours per week, plus practice as directed)
SC 125A Gregg Shorthand
Principles I (R) ..............2 credit hours
Prerequisite or co-requisite: SC 110 or equivalent Introduces the theory of Gregg Shorthand, Diamond Jubilee Series, and is intended for students who have had no previous Gregg Shorthand instruction. Reading from book plates and handwritten notes, writing techniques and typewriter transcription is developed at maximum speeds on familiar material. (5 hours per week, plus lab practice as needed)
SC125B Gregg Shorthand
Principles II (R) .............2 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 125A
This course is a continuation of SC 125A. The course is also designed for those who indicate a need for basic review and reinforcement of Gregg Shorthand theory before continuing with advanced dictation and transcription. Familiar material is dictated at speed ranges of 50-70 words a minute. Transcription at the typewriter is further developed. Dictation of unfamiliar matter at 50-70 words a minute is introduced in this class. (5 hours per week, plus lab practice as needed)
SC 126 Gregg Shorthand Principles
(A, N, R) ......................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 125 or proficiency examination Reinforces basic theory principles and develops the ability to take dictation of both familiar and unfamiliar matter. Transcription at the typewriter is further developed and special attention is placed on building an extensive shorthand vocabulary. Speed emphasis in this course ranges from 70-90 words a minute. (5 hours per week, plus lab as directed)
SC 127 Shorthand Speed Building
(A, N, R).......................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 126 or SC 121 or
Proficiency Examination
Intensive dictation practice permits the student to reach optimum speeds ranging from 90 to 110 words a minute. A comprehensive review is provided in punctuation, spelling, letter styles, and vocabulary improvement. A great emphasis on the typewritten transcript is also stressed in the course. (5 hours per week plus lab as directed)
SC 128 Shorthand Transcription
(A, N, R).......................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 127 or SC 121 Optimum speed and accuracy in dictation and transcription are fully realized in this course, with emphasis on the production of mailable letters. Total business proficiency is expected, and attention is directed to the ability to take dictation for longer periods and to transcribe job assignments at employable production rates. Speed ranges extend from 90 to 120 words a minute. (5 hours per week, plus lab as directed)
SC 130 Machine Transcription I
(A, N, R).......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 112 (Intermediate Typing)
or equivalent
This course provides fundamental instruction in the use of transcribing machines in the preparation of business letters and other correspondence. The course includes a review of letter styles, rules of transcription and punctuation, and the mechanics of producing mail-able letters at high production rates. (5 hours per week, plus lab as directed)
SC 131 Machine Transcription II
(A, N, R) ......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 130 or equivalent Designed primarily for students seeking certification as word-processing typists, this course provides intensive practice in the transcription of business letters from machine sources. Students may elect to concentrate in specific professional or business forms of correspondence, such as medical, legal, or educational transcription. Open to any student on an elective basis. (3 hours per week, plus lab practice)
SC 132 Machine Transcription
Spanish (N) ....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 112 or equivalent proficiency Intensive practice in the use of magnetic tape and belt transcribing machines in the preparation of business correspondence dictated in Spanish. Includes a review of letter styles, rules of transcription and punctuation, and the mechanics of producing mailable letters at high production rates. Experience on several models of
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electric typewriters will be provided. (3 hours per week plus lab practice)
SC 145 Comprehensive Office
Experience (R only) ... 3, 6, or 9 credit hours
This class is designed to give you actual office experience. Work is done for instructors and administrators. Students will hold positions such as Office Manager, Secretary-Receptionist, Accountant, Bookkeeper, Stenographer, Typists, Duplicating Machine Operator, and File Clerk. The position you acquire will be determined by the prerequisites you have had. New machines to be used are IBM Executive Typewriter, IBM Dual-pitch Selectric Typewriter, Magnetic Card Selectric Typewriter, telephone usage, and mimeo-scopes. Credit
hours will depend on hours in class:
1 hour per day, 5 days per week.....3 credit hours
2 hours per day, 5 days per week. .. .6 credit hours
3 hours per day, 5 days per week... .9 credit hours
SC 200 Office Procedures (A, N, R).... 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 112
This course introduces the student to the business world and acquaints the prospective office employee with the various office duties. Units covered include organization of office work, incoming and outgoing mail, postal and shipping services, telephone techniques, maintenance and control of office supplies, and business and social conduct. A practicum is used in the course which correlates classroom discussion with related office projects. (5 hours per week)
SC 206 Legal Dictation and
Transcription (A) ..............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 210
Specialized course for legal reporting and transcription. Student will continue to build mastery of legal terminology and forms. Individual tape, programmed dictation is used extensively in this course. (3 hours per week plus lab as needed)
SC 210 Legal Secretarial Procedures
and Terminology (A).............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 200
Provides intensive practice in preparing many types of legal documents. Student is introduced to the routjne of a legal office. This course is designed for the legal secretarial student, and attention will be given to mastering meanings, spelling, and shorthand forms established for legal terms in preparation for legal and dictating transcription. (5 hours per week plus lab as needed)
SC 259 International Secretarial
Procedures (N) .................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 118
Adapts material described in SC 200 to the International business scene. Covers import-export procedures; telephone procedures (domestic and foreign): transportation and travel (domestic and foreign); money exchange; mailing procedures (domestic and foreign); English-Spanish office communications; and a number of office routines that are characteristic of all business offices. (3 hours per week)
SC 260 Office Practice I
Spanish (N) ....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 113 or equivalent proficiency A course designed primarily for students enrolled in
the International Secretarial Program, and students meeting the above prerequisites. Deals with the commercial Spanish language used in both domestic and foreign offices. Emphasis on Spanish Correspondence. (3 hours per week)
SC 261 Office Practice II
Spanish (N) ..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 260
Continuation of SC 260. Develops a sound business vocabulary and introduces correct translation demanded when acting as an official interpreter for both written and oral business communication. Emphasis on Documentation. (3 hours per week)
SC 262 Office Practice III
Spanish (N) ..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 251
Continuation of SC 261. Emphasizes practical application through project work. Students will be involved with representatives from import-export firms, government offices, foreign consulates, and embassies. (3 hours per week)
TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
(Auraria only)
TT 101 Fundamentals of Commercial
Transportation I (A) .........4 credit hours
(Formerly Introduction to Traffic and Transportation) A survey of the air, highway, rail and water transportation industry. Covers the importance of transportation, location theory, historical fatcors, geographical consideration, inherent advantages of each mode, relationship of carrier and user and the current economic status of each mode. (4 hours per week)
TT102 Fundamentals of Commercial
Transportation II (A).........4 credit hours
(Formerly Introduction to Traffic Transportation) Prerequisite: TT 101 or permission of instructor A continuation of TT 101. (4 hours per week)
TT 103 Fundamentals of Commercial
Transportation III (A)........4 credit hours
(Formerly Logistics and Traffic Management) Prerequisite: TT 102 or permission of instructor A continuation of TT 102, completing a three-quarter sequence essential to the further study of all courses in the Transportation Division of the College. Reviews, in-depth, the significance of the various facets of transportation. (4 hours per week)
TT 105 Traffic Management and
Physical Distribution I (A)...2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 101, TT 102 and TT 103 Advanced studies of management concepts as they relate to traffic management and physical distribution. This first quarter deals with the organization, management, and analytical methods of physical and traffic management. (2 hours per week)
TT 106 Traffic Management and
Physical Distribution II (A).... 2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 105
A continuation of TT 105 covering warehousing, inventory control, material handling and packaging. (2 hours per week)
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TT 107 Traffic Management and
Physical Distribution III (A) .2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 106
Concludes a three-quarter sequence. Deals with the development of rates, classifications relative to transportation, documentation and services offered by or used in connection with various modes of transportation, etc. Also treated in this quarter will be the liabilities of carriers and the managerial procedures involved in claims. (2 hours per week)
TT 110 Transportation
Regulations I (A) ..............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 101
A professional course providing intensive and advanced work in regulation for transportation specialists who are candidates for admission to practice before the Interstate Commerce Commission. A study of the promotion and restriction of transportation enterprises from colonial times to the present; economic and political climate extant as each mode of transport emerged; general effect of transportation legislation. (4 hours per week)
TT 111 T ransportation
Regulations II (A) .............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 110
A comprehensive study of cases applying policies for transportation regulations and employing decisions of special interests in traffic administration. (4 hours per week)
TT112 Transportation
Regulations III (A) ............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 110
A study of the Rules of Procedure before the Interstate Commerce Commission, the Practitioners Code of Ethics, due process, and the preparation of cases. (4 hours per week)
TT 120 International Trade I (A)..........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor A comprehensive course in the field of Import-Export Operations combining basic theory with practical application, such as the facets of including credits, documentation, government controls, promotion sales and transportation legislation. (4 hours per week)
TT121 International Trade (A).............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 120 or permission of instructor Continuation of TT 120. Covers export trade throughout the world and import business within the United States. (4 hours per week)
TT 122 International Trade III (A)........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 121 or permission of instructor Conclusion of a three-quarter sequence in International Trade. This is an advanced course based on case history method with active student participation. Can serve as a refresher course for export executives and their assistants. (4 hours per week)
TT130 Management Tools and
Concepts I (A) .................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105 or permission of instructor The first of three related courses will focus on managerial accounting. Accounting reports and their use.
Cost Accounting introduction, and accounting methodology. For Transportation students only. (4 hours per week)
TT 131 Management Tools and
Concepts II (A).................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 130
Introduces principles of corporate finance, financial analysis and procedures. Introduction to money and banking, fiscal and monetary institutions and tools. For transportation students only. (4 hours per week)
TT132 Management Tools and
Concepts III (A)................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 131
Concluding section of a three-quarter sequence, providing an introduction to marketing and statistics, as they pertain to the field of transportation. (4 hours per week)
TT141 Economics of
Transportation I (A) ...........2 credit hours
Prerequisites: TT 101, TT 102 and TT 103 An in-depth study of transportation economics. Such specifics as the development of transportation systems, theory of pricing, cost structures and rate making, competition between modes, transportation regulation, finance and national transportation policy will be considered. (2 hours per week)
TT 142 Economics of
Transportation II (A)...........2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 141
A continuation of TT 141. An in-depth study of the theory of pricing and rate-making. Examines the regulations of various modes of transportation. (2 hours per week)
TT 143 Economics of
Transportation III (A)..........2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 142
Concludes the Transportation Economics sequence. Studies national transportation policies, competition, integration of transportation, transporting financing, labor, and regulations governing the field of transportation. (2 hours per week)
TT 151 Workshop in Freight
Rates I (A) ....................2 credit hours
A practical workshop designed specifically to prepare the student for tariff interpretation of rates by rail, motor carrier, air cargo, air express, trailer on flat car, container on flat car, freight forwarded and water. (2 hours per week)
TT 152 Workshop in Freight
Rates II (A) ...................2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 151
A continuation of TT 151. An intensive, practical workshop extending tariff interpretations. (2 hours per week)
TT 153 Workshop in Freight
Rates III (A) ..................2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 152
Concludes the Workshop in Freight Rates sequence. Particular emphasis placed on tariff interpretation of rates in view of the various vehicles employed in transportation. (2 hours per week)
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DIVISION OF COMMUNITY AND PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
CONTENTS
Audio-Visual Technology R
Building Inspection R
Classroom Instructional Assisting R
Classroom Teacher Assisting 1 A Criminal Justice R
Day Care Teacher Assisting A
Early Childhood Education Assisting N, A
Early Childhood Education and Management N, R
Suggested Core for Early Childhood Education
Environmental Control Technology R
Fire Science Technology R
Food Service N
Dietary Assisting N
Hotel-Motel Operations A
Institutional Housekeeping A
Information Media Assisting N
Information Media Technology N
Paralegal A
Recreational Leadership R
Senior Citizen Activity Assisting 1 A Social Worker Assisting A
Traffic Engneering Technology R
Urban Horticulture N
Urban Planning Technology R
Water-Wastewater Technology R
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DIVISION OF COMMUNITY AND PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
AUDIO-VISUAL TECHNOLOGY (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
The Audio-Visual Technology program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences, Communications and Arts, and Business and Management are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Audio-Visual Technology from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs
AV100 Introduction to Media..................... 3
AV102 Audio-Visual Basic Electricity............ 3
AV103 Audio-Visual Library Services............. 4
AV 200 Production of AV Materials................ 4
AV 201 Television Production .................... 6
AV 202 Audio-Visual Photography.................. 3
AV 203 Projection Equipment Maint................ 4
AV 204 Transcription Equip. Maint................ 4
AV 205 Audio-Visual Electronics ................. 4
AV 206 Duplicating Processes..................... 3
AV 297 Cooperative Work Experience...............11
AV 299 Independent Study......................... 3
Related Courses
Course Title
EG 106 Occupational Communication ............... 3
EG 107 Occupational Communication ............... 3
EG 108 Occupational Communication ............... 3
M105 Introduction to Algebra.................. 4
MG 105 Introduction to Business................... 3
PY 100 Human Relations in Bus. & Ind..............3
PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Dev....................... 3
Related Elective .................................18
Total Credits Required: 92 Total Contact Hours: 1420
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives must be approved by the students Advisor. NOTE: AV courses should be taken in the sequence which appears above. Special permission should be obtained from the instructor involved to alter sequence.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:
The demand for the services of trained individuals in this area is presently quite strong and the interest in such personnel throughout this state and other states has been high for some time. Trainees will be prepared to enter business, industry and educational systems upon completion of the program. The student will develop basic skills in the audio-visual program from
simple familiarization with the repair of hardware to the various production techniques encountered in the educational media field.
BUILDING INSPECTION (R)
ONE YEAR PROGRAM
The Building Inspection program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Industrial Occupations and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive a Certificate of Achievement in Building Inspection from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs
Bl 100 Bldg. Codes & Standards.................... 3
Bl 102 Construction Materials .................... 4
Bl 103 Mechanical Inspection ..................... 3
Bl 104 Field Inspection Techniques................ 4
Bl 105 Soils and Grading.......................... 3
Bl 106 Electrical Inspection ..................... 3
BI110 Plumbing Inspection ....................... 3
BI112 Plan Review ............................... 3
Bl 214 Const. Organ & Manag....................... 3
Bl 215 Utilities Inspection....................... 3
Bl 216 Intro, to Design Funda..................... 3
Bl 218 Housing Inspection & Programs.............. 3
Bl 297 Cooperative Work Experience................ 4
Related Courses
Course Title
CA211 Blueprint Reading for Building Trades........ 3
EG 108 Occupational Communications ................ 3
Total Credits Required: 48 Total Contact Hours: 550
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:
This program is designed primarily for individuals presently employed in the field of Building Inspection and who wish to improve their abilities and increase their knowledges. Those individuals in the building contracting and construction fields will find the courses valuable in that they will help them understand the requirements which must be met.
Building inspection includes the examination and evaluation of construction work in progress, comparing or contracting it with recognized norms or standards, and accepting or rejecting it in the light of conformity or non-conformity to the standards.. It involves a person capable of understanding and interpreting a body of standards, so that he can make judgments regarding all aspects and phases of building, construction rehabilitation and conservation.
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CLASSROOM INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTING (R) TWO YEAR PROGRAM
The Classroom Instructional Assisting program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences, Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Classroom Instructional Assisting from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Titles nrrs
Cl 110 Classroom Instructional Tech. 1......... 3
Cl 111 Classroom Instructional Tech. II......... 3
Cl 112 Classroom Instructional Tech. Ill......... 3
Cl 297 Cooperative Work Experience.................. 9
Related Courses
Course Titles
AV100 Introduction to Media.................
AR101 Basic Drawing.........................
B 100 General Biology.....................
EG 111 English Composition .................
EG 112 English Composition .................
EG 113 English Composition .................
HS 107 Hangups & Happenings in Amer. His.
HS 220 Colorado History.....................
LI 145 Literature for Children..............
MU 145 Music for Children...................
PS 113 American National Govt..............
PS 114 Amer. State & Local Govt............
Psychology ........................
S 110 Introduction to Speech..............
SC 110 Typing I ............................
SO 107 Sociology of Pers. Dev...............
SO 223 Youth in Society.....................
Math Elective...............................
Physical or Biological Science Elec.........
Social Science Elective.....................
Elective ...................................
Cr.
Hrs.
. 3 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 9 3 4 3 3 3 3-5 3 3
Total Credits Required: 90-92 Total Contact Hours: 1040-1060
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives must be approved by the students advisor.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Increasing demands for higher quality instructional programs including more individualized instruction, new and revised curriculums, and major innovations in the educational process, all of which demand more time by professional staff members suggest that the future of classroom instructional assistants is very bright.
CLASSROOM TEACHING ASSISTING (A)
Training for teacher assistants is offered as a seminar. Time arrangements vary to meet specific needs. Basically the program involves 30 hours of class time which can include observations and practical exper-
ience as well as lectures and demonstrations by qualified school personnel. The aim of the program is to prepare teacher aids to fill existing job needs in local schools.
Topics usually included are: personal and child psychology, introduction to school library organization, orientation to school administration, use of audio-visual equipment and other school machines, first aid and creative activities. Since each offering of the course is intended to meet specific needs, concepts emphasized may vary.
The course may be taken for credit or without credit. If the course is selected for credit, it will be given a TA prefix.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Aides to professional school teachers are employed throughout the public school systems in the local area. Aides for vocational or occupational programs at the secondary level must also meet state certification requirements which exceed this course.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE (R)
TWO YEAR PROGRAM
The Criminal Justice program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences, and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Criminal Justice from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Title
CJ110 Criminal Justice I.............
CJ 111 Criminal Justice II ..........
CJ112 Constitutional Law ............
CJ113 Civil Law .....................
CJ 114 Criminal Law..................
CJ 116 Rules of Evidence.............
CJ 210 Criminal Investigation I .....
CJ211 Criminal Investigation II......
CJ 212 Criminal Investigation III ...
CJ 220 Juvenile Delinquency..........
CJ 222 Traffic Enforcement ..........
CJ 224 Community Relations ..........
*CJ 297 Cooperative Work Experience Criminal Justice Electives............
Related Courses
Course Title
EG 111 English Composition ................... 3
EG 112 English Composition ................... 3
EG 113 English Composition ................... 3
PS 113 American National Govt............... 3
PS 114 American State & Local Govt........... 3
PY210 Social Psychology...................... 3
S110 Fundamentals of Speech................. 3
SO 111 Introduction to Sociology.............. 3
Cr.
Hrs.
. 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0-6 .18
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SO 112 Introduction to Sociology....................... 3
Science or Math Elective..............................3-5
Related Electives ..................................... 6
Total Credits Required: 90-100
Total Contact Hours: 900-1020
Students who are not presently employed in the profession will be required to take a minimum of 8 credit hours of CJ 297, Cooperative Work Experience before they can receive their associate degree.
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives must be approved by the students advisor.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Law enforcement is one of the largest of the career groups in public service. Investigative agents and specialists are employed by the federal government. A vast number of career opportunities exist with a variety of state and local agencies. This program has been designed to serve the needs of new recruits as well as provide for the in-service and upgrading training needs of those presently employed in the field.
DAY CARE TEACHING ASSISTING (A)
ONE QUARTER PROGRAM
The Day Care Teacher Assisting program has been designed to prepare personnel to work in both private and publicly funded day care centers, as assistants. This is a one quarter program and a Certificate of Achievement will be awarded upon successful completion of this program. Cr
Hrs.
CC102 Creative Activities ........................ 3
CC103 Orientation to Program Practicum......... 6
CC 109 Introduction to Teaching the Young Child.. 4
CC 101 Day Care Teaching Techniques and
Program Design ........................... 4
PE 101 First Aid ................................. 1
AV100 Introduction to Media....................... 3
21
Total Credit Hours: 21 Total Contact Hours: 270
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The demand for trained assistants or aides in Day Care Centers is steadily increasing. Jobs are available in nursery schools and other child care centers as group leaders.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND MANAGEMENT (N-R)
The Early Childhood Education and Management Program was designed to meet the vocational training needs for all personnel involved in the care of young pre-kindergarten children as determined by the Colorado State Social Services Licensing Department.
The six-quarter program is the most comprehensive curriculum providing courses in child development and administration, as well as appropriate support courses to complement the observation student teaching core. The academic requirements enumerated by the State are optimally satisfied.
The three-quarter introductory program offers a substantial foundation in the early childhood field and meets current teacher requirements.
The experienced but academically unqualified student will select the appropriate recommended courses from the Suggested Core for Social Services Licensing. The acquisition of 36 quarter hour credits from this program will satisfy minimal requirements.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ASSISTING (N-A)
THREE QUARTER PROGRAM
First Quarter Cr. Hrs.
**CC 103 Orientation to Program Practicum... ... 6
CC 108 Intro, to Teach, the Young Child... . ... 4
CC 102 Creative Activ ... 3
PE 101 First Aid ... 1
Science Elective ...3-5
17-19
Second Quarter Cr. Hrs.
**CC 104 Superv. Lab. Experience ... 6
CC 109 Methods of Teach, the Young Child. ... 4
PY 221 Developmental Psychology ... 3
English Credit or Foreign Language . .3-5
16-18
Third Quarter Cr. Hrs.
**CC 105 Supervised Student Particip ... 6
CC 211 Child Care Proq. Supv. & Admin. II.. ... 4
PY 107 Psychology of Personal Develop, or
GC 100 Guidance Couns .. 3
PY 123 Child Guidance Techniques ... 3
PY 222 Developmental Psychology ... 3
19
Total Credit Hours: 52-56 Total Contact Hours: 749-753
English Credit selected upon approval/or recommendation of advisor:
RE 101 Basic Reading
EG 106 Occupational Communications
SC 100A Typing Beginning courses or other (by examination)
Program Practicum Core-CC103, CC104, CC105 Must be taken sequentially, each of the three may be offered every quarter.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The demand for trained assistants or aides in the child care field is steadily increasing. Jobs are available in nursery schools and day care centers as group leaders.
Additional Course Offerings for refresher or updating:
CC 201 Workshop of Ideas...........4 Cr. Hrs.
CC202 Workshop of Things...........4 Cr. Hrs.
Acceptable for State Social Service Licensing Requirements in the proper categories. See Suggested Core for Social Service Licensing Requirement.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND MANAGEMENT (N-R)
SIX QUARTER PROGRAM
Cr.
Hrs.
CC102 Creative Activ........................... 3
**CC103 Orientation to Prog. Practicum......... 6
PE 101 First Aid ............................... 1
PY 221 Developmental Psychology................. 3
Science Elective ...............................3-5
16-18
80


Second Quarter
"CC104 Supervised Lab. Experience............ 6
PY 107 Psychology of Personal Develop, or
GC100 Guidance Couns........................ 3
PY 222 Developmental Psychology.............. 3
'English Credit or Foreign Language............3-5
15-17
Third Quarter
**CC 105 Superv. Student Participation............ 6
MU 145 Music for Child....................... 3
PY123 Child Guidance Techniques............. 3
S 110 Intro, to Speech or
EG 107 Occup. Commun......................... 3
SO 111 Intro, to Soc. or Ethnic Studies...... 3
"18
Fourth Quarter hr.
* *CC 106 Supervised Student Particip........... 6
CC108 Intro, to Teaching the Young Child... 4
CC210 Child Care Prog. Supv. & Admin. 1..... 4
PY111 Gen. Psychology.......................... 3
~X7
Fifth Quarter
**CC 107 Supv. Student Participation ............. 6
CC109 Methods of Teaching the Young Child.. 4
CC211 Child Care Prog. Supv. & Admin. II... 4
PY 112 Gen. Psych.............................._3
17
Sixth Quarter
CC 201 Workshop of Ideas.......................... 4
CC 212 Child Care Center Bus. Operations......... 4
Cr.
Hrs.
F108 Nutrition ..................................... 3
L1145 Literature for Children....................... 3
Elective .............................................. 3
17
Total Credit Hours: 100-104 Total Contact Hours: 1359-1364
English credit selected upon recommendation or approval of advisor:
RE 101 Basic Reading
EG 106 Occup. Comm.
SC 100A Or other Typing Course
'Program Practicum Core Each of which may be offered every quarter CC103, CC104, CC105, CC106, CC107. To be completed within the two year period with CC103 and 104 taken sequentially as to the initial core.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The nationwide trend is for mothers with small children to join the nations work forces. The pre-school children of these mothers will be taken care of in some type of childrens center. Graduates of this program will be ready to work in day care centers, nursery schools and child development centers as directors or teachers upon completion of the specific experience requirements of the State Social Services Licensing Unit.
Additional Course offerings for refresher or updating:
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accntg........5 Cr. Hrs.
CC 201 Workshop of Ideas...........4 Cr. Hrs.
CC 202 Workshop of Things...........4Cr. Hrs.
Acceptable for State Social Service Licensing requirements in the proper categories. See suggested Core for Social Service Licensing Requiremnt.
81


SUGGESTED CORE FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
SOCIAL SERVICE LICENSING REQUIREMENTS
CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND NURSERY Hcrrs
EDUCATION ..............................18'
CHILD DEVELOPMENT .......................... 9
CC103 Orientation to Program Practicum..... 6
CC108 Introduction to Teaching Young Children 4 CC109 Methods of Teaching the Young Child.. 4 *PY 107 Psychology of Personal Development... 3
*PY 123 Child Guidance Techniques........... 3
*PY221 Developmental Psychology .......... 3
*PY222 Developmental Psychology........... 3
RELATED AREAS .............................. 9
CC102 Creative Activ..................... 3
CC104 Supv. Student Lab. Experience...... 6
Cr.
Hrs.
CC 201 Workshop of Ideas.................... 4
L1145 Literature for Children .............. 3
MU 145 Music for Child..................... 3
PSYCHOLOGY ................................. 4.5
*PY 107 Psychology of Personal Development__3
PY111 General Psych........................ 3
PY 112 General Psych........................ 3
*PY 123 Child Guidance Techniques............ 3
*PY 221 Developmental Psychology............. 3
*PY 222 Developmental Psychology............. 3
ADMINISTRATION.............................. 6
CC210 Child Care Prog. Supv. & Admin. 1.... 4
*CC 221 Child Care Prog. Supv. & Admin. II.. 4
CC212 Child Care Center Business Operations. 4
SOCIOLOGY .................................. 4.5
*CC211 Child Care Prog. Supv. & Admin. II.. 4
SO 111 Introduction to Sociology............ 3
NUTRITION .................................. 3
F108 Nutrition .............................. 3
Courses are applicable to both disciplines but credit will be given in only one.
A total of 18 hours, 9 each from the Child Development & Related areas is required.
Completion of 36 credit hours from the above Core Course can be accomplished in a nine month or three quarter period. This Core is appropriate for those who have already completed the State work experience requirement (4,000 work hours with young children) for licensing. Of the 36 required hours, at least 15 must be taken at Community College of Denver. A Certificate of Completion will be awarded upon satisfactory completion of courses selected by the student to meet licensing requirements.
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
The Environmental Control Technology program Is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Science, and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Environmental Control Technology from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Title h?s.
EV101 Environmental Health.................... 3
EV 107 Solid Waste Pollution................... 3
EV 201 Atmospheric Pollution .................. 4
EV 203 Food Sanitation......................... 3
EV 205 Pollution Control Systems............... 4
EV 207 Vectors and Pesticides ................. 5
EV 220 Pollution Sampling & Analysis........... 4
EV 297 Cooperative Work Experience............. 9
EV 299 Independent Study....................... 4
Related Courses
Course Title hr.
B110 Intro, to Environment................... 3
B 111 General Biology......................... 5
C101 Fundamentals of Chemistry............... 4
82


Cr.
Hrs.
C103 Fundamentals of Chemistry.............. 4
EG 106 Occupational Communication............. 3
EG 107 Occupational Communication or
S110 Introduction to Speech................. 3
EG 108 Occupational Communication ............ 3
M 102 Applied Math I ........................ 3
M 103 Applied Math II ....................... 3
M 104 Applied Math III ...................... 3
PS 161 Political Leadership .................. 3
PY 100 Human Rel. in Bus. & Ind............... 3
51121 Environmental Science ................. 4
51122 Environmental Science.................. 4
51123 Environmental Science.................. 4
WW100 Intro, to Water-Wastewater................ 3
Total Credits Required: 94 Total Contact Hours: 1140
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The Environmental Control Technology program is planned in response to the rising concern with problems of pollution. This program of study is designed to prepare students for employment as technicians in governmental pollution control agencies, industrial pollution control, water supply, water resources, engineering consulting firms, city engineering offices, and related activities. Emphasis is placed upon the technicians role in pollution control functions, utility distribution and collection system layout, surveys, and sampling and testing procedures.
FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
The Fire Science Technology program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences, and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Fire Science Technology from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Title
FS100 Intro, to Fire Science..................... 3
FS 104 Fire Co. Organ. & Proc................... 3
FS106 Fire Fighting Tactics & Strategy........... 3
FS 108 Fire Hydraulics ......................... 3
FS 110 Fire Apparatus & Equip................... 3
FS 202 Fund, of Fire Prevention................. 3
FS 204 Related Codes & Ordinances 1............ 3
FS 205 Related Codes & Ordinances II............ 3
FS 206 Rescue Practices......................... 3
FS 208 Hazardous Materials 1.................... 3
FS 209 Hazardous Materials II................... 3
FS 212 Fire Prot. Equip. & Systems.............. 3
FS 214 Fire Department Administration .......... 3
FS216 Private Fire Protection System............. 3
Cr.
Hrs.
FS218 Fire Investigation .......................... 3
FS 220 Fire Insurance.............................. 3
FS 230 Blprt. Reading For Firefighters............. 3
Fire Science Technology Elective................... 6
Related Courses
Course Title
EG 106 Occup. Comm............................... 3
EG 107 Occup. Comm............................... 3
EG 108 Occup. Comm............................... 3
PY 100 Human Rel. in Bus. & Ind.................. 3
SO 107 Socio. of Pers. Dev....................... 3
M103 Applied Math II ............................ 3
C 109 Applied Chemistry......................... 4
P 101 Fund. Physics ............................. 3
Social Science Elective............................ 3
Math Elective...................................... 3
Related Elective .................................. 3
Total Credits Required: 91 Total Contact Hours: 930
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives must be approved by the students advisor.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Program is designed to prepare for initial entrance into employment or advancement with municipalities, industrial firms, or other employers requiring fire protection personnel. May be employed by insurance companies and agencies as salesmen, fire loss and safety prevention personnel, adjusters or insurance rating and inspection bureaus.
FOOD SERVICE (N)
This program is supported by appropriate related courses for those needing a program for self-employment or management entry. Completion of any one quarter in Food Production merits a Certificate of Completion. A Certificate of Achievement is awarded for completion of three quarters in Food Production plus electives totaling at least 18 credit hours and a minimum of 3 credit hours of Cooperative Work Experience. An A.D. will be awarded upon completion of Food Production and Management courses totaling 96 credit hours (or their equivalent in work experience) combined with 30 hours of appropriate electives; or for a combination of courses that include five quarters of Food Production and Management totaling 80 credit hours (or equivalent work experience) plus 49 credit hours of appropriate electives as specified in the program. In addition, the General Education requirements for an A.D. which are in effect at the time of enrollment must be met satisfactorily.
FOOD PREPARATION
THREE QUARTERS
First Quarter
F 101 Food Production I Sanitations
Safety Equipment, Intro, to Food Prep..16
EG 106 Occupational Communication ............ 3
PY107 Psychology of Personal Develop..........3
22
83


Second Quarter h£
F102 Food Produc. II ..............................16
M 100 Develop. Math .............................. 3
SO 105 Fund of Job Seeking ........................ 3
22
Third Quarter
F 103 Food Produc. Ill.............................16
F108 Nutrition .................................... 3
MG105 Intro, to Business........................... 3
22
Total Credit Hours: 66 Total Contact Hours: 780
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: There are varied opportunities for trained workers in entry level jobs in the field of food production and management. Training programs offered are designed to give students a salable skill in food production by the end of any quarter. Job skills needed to work in one of the basic work stations of a commercial kitchen can be learned in approximately a 200 hour training block depending on
the students previous experience, available time and effort.
FOOD MANAGEMENT 3-6 QUARTERS
The Food management program may be taken as part of the two year program in food service or may be elected without the first year program by the student having work experience in food production and wanting to expand production skills and/or enter the management phase of commercial eating establishments.
Fourth Quarter h.
F 201 Food Mgmt. I .............................16
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accounting................. 5
21
Fifth Quarter
F 202 Food Mgmt. II ............................16
MG 201 Business Mgmt............................ 3
MG 250 Business Policies........................ 3
22
84


Sixth Quarter Hcrrs
F 203 Food Mgmt. Ill ..............................16
F297 Coop. Work Exp. or'Electives
(at least 6 hrs.) .......................1-10
17-26
Total Credit Hours: 125-135 Total Contact Hours: (721-810) or 1501-1590
ELECTIVES
'Business and Management..........3 credit hours
Accounting .......................5 credit hours
Social Sciences...................3 credit hours
Cooperative Work Experience is mandatory for each Food Production or Food Management program. It may be taken either as part of the course block or in addition to it depending upon the student's occuDational objectives and training needs. Arrangements will be made through instructor and the division director.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Completion of the two year program in the food production option will qualify the students for food service occupations in hotels, motels, restaurants, public schools, hospitals and similar institutional jobs. The management option provides occupational up-grading or entry to management careers related to commercial food service.
DIETARY ASSISTANT (N)
THREE QUARTER PROGRAM
This program is designed to prepare dietary assistants, nutritionist aides, and school food service personnel with a limited background in sound food and nutrition principles. There is not, at this time, any such program open to the general public. There is a demonstrable need for individuals with this type of training in hospitals, extended care facilities, nursing homes, with migrant nutrition or with the extension service.
First Quarter ft!j
F 101 Food Prod. I (Sanitation & Safety
Equipment Basic Food Science
Intro, to Food Preparation)...............16
EG106 Occup. Commun........................... 3
T9
Second Quarter
B 100 Basic Human Biology....................... 4
F108 Nutrition ................................ 3
F 201 Food Mgmt. I(B).......................... 4
HE 100 Medical Term............................ 2
PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Development............. 3
SO 105 Fund, of Job Seeking.................... 3
T9
Third Quarter
AC 109 Accounting & Bookkeeping................ 5
F 201 Food Mgmt. I(C)........................... 4
F 210 Diet Therapy............................. 3
F 297 Coop. Work Experience..................... 7
T9
Total Credit Hours: 57 Total Contact Hours: 620
Depending on the vocational interest of the student he may take various elective options:
l-Nutrition aides to work with migrants or the disadvantaged:
First Quarter
F 101 Food Production I (Sanitation & Safety Basic Food Science
Intro, to Food Prep.).......................12
SK 106 Study Skills ................................ 2
SP100 Basic Applied Spanish......................... 2
EG 106 Occup. Communication ....................... 3
19
These students would schedule the F 108 Nutrition section dealing with nutrition for low income families, as well as the F 210 Diet Therapy section which will emphasize deficiency diseases and their dietary management.
II- School food service supervisors could substitute MG 221 Personnel Administration-3 credit Hours for SO 105 Fundamentals of Job Seeking-3 Credit Hours. They would also schedule F 211 The School Nutrition Program-3 Credit Hours.
III- Extended care or nursing home dietary assistants. PY 223 Developmental Psychology (Maturity and Aging) 3 credit Hours. (They should also schedule the section of F 210 Diet Therapy emphasizing geriatric nutrition.)
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The limited number of persons available in the area of dietetic support personnel is inadequate to fill current needs. The Colorado Department of Health is anxious to have at least one such person in every small hospital or extended-care facility in the State. If Title XVIII and XIX, Medicare and Medicaid legislation now pending becomes law, trained dietetic assistants will be required for all such patient care, with the employment of persons with higher levels of competency such as dietetic technicians strongly recommended.
HOTEL-MOTEL OPERATIONS (A)
The Hotel-Motel personnel training programs has been designed to meet the needs of hotel-motel business and industry. Student completing the two-year program will be awarded an Associate Degree. In less than one year the student can acquire a Certificate of Completion. One year of training Certificate of Achievement. Occupations which require less than an A.D. will allow enrollees to enter the job market after one, two, three or four quarters of training.
FIRST YEAR
First Quarter ft's.
EG 106 Occ. Comm.............................. 3
*HM 105 Front Office Procedures................ 3
*HM151 Hotel-Motel Org. & Adm.................... 3
*HM103 Intro, to Hotel-Motel Mgt................. 3
*HM 203 Hotel-Motel Motor Mg. or Elective........ 3
Ti
Second Quarter
M 100 Dev. Math ................................ 3
SO 111 Intro, to Sociology.................... 3
*HM 115 Hotel-Motel Law........................ 3
*HM 109 Supervisory Housekeeping .............. 3
HM 297 Coop. Wk. Ex. or Elective.............. 4
T6
85


Third Quarter H
AC 109 Bookkeeping and Acctg...................... 5
MG 203 Princ. of Marketing ....................... 3
*HM 111 Supervisory Development or
*HM 205 Training & Coaching Tech.................. 3
*HM 297 Coop. Wk. Exp. or Elective................ 4
18
SECOND YEAR
Fourth Quarter
MG 201 Bus. Org. & Mgt............................ 3
PY 107 Psy. of Pers. Dev.......................... 3
*HM117 Hotel-Motel Basic Acctg................. 3
HM 297 Coop. Wk. Exp. or Elective.................^6
15
Fifth Quarter
MG 221 Pers. Management........................ 3
PY 100 Hum. FSel. in Bus. & Ind................... 3
MG 212 Case Studies in Adm. Asst.................. 3
*HM 119 Food & Bev. Mgt. & Serv. or
*HM 123 Food & Bev. Purchasing.................... 3
HM 297 Coop. Wk. Ex. or Elective..............._4
16
Sixth Quarter
*HM 201 Hotel-Motel Sales....................... 3
*HM 121 Food & Bev. Control..................... 3
Elective ........................................ 3
HM 297 Coop. Wk. Exp. or Elective................. 6
Tf>
Total Credit Hours: 95 Total Contact Hours: 950
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Successful completion of this program affords student the opportunity for immediate job entry level assignments. Graduates will be offered employment in hotels, motels, clubs, commercial food establishments, hospitals, and other private and public institutions.
INFORMATION MEDIA TECHNOLOGY (N)
A new flexible approach to Information and Library Employment through education and occupational skills training.
PROGRAMS Library Media Assisting Library Media Technology
SHORT COURSES Information Assisting Micromedia Assisting
COMMUNITY SERVICES
CONFERENCES, SEMINARS AND WORKSHOPS
Information use, service and production are of essential concern to administrators, businessmen, librarians. The past decade has produced improvements in equipment and techniques of library/information systems.
An important part of pre-job and up-grading skills training for para-professional support personnel are the use of new equipment technology and associated management, in a host of related information handling occupations througout industry, business offices, and government.
The program is a flexible basic skill approach to information and library employment. It utilizes integrated block period methods to instruct in basic system characteristics of equipment and supplies, management presentations, and actual work experience, allowing the student to fit functionally into many existing and developing jobs.
The two year Associate Degree is granted upon graduation from the Library Media Technology Program. A certificate of Achievement is awarded for the one year Library Media Assisting plan.
Certificates of completion are given for Micromedia and Records Information Management skills.
LIBRARY MEDIA ASSISTING THREE QUARTER PROGRAM
First Quarter Hrs.
1100 Information Media Services 1............... 6
1150 Information Media Skills 1................... 6
SC 105 Filing & Records Control...................3
SC 110 Typing I ................................... 4
19
Second Quarter
1101 Information Media Services II.............. 9
I 151 Information Media Skills II.................. 9
18
Third Quarter
1200 Technical Supervision Skills................. 9
I 297 Coop. Work Experience ...................... 3
EG 095 Com. Business English...................... 3
15
Total Credit Hours: 52 Total Contact Hours: 73
LIBRARY MEDIA TECHNOLOGY SIX QUARTER PROGRAM
Fourth Quarter #.
AC 109 Accounting & Bookkeeping................... 5
DP 111 Prin. of Bus. Data Processing.............. 3
EG 106 Occup. Comm, or
EG 111 English Comp............................... 3
M 100 Introduction to Math or
M110 Math ........................................ 3
SC 103 Business Mach............................ 3
17
Fifth Quarter
EG 107 Basic Comm, or
EG 112 English Comp.......................... 3
I 290 Community Infor./Library Media Seminar.... 3
SC 111 Typing II ................................. 4
Approved Electives Spec. Development.............6-9
16-19
Sixth Quarter
EG 108 Occup. Comm, or
EG 113 English Comp.......................... 3
I 290 Community Infor./Library Media Seminar.... 3
Approved Electives Spec. Development............9-12
15-18
Total Credit Hours: 100-106 Total Contact Hours: 1480-1500
86


Electives: Must be approved by a counselor or advisor by consulting the students transcript and may be taken at any time during the two year program.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Industrial-Economic growth studies conducted in the Denver Metropolitan region indicate an increasing need for Library and Information Services. Growing information demands are an index which points to the rapid rising potential and advancement for employees in area libraries, resource and information centers. A large work force of technical support staff is necessary to operate the more than 500 various academic, government, public, school, and special libraries in which graduates of the program may seek employment. Many hundreds of business and industrial offices in the region are employing technical information personnel to cope with the records management, micromedia publishing explosion and national data bank information network developments. Demand for the pre-trained job ready worker is in excess of the supply.
Fifth Quarter H
MG 216 Pers. Adm.................................. 3
PY 100 Human Rel. in Bus. & Ind.................. 3
EH 297 Coop. Wk. Exp. or Elective............... 6
~12
Sixth Quarter
EH 115 Pers. Mgt.................................. 3
MG 212 Case Studies in Adm. Asst.................. 3
EH 297 Coop. Wk. Exp. or Elective............... 6
Elective ........................................... 3
T5
Total Credit Hours: 91 Total Contact Hours: 1040
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Upon successfully completing the requirements of the Institutional Housekeeping Program, the graduate will be qualified for immediate job entry level assignments in hospitals, educational institutions and business and industry.
INSTITUTIONAL HOUSEKEEPING (A)
TWO YEAR PROGRAM
The Institutional Housekeeping program is a two year program offering an Associate Degree. In less than one year the student can acquire a Certificate of Completion. One year of training Certificate of Achievement. Occupations which require less than an Associate Degree will allow enrollees to enter the job market after one, two, three or four quarters of training.
FIRST YEAR
First Quarter h£.
EG 106 Occ. Comm................................. 3
SO 111 Intro, to Sociology....................... 3
EH 100 Intro, to Inst. Housekpg.................. 3
LA 107 The Paralegal and the Structure of Govt 4
HM 151 Hotel-Motel Org. & Adm.................... 3
Elective .........................................._3
T8
Second Quarter
PY111 General Psychology........................ 3
EH 105 Maintenance & Controls.................... 3
M 100 Dev. Math.................................... 3
Elective .......................................... 3
EH 297 Coop. Work Exp. or Elective............... 4
T6
Third Quarter
EC 109 Applied Economics ........................ 3
Elective .......................................... 3
EH 109 Basic Interior ........................... 3
AC 111 Accounting ............................... 5
EH 297 Coop. Wk. Exp. or Elective................ 3
17
PARALEGAL (A)
THREE QUARTER PROGRAM
The Paralegal training program has been designed to meet the needs of law offices and corporations, both in the public and private sector. Students completing this program will be prepared to enter law offices in the capacity of a legal assistant. This is a three quarter program and Certificate of Completion will be awarded by the college upon successful course completion.
First Quarter Cr.
Hrs.
LA 100 Intro, to Paralegal Training................ 4
SC 110 Typing I .................................. 4
AC 109 Bookkeeping and Accounting.............. 5
SC 105 Filing and Records......................... 3
LA 107 The Paralegal and the Structure of Govt... 4
Second Quarter
20
LA 101 Domestic Relations ............
LA 102 Corporations ..................
LA 103 Real Estate Procedures or LA 104 Law Office Efficiency and Proc Note: Student may take three out of four of the above courses SC 111 Typing II .....................
Third Quarter
LA 105 Litigation ...........
LA 106 Probate...............
LA 210 Paralegal Workshop SC 112 Typing III ...........
4
4
4
_4
T6
4
4
6
_4
18
Total Credit Hours: 54 Total Contact Hours: 680
SECOND YEAR
Fourth Quarter hVs
EH 111 Purchasing Budget & Rec.................... 4
HM 115 Hotel-Motel Law ........................... 3
MG 201 Bus. Org. & Mgt............................ 3
PY 107 Psychology of Pers. Dev.................... 3
13
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The paralegal training program has been designed to meet the needs of law offices in both the law the public and private sector. Those students completing this program will be prepared to enter law offices in the capacity of a legal assistant. This is a 3 quarter program and certificates of completion will be awarded by the college upon successful course completion.
87


RECREATIONAL LEADERSHIP (R)
TWO YEAR PROGRAM
The Recreational Leadership program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Recreational Leadership from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Title r-
Hrs.
RL 100 Intro, to Recreation Services............. 3
RL 102 Tech, of Prog. Plan. & Organ............. 3
RL 111 Field Work ............................... 4
RL 112 Field Work................................ 4
RL 113 FieldWork................................. 4
RL 120 Creative Dramatics........................ 2
RL 140 Social Recreation ........................ 3
RL 141 Arts & Crafts ............................ 2
RL 200 Team Sports .............................. 2
RL 202 Ind. Lifetime Sports...................... 2
RL 203 Outdoor Recreation & Camping............ 3
RL 204 Games and Rhythms ................ 2
RL 206 Dance Activities ......................... 2
RL207 Equipment & Facilities....................... 3
Recreational Leadership Electives..................14
Related Courses
Course Title cr.
Hrs.
B 130 Basic Health Science......................... 4
EG 106 Occupational Communication or
EG 111 English Composition ...................... 3
PS 114 Amer. State & Local Gov't................. 3
PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Dev....................... 3
PY111 General Psychology........................ 3
PY 210 Social Psychology......................... 3
PY 221 Developmental Psychology.................. 3
S110 Introduction to Speech........................ 3
SO 111 Intro, to Sociology....................... 3
SO 120 Marriage and Family....................... 3
Music Elective .................................... 3
Related Elective .................................. 6
Total Credits Required: 93 Total Contact Hours: 1800
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives must be approved by the students advisor.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Employment opportunities for talented and well-trained persons are presently very good and expected to improve in the future. May be employed in private clubs, schools and institutions, voluntary agencies, industrial plants, community and municipal programs, health studios, hospitals, resorts, urban programs, and other organizations.
SENIOR CITIZEN ACTIVITY ASSISTING (A) NINE-MONTH PROGRAM
The courses listed below must be completed satisfactorily in order to meet the requirements of the Certificate of Achievement in the Senior Citizen Assisting program.
First Guarter
SR 100 Intro, to Geriatrics ....................... 3
RL 100 Intro, to Rec. Services..................... 3
B130 Basic Health Science........................... 4
PY 107 Psy. of Personal Devel...................... 3
SR 105 A.D.L. Laboratory........................... 3
16
Second Ouarter
PE 101 First Aid .................................. 1
SO 107 Socio. of Pers. Dev......................... 3
RL 141 Arts and Crafts ............................ 2
SR 110 Institutional Organization.................. 3
SR 297 Coop. Work Experience....................... 6
15
Third Ouarter
SR 112 Activities for Sr. Citizens................. 3
RL 201 Group Leadership............................ 3
SW100 Intro, to Social Work......................... 3
SR 297 Coop. Work Exp.............................. 6
15
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The purpose of an activity program is to create as near to a normal environment as possible, thereby encouraging persons in a long-term facility to exercise their abilities. The program provides these challenges in a planned, coordinated, structured manner. The activities provided are carefully selected so that they are not only enioyable, but are especially beneficial in overcoming specific problems. An activity program creates the environment of challenge and achievement, helping a person along the road to recovery. The ever-increasing number of senior citizens who are In need of long-term care has created a demand for trained individuals who can make a nursing home more of a home for its residents.
Total Credit Hours: 46
SOCIAL WORKER ASSISTING (A) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
The Social Worker Assisting program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Social Worker Assisting from the Community College of Denver.
88


Occupational Courses
Occupational Courses
Course Title
Cr.
Hrs.
SW100 Intro, to Social Work....................... 3
SW 102 Princ. of Interviewing and Report Writing.. 4
SW 106 Special Social Problems.................... 3
SW110 Field Work .............................. 3
SW111 Field Work .............................. 4
SW 112 Field Work .............................. 4
SW 113 Field Work .............................. 3
Related Courses
Course Title
B130 Basic Health Science.............
EC 107 Consumer Economics ............
EG 106 Occupational Communication or
EG 111 English Composition ...........
HS 110 History of Chicano People. .. .
HS120 History of Black People.........
PS 114 American State & Local Gov't.
PY 107 Psych, of Personal Dev.........
PY111 General Psychology..............
PY 112 General Psychology.............
PY 210 Social Psychology..............
PY 221 Developmental Psychology ...
S 110 Introduction to Speech..........
SO 111 Introduction to Sociology SO 112 Introduction to Sociology
SO 113 Introduction to Sociology......
SO 120 Marriage and the Family........
SO 211 Current Social Issues..........
SO 220 Minority Groups in Amer. Soc.
SO 223 Youth in Society...............
Social Science Elective...............
Related Electives ....................
Cr.
Hrs.
4
, 3
. 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6
Total Credits Required: 91 Total Contact Hours: 1110
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives and Field Work must be approved by the students advisor.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: This program is designed to prepare students for entry into a variety of agencies which provide social services to the community. Upon completion of the program, the graduate is prepared for employment in private or public enterprises of a human welfare nature.
TRAFFIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
The Traffic Engineering Technology program is made up of occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences, Industrial Occupations, and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Traffic Engineering Technology from the Community College of Denver.
Course Title cr.
Hrs.
TE 100 Intro, to Traffic Eng....................... 3
TE102 Technical Physics I ........................ 4
TE103 Technical Physics II ....................... 4
TE 106 Princ. of Traffic Admin. & Safety........... 3
TE 108 Control Devices ............................ 3
TE 200 Field Traffic Survey........................ 6
TE 202 Traffic Laws & Regulations.................. 3
TE 203 Model Traffic Ordinances ................... 3
TE 204 Geometric Design............................ 6
TE210 Traffic Studies............................. 6
TE 211 Traffic Accident Investigation.............. 4
TE212 Urban Transportation Planning............... 6
TE 297 Cooperative Work Experience................. 8
Related Courses
Course Title
AV 200 Prod, of AV Materials...........
D 111 Drafting I ......................
EG 107 Occupational Communications EG 108 Occupational Communications
M 102 Applied Math I ..................
M 103 Applied Math II..................
M 104 Applied Math III ................
M 120 Statistics for Bus. and Ind......
UP 202 Data Processing for Planning.
Social Science Elective................
Related Electives .....................
Cr.
Hrs.
. 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6
Total Credits Required: 93 Total Contact Hours: 1150
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives must be approved by the students advisor.
URBAN HORTICULTURE (N)
SEVEN-QUARTER PROGRAM
Horticulture in Colorado presents many diverse opportunities for persons interested in landscape and floral work. Because of this, the program is made up of seven quarters for persons interested in learning about the total field of horticulture while the three quarter programs are geared to specific job entry categories.
First Quarter
*UH 100 Intro, to Urban Horticulture............. 2
UH 102 Landscape Plant Materials................ 4
UH 104 Plant Science............................ 4
EG 106 Occupational Comm, or
EG 111 English Composition ..................... 3
Math Elective .................................. 3
T6
Second Quarter
UH 106 Plant Science ............................. 4
UH 108 Landscape Planning ........................ 4
EG 107 Occupational Communic. or
EG 112 English Composition ....................... 3
Elective ......................................... 3
T4
89


Third Quarter Cr.
Hrs.
UH110 Soils & Fertilizers...................... 4
UH112 Horticultural Science ................... 4
EC 211 Principles of Economics................. 3
PY 100 Human Relations in Bus. & Ind.........3
77
Fourth Quarter
UH 297 Coorperative Work Experience............. 8
UH 299 Independent Study........................ 4
72
Fifth Quarter
UH 201 Nursery Management ...................... 4
UH 203 Horticultural Equipment & Facilities.... 3
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accounting or
AC 111 Accounting .............................. 5
Business Management Elect......................... 3
15
Sixth Quarter
UH 205 Landscape Maintenance ................... 3
UH 207 Greenhouse Management.................... 4
UH 209 Horticulture Bus. Oper................... 3
"Suggested Elective.............................. 3
Industrial Occup. Elective........................ 3
76
Seventh Quarter
UH211 Diseases & Pests......................... 4
UH 213 Turf Prod. & Management.................. 4
UH 297 Cooperative Work Exp. or
"Elective ....................................... 4
PY 107 Psychology of Pers. Develop.............. 3
15
Total Credit Hours: 102 Total Contact Hours: 1420
Optional Student may substitute elective with instructors approval.
Evening Courses will reauire Saturday Field Trips.
'Suggested Electives: Horticulture Floral Design Workshop-UH114; Horticulture Seminar-UH 221; Perspective Drawing-UH219; Merchandising Horticulture Products-UH-116. Business & Management: Business & Organization Management-MG201 (Prerequisite: Intro, to Business-MG105); Principles of Marketing-MG203; Principles of Retailing & Merchandising-MG215.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: As our society has become more affluent, it has also created more leisure time for recreational activities which utilize park, golf course and other outdoor areas, all of which must be managed and maintained. Flowers increasingly appear in and around our homes, and we have become more concerned about the beautification of our nations landscapes. Consequently, career opportunities have been increasing in the field of urban horticulture, and the industry is looking for ambitious and well-trained people. Successful completion of this program will result in the granting of an Associate Degree in Horticulture.
URBAN HORTICULTURE (N) THREE-QUARTER PROGRAM NURSERY MANAGEMENT AND LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE OPTION
First Quarter Hcrrs
UH 102 Landscape Plant Materials............... 4
UH104 Plant Science .......................... 4
UH 201 Nursery Mgmt............................ 4
Math Elective.................................... 3
15
Second Quarter cr.
Hrs.
UH108 Landscape Plann........................ 4
UH111 Small Engine & Carb. Repair for U.H......5
UH 205 Landscape Maint........................ 3
Bus. Mgmt. Elective............................... 3
EG 106 Occup. Communic............................ 3
t8
Third Quarter
UH 110 Soils &Fert.............................. 4
UH211 Diseases & Pest......................... 4
PY 107 Psychology of Pers. Development............ 3
"Elective ........................................ 3
77
Total Credit Hours: 47
Total Contact Hours: 520
Evening courses will require Saturday Field Trips.
*Suggested Electives: Horticulture Seminar, Perspective Drawing.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The Nursery Management and Landscape Maintenance Option- provides entry level job skills as assistant Nurseryman, Garden Center Employee and Landscape Maintenance man. Successful completion of this program will result in the granting of a Certificate of Achievement.
THREE QUARTER PROGRAM GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT OPTION
First Quarter Hc£
UH 104 Plant Science .............................. 4
UH 203 Hort. Equipment & Facilities................ 3
Industrial Occup. Elective......................... 5
Math Elective ..................................... 3
75
Second Quarter
UH 106 Plant Science .............................. 4
UH111 Small Engine & Carb. Repair for U.H......... 5
UH 207 Greenhouse Mgmt............................. 4
PY 107 Psychology of Pers. Development............. 3
76
Third Quarter
UH 110 Soils & Fert................................ 4
UH 112 Hort. Science .............................. 4
UH211 Diseases & Pest.............................. 4
UH Elective ......................................._3
15
Total Credit Hours: 46 Total Contact Hours: 620
Evening courses will require Saturday field trips.
Suggested Electives: Horticulture Seminar, Floral Design Seminar, Merchandising Horticultural products.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The Greenhouse Management Program is designed to equip an individual with the basic knowledge and skills to work as an assistant grower in a greenhouse. Foreman and supervisory level jobs are available upon completion of the two year program and further greenhouse training. Successful completion of this program will result in the granting of a Certificate of Achievement.
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URBAN HORTICULTURE (N)
THREE-QUARTER PROGRAM
TURF MANAGEMENT OPTION
First Quarter ,9r-
Hrs.
UH104 Plant Science .............................. 4
UH 203 Hort. Equip. & Facilities.................. 3
UH111 Small Engine & Carb. Repair for U.H............. 5
Math Elective......................................... 3
T5
Second Quarter
UH 106 Plant Science ................
UH 205 Landscape Maint...............
UH 299 Independent Study ............
EG 106 Occup. Communic...............
PY107 Psychology of Pers. Development
Third Quarter
4
3
4 3 3
17
UH 110 Soils & Fert................................. 4
UH211 Diseases & Pests ............................. 4
UH 213 Turf. Prod. & Mgt............................ 4
"Elective .......................................... 3
15
Total Credit Hours: 47
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: This program is designed to prepare the student for positions with landscape contractors as supervisory personnel; and with landscape architects as landscape technicians and assistants. Upon completion a Certificate of Achievement will be granted.
URBAN PLANNING TECHNOLOGY (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
The Urban Planning Technology program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Science, Industrial Occupations, and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Urban Planning Technology from the Community College of Denver.
Total Contact Hours: 520
'Evening courses will require Saturday field trips.
*'Suggested Electives: Horticulture Seminar, Merchandising Horticultural Products.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The Turf Management option provides the basis for entry level job skills in Golf Course maintenance.
LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION (AND DESIGN) OPTION
First Quarter uCr-
Hrs.
UH 101 Intro, to Landscape Construe. Drafting 5
UH102 Landscape Plant Materials............ 4
UH 104 Plant Science ....................... 4
UH 201 Nursery Mgmt......................... 4
T7
Second Quarter
CT122 Contracts & Spec.................
PY 107 Psychology of Pers. Development
UH 108 Landscape Plann.................
UH 205 Landscape Mgmt..................
Math Elective..........................
Third Quarter
5
3
4 3 3
18
UH 110 Soils & Fert........................... 4
UH 208 Landscape Surv......................... 4
UH217 Adv. Landscape Planning............... 4
UH219 Landscape Persp. Drawing............... 4
Bus. Mgmt. Elective............................. 3
19
SUMMER QUARTER
Occupational Courses
Course Title
UP 100 Introduction to Planning..,.............. 3
UP 102 Data Collecting Tech. & Eval............. 3
UP 110 Problems in Urban Planning............... 3
UP 200 Statistics for Planners.................. 3
UP 202 Data Processing for Planners............. 3
UP 205 Map Reading & Photo Interp............... 3
UP 207 Pictorial Drafting ...................... 4
UP 210 Planning Law............................. 3
UP 297 Cooperative Work Experience ............. 7
UP 299 Independent Study........................ 3
Related Courses
Course Title
AR 105 Basic Design............................. 3
AV 200 Production of AV Materials............... 4
B 110 Introduction to Environment................. 3
D 111 Drafting I .............................. 4
EC 109 Applied Economics ....................... 3
EG 106 Occupational Communications ............. 3
EG 107 Occupational Communications
or
S 110 Introduction to Speech...................... 3
EG 108 Occupational Communications ............. 3
G 111 Introduction to Geology..................... 4
GE 230 Urban Geography.......................... 3
HS 251 History of Cities........................ 3
M102 Applied Math I .......................... 3
M 103 Applied Math II......................... 3
M104 Applied Math III ........................ 3
PS 114 American State & Local Govt............. 3
SU 103 Basic Surveying ......................... 4
Related Electives ............................... 6
UH 212 Basic Landscape Const.
Estimating & Bidding ................. 8
~8
Total Credit Hours: 62 Total Contact Hours: 700
Total Credits Required: 93 Total Contact Hours: 1220
Electives in both Occupational and Related Areas are available to meet the requirements of this program. Electives must be approved by the students advisor.
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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The program is designed primarily to qualify students, upon completion of the curriculum and requirements, for employment as assistants to professional planners and urban renewal specialists in both public and private city county, regional and state planning offices, urban renewal agencies and other organizations concerned with various aspects of urban development.
WATER-WASTEWATER TECHNOLOGY (R)
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
The Water-Wastewater Technology program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences, Industrial Occupations and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Water-Waste water Technology from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Title
WW 100 Intro, to Water-Wastewater .... WW102 Water & Wastewater Systems... WW105 Water-Wastewater Mechanics WW 200 Hydraulics for Water and
Wastewater Technology .......
WW 203 Water Purification .............
WW 204 Wastewater Treatment Methods WW 205 Water & Wastewater Equipment
Maintenance .................
WW 206 Water & Wastewater Admin.
and Finance .................
WW210 Microbiology for Water &
Wastewater Technology .......
WW 220 Sanitary Chemistry .............
WW 225 Instrumentation and Controls .. WW 297 Cooperative Work Experience .
Cr.
Hrs.
3
3
3
5
3
3
3
3
4 4 4 7
Related Courses
Course Title uCr-
Hrs.
B 111 General Biology......................... 5
B112 General Biology......................... 5
C101 Fundamentals of Chemistry .............. 4
C103 Fundamentals of Chemistry.............. 4
EG 106 Occupational Communication ........... 3
EG 107 Occupational Communication ........... 3
EG 108 Occupational Communication ........... 3
FP 203 Fundamentals of Hydraulics
and Pneumatics ................... 3
M 102 Applied Math I ......................... 3
M 103 Applied Math II......................... 3
PY 100 Human Relations in Bus. & Ind............ 3
Related Electives .............................. 9
Total Credits Required: 93 Total Contact Hours: 1190
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives must be approved by the students advisor.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Persons who master the Water-Wastewater Technology program can serve as assistants to engineers, scientists, and public health personnel concerned with water supply developments and distribution, and with wastewater collection and treatment to abate and prevent pollution. The water and wastewater technician can function as a member of the team engaged in research, plant development, or operation; as an operator or assistant operator of water purification or wastewater-treatment facilities supervising and coordinating the efforts of workmen; as a member of the public health team.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
AUDIO-VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
AV 100 Introduction to Media (R).......3 credit hours
Course is designed to impart the philosophy, aims, and goals of the educational media field. Stress will be placed on understanding of the role of audio-visual aids. (3 hours per week)
AV 102 Audio-Visual Basic
Electricity (R) ..............3 credit hours
This course will help the student develop competencies in recognizing and applying basic principles of electricity, magnetism, electric motors, circuitry (series and parallel) as they apply to audio-visual equipment. It will also prepare the student to do basic electrical repair on projectory and transcription machines. (3 hours per week)
AV 103 Audio-Visual Library
Services (R) .................4 credit hours
Provides the student with a brief overview of a modern library or materials center, emphasizes the role of a A-V materials and equipment. Also prepares the student in the technical processes of acquisition, preparation and circulation of audio-visual materials. (4 hours per week)
AV 200 Production of Audio-Visual
Materials (R) ................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: AV 100 Introduction to Media This course will help the student to develop proficiencies in creating and producing sound-slide presentations, overhead transparencies, single concept films and posters. It also will prepare the student to operate slide and tape duplicators, laminating equipment and basic lettering devices. (4 hours per week)
AV 201 Television Production (R).......6 credit hours
This course is designed to develop competencies in the production of Video and Audio tapes for instructional purposes. It will also provide opportunities to develop basic skills in motion picture photography. (6 hours per week)
AV 202 Audio-Visual Photography (R). 3 credit hours
A basic course in theory of photography, construction and operation of cameras. This course will help the student develop skills in photography as related to audio-visual presentation techniques. (3 hours per week)
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AV 203 Projection Equipment
Maintenance (R) ..............4 credit hours
This course enables the individual student to attain basic knowledge and skills in maintenance and care of slide, filmstrip, overhead, opaque projectors as well as 8mm and 16mm motion picture pictures. (4 hours per week)
AV 204 Transcription Equipment
Maintenance (R) ..............4 credit hours
This course enables the student to attain general knowledge of the maintenance and repair of audio tape recorders, video tape recorders, as well as disc and cassette players. (4 hours per week)
AV 205 Audio-Visual Electronics (R) .4 credit hours
A basic course in vacuum and solid state devices as they pertain to audio-visual equipment. The student will have the opportunity to develop skills in trouble shooting and repair of electronic components in projectors, video tape equipment, phonographs and audio recorders. (4 hours per week)
AV 206 Duplicating Processes (R) ... .3 credit hours
Training in the technology related to reproductions of various graphic designs; provides opportunity to develop skills in offset printing, mimeographing and spirit duplicating. (3 hours per week)
AV 297 Cooperative Work
Experience (R) .............1-6 credit hours
In the Audio-Visual Technology program, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved, with a College instructor providing coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the Division Director.
The amount of time spent in cooperative work experience will vary to meet students individual needs. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
AV 299 Independent Study (R).........1-6 credit hours
This course provides opportunity for a student to study intensively a specific topic of interest under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Permission to enroll for independent study must be obtained from the Division Director and the assigned instructor. The number of credit hours to be allowed for successful completion of the course will be determined cooperatively by the instructor and the Division Director. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
BUILDING INSPECTION
Bl 100 Building Codes and
Standards (R) .................3 credit hours
An analysis of the building laws and their sources regulating construction. (3 hours per week)
BI102 Construction Materials (R) ... .4 credit hours
A qualitative study of wood, masonry, concrete, and steel construction, and survey of roofing, glazing wall
and floor finishes. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab per week)
Bl 103 Mechanical Inspection (R) ... .3 credit hours
An introduction to the art of inspecting the heating and ventilating, and refrigeration work on the construction job. (3 hours per week)
Bl 104 Field Inspection
Techniques (R) ................4 credit hours
An introduction to the art of inspecting construction job-in-progress with special emphasis on problems encountered in the field. (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab per week)
Bl 105 Soils and Grading (R)............3 credit hours
A study of the problems and solutions encountered in the soils of a construction job. (3 hours per week)
Bl 106 Electrical Inspection (R) .......3 credit hours
An introduction to the art of inspecting the electrical work on the construction job. (3 hours per week)
Bl 110 Plumbing Inspection (R) .........3 credit hours
An introduction to the art of inspecting the plumbing work on the construction job. (3 hours per week)
Bl 112 Plan Review (R) .................3 credit hours
Evaluation of building design for life safety, environmental health features, and structural stability. (3 hours per week)
Bl 214 Construction Organization and
Management (R) ................3 credit hours
An introduction to modern management theory and techniques with application to modern construction problems. The student is given an understanding of supervisory principles as they apply to managerial positions. (3 hours per week)
Bl 215 Utilities Inspection (R) ........3 credit hours
An examination of the installation of larger, more complex plumbing systems and trench backfill. (3 hours per week)
Bl 216 Introduction to Design
Fundamentals (R) ...............3 credit hours
Evaluation of building design for features of structural stability. (3 hours per week)
Bl 218 Housing Inspection and
Programs (R) ...................3 credit hours
An examination of the inspection problems unique to existing residential buildings. (3 hours per week)
Bl 297 Cooperative Work
Experience (R)...............1-6 credit hours
In the Building Inspection program, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved, with a College instructor providing coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the Division Director.
The amount of time spent in cooperative work experience will vary to meet students individual needs. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
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Bl 299 Independent Study (R) ........1-6 credit hours
This course provides opportunity for a student to study intensively a specific topic of interest under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Permission to enroll for independent study must be obtained from the Division Director and the assigned instructor. The number of credit hours to be allowed for successful completion of the course will be determined cooperatively by the instructor and the Division Director. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
CLASSROOM INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTING
Cl 110 Classroom Instructional
Techniques I (R) ..............3 credit hours
An introductory course in education, designed to acquaint the classroom instructional assistant major with public education. Study of the nature of growth and development and of the principles and theories of learning as they apply to school children. Study of the role and responsibility of a classroom instructional assistant in instructional techniques and communications techniques with children. Relationship of the classroom instructional assistant to the professional teacher and administrator. (3 hours per week)
Cl 111 Classroom Instructional
Techniques II (R) .............3 credit hours
A study of the procedures used in every day classroom experience including an introduction to school plant, schedules, attendance reports and records and other clerical functions performed by the teacher. An analysis of the basic procedures of test composition, interpretation and evaluation, with special emphasis on scoring recording objective tests, classroom papers and outside assignments. (3 hours per week)
Cl 112 Classroom Instructional
Techniques III (R).............3 credit hours
Opportunity to explore specific grade levels and subject areas. Observation in actual classroom under supervision of a credentialed teacher. Develop understanding of the schools role in the community and discuss problems which typically arise in school-community relations. Trainees are introduced to the use of available community resources and agencies. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab per week)
Cl 297 Cooperative Work
Experience (R) ..............1-6 credit hours
In the Classroom Instructional Assisting program, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personenl at the business, industry or agency involved, with a College instructor providing coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the division director.
The amount of time spent in cooperative work experience will vary to meet students individual needs. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
Cl 299 Independent Study (R) ........1-6 credit hours
This course provides opportunity for a student to study intensively a specific topic of interest under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Permission to enroll for independent study must be obtained from the Division Director and the assigned instructor. The number of credit hours to be allowed for successful completion of the course will be determined cooperatively by the instructor and the Division Director. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
CRIMINAL JUSTICE (R)
CJ 110 Criminal Justice I (R)............3 credit hours
The law enforcement field and the criminal justice system is introduced to the student. The various police professions including federal, state, county and municipal agencies will be studied. The vocational opportunities and functions at all levels of law enforcement will be considered. Includes the history, administrative problems, and philosophical view of the criminal justice system. A survey of the relationship within the American system of justice between law enforcement activities and the courts, and between the courts and correctional activities. (3 hours per week)
CJ111 Criminal Justice II (R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CJ 110
Principles of organization, administration, and public service. Administration as applied to field operations. Discussions of fundamentals of patrol and crime prevention; community problems associated with enforcement, vice, traffic, and other duties; special units; duties of supervisory officers. (3 hours per week)
CJ112 Constitutional Law (R) ............3 credit hours
The development of U.S. Constitutional Law. Covers vital issues, definitions of constitutional terms and case law as it relates to constitutional issues. (3 hours per week)
CJ113 Civil Law (R) .....................3 credit hours
The course concerns the legal protection afforded in civil procedures against interference by others with the security of ones person, property of intangible interests. Three fundamental theories of liability emerge: intentional interference, negligence and strict liability. The influences of theories and underlying social and economic factors is studied in the content of recognized categories of tact liabillity, interference with peace of mind, negligence, trespass to property nuisance, fraud, and other misrepresentation, defamation, and invasion of privacy. Through these illustrations the course seeks to develop an understanding of the laws search for basic principles to govern the resolutions of conflicts arising out of human relationships. (3 hours per week)
CJ114 Criminal Law (R) ..................3 credit hours
The purpose of this course is to explore criminal law viewed as a device for controlling socially undesirable behavior. It is intended to give the students a working knowledge of the criminal code, the basic questions of public policy in the administration of criminal justice and of the legal principles of determining criminal liability. (3 hours per week)
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CJ 116 Rules of Evidence (R)............3 credit hours
The student becomes familiar with the kinds and degrees of evidence, and with the rules governing the admissibility of evidence in court. (3 hours per week)
CJ 120 The Court System (R) .............3 credit hours
The court system of the United States is explained at all levels, emphasizing adversary procedures in the criminal and civil or equity procedures in the juvenile court, together with recent Supreme Court decisions regarding both. (3 hours per week)
CJ 122 Probation, Pardon, and
Paroles (R) ....................3 credit hours
Probation as a judicial process and parole as an executive function are examined as community-based correctional programs and the use of pardons is reviewed. (3 hours per week)
CJ 210 Criminal Investigation I (R). ... 3 credit hours
Probation as a judicial process and parole as an executive function are examined as community-based correctional programs and the use of pardons is reviewed. (3 hours per week)
CJ 211 Criminal Investigation II (R). 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CJ 210
Followup investigation techniques. A continuation of CJ 210, Criminal Investigation I. Attention is given to interviewing and statements; the importance of knowing the criminals modus operandi; and sources of information. Emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of criminal investigation such as the techniques used in special kinds of investigation; case preparation; and methods of dealing with news media. (3 hours per week)
CJ 212 Criminal Investigation III (R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CJ 211
The collection, identification and preservation of evidence. Attention is given to comparative evidence and current laboratory capabilities and limitations. Students are made aware of available technical methods used in criminal investigation. (3 hours per week)
CJ 220 Juvenile Delinquency (R) .........3 credit hours
Analysis of delinquency and the family structure; social theories of casuality; methods of classification; delinquency control; preventive measures by courts and law enforcement; treatment process and programs of training schools; diagnostic methods; detention facilities. Development of the Juvenile Court system in the United States. (3 hours per week)
CJ 222 Traffic Enforcement (R) ..........3 credit hours
Course includes the traffic problem; patrolling procedures; pursuit driving; stopping the violator; officer-violator relationships; drinking driver investigations; traffic direction; and roadblocks. (3 hours per week)
CJ 224 Community Relations (R)...........3 credit hours
The role of the individual officer in achieving and maintaining public support; human relations, public information; relationships with violators and complainants. (3 hours per week)
CJ 230 Police Supervision (R) ...........3 credit hours
Principles of personnel management as applied to the police enterprise evaluation and promotion, discipline,
training, employee welfare, problem solving, leadership. (3 hours per week)
CJ 234 Narcotics and Drugs (R).......3 credit hours
This course will include the discovery and investigation of narcotics peddlers and users; behavior and treatment of the addict; prevention techniques; cooperation with federal agencies; description, chemical properties and results of the use of narcotic and other dangerous drugs. (3 hours per week)
CJ 236 Advance Emergency
Techniques (R) ...............2 credit hours
Skills to be used in the treatment of injuries in an emergency situation; including emergency childbirth and other situations frequently encountered by police. (2 hours per week)
CJ 238 Correctional Services in the
Community (R) ................3 credit hours
Community resources that can be brought to bear on the correctional task are examined, such as vocational rehabilitation, alcohol detoxification and other units, welfare services, child guidance, and mental health clinics, employment services, private volunteer professional assistance, legal aid and other pertinent services. (3 hours per week)
CJ 297 Cooperative Work
Experience (R) .............0-6 credit hours
Students who are not presently employed will be required to take a minimum of 8 credit hours of Cooperative work Experience before they can receive their associate degree.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND MANAGEMENT
CC 101 Day Care Teaching Techniques
and Program Design ...........4 credit hours
An overview of duties and responsibilities of the assistant within day care centers. A study of day care schedules and State requirements for day care centers. Survey of the assistant in relation to the child parents, and total center staff. This course will include a strong emphasis on the team approach, and the value of constant communication from the assistant to the teacher of who he/she is assisting. (4 hours per week)
CC 102 Creative Activities (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
The intent of this course is to provide learning experiences encouraging creativity and self-expression in children through the use of suitable activities and materials. Experiences in basic drawing, painting, pasting, cutting, clay and play dough are included. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab per week)
CC 103 Orientation to Program
Practicum (A, N, R)...........6 credit hours
Analysis and interpretation of childrens activities and experiences based on observations in the Childrens Center at Community College or other approved licensed facility, in relation to early childhood education and development. Appropriate licensing regulations are introduced and qualified. (2 hours lecture, 8 hours lab per week)
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CC 104 Supervised Laboratory
Experience (A, N, R)...........6 credit hours
Prerequisite: CC 103
Practicum in the Community College Childrens Center or other approved licensed facility. Participation as well as discussion and application of methods for guiding childrens learning experiences are involved. (2 hour lecture, 8 hours lab per week)
CC 105 Supervised Student
Participation (A, N, R)........6 credit hours
Prerequisite: CC 104
Practicum in approved day care center; continuation of CC 104. (1 hour lecture and 10 hours lab per week)
CC 106 Supervised Student
Participation (R, N)...........6 credit hours
Prerequisite: CC 105
Practicum in approved day care center; continuation of CC 105. (1 hour lecture and 10 hours lab per week)
CC 107 Supervised Student
Participation (R, N)...........6 credit hours
Prerequisite: CC 106
Practicum in approved day care center; continuation of CC 106. (1 hour lecture and 10 hours lab per week)
CC 108 Introduction to Teaching
the Young Child (A, N, R)......4 credit hours
Theory and methods of teaching the young child, two to six years of age, in relation to his developmental patterns. Survey of relevant learning theories and current learning models. (3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week)
CC 109 Methods of Teaching the
Young Child (A, N, R)..........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: CC 108 or permission of instructor Application of basic philosophy and theory of teaching the child two to six years of age. Student design various materials and aides for use in teaching. (3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab)
CC 201 Workshop of Ideas (A, N, R). .4 credit hours
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor This course is designed to meet needs of teachers currently in the field. It includes a brief review of basic early childhood practices and an introduction to recent learning models and theories. (4 hours per week)
CC 202 Workshop of Things (A, N, R) 4 credit hours
Prerequisite: CC 201 or permission of instructor Examination of commercial and teacher made materials related to current learning models. Teachers design and create teaching materials for their own classroom. (4 hours per week)
CC 210 Child Care Program Supervision
& Administration I (A, N, R) 4 credit hours
Analysis and interpretation of supervision and administration procedures relevant to early childhood education programs. State licensing regulations appropriate to staff and staff responsibilities are presented. (4 hours per week)
CC 211 Child Care Program Supervision
& Administration II (A, N, R). 4 credit hours
Analysis and interpretation of supervision and administration procedures relevant to early childhood education
programs specifically related to the involvement of parents. Community resources are studied in application to home and school needs. (5 hours per week)
CC 212 Child Care Center Business
Operations (A, N, R)............4 credit hours
A study of the methods and problems involved in operating a small business. Inquiry into the areas of zoning restrictions, licensing requirements, tax information, funding procedures, basic bookkeeping techniques. (4 hours per week)
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (R)
EV 101 Environmental Health (R) ........3 credit hours
A broad study of the principles of public health practices. Specific problems concerning air, water, noise,, and solid waste pollution relative to the environment will be investigated in quantitative terms and various solutions discussed. Field trips used to complement and illustrate class work. (3 hours per week)
EV 107 Solid Waste Pollution (R)........3 credit hours
An in-depth study of source of solid waste pollution and methods of control and abatement. Specific attention is paid to modern sewage treatment in all forms with freauent field trips to investigate facilities. (3 hours per week)
EV 201 Atmospheric Pollution (Rt........4 credit hours
A study of air pollution in relation to public health. Sources and classification of pollutants, pollution meteorology, sampling and measurement techniques, principles and methods employed in control are covered in lectures, field work, and class projects. (5 hours per week)
EV 203 Food Sanitation (R) .............3 credit hours
The application of sanitary principles to the processing, storage, distribution and serving of foods including meats, poultry, and sea food, canned and frozen foods, bakery products, and beverages. (3 hours per week)
EV 205 Pollution Control Systems (R). .4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 105 Introduction to Algebra Hydraulic, pneumatic, mechanical, electrical and electronic control systems and components. Basic description, analysis and explanation of operation. Typical performance characteristics, limitations on performance, accuracy, application and their utilization in industrial processes. (6 hours per week)
EV 207 Vectors and Pesticides (R). .5 credit hours
This course includes the study of those parasites which produce disease with particular reference to the human host, and those animals and arthropods that are important in the transmission of disease. (6 hours of lecture and field experience per week)
EV 220 Pollution Sampling and
Analysis (R)...................4 credit hours
A basic course defining the pollution problems with emphasis on training technicians in the methods of determining pollutants of common interest. (5 hours per week)
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EV 297 Cooperative Work
Experience (R) .............1-6 credit hours
In the Environment Control Technology Program, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved, with a College instructor providing coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the Division Director.
The amount of time spent in cooperative work experience will vary to meet students individual needs. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
EV 299 Independent Study (R).........1-6 credit hours
This course provides opportunity for a student to study intensively a specific topic of interest under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Permission to enroll for independent study must be obtained from the Division Director and the assigned instructor. The number of credit.hours to be allowed for successful completion of the course will be determined cooperatively by the instructor and the Division Director. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
FS 100 Introduction to Fire Science
and Suppression (R) ..........3 credit hours
Philosophy and history of fire protection; history of loss of life and property by fire; review of municipal fire defenses; study of the organization and function of federal, state, county, and private fire protection agencies; survey of professional fire protection career opportunities. Fire suppression organization; fire suppression equipment; characteristics and behavior of fire; fire hazard properties of ordinary materials; building design and construction; extinguishing agents; basic fire fighting tactics; public relations. (3 hours per week)
FS 104 Fire Company Organization
and Procedure (R) ............3 credit hours
Review of fire department organization; fire company organization; the company officer; personnel administration; communications; fire equipment; maintenance; training; fire prevention; fire fighting, company fire fighting capability; records and reports. (3 hours per week)
FS 106 Fire Fighting Tactics and
Strategy (R) .................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FS 110 Fire Apparatus and Equipment Review of fire chemistry, equipment, and manpower; basic fire fighting tactics and strategy; methods of attack; pre-planning fire problems. (3 hours per week)
FS 108 Fire Hydraulics (R).............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 102 Applied Math I Review of basic mathematics; hydraulic laws and formulas as applied to the fire service; application of
formulas and mental calculation to hydraulic problems; water supply problems; underwriters requirements for pumps. (3 hours per week)
FS 110 Fire Apparatus and
Equipment (R)..................3 credit hours
Driving laws, driving techniques, construction and operation of pumping engines, ladder trucks, aerial platforms, specialized equipment; apparatus maintenance. (3 hours per week)
FS112 Defensive Driving for
Firemen (R) ...................3 credit hours
Familiarization with national, state, and local driving laws; emergency vehicle driving techniques with emphasis on safety. (3 hours per week)
FS199 Fire Command Officer
Training School (R) ...........3 credit hours
A comprehensive 3 day Command Officer Training Seminar and Workshop. Conducted during the summer quarter utilizing nationally known speakers in Fire Service Management, Command Strategy and Company Operations.
FS 202 Fundamentals of Fire
Prevention (R).................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FS 100 Introduction to Fire Science & Suppression
Organization and function of the fire prevention organization; inspections; surveying and mapping procedures; recognition of fire hazards; engineering a solution of the hazard; enforcement of the solution; public relations as affected by fire prevention. (3 hours per week)
F$ 204 Related Codes and
Ordinances I (R)...............3 credit hours
Familiarization with national, state, and local laws and ordinances which influence the field of fire prevention. (3 hours per week)
FS 205 Related Codes and
Ordinances II (R) .............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: F 204 Related Codes and Ordinances I Continuation of Related Codes and Ordinances I with an emphasis on an analysis of building codes. (3 hours per week)
FS 206 Rescue Practice (R)..............3 credit hours
Rescue practices, the human body, emergency care of victims, childbirth, artificial respiration, toxic gases, chemicals and diseases, radioactive hazards, rescue problems, and techniques. (3 hours per week)
FS 208 Hazardous Materials I (R)........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry A review of basic chemistry, storage, handling, laws, standards, and fire fighting practices pertaining to hazardous materials. (3 hours per week)
FS 209 Hazardous Materials II (R) .3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FS 208 Hazardous Materials I Continuation of the study of hazardous materials covering storage, handling laws, standards, and fire fighting practices with emphasis on fire fighting and control at the company officer level. (3 hours per week)
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FS 212 Fire Protection Equipment and
Systems (R)....................3 credit hours
Portable fire extinguishing equipment sprinkler systems, protective systems for special hazards; fire alarm and detection systems. (3 hours per week)
FS214 Fire Department
Administration (R) ............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FS 104 Fire Company Organization and Procedure
Consideration of basic concepts and principles of administration applicable to the organization and administration of an efficient fire department. (3 hours per week)
FS 216 Private Fire Protection
Systems (R)....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FS 212 Fire Protection Equipment and Systems
An analysis of private protection and alarm systems. Course covers organization and operation of private Fire Brigades, complete water system layouts. A study and evaluation of Fire Detection, Alarm and Supervisory systems. (3 hours per week)
FS218 Fire Investigation (R).............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FS 208 Hazardous Materials I Introduction to arson and incendiarism, arson laws, and types of incendiary fires. Methods of determining fire cause, recognizing and preserving evidence, interviewing and detaining witnesses. Procedures in handling juveniles, court procedures and giving court testimony. (3 hours per week)
FS 220 Fire Insurance (R) ...............3 credit hours
An analysis of the fire insurance rating structure. Elements involved in establishing insurance rates. The grading system for cities and towns, the classification of cities and towns, and hazard factors in occupancy, construction and exposures. (3 hours per week)
FS 222 Fire Service Training
Technique (R) .................3 credit hours
Familiarization with the modern concepts of instruction; Methods of Organizing, Planning and Conducting Fire Service Training. Study and evaluation of objective writing and student motivation. Introduction to Audio-Visual Teaching Techniques. (3 hours per week)
FS 230 Blueprint Reading for
Firemen (R) ...................3 credit hours
This course will give the student a working knowledge of blueprint reading and sketching as applied to the construction industry. Building terms and abbreviations are taught along with symbols and conventions for other major trades. Construction features, beginning with details of component parts and advancing to a complete set of working drawings. (3 hours per week)
FS 297 Cooperative Work
Experience (R)...............1-6 credit hours
In the Fire Science Technology program, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved,
with a College instructor providing coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the Division Director.
The amount of time spent in cooperative work experience will vary to meet students individual needs, (credit hours arranged)
FS 299 Independent Study (R)..........1-6 credit hours
This course provides opportunity for a student to study intensively a specific topic of interest under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Permission to enroll for independent study must be obtained from the Division Director and the assigned instructor. The number of credit hours to be allowed for successful completion of the course will be determined cooperatively by the instructor and the Division Director, (credit hours arranged)
FOOD SERVICE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
F 101 Food Production I (N)...........16 credit hours
An introduction to commerical food preparation. Course will cover the proper utilization of commerical food service equipment, the science of food preparation and sanitation and safety practices. Training at the second cook and fry station will be emphasized. (20 hours per week)
F 102 Food Production II (N)..........16 credit hours
Prerequisite: F 101
This segment will detail safety procedures and programs; the importance and procedures for care and maintenance of hand and stationary food equipment. Demonstration and participation in preparing various soups, consommes, and meat dishes as well as the composite effects of cooking. (20 hours per week)
F 103 Food Production III (N).........16 credit hours
Prerequisite: F 102
Effects of refrigeration and freezing of various foods and food products, the prevention of food spoilage. Understanding specifications and contracts for equipment. Demonstration and participation in the preparation of main entree items. (20 hours per week)
F 108 Nutrition (N) ..................3 credit hours
Orientation in nutritional values, their effect on the healthy human body as well as their therapeutic use in regaining health; their effect on the social, physical and psychological development of children; their application to commerical food service, and the procedures necessary to assure the preservation of these values through proper preparation and service. (3 hours per week)
F 201 Food Management I (N)...........16 credit hours
Menu planning for food services, cafeteria, coffee shop, restaurant and banquets. Food and beverage costing; wine cellar operations; perpetual inventories; sales and cost distribution. A study of the marketing world and how it operates. (20 hours per week)
F 202 Food Management II (N)..........16 credit hours
Prerequisite F 201
Making production schedules from menus; use of order lists; personnel operating reports and portion control.
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