Citation
Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1974-1975

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Title:
Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1974-1975
Creator:
Community College of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
Community College of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Source Institution:
Community College of Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
9842420 ( OCLC )

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library
Community College of Denver Collections

Full Text
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Community College of Denver
ARCHIVES
Auraria Campus AURARIA LIBRARY
North Campus Red Rocks Campus
74/75
AMERICAN PAPERBACK SERVICES
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TOPEKA, KANSAS 66603


COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER
GENERAL INFORMATION 1974-75
THE DENVER AREA COUNCIL FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES
Mrs. Harold V. Anderson, Chairman
Boulder County
Serving on Council since 1967
Tracy J. Smith, Vice Chairman
Adams County
Serving on Council since 1969
Gerald L. Vetter, DVM
Arapahoe County
Serving on Council since 1973
Mrs. H. C. Engdahl, Secretary
Past President of Council
Jefferson County
Serving on Council since 1967
Richard W. Wright
Denver County
Serving on Council since 1967
ADMINISTRATION
Dr. Leland B. Luchsinger, President COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER
Central Administration 1009 Grant Street Denver, Colorado 80203 892-3481
Dr. Jose A. Perea, Vice President AURARIA CAMPUS
1201 Acoma Street Denver, Colorado 80204 893-8868
Dr. John H. Swenson, Vice President NORTH CAMPUS
1001 East 62 Avenue Denver, Colorado 80216 287-3311
Dr. G. Owen Smith, Vice President RED ROCKS CAMPUS
12600 West Sixth Avenue Golden, Colorado 80401 988-6160
COVER PHOTO: LONG LAKE ARAPAHOE PEAKS Courtesy of the Colorado Department of Public Relations


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
No
1974-75 COLLEGE CALENDAR ..................... A 3
KEY TO COURSE PREFIX LETTERS .................. A15
GENERAL INFORMATION............................. A
Admissions Information ................... A 6
Tuition and Fees ......................... A 5
Student Services.......................... A 9
Denver MDTA Skill Center .................. A12
Center for the Physically Disadvantaged .. A13
GENERAL STUDIES ................................ B
Division of Communications and Arts....... B 7
Division of Science and Mathematics ...... B19
Division of Social Sciences............... B27
Consortium of Ethnic Studies.............. B35
OCCUPATIONAL STUDIES Division of Business and
Management Occupations..................... C
Division of Community and Personal
Services Occupation ....................... D
Division of Health Occupations.............. E
Division of Industrial Occupations ......... F
INDEX ........................................ F38
Modules of the catalog pertaining to General Studies (B), Division of Business and Management Occupations (C), Division of Community and Personal Services Occupations (D), Division of Health Occupations (E) and Division of Industrial Occupations (F), have been printed and are available upon request. The General Information (A) module has been incorporated into modules B, C, D, E and F.


1974-75 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER STUDENT CALENDAR
1974
1975
S M T W T F s
JANUARY
_ i (M 4 5
6 Li 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 .
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31
FEBRUARY
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28
MARCH 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 is 19 ja 21 22 23
24 25 26(21 El 29 30
31
APRIL
[7 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30
MAY
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 @ 28 29 30 31
JUNE 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 0 13 14 15
16 17 0 19 Eo 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
5 M T W T F S
JULY
12 3@56
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31
AUGUST
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 H 30 31
SEPTEMBER
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 01120 21
22 HI 24 25 26 27 28
29 30
OCTOBER
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31
NOVEMBER
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26@(28X|§)30
DECEMBER
1 2 3 4 U 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
S M T w T F s S M T W T F s
JANUARY ' JULY
5 did] 1 2 m 4 1 2 3 5
8 E 10 11 6 7 8 9 10 n 12
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
26 27 28 29 30 31 27 28 29 30 31
FEBRUARY AUGUST 1 2
1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 M 29 30
23 24 25 26 27 28 31
MARCH 1 SEPTEMBER
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
16 17 18 0 20 21 22 i41516 liana 19 20
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 21 [22 23 24 25 26 27
30 E3 28 29 30
APRIL OCTOBER
01 2 CL 4 5 1 2 3 4
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
27 28 29 30 26 27 28 29 30 31
MAY NOVEMBER 1
1 2 3 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 23 24 25 @) @ 29
25 @27 28 29 30 31 30
JUNE DECEMBER
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 3 5 6
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
15 16 El 18 [T9 20 21 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
29 30 28 29 30 31
Symbols: Registration, no classes O Holiday, no classes [ First day of classes 1 Last day of classes
SPRING QUARTER
March 27-28* April 1 May 27 June 12
- 1974
Registration Classes Begin School Closed Quarter Ends
Memorial Day Holiday
SUMMER QUARTER 1974
June 18* Registration
June 20 Classes Begin
July 4 School Closed Independence Day
August 29 Quarter Ends
FALL QUARTER 1974
September 18-19*Registration September 23 Classes Begin
November 27-29 School Closed Thanksgiving Recess December 5 Quarter Ends
WINTER QUARTER 1975
January 3, 6, 7* Registration January 9 Classes Begin
March 19 Quarter Ends
SPRING QUARTER 1975
March 31 April 1*Registration April 3 Classes Begin
May 26 School Closed
June 12 Quarter Ends
SUMMER QUARTER 1975
June 17* June 19 July 4 August 28
Registration Classes Begin School Closed Quarter Ends
Memorial Day
Independence Day
'Contact campus of your choice for specific dates. Early registration may take place on some campuses
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GENERAL INFORMATION
History of the College
The 1967 Colorado General Assembly, in the enactment of House Bill 1448, established a state system of community colleges under a State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education. The first college to be created under the State Board, by the passage of House Bill 1449, was the Community College of Denver. The new law called for the establishment of three campuses, in successive years beginning in the fall of 1968, to serve primarily the area of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver and Jefferson counties.
The five-member governing council of the Community College of Denver, officially named the Denver Area Council for Community Colleges, was appointed by the Governor and held its organizational meeting on September 27, 1967. The initial task of the Council was to engage the services of a president. Dr. Leland B. Luchsinger was appointed by the Council as the first president of the Community College of Denver on November 1, 1967.
The first campus of the Community College of Denver, designated as the North Campus, was established in relocatable buildings on a six and one-fourth acre temporary site at the intersection of East 62nd Avenue and Downing Street in the fall of 1968. Eighteen hundred and sixty one students were registered. The campus was expanded during the summer and fall of 1969 to provide additional facilities for new programs and in anticipation of increased enrollment during the next academic year. In the fall of 1969, 2,800 students were registered. Additional facility expansions were made in 1970 and 1971 to accommodate fall enrollment increases to approximately 3,650 students in the fall of 1972.
A permanent site of 160 acres for the North Campus, located at 112th Avenue between Federal and Sheridan Boulevards, has been procured through an appropriation by the Colorado legislature and the efforts of the Community College of Denver Foundation. Physical planning money for the site is being requested of the legislature.
In the fall of 1969, the West Campus, now named the Red Rocks Campus, was established on a temporary site located at 1209 Quail Street in two relocatable buildings. The initial registration for the fall of 1969 was 780 students. The Red Rocks Campus has expanded its facilities and steadily increased in enrollment to a fall 1972 enrollment of 3,000 students.
Program plans for a permanent campus, which will eventually serve more than 10,000 students, have been developed, and the 1970 session of the Colorado General Assembly has also provided facility planning money for the construction of the first permanent buildings beginning in 1971. The first phase of construction on the new site at West 6th and Indiana was completed in the spring of 1973.
A third campus was opened in downtown Denver in the fall of 1970, now named the Auraria Campus. The campus was initially located in temporary renovated facilities located at 12th and Acoma Street. Seven hundred and ninety three students were enrolled in the fall of 1970. A steady increase in enrollment has occurred since the
opening of the campus. Facilities of the campus were expanded during the summer of 1972. In the fall of 1973, 2,389 students were registered.
The downtown campus received its name as the Auraria Campus in conjunction with its planned permanent location as a part of the Auraria Higher Education Center. The Center is to be located on approximately 167 acres in the Auraria Urban Renewal Subdivision, to be shared by Metropolitan State College and the Denver Center of Colorado University. Plans indicate that occupancy of the first phase of permanent buildings on the site will take place in 1975.
Objectives of the College
The Community College of Denver is a comprehensive state community college established within the five-county area of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver and Jefferson Counties to help meet the educational-vocational training needs of youth and adults. More interested in what the student is ready to do than in what he has done, the College is open to all who can profit from the instruction for which they enroll. The program of offerings includes:
1. Occupational courses and programs of several weeks to two years duration, the satisfactory completion of which may lead to job entry in an occupation of the students choice or advancement in a current job.
2. Pre-professional and liberal arts courses which, upon completion of the first and second years, will enable a student to transfer to a four-year college or university and earn a baccalaureate degree.
3. Other education opportunities for youth and adults, both credit and non-credit, including developmental programs, cultural opportunities and community services.
4. An emphasis on meeting the individual needs of the learners including the provision of specialized learning laboratories and a student-oriented learning materials center.
5. A comprehensive counseling program staffed by individuals who are genuinely concerned with the educational, vocational and personal welfare of students.
Accreditation
The Community College of Denver is under the jurisdiction of the Colorado State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education. The community Colleges Division of the State Board has received letters from officials of four-year colleges and universities in Colorado stating that transfer credit will be granted to students who have successfully completed appropriate courses at the several colleges operating under the State Board. Students who plan to transfer to baccalaureate programs at four-year institutions can be confident that
A4


college-parallel credits earned at the Community College of Denver will transfer without difficulty if students do acceptable work at the four-year institution.
The campuses now have Correspondent or Recognized Candidacy Status in the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the association which accredits all institutions of higher education in this area. This indicates that the institution has given evidence of sound planning, has the resources to implement these plans, and has indicated an intent to work toward accreditation.
Location of Campuses of the College
The location of the Red Rocks Campus of the Community College of Denver is at 12600 West 6th Ave. in Jefferson County, approximately five miles west of the west central boundary of the City of Denver and just west of the Denver Federal Center.
The temporary location of the North Campus of the Community College of Denver is at 1001 East 62nd Avenue in Adams County, just outside the north central boundary of the City of Denver, approximately five miles from the State Capitol in the downtown Denver area.
The temporary location of the Auraria Campus of the Community College of Denver is at 1201 Acoma Street, 1160 Lincoln, 1200 Broadway and 1250 Bannock in Denver County, which is in the heart of the central downtown business district of Denver.
Limitations of Catalog Information
This catalog should not be considered a contract between the Community College of Denver and any prospective student. The College must retain the customary right to cancel programs or course offerings where enrollments are insufficient to permit them on an educationally sound and economically efficient basis or to alter them for other reasons. Similarly, published charges for tuition and fees are subject to change as circumstances may require.
All of the courses listed but not offered in a given quarter or on a given campus may be offered if there is sufficient student interest.
Tuition
The tuition for state supported institutions is determined by the Colorado General Assembly and is subject to change.
As of the printing of this catalog, the tuition for 1974-75 has not been determined.
Tuition and fees may be altered at any time prior to the first day of registration for any quarter.
Fees
A Student Fee in the amount of 50 cents per credit hour up to a maximum of $6.00 is charged to all enrolled students. This money is used for various student activities including student publications, operation of student government, cultural activities, recreational activities, clubs and organizational activities. Expenditure of student fee monies is generally made with the approval of the student government. Students enrolled in certain
courses may be required to purchase individual supplies and materials and to rent uniforms.
Residence Classification for Tuition Purposes
At the time of application for admission, students are classified for tuition purposes as Colorado residents or out-of-state residents according to provisions of Colorado law.
Any student who has been classified as a non-resident and who believes he can qualify as a resident may secure from the Registrar an application form for in-state status. A copy of the regulations governing residence classification is a part of the application.
The final decision regarding tuition status rests with the institution. All questions regarding residency classification should be addressed to the Registrar.
Student Rights and Responsibilities
Admission to the College implies a recognition by the student that he should respect the rights of others, and that he should observe moral and civil laws. Interference with the normal process of education in the classroom or elsewhere on the campus will be regarded as unacceptable conduct which warrants suspension and/or dismissal from the school. The success of the college in attaining its objectives is conditioned by the good will, integrity, and honor of its students.
The Denver Area Council has approved a document which contains a Definition of Education, a Joint Statement on Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities of Students, and Rules of Procedure in Student Disciplinary Matters. This document provides guidelines necessary to insure the rights of all members of the college community. Each campus has its specific due process procedures. These procedures are included in the Student Handbook.
Credit Hours
Generally, one credit hour is earned by attending a non-laboratory class for a fifty-minute period, once a week, for a full quarter. In a laboratory course, one credit hour is granted for from two to four, fifty-minute periods per week in a laboratory.
Course Load
The normal course load for a full-time student is fifteen credit hours. Special permission must be obtained from the Dean of Student Services or an authorized representative to register for more than eighteen credit hours.
Counselors are available to consult with students about their course load.
Classification of Students
For record and reporting purposes, students are classified as follows:
Full-time a student who carries twelve or more
credit hours.
Part-time a student who carries less than twelve
credit hours.
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First-year (Freshman) a student who has completed fewer than forty-five credit hours.
Second-year (Sophomore) a student who has completed forty-five or more credit hours, but has not received an associate degree or has not qualified for upper division classification in a four-year college or university.
Unclassified a student who has earned a degree (associate, bachelors, etc.) or who has qualified for upper division classification at a four-year college or university.
Financial Obligations of Students
The financial obligations of students to the College such as payments for tuition, fees, and books are due and payable on the published specified date or at the times the obligations are incurred. In unusual circumstances of an emergency nature, where it may be impossible for a student to pay the total charges at the proper time, special arrangements may be considered for approval by the Director of Business Services.
A student is not considered officially registered until his class schedule has been processed by the Business Office.
A student who is in any way financially obligated to the College through a tuition deferment, emergency student loan, National Defense Loan, etc., or who has failed to account for College property in his possession will be denied a transcript of record and registration for subsequent sessions until he has made a satisfactory settlement with the College.
Attendance
College officials believe that regular class attendance is necessary if a student is to receive maximum benefits from his work. Students are expected to attend all sessions of the classes for which they are registered. Students who anticipate absences are requested to discuss these in advance with instructors.
Adding and Dropping Courses
Students wishing to adjust their schedules should be familiar with the College policy which reads: The deadline for adds will be the 15th full day of instruction. The deadline for drops will be on the date two weeks prior to the end of the quarter. Exceptions to this policy may be made only upon approval by the appropriate division director and instructional dean.
This policy does not preclude adjustments (arranging for change of courses in the interest of the students), nor does it preclude initial enrollment of new students during the course of the quarter in conformity with the continuous registration philosophy of the College.
Foreign Students
The Community College of Denver is authorized by the U.S. Immigration Service to admit non-immigrant alien students.
Foreign students who wish to enroll at the Community
College of Denver are required to submit the following documents:
1. An official application for admission to the Community College of Denver.
2. Two official copies of the appropriate high school, college or equivalent transcript. (See requirements under transcripts.) One copy must be an English translation. The other transcript should be in the original language.
3. Evidence of proficiency in the English language as documented by verbal discourse, or use of the Test of English as a Foreign Language.
For information on the test write to:
Test of English as a Foreign Language Educational Testing Service Box 899
Princeton, New Jersey 08540 U.S.A.
4. A statement of the financial resources to provide for the student's stay in the United States.
Form I-20A will not be issued to any foreign student until all the above documents are on file in the Office of Admissions and Records.
Tuition and fee charges for foreign students are the same as for out-of-state registrants. (See tuition and fee schedule.)
Readmission of Former Students
Former students who are returning to the College after an absence of one or more quarters, summer quarter excepted, must make application for readmission. Students who have attended other colleges since last attending the Community College of Denver may be requested to submit a transcript of all college credits.
Withdrawal Procedure
Students are admitted to the Community College of Denver under the assumption that they will remain until the end of the quarter or longer, unless unforeseen circumstances necessitate their withdrawal from the institution. When the student finds it necessary to initiate a complete withdrawal from the College, he should follow the procedures indicated below:
1. Obtain a withdrawal form from the Office of Admissions
2. Fill in the appropriate information
3. Fulfill all financial obligations to the College incurred with the Business Office, Financial Aid Office, Bookstore, or the Learning Materials Center
4. Conduct an exit interview with a counselor
5. Return withdrawal form to the Office of Admissions
6. Return identification card to the Registrar upon request
Tuition Refunds
No refunds are possible after the tenth day of class
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nor are refunds made if students drop a partial course
load at any time.
The student may claim a seventy-five percent refund of tuition paid if a complete withdrawal is made before the eleventh day of classes of the new quarter. Tuition refund request forms are available in the Office of Admissions and Records. No tuition refunds of less than $1.00 will be made.
Unusual circumstances concerning refunds should be referred to the Dean of Student Services.
Allowance of Credit
Within the strict limitations of an established policy, enrolled students are permitted to apply for an allowance of credit for demonstrated knowledge or competency they have attained through previous study and experience. This procedure includes the challenging of courses which coincide with the student's major program and career objectives, allowance of credit through CLEP Examination performance at the 35th percentile and evidence of proficiency through experience.
The College recognizes the CLEP Examination as well as selected Subject Examinations. Up to 45 hours of college credit may be awarded through the CLEP General Examinations. Additional credit may be earned by attaining successful scores on CLEP subject matter examinations. The Registrar's Office should be consulted for details concerning College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Examinations.
Evaluation and Grading
The Community College of Denver is philosophically committed to a program that focuses on the student and on activities that foster his learning. Student evaluation, when properly conducted, is regarded as one of these activities. Although the College utilizes continuous and varied means of evaluating a students progress, it has departed from tradition in adopting a system of grading. The system emphasizes accomplishment rather than penalty for failure and employes only the grade symbols listed below.
Grade Quality of Work Grade Points
Symbol Denoted by Symbol Per Credit Hour
A Superior 4
B Excellent 3
C Average 2
D Below Average 1
If a student earns a grade of D, he may elect either to have it recorded on his permanent record or disregarded. Learning accomplishment at a level which is judged to be failing receives no credit and is not recorded on the permanent record. If an incomplete (I) is given it must be made up during the following quarter to earn credit.
Grades are issued at the end of each quarter for all students, and grade slips will be mailed approximately one week after the last day of classes.
Students may be permitted to demonstrate that their achievement level, based on prior experience(s), is the e-quivalent of that required for enrollment in the successful completion of a course offered by the College, according to the following conditions and procedures:
1. The student must be currently enrolled in the College.
Grade Point Average
Under this system, grade points measure the achievement of the student for the number of credit hours he has completed at an accomplished level of D or above. They are determined by multiplying the grade points per credit hour by the credit hour value of the course completed.
2.
3.
4.
The student must submit a petition to the appropriate Division Director setting forth the nature of the students previous experience(s) and planned career objective(s) which support his petition to seek allowance of credit in lieu of enrolling in and completing a particular course.
Upon approval of the Division Director, an evaluation shall be arranged whereby the student shall have the opportunity to demonstrate that his level of achievement is the equivalent of that required by the College for successful completion of a particular course.
Not more than one evaluation for allowance of credit for a particular course will be arranged during any quarter of the regular academic schedule of the College.
The following example will enable pute his grade-point average:
Completed Final
Course Credit Hours English 3 Grade B 3 grade
Mathematics 3 C 2 grade
Electronics 2 A 4 grade
Physics 5 C 2 grade
Physical Education 1 D 1 grade
14
the student to com-
Grade Points
points (3x3) equals 9
points (3x2) equals 6
points (2x4) equals 8
points (5x2) equals 10
point (1x1) equals 1
34
5. Upon successful completion of the evaluation for allowance of credit, the student shall be awarded full credit for the particular course(s) as set forth in his approved petition.
6. Students pay tuition only if they pass and would normally owe tuition for the credit.
Total grade points are divided by total credit hours to compute the grade-point average. For example, 34 divided by 14 equals a 2.43 grade-point average.
The cumulative grade-point average is the total number of grade points recorded divided by the total number of credit hours.


Degrees and Certificates Offered
The Associate Degree is awarded to students successfully completing two-year programs. For shorter programs, Certificates of Achievement and Certificates of Comp etion are granted.
Graduation Requirements
To receive the ASSOCIATE DEGREE -a student must:
1. Complete a minimum of ninety quarter hours, including the specific subject or course requirements in the selected program. Certain programs may require more than the minimum of ninety quarter hours and these must also be completed.
2. Earn an overall grade point average of 2.0 in all credit counted toward the degree.
3. Complete three quarter hours of English.
4. Complete at least fifteen hours in residence at the Community College of Denver. (In mitigating circumstances, certain portions of this requirement may be waived by the Dean of Student Services.)
5. File the Application for Graduation form at the time when registering for the final quarter. This form is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
To receive the CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT a student must:
1. Complete the specified subject matter or course requirements of an approved program as set forth in the catalog. For programs longer than one quarter in duration, at least fifteen credit hours must be earned at the Community College of Denver.
2. Earn an overall grade-point average of 2.0 in all credit counted toward the certificate.
3. Complete three credit hours in speech or English in programs of longer than one quarter in duration except in programs where exemption is noted.
4. File the Application for Graduation form when registering for the final quarter. This form is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Certificate of Completion
The College offers many short courses, conferences, workshops and seminars. These will vary in length from
one to two meetings of short duration to units necessitating many clock hours accumulated over a period of several weeks. Successful completion of short courses of this type will result in the granting of a Certificate of Completion.
A Certificate of Completion may also be granted upon the successful completion of a course or courses in fulfillment of an educational objective leading to job-entry level employment as developed in conjunction with an advisor or counselor and approved by the respective division director leading to job entry employment. In order to receive this Certificate the applicant must file the Application for Graduation form at the time of registering for the final quarter. This form is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Transfer of Credit
If a student wishes to have previous college credits applied toward the degree requirements, he must submit official copies of previous college transcripts to the Registrar's Office no later than the time of registration for the quarter he plans to graduate. Official transcripts are those bearing the official seal of the College and mailed to the Registrar's Office by the sending institution.
D" Policy
The Community College of Denver will accept D's from other institutions but in order for a person to graduate from Community College of Denver with a Certificate of Completion, Certificate of Achievement or an Associate Degree, he must have an overall grade point average of 2.0 in all credit counted toward the certificate or degree. Students should be informed that D credit may not be acceptable to four year institutions.
Requests for Transcripts by Students
A student requesting that a transcript of his record be sent to an educational institution or to a prospective employer must complete the appropriate form which may be obtained from the Admissions and Records Office. The College assesses no fee for this service; however, no transcript will be provided for a student who has not fulfilled all financial obligations to the College or who has not provided transcripts as requested by the College.
Course Numbers
Course numbers consist of prefix letters, which constitute an abbreviation of the subject area or program, and a series of three digits, the first of which indicates its classification according to the year it should be taken. Usually, course numbers below 100 are designed for developmental education; numbers from 100^199 are usually taken during the first year of college since they are
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prerequisite courses. Courses numbered 200-299 are usually taken during the second year of college.
STUDENT SERVICES
In addition to the programs of study available at the College, a number of related or special services are provided for the assistance of students and others who may be interested.
Admissions, Records and Registration
Detailed information and admissions requirements and procedures are given in a previous section of the catalog.
Registration for classes is conducted in a manner which is designed for the convenience of students.
A system of record keeping assures the student of a complete and confidential file of information on previous educational experience, credits earned at the Community College of Denver, test data and other information.
Admissions Policy
The College will admit high school graduates, nongraduates of high school who are eighteen years of age or older, and any other person who can profit from the instruction from which he enrolls. However, admission to the College does not assure acceptance of an individual student in a particular course or program. Some students may be requested to enroll in special courses at the College for correction of scholastic or other deficiencies.
The College does not require a physical examination as a general condition of admission but reserves the right to require evidence of good health in individual instances when such seems appropriate. Physical disabilities and chronic illnesses should be indicated to the Admissions Office.
Entrance examinations are not required as a condition for admission to the College.
Students are served more adequately when applications and transcripts of previously earned credits are submitted in advance of counseling appointments, advising, and registration for classes.
Admissions Procedure:
Submit an official application for admission to the Community College of Denver, available from the Registrars Office. Transcripts of previous high school or college credits are not required, except as follows:
1. Persons planning to receive a degree or certificate from the College, who wish previous college credits to be considered, must submit official copies of those previous college tran-
scripts to the Registrars Office no later than the time of registration for the quarter in which they plan to graduate. Only official transcripts will be accepted. Copies should be mailed directly to the Registrars Office from the sending institution.
2. The College reserves the right to request transcripts of students in cases where it is felt that the student can be better served through use of his transcripts.
3. Foreign students should refer to Foreign Student requirements on page 6.
These documents become the property of the College and will not be released to the student or transferred to other institutions. The student's subsequent registration is contingent upon receipt of all required documents.
Bookstore
The Bookstores of Community College of Denver are owned and operated by the institution. The basic philosophy of each store is to serve the entire college community faculty and staff as well as students. While the bulk of items sold are required textbooks, each store tries to stock other merchandise such as paper, pens, slide rules, drafting and art supplies and general reading books that are used in the educational process.
Policy and procedures for the stores are established so that the stores are self-maintaining, and will operate on a competitive level with other retail outlets in the area.
Any profits realized by the stores after operating expenses are deducted will be used to finance student related activities such as scholarship funds and building funds.
Business Services
The Office of Business Services of the College is responsible for a number of functions which support the instructional and other services provided by the College. Included among these are assistance with budget preparation, collection of tuition and fees, financial accounting and reporting, preparation of payrolls, purchasing of equipment and supplies, and maintenance and operation of buildings and grounds.
Community Services
The style and emphasis of Community Services is determined by those community needs and interests which the college can develop resources to serve. Through Community Services, the resources of the college are extended to meet community needs and to help in the solution of community and individual problems. In turn, the needs and know-how of the community are channeled to
A9


college programs so they may better reflect current community conditions. This double-door action between college and community will enhance the growth of both by decreasing the boundaries between instruction and service, between classroom and community-based learning, and between paper and human problem-solving. The long range goals of the Community Services Program include:
1. Educational Expansion Function. Programming a variety of educational, upgrading and new career opportunities which reach beyond the traditional limitations of college credit restrictions; e.g., institutes, seminars, tours, short courses, contractual in-plant training, etc.
2. Educational Extension Function. Increasing the accessibility of the regular courses and curricula of the college by extending their availability to the community at large; e g., evening classes, TV courses, Weekend college, neighborhood extension centers.
3. Social Outreach Function. Organizing programs to increase the earning power, educational level, and political influence of the disadvantaged; e.g., ADC mothers, unemployed males, educationally deprived youth, and welfare recipients.
4. Civic Action Functions. Participating in cooperative efforts with local government, business, industry, professions, religious and social groups to increase the resources of the community to deal with major problems confronting the community; e.g., community self-studies, urban beautification, community chest drives, and air pollution.
5. Leisure-time Activity Function. Expanding opportunities for community members to participate in a variety of recreational activities, e.g., sports instruction, outdoor education, summer youth programs, and senior citizen activities.
6. Community Analysis Function. Collecting and analyzing significant data which reflect existing and emerging needs of the community and which can serve as a basis for developing the community service program of the college; e.g., analyzing census tracts, analyzing manpower data, conducting problem-oriented studies, identifying roles and goals of organizations.
7. Staff Consultation Function. Identifying, developing and making available the consulting skills of the faculty in community development activities; e.g., consulting with small business, advising on instructional materials, designing community studies, instruction in group leadership and laboratory testing.
8. Public Forum Function. Developing activities designed to stimulate interest in understanding of local, national, and world problems; e.g., public affairs pamphlets, town meetings, and TV symposia.
9. Cultural Development Function. Expanding opportunities for community members to participate in a variety of cultural activities; e.g., fine arts series, art festivals, artists in residence, and community theater.
10. Conference Planning Function. Providing professional assistance to community groups in the planning of conferences, institutes and workshops; e.g., registration procedures, program development, and conference evaluations.
11. Facility Utilization Function. Encouraging community use of college facilities by making them readily accessible, by facilitating the scheduling process, and by designing them for multipurpose activities when appropriate; e.g., campus tours, centralized scheduling office, conference rooms, and auditorium design.
12. Developmental Counseling Function. Providing community members with opportunities for self-discovery and development through individual and group counseling processes, e.g., aptitude-interest testing, individual interviews, career information, job placement, and family life.
COUNSELING SERVICES
The Counseling Division is dedicated to helping people. A qualified professional staff is available both days and evenings for exploration with students individually or in groups, of such areas as educational planning, measurement of aptitudes, interest and abilities, career plans, academic difficulties, marriage adjustment and interpersonal relationships.
The counseling staff is committed to the confidentiality of information on any student. The counseling staff is able to relate to student s personal concerns and treats personal information in a professional manner.
Any student desiring assistance from the Counseling Staff is encouraged to contact the counseling office.
Advising
The entire faculty of the College is guidance oriented and has a major commitment to help each individual student pursue a course of study planned to fulfill his goals.
Students are assisted by the instructional staff and/or
A10


counselor in developing his program of study and selection of classes each quarter.
It is the students responsibility to:
1. Meet with an instructor or counselor to discuss the most appropriate classes for his career objective.
2. Discuss his program and classes prior to each registration and work out his class schedule.
3. Contact an instructor or counselor when problems arise in the program. The instructor or counselor should also be informed if he changes his program of study.
4. Make certain he is fulfilling the department's requirements for graduation.
STUDENTS WHO HAVE NOT SELECTED A PROGRAM OF STUDY, OR ARE UNCERTAIN OF THE PROGRAM THEY WANT TO FOLLOW, ARE URGED TO CONTACT THE COUNSELING OFFICE.
Career Center
Within the Student Services complex, a Career Center is maintained. This area has available occupational information, a collection of college catalogs, and materials to assist students in making informed career decisions. A counselor who has major responsibility in assisting students with career plans is in charge of the Center.
Housing
Students who attend the Community College of Denver commute. The College does not operate a residence hall program. Students are expected to arrange their own housing. Those desiring help may contact the Counseling Office.
Orientation
New students are invited to attend an Orientation Session. At the session, the group is given a short general over-view of the college, the staff, the instructional divisions, and the various programs available.
Counselors assist each student in preparing a tentative schedule.
Self-Exploration
Small group seminars are offered that utilize the methods of group counseling. These seminars include self-exploration and understanding, Human Potential workshops and vocational exploration.
Testing
No entrance examinations or tests are required for ad-
mission to the College. Individuals contemplating transfer to another college are encouraged to take the ACT or SAT required by such institutions and have a copy of the results sent to the Community College. The college provides a testing program to assist students in determining their interests, aptitudes, and level of competency in certain subject matter areas. With these data, counselors are better able to assist individual students in planning their educational and vocational program and can make appropriate use of the resources available to him.
Evening Classes
The instructional program of the College includes a large number of evening course offerings, scheduled between 5:00 and 11:00 p.m. five evenings a week. These often make it possible for adults to help satisfy cultural and hobby interests which they may have, in addition to pursuing the regular degree and certificate programs through evening study.
Financial Aid
The Offices of Financial Aid on each campus of the College endeavor to help deserving students obtain financial assistance in meeting their college related expenses. The College participates in several federal, state and institutional financial aid programs including loans, grants and work-study jobs. The College uses the American College Testing Program Financial Needs Analysis in determining the financial need of students applying for aid.
Student loans are available through the National Direct Student Loan Program, Federal Nursing Student Loan Program, and the Federally Insured Student Loan Program. Each represents a long-term, low-interest loan repayable after the student completes his education or terminates his student status.
Grants are available through the Supplementary Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) Program, Federal Nursing Scholarship Program, Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) Program, and the Colorado Student Grant Program (CSG). Some of these grants can pay up to $1500 per academic year.
Federal Nursing Scholarship Funds are available only on North Campus to full-time nursing students and range up to $1500 depending on need and availability of funds. All grant and loan monies are awarded on the basis of financial need.
The school also participates in the Colorado Scholars Program. Students who maintain a 3.0 (B average) may apply for these scholarships, which cover the cost of tuition and fees.
Part-time jobs are available through the College Work-Study and the Colorado Work-Study Programs.
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These awards are also made on the basis of financial need with the exception of 30% of the Colorado Work-Study Program, which is used for no-need students.
Food Service
Automated food service is provided on all campuses in the food vending area. The North campus provides cafeteria service as well.
Health Services
College officials recognize the importance of good health for happy and productive study. The Student Health Service is designed to foster and maintain proper attitudes and habits of personal and community health. Various programs and activities related to current health problems are planned each quarter. These programs are designed to educate students, faculty, and staff of todays health problems and the means of preventive health measures.
A registered nurse is available to assist students with minor emergencies, treatment of minor illnesses, referrals, health information and other health related problems. A consulting physician is also available to students at varying times during the week.
No group accident and sickness insurance program is available to students. Students should make arrangements for individual coverage with their own insurors. Students are encouraged to utilize the health services of the college.
Job Development and Placement
The Job Development and Placement Office on the respective campuses, instructors, and division directors in the area of Occupational Studies maintain close contact with business and industry concerning job opportunities and training needs. A record of available employment positions, both full and part-time, is kept in the Job Development and Placement Office. This office coordinates all of the College s efforts to assist students in obtaining suitable full-time employment in occupations for which they have been prepared at the College. The Services include assistance in resume development. Other services are: application aids, job interview aids, summer employment, and volunteer listings. Students interested in fulltime and part-time jobs should contact the Job Development and Placement Office on their Campus and complete an application for employment.
Parking
Student parking facilities vary at the three campuses. Auraria students use street parking. There are blocks with and blocks without parking meters in the immediate
vicinity. Many students also use the commercial lots in the area which cost approximately 65 cents per day. North campus students may park on nearby streets, in a small lot adjacent to the west building or in a commercial lot on Downing Street at a cost of 25 cents each time they use it. Red Rocks campus has two lots available at a cost of 25 cents each time it is entered or may obtain a pass at a cost of $11 per quarter.
Student Activities
The College cooperates in the development of those student-initiated activities which supplement the more formal instructional program. Such activities are expected to provide constructive experiences which will stimulate personal growth and social development and add to the students enjoyment of life. Opportunities for the development of leadership, cooperative planning and special interests are fostered through participation in these activities. All student activities are coordinated through the Office of Student Activities.
The student activity programs involve students in self-government, participation in the College decisionmaking process, student leadership programs and conferences, student-selected clubs and organizations, and an intramural program in physical education and recreation.
Selective Service
It is the responsibility of enrolled students to keep the Selective Service Local Boards informed of their current status. The Office of Admissions and Records has selective service information for the student. No student status information is sent to the Selective Service Boards unless requested by the student.
Veterans Educational Benefits
The Community College of Denver is approved for education and training under various Veterans Administration programs. Students who are eligible for Veterans benefits should make application for benefits at the Veterans Administration Regional Office. A student approved for educational benefits by the Veterans Administration will be issued a Certificate of Eligibility which he should bring to the Office of Admissions and Records at the time of his initial registration.
Students using Veterans benefits must report any changes in their program of studies immediately to the Office of Admissions and Records.
If a veteran fails to notify the Registrars Office of a reduction in his credit hours during a given quarter, he will automatically be reduced at the end of the quarter and recertified to the Veterans Administration, effective the first day of the quarter in question. For further information, contact the Registrars Office, Division of Veterans Affairs.
Students receiving G. I. benefits are required to notify the Registrars Office, Division of Veterans Affairs, of any change in their training status.
THE DENVER MDTA SKILL CENTER
The Denver Manpower Skill Center is integrated into
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the on-going occupational programs of the Community College of Denver.
The Skill Center was originally designated under the Manpower Development and Training Act of 1962 as amended. The Manpower Skill Center is now authorized under the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act of 1973.
Unemployed and underemployed individuals are referred to the Skill Center for training to job entry level through regular Community College classes.
In addition, individuals may be referred for upgrade training. The individual Skill Center student training program may also include cooperative occupational education experience in addition to classroom instruction.
LEARNING MATERIALS CENTER
As an instructional and supportive division to the total curriculum of the College, the Learning Materials Center (LMC) functions simultaneously as a learning center, in-structional/resources laboratory, and a library.
To realistically serve the many different needs and interests of students and faculty, the LMC circulates a wide range of educational print and non-print media.
Inter-library loans are available through the LMC from the Denver Bibliographical Center for Research and other educational institutions. The Book Catalog of the Jefferson County Public Libraries is available for use by students and faculty on the Red Rocks Campus.
Auraria Campus is a member of the Education Information Services of the University of Northern Colorado.
Professional and supportive personnel are available for consultation and media production services.
INSTRUCTIONAL LABORATORIES
To serve the needs of all CCD students and to assure success in career training, the Community College of Denver provides specialized instructional laboratories at all three campuses. These laboratories offer instruction through specialized equipment thereby enabling students to develop basic learning skills. Mastery of these skills will assure students of successful completion of course assignments as well as high school diplomacy equivalency requirements. Moreover, the instructional laboratories will enable students to qualify for and maintain productive employment. Instruction in such basic skills as writing, reading, spelling, or arithmetic in addition to tutorial support supplementing various instructional programs is provided by the College. Instructional laboratories are open to all students at CCD whether enrolled in occupational or general studies programs.
The procedure in the instructional laboratory is to diagnose the students skill deficiency and prescribe a plan to bolster the lack of basic skills. Thereafter, the student will participate in a highly individualized program in close contact with instructors qualified to help with his specific problem. For example, should a student in carpentry lack a proficiency in math or reading which inhibits his ability to perform simple mathematical computations or to read and translate measurements, the lab will analyze and diagnose this skill problem. Then, through individualized planned instruction, the student will be helped by trained
instructors until his lack of knowledge and skill is rectified.
There is no established timetable for completion in the instructional laboratory. The achievement of proficiency in basic learning skills cannot be related to academic quarters, clock hours or traditional forms of scheduling. Enrolled students are permitted to use the instructional laboratories frequently and for as long as they wish during each time of use.
The following program opportunities for all CCD students are available according to individual needs:
COMMUNICATIONS (READING, WRITING, SPEAKING, LISTENING)
MATHEMATICS (FUNDAMENTALS OF ARITHMETIC, ALGEBRA, AND GEOMETRY)
SCIENCE (BASIC LIFE SCIENCES AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE)
SOCIAL SCIENCES (FUNDAMENTALS OF WORLD AND U.S. HISTORY, U. S. GOVERNMENT, GEOGRAPHY, AND CONSUMER ECONOMICS)
SERVICEMENS OPPORTUNITY COLLEGE
In recognition of the unique educational problems confronting active duty servicemen in obtaining their educational goals, the Community College of Denver has been officially designated as a Servicemens Opportunity College. By completing 15 quarter hours in a degree program at the Community College of Denver, the serviceman may transfer the remaining 75 hours from other Servicemens Opportunity Colleges, other accredited institutions, CLEP examinations and/or institutional challenge examinations completed prior to or after attending the Community College of Denver. Before transferring to another institution, the serviceman may contract for a degree from the Community College of Denver for any work remaining beyond the initial 15 hours. This work may be completed at other Servicemen's Opportunity Colleges, or other accredited institutions.
Each campus of the Community College of Denver has a counselor who serves as a Servicemens Counselor. This counselors prime responsibility is to assist servicemen in achieving their educational goals.
COLLEGIATE CENTER FOR THE PHYSICALLY DISADVANTAGED
Proposed Program
The Community College of Denver has developed, through its Center for the Physically Disadvantaged, comprehensive support services permitting all physically handicapped candidates to pursue existing programs offered in this catalog. Satisfactory completion will lead to one of the following certifications: Associate Degree, Certificate of Achievement, or Certificate of Completion.
The achievement and employment record of handicapped students assisted by the Center has been noteworthy. Because of the heavy demand for the services of the Center for the Physically Disadvantaged, it will be necessary (for the 1974-75 school year) to concentrate this effort primarily at the North Campus until further ex-
A13


pansion is feasible. Therefore, it is recommended that
students desiring to avail themselves of the full battery of
services of the Center register at the North Campus.
Disability Groups Served
This new program will be directed towards secondary and post-secondary candidates, and will provide educational services for the following physical disabilities:
AMPUTATIONS
BLINDNESS/VISUAL PROBLEMS PARAPLEGIA AND SPINAL CORD INJURIES DEAFNESS
CARDIAC AND VASCULAR CEREBRAL PALSY MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS DEFORMITIES SPEECH DISORDERS ASTHMA/RESPIRATORY DISABLING CONDITIONS SELECTED MULTIPLE HANDICAPS
Support Services Offered
Depending upon the candidates disability, the following support services are offered:
TUTORIAL ASSISTANCE
READERS AND BRAILLE TRANSCRIBERS
SPECIAL COUNSELORS
NOTETAKERS AND TESTORS
SPECIALIZED MEDIA
EQUIPPED RESOURCE CENTERS
PERIPHERAL THERAPY AND NURSING SERVICE
PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING SERVICE
INTERPRETING (FOR THE DEAF)
PARAPROFESSIONAL AID
CURRICULUM ADAPTATION MODIFICATION OF ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS PLACEMENT SERVICE FOR THE HANDICAPPED LIAISON WITH REHABILITATION CENTERS ON-CAMPUS ATTENDANT ASSISTANCE TEXTBOOK OUTLINING EARLY REGISTRATION
Educational Objectives
The thrust of this project is to direct handicapped candidates toward the greatest degree of employable competency that the physical limitations of their particular disability will allow.
An in-depth analysis of all occupational programs available at the three-campus complex has been undertaken to identify programs suitable to each kind of handicapping condition. Curriculum modification will be implemented to meet each candidates specific potential. Equipment adaptation or the provision of supplementary equipment will be arranged.
Conceptual Basis for the Program
It is the philosophy of the Community College of Denver that handicapped adults should be given the same opportunities for occupational training as their able-bodied counterparts. In addition, CCD maintains the belief that many more handicapped individuals should and could be employed than are in the present labor market. CCD maintains also that the physically handicapped can be trained more effectively, at less expenditure, in the same classrooms with their non-handicapped peers, rather than in isolated special schools. To facilitate this philosophy, CCD is making certain that ancillary classroom services are available for all physically handicapped students.
A14
i


KEY TO COURSE PREFIX LETTERS
AB Auto Body Service AC Accounting
AE Appliance and Refrigeration Mechanics AES Airframe Power Plant AM Automotive Mechanics AN Anthropology AR Art
AT Architectural Technology AV Audio-Visual Technology B Biology
BE Biomedical Equipment Technology Bl Building Inspection BL Bricklaying C Chemistry CA Carpentry
CC Early Childhood Education and Management
CH Chinese
CJ Criminal Justice
CM Commercial Art
CO Cosmetology
CT Civil Technology
D Drafting
DA Dental Assisting
DM Diesel Mechanics
DP Data Processing
EC Economics
EG English
EG (Manual Communication)
EM Appliance and Refrigeration Mechanics
EO Heavy Equipment Operation
ET Electronics Technology
EV Environmental Control Technology
F Food Service
FP Fluid Power
FR French
FS Fire Science Technology
G Earth Science
GA Graphic Arts
GE Geography
GR German
HE Health Education
HI Hearing Impaired
HM Hotel-Motel Management
HS History
H' Humanities
I Information Media Technology
1C Inventory Control
IE Commercial Industrial Electricity
IM Industrial Management
IN Insurance
IT Respiratory (Inhalation) Therapy Technology JL Journalism LA Para-Legal
LI Literature LT Library Technology M Mathematics MG Management
MH Manufactured Housing Technology
Ml Mineral Industry Technology
MO Medical Insurance Clerk
MS Machine Shop
MU Music
N Nursing
NA Nurse Assisting
NT Nuclear Medicine Technology
OA Optometric Assisting
OM Business Machine Technology
P Physics
PE Physical Education
PH Philosophy
PL Plumbing
PR Public Relations
PS Political Science
PT Commercial Photography
PY Psychology
QA Quality Assurance
R Radiation Therapy Technology
RA Radio and Television Service
RD Reading
RE Real Estate
RL Recreational Leadership
RT Radiologic Technology
S Speech
SC Secretarial Science
SE Sports Crafts and Specialty Area Mechanics SI Science SK Skill Center SO Sociology SP Spanish
SR Activity Directing for Senior Citizens SS Social Science ST Surgical Technology SU Surveying
SW Community and Social Service Assisting
TE Traffic Engineering Technology
Tl Technical Illustration
TT Traffic and Transportation
TV Television Technology
UH Urban Horticulture
UP Urban Planning Technology
VM Vending Machine Technology
VN Practical Nursing
WC Ward Clerk
WE Welding and Fabrication
WW Water-Wastewater Technology
XT General Diagnostic (X-Ray)
A 75


Community College of Denver
ED
uraria Campus lorth Campus led Rocks Campus
xeneral Studies Programs


GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM
General Information Division of Communication and Arts Division of Science and Mathematics Division of Social Sciences Consortium of Ethnic Studies
B5
B7
B19
B27
B35
Note: Auraria CampusA North CampusN Red Rocks CampusR


GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAMS
The General Studies Programs are intended to provide educational opportunities in support of a students selected career emphasis in Occupational Studies, in preparation for transfer to a four-year college or university and in general and developmental education interests.
Students enrolled in Occupational Studies Programs may enroll in General Studies courses to meet the specific requirements of a particular occupational curriculum and to select desired elective courses.
Students who intend to transfer to a four-year college or university should review the catalog of the particular institution to which they plan to transfer in order to determine specific course requirements. Copies of catalogs for other Colorado colleges, universities, and out-of-state schools may be obtained through the Office of Student Services. Students are urged to seek the advice of the division directors and faculty members in the selection of transfer courses in their areas of interest.
The Associate Degree is awarded by the Community College of Denver upon the successful completion of the requirements for the degree. The general requirements for the Associate Degree are listed on Page A8. Also, a General Studies student must meet the specific requirements in one of the four areas of emphasis listed below:
1. Arts This is designed for the student whose major emphasis of study is in Communication and Arts and/or Social Sciences and is intended for transfer to a four-year college or university in his area of interest.
Degree Requirements
Successful completion of a minimum of ninety (90) quarter hours of credit in transfer course work including the following:
a. EG 111, 112, and 113...................9 hours
b. Nine (9) quarter hours of course
work in the Division of Communications and Arts* (in addition to EG 111,
112, and 113) ....................9 hours
c. Twelve (12) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Science
and Mathematics ..............12 hours
d. Twelve (12) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Social
Sciences ........................12 hours
e. Electives that fit in with the students
transfer program.................48 hours
TOTAL ...........................90 hours
'Excluding course work in physical education.
2. Science This is designed for the student whose major emphasis of study is in Science or Mathematics and is intended for transfer to a four-year college or university in his area of interest.
Degree Requirements
Successful completion of a minimum of ninety
(90) quarter hours of credit in transfer course work including the following:
a. EG 111, 112, and 113....................9 hours
b. Nine (9) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Communication and Arts* (in addition to EG 111,
112, and 113) ....................9 hours
c. Thirty (30) quarter hours of course
work in the Division of Science and Mathematics .....................30 hours
d. Twelve (12) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Social
Sciences ........................12 hours
e. Electives that fit in with the students
transfer program.......................30 hours
TOTAL..................................90 hours
'Excluding course work in physical education.
3. Business This is designed for the student whose major emphasis of study is in Business and may be used for transfer to a four-year college or university school of business.
Degree Requirements
Succesful completion of a curriculum designed for transfer to a four-year college or university by the Division of Business and Management Occupations.
4. General Education This is designed for the student who completes a broad program of courses without the constraints of specialization characteristic of the other programs in General Studies and is not designed for transfer.
Degree Requirements
Successful completion of a minimum of ninety (90) quarter hours of course work including the following:
a. Six (6) quarter hours of course
work in the Division of Communication
and Arts*.................................6 hours
b. Six (6) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Science
and Mathematics ....................6 hours
c. Six (6) quarter hours of course work in the Division of Social
Sciences ...........................6 hours
d. Electives in General Studies ......30 hours
e. Electives of the students
choosing.................................42 hours
TOTAL ............................90 hours
Excluding course work in physical education.
NOTE: Students who can submit evidence that their successful completion of ninety (90) quarter hours of course work constitutes a completely transferable curriculum for transfer into a specific program at a four-year college or university need not complete the specific requirements listed above in order to be considered for the Associate Degree.
65


DIVISION OF COMMUNICATION AND ARTS
Art A, N, R
English A, N, R
Beginning Manual Communications N, R
French A, R
German R
Humanities A, R
Instructional Labs A, N, R
Journalism A, R
Literature A, N, R
Music A, N, R
Physical Education A, N, R
Reading A, N, R
Speech A, N,R
Skill Center Instructional Program A, N, R
Spanish A, N, R
Independent Study A, N,R
Note: Auraria CampusA North CampusN Red Rocks CampusR


DIVISION OF COMMUNICATION AND ARTS
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Where a course description does not indicate the campus by the key A, N or R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
AR 100 Art Appreciation (A, N).........3 credit hours
A study of the world's art masterpieces, various aspects and types of art works as a basis for broadening knowledge and appreciation of the subject.
AR 101 Basic Drawing (A, N, R)_________3 credit hours
Freehand drawing covering a selection of subject, proportion, perspective, line, texture, value and composition. Media includes pencil, conte crayon, charcoal and ink. (6 hours per week)
AR 102 Basic Drawing (A, N, R)_________3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 101 or permission of instructor Drawing fundamentals with a stronger emphasis c" the idea or concept of drawing, introduction of color into drawing and a wider selection of drawing media. (6 hours per week)
AR 103 Basic Drawing (A,N,R) ..........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 102 or 103 or permission of instructor
Drawing in varied and mixed media, emphasizing experimentation. Broad range of size and material stressing composition and concept. Introduction to drawing human figure. (6 hours per week)
AR 105 Basic Design (A, N)........3 credit hours
Fundamentals of form, color, visual perception, principles of composition, organization and structure introduced with experimentation in two-dimensional design. (6 hours per week)
AR 106 Basic Design (A, N)........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 105 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 105 with problems in form, color, visual perception, principles of composition, organization and structure in both two and three dimensional design. (6 hours per week)
AR 107 Basic Design (A, N)........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 105 or 106 or permission of instructor
Advanced problems in two and three dimensional design. (6 hours per week)
AR 110 Art of the
Southwest (A) ..............3 credit hours
The architecture, painting and sculpture of the American Southwest from pre-Colombian civilization to present times. Emphasis is on regional adaptation and assimilr -tion of art forms brought about by the different cycles of conquest.
AR 111 Introduction to Art,
A Survey of Masterpieces of
the World (A,R).............3 credit hours
The course is designed for students interested in general awareness of art and art appreciation. A study of the
world's masterpieces from PrehisiJric to Gothic period with brief exposure to some studio experiences if appropriate.
AR 112 Introduction to Art,
A Survey of Masterpieces of
the World (A, R) .........3 credit hours
A continuation of Al 111, from Early Renaissance through Rococo periods.
AR 113 Introduction to Art,
A Survey of Masterpieces of
the World (A, R) .........3 credit hours
A continuation of AR 112, from New Classic through Contemporary periods.
AR 181 Ethnic Studies in
Art, The American
Southwest (A) ............3 credit hours
Special studies of the Art of the American Southwest from pre-Colombian civilizations to present times as it relates to the Chicano.
AR 182 Ethnic Studies in Art,
The Art of Africa and
Black Americans (A).......3 credit hours
Special studies of the Art of Africa from ancient to present times as it relates to contemporary Black American artists.
AR 183 Ethnic Studies in Art,
The Art of the Orient and the American Oriental (A).............. 3 credit hours
Special studies of Oriental Art from ancient to present times as it relates to contemporary American Oriental artists.
AR 184 Ethnic Studies in Art, The
American Indians (A) .....3 credit hours
Special Studies of the Art of the American Indian from ancient to present times as it relates to contemporary American Indian artists.
AR 201 Second Year Drawing
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 103 or permission of instructor Advanced problems in freehand drawing. Emphasis on experimentation using a variety of media and greater emphasis on drawing the human figure. (6 hours per week)
AR 202 Second Year Drawing
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 201 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 201. (6 hours per week)
AR 203 Second Year Drawing
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 201 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 202. (6 hours per week)
B8


AR 211 Basic Water Colors
and Watermedia (A,N,R) ... 3 credit hours
Introduction to transparent and opaque water color media through problems in creative design involving landscape and still life. (6 hours per week)
AR 212 Basic,Water Colors and
Watermedia (A, N, R) ......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 211 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 211. (6 hours per week)
AR 213 Basic Water Colors and
Watermedia (A, N, R) ......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 212 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 211 and 212. (6 hours per week)
AR 215 Figure Drawing I
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Beginning drawing of the human figure with a variety of drawing media and an introduction to human anatomy. (6 hours per week)
AR 216 Figure Drawing II
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 215 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 215. (6 hours per week)
AR 217 Figure Drawing III
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 216 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 216. (6 hours per week)
AR 221 Oil and Acrylic Painting
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Introduction to oil or acrylic painting with basic investigation of the materials of the painter and their employment in control of form and space through the use of color and other elements of design. (6 hours per week)
AR 222 Oil and Acrylic Painting
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 221 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 221. (6 hours per week)
AR 223 Oil and Acrylic Painting
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 222 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 221 or 222. (6 hours per week)
AR 231 Ceramics I (A, R) ..............3 credit hours
Opportunity for students to discover their potential in design as applied to pottery. Various methods of building and glazing ceramic forms are made possible through laboratory experiences. (6 hours per week)
AR 232 Ceramics II (A, R) ............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 231 or permission of instructor (6 hours per week)
AR 233 Ceramics III (A, R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 232 or permission of instructor ( 6 hours per week)
AR 235 Textile Design and
Weaving I (A)..............2 credit hours
Historical development of looms, weaving and textile design techniques, studio experience in weaving, batik and other textile design. (4 hours per week)
AR 236 Textile Design and
Weaving II (A) .............2 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 235 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 235. (4 hours per week)
AR 237 Textile Design and
Weaving III (A) ............2 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 236 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 236. (4 hours per week)
AR 241 History of Art (R) .............3 credit hours
Earliest Stone Age to the Roman Era: Painting, sculpture, architecture, minor arts.
AR 242 History of Art (R) .............3 credit hours
Beginning of the Roman Era to the 18th Century; Architecture, painting, sculpture, minor arts.
AR 243 History of Art (R) .............3 credit hours
Eighteenth Century to Contemporary. European and American, Primitive African and Oceanic: Architecture, painting, minor arts.
AR 245 Printmaking I (A, N, R) ........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 105, 106, 107 Basic Design or permission of instructor A study of basic hand printing techniques: Lithography, etching, wood engraving, block printing and silkscreen printing. (6 hours per week)
AR 246 Printmaking II (A, N, R) _______3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 245 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 245. (6 hours per week)
AR 247 Printmaking III (A, N, R)_______3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 246 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 246. (6 hours per week)
AR 251 Metalsmithing and
Jewelry I (A, R)............3 credit hours
Jewelry design, basic construction and surface treatment techniques in sterling silver. (6 hours per week)
AR 252 Metalsmithing and
Jewelry II (A, R) ..........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 251 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 251. (6 hours per week)
AR 253 Metalsmithing and
Jewelry III (A, R)..........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 252 or permission of instructor (6 hours per week)
AR 255 Basic Sculpture I (A, R)________3 credit hours
Prerequisite: One year of basic design or permission of instructor
A creative approach to three dimensional design in sculpture; modeling, assembling, and construction in a variety of materials. (6 hours per week)
AR 256 Basic Sculpture II (A, R) ... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 255 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 255. (6 hours per week)
AR 257 Basic Sculpture III (A, R) .. 3 credit hours
Continuation of AR 256. (6 hours per week)
AR 261 Second Year Painting
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 213 and 223 or permission of instructor
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A continuation of AR 213 and 223. This course provides an opportunity for the advanced student to work with water color, oil and acrylic, or mixed media through problems involving landscape, still life, abstraction and non-objective painting. (6 hours per week)
AR 262 Second Year Painting
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 261 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 261. (6 hours per week)
AR 263 Second Year Painting
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 262 or permission of instructor Continuation of AR 262. (6 hours per week)
AR 271 Second Year Ceramics I
(A, R)......................3 credit hours
A continuation of AR 233. This course provides an opportunity for advanced ceramics in second year, creative design in wheel thrown pottery forming processes and glaze compositions. (6 hours per week)
AR 272 Second Year Ceramics II
(A, R)......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 271 or permission of instructor (6 hours per week)
AR 273 Second Year Ceramics III
(A, R)......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: AR 272 or permission of instructor (6 hours per week)
AR 281 Art History (R)................3 credit hours
Survey of American art from the Puritan beginnings to contemporary times.
AR 282 Art History (R) ...............3 credit hours
Continuation of AR 281 with emphasis on an in-depth study of an area of art of student's choice.
AR 283 Art History (R)................3 credit hours
Continuation of AR 282 with further independent study.
ENGLISH
IL 090 Communications Laboratory
(A, N, R)............................
This program is designed to guide and assist students who have difficulty in any of the communication skills especially in reading, spelling, written composition and oral communication (including listening). Through counseling and tests these laboratory experiences help the student recognize his problem, define it, and then, through highly individualized teaching, work toward some mean: ingful solution of that problem in order to prepare him to go on with his college work.
EG 095 Comprehensive Business
Communications (R).........3 credit hours
A special course designed for the short-term business students who must improve their skill in the mechanics of transcribing business letters. Intensive practice in proofreading and correcting business correspondence will be provided. (5 class hours per week, plus lab assignments as directed by the instructor).
EG 096 English as a Second
Language (A, N, R) ........5 credit hours
This course is designed to lead the student to mastery of the sound system of English along with the mastery of the
devices which English uses structurally and the fundamental matters of word order and the patterns of form. (5 hours per week)
EG 097 English as a Second
Language (A)..............5 credit hours
Designed to develop the students ability to use correct parts of speech in verbal and written sentences. Pronunciation, rythm, and intonation are stressed as important patterns in communication. Individualized instruction is correlated to each student's other classes.
EG 098 English as a Second
Language (A)..............5 credit hours
Designed to develop college level reading, note-taking, and vocabulary skills. Composition and speech skills are taught simultaneously as products of English thought patterns. Individualized instruction is correlated to each student's other classes.
EG 100 Study Skills (N, R) ..........1 credit hour
Objectives are to introduce basic study skills.
EG 102 Workshop in Language
Fundamentals (A, N, R) ___3 credit hours
The course is designed to give the student basic writing skills. The course will cover basic grammar, punctuation and syntax. Ample exercise and individualized instruction will ensure student progress in the development of fundamental writing skills needed in college or work world.
EG 106 Occupational
Communication (A, N, R) ... 3 credit hours
Designed to develop the occupational students skills and understanding in reading and writing. Special emphasis is placed on business and industrial needs. EG 106 develops these skills in written communication and focuses on the students abilities to read and write within his chosen field.
EG 107 Occupational
Communication (A, N, R) ... 3 credit hours
Designed to develop the students abilities in oral communication (speaking and listening) in his chosen field.
EG 108 Occupational
Communication (A, N, R) ... 3 credit hours
The focus is on introductory technical writing and will cover letters, progress reports and informal technical reports.
EG 111 English Composition
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Designed to introduce the student to the broad field of communication and to develop ability in the writing of short papers and reports through the application of the techniques of clear thinking: definition, classification, structure and process analysis, and comparison/contrast.
EG 112 English Composition
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: EG 111 or equivalent Designed to teach the student to write reports and research papers. The emphasis is on the library paper: (1) defining the problem, (2) collecting data, (3) organizing logical sequence, (4) recording (footnoting, editing, typing, etc.).
EG 113 English Composition
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Designed to develop the students understanding of crea-
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tive forms in all areas of communication. This includes (1) introduction to the characteristics of creativity, (2) meaningful forms of creative expression and application and (3) experiences in the search for personal expression, with particular emphasis on contemporary involvement. EG 111 and 112 are not prerequisites for EG 113.
EG 114 Creative Writing
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
The writing of creative papers and the creative process generally. Students are exposed to a variety of techniques primarily applicable to creative forms; poetry, essays, short stories, and others.
EG 121 Communications for Health
Occupations (N)...........3 credit hours
Designed to give the student insights into the basic communication skills needed for effective performance in the Health Occupations areas of work. The course will cover the communication process, minimum standards for written assignments, documentation techniques, prerequisites for writing, organizational techniques, structure of written reports, techniques for efficient communication, punctuation problems, sentence patterns and variations, and job seeking communications. Students will be given both lecture, and individual instruction in all these areas of communications, and they will be given an opportunity to deal with subjects related to their own world of work when they write.
EG 131 Business Communications I
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Presents essential principles involved in preparing business letters and other types of business communicationspurpose, style, structure and use of correct, forceful English. Intensive practice in the mechanics of language and vocabulary used by management and office personnel is provided.
EG 132 Business Communications It
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: EG 131 or equivalent Applies the business technique to communications that require problem solving and an understanding of human relations in a business situation. Students will compose and evaluate the various kinds of business letters that are commonly used by businessmen. Business reports, interoffice bulletins, news releases and other forms of business composition will receive attention. The legal and ethical responsibilities involved in written communication will be discussed.
EG 133 Business Communications III
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: EG 132 or equivalent Applications of the writing, speaking and listening skills learned in EG 131 and 132 (Business Communications) are covered in this course. Oral business reporting for staff meetings, public speaking, correct telephone usage, techniques in business dictation, listening for notetaking and other business facets of written and oral communications are practiced.
EG 200 Advanced
Composition (A, R) .......3 credit hours
The techniques of clear thinking and organization as implemented by the basic concepts of EG 111 and EG 112 applied to expository writing with special attention to syntactic and rhetorical development.
EG 201 Survey of
Communication (A, R) .....3 credit hours
Focuses on the development of basic communication habits as aids to better communication. The communication model, levels of communicative interdependence, empathy, origin of meanings, general semantics, dimensions of observations and judgments are studied as a new approach to human understanding and improvement of human relations.
EG 214 Advanced Creative
Writing (A, R) ...........3 credit hours
An advanced course in creative writing. The course will channel individual student potential into advanced creative expression, self-enrichment with resultant publishable materials.
EG 220 The Rhetoric of Social
Protest (A) ..............3 credit hours
An analytical and critical study of the rhetoric of social protest in America with special emphasis on activism.
EG 250 Technical
Writing (A, N, R) ........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Successful completion of a sequence of 3 quarters of Occupational Communication, or Business Communications or English Composition or equivalent
Designed as a professional introductory course in technical writing. This course will teach the student to prepare a formal technical report for the printer through (1) the development of definition and analyses, (2) the definition of problems, (3) collection and organization of data, (4) mastery of structure, style and mechanics of the written report, and (5) the use of graphics.
EG MANUAL
EG 151 Beginning Manual
Communications (N, R) ____3 credit hours
A beginning course in the language of signs Emphasis is on the development of receptive and expressive skills in the use of the manual alphabet, together with practice in the use of basic signs.
EG 152 Intermediate Manual
Communications (N, R) ____3 credit hours
Refinement of skills developed in the beginning Manual Communications course. Extensive practice in the use of the sign language, with development of colloquial expressions. Increased practice in the reading of signs and fingerspelling.
EG 153 Advanced Manual
Communications (N, R) ____3 credit hours
Introduction to the role of sign languages as a medium for interpreting. Simulated interpreting situations will provide the vehicle for the development of fluid manual communication skills.
EG 251 Specialized Manual
Communications (N, R) ____3 credit hours
This course, designed for students already familiar with the language of signs, will provide a number of different interpreting situations for observation and practice in order to develop a broad scope of interpreting skills.
EG 252 Supervised Practicum
in Interpreting-I (N, R) .3 credit hours
Using actual classroom situations, students will have the
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opportunity to apply their interpreting skills by translating lectures for deaf students enrolled in a variety of courses; observation and evaluation will be conducted by professional interpreters. (5 hours per week)
EG 253 Supervised Practicum in
Interpreting-ll (N, R)......6 credit hours
A concluding course to bring together all of the many facets of interpreting; continuation of professionally guided classroom and laboratory interpreting for the deaf. (12 or more hours per week as determined by the Coordinator)
FRENCH
FR 100 Basic Applied French
(A, R)...................2 credit hours
Designed for those who wish to learn basic conversational patterns for enjoyment and for travel or for simple business needs. Language background helpful but not essential. (2 hours per week, plus laboratory)
FR 101 Basic Applied French
(A, R).......................2 credit hours
Continuation of FR 100.
FR 102 Basic Applied French
(A, R).......................2 credit hours
Continuation of FR 101.
FR 111 First Year French (A, R)________5 credit hours
Designed to develop basic principles of grammar and syntax; reading and writing of simple French, correct pronunciation and rudimentary conversation.
FR 112 First Year French (A, R)________5 credit hours
Prerequisite: FR 111 Continuation and Expansion of FR 111.
FR 113 First Year French (A, R)________5 credit hours
Prerequisite: FR 112
Continuation and Expansion of FR 112 and additional reading materials.
FR 211 Intermediate French
(A, R).....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FR 113 or equivalent This course will (1) review and reinforce skills and knowledge gained in first year French, (2) develop further skills in listerning, speaking, reading, and writing, (3) develop sense of linguistic structure and increase vocabulary and (4) provide readings in plays, short stories and poems.
FR 212 Intermediate French
(A, R)......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FR 211 Continuation and Expansion of FR 211.
FR 213 Intermediate French
(A,R) ......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FR 212 Continuation and expansion of FR 212.
GERMAN
GR 100 Basic Applied German
(R) .....................2 credit hours
This course is for those who wish to learn basic conversational patterns for enjoyment, for travel, or for simple business needs.
GR 101 Basic Applied German
(R) ......................2 credit hours
Continuation of GR 100.
GR 102 Basic Applied German
(R) ......................2 credit hours
Continuation of GR 101.
GR 111 First Year German (R) ........5 credit hours
Designed to develop basic principles of grammar and syntax; reading and writing of simple German, correct pronunciation and rudimentary conversation.
GR 112 German II (R).................5 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of GR 111.
GR 113 German III (R)................5 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of GR 112 and additional reading materials.
GR 211 Intermediate
German (R)................3 credit hours
This course will (1) review and reinforce skills and knowl-
edge gained in first year German, (2) develop further skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, (3) develop sense of linguistic structure and increase vocabulary and (4) provide readings in plays, short stories and poems.
GR 212 Intermediate German
(R) ......................3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of GR 211.
GR 213 Intermediate German
(R) ......................3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of GR 212.
HUMANITIES
HU 145 Chicano Culture (A) ..........3 credit hours
Story of the Chicano from pre-Colombian to contemporary times. Includes the study of the social, cultural, political and economic heritage of the Chicano and his contribution to American society.
HU 146 Black Culture (A).............3 credit hours
Role of the Black man in American culture and traditions which give rise to current dilemma confronting the American community.
HU 147 Folklore of Mexico and
the Southwest (R) ........3 credit hours
Study of the Indian Folklore of Mexico and the Southwest and its fusion with Hispanic Folklore. (3 hours per week)
HU 201 Pop Culture (A,R).............3 credit hours
A close look at the assumptions made by mass-produced artifacts: movies, TV, magazines, comics, books and an effort to judge them. Students find out whats really going on by means of field trips, individual projects, and discussions.
HU 202 The Movies
(Cinema) (A,R)............3 credit hours
This course provides intensive study of the movies considered the newest art, as a unique 20th century form of communication, and as a reflection of the values and problems of our time. Students will see short movies weekly, will attend several features, and will conduct a research project.
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HU 211 Humanities (A,R)...........5 credit hours
Based on a comparative study of world mythology, religion, and symbolism and the arts that they have produced.
HU 212 Humanities (A,R)..............5 credit hours
A comparative Study of the arts and crafts of the world and the ways in which they influenced human development and the ways in which human development has influenced them.
HU 213 Humanities (A,R)..............5 credit hours
A comparative study of the general themes and methodology of Western and Eastern philosophies and the cultural patterns that form their matrix.
HU 215 ideas in a Changing
Society (A,R) ............3 credit hours
An inter-disciplinary course dealing with current issues placed in historical and ideological perspective. The instructor will be aided by qualified guest speakers and specialists who will discuss various intellectual disciplines, including religion, philosophy, psychology, sociology, education, politics and civil rights.
JOURNALISM
JL 221 Introduction to Journalism
(R) ......................3 credit hours
An introduction to the basic principles of journalism. This is an applied course and will involve work on a college publication or a minimum of 3 hours of class, plus 3 hours of laboratory per week.
JL 222 Introduction to Journalism
(R) .........................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: JL 221 A continuation of JL 221.
JL 223 Introduction to Journalism
(R) .........................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: JL 222 A continuation of JL 222.
LITERATURE
LI 125 The Black Writer
in America (A).............4 credit hours
A beginning course in the study of Black literature, which includes the methods of evaluation and analysis essential for understanding and appreciating the literary contribution of the Black writer in America.
LI 141 Introduction to
Literature (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
Short Story an overview and selected readings.
LI 142 Introduction to
Literature (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
Novel an overview and selected readings.
LI 143 Introduction to
Literature (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
Poetry an overview and selected readings.
LI 144 Afro-American
Literature (A,R).............3 credit hours
Study of the contribution of Afro-American writers to American literature and civilization.
LI 145 Literature for
Children (A,N,R) ..........3 credit hours
A general survey of prose and poetry suitable for young people.
LI 147 Contemporary Chicano Literature
in Translation (A) ........3 credit hours
A contemporary look at the Southwest through the works of its authors. Attention to the writings of the present and how they underline the Chicanos search for an identity.
LI 200 Adams Rib Speaks (N) _________3 credit hours
This course considers the role of the woman in society through literature from the past to the present. It deals with literature both by, and about, the woman in society. Special emphasis is placed on the qualities of the woman in literature that make her unique and important in new and vital ways.
LI 210 Science Fiction (A)............3 credit hours
An examination of current trends in science fiction: robots, computers, time travel, space operas, cloning, the occult. This course is designed to give students the literary interpretation of the technological, progress-oriented world in which they live with an emphasis on how technical advances and futuristic planning affect human values and lives.
LI 211 Fantasy (A).................3 credit hours
The course uses plays, poems, stories, and fables from all over the world in an attempt to understand why men need to write and read fantasy and why it is the foundation of a preponderance of great fiction.
LI 231 Ethnic Literature
in America (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of Black writers in America. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, comparison and genre.
LI 232 Ethnic Literature
in America (N,R) ..........3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of Chicano writers in America. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, comparison and genre.
LI 233 Ethnic Literature
in America (R) ............3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of Oriental writers in America. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, comparison and genre.
LI 234 Ethnic Literature
in America (R) ............3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of the American Indian. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, and genre.
LI 241 Survey of American
Literature (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
By study of major authors, this quarter will emphasize representative themes and works that reflect the literature of the American Experience from the beginning through the Civil War.
LI 242 Survey of American
Literature (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
By in-depth study of major authors, this quarter will emphasize representative themes and works that reflect the literature of the American Experience from the Civil War to World War I.
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LI 243 Survey of American
Literature (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
By in-depth study of major authors, this quarter will emphasize representative themes and works that reflect the literature of the American Experience from World War I to the present.
LI 247 English Literature (A,R)_______3 credit hours
Critical insignts into the major works from the Anglo-Saxon up to the Elizabethan Period.
LI 248 English Literature (A,R)_____3 credit hours
This quarter concentrates on major works of the Elizabethan Period to the Romantic Period.
LI 249 English Literature (A,R)_____3 credit hours
This quarter concentrates on the Romantic Period to the present.
LI 261 World Literature - Asia
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
A study of development of Asiatic literature.
LI 262 World Literature Western
Europe (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
A study of development of Western European literature.
LI 263 World Literature Eastern
Europe (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
A study of development of Eastern European literature.
LI 264 World Literature Africa
(N,R) ......................3 credit hours
A study of development of African literature.
LI 265 World Literature Latin
America (N,R) ..............3 credit hours
A study of development of Latin American literature.
MUSIC
MU 100 Music
Appreciation (A,N,R)........3 credit hours
General overview of music from its inception to the present day. Some general and detailed knowledge of composers, compositions, periods, styles, etc.
MU 111 Theory and
Harmony (A,N)...............5 credit hours
Study of theory and harmony of music dealing with scales, meter, rhythm, intervals, chord structure, voice leading, chord succession and part writing. Course completion will require keyboard work and laboratory work in sight-singing and ear-training, outside of class time. (4 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory). A basic music test will be administered. Those students with a deficiency will be REQUIRED TO COMPLETE AN INTENSIVE 4-WEEK WORKSHOP (no credit) concurrently.
MU 112 Theory and
Harmony (A,N)...............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 111 Continued study of harmony and theory with emphasis on diatonic and secondary seventh chords. Sight-singing aptitude and ability to take musical dictation. Course completion will require keyboard work and laboratory work in sight-singing and ear-training, outside of class time. (4 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory).
MU 113 Theory and
Harmony (A,N)...............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 112
Continued work with the materials of the first two quarters with emphasis on harmonizing sopranos, beginning modulation and some creative writing. Course completion will require keyboard work and laboratory work in sight-singing and ear-training, outside of class time. (4 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)
MU 120 Music of Mexico and
the Southwest (A) ..........3 credit hours
An examination of selected works in Mexican music from pre-Colombian time to present, concentrating on regional works and on Twentieth Century composers and their relationship to Chicano society.
MU 140 Chorus (A,N) ....................1 credit hour
Study of choral literature from the classics to the modern day and from religious through secular music. Special emphasis on rhythm and tone. Can be repeated up to 6 hours credit.
MU 145 Music for Children
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
Introductory study of the fundamentals of music. Emphasis is placed on selection of activities and methods for musical participation by the children rather than on perfection of performance skills. (A general survey of materials, activities and instruments pertinent to the area)
MU 151 152,153 Piano Class for the
Keyboard Beginner (A,N).......1 credit hour
For students with no formal keyboard training. Will lead to an understanding of the instrument, its limits, its possibilities. Appropriate literature will be used. Will require at least three hours outside practice per week.
MU 161,162,163 -
Voice Class (A,N).............1 credit hour
For students with no formal vocal training. Will lead to an understanding of the vocal instrument, its limits, its possibilities. Appropriate literature will be used. Will require at least three hours outside practice per week.
MU 165, 166, 167 Guitar
Class (A,N) ..................1 credit hour
For students with no formal guitar training. Will lead to an understanding of the instrument, its limits, its possibilities. Appropriate literature will be used. Will require at least three hours outside practice per week.
MU 205 Elementary Conducting
(N) ........................2 credit hours
Introduction to conducting patterns and techniques.
MU 206 Instrumental Conducting
(N) ...................... 2 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 205
Further work on conducting emphasizing individual work on instrumental music.
MU 207 Choral Conducting (N)............2 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 205
Further work on conducting, emphasizing individual work on choral music.
NOTE: MU 205, 206, 207 (needed for those transfer students preparing for music major or minor) may also be used for teacher aides.
MU 211 Advanced Theory
and Harmony (A,N)..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 113 or equivalent
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A continuation of Theory and Harmony MU 113 emphasizing traditional harmonies, chromatic harmony and embellishments. Course completion will require keyboard work and laboratory work in sight-singing and ear-training, outside of class time.
MU 212 Advanced Theory
and Harmony (A,N)..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 211 or equivalent Continuation of MU 211 emphasizing modern harmonies. Course completion will require keyboard work and laboratory work in sight-singing and ear-training, outside of class time.
MU 213 Advanced Theory
and Harmony (A,N)..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 212 or equivalent Continuation of MU 212 emphasizing original composition and analysis. Course completion will require keyboard work and laboratory work in sight-singing and ear-training, outside of class time.
MU 241 Introduction to Music (R) .. 3 credit hours
A study of musical styles, forms, developments, literature and composers by historical periods. Outside listening to records required. For music majors and qualified nonmusic majors, by consent of instructor. Antiquity through Baroque.
MU 242 Introduction to Music (R) .. 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 241
Continuation of MU 241, emphasizing Classical and Romantic.
MU 243 Introduction to Music (R) ..3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MU 242
Continuation of MU 242, emphasizing Impressionistic and Contemporary.
MU 251 Piano Class for Advanced
Keyboard Beginner (A,N) ... 1 credit hour
Prerequisite MU 252, 253, and 153 or equivalent Completion will lead to more technical expertise and development of confidence and style. Ensemble playing will be stressed with work in transposition and improvisation. Will require at least 3 hours outside practice per week.
MU 252 Piano Class for Advanced
Keyboard Beginner (A,N) ... 1 credit hour
Prerequisite: MU 251 or equivalent Completion will lead to more technical expertise and development of confidence and style. Ensemble playing will be stressed with work in transposition and improvisation. Will require at least 3 hours outside practice per week.
MU 253 Piano Class for Advanced
Keyboard Beginner (A,N) ... 1 credit hour
Prerequisite: MU 252 or equivalent Completion will lead to more technical expertise and development of confidence and style. Ensemble playing will be stressed with work in transposition and improvisation. Will require at least 3 hours outside practice per week.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE 101 First Aid (A,N,R) .............1 credit hour
The Standard American Red Cross First Aid Course; a basic course stressing the prevention of accidents and proper care of accident victims. The student will qualify for the Standard American Red Cross Certificate (card) upon satisfactory completion of the course.
PE 110 Group Activities
Men (A,N,R) .................1 credit hour
This course is designed to offer participation and instruction in such activities as soccer, touch football and basketball.
PE 112 Group Activities
Women (A,N,R) ................1 credit hour
Participation in activities designed to develop poise, improve physical fitness and teach skills of various team sports.
PE 120 Beginning Conditioning
Activities (A,N,R) ...........1 credit hour
A slimnastics program with emphasis on fundamental movements, body mechanics and conditioning exercises on mats.
PE 121 Intermediate Conditioning
Activities (A,N,R) ...........1 credit hour
Continuation of PE 120.
PE 122 Beginning Archery
(A,N,R) ......................1 credit hour
Class designed to teach basic skills and techniques including target competition, field shooting, equipment
used and terminology.
PE 123 Intermediate Archery
(A,N,R) .....................1 credit hour
Continuation prerequisite PE 122.
PE T24 Beginning Bowling
(A,N,R) .....................1 credit hour
Designed to instruct students in basic skills of bowling. This course will provide instruction in the recreational
activity.
PE 125 Intermediate Bowling
(A,N,R) .....................1 credit hour
Continuation Prerequisite PE 124.
PE 126 Beginning Golf (A,N,R)...........1 credit hour
Introduction to golf, its origin and development, with emphasis on basic skills and techniques.
PE 127 Intermediate Golf (A,N,R) ... 1 credit hour
Continuation Prerequisite PE 126.
PE 128 Swimming (A,N,R)..................1 credit hour
Emphasis is on skill and proficiency in beginning, intermediate and advanced swimming.
A. Lifesaving and Water Safety______1 credit hour
Red Cross lifesaving and water safety instructors certification. Prerequisites: PE 128 and 128 B.
B. Water Related Activities.........1 credit hour
Emphasis is on skill and proficiency in a variety of aquatic activities; including water polo, water basketball and other water contests. Prerequisite:
PE 128.
PE 129 Tennis (A,N,R)......................1 credit hour
A course offering instruction in beginning tennis techniques.
PE 130 Modern Dance (A,N,R)................1 credit hour
Emphasis on modern dance techniques. Vocabulary of movement and skills to develop elasticity, balance and coordination of the body.
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PE 131 Social and Folk Dance
(A,N,R) ...................... 1 credit hour
Emphasis on fundamental rhythms and basic structure of social and folk dances.
PE 132 Skiing (A,N,R)...................1 credit hour
Course will offer basic instruction in skiing, including beginning, intermediate and advanced lessons. Classes will be held at major ski areas, and rental charge will be
required for this course.
PE 133 Intermediate Skiing
(A,N,R) .....................1 credit hour
Prerequisite: PE 132 Continuation of PE 132.
PE 134 Scuba Diving (A,N,R)..............1 credit hour
Course designed to offer basic instruction in scuba diving. Aqua charges will be required for participants in this class and individuals must furnish own scuba diving equipment or rent.
PE 135 Ice Skating (A, N, R).......1 credit hour
A course providing instruction in the recreational activity of ice skating.
PE 136 Self-Defense (A, N, R)......1 credit hour
Class offered to teach basic skill and technique on the art of self-defense.
PE 137 Horsemanship (A, R).......1 credit hour
Beginning instruction in Western style riding and horsemanship.
PE 138 Canoeing (A, R) ............1 credit hour
Course will offer basic strokes of canoeing, principles of water safety and self-rescue.
PE 139 Yoga (A, N, R) .............1 credit hour
Basic concepts of ancient Eastern training of body, mind and spirit through physical culture, proper breathing and meditation techniques.
PE 140 Tumbling-Gymnastics
(A, R)......................1 credit hour
Practical experience and sequential development of stunts, tumbling and apparatus activities.
PE 141 Hiking (N) .................1 credit hour
Will emphasize proper conditioning, hiking and walking techniques, climbing techniques, emergency procedures, choice and use of equipment and nature study.
PE 142 Basic Mountaineering
(A, R)......................1 credit hour
Basic instruction in mountain climbing safety and survival.
NOTE: PE courses may be repeated to gain and develop proficiency.
READING
RD 101 Skills for College
Reading I (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
Promote reading efficiency through development of skills and improved comprehension.
RD 102 Skills for College
Reading II (A, N, R)........3 credit hours
Emphasis on practicing various skills of efficient reading. Individual and group needs will be recognized in com-
prehension skills, study reading techniques, vocabulary development, skimming/skanning skills and flexibility.
RD 120 Speed Reading (A, N, R) ... 2 credit hours
Speed reading is designed to increase speed, develop a more flexible reading pace and promote better comprehension.
RD 200 College Reading (A, R) _______3 credit hours
This course is designed for students who have normal reading ability or better than normal but would like to improve their speed and comprehension as well as develop analytical techniques.
SPEECH
S 102 Motivational Speech (R) ... 3 credit hours
To teach basic principles of sales and persuasive speech as applied to specific occupations and problems.
S 110 Introduction to
Speech (A,N,R) ...........3 credit hours
A beginning course in communication and public speaking. Completion of course requirements in language, speaking poise, speech composition, mastery of listening techniques and ability to express ideas in order to enable students to become more effective speakers.
S 111 Introduction to
Theatre Arts (A,N)........3 credit hours
Drama program introduces the student to the basic principles of acting, scenery and costume construction, elementary problems of production and sales and promotion.
S 112 Introduction to
Theatre Arts (A,N)..........3 credit hours
Continuation of S 111.
S 113 Introduction to
Theatre Arts (A,N)..........3 credit hours
Continuation of S 112.
S 131 Forensic Activity (N)........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: S 110 or equivalent Course will acquaint students with techniques of debate and extemporaneous speaking. Debate activities are encouraged.
S 132 Forensic Activity (N)..........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: S 110 or equivalent Course will acquaint students with techniques used in oratory and in oral interpretation.
S 133 Oral Interpretation of
Literature (A,N).............3 credit hours
Emphasis on learning to select, analyze and perform poetry, drama, fiction and non-fiction for the beginner.
S 134 Readers Theatre
(A,N,R) .....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: S 133
For the advanced student of oral interpretation. Emphasis on learning to select, cut, cast, produce and direct small scale production.
S 210 Advanced Public
Speaking (A,N,R) ............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: S 110
The study of advanced persuasion techniques including those skills necessary for argumentation. Improving the ability to analyze problems logically with emphasis on persuasion. Investigation of two-way and group discus-
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sion skills to determine the best methods of problem solving.
S 221 Survey of Theatre (A,N,R).. 3 credit hours
Survey of great plays, playwrights, performers and critics. Includes weekly workshops on fundamentals of playreading, acting, and dramatic production. Features historical backgrounds of dramatic creativity both lecture and film.
S 222 Survey of Theatre (A,N,R).. 3 credit hours
Continuation of S 221.
S 223 Survey of Theatre (A,N,R).. 3 credit hours
Continuation of S 222.
S 231 Theatre Improvisation
(A,R) ......................3 credit hours
Students who have already had experience in theatre and theatre courses will review the history of improvisation in theatre and have in the various techniques and approaches through actual production.
SKILL CENTER INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM
Though designed primarily to assist Skill Center students in pre-vocational preparation, any student who can benefit from individualized work in the following courses is welcome to enroll.
SK 100 Reading Improvement
(A,N,R) ..................3 credit hours
In order to determine special needs, each students reading ability will first be diagnosed and evaluated. Adequate word attack and comprehension skills will be developed. Where appropriate, training to increase speed will be given. Special attention will be paid to developing good study techniques with all students. (Minimum 3 hours per week)
SK 101 Pre-Vocational
Mathematics (A,N,R).......3 credit hours
An individualized program designed to prepare the student for the entering level of math required for his occupation. For students whose curricula call for math courses, specific preparation will be given for Developmental Math, Math for Business and Industry, Introductory Algebra and Accounting III. (Minimum 3 hours per week)
SK 102 Pre-Vocational
Communication (A,N,R)_____3 credit hours
An individualized program designed to prepare the student for the entering level of math required for his occupation. For students whose curricula call for math courses, specific preparation will be given for Developmental Math, Math for Business and Industry, Introductory Algebra and Accounting III. (Minimum 3 hours per week)
SK 103 Spelling (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
This course will develop awareness of occupational information. Stress will be on thinking, oral communication and listening to others ideas to develop better social awareness as it applies to the job and everyday life. (Minimum 3 hours per week)
SK 104 Occupational
Information (A,N,R) ......3 credit hours
This course will develop awareness of occupational information. Stress will be on thinking, oral communication and listening to others ideas to develop better social
awareness as it applies to the job and everyday life. (Minimum 3 hours per week)
SK 105 GED preparation (A,N,R) . .. 3 credit hours
SK 106 Study Skills (A,R) .. 2 credit hours
SPANISH
SP 100 Basic Applied Spanish (A.N.R) .. 2 credit hours
For those who wish to learn basic conversational Spanish for enjoyment or for travel or for simple business needs.
SP 101 Basic Applied Spanish
(A,N,R) ....................2 credit hours
Continuation of SP 100.
SP 102 Basic Applied Spanish
(A,N,R) .....................2 credit hours
Continuation of SP 101.
SP 111 First Year Spanish
(A,N,R) .....................5 credit hours
Designed to develop basic principles of grammar and syntax; reading and writing of simple Spanish, correct pronunciation and rudimentary conversation.
SP 112 First Year Spanish
(A,N,R) .....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite SP 111 Continuation and Expansion of SP 111.
SP 113 First Year Spanish
(A,N,R) .....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 112
Continuation and Expansion of SP 112 and additional reading materials.
SP 211 Intermediate Spanish
(A,N,R) .....................3 credit hours
This course will (1) review and reinforce skills and knowledge gained in first year Spanish, (2) develop further skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, (3) develop sense of linguistic structure and increase vocabulary, and (4) provide reading in plays, short stories and poems.
SP 212 Intermediate Spanish
(A,N,R) .....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 112 or SP 113 Continuation of Expansion of SP 211.
SP 213 Intermediate Spanish
(A,N,R) .....................3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of SP 212.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
299 Independent Study
(A,N,R) ............... 1 to 3 credit hours
Independent study (Course No. 299) is available in each of the major areas within the Division of Communication and Arts (i.e., English, foreign language, speech, etc.) except physical education and communications laboratory. The course provides opportunity for the serious-minded student to engage in intensive study and research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Prerequisite for enrollment is permission of the Director of the Division of Communication and Arts and the assigned instructor. The number of quarter hours of credit (1-3) will be determined by the Division Director.
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DIVISION OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
Biology Chemistry Earth Science Mathematics Physics Science Independent Study

A, N, R A, N, R R
A, N, R A, N, R N, R A, N, R
t
Note: Auraria CampusA North CampusN Red Rocks Campus R


DIVISION OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Where a course description does not indicate the campus by the key A, N or R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
BIOLOGY
B 100 Basic Human Biology
(A, N, R)...................4 credit hours
A survey course for Health Occupations students and others needing an understanding of basic biological and chemical concepts as applied to the human body. The basic cellular and chemical aspects of life are related to a brief survey of body organ systems. Primarily for students planning to enroll in B 123 Human Anatomy and Physiology. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 105 Microbiology for Dental
Assistants (N) .............1 credit hour
Corequisite: To be taken concurrently with DA 115 A mini course emphasizing micro-organisms of importance to dentistry and methods of controlling bacteria. (1 hour of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory per week)
B 110 Introduction to the
Environment (A, R).........3 credit hours
A study of ecosystems, population dynamics, mans impact upon ecosystems, and possible solutions to the problems posed to man in his environment. (3 hours of lecture per week, no laboratory)
B 111 General Biology (A, N, R) .. 5 credit hours
Biology 111, 112, 113 constitutes a three-quarter course in general college biology. A study of living organisms emphasizing their environmental and evolutionary relationships and origins. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 112 General Biology (A, N, R) .. 5 credit hours
A functional view of the organismic, cellular, and molecular aspects of life. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 113 General Biology (A, N, R) .. 5 credit hours
The life processes of reproduction, genetics, development, and mechanisms of evolution. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 115 Human Sexuality and
Reproduction (A, N, R).....3 credit hours
An introductory course dealing with the various aspects of human reproduction. Topics include overpopulation, human sexual response, pregnancy, birth, contraception, and venereal diseases. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
B 123 Human Anatomy and
Physiology (A, N) .........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 100 or C 101 or SI 136 or consent of instructor
A detailed study of the gross and microscopic anatomical structure of the human body and of the relationship of
these structures to their function. (3 hours of lecture and
3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 124 Human Anatomy and
Physiology (A, N) .........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 123 or consent of instructor A continuation of B 123. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 130 Basic Health (A, N) ............4 credit hours
A survey of the basic issues of human interrelationships and diseases which affect personal, family, and community health. (4 hours of lecture per week, no laboratory)
B 140 Introduction to
Microbiology (A, N).........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 124
An introduction to microbiology with an emphasis on epidemiology and its relationship to the health science occupations. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 150 Biology of the Human
Races (A)...................3 credit hours
The biological aspects of race formation will be considered, including the genetic foundations, the range of human variability and race mixtures, and the usefulness of biological factors in understanding racial problems. (3 hours of lecture per week, no laboratory)
B 231 Environmental Biology
(A, N, R)...................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 111 and B 113 or consent of instructor
An introduction to the principles of ecology, population dynamics and genetics, and evolutionary mechanisms. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week; Saturday field trips may replace laboratories)
B 232 Cell Biology (A, N, R) ...........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 112 or consent of instructor An introduction to the cell as the fundamental unit of function and structure in all living systems. Morphological and physiological characteristics common to all cells will be emphasized. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B 233 Developmental Biology
(A, N, R)...................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: B 113 and B 232 or consent of instructor
An introduction to the changes occurring during organismic development and differentiation; gene action, biochemical regulation, and environmental factors will be stressed. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
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B 240 General Microbiology
(N, R).......................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: One year of college biology A survey of major microbial groups with special emphasis on bacteria. Emphasis is on basic principles and techniques in microbiology as well as identification, structure, function and role in nature and disease. (3 hours of lecture and 6 hours of laboratory per week)
CHEMISTRY
C 101 Fundamentals of
Chemistry (A, N, R) .......4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent, M 105 or equivalent suggested
A first course in the fundamentals of chemistry designed for non-science majors, students in occupational programs, or students with no high school chemistry. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C 102 Fundamentals of
Chemistry (A, N, R) .......4 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 101
A continuation of C 101. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C 103 Fundamental Organic
Chemistry (A, N, R) .......4 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 101
A brief introduction to organic and biological chemistry. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C 109 Applied Chemistry (R) 4 credit hours
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or M 103
A basic applied course designed to provide the background in chemistry needed for course work in particular occupational programs. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C 111 General College
Chemistry (A, N, R) .......5 credit hours
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or C 102, M 106 or equivalent, or consent of instructor
C 111, 112, and 113 constitute a three-quarter sequential course in the principles of college chemistry. Designed for science majors and students in preprofessional programs. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C 112 General College
Chemistry (A, N, R) .......5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 111 or equivalent Continuation of C 111. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C 113 General College
Chemistry (A, N, R) .......5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 112 or equivalent Continuation of C 112. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
C 211 Organic
Chemistry (N, R)...........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 113 or equivalent C 211, 212, and 213 are a three-quarter sequential course in organic chemistry designed primarily for science majors, premedical and predental students and oth-
ers who desire a knowledge of the chemistry of organic compounds. A structural and mechanistic approach to syntheses properties and behavior of chemically and biologically important compounds is stressed. Laboratory emphasis is on basic techniques, synthetic procedures and modern instrumental analyses. (3 hours of lecture and 6 hours of laboratory per week)
C 212 Organic
Chemistry (N, R)............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 211
Continuation of C 211. (3 hours of lecture and 6 hours of laboratory per week)
C 213 Organic
Chemistry (N, R)............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 212
Continuation of C 212. (3 hours of lecture and 6 hours of laboratory per week)
EARTH SCIENCE
G 111 Physical Geology (R) ............4 credit hours
An introductory course exploring our physical environment. Emphasis is on understanding the earths interior, the rocks and minerals of the earth's crust, mountain building, continental drift, volcanoes, and earthquakes. Laboratories include studies of Rocky Mountain geology through field investigations, field trips, and tours of museums. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
G 112 Geologic Processes (R) ... 4 credit hours
An introductory course emphasizing the role of weathering, landslides, streams, waves, wind, glaciers, and ground water in shaping the land surface. Laboratories include studies of Rocky Mountain geology through field investigations, field trips, and tours of museums. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
G 113 Historical Geology (R) ..........4 credit hours
An introductory study of the origin of the earth, geologic time, methods and concepts of rock correlation, and fossils. Emphasis is on the record in the rocks of ancient environments, physical history, and evolution of life forms. Laboratories include studies of Rocky Mountain geology through field investigations, field trips, and tours of museums. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
G 115 Environmental Geology of
Colorado (R) ...............4 credit hours
A non-technical study of the impact of geologic hazards on the environment. Emphasis is on the role of landslides, slump, unstable soils, solid and mine waste disposal, ground water pollution, floods, strip mining, land use planning, etc., in the development of the Front Range region. Laboratories include map studies and field investigations of environmental problems. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
G 211 Colorado Crystals (R) ...........4 credit hours
An exploration into the origin, growth, structure, internal and external form, physical characteristics, occurrence, and classification of natural and man-made crystals and gems. Laboratories include crystal identification, collecting trips, field investigations, and tours of museums. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
B21


G 212 Colorado Minerals (R) .......4 credit hours
An exploration into the origin, occurrence, physical properties, and economic importance of minerals, especially those found in Colorado. Modern equipment, including the direct reading spectroscope and the polarizing microscope, is used to study and identify specimens. Laboratories include mineral identification, collecting trips, field investigations, and museum tours. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
G 213 Colorado Rocks (R)...........4 credit hours
An exploration into the recognition, origin, distribution, use and significance of rocks, especially those found in Colorado. Laboratories include rock identification, collecting trips, field investigations, and museum tours. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
G 214 Geology of
Colorado (R) ...............3 credit hours
An introduction to the origin, development, and significance of Colorados prairies, peaks, and plateaus; the role of glaciers, running water, wind surface movements, and volcanoes in shaping the topography; and mineral resources and their conservation. Numerous field trips, tours, and practical laboratory problems are planned. (2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory or field trip per week)
MATHEMATICS
M 100 Introduction to
Mathematics (A, N, R) ...3 credit hours
This course is designed for students who need a comprehensive review of arithmetic. Topics include the fundamental operations of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percentages, proportion, operations with signed numbers and equations. (3 hours per week)
M 101 Pre-Algebra (R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent This course is for students who need exposure to some mathematical concepts beyond arithmetic before enrolling in algebra. Topics include operations with signed numbers, formulas, literal expressions, and solutions of equations. By arrangement with the Division of Science and Mathematics. (3 hours per week)
M 102 Applied Mathematics I
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent FOR INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS This course is directed toward the application of the fundamental mathematical operations needed to solve problems related to these occupations. Topics include fractions, decimals, percentage, ratio and proportion, powers and roots, weights and measures. (3 hours per week)
M 103 Applied Mathematics II
(A, N, R)................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 102 FOR INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS The development and application of mathematical skills relating to geometry and formula manipulation. (3 hours per week)
M 104 Applied Mathematics III
(A, N, R)................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 103
FOR INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS
The development and application of mathematical skills relating to basic applied trigonometry. Computations with logarithms. (3 hours per week)
M 105 Introductory Algebra
(A, N, R)....................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent A first course in algebra designed for the student who has had less than one year of high school algebra or for those who need a review. Manipulation of algebraic expressions, solving first degree equations in one and two variables, factoring, solving fractional equations, graphing and verbal problem solving. (4 hours per week)
M 106 Intermediate Algebra
(A, N, R)....................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 105 or successful completion of 11/2 years of high school algebra Introduction to sets, introduction to an axiomatic approach to the set of real numbers, extension of exponents, radicals, first and second degree equations in one variable, solving equations by completing the square and quadratic formula, functions and graphs, and logarithms. (4 hours per week)
M 107 Introduction to Geometry
(A, N).......................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 106 or 2 years of high school algebra Designed to extend the mathematical skills developed in M 105 and M 106. The topics to be included are logic, geometry, and basic trigonometry. (4 hours per week)
M 109 Mini-Math Review (N)..............1 credit hour
Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in HE 109 or consent of instructor
A brief review of the basic skills and underlying concepts of fractions, decimals, and percents. Individual student needs are diagnosed through initial testing, and material is structured to meet these needs. (10 hours per quarter)
M 110 Mathematics for Business
(A, N, R)....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent FOR BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS
Consists of an integrated development of the concepts and computational skills of arithmetic that are commonly used in business. Topics covered are percentages, fractions, ratios and proportions, graphs, interest, banking, insurance and taxes. (3 hours per week)
M 111 College Algebra (A, N)............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: Successful completion of two years of high school algebra or M 106 or equivalent Sets, operations on sets, an axiomatic approach to the set of real numbers, absolute value, inequalities, algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions, solving first and second degree equations and equalities, solutions of systems of equations, sequences, permutations and combinations, and mathematical induction. (5 hours per week)
M 112 Trigonometry and Functions
(A, N).......................5 credit hours
Prerequisites 111 or equivalent Topics include trigonometric functions, identities, graphs, logarithms, solutions of triangles, and complex numbers. Functions as mappings, associations and ordered pairs. Theory of equations and further solutions to systems of equations. (5 hours per week)
B22


M 113 Elementary Functions I
(R) .......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 106 or equivalent, M 107 or equivalent strongly recommended A thorough exploration of sets and properties of real numbers and their application to basic algebra. The concept of function and its applications will be emphasized. Exponential and logarithmic functions will be presented. (3 hours per week)
M 114 Elementary Functions II
(R) .......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Elementary Functions I or equivalent Systems of equations will be solved, and various techniques including matrices and determinants will be used to solve linear systems. Sequences and mathematical induction, permutations and combinations, the binomial theorem, and theory of equations will also be covered. (3 hours per week)
M 115 Elementary Functions III
(R) .......................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Elementary Functions I is a prerequisite, and
Elementary Functions II is a prerequisite or corequisite
Trigonometric functions and relationships among them. Solutions of triangles and trigonometric equations. Complex numbers and the application of trigonometry to them. (3 hours per week)
M 116 Calculus I (A, N, R) ............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 112 or M 115 Introduction to single variable calculus and analytic geometry. The concepts introduced will be motivated by geometric and physical interpretations. (5 hours per week)
M 117 Mathematics for
Electronics I (A, N) ......5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent The development and application of mathematical skills needed in electronics. Topics covered include: powers of ten, slide rule, evaluation and solution of equations, fractions, basic trigonometry, vectors and phasors, ratio, proportion, percent and logarithms. (5 hours per week)
M 118 Mathematics for
Electronics II (A, N) .................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 117
Further development of the mathematical skills needed in electronics. This course is a continuation of M 117. Topics covered include: review of percent, graphs, exponents and radicals, solving equations used in electronics, and logarithms. (3 hours per week)
M 120 Statistics for Business and
Industry (A, N, R) ........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 105 or equivalent Designed to provide an opportunity for the business student to develop critical and functional understandings of statistical data. Attention is given to the basic concepts of statistical methodology and procedures which are used as media in the business world. The principles of statistical investigation, technique in data presentation, measures of central tendency, etc., are studied in their practical business application. (3 hours per week)
M 121 Fundamentals of Modern
Mathematics (A, N, R) ......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 105 or equivalent NOT FOR SCIENCE OR MATHEMATICS MAJORS The M 121, 122, and 123 sequence is designed for students who desire a greater knowledge of some of the techniques and concepts of modern mathematics. Sets, Venn diagrams, truth tables, deductive proofs, number bases other than ten. (3 hours per week)
M 122 Fundamentals of Modern
Mathematics (A, N, R) ......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 121
NOT FOR SCIENCE OR MATHEMATICS MAJORS An introduction to groups and modulo arithmetic. Decimals, structure of arithmetic, properties of the natural numbers, integers, and rational numbers. (3 hours per week)
M 123 Fundamentals of Modern
Mathematics (A, N, R) ......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 122
NOT FOR SCIENCE OR MATHEMATICS MAJORS Properties of real numbers, inequalities, absolute value, exponents, and roots. Solutions of equations and inequalities of first and second degree in one or two variables. Introduction to finite probability, permutations and combination. (3 hours per week)
M 130 Finite Probability (N)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 111 or the equivalent Counting, introduction to probability models, conditional probability, mean variance, standard deviation of a variable, histograms, binomial, hypergeometric and normal random variables. (3 hours per week)
M 140 Slide Rule and
Calculator (A, N, R)........1 credit hour
Prerequisite: M 100 or equivalent A course designed to introduce students to the slide rule and to the calculator as calculating devices. (10 hours of instruction)
M 150 Mathematics of Finance
(N) ........................3 credit hours
Introduction to the concepts and processes involved in problems relating to amortization, sinking funds, present worth, investments, depreciation, business equations, graphs, elementary statistics. (3 hours per week)
M 211 Calculus II (A, N, R)............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 116
Extension and further development of concepts of single variable calculus and analytic geometry studied in M 113. Applications of differentiation and integration; techniques of integration. (5 hours per week)
M 212 Calculus III (A, N, R)...........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 211
The completion of the traditional subject matter of single variable calculus not covered in M 113 and M 211. In this course and in M 213 an introduction to vector analysis, multivariable calculus, and solid analytic geometry will be presented. Also covered are three-dimensional vector space and infinite series. (5 hours per week)
M 213 Calculus IV (A, N, R)............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 212
Continuation and completion of topics listed under M 212. (5 hours per week)
B23


M 220 Introduction to Linear
Algebra (A, N, R)..........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 113
This course is designed to be an introduction to some basic concepts encountered in linear algebra. Matrices, matrix algebra, finite dimensional vector spaces, systems of linear equations, linear transformations. (4 hours per week)
PHYSICS
P 100 Survey of Physical
Science (A)................3 credit hours
A core physical science course for health science students and others who need an understanding of the scientific method and the nature of the physical sciences. Emphasis is on observation, experimentation, and quantitative results drawn from chemistry and physics. (2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
P 101 Fundamental Physics
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or M 100 or equivalent
An introduction to some of the more important basic concepts of physics with applications to practical problems relating to various occupational programs. Primarily for occupational students and non-science majors. Recommended as a preparatory course for students with inadequate background in physics who wish to take P 111, 112, and 113. (3 hours per week)
P 101L Fundamental Physics
Laboratory (A, N, R) ......1 credit hour
Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in P 101 A laboratory designed to demonstrate the physical concepts presented in Fundamental Physics (P 101). (2 hours per week)
P 102 Physics for
Instrumentation I (A)......3 credit hours
A study of the basic principles of physics, emphasizing mechanics and heat, with particular emphasis on those principles embodied in the design of mechanical indicating and sensing devices.
P 105 Radiation
Physics (N, R) ............4 credit hours
Provides the student with both specialized information on X-ray equipment and the theoretical background to make it meaningful. Covered are: fundamentals of electrical and radiation physics and the basic principles underlying the operation of X-ray equipment and auxiliary devices. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
P 111 College
Physics (A, N, R)..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 111 or consent of instructor A noncalculus study of kinematics, linear and rotational dynamics, conservation of energy and momentum, and topics in special relativity. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
P 112 College
Physics (A, N, R)..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: P 111 or equivalent and M 112 or concurrent enrollment in M 112 A continuation of P 111. Topics include properties of mat-
ter, wave motion, thermal phenomena, optics, and electricity and magnetism. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
P 113 College
Physics (A, N, R)...........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: P 112
A continuation of P 112. Topics include atomic and nuclear structure, behavior of gases, liquids, and solids, oscillations, electromagnet waves, and matter waves. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
P 114 College Physics - Calculus
Supplement (N, R)...........2 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 113
Application of calculus to the physical concepts discussed in P 111 which must be taken concurrently. (2 hours per week)
P 115 College Physics - Calculus
Supplement (N, R) ..........2 credit hours
Corequisite: M 211
Application of calculus to the physical concepts discussed in P 112 which must be taken concurrently. (2 hours per week)
P 116 College Physics - Calculus
Supplement (N, R) ..........2 credit hours
Prerequisite: P 115 Corequisite: M 212
Application of calculus to the physical concepts discussed in P 111 and P 112. (2 hours per week)
SCIENCE
SI 105 The Metric System:
A Mini Course (A, N, R) ...1 credit hour
An introduction to the metric system designed to allow a person to become proficient in the metric system of measurement and to convert between the English and the metric system. Metric units of length, volume, and mass will be covered as well as temperature measurements in Centigrade and Kelvin Systems. (1 hour per week)
SI 110 The Black Scientist
Contributes (A)............3 credit hours
Auraria Campus only See Consortium of Ethnic Studies, page B38.
SI 111 Science for the Earth Citizen
(An Introduction to Science for Non-Science Majors) (N) .. 4 credit hours
This course is a general introduction to the scientific view of the world designed to help non-science majors live and vote intelligently in a world shaped by science. Basic concepts in astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, physics and technology are studied in terms of words and pictures with no mathematics other than arithmetic being employed. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week.)
SI 112 Science for the Earth Citizen
(An Introduction to Science for Non-Science Majors)(N) ... 4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SI 111 or consent of instructor Continuation of SI 111. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory each week.)
B24


SI 113 Science for the Earth Citizen
(An Introduction to Science for Non-Science Majors)(N) ... 4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SI 112 or consent of instructor Continuation of SI 112. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week.)
SI 121 Environmental Science
(A, N, R)...................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 105 or consent of instructor SI 121, 122, 123 is intended to be a survey of various aspects of our environment. The descriptions given for SI 121, 122, and 123 suggest the scope of the investigation. All areas of interest will be studied from a physical rather than a biological point of view. The physics and some chemistry of the problem will be emphasized.
SI 121 deals with the basic physics, chemistry, and geology necessary for an adequate description of our atmosphere and earth. Air and water pollution problems will be investigated with emphasis on sources of pollution and methods of detection. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
SI 122 Environmental Science
(A, N, R)...................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SI 121
The basic physics of heat, energy, and wave motion will be discussed. Thermal and sound pollutions will be studied. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
SI 123 Environmental Science
(A, N, R)...................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SI 121
The physical problems relating to population, mass transportation, and communications will be studied. Radiation and public safety will then be discussed. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
SI 136 Basic Science I (A, N) .........5 credit hours
This course provides an opportunity to acquire knowledge of selected and fundamental principles in the fields of chemistry, physics, and microbiology. The chemistry and physics module will consist of selected principles and their application to health fields. A module in medical microbiology deals with methods of identification and
control of those organisms which are responsible for infectious disease. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
SI 137 Basic Science II (A, N) __5 credit hours
A one-quarter study of the structure/function of the human body. The course consists of two modules, one of which deals with the erect and moving body and one with body metabolism. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
SI 236 Basic Science III (A, N)_5 credit hours
Prerequisite: SI 137 or consent of instructor A continuation of the topics covered in Basic Science II (SI 137). This course is designed to examine more deeply the physiology of human body systems. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
SI 237 Basic Science IV (A, N)___5 credit hours
Prerequisite: SI 136, B 100 or permission of instructor
A continuation of Basic Science I (SI 136) to complete a biological coverage of microbiology, physics, and chemistry as they relate to body functions.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
299 Independent Study
(A, N, R)........... 1 to 3 credit hours
Students majoring in one of the areas of the Division of Science and Mathematics may enroll in Independent Study (Course No. 299)
This enables the serious-minded student to engage in intensive library and/or laboratory research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified member of the Division faculty. To be eligible the student must have successfully completed one or more second year courses in the subject matter area in which he is majoring and give evidence that he can successfully engage in independent study. Independent Study carries 1-3 hours credit involving a minimum of 3-9 hours per week. Permission to enroll must be obtained from the instructor under whose direction the independent study will be carried out and from the Director of the Division.
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DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
Anthropology A, N, R
Economics A, N, R
Geography A, N, R
History A, N, R
Philosophy A, N, R
Political Science A, N, R
Psychology A, N, R
Sociology A, N, R
Social Science A, N, R
Independent Study A, N,R


DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Where a course description does not indicate the campus by the key A, N or R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
ANTHROPOLOGY
AN 111 Cultural Anthropology
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
An introductory study of the nature of culture and cultural development in the paleolithic, neolithic and modern ages. (3 hours per week)
AN 112 Cultural Anthropology
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
A continuation of AN 111 with emphasis on the relationships among the cultural sub-systems of language, social organization, technology and ideology. (3 hours per week)
AN 113 Cultural Anthropology
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
A continuation of AN 112 with an anthropological approach to current topics of socio-cultural concern such as race, drugs, nationalism, violence and environment. (3 hours per week)
AN 201 Physical Anthropology
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
An introductory study of the fossil record, living animals and cultural factors as they relate to the evolution of man. (3 hours per week)
AN 202 Physical Anthropology
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
A continuation of AN 201 with emphasis on human variation, human biology and the mechanics of evoluation. (3 hours per week)
AN 220 Introduction to
Archeology (A, N, R).......3 credit hours
An introductory study of methods, techniques and theories of archeological investigation. Selected culture areas are used as examples. (3 hours per week)
AN 230 Ethnography of the North
American Indian (A, N, R) .. 3 credit hours
A survey of the major Indian cultures of North America. Environmental and historical relationships are included. (3 hours per week)
ECONOMICS
EC 107 Consumer Economics
(A, N, R)...............3 credit hours
A one-quarter survey of the American economic system from the point of view of the consumer, including such topics as personal and household finance, consumer credit, taxes, insurance, mortgages, social security, medicare and medicaid. (3 hours per week)
EC 108 Labor Relations
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
A study of the development, structure, and philosophy of American trade unionism including collective bargaining, the role of government, productivity and wages, unemployment and automation. (3 hours per week)
EC 109 Applied Economics
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
A one-quarter study of those aspects of basic economics that relate to the role of the small businessman and the wage earner. Problem solving techniques which have proven successful in the market place will be explored
and individualized. (3 hours per week)
EC 161 Black Economics (A) ............4 credit hours
Auraria Campus only. See Consortium of Ethnic Studies, page B36.
EC 211 Principles of Economics
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
The principles and theory of economics, emphasizing the American economic system but including international economics and economic growth. Principles of money, banking, public finance, distribution of income, pricing and allocation of resources, volume of economic activity, etc. (3 hours per week)
EC 212 Principles of Economics
(A, N, R)....................3 credit hours
Continuation of EC 211. (3 hours per week)
EC 213 Principles of Economics
(A, N, R)....................3 credit hours
Continuation of EC 212. (3 hours per week)
EC 252 Economic History of the
United States (A, N, R) _____3 credit hours
A study of the rise of the modern economic system of the United States from colonial times to the present. The study includes the impact of agriculture, industry and capitalism on the nation.
GEOGRAPHY
GE 105 Fundamental Place-Name
Geography(R) .............1 hour credit
An independent study course for persons wanting to know where places are.
GE 111 Physical Geography
(A, N, R).................5 credit hours
An investigation of the relationship between man and his physiographic environment. The course will include a study of minerals, continental origin, earth-forming processes, landform classification, regional landform pat-
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terns, and man-physiographic relationships. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory/field study per week)
GE 112 Physical Geography
(A, N, R)..................5 credit hours
An investigation of the relationship between man and his atmospheric environment. The course will include a study of earth form, basic earth-sun-moon astronomy, weather processes, regional climatic patterns, and man-atmospheric interrelationships. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory/field study per week)
GE 113 Physical Geography
(A, N, R)..................5 credit hours
An investigation of the relationship between man and his biotic and hydrographic environment. The course will include a study of soils, vegetation, water and man-biotic/ hydrographic interrelationships. The implications of physical geography to man's cultural environment will be discussed. (3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory/ field study per week)
GE 121 Man and His Cultural
Environment (R) ...........3 hours credit
An investigation of the human elements of geography. The course will examine processes and patterns of population distribution, cultures, settlement, land use, economic systems, and economic development.
GE 200 World Regional Geography
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
A world perspective of the interrelationship between man and his environment.
GE 201 Continuation of GE 200
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
GE 210 Economic Geography
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
An examination of world economic activities in relation to physical and cultural environments.
GE 220 Human
Ecology (A, N, R) .........3 credit hours
Study of problems facing man in the conservation, use, and management of physical environments. Topics analyzed include the impact of urban development, technological advancement, and the conservation of resources.
GE 230 Urban
Geography (A, N, R) .......3 credit hours
Introductory study of geographic factors related to the development of modern urban areas: population growth, land use, environmental deterioration, and future planning.
HISTORY
HS 107 Hang-Ups and
Happenings in American
History (A, N, R) .........3 credit hours
A one-quarter topical survey of American History from its origin to 1971.
HS 111 History of World Civilization
(A, N, R)..................4 credit hours
The first of a three quarter sequence covering the historical development of world civilizations from ancient times to the present. The cultures examined during the quarter
include South Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia. Emphasis will be placed on India, China, Japan, and Southeast Asia.
HS 112 History of World Civilization
(A, N, R) ..................4 credit hours
No prerequisites. The cultures, examined during the quarter are Moslem, Slavic and European. Emphasis will be placed on the Middle East, East Central Europe, Soviet Union, and Western Europe.
HS 113 History of World
Civilization (A, N, R) .....4 credit hours
No prerequisite. The cultures examined during the quarter will include the Americas, Latin America, and Africa with emphasis on Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa.
HS 121 History of the Indians of
the West (A, N, R) .........3 credit hours
A study of the Indians west of the Mississippi River from prehistoric times to the present.
HS 130 History of the Southwest United States
(Chicano HistoryKA, N, R).. 3 credit hours
The culture and historical development of what is now the Southwestern United States, including the rich cultural contributions of the Chicano people.
HS 145 Chicano Civilization
Spain (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
The development of culture and the history of Spain from Roman times to the present including a brief study of efforts in colonization. This course covers the origin and power of the Catholic Church, the government, and the social structure of Spain.
HS 146 Chicano Civilization
Early Colonies (A, N, R)____3 credit hours
The expansion of Spanish power into the New World and Asia from the 15th century to 1800. This covers the changes in culture, in society brought about by colonization. It traces the expansion of the power of Spain to its peak.
HS 147 Chicano Civilization
Independence to Present
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
The fall of the Spanish Empire, the rise of the new nations and the problems that they face today. This covers North and South America and Asia in relation to Spanish heritage and Modern Society.
HS 150 Contemporary World History
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
The culture and history of modern man since 1900 with critical emphasis on international problems of war, world government, conflicting economic and political ideologist (fascism, communism, socialism) and the emergency of nationalism.
HS 211 The History of the United States
to 1789 (A, N, R) ..........3 credit hours
The Colonial and Revolutionary period of American History to 1789.
HS 212 History of the United States
1789 to 1877 (A, N, R)......3 credit hours
Post Revolutionary period to the Civil War Reconstruction, 1789-1877.
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HS 213 History of the United States
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
The New Nation, 1877 to the present.
HS 220 Colorado History
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
The historical development of Colorado with emphasis on the cultural, political and economic; from pre-historic Indians to modern missile factories.
HS 224 History of the Black
People (A, N, R) ...........3 credit hours
The historical development of the Black people of the world. Tracing this development from the early African civilizations through the American slave systems to the modern day Black cultures of the U.S.
HS 225 The Black People
and the American Frontier
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
This course examines the role of Black people in the winning of the West. It covers colonial days, black settlers, homesteaders, cowboys, gunfighters, and soldiers in the Indian Wars.
HS 246 A History of Mexico
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
The historical and cultural development of Mexico from pre-history to the present. This includes an examination of present day politics and society of Mexico.
HS 250 The History of Democratic
Ideas (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
A study of individual and social freedom culminating in Americas Jeffersonian ideals, including utopian and revolutionary ideas and experiments.
HS 251 The History of Cities
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
A study of cities in the United States in their beginning and developmental stages since the Colonial period.
HS 261 China Today: Tradition and
Change (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
This course will examine Chinese Civilization and culture from prehistoric times to the present. Special emphasis will be given to Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism and Communist society today.
HS 262 China Today: Tradition and
Change (A, R) ..............3 credit hours
(1644 to the present) Auraria Campus only. See Consortium of Ethnic Studies.
HS 265 Japan Today: The Asian Giant
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
The course will briefly survey Japanese traditional society and culture. Emphasis will be placed on recent historical developments from the Tokugawa Shogunate and the Mejii Reforms to the present. Japanese national character, religion (particularly Zen) and the arts will be examined.
HS 267 Indian Today: Tradition and
Change (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
This course will examine the roots of Indian Civilization as well as the intense impact major invasions had on India, from the growth of Hinduism to the development of Western Democracy. The influence India has had on other cultures will also be studied.
HS 269 Cultural History of Southeast
Asia (A) ..................3 credit hours
Auraria Campus only. See Consortium of Ethnic Studies.
HS 271 History of England
Early Years (A, N, R)......3 credit hours
England from Henry VII to Anne, 1485-1713.
HS 272 History of England
Early Years (A, N, R)......3 credit hours
England from Henry VII to Anne, 1485-1713.
HS 273 History of England
Modern Times (A, N, R)_____3 credit hours
The expansion and decline of Great Britain from Anne to the present time, 1713-1972.
PHILOSOPHY
PH 111 Introduction to Philosophy
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
A study of philosophy and its usefulness, of methods of inquiry, man and his place in the world, and of the different schools of philosophy. (3 hours per week)
PH 112 Introduction to Philosophy
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
(Continuation of PH 111) A study of the realm of values and the life worth living, ethics, oriental philosophies, religions, and social issues. (3 hours per week)
PH 120 The Faiths by Which Men
Live (A, N, R) .............3 credit hours
Great religions of the Far East such as Hinduism, Budd-ism, Confucianism, Taoism, etc. Attention will be given to the beliefs and convictions men use as they seek to interpret experience and find meaning and direction in life, and to the role of religion in the development of culture.
PH 121 The Faiths by Which Men
Live (A, N, R) .............3 credit hours
A continuation of PH 120 with attention given to the religions identified with the Middle East and Western Civilization such as Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Some of the modern challenges to religion such as humanism, Marxism, secularism will be explored as we consider recent developments in the field of religion.
PH 220 Ethics: Learning to Cope
With Life (A, N, R) ........3 credit hours
Utilizing the resources of philosophy and ethics to achieve greater competence in living creatively with the problems and possibilities of the contemporary world. (3 hours per week)
PH 230 Logic (A, N, R).................3 credit hours
A study of the principles and practices of reflective thinking and problem solving, of the proposition and syllogism, of evidence and evaluation, and the various approaches to the scientific method of reasoning processes. The aim is the achievement of more precise and creative thinking. (3 hours per week)
POLITICAL SCIENCE
PS 107 The Power Elite: Whos Who
in Colorado (R).............3 hours credit
Focuses on the agents, both individuals and organiza-
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tions, and processes responsible for major social, political, economic, and planning decisions in Colorado.
PS 111 Introduction to Political
Science (A, N, R) ..........3 credit hours
Approaches to the study of politics: man as political animal; the nature and use of power; the role of ideology.
PS 112 Introduction to Political
Science (A, N, R) ..........3 credit hours
Approaches to the study of politics: the relationship between political behavior and governmental structures.
PS 113 American National
Government (A, N, R) .......3 credit hours
Present day American government interpreted in the light of constitutional and other influences; emphasis on the role of institutions, individuals, and groups in forming American political behavior.
PS 114 American State and Local
Government (A, N, R) .......3 credit hours
Governmental structure and political behavior in states and municipalities; urban problems and the role of government in their solution.
PS 161 Political Leadership
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
A study of group process, parliamentary procedures, recruiting, campaigning, publicity, legislation and administration through classroom and laboratory experience.
PS 162 Practical Politics (A,N,R) ... 3 credit hours
Introduction to political action at the local, state and/or national level.
PS 201 Comparative
Politics (A,N,R) ............3 credit hours
Introductory survey and analysis of political behavior and institutions in the 20th century; problems of the over developed world, including Europe, the Soviet Union, Japan, and the United States.
PS 202 Comparative
Politics (A,N,R) ............3 credit hours
Introductory survey and analysis of political behavior and institutions in the 20th century; problems of the "underdeveloped world, including Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
PS 203 International Relations
(A,N,R) .....................3 credit hours
The international political system and the effects of geography, history, culture, ideology, domestic politics, foreign policies, diplomacy, international law, and international organizations upon it.
PS 211 Current Political Issues (N) 3 credit hours
Local, state, national, and international political events with newspapers, periodicals, and television as primary sources for student involvement. Emphasis will be on class discussion.
PS 241 Political Woman (A,N,R)_______3 credit hours
Emphasis on the social, psychological, and economic status of women in the contemporary United States: the role of politics in supporting and attacking that status; the womens movement in the 19th century and today.
PS 251 Chicano Political Experience
(A,N,R) ...................3 credit hours
A critical evaluation of leading issues affecting Chicanos in American society. Includes a survey of social, cultural, and political organizations within the community.
PS 261 Black Political Thought
and Experience (A,N,R)_____4 credit hours
Carries the development of black political thought from Frederick Douglass to the present, making the student aware of the forces which direct the black man in his struggle to achieve personal and community goals.
PSYCHOLOGY
PY 100 Human Relations in Business
and Industry (A,N,R) ......3 credit hours
Primarily focuses on the personal problems encountered by employees in a business relationship with fellow employees and with the employer. Deals with the effect of these problems on others and various methods of handling them or minimizing their effect.
PY 101 Human Potential
Workshop I (A, N, R)......1-3 credit hours
The purpose of Human Potential Workshop is to increase self-affirmation, self-motivation, self-determination and an empathetic regard for others. It will focus primarily on the students strengths, their personal resources, rather than their weaknesses. The emphasis is on an integration of thinking and feelings about oneself and others.
PY 102 Human Potential
Workshop II (A,N,R).......1-3 credit hours
Prerequisite: PY 101
The Human Potential Workship II is a continuation of PY 101 and is designed to assist students in identifying and resolving personal conflicts and clarifying and firming up a meaningful life-style. When a person is in a state of conflict, personal potentialities are often denied or forgotten rather than actualized. Through successful conflict resolution, a person can grow in self-affirmation; therefore, being able to determine the integration of ones life goals, strengths and values, feelings and thoughts leading to an involvement of a congruent life-style.
PY 105 Self-Exploration
and Understanding
(A,N,R) ..................1-3 credit hours
This seminar is designed as a type of discussion group to help provide the student with the opportunity to gail selfunderstanding and acceptance. Good mental health for each student and how it may be achieved is emphasized. The importance of being sensitive to our own individual psychological needs and the needs of others is given considerable attention. Other topics of student concern may be discussed.
PY 107 Psychology of Personal
Development (A,N,R) ......3 credit hours
The study of the individual and the social factors which contribute to the development of both healthy and unhealthy personalities.
PY 108 Vocational Exploration
(A,N,R) ..................1-3 credit hours
PY 108 is designed to enable the student to select either a career direction or confirm his present career choice.
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Each student will have a thorough understanding of this occupation and how it relates to him or herself. They will understand: (1) the nature of their occupation (2) the potential of that occupation (3) information about himself as it relates to his occupation and (4) information as it relates to training for that occupation. Based on this information, the student will decide on the occupational direction to go and will devise and implement a plan to reach that goal. The goal will be tentative and always flexible as occupational choice is to be treated as a life-long process and not a onetime decision. Students will be responsible for a minimum of three papers and/or oral conferences with the instructor. The reports or conferences, and class participation will be considered by the student when determining his grade.
PY 111 General
Psychology (A,N,R) .......3 credit hours
A broad overview of the general field and fundamental principles of psychology. Will study areas of perception, motivation, emotion, learning maturation, social individual differences, mental illness, psycho-therapy, etc.
PY 112 General
Psychology
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
Continuation of PY 111.
PY 113 General
Psychology
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
Continuation of PY 112.
PY 123 Child Guidance
Techniques (A,N,R)..........3 credit hours
A study of acceptable methods and techniques of working with children.
PY 200 Psychology of the
Deaf (A,N,R)................3 credit hours
This course is intended to provide an overview of the field, with particular emphasis on communications, testing measurement of the hearing-impaired, research in the field of deafness, and special methods used in the education of deaf children with psychological ramifications.
PY 210 Social Psychology
(A,N,R) ..................3 credit hours
Social factors which influence the behavior of the individual as he interacts with others. Consideration of such problems as leadership fashions, prejudice, public opinion and social attitudes.
PY 220 Educational Psychology
(A,N,R) ..................3 credit hours
This is a study of psychology as applied to the teacher-learner situation with emphasis on the principles of motivation learning, intelligence, heredity, growth, environment and individual differences.
PY 221 Developmental Psychology (Child Growth & Devel.)
(A,N,R) ..................3 credit hours
Study of early childhood including genetic background, prenatal life, motor-sensory development and the preschool period. Covers all aspects of growth and development: physical, emotional, social, and intellectual.
PY 222 Developmental Psychology (Child Growth and Devel.)
(A, N, R) .................3 credit hours
Continuation of PY 221
PY 223 Developmental Psychology
Adolescence, adulthood, and old
age) (A, N, R).............3 credit hours
Developmental psychology with emphasis on adolescence, adulthood, and old age.
PY 230 Abnormal Psychology
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
Causes, description and theories of severe personality and behavior disorders.
PY 240 Personality (A,N,R)..........3 credit hours
Psychological theories which deal with the development, structure, and functioning of the normal personality.
PY 250 Psychology of Prejudice
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
A course designed to assist students so that they understand in depth the basic causes of prejudice and the etiology of prejudicial behavior. Experiences are provided for greater understanding of people and processes for abating or ameliorating the degree of prejudice by the individual.
PY 255 Black Psychology (A,N,R) .. 3 credit hours
This course is designed to enable the student to identify the psychological factors of racism that influence the development of the Black personality.
PY 260 Chicano
Psychology (A,N,R) .........3 credit hours
This course is designed to develop an understanding from a psychological viewpoint of the impact of the Chicano experience on the Chicano personality.
PY 270 Industrial Psychology
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
Presents psychological material relevant to the industrial setting including employee selection, training, testing, evaluation, assumptions of management about human motivation, job satisfactions, work efficiency, fatigue and human engineering.
SOCIOLOGY
SO 108 Social Problems (A,N,R) ... 3 credit hours
Issues confronting the individual, groups and society are explored. Ranging from alienation to xenophobia, the issues will be examined for their causes, their possible inter-relationships, and their consequences upon the various sectors of society. Particular emphasis will be given to issues of direct concern to the student. (3 hours per week)
SO 111 Introduction to Sociology
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
Basic principles of sociology are introduced: investigating social behavior, man culture, institutions, social interaction and social change. Theoretical principles are introduced and applied to field projects where students seek to acquire familiarity with the community as a laboratory. (3 hours per week)
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SO 112 Introduction to Sociology
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
The issues, concepts and understandings treated in SO 111 are developed by treating major issues and concerns through the writings of major sociologists. Theoretical principles dealing with power, interaction, deviance, etc. are explored in depth. (3 hours per week)
SO 113 Introduction to Sociology
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
Methods and techniques of investigating and for developing understanding of society are given primary focus here. The student spends sizable periods outside of the classroom undertaking methods of research appropriate to different situations depending on the instructors orientation. (3 hours per week)
SO 135 Sociology of Health Care
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
A systematic attempt to relate sociological concepts to the fields of physical health and illness. An overview of socio-cultural aspects of the institution we know as medicine. Includes the community and medical care, medical education, the hospital as a social institution, and concepts of medical practice.
SO 151 The Chicano and the Schools
(A,N,R) ....................3 credit hours
Problems of Chicano students adapting to the schools and the teachers response to them. Includes observation of school facilities and classroom techniques.
SO 152 Urbanization and the Chicano
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Study of rural folk values of the Chicano and their erosion in the urban setting. Includes an analysis of changing values within the Chicano community.
SO 200 Urban Sociology (A,N,R) ... 3 credit hours
City and metropolitan growth are examined in terms of the human factors and social issues involved. Social structures, forms and processes of interaction, residential and institutional patternings, are looked at as these relate to urban planning, community change, transitional neighborhoods and urban tensions. (3 hours per week)
SO 211 Current Social Issues
(A,N,R) .....................3 credit hours
Introductory consideration of some major current social issues designed to improve the student's ability to understand and systematically investigate concerns vital to everyday life. Issues to be treated will include the major P's of poverty, power, pollution, and population; conflict, intergroup relations, social change and alienation. (3 hours per week)
SO 212 Current Social Issues
(A, N, R)....................3 credit hours
Increased emphasis is given here to the interrelationship of issues. The issues to be dealt with are primarily of a national and international flavor. (3 hours per week)
So 213 Field Practicum: Community
Studies (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
Aimed at the service professions (social work, etc.) as well as those adults interested in becoming involved in ongoing social change activities, the course seeks through guided field experiences to aid the student in developing the perspectives, skills and methods vital to ac-
tivating and carrying through community organization, community development, and field study programs.
SO 220 Minority Groups in
American Society (A, N, R). 3 credit hours
The processes and consequences of labeling whereby certain groups come to be defined as minorities" and treated in particular ways are studied. (3 hours per week)
SO 223 Youth in Society
(A, N, R) .................3 credit hours
Presentation of issues and patterns of behavior confronting youth in society: drugs, crime, formation of gangs, relations with adults, education, political involvement, alienation, the creation of counter-cultures, racial tensions and cultural factors affecting individual and group action. The impact of the mass media, advertising, and the arts upon youth groups and the impact of youth groups upon these areas are examined. The role of the above-30 and the elderly in a youth-oriented society are explored. (3 hours per week)
SO 225 Racism and American
Institutions (A, N, R) ....3 credit hours
This course is designed to analyze American institutions in relationship to racism. The historical development of racism and what it has done to influence the American way of life will be the foundation of this class.
SO 230 Hispano Culture
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Designed for all students. The purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of the cultural attainments and activities of the Hispanic Culture. The emphasis will be on the arts, music, religious beliefs, traditions, language, and how all these relate to contemporary cultural patterns.
SO 235 Sociology
of Religion (A)............3 credit hours
Concepts related to the field of religion as it applies to mans organization of society, his cognitive construction of his world.
SO 240 Sociology of the Black
Community (A, N, R) .......3 credit hours
Fundamental concepts and theories of sociology with comparative emphasis on the Black man, his culture, and contributions to American culture.
SO 241 Sociology of the Chicano
Community (A, N, R)........3 credit hours
Fundamental concepts and theories of sociology with comparative emphasis on the Chicano and his culture in America.
SO 250 Marriage and the Family
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Designed for all students, the purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of the social role of marriage and family living, and to promote stable marital relations. Special emphasis is placed on courtship and preparation for marriage, conflict situations and adjustments between husband and wife, parent-child relationships, the family in the community and other factors related to successful family life. (3 hours per week)
SO 254 Juvenile Delinquency
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Sociological and cultural aspects of late childhood and
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adolescence. Problems of the individual in his social environment and group forces which lead to maladjustment. Sociological principles for working with youth from the viewpoint of parent, teacher, police, social worker and youth organization leader. (3 hours per week)
SO 255 Criminology (A)................3 credit hours
The course is designed to study the nature of crime, the statistics of criminal behavior, the nature of the criminal, causes and conditions, theories and practices of treatment.
SOCIAL SCIENCE
SS 101 Field Experience in Community
Organizations I (A, N, R) ... 3 credit hours
Students enrolled in this course will perform human service work in community organizations, programs, and agencies of their choice subject to the approval of the instructor. By doing so, they will gain job experience, community service opportunity, and have an avenue to test career interests in a reality setting. Field experience sites will be developed through mutual agreement of the student, the community organization, and supervising instructor. (1 hour of lecture and 4-6 hours of field experience per week)
SS 102 Field Experience in Community
Organizations II (A, N, R) .. 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Field Experience in Community Organizations I
Continuation of Field Experience. (1 hour of lecture and 4-6 hours of field experience per week)
SS 103 Field Experience in Human
Services (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Field Experience I, II, or acceptable field work
An evaluation of community needs and resources based on the students previous field experienced and through direct readings. The emphasis will be toward change methodology and related skills and techniques. (3 hours per week)
SS 205 The 21st Century: Models of
Future Worlds (R)..........3 credit hours
An interdisciplinary examination of possible futures for man, his physical environment, and his social institutions.
SS 211 The Social and Political Environment of the
20th Century (A, N, R) ....3 credit hours
An interdisciplinary approach to study of the problems confronting the twentieth-century American. Consideration will be given to such issues as urbanization, alienation, war, technological change, violence and protest movements, values, and the quest for personal identity and significance. (3 hours per week)
SS 212 The Social and Political Environment of the
20th Century (A, N, R) ....3 credit hours
Continuation of SS 211. (3 hours per week)
SS 213 The Social and Political Environment of the
20th Century (A, N, R) ....3 credit hours
Continuation of SS 212. (3 hours per week)
SS 260 Research Methods in the Social Sciences
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
An interdisciplinary course designed to aid the student develop the skills, methods and techniques of research required for systematically exploring the social-psychological world in which he lives. An introduction to statistical methods including validity, reliability, correlation and other forms of analysis is also undertaken.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
299 Independent Study
(A, N, R)............. 1 to 3 credit hours
Independent Study (Course No. 299) is available in each of the major areas within the Division of Social Sciences (i.e. history, political science, sociology, etc.). The course provides opportunity for the serious-minded student to engage in intensive study and research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Prerequisite for enrollment is permission of the Director of the Division of Social Sciences and the assigned instructor. The number of quarter hours of credit (1-3) will be determined by the Division Director.
B34


I
CONSORTIUM OF ETHNIC STUDIES...AURARIA ONLY
Anthropology A
Chinese A
Economics A
History A
Humanities A
Literature A, N, R
Music A
Political Science A
Psychology A
Science A
Sociology A
Spanish A, N, R
(THE COURSES LISTED UNDER THE CONSORTIUM OF ETHNIC STUDIES COUNT FOR CREDIT TOWARD THE ASSOCIATE ARTS DEGREE.)
Note: Auraria CampusA North CampusN Red Rocks CampusR


CONSORTIUM OF ETHNIC STUDIES... AURARIA CAMPUS ONLY
ANTHROPOLOGY
AN 230 Ethnography of the North
American Indian (A) ......3 credit hours
A survey of the major Indian cultures of North America. Environmental and historical relationships are included. (3 hours per week)
ART
AR 181 Ethnic Studies in Art, The
American Southwest (A) ... 3 credit hours
Special Studies of the Art of the American Southwest from pre-Colombian civilizations to present times as it relates to the Chicano.
AR 182 Ethnic Studies in Art,
The Art of Africa and
Black Americans (A).......3 credit hours
Special Study of the Art of Africa from ancient to present times as it relates to contemporary Black American Artists.
AR 183 Ethnic Studies in Art,
The Art of the Orient and the American Oriental (A).....3 credit hours
Special Studies of the Art of the American Indian from ancient to present times as it relates to contemporary American Indian Artists.
AR 184 Ethnic Studies in Art, The
American Indians (A) .....3 credit hours
Special Studies of the Art of the American Indian from ancient to present times as it relates to contemporary American Indian Artists.
CHINESE
CH 100 Basic Applied
Chinese (A) ..............2 credit hours
Course designed for those who wish to learn basic conversational patterns for enjoyment and travel or for simple business needs. Language background helpful but not essential. (2 hours per week, plus laboratory)
CH 111 First Year
Chinese...................5 credit hours
Designed to develop basic principles of grammar and syntax; reading and writing of simple Chinese, correct pronunciation and rudimentary conversation.
CH 112 First Year
Chinese (A) ...............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 111
CH 113 First Year
Chinese (A) ...............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 112
Continuation and Expansion of CH 112 and additional reading materials.
CH 211 Intermediate
Chinese (A) ...............3 credit hours
This course will (1) review and reinforce skills and knowl-
edge gained in first year Chinese, (2) develop further skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing, (3) develop sense of linguistic structure and increase vocabulary and (4) provide readings in plays, short stories and poems.
CH 212 Intermediate
Chinese (A) ...............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 211 Continuation and Expansion of CH 211.
CH 213 Intermediate
Chinese (A) ...............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 212 Continuation and Expansion of CH 212.
CH 214 Conversation and Composition
Chinese (A) ...............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CH 213 or demonstration of
sufficient language skills
Conversation and Composition Chinese is designed to increase vocabulary and develop oral and written proficiency at the intermediate level through discussions, reports, and situation dialogues.
CH 215 Conversation and Composition
Chinese (A) ...............3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of CH 214.
CH 216 Conversation and Composition
Chinese (A) ...............3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of CH 215.
CH 241 Contemporary Chinese
Short Stories (A) .........3 credit hours
Selected examples of most representative authors.
CH 242 Contemporary Chinese
Theatre (A)................3 credit hours
Selected plays representative of the Chinese stage today.
CH 243 Contemporary Chinese
Novel (A)..................3 credit hours
ECONOMICS
EC 161 Black Economics (A) ..........4 credit hours
Introduction to the concepts of labor, land, capital, ownership and control of economic institutions as they have affected and continue to affect the lives of Black and poor Americans. The course will span the concepts of slavery to the idea of Black Power.
HISTORY
HS 121 History of the Indians
of the West (A)............3 credit hours
A study of the Indians west of the Mississippi River from prehistoric times to the present.
HS 125 Black Civilization
Africa (A).................3 credit hours
Culture and development of the area of Africa from ear-
636


liest times to the present. Includes tribes, slavery, colonialism and the new independent nations.
HS 126 Black Civilization
Americas to 1865 (A)........3 credit hours
The culture and the development of the Black people in the Americas through the American Civil War. This includes Black people in Brazil, Surinam, the Caribbean, and the United States.
HS 127 Black Civilization
Americas Since 1865 (A) .. 3 credit hours
The culture and development of the Black people in the Americas following the American Civil War. This includes the Black nations and people in South and Central America, the Indies and the U S.
HS 130 History of the Southwest
United States (A, N, R) ____3 credit hours
The cultural and historical development of what is now the Southwestern United States.
HS 145 Chicano Civilization
Spain (A) ..................3 credit hours
The development of culture and the history of Spain from Roman times to the present including a brief study of efforts and colonization, and the colonies that Spain owns today. This course covers the origin and power of the Catholic Church, the government, and the social structure of Spain.
HS 146 Chicano Civilization
Early Colonies (A) .........3 credit hours
The expansion of Spanish power into the New World and Asia from the 15th Century to 1800. This covers the changes in culture, as society brought about, by colonization. It traces the expansion of the power of Spain to its peak.
HS 147 Chicano Civilization
Independence to Present
(A) ........................3 credit hours
The fall of the Spanish Empire, the rise of the new nations and the problems that they face today. This covers North and South America and Asia in relation to Spanish heritage and modern Society.
HS 224 History of the Black
People (A, N, R) ...........3 credit hours
The historical development of the Black people of the world. Tracing this development from the early African civilizations through the American salve system to the modern day Black cultures of the U. S.
HS 225 The Black People and the
Black People (A) ...........3 credit hours
This course examines the role of the Black people and the winning of the West. It covers colonial days, Black settlers, homesteaders, cowboys, gunfighters, and soldiers in the Indian Wars.
HS 261 China Today: Tradition and
Change (A, N, R)............3 credit hours
This course will examine Chinese Civilization and culture from pre-historic times to the present. Special emphasis will be given to Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism and Community society today.
HS 262 China Today: Tradition and Change(1644 to the
present) (A, R)...........3 credit hours
The course will deal with modern Chinese history, beginning with a brief survey of Chinese society from the 17th to the 19th century when the convergence of Chinese and Western history ended Chinese seclusion. More emphasis will be placed on examining the interplay of foreign and domestic elements which gave rise to revolutionary changes in every aspect of Chinese society up to the present.
HS 265 Japan Today: The Asian
Giant (A, N, R)...........3 credit hours
The course will briefly survey Japanese traditional society and culture. More emphasis will be placed on more recent historical developments from the Tokugawa Shogunate and the Meiji Reforms to the present. Japanese national character, religion (particularly Zen) and the arts will be examined.
HS 267 India Today: Tradition and
Change (A, N, R)..........3 credit hours
This course will examine the roots of Indian civilization as well as the intense impact major invasions had on India, from the growth of Hinduism to the development of Western democracy. The influence India has had on other cultures will also be studied.
HUMANITIES
HU 145 Chicano Culture (A) ..........3 credit hours
Story of the Chicano from pre-Colombian to contemporary times. Includes the study of the social, cultural, political and economic heritage of the Chicano and his contributions to American society.
HU 147 Folklore of Mexico and the Southwest (A)
HU 241 Comparative Culture Spanish (A, N) .. 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 213
Study of Spain from the Middle Ages to the 19th Century through the media of slides, records, art books, tapes, films and lectures. (3 hours per week)
HU 242 Comparative Culture
Spanish (A, N) ............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 213
A continued study of Spain, stressing the 19th and 20th Centuries. Early Latin-American development will be investigated. This course will stress the multi-media approach. (3 hours per week)
HU 243 Comparative Culture-
Spanish (A, N) ............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 213
A continued study with emphasis on Latin-American independence and the course of development to the present time. Multi-media approach will be used. (3 hours per week)
LITERATURE
LI 125 The Black Writer in
America (A) ...............4 credit hours
A beginning course in the study of Black literature, which includes the methods of evaluation and analysis essential
B37


for understanding and appreciating the literary contribu-
tions of the Black Writer in America.
LI 144 Afro-American Literature
(A, R).....................3 credit hours
Study of the contribution of Afro-American writers to American literature and civilization.
LI 147 Contemporary Chicano Literature
in Translation (A) ........3 credit hours
A contemporary look at the Southwest through the works of its authors. Attention to the writings of the Chicanos search for an identity.
LI 231 Ethnic Literature in America
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of Black writers in America. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, comparison and genre.
LI 232 Ethnic Literature in America
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of Chicano writers in America. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, comparison and genre.
LI 233 Ethnic Literature in America
(A, N, R) .................3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of Oriental writers in America. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations, comparison and genre.
LI 234 Ethnic Literature in America
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Concentration on the literature of the American Indian. The approach will be through general themes, chronological considerations and genre.
MUSIC
MU 120 Music of Mexico and the
Southwest (A) .............3 credit hours
An examination of selected works in Mexican music from pre-Colombian time to present, concentrating on regional works and on Twentieth Century composers and their relationship to Chicano society.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
PS 251 Chicano Political
Experience (A) ............3 credit hours
A critical evaluation of leading issues affecting Chicanos in American society. Includes a survey of social, cultural and political organizations within the community.
PS 261 Black Political Thought
and Experience (A).........4 credit hours
Carries the development of Black political thought from Frederick Douglass to the present, making the student aware of the forces which direct the Black man in his struggle to achieve personal and community goals.
PSYCHOLOGY
PY 255 Black Psychology (A)......3 credit hours
This course is designed to enable the student to identify the psychological factors of racism that influence the development of the Black personality.
PY 260 Chicano Psychology (A) ... 3 credit hours
This course is designed to develop an understanding from a psychological viewpoint of the impact of the Chicano situation on the Chicano personality.
SCIENCE
SI 110 Black Men in Science
(A) ......................3 credit hours
A survey of the contribution of the Black man to the scientific world, with in-depth studies of some of the major figures. (3 lectures per week, no laboratory)
SOCIOLOGY
SO 140 Field Work in Barrio
Studies (A) ..............3 credit hours
Field study observation of selected barrios, institutions, and agencies to be conducted under supervision and after preparatory instruction to acquaint students with the barrio.
SO 151 The Chicano and the
Schools (A)...............3 credit hours
Problems of Chicano students adapting to the schools and the teacher's response to them. Includes observation of school facilities and classroom techniques.
SO 225 Racism and American
Institutions (A)..........3 credit hours
This course is designed to analyze American institutions in relationship to racism. The historical development of racism and what it has done to influence the American way of life will be the foundation of this class.
SO 230 Hispano Culture (A)...........3 credit hours
Designed for all students. The purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of the cultural attainments and activities of the Hispanic Culture. The emphasis will be on the arts, music, religious beliefs, traditions, language, and how all these relate to contemporary cultural patterns.
SO 240 Sociology of the Black
Community (A) ............3 credit hours
Fundamental concepts and theories of sociology with comparative emphasis on the Black man, his culture, and contributions to American culture.
SO 241 Sociology of the Chicano
Community (A) ............3 credit hours
Fundamental concepts and theories of sociology with comparative emphasis on the Chicano and his culture in America.
SPANISH
SP 100 Basic Applied Spanish (R) 2 credit hours
For those who wish to learn basic conversational Spanish for enjoyment or travel or for simple business needs.
SP 111 First Year Spanish
(A, N, R)..................5 credit hours
Designed to develop basic principles of grammar and syntax; reading and writing of simple Spanish, correct pronunciation and rudimentary conversation.
B38


SP 112 First Year Spanish
(A, N, R)....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 111 Continuation and Expansion of SP 111.
SP 113 First Year Spanish
(A, N, R)....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 112
Continuation and Expansion of SP 112 and additional reading materials.
SP 121 Spanish to the Chicano
(A) ..........................5 credit hours
Designed for the bi-vocal Chicano student. Instruction takes into consideration the interference of English in the development of the Spanish language skills for the student.
SP 122 Spanish to the Chicano
(A) ..........................5 credit hours
Continuation of SP 121
SP 123 Spanish to the Chicano
(A) ..........................5 credit hours
Continuation of SP 122.
SP 211 Intermediate Spanish
(A, N, R)....................3 credit hours
This course will (1) review and reinforce skills and knowledge gained in first year Spanish, (2) develop further skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, (3) develop sense of linguistic structure and increase vocabulary, and (4) provide reading in plays, short stories and poems.
SP 212 Intermediate Spanish
(A, N, R)....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 112 or 113
Continuation and Expansion of SP 211.
SP 213 Intermediate Spanish
(A, N, R).................3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of SP 212.
SP 214 Conversation and Composition
Spanish (A)...............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 213 or demonstration of sufficient language skills
Conversation and Composition Spanish is designed to increase vocabulary and develop oral and written proficiency at the intermediate level through discussions, reports, and situation dialogues.
SP 215 Conversation and
Composition Spanish (A) .. 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of SP 214.
SP 216 Conversation and
Composition Spanish (A) .. 3 credit hours
Continuation and Expansion of SP 215.
SP 241 Contemporary Spanish
Short Stories (A) ........3 credit hours
Selected examples of most representative authors.
SP 242 Contemporary Spanish
Theater (A)................3 credit hours
Selected plays representative of the Spanish stage today.
SP 243 Contemporary Spanish
Novel (A) .................3 credit hours
Selected contemporary novels particularly appealing to modern youth.
B39


immunity College of Denver
ED
uraria Campus lorth Campus led Rocks Campus
division of Business and lanagement Occupations


DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS
Accounting Business Management Credit Management Data Processing-Programmer General Clerical Industrial Management International Secretarial Key Punch Legal Secretarial Marketing Management Medical Secretarial Office Administration Public Administration Real Estate Secretarial Science Stenographic Word-Processing Typist Transportation and Traffic Management
A, N, R A, N, R A N
A, N, R
R
N
N
A
A, N, R
A, N
N, R
R
R
A, N, R A, N, R N, R A
Note: Auraria CampusA North CampusN Red Rocks CampusR


DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS
ACCOUNTING
NINE-MONTH PROGRAM
First Quarter Hrs.
AC 111 Accounting.............................. 5
EG 131 Business Communications................. 3
MG 105 Introduction to Business ............... 3
M 110 Business Math........................... 3
EC 109 or 211 ................................. 3
17
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting.............................. 5
EG 132 Business Communications................. 3
SC 103 Business Machines ...................... 3
DP 111 Princ. of Bus. Data Proc................ 3
Typing Elective1....................... 4
18
Third Quarter
AC 113 Accounting.............................. 5
MG 222 Office Management....................... 3
MG 240 Business Finance........................ 5
Business or Acct. Elect.1............ 3-5
16-18
1.Selection of electives must be made in conference with faculty advisor.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Completion of this course leads to employment opportunities in clerical bookkeeping positions related to the accounting field.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 51-53
ACCOUNTING
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter h/s
AC 111 Accounting............................. 5
EG 131 Business Communications................ 3
MG 105 Intro, to Business..................... 3
M 110 Math for Business ..................... 3
Social Science Elect.1................ 3
17
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting............................. 5
EG 132 Business Communications................ 3
SC 103 Business Machines ..................... 3
DP 111 Princ. of Bus. Data Proc............... 3
Math Elective:
M 120 Business Statistics or
M 150 Math of Finance....................__3
17
Third Quarter
AC 113 Accounting............................. 5
EG 133 Business Communications................ 3
AC 213 Cost Accounting ....................... 5
Data Proc. Elective2................ 3-5
16-18
Fourth Quarter
AC 211 Intermediate Accounting ............... 5
MG 210 Business Law I ........................ 3
MG 240 Business Finance....................... 5
Elective1........................... 3-5
16-18
C4
Fifth Quarter
AC 212 Intermediate Accounting ................. 5
MG 211 Business Law II ......................... 3
EC 211 Princ. of Economics ..................... 3
Elective1............................. 3-5
14-16
Sixth Quarter
MG 201 Business Org. & Mgt...................... 3
Account. Elective3...................... 5
BU 297 Coop. Work Exp. or Elect............... 3-6
11-14
1.Selection of Electives must be made in conference with faculty advisor.
2. Business Elective at Auraria Campus.
3. Accounting Elective must be made in conference with faculty advisor.
These include: AC 214, AC 215, AC 217 and AC 220.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES: Completion of this program leads to employment opportunities in bookkeeping and initial accounting positions in business and industrial concerns or at various levels in governmental agencies.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS 91-100
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
1 Cr
First Quarter Hrs
AC 111 Accounting.............................. 5
EG 131 Business Communications................. 3
MG 105 Introduction to Business ............... 3
SC 103 Business Machines ...................... 3
Math Elective1....................... 3-5
17-19
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting.............................. 5
EG 132 Business Communications................. 3
M 120 Statistics for Business................. 3
DP 111 Prin. of Bus. Data Proc................. 3
Elective2.............................. 3
17
Third Quarter
AC 113 Accounting.............................. 5
EG 133 Business Communications................. 3
DP 112 Advanced Princ. of Bus. DP ............. 5
MG 201 Business Org. & Mgmt...................._3
16
Fourth Quarter
MG 203 Prin. of Marketing I ................... 5
MG 210 Business Law I.......................... 3
EC 211 Prin. of Economics...................... 3
MG 221 Personnel Management ..................._3
14
Fifth Quarter
MG 240 Business Finance........................ 5
MG 211 Business Law II ........................ 3
EC 212 Princ. of Economics .................... 3
Management Elect.3..................... 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Exp. or Elect...............__3
17


Sixth Quarter
MG 250 Business Policies....................... 3
EC 108 Labor Relations ........................ 3
EC 213 Prin. of Economics...................... 3
Mgmt. Elective3........................ 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Exp. or Elect................ 3
15
1.Recommended electives are M 110, M 105, M 150, and M 111. 2.Selection of electives must be made in conference with advisor. 3,Recommended electives are MG 222, MG 217, MG 239, MG 220, MG 212, and AC 213.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 96-98
CREDIT MANAGEMENT (A)
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter Hrs.
MG 130 Credit Fundamentals.................... 3
MG 105 Introduction to Business .............. 3
AC 111 Accounting............................. 5
M 110 Math for Business ....................... 3
EG 131 Business Communications................ 3
17
Second Quarter
MG 131 Credit Fundamentals.................... 3
M 120 Business Statistics ................... 3
AC 112 Accounting............................. 5
EG 132 Business Communications................ 3
Soc. Science Elect.1.................._3
17
Third Quarter
EC 107 Consumer Economics..................... 3
MG 201 Business Org. & Mgmt................... 3
AC 113 Accounting............................. 5
EG 133 Business Communications................ 3
Science Elective1 ...................._3
17
Fourth Quarter
MG 213 Credit and the Law I .................. 3
EC 211 Princ. of Economics ................... 3
MG 210 Business Law I ........................ 3
DP 111 Prin. of Business DP .................. 3
Elective1............................. 3
15
Fifth Quarter
MG 211 Business Law II ....................... 3
MG 221 Personnel Management .................. 3
MG 222 Office Management...................... 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Exp. or Elect.1 2 3 4....... 3
Elective.............................. 3
15
Sixth Quarter
MG 240 Business Fianace....................... 5
MG 220 Small Bus. Management.................. 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience or
Business Elective .................... 6
14
1. Consult faculty advisor for recommended electives.
2. BU 299 (Independent Study) or Elective may be chosen only in event appropriate work station is not available.
DATA PROCESSING-PROGRAMMER (N)
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter h/s
DP 111 Prin. of Bus. Data Proc...................... 3
MG 105 Intro, to Bus................................ 3
Math Elective:
DP 122 Applied Computer Math I M 112 College Algebra
Communications Elect.1.............................. 3
Elective2........................................... 3
17
Second Quarter
DP 112 Adv. Prin. of Bus. Data Proc................. 5
Math Elective ...................................... 5
DP 122 Applied Computer Math II M 112 Trig, and Functions
Communications Elective1 ........................... 3
AC 111 Accounting................................... 5
18
Third Quarter
DP Elective Group I3.............................. 5
Communications Elect.1.............................. 3
AC 112 Accounting................................... 5
Business Elective2 ................................. 3
16
Fourth Quarter
DP Elective Group I3.............................. 5
DP Elective Group II4............................. 5
Business Elective2 ................................. 3
Soc. Science Elective2.............................. 3
16
Fifth Quarter
DP Elective Group II4............................. 5
DP 231 Systems Analysis I .......................... 3
Business Electives2 ................................ 6
Soc. Science Elect.2 ............................... 3
17
Sixth Quarter
DP 232 Systems Analysis II.......................... 3
M 150 Math of Finance or
M 120 Statistics for Bus............................ 3
Electives2.............................. JO
16
1. Communications Electives:
EG 111 English Composition EG 112 English Composition EG 113 English Composition EG 131 Business Communications EG 132 Business Communications EG 133 Business Communications EG 250 Technical Writing S 110 Introduction to Speech S 210 Advanced Public Speaking
2. Consult advisor for recommended electives to fulfill these requirements.
3. Data Processing Electives Group I:
DP 213 Assembler Language I DP 216 Cobol I DP 221 Fortran IV, I DP 224 PL/I, I
4. Data Processing Electives Group II:
DP 214 Assembler Language II DP 217 Cobol II DP 222 Fortran IV, II DP 225 PL/I, II
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 95
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 99
C 5


GENERAL CLERICAL 9-MONTH PROGRAM
First Quarter Hrs.
EG 131 Business Comm.......................... 3
SC 110 Typing (or by placement)............... 4
M 100 Developmental Math
or
M 110 Math for Business ..................... 3
Business Elective .................. 3-5
13-15
Second Quarter
AC 109 Book, and Accounting .................. 5
EG 132 Business Communications................ 3
SC 111 Typing II or (by placement)............ 4
SC 103 Business Machines ....................._3
15
Third Quarter
SC 105 Filing & Records Control............... 3
SC 100 Duplicating Machines .................. 2
SC 112 Intermed. Typing (or placement) ....... 4
PY 100 Human Relations........................ 3
Business Elective ...................__3
15
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 43-45
INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM FIRST YEAR
First Quarter HrS
M 110 Math for Business ..................... 3
AC 111 Accounting................................ 5
EG 131 Bus. Comm................................. 3
IM 103 Industrial Safety......................... 3
IM 101 Elements of Supervision .................. 3
17
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting................................ 5
PY 107 Psych, of Personal Dev................... 3
EG 133 Bus. Comm................................. 3
Math Elective .................................. 4-5
M 105 Introductory Algebra
M 106 Inter. Algebra
M 111 College Algebra
15-16
Third Quarter
IM 104 Work Simpl. & Cost Control................. 3
M 120 Stat. for Bus. & Ind....................... 3
DP 111 Prin. of Bus. Data. Proc................... 3
EC 109 Applied Economics ..................... 3
MG 216 Personnel Admin............................ 3
15
SECOND YEAR
Fourth Quarter Hrs
IM 201 Employee Development.................... 3
S 110 Intro, to Speech ....................... 3
EC 108 Labor Relations ........................ 3
EG 132 Bus. Comm............................... 3
IM 202 Theory & Appl. of Behav. Sci............_3
15
Fifth Quarter
MG 209 Bus. Org. & Mgmt......................... 3
MG 205 Bus. Finance ............................ 3
MG 207 Business Law I........................... 3
MG 222 Office Management........................ 3
Elective................................ 3
15
Sixth Quarter
IM 203 Mgt. by Objectives ...................... 3
Social Sci. Elect................................ 3
MG 239 Wage and Salary Adm...................... 3
Electives............................. 4-6
13-15
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: This program is designed for persons in the field of supervision; however, other students electing to pursue the program should be able to seek employment in the areas of government service, public utilities and industry.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 90-93
INTERNATIONAL SECRETARIAL (N) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter Hrs
MG 105 Introduction to Business ................ 3
Spanish (by placement)1................. 5
Spanish Typing (by placement)...................... 4
SC 110 or SC 111
EG 131 Business Communications.................. 3
PY 100 Human Relat. in Business ................_3
18
Second Quarter
M 110 Math for Business ....................... 3
SC 125 Gregg Shorthand ......................... 4
Spanish (by placement)1................. 5
Typing2......................................... 4
SC 111, SC 112 or SC 113
EG 132 Business Communications.................._3
19
Third Quarter
AC 111 Accounting............................... 5
SC 126 Gregg Shorthand ......................... 4
Spanish (by placement)1................. 5
SC 132 Mach. Trans., Spanish.................... 3
17
Fourth Quarter
SC 260 Office Practice l-Spanish ............... 3
MG 201 Business Org. & Mgmt..................... 3
SC 127 Shorthand Speed Building................. 4
SC 105 Filing & Records Control................. 3
Elective3............................... 3
16
Fifth Quarter
SC 261 Office Practice ll-Spanish............... 3
SC 128 Shorthand Transcription.................. 4
SC 123 Spanish Gregg Shorthand.................. 4
Electives3.............................. 6
17
Sixth Quarter
SC 262 Office Practice Ill-Spanish.............. 3
SC 259 Internat. Sec. Procedures ............... 3
SC 124 Spanish Shorthand Trans.................. 4
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience
or
BU 299 Independent Study4....................... 3
13
C6


1.Students will be placed at a foreign language level suited to their competency at entrance.
2.Students who have had previous instruction and/or experience in typing will be given a proficiency examination to determine proper placement.
3. Consult advisor for recommended elective.
4. BU 299 (Independent Study) or elective may be chosen only in event appropriate work station is not available.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 100
KEY PUNCH (N)
THREE-MONTH PROGRAM* Cr Hrs
DP 102 Key Punch Laboratory .... 8
MG 105 Introduction to Business .... 3
DP 111 Principles of Business DP .... 3
14
*Can be completed in three months only if typing speed is 45 words per minute. In order to enroll in Key Punch Laboratory, student must pass a typing test with 45 wpm within a 5 error limitation.
LEGAL SECRETARIAL (A)
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter Hr*
MG 105 Introduction to Business ................ 3
SC 110 Typing1................................ 4
English Elective1 2.............................. 3
EG 131 Bus. Comm.
EG 111 Eng. Comp.
M 110 Math for Business & Ind.................. 3
SC 105 Filing & Rec. Cont......................._3
16
Second Quarter
SC 125 Gregg Shorthand Prin. or
SC 120 Alpha Shorthand.......................... 4
SC 111 Typing II................................ 4
English Elective:2
EG 132 Business Communications
EG 112 English Composition ................. 3
SC 103 Business Machines .................... 3
Elective2............................... 3
17
Third Quarter
DP 111 Prin. of Business, Data. Proc............ 3
SC 126 Gregg Shorthand Principles............... 4
or
SC 121 Alpha Shorthand.......................... 4
SC 112 Intermediate Typing ..................... 4
English Elective:2
EG 133 Business Communications
EG 113 English Composition ................. 3
MG 210 Business Law, I ........................._3
17
Fourth Quarter
SC 127 Shorthand Speedbuilding.................. 4
SC 113 Prod. Typing ............................ 4
SC 200 Office Procedures........................ 5
MG 211 Business Law, II......................... 3
16
Fifth Quarter
S 128 Shorthand Transcription.................. 4
AC 111 Accounting............................... 5
SC 210 Legal Secretarial Procedures
& Terminology.......................... 3
MG 201 Business Org. & Mgt....................... 3
Social Science Elective2................_3
18
Sixth Quarter
SC 206 Legal Dictation & Trans................... 3
SC 130 Machine Trans. I.......................... 3
Economics Elective:2
EC 109 Applied Econ.
EC 211 Prin. of Econ......................... 3
BU 297 Cooperative Work Experience
or Business Elective................... 3
AC 112 Accounting.............................. 5
17
1.Students who have had previous instruction and/or experience in typing and shorthand will be given proficiency examinations to determine proper placement.
2.Consult faculty advisor or counselor for recommended electives.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 101
MARKETING MANAGEMENT1^,N,R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
Cr
First Quarter Hrs
AC 111 Accounting............................. 5
MG 105 Introduction to Business ................ 3
EG 131 Business Communications................ 3
M 110 Math for Business ........................_3
14
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting____:........................ 5
DP 111 Prin. of Business DP .................. 3
EG 132 Business Communications................ 3
MG 115 Principles of Advertising ............. 3
MG 110 Salesmanship .......................... 3
17
Third Quarter
AC 113 Accounting............................. 5
MG 201 Business Org. & Mgmt................... 3
MG 217 Sales Management....................... 3
EG 133 Business Communications................ 3
M 150 Math of Finance ......................__3
17
Fourth Quarter
MG 203 Prin. of Marketing I .................. 5
MH 210 Business Law I ........................ 3
MG 240 Business Finance....................... 5
EC 211 Princ. of Economics ..................._3
16
Fifth Quarter
MG 221 Personnel Management .................. 3
MG 215 Prin. of Retailing.................... 3
MG 211 Business Law II ....................... 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience2................. 3
M 120 Business Statistics ..................__3
15
Sixth Quarter
MG 216 Principles of Buying .................. 3
MG 250 Business Policies...................... 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience2................. 3
Electives1..........................._6
15
1. Consult faculty advisor for recommended electives.
2. BU 299 (independent Study) or Elective may be chosen in event appropriate work station is not available.
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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Sales, supervision and managerial trainee opportunities in a variety of retail, wholesale and marketing businesses.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 94
MEDICAL SECRETARIAL (A) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter Hrs.
MG 105 Introduction to Business ................. 3
SC 110 Typing I1........................ 4
HE 100 Medical Term........................ 2
EG 131 Business Communications................ 3
B 100 Basic Human Biology ....................._4
16
Second Quarter
SC 125 Gregg Shorthand Principles1 ............... 4
SC 111 Typing II ......................... 4
SC 103 Business Machines ..................... 3
EG 132 Business Communications................ 3
MO 130 Medical Filing ...............'..............3
17
Third Quarter
SC 126 Gregg Shorthand Principles............... 4
SC 112 Intermediate Typing .................... 4
EG 133 Business Communications................ 3
M 110 Math for Business ..................... 3
MO 100 Intro, to Medical Office
Procedures ..........................._3
17
Fourth Quarter
SC 127 Shorthand Speed Building................. 4
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accounting ................ 5
SC 130 Machine Transcription I (Med)............ 3
SC 113 Production Typing ......................._4
16
Fifth Quarter
SC 128 Shorthand Transcription.................. 4
DP 111 Princ. of Business DP.................... 3
SC 100 Duplicating Machines..................... 2
SC 131 Machine Transcription II ................ 3
Psychology Elective..................... 3
15
Sixth Quarter
MG 222 Office Management........................ 3
MF 210 Business Law I .......................... 3
MO 110 Intro, to Health Insur. or
Business Elective .................... 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Exp........................... 3
Elective................................ 3
15-16
1. If a student has shorthand and typewriting background, it is recommended that he challenge the introductory courses and enroll in the courses at his proficiency level.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 98
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION1 (N, R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter Hrs.
MG 105 Introduction to Business ................... 3
EG 131 Business Communications..................... 3
Math Elective:1
M 110 Math for Business
M 105 Introductory Algebra
M 106 Intermediate Algebra......... 3-4
Typing (by placement)2 SC 110 Typing SC 111 Typing
SC 112 Typing ........................ 4
SC 103 Business Machines ......................... 3
16-17
Second Quarter
AC 111 Accounting................................ 5
EG 132 Business Communications.................... 3
Math Elective: 1
M 150 Math of Finance
M 105 Introductory Algebra M 106 Intermediate Algebra
M 111 College Algebra (5 cr. hrs.). 3-5
SC 200 Office Procedures or
SC 112 Typing................................... 4-5
15-18
Third Quarter
AC 112 Accounting................................. 5
EG 133 Business Communications.................... 3
DP 111 Princ. of Business DP...................... 3
MG 201 Business Org. & Mgmt.
or
IM 101 Elements of Supervision ................... 3
SC 105 Filing & Records Control..................._3
17
Fourth Quarter
AC 113 Accounting................................. 5
DP 112 Advanced Prin. of Bus. DP ................. 5
Ecomonics Elective:1
EC 109 Applied Economics
or
EC 211 Principles of Economics.................... 3
PY 100 Human Relations in Business................_3
16
Fifth Quarter
MG 222 Office Management.......................... 3
MG 221 Personnel Management ...................... 3
Soc. Science Elect.1...................... 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Exp. or Elect................... 3
MG 210 Business Law I............................._3
15
Sixth Quarter
MG 240 Business Finance I ........................ 5
MG 211 Business Law II ........................... 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Experience
or Elective3.......................... 3
MG 250 Business Policies.........................__3
14
1. Consult faculty advisor for recommended electives.
2.Students who have had previous instruction and/or experience in typing will be given a proficiency examination to determine proper placement.
3.Elective may be chosen only in event appropriate work station is not available.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Supervisory and administrative or managerial trainee opportunities in a variety of business and industries.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 93-97
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PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM FIRST YEAR
REAL ESTATE (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM FIRST YEAR
First Quarter Hrs
MG 105 Intro, to Bus............................ 3
EG 131 Bus. Comm................................ 3
AC 111 Accounting............................... 5
RE 101 Real Estate Fundamentals................. 3
PY 100 Hum. Rel. in Bus. & Ind.................._3
17
Second Quarter
M 110 Math for Bus............................. 3
EG 132 Bus. Comm................................ 3
AC 112 Accounting............................. 5
RE 103 Real Estate Financ....................... 3
RE 104 Real Estate Law I........................_3
17
Third Quarter
SC 110 Typing I................................. 4
SC 103 Bus. Machines............................ 3
EG 133 Bus. Comm................................ 3
RE 105 Real Estate Law II ..................... 3
RE 110 Real Estate License Prep................._3
16
SECOND YEAR
Fourth Quarter Hrs
RE 201 Prin. of Insurance........................ 3
MG 110 Salesmanship ............................. 3
RE 202 Real Estate Appraisal II................. 3
RE 210 Real Estate Trends and Dev................ 3
Elective................................._3
15
Fifth Quarter
MG 201 Bus. Org. & Mgt........................... 3
EC 109 Applied Economics......................... 3
M 120 Stat. for Bus. & Ind...................... 3
Elective................................. 3
RE 203 Real Estate Appraisal II................._3
15
Cr
First Quarter Hrs
AC 111 Accounting................................ 5
EG 131 Bus. Comm................................. 3
M 110 Math for Bus. & Ind....................... 3
MG 105 Intro, to Bus............................. 3
PS 111 Intro, to Pol Sci........................._3
17
Second Quarter
AC 112 Accounting................................ 5
EG 132 Bus. Comm................................. 3
Math Elective .................................. 4-5
M 105 Intro. Algebra
M 106 Inter. Algebra
M 111 College Algebra
PS 113 American National Govt.................... 3
15-16
Third Quarter
AC 220 Prin. of Govt. Acct. & Budget............. 5
EG 133 Bus. Comm.
or
S 110 Intro, to Speech.......................... 3
M 120 Stat. for Bus. & Ind...................... 3
MG 240 Business Finance.......................... 5
PS 114 Amer. State & Local Govt.................._3
19
SECOND YEAR
Fourth Quarter Hrs
EC 109 Applied Economics....................... 3
MG 210 Bus. Law I ............................. 3
MG 221 Personnel Mgt........................... 3
PR 209 Public Relations........................ 3
Elective............................... 3
15
Fifth Quarter
GE 230 Urban Geography......................... 3
MG 211 Bus. Law II............................. 3
MG 239 Wage and Salary Adm..................... 3
PY 100 Hum. Rel. in Bus. & Ind................. 3
SO 107 Sociology of Pers. Dev.................._3
15
Sixth Quarter
EC 108 Labor Relations ........................ 3
BU 297 Coop. Work Exp.
or
Electives............................. 6
Office Management.....................__3
12
1.Electives will be chosen when an appropriate work station or internship cannot be provided.
General College Requirements: A minimum ot credits in related areas This is a two-year program which will cross several disciplines.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: This program is designed to equip the graduate with the "tools" which are necessary to function at various levels of government. Included in these tools are those which will prepare the student for administrative positions as well as the technician level.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 93-94
Sixth Quarter
RE 204 Real Estate. Inv............................ 3
PS 114 Am. St. & Local Govt........................ 3
Electives.............................. 4-6
10-12
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: This program will prepare a student to work in real estate sales and real estate related fields, and financial institutions relating to real estate.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 90-92
SECRETARIAL SCIENCE TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter Hrs
MG 105 Intro, to Business...................... 3
SC 110 Typing I (or by placement) ............. 4
EG 131 Business Comm........................... 3
M 110 Business Math..........................._3
13
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Second Quarter
SC 125 Gregg Short. Princ...................... 4
SC 111 Typing II .............................. 4
EG 132 Bus. Comm............................... 3
SC 103 Business Machines ...................... 3
SC 105 Filing & Records Cont..................._3
17
Third Quarter
SC 126 Gregg Short. Princ...................... 4
SC 112 Intermediate Typing .................... 4
EG 133 Business Communications................. 3
PY 100 Hum. Rel. in Bus. & Ind................. 3
DP 111 Princ. of Business Data Proc............_3
17
Fourth Quarter
SC 127 Shorthand Speed Building................ 4
AC 109 Book. & Accounting, or
AC 111 Accounting.............................. 5
SC 130 Machine Transcription I ................ 3
SC 113 Production Typing ......................_4
16
Fifth Quarter
SC 128 Shorthand Trans......................... 4
AC 111 Accounting or
AC 112 Accounting.............................. 5
SC 200 Office Procedures....................... 5
SC 131 MachineTrans.il ........................ 3
17
Sixth Quarter
SC 100 Duplicating Machines ................... 2
MG 210 Business Law I ......................... 3
Business Elective ..................... 3
BU 297 Cooperative Work Exp.................. 3-6
Elective............................... 3
14-17
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 94-97
STENOGRAPHIC TWELVE MONTH PROGRAM
First Quarter Hrs.
MG 105 Intro, to Business..................... 3
EG 131 Business Comm.......................... 3
Shorthand ....................................... 4
SC 125 Gregg, or SC 120 Alpha
SC 110 Typing I............................... 4
M 110 Math for Business ....................._3
17
Second Quarter
EG 132 Business Comm.......................... 3
Shorthand ....................................... 4
SC 126 Gregg, or SC 121 Alpha
SC 111 Typing II ............................. 4
SC 105 Filing & Records Control............... 3
SC 103 Business Machines ....................__3
17
Third Quarter
SC 112 Intermediate Typewriting............... 4
SC 127 Shorthand Speed Building............... 4
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Account.................. 5
PY 100 Hum. Rel. in Bus. & Ind...............__3
16
Fourth Quarter
SC 113 Production Typing ..................... 4
SC 130 Machine Transcription I ............... 3
SC 200 Office Procedures...................... 5
Business Elective .................. 3-6
15-18
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 65-68
WORD-PROCESSING TYPIST (N, R)
Cr
First Quarter Hrs
SC 111 Typing II ............................. 4
EG 131 Bus. Communications ................... 3
SC 105 Filing & Records Control............... 3
AC 109 Book. & Accounting ...................._5
15
Second Quarter
SC 112 Intermediate Typing ................... 4
EG 132 Business Comm.......................... 3
SC 130 Machine Transcription I................ 3
Business Electives ..................._6
16
Third Quarter
SC 115 Magnetic Card Typewriting.............. 3
SC 200 Office Procedures...................... 5
SC 131 Machine Transcription II .............. 3
EG 133 Business Communications................_3
14
This program may be completed in 9 months only if student enters with a typing skill of at least 25 wpm.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 45
TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT (A)
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
First Quarter Hrs
TT 101 Commercial Trans. I ..................... 4
TT 130 Mgt. Tools & Concepts I ............... 4
English Elective1 ....................... 3
EG 131 Business Communications EG 111 English Composition EG 106 Occup. Comm.
Math Elective1......................... 3-4
M 110 Math for Business M 105 Introductory Algebra M 106 Intermediate Algebra
MG 105 Introduction to Business ................. 3
17-18
Second Quarter
TT 102 Commercial Transportation II............. 4
TT 131 Mgt. Tools & Concepts II ............... 4
English Elective1 ....................... 3
EG 132 Business Communications EG 112 English Composition EG 107 Occupational Communication
Math Elective1 ___,............................ 3-5
M 102 Applied Math I M 105 Introductory Algebra M 106 Intermediate Algebra M 111 College Algebra
EC 108 Labor Relations ......................... 3
17-19
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Third Quarter
TT 103 Commercial Transport. Ill ................. 4
TT 132 Mgt. Tools & Concepts III.................. 4
English Elective1 ................................... 3
EG 133 Business Communications EG 113 English Composition
Economics Elective1....................... 3
Elective1......................................... 3
Fourth Quarter
TT 120 International Trade I ..................... 4
TT 110 Transport. Reg. I ........................ 4
TT 141 Econ. of Trans. I.......................... 2
TT 105 Traf. Mgt. & Phy. Dist. I ................. 2
MG 201 Bus. Org. & Mgt............................ 3
Elective................................ 2-3
17-18
Fifth Quarter
TT 121 International Trade II..................... 4
TT 111 Trans. Reg. II............................. 4
TT 142 Econ.ofTrans.il ........................... 2
TT 105 Traf. Mgt. & Phy Dist. II ................. 2
MG 203 Prin. of Marketing I ...................... 3
Elective................................ 2-3
17-18
Sixth Quarter
TT 122 International Trade III.................... 4
TT 143 Econ. of Trans. Ill ....................... 2
TT 112 Trans. Reg. Ill ........................... 4
TT 106 Traf. Mgt. & Phy Dist. li ................. 2
MG 210 Business Law I............................. 3
Elective1............................... 2-3
17-18
1. Consult faculty advisor for recommended electives.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 103-109
ACCOUNTING
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accounting
(A, N, R).................5 credit hours
This study of the basic elements of accounting for the secretarial student includes the handling of cash receipts and disbursements, accounts receivable and accounts payable and the five basic journals. Study of the accounting cycle and the preparation of financial statements is provided. Practice set is required. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 110 Payroll & Machine
Accounting (R) ...........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 109 Bookkeeping &
Accounting or AC 111 Accounting or consent of the instructor
An in-depth study of various payroll systems including the study of related law and practices. Includes practice in preparation of payrolls and computation of deduction. Emphasis is placed on actual preparation of payroll projects by hand, pegboard system and the accounting machine. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 111 Accounting (A, N, R)..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite, Corequisite or equivalent:
MG 105 Introduction to Business;
M 110 Mathematics for Business
An introductory study of accounting principles to acquaint the student with the theory and logic that underlie accounting procedures. Course content includes basic accounting structure, the accounting cycle, processing sales and cash receipts, processing purchases and cash payments, summarizing and reporting, receivables and payables, and merchandise inventory. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 112 Accounting (A, N, R).............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 111 Accounting A continuation of accounting principles as they pertain to deferrals and accruals, plant assets and intangible assets, systems and controls, payroll systems, systems design and automated data processing, concepts and principles, partnerships and corporation organization and operations. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 113 Accounting (A, N, R).............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 112 Accounting A study of accounting principles, theory and logic relating to corporations. Special emphasis is given to stockholders equity, earnings and dividends, long-term obligations and investments, departments and branches, management reports and special analysis, fund, fund statement and cash flow, consolidated statements and other statements, and financial statement analysis. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 211 Intermediate Accounting
(A, N, R)...................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 113 Accounting and DP 111
Principles of Business Data Processing In-depth study of the fundamental accounting process with emphasis on the financial statement (income statement, retained earning statement and balance sheet), working capital (cash and liabilities), receivable forecast, inventories and current liabilities as related to a corporate form of business organization. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 212 Intermediate Accounting
(A, N, R)...................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 211 Intermediate Accounting in-depth study of the fundamental accounting process with emphasis on non-current assets, liabilities and owners equity as related to a corporate form of business organization. Includes in-depth study of financial statement analysis, ratios and measurement, and fund flow. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 213 Cost Accounting I
(A, N, R)...................5 credit hours
Prerequisite or Corequisite: AC 113
Accounting or equivalent
A study of the cost accumulation methods emphasizing planning and control. Concepts and procedures applicable to job order and process cost systems are presented. Orientation in the use and interpretation of cost data by management. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 214 Cost Accounting II (R)...........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 213 Accounting or equivalent.
A study of responsibility accounting and reporting of factory overhead, materials and labor. Emphasis on cost control and the planning phase, budgeting. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
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AC 215 Introduction to Accounting
Systems................... 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 113 Accounting and DP 112
Advanced Principles of Business Date Processing A study of the integration of computers and accounting, the installation and control of accounting systems in various business study. Analysis of case problems and applications are an essential part of the course. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 217 Individual Income Tax
Accounting..................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 113 Accounting or equivalent Practice in the application of the Internal Revenue Code and Colorado Income Tax Law to determine individual income tax. Coverage is restricted to individual income taxation and includes the basic concepts of returns, exemptions, exclusions and inclusions of gross income, itemized and standard deductions, payment of tax liability, recognition of gains and losses. Selected practical problems will be solved through student research of the Code provided by the Commerce Clearing House tax service. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 218 Individual Income Tax
Accounting II (R) ..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 217 Individual Income Tax Accounting or equivalent
An introduction to basic concepts of state returns and partnerships, corporation and fiduciary returns will be included. A continuation of the basic concepts of individual income tax preparation. Coverage will include installment and deferred payment sales, dividends, inventories, deductions for expense, depreciation and investment credits, depletion, deduction for bad debts, income averaging. Emphasis will be placed on selected practical problems through student research of the Code provided by the Commerce Clearing House tax service. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
AC 220 Principles of Governmental
Accounting and Budget_______5 credit hours
Prerequisite: AC 113 Accounting Orientation in the concept of fund and budgetary controls as a matter of law and public administration at the County, City, State and Federal Leve. Includes forecast of requirements and anticipated revenue, the anticipated expenditures and the actual revenue and expenditures. Accounting principles and procedures to implement budget forecasts, and actual enactment of the budget. (5 hours per week plus programmed laboratory as needed)
BUSINESS
BU 297 Cooperative Work
Experience........... 1 to 6 credit hours
In some program areas, cooperative work experience is a part of the course study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved, with a College Instructor providing general co-ordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the Division Director.
BU 299 Independent Study ... 1 to 3 credit hours
Provides an opportunity for the mid-management or transfer student to engage in intensive study and research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Conditions for electing this course will be evaluated by the Director of the Division of Business and Management Occupations, who will assist in selecting an advisor and determining the amount of credit to be granted for successful completion of the work.
DATA PROCESSING
DP 102 Key Punch Laboratory
(N, R)....................8 credit hours
Prerequisite: Typing speed of 45 wpm with 5 error maximum
A practice course in the operation of the card punch machine and verifier. If the student reaches employable levels prior to the completion of the quarter, he may be given other tape equipment instruction as conditions permit. Because of conflicting keyboard arrangements, it is recommended that students avoid scheduling SC 103, Business Machines, concurrently with Key Punch Laboratory. (15 hours per week, plus lab as directed by instructor)
DP 111 Principles of Business Data
Processing (A, N, R) .....3 credit hours
An introduction to basic method, techniques, and systems of manual, mechanical, unit record, and electronic data processing. Objective of this course is to give the student a general understanding of the field of data processing. (3 hours per week)
DP 112 Advanced Principles of Business
Date Processing (A, N. R) .. 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 111
A basic course in computer programming which includes the use of simple flow charts, decision tables, and logic techniques to acquaint the student with the logical necessities of programming. The student is exposed to machine language, assembly language, and the general principles of a computer operating system. (5 hours per week)
DP 114 Report Program Generator
(N) ......................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 112
Coding and execution of simple business programs using RPG. (5 hours per week)
DP 121 Applied Computer
Mathematics (N).............5 credit hours
Application of data processing techniques to simple business mathematics problems. (5 hours per week)
DP 122 Applied Computer
Mathematics (N).............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 121
Continuation of DP 121 using more advanced applications. (5 hours per week)
DP 213 Assembler Language I
(N,R) ......................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 112
Coding and execution of simple business programs using assembler language. (5 hours per week)
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DP 214 Assembler Language II
(N) ........................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 213
Continuation of DP 213 using more advanced applications. (5 hours per week)
DP 216 Cobol I (N) .....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 112
Coding and execution of simple business programs using COBOL. (5 hours per week)
DP 217 Cobol II (N) ....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 216
Continuation of DP 216 using more advanced applications. (5 hours per week)
DP 221 Fortran IV, I (N)................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 112
Coding and execution of simple business programs using Fortran IV. (5 hours per week)
DP 222 Fortran IV, II (N)...............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 221
Continuation of DP 221 using more advanced applications. (5 hours per week)
DP 224 PL/I (N) ........................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 112
Coding and execution of simple business programs using PL/I. (5 hours per week)
DP 225 PL/II (N)........................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 224
Continuation of DP 224 using more advanced applications. (5 hours per week)
DP 231 Systems Analysis I
(N) ........................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Completion of a two quarter programming language sequence.
Courses DP 231 and DP 232 constitute a two quarter sequence in which the student will be given a problem to analyze, define, and solve by data processing techniques using a programming language. (3 hours per week)
DP 232 Systems Analysis II (N)_________3 credit hours
Prerequisite: DP 231
Continuation of DP 231 (3 hours per week)
INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT
(Red Rocks only)
IM 101 Elements of
Supervision (R) ..........3 credit hours
Emphasis is given to the first-line supervisor s needs for a working understanding of functions of management, organizational arrangements, and practical aspects of motivation. This course also emphasizes developing an ability to critically and constructively self-evaluate with a view toward developing attitudes, habits, and skills which lead to effective as well as personally rewarding and satisfying supervisory practices. (3 hours per week)
IM 103 Industrial Safety (R) ........3 credit hours
A survey of Workmens Compensation regulations and the first-line supervisors responsibility in this area. The course will stress the importance of on-the-job safety training. (3 hours per week)
IM 104 Work Simplification and
Cost Control (R)...........3 credit hours
This course seeks to assist each class member to develop a working understanding of the major elements of work simplification and skill in systematic analytical approaches in their application; a working understanding of the principles and procedures useful in devising and employing work measurement methods using various measurement techniques and the purposes to be served by these methods including setting of incentives; the ability to recognize potential areas for application of cost control mechanisms; an appreciation of the significance of recognizing and coping with problems inherent in devising and gaining acceptance of improved methods and/or measurement of work activity. (3 hours per week)
IM 151 Construction Supervision
(R) .......................2 credit hours
The study of construction supervision from a job-related approach. Job situations are used to illustrate types of leadership, methods of exerting leadership influence, types of motivational forces, and effective communication techniques. Students repeatedly participate in simulated situations to improve their supervisory skills. The course is conducted in cooperation with the Associated General Contractors. Depending upon a students major, this course will apply as an elective within the Industrial Management Program. (2 hours per week)
IM 152 Construction Supervision
(R) .......................2 credit hours
Prerequisite: IM 151 Construction Supervision This course is a continuation of IM 151 Construction Supervision. Student involvement and simulated situations are used to teach methods of identifying and solving problems, decision making, job analysis, job-site material handling and storage and techniques of job planning, organization and follow through. Depending upon a students major, this course will apply as an elective within the Industrial Management Program. (2 hours per week)
IM 201 Employee Development
(R) .......................3 credit hours
A course designed to acquaint the student with the various on-the-job methods of training. The course will cover vestibule, coaching, counseling, and the use of evaluation in training. (3 hours per week)
IM 202 Theory and Application of
Behavioral Sciences (R) ... 3 credit hours
A study of the supervising aspect of management. The course will consider, in depth, the ideas of persons such as Maslow, Argyris, McGregor, etc. Also, an exposure to sensitivity" training will be included. (3 hours per week)
IM 203 Management by
Objectives (R).............3 credit hours
A course designed to make a student aware of a method of management which will enable him to make decisions based on an immediate goal. It is to include case studies in its approach to this subject. (3 hours per week)
MANAGEMENT
MG 105 Introduction to Business
(A, N, R)...............3 credit hours
A survey of the structure and functions of the American business system. Provides an overview of business orga-
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nization, finance, managerial, control, production, dis-
tribution, personnel, and the interdependence of business
and government (3 hours per week)
MG 110 Salesmanship (A, N, R).........3 credit hours
Covers the fundamentals of selling from the determination of customer needs to the close of the sale. Treats such factors as customer problems, merchandising knowledge, and personality traits of successful salesmen. (3 hours per week)
MG 115 Principles of Advertising
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
An introductory course handling the theory, practice and techniques in advertising. Considers the role of advertising and sales promotion in our economy, and includes a general survey of the kinds and purposes of different media, the psychological implications of typical appeals, and limited student practice in promotional programming. (3 hours per week)
MG 130 Credit Fundamentals I
(A) .........................3 credit hours
A study of the development and growth of consumer and retail credit and its effect on the American life style. Various credit plans will be analyzed. Home mortgage loans and the role of sales finance companies will also be discussed. (3 hours per week)
MG 131 Credit Fundamentals II
(A) .........................3 credit hours
A study of commercial and governmental uses of credit with an analysis of the actual operations of a retail, wholesale, and commercial credit department. Basis for credit making decisions will be discussed. (3 hours per week)
MG 201 Business Organization and
Management (A, N, R) .....3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105 and MG 110 The study of the management functions as they relate to the elements of management to the elements of management to include planning, organizing, directing and controlling. (3 hours per week)
MG 203 Principles of Marketing
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105, BU 110 Marketing as an institution and as a managerial variable is studied in this course. Covers a survey of the distributive fields, their function, and interrelationship. (3 hours per week)
MG 210 Business Law I (A, N, R) ... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105
Introduction of ordinary legal aspects of business transactions involving such topics as legal rights and duties, law of contracts, negotiable instruments. Designed to give a general understanding and development of basic legal logic in business situations through the use of principles and cases and information useful in determining the need for professional counsel. (3 hours per week)
MG 211 Business Law II
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 210
Continuation of Business Law I. Course includes further study in law of sales, bailments, agency, real estate, insurance, business organization and social welfare legislation. Primarily designed for students planning careers in
accounting, credit, management, and other fields related to business law. Extensive use of case material. (3 hours per week)
MG 212 Business Law III................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 211
Continuation of Business Law II. Course includes study of personal property, bailments, security devices, partnerships, and corporations. (3 hours per week)
MG 213 Credit and
the Law I (A) ..............3 credit hours
A presentation of the legal aspects of credit as it relates to interest, collection, conditional sales and installment contracts, wage assignments and the basic rights of debtor and creditor.
MG 215 Principles of Retailing
(A, N, R,)..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105 and M 110 Designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of retail store organization and management, including store location, layout, buying, pricing operation, advertising display, and analysis associated with handling of merchandise. (3 hours per week)
MG 216 Principles of Purchasing
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105, MG 203, M 110 Objectives and methodology of industrial, institutional, and governmental purchasing agents and buyers; emphasizes value analysis, product quality control, maintenance of operating efficiency, analysis of competitive price quotations, and materials management.
MG 217 Sales Management
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 110 and Corequisite: MG 201 A study of sales management, the methods, techniques, and problems involved, and the relationship of sales management to the total business operation. (3 hours per week)
MG 220 Small Business
Management (A, N, R) .......3 credit hours
Prerequisites: MG 201 and MG 203 A study of small business and its importance in the American economy. Problems of small business operation will be analyzed. (3 hours per week)
MG 221 Personnel Management
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105 and MG 201 A study of the principles and techniques of personnel management, including an examination of managerial practices in the selection, development, and motivation of employees. Considers factors underlying employee participation in policy formation; the effect of the work environment; administration of wages, salaries, and benefits; and the evaluation of personnel programs. (3 hours per week)
MG 222 Office Management
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105
Emphasis is placed on the functions of the office and office organization, work in the office, office layout, equipment, supplies, and forms, personnel problems in the office, and costs and control of office work. Course presents methods of recognizing and solving office com-
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munication problems and awareness of successful human relations, changing technologies and philosophy of business and the technical terminology used in business. (3 hours per week)
MG 239 Wage and Salary
Administration (R) .........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 221 or consent of instructor Systematic administration of wages and salaries as a means of motivation and control in business and other enterprises. Job analysis, descriptions and specifications, job evaluation methods, wage structure, community wage and salary surveys, principles and administration of wage incentive plans and their effectiveness. (3 hours per week)
MG 240 Business Finance
(A,N,R) ....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105, EC 109 or 211, AC 113 Studies the impact of fiscal and monetary policy on the business environment. Examines the sources and uses of short term, intermediate term, and long term funds for a business. Principles and motives of corporate financial management are stressed. (5 hours per week)
MG 250 Business Policies (A, N, R) 3 credit hours
Prerequisites: MG 105 and MG 201 and 12 Hrs. Mgt. Courses
A study of policy construction and its relationship to effective management, sound personnel administration, and financial stability. Various areas previously studied are related to policy decision-making through the use of case studies. (3 hours per week)
PR 209 Public Relations (R).............3 credit hours
Introduction to procedures and practice in writing institutional news, features and editorials for public information media. (3 hours per week)
REAL ESTATE
RE 101 Real Estate Fundamentals (R) 3 credit hours
A general survey of real estate principles and practices designed to provide basic knowledge of real estate. (3 hours per week)
RE 103 Real Estate Finance (R)_____3 credit hours
A course of study covering the various methods of financ-
ing real property and the financial institutions that provide the funds for financing residential, commercial and income properties. (3 hours per week)
RE 104 Real Estate Law I (R).......3 credit hours
A comprehensive case study of real estate law as it pertains to individuals, real estate brokers, subdividers and developers with special emphasis on the law as applied in the State of Colorado. (3 hours per week)
RE 105 Real Estate Law II (R) .....3 credit hours
A continuation of Real Estate Law I including existing and proposed state and federal legislation affecting real estate development. (3 hours per week)
RE 110 Real Estate License
Preparation (R) ............3 credit hours
A course designed to prepare real estate license applicants for the Multi-State and Colorado License Examinations. (3 hours per week)
RE 201 Principles of
Insurance (R)...............3 credit hours
A general survey of all types of insurance with special emphasis on property, life and automobile insurance. (3 hours per week)
RE 202 Real Estate Appraisal
I (R).......................3 credit hours
A basic study of the principles, techniques and accepted methods of evaluating real property as used by professional appraisers, emphasis is placed on the evaluation of residential property. (3 hours per week)
RE 203 Real Estate Appraisal
II (R) .....................3 credit hours
A study of the income approach and rate of return approach in the evaluating of income producing properties such as apartments, motels, hotels, and office buildings. (3 hours per week)
RE 204 Real Estate Investments
(R) ........................3 credit hours
A study of the investment opportunities in the real estate market including tax benefits derived from depreciation, tax free exchanges and preferred types of ownership. (3 hours per week)
RE 210 Real Estate Trends
and Developments (R)...3 credit hours
A study based upon new concepts in the development of residential, multi-family, commercial and industrial real estate including trends to disperse population growth. (3 hours per week)
SECRETARIAL
SC 100 Duplicating Machines
(A, N, R)..................2 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 112 Typing or equivalent Provides instruction and practice in the operation of spirit duplicators, mimeograph machines, and thermal and photocopy machines. Also includes the preparation of stencils, master, and various media associated with these machines. (2 hours per week plus lab as needed)
SC 103 Business Machines
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite or Corequisite: M 100 Developmental Math
Fundamental instruction in the basic mathematical process-addition, subtraction, multiplication, divisionon full-key, and printing calculators. Following basic familiarization on a variety of makes and models, the student will return to the 10-key machines to develop employable proficiency at high levels of speed and accuracy. (Also, the student will be introduced to specialized machine processes such as employing constants, using machine memory devices, figuring lapsed time, chain discounts, mark-ups and mark-downs, percentages of increase and decrease etc. (5 hours per week plus a minimum of 2 practice hours)
SC 105 Filing and Records Control
(A, N, R)..................3 credit hours
This course acquaints the student with the rules, procedures, and techniques of filing that are vital to every business worker. The course also covers the principles of records management and control. (3 hours per week)
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SC 110 Typing I (A, N, R) .............4 credit hours
A beginning course for those who have had no previous instruction in typing. Introduces the keyboard and machine parts, and develops correct techniques for attaining acceptable levels of speed and accuracy. While primary emphasis is placed on straight-copy skills, the course covers a range of basic typing applications: letters, manuscripts, tabulation problems, and common business forms. This course is designed to meet the needs of students with vocational as well as nonbusiness objectives. (5 hours per week, plus lab as needed)
SC 111 Typing II (A, N, R).............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 110 or equivalent Typing speed of 25 words per minute This course is a continuation of SC 110. The course is also designed for those who have taken some limited typing instruction but need to have their basic skills restored before they can pursue intermediate typing (SC 112). The student is encouraged to develop speed and accuracy skills to a higher degree before entering the next phase of the typing sequence. (5 hours per week plus lab as needed)
SC 112 Intermediate Typing
(A, N, R)...................4 credit hours
Typing speed of 35 words per minute Reinforces skills acquired in typing, identifies and handles individual typing deficiencies and covers a comprehensive program of vocational typing applications. Emphasis is placed upon production typing as it relates to office situations. (5 hours per week plus lab as directed)
SC 113 Production Typing
(A, N, R)..................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 112 or equivalent Typing speed of 45 words per minute Emphasizes attainment of high professional levels in speed and accuracy, especially in the rate of production output in those activities frequently performed by a secretary or full-time typist. The course concentrates on building production skills and preparation for office employment using proper business forms. Emphasis is placed upon problem typing in the following areas: general, technical, accounting, professional, government, and executive. This is the terminal course in the typing sequence. (5 hours per week plus lab as directed)
SC 115 Magnetic Card
Typewriting................3 credit hours
Student will be instructed in keyboarding techniques of magnetic media typewriters in order to develop an employable skill in the operation of this equipment.
SC 120 Alphabetical Shorthand
Principles I (A, N, R) ....4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 110 or equivalent This is an accelerated introductory shorthand course for those students preferring an alphabetic rather than a symbol system. The course covers the theory of ABC Stenoscript Shorthand, a totally alphabetical system. Both reading and writing techniques are stressed, and the student is introduced to short dictation exercises at minimum speeds. (5 hours per week plus lab as directed)
SC 121 Alphabetic Shorthand
Principles II .............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 120 or proficiency examination This course develops speed in taking dictation from
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70-90 words per minute. Typewritten transcription is further developed. The basic rules of sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization, etc. are reviewed in preparation for job entrance tests and Civil Service Examination. Spelling improvement is integrated with the course content. It is suggested that students plan to follow this course with SC 127 Shorthand Speedbuilding. (5 hours per week plus lab practice as directed)
SC 123 Spanish Gregg Shorthand
Principles (N)..............4 credit hours
See course description for SC 125. This course will introduce the theory of Gregg Shorthand in Spanish. Designed for International Secretarial Program. (5 hours per week)
SC 124 Spanish Shorthand
Transcription (N) ..........4 credit hours
See course description for SC 128. Continuation of SC 123. Designed for International Secretarial students. (5 hours per week)
SC 125 Gregg Shorthand
Principles (A, N) ..........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 110 or equivalent Introduces the theory of Gregg Shorthand, Diamond Jubilee Series, and develops reading speeds from book plates and handwritten notes. Shorthand writing of familiar matter demonstrating all Gregg Principles is developed to average speeds of 60 words a minute. This course is intended for students who have had no previous Gregg Shorthand instruction, or for those whose proficiency examination indicate a need for basic review and reinforcement. (5 hours per week, plus practice as directed)
SC 126 Gregg Shorthand Principles
(A, N, R)...................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 125 or proficiency examination Reinforces basic theory principles and develops the ability to take dictation of both familiar and unfamiliar matter. Transcription at the typewriter is further developed and special attention is placed on building an extensive shorthand vocabulary. Speed emphasis in this course ranges from 70-90 words a minute. (5 hours per week, plus lab as directed)
SC 127 Shorthand Speed Building
(A, N, R)...................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 126 or SC 121 or Proficiency Examination
Intensive dictation practice permits the student to reach optimum speeds ranging from 90 to 110 words a minute. A comprehensive review is provided in punctuation, spelling, letter styles, and vocabulary improvement. A great emphasis on the typewritten transcript is also stressed in the course. (5 hours per week plus lab as directed)
SC 128 Shorthand Transcription
(A, N, R)...................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 127 or SC 121 Optimum speed and accuracy in dictation and transcription are fully realized in this course, with emphasis on the production of mailable letters. Total business proficiency is expected, and attention is directed to the ability to take dictation for longer periods and to transcribe job assignments at employable production rates. Speed ranges extend from 90 to 120 words a minute (5 hours per week, plus lab as directed)


SC 130 Machine Transcription I
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 112 (Intermediate Typing) or equivalent and EG 131
This course provides fundamental instruction in the use of transcribing machines in the preparation of business letters and other correspondence. The course includes a review of letter styles, rules of transcription and punctuation, and the mechanics of producing mailable letters at high production rates. (3 hours per week, plus lab as directed)
SC 131 Machine Transcription II
(A, N, R)...................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 130 or equivalent Designed primarily for students seeking certification as word-processing typists, this course provides intensive practice in the transcription of business letters from machine sources. Students may elect to concentrate in specific professional or business forms of correspondence, such as medical, legal, or educational transcription. Open to any student on an elective basis. (3 hours per week, plus lab practice)
SC 132 Machine Transcription
Spanish (N).................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 112 or equivalent proficiency Intensive practice in the use of magnetic tape and belt transcribing machines in the preparation of business correspondence dictated in Spanish. Includes a review of letter styles, rules of transcription and punctuation, and the mechanics of producing mailable letters at high production rates. Experience on several models of electric typewriters will be provided. (3 hours per week plus lab practice)
SC 145 Comprehensive Office Experience
(R only)............3, 6, or 9 credit hours
This class is designed to give you actual office experience. Work is done for instructors and administrators. Students will hold positions such as Office Manager, Secretary-Receptionist, Accountant, Bookkeeper, Stenographer, Typists, Duplicating Machine Operator, and File Clerk. The position you acquire will be determined by the prerequisites you have had. New machines to be used are IBM Executive Typewriter, IBM Dual- pitch Selectric Typewriter, Magnetic Card Selectric Typewriter, telephone usage, and mimeo-scopes. Credit hours will depend on hours in class:
1 hour per day, 5 days per week .... 3 credit hours
2 hours per day, 5 days per week ... 6 credit hours
3 hours per day, 5 days per week ... 9 credit hours
SC 200 Office Procedures
(A, N, R)...................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 112
This course introduces the student to the business world and acquaints the prospective office employee with the various office duties. Units covered include organization of office work, incoming and outgoing mail, postal and shipping services, telephone techniques, maintenance and control of office supplies, and business and social conduct. A practicum is used in the course which correlates classroom discussion with related office projects. (5 hours per week)
SC 206 Legal Dictation and
Transcription (A)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 210
Specialized course for legal reporting and transcription. Student will continue to build mastery of legal terminology and forms. Individual tape, programmed dictation is used extensively in this course. (3 hours per week plus lab as needed)
SC 210 Legal Secretarial Procedures and
Terminology (A) ...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 200
Provides intensive practice in preparing many types of legal documents. Student is introduced to the routine of a legal office. This course is designed for the legal secretarial student, and attention will be given to mastering meanings, spelling, and shorthand forms established for legal terms in preparation for legal and dictating transcription. (5 hours per week plus lab as needed)
SC 259 International Secretarial
Procedures (N) ............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 118
Adapts material described in SC 200 to the international business scene. Covers import-export procedures; telephone procedures (domestic and foreign); transportation and travel (domestic and foreign); money exchange; mailing procedures (domestic and foreign); English-Spanish office communications; and a number of office routines that are characteristic of all business offices. (3 hours per week)
SC 260 Office Practice I
Spanish (N)................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SP 113 or equivalent proficiency A course designed primarily for students enrolled in the International Secretarial Program, and students meeting the above prerequisites. Deals with the commercial Spanish language used in both domestic and foreign offices. Emphasis on Spanish Correspondence. (3 hours per week)
SC 261 Office Practice II
Spanish (N)................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 260
Continuation of SC 260. Develops a sound business vocabulary and introduces correct translation demanded when acting as an official interpreter for both written and oral business communication. Emphasis on Documentation. (3 hours per week)
SC 262 Office Practice III
Spanish (N)................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SC 251
Continuation of SC 261. Emphasizes practical application through project work. Students will be involved with representatives from import-export firms, government offices, foreign consulates, and embassies. (3 hours per week)
TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
(Auraria only)
TT 101 Fundamentals of Commercial
Transportation I (A).......4 credit hours
(Formerly Introduction to Traffic and Transportation)
A survey of the air, highway, rail and water transportation industry. Covers the importance of transportation, location theory, historical factors, geographical consideration, inherent advantages of each mode, relationship of carrier and user and the current economic status of each mode. (4 hours per week)
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TT 102 Fundamental of Commercial
Transportation II (A).......4 credit hours
(Formerly Logistics and Traffic Management) Prerequisite: TT 101 or permission of instructor A continuation of TT 101. (4 hours per week)
TT 103 Fundamentals of Commercial Trans-
ortation III (A)............4 credit hours
(Formerly Logistics and Traffic Management) Prerequisite: TT 102 or permission of instructor A continuation of TT 102, completing a three-quarter sequence essential to the further study of all courses in the Transportation Division of the College. Reviews, in-depth, the significance of the various facets of transportation. (4 hours per week)
TT 105 Traffic Management
and Physical
Distribution I (A)..........2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 101, TT 102 and TT 103 Advanced studies of management concepts as they relate to traffic management and physical distribution. This first quarter deals with the organization, management, and analytical methods of physical and traffic management. (2 hours per week)
TT 106 Traffic Management
and Physical
Distribution II (A).........2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 105
A continuation of TT 105 covering warehousing, inventory control, material handling and packaging. (2 hours per week)
TT 107 Traffic Management
and Physical
Distribution III (A) .......2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 106
Concludes a three-quarter sequence. Deals with the development of rates, classifications relative to transportation, documentation and services offered by or used in connection with various modes of transportation, etc. Also treated in this quarter will be the liabilities of carriers and the managerial procedures involved in claims. (2 hours per week)
TT 110 Transportation
Regulations I (A) ..........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 101
A professional course providing intensive and advanced work in regulation for transportation specialists who are candidates for admission to practice before the Interstate Commerce Commission. A study of the promotion and restriction of transportation enterprises from colonial times to the present; economic and political climate extant as each mode of transport emerged; general effect of transportation legislation. (4 hours per week)
TT 111 Transportation
Regulations II (A)..........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 110
A comprehensive study of cases applying policies for transportation regulations and employing decisions of special interests in traffic administration. (4 hours per week)
TT 112 Transporation
Regulations III (A).........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 110
A study of the Rules of Procedure before the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the Practitioners Code of Ethics, due process, and preparation of cases. (4 hours per week)
TT 120 International
Trade I (A) ................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor A comprehensive course in the field of Import-Export Operations combining basic theory with practical application, such as the facets of including credits, documentation, government controls, promotion sales and transportation legislation. (4 hours per week)
IT 121 International
Trade II (A)................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 120 or permission of instructor Continuation of TT 120. Covers export trade throughout the world and import business within the United States (4 hours per week)
IT 122 International
Trade
III (A).....................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 121 or permission of instructor. Conclusion of a three-quarter sequence in International Trade. This is an advanced course based on case history method with active student participation. Can serve as a refresher course for export executives and their assistants. (4 hours per week)
IT 130 Management Tools and
Concepts I (A)..............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: MG 105 or permission of instructor The first of three related courses will focus on managerial accounting. Accounting reports and their use. Cost Accounting introduction, and accounting methodology. For Transportation students only. (4 hours per week)
TT 131 Management Tools and
Concepts II (A).............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 130
Introduces principles of corporate finance, financial analysis and procedures. Introduction to money and banking, fiscal and monetary institutions and tools. For transportation students only. (4 hours per week)
TT 132 Management Tools and
Concepts III (A) ...........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 131
Concluding section of a three-quarter sequence, providing an introduction to marketing and statistics, as they pertain to the field of transportation. (4 hours per week)
TT 141 Economics of
Transportation I (A)........2 credit hours
Prerequisites: TT 101, TT 102 and TT 103 An in-depth study of transportation economics. Such specifics as the development of transportation systems, theory of pricing, cost structures and rate making, competition between modes, transportation regulation, finance and national transportation policy will be considered. (2 hours per week)
TT 142 Economics of
Transportation II (A).......2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 141
A continuation of TT 141. An in-depth study of the theory of pricing and rate-making. Examines the regulations of various modes of transportation. (2 hours per week)
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TT 143 Economics of
Transportation III (A) .....2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 142
Concludes the Transportation Economics sequence. Studies national transportation policies, competition, integration of transportation, transporting financing, labor, and regulations governing the field of transportation. (2 hours per week)
TT 151 Workshop in Freight
Rates I (A).................2 credit hours
A practical workshop designed specifically to prepare the student for tariff interpretation of rates by rail, motor carrier, air cargo, air express, trailer on flat car, container on flat car, freight forwarded and water. (2 hours per week)
TT 152 Workshop in Freight
Rates II (A)................2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 151
A continuation of TT 151. An intensive, practical workshop extending tariff interpretations. (2 hours per week)
TT 153 Workshop in Freight
Rates III (A)...............2 credit hours
Prerequisite: TT 152
Concludes the Workshop in Freight Rates sequence. Particular emphasis placed on tariff interpretation of rates in view of the various vehicles employed in transportation. (2 hours per week)
TT 161 Introduction to Public
Transit Systems (A).........2 credit hours
A study of the development of transit systems, to include: historical analysis, land use patterns, public relations, technologies and economics of urban transportation and its effects on the American life style.
/
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immunity College of Denver
luraria Campus Jorth Campus \ed Rocks Campus
)ivision of Community
ind Personal Service Occupations
People Serving People


DIVISION OF COMMUNITY AND PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
Audio-Visual Technology R
Activity Directing for Senior Citizens A
Building Inspection R
Classroom Teaching Assisting A
Community and Social Service Assisting A
Cosmetology R
Criminal Justice R
Dietic Assisting N
Early Childhood Education Assisting N, A
Early Childhood Education and Management N, R
Suggested Core for Early Childhood Education
Environmental Control Technology R
Fire Science Technology R
Food Service N
Hotel-Motel Operations A
Information Media Technology N
Library Media Assisting N
Library Media Technology N
Paralegal A
Recreational Leadership R
Traffic Engineering Technology R
Urban Horticulture N
Urban Planning Technology R
Water-Wastewater Technology R
Note: Auraria CampusA North CampusN Red Rocks CampusR


DIVISION OF COMMUNITY AND PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
AUDIO-VISUAL TECHNOLOGY (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
The Audio-Visual Technology program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences, Communications and Arts, and Business and Management are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Audio-Visual Technology from the Community College of Denver.
ACTIVITY DIRECTING FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
(A)
THREE QUARTER PROGRAM
The Activity Directing for Senior Citizens program is designed to train personnel for employment in nursing homes and other resident facilities for senior citizens. The purpose of an activity program is to create as near to a normal environment as possible, thereby encouraging persons in a long-term facility to exercise their abilities. The curriculum prepares students to provide these challenges in a planned, coordinated, and structured manner.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related courses which must be satisfactorily completed in order to meet the requirement for the Certificate of Achievement in the Activity Directing for Senior Citizens program.
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs.
AV 100 Introduction to Media .................. 3
AV 102 Audio-Visual Basic Electricity.......... 3
AV 103 Audio-Visual Library Services........... 4
AV 200 Production of AV Materials.............. 4
AV 201 Television Production................... 6
AV 202 Audio-Visual Photography................ 3
AV 203 Projection Equipment Maint.............. 4
AV 204 Transcription Equip. Maint.............. 4
AV 205 Audio-Visual Electronics................ 4
AV 206 Duplicating Processes................... 3
AV 297 Cooperative Work Exp.................... 8
AV 299 Independent Study....................... 6
Related Courses
Course Title Hrs
M 105 Introduction to Algebra ................ 4
MG 105 Intro, to Business...................... 3
PY 100 Human Rel. in Bus. & Ind................ 3
PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Dev..................... 3
English Elective ....................... 9
Related Electives...................... 18
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED: 92
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 1417
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives must be approved by the students Advisor.
NOTE: AV courses should be taken in the sequence which appears above. Special permission should be obtained from the instructor involved to alter sequence.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The demand for the services of trained individuals in this area is presently quite strong and the interest in such personnel throughout this state and other states has been high for some time. Trainees will be prepared to enter business, industry and educational systems upon completion of the program. The student will develop basic skills in the audio-visual program from simple familiarization with the repair of hardware to the various production techniques encountered in the educational media field.
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Occupational Courses
Course Title Ur. Hrs.
SR 100 Intro, to Studies of the Aging 3
SR 102 Nutrition for the Elderly 3
SR 105 A.D.L. Laboratory 3
SR 110 Inst. Organiz. & Record Keeping 3
SR 112 Activ. for Sr. Citizens I 3
SR 113 Activ. for Sr. Citizens II 3
SR 121 Physical, Psych. & Soc. Implic. of Aging 3
SR 122 Reality Orient. & Remotivation 3
SR 297 Coop. Work Experience 4
SR 297 Coop. Work Experience Related Courses 6
Course Title Cr. Hrs.
Intro, to Soc. Welfare Inst............... 4
Princ. of Interviewing & Rept. Writing ... 4
Psych, of Pers. Development .............. 3
First Aid ................................ 1
English or Speech Credits ................ 3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS 49
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS 590
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The ever increasing number of senior citizens who are in need of long-term care and opportunities for wholesome recreation and socialization has created a demand for trained personnel to work in nursing homes & other residential facilities. Successful completion of this program will prepare the student for an occupation as Activity Director with senior citizens.
sw 100
sw 102
PY 107
PE 101
BUILDING INSPECTION (R)
ONE YEAR PROGRAM
The Building Inspection program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Industrial Occupations and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.


Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive a Certificate of Achievment in Building Inspection from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs.
Bl 100 Bldg. Codes & Standards ............... 3
Bl 102 Construction Materials................. 4
Bl 103 Mechanical Inspection ................. 3
Bl 104 Field Inspection Techniques............ 4
Bl 105 Soils and Grading ..................... 3
Bl 106 Electrical Inspection.................. 3
Bl 110 Plumbing Inspection ................... 3
Bl 112 Plan Review............................ 3
Bl 214 Const. Organ & Manag................... 3
Bl 215 Utilities Inspection................... 3
Bl 216 Intro, to Design Funda................. 3
Bl 218 Housing Insp. & Programs............... 3
*BI 297 Cooperative Work Exp................... 4
Related Courses
Cr
Course Title Hrs.
CA 102 Blueprint Read, for Bldg. Trades....... 4
EG 108 Occup. Comm............................ 3
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED: 45-49
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 542-550
'Students who are not presently employed in the profession will be required to take a minimum of 4 credit hours of Bl 297, Cooperative Work Experience before they can receive their associate degree.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: This program is designed primarily for individuals presently employed in the field of Building Inspection and who wish to improve their abilities and increase their knowledge. Those individuals in the building contracting and construction fields will find the courses valuable in that they will help them understand the requirements which must be met.
Building inspection includes the examination and evaluation of construction work in progress, comparing or contrasting it with recognized norms or standards, and accepting or rejecting it in the light of conformity or non-conformity to the standards. It involves a person capable of understanding and interpreting a body of standards, so that he can make judgments regarding all aspects and phases of building, construction rehabilitation and conservation.
CLASSROOM TEACHING ASSISTING (A)
Training for teacher assistants is offered as a seminar. Time arrangements vary to meet specific needs. Basically the program involves 30 hours of class time which can include observations and practical experience as well as lectures and demonstrations by qualified school personnel. The aim of the program is to prepare teacher aids to fill existing job needs in local schools.
Topics usually included are: personal and child psychology, introduction to school library organization, orientation to school administration, use of audio-visual equipment and other school machines, first aid and creative activities. Since each offering of the course is intended to meet specific needs, concepts emphasized may vary.
This course may be taken for credit or without credit. If the course is selected for credit, it will be given a TA prefix.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Aides to professional school teachers are employed throughout the public school system in the local area. Aides for vocational or occupational programs at the secondary level must also meet state certification requirements which exceed this course.
COMMUNITY & SOCIAL SERVICE ASSISTING (A)
The Community & Social Service Assisting Program is designed to meet the vocational training needs of persons involved in social work practice and social welfare services in the community.
This is a six quarter program with a comprehensive curriculum providing content courses on social work practice and appropriate educationally directed field instruction. The curriculum is intended to prepare students to understand and appreciate traditions of the varied cultural and ethnic groups in American society and assist them to achieve skill in analyzing, interpreting, and relating this material to social issues.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related courses necessary to meet the requirements for the Associate Degree in Community & Social Service.
COMMUNITY & SOCIAL SERVICE ASSISTING (A)
SIX QUARTER PROGRAM Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs
SW 100 Intro, to Soc. Welfare Inst............. 4
SW 102 Interviewing & Report Writing for
Social Service Workers................. 4
SW 120 Survey of Soc. Work Methods & Svcs. .. 4
SW 125 Social Work with Indiv. & Families.... 4
SW 200 Soc. Service Prac. & Seminar ........
or
SW 201 Applic. of Soc. Work Methods I......... 4
SW 202 Applic. of Soc. Work Methods II......... 4
SW 225 Creative Approaches
with Commun. & Groups.................. 4
SW 110 Field Experience ....................... 3
SW 111 Field Experience ....................... 3
SW 211 Field Experience ....................... 3
SW 212 Field Experience ....................... 3
SW 213 Field Experience ....................... 3
Related Courses
Course Title h.
Engl. Credit .......................... 3
Elective (Foreign Language or
Audiovisual Recommended)............. 2-5
SR 100 Introduction Studies of the Aging..... 3
LA 101 Domestic Relations...................... 4
B 130 Basic Health Science.................... 3
GC 101 Self-Exploration & Underst.............. 3
or
PY 107 Psychology of Pers. Dev................. 3
PY 221 Developmental Psychology................ 3
PY 223 Developmental Psychology................ 3
D5


PY 210 Social Psychology or Personality
PY 240 . 3
PY 230 Abnormal Psychology 3
*HS 110 History of Chicano People . 3
*HS 120 History of Black People . 3
*HS 121 History of the Indians of the West . 3
EC 107 Consumer Economics . 3
PS 114 American State & Local Government . 3
M 100 Introduction to Mathematics
SS 260 Research Methods in Social Sciences . . 3
SO 111 Introduction to Sociology . 3
SO 200 Urban Sociology 3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS 97-100 TOTAL CONTACT HOURS 1220-1250 *
*The history courses listed above are strongly recommended. Other related subjects dealing with minority & ethnic groups in search of equality may be substituted with approval.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Following suc-
cessful completion of this program, the graduate will be well prepared for practice in a variety of agencies, public and private, providing social services to individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.
COSMETOLOGY (R)
TWO YEAR PROGRAM
The Associate Degree program in Cosmetology is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations of the Red Rocks Campus in cooperation with the Jefferson County Warren Occupational Center.
Related courses in the areas of Business and Management Occupations, Communications and Arts, Science and Math and Social Sciences are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational requirements and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Cosmetology from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Occupational course requirements may be met by completing the Certificate of Achievement program in Cosmetology offered by the Community College of Denver, Red Rocks Campus or providing the college with verification that the 1650 hours of Cosmetology training required as preparation for the Colorado State Board of Cosmetology examination has been completed at another institution.
Students must also complete the following Occupational Courses:
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs.
CO 120 Salon Management ................... 3
Related Courses
Course Title Hrs
AC 109 Bookkeeping and Accounting ......... 5
AR 105 Basic Design........................ 3
BU 110 Business Mathematics ............... 3
EC 109 Applied Economics .................. 3
EG 107 Occupational Communications......... 3
P 100 Survey of Phys. Science ............ 3
PS 114 Amer. State & Local Govt........... 3
PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Dev................. 3
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED: 101
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 1686
COSMETOLOGY (R)
12 MONTH PROGRAM
The Certificate of Achievment program in Cosmetology is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the 1650 hours of Cosmetology training required as preparation for the Colorado State Board of Cosmetology examination and job entry.
Occupational Courses
Upon completion of the 1650 hour training program, the student will be awarded 72 quarter hours of credit by the Community College of Denver, Red Rocks Campus.
Student must contact Director of Community and Personal Service Occupations for an explanation of enrollment procedures, tuition costs and class scheduling.
EMPLOYMEN. OPPORTUNITIES: Part and full time employment in the field of Cosmetology is extremely good in the Denver Metro area. Job categories include hairdressing, manicuring, beauty salon operator, salon manager, and cosmetology instructor. The Cosmetologists perform the following activities: manicuring, color application, permanent waving, shampooing, haircutting, hair styling, finger waving, iron curling, facials, wig servicing, scalp and hair treatments and skin analysis. Potential earnings depend on the location of the shop and the hours spent. Operators can expect to make from $4,800 to $10,000 per year for the first five years. Tips make the difference in exact salary and these vary based on the type of salon and its location.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE (R)
TWO YEAR PROGRAM
The Criminal Justice program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession. Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Criminal Justice from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs
CJ 110 Criminal Justice I........................... 3
CJ 111 Criminal Justice II ......................... 3
D6


CJ 112 Constitutional Law........................ 3
CJ 113 Civil Law................................. 3
CJ 114 Criminal Law ............................ 3
CJ 116 Rules of Evidence ....................... 3
CJ 210 Criminal Investigation I................. 3
CJ 211 Criminal Investigation II ............... 3
CJ 212 Criminal Investigation III .............. 3
CJ 224 Community Relations ...................... 3
*CJ 297 Coop. Work Experience..................... 8
Criminal Justice Elect................... 24
Related Courses
Cr
Course Title Hrs
English Elective...................... 3
Math &/or Science Elect................. 3-5
S 110 Fundamentals of Speech.................... 3
Social Science Electives ................ 15
Related Electives........................ 12
NOTE: All Electives must be approved by the students advisor.
'Students who are not presently employed in the profession will be required to take a minimum of 8 credit hours of CJ 297, Cooperative Work Experience before they can receive their associate degrees.
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED: 90-100
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 900-1020
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Law enforcement is one of the largest of the career groups in public service. Investigative agents and specialists are employed by the federal government. A vast number of career opportunities exist with a variety of state and local agencies. This program has been designed to serve the needs of new recruits as well as provide for the in-service and upgrading training needs of those presently employed in the field.
DIETETIC ASSISTING (N)
THREE QUARTER PROGRAM
This program is designed to prepare dietary assistants, nutritionist aides, and school food service personnel with a limited background in sound food and nutrition principles. There is not, at this time, any such program open to the general public at a post secondary level. There is a demonstrable need for individuals with this type of training in hospitals, extended care facilities, nursing homes, with migrant nutrition or with the extension service.
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs
F 100 Intro, to Food Service Indus. ... Module A 4 16
Module B 4
Module C 4
Module D 4
F 108 Normal Nutrition 3
F 200 Food & Bev. Svc. & Mgt Module A 4 8
Module F 4
F 210 Diet Therapy 3
F 297 Cooperative Work Exp 8
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accounting .... 5
HE 100 Medical Terminology 2
MG 221 Personnel Mgmt 3
Related Courses
Course Title Hrs
B 100 Basic Human Biology ................ 4
PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Devel............... 3
EG 106 Occup. Communications or
EG 111 English Comp.......................__3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 58
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 630
Depending on the vocational interest of the student he may take various elective options:
I School food service supervisors would schedule F 211 The School Nutrition Program 3 credit hours.
II Extended care or nursing home dietary assistants. PY 223 Developmental Psychology (Maturity and Aging) 3 credit hours. (They should also schedule the section of F 210 Diet Therapy emphasizing geriatric nutrition.)
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The limited number of persons available in the area of dietetic support personnel is inadequate to fill current needs. The Colorado Department of Health is anxious to have at least one such person in every small hospital or extended-care facility in the State. If Title XVIII and XIX, Medicare and Medicaid legislation now pending becomes law, trained dietetic assistants will be required for all such patient care, with the employment of persons with higher levels of competency such as dietetic technicians strongly recommended.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND MANAGEMENT
(N-R)
The Early Childhood Education and Management Program was designed to meet the vocational training needs for all personnel involved in the care of young pre-kindergarten children as determined by the Colorado State Social Services Licensing Department.
The six-quarter program is the most comprehensive curriculum providing courses in child development and administration, as well as appropriate support courses to complement the observation student teaching core. The academic requirements enumerated by the State are optimally satisfied.
The three-quarter introductory program offers a substantial foundation in the early childhood field and meets current teacher requirements.
The experienced but academically unqualified student will select the appropriate recommended courses from the Suggested Core for Social Services Licensing. The acquisition of 36 quarter hour credits from this program will satisfy minimal requirements.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ASSISTING (N-A)
THREE QUARTER PROGRAM Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs
CC 102 Creative Activities..................... 3
CC 103 Intro, to Early Childhood Ed............ 6
D7


CC 104 Supervised Laboratory Exp............. 6
CC 105 Supervised Student Partic............. 6
CC 108 Theory of Teaching the Young Child .... 4
CC 109 Meth. of Teaching the Young Child ..... 4
CC 211 Child Care Prog. Super.
& Admin. II ............................ 4
Related Courses
Course Title h/s.
English Credit ........................ 3
PE 101 First Aid ............................. 1
PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Dev. or
GC 100 Guidance Counseling ................... 3
PY 123 Child Guidance Techniques ............. 3
PY 221 Developmental Pshcyology............... 3
PY 222 Developmental Psychology............... 3
Science Elective ..................... 3^5
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 52-54
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 749-753
English Credit selected upon approval/or recommendation of advisor:
RE 101 Basic Reading
EG 106 Occupational Communications
SC 100A Typing Beginning courses or other (by examination)
Program Practicum Core CC 103, CC 104, CC 105 Must be taken sequentially, each of the three may be offered every quarter.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The demand for trained assistants or aides in the child care field is steadily increasing. Jobs are available in nursery schools and day care centers as group leaders. Additional Course Offerings for refresher or updating:
CC 201 Workshop of Ideas ........... 4 Cr. Hrs.
CC 202 Workshop of Things .......... 4 Cr. Hrs.
Acceptable for State Social Service Licensing Requirements in the proper categories. See Suggested Core for Social Service Licensing Requirement.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND MANAGEMENT (N-R)
SIX QUARTER PROGRAM
Occupational Courses
Course Title Cr Hrs.
CC 102 Creative Activities ... 3
CC 103 Intro, to Early Child. Ed ... 6
CC 104 Supervised Lab. Experience ... 6
CC 105 Supv. Student Partic ... 6
CC 106 Supv. Student Partic ... 6
CC 107 Supv. Student Partic ... 6
CC 108 Theory of Teach, the Yng. Child . 4
CC 109 Meth. of Teach, the Yng. Child . 4
CC 201 Workshop of Ideas . 4
CC 210 Child Care. Prog. Supv. & Admin. I ... . 4
CC 211 Child Care Prog. Supv. & Admin. II ... . 4
CC 212 Child Care Center Bus. Op . 4
Related Courses
Course Title Cr. Hrs.
English or For. Lang. Cr . 3-5
F 108 Nutrition ... 3
GC 100 Guidance Counc. or
PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Dev ... 3
PY 111 General Psychology ... 3
PY 112 General Psychology ... 3
PY 123 Child Guidance Techniques .............. 3
PY 221 Developmental Psychology................ 3
PY 222 Developmental Psychology................ 3
PE 101 First Aid .............................. 1
LI 145 Literature for Children ................ 3
S 110 Introduction to Speech or
EG 107 Occup. Comm............................. 3
Elective................................. 3
Science Elective ...................... 3-5
MU 145 Music for the Child .................... 3
SO 111 Intro, to Soc. or Ethnic Stud........... 3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 100-104
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 1359-1364
English credit selected upon recommendation or approval of advisor.
RE 101 Basic Reading EG 106 Occup. Comm.
SC 110 Or other Typing Course
Program Practicum Core Each of which may be offered every quarter CC 103,
CC 104, CC 105, CC 106, CC 107. To be completely within the two year period with
CC 103 and 104 taken sequentially as to the initial core.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The nationwide trend is for mothers with small children to join the nation's work forces. The pre-school children of these mothers will be taken care of in some type of children's center. Graduates of this program will be ready to work in day care centers, nursery schools and child development centers as directors or teachers upon completion of the specific experience requirements of the State Social Services Licensing Unit.
Additional Course offerings for refresher or updating:
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accntg......... 5 Cr. Hrs.
CC 201 Workshop of Ideas ........... 4 Cr. Hrs.
CC 202 Workshop of Things .......... 4 Cr. Hrs.
Acceptable for State Social Service Licensing requirements in the proper categories. See suggested Core for Social Service Licensing Requirement.
SUGGESTED CORE FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
SOCIAL SERVICE LICENSING REQUIREMENTS
Child Development and Nursery Education
Total of 36 credit hours from the following:
Child Development (Total of 9) Hrs
CC 103 Intro, to Early Child. Ed.............. 6
CC 108 Theories of Teach, the Yng. Child :.... 4
CC 109 Methods of Teach, the Yng. Child...... 4
*PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Dev.................... 3
*PY 123 Child Guidance Techniques ............. 3
*PY 221 Developmental Psychology............... 3
*PY 222 Developmental Psychology............... 3
Related Areas (Total of 9)
CC 102 Creative Activities.................... 3
CC 104 Supv. Student Lab. Experience ......... 6
CC 109 Methods of Teach, the Yng. Child...... 4
CC 201 Workshop of Ideas ..................... 4
LI 145 Literature for Children ............... 3
MU 145 Music for Children..................... 3
Psychology (Total of 4.5)
*PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Dev.................... 3
PY 111 General Psychology .................... 3
PY 112 General Psychology .................... 3
*PY 123 Child Guidance Techniques ............. 3
*PY 221 Developmental Psychology .. ........... 3
*PY 222 Developmental Psychology............... 3
D8


Administration (Total of 6)
CC 210 Child Care Prog. Supv. & Admin. I ..... 4
*CC221 Child Care Prog. Supv. & Admin. II.... 4
CC 212 Child Care Center Bus. Operations ..... 4
Sociology (Total of 4.5)
*CC211 Child Care Prog. Supv. &
Admin II.............................. 4
SO 111 Introduction to Sociology ............. 3
Nutrition (Total of 3)
F 108 Nutrition ............................. 3
Courses are applicable to both disciplines but credit will be given in only one.
A total of 18 hours, 9 each from the Child Development & Related areas is required. Completion of 36 credit hours from the above Core Course can be accomplished in a nine month or three quarter period. This Core is appropriate for those who have already completed the State work experience requirement (4,000 work hours with young children) for licensing. Of the 36 required hours, at least 15 must be taken at Coritaiunity College of Denver. A Certificate of Completion will be awarded upon satisfactory completion of courses selected by the student to meet licensing requirements.
CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE (A, N, R)
The Early Childhood Education Program is designed around a core curriculum. The Core curriculum, comprised of approximately ten (10) courses, can be achieved/earned through two approaches. The regular traditional on-campus approach or the innovative on-site field based CDA (Child Development Associate) like approach.
Acceptance to register for the CDA like approach can be approved by the Early Childhood staff.
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (R)
The Environmental Control Technology Program is composed of courses designed to meet the requirements of local, state and Federal agencies, business and industry groups in order to prepare individuals for environmental generalist technician positions in a variety of environmental fields. The program is offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Science, and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in the various environmental fields as well as to meet the general education demands of the environmental fields themselves.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Environmental Control Technology from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs.
EV 101 Environmental Problems................... 3
EV 105 Noise Pollution.......................... 3
EV 107 Solid Waste Pollution.................... 3
EV 110 Environmental Decision Making............ 3
EV 115 Industry and O.S. H. A................... 3
EV 118 Industrial Hygiene ...................... 3
EV 201 Atmospheric Pollution.................... 4
EV 205 Pollution Control Systems................ 4
EV 297 Cooperative Work Exp..................... 9
Related Courses
Cr
Course Title Hrs
B 110 Introduction to Environment ............. 3
B 114 Sanitary Microbiology ................... 4
G 115 Environmental Geology ................... 4
M 105 Introductory Algebra................... 4
M 106 Intermediate Algebra................... 4
M 107 Intro, to Geometry .................... 4
M 140 Slide Rule and Calculator.............. 1
PY 100 Human Relations in Bus. & Ind.......... 3
SI 105 The Metric System ..................... 1
SI 121 Environmental Science.................. 4
SI 122 Environmental Science.................. 4
WW 100 Intro, to Water-Wastewater............. 3
Chemistry Elective .................... 5
English Electives ..................... 6
Related Electives...................... 6
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED: 91
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 1,130
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives must be approved by the students advisor.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: This program was planned in response to the intense public concern with the multitude of environmental problems confronting mankind.
The program is designed to prepare students for employment as technicians and related jobs in a variety of environmental fields, including, but not limited to, air, water, and noise pollution, solid waste disposal, environmental health, law enforcement, land use, public relations and industrial occupational health. Potential job opportunities exist in local, state and Federal environmental agencies, industrial pollution control, engineering consulting firms, city engineering offices and business firms which sell pollution sampling and monitoring equipment. Emphasis is placed upon the technicians role in such areas as detection and control of pollution through surveys, sampling and testing procedures, operating and maintaining pollution detection and control equipment and an understanding of environmental impact statements and land use. Emphasis will also be placed upon the art and science of recognizing, evaluating and controlling occupational health and safety hazards in industry.
FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
The Fire Science Technology program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences, and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Fire Science Technology from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs
FS 100 Intro, to Fire Science ................ 3
FS 104 Fire Co. Organ. & Proc.................. 3
FS 106 Fire Fighting Tactics & Strat........... 3
FS 108 Fire Hydraulics......................... 3
FS 110 Fire Apparatus & Equip.................. 3
FS 202 Fund, of Fire Prevention............... 3
D9


FS 204 Related Codes & Ord. I ................ 3
FS 205 Related Codes & Ord. II ............... 3
FS 206 Rescue Practices....................... 3
FS 208 Hazardous Materials I.................. 3
FS 209 Hazardous Materials II ................ 3
FS 212 Fire Prot. Equip. & Systems ........... 3
FS 214 Fire Dept. Admin....................... 3
FS 216 Private Fire Protection Syst........... 3
FS 218 Fire Investigation..................... 3
FS 220 Fire Insurance......................... 3
FS 230 Blprt. Reading for Firefighters ....... 3
Fire Science Tech. Elect............... 6
Related Courses
Course Title Hrs.
C 109 Applied Chemistry...................... 4
EG 107 Occupational Comm...................... 3
EG 108 Occupational Comm...................... 3
M 103 Applied Math II ....................... 3
P 101 Fundamental Physics ................... 4
PY 100 Human Relat. in Bus. & Industry........ 3
RD 101 Skills for College Reading ............ 3
Math Elective ......................... 3
Social Science Electives .............. 6
Related Elective....................... 3
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED: 92
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 930
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives must be approved by the students advisor.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Program is designed to prepare for initial entrance into employment or advancement with municipalities, industrial firms, or other employers requiring fire protection personnel. May be employed by insurance companies and agencies as salesmen, fire loss and safety prevention personnel, adjusters or insurance rating and inspection bureaus.
FOOD SERVICE PREPARATION/MANAGEMENT
(N)
The Community & Personal Service Occupations Food Service Program is structured to give each student the maximum time available in his chosen occupational area. The courses will be identified as 100 for the first year and 200 for the second year with the appropriate prefix to identify the particular discipline, e.e., F 100-F 200. Each course is designed to continue through three quarters of approximately 10 weeks in length totaling 600+ hours of instruction per year.
Each course will consist of a series of different specific measurable performance objectives that the student is expected to master before moving on to the next skill. Under this system, it is entirely possible for the student to earn more or less credit hours than he contracted for at the time of registration. Those students capable of moving at an accelerated pace will be encouraged to do so and students having difficulty with a particular unit or skill will be given the individual attention necessary to master those difficult units.
The normal ratio of credits earned for time invested will be as follows:
4 credit hours = 5 contact hours 8 credit hours = 10 contact hours 12 credit hours = 15 contact hours 16 credit hours = 20 contact hours
A student who signs up for 16 credit hours would invest 20 hours of time each week of the 10 week quarter, and would gain 200 hours of instructional time for each of the three quarters.
Note: Class periods will be 50 minutes in length.
F 100 48 Credit Hours/16 per Quarter
600 Contact Hours in three (3) quarters, 200 Contact/ Quarter
Introduction to the food service industry Occupational Courses
Course Title Hr:
Module A Sanitation and Safety 4
Module B Tools and Equipment 4
Module C Basic Food Service 4
Module D Food Production I 4
Module E Menu Planning 4
Module F Pantry Station 4
Module G Basic Baking 4
Module H Food Production II 4
Module I Fry Cooks Station 4
Module J Restaurant Service 4
Module K 1st Cooks Station 4
Module L Food Production III 4
48
Required Support Courses
Cr Hrs.
.. 3
.. 3
.. 3
.. 3
.. 3
6-12 21-27
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 69-75
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 810-870
Upon completion of 69-75 quarter hours 810-870 contact hours a Certificate of Achievment will be awarded.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: There are varied opportunities for trained workers in entry level jobs in the field of food production and management. Training programs offered are designed to give students a salable skill in food production by the end of any quarter. Job skills needed to work in one of the basic work stations of a commercial kitchen can be learned in approximately a 200 hour training block depending on the students previous experience, available time and effort.
SECOND YEAR
FIRST YEAR
Course Title
F 108 Nutrition
M 110 Math for Business
MG 105 Intro, to Business
PY 100 Psych, for Bus. & Ind. ..
EG 106 Occ. Comm
F 297 Coop. Work Experience
Course Title Hrs
F 200 Food & Beverage Serv. & Mgmt.
32 credit hours/16 per quarter 400 contact hours in 2 quarters. 200 contact hrs./quarter Module A Intro, to Food & Bev. Mgmt. & Serv. 4
Module B Intro, to Food Serv. & Bev. Contr. Syst. 4
Module C Personnel Sched. & Motiv. 4
Module D Merch. & Public Relations 4
Module E Cash Reg. Syst. & Controls
& Customer Serv. & Sales 4
Module F Purch. & Stock Record Cont. Syst. 4
D10


Module G Food, Bev., Labor Cont. & Cost. Acct.
Syst. 4
Module H Process, of Meats, Fish & Poultry 4
32
Required Support Courses
Cr
Course Title Hrs.
AC 109 Bookkeep. & Accounting............... 5
MG 201 Business Management ................. 3
EG 107 Occupat. Comm........................ 3
EG 131 Bus. Comm............................ 3
14
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 46
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 540
Upon completion of 46 credit hours 540 contact hours the student will be awarded a Certificate of Completion. Completion of the F 100-F 200 and required support courses will yield the student an Associates Degree in Food Services.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Completion of the
two year program in the food production option will qualify the students for food service occupations in hotels, motels, restaurants, public schools, hospitals and similar institutional jobs. The management option provides occupational up-grading or entry to management careers related to commercial food service.
HOTEL-MOTEL OPERATIONS (A)
SIX QUARTER PROGRAM
The Hotel-Motel personnel training program has been designed to meet the needs of hotel-motel business and industry. Students completing the two-year program will be awarded an Associate Degree. In less than one year the student can acquire a Certificate of Completion. One year of training Certificate of Achievement. Occupations which require less than an A.D. will allow enrollees to enter the job market after one, two, three or four quarters of training.
Occupational Courses
Course Title Cr Hrs.
HM 103 Intro, to Hotel-Motel Mgmt 3
HM 105 Front Office Procedures 3
HM 109 Supervisory Housekeeping 3
HM 111 Supervisory Dev. or
HM 205 Training & Coaching Tech 3
HM 115 Hotel-Motel Law 3
HM 117 Hotel-Motel Basic Acct 3
HM 119 Food & Bdv. Mgmt. & Serv. or
HM 121 Food and Bev. Control 3
HM 123 Food and Bev. Purch 3
HM 151 Hotel-Motel Org. & Admin 3
HM 201 Hotel-Motel Sales 3
HM 203 Hotel-Motel Motor Mg. Or El 3
HM 297 Coop. Work Exp. or Elective 4
HM 297 Coop. Work Exp. or Elective 4
HM 297 Coop. Work Exp. or Elective 6
HM 297 Coop. Work Exp. or Elective 4
HM 297 Coop. Work Exp. or Elective 6
Related Courses
Course Title Cr Hrs
EG 106 Occup. Comm 3
M 100 Intro, to Mathematics 3
SO 111 Intro, to Sociology.................. 3
AC 109 Bookkeep. and Account................ 5
MG 201 Business Org. & Mgmt................. 3
MG 203 Princ. of Marketing ................. 3
MG 221 Pers. Management .................... 3
MG 222 Pers. Management .................... 3
PY 100 Human Relat. in Bus. & Ind........... 3
PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Dev.................. 3
Elective............................ 3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 92
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 920
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Successful completion of this program affords the student the opportunity for immediate job entry level assignments. Graduates will be offered employment in hotels, motels, clubs, commercial food establishments, hospitals, and other private and public institutions.
INFORMATION MEDIA TECHNOLOGY (N)
A new flexible approach to information and Library Employment through education and occupational skills training.
PROGRAMS Library Media Assisting Library Media Technology SHORT COURSES Information Assisting Micromedia Assisting
COMMUNITY SERVICES CONFERENCES, SEMINARS AND WORKSHOPS
Information use, service and production are of essential concern to administrators, businessmen and librarians. The past decade has produced improvements in equipment and techniques of library/information systems.
An important part of pre-job and up-grading skills training for para-professional support personnel are the use of new equipment technology and associated management, in a host of related information handling occupations throughout industry, business offices and government.
The program is a flexible basic skill approach to information and library employment. It utilizes integrated block period methods to instruct in basic system characteristics of equipment and supplies, management presentations, and actual work experience, allowing the student to fit functionally into many existing and developing jobs.
The two year Associate Degree is granted upon graduation from the Library Media Technology Program. A certificate of Achievement is awarded for the one year Library Media Assisting plan.
Certificates of completion are given for Micromedia and Records Information Management skills.
LIBRARY MEDIA ASSISTING THREE QUARTER PROGRAM
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs.
I 100 Information Media Services I ............. 6
I 101 Information Media Services II............. 9
D11


I 150 Information Media Skills I .......... 6
I 151 Information Media Skills II.......... 9
I 200 Technical Supervision Skills ........ 9
I 297 Cooperative Work Experience.......... 3
Related Courses
Course Title h/s.
EG 131 Business Communications.............. 3
SC 105 Filing and Records Control........... 3
SC 110 Typing I............................. 4
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 52
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 73
LIBRARY MEDIA TECHNOLOGY SIX QUARTER PROGRAM
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs
I 100 Information Media Services I .......... 6
I 101 Information Media Services II.......... 9
I 150 Information Media Skills I ............ 6
I 151 Information Media Skills II............ 9
I 200 Technical Supervision Skills .......... 9
I 290 Comm. Intro/Library Media Sem.......... 6
I 297 Coop. Work Experience.................. 3
AC 109 Accounting & Bookkeeping ........... 5
DP 111 Princ. of Business Data Process....... 3
SC 103 Business Machines ..,................. 3
SC 105 Filing and Records Control............ 3
SC 110 Typing I.............................. 4
SC 111 Typing II ............................ 4
Appr. Elect, specialty devel....... 15-21
Related Courses
Course Title h.
EG 095 Com. Business English................. 3
EG 106 Occup. Comm, or
EG 111 English Composition................... 3
EG 107 Basic Composition or
EG 112 English Composition................... 3
EG 108 Occup. Communications or
EG 113 English Composition................... 3
M 100 Introduction to Math or
M 110 Math.................................. 3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS 100-106
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS 1480-1500
Electives: Must be approved by a counselor or advisor by consulting the students transcript and may be taken at any time during the two year program.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Industrial-Economic growth studies conducted in the Denver Metropolitan region indicate an increasing need for Library and Information Services. Growing information demands are an index which points to the rapid rising potential and advancement for employees in area libraries, resource and information centers. A large work force of technical support staff is necessary to operate the more than 500 various academic, government, public, school, and special libraries in which graduates of the program may seek employment. Many hundreds of business and industry offices in the region are employing technical information personnel to cope with the records man-
agement, micromedia publishing explosion and national data bank information network developments. Demand for the pre-trained job ready worker is in excess of the supply.
PARALEGAL (A)
THREE QUARTER PROGRAM
The Paralegal training program has been designed to meet the needs of law offices and corporations, both in the public and private sector. Students completing this program will be prepared to enter law offices in the capacity of a legal assistant. This is a three quarter program and Certificate of Completion will be awarded by the college upon successful course completion.
OCCUPATIONAL COURSES
Course Title
LA 100 Intro, to Paralegal Train.............. 4
LA 101 Domestic Relations..................... 4
LA 102 Corporations.......................... 4
LA 103 Real Estate Procedures or
LA 104 Law Offices Effic. and Proc........... 4
LA 105 Litig. Civil Procedures .............. 4
LA 106 Probate............................... 4
LA 107 The Paraleg. and the Str. of Govt..... 4
LA 210 Paralegal Workshop ................... 6
RELATED COURSES
SC 105 Filing and Records ................... 3
SC 110 Typing I.............................. 4
SC 111 Typing II ............................ 4
SC 112 Typing III ........................... 4
AC 109 Bookkeeping & Accnt..................__5
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS 54
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS 680
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Perhaps the most exciting and revolutionary occurrence in the field of law in this century has been the introduction of paralegals. Today paralegals are doing a large percent of the legal work attorneys are called upon to perform. Because of this, there has been an increased demand for trained paralegals in the profession. Job opportunities are increasing everyday both in the public and private sectors of law.
RECREATIONAL LEADERSHIP (R)
TWO YEAR PROGRAM
The Recreational Leadership program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Recreational Leadership from the Community College of Denver.
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Occupational Courses
Occupational Courses
Course Title
RL 100 Intro, to Recreation Services.......... 3
RL 102 Tech, of Prog. Plan. & Organ........... 3
RL 111 Field Work............................. 4
RL 112 FieldWork ............................. 4
RL 113 FieldWork ............................. 4
RL 120 Creative Dramatics .................... 2
RL 140 Social Recreation ..................... 3
RL 141 Arts & Crafts.......................... 2
RL 200 Team Sports .......................... 2
RL 202 Ind. Lifetime Sports................... 2
RL 203 Outdoor Recreation & Camping........... 3
RL 204 Games and Rhythms ..................... 2
RL 206 Dance Activities....................... 2
RL 207 Equipment & Facilities ................ 3
Recreat. Lead. Electives ............. 14
Related Courses
Cr
Course Title Hrs.
B 100 Basic Human Biology ................... 4
EG 106 Occupational Communication or
EG 111 English Composition.................... 3
PS 114 Amer. State & Local Gov't.............. 3
PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Dev.................... 3
PY 111 General Psychology .................... 3
PY 210 Social Psychology...................... 3
PY 221 Developmental Psychology............... 3
S 110 Intro, to Speech....................... 3
SO 111 Intro, to Sociology.................... 3
SO 120 Marriage and Family ................... 3
Music Elective ........................ 3
Related Elective....................... 6
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED: 93
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 1800
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives must be approved by the students advisor.
Course Title Hrs
TE 100 Intro, to Traffic Eng................... 3
TE 102 Traffic Eng. Studies I ................. 3
TE 103 Traffic Eng. Studies II................. 3
TE 106 Traffic Admin. & Safety ................ 3
TE 108 Control Devices ........................ 3
TE 200 Traffic Eng. Psychology................. 3
TE 202 Traffic Laws & Regulations.............. 4
TE 203 Geometric Design I ..................... 3
TE 204 Geometric Design II .................... 4
TE 210 Traffic Accid. Rept. & Analy............ 3
TE 211 Urban Trans. Planning I ............... 3
TE 212 Urban Transport. Planning II............ 3
TE 215 Traffic Eng. Prob....................... 3
Related Courses
Course Title h/s
EG 107 Occup. Comm............................ 3
EG 108 Occup. Comm............................. 3
D 100 Mech. Drafting Theory & Tech............ 4
DP 111 Prin. of Bus. Data Proc................. 3
M 105 Intro, to Algebra....................... 4
M 106 Interm. Algebra......................... 4
M 107 Intro, to Geometry ..................... 4
M 120 Stat. for Bus. & Industry............... 3
P 111 College Physics......................... 5
P 112 College Physics......................... 5
P 113 College Physics......................... 5
SU 103 Basic Surveying......................... 8
UP 100 Intro, to Planning ..................... 3
Social Science Elective................. 3
Related Elective........................ 3
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED: 101
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 1175
Electives in both Occupational and Related areas are available to meet the requirements of the program. Electives must be approved by the students advisor.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Employment opportunities for talented and well-trained persons are presently very good and expected to improve in the future. May be employed in private clubs, schools and institutions, voluntary agencies, industrial plants, community and municipal programs, health studios, hospitals, resorts, urban programs, and other organizations.
TRAFFIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (R) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
The Traffic Engineering Technology program is made up of occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences, Industrial Occupations and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Traffic Engineering Technology from the Community College of Denver.
URBAN HORTICULTURE (N) SEVEN-QUARTER PROGRAM
Horticulture in Colorado presents many diverse opportunities for persons interested in landscape and floral work. Because of this, the program is made up of seven quarters for persons interested in learning about the total field of horticulture while the three quarter programs are geared to specific job entry categories.
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs.
*UH 100 Intro, to Urban Horticulture........... 2
tUH 102 Landscape Plant Materials ............. 4
UH 104 Plant Science I........................ 4
UH 106 Plant Science II ...................... 4
tUH 108 Landscape Planning .................... 4
UH 110 Soils and Fertilizers ................. 4
UH 112 Plant Propagation...................... 4
UH 201 Nursery Management .................... 4
UH 203 Hort. Equip, and Facil................. 3
tUH 205 Landscape Management................... 4
tUH 207 Greenhouse Management ................. 4
UH 209 Horticulture Bus. Oper................. 3
tUH 211 Diseases and Pests..................... 4
tUH 213 Turf Prod, and Mgmt.................... 4
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UH 297 Coop. Work Experience.............. 8-12
UH 299 Independent Study..................... 4
***Occup. Electives.................... 4
AC 109 Bookkeep. and Account, or
AC 111 Accounting............................ 5
Related Courses
Cr
Course Title Hrs.
EG 106 Occupational Communication or
EG 111 English Comp.......................... 3
EG 107 Occupational Communication or
EG 112 English Comp.......................... 3
EC 211 Principles of Economics .............. 3
Math Elective ......................... 3
PY 100 Human Relat. in Bus. & Ind............ 3
PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Devel................. 3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 103-107
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 1423-1430 *
Option Student may substitute elective with instructor's approval. tEvening Courses will require Saturday Field Trips.
Suggested Electives: Horticulture-Floral Design Workshop-UH 114; Horticulture Seminar-UH 221; Perspective Drawing-UH 219; Merchandising Horticulture Products-UH 116. Business & Management; Business & Organization Management-MG 201 (Prerequisite: Intro, to Business- MG 105); Principles of Marketing-MG 203; Principles of Retailing & Merchandising-MG 215.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: As our society has become more affluent, it has also created more leisure time for recreational activities which utilize park, golf course and other outdoor areas, all of which must be managed and maintained. Flowers increasingly appear in and around our homes, and we have become more concerned about the beautification of our nations landscapes. Consequently, career opportunities have been increasing in the field of urban horticulture, and the industry is looking for ambitious and well-trained people. Successful completion of this program will result in the granting of an Associate Degree in Horticulture.
URBAN HORTICULTURE (N) THREE-QUARTER PROGRAM
NURSERY MANAGEMENT AND LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE OPTION
Occupational Courses
Course Title h/s
*UH 102 Landscape Plant Materials ............ 4
UH 104 Plant Science I....................... 4
*UH 108 Landscape Planning ................... 4
UH 110 Soils and Fertilizers ................ 4
UH 111 Small Eng. & Carb. Repair
for Urban Hort...................... 5
*UH 201 Nursery Management ................... 4
*UH 205 Landscape Management.................. 4
*UH 211 Diseases and Pests.................... 4
Business and Mgmt. Elective ......... 3
"Elective............................ 3
Related Courses
Course Title £.
EG 106 Occup. Communications ................ 3
PY 107 Psych, of Pers. Devel................. 3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 45
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 620
Evening courses will require Saturday Field Trips.
Suggested Electives: Horticulture Seminar, Perspective Drawing, and Coop. Work
Exp.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The Nursery Management and Landscape Maintenance Option provides entry level job skills as assistant Nurseryman, Garden Center Employee and Landscape Maintenance man. Successful completion of this program will result in the granting of a Certificate of Achievment.
URBAN HORTICULTURE (N) THREE-QUARTER PROGRAM GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT OPTION Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs
UH 104 Plant Science I........................ 4
UH 106 Plant Science II ...................... 4
UH 110 Soils and Fertilizers ................. 4
UH 111 Small Engine & Carb. Repair
for Urban Hort........................ 5
UH 112 Plant Propagation...................... 4
UH 203 Horticult. Equip. & Facil.............. 3
*UH 207 Greenhouse Management ................. 4
*UH211 Diseases and Pests..................... 4
**UH Elective............................... 3
Indus. Occupations Elect.............. 5
Related Courses
Course Title Hrs
Math Elective ........................ 3
EG 106 Occupational Comm...................... 3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 46
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 620
Evening courses will require Saturday field trips.
Suggested Electives: Horticulture Seminar, Floral Design Seminar, Merchandising
Horticultural products, and Coop. Work Exp.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The Greenhous Management Program is designed to equip an individual with the basic knowledge and skills to work as an assistant grower in a greenhouse. Foreman and supervisory level jobs are available upon completion of the two year program and further greenhouse training. Successful completion of this program will result in the granting of a Certificate of Achievement.
URBAN HORTICULTURE (N) THREE-QUARTER PROGRAM TURF MANAGEMENT OPTION
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs
UH 104 Plant Science I........................ 4
UH 106 Plant Science II ...................... 4
UH 110 Soils and Fertilizers ................. 4
UH 111 Small Engine & Carb. Repair
for Urban Hort......................... 5
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UH 203 Horticulture Equip. & Facil.......... 3
*UH 205 Landscape Management................. 4
UH 211 Diseases and Pests................... 4
*UH 213 Turf Prod. & Management ............. 4
UH 299 Independent Studies.................. 4
*UH Elective............................. 3
Related Courses
Course Title h.
EG 106 Occup. Communications ............... 3
Math Elective ....................... 3
PY 107 Psych, of Personal Dev............... 3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 48
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 522
URBAN PLANNING TECHNOLOGY (R)
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
The Urban Planning Technology program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Science, Industrial Occupations, and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Urban Planning Technology from the Community College of Denver.
Evening courses will require Saturday field trips.
Suggested Electives: Horticulture Seminar, Merchandising Horticultural Products, and Coop. Work Exp.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The Turf Management option provides the basis for entry level job skills in Golf Course maintenance.
URBAN HORTICULTURE (N)
THREE-QUARTER PROGRAM
LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION (AND DESIGN) OPTION
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hr* **
UH 101 Intro, to Landscape Constr. Draft..... 4
UH 102 Landscape Plant Materials ............ 4
UH 104 Plant Science I....................... 4
UH 108 Landscape Planning ................... 4
UH 110 Soils and Fertilizers .............. 4
*UH 201 Nursery Management ................... 4
*UH 205 Landscape Management.................. 4
UH 208 Landscape Surveying................... 4
UH 212 Basic Landscape Construction ......... 8
UH 217 Advanced Landscape Planning .......... 4
UH 219 Landscape Perspective................. 4
**UH Elective.............................. 5
Business Mgmt. Elective ............. 3
Related Courses
Cr
Course Title Hrs
EG 106 Occup. Communications ................ 3
Math Elective ...................... 3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 62
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 700
Evening courses will require Saturday Field Trips.
Suggested Electives: Horticulture Seminar, Floral Design Seminar, Merchandising Horticultural products and Cooperative Work Experience.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: This program is designed to prepare the student for positions with landscape contractors as supervisory personnel; and with landscape architects as landscape technicians and assistants. Upon completion a Certificate of Achievement will be granted.
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs
UP 100 Introduction to Planning............. 3
UP 102 Data Collecting Tech. & Eval......... 3
UP 110 Problems in Urban Planning .......... 3
UP 200 Statistics for Planners ............. 3
UP 202 Data Processing for Planners......... 3
UP 205 Map Reading & Photo Interp........... 3
UP 207 Pictorial Drafting ................. 4
UP 210 Planning Law......................... 3
UP 297 Coop. Work Experience................ 7
UP 299 Independent Study.................... 3
Related Courses
Course Title Hrs
AR 105 Basic Design......................... 3
AV 200 Production of AV materials........... 4
B 110 Intro, to Environment................ 3
D 100 Mech. Drafting Theory & Tech......... 4
EC 109 Applied Economics.................... 3
EG 106 Occup. Communications ............... 3
EG 107 Occup. Communications
or
S 110 Intro, to Speech..................... 3
EG 108 Occup. Communications ............... 3
G 111 Intro, to Geology .................... 4
GE 230 Urban Geography....................... 3
HS 251 History of Cities.................... 3
M 102 Applied Math I....................... 3
M 103 Applied Math II ...................... 3
M 104 Applied Math III ..................... 3
PS 114 American State & Local Gov't.......... 3
SU 103 Basic Surveying....................... 8
Related Electives..................... 6
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED: 97
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 1225
Electives in both Occupational and Related Areas are available to meet the requirements of this program. Electives must be approved by the student's advisor.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The program is designed primarily to qualify students, upon completion of the curriculum and requirements, for employment as assistants to professional planners and urban renewal specialists in both public and private city, county, regional and state planning offices, urban renewal agencies and other organizations concerned with various aspects of urban development.
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WATER-WASTEWATER TECHNOLOGY (R)
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
The Water-Wastewater Technology program is made up of Occupational Courses designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in this profession and offered exclusively by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations.
Related Courses in the areas of Science and Math, Social Sciences, Industrial Occupations and Communications and Arts are also required to meet the needs of individuals in this profession.
Listed below are the Occupational and Related Courses necessary to meet the requirements to receive an Associate Degree in Water-Wastewater Technology from the Community College of Denver.
Occupational Courses
Course Title Hrs
WW 100 Intro, to Water-Wastewater............. 3
WW 103 Blueprt. Read, for Water-Wastewater ... 3
WW 107 Advanced Treatment..................... 3
WW 109 Basic Elect, for Water-Waste........... 3
WW 200 Hydraulics for Water-Waste............. 3
WW 205 Water-Waste. Equip. Maint.............. 3
WW 206 Water-Waste. Admin. & Finance ......... 3
WW 208 Sanitary Chemistry I .................. 4
WW 209 Sanitary Chemistry II ................. 4
WW 220 Public. Relat. for Water-Waste......... 3
WW 225 Instrument, and Control ............... 4
*WW297
Cooperative Work Exp................. 7
Water-Waste. Electives.............. 12
Students who are not presently employed in the profession will be required to take a minimum of 7 credit hours of WW 297, Cooperative Work Experience, before they can receive their Associate Degree.
Related Courses
Course Title Hrs
B 112 General Biology.......................... 5
B 114 Sanitary Biology......................... 4
PY 100 Human Relat. in Bus. & Ind.............. 3
M 102 Applied Math............................. 3
M 103 Applied Math............................. 3
FP 103 Pumps and Motors......................... 4
IM 101 Elements of Supervision ................. 3
IM 103 Industrial Safety........................ 3
EV 118 Industrial Hygiene ...................... 3
English Electives ..................... 6
Related Electives...................... 6
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 93-100
TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: 976-990
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Persons who master the Water-Wastewater Technology program can serve as assistants to engineers, scientists, and public health personnel concerned with water supply developments and distribution, and with wastewater collection and treatment to abate and prevent pollution. The water and wastewater technician can function as a member of the team engaged in research, plant development, or operation; as an operator or assistant operator of water purification or wastewater-treatment facilities supervising and coordinating the efforts of workmen; as a member of the public health team.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
AUDIO-VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
AV 100 Introduction to Media (R) .. 3 credit hours
Course is designed to impart the philosophy, aims, and goals of the educational media field. Stress will be placed on understanding of the role of audio-visual aids. (3 hours per week)
AV 102 Audio-Visual Basic
Electricity (R)............ 3 Credit hours
This course will help the student develop competencies in recognizing and applying basic principles of electricity, magnetism, electric motors, circuitry (series and parallel) as they apply to audio-visual equipment. It will also prepare the student to do basic electrical repair on projectory and transcription machines. (3 hours per week)
AV 103 Audio-Visual Library
Services (R)...............4 credit hours
Provides the student with a brief overview of a modern library or materials center, emphasizes the role of A-V materials and equipment. Also prepares the student in the technical processes of acquisition, preparation and circulation of audio-visual materials. (4 hours per week)
AV 200 Production of Audio-Visual
Materials (R)..............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: AV 100 Introduction to Media This course will help the student to develop proficiencies in creating and producing sound-slide presentations, overhead transparencies, single concept films and posters. It also will prepare the student to operate slide and tape duplicators, laminating equipment and basic lettering devices. (4 hours per week)
AV 201 Television
Production (R).............6 credit hours
This course is designed to develop competencies in the production of Video and Audio tapes for instructional purposes. It will also provide opportunities to develop basic skills in motion picture photography. (6 hours per week)
AV 202 Audio-Visual
Photography (R) ...........3 credit hours
A basic course in theory of photography, construction and operation of cameras. This course will help the student develop skills in photography as related to audio-visual presentation techniques. (3 hours per week)
AV 203 Projection Equipment
Maintenance (R)............4 credit hours
This course enables the individual student to attain basic knowledge and skills in maintenance and care of slide, filmstrip, overhead, opaque projectors aswellas 8mm and 16mm motion picture pictures. (4 hours per week)
AV 204 Transcription Equipment
Maintenance (R)............4 credit hours
This course enables the student to attain general knowledge of the maintenance and repair of audio tape recorders, video tape recorders, as well as disc and cassette players. (4 hours per week)
AV 205 Audio-Visual
Electronics (R) ...........4 credit hours
A basic course in vacuum and solid state devices as they
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pertain to audio-visual equipment. The student will have the opportunity to develop skills in trouble shooting and repair of electronic components in projectors, video tape equipment, phonographs and audio recorders. (4 hours per week)
AV 206 Duplicating
Processes (R) .............3 credit hours
Training in the technology related to reproductions of various graphic designs; provides opportunity to develop skills in offset printing, mimeographing and spirit duplicating. (3 hours per week)
AV 297 Cooperative Work
Experience (R) ..........1-6 credit hours
In the Audio-Visual Technology program, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved, with a College instructor providing coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the Division Director.
The amount of time spent in cooperative work experience will vary to meet students individual needs. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
AV 299 Independent Study (R)... 1-6 credit hours
This course provides opportunity for a student to study intensively a specific topic of interest under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Permission to enroll for independent study must be obtained from the Division Director and the assigned instructor. The number of credit hours to be allowed for successful completion of the course will be determined cooperatively by the instructor and the Division Director. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
ACTIVITY DIRECTING FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
(A)
SR 100 Introduction to Studies
of the Aging (A) ..........3 credit hours
Physical, mental and psychologyical changes which occur in aging are considered. Problems which may occur in later years with possible solutions and prevention are discussed. Nutritional implications in geriatrics will be included. (3 hours per week)
SR 102 Nutrition for
the Elderly (A)............3 credit hours
A study of the essential nutrients and their values in various food groups; their function in the body; and how to determine the food need of the elderly individual. (3 hours per week)
SR 105 A. D. L. Laboratory (A)........3 credit hours
Procedures that relate to the Activities of Daily Living, awareness of range of motion mechanics that are utilized in rehabilitation to the maximum potential of the individual. (3 hours per week)
SR 110 Institutional Organization and
Record Keeping (A) ........3 credit hours
General procedure followed in the home for senior citizens; psychology of relations with senior citizens. Responsibilities of personnel to self, employer and residents. Communication skill necessary to record informa-
tion relevant to activities. Orientation to senior citizen home record department. Obtaining, preserving and using records; coding; statistics; legal aspects of record keeping; ethics. (3 hours per week)
SR 112 Activities for
Senior Citizens I...........3 credit hours
Planning and conducting meaningful recreational opportunities that meet the interests of senior citizens, are adapted to their physical limitations, and contribute to their adjustment to the home. (3 hours per week)
SR 113 Activities for
Senior Citizens II...........3 credit hours
Continuation of SR 112. (3 hours per week)
SR 121 Physical, Psychological &
Social Implications
of Aging.....................3 credit hours
This course will provide the student with a better understanding of the social, psychological, and physical implications in the aging process and how they relate to the needs of the individual. (3 hours per week)
SR 122 Reality Orientation and
Remotivation ................3 credit hours
Reality Orientation is an effective means of assisting the
individual in everyday living. Both the Team concept and the Classroom concept will be covered.
Remotivation assists the individual in coping with todays world through a technique of simple group interaction. Thirty classroom hours will provide the student with the title of Remotivation Technician through the American Psychiatric Association. (3 hours per week)
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: The purpose of an activity program is to create as near to a normal environment as possible, thereby encouraging persons in a long-term facility to exercise their abilities. The program provides these challenges in a planned, coordinated, structured manner. The activities provided are carefully selected so that they are not only enjoyable, but are especially beneficial in overcoming specific problems. An activity program creates the environment of challenge and achievement, helping a person along the road to recovery. The ever-increasing number of senior citizens who are in need of long-term care has created a demand for trained individuals who can make a nursing home more of a home for its residents.
BUILDING INSPECTION
Bl 100 Building Codes and
Standards (R) .............. 3 credit hours
An analysis of the building laws and their sources regulating construction. (3 hours per week)
Bl 102 Construction
Materials (R)...............4 credit hours
A qualitative study of wood, masonry, concrete, and steel construction, and survey of roofing, glazing wall and floor finishes. (4 hours per week)
Bl 103 Mechanical
Inspection (R) ............. 3 credit hours
An introduction to the art of inspecting the heating and ventilating, and refrigeration work on the contruction job. (3 hours per week)
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Bl 104 Field Inspection
Techniques (R) ............4 credit hours
An introduction to the art of inspecting construction job-in-progress with special emphasis on problems encountered in the field. (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab per week)
Bl 105 Soils and Grading (R)...... 3 credit hours
A study of the problems and solutions encountered in the soils of a construction job. (3 hours per week)
Bl 106 Electrical Inspection (R) ... 3 credit hours
An introduction to the art of inspecting the electrical work on the construction job. (3 hours per week)
Bl 110 Plumbing Inspection (R) ... 3 credit hours
An introduction to the art of inspecting the plumbing work on the construction job. (3 hours per week)
Bl 112 Plan Review (R)............3 credit hours
Evaluation of building design for life safety, environmental health features, and structural stability. (3 hours per week)
Bl 214 Construction Organization and
Management (R)............3 credit hours
An introduction to modern management theory and techniques with application to modern construction problems. The student is given an understanding of supervisory principles as they apply to managerial positions. (3 hours per week)
Bl 215 Utilities Inspection (R).....3 credit hours
An examination of the installation of larger, more complex plumbing systems and trench backfill. (3 hours per week)
Bl 216 Introduction to Design
Fundamentals (R)............3 credit hours
Evaluation of building design for features of structural stability. (3 hours per week)
Bl 218 Housing Inspection and
Programs (R) ...............3 credit hours
An examination of the inspection problems unique to existing residential buildings. (3 hours per week)
Bl 297 Cooperative Work
Experience (R) ...........1-6 credit hours
In the Building Inspection program, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved, with a College instructor providing coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the Division Director.
The amount of time spent in cooperative work experience will vary to meet students individual needs. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
Bl 299 Independent Study (R)... 1-6 credit hours
This course provides opportunity for a student to study intensively a specific topic of interest under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Permission to enroll for independent study must be obtained from the Division Director and the assigned instructor. The number of credit hours to be allowed for successful completion of the course will be determined cooperatively by the instructor
and the Division Director. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
COMMUNITY &
SOCIAL SERVICE ASSISTING
SW 100 Introduction to Social
Welfare Institutions (A)___4 credit hours
This course will expose the beginning student to the history and philosophy of social welfare institutions and their relationships to other social institutions in the United States. Current patterns of social welfare provision are placed within an historical perspective. (4 hours per week)
SW 102 Interviewing & Report Writing for Social
Service Workers (A) .......4 credit hours
This course is designed to enhance the students skills in such social work practice areas as communication, observation, report writing and interviewing. Emphasis is placed on conducting interviews and writing reports in such a way that the client will be served. (4 hrs. per week)
SW 110 Field Experience (A)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SW 100
The field experience is an educationally directed program which offers students opportunities to learn by participating in the delivery of social services to individuals, small groups, families, organizations and/or communities. Students are assigned to a specific social agency, social work program or service. (8 hrs. per week)
SW 111 Field Experience (A)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SW 110 Field Experience Contination of SW 110 with progressive expectations. (8 hrs. per week)
SW 120 Survey of Social Work Methods and
Services (A)...............4 credit hours
An analysis of the three basic social work methods: social casework, social group work, and community organization is provided. The basic concepts and principles of the three methods are viewed within the general values of the social work profession. Characteristics of particular fields of service, such as child welfare or corrections, and the application of the above to specific fields is included. (4 hrs. per week)
SW 125 Social Work with Individuals
and Families (A)...........4 credit hours
Skills in the provision of direct social services to individuals and families are taught on a theoretical level or through simulated practice situations in the classroom. Beginning familiarity with role theory, group theory, and learning theory, as they apply to social work practice, is developed. (4 hrs. per week)
SW 200 Social Services
Practicum & Seminar (A) ... 4 credit hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of community & social service workers already in the field. Work performed in the field will be related to the academic program. The seminar method is utilized and discussion includes such job oriented functions as: relationship of worker and supervisor, role fo the professional social worker, role of the para-professional. Students also evaluate and discuss typical case studies. (4 hrs. per week)
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SW 201 Application of Social
Work Methods I (A).........4 credit hours
Application of social work knowledge & skills with different ethnic and socio-economic groups is discussed. Various aspects of practice including working relationships, are explored. Belief in human worth and human potential, self-awareness, sensitivity to others, and a sense of responsibility are all stressed. (4 hrs. per week)
SW 202 Application of
Social Work II (A).........4 credit hours
Application of social work knowledge and skills with different age groups is looked into. Principles and techniques are illustrated through the use of case material. (4 hrs. per week)
SW 211 Field Experience (A)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SW 111 Field Experience Contination of SW 111 with progressive expectations. (8 hrs. per week)
SW 212 Field Experience (A)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SW 211 Field Experience Contination of SW 211 with progressive expectations. (8 hrs. per week)
SW 213 Field Experience (A)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SW 212 Field Experience Continuation of SW 212 with progressive expectations. (8 hrs. per week)
SW 225 Creative Approaches with C immunities and Groups (A) ..................................4 credit hours
This course will serve as a resource for students and agency personnel planning services to communities and groups. Ways of mobilizing people and devising means to satisfy changing human needs are examined. An approach based on individual circumstances, personality factors and the particular setting is advocated. (4 hrs. per week)
COSMETOLOGY
CO 100 Cosmetology.............. 73 credit hours
The Cosmetology program consists of 1650 hours of training over approximately 12 months. The course includes training in the following areas: Sterilization, sanitation, basic personal grooming, bacteriology, basic hair styling, finger-waving, manicuring, scalp treatment, facials, facial makeup, hair cutting, hair coloring, permanent waving, skin and scalp disorders and diseases, wig care, iron curling, shear hair cutting, oil manicuring, anatomy, physiology, electricity, chemistry, air blow styling, scalp treatment, hair removal techniques, lash and brow tinting, and shampoo methods. (35 hours per week)
CO 120 Salon Business Operations
and Management..........3 credit hours
PrerequisitePossession of Cosmetology License The course consists of indepth study of salon procedures and operations. The planning of the physical facility, salon personnel, salon inventory procedures, salon accounting procedures, merchandising, advertising, public relations are all slanted toward the beauty salon in day to day activities. (3 hours per week)
CRIMINAL JUSTICE (R)
CJ 110 Criminal Justice I (R) .........3 credit hours
The law enforcement field and the criminal justice system is introduced to the student. The various police professions including federal, state, county and municipal agencies will be studied. The vocational opportunities and functions at all levels of law enforcement will be considered. Includes the history, administrative problems, and philosophical view of the criminal justice system. A survey of the relationship within the American system of justice between law enforcement activities and the courts, and between the courts and correctional activities. (3 hours per week)
CJ 111 Criminal Justice II (R) ........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CJ 110
Principles of organization, administration, and public service. Administration as applied to field operations. Discussions of fundamentals of patrol and crime prevention; community problems associated with enforcement, vice, traffic, and other duties; special units; duties of supervisory officers. (3 hours per week)
CJ 112 Constitutional Law (R)..........3 credit hours
The development of U. S. Constitutional Law. Covers vital issues, definitions of constitutional terms and case law as it relates to constitutional issues. (3 hours per week)
CJ 113 Civil Law (R)............... 3 credit hours
The course concerns the legal protection afforded in civil procedures against interference by others with the security of ones person, property of intangible interests. Three fundamental theories of liability emerge: intentional interference, negligence and strict liability. The influences of theories and underlying social and economic factors is studied in the content of recognized categories of tact liability, interference with peace of mind, negligence, trespass to property nuisance, fraud, and other misrepresentation, defamation, and invasion of privacy. Through these illustrations the course seeks to develop an understanding of the law's search for basic principles to govern the resolutions of conflicts arising out of human relationships. (3 hours per week)
CJ 114 Criminal Law (R)................3 credit hours
The purpose of this course is to explore criminal law viewed as a device for controlling socially undesireable behavior. It is intended to give the students a working knowledge of the criminal code, the basic questions of public policy in the administration of criminal justice and of the legal principles of determining criminal liability. (3 hours per week)
CJ 115 Patrol Procedures ..............3 credit hours
This course includes the operation of the patrol division of a law enforement agency. The complex day to day duties of the patrol officer will be introduced to the student. The course covers the different areas of patrol procedures including purpose of police patrol, types of patrol, field note-taking, techniques and tactics by type of call, and courtroom testimony and demeanor.
CJ 116 Rules of Evidence (R)...........3 credit hours
The student becomes familiar with the kinds and degrees of evidence, and with the rules governing the admissibility of evidence in court. (3 hours per week)
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CJ 120 The Court System (R) ...........3 credit hours
The court system of the United States is explained at all levels, emphasizing adversary procedures in the criminal and civil or equity procedures in the juvenile court, together with recent Supreme Court decisions regarding both. (3 hours per week)
CJ 122 Probation, Pardon, and
Paroles (R) ................3 credit hours
Probation as a judicial process and parole as an executive function are examined as community-based correctional programs and the use of pardons is reviewed. (3 hours per week)
CJ 210 Criminal Investigation I (R) 3 credit hours
Preliminary investigation techniques to include securing the scene; identifying witnesses; interviewing; search and recording of the scene; arrest procedures; and other related topics. (3 hours per week)
CJ 211 Criminal
Investigation II (R)........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CJ 210
Followup investigation techniques. A contination of CJ 210, Criminal Investigation I. Attention is given to interviewing and statements; the importance of knowing the criminals modus operandr, and sources of information. Emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of criminal investigation such as the techniques used in special kinds of investigation; case preparation; and methods of dealing with news media. (3 hours per week)
CJ 212 Criminal
Investigation III (R).......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CJ 211
The collection, identification and preservation of evidence. Attention is given to comparative evidence and current laboratory capabilities and limitations. Students are made aware of available technical methods used in criminal investigation. (3 hours per week)
CJ 222 Traffic Enforcement (R)_________3 credit hours
Course includes the traffic problem; patrolling procedures; pursuit driving; stopping the violator; officer-violator relationships; drinking driver investigations; traffic direction; and roadblocks. (3 hours per week)
CJ 224 Community Relations (R) .. 3 credit hours
The role of the individual officer in achieving and maintaining public support; human relations, public information; relationships with violators and complainants. (3 hours per week)
CJ 230 Police Supervision (R) .........3 credit hours
Principles of personnel management as applied to the police enterprise evaluation and promotion, discipline, training, employee welfare, problem solving, leadership. (3 hours per week)
CJ 234 Narcotics and Drugs (R) ... 3 credit hours
This course will include the discovery and investigation of narcotics peddlers and users; behavior and treatment of the addict; prevention techniques; cooperation with federal agencies; description, chemical properties and results of the use of narcotics and other dangerous drr~s. (3 hours per week)
CJ 236 Advance Emergency
Techniques (R) .............2 credit hours
Skills to be used in the treatment of injuries in an emer-
gency situation; including emergency childbirth and other situations frequently encountered by police. (2 hours per week)
CJ 238 Correctional Services in the
Community (R)..............3 credit hours
Community resources that can be brought to bear on the correctional task are examined, such as vocational rehabilitation, alcohol detoxification and other units, welfare services, child guidance, and mental health clinics, employment services, private volunteer professional assistance, legal aid and other pertinent services. (3 hours per week)
CJ 297 Cooperative Work
Experience (R) ..........1-6 credit hours
In the Criminal Justice program, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved with a College instructor providing coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the Division Director.
The amount of time spent in cooperative work experience will vary to meet students individual needs. (Credit Hours Arranged)
CJ 299 Independent Study (R)... 1-6 credit hours
This course provides opportunity for a student to study intensively a specific topic of interest under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Permission to enroll for independent study must be obtained from the Division Director and the assigned instructor. The number of credit hours to be allowed for successful completion of the course will be determined cooperatively by the instructor and the Division Director. (Credit Hours Arranged)
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND MANAGEMENT
CC 101 Day Care Teaching Techniques &
Program Design (A)........4 credit hours
An overview of duties and responsibilities of the assistant within day care centers servicing the children 2 to 6 years of age. A study of day care schedules and State requirements for day care centers. Survey of the assistant in relation to the child, parent, and total center staff. This course will include a strong emphasis on the team approach, and the value of constant communication from the assistant to the teach of who he/she is assisting. (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab)
CC 102 Creative
Activities (A,N,R) .......3 credit hours
The intent of this course is to provide learning experiences encouraging creativity and self-expression in children 2 to 6 years of age through the use of suitable activities and materials. Experiences in basic drawing, painting, pasting, cutting, clay and play dough are included. (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab)
CC 103 Introduction to Early Childhood
Education (A,N,R).........6 credit hours
Analysis and interpretation of childrens activities and experiences based on observations in the Children's Center
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at Community College or other approved licensed facility serving the children 2 to 6 years of age, in relation to early childhood education and development. Appropriate licensing regulations are introduced and qualified. (2 hrs. lecture, 8 hrs. lab)
CC 104 Supervised Laboratory
Experience (A,N,R) .........6 credit hours
Prerequisite: CC 103
Practicum in the Community College Children s Center or other approved licensed facility. Participation as well as discussion and application of methods for guiding childrens learning experiences are involved in serving the children 2 to 6 years of age. (2 hrs. lecture, 8 hrs. lab)
CC 105 Supervised Student
Participation (A,N,R).......6 credit hours
Prerequisite: CC 104
Practicum in approved day care center; continuation of CC 104 servicing the children 2 to 6 years of age. (1 hr. lecture, 10 hrs. lab)
CC 106 Supervised Student
Participation (A,N,R).......6 credit hours
Prerequisite: CC 105
Practicum in approved day care center; continuation of CC 105 servicing the children 2 to 6 years of age. (1 hr. lecture, 10 hrs. lab)
CC 107 Supervised Student
Participation (A,N,R).......6 credit hours
Prerequisite: CC 106
Practicum in approved day care center; continuation of CC 106 servicing the children 2 to 6 years of age. (1 hr. lecture, 10 hrs. lab)
CC 108 Theories of Teaching
the Young Child (A,N,R)_____4 credit hours
Theory and methods of teaching the young child, two to six years of age, in relation to his developmental patterns. Survey of relevant learning theories and current learning models. (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab)
CC 109 Methods of Teaching the
Young Child (A,N,R).........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: CC 108 or permission of instructor Application of basic philosophy and theory of teaching the child two to six years of age. Student design various materials and aides for use in teaching. (3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab)
CC 201 Workshop
of Ideas (A,N,R) ...........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor This course is designed to meet needs of teachers currently in the field. It includes a brief review of basic early childhood practices and an introduction to recent learning models and theories. (4 hours per week)
CC 202 Workshop
of Things (A,N,R) ..........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: CC 201 or permission of instructor Examination of commercial and teacher made materials related to current learning models. Teacher design and create teaching materials for their own classroom. (4 hours per week)
CC 210 Child Care Program Supervision &
Administration I (A,N,R)____4 credit hours
Analysis and interpretation of supervision and administra-
tion procedures relevant to early childhood education programs. State licensing regulations appropriate to staff and staff responsibilities are presented. (4 hours per week)
CC 211 Child Care Program Supervision &
Administration II (A,N,R) ... 4 credit hours
Analysis and interpretation of supervision and administration procedures relevant to early childhood education programs specifically related to the involvement of parents. Community resources are studied in application to home and school needs. (5 hours per week)
CC 212 Child Care Centers Business
Operations (A,N,R).........4 credit hours
A study of the methods and problems involved in operating a small business. Inquiry into the areas of zoning restrictions, licensing requirements, tax information, funding procedures, basic bookkeeping techniques. (4 hours per week)
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (R)
EV 101 Environmental
Problems (R) ..............3 credit hours
An introduction to the major environmental problems confronting mankind and their physical and psychological effects upon people. Problems involving air, water, noise and scenic pollution, solid waste disposal, land use and population growth will be identified and discussed. Present and potential technological controls and the development of alternative solutions to environmental problems will also be studied. Field trips to complement and illustrate classroom studies will be taken. (3 hours per week)
EV 105 Noise Pollution (R)............3 credit hours
An introduction to noise pollution, including the psychological and physical effects of noise upon people. A familiarization with the operations of instruments used to measure noise intensity through demonstrations, field experiences and operation of the equipment by students themselves. Noise control methods used in industry and in the local community will be discussed, along with current and proposed noise control legislation. (3 Hours per week)
EV 107 Solid Waste
Pollution (R)..............3 credit hours
An in-depth study of sources of solid waste and the problems such pollution causes relative to land use, water and people. Traditional, new and experimental methods of control and abatement will be identified. Methods of sewage treatment will also be studied. Field trips will be taken to sanitary landfill and garbage dump facilities and wastewater treatment plants to observe both poor and good practices, relative to solid waste disposal. (3 hours per week)
EV 110 Environmental Decision
Making (R).................3 credit hours
A course designed to help the student become acquainted with techniques involved in environmental decision making, including ecological, social, economic and cultural considerations. The concept of the Environmental Impact Statement required by Federal law will be explored, along with case studies of actual environmental impact statements developed by various entities. Integra-
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tion of project management techniques and the evaluation of actual development proposals from neighboring communities will be included in the course. (3 hours per week)
EV 115 Industry and
O. S. H. A. (R)............3 credit hours
A course designed to help the student become familiar with the relatively new Federal and state occupational safety and health laws which will directly relate to one's responsibilities as an industrial hygiene or environmental technician. (3 hours per week)
EV 118 Industrial
Hygiene (R)................3 credit hours
The science of recognizing, evaluating and controlling health hazards, including safety, in industry will be studied. Included in the course will be a description of techniques involved in collecting and analyzing airborne contaminants, radiation, and physical hazards, such as noise and heat stress. Students will also become familiar with the various types of industrial hygiene sampling equipment. Field trips will be taken to observe and become familiar with industrial processes which present potential health hazards. (3 hours per week)
EV 201 Atmospheric Pollution (R)..........4 credits
Source and classification of air pollutants, effects upon public as well as upon plant life and man-made materials, present technological methods of control and future alternative solutions. Pollution and weather and descriptions of sampling and measurement techniques will also be covered. Field trips will be taken to observe technological controls now employed and equipment used to detect and analyze air pollutants. (4 hours per week)
EV 205 Pollution Control
Systems....................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 105 Introduction to Algebra Hydraulic, pneumatic, mechanical, electrical and electronic control systems and components. Basic description, analysis and explanation of operation. Typical performance characteristics, limitations on performance, accuracy, application and their utilization in industrial processes. (4 hours per week)
FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
FS 100 Introduction to Fire Science
and Suppression (R)........3 credit hours
Philosophy and history of fire protection; history of loss of life and property by fire; review of municipal fire defenses; study of the organization and function of federal, state, county, and private fire protection agencies; survey of professional fire protection career opportunities. Fire suppression organization; fire suppression equipment; characteristics and behavior of fire; fire hazard properties of ordinary materials; building design and construction; extinguishing agents; basic fire fighting tactics; public relations. (3 hours per week)
FS 104 Fire Company Organization
and Procedure (R)..........3 credit hours
Review of fire department organization; fire company organization; the company officer; personnel administration; communications; fire equipment; maintenance; training; fire prevention; fire fighting, company fire fighting capability; records and reports. (3 hours per week)
FS 106 Fire Fighting Tactics and
Strategy (R) ..............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FS 110 Fire Apparatus and Equipment
Review of fire chemistry, equipment and manpower; basic fire fighting tactics and strategy; methods of attack; preplanning fire problems. (3 hours per week)
FS 108 Fire Hydraulics (R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 102 Applied Math I Review of basic mathematics; hydraulic laws and formulas as applied to the fire service; application of formulas and mental calculation to hydraulic problems; water supply problems; underwriters requirements for pumps. (3 hours per week)
FS 110 Fire Apparatus and
Equipment (R) ..............3 credit hours
Driving laws, driving techniques, construction and operation of pumping engines, ladder trucks, aerial platforms, specialized equipment; apparatus maintenance. (3 hours per week)
FS 112 Defensive Driving for
Firemen (R).................3 credit hours
Familiarization with national, state and local driving laws; emergency vehicle driving techniques with emphasis on safety. (3 hours per week)
FS 199 Fire Command Officer
Training School (R).........3 credit hours
A comprehensive 3 day Command Officer Training Seminar and Workshop. Conducted during the summer quarter utilizing nationally known speakers in Fire Service Management, Command Strategy and Company Operations.
FS 202 Fundamentals of Fire
Prevention (R).............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FS 100 Introduction to Fire Science & Suppression
Organization and function of the fire prevention organization; inspections; surveying and mapping procedures; recognition of fire hazards; engineering a solution of the hazard; enforcement of the solution; public relations as affected by fire prevention. (3 hours per week)
FS 204 Related Codes and
Ordinances I (R)...........3 credit hours
Familiarization with national, state and local laws and ordinances which influence the field of fire prevention, with emphasis on building codes. (3 hrs. per week)
FS 205 Related Codes and
Ordinances II (R) .........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: F 204 Related Codes and Ordinances I Continuation of Related Codes and Ordinances I with an emphasis on life safety and fire prevention codes. (3 hrs. per week)
FS 206 Rescue Practice (R) ...........3 credit hours
Rescue practices, rescue skills and techniques, rescue tools and equipment with emphasis on auto accident extraction, building collapse, cave-in and landslide and other rescue problem procedures. (3 hrs. per week)
FS 208 Hazardous
Materials I (R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: C 109 Applied Chemistry A review of basic chemistry, storage, handling, laws,
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standards, and fire fighting practices pertaining to hazardous materials. (3 hours per week)
FS 209 Hazardous
Materials II (R) ...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FS 208 Hazardous Materials I Continuation of the study of hazardous materials covering storage, handling laws, standards, and fire fighting practices with emphasis on fire fighting and control at the company officer level. (3 hours per week)
FS 212 Fire Protection Equipment
and Systems (R).............3 credit hours
Portable fire extinguishing equipment requirements. Sprinkler systems, types, installation and maintenance and special protection systems for various hazards. (3 hrs. per week)
FS 214 Fire Department
Administration (R) .........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FS 104 Fire Company Organization and Procedure
Consideration of basic concepts and principles of administration applicable to the organization and administration of an efficient fire department. (3 hours per week)
FS 216 Private Fire Protection
Systems (R) ................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: FS 212 Fire Protection Equipment and Systems
An analysis of private protection and alarm systems. Course covers organization and operation of private Fire Brigades, complete water system layouts. A study and evaluation of Fire Detection, Alarm and Supervisory systems. (3 hours per week)
FS 218 Fire Investigation (R) .........3 credit hours
Introduction to arson and incendiarism, arson laws, and types of incendiary fires. Methods of determining fire cause, recognizing and preserving evidence, interviewing and detaining witnesses. Procedures in handling juveniles, court procedures and giving cour testimony. (3 hours per week)
FS 220 Fire Insurance (R) ..........3 credit hours
An analysis of the fire insurance rating structure. Elements involved in establishing insurance rates. The grading system for cities and towns, the classification of cities and towns, and hazard factors in occupancy, construction and exposures. (3 hours per week)
FS 222 Fire Service Training
Techniques (R) .............3 credit hours
Familiarization with the modern concepts of instruction; Methods of Organizing, Planning and Conducting Fire Service Training. Study and evaluation of objective writing and student motivation. Introduction to Audio-Visual Teaching Techniques. (3 hours per week)
FS 230 Blueprint Reading for
Firemen (R).................3 credit hours
This course will give the student a working knowledge of blueprint reading and sketching as applied to the construction industry. Building terms and abbreviations are taught along with symbols and conventions for other major trades. Construction features, beginning with details of component parts and advancing to a complete set of working drawings. (3 hours per week)
FS 297 Cooperative Work
Experience (R) ..........1-6 credit hours
In the Fire Science Technology program, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved, with a College instructor providing coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the Division Director,
The amount of time spent in cooperative work experience will vary to meet students individual needs. (Credit hours arranged)
FS 299 Independent Study (R) ... 1-6 credit hours
This course provides opportunity for a student to study intensively a specific topic of interest under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Permission to enroll for independent study must be obtained from the Division Director and the assigned instructor. The number of credit hours to be allowed for successful completion of the course will be determined cooperatively by the instructor and the Division Director. (Credit hours arranged)
FOOD SERVICE
F 100 Introduction to the Food
Service Industry......... 16 credit hours
per quarter for 3 quarters
An introduction to commercial and institutional food services. Courses will cover sanitation/safety practices and utilization of commercial food service equipment. Demonstration and participation in preparing various soups, sauces, meat dishes and fruits and vegetables.
Cr
Hrs.
Module A Sanitation and Safety 4
Module B Tools and Equipment 4
Module C Basic Food Science 4
Module D Food Production I 4
Module E Menu Planning 4
Module F Pantry Station 4
Module G Basic Baking 4
Module H Food Production II 4
Module I Fry Cooks Station 4
Module J Restaurant Service 4
Module K 1st Cooks Station 4
Module L Food Production III 4
F 108 Nutrition........................3 credit hours
Orientation in nutritional values, their effect on the health human body as well as their therapeutic use in regaining health; their effect on the social, physical and psychological development of children; their application to commercial food service, and the procedures necessary to assure the preservation of these values through proper preparation and service. (3 hours per week)
F 200 Food & Beverage Service &
Management ............ 16 credit hours
per quarter for two quarters
This program is designed to qualify the student for a position in food services mid-management. The areas of Purchasing, Accounting and Control Systems as well as Personnel and Scheduling will be stressed. Other areas in-
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elude: Merchandising, Service and Sales. Opportunities for employment upon completion are numerous. Some would include: Hotel; (catering, food and beverage management) Restaurant; (coffee shop management, fast food management)
Cr Hrs.
Module A Intro, to Food & Beverage Management & Service 4
Module B Intro, to Food Service & Beverage Control Systems 4
Module C Personnel Scheduling & Motivation 4
Module D Mechandising and Public Relations 4
Module E Cash Register Systems & Controls & Customer Service and Sales 4
Module F Purchasing & Stock Record Control Systems 4
Module G Food, Beverage, Labor Control & Cost Accounting Systems 4
Module H Processing of Meats, Fish and Poultry 4
F 210 Diet Therapy (N) . 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: F 108 and HE 100
An intensive study of more detailed diet therapy emphasizing the team case study approach. In addition to an understanding of diet as a therapeutic means in general illnesses, special emphasis will be given to work with geriatrics and deficiency diseases. (3 hours per week)
F 211 School Nutrition
Program (N) ................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: F 108
An in depth study of the school nutrition program as currently implemented and supported by school food service. (3 hours per week)
HOTEL-MOTEL MANAGEMENT
HM 103 Introduction to Hotel-Motel
Management (A)...........3 credit hours
This course is designed to give the background of hotel-motel management from early innkeeping to the modern skyscraper hote. Organization of hotel operations, opportunities and trends will be stressed. (3 hours per week)
HM 105 Front Office
Procedures (A) ..........3 credit hours
Develops the area of human and public relationships responsibilities of the front office salesmanship, cashiers charges, posting machines and some legal aspects of innkeeping. (3 hours per week)
HM 107 Maintenance and
Engineer (A).............3 credit hours
Examines the organization of the engineering department. Discusses plumbing, heating ventilation, refrigeration and air conditioning, and electrical systems. Vertical transportation, structural maintenance, painting, landscaping, contracts, communication, acoustics, fire protection and maintenance of kitchen equipment represent the content of this course. (3 hours per week)
HM 109 Supervisory
Housekeeping (A) ..........3 credit hours
Provides a functional knowledge of the supervisors duties such as record keeping, staffing, and employee training. (3 hours per week)
HM 111 Supervisory
Development (A) ...........3 credit hours
Critical study of selected areas such as interpersonal relations in the industry, understanding and motivating people, handling grievances, training and evaluation, and cost control. (3 hours per week)
HM 115 Hotel-Motel
Law (A).....................3 credit hours
An exploration of problems related to theories of liability, casual relationships and intentional torts, negligence, labor laws, liens, evictions and crimes. (3 hours per week)
HM 117 Hotel-Motel Basic
Accounting (A) .............3 credit hours
Develops the basic principles of accounting as applied to the hospitality industry. Student progresses from an initial transaction to an analysis of the financial statement. (3 hours per week)
HM 119 Food & Beverage Management
and Service (A).............3 credit hours
An overview for complete food and beverage operations which extends from purchasing, receiving and storage to preparation and service. (3 hours per week)
HM 121 Food and Beverage
Control (A) ................3 credit hours
Outlines the essentials of effective food and beverage control. Establishes a system for determining sale values for food and beverages. (3 hours per week)
HM 123 Food and Beverage
Purchasing (A)..............3 credit hours
A detailed study of the major groups of food purchased by quantity buyers. Establishes quality procurement procedures for food, beverage, and related items. (3 hours per week)
HM 151 Hotel-Motel Organization &
Administration (A) .........3 credit hours
Analysis of management functions and responsibilities in the lodging industry. (3 hours per week)
HM 201 Hotel-Motel Sales (A)..........3 credit hours
A critical study of effective techniques for promoting the industry through application of principles of sales, service, marketing, advertising media, and public relations. (3 hours per week)
HM 203 Hotel-Motel Motor
Management (A).............3 credit hours
A study for operators of small properties. Emphasizes administrative techniques for today's motel operators such as history, space utilization and business practices. (3 hours per week)
HM 205 Training and Coaching
Techniques for Hotel-Motel
Supervisor (A).............3 credit hours
Course is designed to assist the student in learning supervisory skills and organizational methods for maximizing the employers day-to-day work performance. (3 hours per week)
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INFORMATION MEDIA TECHNOLOGY
I 100 Information Media
Services I (N)............6 credit hours
Introduces the student to a brief history of information Media, including books, non-book media-microforms and audio-visual materials. Library and information center organization and management are studied, with vocabulary, equipment and personnel. Tasks and operations involved in the Technical Assistant staff role, in all service areas. Major instruction is given in technical circulation duties of materials control systems and associated records. (8 hours per week)
I 101 Information Media
Services II (N)...........9 credit hours
Continues staff role study and service areas-reference study; stresses research materials methods and user service duties. Laboratory skills in the function of preparing materials in the technical operations, also acquisition and maintenance of materials in all types of information library facilities. Technical cataloging operations in operating bibliographic information storage and retrieval methods are emphasized. (12 hours per week)
I 105 Library Use (N) ...............1 credit hour
A 1 hour course designed to introduce students to the library, its resources and how to use them. The course includes explanations of the card catalog, indexes and various reference materials. (A total of 9 contact hours)
I 110 Records & Information
Management (N)............4 credit hours
The course will include a practical simplified approach to organization of office collections of 100 to 1000 items. There will be instruction in use of standard and non-con-ventional organizational methods. The program will instruct in the use and preparation of special materials and files. Additional exercises provide information for application of library and office filing practices. Executive oriented training in dictionaries, hand books, looseleaf services and other references in business and science will be covered. Special arrangement offers individual experience methods application practice in management of the office Information Center to make it function when assembled. (6 hours per week)
I 115 Micromedia Skills (N)..........6 credit hours
Three phases of training are integrated into this course. Basic and important characteristics of equipment its use and manual-automated machine practices are primary methods studied. Management elements are examined in simulation to train students in designing, operating and managing microform systems. Occupationally related uses in libraries, business and industry and also specialized fields in both present and potential applications. Field trips, manufacturer and use presentations with general and special application purposes will be part of the learning laboratory experience. Guided investigation of students will relate executive, middle management and operative staff in microform use. (9 hours per week)
I 150 Information Media
Skills I (N)..............6 credit hours
Instruction in the basic audio-visual skills for anyone employed in Information/Library, Education, Child Care, Business-Marketing & Sales or Government. Learn to make transparencies, with added color and motion, bulletin boards, dioramas, flannel boards, also laminate and
mount pictures. Instruction includes the operation of motion picture, overhead, opaque, filmstrip, slide projectors, tape recorders and other special audio-visual equipment. (8 hours per week)
I 151 Information Media
Skills II (N) ..............9 credit hours
PrerequisiteL I 100; I 101
Introduces the student to advanced cataloging techniques and several existing subject classifications for all types of information and library collections. Materials selection instructs the student to incorporate pamphlets, audio-visual materials, etc., into the collection. Standard catalogs are utilized, and lists plus basic skills in procurement systems of materials are practiced. Information sources from business, science and educational research are related to technical-service duties and responsibilities. (12 hours per week)
I 200 Technical Supervision
Skills (N) .................9 credit hours
Prerequisite: I 100, 101, 150, 151 Develop skills related to the supervisory principles of the Technical Supervision role, gives basic instruction in the supervising of other clerical personnel. Explores the management of information/library and related equipment use for effective arrangement by field experience, laboratory exercises and case study methods. Faculty supervision in applied skills of computer automation, micrographics and advanced storage and retrieval methods operating in libraries and information facilities in which the student plans to seek employment. (12 hours per week)
I 290 Information Media Community
Service Seminar (N).......1-6 credit hours
Seminars and workshops can be offered as needed to meet community demand. Technical simulation will familiarize the student with modern information/library technology. Community service seminars require the student to work one half day a week on a specific project in the community, such as working with mentally retarded, physically handicapped, persons in penal institutions, hospitals, and nursing homes the opportunities are unlimited. The seminar format allows the students to share their experiences and ideas with others.
PARALEGAL (A)
LA 100 Introduction to Paralegal
Training (A)..............4 credit hours
The intent of this course is to give the student interested in becoming a paralegal, exposure to his career options, a working knowledge of legal concepts and terminology, familiarity with legal research techniques, techniques of getting a job, and exposure to five substantive areas of the law and the attorneys and paralegals who practice in these areas. (4 hours per week)
LA 101 Domestic Relations (A) _______4 credit hours
This course will deal not only with standard legal problems of marriage that lawyers deal with, encompassed by the dissolution of Code such as dependent and neglected children, children in need of supervision, adoptions, etc.
LA 102 Corporations (A)..............4 credit hours
Emphasis will be placed on drafting the forms necessary to incorporate a corporation, do the upkeep on it, etc. The
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course should prepare the student to step directly into a law office and be an integral part of the firm corporate department. The paralegal will learn to do such things as draft stock option agreements, promissory notes and other such form relevant to corporate or commercial law. (4 hours per week)
LA 103 Real Estate
Procedures (A) ............4 credit hours
Emphasis will be placed on drafting such things as partnership agreements, filling out forms necessary to complete a real estate transaction, how to comply with subdivision requirements, relevant legislation and other procedures relevant to a successful real estate law practice. (4 hours per week)
LA 104 Law Office Efficiency and
Procedures (A) ............4 credit hours
Most law firms exist in chaos, attorneys spend time managing rather than practicing law. This course will be geared to teach the paralegal how to create order out of chaos, i.e., it will teach such skills as time-keeping, management control, client files, checklists, etc. (4 hours per week)
LA 105 Litigation &
Civil Procedures...........4 credit hours
An intensive study of the Colorado Rules of Civil Procedures in all courts of records and their importance in litigation.
LA 106 Probate (A)....................4 credit hours
Stress will be primarily on drafting wills, settling estates, trusts, and the tax considerations involved in each of these. (4 hours per week)
LA 107 The Paralegal and the Structure
of Government (A)..........4 credit hours
This course will be an overview of the structure and work of the State and Federal Government, furthermore this course will instruct students as to which legal documents should be filed in which agency or office of the Federal and State Government, that is articles of incorporation with Secretary of State, sub division plats with county planning commissions in environmental impact statement with E. P. A., etc., etc. (4 hours per week)
LA 108 Legal Assistance to
Indigent Client ...........4 credit hours
A comprehensive study of the emerging area of poverty law, particularly in the civil area, but also concerning itself with defense of the indigent criminal defendant. Can be taken in place of LA 107.
LA 109 Legal Research ................4 credit hours
The intent of this course is to provide the student with a working knowledge of the law library and to develop his skills in the area of legal research which is of prime importance and necessity for any student interested in pursuing a career as a paralegal.
LA 210 Paralegal Workshop (A)_________6 credit hours
This course will be taught by a consortium of instructors from the disciplines mentioned above. It will allow the student to become a specialist in one of the substantive areas mentioned above. This course will stress legal tools, systems, techniques, problems and checklists. It will also give the student the opportunity of working directly with attorneys practicing in the students chosen specialty area. (6 hours per week)
RECREATIONAL LEADERSHIP
RL 100 Introduction to Recreation
Services (R)................3 credit hours
Introduces the basic fundamentals of the nature, scope, and significance of organized recreation services. It includes study of factors involved in the operation of basic recreation units, major program areas, organizational patterns, and the interrelationships of special agencies and institutions which serve the recreation needs of society. (3 hours per week)
RL 102 Techniques in Program Planning
and Organization (R)........3 credit hours
A study of the essential elements and basic principles involved in the organization, supervision, promotion, and evaluation of various types of recreation programs. Emphasis is on organized programs and services. (6 hours per week)
RL 111 Field Work (R)..................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: RL 100 and Recreational Leadership major
A course designed to give the recreation student practical experience under supervision. The first experience should have the student working with an agency leader. Exposure to leadership responsibilities of planning, conducting, and evaluating an activity or program should result. (6 hours per week)
RL 112 Field Work...................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: RL 111
The second supervised course designed to give the recreation student practical experience in developing recreation leadership skills. This experience should have the student working as direct leader with the responsibility for planning, conducting, and evaluating an activity or program. (6 hours per week)
RL 113 Field Work (R)...............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: RL 112
The third course designed to give the recreation student practical experience under supervision. This experience should involve the student working as an indirect leader by assisting a group or individual in the planning, conducting, and evaluating the groups or individuals desired experience. (6 hours per week)
RL 120 Creative
Dramatics (R)...............2 credit hours
A survey of the scope, values, and fundamental skills of drama and its role in recreation. Emphasis is on knowledge, understanding, and promotion of drama rather than mastery of performance skills. (4 hours per week)
RL 121 Tumbling and
Gymnastics (R) .............2 credit hours
Designed to acquaint the student with skills, teaching techniques and progression of tumbling, stunts and gymnastics for elementary and secondary school students. (4 hours per week)
RL 122 Sports Officiating (R)...........2 credit hours
Instruction and experience in organizing, officiating and conducting competetive and recreational sports. (4 hours per week)
RL 140 Social Recreation (R)............3 credit hours
Introduces methods and materials for planning, organiz-
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ing, and conducting social activities for groups of various sizes and ages in a variety of social situations. Emphasis is on the mechanics of planning and presenting a repertoire of activities for social recreation events. Major activities will be discussed, played, and/or demonstrated. (6 hours per week)
RL 141 Arts and Crafts (R) ............2 credit hours
Demonstrates the methods and materials used in arts and crafts projects for a variety of recreational settings; school, camp, playground, recreation center, and clubs. Emphasis is on constructing, administering, promoting and teaching crafts. (4 hours per week)
RL 200 Team Sports (R).................2 credit hours
A survey of the basic terminology, skills, and rules of selected team sports and their use in recreation. Emphasis is upon knowledge and understanding of the organization, administration, and promotion of sport rather than mastery of performance skills. (4 hours per week)
RL 201 Group Leadership (R).........2 credit hours
Provides insight into the theory, principles and practice of planning, organizing, and conducting effective recreation programs for various groups. Emphasis is on group involvement. (4 hours per week)
RL 202 Individual
Lifetime Sports (R) ........2 credit hours
A survey of the basic terminology, skills, and rules for selected individual lifetime sports and their use in recreation. Emphasis is on knowledge and understanding of the organization, administration and promotion of sports which have carry-over value rather than on mastery of performance skills. (4 hours per week)
RL 203 Outdoor Recreation and
Camping (R).................3 credit hours
Includes study of the history, development, and trends of outdoor recreation, conservation, and organized camping. Emphasis is on laboratory work, field trips, and the development of outdoor skills. (6 hours per week)
RL 204 Games and
Rhythms (R) ................2 credit hours
Introduces methods and procedures in the instruction of recreational games and rhythmical activities. Course includes basic skills of games and rhythms at the elementary and secondary level. (4 hours per week)
RL 205 Aquatic
Programming (R)............2 credit hours
Includes the basic terminology, skills, and techniques of selected water related activities and their use in recreation programs. (4 hours per week)
RL 206 Dance Activities (R) .........2 credit hours
Introduces methods and materials for folk, square and social dance. Attention is given to terminology, skills, selection, and presentation of dances. Emphasis is on knowledge and understanding of administration and promotion, rather than on mastery of performance skills. (4 hours per week)
RL 207 Equipment &
Facilities (R)..............2 credit hours
Designed to acquaint and familiarize student with recreational equipment and program facilities. (4 hours per week)
RL 208 Recreation in Special
Settings (R) ...............3 credit hours
Insight into special recreation programming: therapeutic recreation; recreation for aged; recreation for the handicapped as related to community and volunteer services; recreation rehabilitation for the alcoholic, juvenile delinquent and criminal. (3 hours per week)
RL 299 Independent Study (R)... 1-6 credit hours
This course provides opportunity for a student to study intensively a specific topic of interest under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Permission to enroll for independent study must be obtained from the Division Director and the assigned instructor. The number of credit hours to be allowed for succesful completion of the course will be determined cooperatively by the instructor and the Division Director. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
TRAFFIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM
TE 100 Introduction to Traffic
Engineering (R)............3 credit hours
Course objectives include a general overview of Traffic Engineering, career opportunities, specific areas of interest to the student, and an introduction to the remaining occupational courses required in the program. (3 hours per week)
TE 102 Traffic Engineering
Studies I ..................3 credit hours
Course includes problems applicable to surveys, survey types, execution, analysis, and field techniques. Stressed are statistical significance, innovations of applications and hands-on procedures. (3 hours per week)
TE 103 Traffic Engineering
Studies II..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: TE 102
A continuation of TE 102 with emphasis placed upon such topics as origin-destination surveys, transit studies, parking studies, lighting studies and observance studies. (3 hours per week)
TE 200 Traffic Engineering
Psychology..................3 credit hours
Course objectives include behavioral theory, behavioral measurements and driver expectancy. Course will stress practical application and research techniques. (3 hours per week)
TE 202 Traffic Laws, Ordinances and
Regulations ................4 credit hours
Course covers the court system, legislative procedure, legislative language, judicial interpretation and their application to traffic control. (4 hours per week)
TE 203 Geometric Design I...........3 credit hours
Geometries will be defined and geometric design will be related to accident and traffic operations. Capacity will also be covered. (3 hours per week)
TE 204 Geometric Design II..........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: TE 203
A continuation of TE 203 with added instruction in topics such as control of access, grade separations and interchanges, safety, research, capacity, freeways and expressways, etc. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab per week)
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TE 210 Traffic Accident Reporting
and Analysis...............3 credit hours
Course objectives include reporting an accident, determining violations and causes, analyzing mass accident data, determining causative elements, and proposing solutions to accident problems. (3 hours per week)
TE 211 Urban Transportation
Planning I ................3 credit hours
Course includes an introduction to the purpose, technique and limitations of urban transportation planning. The use of output from the planning process as an operational tool and the limitations on accuracy will be covered. (3 hours per week)
TE 212 Urban Transportation
Planning II................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: TE 211
A continuation of TE 211 with additional instruction in model split techniques, parking, traffic assignments, environmental considerations, development of alternatives and economic analysis. (3 hours per week)
TE 215 Traffic Engineering
Problems...................3 credit hours
Social, economic and psychologyical factors which influence traffic engineering. Traffic engineering issues and problems of contemporary importance will be discussed. (3 hours per week)
URBAN HORTICULTURE
UH 100 Introduction to Urban
Horticulture (N)...........2 credit hours
Rocky Mountain Horticulture is different, but not impossible. Cultural methods and plant materials are suggested which will aid the horticulturist in adjusting to our existing climatic conditions. Basic design principles and maintenance are also covered. (2 hours per week)
UH 101 Introduction to Landscape
Construction Drafting (N) .. 4 credit hours
This course introduces the student to the proper use of drafting equipment, printing techniques, freehand drawing, scale drawings, and isometric drawings designing landscape structure. (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)
UH 102 Landscape Plant
Materials (N) .............4 credit hours
The identification, culture and use of deciduous and evergreen plant materials. (6 hours per week, lecture and lab)
UH 104 Plant Science I (N) ...........4 credit hours
A study of fundamentals of plant growth with major emphasis upon the seed plants. Plant processes and growth related to commercial horticultural practices. (6 hours per week, lecture and lab)
UH 106 Plant Science II (N)...........4 credit hours
Suggested Prerequisite: UH 104 A continuation of Plant Science UH 104, including factors affecting flowering, seeds, fruits, plant genetics and the lower plants, related to plant diseases likely to be encountered in the field. (6 hours per week, lecture and lab)
UH 108 Landscape Planning (N) ... 4 credit hours
Suggested Prerequisite: UH 101 and UH 102 Practical experience in drafting and design principles used in planning the home grounds and other areas. (6 hours per week, lecture and lab)
UH 110 Soils & Fertilizers (N) ...... 4 credit hours
Suggested Prerequisite: UH 104 The properties and management of soils in relation to plant growth with emphasis on the principles of solid fertility and practice of fertilizer use. (6 hours per week, lecture and lab)
UH 111 Small Engine & Carburetion
Repair for U.H. (N).........5 credit hours
The principles, design, construction, servicing, operation, troubleshooting and major overhaul of small engines (both two- and four-cycle) are studied, both in theory and practical application on live chain-saws, mowers, tillers, spraying equipment and small garden tractors. (6 hours lecture and lab per week)
UH 112 Plant Propagation (N)...........4 credit hours
Suggested Prerequisite: UH 104 The theory and practical application of propagation by seed, cuttings, budding, grafting and layering with proper usage of chemical room stimulators. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week)
UH 114 Floral Design (N) ..............4 credit hours
Practical experience in handling and arrangement of flowers. Students will design their own certerpieces, corsages, floral arrangements for special occasions and holidays. (6 hours per week, lecture and lab)
UH 116 Merchandising Horticultural
Products (N)................1 credit hour
Display and selling of plants produced in horticultural greenhouse. (2 hours per week, lab)
UH 201 Nursery Management (N) .. 4 credit hours
Suggested Prerequisites: UH 102 and UH 104 and UH 110.
Propagation, planting, crop rotation, business and cultural practices involved in operating a nursery. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab per week)
UH 203 Horticultural Equipment &
Facilities (N)..............3 credit hours
Practical experience is gained in the operation of landscaping and turf equipment: tractors, front end loaders, etc. along with their proper servicing and maintenance. Various horticulture supplies will also be introduced. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab per week)
UH 205 Landscape
Management (N)..............4 credit hours
Suggested Prerequisites: UH 102,
UH 104 and UH 110
Care and maintenance practices concerning commercial, industrial, and public grounds areas. Field trips will aid the student in identifying and solving grounds management problems. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
UH 207 Greenhouse Management
(N) ........................4 credit hours
Suggested Prerequisites: UH 104 and UH 110 Environmental control, culture and production methods employed in producing some of the leading florist crops (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab per week)
UH 208 Landscape Surveying (N) .. 4 credit hours
The student will learn how to use surveying equipment; topographical plotting as pertains to landscape development and construction, establishing grades, contouring,
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estimating top soil quantities and placing grade stakes in the field. (6 hours per week lecture and lab)
UH 209 Horticultural Business
Operations (N)..............3 credit hours
A study of the methods and problems involved in operating a small business. (3 hours per week lecture)
UH 211 Diseases and Pests (N)__________4 credit hours
Identification, prevention and control of diseases and insect problems. Special consideration will be given to the use of insecticides and other chemicals (6 hours per \ week, lecture and lab)
UH 212 Basic Landscape
Construction Estimating & Bidding (N) ..............8 credit hours
Suggested Prerequisites: Math, UH 102,
UH 108, UH 110, UH 201, UH 203 Students will learn basic landscape construction methods and equipment operation, i.e., grading and sod laying, seeding, retaining wal and step construction, edging gravel and mulching techniques and estimating costs. (10 hours lecture and lab per week)
UH 213 Turf Production &
Management (N)..............4 credit hours
Suggested Prerequisites: UH 104 and UH 110 The principles and practices involved in the establishment and maintenance of lawns and turfs for parks, playgrounds, golf courses and home grounds. (6 hours per week, lecture and lab)
UH 217 Advanced Landscape
Planning (N) ...............4 credit hours
Suggested Prerequisites: UH 101, UH 102, UH 108, UH 110, UH 208
Most of the class activity will be advanced field work which includes use of surveying procedures. Classroom lecture time will be held to a minimum. Enrollment will be limited. (6 hours per week, lecture and lab)
UH 219 Landscape Perspective
Drawing (N).................4 credit hours
Suggested Prerequisite: UH 108 Students will learn how to illustrate landscaping plans in three dimension drawings. 6 hours per week, lecture and lab)
UH 221 Seminar in
Horticulture (N)............1 credit hour
Student must have completed 45 credit hours, at least 15 of which, must be in horticulture or a related science. (Hours arranged)
URBAN PLANNING TECHNOLOGY
UP 100 Introduction to
Planning (R) .............3 credit hours
An introduction to the planning process as it is currently operating in the urban setting with an emphasis on basic planning philosophy, techniques, and the function of the planning technician in development of solutions to urban problems including mass transportation, housing, and pollution. (3 hours per week)
UP 102 Date Collecting Techniques
and Evaluation (R)........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: UP 100 Introduction to Planning
Basic principles of sampling; survey design; systems of sampling; methods of estimation; problem definition; evaluation of information collected; organization and preparation of reports, including techniques of collecting, interpreting and presenting information useful in urban planning. (2 hours of lecture, 3 hours lab per week)
UP 110 Problems in Urban
Planning (R) ...............3 credit hours
Social, economic and psychological factors which influence social stratification and their effect on urban planning. Urban planning issues and problems of contemporary importance such as social attitudes, public opinion, etc. (3 hours per week)
UP 200 Statistics for
Planners (R) ...............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 104 Applied Math III Data handling; methods of analysis of interpretation; application of techniques to data rather than development of formulas; with examples drawn from urban planning studies. (3 hours per week)
UP 202 Data Processing for
Planners (R) ...............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: M 104 Applied Math III and UP 102 Data Collecting Techniques and Evaluation Effective use of automatic equipment necessary to meet the information needs of urban planners. Study of the basic data processing concepts and procedures including management information systems, the hardware and software necessary for system implementation and intrafirm and agency coordination. (3 hours per week)
UP 205 Map Reading and Photo
Interpretation (R)..........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SU 102 Basic Surveying, and UP 100 Introduction to Planning
Interpretation and information gathering from maps and aerial photos. Use and application of black and white and color photos to urban planning. Final projects will be an evaluation of an area for specific proposal. (6 hours lab per week)
UP 207 Pictorial Drafting (R)...........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: D 111 Introduction to Drafting Problems involving the construction, layout, and rendering of pictorial illustrations of a technical nature, including exploded assemblies and assembled sections, using axonometric, and perspective projection. (6 hours each week, lecture and laboratory)
UP 210 Planning Law (R).................3 credit hours
An introduction to the legal basis for planning including such topics as the basic court cases and Federal laws which delineate the planning function in the urban setting, the State enabling legislation, and a review of local jurisdiction ordinance forms. This is followed by a review of the process which is required for the passage of new state and local laws. (3 hours per week)
UP 297 Cooperative Work
Experience (R) ...........1-6 credit hours
In the Urban Planning Technology program, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved, with a College in-
029


structor providing coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and apprd approval of the Division Director. The amount of time spent in cooperative work experience will vary to meet student's individual needs. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
UP 299 Independent Study (R) ... 1-6 credit hours
This course provides opportunity for a student to study intensively a specific topic of interest under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Permission to enroll for independent study must be obtained from the Division Director and the assigned instructor. The number of credit hours to be allowed for successful completion of the course will be determined cooperatively by the Instructor and the Division Director. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
WATER-WASTEWATER TECHNOLOGY (R)
WW 100 Introduction to
Water-Wastewater (R)_____3 credit hours
This course is designed to introduce the student to the characteristic effects of wastewater upon water quality. Treatment operations used to remove objectionable pollutants. Characteristics of water, water treatment and protection of ground water.(3 hours per week)
WW 101 Water Sources
and Supply (R) ..........3 credit hours
A study of the aspects of Water Sources and Supply. Included topics will be Surface Water, Ground Water, Water Storage, Affects of Storage, Water Shed Protection and Raw Water Transmission. (3 hours per week)
WW 102 Mechanical
Physical Treatment (R) ... 3 credit hours
The course will include the principles of pre-treatment of wastewater, study of Sceens and Racks, Communution, Grit Removal and Grit Chambers and Preaeration. Also, studied will be the technical processes of sedimentation and flotation. (3 hours per week)
WW 103 Blueprint Reading for
Water-Wastewater (R)_____3 credit hours
Instruction in reading and interpreting drawings of treatment works, equipment, distribution and collection systems and introduction to different types of graphical presentations and interpretations and use of various graphs and monographs. (3 hours per week)
WW 105 Water Distribution (R) .... 3 credit hours
Develops a knowledge of water distribution systems and components and the operation and maintenance of equipment. Some specifics are: distribution and service fittings, tapping, valves, hydrants, main cleaning and line installation. (3 hours per week)
WW 106 Sludge Treatment (R) _________3 credit hours
A corrse designed to give the student a basic understanding of the principles of Sludge Digestion, Sludge drying on sand beds, the use of chemical for conditioning. Also covered will be Vacuum filtration, Flotation and Centrifuging. (3 hours per week)
WW 107 Advanced Treatment (R) 3 credit hours
Introduction to some of the more sophisticated treatment methods used in water and wastewater. Tertiary treatment methods are discussed such as, ion exchange, acti-
vated carbon and reverse osmosis. Disinfection will also be discussed. (3 hours per week)
WW 108 Waste Water Collection
Systems (R)..................3 credit hours
The course will develop an understanding of information and procedures used in design, construction and maintenance of sanitary sewers, lift stations and sewage pumps, measurement of wastewater flow and sewage disposal for residences and institutions through discussion. (3 hours per week)
WW 109 Basic Electricity for
Water-Wastewater (R)_________3 credit hours
An elementary study of electricity, electrical terms and how to trouble shoot basic electrical problems that may be incurred in day-to-day plant operations. (3 hours per week)
WW 200 Hydraulics for
Water-Wastewater (R) .... 5 credit hours
Introduction to principles of density, specific gravity, Pascals law, pressures, force, heads, friction loss, flow measurement and other topics related specifically to liquids and their properties in water and wastewater operations. (3 hours lecture, 4 hours lab per week)
WW 202 Water Treatment I (R)_3 credit hours
Familiarization with theory equipment and operational practices of a conventional Water Treatment Plant. Including basic design and operation (3 hours per week)
WW 203 Water Treatment II.3 credit hours
Study of the Chemical-Physical aspects of Water Treat-
ment. (Coagulation-Flacculation.) To afford the student a more complete understanding of Coagulation-Flacculation, Sedimentation, and Filtration. Includes disinfection. (3 hours per week)
WW 204 Biological
Treatment (R)..................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: WW 100 Introduction to Water-Wastewater
A study of how Biological Treatment is used in the field of waste water treatment. Included topics that will be covered will be: activated sludge, trickling filters, and oxidation ponds. (3 hours per week)
WW 205 Water-Wastewater Equipment-
Maintenance (R)..............3 credit hours
A course designed to make the student aware of sound practices in general equipment repair and maintenance. Specific tools, protective coatings and record keeping are to be stressed. (3 hours per week)
WW 206 Water-Wastewater Administration
& Finance (R)...............3 credit hours
Sound practices in project service costs, rate structure, municipal finance, safety programs and personnel practices are to be taught. (3 hours per week)
WW 208 Sanitary
Chemistry I (R)..............4 credit hours
Introductory course teaches fundamentals essential to good laboratory operation. Subjects such as laboratory safety, basic concepts concerning atoms and molecules, calculations regarding solubility, reactivities of compounds, pH calculations etc., to provide a basis for more detailed work in the water and wastewater laboratory courses. (3 hours lecture, 4 hours lab per week)
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WW 209 Sanitary
Chemistry II (R) .........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: WW 208 Sanitary Chemistry I Theory and laboratory techniques for all control tests of water purification and wastewater treatment. It includes basic in-plant studies. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab per week)
WW 220 Public Relations for Water-
Wastewater ...............3 credit hours
Course will be developed during 1973-74 school years. For course content and description student should contact program instructors. (3 hours per week)
WW 225 Instrumentation and
Controls (R)..............4 credit hours
An elementary study of hydraulic, pneumatic, mechanical, electrical and electronic control systems and components. It includes a basic description, analysis, and explanation of operation of instrumental controls for water and wastewater plants. Typical performance characteristics, accuracy and application of instruments are studied. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab per week)
WW 297 Cooperative Work
Experience (R) ...........7 credit hours
In the Water-Wastewater Technology program, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved, with a College instructor providing coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the division director.
The amount of time spent in cooperative work experience will vary to meet students individual needs. (Credit and Contact Hours Arranged)
SEMINARS AND WORKSHOPS
Most of the courses offered by the Division of Community and Personal Service Occupations can be adapted for seminars and workshops to meet specific occupational needs. For further information, contact the Director of Community and Personal Service Occupations on your campus.
COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE
297 Cooperative Work
Experience (A, N, R) ... 3-12 credit hours
In some program areas, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved, with a College instructor providing coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of the Division Director.
The amount of time spent in cooperative work experience will vary somewhat from program to program and to meet students individual needs, (credit hours arranged)
OCCUPATIONAL PRACTICUM
298 Occupational
Practicum (R).........1-6 credit hours
This course is designed for students having previous work experience in their major field of study. Emphasis will be placed upon job analysis, development of long-range career goal planning, upgrading of present job, supervisory training and the like. Planned and supervised learning experiences will be provided in the business- industry sector of the community, depending on individual student needs and interests. Learning experiences will be supervised by the Coordinator of Cooperative Education. Prerequisites are completion of 297 Cooperative Work Experience or the equivalent job-related work experience and the approval of the Coordinator of Cooperative Education, (credit hours arranged)
INDEPENDENT STUDY
299 Independent Study
(A, N, R)........... 1-12 credit hours
Independent study is available in each of the major areas of the Division of Community & Personal Service Occupations. The course provides opportunity for a student to study intensively a specific topic of unterest under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Permission to enroll for independent study must be obtained from the Division Director and the assigned instructor. The number of credit hours to be allowed for successful completion of the course will be determined cooperatively by the instructor and the Division Director, (credit hours arranged)
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DIVISION OF HEALTH OCCUPATIONS
Dental Assisting N
Respiratory (Inhalation) Therapy Technology N
Respiratory (inhalation) Therapy Asst. N
Medical Insurance Clerk A
Nurse Assisting A, N, R
Nursing A, N
Practical Nursing A
R. N. Refresher Course R
Optometric Assisting N
Radiologic Technology N
Operating Room Technology A
Ward Clerk A
Note: Auraria CampusA North CampusN Red Rocks CampusR