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Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1984-1985

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Title:
Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1984-1985
Creator:
Community College of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
Community College of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Source Institution:
Community College of Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
9842420 ( OCLC )

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Auraria Library
Community College of Denver Collections

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KWIk Community College of Denver System
1600 Downing Street Denver, Colorado 60218 (303)866-3481


Community College of Denver System
1984-85 Catalogue
College Addresses
Denver Auraria Community College 1111 West Colfax Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 (303) 629-3285
Front Range Community College 3645 West 112th Avenue Westminster, Colorado 80030 (303) 466-8811
Red Rocks Community College 12600 West Sixth Avenue Golden, Colorado 80401 (303) 988-6160
Central Administration
1600 Downing Street Denver, Colorado 80218 (303) 866-3481
Accredited by
North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Programs approved by
State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education Memberships
American Association of Community and Junior Colleges


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Community College of Denver System
The colleges reserve the right to change any provision or requirement of this catalog, including fees, pursuant to law, State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education (SBCCOE) rules and college policy.
The colleges in the system reserve the right at any time and from time to time, without notice, to cancel any course or program described in this catalog, or to change or modify the content, description, timing, availability, location, instructor, academic credit, or any other aspect of any course or program, whenever, in its judgment, it is necessary or advisable to do so.
The colleges further reserve the right to require the student to withdraw at any time pursuant to appropriate policies and procedures and also reserve the right to impose probation on any student whose conduct is unsatisfactory in relation to established policy. Any admission on the basis of false statements or documents may be grounds for dismissal and loss of all credit for work which may have been completed.


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
3
Table
INSTRUCTIONAL CALENDAR...................................
INSTRUCTIONAL OFFERINGS..................................
GENERAL INFORMATION......................................
History .................................................
Philosophy...............................................
Affirmative Action Program...............................
Nondiscrimination on Basis of Handicap...................
Resource Development.....................................
Community College of Denver System Foundation............
Advisory Committees......................................
Continuing Education and Community Services..............
Women s Programs.........................................
ROTC Information.........................................
ADMISSIONS INFORMATION...................................
Admissions Policy........................................
Student Rights and Responsibilities......................
Admissions Procedure.....................................
Readmission of Former Students...........................
Transfer of Credit.......................................
International Students...................................
Transferability of Credit to Four-Year Institutions.....
Requests for Transcripts.................................
Change of Address.....................'..................
Inter-College and Inter-Institutional Registration.......
Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 .........
Safety...................................................
TUITION, FEES AND REFUNDS................................
Tuition..................................................
Fees.....................................................
Tuition and Fee Payment..................................
Late Registration Fee....................................
Tuition Policy for Senior Citizens.......................
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes............
Financial Obligations of Students........................
Withdrawal Procedure and Tuition Refunds.................
Tuition Ad|ustment Related to Adding and Dropping Courses....
ASSESSMENT PROGRAM.......................................
EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS....................................
Attendance...............................................
Course Load...........................v.................
Academic Standards of Progress Policy....................
Evaluation and Grading...................................
Guidelines for Grade Symbois.............................
Credit Hours.............................................
Grade Point Average Calculation..........................
Cooperative Education Program............................
Independent Study........................................
Special Topics Courses...................................
Credit for Prior t.earning...............................
STUDENT SERVICES ........................................
Financial Aid..... ..................................
Contents
Veterans Affairs Office................................. 22
Veterans' Academic Standards of Progress................ 22
Career Planning and Advising Center..................... 22
Job Development and Placement........................... 23
Food Service............................................ 23
Health Services......................................... 23
Housing................................................. 23
Student Activities...................................... 23
Student Government Association.......................... 23
Student Publications.................................... 23
Educational Opportunity Center.......................... 23
OTHER SUPPORT SERVICES .............................. 24
Center for the Physically Disadvantaged 24
Learning Development Centers............................ 24
Learning Materials Centers.............................. 25
Aurana Library.......................................... 25
Bookstores.............................................. 26
Supplemental Services for Disadvantaged Students 26
CONSORTIUM OF ETHNIC STUDIES............................ 27
DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAM 28
RED ROCKS COMMUNITY COLLEGE COORDINATED PROGRAMS WITH
WARREN OCCUPATIONAL TECHNICAL CENTER 29
TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER 30
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 33
Degrees................................................. 33
Certificates............................................ 33
Recognition of Achievement.............................. 33
Graduation Policies..................................... 33
Associate of Arts Degree................................ 33
Associate of Science Degree............................. 34
Associate of General Studies Degree 34
Associate of Applied Science Degree 34
Summary of Minimum Degree Requirements 34
Courses Intended for Transfer 35
Courses That Are Not Applicable Toward
the General Education Requirements.................... 35
Petitioning for Waivers and/or Program Substitutions 35
INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS 36
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 69
COLLEGE DIRECTORY 141
Colorado State Board for Community Colleges
and Occupational Education........................... 141
Central Administration................................. 142
Denver Area Council for Community Colleges 141
Denver-Auraria Community College 142
From Range Community College 143
Red Rocks Community College 144
Technical Education Center 145
INDEX.................................................. 146
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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogs

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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
5
Instructional Calendar
Summer 1984 (15 Week Term) Monday, May 21 Monday, May 21 Wednesday, May 23 Monday, May 28 Wednesday, July 4 Thursday, August 23 Faculty Report Registration Classes Begin Memorial Day Holiday (no classes) Independence Day Holiday (no classes) Classes End
Summer 1984 (10 Week T erm) Wednesday, June 6 Wednesday, June 6 Monday, June 11 Wednesday, July 4 Friday, August 17 Faculty Report Registration Classes Begin Independence Day Holiday (no classes) Classes End
Fall Semester 1984 Monday, August 20 Tuesday-Wednesday, August 21-22 Monday, August 27 Monday, September 3 Thursday-Friday, November 22-23 Wednesday, December 12 Faculty Report Registration Classes Begin Labor Day Holiday (no classes) Thanksgiving Holiday (no classes) Classes End
Spring Semester 1985 Front Range Community College Red Rocks Community College Tuesday, January 8 Tuesday-Wednesday, January 15-16 Monday, January 21 Monday-Friday, March 18-22 Monday-Friday, March 25-29 Friday, May 10 Faculty Report Registration Classes Begin Spring Break (Front Range Community College) Spring Break (Red Rocks Community College) Classes End
Spring Semester 1985 Denver Auraria Community College
Tuesday, January 15 Tuesday-Wednesday, January 22-23 Monday, January 28 Monday-Friday, March 18-22 Friday, May 17 Faculty Report Registration Classes Begin Spring Break Classes End
Summer 1985 (15 Week Term) Front Range Community College
Monday, May 13 Faculty Report
Monday, May 13 Wednesday, May 15 Monday, May 27 Thursday, July 4 Friday, August 15 Registration Classes Begin Memorial Day Holiday (no classes) Independence Day Holiday (no classes) Classes End
Summer 1985 (10 Week T erm) Wednesday, May 29 Wednesday, May 29 Monday, June 3 Thursday, July 4 Friday, August 9 Faculty Report Registration Classes Begin Independence Day Holiday (no classes) Classes End


6
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Instructional Offerings
KEY: D Denver Auraria Community College F Front Range Community College R Red Rocks Community College
Program (Certificate/Degree) Prefix College Location Program Page Course Description Page
Accounting (C, AAS) Administrative Support Occupations Options: AC.C D, F, R 36 71
Administrative Assistant (AAS) D, F, R 37 #
Chiropractic Assisting (C) CPA D 38 #
Clerical (C) D, F, R 38 #
Legal Secretarial (AAS) D, F 37 #
Medical Secretarial (C, AAS) D 37 #
Secretarial-Bilingual Office Careers (AAS) F 37 #
Secretarial (AAS) SEC D, F, R 37 127
Stenographic (C) D, F.R 38 #
Word Processing (C, AAS) D, F, R 38 #
Airframe Power Plant (AAS) D. F 39 #
"American Sign Language ASL F 74
Anthropology (AA) ANT D. F, R 39 72
Architectural Technology (AAS) ATE F 39 74
Art (AA) ART ' D, F, R 39 72
Audiovisual Technology (AAS) AVT R 39 76
Auto Body Painting (C) ABP F 39 70
Auto Body Service (C AAS) ABS F 40 70
Automotive Mechanics (C. AAS) AUM F, R 41 74
Biology (AS) BIO D..F, R 41 76
Black Studies (AA) D 41 #
Bricklaying (C, AAS) BRI R 42 77
Business (AA) BUS D, F, R 42 78
Business Machine Technology (C) BMT " D 42 77
Carpentry (C, AAS) CAR R 42 78
Chemistry (AS) > CHE D, F, R 42 79
Chicano Studies (AA) D 42 #
Civil Engineering Technology (C, AAS) CET R 42 79
Commercial Art (AAS) COA D 43 80
Commercial Food Service Management (C) FSM/FSP R 43 98
Communications (AA) COM D, F, R 43 81
Computer Programming for Business (C, AAS) CPB D, F, R 43 81
Computer Programming for the Severely Handicapped (C) CPB D 44 #
Computer Science (AS) CSC D, F. R 44 83
Consumer Electronics Technofogy (C. AAS) TCE/TVT F 44 133,135
Criminal Justice (C. AAS) CRJ R 45 82
Dental Assisting (C. AAS) DEA F 45 84
Diagnostic Radiologic Technology (AAS) RAT D 45 123
Diesel Power Mechanics (C, AAS) DPE R 46 85
Dietetic Technology (C, AAS) Drafting. DIT F 46 . 84
"Drafting/Blueprint Reading DPR D, R 86
Drafting for Civil/Topographic Mapping (AAS) DRM D, R 47 87
Drafting for Construction (C, AAS) DRC R 47 86
Drafting for Industry (C, AAS) DRI D, R 46 87
Drafting for Petro/Chemical Piping Processes (C. AAS) DRP D 47 88
Technical Illustration (AAS) TEI D 65 134
' Courses only
# This program is composed of courses from several different disciplines.
Note Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS) programs and Certificate (C) programs are not intended for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program:
however, some of the courses may be accepted toward a bachelor's degree at some institutions Please consult an advisor for further information


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
7
KEY: D Denver Auraria Community College F Front Range Community College R Red Rocks Community College
Course
Program (Certificate/Degree) Prefix College Location Program Page Description Page
Drama (AA) DRA D, F, R 47 86
Early Childhood Education and Management (C, AAS) ECE D. F, R 48 89
Child Development Associate (C, AAS) ECE F 48 89
Infant Toddler (C) ECE F 48 89
Earth Science (AS) EAS D, F, R 48 88
Economics (AA) ECO D, F, R 48 91
Education (AA) EDU D 49 92
Electricity Fundamentals ELF / R 94
Electricity Industrial/Commercial (C, AAS) EIC R 49 93
Electronic Digital Technology (C, AAS) EDT R 49 91
Electronics Technology (C, AAS) ELT/ETE D, F 49 94,96
Engineering (AS) D. F, R 50 #
English (AA) ENG D, F, R 50 95
English as a Second Language Environmental & Refrigeration Technology; esl D. F, R 95
Commercial-Industrial Refrigeration/Heating &
Air Conditioning (C, AAS) RAC D 50 122
Major Appliance Repair (C, AAS) APT D 51 72
Environmental Technology (AAS) EVT D 51
Fire Science Technology (C, AAS) FST R 51 98
Flexible Automation Robotics (AAS) FAR R 52 97
Fluid Power (C, AAS) FLP R 52 97
Foreign Automotive Mechanics (C, AAS) FAM D 52 96
French (AA) FRE D. R 53 98
General Education Development GED D.F, R 100
Geography (AA) GEO D, F, R 53 100
German (AA) GER R 53 100
Graphic Arts (C, AAS) GRA D 53 100
Health Occupations HOC D. R 102
Heavy Equipment Operation & Preventive Maintenance (C, AAS) HEO R 53 101
History (AA) HIS D, F, R 54 102
Hospitality and Restaurant Administration (C, AAS) HRA D 54 103
Human Services (AAS) HSE D 54 103
Humanities (AA) HUM D, F, R 54 104
Industrial Electrical Maintenance Technology (C, AAS) IMA R 54 104
Industrial Management (AAS) INM R 55 104
Interpreter Training Program (C, AAS) ITP F 55 105
Journalism (AA) JOU D, F.R 55 105
Literature (AA) . LIT D, F, R 55 105
Machine Drafting Technology (C, AAS) MDT F 55 109
Machine Shop (C, AAS) MAS F 56 107
* Courses only
# This program is composed of courses from several different disciplines
Note Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS) programs and Certificate (C) programs are not intended for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program;
however, some of the courses may be accepted toward a bachelor's degree at some institutions Please consult an advisor for further information



8 1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
KEY: D Denver Auraria Community College Program (Certificate/Degree) F Front Range Community College College Prefix Location R Red Rocks Community College Course Program Description Page Page
Management (AAS) MAN D, F, R 56 106
Management Information System (C) MIS D 57 110
Marketing (AAS) MAR D, F, R 57 107
Mathematics (AS) MAT D, F, R 57 108
Music (AA) MUS D, F 57 110
Nuclear Medicine Technology (C, AAS) NMT D 57 114
Nursing (C, AAS) NUR D, F 58 114
Continuing Education for Nurses (C) NCE D, F, R 59 111
Paralegal (C, AAS) PAR D 59 116
Petroleum Technology (AAS) PET R 60 117
Philosophy (AA) PHI D, F, R 60 119
Photography (C, AAS) PHO D 60 119
Physical Education (AA) PHE F, R 60 117
Physics (AS) PHY D, F, R 60 120
Plumbing (C, AAS) PLU R 60 120
Political Science (AA) POS D, F, R 61 121
Psychology (AA) PSY D, F, R 61 121
Public Administration (AAS) R 61 #
Radiation Therapy Technology (C, AAS) RTT D 61 126
Reading REA D, F, R 124
Real Estate (AAS) REE R - 61 124
Recreational Leadership (C, AAS) REL R 62 125
Respiratory Therapy Technology (AAS) RIT F 62 126
Science (AS) SCI D, F, R 62 127
Small Engine Mechanics (C, AAS) SEM F 62 128
Social Science (AA) , SOS D, F, R 63 132
Sociology (AA) SOC D, F, R 63 131
Solar Energy Technology: Active SolarInstallation & Maintenance (C, AAS) SET R 63 129
Passive Solar Design (C, AAS) SET R 64 129
Spanish (AA) SPA D, F, R 64 132
Speech (AA) SPE D, F, R 64 132
Surgical Technology (C) STE D 64 132
Surveying (AAS) SUR R 64 133
Technical Illustration (AAS) TEI D 65 134
Traffic Engineering Technology (AAS) TET D 65 '
Traffic and Transportation Management (AAS) TTM . D 65 134
Travel and Tourism Occupations (C) TTO D 65 135
Urban Horticulture (C, AAS) URH F 65 135
Urban Planning Technology (AAS) UPT D 66
Water-Wastewater Technology (C, AAS) WWT R 67 139
Welding and Fabrication (C, AAS) WEF D, R 68 136
Welding Technology (C, AAS) WTE F 68 138
* Courses only
# This program is composed of courses from several different disciplines.
Note: Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS) programs and Certificate (C) programs are not intended for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program:
however, some of the courses may be accepted toward a bachelor's degree at some institutions Please consult an advisor for further information


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
9
General Information
History
The Community College of Denver System includes public community colleges planned and developed in response to the needs of the metropolitan Denver community.
The successful passage of House Bill 1448 in 1967 established a state system of community colleges under a State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education The first college to be created under the State Board, by the passage of House Bill 1449, was the Community College of Denver
Through a foresighted general assembly, this act provided educational facilities and faculty for greater development of skilled manpower to meet the demands of an expanding industrial and business environment. It initiated more accessible low cost, high quality, post high school education to many citizens of the community who had previously found post-secondary education inaccessible because of the high tuition or limited offerings among existing Colorado higher education institutions.
House Bill 1449 also called for the establishment of three campuses in successive years beginning in the fall of 1968 to serve the five-county area of Adams, Arapahoe. Boulder. Denver and Jefferson.
The first students enrolled on North Campus, the first of the three campuses, in relocatable buildings at East 62nd Avenue and Downing Street in 1968 The permanent North Campus building was constructed in 1977 at 112th Avenue and Lowell Boulevard.
This campus has gained the distinction of having the largest known solar heated facility in the world. At a time when many are feeling the pangs of the energy shortage, North's solar heated campus building of 279,000 square feet, serves the community not only by providing academic excellence, but also by making minimum demands on limited supplies of energy that must be shared by all.
The West Campus was established in 1969. also at a temporary site The first phase of the permanent new facility was built at 12600 West 6th Avenue and opened its doors to students in 1973.
This beautiful campus, with the mountains in its backyard, was renamed Red Rocks. A final phase of the campus was completed in 1976.
CCD chose downtown Denver as the site for its third campus, Auraria. in order to make education readily available to people who live and work in Denver proper
From its inception in 1970, operating out of several rented buildings. Auraria has provided ready access from the core city The permanent location at 1111 West Colfax Street, in the Auraria Higher Education Center Complex, was established in 1976 Auraria has the distinction of being the only urban community college campus in Colorado
In 1979, the Aurora Education Center, an extension of CCD, was established to more effectively serve the eastern part of the Denver metro area. Located at 9859 East 16th Avenue, the Aurora Education Center was housed in a building which was formerly occupied by the city's police department and municipal court. The Center shared facilities with the fire department and city library
In June 1983, legislation was passed which made the Aurora Education Center a separate collegeCommunity College of Aurora This change was effective in September 1983. The College is now located at 791 Chambers Road. Aurora
In January 1983. the State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education approved changing CCD to the Community College of Denver System (CCDS). In order to provide more community identity with each of the campuses, name changes were approved Auraria Campus was changed to Denver Auraria Community College, North Campus became Front Range Community College and Red Rocks Campus was changed to Red Rocks Community College.
Since its early beginnings, there have been more than 300,000 registrations in one or more courses within the multi-college system. More than 100 different technical and occupational programs leading to certificates or degrees in a broad range of employment fields are offered through the three colleges. Additionally, a variety of transfer-oriented and skill-improvement courses are available.
Many other individual and community services are also offered to thousands of people who are finding the proximity, economy, and quality of the colleges' courses to their liking. The colleges efforts have been dedicated to meeting the wide range of interests and needs of the people in the community
It is estimated that the Community College of Denver System has an impact on the lives of approximately one out of ten metropolitan Denver residents. From an initial one campus with 1.861 students the System has expanded to an enrollment of over 13,000 students, making it the third largest college system in Colorado
As plans for the future are made, the Community College of Denver System remains dedicated to a high level of service to the community and to being a truly comprehensive community college.
Philosophy
The Community College of Denver System colleges believe that each individual, regardless of sex, race, religion, age. national origin, handicap or financial resources, should be provided the opportunity to develop his or her full potential to the individual s ultimate benefit. The colleges further believe that quality education supports individuals as they are and assists them in attaining a stronger and more purposeful goal in life. The colleges are dedicated to accepting those who can benefit from the educational programs The Community College of Denver System pledges itself to the continuing role of developing and maintaining the best educational opportunities possible, within the limits of resources, for all citizens in its service area
Implementation of this philosophy will include the following goals:
To offer a high-quality, balanced general education program de signed to provide students with essential college-level skills and competencies
To develop and maintain programs in continuing education, outreach education, and community services to meet the life-long learning needs of citizens of its service area
To provide high-quality, balanced occupational education programs for students which ensure upgrading and job-entry skill levels in current and developing occupations
To develop and maintain educational opportunities that enable students to transfer to baccalaureate degree-granting colleges and universities in the academic discipline or professional area of their choice.
To provide students with personalized settings with opportunities to develop skill and knowledge at all levels.
To recruit students actively from all segments of the community and to minimize barriers to admission
To accept students as they are, to assist them in making wise decisions relative to those educational routes and programs which are consistent with their interests and abilities, and to assist them in completing their objectives. r
To make available a variety of instructional modes and options so as to provide students with the most effective learning experiences
To provide high-quality educational guidance and counseling that will aid students in matching their talents and interests with educational and career opportunities.
To provide opportunities for students to be exposed to cultural and aesthetic experiences, and sponsor cultural events as a contribution to the enrichment of the community.


10
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
These goals reflect the colleges dedication to remaining a comprehensive, community college that is sensitive and alert to the evolving nature of society and to the changing needs of those served
Affirmative Action Program and Statement
The Community College of Denver System has had a policy pertaining to nondiscrimination since the System opened its doors in 1968. The Affirmative Action Plan constitutes a commitment to the continuing implementation of that policy.
It is not sufficient to state a policy of nondiscrimination. The System has a legal and moral obligation to take positive action to ensure the full realization of equal opportunity for all who are employed or seek employment at the Community College of Denver System. Special effort is made to identify promising minority persons and women for positions in all areas and at all levels in which these groups are unrepresented relative to their availability. Selection must be based solely on the candidates' qualifications to carry out the responsibilities that the positions require. Such actions can only result in raising the quality and competence of the faculty and staff.
All staff members should share the responsibility for implementing and maintaining an aggressive Affirmative Action Program. An Affirmative Action office has been established to serve the students and staff of the three colleges and Central Administration in all cases of discrimination. The Affirmative Action function is located in the Office of Personnel Services at Central Administration, 1600 Downing Street
Nondiscrimination on Basis of Handicap
As part of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Public Law 93-112), Congress enacted Section 504 which provides that no physically or mentally handicapped individual in the United States shall, solely by reason of handicap, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. Subpart B of the regulations, dealing with employment practices, bars discrimination by recipients of Federal assistance in recruitment hiring, compensation, job assignment and classification, and fringe benefits. It also required employers to make reasonable accommodation to qualified handicapped applicants or employees.
It is the intention of the Community College of Denver System to comply fully with the guidelines of Section 504. Further information or copies of the regulations are available from the Center for the Physically Disadvantaged at any location.
Resource Development
The Community College of Denver System actively seeks funding from external funding sources in order to provide programs that will
1. Enable more students to attend the colleges and accommodate more student diversity.
2. Offer courses of instruction and provide services that could not ordinarily be provided from present operating funds.
3. Enrich present programs.
4. Support and enhance the philosophical commitment and mission of the colleges.
5. Augment the financial and human resources of the colleges.
The programs vary according to schedules for funding and agency guidelines. *
Community College of Denver System Foundation
As a student and future alumnus you are encouraged to be a contributing member of the Community College of Denver System Foundation. The Foundation was created to benefit students and their colleges by seeking a broad base of private charitable support.
Your annual contributions will go to support scholarships and a variety of campus/community projects. Ask your employer if the company has a policy of matching individual employee contributions.
Tax deductible gifts should be made payable to The Community College of Denver System Foundation, and mailed to 1600 Downing, Denver, CO 80218. For more information contact the Foundation Office by calling 866-4527.
Advisory Committees
Each occupational program has an advisory committee representative of that particular business, industry, or professional area. The committee assists the colleges in planning and development activities, such as, curriculum, equipment selection and employment opportunities.
Each college has a General Advisory Committee to serve as a communication link between the college and the constituency to be served. The General Advisory Committee also provides information on program needs, as well as communication with secondary schools, the legislature and the public.
Continuing Education and Community Services
The Continuing Education and Community Services Divisions share in the colleges mission of meeting the communities' challenge to provide comprehensive educational opportunities. These Divisions administer non-credit programs, coordinate credit outreach courses, supervise women's programs and provide resources for community development. The type and emphasis of the programs offered by each college may vary according to the special conditions and population needs of the respective community areas served.
Denver Auraria Community College Serving Denver County -
Call 629-3386
Front Range Community College Serving Adams and Boulder
Counties -
Call 466-8811, ext. 513 or 468
Red Rocks Community College Serving Jefferson, Clear Creek,
Park and Gilpin Counties -Call 988-6160, ext. 260 or 300
Non-Credit Programs
Non-credit programs are offered in dance, conditioning, investing, career planning, personal/social growth, energy, health, arts and crafts, home repair and more. Your program suggestions are welcome.
Sessions start: Denver Auraria Community College September, January and June
Front Range Community College September, January, March and June
Red Rocks Community College September, January and June
The special summer COLLEGE FOR KIDS classes start in June at all three colleges.
Professional Development Programs
Professional development programs are offered on campus or at organizational locations for credit or non-credit Continuing Education Units (CEUs) certification. Courses are offered in supervisory management, human relations, leadership development, communications, conflict resolution, goal setting, computer basics and more. Credit and non-credit programs can be developed at any time to meet the specific needs of your organization.
Community Development Programs
Community development programs are designed to utilize college resources and personnel to assist in community improvement and problem solving. Activities supporting this function include specialized non-credit programs and administration of grant projects


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
11
funded by outside sources. The Continuing Education and Community Services Divisions welcome suggestions for community development projects.
Womens Programs
The Women's Programs, offered at all three colleges, serve to maximize the potential of women of all races, ages, economic and ethnic backgrounds. Short courses, special programs, films, workshops, "brown bag" lunch programs as well as mini-courses, rap-sessions and workshops for women "in transition" are some of the services which may be provided Each college has programs designed to serve the unique needs of their particular college community.
Denver Auraria Community College 629-3302
Front Range Community College 466-8811, ext. 466,549
Red Rocks Community College 988-6160, ext. 213
ROTC Information
Community College of Denver System students may participate in two Army ROTC programs which lead to a commission in the active Army, the Army Reserve or the Colorado National Guard.
Students at the colleges may participate, through crossenrollment procedures, in the ROTC program. For specific informa-tion regarding your college please contact:
Department of Military Science Metropolitan State College Box 93
Denver, Colorado 80204 Telephone: 629-3491


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12
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Admissions Information
Admissions Policy
Admission is open to high school graduates, recipients of a G.E.D. Certificate, nongraduates who are 18 years of age or older, and to any other persons who can profit from instruction.
Admission does not assure acceptance into a particular course or program Students should be aware that some programs have limited space and special admissions procedures. Applicants for these programs are responsible for contacting the particular division at the college of their choice. Students may enroll in any course in which there is a reasonable expectation for completion. However, students may be requested to enroll in courses designed to correct learning deficiencies
The colleges reserve the right to review the enrollment of those students who do not appear to be profiting from instruction and whose enrollment poses a hazard to themselves or to others When questions of admissibility arise, the individual's application is to be reviewed by the dean of student services and a recommendation is made to the college president who has the responsibility to render the final decision.
Physical examinations are not required as a condition for admission Physically handicapped students, following admission, are encouraged to contact the Center for the Physically Disadvantaged (CPD) CPD provides, at no additional cost to the student, numerous types of support services which provide full accessibility to all programs and facilities All acquired information is confidential, and is utilized for the sole purpose of planning appropriate services
Students are served more adequately when applications, transcripts of previously earned credit, and other information that would be of assistance in making educational decisions are submitted prior to student assessment, advising, and registration.
Student Rights and Responsibilities
Admission implies a recognition that the student should respect the rights of others, and observe moral and civil laws. Interference with the normal processes of education in the classroom or elsewhere on the campus will be regarded as unacceptable conduct which warrants suspension and/or dismissal The success of the college in attaining its objectives is conditioned by the good will, integrity, and honor of its students
The Denver Area Council has approved a document which contains a Definition of Education, a Joint Statement on Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities of Students, and Rules of Procedure in Student Disciplinary Matters. This document provides guidelines necessary to ensure the rights of all members of the college community, including the right to secure educational benefits and services without regard to sex, race/national origin, handicap or age Each college has its specific "due process" procedures. These procedures are available in Student Activities/S.G.A offices.
A student enrolling in the college assumes an obligation to conduct himself in a manner compatible with college objectives Regulations of the college are based upon respect for the rights of others and observance of civil law and current moral standards. On campus conduct for which students are subject to discipline falls igto the following categories:
1. Dishonesty, such as cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information to the college
2. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of college documents, records or identification.
'3 Obstruction or disruption of teaching, administration, disciplinary procedures or other college activities, including its public service functions, or other authorized activities.
4. Physical abuse of any person on college-owned or controlled property or at college-sponsored or supervised functions, or conduct which threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person as expressly prohibited by law 5 Theft of or damage to property of the college or of a member of the college community or a visitor.
6. Unauthorized entry to or use of college facilities
7. Violation of college policies concerning the registration of student organizations and the use of college facilities
8. Use, possession or distribution of narcotic or dangerous drugs such as marijuana and lysergic acid diethylamine (LSD) except as expressly permitted by law
9. Disorderly conduct or lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct on college-owned or controlled property or at a college-sponsored or supervised function
Admissions Procedure
A Submit an Application for Admission to the college of your choice Applications are available from the Admissions Center
1. Persons planning to receive a degree or certificate who wish previous college credits to be considered must submit official copies of college transcripts to the Registrar's Office no later than the semester preceding the final term of graduation Veterans using V.A. benefits must submit transcripts of all previous post-secondary education and training no later than 30 days after the beginning of the first semester of attendance
2 The colleges reserve the right to request transcripts of students in cases where it is determined that the student can be better served through use of transcripts.
3 International students should refer to the International Student section in this catalog.
B. Students are required to take an assessment of basic skills before registration. The assessment will assist the advisor to correctly place the student in college courses.
C. Applicants should declare their program major on the Application for Admission form If undecided on a program major of study, contact the Career Planning and Advising Center.
The High School Student
An individual under 18, presently attending high school and wanting to take courses should:
1 Make arrangements through a high school counselor for certification of credit
2. Complete an Application for Admission which is available from the Admissions Center
3 Submit the special underage student application.
Readmission of Former Students
Former students who are returning after an absence of one or more semesters, (summer term excepted) must make application for readmission. Students who have attended other colleges since last attending the Community College of Denver System college(s) will be requested to submit a transcript of all college credits Documents mentioned above become the property of the college^) and will not be released to the student or transferred tc other institutions The student s subsequent registration is con tingent upon receipt of all required documents
Transfer of Credit
1 Students needing transcript evaluations for educational plan ning should contact the Admissions Center, and they will b directed to the proper office for transcript evaluation


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
2. Due to staff limitations, transcripts will not be evaluated on registration days.
3 The colleges will not accept "D" grades. In order to graduate with a Certificate or an Associate of Applied Science degree (AAS), some programs may require a student to earn at least a "C" in all course work as well as a cumulative 2.0 GPA in all credit attempted
In the Associate of General Studies (AGS) and Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) degrees, a cumulative GPA of 2 0 in all credit attempted is required for graduation.
A student may repeat a course only once with less than a "C" grade. Courses for which the student has received a grade of "C" or better may not be repeated
4. The colleges reserve the right to examine all credits to determine obsolescence of content. In the event that coursework is found to be obsolete, the student may be required to update the credit
The colleges do allow students to challenge courses by taking special exams and/or earning credit for prior learning.
5. The colleges will accept transfer credit only from postsecondary institutions accredited by one of the six regional accrediting associations Transfer credit may be accepted from other SBCCOE approved institutions as a result of special agreements between the colleges and those institutions.
International Students
This school is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant, alien students.
International students are required to submit the following documents:
1 An Application for Admission
2. One official copy of the appropriate high school, college or equivalent transcript Transcripts must be a certified English translation
3 A statement of financial resources sufficient to provide for stay in the United States
4 Evidence of proficiency in the English language as documented by the Test of English as a Foreign Language, minimum score, 475 Other validated evidence of English language proficiency may be accepted by individual colleges in lieu of the TOEFL. Students submitting other evidence of English proficiency must have their proficiency validated through the Community College of Denver System assessment program.
Form I-20A will not be issued to an international student until all the above documents are on file in the appropriate college Office of Admissions and Records and a decision to admit the student is made. International students should allow sufficient time to gather and submit all required documentation so that an admissions decision might be made prior to the beginning of the term for which admission is sought.
International students must also comply with the following:
1. Assessment shall be required for all international students, and
students will be required to follow the placement recommendations indicated as a result of assessment ,
2. International students shall be expected to comply with immigration requirements with respect to the number of credit hours taken at their home campus. U S. Immigration and Naturalization Service Regulations require that foreign students on F-1 visas carry and complete a full course of study (maximum of twelve credit hours per semester) and that they complete their educational objectives within a reasonable period of time
3. The Academic Standards of Progress Policy shall apply to all students including international students
4 All nonimmigrant students (F-2), etc must take assessment and are subject to mandatory placement
5 All students are required to pay tuition and fees in full at the time of registration.
Tuition and fee charges for international students are the same as for out-of-state registrants
13
Transferability of Credit to Four-Year Institutions
Students whose primary interest in attending the Community College of Denver System colleges is to prepare for transfer to a four-year college or university should familiarize themselves with the general education requirements of that institution Since graduation requirements vary among institutions, it is important to obtain assistance from an advisor in planning a transferable program of study. A Transfer Guide to Colorado colleges and universities is available in the Career Planning and Advising Center.
In addition, each major field of study at a particular institution has specific course requirements. Therefore, it is extremely important for students to follow a well-planned course of study. Students should follow a prescribed transfer program (recommended by an advisor) in order to make a smooth transition to the four-year college or university.
Request for Transcripts
A student requesting that a transcript of this record be sent to an educational institution or to a prospective employer must complete the appropriate form which may be obtained from the Registrar's Office A fee of $1 will be charged for all copies No transcript will be provided for a student who has not fulfilled all financial obligations to the college(s).
Change of Address
It is the responsibility of each student to notify the Registrar's Office of any change of address.
Inter-College and Inter-Institutional Registration
Students who wish to register concurrently at one or more college of the Community College of Denver System, or the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College and the Community College of Aurora, should make inquiry at the Registrar's Office International students must meet the host institution's English proficiency requirements
Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974
Annually, the Community College of Denver System informs students of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 This Act, with which the institution intends to comply fully, was designated to protect the privacy of education records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their education records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act
The Community College of Denver System policy explains, in detail, the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the Act Copies of the policy may be found in the following offices: 1) Registrar's Office, and 2) Dean of Student Service's Office
The policy is also printed in the Student Handbook The offices mentioned also maintain a Directory of Records which lists all edu cational records maintained on students by this institution
Ouestions concerning the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Registrar's Office


14
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Safety
Correct safety instruction and practices are a vital concern within the instructional programs and it is the responsibility of all persons to practice correct safety measures
Students with health .problems that may be a hazard to themselves or to others must report such information to the Health Service Office.
If an injury occurs either during instruction or at any time while on campus, the injured party must report the injury to the Health Services Office so that medical treatment may be administered and an accident report completed. The instructor must also be notified if the accident occurred during class.


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
15
Tuition, Fees and Refunds
Tuition
The tuition for state supported institutions is determined by the State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education and is subject to change
Summer Term, Fall and Spring Semester
Resident
1-11 credit hours$28.00 per credit hour 12-18 credit hours$336.00 Each hour over 18 is an additional $22 40 Non-Resident
1-11 credit hours$107.00 per credit hour
12-18 credit hours$1284.00
Each hour over 18 is an additional $85.60
Fees
A student fee in the amount of $1.30 to $2.95 per credit hour, depending upon the campus, up to a maximum of $35.40 is charged to all enrolled students. This money is used for various student activities and benefits including student publications, operation of student government, parking privileges, cultural activities, recreational activities, clubs and organizational activities. Expenditure of student fee monies is generally made with the approval of the Student Government Association. Students enrolled in certain courses may be required to purchase individual supplies and materials and to rent uniforms
In addition to the activity fee at the Denver Auraria Community College, every registered student is assessed $16 per semester which is for the payment for the construction of the Auraria Student Center and Child Care Center
Deadline For Tuition Payment
Students who are not enrolled with complete payment will not be permitted to attend classes under any circumstances Enrollment after the 12th day will be limited to "open entry/open exit," self-paced, short-term and modular courses
Tuition and Fee Payment
Students who are not enrolled with complete payment will not be permitted to attend classes under any circumstances
Late Registration Fee
Students who register after the 5th instructional day of the term will be charged a $10 Late Registration Fee. This fee may not be applicable to certain "Open Entry/Open Exit," self-paced, short-term and modular courses This fee is not refundable
Tuition Policy For Senior Citizens
Persons over the age of sixty who are classified as in-state students may take regularly scheduled courses for credit or audit on a space-available basis, free of tuition charges. However, the student activities fee and the parking fee (if applicable) may be assessed This provision concerning free tuition does not apply to Continuing Education courses
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
At the time of application for admission, students are classified for tuition purposes as in-state residents or out-of-state residents according to provisions of Colorado law
Any student who has been classified as a non-resident and who believes he can qualify as a resident must obtain from the Registrar's office, a petition form for in-state status. A copy of the regulations governing residency classification is a part of the petition Students should be aware of the published deadline for petitions for each academic term. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that petitions and all supportive documentation are on file in the Registrar's Office by the published deadline. The Registrar's Office cannot assume responsibility for mailed petitions which arrive after the deadline, and petitions will not be accepted after the published date
The final decision regarding tuition status is determined by the Registrar. Changes in classification, whether from out-of-state to instate or the reverse, shall become effective at the time of the student's next registration. All questions regarding residency classifi cation should be addressed to the Registrar
Tuition Adjustment Related to Adding and Dropping Courses
Students wishing to adjust their schedules should be familiar with the following policy: The deadline for adds is the 12th full instructional day of the term. The deadline for drops is two weeks prior to the end of the semester Exceptions to this policy may be made only upon approval by the appropriate division director and instruc tional dean
After the 12th instructional day of the term, tuition and fees will be charged for all credits added. Offsetting drops will not be taken into consideration in calculating any additional tuition. Students are encouraged to be aware of the last day to add classes each semester to avoid any additional tuition and fee payment ,
Financial Obligations of Students
The financial obligations of studentssuch as payments for tuition, fees, and booksare due and payable on the published specified date or at the times the obligations are incurred. In unusual circumstances of an emergency nature, where it may be impossible for a student to pay the total charges at the proper time special arrangements may be considered for approval by the Busi ness Office
A student is not considered officially registered until his class schedule has been processed by the Business Office
A student who is in any way financially obligated to a college(s) through a tuition deferment, emergency student loan. National De fense Loan, etc or who has failed to account for college(s) property in his possession will be denied a transcript of record and registra tion for subsequent sessions until he has made a satisfactory settle ment with the college(s). *
Withdrawal Procedure and Tuition Refunds
Students are admitted under the assumption that they will remain until the end of the semester or longer, unless unforeseen circumstances necessitate their withdrawal from the Community College of Denver System
When it becomes necessary to initiate a complete withdrawal, students should check with the Registrar's Office for the proper procedures and obtain the necessary forms



16 1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
1. 100 percent tuition and fees will be refunded for courses dropped between the day of registration and the first day of the term.
2. A 75 percent refund of tuition only for total or partial withdrawal from the first day of the term through the 12th day of the term. No tuition or fee refund of less than $1 will be made.
3. No refund will be made subsequent to the 12th day of the term
4. Prior to the 12th day of the term, no tuition or fee shall be charged to a student for adding or dropping classes unless the difference between the. number of credits dropped or added takes that student beyond the amount the student-has originally paid.
5. If original tuition paid warrants, students are entitled to a 100 percent refund of tuition and fees paid for any class(es) cancelled by the college(s). This refund must be initiated by the student through the Registrar's Office.
Assessment Program
The Community College of Denver System has implemented an assessment program designed to assist in the placement of students in proper courses The assessment program began because the colleges believe in opening their doors to all who can benefit from college programs. The colleges will admit any person, regardless of any previous academic experience, and that person may be enrolled in any course which he can reasonably be expected to successfully complete.
While maintaining academic standards, the colleges are committed to working with students to insure success, not failure Effective placement of students in courses increases the probability of student success and the colleges have an ongoing process for improving the procedures used to place students in the most effective manner. Assessment includes appraisal of skills, knowledge and capabilities of students as well as the opportunity for students to assess their own abilities and attitudes.
An important part of the assessment process is identifying entry level skills for each program area. Division directors and program faculty identify appropriate entry level skills and determine the placement status for each program. Therefore, students may be allowed to register for the required program courses while strengthening some basic skills, or students may be required to obtain certain skill levels before entering the program.
The Community College of Denver System requires that all new students complete the assessment program prior to registration The assessment tests are designed to help students identify the most appropriate courses with which to begin their college studies Assessment consists of four short tests in Reading, Math, English, and Study Skills. Testing time is two hours including administration and scoring. To save time, all students are urged to complete assessment prior to their first semester s registration. For further information, contact the Learning Development Center at any college.
The assessment tests may be waived for students who meet at least one of the following criteria:
1. A degree from an accredited college or university.
2 Successful previous college work within the past two years.
3. Acceptable SAT or ACT scores.
*4 Students taking only a GED preparation course.
5. Students taking a single class (exceptions to this condition to be determined by each of the colleges).
Students must bring appropriate documentation to receive a waiver.
except Denver Auraria Community College


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
17
Educational Standards
Attendance
Regular class attendance is necessary if a student is to obtain maximum benefits from instruction. Students are expected to comply with the attendance policy as set by individual instructors and divisions.
Course Load
The normal course load is 15 credit hours. Students who are registered for fewer than 12 credit hours are regarded as part-time students.
Eighteen (18) credit hours is considered a heavy load. Twenty (20) credit hours is the maximum load for all students without special permission.
Academic Standards Of Progress Policy
A grade point average of at least 2.0 (C) is required on all academic work for a student to complete certificate and degree programs.
1. Mid-Semester Warning
A mid-semester warning notice may be issued to a student who is not making satisfactory progress toward graduation.
2. Progress Alert Status
The progress alert status affects the following two classifications of students:
a. A student who has earned 15 or more credit hours and has less than a 1.5 cumulative grade point average, and b A student who has earned 30 or more credit hours and has less than a 2.0 (C) cumulative grade point average.
3. Scholastic Probation
After having been placed on a "progress alert status, and no evident change in the grade point average has been indicated, a student is automatically placed on scholastic probation until he/she has accumulated an additional 15 credit hours.
a. Continuation of Probation
A student may be continued on probation if, during the probation period, and after consultation with the division director, it is determined that he/she has maintained a 2.0 (C) or better grade point average since being placed on probation but has not been able to achieve a 2.0 (C) cumulative grade point average
b. Removal from Probation
A student who earns at least 2.0 (C) cumulative grade point average during the period of probation and who has removed previous grade point deficiencies may be removed from probation.
4. Administrative Suspension
Administrative suspension is appropriate if:
a. A student has been on scholastic probation for two consecutive semesters, or
b A student has failed to obtain a cumulative grade point average of 2 0 (C) for two consecutive semesters, or
c. A student has received all failing grades, or "I" "(incomplete) grades, or
d. In the opinion of the division director and instructors concerned, the student shows poor scholarship and is no longer profiting from the educational program, or
e. In the interest of the student or the colleges, the administration deems it advisable.
* For the purposes of this policy, an I grade is awarded zero (0) grade points in computing the cumulative grade point average.
During this period of suspension all non-instructional laboratories and support services, i.e., Counseling, Career Planning, Academic Advising, Learning Development Center, etc., will be available for students to utilize to correct deficiencies in their academic progress. Students are encouraged to take advantage of these college resources.
A student can be reinstated to enrollment in a course(s) when:
a. Non-enrollment has taken place for one semester: or
b. The administrative suspension decision is over-ruled by appropriate officials, based either on informal administrative appeal or established formal grievance policies and procedures. However, prior to re-enrolling, students must contact an academic advisor, if they are to be allowed to register for additional courses at the colleges.
5. Appeal Procedure
Information concerning the procedure to appeal any of the types of academic censure is available from the offices of the deans of instruction and/or the deans of student services. A complete copy of the Academic Standards of Progress Policy is available from the offices of the deans of instruction and/or the deans of student services.
Evaluation and Grading
Student achievement is eyaluated in relation to the attainment of specific objectives of the course. At the beginning of a course the instructor will explain these objectives and the basis upon which grades are assigned. For the purposes of the grade descriptions, "achievement" means successfully reaching a certain level of knowledge or understanding, and "mastery" means successfully reaching an objective level of competency in a skill.
Grade descriptions derive from the average grade attained by students, the C-level, and are as follows:
Grade Quality of Work Grade
Symbol Indicated by Symbol Points
A The student has demonstrated superior 4
mastery or achievement of course objectives and/or additional objectives.
B The student has demonstrated better- 3
than-acceptable mastery or achievement of the course objectives and/or additional objectives.
C Acceptable standard for graduation. The 2
student has demonstrated acceptable mastery or achievement of the course objectives.
D The student has demonstrated less- 1
than-acceptable mastery of achievement of course objectives. In some programs it may be necessary to repeat the course in order to advance, as D-level achievement is not generally satisfactory for advancement in the same or related studies. Credit may not transfer.
F The student has not demonstrated satis- 0
factory mastery or achievement of course objectives.
CR Credit. The student has demonstrated at Not
least acceptable completion of the course computed objectives. Limited to certain specified in GPA courses in which student achievement is evaluated on a dredit-no-credit basis, rather than by a letter grade.


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
SP
W
AU
Satisfactory Progress. For designated courses listed as open-entry/open-exit, denoting that the class may extend beyond the normal end of a term. The student has demonstrated satisfactory progress in completing course objectives and is eligible to complete the course during the following semester for credit and a grade. Re-registration may be required in certain circumstances.
Incomplete. Due to extenuating circumstances, the student has not been able to complete the course requirements. Two-thirds to three-fourths of the work shall have been satisfactorily completed for a student to be eligible for an I," and the instructor shall have determined that the stu-dent has a reasonable chance of completing the remainder. It is the student's responsibility, before the end of the term, to arrange with the instructor for completion of the course. Course work needed to change an "I" to a grade should be completed before the end of the next consecutive fall or spring semester.
The student has officially withdrawn from the course.
Not
computed in GPA
Not
computed in GPA
Not
computed in GPA
The student has audited the course. Not
computed
in GPA
Grades are issued at the end of each semester for all students, and grade slips will be mailed approximately one week after the last day of classes.
Guidelines For Grade Symbols
The guidelines listed below are used by faculty, subject to the needs of the program or course, to establish their grading criteria.
GRADE AA Distinguished Grade For Superior Work
1 The student has mastered the content and objectives of the course, is able to apply what he/she has learned to new situations, and is able to relate it to other knowledge.
2. The student consistently distinguishes himself/herself in examinations, reports, projects, class participation and laboratory or training situations.
3. The student shows independent thinking in assignments and class discussion.
4. Work is consistently in proper form, where required shows satisfactory evidence of careful research, and is submitted punctually!
5. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student consistently demonstrates superior skills, ability and performance..
6 The student complies with the instructor's attendance requirements.
GRADE BA Better-than-Acceptable Grade
1. The student consistently shows mastery of the course content and objectives, and usually is able to apply what he/she has learned to new situations or to relate it to other knowledge.
2 The student is consistently above average in examinations, reports, projects, class participation, and laboratory or training situations
3 Work is in proper form, where required shows satisfactory evidence of research and is submitted punctually.
4. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student consistently demonstrates above average skills, ability and performance.
5. The student complies with the instructor's attendance requirements.
GRADE CAn Acceptable Grade
Permitting Progress Forward in Course Sequence
1. The student shows evidence of a reasonable comprehension of the subject matter of the course and has an average mastery of the content sufficient to indicate success in the next course in the same field.
2. The student consistently makes average scores in examinations, reports, projects, class participation and laboratory or training situations.
3. If the subject carries transfer credit, the student has indicated sufficient competence in the content to continue in the subject field upon transfer.
4. Assignments are completed in good form and on time.
5. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student consistently demonstrates average skills, ability and performance.
6. The student complies with the instructors attendance requirements.
GRADE DA Less-than-Acceptable, Passing Grade
1. The student falls below the average in examinations, projects, reports, class participation and laboratory or training situations, but shows some competence in the assigned subject matter of the course.
2. The competence demonstrated is insufficient to indicate success in the next courses in the subject field.
3. Assignments are completed in imperfect form, sometimes late, or of inconsistent quality.
4. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student consistently demonstrates usable but below-average skills, ability and performance.
5. The student complies with the instructor's attendance requirements.
GRADE FA Failing Grade
1. With respect to examinations, projects, reports, class participation and laboratory or training situations, the student fails to perform at the D" or above level
2. The student shows little or no competence in the assigned subject matter of the course.
3. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student fails to perform at the "D" or above level
4. The student fails to comply with the instructor's attendance requirements.
CREDITNO CREDIT
Some courses are offered on a credit-no credit basis. Upon successful completion of such a course, unit credit will be awarded. However, courses taken on a credit-no credit basis are not used in the computation of a student's grade-point average. Regulations for such courses are these:
1. In courses in which credit-no credit is authorized, the credit grade is granted for performance which is equivalent to the letter grade of "C" or better
2. Courses in which credit-no credit grading may be used must be so designated by the division involved. Courses falling into this category will be specified by the colleges each term in their class schedules. A department may require majors to obtain letter grades in that department's major subjects.
GRADE SPSatisfactory Progress
Some courses, designated as open-entry/open-exit, may extend beyond the normal end of a semester since they are designed on a mastery-learning basis.
Upon successful completion of such a course, unit credit and a grade will be awarded. Regulations for such courses are:
1. In courses for which this grade is authorized, the SP will be given to:


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
19
a. the student who has attended for a full term and has shown satisfactory progress, but has not yet mastered required course objectives, or
b. the student who, under the colleges continuous:enrollment policy, has enrolled late in the semester and is making satisfactory progress, but has not had sufficient time to master required course objectives.
2. A student may be required to re-register for a course in which he/she received an SP grade if the course work is not completed by the end of the next consecutive fall or spring semester. When the remaining time needed for completion is short, however, or when other extenuating circumstances occur, the dean may waive the requirement for re-enrollment.
GRADE IIncomplete
1 The student has not been able to complete the course requirements.
2 Two-thirds to three-fourths of the course work shall have been satisfactorily completed.
3 The student must, before the end of the term, make arrangements with the instructor to complete the course.
4 The student must complete the necessary course work prior to the end of the next consecutive fall or spring semester.
GRADE WWithdrawal
The student has officially withdrawn from the college.
GRADE AUAudit The student has audited the course.
Credit Hours
Generally, one credit hour is earned by attending a lecture class for a fifty-minute period, once a week, for a full semester. In a laboratory course, one credit hour is granted for from two to three fifty-minute periods per week in a laboratory
Grade Point Average Calculation
Under this system, grade points measure the achievement of the student for the number of credits completed To calculate the grade point average, multiply the number of grade points per credit by the number of credits for each course Total the credits and points and divide tf|e grade points by the credits.
A equals 4 grade points B equals 3 grade points C equals 2 grade points D equals 1 grade point F equals 0 grade point
The following example will enable the student to calculate a grade point average:
Course Course Title Credits Grade Points
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 A (3X4) 12
ELT 105 DC Circuits and Magnetism 3 A (3X4) 12
ELT 106 AC Fundamentals 3 B (3X3) 9
ENG 111 English Composition 3 C (3X2) 6
MAT 111 Introductory Algebra 3 F (3X0) 0
Totals 15 39
Total grade points divided by total credits equals the cumulative grade point average Therefore, the grade point average for the above example would be: 39 divided by 15 equals 2 60.
Cooperative Education Program
The Cooperative Education Program provides opportunities to supplement course work with practical work experiences related to the student's educational program and occupational objective The Cooperative Education Program is an extension to and application of classroom instruction through work experience under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business or industry involved However, the colleges have complete control of the Cooperative Education Program A qualified instructor and/or coor-
dinator coordinates and directly supervises the total work experience program by working closely with the student and the employer through telephone contacts, site visitations, student reports and reports from the student's supervisor.
A required Training Agreement defining responsibilities of all par ties involved is signed by the student, the appropriate college, and the employer. In addition to the signing of the Training Agreement, all students are required to identify job-oriented learning objectives which must be approved by the work supervisor and the faculty coordinator, and to submit weekly time sheets. In addition, appropriate individual assignments and a final report must be submitted according to specific program requirements.
A required on-campus seminar is scheduled each week during the semester for the student to meet with a faculty advisor or coordinator on theory application related to the student's field of study This seminar has a COE prefix and is numbered 296.
Evaluation of the work experience is similar to that used in other courses, with additional emphasis on the employer's rating which becomes a part of the final evaluation process
Students enrolled in Cooperative Education may earn one hour of college credit for each three hours per week for fifteen weeks of cooperative work experience. In some programs, Cooperative Education is a part of the instructional program and is required for graduation. The total number of credit hours a student may apply toward a degree in a specific instructional program is identified in the program requirements section of this catalog. For programs in which Cooperative Education is not a requirement, Co-Op is consid ered an approved substitute, or an elective upon permission of the faculty advisor.
All Cooperative Education courses carry a course/program prefix and are numbered 297 The following description applies to all Co operative Education courses:
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor coordinator and cooperative education job supervisor
Corequisite: COE 296 unless waived by the division director
This course provides the student with the opportunity to supplement course work with practical work experience related to the student's educational program and occupational objective. All Cooperative Education courses are to comply with all policy and procedure requirements
Credit hours: variable
Contact hours: variable
Independent Study
The Community College of Denver System recognizes a commitment to provide for individual needs, and independent study is seen as one means of meeting this commitment. All Independent Study courses carry a course/program prefix and are generally numbered 299. The following course description applies to all Independent Study courses:
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and division director on submission of approved proposal
This program provides the opportunity for the student to engage ir) intensive study and/or research on a specific topic under the direction of a qualified faculty member The number of semester hours of credit will be determined by the instructor and the division director No more than six (6) semester hours of Independent Study course work may be applied to any associate degree program
Special Topics Courses
The Community College of Denver System utilizes Special Topics courses for specific study topics for a class size situation. All Special Topics courses carry a course/program prefix and are numbered 290. The following course description applies to all Special Topics courses:
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and division director on submission of approved proposal


20
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
The course focuses on selected topics within the program or academic area. The number of semester hours of credit will be determined by the instructor and division director. No more than six (6) semester hours of Special Topics courses may be applied to any associate degree program.
Credit hours: 1-6
Contact hours: 15-90
Credit for Prior Learning
Students are allowed to earn credit for college equivalent education which has been acquired through earlier schooling, work, or other life experiences. Such prior learning must be comparable to Community College of Denver System courses or curricula and must relate to the student's educational objectives; however, appropriate elective credit may be accepted.
Students may document prior learning through successful completion of any of the following:
1. Military courses
2. selected CLEP and ACT examinations
3. Community College of Denver System challenge examinations
4 portfolio of learning outcomes
For more details than are presented here, contact the Office for Prior Learning at any college.
Military Courses
Students desiring credit for courses completed through the U S. Armed Forces Institute may petition for credit by developing a portfolio that describes and documents pertinent learning comparable to Community College of Denver System courses. A faculty committee in the appropriate program area will evaluate the portfolio and award credit commensurate with the learning.
The Community College of Denver System has been designated as an institutional member of Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC), a group of over 400 colleges and universities providing voluntary postsecondary education to members of the military throughout the world. As a SOC member, the Community College of Denver System recognizes the unique nature of the military lifestyle and has committed itself to easing the transfer of relevant course credits, providing flexible academic residency requirements, and crediting learning from appropriate military training and experiences SOC has been developed jointly by educational representatives of each of the Armed Services, the Office of the Secretary of Defense and a consortium of thirteen leading national higher education associations; it is sponsored by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges (AACJC).
National Examinations
College Level Examination Program
The Community College of Denver System recognizes the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) examination as well as selected subject examinations. Up to 26 hours of college credit may be awarded through the CLEP general examinations. Additional credit may be earned by attaining successful scores on CLEP subject examinations.
ACT Advanced PlacementNursing
Corpsmen, Licensed Practical Nurses, and transfer students from hospital nursing programs entering the Nursing Program at Front Range Community College are eligible for credit award by examination for advanced placement in this program.
Challenge Examinations
Most courses may be challenged by currently enrolled students. No more than one challenge of a particular course will be arranged during any one semester.
Portfolio of Learning Outcomes
Currently enrolled students may petition for credit by developing a portfolio that describes and documents pertinent learning comparable to Community College of Denver System courses. A faculty committee in the appropriate program area will evaluate the portfolio and award credit commensurate with the learning.
No more than one portfolio evaluation for a particular evaluation for a particular course will be arranged during any one semester.


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Student Services
Financial Aid
General Information
The Office of Financial Aid administers federal and state financial aid programs. Eligibility is based on financial need as defined by federal, state and institutional regulations and guidelines Full-time (12 credit hours or more) financial aid recipients are expected to complete a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester with a 2 0 grade point average.
Part-time (1-11 credit hours) financial aid recipients are expected to complete all credit hours attempted with a 2.0 grade average For more detailed information refer to the Financial Aid Information Booklet" which is available in the Office of Financial Aid
Application Procedures
All students must apply and be accepted for admission before disbursement of any financial aid can be made.
Applications for financial aid are required to be completed once each year to determine eligibility.
The following applications are required:
1. American College Testing Program's Family Financial Statement (FFS). Students may use this form to apply for the PELL Grant and other types of financial aid.
2. Institutional application.
Additional supporting documents may'be requested by the Office of Financial Aid, such as Federal Income Tax Forms 1040A, and 1040, statements of Welfare, Social Security, vocational rehabilitation benefits, employment, etc Applications are available in the Office of Financial Aid.
Priority in awarding financial aid will be given to students with completed applications on file by the following dates:
Summer 1984April 1, 1984 Academic Year 1984-85June 1, 1984 Spring 1985December 1, 1984 Summer 1985April 1, 1985
Types of Financial Aid
1. Pell Grants
The Pell Grant Program provides federal grants to assist with educational expenses Award amounts range from $200 to $1800 depending upon the cost of education. Approximately six weeks after the student applies, he/she will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR). All copies of the SAR must be brought or mailed to the Office of Financial Aid even if the student is ineligible to receive a Pell Grant award
2. Self Help Programs
a. Work-Study Program
The Work-Study Program provides part-time employment opportunities for students demonstrating financial need as defined by the college(s). Hourly rates start at federal minimum wage.
b. Colorado Work-Study (No-Need)
The State of Colorado provides limited funds to employ students part-time who do not demonstrate financial need and who are Colorado residents for tuition purposes Hourly rates start at federal minimum wage.
3. Grants
a. Colorado Student Grant (CSG)
Grants are available to Colorado residents based on financial need Awards range up to $1,000 per academic year
b. Colorado Student Incentive Grant (CSIG)
Grants are available on a need basis. The maximum award is $2,000 per year. The State of Colorado and the Federal Government each contribute 50% of the available funds
c. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)
Grants range from $200 to $2,000 depending on financial need
4. Scholarships
Colorado Scholars Program
Scholarships are available to Colorado residents who have completed a minimum of 12 credit hours at the college(s) with at least a 3.0 grade point average in all courses attempted Applications are available in the Office of Financial Aid. Scholarships are dependent upon the availability of funds Award amounts range up to resident tuition and fees.
5. Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL)
a. Loans to Students
The GSL program provides loans to students at 8 percent interest rates per annum. Undergraduate students may borrow up to $2,500 per year, not to exceed an aggregate amount of $12,500 for their undergraduate studies. Loans have a six-month grace period after graduation or termination of at least half-time student status before payments are due.
b. Loans to Parents
The maximum amount a parent of a dependent under-graduate student may borrow for any one student in any academic year is $3,000. The aggregate loan limit is $15,000. The interest rate is 12 percent per annum and the parent has up to ten years to repay the loan Repayment starts 60 days after the issuance of the loan.
Students are encouraged to submit applications early. Applications received after the above priority dates will be given consideration based on the availability of funds.
Students cannot expect to receive a financial aid award at the time classes begin unless their application is complete and has been reviewed to determine eligibility.
Students whose files are not complete at the time of registration will be responsible for paying their own tuition and fees. Upon completion of the application process, if eligible, a fiancial aid award will be determined
Eligibility
Most types of financial aid are based on financial need as determined by the Office of Financial Aid. Financial need is the difference between the cost of attending the college(s) and the resources available to the student. Resources include parents' contributions, student's earnings, spouse's earnings, G.l bill, social security, vocational rehabilitation, welfare, etc.
All resources and changes in resources must be reported to the Office of Financial Aid.
Students who have earned an associate, baccalaureate, masters or other advanced degree will not be eligible for financial aid. Students who feel they have circumstances that may justify their receiving financial assistance may file an appeal to determine eligibility.


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Satisfactory and Measurable Progress
Students receiving financial aid must maintain satisfactory and measurable progress each semester. Full-time aid recipients must complete at least 12 credit hours per semester with a 2.0 grade point average to remain in good standing
In general, financial aid recipients may receive up to five semesters of financial assistance. For more detailed information contact the Office of Financial Aid or refer to the Financial Aid Information Booklet"
Repayment Policy
A student who withdraws during the semester may be required to repay a portion of the financial aid received. If the student's tuition and fees were paid by financial aid funds and the student is eligible to receive a tuition refund, the refund will be returned to the financial aid account
Veterans Affairs Office
This program, funded through the Veterans Cost of Instruction Payments Program (U S. Office of Education) provides comprehensive services to veteran students as well as (through community outreach efforts) veterans in the community.
The program, available at all three colleges, was established .to enable Vietnam era veterans to use their VA and other federal, state and community benefits, and to aid the educational institution in meeting the Vietnam era veterans' special needs.
Services available include:
Information about veterans benefits federal, state and community
Assistance with VA inquiries
Referral for emergency food, clothing, housing, legal aid and employment.
Veterans Academic Standards of Progress
The following policy applies to all student veterans and other eligible persons receiving VA benefits:
1. Grade Point Requirements
Veteran students are required to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2 0 for all course work attempted. Any veteran whose cumulative GPA is below 2.0 will be placed upon academic probation for the following term Should the veteran fail to raise his GPA to the required 2.0 cumulative GPA during the probation term, the veteran will be suspended for one academic term. Reinstatement will only occur after approved counseling.
Suspension of the veteran student under the Veterans' Academic Standards of Progress Policy will result in the colleges not certifying enrollment to the Veterans Administration. Veterans in such status may still attend the colleges, however, they will be subject to the provisions of the Academic Standards of Progress Policy requirements for continuation of enrollment.
2. Other Special Grades
A AU Grade (Indicates that the student audited the course). No credit is allowed for audited courses, nor is this grade certifiable to the VA
B I Grade (Incomplete). Please refer to Evaluation and Grading policy in the catalog. An Incomplete or I grade must be made up before the end of the following term (fall or spring). If an "I" grade is not completed in this required period, the I" will remain on the transcript, but will be treated as a failing grade and calculated as an F" under Veteran Academic Standards of Progress Policy. The veterans' certification will be adjusted back to the beginning date of the term in which the "I" grade was received.
3. Attendance
Veterans' attendance records showing each absence from regularly scheduled classes are required, and the colleges are required to document such attendance records.
If a student veteran stops attending class but does not officially withdraw, he is considered as non-attending' and may be dropped administratively and his VA certification adjusted accordingly. Such an administrative drop will be initiated by the instructor.
4. Mitigating Circumstances
(As defined by P.L. 94-502) are those which directly hinder eligible veteran's or other person's pursuit of a course and which are judged to be out of the student's control. Following are some general categories of mitigating circumstances (this list is not all-inclusive):
A. Serious illness of the eligible veteran or person
B. Serious illness or death in the eligible veteran's or other person's immediate family.
C. Immediate family or financial obligations which require a change in terms, hours, or place of employment which precludes pursuit of course.
D. Discontinuance of a course by a school.
E Active military duty, including active duty for training.
F. Withdrawal from a course or receipt of a nonpunitive grade upon completion of a course due to unsatisfactory work may be considered to be under mitigating circumstances if the student can demonstrate good faith pursuit of the course up to the point of withdrawal or completion and the student submits evidence that he or she applied for tutorial aid, consulted a Veterans Administration counselor, or consulted a school academic counselor or advisor regarding an attempt to remedy the unsatisfactory work before withdrawal or completion.
When mitigating circumstances prevail, the colleges will attempt to intervene on behalf of the veteran with the Veterans Administration.
Career Planning and Advising Center
The Career Planning and Advising Center is a central location for information on classes, requirements and career options.
Advising
Students and prospective students alike are welcome to discuss requirements for certificates or degrees, recommended classes and their sequence and prerequisites for particular programs with the advising staff.
Advising can inform students which courses will transfer to other institutions of higher education for those individuals interested in continuing their education.
Advising records, available to individual students and faculty members, chart each student's progress. This information is helpful in planning educational programs.
Schedule adjustments, such as drop/add, withdrawal or conflicts, are also handled through the Advising Center. Staff can advise students on the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) which enables individuals to obtain college credit for nontraditional education such as travel, personal reading, or experience on jobs.
Career Planning
Career planning is not just for the young or those who have recently completed high school. Research shows that most adults will change careers several times during their lives. It is important that career changes be undertaken only after careful consideration is made of an individual's skills, interests and needs as well as the job market.
Career planning helps in this process. It assists students and community members to explore career options, make decisions and develop educational plans to implement these decisions


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Reference materials (such as books, pamphlets, tapes and computerized information) and staff members help individuals research options by providing solid background Interest testing is also available at a minimal fee
Career Search Seminars
Offered each semester and sponsored by the Career Planning and Advising Center. Career Search Seminars are designed to help individuals explore career options Students develop a process, narrow their interests and design a career plan Portions of the Seminars include interest tests and other exercises to determine which occupational areas are most suited to an individual's goals. This is followed by reading and use of a computerized data bank to give in-depth information about particular careers
Job Development and Placement
The Job Development and Placement Office at the colleges and the instructional departments maintain continued contact with business and industry concerning employment opportunities and training needs As a result of the Placement Office and instructional departments' efforts, a wide range of full-time, part-time and temporary jobs are usually available to currently enrolled students or graduates
Related employment-seeking and assessment services which are provided by the Job Placement Office are
1. Resume writing, job applications aid, interviewing assistance and related employment-seeking skills
2. Class presentations, speakers from business and industry and on-campus recruiters
While the colleges and the Placement Office cannot guarantee the student a job, every effort will be made to secure appropriate employment for the student and graduates who are registered with the Job Placement Office
At the Denver Auraria Community College, all of the above services are available at the Auraria Student Assistance Center
Food Service
A cafeteria serving hot and cold selections is open during peak meal hours at all colleges Automated food service is also available in designated areas throughout each college campus
Health Services
Student Health Services are designed to foster and maintain proper attitudes and habits of personal and community health Various programs and activities related to current health problems are planned each semester These programs are designed to educate students, faculty and staff regarding health problems and the means of preventing them, which includes a wellness program
The Student Health Service also provides a variety of diagnostic procedures, confidential health counseling and physical assessments Emergency accident and illness care, referral service and health pamphlets as well as over-the-counter medications and supplies are available A quiet rest area for ill students is also provided in the Health Center
Since the colleges carry no accident insurance for students, expenses resulting from instructional and/or recreational injuries are the sole responsibility of the student and his insurance company
An accident and sickness insurance plan is available to students at reasonable cost Applications for such insurance for students and their dependents are provided at the time of registration Those who enroll after the regular registration periods may request an application form from the Health Center
Housing
Students who attend the Community College of Denver System colleges need to commute since the colleges do not operate a residence hall program. Students are expected to arrange their own housing, and those desiring assistance may contact the Office of Student Activities
Student Activities
The Student Activities Office endeavors to develop and foster programs and activities to meet the academic, social and recreational interests of the students and community
Programs and activities offered through the Student Activities office include the Child Care Program, staff assistance to Student Government and student organizations, intramural and recreational activities, Health Services, lost and found, social and cultural activities, student publications/newspaper, management of student cen-ter/lounge areas, student leadership training programs, and notary public Such activities are expected to provide constructive experiences which will stimulate personal growth and social development and add to the student's enjoyment of life Opportunities for the development of leadership, cooperative planning and special interests are fostered through participation in these activities
The Student Activities Office approves posters, flyers or announcements for posting on campus bulletin boards
Student Government Association
The purpose of the Student Government is to represent the student body through effective communication with all members of the college community It encourages the development of organizations and activities which meet the needs and interests of the students The Student Government also attempts to represent and interpret student opinion in the formation of college policy Student Activities funds are used to provide a variety of extra-curricular and co-curricular educational and social opportunities for students, and to promote unity and fellowship among students
Student Publications
A school newspaper and other publications are produced under the guidance of the Board of Publications, with the funding support and cooperation of the Student Activities Office
Educational Opportunity Center
The Educational Opportunity Center provides counseling services, and is a clearinghouse of information on post-secondary education These services are offered to provide information on aspects of edutational admissions, career planning and financial aid options
This service is free, and is located at 909 Santa Fe Drive (second floor) Please call for an appointment at 866-2101


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Other Support Services
Center for the Physically Disadvantaged
The Community College of Denver System provides equitable opportunities for disabled students to pursue education in regular classes. In order to accommodate this component of the student body, the college has established the Center for the Physically Disadvantaged (CPD) through which approximately 30 professional personnel offer numerous support services on all three locations of the college. Examples include such services as:
academic advising
accessible parking
adapted scheduling
curriculum adaptation
health education and advising
interpreting for hearing impaired students
job placement
liaison with community resources
modification of classroom setting
notetaking
reading and Braille transcribing
registration assistance
specialized career planning
temporary wheelchair loan
textbook recording
tutorial assistance
vocational assessment
Services are provided without additional cost for any handicapped student attending the college, including those with temporary disabilities. A brochure describing CPD is available at any of the colleges.
Mainstreaming of disabled students into regular college classes has been an integral part of the Community College of Denver System philosophy since its inception in 1968. All facilities of the colleges are of recent construction, with barrier-free design being a prime factor in planning
This combination of accessible facilities, faculty orientation to mainstreaming, and the availability of one of the most comprehensive support systems of any post-secondary institution in the nation has attracted large numbers of handicapped persons to the Community College of Denver System.
Some disabled candidates seeking admission to or presently pursuing studies at the colleges may not be able to succeed in this type of educational environment despite the accessible programs and facilities, the broad choice of career options, and the full range of support services. Because mainstreaming is an integral portion of the colleges' philosophy, retention of the student is based upon the capability of succeeding in classes.
Learning Development Centers
The Learning Development Centers (LDC) at all three colleges provide free learning assistance to all CCDS students. The LDC at Denver Auraria Community College also provides all of the services to students enrolled at MSC and UCD. The Centers are set up to help the student enter and complete the educational program of his/her choice
There is no established timetable for completion of individual programs in the LDC; students are permitted to use the LDC for as long as they remain CCDS students or are enrolled at MSC or UCD
Testing and tutoring are available on a one-to-one basis and in small groups. The purpose of testing is to diagnose skill and/or achievement levels, and to assess learning styles The purpose of tutoring is to:
1 Achieve proficiency in basic skills and study skills,
2. Apply basic skills and study skills to course work,
3. Prepare to challenge a course for credit,
4. Clear an Incomplete grade.
Free assistance in the following areas:
Reading-English (D,F,R)
Reading Comprehension
Writing
Listening
Spelling and Word Study Speed Reading
English as a Second Language Grammar and Usage Reading Skills for Any Course Language (D,F,R)
French, German, Spanish Vocabulary Building Grammar Conversation Individual Tutoring ESL Tutoring and Tapes
Additional Taped Instruction (F) .
Hebrew, Greek, Russian, Japanese, Arabic, Swedish, Portuguese Italian
English for Arabic speakers Spanish for Medical Professions Health Occupations (D)
Basic Skills in Nursing Fundamentals Math (D.F.R)
Math Anxiety Reduction
Basic Math
Algebra
Geometry
Trigonometry
Calculus
Statistics
Applied Math
Metrics
Computer Math Math Skills (D.F.R)
Nursing
Drafting
Automotive
Welding
Graphics
Hydraulics
Electronics
Food Service
Physics
Chemistry
Plumbing (R)
Water Wastewater (R)
Testing (D,F,R)
Entry-Level Assessment
Basic Skills Diagnosis (Reading, Math, English)
G.E.D. pre test
Make-up exams
Vocational Interest Exams (D)
Achievement Testing (D)
Learning Potential Battery (D)
Vocational Aptitute Testing (R)
G.E.D. Preparation (D,F,R)
Social Studies Science Mathematics Reading Skills Writing Skills Study Skills (D,F,R)
Test Taking Note Taking


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Time Management Textbook Reading Memory Techniques Research Techniques
Special Academic Support for Learning Strengths & Weaknesses (D)
Diagnostic Evaluation Prescriptive Tutoring
Learning Development Center Offerings
In addition to free LDC services, students may register for noncredit learning (Front Range Community College and Red Rocks Community College only) Tuition and fees will be assessed after initial testing to determine skill deficiencies LDC 071 Basic Skills in Reading (F.R)
(1-3 tuition hours) Personalized learning programs designed to improve ability in reading speed, comprehension, vocabulary, and study skills. (2-6 contact hours per week.)
LDC 073 Basic Skills in Writing (F.R)
(1-3 tuition hours) Individual programs directed to meet student writing needs in the academic or vocational worlds (2-6 contact hours per week.)
LDC 081 Basic Skills in Math (F,R)
(1-3 tuition hours) Individualized assistance planned to improve skills in arithmetic, algebra. (2-6 contact hours per week.)
LDC 090 General Skills (D,F,R)
(0 tuition hours) Individualized assistance in any of the skills areas for no tuition charge.
Note: At Denver Auraria Community College, these courses are offered for credit through Developmental Studies Individual instruction and sample testing are combined to help students achieve their GED Certificate Students prepare for the GED test by registering for a maximum of three of the following courses in any one semester. (At Denver Community College Auraria, equivalent GED courses are offered through Developmental Studies.)
Testing (D,F,R)
The colleges provide a voluntary testing program to assist students in clarifying interests and assessing general aptitudes With this information, counselors are better able to assist individual students in making their educational and career choices and making optimum use of the resources available. Services include:
Diagnostic Testing for classes or individual instruction Make-up Tests for classes
CLEP (College Level Examination Program) tests are administered on the third Saturday of each month. Telephone 629-2497 for the specific schedule
Test Center (D)
The test center, located in S0141 A, is open half days and two evenings a week. Students should check the schedule posted in the Learning Development Center (S0141) at the beginning of each semester for test center hours. The test center provides achievement, aptitude, and vocational interest testing in addition to the assessment program.
Writing Center (D,F,R)
The Writing Center provides direct support for students enrolled in various English classes and assists students with writing projects from any course Through individual instruction and using a variety of materials the Center helps students develop writing skills in the following areas:
Planning
choosing and narrowing a topic .
determining the aspects of the topic to be developed
developing concrete/specific details
organizing details Writing
writing a topic sentence
writing a thesis statement
writing a paragraph
writing an essay
writing a research paper or report
using transitions Revising
subject focus
sentence structure Editing
grammar and usage
punctuation
spelling Research
using library sources
taking notes
referencing secondary sources
The Writing Center is staffed with highly qualified, professional faculty who have successfully trained students to be competent, self-reliant writers across a variety of fields.
Learning Materials Centers
(Front Range Community College and Red Rocks Community College)
The Learning Materials Centers (LMC), which are located at Front Range Community College and Red Rocks Community College, are a combination library, audio-visual department and independent learning center. They provide learning materials, audio-visual equip ment, study and program production facilities and staff services to supplement and support the curriculum of the colleges The LMC's also provide resources of a cultural and recreational nature, not necessarily stemming from the curriculum, and cooperate with other libraries in borrowing and lending books and other information resources
To meet the needs of a diverse student population, the LMC's provide a variety of educational materials consisting of: books, periodicals, newspapers, microforms, audio and videotapes, films, filmstrips, slides, transparencies, recordings, and multi media kits The LMCs also instruct students in exploring and using these varied resources and increasing their skills in finding answers to many questions related to their studies.
In addition to providing information, educational material and a capable staff to serve the total student body, the LMCs also make similar services available to the general public.
Auraria Library
Denver Auraria Community College
The Auraria Library provides a wide variety of learning resources for the students and faculty of Denver Auraria Community College and the other Auraria institutions. The library has almost 700,000 volumes of books, microforms, and bound periodicals, in addition to over 1,700 current periodical and newspaper subscriptions The main collection is supplemented by a Design and Planning Resource Center which is located in Bromley Building, Suite 200 In addition, as a member of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, the Auraria Library has access to an additional six million volumes through interlibrary loan as well as being able to access materials across the country
All students are encouraged to take a 50 minute self-guided au diotape tour of the library to familiarize themselves with the services and resources available to support their academic pursuits Specia services offered by the library include computerized bibliographic searches, library orientation and instruction for groups and individu als, a depository of U S. and Colorado government publications and media listening and viewing facilities. Library rooms are also


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
available for individual study, group conferences and typing. A new resource center for disabled students has also been established within the library.
The Media and Telecommunications Division of the library also has an internship program and a self-service graphics lab which might be of particular interest to students
Bookstores
Auraria Book Center (Denver Auraria Community College) Telephone: 629-3230
Location: Lawrence at 10th St. in the Student Center Hours: Please call for information
Front Range Community College Bookstore Telephone 466-8811
Location: 3645 West 112th Ave in the Student Center Hours (during class sessions): 9 a m.-8:30 p.m Mon.-Thur.: 9 a m.-3 p.m. Fri.
Red Rocks Community College Bookstore Telephone: 988-6160
Location: 12600 West Sixth Ave. on the Bridge Hours (during class sessions): 9 a m -8:30 p m Mon.-Thur.: 9 a m.-4 p.m. Fri.
The Bookstores are the student source for all required and non-required educational materialsused and new textbooks, dictionaries and reference books, school and course related supplies.
The Bookstores are also a source for college(s) imprinted items, art and drafting supplies, office supplies, sundries, gift items, greeting cards, candy and soft goods.
Services offered by the Bookstores include special orders, used book buy, limited check cashing, photo finishing, postage stamps, graduation announcements and class rings Hole punches, pencil sharpeners and staplers are always available for student use
Supplemental Services for Disadvantaged Students
Services and instruction are provided to disadvantaged occupational students including guidance, tutoring, testing and cooperative education.


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Consortium of Ethnic Studies
The Denver Auraria Community College offers the Associate of Arts Degree with an emphasis in Black Studies or Chicano studies The following ethnic studies courses are offered and course descriptions may be found under the departmental listings in the Course Descriptions section Note: All of the courses are 3 credit hours
ART 195 The Art of Africa and Black Americans
ECO 265 Black Economic Development
HIS 116 The Native American Experience and Indian History
HIS 130 The Southwest United States
HIS 135 Introduction to Latin American History
HIS 241 Black Civilization Africa
HIS 242 Black Civilization America
HIS 243 Land Grants and Their Relationship To The Contemporary Chicano
HIS 246 Mexico: Colonial Period Present
HIS 271 Mestf America: Middle America
HUM 115 Introduction to Chicano Studies
HUM 126 Folklore of Mexico and the Southwest
HUM 127 Indigenismo and The Chicano
HUM 225 Contemporary Chicano
HUM 251 Curanderismo
LIT 125 Introduction to Chicano Literature
LIT 229 Contemporary Black Literature
POS 206 Federal Indian Policies
POS 251 Chicano Political Experience
POS 253 Third World Politics and The Chicanos
POS 265 Black Political Thought and Experience
PSY 255 Psychological Development of The Black Personality
PSY 260 Psychology of The Chicano
SOC 210 La Familia Chicana
soc 230 Sociology of the Chicano Community
SOC 236 The;Chicano and The Schools
soc 241 Sociology of the Black Community I
soc 242 Sociology of the Black Community II
soc 266 The Contemporary Native American
soc 267 The Native American in Urban America


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Developmental Studies Program
The Developmental Studies Program is designed for students who desire to strengthen their learning skills. Students will find courses which assist them in successfully reaching both vocational and educational goals. Students may take Developmental Studies courses which focus on basic skills, and refresher courses which provide coping skills or which students take for personal satisfaction. Students may enter this program at various levels based on assessment recommendations or through personal choice. In addition, they may take courses concurrently with courses in their major program areas Students will find a variety of instructional methods. These methods may include small classes allowing for individual attention, open entry/open exit, tutorial assistance, self-paced lab study, variable credit offerings, and techniques for reducing anxiety and increasing success. Since all Developmental Studies courses are based on a mastery learning system, students will work at their own pace until they achieve the course objectives.
The following developmental studies courses are offered and course descriptions may be found under the departmental listings in the Course Descriptions section:
EDU 140 1-3 Credit Hours Seminar in Peer Tutoring
ENG 099 1-3 Credit Hours Sound and Spelling
ENG 103 1-3 Credit Hours Workshop to Reading, Writing and Speaking
ENG 105 1-3 Credit Hours Study Skills
ENG 107 3 Credit Hours Language Fundamentals I
ENG 108 3 Credit Hours Language Fundamentals II
ESL100 1 or 3 Credit Hours .. Basic ESL
ESL101 1 or 3 Credit Hours .. Low Intermediate ESL
ESL102 1 or 3 Credit Hours .. High Intermediate ESL
ESL 103 1 or 3 Credit Hours .. Advanced ESL
GED 010 1-3 Credit Hours Developmental GED
GED011 1-3 Credit Hours GED Preparation
MAT 090 3 Credit Hours Basic Operations on Whole Numbers
MAT 095 3 Credit Hours Process and Procedures of Mathematics I
MAT 096 1-3 Credit Hours Process and Procedures of Mathematics II
MAT 103 1-3 Credit Hours Math Anxiety
MAT 106 3 Credit Hours Introduction to Mathematics
MAT 107' 5 Credit Hours Mathematics for Electronics
PSY 099 3 Credit Hours Job Search Technique Workshop
PSY 108 3 Credit Hours Vocational Exploration
REA 090 1-3 Credit Hours Introduction to Basic Reading Skills
REA 091 1-3 Credit Hours Introduction to Reading and Study Skills
REA 100 1-3 Credit Hours Building Everyday Reading Skills
REA 101 3 Credit Hours Skills for College Reading
REA 102 1-3 Credit Hours Skills for College Reading II
REA 103 1-3 Credit Hours Workshop in Reading, Writing and Speaking
REA 104 1-3 Credit Hours Skill in Test-Taking
REA 105 1-5 Credit Hours Study Skills
REA 106 1-3 Credit Hours Vocabulary Development
REA 109 1-3 Credit Hours Critical Analysis in Reading Reasoning
REA 131 1-3 Credit Hours Speed Reading and Effective Comprehension


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Red Rocks Community College Coordinated Programs with Warren Occupational Technical Center
There is an increased number of educational programs available to students as a result of a cooperative agreement between Red Rocks Community College and the Warren Occupational Technical Center. The Warren Center is a Jefferson County technical center for high school students. Through the cooperative agreement, adults may enroll in the following vocational-technical programs offered at the Warren Center:
Auto Body Trades Computer Operator Copy Preparation Cosmetology Data Entry Health Occupations Industrial Machine Maintenance and Repair
Litho Preparation Machine Tool Technology Offset Printing Radio and TV Technology Restaurant Arts Sheet Metal
Small Engine Mechanics
Upholstery
Urban Horticulture
The cooperative agreement also allows high school students to enroll in selected vocational programs at Red Rocks Community College. The selected programs are listed in the Warren Center Information Bulletin.
High School Students Wanting to Take Classes at Red Rocks Community College
High school students interested in taking an occupational program at Red Rocks Community College should contact their high school counselor
Adult Students Wanting to Take Courses at the Warren Technical Center
Adults interested in taking a daytime occupational program at the Warren Center should call the Advising Center at Red Rocks Community College The telephone number is 988-6160, extension 288.


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Technical Education Center
This section lists occupational programs which are available through the Technical Education Center for students who are interested in concentrated fast-track training.
Fast-track training permits students to complete a certificate program in seven months or less. College credit is granted by Denver Auraria Community College for all courses successfully completed these credits can be applied to an associate degree should the student choose to complete the necessary requirements at one of the colleges.
The Technical Education Center is a job training center offering business and industry-based training. Programs are open-entry, open-exit and operate year-around with individualized instruction, allowing a student to enroll anytime and leave when program requirements are complete. Students attend class an average of 6 to 7 hours a day, 5 days each week.
The center also provides classes in career exploration, job search techniques, GED preparation, basic study skills and cooperative education as well as career assessment testing using Valpar/MESA, educational counseling, and job placement assistance
All programs have been approved by or are in the approval process with the State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education (SBCCOE) Financial aid is available to qualified students through the Denver Auraria Community College The Technical Education Center is located at:
6221 Downing Street ^
Denver, Colorado 80216 For more information call:
289-2243.
Chemical Operator Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for job placement in various chemical operation occupations Students will learn the use and operation of chemical processing equipment such as pumps, valves, heat exchangers, filters, distillers, evaporators, flow meters, and transfer lines with holding tanks Industrial safety and procedures such as sampling, analysis, and dissolution are also covered
First Semester
* Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
ENG 105 Study Skills 3 60
CHE 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry I , 4 90
MAT 114 Math for College Students 3' 50
PHY 100 Basic Physics 4 60
CHO 106 Balance & Weights 2 45
CHO 107 Glove Box 2 45
18 350
Second Semester
Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
CHO 100 Vacuum Systems 3 60
CHO 105 Chemical Reagents & Makeups 3 60
CHO 108 Dissolution 3 60
CHO 109 Filtration , 2 45
CHO 111 Ion Exchange 2 45
CHO 115 Raschig Ring Inspection 2 45
PSY 099 Job Search Techniques 3 45
18 360
Cooperative Education Certificate
This program is designed to place students in job training stations soon after enrollment. The program emphasizes job seeking/keeping skills, basic academic skills, job skills, positive work habits, and work conflict solving skills
First Semester Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
ENG 105 Study Skills 3 60
COE 290 Job Preparation Skills 3 45
PSY 099 Job Search Techniques 3 45
"XXX 297 Cooperative Education 9 450
18 600
"The prefix for this course is dependent upon the student's area of enrollment.
Industrial Drafter Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for job placement on drafting and design teams in industrial plants, engineering and manufacturing firms, and government agencies.
First Semester
Required Courses Credits Ct, Hrs.
ENG 105 Study Skills 3 60
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 6 120
DRI 106 Basic Descriptive Geometry 3 60
DRI 107 Section & Dimension Practices 6 120
18 360
Second Semester
Required Courses Credits Ct, Hrs.
DRI 109 Intersections & Developments 3 60
DRI 110 Intro to Assembly & Welding Drawings 3 60
DRI 115 Perspective Drawing 3 60
DRI 116 Mechanical Assembly & Detail 6 120
PSY 099 Job Search Techniques 3 45
18 345
Information Processing Cluster Certificates
This program is designed to prepare students for job placement in a cluster of general business and office occupations. Students who complete the Records and Filing Clerk semester are prepared for jobs such as filing clerk, records clerk, and office receptionist Students who complete the Bookkeeping Clerk semester are prepared for jobs such as bookkeeping clerk, payroll clerk and inventory clerk
Students who complete the Office Secretary semester are prepared for such jobs as clerk typist and office secretary as well as those listed above for the Records and Filing Clerk semester. Students who complete the Accounting Clerk semester are prepared for jobs such as accounting clerk and data entry clerk as well as those listed above for the Bookkeeping Clerk semester
Students who complete the Word Processor semester are prepared for jobs such as word processor and information processor as well as those listed above for the Records and Filing Clerk and Office Secretary semesters
Students who exit at the end of any semester receive a certificate
appropriate to the semester of enrollment First Semester Records and Filing Clerk Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
SEC 101 Typewriting I 4 75
SEC 101B Typing Skill Development 2 30
SEC 120. Filing & Records Control 2 30
SEC 148 Communications in the Office 1 15
BUS 136 Business Communication - 3 45
ENG 105 Study Skills 3 60
,ENG 107 Language Fundamentals I 3 45
18 300


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
31
Office Secretary
Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 75
SEC 200 Office Procedures 3 45
SEC 203 Typewriting III 4 75
BUS 115 Business Math by Machines 4 60
ACC 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
18 300
Word Processor
Required Courses Credits a. Hrs.
SEC 133 Word Processing Communication 3 60
SEC 215 Magnetic Card II Typewriting 3 45
SEC 217 CRT Typewriting 3 45
SEC 290 Special Topics 2 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
PSY 099 Job Search Techniques 3 45
18 300
Bookkeeping Clerk
Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
SEC 105 Office Skills for Non-Secretarial 3 60
ACC 106 Intro to Beginning Accounting 3 45
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 5 75
BUS 115 Business Math by Machines 4 60
ENG 105 Study Skills 3 60
18 300
Accounting Clerk
Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II ' 5 75
ACC 113 Intro to Computer Accounting 3 60
ACC 221 Cost Accounting 3 45
ACC 255 Computerized Accounting 4 75
PSY 099 Job Search Techniques 3 45
18 300
(Students that exit at the end of the Records and Filing Clerk, Bookkeeping Clerk and Office Secretary semesters are required to enroll in PSY 099 Job Search Techniques in addition to the courses shown.)
Machine Tool Operator Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for job placement in jobs that require the operation of lathes, milling machines, boring machines, shapers, grinders drillpresses, and hacksaws as well as jobs such as inspector and tool room attendant.
First Semester
Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
ENG 105 Study Skills 3 60
MTO 100 Shop Safety 3 45
MTO 105 Intro to Machine Shop 4 90
MTO 107 Blueprint Reading for Machine Shop 3 45
MTO 115 Lubrication & Maintenance 1 20
MTO 117 Vertical Mill Setup & Operation I 4 90
18 350
Second Semester Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
MTO 106 Metrology 2 30
MTO 118 Vertical Mill Setup & Operation II 4 90
MTO 119 Horizontal Mill Setup & Operation 4 90
MTO 120 Machine Shop Grinding 3 60
MTO 125 Shaper Setup & Operation 2 45
MAT 114 Math for College Students 3 50
18 365
Third Semester Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
MTO 126 Engine Lathe Setup & Operation I 4 90
MTO 127 Engine Lathe Setup & Operation II 4 90
MTO 128 Engine Lathe Setup & Operation III 4 90
MTO 129 Job Shop Machining 3 60
PSY 099 Job Search Techniques 3 45
18 375
Welder Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for job placement in various construction and repair welding occupations. Students will learn to set up and use oxy-acetylene units, AC/DC welding machines, and MIG and TIG welding machines for both structural and pipe welding. The student is also prepared for A.S.M.E. and A.W.S. pipe testing.
First Semester
Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
ENG 105 Study Skills 3 60
WEF 100 Oxy-Acetylene Safety & Welding 3 60
WEF 106 Brazing & Special Applications 3 60
WEF 107 Blueprint Reading & Estimating 3 50
WEF 108 S.M.A.W. Safety & Electrode
Identification 3 60
WEF 109 S.M.A.W. Surface Padding 3 60
18 350
Second Semester
Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
WEF 110 S.M.A.W. Joints in 3 positions 3 60
WEF 115 Plate Code Test, E7018 with Back
Strip 3 60
WEF 116 Plate Code Test, E6010 without
Backing 3 60
MAT 114 Math for College Students 3 50
WEF 130 G.M.A.W. A.W.S Pipe & Plate 3 60
WEF 201 A.S.M.E. Pipe Test & Prep, Sect IX,
E6010 3 60
18 350
Third Semester
Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
WEF 203 S.M.A.W. Pipe Testing, 2G & 5G 3 60
WEF 206 S.M.A.W. Pipe Testing, 6G 3 60
WEF 207 G.T.A.W. Safety & Welding 3 60
WEF 208 G.T.A.W. Welding Alloys & Varied
Shapes 3 60
WEF 209 G.M.A.W. Pipe & Plate Code Testing 3 60
PSY 099 Job Search Techniques 3 45
18 345




1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
33
Graduation Requirements
Degrees
The Community College of Denver System colleges award the following degrees:
Associate of Arts (AA)
Associate of Science (AS)
Associate of General Studies (AGS)
Associate of Applied Science (AAS)
To receive an ASSOCIATE DEGREE, a student shall:
1. Be currently enrolled in a college(s) with exceptions approved by the dean of instruction
2. File an "application for graduation" form during the term in which the student intends to graduate, according to the deadline published in the schedule of courses for that term
3. Complete a minimum of sixty (60) semester hours, including the specific subject or course requirements as prescribed by the specific degree fJrogram Certain programs may require more than the minimum of sixty (60) semester hours.
4. Complete appropriate general education requirements for the degree.
Other Policies Pertaining to Graduation
1. The Community College of Denver System will not accept "D" grades in transfer
In order to graduate with a Certificate or an Associate of Applied Science degree, some programs may require a student to earn at least a "C" in all course work Students should check with their specific instructional division as well as their advisor for information regarding the minimum grade point average requirement which is necessary for graduation. A cu^ mulative 2 0 GPA is required in all credit attempted In the Associate of General Studies (AGS), Associate of Arts (AA), and Associate of Science (AS) degrees, a cumulative GPA of 2.0 (C) in all credit attempted is required for gradua tion.
A student may repeat a course only once with less than a "C" grade. Courses for which the student has received a grade of "C" or better may not be repeated for credit; exceptions must be made by both the full time faculty or the advisor and the division director.
2. Students who transfer with 45 semester hours or more, must complete the last 15 hours counted toward the degree with a C" or better average at the colleges Students who have earned 45 semester hours or more at the colleges may earn a degree by transferring approved 15 semester hours that may be counted toward the degree with a "C" or better average For the Associate of Applied Science degree, a minimum of 15 hours in the program area must be earned at the colleges Exceptions may be approved by the dean of instruction
3. No more than six (6) semester hours of Independent Study course work may be applied to any associate degree program.
4 No more than six (6) semester hours of Special Topics courses may be applied to any associate degree program
5 A student is considered to be under the guidelines of the catalog of the year of initial entry. If a break in attendance of two consecutive semesters or more occurs, the catalog of the new re-entry year is the document of authority
6. The colleges reserve the right to substitute, or delete course work requirements based on current curriculum Students are assured that if the curriculum does change, the colleges will make every effort to determine an equitable solution.
Certificates
To receive a CERTIFICATE, a student shall:
1. Complete the specified subject matter or course requirements of an approved vocational/technical program. For programs longer than one semester, at least fifteen (15) credit hours must be earned at the colleges. (In mitigating circumstances, certain portions of this requirement may be waived by the dean of instruction).
2. Earn an overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) in all credit counted toward the certificate
3. File an "application'for graduation form during the term-in which the student intends to graduate, according to the deadline published in the schedule of courses for that term.
Recognition of Achievement
The colleges offer many courses, conferences, workshops and seminars for upgrading job skills as well as for personal enrichment Successful completion of courses of this type may result in the granting of a "Recognition of Achievement." This may be requested from the appropriate instructional division
Associate of Arts Degree (AA)
The Associate of Arts degree (AA) is intended to prepare students to transfer to a four-year college or university for the purpose of obtaining a baccalaureate or other advanced degree. This degree is designed for the student whose emphasis of study is in the arts, communications and/or social sciences.
Students should review the catalog of the institution to which they plan to transfer in order to determine specific course and graduation requirements Students are also urged to seek the advice of division directors, faculty, and counselors in the selection of transfer courses.
.Information concerning transfer to Colorado universities and colleges is available in the Office of Student Services.
Requirements:
A student who is interested in earning an AA degree must complete a minimum of sixty (60) credits in transferable course work. Please refer to the list of "Courses Intended For Transfer. Credits are to be distributed as follows:
(no course fulfills more than one (1) requirement)
1 GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: (Please refer to the
list of non-applicable courses.)
Communications (ENG 111,112) 6 credits
Arts and Humanities (ART, DRA, FRE, GER, HUM, LIT,
MUS, PHI, SPA) 3 credits
Mathematics (MAT 121 and above) 3 credits
'Science (BIO, CHE, CSC, EAS, PHY, SCI) 3 credits
Social Sciences (ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, POS, PSY,
SOC, SOS) 3 credits
Credit from any of the following five (5) areas
in any combination: 12 credits
Arts and Humanities (ART, DRA, FRE, GER, HUM, LIT,
MUS, PHI, SPA)
Communications (COM, ENG, JOU, REA, SPE)
Mathematics (MAT 121 and above)
Science (BIO, CHE, CSC, EAS, PHY, SCI)
Social Sciences (ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, POS, PSY',
SOC, SOS)
*GEO 111,112, and ANT 201, 202 may be taken and counted toward the science requirement. However, these courses may not then be counted toward the social science requirement


34
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
2 ELECTIVES ** 30 credits
''Excluding courses that will not transfer and limited to a maximum of three (3) credits in physical education.
Associate Of Science Degree (AS)
The Associate of Science degree (AS) is intended to prepare students to transfer to a four-year college or university for the purpose of obtaining a baccalaureate degree or other advanced degree. This degree is designed for the student whose emphasis of study is in science or mathematics.
Students should review the catalog of the institution to which they plan to transfer in order to determine specific course and graduation requirements. Students are also urged to seek the advice of division directors, faculty, and counselors in the selection of transfer courses.
Information concerning transfer to Colorado universities and colleges is available in the Office of Student Services.
Requirements:
A student who is interested in earning an AS degree must complete a minimum of sixty (60) credits in transferable course work. Please refer to the list of "Courses Intended For Transfer'. Credits are to be distributed as follows:
(no course fulfills more than one (1) requirement)
1 GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: (Please refer to the
list of non-applicable courses)
Communications (ENG 111,112) 6 credits
Arts and Humanities (ART, DRA, FRE, GER, HUM, LIT,
MUS, PHI, SPA) 3 credits
Mathematics (MAT 121 and above) 3 credits
Science (BIO, CHE, CSC, EAS, PHY, SCI) 3 credits
Social Sciences (ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, POS, PSY,
SOC, SOS) 3 credits
Credit from any of the following five (5) areas in any
combination: 12 credits
Arts and Humanities (ART, DRA, FRE, GER, HUM, LIT,
MUS, PHI, SPA)
Communications (COM, ENG, JOU, REA, SPE)
Mathematics (MAT 121 and above)
Science (BIO, CHE, CSC, EAS, PHY, SCI)
Social Sciences (ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, POS, PSY,
SOC, SOS)
2 SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS (BIO, CHE, CSC, EAS,
MAT, PHY, SCI) 20 credits
3. ELECTIVES* 10 credits
'Excluding courses that will not transfer and limited to a maximum of three (3) credits in physical education .
Associate Of General Studies Degree (AGS)
The Associate of General Studies degree (AGS) is available for students who want to complete a broad program of courses without constraints of specialization. This degree is not intended for transfer. Depending upon the receiving institution, individual courses within the degree may be transferable.
Information concerning transfer to Colorado universities and colleges is available in the Office of Student Services.
Requirements:
A student who is interested in earning an AGS degree must complete a minimum of sixty (60) credits to be distributed as follows:
(no course fulfills more than one (1) requirement)
1. GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: (Please refer to the list of non-applicable courses.)
Credit from each of the following five (5) areas:
Arts and Humanities (ART, DRA, FRE, GER, HUM, LIT,
MUS, PHI, SPA) 3 credits
Communications (COM, ENG, JOU, REA, SPE) 3 credits
Mathematics (MAT) 3 credits
'Science (BIO, CHE, CSC, EAS, PHY, SCI) 3 credits
Social Sciences (ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, POS, PSY, SOC, SOS)
3 credits
Credit from any of the following five (5) areas: 3 credits
Arts and Humanities (ART, DRA, FRE, GER, HUM, LIT,
MUS, PHI, SPA)
Communications (COM, ENG, JOU, REA, SPE)
Mathematics (MAT)
Science (BIO, CHE, CSC, EAS, PHY, SCI)
Social Sciences (ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, POS, PSY,
SOC, SOS)
'GEO 111, 112 and ANT 201, 202 may be taken and counted toward the science requirement. However, these courses may not then be counted toward the social sciences requirement.
2. ELECTIVES '* 42 credits
"May be selected from transfer and/or occupational courses.
Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS)
The Associate of Applied Science degree (AAS) prepares students for (a) entry-level employment in a given occupation, or (b) upgrading/stabilizing employment. This program is not intended for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program; however, some of its courses may be accepted toward a bachelor's degree at some institutions. Please consult an academic advisor for further information.
Requirements:
A student who is interested in earning an AAS degree must complete a minimum of sixty (60) credits to be distributed as follows:
(no course fulfills more than one (1) requirement)
1. GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: (Please refer to the
list of non-applicable courses.)
Communications (COM, ENG, JOU, REA, SPE) 3 credits
Mathematics (MAT) 3 credits
Credit from any two (2) of the following three (3) areas: 6 credits Arts and Humanities (ART, DRA, FRE, GER, HUM, LIT,
MUS, PHI, SPA)
Science (BIO, CHE, EAS, PHY, SCI)
Social Sciences (ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, POS, PSY,
SOC, SOS)
Individual departments may specify particular courses that may be counted toward these general education requirements.
2. SPECIFIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 48 credits NOTE: Most AAS degree programs require more than sixty (60)
credits.
Summary of Minimum Degree Requirements
Specific
General Science and Program Total
Degree Education Electives Mathematics Requirements Credits
AA 30 30 - 60
AS 30 10 20 60
AGS 18 42 - 60
AAS 12 - 48 60


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
35
Courses Intended For Transfer
These courses transfer to one or more of the four-year colleges or universities in Colorado Anthropology All courses.
Art All courses except 299.
Biology All courses except 106, 109, 299.
Chemistry -111,112, 201,202.
Communications All courses except 130.
Computer Science All courses Drama All courses.
Earth Science -111,112,201,206, 207, 208 Economics All courses.
English All courses numbered 110 and above.
Geography All courses numbered 111 and above except 299. German-111,112,211,212.
History All courses Humanities All courses.
Journalism All courses.
Literature All courses
Mathematics All courses numbered 121 and above.
Music All courses.
Philosophy All courses.
Physical Education All courses.
Physics -151, 152, 161, 162, 163, 164 Political Science All courses.
Psychology All courses numbered 111 and above.
Reading-101,102, 103,109.
Science All courses numbered 111 and above.
Sociology All courses Social Science All courses.
Spanish All courses except 101,102.
Speech All courses.
Additional courses may be transferable to one or more of the four-year colleges or universities in Colorado For specific information, please consult an advisor
Courses That Are Not Applicable Toward The General Education Requirements
The following courses will not count toward the general education
requirements:
EDU 140 1-3 Credits Seminar in Peer Tutoring
ESL 100 1 or 3 Credits Basic ESL
ESL 101 1 or 3 Credits Low Intermediate ESL
ESL102 1 or 3 Credits High Intermediate ESL
ESL 103 1 or 3 Credits Advanced ESL
ENG 099 1-3 Credits Sound and Spelling
ENG 105 1-3 Credits Study Skills
ENG 107 3 Credits Language Fundamentals I
ENG 108 3 Credits Language Fundamentals II
GED 010 1-3 Credits Developmental GED
GED011 1-3 Credits GED Preparation
MAT 090 3 Credits Basic Operations on Whole Numbers
MAT 095 1-3 Credits Process and Procedures of Mathematics I
MAT 096 1-3 Credits Process and Procedures of Mathematics II
MAT 103 1-3 Credits Math Anxiety
MAT 106 3 Credits Introduction to Mathematics
MAT 107 5 Credits Mathematics for Electronics
PSY 099 3 Credits Job Search Technique Workshop
PSY 108 1-3 Credits Vocational Exploration
REA 090 1-3 Credits Introduction to Basic Reading Skills
REA 091 1-3 Credits Introduction to Reading and Study Skills
REA 100 1-3 Credits Building Everyday Reading Skills
REA 104 1-3 Credits Skill in Test-Taking
REA 105 1-5 Credits Study Skills
REA 106 1-3 Credits Vocabulary Development
REA 131 1-3 Credits Speed Reading and Effective Comprehension
Petitioning For Waivers and/or Program Substitutions
Students who, due to extenuating circumstances, wish to petition for a waiver and/or substitution of program requirements must complete a "Waiver/Program Substitution Request Form." The form is available in each division office.
The student should complete the request and have it approved by the program coordinator, the division director and the instructional dean. The form will then be kept on file in the Registrar's Office.


36
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Instructional Programs
Special Note for All Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS) Programs and All Certificate Programs:
These programs are not intended for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program; however, some of the courses may be accepted toward a bachelor's degree at some institutions. Please consult an advisor for further information
Accounting (D, F, R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed for students whose objective is to obtain a technical degree in accounting. Students with an existing associate or baccalaureate degree in non-accounting areas or with sufficient earned college credit m£y be able to qualify for the accounting Associate of Applied Science degree by taking accounting courses only.
Students planning to transfer to a senior institution can design, in conjunction with an accounting adviser, their associate degree programs in accounting for maximum transferability. Students should initiate this advisement early in the program.
Required Core Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111 ACC 112 Accounting Principles I Accounting Principles II or Corporate Accounting 5 75
ACC 116 2-5 30-75
ACC 131 Individual Income Tax I 3 45
ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting I 3 45
ACC 221 BUS 110 Cost Accounting Mathematics of Business/Personal 3 45
Finance 3 45
CPB 100* SEC 105 Introduction to Computers Office Skills for Non- Secretarial Students or Elective (with approval of accounting 4 60
advisor) 3 45
Total Core Hours Additional Required Courses 26-29 390-435
Management/Economics: Select at least two courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
ECO 201 Principles of Economics (Macro) 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law 4 60
MAN 215 Principles of Management 3 45
6-7 90-105
Accounting/Computers/Finance Electives: Select at least four courses with a minimum of two at the 200 level having ACC pre-
fixes.
Students whose objective is transfer to a senior institution may substitute transfer courses for non-transferable courses in this area (Accounting/Computers/Finance) Any such substitution must be in
writing, approved by the Accounting Department, and include
MAT 127- -Survey of Calculus.
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ACC 105 Payroll Procedures 3 45
ACC 113 Introduction to Accounting on the
Computer 3 45
ACC 132 Individual Income Tax II 2 30
ACC 212 Intermediate Accounting II 3 45
ACC 215 Accounting Systems 3 45
ACC 216 Governmental Accounting 3 45
ACC 235 Business Taxation 3 45
ACC 250 Oil and Gas Accounting 1 4 60
CPB 106 COBOL (4)
CPB 108 BASIC (3) 3-4 45-60
MAN 225 Managerial Finance 3 45
11-13 165-195
General Education Electives: Select a minimum of four courses with accounting advisor approval to meet current College general education requirements for the Associate of Applied Science degree.
Communications One course 3 45
Mathematics One course 3-4 45-60
Arts and Humanities] Two courses, one
Social Science r each from two of
Science J the three areas bracketed 6-8 90-120
12-15 180-225
Electives: When all above requirements for the Associate of Applied Science degree in accou nting have been fulfilled, students may, as needed to reach the 60-hour minimum required for the degree, take additional elective courses. These electives must be chosen in conjunction with an accounting advisor.
Total Minimum Required Hours 60 900
Students desiring to qualify for the Associate of Applied Science degree must earn a minimum of C in all courses having the following prefixes: ACC, BUS, and MAT.
Students desiring to acquire Cooperative Education work experience as part of the Associate of Applied Science degree program should consult an accounting advisor before entering the third semester of course work.
*CPB 100 requires an additional laboratory credit hour of CPB 095. Any laboratory credit does not count towards the 60-credit minimum for the degree.
Two-Semester Accounting/Business Certificate
This program is recommended for students who wish to study basic business fundamentals while developing entry-level accounting skills The certificate program constitutes an acceptable first-year curriculum in accounting and business for an associate degree and applies towards a baccalaureate degree at many senior institutions This certificate is also recommended for students who have not selected an option in accounting or business, but who wish to complete a program which permits many continuing options without loss of credit Students should consult an adviser for counseling concerning any courses with alternatives, for information about continuing opportunities at the cdlleges, and/or for details regarding transfer to senior institutions upon completion of this certificate program.
Required Major Courses
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I Credits 5 Ct. Hrs. 75
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II or ACC 116-221 5 75
CPB 100* Introduction to Computers 4 60
MAN 105 MAN 206 Introduction to Business or Business Law 3-4 45-60
SEC 105 Office Skills for Non-Secretarial Students or


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
37
Elective with approval of accounting advisor
45
Total Required Hours 20-21 300-315
Required Electives
(Select a minimum of 3 credits each with advisor approval.) Mathematics elective 3 45
Communications elective 3 45
Elective 3 45
Total Required Electives
135
450
Total Required Hours 30
*CPB 100 requires one additional laboratory credit (CPB 095) Laboratory credit does not count toward the certificate.
Administrative Support Occupations (D.F.R)
These program options are designed to prepare students for entry level positions and/advancement in businesses, governmental agencies and other institutions which employ persons in administrative support areas.
Core Course Requirements
ACC 103 Bookkeeping (3) or
ACC 106 Intro to Beginning Accounting (3) or
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I
BUS 110 Mathematics of Business/Personal Finance (3) and
SEC 115 Business Machines (1)
or
BUS 115 Business Math by Machines
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications
MAN 105 Introduction to Business
SEC 101 Typewriting!
SEC 102 Typewriting II
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control
SEC 200 Office Procedures
or
BUS 297 Cooperative Education
Credits
3-5
Ct. Hrs.
45-75
3-6
60
45
45
75
75
30
Administrative Assistant Option (D,F,R) Associate of Applied Science Degree Required Major Courses
Core Course Requirements plus
SEC 131 Introduction to Word Processing SEC 230 Machine Transcription MAN 215 Principles of Management MAN 116 Principles of Supervision CPB 100 Introduction to Computers1 Economics Elective Elective
General Education Courses
Total Required Hours
1CPB 100 requires CPB 095 (1 Credit Hour)
Legal Secretarial Option (D,F) Associate of Applied Science Degree Required Major Courses
Core Course Requirements plus
Credits
26-31
3
4 3
3
4 3 3
12
Credits
26-31
MAN 206 Business Law 4 60
PAR 107 Legal Research 3 45
SEC 209 Legal Terminology SEC 111 Alpha Shorthand I 2 30
SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand I SEC 112 Alpha Shorthand II 5 75
SEC 122 Gregg Shorthand II 4 60
SEC 131 Introduction to Word Processing SEC 215 Mag Card II Typewriting or SEC 217 CRT Typing 3 45
3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 66-71 1110-1275
Secretarial-Bilingual Office Careers Option (F) Associate of Applied Science Degree Required Major Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
Core Course Requirements plus 26-31 510-675
SEC 100 Spanish Typewriting SEC 124 Spanish Gregg Shorthand or SEC 230 Machine Transcription SEC 256 Sp. Bus. Terminology 3 45
4 60
& Translation Techniques SEC 260 Spanish Business Correspondence 3 45
& Documentation 3 45
SPA 111 SpanishFirst Year SPA 112 SpanishFirst Year 5 75
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish I 3-5 45-75
SPA 221 Current Spanish 3 45
Electives 3 45
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 65-72 1095-1290
Medical Secretarial Option (D) Associate of Applied Science Degree Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
510-675 Core Course Requirements 26-31 510-675
plus
HOC 100 Medical Terminology I 1 15
ACC 105 Payroll Procedures 3 45
SEC 111 Alpha Shorthand I 5 75
SEC 112 Alpha Shorthand II
Ct. Hrs. or
510-675 SEC 203 Typewriting III 4 60
SEC 131 Introduction to Word Processing 3 45
45 SEC 215 Mag Card II Typewriting
60 or
45 SEC 217 CRT Typing 3 45
45 SEC 206 Insurance Methods and Claims 3 45
60 SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
45 General Education Courses 12 180
45
180 Total Required Hours 64-69 1080-1245
1035-1200 Secretarial Option (D,F,R,)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
Core Course Requirements ' 26-31 510-675
plus
Ct. Hrs. SEC 111 Alpha Shorthand I
510-675 or
SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand I 5 75


38
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
SEC 112 Alpha Shorthand II
or
SEC 122 SEC 131 Gregg Shorthand II Introduction to Word Processing or Introduction to Computers 4 60
CPB 100 3-4 45-60
SEC 203 Typewriting III 4 60
SEC 223 Shorthand Speedbuilding 4 60
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 'CPB 100 requires CPB 095 (1 Credit Hour) 62-68 1050-1230
Word Processing Option (D,F,R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Credits Ct. Hrs.
Core Course Requirements 26-31 510-675
CPB 100 plus Introduction to Computers' 4 60
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision , 3 45
SEC 131 Introduction to Word Processing 3 45
SEC 133 Word Processing Communications I 3 45
SEC 203 Typewriting III 4 60
SEC 215 SEC 217 Mag Card II Typewriting or CRT Typing 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
Electives 3 45
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 62-67 1050-1215 'CPB 100 Requires CPB 095 (1 credit hour)
General Clerical (D,F,R)
Certificate
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103
ACC 106 BUS 115 BUS 136
SEC 101 SEC 102 SEC 120 SEC 200
SEC 205
BUS 297
'Elective
Bookkeeping
or
Intro to Beginning Accounting 3 45
Business Math by Machines Business Communications 4 60
Applications 3 45
Typewriting I 4 75
Typewriting II .4 75
Filing & Records Control Office Procedures 2 30
or Office Simulation or
Cooperative Education 3 135
Business Elective' 3 45
English Elective' 3 45
Total Required Hours 29 555
chosen must have approval of advisor.
Chiropractic Assisting (D) Certificate
(Program Not Yet Approved by State Agencies)
The objective of this program is to prepare students for entry-level employment in chiropractic offices and clinics. Graduates will assist the chiropractic doctor in clinical and front office procedures
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
CPA 101 Chiropractic Modalities I 3 60
CPA 102 Chiropractic Modalities II 3 60
HOC 100 Medical Terminology I 1 15
RAT 100 Radiographic Techniques I 3 60
RAT 105 Radiographic Positioning 3 60
13 255
Additional Required Courses
ACC 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
CPA 297 Cooperative Education 6 270
SEC 101 Typewriting I 4 75
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 25
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 2 30
SEC 206 Insurance Methods and Claims 3 45
English Elective 3 45
22 535
Total Required Hours 35 790
Medical Secretarial (D) Certificate
ACC 103 Bookkeeping Credits 3 Ct. Hrs. 45
ACC 105 Payroll Procedures 3 45
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 15
BUS 110 Mathematics of Business/Personal Finance 3 45
English Elective 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I 4 75
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 75
SEC 120 Filing & Records Control 2 30
HOC 100 Medical Terminology 1 15
SEC 200 BUS 297 Office Procedures or Cooperative Education 3-6 135-270
SEC 206 Insurance Methods and Claims 3 45
SEC 131 Introduction to Word Processing 3 45
SEC 215 SEC 217 Mag Card II Typewriting or CRT Typing 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
Total Required Hours 40-43 720-855
Stenographic (D,F,R) Certificate
Credits Ct. Hrs.
English Elective 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I 4 75
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 75
SEC 111 Alphabetic Shorthand I
SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand I 5 75
SEC 112 Alpha Shorthand II
SEC 122 Gregg Shorthand II 4 60
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 15
SEC 120 Filing & Records Control 2 30
SEC 223 Shorthand Speedbuilding and
Transcription 4 60
BUS 297 Cooperative Education 3-6 135-270
Total Required Hours 33-36 615-750
Word Processing (D,F,R)
Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions and/or career advancement in businesses, governmental


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
agencies, and other institutions which employ persons in structured word processing
SEC 133 Word Processing Communications I Credits 3 Ct. Hrs. 45
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 75
SEC 131 Introduction to Word Processing 3 45
SEC 215 SEC 217 Mag Card II Typewriting or CRT Typing 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
Total Required Hours 17 270
Airframe Power Plant (D,F)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Students interested in the Airframe Power Plant Program may register for these courses at Emily Griffith Opportunity School. Upon completion of these courses at Opportunity School, an FAA certificate, and fifteen (15) semester hours, the student may receive an associate degree from the College. (Opportunity School credits are quarter hours. When application is made for the Associate Degree, these quarter hours will be computed as semester hours.) Other FAA certificates may be substituted for Emily Griffith Opportunity School courses.
Anthropology (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in anthropology A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree Should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution
Architectural Technology (F)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides you with entry level skills as a drafting technician in architectural offices and related building construction industries
Demonstrated mastery of skills is required The program is open-entry and open-exit. Therefore, you may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to complete the program for a degree, or to upgrade specific skills.
In order to graduate from this program, a student must earn at least a "C" in all course work.
"Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ATE 100 Basic Architectural Techniques 3 60
ATE 106 Construction Drawing Fundamentals 3 60
ATE 107 Residential Construction Drawings 6 120
ATE 108 Residential Construction Details 3 60
ATE 109 Light Commercial Construction Drawings 6 120
ATE 110 Light Commercial Construction Details 6 120
ATE 115 Three Dimensional Drawing Methods 3 60
ATE 200 Preliminary Working Drawing Development 6 120
ATE 205 Structural Materials 3 60
ATE 206 Structural Framing Systems 3 60
ATE 207 Heating, Ventilating, Air Conditioning Systems (HVAC) 3 60
ATE 208 Electrical Systems 3 60
ATE 209 Plumbing Systems 3 60
ATE 210 Building Specialties 6 120
ATE 215 Planned Building Groups 3 60
Total Required Hours 60 1200
General Education Courses (suggested minimum level requirements) MAT 114 Gen Math for College Students 3 45
39
PHY 100 Basic Physics 3 45
SOS 115 Intro to Soc. Sci 3 45
COM 110 Career Communication 3 45
12 180
Total Required Hours 72 1380
"Equivalent COE 296 and ATE 297 may be substituted for any of the modules with permission of the instructor, not to exceed six (6) credit hours.
Art (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in art. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution
Audiovisual Technology (R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
At the completion of this program, the student should be able to effectively provide services in the areas of equipment operation, basic maintenance, media production and media utilization The student should be employable in public educational, medical, or governmental agencies or private businesses and industries.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
AVT 105 AVT 108 Audiovisual Equipment Utilization Introduction to Audiovisual 3 67
AVT 109 Photography Graphic Techniques for Media 5 90
Productions 4 83
AVT 125 AV Projection Equipment Maintenance 5 90
AVT 180 AV Audio Production 5 90
AVT 202 Slide/Tape Production I 4 68
AVT211 AV Television Production I 6 113
Electives (must be approved by AVT advisor) 16 293-498
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours Approved AVT Elective Courses 60 1074-1279
AVT 100 Introduction to Educational Media 2 30
AVT 113 Script Visualization 1 15
AVT 115 Basic Video Production 1 15
AVT 201 Intermediate AV Photography 5 90
AVT212 AV Television Production II 4 83
AVT219 Slide Duplication 1 15
AVT 231 Audiovisual Design I 4 83
AVT 232 Audiovisual Design II 4 83
"AVT 297 Cooperative Education 2-6 90-270
COE 296 Cooperative Education Seminar 1 15
AVT 299 Independent Study 2-6 45-135
"Students who are not presently employed in the profession will be required to take a minimum of six credit hours of AVT 297, Cooperative Education before they can receive their Associate Degree Additional courses from other program areas may be acceptable Consult the AVT advisor for specifics.
Note: Additional^ courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog
Auto Body Painting (F)
Nine Month Certificate
This program provides you with job entry skills for the auto body painting trades and upgrading for those in the field who need to ac quire more skill.
Demonstrated mastery of skills is required The program is open-entry and open-exit. Therefore, you may complete of the courses enter the work force, then return at any time to cite the program for a certificate or to upgrade specific skills


40
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
In order to graduate from this program, a student must earn at least a C" in all course work.
PHY 100 Basic Physics COM 110 Career Communication
3 45
3 45
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ABP 100 Orientation on Policy and Auto Body Painting Safety, Sanding 3 60
ABP 102 Priming 3 60
ABP 103 Painting Acrylic Lacquer 3 60
ABP 104 Spot Painting with Acrylic Lacquer 3 60
ABP 105 Painting with Acrylic Enamel and Enamel 3 60
ABP 111 General Refinishing 1 3 60
ABP 112 General Refinishing II 3 60
ABP 113 General Refinishing III 3 60
ABP 114 General Refinishing IV 3 60
ABP 115 General Refinishing V 3 % 60
Total Required Hours 30 600
Auto Body Service (F)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides you with job entry skills for the auto body service trades and upgrading for those in the field who need to acquire more skill.
Demonstrated mastery of skills is required Programs are open-entry and open-exit. Therefore,' you may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time either to complete the program for a certificate or degree, or to upgrade specific skills.
In order to graduate from this program with a Certificate, or As sociate Applied Science Degree, a student must earn at least a "C" in all course work.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ABS 100 Orientation; Remove and Replace
Front Sheet Metal and Bolt-on Body
Parts 3 60
ABS 107 Remove and Replace Hardware, Trim,
and Glass 3 60
ABS 108 Metal Repair 3 60
ABS 109 Heat Distortion and Shrinking
and Gas Welding 3 60
ABS 115 Patch Weld Repairs Oxy-Acetylene,
TIG and MIG Welding 3 60
ABS 116 Use of Plastic Filler 3 60
ABS 117 Pull Rod and
Pry Bar Repair 3 60
ABS 118 Minor Dent Repair I 3 60
ABS 119 Minor Dent Repair II 3 60
ABS 120 Body Alignment 3 60
ABS 201 Frame Repair 3 60
ABS 202 Major Damage Repairs I 3 60
ABS 203 Major Damage Repairs II 3 60
ABS 204 Major Damage Repairs III 3 60
ABS 205 Major Damage Repairs IV 3 60
ABS 211 General Auto Body
Repair I 3 60
ABS 212 General Auto Body
Repair II 3 60
ABS 213 General Auto Body
Repair III 3 60
*ABS 214 General Auto Body IV 3 60
'ABS 215 General Auto Body
Repair V 3 60
60 1200
General Education Courses
(suggested minimum level requirements)
SOS 115 Intro to Soc Sci 3 45
MAT 114 Gen Math for College Students 3 45
12 180
Total Required Hours 72 1380
'Equivalent COE 296 and ABS 297 may be substituted for ABS 214
and/or ABS 215
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course
Description section of the catalog
Fiberglass Repair Six Week Certificate
Credits
ABS 130 Fiberglass Repair 3
ABS 135 Fiberglass Panel Replacement 3
Radiator Repair Six Week Certificate
ABS 136 Cleaning. Leak Testing, Soldering
(Radiator) 3
ABS 137 Repair, Recore (Radiator) 3
Ct. Hrs.
60 60
60
60
Frame Repair Three Week Certificate
Prerequisites: ABS 100, 109 and 120
ABS 204 Frame Repair 3 60
Auto Body Repair, Fiberglass and Radiator Repair
Option (F) . *
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ABS 100 Orientation
Remove and Replace Front Sheet
Metal and Bolt-on Body Parts 3 60
ABS 107 Remove and Replace Hardware, Trim,
and Glass 3 60
ABS 108 Metal Repair 3 60
ABS 109 Heat Distortion and Shrinking and Gas
Welding 3 60
ABS 115 Patch Weld Repairs Oxy-Acetylene,
TIG and MIG welding 3 60
ABS 116 Use of Plastic Filler 3 60
ABS 117 Pull Rod and Pry Bar Repair 3 60
ABS 118 Minor Dent Repair I 3 60
ABS 119 Minor Dent Repair II 3 60
ABS 120 Body Alignment 3 60
ABS 201 Frame Repair 3 60
ABS 202 Major Damage Repairs I 3 60
ABS 203 Major Damage Repairs II 3 60
ABS 204 Major Damage Repairs III 3 60
ABS 205 Major Damage Repairs IV 3 60
ABS 211 General Auto Body
Repair I 3 60
ABS 130 Fiberglass Repair 3 60
ABS 135 Fiberglass Panel Replacement 3 60
ABS 136 Cleaning, Leak Testing, Soldering
(Radiator) 3 60
ABS 137 Repair, Recore (Radiator) 3 60
General Education Courses
(suggested minimum level requirements)
MAT 114 Gen Math for College Students 3 45
PHY 100 Basic Physics 3 45
SOS 115 Intro to Soc.Sci 3 45
COM 110 Career Communication 3 45
12 180
Total Required Hours 72 1380


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
41
Auto Body Repair and Refinishing Option (F)
Required Major Courses
ABS 100 Orientation: Remove and Replace Front Sheet Metal and Bolt-on Body Parts 3 60
ABS 107 Remove and Replace Hardware, Trim, and Glass 3 60
ABS 108 Metal Repair 3 60
ABS 109 Heat Distortion and Shrinking and Gas Welding 3 60
ABS 115 Patch Weld Repairs Oxy-Acetylene, TIG and MIG Welding 3 60
ABS 116 Use of Plastic Filler 3 60
ABS 117 Pull Rod and Pry Bar Repair 3 60
ABS 118 Minor Dent Repair I 3 60
ABS 119 Minor Dent Repair II 3 60
ABS 120 Body Alignment 3 60
ABS 201 FrarTie Repair 3 60
ABS 202 Major Damage Repairs I 3 60
ABS 203 Major Damage Repairs II 3 60
ABS 204 Major Damage Repairs III 3 60
ABS 205 Major Damage Repairs IV 3 60
ABP 100 Orientation on Shop Policy and Auto Body Painting Safety Sanding 3 60
ABP 102 Priming 3 60
ABP 103 Painting Acrylic Lacquer 3 60
ABP 104 Spot Painting with Acrylic Lacquer 3 60
*ABP 105 Painting with Acrylic Enamel and Enamel 3 60
60 1200
General Education Courses (suggested minimum level requirements)
MAT 114 Gen Math for College Students 3 45
PHY 100 Basic Physics 3 45
SOS 115 Intro to Soc. Science 3 45
COM 110 Career Communication 3 45
12 180
Total Required Hours 72 1380
Automotive Mechanics (F,R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides you with job entry skills for the automotive trade and upgrading for those in the field who need to acquire more skill.
Demonstrated mastery of skills is required. The program is open-entry and open-exit. Therefore, you may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to complete the program for a certificate or degree, or to upgrade specific skills.
Required Major Courses
AUM 215 Engine Operation, Diagnosis,
Disassembly, & Measurement 6 120
AUM 216 Engine Recondition & Assembly 3 60
AUM 217 Air Conditioning, Theory, Service, & Safety 3 60
AUM218 General Service Repair, or one of the following: Cooperative Education or Independent Study 3 60
60 1190
General Education Courses Front Range Community College General 12 180
Education Courses:
PHY 100 Basic Physics 3 45
MAT 114 Gen Math for College Students 3 45
SOS 115 Introduction to Social Science 3 45
COM 110 Career Communication 3 45
Total Required Hours 72 1370
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.
Tune-Up and Emission Controls (F,R) 15-Week Certificate
Credits Ct. Hrs.
AUM 100 Principles of Engine Operation, Basic Electricity and Ignition Systems 6 120
AUM 106 Starting and Charging Systems 3 60
AUM 107 Fuel Systems 3 60
AUM 110 Electronic Testing and Emission Control 3 60
Check with advisor for prerequisites.
Drum and Disc Brakes (F,R) Six-Week Certificate
Credits Ct. Hrs.
AUM 115 Drum Brake Systems 3 60
AUM 116 Disc Brake Systems 3 60
Check with advisor for prerequisites.
Automatic Transmissions (F,R) Nine-Week Certificate
Credits Ct. Hrs.
AUM 207 Automatic Transmissions, Theory and Maintenance 3 60
AUM 208 Automatic Transmission, Rebuild 6 120
Wheel Alignment and Suspensions (F,R)
Six-Week Certificate
Credits Ct. Hrs.
AUM 117 Wheel Alignment 3 60
AUM 118 Wheel Balance and Suspension 3 60
Check with advisor for prerequisites.
Credits Ct. Hrs.
AUM 100 Principles of Engine Operation, Basic Electricity & Ignition Systems 6 120
AUM 106 Starting & Charging Systems 3 60
AUM 107 Fuel Systems 3 60
AUM 110 Electronic Testing & Emission Controls 3 60
AUM 115 Drum Brake Systems 3 60
AUM 116 Disc Brake Systems 3 60
AUM 117 Wheel Alignment 3 60
AUM 118 Wheel Balance & Suspension 3 60
AUM 145 GM Computer Command Control 2 30
AUM 146 GM Light Duty Diesel 1 20
AUM 205 Clutches & Manual Transmissions 3 60
AUM 206 Drive-Lines and Differentials 3 . 60
AUM 207 Automatic Transmissions, Theory & Maintenance 3 60
AUM 208 Automatic Transmission, Rebuild 6 120
Air Conditioning (F,R)
Three-Week Certificate
AUM 217 Air Conditioning Theory, Service and
Safety 3 60
Biology (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Science degree with an emphasis in biology. A student who is interested ip pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Black Studies (D)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in black studies. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.


42
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Bricklaying (R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides you with job entry skills in brick and block laying for residential construction fireplace design and construction and teaches flagstone, moss rock and advanced masonry techniques.
Required Major Courses
BMT116 Basic Electronic Theory 6 120
Total Required Hours 30 600
Note: Students who complete one semester of electronics may waive BMT 116 Basic Electronic Theory.
Carpentry (R)
Credits Ct. Hrs.
*BR1100 Safety, History, Glossary, Use of Mason Tools and Related Equipment Used by a Brickmason 6 120
*BR1105 Safety Codes Used in Masonry, State of Colorado 1 20
*BR1106 Spreading Mortar, Laying to Line, Use of Masonry Tools, Basic Leads, Masonry Walls 6 120
*BR1107 Bonded Brick Leads, Joints, Striking and Brushing 2 40
*BR1109 Masonry Piers, Pilasters, Solid and Hollow Masonry, Bonds, Floors, and Masonry Walls 6 120
*BR1110 Laying to the Line, Headers, Soldiers, Sailors, Rollock, Miter Corners 6 120
*BR1115 / Through-the-Wall Units, Laying to the Line 2 40
*BR1116 Masonry Codes 1 20
BRI 200 Mortar Types, Masonry Cement and Fireplace Basics 6 120
BRI 206 Fireplace Construction and Heatilator Construction 6 120
BRI 207 Chimney Construction, Flashing and Cooping 2 40
BRI 208 Masonry Materials 1 20
BRI 210 Fireplace Codes, Flagstone and Moss Rock 6 120
BRI 215 Reinforced Masonry and Over-the-Wall Construction 5 100
BRI 217 Mason Tender 3 60
BRI 218 Building Codes 1 20
60 1200
Additional Required Courses General Education Courses 12 180
Electives 3 45
Total Required Hours 75 1425
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
The Carpentry program provides theory, techniques and laboratory training for job-entry skills to enter the residential carpentry field and job upgrading and refresher courses for people already employed in the industry.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
*CAR 100 Orientation, Safety and Construction Materials 4 80
CAR 105 Hand and Power Tool 3 60
CAR 106 Plans, Specifications, Codes, and Construction Overview 4 80
CAR 107 Site Preparation 2 40
CAR 108 Foundation Systems 2 40
CAR 109 Sill and Floor Framing 4 80
CAR 110 Wall and Partition Framing 5 100
CAR 115 Stair and Roof Framing 6 120
CAR 200 Exterior Trim 3 60
CAR 205 Exterior Doors and Windows 4 80
CAR 206 Exterior Wall Coverings 4 80
CAR 207 Roof Coverings 4 80
CAR 208 Interior Trim Work 4 80
CAR 209 Cabinetmaking 4 80
CAR 210 Plastic Laminates 3 60
CAR 215 Cabinet Installation 4 80
60 1200
Additional Required Courses General Education Courses 12 180
Elective 3 45
Total Required Hours 75 1425
'Certificate Requirements
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.
Chemistry (D,F,R)
* Certificate Requirements
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.
Business (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Science degree with an emphasis in chemistry. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in business. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Business Machine Technology (D)
Chicano Studies (D)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in Chicano studies. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Certificate
Civil Engineering Technology (R)
This program teaches the student to maintain, troubleshoot, and repair a specific range of modern business machines.
The Business Machine Technology program (two semester) certificate program. Required Major Courses is now a one-year
Credits Ct. Hrs.
BMT 105 IBM Typebar Typewriter 9 180
BMT 107 Adler and Royal "970" Typewriter 6 120
BMT 110 IBM "Selectric" Typewriter 9 180
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
An intensive preparation for individuals to fill positions as construction or engineering assistants, draftsmen, and laboratory aides in the broad field of civil engineering.
Required Major Courses
CET 101 Structures I Credits 3 Ct. Hrs. 53
CET 107 Civil Engineering Technology Laboratory 3 60


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
43
CET 201 Structures II 3 53
CET 205 Applied Hydrology 4 68
SUR 100 Surveying Field Work, Elementary 11 218
SUR 201 Surveying Calculations II 3 49
SUR 205 Photogrammetry for Surveyors 6 109
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 6 120
DRI 205 Introduction to Architectural-Structural Plans and Details 6 120
45 850
Additional Required Courses
EAS 111 Physical Geology 4 90
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trig, and Functions 3 45
Chemistry elective 2 60
Computer Science elective 4 90
General Education Courses 12 180
29 525
Total Required Hours 74 1375
Note Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog
Commercial Art (D)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to give students the skills necessary for entry into the field of commercial art. The commercial art field broadly covers production or paste up art, graphic or advertising design and illustration Each of these broad specialties overlap and specialization in any one area requires special talent The Commercial Art program covers all three specialties and allows the student to develop basic skills common to all three while developing an emphasis in one
Students are expected to buy their own tools and materials. The beginning program courses require an original investment of between $100 and $300 and the student is expected to add needed tools and materials as the program progresses.
Required Major Courses
COA 100 Lettering/Typographic Design and Career Survey Credits 5 Ct. Hrs. 100
COA 105 Advertising Typography and Layout 5 100
COA 106 Descriptive Drawing and Rendering 5 100
COA 107 Rendering for Advertising Design 5 100
COA 200 Advertising Design and Portfolio Preparation 5 100
COA 205 Creative Graphic Design and Portfolio Preparation 5 100
COA 206 Art Preparation for Reproduction 5 100
COA 207 Advanced Art Preparation for Reproduction 5 100
ART 111 Basic Drawing I 3 90
ART 112 Basic Drawing II 3 90
ART 114 Design Theory & Practice I 3 90
ART 115 Design Theory & Practice II 3 90
PHO 100 Fundamentals of Photography 4 80
PHO 100L Fundamentals of Photography Lab 1 20
GRA 120 Process Camera and Halftones 6 120
Additional Major Electives COA 208 Illustration 5 100
COA 209 Three Dimensional Advertising 5 100
COA 297 Cooperative Education 3-5 60-100
ART 273 Printmaking I 3 90
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 69-70 1440-1460
Commercial Food Service Management (R)
Certificate
This one-year Certificate Program is offered in conjunction with the Restaurant Arts Program offered at the Warren Occupational-Technical Center. This program will prepare students to hold a supervisory level position in a food service facility, either in a "front of
the house or "back of the house" operation Required Major Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
FSP 101W Restaurant Arts I 6 138
FSP 102W Restaurant Arts II 6 138
ACC 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
BUS 110 Math of Bus/Personal Finance 3 45
COE 290 Job Preparation 1 15
FSM 297 Cooperative Education 3 45
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAN 205 Small Business Management 3 45
MAR 216 Principles of Purchasing 3 45
SPE 111 Introduction to Speech 3 45
Total Required Hours 34 606
Communications (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in communications. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution
Computer Programming for Business (D,F,R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
The objective of this program is to prepare the student as an entry-level programmer, programmer trainee, or junior programmer Upon completion of this degree program, the student will have com pleted a minimum of 50 programs ranging from simple business programs to the design and completion of a complex business system
Required Major Courses
CPB 100' Introduction to Computers CPB 104' Programming Logic CPB 106' COBOL CPB 108' BASIC
CPB 205* Basic Assembler Language (BAL) CPB 206 Advanced COBOL CPB 220' Systems Analysis MAT 225' Introduction to Statistics or
CPB 225' Business Statistical Programming CPB Electives (Select 6 credits from below One course must be selected from the first three courses)
CPB 200 Operating Systems & JCL (3)
CPB 208 Advanced Basic (3)
CPB 209 FORTRAN (3)
CPB 290a Special Topics RPG (1)
CPB 290b Special Topics Data Base Concepts
(1)
CPB 290c Special Topics Data Files for Microcomputer (1)
CPB 290d Special Topics Pascal (1)
CPB290e Special Topics Electronic Spreadsheet (T)
CPB 290f Special Topics Telecommunications (1)
Credits Ct. Hrs.
4 60
3 45
4 60
3 45
4 60
4 60
5 75
3 45
6 90
36 540


44
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
CPB 290g Special Topics Data Structures in Pascal (1)
CPB 290h Special Topics Advanced
BUS 297 Cooperative Education (3)
Additional Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111* Accounting Principles I 5 75
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II or 5 75
ACC 116* Corporate Accounting (2) and
ACC 221* Cost Accounting (3)
MAN 105* Introduction to Business 3 45
ENG 111 English Composition 3 45
BUS 136* Business Communications Applications or
ENG 112 English Composition or
ENG 231 Technical Writing 3 45
19 285
General Education Courses
SPE 111 Introduction to Speech 3 45
MAT 111 Introduction to Algebra 3 45
ECO 202 Principles of Econ-Micro Take 1 course from any 2 of the following areas: Arts & Humanities 3 45
Science 3 45
12 180
Total Required Hours 67 1005
*These courses must be completed to obtain a Certificate in Com-
puter Programming for Business.
Note: Elective options must be approved by advisor.
At Denver Auraria Community College and Red Rocks Community College only grades of C or better in courses with a CPB prefix will be counted toward a degree or certificate.
At Front Range Community College only grades of C or better in all courses will be counted toward a degree or certificate.
CPB 095 Computer Programming Lab Lab is required for students taking CPB courses. One (1) credit hour per course per semester.
Computer Programming for the Severely Handicapped (D)
Certificate
This program is specifically designed to train selected severely handicapped persons for entry level positions as computer programmers, emphasizing the COBOL language.
Required Major Courses:
Credits a. Hrs.
CPB 100 Introduction to Computers 4 60
CPB 104 Programming Logic 3 45
CPB 106 COBOL 4 60
CPB 206 Advanced COBOL 4 60
CPB 200 Operating Systems and JCL 3 45
CPB 220 System Analysis and Design 5 75
CSC 218 Advanced Programming Techniques 3 45
BUS 297 Cooperative Education 3-6 135-270
29-32 525-660
Additional Required Courses
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
ACC 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications 3 45
Elective 3 45
12 180
Total Required Hours 41-44 705-840
Computer Science (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Science degree with an emphasis in computer science. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Consumer Electronics Technology (F)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides you with job entry skills in diagnosing, troubleshooting, and repairing selected consumer entertainment and home electronics products.
Demonstrated mastery of skills is required. The program is open-entry and open-exit. Therefore, you may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to complete the program for a certificate or degree, or ter upgrade specific skills
In order to graduate from this program with a Certificate, or Associate of Applied Science Degree, a student must earn at least a C in all course work.
Required Major Courses
Credits a. Hrs.
TCE 100 Analyze and Troubleshoot DC Circuits 3 60
TCE 105 Analyze and Troubleshoot AC Circuits 3 60
TCE 106 Analyze Transients and Resonant
Circuits, Filters and Coupling 3 60
TCE 107 Operations of Transistor Circuits 3 60
TCE 108 Troubleshoot Solid State Circuits 3 60
TCE 109 Troubleshoot Other Solid State
Devices and Power Supplies 3 60
TCE 110 Troubleshoot and Repair VT Radios 3 60
TCE 115 Troubleshoot and Repair Solid State
AM Radios 3 60
TCE 116 Troubleshoot and Repair FM Radios 3 60
TCE 117 Troubleshoot and Repair Stereo Audio
Amplifiers 3 60
TVT 201 Digital Electronics 6 120
TVT 202 Symptom Diagnose Monochrome TV 3 60
TVT 203 Symptom Diagnose Monochrome &
Color TV 3 60
TVT 204 Diagnose, Troubleshoot, & Localize TV
Troubles 3 60
TVT 205 Tuner, Frequency Synthesis, Pll, and
Remote Cont 3 60
TVT 206 Video IF, Detector, and AGC 3 60
TVT 207 Video Amplifier, Picture Tube, and
Power Supply 3 60
TVT 208 Sync & Vertical Deflection System 3 60
TVT 209 Horizontal Deflection & Receiver
Analysis 6 120
63 1260
General Education Courses
(suggested minimim level requirements)
MAT 114 Gen Math for College Students 3 45
PHY 100 Basic Physics 3 45
SOS 115 Intro to Soc. Science 3 45
COM 110 Career Communication 3 45
Total 75 1440
Equivalent COE 296 and TCE 297 may be used as an elective not to exceed 12 credit hours.
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.
Note: CPB 095 Computer Lab is required as a co-requisite for CPB 100, 106, 206, 215, and CSC 218


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
TV Certificate
TVT 201 Digital Electronics Credits 6 Ct. Hrs. 120
TVT 202 Symptom Diagnose Monochrome TV 3 . 60
TVT 203 Symptom Diagnose Monochrome & Color TV 3 60
TVT 204 Diagnose, Troubleshoot, and Localize TV Troubles 3 60
TVT 205 Tuner, Frequency Synthesis, Pll, & Remote 3 60
TVT 206 Video IF, Detector, and AGC 3 60
TVT 207 Video Amplifier, Picture Tube, and Power Supply 3 60
TVT 208 Sync & Vertical Deflection System 3 60
TVT 209 Horizontal & Receiver Analysis 6 120
Criminal Justice (R)
Associate of Applied Science DegreeLaw Enforcement
This course of study is designed to prepare individuals with job-entry skills in the Criminal Justice field. Emphasis is on law enforcement functions.
Completion of the degree requires courses in the following three groups.
Required Major Courses
CRJ 110 Intro, to Criminal Justice Credits 4 Ct. Hrs. 60
CRJ 115 Criminal Law 3 45
CRJ 116 Constitutional Law 3 45
CRJ126 Patrol Procedures 3 68
CRJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Investigation 4 60
CRJ 202 Advanced Investigation 3 68
CRJ210 Community Relations 3 45
CRJ 220 Traffic Enforcement 3 68
CRJ 297 Cooperative Education 1-4 45-180
COE 296 Cooperative Education Seminar 1 15
General Education Courses 28-31 12 519-654 180
Additional credits in major courses are required 18-21 270-315
Total Required Hours 61 969-1149
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Catalog section of this catalog.
CertificateInvestigations
This course of study permits the students to specialize in the area of criminal and other investigations.
CRJ 110 Intro, to Criminal Justice Credits 4 Ct. Hrs. 60
CRJ 115 Criminal Law 3 45
CRJ 116 Constitutional Law 3 45
CRJ 118 Rules of Evidence 3 45
CRJ129 Court Systems 3 45
CRJ149 Reports & Records 3 45
CRJ 201 Intro, to Criminal Investigations 4 60
CRJ 202 Advanced Investigations 3 68
CRJ 205 Interview, Interrogation and Confession 3 45
Total Required Hours 29 458
Dental Assisting (F)
Certificate
The program is designed to prepare students for employment in general and specialized practice dental offices. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the examination for certification.
In order to graduate from this program, a student must earn at least a "C" in all course work.
45
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
DEA 100 Orientation to Dental Assisting 2 30
DEA 105 Intro, to Dental Operatory Procedures 3 45
DEA 106 Dental Materials 2 38
DEA 107 Dental Science 4 60
D£A 108 Dental Chairside Procedures 3 45
DEA 110 Dental Office Procedure 3 45
DEA 111 Clinic 1 2 45
DEA 112 Clinic II 2 45
DEA 121 Dental Radiology 1 2 38
DEA 122 Dental Radiology II 2 38
DEA 125 Dental Lab Procedures 4 68
DEA 126 Clinical Practicum 5 225
34 722
Additional Required Courses
BIO 108 Introduction to Human Biology 3 45
BIO 110 Dimensions of Human Living 3 45
DIT 155 Basic Nutrition 2 30
Communication 3 45
Psychology 3 45
11 165
Total Required Hours - 45 887
Note: It is also possible to earn an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Dental Assisting. For information, please contact the Division Director.
Diagnostic Radiologic Technology (D) (X-Ray)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Upon completion of this program, the graduate will be eligible to write the certification examination given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists.
This program begins in the fall term of each academic year. It is twenty-four months in duration.
Application and a health occupations assessment test must be completed prior to entrance into the program.
Admission information may be obtained from Student Advising and/or the Division of Health and Human Services. Enrollment is limited to thirty (30) students.
Note: All new students will be required to pay an initial laboratory fee of $20.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care 2 30
RAT 100 Radiographic Technique I 3 60
RAT 105 Radiographic Positioning I 3 60
RAT 106 Clinical Laboratory Experience I 3 120
RAT 108 Radiographic Positioning II 3 60
RAT 109 Physics of Diagnostic Radiology 3 45
RAT 110 Clinical Practicum I 5 240
RAT 115 Radiographic Positioning III 3 60
RAT 116 Clinical Practicum II 5 240
RAT 200 Survey of Medical and Surgical Diseases 2 30
RAT 205 Special Procedures & Techniques 3 45
RAT 206 Clinical Practicum III 11 480
RAT 207 Radiographic Technique II 3 45
RAT 208 Clinical Practicum IV 12 540
RAT 209 Review Concepts 3 45
RAT 210 Clinical Practicum V 12 540
76 2640
Additional Required Courses
BIO 109 Human Biology for Health Sciences 4 45
PHY 115 Intro to Medical Physics 3 45


46
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
MAT 130 Contemp. Coll. Math. General Education Courses 3 45
(ENG 111 & PSY 115) 6 90
16 225
Total Required Hours 92 2865
Diesel Power Mechanics (R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to train individuals for entry into the diesel power mechanics of the heavy duty mechanic field. In addition. courses are offered for job refreshing and upgrading
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
"DPE 100 Safety. Tools, Bolts, Bearings, Gaskets and Seals 3 60
"DPE 105 Four-Cycle Engine Overhaul 6 120
"DPE 106 Two-Cycle Engine Overhaul 6 120
"DPE 107 Clutches and Manual Transmissions 9 180
"DPE 108 Power-Shift Transmissions 6 120
DPE 200 Differentials 3 60
DPE 201 Chassis Components and Suspension Systems 6 120
DPE 202 Steering Systems 6 120
DPE 205 Brake Systems (Air/Hydraulic) 3 60
DPE 208 Electrical Troubleshooting 3 60
DPE210 Practical Shop Experience 9 180
60 1200
Additional Required Courses General Education Courses 12 180
Approved Elective 3 - 45
15 225
Total Required Hours 75 1425
"Certificate Requirements
Note Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog
Dietetic Technology (F)
"Seminars must be scheduled concurrently with clinical experiences
Additional Required Courses
ACC 103 Bookkeeping * 3 45
3 45
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 68 1358
Dietetic Technology (F)
Certificate ProgramDietetic Assistant Food Management Major
This allied health program is planned to provide entry level skills and/or upgrading for food service workers in health care areas. The training of the graduate emphasizes food service management where nutrition care is the prime objective In order to graduate form this program, a student must earn at least a C in all course work
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
DIT 105 Introduction to Food Service 3 60
DIT 108 Nutrition for Health 3 45
DIT 109 Volume Food Prep. & Service 3 60
DIT 110 The Modified Diet & Its Service 4 68
DIT 116 Dietetic Orientation and Terminology 3 . 45
DIT 121 Clinical Experience 4 150
DIT 135 ' Quantity Food Purchasing 3 45
DIT 215 Personnel Supervision 3 45
DIT 220 Management by Menu 3 45
29 563
Additional Required Courses
PSY 115 Psychology of Personal Adjustment 3 45
SPE 111 Intro, to Speech 3 45
6 90
Total Required Hours 35 653
Associate of Applied Science Degree Food Management Major
This allied health program is planned to provide entry level skills and/or upgrading for food service workers in health care areas. The training of the graduate emphasizes food service management where nutrition care is the prime objective In order to graduate from this program, a student must earn at least a "C in all course work
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
DIT 105 Introduction to Food Service 3 60
DIT 108 Nutrition for Health 3 45
DIT 109 Volume Food Preparation & Service 3 60
DIT 110 The Modified Diet& Its Service 4 68
DIT 116 Dietetic Orientation and Terminology 3 45
"DIT 121 Clinical Experience 12 450
DIT 135 Quantity Food Purchasing 3 45
"DIT 212 Nutrition Care Seminar 3 45
DIT 215 Personnel Supervision 3 45
DIT 220 Management by Menu 3 45
"DIT 240 Food Management Seminar 3 45
"DIT 250 Dietetic Seminar 3 45
DIT 256 Specifics of Fgod Operation Management 3 45
DIT Elective 4 90
53 1133
Drafting
The Drafting program includes five options: a Drafting for Industry (D.R) b Drafting for Construction (R)
c. Drafting for Civil/Topographic Mapping (D.R)
d. Drafting for Petro/Chemical Piping Processes (D) e Drafting option E See Technical Illustration (D)
Students entering these programs must have a writing and speaking command of English for technical purposes
Drafting for Industry (D,R)
Option A
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
The Drafting for Industry option prepares you for job entry positions on drafting and design teams in industrial plants, engineering and manufacturing firms and government agencies.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
"DRI 105 Intro to Drafting 6 120
"DRI 106 Basic Descrip. Geom and Aux View Proj 3 60
"DRI 107 Sections and Dimension Practices ' 6 120
"DRI 109 Intersect and Devel 3 60
"DRI 110 Intro to Assem and Weld Draw 3 60


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue 47
*DRI 115 Perspective Drawing 3 60 'DRI 106 Basic Descrip. Geom. and Aux. View
'DR1116 Mechanical Assembly and Detail Proj. 6 120 Project 3 60
DRI 200 Industrial Plant Devel. 6 120 'DR1107 Sections and Dimension Practices 6 120
. DRI 205 Intro to Archit-Struct Plans and Det 6 120 'DR1109 Intersect, and Devel. 3 60
DRI 206 Indust. Piping and Utility.. Consid. 3 60 'DRI 110 Intro, to Assem. and Weld. Draw. 3 60
DRI 207 Large Mech. Equip 9 180 'DR1115 Perspective Drawing 3 60
DRI 208 Material Handling and Convey. Meth. 6 120 *DRM 116 Intro, to Civil/Topo Map 6 120
DRM 200 Map Construct. Tech 9 180
60 1200 EAS 203 Air Photo Interpretation 3 105
General Education Courses
MAT 114 Gen. Mathematics for College Students 5 75
PHY 101 Fundamentals of Physics I . 4 90
ENG 231 Technical Writing 3 45
Arts & Humanities 3 45
Total Required Hours 75 1455
'Certificate Requirements
Drafting for Construction (R)
Option B
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
The Drafting for Construction option prepares you for job entry positions on drafting and design teams for engineering construction firms, steel fabricating companies, public utilities, and government agencies
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
'DRI 105 Intro, to Drafting 6 120
'DRI 106 Basic Descrip Geom and Aux. View
Proj. 3 60
'DRI 107 Sections & Dimensioning Practices 6 120
'DR1109 Intersect & Develop 3 60
'DR1110 Intro, to Assem & Weld Draw 3 , 60
*DR1115 Perspective Drawings'* 3 60
'DRC 116 Intro, to Arch Draft; Frame Const. 6 120
DRC 200 Intro, to Com Arch Mason Const 6 120
DRI 205 Intro to Arch -Struct Plans & Details 6 120
DRI 206 Indus. Piping & Util. Consid. 3 60
DRC 207 Structural Design & Drafting 5 100
DRC 208 Practical Application of Construction
Drafting 10 200
60 1200
General Education Courses
MAT 114 Gen. Mathematics for College
Students 5 75
PHY 101 Fundamentals of Physics 1 4 90
ENG 231 Technical Writing 3 45
Arts & Humanities 3 45
Total Required Hours 75 1455
'Certificate Requirements
Drafting for Civil/Topographic Mapping (D,R)
Option C
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
The Drafting for Civil/Topographic Mapping option prepares you for job entry positions on drafting and design teams for local, state, and federal government agencies, petroleum, geological, civil engineering, mineral development and planning companies.
Required Major Courses 'DRI 105 Intro to Drafting
Credits
Ct. Hrs.
120
DRM 205 Advanced Map Construction
Techniques 6
DRM 210 Civil Topographic Mapping Technical
Project 12
60
General Education Courses
MAT 114 General Mathematics for College Students
PHY 101 Fundamentals of Physics I
ENG 231 Technical Writing
Arts & Humanities
Total Required Hours 75
'Certificate Requirements
120
240
7245
75
90
45
45
1500
Drafting for Petro/Chemical Piping Processes (D)
Option D
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
The Petro/Chemical Pipe Process Drafting option prepares you for job entry positions on drafting and design teams in petrochemical design, engineering and manufacturing firms.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
'DRI 105 Intro to Drafting 6 120
'DRI 106 Basic Descrip Geom and Aux. View
Proj. 3 60
'DRP 107 Drafting and Dimension Pract. 3 60
'DRI 109 Intersect and Devel. 3 60
'DR1110 Introduction to Piping 6 120
*DRP 111 Process Piping Drafting I 3 60
'DRP 112 Process Piping Drafting II 6 120
'DRP 115 Engineering Problems 3 60
DRP 200 Process Piping Design I 8 160
DRP 201 Model Making 4 80
DRP 202 Welding 3 60
DRP 210 Process Piping Design II 9 180
DRP 211 Safety & Maintenance 3 60
DRP 212 Plumbing 3 60
63 1260
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 75 1440
'Certificate Requirements
Drama (D,F,R)
This College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in drama A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution


48
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Early Childhood Education and Management (D,F,R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
The Early Childhood Education and Management Program is designed to meet the vocational training needs for personnel involved in the care of young children (infancy through six years) and* all Colorado Department of Social Services licensing requirements
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ECE 100 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3 45
ECE 110 Child Growth and Development I 5 75
ECE 120 Curriculum Development 5 75
ECE 261 Admin IParent Involvement and Staff Development 3 45
ECE 262 Admin. IILicensing and Operations 3 45
19 285
Additional Requirements 'Early Childhood Education Electives (to include a minimum of 6 credits of lab/student teaching) 25 465
Electives 12 180
37 645
General Education Requirements 12 180
Total Required Hours 68 1,100
'See program faculty for specific courses which fulfill these requirements.
Note: Experience in an infant/toddler lab may be obtained at Front Range Community College.
Infant Toddler Certificate (F)
Completion of the following 30 credit hours will qualify students for an Infant/Toddler Certificate.
Required Major Courses
ECE 100 Introduction to Early Childhood Credits
Education 3
ECE 110 Child Growth and Development I 5
ECE 126 Health and Safety and the Young
Child 1-3
ECE 131 Infant Stimulation 3
ECE 133 Infant/Toddler Developmental
Theory and Application 3
ECE 135 Infant/Toddler Supervised Lab
Experience 5
ECE 136 Infant/Toddler Seminar for Parents I 1
ECE 139 Infant/Toddler Supervised Student
Teaching 5
DIT 150 Infant Nutrition 1
Plus a three (3) credit ECE elective 3
Students must have prior advisor approval.
Ct. Hrs.
45
75
15-45
45
45
150
15
150
15
45
Total Required Hours 30-32 600-630
Child Development Associate (F)
Competency Based Curriculum Certificate and Associate of Applied Science Degree
The CDA program is one of the 13 nationally approved competency-based programs designed to accomodate the child care worker in a combination of competency-based and traditional on-campus curriculum The CDA certificate requirements (which meet the Colorado Social Service Group Leader requirements) are starred ('). Completion of additional ECE and general education courses are required to meet the Associate Degree requirements
Required Major Courses
Credits
*ECE 170 Initial Assessment of the Child
Development Associate 2
'ECE 175 Creative Learning Environments
(CDA) 5
*ECE 176 Physical and Intellectual Development
of the Child 5
*ECE 177 Self Concept and Individual Strengths
for the Child 5
'ECE 178 Children and AdultsGroup
Management 5
'ECE 179 Administration IHome
Center/Parent Involvement 5
'ECE 180 Administration IIStaff Development 5
'ECE 185 Child Abuse and Neglect 1-5
'ECE 189 Final Assessment of the Child
Development Associate 2
35-39
Ct. Hrs.
45
112
112
112
112
112
112
15-75
30
762-822
The following courses are required for the Colorado Department of Social Services Director qualifications:
ECE 210 Child Growth and Development II 3 45
ECE 262 Administration IILicensing and Operations 3 45
DIT 155 Basic Nutrition 2 30
Sociology elective 3 45
Psychology elective 3 45
49-53 972-1,032
'Certificate requirements total 39 semester hours.
The student must also complete general education requirements to earn the AAS degree under this option
Colorado Department of Social Services Licensing Requirements
Currently, group leader qualifications for the Colorado Department of Social Services require 12 semester hours in early childhood education One course must be in child development, plus 9 months of verifiable work experience See an advisor for 1) specific course(s) which meet(s) the above course requirements; 2) assistance in computation of the verifiable work experience: and/or 3) the other options as they pertain to community college courses.
To be director qualified by the Colorado Department of Social Services, 24 semester hours must be completed, plus 24 months of verifiable work experience:*
12 semester hours which must include:
1) child growth and development
2) curriculum/methods in early childhood education
3) related courses in early childhood education
psychology sociology
business/administration and nutritioi 'See an advisor for specific course(s) that meet the above course requirements and assistance in computation of work experience Note See Colorado Department of Social Service minimum rules and regulations for further options/information and for infant and toddler requirements
3 semester hours 3 semester hours 6 semester hours
Earth Science (R)
The College offers an Associate of Science degree with an emphasis in earth science A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution
Economics (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in economics A student who is interested in pursurng a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
49
Education (D)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in education. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Electricity
Industrial/Commercial (R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to give skills for job-entry employment as an electrical apprentice, wiring residences, commercial and industrial installations, under the supervision of a licensed journeyman electrician, using the latest techniques of installation according to the National Electric Code
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct, Hrs.
'ELF 100 Fundamentals of AC/DC Electricity 9 180
*ELF 105 Solid State Devices and Circuits 6 120
*EIC 105 Electrical Blueprint Reading 3 45
*EIC 115 Electrical Planning 3 45
*EIC 121 Electrical Installations I 3 60
*EIC 122 Electrical Installations II 3 60
'EIC 131 National Electric Code I 3 45
EIC 132 National Electric Code II 3 45
EIC 200 Electrical Calculations 4 60
EIC 201 Transformer Installation and Theory 3 60
EIC 202 AC and DC Machines, Installation and
Theory 3 60
EIC 203 Polyphase Rotating Machines and
Transformers 3 60
EIC 207 Electrical Control Wiring for Plumbing,
Heating, Air-Conditioning 3 60
EIC 211 Installation and Operation of
Distribution Systems I 3 60
EIC 212 Installation and Operation of
Distribution Systems II 3 60
EIC 215 Advanced Electrical Installation 3 60
EIC 216 Advanced Electrical Planning 3 45
61 1125
Additional Required Courses
General Education Courses 12 180
Elective 3 45
15 225
Total Required Hours 76 1350
'Certificate Requirements
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog
Electronic Digital Technology (R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
A comprehensive program designed to give a thorough understanding of digital electronics for job entry positions in companies which utilize digital electronics and computer concepts, or to give job upgrading and refresher courses for people already employed in the field.
Required Major Courses
'EDT 110 Fundamentals of AC/DC Circuits for Electronics
*EDT 120 Solid State Devices & Circuits for Electronics
'EDT 130 Digital Logic Devices & Circuits for Electronics
Credits
9
6
9
Ct. Hrs.
180
120
180
'EDT 140 Operational Amplifiers and A to D
Converters for Electronics 6 120
EDT 210 Introduction to Computers 7 140
EDT 220 Computer Troubleshooting 7 140
EDT 230 Interfacing/Computer Peripheral 7 140
EDT 240 Microprocessors 7 140
58 1160
General Education Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ENG 231 Technical Writing 3 45
MAT 111 Introductory Algebra 3 45
PHY101 Fundamental of Physics I 4 90
PSY 111 General Psychology 3 45
Total Required Hours 71 1385
' Certificate Requirements
Note: First digit indicates the year The second digit indicates the sequence of that year. All mandatory electronic classes end with the third digit equal to zero "0." Example: EDT 120 equals first year, second required course
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.
Electronics Technology (D)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to prepare individuals with job entry skills in assembly, test, repair and maintenance areas and basic knowledge to advance into more detailed and specific areas with further training and experience.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT105 DC Circuits and Magnetism 3 60
ELT 106 AC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 107 AC Circuits 3 60
ELT108 Vacuum Tubes 3 60
ELT 109 Solid State Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 110 Transistor Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 115 Transistor Oscillators and FETs 3 60
ELT 116 SCR, UJT and Special Devices 3 60
ELT 117 IC Operational Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 200 Instruments and Measurements 6 120
ELT 206 Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 207 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 208 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 205 Communications Systems 3 60
ELT 209 Trouble-shooting Techniques 3 60
ELT 210 Electronic Fabrication Techniques 6 120
ELT 216 Introduction to Electro-Mechanical Devices 3 60
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 72 1380
Note Additional courses are listed and described in the Course
Description section of this Catalog
Certificate Programs (D)
Basic Electronics
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 105 DC Circuits and Magnetism 3 60
ELT 106 AC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 107 AC Circuits 3 60
Total 12 240


50
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Vacuum Tube Techniques ELT 108 Vacuum Tube Fundamentals and
Circuits 3 60
Total 3 60
Solid State Theory Credits Ct. Hrs,
ELT 109 Solid State Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 110 Transistor Amplifier 3 60
ELT 115 Transistor Oscillators and FETs 3 60
Total 9 180
Transistors Special Devices Credits Ct. Hrs.
ELT 116 SCR.UJT 3 60
ELT 117 IC Operational Amplifiers 3 60
Total 6 120
Equipment Servicing Credits Ct. Hrs.
ELT 200 Instruments and Measurements 6 120
ELT 209 Troubleshooting Techniques 3 60
Total 9 180
Digital Fundamentals Credits Ct. Hrs.
ELT 206 Pulse and Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 207 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 208 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 60
Total 9 180
Layout and Fabrication Credits Ct. Hrs.
ELT 210 Electronic Fabrication Techniques 6 120
ELT 216 Introduction to Electro-Devices 3 60
Total 9 180
Electronics Technology (F)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides you with job entry skills in assembly, test, repair, and maintenance areas and basic knowledge to advance into more detailed and specific areas with further training and experience.
In order to graduate from this program with a Certificate, or Associate of Applied Science Degree, a student must earn at least a "C in all course work.
'Required Major Courses
ETE 207 Instruments, Measurements, & Troubleshooting 6 120
ETE 208 Electronic Fabrication Techniques 6 120
60 1200
General Education Courses (suggested minimum level requirements)
MAT 114 General Math for College Students 3 45
PHY 100 Basic Physics 3 45
SOS 115 Intro to Social Science 3 45
COM 110 Career Communication 3 45
12 180
Total Required Hours 72 1380
*COE 296 and ETE 297 may be substituted for any of the ETE modules with permission of the instructor, not to exceed 6 credit hours.
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course
Description section of the catalog. Certificate #1
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ETE 112 Transistor Configurations 3 60
ETE 113 Typical Amplifiers 3 60
ETE 114 Transistor Oscillators & FET's 3 60
ETE 121 SCR, UJT, & Special Devices 3 60
ETE 122 IC Operational Amplifiers 3 60
Certificate #2
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ETE 201 Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ETE 202 Digital Circuits 3 60
ETE 203 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 60
ETE 204 Microprocessor Applications 3 60
Certificate #3
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ETE 208 Electronic Fabrication Techniques 3 60
Engineering (D,F,R)
The Community College of Denver System offers courses which will transfer to many of the four-year institutions including Colorado State University, Colorado School of Mines and the University of Colorado All transfer students are subject to a minimum grade point of 3.0 (B) or better and test scores to compete successfully for admission to these institutions. No single criterion for admission is used, however, the most important single factor is scholastic achievement. Students who are interested in pre-engineering should see a pre-engineering advisor.
English (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in English. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
ETE 101 DC Fundamentals Credits 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
ETE 102 DC Fundamentals & Magnetism 3 60
ETE 103 AC Fundamentals 3 60
ETE 104 AC Circuits 3 60
ETE 111 Rectifiers & Power Supplies 3 60
ETE 112 Transistor Configurations 3 60
ETE 113 Typical Amplifiers 3 60
ETE 114 Transistor Oscillators & FET's 3 60
ETE 121 SCR, UJT, & Special Devices 3 60
ETE 122 IC Operational Amplifiers 3 60
ETE 201 Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ETE 202 Digital Circuits 3 60
ETE 203 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 60
ETE 204 Microprocessor Applications 3 60
ETE 205 Communications Systems 3 60
ETE 206 Basic Programming for Electronics 3 60
Environmental and Refrigeration Technology (D)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
Commercial-Industrial Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning Option (D)
The certificate programs consist of the 200 level courses only anc requires basic knowledge of electricity and refrigeration for entry.
The Associate of Applied Science Degree programs have no pre requisites and provide basic trade skills.
Both programs prepare you with job entry skills in the fields o commercial-industrial refrigeration, heating and air conditioning.


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
51
Demonstrated mastery of skills is required. Programs are open-entry and open-exit. You may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to either complete the program for a certificate or degree or to upgrade specific skills.
In order to satisfy the requirements for an Associate Degree, the following courses must be taken in the listed sequence (courses required for the certificate program are indicated with an asterisk*):
Required Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
RAC 100 Safety, Tools, and Piping 3 60
RAC 106 Fund, of Refrigeration 3 60
RAC 111 Fund, of Electricity I 3 60
RAC 112 Fund, of Electricity II 3 60
RAC 116 Fund, of Refrigeration II 3 60
*RAC 200 Refrig Sys Comp. & Applications 3 60
*RAC 205 Refrig. Heat Loads & System Development 3 60
*RAC 206 Install. & Startup 3 60
*RAC 207 Troubleshooting & Service 3 60
RAC 208 Special Refrig. Systems 3 60
*RAC 209 Fund, of Air Conditioning 3 60
*RAC 210 Unitary & Central Station Systems 3 60
*RAC 215 Air Flow Principles 3 60
*RAC 216 Control Systems 3 60
*RAC 217 Troubleshooting & Svc. 3 60
45 900
Additional Required Courses
(To be taken at any time)
RAC 297 Cooperative Education or Independent Study 3 90
RAC 299 3 90
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 60 1170
Major Appliance Repair Option (D)
. In order to satisfy the requirements for an Associate Degree, the following courses must be taken in the listed sequence (courses required for the certificate program are indicated with an asterisk*):
Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
RAC 100 Safety, Tool, and Piping 3 60
RAC 106 Fund of Refrigeration I 3 60
RAC 111 Fund, of Electricity I 3 60
RAC 112 Fund of Electricity II 3 60
RAC 116 Fund, of Refrigeration II 3 60
APT 218 Automatic Washers I 3 60
APT 219 Clothes Dryers I 3 60
APT 220 Kitchen Equipment I 3 60
APT 225 Refrig./Freezers I 3 60
APT 226 Room Air Conditioning 3 60
APT 227 Automatic Washers II 3 60
APT 228 Clothes Dryers II 3 60
APT 229 Kitchen Equipment II 3 60
APT 230 Refrig./Freezers II 3 60
APT 235 Automatic Washers III 3 60
45 900
Additional Required Courses
(To be taken at any time)
RAC 297 Cooperative Education or RAC 299 Independent Study 3 90
3 90
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 60 1170
Environmental Technology (D)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to prepare individuals with job entry skills for the environmental field. The program places emphasis on air, noise, water and solid waste pollution.
This program has been recently transferred from Red Rocks Community College to Denver Auraria Community College and will be reviewed.and revised prior to offering courses
Fire Science Technology (R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree Fire Suppression
Completion of this curriculum will prepare individuals for entry in a fire protection career. This option places emphasis on modern methods of suppression and management of fire protection.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
FST 105 Fire Apparatus & Equip 3 45
FST 106 Fire Prevention 3 45
FST 107 Related Codes & Ordinances 3 45
FST 108 Fire Hydraulics 4 68
FST 109 Building Plans & Construction 3 45
FST 121 Hazardous Materials 4 68
FST141 Automatic Sprinkler Systems 1 15
FST 142 Special Automatic Protection Systems 1 15
FST143 Portable Fire Extinguishers 1 15
FST 144 Automatic Fire Detection Systems 1 15
FST 145 Firefighter Respiratory Protection 1 15
FST 215 Strategy & Tactics 3 45
FST216 Rescue Procedures 3 45
FST 218 Fire Service Management 3 45
FST 286 Firefighter Safety 3 45
FST 297 Cooperative Education 4 120
COE 296 Cooperative Education Seminar 1 15
FST 299 Independent Study 3 69
FST Electives 7 105
52 880
Additional Required Courses
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 64 1060
Note: Individuals not employed in the suppression field will be required to enroll for a minimum of 4 credit hours of cooperative education. Individuals employed in the suppression field may substitute an additional major course
Associate of Applied Science Degree Fire Prevention
Completion of this curriculum will prepare individuals for entry in a fire protection career. Emphasis is placed on life and safety and protection of buildings using related codes and ordinances
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
FST105 Fire Apparatus & Equipment 3 45
FST 106 Fire Prevention 3 45
FST 107 Related Codes & Ordinances 3 45
FST108 Fire Hydraulics 4 68
FST 109 Building Plans & Construction 3 45
FST 121 Hazardous Materials 4 68
FST141 Automatic Sprinkler Systems 1 15
FST 142 Special Automatic Protection Systems 1 15
FST 143 Portable Fire Extinguishers 1 15
FST 144 Automatic Fire Detection Systems 1 15
FST 145 Firefighter Respiratory Protection 1 15
FST 205 Fire Safety Education 3 . 45
FST 206 Fire Investigation 3 45


52
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
FST 208 Building Inspections for Fire Protection 3 45
FST 286 Firefighter Safety 3 45
FST 297 Cooperative Education 4 120
COE 296 Cooperative Education Seminar 1 15
FST 299 Independent Study 3 69
FST Electives 6 90
51 865
Additional Required Courses General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 63 1045
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course
Description section of this Catalog
Fire Service Training (R)
The State of Colorado offers a program of Fire Service Training to all fire service units.
This training consists of an instructor being sent into the area fire departments to drill fire fighters with their own apparatus and equipment. Special workshops and seminars are also scheduled throughout the year.
For information on costs and scheduling, contact: Joe Lewand, director of Fire Service Training 988-6160 Ext. 320 Special workshops and seminars may be applicable to the Fire Science Technology degree.
Flexible Automation Robotics (R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
A comprehensive program which includes electronics, fluid power and robotic courses designed to prepare students for job entry positions, as maintenance and repair technicians in industries utilizing flexible automation. Students are provided "handson" training with industrial grade robots.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
EDT110 Fundamentals of AC/DC Circuits for Electronics 9 180
EDT 120 Solid State Devices and Circuits for Electronics 6 120
EDT130 Digital Logic Devices for Electronics 9 180
EDT 140 Operational Amplifiers and A to D Converters for Electronics 6 120
EDT 214 Introduction to Microprocessors 3 60
FAR 101 Introduction to Industrial Robotics 4 80
FAR 106 Survey of Robot Drive Systems 3 60
FAR 107 Robot Control Systems 4 80
FAR 110 Intermediate Robot Maintenance and Repair 3 60
FAR 210 Robotic Applications 4 80
FLP 105 Basic Principles of Hydraulics 3 60
FLP 116 Pump, Overhaul and Testing 3 60
FLP 207 Directional Control Valves 3 60
FLP 215 Pneumatic Logic Controls 3 60
63 1260
General Education Courses
ENG 231 Technical Writing 3 45
MAT 111 Introductory Algebra 3 45
PSY 111 General Psychology I 3 45
PHY 101 Fundamentals of Physics I 4 90
13 225
Total Required Hours 76 1485
V
Fluid Power (R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
The Fluid Power program is designed to prepare students to enter the field as a hydraulic and/or pneumatic mechanic in an overhaul and repair shop for industrial equipment. It also provides job upgrading or refresher courses for people already employed in the field.
The Fluid Power program is in two parts, FLP 100s and FLP 200s. The FLP 100s deal with hydraulics and the FLP 200s deal with pneumatics. Each consists of ten modules which consist of three week periods The student has the option of the program with which to start, FLP 100 or FLP 200 The Fluid Power program is two years in length; one year of hydraulics and one year of pneumatics. The certificate program consists of either one year in the FLP 100s or one year in the FLP 200s. The Associate Degree requires 15 credits of electivesmath, English, social science, etc.
Required Major Courses
Hydraulics
Credits Ct. Hrs.
FLP 100 SafetyIntroduction and Orientation 3 60
FLP 105 Basic Principles of Hydraulics 3 60
FLP 106 Fluids for Hydraulics, Sealing Devices 3 60
FLP 107 Source of Hydraulic Power 3 60
FLP 108 Control of Hydraulic Power 3 60
FLP 109 Hydraulic Actuators
MotorsCylinders 3 60
FLP 110 Distribution of Hydraulic Power 3 60
FLP 115 Conditioning Power Fluids 3 60
FLP 116 Pump, Overhaul and Testing 3 60
FLP 117 Components, Overhaul and Testing 3 60
Pneumatics
FLP 200 Basic PneumaticsSafety 3 60
FLP 205 Compressors 3 60
FLP 206 Primary, Secondary Air Treatment 3 60
FLP 207 Directional Control Valves 3- 60
FLP 208 Cylinders, Motors, Pneumatics 3 60
FLP 209 Piping, Hose, Fitting, Pneumatic
Systems 3 60
FLP 210 Pressure Control Valves, Pneumatic
Systems 3 60
FLP 215 Pneumatic Logic Controls 3 60
FLP 216 Troubleshooting, Print Reading 3 60
FLP 217 Basic Fluidics 3 60
60 1200
Additional Required Courses
General Education Courses 12 180
Approved elective 3 45
15 225
Total Required Hours 75 1425
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.
Foreign Automotive Mechanics (D)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides the student with job entry skills for the foreign automotive trade and upgrading for those in the field who need to acquire more skill
Required Major Courses
*FAM 100 Orientation, Safety, Basic Electrical and Ignition Systems Credits 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
*FAM 105 Starting and Charging Systems 3 60
*FAM 106 Carburetor Service 3 60
*FAM 107 Oscilloscopes and Electronic Testing 3 60


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
53
'FAM 107 Oscilloscopes and Electronic Testing 3 60
*FAM 108 Emission Control 3 60
*FAM 109 Drum Brake Systems 3 60
*FAM 110 Disc Brake Systems 3 60
*FAM 115 Wheel Alignment 3 60
*FAM 116 Wheel Balance and Suspension 3 60
*FAM 117 Steering Gears and Systems 3 60
FAM 200 Clutches and Manual Transmissions 3 60
FAM 205 Drive Lines and Differentials 3 60
FAM 206 Automatic Transmission Theory and Maintenance 3 60
FAM 207 Automatic Transmission Rebuilding 6 120
FAM 208 Engine Operation, Diagnosis, Disassembly and Measurement 6 120
FAM 209 Engine Reconditioning and Assembly 3 60
FAM 210 Air Conditioning Theory, Service and Safety 3 60
FAM 215 General Service Repair or one of the following: inter-department elective or cooperative education 3 60
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 72 1380
* Certificate Requirements
French (D,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in French A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution
Geography (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in geography. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
German (R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in German A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution
Graphic Arts (D)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program will prepare the student with job entry skills to accomplish most operations necessary on the process camera and the offset press, and to function in the areas of basic bindery, stripping and general layout and composition work. Students completing the program will be equipped to enter positions with commercial print shops, trade shops, in-plant print shops and any other operation requiring printers.
Required Major Courses
*GRA 100 Intro to Graphic Arts Credits 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
*GRA 105 Beginning Process Camera I 3 60
*GRA 106 Halftones on Process Camera 3 60
*GRA 107 Composition I 3 60
'GRA 108 Process Camera II, Composition II 3 60
*GRA 109 Beginning Offset Presses 3 60
*GRA 110 Stripping and Small Bindery 3 60
'GRA 115 Intermediate Offset Presses 3 60
'GRA 116 Paper, Management and Production 3 60
'GRA 117 Inks, Plates and Intro/Large Bindery 3 60
GRA 200 Process Color Separation 3 60
GRA 205 Process Color Printing 3 60
GRA 206 Computerized Typesetting 3 60
GRA 207 Raised Printing 3 60
GRA 208 Basic Machine Maintenance 3 60
GRA 209 Silkscreening 3 60
GRA 210 Printing Management and Marketing 3 60
GRA 299 Independent Study Additional Required Courses 5 150
SEC 101a Intro, to the Typewriter Keyboard 2 30
COA 105 Typography and Layout or Fundamentals of Photography 5 100
PHO 100 4 80
PHO 100L Fundamentals of Photography Lab or Airbrush I for Non-Majors 1 20
TEI 201 3 60
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 73-75 1390-1430
'Certificate requirements
Heavy Equipment Operation and Preventive Maintenance (R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to train a person with job-entry skills to enter the heavy equipment operation field
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
*HEO 100 Safety Orientation and Starting
Procedures 3 60
*HEO 105 Maintenance and Adjustments 3 60
*HEO 106 Operating Equipment 3 60
'HEO 107 Field Tasks
Initial Grading 3 60
'HEO 108 Field Tasks
Subgrading 3 60
*HEO 109 Field Tasks
Initial Finish Work 3 60
'HEO 110 Field Tasks
Dozer Equipment 3 60
'HEO 115 Field Tasks
Scraper Equipment 3 60
'HEO 116 Field Tasks
Grader Equipment 3 60
'HEO 117 Field Tasks
Loader and Backhoe Equipment 3 60
'HEO 118 Advanced Maintenance 3 60
'HEO 119 Advanced Field Tasks 3 60
*HEO 120 Advanced Field Tasks
Special Projects 3 60
WEF 108 S.M.A.W Safety and Electrode
Identification Padding 3 60
WEF 109 S.M.A.W. Joint Designs. All Electrodes 3 60
WEF 110 S.M.A.W. Joint Designs. All Positions 3 60
WEF 116 A S M E. Section IX Test E6010 3 60
WEF 117 A S M E. Section IX Test E7018 3 60
FLP 105 Basic Principles of Hydraulics 3 60'
FLP107 Source of Hydraulic Power 3 60
60 1200
Additional Required Courses
General Education Courses 12 180
Approved elective 3 45
15 225
Total Required Hours 75 1425
* Certificate Requirements
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog



54 1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
History (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in history. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Hospitality and Restaurant Administration (D)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to prepare students for entry level employment within the hospitality industry to include hotels, motels, restaurants, hospitals, state, city and federal institutions.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
HRA 110 Intro, to the Hospitality Industry 3 45
HRA 130 Administration and Front Office
Management 3 45
HRA 125 Maintenance and Engineering for the
Hospitality Industry 3 45
HRA 200 Sanitation Policies and Procedures 3 45
HRA 207 Food and Beverage Controls 3 45
HRA 221 Accounting Practices for the
Hospitality Industry 5 75
HRA 297 Cooperative Education or
Electives' 18 630
38 930
Additional Required Courses
CPB 100 Introduction to Computers 4 60
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision or
Elective 3 45
MAR 216 Principles of Purchasing 3 45
Typewriting Elective 4 75
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 25
General Education Courses 12 180
27 430
Total Required Hours 65 1360
'Elective must have advisor approval
2CPB 100 requires CPB 095 Computer Lab (1 Credit Hr.)
Hospitality and Restaurant Administration (D)
Certificate
This program is designed to upgrade students already employed within the hospitality industry.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
HRA 110 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry 3 45
HRA 297 Cooperative Education 6 270
HRA Electives 12 180
Electives 9 135
Total Required Hours 30 630
'Electives must be selected with adviser approval.
Humanities (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in humanities A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Human Services (D)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program prepares individuals for entry-level employment in communities and institutions that serve clients with a variety of human needs. Students may choose, through the selection of elective and specialized courses, to focus on specific skill areas, such as social service agencies, health care centers, youth services, substance abuse programs, geriatric centers
Required Major Courses
HSE 105 Intro to Social Welfare Credits 3 Ct. Hrs. 45
HSE 106 Survey of Human Services 3 45
HSE 107 Interviewing of Principles & Practices 3 45
HSE 108 Intro, to Therapeutic Systems 3 45
HSE 109 Social Issues In Human Services 3 45
HSE 115 Human Services Practicum I 4 150
HSE 205 Human Services for Groups 3 45
HSE 206 Human Services for Families 3 45
HSE 207 Community Organization 3 45
HSE 208 Social Welfare Policy 3 45
HSE 209 Crisis Theory & Intervention 3 45
HSE 211 Human Services Practicum II 4 150
HSE212 Human Services Practicum III 7 285
General Education Courses 12 180
Electives 6 90
Total Required Hours 63 1305
Industrial Electrical Maintenance Technology (R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed for improving the general knowledge required for the technician to advance into positions of increasing responsibility in the field of industrial process control and AC power technology.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
*ELF 100 Fundamentals of AC/DC Electricity 9 180
*ELF 105 Solid State Devices and Circuits 6 120
*ELF 106 Digital Logic Devices and Circuits 9 180
*ELF 107 Operational Amplifiers and A to D
Converters 6 120
IMA 200 Electronic/Pneumatic Instrumentation 9 180
EIC 201 Transformer Installation and Theory 3 60
EIC 202 AC and DC Machines, Installations
and Theory 3 60
EIC 203 Polyphase Rotating Machines and
Transformers 3 60
IMA 205 Industrial Control Systems 9 180
Technical Elective
(advisors approval required) 3 60
60 1200
Additional Required Courses
General Education Courses 12 180
Elective 3 45
15 225
Total Required Hours 75 1425
Certificate Requirements
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.



1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue 55
Industrial Management (R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides the student with a broadly based exposure to general business functions and fundamental industrial management concepts. Upon completion of the program the student should qualify for job entry into a wide variety of lower level general production management positions which carry initial functional administrative responsibility. Students already employed should acquire background necessary for personal development directed to job advancement.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
BUS 110 Business Mathematics 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications 3 45
INM211 Production Management I 3 45
INM 215 Production Management II 3 45
INM 215 Production Management Case Study 2 30
MAN 105 Intro, to Business 3 45
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law 4 60
MAN 225 Managerial Finance 3 45
27 405
Additional Required Courses
ACC 111 Accounting Principles 1 5 75
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II 5 75
CPB 100 Introduction to Computers 4 60
MAR 107 Principles of Marketing 3 45
MAT 111 Introductory Algebra 3 45
MAT 225 Statistics 3 45
23 345
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 62 930
Interpreter Training Program (F)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides the student with job entry skills in interpreting for deaf individuals Upon completion of this two-year certificate or degree program, the student will be eligible to take the evaluation offered by the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf
Demonstrated mastery of skills is required when exiting this program.
Students who wish to enter this program must make application in the Division of Arts and Humanities
Students are enrolled in the program only during the fall of each year.
In order to satisfy the requirements for a certificate, the following courses must be taken in the listed sequence This can be done by attending two years of daytime courses or three years of evening courses. To satisfy requirements for the Associate of Applied Science Degree, students must take an additional 12 hours of core courses
In order to graduate from this program, a student must earn at least a "C" in all course work.
Required Major Courses
ASL 111 American Sign Language I Credits 5 Ct. Hrs. 75
ANT 105 Ethnography of the Deaf Community 3 45
ITP 100 Hearing Process and Pathology 2 30
ITP 110 Interpreter Seminar I 3 45
ASL 112 American Sign Language II 5 75
PSY 220 Ecology of Deafness 3 45
ITP 106 Fingerspelling 3 45
ITP 107 Oral Communication Facilitation 3 45
ITP 111 Interpreter Seminar and Observation 2 30
ASL211 American Sign Language III 3 . 45
ITP 200 Reverse Interpreting I 3 45
ITP 205 Voice to Sign Interpreting I 3 45
ITP 206 Manually Coded English 2 30
ITP 207 Transliterating I 3 45
ASL212 American Sign Language IV 3 45
ITP 220 Reverse Interpreting II 5 75
ITP 225 Voice to Sign Interpreting II 5 75
ITP 227 Transliterating II 3 ' 45
ITP 203 Educational Interpreting 3 45
Total Required Hours For Certificate 62 930
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required For Degree 74 1,110
Journalism (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in journalism A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Literature (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in literature A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution
Machine Drafting Technology (F)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides the student with job entry skills as a mechanical technician in the mechanical drafting field. Demonstrated mastery of skills is required. Programs are open-entry and open-exit Student may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time either to complete the program for a degree or to upgrade specific skills
In order to graduate from this program with a Certificate, or Associate of Applied Science Degree, a student must earn at least a "C" in all course work.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
MDT 101 Mechanical Drafting Theory & Techniques I 3 60
MDT 102 Mechanical Drafting Theory &
Techniques II 3 ... 60
MDT 103 Mechanical Drafting Theory & Techniques III 3 60
MDT 111 Machine Detail & Assembly Drawing I 3 60
MDT 112 Machine Detail & Assembly Drawing II 3 60
MDT 113 Machine Detail & Assembly Drawing III 3 60
MDT 114 Machine Detail & Assembly Drawing IV 3 60
MDT 121 Introduction to Inking 3 60
MDT 122 Introduction to Sheet Metal Drawing 3 60
MDT 123 Introduction to Electro-Mechanical Drawing 3 60
MDT 200 Introduction to Casting 3 60
MDT 206 Introduction to Technical Illustration 3 60
MDT 207 Introduction to Gears & Cams 3 60
MDT 208 Introduction to Pipe Drawing 3 60
MDT 209 Introduction to Welding Drawing 3 60
MDT 201 Machine Drafting Technology I 3 60
MDT 202 Machine Drafting Technology II 3 60
MDT 203 Machine Drafting Technology III 3 60
MDT 204 Machine Drafting Technology IV 3 60
*MDT 205 Machine Drafting Technology V 3 60
60 1200



56 1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
General Education Courses
MAT 114 General Mathematics for College
Students 3 45
PHY 100 Basic Physics 3 45
SOS 115 Introduction to Social Science 3 45
COM 110 Career Communication 3 45
12 180
Total Required Hours 72 1380
Note: MDT 200, MDT 206, MDT 207, MDT 208, & MDT 209 may be
substituted by the following five classes:
MAS 100 Introduction to Machine Shop 3 60
MAS 101 Engine Lathe Setups and Operations I 3 60
MAS 111 Vertical Mill Setups & Operations 3 60
MAS 115 Horizontal Mill Setups and Operations 3 60
MAS 201 Surface Grinder Setups & Operations 3 60
'Equivalent COE 296 and MDT 297 may be substituted for MDT
205 with permission of the instructor.
MDT 299 Independent Study may be taken as an elective.
Machine Shop (F)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides job entry skills for the machine trades field and upgrading for those in the field who need to acquire more skill.
Demonstrated mastery of skills is required. The program is open-entry and open-exit. Therefore, you may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to complete the program for a certificate or degree, or to upgrade specific skills.
In order to graduate from this program with a Certificate, or Associate of Applied Science Degree, a student must earn at least a "C" in all course work.
'Required Major Courses
MAS 100 Credits Introduction to Machine Shop 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
MAS 101 Engine Lathe Setups and Operations I 3 60
MAS 102 Engine Lathe Setups and Operations II 3 60
MAS 103 Engine Lathe Setups and Operations III 3 60
COM 110 Career Communication 3 45
12 ~180
Total Required Hours 72 1380
*COE 296 and MAS 297 may be substituted for any of the MAS modules with permission of the instructor, not to exceed 12 credit hours.
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.
Lathe Operator 30 Week Certificate
Credits Ct. Hrs.
MAS 100 Introduction to Machine Shop 3 60
MAS 101 Engine Lathe Setups and Operations I 3 60
MAS 102 Engine Lathe Setups and Operations II 3 60
MAS 103 Engine Lathe Setups and Operations III 3 60
MAS 104 Engine Lathe Setups and Operations IV 3 60
MAS 105 Blueprint Reading 3 60
MAS 205 Tracing Lathe Setups and Operations 3 60
MAS 206 Turret Lathe and Automatic Screw Machines 3 60
MAS 208 NC Lathe & Setup & Operation 3 60
MAS 213 Job Shop Machining III 3 60
Check with advisor for prerequisites
Mill Operator 27 Week Certificate
Credits Ct. Hrs.
MAS 105 Blueprint Reading 3 60
MAS 111 Vertical Mill Setups and Operations I 3 60
MAS 112 Vertical Mill Setups and Operations II 3 60
MAS 115 Horizontal Mill Setups and Operations 3 60
MAS 116 Milling Machine Setups and Operations 3 60
MAS 207 Point-to-Point Numerical Control 3 60
MAS 209 Computer Numerical Control 3 60
MAS 214 Job Shop Machining IV 3 60
Check with advisor for prerequisites
MAS 104 Engine Lathe Setups and Operations IV 3 60
MAS 105 Blueprint Reading 3 45
MAS 111 Vertical Mill Setups and Operations I 3 60
MAS 112 Vertical Mill Setups and Operations II 3 60
MAS 115 Horizontal Mill Setups and Operations 3 60
MAS 116 Milling Machine Setups and Operations 3 60
MAS 201 Surface Grinder Setups and Operations 3 60
MAS 202 Cylindrical Grinder and Tool and Cutter Grinder 3 60
MAS 205 Tracing Lathe Setups and Operations 3 60
MAS 206 Automatic Screw Machines 3 60
MAS 207 Point-to-Point Numerical Control 3 60
MAS 208 NC Lathe Setup and Operation 3 60
MAS 209 Computer Numerical Control 3 60
MAS 213 Job Shop Machining III 3 60
MAS 214 Job Shop Machining IV 3 60
MAS 215 Job Shop Machining V, or a MAS Elective 3 60
60 1185
General Education Courses (suggested minimum level requirements)
MAT 114 Gen Math for College Students 3 45
PHY 100 Basic Physics 3 45
SOS 115 Intro to Soc Sci. 3 45
Management (D,F,R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides the student with a broadly based exposure to general business functions and fundamental management concepts. Upon completion, the student should qualify for job entry into a wide variety of lower level general business positions which carry initial functional administrative responsibility. Students already employed in these areas should acquire background necessary for personal development directed to job advancement.
Credits a. Hrs.
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 215 Principles of Management 3 45
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law 4 60
MAN 225 Managerial Finance 3 45
MAN 239 Business Policies 3 45
MAN 240 Management Information Systems 3 45
22 330
Additional Required Courses
ACC 111 Accounting Principles 5 75
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II 5 75
Bus 110 Mathematics of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications 3 45


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
57
CPB 100* Introduction to Computers 4 60
ECO 118 Labor Relations or Elective' 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Economics (Macro) 3 45
MAR 107 Principles of Marketing 3 45
Elective 3 45
32 480
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 66 990
'Electives to be selected with advisor approval *CPB 100 requires CPB 095 (1 credit hour)
Management Information Systems (D)
Certificate
This program prepares the student to organize and use the informational resources of business, government and industry.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
MIS 110 Introduction to Records Management 3 45
MIS 112 Records Indexing and Coding 2 30
MIS 114 Forms Design and Control 4 60
SEC 131 Introduction to Word Processing 3 45
BUS 297 Cooperative Education 6 270
18 450
Additional Required Courses Credits Ct. Hrs.
CPB 100 Introduction to Computers 4 60
SEC 148 Communications in the Office 1 15
SEC 101 Typewriting 4 75
9 150
Total Required Hours 27 600
'CPB 100 requires CPB 095 Computer Programming Lab with
variable contact hours.
BUS 297 Cooperative Education 3-6 135-270
CPB 100* Introduction to Computers 4 60
ECO 201 Principles of Economics (Macro) 3 45
21-24 405-540
Electives(Select 3 hours from courses listed below):
BUS 137 Listening Skills 2
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision 3
MAN 205 Small Business Management 3
MAR 115 Visual Merchandising 2
MAR 115L Visual Marchandising Lab 1
MAR 208 Sales Seminar 2
MAR 211 Wholesaling and Distribution 3
PSY 117 Human Relations in Business and Industry 3
Required Electives (Minimum) 3 45
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 63-66 1035-1170
'Electives to be selected with advisor approval *CPB 100 requires CPB 095 (1 credit hour)
Mathematics (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Science degree with an emphasis in mathematics. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Music (D,F)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in music. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Nuclear Medicine Technology (D)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
Marketing (D,F,R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides the student with a broadly based exposure to general business functions and fundamental management concepts, with emphasis on the marketing function. Upon completion of the program, the student should qualify for job entry into a wide variety of lower level general business positions, particularly those with sales and initial marketing administration or support responsibility. Students already employed in these areas should acquire background necessary for personal development directed to job advancement in marketing related areas.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 215 Principles of Management 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law 4 60
MAR 107 Principles of Marketing 3 45
MAR 108 Principles of Salesmanship 3 45
MAR 109 Advertising and Promotion 3 45
MAR 215 Retail Management 3 45
MAR 216 Principles of Purchasing 3 45
MAR 207 Marketing Seminar 2 30
27 405
Additional Required Courses
ACC 111 Principles of Accounting I 5 75
BUS 110 Mathematics of Business/Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications Applications 3 45
Upon completion of this program, the graduate will be eligible to write the certifying examination in Nuclear Medicine Technology given by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board, American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, or the Board of Registry of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists The AAS program begins in September of each year and continues for 24 months (two calendar years). The Certificate program, which requires previous certification in a health related field or four-year degree, begins in June of each year and continues for fifteen months. Since enrollment is limited, early application is highly recommended.
The program is conducted so that the academic portion is offered on campus and clinical "hands-on" experience is offered at one of the ten participating area hospitals Note: All new students will be required to pay an initial laboratory fee of $10.
Credits Ct. Hrs.
*HOC 106 Basic Patient Care 2 40
HOC 107 Orientation to Clinical Practicum 1 40
HOC 108 Positioning and Techniques 3 45
*RAT 200 Survey of Medical & Surgical Diseases 2 30
*NMT 200 Clinical Applications I 2 30
*NMT 203 Nuclear Medicine Practicum
Orientation 1 15
*NMT 205 Statistics of Radioactive Counting 1 15
*NMT 206 Radiation Physics for Nuclear
Medicine 3 45
*NMT 207 Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation 4 60
*NMT 208 Clinical Practicum I 8 360
*NMT 209 Clinical Applications II 4 60
*NMT 210 Clinical Practicum II 8 360
NMT215 Computers in Nuclear Medicine 3 45
NMT216 Clinical Practicum III 15 680


58
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
'NMT217 Radiopharmaceutical Preparations 4 68
'NMT218 Radioassay Procedures 3 45
'RTT215 Radiation Biology and Pathology 2 30
Additional Required Courses
BIO 111 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 90
BIO 112 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 90
CHE 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry I 4 90
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
PHY 115 Intro, to Medical Physics 3 45
General Education Courses 6 90
Total Required Hours 91 2433
* Certificate Requirements
Nursing (D)
Certificate in Practical Nursing or
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Nursing as a career includes a variety of employment opportunities and patterns of educational preparation. This nursing program enables the student to choose the career approach most appropriate to individual goals and needs, whether this career be as a practical nurse or associate degree nurse.
This program begins in the summer term and continues through the fall and spring semesters for two years. Applications, transcripts, and the Nursing Diagnostic Test must be completed by January 8th of each calendar year for the following June admission. Information may be obtained from the Educational Planning and Advising Center. Enrollment is open to 70 students each year.
The graduate with an Associate of Applied Science degree is eligible to take the examination for licensure as a Registered Nurse.
After successful completion of the first year, the student will receive a certificate in Practical Nursing and is eligible to take the examination for licensure as a Licensed Practical Nurse.
Note: All new students will be required to pay an initial laboratory fee of $20.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
NUR 100 Intro, to Nursing 3 45
HOC 116 Intro, to Pharmacology 2 30
NUR 111 Nursing Concepts I 10 195
NUR 112 Nursing Concepts II 14 270
NUR 115 Socialization into Nursing I 1 15
NUR 201 Advanced Pharmacology 2 30
NUR 211 Comprehensive Nursing I 12 230
NUR 212 Comprehensive Nursing II 14 270
NUR 214 Socialization into Nursing II 1 15
NUR 215 Socialization into Nursing III 1 15
60 1115
Additional Required Courses
'BIO 111 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 90
'BIO 112 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 90
'BIO 211 Adv. Phys. and Pathogenesis 3 45
'BIO 215 Intro, to Microbiology 3 75
*PSY 235 Psych, of Human Growth and
Development 3 45
'ENG 111 English Composition 3 45
Total Required Hours 80 1505
'Meets General Education Requirement
Advanced Placement
Advanced placement into Level II is available for graduates of approved schools of practical nursing. All applicants must complete the required Level I related courses plus NUR 120 and 126 before entry level into Level II. Placement will be made based on clinical availability in the fall or spring semester. All applicants must take a nursing diagnostic test.
Credits Ct. Hrs.
BIO 111 Hum. Anat. and Phys. I 4 90
BIO 112 Hum- Anat. and Phys. II 4 90
NUR 120 Psychosocial Concepts in Nursing 2 30
NUR 126 Nursing Process: Concepts and Skills 4 68
*ENG 111 English Composition 3 45
*PSY 235 Psych, of Human Growth and
Development 3 45
'MAT 130 3 45
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course
Description section of this catalog.
'Meets General Education Requirement
Nursing (F)
Certificate in Practical Nursing or
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Nursing as a career includes a variety of employment opportunities and patterns of educational preparation This nursing program enables the student to choose the career approach most appropriate to individual goals and needs, whether this be a career as a practical nurse or registered nurse.
Admission to the Front Range Community College nursing program is by random selection (lottery). Application to the program is through the admissions offjce and closes the end of October each year for entry into the following one to two years of nursing classes Completion of two support courses, NUR 116 and BIO 111, is required prior to beginning nursing courses. It is also strongly recommended that students begin work on other non-nursing required courses while waiting for entry into the nursing program.
After successful completion of the first year (course indicated by an asterisk), the student will receive a certificate in Practical Nursing and is eligible to take the examination for licensure as a licensed practical nurse.
After successful completion of the second year, the student will receive an Associate of Applied Science Degree and is eligible to take the examination for licensure as a Registered Nurse.
In accordance with the College policy related to Profit from Instruction and due to restricted clinical facilities, only one re-entry to the program can be provided after failure in a clinical nursing course.
In order to graduate from this program, a student must earn at least a "C" in all course work.
Advanced Placement
Advanced Placement through transfer or ACT examination is available to Licensed Practical Nurses and nursing students from other schools.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
'NUR 116 Medical Terminology 1 15
*NUR 102 Pharmacology I 1 15
*NUR 103 Calculations of Dosages 1 15
'NUR 105 Basic Concepts of Nursing 6 120
'NUR 106 Basic Concepts of Family Centered Maternal-Newborn Nursing 4 75
'NUR 107 Basic Concepts of Nursing of Children 4 75
'NUR 108 Basic Concepts of Nursing of Adults 10 198
'NUR 130 Socialization into Nursing I 1 15
NUR 201 Pharmacology II 2 30
NUR 206 Comprehensive Concepts in Family Centered Maternal-Newborn Nursing 4 70
NUR 207 Comprehensive Nursing of Children 3 65
NUR 208 Comprehensive Nursing of Adults 6 120
NUR 216 Comprehensive Nursing of the Emotionally III 6 113
NUR 217 Comprehensive Nursing of Older Adults 8 165


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
59
NUR 231 Socialization into Nursing II 1 15
NUR 232 Socialization into Nursing III 1 15
59 1121
Additional Required Courses
*BIO 111 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 90
*BIO 112 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 90
*DIT 115 Nutrition 1 15
BIO 211 Advanced Physiology 3 45
BIO 215 Intro, to Microbiology 3 75
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth and Development 3 45
18 360
Additional General Education Courses (communications* & mathematics) 6 90
Total Required Hours 83 1571
Continuing Education for Nurses (D,F,R)
Continuing Education will be offered, as indicated by community needs, to augment the knowledge and skills of nursing These courses will enable the nurse to acquire an increased depth of knowledge in basic practice areas, an awareness of progress, developments and new therapy measures, and to meet requirements for Continuing Education Units
NCE 200 Registered Nurse Refresher Course Credits 13 Ct. Hrs. 240
NCE 201 Pre and Post Op Patient Teaching 1 15
NCE 202 Psychiatric Nursing Review 1 15
NCE 203 Medical-Surgical Nursing Review 2 30
NCE 204 Maternal Child Nursing Review 1 15
NCE 205 The Ups and Downs of Depression 1 15
NCE 206 Applied Physiology for Nurses 4 60
NCE 207 Acute Care of the Med Surg Patient. 3 45
NCE 208 Basic EKG Interpretation 2 30
NCE 209 Clinical Interpretation of Lab Test 2 30
NCE 210 Physical Assessment of Adult 3 45
NCE 211 Auscultation of Breath and Heart Sounds 1 15
NCE 212 Managing the Hypertension Patient 1 15
NCE 213 Primary Crisis Intervention 2 30
NCE 214 Spiritual Care of the Patient 1 15
NCE 215 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 1 15
NCE 216 Orthopedic and Neurological Nursing 2 30
NCE 217 Pharmacodynamics and Drug Interaction 3 45
NCE 218 Legal Aspects of Charting 1 15
NCE 219 Nursing Leadership and Management 2 30
NCE 220 Legal Aspects of Nursing 2 30
NCE 221 Wellness 1 15
NCE 222 Auscultation of Heart Sounds i 15
NCE 223 Auscultation of Breath Sounds 1 15
NCE 224 The Faces of Drug Abuse: Caring and Coping 1 15
NCE 225 Body Mechanics for Nurses 1 15
NCE 226 I V. Therapy 1 15
NCE 227 Communication Skills for Nurses 1 15
NCE 228 Hyperalimentation 1 15
NCE 229 Fluid and Electrolytes .1 15
NCE 230 Emergency Nursing Assessment .1 15
NCE 231 Nurse's Personal Finances 1 15
NCE 232 Preventing the Burnout Syndrome 1 15
NCE 233 Career Planning Seminar for Nurses i 15
NCE 234 Assessing Health Problems of Elderly 2 30
NCE 235 Emergency Trauma Nursing 2 30
NCE 236 Physical Assessment of the Child 2 30
NCE 237 Basic Spanish for Nurses 3 45
NCE 238 Interviewing Techniques for Nurses 1 15
NCE 239 Blood Gases 1 15
NCE 240 Assertiveness for Nurses 2 30
NCE 241 Arthritis & Related Disorders 2 30
NCE 242 Therapeutic Touch 1 15
NCE 243 Understanding IV Solutions 1 15
NCE 244 Holistic Nursing 2 30
NCE 245 Intermediate EKG Interpretation 2 30
NCE 247 Intro, to Critical Care 2 30
NCE 248 Psychiatric Nursing Update 2 30
NCE 249 Sexual Aspects of Patient Care 2 30
NCE 250 Tubes and Intubation 1 15
NCE 251 Adolescent Health: Ease and Disease 2 30
NCE 252 Stress Management for Nurses 1 15
NCE 255 Problem Oriented Medical Records 1 15
NCE 256 Interpretation of Vital Signs 1 15
NCE 257 Selected Emergency Care 1 15
NCE 259 Aging Process 1 15
NCE 260 Pediatric Emergency Care 2 30
NCE 265 Emergency Care 4 75
NCE 266 Mgmt in Long Term Care 1 15
NCE 267 Care of Patient with Open Heart
Surgery 1 15
NCE 268 Quality Assurance in Long Term Care 1 15
NCE 269 Nutrition 1 15
NCE 270 Emergency Drugs 1 15
NCE 276 Drugs and the Elderly 1 15
NCE 277 Cardiovascular Nursing Care 2 30
NCE 278 Rehabilitation Nursing 2 30
NCE 279 Immunization Laws and Child Care 1 15
NCE 280 Nursing Skills 1 15
NCE 285 Advanced Communication Skills 1 15
NCE 295 Psych. Aspects of Patient Care 2 30
NCE 296 Common Childhood Illnesses 2 30
NCE 298 Vital Issues in Nursing 1 15
Paralegal (D)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to prepare individuals with job entry skills for the general paralegal field. Emphasis is placed on practical skills such as interviewing, research, and document drafting. Programs may be designed with areas of specialization in the following: bilingual paralegal, research specialist, criminal law specialist, public law specialist, or probate and estate planning specialist.
Required Major Courses
*PAR 100 Intro to Paralegal Credits 3 Ct. Hrs. 45
PAR 105 Torts 3 45
PAR 106 Contracts 3 45
PAR 107 Legal Research 3 45
PAR 108 Civil Procedures 3 45
PAR 109 Property 3 45
PAR 115 Domestic Relations 3 45
PAR 201 Business Organizations 3 45
PAR 202 Commercial Law 3 45
PAR 203 Constitutional Law 3 45
PAR 204 Criminal Law and Procedures 3 45
PAR 205 Probate 3 45
PAR 210 Paralegal Workshop 6 285
PAR 219 Paralegal Seminar 3 45
PAR 207 Legal Research Seminar I 3 45
PAR 208 Legal Research Seminar II 3 45
PAR 214 Administrative Law 3 45
PAR 215 Real Estate and Land Use Law 3 45
PAR 290 or Selected Topics in PAR 1-6 15-90
PAR 297 Cooperative Education 1-6 45-270
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 6066 1095-1320
Certificate program consists of those courses marked with an plus 15 hours of PAR electives.


60
Petroleum Technology (R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program prepares you for employment in the petroleum industry as a technical assistant in the exploration, production, engineering or land departments of a petroleum company, or other
company or government agencies engaged in qeoloqic, geo-
physical or environmental work.
Required Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs
EAS 111 Physical Geology 4 90
EAS 112 Historical Geology 4 90
EAS 203 Map & Airphoto Interpretation 3 45
EAS 207 Geologic Field Methods 3 45
ENG 111 English Composition: Essay 3 45
ENG 112 English Composition: Research Paper 3 45
ENG 231 Technical Writing (3) (45)
DRI105 Introduction to Drafting 6 120
PET 105 Petroleum Industry 3 45
PET 108 Geophysical Concepts 3 45
PET 206 Land and Legal Aspects (3) (45)
PET 207 Petroleum Drilling 3 45
PET 216 Petroleum Production ' 3 45
MAT 111* Introductory Algebra 3. 45
MAT 112' Intermediate Algebra 4 60
MAT 113* Introduction to Geometry 3 45
CSC 111 Introduction to Computing with Basic 4 90
CPB 095 Computer Programming Laboratory 1 30
General Education Course (from approved list) 3 45
Science Electives, (PET 220, 299, EAS, MAT, PHY,
CHE, BIO, CSC, CPB, SUR) 4 60
60 1035
'MAT 121-122 and 3 hours of science electives may be substituted for MAT 111,112,113.
Philosophy (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in philosophy. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Physical Education (F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in physical education. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Photography (D)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides a comprehensive course of technical and aesthetic training to prepare graduates with the skills necessary to enter the field of professional photography The basic approach of the program is through application of photographic craft in solving problems in the field of visual communication. The photograph is an idea that the photographer needs to express and convey with precision, clarity and creativity. Students completing this program will be prepared to enter the various areas of professional photography including freelance work, portrait photography as well as creative photography.
Credits Ct. Hrs.
'PHO 100 Fund, of Photo 4 80
PHO 100L Fund, of Photo Lab 1 20
PHO 102 Fund, of Color 4 80
PHO 102L Fund, of Color Lab 1 20
PHO 105 Advanced Photo 4 80
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
'PHO 105L Advanced Photo Lab 1 20
*PHO 107 History of Photography 4 80
*PHO 107L History of Photography Lab 1 20
*PHO 108 Advanced Color 4 80
PHO 108L Advanced Color Lab 1 20
PHO 201 Professional Photo 4 80
PHO 201L Professional Photo Lab 1 20
PHO 209 Art of Photography 4 80
PHO 209L Art of Photo Lab 1 20
PHO 219 Seminar in Photography 4 80
PH0 219L Seminar Lab 1 20
ART 114 Design Theory & Practice I 3 90
General Education Courses 12 180
Students are required to take a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following required electives to fulfill degree requirements for the
photography program: ART 115 Design Theory & Practice II 3 90
ART 273 Printmaking I 3 90
COA 105 Typography and Layout 5 100
GRA 120 Process Camera and Halftones 6 120
TEI 201 Airbrush I for Nonmajors 3 60
MAN 105 Intro to Business 3 45
PHO 290 Special Topics 1-4 20-80
Total Required Hours 63-67 1235-1280
'The certificate program consists of those courses marked with an *.
Physics (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Science degree with an emphasis in physics. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Plumbing (R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to prepare individuals with basic job-entry skills for plumbing. It is also intended for job upgrading in special areas and for preparation of plumbers for city or State journeyman tests.
'PLU 100 Orientation of Tools, Basic Plumbing Drawings Credits 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
*PLU106 Basic Waste and Vent Layout and Code Requirements 6 120
'PLU107 Water Piping Methods 3 60
*PLU108 Gas Pipe, Code and Sizing, and Flue Vents 3 60
'PLU109 Residential Plumbing 6 120
'PLU 110 Finish and Installation of Plumbing Fixtures 3 60
*PLU 116 Plumbing Repair 3 60
*WEF 120 Welding for Construction and Mechanical Trades 3 60
PLU 205 Blueprint Reading and Layout 3 60
PLU 206 Hot Water Heating Installation and Maintenance 3 60
PLU 207 Basic Solar Energy 3 60
PLU 208 Advanced Solar Energy 3 60
PLU 210 Commercial Layout and Code Multistory Projects 3 60
PLU 215 Colorado State Code Requirements 3 45
PLU 216 Uniform Plumbing Code 3 45


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
61
PLU 220 City of Denver Code 3 45
PLU 225 Technical Project 6 180
60 1215
General Education Courses 15 225
R.N. education. The program is conducted so that the academic portion is offered at the Denver Auraria campus and the clinical hands on" experience is offered in one of eight participating hospitals. Both the degree and certificate programs begin each September. Applications are accepted from January to March.
Total Required Hours 75 1440
'Certificate Requirements
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this Catalog.
Political Science (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in political science. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution
Psychology (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in psychology. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Public Administration (R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to equip the student with skills necessary to function successfully at various levels in the public sector. It provides fundamental training for persons interested in managerial, administrative or technical positions.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 5 75
ACC 216 Governmental Accounting 3 45
BUS 110 Business Mathematics 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications
Applications 3 45
CPB 100 Introduction to Computers 4 60
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law 4 60
MAN 215 Principles of Management * 3 45
MAN 239 Business Policies 3 45
Business Elective' 3 45
37 555
Additional Required Courses
POS 111 Introduction to Political Science 3 45
POS 121 American National Government 3 45
POS 122 American State and Local
Government 3 45
Electives* 3 45
12 180
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 61 915
'Advisor approval required
Radiation Therapy Technology (D)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This accredited program is designed to provide job entry level skills for a therapy technologist A radiation therapy technologist is responsible for the accurate delivery of ionizing radiation to those patients with cancer Candidates for admission to the two year Associate Degree program must have a high school diploma or a G.E.D. equivalent. The Certificate program, a 12 month option, is also available to those students who have obtained an R.T or an
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care 2 40
HOC 107 Orientation to Clinical Practicum 1 45
HOC 108 Positioning and Techniques 3 45
RTT 125 Radiation Therapy Practicum I 4 180
RAT 200 Survey Of Medical and Surgical
Diseases 2 30
RTT 150 Radiation Therapy Practicum II 4 180
*RTT 200 Physics of Radiation Therapy I 2 30
*RTT 205 Radiation Therapy Methodology 2 30
*RTT 206 Radiation Oncology I 3 45
'RTT 207 Radiation Therapy Practicum III 11 496
'RTT 208 Physics of Radiation Therapy II 2 30
'RTT 209 Radiation Dosimetry 2 30
'RTT 210 Radiation Oncology II 1 15
*RTT 215 Radiation Biology and Pathology 2 30
'RTT 216 Radiation Therapy Practicum IV 11 500
*RTT 218 Radiation Therapy Practicum V 14 644
*RTT 285 Selected Topics in Radiation Therapy 3 45
Total 69 2415
Additional Required Courses
BIO 111 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 90
BIO 112 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 90
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
PHY 115 Introduction to Medical Physics 3 45
CHE 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry 4 90
General Education Courses 6 90
25 465
Total Required Hours 94 2880
'Certificate Requirements
Real Estate (R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program will prepare a student to work in real estate sales and real estate related fields, and financial institutions relating to real estate.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
REE 100 Real Estate Fundamentals 3 45
REE 105 Real Estate Finance 3 45
REE 111 Real Estate Law 3 45
REE 115 Real Estate License Preparation 3 < 45
REE 200 Principles of Insurance 2 30
REE 205 Real Estate Appraisal 3 45
REE 207 Real Estate Investment 3 45
REE 209 Real Estate Closings 3 45
REE 210 Real Estate Tax Factors 3 45
REE 216 Real Estate Listings & Selling
Techniques 3 45
REE 217 Real Estate Contracts 3 45
32 480
Additional Required Courses
ACC 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
BUS 115 Business Mathematics by Machines 4 60
CPB 100 Intro, to Computers 4 60
MAN 105 Intro, to Business 3 45


62
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
MAN 215 Principles of Management 3 45
17 255
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 61 915
Recreational Leadership (R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
BIO 138 Anatomy and Physiology for
Respiratory Therapy 4 90
CHE 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry I 4 90
PHY 100 Basic Physics 3 75
MAT 112 Intermediate Algebra 4 60
BIO 215 Intro, to Microbiology 3 75
PSY 111 General Psychology 3 45
25 525
Total Required Hours 73 2010
The Recreational Leadership program is designed specifically to meet the needs of individuals participating in the profession. The program places emphasis on techniques, planning and organization in the field of recreation.
Required Major Courses
Cradtt* Ct Mr*.
REL110 Intro, to Recreation Service 3 45
REL 111 Field Work 3 45
REL 112 Field Work 3 45
REL 113 Field Work 3 45
REL 121 Sports Officiating 5 98
REL 125 Dance Activities 5 98
REL126 Tumbling and Gymnastics 2 30
REL 145 Arts and Crafts 2 30
REL201 Team Sports 2 30
REL205 Group Leadership 3 45
REL207 Elementary Games & Activities 5 98
REL208 Programming Aquatic Activities 2 30
REL209 Creative Dramatics 5 98
REL211 Individual Lifetime Sports 2 30
REL 215 Recreational Equipment & Facilities 3 45
REL 216 Recreation in Special Settings 2 30
REL217 Techniques in Program Planning &
Organization 3 45
REL218 Outdoor Recreation & Camping 2 30
55 902
Additional Required Courses
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 67 1082
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.
Respiratory Therapy Technology (F)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
The program in Respiratory Therapy Technology is designed to prepare the student for employment as a registry-eligible respiratory therapist under the supervision of a physician. Upon completion of the program, the student is eligible to take the Registry Examination offered by the National Board for Respiratory Therapy.
In order to graduate from this program, a student must earn at least a C" in all course work.
Required Major Courses
CfMftt* Ct Hr*.
NUR 116 Medical Terminology 1 15
RIT 100 Respiratory Technology I 4 90
RIT 205 Intro to Critical Care 3 45
RIT 211 Clinical Practicum I 9 375
RIT 208 Respiratory Pathophysiology 3 45
RIT 209 Pharmacology for Respiratory Therapy 2 30
RIT 200 Respiratory Technology II 5 90
RIT 212 Clinical Practicum II 9 375
RIT 217 Pediatric Respiratory Therapy 3 45
RIT 213 Clinical Practicum III 9 375
48 1485
Additional Required Courses
BIO 111 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 90
Science (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Science degree with an emphasis in science. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Small Engine Mechanics (F)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides you with job entry skills for small engines and the specialty area mechanics field. The program places emphasis on the comprehensive small engine repair with second year options in lawn and garden equipment repair, outboard repair, snowmobile repair and motorcycle repair.
Demonstrated mastery of skills is required. The program is open-entry and open-exit. Therefore, you may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to complete the program for a certificate or degree, or to upgrade specific skills.
In order to graduate from this program with a Certificate, or Associate of Applied Science Degree, a student must earn at least a "C" in all course work.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
SEM 101 Basic Engines, Tools, and Safety 3 60
SEM 102 Carburetor and Fuel Systems 3 60
SEM 103 Ignition Systems 3 60
SEM 104 Engine Rebuild and Special Tools 3 60
SEM 111 Engine Control Systems 3 60
SEM 112 Basic Electrical Theory and Test
Equipment 3 60
SEM 113 Charging and Starting Systems 3 60
SEM 114 Engine Troubleshooting and Tune-Up 3 60
SEM 121 General Service I 3 60
SEM 122 General Service II 3 60
SEM 201 Clutches, Transmissions, and Drive
Systems 3 60
SEM 202 Basic Hydraulics, Service, and Repair 3 60
SEM 203 Brake Systems, Front Axles, and
Steering Systems 3 60
SEM 204 Hydrostatic Drive, Service, and Repair 3 60
SEM 211 Rotary and Reel Mowers, Service and
Repair 3 60
SEM 212 Roto-tillers and Snow Blowers 3 60
SEM 213 Garden Tractors and Rider Mowers 3 60
SEM 214 Edgers and Power Trimmers 3 60
SEM 221 Customer Service I 3 60
SEM 222 Customer Service II 3 60
60 1200
General Education Courses
(suggested minimum level requirements)
MAT 114 Gen. Math for College Students 3 45
PHY 100 Basic Physics 3 45


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
63
SOS 115 Intro to Social Science 3 45
COM 110 Career Communication 3 45
~l2 180
Total Required Hours 72 1380
Equivalent COE 296 and SEM 297 may be substituted for SEM 216 and/or SEM 217
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.
Chainsaw Repair
9-Month Certificate or 30-Week Certificate
Credits a. Hrs.
SEM 101 Basic Engine Tools and Safety 3 60
SEM 102 Carb and Fuel Systems 3 60
SEM 103 Ignition Systems 3 60
SEM 104 Engine Rebuild and Spec. Tools 3 60
SEM 116 General Service I 3 60
SEM 251 Chainsaw Safety, Drive Systems/Oiler Systems 3 60
SEM 252 Chainsaw Engine Systems 3 60
SEM 253 Chainsaw Maintenance/Overhaul 3 60
SEM 254 Chainsaw Troubleshooting 3 60
SEM 261 Chainsaw General Service 3 60
60 Motorcycle Service and Repair 9-Month Certificate or 30-Week Certificate 600
Credits Ct. Hrs.
SEM 223 Brake and Suspension Systems 3 60
SEM 224 Motorcycle Drive Systems 3 60
SEM 231 Electrical System Troubleshooting and Service 3 60
SEM 232 Carburetor Service and Repair 3 60
SEM 233 Single Cylinder Four-Cycle Engines 3 60
SEM 234 Multi-Cylinder Four-Cycle Engines 3 60
SEM 241 Two-Cycle Engines 3 60
SEM 242 Motorcycle Service and Repair 3 60
SEM 243 Motorcycle Customer Service I 3 60
SEM 244 Motorcycle Customer Service II 3 60
Rental Equipment Service and Repair 9-Week Certificate
SEM 106 Introduction to Rental Equipment Credits 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
SEM 107 Customer Service Operations 3 60
SEM 108 Rental Equipment Troubleshooting & Safety 3 60
COE 296 Cooperative Education Seminar 1 16
SEM 297 Cooperative Education 2 90
* Basic Engines, Electrical and Carburetion Systems 9-Month Certificate or 30-Week Certificate
Credits Ct. Hrs.
SEM 101 Basic Engines, Tools, and Safety 3 60
SEM 102 Carburetor and Fuel Systems 3 60
SEM 103 Ignition Systems 3 60
SEM 104 Engine Rebuild and Special Tools 3 60
SEM 111 Engine Control Systems 3 60
SEM 112 Basic Electrical Theory and Test Equipment 3 60
SEM 113 Charging and Starting Systems 3 60
SEM 114 Engine Troubleshooting and Tune-Up 3 60
SEM 121 . General Service I 3 60
SEM 122 General Service II 3 60
* Lawn and Garden Equipment Service and Repair 9-Month Certificate or 30-Week Certificate
Credits Ct. Hrs.
SEM 201 Clutches, Transmissions, and Drive
Systems 3 60
SEM 202 Basic Hydraulics, Service, and Repair 3 60
SEM 203 Brake Systems, Front Axles, and
Steering Systems 3 60
SEM 204 Hydrostatic Drive, Service, and Repair 3 60
SEM 211 Rotary and Reel Mowers, Service and
Repair 3 60
SEM 212 Roto-tillers and Snow Blowers 3 60
SEM 213 Garden Tractors and Rider Mowers 3 60
SEM 214 Edgers and Power Trimmers 3 60
SEM 221 Customer Service I 3 60
SEM 222 Customer Service II 3 60
Students will be admitted to these programs with documented evidence of prior learning and with instructor's consent. Social Science (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in social science. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Sociology (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in sociology. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Solar Energy Technology (R)
Option A
Active SolarInstallation and Maintenance Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
The program is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills for job entry into the solar energy field, in the area of installation and maintenance, and to provide upgrading and refresher courses for people already employed in the field.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
SET 101 Basic Solar Systems 3 60
SET 111 Solar Engineering Technology I 4 -c 68
SET 112 Solar Engineering Technology II 4 68
SET 115 Basic Sheet Metal for Solar 3 F 60
SET 125 Solar. System Design & Layout 3 60
SET 126 Solar Collectors 3 60
SET 127 Solar System Estimating and Maintenance Techniques 3 60
SET 132 Basic Solar Controls 3 60
SET 141 Passive Solar Systems I 3 60
SET 205 Computer and Calculator Techniques for Solar Energy 4 68
SET 215 Intro, to Wind Energy 3 60
SET 225 Domestic Hot Water Energy 3 60
SET 226 Solar Panel Installation 3 60
SET 233 Advanced Solar Controls 3 60
45 864
Additional Required Courses
BR1120 Bricklaying for Construction Trades 3 60
CAR 120 Carpentry for Construction Trades 3 60
DPR 125 Blueprint Reading for Construction Trades 3 63
PLU 100 Orientation of Tools, Basic Plumbing and Drawings 3 60
PLU 107 Water Piping Methods 3 60


64
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
PLU 206 Hot Water Heating Installation and
Maintenance 3 60
__I8 ~363
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 75 1407
Note: A minimum of 30 credit hours is required for a Certificate.
Applications and all germane documents and tests need to be completed by mid-February of each calendar year for the prografri starting the following summer. Admissions information may be obtained from Student Advising or the Health and Human Services Division at Denver Auraria Community College. Enrollment is limited to 25 students.
Note: All new students will be required to pay an initial laboratory fee of $20.
Option B
Passive Solar Design
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
The program is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills for job entry into the solar energy field, in the area of passive design, and to provide upgrading and refresher courses for people already employed in the field.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
SET 101 Basic Solar Systems 3 60
SET 141 Passive Solar Systems I 3 60
SET 145 Passive Solar Retrofit 3 60
SET 146 Passive Solar Engineering Technology 4 68
SET 151 Solar Greenhouse Design 4 68
SET 152 Sunspace 3 60
SET 205 Computer and Calculator Techniques for Solar Energy 4 68
SET 242 Passive Solar Systems II 3 60
SET 245 Earth Shelter Building Design 4 68
SET 295 Solar Design Technical Project 5 150
36 722
Additional Required Courses
BR1120 Bricklaying for Construction Trades 3 60
BR1126 Solar Walls and Fireplaces 3 60
DR1105 Intro, to Drafting 6 120
DR1115 Perspective Drawing 3 60
DRC 116 Intro, to Architectural DraftingFrame Construction 6 120
DRC200 Intro, to Commercial Architecture-Masonry Construction 6 120
27 540
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 75 1442
Additional Courses*
Note: A minimum of 30 credit hours is required for a certificate 'Please see Drafting Section for DRI/DRC Course Descriptions.
Spanish (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in Spanish. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Speech (D,F,R)
The College offers an Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in speech. A student who is interested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree should consult an advisor, the Transfer Guide, and the current catalog of the four-year institution.
Surgical Technology (D)
Certificate Program
This program begins in the summer term and continues through the fall and spring semesters. It is twelve months in duration.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
HOC 100 Medical Terminology I 1 15
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care 2 40
STE 100 Intro, to Surgical Technology 4 60
STE 105 Pharmacology for Surgical Technology 2 30
STE 106 Surgical Skills 6 120
STE 107 Surgical Instrumentation 3 60
STE 108 Surgical Trends 2 30
STE 109 Surgical Laboratory Experience 5 115
STE 110 Surgical Technician Practicum 7 325
STE 115 Surgical Pathology and Intervention 4 60
STE 290 Special Topics 2 30
38 885
Additional Required Courses
These courses may be taken, when available, any time prior to, or concurrently with the Surgical Technology Program. The following requirements may be taken prior to entering the program:
HOC 100 Medical Terminology
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care
BIO 111 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 112 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
ENG 111 English Composition
Semester Course Distribution
Summer Credits Fall Credits
HOC 100 1 BIO 112 4
HOC 106 2 STE 105 1
BIO 111 4 STE 106 6
ENG 111 3 STE 107 3
STE 100 4 STE 108 2
Total 14 Total 16
Spring Credits
STE 109 5
STE 110 7
STE 115 4
STE 290 2
Total 18
Surveying (R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
The Surveying Program provides theoretical training and field practice for a surveyor to enter and succeed in employment in the surveying profession. Parts of this program can be taken for upgrading within the profession.
Required Major Courses
SUR 100 SurveyingField Work, Elementary Credits 11 Ct. Hrs. 218
SUR 101 Surveying Calculations I 4 64
SUR 105 Surveying Drafting 8 160
SUR 200 SurveyingField Work, Advanced 11 218
SUR 201 Surveying Calculations II 3 49
SUR 202 Surveying Calculations III 3 49
SUR 203 Surveying Calculations IV 3 49
SUR 204 Surveying Computer Applications 4 60
SUR 205 Photogrammetry for Surveyors 6 109
SUR 206 Legal Aspects of Surveying 3 45
56 1021


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Additional Required Courses
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trig, and Functions 3 45
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 75 1306
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course
Description section of this catalog.
Technical Illustration (D)
(Option E Drafting)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
The Technical Illustration program prepares students for entry level positions as members of drafting and illustration teams in the technical illustration field, working with trade publications, annual reports, presentations, proposals, and product information.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
DR1105 Intro, to Drafting 6 120
DR1106 Basic Descript. Geom. and Aux.
View Proj. Prac. 3 60
DR1107 Drafting and Dimension Pract. 6 120
DR1109 Intersect, and Devel. 3 60
DR1110 Intro, to Assem. and Weld. Draw. 3 60
DR1115 Perspect. Drawings 3 60
TEI 200 Rendering and Airbrush I 6 120
TEI 205 Airbrush II 3 60
TEI 207 Special Problems 6 120
39 780
Additional Required Courses
ART 111 Basic Drawing 3 90
ART 112 Basic Drawing 3 90
ART 114 Design Theory & Practice I 3 90
COA106 Descript. Drawing and Rendering 5 100
COA 107 Rendering for Advert. Design 5 100
GRA 120 Process Camera and Halftones 6 120
25 590
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 76 1550
Note. Additional courses for all four drafting options are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.
Traffic Engineering Technology (D)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is intended to prepare students for job entry skills in the area of city, county and regional traffic engineering in both the public and private sectors. The primary emphasis of this program is dealing with automotive traffic and the problems associated with it.
This program has been recently transferred from Red Rocks Community College to Denver Auraria Community College and will be reviewed and revised prior to offering courses
Traffic and Transportation Management (D)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to prepare students for careers in the transportation of merchandise at the entry level position. It also prepares students for examinations given by the American Society of Traffic and Transportation.
65
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
TTM 101 Fundamentals of Commercial
Transportation I 3 45
TTM 151 Freight Rates I 3 45
TTM 152 Freight Rates II 3 45
TTM 211 Economics of Transportation I 2 30
TTM 212 Economics of Transportation II 2 30
TTM 221 Transportation Regulations I 3 45
TTM 222 Transportation Regulations II 3 45
TTM 231 Transportation Management I 2 30
TTM 232 Transportation Management II 2 30
Transportation Electives 6-9 90-135
29-32 435-480
Additional Required Courses
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 5 75
BUS 136 Bus. Communications Applications 3 45
ECO 118 Labor Relations 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law 4 60
MAR 107 Principles of Marketing 3 45
General Education Courses 12 180
33 495
Total Required Hours 62-65 930-975
Travel and Tourism Occupations (D)
Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for entry level employment in travel agencies, airlines and tourist offices.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
TTO 101 Geography for Travel and Tourism 4 60
TTO 102 Domestic Travel and Tariffs 4 60
TTO 103 International Travel and Tariffs 4 60
TTO 104 Travel Agency Management and Procedures 4 60
TTO 105 Computer Reservations Systems 3 45-60
TTO 297 Coop Education 6 270
25 555-570
Additional Required Courses
ACC 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 25
SEC 101 Typewriting I 4 75
English Elective 3 45
11 190
Total Required Hours 36 745-760
Urban Horticulture (F)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides job entry skills for the horticultural field and upgrading for those in the field who need to acquire more skill
The program is open-entry and open-exit Therefore, you may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to complete the program for a certificate or degree or to upgrade specific skills.
There are five options within the Urban Horticulture program. To meet special needs, the student may select any course from another specialty area.
A total of 30 URH credit hours are required for the certificate and 60 URH credit hours plus 12 credit hours in General Education are required for the AAS degree.


66
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
In order to graduate from this program, a student must earn at least a C in all course work.
Required Major Courses (All Options)
Credits Ct. Hrs.
URH101 Plant Science I 4 68
URH125 Soils and Fertilizers 4 75
Greenhouse and Garden Center Management Option (F)
URH 100 Rocky Mountain Horticulture Credits 2 Ct. Hrs. 30
URH 102 Plant Science II 4 75
URH 106 Landscape Plant Materials 4 75
URH 107 Plants in the Landscape 2 30
URH 115 Plant Usage 4 75
URH 135 Plant Propagation 4 75
URH 155 Arboriculture 3 53
'URH 200 Greenhouse and Field Experience 3 60
URH 204 Garden Center Operations 2 30
'URH 206 Interior Landscape Design 3 53
URH 210 Landscape Management 3 45
URH 212 Garden Management 3 45
URH 215 Greenhouse Management 3 45
URH 226 Horticulture Business Operations 3 53
*URH 235 Diseases and Pests 4 68
URH 240 Preparation for Commercial Appl. Cert 3 45
URH 245 Turf Production and Management 4 75
URH 255 Horticulture Management 2 30
URH 297 Cooperative Education 4 150
'Certificate Requirements
Landscape Construction Option (F)
URH 100 Rocky Mountain Horticulture Credits 2 Ct. Hrs. 60
URH 105 Intro, to Landscape Construction Drafting 3 60
URH 106 Landscape Plant Materials 4 75
URH 115 Plant Usage 4 75
URH 116 Landscape Planning 4 75
URH 126 Small Engine and Carburetor Repair for URH 3 60
URH 145 Sprinkler System Design 3 53
*URH 146 Sprinkler System Installation 3 60
URH 210 Landscape Management 3 45
URH 212 Garden Management 3 45
URH 216 Landscape Grading 3 60
'URH 225 Horticulture Equipment 4 75
URH 226 Horticulture Business Operations 3 53
'URH 235 Diseases and Pests 4 68
'URH 236 Basic Landscape Construction 4 68
*URH 237 Bidding and Estimating 2 30
'URH 239 Advanced Landscape Construction . 4-8 60-120
URH 245 Turf Production and Management 4 75
URH 255 Horticulture Management 2 30
URH 297 Cooperative Education 4 f 150
'Certificate Requirements Landscape Design Option (F) URH 100 Rocky Mountain Horticulture Credits 2 a. Hrs. 30
'URH 105 Intro, to Landscape Construction Drafting 3 60
*URH 106 Landscape Plant Materials 4 75
URH 107 Plants in the Landscape 2 30
URH 115 Plant Usage 4 75
*URH 116 Landscape Planning 4 75
'URH 145 Sprinkler System Design 3 53
URH 206 Interior Landscape Design 3 53
URH 210 Landscape Management 3 45
URH 212 Garden Management 3 45
URH 216 Landscape Grading 3 60
URH 226 Horticulture Business Operations 3 53
URH 235 Diseases and Pests 4 68
URH 236 Basic Landscape Construction 4 68
URH 237 Bidding and Estimating 2 30
'URH 246 Advanced Landscape Planning 4 75
URH 256 Landscape Perspective Drawing 3 53
URH 297 Cooperative Education 4 150
'Certificate Requirements
Nursery Management Option (F)
URH 100 Rocky Mountain Horticulture Credits 2 Ct. Hrs. 30
URH 102 Plant Science II 4 68
*URH 106 Landscape Plant Materials 4 75
URH 107 Plants in the Landscape 2 30
URH 115 Plant Usage 4 75
URH 126 Small Engine and Carburetor Repair for URH 3 60
*URH 135 Plant Propagation 4 75
URH 146 Sprinkler System Installation 3 60
'URH 155 Arboriculture 3 53
URH 200 Greenhouse and Field Experience 3 60
URH 204 Garden Center Operations 2 30
*URH 205 Nursery Management 4 75
URH 210 Landscape Management 3 45
'URH 225 Horticulture Equipment 4 75
'URH 235 Diseases and Pests 4 68
URH 236 Basic Landscape Construction 4 68
URH 240 Preparation for Commercial Appl. Certification i 3 45
URH 297 Cooperative Education 4 150
'Certificate Requirements Turf and Landscape Management Option (F)
URH 100 Rocky Mountain Horticulture Credits 2 Ct. Hrs. 30
URH 102 Plant Science II 4 68
URH 106 Landscape Plant Materials 4 75
URH 115 Plant Usage 4 75
URH 126 Small Engine and Carburetor Repair for URH 3 60
URH 145 Sprinkler System Design 3 53
'URH 146 Sprinkler System Installation 3 53
'URH 147 Sprinkler Service and Repair 2 30
URH 155 Arboriculture 3 53
'URH 210 Landscape Management 3 45
URH 212 Garden Management 3 45
URH 216 Landscape Grading 3 60
*URH 225 Horticulture Equipment 4 75
URH 226 Horticulture Business Operations 3 53
'URH 235 Diseases and Pests 4 68
URH 236 Basic Landscape Construction 4 68
URH 237 Bidding and Estimating 2 30
*URH 245 Turf Production and Management 4 75
'Certificate Requirements
Urban Planning Technology (D)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to prepare individuals with job-entry skills for the urban planning field. The program is intended to prepare the student for private sector and public sector employment. It will deal with local, county, regional and state concerns.
This program has been recently transferred from Red Rocks Community College to Denver Auraria Community College and will be reviewed and revised prior to offering courses


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
67
Water-Wastewater Technology (R)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program is designed to prepare students for entry level employment in jobs related to various water-wastewater treatment methods. Main emphasis is placed on water-'wastewater plant operations, procedures, problems and costs.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
WWT 100 Introduction to Water-Wastewater 3 45
WWT 105 Specific Calculations for W/W 4 60
WWT 119 Basic Water Analysis 5 83
WWT 120 W/W Equipment Maintenance 5 83
WWT 200 Hydraulics for Water-Wastewater 5 83
WWT 206 Design InterpretationW/W Systems 5 83
WWT 210 Advanced Water Analysis 5 83
WWT 216 Biological & Bacteriological Water Analysis 5 83
WWT 217 WWTDisinfection Techniques 3 45
WWT 297 Cooperative Education 4 180
COE 296 Cooperatiave Education Seminar 1 15
WWT Electives 10 150
55 993
Additional Required Courses General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 67 1173
* Students who are not presently employed in the profession will be required to take a minimum of four credit hours of WWT 297 Cooperative Education, before they can receive their Associate Degree.
Students currently employed in the W/W field will be required to complete four credit hours of additional major courses to satisfy Cooperative Education requirements.
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.
Water Distribution (R)
Certificate Program
This certificate program is designed to provide the student with a broadly based exposure to the general functions and fundamental concepts of the water distribution area of the water/wastewater industry. Students currently employed in the water/wastewater field should acquire background and refresher training suitable for personal development directed towards job advancement.
Required Major Courses
WWT 105 Specific Calculations for W/W Credits 4 Ct. Hrs. 60
WWT 109 Water DistributionBasic 3 45
WWT 110 Meter Shop Operations 3 45
WWT 128 Water/Wastewater Terminology 1 15
WWT 200 Hydraulics for W/W 5 90
WWT 206 Design Interpretation W/W System 5 83
WWT 236 Safety Practices for W/W 1 15
Total Required Hours 22 353
Water Treatment (R)
Certificate Program
This certificate program is designed to provide the student with a broadly based exposure to the general functions and fundamental concepts of the water treatment area of the water/wastewater industry. Students currently employed in the water/wastewater field should acquire background and refresher training suitable for personal development directed towards job advancement.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
WWT 105 Specific Calculations for W/W 4 60
WWT 116 Pretreatment Processes for W/W 3 45
WWT 117 Filters & Filtration 3 45
WWT 128 Water/Wastewater Terminology 1 15
WWT 209 Clarification Processes 3 45
WWT 217 Disinfection Techniques 3 " 45
WWT 235 Water Softening Processes 1 15
WWT 236 Safety Practices for W/W 1 15
WWT 240 Taste & Odor Control 1 15
WWT 246 Drinking Water Standards 1 15
Total Required Hours 21 315
Wastewater Collection (R)
Certificate Program
This certificate program is designed to provide the student with a broadly based exposure to the general functions and fundamental functions of the wastewater collection area of the water/wastewater industry. Students currently employed in the water/wastewater field should acquire background and refresher training suitable for personal development directed towards job advancement
Required Major Courses
WWT 105 Specific Calculations Credits 4 Ct. Hrs. 60
WWT 118 Wastewater Collection Systems 3 45
WWT 128 Water/Wastewater Terminology 1 15
WWT 206 Design Interpretation W/W Systems 5 83
WWT 226 T V. Surveillance of Collection Systems '3 45
WWT 236 Safety Practices for W/W 1 15
Total Required Hours 20 263
Wastewater Treatment (R)
Certificate Program
This certificate program is designed to provide the student with a broadly based exposure to the general functions and fundamental functions of the wastewater treatment area of the water/wastewater industry. Students currently employed in the water/wastewater field should acquire background and refresher training suitable for personal development directed towards job advancement.
Required Major Courses
WWT 105 Specific Calculations for W/W Credits 4 Ct. Hrs. 60
WWT 106 Mechanical Physical Treatment 2 30
WWT 107 Sludge Treatment 3 45
WWT 128 Water/Wastewater Terminology 1 15
WWT 207 Biological Treatment 3 45
WWT 217 Disinfection Techniques 3 45
WWT 236 Safety Practices for W/W 1 15
WWT 250 National Pollution Discharge Elimination System 1 15
Total Required Hours 18 270
Water Quality Control (R)
Certificate Program
This certificate program is designed to provide the student with a broadly based exposure to the general functions and fundamental concepts of the water quality control area of the water/wastewater industry. Students currently employed in the water/wastewater field should acquire background and refresher training suitable for personal development directed towards job advancement
Required Major Course
Credits Ct. Hrs.
WWT 119 Basic Water Analysis 5 90
WWT 128 Water/Wastewater Terminology 1 15
WWT 210 Advanced Water Analysis 5 83
WWT 219 Biological & Bacteriological Water Analysis 5 90
WWT 239 Cross Connection Control 1 15
WWT 245 Drinking Water Standards 1 15


68
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
WWT 250 National Pollution Discharge Elimination System 1 15
MAT 110 The Metric System 1 15
ENG 231 Technical Writing 3 45
Total Required Hours 22 368
Water/Wastewater Administration and Finance (R) Certificate Program
This certificate program is designed to provide the student with a broadly based exposure to the general functions of the administration and finance areas of the water/wastewater industry. Students currently employed in the water/wastewater field should acquire background and refresher training suitable for personal development directed towards job advancement
Required Major Courses
WWT 121 Public Relations for W/W Credits 3 Ct. Hrs. 45
WWT 129 Records & Record Keeping 2 30
WWT 208 W/W Admin. & Finance 3 45
WWT 236 Safety Practices for W/W 1 15
POS 122 American State & Local Government 3 45
ENG 111 English Composition 3 45
MAN 116 Principles of Supervision 3 45
SPE 111 Introduction to Speech 3 45
WWT 128 Water/Wastewater Terminology 1 15
Total Required Hours 22 330
Note: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section in this catalog.
Welding and Fabrication (D, R)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides job entry skills in the welding trade and upgrading for those in the field who need to acquire more skill.
Demonstrated mastery of skills is required Programs are open-entry and open-exit. You may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time either to complete the program for a certificate or degree, or to upgrade specific skills.
Required Major Courses
WEF 100 Oxy-acetylene Safety, Cutting & Welding Credits 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
WEF 106 Brazing & Special Applications 3 60
WEF 107 Blueprint Reading & Estimating 3 45
WEF 108 SMAW Safe Electrode ID & Surface Padding 3 60
WEF 109 SMAW Surface Padding 3 60
WEF 110 SMAW Joints, in Three Positions 3 60
WEF 115 Plate Code Test E7018 w/Backing Strip/Plate 3 60
WEF 116 Plate Code Test E6010 wo/Backing 3 60
WEF 117 Plate Code Test E6010/6011, E7018 wo/ Backing 3 60
WEF 118 Special Applications in Arc Welding 3 60
WEF 200 Pipe Joint Design & Fab Pipe Testing 2G 3 60
WEF 201 Pipe Prep & Test AS.ME., Sec IX, E6010 (R only) 3 60
WEF 205 Pipe Code Testing 5G Position (D only) 3 60
WEF 206 Pipe Code Testing 6G Position (D only) 3 60
WEF 207 GTAW Safety & Welding 3 60
WEF 208 GTAW Weld Alloys & Join. Var. Shapes (D only) 3 60
WEF 209 GMAW Pipe & Plate Code Testing 3 60
WEF 210 Structural Shapes & Joint Design-Proj. Develop 3. 60
WEF 215 Structural Project Layout & Fab (D only) 3 60
WEF 216 Structural Fabrication 3 60
WEF 217 Maintenance Welding & Repair (D only) 3 60
WEF 228 GTAW & SMAW Pipe Testing (R only) 3 60
WEF 235 Pipe Test ASME, Sec. IX, E6010, E7018 (R only) 3 60
WEF 236 Pipe Joint Design (R only) 3 60
WEF 237 GTAW Plate & Pipe Test (R only) 3 60
WEF 238 GMAW Plate & Pipe ASME, Section IX (R only) 3 60
60 1,185
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 72 1,365
Welding Technology (F)
Certificate or Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program provides job entry skills in the welding trade and upgrading for those in the field who need to acquire more skill.
Demonstrated mastery of skills is required. Programs are open-entry and open-exit. You may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time either to complete the program for a certificate or degree, or to upgrade specific skills.
In order to graduate from this program with a Certificate, or Associate of Applied Science Degree, a student must earn at least a C in all course work.
Required Major Courses
Credits Ct. Hrs.
WTE 101 Oxy-acetylene Safety Cutting and
Welding 3 60
WTE 102 Brazing and Special Applications 3 60
WTE 103 Welding Code & Testing 3 45
WTE 104 Blueprint Reading and Estimating 3 45
WTE 105 S.M.A.W. Safety, Electrode Identification and Surface Padding 3 60
WTE 106 S.M.A.W. Joints 3 60
WTE 107 Plate Code Testing E-7018 With Backing Strip 3 60
WTE 108 Plate Code Testing E06010 Without Backing Strip 3 60
WTE 109 Special Applications in Arc Welding 3 60
WTE 115 GMAW -A.W S Pipe & Plate 3 60
WTE 201 A.W.S Pipe Testing 2G & 5G 3 60
WTE 202 A.W.S. Pipe Testing 6G 3 60
WTE 205 Advanced G.M.A.W. 3 60
WTE 211 Ornamental Iron I 3 60
WTE 212 Ornamental Iron II 3 60
WTE 221 G.T.A.W. Welding Alloys 3 60
WTE 222 G.T.A.W. Safety & Welding, All Joints 3 60
WTE 223 G.T.A.W. & S.M.A.W. Pipe Test 3 60
WTE 231 Maintenance Welding & Repair 3 60
WTE 232 General Shop & Improvement 3 60
60 1170
General Education Courses (suggested minimum level requirements)
MAT 114 Gen Math for College Students 3 45
PHY 100 Basic Physics 3 45
SOS 115 Intro to Social Science 3 45
COM 110 Career Communication 3 45
12 180
Total Required Hours 72 1350


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
69
Course Descriptions
Course descriptions are listed in Alphabetical Order by Prefix by
Course Number. Please refer to the semester Class Schedules for each location for the list of courses offered each semester.
Course Modifications
The courses listed in the following pages are an indication of college course offerings. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester The instructor may alter the content of a course or program to meet particular class needs
College Locations
College locations are shown in parentheses following the course title as follows:
DDenver Auraria Community College FFront Range Community College RRed Rocks Community College
Prerequisite
A prerequisite is a course which must be satisfactorily completed before taking the next higher level course or the prerequisite for a course may be "permission of instructor."
290, 297 and 299 Courses
Cooperative Education
The Cooperative Education Program provides opportunities to supplement course work with practical work experiences related to the student's educational program and occupational objective.
Most program/course prefix areas offer cooperative education and in some programs it is required for graduatibn. All cooperative education courses have a course/program prefix and are numbered 297. The credit hours and contact hours are variable Permission of the instructor coordinator and the cooperative education job supervisor is required COE 296 Cooperative Education Seminar is a corequisite for this course unless waived by the division director.
Independent Study
Most program/course prefix areas offer independent study All independent study courses have a course/program prefix and are numbered 299 regardless of the class level of the student. The credit hours and contact hours are variable Permission of the instructor and division director is required prior to registration.
Special Topics Courses
Most program/course prefix areas offer special topics courses. All special topics courses have a course/program prefix and are numbered 290 The courses carry 1-6 credits and 15-90 contact hours. Permission of the instructor and division director is required prior to registration.


70
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Auto Body Painting
ABP100 ORIENTATION ON SHOP POLICY, AUTO PAINTING SAFETY, AND SANDING (F)
3 Credit Hours
Demonstrate a knowledge of school policy on safety, shop clean-up, grading procedures, list tools and equipment, perform safe handling of solvents, feath-eredge, block sand, hand sand, power sand, and prepare a surface for paint The knowledge will be evidenced through demonstration and by scoring 90 percent on the unit test. 60 Contact Hours
ABP 102 PRIMING (F)
3 Credit Hours
Mix primers and sealers to paint company specifications, perform all paint gun and air line regulator adjustments, clean, assemble paint gun, apply primer surfacer for spot and panel repair. This knowledge will be evidenced through demonstration and by scoring 90 percent on the unit test. 60 Contact Hours
ABP 103 PAINTING WITH ACRYLIC LACQUER
(F)
3 Credit Hours
Apply acrylic lacquer color and top coats, list variable temperature changes for thinners and solvents, demonstrate hand and machine compounding. This knowledge will be evidenced through demonstration and by scoring 90 percent on the unit test. 60 Contact Hours
ABP 104 SPOT PAINTING WITH ACRYLIC LACQUER (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prepare practice panels for spot painting, perform sanding procedures, apply blending and compounding techniques. This knowledge will be evidenced through demonstration and by scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABP 105 PAINTING WITH ACRYLIC ENAMEL AND ENAMEL (F)
3 Credit Hours
Apply acrylic enamel, enamel color and topcoats, demonstrate the different techniques in their application, list paint problems, their causes and cures. This knowledge will be evidenced through demonstration and by scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABP 111-114 GENERAL REFINISHING I, II, III, AND IV (F)
3 Credit Hours each course Perform live work under closely related shop and business conditions with emphasis placed upon quality work and flat rate. The student should be able to perform all operations from ABP 100 through ABP 105. This knowledge will be evidenced through demonstration and by scoring 90 percent on the unit test Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABP 115 GENERAL AUTO REFINISHING V (F)
3 Credit Hours
Perform more refinishing in specific area to overcome deficiencies or provide enrichment with emphasis placed upon quality work and flat rate. This knowledge will be evidenced through demonstration and by scoring 90 percent on the unit test 60 Contact Hours
Auto Body Service
ABS 100 ORIENTATION, REMOVE AND
REPLACE FRONT SHEET METAL, AND BOLT-ON PARTS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Demonstrate knowledge of shop policies, safety, grading procedures, identification and use of hand and power tools, and complete nomenclature of body parts. Be able to disassemble and reassemble bumpers, radiators, fenders, hoods, grills, doors, locks, regulators, trunk lids, and hinges within factory specifications and required flat rate time. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABS 107 REMOVE AND REPLACE HARDWARE, TRIM, AND GLASS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Remove and replace and align all interior and exterior trim and hardware including: moldings, handles, seat tracks, trim panels on doors, quarters, center post and cowl panel. Also, remove and replace door and quarter glass and be able to select the tools to remove and replace any one or all parts within factory specifications and required flat rate time. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABS 108 METAL REPAIR (F)
3 Credit Hours
Remove minor damage from sheet metal using the proper procedures of hammer, dolly blocks, files and power sanders, and be able to select the proper tools and rough out, smooth a minor dent in sheet metal without stretching the metal. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABS 109 HEAT DISTORTION AND SHRINKING AND GAS WELDING (F) .
3 Credit Hours
Demonstrate safety rules and procedures of setting up an oxy-acetylene torch, lighting of torch, how to control distortion in metal caused by heat, and different methods of shrinking stretched metal, weld four different joints in four positions. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and by scoring 90 percent on the unit test. 60 Contact Hours
ABS 115 PATCH WELD REPAIRS
OXYACETYLENETIGAND MIG WELDING (F)
3 Credit Hours
Remove damaged area from a panel and patch weld in new metal by using an oxyacetylene torch and mild steel welding rod or by spotting metal with mild steel and finishing with a flux coated brass rod. The student should also learn to weld in all positions with a MIG "continuous wire welder" The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABS 116 USE OF PLASTIC FILLER (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prepare a damaged surface to be filled and mix the material to manufacturer's specification, apply and finish filler. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABS 117 PULL ROD AND PRY BAR REPAIRS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Demonstrate use of dent pullers, pry bars, and pull rods to repair small dents and creases on double panels and hard-to-get areas, and metal finish or fill with body filler. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABS 118 MINOR DENT REPAIR (F)
3 Credit Hours
Repair a small area of damage by using hammer and dolly, pry bars, pull rods, dent pullers, using shrinking procedures and either metal finish or use of body filler. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABS 119 MINOR DENT REPAIR (F)
3 Credit Hours
Repair damaged areas by cutting out and patch welding in new metal, bumping out dents with hammer and dolly, using pry bars, pull rods, dent pullers and the use of all shrinking procedures and finish area with a body filler. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABS 120 BODY ALIGNMENT (F)
3 Credit Hours
Identify damaged area and align body using hydraulic jacks, tram gauge, alignment equipment, read and use measuring devices. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABS 130 FIBERGLASS REPAIR (F)
3 Credit Hours
Identify types of materials and equipment used for fiberglass repair and also demonstrate such repairs on fiberglass panels. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABS 135 FIBERGLASS PANEL REPLACEMENT
(F)
3 Credit Hours
Identify different panels or sections that are used and demonstrate how to reinforce spliced areas for strength and safety, select the tools and material to replace or section a panel. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABS 136 CLEANING, LEAK TESTING, SOLDERING RADIATORS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Demonstrate safety factors of working with overheated radiators and the caustics used in cleaning a radiator for repair. Know the technique in cleaning a radiator inside and out, and how to test it to locate a leak and be able to solder the leak and test its repair. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ABS 137 REPAIR, RECORE (RADIATOR) (F)
3 Credit Hours
Select tools and straighten fins of a radiator, repair leaks, recore a radiator, repair upper and lower tanks, boilout, rodout, back flush, and repair or replace damaged areas using all safety precautions The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. Yr 60 Contact Hours


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ABS 201 FRAME REPAIR (F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: 100,109,120 Select the hookups using portable rail and power post to straighten and align frames on conventional and unitized type construction to manufacturer's specifications. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. 60 Contact Hours
ABS 202-205 MAJOR DAMAGE REPAIRS I, II, III, IV (F)
3 Credit Hours each unit
Perform repairs and align auto bodies, repair and align sheet metal with the use of different types of equipment, gauges, and measuring devices. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. 60 Contact Hours
ABS 211-215 GENERAL AUTO BODY REPAIR I,
II, III, IV, V (F)
3 Credit Hours each unit
Identify and use all types of equipment and tools necessary to make repairs on various types of auto bodies with emphasis on speed and quality work. The knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and scoring 90 percent on the unit test. 60 Contact Hours
Accounting
ACC 095 LAB: INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING ON THE MICROCOMPUTER (D,F,R)
1 Credit Hour
The lab provides microcomputers, printer, computerized accounting software, plus instructional assistance necessary to help the student complete assignments in the course ACC 113 Introduction to Accounting on the Microcomputer. 30 Contact Hours
ACC 103 BOOKKEEPING (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
A study of the basic elements of the accounting cycle through statement preparation. Course includes common bookkeeping procedures in handling cash receipts and disbursements; in dealing with accounts receivable and payable; in maintaining journals and ledgers. Emphasis on practice. 45 Contact Hours
ACC 104 ADVANCED BOOKKEEPING (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ACC 103 or permission of instructor A study of the use of special journals; cash systems; accounting for sales taxes, bad debts, and depreciation; accounting for notes, accrued revenues and expenses; an introduction to partnership and corporation accounting. Emphasis on practice. 45 Contact Hours
ACC 105 PAYROLL PROCEDURES (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ACC 103 or ACC 111 Includes a study of various payroll systems and related laws. Practice in preparation of payrolls, review and reinforcement of payables and receivables, and an introduction to one-write systems. 45 Contact Hours
ACC 106 INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNING ACCOUNTING (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
An introduction to beginning accounting for those students seeking basic background or preparation for ACC 111 and/or ACC 113. A study of the basic elements of the accounting cycle through statement preparation. Included are procedures for cash control, receivables and payables, payroll preparation, recognition of accrued revenues and expenses, and other fundamental areas of accounting. Completion of this course does not fulfill the requirements of ACC 111. 45 Contact Hours
ACC 111 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I (D,F,R)
5 Credit Hours
An introductory study of accounting principles to acquaint the student with the theory and logic that underlie accounting procedures. Course content includes the accounting cycle, periodic reporting, notes, inventory, systems and controls and plant assets. Emphasis on theory. 75 Contact Hours
ACC 112 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II (D,F,R)
5 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ACC 111
A continuation of Accounting Principles I with emphasis on partnership and corporation accounting, department and branch accounting, introduction to cost systems, management reports, and special analysis. 75 Contact Hours
ACC 113 INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING ON THE MICROCOMPUTER (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
An introduction to data entry procedures on the computer in accounting applications. The course includes accounting training in both manual and computer procedures. Phase 1: Completion of a manual practice set for reviewing and/or updating accounting fundamentals. Phase 2: In-class theoretical discussion and introduction to hands-on data entry procedures. Phase 3: Assigned accounting problems which the student is required to run on a computer culminating in fhe practical application of the material covered in Phases 1 and 2. 45 Contact Hours
ACC 116 CORPORATE ACCOUNTING (F)
2 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ACC 111
A continuation of Accounting Principles I with emphasis on selected aspects of corporation accounting, funds, preparation of worksheets, manufacturing statements, and special analysis. 30 Contact Hours
ACC 130 INCOME TAX SEMINAR (D,F,R)
1 Credit Hour
An introduction to preparation of individual income tax reports as required by the Internal Revenue Service and the Income Tax Division of the Colorado Revenue Department. 15 Contact Hours
ACC 131 INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Designed to familiarize the student with the most frequently used tax forms, tax information and procedures. Coverage is limited to individual income tax preparation as required by the Internal Revenue Service and the Income Tax Division of the Colorado Revenue Department. 45 Contact Hours
ACC 132 INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX II (R)
2 Credit Hours
Co-requisite: ACC 131 at Red Rocks A continuation of ACC 131; includes in-depth study of gains and losses emphasizing business and investment property, depreciation, income averaging, mini and maxi tax. 30 Contact Hours
ACC 133 INCOME TAX SERVICE (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ACC 131 and ACC 132 This course offers the student the opportunity to prepare state and federal returns. This is a hands-on experience. 45 Contact Hours
ACC 170 ACCOUNTING SEMINAR (D,F,R)
1 Credit Hour
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
Designed to examine contemporary accounting
practices and procedures. 15 Contact Hours
ACC 211 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ACC 112 or ACC 116 and ACC 221 A review of the accounting cycle A detailed study of the conceptual framework of accounting as it relates to the corporate structure. 45 Contact Hours
ACC 212 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II
(D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ACC 112 or 221 A continuation of the study of the framework of accounting as begun in Intermediate Accounting I. 45 Contact Hours
ACC 215 ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ACC 112 and CPB 100 A study of the principles, concepts and tools used in the design, implementation, and integration of accounting systems, controls, and procedures. Practical application projects are used to illustrate manual and computerized systems 45 Contact Hours
ACC 216 GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING
(D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ACC 111 or consent of instructor A study of the budgeting and fund control at the local, state, and federal levels. Includes the forecast or preparation of the budgetary requirement and anticipated revenue at each level of government. The accounting principles and procedures related to the government law, appropriate to the execution of the public law, concerning public funds, are presented 45 Contact Hours
ACC 221 COST ACCOUNTING (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ACC 112 or ACC 116 A study of the cost accumulation methods and management reports The concepts and principles or order, process, standard and direct cost system; budgeting; planning and control of costs are included. 45 Contact Hours
ACC 235 BUSINESS TAXATION (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ACC 131
Designed to familiarize the student with most frequently used tax forms, current Internal Revenue Code and the State of Colorado Revenue Code as they apply to most businesses. The course will include state and federal payroll taxes, sales tax reporting, and the following income tax returns: Subchapter S, corporations, partnerships. 45 Contact Hours


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
ACC 250 OIL AND GAS ACCOUNTING (D,F,R)
4 Credit Hours Prerequisite ACC 112
A study of accounting principles as they relate to the energy industry. This study includes a review of law and practices as they relate to accounting principles and concepts peculiar to the energy industry. .60 Contact Hours
ACC 255 COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING
(D.F.R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite CPB 100, SEC 105 and 10 credits of accounting theory
A study of the theory and mechanics of a hypothetical corporation requiring the completion of a business project using computerized accounting techniques Computer lab (CPB 095) is required 60 Contact Hours
Anthropology
ANT 105 ETHNOGRAPHY OF THE DEAF COMMUNITY (F)
3 Credit Hours
The application of ethnographic principles and methods to deaf communities. Focus is upon language as the major vehicle for examining deaf and hearing community interaction while attempting to discover native categories, rules and strategies that affect adaptation in a hearing world is 45 Contact Hours
ANT 111 PRINCIPLES OF ANTHROPOLOGY I
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
An introductory study of culture as an instrument of adaptation. 45 Contact Hours
ANT 112 PRINCIPLES OF ANTHROPOLOGY ll(D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
An introductory study of culture including language, technology, social structure, arts and values. is 45 Contact Hours
ANT 140 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CULTURE (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
Studies and evaluates the evolution of cultural concepts and experiences in America. 45 Contact Hours
ANT 201 PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY I (F,R)
4 Credit Hours
An introductory study of the fossil record, living animals, and cultural factors as they relate to human evolution May be taken for science credit by nonscience majors 90 Contact Hours
ANT 202 PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY II (F,R)
4 Credit Hours
An anthropological study of human variation, human biology, and the mechanics of evolution. May be taken for science credit by non-science majors 90 Contact Hours
ANT 205 ANTHROPOLOGY OF SEX AND GENDER (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
A cross-cultural investigation of sexual roles in pre-industrial and industrial societies 45 Contact Hours
ANT 206 CULTURE IN THE WORLD TODAY: LATIN AMERICAN (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
A view of cultural dynamics 45 Contact Hours
ANT 207 CULTURE IN THE WORLD TODAY: THE MIDDLE EAST (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
A view of cultural dynamics.; 45 Contact Hours
ANT 208 CULTURE IN THE WORLD TODAY: AFRICA (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
A view of cultural dynamics. is 45 Contact Hours
ANT 209 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHAEOLOGY (R)
3 Credit Hours
An introductory study of methods, techniques and theories of archaeological investigation 45 Contact Hours
ANT 215 THE NATURE OF LANGUAGE (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
A survey of the basic structure, origin and development of language :: 45 Contact Hours
ANT 235 ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
Investigates the birth of religion in the life and experience of pre-literate and literate societies. 45 Contact Hours
Environmental and Refrigeration Technology
(Major Appliance Repair)
APT 218 AUTOMATIC WASHERS I (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites RAC 100 series or equivalent experiences
Examines control devices and the electrical circuits common to most automatic washers, and the methods of troubleshooting electrical circuits 60 Contact Hours
APT 219 CLOTHES DRYERS I (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: RAC 100 series or equivalent experiences
Examination of circuits, control devices, diagnostic and repair procedures on various makes of automatic electric clothes dryers is 60 Contact Hours
APT 220 KITCHEN EQUIPMENT 1(D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites RAC 100 series or equivalent experiences
Examines the repair of automatic dishwasher disposals, and domestic water conditioners. 60 Contact Hours
APT 225 REFRIGERATORS/FREEZERS I (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: RAC 100 series or equivalent experiences
Presents the study and repair of various makes and models of upright refrigerator/freezers and chest freezers. 60 Contact Hours
APT 226 ROOM AIR CONDITIONERS (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: RAC 100 series or equivalent experiences
Presents circuits, control devices, diagnostic and repair procedures on various makes of room air conditioners. is 60 Contact Hours
APT 227 AUTOMATIC WASHERS II (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: RAC 100 series or equivalent experiences
Presents troubleshooting, and the methods and procedures to adjust, repair or replace components on General Electric, Westmghouse, Maytag, Kelvi-nator and D&M machines as available. 60 Contact Hours
APT 228 CLOTHES DRYERS II (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: RAC 100 series or equivalent experiences
Presents a study of circuits, control devices, diagnostic and repair procedures on various makes of automatic gas clothes dryers is 60 Contact
Hours
APT 229 KITCHEN EQUIPMENT II (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites RAC 100 series or equivalent experiences
Presents the study and repair of gas and electric ranges and microwave ovens, and trash compactors. is 60 Contact Hours
APT 230 REFRIGERATORS/FREEZERS II (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: RAC 100 series'or equivalent experience
Presents the study and repair of various makes and models of upright refrigerator/freezers and chest freezers is 60 Contact Hours
APT 235 AUTOMATIC WASHERS III (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites RAC 100 series or equivalent experiences
Presents troubleshooting and the methods and procedures to adjust, repair or replace the components on Norge, Whirlpool, Speed Queen, Frigidaire and Franklin machines is 60 Contact
Hours
Art
ART 111 BASIC DRAWING I (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Freehand drawing covering a selection of subjects proportion perspective, line, texture, value and composition Media includes pencil, conte crayon, charcoal, and ink is 90 Contact Hours
ART 112 BASIC DRAWING II (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites ART 111 or permission of instructor Introduction of color into drawing Drawing in varied and mixed media, emphasizing experimentation Broad range of size and material stressing composition and concept Introduction to drawing the human figure, is 90 Contact Hours
ART 114 DESIGN THEORY AND PRACTICE I
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Fundamentals of form, color, visual perception, principles of composition, organization and structure introduced with experimentation in both two and three dimensional design is 90 Contact Hours
ART 115 DESIGN THEORY AND PRACTICE II
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prequisites ART 114 or permission of instructor Continuation of ART 114 *90 Contact Hours
ART 131 BASIC WATERCOLOR I (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Transparent and opaque water color painting. 90 Contact Hours


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ART 132 BASIC WATERCOLOR II (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ART 131 or permission of instructor. Continuation of ART 131. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 141 OIL AND ACRYLIC PAINTING I (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Investigation of the materials of the painter in controlling form and space. 90 Contact Hours
ART 142 OIL AND ACRYLIC PAINTING II (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites. ART 141 or permission of instructor Continuation of ART 141. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 151 BASIC SCULPTURE I (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
A creative approach to three dimensional design in sculpture, modeling, assembling, and construction in a variety of materials. 90 Contact Hours
ART 152 BASIC SCULPTURE II (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Continuation of ART 151. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 161 POTTERY I (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Design and construction of pottery using various handbuilding methods. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 162 POTTERY II (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to throwing techniques using a potter's wheel. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 163 POTTERY III (R)
3 Credit Hours
Design and throwing of the basic forms with exploration in glazing techniques. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 171 TEXTILE DESIGN AND WEAVING I (F,R) 3 Credit Hours
Looms, weaving and textile design techniques, studio experience in weaving, batik, and other textile design. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 172 TEXTILE DESIGN AND WEAVING II (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ART 171 or permission of instructor Continuation of ART 171. *90 Contact Hours
ART 181 BASIC METAL TECHNIQUES IN JEWELRY DESIGN (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Construction of jewelry designs in precious metals and small casting techniques. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 182 BASIC CASTING FOR JEWELRY DESIGN (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ART 181 or permission of instructor. Continuation of ART 181. Centrifugal and vacuum casting of precious metals using lost-wax techniques, wax working techniques, mold making and wax injection. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 190 ART APPRECIATION (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
A study of the world's art masterpieces. Yr 45 Contact Hours
ART 191 A SURVEY OF ART MASTERPIECES I (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Art appreciation and history of the masterpieces of the world from pre-history through the Renaissance Yr 45 Contact Hours
ART 192 A SURVEY OF ART MASTERPIECES II (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
A continuation of ART 191, from baroque through modern art. Yr 45 Contact Hours
ART 195 THE ART OF AFRICA AND BLACK AMERICANS (D)
3 Credit Hours
A critical examination of the art of Africa and its relationship to the artistic development of the United States. Yr 45 Contact Hours
ART 211 SECOND-YEAR DRAWING I (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Experimentation using a variety of media. 90 Contact Hours
ART 212 SECOND-YEAR DRAWING II (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ART 211 or permission of instructor Continuation of ART 211. Advanced concepts seeking more individualized solutions. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 214 ADVANCED DESIGN I (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Applied techniques of layout and design. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 215 ADVANCED DESIGN II (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Continuation of ART 214. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 221 FIGURE DRAWING I (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Beginning drawing of the human figure. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 222 FIGURE DRAWING II (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Continuation of ART 221 90 Contact Hours
ART 231 SECOND-YEAR WATERCOLOR I
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Emphasis on solutions in water media on a more individualized basis. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 232 SECOND-YEAR WATERCOLOR II
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Continuation of ART 231. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 241 SECOND-YEAR OIL AND ACRYLIC PAINTING I (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites. ART 142 or permission of instructor. Mixed media through problems involving landscape, still life, abstraction and non-objective painting. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 242 SECOND-YEAR OIL AND ACRYLIC PAINTING II (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Continuation of ART 241 -> 90 Contact Hours
ART 251 BASIC SCULPTURE I (F.R)
3 Credit Hours
A creative approach to three dimensional design in sculpture, modeling, assembling, and construction in a variety of materials. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 252 BASIC SCULPTURE II (F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Continuation of ART 251, Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 26t SECOND-YEAR POTTERY I (F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Intermediate wheelwork with advanced throwing problems. Continuing involvement in glazing and firing techniques Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 262 SECOND-YEAR POTTERY II (F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Continuation of ART 261. More advanced throwing problems in one of three areas: (1) tableware, (2) other functional forms, (3) art forms. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 263 CERAMICS DESIGN (R)
3 Credit Hours
Advanced study in throwing. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 266 PRIMITIVE POTTERY (R)
3 Credit Hours
Hand building and use of primitive firing methods. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 267 ADVANCED HAND BUILDING TECHNIQUES (R)
3 Credit Hours
Advanced study in hand building. Building and firing large forms, including mold-making techniques Y: 90 Contact Hours
ART 268 RAKU POTTERY (R)
3 Credit Hours
Raku as an art form with various hand building and throwing techniques Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 269 GLAZE FORMULATION (R)
3 Credit Hours
The study of glaze materials and various firing techniques. Loading and firing of kilns formulating glazes. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 271 SECOND YEAR TEXTILE DESIGN AND WEAVING I (F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ART 171 and 172 or permission of the instructor.
Looms, weaving and textile design techniques, studio experience in weaving, batik and other textile design. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 272 SECOND YEAR TEXTILE DESIGN AND WEAVING II (F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ART 271 or permission of the instructor.
Continuation of ART 271. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 273 PRINTMAKING I (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Basic Drawing and/or Theory and Practice I
A study of hand printing techniques: silkscreen printing and intaglio. Emphasis in this class is on silkscreen to include glue, films and photographic with an introduction to intaglio to include etching and collographs. (Entry-level skills: drawing and/or design skills.) Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 274 PRINTMAKING II (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ART 273
A continuation of ART 273 with emphasis on intaglio, planographs, relief and stencil. Students will work With woodcuts, etchings and seriography with special attention on design and craftsmanship. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 281 SECOND-YEAR METALSMITHING I
(F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Creating hollow forms by raising, sinking, stretching, and polishing metals. Also includes pattern making for large hollow constructed forms 90 Contact Hours
ART 282 SECOND-YEAR METALSMITHING II (F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Continuation of ART 281. Emphasis on advanced design and experimentation of advanced techniques. Yr 90 Contact Hours


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
ART 283 APPLIED ART (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ART 111, 112 and 114, 115 or ART 131,132 or 141,142 or 151,152 In this course, the student will explore, identify, and gain practical experience in a project related to a career area involving fine art knowledge and skills. The course surveys art market place activities, and identifies student strengths and interests which may apply to the areas of design, painting, drawing and sculpture. Yr 90 Contact Hours
ART 291 HISTORY OF AMERICAN ART I (R)
3 Credit Hours
Major artists and movements in America to 1865. Yr 45 Contact Hours
ART 292 HISTORY OF AMERICAN ART II (R)
3 Credit Hours
Continuation of ART 291. American artists and movements from 1865 to the present Yr 45 Contact Hours
ART 295 ART IN THE COMMUNITY (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ART 111 or ART 114 and 115 or permission of instructor.
Studies art for public spaces. Areas of application include both painting and sculpture for public buildings as well as design or community space. The emphasis is on environmental needs. (Entry-level skills: a fundamental knowledge of the principles of art.) Yr 90 Contact Hours
American Sign Language
ASL 111 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I (F)
5 Credit Hours
The student will have an opportunity to develop a basic syntactic knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL), basic vocabulary and basic conversation skills. Lessons will be conducted using ASL to develop receptive skills Yr 75 Contact Hours
ASL 112 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II (F)
5 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ASL 111
The purpose of this course is to provide the student an opportunity to further develop an understanding of the grammatical guidelines of the American Sign Language (ASL) and to increase sign vocabulary. This course is a continuation of ASL 111 with more emphasis on expressive skills in signing. Yr 75 Contact Hours
ASL 211 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ASL 112 with B or better The purpose of this course is to provide the student an opportunity to increase sign vocabulary and to develop spontaneity in conversational American Sign Language (ASL). Yr 45 Contact Hours
ASL 212 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE IV (F)
3 Credit Hours Prequisites: ASL 112,211
The student will have the opportunity to develop spontaniety and fluency in conversational ASL by giving prepared and/or impromptu presentations. Yr 45 Contact Hours
Architectural Technology
ATE 100 BASIC ARCHITECTURAL TECHNIQUES
(F)
3 Credit Hours
Given applicable instructional standards, the student should be able to demonstrate basic, professional, architectural drafting skills in areas of lettering, sketch technique, and format instrument drawing: the latter to include proficiency in orthographic, oblique, isometric and "geometric construction" fundamentals. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ATE 106 CONSTRUCTION DRAWING FUNDAMENTALS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 100 or permission of instructor With concept sketches and resource references furnished, the student should be able to draw, reproduce, and assemble a professional set of construction working drawings of a small wood frame structure. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ATE 107 RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS (F)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 106 or permission of instructor From either a concept sketch or set of preliminary drawings, the student should be able to draw the major portion of a set of professional construction working drawings for a residence. Yr 120 Contact Hours
ATE 108 RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION DETAILS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 107 or permission of instructor Continuing with the same references as ATE 107, the student should be able to draw selected assigned details for the residence started in ATE 107, arrange the total project in proper sequence, reproduce and bind same into a comprehensive set of prints. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ATE 109 LIGHT COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS (F)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 108 or permission of instructor From given requirements such as a set of presentation drawing, the students should be able to draw the major portion of a professional set of construction working drawings for an assigned skeletonframed building. Yr 120 Contact Hours
ATE 110 LIGHT COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION DETAILS (F)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 109 or permission of instructor Given standard references for detailing a structure, the student should be able to draw selected, assigned details for the skeleton-framed building started in ATE 109; arrange the total project in proper sequence; reproduce, and bind same into a comprehensive set of prints. Yr 120 Contact Hours
ATE 115 THREE-DIMENSIONAL DRAWING METHODS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 110 or permission of instructor The student should be able to draw assigned objects and buildings by perspective drawing methods, correctly adding shades and shadows thereon, to the professional standards provided and demonstrated by the instructor. Progressive proficiency in isometric and oblique methods should also be achieved. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ATE 200 PRELIMINARY WORKING DRAWINGS DEVELOPMENT (F)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 115 or permission of instructor Utilizing architectural sketches furnished, the student should be able to produce, to scale, preliminary plans developed in accordance with building codes, zoning ordinances, and regulatory agencies. Yr 120 Contact Hours
ATE 205 STRUCTURAL MATERIALS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 200 or permission of instructor Given load conditions super-imposed on building materials, the student should be able to detail structural components, reflecting basic standard strength of materials procedures. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ATE 206 STRUCTURAL FRAMING SYSTEMS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 205 or permission of instructor Building plans furnished, the student should be able to draw framing plans, depicting the use of various structural materials, in accordance with standard construction practices. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ATE 207 HEATING, VENTILATING, AIR
CONDITIONING SYSTEMS (HVAC) (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 206 or permission of instructor Using the assigned text as a guide, the student should be able to draw basic heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ATE 208 ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 207 or permission of instructor Code requirements applied, the student should be able to circuit the distribution system of a commercial building. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ATE 209 PLUMBING SYSTEMS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 208 or permission of instructor Assigned a building plan, the student should be able to layout waste and water lines according to codes. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ATE 210 BUILDING SPECIALTIES (F)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 209 or permission of instructor Examples provided, the student should be able to produce detailed drawings of assigned special equipment in buildings Yr 120 Contact Hours
ATE 215 PLANNED BUILDING GROUPS (F)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ATE 210 or permission of instructor Conforming to regulatory agencies' requirements, the student should be able to produce a detailed site plan of an-assigned building group. Yr 120 Contact Hours
Automotive Mechanics
AUM 100 PRINCIPLES OF ENGINE OPERATION, SAFETY, AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS 6 Credit Hours
Read schematic diagrams, use test equipment, and diagnose probable causes of electrical failure in automotive electrical systems. This will be evidenced by demonstrations and a series of unit tests. Yr 120 Contact Hours


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AUM 106 CHARGING AND STARTING SYSTEMS (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Diagnose, repair and replace charging system components; also test, remove, and repair starters on domestic automobiles. This knowledge will be evidenced through demonstrations and unit tests. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 107 FUEL SYSTEMS (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Apply the theories of operation of automotive fuel systems to determine malfunctions in engine fuel systems; also rebuild and make proper adjustments on one, two and four barrel carburetors. This knowledge will be evidenced through unit tests and demonstrations. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 110 ELECTRONICS TESTING AND EMISSION CONTROLS (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Operate an electronic engine tester and interpret the test results. The student should also know the function of emission control components, operate and interpret the emission tester results and make the necessary repairs. These abilities will be evidenced by written and performance tests. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 115 DRUM BRAKE SYSTEMS (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
To apply the theory of hydraulic principles, brake operation, and identify brake parts and define terms associated with brake systems. The student should demonstrate the ability to replace shoe and lining assemblies, recondition wheel cylinders and master cylinders and properly bleed a brake system. This knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and a series of unit tests. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 116 DISC BRAKE SYSTEMS (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Describe the purpose and operation of disc brakes, identify parts and define terms associated with disc brake systems. The student should demonstrate the ability to remove and replace and overhaul a caliper assembly; replace brake pads, and properly bleed a disc brake system. This knowledge will be evaluated by demonstration and a series of unit tests. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 117 WHEEL ALIGNMENT (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Explain the principles and purpose of wheel alignment, and the various methods of adjustments. The student should demonstrate the ability to align an automotive front end system, identify the parts, and define terms associated with wheel alignment. This knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and unit tests. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 118 WHEEL BALANCE AND SUSPENSION (F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Explain the theory and purpose of wheel balance and suspension systems. The student should demonstrate the ability to balance wheels, replace suspension parts, and identify parts and define terms associated with wheel balance and suspension systems. This knowledge will be evidenced by demonstration and unit tests. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 120 AUTO MECHANICS FOR MECHANICAL TRADES (R)
3 Credit Hours
Orientation to the field of auto mechanics. General principles, initial techniques and skill development, and how auto mechanics relates to the various trades. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 145 GM COMPUTER COMMAND CONTROL (F.R)
2 Credit Hours
This course is intended to acquaint students with operation, design, service procedures, and diagnostic procedures of General Motors automobiles manufactured after 1980 with computer command controlled engines. Students will participate in on-car adjustments, carburetor overhaul, system performance checks, and C.C.C. system diagnosis. 30 Contact Hours
AUM 146 GM LIGHT DUTY DIESEL (F,R)
1 Credit Hour
This course is intended to acquaint students with operation, design, maintenance, and service procedures of the light duty diesel engine. Students in this course will study diesel fuel and its major properties as well as each component of the diesel fuel system. Engine support systems will be discussed and demonstrated. 20 Contact Hours
AUM 205 CLUTCHES AND MANUAL TRANSMISSION (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Describe the construction and operation of the clutch assembly. The student should demonstrate the ability to remove, inspect and correctly replace a clutch assembly. This knowledge will be evidenced through demonstration and unit tests. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 206 DRIVE LINES AND DIFFERENTIALS
(F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Identify the components and explain the purpose of the drive line and universal joints correctly. The student should be able to repair or replace drive line components as necessary. Also, the student should be able to explain the purpose of the differential, identify the different types; remove, check, disassemble, reassemble, adjust, and replace a standard differential assembly. This knowledge will be evidenced through demonstration and unit tests. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 207 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION,
THEORY AND MAINTENANCE (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
State the purpose and identify the component parts of an automatic transmission. Given a hydraulic circuit, test pressures and transmission symptoms, the student should be able to predict the probable cause 6r causes of automatic transmission failures three out of five times. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 208 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION REBUILD (F,R)
6 Credit Hours
Perform the checks, tests and adjustments associated with transmission service. Given an automatic transmission in need of an overhaul, replacement parts and specifications, the student should be able to return the transmission to manufacturer's specifications within twice the flat rate time. 120 Contact Hours
AUM 210 AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL SERVICE (R)
3 Credit Hours
This course is an introductory study of four-cycle Diesel engines, currently used in some automobiles. It includes fuel, coolant and lubricating systems, basic servicing and maintenance. This knowledge will be evidenced by unit testing. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 215 ENGINE OPERATION, DIAGNOSIS,
DISASSEMBLY, AND MEASUREMENT
(F.R)
6 Credit Hours
Describe and explain the operation of an automobile engine and the function of components. The student should also be able to explain overhaul procedures, disassembly and measurement of engine parts with precision tools. To define terms and procedures associated with overhaul of cylinder heads and block assemblies. This knowledge will be evidenced through demonstration and unit tests. 120 Contact Hours
AUM 216 ENGINE RECONDITION AND ASSEMBLY (F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Explain overhaul and assembly procedures; identify the components and correct usage of assembly procedures. The student should also be able to time and make final adjustments to the engine. This knowledge will be evidenced by shop performance and unit tests. Yr 60 Contact Hours
AUM 217 AIR CONDITIONING, THEORY, SERVICE AND SAFETY (F,R)
3 Credit Hours
List the principles of air conditioning and define related terms; identify the components of a basic air conditioning unit and match the function to the component; identify tools arid special equipment used for air conditioning service. The student should also be able to perform minor repairs, to discharge, evacuate, leaktest and charge a basic unit. This knowledge will be evidenced through performance and unit tests. 60 Contact Hours.
AUM 218 GENERAL SERVICE REPAIR (F.R)
3 Credit Hours
This module is designed for work on automobiles and any work in which the student needs to complete the program. It may include any work that fits the instructional program in which the student has had experience. 60 Contact Hours
AUM 219 CUSTOMER SERVICE (F,R)
7 Credit Hours
This module is designed for the student desiring additional work experience in areas in which he feels deficient or in which he may want to specialize. This may be arranged on an hourly basis with permission of the instructor or instructors involved. 140 Contact Hours
AUM 225 ADVANCED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION (R)
7 Credit Hours
In this unit, the student will have advanced study diagnosing, removing, reconditioning and replacing automatic transmissions. This knowledge will be evidenced by performance and unit tests. 140 Contact Hours
AUM 226 ADVANCED EMISSION CONTROL SERVICE (F.R)
7 Credit Hours
In this unit, the student will have advanced study diagnosing emission control problems. This course is recommended for continuing students, individuals preparing for N.I.A.S.E. Testing and State Emission's Inspection Certification. This knowledge will be demonstrated by performance and unit testing. 140 Contact Hours


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
Audiovisual Technology
AVT 100 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL MEDIA (R)
2 Credit Hours
This is an introductory course covering the aims, goals, and philosophy of the educational media field. Field trips will be made to observe educational media systems. 30 Contact Hours
AVT 105 AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT UTILIZATION (R)
3 Credit Hours
This course covers set up, operation, and minor maintenance of various types of audiovisual equipment common to businesses and educational institutions. Projectors, and basic audio and video recording systems will be covered. 67 Contact Hours
AVT 108 INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOVISUAL PHOTOGRAPHY (R)
5 Credit Hours
This course introduces black and white photography for the audiovisual technician. Operation of the camera, exposure, film development, printing, basic studio lighting and the electronic flash will be covered. 90 Contact Hours
AVT 109 GRAPHIC TECHNIQUES FOR MEDIA PRODUCTIONS (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: AVT 108 (AVT 109 may be taken concurrently with AVT 108)
Lay out and design, inking, lettering, coloring, copy stand photography, and transparency production will be covered. Students will work with a variety of graphic materials. 83 Contact Hours
AVT 113 SCRIPT VISUALIZATION (R)
1 Credit Hour
A workshop focusing on the visualization of written scripts for media presentations This class will present techniques and concepts used in selecting and sequencing appropriate pictures to support and reinforce a written script. Storyboard techniques and script formats will also be covered. 15 Contact Hours
AVT 115 BASIC VIDEO PRODUCTION (R)
1 Credit Hour
A workshop on production techniques using a single camera portable video system. Planning, sequencing, shot selection, and in-camera editing are some of the topics to be covered. Designed for individuals who have access to a portable video recorder and camera. 15 Contact Hours
AVT118 DARKROOM PROCEDURES(R)
1 Credit Hour
Black and white film development, contact printing, and enlarging will be covered. Prior knowledge of exposure and camera operation is assumed Students should have access to a 35mm camera. 18 Contact Hours
AVT 125 AV PROJECTION EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE (R)
1-5 Credit Hours (Variable)
Basics of electricity, safety, optical systems, troubleshooting, and basic maintenance of projectors will be covered. 90 Contact Hours
AVT 180 AUDIOVISUAL AUDIO PRODUCTION
(R)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: AVT 105, AVT 125 Equipment and techniques used in the production of sound tracks for various media. Mike selection, physical editing, mixing, and syncing sounds with visuals are some of the topics to be covered. 90 Contact Hours
AVT 201 INTERMEDIATE AV PHOTOGRAPHY
(R)
5 Credit Hours Prerequisite: AVT 108
An exciting course in slide photography Visual literacy, visual statements, themes of photography, sequencing visuals, and photo essays will be some of the topics discussed and developed. Darkroom procedures for processing both black and white and color slides will be presented. 90 Contact Hours
AVT 202 SLIDE/TAPE PRODUCTION I (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: AVT 105, AVT 109, AVT 180 Introduction to planning and producing a slide/tape presentation. Objectives, scriptwriting, storyboarding and slide photography are examples of the subjects covered. 68 Contact Hours
AVT 211 AV TELEVISION PRODUCTION I (R)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: AVT 105, AVT 125 Principles and operation of a closed-circuit television studio. Cameras, recorders, sound, and lighting equipment will be covered along with editing and production techniques. 113 Contact Hours
AVT 212 AV TELEVISION PRODUCTION II (R)
4 Credit Hours Prerequisite: AVT 211
A continuation of AVT 211 with emphasis placed on the role of television as an educational or instructional tool. The student will work on producing and directing instructional video tapes Field trips to local production facilities will be made 83 Contact Hours
AVT 219 SLIDE DUPLICATION PROCEDURES
(R)
1 Credit Hour
A workshop exploring the equipment and procedures used in duplicating color slides and filmstrips. Filtering, exposure, flashing, and films will be covered. Competency in color slide photography is assumed. 15 Contact Hours
AVT 231 AUDIOVISUAL DESIGN I (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor A seminar/workshop on several aspects of media production. The student will be assigned to a "client" and will budget, plan and produce a media presentation to the client's specifications. A weekly meeting of all students will cover the problems students are experiencing. 83 Contact Hours
AVT 232 AUDIOVISUAL DESIGN II (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor A continuation of AVT 231. 83 Contact Hours
Biology
BIO 102 SANITARY MICROBIOLOGY (R)
3 Credit Hours
A basic course emphasizing the procedure for isolating, identifying, and differentiating between those microorganisms found in water, waste water, solid waste, and those problems relating to waste water treatment, stream sanitation, and public health. 75 Contact Hours
BI0106 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF BIOLOGY (D)
3 Credit Hours
A survey course for students needing an understanding of basic biological and chemical concepts as applied to the study of living organisms. The basic cellular and chemical aspects of life are related to a brief survey of scientific methods. This course can be used by students with minimal science background preparatory to general college biology (BIO 131-132). 45 Contact Hours
BIO 108 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN BIOLOGY
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
A survey of the basic concepts concerning human anatomy and physiology which includes cellular, biochemical and biological mechanisms found in health and disease This course can be utilized by students with minimal science background as preparatory to human anatomy and physiology (BIO 111 and BI0112). 45 Contact Hours
BIO 109 HUMAN BIOLOGY FOR HEALTH SCIENCES (D)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor Details the entire human body, covering all body systems with an emphasis on anatomy. This course is a one semester study of the structure and function of the human body which satisfies the requirements of the Diagnostic Radiological Technology Program, Medical Secretary Program and Chiropractic Assisting Program. 75 Contact Hours
BIO 111 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I
(D.F.R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: None although BIO 108 may be helpful The first of a two semester study of the principles of human anatomy and physiology through an in-depth examination of anatomical structures and the relationship of these structures to their function. The areas in this first course include cytology histology, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, endocrine system. 90 Contact Hours
BI0112 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II (D.F.R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BIO 111 or permission of instructor A continuation of BIO 111 and includes the physiology of reproduction with emphasis on human development, the urinary, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, and digestive systems Consideration is given to maintenance of homeostasis by integrated activity of all systems. 90 Contact Hours
BI0121 INTRODUCTION TO THE ENVIRONMENT (D)
3 Credit Hours
Contains a study of the basic principles of ecology, population dynamics, human impact upon natural ecosystems and possible solutions to the problems posed to and by man in his environment. 45 Contact Hours
BI0125 URBAN ECOLOGY (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: None although BIO 121 is helpful Studies urban environments, stressing basic ecological principles and comparing natural and urban ecosystems. Both physical aspects (geology, energy, water and air treatment, transportation and housing) and biological aspects (vegetation and animal characteristics) of urban areas will be included. 45 Contact Hours


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
77
BIO 126 FIELD BIOLOGY (D,F,R)
2 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: None although BIO 121 is helpful. Covers a field study of the biomes, life zones and successions in the front range with an introduction to plant and animal identification and quantitative ecology. This course may also consist of field studies in ecosystems outside Colorado: for example, desert ecology, shore ecology, involving a week or more study during a semester break. 60 Contact Hours
BIO 131 GENERAL COLLEGE BIOLOGY I (D,F,R) 4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: None although BIO 106 is helpful Introduces biology and considers living systems from the environmental, evolutionary and behavioral points of view. Topics will inctude ecology, population dynamics, adaptation, microscopy and biological diversity and individual and social behaviors. 90 Contact Hours
BI0132 GENERAL COLLEGE BIOLOGY II (D,F,R) 4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BIO 131 or equivalent or permission of instructor
Deals with living systems from a functional and developmental point of view. Topics include cellular function and structure, major biochemical concepts, reproduction, heredity and evolutionary mechanisms. 90 Contact Hours
BI0147 HUMAN HEREDITY (D)
3 Credit Hours
Considers the biological aspects of race and human heredity and includes genetic foundations, ranges of human variability, racial mixtures and.Jhe usefulness of biological factors in understanding racial differences. 45 Contact Hours
BIO 157 DRUGS: THEIR USE AND ABUSE (D.R)
3 Credit Hours
Examines some of the drugs commonly used in society today and details the effects of these drugs on the human body. Drugs covered include alcohols, amphetamines, barbiturates, opiates, hallucinogens, marijuana, nicotine and street drugs. 45 Contact Hours
BI0167 BIOLOGY OF WOMEN (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Deals with all biological aspects of a woman s life from the basis of female roles through anatomy and physiology, sexuality, childbearing, basic health and diet, and finally to suggested solutions to improve function and effectiveness of the female. 45 Contact Hours
BI0177 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY OF THE SEA (D,F)
3 Credit Hours
Studies the various aspects of life in the oceans, including some of the different kinds of marine organisms, marine habitats, resources, pollution and the importance of the seas to human continued existence. 45 Contact Hours
BIO 206 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (D,F,R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BIO 131 or BIO 132 or permission of instructor
Details the study of ecological principles. Topics will include ecosystems, energy, population and community dynamics, cycling of elements and nutrients, water and air pollution, world biomes and distribution of plants and animals. 90 Contact Hours
BIO 211 ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: BIO 112
Studies the functions of the human body systems with emphasis on their inter-relationships in adaptation to stress and disease. Alterations of normal body functions, pathogenesis and pathophysiology are delineated. 45 Contact Hours
BIO 215 INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BIO 111 or permission of instructor Introduces microbiology with an emphasis on epidemiology of selected infections, body defenses and community control measures This course is designed to show relationships to the health science occupations. 75 Contact Hours
BIO 216 CELL BIOLOGY (D.F.R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BI0132 or permission of instructor Details an introduction to the cell as the fundamental unit of function and structure in all living systems. Morphological and physiological characteristics common to all cells will be emphasized. 90 Contact Hours
BIO 226 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (D,F,R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BIO 112 or BIO 132 or permission of instructor
Introduces the changes occurring during organismic development and differentiation. Gene action, biochemical regulation and environmental factors will be stressed. 90 Contact Hours
BIO 246 GENETICS (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BIO 112 or BIO 132 or permission of instructor
Surveys the field of hereditary mechanisms for plants and animals. Topics will include transmission of traits, cellular aspects of heredity, mechanisms of gene action, population genetics, and relevant areas of human genetics. 45 Contact Hours
BIO 255 GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY (D.F.R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BIO 111, 131 or BIO 132 or permission of instructor
A survey of major microbial groups with special emphasis on bacteria Emphasis is on basic principles and techniques of microbiology as well as identification, structure, function and role in nature and disease. 90 Contact Hours
Business Machine Technology
BMT105 IBM TYPEBAR TYPEWRITER (D)
9 Credit Hours
Provides the student with proper classroom/lab safety and operational procedures; electrical and mechanical principles, troubleshooting, adjustments, and specific location of all internal mechanisms of the IBM C and D Models. Yr 180 Contact Hours
BMT107 ADLER AND ROYAL "970" TYPEWRITER (D)
6 Credit Hours
Provides the student with electrical and mechanical principles, troubleshooting, adjustments, and specific location of all internal mechanisms of the Adler and Royal "970," and relevant working knowledge of metric system of distance measurement. 120 Contact Hours
BMT110 IBM "SELECTRIC TYPEWRITER (D)
9 Credit Hours
This course will provide the student with the operation of element machine, electrical and troubleshooting, adjustments, and specific locations of all internal mechanisms of the IBM Selectric." 180 Contact Hours
BMT116 BASIC ELECTRONIC THEORY (D)
6 Credit Hours
This course will provide the student with basic electronic theory and familiarizes the student with field effect transistors as it pertains to the office machine field. 120 Contact Hours
Bricklaying
BR1100 SAFETY, HISTORY, GLOSSARY, USE OF MASON TOOLS AND RELATED EQUIPMENT USED BY A BRICKMASON
(R)
6 Credit Hours
In this class, the student is taught safety practices, history of masonry in Colorado, terms used by the brickmason, proper use and care of bricklaying tools, operation of the masonry saw, mortar mixer and scaffolds. BR1105 SAFETY CODES USED IN MASONRY, STATE OF COLORADO (R)
1 Credit Hour
This class presents the Safety Codes used in the masonry field as required by the State of Colorado. 20 Contact Hours
BR1106 SPREADING MORTAR, LAYING TO LINE, USE OF MASONRY TOOLS,
BASIC LEADS, MASONRY WALLS (R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisites: BR1100
The student will be taught to use the trowel to spread mortar, lay brick and block to line, use of brickmason tools, and the layout and construction of basic brick and block leads in this class. 120 Contact Hours
BR1107 BONDED BRICK LEADS, JOINTS, STRIKING AND BRUSHING (R)
2 Credit Hours Prerequisites: BR1106
This class presents layout and construction of bonded brickleads, different mortar joints, and methods used in tooling masonry walls. 40 Contact Hours
BR1109 MASONRY PIERS, PILASTERS, SOLID AND HOLLOW MASONRY, BONDS, FLOORS, AND MASONRY WALLS (R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisites: BR1107
Students in this class are taught layout, squaring and plumbing masonry piers and pilasters, solid and hollow masonry walls, identification of masonry bonds, laying out of masonry walls, and laying brick floors. 120 Contact Hours
BR1110 LAYING TO THE LINE, HEADERS, SOLDIERS, SAILORS, ROLLOCK,
MITER CORNERS (R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisite: BR1109
Characteristics and skill development in laying brick in the various positions of the soldiers, sailors, rol-lock and the miter corner are presented to the student. 120 Contact Hours


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
BR1115 THROUGH-THE-WALL UNITS, LAYING TO THE LINE (R)
2 Credit Hours Prerequisites: BR1110
In this unit, the student will learn the construction of leads using through-the-wall units, laying through-the-wall units to a line, and will be taught how to identify different types of through-the-wall bonding. 40 Contact Hours
BR1116 MASONRY CODES (R)
1 Credit Hour Prerequisites: BR1115
Codes for cover brick veneer, solid masonry, fireplaces, and block laying with inspections on job sites, will be presented in this class. Yr 20 Contact Hours
BR1120 BRICKLAYING FOR CONSTRUCTION TRADES (R)
3 Credit Hours
An orientation to the field of bricklaying is presented. Also, the general principles, initial techniques and skill development for bricklaying and how bricklaying relates to the various trades are presented. Yr 60 Contact Hours
BR1126 SOLAR WALLS AND FIREPLACES (R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: BR1120
In this class, the student is taught trombe wall and solid masonry construction and also fireplace construction that includes basic and special types with emphasis on heatilators and heat exchangers. Yr 60 Contact Hours
BRI200 MORTAR TYPES, MASONRY CEMENT AND FIREPLACE BASICS (R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisites: BR1116
Types, specifications, properties of mortar, skill development in mixing of mortar and masonry cement are presented to the student. Also, types, parts, terms associated with chimneys and fireplaces, factors to consider in constructing fireplaces are presented. Yr 120 Contact Hours
BRI 206 FIREPLACE CONSTRUCTION AND HEATILATOR CONSTRUCTION (R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisites: BRI 200
The characteristics of firebrick, procedures for buttering firebrick, and the construction of a firebox and fireplace will be taught. The student will also participate in installing a heatilator fireplace using precast fireboxes. Yr 120 Contact Hours
BRI 207 CHIMNEY CONSTRUCTION, FLASHING AND COOPING (R)
2 Credit Hours Prerequisites: BRI 206
The layout and construction of masonry stack and the installation of flashing are presented in this class. 40 Contact Hours
BRI 208 MASONRY MATERIALS (R)
1 Credit Hour
Masonry materials for all types of masonry will be covered in this class. Yr 20 Contact Hours
BRI 210 FIREPLACE CODES, FLAGSTONE AND MOSS ROCK (R)
6 Credit Hours
The student will be taught fireplace codes, types of mortar used in fireplaces, types of rocks will be identified, and will participate in the laying of flagstone in walls and walks along with the laying of moss rock. Yr 120 Contact Hours
BRI 211 FIREPLACE TECHNOLOGY FOR SOLAR (R)
10 Credit Hours
This course will cover fireplace codes and construction of new energy fireplaces. Yr 200 Contact Hours
BRI 215 REINFORCED MASONRY AND OVER-THE-WALL CONSTRUCTION (R)
5 Credit Hours Prerequisites: BR1116
Orientation to the necessary materials used in reinforced brick masonry, importance of using different materials and skill development in constructing reinforced masonry walls. Laying brick in the over-the-wall" construction method is stressed in this class Yr 100 Contact Hours
BRI 217 MASON TENDER (R)
3 Credit Hours
Scaffolding construction, stocking scaffolding and type of masonry units are taught in this class. Yr 60 Contact Hours
BRI 218 BUILDING CODES (R)
1 Credit Hour
This class will cover the Building Codes in the masonry field. Yr 20 Contact Hours
Business
BUS 095 BUSINESS LABORATORY (D,F,R)
1 Credit Hour
Prerequisites: Enrollment in any accounting, secretarial or business course.
Provides facilities, equipment, and supplementary materials for students to use in completing assignments. Assistance is given on a one-to-one basis. Grading is on a credit/no-credit basis. Yr Variable Contact Hours
BUS 110 MATHEMATICS OF BUSINESS/ PERSONAL FINANCE (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Minimum of high school algebra or equivalent
This course emphasizes the development and understanding of concepts regarding various business applications. Students learn the mathematical problem solving in the areas of merchandising, financial accounting, and general business and personal finance. Yr 45 Contact Hours
BUS 111 MATH ANALYSIS FOR BUSINESS (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor This course is a review of basic numbers and expressions, exponents, quadratic equations, and graphs. Annuities, amortization, interest and depreciation are covered as applications. Yr 45 Contact Hours
BUS 115 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS BY MACHINES (D.F.R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: MAT 106 or permission of instructor This course is designed to provide basic understanding of business mathematics and to develop the skills necessary to operate calculating machines efficiently. Yr 60 Contact Hours
BUS 136 BUSINESS COMMUNICATION APPLICATIONS (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Course in English with advisor approval
Applied business techniques of communications that require problem solving and understanding of human relations in business situations. Students compose and evaluate various types of correspondence business reports, memos, and letters. Emphasis will be placed on good format and writing principles. Course also develops proper dictation techniques. Yr 45 Contact Hours
BUS 137 LISTENING SKILLS (D,F,R)
2 Credit Hours
Principles and techniques useful in developing listening skills applicable to common business situations (specifically by acquiring the four central listening abilities overcoming distractions, detecting central ideas, maintaining emotional control, and evaluating spoken messages) so as to enhance employability at all levels. Designed primarily for accounting and management students and others interested in business. Yr 30 Contact Hours
BUS 296 OFFICE OCCUPATIONS SEMINAR
(D.F.R)
1 Credit Hour
These seminars are designed to make the students specifically aware of expectations of the business, industry and government sectors. Additionally, these seminars are designed to help students attain skills and knowledge they might not have received in other course work. Yr 15 Contact Hours
Carpentry
CAR 100 ORIENTATION, SAFETY AND
CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS (R)
4 Credit Hours
Carpentry as a trade, safety practices, and the .qualities, uses, and characteristics of wood. Building materials including lumber grading and defects, estimating, ordering, pricing, fastners, adhesives, manufactured wood products, and their applications in residential construction. Yr 80 Contact Hours
CAR 105 HAND AND POWER TOOLS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor Basic rules for the care, safe and correct use of hand tools, skill development, identification and use of the power woodworking machines and tools, safety rules for each, and every skill development are presented the student. Yr 60 Contact Hours
CAR 106 PLANS SPECIFICATIONS, CODES,
AND CONSTRUCTION OVERVIEW (R)
4 Credit Hours
Blueprint reading, elements of drawings, specifications, building permits and licensing, inspections and the Uniform Building Code are taught while inter-trade coordination, remodeling and additions, principles of structural framework and finishes, construction practices, construction management and supervision, and scheduling, solar building techniques, insulation concerns, multi-unit construction are introduced Yr 80 Contact Hours
CAR 107 SITE PREPARATION (R)
2 Credit Hours
Building site characteristics including zoning and utilities, plot plans, utilizing transit and level for site layout, foundation styles, footing construction, and concrete as a building material, and excavation. Yr 40 Contact Hours


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
79
CAR 108 FOUNDATION SYSTEMS (R)
2 Credit Hours
Exploring different types of foundations utilized in residential construction, perimeter drainage, estimating materials, steel reinforcement, precast construction, and wall forms. 40 Contact Hours
CAR 109 SILL AND FLOOR FRAMING (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor Floor and sill framing terminology, framing members, styles of framing, and installation of floor joist and subflooring are taught. 80 Contact Hours
CAR 110 WALL AND PARTITION FRAMING (R)
1-5 Credit Hours
Module 1 Sole and Top Plate A. Lay out 16" on center stud positions and cut sole and top plate. B. Lay out window and door rough openings Module 2 Stud and Corner Posts A. Cut studs to proper length and nail in place. B. Cut, assemble, and nail corner posts in place. Module 3 Window and Door Openings A. Cut and install window and door headers, sills, jack studs and cripple studs. B. Cut and install double top plate. Module 4 Wall Sheathing A. Square walls. B. Cut and install corner bracing plywood wall sheathing. Module 5 Erect, Plumb and Brace Walls A. Erect and secure outside walls.and center partitions. B. Plumb, brace, and align walls and partition. 20-100 Contact Hours
CAR 115 STAIR AND ROOF FRAMING (R)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor Terminology of components of stairs, layout and construction of common types, roofing members and styles, determining rafter lengths, cutting and assembling various roof structures, estimating cost of material for each type of roof frqm a drawing, and the grades and types of shingles are taught, ir 120 Contact Hours
CAR 120 CARPENTRY FOR CONSTRUCTION TRADES (R)
3 Credit Hours
Structural design, rafter layout, wall and floor layout, basic framing and solar panel installation are taught. 60 Contact Hours
CAR 200 EXTERIOR TRIM (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor Study materials that are used in exterior trim, and proper installation of soffet, facia, freeze, brick mold and other exterior trim items are taught. 60 Contact Hours
CAR 205 EXTERIOR DOORS AND WINDOWS (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor The study of existing and new exterior doors and windows on the market and proper installation of same are taught. 80 Contact Hours
CAR 206 EXTERIOR WALL COVERINGS (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor This course covers terminology associated with exterior wall coverings, common and new materials used and proper installation of same. 80 Contact Hours
CAR 207 ROOF COVERINGS (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor The study of roofing materials, estimating of materials and proper application of various roofing systems are taught in this class 80 Contact Hours
CAR 208 INTERIOR TRIM WORK (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor The study of interior trim materials, paneling, base, moldings, casings, door, shelves, and proper installation of doors and all trim items are taughL 80 Contact Hours
CAR 209 CABINETMAKING (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor Components of a cabinet, types of materials used, constructions, installation of hardware and proper use of power tools are taught. 80 Contact Hours
CAR 210 PLASTIC LAMINATES (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor This course covers terminology and types of plastic laminates available, proper handling, installation of laminated materials and installation of prefabricated counter tops. 60 Contact Hours
CAR 215 CABINET INSTALLATION (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor The proper installation of factory-built cabinets and a study of various cabinets on the market/arrange-ment are taught. 80 Contact Hours
CAR 216 DRYWALL CONSTRUCTION AND INTERIOR TRIM (R)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission qf instructor
The terminology associated with drywall construction, estimating the materials needed, concealing joints and fasteners and interior trim are taught in this class. 80 Contact Hours
CAR 217 ADVANCED CABINETMAKING (R)
8 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor This course will expand on the basic skills taught in CAR 209. It will include a review of the types of joints, gluing and hardware used in cabinets. The student will become familiar with various types and designs of cabinets used in residential and commercial construction. Construction of shop-built cabinets may include panel doors with mouldings, glass doors, and will include the proper use of power tools for creating various designs. The uses and application of plastic laminates will be explored, and the student will learn the proper installation of shop-built cabinets. 160 Contact Hours
CAR 219 ADVANCED STAIR AND ROOF FRAMING (R)
8 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor This is an advanced course for the student with the basic knowledge of carpentry. The student will learn the techniques of stair framing for stairs such as winders, bowed U-shaped or spiral and the attachment of handrails and Newel posts. The course will also cover framing for roofs such as hip, valley, gable, gambrel, mansard or multi-pitch. 160 Contact Hours
Civil Engineering Technology
CET 101 STRUCTURES I (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DR1105 and MAT 111 Mechanical properties of materials, stresses and strain irf members subjected to tension, compression and shear. Force systems, graphical analysis of space frames including trusses. 53 Contact Hours
CET 105 CONTRACTS AND SPECIFICATIONS
(R)
3 Credit Hours
The Law of Contracts and its application to construction and engineering activities. The drafting of specifications for labor, material, processes, and construction performance. 45 Contact Hours
CET 107 CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY (R)
3 Credit Hours
Investigation of concrete, soils and bituminous materials, classification, strength and deformation characteristics, sampling and testing these materials for engineering purposes. 60 Contact Hours
CET 201 STRUCTURES II (R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: CET 101
Elementary structural analysis, including timber and steel structures, columns: riveted and bolted connections. Shear and moment diagrams, deflections, beam analysis and elementary design problems. 53 Contact Hours
CET 205 APPLIED HYDROLOGY (R)
4 Credit Hours Prerequisite: SUR 100
Rainfall, runoff, urban and rural drainage, flow measurements in conduits, and open channels. Basic fluid mechanics. 68 Contact Hours
Chemistry
CHE 101 FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY I
(D.F.R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: MAT 106 or MAT 111 or equivalent A first course in the fundamentals of chemistry designed for nonscience majors, students in occupational programs, or students &ith no high school chemistry. The student completing the sequence of CHE 101 and CHE 102 will have a general background in basic chemistry and an introduction to organic and biochemistry. 90 Contact Hours
CHE 102 FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY II (D.F.R)
4 Credit Hours Prerequisites: CHE 101
A continuation of CHE 101 90 Contact Hours
CHE 109 PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE CHEMISTRY (D)
4 Credit Hours
A one semester course designed primarily for students with some background in chemistry who need review or new information in specific background areas before they are prepared for the general college chemistry course (CHE 111). Instruction will concentrate on four major areas: inorganic nomenclature, stoichiometry, simple models of the chemical bond, and several types of chemical reactions. 75 Contact Hours


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
CHE 111 GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I
(D,F,R)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on a Standardized Placement Exam and MAT 121 or equivalent.
The first semester of a two semester sequence in general college chemistry. Designed for science majors and students in pre-professional programs. The concepts presented in the two-semester sequence may include chemical equations, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, properties of gases, the kinetic molecular theory, theory of atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, and the liquid and solid phases, solutions, acids and bases, electrochemistry, kinetics and equilibrium concepts. 105 Contact Hours
CHE 112 GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II (D.F.R)
5 Credit Hours Prerequisite: CHE 111
A continuation of CHE 111. 105 Contact Hours
CHE 201 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (D,F,R)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CHE 112 or equivalent CHE 201 and CHE 202 are a sequence in organic chemistry designed primarily for science majors, premedical and predental students, and others who desire a knowledge of the chemistry of organic compounds A structural and mechanistic approach to syntheses, properties and behavior of chemically and biologically important compounds is stressed. Laboratory emphasis is on basic techniques, synthetic procedures, and modern instrumental analyses. 135 Contact Hours
CHE 202 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (D.F.R)
5 Credit Hours Prerequisite: CHE 201
Continuation of Ch£ 201. 135 Contact Hours
Chemical Operator
CHO 100 VACUUM SYSTEM (D)
3 Credit Hours
In this course, the student will demonstrate the safety procedures and learn to perform all the activities in the objectives of the course, as they apply, given a full operating vacuum system. 45 Contact Hours
CHO 105 CHEMICAL REAGENTS AND CHEMICAL MAKEUPS (D)
3 Credit Hours
In this course, the student will demonstrate the safety procedures and learn to perform all the activities in the objectives of this course, as they apply, given chemical reagents and a complete chemical makeup unit, ir 45 Contact Hours
CH0106 BALANCE AND WEIGHTS (D)
2 Credit Hours
In this course, the student will demonstrate the safety procedures and learn to perform all the activities in the objectives of the course, as they apply given a full operating set of balance and weights. 30 Contact Hours
CH0107 GLOVE BOX (D)
2 Credit Hours
In this course, the student will demonstrate the safety procedures and learn to perform all the activities in the objectives of the course, as they apply, given a fully operating glove box. 30 Contact Hours
CH0108 DISSOLUTION (D)
3 Credit Hours
In this course, the student will demonstrate the safety procedures and learn to perform all the activities in the objectives of the course, as they apply, given a fully operating dissolution system. Yr 45 Contact Hours
CH0109 FILTRATION (D)
3 Credit Hours
In this course, the student will demonstrate the safety procedures and learn to perform all the activities in the objectives of the course, as they apply, given a fully operating filtration system, 45 Contact Hours
CH0111 ION EXCHANGE (D)
3 Credit Hours
In this course, the student will demonstrate the safety procedures and learn to perform all the activities in the objectives of the course, as they apply, given a fully operating exchange system. 45 Contact Hours
CHO 115 RASCHIG RING INSPECTION (D)
3 Credit Hours
In this course, the student will demonstrate the safety procedures and learn to perform all the activities in the objectives of the course, as they apply, given a raschig ring inspection unit, changing and gamma units. 45 Contact Hours
Commercial Art
COA100 LETTERING/TYPOGRAPHIC DESIGN AND CAREER SURVEY (D)
5 Credit Hours
Should be taken with COA 106 Descriptive Drawing and Rendering
Introduction to the concepts of typography as applied to graphic communication. Exercises in both layout and finished lettering for advertising and logo design. Study of type recognition and typographic technology. Career possibilities will be explored with tours, guest speakers and printed materials, tr 100 Contact Hours
COA 105 ADVERTISING TYPOGRAPHY AND LAYOUT (D)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequiste: COA 100: Should be taken with COA 107 Rendering for Advertising Design Exercises in creating letter forms, indicating photography and illustration and basic copy fitting methods. Stress given to creative solutions of graphic advertising skills. (Entry level skills: tenth grade reading level and visualizing aptitude.) 100 Contact Hours
COA 106 DESCRIPTIVE DRAWING AND RENDERING (D)
5 Credit Hours
Should be taken with COA 100 Lettering/ Typographic Design and Career Survey Introduction to methods of accurate drawing. Included are exercises in measuring, ruling, scaling, shading in ink and precise drawing of objects in two and three dimensions. Ink line renderings will be covered. (Entry level skills: good eye-hand coordination.) 100 Contact Hours
COA 107 RENDERING FOR ADVERTISING DESIGN (D)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisite:COA 106: Should be taken with COA 105 Advertising Typography and Layout Introduction to product rendering in pen and ink, cut films, wash and opaque water media for print reproduction. Both free hand and mechanical methods are explored 100 Contact Hours
COA 200 ADVERTISING DESIGN AND
PORTFOLIO PREPARATION (D)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: COA 100,105,106 and 107 Introduces the student to the process of solving comprehensive advertising design problems. Student will gain experience in designing, advertising, marketing, research, media considerations and developing concept through to final presentations. Student projects will be prepared for portfolio presentation and consideration will be given to the final portfolio in practice and theory. (Entry level skills: minimum tenth grade reading skills.) 100 Contact Hours
COA 205 CREATIVE GRAPHIC DESIGN AND PORTFOLIO PREPARATION (D)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: COA 200 and COA 206 Designed to give the student further experience in designing trademarks, packaging, symbols, signing and resumes. The demonstration of job readiness is emphasized through portfolio preparation and presentation techniques. 100 Contact Hours
COA 206 ART PREPARATION FOR REPRODUCTION (D)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: First year COA program.
Introduction to the production of type and paste up in simple one and two color printing. Emphasis placed on development of basic manual skills, precision measuring and copy proofing. Marking copy procedures are covered. (Entry level skills: Knowledge of advertising layout.) 100 Contact Hours
COA 207 ADVANCED ART PREPARATION FOR REPRODUCTION (D)
5 Credit Hours Prerequisite: COA 206
Designed to develop further competency in skills acquired in COA 206, Art Preparation for Reproduction. Exploration and exercises in production of more complicated, camera-ready art, including four-color separations, ink and paper specification, type mark-up, computer type setting, packaging mechanicals and effects of printing production on design. (Entry level skills: some knowledge of paste up.) 100 Contact Hours
COA 208 ILLUSTRATION (D)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: First year COA program Designed as an additional major course for the Commercial Art student and working professional who wishes to develop further competencies in illustration. Current trends and printing production limitations are incorporated into exercises aimed at developing proficiency in a variety of traditional as well as experimental techniques (Entry level skills: Demonstrated drawing and layout skills.) 100 Contact Hours
COA 209 THREE DIMENSIONAL ADVERTISING
(D)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: First year COA program Designed as an additional major course for the commercial art student as well as the working professional who wants training in designing three dimensional advertising. The student will design point of purchase displays, corporate or trade show exhibits and be introduced to visual merchandising. (Entry level skills: Knowledge of layout and basic design.) 100 Contact Hours


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
81
Communications
COM 110 CAREER COMMUNICATION (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Develops skills in communication especially speaking, writing, and listening. Focus on instruction giving, discussion and teamwork, interviewing skills, writing resumes, critical reading skills, and vocabulary development. Practical application to career fields. 45 Contact Hours
COM 111 SURVEY OF COMMUNICATION (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
Introduces through readings and class discussion the many facets of communication such as meaning of symbols, perception of life, non-verbal behavior and listening patterns. Offered normally fall term. 45 Contact Hours
COM 121 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION
(D,R)
3 Credit Hours
Explores basic principles of interpersonal communication theory and involves student in practicing skills to improve relationships with others. Offered normally fall term. 45 Contact Hours
COM 130 TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Reading level of 10th grade or above and level 4 on assessment.
This course is designed to sharpen competence in reading, writing, speaking, and listening as applied to the needs of students in career programs as well as in general and transfer studies. 45 Contact Hours
COM 131 INTRODUCTION TO SEMANTICS (D,R) 3 Credit Hours
Examines the interrelationships of language, thought and behavior in the study of language and the use of words. Offered normally spring term. 45 Contact Hours
COM 135 COMPARING LANGUAGES (D)
3 Credit Hours
This course will present an initial overview of the similarities and differences between languages. This course will compare and contrast the following systems of the English and Spanish languages: the sound system, the structural system, and the meaning system. This will assist in revealing those features of a first language which may interfere in learning a second language. 45 Contact Hours
COM 181 INTRODUCTION TO SIGN LANGUAGE (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
A beginning course in the use of the basic signs and finger spelling used by the deaf. 45 Contact Hours
COM 182 ADVANCED SIGN LANGUAGE (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: COM 181
An extension in the development of signs and emphasis of idomatic expression, increased practice in the reading of signs. 45 Contact Hours
COM 185 FINGER SPELLING (D.R)
3 Credit Hours
Develops speed and clarity with receptive and expressive finger spelling. Offered normally fall term. 45 Contact Hours
COM 186 SYSTEMS OF MANUAL COMMUNICATION (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: COM 185 or permission of instructor Introduces manually coded English systems and their use by schools and hearing-impaired persons. Offered normally spring term. 45 Contact Hour§
COM 231 IMAGE AND MEANING (D.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: COM 111 or permission of instructor Studies the relation between visual and literary arts with special emphasis on film, poetry and short fiction. Offered normally spring term. 45 Contact Hours
COM 241 INTRODUCTION TO DISCUSSION AND GROUP LEADERSHIP (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: COM 111 or permission of instructor Explores group process such as structure, norms, communication through class problem solving and develops leadership techniques for small groups. Offered normally Fall term. 45 Contact Hours
COM 251 INTRODUCTION TO TV AND RADIO
(D.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: COM 111 or permission of instructor Examines the electronic media with emphasis upon applied theory in the medias' written, spoken, and technical aspects. Offered normally Fall term. 45 Contact Hours
COM 255 SURVEY OF THE MOVIES (D.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: COM 111 or permission of instructor Explores a variety of films in order to develop visual literacy and in order to provide a comprehensive view of the possibilities of this newer art form. Offered normally Spring term. 45 Contact hours
COM 256 MEDIA SURVEY (D.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: COM 111 or permission of instructor Investigates the impact of print, movies, radio, and television on a consumer and develops skills of evaluative thinking relating to these media. Offered as need and interest arise. 45 Contact Hours
COM 257 THEMES AND GENRES IN FILM (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: COM 111 or permission of instructor Concentrates on specific types of film, such as comedy, the western, or the documentary and defines the themes which guide the establishment and development of each Offered as need and interest arise. 45 Contact Hours
COM 261 ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION
(D.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: COM 111 or permission of instructor Studies communication within larger formalized groups with emphasis upon formal and informal patterns and effective methods for communication. Offered as need and interest arise. 45 Contact Hours
Chiropractic Assisting
CPA 101 CHIROPRACTIC MODALITIES I (D)
3 Credit Hours
Corequisite: HOC 100, SEC 101, RAT 100 The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the science, art, and philosophy of chiropractic; to gain knowledge of its beginning in the role chiropractic plays in the modern health care system today. A thorough understanding of clinic procedures, related medical terminology, an introduction to important anatomical structures, and basic physiology will be stressed. 60 Contact Hours
CPA 102 CHIROPRACTIC MODALITIES II (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: CPA 101, RAT 100 Corequisite: RAT 105
An introduction to electro-therapy machines, their indications and contra-indications for use in the chiropractic office will be studied in detail in local chiropractic clinics. Any student with one year or more of clinical chiropractic experience can challenge CPA 102. All students completing CPA 101 and CPA 102 will receive a certificate of completion from the Colorado Chiropractic Association. 60 Contact Hours
Computer Programming for Busines:
Students who are interested in taking computer courses should be aware that courses are offered in Computer Programming for Business (CPB) as well as in Computer Science (CSC). In order to understand the differences in the courses, students should consult with an advisor.
CPB 095 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING LAB (D.F.R)
1 Credit Hour (Per programming course per semester)
Co-requisite: Enrollment in any CPB course The lab provides facilities, equipment and supplementary materials for students to use in completing programming and other assignments. Assistance is given on a one-to-one basis. One hour of credit is granted on a Credit/No Credit basis for each programming course taken during a semester.
CPB 100 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS (D.F.R)
4 Credit Hours
Introductory course in the use of computers in our society. The course covers a general overview of data processing, the vocabulary used in the field, and a specific study of how to write computer programs using the language BASIC. 60 Contact Hours
CPB 104 PROGRAMMING LOGIC (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Co-requisite: CPB 100 Introduction to Computers An introduction to the development of computer program design using the concepts of structured programming and logic. Pseudocode, IPO charts, Flowcharts, and Decision Tables are some of the vehicles used in developing'simple to complex logic designs including subtotal logic, multi file processing logic, sort design logic, etc. 45 Contact Hours
CPB 106 COBOL (D.F.R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CPB 100 Introduction to Computers CPB 104 Programming Logic An introduction to the coding and execution of business problems using COBOL. A minimum of nine programs will be coded, executed, and documented using structured programming techniques. Programs written will cover the topics of input and output operations, arithmetic verbs, report headings, report editing, control breaks, final total processing, use of nested IFs, and simple table-handling procedures. 60 Contact Hours


82
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
CPB108 BASIC (D,F,R)
3 Credits Hours
Prerequisites: CPB 100 Introduction to Computers CPB 104 Programming Logic An introduction to the coding and execution of business problems using BASIC. A minimum of 15 programs will be coded and executed using a PDP 11 computer or comparable equipment. Topics covered include: utilization of basic instructions, entering data from a terminal, building and reading files, finding and correcting records in a file, adding and deleting records, calculating subtotals, For/ Next statements, one- and two-dimensional arrays, virtual file, BASIC functions, and MAT statements. 45 Contact Hours
CPB 200 OPERATING SYSTEMS AND JCL (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CPB 100 Introduction to Computers, and at least one course in programming
An introductory course to the IBM OS/VS operating system and Job Control Language. Topics covered include: Components of the IBM OS/VS operating system, JOB and EXEC statements, DD statements for sequential, partitioned, indexed sequential, and direct access data sets, JCL statements for in-stream and catalogued procedures, JCL statements for utility routines, and functions of virtual storage, ft 45 Contact Hours
CPB 205 BASIC ASSEMBLER LANGUAGE -BAL(D.F.R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CPB 100 Introduction to Computers CPB 104 Programming Logic, and at least onS1 course in programming An introduction to the coding and execution of simple buness problems using IBM 370 Assembler Language A minimum of six programs will be coded and executed using simple assembly language instructions (standard and packed decimal instruction sets), macro instructions for the QSAM access method, macro instructions to generate dumps, and JCL for data sets using QSAM. Topics covered include: data representation, machine language instruction formats, arithmetic instructions, data manipulation instructions, branch instructions, editing data, SNAP macros, logical operations, and debugging. ft 60 Contact Hours
CPB 206 ADVANCED COBOL (D.F.R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: CPB 106 COBOL A continuation of CPB 106 COBOL. Students will be required to design, code, execute, and document a business system composed of a minimum of six programs and related utilities These programs will consist of the following: table handling, magnetic tape sequential file creation, editing, and update: creating, editing, and updating an ISAM file both sequentially and randomly; report writer, sort utilities and various dump utilities, ft 60 Contact Hours
CPB 208 ADVANCED BASIC (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites CPB 108
This course is an extension of the introductory-BASIC course. The activities of this course will include a combination of lecture and "hands-on" experiences with menu-driven systems which are interactive in nature. Emphasis will be placed on ease-of-use for the system for the non-technical computer user. Topics covered will include: Extended BASIC features, Programming Standards, String Functions/Parsing, CRT Formatting, Special RSTS/E Features and Advanced Input and Output, ft 45 Contact Hours
CPB 209 FORTRAN (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CPB 100 Introduction to Computers CPB 104 Programming Logic An introduction to the coding and execution of business problems using FORTRAN. A minimum of nine programs will be coded, executed and documented using structured programming techniques. The topics covered include: input/output operations, arithmetic verbs, report headings, report editing, control breaks, final total processing, use of nested DO Loops, and simple table handling procedures, ft 45 Contact Hours
CPB 220 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (D.F.R)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CPB 100 Introduction to Computers, and at least two courses in programming
An introduction to the materials, techniques, and procedures to develop a computerized business system. The course requires the student to design an actual system. Topics covered include: the systems approach, fact gathering techniques, forms design, input/output, file design, file organization, various charting techniques, system processing and controls, system presentation techniques, system audits and controls, project management, and implementation and evaluation ft 75 Contact Hours
CPB 225 BUSINESS STATISTICAL PROGRAMMING (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CPB 100,108 or 208 or 209; MAT 111 The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the concepts of statistics, statistical programming, and the use of statistical computer packages. Topics to be covered include common statistical measures, basic probability, binominal and normal distributions, hypothesis testing, measure of relationship, statistical programming concepts, and the use of pre-programmed computer packages, ft 45 Contact Hours
Criminal Justice
CRJ110 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE (R)
4 Credit Hours
An introduction to the components and procedures followed in the criminal justice system. Required of all criminal justice majors, ft 60 Contact Hours
CRJ115 CRIMINAL LAW (R)
3 Credit Hours
An examination of the development, terms and concepts embodied in criminal law ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 116 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (R)
3 Credit Hours
Provides an overview of constitutional considerations affecting the criminal justice enterprise. Landmark Supreme Court cases will be examined in detail ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ117 CIVIL LAW (R)
3 Credit Hours
The concepts of torts is developed as it may effect the criminal justice practitioner. Personal liability while acting in an official capacity is explored, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ118 RULES OF EVIDENCE (R)
3 Credit Hours
Different types of evidence and legal requirements for admission in court are presented Court decisions regarding proper use and introduction are examined in detail, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ119 THE JUVENILE IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (R)
3 Credit Hours
A course designed to prepare criminal justice practitioners for the complexity of laws and procedures involved in dealing with Children's Code is extensively examined, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ120 CORRECTIONS (R)
3 Credit Hours
An examination of the corrections components of the development of corrections and special programs. Treatment approaches and problems associated with certain offenses are presented, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 126 PATROL PROCEDURES (R)
3 Credit Hours
The daily duties of a patrol officer are presented as well as techniques and tactics involved in conducting a patrol, ft 68 Contact Hours
CRJ 127 PROBATION, PARDON AND PAROLE
(R)
3 Credit Hours
Probation as a judicial process, parole as an executive function and the use of pardons are examined and reviewed ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 128 CORRECTIONAL SERVICES IN THE f COMMUNITY (R)
3 Credit Hours
Community resources that can be brought to bear on the corrections function are examined. The role of vocational rehabilitation, welfare services, guidance clinics and other community agencies is presented ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 129 THE COURT SYSTEM (R)
3 Credit Hours
An examination of the U S. court system at all levels Emphasis is placed on procedures and jurisdictions of various courts, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 135 POLICE ARMAMENT (R)
3 Credit Hours
An examination of the devices and procedures available to police for control and restraint. The FBI pistol course will be included as well as armament from non-lethal restraints to automatic weapons Student must furnish own ammunition, ft 68 Contact Hours
CRJ 136 PUBLIC SERVICE DISPATCH PROCEDURES (R)
3 Credit Hours
An examination of single service and multi-service dispatch systems. Orientation on various computer terminals will be provided, as well as familiarization with different systems of communication, ft 68 Contact Hours
CRJ 137 POLICE PHOTOGRAPHY (R)
3 Credit Hours
The course is designed to provide the police patrol officer with the necessary photographic skills to prepare evidence photographs for use in judicial proceedings. Black and white film and paper will be used with limited discussions of color ft 68 Contact Hours
CRJ 139 TERRORISM (R)
3 Credit Hours
Examination of duties, inter and intra national terrorism. Government and individual response and defense will be studied as well as asset and executive protection techniques, ft 45 Contact Hours


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
83
CRJ 146 CURRENT POLICE PRACTICES (R)
1-3 Credit Hours
Discussion, role playing and other techniques to illustrate and offer possible solutions to problems found by police officers. ft 15-45 Contact Hours
CRJ149 CRIMINAL JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS (R)
3 Credit Hours
The procedures of report preparation with special emphasis on narrative and fill-in reports forms will be discussed in detail. Other forms, their recording and eventual use, as well as verbal skills in reporting information, will be presented. ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 201 INTRODUCTION TO INVESTIGATION
(R)
4 Credit Hours
Preliminary investigative techniques to include crime scene preservation, interview of witnesses and collection of evidence are covered ft 60 Contact Hours
CRJ 202 ADVANCED INVESTIGATION (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CRJ 201, or permission of instructor Advanced investigative techniques are introduced to include facts and techniques peculiar to specific offenses. An examination of the scientific resources available to the investigator is offered. ft 68 Contact Hours
CRJ 205 INTERVIEW, INTERROGATION AND CONFESSION (R)
3 Credit Hours
A course designed to present interview and interrogation techniques and differentiate between the two. Court decisions and other legal considerations bearing on obtaining and using confessions will be examined. ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 206 ORGANIZED CRIME: CONCEPTS AND \ CONTROL (R)
3 Credit Hours
An examination of the- known characteristics of organized crime is presented, along with some considerations appropriate for decrease or elimination ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 207 POLICE ADMINISTRATION (R)
3 Credit Hours
The administration of all the sub-units that comprise a police department is examined. Special emphasis will be placed on administration of the small and medium sized department which does not have the luxury of specialization, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 208 CRIMINAL JUSTICE PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION (R)
3 Credit Hours
The personnel function of a police administrator is examined. Recruitment, training pay, retirement, benefit plans and collective bargaining will be presented ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 209 POLICE SUPERVISION (R)
3 Credit Hours
Line and mid-level supervision will be examined. Principles of management will be explored and modified as necessary to fit criminal justice situation, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 210 COMMUNITY RELATIONS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Presentation of the role of the individual officer in achieving and maintaining public support. Public information programs and relationships with complainants is discussed, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 215 COMMUNITY CRIME PREVENTION (R)
3 Credit Hours
An examination of alternatives to existing reactive police practices. Through examination of such concepts as citizen involvement, comprehensive prevention, planning and environmental crime deterrance, working models will be developed, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 216 RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN PUBLIC SAFETY MANAGEMENT (R)
3 Credit Hours
A course intended to prepare mid-and upper-level management for the considerations involved in integrating the concept of collective bargaining and other organized labor practices into the unique requirements of the criminal justice enterprise, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 217 NARCOTICS AND DRUGS (R)
3 Credit Hours
This course will examine detection and investigation of drug dealers and users: behavior of the addict; prevention techniques and cooperation between federal agencies concerned with narcotics and drugs. Chemical properties and results of different narcotics will be presented, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 220 TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT (R)
3 Credit Hours
Includes definition of the traffic problem, patrol procedures, accident investigation, traffic direction and other aspects of the traffic control function of a police department, ft 68 Contact Hours
CRJ 225 BREATH EXAMINER SPECIALIST (R)
3 Credit Hours
Provides for the development of practical skills leading to certification as a breath examiner specialist. Includes basics of chemical testing, suspect processing and equipment operation, ft 68 Contact Hours
CRJ 226 CHILD ABUSE-ETIOLOGY AND RESPONSE(R)
3 Credit Hours
A multi-disciplinary examination including legal, emotional, medical, sociological, and psychological aspects of child abuse. Will provide an understanding of the etiology of the abuse syndrome, appropriate individual responses and supportive community resources. Designed for criminal justice personnel as well as others whose professions may include contact with children, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 227 EMERGENCY TECHNIQUES FOR POLICE OFFICERS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Presentation of medical skills often needed by police officers including first aid and emergency childbirth. ft 68 Contact Hours
CRJ 235 HAZARDOUS POLICE TACTICS (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Patrol Procedures or permission of instructor
High stress and high danger calls to stimulate student response. Areas of emphasis are officer assaults and deaths, examination of specific officer murders, response to high risk crimes in progress, inconspicuous and disguised weapons, sniper and ambush response, domestic crisis intervention, bombing and outlaw motorcycle gangs, ft 90 Contact Hours
CRJ 236 FRAUD INVESTIGATION (R)
3 Credit Hours
Detection, investigation, and prosecution of fraud forgery, deceptive practices, computer crime, confidence games and other scams, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 237 ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Traffic Enforcement or permission of instructor
Principles of automobile accident investigation to include vector analysis to determine speed, skid mark measurement to determine reaction time and reporting procedures, ft 45 Contact Hours
CRJ 238 SELF DEFENSE FOR POLICE (R)
3 Credit Hours
Techniques of prisoner handling, crowd control and personnel protection. A pragmatic approach to options shBrt of deadly physical force, ft 90 Contact Hours
Computer Science
Students who are interested in taking computer courses should be aware that courses are offered in Computer Science (CSC) as well as in Computer Programming for Business (CPB). In order to understand the differences in the courses, students should consult with an advisor.
CSC 095 COMPUTER SCIENCE LAB (D,F,R)
Lab is required for students taking CSC courses. One (1) credit hour per course per semester.
CSC 105 COMPUTERS AND YOU (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
A course designed to familiarize all students with the computer and its application in today's home. Each student will work with the computer using prewritten programs and learn the basics of the logic used in programming a computer. Applications to be covered will include money and resource management, consumer affairs and the use of computers for entertainment, ft 45 Contact Hours
CSC 111 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING WITH BASIC (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
An introductory course in computer programming that will acquaint the student with the elements of the BASIC language, elementary programming techniques, and how a computer operates. This course is a prerequisite for all other CSC courses, ft 45 Contact Hours
CSC 112 ADVANCED BASIC (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: CSC 111
A continuation of CSC 111 that will introduce the student to the more advanced features of today's extended BASICS Topics will include numerical methods, string manipulations and use of sequential and random files ft 45 Contact Hours
CSC 150 PROGRAMMING IN FORTRAN IV
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CSC 111 and MAT 121 or permission of instructor
An introduction to the FORTRAN language and the use of this language in advanced programming techniques including numerical methods, subroutines, string handling and file manipulation, ft 45 Contact Hours
CSC 155 PROGRAMMING IN PASCAL (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor An introduction to the PASCAL language and the application of its structured nature to such areas as numerical methods, string handling, and file manipulation. ft 45 Contact Hours


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
CSC 200 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CSC 112 or CSC 150 or CSC 155 An introduction to the internal functions of a computer Topics to be covered will include the various methods computers use for handling logic flow, storage and manipulation of numbers, variables, arrays, strings and subroutines. Yr 45 Contact Hours
CSC 210 PROGRAMMING IN ASSEMBLER LANGUAGE (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CSC 112 or CSC 150 or CSC 1*55 An introduction to assembly level programming for simple problems using the MACRO-11 Assembler on the PDP-11/34A. Yr 45 Contact Hours
CSC 215 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER HARDWARE (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: C§C 200
An introduction to the electronics used in a computer system. The course will begin with elementary electronics, digital circuits, flip-flops, registers and then show how these elements are combined to form memory, input/output modules, the central processor unit, and finally the components that form a complete computer system. 45 Contacf Hours
CSC 216 DATA STRUCTURES (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: CSC 200
This course will provide the student with an introduction to data organization and manipulation Topics to be covered will include queues, stacks, lists, trees, records and files. Various sorting and file handling techniques will also be covered. 45 Contact Hours
CSC 217 OPERATING SYSTEMS (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: CSC 200
This course will discuss the organization and design of several different operating systems ranging from a single user system for micro-processors to a complex multiuser system on a multipurpose computer system. Yr 45 Contact Hours
CSC 218 ADVANCED PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: CSC 200
This course will be divided into two parts. The first third of the course will be an introduction to numerical analysis, floating point mathematical packages, interpreters and compilers. The remaining two thirds of the course will be dedicated to applications of computers in the real world. Yr 45 Contact Hours
CSC 221 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER OPERATION (D,F,R)
1-3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CSC 111 and permission of the Computer Center Coordinator
A course designed for student hands-on operation of both micro- and mini-computer systems. Students will learn "boot-up," operate and manage a computer system, and aid other students in the use of the computer systems. Yr 45-135 Contact Hours
CSC 222 COMPUTER OPERATIONS (D.F.R)
1-3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CSC 111 and permission of Computer Center Coordinator
This course has been designed to enable the student to become familiar with the operating system, command control language and system utilities on the PDP 11-34/A computer system and how they may be used to customize the operating system to satisfy specific needs Yr 45-135 Contact Hours
Dental Assisting
DEA100 ORIENTATION TO DENTAL ASSISTING
(F)
2 Credit Hours
An overview of dentistry with emphasis on' the role of the dental assistant on the dental health team. Yr 30 Contact Hours
DEA 105 INTRODUCTION TO DENTAL
OPERATORY PROCEDURES (F)
3 Credit Hours
An introduction to the responsibilities of the chair-side dental assistant including care of operatory equipment, instrument identification, sterilization and patient handling. Preventive and four-handed dentistry are introduced. Yr 45 Contact Hours
DEA 106 DENTAL MATERIALS (F)
2 Credit Hours
Chemical properties and uses of dental materials and solutions. Manipulation of materials included. Yr 38 Contact Hours
DEA 107 DENTAL SCIENCE (F)
4 Credit Hours
An introduction to microbiology and the study of the anatomy and physiology of the head and neck. Yr 60 Contact Hours
DEA 108 DENTAL CHAIRSIDE PROCEDURES (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DEA 105 and DEA 111 The identification and use of dental instruments in specialty practice. Pharmacologic agents and emergency measures common to dental practice are also included Yr 45 Contact Hours
DEA 110 DENTAL OFFICE PROCEDURES (F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DEA 100 Corequisite: DEA 111
Appointment control; basic bookkeeping procedure including payroll, taxes, insurance records, recall and inventory. Also includes considerations of common emergencies. Yr 45 Contact Hours
DEA 111 CLINIC (F)
2 Credit Hours
The application of patient management principles, sterilization and preparation of instrument trays, and introductory general practice assisting The practice of various exposure techniques of intra oral radiograph is included. Yr 45 Contact Hours
DEA 112 CLINIC II (F)
2 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DEA 111
Further experience in chariside assisting in general dentistry. A continuation of front desk duties and radiography. Yr 45 Contact Hours
DEA 121 DENTAL RADIOLOGY I (F)
2 Credit Hours Corequisite: DEA 111
Instruction and practice in making intra oral x-ray exposures. Safety measures for patient and operator are stressed Yr 38 Contact Hours
DEA 122 DENTAL RADIOLOGY II (F)
2 Credit Hours Prerequisite DEA 121.107 Corequisite: DEA 112
Continuation of DEA 121 including advanced radiographic techniques. Yr 30 Contact Hours
DEA 125 DENTAL LABORATORY PROCEDURES
(F)
4 Credit Hours
A continuation of DEA 106 and the addition of the construction of orthodontic space maintainers, temporary crowns and bridges and impressions. Yr 68 Contact Hours
DEA 126 CLINICAL PRACTICUM (F)
5 Credit Hours
Clinical practice in general and specialty offices and clinics. Yr 225 Contact Hours
DEA 205 INTRODUCTION TO EXPANDED DUTIES (F)
3 Credit Hours
The introduction to concepts and techniques used by the dental auxiliary in expanded functions. Descriptive anatomy of the teeth, including laboratory experience, to prepare the student for packing teeth, including laboratory experience, to prepare the student for packing and carving of amalgam and composite restorations. Yr 45 Contact Hours
DEA 209 ADVANCED OPERATORY PROCEDURES (F)
2 Credit Hours
Includes instruction in four handed dentistry, pumice prophylaxis rubber dam application, placement of matrix bands, health evaluation/prevention of emergencies, C.P.R., patient motivation in preventive dentistry and scrub, gown, and glove procedure for hospital dentistry, Yr 45 Contact Hours
Dietetic Technology
DIT102 WEIGHT REDUCTION (F)
2 Credit Hours
For those individuals who desire guidance on weight loss following good nutrition principles, exercise and establishing life-long eating patterns. Yr 30 Contact Hours
DIT 104 FOOD CONSUMERISM (F)
2 Credit Hours
Exploring and practicing various activities in food consumerism such as nutrition, planning, purchasing, storing, energy use, and recycling. Yr 30 Contact Hours
DIT 105 INTRO. TO FOOD SERVICE (F)
3 Credit Hours
A course dealing with the fundamentals of commercial food service laws, rules, and regulations on sanitation and safety and how these apply to the tools and equipment facilities and personnel of the industry. Yr 60 Contact Hours
DIT 106 NUTRITIONAL ECOLOGY OF MAN (F)
3 Credit Hours
If you are interested in how the environment affects your nutritional requirements, this course is for you. Yr 45 Contact Hours
DIT 108 NUTRITION FOR HEALTH (F)
3 Credit Hours
This course presents basic information and nutrition and diet therapy to students in dietetic technology and other health related fields. This course is open to any student interested in the field. Yr 45 Contact Hours


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
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DIT109 VOLUME FOOD PREPARATION AND SERVICE (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Proficiency in DIT 105 This includes planning meals, table count and cafeteria service. Basic stocks, sauces, secondary sauces, gravies, independent production and casserole cookery are stressed. 60 Contact Hours
DIT 110 THE MODIFIED DIET AND ITS SERVICE (F)
4 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DIT 108
Understanding of diet as a therapeutic tool in general illnesses. Preparation and service of modified foods. 68 Contact Hours
DIT 115 NUTRITION (F)
1 Credit Hour
Basic elements of nutrition as required for nursing, ft 15 Contact Hours
DIT 116 DIETETIC ORIENTATION AND TERMINOLOGY (F)
3 Credit Hours
This course is required for dietetic technology students. It deals with the type of work a dietetic technician does, the personnel and professional skills required and the technical vocabulary used in the field of dietetics. ft 45 Contact Hours
DIT 118 BASIC BAKING (F)
3 Credit Hours
In this class the student will be introduced to basic terms, equipment, procedure and techniques used in basic baking. This information will then be applied to production of yeast breads, sweet breads, pies, cakes and cookies. ft 60 Contact Hours
DIT 120 PRE CLINICAL (F)
4 Credit Hours
Exploration of dietetic field for student with limited background. Observations at clinical facilities. ft 105 Contact Hours
DIT 121 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE (F)
4-12 Credit Hours
Prerequisites DIT 108, DIT 116, concurrent DIT 110 or permission of instructor
Special needs groups in the community are considered from the viewpoint of the nutritionist working with them. ft 150-450 Contact Hours
DIT 135 QUANTITY FOOD PURCHASING (F)
3 Credit Hours Concurrent: DIT 105,109
The student will become familiar with means of determining quality and other standard levels of purchased items. The emphasis will be on feasibility of need, methods of, and control in purchasing and accounting for purchased items. ft 45 Contact Hours
DIT 150 INFANT NUTRITION (F)
1 Credit Hour
Nutritional considerations in the development of the healthy infant toddler, birth to 30 months will be considered. ft 15 Contact Hours
DIT 155 BASIC NUTRITION (F)
2 Credit Hours
Required for Early Childhood Education and Management, and Dental Assisting. A survey of basic nutrition of general interest. Open to all students. ft 30 Contact Hours
DIT 212 NUTRITIONAL CARE SEMINAR (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DIT 107,110, BIO 108 or 111 A case study application of normal diet modifications to therapeutic nutrition. ft 45 Contact Hours
DIT 215 PERSONNEL, SUPERVISION (F)
3 Credit Hours
The student will understand methods and reasons for suitable recruiting, selecting, training and motivating the proper staffing of employees in the hospitality industry. Also, the effect of labor relation negotiations and contracts on the operations and supervision of the work force. ft 45 Contact Hours
DIT 220 MANAGEMENT BY MENU (F)
3 Credit Hours
The student will gain proficiency in developing through analytic planning and determination of customer desires, menus within constraints of allowed costs, required nutrition, desirable color and texture, and available staff and equipment limitations, as well as mechanical confines, through programmed lab experience. ft 45 Contact Hours
DIT 221 FOOD AND DRUG INTERACTIONS (F)
1 Credit Hour
Drugs in common use, both prescription and over-the-counter, are considered in relation to the side effects. Nutritional means of overcoming these side effects are studied. ft 15 Contact Hours
DIT 222 NUTRITION AND THE ELDERLY
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DIT 108 or 155 This course is designed as a survey of basic nutrition and nutritional problems related to the aging process. It emphasizes the responsibility of the person in charge of food service to the health and well being of elderly clients in a variety of settings. 45 Contact Hours
DIT 240 FOOD MANAGEMENT (F)
3 Credit Hours
Layout, purchasing of food supplies and equipment specifically for health care food service. ft 45 Contact Hours
DIT 250 DIETETIC SEMINAR (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DIT 212, DIT 222, DIT 240 Application of principles of personnel and food management to specific health care food service situation. ft 45 Contact Hours
DIT 256 SPECIFICS OF FOOD MANAGEMENT
(F)
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed for students having previous work experience in a particular major field of Food Operations Management in a specific area of the hospitality industry and will serve to reinforce their practical experience and gain proficiency or enhance job knowledge in the better methods of accomplishing their task. ft 45 Contact Hours
DIT 260 DIETETIC REVIEW AND UPDATE (F)
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed for the dietetic technician graduate or advanced student who wishes to keep abreast of continuous changes in the field ft 45 Contact Hours
Diesel Power Mechanics
DPE 100 SAFETY, TOOLS, BOLTS, BEARINGS, GASKETS AND SEALS (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student is taught shop and trade safety, the proper use of hand tools, tensile strength and grades of nuts and bolts, features and design of various types of bearings and load ratings, and types of seals and gaskets. The student studies special tools used. The student will have prescribed times of days to spend in the toolroom during the entire two-year period for advanced studies of special tools. ft 60 Contact Hours
DPE 105 FOUR-CYCLE ENGINE OVERHAUL (R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DPE 100
An introduction to the fundamentals of four-cycle engines and procedures for disassembling and reassembling, tune-up, test run and troubleshooting are taught A study of subassemblies, their function and rebuilding procedures, including turbo chargers, oil pumps, fan hubs and water pumps are also taught. ft 120 Contact Hours
DPE 106 TWO-CYCLE ENGINE OVERHAUL (R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DPE 100
An introduction to the fundamentals of two-cycle engines and procedures for disassembling and reassembling, tune-up. test run and troubleshooting are taught. Students will learn subassemblies, their function and rebuilding procedures, including blowers and blower rebuild, oil pumps, fan hubs and water pumps. ft 120 Contact Hours
DPE 107 CLUTCHES AND MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS (R)
9 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DPE 100
Students are taught types and sizes of clutches and bell housings, drive-lines and universal joints. They are also taught theory of designs, gears and gear ratios; disassembly, inspection, and replacement of parts and reassembly of same ft 180 Contact Hours
DPE 108 POWER-SHIFT TRANSMISSIONS (R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DPE 100
The student is taught theory operation and rebuilding, principles and operations of torque converters and fluid couplings. ft 120 Contact Hours
DPE 200 DIFFERENTIALS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 100 or permission of instructor The student is taught the purpose theory and operation of differentials as used in trucks and heavy equipment, and the class includes overhaul and adjusting of the differentials. ft 60 Contact Hours
DPE 201 CHASSIS COMPONENTS AND SUSPENSION SYSTEMS (R)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 100 or permission of instructor The student is taught the purpose, types, principle parts, care and maintenance, removal and installation of the same ft 120 Contact Hours
DPE 202 STEERING SYSTEMS (R)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 100 or permission of instructor The student is taught theory of operation, types and methods used, troubleshooting, repair and adjust-ment procedures ft 120 Contact Hours
DPE 205 BRAKE SYSTEMS (AIR HYDRAULIC)
(R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 100 or permission of instructor Terminology, components, types of systems, principles of operation, disassembly, rebuilding and assembly of various systems are taught ft 60 Contact Hours
DPE 208 ELECTRICAL TROUBLESHOOTING (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 100 or permission of instructor The student in this class is taught theory, starting with the lead acid battery. The class also includes the study and maintenance of starters, alternators, generators and lights, and reviews electrical systems and accessories. 60 Contact Hours


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
DPE 210 PRACTICAL SHOP EXPERIENCE (R)
9 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 100 or permission of instructor This class will utilize all previous classes taught, using hands-on experience to increase the student's ability to apply his/her knowledge to improve mechanical aptitude. 180 Contact Hours
DPE 211 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINE AND FUEL SYSTEM DESIGN RELATIONSHIPS (R)
1 Credit Hour
This class studies engine design, timing, and principles of injection and factors directly relating to fuel injection. 20 Contact Hours
DPE 215 ADVANCED ENGINE STUDY-CATERPILLAR (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 211 or permission of instructor This class is the study and tune-up of Caterpillar engines, dealing with the systems and subassemblies unique to the manufacturer's design. 60 Contact Hours
DPE 216 ADVANCED ENGINE STUDY-CUMMINS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 211 or permission of instructor This class is the study of tune-up of Cummins engines, dealing with the systems and subassemblies unique to the manufacturer's design. 60 Contact Hours
DPE 217 ADVANCED ENGINE STUDY DETROIT DIESEL (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 211 or permission of instructor This class is the study of tune-up of Detroit Diesel engines, dealing with the systems and subassemblies unique to the manufacturer's design. 80 Contact Hours
DPE 218 ADVANCED ENGINE STUDY ALLIS CHALMERS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 211 or permission of instructor This class is the study of, and the tune-up of Allis Chalmers engines, dealing with the systems and subassemblies unique to the manufacturer's design. 60 Contact Hours
DPE 219 ADVANCED FUEL SYSTEMS -CUMMINS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 211 or permission of instructor Cummins fuel pumps and injectors, theory, disassembly, reassembly and calibration are taught. 60 Contact Hours
DPE220 ADVANCED FUEL SYSTEMS-ROOSAMASTER (R)
3 Cresdit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 211 or permission of instructor Roosamaster pump and pencil nozzles theory, disassembly, reassembly and calibration are taught. 60 Contact Hours.
DPE225 ADVANCED FUEL SYSTEMS-CATERPILLAR (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 211 or permission of instructor Caterpillar pumps, nozzles and precombustion chambers, theory, disassembly, reassembly and calibration are taught. 60 Contact Hours
DPE226 ADVANCED FUEL SYSTEMS-AMERICAN BOSCH (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 211 or permission of instructor American Bosch pumps and nozzles, theory, disassembly, reassembly and calibration are taught. 60 Contact Hours
DPE227 ADVANCED FUEL SYSTEMS-ROBERT BOSCH (R)
2 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 211 or permission of instructor Robert Bosch pumps, theory, disassembly, reassembly and calibration are taught. 40 Contact Hours
DPE 228 ADVANCED FUEL SYSTEMS -DETROIT (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 211 or permission of instructor Detroit Diesel pump and injectors, theory, disassembly and reassembly, testing and calibrating injectors on stand are taught. 60 Contact Hours
DPE 229 ADVANCED TROUBLESHOOTING AND TUNE-UP (R)
7 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 211 or permission of instructor Advanced troubleshooting techniques used in industry on diesel-powered equipment are taught. 140 Contact Hours
DPE 235 AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEMS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DPE 211 or permission of instructor Automotive air-conditioning used in the diesel industry, and truck refrigeration systems are taught. 60 Contact Hours
Drafting/Blueprint Reading
DPR 125 BLUEPRINT READING FOR CONSTRUCTION TRADES (R)
4 Credit Hours
Principles of interpreting blueprints and trade specifications common to the residential building trades 68 Contact Hours
DPR 126 BLUEPRINT READING FOR MECHANICAL TRADES (R)
4 Credit Hours
Principles of interpreting blueprints and trade specifications common to the mechanical trades. 68 Contact Hours
DPR 127 BUILDING INSPECTION FOR CONSTRUCTION TRADES (R)
4 Credit Hours
Examination and evaluation of construction work in progress. Comparing and contrasting with recognized norms or standards to meet state and local building requirements. 68 Contact Hours
DPR 128 ESTIMATING RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION COSTS (R)
4 Credit Hours
Construction mathematical review, plan reading, specifications, excavation, take off estimates, concrete foundations, footings, caissons, and slab. Rough structure, and full enclosure. 68 Contact Hours
DPR 129 CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS I (R)
4 Credit Hours
Terminology, nomenclature, board footage, lumber, plywood, millwork, brick cement will be covered by lecture and field trips. 68 Contact Hours
DPR 130 CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS II (R)
4 Credit Hours
Roofing, drywall, steel products, beams, stress graded lumber, and building codes will be covered by lecture and field trips. 68 Contact Hours
DPR 135 BLUEPRINT READING (D,F)
3 Credit Hours
Introductory course in reading, and interpretation of blueprints used by technicians. Emphasis is placed on visualization, sketching, and various systems of projection. 60 Contact Hours
Drama
DRA 111 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE ARTS I
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Introduces basic principles of acting and a variety of production skills as appropriate to course of study and school activities. 45 Contact Hours
DRA 112 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE ARTS II
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Continues development of acting principles through various school activities. 45 Contact Hours
DRA 121 READER'S THEATRE (D)
3 Credit Hours
Trains student to select, cut, cast, produce and direct small scale production. 45 Contact Hours
DRA 211 SURVEY OF THEATRE I (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
Surveys great plays, writers, performers, and critiques through play reading, acting and production. 45 Contact Hours
DRA 212 SURVEY OF THEATRE II (D.R)
3 Credit Hours
Continues survey of drama. 45 Contact Hours
DRA 221 THEATRE IMPROVISATION (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: DRA 111 or DRA 112 or permission of instructor
Develops skills in improvisation through the techniques and approaches of actual production. 45 Contact Hours
Drafting for Construction
DRC 116 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING FRAME CONSTRUCTION (R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DR1115
Utilizing a specified floor plan with an emphasis on wood construction, various details will be drawn such as wall section, cross section, stair section, elevations, fireplaces, foundation plans and sections, various schedules, dimensioning methods, window and door details and perspectives. 120 Contact Hours
DRC 200 INTRODUCTION TO COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE MASONRY CONSTRUCTION (R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DRC 116
Utilizing a given floor plan with an emphasis on masonry and concrete construction, various details will be drawn such as wall sections, cross sections, stair sections, elevations, foundation plans and section, masonry coursing and precast units. 120 Contact Hours


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
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DRC 207 STRUCTURAL DESIGN & DRAFTING
(R)
5 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRC 200
An introduction to the selection of structural steel, wood, and concrete members used in building construction, using portions of the A.I.S.C., C.R.S.I. and selected wood design manuals and building codes. Types of structured details as required on plans will be discussed and drawn. Yr 100 Contact Hours
DRC 208 PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS OF CONSTRUCTION DRAFTING (R)
10 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRC 207
A drafting and design project for a commercial structure consisting of: floor plans, elevations, sections and details, complete with dimensions and notes. Approval of this project by the instructor is required and will be discussed at the first regular scheduled class meeting. Extensive use of reference material is required. Yr 200 Contact Hours
DRC 210 ARCHITECTURAL TECHNICAL PROJECT (R)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
This is a technical project consisting of: 1 a student written and faculty approved proposal; 2. scheduled progress reports; 3. a finalized set of drawings (plans, elevations and details) sufficient to determine the various aspects of the proposal. Proposals must be approved prior to course registration. The purpose is to allow students to expand knowledge in DRC 207,208
This course is in addition to the required program credit hours. Yr 120 Contact Hours
Drafting for Industry
DR1105 INTRODUCTION TO DRAFTING (D,R)
6 Credit Hours
Serves as an introductory course to drafting for all students, drafting majors and non-majors. It is the introductory course for all certificate and associate degree programs in drafting and also satisfies introductory or basic drafting requirements for all programs such as civil technology, petroleum, carpentry, surveying, solar, and serves as an exploratory course for non-occupational students. The following areas will be introduced: 1) lettering, line-work, reproduction methods and geometric constructions; 2) orthographic projection and sketching; 3) isometric sketching; 4) orthographic and isometric drafting practices. Yr 120 Contact Hours
DR1106 BASIC DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY AND AUXILIARY VIEW PROJECTION (D,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DR1105
The following problem areas will be covered: 1) Line problems; true length, point view, bearing, slope and aximuth. 2) Plane problems: edge view, dihedral angle, true size and shape of any plane, true angle between two lines, true length of a line by the principle line method. 3) Shortest distances between: parallel and non-parallel lines, lines and planes 4) intersecting lines; lines, and planes. Yr 60 Contact Hours
DR1107 SECTION AND DIMENSIONING PRACTICES (D,R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DR1106
This module introduces the principles of orthographic projection, and isometric drawing, sections, conventions, and basic dimensioning practices. Cumulative, aligned fractional and un-directional, coordinate, decimal dimensioning systems will be used Introduction to inking. Yr 120 Contact Hours
DR1109 INTERSECTIONS AND DEVELOPMENTS (D,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DR1107
Introduces the principles of flat and curved surface intersections and their resulting developments in terms of thin materials and heavy plate applications. Right and oblique prisms, cylindrical and conical surfaces transitions and their resulting intersections and developments will be completed. Yr 60 Contact Hours
DR1110 INTRODUCTION TO ASSEMBLY AND WELDMENT DRAWINGS (D,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DR1109
Introduces assembly and detail drawings by the use ofa welded assembly. Introduces drawing layout and dimensioning methods, subassembly, part callouts and material lists. Applies welding symbols, their functions and methods of representation Uses fractional, aligned, cumulative and metric dimensions Yr 60 Contact Hours
DR1115 PERSPECTIVE DRAWING (D,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DR1110
Introduces two point perspectives and presentation charts, including diagrams and drawings. Yr 60 Contact Hours
DR1116 MECHANICAL ASSEMBLY AND DETAIL PROJECTS (D,R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DR1110,115 Introduces the drawing of mechanical and operating mechanical assemblies and subassemblies and may include cast, welded or machined materials and purchased parts Includes preparation of appropriate assembly drawings and necessary detail drawings utilizing required parts callouts and material lists and appropriate dimensions for the subject matter. Introduces precision dimensioning techniques. Yr 120 Contact Hours
DRI200 INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL PLANT DEVELOPMENT (D,R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DR1116
Introduces the drawing of preliminary plans for an industrial plant development system utilizing process flow diagrams, mechanical equipment and building relationships, preliminary drawings, plot plan and civil requirements relating to industrial production processes and requirements. Yr 120 Contact Hours
DRI 205 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL-STRUCTURAL PLANS AND DETAILS
(D,R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DRI 200
Requires the drawing of a small industrial building utilizing masonry, concrete and steel plans and details showing architectural and structural elements, use of AISC Manual of Steel Construction, Smoley's Tables and Architectural Graphic Standards. Yr 120 Contact Hours
DRI 206 INDUSTRIAL PIPING AND UTILITY CONSIDERATIONS (D.R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DRI 205
Industry-related drawings will be made based on details for industrial piping and/or electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic, plumbing, heating and air conditioning systems. 60 Contact Hours
DRI 207 LARGE MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT (D,R)
9 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DRI 206
Involves the development of large mechanical assemblies, their subassemblies and details pertinent to their manufacture and installation Types of assemblies may include rotary dryers, dust collectors, vessels, hoppers, bins, separators and similar equipment. The AISC Manual of Steel Construction and Smoleys Tables will be used. 180 Contact Hours
DRI 208 MATERIAL HANDLING AND CONVEYING METHODS (D,R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRI 207
Introduces material handling methods, systems, equipment and building factors used in conveying bulk material or packaged goods Includes developing plans, details and drive components for a material handling system Yr 120 Contact Hours
DRI 209 INSTALLATION PLANS AND DETAILS
(D,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: DRI 208
Requires drawings of plans and details for the installation of various types of industrial equipment in a new or existing plant situation. Yr 60 Contact Hours
DRI 210 MECHANICAL TECHNICAL PROJECT (D,R)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
This is a technical project consisting of 1) A student written and faculty approved proposal; 2) Scheduled progress reports; 3) a finalized set of drawings (assemblies, subassemblies, pertinent details, material lists, etc.) sufficient to determine the various aspects of the proposal Proposals must be approved prior to course registration The purpose is to allow the student to expand knowledge in DRI 207, 208. This course is in addition to the required program credit hours. Yr 120 Contact Hours
Drafting for Civil/Topographic Mapping
DRM116 INTRODUCTION TO
CIVIL/TOPOGRAPHIC MAPPING (D.R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DR1115
Introduces various techniques of civil/topographic mapping utilizing a specified plat Content will include working from field notes, bearing and distance, traverses, coordinates, plat-maps, plot or site plans, contours and various civil, topographic and geological surface and subsurface conventions Yr 120 Contact Hours


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
DRM 200 MAP CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES
(D.R)
9 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRM 116
Studies the following areas and materials as used in base map construction: land and geological symbols, pressure sensitive transfer type and pattern screens, independent and dependent survey, plani-metric measurements, route curves, easements and spirals, survey plats, topographies sheets, aerial photos and survey notes. 180 Contact Hours
DRM 205 ADVANCED MAP CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES (D.R)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRM 200
Involves base and overlay map construction, the use of metes and bounds, written legal descriptions, coordinates, latitude and longitude, azimuth and tangent methods. 120 Contact Hours
DRM 210 CIVIL TOPOGRAPHIC MAPPING TECHNICAL PROJECT (D,R)
12 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor This is a technical project consisting of:
1) A student written and faculty approved proposal.
2) Scheduled progress reports.
3) A finalized set of drawings and related details sufficient to determine the various aspects of the proposal. Proposals must be approved prior to course registration. The purpose is to allow students to expand knowledge in specific areas. This course is in addition to the required program credit hours. 240 Contact Hours
Drafting for Petro/Chemical Piping Processes
DRP107 DRAFTING & DIMENSIONING PRACTICES (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DR1105
This module expands the principles of orthographic projection, isometric drawing, sections and conventions and introduces basic dimensioning practices for cast and machined parts as used in the piping industry and fabrication shops. 60 Contact Hours
DRP110 INTRODUCTION TO PIPING (D)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRP 107
Introduces equipment, terms and drafting symbols: flanges and fittings and various valves. Flow diagrams and symbols, piping and general specifications. Nomenclature of vessels, structural, concrete and electrical components. Plot plan and foundation location plan Standard piping details. 120 Contact Hours
DRP 111 PROCESS PIPING DRAFTING I (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRP 110
Introduces piping drawings, control stations, orifice flanges, meter runs, pipe racks, instrument details and specifications. Isometric definitions, dimensioning, spools and call outs. 60 Contact Hours
DRP 112 PROCESS PIPING DRAFTING II (D)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRP 111
Review equipment foundations, piping specifications and general specifications, standard piping details and general piping details. Draw major project-plan, elevation, sections and isometric pipe runs of depropanizer area. 120 Contact Hours
DRP 115 ENGINEERING PROBLEMS (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Knowledge of math, trigonometry, and algebra
Introduces the student to some of the problems encountered in engineering, and to support the student in developing the basic skills necessary to apply solutions to the problems. Students will learn specific procedures of order in problem solving, accuracy in results. 60 Contact Hours
DRP 200 PROCESS PIPING DESIGN I (D)
8 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRP 112
Introduces process terms, plant arrangement and feed tanks, plot plans, vessels and piping systems.
160 Contact Hours
DRP 201 MODEL MAKING (D)
4 Credit Hours
To develop a basic knowledge of the tools and materials used in model construction and the ability to think through the model as an engineering tool. There will be a lab fee for this course. 80 Contact Hours
DRP 202 WELDING (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRP 107
Introduces assembly and detail drawings by the use of a welded assembly. Introduces layout and dimensioning methods, welding symbols and methods of representation. Types of joints and types of welds.
60 Contact Hours
DRP 210 PROCESS PIPING DESIGN II (D)
9 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRP 200
Introduction to instrumentation, pumps and turbines, compressors, fired heaters, exchangers and piping flexibility. 180 Contact Hours
DRP 211 SAFETY & MAINTENANCE (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRP 210
Introduction to safety and maintenance. Introduces steam, glycol, water, hot oil and electrical tracing. 60 Contact Hours
DRP 212 PLUMBING (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: DRP 211
Introduces state plumbing codes Piping and pipe fittings symbols and insulation details 60 Contact Hours
Earth Science
EAS 111 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY (D,F,R)
4 Credit Hours
An introductory study of the earth Emphasis is on recognizing earth materials, discovering the relationship between crustal movements and the earth's interior mountain building, metamorphism, volcanism, and earthquakes; and investigating the role of weathering, landslides, streams, waves, wind, and groundwater in shaping the land surface. Laboratories include studies of Rocky Mountain geology through field investigations, field trips, and museum tours. EAS 111 and EAS 112 constitute a one-year course in geology. 90 Contact Hours
EAS 112 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY (D,F,R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EAS 111 or permission of instructor. An introductory study of the physical and biological origin and development of the earth through the vast span of geologic time. Emphasis is on investigating and interpreting sedimentary rocks, the record of ancient environments, fossil life forms, and physical events, all within a framework of shifting crustal plates. Laboratories include studies of Rocky Mountain geology through field investigation, field trips, and museum tours. EAS 111 and EAS 112 constitute a one-year course in geology. 90 Contact Hours
EAS 116 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY OF COLORADO (D.R)
4 Credit Hours Prerequisites: EAS 111
A study of the environment from a geologic perspective. Many examples taken from Colorado and elsewhere will illustrate problems of land use, geologic hazards, mineral resources, and energy needs for the future. Laboratory work involves field trips to local areas to examine landslides, swelling soils, dams, and river floodplains as well as indoor work with rocks, minerals, topographic, and geologic maps. 90 Contact Hours
EAS 119 THE GREAT ICE AGE (D,R)
1 Credit Hour
This course will analyze the effect of the Great Ice Age on the development of North Anherica and will also explore theories of climatic change. 15 Contact Hours
EAS 120 WEATHER AT ITS WORST (D,R)
1 Credit Hour
This course will analyze the causes of tornadoes, hurricanes, thunderstorms, and drought. 15 Contact Hours
EAS 125 CONTINENTAL DRIFT (D.R)
1 Credit Hour
The history of continental movement and its relationship to earthquakes and volcanoes and the history of life. 15 Contact Hours
EAS 130 AVALANCHE STUDY (D,R)
2 Credit Hours
A comprehensive and in-depth study of snow and avalanches. Emphasis will be on recognizing and evaluating existing hazards. Classroom topics are: meteorological fundamentals, mountain snowpack, avalanche characteristics, snow mechanics, terrain analysis, and avalanche rescue. Field work will include identification of weak snowpack layers, route selection, avalanche rescue, avalanche hazard forecasting, and stability evaluation. 60 Contact Hours
EAS 201 INTRODUCTION TO MINERALOGY
(D.R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EAS 111 or permission of instructor and high school chemistry or equivalent
A study of minerals, their occurrences, origins, description, and identification. Topics will include history of mineralogy and lore of gems, physical properties or minerals, crystallography, origin and occurrence of mineral deposits. Includes mineral identification with spectographic analyzer and simple chemical techniques as well as hand specimen identification. Field trips will be taken to local mineral collecting areas. 90 Contact Hours


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
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EAS 202 INTRODUCTION TO PETROLOGY (D,R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites:EAS 111 or permission of instructor and high school chemistry or equivalent
Using examples from Colorado, the occurrence, description, and origin of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks will be studied. The relation of ore deposits to the rock framework of Colorado will also be discussed. Includes preparation and description of rock thin sections using the polarizing microscope as well as field trips to outstanding geologic localities. 90 Contact Hours
EAS 203 MAP AND AIRPHOTO INTERPRETATION (D,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: EAS 111
An introduction to our environment using airphotos, maps, and remote sensing data. Emphasis is on the development of skills and reasoning ability required for the interpretation of geologic features. Aspects of forestry, agriculture, land use, engineering, urban planning, and industrial problems, are reviewed. Laboratory work includes practical use of the stereoscope, simple photogrammetric instruments, maps, photomaps, and air photographs. 60 Contact Hours
EAS 206 GEOLOGY FIELD EXPERIENCES (D,R)
2 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
In-depth field studies into the geology of specific regions both within and outside of Colorado. A field trip of several days' length to the study area will constitute the major activity of the course. The specific area of investigation will be indicated in the schedule of classes each time the course is offered. 60 Contact Hours.
EAS 207 GEOLOGIC FIELD METHODS (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EAS 111 and EAS 112 An introduction to geologic mapping and methods of field investigation. Emphasis is on field identification of rocks, use of geologic instruments such as the Brunton compass, hand level, Jacob's staff, chain, etc., preparing geologic maps, sampling techniques, note-taking, measuring and compiling columnar sections, and writing reports. Laboratory work is held outdoors, 90 Contact Hours
EAS 208 ECONOMIC GEOLOGY (D,R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisites: EAS 111
This course treats the nature, occurrence, production, use and future of economic mineral deposits. These include not only the metals, but fuels such as coal, uranium and oil, and supplies for the building, chemical and agricultural industries. Several weekend field trips will be held to local mines and mills to examine Colorado's mineral industry firsthand. it 45 Contact Hours
Early Childhood Education and Management
ECE 100 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
By observing and recording the activities and interactions of children and educators in various settings, students will develop an understanding of the field of early childhood. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 110 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT I (D.F.R)
5 Credit Hours
Corequisite: Recommended ECE 100 The growth and development of the child from the prenatal stage through the sixth year of life is the focus of this course. The integration of physical, emotional and cognitive development will be observed and interpreted by the student for a better understanding of the total child. 75 Contact Hours
ECE 117 SENSORI-MOTOR EXPLORATION (D.R)
1-3 Credit Hours
This participatory workshop will introduce and explore sensori-motor experiences, creative movement exploration and movement education strategies appropriate to young children. 15-45 Contact Hours
ECE 120 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT (D.F.R)
5 Credit Hours
An introduction to the process of planning and design learning environments, materials and experiences that meet the developmental needs of individuals or groups of children. 75 Contact Hours
ECE 125 CREATIVITY AND THE YOUNG CHILD (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
This course explores the design of an appropriate environment and experiences that enhance the child's development of creativity. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 126 HEALTH AND SAFETY OF THE YOUNG CHILD (D,F,R)
1-3 Credit Hours
This is a fundamental course in first aid and the setup and maintenance of a healthy and safe environment for children. 15-45 Contact Hours
ECE 127 SPECIALIZED LEARNING
ENVIRONMENTS OUTDOORS (D,F,R) 1-3 Credit Hours
This course explores the design of outdoor playlearning environments appropriate for young children. 15-45 Contact Hours
ECE 131 INFANT STIMULATION (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
A course designed to enable students to appropriately encourage development of very young children. Focus will be on the development of materials and their use in stimulation activities. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 133 INFANT/TODDLER DEVELOPMENTAL THEORY AND APPLICATION (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
This is a child development course designed to integrate the theory with application in infant/toddler settings. Students will observe and explore the rationale for age-appropriate activities for children under the age of two. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 135 INFANT/TODDLER SUPERVISED LAB EXPERIENCE AND SEMINAR (F)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor This course provides a supervised experience working with infants and toddlers in a group setting. It involves giving care and stimulation appropriate to individual children's growth and developmental needs. Students also participate in weekly seminars designed to facilitate planning and evaluation for specific needs of children. 135 Contact Hours
ECE 136 INFANT/TODDLER SEMINAR FOR PARENTS I (F,R)
1 Credit Hour
This course is designed to develop optimal coordination and understanding between caregivers and parents. Students will make home visits, plan seminars and develop techniques for sharing and working with parents Parents will observe and participate with their child, utilize equipment and design activities to meet the needs of their child. Required of parents of infants/toddlers enrolled and current lab students. 15 Contact Hours
ECE 137 INFANT/TODDLER SEMINAR FOR PARENTS II (F,R)
1 Credit Hour
Practical experience in bringing about optimal coordination of home and center. Home visits and parent meetings are included. Required of parents of lab children and current lab students. 15 Contact Hours
ECE 139 INFANT/TODDLER SUPERVISED STUDENT TEACHING (F)
5 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ECE 135
A supervised field experience in an infant/toddler setting. Students will participate in daily activities designed to increase their abilities and skills in giving appropriate care and stimulation relevant to developmental levels of infants and toddlers 150 Contact Hours
ECE 141 PRESCHOOL SUPERVISED LAB
EXPERIENCE AND SEMINAR (D,F,R)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor This course provides the first supervised experience working with children in group settings. It provides an introduction to all areas of curriculum and many areas of operating a center. A weekly staff meeting for planning, evaluation and staff development is required. 150 Contact Hours
ECE 142 PRESCHOOL SEMINAR FOR PARENTS
I (D.F.R)
1 Credit Hour
This course is designed to develop optimal coordination and understanding between caregivers and parents. Students will make home visits, plan seminars, and develop techniques for sharing and working with parents Parents will observe and participate with their child, utilize equipment and design activities to meet the needs of their child. Required of parents of lab children and current lab students. 15 Contact Hours
ECE 143 PRESCHOOL SEMINAR FOR PARENTS
II (D.F.R)
1 Credit Hour
Practical experience in bringing about optimal coordination of home and center Home visits and parent meetings are included. Required of parents of lab children and current lab students. 15 Contact Hours
ECE 149 SUPERVISED LAB EXTENSION I (D.F.R)
1-6 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor In this course the student will have the opportunity to become more proficient at short- and long-range planning, evaluating the progress of children and guiding other adults in the classroom setting. 30-180 Contact Hours


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
ECE 151 SUPERVISED STUDENT TEACHING AND SEMINAR I (D.F.R)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor This is the first field experience working with young children. It develops the student's understanding of children's growth and behavior and the ability to meet their individual and group needs. There is a focus on the teaching styles and ways of relating to children and adults. A weekly seminar is required. 150 Contact Hours
ECE 159 SUPERVISED EXTENSION II (D.F.R)
1-6 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor In this field experience, the student will have the opportunity to become more proficient at short- and long-range planning, evaluating the progress of children, and guiding other adults in the classroom setting. 30-180 Contact Hours
ECE 161 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION FOR THE DAY CARE HOME PROVIDER (D.F.R)
1-3 Credit Hours
Explores various aspects of meeting the needs of young children and parents in the day care home setting. 15-45 Contact Hours
ECE 162 THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT IN THE DAY CARE HOME (D.F.R)
1-3 Credit Hours
In this course the student learns to design develop-mentally appropriate learning environments and materials for children in the day care home setting. 15-45 Contact Hours
ECE 165 THE SCHOOL-AGE CHILD IN DAY CARE(D,F,R)
1-3 Credit Hours
This course explore important issues of before- and after-school care emphasizing child development, health, safety, and appropriate activities. 15-45 Contact Hours
ECE 170 INITIAL ASSESSMENT OF THE CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE (F)
2 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor Initial assessment is designed to establish a base line of performance and knowledge in six competency areas to enable prescriptive training. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 175 CREATIVE LEARNING
ENVIRONMENTS [CDA] (F)
5 Credit Hours
A course in which the student learns to set up and maintain an environment which is safe, healthy and conducive to creative learning. 112 Contact Hours
ECE 176 PHYSICAL AND INTELLECTUAL
DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHILD [CDA]
(F)
5 Credit Hours
Introduction to methods and theories of teaching the young child while developing skills in the physical, cognitive and creative language areas. 112 Contact Hours
ECE 177 SELF-CONCEPT AND INDIVIDUAL STRENGTH OF THE CHILD [CDA] (F)
5 Credit Hours
Designed to aid the student in developing the child's positive self image and awareness of feelings. Intensified lab school experience includes major trends in child growth and development. 112 Contact Hours
ECE 178 CHILDREN AND ADULTS-GROUP MANAGEMENT [CDA] (F)
5 Credit Hours
A study of the factors involved in the teaching/ learning process, the relationship of children and adults functioning together in planned group environments and in group management. 112 Contact Hours
ECE 179 ADMINISTRATION I HOME-CENTER COORDINATION/PARENT INVOLVEMENT [CDA] (F)
5 Credit Hours
Techniques for bringing about optimal coordination of home and center. Child-rearing practices and expectations are included in program planning. 112 Contact Hours
ECE 180 ADMINISTRATION II STAFF DEVELOPMENT [CDA] (F)
5 Credit Hours
Administrative and supplementary responsibilities related to children's programs are given with an emphasis on staff development and training. Staff will plan and implement children's program. 112 Contact Hours
ECE 185 CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT (D.F.R) 1-5 Credit Hours
This course will help parents, child care workers, and others to understand and take constructive action against child neglect and abuse. 15-75 Contact Hours
ECE 187 CDA ADVISOR'S WORKSHOP (D.F)
1-3 Credit Hours
Introduction to theory and practice of competency-based training, CDA criteria and assessment methods. 15-45 Contact Hours
ECE 188 FINAL ASSESSMENT FOR CDA ADVISORS (D.F)
1-3 Credit Hours
Overview of credential award system, LAT procedure for candidates, advisors, and parent representatives. 15-45 Contact Hours
ECE 189 FINAL ASSESSMENT OF THE CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE (F)
2 Credit Hours
Final assessment is designed to establish exiting competence in six CDA competency areas for recommendation for national CDA assessment and cre-dentialing. 30 Contact Hours
ECE 195 WORKSHOP OF IDEAS I (D.F.R) f3 Credit Hours
This is a course for teachers, parents and others interested in young children. Child development, adult-child' interactions and other topics of current interest will be explored. 15-45 Contact Hours
ECE 196 WORKSHOP OF THINGS I (D.F.R)
1-3 Credit Hours
This is a course for teachers, parents and others interested in young children. Appropriate learning materialscommercial and/or handmadewill be explored. 15-45 Contact Hours
ECE 198 THE JOYS OF PARENTING-
UNDERSTANDING THE YOUNG CHILD (D.F.R)
1-3 Credit Hours
A special course covering children's development for parents, expectant parents, teenagers and grandparents. Methods and techniques of handling-potentially stressful periods and enhancing the optimum in learning will be included. May also include special sessions with parents who have completed four semsters in the Parent Seminars. 15-45 Contact Hours
ECE 210 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT II (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
This is an advanced course in child development aimed at integrating the students understanding of the whole child. Through analysis of theories and recent trends relevant to human development and learning, the student will develop a philosophy of education. Observations will be included. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 215 APPLIED CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
This course relates fundamental knowledge of the child's physical, cognitive, social and emotional development to application in infant and early childhood settings. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 221 HISTORY AND THEORIES OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Through analysis of the history, theories and recent trends in early childhood education, the student will develop a philosophy of education and an understanding of the importance and potential scope of the field of early childhood education. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 222 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
This course explores various techniques and theories for understanding and coping with children individually and in group settings. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 225 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT:
LANGUAGE AND COGNITION (D.R)
3 Credit Hours
This is an advanced study of the development of appropriate experiences and materials in language and cognition that promote the young child's mastery of his or her world. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 226 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT: MUSIC AND MOVEMENT (D.R)
3 Credit Hours
This is an advanced study of the development of appropriate experiences and materials in music and movement that promote the young child's mastery of his or her world. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 227 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT: SCIENCE AND MATH (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
This is an advanced study of the development of appropriate experiences and materials in science and math that promote the young child's mastery of his or her world. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 236 INFANT/TODDLER SEMINAR FOR PARENTS III (F.R)
1 Credit Hour
Practical experience in bringing about optimal coordination of home and center. Home visits and parent meetings are included. Required of parents of lab children and current lab students. 15 Contact Hours
ECE 237 INFANT/TODDLER SEMINAR FOR PARENTS IV (F.R)
1 Credit Hour
Practical experience in bringing about optimal coordination of home and center. Home visits and parent meetings are included. Required of parents of lab children and current lab students. 15 Contact Hours


1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
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ECE251 SUPERVISED STUDENT TEACHING AND SEMINAR ll(D,F,R)
5 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor This is a field experience in which students assume increasing responsibility for program planning and implementation, and evaluation of children. In addition, the student will focus on children's group relationships, parent involvement and staff interactions. A weekly seminar is required. 150 Contact Hours
ECE 252 PRESCHOOL SEMINAR FOR PARENTS III (D,F,R)
1 Credit Hour
This course is designed to develop optimal coordination and understanding between caregivers and parents. Students will make home visits, plan seminars and develop techniques for sharing and working with parents. Parents will observe and participate with their child, utilize equipment and design activities to meet the needs of their child. Required of parents of preschoolers enrolled and current lab students. 15 Contact Hours
ECE 253 PRESCHOOL SEMINAR FOR PARENTS IV (D,F,R)
1 Credit Hour
This course is designed to develop optimal coordination and understanding between caregivers and parents Students will observe and participate in parent meetings and conferences. Parents will observe and participate with their child. Required of parents of preschoolers and current lab students. 15 Contact Hours
ECE 259 SUPERVISED EXTENTION III (D,F,R)
1-6 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor Through this course the student will have the opportunity to become more proficient in adminstrative skills. The number of semester hours of credit (1-6) will be determined by the instructor. 30-180 Contact Hours
ECE 261 ADMINISTRATION I PARENT INVOLVEMENT AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Presents an analysis and interpretation of supervision and administration procedures relevant to early childhood programs; techniques related to involving and educating parents, and hiring and training staff Community resources are studied as they apply to home and school needs 45 Contact Hours
ECE 262 ADMINISTRATION II LICENSING AND OPERATIONS (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Licensing rules and regulations pertinent to the opening or operation of a children's center are considered including licensing, insurance, policy statements and procedures for financial management. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 265 ADMINSTRATION WORKSHOP:
COMMUNICATIONS AND LEADERSHIP
m
1 Credit Hour
In this experiential workshop, students will learn and practice techniques for promoting effective communication and decision making and for combating "burn-out." Discussion will focus on application of these basic group-process skills in staff-development and parent-involvement activities. 15 Contact Hours
ECE 266 ADMINISTRATION WORKSHOP:
STAFF DEVELOPMENT (D.R)
1 Credit Hour
This experiential workshop focuses on staff development techniques and practices. Topics covered include: communication and group-process skills; decision making and priority setting; and planning, presenting, and evaluating in-service training workshops. 15 Contact Hours
ECE 267 ADMINISTRATION WORKSHOP: PARENT INVOLVEMENT (D.R)
1 Credit Hour
In this experiential workshop, techniques and procedures for promoting parent involvement are developed. Communication and group-process skills will be introduced and practiced in relation to planning effective home visits, meetings and workshops for parents and parent-teacher conferences. 15 Contact Hours
ECE 269 NUTRITION FOR YOUNG CHILDREN (D.R)
2 Credit Hours
This is a seminar in basic nutrition, menu planning, food shopping and preparation, and cooking with children. There is an emphasis on developing an understanding of the relationship of good nutrition to optimum health and development. 30 Contact Hours
ECE291 SPECIALIZED LEARNING
ENVIRONMENTS SPECIAL NEEDS (D.R)
1-3 Credit Hours
This course covers the design of appropriate materials and learning environments for children with special needs. 15-45 Contact Hours
'ECE 292 GIFTED AND SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Explores developmental theories, screening materials, activities, techniques and learning environments for children with unique needs. Includes the developmental^ delayed and gifted child. 45 Contact Hours
ECE 295 WORKSHOP OF IDEAS II (D.F.R)
1-3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet needs of teachers currently in the field. It includes a brief review of basic information and an introduction to recent developments in the field. 15-45 Contact Hours
ECE 296 WORKSHOP OF THINGS II (D.F.R)
1-3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of teachers currently in the field. It includes examinations of commercial and/or teacher-made materials related to current learning models. Teachers may design learning experiences or materials for use in their own classroom. 15-45 Contact Hours
Economics
ECO 117 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Emphasizes development of economic systems and philosophies; applications of fundamental economic concepts. 45 Contact Hours
EC0118 LABOR RELATIONS (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
An indepth analysis of labor economics, collective bargaining, labor laws, and the role of government in labor relations. 45 Contact Hours
ECO 119 APPLIED ECONOMICS (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Emphasizes basic economics that relate to the role of the small businessman and the wage earner. 45 Contact Hours
EC0120 ECONOMICS FOR THE CONSUMER
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Deals with consumer effectiveness, in areas such as money management, credit, taxes, and consumer law. 45 Contact Hours
ECO 121 LABOR-MANAGEMENT RELATIONS I
(F)
3 Credit Hours
The role of the union steward and first-line supervisor in the labor-management relationship.
45 Contact Hours
EC0122 LABOR-MANAGEMENT RELATIONS II
(F)
3 Credit Hours
The role of the union steward and first-line supervisor in preparation for negotiations; a simulated exercise in bargaining a labor contract with union and management teams. 45 Contact Hours
ECO 175 GOVERNMENT AND THE U.S.
ECONOMY (D.R)
3 Credit Hours
Deals with development of government's role in the national economy. 45 Contact Hours
ECO 201 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS -MACRO (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Presents an overview of gross national product, government involvement, money and banking, national income determination, inflation and unemployment, business cycle fluctuations, and international trade. 45 Contact Hours
ECO 202 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS -MICRO (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Presents an analysis of the market system: consumers, businesses, markets, price theory, income distribution, economic issues and economics of ecology. 45 Contact Hours
ECO 265 BUCK ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
(D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: 3 hours 100 level ECO or permission of instructor
Analyzes the nature of urban growth, economic instability, income inequality, urban public services, public revenues, and the different problems of unemployment, poverty and manpower development. 45 Contact Hours
ECO 285 DYNAMICS OF ECONOMICS (D.R)
3 Credit Hours
Focuses upon a topical approach to contemporary economic issues. 45 Contact Hours
Electronic Digital Technology
EDT110 FUNDAMENTALS OF AC/DC CIRCUITS FOR ELECTRONICS (R)
9 Credit Hours
Current, voltage, resistance and power in AC and DC circuits. Series, parallel and series-parallel circuit computations and measurements, troubleshooting procedures, properties of conductors and insulators. Soldering, basic test equipment and circuit analysis. Emphasis will be on electronic applications. 180 Contact Hours


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
EDT118 BASICS OF AC AND DC ELECTRONICS
(R)
3 Credit Hours
Resistance, current, voltage, and power in AC and DC circuits. Measurements, and computations of eries and parallel circuits. Circuit analysis and troubleshooting with basic test equipment. 60 Contact Hours
EDT 120 SOLID STATE DEVICES & CIRCUITS FOR ELECTRONICS (R)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EDT 110 or permission of instructor Analysis and interpretation of various circuits, using solid state devices with emphasis on SCR's, Triacs, and the firing circuits and common base configurations. Introduction to digital logic soldering, and layout techniques. Emphasis will be on electronic applications. 120 Contact Hours
EDT 130 DIGITAL LOGIC DEVICES FOR ELECTRONICS (R)
9 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EDT 120 or permission of instructor An introduction to digital circuits applicable to computers, instrumentation and industrial electronic students Codes, logic gates, memory devices, counters, shift registers, and Boolean algebra. Basic troubleshooting techniques. Emphasis will be on electronic applications. 180 Contact Hours
EDT 140 OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS AND A TO D CONVERTERS FOR ELECTRONICS (R)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EDT 130 or permission of instructor Advanced continuation of EDT 130 which deals with operational amplifiers and their use as voltage followers, inverting and non-inverting amplifiers, summing amplifiers, integrators and differentiators and applications of each; bridge circuits used in sensing and measuring equipment and electronic instruments; Analog to Digital conversion techniques and equipment as related to digital control of an analog system. Basic troubleshooting techniques. Emphasis will be on electronic applications. 120 Contact Hours
EDT 210 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS (R)
7 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EDT 140 or permission of instructor Machine language programming for maintenance; schematics, test specifications, operational procedures and circuits of a minicomputer. 140 Contact Hours
EDT 214 INTRODUCTION TO
MICROPROCESSORS (R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: EDT 140
Introduction course on the development and use of microprocessors, programming and hardware. Industrial orientation. 60 Contact Hours
EDT 215 MICRO-PROCESSORS PROGRAMMING (R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: EDT 214
Advance programming on Motorola 6800, Intel 8080, and Ziog Z280 computer techniques. Industrial orientation. 60 Contact Hours
EDT 219 FOCAL PROGRAMMING (SELF PACED)
(R)
3 Credit Hours
Flow charting and programming using "FOCAL" to solve electronic problems. 60 Contact Hours
EDT 220 COMPUTER TROUBLESHOOTING (R)
7 Credit Hours Prerequisite: EDT 210
Practical experience in troubleshooting a small commercial computer using associated test equipment utilized in isolating malfunctions to a card and chip level. 140 Contact Hours
EDT 225 MINI COMPUTERS (SELF PACED) (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor Introductory course to the principles of operation, functions and hardware of a mini computer. 60 Contact Hours
EDT 226 DISK CONCEPTS (SELF PACED) (R)
2 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor Operating principles, programming techniques, hardware, and the use of the disk as the main and external storage device in a computer system. 45 Contact Hours
EDT 227 TAPE CONCEPTS (SELF PACED) (R)
2 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor Operating principles, functions, and hardware of magnetic tape units. 45 Contact Hours
EDT 228 MAGNETIC RECORDING (SELF PACED) (R)
2 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor Magnetic recording techniques and hardware used in commercial tape units, disks, and other magnetic devices. 45 Contact Hours
EDT 229 DATA COMMUNICATIONS (SELF PACED) (R)
2 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor Operating principles and characteristics of equipment with an emphasis on terminal and computer-to-computer communication techniques. 45 Contact Hours
EDT 230 INTERFACING/COMPUTER PERIPHERAL (R)
7 Credit Hours Prerequisite: EDT 220
Detailed descriptions and lab work involving interface construction and programming. Principles of operation, components, circuitry, and programming of various computer peripheral devices. 140 Contact Hours
EDT 235 PDP-11 COMPUTER (SELF PACED) (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Self paced adaptation of EDT 207. 60 Contact
Hours
EDT 240 MICROPROCESSORS (R)
7 Credit Hours
Hardware and programming of microprocessors with application related to industrial systems. Practical experience in troubleshooting microprocessors. 140 Contact Hours
EDT 250 COMPUTER TERMINAL (R)
7 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor Principles of operation and hardware of various types of terminals; ie. teletype, video, DEC writer, and TV interfacing. Introductory course in theory and application of word processing terminals. 140 Contact Hours
Education
EDU 110 INTRODUCTION TO BIBLIOGRAPHIC RESEARCH (F,R)
2 Credit Hours
Using the LMC as a classroom, students will learn to unlock the secrets of research on a topic of their choice. College survival in the 80 s depends on finding accurate information quickly from a variety of sources: videotapes as well as books; microfilm and magazines; information networks as well as newspapers. 30 Contact Hours
EDU 140 SEMINAR IN PEER TUTORING (D,F,R)
1-3 Credit Hours
This seminar in peer tutoring prepares students to be effective tutors of their peers through class lecture, practical experience, and small group seminars. The variable credit, open-entry format allows students flexibility in scheduling and an opportunity to investigate certain features of teaching techniques. 15-45 Contact Hours
EDU 200 THE CHICANO FAMILY & COMMUNITY AS CLASSROOM RESOURCES (D)
3 Credit Hours
This course will present significant aspects of the home culture that the teaching staff can incorporate into their classrooms and use as instructional resources. Some of these aspects are traditions, values, and socialization practices which can be strategies for utilizing parents and the community in the school program. 45 Contact Hours
EDU 220 LANGUAGE ASSESSMENT AND DEVELOPMENT: THEORY AND PRACTICE (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: COM 135
This course will present an introductory framework to theories of language assessment and language development. Additionally, it will present techniques for developing first and second skills. Emphasis will be placed on presenting information for English and Spanish language development within bilingual or
E.S.L. public school programs. 45 Contact Hours
EDU 230 TEACHING READING TO THE BILINGUAL CHILD (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ENG 111; EDU 110, 210, 211 (MSC); EDU 220
This course will provide basic information and methods for teaching reading to bilingual children. Emphasis will be placed on presenting English, as well as Spanish reading approaches This course is intended for those individuals who provide instruction to bilingual children. 45 Contact Hours
EDU 240 DEVELOPMENT OF BILINGUAL/E.S.L.
METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR THE CONTENT AREAS (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ENG 111; EDU 110, 210, 211 (MSC); EDU 220
This course will provide examples of Bilingual/E.S.L. methods for developing content area skills in classrooms with linguistically different students. It will present strategies for organizing and implementing bilingual content area lessons. Students will develop appropriate Bilingual/E.S.L. materials and integrating cultural differences to Supplement instruction in the content areas. 45 Contact Hours


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EDU 250 SUPERVISED INTERNSHIP AND
SEMINAR FOR THE BILINGUAL E.S.L. INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EDU 200,220, 230,240 This supervised internship will take place in a public school classroom with limited English proficient students. It is designed to integrate background knowledge, competencies, and practical skills of previous classes. Students will be developing, utilizing, and applying their instructional skills in language, culture, and the bilingual process. 90 Contact Hours (75 classroom, 15 seminar)
Electricity Industrial/Commercial
EIC 105 ELECTRICAL BLUEPRINT READING (R)
3 Credit Hours
This class introduces the student to blueprint reading for commercial and industrial electrical applications. 45 Contact Hours
EIC 111 SOLID STATE DEVICES FOR ELECTRICIANS I (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ELF 100 or permission of instructor. The student will learn the basic properties of diodes, transistors, triacs, SCRs and other solid state devices in this class. He/she will also become involved in the application of solid state devices in control and power conversion and the circuits in equipment likely to be encountered in 60-cycle power installation. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 112 SOLID STATE DEVICES FOR ELECTRICIANS II (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EIC 111 or permission of instructor.
In this unit, the student will be involved in the applications of solid state devices applicable to industrial controls with special emphasis on solid state contactors and starters, proximity sensors, temperature probes, liquid level sensors and opto-electric devices. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 115 ELECTRICAL PLANNING (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EIC 105 or permission of instructor. This class teaches the planning of electrical system installations, starting from the blueprints through to the completed job; preparation of material lists, job sheets, and time schedules for various phases of construction. 45 Contact Hours
EIC 118 BASICS OF AC AND DC ELECTRICITY
(R)
3 Credit Hours
This class teaches resistance, current, voltage and power in AC and DC circuits, measurements, computations of series and parallel circuits, circuit analysis and troubleshooting with basic test equipment. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 120 ELECTRICITY FOR CONSTRUCTION TRADES (R)
3 Credit Hours
This class is an orientation to the field of electricity. General principles, initial techniques and skill development and how electricity relates to the various construction trades are presented 60 Contact Hours
EIC 121 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS (R)
3 Credit Hours
This class teaches residential and commercial building wiring in conformance with the current National Electric Code and local codes, using non-metallic cable and electric metallic tubing. Proper use of tools and safety is emphasized. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 122 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS II (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: EIC 121 or permission of instructor This class teaches commercial and industrial building wiring in conformance with the current National Electric Code ancMocal codes, using electric metallic tubing and rigid conduit and other raceways Proper use of tools and safety are emphasized. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 131 NATIONAL ELECTRIC CODE I (R)
3 Credit Hours
The National Electric Code and local code requirements for electrical installation are taught in this class. 45 Contact Hours
EIC 132 NATIONAL ELECTRIC CODE II (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EIC 131 or permission of instructor This class is a continuation of EIC 131. 45 Contact Hours
EIC 141 ELECTRICITY FOR AUTOMOTIVE STUDENTS I (R)
3 Credit Hours
This class teaches the principles of electricity and magnetism; use of basic electrical laws to analyze circuits with regard to voltage, current and power with emphasis on automotive applications. The student will learn the use of common electrical instruments and oscilloscopes for measurements. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 142 ELECTRICITY FOR AUTOMOTIVE STUDENTS II (R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: EIC 141
In this class, the student is taught the principles of AC electricity and rectification, especially as related to automotive alternators and battery-charging systems; capacitance and inductance and their use in ignition systems and automotive instruments; and the use of electrical instruments and oscilloscopes to measure and analyze electrical systems. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 143 SOLID STATE DEVICES FOR AUTOMOTIVE STUDENTS (R)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: EIC 142
This class teaches the principles of diodes, transistors and controlled rectifiers; solid state voltage regulators; electronic ignition systems; electronic automotive instruments; and survey of computerized monitors. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 200 ELECTRICAL CALCULATIONS (R)
4 Credit Hours
In this class, calculations used in the application of the National Electric Code, sizing of branch circuit and feeder conductors and calculation of ratings of protective devices are emphasized. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 201 TRANSFORMER INSTALLATION AND THEORY (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ELF 100 or permission of instructor.
In this class, the student is taught the installation and maintenance of transformers; considerations of dry and liquid filled transformers; installations above and below grade including vaults; and theory and operating characteristics of the various classes of transformers. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 202 AC AND DC MACHINES, INSTALLATION AND THEORY (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ELF 100 or permission of instructor. The student will learn installation and maintenance of AC and DC machines, connections, multiple voltage, speed change, starting methods, and machine maintenance in this class. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 203 POLYPHASE ROTATING MACHINES AND TRANSFORMERS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ELF 100 or permission of instructor.
In this class, the student will learn about installing and maintenance of polyphase induction, synchronous machines and transformers; Wye/Delta and Scott connections; power factor control and analysis; reduced voltage starting methods; and multispeed and voltage connections. ft 60 Contact Hours
EIC 205 BASIC ELECTRICAL HOUSE WIRING (R)
3 Credit Hours
This class is an introduction course of wiring methods, using non-metallic cable (romex) with emphasis on installation techniques. ft 60 Contact Hours
EIC 207 ELECTRICAL CONTROL WIRING FOR PLUMBING, HEATING & AIR-CONDITIONING (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: ELF 100 or permission of instructor. This class is an introduction to electrical controls for valves, limits, relays, pressure, temperature, wiring and installation techniques with emphasis on schematic and control diagrams ft 60 Contact Hours
EIC 208 ADVANCED NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE(R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Journeyman's license or permission of instructor.
This is an advanced National Electrical Code class for the licensed journeyman electrician and in-plant electrician, and it prepares for the Master Electrician Examination. ft 45 Contact Hours
EIC 209 ADVANCED CODE CALCULATIONS (R)
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: Journeyman s license or permission of instructor
In this class, calculations based on code requirements for sizing conductors, conduit, fittings, protective devices, motor loads, and cost estimating based on material takeoffs are taught. ft 60 Contact Hours
EIC 211 INSTALLATION AND OPERATION OF DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS I (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EIC 201 or permission of instructor.
In this class, the student will learn installation and operation of electrical distribution systems, 600 volts and below. Emphasis is given to secondary distribution and standby power and switch gear. ft 60 Contact Hours
EIC 212 INSTALLATION AND OPERATION OF DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS II (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: EIC 201 or permission of instructor. This class teaches the installation and operation of electrical primary distribution systems, switch gear, system protection, and related metering of demand and power factor. ft 60 Contact Hours


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
EIC 215 ADVANCED ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: EIC 122 or permission of instructor. Techniques of large commercial and industrial installation, relating to Code, safety and OSHA are taught. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 216 ADVANCED ELECTRICAL PLANNING
(R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: EIC 115 or permission of instructor.
In this class, the student will learn the planning and layout of large commercial and industrial installations. 45 Contact Hours
EIC 217 ELECTRICAL ESTIMATING AND COSTING (R)
3 Credit Hours
Fundamentals of electrical estimating. Material take offs from prints. Labor hours required for various types of installations. Material loss allowances. Scheduling to insure orderly progress of work. 45 Contact Hours
EIC 218 ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENTS AND MEASUREMENTS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Proper techniques for the use of electrical instruments including oscilloscopes, potentiometers, thermo couples, and recording meters. Instrument transformers for journeyman and in-plant electricians. 60 Contact Hours
EIC 219 ELECTRICAL MACHINE AND CONTROL CIRCUITS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Characteristics of across the line and reduced voltage starters. Reversing starters. Over-current devices. Local and remote control stations. 60 Contact Hours
Electricity Fundamentals
ELF 100 FUNDAMENTALS OF AC/DC ELECTRICITY (R)
9 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: MAT 111 or equivalent In this class, the student is taught about current, voltage, resistance and power in AC, three phase, and DC circuits, series, parallel and series-parallel circuit computations and measurements: troubleshooting procedures; properties of conductors and insulators; soldering; basic test equipment; and circuit analysis. 180 Contact Hours
ELF 105 SOLID STATE DEVICES AND CIRCUITS
(R)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ELF 100 or permission of instructor In this class, the student is taught the analysis and interpretation of various circuits using solid state devices with emphasis on SCRs, Triacs, and the firing circuits used to operate these devices; common emitter, common collector and common base transistor circuits. *120 Contact Hours
ELF 106 DIGITAL LOGIC DEVICES AND CIRCUITS (R)
9 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ELF 105 or permission of instructor This class is an introduction to digital circuits applicable to computers, instrumentation and industrial electronic students in codes, logic gates, memory devices, counters, shift registers, Boolean algebra and basic troubleshooting techniques. 180 Contact hours
ELF 107 OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS AND A TO DCONVERTERS(R)
6 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ELF 105 or permission of instructor This class is a continuation of ELF 105 which deals with operational amplifiers and their use as voltage followers, inverting and non-inverting amplifiers, summing amplifiers; integrators and differentiators and applications of each; bridge circuits used in sensing and measuring equipment and electronic instruments: analog to digital conversion techniques and equipment as related to digital control of an analog system, and basic troubleshooting techniques.
120 Contact Hours
Electronics Technology
ELT 100 DC FUNDAMENTALS (D)
3 Credit Hours
Construct and evaluate series and parallel circuits to show the relationships of voltage, current, resistance, and power emphasizing standard safety practices. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 105 DC CIRCUITS AND MAGNETISM (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 100
Construct and analyze series-parallel resistive, RC, and RL circuits and describe the properties of magnetism, inductance, and capacitance. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 106 AC FUNDAMENTALS (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 105
Construct and analyze basic transformer voltage, current and impedance ratios, and voltage current, phase, and power relationships of series AC circuits composed of inductive, capacitive, and resistive combinations using oscilloscopes, AC meters, and vector analysis. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 107 AC CIRCUITS (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 106
Analyze, construct, and troubleshoot basic power supply and frequency discriminating circuits consisting of resistors, inductors, and capacitors in series, parallel, and combinations as applied to filters.
60 Contact Hours
ELT 108 VACUUM TUBE FUNDAMENTALS AND CIRCUITS (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 107
Analyze, construct, troubleshoot, plot frequency response curves and compute DB gain for various classes of tube type audio amplifiers including phase splitters and inverters, single-ended, and push-pull circuits. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 109 SOLID STATE FUNDAMENTALS (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 107
Measure the AC and DC voltages of half-wave, full-wave bridge, and voltage doubler power supply circuits, and test series and shunt regulator circuits for correct linear operation. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 110 TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIERS (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 109
Examine the characteristics of the common emitter, common base, and common collector configurations, and describe the operation of the single-ended, phase splitter, phase inverter, push-pull, and differential amplifiers. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 115 TRANSISTOR OSCILLATORS AND FET'S (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 110
Analyze Armstrong, Colpitts, Hartley, crystal, RC phase shift, and multi-vibrator oscillator circuits, and diagnose the operational characteristics of JFET and MOSFET configurations. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 116 SCR'S, UJT'S AND SPECIAL DEVICES
(D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 115
Identify the symbols of and describe the characteristics and circuit operation for SCR's, UJT's, TRIAC, DIACS, varactors and thermistors. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 117 IC OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 116
Identify and demonstrate the principles and applications of inverting and non-inverting amplifier, voltage follower, summing, integrator, differentiator, sine-wave, and squarewave generator circuits. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 200 INSTRUMENTS AND MEASUREMENTS
(D)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 117
Demonstrate the principles of measurements, the selection, application and limitations of electronic test equipment, the operation of instruments including meters, oscilloscopes, signal generators, transistor curve tracers and frequency counters. 120 Contact Hours
ELT 205 COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 117
Demonstrate the fundamental principles of RF wave propagation, antenna theory, receivers and transmitters, including representative amplitude, frequency and pulse modulation circuits and stereo incoding and decoding techniques. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 206 DIGITAL FUNDAMENTALS (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 117
Demonstrate the principles of digital integrated circuits, binary, octal, hexadecimal, and various binary codes, digital logic, truth tables, basic Boolean Algebra, and combinational logic. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 207 DIGITAL CIRCUITS (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 206
Demonstrate the principles and operation of functions of combinational logic, flip-flops, counters, and registers, logic circuit maximization by algebraic techniques and Karnaugh mapping. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 208 MICROPROCESSOR FUNDAMENTALS
(D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 207
Examine the fundamentals of microprocessors, micro- and mini-computers and assembly language programs. May also include writing assembly language programs in Motorola M6800 mnemonics to meet predesignated arithmetic and logic input and output parameters; convert these programs to machine coding; and demonstrate the successful operation of these programs in meeting all prescribed parameters when encoded in a Motorola D2-M6800 Microprocessor Trainer. 60 Contact Hours


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ELT 209 TROUBLESHOOTING TECHNIQUES (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 117
Analyze and isolate representative analog circuit problems, following logical troubleshooting procedures and using signal tracing and/or signal substitution and in-circuit voltage and signal measurements to locate the circuit faults. 60 Contact Hours
ELT 210 ELECTRONIC FABRICATION TECHNIQUES (D)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 117
Develop component layouts and printed circuit board artwork, both single- and double-sided, from schematics and parts lists: use photographic and chemical etching techniques in preparing finished printed circuit boards from artwork; assemble, solder, test and when necessary, troubleshoot finished circuits; package finished circuits, fabricating special parts and hardware when necessary; and prepare well-documented reports, logs, and drawing covering the above activities. 120 Contact Hours
ELT 216 INTRODUCTION TO
ELECTROMECHANICAL DEVICES (D)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ELT 117
Examines alternating and direct current motors, single and three-phase power concepts, and associated control and measurement methods. 60 Contact Hours
English
English assessment is required for new students before or during registration Results will be used to advise students into courses in which they are prepared to succeed
ENG 099 SOUND AND SPELLING (D.F.R)
1-3 Credit Hours
This course is designed for the student who needs a refresher course in spelling and pronunciation. It emphasizes understanding dictionary pronunciation keys, spelling rules, vocabulary, and spelling problems common to college level writing. It will provide for oral and written approaches to improve spelling ability. 14-45 Contact Hours
ENG 103 WORKSHOP IN READING, WRITING, AND SPEAKING (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
The course integrates the three basic communication areasreading, writing, and speaking by emphasizing skills common to each area and facilitating transfer of skills from one area to another. The course surveys small group communication skills and basic research skills. The student studies logical structure and its implementation in reading, writing, and speaking. Note: This course may be taken for ENG or REA credit (see REA 103) and as a preparation for the General Education Core Communication course. 45 Contact Hours
ENG 105 STUDY SKILLS (D,F,R)
1-3 Credit Hours
NOTE: This course may be taken for either English or reading credit, depending on the students needs (see REA 105).
Particularly helpful for the student who has been away from school for several years, this course is designed for the student whose reading skills are adequate but who needs a review of methods to improve study skills. Methods used include the following: making better use of time, improving reading rate, notetaking, outlining, skimming and scanning, test taking techniques, library use, critical reading, and vocabulary building. Yr 15-45 Contact Hours
ENG 107 LANGUAGE FUNDAMENTALS I (D,F,R) 3 Credit Hours
This course is designed for the student who needs a review of basic grammar and formal/informal use of the English language It introduces sentence structure, organization patterns and word use. Utilizing and individual approach, it will help prepare students for higher level English courses. 45 Contact Hours
ENG 108 LANGUAGE FUNDAMENTALS II (D,F,R) 3 Credit Hours
A quick review of grammar, in addition to a general review of basic writing skills; teaches sentence structure, punctuation, basic paragraph style and organization. It will help prepare students for higher level English courses. 45 Contact Hours
ENG 110 COMPOSITION, STYLE, AND TECHNIQUE (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
ENG 110 prepares the student to enter freshman composition and introductory technical writing courses. The student reviews the writing process, organization and development of the basic paragraph and essay, sentence structure and style and effective diction. The student is expected to complete sentence writing exercises, read essays as prose models, write basic paragraphs and essays, and take tests. ENG 110 satisfies the requirements for the Associate of Applied Science degree and the Associate of General Studies degree. Yr 45 Contact Hours
ENG 111 ENGLISH COMPOSITION: ESSAY WRITING (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
The course begins with a brief review of sentence structure, punctuation, and basic paragraphing skills; it then teaches organization and evaluation of essay forms and strategies of style Students write a variety of essays designed to provide appropriate writing practice in their field of specialization. The course is required for graduation with the AA or AS degrees and provides transfer credit. 45 Contact Hours
ENG 112 ENGLISH COMPOSITION: THE
COLLEGE RESEARCH PAPER (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ENG T11 or permission of instructor The second semester of expository writing continues with instruction in style and logical thinking, and introduces techniques for documentation and organization of well-developed reports and research papers. Students demonstrate research techniques uses of library and community resources in appropriate format for one or more research papers. This course is required for graduation with the AA and AS degrees and provides transfer credit. 45 Contact Hours
ENG 115 CREATIVE WRITING (D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
This course explores imaginative uses of language and teaches appreciation and creation of various forms such as short stories, short plays, poetry, and creative nonfiction. 45 Contact Hours
ENG 125 POETRY WRITING (D,R)
3 Credit Hours
This course teaches techniques for creating poems, including study of the language, forms and sound patterns of poetry. 45 Contact Hours
ENG 135 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Assessment level of 3 Concentrates on basic grammar, business vocabulary, punctuation and business style (correctness, conciseness, and precision). Also teaches rhetorical principles of essay writing, including two short research papers. 45 Contact Hours
ENG 211 COMPOSITION II: ARTICLE WRITING
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 112 or permission of instructor The student's essay-writing ability will be further developed through emphasis on non-fiction writing for magazines. 45 Contact Hours
ENG 215 ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING
(D.F.R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ENG 115 or permission of instructor This course provides individualized instruction in such forms as poetry, fiction, nonfiction and script writing. It advances the students writing abilities, emphasizing techniques for developing and controlling narrative and dramatic ideas. 45 Contact Hours
ENG 231 TECHNICAL WRITING (D,F,R)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Eng 111 or ENG 135 or permission of instructor
This course provides skills one can immediately apply to technical reports and job needs. Teaches principles for organizing, writing and revising a variety of clear, readable reports for industry, business and government. Gives transfer credit in several programs or major areas. 45 Contact Hours
English as a Second Language
ESL100 BASIC ESL(D,F,R)
1 or 3 Credit Hours
This course is for the student who has no or very little experience with spoken English. Emphasis is on the understanding and usage of basic grammatical patterns and common vocabulary in conversation. 45 or 75 Contact Hours
ESL101 LOW INTERMEDIATE ESL (D.F.R)
1 or 3 Credit Hours
A continuation of ESL 100. Emphasis is on increasing understanding and usage of basic grammatical patterns and vocabulary in conversation and improvement of pronounciation. 45 or 75 Contact Hours
ESL 102 HIGH INTERMEDIATE ESL (D.F.R)
1 or 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ESL 101 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of ESL 101. Gives additional practice to increase fluency and comprehension of spoken English. 45 or 75 Contact Hours


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1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
ESL103 ADVANCED ESL(D,F,R)
1 or 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ESL 102 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of ESL 102. Emphasis is on the development of conversation skills through discussion of social, political, or personal issues and cultural differences. 45 or 75 Contact Hours
Electronics Technology
ETE 101 DC FUNDAMENTALS (F)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Minimum Assessment Levels of:
Math 3
English 3
Reading 3
Study Skills 4
Study, construct, and evaluate series and parallel DC resistive circuits to show the relationships of voltage, current, resistance, and power, utilizing formulas and common test instruments, while emphasizing standard safety practices. 60 Contact Hours
ETE 102 DC CIRCUITS AND MAGNETISM (F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 101
Study, construct, and evaluate combination resistive, magnetic, R-C and R-L circuits and describe and utilize the properties of magnetism, inductance, and capacitance, utilizing formulas, common test instruments and standard safety practices. 60 Contact Hours
ETE 103 AC FUNDAMENTALS (F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 102
Construct and analyze basic transformer voltage, current, and impedance ratios, and voltage current, phase, and power relationships of series AC circuits composed of inductive, capacitive, and resistive combinations using oscilloscopes, AC meters, and vector analysis. 60 Contact Hours
ETE 104 AC CIRCUITS (F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 103
Analyze, construct, and troubleshoot basic power supply and frequency discriminating circuits consisting of resistors, inductors, and capacitors in series, parallel, and combinations as applied to filters. 60 Contact Hours
ETE 111 RECTIFIERS & POWER SUPPLIES (F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 104
Analyze, construct, troubleshoot, and compare various rectifier and filter circuits. 60 Contact Hours
ETE 112 TRANSISTOR CONFIGURATIONS (F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 111
Inspect and measure the characteristics of the common emitter, common base, and common collector configuration, identify the symbols, and test the transistor, and determine the proper biasing technique used for the cutoff, saturation, and active regions. 60 Contact Hours
ETE 113 TYPICAL AMPLIFIERS (F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 112
Examine the characteristics of the RC coupled, direct coupled, transformer coupled and complementary amplifiers and demonstrate, construct, and analyze the operation of the single-ended, phase splitter, phase inverter, push-pull, and the differential amplifiers. 60 Contact Hours
ETE 114 TRANSISTOR OSCILLATORS AND FET'S(F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 113
Analyze Armstrong, Colpitts, Hartley, crystal, RC phase shift, and multi-vibrator oscillator circuits, and diagnose the operational characteristics of JFET and MOSFET configurations. 60 Contact Hours
ETE 121 SCR'S, UJT'S AND SPECIAL DEVICES
(F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 113
Identify the symbols of and describe the characteristics and circuit operation for SCR's, UJTs, TRIAC, DIACs, varactors and thermistors 60 Contact Hours
ETE 122 1C OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS (F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 121
Identify and demonstrate the principles and applications of inverting and non-inverting amplifier, voltage follower, summing, integrator, differentiator, sine-wave, and squarewave generator circuits. 60 Contact Hours '
ETE 201 DIGITAL FUNDAMENTALS (F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 122
Demonstrate the principles of digital integrated circuits, binary, octal, hexadecimal, and various binary codes, digital logic, truth tables, basic Boolean Algebra, and combinational logic. Y? 60 Contact Hours
ETE 202 DIGITAL CIRCUITS (F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 201
Demonstrate the principles and operation of functions of combinational logic, flip-flops, counters, and registers, logic circuit maximization by algebraic techniques and Karnaugh mapping w 60 Contact Hours
ETE 203 MICROPROCESSOR FUNDAMENTALS
(F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 202
Examine the fundamentals of microprocessors, micro- and minicomputers and assembly language programs. May also include writing assembly language programs in Motorola M6800 mnemonics to meet predesignated arithmetic and logic input and output parameters, convert these programs to machine coding: and demonstrate the successful operation of these programs in meeting all prescribed parameters when encoded in a Motorola D2-M6800 Microprocessor Trainer. 60 Contact Hours
ETE 204 MICROPROCESSOR APPLICATIONS
(F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 203
When given the required input and output parameters of a micro-computer control problem, formulate and fabricate peripheral interface connections between a Motorola D2-M6800 Microprocessor Trainer and a simulation of the controlled device: write an assembly language program to provide the required control functions; machine code this program; and demonstrate the successful operation of a microprocessor controlled system 60 Contact Hours
ETE 205 COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS(F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 204
Demonstrate the fundamental principles of RF wave propagation, antenna theory, receivers and transmitters, including representative amplitude, frequency and pulse modulation circuits and stereo encoding and decoding techniques. 60 Contact Hours
ETE 206 BASIC PROGRAMMING FOR ELECTRONICS (F)
3 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 122
Learn basic programming language and techniques with emphasis on using this programming tool for solving electronic based problems. Yr 60 Contact Hours
ETE 207 INSTRUMENTS, MEASUREMENTS, AND TROUBLESHOOTING
6 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 122
Examine the system of standards used for measurement. Demonstrate the principles of electronic measurements, by the selection, application, and limitations of common electronic test equipment. Analyze troubleshooting techniques by using analog and digital meters, oscilloscopes, signal generators, frequency counters and analyzers: 120 Contact Hours
ETE 208 ELECTRONIC FABRICATION TECHNIQUES (F)
6 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 122
Develop component layouts and printed circuit board artwork, both single and double-sided, from schematics and parts lists; use photographic and chemical etching techniques in preparing finished printed circuit boards from artwork: assemble, solder, test and when necessary, troubleshoot finished circuits: package finished circuits; package finished circuits, fabricating special parts and hardware when necessary; and prepare well-documented reports, logs, and drawing covering the above activities. 120 Contact Hours
ETE 209 FCC GENERAL CLASS LICENSE PREPARATION (F)
8 Credit Hours Prerequisite: ETE 122
Obtain FCC General Class Radio Telephone License by learning basic law and operating procedures and radio telephone theory (FCC Elements I & II). 120 Contact Hours
Foreign Automotive Mechanics
FAM 100 ORIENTATION, SAFETY, BASIC ELECTRICAL AND IGNITION SYSTEMS (D)
3 Credit Hours
Introduces the automotive program, general shop safety, basic engine operations, electrical theory, conventional and solid state ignition systems and metric systems. 60 Contact Hours
FAM 105 STARTING AND CHARGING SYSTEMS
(D)
3 Credit Hours
Examines operation of charging and starting systems and how to diagnose and repair the systems 60 Contact Hours
FAM 106 CARBURETOR SERVICE (D)
3 Credit Hours
Presents the theory of operation and how to rebuild and adjust one, two and four barrel carburetors.
60 Contact Hours


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FAM 107 OSCILLOSCOPES AND ELECTRONIC TESTING (D)
3 Credit Hours
Introduces the reading of oscilloscope patterns and use of electronic testing instruments. 60 Contact Hours
FAM 108 EMISSION CONTROL (D)
3 Credit Hours
Presents the theory of operation and the repair of emission control components. 60 Contact Hours
FAM 109 DRUM BRAKE SYSTEMS (D)
3 Credit Hours
Examines hydraulic principles, theory, and service as applied to the automotive brake systems, it 60 Contact Hours
FAM 110 DISC BRAKE SYSTEMS (D)
3 Credit Hours
Introduces theory, operation, and service on automotive disc brakes, it 60 Contact Hours
FAM 115 WHEEL ALIGNMENT (D)
3 Credit Hours
Presents theory, operation, and service of wheel alignment 60 Contact Hours
FAM 116 WHEEL BALANCE AND SUSPENSION
(D)
3 Credit Hours
Presents theory and. service of wheel balance and suspension. 60 Contact Hours
FAM 117 STEERING GEARS AND SYSTEMS (D)
3 Credit Hours
Examines theory and service of steering gears and systems. 60 Contact Hours
FAM 200 CLUTCHES AND MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS (D)
3 Credit Hours
Includes construction, operation, and service techniques for standard transmission clutches 60 Contact Hours
FAM 205 DRIVE LINES AND DIFFERENTIALS (D)
3 Credit Hours
Presents service procedures and construction of universal joints, drive lines, and differential assemblies. 60 Contact Hours
FAM 206 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS THEORY AND MAINTENANCE (D)
3 Credit Hours
Examines the theory and service of automatic transmissions. it 60 Contact Hours
FAM 207 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION REBUILDING (D)
6 Credit Hours
Requires diagnosing malfunctions and rebuilding automatic transmissions it 120 Contact Hours
FAM 208 ENGINE OPERATION, DIAGNOSIS,
DISASSEMBLY AND MEASUREMENT
(D)
6 Credit Hours
Presents engine overhaul procedures, disassembly and measurement with micrometers and special tools. 120 Contact Hours
FAM 209 ENGINE RECONDITIONING AND ASSEMBLY (D)
3 Credit Hours
Presents assembly procedures and reconditioning of the complete engine 60 Contact Hours
FAM 210 AIR CONDITIONING THEORY SERVICE AND SAFETY (D)
3 Credit Hours
Examines the service, theory and safety procedures on automotive air conditioning. 60 Contact Hours
FAM 215 GENERAL SERVICE REPAIR (D)
3 Credit Hours
Includes work on customer cars and any work the student needs to complete the program, with the advisors permission, it 60 Contact Hours
FAM 216 CUSTOMER PARTS SERVICE (D)
3 Credit Hours
Analyzes how to read the parts catalog, compare parts, stock an inventory of parts 60 Contact Hours
Flexible Automation Robotics
FAR 101 INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL ROBOTICS (R)
4 Credit Hours
A technical overview of robot systems covering Classic elements. Discussions will include programming operations, general control theory, industrial terminology, power systems and linkage anatomy. Laboratory sessions included, it 30 Contact Hours
FAR 106 SURVEY OF ROBOT DRIVE SYSTEMS
(R)
3 Credit Hours
Comparative study of mechanical arm configurations. Coverage of electrical, pneumatic, and hydraulic systems Understanding specification criferia. Direct exposure to pick-and-place robots and articulated robots Laboratory sessions included. it 60 Contact Hours
FAR 107 ROBOT CONTROL SYSTEMS (R)
4 Credit Hours
A theoretical and practical study of digital and analog control systems. Provides an in-depth look at programmable controllers, truth tables, logic ladders, editing techniques, usage of teach pendants for servo drive systems. Position-tracking principles used with closed loop servomechanisms will be covered. Included will be input/output interfacing, end effector considerations, and flowcharting for tasks dedicated to robot cells. Laboratory intensive. 80 Contact Hours
FAR 110 INTERMEDIATE ROBOT
MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR (R)
3 Credit Hours
A detailed look at maintenance procedure and troubleshooting techniques Additional use of programmer controls. Students will be involved in problems relating to air logic and electrical circuitry, hydraulic and DC servo systems, peripheral componentry and ancillary equipment Laboratory sessions are included 60 Contact Hours
FAR 210 ROBOTIC APPLICATIONS (R)
4 Credit Hours
This course offers involvement in a flexible automation environment. Regimen will cover one or more areas of advanced troubleshooting, programming and diagnostic techniques, system interfacing, end effector studies, robot inspection and general maintenance, job structuring, and workshop practices. it 80 Contact Hours
Fluid Power
FLP 100 SAFETY INTRODUCTION AND ORIENTATION (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student is taught the identification and the use of basic hand tools and is given an orientation to the fluid power field, it 60 Contact Hours
FLP 105 BASIC PRINCIPLES OF HYDRAULICS
(R) 9
3 Credit Hours
Fundamentals of hydraulic systems and the principles of hydraulics are taught. The students will perform shop laboratory experiments, using shop trainers, it 60 Contact Hours
FLP 106 FLUIDS FOR HYDRAULICS, SEALING DEVICES (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student studies petroleum-base fluids, viscosity, fire resistant fluids, water glycol, water-in-oil emulsions, and neutralization number of oils. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 107 SOURCE OF HYDRAULIC POWER (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student will disassemble, inspect, repair or replace worn parts and assemble and test gear, vane and piston pumps in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications it 60 Contact Hours
FLP 108 CONTROL OF HYDRAULIC POWER (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student will repair, adjust, test and install hydraulic controls as listed by the instructor. He/she will study the flow control valves to meet the manufacturers specifications; the set time and adjusting of all balanced and unbalanced direct and pilot operated relief valves to meet manufacturer's specifications; and will disassemble, repair and test all solenoid control valves according to the manufacturers specifications. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 109 HYDRAULIC ACTUATORS MOTORS CYLINDERS (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student will repair, test and select the proper actuator cylinder or motor for the job, using shop manuals according to the manufacturer's specification, select the proper hydraulic motor for different torque, pressures, and G.P.M. to the customer's specifications using charts and graphs, it 60 Contact Hours
FLP 110 DISTRIBUTION OF HYDRAULIC POWER (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student is taught the proper hoses, tubing or pipe for any given volume or pressure setting, using charts and graphs, and manufactured and test flex hose and rigid tubing in sizes and lengths, it 60 Contact Hours
FLP 115 CONDITIONING POWER FLUIDS (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student will learn to select the proper filter, reservoir, heat exchanger and strainers for any given hydraulic system, identifying correctly, various types of filter elements, full flow and by-pass indicators, and taking Mil Pore "A" pressure readings across filter elements, it 60 Contact Hours
FLP 116 PUMP, OVERHAUL AND TESTING (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student will disassemble, inspect, repair, assemble and test gear, vane and piston-type pumps, using pump overhaul kits, test the pump on shop test equipment for proper G.P.M., P S.I., and for volumetric efficiency at rapid R.P.M. using the manufacturers test charts. 60 Contact Hours


98
1984-85 Community College of Denver System Catalogue
FLP117 COMPONENTS, OVERHAUL AND TESTING (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student will disassemble, inspect and repair relief valves, directional control valves, pressure-reducing valves, actuating cylinders, and other hydraulic components, used in a hydraulic system in accordance with the manufacturer's recommended procedures and test charts, and hook up components to the shop test equipment for proper testing and adjustments. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 120 FLUID POWER FOR MECHANICAL TRADES I (R)
3 Credit Hours
Orientation to the field of fluid power, general principles, initial techniques and skill development, and how fluid power relates to the various mechanical trades is presented. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 121 FLUID POWER FOR MECHANICAL TRADES II (R)
3 Credit Hours
This class covers power steering for automobiles and construction equipment, trucks, etc., including pumps, cylinders, and valves, and hydrostatic transmissions. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 125 ANALYZING HYDRAULIC CIRCUITS (R)
3 Credit Hours
The students will learn how to analyze hydraulic systems, drawings and determine the how and why of the system and the hydraulic components required. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 126 HYDRAULIC SCHEMATICS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Students will plan and draw hydraulic circuits using ASIA symbols and diagrams for various hydraulic systems as designated by the instructor. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 127 HYDROSTATIC DRIVES (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student will learn troubleshooting, adjusting and testing of hydrostatic drives. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 200 BASIC PNEUMATICS-SAFETY (R)
3 Credit Hours
Application of basic physical laws of fluids and mechanics pertaining to fluid power are presented. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 205 COMPRESSORS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Operation and physical characteristics of most positive and nonpositive displacement compressors, and procedures for dismantling, inspecting and adjusting compressors are taught. Yr 60 Contact Hours
FLP 206 PRIMARY, SECONDARY AIR TREATMENT(R)
3 Credit Hours
Operation and application of primary and secondary air treatment units are taught. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 207 DIRECTIONAL CONTROL VALVES (R)
3 Credit Hours
Operation, adjustments and repair of directional control valves are taught. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 208 CYLINDERS, MOTORS, PNEUMATICS
(R)
3 Credit Hours
Maintaining pneumatic cylinder motors and principles of operation and construction are taught. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 209 PIPING, HOSE, FITTING, PNEUMATIC SYSTEMS (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student will fabricate, inspect, install and test air system piping hoses. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 210 PRESSURE CONTROL VALVES, PNEUMATIC SYSTEMS (R)
3 Credit Hours
The student will disassemble, inspect, repair, assemble and test pressure control valves. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 215 PNEUMATIC LOGIC CONTROLS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Methods whereby control answers can be attained are taught. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 216 TROUBLESHOOTING, PRINT READING
(R)
3 Credit Hours
Troubleshooting basic pneumatic circuits, using manuals and prints, is taught. Yr 60 Contact Hours
FLP 217 BASIC FLUIDICS (R)
3 Credit Hours
Operation of fluidic (nonmoving part), logic devices and their application in problem solving are taught. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 218 ADVANCED SYSTEM COMPONENTS AND CIRCUITS (R)
3 Credit Hours
JIC standards, graphic symbol, schematic diagrams, hydrostatic drives, and servo controls for the advanced hydraulic mechanic are taught. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 219 ADVANCED TROUBLESHOOTING -SAFETY (R)
3 Credit Hours
Various methods of troubleshooting complete hydraulic and pneumatic systems, both in the field and laboratory setting, using portable test equipment and shop test stands are taught 60 Contact Hours
FLP 220 ADVANCED FLUID POWER,
HYDRAULIC AND PNEUMATIC MAINTENANCE (R)
3 Credit Hours
In this class, the student will learn hydraulic and pneumatic shop procedures, manufacturer's specifications of hydraulic and pneumatic components and will participate in local shop visits for the advanced mechanic. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 221 FLUID POWER INSTRUMENTATION (R)
3 Credit Hours
Students are taught the individual instruments or hardware that measure the variables in a fluid power system. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 225 AIR BRAKE AND ANTI-SKID SYSTEMS
(R)
3 Credit Hours
Students will learn fundamentals of the air brake and anti-skid systems and principles of operation. 60 Contact Hours
FLP 230 COMPRESSOR OVERHAUL (R)
3 Credit Hours
Students will learn overhaul procedures using manufacturer's manuals and specifications. 60 Contact Hours
French
FRE 101 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I (D)
3 Credit Hours
Introduces conversational French for career, travel, and general appreciation of French culture. AV materials, songs, games and skits will be used to teach basic language patterns and pronunciations. 45 Contact Hours
FRE 102 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH II (D)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisites: FRE 101 or permission of instructor Continues emphasis on conversational French with more practice in basic conversational patterns, grammar and syntax, 45 Contact Hours
Commercial Food Service Management
FSP101W RESTAURANT ARTS I (R)
6 Credit Hours
This is a six credit first semester program. Basic cooking skills are applied in the operation of the Warren Center Coffee Shop and Gourmet Dining Room. Concepts of food service management including identification, use and care of tools and equipment and basic culinary terms are covered. Special emphasis is on sanitary practices and the development of professional work habits. Students also gain experiences in serving the dining public Areas covered include coffee house and dining room table service, guest check writing and suggestive selling; busing, cashiering; as well as hostess and maitre d skills. 138 Contact Hours
FSP102W RESTAURANT ARTS II (R)
6 Credit Hours 'Quality Food Production "Linecooking and tableservice Quality Food Production is a three credit one semester program designed to provide students with skills in quantity food production. Areas in food preparation include the following: the nomenclature of the profession and industry; how to read, use and adapt recipes; basic baking, butchering, and meat identification; quantity production of salads, soups, sauces, and main dishes (entrees); short orders, breakfast cookery and table service, and the principles of food handling and storage.
"Linecooking and Tableservice is a three credit one semester program designed to provide students with training in coffee house, dining room cooking and table service during lunch. Areas in food prepa ration will include training in short order cooking in our coffee house and a la carte saute cooking in our gourmet dining room. Areas in customer service include the following: coffee house and dining room table service, guest check writing and suggestive selling, busing, hostessing, and maitre d' techniques and cashiering. 138 Contact Hours
Fire Science Technology
FST100 FIRE PROTECTION (R)
3 Credit Hours
History and philosophy of fire protection Introduction to the fire service and its many facets. Review of the general areas of duties and responsibilities at the fire company level. 45 Contact Hours
FST105 FIRE APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT
(R)
3 Credit Hours
Types of fire apparatus used in the fire service. Familiarization, operation and uses of the various types of pumps, ladders, aerial platforms, squads and all specialized fire equipment. 45 Contact Hours