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Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1979-1980

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Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1979-1980
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Community College of Denver
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Denver, Colo.
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Community College of Denver
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English

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Community College of Denver
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Auraria Library
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Full Text
Community College of Denver
1979/80 Catalog
raria Campus h Campus ed Rocks Campus
AURARIA LIBRARIES
LAWRENCE AT ELEVENTH SL JDJENVER, COLORADO 80204
ARCHIVES AURARIA LIBRARY


Denver Area Council
Mrs. Rosemary Dooley
Chairperson 5/26/75 5/26/79 Jefferson County
Mr. Edwin E. Harshbarger, Jr.
Vice Chairperson 1/12/77 5/25/79 Adams County
Mr. Cipriano Griego
Secretary 5/16/75 5/26/79 Denver County
Mrs. Aurelia C. Anderson
9/14/67 5/26/81 Boulder County
Eddie L. Brandon
4/12/79-5/26/81 Arapahoe County
Robert E. Lahti President
The Community College of Denver is dedicated to the open door philosophy of accepting post-secondary individuals who can profit from any instructional program or service offered. This publication describes the programs and services extended by our staff as we attempt to meet the needs of each individual. Should there be additional instructional activities or services which would allow us to be more responsive to our 5-county service area, we hope you will not hesitate to call them to our attention.
With commitment to the dignity and significance of each individual student, we pledge to do our best facilitating the achievement of your educational goal while at CCD.
Welcome to campus!
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Robert E. Lahti President
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
KEY TO COURSE PREFIX LETTERS.................................................3
GENERAL INFORMATION.......................................................4-19
Admissions Information.....................................................5
Tuition and Fees......................................................... 5
Student Services..........................................................10
Center for Physically Disadvantaged..................................... 17
MAP........................................................................ 20
1979-80 STUDENT CALENDAR.................................................. 21
GENERAL STUDIES...........i.....
Division of Communications and Arts Division of Science and Mathematics.
Division of Social Sciences....
Consortium of Ethnic Studies...
22,23 24 .35 .42 50
OCCUPATIONAL STUDIES.........
Division of Business Occupations Division of Health Occupations Division of Industrial Occupations Division of Service Occupations. .
53-55 56 72 .88 156
STAFF AND FACULTY
191-196
INDEX
197, 198
COLLEGE ADDRESSES
Central Administration 1600 Downing Street Denver, Colorado 80218 Phone: 839-3481
Aurora Education Center 9859 East 16th Avenue Aurora, Colorado 80010 Phone: 364-4495
North Campus 3645 West 112th Avenue Westminster, Colorado 80030 Phone: 466-8811
Auraria Campus 1111 West Colfax Denver, Colorado 80204 Phone: 629-2400
Red Rocks Campus 12600 West 6 Avenue Golden, Colorado 80401 Phone: 988-6160
Page 2


KEY TO COURSE PREFIX LETTERS
Page No.
ABP Auto Body Painting......................132,133
ABS Auto Body Service........................ 133-135
ACC Accounting.................................56, 57
ANT Anthropology...................................42
APP Airframe Power Plant..........................132
APT Appliance and Refrigeration Technology .... 110, 111
ART Art........................................24, 25
ATE Architectural Technology...................96,97
AUM Automotive Mechanics......................135-139
AVT Audio Visual Technology................. 156, 157
BET Biomedical Equipment Technology...........111,112
BIO Biology.....................................35,36
BMT Business Machine Technology...............139-141
BOC Bilingual Office Careers....................57,58
BRI Bricklaying................................88, 89
BTR Building Trades.............................88,89
BSI Business Simulation and Internship.........58, 59
BUS Business...........'............................59
CAR Carpentry..................................90, 91
CET Civil Engineering Technology...............97, 98
CHE Chemistry..................................36, 37
COA Commercial Art.............................98-100
COM Communications............................25, 26
CRJ Criminal Justice..........................158-161
CRM Credit Management..............................60
CSC Computer Science...............................37
CSS Community and Social Service Associate. 157,158
DEA Dental Assisting...........................72, 73
DIT Dietetic Technology.......................161,162
DPE Diesel Power-Heavy Equipment
and Truck Mechanics.......................141,142
DRA Drama..........................................26
DRC Drafting for Construction.................100-102
DRI Drafting for Industry...................101,102
EAS Earth Science..............................37, 38
ECE Early Childhood Education
and Management.......................... 162-165
ECO Economics...................................42,43
EDP Electronic Data Processing.................61, 62
EDT Electronic Digital Technology.............. 120-122
EIC Electricity Industrial/Commercial.........118-120
ELC Communications Electronics Technology... 113,114
ELF Electricity Fundamentals......................118
ELT Electronics Technology................... 122-124
ENG English^................................... 26,27
EVT Environmental Technology..................165-167
EXH Executive Housekeeping....................177,178
FAM Foreign Automotive Mechanics..............144.145
FLP Fluid Power...............................142-144
FRE French.........................................27
FSM Food Service and Management............... 169 172
FST Fire Science Technology...................167-169
GEO Geography......................................43
GER German.........................................27
GGA Gerontology/Geriatricsand
Activities Directing......................172,173
GRA Graphic Arts..............................103,104
HEO Heavy Equipment Operation
and Preventive Maintenance.............. 145-147
HIS History.....................................43-45
HMO Hotel Motel Operations....................173, 175
Page No.
-HUM Humanities......................................28
IMD Industrial Maintenance Technology..........125, 126
IMD Industrial Mechanical
Drafting Technology.......................104-106
IMT Information Media Technology................175-177
INM Industrial Management.........................62,63
JOU Journalism.......................................28
LDC Learning Development Center...................16,17
LIT Literature................;..................29, 30
MAN Management...................................63, 64
MAR Marketing.................................... 64,65
MAS Machine Shop...............................128-131
MAT Mathematics..................................38, 39
MDT Machine Drafting Technology................106,107
MOM Medical Office Management...................75, 76
MUS Music.........................................30,31
NCE Continuing Education for Nurses...............79-81
NMT Nuclear Medicine Technology.................. 76,77
NUR Nursing......................................78, 79
OPA Optometric Assisting.........................82, 83
ORT Operating Room Technology.....................81,82
PAR Paralegal...................................178-181
PET Petroleum Technology
Exploration/Production...................149, 150
PHE Physical Education............................31-33
PHI Philosophy.......................................45
PHO Photography.................................107-109
PHY Physics......................................40, 41
PLU Plumbing......................................92,93
POS Political Science .........................45,46
PSY Psychology....................................46,47
QAT Quality Assurance Technology................150,151
RAT Diagnositc Radiologic Technology..............74,75
REA Reading..........................................33
REE Real Estate.................................. 66,67
REL Recreational Leadership.....................181,182
RIT Respiratory Therapy Technology................86,87
RTT Radiation Therapy Technology................. 83,85
SCI Science..........................................41
SCS Sports Crafts and Specialty
Area Mechanics........................... 147-149
SEC Secretarial...................................67,68
SKC Skills Center
Instructional Center...........................33
SOC Sociology.....................................47-49
SOM Solar Energy-Installation
and Maintenance.............................94,95
SOS Social Science...................................49
SPA Spanish......................................33, 34
SPE Speech...........................................34
SUM Supervisory Management....................... 68,69
SUR Surveying <.................................95,96
TCE Consumer Electronics Technology.............114-118
TEI Technical Illustration.....................109, 110
TET Traffic Engineering Technology............. 182-184
TTM Traffic and Transportation Management.........70,71
UPT Urban Planning Technology..................188, 189
URH Urban Horticulture..........................184-187
VMT Vending Machine Technology.................127, 128
WEF Weldingand Fabrication......................151-155
WWT Water-Wastewater Technology................189-191
Page 3


GENERAL INFORMATION
History of the College
The 1967 Colorado General Assembly in the enactment, of House Bill 1448 established a state system of community colleges under a State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education. The Bill also called for a five-member council for each of the state community colleges. The council then was appointed for the Community College of Denver and officially named the Denver Area Council for Community Colleges.
The first college to be created under the State Board by the passage of House Bill 1449 was the Community College of Denver. The law called for the establishment of three campuses in successive years beginning in the Fall of 1968 to serve primarily the area of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver and Jefferson Counties.
The first campus, designated the North Campus, was established in relocatable buildings at East 62nd Avenue and Downing Street in the Fall of 1968. The permanent buildings for this campus were constructed at 112th and Lowell Boulevard and occupied in the Fall of 1977. It is a unique campus in that it is the largest known facility in the world totally solar heated. The North Campus has grown in enrollment from the original 1,861 students to 4,831 in the Fall of 1977.
The West Campus, now named Red Rocks, was established in the Fall of 1969, also on a temporary site. The initial registration for that Fall was 780 students. The first phase of a permanent new facility was built at 12600 W. 6th Avenue and occupied by students in the Spring of 1974. The second phase of the Campus was completed in time for Winter Quarter, 1976. The initial enrollment of 780 students at this campus has grown to an enrollment of 6,310 for the Fall, 1977.
A third Campus, Auraria, opened in downtown Denver in the Fall of 1970. This campus occupied several rented buildings prior to Winter Quarter, 1976. At that time the campus moved to its permanent home located on the Auraria Higher Education Center site. The Auraria Campus had an enrollment of 4,288 for Fall, 1977.
Accreditation
In April. 1975, each of the three campuses of the Community College of Denver were granted unconditional accreditation and membership status in the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
The Community College of Denver is under the jurisdiction of the Colorado State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education. The community Colleges Division of the State Board has received letters from officials of four-year colleges and universities in Colorado stating that transfer credit will be granted to students who have successfully completed appropriate courses at the several colleges operating under the State Board. Students who plan to transfer to baccalaureate programs at tour-year institutions can be confident that college-parallel credits earned at the Community College of Denver will transfer without difficulty if students do acceptable work at the four-year institution.
MISSION AND ROLE
Mission Statement
The Community College of Denver is a comprehensive State community college established within the five county area of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder. Denver and Jefferson counties to help meet the educational needs of youth, adults and the community. The college is dedicated to accepting all individuals who can benefit from the educational programs of the college.
College Role
The role of the Community College of Denver is:
1. To provide educational programs to meet the occupational needs of youth and adults in technical and vocational fields.
2. To provide educational programs which will enable students to transfer to four-year colleges or universities.
3. To provide other educational opportunities for youth and adults including developmental programs, cultural opportunities and community service.
4. To provide services that will assist students in identifying, selecting and accomplishing their educational goals.
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
The Affirmative Action Supervisor has been appointed to serve the students and staff of the three campuses and Centeral Administration in all cases of discrimination. The Affirmative Action Supervisor is located at Center Administration. 1009 Grant Street
Page 4


TUITION, FEES, EXPENSES, AND REFUNDS
TUITION
The tuition for state supported institutions is determined by the Colorado General Assembly and is subject to change, at press time 1979 Long Bill still in debate.
TUITION SUMMER TERM, FALL AND SPRING SEMESTER Resident
1-11 credit hours $16.20 per credit hour 12-18 credit hours $194.50 Each hour over 18 is an additional $13.00 Non-Resident
1-11 credit hours $73.05 per credit hour
12-18 credit hours $876.50
Each hour over 18 is an additional $58.45
FEES
A student fee in the amount of $.75 to $2.40 per credit hour depending upon the campus up to a maximum of $28.80 is charged to all enrolled students. This money is used for various student activities and benefits including student publications, operation of student government, parking privileges, cultural activities, recreational activities, clubs and organizational activities. Expenditure of student fee monies is generally made with the approval of the Student Government Association. Students enrolled in certain courses may be required to purchase individual supplies and materials and to rent uniforms.
In addition to the activity tee at the Auraria Campus, every registered student is assessed $10.00 per semester which is for the payment for the construction of the Auraria Student Center and Child Care Center.
FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS OF STUDENTS
The financial obligations of students to the College such as payments for tuition, fees, and books are due and payable on the published specified date or at the times the obligations are incurred. In unusual circumstances of an emergency nature, where it may be impossible for a student to pay the total charges at the proper time, special arrangements may be considered for approval by the Business Office.
A student is not considered officially registered until his class schedule has been processed by the Business Office.
A student who is in any way financially obligated to the College through a tuition deferment, emergency student loan, National Defense Loan, etc., or who has failed to account for College property in his possession will be denied a transcript of record and registration for subsequent sessions until he has made a satisfactory settlement with the college.
RESIDENCE CLASSIFICATION FOR TUITION PURPOSES
At the time of application for admission, students are classified for tuition purposes as Colorado residents or out-of-state residents according to provisions of Colorado law.
Any student who has been classified as a non-resident and who believes he can qualify as a resident may secure from the Registrar a petition form for in-state status. A copy of the regulations governing residence classification is a part of the petition. Students should be aware of the published deadline for petitions for each academic term. It is the students responsibility to ensure that petitions and all sup-
Page5
portive documentation are on file in the Registrar's Office by the published deadline. The Registrars Office cannot assume responsibility for mailed petitions which arrive after the deadline, and petitions will not be accepted after the published date.
The final decision regarding tuition status rests with the Registrar. Changes in classification, whether from out-of-state to in-state or the reverse, shall become effective at the time of the students next registration. All questions regarding residency classification should be addressed to the Registrar.
WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURE AND TUITION REFUNDS
Students are admitted to the Community College of Denver under the assumption that they will remain until the end of the quarter or longer, unless unforeseen circumstances necessitate their withdrawal from the institution.
When a student finds it necessary to initiate a complete withdrawal from the College, he should check with the Register's office for the proper procedure and to obtain the necessary forms.
The student may claim a seventy-five percent refund of tuition paid if a complete withdrawal is made before the eleventh day of classes of the new semester. Tuition refund request forms are available in the Office of Admissions and Records. No tuition refund of less that $1.00 will be made.
No refunds are possible after the tenth day of class, nor are refunds made if students drop a partial course load at any time, v .
If original tuition paid warrants, students are entitled to a 100% refund of tuition and fees paid for any class(es) cancelled by the College. This refund must be initiated by the student through the Admissions Office.
Unusual circumstances concerning refunds should be referred to the Dean of Student Services.
ADMISSION POLICY
The College will admit high school graduates, nongraduates of high school who are eighteen years of age or older, and any other person who can profit from the instruction for which he enrolls. However, admission to the College does not assure acceptance of an individual student in a particular course or program. Some students may be requested to enroll in special courses at the College tor correction of scholastic or other deficiencies.
Applicants interested in particular programs in Health Occupations and Industrial Occupations should be aware that some of these programs'have additional special admissions procedures and forms. The applicant is responsible for contacting the particular division at the campus of his/her preference for this information.
The College does not require a physical examination as a general condition of admission but reserves the right to require evidence of good health in individual instances when such seems appropriate Physical disabilities and chronic illnesses should be indicated to the Admissions Office, Health Center and the Center for the Physically Disadvantaged.
Information confidential used to plan for appropriate services only. Entrance examinations are not required as a condition for admission to the college.
Students are served more adequately when applications and transcripts of previously earned credits are submitted in advance of counseling appointments, advising, and registration for classes.


ADMISSIONS PROCEDURE:
Submit an official form for admission to the Community College of Denver, available from the Registrars Office. Transcripts of previous high school or college credit are not required except as follows:
1. Persons planning to receive a degree or certificate from the college, who wish previous college credits to be considered, must submit official copies of those previous college transcripts to the Registrars Office no later than the deadline for graduation applications as published in the quarterly Schedule of Courses. Veterans using V.A. benefits must submit transcripts of all previous post-secondary education and training.
2. The College reserves the right to request transcripts of students in cases where it is felt that the student can be better served through use of his transcripts.
3. International students should refer to International Student section.
These documents become the property of the College and will not be released to the student or transferred to other institutions. The student's subsequent registration is contingent upon receipt of all required documents.
THE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT
An individual, under 18, presently attending high school, and wanting to take courses at the College should:
1. Make arrangements through a high school counselor for certification of credit.
2. Complete a standard form for admission.
3. Submit the special under age student application.
HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES
Colorado high school seniors applying for admission should obtain the application form from the OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS at CCD.
READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS
Former students who are returning to the College after a absence of one or more semesters, Summer term excepted, must make application for readmission. Students who have attended other colleges since last attending the Community College of Denver may be requested to submit a transcript of all college credits.
TRANSFER OF CREDIT
If a student wishes to have previous college credits applied toward CCD degree requirements, he.must submit official copies of previous college transcripts to the Registars Office no later than the deadline for graduation applications as published in the semester course schedule.
Students needing transcript evaluations for educational planning must make arrangements for evaluations before or after formal registration periods. Due to staff limitations, transcripts will not be evaluated on registration days.
The Community College of Denver will accept Ds" from other institutions, but in order for a person to graduate from Community College of Denver with a Certificate of Completion, Certificate of Achievement, or an Associate Degree, he must have an overall grade point average of 2.0 in
all credit counted toward the certificate or degree. Students are herewith advised that "D" credit may not be acceptable to four year institutions.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
The Community College of Denver is authorized by the U.S. Immigration Service to admit non-immigrant alien students.
International students who wish to enroll at the Community College of Denver are required to submit the following documents:
1 An official form for admission to the Community College of Denver.
2. Two official copies of the appropriate high school, college or equivalent transcript. One copy must be an English translation. The other transcript should be in the original language.
3. Evidence of proficiency in the English language as documented by the Test of English as a Foreign Language, or ELS, level 107 (English Language Services).
For information on the TOEFL test, write to:
Test of English as a Foreign Language
Educational Testing Service
Box 899
Princeton, New Jersey 08540 U.S.A.
4. A statement of the financial resources to provide for the student's stay in the United States.
Form 1-20A will not be issued to an International student until all the above documents are on file in the appropriate campus Office of Admissions and Records, and a decision to admit the student is made. International students should allow sufficient time to gather and submit all required documentation so that an admissions decision might be made by the College prior to the beginning of the term for which admission is sought.
Tuition and fee charges for international students are the same as for out-of-state registrants.
Page 6


REQUEST FOR TRANSCRIPTS BY STUDENTS
A student requesting that a transcript of his record be sent to an educational institution or to a prospective employer must complete the appropriate form which may be obtained from the Admissions and Records Office. The College assesses no fee for this service; however, no transcript will be provided for a student who has not fulfilled all financial obligations to the college or who has not provided transcripts as requested by the college.
CHANGE OF ADDRESS
It is the responsibility of each student to notify the Office of Admissions and Records of any change of address.
INTRA-INSTITUTIONAL AND INTER-INSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION
Students who wish to register concurrently on one or more campuses of the Community College of Denver, or at both the Auraria Campus and Metropolitan State College, should make inquiry at the office of the Registrar.
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
ATTENDANCE
College officials believe that regular class attendance is necessary if a student is to receive maximum benefits from his work. Students are expected to attend all sessions of the classes for which they are registered. Students who anticipate absences are requested to discuss these in advance with instructors.
CREDIT HOURS
Generally, one credit hour is earned by attending a nonlaboratory class for a fifty-minute period, once a week, for a full semester. In a laboratory course, one credit hour is granted for from two to four, fifty-minute periods per week in a laboratory.
COURSE LOAD
The normal course load for a full-time student is 12-18 credit hours. Special permission must be obtained from the appropriate instructional dean or an authorized representative to register for more than eighteen credit hours.
ADDING AND DROPPING COURSES
Students wishing to adjust their schedules should be familiar with the college policy which reads: The deadline for adds will be the 10th full day of instruction. The deadline for drops will be on the date two weeks prior to the end of the semester. Exceptions to this policy may be made only upon approval by the appropriate division director and instructional dean.
After the tenth class day, regular tuition will be charged for all credits added. Offsetting drops will not be taken into consideration in calculating any additional tuition. Students are encouraged to become aware of the last day to add classes each semester to avoid any additional tuition payment.
ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWAL
It is a policy of the Community College of Denver to aid and support students in pursuit of their academic goals. In the event that a student is failing to meet his/her goals through acceptable satisfactory progress, the college may ask the student to withdraw for a semester (including summer session) so the student can better clarify his/her goals during this time period and remove learning barriers which impede educational advancement.
Students who carry less than a cumulative 2.0 grade point average over two consecutive semesters (including summer session) will be subject to a one-semester suspension.
Students have the right to appeal the administrative withdrawal in view of extenuating circumstances.
Page >


EVALUATION AND GRADING
The Community College of Denver is philosophically committed to a program that focuses on the student and on activities that foster his learning. Student evaluation, when properly conducted, is regarded as one of these activities. Although the College utilizes continuous and varied means of evaluating a students progress, it has departed from tradition in adopting a system of grading. The system emphasizes accomplishment rather than penalty for failure and employs only the grade symbols listed below:
Grade Quality of Work Grade Points
Symbol Denoted by Symbol Per Credit Hour
A Superior 4
B Excellent 3
C Average 2
D Below Average 1
If a student earns a grade of D. he may elect either to have it recorded on his permanent record or disregarded. Learning accomplishment at a level which is judged to be failing receives no credit and is not recorded on the permanent record. Also, some classes have a Passing/No Credit option for grading purposes.
Grades are issued at the end of each semester for all students, and grade slips will be mailed approximately one week after the last day of classes.
Incompletes
If an incomplete (I) grade is received, it must be made up during the following semester to earn credit. (Exception: Spring Semester incompletes may be made up the subsequent Fall Semester). When work is not completed, incompletes automatically revert to No Credit (NC).
GRADE-POINT AVERAGE
Under this system, grade points measure the achievement of the student for the number of credit hours he has completed at an accomplished level of D or above. They are determined by multiplying the grade points per credit hour by the credit hour value of the course completed.
The following example will enable the student to compute his grade-point average:
Course Completed Final
Credit Hours Grade Grade Points
English Mathematics 3 B 3 grade points (3x3) equals 9
3
C 2 grade points (3x2)
Electronics equals 6
2 A 4 grade points (2x4)
Physics equals 8
5 C 2 grade points (5x2) equals 10
Physical
Education 1 D 1 grade point (lxl)
Total grade points are divided by total credit hours to compute the grade-point average. For example, 34 divided by 14 equals a 2.43 grade-point average.
The cumulative grade-point average is the total number of grade points recorded divided by the total number of credit hours.
Quarter Credit Conversion to Semester Credits
A quarter credit is equivalent to 2/3 of a semester credit. Multiply quarter credits by 2/3 to convert them to semester credits. Examples:
a) 17 quarter credits x 2/3 = 34/3 = 11 1/3 semester credits
b) 19 quarter credits x 2/3 = 38/3 = 12 2/3 semester credits
c) 180 quarter credits x 2/3 = 360/3 = 120 semester credits
The permanent record will reflect only the cumulative total quarter hours converted to semester hours: 129 quarter credits x 2/3 = 258/3 = 86 semester credits.
CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
For record and reporting purposes, students are classified as follows:
Full-time a student who carries twelve or more credit hours. Part-time a student who carries less than twelve credit hours.
First-year (Freshman) a student who has completed fewer than thirty semester hours.
Second- Year (Sophomore) a student who has completed thirty or more semester hours, but has not received an associate degree or has not qualified for upper division classification at a four-year college or university.
Unclassified a student who has earned a degree (associate, bachelors, etc.) or who has qualified for upper division classification at a four-year college or university.
CHALLENGE ALLOWANCE OF CREDIT
Students may be permitted to demonstrate that their achievement level, based on prior experience(s), is the equivalent of that required for enrollment in the successful completion bf a course offered by the College, according to the following conditions and procedures:
1. The student must be currently enrolled in the College.
2. The student must submit a petition to the appropriate division director setting forth the nature of the student's previous experience(s) and planned career objective(s) which support his petition to seek allowance of credit in lieu of enrolling in and completing a particular course.
3. Upon approval of the division director, an evaluation shall be arranged whereby the student shall have the opportunity to demonstrate that his level of achievement is the equivalent of that required by the College for successful completion of a particular course.
4. No more than one evaluation for allowance of credit for a particular course will be arranged during any semester of the regular academic schedule of the College.
5. Upon successful completion of the evaluation for allowance of credit, the student shall be awarded full credit for the particular course(s) as set forth in his approved petition.
6. Students pay tuition only if they pass and would normally owe tuition for the credit.
Page 8


NON-TRADITIONAL CREDIT
Within the strict limitations of an established policy, enrolled students are permitted to apply for an allowance of credit for demonstrated knowledge or competency they have attained through previous study and experience. This procedure includes the challenging of courses which coincide with the student's major program and career objectives, allowance of credit through CLEP examination performance at the 35th percentile, allowance of credit for USAFI test scores meeting CCD requirements, and evidence of proficiency acquired through Life Experience.
USAFI
Students desiring credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute should request that copies of such transcripts be forwarded to the registrars office An evaluation will be made and credit awarded as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education.
LIFE EXPERIENCE
The Community College of Denver may allow college credit for life experience which is evaluated by the college to be equivalent to the content of its own courses in Occupational and General Studies. Life experience is defined as any program of instruction or related experiences, formal or informal, which has not been previous equated to college credit. Students who wish to petition for such credit should contact the appropriate instructional division for complete information.
COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM
The College recognizes the CLEP examination as well as selected Subject Examinations. Up to 45 hours of college credit may be awarded through the CLEP General Examinations. Additional credit may be earned by attaining successful scores on CLEP subject matter examinations. The Registrar's Office should be consulted for details concerning College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Examinations.
Guidelines for the PEP are currently in the process of development. There are instances, particularly in the Nursing Program, where the division has requested use of the Proficiency Examination Program.
MINIMUM DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS
To receive the ASSOCIATE DEGREE a student must:
1. Complete a minimum of sixty semester hours, including the specific subject or course requirements in the selected program. Certain programs may require more than the minimum of sixty semester hours, and these must also be completed.
2. Earn an overall grade point average of 2.0 in all credit courses counted toward the degree.
3. Complete a minimum of eight semester credit hours in General Studies of which two semester credit hours must be in English.
4. Complete at least fifteen semester hours in residence at the Community College of Denver. (In mitigating circumstances, certain portions of this requirement may be waived by the Dean of Student Services.)
5. File the Application for Graduation form no later than the deadline for graduation applications as published in the semester schedule of courses. This form is available from the office of Admissions and Records.
To receive the CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT a student
must:
1. Complete the specified subject matter or course requirements of an approved program as set forth in the catalog. For programs longer than one semester in duration, at least fifteen credit hours must be earned at the Community College of Denver.
2. Earn an overall grade-point average of 2.0 in all credit counted toward the certificate.
3. Complete three credit hours in speech or English in programs of longer than one semester in duration except in programs where exemption is noted.
4. File the Application for Graduation form when registering for the final semester. This form is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION
The College offers many short courses, conferences, workshops and seminars. These will vary in length from one to two meetings of short duration to units necessitating many clock hours accumulated over a period of several weeks. Successful completion of short courses of this type will result in the granting of a Certificate of Completion.
A Certificate of Completion may also be granted upon the successful completion of a course or courses in fulfillment of an educational objective leading to a job-entry level employment as developed in conjunction with an advisor or counselor and approved by the respective division director leading to job-entry employment. In order to receive this Certificate the applicant must file the Application for Graduation form at the time of registering for the final semester. This form is available from the Office of Admission and Records.
Awarding of Posthumous Certificates and Degrees
A request for a posthumous certificate or degree may be made if the student for whom the request is made has met the following requirements:
1. Has successfully completed a minimum of 5/6 of the course credits required for the appropriate certificate or degree program.
2. Has successfully completed a minimum of 10 semester hours at the Community College of Denver.
Further information on making such a request is available in the Office of the Registrar.
TRANSFERABILITY OF CCD CREDIT TO FOUR-YEAR INSTITUTIONS
Students whose primary interest in attending the Community College of Denver is to prepare for transfer to a four-year institution should familiarize themselves with the general requirements of that institution. Because these requirements vary from institution to institution, it is important to obtain help from an advisor or counselor in planning a program of study.
In addition, each major at an institution has specific course requirements, making it extremely important for students to follow a well-planned course of study at CCD. Students who follow a prescribed transfer program (recommended by an advisor or counselor) will have the best chance of making the smoothest transition to the college to which the student plans to transfer.
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ADVISING
PERSONAL GROWTH GROUPS
The entire faculty of the College is guidance oriented and has a major commitment to help each individual student pursue a course of study planned to fulfill his/her goals.
Students are assisted by the instructional staff and especially in the case of undecided students, a counselor in developing his/her program of study and selection of classes each semester.
It is the students responsibility to:
1. Meet with an instructor to discuss the most appropriate classes for his career objective.
2. Discuss his/her program and classes prior to each registration and work out his class schedule.
3. Contact an instructor when problems arise in the program. The instructor should also be informed if he/she changes his/her program of study.
4. Make certain he/she is fulfilling the departments requirements for graduation.
STUDENTS WHO HAVE NOT SELECTED A PROGRAM OF STUDY, OR ARE UNCERTAIN OF THE PROGRAM THEY WANT TO FOLLOW. ARE URGED TO CONTACT THE COUNSELING CENTER.
STUDENT SERVICES
In addition to the programs of study available at the College, a number of related or special services are provided for the assistance of students and others who may be interested.
COUNSELING
The members of the counseling staff are dedicated to helDine the students of the Community College of Denver receive the types of couhseling services they need from well-qualified and concerned counselors. Counseling is available both days and evenings for educational and career planning, and for discussion of personal and social problems.
Counseling is available from 8:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.. Monday through Thursday, and 8:00 A M. to 5:00 P.M. on Friday. Special attention is given to Academic-Educational problems, Career-Vocational Planning, and Personal-Social Adjustment. In addition to one-to-one services, a number of personal growth group activities are provided.
All counseling is treated with the highest regard for confidentiality.
Small group experiences are offered that provide assistance and personal growth in such areas as: selfexploration and understanding, human potential seminar, vocational exploration, assertiveness training and anxiety management. Some of the groups offer college credit.
TESTING
The College provides a voluntary testing program to assist students in clarifying interests and assessing general aptitudes. With this information, counselors are better able to assist individual students in making their educational and career choices and making optimum use of the resources available.
INFORMATION CENTER
On each campus, an Information Center has been established, in which a student is encouraged to ask for information about campus programs and resources. "*
CAREER CENTER
The Career Center works in conjunction with the Counseling Division. This Center has much occupational information, various college catalogs, and operates the Colorado Career Information System (COCIS) to assist students in making informed career decisions. A Vocational Guidance Specialist is available to assist students in this Center.
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FAMILY EDUCATION RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT OF
1974
In compliance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, also known as the Buckley Amendment, institutions of higher education such as the Community College of Denver are required, on an annual basis, to inform their students of their rights under the Act, and to enumerate its basic provisions. The following statement constitutes such notice.
Under the Act, students at post-secondary institutions have the right to inspect and review any and all official records, files, and data directly related to the student, including all material that is incorporated into each student's cumulative record folder.
The student shall have the right to challenge the contents of their educational records and also, an opportunity for the right to a hearing to challenge the content of his/her school records, to ensure that the records are not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy or other rights of students, and to provide an opportunity for the correction or deletion of any such inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate data contained therein.
Institutions may lose federal funds if institutional policy permits the release of personally identifiable records or files (or personal information contained therein) of students without written consent of the student, to any individual, agency, or organization, other than the following:
1. Other officials within the college.
2. Officials of other colleges to which student seeks admission.
3. Certain state and federal authorities.
4. Financial aid agencies.
5. Authorities entitled to access under state law (e.g. Open Records Law).
6. Organizations studying means of improving test, student aid, or instruction.
7. Accrediting organizations.
8. Parents of dependent students.
9. Officers of the court in response to order or subpoena.
10. Persons dealing with emergency that threatens health or safety.
"Personally identifiable records" includes the following: the name and address of the student, the name of the students parent(s) or other family member, the student's social security number, a list of personal characteristics which would make the student's identity easily traceable, or other information which would make the students identity easily traceable.
The school may release "directory information" about students without the prior approval of the student unless the student requests in writing that the institution not designate that information relating to the student: the students name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student, and other similar information.
Any student at the CCD not wishing any or all of the above information to be released upon request to any interested party must notify the Registrars Office in writing within the first ten class days of any quarter or semester. Forms for such purpose are available in the Registrar's Office. Requests for non-disclosure will be honored by the institution for only one academic year. All requests for nondisclosure filed in any academic year expire on the first day of class of the next academic year (Sept. June), and must be renewed if the student desires further non-disclosure.
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, The following types of information are maintained by the institution and are located in the Registrars Office:
1 Application for admission.
2. Evaluations of transfer credit and the transferred
transcript(s).
3. Applications for and evaluations pertaining to graduation.
4. Petitions for change in residency classification.
5. Records pertaining tothe awarding of non-traditional credit (CLEP. USAFI. Life Experience).
6. Records of all courses attempted and completed at CCD.
7. Official CCD transcript of the student's academic record.
8. Routine correspondence between the student and the institution.
9. Other records pertaining to routine transactions between the student and the institution on a day-to-day basis, eg. add-drop forms, requests for transcripts, grade change forms, etc.
The Registrar is the person responsible for the maintenance of records, and inquiries regarding such records should be directed to the Registrar or his designee.
Students wishing to examine their records may be required by the institution to give written notice of such intent. Such requests must be honored by the institution within a period not to exceed forty-five days from the date of the notice of intent.
When personally identifiable information is released to third parties under the provisions of this act, it is done on the condition that such party will not permit any other party to have access to such information without the written consent of the student.
This notice supersedes all previous notices on the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 published by or for the Community College of Denver. Revisions and clarifications will be published as experience with the law and institutional pohey warrants.
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Admission to the College implies a recognition by the student that he should respect the rights of others, and that he should observe moral and civil laws. Interference with the normal processes of education in the classroom or elsewhere on the campus will be regarded as unacceptable conduct which warrants suspension and/or dismissal from the school. The success of the College in attaining its objectives is conditioned by the good will, integrity, and honor of its Students.
The Denver Area Council has approved a document which contains a Definition of Education, a Joint Statement on Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities of Students, and Rules of Procedure in Student Disciplinary Matters. This document provides guidelines necessary to insure the rights of all members of the college community. Each campus has its specific "due process procedures. These procedures are included in the Student Handbook.
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
The College cooperates in the development of those student-initiated activities which supplement the more formal instructional program. Such activities are expected to provide constructive experiences which will stimulate personal growth and social development and add to the student's enjoyment of life. Opportunities for the development of leadership, cooperative planning and special interests are fostered through participation in these activities. All student activities are coordinated through the Office of Student Activities.


STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
The purpose of the Student Government is to represent the student body through effective com munication with all members of the college community. It encourages the development of campus organizations and activities which meet the needs and interests of the students. The Student Government also attempts to represent and interpret student opinion in the formation of Campus policy. Student Activities funds are used to provide a variety of extra-curricular and co-curricular educational and social opportunities for students, and to promote unity and fellowship among students of the Campus community.
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
A school newspaper and other publications are produced under the sponsorship of the Board of Publications, with the cooperation of the Student Activities Office.
FOODSERVICE
Automated food service is provided on all campuses in the food vending area. The Auraria Campus and North Campus provide cafeteria service as well.
HOUSING
Students who attend the Community College of Denver commute. The College does not operate a residence hall program. Students are expected to arrange their own housing. Those desiring help may contact the Business Office of Student Government Association.
STUDENT CENTER
On the Auraria Campus, the Student Center houses the Student Activities Office, Health Office, bookstore, club rooms, student council offices, activity rooms, game rooms, a Rathskellar, and lounges.
HEALTH SERVICES
College officials recognize the importance of good health for happy and productive study. The Student Health Service is designed to foster and maintain proper attitudes and habits of personal community health. Various programs and activities related to current health problems are planned each quarter. These programs are designed to educate students, faculty, and staff regarding health problems and the means of preventing them.
A registered nurse is available to assist students with minor emergencies, treatment of minor illnesses, referrals, health information and other health related problems.
Because the College carries no accident insurance for students, expenses resulting from instructional and/or recreational injuries are the sole responsibility of the student and his insurance company.
An accident and sickness insurance plan is available to students at reasonable cost. Applications for such insurance for students and their dependents are provided at the time of registration. Those who enroll after the regular registration periods may request an application form from the Health Center on the campus.
JOB DEVELOPMENT AND PLACEMENT
The Job Development and Placement Office on the respective campuses, the instructors, and the Occupational Studies Division Directors maintain close contact with business and industry concerning job op-
portunities and training needs. As a result of this team effort, various types of job opportunities are made available to students seeking full-time, part-time and temporary jobs. A special effort is made to assist students in obtaining suitable career-related employment in occupations for which they have been trained. Included in the services are resume' development, job application aids, job interview aids, summer employment, vocational counseling and a current listing of various federal, state, city and county civil service job openings. A close working relationship is also maintained with most of the community and social agencies.
Students needing employment are encouraged to contact the Placement Office on their campus for assistance and support in their job search efforts.
An employment related follow-up study is conducted on an ongoing basis to assist the college in evaluating its programs.
BOOKSTORES
AURARIA BOOK CENTER
Serving the Auraria Campus.
Telephone: 629-3230
Location: Lawrence at 10th St. in the Student Center Hours: Please call for information
NORTH CAMPUS BOOKSTORE
Serving the North Campus.
Telephone: 466-8811
Location: 3645 W. 112th Ave. in the Student Center Hours (during class sessions): 9:00 AM 8:30 PM Mon. Thur. 9:00 AM 3:00 PM Fri.
RED ROCKS BOOKSTORE
Serving the Red Rocks Campus
Telephone: 988-6160
Location: 12600 W. 6th Ave. on the Bridge.
Hours (during class sessions): 9:00 AM 8:30 PM Mon. Thur. 9:00 AM -5:00 PM Fri.
The Bookstores are the student source for all required and non-required educational materials used and new textbooks, dictionaries and reference books, school and course related supplies.
The Bookstores are also a source for college imprinted items, art and drafting supplies, office supplies, drugs and sundries, gift items, greeting cards, candy and soft goods.
Services offered by the Bookstores include special orders, used book buy, limited check cashing, photo finishing, postage stamps, graduation announcements and class rings. Hole punches, pencil sharpeners and staplers are always available for student use.
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
GENERAL INFORMATION:
The Financial Aid Office administers federal and state financial assistance programs. Eligibility is based on financial need as defined by Federal, State and institutional regulations and guidelines. Financial Aid students are expected to complete a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester with a 2.0 grade or better.
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APPLICATION PROCEDURES:
All students must apply and be accepted for admission to the College before disbursement of any financial aid. Applications for financial aid are required to be completed once each year to determine each student's eligibility for financial aid. The following applications are required:
1 American College Testing Programs Family Financial Statement (FFS) also includes the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program (BEOG).
2. Institutional Application (CSD)
Additional supporting documents may be requested by the Financial Aid Office such as tax returns, Affidavit of Non-Support, statement of Welfare benefits, Social Security benefits, etc. Application materials are available in the Financial Aid Office on each campus of the Community College of Denver. Priority will be given to students with completed applications on file by the following dates:
Academic Year 1979-80 June 1,1979 Spring Semester 1980 December 1,1979 Summer Session 1980 April 1,1980
Students are encouraged to submit their applications early. Applications received after the above priority dates will be given consideration based on the availability of funds.
Financial Aid will be awarded by priority date until funds are expended.
ELIGIBILITY:
Most types of assistance from the Financial Aid Office are based on financial need. Financial need is the difference between the costs of attending the College and the resources available to the student. Resources include parents contributions, earnings from employment, spouse's income, assistance from friends, Veterans benefits, Social Security, Vocational Rehabilitation, Welfare, etc. All resources and changes in resources must be reported by the student to the Financial Aid Office.
Financial Aid recipients must reapply for aid each academic year. Summer awards are determined separately from academic year awards. Each year financial aid is awarded based on the students current financial need and academic progress, and the availability of funds.
Part-time students (1-11 credit hours per semester) may receive aid not to exceed tuition and fees plus $6.00 per' credit hour for books and supplies, and transportation of $10.00 per month.
G.E.D. students may receive aid not to exceed tuition and fees plus $6.00 per credit hour for books and supplies and transportation of $10.00 per month.
Students holding or eligible for Associate, Bachelors, Masters, or Doctorate degrees will not be eligible for financial aid. Flowever, in exceptional cases a person may appeal to the Office of Financial Aid for direct educational costs [tuition and fees (instate)].
SATISFACTORY AND MEASURABLE PROGRESS:
Students receiving Financial Aid must maintain satisfactory and measurable progress each semester. Fulltime aid recipients must complete at least 12 credit hours per semester with a 2.0 grade point average to remain in good standing.
In general, financial aid recipients may only receive up to five semesters of financial assistance. (For more detailed information contact the Campus Financial Aid office.)
REFUND POLICY
A student who withdraws during the semester must repay a portion of financial aid received. If the students -tuition and fees were paid by financial aid and the student is eligible to receive a tuition refund, the refund will be returned to the financial aid account.
TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID:
1. Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG)
The BEOG program Drovides federal grants to assist with educational expenses. Award amounts range from $200.00 to $1800.00 depending upon the cost of education. Approximately six weeks after the student applies, he/she will receive a Student Eligibility Report (SER). All copies of the SER must be brought or mailed to the Financial Aid Office even if the student is ineligible to receive-a Basic Grant award.
2. Self-Help Programs
a. College Work-Study Program
The College Work-Study Program provides employment opportunities for students demonstrating a financial need as defined by the College. Houriy rates start at Federal minimum wage.
b. Colorado Work-Study (No-Need)
The State of Colorado provides limited funds to employ students who do not demonstrate financial need and who are Colorado residents for tuition purposes. Hourly rates start at Federal minimum wage.
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c. National Direct Student Loan (NDSL)
Loans are available to students based on their demonstrated financial need. Repayment begins not later than ten months after graduation or termination ot student status. The interest rate is three percent per annum with minimum monthly payments of $30.00 per month. The period of repayment cannot exceed 10 years. Repayments may be postponed if education is resumed, for service in the Peace Corps, Vista or for up to three years of military service.
d. Nursing Loans
Loans are available to students enrolled in a course of study leading to the associate degree in nursing. Repayment begins ten months after the borrower graduates or terminates his student status. Interest accrues at the rate of three percent per annum. A portion of the loan may be cancelled for professional service in specified areas.
3. Grants
a. Colorado Student Grant (CSG)
Grants area available to Colorado residents based on financial need. Awards range up to $1000 per academic year.
4. Colorado
b. Student Incentive Grant (CSIG)
Grants are available on a need basis and must be matched dollar for dollar by the Colorado Student Incentive Grant Program. The maximum award is $1500.00 per year.
c. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)
Grants range from $200 to $1500 depending on financial need and the availability of funds. In order for students to be eligible, their resources cannot exceed 50% of their college budget. Grants must be matched with other financial assistance such as grants, scholarships, loans, and work-study earnings equal to the SEOG award.
d. Nursing Scholarship Program
Scholarships are available to students enrolled in a course of study leading to an associate degree in nursing. Awards may range up to $2,000 per year based on availability of funds and the students demonstrated financial need.
4. Scholarships a. Colorado Scholars Program
Scholarships available to Colorado residents who have completed a minimum of 12 credit hours at CCD with at least a 3.0 grade average in all courses attempted. Applications are available at the Financial Aid Office. Scholarships are limited to tuition and fees and dependent upon the availability of funds.
Community Services
The comprehensive community college has responsibility, in addition to providing credit curriculum and support services to the student body, to meet other needs of the community consistent with the goals a,id philosophy of the College. To do so. the Community Service Offices at each campus offer noncredit continuing education programs, provide coordination for off-campus credit classes, are involved in community development and institutional improvement activity. Each campus will differ in the emphasis placed on these functions according to the unique conditions and population needs in their respective service areas. Each campus encourages
ideas from the public for non-credit and off-campus credit classes and the participation of the College in community problem solving efforts.
Community Service Offices
North Red Rocks Auraria
466-8811 988-9445 629-2442
Ext. 511,512 988-6160 534-5564
Types of Non-Credit Programs Offered (included but not limited to): Social/interpersonal development, recreation, dance, domestic skills, business, home/financial improvement, vocational, arts and crafts, psychic, womens, leisure time use, and others.
Community Development Activity: Advisory and planning group membership, technical assistance, service projects, social agency liason, service learning, needs analysis, etc. Other Services: Senior citizens tuition free enrollment, referral and information on other continuing educatior programs, public information, etc.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
The College actively seeks funding from external funding sources in order to provide programs that will:
1. Enable more students to attend the college
2. Offer courses of instruction and provide services that could not ordinarily be provided from present operating funds.
3. Enrich present programs
4. Be consistent with the philosophical commitment of the college
5. Be within the scope of the financial and human resources of the college
The programs vary according to schedules for funding and agency guidelines. Currently, the following continuing sponsored programs serve College students:
DISADVANTAGED SUPPLEMENTAL SERVICES Services and instruction are provided to disadvantaged occupational students including guidance, tutoring, testing, and cooperative work experience.
EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY CENTER The Center, in cooperation with Metropolitan State College and the University of Colorado at Denver, provides assessment and guidance services to prospective students in the five-county Denver Metropolitan area.
FIRE SERVICE TRAINING Training courses are offered upon request to fire departments at their local stations.
HUMAN SERVICES AIDE Human services training is coordinated with the Colorado Department of Social Services.
PREP PROGRAM (PREDISCHARGE EDUCATION PROGRAM) G.E.D. and College refresher/remedial education is conducted at Lowry Air Force Base for eligible airmen.
VCIP (VETERANS COST OF INSTRUCTION PROGRAM) -
Comprehensive services are provided to veterans on three campuses and through a community-based outreach program.
LIMITATIONS OF SCHEDULE INFORMATION
This schedule of courses should not be considered a contract between the Community College of Denver and any prospective student. The college must retain the right to cancel programs or courses, to change instructors, and to change times or locations of classes offered.
Published charges for tuition and fees are subject to changes established by the legislature.
All courses listed in the current catalog but not offered in a given semester or on a given campus may be offered if there is sufficient student interest.
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Similarly, published charges for tuition and fees are subject to change as circumstances may require.
All of the courses listed but not offered in a given quarter or on a given campus may be offered if there is sufficient student interest.
Course Numbers
Course numbers consist of prefix letters, which constitute an abbreviation of the subject area or program, and a series of three digits, the first of which indicates its classification according to the year it should be taken. Usually, course numbers below 100 are designed for developmental education; numbers from 100-199 are usually taken during the first year of college since they are prerequisite courses. Courses numbered 200-299 are usually taken during the second year of college.
LEARNING MATERIALS CENTER
The Learning Materials Center (LMC), a combination of the library, audio-visual department, and independent study center, functions as an instructional area and provides support for the courses taught at the college. It is a source of information in a variety of forms, including books, periodicals and audio-visual materials. The equipment necessary to use the A-V materials is also available.
As all campuses of Community College of Denver are young and growing, the LMCs do not own everything you will need. To provide you with additional information, books, periodicals and audio-visual materials are exchanged among campuses and borrowed from other libraries as well.
Finally, you will find a staff interested and willing to assist you in discovering and utilizing the LMC resources available to you.
WOMEN S CENTER
Attitudes surrounding women and their roles and lifestyles have changed dramatically in recent years. Contemporary society includes increasing emphasis on options for women. Options available to women in the 70s include: (a) life solely in the home; (b) life divided among home, employment and community involvement; (c) life primarily outside the home. Women are faced with a greater responsibility than ever before, as well as new freedom. Women who have diversified backgrounds are seeking ways by which they can become more actively involved in all aspects of advancing society. Students already enrolled at CCD as well as people who are considering re-entry to school have been active participants in Womens Center program.
The Women's Center strives to maximize the potential of women of all races, ages, economic and ethnic backgrounds. As more and more women re-examine their positions in society, the Womens Center will offer insights into work and how it affects lives, as well as examining the prevalent roles of women in the Denver and Colorado regions. Mini-courses, workshops, rap sessions, etc. will also be held for women in transition, single parents, those exploring career or school reentry or change, handling personal and family finances and advocacy. The Women's Center acts as a clearinghouse of information providing services and data relevant to women and their needs. The Center also works with faculty and administrators to develop an awareness on campus and in the community as to the needs of women.
Programs from all three campuses focus on the needs of women who wish to re-enter school. Each campus has programs designed to serve the unique needs of the campus community. Call your local Womens Center for more information on re-entry programs.
AURARIA CAMPUS WOMENS CENTER
With the increase of women attending schools of Higher Education, the developing, implementing and promoting of programs to meet the special needs of women are highly essential. Our plans are to provide Workshops, Speakers, Films and Programs for re-entry to college.
Our plans, here at the Womens Resource Center, are to provide assistance to as many women on the CCD/Auraria Campus as possible. We have developed and implemented programs to meet the special needs of women.
We recognize the needs of women veterans, women on welfare, women on financial aid, women offenders, women on social security income who are here to further their education. We also plan to provide referrals to various community agencies.
NORTH CAMPUS WOMENS CENTER
Currently, the greatest demands met by the Womens Center at North Campus are for information in the areas of employment, child care, financial aid, counseling (career and personal), and educational information. The Women's Center is a central location where women can come to receive various kinds of assistance without charge. The center also provides special support groups and classes for women.
The Center is open Monday through Friday, 9-4 and Wednesday evenings by appointment. All students, staff, faculty and community people are welcome to use our service.
RED ROCKS WOMENS CENTER
Red Rocks Women's Center serves people in the community and on campus through a series of brown bag lunch programs which are held on campus every Thursday from 12:15 to 1:30. Past programs have featured information on employment career changes and re-entry including interview techniques, resume preparation, current employment trends and expanding career opportunities for women. Other series have dealt with child care, financial planning, assertiveness training, new credit regulations, legal rights, and womens health concerns. Most programs are offered without charge. Reservations are not necessary.
Other CCD-RR Womens Center projects have included workshops for women in non-traditional jobs research on alternative work patterns, and a special re-entry to school programs, a monthly newsletter featuring campus and community activities of interests to women, classroom and community presentations on women and their role in contemporary society, information and referral, and a Directory of Services for Women in Jefferson County.
The Center is open Monday through Friday for students, faculty, staff, and members of the community. The Center is located in the West Wing of CCD-RR and the phone is 989-4686.
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LEARNING DEVELOPMENT CENTER
Individual progress in the basic skills is what the LDC is all about. Do you want to improve your skills (in reading, writing, math, study habits, spelling, etc.) or to receive instruction toward a GED certificate? See the LDC staff, who provide free learning assistance to all Community College of Denver students. We want to help you enter and complete the Community College of Denver program of your choice. Centers are open day and night let us help your academic dreams become realities.
There is no established timetable for completion of individual programs in the LDC; students enrolled at the Community College of Denver are permitted to use the LDC for as oong as they wish. Gaining proficiency in basic learning skills is not related to academic semesters, clock hours, or traditional forms of scheduling.
In order to meet individual needs, the LDC offers various types of instruction. Tutoring is available both on a one-to-one basis and in small groups. The purpose of this tutoring can be 1) to achieve proficiency in basic skills and study skills; 2) to apply these skills to course work; 3) to diagnose skill levels; 4) to assess learning styles; 5) to prepare to challenge a course for credit; or 6) to clear an incomplete grade.
The following instructional opportunities for all CCD students are available according to individual needs:
COMMUNICATIONS SKILLS CENTER (Auraria*, North, Red Rocks)
Reading, writing, speaking, listening, spelling, phonics, study skills, vocabulary development, speed reading, English as a second language, and grammar.
MATHEMATICS SKILLS CENTER (Auraria*, North, Red Rocks)
Tutoring in basic math, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus, as well as in math skills needed for other subjects (electronics, nursing, drafting, etc.)
G.E.D. SKILLS CENTER (Auraria*, North, Red Rocks)
Complete instruction and tutorial assistance for those students preparing for GED test. Any student who is enrolled for one hour at CCD can take as many hours of GED preparation per week as the LDC is open.
SOCIAL SCIENCE SKILLS CENTER (Auraria*, North, Red Rocks)
Back-up tutoring to students enrolled in Social Science classes; assistance in understanding basic principles, correlations, and vocabulary of the social sciences. Tutoring is given in sociology, psychology, philosophy, anthropology, economics, history, geography, and political science.
*At Auraria these four (4) services are offered at one center.
LANGUAGE SKILLS CENTER (Auraria, Red Rocks)
Assistance for students of Spanish and French in the achievement of performance goals as outlined by language instructors; assistance for foreign students who have a limited facility with the English language. To accomplish this dual purpose, the Lab offers tutorial services from qualified lab personnel and equipment for audio-lingual practice.
HEALTH OCCUPATIONS SKILLS CENTER (Auraria)
Back-up tutorial assistance to students who are in the Health Occupation classes.
TESTING SERVICE (Auraria)
TESTING SERVICE (Auraria, North, Red Rocks)
Diagnostic Testing for classes or individual instruction.
Cognitive Mapping Inventory describing how a student learns best.
Make-up Tests for classes.
TESTING CENTER (Auraria)
The testing center, which is located in the LDC area, is open daily. The main testing areas which are covered include: Achievement Testing primarily for counselors' use. Vocational interest Testing for individual and counseling purposes.
The Testing Center is currently working in conjunction with the rest of the LDC in developing tests and instruction for the learning disabled.
LEARNING DEVELOPMENT CENTER
Free assistance in the following areas:
Reading English (A,N,R)
Writing
Listening Skills Phonics Spelling Study Skills
Vocabulary Development Speed Reading
English as a Second Language Grammar
Language (A,R)
Spanish Vocabulary Building Spanish Grammar Conversational Spanish Individual Tutoring Spanish French ESL Tapes
Health Occupations (A)
Basic Skills in Nursing Fundementals
Math (A,N,R)
Basic Math
Algebra
Geometry
Trigonometry
Calculus
Math Skills for(A,N,R)
Nursing
Drafting
Automotive
Welding
Graphics
Social Science (A,N,R)
Psychology Philosophy
Sociology
Economics
History
Geography
Political Science
Anthropology
Testing (A,N,R)
Basic Skills (Reading, Math, English)
G.E.D. pre-test Make-up exams Vocational Interest Exams
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G.E.D. (A,N,R)
Reading Social Science Natural Science Math
Literature
English
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Tuition and fees will be assessed on a credit hour equivalency basis for registration, after initial testing to determine skill deficiences, for the following subjects:
LDC 071 Basic Skills in Reading (N,R) (13-tuition hours) Personalized learning programs designed to improve ability in reading speed, comprehension, vocabulary, and study skills. (2-6 contact hours per week)
LDC 073 Basic Skills in Writing (N,R)
(1-3 tuition hours) Individual perspective programs directed to meet student writing needs in the academic or vocational worlds. (2-6 contact hours per week)
LDC 081 Basic Skills in Math (N,R)
(1-3 tuition hours) Individualized assistance planned to improve skills in arithmetic, algebra, and calculus. (2-6 contact hours per week)
LDC 090 General Skills (A,N,R)
(0 tuition hours) Individualized assistance in any of the skills area for no tuition charge.
GED PREPARATION
Individual instruction and sample testing are combined to help students towards their GED Certificate. Students prepare for the GED test by studying up to three of the following at a time: (At Auraria, equivalent GED courses are offered through the division of Communication & Arts.)
LDS091 Ged Preparation in Social Studies(N.R)
(1-5 tuition hours) Covers knowledge and reading
comprehension of history, economics, geography, political science, and behavioral science. (2-9 contact hours per week)
LDC 092 GED Preparation in Reading Skills (N,R)
(1-5 tuition hours) Covers reading comprehension and interpretation of practical, general, and literary selections. (2-9 contact hours per week)
LDC 093 GED Preparation in Science (N,R)
(1-5 tuition hours) Covers knowledge and reading
comprehension in biology and physical sciences. (2-9 contact hours per week)
LDC 094 GED Preparation in Writing Skills (N,R)
(1-5 tuition hours) Covers spelling, capitalization,
punctuation, grammatical usage, diction and style, sentence structure, logic and organization. (2-9 contact hours per week)
LDC 095 GED Preparation in Mathematics (N,R)
(1-5 tuition hours) Covers arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. (2-9 contact hours per week)
In addition, all three campuses offer free mini courses in the following areas: Speed Reading, Improving Spelling and Phonics, Finding Main Ideas, English Review, Memory Techniques, Test Taking, Note Taking and Outlining, Study Methods, Improving Vocabulary, College Algebra, Calculus I, GED Math. Algebra (MAT 111 & 112).
Page 17
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAM Presidents Statement
The Community College of Denver has had a policy pertaining to nondiscrimination since the College opened its doors in 1968. The Affirmative Action Plan constitutes a commitment of the College to the continuing implementation of that policy.
It is not sufficient to state a policy of nondiscrimination. The College has a legal and moral obligation to take positive action to ensure the full realization of equal opportunity for all who are employed or seek employment at the Community College of Denver. Special effort is made to identify promising minority persons and women for positions in all areas and at all levels in which these groups are unrepresented relative to their availability. Selection must be based solely on the candidates qualifications to carry out the responsibilities that the positions require. Such actions can only result in raising the quality and competence of the College faculty and staff.
All College staff members should share the responsibility for implementing and maintaining an aggressive Affirmative Action Program.
COLLEGIATE CENTER FOR THE PHYSICALLY DISADVANTAGED
In keeping with Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973, it is both the policy and the practice of the Community College of Denver to provide equitable opportunities for physically and sensory disabled students to pursue occupational and academic training in regular classes, without discrimination. In order to accomplish this goal to the optimum benefit of the handicapped student, the utmost effort has been made to provide an appropriate physical, at-titudinal, and supportive environment.
Accessible Facilities and Support Systems
All facilities of the College are of recent construction, and barrier-free design was a prime factor in the planning. Because mainstreaming has been an integral part of the philosophy of the College since its inception in 1968, handicapped students have access to one of the most comprehensive support systems available at any postsecondary institution in the nation. More than one hundred different auxiliary services are provided at no additional charge, to assist the disabled client in reaching his educational objectives.
This combination of highly functional barrier-free facilities, total faculty orientation to the mainstreaming concept, and intensive auxiliary service has understandably attracted large numbers of handicapped candidates to the Community College of Denver. To accommodate this significant component of the student body (ranging from 500 to 700 in any given year), the college has established a Center for the Physically Disadvantaged, through which approximately 30 professional and paraprofessional personnel offer service on the three campuses of the College. Fleadquartered at the North Campus in a building erected under joint Federal and State auspices, the Center and its affiliate offices at the Auraria and Red Rocks campuses serve from 500 to 700 disabled students in any given year.
Mainstreaming Required
It is recognized that some candidates seeking admission to or presently pursuing studies at the College cannot succeed in this particular mainstreamed environment, despite the accessible programs and facilities, the broad choice of career


options open to everyone, and the full range of supportive services available. It must be emphasized that, because mainstreaming in regular classes is both an integral part of the College philosophy as well as the intent of Section 504, admission and retention of the candidate is based on his/her capability for receiving training in regular classes.
The majority of candidates presently served are clients of a referral agency such as the State Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, or Veterans Administration. The assistance of the client, his referral source, and any other sources or information the client volunteers to offer toward the mutual effort of determining whether the Community College of Denver program and services will meet the individual's needs and career goals will be utilized. An excellent evaluation system, nationally developed to aid handicapped clients in the selection of appropriate training, is also made available to enrolled students on an optional basis.
Disability Groups Served
Within the above guidelines, persons with the following disabilities are typical of those who have been successfully accommodated:
Spinal cord injuries (paraplegia, quadriplegia and other wheelchair conditions)
Amputations or congenital absence of limbs (bilateral or combinations)
Cardio-vascuiar limitations and malfunctions Profound deafness and hearing impairments (Served primarily at North Campus because of a national shortage of qualified interpreters)
Impairment of function of one or more extremities Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinsons Disease, Muscular Dystrophies
Disablements affiliated with gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary illness
Trunk, spine, abdominal defects (including fusions, Spina Bifida, etc.)
Systemic diseases, including malignancies, diabetes, malaria, arthritis, etc.
Endocrine limitation such as dwarfs, giants, midgets, cretins
Epilepsy and head injuries, with residual effects
Lung and asthmatics conditions
Cerebal Palsy, including spasticity, ataxia, etc.
Multiple handicaps
Support Service Offered
Though a full description of the program and its services cannpt be treated in the space limitations of this catalog, interested candidates are encouraged to secure a copy of a free booklet describing the program, entitled, THE CENTER A WORLD OF DISCOVERY. Copies can be obtained at any of the College's three campuses, or by writing to CPD, North Campus, 3645 W. 112th Ave., Westminster, CO 80030.
A representative sampling of services is listed below: Complete vocational evaluation Specialized counseling (deaf, blind, spinal cord, etc.) Tutorial assistance
Rehabilitation health maintenance and nursing service
Interpreting service for the deaf
Readers and Braille Transcribers
Equipped and staffed resource center
Job placement for disabled students
Attendants, notetakers, parking privileges
Arrangements for early registration
Curriculum adaptation and adapted scheduling
Specialized media
Liaison with rehabilitation centers
Modification of classroom setting
VETERANS AFFAIRS OFFICE
This program, funded through the Veterans Cost of Instruction Payments Program (HEW) and the Veterans Administration Veterans Representative Program, provide comprehensive services to veteran students as well as, through community outreach efforts, to veterans in the community.
This program, on the three campuses, was established to aid Vietnam era veterans use their VA and other federal, state and community benefits and aid the educational institution in meeting the Vietnam era veterans special needs.
Services available include:
Information on veterans benefits federal, state
and community
Assistance with VA inquiries
Referral for emergency food, clothing, housing, legal
aid, employment, etc.
Discharge upgrade counseling
VETERANS ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND PROGRESS
The following policy becomes effective immediately for all veteran students receiving VA benefits. This policy replaces the Veterans Academic Standards and Progress Policy appearing in the 76/77 catalog.
1. Evaluation and Grading Veterans
The Community College of Denver is philosophically committed to a program that focuses on the student and on activities that foster his learning.
Grades which appear on the students permanent record and are used to meet graduation requirements:
Grade Quality of Work Grade Points
Symbol Denoted by Symbol Per Credit Hour
A Superior 4
B Excellent 3
C Average 2
D Below Average 1
2. Grade Point Average
Linder this system, grade points measure the achievement of the student for the number of credit hours he has taken. They are determined by multiplying the grade points per credit hour by the credit hour value of the course taken. The following example will enable the student to compute his grade point average.
Completed Course Credit Hrs. Final Grade Grade Points *
English 3 A 4 grade points (4x3) equals 12
Mathematics 3 B 3 grade points (3x3) equals 9
Electronics 2 A 4 grade points (2x4) equals 8
Physics Physical 5 C 2 grade points (5x2) equals 10
Education 3 14 D 1 grade point (3x1) equals 3 42
Total grade points are divided by total credit hours to compute the grade point average. For example, 42 divided by 14 equals a 3.0 grade point average. The cumulative grade point average is the total number of grade points recorded divided by the total number of credit hours.
A current term GPA (that which appears on the transcript) of 2.0 must be maintained. Any veteran whose current term GPA is less than 2.0 will be placed on probation for the following term, during which time he should achieve at least a 2.0 GPA. Should he fail to achieve a 2.0 GPA for that
Page 18


probationary term, the veterans certification section will terminate his certification effective the last day of class of the probationary term, and counseling and approval must be received from the Veterans Administration in order for his certification to be reinstated for any subsequent term.
In addition to the above grades, the Community College of Denver also uses the following symbols for specially noted situations.
3. Non-Punitive Grades (which are not recorded on a students permanent record)
A. NC (No Credit Earned)
This symbol reflects a learning accomplishment which is at a level judged to be failing. As a non-punitive grade symbol, it cannot be used in determining progress toward fulfillment of requirements toward graduation, and according to V.A. regulations veterans affected by these symbols must have their benefits adjusted back to the beginning day of the term'in effect.
B WX (Veteran withdrawal after the Add-Drop period)
When a veteran student officially withdraws (totally or partially), after a period of 30 days following the first day of classes, a grade of "WX will be recorded on the student's institutional (internal) record. The WX will be considered a non-punitive grade and (except for mitigating circumstances) benefits for that course will be terminated back (P.L. 94-502) to the first day of class. If a veteran student stops attending class but does not officially withdraw, he is considered as non-attending" and may be dropped administratively. Such an administrative drop is to be initiated by the instructor with appropriate administrative support.
C. DX (A grade of D" which is not recorded on the student's permanent record)
According to CCD policy, a D grade will not be recorded on a students permanent record except by the students written request that such course and grade be recorded. In accordance with P.L. 94-502, veterans receiving a non-recordable D (DX) will have their benefits for such course terminated back to the first day of classes.
4 Other Special Grades A AU Grade
A grade symbol of "AU (audit) indicates that the student audited the course. No credit is allowed for audited courses.
B I Grade y
A grade symbol of "I (Incomplete) is a temporary grade indicating that a student did not complete all assignments by the end of the term.
Assignments to be completed must be mutually agreed upon by the student and the instructor with written documentation attesting same. Assignments to be completed should be on file with the division director with appropriate signatures (student, instructor and division director) for future reference in the event of personnel changes or other circumstances.
An Incomplete grade (I) must be made up before the end of the following term or it will be recorded as an "NC and Veterans benefits will be adjusted according to paragraph 3 A (above) of this policy.
5 Attendance (Certificate Programs Only)
Veterans attendance records showing each absence from regularly scheduled classes are required, and the College will be required to document such attendance records.
6. Mitigating Circumstances (as defined by P.L. 94-502) Circumstances which directly hinder eligible veteran's or other person's pursuit of a course and which are judged to be out of the students control. Following are some general categories of mitigating circumstances (this list is notall-inclusive):
A. Serious illness of the eligible veteran or person.
B. Serious illness or death in the eligible veteran's or other person's immediate family.
C. Immediate family or financial obligations which require a change in terms, hours, or place of employment which precludes pursuit of course.
D. Discontinuance of a course by a school.
E. Active duty military service, including active duty for training.
F. Withdrawal from a course or receipt of a nonpunitive grade upon completion of a course due to unsatisfactory work may be considered to be under mitigating circumstances if the student can demonstrate good faith pursuit of the course up to the point of withdrawal or completion and the student submits evidence that he or she applied for tutorial aid, consulted a Veterans Administration counselor, or consulted a school academic counselor or advisor regarding an attempt to remedy the unsatisfactory work before withdrawal or completion.
When mitigating circumstances prevail, the College will attempt to intervene in behalf of the veteran with the Veterans Administration.
Page 19


Denver, Colorado 80218 Aurora, Colorado 80010
Phone: 839-3481 Phone: 364-4495
North Campus Red Rocks Campus
3645 West 112th Avenue 12600 West 6 Avenue
Westminster, Colorado 80030 Golden, Colorado 80401
Phone:466-8811 Phone:988-6160
Auraria Campus 1111 West Colfax Denver, Colorado 80204 Phone: 629-2400
Page 20


COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER STUDENT CALENDAR
Auraria Campus and Red Rocks Campus and
Aurora Education Center North Campus
1979 1979
JANUARY FEBRUARY march APRIL JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
S MTWT FS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS
12 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 1 2 3 12 3,4 5 6 7 12 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 1 2 3 12 3 4 5 6 7
789 10 II 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 14
14 15 16 17 18 1920 II 12 13 14 15 16 17 1 M2 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 II 12 13 14 15 16 17 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30
MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST
SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS
12 3 4 5 1 2 12 3 4 5 6 7 12 3 4 12 3 4 5 1 2 12 3 4 5 6 7 12 3 4
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 II 6 7 8 9 10 II 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22X24 25 26 27 28{2$B33 i 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31 26 27 28(29T30l3 1
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER _ SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
SMTWTFS S MTWT F S SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS
1 2305678 12 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 1 2 3 GC 5 6 7 8 12 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 1
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 II 12 13 I4L5J4I7 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 9 10 II 12 13 14 15 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 II 12 13 14 L516 17 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 2 lDaD324 16 17 I8T320 2.1 22 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21032124 16 17 18 I9lgbt H 23 24 25 26^728 29
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 79 70 23.24 25 26 27 28 29 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 Z93U
1 30 3031 30 1 3031
1980 1980
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
iMTWTFS S M T W T F S S M T W T F S SMTWTFS S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 1 1 2 1 12 3 4 5 12 3 4 5 1 2 1 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1112 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
6 7 f 10 If 13 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 II 12 6|7nn9(s:ii 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 3 4 S 6 7 8 9 to it nn 14 15
13 141151! 6LX 18 19 10 II 12 13 14 15 16 9 10 II 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
20U1 22 2324 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30
30 31 30 31
. MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST
SMTWTFS S M T W T F S S M T W T F S SMTWTFS S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 12 3 4 5 6 7 12 3 4 5 1 2 1 2) 3 12 3 4 5 6 7 12 3 4 5 1 2
4 S 6 7 8 3]I0 8 9 10 II 12 13 14 6 7 8 9 10 II 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 II 12 13 14 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
II 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 II 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 16 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 DECEMBER 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F S SMTWTFS S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F SI S M T W T F S
12 3 4 5 6 12 3 4 1 12 3 4 5 6 12 3 4 5 6 12 3 4 1 12 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 II 12 13 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 1920 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 31 28 29 30 26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 31
Fall Semester - 1979 FALL SEMESTER 1979
August 29,30 Registration August 29, 30 Registration
September 4 Classes Begin September 4 Classes Begin
November 22, 23 Thanksgiving Vac November 22, 23 Thanksgiving Vac
December 19 Classes End December 20 Classes End
SPRING SEMESTER 1980 SPRING SEMESTER 1980
January 15, 16 Registration January 7,8 Registration
January 21 Classes Begin January 10 Classes Begin
March 17-21 Spring Break March 10-14 Spring Break
May 9 - Classes End May 2 Classes End
Symbols: Campus Registration, no classes 0 Holiday, no classes [ First day of classes ] Last day of classes X Auraria Center Registration Shaded areas indicate breaks
Page 21


Gen ral Studi s
COMMUNICATION AND ARTS
Program Campus
Art................................................A, N, R
Communications.....................................A, N, R
English........................................ A, N, R
Drama..............................................A,N,R
French.............................................A, R
German............................................... R
Humanities.......................................A, N, R
Journalism................................... A, N, R
Literature.......................................A, N, R
Music.......................................... A, N, R
Physical Education.................................A, N, R
Reading..........................................A, N, R
Skill Center Instructional Program...............A, N, R
Spanish..........................................A, N, R
Speech...........................................A, N, R
Independent Study..................................A, N, R
SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
Biology............................................A, N, R
Chemistry..........................................A, N, R
Computer Science................................ A, N, R
Earth Science.........................................R
Mathematics........................................A, N, R
Physics............................................A, N, R
Science............................................A, N, R
Independent Study..................................A, N, R
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Anthropology...........................
Economics..............................
Geography..............................
History................................
Philosophy.............................
Political Science......................
Psychology.............................
Sociology..............................
Social Science.........................
Independent Study......................
CONSORTIUM OF ETHNIC STUDIES
Anthropology............................
Art.....................................
Drama...................................
Economics...............................
English.................................
History................................
Humanities..............................
Literature.............................
Music...................................
Philosophy..............................
Political Science.......................
Psychology..............................
Sociology...............................
Note: Auraria Campus A North Campus N Red Rocks Campus R
A, N, R A, N. R A, N, R A, N, R A, N, R A, N, R A, N, R A, N, R A, N, R A, N, R
....A ....A ...A ...A ...A A,N,R ... A A,R ... A ... A A,N A,N A,N
GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM
The General Studies Programs are intended to provide educational opportunities in preparation for transfer to a four-year college or university, in general and developmental education interests, and in support of a student's selected career emphasis in Occupational Studies.
Students who intend to transfer to a four-year college or university should review the catalog of the particular institution to which they plan to transfer in order to determine specific course requirements. Copies of catalogs for other Colorado colleges, universities, and out-of-state schools may be obtained through the Office of Student Services. Students are urged to seek the advice of the division directors and faculty members in the selection of transfer courses in their areas of interest.
Students enrolled in Occupational Studies Programs may enroll in General Studies courses to meet the specific requirements of a particular occupational curriculum and to select desired elective courses.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The Associate Degree is awarded by the Community College of Denver upon the successful completion of the requirements for the degree. The general requirements for the Associate Degree are listed on Page 9. A General Studies student must also meet the specific requirements in one of the three areas of emphasis listed below:
ARTS
This is designed for the student whose major emphasis of study is in Communication and Arts and/or Social Sciences and is intended for transfer to a four-year college or university in his/her area of interest.
Degree Requirements:
Successful completion of a minimum of sixty (60) semester hours of credit in transfer course work including the following:
Page 22


ENG 111a nd 112................................6 hours
Six (6) semester hours of course work in the Division ot Communication and Arts* (in addition to
ENG 111 and 112)......................................6 hours
Eight (8) semester hours of course work
in the Division of Science and Mathematics.....8 hours
Eight (8) semester hours of course work
in the Division of Social Sciences....................8 hours
Electives that fit in with the
student's transfer program...........................32 hours
TOTAL................................................60 hours
*Excluding course work in physical education Science
This is designed for the student whose major emphasis of study is in Science or Mathematics and is intended for transfer to a four-year college or university in his area of interest.
Degree Requirements:
Successful completion of a minimum of sixty (60) semester hours of credit in transfer course work including the
following:
ENG 111 and 112.................................6 hours
Six (6) semester hours of course work in the Division of Communication and Arts* (in addition to
ENG 111 and 112).......................................6 hours
Twenty (20) semester hours of course work
in the Division of Science and Mathematics......20 hours
Eight (8) semester hours of course work
in the Division of Social Sciences.....................8 hours
Electives that fit in with the
students transfer program............................20 hours
TOTAL.................................................60 hours
Excluding course work in physical education
General Education
This is designed for the student who completes a broad program of courses without the constraints of specialization characteristic of the other programs in General Studies and is not designed for transfer.
Degree Requirements:
Successful completion of a minimum of sixty (60) semester hours of course work.including the following:
Four (4) semester hours of course work in the Division of Communication and Arts* of which two (21
semester hours must be English...................4 hours
Four (4) semester hours of course work
in the Division of Science and Mathematics.......4 hours
Four (4) semester hours of course work
in the Division of Social Sciences.....................4 hours
Electives in General Studies..........................20 hours
Electives of the students choosing...................28 hours
TOTAL.................................................60 hours
Excluding course work in physical education
NOTE: Students who can submit evidence that their successful completion of sixty (60) semester hours of course work constitutes a completely transferable curriculum for transfer into a specific program at a four-year college or university need not complete the specific requirements listed above in order to be considered for the Associate Degree.
Page 23


DIVISION OF COMMUNICATION AND ARTS
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Where a course description does not indicate the campus by the key A, N, or R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
ART
ART 101 Basic Design (A,N,R).................3 credit hours
Foundations of design theory.
ART 102 Basic Design (A,N,R).................3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 101.
ART 111 Basic Drawing (A,N,R)................3 credit hours
Freehand drawing and various media techniques.
ART 112 Basic Drawing (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 111.
ART 131 Basic Water Color and
Water Media (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
Transparent and opaque water color painting.
ART 132 Basic Water Color and
Water Media (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 131.
ART 141 Oil and Acrylic
Painting (A,N,R)...... ..........3 credit hours
Investigation of the materials of the painter in controlling form and space.
ART 142 Oil and Acrylic
Painting (A,N,R)...... ........3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 141.
ART 161 Pottery (N,R)........................3 credit hours
Design and construction of pottery using various handbuilding methods. >
ART 162 Pottery (N,R)........................3 credit hours
Introduction to throwing techniques using potter's wheel.
ART 163 Pottery (N,R)........................3 credit hours
Design and throwing of basic forms with exploration in glazing techniques.
ART 171 Textile Design and
Weaving (N,R).........................3 credit hours
Looms, weaving and textile design techniques, studio experience in weaving, batik, and other textile design.
ART 172 Textile Design and
Weaving (N,R).........................3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 171.
ART 181 Basic Metal Techniques in
Jewelry Design (N,R)..................3 credit hours
Construction of jewelry designs in precious metals and small casting techniques.
ART 182 Basic Casting for
Jewelry Design Continuation of ART 181. Centrifugal and vacuum casting of precious metals using lost-wax techniques, wax working techniques, mold making and wax injection.
ART 190 Art Appreciation (N,R)...............3 credit hours
A study of the worlds art masterpieces.
ART 191 Introduction td Art:
A Survey of the Masterpieces
of the World (N,R)...............3 credit hours
Art appreciation and history of the masterpieces of the world from pre history through the Renaissance.
ART 192 Introduction to Art:
A Survey of the Masterpieces
of the World (N,R)................3 credit hours
A continuation of ART 191, from baroque through modern
art.
ART 195 The Art of Africa and
Black Americans (A)...............3 credit hours
A critical examination of the art of Africa and its relationship to the artistic development of the New World.
ART 196 Chicano Art History (A)...............3 credit hours
A basic course in art appreciation designed to provide historical background in Chicano art.
ART 197 Native American Arts and Contemporary
Development (A)........................3 credit hours
History of Native American art with emphasis on painting, sculpture, and crafts.
ART 201 Second Year Basic
Design (A,N,R).........................3 credit hours
Applied techniques of layout and design.
ART 202 Second Year Basic
Design (A,N,R).........................3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 201.
ART 211 Second Year
Drawing (A,N,R)........................3 credit hours
Experimentation using a variety of media.
ART 212 Second Year
Drawing (A,N,R)..................3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 211. Advanced concepts seeking more individualized solutions.
ART 221 Figure Drawing (A,N,R)..................3 credit hours
Beginning drawing of the human figure.
ART 222 Figure Drawing (A,N,R)..................3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 221.
ART 231 Second Year Water
Color (A,N,R)..........................3 credit hours
Emphasis on solutions in water media on a more individualized basis.
ART 232 Second Year Water
Color (A,N,R)....................3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 231.
ART 241 Second Year Oil and
Acrylic Painting (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: ART 142 or permission of instructor.
Mixed media through problems involving landscape, still life, abstraction and non-objective painting.
Fage 24


ART 242 Second Year Oil and
Acrylic Painting (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 241.
ART 251 Basic Sculpture (N,R)...............3 credit hours
A creative approach to three dimenstional design in sculpture, modeling, assembling, and construction in a variety of materials.
ART 252 Basic Sculpture (N,R)...............3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 251.
ART 261 Second Year Pottery (N,R)...........3 credit hours
Intermediate wheelwork with advanced throwing problems. Continued involvement in glazing and firing techniques.
ART 262 Second Year Pottery (N,R)...........3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 261. More advanced throwing problems in one of three areas: (1) tableware, (2) other functional forms, (3) art forms.
ART 263 Ceramics Design (N,R)...............3 credit hours
Advanced study in throwing.
ART 266 Primitive Pottery (N,R).............3 credit hours
Hand building and firing of primitive pottery.
ART 267 Hand Building
Techniques (N,R).................3 credit hours
Advanced study in hand building. Building and firing large forms, including mold-making techniques.
ART 268 Raku Pottery (N,R)..................3 credit hours
Raku as an art form with various hand building and throwing techniques.
ART 269 Firing Techniques (N,R).............3 credit hours
The study of glaze materials and various firing techniques. Loading and firing of kilns, formulating glazes and construction of various types of kilns.
ART 271 Printmaking (A,N,R).................3 credit hours
Astudy of basic hand printing techniques.
ART 272 Printmaking (N,R)...................3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 271.
ART 281 Second Year
Metalsmithing(N,R)...............3 credit hours
Creating hollow forms by raising, sinking, stretching, and polishing metals. Also includes pattern making for large hollow constructed forms.
ART 282 Second Year
Metalsmithing(N,R)...............3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 281. Emphasis on advanced design and experimentation of advanced techniques.
ART 291 History of
American ART I (N.R).............3 credit hours
Major artists and movements in America to 1865.
ART 292 History of
American Art II (N,R)............3 credit hours
Continuation of ART 291. American artists and movements from 1865 to the present.
ART 295 Chicano Mural Painting (A)..........3 credit hours
Pre requisite: ART 101 and ART 102 or permission of instructor.
Study in a variety of approaches to mural painting including fresco, secco. and relief. Emphasis on contemporary Chicano subjects.
Page 25
ART 296 Women in Art (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
Historical study of womens art from the Renaissance to the early twentieth century providing information not generally available in art history classes. Through comparisons with art of men in similar eras, women's art will be reevaluated.
ART 297 Contemporary Issues of
Women in ART (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
The art of women from early twentieth century through contemporary time with emphasis on the concerns of contemporary women artists.
ART 299 Independent Study (A,N,R). ... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 34.
COMMUNICATIONS
COM 100 Communications and Stress Management
for Health Occupations (A,N)...3 credit hours
Communication theory and practice, oral and written, with emphasis on stress situations in health occupations.
COM 105 Self-Hypnosis (R).................3 credit hours
Concepts and techniques of self-control and selfcommunication.
COM 107 Occupational
Communication (A,R)........1 to 3 credit hours
Oral communication: speaking and listening in chosen fields, (can be taken as SPE 107).
COM 110 Creativity in
Communication (A,N,R)..........3 credit hours
Creativity through increased perception and awareness, variously expressed.
COM 120 Communication Between
the Sexes (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
Interpersonal communication: non-verbal communication, listening, sexual identity, conflict resolution.
COM 141 American Sign Language I (A,N) ... 3 credit hours
A beginning course in the use of basic signs and finger spelling used by the deaf.
COM 142 American Sign Language II (A,N)... 3 credit hours
An extension in the development of signs and emphasis of idiomatic expression. Increased practice in the reading of
signs.
COM 160 Words Don't Mean,
People Do (A,R)................3 credit hours
Basic theory and practice of human communication and how language affects thought and behavior.
COM 200 Survey of Communication (A,R).... 3 credit hours
Improved communication habits: models, empathy, and general semantics.
COM 205 Introduction to Discussion and
Group Leadership (A,R)..........3 credit hours
Methodology of working effectively in committees and discussion groups.
COM 210 The Movies (A,R)..................3 credit hours
An introduction to the movies as a 20th century form of communication.
COM 215 The Movies as Genre (A,R).........3 credit hours
A study of genre in film.
COM 220 Introduction to
Radio and TV (A,N.R)............3 credit hours


Radio and TV history, skills and occupations; includes writing and producing shows.
COM 225 The Television Image (A,N,R)........3 credit hours
Television's influence on society and societys reaction to that influence.
COM 230 Image and Meaning (A,R).............3 credit hours
A study of the relationships between the visual and the literary arts.
COM 240 Organizational
Communication (A,R)..............3 credit hours
Concepts and techniques for effective communication in organizations.
COM 245 Interpersonal
Communication (A,R).............3 credit hours
Basic theory and practice of interpersonal communication skills: self-concept, empathizing, listening, values clarification, decision-making, problem solving and conflict resolution.
COM 299 Independent Study (A,N,R)-------1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 34.
DRAMA
DRA 100 Theatre in Action (N,R).............3 credit hours
Practical insights into theatre by visiting various local theatres and theatre groups.
DRA 101 Introduction to
Theatre Arts (A,N)...............3 credit hours
Basic principles of acting, scenery and costume construction.
DRA 102 Introduction to
Theatre Arts (A.N)...............3 credit hours
Continuation of DRA 101.
DRA 120 Readers Theatre (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
Learning to select, cut, cast, produce and direct small scale productions.
DRA 131 Practicum in Teatro 1(A)............3 credit hours
Building upon the precedent of current Chicano teatro, students will establish their own techniques of acting, directing, and playwriting.
DRA 132 Practicum in Teatro II (A)..........3 credit hours
Continuation of DRA 131
DRA 201 Survey of the Theatre (N,R).........3 credit hours
Survey of great plays, writers, performers and critics, through play reading, acting and production.
DRA 202 Survey of the Theatie(N,R)..........3 credit hours
Continuation of DRA 201.
DRA 210 Theatre Improvisation (R)...........3 credit hours
History of improvisation in theatre with the techniques and approaches through actual production.
DRA 299 Independent Study (A,N,R).... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 34.
ENGLISH
ENG 001 English as a
Second Language (A,N,R)......2 to 5 credit hours
An introduction to the vocabulary, syntax, and sound system of English.
ENG 002 English as a
Second Language (A,N,R)......2 to 5 credit hours
An introduction to the vocabulary and patterns of written and oral English.
ENG 003 English as a Second
Language (A,N,R)............2 to 5 credit hours
A survey of English speech and composition patterns.
ENG 020 Sound and Spelling (A).........1 to 3 credit hours
An individualized developmental program in phonics and spelling.
ENG 021 Introduction to
Language Fundamentals 1(A)......3 credit hours
A developmental program in grammar and sentence structure.
ENG 022 Introduction to
Language Fundamentals II (A)....3 credit hours
A developmental program in sentence style and paragraph structure.
ENG 101 Occupational
Communications (A,N,R)......1 to 3 credit hours
Basic communication skills: job entry and on-the-job reading and writing.
ENG 102 Occupational
Communication (A,N,R).......1 to 3 credit hours
Basic communication skills with emphasis on pre-job and on-the-job speaking and listening.
ENG 103 Occupational
Communication (A,N,R).......1 to 3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: ENG 101 or permission of instructor. Introductory technical writing: letters, progress reports and informal technical reports.
ENG 105 Study Skills (A,N,R)...........1 to 3 credit hours
An introduction to basic study skills.
ENG 106 Communication for
Health Occupations (A,N,R)......3 credit hours
Technical writing in the health field: documentation and organization techniques, communication processes, structure of written reports and job-seeking communications.
ENG 107 Workshop in Language
Fundamentals I (A,N,R)..........3 credit hours
An introduction to grammar and sentence structure.
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ENG 108 Workshop in Language
Fundamentals I (A,N,R)........3 credit hours
An introduction to sentence style and paragraph structure.
ENG 109 Barriology Communication (A) .... 3 credit hours
Networks and modes of communication in the Chicano community, including communication between the people and different public agencies. Basic communication theory will be examined and applied to communications channels in the barrio.
ENG 110 Composition, Style
and Technique (A,R)...........3 credit hours
The basic paragraph and essay with focus on developing skills in varied sentence structure, diction, logic, clarity, conciseness and punctuation. Diagnostic tests and unit samples are used for placement.
ENG 111 English Composition (A,N,R)........3 credit hours
Expository writing: grammatical and rhetorical principles of organization and style.
ENG 112 English Composition (A,N,R)........3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: ENG 111 or permission of instructor. Researching and writing the library Paper.
ENG 115 Creative Writing (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
Techniques applicable to creative forms: poetry, essays, short stories.
ENG 125 Poetry Writing (A,N,R).............3 credit hours
The fundamentals of creating the language of poetry.
ENG 131 Business Communication (A,N,R).. 3 credit hours Intensive practice in the mechanics of language and
vocabulary used by management and office personnel in preparing business letters and other business communications.
ENG 215 Advanced Creative
Writing (A,N,R)...................3 credit hours
Advanced creative expression of self-enrichment toward resultant publishable material.
ENG 216 Advanced Composition (A,N,R).... 3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: ENG 112 or permission of instructor. Expository writing with emphasis on syntactic and rhetorical development.
ENG 225 Poetry Writing (A,N,R). ............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: ENG 125 or permission of instructor. Continuation of ENG 125.
ENG 231 Technical Writing (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: Successful completion of two semesters of Occupational Communication, or Business Communication or English Composition or equivalent.
Formal technical reports for the printer, through definition and analysis, problem defining, organization, of data, structure, style and mechanics, and graphics.
ENG 232 Technical Writing (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
Acontinuation of ENG 231.
ENG 299 Independent Study (A,N,R). ... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 34.
FRENCH
FRE 101 Basic Applied French (A,N,R)........3 credit hours
Basic conversational French for enjoyment and/or practical
use.
FRE 102 Basic Applied French (A,N,R)........3 credit hours
Continuation of FRE 101.
FRE 111 First Year French (N,R).............5 credit hours
Basic principles of grammar, reading and writing skills, correct pronunciation and basic conversation.
FRE 112 First Year French (N,R).............5 credit hours
Pre-requisite: FRE 111 or permission of instructor. Continuation and expansion of FRE 111.
FRE 211 Intermediate French (N,R)...........3 credit hours
Pre-requistie: FRE 112 or equivalent.
Further skills in communications, linguistic structure, and vocabulary through readings in literature.
FRE 212 Intermediate French (N,R)...........3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: FRE 211.
Continuation and expansion of FRE 211.
FRE 299 Independent Study (A,N,R). ... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 34.
GERMAN
GER 101 Basic Applied German (R)............3 credit hours
Basic conversational patterns for enjoyment and/or for
practical use.
GER 102 Basic Applied German (R)............3 credit hours
Continuation of GER 101.
GER 111 First Year German (R)...............5 credit hours
Basic principles of grammar, reading and writing skills, correct pronunciation, and basic conversation.
GER 112 First Year German (R)...............5 credit hours
Pre-requisite: GER 111 or permission of instructor. Continuation and expansion of GER 111.
GER211 Intermediate German (R)..............3credithours
Pre-requisite: GER 112 or equivalent.
Further skills in communications, linguistic structure and vocabulary through readings in literature.
GER 212 Intermediate German (R).............3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: GER 211.
Continuation and expansion of GER 211.
GER 299 Independent Study (A,N,R). ... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 34.


HUMANITIES
HUM 100 The Female Experience (A,N,R). ... 3 credit hours
Increased student consciousness concerning needs of women and discrimination because of sex.
HUM 111 Studies in the ,
Humanities (A,N,R)...............3 credit hours
A comparative study of the arts and philosophies in world civilization.
HUM 112 Studies in the
Humanities (A,N,R)...............3 credit hours
Continuation of HUM 111.
HUM 115 Introduction to
Chicano Studies (A)...............3 credit hours
An overview of the origin, culture, philosophy, and present status of the Chicano.
HUM 120 The Native
American Perspective:
Arts and Ideas (A)..............3 credit hours
A study of the art and music of various Native American peoples and of the religion and philosophy from which the Native American arts forms evolved.
HUM 126 Folklore of Mexico
and the Southwest (A,R).........3 credit hours
Indian and Mestizo folklore of Mexico and the Southwest.
HUM 127 lndigeni§mo and
the Chicano (A).................3 credit hours
A refreshing change of pace for the student interested in a non-European approach to the often forgotten philosophies and ideas of native peoples in the Americas which have affected the Chicano.
HUM 200 Pop Culture (A,R)..................3 credit hours
A survey of mass-produced artifacts and their meanings.
HUM 211 Humanities (A,N,R).................5 credit hours
A study in human values and achievements as represented in the arts, religions, philosophies and rational systems.
HUM 212 Humanities (A,N,R)................5 credit hours
Acontinuation of HUM 211.
HUM 215 Ideas in a Changing
Society (A,R)....................3 credit hours
A study of current issues placed in historical and ideological
perspective.
HUM 216 Jesus and the Challenge
of Being Human (R)...............3 credit hours
The historical Jesus, his environment and his teachings.
HUM 225 Contemporary Chicano (A)............3 credit hours
An interdisciplinary course dealing with current issues of the
Chicano.
HUM 226 Comidas Chicanas(A).................3 credit hours
A study of the history and folklore of comidas chicanas (cuisine), along with its position, traditional and contemporary, in the cultural matrix of the Chicano
community.
HUM 299 Independent Study (A,N,R)...........1 to 3 hours
See course description on page 34.
JOURNALISM
JOU 101 Introduction to
Journalism (A,N,R)...............4 credit hours
Basic principles of journalism involving work on a college publication with 3 hours of laboratory work per week.
JOU 102 Introduction to
Journalism (A,N,R)...............4 credit hours
Pre-requisite: JOU 101 A continuation of JOU 101
JOU 111 Reporting and Editing I (A,N,R).... 3 credit hours
Reporting, weighing evidence, interpreting issues and editing
copy.
JOU 112 Reporting and Editing (A,N,R).......3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: JOU 211 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of JOU 111 with more opportunity for practical experience.
JOU 121 Photography as
Communication (N,R)..............3 credit hours
Basic understanding of photographic equipment, materials and processes, and how they may communicate emotion, ideas, or facts.
JOU 122 Photography as Communication:
Studio Practice (N,R)............3 credit hours
Introduction to indoor photography including lighting, composition, subject arrangement, camera support, background, etc.,
JOU 210 Feature Writing (A,N,R).............3 credit hours
Feature writing for newspapers and magazines.
JOU 225 Photography as Communication:
Outdoor Photography (N,R)........3 credit hours
Black and white outdoor photography with both classroom lectures/discussions and field trips.
JOU 226 Photo Journalism (N,R)..............3 credit hours
Photographic methods as applied to editorial and news
photography.
JOU 240 Journalistic Advertising (N,R)......3 credit hours
Advertising principles as applied to the print media, radio and television.
JOU 299 Independent Study (A,N,R). ... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 34.
Page 28


LITERATURE
LIT 100 Literature for Children (A,NtR).... 3 credit hours
Survey of prose and poetry for teachers of children.
LIT 105 Introduction to Literature (A,N,R).. 3 credit hours
The short story: selected readings.
LIT 106 Introduction to Literature (A,N,R).. 3 credit hours
The novel: selected readings.
LIT 107 Introduction to Literature (A,N,R).. 3 credit hours
Poetry: selected readings.
LIT 110 Themes in Literature (R)..............3 credit hours
A thematic approach to literature.
LIT 120 Literature of
Human Sexuality (A,N).............3 credit hours
Literature of the perception and verbalization of sexuality from ancient to modern times.
LIT 125 Introduction to
Chicano Literature (A)............3 credit hours
An overview of Chicano literature from its indigenous (native) roots to the present.
LIT 126 Native American
Literature (A,N,R)................3 credit hours
A survey of the literature of the native American.
LIT 128 Black Literature
in America (A)....................3 credit hours
A study of Black literature which includes methods of evaluation and analysis essential for understanding and appreciating the literary contributions of the Black writer.
LIT 201 Literature by and About Women:
Selected Topics I (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Inter-disciplinary analysis of the role of women as characters and authors. Unique problems and insights of women writers emphasized.
LIT 202 Literature by and About Women:
Selected Topics II (A,N,R)........3 credit hours
Focus on contemporary literature with emphasis placed on alternatives for women as seen through literature.
LIT 205 Radical Feminist
Literature (A,N,R)................3 credit hours
An examination of auto biographical accounts, fiction and other writings of feminists who espouse avante-garde life styles and/or political activism.
LIT 210 Science Fiction (A,N,R)..................3 credit hours
Current trends in science fiction: selected readings.
LIT 215 Cult and the Occult (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
A study of cults and the occult from the visionary to the diabolical.
LIT 216 Fantasy (A,N,R)..........................3 credit hours
Plays, poems, stories and fables from all over the world.
LIT 217 Humor and Satire (A,N,R).................3 credit hours
An examination of the literature of laughter and its underlying seriousness.
LIT 218 Detective Fiction:
Crime (A,N,R).....................3 credit hours
A study of detective, spy and mystery fiction as genre.
Page 29
LIT 220 Ethnic Literature
in America (N,R).................3 credit hours
A survey of native American writers.
LIT 225 Ethnic Literature
in America (N,R).................3 credit hours
A survey of Chicano writers in America.
LIT 226 Ethnic Literature
in America (N,R).................3 credit hours
A survey of Asian American writers.
LIT 227 Ethnic Literature
in America (N,R).................3 credit hours
A survey of ethnic literature in American social evolution Black literature.
LIT 228 Contemporary
Chicano Literature (A)...........3 credit hours
This class will analyze the various literary styles of contemporary Chicano literature and students will express themselves through their own literary works and research.
LIT 229 Contemporary
Black Literature (A,R)...........3 credit hours
An analytical and critical study of contemporary Black literature emphasizing the plight and protest of Black Americans in American society.
LIT 230 Literature of
the American West (A,N,R).......... 3 credit hours
Writers and writings of the American West.
LIT 240 Practicum in Chicano Literary
Research (Bi-linqual) (N)........3 credit hours
Research techniques using Chicano community as a laboratory: compile information in poesia (poetry), cuentos (stories), leyendas (legends), canciones (songs), medicanas (medicines), pachquismos (linguistic dialect), and the ways of the elders.
LIT 241 Survey of
American Literature (A,N,R)......3 credit hours
A comparative study of major American authors through the Civil War.
LIT 242 Survey of
American Literature (A,N,R)......3 credit hours
A continuation of LIT 241, covering the period for the Civil War to the present.
LIT 251 English Literature (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
A survey of major works from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Elizabethian period.
LIT 252 English Literature A survey of major works from the 18th Century to the present.
LIT 261 Great Books I (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
Close reading of some of the generally recognized classics of World Literature.
LIT 262 Great Books II (A.N.R).............3 credit hours
A continuation of LIT 261.
LIT 275 World Literature:
Western Europe (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
A study of development of Western European literature.
LIT 276 World Literature:
Eastern Europe (N,R).............3 credit hours
A study of development of Eastern European literature.


LIT 277 World Literature:
Africa (N,R).......................3 credit hours
A study of development of African literature.
LIT 278 World Literature:
Latin America (N,R)................3 credit hours
A study of development of Latin American literature.
LIT 279 World Literature:
Asia (N,R).........................3 credit hours
A study of development of Asian literature.
LIT 299 Independent Study (A,N,R).... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 34.
MUSIC
MUS 100 Ensemble: Chorus (A,N,R).............1 credit hour
Study of choral styles and literature. (May be repeated for up to six hours credit)
MUS 101 History of
Afro-American Music 1(A)..........3 credit hours
A study of African music as one of the main sources of Black music in America. Emphasis will move from the music and musical instruments of Africa to the jazz age.
MUS 102 History of
Afro-American Music II (A)......3 credit hours
The contemporary era beginning with the jazz age and moving to the present.
MUS 105 Ensemble: Band (N).................1 credit hour
Study of instrumental styles and literature. (May be repeated for up to six hours credit)
MUS 111 Theory and Harmony (A,N,R).........5 credit hours
The study of melody, harmony, rhythm, analysis, composition, sight singing and ear training.
MUS 112 Theory and Harmony (A,N,R).........5 credit hours
Pre-requisite: MUS 111.
Continuation of MUS 111.
MUS 115 Music for Children (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Fundamentals for music for teachers in early childhood education.
MUS 120 Introduction to
Chicano Music (A)...............3 credit hours
An examination of selected woi s in Mexican music from pre-Colombian time to present concentrating on regional works and on Twentieth Century composers.
MUS 125 Practicum in
Chicano Coro (A).................3 credit hours
Designed to encourage and develop student singing skills beginning with Chicano corridos" or ballads and building to current songs of the Chicano movement.
MUS 131 Voice Class (A,N,R).................1 credit hour
Study of vocal techniques.
MUS 132 Voice Class(A,N,R)..................1 credit hour
Pre-requisite: MUS 131.
Continuation of MUS 131.
MUS 140 Woodwind Methods (N).... ?..........1 credit hour
Develop basic knowledge of the woodwind family, the problems, functions, possibilities and literature.
MUS 145 Brass Methods (N)....................1 credit hour
Develop basic knowledge of the brass family, the problems, functions, possibilities and literature.
MUS 146 Percussion Methods (N)...............1 credit hour
Develop basic knowledge of the percussion family, the problems, functions, possibilities and literature.
MUS 151 Piano Class(A,N,R).................... 1 credit hour
Study of basic piano techniques including chords and accompaniment.
MUS 152 Piano Class (A.N.R)..................1 credit hour
Continuation of MUS 151.
MUS 161 Folk Guitar I (R)....................1 credit hour
Principles and techniques of folk guitar.
MUS 162 Folk Guitar II (R)...................1 credit hour
Continuation of MUS 162.
MUS 165 Guitar Class (A,N,R)........... .....1 credit hour
Fundamental techniques for guitar, chord study and related literature.
MUS 166 Guitar Class (A,N,R).................1 credit hour
Continuation of MUS 165.
MUS 171 Introduction to
Electronic Music (N).............2 credit hours
Exploration of techniques used in electronic music.
MUS 190 Music Appreciation (A.N.R)...........3 credit hours
Survey of music literature, style and form from inception to present day.
MUS 200 Choral Conducting (N)................2 credit hours
Introduction to conducting patterns and techniques with emphasis on choral compositons and problems.
MUS 201 Introduction to Music I (R)..........3 credit hours
Study of musical styles, forms development, literature and composers from antiquity through Baroque.
MUS 202 Introduction to Music II (R).........3 credit hours
Continuation of MUS 201, emphasizing impressionistic and contemporary.
MUS 205 Instrumental Conducting (N)..........2 credit hours
Introduction to conducting patterns and techniques with emphasis on instrumental compositions and problems.
MUS 211 Advanced Theory
and Harmony (N,R)................5 credit hours
Pre-requisite: MUS 112
Continuation of MUS 112 with emphasis on chromatic and contemporary harmony, counterpoint arid instrumentation.
Page 30


MUS 212 Advanced Theory
and Harmony (N,R)..............5 credit hours
Continuation of MUS 211.
MUS 231 Chorus:
Theory and Practice I (R)......3 credit hours
Choral literature from the classics to the contemporary including vocal techniques and diction.
MUS 232 Chorus:
Theory and Practice II (R).....3 credit hours
Continuation of MUS 231.
MUS 251 Piano Class for Advanced
Keyboard Beginners (N)..........1 credit hour
Pre-requisite: MUS 151 and 152. Continuation of MUS 152 with emphasis on ensemble playing, transposition and improvisation.
MUS 252 Piano Class for Advanced
Keyboard Beginners (N)...........1 credit hour
Pre-requisite: MUS 251.
Continuation of MUS 251.
MUS 299 Independent Study (A,N,R). ... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 34.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PHE 100 Group Activities (N,R)...............1 credit hour
Coed participation in soccer, volleyball, softball, basketball and field hockey.
PHE 101 First Aid (N.R)......................2 credit hours
The standard American red cross first aid course. The standard American red cross certificate (card) will be given on satisfactory completion of the course.
PHE 102 Advanced First Aid (N,R).............2 credit hours
Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (or valid American red cross card).
PHE 105 Group Activities, Women (N,R)........1 credit hour
Participation in activities designed to improve physical fitness and to improve skills in various team sports.
PHE 106 Horsemanship (N,R)...................1 credit hour
Beginning instruction in western style riding and horsemanship.
PHE 107 Canoeing.............................1 credit hour
Basic strokes of canoeing, principles of water safety and selfrescue.
PHE 111 Beginning Archery (N,R)..............1 credit hour
Basic skills and techniques including target competition field shooting, equipment and terminology.
PHE 112 Intermediate Archery (N,R)...........1 credit hour
Continuation of PHE 111 with emphasis on advanced skills in shooting.
PHE 121 Beginning Bowling (N,R)..............1 credit hour
Basic skills and techniques of bowling.
PHE 122 Intermediate Bowling (N,R)...........1 credit hour
Pre-requisite: PHE 121 Continuation of PHE 121.
PHE 131 Beginning Golf (N,R).................1 credit hour
Introduction to golf, its origin and development, with emphasis on basic skills and techniques.
Page 31
PHE 132 Intermediate Golf (N,R)................1 credit hour
Pre-requisite: PHE 131.
Advanced skills in golf.
PHE 141 Beginning Swimming (N,R)...............1 credit hour
Basic fundamentals of swimming, includes basic crawl, elementary backstroke and life support.
PHE 142 Intermediate Swimming (N,R)............1 credit hour
Side stroke, elementary backstroke, surface dives, underwater swimming and endurance of crawl.
PHE 143 Advanced Swimming (N,R)................1 credit hour
Advanced skills and review of swim strokes, trudgen crawl, butterfly and diving.
PHE 144 Senior Lifesaving (N,R)................1 credit hour
Pre-requisite: PHE 143 or pass pre-test.
Advanced lifesaving course including self survival, rescue techniques and general first aid.
PHE 145 Water Safety Instructor
Certification (N,R)................1 credit hour
Pre-requisite: Advanced swimming and senior lifesaving or current advanced lifesaving certificate.
Methods of teaching water safety, skill analysis and correction. Course leads to American red cross instructor
certification.
PHE 146 Scuba Diving (N,R).....................1 credit hour
Basic instruction and skills in scuba diving. Aqua charges will be required for participants in this class and individuals must furnish own scuba diving equipment or rent, (laboratory
hours required) ,
PHE 151 Beginning Tennis (N,R)...............1 credit hour
Techniques and skills along with rules and regulations of the
game.
PHE 152 Intermediate Tennis (N,R)............1 credit hour
Advanced skills, team play and game strategy.
PHE 153 Advanced Tennis (N,R)................1 credit hour
Individual competition and team play.
PHE 160 Social Dancing (N)...................1 credit hour
Introduction to social dancing and various dance formations and rhythms. Laboratory hours required.
PHE 161 Beginning Collegiate Dance (N,R)... 1 credit hour
Exercises fundamental to theatrical dancing.
PHE 162 Beginning Collegiate Dance (N,R)... 1 credit hour
Theatrical dancing with level step combinations.
PHE 165 Square and Folk Dance (N.R)..........1 credit hour
Introduction to various customs and traditions of square and folk dance. Emphasis on basic steps, rhythms and structure of these dances. Laboratory hours required.
PHE 166 Ice Skating (N,R)....................1 credit hour
Basic instruction and skills of ice skating.
PHE 170 Cross-country Skiing (N,R)...........1 credit hour
Skills and techniques for cross country skiing.
PHE 171 Beginning Skiing (N,R)...............lcredithour
Basic techniques and skills for beginning skier.
PHE 172 Intermediate Skiing (N,R)............1 credit hour
Continuation of PHE 171.


PHE 173 Advanced Skiing (N,R)................... 1 credit hour
Biomechanics of skiing. Parallel, wedin, racing and free style introduction.
PHE 175 Ski Instruction
Certification (N,R)..............3 credit hours
Preparation for teaching skiing. Includes (a) teaching methodology, (b) A.T.M. sequence, (<} biomechanics, (d) racing free style, (e) ski tuning and maintenance.
PHE 180 Basic Mountaineering (N,R)...........3 credit hours
Mountain climbing techniques, including route finding and rope handling.
PHE 181 Beginning Rock Climbing (N,R)........1 credit hour
(Five weeks only)
Fundamentals of hand and foot holds and the use of ropes.
PHE 182 Intermediate Rock Climbing (N,R) 1 credit hour
(Five weeks only)
Continuation of PHE 181.
PHE 183 Advanced Rock Climbing (N,R)......1 credit hour
(Five weeks only)
Continuation of PHE 182.
PHE 185 Snow and Glacier Climbing (R) .... 3 credit hours
Use of ice axe, crampons and rope, including route finding and crevasse rescue.
PHE 186 Orienteering (R)..................3 credit hours
Competitive cross country wa ing and running using map and compass.
PHE 187 Map and Compass for
the Outdoorsman (R)............3 credit hours
Route-finding, map reading and navigational principles. Field trips.
PHE 188 Hiking and Backpacking (N,R) 1 to 3 credit hours
The fundamentals of hiking and backpacking involving the factors of clothing, equipment, weather, shelter and fire building.
PHE 189 Climbing/Backpacking
Expedition (R) ..................3 credit hours
Expedition covering seven to ten days hiking and climbing in remote North American regions.
PHE 191 Beginning Self Defense (N,R)........1 credit hour
Basic skills and techniques on the art of self defense.
PHE 192 Intermediate Self Defense (N,R).... 1 credit hour
Advanced skills and techniques.
PHE 193 Advanced Self Defense (N,R)..........1 credit hour
Pre-requisite: Intermediate self defense.
Emphasis on perfection of self defense movement.
PHE 200 Physical Education in the
Elementary School (N,R)..........2 credit hours
Theory and techniques involved in teaching elementary school physical education. Includes study of activity areas, program development and organization of learning activities.
PHE 201 Beginning Martial Arts (N,R).........2 credit hours
The history, philosophy! religion, psychology and skills of the martial arts of Karate, Judo, Ju-jitsu, Aikido, and Kendo.
PHE 202 Intermediate Martial Arts (N,R) ... 2 credit hours
Continuation of PHE 201.
PHE 203 Advanced Martial Arts (N,R)..........2 credit hours
Continuation of PHE 202.
PHE 205 Introduction to
Physical Education (N,R).........1 credit hour
Orientation to history of physical education, objectives, opportunities in the field, professional organizations and literature available.
PHE 206 Physical Education Activities (N,R). 2 credit hours
Instruction and teaching techniques of sports (Lecture and laboratory hours required)
PHE 207 Physical Fitness
for Women.......... .............2 credit hours
Fitness program, emphasis on theory of exercise, fundamental movements, body mechanics and health.
PHE 208 Physical Fitness
for Men..........................2 credit hours
Lecture and laboratory course with emphasis on body conditioning, theory of exercise and actions needed to work muscle groups.
PHE 209 Rules and Mechanics
of Officiating (N,R).............2 credit hours
Study of rules and mechanics of officiating in group sports.
PHE 211 Beginning Conditioning (N,R).........1 credit hour
Basic program of body conditioning to meet individual needs.
PHE 212 Intermediate Conditioning (N,R).... 1 credit hour
Continuation of PHE 211.
PHE 251 Beginning Yoga (N,R).................1 credit hour
Meditation techniques and proper breathing to relax mind and body.
PHE 252 Intermediate Yoga (N,R)..............1 credit hour
Intermediate skills and techniques of meditation along with learning to relax the mind and body.
PHE 253 Advanced Yoga (N,R)..................1 credit hour
Concepts of Eastern training of body, mind and spirit through physical culture
PHE 260 Tumbling(N.R)........................lcredithour
Skill progressions and teaching of stunts and tumbling.
PHE 261 Ballet (N,R).........................1 credit hour
Emphasis on exercise fundamentals of ballet.
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PHE 262 Ballet (N,R)........................1 credit hour
Continuation of beginning ballet
PHE 265 Gymnastics (N,R)....................1 credit hour
Skills, teaching techniques and progression of gymnastics.
PHE 280 Mountaineering Ethics (R)..........2 credit hours
The motivation, esthetics, and ethics of mountaineering, including conservation principles. Field trips.
PHE 281 Wilderness Survival (R)............3 credit hours
The physical, physiological and psychological principles of survival. Field trips.
PHE 285 Mountaineering Photography (R) .. 3 credit hours
The fundamentals of mountaineering and mountain photography.
PHE 291 Adaptive Physical Education (N,R) 2 credit hours
Conditioning involving vascular improvement, weight control, balance and body image.
PHE 292 Techniques of Adaptive
Physical Education (N,R).......2 credit hours
Continuation of PHE 291.
READING
REA 010 Introduction to Study Skills (A) .... 3 .credit hours
A developmental program in the skills of textbook reading, out-lining, note-taking, and test taking.
REA Oil Introduction to
Basic Reading Skills 1(A)......3 credit hours
A developmental program in basic reading skills.
REA 012 Introduction to
Basic Reading Skills II (A)....3 credit hours
A developmental program in reading comprehension.
REA 100 Basic Reading Skills (A,N,R,).....3 credit hours
Mastery of basic reading skills.
REA 101 Skills for College Reading (A,N,R).. 3 credit hours
Reading efficiency through development of skills and improved comprehension.
REA 102 Skills for College Reading (A,N,R).. 3 credit hours
Emphasis on practicing various skills of efficient reading.
REA 110 Speed Reading (A,N,R).............3 credit hours
Increased speed, a more flexible reading pace and better comprehension.
REA 200 College Reading (N,R).............3 credit hours
For advanced readers who would like to improve speed, comprehension, and analytical techniques.
REA 299 Independent Study (A,N,R).... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 34.
SKILL CENTER INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM SKC 010 GED Preparation (A,N,R)........1 to 6 credit hours
General skills needed to pass the GED exam.
SKC 015 GED Mathematics (N,R)..........1 to 6 credit hours
Preparing the student to interpret and pass the GED mathematics test.
SKC 016 GED Grammar
and Usage (A,N,R)...........1 to 6 credit hours
Preparing the student to interpret and pass the GED spelling, grammar and usage sections of the exam.
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SKC 017 GED Reading:
Social Science (A,N,R).......1 to 6 credit hours
Preparing the student to take and pass the GED social science exam.
SKC 018 GED Reading:
Natural Sciences (A,N,R).....1 to 6 credit hours
Preparing the student to interpret and pass the GED natural sciences sections of the exam.
SKC 019 GED Reading:
Literature (A,N,R)...........1 to 6 credit hours
Preparing the student to take and pass the GED literature exam.
SPANISH
SPA 101 Basic Applied Spanish (A,N,R)........3 credit hours
Basic conversational Spanish for enjoyment and/or for practical use.
SPA 102 Basic Applied Spanish (A,N,R)........3 credit hours
Continuation of SPA 101
SPA 111 First Year Spanish...................5 credit hours
Basic principles of grammar, reading and writing skills, correct pronunciation, and basic conversation.
SPA 112 First Year Spanish (A,N,R)...........5 credit hours
Pre-requisite: SPA 111 or permission of the instructor. Continuation and expansion of SPA 111.
SPA 121 Spanish for the Chicano (A)..........5 credit hours
For the bilingual student (equivalent to SPA 111)
SPA 122 Spanish for the Chicano (A)..........5 credit hours
Pre-requisite: SPA 121 or permission of the instructor. Continuation of SPA 121.
SPA 130 Idioma Aztekah
(Aztec Language) (A).............3 credit hours
The basic grammar and elementary vocabulary of the true Mexican language called Nahuatl. Philosophy, culture, and history will also be discussed.
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish (A,N,R)......3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: SPA 112 or 122 or permission of the instructor.
A continued study of Spanish language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.
SPA 212 Intermediate Spanish (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: SPA 211 or permission of the instructor. Continuation and expansion of SPA 211.


SPA 220 Dialects of the Southwest (A)........3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: One semester Spanish or equivalent. Students will study the development of language and dialect relevant to the Chicano. Language emphasis will be on Spanish spoken in the Chicano community.
SPA 221 Current Spanish
Spoken and Written (A,N,R).......3 credit hours
Second year course leading to more fluent and current usage of Spanish. May substitute for SPA 211 sequence.
SPA 222 Current Spanish
Spoken and Written (A,N,R).......3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: SPA 221 or permission of instructor. Continuation of SPA 221.
SPA 225 Spanish for the Professional (A) ... 3 credit hours
Job-related Spanish for the professional including technical vocabulary for the professional.
SPA 299 Independent Study (A,N,R). ... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 34.
SPEECH
SPE 100 Motivational Speech (R)..........3 credit hours
Basic principles of sales and persuasive speech applied to specific occupations.
SPE 101 introduction to Speech (A,N,R)______3 credit hours
Skills in communication theory and public speaking.
SPE 102 Public Speaking (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
Continuation of SPE 101.
SPE 107 Occupational
Communication (A,N,R)........1 to 3 credit hours
Basic communication skills with emphasis on speaking and listening and on-the-job communication. (Can be taken as COM 107)
SPE 111 Forensic Activity I (N,R)..........3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: SPE 101 or equivalent.
Techniques of debate and extemporaneous speaking.
SPE 120 Oral Interpretation
of Literature (A,N,R).............3 credit hours
Learning to select, analyze and perform various literary forms. (For the beginner).
SPE 200 Business and Occupational
Public Speaking (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: SPE 101 or permission of the instructor. Effective oral reporting and use of audio-visual aids in business and occupations.
SPE 205 Voice and Diction (A,R)...............3 credit hours
The mechanism of voice production. Emphasis on development of individual voice production.
SPE 211 Intermediate Public
Speaking (A,N,R)..................3 credit hours
Pre-requisite: SPE 101 or permission of the instructor. Skill necessary for effective, intelligent and responsible speech.
SPE 299 Independent Study (A,N,R)________1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 34.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
299 Independent Study (A,N,R).... 1 to 3 credit hours
Independent study (Course No. 299) is available in each of the major areas within the Division of Communication and Arts (i.e., English, foreign language, speech, etc.) except physical education and communications laboratory. The course provides opportunity for the serious-minded student to engage in intensive study and research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Prerequisite for enrollment is permission of the Director of the Division of Communication and Arts and the assigned instructor. The number of quarter hours of credit (1-3) will be determined by the Division Director.
SPE 112 Forensic Activity II (N,R)..........3 credit hours
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DIVISION OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Where a course description does not indicate the campus by the key A, N, or R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
BIOLOGY
BIO 101 Biology for Water/Wastewater
Programs (R)....................4 credit hours
Consists of an introduction to ecological principles, biological chemistry and processes, and variety in living organisms. The course is directed toward water/wastewater systems. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 102 Sanitary Microbiology (R).........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: BIO 101
A basic course emphasizing the procedures for isolating, identifying, and differentiating between those microorganisms found in water, waste water, solid waste, and those problems relating to waste water treatment, stream sanitation, and public health. (2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 105 Microbiology for
Dental Assistants (N)...........1 credit hour
A mini-course emphasizing microorganisms of importance to dentistry and methods of controlling bacteria. (1 hour lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week)
BIO 106 Fundamental Concepts
of Human Biology (A,N)..........3 credit hours
A survey course for students needing an understanding of basic biological and chemical concepts as applied to the human body. The basic cellular and chemical aspects of life are related to a brief survey of body organ systems. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
BIO 107 VD and You (A,N)....................1 credit hour
A study of the prevalent venereal diseases, causes of the VD epidemic in the world today, and personal and public preventive measures. (1 hour per week, no laboratory)
BIO 108 Health and Modern Living (N)........3 credit hours
A survey of the basic issues of human interrelationships and diseases which affect personal, family, and community health. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
BIO 111 Human Anatomy and
Physiology I (A,N,R)............4 credit hours
A detailed study of the principles of human biology as seen through an in-depth examination of the gross and microscopic anatomical structures of the human body and of the relationship of these structures to their function. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 112 Human Anatomy and
Physiology II (A,N,R)........<.., 4 credit hours
Prerequisite: BIO 111
A continuation of BIO 111. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 115 Introduction to Microbiology (N) ... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: BIO 112 or SCI 101 An introduction to microbiology with an emphasis on epidemiology and its relationship to the health science occupations. (2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
Page 35
BIO 116 Summer Mountain Survival
and Ecology (N,R)................2 credit hours
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor An integrated course in basic wilderness travel and general biology. The basic thrust of the course will be the accumulation of practical knowledge. Ecology, conservation, and safety will be stressed. (6 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 117 Winter Mountain Survival
and Ecology (N,R)................2 credit hours
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor A course for those people who enjoy the winter outdoors and want to know more about it. This is a learning by doing course which involves planning cross-country ski trips, gathering the required equipment and supplies, learning the necessary fundamentals about the environment, and taking a series of overnight camping excursions and cross-country ski trips. (6 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 121 Introduction to the
Environment (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
A study of the basic principles of ecology, population dynamics, mans impact upon natural ecosystems, and possible solutions to the problems posed to man in his environment. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
BIO 122 Field Experiences
Environment (A,N)................1 credit hour
Prerequisite: BIO 121 or concurrent enrollment in BIO 121
A descriptive field study of the natural ecosystems of the front range region around Denver, with extensive field trips designed to accompany BIO 121. (3 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 125 Urban Ecology (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
A course designed to view and study urban environments with an ecological perspective. The urban environment will be dealt with from two broad viewpoints: (1) physical, (2) biological. The physical aspect will include such areas as micro and macromates, geology, energy, and physical services such as water and air treatment. The biological aspect will deal with those vegetational and animal characteristics germane to an urban environment. The dominant organism will be man. The study of water will lead to a treatment of history, transportation, industry, and housing in the city. The course will stress basic ecological principles and compare the differences between natural ecosystems and urban ecosystem. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
BIO 126 Field Biology (A,N,R)................2 credit hours
A field study of the biomes, life zones, and successions in the front range with an introduction to plant and animal identification and quantitative ecology. This course may also consist of field studies in ecosystems outside Colorado; for example, desert ecology, shore ecology, involving a week or more study during a semester break. (1 hour lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)


BIO 127 Microbes and Man (N)..............2 credit hours
A microbiology course for nonscience students. A presentation of the interesting activities and influences of microorganisms on man and his environment. (2 hours per week, no laboratory)
BIO 131 General College Biology I (A,N,R) .. 4 credit hours
This introductory course in biology will consider living systems from the environmental, evolutionary, and behavioral point of view. Topics will include ecology, population dynamics, adaptation, microscopy and biological diversity, individual and social behavior. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 132 General College '
Biology II (A,N,R)..............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: BIO 131 or permission of instructor.
Deals with living systems from a functional and developmental point of view. Topics include cellular structure and function, major biochemical concepts, reproduction, heredity, and evolutionary mechanisms. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 137 Human Sexuality and
Reproduction (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
An introductory course dealing with the various aspects of human reproduction. Topics include overpopulation, human sexual response, pregnancy, birth, contraception, and venereal diseases. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
BIO 147 Human Heredity (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
The biological aspects of race and human heredity will be considered, including the genetic foundations, the range of human variability, racial mixtures, and the usefulness of biological factors in understanding racial differences. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
BIO 157 Drugs: Their Use and
Abuse (A,N,R)....................3 credit hours
A study of some of the drugs commonly used in our society today. The effects on the body of such drugs as the alcohols, amphetamines, barbiturates, opiates, hallucinogens, marijuana, and nicotine will be examined. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
BIO 167 The Biology of
Women (A,N,R).....................3 credit hours
This course deals with all biological aspects of a woman's life from the basis of female roles, through anatomy and physiology, sexuality, childbearing, basic health and diet, and finally to suggested solutions to the betterment of the female and her body. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
BIO 205 General Microbiology (N,R).............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: BIO 132 or consent of instructor A survey of major microbial groups with special emphasis on bacteria. Emphasis is on basic principles and techniques in microbiology as well as identification, structure, function and role in nature and disease. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 206 Environmental Biology (A,N,R).... 4 credit hours
Prerequisite: BIO 132
An introduction to the principles of ecological systems, world biomes, population dynamics, and distribution or organisms. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 216 Cell Biology (A,N,R)..................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: BIO 132 or consent of instructor An introduction to the cell as the fundamental unit of function and structure in all living systems. Morphological and physiological characteristics common to all cells will be emphasized. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 226 Developmental Biology (A.N.R).........4 cedit hours
Prerequisite: BIO 132 or consent of instructor An introduction to the changes occurring during organismic development and differentiation. Gene action, biochemical regulation, and environmental factors will be stressed. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 236 Plant Biology (R).....................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: BIO 132
A survey of the main plant groups built around the photosynthetic, reproductive, and other functions of a living plant and how these functions express themselves at and through different levels of structure. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
BIO 246 Genetics (A,N)........................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: BIO 132 or permission of instructor A broad survey of the field of hereditary mechanisms which will be of interest to students in biology, psychology, anthropology, and to those who wish to learn something of the field of genetics. Topics to be covered will include transmission of traits, cellular aspects of heredity, mechanisms of gene action, and population genetics. Relevant areas of human genetics will be incorporated into each of these topics. (4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week)
BIO 299 Independent Study (A,N,R).... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 41.
CHEMISTRY
CHE 101 Fundamentals of
Chemistry I (A,N,R)............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 106 or MAT 111 or equivalent
A first course in the fundamentals of chemistry designed for nonscience majors, students in occupational programs, or students with no high school chemistry. The student completing the sequence of CHE 101 and CHE 102 will have a general background in basic chemistry and an introduction to organic and biochemistry. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
CHE 102 Fundamentals of
Chemistry II (A,N,R)...........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: CHE 101
A continuation of CHE 101. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
CHE 109 Preparation for College
Chemistry (A,N,R)...............4 credit hours
A one semester course designed primarily for students with some background in chemistry who need review or new information in specific background areas before they are prepared for the general college chemistry course (CHE 111). Instruction will concentrate on four major areas: inorganic nomenclature, stoichiometry, simple models of the chemical bond, and several types of chemical reactions. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
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CHE 111 General College
Chemistry I (A,N,R).............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: CHE 102 or 1 year of high school chemistry or MAT 112 or consent of instructor.
CHE 111 and CHE 112 constitute a two-semester sequential course in the principles of college chemistry. Designed for science majors and students in preprofessional programs. (4 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
CHE 112 General College
Chemistry II (A,N,R)............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: CHE 111
Continuation of CHE 111. (4 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
CHE 121 Chemistry for a Changing
Society I (R)...................3 credit hours
A study of basic chemical principles in a series of topics of consumer interest, including: food and additives, fabrics, plastics, metals, cleaning agents, and health care products. No previous chemistry background is required. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
CHE 122 Chemistry for a Changing
Society II (R)..................3 credit hours
A study of basic chemical principles in a series of environmental topics, including: composition of the atmosphere and natural waters, and their pollution; recycling; thermodynamics, fuels, and energy alternatives. No previous chemistry background is required. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
CHE 201 Organic Chemistry I (A,N,R).........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: CHE 112 or equivalent CHE 201 and CHE 202 are a sequence in organic chemistry designed primarily for science majors, premedical and predental students, and others who desire a knowledge of the chemistry of organic compounds. A structural and mechanistic approach to syntheses, properties and behavior of chemically and biologically important compounds is stressed. Laboratory emphasis is on basic techniques, synthetic procedures, and modern instrumental analyses. (3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week)
CHE 202 Organic Chemistry II (A,N,R)........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: CHE 201
Continuation of CHE 201. (3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week)
CHE 299 Independent Study (A,N,R).... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 44.
COMPUTER SCIENCE
CSC 105 Computers and You (A,R).............3 credit hours
For students with nontechnical backgrounds who desire experience in using the computer for problem solving in the social and biological sciences, education, or business. Includes flow charting and programming methods, modeling and simulations, statistical packages, data base handlers, and digital process control techniques. (2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
CSC 201 Introduction to Computer
Science I (A,N,R)...............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 111
CSC 201 and CSC 202 are a sequence in computer science covering programming methods, using Fortran and assembly language programming for both numeric and nonnumeric problems. Includes machine architecture, digital representation of data, string manipulation, compilers, and assemblers. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
Page 37
CSC 202 Introduction to Computer
Science II (A,N,R).................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: CSC 201 or consent of instructor Continuation of CSC 201. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
CSC 205 Computer Methods for
Scientific Studies (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 111
An introduction to numerical problem solving using a high level computer language with scientific applications. Includes these language elements: control statements, arithmetic operations, arrays, subprograms, and input/output statements. (2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
CSC 211 Computer Methods for Scientific
Studies I (A,N,R).................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 111
An introduction to numerical problem solving using a high level computer language with scientific applications. Includes these language elements: control statements, arithmetic operations, arrays, subprograms, and input/output statements. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
CSC 212 Computer Methods for Scientific
Studies II (A,N,R)................4 credit hours
A continuation of CSC 211 with emphasis on structured programming, file manipulation, string variables, and more advanced programming techniques applied to scientific problems. (4 hours lecture and 4 hours laboratory per week)
CSC 299 Independent Study (A,N,R)_________1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 41.
EARTH SCIENCE
EAS 101 Physical Geology (R)...............4 credit hours
An introductory study of the earth. Emphasis is on recognizing earth materials, discovering the relationship between crustal movements and the earths interior, mountain building, metamorphism, volcanism, and earthquakes; and investigating the role of weathering, landslides, streams, waves, wind, glaciers, and groundwater in shaping the land surface. Laboratories include studies of Rocky Mountain geology through field investigations, field trips, and museum tours. EAS 101 and EAS 102 constitute a one-year course in geology; they need not be taken in sequence. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
EAS 102 Historical Geology (R)................4 credit hours
An introductory study of the physical and biological origin and development of the earth through the vast span of geologic time. Emphasis is on investigating and interpreting sedimentary rocks, the record of ancient environments, fossil life forms, and physical events, all within a framework of shifting crustal plates. Laboratories include studies of Rocky Mountain geology through field investigations, field trips, and museum tours. EAS 101 and EAS 102 constitute a one-year course in geology; they need not be taken in sequence. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
EAS 105 The Geology of the Regional National
Parks and Monuments (R)...........3 credit hours
This course will examine the geologic history of the National Parks and Monuments within a day's ride of Denver. Field trips will be taken. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)


EAS 106 Environmental Geology of
Colorado (R)....................4 credit hours
A study of the environment from a geologic perspective. Many examples taken from Colorado and elsewhere will illustrate problems of land use, geologic hazards, mineral resources, and energy needs for the future. Laboratory work involves field trips to local areas to examine landslides, swelling soils, dams, and river floodplains as well as indoor work with rocks, minerals, topographic, and geologic maps. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
EAS 107 Airphoto Interpretation (R).........3 credit hours
An introduction to our environment using airphotos, maps, and remote sensing data. Emphasis is on the development of Skills and reasoning ability required for the interpretation of geologic features and aspects of forestry, agriculture, land use, engineering, urban planning, and industrial problems. Laboratory work includes practical use of the stereoscope, simple photogrammetric instruments, maps, photomaps, and airphotographs. (1 hour lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week)
EAS 108 Weather and Climate (R).............4 credit hours
The behavior of the atmosphere and its influence on mans activities. Topics include weather observation, solar radiation, pressure and wind, precipitation, the climates of the earth, and theories of climate change. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
EAS 115 Mineral Resources and
the Future (R)..................1 credit hour
This course will analyze the worlds mineral wealth, its distribution, and the potential effects on the U.S. lifestyle. (1 hour per week, no laboratory)
EAS 119 The Great Ice Age (R)...............1 credit hour
This course will analyze the effects of the Great Ice Age on the development of North America and will also explore theories of climatic change. (1 hour per week, no laboratory)
EAS 120 Weather at Its Worst (R)............1 credit hour
This course will analyze the causes of tornadoes, hurricanes, thunderstorms, and drought. (1 hour per week, no laboratory)
EAS 125 Continental Drift (R)...............1 credit hour
The history of continental movement and its relationship to earthquakes and volcanoes and the history of life. (1 hour per week, no laboratory)
EAS 126 Volcanoes and Earthquakes (R) ... 1 credit hour
Great natural disasters: their causes, results, prediction, and impact on society. (1 hour per week, no laboratory)
EAS 201 Introduction to Mineralogy (R)......4 credit hours
A study of minerals, their occurrences,' origins, description, and identification. Topics will include history of mineralogy and lore of gems, physical properties of minerals, crystallography, origin and occurrence of mineral deposits. Includes mineral identification with spectographic analyzer and simple chemical techniques as well as hand specimen identification. Field trips will be taken to local mineral collecting areas. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
EAS 202 Introduction to Petrology (R).......4 credit hours
Prerequisite: EAS 201 or consent of instructor Using examples from Colorado, the occurrence, description, and origin of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks will be studied. The relation of ore deposits to the rock framework of Colorado will also be discussed. Includes preparation and description of rock thin sections using the polarizing microscope as well as field trips to outstanding geologic localities. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
EAS 205 Geology of Colorado (R)............2 credit hours
A summer course consisting of field trips to classic geologic localities in Colorado. One-day trips in the front range and trips to the western slope will be taken. (1 hour lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
EAS 206 Geology Field Experiences (R)......2 credit hours
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor In-depth field studies into the geology of specific regions both within and outside of Colorado. A field trip of several days length to the study area will constitute the major activity of the course. The specific area of investigation will be indicated in the schedule of classes each time the course is offered. (1 hour lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
EAS 207 Geologic Field Methods (R).........2 credit hours
Prerequisite: EAS 101 and EAS 102 An introduction to geologic mapping and methods of field investigation. Emphasis is on field identification of rocks, use of geologic instruments such as the Brunton compass, hand level, Jacobs staff, chain, etc., preparing geologic maps, sampling techniques, note-taking, measuring and compiling columnar sections, and writing geologic reports. Laooratory work is held outdoors. (1 hour lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
EAS 299 Independent Study (A,N,R). ... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 41.
MATHEMATICS
MAT 090 Basic Operations on
Whole Numbers (A)...............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor Designed to strengthen skills in adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing whole numbers; this course offers diagnostic testing and individualized instruction, with the opportunity for self-paced progress. In addition to whole numbers, the basic ideas of fractions, decimals, percent, and measurement are available for exploration. (3 hours per week)
MAT 101 Applied
Mathematics I (A,N,R).......1 to 3 credit hours
FOR INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS Applications of elementary mathematics in industrial occupations. Topics include fractions, decimals, percents, ratio and proportion, powers and roots, weights and measures, working with formulas and simple equations, and introduction to geometry. Students registering for less than 3 semester hours must have the approval of their advisor and the Division of Science and Mathematics. (1 to 3 hours per week)
MAT 102 Applied Mathematics II
(A,N,R).....................1 to 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 101 FOR INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS A continuation of the study of basic geometry including polygons, circles, solid figures, followed by basic trigonometry. Students registering for less than 3 semester hours must have the approval of their advisor and the Division of Science and Mathematics. At North Campus all of the geometry topics are included in MAT 101. Additional topics pertaining to mathematics for electronics are taught in MAT 102 at both North Campus and Red Rocks Campus. (1 to 3 hours per week)
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MAT 105 Selected Topics
in Mathematics (A,N).........1 to 2 credit hours
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor The topics covered include fractions, decimals and percents, ratio and proportion, solving word problems, exponents, dimensional analysis, etc., as they are applied in certain areas of the physical sciences. Individuals' needs are assessed by an initial diagnostic exercise which determines what material each student covers. (1 to 2 hours per week)
MAT 106 Introduction to
Mathematics (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
Designed for students who need a comprehensive review of arithmetic. Topics include the fundamental operations of whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percentages, proportion, operations with signed numbers, and equations. (3 hours per week)
MAT 107 Mathematics for
Electronics (A)..................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 106 or equivalent Develops mathematical skills needed in electronics. Topics covered include: powers of ten, scientific notation, working with electronic units, use of the electronic calculator, basic algebra, Ohm's law and power formulas and related direct current circuits, system of equations, elementary trigonometry, and alternating current circuits. (5 hours per week)
MAT 108 Hand-Held Calculator (A,N,R).........1 credit hour
Prerequisite: MAT 106 or equivalent Designed to introduce the concepts of scientific notation, estimation, significant digits, and algebraic hierarchy as applied to the use of the calculator for computation. (1 hour per week)
MAT 111 Introductory Algebra (A.N.R).........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 106 or equivalent A first course in algebra designed for the student who has had less than one year of high school algebra or for those who need a review. Manipulation of algebraic expressions, solving first degree equations in one and two variables, factoring, solving fractional equations, graphing, and verbal problem solving. (3 hours per week) \
MAT 112 Intermediate Algebra (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 111 or equivalent Introduction to sets, introduction to axiomatic approach to the set of real numbers, extension of exponents, radicals, first and second degree equations in one variable, functions, and graphs. (3 hours per week)
MAT 113 Introduction to
Geometry (A,N,R).................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 112 or equivalent Designed to extend the mathematical skills developed in MAT 111 and MAT 112. The topics to be included are logic, geometry, and basic trigonometry. (3 hours per week)
MAT 115 Consumer Mathematics (A,N,R) ... 2 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 106 or equivalent skills A course designed to help the student in his everyday dealing with the business world. Topics include loans, interest, checkbook reconciliation, and installment buying. (2 hours per week)
MAT 116 Exploring Mathematics (A,N)..........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 106 or equivalent skills A survey course designed to give the student an application of a great variety of interesting topics in mathematics without emphasizing its computational aspects. (3 hours per week)
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MAT 117 Survey of Calculus (A,N,R)............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 112
For Business, Life Science, and Social Science majors. Derivatives, integrals, and applications of them are included with attention restricted to algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. (4 hours per week)
MAT 121 College Algebra (A,N,R)............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 112 or equivalent Sets, operations on sets, an axiomatic approach to the set of real numbers, absolute value, inequalities, algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions, solving first and second degree equations and inequalities, graphs, solutions of systems of equations, sequences, permutations and combinations, and mathematical induction. (4 hours per week)
MAT 122 T rigonometry and
Functions (A,N,R).................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 121 or equivalent Topics include trigonometric functions, identities, graphs, logarithms, solutions of triangles, complex numbers, and polynomials. Functions as mappings, associations, and ordered pairs. Theory of equations and further solutions to systems of equations. (3 hours per week)
MAT 125 Statistics (A,N,R)....................3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 111 or equivalent Designed to provide an opportunity for the student to develop critical and functional understandings of statistical data. Attention is given to the basic concepts of statistical methodology and procedures. The principles of statistical investigation, technique and data presentation, measures of central tendencies, etc., are studied. (3 hours per week)
MAT 126 Computer Applications
for Statistics (A,R)................1 credit hour
Prerequisite: MAT 125 or concurrent enrollment in MAT
125
Laboratory course to include computer applications of statistical procedures such as correlation, chi square analysis, and analysis of variance. Data analysis will be done by using commercially prepared computer packages. (3 hours laboratory per week) ,
MAT 201 Calculus I (A,N,R)....................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 122 or equivalent Introduction to single variable calculus and analytic geometry. The concepts introduced will be motivated by geometric and physical interpretations. (5 hours per week)
MAT 202 Calculus II (A,N,R)...................5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 201
Extension and further development of concepts of single variable calculus and analytic geometry studies in MAT 201. Applications of differentiation'and integration; techniques of integration. (5 hours per week)
MAT 203 Calculus III (A,N,R)..................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 202
The completion of the traditional subject matter of single variable calculus not covered in MAT 201 and MAT 202. In this course, an introduction to vector analysis, multivariable calculus, and solid analytic eeometrv will he nresentPri Akr> covered are three-dimensional vector space and infinite series. (4 hours per week)
MAT 205 Ordinary Differential
Equations (A,N,R).................3 credit hours
This course will introduce the student to the formal study of differential equations. Topics will include differential equations of first order and first and higher degrees, linear differential equations and higher order equations, with applications. (3 hours per week)
MAT 299 Independent Study (A,N,R). ... 1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 41.


PHYSICS
PHY 101 Fundamental Physics I (A,N,R) .... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 101 or equivalent An introduction to basic concepts in physics with an emphasis on applications. Primarily designed for occupational students and nonscience majors. (2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 102 Fundamental Physics II (A,N,R). ... 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 102 or equivalent Continuation of PHY 101. (2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 105 Topics in
the Physical Sciences (A)........'.. 3 credit hours
A nonmathematical course emphasizing topical subjects in the physical sciences. For students wishing to explore the concepts of the physical sciences. (2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 111 Applied Physics I (R)................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 112
A laboratory based course in mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, and magnetism with emphasis on the application to technology. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 112 Applied Physics II (R)...............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: PHY 111
A continuation of PHY 111. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 115 Introduction to Medical
Physics (A)......................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 121 or concurrent enrollment in MAT 121
Provides the physical theory pertinent to students of nuclear medicine and radiation therapy technology. Covers fundamentals of mechanics, electromagnetism, radiation, and atomic and nuclear theory. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 121 Principles of Electronics
for Science Majors I (R).........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 122 or concurrent enrollment in MAT 122 or consent of instructor
An introductory course in the principles of electronics and of the components used in modern electronic instrumentation. The student will become familiar with (1) basic test instruments, (2) the input-output characteristics of components and circuits, (3) assembly of components and circuits into electronic devices and instrumentation. Emphasis on components, basic circuits, and transducers. (3 hours lectureand 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 122 Principles of Electronics
for Science Majors II (R)........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: PHY 121
Continuation of PHY 121 with emphasis on the use of analog and digital electronics in processing and control systems. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 125 Astronomy for
the Layman (A,R).................2 credit hours
Designed for nonscience majors as an introductory course in identification of constellations with telescopic studies of the moon, some planets, nebula, and other stellar objects. Other topics will include: mythology, origin of the universe and solar system, physical characterisitcs of the solar system, and photography through the telescope. Optional field trips included. (2 hours per week, no laboratory)
PHY 130 Introduction to Astronomy (N) ... 4 credit hours
A nonmathematical introduction to the nature and structure of the universe. Class discussion will include current topics such as the lives of stars, the fate of the universe, and black holes. Each student will learn to recognize many stars and constellations. Opportunities will be provided for telescopic observation of the moon, planets, galaxies, and nebulas. (4 hours per week, no laboratory)
PHY 131 General Astronomy I (A,N,R).........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 112 or consent of instructor A study of the history and methods of astronomy and an introduction into our present understanding of the universe in terms of basic physical principles including the most recent discoveries and ideas such as quasars, pulsars, and black holes. (4 hours per week, no laboratory)
PHY 132 General Astronomy II (A,N,R)........4 credit hours
Prerequisite: PHY 131
Continuation of PHY 131. (4 hours per week, no laboratory)
PHY 135 Special Topics
in Astronomy (N).................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
This course is designed for the serious amateur astronomer and has two main objectives: (1) help the student understand current writings on astronomy at the level of Scientific American or Sky and Telescope Magazine, (2) develop observational and photographic skills employing small telescopes. (4 hours per week, no laboratory)
PHY 141 Physics for Arts
and Humanities 1(A).............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: High school algebra or consent of instructor A study of the concepts, history, and philosophy of physics and its interaction with our culture. Topics include motion, force and energy, symmetry and form, structure of matter, relativity, and cosmology. Activities include discussions, demonstrations, films, and projects. (2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 142 Physics for Arts
and Humanities II (A)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: High school algebra or consent of instructor Continuation of PHY 141 jz iiouis lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 151 General Physics I (A,N,R)...........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 121 or consent of instructor A noncalculus study of classical and modern physics. An elementary but thorough presentation of the fundamental principles of mechanics, heat, electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics, and the application of these principles on the micro and macro scale. (4 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 152 General Physics II (A,N,R)..........5 credit hours
Prerequisite: PHY 151 or consent of instructor Continuation of PHY 151. (4 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 153 General Physics
Calculus Supplement I (N).......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: MAT 201 and concurrent enrollment in
PHY 151
Application of calculus to physical concepts discussed in PHY
151. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
PHY 154 General Physics
Calculus Supplement II (N)......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: PHY 153. MAT 202. and concurrent enrollment in PHY 152
Application of calculus to physical concepts discussed in PHY
152. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
Page 40


PHY 161 Physics for Scientists
and Engineers I (A,R).............5 credit hours
Corequisite: MAT201
A calculus-based study of mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, and optics. (4 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 162 Physics for Scientists
and Engineers II (A,R)............5 credit hours
Prerequisite: PHY 161 and concurrent enrollment in MAT 202
Continuation of PHY 161. (4 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
PHY 201 Human Realities: Art,
Science, Literature 1(A) .,.......3 credit hours
An interdisciplinary, team-taught course using modular approach integrating studies in the humanities and the sciences to meet the diverse needs and interests of inner-city community college students. Students must also register for the humanities section of this course (3 hours per week, no
laboratory)
PHY 202 Human Realities: Art,
Science, Literature II (A)..........3 credit hours
A continuation of PHY 201. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
PHY 205 Modern Physics (A,N,R).................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: PHY 162
The principles of quantum mechanics and relativity applied to solid state, radiation, molecules, atoms, nuclei, and elementary particles. (4 hours per week, no laboratory)
PHY 206 Electricity
and Magnetism (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: PHY 162 or consent of instructor Theory of static and dynamic electricity and magnetism and electromagnetic radiation. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
PHY 207 Optics (R)...........................4 credit hours
Prerequisite: PHY 152 or consent of instructor Theory of light: geometric and physical optics. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory pet* week)
PHY 208 Quantum Mechanics (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: PHY 162
A study of the basic foundations of quantum theory including the uncertainty principle, Schrodinger equation, probability waves, wave packets, and wave trains with applications to simple systems. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
PHY 299 Independent Study (A,N,R)-------1 to 3 credit hours
See course description on page 41.
SCIENCE
SCI 101 Science for
Health Occupations I (A,N).......4 credit hours
A one semester study of the structure and function of the human body. Emphasis is on the anatomy of the body systems. Includes some microbiology. (3 hour-s lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week)
SCI 102 Science for
Health Occupations II (A,N).....2 credit hours
Selected topics in metric measurements, chemistry, and physics which relate directly to the health occupations. (1 hour lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week)
SCI 105 The Metric System (A,N,R)..........1 credit hour
A comprehensive coverage of metric area, cubic volume, and capacity volume. Also included are conversions of English area, land area, cubic volume, capacity volume to metric units. Fahrenheit and Celsius temperatures and density and specific gravity are also included. (1 hour per week, no laboratory)
Page 41
SCI 106 Science and the
Preschool Child (A,N,R)............2 credit hours
A course for the teacher or parent who desires an insight into the natural sciences and their meaning to the preschool child. It will provide the student with concepts and facts which a preschool child can grasp and with techniques which will stimulate a childs interest in the natural sciences. (2 hours per week, no laboratory)
SCI 111 Science for the
Earth Citizen I (N)................4 credit hours
This course is a general introduction to the scientific view of the world designed to help nonscience majors live and vote intelligently in a world shaped by science. Basic concepts in astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, physics, and technology are studied in terms of words and pictures with no mathematics other than arithmetic being employed. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week)
SCI 112 Science for the
Earth Citizen II (N).............4 credit hours
Continuation of SCI 111. (3 hours lecture and 3 hours
laboratory per week)
SCI 115 The Ascent of Man (N,R)..............2 credit hours
An overview of the many disciplines which have contributed to the knowledge of human origins, based upon the popular television series broadcast on BBC-TV. (2 hours per week, no
laboratory) *
SCI 116 Science and Science Fiction: A Changing
Vision (A,N,R)....................3 credit hours
This course will deal with the major revolutionary developments in modern science and how science fiction literature views these developments including their impact on the values and goals of our society and the changing vision of the place of man in his universe. (3 hours per week, no laboratory)
SCI 201 Science for Health
Occupations III (A,N).............4 credit hours
Prerequisite: SCI 101 and SCI 102 An expansion of the topics covered in Science for Health Occupations I with emphasis on the physiology of the body systems, and physiological adaptations to stress and disease. (3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week)
SCI 202 Science for Health
Occupations IV (A,N)..............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: SCI 101 and SCI 102 An introduction to microbiology related to infectious diseases and the bodys defenses against infectious diseases. (2 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week)
SCI 203 Science for Health
Occupations V (A,N)...........1 to 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Selected topics in health related concepts. (1 to 3 hours per week, no laboratory)
SCI 299 Independent Study (A,N,R). ... 1 to 3 credit hours
Students majoring in one of the areas of the Division of Science and Mathematics may enroll in independent study Intensive library and/or laboratory research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified member of the division faculty. To be eligible, the student must have successfully completed one or more second year courses in the subject matter area in which he is majormg and give evidence that he can successfully engage in independent study. Independent study carries 1 to 3 hours credit involving a minimum of 3 to 9 hours per week. Permission to enroll must be obtained from the instructor under whosedirection the independent study will be carried out and from the director of the division.


DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Where a course description does not indicate the campus by the key A, N, or R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
ANTHROPOLOGY
ECONOMICS
ANT 111 Principles of Anthropology (A,N,R). 3 credit hours
An introductory study of the nature of culture and cultural evolution.
ANT 112 Principles of Anthropology (A,N,R). 3 credit hours
An introductory study of culture including language, technology, social structure, arts and values.
ANT 119 Anthropology of Religion (A,N,R)... 3 credit hours
An investigation of religion in preliterate and literate societies.
ANT 140 Contemporary American 0
Culture (A,N,R)..................3 credit hours
An evaluation of contemporary American culture.
ANT 201 Physical Anthropology (A,N,R) .... 4 credit hours
An introductory study of the fossil record, living animals, and cultural factors as they relate to human evolution. May be taken for science credit for non-science majors.
ANT 202 Physical Anthropology (A,N,R) .... 4 credit hours
An anthropological study of human variation, human biology, and the mechanics of evolution. May be taken for science credit for non-science majors.
ANT 205 Anthropology of Women (A,N,R)... 3 credit hours
A cross-cultural investigation of female roles in pre-industrial and industrial societies.
ANT 206 Culture in the World
Today: Latin America (A,R).......3 credit hours
A view of cultural dynamics.
ANT 207 Culture in the World
Today: The Middle East (A.R).....3 credit hours
A view of cultural dynamics.
ANT 208 Culture in the World
Today: Africa (A.R)..............3 credit hours
A view of cultural dynamics.
ANT 209 Principles of Archeology (A,N,R)... 3 credit hours
An introductory study of methods, techniques and theories of archeological investigation.
ANT 215 The Nature of Language (A,N)........3 credit hours
A survey of the basic structure, origin and development of Language.
ANT 216 Principles of Ethnology (A,N,R).... 3 credit hours
A view of the methods and concepts which anthropologists use in studying non-industrialized cultures.
ANT 225 Current Topics in
Anthropology (A,N,R).............3 credit hours
Prerequisite: 6 hours of Anthropology
An analysis of topics of anthropological interest varying from arm to term.
ANT 230 Ethnography of the North
American Indian (A,N)...........3 credit hours
Focuses upon the indigenous Indian cultures of North America.
ECO 107 Consumer Economics (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Deals with consumer effectiveness, in areas such as money management, credit, taxes, and consumer law.
ECO 117 I ntroduction to
Economics (A,N,R)...............3 credit hours
Emphasizes development of economic systems and philosophies; applications of fundamental economic concepts. \
ECO 118 Labor Relations (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
An in-depth analysis of labor economics, collective bargaining, labor law, and the role of government in labor relations.
ECO 119 Applied Economics (A,N,R)..........3 credit hours
Emphasizes basic economics that relate to the role of the small businessman and the wage earner.
ECO 121 Labor-Management
Relations I (N).................3 credit hours
The role of the union steward and first-line supervisor in the labor-management relationship.
ECO 122 Labor-Management
Relations II (N)................3 credit hours
The role of the union steward and tirst-line supervisor in preparation for negotiations; a simulated exercise in bargaining a labor contract with union and management teams.
ECO 165 Economics and the Chicano (A).... 3 credit hours
Deals with the contributions of the Chicano to the American economic system. The economic activities in which the Chicano is presently engaged will be examined.
Page 42


ECO 175 Government and the
U.S. Economy (A,R)..............3 credit hours
Deals with development of governments role in the national economy.
ECO 211 Principles of Economics
Micro (A,N,R)...................3 credit hours
Presents an analysis of the market system: Consumers, businesses, and markets.
ECO 212 Principles of Economics
Macro (A,N,R)...................3 credit hours
Present an overview of gross national product, government involvement, money and banking, national income determination, inflation and unemployment, business cycle fluctuations, and international trade.
ECO 265 Black Economic
Development (A).................3 credit hours
Analyzes the nature of urban growth, economic instability, income inequality, urban public services, public revenues, and the different problems of unemployment, poverty, and manpower development.
ECO 285 Dynamics of Economics (A,N,R) 1 to 3 credit hours
Focuses upon a topical approach to contemporary economic issues.
GEOGRAPHY
The geography offerings are composed of courses which may be used for science and social science credit both at CCD and for transfer to other colleges. Consult with the geography faculty for additional information.
GEO 105 Fundamental Place-Name
Geography (A,N,R)...............1 credit hour
Designed for persons wanting to know where places are located.
GEO 106 Visual Literacy (A,N,R)............1 credit hour
Designed to acquaint students with techniques for increasing their visual awareness and understanding.
GEO 107 Applied Geography (A,N,R)..........1 credit hour
Designed for the student who wants to know how informed locational decisions related to residential location, marketing geography, and manpower geography are made.
GEO 108 Maps and Compass Use (A,N,R) .... 1 credit hour
Designed to improve the student's ability to make and use maps.
GEO 111 Physical Geography
(Weather and Climate) (A,N,R) .... 4 credit hours
Introduction to the principles of landforms and soils as major aspects of mans natural environment.
GEO 112 Physical Geography
(Landforms) (A,N,R).............4 credit hours
A general introduction to the principles of meteorology, climatology, world vegetation patterns, and world regional climatic classification.
GEO 121 Geography of Man (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
An introduction to the patterns and forms of mankinds changing use of and adjustments to the earth's environments.
Page *3
GEO 122 Geography of Man (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
A preliminary examination of major global social, economic, and political problems from a spatial, geographic perspective.
GEO 150 World Regional
Geography (A,N,R)..............4 credit hours
An introduction to the major regions of the world and to the concepts of cultural geography.
GEO 165 Geography of
Latin America (A,N.)...........3 credit hours
An indepth analysis of geographical patterns of Latin America.
GEO 200 Human Ecology (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
A survey of world resources, the nature of resources.
attitudes toward resources, environmental principles, and the impact of populations on resource bases.
GEO 210 The Geography of
Economic Activity (A,N,R)......3 credit hours
An examination of mans economic activities and their
location.
GEO 220 The Many Colorados (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Examines such things as the landforms. vegetation, climate, peoples, economy, and culture which gives various areas of Colorado their character.
GEO 230 Urban Geography (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
The study of sociological, psychological, and economic forces at work in urban places from a spatial, geographic perspective.
GEO 235 Rural Geography (A,N)..............3 credit hours
An examination of the changing patterns of land use and population in rural America resulting from both agricultural and non-agricultural forces since World War II and the effects of these changes on rural America.
GEO 289 Geography Practicum (A,N,R) 1 to 9 credit hours
Field experience related to the students interests. Arrangement with instructor required.
HISTORY
HIS 111 World Civilization (A,N,R)........4 credit hours
Explores the historical and cultural development of peoples in various areas of the world.


HIS 112 World Civilization (A,N,R)............4credithours
Explores the historical and cultural development of peoples in various areas of the world with greater emphasis on the modern period.
HIS 115 Personalities and Issues (A,N,R)... 3 credit hours
Examines the personalities and issues that have shaped history.
HIS 116 The Native American Experience
and Indian History (A,N)..........3 credit hours
An introduction to American Indians historical and sociocultural development with emphasis upon those processes and relations with non-Indians, which have contributed to the current conditions.
HIS 130 The Southwest
United States (A,N,R) ............3 credit hours
The culture and historical development of what is now the Southwestern United States, including the cultural contributions of the American Indian and Chicano people.
HIS 135 Introduction to
Latin American History (A).......3 credit hours
Provides an introduction to the land, people, and politics from a historical perspective and Third World approach.
HIS 136 Historiade
Latino America (A)............'... 3 credit hours
Una presentacion de la historia de Latino-America hecho principalmente en espanol y con entasis tambien en los temas contemporaneas.
HIS 140 Caribbean Culture and
the Cuban Revolution (A).........3 credit hours
Will investigate the cultural aspects of life in the West Indies with emphasis on the Cuban Revolution from 1960 to the
present.
HIS 150 Contemporary
World History (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
Analyzes the history and culture of modern man since 1900.
HIS 205 Women in History (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
Surveys the roles, experiences, and contributions of women in the history of the Americas; explores ways in which womens history modifies traditional interpretations of historical events.
HIS 211 The United
States to 1865 (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
Story of the American people from the first inhabitants, through the European Colonies, the American Revolution, and the early experiences of the new nation through the crisis of Civil War.

HIS 212 The United
States 1865 to Present (A,N,R).... 3 credit hours
Story of the people of the U.S. from reconstruction through the resettlement of the west, the emergence of the Modern Industrial State, World War, the Roaring Twenties, and the Great Depression, to the upheavals since World War II.
HIS 218 The Civil War
and Reconstruction (N,R)..........3 credit hours
Designed to expose the student to the causes of the Civil War, the way it was fought, and the attempts to reconstruct the South in the aftermath of war. Special focus upon Lincoln, Black men in America, and the idea of the confederacy.
HIS 220 Colorado History (A,N,R).............3 credit hours
The story of the people, society and culture of Colorado from its earliest settlers, the Indians, tnrough the Spanish influx, the Fur Traders, the explorers, the Gold Rush, the cattlemen and farmers, the tourists and the modern 20th Century state.
HIS 225 Colorado Seminar (N,R).................3 credit hours
On-site seminar with visits to local places of historical significance, such as Fort Vasquez, Cripple Creek, and Georgetown. Examines the dynamics of mining, labor, farming and ranching, and Colorados people.
HIS 226 The Greater Denver
Area (A,N,R)..................3 credit hours
On-site history of the development of the greater Denver area. Designed to give the student an overall and indepth view of the local culture, heritage and character.
HIS 228 The Black People and
the American Frontier (A,N)...3 credit hours
Examines the roles of Black people in the development of the West.
HIS 235 The American West (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
Focuses upon Indians, Fur Traders, explorations, gold rushes, cattlemen, sodbusters, closing of the frontier, and developments in the 20th Century.
HIS 239 American Presidents (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
uives the student an opportunity to analyze some of the critical problems facing our American Presidents, from George Washington to the present.
HIS 241 Black Civilization
Africa (A).......................3 credit hours
Traces the culture and development of early African Civilization to the American Civil War.
HIS 242 Black Civilization
America (A)......................3 credit hours
The culture and the development of Blacks in America from the Civil War to the present time. Treats reconstruction and the basic problems which have emerged both in the South and North with emphasis on the protest movements emerging in the 20th Century.
HIS 243 Land Grants and Their Relationship to the
Contemporary Chicano 1(A)........3 credit hours
Provides the student with information concerning the Spanish and Indian Pueblo Land Grants of the Southwest from 1689-1848.
HIS 244 Land Grants and Their Relationship to the
Contemporary Chicano II (A)......3 credit hours
Covers changes of land grants status made after the conquest of the Southwest by the United States 1848 to the present emphasis on contemporary issues.
HIS 246 Mexico .............................3 credit hours
The historical and cultural development of Mexico from earliest times to the present; includes an examination of present day politics and society of Mexico.
Page 44


HIS 250 Democratic Ideas (A,R)..............3 credit hours
Study of individual and social freedom as a value and concern in the western world.
HIS 255 Soviet Russia (A,R).................3 credit hours
An analysis of the men and ideas that shaped the development of the Soviet Union.
HIS 261 England I (R).......................3 credit hours
Deals with the formative development of England from Stone Henge to the restoration of the monarchy in 1660.
HIS 262 England II (R)......................3 credit hours
Study of the political, social, and economic forces in England from 1660 to the present.
HIS 271 Middle America (MESO) (A,N).........3 credit hours
Traces the history of the indigenous population of Middle America (Mexico, Guatemala) from earliest times until the conquest of Mexico by the Spanish, Emphasis is on the civilizations of the Olmeca, Zapoteca, Maya, Tolteca, Mixteca, and Azteca.
HIS 272 Middle America (MESO) (A,N).......3 credit hours
Presents the history of Middle America after the arrival of the Europeans until the present times.
HIS 280 No More Lies: The Other Side
of American History (A).........3 credit hours
Features a revisionist approach to American history; the purpose is to develop an objective understanding of Americas history of its dark side as well as its greatness.
STUDENTS MUST ARRANGE WITH INSTRUCTOR FOR ENROLLMENT IN HIS 285, HIS 286, HIS 287, HIS 288, HIS 289.
HIS 285 Internship in a History Museum:
General Introduction (N,R)........3 credit hours
Work in a local history museum involving duties designed to familiarize them with functions of a history museum.
HIS 286 Internship in a History Museum:
Library Resources (N,R)...........3 credit hours
Work in the library resources are of the State Historical Society.
HIS 287 Internship in a History Museum:
Building and Sites (N,R)..........3 credit hours
Performs a variety of tasks for the buildings and sites department of the State Historical Society including research on historical sites.
HIS 288 Internship in A History Museum:
Education (N,R)...................3 credit hours
Work in the education department of the State Historical Society.
HIS 289 Internship in a History Museum:
Collections (N,R).............. 3 credit hours
Work in the collections department of the State Historical Society.
PHILOSOPHY
PHI 111 Introduction to
Philosophy (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
A study of the significant questions of the human enterprise with consideration given to human nature and existence, theories of knowledge and reality, freedom, the good life, and religion.
PHI 115 Social and
Political Philosophy (A,N,R)....3 credit hours
Examines the arguments, values, and ideas man uses to explain, criticize and change his society and culture.
PHI 121 Eastern Philosophies...............3 credit hours
An analysis of the great religions of the Far East; includes Hinduism, Buddhisim, Confucianism, and Taoism.
PHI 122 Western Philosophies...............3 credit hours
An analysis of the religions of the Middle East and Western Civilization, includes Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
PHI 125 Indigenismoand
the Chicano (A).................3 credit hours
A refreshing change of pace for the student interested in a non-european approach to the often forgotten philosophies and ideas of native peoples in the Americas which have affected the Chicano. Cross reference with HUM 127. Can be accepted as Philosophy or Humanities credit.
PHI 221 Ethics and Values (A,N,R)..........3 credit hours
A comprehensive consideration of the the good life of the knowledge and values that can be used in the endeavor to master the problems and possibilities of the contemporary human situation.
PHI 222 Contemporary Moral Issues (A,N,R) 3 credit hours
Ethical and value considerations of vital current moral issues.
PHI 230 Logic (A,N,R)......................3 credit hours
The principles of logic applied to the problems and realities encountered in the practical realms of daily life.
PHI 240 Progressive Thinking and
the Contemporary Chicano (A) .... 3 credit hours
An analysis of the development of the Philosophy of the
Chicano.
PHI 245 American Philosophy (A,N,R)..........3 credit hours
The development of the American Philosophical thought.
PHI 260 Philosophies
of Education (A).................3 credit hours
Examines the philosophical role ot education in society.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
POS 111 Introduction to
Political Science (A,N,R).........4 credit hours
Studies man as a political animal; the nature and use of power; the role of ideology.
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POS121 American
National Government (A,N,R)......3 credit hours
Study of American government emphasis on the role of institutions, individuals, and groups of informing American political behavior.
POS 122 American State and
Local Government (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Analysis of governmental structure and political behavior in states and municipalities; urban problems and the role of government in their solution.
POS 161 Political Leadership (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
A study of group process, parliamentary procedures, recruiting, campaigning, publicity, legislation, and administration through classroom and laboratory experience.
POS 162 Practical Politics (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
Introduction to political action at the local, state and/or national level.
POS 201 Comparative Politics (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Introductory survey and analysis of political behavior and institutions in the 20th Century; problems of the over developed and under developed world.
POS 205 International Relations (A,N,R).... 3 credit hours
The international political system and .the effects of geography, history, culture, ideology, domestic politics, foreign policies, diplomacy, international law, and international organizations.
POS 206 Current Political Issues (A,N,R)_____3 credit hours
A General overview of federal relationships with the various tribes and the Indian population.
POS 215 Federal Indian Policies (A)..........3 credit hours
Studies local, state, national and international political events and developments.
POS 230 Chicano and
the Law (A,N)....................3 credit hours
Provides an insight into all phases of the jurisprudence system both Civil and Criminal. '
POS 246 Women, Power,
and Politics (A,N,R).............3 credit hours
Designed to reach the process of political activism to persons interested in changing discrimination activities against women.
POS 247 Colorado Politics (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
The agents, both individuals and organizations, and processes responsible for major social, political, economic, and planning decisions in Colorado.
POS 251 Chicano Political Experience (A)... 3 credit hours!
A critical evaluation of leading issues affecting Chicanos in American society.
POS 253 Third World Policies
and the Chicano (A)...............3 credit hours
Provides a realistic look at the Chicano in relationships to the developing nations presently known as Third World countries.
POS 254 Chicano Legislative Review A critical evaluation of leading issues effecting Chicanos in the legislative process. Includes a practicum which involves a follow-through of bills selected by the students. (Course offered when the State Legislature is in process)
POS 265 Black Political
Thought and Experience (A,N)......3 credit hours
A critical analysis and evaluation of the development of Black political thought and the reciprocal impact of political
institutions and organizations upon Blacks in America.
i
POS 285 Dynamics of Political Science
(A,N,R).......................1 to 4 credit hours
Deals with political forces affecting community development in urban and/or rural environments. Emphasizes problem solving through the use of the tools of political science. Arrangements with instructor required.
PSYCHOLOGY PSY 100 Human Relations in
Business and Industry (A,N,R) .... 3 credit hours
Focuses on the personal problems encountered by employees in a business relationship with fellow employees and with the employer.
PSY 105 Self-Exploration
and Understanding (R).........1 to 3 credit hours
This is an intensive growth experience offering the opportunity for students to explore their identity, feelings, unfinished relationships and the making of new relationships.
PSY 106 Human Potential Seminar (R)..........3 credit hours
Uses James McHolland's Human Potential Workbook following his structure dealing with subjects of self-affirmation, self-motivation, determination and emphathy for others.
PSY 111 General Psychology (A,N,R).....3-4 credit hours
A broad overview of general field and fundamental principles of Psychology. (It is recommended that PSY 111 and PSY 112 be taken in sequence.) General Psychology Lab offered at Auraria and North Campuses for one (1) credit hour.
PSY 112 General Psychology (A,N,R).....3-4 credit hours
Continuation of PSY 111. (It is recommended that PSY 111 and PSY 112 be taken in sequence.) General Psychology lab offered at Auraria and North Campuses for one (1) credit hour.
PSY 115 Psychology of Personal
Adjustment (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
Psychological principles as they relate to individuals in the areas of social interaction and personal adjustment.
PSY 125 Child Guidance Techniques (A.N,R) 3 credit hours
A study of methods and techniques of working with children.
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PSY 126 Psychology of Law
Enforcement (R)..................3 credit hours
Deals with the psychological effects of policing on the officer and the public.
PSY 205 Psychology of Women (A,N,R)..........3 credit hours
The psychological assumptions about the female personality and how these assumptions are being questioned or verified by recent studies and cultural change.
PSY 210 Social Psychology (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
Social factors which influence the behavior of individuals as they interact with others.
PSY 211 Introduction to Human
Resources Development (A,N,R)... 3 credit hours
This course integrates knowledge and theories from a variety of behavioral sciences. This course is not intended to develop analysts or therapists, but rather is designed to sensitize the student to the issues and development of human resources.
PSY 212 Introduction to Human
Resources Development (A,N,R)... 3 credit hours
Examines in depth the contemporary phenomenon of complex human behavior. Emphasis will be in the area of group dynamics, communication processes, group problemsolving, and group growth.
PSY 215 Psychology of
Human Sexuality (A,N,R)..........3 credit hours
Covers topics dealing with the psychological, sociological, biological implications of human sexuality.
PSY 218 The Mental Health Aspects of Sports,
Exercise, and Recreation (A).....3 credit hours
A humanistic approach to the value of sports, exercise, and recreation as a means of self-fulfillment.
PSY 221 Child Development (A,N,R)............3 credit hours
Studies the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of the child.
PSY 222 Developmental Psychology (A,N,R). 3 credit hours
Studies the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development from late middle years to adulthood.
PSY 225 Psychology of
Death and Dying (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
Deals with the social and psychological aspects of death and dying.
PSY 226 Coping With Stress,
Crisis and Dying (A)..............3 credit hours
Designed to look at the areas of crisis intervention, altered body image, and death and dying.
PSY 230 Abnormal Psychology (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
Prerequisite: PSY 111 and PSY 112 or arrangement with instructor.
Description, and theories of personality and behavior disorders.
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth
and Development (A,N,R)..........3 credit hours
Studies of childhood to senescence. Designed primarily for health occupations.
PSY 247 Behavioral Modification (R).........3 credit hours
Studies theory, principles, and applications of behavioral modification.
Page 47
PSY 250 Psychology of Prejudice (A,N,R) ... 3 credit hours
Designed to assist students so that they understand in depth the basic causes of prejudice and the etiology of prejudical behavior.
PSY 255 Psychological Development of
the Black Personality (A).......3 credit hours
An indepth study into the psychological factors of racism that influence the development of the Black personality.
PSY 260 Psychology of
the Chicano (A,N)...............3 credit hours
Designed to develop an understanding of the psychological impact of the Chicano experience on the Chicano personality.
PSY 265 Social Psychology of
the Native American (A).........3 credit hours
Presents a view of the Native American personality in relation to the modern environment on the United States, from the Native American perspective.
PSY 266 Chicano Community
Mental Health (A)................3 credit hours
Deals with the individual and family mental health of the
Chicano community.
PSY 270 Industrial Psychology (A,R).........3 credit hours
Presents the psychological principles of employee selection, training, testing, evaluation, human motivation, job satisfaction, work efficiency, fatigue, and human engineering.
PSY 275 Psychology of Management............3 credit hours
Concepts of Human Behavior that are relevant to organizational and managerial problems.
PSY 285 Dynamics
of Psychology (R)............1 to 3 credit hours
A study of patterns of human behavior in problem-solving and decision-making.
PSY 297 Introduction to
Human Services (R)...............6 credit hours
Students will participate in a series of workshops emphasizing crisis intervention, psychotherapeutic techniques and related communication processes. Students will work in a social service agency or institution.
SOCIOLOGY
SOC 111 Introduction to
Sociology (A,N,R)................3 credit hours
Deals with the basic concepts and principles of sociology that pertains to the individual in society.
SOC 112 Introduction to
Sociology (A,N,R)................3 credit hours
Deals with the basic patterns of sociology that shape society.
SOC 115 The Athlete and Sports
in Society (A,N,R)...............3 credit hours
The study of sociological issues through such topics as violence, competition, the value of participation, the changing role of women, and sports as a vocation.
SOC 140 Sociology of
Mental Health (A,R)..............3 credit hours
An investigation into socio-psychological factors of mental health.
SOC 150 Marriage and
the Family (A,N,R)...............3 credit hours
Develops an understanding of the social role of marriage and family living, of those factors which promote stable marital relations.


SOC 156 Sociology of Women:
Selected Topics (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
Interdisciplinary study of women past and present, provides a perspective for research and understanding of changing roles of women in various levels of society.
SOC 165 Movimiento Estudiantil
Chicano de Aztlan (A).............3 credit hours
Designed to acquaint Chicano and Bilingual students with general college information and educate them in the area of academic planning.
SOC 200 Urban Sociology (A,N,R)...............3 credit hours
City and metropolitan growth are examined in terms of the human factors and social issues involved.
SOC 205 Industrial Sociology (A,N)............3 credit hours
Studies problems and benefits of an industrial system for the individual and society; alternative industrial structures; and the relationships to different economic and political systems.
SOC 206 The 21st Century: Models of
Future Worlds (A,R)...............3 credit hours
An interdisciplinary examination of possible futures for human beings, their physical environment, and their social institutions.
SOC 210 La Familia Chicana (A)................3 credit hours
Designed to provide insights into the structure and traditions of the Chicano family as compared and contrasted with other America family structures.
SOC 215 Current
Social Problems (A,N,R)...........3 credit hours
Introductory considerations of some major current social issues designed to improve the students ability to understand and systematically investigate concerns vital to everyday life.
SOC 217 Social Stratification (A,N,R).........3 credit hours
Critical examination and evaluation of major theories of class and distribution of power, prestige and wealth, the relationship between class and personality.
SOC 218 Sociology of Poverty (A)..............3 credit hours
A cross cultural study of poverty in todays societies. Comparative description of poverty in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Also, study of the cultural, political and economic aspects of poverty in the United States.
SOC 219 Sociology of Conflict (A).............3 credit hours
Examines the stages and functions of conflicts within society and social groups such as community organizations, religious systems, economic institutions, educational institutions, and political structures.
SOC 220 Minority Groups on
American Society (A,N,R)..........3 credit hours
The processes and consequences of labeling whereby certain groups come to be defined as minorities and treated in particular ways are studied.
SOC 225 Deviant Behavior (A,R)................3 credit hours
Sociological perspectives on behavior defined as deviant, abnormal, or socially unacceptable.
SOC 226 Aging
and the Aged (A,N,R)..............3 credit hours
Cultural alternatives of viewing the aging process and treatment of the aged studied from sociological, psychological, and political perspectives.
SOC 227 Social Change (A)....................3 credit hours
Factors and determinants of continuity and analysis of leading theories of social change in technologically developed and underdeveloped societies against the historical background of their times.
SOC 228 Sociology of Education (A)...........3 credit hours
The study of educational processes in relation to contemporary society. Cultural forces and institutions helping to shape education and some resulting issues and problems.
SOC 229 Education in Urban
America (A)......................3 credit hours
The study of factors that affect teaching-learning of inner-city children. This course includes subjects such as: Poverty, discrimination, prejudice, and racism in the United States and their impacts on teaching-learning processes.
SOC 230 Sociology of the
Chicano Community (A)............3 credit hours
Fundamental concepts and theories of sociology with comparative emphasis on the Chicano and his culture in America.
SOC 235 Sociology of Religion (A)............3 credit hours
Concepts related to the field of religion as it applies to the organization of society, and cognitive construction of truth by man be ngs
SOC 236 The Chicano and
the Schools (A)..................3 credit hours
Studies problems of Chicano students adapting to the schools and the teacher's response to them.
SOC 237 Urbanization and
the Chicano (A)..................3 credit hours
Studies rural folk values of the Chicano and their erosion in the urban setting.
SOC 238 Field Work in
Barrio Studies (A)...............3 credit hours
Observation of selected barrios, institutions, and agencies to be conducted under supervision and after preparatory instruction to acquaint students with the barrio.
SOC 239 Political Sociology (A)...................3 credit hours
A sociological analysis of the state as a social organization, the nature of political systems and political, behavior in a societal context, and of-the interrelationships of political and societal phenomena.
SOC 241 Sociology of the
Black Community 1(A)............3 credit hours
Fundamental concepts and theories of sociology are related to Black people, their culture, and contributions to America.
SOC 242 Sociology of the
Black Community II (A)..........3 credit hours
Presents the problems and characteristics of Black communities in relation to various agencies and institutions operating within them.
SOC 246 La Mujer Politica (A,N)..............3 credit hours
Delves into the traditional and contemporary roles of La Chicana.
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SOC 248 Peoples and Cultures of
the Middle East (A)...............3 credit horus
Includes a discussion of the fundamental aspects of the Middle Eastern societies covering such topics as impacts of physical environment on development of cultures, contemporary demographic characteristics and problems, overall examination of major institutions (economic, family, political, educational, and religious).
SOC 255 Criminology (A.N.R.)..............3 credit hours
Designed to study the nature and causes of crime as a social phenomenon.
SOC 256 Juvenile Delinquency (A.N.R)......3 credit hours
Theories of the causes and prevention of delinquency.
SOCIAL SCIENCE
SOS 101 Field Experience in
Community Organizations I (A,N,R) 3 credit hours
Students will perform human service work in community organizations, programs, and agencies of their choice. Arrangement with instructor required. (1 hour of lecture and 4 to 6 hours of field experience per week)
SOS 102 Field Experience in
Community Organizations II (A,N,R) 3 credit hours
Continuation of Field Experience I. Arrangement with instructor required. (1 hour of lecture and 4 to 6 hours of field experience per week)
SOC 257 Correction,
Treatment, and Custody (A).......3 credit hours
Examination of principles and problems of controlling and treating offenders.
SOC 258 Field Practicum
in Corrections (A)...........3 to 5 credit hours
Prerequisite: 3 required courses in corrections and by arrangement with the instructor.
Students will work with community organizations, programs
and agencies and study the application of treatment of
offenders in order to aid the student in developing the
perspectives, skills, and methods vital in corrections.
*
SOC 260 Divorce and Other
Unmarried Lifestyles (A,N,R).....3 credit hours
Develops an understanding of the causes of divorce and the problems of adjustment to it; the single life, the one-parent household, the arrangement, swinging, communes, and other unmarried lifestyles.
SOC 266 The Contemporary
Native American (A)..............3 credit hours
An intensive survey of the contemporary problems, issues and developments involving American Indians, both urban and rural.
SOC 267 The Native American
in Urban America (A).............3 credit hours
A study of the historical development of Native American communities within urban areas and an analysis of what it means to be an urban Indian in modern America.
SOC 285 Dynamics of Sociology (A,N,R). 1 to 3 credit hours
Focuses on selected areas of sociological investigation to be announced in each semester's schedule.
SOS 115 Introduction to
Social Science (R)...............3 credit hours
Surveys various social science disciplines in terms of basic concepts and methodology.
SOS 211 Introduction to
Community Development (A,N,R,) 3 credit hours
The Current theories of planned social change will be surveyed, along with their practical application in numerous community settings by various social change agents.
SOS 212 Techniques in
Community Development (A,N,R).. 3 credit hours
From the conceptual foundations established in SOS 211, the students will delve deeper into planned social change by taking the position of change agents.
The classroom style will be identical to SOS 211.
SOS 216 The Urban Setting:
Metro Denver (A,N,R>.............3 credit hours
Metro Denver will be used as a comparative case study in American urban areas.
The classroom style will be identical to SOS 211.
SOS 260 Research Methods in the
Social Sciences (A,N,R)..........3 credit hours
Designed to aid the student to develop the skills, methods, and techniques of research required for systematically exploring the socio-psychological world in which he lives.
SOS 261 Research Methods in
Community Development (A,N,R).. 3 credit hours
The various data gathering methods, approaches to analysis of data, and the evaluation of their use for community development purposes.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
299 Independent Study (A,N,R)........1 to 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of the Division Director and arrangement with instructor.
Provides opportunity for the student to engage in intensive study and research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified faculty member.
This course will not transfer.
Page 49


CONSORTIUM OF ETHNIC STUDIES
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Where a course description does not indicate the campus by the key, A, N, or R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
ANTHROPOLOGY
ANT 230 Ethnography of the North
American Indian (A)........3 credit hours
Focuses upon the Indigenous Indian cultures of North America.
ART
ART 195 The Art of Africa
and Black Americans (A)..........3 credit hours
A critical examination of the Art of Africa and its relationship to the artistic development of the New World.
ART 196 Chicano Art History (A).............3 credit hours
A basic course in art appreciation designed to provide historical background in Chicano art.
ART 197 Native American Arts and
Contemporary Development (A) t.. 3 credit hours
The history of Native American art with emphasis on painting, sculpture, and crafts.
ART 295 Chicano Mural Painting (A).......3 credit hours
Prerequisite: ART 103 and ART 107 or arrangement with instructor. '
Study in a variety of approaches to mural painting including fresco, secco, and relief. Emphasis on contemporary Chicano subjects.
\
DRAMA
DRA 131 Practicum in Teatro 1(A).........3 credit hours
Building upon the precedent of current Chicano "teatro", students will establish their own techniques of acting, directing, and playwriting.
DRA 132 Practicum in Teatro II (A).......3 credit hours
Continuation of Teatro I.
ECONOMICS
ECO 165 Economicsand
the Chicano (A)...............3 credit hours
Deals with the contributions of the Chicano to the American economic system. The economic activities in which the contemporary Chicano is presently engaged will be examined.
ECO 265 Black
Economic Development (A)......3 credit hours
Analyzes the nature of urban growth, economic instability, income inequality, urban public services, public revenues, and the different problems of unemployment, poverty, and manpower development.
ENGLISH
ENG 109 Barriology Communications (A).... 3 credit hours
A study of networks and modes of communication utilized in the Chicano community, including communication between the people and different public agencies which serve them. Basic communication theory will be examined and applied to communications channels in the barrio.
HISTORY
HIS 116 The Native American Experience
and Indian History (A,N)........3 credit hours
An introduction to American Indian historical and sociocultural development with emphasis upon those processes and relations with non-Indians, which have contributed to the current conditions.
HIS 130 The Southwest United
States (A,N,R)..................3 credit hours
The culture and historical development of what is now the Southwestern United States, including the cultural contributions of the American Indian and Chicano people.
HIS 135 Introduction to
Latin American History (A)......3 credit hours
Provides an introduction to the land, people, and politics of Latin America from a historical perspective and a Third World approach.
HIS 136 Historia de
Latino America (A)..............3 credit hours
Una presentacion de la historia de Latino-America Hecho principalmente en espanol y con entasis tambien en los temas contemporaneas.
HIS 140 Carribbean Culture and the
Cuban Revolution (a)............3 credit hrs.
Will investigate the cultural aspects of life jn the West Indies with emphasis on the Cuban Revolution from 1960 to the Present.
HIS 228 The Black People and
the American Frontier (A,N).....3 credit hours
Examines the role of Black people in the development of the West.
HIS 241 Black Civilization
Africa (A)..........................3 credit hours
Traces the culture and development of early African Civilization,to the American Civil War.
HIS 242 Black Civilization
Africa (A)..........................3 credit hours
The culture and the development of Blacks in America from the Civil War to the present time. Treats Reconstruction and the basis problems which have emerged in the South and North with emphasis on the protest movements emerging in the 20th Century.
Page 50


HIS 243 Land Grants and Their Relationship to the
Contemporary Chicano 1 (A)......3 credit hours
Provides the student with information concerning the Spanish and Indian Pueblo Land Grants of the Southwest from 1689-1848.
HIS 244 Land Grants and Their Relationship to the
Contemporary Chicano II (A).....3 credit hours
Covers changes of land grants status made after the conquest of the Southwest by the United States 1848 to the present with emphasis on contemporary issues.
HIS 246 Mexico (R)... .....................3 credit hours
The historical and cultural development of Mexico from earliest times to the present; includes an examination of present day politics and society of Mexico.
HIS 271 Middle America (MESO) A,N).........3 credit hours
Traces the history of the indigenous population of Middle America (Mexico, Guatemale) from earliest times until the conquest of Mexico by the Spanish. Emphasis is on the civilizations of the Olmeca, Zapoteca, Maya, Tolteca, Mixteca, and Azteca.
HIS 272 Middle America (MESO) (A,N)........3 credit hours
Presents the history of Middle America after the arrival of the Europeans until present times.
HUMANITIES
HUM 115 Introduction to
Chicano Studies (A).............3 credit hours
An overview of the origin, culture, philosophy, and present status of the Chicano.
HUM 120 The Native American Perspective:
Arts and Ideas (A)..............3 credit hours
A study of the art and music of various Native American peoples and of the religion and philosophy from which the Native American art forms evolved.
HUM 126 Folklore of Mexico
and the Southwest (A)...........3 credit hours
A study of the folklore of indigenous people and the Mestizo in Mexico and the Southwest.
HUM 127 Indigenismoand
the Chicano (A).................3 credit hours
A refreshing change of pace for the student interested in a non-european approach to the often forgotten philosophies and ideas of native peoples in the Americas which have affected the Chicano. Cross reference with PHI 125. Can be accepted as Humanities or Philosophy credit.
HUM 225 Contemporary Chicano (A)...........3 credit hours
An interdisciplinary course dealing with current issues of the Chicano. General themes to be discussed and analyzed will include; alienation, community identity, political organization, conflict and change, ideology, religion, and power.
HUM 226 Comidas Chicanas (A)...............3 credit hours
A study of the history and folklore of comidas chicanas (cuisine), along with its position, traditional and contemporary, in the cultural matrix of the Chicano community.
LITERATURE
LIT 125 Introduction to
Chicano Literature (A)..........3 credit hours
An overview of Chicano literature from its indigenous (native) roots to the present.
Page 51
LIT 126 Native
American Literature (A).........3 credit hours
A survey of the literature of the Native American.
LIT 128 Black Literature
in America (A)..................3 credit hours
A study of Black literature which includes methods of evaluation and analysis essential for understanding and appreciating the literary contributions of the Black writer.
LIT 228 Contemporary
Chicano Literature (A)..........3 credit hours
Analyzes the various literary styles of contemporary Chicano literature and students will express themselves through their own literary works and research.
LIT 229 Contemporary
Black Literature (A,R)..........3 credit hours
An analytical and critical study of contemporary Black literature emphasizing the plight and protest of Black Americans in American society.
MUSIC
MUS 101 History of
Afro-American Music 1(A)........3 credit hours
A study of African music as one of the main sources of Black music in America. Emphasis will move from the music and musical instruments of Africa to the Jazz Age.
MUS 102 History of
Afro-American Music II (A)......3 credit hours
The contemporary era beginning with the Jazz Age and moving to the present.
MUS 120 Introduction to
Chicano Music (A)...............3 credit hours
An examination of selected works in Mexican music from pre-Columbian time to present concentrating on regional works and on 2Uth Century composers.
MUS 125 Practicum in
Chicano Coro (A)..............3 credit hours
Designed to encourage and develop student singing skills beginning with Chicano Corridos or ballads arid building to current songs of the Chicano movement.
PHILOSOPHY
PHI 125 Indigenismo and
the Chicano (A)...............3 credit hours
A refreshing change of pace for the student interested in a non-european approach to the often forgotten philosophies and ideas of native peoples in the Americas which have affected the Chicano. Cross reference with HUM 125. Can be accepted as Philosophy or Humanities credit.
PHI 240 Progressive Thinking and the
Contemporary Chicano (A)......3 credit hours
An analysis of the development of the Philosophy of the Chicano.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
POS 206 Federal Indian Policies (A)............3 credit hours
A general overview of federal relationships with the various tribes and the Indian population.
POS 230 Chicano and
the Law (A)................. ......3 credit hours
Provides insight into all phases of the jurisprudence system both Civil and Criminal.


POS 251 Chicano Political Experience (A)... 3 credit hours
A critical evaluation on leading issues affecting Chicanos in American society.
POS 253 Third World Policies
and the Chicanos (A).............3 credit hours
Provides a realistic look at the Chicano in relationship to the developing nations presently known as Third World countries.
POS 254 Chicano Legislative Review (A)------3 credit hours
A critical evaluation of leading issues effecting Chicanos in the legislative process. Includes a practicum which involves a follow-through of bills selected by the students. (Course offered when the State Legislature is in process)
POS 265 Black Political Thought
and Experience (A,N).............3 credit hours
A critical analysis and evaluation of the development of Black Political thought and the reciprocal impact of political institutions and organizations upon Blacks in America.
PSYCHOLOGY
PSY 255 Psychological Development of
the Black Personality (A)........3 credit hours
An in-depth study into the psychological factors of racism that influence the development of the Black personality.
PSY 260 Psychology of
the Chicano (A,N)................3 credit hours
Designed to develop an understanding of the psychological impact of the Chicano experience on the Chicano personality.
PSY 265 Social Psychology of
the Native American (A)..........3 credit hours
Presents a view of the Native American personality in relations to the modern environment on the United States, from the Native American perspective.
PSY 266 Chicano Community
Mental Health (A)................3 credit hours
Deals with the individual and family mental health of the Chicano community.
SOCIOLOGY
SOC 165 Movimiento Estudiantil
Chicano de Aztlan (A)............3 credit hours
Designed to acquaint Chicano and bilingual students with general college information and educate them in the area of academic planning.
SOC 210 La Familia Chicana (A)..............3 credit hours
Designed to provide insights into the structure and traditions of the Chicano family as compared and contrasted with other American family structures.
SOC 230 Sociology of
the Chicano (A)..................3 credit hours
Fundamental concepts and theories of sociology with comparative emphasis on the Chicano and his culture in America.
SOC 236 The Chicano
and the Schools (A) .............3 credit hours
Studies problems of the Chicano student adapting to the schools and the teachers response to them.
SOC237 Urbanization and
the Chicano (A)..................3 credit hours
Studies rural folk values of the Chicano and their erosion in the urban setting.
SOC 238 Field Work
in Barrio Studies (A)...........3 credit hours
Observation of selected barrios, institutions, and agencies to be conducted under supervision and after preparatory instruction to acquaint students with the barrio.
SOC 241 Sociology of
the Black Community 1(A)........3 credit hours
Fundamental concepts and theories of sociology are related to Black people, their culture, and contributions to America.
SOC 242 Sociology of
the Black Community II (A)......3 credit hours
Presents the problems and characteristics of Black communities in relation to various agencies and institutions operating within them.
SOC 246 La Mujer Politica (A,N)............3 credit hours
Delves into the traditional and contemporary roles of La Chicana.
SOC 266 The Contemporary
Native American (A).............3 credit hours
An intensive survey of the contemporary problems, issues and developments involving American Indians, both urban and rural.
SOC 267 The Native American
in Urban America (A)............3 credit hours
A study of the historical development of Native American communities within urban areas and an analysis of what it means to bean urban Indian in modern America.
Page 52


Occupational Studies
BUSINESS OCCUPATIONS
Programs Campus
Accounting.........................................A, N, R
Bilingual Office Careers................................N
Credit Management.......................................A
Data Entry............................................. N
Electronic Data Processing........................... N
General Clerical....................................A, N, R
Industrial Management...................................R
Legal Secretarial.......................................A
Management.........................................A, N, R
Marketing..........................................A, N, R
Medical Secretarial.....................................A
Office Administration................................N, R
Public Administration...................................R
Real Estate............................................ R
Secretarial........................................A, N, R
Stenographic.......................................A, N, R
Supervisory Management..................................N
Traffic and Transportation Management...................A
Word Processing Typing...............................N, R
HEALTH OCCUPATIONS
Dental Assisting......................j.........N
Diagnostic Radiologic Technology.................A
Medical Office Management........................A
Nuclear Medicine Technology......................A
Nursing.......................................A, N
Continuing Education for Nursing............A, N, R
Operating Room Technology........................A
Optometric Assisting.............................N
Radiation Therapy Technology.....................A
Respiratory Therapy Technology...................N
INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS
BUILDING TRADES
Bricklaying..........................................,.. R
Carpentry............................................. R
Plumbing................................................R
Solar Energy Installation & Maintenance...............R
Surveying...............................................R
DRAFTING AND DESIGN
Architectural Technology................................N
Civil Engineering Technology............................R
Commercial Art..........................................A
Drafting for Construction............................. R
Drafting for Industry...............................A, R
Graphic Arts............................................A
Industrial Mechanical Drafting Technology...............N
Machine Drafting Technology.............................N
Photography.............................................A
Technical Illustration..................................A
ELECTRICITY/ELECTRONICS
Appliance and Refrigeration Technology..................A
Biomedical Equipment Technology.........................A
Communications Electronics Technology...................N
Consumer Electronics Technology.........................N
Electricity Industrial/Commercial.......................R
Electronics Digital Technology..........................R
Electronics Technology................................A,N
Industrial Electronics/Electricity Technology...........R
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Industrial Maintenance Technology...................R
Vending Machine Technology........................ A
MACHINE SHOP
Machine Shop........................................N
MECHANICS
Airframe Power Plant................................A
Auto Body Painting................................ N
Auto Body Service...................................N
Automotive Mechanics.............................N, R
Business Machine Technology.........................A
Diesel Power Heavy Equipment
& Truck Mechanics..................................R
Fluid Power.........................................R
Foreign Automative Mechanics........................A
Heavy Equipment Operation &
Preventive Maintenance..............................R
Sports Crafts & Specialty Area Mechanics............N
MINERAL
Petroleum Technology-Exploration/Production.........R
QUALITY ASSURANCE
Quality Assurance................................. A
WELDING & FABRICATIONS
Welding & Fabrication.........................A, N, R
* Program curriculum and course descriptions were not approved prior to publication of the catalog. Contact the Division of Industrial Occupations on the Red Rocks Campus for program details.
SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
Audio Visual Technology................................R
Community & Social Service Associate...................A
Criminal Justice Program...............................R
Dietetic Technology....................................N
Early Childhood Education
and Management.......... ........................A, N, R
Environmental Technology...............................R
Fire Science Technology ...............................R
Food Service and Management............................N
Gerontology/Geriatrics &
Activities Directing...................................A
Hotel Motel Operations.................................A
Information Media Technology...........................A
Executive Housekeeping.................................A
Paralegal............................................. A
Recreational Leadership................................R
Traffic Engineering Technology..................... R
Urban Horticulture.....................................N
Urban Planning Technology..............................R
Water-Wastewater Technology............................R
Note:
Auraria Campus A North Campus N
Red Rocks Campus R /


Catalog 1977-78
OCCUPATIONAL STUDIES GENERAL INFORMATION
Occupational Studies at the Community College of Denver consists of the following instructional divisions: Business, Health, Industrial and Service Occupations. Instructional programs within these Divisions are designed to prepare an individual for employment and provide additional education or training for those currently employed. Although many of the courses can be transferred to other institutions of higher education, this is not the design of our curriculum. If a student enrolls with the intent of transferring to another institution, he or she, should obtain prior approval from the receiving institution.
Program Admission
Admission to the College does not assure acceptance of an individual student in a particular occupational course or program. Occupational Studies students must declare their program major at the time of registration and in the event of a change in program major, must notify the registrar's office of such change.
Advisory Committees
Each Occupational Studies Program has an advisory committee representative of that particular business, industry or professional area to assist the College in planning and development activities, such as, curriculum, equipment, employment opportunities, etc.
Employment Opportunities
Occupational Studies courses and program are designed to meet the employment needs of the greater Denver Metropolitan Area. It is the responsibility of the College to keep their educational offerings current to the employment needs, and it is the student's responsibility to put forth the effort to achieve to the best of his or her ability. Employment opportunities available are on file in the College's Job Development and Placement Offices.
Job Development and Placement
The Job Development and Placement Office on the respective campuses, instructors, and division directors in the area of Occupational Studies maintain close contact with business and industry concerning job opportunities and training needs. A record of available employment positions, both full and part-time, is kept in the Job Development and Placement Office. This office coordinates all of the colleges efforts to assist students in obtaining suitable full-time employment in occupations for which they have been prepared at the college. The services include assistance in resume development. Other services are: application aids, job interview aids, summer employment, and volunteer listings. Students interested in full-time and part-time )obs should contact the Job Development and Placement Office on their campus and complete and application for employment.
Student Advising
So that an Occupational Studies student can be assured proper direction through the learning objectives of a program, he or she will be assigned a faculty advisor representing the student's major program of study. Students will be required to seek assistance from their faculty advisor.
Independent Study
The college recognizes a commitment to provide for individual needs, and independent study is seen as one means of meeting this commitment. This program provides an opportunity for a student to pursue study on a special topic outside the regular offerings of the institution. The Division Director or appropriate supervisor will select an instructor and determine the amount of credit to be granted. Credit will be granted proportional to the hours of experience, but not to exceed four credits.
Cooperative Work Experience
In some program areas, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is contracted through the instructor/coordinator to a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or agency involved, with a college coordinator providing general coordination and evaluation. Prerequisites for enrollment to Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of tne division director. A weekly one-hour seminar is required by all students.
Credit will be granted proportional to the hours of work
experience, but not to exceed 16 semester hours in a nine-month program, or 32 credit hours in an associate degree program.
Health Occupations Laboratory Experience
The required hospital, clinic or doctors experience for employment in the health occupations field, the students receive instruction and are directly supervised by college faculty.
Clinical Practicum
In the required hospital, clinic or doctors office experience for employment in the health occupations field, the students receive instruction by college faculty, but are supervised in practicum by clinical personnel, coordinated by college faculty.
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Challenge Allowance of Credit
Students may be permitted to demonstrate that their achievement level, based on prior experience(s), is the equivalent of that required for enrollment in the successful completion of a course offered by the College, according to the following conditions and procedures:
1. The student must be currently enrolled in the College
2. The student must submit a petition to the appropriate division director setting forth the nature of the students previous experience(s) and planned career objective^) which support his petition to seek allowance of credit in lieu of enrolling and completing a particular course.
3. Upon approval of the Division Director, an evaluation shall be arranged whereby the student shall have the opportunity to demonstrate that his level of achievement is the equivalent of thpt required by the College for successful completion of a particular course.
4. Not more than one evaluation or allowance of credit for a particular course will be arranged during any semester of the regular academic schedule of the College.
5. Upon successful completion of the evaluation for allowance of credit, the student shall be awarded full credit for the particular course(s) as set forth in his approved petition.
6. Students pay tuition only if they pass and would normally owe tuition for the credit.
Life Experience Allowance of Credit
The Community College of Denver may allow college credit for life experience which is evaluated by the college to be equivalent to the content of its own courses in Occupational and General Studies. Life experience is defined as any program of instruction or related experiences, formal or informal, which has not been previously equated to college credit. Student^ who wish to petition for such credit should contact the appropriate instructional division for complete information.
Certificate of Completion
The College offers many short courses, conferences, workshops and seminars. These will vary in length from one to two meetings of short duration to units necessitating many clock hours accumulated over a period of several weeks. Successful completion of short courses of this type will result in the granting of a Certificate of Completion.
A Certificate of Completion may also be granted upon the successful completion of a course or courses in fulfillment of an educational objective leading to job-entry level employment as developed in conjunction with an advisor and approved by the respective division director leading to.job entry employment. In order to receive this Certificate the applicant must file the Application for Graduation form at the time of registering for the final semester. This form is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Associate Degree
The Associate Degree is awarded by the Community College of Denver upon the successful completion of the requirements for the degree as shown by Occupational Studies program major. The student must earn an overall grade point average of 2.0 in all credit counted towards the degree.
Additional Major Courses
Additional major courses are available beyond the requirements for an Associate Degree. These courses are designed for persons seeking continuing education, upgrading and cross-training activities to supplement their
Page 55
current employment. Interested persons should refer to the Catalog Course Descriptions and if further information is requested, contact the appropriate instructional division.
Career Center
Located within the Student Services complex, a Career Center is maintained. This area has available occupational information, a collection of college catalogs, and materials to assist students in making informed career decisions. A vocational guidance specialist who has major responsibility in assisting students with career plans is in charge of the Center.
Attendance
Regular attendance is required by all Occupational Studies Programs. Learning objectives are designed around the students attendance and absenteeism will definitely affect a student's achievement.
Safety
Correct safety instruction and practices are a vital concern within the instructional programs of the College and it is the responsibility of all persons to practice correct safety measures. If an injury does occur during instruction, the student needs to report such injury to the instructor immediately, so that first aid may be administered or the student may be directed to the College Health Service Office. Students with health problems should report such problems to the Health Service Office, so that information will be available in case of an emergency.
Student Health Insurance
All students are urged to have health insurance (student plan, family plan or other) before enrolling in any Occupational Studies instructional course or program. In case of an injury or emergency medical care, the College is not responsible for students financial obligations. For additional information please contact the Student Services Office.
Warren Center
The Community College of Denver, Red Rocks Campus, and the Warren Occupational Technical Center have established a cooperative agreement whereby students from either of the institutions may enroll in one or the other's programs. This agreement, in essence, doubles the number of offerings in both institutions.
Admissions Procedures for Warren Center
Secondary Students to Community College of Denver Red Rocks Campus, any high school student desiring to take an occupational program at Community College of Denver, Red Rocks Campus (CCD-RRC), must contact their home high school counselor who will assist them through the Warren Center into CCD-RRC.
Post-Secondary Students to Warren Center
Any post-secondary student desiring to take a day-time occupational program at Warren Center must contact the Vocational Guidance Specialist at CCD-RRC for assistance. For entry into evening occupational programs at Warren Center contact the specific Division Director at CCD-RRC.
Any occupational program which is located both at CCD RRC and at Warren Center will be filled on a space -dVdiiauiv, basis. Where duplicate occupational programs exist, CCD-RRC classes will be filled on a priority. Refer to the general catalog for additional information as needed.


DIVISION OF BUSINESS OCCUPATIONS
Where a program does not indicate the campus by the key A,N, or R, it is suggested that you call the campus of your choice of information
ACCOUNTING (A R N)
Certificate
This program is designed to prepare individuals with entry-
level skills for employment in basic bookkeeping and related
areas.
Required Major Courses
Course Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles 1 5 75
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II 5 75
10 150
Required Related Courses
BSI 115 Business Machines 1 15
BUS 110 Business Math 3 45
BUS 135 Business Correspondence 2 So
EDP 100 Principles of Electronic
Data Processing 4 60
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting 1 4 75
20 315
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS 30 465
Additional Major Courses
ACC 109 Bookeeping and Accounting 3' 45
ACCOUNTING (A N R)
Associate Degree
This program is designed to prepare students with skills and knowledges of accounting and related areas to enable them to obtain employment and to advance, with experience, to full-charge bookkeeping or junior accountant positions.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles 1..........5 75
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II.........5 75
ACC 211 Intermediate
Accounting I....................5 75
15 225
Accounting
Electives: Selection of 10-16 hours
with advisor approval...... 10-16 150-240
ACC 212 Intermediate £
Accounting 11.................. .3 45
ACC 221 Cost Accounting..................4 60
ACC 215 Accounting Systems OR............3 45
BUS 215. Systems (N)......................3 45
ACC 231 Individual Income Tax............3 45
ACC 216 Governmental Accounting..........3 45
25-31 375-465
Required Related Courses
BUS 110 Business Mathematics.............3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications.....................3 45
BUS 297 Cooperative Work Experience.... 3 45
ECO 212 Principles of Economics..........3 45
EDP 100 Principles of Electronic
, Data Processing..................4 60
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals.....................3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business.........3 45
MAN 106 Business Law.....................4 60
MAN 115 Principlesof
Management.......................3 45
MAN 225 Business Finance.................3 45
SPE 101 Introduction to Speech..............3 45
* Elective 3 45
38 570
TOTAL REQUIRED
HOURS..................63-69 945-1035
Additional Major Courses
ACC 109 Bookkeeping and Accounting.......3 45
ACC 110 Payroll & Machine t
Accounting (r)...................3 45
ACC 232 Individual Income Tax II (R)......5 75
* Elective chosen must have approval of advisor.
* Ethnic Studies Elective Auraria Campus Only.
ACCOUNTING
ACC 109 Bookkeeping
and Accounting....................3 credits
A study of the basic elements of accounting. Course includes common bookkeeping procedures in handling cash receipts and disbursements; in dealing with accounts receivable and payable: in maintaining journals and ledgers. Emphasis in
practice.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
ACC 110 Payroll and
Machine Accounting (R)................3 credits
Prerequisite: ACC 109 Bookkeeping and Accounting or ACC 111 Accounting Principles I or consent of instructor.
A study of various payroll systems including the study of related laws and practices. Includes practice in preparation of payrolls and computation of deductions.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles 1...............5 credits
Corequisite: BUS 110 Business Math or equivalent.
An introductory study of accounting principles to acquaint the student with the theory and logic that underlie accounting procedures. Course content includes the accounting cycle, periodic reporting, notes, inventory, systems and controls
and longterm assets.
75 Theory Hrs. 75 Ct. Hrs.
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II...............5 credits
Prerequistie: ACC 111 Accounting Principles I.
A continuation of Accounting Principles I with emphasis on partnership and corporation accounting, department and branch accounting, introduction to cost systems, management reports and special analysis.
75 Theory Hrs. 75 Ct. Hrs.
J
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ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting I.................5 credits
Prerequisite: ACC 112 Accounting Principles II.
A review of the accounting cycle. A detailed study of the conceptual framework of accounting as it relates to the corporate structure.
75 Theory Hrs. 75 Ct. Hrs.
ACC 212 Intermediate Accounting II................3 credits
Prerequisite: ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting I.
A continuation of the study of the framework of accounting as begun in Intermediate I.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
ACC 215 Accounting Systems........................3 credits
Prerequisites: ACC 112 Accounting Principles II, EDP 100 Principles of Electronic Data Processing.
A study of the integration of computers and accounting, and the installation and control of accounting systems in business. Emphasis on utilization of a computer to prepare
management reports.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
ACC 216 Governmental Accounting............3 credits
Prerequisite: ACC 111 Accounting Principles I.
A study of the budgeting and fund control at the local, state, and federal levels. Includes the forecast and preparation of the budgetary requirement and anticipated revenue at each level of government. The accounting principles and procedures related to the government law, appropriate to the execution of the public law, concerning public funds are
presented.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
ACC 221 Cost Accounting.........................4 credits
Prerequisite: ACC 112 Accounting Principles II A study of the cost accumulation methods and the management reports. The concepts and principles of job order, process, standard and direct cost systems; budgeting; planning and control of costs are included.
60 Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
ACC 231 Individual Income Tax I...................3 credits
Designed to familiarize the student with the most frequently used tax forms, tax information and procedures. Coverage is limited to individual income tax preparation as required by the Internal Revenue Service and the Income Tax Division of
the Colorado Revenue Department.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
ACC 232 Individual Income Tax II (R)............5 credits
Prerequisite: ACC 231 Individual Income Tax I or equivalent.
Continuation of individual income tax. In depth study of gains and losses emphasizing business and investment property, net operating losses, income averaging and tax credits. Selected problems will be solved through student research. Student is required to work in the Red Rocks Tax Service which gives practical application of knowledge to the preparation of actual tax returns.
75 Theory Hrs, 75 Ct. Hrs.
BILINGUAL OFFICE CAREERS (N)
Associate Degree
This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions and/or career advancement in businesses, governmental agencies, and other institutions which employ bilingual (Spamsh-English) personnel.
Required Major Courses
Course
No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
BOC111 Spanish Typewriting and
Machine Transcription...........4 75
BOC 260 Spanish Business
Correspondence and
Documentation...................3 45
BOC 124 Introduction to Spanish
Gregg Shorthand.................5 75
BOC 259 Clerical Simulation
in Spanish.................... 3 45
15 240
Required Related Courses
ACC 109 Bookkeeping and Accounting..... 3 45
BUS 135 Business Correspondence.........2 30
BTJS115 Business Math by Machines.........4 60
BUS 297 Cooperative Work Experience .... 3 45
ENG 131 Business Communications Fundamentals 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business..........3 45
SEC 101 Typing II.......................4 75
SEC 102 Typing III......................4 75
SEC 105 Filing and Records Control......2 30
SEC 116 Magnetic Typewriting (Memory). .. 3 45
SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand I..............5 75
SEC 122 * Gregg Shorthand II............4 60
SEC 123 Shorthand Speedbuilding
and Transcription..............4 60
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish............3 45
SPA 212 Intermediate Spanish............3 45
SPA 242 *Current Spanish
Written-Spoken............ .3________ 45
53 825
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS_____68 1065
Students not in the Secretarial area may select courses from other major areas. Appropriate courses will be suggested by advisor.
Designed for students completing Second Year Spanish
BILINGUAL OFFICE CAREERS
BOC 111 Spanish Typewriting and
Machine Transcription (N)............4 credits
Prerequisite: Spanish I or equivalent Introduction of the Spanish typewriting keyboard and principles of typewriting in Spanish. The student is encouraged to develop proficiency in speed and accuracy. Machine transcription is incorporated with the typewriting class. Tape recordings with voices from different Spanishspeaking countries is provided for transcription of
correspondence.
60TheoryHrs. 60Ct. Hrs.
BOC 124 Introduction to Spanish
Gregg Shorhand (N)..................5 credits
Prerequisite: Spanish II, BOC 260 This course introduces the theory of Gregg Shorthand Diamond Jubilee Series in Spanish. Students develop reading speeds from book plates and handwritten notes. Shorthand writing of familiar matter is demonstrated and all Gregg Shorthand principles are developed to achieve speeds of 60 words per-minute. Transcription techniques are taught. In addition, the student may take dictation in English and transcribe/translate to Spanish or English.
75 Theory Hrs. 75 Ct. Hrs.
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BOC 259 Clerical Simulation
in Spanish (N).....................3 credits
This course is an office simulation class with diversified personnel to acquaint the student with various duties performed by such personnel. The material covers English-Spanish communications, telephone techniques, travel, money exchange, filing, and office routines that are
characteristic to bilingual office situations.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
BOC 260 Spanish Business Correspondence
& Documentation (N)...................3 credits
Prerequisite: Spanish II
This course is designed primarily for students enrolled in the Bilingual Office Careers program, and other students meeting the above prerequisites. The emphasis of this course is business communications, business correspondence, translating and interpreting techniques, and documents through simulated transactions.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
BUSINESS SIMULATION AND INTERNSHIP BSI105 Billing Clerk.......................1 credit
One of several in the office )ob training projects. This unit covers the concepts of billing and introduces the applications of important general concepts of billing including purchase orders, invoicing, posting and preparation of credit memos. It also provides training on a computerized
billing machine.
15 theory hours 10 laboratory
BSI 106 Recordkeeping.........................3 credits
This course is designed to give the student a background in single-entry recordkeeping including sales, cash, payroll, retail, clerical and accounting clerk records, petty cash, bank reconciliations and a recordkeeping practice set
45 theory hours 15 laboratory
BSI 107 Payroll Clerk..............................1 credit
One of several in the office job training projects. Each unit is designed to give practical training in such clerical duties as documentation, pasting, mathematical computations, filing, proofreading, organizing work, processing, and communications. This unit involves jobs relating to office cashier duties, payroll clerical details, and the keeping of a one-write system pegboard payroll involving time cards, employee earnings records, payroll register, checks, and reports. Completion of this course leads to entry-level employability in a cluster of clerical jobs concerned with payroll
and cashier work.
15 theory hours 10 laboratory
BSI 108 Office Internship.........................2 credits
Pre-requisite: Basic typing skills Pre-or co-requisite: Minimum of 2 BSI modules One of several in the office job training projects. This unit is designed to provide students with practical training experience to apply learned skills and techniques in an actual business office setting.
30 theory hours
BSI 109 Telephone Techniques......................1 credit
One of several in the office job training projects. This unit covers use of directories, basic telephone equipment, and switchboard. Organization of work area, handling of calls, basic terminology, billing, special services, voice control, and message taking are covered. Some hands-on experience is provided. Completion of this course is appropriate both for those seeking any kind of office employment and for those interested in specific recep-tiomst/telephone jobs.
15 theory hours . 10 laboratory
BSI 115 Business Machines...........................1 credit
One of several in the office job training projects. This unit will stress operating a 10-key calculator by the touch system for developing speed and accuracy. Timed tests will be periodically administered under office conditions and job application testing simulations.
15 theory hours 10 laboratory
BSI 116 Job Search..................................1 credit
One of several in the office job training projects. This unit emphasizes the analysis of the job market, the assessment of personal qualifications; the preparation of the application and follow-up materials and techniques of the job interview.
15 theory hours 10 laboratory
BSI 117 Personal Typewriting.....................1 credit
One of several in the office job training projects. This module is designed for those who have had little or no instruction in typewriting techniques. This course is organized into five parts, each representing a basic typewriting operation: Basic skill mastery drills, centering, manuscript, business letters and tabulation. (This does not substitute for the regular first semester of typewriting).
15 theory hours 10 laboratory
BSI 118 Control Clerk.............................1 credit
Prerequisite: Basic typing
One of several in the office job training projects. Each unit is designed to give practical training in such clerical duties as documentation, posting, mathematical computations, filing, proofreading, organizing work, processing, and com-
munications. This unit involves job relating to traffic, purchasing, and stock control. Completion of this course leads to entry-level employability in a cluster of clerical occupations jobs.
15 theory hours 10 laboratory
BSI 119 Account Clerk 1 credit
One of several in the office job training projects. Each unit is designed to give practical training in such clerical duties as documentation, posting, mathematical computations, filing, proofreading, organizing work, processing and com-
munications. This unit involves jobs relating to accounts payable, accounts receivable and credit clerk duties. Completion of this course leads to entry-level employability in the cluster of clerical jobs concerned with invoices, vouchers, credit information, and the preparation of special
reports.
15 theory hours 10 laboratory
BSI 126 Refresher Typewriting.....................1 credit
One of several in the office job training projects. This module is designed for those students who need review of the basic typewriting applications. Emphasis will be placed on speed building, centering, manuscripts, business letters
and tabulations.
15 theory hours 10 laboratory
BSI 127 Refresher Shorthand......................2 credits
Prerequisites: Minimum dictation speed of 50 words per minute
This course is designed to provide review of theory, brief forms and phrases. Some work will be done on grammar and punctuation. The major emphasis will be on speedbuilding, mailability and transcription.
30 theory hours 20 laboratory
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BSI141 Office Orientation & Exploration 1......1 credit
This course is designed to give each student enrolled the opportunity to become familiar with the services available to students at Red Rocks and to explore careers in office occupations. Resource persons from the campus and the business, industry and government communities will participate.
15 theory hours 15 contact hours
BSI 142 Office Orientation & Exploration II....1 credit
This course is designed to assist students in preparing for the logistics of getting and keeping a job. Campus resources as well as business, industry and government personnel will
participate.
15 theory hours 15 contact hours
BSI 145 Typing Skill Development..................1 credit
Pre-requisite: touch typing
This course is designed to help the student gain speed and accuracy in typing. Intensive class drill work and prescriptive individual drill work will be assigned to a student to im-
prove typing skills.
15 theory hours 15 contact hours
BSI 146 Office Occupations Seminar.................1 credit
These seminars are designed to make the students specifically aware of expectations of the business, industry and government sectors. Additionally, these seminars are designed to help students attain skills and knowledge they might not have received in other course work.
15 hours theory/lab 15 contact hours
BSI 147 Typing Numbers.........................1 credit
This course is designed to help students build skills in typing numbers. Students will type sample financial statements and other numerical data.
15 hours theory/lab 15 contact hours
BSI 148 Communications in the Office............1 credit
This course is designed to help students develop skills in verbal, telephone and mail communications.
15 hours theory/lab 15 contact hours
BSI 155 Gregg Shorthand Review.................1 credit
This course is designed for students who need to review and/or refresh their skills with regard to Gregg Shorthand theory. '
15 theory hours 15 contact hours
BSI 156 Alpha Shorthand Review.................1 credit
This course is designed for students who need to review and/or refresh their skills in Alphabetic Shorthand theory.
15 theory hours 15 contact hours
BSI 157 Dictation Techniques...................1 credit
This course covers the communication techniques used when dictating into recording equipment or in dictating to a secretary.
15 theory/lab hours ' 15 contact hours
BUSINESS
BUS 095 Business Laboratory...............1 to 3 credits
Prerequisite: Enrollment in any Accounting, Secretarial, or Business Course.
The Business Lab provides facilities, equipment, and supplementary materials for students to use in completing assignments. Assistance is given on a one-to-one basis. For each credit hour the student is required to attend an average of one hour per week, however; the student may attend up to 3 hours per week. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. 45 to 135 lab hours 45 to 135 Ct. Hrs.
Page 59
BUS 110 Business Mathematics..................3 credits
Prerequisite: MAT106 or consent of instructor.
Primarily directed to the needs of students in the Accounting and Management programs. This course emphasizes the development and understanding of concepts regarding various business applications. The students learn the mathematical problem solving in the areas of merchandising, financial accounting, and general business
areas.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
BUS 115 Business Mathematics
by Machines.......................4 credits
Prerequisites: MAT106 or consent of instructor.
This course is designed to provide basic understanding of business mathematics and to develop the skills necessary to
operate calculating machines efficiently.
60 Theory Hrs. 60Ct.Hrs.
BUS 135 Business Correspondence
(Clerical/Secretarial Emphasis)......2 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisites: ENG 131 orENG 111 or equivalent. Applied business technique to communications that require problem solving and an understanding of human relations in a business situation. Students evaluate the various kinds of correspondence commonly used by business. Primary emphasis is on improving skills in the areas of proofreading and editing for mailability, composing routine letters and memorandums, letter and report set-ups and a reinforcing of the mechanics required to achieve success in producing
mailable business correspondence.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
BUS 136 Business
Communications Applications.......3 credits
Prerequisites: ENG 131 or ENG 111 or equivalent. Applied business technique of communications that require problem solving and an understanding of human relations in a business situation. Students compose and evaluate the various types of correspondence that are commonly used in business. Included will be the preparation and analysis of business reports, memos, etc. Emphasis will be placed on good writing principles. The course is designed primarily for accounting and management students and others who are
interested in business. '
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
BUS 137 Business Listening Skills................2 credits
Principles and techniques useful in developing listening skills applicable to common business situations (specifically by acquiring the four central listening abilities overcoming distractions, detecting central ideas, maintaining emotional control, and evaluating spoken messages) so as to enhance employability at all levels. Designed primarily tor accounting and management students and others interested in business.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.


BUS 215 Systems (N)..............................5 credits
Prerequisites: ACC 112 or MAN 112, EDP 100 and one programming language.
This systems course is designed to serve the needs of Data Processing, Accounting, and Management students. It is taught as follows:
1st 4 weeks A data processing instructor teaches the steps to review and design a system.
2nd 4 weeks An accounting instructor teaches the interplay of the system review in conjunction with accounting needs.
3rd 4 weeks A management instructor teaches the management inter-play and supports the system review with emphasis on management information systems.
4th 3 weeks Students complete a system review, revise, design, and present the new systems. This is a student team project, with team instruction from data processing, management, and accounting instructors.
75 Theory Hrs. 75Ct.Hrs.
BUS 297 Cooperative Work Experience..........3 credits
In some program areas, cooperative work experience is a part of the course of study. The student is placed at a work station, somewhere in the Metropolitan Denver area, which is related to his educational program and occupational objective. He works under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business, industry or ageniy involved, with a college instructor providing general coordination. Prerequisites for enrollment in Cooperative Work Experience are permission of the instructor and approval of
the division director.
15Theory/60 Lab Hrs. 75 Ct. Hrs.
BUS 299 Independent Study.................1 to 3 credits
Prerequisite: Division Director approval.
Provides an opportunity for the student to engage in intensive study and research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Conditions for electing this course are evaluated by the Director of Business Occupations, who will assist in selecting an advisor and determining the amount of credit granted for successful completion of the work.
15 to 45 Theory Hrs. 15to45Ct. Hrs.
CREDIT MANAGEMENT (A)
Associate Degree
This program prepares students for entry-level positions in consumer and commerical credit institutions. The program is also designed to prepare those individuals already in the field for advancement to upper management positions.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs
CRM 111 Financial Institutions.............2 30
CRM 112 Credit Fundamentals................3 45
CRM 113 Credit Management Problems.... 3 45
CRM 114 Credit and the Law............. .. 3 4j>
11 165
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals....................3 45
IMT 109 Business Materials Use...........1 15
MAN 105 Introduction to Business.........3 45
MAN 106 Business Law.....................4 60
MAN 115 Principles of Management.........3 45
MAN 225 Business Finance.................3 45
Electives..................... 9 135
53 795
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS..........64 960
Elective chosen must have approval of advisor.
Three semester hours must be selected from the Ethnic Studies area.
CREDIT MANAGEMENT (A)
CRM 111 Financial Institutions (A)...........2 credits
A study of the functions and roles of various financial institutions as they interact with the commerical, consumer and economic environment.
30Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
CRM 112 Credit Fundamentals (A)..............3credits
A study of the development and growth of consumer and retail credit and its effect on the American life style. Studies are made of commerical and governmental used of credit through an analysis of the actual operations of a retail, wholesale, and commerical credit department. Basis for credit making decisions will be discussed as well as various aspects of collections, bankruptcy, and charge-offs.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
CRM 205 Credit Management Problems (A)....3 credits
Prerequisite: CRM 112 Credit Fundamentals.
Case Studies and discussions of credit department functions as they relate to the overall management and objectives of the business firm. Also explores the relationship of credit to other aspects of the business enterprise.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
CRM 206 Credit and the Law (A)...................3 credits
Prerequisite: CRM 112 Credit Fundamentals, MAN 106 Business Law or consent of instructor.
A presentation of the legal aspects of credit as it relates to interest, collections, conditional sales and installment contracts, wage assignments and the basic rights of debtor and creditor.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
DATA ENTRY (N)
Certificate of Achievement
The objective of this program is to prepare the Post-Secondary student for entry-level job employability in data entry positions.
Required Major Courses Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs
EDP 103 Data Entry Laboratory . 5 135
EDP100 Principles of Electronic Data Processing 4 60
ACC 109 Required Related Courses Bookkeeping and Accounting 9 195
OR BSI 106 Recordkeeping 3 45
Required Related Courses
ACC 111 Accounting Principles 1..........5 75
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II.........5 75
BUS 115 Business Math by Machines........4 60
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications.....................3 45
BUS 297 Cooperative Work Experience .... 3 45
ECO 212 Principles of Economics..........3 45
EDP 100 Principles of Electronic
Data Processing..................4 60
TOTAL REQUIRED COURSES ... 12 240
Page 60


Electronic Data Processing (N)
Associate Degree
The objective of this program is to prepare the student as an entry-level programmer.
Required Major Courses
Course No . Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
EDP 100 Principles of Electronic Data Processing 4 60
EDP105 Assembler Language 4 60
EDP 106 COBOL 4 60
EDP 206 Advanced COBOL 3 45
EDP 208 RPG 3 45
EDP 215 Opperating Systems Concepts and JCL 3 45
EDP216 EDP Seminar 1 15
EDP Electives Select 2 8 120
EDP205 Advanced Assembler Language (4)
EDP205 EDP 107 EDP 207 FORTRAN IV (4) PL/1 (4) Advanced Pl/L (4) \ 30 450
ACC 111 Required Related Courses Accounting 1 5 75
ACC 112 OR Accounting II MAN 111 Managerial Accounting . ... 3-5 45-75
BUS 136 Business Communications Applications OR ENG 112 English Composition II ... . 3 45
BUS 215 Systems 3 45
ENG 131 Business Communications Fundamentals OR ENG 111 English Composition 1 . ... 2-3 30-35
MAN 105 Introduction to Business .. 3 45
MAT 111 Introductory Alegbra 3 45
MAT 125 Introductory Statistics 3 45
SPE 101 1 ntroduction to Speech 3 45
*Electives 6 90
34-37 510-555
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS 64-67 960-1005
* EDP 095, Data Processing Lab is required for students taking EDP courses.
^Electives chosen must have advisor approval.
ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING
EDP 095 1 to 3 credits
Prerequisite: Enrollment in any EDP course.
The lab provides facilities, equipment, and supplementary materials for students to use in completing assignments. Assistance is given on a one-to-one basis. For each credit hour the student is required to attend an average of one hour per week, however; the student may attend up to 3 hours per
week. Grading is on a pass/fail basis.
45 to 135 lab hours 45 to 135 ct. hrs.
EDP 100 Principles of
Electronic Data Processing..............4 credits
An introduction to the basic methods, techniques, and systems employed in using electronic data processing. The objective of this course is to give the student an understanding of the field of electronic data processing.
60Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
EDP 103 Data Entry Laboratory (N)............5 credits
Prerequisite: Typing speed of 45 wmp with 5 error maximum.
A practice course in the operation of the 3760 Data Entry Page 61
machine and verifier. If the student reaches employable levels prior to completion of the semester, he may be given other equipment instruction as conditions permit. Because of conflicting keyboard arrangements, it is recommended that students avoid scheduling business machines concurrently
with Data Entry Laboratory.
45 Theory Hrs./90 Lab Hrs. 135 Ct. Hrs.
EDP 105 Assembler Language (N)....................4 credits
Prerequisite: EDP 100.
An introduction to the coding and execution of simple business problems using IBM 370 Assembler Language.
60Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
EDP 106 COBOL (N)......................................4 credits
Prerequisite: EDP 100.
An introduction to the coding and execution of simple business problems using COBOL.
60TheoryHrs. 60Ct. Hrs.
EDP 107 PL/I (N)................................ 4 credits
Prerequisite: EDP 100.
An introduction to the coding and execution of simple business problems using PL/I.
60 Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
EDP 108 Basic...........................................3 credits
Prerequisite: EDP 100
An introduction to the coding and execution of simple problems using BASIC.
45 Theory Hours 45 Ct. Hrs.
EDP 205 Advanced Assembled Language (N)----4 credits
Prerequisite: EDP 105.
A continuation of EDP 105 using more advanced applications and programming techniques.
60TheoryHrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
EDP 206 Advanced COBOL (N).......................3 credits
Prerequisite: EDP 106.
A continuation of EDP 106 using more advanced applications and program techniques.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
EDP 207 Advanced PL/I (N)........................4 credits
Prerequisite: EDP 107.
A continuation of EDP 107 using more advanced applications and programming techniques.
60Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
EDP 208 RPG(N)...................................3 credits
Prerequisite: EDP 100.
An introduction to the coding and execution of simple
business problems using the Report Program Generator
language.
45 Theory Hrs. *" 45 Ct. Hrs.
EDP 209 Fortran IV (N)..........................4 credits
Prerequisite: EDP 100.
An introduction to the coding and execution of simple business problems using Fortran IV.
60TheoryHrs. 60Ct. Hrs.
EDP 215 Operating System
Concepts and JCL (N).................3 credits
Prerequisite: EDP 105 or EDP 106.
An introduction to IBM 360/370 OS/VS operating system concepts and job control language. Emphasis is on operating system and virtual storage concepts, coding JOB, EXEC, and DD statements, using catalogued procedures, job set-up for utility routines, and debugging concepts.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.


EDP 216 EDP Seminar (N)...........................1 credit
Prerequisite: EDP 205 or EDP 207.
A seminar designed to introduce the student to state of the art" applications and/or techniques in electronic data processing.
15TheoryHrs. 15Ct. Hrs.
GENERAL CLERICAL (A,N,R)
Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions and/or for career advancement in businesses, governmental agencies, and other institutions which employ persons in the general office area.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 109 Bookeeping and Accounting 3 45
BSI Business Stimulation and Internship 1-10 15-160
BUS 115 Business Mathematics by Machines 4 60
BUS 135 Business Correspondence. . 2 30
SEC 101 Typing 1 4 75
SEC 102 Typing II 4 75
SEC 105 Filing and Records Control. . 2 30
SEC 200 Office Procedures
OR SEC 205 Office Simulation . 3 45
'Business Elective 3 45
26-35 420-565
Required Related Courses
ENG 131 Business Communications Fundamentals 3 45
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS . . 29-38 465-610
Elective chosen must have approval of advisor.
INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT (R)
Associate Degree
This program provides the student with a broadly based exposure to general business and industrial functions and fundamental management concepts. Upon completion the student should qualify for job entry into a wide variety of lower level general production positions which carry initial functional administrative responsibility. Students already employed should acquire background necessary for personal development directed to job advancement.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
BUS 110 Business Mathematics . 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications .. 3 45
INM 211 Production Management 1 . 3 45
INM 212 Production Management II .3 45
INM 215 Production Management
Case Study . 2 30
MAN 105 Introduction to Business . 3 45
MAN 106 Business Law . .4 60
MAN 111 Managerial Accounting 1....... . 3 45
MAN 112 Managerial Accounting II . .3 45
MAN 115 Principles of Management . .3 45
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision .3 45
MAN 225 Business Finance . 3 45
36 540
Required Related Courses
ECO 212 Principles of Economics-Macro . . .3 45
EDP100 Principles of Electronic
Data Processing . 4 60
ENG 131 Business Communication
Fundamentals . 3 45
MAR 107 Principles of Marketing . 3 45
MAT 111 Introductory Algebra .. 3 45
MAT 125 Statistics....................3 45
SPE 101 Introduction to Speech........3 45
"Minimum of 3 elective courses. . . 6 90
28 420
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS.........64 960
'Electives chosen must'have approval of advisor.
INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT (R)
INM 103 Occupational Safety (R)...............2 credits
Course is designed to acquaint students with the responsibilities of the worker and/or first line supervisor with regard to OSHA, workman's compensation, and on-the-job
safety training.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
INM 211 Production Management I...................3 credits
Preparation in principles and practices of industrial management. Emphasis given to the organization structure of a production enterprise: production facilities; methods and procedures for effective plant layout: and other mechanisms necessary for effective control over production, quality, inventories, costs and budgets.
45 Theory Hrs. . 45 Ct. Hrs.
Page 62


INM 212 Production Management II......................3 credits
Pre-requisite: INM 211 Production Management I A continuation of Production Management I, this course emphasizes development of skill and knowledge in industrial relations, employee development, systems, procedures, work simplification, and risk management.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
INM 215 Production Management
Case Study............................2 credits
Pre-requisite: Consent of instructor.
A practical approach to problem solving and decision making in a production oriented company using case examples which require an integrative approach using the various factors of the organization and its processes in a mode of management by objectives.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
LEGAL SECRETARIAL (A)
Associate Degree
This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level
positions in the legal secretarial field.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
SEC 101 Typing I..........................4 75
SEC 102 Typing II ........................4 75
SEC 103 Typing III........................4 75
SEC 105 Filing and Records Control........2 30
SEC 111 Alphabetic Shorthand I
OR SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand 1........5 75
SEC 112 Alphabetic Shorthand II
OR SEC 122 Gregg Shorthand II.......4 75
SEC 116 MagneticTypewriting(Memory).. 3 45
SEC 123 Shorthand Speedbuilding
& Transcription..................4 60
SEC 130 Machine Transcription.............4 60
SEC 206 Legal Terminology, Procedure
and Dictation....................5 75
39 645
Required Related Courses
ACC 109 Bookeeping and Accounting OR ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 3-5 45-75
BUS 115 Business Math by Machines.......4 60
BUS 135 Business Correspondence.........2 30
BUS 297 Cooperative Work Experience .... 3 45
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals....................3 45
IMT 109 Business Materials Use...........1 15
MAN 105 Introduction to Business.........3 45
MAN 106 Business Law.....................4 60
PAR 107 Legal Research...................3 45
SEC 116 Magnetic Typewriting (Memory). .. 3 45
* Psychology Elective...........3 45
Ethnic Studies Elective-
Auraria Campus............... 3 45
35-37 525-555
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS 74-76 1170-1200
Electives chosen must have approval of advisor.
MANAGEMENT (A,N,R)
Associate Degree
This program provides the student with a broadly based exposure to general business functions and fundamental management concepts. Upon completion the student should qualify for job entry into a wide variety of lower level general business positions which carry initial functional administrative responsibility. Students already employed should acquire background necessary for personal development directed to job advancement.
Page 63
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
MAN 105 Introduction to Business .. 3 45
MAN 106 Business Law 4 60
MAN 115 Principles of Management . 3 45
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision . 3 45
MAN 225 Business Finance 3 45
MAN 239 Business Policies 2 30
MAR 107 Principles of Marketing . 3 45
Minimum of 2 elective
courses .... 5-6 75-90
26-27 390-504
Required Related Courses X
ACC 111 Accounting Principles 1
OR MAN 111 Managerial
Accounting 1 .... 3-5 45-75
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II
OR MAN 112 Managerial
Accounting II .... 3-5 45-75
BUS 110 Business Mathematics .... 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications 3 45
ECO 212 Principles of Economics .. 3 45
EDP 100 Principles of Electronic
Data Processing 4 60
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals 3 45
MAT 111 Introduction to Algebra ... 3 45
SPE 101 Introduction to Speech. . 3 45
Minimum of 3 elective courses 8-9 120-135
36-41 540-615
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS . 62-68 930-1020
Additional Major Courses
MAN 205 Small Business Management MAN 209 Management Seminar MAN 120 Office Management.
Any Marketing Course BUS 137 Business Listening Skills
Electives chosen must have approval of advisor One elective is to be chosen from the Ethnic Studies area-Auraria Campus only.
MANAGEMENT
MAN 105 Introduction to Business..............3 credits
A survey course enabling the student to gain an understanding of the overall business system and of the individual business institution. Surveys the functions and interrelationships within the individual business enterprise, and with its commercial and economic environment. Emphasizes the primary functional areas common to all types
of business enterprise.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
MAN 106 Business Law.............................4 credits
A study of American law as it related to such subjects as man's agreements with other men (contracts), man's willingness to work with other men (agency), mans accidental injuries (torts), mans property ownership, commercial paper, sales, consumer rights, and the court system. This course is designed to familiarize the student with basic rules of American society, how they have developed, and how they are administered.
60 Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.


MAN 111 Managerial Accounting I (N,R)..........3 credits
A study of accounting for planning and control as viewed through the eyes of managers who are suuject to accounting measures of performance and who often are heavily dependent on accounting information for guidance in decision making.
Emphasis is placed upon the language of the accountant, concepts and principles that guide accountants in providing data of maximum usefulness, an overview of the accounting process, upon a knowledge of the flow and management of cash and securities, and on financial analysis.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
MAN 112 Managerial Accounting II (N,R).........3 credits
A continuation of managerial accounting as it pertains to planning for profits, the budgeting process, cost behavior, management of inventories, control of overhead, cost of capital, impact of income taxes on management planning, and
internal controls through accounting.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
MAN 115 Principles of Management..................3 credits
This course is designed to focus on the fundamentals of business organization as it applies to planning, organizing, and controlling. Emphasis will be placed on methods of recognizing and solving organizational problems, and measuring corporate results against objectives.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision..............3 credits
Prerequisite: MAN 115 or Consent of Instructor A study of the principles and techniques of managing and motivating personnel. This course is designed for the student who is interested in supervising others or for those presently in supervision. Course content will focus on the human interaction in supervision as well as the personnel functions of selection, motiviation, evaluation, training, and wage administration.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
MAN 117 Time Management (A)...................2 credits
This course is intended to provide the student with the conceptual knowledge and tools to make better use of his time in the management function.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
MAN 225 Business Finance ...........................3 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
A study of the principles, concepts, and techniques used to finance business operations. The course will concentrate on the analysis of financial needs, sources and uses of short term funds, intermediate term financing, long term funding, and a survey of financial institutions. A review of fiscal and monetary policy is included in order to understand the impact of government activity on the business community.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
MAN 238 Public Administration
Policies (R)...........................3 credits
Pre-requisite: Consent of instructor.
A study of policy formulation and its relationship to effective management in the public sector. Various areas previously studied are related to policy decision-making through the use
of case studies.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
MAN 239 Business Policies........................2 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
A study of policy formulation and its relationship to effective management of various areas such as marketing, production, finance, and personnel. Various areas previously studied are related to policy decision-making through the use of case studies. i
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
MARKETING (A,N,R)
Associate Degree
This program provides the student with a broadly based exposure to general business functions and fundamental management concepts, with emphasis on the marketing function. Upon completion of the program, the student should qualify for job entry into a wide variety of lower level general business positions, particularly those with sales and initial marketing administrative or support responsibility. Students already employed should acquire background necessary for personal development directed to job advancement in marketing related areas.
MAN 120 Office Management (A)................2 credits
Emphasis is placed on the functions of the office. Includes office organization, work in the office, office layout, equipment and supplies procurement and control, work flow, forms design, record' storage and retrieval systems, personnel administration and problems, and Government
control.
30 Theory Hours 30 Ct. Hrs.
MAN 205 Small Business Management.............3 credits
A study of the importance of the small business, its problem status, and requirements for success. Focus is on the fundamentals basic to small business operations while recognizing variations in application suited to particular needs. Specific management problems are considered on an
individual basis.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
MAN 209 Management Seminar..................1-4 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
A variable content and credit course to provide for the offering of: (1) special coverage of areas of current topical interest, (2) experimental coverage of potential new units or courses, and (3) program integrating effort via seminar and simulation techniques.
15-60 Theory Hrs. 15-60 Ct. Hrs.
Required Major Courses Course No Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs
MAN 105 Introduction to Business .. 3 45
MAN 106 Business Law . 4 60
MAN 115 Principles of Management .... .. 3 45
MAN 239 Business Policies ...2 30
MAR 107 Principles of Marketing .. .3 45
MAR 108 Introduction to Salesmanship . ...3 45
MAR 109 Principles of Advertising . .2 30
MAR 215 Principles of Retailing . .3 45
MAR 216 Principles of Purchasing ...2 30
"Minimum of 1 elective course . . 3-5 45-75
28-30 420-450
Page 64


Required Related Courses
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I OR MAN 111 Managerial
Accounting 1 ... 3-5 45-75
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II
OR MAN 112 Managerial
Accounting II ... 3-5 45-75
BUS 110 Business Mathematics 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications 3 45
ECO 212 Principles of Economics . 3 45
EDP 100 Principles of Electronic
Data Processing 4 60
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals 3 45
MAT 111 Introduction to Algebra .. 3 45
SPE 101 Introduction to Speech 3 45
Minimum of 2 elective courses.. 6 90
33-37 495-555
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS . . 61-67 915-1005
Additional Major Courses
Any Management Course Not Required Above ^Elective chosen must have approval of advisor.
One elective is to be chosen from the Ethnic Studies Area-Auraria Campus only.
MARKETING
MAR 107 Principles of Marketing.............3 credits
A comprehensive introductory course enabling the student to gain a broad understanding of marketing as a functional process and as a managerial variable. Presents marketing as an integral system of activities designed to plan, price, promote, sell, and distribute goods and services to other
business and to consumers.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
0
MAR 108 Introduction to Salesmanship............3 credits
An overview course to enable the student to gain a basic understanding of the overall sales activity. Surveys the role of selling in the marketing process, communications and behavioral interactions in the buying-selling process, the functional techniques of salesmanship, and considerations of
sales management.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
MAR 109 Principles of Advertising.............2 credits
An introductory course handline the theory, practice, and techniques of advertising. Considers the role of advertising and sales promotion on our economy. Includes a general survey of the kinds and purposes of different media, the psychological implications of typical appeals, and limited student practice in promotional programming.
X Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
MAR 215 Principles of Retailing...................3 credits
Designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of retail store organization and management. Includes consideration of store location, layout, buying, pricing, operation, advertising, display, and analysis associated with
handling of merchandise.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
MAR 216 Principles of Purchasing................2 credits
Objectives and methodology of industrial, institutional, and governmental purchasing agents and buyers. Emphasizes value analysis, product quality control, maintenance of operating efficiency, analysis of competitive price quotations, and materials management.
X Theory Hrs.
Page 65
MEDICAL SECRETARIAL (A)
Associate Degree
This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level employment as medical secretaries and to advance, with experience, to related medical office management responsibilities.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hr. Ct. Hrs.
MOM 100 Introduction'to Medical
Office Procedures .. 3 45
MOM 108 Advanced Medical
Office Procedures . .3 45
MOM 107 Insurance Information
Methods . .3 45
MOM 106 Applied Science for
Medical Office Workers . .4 60
MOM 109 Medical Filing Procedures .. 1 15
MOM 116 Medical Ethics . 1 15
SEC 101 Typing 1 . 4 75
SEC 102 Typing II . .4 75
SEC 103 Typing III . .4 75
SEC 116 Magnetic Typewriting
(Memory) . 3 45
30 495
Required Related Courses
ACC 109 Bookkeeping and Accounting
OR MOM 105 Medical Office
Bookkeeping & Accounting . .3 45
BUS 115 Business Math by Machines.... . .4 60
BUS 135 Business Correspondence . .2 30
BUS 297 Cooperative Work Experience. . .. 3 45
EDP 100 Principles of Electronic
Data Processing . .4 60
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals . .3 45
SEC 111 Alphabetic Shorthand 1
OR SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand 1. . .. 5 75
SEC 112 Alphabetic Shorthand II
OR SEC 122 Gregg Shorthand II . . 4 75
SEC 123 Shorthand Speedbuilding
& Transcription . 4 60
SEC 130 Machine Transcription . 4 60
'General Studies Elective . 3 45
Ethnic Studies Elective 3 45
42 645
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS . . 72 1140
Elective chosen must have approval of advisor.
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION (N R)
Associate Degree
This program is designed to provide preparation for supervisory trainee positions in business and industry in the area of office occupations. Certified Professional Secretaries and those with previous office experience should consider this program.
30 Ct. Hrs.


Required Major Courses
Course No Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles 1 . 5 75
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II . 5 75
BUS 110 Business Mathematics .. 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications .. 3 45
BUS 297 Cooperative Work Experience. . . 3 45
EDP 100 Principles of Electronic
Data Processing . 4 60
MAN 105 Introduction to Business . 3 45
MAN 106 Business Law . .4 60
MAN 115 Principles of Management . 3 45
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision . 3 45
SEC 102 Typewriting II . .4 ,75
SEC 105 Filing and Records Control . .2 30
SEC 116 Magnetic Typewriting
(Memory) . 3 45
SEC 200 Office Procedures
OR SEC 205 Office Simulation 3 45
48 735
Required Related Courses
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals . 3 45
ECO 212 Principles of Economics .. 3 45
^Electives 7 105
13 195
* TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS .... 61 930
* Elective chosen must have approval of advisor.
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (R)
Associate Degree
This program is designed to equip the individual with skill necessary to function successfully at various levels in the public sector. It provides fundamental training for those interested in managerial, administrative, or technical positions.
Required Major Courses
Course No Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs
ACC 111 Accounting Principles 1 .. 5 75
ACC 115 Managerial Accounting . 3 45
ACC 126 Governmental Accounting .. 3 45
BUS 110 Business Mathematics .. 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications Applications .. 3 45
EDP 100 Principles of Electronic Data Processing . 4 60
MAN 105 Introduction to Business . 3 45
MAN 115 Principles of Management . .3' 45
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision . 3 45
MAN 238 Public Administration Policies . 3 45
BUS 297 Cooperative Work Experience or Business Elective . 3 45
36 540
Required Related Courses
ECO 212 Principles of Economics . 3 45
ENG 131 Business Communications Fundamentals . 3 45
POS 111 Introduction to Political Science . 3 45
POS 121 American National Government . 3 45
POS 122 American State and
Local Government ............3 45
Electives................ .9 135
24 360
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS.......60 900
'Elective to be selected with advisor approval.
REAL ESTATE (R)
Associate Degree
This program will prepare a student to work in real estate sales and real estate related fields, and financial institutions relating to real estate.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
REE 100 Real Estate Fundamentals . .3 45
REE 105 Real Estate Finance . .3 45
REE 111 Real Estate Law 1 . .3 45
REE 217 Real Estate Contracts . .3 45
REE 115 Real Estate License
Preparation . 3 45
REE 200 Principles of Insurance . .2 30
REE 205 Real Estate Appraisal 1 . 2 30
REE 206 Real Estate Appraisal II . .3 45
REE 207 Real Estate Invstments .. 3 45
REE 208 Real Estate Trends ..3 45
REE 209 Real Estate Closings .2 30
REE 210 Real Estate Tax Factors . .3 45
REE 215 Real Estate Exchanging . .3 45
REE 216 Real Estate Listings
and SellingTechniques . 4 60
40 600
Required Related Courses
ACC 109 Bookkeeping and Accounting.. . . 3 45
BUS 115 Business Mathematics
by Machines . 4 60
BTR 127 Building Inspection for
for Construction Trades . .4 80
ECO 109 Applied Economics . 3 45
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals . .3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business . .3 45
MAN 115 Principles of Management . .3 45
"Elective 3 45
26 410
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS 66 1010
Elective must come from General Studies REAL ESTATE (R)
REE 100 Real Estate Fundamentals................3 credits
A general survey of real estate principles and practices designed to provide basic knowledge of real estate. Career information and real estate office practices and procedures
will be covered.
45 theory hours 45 Ct. Hrs.
REE 105 Real Estate Finance (R).................3 credits
A course of study covering the various methods of financing real property and the financial institutions that provide the funds for financing residential, commercial and income properties.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
Page 66


REE 111 Real Estate Law I.....................3 credits
A comprehensive case study of real estate law as it pertains to individuals, real estate brokers, subdividers, and
developers, with special emphasis on ethics, statute?, and the law as applied in the State of Colorado.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
REE 115 Real Estate
License Preparation (R)..............3 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
This course is designed to prepare students for the Colorado Real Estate Examination.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
REE 200 Principles of Insurance (R)..............2 credits
A general survey of all types of insurance with special emphasis on property, life and automobile insurance.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
REE 205 Real Estate Appraisal I (R)..............2 credits
A basic study of the principles, techniques and accepted methods of evaluating real property as used by professional appraisers, emphasis is placed on the evaluation of residential property.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
REE 206 Real Estate Appraisal II (R)............3 credits
A study of the income approach and rate of return approach in the evaluating of income producing properties such as apartments, motels, hotels, and office buildings.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
REE 207 Real Estate Investments (R).............3 credits
A study of the investment opportunities in the real estate market including tax benefits derived from depreciation, tax free exchanges and preferred types of ownership.
45 Theory Hrs. 45Ct.Hrs.
REE 208 Real Estate Trends (R)..................3 credits
A study based upon new concepts in the development of residential, multi-family, commercial and industrial real estate including trends to disperse population growth.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
REE 209 Real Estate Closings (R)................2 credits
An in depth study of documents related to closings. This includes the understanding of debit and credit items on the closing statement itself.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
REE 210 Real Estate Tax Factors (R).............3 credits
This course covers capital and ordinary gains, basis, installment sales, depreciation, and postponement of income
tdX
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
SECRETARIAL (A NR)
Associate Degree
This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions and/or career advancement in businesses, governmental agencies and other institutions which employ persons in the secretarial area.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 109 Bookkeeping and Accounting
OR ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 3-5 45-75
BSI Business Simulation
and Internship..............1-10 15-150
BUS 115 Business Math by Machines........4 60
BUS 135 Business Correspondence..........2 30
EDP 100 Principles of
Electronic Data Processing.....4 60
MAN 105 Introduction to Business.........3 45
MAN 106 Business Law.....................4 60
SEC 101 Typing I.........................4 75
SEC 102 Typing II .......................4 75
SEC 103 Typing III.......................4 75
SEC 105 Filing and Records Control.......2 30
SEC 116 MagneticTypewriting(Memory).. 3 45
SEC 111 Alphabetic Shorthand I
OR SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand 1........5 75
SEC 112 Alphabetic Shorthand II
OR SEC 122 Gregg Shorthand II.......4 60
SEC 123 Shorthand Speedbuilding
and Transcription..............4 60
SEC 130 Machine Transcription............4 60
SEC 200 Office Procedures OR SEC 205 Office Simulation
OR BUS 297 Cooperative Work
Experience.................... 3 45
58-69 915-1080
Required Related Courses
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals.....................3 45
SPE 101 Introduction to Speech............3 45
General Studies Elective........3 45
9 135
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS 67-78 1050-1215
^Elective chosen must have approval of advisor.
* Ethnic Studies Elective-Auraria Campus Only.
SECRETARIAL
REE 215 Real Estate Exchanging (R)..............3 credits
For advanced students, the mechanics of exchanging, including documents involved. This course also covers an evaluation of the motivations for trading.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
REE 216 Real Estate Listings
and Selling Techniques..............4 credits
A study of listing contracts, the various types and how to use them. An in-depth study of real estate selling and how it differs from other types of selling.
60 theory hours 60 contact hours
REE 217 Real Estate Contracts...................3 credits
Pre-requisite: consent of instructor A complete and thorough examination of all types of contracts used in the State of Colorado, emphasis is placed on when and how to use them, and their proper preparation.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
Page 67
SEC 101 Typewriting 1..............................4 credits
For students without previous typewriting instruction. Introduces keyboard, machine parts, correct techniques, and accuracy in typewritten work. Strong emphasis on numbers. Foundations of typewriting applications: centering, letters, tabulation, and manuscript. Designed for students with either vocational or non-business objectives.
45 Theory Hrs. 30 Lab. Hrs. 75 Ct. Hrs.
SEC 102 Typewriting II..........................4 credits
Prerequisite: SEC 101 Typewriting I or equivalent. Reinforcement of fundamentals of typewriting procedures. Development of speed and accuracy in more advanced levels of production work, using the prevailing business forms. Emphasis on quality of output.
45 Theory Hrs. 30 Lab Hrs. 75 Ct. Hrs.


SEC 103 Typewriting III..........................4 credits
Prerequisite: SEC 102 Typewriting II or equivalent. Emphasizes attainment of professional levels of speed and accuracy, especially in production output. Concentration on problem typewriting with the student assuming the initiative for determining correct action and using appropriate business forms in completing the work.
45 Theory Hrs. 30 Lab Hrs. 75 Ct. Hrs.
SEC 105 Filing and Records Control...............2 credits
Develops thft ability to file and retrieve documents using alphabetic, numeric, and geographic systems, and provides the participant with records management skills.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs
SEC 111 Alpha Shorthand Principles I.............5 credits
Prerequisite: SEC 101 Typewriting I or equivalent. (SEC 111 and SEC 101 may be taken concurrently)
An introductory course covering the theory of alphabetic shorthand.
75 Theory Hrs. 75 Ct. Hrs.
SEC 112 Alpha Shorthand
Principles II ........................4 credits
Prerequisite: SEC 111 Alpha,Shorthand Principles I.
A continuation of Alpha Shorthand Principles I.
50 Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SEC 116 Magnetic Typewriting (Memory)............3 credits
Prerequisite: SEC 102 Typewriting II or equivalent. Instruction in operating techniques of a magnetic media typewriter with memory feature to develop an employable
skill in the operation of this equipment.
45 Lab Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand Principles 1..............5 credits
Prerequisite: SEC 101 Typewriting I or equivalent. (SEC 121 and SEC 101 may be taken concurrently)
An introductory course covering the theory of Gregg
Shorthand, Diamond Jubilee Series.
75 Theory Hrs. 75 Ct. Hrs.
SEC 122 Gregg Shorthand Principles II...........4 credits
Prerequisite: SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand Principles I or equivalent.
Reinforcement of basic Gregg Theory and development of
skills in taking dictation.
. 60 Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SEC 123 Shorthand Speed Building and
Transcription Skills..................4 credits
Prerequisite: SEC 112 Alpha Shorthand Principles II or SEC 122 Gregg Shorhand Principles II.
Intensive practice in taking dictation and transcribing
mailable materials.
45 Theory Hrs. -15 Lab Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SEC 130 Machine Transcription.....................4 credits
Prerequisite: SEC 102 Typewriting II and BUS 135 Business Correspondence.
This course provides instruction in the use of transcribing machines in the preparation of business letters and other correspondence. The course includes a review of letter styles, rules of transcription and punctuation, and the mechanics of producing mailable letters at high production rates.
45 Theory Hrs. -15 Lab Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SEC 200 Office Procedures.....................3 credits
Prerequisite: SEC 102 Typewriting II or equivalent^
This course introduces the student to the business world and acquaints the prospective office employee with the various office duties. Units covered include organization of office work, incoming and outgoing mail, postal and shipping services, telephone techniques, maintenance and control of office supplies, and business and social conduct. A practicum
is used in the course which correlates classroom discussion
with related office projects.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
SEC 205 Office Simulation (A,R)...................3 credits
Simulated office experience, including work flow, human relations, filing, record keeping and accounting. This course is designed to make the transaction from school to employment easier for those who have no actual office experience. Weekly seminars covering a variety of related
topics will be held.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
SEC 206 Legal Procedure
Terminology and Dictation (A).......5 credits
Prerequisite: SEC 111 Alpha Shorthand Principles I or SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand Principles I.
The course provides intensive practice in preparing many types of legal documents, and introduces routine procedures in a legal office. Attention will be given to mastering terminology, meanings, spelling, and shorthand forms for dictation and transcription.
75 Theory Hrs. 75 Ct. Hrs.
STENOGRAPHIC (A,N,R)
Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions and/or career advancement in businesses, governmental agencies and other institutions which employ persons in the stenographic area.
Required Major Courses
Course No. htle Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 109 Bookkeeping and Accounting.....3 45
BSI Business Simulation
and Internship...............110 15-150
BUS 115 Business Mathematics
by Machines....................4 60
BUS 135 Business Correspondence........2 30
MAN 105 Introduction to Business........3 45
SEC 101 Typing I............v............4 75
SEC 102 Typing II ......................4 75
SEC 103 Typing III......................4 75
SEC 105 Filing and Records Control.....2 30
SEC 111 Alphabetic Shorthand I
OR SEC 12TGregg Shorthand 1........5 75
SEC 112 Alphabetic Shorthand II
OR SEC 122 Gregg Shorthand II.....4 75
SEC 123 Shorthand Speedbuilding
and Transcription..............4 60
SEC 130 Machine Transcription...........4 60
SEC 200 Office Procedures
OR SEC 205 Office Simulation......3 45
BUS 297 Cooperative Work Experience. ... 3 45
50-59 810-945
Required Related Courses
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals...................3 45
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS 53-62 855-990
SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT (N)
Certificate and Associate Degree Option
This program is offered as a basic training program in the technical, conceptual, and human skills necessary'to perform effectively the supervisory function, regardless of the specific type of business, industrial, institutional, or governmental
setting.
Page 68


Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
SUM 100 Getting Ready to Supervise....3 45
SUM 101 Selecting your Subordinates...3 45
SUM 111 Managing People I.............3 45
SUM 112 Managing People II............3 45
SUM113 Managing People III...............3 45
SUM 121 Managing Resources I..........3 45
SUM 122 Managing Resources II.........3 45
SUM 125 Performance Appraisal.........3 45
SUM 126 On-the-Job Training...... 3 45
27 405
Management Associate Degree Option
Students completing the above certificate program may have the option of completing an Associate Degree in Management
by taking the following:
MAR 107 Principles of Marketing.........3 45
MAN 106 Business Law....................4 60
And all of the Required Related Courses in the
Management Program .. 34-39 510-585
41-46 615-690
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS 68-73 1020-1095
SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT
SUM 100 Getting Ready to
Supervise (N)......................3 credits
This is the first in a series of nine courses designed to develop job entry and job upgrading opportunities for positions as supervisor, foreman, leadman, and other management positions in business, industry, and government.
Material covered includes an overview of the supervisory role, the basics of business organization, legal requirements of supervision and decision making.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
SUM 101 Selecting your
Subordinates (N).....................3 credits
Concentrates on developing the skills needed to post job vacancies, advertise position openings, write job notices, develop interviewing skills, develop selection skills, learn screening techniques, and develop induction and orientation
programs. v
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
SUM 111 Managing People I (N).................3 credits
Human skills development is the objective of this course. Communication techniques, learning the reasons behind Page 69
attitudes, how they affect production and how to create positive attitudes are emphasized.
Concepts are used to study and apply motivational techniques in work situations. Emphasis is placed up learning how to get people to want to work for you.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
SUM 112 Managing People II (N)..............3 credits
Emphasis is placed on how to discipline employees, how to motivate subordinates who are problem workers, and how to recognize and work with groups within the organization. Cases, video tape sessions and other learning tools are used to reinforce people-oriented management concepts and prac-
tices.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
SUM 113 Managing People III (N)..................3 credits
Course content is centered on the concepts, practices, and strategies of administering union contracts. The student will develop coordination techniques and perform the function through role playing and simulation in handling union labor situations.
Leadership is used as a capstone in the learning process. The role of leadership, the various aspects of leadership, and
leadership techniques are emphasized.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
SUM 121 Managing Resources I (N)..............3 credits
This course concentrates on the management of activities, work simplification, and time management. Principles and concepts in management activities will be developed as well as techniques of work/job analysis and work simplification. Time management concentrates on time as it relates to planning, organizing, blocking interruptions, handling decisions, delegation and managing the subordinates time.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
SUM 122 Managing Resources II (N)............3 credits
Course work centers on cost management, management tools, and management by objectives. Concentrates on finalizing the techniques and skills needed in bringing together resource utilization of time, cost, and activities. Emphasis is placed on the principles, concepts, structure, and application of M.B.O. in the students work environment.
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
SUM 125 Performance Appraisal (N)............3 credits
Provides the student with the skills required to properly research, prepare, evaluate, and perform appraisal activities. Attention is given to the need for a formal appraisal process and how to conduct the interview. In addition, personnel administration activities will be discussed with emphasis on wage administration, dehiring techniques, and the role of the personnel departments.
45 l heory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.
SUM 126 On The Job
Training (N).......................3 credits
Deals with training requirements in handling day to day responsibilities. Emphasis is on training psychology, techniques used in developing training programs and how to administer the function.
Attention is given to the techniques used in coordinating the training function and to the tools used in measuring the accomplishment of performance objectives. Methods and procedares used in measuring the overall effectiveness of the training program are considered. '
45 Theory Hrs. 45 Ct. Hrs.


TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT (A) Associate Degree
This program is designed to prepare students for careers in transportation management and related areas at entry-level positions. The program also prepares students for examinations given by the American Society of Traffic and Transportation.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
TTM 101 Fundamentals of Commercial
Transportation I................4 60
TTM 102 Fundamentals of Commercial
Transportation II .............4 60
TTM 111 Transportation Regulations I........4 60
TTM112 Transportation Regulations II .... 4 60
TTM 121 Economics of Transportation I.... 2 30
TTM 122 Economics of Transportation II ...2 30
TTM 131 Transportation Management I.... 2 30
TTM 132 Transportation Management II ... 2 30
24 360
Required Related Courses
BUS 110 Business Mathematics................3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications.......................3 45
ECO 120 Labor Management Relations I ... 2 30
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals.......................3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business............3 45
MAN 106 Business Law........................4 60
MAN 115 Principles of Mangement.............3 45
MAR 107 Principles of Marketing i.........3 45
'^Transportation Electives .... 6-12 90-180
''Mathematics Elective.............3 45
^English Elective..................3 45
Ethnic Studies Elective.........3 45
39-45 585-675
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS 63-69 945-1035
* Electives chosen must have approval of advisor.
TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT TTM 101 Fundamentals of Commercial
Transportation 1..................4 credits
A beginning course in the study of the U.S. Transportation system. The course is designed to acquaint the student with the why and how we manage transportation, the history of transportation regulation and other government functions; freight classification; the domestic bill of lading; rates; routing; packaging; loading; materials handling; freight
claims; distribution and warehousing.
60 Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 102 Fundamentals of Commercial
Transportation II.............. .....4 credits
Deals with contract and private motor carriage, expediting and tracing, detention charges, demurrage, siding and weight agreements, organizing, operating and equipping a traffic department, data processing in transportation, U.S. government traffic, international shipments, the transportation of hazardous materials, and the ocean bill of
lading contract.
60 Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 115 Freight Claims............................2 credits
This course is designed to further student understanding in the processing and management of freight claims and claim prevention. Course content includes case work in legal
principles relating to claim rules and practices.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 116 Basics in Air Cargo......................2 credits
A practical course in the basics of the developing field of air cargo. Topics include air freight rates, tariff rules, regulations and hazardous articles. Course will also cover domestic and international cargo operations, marketing and total cost
concepts.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 141 Management Tools and
Concepts I ......................... 4 credits
This course is designed to afford the student an opportunity to relate general management concepts to the problems of transportation, traffic and physical distribution management
with an emphasis on accounting and law.
60 Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 142 Management Tools and
Concepts II........................4 credits
A continuation of the first course in Management Tools and Concepts with emphasis on marketing and management concepts.
60 Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 151 Freight Rates I.......................2 credits
Introduction to freight rates and tariffs beginning with parcel post, U.P.S., express and air freight forwarders. This will be followed by a study of the national motor freight classification and related work problems, leading into motor carrier tariff procedures, rules and interpretation.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 152 Freight Rates II .......................2 credits
Pre-requisite: 1st semester or working knowledge of motor classification and tariffs.
A continuation of work problems involving motor tariffs of different bureaus covering a variety of situations.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 161 Techniques of
Warehousing........................2 credits
A workshop presentation designed for those interested in, or engaged in the area of physical distribution and aspiring to move into management. Includes a brief history of warehousing, (1) its development as an integral segment of the distribution function, (2) types of warehouses, and (3) an outline of warehouse layout and physical handling methods.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 201 International T rade
Exports..............................2 credits
A comprehensive study of doing business overseas. Course includes geography review, methods of locating and servicing markets, documentation workshop and transportation methods and rates, case problems from receipt of inquiry to receipt of order by overseas buyer.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 202 International Trade
Imports............................. 2 credits
This course is designed to acquaint the student with transportation and related matters for international import freight movement.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 211 Economics of
Transportation I.....................2 credits
An in depth study of transportation economics. Specific topics cover the development of transportation systems, theory of pricing, cost structures, and rate making.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
Page 70


TTM 212 Economics of
Transportation II.....................2 credits
A study of the competition between modes, transportation regulations, finance and problems of transportation policies. 30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 221 Transportation
Regulations I.........................4 credits
An advanced study course designed to prepare students for admission to practice before the Interstate Commerce Commission in regulation areas. A study of the first four parts
of the Interstate Commerce Act.
60 Theory Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 222 Transportation
Regulations II..............................4 credits
This course will focus on court decisions, the rules of practice before the Interstate Commerce Commission and the code of ethics.
60TheoryHrs. 60Ct. Hrs.
TTM 231 Transportation
Management I................................2 credits
An analysis of the modern transportation managers role within the complex American transportation system. Emphasis is on identification of the competing forces within that system private vs. for-hire transportation, interstate vs. intrastate transportation, market forces vs. regulatory
pressures, etc.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
TTM 232 Transportation
| Management II....................2 credits
A continuing in-depth study of the factors surrounding modern transportation management. Narrows the issues explored in Transportation Management I, e.g. by analyzing specific differences among different modes of transport.
30 Theory Hrs. 30 Ct. Hrs.
WORD PROCESSING TYPING (N R)
Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions and/or career advancement in businesses, governmental agencies and other institutions which employ persons in structured word processing centers.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 109 Bookkeeping and Accounting. . . 3 45
BSI Business Simulation and
Internship 1-10 15-150
BUS 135 Business Correspondence . ...2 30
SEC 101 Typing 1 . 4 75
SEC 102 Typing II . .4 75
SEC 105 Filing and Records Control. . . 2 30
SEC 116 Magnetic T ypewriting (Memory) . 3 45
SEC 130 Machine Transcription . 4 60
SEC 200 Office Procedures
OR SEC 205 Office Simulation
OR BUS 297 Cooperative Work
Experience . 3 45
26-35 420-585
Required Related Courses
ENG 131 Business Communications
Fundamentals............... .. 3 ___45
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS 29-38 465-630
Page 71


DIVISION OF HEALTH OCCUPATIONS
Where a program does not indicate the campus by the key A, N, or R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
DENTAL ASSISTING (N)
Associate Degree
The program is designed to prepare students for employment in general and specialized practice dental offices. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the examination for certification.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
DEA 100 Orientation to
Dental Assisting . 2 30
DEA 105 Introduction to
Dental Operatory Procedures .. . .3 45
DEA 106 Science of
Dental Materials .. 3 60
DEA 107 Dental Science . .2 30
DEA 108 Dental Chairside
Procedures 1 .. 2 45
DEA 109 Applied Science
of Dental Materials .. 3 60
DEA 110 Dental'Office
Bookkeeping .3 60
DEA 115 Odontology .4 75
DEA 200 Dental Roentgenology . .4 75
DEA 205 Dental Chairside
Procedures II . .4 90
DEA 206 Emergency Measures
for Dental Assistants .1 15
DEA 207 Pharmacology for
Dental Assistants . 1 15
DEA 208 Advanced
Laboratory Procedures . 2 45
DEA 209 Advanced
Operatory Procedures .3 60
DEA 210 Clinical Practicum 10 450
DEA 215 Clinical Review . 2 23
DEA 216 Dental Office
Management ? 45
51 1223
Required Related Courses
BIO 111 Human Anatomy and
Physiology 1 . 4 90
English Elective (required) .2 30
BIO 112 Human Anatomy and
Physiology II . .4 90
DIT 108 Nutrition for Health
Occupations . 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting 1 . 4 75
BIO 102 Microbiology for
Dental Assistants . 1 30
Psychology Elective (Required) ._. .2 30
20 390
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS... 71 1613
Additional Major Courses
DEA 225 Rubber Cup Pumice Prophylaxis .. 3 60
DEA 226 Placing and Finishing Amalgam and Composite Restorations ... . 4 75
DEA 227 Oral Surgery Assisting .2 30
DEA 228 Hospital Surgical Procedures. .. .. 3 45
DEA 229 Minor Dental Laboratory Repairs in Acrylics .. 2 30
DEA 230 Office Management and Supervision .. 2 30
DEA235 Preventive Therapy I...........l 15
DEA236 Preventive Therapy
Counseling II..................1 15
DENTAL ASSISTING (N)
DEA 100 Orientation to Dental Assisting.......2 cr. hrs.
An overview of dentistry and the role of the Certified Dental Assistant in relationship to other members of the dental health team. A brief history of the profession, code of ethics, jurisprudence and legal implications also included.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
DEA 105 Introduction to
Dental Operatory Procedures...........3 cr. hrs.
An introduction to the basic responsibilities of the chairside dental assistant. Basic terminology, identification, care and maintenance of equipment, the prevention control program and off campus supervised observation of dental facilities.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
DEA 106 Science of Dental Materials...............3 cr. hrs.
Chemical properties and uses of dental materials and solutions. Manipulation of impression materials and gypsum products are included.
15 hrs. theory-45 hrs. lab 60 ct. hrs.
DEA 107 Dental Science...........................2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: BIO 111.
This course covers oral anatomy and physiology, microscopic anatomy, pathology and bacteriology, physiology of eating and breathing, oral structure and terminology.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
DEA 108 Dental Chairside Procedures I............2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: DEA 105.
An introduction to the identification and use of dental instruments in general dentistry, operation of equipment in the dental operatory, assisting in four handed dentistry, and
sterilization techniques.
45 hrs. lab 45 ct. hrs.
DEA 109 Applied Science
of Dental Materials........................3 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: DEA 106.
Chemical properties and manipulation of restorative materials.
15 hrs. theory -45 hrs. lab 60 ct. hrs.
DEA 110 Dental Office
Bookkeeping................................3 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: DEA 100, DEA 105 Basic bookkeeping for accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll, taxes, filing systems. Basic math background
essential.
15 hrs. theory 45 hrs. lab 60 ct. hrs.
DEA 115 Odontology................................4 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: DEA 100, DEA 105.
A course in descriptive anatomy of teeth, i.e., the external form and relationship of teeth. Laboratory experience in the preparation of a three dimensional record of each tooth is included. This course prepares the student for the expanded duty course area of packing and carving of amalgam and composite restorations.
30 hrs. theory -45 hrs. lab 75 ct. hrs.
Page 72


DEA 200 Dental Roentgenology.....................4 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: DEA 107.
Principles, practices, and safety precautions in the operation of all types of dental x-ray units are studied. Various exposure techniques of intra oral and extra oral radiographs, will be
practiced.
30 hrs. theory-45 hrs. lab 75 ct. hrs.
DEA 205 Dental Chairside Procedures II..........4 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: DEA 105, DEA 108.
A continuation of DEA 108. A further study of instruments, their identification, with concentration on use in specialty practices chairside treatment sequences. The student will prepare and present a table clinic, and counsel first year students in preventive dental care.
90 hrs. lab 90 ct. hrs.
DEA 206 Emergency Measures
for Dental Assistants.................1 cr. hr.
Prerequisites: BIO 112, DEA 107.
A discussion of physiologic processes relevant to common dental emergency situations and the planning and immediate response measures required by those emergencies.
15 hrs. theory 15 rt. hrs.
DEA 207 Pharmacology for
Dental Assistants......................1 cr. hr.
Prerequisites: BIO 112, DEA 107.
An overview of pharmacologic agents used in dental practice. Drug therapy measures for emergency situations included.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
DEA 208 Advanced Laboratory Procedures...........2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: DEA 109, DEA 205.
Student are given opportunity to put together previous course information and manipulation of materials to construct orthodontic space maintainers, temporary crowns and bridges, personalized trays and take impressions out of
various materials.
45 hrs. lab 45 ct. hrs.
DEA 209 Advanced Operatory Procedures..............3 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: DEA 205.
Pumice prophylaxis, topical fluoride application and polishing amalgam restorations are covered in this class, placing and finishing of amalgam and composite restorations in typodents
and prepared models.
15 hrs. theory -45 hrs. lab 60 ct. hrs.
DEA 210 Clinical Practicum......................10 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: DEA 205.
This course provides an opportunity for the students to apply their knowledge and further their skills, essential for employment as Dental Assistants. Students are assigned to dental offices and clinics for this experience.
450 hrs. Clinical Practicum 450 ct. hrs.
DEA 215 Clinical Review............................2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in DEA 210. Feedback and class discussion of clinical experiences encountered the previous week. Evaluation of dental assisting techniques and improvements of skills.
23 hrs. lab 23 ct. hrs.
DEA 216 Dental Office
Management..........................2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: DEA 110, SEC 101 Appointment control, treatment and case history planning, insurance records, recall and inventory.
45 hrs. lab 45 ct. hrs.
Page 73
DEA 225 Rubber Cup
Pumice Prophylaxis...................3 cr. hrs.
Principles of technique for rubber cup polishing with use of disclosing agents, fluoride treatments, auxiliary plaque control measures and care of dental appliances.
15 hrs. theory-45 hrs. lab 60ct. hrs.
DEA 226 Placing and Finishing Amalgam
and Composite Restorations...........4 cr. hrs.
Acorde Program presented for Class I through Class V placements, finishing and polishing of restoration material using Rubber Dam techniques.
30 hrs. theory-45 hrs. lab 75 ct. hrs.
DEA 227 Oral Surgery Assisting..................2 cr. hrs.
Oral Surgery Assisting in private practice. Subject material includes pre-medications, drug commonly used, levels of anesthesia, instrumentation, transfer methods and zones, sterilization procedures, suture removal, post op care, and emergency measures as they relate to oral surgery patients.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
DEA 228 Hospital Surgical Procedures
for Dental Assisting.................3 cr. hrs.
A course to familiarize the private practice auxiliary with general hospital procedures including, record keeping, scrub technique, gowning and gloving, O.R. equipment and set-ups. Technical information on various dental procedures presented to differentiate instrument set-ups and sequencing of surgical assisting procedures.
15 hrs. theory 30 hrs. lab 45 ct. hrs.
DEA 229 Minor Dental Laboratory
Repairs in Acrylics..................2 cr. hrs.
Broken retainers, cracked dentures, replacement of broken tooth in denture will be repaired, mouth guards, temporary crowns and bridges will be constructed.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
DEA 230 Office Management
and Supervision......................2 cr. hrs.
Course includes personnel management, interviews and hiring techniques, financial record responsibilities, inventory controls, time and motion studies, effective delegation of duties and utilization of equipment and personnel.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
DEA 235 Preventive Therapy 1......................1 cr. hr.
Designed to provide the dental assistant with the skills and motivation necessary to apply the principles of preventive dentistry to his own oral cavity.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
DEA 236 Preventive Therapy Counseling II..........1 cr. hr.
Prerequisite: DEA 235 or equivalent.
Designed to provide the dental assistant with the skills necessary to become a preventive therapist in a dental facility. The course will include patient motivation techniques, plaque removal aids and nutrition counseling.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.


DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY (A) (X-RAY)
Associate Degree
Upon completion of this program, the graduate will be eligible to write the certification examination given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr . Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
HOC 100 Medical Terminologv ... 1 15
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care .. .2 30
RAT 100 Radiographic Technique 1 ... 3 45
RAT 105 Radiographic Positioning 1 .. . .. .3 45
RAT 106 Clinical Laboratory
Experience 1 . 5 120
RAT 107 Radiographic Technique II.... ...3 45
RAT 108 Radiographic Positioning II ... . 3 45
RAT 109 Radiographic Physics
Technque .. .3 45
RAT 110 Clinical Laboratory
Experience II . .8 180
RAT 115 Radiographic Positioning III . . 3 45
RAT 116 Clinical Practicum 1 ... 5 240
RAT 200 Survey of Medical &
Surgical Diseases ...2 30
RAT 205 Special Procedures
and Techniques .. .3 45
RAT 206 Clinical Practicum II . 11 480
RAT 207 RadiographicTechnique II ... 3 45
RAT 208 Clinical Practicum III . 11 480
RAT 209 Registry Review .. 3 45
RAT 210 Clinical Practicum IV 11 480
80 2415
Required Related Courses
MAT 106 Introduction to Math .3 45
SCI 101 Science for
Health Occupations . .4 75
PHY 105 Topics in
the Physical Sciences .. 3 75
English Elective . .3 45
Psychology Elective . 2 30
15 270
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS .... . 95 2685
DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY (A)
HOC 100 Medical Terminology...............1 cr. hr.
A study designed to acquaint the student with the origin and structure of medical terms. The intent of this course is to help the student interpret and understand medical terms reports and therapy requests to his field.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care........................2 cr. hrs.
Focuses on the basic concepts and technical skills common to all health care deliverers. Ethical and legal responsibilities, basic techniques necessary to meet care needs and
emergency measures are included.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
RAT 100 Radiographic Technique I..............3cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: Admission to the Radiologic Technology Program or permission of instructor.
Co-requisites: RAT 105 and RAT 106.
Basic orientation course for diagnostic students. Includes a brief history of radiation opportunities and advancement in the field, general radiographic technique principles, equipment, and accessories; latent image formation, manual and automatic processing fundamentals; radiation protection.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RAT 105 Radiographic Positioning 1.................3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: Admission to the Radiologic Technology Program or permission of instructor.
Co-requisites: RAT 100, RAT 106, SCI 101.
An introduction to topographic anatomy, positioning terminology and beginning principles in radiography positioning. Includes use of the energized lab and phantoms, plus radiographic techniques for those positions.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RAT 106 Clinical Laboratory
Experience I.........................5cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: Admission to Radiologic Technology Program or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: RAT 100, RAT 105.
Introduction to clinical laboratory education which will enable student to begin practice of radiographic principles and positioning on patients under the direct supervision of
registered technologists.
120 laboratory hrs. 120 ct. hrs.
RAT 108 Radiographic Positioning II...............3 cr. hrs.
Pre requisites: RAT 105, RAT 106, SCI 101.
Co-requisite: RAT 109.
Additional radiographic positioning skills and techniques are
introduced and mastered.
45 hrs. laboratory 45 ct. hrs.
RAT 109 Radiographic Physics Technique...........3 cr. hrs.
Pre requisites: RAT 100, RAT 105, SCI 101, permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: RAT 108.
Specialized information on x-ray equipment and the theoretical background. Topics are: fundamentals of electricity and radiation physics and basic principles underlying the operation of x-ray equipment and auxilary
devices related to exposure techniques.
45 hrs. laboratory 45 ct. hrs.
RAT 110 Clinical Laboratory Experience...........8 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: RAT 100, RAT 105. RAT 106, SCI 101, permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: RAT 108.
Student will gain experience and develop skills in performing radiographic examinations under the direct supervision of
registered technologists.
180 hrs. laboratory 180 ct. hrs.
RAT 115 Radiographic Positioning III..............3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: RAT 108, permission of ii.olructor. Co-requisites: RAT 116.
In-depth treatment of concepts and principles of radiographic
positioning.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RAT 116 Clinical Practicum I........................5 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: RAT 108.
Co-requisites: RAT 115.
Student gains experience in advanced techniques and positioning skills. Included are classes in film critique given at these hospitals.
240 hrs. laboratory 240 ct. hrs.
Page 74


RAT 200 Survey of Medical
and Surgical Diseases ................2 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: HOC 100, acceptance to Radiologic Technology Program or permission of instructor.
Basic causes of diseases, changes that occur in disease and trauma, and related diagnostic and therapeutic measures. Discussion, case examples will be related in the students particular occupational interest.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
RAT 205 Special Procedures
and Techniques.....................3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: RAT 107, permission of instructor. Co-requisites: RAT 206.
This course covers special radiographic procedures; advanced techniques, radiation therapy, nuclear medicine,
and radiation biology.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RAT 206 Clinical Practicum II....................11 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: RAT 116, permission of instructor. Co-requisite: RAT 205.
Under the supervision of registered technologists, the student will have the opportunity to perform duties typical of a staff radiologic technologist. Film critique and conferences will be conducted approximately two hours per week in the
affiliated hospital during this time.
480 hrs. laboratory 480 ct. hrs.
RAT 207 Radiographic Technique II...................3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: RAT 205, 206 Co-requisite: RAT 208
An exploration of advanced principles and techniques of radiographic exposure and qualities of a good radiograph.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RAT 208 Clinical Practicum III................11 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: RAT 206, permission of instructor. Co-requisite: RAT 207.
Student performs more advanced procedures in clinical radiography and fluoroscopy at participating hospitals.
480 hrs. laboratory 480 ct. hrs.
RAT 209 Registry Review...........................3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: RAT 207, permission of instructor. Co-requisites: RAT 210.
Total review of all course and clinical work in X-Ray Technology in preparation for registry examination given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists in cooperation with the Council on Medical Education of the
American Medical Association.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RAT 210 Clinical Practicum IV....................11 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: RAT 208, permission of instructor. Co-requisite: RAT 209.
Final course of clinical practicum in Diagnostic Radiologic Technology, in which the student begins to function with a minimal amount of supervision. Emphasis is placed upon the transition from the student to the graduate role.
480 hrs. laboratory 480 ct. hrs.
DIAGNOSTIC ULTRASOUND TECHNOLOGY (A)
Certificate or Associate Degree
(See Health Occupations Division for more information).
MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT (A)
Certificate Program
Upon completion of this program, the graduate will possess job entry skills for positions in the business component of medical office practice.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. 45
MOM 100 Intro Medical Office Procedures 3 45
MOM 105 Medical Office Bookkeeping and Accounting 3 45
MOM 106 Applied Science for Medical Office Workers ... 4 60
MOM 107 Insurance Information Methods 3 45
MOM 108 Advanced Medical Office Procedures . 3 45
MOM 109 Medical Filing Procedures . 1 15
MOM 110 Health Insurance Claim Reporting 3 45
MOM 115 Data Processing for Patient Accounting 3 45
MOM 116 Medical Ethics 1 15
MOM 117 Medical Office Practicum 3 135
ENG 131 27 Required Related Courses Business Communications 3 495 45
SEC 101 OR 102 Typing 1 or II 4 75
BUS 115 Business Math by Machine 4 60
11 38 180 675
MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT (A)
MOM 100 Introduction to Medical
Office Procedures .................3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: Admission to Medical Office Management Program or permission of instructor.
Introduction to office routines of medical, hospital, dental offices and the problems encountered in the business side of medical office practice. Emphasis is also placed on basic
conepts of medical care.
45 Hrs. Theory 45 Ct. Hrs.
MOM 105 Medical Office Bookkeeping
and accounting......................3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: Admission to Medical Office Management Program or permission of instructor.
Basic medical office bookkeeping and accounting routines, accounts receivable, accounts payable, cash disbursements, payroll, bank reconciliation with emphasis on systems that
are unique to medical offices.
45 Hrs. Theory 45 Ct Hrs.
MOM 106 Applied Science for Medical
Office Workers........ ..............4 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: Admission to the Medical Office Management Program or permission of instructor.
Integration of basic concepts of body structure and functioning with the study of the origin and structure of
medical terms.
60 Hrs. Theory 60 Ct. Hrs.
MOM 107 Insurance Information Methods...........3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: Admission to the Medical Office Management Program or permission of instructor. Introduction to insurance claim reporting. Emphasis is placed on generation of simple insurance claim forms from patient charts utilizing ICDA and CRV codes.
45 Hrs. Theory 45 Ct. Hrs.
Page 75


MOM 108 Advanced Medical Office Procedures ... 3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: MOM 100 or permission of instructor.
Step by step development of running the business side of a medical practice. Topics will include accounting systems, daily routing and procedures that include appointment blocking, traffic flow, patient charts, billing and collection methods and hospital receivables management. Social and vocational relationships in the work setting will be explored.
45 Hrs. Theory 45 Ct. Hrs.
MOM 109 Medical Filing Procedures.............1 cr. hr.
Pre-requisites: Admission to the Medical Office Management Program or permission of instructor. Introduction to basic filing principles, medical office filing procedures and systems and medical records development.
15 Hrs. Theory 15Ct.Hrs.
MOM 110 Health Insurance Claim Reporting......3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: Admission to Medical Office Management Program or permission of instructor.
Insurance claim forms initiated from complex problems in patient charts, using ICDA, CRVS, CPI codes with emphasis placed upon the use of medical terms and abbreviations.
45 Hrs. Theory 45 Cr. Hrs.
MOM 115 Data Processing for
Patient Accounting..................3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: Admission to Medical Office Management Program or permission of instructor.
Introduction to preparation of data for patient accounting, reading of computer print-outs and transmission of data from terminal in laboratory to computer center.
30 Hrs. Theory, 15 Hrs. Laboratory 45 Ct. Hrs.
MOM 116 Medical Ethics...........................lcr.hr.
Pre-requisite: Admission to Medical Office Management program or permission of instructor.
Exploration of various aspects of professional ethics, patient-physician confidentiality, medical licensure, registration and
statutory reports.
15 Hrs. Theory 15 Ct. Hrs.
MOM 117 Medical Office Practicum................3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: Completion of all first and second semester courses in the Medical Office Management curriculum.
Student placement at a work station related to their occupational objectives. Immediate supervision provided by experienced personnel with general coordination and supervision provided by the program instructor/coordinator. 135 Hrs. Laboratory 135 Ct. Hrs.
NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY Certificate or Associate Degree
Upon completion of this program, the graduate will be eligible to write the certifying examination in Nuclear Medicine Technology given by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board, American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, or the Board of Registry of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
HOC 100 Medical Terminology .. 1 15
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care ..2 30
HOC 107 Orientation to
Clinical Practicum .. 1 40
HOC 108 Positioning Techniques . .2 30
HOC 109 Radiologic Instrument
Maintenance .. 2 30
RAT 200 Survey of Medical and
Surgical Diseases . 2 30
NMT 200 Nuc. Med. Tech. Clinical
Applications! . 1 15
NMT 205 Statistics of Radioactive
> Counting and Imaging . 1 15
NMT 206 Radiation Physics . 3 45
NMT 207 Nuclear Medicine
Instrumentation . .4 60
NMT 208 Nuc. Med. Tech. Pract -jm 1 .. . . 10 431
NMT 209 Nuc. Med. Tech.
Clinical Applications . .4 60
NMT 210 Nuc. Med. Tech. Practicum II. . .9 384
NMT 215 Nuc. Med. Tech. Seminars . .3 45
NMT 216 Nuc. Med. Tech. Practicum III .. . 15 672
RTT215 Radiation Biology
and Pathology .. 2 30
NMT 217 Nuc. Med.
Radiopharmaceutical Prep . 4 90
NMT 218 Competitive Radioassay 4 90
70 2112
Required Related Courses
BIO 111 Human Anatomy
and Physiology 1 . .4 90
BIO 112 Human Anatomy
and Physiology II . .4 90
MAT 121 College Algebra . 4 60
CHE 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1. .. . .4 90
PHY 115 Introduction to
Medical Physics . .4 90
Psychology Elective . 2 30
English Elective ? 30
24 480
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS .94 2592
NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY (A)
HOC 100 Medical Terminology.............1 cr. hr.
A study designed to acquaint the student with the origin and structure of medical terms. The intent of this course is to help the student interpret and understand medical terms, reports
and requests to his field.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care.......................2 cr. hrs.
Focuses on the basic concepts and technical skills common to all health care deliverers. Ethical and legal responsibilities, basic techniques necessary to meet health care needs, and emergency measures are included.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. fir's.
Page 76


HOC 107 Orientation to
Clinical Practicum......>................1 cr. hr.
Pre-requisites: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology, Radiation Therapy Technology or Ultrasound Technology Programs.
An orientation to a Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Therapy or Ultrasound Technology facility designed to acquaint the student with the selected radiologic technology specialty
area.
40 hrs. laboratory 40 ct. hrs.
HOC 108 Positioning Techniques......................2 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology or Radiation Therapy Technology Program. Introduction to terminology and general principles of positioning, routine positioning and anatomy of the chest, abdomen and skull as related to Nuclear Medicine and
Radiation Therapy procedures.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
HOC 109 Radiologic
Instrument Maintenance..............2 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: Admission to Nuclear Medicine Technology or Radiation Therapy Program or permission of instructor.
Basic electronics of instruments used in the above fields. Course will cover calibration and minor repairs for the same.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
RAT 200 Survey of Medical
and Surgical Qiseases..................2 cr. hrs.
Pre requisites: HOC 100, acceptance to Radiologic Technology Program or permission of instructor.
Basic causes of diseases, changes that occur in disease and trauma, and related diagnostic and therapeutic measures. Discussion, case examples will be related in the students
particular occupational interest.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
NMT 200 Nuclear Medicine Technology
Clinical Applications I................1 cr. hr.
Pre-requisite: Admission to the second year of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program. A basic methodology course designed to introduce the student to the various in vivo procedures routinely performed in the Nuclear Medicine
Department.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
NMT 205 Statistics of Radioactive
Counting and Imaging................1 cr. hr.
Pre-requisite: Admission to second year of Nuclear Medicine Technology Program.
A study of the statistical analysis associated with the field of Nuclear Medicine Technology. Topics will include Determinate and Indeterminate Errors, Precision, Bias, Accuracy, Gaussion and Poisson Distributions, Standard Deviations, Error Analysis, and Optimum Distribution of
counting times.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
NMT 206 Radiation Physics........................3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: Admission to second year of Nuclear Medicine Technology Program.
Application of selected principles of physics to the fields of Nuclear Medicine Technology and Radiation Therapy Technology. Mathematical concepts are discussed as they
related to specific areas.
30 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
NMT 207 Nuclear Medicine
Instrumentation.......................4 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: Admission to second year of Nuclear Medicine Technology Program.
Study of radiation units, identification of radionuclides, Page 77
scintillation spectrometry, operation of detective instruments (Geiger-Mueller) well counter, Rectilinear Scanners, Stationery Imaging Devices, and quality assurance
procedures for each.
60 hrs. theory 60 ct. hrs.
NMT 208 Nuclear Medicine Technology
Practicum I............... .........10 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: Admission to second year of Nuclear Medicine Technology Program and concurrent registration for NMT 209.
Laboratory course in a clinical nuclear medicine setting. Provides the opportunity to develop skills in the performance of nuclear medicine examinations. Emphasis is placed on operation and use of associated nuclear medicine
instrumentation.
431 hrs. laboratory 431 ct. hrs.
NMT 209 Nuclear Medicine Technology
Clinical Applications..................4 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: NMT 207 and NMT 208.
Clinical application of radionuclides. Course will include use of radioactive nuclides for thyroid, ferrokinetics, hematology, gastro-intestinal, skeletal, nervous cardiovascular,
pulmonary and genitourinary studies.
60 hrs. laboratory 60 ct. hrs.
NMT 210 Nuclear Medicine Technology
Practicum II..........................9 cr. hrs.
Co-requisite: NMT 215.
Laboratory course in a clinical nuclear medicine setting. Emphasis placed on developing skills in the performance of studies described in Nuclear Medicine Technology Clinical Applications.
384 hrs. laboratory 384 ct. hrs.
NMT 215 Nuclear Medicine Technology
Seminars..............................3 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: Admission to second year of Nuclear Medicine Technology Program and NMT 209 and NMT 210. This course will provide the student with information related to special procedures in Nuclear Medicine Technology.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
NMT 216 Nuclear Medicine Technology
Practicum III .....................15 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: NMT 202 and NMT 209.
A laboratory course provided for the student in a clinical nuclear medicine setting. Provides the student the opportunity to gain advanced experience in techniques of nuclear medicine procedures and decision making related to
the performance of these procedures.
672 hrs. laboratory 672 ct. hrs.
NMT 217 Nuclear Medicine
Radiopharmaceutical Prep............4 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: Admission to the second year of Nuclear Medicine Technology and CHE 101.
Basic principles involved in preparation and use of radiopharmaceuticals emphasized. Topics include radionuclide generators, labeling procedures, sterility and pyrogen testing, radiochemical, and radionuclide purity, regulations nuclide suppliers and associated quality assurance tests.
45 hrs. theory 45 hrs. laboratory 90 ct. hrs.
NMT 218 Competitive Radioassay...................4cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: Admission to second year of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program.
Information related to the theory, performance and the use of competitive radioassay techniques. Topics will include components of the radioassay system, combination and incubation of assay components, quality assurance procedures and clinical applications.
45 hrs. theory 45 hrs. laboratory 90 ct. hrs.


NURSING (A,N)
Certificate or Associate Degree
Nursing as a career includes a variety of employment opportunities and patterns of educational preparation. The nursing program is planned to enable the student to choose the career approach most appropriate to individual goals and needs.
The Graduate of this program is eligible ! tO take the
examination for licensure as a Registered Nurse.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
HOC 100 Medical Terminology . 1 15
NUR 101 Pharmacology 1 .2 30
NURlll Nursing Concepts 1 10 180
NUR 112 Nursing Concepts II 14 285
NUR 115 Vocational Relationships . 1 15
NUR201 Pharmacology II .2 30
NUR 211 Comprehensive Nursing 1 12 240
NUR212 Comprehensive Nursing II 14 270
NUR215 Nursing Trends and Issues 2 30
58 1095
Required Related Courses
BIO 111 Human Anatomy and
Physiology 1 . 4 90
BIO 112 Human Anatomy and
Physiology II . 4 90
Advanced Physiology . 3 75
BIO 115 Introduction to
Microbiology . 3 75
ENG 106 Communications for
Health Occupations . 3 45
PSY 235 Psychology of Human
Growth & Develppment 3 45
20 420
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS 78 1515
After successful completion of the first two semesters, the student will receive a certificate in Practical Nursing and is eligible to take the examination for licensure as a Practical
Nurse. NUR100 Additional Major Courses Nursing Skills Laboratory .... . 2-4 45-90
NUR 109 Concentrated Nursing Skills.. . 3-9 105-315
NUR 110 Review of Nursing Concepts .. ...2 30
NUR 120 Psychosocial Concepts In Nursing ...2 30
NUR 209 Review of Nursing Principles .. ...2 30
NUR 210 Advanced Nursing Skills . 5-15 105-315
HOC 100 NURSING (A,N) Medical Terminology . 1 cr. hr.
A study designed to acquaint the student with the origin and structure of medical terms. The intent of this course is to help the student interpret and understand medical terms, reports
and therapy requests to his field.
15 hrs. theory 15ct. hrs.
NUR 100 Nursing Skills Laboartory..............2-4 cr. hrs.
Selected laboratory experiences designed to meet individual student needs and to supplement required nursing courses. 45 or 90 hrs. lab 45 or 90 ct. hrs.
NUR 101 Pharmacology I.........................2 cr. hrs.
Basic course in drugs and drug administration. Student must possess knowledge of fractions and decimals.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
NUR 109 Concentrated Nursing Skills............3-9 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: NUR 101, NURlll, BIO 111.
A laboratory course designed to reinforce basic nursing care skills in the clinical area. Emphasis is placed on organization, priority setting, assessment and confidence building.
15 or 45 hrs. theory 90 or 270 hrs. lab 105 or 315 ct. hrs.
NUR 110 Review of Nursing Concepts..............2 cr. hrs.
A review of basic nursing care concepts to reinforce job entry preparation. A seminar approach is used to adjust the course to specific student needs.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
NUR 111 Nursing Concepts I.......................10 cr. hrs.
Co-requisites: HOC 100, NUR 101, BIO 111.
An introductory course in the fundamentals of patient care which incorporates mental health, cultural concepts, and medical-surgical nursing knowledge basic to the care of the patient. Nursing care skills are stressed throughout the
course.
90 hrs. theory-90 hours lab 180 ct. hrs.
NUR 112 Nursing Concepts II.....................14 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: NUR 111.
Co-requisites: BIO 112, NUR 115 Emphasis in this course is placed on health maintenance and common illnesses occurring at various developmental cycles. Focus is placed on the child-bearing family, care of the child from newborn to adolescence and common illnesses of the
young adult.
60 hrs. theory 225 hours lab 285 ct. hrs.
NUR 115 Vocational Relationships...................1 cr. hr.
Pre-requisite: NUR 111.
CO-requisite: NUR 112.
An exploration of the changing trends in nursing with emphasis on the specific legal and ethical implications for the practical nurse. Focus is on role of practical nurse as a health
team member in the community.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
NUR 120 Psychosocial Concepts in
Nursing.............................. 2 cr. hrs.
A basic course concerned with theory and skills of therapeutic communication, interviewing, personality structure, growth and development, anxiety, defense mechanism, concepts of body image, loss, grief, sexuality, aging and common patterns of behavior in response to stress. Knowledge of these concepts is required for students applying for advanced standing in the Nursing Program.
30 hrs. theory 30ct. hrs.
NUR 201 Pharmacology II.......................2 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisites: NUR 101, NUR 112, BIO 112, Adv. Physiology (may be taken concurrently)
Builds on basic pharmacology course. Emphasis is on nurses role in identifying therapeutic and toxic effects of drugs on body systems and related nursing action.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
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NUR 209 Review of Nursing Principles..............2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: NUR 115 or Instructors permission.
Review and synthesis of nursing theory preparing the student for job readiness.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
NUR 210 Advanced Nursing Skills................5-15 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: Instructors Permission.
This is a laboratory course of advanced nursing skill development designed to follow the basic courses of the nursing program. Students may request this course to gain additional skills in team leading or an introduction to more complex or specialty areas of nursing practice.
15 or 45 hrs. theory 90 or 270 hrs. lab 105-315 ct. hrs. NUR 211 Comprehensive Nursing I...........12 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: NUR 112, ENG 106 or equivalent NUR 115 Co-requisites: Adv. Physiology, NUR 201, PSY 235 An advanced nursing course primarily concerned with illnesses common at varying age levels of the developmental cycle. Nursing intervention related to child-bearing family, children and common medical-surgical conditions is stressed.
60 hrs. theory -180 hours lab 240 ct. hrs.
NUR 212 Comprehensive Nursing II......J____14 cr. hrs.
PRE-requisites: NUR 211, NUR 201. Adv. Physiology Co-requisites: BIO 115, NUR 215 Designed to deal with the cultural, psychological and health maintenance needs of the adult. The course deals with common psychiatric and medical-surgical problems of
patients.
90 hrs. theory -180 hours lab 270 ct. hrs.
NUR 215 Nursing Trends and Issues...................2 cr. hrs.
Focus on current issues related to legislation, licensure, professional organization and the relationship of nursing history to current trends in delivery of health care.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR NURSES (A,N,R) Certificate Program
Continuing education will be offered, as indicated by community needs, to augment the knowledge and skills of practitioners in nursing. These courses will enable the practitioner to acquire an increased depth of knowledge in basic practice areas, an awareness of progress, developments and new therapy measures, and to meet requirements for Continuing Education Units.
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
NCE 200 Registered Nurse Refresher Course ... 13 240
NCE 206 Applied Physiology for Nurses 4 60
NCE 207 Acute Care of the Med. Surg. Patient 3 45
NCE 208 Basic EKG Interpretation. . 2 30
NCE 209 Clinical Interpretation of Lab Test 2 30
NCE 210 Physical Assessment of Adult 3 45
NCE215 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 1 15
NCE 216 Orthopedic and Neurological Nursing 2 30
NCE 217 Pharmacodynamics and Drug Interaction. 3 45
NCE 218 Legal Aspects of Charting . 1 15
NCE 219 Nursing Leadership and Management 2 30
NCE 220 Legal Aspects of Nursing . 2 30
NCE 225 Body Mechanics for Nurses 1 15
Page 79
NCE226 I.V. Therapy......................1 15
NCE 227 Communications Skills
for Nurses.......................1 15
NCE 228 Hyperalimentation.................1 15
NCE 229 Fluids and Electrolytes...........1 15
NCE 230 Emergency Nursing
Assessment.......................1 15
NCE235 Emergency Trauma Nursing.........2 30
NCE 236 Physical Assessment
of Child.........................2 30
NCE 237 Basic Spanish for Nurses..........3 45
NCE 238 Interviewing Techniques
for Nurses.......................2 30
NCE 239 Blood Gases.......................1 15
NCE 240 Assertiveness for Nurses..........2 30
NCE 245 Intermediate EKG
Interpretation................. 2 30
NCE 246 Advanced EKG
Interpretation...................2 30
NCE 247 Intro, to Critical Care...........2 30
NCE 248 Psychiatric Nursing Update........3 45
NCE 249 Sexual Aspects of
Patient Care.....................2 30
NCE 250 Tubes and Intubation..............1 15
NCE 255 Problem Oriented
Medical Records..................1 15
NCE 256 Interpretation of
Vital Signs......................1 15
NCE 257 Selected Emergency Care..........1 15
NCE 258 Ethnic Components
of Nursing Care..................2 30
NCE 259 The Aging Process.................2 30
CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR NURSES (A,N,R)
NCE 200 Registered Nurse
Refresher Course....................13 cr. hrs.
Classroom instruction includes nursing knowledge and skills basic to all areas of nursing practice: current trends in health care, pharmacology, fluid and electrolytes, intravenous therapy, cariopulmonary resuscitation and legal aspects. Emphasis on patient assessment and nursing intervention. Hospital experience will consist of patient care and observation in the areas of student's choice when possible.
105 hrs. theory 135 hrs. lab 240 ct. hrs.
NCE 206 Applied Physiology
for Nurses...........................4 cr. hrs.
Study of physiology and pathophysiology an integrated approach to human disease with emphasis on nursing
implications.
60 hrs. theory 60 ct. hrs.
NCE 207 Acute Care of the
Med. Surg. Patient....................3 cr. hrs.
Identifies new concepts in the assessment and responsibilities of the nurse in the care of the acute medical surgical patient. To include commonly occuring disease processes.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
NCE 208 Basic EKG Interpretation....................2 cr. hrs.
Anatomy and physiology of the heart, conduction system, normal and abnormal stimuli of cardiac muscle, cardiac drugs and recognition of arrhythmias for interpretation telemetry. 30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
NCE 209 Clinical Interpretation
of Laboratory Test......................2 cr. hrs.
New developments in laboratory test and analysis. Emphasis on nurses responsibilities in interpreting and evaluating laboratory tests to improve patient care.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.


NCE 210 Physical Assessment
of the Adult........................3cr. hrs.
Study and practice of techniques that are necessary in history taking and physically examining an adult patient for nursing care assessments.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
NCE 215 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation............1 cr. hr.
Normal heart physiology and basic EKG followed by practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Based on AMA & AHA Standards.
15 hrs. theory . 15 ct. hrs.
NCE 216 Orthopedic and
Neurological Nursing..................2 cr. hrs.
New developments and expanded skills in the assessment of orthopedic and neurological problems. Emphasis will be on patient needs alleviation of pain, correct positioning of injured or surgically repaired extremities, prevention of complications and rehabilitation.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
NCE 217 Pharmacodynamics
and Drug Interaction................3 cr. hrs.
Study of the biochemical and physiologic effects of drugs and mechanism of action and interaction. Enables the nurse to understand drug interaction, and to increase observation skills and interpretation of drug response in patient care.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
NCE 218 Legal Aspects of Charting................1 cr. hr.
Basic concepts of charting. Emphasis placed on observations, patient response to care and legal aspects of the nurses record. A practice charting session and evaluation of charting in relation to various patient situations will be included.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
NCE 219 Nursing Leadership
and Management....................2 cr. hrs.
Directed toward helping the professional nurse to understand the responsibilities in becoming a leader and to provide a simple guide to the various ways in which he/she can exercise leadership in the management of patient care.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
NCE 220 Legal Aspects of Nursing.................2 cr. hrs.
Introduction to the law and application to nursing practice.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
NCE 225 Body Mechanics for Nurses................1 cr. hr.
Fundamental principles, protection of the lowback, rules of body alignment in activity, specific motions and postures, specific application to hospital activities.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
NCE 226 I.V. Therapy.............................1 cr. hr.
Basic venipuncture techniques, factors involved in vein selection, psychological implications, complications and nursing measures.
NCE 227 Communication Skills
for Nurses.........................1 cr. hr.
Therapeutic listening, message-sending and problem solving techniques.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
NCE 228 Hyperalimentation.....................1 cr. hr.
3resents the facts of parenteral hyperalimentation as a :herapeutic adjunct in the treatment or prevention of negative nitrogen balance. Emphasis on implications of nursing care to promote maximum therapeutic benefit to the natient.
.5 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
NCE 229 Fluid and Electrolytes 1 cr. hr.
Identifies the principles of fluids and electrolytes and their application to patient care. To include causative factors of imbalances, recognition of signs and symptoms, laboratory tests, treatment and nurses responsibilities.
15 hrs. theory 15ct.hrs.
NCE 230 Emergency Nursing
Assessment........................1 cr. hr.
Basic patient assessment in an emergency situation.
15 hrs. theory 15ct.hrs.
NCE 235 Emergency Trauma Nursing.......... .. 2 cr. hrs.
Acute care of the patient from treatment at the scene of an
accident to management of emergencies that occur within the hospital setting. Patient assessment, therapeutic needs, diagnostic procedures and treatment techniques.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
NCE 236 Physical Assessment
of the Child.......................2cr. hrs.
Study and practice of skills required by the nurse in collecting data for nursing assessment. To include interviewing, observation, and physical appraisal skills of the infant
through adolescents.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
NCE 237 Basic Spanish for Nurses.................3 cr. hrs.
To meet the immediate needs of the health worker in communicating with the Spanish speaking patient. Includes vocabulary, grammar and idioms. Previous knowledge of
Spanish is not necessary.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
NCE 238 Interviewing Techniques
for Nurses...........................2 cr. hrs.
Designed for nurses in hospitals and all health care agencies. Includes the role of the nurse interviewer, principles of patient interviewing and evaluation by the nurse interviewer. This is the basis for problem oriented patient care.
30 hrs. theory 30ct.hrs.
NCE 239 Blood Gases...............................1 cr. hr.
Four primary acid-base balance problems, interpretation of blood gas test, signs, symptoms and measure to help the nurse plan effective patient care.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
NCE 240 Assertiveness for Nurses.................2 cr. hrs.
Seminar for nurses to expand positive attitudes and actions, applicable for personal and professional growth. Includes communication skills, time utilization, creativity, leadership,
and goal setting. Be assertive!!
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
NCE 245 Intermediate EKG
Interpretation.........................2 cr. hrs.
Continuation of basic EKG interpretation. To include twelve (12) lead interpretation.
30 hrs. theory 30ct.hrs.
NCE 246 Advanced EKG Interpretation.............2 cr. hrs.
An in-depth analysis of various components of electrocardiogram and their clinical significance.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
NCE 247 Introduction to
Critical Care..........................2cr. hrs.
An introduction to the care of the critically ill patient to include the technical, psychological and physical aspects of critical care nursing.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
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NCE 248 Psychiatric Nursing Update...................3 cr. hrs.
Designed to provide the nurse with a broad overview of the new dimensions in psychiatry and an update in psychiatric mental health nursing. Attention will be paid to the community mental health centers and their functions.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
NCE 249 Sexual Aspects of
Patient Care.........................2 cr. hrs.
Theories and attitudes of human sexuality. Sexual development, sexual maturity and acceptance of ourselves as sexual beings. Emphasis on nursing implications regarding physiological, behavioral and cultural aspects.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
I
NCE 250 Tubes and Intubation......................1 cr. hr.
Identification, insertion and maintenance of tubes used in every aspect of patient care. This course will not teach one how to do tracheal intubation.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
NCE 255 Problem Oriented
Medical Records.......................... 1 cr. hr.
Philosophy and mechanics of POMR. Participants will learn to identify and describe patient problems, organize and record both nursing care plans and interventions using the problem-oriented record.
15 hrs. theory 15ct.hrs.
NCE 256 Interpretation of
Vital Signs...........................1 cr. hr.
An in-depth look at vital signs; what each means in relation to the other; and what the abnormals indicate in relation to different disease processes. This is more than basic TPR.
15 hrs. theory 15ct.hrs.
NCE 257 Selected Emergency Care...................1 cr. hr.
First aid plus emergency care of patient with diabetes, epilepsy, fainting, burns, etc.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
OPERATING ROOM TECHNOLOGY (A)
Certificate Program
Upon completion of this program, the graduate will be eligible to write the Operating Room Technician National Certifying Examination.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
HOC 100 Medical Terminology . .. 1 15
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care ...2 30
ORT 100 Introduction to
Surgical Technology . .4 60
ORT105 Pharmacology for
Operating Room Tech ...2 30
ORT106 Operating Room Skills . .6 120
ORT 107 Operating Room
Instrumentation .. .3 60
ORT 108 Operating Room Trends ...2 30
ORT109 Operating Room
Laboratory Experience . 5 115
0RT110 Operating Room
Technician Practicum . 7 325
ORT 115 Surgical Pathology
and Intervention . 4 60
ORT 119 Program Review ...2 30
38 875
Required Related Courses
SCI 101 Science for
Health Occupations 1 . .4 90
SCI 202 Science for
Health Occupations IV . 3 75
PSY 226 Coping with Crises,
Stress and Dying . .. 3 45
COM 100 Communication and
Stress Management . 3 45
15 255
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS . . 51 1130
NCE 258 Ethnic Components
of Nursing Care....................2 cr. hrs.
Presentation and discussion of care measures and nursing intervention considerations directly related to ethnic origin. The course will focus on concerns of patients commonly
encountered in this region.
30 hrs. theory 30ct.hrs.
NCE 259 The Aging Process......................2 cr. hrs.
A lecture-discussion course designed to increase awareness of the normal aging process and the assets and liabilities of the older adult. Social and legislative issues, as well as common illnesses, will be discussed.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
OPERATING ROOM TECHNOLOGY (A)
HOC 100 Medical Terminology.............1 cr. hr.
A study designed to acquaint the student with the origin and structure of medical terms. The intent of this course is to help the student interpret and understand medical terms, reports and therapy requests to his field.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care........................2 cr. hrs.
Focuses on the basic concepts and technical skills common to all health care deliverers. Ethical and legal responsibilities, basic techniques necessary to meet care needs and
emergency measures are included.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
ORT 100 Introduction Surgical Technology........4 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: Admission to Operating Room Technician Program or permission of instructor.
Study of the theoretical application for such areas as asepsis, anesthesia, hemostasis, radiology, sepsis, and surgical patient care to the framework of an Operating Room Department. Course is geared to the introductory aspects of surgical care in health care delivery.
60 hrs. theory 60 ct. hrs.
ORT 105 Pharmacology for
Operating Room Tech.................2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: Concurrent with ORT 106 and ORT 107. Exploration of chemical therapy utilization pre-operatively, operatively and post-operatively of the surgical patient. Emphasis is on drug types, effects/side effects, principles of administration and appropriate personnel actions.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
Page 81


ORT 106 Operating Room Skills.....................6 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: Concurrent with ORT 105 and ORT 107. Student involvement in the assimilation and application evaluation of principles relating to basic Operating Room skills necessary to function as an operating Room Tech. Laboratory experiences are focused on achieving satisfactory performance skill levels with basic to advanced types of mechanized and non-mechanized equipment commonly used
in an Operating Room.
30 hrs. theory 90 hrs. laboratory 120 ct. hrs.
ORT 107 Operating Room Instrumentation...........3 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: Concurrent with ORT 105 and ORT 106. Theory and laboratory experiences with instruments, sutures, needles, sponges and dressings commonly found on a major abdominal surgical procedure. Emphasis is placed upon aseptic technique principles, skills integration, adaptic changes in case sequence and counts.
30 hrs. theory 30 hrs. laboratory 60 ct. hrs.
ORT 108 Operating Room Trends....................2cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.
Theory with discussion periods of professional responsibilities, deaths in Operating Room, surgical emergencies and history of surgical care. Emphasis is placed on individualistic approaches to continuing education, problems within the work setting, emergency responses of personnel and importance of historical aspects of surgical
care.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
ORT 109 Operating Room Technician
Laboratory Experience.................5 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: ORT 100, ORT 105, ORT 106, ORT 107, ORT 108.
Student participation in clinical setting in which correct application of principles, refinement of skills levels and evaluation of performance are stressed. Supervision is
provided by a college instructor.
115 hrs. laboratory 115 ct. hrs.
ORT 110 Operating Room
Technician Practicum...................7cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: Concurrent with ORT 109.
Continuation of skills refinement begun in ORT with emphasis concentrated on good patient care and correct aseptic techniques. Primary supervision of activities is performed by hospital personnel with the instructor being responsible for
coordination of experiences.
325 hrs. laboratory 325 ct. hrs.
ORT 115 Surgical Pathology
and Intervention.......................4 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: SCI 101, SCI 202 concurrent with ORT 109, ORT 110.
Theory assimilation and application of principles relating to pre-operative pathology, presented with intra-operative interventional approaches to system problems. Focus is on post operative progression with attention given to possible problems, appropriate Operating Room Staff actions. Emphasis is placed on surgeries of abdomens, chest, head and extremities, pediatrics, cancer and plastic with the direction of Operating Room Technician functioning in areas
of instrumentation and supplies.
60 hrs. theory i 60 ct. hrs.
ORT 119 Program Review.........................2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.
Total review of program theory/skills content for purposes of concept integration and certification examination preperation. Emphasis is placed upon the job-entry description, skills and functions of an Operating Room Technician in an Operating Room and/or related area.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
OPTOMETRIC ASSISTING (N)
Certificate
This program is designed to provide the job entry skills for employment in Optometric offices or clinics.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
HOC 100 Medical Terminology ... 1 15
OPA100 Ocular Anatomy,
Physiology, Pathology .. .3 45
OPA 105 Visual Science and Optics ...2 30
OPA 106 Preliminary
Examination T echniques .. 4 68
OPA 107 Optometric Office Procedures. .. .2 30
OPA 108 Facial Analysis Frame
Selection and Adjustment .. . ...2 30
OPA109 Contact Lenses . 5 90
OPA 110 Pharmacology-Emergency
Measures for Optometric
Assistants .. .2 30
OPA 115 Clinical Practicum . .8 300
OPA 116 Clinical Seminar ... 1 15
30 653
Required Related Courses
ENG106 Communications for
Health Occupations .. .3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting 1 ...4 75
SCI 105 The Metric System ... 1 15
8 ll35
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS .. . . 38 788
OPTOMETRIC ASSISTING (N)
HOC 100 Medical Terminology..............1 cr. hr.
A study designed to acquaint the student with the origin and structure of medical terms. The intent of this course is to help the student interpret and understand medical terms, reports and therapy requests to his field.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
OPA 100 Ocular Anatomy, Physiology
and Pathology.......................3 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: Admission to Optometric Assisting Program.
A study of surface and intraocular anatomy, relation to and function of each part to the other, common disorders, diseases and abnormal conditions of the eye. An overview of basic anatomical structures of man and functioning of the various components, particularly the pathological conditions directly affecting the eye will be included.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
OPA 105 Visual Science and Optics..............2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OPA 100,
SCI 105
Properties of light, glass, plastic, single vision, multifocal, photochromic, tinted, coated, antireflection, and low vision lenses. Use of the lensometer, geneva lens measure, calipers, inte-pupillary measurements, and review of metric system is included.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
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OPA 106 Preliminary Examination
Techniques..........................4cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OPA 105
Lecture and lab in basic terminology, visual acuities, cover test, color vision, keystone skills, depth perception (steropsis), case histories, fields, chairside assisting, and
related equipment.
45 hrs. theory 23 hrs. lab 68 ct. hrs.
OPA 107 Optometric Office Procedures...........2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: SEC 101, ENG 106
Review of basic math, use of office equipment, record keeping, proper telephone techniques, mail recall system, fees, finance, credit procedures, filing systems, insurance forms, appointment scheduling, and patient control. A brief history of the profession, code of ethics, and legal
implications included.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
OPA 108 Facial Analysis-Frame
Selection and Adjustment............2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OPA 109
Study of facial structures with subsequent frame selection and adjustment. Minor frame repair and use of related
equipment included.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
OPA 109 Contact Lenses.......................5 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: OPA 105 and OPA 106 Continuation of OPA 105 with emphasis on contact lenses. Optics of, inspection, verification, polishing, and modification, care and handling procedures. Auxiliary solutions, insertion, removal, and centering techniques.
Use of the related equipment included.
45 hrs. theory 45 hrs. lab 90 ct. hrs.
OPA 110 Pharmacology-Emergency Measures
for Optometric Assistants.........2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: OPA 100 and OPA 106
Designed to familiarize the student with pharmacologic agents common to the eye care field, and their application and common emergency situations, the planning and
immediate responses required.
30 hrs. theory , 30 ct. hrs.
OPA 115 Optometric Clinical
Practicum.........................8 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: ENG 106, SEC 101, OPA 106, OPA 107
Through placement in a professional office or clinic, the student is provided the opportunity to perform the duties of an assistant under the direct supervision of a qualified assistant or optometrist.
60 hrs. skill lab 240 hrs.
clinical experience 300 ct. hrs.
OPA 116 Clinical Seminar............................1 cr. hr.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OPA 115
Clarification of clinical learning experiences through discussion and lab.
15 hrs. theory and lab 15 ct. hrs.
PSYCHIATRIC TECHNICIAN (A)
Certificate
(Open to LPN only. See Health Occupations Division for more information).
RADIATION THERAPY TECHNOLOGY (A)
Certificate or Associate Degree
Upon completion of this program the graduate will be eligible to write the certification examination of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists for Radiation Therapy.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
HOC 100 Medical Terminology 1 20
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care 2 30
HOC 107 Orientation to Clinical Practicum 1 40
HOC 108 Positioning Techniques . 2 30
HOC 109 Radiologic Instrument Maintenance . 2 30
RAT 200 Survey of Medical and Surgical Diseases 2 30
RTT 125 Radiation Therapy Practicum 1 4 200
RTT 200 Physics of Radiation Therapy 1 2 30
RTT 205 Radiation Therapy Methodology 2 30
RTT 206 Radiation Oncology 1 3 45
RTT 207 Radiation Therapy Practicum II 11 512
RTT 208 Physics of Radiation Therapy II 2 30
RTT 209 Radiation Dosimetry 2 30
RTT 210 Radiation Oncology II 1 20
RTT 215 Radiation Biology and Pathology 2 30
RTT 216 Radiation Therapy Practicum III 13 576
RTT 217 Selected Topics in Radiation Therapy 3 45
RTT 218 Radiation Therapy Practicum IV 15 688
70 2416
Required Related Courses
BIO 111 Anatomy and Physiology 1. ... . 4 90
BIO 112 Anatomy and Physiology II ... ... .4 90
Psychology Elective . 2 30
English Elective ....2 30
MAT 121 College Algebra . 4 60
PHY 115 Introduction to
Medical Physics ....4 90
CHE 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry.. . .4 90
24 480
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS . .. .94 2896
i
Page 83


RADIATION THERAPY TECHNOLOGY (A)
HOC 100 Medical Terminology.............1 cr. hr.
A study designed to acquaint the student with the origin and structure of medical terms. The intent of this course is to help the student interpret and understand medical terms, reports
and requests to his field.
15 hrs. theory 15ct.hrs.
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care.......................2 cr. hrs.
Focuses on the basic concepts and technical skills common to all health care deliverers. Ethical and legal responsibilities, basic techniques necessary to meet health care needs, and
emergency measure are included.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
HOC 107 Orientation to Clinical Practicum......1 cr. hr.
An orientation to a Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Therapy or Ultrasound Technology facility designed to acquaint the student with the selected radiologic technology specialty
area.
40 hrs. laboratory 40 ct. hrs.
HOC 108 Positioning Techniques......................2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology or Radiation Therapy Technology Programs. Introduction to terminology and general principles of positioning, routine positioning and anatomy of the chest, abdomen and skull as related to Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy procedures.
30 hrs. theory 30ct.hrs.
HOC 109 Radiologic Instrument Maintenance________2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: Admission to Nuclear Medicine Technology or Radiation Therapy Program and permission of instructor.
Basic electronics of instruments used in the above fields. Course will cover calibration and minor repairs for the same.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
RTT 125 Radiation Therapy
Practicum 1...........................4cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: Admission to Radiation Therapy Technology Program.
A clinical laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the hospital as a whole with specific objectives to complete rotation to related departments.
200 hrs. laboratory 200 ct. hrs.
RAT 200 Survey of Medical
Surgical Diseases......................2 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: HOC 100. Acceptance to Radiation Therapy Technology Program or permission of instructor. Basic causes of diseases, changes that occur in disease and trauma, and related diagnostic and therapeutic measures. Discussion, case examples will be related in the students
particular occupational interest.
30 hrs. theory 30ct.hrs.
RTT 200 Physics of Radiation Therapy 1...........2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiation Therapy Technology Program
Co-requisite: RTT 205, RTT 206, RTT 207.
Deals with the theoretical physics of radiation therapy. Focuses on particulate and electromagnetic radiation and their interactions with matter and examination of the theory and construction of cobalt machines, linear accelerators, betatrons, and other treatment machines.
30 hrs. theory 30ct.hrs.
RTT 205 Radiation Therapy Methodology...........2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: Admission to Radiation Therapy Technology Program.
An introduction to radiation therapy technology. This course will survey types of treatment machines, principles of patient set-ups, geometrical considerations, patient immobilization devices as well as the calculation of radiation dose to patients. It will also correspond very closely with the Radiation Oncology course, providing for discussion of
specific primary cancer sites.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
RTT 206 Radiation Oncology I............... ........3 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: Admission to Radiation Therapy Technology Program.
Includes presenting symptoms, diagnostic workup, staging, histologies, treatment portals, critical organs and their tissue tolerances, and survival statistics.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RTT 207 Radiation Therapy
Practicum 1.........................11 cr. hrs.
Pre-requisite: Admission to Radiation Therapy Technology Program.
A clinical laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the clinical therapy setting, basic equipment and therapeutic routines. The student will perform therapeutic treatments under the direct supervision of a physician or
registered technologist.
512 hrs. laboratory 512 ct. hrs.
RTT 208 Physics of Radiation Therapy II.............2 cr. hrs.
Co-requisites: RTT 209, RTT 215, RTT 210, RTT 216.
The physics of radiation therapy deals with radioactive and nuclear physics, medical use of radium and other radioactive isotopes, and radiation protection.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
RTT 209 Radiation Dosimetry......................2 cr. hrs.
Co-requisites: RTT 200, RTT 206.
This course explores dosimetric consideration of complex radiation treatments, radium implants and interstitial implants. Both manual and computer calculations are
stressed.
20 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
RTT 210 Radiation Oncology II.....................1 cr. hrs.
Discussion of biological and pathological effects of radiation at the chemical, cellular, organ and whole body levels. Emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of radiation biology with respect to radiation therapy and nuclear
medicine.
20 hrs. theory 20 ct. hrs.
Page 84


RTT 215 Radiation Biology and Pathology............2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: Admission to the second year of the Radiation Therapy Technology Program or Nuclear Medicine Technology Program.
Co-requisite: RTT 208.
Discussion of the biological and pathological effects of radiation at the chemical, cellular, organ and whole body levels. Emphasis is placed upon the practical aspects of radiation biology with respect to associated radiation therapy
and nuclear medicine procedures.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
RTT 216 Radiation Therapy Practicum III..........13 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: RTT 207.
An advanced clinical course with increased responsibility in the overall operation of a radiation therapy department. Includes rotation to other hospitals.
576 hrs. laboratory 576 ct. hrs.
RTT 217 Selected Topics
in Radiation Therapy....................3 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.
Review of courses and clinical work in preparation for the Certification examination given by the American Registry of
Radiologic Technologists.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RTT 218 Radiation Therapy Practicum IV.............15 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: RTT 216.
Co-requisite: RTT 217.
The final semester of clinical experience. Here the student will have the opportunity to perform duties typical of a staff radiation therapy technologist as preparation for employment. (37 hours per week)
688 hrs. laboratory 688 ct. hrs.
Page 85


RESPIRATORY THERAPY TECHNOLOGY (N) Associate Degree
The program in Respiratory Therapy Technology is designed to prepare the student for employment as a registry-eligible Respiratory Therapist under the supervision of a physician. Upon completion of the program the student is eligible to take the Registry Examination offered by the National Board for Respiratory Therapy.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
HOC 100 Medical Terminqlogy.............1 15
HOC 105 Introduction to Pathology.......1 15
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care..............2 30
RIT100 Respiratory Technology..........3 45
RIT 205 Cardio-Pulmonary Physiology .... 3 45
RIT 206 Clinical Practicum 1............8 360
RIT 207 Pulmonary Function..............2 30
RIT 208 Respiratory Pathophysiology.....3 45
RIT 209 Pharmacology for
Respiratory Therapy............2 30
RIT 210 Respiratory Critical Care.......3 45
RIT215 Department Management...........3 45
RIT 216 Therapy Seminar.................3 45
RIT 217 Pediatric Respiratory Therapy.... 2 30
RIT 218 Clinical Practicum II.......... 7 320
RIT 219 Clinical Practicum III ......... .8 360
51 1460
Required Related Courses
BIO 111 Anatomy and Physiology 1.........4 90
CHE 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry I......4 90
CHE 102 Fundamentals of Chemistry II .... 4 90
ENG 106 Communications for
Health Occupations..............2 30
PSY 226 Coping with stress,
Crisis and dying...............3 45
BIO 112 Anatomy and Physiology II.......4 90
PHY 101 Fundamental Physics I............3 75
MAT 111 Intro. Algebra...................3 45
BIO 115 Microbiology.................... . 3 75
30 630
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS............81 2,090
Additional Major Courses
RIT 220 Registration and
Certification Review............3 45
RESPIRATORY THERAPY TECHNOLOGY (N)
HOC 100 Medical Terminology..... .......1 cr. hr.
A study designed to acquaint the student with the origin and structure of medical terms. The intent of this course is to help the student interpret and understand medical terms, reports
and therapy requests to his field.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
HOC 105 Introduction to Pathology..................1 cr. hr.
Prerequisite: HOC 100
An introduction to the primary pathophysiological processes of diseases.
15 hrs. theory 15 ct. hrs.
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care.........................2 cr. hrs.
Focuses on the basic concepts and technical skills common to all health care deliverers. Ethical and legal responsibilities, basic techniques necessary to meet care needs and emergency measures are included.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
RIT 100 Respiratory Technology...................3 cr. hrs.
An introduction to sterilization techniques and basic equipment maintenance, assisted and controlled ventilation, chest physiotherapy, ancillary techniques of bronchial
hygiene, humidification and aerosols.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RIT 205 Cardio Pulmonary Physiology...............3 cr. hrs.
Prerequisites: BIO 112, CHE 102
An in-depth study of the structure and function of the cardiac and respiratory systems as this knowledge relates to
respiratory technology.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RIT 206 Clinical Practicum I......................8 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: HOC 106
Clinical application orientation to basic respiratory therapy procedures in the clinical setting. Emphasis placed on familiarization of equipment and technique.
360 hrs. practicum 360 ct. hrs.
f
RIT 207 Pulmonary Function.....................2cr. hrs.
An orientation to the basic and advanced pulmonary function studies utilized in Respiratory Therapy.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
RIT 208 Respiratory Pathophysiology...........3 cr. hrs..
Prerequisites: RIT 205, RIT 207
An in-depth study of cardio pulmonary anatomy-physiology and disorders. Etiology and course of the disease are discussed. Treatment by the Respiratory Therapist is emphasized.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RIT 209 Pharmacology for Respiratory Therapy 2 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: BIO 112
Study of the biochemical and physiologic effects of pharmacologic agents commonly encountered in medical conditions requiring respiratory care or respiratory therapy
measures.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
RIT 210 Respiratory Critical Care...............3 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: RIT 205 and RIT 206 An in-depth study of basic and advanced techniques utilized in the management of prolonged artificial ventilation and the patient who is critically ill, and the role of the therapist on the
critical care team.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RIT 215 Department Management.....................3 cr. hrs.
This course includes an introduction to departmental administration. Attention is directed to the organization and operation of a Respiratory Therapy department. The administrative problems, factors influencing a solution, and methods of solution are emphasized.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RIT 216 Therapy Seminar........................3cr. hrs.
A review and discussion of current topics in Respiratory Therapy and areas of special interest to the student.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.
RIT 217 Pediatric Respiratory Therapy.............2 Cr. Hrs.
An in-depth study of the pediatric respiratory system from embryology to the first breath. Also included is the pathological entities most often seen and treated in Pediatric Respiratory Therapy.
30 hrs. theory 30 ct. hrs.
Page 86


RIT 218 Clinical Practicum II.....................7 cr. hrs.
A clinical application of pulmonary function techniques and basic techniques of Respiratory Therapy outside the intensive care unit.
320 hrs. practicum 320 ct. hrs.
RIT 219 Clinical Practicum III....................8 cr. hrs.
This clinical application will provide the student with experience in the intensive care unit with emphasis on the role of the therapist as related to the critical care team.
360 hrs. practicum 360 ct. hrs.
RIT 220 Registration and
Certification Review..................3 cr. hrs.
Prerequisite: Completion of requirements for the ARRT Registry or Certification examinations.
This course is designed to help prepare those people taking the Registry (ARRT) or Certification (CRTT) Examinations in Respiratory Therapy. The basic principles and practices of Respiratory Therapy as well as clinical applications will be reviewed.
45 hrs. theory 45 ct. hrs.


DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS
Where a program does not indicate the campus by the key A, N, or R, we would suggest you call the campus of your choice for information.
BUILDING TRADES
BRICKLAYING (R)
Certificate or Associate Degree
The Bricklaying Program provides training for job entry skill during the first year in brick and block laying used primarily in residential construction, and the second year in fireplace design and construction, flagstone, moss rock, and advanced masonry techniques.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
BRI100 Safety, History, Glossary,
Use Of Mason Tools...............3 60
BRI 105 Related Equipment
Used By Brickmasons..............3 60
BRI 106 Spreading Mortar, Laying
To Line, Use Of Tools............3 60
BRI 107 Basic Leads, Masonry Walls......3 60
BRI 108 Bonded Brick Leads, Joints,
Striking & Brushing..............3 60
BRI 109 Masonry Piers & Pilasters,
Solid & Hollow Masonry...........3 60
BRI 110 Bonds, Floors, Masonry Walls .... 3 60
BRI 115 Through The Wall Joints,
Laying To Line...................3 60
BRI 116 Tooling, Rake, Grape
Joints, Flush Cut................3 60
BRI 117 Headers, Soldiers, Sailors,
Rollock, Miter Corner............3 60
BRI 200 Mortar Types, Masonry Cement. .. 3 60
BRI 205 Fireplace Basics..................3 60
BRI 206 Fireplace Construction............3 60
BRI 207 Heatilator Construction...........3 60
BRI 208 Chimney Construction,
Flashing, Cooping................3 60
BRI 209 Fireplace Codes...................3 60
BRI 210 Flagstone, Moss Rock..............3 60
BRI 215 Reinforced Masonry................3 60
BRI216 Over thr WJ'Construction........3 60
BUI 60 1200
Required Related Courses
Math Elective....................3 45
English Elective.................3 45
Social Science Elective..........3 45
Electives..................... 6 90
15 225
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS........... 75 1425
Additional Major Courses
BRI 118 Masonry Code and Inspection .... 1 20
BRI 120 Bricklaying For
Construction Trades...............3 60
BRI 297 Cooperative Work Experience .. 2-9 60-3^5
BRI 299 Independent Study................3 90
BTR125 Blueprint Reading For
Construction Trades...............4 68
BTR 126 Blueprint Reading For
Mechanical Trades.................4 68
BTR 127 Building Inspection For
Construction Trades...............4 68
BTR 128 Estimating Residential
Construction Costs................4 68
BTR 129 Construction Materials 1 . .4 68
BTR 130 Construction Materials II .... .. .4 68
BTR 140 Overview Of Bricklaying, Carpentry, Electrical & Plumbing Fields ... .4 68
BRICKLAYING (R)
BRI 100 Safety, History, Glossary,
Use Of Mason Tools...................3 Cr. Hrs.
Safety practices, history of masonry in Colorado, terms used by the brickmason, proper use and care of bricklaying tools.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 105 Related Equipment
Used By Brickmasons..................3 Cr. Hrs.
Operation of the masonry saw, mortar mixer, and scaffolds.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 106 Spreading Mortar, Laying
To Line, Use Of Tools................3 Cr. Hrs.
Using the trowel to spread mortar, laying brick and block to line, and use of brickmason tools.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 107 Basic Leads, Masonry Walls..............3 Cr. Hrs.
Layout and construction of basic brick and block leads.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 108 Bonded Brick Leads,
Joints, Striking & Brushing..........3 Cr. Hrs.
Layout and construction of bonded brickheads, different mortar joints, and methods used in tooling masonry walls.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 109 Masonry Piers & Pilasters,
Solid & Hollow Masonry........ ......3 Cr. Hrs.
Layout, squaring and plumbing masonry piers and pilasters, and solid and hollow masonry walls.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 110 Bonds Floors,
Masonry Walls........................3 Cr. Hrs.
Identification of masonry bonds, laying out of masonry walls, and laying brick floors.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 115 Through the Wall Joints,
Laying To Line.......................3 Cr. Hrs.
Construction of leads using through the wall units. Laying through the wall units to a line, and identifying types of through the wall bonding.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 116 Tool, Rake, Grape
Joints, Flush Out .................3 Cr. Hrs.
Identifying and skill development of the different types of
tools.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 117 Headers, Soldiers, Sailors,
Rollock, Miter Corner................3 Cr. Hrs.
Characteristics and skill development in laying brick in the various positions of the soldiers, sailors, rollock, and the miter corner.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
Page 88


BRI118 Masonry Codes and
Inspection..........................1 Cr. Hr.
Codes will cover brick veneer, solid masonry, fireplaces, and block laying with inspections on job sites.
5Hrs. Theory15 Hrs. Lab 20 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 120 Bricklaying For
Construction Trades.................3 Cr. Hrs.
Orientation to the field of bricklaying. General principles, initial techniques and skill development, and how bricklaying relates to the various trades.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 200 Mortar Types,
Masonry Cement......................3 Cr. Hrs.
Types, specifications, and properties of mortar, and skill development in mixing.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 205 Fireplace Basics........................3 Cr. Hrs.
Types, parts, and terms associated with chimneys and fireplaces, factors to consider in constructing fireplaces.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 206 Fireplace Construction..................3 Cr. Hrs.
Characteristics of firebrick, procedures for buttering firebrick, and construction of a firebox and fireplace.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 207 Heatilator Construction.................3 Cr. Hrs.
installing a heatilator fireplace, and using precast fireboxes. 15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 208 Chimney Construction,
Flashing, Cooping...................3 Cr. Hrs.
Layout and construction of masonry stack, and the installation of flashing.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 209 Fireplace Codes.........................3 Cr. Hrs.
Fireplace codes, types of mortar used in fireplaces, and further skill development.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 210 Flagstone, Moss Rock....................3 Cr. Hrs.
Identifying types of rock, laying of flagstone in walls and walks, and laying moss rock.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 215 Reinforced Masonry......................3 Cr. Hrs.
Orientation to the necessary materials used in reinforced brick masonry, importance of using different materials and skill development in constructing reinforced masonry walls.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 216 Over the Wall Construction.............3Cr. Hrs.
Laying brick in the over the waH construction method.
15 Hrs. Theory45 Hrs. Lab. 60Ct. Hrs.
BRI 217 Mason Tender............................3Cr. Hrs.
Scoffoling construction, stocking scoffaling and types of masonry units.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 297 Cooperative
Work Experience.....................2-9 Cr. Hrs.
A program study developed with coordinated college course work and industry work experience.
15 Hrs. Theory 45-360 Hrs. Lab. 60-375 Ct. Hrs.
BRI 299 Independent Study.......................3 Cr. Hrs.
Individual study on a special project which is related to the bricklaying program, and outside the program offerings.
90 Hrs. Lab 90Ct.Hrs.
Page 89
BTR 125 Blueprint Reading For
Construction Trades..................4 Cr. Hrs.
Principles of interpreting blueprints and trade specifications common to the mechanical trades. Development of proficiency in making three-view and pictorial sketches.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68Ct. Hrs.
BTR 126 Blueprint Reading For
Mechanical Trades....................4 Cr. Hrs.
Principles of interpreting blueprints and trade specifications common to the building trades. Development of proficiency in making three-view and pictorial sketches.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab- 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 127 Building Inspection For
Construction Trades..................4 Cr. Hrs.
Examination and evaluation of construction work in progress. Comparing and contrasting with recognized norms or standards to meet state and local building requirements.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 128 Estimating Residential
Construction Costs...................4 Cr. Hrs.
Construction mathematical review, plan reading, specifications, excavation, take off estimates, concrete foundations, footings, caissons, and slabs. Rough structure, and full enclosure.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 129 Construction Materials 1.................4 Cr. Hrs.
Terminology, nomenclature, board footage, lumber, plywood, millwork, brick and cement will be covered by lecture and field trips.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 130 Construction Materials II................4 Cr. Hrs.
Roofing, drywall, steel products, beams, stress graded lumber, and building codes will be covered by lecture and field trips.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 140 Overview Of Bricklaying,
Carpentry, Electrical,
& Plumbing Fields....................4 Cr. Hrs.
Relationship of each trade to the total construction project, and how coordinated efforts are regulated from beginning to completion.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.


CARPENTRY (R)
Certificate or Associate Degree
The Carpentry Program provides theory, techniques, and laboratory training for job entry skills to enter the residential carpentry field and job upgrading and refresher courses for people already employed in the industry.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
CAR 100 Orientation, Satety &
Construction Materials .. 3 60
CAR 105 Hand & Power Tools . .3 60
CAR 106 Plans, Specifications &
Uniform Building Code ..3 60
CAR 107 Site Layout & Concrete
Forms For Footings ..3 60
CAR 108 Concrete Forms For
Foundation Walls ..3 60
CAR 109 Sill & Floor Framing ..A 80
CAR 110 Wall & Partition Framing .. 5 100
CAR 115 Stair & Roof Framing . .6 120
CAR 200 ExteriorTrim . .3 60
CAR 205 Exterior Doors & Windows . .4 80
CAR 206 Exterior Wall Coverings . .4 80
CAR 207 Roof Coverings . 4 80
CAR 208 InteriorTrim Work . 4 80
CAR 209 Cabinet Making . .4 80
CAR 210 Plastic Laminates ..3 60
CAR 215 Cabinet Installation . 4 80
60 1200
Required Related Courses
Math Elective . .3 45
English Elective . 3 45
Social Science Elective .3 45
Electives .6 120
15 255
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS . 75 1455
Additional Major Courses
CAR 120 Carpentry For
Construction T rades . 3 60
CAR 216 Drywall Construction . .4 80
CAR 217 Advanced Cabinet Making . .4 80
CAR 218 Bidding and Buying . 2 40
CAR 297 Cooperative Work Experience . .2-9 . 60-375
CAR 299 Independent Study . .3 90
BTR 125 Blueprint Reading
for Construction Trades . .4 68
BTR 126 Blueprint Reading
for Mechanical Trades . 4 68
BTR 127 Building Inspection
for Construction Trades . .4 68
BTR 128 Estimating Fiesidential
Construction Costs . .4 68
BTR 129 Construction Materials 1 . 4 68
BFR130 Construction Materials II . .4 68
CARPENTRY(R) .
CAR 100 Orientation, Safety &
Construction Materials...............3 Cr. Hrs.
Orientation, field trips, occupational outlook in the carpentry trade, and securing of employment. Orientation to safety rules and practices required in the trade. Identification of the grades of lumber and common defects, writing a bill of materials for ordering lumber, different fasteners and their
uses, and Guard Foot Board calculations.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab 60 Ct. Hr.s.
*
CAR 105 Hand & Power Tools..................3Cr. Hrs.
Basic rules for the care, safe and correct use of hand tools, and skill development. Identification and use of the power woodworking machines and tools, safety rules for each, and skill development.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab 60 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 106 Plans, Specifications &
Uniform Building Code................3 Cr. Hrs.
The terminology associated with blueprint reading, alphabet of lines, drawing symbols, measure scaled drawings, and the Uniform Building Code.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab 60 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 107 Site Layout & Concrete
Forms for Footing....................3 Cr. Hrs.
Surface aspects, services and zoning restrictions that influence the selection of a building site; locate the buildings using the plot plans, layout and squaring the building with the use of batter boards. Footing form terminology, styles of footings, construct types of footing forms, and strip a pier
footing form.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab 60 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 108 Concrete Forms For
Foundation Walls....................3Cr. Hrs.
Steel reinforcements and installation along with identification and application of all foundation wall forms; built in place, bulkheads, blockouts, architectural effects, and other special modifications.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab 60 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 109 Sill & Floor Framing.........:......4 Cr. Hrs.
Floor and sill framing terminology, framing members, styles of framing, and installation of floor joist and subflooring.
20 Hrs. Theory 60 Hrs. Lab 80 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 110 Wall & Partition Framing............5Cr. Hrs.
PREREQUISITE: CAR 100 thru 108 Wall and partition members, framing terminology, layout cutting, and assembly.
25 Hrs. Theory-75 Hrs. Lab 100 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 115 Stair & Roofing Framing.............6 Cr. Hrs.
PREREQUISITE: CAR 100 thru 108 Terminology and components of stairs, layout and construction of common types. Roofing members and styles, determining rafter length, cutting, and assembling various roof structures. Estimating cost of material for each type of roof identifying components of a roof from a drawing, and the
grades and types of shingles.
30 Hrs. Theory 90 Hrs. Lab 120 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 120 Carpentry For
Construction Trades.................3 Cr. Hrs.
Orientation to the field of carpentry, general principles, initial techniques and skill development, and how carpentry relates to the various construction trades.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab 60 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 200 ExteriorTrim...........................3 Cr. Hrs.
PREREQUISITE: CAR 100 thru 108 or equivalent Study materials used in exterior trim, and proper installation of soffet, facia, freeze, brick mold, and other exterior trim items.
15 Hrs. Theory -45 Hrs. Lab 60 Ct. Hrs.
Page 90


CAR 205 Exterior Doors & Windows..............4 Cr. Hrs.
PREREQUISITE: CAR 100 thru 108 or equivalent Study existing and new exterior doors and windows on the market, and proper installation.
20 Hrs. Theory 60 Hrs. Lab 80 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 206 Exterior Wall Coverings...............4 Cr. Hrs.
PREREQUISITES: CAR 100 thru 108 Terminology associated with exterior wall coverings. Common and new materials used and proper installation.
CAR 207 Roof Covering.........................4 Cr. Hrs.
PREREQUISTE: CAR 100 thru 108 or equivalent The study of roofing materials, estimating of materials and proper application of various roofing systems.
20 Hrs. Theory 60 Hrs. Lab 80 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 208 Interior Trim Work....................4 Cr. Hrs.
PREREQUISITE: CAR 100 thru 108 or equivalent Study of interior trim materials; paneling, base, moldings, casings, doors, shelves, and proper installation of doors and all trim items.
20 Hrs. Theory 60 Hrs. Lab ' 80 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 209 Cabinet Making........................4 Cr. Hrs.
Components of a cabinet, types of materials used, construction, installation of hardware, and proper use of power tools.
20 Hrs. Theory 60 Hrs. Lab 80Ct. Hrs.
CAR 210 Plastic Laminates.....................3 Cr. Hrs.
Terminology and study of kinds of plastic laminates available. Proper handling, installation and repair of laminate materials, and installation of prefabricated counter tops.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab 60 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 215 Cabinet Installation..................4 Cr. Hrs.
PREREQUISITE: CAR 100 thru 108 or equivalent Proper installation of factory built cabinets, and a study ol various cabinets on the market.
20 Hrs. Theory 60 Hrs. Lab 80 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 216 Drywall Construction..................4 Cr. Hrs.
Terminology associated with drywall construction, estimating the material needed, concealing joints and fastners.
20 Theory Hrs. 60 Hrs. Lab 80 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 217 Advanced Cabinet Making...............4 Cr. Hrs.
Styles and types of cabinets. Components of cabinets drawers, rails, shelvings, and depths. Bathroom Vanities, Plastic laminates, and installation, including installation hardware.
CAR 218 Bidding and Buying....................2Cr. Hrs.
Selecting, determining, ordering, locating outlets for purchasing materials and studying the process of working through sub-contractors for estimating, Electrical, Plumbing, Heating, Kitchen and Bath Cabinets, tile and carpet and other types of material relating to construction. Methods for procedures for securing bids from sub-contracts and material supplies for residential construction.
20 Theory Hrs. 20 Hrs. Lab 40 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 297 Cooperative Work Experience...........2-9 Cr. Hrs.
A program of study developed with coordinated college course work and industry work experience.
15 Hrs. Theory 45-360 Hrs. Lab 60-375 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 299 Independent Study........................3 Cr. Hrs.
Individual study on a special project which is related to the Carpentry Program, and outside the program offerings.
90 Hrs. Lab. 90Ct. Hrs.
BTR 125 Blueprint Reading For
Construction Trades. ................4 Cr. Hrs.
Principles of interpreting blueprints and trade specifications common to the building trades. Development of proficiency in making three-view and pictorial sketches.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 126 Blueprint Reading For
Mechanical Trades....................4 Cr. Hrs.
Principles of interpreting blueprints and trade specifications common to the mechanical trades. Development of proficiency in making three-view and pictorial sketches.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 127 Building Inspection For
Construction Trades..................4 Cr. Hrs.
Examination and evaluation of construction work in progress. Comparing and contrasting with recognized norms or standards to meet state and local building requirements.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 128 Estimating Residential
Construction Costs...................4 Cr. Hrs.
Construction mathematical review, plan reading, specifications excavation, take off estimates, concrete foundations, footings, caissons, and slabs. Rough structure, and full enclosure.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 129 Construction Materials 1.................4 Cr. Hrs.
Terminology, nomenclature, board footage, lumber, plywood millwork, brick and cement will be covered by lecture and field trips.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 130 Construction Materials II................4 Cr. Hrs.
Roofing, drywall, steel products, beams, stress graded lumber, and building codes will be covered by lecture and field trips.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 140 Overview of Bricklaying, Carpentry,
Electrical & Plumbing Fields.........4 Cr. Hrs.
Relationship of each trade to the total construction project, and how coordinated efforts are regulated from beginning to completion.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab 68 Ct. Hrs.
Page 91


PLUMBING (R)
Certificate or Associate Degree
This program is designed to prepare individuals with basic knowledge of job entry skills for plumbing. It is also intended for job upgrading in special areas and preparation of plumbers for city or state journeyman tests.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
PLU 100 Orientation Of Tools,
Basic Plumbing,
& Drawings ...3 60
PLU 105 Basic Waste Layout &
Code Regulations . 3 60
PLU 106 Basic Venting &
Code Regulations ... 3 60
PLU 107 Water Piping Methods ...3 60
PLU 108 Gas Pipe,
Code, & Sizing . .. 3 60
PLU 109 Residential Plumbing ... 3 60
PLU 110 Finish & Installation k
Of Plumbing Fixtures ... 3 60
PLU 115 Rough-In & Setting
Of Special Fixtures .. .3 60
PLU 116 IPIumbing Repair . 3 60
PLU 200 Plumbing Business Requirements
& Cost Estimating ...3 60
PLU 206 Hot Water Heating
Installations Maintenance... . . 3 60
PLU 207 Basic Solar Energy .. .3 60
PLU 208 Advanced Solar Energy .. .3 60
PLU 210 Commercial Layout & Code,
Multi-Story Projects .. .3 60
PLU 215 Colorado State
Code Requirements . 3 60
PLU 216 Uniform Plumbing Code . 3 60
PLU 219 Denver City Code . 3 60
PLU 217 Foreman &
Superintendent Training . 3 60
54 1080
Required Related Courses
Math Elective ...3 45
English Elective ...3 45
Social Science Elective ... 3 45
Electives . .6 90
15 225
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS ... . 75 1425
69 1305
Additional Major Courses
PLU 120 Plumbing For
Construction T rades . .3 60
PLU 218 Control For Heating,
Air Conditioning,
& Plumbing . 3 60
PLU 297 Cooperative Work Experience . .2-9 60-375
PLU 299 Independent Study .3 90
BTR 125 Blueprint Reading
For Construction Trades ...4 68
BTR 126 Blueprint Reading
For Mechanical Trades . 4 68
BTR 127 Building Inspection For Construction Trades .... ... .4 68
BTR 128 Estimating Residential Construction Costs . .. .4 68
BTR 129 Construction Materials 1 . .. .4 68
BTR 130 Construction Materials II ... . . .4 68
BTR 140 Overview Of Bricklaying, Carpentry, Electrical, & Plumbing Fields . .. .4 68
PLUMBING (R)
PLU 100 Orientation Of Tools,
Basic Plumbing & Drawings...........3 Cr. Hrs.
Soldering techniques and skill development, bathroom drawings using 30/60 isometric three dimensional system, and material list from drawings.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. .60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 105 Basic Waste Layout &
Code Regulations....................3 Cr. Hrs.
Installation of small plumbing jobs using soil pipe, plastic or copper tubing to meet code requirements.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 106 Basic Venting &
Code Requirements...................3 Cr. Hrs.
Venting systems, making material lists, and installation.
15 Hrs. Theory -45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 107 Water Piping Methods...................3 Cr. Hrs.
Drawing water plans, sizing, and installation.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab. 60Ct. Hrs.
PLU 108 Gas Pipe, Code, & Sizing...............3 Cr. Hrs.
Cutting and installing gas pipe from a drawing to meet required code and safety regulations.
15 Hrs. Theory -45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 109 Residential Plumbing...................3 Cr. Hrs.
Drawing complete soil waste, vent, water, and gas systems, which will meet all local codes and safety procedures; and skill development in installation.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 110 Finish & Installation
Of Plumbing Fixtures................3 Cr. Hrs.
Installing plumbing fixtures on existing rough-ins to meet all code and safety requirements.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 115 Rough-In & Setting
Of Special Fixtures.................3 Cr. Hrs.
Installing special fixtures under special circumstances such as: dishwasher disposals, dishwasher service, sinks, urinals, wall hung water closets, and mounting fixtures on concrete.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 116 Plumbing Repair........................3Cr. Hrs.
Repairing, servicing, or replacing plumbing equipment.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
Page 92


PLU 120 Plumbing For Construction Trades .... 3 Cr. Hrs.
Orientation to the field of Plumbing, general principles, initial techniques and skill development, and how Plumbing relates to the various construction trades.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 200 Plumbing Business Requirements &
Cost Estimating....................3 Cr. Hrs.
Setting up plumbing business, estimating, need for licenses, and Federal and State tax procedures.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 205 Advanced Isometric Blueprint
Reading & Layout...................3 Cr. Hrs.
Reading and interpreting blueprints, drawing isometrics, and orthographic projections.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 206 Hot Water Heating
Installation & Maintenance.........3 Cr. Hrs.
Installation of hot water heating systems, service, and maintenance.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 207 Basic Solar Energy.....................3 Cr. Hrs.
Drawing and installing solar systems, including panels for collection, storage and distribution.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 208 Advanced Solar Energy..................3 Cr. Hrs.
Solar panel construction, installing complete solar heating or domestic hot water systems, with a study of the variables and flexibility of the system.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 219 City of Denver Code,
its use and enforcement...........3 Cr. Hrs.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab 60Ct. Hrs.
PLU 210 Commercial Layout & Code,
Multi-Story Projects...............3 Cr. Hrs.
Laying commercial and multi-story projects. Different types of plumbing installations in commercial work, and code applications to layout.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 215 Colorado State
Code Requirements ................3 Cr. Hrs.
Plumbing code, violations of state code, endangerments to health and safety, and the state plumbing code test.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 216 Uniform Plumbing Code &
Denver City Code...................3 Cr. Hrs.
Uniform Plumbing Code, proper installation of the code and the need to enforce.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 217 Foreman & Superintendent Training... 3 Cr. Hrs.
Communications between management and labor, with responsibilities to management and the men you supervise.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 218 Control For Heating,
Air Conditioning, & Plumbing..........3 Cr. Hrs.
Wiring sequence and how to read basic wiring diagrams for low voltage (24 volts) systems. Hook up pumps, zone valves, thermostat, etc. on air conditioning, plumbing, and heating systems.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 297 Cooperative Work Experience.............2-9 Cr. Hrs.
A program of study developed with coordinated college course work and industry work experience.
15 Hrs. Theory 45-360 Hrs. Lab. 60-375 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 299 Independent Study.......................3 Cr. Hrs.
Individual study on a special project which is related to the Plumbing Program, and is outside the program offerings.
90 Hrs. Lab 90 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 125 Blueprint Reading
For Construction Trades......... ... 4 Cr. Hrs.
Principles of interpreting blueprints and trade specifications common to the building trades. Development of proficiency in making three-view and pictorial sketches.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 126 Blueprint Reading
For Mechanical Trades...............4 Cr. Hrs.
Principles of interpreting blueprints and trade specifications common to the mechanical trades. Development of proficiency in making three-view pictorial sketches.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 127 Building Inspection
For Construction Trades.............4Cr. Hrs.
Examination and evaluation of construction work in progress. Comparing and contrasting with recognized norms or standards to meet state and local building requirements.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 128 Estimating Residential
Construction Costs...................4 Cr. Hrs.
Construction mathematical review, plan reading, specifications, excavation, take off estimates, concrete foundations, footings, caissons, and slabs. Rough structure, and full enclosure.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 129 Construction Materials 1.................4 Cr. Hrs.
Terminology, nomenclature, board footage, lumber, plywood, millwork, brick and cement will be covered by lecture and field trips.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 130 Construction Materials II................4 Cr. Hrs.
Roofing, drywall, steel products, beams, stress graded lumber, and building codes will be covered by lecture and field trips.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 140 Overview Of Bricklaying, Carpentry,
Electrical, & Plumbing Fields........4 Cr. Hrs.
Relationship of each trade to the total construction project, and how coordinated efforts are regulated from beginning to completion.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
Page 93


SOLAR ENERGY-INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE (R)
(Certificate or Associate Degree)
The program is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills for job entry into the solar energy field, in the area of installation and maintenance, and to provide upgrading and refresher courses for people already employed in the field.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
SOM 220 Basic Solar Systems .. 3 60
SOM 221 Solar Engineering Technology! . .4 68
SOM 222 Solar Engineering Technology II . .4 68
SOM 225 Solar System Design & Layout ...3 60
SOM 226 Solar Panel Arrays ... 3 60
SOM 227 Testing & Evaluation Of Solar Systems . 3 60
SOM 228 Solar System Maintenance ...3 60
SOM 229 Solar Panel Installations ...3 60
SOM 235 Basic Solar Controls . 3 60
SOM 236 Advanced Solar Systems & Controls . 3 60
SOM 237 Passive Solar Systems . 3 60
SOM 238 Alternative Backup Systems for Solar Energy . 3 60
SOM 239 Introduction to Photovoltac & Wind Energy ...3 60
PLU 100 Orientation of Tools, Basic Plumging, & Drawings.. . ...3 60
PLU 107 Water Piping Methods . 3 60
PLU 206 Hot Water Heating-Installation & Maintenance .. .3 60
BRI 120 Bricklaying For Construction Trades .. .3 60
BTR 125 Blueprint Reading For Construction Trades .. .4 68
CAR 120 Carpentry For Construction T rades ...3 60
SHM 100 Basic Sheet Metal For Solar Energy ... 3 60
63 1224
Required Related Courses Math Elective . .3 45
English Elective ..3 45
Social Science Elective .. 3 45
Electives . 6 90
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS. .. . 15 78 225 1449
SOM 297 Additional Major Courses Cooperative Work Experience 2-9 60-375
SOM 299 Independent Study . 3 90
Solar Energy
Installation & Maintenance
SOM 220 Basic Solar Systems.......................3 Cr. Hrs.
Different types of solar systems, collectors storage, and distribution. Solar heating, solar domestic hot water and solar air conditioning. Difference between air and liquid
systems.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab 60 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 221 Solar Engineering
Technology I........................4 Cr. Hrs.
The purpose of this course is to develop the capability of practitioners in the home building industry to size, install and operate solar heating and cooling systems for residential buildings. Also included is an overview of our energy problems today, a review of engineering math pertaining directly to this course, and basic physics.
45 Hrs. Theory/Lecture-23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 222 Solar Engineering
Technology II.......................4 Cr. Hrs.
This course is limited in scope to the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential buildings, with primary emphasis on heating systems, although solar cooling systems are discussed, design and economic analysis of systems are the topics, and a review of engineering math related to this
class.
45 Hrs. Theory/Lecture-23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 225 Solar System Design &
Layout...............................3 Cr. Hrs.
Keeping architectural and solar systems in harmony; adapting to existing structures, and when it is practical; types of collectors, flat plate air, or liquid; omni directional trading and tower reflection used in high temperature concentrating collectors.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 226 Solar Panel Arrays......................3 Cr. Hrs.
Principles of operation and functional components, as in lumber and type required. Construction features of most air or liquid panels, and construction of a basic panel.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 227 Testing & Evaluation Of
Solar Systems.......................3 Cr. Hrs.
Cost, efficiency, and durability of panels, cost of backup systems, and types of control and sensors used.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 228 Solar System
Maintenance.........................3 Cr. Hrs.
Repair of panels; checking for heat loss; where and how to correct condition of liquid evaluation equipment; maintenance of pumps, blowers, coils, and controls.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 229 Solar Panel
Installations.......................3 Cr. Hrs.
Installing all types of panel on all types of roofs.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 235 Basic Solar Controls....................3 Cr. Hrs.
Theory of low and line voltage controls. Emphasis on schematic and layout techniques. Safety and basic electric components discussed. Trouble shooting solar control system and operational problem solving.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
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SOM 236 Advanced Solar Systems
& Controls.........................3Cr. Hrs.
This course will cover solar systems and controls of flat plate and concentrating collectors and solar systems, heat pumps, solar cooling and dehumidifying with emphasis on trouble shooting, and problems: resolution using lab systems and
simulators.
30 Hrs. Theory/Lecture-30 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 237 Passive Solar Systems...................3 Cr. Hrs.
A study of the theory and use of passive solar energy. The design of the structure in harmony with passive systems experiment different storage methods, and cost analysis of passive systems versus other heating methods.
30 Hrs. Theory-30 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 238 Alternative Backup
Systems for Solar Systems...........3 Cr. Hrs.
Review of conventional and nonconventional sources of energy with applications.
30 Hrs. Theory-30 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 239 Introduction to Photovoltac
& Wind Energy.......................3 Cr. Hrs.
This course will explore the state-of-the-art hardware and its application for residential use. It will include discussion of the electrical circuits and components, power regulation and storage of electrical energy.
30 Hrs. Theory-30 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 100 Orientation of Tools,
Basic Plumbing & Drawings...........3 Cr. Hrs.
Soldering techniques and skill development, bathroom drawings using 30/60 isometric three dimensional system, and material list from drawings.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 107 Water Piping Methods...................3 Cr. Hrs.
Drawing water plans, sizing and installation.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
PLU 206 Hot Water Heating-
Installation & Maintenance...........3 Cr. Hrs.
Installation of hot water heating systems, service, and maintenance.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab 60 Ct. Hrs.
BTR 125 Blueprint Reading For
Construction Trades..................4 Cr. Hrs.
Principles of interpreting blueprints and trade specifications common to the building trades. Development of proficiency in making three-view and pictorial sketches.
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs, Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
BRI120 Bricklaying For
Construction Tades..................3 Cr. Hrs.
Orientation to the field of bricklaying. General principles, initial techniques and skill development, and how bricklaying relates to the various trades.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
CAR 120 Carpentry For
Construction Trades.................3 Cr. Hrs.
Orientation to the field of carpentry, general principles, initial techniques and skill development, and how carpentry relates to the various construction trades.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
Page 95
SOM 100 Oneet Metal for
Solar Energy .......................3 Cr. Hrs.
introduction to the Sheet Metal field, safety, basic equipment, and tools. Fabrication, techniques, and blueprint interpretation.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 297 Cooperative Work
Experience..................... 2-9 Cr. Hrs.
A program of study developed with coordinated college course work and industry work experience.
15 Hrs. Theory-45-360 Hrs. Lab. 60-376 Ct. Hrs.
SOM 299 Independent Study.....................3 Cr. Hrs.
Individual study on a special project which is related to the Diesel Program and outside the program offering.
90 Hrs. Lab. 90 Ct. Hrs.
SURVEYING (R)
The Surveying Program provides theoretical training and field practice for a surveyor to enter and succeed in employment in the surveying profession. Parts of this program can be taken for upgrading within the profession.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
SUR100 Surveying Field Work, Elementary 11 218
SUR101 Surveying Calculations 1 .4 64
SUR105 Surveying Drafting .9 188
SUR106 Surveying Computer Applications . 3 53
SUR 200 Surveying Field Work, Advanced 11 218
SUR201 Surveying Calculations II . 3 49
SUR 202 Surveying Calculations III . 3 49
SUR 205 Photogrammetry For Surveyors.. .6 109
SUR 206 Legal Aspects Of Surveying . 3 45
CET105 Contracts & Specifications 3 45
56 1038
Required Related Courses
MAT 121 College Algebra . 4 60
MAT 122 Trigonometry & Functions . 3 45
MAN 116 Principles Of Supervision . 3 45
ENG 231 Technical Writing . 3 45
Math, Science, or Social Science Elective 6 90
19 285
75 1323
Additional Major Courses
SUR120 Surveying For Construction & Technical Trades . 3 60
SUR 216 Surveying Calculation Refresher. . 4 60
SURVEYING (R)
SUR 100 Surveying Field Work,
Elementary..........................11 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Use, care and theory of the chain and level, introduction to transit, field practice in chaining, elevations with hand and engineer level, and introductory transit work. Office practice stresses theory and importance of field notes.
60 Hrs. Theory -158 Hrs. Lab. 218 Ct. Hrs.
SUR 101 Surveying Calculations 1................4 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Hand solutions with and without calculators of applied mathematical surveying relationships. Student should spend a minimum of 3 hours per week outside the classroom on homework.
53 Hrs. Theory-11 Hrs. Lab 64Ct. Hrs.


SUR 105 Surveying Drafting......................9 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: SUR 100
Basic drafting techniques and principles of three dimensional projection applied to surveying problems. Surveying drafting of traverses, plats, route survey drawings and maps.
30 Hrs. Theory -158 Hrs. Lab. 188 Ct. Hrs.
SUR 106 Surveying Computer Applications...........3 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: SUR 100 & SUR 101
Student is required to program repetitious surveying problems on a small office computer. Programming may be in
BASIC, FOCAL, FORTRAN, or COGO.
30 Hrs. Theory-23 Hrs. Lab. 53Ct. Hrs.
SUR 120 Surveying For Construction
& Technical Trades................3 Cr. Hrs.
General surveying concepts of distance, elevation and angles. Emphasis on field work, enough theory to understand basic principles. This course can be substituted for any surveying
major course.
15 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
SUR 200 Surveying Field Work,
Advanced..........................11 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: SUR 100, SUR 101, SUR 105 Use, care and theory of transit, modern levels, theodolites, EDM and plane table, Field and office practice with horizontal and vertical angles applied to line, curve area problems, and astronomical observations. Field problems stress application, accuracy and evaluation of the field data.
60 Hrs. Theory -158 Hrs. Lab. 218 Ct. Hrs.
SUR 201 Surveying Calculations II...............3 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: SUR 100, and SUR 101 Understanding of application and theory of: traverse calculations; areas of straight and curved boundaries; horizontal curves; vertical curves; route surveys; earth work. The student should have his own calculator and spend a minimum of 3 hours per week outside the classroom on
homework.
38Hrs.Theory-11 Hrs. Lab. 49Ct. Hrs.
SUR 202 Surveying Calculations III............3Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: SUR 201
Continuation of SUR 201, Surveying Calculations II. Subjects: rectangular coordinates; State plane coordinate systems; United States public land surveys; calculations for astronomical observations; error analysis; least square adjustments. Student should spend at least 3 hours per week
outside the classroom on homework.
38Hrs.Theory-11 Hrs. Lab. 49Ct. Hrs.
SUR 205 Photogrammetry For Surveyors ________6 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: SUR 201
The interpretation and evaluation of aerial photographs with
photogrammetric instruments from pocket stereoscope to projection plotters.
53 Hrs. Theory 56 Hrs. Lab. 109 Ct. Hrs.
SUR 206 Legal Aspects Of Surveying............3 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: SUR 200
Problems encountered by the surveyor dealing with boundary control, property disputes and legal cases.
45 Hrs. Theory 45 Ct. Hrs.
SUR 216 Surveying Calculation Refresher.......4Cr. Hrs.
REFRESHER course for practicing surveyors who need a review in surveying calculations and theory. Course not suitable for first-time student. H & V curves, earth work, coordinates, astronomical observations and topics selected by the class.
60 Hrs. Theory 60 Ct. Hrs.
CET105 Contracts & Specifications.................3 Cr. Hrs.
The Law of Contracts and its application to construction and engineering activities. The drafting of specifications for labor, material, processes, and construction performance.
45 Hrs. Theory 45 Ct. Hrs.
DRAFTING AND DESIGN
r
ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY (N)
2-Yr. Certificate and/or Associate Degree
This program equips individuals with appropriate attitudes, skills, and knowledge as entry level drafting technicians in Architectural offices and related building construction industries.
In order to satisfy the requirements of each of the following modules, a student will be required to perform hands-on tasks and demonstrate an understanding of the theory according to prescribed standards. If the standards are not achieved, the student will repeat or remain in the module until the necessary level of skill and knowledge is achieved.
Course No. Required Major Courses Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
ATE 100 Basic Architectural Techniques ... 3 60
ATE 105 Three Dimensional Drawing
Methods 3 60
ATE 106 Construction Drawing
Fundamentals 3 60
ATE 107 Residential Construction Drawings 6 120
ATE 108 Residential Construction Details.. 3 60
ATE 109 Light Commercial
Construction Drawings 6 120
ATE 110 Light Commercial
Construction Details 6 120
ATE 200 Light Commercial Design 6 120
ATE 205 Structural Design 3 60
ATE 206 Structural Framing Plans 3 60
ATE 207 Air Conditioning Design 3 60
ATE 208 Electrical Design 3 60
ATE 209 Plumbing Design 3 60
ATE 210 Public Building Design 6 120
ATE 215 Mechanical Equipment of buildings
or one of the following: Elective, Cooperative Work Experience, or Independent Study 3 60
60 1200
Required Related Courses Occupational Communications Elective 3 - 45
Math Electives 5 80
Social Science Elective 3 45
11 170
71 1370
ATE 216 Additional Major Courses Site Planning 6 120
ATE 217 Architectural Surveys 3 60
ATE 297 Cooperative Work Experience .... 3
ATE 299 Independent Study 3 90
ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY (N)
ATE 100 Basic Architectural Techniques (N) .... 3 Cr. Hrs.
This unit outlines the Architectural Technology program, class procedures, and office safety practices. It introduces the attitudes, skills, and knowledge necessary for world-of-work success in this field. Drawing exercises cover architectural freehand lettering, sketch technique, drafting instrument use, sheet layout, basic dimensioning, and line quality.
Theory 20 Hrs. Lab. 40 Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
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ATE 105 Three Dimensional Drawing
Methods (N)........................3Cr. Hrs.
This unit covers an architectural approach to the fundamentals of three-view orthographic projection together with isometric, oblique, and perspective drawing techniques. Theory 20 Hrs. Lab. 40 Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 106 Construction Drawing
Fundamentals (N)...................3 Cr. Hrs
Covered in this unit is the concept of architectural construction drawings (working drawings or blueprints), their creation, content, and sheet sequencing. An abbreviated set of construction drawings for a small wood frame building will be drawn from notes and sketches provided through interviews with a hypothetical client. Drafting technique and fundamentals of wood frame construction will be emphasized.
Theory 20 Hrs. Lab 40 Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 107 Residential Construction Drawings (N). 6 Cr. Hrs.
Here, the steps for planning and drawing a residence will be examined and followed from initial client contact through completed construction drawings. Student drawings for this unit will include floor plans, exterior elevations, wall sections, and building sections.
Theory 40 Hrs. Lab. 80 Hrs. 120 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 108 Residential Construction Details (N)... 3 Cr. Hrs.
In this unit, the set of residential construction drawings started in the previous unit will be completed, checked, corrected, reproduced, and bound. Emphasis here will be on detailing selected portions of the structure and components
thereof.
Theory 20 Hrs. Lab 40 Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 109 Light Commercial Construction
Drawings (N).........................6Cr. Hrs.
Here, the student will learn the architectural drafting techniques and basic construction methods involved in a light commercial building of rigid frame construction. Student drawings will include plans and exterior elevations.
Theory 40 Hrs. Lab 80 Hrs. 120 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 110 Light Commercial Construction
Details(N)........................... 6Cr. Hrs.
The student will learn drafting procedures involved in detailing specified portions of the light commercial building started in the previous unit. Student drawings will include wall sections, building sections; door, window, and stair
sections; and other selected details.
Theory 40 H rs. La b 80 H rs. 120 Ct. H rs.
ATE 200 Light Commercial Design (N)............6 Cr. Hrs.
Given a copy of building requirements desired by a hypothetical client, the student will develop the ability to design (plan) the building with emphasis on efficient circulation, economical use of materials in conformance to local zoning and building codes. Drawings will further develop and reflect a sense of aesthetic design values.
Theory 40 Hrs. Lab 80 Hrs. 120 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 205 Structural Design (N)...................3 Cr. Hrs.
In this unit, the student will learn basic design (sizing) of beams and columns in wood, steel, and concrete.
Theory 20 Hrs.-Lab 40 Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 206 Structural Framing Plans (N)............3 Cr. Hrs.
Here, the student will learn to produce a set of structural framing plans including the design of roof and floor systems, steel beams, and columns.
Theory 20 Hrs. Lab 40 Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 207 Air Conditioning Design (N).............3 Cr. Hrs.
This unit covers basic design of hot water heating, chilled water cooling, evaporative cooling, air heating and cooling, and ventilation systems.
Theory 20 Hrs. Lab. 40 Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 208 Electrical Design (N)...................3 Cr. Hrs.
Here, the student will learn basic design of electrical systems including lighting fixtures, outlets and receptacles, mechanical equipment electrical requirements, sizing conduits and conductors, circuit breakers, subpanels, main distribution panels, safety devices, and building electrical
services.
Theory 20 Hrs. Lab. 40 Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 209 Plumbing Design (N).....................3 Cr. Hrs.
In this unit, the student will learn basic design of plumbing systems including the sizing of waste lines and venting, hot and cold water piping, and gas piping.
Theory 20Hrs. Lab. 40 Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 210 Public Building Design (N)...............6 Cr. Hrs.
Given a copy of building requirements desired by a hypothetical client, the student will develop the ability to design (plan) a public building with emphasis on efficient, economical planning, local zoning and building codes, and building elevations which will reflect and further develop a
sense of aesthetic building values.
Theory 40 Hrs. Lab. 80 Hrs. 120 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 215 Mechanical Equipment of
Buildings (N)........................3 Cr. Hrs.
The student will be able to identify plumbing, heating and air conditioning, electrical symbols, systems, and their components; or with the permission of the instructor, the student will participate in one of the following: additional architectural techniques, department related electives, cooperative work experience, or independent study.
Theory 20 Hrs. Lab40 Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 216 Site Planning (N).....................6Cr. Hrs.
The student will develop the design of a multi-family housing development including building orientations, traffic and pedestrian circulation, off street parking, landscaping, site grading, utilities, and densities.
Theory 40 Hrs. Lab. 80 Hrs. 120 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 217 Architectural Surveys (N)...............3 Cr. Hrs.
The student will develop the ability to utilize the surveyor's transit, level, rod, chain, and compass in the field to obtain information for classroom site plan development.
Theory 20 Hrs. Lab. 40 Hrs. 60 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 297 Cooperative Work Experience (N).........3 Cr. Hrs.
A program of study developed with coordinated college course work and industry work experience.
15 Hrs. Theory 90 Hrs. Lab. 105 Ct. Hrs.
ATE 299 Independent Study (N)...................3 Cr. Hrs.
Individual study on a special project which is related to the Architectural Technology Program, and is outside the program offering.
90 Hrs. Lab. 90 Ct. Hrs.
CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (R)
Certificate or Associate Degree
An intensive preparation for individuals to fill positions as construction or engineering assistants, draftsmen, and laboratory aides in the broad field of civil engineering.
page 97


Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
CET 100 Civil Engineering Drafting . .4 i 75
CET 105 Contracts & Specifications .. 3 45
CET 106 Building Construction Methods
& Estimating . .3 45
CET 107 Civil Engineering Technology
Laboratory .. 6 120
CET 200 Structures .. 5 98
CET 205 Applied Hydrology . .4 68
CET206 Technical Project . .3 60
SUR 100 Surveying Field Work
Elementary . 11 218
SUR200 Surveying Field Work
Advanced . 11 218
SUR 205 Photogrammetry For Surveyors. . .6 109
56 1056
Required Related Courses
MAT 111 Introductory Algebra .. 3 45
Elective . 4 60
ENG 231 Technical Writing ..3 45
CHE 101 Fundamentals Of Chemistry 1 .. . .4 90
PHY 101 Fundamentals Of Physics ..3 75
EAS 101 Physical Geology . .4 90
English Elective 3 45
24 450
80 1506
Additional Major Courses
CET297 Cooperative Work Experience .. 2-9 60-375
CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (R)
CET100 Civil Engineering Drafting..............4 Cr. Hrs.
Basic course in graphical representation including geometric construction, concepts of views, sketching, pictorial representation. Emphasis on graphic procedures as used in civil engineering.
30 Hrs. Theory 45 Hrs. Lab. 75 Ct. Hrs.
CET 105 Contracts & Specifications.............3 Cr. Hrs.
The Law of Contracts and its application to construction and engineering activities. The drafting of specifications for labor, material, processes, and construction performance.
45 Hrs. Theory 45 Ct. Hrs.
CET 106 Building Construction Methods
& Estimating............................3 Cr. Hrs.
Elementary types of buildings, construction methods, building materials, design, construction details, cost estimates.
45 Hrs. Theory 45 Ct. Hrs.
CET 107 Civil Engineering Technology
Laboratory..............................6 Cr. Hrs.
Investigation of concrete, soils and bituminous materials, classification, strength and deformation characteristics, sampling and testing these materials for engineering
purposes.
30 Hrs. Theory 90 Hrs. Lab. 120 Ct. Hrs.
CET 200 Structures.............................5 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: CET 100 & Introduction To Algebra Mechanical properties of materials, stresses and strain in members subjected to tension, compression and shear. Elementary structural analysis.
30 Hrs. Theory 68 Hrs. Lab. 98 Ct. Hrs.
CET 205 Applied Hydrology....................4 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: SUR 100
Rainfall, runoff, urban and rural drainage, flow measurements in conduits, and open channels. Basic fluid
mprhjl nir*c
45 Hrs. Theory 23 Hrs. Lab. 68 Ct. Hrs.
CET 206 Technical Project.......................3 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: Completion of at least 50 hours of instruction in the Civil EngineeringTechnology curricula. Independent study and research on a subject of the students own choice in the field of Civil Engineering.
15 Hrs. Theory-45 Hrs. Lab. 60 Ct. Hrs.
CET 297 Cooperative Work Experience..........2-9 Cr. Hrs.
A program of study developed with coordinated college course work and industry work experience.
15 Hrs. Theory 45-360 Hrs. Lab. 60-375 Ct. Hrs.
SUR 100 Surveying Field Work,
Elementary........................11 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Use, care and theory of the chain and level, introduction to transit, field practice in chaining, elevations with hand and engineer level, and introductory transit work. Office practice stresses theory and importance of field notes.
60 Hrs. Theory -158 Hrs. Lab. 218 Ct. Hrs.
SUR 200 Surveying Field Work,
Advanced.........................11 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: SUR 100, SUR 101, SUR 105 Use, care and theory of transit, modern levels, theodolites, EDM and plane table, Field and office practice with horizontal and vertical angles applied to line, curve area problems, and astronomical observations. Field problems stress application,
accuracy and evaluation of the field data.
60 Hrs. Theory -158 Hrs. Lab. 218 Ct. Hrs.
SUR 205 Photogrammetry For Surveyors...........6 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: SUR 201
The interpretation and evaluation of aerial photographs with photogrammetric instruments from pocket stereoscope to projection plotters.
53 Hrs. Theory-56 Hrs. Lab. 109 Ct. Hrs.
COMMERCIAL ART (A)
Associate Degree
This program is designed to give students the skill level necessary for job entry in this field.
Required Major Courses
Course No. Title Cr. Hrs. Ct. Hrs.
COA 100 Letteringand Typographic Design. 4 80
COA 105 Typography and Layout...........4 80
COA 106 Descriptive Drawing.............4 80
COA 200 Advertising Design and Rendering 4 80
COA 205 Creative Graphic Design.........4 80
COA 206 Art Preparation for
Reproduction...................4 80
COA 207 Advanced Art Preparation
for Reproduction...............4 80
COA 208 Illustration....................4 80
COA 209 Three Dimensional Advertising ... 4 80
ART 101 Basic Design I..................3 90
ART 102 Basic Design II.................3 90
ART 111 Basic Drawing 1.................3 90
ART 112 Basic Drawing II................3 90
ART 211 Advanced Drawing................3 90
ART 271 Printmaking I...................3 90
GRA 120 Process Camera and Halftones ... 6 120
PHO 100 Fundamentals of Photography-----4 80
64 1460
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Required Related Courses English 3 45
Humanities, Literature or Psychology Elective 3 45
Art, Photography or Cooperative Work Elective . ... 3-4 80-90
Principles of Marketing, Speech, Technical Illustration, or Independent Study Elective. 3 45-60
12-13 215-240
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS .. 76-77 1675-1700
COMMERCIAL ART (A)
COA 100 Lettering and Typographic Design.4 Cr. Hrs.
Designed to introduce the student to the concepts of typography as applied to graphic communication. Exercises in both layout and finished lettering for advertising and logo design. Study of type recognition and typographic technology
covered.
32 Hrs. Theory -48 Hrs. Lab. 80 Ct. Hrs.
COA 105 Typography and Layout..................4 Cr. Hrs.
Exercises in creating letterforms, indicating photography and illustration and basic copy fitting methods. Stress given to creative solutions of graphic problems.
32 Hrs. Theory 48 Hrs. Lab. 80 Ct. Hrs.
COA 106 Descriptive Drawing....................4 Cr. Hrs.
This course is designed to introduce methods of accurate drawing. Included are exercises in measuring, ruling, scaling, shading in ink and precise drawings of objects in two and three dimensions.
32 Hrs. Theory -48 Hrs. Lab. 80 Ct. Hrs.
COA 200 Advertising Design and Rendering________4 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: COA 100 Lettering and Typographic Design; COA 105 Typography and Layout; COA 106 Descriptive Drawing; ART 101 Basic Design I; ART 111 Basic Drawing I.
Designed to produce rendering skills in both line and continuous tone. Opaque water colors, India ink, scratch board, Ross board, cut papers and films are applied to a
variety of graphic design problems.
32 Hrs. Theory 48 Hrs. Lab. 80 Ct. Hrs.
COA 205 Creative Graphic Design...............4 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: COA 200 Advertising Design and Rendering.
Designed to give student further experience in designing trademarks, packaging, symbols, audio visual art preparation, and signing as well as producing individual pieces that complete portfolios.
32 Hrs. Theory 48 Hrs. Lab. 80 Ct. Hrs.
COA 206 Art Preparation for
Reproduction........................4 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisites: COA 100 Lettering and Typographic Design; COA 105 Typography and Layout; COA 106 Descriptive Drawing.
Designed to introduce the student to the necessary procedures for the production of type and paste up in simple one and two color printing. Emphasis placed on development of basic manual skills, precision measuring and copy proofing. Marking copy procedures are covered.
32 Hrs. Theory 48 Hrs. Lab. 80 Ct. Hrs.
COA 207 Advanced Art Preparation
for Reproduction.......................4 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: COA 206 Art Preparation for Reproduction.
Designed to develop further competency in skills acquired in COA 206 Art Preparation for Reproduction. Exploration and exercises in production of more complicated camera ready art including: hand color separations, ink and paper specification, type mark-up, computer type setting, audio visual art, packaging mechanicals and effects of printing production on design.
32 Hrs. Theory-48 Hrs. Lab 80 Ct. Hrs.
COA 208 Illustration ..;...........................4 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisites: ART 101 Basic Design I; ART 111 Basic Drawing I; COA 200 Advertising Design and Rendering; COA 106 Descriptive Drawing.
Designed to creatively apply knowledge gained in basic drawing, basic design and descriptive drawing to advertising illustration. Current trends, printing production, media, and techniques are applied to course exercises.
32 Hrs. Theory 48 Hrs. Lab. 80 Ct. Hrs.
COA 209 Three Dimensional Advertising........4 Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite: COA 106 Descriptive Drawing.
Designed to give the student experience in the creation of three dimensional displays as they relate to retail sales and informational displays. Course includes exercises in the creation of retail display and mockups for three dimensional advertising.
32 Hrs. Theory 48 Hrs. Lab. 80 Ct. Hrs.
ART 101 Basic Design 1.........................3 Cr. Hrs.
Fundamentals of form, color, visual perception, principles of composition, organization and structure introduced with experimentation in two dimensional design.
ART 102 Basic Design II........................3 Cr. Hrs.
Continuation of ART 101 Basic Design I, with advanced problems in form, color, visual perception, principles of composition, organization and structure in both two and three dimensional design.
ART 111 Basic Drawing 1........................3 Cr. Hrs.
Freehand drawing covering a selection of subjects," proportion, perspective, line, texture, value and composition. Media include pencil, conte crayon, charcoal and ink.
ART 112 Basic Drawing II.......................3Cr. Hrs.
Introduction of color into drawing. Drawing in varied and mixed media, emphasizing experimentation. Broad range of size and material stressing composition and concept. Introduction to drawing human figure.
ART 211 Advanced Drawing I.....................3 Cr. Hrs.
Advanced problems in freehand drawing. Emphasis on experimentation using a variety of media and greater emphasis on drawing the human figure.
ART 271 Printmaking I..........................3 Cr. Hrs.
A study of basic hand printing techniques: Lithography, etching, wood engraving, block printing, and silkscreen printing.
GRA 120 Process Camera and Halftones...........6 Cr. Hrs.
(Non-Graphic Art Majors)
In this unit, the student will learn theory, use, parts plus types of process camera; films, papers, chemicals, proportions, tint screens, filters, gray scales. Theory of halftones, calibrate screens, compute flash chart, shoot halftones.
48 Hrs. Theory 72 Hrs. Lab. 120 Ct. Hrs.
Page 99