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Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1988-1989

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Title:
Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1988-1989
Creator:
Community College of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
Community College of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Community College of Denver
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
9842420 ( OCLC )

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Community College of Denver Collections

Full Text
COLLEGE CATALOG
' -'ARCHIVES AURARIA LIBRARY
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Community College of Denver Downtown Auraria Campus
1111 W. Colfax Denver, CO 80204 (303) 556-2481
NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID
PERMIT NO. 1849 DENVER, CO


COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER
1988-89 CATALOG
1111 West Colfax Avenue Denver, CO 80204 (303) 556-2481


COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER
Dr. Byron McClenney, President
COLLEGE ADVISORY COUNCIL
Jane Earle, Chair
Dr. Alicia Cuaron James H. Daniels Richard C. D. Fleming
Leslie S. Franklin Bruce Rockwell Ralph Torres
STATE BOARD FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION
Dr. Jerome Wartgow, System President
Lawrence E. Hamilton, Chairman Anita L. Sanchez,
Vice Chairman Rolf F. Anderson Jay L. Fox
Reuben Gutierrez Julianne Fischer Haefeli Jane S. Quimby H. Clay Whitlow Raymond Buzz Wilder
Cover: Original Painting by Mel Carter CCD Professor of Fine Arts Title: Colorado Landscape Acrylic, 41A'x6'


Table of Contents
TELEPHONE DIRECTORY ....
1988-89 ACADEMIC CALENDAR MAP OF CAMPUS...........
GUIDE TO DEGREES
AND CERTIFICATES PROGRAMS.................... v
CCD GUARANTEES............................... vii
GENERAL INFORMATION............................ 1
College Philosophy............................. 1
College Mission................................ 1
History ....................................... 1
Notice of Nondiscrimination.................... 1
Approval ...................................... 1
STUDENT SERVICES............................... 2
Educational Planning and Advising.............. 2
Evening Center ................................ 2
Educational Opportunity Center ................ 2
Women's Support Team .......................... 2
CCD Child Development Lab School .............. 2
Veteran Affairs Office......................... 2
Center for the Physically Disadvantaged ....... 3
Vocational Rehabilitation Services ............ 3
Job Placement ................................. 3
Career Service................................. 3
Student Activities............................. 3
Accident Insurance............................. 3
AURARIA CAMPUS FACILITIES ..................... 4
Student Center ................................ 4
Health Services ............................... 4
Auraria Library................................ 4
Campus Recreation.............................. 4
Auraria Student Assistance Center ............. 4
ROTC Information .............................. 5
International Programs ........................ 5
Off-Campus Housing Services.................... 5
Auraria Child Care Center ..................... 5
Interfaith Ministry............................ 5
Parking and Transportation Services ........... 5
Transportation Options ...................... 5
Weekend Parking ............................. 5
ADMISSIONS AND TRANSFERS OF CREDIT ............ 6
TUITION, FEES AND REFUNDS ..................... 8
FINANCIAL AID ................................ 10
STUDENT CONDUCT
AND OTHER COLLEGE POLICIES ............... 12
ACADEMIC STANDARDS ......................... 13
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS .................... 16
INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES ............. 17
Learning Development Center................. 17
Tutoring.................................. 17
Peer Tutoring ............................ 17
Supplemental Services Tutoring ........... 17
Special Learning Support Program.......... 17
Test Center .............................. 17
Writing Center............................ 17
Computer Labs ............................ 17
Developmental Studies Program .............. 17
Developmental Studies Courses............. 17
SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS ............... 18
Technical Education Center ................. 18
The Denver Human Resource Center............ 18
Cooperative Education Program .............. 18
Honors Program ............................. 18
Continuing Education ....................... 18
Continuing Education Units ............... 19
Certificate and Degree Program ........... 19
The Certified Financial Planner Program .. 19
GED Preparation:
High School Equivalent Certificate...... 19
Business and Industry Services ........... 19
Weekend College .......................... 19
Extended Campus .......................... 20
Correspondence Courses ................... 20
Television Courses ....................... 20
London Semester........................... 20
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE PROGRAMS........... 21
ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS....... 22
ASSOCIATE OF GENERAL STUDIES DEGREE........ 24
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE......... 25
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS ....................... 38
TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER PROGRAMS .... 45
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ........................ 47
TEC COURSE DESCRIPTIONS..................... 92
STAFF ...................................... 99
FACULTY.................................... 103
INDEX ..................................... 106
COLLEGE APPLICATION ....................... 109
i


Telephone Directory
Admissions Center....................... 556-2481
Computer Labs........................... 556-2497
Arts and Humanities..................... 556-2473
Auraria Book Center..................... 556-3230
Auraria Interfaith Center............... 556-8591
Auraria Library......................... 556-2741
Auraria Parking and Transportation ..... 556-8493
Business and Governmental Studies ...... 556-2487
Business Office......................... 556-3625
Campus Recreation ...................... 556-3210
Center for the Physically Disadvantaged.. 556-3300
Child Development Center ............... 556-3634
Community Relations .................... 556-3380
Continuing Education ................... 556-3356
Cooperative Education .................. 556-2413
Developmental Studies .................. 556-8455
Educational Planning and Advising....... 556-2481
Evening Center ............................. 556-2481
Financial Aid .............................. 556-2420
Health and Human Services................... 556-2472
Human Resource Center....................... 830-0920
International Student Services.............. 556-2481
Learning Development Center................. 556-2497
Minority Student Services................... 556-2481
President of CCD ........................... 556-2411
Refugee Student Services.................... 556-2481
Registration and Records.................... 556-2430
Science and Technology...................... 556-2460
Student Activities.......................... 556-2597
Technical Education Center.................. 289-2243
Testing Center.............................. 556-3810
Veteran's Office............................ 556-2452
Vice President for Instruction.............. 556-2414
Vice President for Student Services......... 556-2413
1988-89 Calendar
Summer 1988
Orientation-Registration Classes Begin Independence Day Classes End
May 23-27 May 31 July 4 August 5
Fall 1988
Orientation-Registration Classes Begin Labor Day- No Classes Thanksgiving Holiday Classes End
August 15-1S August 2< September 5 November 24-25 December 5
Spring 1989
Orientation-Registration Classes Begin Spring Break Classes End
January 9-13 January 17 March 20-24 May 8
n


1-25 Northbound Exit No. 21OA
Information Booth
Historic Buildings
SUMMER 1986
L\
ifi
Community College of Denver
at Auraria Higher Education Center
Visitor Parking Lot G


Guide to
Degrees and Certificates
DEGREE PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS (A.A.)
University Parallel, Transfer Program
Art History
Behavioral Sciences Music
Communications Political Science
Economics
ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE (A.S.)
University Parallel, Transfer Program
Biology Mathematics
Chemistry Medical Cluster
Computer Science Physics
Pre-Engineering
ASSOCIATE OF GENERAL STUDIES (A.G.S.)
University Parallel, Transfer Program
Public Administration Business
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE (A.A.S.)
Accounting Airframe/Power Plant Commercial Art Computer Programming for Business Drafting
Drafting for Industry Drafting for Civil/Topographical Mapping
Drafting for Petro/Chemical Piping Processes Early Childhood Education and Management Electronics Technology General Electronics Biomedical Equipment Environmental and Refrigeration Technology Commercial/lndustrial Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning Major Appliance Repair
Graphic Arts Human Services Financial Services Banking Credit Union Savings and Loan Management Marketing Nursing Paralegal Photography
Radiologic Health Sciences Nuclear Medicine Radiation Therapy Radiologic Technology Radiography Secretarial and Administrative Support Occupations Administrative Assistant Legal Secretarial Medical Secretarial General Secretarial Word Processing


CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Accounting/Business Bookkeeping Clerk (TEC)
Chemical Operator (TEC)
Commercial Art Production Computer Graphics Computer Programming for Business Computer Training for the Handicapped Cooperative Education (TEC)
Drafting for Industry (Auraria & TEC)
Early Childhood Education Social Services Licensing Child Development Associate (Competency-Based Certificate) Electronics Technology Basic Electronics Solid State Theory Digital Fundamentals Troubleshooting Microcomputer Systems Biomedical Technician Environmental & Refrigeration Technology Commercial/lndustrial Refrigeration Heating and Air Conditioning Major Appliance Repair Financial Services Foreign Automotive Mechanics
Electrical Systems Brake System Steering System Transmission Engine Conditioning Graphic Arts
Machine Tool Operator (TEC)
Nuclear Medicine Technology Nursing (L.P.N.)
Paralegal
Photography
Radiation Therapy Technology Secretarial and Administrative Support Occupations General Clerical Medical Secretarial Office Secretary (TEC)
Records & File Clerk (TEC) Stenographic Word Processing Supervisory Management Surgical Technology Travel and Hospitality Hospitality & Restaurant Management Travel and Tourism Agent Travel and Tourism Management Welding and Fabrication (TEC)
ACCREDITATION
Community College of Denver is accredited by the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The Nursing Program is accredited by the Colorado State Board of Nursing. The following programs are accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation (CAHEA):
Nuclear Medicine Technology Radiation Therapy Technology Radiologic Technology Surgical Technology
Joint Review Committee on Education for
Nuclear MedicineTechnology
Joint Review Committee on Education for
RadiationTherapy Technology
Joint Review Committee on Education for
RadiologicTechnology
Joint Review Committee on Education for
Surgical Technology
Community College of Denver is a member of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges.
VI


CCD Guarantees
GUARANTEE OF TRANSFER CREDIT
The Community College of Denver guarantees to its degree graduates the transferability of course credits to Colorado colleges or universities (as identified and defined in the CCD Transfer Guide), or the Community College will refund the tuition of non-transferring courses.
Agreements between Colorado's Community/Junior Colleges and Colorado's four-year colleges and universities (as identified in the CCD Transfer Guide) guarantee to CCD's Associate of Arts and Associate of Science graduates the transferability of CCD's general education core program to fulfill lower division general education requirements.
SPECIAL CONDITIONS_____________________
Transfer Credit
Transferability means the acceptance of credits toward a degree. Classes must be identified as transferable in transfer guides dated 1988-89 or later.
Limitations on total number of credits accepted in transfer, grades required, and duration of transferability apply as stated in the Transfer Guide.
The formal agreements with Colorados public four year colleges and universities for the transfer of the core will become effective in the fall of 1989. Please refer to the Transfer Guide for details.
GUARANTEE OF JOB COMPETENCY
Any Associate of Applied Science graduate judged by his/her employer to be lacking in the technical job skills identified as exit competencies for his/her specific degree program will be provided up to nine
tuition-free credit hours of additional skill training under the conditions of the guarantee policy.
SPECIAL CONDITIONS____________________________
Job Competency
The graduate must have earned the A.A.S. degree beginning May 1990 or thereafter in an occupational program identified in the college catalog.
The graduate must have completed the A.A.S. degree at CCD (with a majority of the credits being earned at CCD) and must have completed the degree within a four-year time span.
Graduates must be employed full-time in an area directly related to the area of program concentration as certified by the Job Placement Office.
Employment must commence within 12 months of graduation.
The employer must certify in writing that the employee is lacking entry-level skills identified by CCD as the employee's program competencies and must specify the areas of deficiency within 90 days of the graduate's initial employment.
The employer, graduate, division dean, job placement counselor and appropriate faculty member will develop a written educational plan for retraining.
Retraining will be limited to nine credit hours related to the identified skill deficiency and to those classes regularly scheduled during the period covered by the retraining plan.
All retraining must be completed within a calendar year from the time the educational plan is agreed upon.
The graduate and/or employer is responsible for the cost of books, insurance, uniforms, fees and other course-related expenses.
The guarantee does not imply that the graduate will pass any licensing or qualifying examination for a particular career.
Students sole remedy against CCD and its employees for skill deficiencies shall be limited to nine credit hours of tuition-free education under conditions described above.
vii




General Information
COLLEGE PHILOSOPHY
The Community College of Denver is a comprehensive, student- oriented urban college, providing open access to a diverse population.
Believing that the opportunity for life-long education and personal development should be accessible to all who seek it, the College pledges open admissions and supportive services to every individual who can profit from instruction.
Believing that educated citizens will make a significant and positive impact on a local community and local economy, the College strives for excellence in transfer education and occupational programs, pledges a sensitivity to the changing needs of area employers and seeks new and effective ways of extending its campus throughout its service area.
COLLEGE MISSION
The College shares a campus, the Auraria Higher Education Center, with Metropolitan State College and the University of Colorado at Denver. Among the Auraria institutions, the Community College of Denver pledges responsibility for the following:
Transfer courses for students pursuing a baccalaureate degree;
Occupational programs for those seeking job-entry skills or upgrading;
General education;
Remedial instruction and developmental studies;
Continuing education and community services;
GED preparation; and,
Cooperative inter-institutional programs for personal and career advancement.
HISTORY
In September, 1970, the college opened its doors, operating in several rented buildings in central Denver. Since that time the Community College of Denver (CCD) has provided the core city with education conveniently close to home.
In December of 1975, CCD moved to its present site downtown, sharing location and facilities with Metropolitan State College and the University of Colorado at Denver on the Auraria campus.
While the Auraria Higher Education Center is new in concept, the site historically has been intertwined with the development of Denver. In the mid-nineteenth century, the news of gold brought thousands of fortune-seekers to Denver City." Many settled where the waters of Cherry Creek tumbled into the Platte River, while other prospectors struck roots in a part of the settlement called Auraria.
Much of the heritage of the original site has been preserved to co-exist with 17 modern buildings, designed to accommodate over 33,000 students. A cluster of 16 restored Victorian-era buildings are the campus hub. St. Cajetan's, a mission-style structure, is now the campus auditorium. The oldest standing structure in Denver, Emmanuel Gallery, displays modern student
art. Preserving the flavor of yesteryear, the landmark Tivoli Brewery, adjacent to the campus, has been restored into an elegant shopping center.
CCD is within walking distance of Larimer Square and downtown Denver; Mile High Stadium, home of the NFL Broncos; McNichols Sports Arena, home of the NBA Nuggets; Currigan Exhibition Hall; and, the Denver Center for the Performing Arts.
CCD is the only community college within the city limits of Denver, one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the United States. Rapidly developing energy, aerospace, engineering and high-tech industries have supplanted gold as a lure, but the pioneering spirit remains in the Queen City of the Rockies". Tourism, a major Colorado industry, attracts 4 million visitors a year to the Denver area and the nearby Rocky Mountains.
NOTICE OF
NONDISCRIMINATION
Community College of Denver does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, sex, age or handicap in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its educational programs or activities. Inquiries concerning Title VI, TITLE IX and Section 504 may be referred to Lillian Hunsaker, Director of Student Development, Box 203, Community College of Denver, 1111 W. Colfax, Denver, CO 80204 (556-3300) or to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1961 Stout Street, Denver, CO 80294.
APPROVAL
The operation of Community College of Denver is approved by the State of Colorado. All programs are approved by the Colorado State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education. In addition, the Colorado Commission on Higher Education reviews and approves all programs leading to the associate degree.
General
Information
Page
1
1


Student Services
Student
Services
Page
2
Community College of Denver offers a broad array of student services. These are supplemented by the Au-raria Student Assistance Center, a shared campus facility. Student support services all have one goal to increase students' access to quality education and help them achieve their educational objectives.
EDUCATIONAL PLANNING AND ADVISING CENTER
The Community College of Denver believes that advising is an integral factor in a student's success. Advising includes the exploration of life and career goals, an examination of academic and career skills, and the selection of instructional programs and courses. Both the student and the advisor are active participants and share responsibility for the advising process.
The Educational Planning and Advising Center is the first contact many students have with the college. Its purpose is to help students plan their college work and also to assist students in removing barriers which interfere with their abilities to be successful in school.
The Educational Planning and Advising Center assists new students with the admissions process, conducts orientation sessions, provides information on and interpretation of assessment programs, and advises students who have not declared a major on programs and courses.
Advisors have a wide range of knowledge of community and campus resources which students may want to utilize.
All new students are encouraged to contact the Educational Planning and Advising Center. Special advisors assist refugee and international students, as well as single parents.
Career advising is available on an individual or small group basis. Interest inventories, career assessment tools, and computerized occupational information are utilized. The Educational Planning and Advising Center is located in the South Classroom Building, Room 134. The phone is 556-2481.
EVENING CENTER
The Evening Center attempts to meet the needs of students who are unable to come to the college during daytime business hours. The Evening Center provides information about the college, assists students with the admissions/registration process, and can arrange for consultation with faculty advisors.
Students needing career counseling or advising on a specific program should make an appointment before coming to the Center. The Evening Center is located in Room 134 of the South Classroom Building. The phone number is 556-2481.
EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY CENTER
The Educational Opportunity Center is a community service program providing educational planning information and assistance services:
career exploration counseling;
college/university admission coaching;
vocational-technical school enrollment assistance;
academic assessment coordination;
federal and state student financial aid advising, and
educational planning workshops.
This service is free and is located at 1391 Speer Blvd., 5th floor, Suite 550. Please call 629-9226 for an appointment.
WOMEN'S SUPPORT TEAM
The Women's Support Team provides information and support services, counseling and seminars for women and all single heads-of-households. Special programs and assistance are available for displaced homemakers, women in crisis, and women in need of career assessment, educational planning and financial aid/s-cholarship information. For further information, contact the Women's Support Team in the South Classroom Building, Room 134, or call 556-2481.
CCD CHILD DEVELOPMENT LAB SCHOOL
The Community College of Denver Child Development Center provides a program in Early Childhood that addresses the intellectual, physical, social, emotional and affective aspects of learning.
Two separate preschool sessions are offered for children 2 Vi- 6 years of age. Children may attend one or both sessions: 8:30-11:30 a.m. or 12:30-3:30 p.m. The Center is open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuition costs are $30 per session per week, or $60 per week for two full sessions per day.
The center, licensed by Colorado State Social Services, provides an enriched cognitive approach to individualized learning for each child, and provides a meaningful foundation for life-long learning. Pre-kindergarten experiences are presented in a variety of modes for children who are developmentally ready. Pre-registration is suggested. Call 556-2439 or 556-2466, between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m., for more information.
VETERAN AFFAIRS OFFICE
Funded through the Veterans Cost of Instruction Payments Program (U.S. Office of Education), this office provides comprehensive service to veteran students, as well as to veterans in the community. The program was established to enable Vietnam era veterans to use their VA and other federal, state and community benefits, and to aid the educational institutions in meeting the Vietnam era veterans' special needs.
Services available include: information about veterans benefits federal, state and community; assistance with VA inquiries; and, referral for emergency food, clothing, housing, legal aid and employment. The Veteran Affairs Office is located in the South Classroom Building, Room 133, 556-2452.
2


CENTER FOR THE
PHYSICALLY
DISADVANTAGED
Students with disabilities (including the learning disabled and those with physical, sensory and temporary disabilities) are encouraged to contact the Center for the Physically Disadvantaged (CPD), regarding free services to assist them at CCD. These include specialized career counseling and vocational assessment; academic advising and registration assistance; tutoring, classroom assistance and curriculum and test modification; consultation with instructors; text recording, note-taking and use of adaptive equipment; job development and placement assistance; handicapped parking and campus orientation; sign language and oral interpreting; liaison with rehabilitation agencies and other Colorado post- secondary institutions; and, housing and transportation information. CPD is located in the South Classroom Building, Room 134. For more information of CPD and other resources listed, call 556-2481.
In addition to CPD, other resources at the college which are useful to students with disabilities are the College for Living, the Computer Training for the Handicapped Program, the Learning Development Center, the Special Learning Support Program and the microcomputer laboratories. Also, the Colorado Division of Rehabilitation has an office on the Auraria campus.
Community College of Denver complies with and fully supports Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, with amendments of 1974, regarding nondiscrimination on the basis of handicap. Inquiries concerning Title VI, TITLE IX and Section 504 may be referred to Lillian Hunsaker, Director of Student Development, Box 203, Community College of Denver, 1111 W. Colfax, Denver, CO 80204 (556-3300) or to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1961 Stout Street, Denver, CO 80294.
VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES
This campus branch of the State of Colorado Department of Social Services assists disabled students in becoming fully employable and self-supporting. The office works cooperatively with the Center for the Physically Disadvantaged. Vocational rehabilitation services include job-seeking skills training, vocational testing and evaluation, vocational counseling, provision of occupational tools and materials and referral to additional sources of financial aid. The Division of Rehabilitation is located in the Arts Building, Room 177, 556- 2785.
CAREER SERVICES
CCD students have several opportunities to get help regarding their careers. Career exploration and planning is available through CCD's Educational Planning and Advising Center. Students may receive individual consultation or work in small groups. Interest inventories, career assessment, and computerized occupational information are available. The Educational Planning and Advising Center is located in Room 134, South Classroom Building. The phone number is 556-3474.
CCD students may also use the Auraria Student Assistance Center's Office of Career Services. Career planning, student employment and graduate placement are provided. Individual counseling, testing, workshops and resources are available to students and alumni in planning their careers. Listings of part-time and temporary jobs are available to currently enrolled students. Individual counseling, workshops, on-cam-pus interviews with employers, computerized job match and employer information are offered to graduating students and alumni. Schedules of workshops, on-campus interviews, and other activities are included in the Spotlight, a bi-monthly newsletter. The Office of Career Services is located in the Auraria Student Assistance Center, Arts Building, Room 177. The phone number is 556-3474.
CCD STUDENT ACTIVITIES
The Student Activities Office develops and implements programs and activities to meet the academic, social and recreational interests of the students and community.
Programs and activities offered through or supported by the Student Activities Office include the Student Government and student organizations, intramural and recreational activities and health services, social and cultural activities, student publications/new-spaper and student leadership training programs. These activities provide constructive experiences to stimulate personal growth and social development and add to the students' enjoyment of life.
Each student at the Community College of Denver is a member of the Association of Students at CCD and select its representative government. The Student Representative Council (SRC) acts as a voice for students in the administration and instructional programs of the college. It represents students on major committees, boards and councils of the college and the Auraria campus.
For information regarding the SRC, clubs and organizations, CCD special events, or other student activity related items, contact the Student Activities office located on the first floor of the Auraria Student Center; room 153D; 556-2597.
Student
Services
Page
3
JOB PLACEMENT
The Colorado Job Service Center, located in the South Classroom Building, Room 134, staffs a counselor on campus to assist students. Job placement assistance also is available in the Career Services Office in the Auraria Student Assistance Center in the Arts Building, Room 177. For more information, contact the Education Planning and Advising Center, South Classroom Building, Room 134, or call 556-3302.
ACCIDENT INSURANCE
An accident and sickness insurance plan is available to students at reasonable cost. Applications for students and their dependents are provided at the time of registration. Brochures are available in the Student Health Services Office of the Student Center, the Student Activities Office, Student Center, Room 153, and the Education Planning and Advising Center, South Classroom Building, Room 134.
3


Auraria Campus Facilities
Auraria
Campus
Facilities
Page
4
STUDENT CENTER
The Auraria Student Center is a focal point for students and staff, combining campus services with service to the surrounding community, and encouraging exchanges of ideas and interests through a number of activities.
The Auraria Student Center manages the food services on campus and Auraria Book Center, and houses the student activities, clubs and organization offices. Student Center food services offer a wide variety of items guaranteed to satisfy any food craving. The cafeteria serves breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as snacks for in between classes. The garden level Larimer Street Mission features Mexican food, chicken, pizza, a char grill and beer, and becomes a relaxing outdoor cafe in the summer.
The fireplace, TV, and general study lounges offer opportunities for relaxation. Billiards, arcade games, outdoor patio and beer are just a few of the features of the Gameroom. ID cards also may be obtained here.
The Auraria Book Center, located on the garden level of the Student Center, sells all required class texts, general books and supplies, including art and engineering materials. Information is available by calling 556-3230. Candy, magazines and other articles may be purchased at the Convenience Store, which includes a photo copy center.
Across from the Convenience Store is the Postal Center which has a package drop and scales, and a stamp machine. Down the hall is the MSC Health Clinic, free to all MSC students and available to other students for a small fee. Also on the garden level are electronic banking services, RTD bus schedules and housing information.
The Student Center Administrative Office is located on the second floor, Room 210. The office operates a lost and found, magazine checkout and other student services such as pop machine refunds and club key checkout and locker assignments. Several special programs are co-sponsored by the Student Center and the CCD Student Activities Office each year. Family Night, an annual carnival event attracting four thousand participants, takes place in April.
The southwest wing of the Student Center houses offices for over 30 clubs and organizations of the Auraria institutions. The Student Activities Office, Room 153, offers support services and develops a myriad of extra-curricular student activities. (See page 3)
HEALTH SERVICES
CCD students may use the MSC Student Health Clinic, an accessible out-patient health care clinic.
The Student Health Clinic provides direct, confidential health care services that stress wellness and preventative medicine. The Student Health Clinic is located in the Student Center, room 140, 556-2525.
AURARIA LIBRARY
CCD students are fortunate to have access to the Auraria Library, which serves all three colleges and houses up-to-date, comprehensive collections and modern services. The Auraria Library provides a wide variety of learning resources for students and faculty. The library has over 560,000 volumes of books, microforms and bound periodicals, and over 1,700 current periodical and newspaper subscriptions. In addition, as a member of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, the Auraria Library has access to an additional six million volumes through inter-library loans. Students are encouraged to take a 50 minute, self-guided, audiotape tour of the library to become familiar with the services and resources available. Special services offered by the library include computerized bibliographic searchers, library orientation and instruction for groups and individuals, a depository of U.S. and Colorado government publications and media listening and viewing facilities. Rooms for individual study, group conferences and typing are available. For information about library hours, call 556-2740.
CAMPUS RECREATION______________________
Campus Recreation offers unique opportunities to develop athletic skills, leadership abilities, and team spirit through recreation activities. Drop-in Activities, Intramural Programs, Special Events, Club Sports and an Outdoor Adventure Program provides an opportunity for the student's involvement.
Major campus attractions include noon-hour aerobics, swimming pool, weight room and handball/rac-quetball courts. The Outdoor Adventure Program offers a variety of one-day and multi-day trips for wind surfing, skiing, snow-shoeing, bicycling, cross- country skiing and ice sailing. The Intramural Program includes touch football, basketball, racquetball, tennis, 3-on- 3 basketball, floor hockey, volleyball and innertube water polo. Club Sports provides a high level of competition in rugby, LaCrosse, Tae Kwon Do, weight lifting, soccer, football, karate, skiing and volleyball. Room 108 of the Physical Education and Recreation (PER) building is the campus recreation hub. Stop by for semester schedules, to make handball/racquet-ball reservations, check out equipment, or check in for activities. Call 556-3210 for further information.
AURARIA STUDENT ASSISTANCE CENTER
Auraria Higher Education Center offers a broad range of programs and services to Auraria students, including an information and referral service, career services, international programs, off-campus housing, vocational rehabilitation services. Prearranged tours of the campus are also available. For more information, visit or call the Auraria Student Assistance Center, Arts Building, Room 177, 556-3474.
4


ROTC INFORMATION____________________
Community College of Denver students may participate in two Army ROTC programs that lead to a commission in the active Army, the Army Reserve, or the Colorado National Guard.
CCD students may participate through inter-institutional registration in the ROTC program. For specific information contact: Department of Military Science, Metropolitan State College, Box 93, Denver, CO 80204, or call 556-3491.
INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
Located in the Auraria Student Assistance Center, the office assists international students from some 80 countries, providing support services and helping bridge any campus cultural gaps. Services include: counseling on immigration transactions; host family accommodations; support for personal adjustment; acculturation and peer interaction; newsletter; postadmissions follow-up; and, liaison with consulates, missions, embassies and foreign organizations. The office also provides information to those U.S. students who want to study abroad.
OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING SERVICES
This office helps students locate housing and roommate wanted situations. Full-time students also are eligible to be referred to live in a residence hall at a local residential college campus. Off-Campus Housing Services is located in the Auraria Student Assistance Center, Arts Building, Room 177.
AURARIA CHILD CARE CENTER
Providing child care for students, faculty and staff on the Auraria campus, the Auraria Child Care Center is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services. Space is available for 30 toddlers, aged 18 months to 3 years, and 120 children, aged 3 to 8 years. Professional staff provide a toddler, preschool and state certified kindergarten program. Information may be obtained by calling 556-3188.
INTERFAITH MINISTRY_____________________
The Auraria Interfaith Ministry (AIM) is a cooperative endeavor of several church denominations. AIM provides program and counseling services and promotes a church-campus partnership to support individual spiritual growth. The AIM offices are located in the St. Francis Center. Call 556-8591 for more detail.
PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
Auraria students, faculty and staff can choose from three parking options: monthly permit; daily fee; or, hourly rate in visitor lots.
Permits, sold at the Parking Office, may be purchased month to month or for a semester. If choosing to pay a daily fee, commuters must also purchase an "Auraria Vehicle Registration Decal" at the Parking Office. Visitor lot parking does not require a permit or decal. The Parking Office is located at 1250 7th Street, 556-8493.
Monthly lot fees range from $15 to $30. A discount, except for Lot CA, is offered if a parking permit for three or more months is purchased. Fees in the daily lots range from $1 to $1.50 per day. The Vehicle Registration Decal required to park in the daily fee lots is $3 each semester, and can be purchased at the Parking Office upon presentation of a current Auraria identification card and state vehicle registration. In order to obtain a decal for a vehicle registered in someone else's name, the registered owner must complete a permission form (available at the Parking Office).
TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS
1. Park Free at Mile High Stadium and take a Trolley Ride to the Auraria Student Center. The Auraria Trolley costs 25 cents with a current campus identification card. The trolley runs every 15 minutes from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday-Friday, during the fall and spring semesters.
2. Park at the Denver Arts Center garage (13th and Arapahoe) for the reduced fee of $2 daily. Only vehicles displaying a current Auraria vehicle registration decal receive this discount.
3. Rideshare to campus. Contact the Campus Transportation Coordinator at 556-3640 for information on carpooling and other transportation alternatives.
4. Catch The Ride. RTD now offers student discounted monthly bus passes, which can be purchased at the Auraria Convenience Store upon presentation of a current campus identification card.
5. The Auraria Evening Express, an on-campus shuttle bus, provides free rides to and from classroom buildings and Auraria parking lots. The Express runs Monday through Thursday from 4:30 to 10:30 p.m. "On-call" service is available by contacting the Parking Office. Wait time usually is no longer than 10 minutes. For service, call 556-3257 or ext. 3257 from an on-campus extension.
6. Handicapped and temporarily disabled persons may make arrangements with the Parking Office for the special HANDIVAN campus pick-up service. Service is available Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. If prior arrangements for the HANDIVAN have not been made, 45 minutes advance notice is requested. For information or service, call 556-3257 or ext. 3257 from an on-campus extension.
WEEKEND PARKING
From 6 p.m. Friday until 6 a.m. Monday, persons who have current Auraria vehicle registration decals or monthly permits may park free in designated Auraria lots. Only selected lots are open on weekends. Bronco home game parking and special events may require special fees. Handicapped and loading zone parking regulations are enforced at all times.
Auraria
Campus
Facilities
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Admissions and Transfers of Credit
Admissions and Transfers of Credit
Page
6
ADMISSION POLICY
Admission to the college is open to high school graduates, those who have been awarded GED (General Education Development) certificates, and non-graduates who are 16 years of age or older.
Enrollment in a particular course or program of study may depend on minimum competency standards. Some programs have mandatory placement standards. Please see an advisor.
All applications must be sul mitted and approved before you can take part in assessment, advising and registration.
ADMISSION PROCEDURE
1. All new students must submit an official Applica-tion for Admission, available in this catalog.
If you plan to receive a degree or certificate, and you want previous college credits transferred, submit official copies of college transcripts to the Registrar's Office no later than the semester preceding the final term of graduation. Veterans using VA Benefits must submit transcripts of all previous post- secondary education and training no later than 30 days after the beginning of the first semester of attendance. The college may request your transcripts at any time.
2. All new students' basic skills are measured before registration. Your advisor will use this information to help you plan your studies. Call 556-2497, 556-8455 or 556-2481 for information.
3. You should declare your program major on the Application for Admission form. If you are undecided about a major, contact the Educational Planning and Advising Center for help.
4. Enrollment after the 12th day of the semester is limited to open entry/open exit," self-paced, short-term and modular courses.
5. If you are a high school student, under age 18 and presently attending high school, you should:
a. Make arrangements through a high school counselor for certification credit;
b. Complete an Application for Admission form which is available from the Admissions Center; and,
c. Submit the special Underage Student Application.
6. If you are an International Student (on an F1 visa) you are eligible for enrollment in CCD, under Federal law. You are required to submit the following documents:
d. An Application for Admission;
e. One copy of an official, certified English Translation, high school, college or equivalent transcript;
f. A statement of financial resources sufficient to provide for staying in the United States; and,
g. Evidence of proficiency in the English language as documented by the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), with a minimum score of 475, or an equivalent score on the college's Institutional Student Placement Test (ISPT). If you are admitted with the ISPT, you must score 475 on the TOEFL exam by the end of the second semester. Other validated evidence of English language proficiency may be accepted in lieu of the TOEFL. You may submit other evidence of English proficiency or have your proficiency validated through the Community College of Denver assessment program.
You will not be issued Form 1-20A until all of the above documents are on file with the International Student Advisor, and a decision of admission has been made. Please allow sufficient time for gathering and submitting all required documentation so that an admissions decision might be made before the beginning of the term for which admission is sought.
International students and students with Visitor Visas (B-1, B-2) also must comply with the following:
h. The Basic Skills Assessment and the International Student Placement Test are required for all international students. You will be required to follow the placement recommendations indicated as a result of assessment; b. You are expected to comply with U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service Regulations; c. If you are here on a F-2 Visa, you must take the Basic Skills Assessment, and you will be subject to mandatory class placement as a result of the assessment; d. You are required to pay out-of-state tuition and fees in full at the time of registration, or make acceptable arrangements with the Business Office;
6


and, e. The Academic Standards of Progress Policy applies to all students.
7. If you are a former student, returning after an absence of one or more semesters (summer term excepted), you must make Application for Admission. If you have attended other colleges since attending CCD you must submit all college transcripts, if you wish to have the credit considered for transfer to CCD.
All documents become the property of the college and will not be released to the student or transferred to other institutions. Your registration depends upon CCD's receiving all required documents.
TRANSFERRING CREDIT TO CCD
1. If you are transferring credit to CCD, contact the Educational Planning and Advising Center for transcript evaluation. Transcripts will not be evaluated on registration days, and the college will not accept "D" grades in transfer.
2. CCD reserves the right to evaluate all credits. In the event that course work is found to be obsolete, you may be required to update the credit.
CCD allows you to challenge the need to take courses by taking special exams or earning credit for prior learning, or both. (See below)
3. CCD will accept transfer credit only from accredited post- secondary institutions. Transfer credit may be accepted from other institutions approved by the Colorado Community Colleges and Occupational Education System (CCCOES) as a result of special agreements between CCD and those institutions. Education) approved institutions as a result of special agreements between CCD and those institutions.
Cooperative Programs with Emily Griffith Opportunity School
CCD provides advance placement status in various programs to students with credits from many Emily Griffith programs. See your advisor for details.
CREDIT FOR PRIOR LEARNING
If you are enrolled at CCD you can earn credit for college equivalent education, acquired through earlier schooling, work, or other life experiences. Such prior learning must be comparable to Community College of Denver courses or curricula and must relate to your educational objectives.
You may document prior learning through any of the following: military courses, selected CLEP and ACT examinations, Challenge Examinations or Portfolio of Learning Outcomes.
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Community College of Denver recognizes the CLEP examination as well as selected subject examinations. Up to 26 hours of college credit may be awarded through the CLEP general examinations. Additional credit may be earned by attaining successful scores on CLEP subject examinations.
Challenge Examinations Currently enrolled students may challenge courses. Only one challenge of a particular course will be arranged during any one semester.
Portfolio of Learning Outcomes Currently enrolled students may petition for credit by developing a portfolio that describes and documents pertinent learning comparable to that available in Community College of Denver courses. A faculty committee in the appropriate program area will evaluate the portfolio and award commensurate credit. Only one portfolio evaluation for a particular course will be arranged during any one semester.
For more details on Credit for Prior Learning arrangements, contact the Educational Planning and Advising Center, 556-3302.
TRANSFERABILITY OF CREDIT TO FOUR-YEAR INSTITUTIONS
If you are attending the Community College of Denver to prepare for transfer to a four-year college or university, familiarize yourself with the general education requirements of that institution. Since graduation requirements vary among institutions, it is important to obtain assistance from an advisor in planning a transferable program of study. Students intending to transfer to another institution should see an advisor in the Educational Planning and Advising Center, SO 134. A Transfer Guide to Colorado colleges and universities is available in the Educational Planning and Advising Center.
In addition, each major field of study at a particular institution has specific course requirements. It is extremely important for you to follow a prescribed transfer program (recommended by an advisor) in order to make a smooth transition to the four-year college or university.
Admissions and Transfers of Credit
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Tuition, Fees and Refunds
Tuition Fees and Refunds
Page
8
TUITION POLICY
Tuition is determined by the change. Resident Colorado Community Colleges and Occupational Education System and is subject to Nonresident
Credit Hours Tuition Fees Total Credit Hours Tuition Fees Total
1 34.00 5.00 39.00 1 136.00 5.00 141.00
2 68.00 10.00 78.00 2 272.00 10.00 282.00
3 102.00 15.00 117.00 3 408.00 15.00 423.00
4 136.00 20.00 156.00 4 544.00 20.00 564.00
5 170.00 25.00 195.00 5 680.00 25.00 705.00
6 204.00 30.00 234.00 6 816.00 30.00 846.00
7 238.00 35.00 273.,00 7 952.00 35.00 987.00
8 272.00 40.00 312.00 8 1,088.00 40.00 1,128.00
9 306.00 45.00 351.00 9 1,224.00 45.00 1,269.00
10 340.00 50.00 390.00 10 1,360.00 50.00 1,410.00
11 374.00 55.00 429.00 11 1,496.00 55.00 1,551.00
12 390.00 60.00 450.00 12 1,632.00 60.00 1,692.00
13 390.00 60.00 450.00 13 1,632.00 60.00 1,692.00
14 390.00 60.00 450.00 14 1,632.00 60.00 1,692.00
15 390.00 60.00 450.00 15 1,632.00 60.00 1,692.00
16 390.00 60.00 450.00 16 1,632.00 60.00 1,692.00
17 390.00 60.00 450.00 17 1,632.00 60.00 1,692.00
18 390.00 60.00 450.00 18 1,632.00 60.00 1,692.00
19 424.00 60.00 484.00 19 1,768.00 60.00 1,828.00
20 458.00 60.00 518.00 20 1,904.00 60.00 1,964.00
Rates Subject To Change Without Advance Notice
Residents taking more than 18 credit hours must pay $34.00 for each additional hour. Nonresidents taking more than 18 credit hours must pay $136.00 for each additional hour.
Bad Check Fee $15.00
Complete payment of tuition and fees is necessary for enrollment and permission to attend class.
RESIDENCY CLASSIFICATION FOR TUITION PURPOSES
At the time of application for admission, you are classified for tuition purposes as either an in-state or out-of-state resident, according to provisions of Colorado law.
If you have been classified as a non-resident and can provide further information to qualify as a resident, obtain and complete a petition form for in-state status from the Registrar's office.
It is your responsibility to ensure that petitions and all supportive documentation are submitted to the office of the Vice President for Student Services. The Office cannot assume responsibility for mailed petitions which arrive after the deadline. Petitions will not be accepted after the deadline.
The final decision regarding tuition status is determined by the Vice President for Student Services. Changes in classification will not occur after the published deadline, and petitions received after the deadline will not be considered until the following semester. Changes in classification, whether from out-of-state to in-state or the reverse, shall become effective at the time of the student's next registration. All questions regarding residency classification should be addressed to the Vice President for Student Services.
Military personnel on active duty in Colorado, and their dependents, are considered residents.
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TUITION POLICY FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
If you are an in-state resident 60 years or older, you may take regularly scheduled courses for credit provided you pay 50 percent of the tuition charges. If you do not wish credit, no tuition will be charged, and you may sit in a class on a space available basis. The student activity fee and the parking fee (if applicable) will be assessed only when you seek credit for a course. You must pay regular charges for community service noncredit offerings. The Registrar's Office in Room 133 of the South Classroom Building can provide further information.
FEES
All enrolled students will be asked to pay a student fee if taking classes on campus. This money is used for various student activities and benefits, including student publications, operation of student government, cultural activities, recreational activities, clubs and organizational activities. Student fees are also allocated to retire debt related to the construction of the Auraria Student Center and Child Care Center. Expenditure of student fee monies is made with the approval of the Student Government Association. Students enrolled in certain courses may be required to purchase individual supplies and materials, and to rent uniforms.
ADD/DROPAVITHDRAWAL
POLICY
Definitions:
Census date The census date for a standard course or a module course is that point when 15 percent of the class days of the term of the class have occurred. Census date for continuous enrollment courses is that point when 15 percent of the balance of the term from the date of registration has occurred.
Add An add occurs when a student enrolls in a class after the original registration.
Drop A drop occurs when a student officially exits a class prior to the appropriate census date.
Withdrawal A withdrawal occurs when a student exits from a class after the appropriate census date.
Note: the diference between a drop and a withdrawal is the time in which it occurs.
The final date to add or drop a course is a predetermined census date, noted in the current semester class schedule. Until the census date, students may add or drop classes and tuition will be recalculated. After census date, students may add a class only with the permission of the instructor, and students will be assessed the tuition and student fees of all added classes. After census date, students may not drop classes. Students may withdraw from classes after the census date, but they will not be eligible for refunds.
FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS OF STUDENTS
Payments for tuition, fees and books are due and payable on the published specified date, or at the time the obligations are incurred. Under unusual circum-
stances, or in emergencies, special payment arrangements may be considered and approved by the Business Office.
You are not considered officially registered" until your class schedule is processed by the Business Office.
WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURE
If a complete withdrawal is necessary, check with the Registrar's Office for the proper procedures, and to obtain the necessary forms. Withdrawal after the published add/drop deadline, as published in the class schedule, will result in a "W" grade on the student's transcript.
REFUND POLICY
To be eligible for tuition refunds, you must officially drop the credit hours and apply for the refund. The processing period is usually three to four weeks from the time a tuition refund request is made, to the time it actually is mailed.
There is no refund for credits beyond 12 hours, within the 12 to 18 hour credit range, if no additional tuition was paid for those credit hours. Otherwise refunds are made as follows:
1. 100 percent tuition and fees will be refunded for courses dropped between the day of registration and on, or before, the first day of the class.
2. A 75 percent refund of tuition only for total or partial withdrawal from the first day of classes through the published refund date (12th day of the term). No tuition or fee refund of less than $1 will be made.
3. No refund will be made after the 12th day of the term (census date). Also, no refunds will be made for courses concentrated into one (1) week or less.
4. You are entitled to a 100 percent refund of tuition and fees paid for any class(es) cancelled by the college. The college will initiate the refund process through the Registrar's Office.
5. Refunds to Open Entry courses will be made within the first 15 percent of the number of days left in the semester, from the day of registration.
Tuition Fees and Refunds
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Financial Aid
Financial Aid
10
APPLY EARLY
The Office of Financial Aid administers a full range of Federal and State financial aid programs to assist eligible students in meeting the cost of education at CCD. Financial Aid funds are limited, and students are encouraged to start the applications process several months before enrolling. The Office of Financial Aid publishes an information brochure detailing the financial aid program. Information/applications are available at the Office of Financial Aid, South Classroom Building, Room 135, or phone 556-2420.
STUDENT BUDGET
The cost of education at CCD includes tuition, fees, books and supplies. In addition, you may have expenses for room and board, transportation and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid establishes a standard student budget based on the estimated costs of living during the time of enrollment. Budgets are adjusted for the size of family, living arrangement (such as living with parents) and the length of enrollment. For 1988-89, the student monthly living allowance is as follows:
Single at home $280
Single away from home $600
Married $910
A child allowance of $180 per month is added for
each child living with the student.
ELIGIBILITY
Most types of financial aid are based on financial need as determined by the Office of Financial Aid. Financial need is the difference between the cost of attending the college and your available resources. Resources include parents' contributions, your earnings, spouse's earnings, Gl Bill, social security, vocational rehabilitation, welfare, unemployment, etc.
If you have earned an associate, baccalaureate, masters or other advanced degree you may not be eligible for some types of aid. If you are in this category, contact the Office of Financial Aid.
Applications for financial aid must be completed once each year to determine eligibility.
APPLICATION PROCEDURES
All applications are available at the Office of Financial Aid. To apply for grants, work-study employment and the Guaranteed Student Loan, complete the Family Financial Statement (FFS) from ACT and an institutional application. Loans and scholarships require a separate application.
Additional supporting documents may be requested by the Office of Financial Aid, such as Federal Income Tax Forms 1040A, 1040EZ and 1040, statements of welfare, social security, vocational rehabilitation benefits, employment, etc.
Priority in awarding financial aid will be given to students with completed applications on file by the following dates:
Summer 1988 April 1, 1988
Academic Year 1988-89 June 1, 1988
Spring 1989 December 1, 1988
Summer 1989 April 1, 1989
You are encouraged to submit applications early. Applications received after the priority dates will be considered based on the availability of funds.
REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTINUED FINANCIAL AID
Financial aid recipients must maintain satisfactory and measurable progress each semester. Full-time aid recipients must complete at least 12 credit hours per semester with a 2.0 grade point average to remain eligible.
Financial aid recipients may receive up to six semesters of financial assistance. For more detailed information contact the Office of Financial Aid, or refer to the "Financial Aid Information Booklet."
Students who have been denied aid, and think they have circumstances that may justify receiving financial assistance, you can file a written appeal.
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REPAYMENT POLICY
Students who withdraw during the semester may be required to repay a portion of the financial aid received. If tuition and fees were paid by financial aid funds, any refund will be returned to the financial aid account.
TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID
Grants and Work-Study
Pell Grant Pell Grants assist with educational expenses. Award amounts range up to $2,100 depending upon the cost of education. Approximately six weeks after applying, you will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR). All copies of the SAR must be brought, or mailed, to the Office of Financial Aid even if you are ineligible to receive a Pell Grant.
Colorado Student Grant (CSG) Grants are available to Colorado residents based on financial need. Awards range up to $2,000 per academic year.
Colorado Student Incentive Grant (CSIG) Grants are available on a need basis. The maximum award is $2,000 per year. The State of Colorado and the Federal Government each contribute 50 percent of the available funds.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)
Grants range from $200 to $2,000 depending on financial need.
Colorado Work-Study Program The Colorado Work-Study Program provides part-time employment opportunities for Colorado residents demonstrating financial need as defined by the college. Hourly rates start at Federal minimum wage.
College Work-Study The Federal work-study program provides part-time employment for students demonstrating financial need as defined by the college.
Colorado Work-Study (No-Need) The State of Colorado provides limited funds to employ students part-time who do not demonstrate financial need, and who are Colorado residents for tuition purposes. Hourly rates start at federal minimum wage.
SCHOLARSHIPS
Colorado Scholars Program Scholarships are available to Colorado residents who have completed a minimum of 12 credit hours at the college with at least a 3.0 grade point average in all courses attempted. Applications are available in the Office of Financial Aid. Scholarships are dependent upon the availability of funds. Award amounts range up to resident tuition and fees.
High school graduates with a 3.0 grade point average through fifth semester you can apply. A limited number of scholarship awards also are available to nonresident students.
EDUCATIONAL LOAN PROGRAMS
Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL) program provides loans to students at 8 percent interest per year. Undergraduate students in their freshman and sophomore year may borrow up to $2,625 per year, not to exceed an aggregate amount of $17,250 for their undergraduate studies. Loans have a six-month grace period after graduation or termination of at least half-time student status before payments are due. Guaranteed Student Loans are need-based. All applicants must first complete an ACT FFS.
Loans to Parents The maximum amount a parent of a dependent undergraduate student may borrow for any one student in any academic year is $4,000. The aggregate loan limit is $20,000. The interest rate is 12 percent per annum and the parent has up to ten years to repay the loan. Repayment starts 60 days after the issuance of the loan.
Supplemental Loans for Students (SLS) Independent students may borrow $4,000 per year through the SLS program. The aggregate loan limit is $20,000. Interest rates and repayment procedures are the same as the Plus Loan.
Financial Aid
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Student Conduct and Other College Policies
Student
Conduct and
Other
College
Policies
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STUDENT CONDUCT
Admission implies a recognition that the student should respect the rights of others, and observe moral and civil laws. Interference with the normal processes of education in the classroom or elsewhere on the campus will be regarded as unacceptable conduct, warranting suspension or dismissal.
Community College Council has approved a document which contains a definition of education, a joint statement on rights, freedoms and responsibilities of students, and rules of procedure in student disciplinary matters. This document provides guidelines necessary to ensure the rights of all members of the college community, including the right to secure educational benefits and services without regard to sex, race, national origin, religion, handicap or age. The college has a specific "due process" procedure. A copy is available in the Student Activities Offices and in the Office of the Vice President for Student Services.
A student enrolling in the college assumes an obligation to conduct him/herself in a manner compatible with the College's objectives. Regulations of the College are based upon respect for the rights of others and observance of civil law and current moral standards. On-campus conduct for which students are subject to discipline falls into the following categories:
a. Dishonesty, such as cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information to the College.
b. Forgery, alteration or misuse of college documents, records or identification.
c. Obstruction or disruption of teaching, administration, disciplinary procedures, or other college activities, including its public service functions, or of other authorized activities on college premises.
d. Physical abuse of any person on college-owned or controlled property, or at college-sponsored or supervised functions, or conduct which threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person as expressly prohibited by law.
e. Theft of or damage to property of the College or of a member of the College community or campus visitor.
f. Unauthorized entry to or use of College facilities.
g. Violation of college policies concerning the registration of student organizations and the use of college facilities.
h. Use, possession or distribution of controlled substances, except as expressly permitted by law.
i. Disorderly conduct or lewd, indecent or obscene conduct or expression on college-owned or controlled property, or at college-sponsored or supervised functions.
RIGHTS OF THE COLLEGE
Community College of Denver reserves the right to change provisions, requirements and fees in this catalog. Without notice, CCD may cancel any course or program or change its content, description, timing, availability, location, academic credit, or any other aspect.
CCD also reserves broad rights with respect to student withdrawal for health reasons and for reasons having to do with established policies and procedures. Any student whose conduct is unsatisfactory may be put on probation. Any admission on the basis of false documents or statements may be grounds for a student's dismissal and loss of all credit for work completed.
FAMILY EDUCATION RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT OF 1974
Annually, CCD informs students of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended. This Act was designed to protect the privacy of education records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their education records and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings.
Students have the right to file complaints with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA), concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.
The CCD policy explains, in detail, the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the Act's provisions. Copies of the policy are available from the Registrar's Office and the office of the Vice President of Student Services. The Registrar's and Student Service's offices also maintain a Directory of Records which lists all educational records maintained on students by CCD.
Questions concerning the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Registrar's Office.
STUDENT INFORMATION AND MESSAGES
CCD will not release registration information, including student's class location, to non-college personnel. Students who wish to be reached on campus, should provide a copy of their schedule to a friend, family member or CCD Child Development Lab School or Auraria Child Care Center.
Emergency student messages may be telephoned into the Vice President for Student Service's Office between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. at 556-2413. Messages will be delivered between classes, as time and personnel allow.
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Academic Standards
ATTENDANCE
Regular class attendance is necessary if a student is to obtain maximum benefits from instruction. Students are expected to comply with the attendance policy as set by individual instructors and divisions.
COURSE LOAD
The normal course load is 15 credit hours. Students who are registered for fewer than 12 credit hours are regarded as part- time students.
Eighteen (18) credit hours is considered a heavy load. Twenty (20) credit hours is the maximum load for all students without special permission.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS OF PROGRESS
The purpose of this policy is to foster the progress of individuals who are able to profit from instruction. The student must demonstrate acceptable academic progress.
1. A student is required to maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 for all course work attempted.
2. A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below the required 2.0 and who has earned six or more credit hours will be placed on academic probation for the following term of enrollment.
3. A student who fails to raise the cumulative GPA to 2.0 by the end of the probationary instructional term will be placed on academic suspension for a minimum of one term.
4. A student placed on academic suspension will be required to meet with the Vice President of Student Services to determine eligibility for continued enrollment.
5. A student who wishes to appeal suspension may appeal to the Suspension Review Board. Decisions of the Suspension Review Board are final.
APPEAL PROCEDURE
Students wishing to appeal academic suspension, or seeking information about the appeal procedure, should contact the Office of the Vice-President for Student Services, 556-2413.
VETERAN'S ACADEMIC STANDARDS OF PROGRESS
The following policy applies to all student veterans and other eligible persons receiving VA benefits.
1. Grade Point Requirements
Veteran students are required to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 for all course work. Veteran's whose cumulative GPA is below 2.0 will be placed on academic probation for the following term. If the GPA is not raised to 2.0 during the probation term, the veteran will be suspended for one academic term. Reinstatement will occur only after approved counseling.
Suspension of the veteran student under the Veterans' Academic Standards of Progress Policy will result in CCD's not certifying enrollment to the Veterans Administration. Veterans in this status may still attend CCD; however, they will be subject to the provisions of the Academic Standards of Progress Policy requirements for continuation of enrollment.
2. Other Special Grades
AU Grade indicates that the student audited" the course. No credit is allowed for audited courses, nor is the grade certifiable to the VA.
I Grade indicates "incomplete." An incomplete or "I" grade must be made up before the end of the following term (fall or spring). For veterans, if an "I" grade is not completed in this required period, the "I" will remain on the transcript, and the veteran's certification will be adjusted back to the beginning date of the term in which the "I" grade was received.
SP Grade indicates "satisfactory progress", which will be treated the same as an "I", incomplete, grade.
3. Attendance
Veterans' attendance records showing each absence from regularly scheduled classes are required, and CCD is required to document such attendance records.
If a student veteran stops attending class, but does not officially withdraw, he is considered as "nonattending" and may be dropped administratively. VA certification will be adjusted accordingly. An administrative drop will be initiated by the instructor.
4. Mitigating Circumstances
(As defined by P.L. 94-502) Mitigating circumstances which directly hinder eligible veteran's or other person's pursuit of a course, are judged to be out of the student's control. Following are some general categories of mitigating circumstances (not all-conclusive):
a. Serious illness of the eligible veteran or person.
b. Serious illness or death in the eligible veteran's or other person's immediate family.
c. Immediate family or financial obligations which require a change in terms, or place of employment, precluding pursuit of course work.
d. Discontinuance of a course by the college.
e. Active military duty, including active duty for training.
f. Withdrawal from a course or receipt of a non-punitive grade upon completion of a course due to unsatisfactory work may be considered mitigating circumstances if the student can demonstrate good faith pursuit of the course up to the point of withdrawal or completion. The student must submit evidence that he/she applied for tutorial aid, consulted a Veterans Administration counselor, or consulted a school academic counselor or advisor regarding an attempt to remedy the unsatisfactory work before withdrawal or completion.
Academic
Standards
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Academic
Standards
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When mitigating circumstances prevail, CCD will attempt to intervene on behalf of the veteran with the Veterans Administration.
CCD GRADING STANDARDS
The following guidelines are used by faculty, subject to the needs of the program or courses, to establish their grading criteria.
Grade A A Distinguished Grade For Superior Work
t. The student has mastered the content and objectives of the course, is able to apply what he/she has learned to new situations and is able to relate it to other knowledge.
2. The student consistently distinguished himself-/herself in examinations, reports, projects, class participation and laboratory or training situations.
3. The student shows independent thinking in assignments and class discussion.
4. Work is consistently in proper form, shows satis-factoryevidence of careful research (where required) and is submitted punctually.
5. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student consistently demonstrates superior skills, ability and performance.
6. The student complies with the instructor's atten-dancerequirements.
Grade B A Better-than-Acceptable Grade
The student consistently shows mastery of the course content and objectives, and usually is able to apply what he/she has learned to new situations or relates it to other knowledge.
The student's work is in proper form, shows satis-factoryevidence of research (where required), and work is submitted punctually.
Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student consistently demonstrates above average skills, ability and performance.
The student complies with the instructor's attendan-cerequirements.
Grade C An Acceptable Grade Permitting Progress Forward in Course Sequence
1. The student shows evidence of a reasonable comprehension of the subject matter of the course and has an average mastery of the content sufficient to indicate success in the next course in the same field.
2. The student consistently makes average scores in examinations, reports, projects, class participation and laboratory or training situations.
3. If the subject carries transfer credit, the student hasindicated sufficient competence in the content to continue in the subject field upon transfer.
4. Assignments are completed in good form and on time.
5. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student consistently demonstrates average skills, ability and performance.
6. The student complies with the instructor's atten-dancerequirements.
Grade D A Less-than-Acceptable, Passing Grade
1. The student falls below the average in examinations,projects, reports, class participation and laboratory or training situations, but shows some competence in the assigned subject matter of the course.
2. The competence demonstrated is insufficient to indicatesuccess in the next course in the subject field.
3. Assignments are completed in imperfect form, sometimes late, or of inconsistent quality.
4. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student consistently demonstrates unable and below average skills, ability and performance.
5. The student complies with the instructor's atten-dancerequirements.
Grade F A Failing Grade
1. With respect to examinations, projects, reports, classparticipation and laboratory or training situations, thestudent fails to perform at the "D" level.
2. The student shows little or no competence in the assignedsubject matter of the course.
3. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skill, the student fails to perform at the "D" orabove level.
4. The student fails to comply with the instructor's attendancerequirements.
Credit/No Credit
Some courses are offered on a credit/no credit basis. Upon successful completion of such a course, unit credit will be awarded. However, courses taken on a credit/no credit basis are not used in the computation of a student's grade-point average (CPA). Regulations for such courses are:
1. In authorized credit/no credit courses, the credit grade is granted for performance which is equivalent to the letter grade of "C" or better.
2. Credit/no credit graded courses must be designated by the respective division. Courses falling into this category will be specified each term by CCD in the class schedules. Departments may require majors to obtain letter grades in that department's major subjects.
Grade SP Satisfactory Progress
Some courses, designated as open-entry/open-exit, may extend beyond the normal end of a semester since they are designed on a master-learning basis.
Upon successful completion of such a course, unit credit and a grade will be awarded. Regulations for such courses are:
1. In courses for which this grade is authorized, the SP will be given to:
a. the student who has attended for a full term, and who has shown satisfactory progress, but has not yet mastered required course objectives; or,
b. the student who, under the college's continuous enrollment policy, has enrolled late in the semester and is making satisfactory progress, but has not had sufficient time to master required course objectives.
14


2. A student may be required to re-register for a course in which he/she received an SP grade if the course work is not completed by the end of the next consecutive fall or spring semester. When the remaining time needed for completion is short, however, or when other extenuating circumstances occur, the dean may waive the requirement for re-enrollment.
Grade I Incomplete
1. The student has not been able to complete the course
requirements due to extenuating circumstances.
2. Two-thirds to three-fourths of the course work has been
satisfactorily completed.
3. The student must, before the end of the term, make
arrangements with the instructor to complete the course.
4. The student must complete the necessary course work prior to
the end of the next consecutive fall or spring semester.
Grade W Withdrawal
The student has officially withdrawn from the college after the add/drop deadline as published in the class schedule.
Grade AU Audit
The student has audited the course.
Grade AW Administrative Withdrawal
The student has attended one or more class sessions, but too few to be appropriately evaluated.
REPEATING A COURSE_____________________________
Students who receive a "D", "NC" or "F" grade in a course may retake the same course. The higher of the two grades received will be computed in the student's transcript CPA. However, the transcript will indicate the grades for both courses. Students must file a request with the Admissions and Records Office to repeat a course under this policy, no later than the published deadline date for add/drops. A student may repeat a course only once.
CREDIT HOURS
Generally, one credit hour is earned by attending a lecture class for a fifty-minute period, once a week, for a full semester. In a laboratory course, one credit hour is granted for two-to-three fifty-minute periods per week in the laboratory.
Recognition of Achievement or Continuing Education Units (CEU)
CCD offers many courses, conferences, workshops and seminars for upgrading job skills as well as for personal enrichment. Successful completion of courses of this type may result in the granting of a Recognition of Achievement or a CEU which may be requested from the appropriate instructional division.
DEAN'S HONORS LIST_________________
Students are selected for the Dean's Honors List during the semester preceding their graduation from CCD. To be eligible for this academic honor, a student must be completing at least 30 semester credit hours in a certificate program, or be completing the requirements for one of the four associate degrees. In addition, the student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.85, based on all courses attempted while enrolled at CCD. Selection for the Dean's Honors' List is printed on the student's permanent academic transcript.
PHI THETA KAPPA
Phi Theta Kappa, the national scholastic honorary society for two-year community and junior colleges, opened a chapter at CCD in spring, 1987. Phi Theta Kappa recognizes student academic excellence at CCD and promotes academic community at the college.
To be eligible for membership, students must have a 3.5 grade point average after completing 15 or more credit hours of college-level work, and carry three or more credit hours during the current academic year. Phi Theta Kappa members are honored at graduation for their outstanding academic achievements.
Faculty sponsors of CCD's Phi Theta Kappa Chapter are Dr. Jesse Cheng-Fan I and Associate Professor Susan Simons. For more information, interested and eligible students should call Dr. I, Ms. Simons, or Patty Rebne, Director of Student Activities.
Academic
Standards
Page
15
15


Graduation
Requirements
Page
16
Graduation
Requirements
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
All applicants for CCD degree programs must meet the following requirements:
1. Be enrolled in CCD classes for the semester in which he/she intends to graduate. Exceptions may be approved by the Vice President of Instruction.
2. Complete a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit in approved course work.
3. Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (C average). Some programs, as stated in the current catalog, may require a student to earn at least a "C" in specific course work. Students should check with their instructional division as well as their advisor for information regarding the minimum grade point average requirement.
4. Complete a minimum of 15 credits at CCD in the program area. Exceptions may be approved by the Vice President of Instruction.
5. Complete the Academic Profile, a general education assessment, during the final academic semester at the college. Students should check with the Testing Center in Room 142 of the South Classroom Building for dates and times the Academic Profile may be taken.
6. File an "application of graduation" form during the term in which the student intends to graduate, according to the deadline published in the schedule of courses for that item.
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS_____________________________
CCD believes that General Education assists individuals to assume the responsibilities of citizens in a democratic society. All associate degrees have general education requirements. These requirements adhere to goals for General Education established by the board of the Colorado Community College and Occupational Education System.
1. To build skills for advanced and lifelong learning.
2. To expose students to the mainstream of thought and interpretation humanities, sciences, mathematics, social sciences, communications and the arts.
3. To integrate learning in ways that cultivate the student's broad understanding and ability to think about a large and complex subject, formulate and analyze valid concepts, solve problems and clarify values.
4. To prepare individuals for their roles as effective citizens in a changing and complex society.
CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS
All CCD graduates of certificate programs must meet the following requirements:
1. Complete the specified requirements of an approved vocational/technical program.
2. Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (C). Some programs, as stated in the current catalog, may require a student to earn at least a "C" in specific course work. Students should check with their instructional division, as well as their advisor, for information regarding the minimum grade point average required for graduation.
3. File an "application of graduation" form during the term in which the student intends to graduate, according to the deadline published in the schedule of courses for that term.
4. Complete a minimum of 15 credits in the program area at CCD. Exceptions may be approved by the Vice President of Instruction.
GRADUATION POLICIES
1. No more than six semester hours of courses num-bered "299" (independent study course work) may be applied toward an associate degree program.
2. There is no limit on special topics courses allowed to count toward a degree. In individual cases, the limit will be determined by the program area. Students taking special topic courses should consult with their advisors as to how these credits will apply toward a degree.
3. CCD reserves the right to substitute or delete course work based on current curriculum. Students are assured that if the curriculum changes, CCD will make every effort to determine an equitable solution.
4. Completion of the "Academic Profile."
CATALOG REQUIREMENTS
Students may graduate under the catalog requirements listed for the academic year in which they were firsi enrolled. If students interrupt attendance for one yeai or more and then return, the catalog of the new readmission year is the document of authority. Ii graduation requirements and policies should change students may choose to follow the catalog of the yeai of initial entry or the current catalog. Students shoulc be sure to obtain and keep a copy of the catalog undei which they enter or are readmitted.
PETITIONING FOR WAIVERS
Students who, due to extenuating circumstances, wish to petition for a waiver and/or substitution of prograrr requirements must complete a "Waiver/Program Sub stitution Request Form." The form is available in eacf instructional division office.
The student should complete the request and have i approved by the program coordinator, the divisior dean, and the Vice President of Instruction. The forn will then be kept on file in the Registrar's Office.
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Instructional Support Services
LEARNING DEVELOPMENT CENTER
Located in the South Classroom Building, Room 142, the Learning Development Center (LDC) provides free tutorial assistance to all CCD students and helps them enter and complete the educational program of their choice. For more information, call 556-2497.
Tutoring One-to-one and small group tutoring is available to help students achieve proficiency in basic academic skills, apply those skills to course work, prepare to challenge a course for credit or clear an incomplete grade.
Peer Tutoring This program provides student-to-student tutoring. Peer tutors must have successfully completed the courses they tutor and be recommended by faculty for the program. In addition, tutors must either have successfully completed the peer tutoring course (EDU 140) or be currently enrolled in EDU 140.
Supplemental Services Tutoring Supplemental Services provides vocational assessments, career exploration and tutoring to students enrolled in vocational education programs.
Special Learning Support Program This program offers diagnostic evaluation and prescriptive tutoring for adults with learning disabilities. The program also provides support services for faculty, referrals for students and assistance for an LD support group.
Test Center The Test Center provides achievement, abilities, vocational interest, basic skills assessment and make-up exams. Students should check the schedule posted outside Room 142, South Classroom Building, at the beginning of each semester for Test Center hours.
Writing Center Provides direct support for students enrolled in various English classes, and assists students with writing projects from any course. Through individual instruction and the use of a variety of materials, the Center helps students develop and improve critical writing skills.
Computer Labs An open laboratory of computers is provided for student and class use. Any student may use the facility at any time during the semester, including nights and weekends. Many CCD classes make use of the Center for word-processing, accounting, math, programming, test-taking, computer graphics and design, or other computer-assisted instruction. The Computer Lab offers a variety of self-paced/self-teaching courses for one credit. These one-credit courses offer students the opportunity to learn computer application programs, such as WordStar, Lotus, or dBase through hands-on experience, and are designed for those who wish to learn more about computers on their own or to upgrade their computer skills for better employability.
DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAM
To be successful at the Community College of Denver, students must be able to apply reading, math,writing and study skills. CCD offers a comprehensive support program in these skill areas to help students achieve academic success. Offerings include:
1. assessment of basic academic skills, vocational aptitude and interest;
2. test results interpretation by skilled faculty and counselors;
3. a variety of courses in reading, mathematics, writing and study skills;
4. the College for Living Program which assists devel-opmentally disabled adults with independent living activities and pre- vocational skills;
5. special assessment and tutorial support for the learning disabled;
6. computer literacy courses and support for computer assisted instruction;
7. tutoring for basic skills and vocational programs;
8. preparation for GED; and
9. English as a Second Language.
DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES COURSES
Reading a series of credit courses designed to improve retention and comprehension, vocabulary development, word- attack skills, critical thinking skills, and speed. Courses use a variety of teaching methods as well as lab support activities.
Writing a series of courses which emphasize the writing process structure of the language and the use of appropriate grammar and syntax.
Mathematics a series of modular courses which include operations on whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percent, ratio and proportion and pre-algebra. There are also a series of applied math modules for occupational programs.
Study Skills two courses which cover basic reading strategies for beginning students, test taking, memory strategies, notetaking, outlining, skimming and scanning, library use and vocabulary building.
Instructional
Support
Services
Page
17
17


Special
Educational
Programs
Page
18
Special Educational Programs
TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER
CCD's Technical Education Center (TEC) is a job training center, offering business and industry-based training. All programs are open-entry/open-exit and operate year-round with individualized instruction, allowing a student to enroll anytime and leave when program requirements are completed. Students attend class an average of six to seven hours a day, five days each week.
Fast-track training permits students to complete a certificate program in seven months or less. CCD grants college credit for all courses successfully completed. These credits can be applied to an associate degree.
The center also provides classes in job search techniques, CED preparation and basic study skills. Career assessment testing using Valpar/MESA, educational counseling and job placement assistance also are available. TEC is currently located at 6221 Downing Street, Denver, CO 80216. For more information, call 289-2243.
THE DENVER HUMAN RESOURCE CENTER
The Human Resource Center is a project funded by the City and County of Denver's Private Industry Council and operated by CCD through TEC. The Center provides employment related services to Denver employers, PIC contractors and DETA clients. Major emphasis is placed on supplying Denver employers with qualified job applicants.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM
The Cooperative Education Program provides opportunities to supplement course work with practical work experience related to the student's educational and occupational objectives. Cooperative Education is an extension to and application of classroom instruction through work experience under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the business or industry site. A qualified instructor coordinates and supervises the total work experience program, guiding the student and the employer through telephone contacts, site visitations, student reports and reports from the student's supervisor. For more information stop by the South Classroom Building, Room 134, or call 556-3302.
HONORS PROGRAM
An Honors Program is available for qualified students at CCD. Honors courses are presented for students to develop sophisticated creative and critical thinking skills, and primary and secondary research skills. Special honors sections are noted in each semester's schedule. Interested students should contact Dr. Mary Beth Susman, Honors Program Chairperson, at 556-2424.
CONTINUING EDUCATION
Credit and Non-Credit Offerings in These Areas: Extended Campus Weekend College Business and Industry Services Certified Financial Planner TM Program Supervisory Certificate in Business High School Equivalency Certificate (GED) Restaurant Management Business Management Microcomputer Courses and Workshops Correspondence Courses Television Courses
Professional Development Workshops Life Enrichment/Lifelong Learning The London Semester/Study Abroad The Continuing Education Division extends professional development and educational opportunities to learners of all ages, circumstances, and locations. It aids in the development of careers, knowledge, and skills for people who cannot be accommodated fully within the traditional academic and campus- bound structure of higher education. In cooperation with other academic divisions of the College, Continuing Education provides credit and non-credit learning opportunities at both on-campus and off-campus locations.
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Continuing Education activities include seminars and workshops, off-campus courses, Weekend College, and correspondence or media courses. The Community College of Denver cooperates with professional associations, private and business organizations, occupational groups, and governmental agencies to serve a variety of publics. Through these arrangements, career- development, non-traditional, or special-interest courses and workshops are offered throughout the year for varying numbers of sessions, fees, and beginning dates; training experiences are delivered through an array of creative program designs best suited to the needs of various groups. Workshops, courses, and seminars are designed to increase knowledge and skills in a rapidly changing environment and workplace. Short-term intensive courses are compatible with busy work schedules. Continuing Education strives to provide non-traditional formats to benefit work-experienced adult learners who would not be served by the College's career degree programs were it not for such alternative learning approaches.
Civic groups, businesses, professional groups and others are encouraged to contact the Dean of Continuing Education for help in organizing specialized courses, seminars, and workshops.
Continuing Education Units
CEU's are awarded for non-credit offerings in recognition of achievement for restaurant and business management workshops, the financial planner program, computer workshops, and professional development seminars.
Certificate and Degree Programs
The Continuing Education Division offers non-traditional, off- campus, or worksite formats for completing certificate and associate degree programs. For example, a certificate program in Supervisory Management offers courses in business, management, accounting, and economics. This entire program is designed to be delivered through alternative non-traditional approaches which include correspondence, television, and computerized study. Call 556-3386 for more information.
The Certified Financial Planner Program
The Community College of Denver is a local affiliate of the Denver-based College for Financial Planning, which provides a total curriculum to prepare candidates for the professional designation CFP (R) (Certified Financial Planner). In cooperation with the College for Financial Planning, the Continuing Education Division offers instruction in all six courses of the CFP program. This instruction enables candidates to learn together in a traditional classroom environment, a valuable accompaniment to the self-paced CFP curriculum.
All students must be registered with the College for financial Planning in order to attend CFP classes at CCD.
Vlay qualify for Continuing Education Units (CEU's) 'equired for renewal of professional credentials.
=ore more information call 556-3356.
GED Preparation: High School Equivalency Certificate
In cooperation with the Developmental Studies Division of the College, through off-campus outreach centers, Continuing Education provides adults who have no high-school diploma with the opportunity to earn a High-School Equivalency Certificate. An open-entry, open-exit course allows students to prepare at any time they wish for the GED (General Education Development) exam leading to the equivalency certificate. The GED exam includes the areas of English, mathematics, social sciences, history, and science. Call 556-3386 for more information.
Business and Industry Services
The Continuing Education Division assists the business community with its training needs through credit and non-credit offerings at the work site and at the college. The Division acts as a major broker of fast-track employee training programs, courses, workshops, and seminars. Businesses and organizations in the metropolitan area may select from existing college programs or have courses and workshops tailored to their specific needs. As well as being custom designed, courses and programs can be held either at the workplace or on campus and can be scheduled at times convenient for employees. To obtain more information call 556-3356.
Weekend College
The Weekend College provides a compressed schedule for those persons unable to attend regular college classes on a full-time or daily basis. These weekend, on-campus courses are especially designed for the working adult who desires to acquire a college experience, to upgrade existing skills, or to acquire new skills. The weekend courses also provide an opportunity to enroll in compressed classes which may be applied toward meeting certificate or associate degree requirements.
The purposes of the Weekend College are to provide expanded educational opportunities for part-time learners such as these:
-those who want to qualify for a certificate or degree
-those who want to enroll in courses of special interest
-those who find it impossible because of personal circumstances to attend college full time
-those wishing to complete general-education requirements
preparatory to enrolling in a specialized field
-those who have been unsuccessful in previous attempts at
obtaining a college education
Courses are offered in microcomputers, job skills, basic skills, liberal arts, and general interest. Call 556-3356 for more information.
Special
Educational
Programs
Page
19
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Special
Educational
Programs
Page
20
Extended Campus
Extended-campus courses are offered off-campus throughout the Denver metropolitan community. Credit classes in general studies, basic skills, liberal arts, science, mathematics, accounting, business and management, General Educational Development (GED), and English as a Second Language (ESL) are offered at Denver-area high schools, community centers, libraries, and businesses. For more information call 556-3386.
Correspondence Courses
Correspondence courses designed for study at home are open- entry/open-exit. This means students may register at any time for these courses. After registration, course materials which explain course procedures, indicate assignments, and provide textbook information are mailed to each student. Contact with the instructor is maintained by phone and mail. Correspondence courses are offered in a variety of programs. For more information call 556-3386.
Television Courses
TV courses are offered in association with KRMA-TV Channel 6. Course offerings vary from semester to semester and cover a wide range of topics. Course materials, assignments, and textbook information are mailed to the student after registration. Contact with the teacher is maintained by phone and mail, with optional meetings. As well as watching courses on TV, students may view tapes for all telecourses which are available on campus in the Media Center of the Auraria Library. For more information call 556-3386.
Microcomputer Courses
The Continuing Education Division offers credit and non-credit courses or workshops in microcomputer
training to the public and to businesses. These hands-on courses or workshops are available in self-study formats (without a teacher on hand) or traditional formats with a teacher directing the classes. In either situation, each student works individually at a microcomputer in the computer lab on campus. Computer topics include introduction to the computer, operating systems, and applications in word processing, spreadsheets, graphics, and database management.
LONDON SEMESTER
CCD offers a one semester study abroad program in London, England. This program is available to all eligible students from member schools of the Colorado Consortium for International Programming (CCIP). Community College of Denver is a member of the Consortium.
Students interested in applying for the London Semester need to have completed a minimum of 12 semester hours of college course work with a cumulative GPA of 2.0. Applicants must be in good health.
Final eligibility for enrollment into CCIP programs will be determined by the student's ability to profit from the study abroad experience.
All CCIP courses are designed to meet the requirements for an associate degree, either as a major or as an elective. Courses offered in 1988-89 will be from the areas of Behavioral Sciences (anthropology, psychology, sociology), History (British, modern European), Humanities (art history, literature, theatre) and International Business (banking, economics, trade).
In addition, all students in the program are required to take "British Life and Culture" (3 credits), taught by faculty from the University of London.
Students eligible for financial aid at CCIP member colleges may be able to use their financial aid for the London Semester.
20


Degree Programs
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE
University Parallel, Transfer Program
An Associate of Arts Degree (A.A.) provides a learning foundation in communications, social science, arts or humanities. Although some students work toward the Associate of Arts Degree for purposes of personal enrichment, many others plan to transfer to four-year colleges and universities in order to continue their work toward baccalaureate degree and pre-professional training in such fields as law, education, the arts and social sciences.
The Associate of Arts Degree is sometimes referred to as a University Parallel or Transfer degree. CCD provides a wide variety of course offerings which parallel those found in the first two years of a university and which satisfy lower division (freshman/sopho-more) requirements.
Within the A.A. Degree, the College offers seven possible areas of emphasis: Art, Behavioral Sciences, Communications, Economics, History, Music, or Political Sciences. The same course may not count both toward general education requirements and toward an area of emphasis. All graduates of the Associate of Arts (A.A.) Degree must meet the following program requirements.
A.A. Degree Program Requirements
General Education Core Credit Hours
General Education courses taken 34
from the prefixes listed below under General Education courses.
Area of Emphasis (Optional)
A maximum of four courses in an 12-20
academic area of emphasis.
Electives 6-14
Students who do not select an area
of emphasis or who have fewer than
60 credit hours with their core
courses and their area of emphasis
should take general electives as
needed to complete the 60 credit
hours required for the Associate of
Arts Degree. General Electives must
be core courses or higher numbers.
Courses numbered lower than the general education curriculum in any prefix will not meet requirements for the A.A. Degree.
Total Hours 60
General Education Course Requirements
Credit Hours
I. English/Speech 9
ENG 121 and ENG 122 SPE115
II. A. Mathematics 3
(any 1 of the following)
MAT 121,125, 135, 201, 202
B. Science 4
(any 1 of the following)
AST 101, 102 BIO 105, 111, 112 CHE 101, 102, 111, 112 PHY 105, 111, 112, 211, 212 GEY 111, 121
III. Social & Behavioral Sciences 9
(9 credit hours from 2 disciplines)
ECO 201, 202 GEO 105
HIS 101, 102, 201, 202 POS 111 PSY 101, 102 SOC 101, 102
IV. Humanities 9 (9 credit hours from 2 disciplines)
ART 111, 112 SPA 111, 112 HUM 121, 122, 123 LIT 115, 201, 202 MUS 120, 121 PHI 111, 112, 113
Total 34
Areas of Emphasis for the A.A. Degree
Art Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ART 112 Basic Drawing II (Prerequisite ART 111) 3 90
ART 115 Design Theory and Practice II (Prerequisite ART 114) 3 90
Choose two courses from the following:
ART 142 Oil and Acrylic Painting II (Prerequisite ART 141) 3 90
ART 211 Second Year Drawing I 3 90
ART 212 Second Year Drawing II 3 90
ART 214 Advanced Design I 3 90
ART 215 Advanced Design II 3 90
ART 221 Figure Drawing I 3 90
ART 222 Figure Drawing II 3 90
Total 12 360
Behavioral Sciences Emphasis
SOC 111 Introduction to Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 45
SOC 112 Sociology I Introduction to 3 45
PSY 111 Sociology II General Psychology I 3 45
PSY 112 General Psychology II 3 45
Total 12 180
Degree
Programs
Page
21
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Degree
Programs
Page
22
Communications Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
SPE
115 Principles of Speech Communication or
COM 121 Interpersonal 3 45
Communication
COM 250 Elements of Argument
or
ENG 231 Technical Writing 3 45
LIT 215 Introduction to 3 45
Literature
LIT 201 Masterpieces of 3 45
Literature I
Total 12 180
Economics Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ECO 201 Principles of Macro 3 45
Economics
ECO 202 Principles of Micro 3 45
Economics
ECO 205 Labor Economics 3 45
ECO 210 Political Economy 3 45
Total 12 180
History Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
HIS 101 Western Civilization I 3 45
HIS 201 United States History I 3 45
HIS 202 United States History II 3 45
HIS 220 Colorado History I 3 45
Total 12 180
Music Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MUS 111 Theory and Harmony I 5 75
MUS 112 Theory and Harmony II 5 75
MUS 151 Piano Class I 1 30
MUS 120 Music Appreciation
or
MUS 235 American Popular Music
or
MUS 290 Special Topics 3 45
Total 14 225
Political Science Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
POS 121 Introduction to Political 3 45
Science
POS 111 American Government 3 45
POS 200 American State and 3 45
Local Government
POS 205 International Relations 3 45
Total 12 180
ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE
University Parallel, Transfer Program
The Associate of Science Degree (A.S.) provides a learning foundation in mathematics and the sciences.
Although some students work toward the Associate of Science Degree for personal enrichment, many plan to transfer to four-year colleges and universities to continue work toward baccalaureate degree and pre-professional training in such fields as engineering, medicine, biology, chemistry and physics.
The Associate of Science Degree is sometimes referred to as a University Parallel or Transfer degree. CCD provides a wide variety of science and mathematics course offerings which parallel those found in the first two years of a university and which satisfy lower division (freshman/sophomore) requirements.
Within the Associate of Science Degree, the College offers seven areas of emphasis: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Medical Cluster, Pre-Engineering and Physics. The same course may not count both toward general education requirements and toward an area of emphasis. All graduates of the Associate of Science (A.S.) Degree must meet the following program requirements.
A.S. Degree Program Requirements
General Education Core Credit Hours
General Education courses taken from the prefixes listed below under General Education courses.
Area of Emphasis (Optional)
A maximum of four courses in an academic area of emphasis.
Electives
Students who do not select an area of emphasis or who have fewer than 60 credit hours with their core courses and their area of emphasis should take general electives as needed to complete the 60 credit hours required for the Associate of Science Degree. General Electives must be core courses or higher numbers. Courses numbered lower than the general education curriculum in any prefix will not meet requirements for the A.S. Degree.
Total Hours
33
12-2C
7-13
6<
General Education Courses Requirements
I. English/Speech ENG 121, 122 SPE115
II.
A. Mathematics
(any 1 of the following) MAT 121, 125, 201, 202
B. Science
(any 2 of the following)
AST 101, 102
BIO 111, 112
CHE 111, 112
PHY 111, 112, 211, 212
GEY 111, 121
22


III. Social & Behavioral Sciences 6 Medical Cluster
(6 credit hours from 2 disciplines) ANT 101, 111 A. Pre-Dental Emphasis Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ECO 201,202 BIO 111 General College Biology I 5 90
GEO 105 HIS 101, 102, 201, 202 BIO 112 General College Biology 5 90
POS 111 II
PSY 101, 102 BIO 141 Human Anatomy & 5 90
SOC 101,102 Physiology I
IV. Humanities 6 BIO 142 Human Anatomy & 5 90
(any 2 of the following) ART 111, 112 Physiology II Total 20 360
SPA 111,112 HUM 121, 122,123 B. Pre-Medicine Emphasis Cr. Ct. Hrs.
LIT 115, 201, 202 BIO 111 General College Biology | 5 90
MUS 120, 121 PHI 111, 112,113 BIO 112 General College Biology II CHE 111 General College 5 90
Total Hours 33 5 90
Chemistry I
Areas of Emphasis for the A.S. Degree MAT 135 Introduction to Statistics Total 3 18 45 315
C. Pre-Nursing Emphasis (non- CCD) Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Biology Emphasis BIO 141 Human Anatomy & 5 90
Cr. Ct. Hrs. Physiology I
BIO 111 General College Biology I 5 90 BIO 142 Human Anatomy & 5 90
Physiology II
BIO 112 General College Biology 5 90 BIO 215 Microbiology 4 75
II CHE 111 General College 5 90
CHE 111 General College 5 90 Chemistry I
Chemistry I Total 19 345
CHE 112 General College 5 90
Chemistry II D. Pre-Veterinary Emphasis Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Total 20 360 BIO 111 General College Biology l 5 90
BIO 112 General College Biology 5 90
Chemistry Emphasis II
Cr. Ct. Hrs. CHE 111 General College 5 90
CHE 111 General College 5 90 Chemistry I
Chemistry I CHE 112 General College 5 90
CHE 112 General College 5 90 Chemistry II
Chemistry II Total 20 360
PHY 111 General College Physics 5 90
1 PHY 112 General College Physics 5 90 Pre-Engineering Emphasis Cr. Ct. Hrs.
II
Total 20 360 PHY 211 Physics: Calculus Based I 5 90
I PHY 212 Physics: Calculus Based 5 90
Computer Science Emphasis II
Cr. Ct. Hrs. CHE 111 General College 5 90
CIS 111 Computer Literacy 3 45 Chemistry I
CIS 171 Programming in BASIC 3 45 MAT 201 Calculus I 5 75
CIS 175 Programming in 3 45 Total 20 345
FORTRAN
CIS 173 Programming in PASCAL 3 45 Physics Emphasis
MAT 135 Introduction to Statistics 3 45 Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Total 15 225
PHY 211 Physics: Calculus Based 5 90
Mathematics Emphasis I PHY 212 Physics: Calculus Based 5 90
Cr. Ct. Hrs. II
MAT 201 Calculus I 5 75 CHE 111 General College 5 90
MAT 202 Calculus II 5 75 Chemistry I
MAT 203 Calculus III 4 60 BIO 111 General College Biology 5 90
MAT 205 Ordinary Differential 3 45 I
Equations Total 20 360
MAT 209 Linear Algebra 3 45
Total 20 300
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ASSOCIATE OF GENERAL STUDIES DEGREE
University Parallel, Transfer Program
The Associate of General Studies Degree (A.G.S.) is available to students who want to complete a broad program of both career and transfer courses without the constraints of specialization, or for those students desiring a specific mix of career and traditional transfer courses. Transferability of the A.G.S. depends upon the courses taken and the receiving institution. See your advisor and the Transfer Guide.
While many students take the A.G.S. Degree because of the freedom to design their individual programs, others select one of two A.G.S. Degrees the College has articulated with Metropolitan State College. All graduates of the Associate of General Studies Degree (A.G.S.) must meet the following program requirements.
A.G.S. Degree Program Requirements
1. General Education Requirements: Credit Hours
a. English/Speech (ENG 121, 122; SPE 115) 6
b. Mathematics (MAT 125,135, 201, 202) 3
c. Science (AST 101,102, BIO 105,111,112; CHE 101,
102,111, 112; PHY 105, 111,112, 211, 212; GEY 111, 121) 4
d. Social & Behavioral Sciences (ECO 201, 202; GEO
105; HIS 101, 102, 201, 202; POS 111, PSY 101, 102; SOC 101, 102) 3
e. Humanities (ART 111, 112; SPA 111, 112; HUM
121, 122, 123; LIT 115, 201, 202; MUS 120, 121, PHI 111,112) 3
f. Electives in General Education
Please see advisor. 2-3
2. Professional education courses generally recog-
nized as transferable, i.e., college level courses in business, management, marketing, computer science and selected courses in technical education and health education, and/or other courses from General Education Core Requirements. (Consult advisor.) 9
3. Vocational prefixed courses and/or general electives
General electives must be general education prefixes numbered equal to or above the general education course numbers or numbered 111 or above. 30
Total 60-61
Pre-Business Emphasis
The following courses represent the CCD/MSC Pre-Business two plus two transfer agreement. Students completing these courses will be admitted as juniors in MSC's School of Business.
ENG 121 English Composition I Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 45
ENG 122 English Composition II 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Communications Electives 6 90
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 125 Survey of Calculus
or
MAT 201 Calculus I 5 75
Science Elective 4 90
General Elective 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Eco- 3 45
nomics
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Eco- 3 45
nomics Elective 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II 4 60
CIS 111 Computer Literacy* 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law I 3 45
MAT 135 Introduction to Statistics 3 45
ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting I** 3 45
or
MAN 215 Principles of Management** 3 45
or
MAR 207 Principles of Marketing** 3 45
Total Required Hours 65-66 1005-
1020
Requires co-requisite CIS 075 Computer Lab Requires validation examination contact CCD Advisor
Public Administration Emphasis
The following courses represent the CCD/MSC Public Administration 2 plus 2 transfer agreement. Students completing these courses will be admitted as juniors in MSC's Public Administration Program.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 121 English Comp I 3 45
ENG 122 English Comp II 3 45
Elective (LIT, HUM, or PHI) 3 45
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
Science Elective (PHY, 3-4 45-60
BIO, GEO, CHE) Social Science Elective (SOC, PSY or HIS) 6 90
SPE 115 Principles of Speech Communications 3 45
MAT 135 Introduction to Statistics 3 45
ECO 203 Principles of Macro Eco- 3 45
nomics
POS 121 Introduction to Political Science 3 45
POS 111 American Government 3 45
POS 200 American State and Local Government 3 45
ECO 210 Political Economy 3 45
CIS 111 Computer Literacy* 3 45
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
Electives-College Transferable Courses 9 135
Total Required Hours 62-63 930-945
Requires co-requisite CIS 075 Computer Lab
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ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS
The Associate of Applied Science Degree (A.A.S.) prepares students for entry level employment in a given occupation or upgrades/stabilizes employable skills.
While not intended for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program, all A.A.S. degrees have limited transferability. In each A.A.S. program, some of the courses are articulated with and accepted by at least one specific baccalaureate program. In some instances, A.A.S. graduates transfer to full junior standing within a specific, articulated baccalaureate program. See your Transfer Guide and talk with your advisor for specific details.
A.A.S. Degree Program Requirements
The A.A.S. Degree requires a minimum of 60 credit hours, 12 of which must meet General Education requirements and 48 of which must meet specific program requirements.
General Education Requirements Credit Hours
a. Communications (COM, ENG, JOU, REA, SPE) 3
b. Mathematics (MAT) 3
c. Credit from any two of the following three areas: Arts and Humanities (ART, DRA, HUM, LIT, MUS, PHI, SPA)
Science (BIO, CHE, PHY)
Social Sciences (ECO, GEO, HIS, POS, PSY, SOC)6 Program-Specific Requirements 48
Total 60
Individual departments may specify particular courses that may be counted toward these general education requirements.
Accounting
This program is designed for students whose objective is to obtain a technical degree in accounting. Students with an existing associate or baccalaureate degree in non-accounting areas or with sufficient earned college credit may be able to qualify for the Accounting Associate of Applied Science Degree by taking accounting courses only. Please see appropriate faculty advisor upon entry.
Students planning to transfer to a senior institution can design, in conjunction with an accounting advisor, their associate degree programs for maximum transfer-ability. Students should contact an advisor early in the program.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II 4 60
ACC 131 Individual Income Tax 3 45
ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting I 3 45
ACC BUS 221 110 Cost Accounting Math of Business/Perso-nal Finance or 3 45
MAT 112 Intermediate Algebra 3-4 45-60
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 111 Computer Literacy* 3 45
Typewriting Elective 2-4 40-75
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
ACC Select 295 Job Search Workshop 2 courses with advisor approval: 1 15
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law I 3 45
MAN 215 Principles of Management 3 45
MAR Select 207 Principles of Marketing 5 courses with advisor approval: 3 45
ACC 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
ACC 113 Introduction to Accoun-ting/Microcomputer 3 45
CIS 150 LOTUS 1-2-3* 3 45
CIS 140 dBASE III Accounting* 3 45
ACC 215 Accounting Systems 3 45
ACC 216 Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting 3 45
CIS 174 Programming in COBOL* 3 45
CIS 171 Programming in BASIC* 3 45
MAN 225 Managerial Finance 3 45
ACC 297 Cooperative Education (or Elective) General Education Courses 3-6 45-270
MAT 111 Introductory Algebra 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I or 3 45
SPE Ul 115 Principles of Speech Communication 3 45
Select 6 credits from two of the following *Arts and Humanities *Social Sciences areas:
Science 6 90
Total Required Hours 63-69 960-1235
*CIS courses require additional laboratory credit hours of CIS 075. CIS 075 does not count towards the 60-credit minimum for degree.
Airframe/Power Plant
Students interested in the Airframe/Power Plant Program may register for these courses at Emily Griffith Opportunity School. Upon completion of these courses, students receive an FAA certificate. With an additional 15 semester hours at CCD, students may receive an A.A.S. Degree. Other FAA certificates may be substituted for Emily Griffith Opportunity School courses. Please see Division Dean in Science and Technology for information on this program.
Commercial Art
This program is designed to give students the skills necessary for entry into the field of commercial art. The commercial art field broadly covers production of paste-up art, graphic or advertising design, and illustration. The Commercial Art Program covers all three specialties and allows the student to develop basic skills common to all three while developing an emphasis in one.
Students are expected to buy their own tools and materials. The beginning program courses require an original investment of between $100 and $300 and the student is expected to add needed tools and materials as the program progresses.
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COA 100 Lettering/Typographic Cr. 5 Ct. Hrs. 100
COA 105 Design and Career Survey Advertising Typography 5 100
COA 106 and Layout Descriptive Drawing and 5 100
COA 107 Rendering Rendering for Advertis- 5 100
COA 200 ing Design Advertising Design and 5 100
COA 205 Portfolio Preparation Creative Graphic Design 5 100
COA 206 and Portfolio Preparation Art Preparation for Re- 5 100
COA 207 production Advanced Art Prepara- 5 100
ART 121 tion for Reproduction Basic Drawing I 3 90
ART 122 Basic Drawing II 3 90
ART 114 Design Theory & Prac- 3 90
ART 115 tice I Design Theory & Prac- 3 90
PHO 100 tice II Fundamentals of Pho- 4 80
PHO 101 tography and Fundamentals of Pho- 1 20
GRA 120 tography Lab or Process Camera and 6 120
Halftones General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours Optional Electives TEI 201 Airbrush I for Non-Ma- 69-70 3 1140- 1460 60
COA 208 jors Illustration 5 100
COA 297 Cooperative Education 3-6 135-270
COA 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
ART 273 Printmaking I 3 90
Computer Programming for Business
This program prepares the student as an entry-level programmer, programmer trainee, or junior programmer. Upon completion of this degree program, the student will have completed a minimum of 50 computer programs ranging from simple business applications to the design and completion of a complex business system.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 111 Computer Literacy 3 45
CIA 265 Programming in Assembler 3 45
CIS 217 Systems Analysis and Design 3 45
CIS 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II or
MAT 112 U1 Intermediate Algebra 4 60
BUS 136 Business Communications
ENG 231 or Technical Writing 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAR 208 Principles of Salesmanship 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech Communications 3 45
CIS Electives Select 18 Credits from the following
courses:
CIS 174 Programming in COBOL 3 45
CIS 274 Advanced COBOL 3 45
CIS 140 dBase III 3 45
CIS 171 Programming in BASIC 3 45
CIS 150 LOTUS 1-2-3 3 45
CIS 271 Programming in RPG 1 15
CIS 215 Distributed Computing 3 45
CIS 173 Programming in Pascal 3 45
CIS 260 Operating Systems and JCL 3 45
CIS 175 Programming in FORTRAN 3 45
CIS 273 Programming in "C" 3 45
CIS 262 UNIX Operating System 3 45
CIS 297 Cooperative Education or Elective 3-6 45-270
Elective 3 45
General Education Courses
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Eco- 3 45
nomics
MAT 111 Introduction to Algebra 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
Select one (1) course from Arts and Humanities or Science 3 45
Total Required Hours 60-63 900-1125
CIS prefix courses require CIS 075 Computer Lab as a co-requisite.
Drafting
The A.A.S. Drafting program includes three (3) options: Drafting for Industry, Mechanical Emphasis Drafting for Civil/Topographic Mapping Emphasis Drafting for Petro/Chemical Piping Processes Emphasis
26


Drafting for Industry Mechanical Emphasis
The Drafting for Industry emphasis prepares students for job entry positions on drafting teams in industrial plants, engineering and manufacturing firms, and government agencies.
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting Cr. 6 Ct. Hrs. 120
DRI 106 Basic Descriptive Geom- 3 60
DRI 107 etry and Aux. View Projections Dimensioning & Tole- 3 60
DRI 109 rancing Practices Intersections and Devel- 3 60
CAD 110 opment Introduction to Com- 3 60
DRI 115 puter Assisted Drafting Pictorial Drawing 3 60
DRI 116 Mechanical Assembly 6 120
DRI 200 and Detail Projections Introduction to Civil To- 6 120
DRI 205 pographic Mapping Introduction to Archi- 6 120
DRI 206 tectural-Structural Plans and Detail Industrial Piping and 3 60
DRI 207 Utility Considerations Large Mechanical Equip- 9 180
DRI 208 ment Material Handling and 6 120
DRI 295 Convey. Method Job Search Workshop 1 15
General Education Courses MAT 111 Introduction to Algebra 3 45
PHY 101 Fundamentals of Physics 1 4 90
ENG 231 1 Technical Writing 3 45
Arts & Humanities or 3 45
Social Sciences
With the permission of program faculty, DRI 297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be used in place of other drafting courses.
Total Required Hours 74 1440
Drafting for Civil/Topographic Mapping Emphasis
The Drafting for Civil/Topographic Mapping emphasis prepares students for job entry positions on drafting and design teams for local, state, and federal government agencies; petroleum, geological, civil engineering, mineral development and planning companies.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 6 120
DRI 106 Basic Descriptive Geometry and Aux. View Project 3 60
DRI 107 Dimensioning & Tole-rancing Practices 6 120
DRI 109 Intersections and Development 3 60
DRI 116 Mechanical Assembly and Detail Projections 6 120
DRI 205 Introduction to Architectural-Structural Plans and Details 6 120
CAD 110 Introduction to Computer Assisted Drafting 3 60
DRI 115 Pictorial Drawing 3 60
DRI 200 Introduction to Civil/Topographic Mapping 6 120
DRI 200 Map Construction Techniques 9 180
DRM 205 Advanced Map Construction Techniques 6 120
DRI 206 Industrial Piping and Utility Considerations 3 60
General Education Courses
MAT 111 Introduction to Algebra 3 45
PHY 101 Fundamentals of Physics 1 4 90
ENG 231 1 Technical Writing 3 45
Arts & Humanities or 3 45
Social Sciences
With permission of program faculty, DRM 297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRM 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be used in place of other drafting courses.
Total Required Hours 73 1425
Drafting for Petro/Chemical Piping Processes Emphasis
The Petro/Chemical Piping Processes Drafting emphasis prepares students for job entry positions on drafting and design teams in petro-chemical design, engineering and manufacturing firms.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 6 120
DRI 106 Basic Descriptive Geometry and Aux. View Project 3 60
DRI 107 Dimensioning & Tole-rancing Practices 6 120
DRI 109 Intersections and Development 3 60
CAD 110 Introduction to Computer Assisted Drafting 3 60
DRI 115 Pictorial Drawing 3 60
DRP 112 Process Piping Drafting II 6 120
DRP 200 Process Piping Design I & Model Making 9 180
DRI 116 Mechanical Assembly and Detail Projections 6 120
DRI 200 Introduction to Civil/Topographic Mapping 6 120
DRI 205 Introduction to Architectural-Structural Plans and Detail 6 120
DRI 206 Industrial Piping and Utility Considerations 3 60
General Education Courses
MAT 111 Introduction to Algebra 3 45
PHY 101 Fundamentals of Physics 4 90
ENG 231 Technical Writing 3 45
Arts and Humanities or Social Sciences 3 45
Total Required Hours 73 1425
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Early Childhood Education and Management
This program meets the vocational training needs for personnel involved in the care of young children (infancy through six years) and all Colorado Department of Social Services licensing requirements. CDA (Child Development Associate), an alternative mode, is included.
ECE 100 Introduction to Early Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 45
ECE 110 Childhood Education Child Growth and De- 5 75
ECE 120 velopment I Curriculum Develop- 5 75
ECE 141 ment Preschool Supervised 5 75
ECE 151 Lab Experience & Seminars Supervised Student 5 75
ECE 185 Teaching & Seminar Child Abuse and Ne- 3-5 45-75
ECE 210 glect Child Growth & Devel- 3 45
ECE 222 opment II Classroom Management 3 45
ECE 251 Techniques Supervised Student 5 75
ECE 261 Teaching & Seminar Administration I Parent 3 45
ECE 262 Involvement & Staff Development Administration II Li- 3 45
ECE 269 censing & Operations Nutrition for Young 2 20
Children Choose three of the following: ECE 125 Creativity and the 3 45
ECE 126 Young Child Health & Safety of the 1-3 15-45
ECE 195 Young Child Workshop of Ideas 1-3 15-45
ECE 196 Workshop of Things 1-3 15-45
ECE 215 Applied Child Growth & 3 45
ECE 225 Development Language and Cognition 3 45
ECE 226 Music and Movement 3 45
ECE 227 Science & Math 3 45
ECE 149 Supervised Extension I 1-6 15-120
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 68-70 845-865
Electronics Technology
This program is designed to prepare individuals with job entry skills in assembly, testing, repair and maintenance of electronic equipment. Basic knowledge to advance into more detailed and specific areas with further training and experience is provided.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 101 DC Circuits and Magnetism 3 60
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 60
ELT 104 Network Theorem & Vacuum Tubes 3 60
ELT 110 Diode Circuits 3 60
ELT 111 Transistor Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 112 JFET's and Oscillators 3 60
ELT 113 Special Devices 3 60
ELT 114 IC Operational Amplifi- 3 60
ers
ELT 200 Pulse and Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 201 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 203 Microprocessor Applications 3 60
ELT 204 Microcomputer Systems I 3 60
ELT 210 Communications I 3 60
ELT 211 Instruments and Measurements I 3 60
ELT 212 Troubleshooting Techniques for Analog and Digital Systems 3 60
ELT 213 Fabrication Techniques 3 60
ELT 214 Microcomputer Systems II 3 60
ELT 215 or Instruments and Measurements II 3 60
ELT 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
General Education Courses
MAT 111 Introductory Algebra 3 45
PHY 101 Fundamentals of Physics 1 4 75
PSY 111 1 General Psychology 1 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
Total Required Hours 74 1410
Electronics Technology:
Biomedical Equipment Repair
This program prepares individuals with job entry skills in biomedical equipment technology. Upon completion of the program, entry level technicians will be able to perform assembly, testing and nominal maintenance. Technicians currently working in the field may refresh their skills and advance into specialized areas. This program also prepares technicians for certification and allows students to readily transfer into a Bachelor of Science degree program to major in Technical and Industrial Administration.
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ELT 100 DC Fundamentals Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
ELT 101 DC Circuits and Magne- 3 60
ELT 102 tism AC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 60
ELT 104 Network Theorem & 3 60
ELT 110 Vacuum Tubes Diode Circuits 3 60
ELT 111 Transistor Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 112 Transistor Oscillators 3 60
ELT 113 and FET's Special Devices 3 60
ELT 114 IC Operational Amplifi- 3 60
ELT 200 ers Pulse and Digital Funda- 3 60
ELT 201 mentals Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 202 Microprocessor Funda- 3 60
ELT 203 mentals Microprocessor Applica- 3 60
ELT 222 tions Introduction to Biomed- 3 60
ELT 223 ical Technology High Frequency and 4 75
ELT 224 Clinical Lab Instrumentation Biophysical Measure- 4 75
ELT 225 ments, EKG Equipment and Troubleshooting Hospital Internship 2 60
ELT 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
General Education Courses MAT 111 Introductory Algebra 3 45
PHY 101 Fundamentals of Physics 1 4 75
ENG 231 1 Technical Writing 3 45
PSY 111 General Psychology 1 3 45
BIO 113 Anatomy & Physiology 1 15
HOC 100 Concepts Medical Terminology 1 15
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Communication Total Required Hours 74 1410
Environmental and Refrigeration Technology
Commercial-Industrial Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning Option
This program prepares the student with job entry skills in the fields of commercial-industrial refrigeration, heating and air conditioning. Demonstrated mastery of skills is required. Programs are open-entry and open-exit. Students may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to either complete the program for a certificate or degree or to upgrade specific skills. To satisfy the requirements for an Associate Degree, the following courses must be taken in the listed sequence.
RAC 111 Fundamentals of Elec- Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
RAC 112 tricity I Fundamentals of Elec- 3 60
RAC 114 tricity II Fundamentals of Refrig- 3 60
RAC 115 eration I Safety, Tools, and Piping 3 60
RAC 116 Fundamentals of Refrig- 3 60
RAC 200 eration II Refrigeration Systems 3 60
RAC 205 Comp. & Applications Refrigeration Heat Loads 3 60
RAC 208 & System Development Special Refrigeration 3 60
RAC 211 Systems Installation & Service 6 120
RAC 212 Refrigeration Systems Fundamentals of Air 3 60
RAC 214 Conditioning Unitary & Central Sta- 3 60
RAC 215 tion Systems Air Flow Principles & 3 60
RAC 216 Distribution Control Systems 3 60
RAC 217 Troubleshooting & Ser- 3 60
RAC 295 vicing Job Search Workshop 1 15
The following courses may taken any time: RAC 297 Cooperative Education 3 135
RAC 299 VI Independent Study 3 90-135
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 61 1185-1230
Major Appliance Repair Option
To satisfy the requirements for an associate degree, the following courses must be taken in the listed sequence.
RAC 111 Fundamentals of Elec- Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
RAC 112 tricity I Fundamentals of Elec- 3 60
RAC 114 tricity II Fundamentals of Refrig- 3 60
RAC 115 eration I Safety, Tools, and Piping 3 60
RAC 116 Fundamentals of Refrig- 3 60
APT 218 eration II Automatic Washers I 3 60
APT 219 Clothes Dryers I 3 60
APT 220 Kitchen Equipment I 3 60
APT 225 Refrigerator/Freezers I 3 60
APT 226 Room Air Conditioning 3 60
APT 228 Clothes Dryers II 3 60
APT 229 Kitchen Equipment II 3 60
APT 230 Refrigerator/Freezers II 3 60
APT 231 Automatic Washers II 6 120
APT 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
The following courses may be taken at RAC 297 Cooperative Education any time: 3 135
RAC 299 VI Independent Study 3 90-135
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 61 1185-1230
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Graphic Arts
This program prepares students with job entry skills to accomplish most operations necessary on the process camera and the offset press and to function in the areas of basic bindery, stripping, and general layout and composition work. Students completing the program will be equipped to enter positions with commercial print shops, trade shops, in-plant shops and any other operation requiring printers.
GRA 100 Introduction to Graphic Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
GRA 105 Arts Beginning Process Cam- 3 60
GRA 106 era Halftones on Process 3 60
GRA 107 Camera Composition 3 60
GRA 108 Process Camera II, 3 60
GRA 109 Composition II Beginning Offset 3 60
GRA 110 Presses Stripping and Small 3 60
GRA 115 Bindery Intermediate Offset 3 60
GRA 116 Presses Paper, Management and 3 60
GRA 117 Production Inks, Plates and Intro- 3 60
GRA 200 duction to Large Bindery Process Color Separa- 3 60
GRA 205 tion Process Color Printing 3 60
GRA 206 Computerized Typeset- 3 60
GRA 207 ting Raised Printing 3 60
GRA 208 Basic Machine Mainte- 3 60
GRA 209 nance Silkscreening 3 60
GRA 210 Printing Management 3 60
GRA 299 and Marketing Independent Study 5 150
Additional Required Courses SEC 099 Introduction to the 2 40
COA 105 Typewriter Keyboard Advertising, Typography 5 100
PHO 100 and Layout or Fundamentals of Pho- 4 80
PHO 101 tography and Fundamentals of Pho- 1 20
TEI 201 tography Lab or Airbrush I for Non-Ma- 3 60
jors General Education Courses 12 180
Elective GRA 297 Cooperative Education 2-6 90-270
Total Required Hours 73-75 1300- 1495
Human Services
This program prepares individuals for entry-level employment in communities and institutions that serve clients with a variety of human needs. Students may choose to focus on specific skill areas, such as social
service agencies, health care centers, youth services, substance abuse programs, geriatric centers, child abuse, community corrections, crisis centers and do-
mestic violence. Cr. Ct. Hrs.
HSE 105 Introduction to Social Welfare 3 45
HSE 106 Survey of Human Services 3 45
HSE 107 Interviewing Principles and Practices 3 45
HSE 108 Introduction to Therapeutic Systems 3 45
HSE 109 Social Issues in Human Services 3 45
HSE 115 Human Services Practi-cum I 4 150
HSE 205 Human Services for Groups 3 45
HSE 206 Human Services for Families 3 45
HSE 207 Community Organization 3 45
HSE 208 Social Welfare Policy 3 45
HSE 209 Crisis Theory & Intervention 3 45
HSE 211 Human Services Practi-cum II 4 150
HSE 212 Human Services Practi-cum III 7 285
HSE 295 job Search Workshop 1 15
General Education Courses Electives (6 credit hours) 12 180
HSE 213 Substance Abuse: A Multi Model Approach 3-7 45-150
HSE 214 Clinical Social Work Practice With the Elderly 3-7 45-150
HSE 215 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System Total Required Hours 3-7 64 45-150 1320
With permission of program faculty, the following two courses may be used as electives.
HSE 297 Cooperative Education (variable credit)
HSE 299 Independent Study (variable credit)
Management/Marketing/Financial
Services
This program includes a group of core courses and four selected occupational options which include Management, Marketing, Traffic and Transportation, and Financial Services. The core courses are ACC 111, BUS 110, BUS 136, CIS 111, MAN 105, MAN 206, MAN 215, and MAN 216.
Management Option
This program provides a broad exposure to general business functions and fundamental management concepts. Upon completion, the student is qualified for an entry-level position in a wide variety of general business occupations. Students already employed are able to acquire skills necessary for personal development directed toward job security, and advancement.
30


Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BUS 110 Mathematics of Busines-s/Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 111 Computer Literacy* 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law I 3 45
MAN 215 Principles of Manage- 3 45
ment
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II 4 60
ACC Elective 3 45
CIS Elective* 3 45
MAN 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
MAN 297 Cooperative Education or Electives 3 45-135
MAN Elective 4 60
MAR 207 Principles of Marketing 3 45
General Education Courses
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
or
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Eco-
nomics
ENG 111 English Composition I 3 45
Mathematics Elective: MAT 111, 112, 121, or 135 3-4 45-60
GEO 112 Physical Geography or 3 3 45
credits from Arts and Humanities Elective 3 45
Total Required Hours 61-62 915-1020
NOTE: CIS courses require CIS 075 Computer Lab as a co- requisite.
Marketing Option
This program provides a broad exposure to general business functions and fundamental management concepts with emphasis on the marketing function. Upon completion of the program, the student will qualify for job entry into a wide variety of entry level, general business positions, particularly those with sales and initial marketing administration or support responsibility. Students already employed in these areas will acquire background necessary for personal development directed to job advancement in marketing-related areas.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BUS 110 Mathematics of Busines-s/Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 111 Computer Literacy* 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law I 3 45
MAN 215 Principles of Management 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
CIS Electives* 3 45
MAN Electives 3 45
MAR 207 Principles of Marketing 3 45
MAR 208 Principles of Salesmanship 3 45
MAR 215 Retail Management 3 45
MAR 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
MAR 297 Cooperative Education or Electives 6 90-270
General Education Courses
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Eco- 3 45
nomics or
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Eco-
nomics
ENG 111 English Composition I 3 45
Mathematics Elective: MAT 111, 112, 121, or 135 3- 4 45-60
GEO 112 Physical Geography or 3 3 45
credits from Arts and Humanities Elective 3 45
Total Required Hours 62-63 930-1125
*CIS courses require CIS 075 Computer Lab as a co-requisite.
Traffic and Transportation Management Option
This program is designed to prepare students for careers in the transportation of merchandise at the entry level position. It also prepares students for examinations given by the American Society of Traffic and Transportation.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I Cr. 4 Ct. Hrs. 60
BUS 110 Mathematics of Busines- 3 45
BUS 136 s/Personal Finance Business Communica- 3 45
CIS 111 tions Computer Literacy* 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law I 3 45
MAN 215 Principles of Manage- 3 45
MAN 216 ment Principles of Supervision 3 45
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MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAR 207 Principles of Marketing 3 45
TTM 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
TTM 297 Cooperative Education or Electives 3 45-135
TTM 151 Transportation Pricing I 3 45
TTM 152 Transportation Pricing II 3 45
TTM 231 Transportation Management I 2 30
TTM 232 Transportation Management II 2 30
TTM 211 Economics of Transportation 2 30
TTM 221 Transportation Law I 3 45
TTM Electives 2-3 30-45
General Education Courses
ECO 205 Labor Economics or
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Eco- 3 45
nomics or
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Eco-
nomics
ENG 111 English Composition I 3 45
Mathematics Elective: MAT 111,112, 121, or 135 3-4 45-60
GEO 112 Physical Geography or 3 3 45
credits from Arts and Humanities
Total Required Hours 61-63 915-1035
*CIS prefix courses require CIS 075 Computer Lab as a co- requisite.
Financial Services: Banking Emphasis
This degree program offers opportunities for entry-level positions and/or advancement in the career field of finance. This program is offered in cooperation with the American Institute of Banking, the Colorado Credit Union League and the Denver Chapter 4 of the Institute of Financial Education.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BUS 110 Mathematics of Busines-s/Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 111 Computer Literacy* 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law I 3 45
MAN 215 Principles of Management 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
FIN 105 Law and Banking 2 30
FIN 106 Principles of Banking 3 45
FIN 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
CIS 174 Programming in COBOL 3 45
American Institute of 6-9 90-135
Banking Electives Cooperative Education or Electives 9 135-270
General Education Courses
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Eco- 3 45
nomics or
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Eco-
nomics
ENG 111 English Composition I 3 45
Mathematics Elective: MAT 111, 112, 121, or 135 3-4 45-60
GEO 112 Physical Geography or 3 credits from Arts and Humanities 3 45
Total Required Hours 61 915-1110
CIS 111 requires CIS 075 Computer Lab as a co-requisite.
Financial Services: Credit Union Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BUS 110 Mathematics of Business/Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 111 Computer Literacy* 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law I 3 45
MAN 215 Principles of Management 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
FIN 110 Introduction to Credit Unions 3 45
FIN 111 Credit Union Operations 3 45
FIN 112 Credit Union Financial Management 3 45
FIN 113 Credit Union Accounting 2 30
FIN 215 Credit Union Auditing 3 45
FIN 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
FIN 297 Cooperative Education or Electives 9 135-270
General Education Courses
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics or 3 45
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics
ENG 111 English Composition I 3 45
Mathematics Elective: MAT 111,112, 121, or 135 3-4 45-60
GEO 112 Physical Geography or 3 credits from Arts and 3 45
Humanities
Total Required Hours 61-62 915-1065
Requires CIS 075 Computer Lab as a co-requisite.
Financial Services: Savings and Loan Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BUS 110 Mathematics of Business/Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 111 Computer Literacy* 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law I 3 45
MAN 215 Principles of Management 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
32


FIN 115 Introduction to the Savings Institution Business 2 30
FIN 116 Funds Transfer Service 2 30
FIN 117 Residential Mortgage Lending 2 30
FIN 118 Financial Planning 2 30
FIN 119 Deposit Accounts and Services 2 30
FIN 121 Savings Institutions Operations 2 30
FIN 205 Consumer Lending 2 30
FIN 210 Commercial Lending 2 30
FIN 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
FIN 297 Cooperative Education or Electives 6 90-270
General Education Courses
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics or 3 45
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics
ENG 111 English Composition I 3 45
Mathematics Elective: MAT 111, 112, 121, or 225 3 45
GEO 112 Physical Geography or 3 credits from Arts and 3 45
Humanities
Total Required Hours 60 900-1080
CIS 111 requires CIS 075 Computer Lab as a co-requisite.
Nursing
This program begins in the summer term and continues through the fall and spring semesters for two years. Applications, transcripts and the Nursing Diagnostic Test must be completed by May 7 of each calendar year for the following June admission. Information may be obtained from the Education Planning and Advising Center. Enrollment is open to 70 students each year.
The graduate with an Associate of Applied Science degree is eligible to take the examination for licensure as a Registered Nurse.
After successful completion of the first year, the student will receive a certificate in Practical Nursing and is eligible to take the examination for licensure as a Licensed Practical Nurse.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
NUR 100 Introduction to Nursing 3 45
NUR 101 Basic Concepts in Pharmacology 2 30
NUR 111 Nursing Concepts I 10 195
NUR 112 Nursing Concepts II 14 270
NUR 115 Socialization into Nursing I 1 15
NUR 201 Advanced Pharmacology 2 30
NUR 210 Comprehensive Maternity Nursing 6 120
NUR 211 Comprehensive Psychosocial Nursing 7 135
NUR 212 Comprehensive Nursing II Socialization into Nursing II 14 270
NUR 214 1 15
NUR 215 Socialization into Nursing III 1 15
BIO 141 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 90
BIO 142 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 90
BIO 211 Advanced Physiology & Pathogenesis 3 45
BIO 215 Introduction to Microbiology 3 75
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Development 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition: Essay Writing 3 45
MAT 121 Contemporary College Math 3 45
Total Required Hours 84 1575
Advanced Placement
Advanced placement into Level II is available for graduates of approved schools of practical nursing. All applicants must complete the required Level I related courses plus NUR 120 and 126 before entry into Level II. Placement will be made based on clinical availability in the fall or spring semester. All applicants must take nursing diagnostic tests.
BIO 141 Human Anatomy & Cr. 4 Ct. Hrs. 90
BIO 142 Physiology I Human Anatomy & 4 90
BIO 211 Physiology II Advanced Physiology & 3 45
BIO 215 Pathogenesis Introduction to Micro- 3 75
NUR 120 biology Psychosocial Concepts 2 30
NUR 126 in Nursing Nursing Process: Con- 4 60
ENG 121 cepts and Skills English Composition I 3 45
PSY 235 Psychology of Human 3 45
MAT 130 Growth & Development Contemporary College 3 45
MAT 111 Math or Introductory Algebra or 3 45
MAT 114 General Mathematics 3 45
for College Students Total Required Hours 29 525
NOTE: Additional courses are listed and described in the Course Description section of this catalog.
Degree
Programs
Page
33
33


Degree
Programs
Page
34
Paralegal
This program is designed to prepare individuals with job entry skills for the general paralegal field. Emphasis is placed on practical skills such as interviewing, research, and document drafting. Programs may be designed with areas of specialization in the following: bilingual paralegal, research specialist, criminal specialist, public law specialist, or probate and estate planning specialist.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
PAR 100 Introduction to Paralegal 3 45
PAR 105 Torts 3 45
PAR 106 Contracts 3 45
PAR 107 Legal Research 3 45
PAR 108 Civil Procedures 3 45
PAR 109 Property 3 45
PAR 115 Domestic Relations 3 45
PAR 127 Evidence 3 45
PAR 201 Business Organizations 3 45
PAR 203 Constitutional Law 3 45
PAR 204 Criminal Law and Procedures 3 45
PAR 205 Probate 3 45
PAR 210 Paralegal Workshop 6 285
PAR 219 Paralegal Seminar 3 45
PAR 207 Legal Research Seminar 3 45
I
or
PAR 208 Legal Research Seminar II 3 45
PAR 214 or Administrative Law 3 45
PAR 215 or Real Estate and Land Use Law 3 45
PAR 250 or The Elements of Argument 3 45
or PAR 290 Special Topics or PAR 297 Cooperative Education General Education Courses Total Required Hours 3-6 3-6 12 60 45-90 135-270 180 IHO- 1335
Note: PAR 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be used as an elective.
Required Courses
Photography
This program provides technical and aesthetic training to prepare graduates with the skills necessary to enter the field of professional photography including freelance work, portrait photography and creative photography.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
PHO 100 Fundamentals of Photography 4 80
PHO 101 Fundamentals of Photography Lab 1 20
PHO 102 Fundamentals of Color Photography 4 80
PHO 103 Fundamentals of Color Photography Lab 1 20
PHO 105 Advanced Photography 4 8C
PHO 106 Advanced Photography Lab 1 20
PHO 107 History of Photography 4 80
PHO 108 History of Photography Lab 1 20
PHO 109 Advanced Color Photography 4 80
PHO 110 Advanced Color Photography Lab 1 20
PHO 201 Professional Photography 4 80
PHO 202 Professional Photography Lab 1 20
PHO 209 Art of Photography 4 80
PHO 210 Art of Photography Lab 1 20
PHO 219 Seminar in Photography 1 20
PHO 220 Seminar in Photography Lab 1 20
ART 114 Design Theory & Practice I 3 90
General Education Courses 12 80
Select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:
ART 115 Design Theory & Practice II 3 90
ART 273 Printmaking I 3 90
COA 105 Advertising Typography and Layout 5 100
GRA 120 Process Camera and Halftones 6 120
TEI 201 Airbrush I for Non-majors 3 60
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
PHO 209 Special Topics 1-4 20-80
PHO 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
PHO 297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) Total Required Hours 3-6 64 60-120 1150- 1195
Radiologic Health Sciences
The Radiologic Health Sciences Program offers degrees in three radiologic career areas: Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Therapy and Radiography. All students complete a common required first level curriculum of 1 year (3 semesters). Upon completion of the first level, a student chooses an advanced placement option of 1 year (three semesters) in either Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Therapy, or Radiography. Graduates earn an Associate of Applied Science Degree and are eligible to apply for national registry.
Graduates of any of the three programs can be eligible for registry in a second area by completing the advanced placement option for that specific career.
The program begins fall semester each year and a specific program application must be completed and returned to the Health and Human Services Division. Information and requirements can be obtained from the Educational Planning and Advising Center.
This program is available for those students who are interested in articulating their career with a Bachelor of Science Degree.
34


Radiologic Health Sciences Core
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
RHS 103 Introduction to Radiologic Science 3 45
RHS 102 Radiologic Positioning I 3 60
RHS 104 Radiologic Internship I 5 225
RHS 106 Radiologic Patient Care 2 45
RHS 115 Introduction to Medical Physics 3 45
RHS 112 Radiologic Positioning II 3 60
RHS 114 Radiologic Internship II 5 225
RHS 122 Radiologic Positioning III 3 60
RHS 124 Radiologic Internship III 5 225
RHS 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
BIO 141 Anatomy & Physiology I 4 90
BIO 142 Anatomy & Physiology II 4 90
MAT 130 Contemporary College Math 3 45
or
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
General Education Courses 6-10 90-135
Total Required Hours 54-55 1305-1365
Required for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy Chemistry 101 required for Nuclear Medicine
Nuclear Medicine Technology:
Radiologic Health Sciences Advanced Placement Option
In addition to the successful completion of all Radio-logic Health Science courses, students must complete a basic chemistry (CHE 101) course to declare Nuclear Medicine Technology as their major. Students then continue through the second year of courses, prefixed "NMT."
The second year of course work commences with the fourth (or fall) semester and continues through the following summer semester. Upon successful completion of the second year, the graduate may apply to write the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT(N)) and/or the Nuclear Medicine Technol-
ogy Board (NMTCB) examination for certification. Cr. Ct. Hrs.
NMT 210 Nuclear Medicine Physics 4 60
NMT 211 Clinical Applications I 2 30
NMT 213 Nuclear Medicine Instrument 4 60
NMT 221 Clinical Internship I 8 360
NMT 212 Clinical Applications II 3 45
NMT 215 Radiopharmaceutical Prep 3 45
NMT 217 Computers in Nuclear Medicine 2 30
NMT 222 Clinical Internship II 8 360
RHS 215 Radiation Biology & Path. 2 30
NMT 216 Radioassay Procedures 3 45
NMT 223 Clinical Internship III 15 675
Total Required Hours 54 1740
Radiation Therapy:
Radiologic Health Sciences Advanced Placement Option
Upon completion of the Radiologic Health Sciences courses, the student declares a major in Radiation Therapy. Students then continue through the second year of courses, prefixed "RTT."
The second year of course work commences with the fourth (or fall) semester and continues through the following summer semester. Upon successful completion of the second year, the graduate may apply to write the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist examination for certification.
RTT 200 Physics of Radiation Cr. 2 Ct. Hrs. 30
RTT 205 Therapy II Radiation Therapy Meth- 2 30
RTT 206 odology Radiation Oncology I 3 45
RTT 207 Radiation Therapy In- 11 495
RTT 208 ternship I Physics of Radiation 2 30
RTT 209 Therapy II Treatment Planning 2 30
RTT 210 Radiation Oncology II 1 15
RHS 215 Radiation Biology and 2 30
RTT 217 Pathology Radiation Therapy In- 11 495
RTT 227 ternship IV Radiation Therapy In- 11 495
RTT 285 ternship V Selected Topics in Radi- 2 30
ation Therapy Total Required Hours 50 1740
Radiologic Technology Radiography: Radiography Advanced Placement Option
Upon completion of the Radiologic Health Science courses, the student declares a major in Radiography. Students then continue through the second year of courses, prefixed "RTR."
The second year of course work commences with the fourth (or fall) semester and continues through the following summer semester. Upon successful completion of the second year, the graduate may apply to write the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist (ARRT(R)) examination for certification.
RTR 203 Radiographic Technique II Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 45
RTR 204 Radiographic Internship 11 495
RTR 206 IV Special Radiologic Pro- 3 45
RTR 207 cedures Registry Examination 2 30
RTR 214 Review Radiographic Internship v 12 540
RTR 215 Radiologic Science 1 15
RTR 224 Radiographic Internship 8 360
RHS 295 VI Job Search Workshop 1 15
RHS 215 Radiation Biology and 2 30
Pathology Total Required Hours 43 1575
Degree
Programs
Page
35
35


Degree
Programs
Page
36
Secretarial and Administrative Support Occupations
These program options are designed to prepare students for entry-level positions and advancement in business, governmental agencies and other institutions which employ persons in secretarial/administra-tive support areas. All options have a common core of ACC 103 or ACC 111, BUS 110, BUS 136, BUS 139, MAN 105, SEC 101, SEC 102, SEC 104, SEC 115, SEC 120, SEC 295, and SEC 297 or SEC 200.
Administrative Assistant Emphasis
ACC 103 Bookkeeping or
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I BUS 110 Math of
Business/Personal Finance BUS 136 Business
Communications BUS 139 Professional Development
MAN 105 Introduction to Business SEC 101 Typewriting I**
SEC 102 Typewriting II**
SEC 104 Typewriting
Speedbuilding
SEC 115 Business Machines SEC 120 Filing and Records Control
SEC 295 Job Search Workshop SEC 297 Cooperative Education or
Cr.
3-4
3
3
3
3
4 4
3
1
3
1
Ct. Hrs.
45-60
45
45
45
41
75
75
60
20
41
15
SEC 200 Office Procedures
or
Electives (with advisory approval) 3-6 45-270
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts* 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription** 4 60
CIS 111 Computer Literacy* 3 45
MAN 215 Principles of Management 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
Word Processing Elective 3 60
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 65-69 1040-1280
"Corequisite CIS 075, Microcomputer Lab "Corequisite SEC 095, Secretarial Lab
Legal Secretarial Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103 Bookkeeping
or
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 3-4 45-60
BUS 110 Math of Business/Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 139 Professional Development 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I** 4 75
SEC 102 Typewriting II** 4 75
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 60
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
or
SEC 200 Office Procedures
or
Electives (with advisory approval) 3-6 45-270
MAN 206 Business Law I 3 45
PAR 107 Legal Research 3 45
SEC 111 Alpha Speedwriting I
or
SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand I 4 60
SEC 112 Alpha Speedwriting II
or
SEC 122 Gregg Shorthand II 4 60
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts* 3 45
SEC 209 Legal Terminology 2 30
CIS 117 Wang**
or
CIS 124 Displaywriter III** 3 45
or
CIS 125 Wordperfect**
or
CIS 126 Wordstar** 3 60
SEC 230 Machine Transcription** 4 60
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 72-76 1130-1370
*Corequisite CIS 075, Microcomputer Lab "Corequisite SEC 095, Secretarial Lab
36


Medical Secretarial Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103 Bookkeeping
or
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 3-4 45-60
BUS 110 Math of Business/Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 139 Professional Development 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I** 4 80
SEC 102 Typewriting II** 4 80
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 60
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
or
SEC 200 Office Procedures
or
Electives (with advisory approval) 3-6 45-270
HOC 100 Medical Terminology 1 15
SEC 111 Alpha Speedwriting I 4 60
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts* 3 45
SEC 206 Health Insurance Methods & Claims 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription** 4 80
Word Processing Elective 3 60
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 64-68 1055-
1280
Corequisite CIS 075, Microcomputer Lab Corequisite SEC 095, Secretarial Lab
Secretarial Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103 Bookkeeping
or
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 3-4 45-60
BUS 110 Math of Business/Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 139 Professional Development 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I** 4 75
SEC 102 Typewriting II** 4 75
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 60
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
or
SEC 200 Office Procedures
or
Electives (with advisory approval) 3-6 45-270
SEC 111 Alpha Speedwriting I
or
SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand I 4 60
SEC 112 Alpha Speedwriting II
or
SEC 122 Gregg Shorthand II 4 60
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts* 3 45
CIS 120 WordStar**
or
CIS 125 Word Perfect**
or
CIS 117 Word Processing (Wang)**
or
CIS 124 Word Processing (IBM Displaywriter)** 3 60
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 60-64 965-1205
Corequisite SEC 075, Microcomputer Lab Corequisite SEC 095, Secretarial Lab
Word Processing Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103 Bookkeeping
or
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 4 45-60
BUS 110 Math of Business/Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 139 Professional Development 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I** 4 80
SEC 102 Typewriting II** 4 80
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 60
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
or
SEC 200 Office Procedures
or
Electives (with advisory approval) 3-6 45-270
CIS 111 Computer Literacy 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts* 3 45
CIS 124 Displaywriter III
or
CIS 125 Wordperfect**
or
CIS 120 Word Processing (WordStar)** 3 60
or
CIS 117 Word Processing (Wang)**
SEC 230 Machine Transcription** 4 80
General Education Courses 12 180
Total Required Hours 62-66 1025-
1250
Corequisite CIS 075, Microcomputer Lab "Corequisite SEC 095, Secretarial Lab
Degree
Programs
Page
37
37


Certificate Programs
Certificate
Programs
38
In addition to the Associate Degree programs, specially designed courses and sequences leading to the awarding of certificates have been designed in cooperation with business, commerce and local government to provide opportunity for persons seeking to improve in their occupational fields. Courses in certificate sequences are applicable to appropriate associate degree programs.
Bookkeeping
Recommended for students who wish to study basic business fundamentals while developing entry-level bookkeeping skills. Constitutes an acceptable first-year curriculum in accounting and business for an associate degree and applies towards a baccalaureate degree at many senior institutions.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103 Bookkeeping or Accounting Principles I
ACC 111 3-4 45-60
Accounting Elective 3-4 45-60
BUS 110 Math of Business/Perso-nal Finance 3 45
CIS 111 Computer Literacy 3 45
ACC 113 Introduction to 3 45
Accounting on the Computer
ACC 297 Cooperative Education or Elective 3-6 45-270
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
Typewriter Elective 2-4 30-75
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
CIS Spreadsheet Elective 1-3 15-45
Total Required Hours 31-40 470-800
* Requires CPB 095 Computer Lab (1 Cr. Hr.)
Computer Programming
Computer Programming for Business
This program prepares the student as an entry-level programmer, programmer trainee or junior program-
mer. Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 111 Computer Literacy 3 45
CIS 174 Programming in COBOL or CIS elective 3 45
CIS 171 Programming in BASIC 3 45
CIS 265 Basic Assembler Language (BAL) 3 45
CIS 274 Advanced COBOL or CIS elective 3 45
CIS 217 Systems Analysis and Design with COBOL 3 45
MAT 135 Introduction to Statistics or
Accounting Elective 3-6 45-90
CIS Electives 5 75
Total Required Hours 29-32 435- 480
Note: CIS prefix requires CIS 075 computer Lab as a co-requisite.Computer Training for the Handicapped This 12-month program begins each summer and is specifically designed to train selected handicapped persons for entry-level positions as computer programmers, emphasizing the COBOL language. Applications should be submitted by March 1. Admissions information may be obtained from the Center for the Physically Disadvantaged.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 111 Computer Literacy 3 45
CIS 174 Programming in COBOL 3 45
CIS 216 Data Base Concepts 3 45
CIS 260 Operating Systems and JCL 3 45
CIS 274 Advanced COBOL 3 45
CIS 217 Systems Analysis & Design w/COBOL 3 45
CIS 231 On-Line Program Devel-opment/TSO 3 45
CIS 233 Introduction to CICS 3 45
CIS 297 Cooperative Education 6 270
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
Total Required Hours 40 780
Note: CIS prefix courses require CIS 075 Computer
Lab as a co-requisite.
Drafting for Industry
The Drafting for Industry option prepares students for job entry positions on drafting and design teams in industrial plants, engineering and manufacturing firms and government agencies.
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting Cr. 6 Ct. Hrs. 120
DRI 106 Basic Descriptive Ceom. 3 60
DRI 107 and Aux. View Projections Dimensioning and Tole- 6 120
DRI 109 rancing Practices Intersection and Devel- 3 60
CAD 110 opment Introduction to Com- 3 60
DRI 115 puter Assisted Drafting Pictorial Drawing 3 60
DRI 116 Mechanical Assembly 6 120
and Detail Projection Total Required Hours 30 600
38


Early Childhood Education
This program prepares graduates for assistant level positions in day care and preschool centers and meets State Social Services licensing requirements.
ECE 100 Introduction to Early Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 45
ECE 110 Childhood Education Child Growth and De- 5 75
ECE 120 velopment I Curriculum Develop- 5 75
ECE 141 ment Preschool Supervised 5 75
ECE 185 Lab Experience & Seminars Child Abuse and Ne- 3-5 45-75
ECE 222 glect Classroom Management 3 45
Electives -ECE 125 Techniques Select two of the following: Creativity and the 3 45
ECE 126 Young Child Health & Safety of the 1-3 15-45
ECE 151 Young Child Supervised Student 5 75
Teaching & Seminar Total Required Hours 33-38 495- 555
Electronics Technology
The electronics certificate options offer the opportunity for specialization and/or upgrading. All courses have a prerequisite of the preceding course or proof of competency.
Basic Electronics Option A Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 101 DC Circuits and Magne- 3 60
tism
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 60
ELT 104 Network Theorems and 3 60
Vacuum Tubes
Total Required Hours 15 300
Solid State Theory Option B Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 110 Diode Circuit 3 60
ELT 111 Transistor Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 112 JFETs and Oscillators 3 60
ELT 113 Special Devices 3 60
ELT 114 Operational Amplifiers 3 60
Total Required Hours 15 300
Digital Fundamentals Option C Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 200 Pulse and Digital Funda- 3 60
mentals
ELT 201 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 202 Microprocessor Funda- 3 60
mentals
ELT 203 Microprocessor Applica- 3 60
tions
Total Required Hours 12 240
Troubleshooting Techniques Op- Cr. Ct. Hrs.
tion D
ELT 204 Microcomputer Systems 3 60
I
ELT 211 Instruments and Measurements I 3 60
ELT 212 Trouble-shooting Tech niques for Digital/Ana-log Systems 3 60
ELT 213 Fabrication Techniques 3 60
Total Required Hours 12 240
Microcomputer Systems Technician Option E Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 200 Pulse and Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 201 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 205 Microcomputer Interfacing and Software 4 75
ELT 206 Microcomputer Repair 3 60
ELT 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total Required Hours 18 345
Biomedical Equipment Technician #1 Option F Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Prerequisite: Competency equivalent through 3rd semester Electronics (ELT 203).
ELT 222 Introduction to Biomedical Technology 3 60
ELT 223 High Frequency and Clinical Lab Instrumentation 4 75
ELT 224 Biophysical Measurements, EKG Equipment and Troubleshooting 4 75
ELT 225 Hospital Internship 2 60
Total Required Hours 13 270
Biomedical Equipment Technician #2 Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Option G
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 101 DC Circuits and Magnetism 3 60
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 60
ELT 104 Network Theorem & Vacuum Tubes 3 60
ELT 110 Diode Circuits 3 60
ELT 111 Transistor Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 112 JFET's and Oscillators 3 60
ELT 113 Special Devices 3 60
ELT 114 IC Operational Amplifi- 3 60
ers
ELT 200 Pulse and Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 201 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 203 Microprocessor Applications 3 60
ELT 222 Introduction to Biomedical Technology 3 60
ELT 223 High Frequency and Clinical Lab Instrumentation 4 75
ELT 224 Biophysical Measurements, EKG Equipment and Troubleshooting 4 75
ELT 225 Hospital Internship 2 60
ELT 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total Required Hours 56 1125
Certificate
Programs
Page
39
39


Certificate
Programs
Page
40
Environmental and Refrigeration Technology
Programs are open-entry and open-exit. Students may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to either complete the program for a certificate or degree or upgrade specific skills. In order to satisfy the requirements for a certificate, the following courses must be taken in the listed sequence.
Students may waive 100 level courses due to prior knowledge and experience. Waiver must be approved by instructor.
Refrigeration and Air Conditioning
RAC 111 Fundamentals of Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
RAC 112 Electricity I Fundamentals of 3 60
RAC 115 Refrigeration I Safety, Tools and Piping 3 60
RAC 116 Fundamentals of 3 60
RAC 200 Refrigeration II Refrigeration Systems 3 60
RAC 205 Comp. & Applications Refrigeration Heat Loads 3 60
RAC 208 & System Development Special Refrigeration 3 60
RAC 211 Systems Installation & Service 6 120
RAC 212 Refrigeration Systems Fundamentals of Air 3 60
RAC 214 Conditioning Unitary & Central 3 60
RAC 215 Station System Air Flow Principles & 3 60
RAC 216 Distribution Control Systems 3 60
RAC 217 Troubleshooting & 3 60
RAC 295 Servicing Job Search Workshop 1 20
Total Required Hours 46 920
Major Appliance Reipar
RAC 111 Fundamentals of Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
RAC 112 Electricity I Fundamentals of 3 60
RAC 115 Refrigeration I Safety, Tools and Piping 3 60
RAC 116 Fundamentals of 3 60
APT 218 Refrigeration II Automatic Washers I 3 60
APT 219 Clothes Dryers I 3 60
APT 220 Kitchen Equipment I 3 60
APT 225 Refrigerator/Freezers I 3 60
APT 226 Room Air Conditioning 3 60
APT 228 Clothes Dryers II 3 60
APT 229 Kitchen Equipment II 3 60
APT 230 Refrigerator/Freezers II 3 60
APT 231 Automatic Washers II 6 120
RAC 295 Job Search Workshop 1 20
Total Required Hours 46 920
Foreign Automotive Mechanics
These certificate programs provide the student with job entry skills for the foreign automotive trade and upgrading for those in the field who need to acquire additional skill.
Electrical Systems Certificate
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
FAM 100 Orientation, Safety, 3 60
Basic Electrical and Electrical Systems FAM 105 Starting and Charging 3 60
Systems Total Required Hours 6 120
Brake Systems Certificate Cr. Ct. Hrs.
FAM 109 Drum Brake Systems 3 60
FAM 110 Disc Brake Systems 3 60
Total Required Hours 6 120
Steering System Certificate Cr. Ct. Hrs.
FAM 115 Wheel Alignment 3 60
FAM 116 Wheel Balance and 3 60
Suspension FAM 117 Steering Gears and 3 60
Systems Total Required Hours 9 180
Transmission Certificate Cr. Ct. Hrs.
FAM 206 Automatic 3 60
Transmissions Theory & Maintenance FAM 207 Automatic Transmission 6 120
Rebuilding Total Required Hours 9 180
Engine Conditioning Certificate Cr. Ct. Hrs.
FAM 208 Engine Operation, 6 120
Diagnosis, Disassembly and Measurement FAM 209 Engine Reconditioning 3 60
and Assembly Total Required Hours 9 180
40


Graphic Arts
This program will prepare the student with job entry skills to accomplish most operations necessary on the process camera and the offset press, and to function in the areas of basic bindery, stripping, and general layout and composition work. Students completing the program will be equipped to enter positions with commercial print shops, trade shops, in-plant shops and any other operation requiring printers.
GRA 100 Introduction to Graphic Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
GRA 105 Arts Beginning Process Cam- 3 60
GRA 106 era Halftones on Process 3 60
GRA 107 Camera Composition 3 60
GRA 108 Process Camera II, 3 60
GRA 109 Composition II Beginning Offset 3 60
GRA 110 Presses Stripping and Small 3 60
GRA 115 Bindery Intermediate Offset 3 60
GRA 116 Presses Paper, Management and 3 60
GRA 117 Production Inks, Plates and Intro- 3 60
duction to Large Bindery Total Required Hours 30 600
Management/Marketing/Financial
Services
Financial Services
The program is designed to prepare students for entry level employment in the financial services field.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103 Bookkeeping
or
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 3-4 45-60
BUS 110 Mathematics of Busines-s/Personal Finance 3 45
CIS 111 Computer Literacy* 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
Electives** 2-9 30-135
Optional Electives** 3-6 45-90
Total Required Hours 17-28 255-420
*CIS 111 requires CIS 075 Computer Lab (1 Credit) Electives must have advisor approval
Supervisory Management
The Supervisory Management Certificate Program is designed to be delivered through alternative non-traditional approaches. The entire program will be offered through home study, telecourse and computerized instruction.
MAN 105 Introduction to Business Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 45
MAN 215 Principles of Manage- 3 45
MAN 216 ment Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAN 206 Business Law I 3 45
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Eco- 3 45
nomics
BUS 110 Math of Business/Perso-nal Finance 3 45
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
Total Required Hours 25 375
Practical Nursing (LPN)
This program begins in the summer term and continues through the fall and spring semesters. Applications, transcripts, and the Nursing Diagnostic Test must be completed by May 7 of each calendar year for the following June admission. Information may be obtained from the Educational Planning and Advising Center. Enrollment is open to 70 students each year.
After successful completion of this program, the student will receive a certificate in Practical Nursing and is eligible to take the examination for licensure as a Licensed Practical Nurse. This certificate program is the first year of the A.A.S. Degree in Nursing.
NUR 100 Introduction to Nursing Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 45
NUR 101 Basic Concepts in Phar- 2 30
NUR 111 macology Nursing Concepts I 10 195
NUR 112 Nursing Concepts II 14 270
NUR 115 Socialization into Nurs- 1 15
BIO 141* ing I Human Anatomy & 4 90
BIO 142* Physiology I Human Anatomy & 4 90
PSY 235* Physiology II Psychology of Human 3 45
ENG 111* Growth & Development English Composition: 3 45
Essay Writing Total Required Hours 44 825
Meets General Education Requirement
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Certificate
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42
Paralegal
This program is designed to prepare individuals with job entry skills for the general paralegal field. Emphasis is placed on practical skills such as interviewing, researching and document drafting.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
PAR 100 Introduction to Paralegal 3 45
PAR 107 Legal Research 3 45
PAR 108 Civil Procedures 3 45
PAR 210 Paralegal Workshop 6 285
Electives from Paralegal 18 225-405
courses
Total Required Hours 33 690-405
Photography
This program provides technical and aesthetic training to prepare graduates with the skills necessary to enter the field of professional photography, including freelance work, portrait photography and creative photog-
raphy.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
PHO 100 Fundamentals of Photography 4 80
PHO 101 Fundamentals of Photography Lab 1 20
PHO 102 Fundamentals of Color 4 80
PHO 103 Fundamentals of Color Lab 1 20
PHO 105 Advanced Photography 4 80
PHO 106 Advanced Photography Lab 1 20
PHO 107 History of Photography 4 80
PHO 108 History of Photography Lab 1 20
PHO 109 Advanced Color Photography 4 80
PHO 110 Advanced Color Lab 1 20
Total Required Hours 25 500
Radiologic Health Sciences
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technology
This certificate program limits application to those who have registry and/or certification in any other diagnostic imaging modality (RT, NMT, RDMS). It is a two semester program which commences .in the fall. Upon completion of all course work, the student receives a certificate of completion of college courses. (NOTE: as of this date no written registry is available)
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MRI 277 Clinical Applications of MRI 1 15
MRI 278 Clinical Internship I 2 90
MRI 278 Physics & Instrumentation of MRI 2 30
MRI 274 Cross-sectional Anatomy 1 15
MRI 287 Clinical Applications II 2 30
MRI 288 Clinical Internship II 2 90
MRI 285 Physics & Instrumentation of MRI II 2 30
Total Required Hours 12 300
Nuclear Medicine Technology
Commencing in the fall of 1989, this twelve month program is concurrent with the second year of the associate degree program. It allows for the entrance of applicants who are already licensed in another allied health profession or have a baccalaureate which includes the following courses: college algebra (MAT 121), introductory chemistry (CHE 101), anatomy and physiology (BIO 141,142), basic patient care (RHS 106) or equivalent.
HOC 210 Nuclear Medicine Phys- Cr. 4 Ct. Hrs. 80
NMT 211 ics Clinical Applications I 2 30
NMT 213 Nuclear Medicine In- 4 60
NMT 221 strument Clinical Internship I 8 360
NMT 212 Clinical Applications II 3 45
NMT 215 Radiopharmaceutical 3 45
NMT 217 Prep Computers in Nuclear 2 30
RHS 215 Medicine Radiation Biology & 2 30
NMT 216 Path. Radioassay Procedures 3 45
NMT 223 Clinical Internship III 15 675
Total Required Hours 54 1740
Radiation Therapy Technology:
Radiologic Health Science Advanced Placement Option
A radiation therapy technologist delivers ionizing radiation to cancer patients. The Certificate program is a 12-month option available to students who have an R.T. or an R.N. education. Academics are offered at the College and clinical experience is offered in one of eight participating hospitals. Applications are accepted from January to April. The program begins each fall semester. College algebra is a required pre-requisite.
This program is also available for those students interested in articulating their career for a Bachelor of
Science Degree.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
RTT 200 Physics of Radiation Therapy I 2 30
RTT 205 Radiation Therapy Methodology 2 30
RTT 206 Radiation Oncology I 3 45
RTT 207 Radiation Therapy Internship III 11 495
RTT 208 Physics of Radiation Therapy II 2 30
RTT 209 Treatment Planning 2 30
RTT 210 Radiation Oncology II 1 15
RHS 215 Radiation Biology and Pathology 2 30
RTT 217 Radiation Therapy Internship IV 11 495
RTT 227 Radiation Therapy Internship V 11 495
RTT 285 Selected Topics in Radiation Therapy 2 30
Total Required Hours 49 1725
(NOTE: Program approval is pending at time of catalog publication. Program approval and implementation should be completed by fall, 1988.)
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Secretarial and Administrative Support
General Clerical
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
or
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 3-4 45-60
BUS 110 Math of Business/Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 139 Professional Development 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I* 4 75
SEC 102 Typewriting II* 4 75
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 60
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control* 3 45
SEC 200 Office Procedures
or
SEC 297 Cooperative Education 3 45-135
Business Elective 3 45
(w/advisor approval) English Elective (w/advisor approval) 3 45
Total Required Hours 33- 34 545-650
Corequisite SEC 095, Secretarial Lab
Medical Secretarial
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103 Bookkeeping
or
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I 3-4 45-60
BUS 110 Math of Business/Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 139 Professional Development 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I* 4 75
SEC 102 Typewriting II* 4 75
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 60
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control* 3 45
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts** 3 45
SEC 200 Office Procedures
or
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
or
SEC 206 Health Insurance Methods and Claims 3-6 45-270
CIS 120 Word Processing (WordStar)*
or
CIS 117 Word Processing (WANG)
or
CIS 124 Word Processing (IBM Displaywriter)*
or
CIS 125 Word Processing (Word Perfect)* 3 60
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
SEC 230 Machine Transcription* 4 75
HOC 100 Medical Terminology 1 15
Total Required Hours Corequisite SEC 095, Secretarial Lab Corequisite CIS 075, Microcomputer Lab Stenographic 38-42 650-935
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 139 Professional Development 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I* 4 75
SEC 102 Typewriting II* 4 75
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding SEC 111 Alpha Speedwriting I or 3 60
SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand I SEC 112 Alpha Speedwriting II or 4 60
SEC 122 Gregg Shorthand II 4 60
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control* 3 45
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts** CIS 120 Word Processing (WordStar)* or CIS 117 Word Processing (WANG) or CIS 124 Word Processing (IBM Displaywriter)* or 3 45
CIS 125 Word Processing (Word Perfect) 3 60
SEC 297 Cooperative Education or Elective 3-6 45-270
Total Required Hours Corequisite SEC 095, Secretarial Lab Corequisite SEC 075, Microcomputer Lab Word Processing Option I (One Semester Block) 42-45 710- 935
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
SEC 102 Typewriting II* 4 75
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 60
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts ** 3 45
SEC Word Processing Elective (Select 1 course) Word Perfect, Word Star, Wang or IBM Displaywriter* 3 60
SEC 230 Machine Transcription* 4 75
Total Required Hours 17 315
Co-requisite SEC 095 Secretarial Lab (1 credit hour only). Co-requisite CIS 075 Computer Lab (1 credit hour only).
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Certificate
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44
Word Processing Option II
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 139 Professional Development 3 45
Elective (w/advisor approval) 2 30
SEC 101 Typewriting I* 4 75
SEC 102 Typewriting II* 4 75
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 60
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts** 3 45
SEC 133 Word Processing Communications
or
English Elective (w/advisor approval) 3 45
CIS 125 Word Perfect*
or
CIS 120 Word Processing (WordStar)*
or
CIS 117 Word Processing (WANG)*
or
CIS 124 Word Processing (IBM Displaywriter)* 3 60
SEC 230 Machine Transcription* 4 75
SEC 297 Cooperative Education 3-6 45-270
Total Required Hours 35-38 600- 825
Corequisite SEC 095, Secretarial Lab Corequisite SEC 075, Microcomputer Lab
Surgical Technology
This program begins in the summer term and continues through the fall and spring semester. It is twelve months in duration. Applications and all applicable documentation and test results need to be completed by the last day in February of each calendar year for the program starting the following summer. Admission information may be obtained from the Educational Planning and Advising Center or the Health and Human Services Division. Enrollment is limited to 25 students.
The Surgical Technology Program at CCD depends upon voluntary affiliation by clinical affiliates for spaces for clinical practicum. Students must recognize that due to the need to utilize all available clinical resources they may have to travel some distance to sites outside of the Denver Metropolitan area.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
HOC 100 Medical Terminology 1 15
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care 2 30
STE 100 Introduction to Surgical Technology 4 60
STE 105 Pharmacology for Surgical Technology 2 30
STE 106 Surgical Skills 6 120
STE 107 Surgical Instrumentation 3 60
STE 108 Surgical Trends 2 30
STE 109 Surgical Technology Laboratory Experience 5 115
STE 110 Surgical Technology Practicum 7 315
STE 115 Surgical Pathology and Intervention 4 60
STE 290 Selected Topics 2 30
BIO 141 Human Anatomy and Physiology I * 4 90
BIO 142 Human Anatomy and Physiology II * 4 90
ENG 111 English Composition: Essay Writing * 3 45
Total Required Hours 49 1100
Travel and Hospitality Occupations
Travel and Tourism Agent
This program is designed to prepare students for entry level employment in travel agencies, bus-lines, raillines and tourist offices.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
TTO 101 Geography for Travel & Tourism 3 45
TTO 102 Domestic Travel & Tariffs 3 45
TTO 103 International Travel & Tariffs 3 45
TTO 105 Computer Reservations 3 45
SEC Typewriting 2-4 45-75
Elective
Total Required Hours 14-16 225- 255
Travel and Tourism Management
This program is designed to provide training in travel agency procedures and to develop tele-marketing
skills for new and current employees.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
TTO 104 Travel Agency Manage- 3 45
ment & Procedures
MAR 216 Tele-Marketing 1-3 15-45
TTO 297 Cooperative Education 3-6 135-270
or Elective
English Elective 3 45
Total Required Hours 10-15 240- 405
Hospitality and Restaurant Management
This program is designed to provide entry-level employment and updating skills for those students already employed in the industry.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
HRA 130 Front Office Management 3 45
HRA 201 Food & Beverage Management & Controls 3 45
HRA 297 Cooperative Education or Elective 3-6 135-270
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 45
MAN 215 Principles of Management 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAR 208 Principles of Salesmanship or Elective 3 45
MAR 216 Tele-Marketing 1-3 15-45
Total Required Hours 22-27 420- 585
44


TEC Programs
TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER
6221 Downing Street
Denver, Colorado 80216
For more information call: 289-2243
The Technical Education Center is a job training center offering business and industry-based training. All programs are open-entry, open-exit and operate year-around with individualized instruction, allowing a student to enroll anytime and leave when program requirements are complete. Students attend class an average of 6 to 7 hours a day, 5 days each week.
Fast-track training permits students to complete a certificate program in seven months or less. These credits can be applied to an associate degree.
The center also provides classes in job search techniques, CED preparation and basic study skills. Career assessment testing (using Valpar/MESA), education counseling and job placement assistance are also available.
Bookkeeping/Accounting
Certificates
These programs are designed to prepare students for jobs such as Bookkeeping Clerk, Payroll Clerk, Inventory Clerk, Accounting Clerk and Data Entry Clerk. Students who complete the first semester only may exit with a certificate for Bookkeeping Clerk after an additional enrollment in PSY 099 Job Search Skills.
Bookkeeping Clerk First Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACT 106 Introduction to Accounting 3 45
ACT 111 Accounting Principles I 5 75
ACT 116 Multi-Plan Accounting 3 45
BSS 115 Business Math by Machine 4 60
SCY 095 Secretarial Lab 1 30
SCY 099 Introduction to the Keyboard 2 30
PCD 100 Personal Growth & Development 2 30
Sub Total 20 315
Accounting Clerk Second Semes- Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ter
ACT 112 Accounting Principles II 5 75
ACT 113 Computer Accounting I 3 45
ACT 211 Intermediate Accounting 3 45
ACT 255 Computer Accounting II 4 60
JSS 099 Job Search Skills 3 45
Sub Total 18 270
Total Required Hours 38 585
Chemical Operator
This certificate program is offered intermittently, upon demand by industry. This program is designed to prepare students for job placement in various chemical operation occupations. Students will learn the use and operation of chemical processing equipment, such as
pumps, valves, heat exchangers, filters, distillers, evaporators, flow meters, and transfer lines with holding tanks. Industrial safety and procedures such as sampling, analysis and dissolution are also covered.
First Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CHO 100 Vacuum Systems 3 60
CHO 108 Dissolution 3 60
CHO 106 Balance and Weights 2 45
CHE 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry I 4 90
MAT 114 Math for College Students 3 50
ENH 105 Study Skills 3 60
Sub Total 18 365
Second Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CHO 107 Clove Box 2 45
CHO 105 Chemical Reagents and Makeups 3 60
CHO 109 Filtration 2 45
CHO 111 Ion Exchanges 2 45
CHO 115 Raschig Ring Inspection 2 45
PHY 100 Basic Physics 4 60
JSS 099 Job Search Techniques 3 45
Sub Total 18 345
Total Required Hours 36 710
Cooperative Education Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for a wide variety of jobs through the use of paid job training stations and development of basic job seeking and job keeping skills.
CWE 095 Cooperative Education Cr. 9 Ct. Hrs. 400
CWE 096 Coop Seminar 6 90
JSS 099 Job Search Skills 3 45
PGD 100 Personal Growth & De- 2 30
velopment Total Required Hours 20 565
Industrial Drafter Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for jobs such as Industrial Drafter, Plant Drafter and Manufacturing Drafter.
First Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
DRF 105 Introduction to Drafting 6 120
DRF 106 Basic Descriptive Geometry 3 60
DRF 107 Dimensions and Toler- 6 120
ances
DRF 115 Pictorial Drawing 3 60
PGD 100 Personal Growth & Development 2 30
Sub Total 20 390
Second Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
DRF 109 Intersections & Developments 3 60
DRF 116 Mechanical Assemblies & Details 6 120
DRF 117 Electronics Drawings 3 60
TEC
Programs
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TEC
Programs
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46
DRF 100 Computer Assisted Drafting I 3 60
JSS 099 Job Search Skills 3 45
Sub Total 18 345
Total Required Hours 38 735
Information Processing Certificates
These programs are designed to prepare students for jobs such as Records Clerk, Filing Clerk, Receptionist, Clerk Typist, Office Secretary, Word Processor and Information Processor. Students who complete the first semester only may exit with a certificate for Records and Filing Clerk after an additional enrollment in JSS 099 Job Search Skills. Students that complete the first and second semesters only may exit with a certificate for Office Secretary after an additional enrollment in JSS 099 Job Search Skills.
Records and Filing Clerk First Se- Cr. Ct. Hrs.
mester
BSS 136 Business Communica- 3 45
tions
ENH 107 Language Fundamentals i 3 45
i SCY 101 Typewriting I 4 80
SCY 100 Typing Skill Develop- 2 30
ment
SCY 120 Filing and Records Con- 3 45
trol
SCY 200 Office Procedures 3 45
PGD 100 Personal Growth & De- 2 30
velopment
Sub-total 20 320
Office Secretary Second Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACT 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
BSS 115 Business Math by Ma- 4 60
chines
SCY 102 Typewriting II 4 80
SCY 133 Word Processing Com- 3 60
munications
SCY 203 Typewriting III 4 80
Sub Total 18 325
Word Processor Third Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
JSS 099 Job Search Skills 3 45
SCY 095 Secretarial Lab 1 30
SCY 215 Word Perfect 3 60
SCY 219 Word ProcessingA/Vang 3 60
OIS
SCY 220 Advanced Word Proces- 3 60
singAVang OIS
SCY 235 Production Typing/Ma- 5 75
chine Transcription
Sub Total 18 330
Total Required Hours 56 975
Machine Tool Operator Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for the
machinist trade such as apprenticeships, maintenance
and production work including lathe, mill, grinding,
drilling, inspection, layout, job shop and machine
repair work.
First Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MTO 105 Introduction to Machine 4 80
Shop
MTO 106 Metrology 2 40
MTO 117 Vertical Mills I 4 80
MTO 118 Vertical Mills II 4 80
MTO 126 Engine Lathes I 4 80
PGD 100 Personal Growth & De- 2 30
velopment
Sub Total 20 390
Second Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MAT 114 Machine Tool Math 3 45
MTO 100 Machine Shop Safety 3 60
MTO 115 Machine Maintenance 1 20
MTO 119 Horizontal Mills 4 80
MTO 120 Machine Shop Grinding 3 60
MTO 127 Engine Lathes II 4 80
Sub Total 18 345
Third Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MTO 107 Machine Tool Blueprints 3 45
MTO 125 Shaper Setup and Oper- 2 40
ation
MTO 128 Engine Lathes III 4 80
MTO 129 Job Shop Machining 3 60
MTO 130 Student Project 3 60
JSS 099 Job Search Skills 3 45
Sub Total 18 330
Total Required Hours 56 1065
Welder Certificate
This program is designed to prepare students for jobs such as Construction Welder, Industrial Welder, Production Welder, Arc Welder, MIC Welder, TIG Welder, Plate Welder, Pipe Welder and Sheet Welder. Welding certification tests are available through a state approved testing company. Depending on a student's readiness, occupational goal, and the welding instructor's recommendation that a student has a high prob-
ability of testing success, sponsoring agencies may
authorize funds for various tests.
First Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
WEF 100 Oxyacetylene Safety & 3 60
Welding
WEF 108 SMAW Safety & Set-Up 3 60
WEF 109 SMAW Surface Padding 3 60
WEF 110 SMAW Joints/AII Posi- 3 60
tions I
WEF 111 SMAW Joints/AII Posi- 3 60
tions II
WEF 116 Plate Code Test, E6010 3 60
PGD 100 Personal Growth & De- 2 30
velopment
Sub Total 20 360
Second Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
WEF 114 Welding Math 3 45
WEF 107 Welding Blueprints 3 45
WEF 115 Plate Code Test, E7018 3 60
WEF 201 ASME Pipe Welding 3 60
WEF 203 SMAW Pipe Welding - 3 60
2G & 5G & 6G
WEF 207 GTAW Safety & Set-Up 3 60
Sub Total 18 330
Third Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
JSS 099 Job Search Skills 3 45
WEF 130 GMAW Safety & Set-Up 3 60
WEF 208 GTAW Alloy Welding 3 60
WEF 209 GMAW Plate & Pipe 3 60
Welding
WEF 210 GTAW Thin Gauge 3 60
Welding
WEF 211 GMAW Thin Gauge 3 60
Welding
Sub Total 18 345
Total Required Hours 56 1065
46


Course Descriptions
Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by prefix and course number. Please refer to the semester Class Schedules for the list of courses offered each semester.
Course Modifications
The courses listed in the following pages are an indication of college course offerings. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester.
Prerequisite
A prerequisite is a course which must be completed satisfactorily before taking the next higher level course, or the prerequisite for a course may be "permission of Instructor."
COURSES COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM
075 Microcomputer Lab Variable Credit
Provides access to the microcomputer labs for personal use or for instructional assistance necessary to complete assignments in many program/course prefix areas.
290 Special Topics Courses
Most program/course prefix areas offer special topics courses. All special topics courses have a course/pro-gram prefix and are numbered 290. The courses carry 1-6 credits and 15-90 contact hours. Permission of the instructor and division director is required prior to registration.
295 Job Search Workshop Variable Credit
Most occupational programs and many transfer programs offer the Job Search Workshop. This course presents information on the nature of work, employer expectations, resume writing, job interview techniques and job search skills.
297 Cooperative Education
The Cooperative Education Program provides opportunities to supplement course work with practical work experiences related to the student's educational program and occupational objective. Most programs offer cooperative education and some programs require it for graduation. All cooperative education courses have a program prefix and are numbered 297. The credit and contact hours are variable. Permission of the instruc-tor/coordinator and the cooperative job supervisor is required. Four-year institutions vary in their policies regarding acceptance of cooperative education credit. Students who are planning to transfer should consult an advisor.
199, 299 Independent Study
Most programs offer independent study. All independent study courses have a program prefix and are numbered 199 or 299 The credit and contact hours are variable. Permission of the instructor and division director is required prior to registration. Four-year institutions vary in their policies regarding acceptance of independent study credit. Students who are planning to transfer should consult with an advisor.
ACCOUNTING
ACC 103 Bookkeeping
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Emphasizes the basic elements of the accounting cycle through statement preparation. Includes common bookkeeping procedures in handling cash receipts and disbursements, working with accounts receivables and payable. Practice in handling journals and ledgers is an integral part of the course.
ACC 111 Accounting Principles I
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Studies accounting principles and their application with emphasis on sole proprietorships. Includes the accounting cycle for service and merchandising firms, notes receivable and payable, inventories, systems and controls, payroll and plant assets.
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 111
A continuation of ACC 111 with emphasis on partnership and corporation accounting, department and branch accounting processes, cost accounting systems, management reports and special analysis.
ACC 113 Introduction to Accounting on the Microcomputer 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 103 or ACC 111 Computer Lab (CIS 095 is a co-requisite) Introduces data entry procedures on the computer in accounting applications. Includes a review of manual procedures with extensive hands on experience with computerized accounting systems.
CIS 150 Lotus 1,2,3 Accounting Application 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Presents the Lotus 1,2,3 computerized spreadsheet. Includes accounting applications in inventory control, payroll, budgeting, cash flow, break-even analysis, sales estimating and other "what ifs" in problem solving.
Course
Descriptions
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Descriptions
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48
ACC 131 Individual Income Tax 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Analyzes individual tax payer responsibilities and explains the selection and use of appropriate forms. Coverage is limited to income tax preparation as required by the Internal Revenue Service and the Income Tax Division of the Colorado Revenue Department.
ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 112
Reviews the accounting cycles in depth by providing a conceptual framework for analysis. Emphasis is on the corporate structure.
ACC 215 Accounting Systems 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 112
Studies the principles, concepts and tools used in the design, implementation and integration of accounting systems, controls and procedures. Practical application projects are used to illustrate manual and computerized systems.
ACC 216 Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 111 or Instructor Permission
Examines budgeting and funds control at the local, state and federal levels. Includes the forecast and preparation of the budgetary requirements and anticipated revenue at each level of government.
ACC 221 Cost Accounting 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 112
Studies cost accumulation methods and reports. Includes the concepts and principles of job order, process, standard and direct cost systems. Planning, budgeting, and cost controls are discussed.
ENVIRONMENTAL AND
REFRIGERATION
TECHNOLOGY
(Major Appliance Repair)
APT 218 Automatic Washers I 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2 + 2) Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Examines control devices and the electrical circuits common to most automatic washers and the methods of troubleshooting electrical circuits.
APT 219 Clothes Dryers I 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2 + 2) Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Examines circuits, control devices, diagnostic and repair procedures on various makes of automatic electric clothes dryers.
APT 220 Kitchen Equipment I 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2 + 2) Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Examines the repair of automatic dishwashers, disposal and domestic water conditioners.
APT 225 Refrigerators/Freezers I 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2 + 2) Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent
Experiences
Presents the procedures for the repair of various makes and models of upright refrigerator/freezers and chest freezers.
APT 226 Room Air Conditioning 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2 + 2) Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Presents circuits, control devices, diagnostic and repair procedures on various makes of room air conditioners.
APT 228 Clothes Dryers II 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2 + 2) Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Presents circuits, control devices, diagnostic and repair procedures on various makes of automatic gas clothes dryers.
APT 229 Kitchen Equipment II 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2 + 2) Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent
Experiences
Presents the procedures for the repair of gas and electric ranges and microwave ovens and trash compactors.
48


APT 230 Refrigerators/Freezers II 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2 + 2) Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Presents the procedures for the repair of various makes and models of upright refrigerator/freezers and chest freezers.
APT 231 Automatic Washers II 6 Credit Hours/ 120 Contact Hours (4 + 4) Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Continues to present the concepts of washing machine components and operation and apply them to customer repairs.
ART
ART 111 Art History I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides the knowledge base to understand the visual arts, especially as related to Western Culture. Surveys the visual arts from the Ancient through the Medieval periods.
ART 112 Art History II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides the knowledge base to understand the visual arts, especially as related to Western Culture. Surveys the visual arts from the Renaissance through the Modern periods.
ART 114 Design Theory and Practice I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Introduces fundamentals of form, painting and color mixing, visual perception, principles of composition, organization and structure introduced with both two and three dimensional design. One five-week module of computer graphics is introduced to include both LOCO language and Micro-illustrator Paint Systems.
ART 115 Design Theory and Practice II 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ART 114 or Permission of Instructor
Explores color theory and the interaction of color. Further explorations in form, perception and composition are completed with an emphasis on 3-D form. One five-week module of computer graphics teaches animation and picture sequences using the Microillustrator Paint System.
ART 121 Basic Drawing I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Covers freehand drawing through a selection of subjects, proportion perspectives, line, texture, value and composition. Media include pencil, conte crayon, charcoal and ink.
ART 122 Basic Drawing II 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ART 111 or Permission of Instructor
Introduces color into drawing, drawing in varied and mixed media emphasizing experimentation and an introduction to drawing the human figure. A broad range of sizes and material stressing composition and concept.
ART 131 Basic Watercolor I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Introduces transparent and opaque water color painting.
ART 132 Basic Watercolor II 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ART 131 or Permission of Instructor
Continues to introduce transparent and opaque water color painting.
ART 135 Workshop in Video Art I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Examines videotapes produced by well-known artists and the works presented on Music-TV, FM-TV and waveform, as well as local artists working in the medium. "Hands-on" experience in recording video art.
ART 141 Oil and Acrylic Painting I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Introduces the materials of the painter in controlling form and space.
ART 142 Oil and Acrylic Painting II 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ART 141 or Permission of Instructor
Investigates the materials of the painter in controlling form and space.
ART 211 Second-Year Drawing I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Experiments with a variety of media. Applies techniques of layout and design.
ART 212 Second-Year Drawing II 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ART 211 or Permission of Instructor
Studies advanced drawing concepts and individualized solutions. A continuation of ART 211.
ART 214 Advanced Design I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Applies the techniques of layout and design.
ART 215 Advanced Design II 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Advances the concepts which were introduced in ART 114 and 115 are presented for more individualized solutions.


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ART 221 Figure Drawing I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Introduces the drawing of the human figure.
ART 222 Figure Drawing il 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Studies drawing the human figure at an intermediate level.
ART 231 Second-Year Watercolor I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Studies individualized solutions in water media.
ART 232 Second-Year Watercolor II 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Continues the study of solutions in water media.
ART 241 Second-Year Oil and Acrylic Painting I
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ART 142 or Permission of Instructor
Applies mixed media through problems involving landscape, still life, abstraction and non-objective painting.
ART 242 Second-Year Oil and Acrylic Painting II
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ART 142 or Permission of Instructor
Continues the application of mixed media through problems involving landscape, still life, abstraction and non-objective painting.
ART 273 Printmaking I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ART 111 and/or 114 Studies hand printing techniques: silkscreen printing and intaglio. Emphasis on silkscreen includes glue, films and photographies. Introduction to intaglio includes etching and collographs. (Entry-level skills: drawing and/or design skills.)
ART 289 Computer Graphics for Artists 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Focuses upon the integration of art elements in design using the principles of variation, balance, emphasis and rhythm with the computer as a design tool. Emphasizes the use of color with design. Introduces practicing artists as well as students in art, photography and commercial art to the field of computer graphics.
ASTRONOMY
AST 101 Astronomy I 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Studies the history of astronomy, the tools of the astronomer and the contents of the solar system: the planets, moons, asteroids, comets and meteoroids. Includes laboratory experience.
AST 102 Astronomy II 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: AST 101
Studies the structure and lifecycle of the stars, the sun, galaxies and the universe as a whole, including cosmology and relativity. Includes laboratory experience.
BIOLOGY
BIO 105 Science of Biology
4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours
Designed for non-science students. Examines the basis of biology in the modern world and surveys the current knowledge and conceptual framework of the discipline. Biology as a sciencea process of gaining new knowledgeis explored as is the impact of biological science on society. Includes laboratory experiences.
BIO 111 General College Biology I
5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Examines the fundamental molecular, cellular and genetic principles characterizing plants and animals. Includes cell structure, function, and the metabolic processes of respiration, and photosynthesis are included as well as cell reproduction and basic concepts of heredity. Includes laboratory experience.
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BIO 111 or equivalent or Permission of Instructor
A continuation of Biology I. Includes ecology, evolution, classification, structure, and function in plants and animals. Includes laboratory experience.
BIO 113 Anatomy and Physiology Concepts 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours (1 +0) Co-Requisite: ELT 222
Overviews the human body by systems with an emphasis on those concepts of human anatomy and physiology which relate directly to biomedical instrumentation and recordable parameters.
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BIO 116 Human Biology (for Non-Majors)
4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours
Details the entire human body, covering all body systems. Stresses those anatomical features of the human body which are studied radiographically while including minimal physiology.
BIO 117 Drugs: Their Use and Abuse 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines some of the drugs commonly used in society and details the effects of these drugs on the human body. Drugs include alcohols, amphetamines, cocaine, barbiturates, tranquilizers, opiates, hallucinogens, marijuana, other street drugs, and nicotine.
BIO 118 Human Ecology and the Environment
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores the ways in which human population ecology impacts the global environmental balance, and is, in turn, affected by it. Topics focus around population and natural resources such as: energy, mining, and patterns of land use. The emphasis is on the way in which environmental problems and issues are interrelated.
BIO 141 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: None, although BIO 105 may be helpful
Begins a two-semester study of the principles of human anatomy and physiology through an in-depth examination of anatomical structures and the relationship of these structures to their function. Topics include cytology, histology, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, and endocrine system. [000c]
BIO 142 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141
Continues the second semester of principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology. Topics include reproductive systems with emphasis on human development, urinary system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic system, respiratory system and digestive system. Orients the maintenance of homeostasis to integrated activity of all systems.
BIO 211 Advanced Physiology and Pathogenesis
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142
Focuses on a study of the functions of the human body with emphasis on their interrelationships in adaptation to stress and disease. Delineates alterations of normal body functions, pathogenesis and pathophysiology conceptually.
BIO 215 Introduction to Microbiology
4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142
Introduces microbiology with an emphasis on microbial structure and function; epidemiology of selected diseases; body defenses and community control mea-
sures. Relates presented materials specifically to health-care facilities and the personnel involved, including patients.
BUSINESS
BUS 110 Mathematics of Business/Personal Finance
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 100 or equivalent
Emphasizes the application of mathematics to business situations. Students learn problem solving techniques in the areas of merchandising, financial accounting, general business and personal finance.
BUS 136 Business Communications 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Course in English with Advisor Approval
Introduces applied business communications in business reports, memos and letters. Emphasis is placed on proper format, good writing principles and proper communication techniques.
BUS 139 Professional Development 1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Emphasizes the importance of personal impressions in the work environment. Also explores job search skills and strategies.
COMPUTER ASSISTED DRAFTING
CAD 110 Introduction to Computer Assisted
Drafting Micro
Computer
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite or
Co-requisite: DRI 105 or Equivalent
Introduces computer assisted drafting for drafting majors and non-majors. Includes keyboard functions, lines, arcs and shapes and point placement, text coordinate system, dimensioning and sectioning, layering, library development and producing hard copy.
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CAD 111 Computer Assisted Drafting 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CAD 110 or Equivalent
Introduces differences between micro and mini CAD systems, geometric constructions, drawing management, figure insertion, complex symmetrical drawings, editing graphics and field trips.
CAD 112 Advanced Computer Assisted Drafting
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite or Co-requisite: CAD 111
Introduces advanced editing commands for text construction, user defined commands in graphics, calculator mode for arithmetic computations, directory search list for accessing working directory, menu operations, copying files and directories, introduction to three-dimensional model construction.
COLLEGE FOR LIVING___________________________
CFL 070 The Employable Self 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Introduces the process of preparing for and securing a job. Concentrates on behaviors necessary for job retention: following directions, asking for assistance, demonstrating appropriate social skills, and timeliness.
CFL 080 Arts and Crafts 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Introduces various forms of manipulative arts and crafts. Emphasizes sequencing of skills, manipulation of materials and visual imagery through hands-on learning.
CFL 081 Golf
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Introduces golfing fundamentals including terminology, scoring and safety. Also familiarizes the student with proper equipment use and care.
CFL 082 Swimming 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Introduces recreational, adaptive and therapeutic swimming. Emphasizes water safety and emergency procedures.
CFL 090 Cooking 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Introduces the basics of meal preparation, including comparative shopping skills, food handling and kitchen safety.
CFL 091 Money Management 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Introduces the relative value of dollars and cents, the pay process associated with work and the purchase of goods and services. Emphasizes effective strategies for counting and controlling money.
CFL 092 Budgeting and Banking 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Introduces income sources and effective consumerism. Emphasizes appropriate decision making strategies, account payments and simple checking and banking procedures.
CFL 093 Reading I 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Introduces basic reading requirements for daily living. Includes public transportation schedules, menus, traffic signs, directions, and common consumer reading. Emphasizes effective strategies for seeking help.
CFL 095 Reading II 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Continues CFL 093. Includes practical exercises in coping skills to identify key words in directions, job-related situations, and social interactions. Emphasizes vocabulary enrichment and comprehension strategies.
CHEMISTRY
CHE 085 Problem Solving 1 Credit Hour
Co-requisite for All CHE Courses.
An open-entry open-exit tutorial class designed to assist student in developing problem-solving skills.
CHE 101 Introduction to Chemistry I 5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: Algebra or consent of instructor.
For non-science majors, students in occupational and health programs, or students with no chemistry background. Includes measurements, atomic theory, chemical bondings, gas laws, condensed states, and organic chemistry. Laboratory experiments demonstrate the above concepts qualitatively and quantitatively.
CHE 102 Introduction to Chemistry II 5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: CHE 101
Includes hybridization of atomic orbitals for carbon; nomenclature of organic compounds; preparation and reactions of hydrocarbons, alcohols, halides, amines, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives; and introduction to biological chemistry. Laboratory experiments demonstrate the above concepts quantitatively and qualitatively.
CHE 111 General College Chemistry I 5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: One year of High School Chemistry or Equivalent.
Co-Requisite: College Algebra or consent of instructor.
For science and engineering majors. Includes the study of measurement, atomic theory, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, gases, condensed states, solutions, and thermodynamics. Includes problem solving skills and descriptive contents. Laboratory techniques demonstrate the quantitative analytical techniques involved in chemistry.
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CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CHE 111
Includes chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibrium, ionic equilibrium, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. Problem solving skills and descriptive contents will be included. Organic chemistry may be included if time permits. Laboratory experiments will demonstrate both the quantitative analytical techniques.
COMMERCIAL ART
COA 100 Lettering/Typographic Design and Career Survey
5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Co-requisite: COA 106
Introduces the concepts of typography as applied to graphic communications. Exercises in both layout and finished lettering for advertising and logo design. Study of type recognition and typographic technology. Career possibilities are explored with tours, guest speakers and printed materials.
COA 105 Advertising Typography and Layout 5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Prerequisite: COA 100 Co-requisite: COA 107
Covers production of layouts for graphic problems. Also working with clients, producing concepts, thumbnails, rough layouts, comprehensive layouts and presentation methods. Develops skills in layout rendering of photography and illustration, copy fitting, researching layout subjects, indicating lettering for headlines and subheads and developing concepts, as well as basic market research.
COA 106 Descriptive Drawing and Rendering 5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Co-requisite: COA 100
Introduces methods of accurate drawing. Included are exercises in measuring, ruling, scaling, shading in ink and precise drawing of objects in two and three dimensions. Ink line renderings will be covered. (Entry-level skills: good eye/hand coordination.)
COA 107 Rendering for Advertising Design 5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Co-requisite: COA 105
Introduces product rendering in pen and ink, cut films, wash and opaque water media for print reproduction. Explores both free-hand and mechanical methods.
COA 200 Advertising Design and Portfolio Preparation
5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Prerequisites: COA 100, 105, 106 and 107 Introduces the process of solving comprehensive advertising design problems. Students gain experience in designing and developing concepts through to final presentations. Projects are prepared for portfolio presentation and consideration is given to the final portfolio in practice and theory. (Entry-level skills: minimum tenth-grade reading skills.)
COA 205 Creative Graphic Design and Portfolio Preparation 5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Prerequisites: COA 200 and 206 Provides further experience in designing trademarks, packaging, symbols, signing and resumes. Emphasizes demonstration of job readiness through portfolio preparation and presentation techniques.
COA 206 Art Preparation for Reproduction 5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Prerequisite: First-year COA Program
Applies the production of type and paste up in simple one and two color printing. Emphasis on development of basic manual skills, precision measuring and copy proofing. Covers marking copy procedures. (Entry-level skills: knowledge of advertising layout.)
COA 207 Advanced Art Preparation for Reproduction
5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Prerequisite: COA 206
Explores and presents exercises in production of more complicated, camera-ready art, including four-color separations, ink and paper specification, type markup, computer type setting and effects of production on design. (Entry level skills: some knowledge of paste up.)
COA 208 Illustration 5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Prerequisite: First-year COA Program
Develops competencies in illustration. Exercises are aimed at developing proficiency in a variety of traditional as well as experimental techniques. (Entry-level skills: demonstrated drawing and layout skills.)
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COMMUNICATIONS
COM 121 Interpersonal Communication 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores basic principles of interpersonal communication theory and involves student in practicing skills to improve relationships with others.
COM 135 Comparing Languages 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides an overview of the similarities and differences between languages. Compares and contrasts the following systems of the English and Spanish languages: the sound system, the structural system and the meaning system. Assists in revealing those features of a first language which may interfere in learning a second language.
COM 250 The Elements of Argument 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 111 or Permission of Instructor
Presents practical reasoning concepts which are applicable to both formal studies and ordinary life. Presents a scheme of practical analysis applied to a variety of interdisciplinary materials adaptable to the paralegal and communications fields.
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
CIS 110 Introduction to the PC 1-2 Credit Hours/15-30 Contact Hours
Introduces personal computer usage and terminology. Covers the following hardware areas: CPU, ROM-/RAM, input/output, printers, disk drives, hard disks. Also explores disk operating system including command structure and applications software.
CIS 111 Introduction to Computers 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Focuses upon computer technology with emphasis on terminology used to describe computer components, memory and storage. Introduces the major types of application software and computer languages. Also explores the legal and ethical issues that have arisen around the computer revolution. Students will select a particular software program (word processing, spreadsheet or data base) for extended study.
CIS 120 WordStar
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours
Enables the student to apply word processing skills, utilizing WordStar on the IBM/PC. Includes creating, editing, printing, storing of documents on diskettes and other word processing functions.
CIS 122 MultiMate
1-3 Credit Hour/20-60 Contact Hours
Introduces document creation, simple editing features, saving files, formatting and printing documents in this word processing program. Develops facility in using MultiMate menu functions.
CIS 123 Electric Pencil
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours
Introduces document creation, simple editing features, saving files, formatting and printing documents in this word processing program. Develops facility in using Electric Pencil menu functions.
CIS 124 IBM Displaywriter 1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SEC 102 or Typing Speed of 45 WPM
Enables the student to apply word processing skills utilizing the IBM/Displaywriter. Includes creating, editing, printing, storing documents on diskettes and various other word processing functions.
CIS 125 WordPerfect 1 -3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours
Enables the student to apply word processing skills, utilizing WordPerfect on the IBM/PC. Includes creating, editing, printing, and storing materials on diskettes, along with various other word processing functions.
CIS 126 Microsoft Word
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours
Introduces document creation, simple editing features, saving files, formatting and printing documents in this word processing program. Develops facility in using Microsoft Word menus.
CIS 127 WANG
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours
Trains students to apply word processing skills, utilizing the WANG PC. Includes creating, editing, printing, storing of documents on diskettes and various othei word processing functions.
CIS 140 dBASE III +
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the functions of dBASE III including file creation, searches, sorts, simple editing. Includes designing printed reports, quick code, utilities, screer generators, and file matching. Also presents dBASE II programming, problem solving and interfacing with other software packages Note: Separate one (1) credit hour modules (CIS 141-143) also may be taken.
CIS 141 Introduction to dBase III +
1 Credit Hours/20 Contact Hours
Introduces the functions of dBase III including file creation, searches, sorts, simple editing and indexing Emphasizes data base design features, and data fielc types.
CIS 142 Intermediate dBase III +
1 Credit Hours/20 Contact Hours
Expands on CIS 141 features. Content includes design ing printed reports, quick code, utilities, screen gen erators, string operators and file matching.
CIS 143 Advanced dBase III +
1 Credit Hours/20 Contact Hours
Introduces dBase III programming, problem solving and interfacing with other software packages.
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CIS 150 LOTUS 1-2-3
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces basic spreadsheet functions and LOTUS command structure. Includes file saves, retrieval, combining and printing. Also introduces Data Base development and extracts. Presents graphics and explore fonts, students develop menu driven macros and examine "what-if" tables. Note: Separate one (1) credit hour modules (CIS 151-153) also may be taken.
CIS 151 Introduction to Lotus 1-2-3 1 Credit Hours/20 Contact Hours
Introduces basic spreadsheet functions and Lotus command structure. Includes formula development and the following functions: @SUM, @AVG, @MIN, @MAX. Also includes file saves, retrieval, combining and printing.
CIS 152 Intermediate Lotus 1-2-3 1 Credit Hours/20 Contact Hours
Focuses on more advanced functions including (LOOKUP, @DATE, @NOW. Introduces data Base development and extracts. Explores graphics, graph printing and fonts.
CIS 153 Advanced Lotus 1-2-3 1 Credit Hours/20 Contact Hours
Emphasizes the development and execution of macros to automate the spreadsheet and develops menu driven macros. Introduces "What-lf" tables.
CIS 154 Supercalc 4 Spreadsheet 1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours
Introduces basic spreadsheet functions and spreadsheet organization. Includes formula development and major functions. Also includes file saves, retrieval, combining and printing.
CIS 155 Multiplan VER 2 Spreadsheet 1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours
Introduces basic spreadsheet functions and spreadsheet organization. Includes formula development and major functions. Also includes file saves, retrieval, combining and printing.
CIS 160 MS-DOS/PC-DOS
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours
Introduces the basic utilities of the Disk Operating System. Features include: COPY, DISKCOPY, FORMAT, DIR, CHKDSK, TYPE, RENAME, and ERASE. Includes general discussion of file management and file storage safety.
CIS 170 Introduction to BASIC
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours
Introduces coding and execution of programming problems in BASIC using structured programming techniques.
CIS 171 Programming in BASIC 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 111
Introduces coding and execution of programming problems in BASIC using structured programming techniques. Includes I/O operations, batch and inter-
active processing, arithmetic operations, string manipulation, control breaks, sorting and sequential file handling.
CIS 172 Introduction to PASCAL 1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours
Introduces coding and execution of programming problems in PASCAL using structured programming techniques.
CIS 173 Programming in PASCAL 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 111
Introduces coding and execution of computer programs in PASCAL using structured programming techniques. Includes datatypes, I/O operations, numerical operations, string manipulation, pointers, arrays and file handling.
CIS 174 Programming in COBOL 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 111
Introduces coding and execution of programs in COBOL using structured programming techniques. Includes I/O operations, arithmetic operations, report headings, editing and control breaks, final total processing, nested IFs, simple table handling procedures and sorting.
CIS 175 Programming in FORTRAN 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 111
Introduces the coding, execution and documentation of programming problems using FORTRAN. Includes I/O operations, arithmetic operations, logical and relational operations, report generation, character data arrays, subroutines and file handling.
CIS 177 Introduction to LOGO 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Introduces coding and execution of programming problems in LOGO using a graphics language to illustrate programming principles.
CIS 180 Framework
1-2 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Covers the basic mechanics of using the integrated word processor, spreadsheet, graphics telecommunications and data base features of the software in a modular format. Emphasizes moving information between the various sub-programs of the package to create composite documents.
CIS 182 Enable
1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 110, CIS 111 or permission of instructor
Covers the basic mechanics of using the integrated word processor, spreadsheet, graphics telecommunications and data base features of the software in a modular format. Emphasizes moving information among the various sub-programs of the package to create composite documents.
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CIS 191 Symphony
1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Covers the basic mechanics of using an integrated word processor, spreadsheet, graphics telecommunications and data base features of the software in a modular format. Emphasizes moving information among the various sub-programs of the package to create composite documents.
CIS 215 Distributed Computing 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 111
Introduces the concepts and techniques of Data Communications and electronic data transfer. Explores various media, techniques and architectures of Local and Wide area Networks. Includes methodology of large scale to micro computer communication.
CIS 216 Data Base Concepts 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 111
Introduces the principles of data base concepts. Includes relational and hierarchical database structure, query commands and command level programs. Students establish, access and update data bases.
CIS 217 System Analysis and Design 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 111 and one programming language
Introduces materials, techniques and procedures used to develop a computerized business. Includes fact gathering, forms design and file design, charting techniques, system presentation, audits, controls, project management and systems implementation and evaluation.
CIS 231 On-Line Program Development on the IBM Mainframe 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the techniques and software packages used to develop computer programs on the IBM mainframe computer. Emphasizes use of the Interactive System Productivity Facility (ISPF). Presents the native TSO language and TSO CLIST procedures, the use of library management facilities such as IBM Partitioned Data Sets (PDS) and the PANVALET and LIBRARIAN software products.
CIS 233 Introduction to Command-Level CICS/VS
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the concepts of on-line systems and programs, the use of the CICS/VS software product, and the creation of CICS Maps using the Basic Mapping Support (BMS) facility. Students develop and test procedural language programs which use CICS Maps and command-level CICS facilities. COBOL is the primary procedural language. PL/I and Assembler programs which use CICS also may be presented. Therefore, it is recommended that a student have completed a course in one of these three languages, preferably COBOL.
CIS 260 Operating Systems and JCL 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 111 and one programming language
Introduces the IBM OS/VS operating system and Job Control Language. Include components of the operating system, JOB and EXEC in stream and DD statements for sequential, partitioned and indexed data sets, in stream and cataloged data sets, utility routines and the function of virtual storage.
CIS 262 UNIX
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 111 and one programming language
Introduces the structure and fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System. Instruction includes directories and sub- directories, screen and line editors, terminal use, system accounts, and the UNIX shell.
CIS 265 Programming in Assembler-BAL 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: CIS 111 and one programming language
Introduces the coding and execution of business programs using the IBM 370 assembler language. Programs are coded, executed and documented using structured programming techniques. Includes data representation, instruction formats, arithmetic operations, string manipulation, branching instructions, editing, and logical operations.
CIS 271 Programming in RPG 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 111
Introduces the Report Program Generator language. Includes I/O operations, arithmetic operations, file description and use of tables.


CIS 273 Programming in 'C'
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 111 and CIS 173 or permission of instructor
Introduces the coding and execution of programming problems using the 'C' language. Topics covered include I/O operations, string manipulations, arithmetic operations, pointers, logical and relational operations and file handling.
CIS 274 Advanced COBOL 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 174
Continues CIS 174 COBOL. Students code, execute and document programs using structured programming techniques. Includes multi-dimensional table handling, sequential file maintenance, report writer, indexed file maintenance and dump reading.
DRAFTING FOR INDUSTRY
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours
Introduces drafting for drafting majors and non-majors. Includes: lettering, line work, reproduction methods and geometric constructions; orthographic projection and sketching; isometric sketching; orthographic and sectioning drafting practices; introduction to inking.
DRI 106 Basic Descriptive Geometry and
Auxiliary View
Projection
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 105
Introduces: line problems true length, point view, bearing, slope and azimuth; plane problems edge view, dihedral angle, true size and shape of any plane, true angle between two lines, true length of a line by the principle line method; shortest distances between parallel and non-parallel lines and lines and planes; and intersecting lines and planes.
DRI 107 Dimensioning and Tolerancing Practices
6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 106
Introduces the principles of sections, conventions and basic dimensioning practices. Uses cumulative, aligned fractional and unidirectional, coordinate and decimal dimensional systems.
DRI 109 Intersections and Developments 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 107
Introduces the principles of flat and curved surface intersections and their resulting developments in terms of thin materials and heavy plate applications. Right and oblique prisms, cylindrical and conical surfaces transitions and their resulting intersections and developments will be completed.
DRI 115 Pictorial Drawing
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: DRI 109
Introduces two point perspectives and presentation charts, including diagrams and drawings.
DRI 116 Mechanical Assembly and Detail Projects
6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 115
Introduces the drawing of mechanical and operating mechanical assemblies and subassemblies and may include cast, welded or machined materials and purchased parts. Includes preparation of appropriate assembly drawings and necessary detail drawings utilizing required parts callouts and material lists and appropriate dimensions for the subject matter. Introduces precision dimensioning techniques.
DRI 200 Drafting for Civil/Topographic Mapping
6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 116
Introduces various techniques of civil/topographic mapping utilizing a specified plat. Content includes working from field notes, bearing and distance, traverses, coordinates, plat maps, plot or site plans, contours, and various civil, topographic and geological surface and subsurface conventions.
DRI 205 Introduction to Architectural-Structural Plans and Details
6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 200
Requires the drawing of a small industrial building utilizing masonry, concrete and steel plans and details showing architectural and structural elements, use of AISC Manual of Steel Construction, Smoley's Tables and Architectural Graphic Standards.
DRI 206 Industrial Piping and Utility Considerations
6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 205
Requires drawings to be made based on details for industrial piping and/or electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic, plumbing, heating and air conditioning systems.
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DRI 207 Large Mechanical Equipment 9 Credit Hours/180 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 206
Introduces the development of large mechanical assemblies, their subassemblies and details pertinent to their manufacture and installation. Includes rotary dryers, dust collectors, vessels, hoppers, bins, separators and similar equipment. The AISC Manual of Steel Construction and Smoley's Tables are used.
DRI 208 Material Handling and Conveying Methods
6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 207
Introduces material handling methods, systems, equipment and building factors used in conveying bulk material or packaged goods. Includes developing plans, details and drive components for a material handling system.
DRAFTING FOR
CIVIL/TOPOGRAPHIC
MAPPING
DRM 200 Map Construction Techniques 9 Credit Hours/180 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 200
Introduces the following areas and materials as used in base map construction: land and geological symbols, pressure-sensitive transfer type and pattern screens, independent and dependent survey, planimetric measurements, route curves, easements and spirals, survey plants, topographic sheets, aerial photos and survey notes.
DRM 205 Advanced Map Construction Techniques
6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRM 200
Involves base and overlay map construction, the use of metes and bounds, written legal descriptions, coordinates, latitude and longitude, azimuth and tangent methods.
DRAFTING FOR PETRO/CHEMICAL PIPING PROCESSES
DRP 112 Process Piping Drafting II 6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 206
Reviews equipment foundations, piping specifications and general specifications, standard piping details and elevation, sections and isometric pipe runs of depropanizer area.
DRP 200 Process Piping Design I and Model Making
9 Credit Hours/180 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRP 112
Introduces process terms, plant arrangement and feed tanks, plot plans, vessels and piping systems.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND MANAGEMENT
ECE 100 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides interaction with children and educators in various settings. Planned Observations give students the opportunity to develop and understand early childhood education.
ECE 110 Child Growth and Development I 5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Co-requisite: Recommended ECE 100
Identifies the growth and development of the child from the prenatal stage through the sixth year of life. The integration of physical, emotional and cognitive development is observed and interpreted by the student for a better understanding of the total child.
ECE 120 Curriculum Development 5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours
Introduces the process of planning and designing learning environments, materials, and experiences that meet the developmental needs of individuals or groups of children.
ECE 125 Creativity and the Young Child 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores the design of an appropriate environment and experiences that enhance the child's development of creativity.
ECE 126 Health and Safety of the Young Child
1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Introduces first aid, preventive health concepts and maintenance of a healthy and safe environment for children.
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ECE 127 Specialized Learning
Environments-Outdoors
1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Explores the design of outdoor play-learning environments appropriate for young children.
ECE 141 Preschool Supervised Lab Experience and Seminar
5 Credit Hours/150 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor Provides the first supervised experience working with children in group settings. Introduces all areas of curriculum and many areas of operating a center. Requires a weekly staff meeting for planning, evaluation and staff development.
ECE 149 Supervised Lab Extension I 1-6 Credit Hours/30-180 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Provides the student with the opportunity to become more proficient at short and long range planning, evaluating the progress of children and guiding other adults in the classroom setting.
ECE 151 Supervised Student Teaching and Seminar
5 Credit Hours/150 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Provides the first field experience working with young children. Develops the student's understanding of children's growth and behavior and the ability to meet their individual and group needs. Focuses on the teaching styles and ways of relating to children and adults. Requires a weekly seminar.
ECE 161 Introduction to Early Childhood
Education for the
Day Care Home Provider
1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Explores various aspects of meeting the needs of young children and parents in the day care home setting.
ECE 170 Initial Evaluation (CDA)
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact hours Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Provides opportunities to observe, evaluate and establish a baseline of performance and knowledge in six CDA competency areas to enable prescriptive training.
ECE 175 Creative Learning Environments (CDA)
5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours
Provides experience in setting-up and maintaining an environment which is safe, healthy and conducive to creative learning.
ECE 176 Physical and Intellectual Development of the Child
(CDA)
5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours
Introduces methods and theories of teaching the young child while developing skills in the physical, cognitive and creative language areas.
ECE 177
Social/Emotional/Development/Guidance of the Child (CDA)
5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours
Introduces theory and methods of providing physical and emotional security for each child, resulting in self esteem. Explores techniques to provide positive guidance.
ECE 178 Family and Community (CDA)
5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours
Develops optimal coordination and understanding between care givers and parents. Parental and community involvement is encouraged and developed by establishing positive and productive relationships in the developmental process.
ECE 179 Administration I Program Management (CDA)
5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours
Provides a systematic approach to establishing a day care program which meets the needs of children and their families. Includes planning, record keeping and supplementary responsibilities. Reviews child care licensing requirements and child rearing practices.
ECE 180 Administration II Professionalism (CDA)
5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours
Provides increased knowledge of physical, cognitive, language, emotional and social development of young children as a basis for planning program goals.
ECE 185 Child Abuse and Neglect 1-5 Credit Hours/15-75 Contact Hours
Assists parents, child care workers and others to understand and take constructive action against child neglect and abuse.
ECE 187 CDA Advisor's Workshop 1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Introduces theory and practice of competency-based training, CDA criteria and assessment methods.
ECE 189 Final Evaluation and Credentialing Process for the
Child Development Associate (CDA)
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Establishes exiting competence in six CDA competency areas for recommendation for national CDA assessment and credentialing.
ECE 195 Workshop of Ideas I
1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Presents current ideas to teachers, parents and others interested in young children. Explores child development, adult- child interactions and other topics of current interest.
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ECE 198 The Joys of Parenting: Understanding the YoungChild
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides parents, expectant parents, teenagers and grandparents, with methods and techniques for handling potentially stressful periods and enhancing the optimum in learning. Includes special sessions with parents who have completed four semesters in the Parent Seminars.
ECE 210 Child Growth and Development II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Promotes an understanding of child development aimed at integrating the student's understanding of the whole child. Through analysis of theories and recent trends relevant to human development and learning, the student will develop a philosophy of education. Includes observation.
ECE 215 Applied Child Growth and Development
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Relates fundamental knowledge of the child's physical, cognitive, social and emotional development to application in infant and early child settings.
ECE 222 Classroom Management Techniques 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores various techniques and theories for understanding and coping with children individually and in group settings.
ECE 225 Curriculum Development: Language and Cognition
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides a comprehensive study of the development of appropriate experiences and materials in language and cognition that promote the young child's mastery of his or her world.
ECE 226 Curriculum Development: Music and Movement
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Develops and implements appropriate experiences, using materials in music and movement that promote the young child's mastery of his or her world.
ECE 227 Curriculum Development: Science and Math
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines curriculum and development in math and science. Plan appropriate experiences, using materials in science and math that assist the young child to master his or her world.
ECE 251 Supervised Student Teaching and Seminar II
5 Credit Hours/150 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Collaborates with teaching institutions to allow students to assume increasing responsibility for program planning, implementation, and evaluation of children. Focuses upon children's group relationships, parent involvement and staff interactions. Requires a weekly seminar.
ECE 261 Administration I Parent Involvement and Staff Development
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Presents an analysis and interpretation of supervision and administration procedures relevant to early childhood programs; techniques related to involving and educating parents; and hiring and training staff. Community resources are studied as they apply to home and school needs.
ECE 262 Administration II Licensing and Operations
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces licensing rules pertinent to the opening or operation of a children's center. Includes licensing, insurance, policy statements and procedures for financial management.
ECE 265 Administration Workshop: Communications and Leadership
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Provides an experiential workshop in which students learn and practice techniques for promoting effective communication and decision making and combating "burn-out." Focuses on application of these basic group-process skills in staff development and parent involvement activities.
ECE 269 Nutrition for Young Children
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Promotes basic nutrition concepts, menu planning, food shopping, preparation and cooking with children. Emphasizes the relationship of good nutrition to optimum health and development.
ECONOMICS
ECO 117 Introduction to Economics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Emphasizes development of economic systems and philosophies; applications of fundamental economic concepts.
ECO 120 Consumer Economics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Deals with day-to-day economic survival, and enlightens students to the many alternatives available to them in terms of money management, planning and thinking in order to attain a higher quality of living, now and in the future.
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Overviews the American economy stressing the interrelationship among the consumer, business and government sectors. Includes saving and investment decisions, unemployment, inflation, GNP analysis, taxing and spending policies, the Federal Reserve System, money and banking and their relationship to the economy. Briefly covers International economics.
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ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Analyzes the firm as it relates to the economy as a whole and economic issues. Students construct and study several economic models related to the firm: perfect competition; monopoly; oligopoly; and, monopolistic competition.
ECO 205 Labor Economics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ECO 201 or 202
Analyzes collective bargaining, labor laws, determination of wages, hours and work in the American Economy. Includes the influence of various interest groups in decision-making within the political economy.
ECO 210 Political Economy 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ECO 201 or 202
Compares the roles of consumers, business and government in the economy. Examines the influence of various interest groups in decision-making within the political economy.
EDUCATION
EDU 140 Seminar in Peer Tutoring 1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Prepares students to be effective tutors of their peers. Includes general tutoring techniques, establishing rapport with the learner, adult learning styles, and conducting small-group tutorials. Also includes establishing learning goals and techniques for tutoring the special learner.
EDU 142 Teaching the Developmental^ Disabled Adult
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the student to teaching developmentally disabled adults. Focuses upon teaching daily living skills, athletic skills enrichment, applied academics, and pre- vocational/employment skills. Also reviews general concepts in developmental disabilities.
ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the student to simple components and DC circuits while developing safe work habits. The student will construct and evaluate series and parallel circuits to show relationships of voltage, current, resistance and power, using DC meters to measure circuit values.
ELT 101 DC Circuits and Magnetism 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 100
Continues the study of DC circuits by examining series- parallel resistive circuits such as the loaded voltage divider, RC and RL time constant circuits and properties of magnetism, inductance and capacitance.
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: ELT 101
Introduces AC concepts and circuits, using AC meters, oscilloscopes and signal generators. Students construct and analyze series and parallel circuits with inductance or capacitance and resistance to show relationships of voltage, current, phase, power and impedance using phasor analysis.
ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 102
Continues the study of AC circuits with RCL phasor analysis. Students construct, analyze and troubleshoot complex series- parallel circuits both on and off resonance, with filter applications.
ELT 104 Network Theorems and Vacuum Tubes
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 103
Applies advanced analysis to AC and DC circuits with Thevenin's, Norton's, Superposition and Maximum Power Transfer theorems. Students also construct and analyze vacuum tube amplifiers using DC load lines and curve families.
ELT 110 Diode Circuits 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 104
Introduces the fundamentals of solid-state devices, both diodes and transistors. Students construct and analyze diode circuits including rectifiers, clippers and clampers, and examine characteristics of zener and transistor regulated power supplies.
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ELT 111 Transistor Amplifiers
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: ELT 110
Continues the study of transistors by examining three basic amplifier configurations for AC and DC characteristics using load lines and equivalent circuits. Student construct class A and B power amps, phase splitters and phase inverters.
ELT 112 JFET's and Oscillators 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 111
Continues the study of amplifiers with classes C, D, and S, and introduces the junction field effect transistor and principles of oscillation. Students construct and analyze FET amplifiers and oscillator circuits including multivibrators, phase-shift, Hartley Colpitts and Schmitt trigger.
ELT 113 Special Devices 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 112
Examines a variety of special-application solid-state devices. The student will determine operating characteristics of MOSFET's, SCR's UJT's, TRIAC's, LED's and opto-couplers while constructing power-control and other circuits.
ELT 114 Operational Amplifiers 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 113
Introduces the multipurpose op amp by examining a wide range of applications. Students construct and analyze differential and IC operational amplifier circuits including summers, integrators, differentiators, active filters and 555 timers.
ELT 200 Pulse and Digital Fundamentals 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 114
Introduces digital electronics. Students demonstrate the principles of digital integrated circuits using binary, octal, hexadecimal and other codes,logic gates, truth tables, Boolean algebra and combinational logic.
ELT 201 Digital Circuits 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 200
Continues the study of digital circuits by demonstrating the principles and operation of logic circuits, including flip-flops, counters, registers and memory circuits. Students use algebraic techniques and Karnaugh mapping as tools for circuit simplification.
ELT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 201
Introduces the microprocessor by examining the arithmetic logic unit, microprocessor families, memories and bus construction. The operation of the microcomputer trainer (8080A) will be demonstrated.
ELT 203 Microprocessor Applications 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 202
Continues the study of microprocessors by writing assembly language programs for 8080A and 8085, converting programs to machine code, and interfacing the programmed trainer to peripheral devices.
ELT 204 Microcomputer Systems I
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 203
Applies digital theory to the computer by examining interfacing and timing cycles for computer systems, including display and/or printer. Students troubleshoot, calibrate and align major components using logic analyzer and other test equipment.
ELT 205 Microcomputer Interfacing and Software
4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 202
Demonstrates the assembly and alignment of floppy disc drives using software and oscilloscope techniques. The student will perform board level repair on power supply, display, disc drive, I/O and motherboard circuits and perform component level repair on memory.
ELT 206 Microcomputer Repair 4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 205
Demonstrates assembly of a microcomputer system from power supply, chassis, memory and adaptor components. Students interface to peripheral devices and troubleshoot with diagnostic software, digital meters, and logic probes.
ELT 210 Communications I 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 214
Introduces the theory of communications by examining basic principles of RF wave propagation, antenna theory, transmitters and receivers. Includes amplitude, frequency and pulse modulation circuits, stereo encoding and decoding.
ELT 211 Instruments and Measurements I 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 204
Demonstrates principles of measurements and measuring systems, selection, application and limitations of test instruments. Students examine operation, special applications and circuitry of analog and digital meters, oscilloscopes and function generators.
ELT 212 Troubleshooting Techniques for
Analog and Digital
Systems
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 204
Provides students with opportunities to apply all accumulated theory by analyzing and isolating representative circuit faults using troubleshooting procedures such as signal tracing and signal substitutions, and voltage and signal measurements.
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ELT 213 Fabrication Techniques 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 204
Demonstrates methods of circuit fabrication. Students prepare printed circuit boards using photographic and chemical etching techniques and apply assembly, solder and wire-wrapping techniques to a self-designed electronic device.
ELT 214 Microcomputer Systems II 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 204
Compares and contrasts IBM-PC and Apple lie computer systems. Students run diagnostic tests, troubleshoot, repair and/or service systems using technical data and test equipment.
ELT 215 Instruments and Measurements II 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 211
Examines applications and limitations of specialized test equipment including frequency counters, spectrum analyzers and storage scopes. Students select and apply signal conditioners and transducers and test citizens band transceivers.
ELT 222 Introduction to Biomedical Technology
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 203
Applies terminology and theory of optics, electromagnetism, transducers, fluid dynamics and basic physiology to servicing of medical equipment including autoclaves and incubators.
ELT 223 High Frequency and Clinical Lab Instrumentation
4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 222
Demonstrates principles of operation of telemetry, diothermy, ultrasound and electrosurgical equipment, and examines blood chemical and cell counting tests/ measurements.
ELT 224 Biophysical Measurements, EKG
Equipment and
Troubleshooting
4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 223
Examines cardiovascular and nervous systems with application of test instrumentation including EEG, EMG, EKG, fibrilators, respirators and ventilators.
ELT 225 Hospital Internship 2 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 224
Provides clinical exposure for students in the Biomedical program. The student will observe and apply theory under supervision at a local hospital.
ENGLISH
English assessment is required for new students before or during registration. Assessment results will be used to advise students into courses for which they are prepared.
ENG 107 Language Fundamentals I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Reviews basic grammar patterns and formal/informal written use of English. Introduces sentence structure, organization patterns and various approaches to word usage.
ENG 108 Language Fundamentals II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Continues review of grammar and a general review of basic writing skills. Also covers more complex sentence structure, punctuation, and basic paragraph style and organization.
ENG 109 Workshop in Reading, Writing and Speaking
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Facilitates transfer of skills among the three basic areas of communication reading, writing and speaking. Surveys small- group communication skills and reviews logical structure and its implementation to the three communication areas. Also concentrates on critical thinking skills.
ENG 110 Composition, Style and Technique 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Assessment score of 3 or Permission of Instructor
Introduces academic and career writing with emphasis on the writing process, information sources and organization and development of written assignments for specific purposes and audiences. Examines composition techniques including language fluency, effective diction and appropriate sentence, paragraph and essay structure.
ENG 115 Creative Writing 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Assessment score of 3
Focuses upon the writing of poems, short stories, short plays or non-fiction articles.
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ENG 121 English Composition I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Emphasizes the planning, writing, and revising of compositions, including the development of critical and logical thinking skills. Includes a minimum of five (5) compositions, which may include expressive, informative, analytical, evaluative, and persuasive writing.
ENG 122 English Composition II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Expands and refines the objectives of English Composition I. Emphasizes critical and logical thinking, problem definition, research strategies, and writing analytical, evaluative, and or persuasive papers that incorporate research.
ENG 125 Poetry Writing 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Assessment score of 3
Focuses on the writing of poems and the study of language and patterns of poetry.
ENG 231 Technical Writing 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 111 or Permission of Instructor
Surveys the principles of organizing, writing and revising a variety of clear, readable reports for business, industry and government.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
ESL 100 Low Intermediate ESL 1 or 3 Credit Hours/15 or 45 Contact Hours
Introduces basic grammar structures in conversational setting, increases basic vocabulary, and improves pronunciation. Emphasizes controlled reading and writing
exercises.
ESL 101 High Intermediate ESL 1 or 3 Credit Hours/15 or 45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ESL 100
Introduces intermediate grammar structures in conversational setting and develops vocabulary through controlled intermediate writing and reading exercises.
ESL 102 Basic Reading 1 or 3 Credit Hours/15 or 45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ESL 100
Focuses on reading comprehension skills. Presents effective ways to develop and increase reading skills, word attack skills and vocabulary use.
ESL 103 ESL Grammar 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ESL 100
Presents basic grammar structures, introduces sentence structure and methods of vocabulary development.
ESL 104 Basic Composition for ESL Students 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours.
Prerequisite: ESL 103
Introduces organizational patterns in paragraph writing; develops and refines grammatical structure and enhances students' vocabulary use.
ESL 105 Intermediate Composition for ESL Students
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ESL 104
Covers longer paragraph organization, more advanced grammatical structures and more sophisticated vocabulary. Prepare students for ENG composition classes.
ESL 106 English for Vocational Majors 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Provides activities that will increase students' comprehension and use of technical vocabulary and grammatical patterns encountered in various vocational areas.
ESL 107 Pronunciation 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Enriches vocabulary and word attack skills through listening discrimination exercises. Includes introductions to the English vowel and consonant systems and stresses word analysis.
FOREIGN AUTOMOTIVE MECHANICS
FAM 100 Orientation, Safety, Basic Electrical
and Ignition
Systems
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the automotive program, general shop safety, basic engine operations, electrical theory along with an introduction to the reading of oscilloscope patterns and the use of electronic testing instruments, conventional and solid state ignition systems, metric system and the operation of emission control components.
FAM 105 Starting and Charging Systems 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Examines the operation of the automotive charging and starting systems. Instructs in the diagnoses and repair of the systems.
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FAM 109 Drum Brake Systems 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the hydraulic principles and theory of the automotive drum brake systems. Includes the service, maintenance, and use of proper tools.
FAM 110 Disc Brake Systems 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the theory and operation of automotive disc brakes. Includes the service and maintenance with a special emphasis on the use of service machines.
FAM 115 Wheel Alignment 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the theory and principles of wheel alignment by use of electronic devices. Includes service based on electronic diagnosis.
FAM 116 Wheel Balance and Suspension 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the theory and operation of wheel balance and suspension by use of electronic devices. Includes service based on electronic diagnosis.
FAM 117 Steering Gears and Systems 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the theory and service of steering gears and systems on both import and domestic models.
FAM 206 Automatic Transmissions Theory and Maintenance 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the theory and basic principles of automatic transmissions on both import and domestic models.
FAM 207 Automatic Transmission Rebuilding 6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours
Requires diagnosing malfunctions, troubleshooting various components and rebuilding automatic transmissions.
FAM 208 Engine Operation, Diagnosis,
Disassembly and
Measurement
6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours
Introduces the theory and procedures for engine overhauls, disassembly and measurements. Special emphasis on micrometers and special tools.
FAM 209 Engine Reconditioning and Assembly
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the theory and instructions for engine assembly procedures and reconditioning of the complete engine.
FINANCIAL SERVICES
FIN 101 Introduction to Finance 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Surveys financial markets, the place of finance in the business economy, the role of the financial manager, the organization of financial intermediaries, and the basic techniques of financial analysis.
FIN 105 Law and Banking
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Examines negotiable instruments and their implications within the financial sector. Covers the essential elements of negotiable instruments, the rules for intervention and liabilities of parties of an instrument.
FIN 106 Principles of Banking
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Reviews commercial banking functions and operations, including the Federal Reserve System, regulations, security and staff responsibilities.
FIN 111 Introduction to Credit Unions 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Studies the legal basis for the operation of a credit union, as well as the powers and characteristics of credit unions. Roles and functions of credit union management and volunteers will be examined. Bonding, insurance, and the developing credit union financial system.
FIN 112 Credit Union Financial Management 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Covers the concepts of financial management as practiced in a credit union environment, including pricing member services, managing risk and issues of the future.
FIN 113 Credit Union Accounting 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Explains terms and procedures basic to accounting and unique to credit unions. Include concepts of credit union accounting, general records and the general ledger, reserves and undivided earnings, the statement of financial condition, the balancing of other subsidiaries, closing the books, various accounting situations and the credit union cycle.
FIN 115 Introduction to the Savings Institution Business 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Covers the origins and growth of savings institutions, their role in the world of business, their intermediary function, their relationship to the housing industry and markets, the regulatory bodies and government agencies with which they work, and the competitive arena in which they operate.
FIN 116 Funds Transfer Services 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Provides fundamental information about automatic teller machines (ATMs), bank credit cards, point of sale services (POS), check truncation, automated clearing houses (ACHs), home banking and other types of electronic funds transfers.
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FIN 117 Residential Mortgage Lending 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Provides a working knowledge of all aspects of making a residential mortgage loan. Covers the adjustable rate mortgage, alternative mortgage instruments and government related loan programs; includes a brief overview of appraising and the secondary mortgage market.
FIN 118 Financial Planning 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Provides basic financial planning information. Prepares students to answer questions and provide customers with information they seek about financial matters.
FIN 119 Deposit Accounts and Services
2 Credits/30 Contact Hours
Provides an in-depth study of the nature, ownership and classification of deposit accounts, and the terms and conditions for payment of interest. Emphasizes the procedural aspects of deposit accounts.
FIN 120 Savings Institutions Operations
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides a survey of major operational areas in savings associations, including functions and work processes. After study of each area, students review operations in their own associations.
FIN 205 Consumer Lending 2 Credits/30 Contact Hours
Introduces consumer credit and consumer lending activities performed by savings association personnel.
FIN 210 Commercial Lending for Savings Institutions
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Provides an overview of important terms, concepts and techniques needed to perform the complex tasks involved in commercial lending. Includes using commercial lending to reduce vulnerability to economic fluctuations. Marketing, loan commitments and loan administration are examined.
FRE 101 Conversational French I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces conversational French for career, travel and general appreciation of French culture.
FRE 102 Conversational French II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: FRE 101 or Permission of Instructor
Continues FRE 101 with emphasis on conversational French with more practice in basic conversational patterns, grammar and syntax.
FRE 103 Intermediate Conversational French 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides a second year of instruction in basic French conversation. Completes all the fundamental grammar and syntax used in speaking a language. Also provides native speakers with an opportunity for practice and review.
GENERAL EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT
GED 011 GED Preparation
1-12 Credit Hours/15-180 Contact Hours
Prepares the student for the five areas of the GED test: English, Social Studies, Science, Reading and Mathematics. Includes diagnostics and simulated GED test practice.
GEOLOGY
GEY 111 Physical Geology 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Studies the materials of the earth, its structure, surface features and the geologic processes involved in its development. Includes laboratory experience.
GEY 121 Historical Geology 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Physical Geology (GEY 121) or consent of instructor.
Studies the physical and biological development of the earth through the vast span of geologic time. Emphasizes the investigation and interpretation of sedimentary rocks, the record of ancient environment, fossil life forms, and physical events, all within the framework of shifting crustal plates.
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GEOGRAPHY
GEO 105 Geography 3 Credit Hoursi/45 Contact Hours
Introduces concepts of spatial relationships between and among the geographic regions of the world. Includes demographic and cultural (political, economic, and historic) forces related to the physical environments of selected regions. Analyzes interrelationships between developed and developing regions.
GEO 200 Human Ecology 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Surveys world resources, the nature of resources, attitude toward resources, environmental principles and the impact of populations on resource bases.
GEO 220 Geography of Colorado 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines the landforms, vegetation, climate, peoples, economy and culture which gives various areas of Colorado their characteristics.
GEO 230 Urban Geography 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Studies sociological, psychological and economic forces at work in spaces from a spatial, geographic perspective.
GRAPHIC ARTS
GRA 100 Introduction to Graphic Arts 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the history of printing, illegal printing, pica pole, grid sheets, border tape, thumbnails, comprehensive, waxer and beginning paste-up. Emphasizes types, paste-up, harmony, balance and design, letterheads, brochures, ads, proofreading, newspaper paste-up and corrections.
GRA 105 Beginning Process Camera 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 100 or Permission of Instructor
Introduces theory, use, parts, plus types of process camera, films, papers, chemicals, proportions, tint-screens, filters, gray scales for process camera and two color card paste-up, including a window and picture for halftones.
GRA 106 Halftones on Process Camera 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 105 or Permission of Instructor
Introduces theory of halftones, calibrate screens, compute flash chart, shoot halftones, halftone bumps, dropouts design, paste-up two color personal business card and begin shooting. Assignments include pasteup and camera with weak copy, percentage plus f-stop changes and filter factors.
GRA 107 Composition 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 106 or Permission of Instructor
Emphasizes business cards, transfer type, ad helpers, design, paste-up with picture, three panel brochure, shooting of brochure, forms, index cards with two-sided ruling pen, border tape and scribe. (A continuation of GRA 100, 105 and 106.)
GRA 108 Process Camera II and Composition II
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 107 or Permission of Instructor
Reviews line shots, halftones, design, paste-up two color cards and shooting of cards. (A continuation of GRA 105, 106 and 107.)
GRA 109 Beginning Offset Presses 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRA 100-108 series or Permission of Instructor
Introduces operation of offset pres set-up for: paper feeder, register board, delivery and printing head.
GRA 110 Stripping and Small Bindery 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 109 or Permission of Instructor
Introduces simple, advanced, book and color stripping, register pins, small bindery, paper drill, power paper cutter, book bindings, Velo bind, saddle stitch, perfect bind, table model friction folder, perforating, scoring and slitting. (Continuation of offset processes.)
GRA 115 Intermediate Offset Presses 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 110 or Permission of Instructor
Continues the work on beginning offset presses, including quick copy, pressure settings and adjustments, register techniques, introduction to 25" press, multicolor registering and running. (Continuation of offset process.)
GRA 116 Paper, Management and Production 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 115 or Permission of Instructor
Surveys buying, estimating, pricing, job pricing, job planning and scheduling, work flow and plant layout; plus printing papers, figuring, identifying and pricing.
GRA 117 Inks, Plates and Introduction to Large Bindery
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 116 or Permission of Instructor
Introduces students to work with kinds of ink, manufacture and characteristics, ink color mixing and additives, types, brands, characteristics, and processing of offset plates and basics of air fed folder techniques. Teaches offset processes.
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GRA 120 Process Camera and Halftones 6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours
Surveys theory, use, parts of and types of process camera films; covers papers, chemical proportions, tint screen filters, gray scales and theory of halftones; experience in calibrating screens, computing flash chart and shooting halftones.
GRA 200 Process Color Separation 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRA 100 series or Permission of Instructor
Covers process color separation with use of filters, separations of both reflection and transmission copy, transmission densitometer, theory and use of direct and indirect separations. (Continues offset processes.)
GRA 205 Process Color Stripping and Printing 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 200 or Permission of Instructor
Provides students work with set-up, register and offset stripping and printing of process color separation, techniques and features of 25" presses, changing and setting of molleton covers.
GRA 206 Computerized Typesetting 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 205 or Permission of Instructor
Teaches the theory, function and use of a computerized photo typesetter. (Continues offset processes.)
GRA 207 Raised Printing 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 206 or Permission of Instructor
Teaches the theory and use of raised printing functions and set-up of three section air fed folder and set-up of four pocket Rosback signature collator. (Continues offset processes.)
GRA 208 Basic Machine Maintenance 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRA 200 series or Permission of Instructor
Teaches basic settings lubrication, adjustments and minor repair of offset equipment, including presses, cameras, vacuum pumps, etc. (Continues offset processes.)
GRA 209 Silkscreening 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the student to the various methods of commercial silkscreening such as direct photography, indirect photography and hand cut stencils. Introduces equipment, materials and inks for silkscreening. Appropriate for students in graphic arts, commercial art, photography and technical illustration, as well as those interested in silkscreening as a hobby.
GRA 210 Printing Management and Marketing 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRA 100 109, 200 series or Permission of Instructor
Familiarizes the student with estimating, pricing, planning and printing various jobs. Students plan, price and budget for a new, medium sized print shop operation, including building lease, equipment, tools, supplies, overhead and personnel. Before completion of this course the student will be able to successfully complete all aspects of one printing job.
HEALTH OCCUPATIONS
HOC 100 Medical Terminology
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Surveys the origin and structure of medical terms; helps the student interpret and pronounce medical terms used in various health related areas.
HOC 106 Basic Patient Care
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Stresses basic concepts and technical skills common to all health care deliverers. Includes ethical and legal responsibilities, basic techniques necessary to meet health care needs and emergency measures.
HISTORY
HIS 101 Western Civilization I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores the major political, economic, social, diplo-matic/military, cultural, and intellectual events and the roles of key personalities that shaped Western civilization from the prehistoric era to 1715.
HIS 102 Western Civilization II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores the major political, economic, social, diplo-matic/military, cultural, and intellectual events and the roles of key personalities that shaped Western civilization from 1650 to the present day.
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HIS 116 The Native American Experience and Indian History
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides an introduction to the American Indian's historical and socio-cultural development with emphasis upon those processes and relations with non-Indians, which have contributed to the current conditions.
HIS 130 The Southwest United States 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Traces the culture and historical development of what is now the southwestern United States, including the cultural contributions of the American Indian and Chicano peoples.
HIS 201 United States History I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines the major political, economic, social, military, cultural and intellectual events from the first inhabitants through the Civil War.
HIS 202 United States History II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines the major political, economic, social, military, cultural, and intellectual events from reconstruction to the present.
HIS 205 Women in History 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Surveys the roles, experiences and contributions of women in the history of the Americas; explores ways in which women's history modifies traditional interpretations of historical events.
HIS 220 Colorado History I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Focuses upon Colorado's past from the prehistoric Indians, the state's first residents, to the great days of gold and silver.
HIS 221 Colorado History II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines the people, society and culture of Colorado from the silver rush of 1876 through the 20th Century.
HIS 226 History of Denver 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores the history of the development of the greater Denver area from the gold rush to the mid-1980s. Gives an overall and in-depth view of the local culture, heritage and character.
HIS 235 The American West 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Focuses upon Indians, fur traders, explorations, gold rushes, cattlemen, sodbusters, closing of the frontier and developments in the 20th Century.
HIS 246 Mexico: Colonial Period-Present 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Traces the historical and cultural development of Mexico from 1521 to the present; includes an examination of present day politics and society of Mexico.
HOSPITALITY AND
RESTAURANT
ADMINISTRATION
HRA 120 Bartending 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides a working knowledge to the variety of alcoholic beverages served domestically and internationally. Practical hints on equipment and its uses within bar, restaurant and lounge settings; measurement procedures for serving alcoholic beverages.
HRA 130 Front Office Operations 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Covers organization, guest relations, salesmanship, rooming procedure, equipment, cash and credit, accounting, transcripts, office machines, data register and the changing face of hotel keeping.
HRA 201 Food and Beverage Management and Controls
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Outlines the essential principles and procedures of effective food and beverage control and emphasizes calculation of food costs, standards and planning.
HRA 204 Catering Operations 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides practical instruction for catering operation on and off the premises to include staffing techniques for profitable catering.
HUMAN SERVICES
HSE 105 Introduction to Social Welfare 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines a historical and philosophical background of statutes, ideologies, political process, policy making, decision rules and influential leaders who have had an impact on shaping the social welfare institutions in the United States.
HSE 106 Survey of Human Services 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides a philosophical, political, statutory and contemporary process of social problems as they are related to social work, including social work and future trends.
HSE 107 Interviewing Principles and Practices 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Identifies basic concepts of the interview relationship with emphasis on the helping interview. Examines the principles, processes, documentation, and techniques of interviewing with an opportunity to engage in practice interviews, role playing and feedback.
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HSE 108 Introduction Therapeutic Systems 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: HSE 105, 106, 107 or Permission of Instructor
Introduces basic concepts of major therapeutic systems, including backgrounds, developmental theories and practices of specific systems from psychoanalysis to reality therapy.
HSE 109 Social Issues in Human Services
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: HSE 105, 106, 107 or Permission of Instructor
Provides an analytical overview of the social functions of Human Services. Examines the welfare system from the liberal, conservative and radical perspectives. Presents idealism and pragmatism of the present state of human services and trends for the future.
HSE 115 Human Services Practicum I
4 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: HSE 105, 106, 107
Provides experiences in various service agencies to familiarize students with agency work. Emphasis is upon developing observational skills, individual growth in self-awareness, interviewing skills, introduction to agencies and client systems. A weekly classroom seminar complements the agency experience.
HSE 205 Human Services for Groups 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 115 or Permission of Instructor
Introduces the concepts, principles, goals and skills of groupwork as a method of providing human services. Emphasis is on thebasic practice skills and intervention techniques.
HSE 206 Human Services for Families 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 115 or Permission of Instructor
Provides students with introductory knowledge of family theoryand practice. The course covers such topics as: Systems Theory,Communication Theorists, Structure Therapists, DevelopmentalTheory, and Future Directions in Research of Family Therapy.
HSE 207 Community Organization 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 115 or Permission of Instructor
Assists the students to understand the theory and practice of organizing communities, neighborhoods, committees, and advisory boards as they relates to the social service delivery system.
HSE 208 Social Welfare Policy 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 115 or Permission of Instructor
Presents models for social policy analysis, program planning and evaluation. Applies models to relevant social welfare issues.
HSE 209 Crisis Theory and Intervention
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 115 or Permission of Instructor
Introduces the student to basic theories and principles of crisis intervention from a historical as well as a practical orientation.
HSE 211 Human Services Practicum II
4 Credit Hours/60-90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 115
Provides placement in a service agency where the student applies the values, concepts and skills gained in theory courses to the actual process of helping people. Emphasis is upon sharpening skills and knowledge, use of self in the helping process, understanding systems and use of community resources.
HSE 212 Human Services Practicum III 7 Credit Hours/45-150 Contact Hours Prerequisites: HSE 115, 211 Provides practical experience working in a approved social service agency. The student participates in various service agency functions as a group member and leader, and further develops skills and knowledge in the use of self and systems in the helping process.
HSE 213 Substance Abuse: A Multi-Model Approach
3-7 Credit Hours/45-150 Contact Hours Prerequisites: None
Provides a study of major treatment modalities in the area of substance abuse. Topics include: the history of treatment approaches, prevention with emphasis on youth adolescent groups and the families. Major emphasis is upon the delivery of services in helping people with substance abuse problems.
Includes separate theory and practicum components. Students may take either component or both.
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HSE 214 Clinical Social Work Practice With the Elderly
3-7 Credit Hours/45-150 Contact Hours Prerequisites: None
Examines aging as a human experience. Includes the physiological, social, psychological and economic losses of the elderly. Emphasizes medicare, medicaid and social work intervention in working with the elderly. Includes crisis intervention, mental illness, social systems, and implications for social work practice. Major emphasis is on the delivery of services in helping the elderly.
Includes separate theory and practicum components. Students may take either component or both.
HSE 215 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System
3-7 Credit Hours/45-150 Contact Hours Prerequisite: None
Provides a historical and philosophical background of statutes, ideologies, political process and policy making the American Justice System. Examines adult, juvenile and community corrections from the police officers through the court system.
Includes separate theory and practicum components. Students may take either or both.
HUMANITIES
HUM 115 Introduction to Chicano Studies 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines the origin, culture, philosophy and present status of the Chicano.
HUM 121 Survey of Humanities I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces students to the history of ideas in Western cultures through a study of the visual arts, literature, drama, music, and philosophy of early civilizations, Greek and Roman antiquity and Christian eras. Emphasizes connections among the arts, values, and diverse cultures.
HUM 122 Survey of Humanities II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods through a study of the visual arts, literature, music, and philosophy. Compares and contrasts diverse cultural ideas and feminine and masculine viewpoints.
HUM 123 Survey of Humanities III 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines the cultures of the 17th through the 20th centuries by focusing on the interrelatedness of the arts, ideas and history. Considers the influences of industrialism, scientific development and non-European peoples.
HUM 126 Folklore of Mexico and the Southwest
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the historical and cultural heritage of the people of Mexico and the Southwest. Includes the ancient cultures that existed before the arrival of the
Europeans and later the Spaniards and other cultures. Includes folk medicine, folk art, folk music, games, folklore, riddles, food and ballads.
HUM 127 Indigenismo and the Chicano 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Surveys the non-European approach to philosophies and ideas of native peoples in the Americas as those philosophies and ideas affect the Chicano.
HUM 200 Popular Culture 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Surveys the meanings, implicit values and impact of the artifacts of cultures as observed in popular music, art, film, television and print.
HUM 215 Ideas in a Changing Society 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 111 or Permission of Instructor
Presents an interdisciplinary study of the modes of change as manifested in the arts, or mass culture, or language, or lifestyles.
HUM 225 Contemporary Chicano 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides an interdisciplinary approach to current issues of the Chicano. General themes include: alienation, community identity, political organization, conflict and change, ideology, religion and power.
HUM 251 Curanderismo: A Cultural
Approach to Holistic
Medicine
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Studies the history, philosophy and practicality of medicinal herbs of the Southwest. Other holistic concepts are included.
JOURNALISM
JOU 111 Introduction to Journalism I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces basics of the print media, including news writing, features, interviews as well as giving exposure to layout, make- up and typesetting.
JOU 112 Introduction to Journalism II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Continues the studies begun in JOU 111.
LITERATURE
LIT 111 The Short Story 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines salient features of the short story as it is different from other literary genres. Includes works by authors from both the Eastern and Western hemispheres.
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LIT 112 The Short Novel 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines classic and contemporary short novels selected from the Western as well as the Oriental traditions.
LIT 115 Introduction to Literature 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces students to fiction, poetry, and drama. Emphasizes active and responsive reading.
LIT 201 Masterpieces of Literature I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines significant writings in world literature from the ancients through the Renaissance. Emphasizes careful reading and understanding of the works and their cultural backgrounds.
LIT 202 Masterpieces of Literature II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines significant writings in world literature from the seventeenth century to the present. Emphasizes careful reading and understanding of the works and their cultural backgrounds.
LIT 210 Science Fiction 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 111 or Permission of Instructor
Traces current trends in science fiction: selected readings in short stories and novels from Jules Verne to Isaac Asimov. (Entry level skills: twelfth grade reading level.)
LIT 214 Detective Literature 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Focuses upon detective fiction. Outstanding selections of novels and short stories will be studied.
LIT 215 Literature of the Occult 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Presents a selection of classic and modern literature exploring aspects of the occult. Related themes will include religion, parapsychology and mysticism.
LIT 216 Fantasy Literature 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Surveys classic and modern literature which have a fantasy theme.
MANAGEMENT
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Surveys the business environment to include economics, the labor force, labor relations, management, ethics and responsibility, finance, accounting, marketing and physical distribution.
MAN 117 Time Management 1 Credit Hours/15 Contact Hours
Provides the student with the conceptual knowledge and tools to make better use of time in the management function and/or for personal use.
MAN 200 Personnel/Human Resources Management
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Presents the methods and techniques of personnel administration. Emphasis is on recruiting, interviewing, selecting, placement, training and evaluating. Includes job descriptions, orientation, remuneration, promotion and transfers, benefits, grievances and union-management relations.
MAN 205 Small Business Management/Entrepreneurship 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores the fundamentals of organizing and operating a small business. The variations in application suited to individual needs is recognized. The problems of labor, location, financing, management, marketing, accounting and research are studied.
MAN 206 Business Law I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Develops the recognition of legal problems and their solutions. Introduces the court system and the legal process; covers the study of laws relating to business contracts, sales, agency relationships and the application of the Uniform Commercial Code; and details the legal concepts of property.
MAN 207 Business Law II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAN 206 or Permission of Instructor
Examines the legal entities of business organizations. Includes the study of the Uniform Commercial Code as it applies to commercial paper and fundamental legal concepts of bankruptcy and estates.
MAN 209 Management Seminar 1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Provides special coverage of current topical interest areas.
MAN 215 Principles of Management 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Studies the four basic management functions: planning, organizing, directing and controlling. Introduces a historical review of various management theories and philosophies.
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Covers supervisory concepts applicable to various business organizations. Introduces leadership styles, contemporary practices and techniques of managing individual and group behaviors.
MAN 225 Managerial Finance 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ACC 111, 112 and ECO 201
Involves concepts and techniques for analyzing financial statements, funds flow management, and long-term/short-term financing considerations. Reviews money markets and financial institutions.
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MARKETING
MAR 207 Principles of Marketing 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces marketing as a functional process and managerial variable. Presents marketing strategies as an integrated system of the marketing mix designed to plan, promote, price and distribute goods and services to businesses and consumers.
MAR 208 Principles of Salesmanship 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces proper sales techniques. Covers the role of selling in the marketing process, consumer behavioral consideration in the buying-selling process, sales techniques and sales management.
MAR 209 Advertising and Promotion 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces techniques of advertising and promotion. Includes the role of advertising and sales promotion in our economy, the kinds and purposes of different media consumer behavioral implications and student practice and application in campaign programming.
MAR 210 Marketing Seminar
1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: MAR 207 or Equivalent
Analyzes advanced marketing concepts, enabling the student to apply marketing strategies to the development of both individual and group projects.
MAR 211 Wholesaling and Distribution 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Teaches strategies in wholesaling and physical distribution. Includes the function, purposes and operation of the various wholesale middlemen, warehouse and transportation policies and procedures, and documentation of goods and services.
MAR 212 Sales Seminar
1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: MAR 208 or Equivalent
Discusses professional selling as a career. Students design a personal profile for sales success, develop advanced sales techniques and develop an acquaintance and association with professional salespeople.
MAR 213 Fashion Merchandising 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Covers the fashion merchandising industry including styles leading the industry in both textiles and nontextiles. Students learn to recognize style and quality characteristics of apparel and home furnishings merchandise.
MAR 214 Consumer Information 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
A survey of several sources (consumer guides, digests, reports, etc.) for information on consumer products-/services in order to expend discretionary cash wisely.
MAR 215 Retail Management 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Acquaints the student with the fundamentals of retail store management. Covers retail organization and management, store location, buying and handling merchandise, pricing merchandise and promotional efforts.
MAR 216 Telemarketing
1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Provides the basis for developing telemarketing skills for direct sales, survey taking, appointment making, customer service and follow-up. Includes script writing, paper flow management and the importance of up-to-date telemarketing lists.
MATHEMATICS
MAT 090 Basic Operations on Whole Numbers
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Reviews multiplication tables and strengthens skills in adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing whole numbers. Includes basic operations with simple fractions and decimals.
MAT 095 Process and Procedures of Mathematics I
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides special learning techniques and compensatory strategies including retention of math facts, organization of materials and conceptualization of principles. Emphasizes alternative approaches to basic operations on whole numbers, decimals and fractions.
MAT 096 Process and Procedures of Mathematics II
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Continues MAT 095. Emphasizes problem solving strategies for integers and pre-algebra areas. Also covers alternative approaches for word problems.
MAT 100 Introduction to Mathematics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Reviews arithmetic principles including decimals/per-cents, fractions/proportions and integers/equations. Separate, 1- credit-hour modules of this course may be taken as MAT 102, 103, or 104.
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MAT 102 Decimals and Percents 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Introduces operations on decimal numbers and percents including the order of operations.
MAT 103 Fractions and Proportions 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Introduces the operations with fractions including the order of operations. Also introduces proportions and problem-solving components involving proportions.
MAT 104 Integers and Equations 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Introduces basic operations positive and negative whole numbers. Also introduces the order of operations and solves basic linear equations.
MAT 105 Applied Math for Business and Economics
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Introduces concepts of mean, median, mode and slope. Shows how to graph lines and parabolas for business use. Concentrates on problems dealing with maximums, minimums and break-even points.
MAT 106 Applied Geometry 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Introduces geometric terms, angle/line relationships, area and volume of geometric figures.
MAT 107 Applied Trigonometry 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Introduces the basic trigonometric ratios and the Pythagorean Theorem, the laws of sines and cosines and basic vector operations.
MAT 108 Teacher Competency Review -Math
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Reviews math computational skills and math comprehension from basic arithmetic concepts through beginning Algebra. Concentrates on solutions to word problems and manipulating the metric system.
MAT 110 Metric Measurement 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Reviews the metric system, with special emphasis on conversions among English, metric, apothecary and common household measuring systems. Includes concepts of accuracy, rounding and precision. Covers density, temperature and specific gravity.
MAT 111 Introductory Algebra
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 100 or Equivalent
Includes manipulation of algebraic expressions, solving first degree equations in one and two variables, factoring, solving fractional equations, graphing and verbal problem solving.
MAT 112 Intermediate Algebra
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 111 or Equivalent
Covers sets, axiomatic approach to the set of real numbers, extension of exponents, radicals, first and second degree equations in one and two variables, and graphs.
MAT 114 General Mathematics for College Students
1-5 Credit Hours/15-75 Contact Hours
Provides the student with the basics of the mathematical areas of arithmetic review, calculators, measurement, algebra, geometry and trigonometry.
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 112 or Equivalent
Includes a brief review of intermediate algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, linear and nonlinear systems, graphing of the conic sections, introduction to sequences and series, progressions, permutations and combinations, the binomial theorem and theory of equations.
MAT 122 Trigonometry and Functions
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 121 or Equivalent
Examines trigonometric functions and their graphs, identities and equations, and solutions of triangles. Introduces equations and graphs of conic sections, vectors, and polar coordinates.
MAT 125 Survey of Calculus
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 121 or Permission of Instructor
For business, life science and social science majors. Includes derivatives, integrals, and their applications with attention restricted to algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions.
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MAT 130 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Surveys mathematical concepts needed to function in contemporary society. Includes electronic calculating devices (calculators and computers), problem solving skills (algebra and logic), consumer mathematics, elementary probability theory and descriptive statistics, measurement (metric system, areas and volumes) and graphs of elementary functions.
MAT 135 Introduction to Statistics
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Algebra
Introduces data presentation and summarization, introduction to probability concepts and distributions, statistical inference- estimation, testing comparison of populations, correlation and regression.
MAT 201 Calculus I 5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 122 or Equivalent
Introduces single variable calculus and analytic geometry. Includes limits, continuity, derivatives, and applications of derivatives, indefinite and definite integrals and their applications are also covered.
MAT 202 Calculus II 5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 201
Continuation of single variable calculus which will include calculus of transcendental functions, techniques of integration, polar coordinates, analytic geometry, improper integrals, and infinite series.
MAT 203 Calculus III
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 202
Completes the traditional subject matter of single variable calculus not covered in MAT 201 and MAT 202 and introduces vector analysis, multi-variable calculus, solid analytic geometry and dimensional vector space.
MAT 205 Ordinary Differential Equations 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 202 or MAT 203 Concurrently
Introduces ordinary differential equations. Includes equations of first and second order with applications, linear equations, series methods and transform methods.
MAT 211 Computer Applications Calculus I
1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours
Includes work in the computer lab doing assignments that coincide with Calculus I homework. Provides a good review of Calculus I for anyone who has already taken the course work.
MAT 212 Computer Applications Calculus II
1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 201 Co-requisites: MAT 202 or 203 or 205
Includes work in the computer lab doing assignments that coincide with Calculus II homework. Provides a good review of Calculus II for anyone who has already taken the course work.
MAT 226 Computer Applications for Statistical Procedures 1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 225 or Concurrent Enrollment in MAT 225
Includes computer applications of statistical procedures such as correlation, chi square analysis and analysis of variance. Data analysis will be done by using commercially prepared computer packages. Laboratory course.
MUSIC
MUS 100 Ensemble: Chorus
1-4 Credit Hours/30-120 Contact Hours
Presents choral styles and literature from the classics to the contemporary, including vocal techniques and diction.
MUS 111 Theory and Harmony I 5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Co-requisite: MUS 151 or 152 or Permission of Instructor
Introduces the study of melody, harmony, rhythm, analysis, composition, sight singing and ear training.
MUS 112 Theory and Harmony II 5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MUS 111
Co-requisite: MUS 151 or 152 or Permission of Instructor
Continues the study of harmony from MUS 111. Emphasizes techniques in harmonizing with inverted triads and seventh chords and modulation formula.
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MUS 116 Songwriting 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Presents the basics of pitch and rhythm notation, includes the elements of melody construction and analyzes the basic characteristics of popular melodies. Students are encouraged to write at least one melody a week. (Entry level skills: basic skills in music.)
MUS 120 Music Appreciation 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Covers the basic materials of music, musical forms, media, genres, and musical periods. Emphasizes the development of tools for intelligent listening and appreciation.
MUS 121 Introduction to Music History I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Studies the various periods of music history with regard to the composers, aesthetics, forms, and genres of each period. Considers music from the Middle Ages through the Classical period.
MUS 122 Introduction to Music History II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Continues Introduction to Music History I with a review of the elements of music and a study of music from the early Romantic period to the present.
MUS 131 Voice Class I 1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours Co-requisite: MUS 151 or Permission of Instructor
Studies vocal techniques of various major teachers, including emphasis on breathing techniques, tonal control, stage presence and interpretation of vocal materials from all periods.
MUS 132 Voice Class II 1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MUS 131 or Permission of Instructor
Co-requisite: MUS 151 or 152
Continues MUS 131 with special emphasis on diction, enunciation and performance preparation.
MUS 151 Piano Class I 1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours
Introduces the basic piano techniques. Includes major and minor chords, accompaniment patterns, rhythm drills and traditional notation.
MUS 152 Piano Class II 1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MUS 151 or Permission of Instructor
Continues MUS 151. Includes a complete study of chords, jazz rhythms and accompaniment techniques.
MUS 251 Advanced Piano Class I 1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MUS 151 or Permission of Instructor
Continues MUS 152 with emphasis on ensemble playing, transposition and improvisation.
MUS 252 Advanced Piano Class II 1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MUS 251 or Permission of Instructor
Continues MUS 251 with emphasis on advanced improvisation and accompaniment.
NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY
NMT 210 Nuclear Medicine Physics 4 Credit Hours/60 contact Hours Prerequisites: MAT 121, RHS 115 Co-requisite: NMT 221
Provides an in-depth study of atomic and nuclear structure. Includes terminology and symbols specific to the understanding of radioactive decay modes. Explains photon interactions with matter, and the consequent detection of radiation. Equations, units and statistical interpretation as applied in Nuclear Medicine Technology.
NMT 211 Clinical Applications I
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 142 Co-requisite: NMT 221
Analyzes each procedure performed in the Nuclear Medicine Department: mechanisms of localization of radiopharmaceuticals to specific organs and/or organ systems; techniques for performing procedures; parameters for defining normal anatomy and/or physiology-
NMT 212 Clinical Applications II
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: NMT 211, NMT 221 Co-requisite: NMT 222
Integrates the anatomy, physiology, pathology and methodology of nuclear medicine studies. Units studied include diagnostic in-vivo and in-vitro studies and radionuclide therapy.
NMT 213 Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Co-requisites: NMT 211, NMT 221
Provides a study of basic scintillation detectors, gas detectors, scintillation spectrometry, well counters, stationary and moving imaging devices, photographic media, calibrators and computers and quality assurance procedures for all major instrumentation used in nuclear medicine departments.
NMT 215 Radiopharmaceutical Preparations 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: CHE 101, NMT 210,
Permission of Instructor Co-requisites: NMT 212, NMT 221 Describes the basic theory and practice of radiopharmaceutical preparation and quality control in nuclear medicine. Emphasizes the design and function of radionuclide generators, labeling procedures, sterility and pyrogenicity considerations, radionuclide and radiochemical quality control procedures.
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NMT 216 Radioassay Procedures 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: NMT 211, NMT 221 Co-requisites: NMT 212, NMT 223 Examines the theory of radioassay procedures performed in nuclear medicine: radioimmunoassay, competitive protein binding, hematology and urinalysis. Also includes quality control and troubleshooting. Reinforces technique via laboratories.
NMT 217 Computers in Nuclear Medicine 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: NMT 213 Co-requisite: NMT 223
Provides the theoretic bases of computer operations and medical applications in the nuclear medicine department. workshops provide hands-on experience with computerized systems at hospital sites.
NMT 221 Clinical Internship I 8 Credit Hours/360 Contact Hours Co-requisites: NMT 211, NMT 213, NMT 210 First in a series of three internship courses. Provides the opportunity to practice Nuclear Medicine Technology: basic patient care, radiation safety, quality control and routine diagnostic procedures.
NMT 222 Clinical Internship II 8 Credit Hours/360 Contact Hours Prerequisite: NMT 221
Co-requisites: NMT 212, NMT 216, RHS 215, NMT 215
Second in a series of three internship courses. Provides the opportunity to practice radiopharmaceutical preparation and quality control, radioassay procedures and quality control, cardiovascular nuclear medicine and other computer applications.
NMT 223 Clinical Internship III 15 Credit Hours/675 Contact Hours Prerequisite: NMT 222 Co-requisite: NMT 216
The last in a series of internship courses. Refinement of all skills associated with Nuclear Medicine Technology. Where appropriate, opportunities for specialization in a given area for a portion of this internship.
NURSING
NUR 100 Introduction to Nursing 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Admission to Nursing Program Introduces the Nursing Program and nursing as a health occupation. Focuses on basic nursing skills, nutrition and diet therapy. Includes orientation to the college and its resources.
NUR 101 Basic Concepts in Pharmacology 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Provides introduction to pharmacology. Includes drug legislation and standards, drug information sources, administration of medications, drug classifications, action. Also includes therapeutic use, adverse effects,
nursing implications, drug misuse and abuse, an overview of dosage computation and the pharmacology of foods.
NUR 111 Nursing Concepts I 10 Credit Hours/195 Contact Hours Prerequisites: NUR 100, BIO 141 Introduces fundamentals of patient care and incorporates Maslow's hierarchy of needs, mental health, cultural concepts, nursing process and nursing knowledge basic to care of the patient. Includes practical nursing care for the patient throughout the life cycle and concepts related to child-rearing families. Provides learning experiences in the college classroom and laboratory and in clinical facilities within the community.
NUR 112 Nursing Concepts II 14 Credit Hours/270 Contact Hours Prerequisites: NUR 111, BIO 142
Synthesizes Maslow's hierarchy of needs related to health maintenance and common illnesses occurring at various developmental cycles. Focus is on care by the practical nurse for the child and adult, and includes common medical and/or surgical problems. Includes the nursing process and mental health concepts. Provides learning experiences in the college classroom and laboratory and in clinical facilities within the community.
NUR 115 Socialization into Nursing I 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisite: NUR 111
Explores the changing trends in nursing with emphasis on the specific legal and ethical implications for the practical nurse. Focus is upon the role of the practical nurse as a health team member in the community. Covers skills necessary to seek employment in this new role.
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NUR 120 Psychosocial Concepts in Nursing 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisites: Passing scores on Nursing Diagnostic Test;
graduation from approved school of practical nursing.
Provides theory and skills of therapeutic communications and interviewing, therapeutic role of the nurse, ethnicity, spiritual needs, stress and adaptation, mental defense mechanisms, the nursing process, basic concepts of body image and loss, death and dying and common patterns of response to stress.
NUR 126 Nursing Process: Concepts and Skills
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: Nursing Diagnostic Test and graduation from an approved school of practical nursing.
Provides update of basic concepts related to nursing care throughout the developmental cycle. Emphasizes the child-rearing family, medical and surgical problems and common tasks and problems of childhood. Utilizes the nursing process to identify components of a nursing care study. Addresses specific nursing procedures.
NUR 201 Advanced Pharmacology 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Level II Student or Permission of Instructor
Focuses on the clinical use of drugs and implications for nursing practice. Emphasizes altered absorption, distribution, biotransformation and excretion of drugs. Provides information to aid in recognition of drug interactions.
NUR 209 Review of Nursing Principles 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Reviews and synthesizes nursing theory to prepare the student for the NCLEX-RN (State Board Examination).
NUR 210 Comprehensive Maternity Nursing
6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: NUR 112 or Advanced Placement Requirements Co-requisite: NUR 211
Emphasizes the commonly occurring problems in the antenatal, intranatal, neonatal and postpartum periods. The nursing process continues to be the framework for discussing these problems. Incorporates concepts of pharmacology, nutrition and growth and development. Provides practice in clinical agencies concurrently with classroom instruction.
NUR 211 Comprehensive Psychosocial Nursing
7 Credit Hours/135 Contact Hours Prerequisite: NUR 112 or Advanced Placement Requirements Co-requisite: NUR 210
Emphasizes application of the nursing process to care of adults and children with commonly occurring emotional and behavioral disorders.
NUR 212 Comprehensive Nursing II 14 Credit Hours/270 Contact Hours Prerequisite: NUR 112 or Advanced Placement Requirements
Provides a comprehensive integrated approach to nursing care of adults and children, organized around Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Applies the conceptual framework of basic human needs to the human life cycle within the context of safety and security, activity and rest, sexual role satisfaction, nutrition, elimination and oxygenation.
NUR 214 Socialization into Nursing II 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Enrollment in Level II
Introduces role responsibilities, dependent and independent functions of the associate degree nurse in the health care delivery system. Focuses on principles of effective leadership and group member skills for basic nursing care.
NUR 215 Socialization into Nursing 111 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisite: NUR 214
Focuses on the skills necessary to seek employment as a graduate nurse, role changes required int he transition from student nurse, educational opportunities for the A.D. nurse and pitfalls a new nurse may experience in high stress employment.
PARALEGAL
PAR 100 Introduction to Paralegal 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Emphasizes career options, legal concepts and terminology and basic techniques and functions of the paralegal.
PAR 105 Torts
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces basic area of law dealing with civil (as opposed to criminal) wrongs, with emphasis on the area of negligence law.
PAR 106 Contracts 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the basic area of contracts, with special emphasis on the preparation of contracts.
PAR 107 Legal Research 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines the location and interpretation of federal, state and local statutes and ordinances with emphasis on locating relevant case law interpretations of this legislation. Use of law libraries is emphasized.
PAR 108 Civil Procedures 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the litigation process. Students will learn procedural aspects of law, and the drafting of pleadings. Upon completion of this course students will have the necessary skills to assist attorneys in the litigation process.
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PAR 109 Property 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Emphasizes procedures relevant to subdivision requirements and other requirements of real estate law practice.
PAR 115 Domestic Relations 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces standard legal problems of marriage including dissolution of marriage, dependent and neglected children, children in need of supervision and adoptions.
PAR 120 Office Procedures 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces timekeeping, management controls, client files, checklists and other skills necessary to keep any law firm operating efficiently.
PAR 125 Tax Law 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces Internal Revenue Code rules and regulations, its forms and special tax problems relating to property and inheritance. Deals with mechanics, not theory, of tax law.
PAR 126 Creditor/Debtor/Bankruptcy 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines creditor's rights with emphasis on prejudgment and judgment remedies. Emphasizes bankruptcy procedures.
PAR 127 Evidence 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the Rules of Evidence and covers the methodology of interviewing witnesses, investigating and marshalling of evidence for trial cases.
PAR 128 Environmental and Natural Resource Law
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the new field of environmental law with attention to mineral rights law, water law, land-use litigation, public and private interest questions, tax questions and other related areas.
PAR 201 Business Organizations 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the law of sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations, with emphasis on drafting the numerous documents inherent in corporate law practice.
PAR 202 Commercial Law 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Deals with Colorado law of sales and secured transactions with emphasis on Uniform Commercial Code. Forms and documents dealing with these areas are covered in detail.
PAR 203 Constitutional Law 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces state and federal constitutional law and principles and individual guarantees against governmental or private action. Individual rights are emphasized.
PAR 204 Criminal Law and Procedures 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Covers criminal law theory, construction and interpretation of criminal law statutes, various categories of criminal offenses and process of criminal justice, investigation, arrest, trial and judgment.
PAR 205 Probate 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Emphasizes drafting wills, settling estates and trusts.
PAR 207 Legal Research Seminar I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: PAR 107
Emphasizes student's ability to brief cases and write legal memoranda. This course continues to utilize research techniques learned in PAR 107.
PAR 208 Legal Research Seminar II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: PAR 107
Continues the use of techniques learned in PAR 107 and PAR 207.
PAR 210 Paralegal Workshop 6 Credit Hours/285 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Completion of 15 credit hours of PAR courses.
Deals with the placing of students in working situations involving areas of specialty.
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PAR 214 Administrative Law 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the Rule of Administrative Agencies and daily operating procedures of agencies, and teaches how the paralegal can work within these various agency structures.
PAR 215 Real Estate and Land Use Law 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Emphasizes the methods of utilization of land with regard to land planning, development financing. Methods of appraisal will be studied, together with tax problems relating to real estate.
PAR 219 Paralegal Seminar 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Any 100 Level PAR Course Brings together a focus in general paralegal skills, and reviews crucial functions in the general paralegal field.
PAR 250 The Elements of Argument 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 111 or Level 4 Assessment Stresses practical reasoning concepts which are applicable to both formal studies and ordinary life. Presents a scheme of practical analysis applied to a variety of interdisciplinary materials adaptable to the paralegal and communications fields.
PAR 253 Paralegal Synthesis 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: PAR 107, 108, 127 and Permission of Instructor
Helps the student synthesize information and skills previously learned in such courses as Contracts, Torts and Civil Procedures. Includes legal terms, preparation of legal briefs and documents and legal research.
PHILOSOPHY
PHI 111 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces significant human questions. Emphasizes understanding the meaning and methods of philosophy. Includes the human condition, knowledge, freedom, history, ethics, the future, and religion.
PHI 112 Ethics
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines human life, experience and thought in order to discover and develop the principles and values for pursuing a more fulfilled existence. Applies ethical theories to a selection of contemporary social issues.
PHI 113 Logic
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Studies effective thinking. Provides tools and develops skills for creative and critical thinking. Emphasizes the development of decision-making and problem solving skills.
PHOTOGRAPHY
PHO 100 Fundamentals of Photography 4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Co-requisite: PHO 101
Introduces basic black and white techniques seeing with the camera, camera types, films and exposure, negative processing, enlargers, print finishing and mounting. Emphasizes sound camera and darkroom techniques, producing good negatives and prints, developing a personal awareness of expression and communication through photography.
PHO 101 Fundamentals of Photography Lab 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Lab for PHO 100.
PHO 102 Fundamentals of Color Photography 4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Co-requisite: PHO 103
Introduces color theory, the nature of light and light sources, the reproduction of color, color films, processing. Emphasizes building individual experience with color transparency films and potential expression through color photography.
PHO 103 Fundamentals of Color Photography Lab
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Lab for PHO 102.
PHO 105 Advanced Photography 4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Prerequisite: PHO 100 Co-requisite: PHO 106
Introduces professional quality techniques the zone system, the view camera, photographic chemistry, proper use of the light meter, how to produce a professional quality black and white print. Emphasizes practical testing and application of the technical controls which augment expression.
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PHO 106 Advanced Photography Lab 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Lab for PHO 105.
PHO 107 History of Photography 4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Co-requisite: PHO 108
Surveys the history of photography from its beginnings to the present. Emphasizes individual photographers who have made significant contributions to the field. Includes technical, artistic, commercial and social development of photography as a form of visual communication.
PHO 108 History of Photography Lab 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Lab for PHO 107.
PHO 109 Advanced Color Photography 4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Prerequisite: PHO 102 Co-requisite: PHO 110
Emphasizes color printing, the nature of photographic color paper, how to make your own standard negative, the use of modern color enlarger and color analyzer, print processing finishing. Emphasizes sound procedures and principles as well as experimental techniques.
PHO 110 Advanced Color Photography Lab 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Lab for PHO 109.
PHO 201 Professional Photography 4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Prerequisites: PHO 100, 102, 105, 108 Co-requisite: PHO 202
Stresses the major areas of specialization in professional photography: documentary, commercial, environmental and portrait photography.
PHO 202 Professional Photography Lab 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Lab for PHO 201.
PHO 209 The Art of Photography 4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Prerequisites: PHO 102, 105 Co-requisite: PHO 210
Develops the individual's awareness in the creative aspects of photography: composition, photographic seeing, elements of design, visualization and photographic communication. Emphasizes different styles, methods of working and individual contributions of various photographers.
PHO 210 The Art of Photography Lab 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Lab for PHO 209.
PHO 219 Seminar in Photography 4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Prerequisites: PHO 100, 102, 105, 108 Co-requisite: PHO 220
Provides an opportunity to compile a professional portfolio as a preparation for job entry. Provides the advanced student with an opportunity to receive personal attention from the photography faculty in his/her specific area of professional expertise.
PHO 220 Seminar in Photography Lab 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Lab for PHO 219.
PHYSICS
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics
4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 106 or Permission of Instructor
Studies mechanics, heat, properties of matter, electricity and magnetism, light and modern physics. Includes laboratory.
PHY 111 Physics: Algebra Based I
5 Credit Hours/105 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 121 or Permission of Instructor
Studies mechanics and heat. Includes laboratory experience.
PHY 112 Physics: Algebra Based II 5 Credit Hours/105 Contact Hours Prerequisite: PHY 111 or Permission of Instructor
Studies electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. Includes laboratory experience.
PHY 211 Physics: Calculus Based I 5 Credit Hours/105 Contact Hours Co-requisite: MAT 201
Studies mechanics and heat. Includes laboratory experience.
PHY 212 Physics: Calculus Based II 5 Credit Hours/105 Contact Hours Prerequisites: PHY 211 and Concurrent Enrollment in MAT 202
Studies wave motion, electricity and magnetism, and light. Includes laboratory experience.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
POS 111 American Government 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines American government with emphasis on the role of institutions, individuals and groups in forming American political behavior.
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POS 121 Introduction to Political Science 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Studies how societies govern themselves and resolve conflicts within domestic and international environments. Questions how governments do and should govern themselves.
POS 200 American State and Local Government
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Analyzes governmental structure and political behavior in states and municipalities; urban problems and the role of government in their solutions.
POS 205 International Relations 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the international political system and the effects of geography, history, culture, ideology, domestic politics, foreign policies, diplomacy, international law and international organizations.
POS 215 Current Political Issues 1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Examines local, state, national and international political events and developments.
POS 251 Chicano Political Experience 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Evaluates leading issues affecting Chicanos in American society.
POS 253 Third World Policies and the Chicano
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Looks at the Chicano in relationship to the developing nations as "Third World" countries.
PSYCHOLOGY
PSY 095 Learning and Skill Development 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Emphasizes compensatory strategies for attention and concentration, organization skills, memorization, following directions and instructions, problem solving and time management. Also concentrates on ways of relieving learning-related anxiety.
PSY 101 General Psychology I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Overviews psychology as a behavioral science, with emphasis on psychological concepts and principles. Includes psychological methods, the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and thinking and motivation.
PSY 102 General Psychology II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: PSY 111
Builds on content covered in PSY 111. Includes personality, psychological disorders, therapeutic techniques, attitudes and influence and interpersonal relationships.
PSY 115 Psychology of Personal Development 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides a study of personal growth and the development of interpersonal skills. Focuses on practical application of psychological principles and theories in achieving self- understanding and personal growth.
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth and Development
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines the developmental stages from birth through death. Includes the physical, emotional, social and psychological environments of the developing human. Primarily for the health occupations degree.
COMMERCIAL-INDUSTRIAL REFRIGERATION, HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING
RAC 111 Fundamentals of Electricity I 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces atomic theory, charges, the basic concepts of electrical circuits and safe procedures when working with electrical breakboards and developing simple circuits.
RAC 112 Fundamentals of Electricity II 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RAC 111
Introduces magnetism, electrical motor design and operation, and the use and care of testing meters.
RAC 114 Fundamentals of Refrigeration I 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces molecular theory, heat and methods of heat transfer, the basic compression cycle, molecular construction and nature of refrigerants.
RAC 115 Safety, Tools and Piping 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces safety rules and procedures for shop and personal safety. Presents basic hand tools and tools of the trade, safe and proper use, soldering, brazing, cutting and welding safety procedures and techniques.
RAC 116 Fundamentals of Refrigeration II 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RAC 114
Presents the opportunity to construct, evacuate, charge, start-up and test the operation of a basic refrigeration system.
RAC 200 Refrigeration System Components and Applications
3 Creait Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Presents the individual components of refrigeration systems and their applications. Calculating evaporator and condensing unit capacities and matching components.
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RAC 205 Refrigeration Heat Loads and System Development 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Presents the concepts of heat gains and losses. Utilizes these concepts to calculate heat loads and presents methods of equipment selection.
RAC 208 Special Refrigeration Systems 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Examines absorption units and other industrial applications.
RAC 211 Installation and Service Refrigeration Systems 6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RAC 200
Presents the requirements for the installation of refrigeration system components and accessories and the construction of complete refrigeration systems. Introduces the proper procedure for troubleshooting and servicing refrigeration systems and components through the use of manufacturer's specifications and wiring diagrams.
RAC 212 Fundamentals of Air Conditioning 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Examines the principles and definitions of atmosphere, humidity, measurements and controls, psychometric charts and tables.
RAC 214 Unitary and Central Station Systems 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Examines heat pump operation and the installation of packaged units, components and piping for split systems and evaporative coolers.
RAC 215 Air Flow Principles and Distribution 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Presents applications of air requirements, flow and sizing of air distribution ducts.
RAC 216 Control Systems 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Examines control methods and devices used in air conditioning electrical and pneumatics.
RAC 217 Troubleshooting and Service 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences
Examines procedures in troubleshooting systems and servicing components of air conditioning systems.
READING
REA 090 Introduction to Basic Reading Skills 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces basic reading readiness concepts of word analysis, oral and visual vocabulary, context clues, comprehension, and fluency. Enhances skills in word association, listening/reading and following directions.
REA 091 Introduction to Reading and Study Skills
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Continues basic reading readiness concepts but concentrates on higher grade-level language skills. Develops the student's ability to identify buried main ideas, use locational and study skills in reading and analyze and interpret meaning.
REA 095 Basic Strategies in Reading and Written Language I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: permission of instructor Introduces compensatory strategies for developing skills in reading comprehension, listening, critical thinking, and vocabulary development. Also emphasizes task analysis skills and multi-sensory strategies.
REA 096 Basic Strategies in Reading and Written Language II 3 Credit Hours, 45 Contact Hours
Continues REA 095. Emphasizes questioning, memorization, time relation development, and advanced reading comprehension skills.
REA 100 Everyday Reading Skills 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Concentrates on practical, consumer-related reading skills. Includes reading and interpreting advertisements, newspapers, labels, and common forms. Includes the general vocabulary of business, banks, rental agencies, the IRS and insurance companies.
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REA 101 Skills for College Reading
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Reviews common and effective ways to outline and read textbooks, skimming and scanning techniques and finding additional resources. Introduces inferential reading skills, reading in the content area and recognizing tone, bias and attitude.
REA 104 Skill in Test-Taking 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores effective ways to prepare for and take multiple choice, true/false, completion and essay exams. Also teaches relaxation, meditation and breathing techniques which reduce test-related anxiety.
REA 105 Study Skills
1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Reviews several methods to increase learning effectiveness. Includes time management, improving reading rate and comprehension, skimming and scanning strategies, preparing for and taking tests, using the library, enhancing critical reading skills and building a stronger vocabulary. Emphasizes application of skills to other courses.
REA 106 Vocabulary Development 1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Demonstrates effective ways to develop vocabulary. Focuses upon basic word parts and origins, dictionary and thesaurus usage, and distinguishing between formal and informal language. Emphasizes words in context for vocabulary improvement and retention.
REA 109 Workshop in Reading, Writing and Speaking
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Facilitates the student's transfer of skills among the three basic areas of communication reading, writing and speaking. Surveys small-group communication skills and reviews logical structure and its implementation in the three communication areas. Also concentrates on critical thinking skills.
REA 110 Critical Analysis in Reading Reasoning
1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Introduces concepts of inferential reading including fact/opinion, assumptions and personal judgment. Develops skills in examining arguments, recognizing propaganda techniques, and analysis and analogy. Also includes common patterns of inductive and deductive argument.
REA 131 Speed Reading and Reading Efficiency
1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours
Examines the physical mechanics of reading: fixation, regression, accommodation and visual perception. Increases specific reading rates and literal and critical comprehension rates.
RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY RADIOGRAPHY
RTR 203 Radiographic Technique II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RHS 103 or Permission of Instructor
Provides the student with an in-depth knowledge of radiographic exposure technique and the factors affecting radiographic film quality. Includes a review of mathematics needed for formula solving, radiographic quality control, technique chart formulation, sensito-metry, and film processing.
RTR 204 Radiographic Technology Internship IV
11 Credit Hours/495 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RTR 200, 124 or Permission of Instructor
Encourages independent assessment; develops proficiency in the radiographic procedures introduced in Internships I, II and III, and applies the knowledge learned in the classroom during the first year of the Radiologic Technology Program.
RTR 206 Special Radiologic Procedures 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RTR 200, 124 or Permission of Instructor
Provides instruction in the equipment, procedure, technique and patient care necessary to perform basic special radiologic procedures. Introduces computer use and the radiological specialty areas of Computerized Tomography, Ultra-Sound, Digital Radiography, Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Therapy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.
RTR 207 Registry Examination Review 2 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RTR 214, 215 or Permission of Instructor
Reviews all major subjects covered during the two years of study in the program, prior to the student sitting for the National Registry Examination. Emphasizes the five major categories included in the examination.
RTR 214 Radiographic Internship V
12 Credit Hours/540 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RTR 204, 206 or Permission of Instructor
Prepares the student to perform procedures in the radiographic specialty areas of pediatrics, geriatrics, the out- patient clinic. Increases proficiency in general radiography.
RTR 215 Radiographic Science 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RHS 115 or Permission of Instructor
Develops the basic concepts of physics introduced in RHS 115 into an understanding of X-ray production interaction, and radiographic equipment. Stresses radiation protection.
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RTR 224 Radiographic Internship VI 8 Credit Hours/360 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RAT 214, 215 or Permission of Instructor
Introduces the radiographic specialty areas of special procedures, spinal cord injured patients and Computerized Axial Tomography. Increases proficiency in general radiography.
RADIOLOGIC HEALTH SCIENCES
RHS 102 Radiologic Positioning I 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Admission to the program
Introduces fundamentals of radiologic positioning, including use of radiographic equipment and safety, positioning terminology, anatomy and skills necessary to perform radiographic procedures of the chest, abdomen, upper extremity and basic positioning skills for nuclear medicine and radiation therapy.
RHS 103 Introduction to Radiologic Sciences 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Admission to the Program
Introduces the field of radiology and the fundamental aspects of radiographic exposure including, radiology as a profession, history of radiology, image receptors, screens, cassettes, control of scatter, principles of exposure and technical conversions.
RHS 104 Radiologic Internship I 5 Credit Hours/225 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Admission to Program
Introduces the clinical education experience at the clinical education center. Students apply knowledge learned in the classroom to actual practice of radiology-
RHS 106 Radiologic Patient Care
2 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Admission to the program
Provides the theory and practical skills necessary for the student of radiology to provide safe patient care. Includes communication skills, legal and ethical issues in medicine, body mechanics, patient transfer, vital signs, medical and surgical asepsis, medical emergencies and assisting with medication administration.
RHS 112 Radiologic Positioning II
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RHS 102 or Permission of Instructor
Continues material covered in RHS 102, and includes the knowledge of anatomy and skills necessary to perform radiographic procedures of the shoulder girdle, lower extremities, pelvis, spine and bony thorax. (The second of three courses in radiologic positioning.)
RHS 114 Radiologic Internship II 5 Credit Hours/225 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RHS 103, 102, 104, BIO 141 or permission of instructor
Expands upon all basic concepts and procedures learned during Internship I, and introduces additional radiographic procedures that are more complex in nature.
RHS 115 Introduction to Medical Physics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: RHS 112, 114 or Permission of Instructor
Introduces the fundamental concepts of physics necessary to understand the production of x-rays and gamma rays and the operation of radiation producing equipment.
RHS 122 Radiologic Positioning III 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RHS 102, 112 or Permission of Instructor
Continues RHS 112, concentrates on the knowledge of anatomy and the skills necessary to perform radio-graphic procedures of the skull, or cranium, and facial bones. (The third of three courses in radiologic positioning.)
RHS 124 Radiologic Internship III 5 Credit Hours/225 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RHS 112, 114 or Permission of Instructor
Reinforces the basic concepts of Internships I and II, and introduces radiography of the cranium and facial bones. Students choosing nuclear medicine or radiation therapy as their advanced placement option are introduced to basic procedures in those areas.
RHS 295 Job Search Workshop 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Explores work opportunities and employment readiness in radiologic technology, nuclear medicine and radiation therapy.
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RADIATION THERAPY TECHNOLOGY
RTT 200 Physics of Radiation Therapy 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: All first level courses or Acceptance into the Certificate Program
Provides the student with the fundamentals of radiation physics with emphasis on the structure of matter, the nature of radiation and the interaction of radiation and matter.
RTT 205 Radiation Therapy Methodology
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: All First Year Courses or Acceptance into
Certificate Program
Provides the student with clinical application of the treatment techniques and modalities used in the radiation oncology department.
RTT 206 Radiation Oncology I
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: All first year courses or acceptance into
Certificate Program
Studies cancer as a disease process which explores specific anatomical regions that integrate the oncology treatment concepts.
RTT 207 Radiation Therapy Internship III 11 Credit Hours/495 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Admission to Radiation Therapy Program
Involves the student in patient treatment set-ups. Establishes the skills needed to accurately deliver a course of radiation therapy.
RTT 208 Physics of Radiation Therapy II 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Successful Completion of RTT 200
Provides the student with advanced understanding of measurement of ionizing radiation modification of photon beam dosimetry, electron beam therapy, calculation and dose distribution in brachy therapy along with various aspects of radiation protection and quality assurance.
RTT 209 Treatment Planning 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Second Year Fall Courses
Explores the technical aspects of radiation oncology with emphasis on treatment planning.
RTT 210 Radiation Oncology II 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Builds on radiation oncology treatment concepts.
RTT 215 Radiation Biology and Pathology 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Provides the basic knowledge and understanding of the biologic effects of ionizing radiation.
RTT 217 Radiation Therapy Internship IV 11 Credit Hours/495 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Successful Completion of RTT 207
Develops an increased level of responsibility in the more complex patient treatment set-ups. Includes an eight-week placement in treatment planning.
RTT 227 Radiation Therapy Internship V 11 Credit Hours/495 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spring Semester
Prepares the student for job entry through performance of skills typical of a beginning level staff radiation therapy technologist. Includes a rotation through other participating oncology departments.
RTT 285 Selected Topics in Radiation Therapy 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spring Semester
Explores the changing trends in radiation oncology, and reviews treatment concepts in preparation for the national registry.
SECRETARIAL
SEC 095 Secretarial Lab
1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours
The secretarial lab provides typewriters, calculators, transcribing and word processing equipment for student use in completing assignments.
SEC 099 Introduction to the Typewriter Keyboard
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Introduces the basic keyboard, machine parts and correct typing techniques.
SEC 100 Typing Skill Development 2 Credit Hours/40 contact Hours
Stresses application of keyboard skills and emphasis on centering, letters, tabulation and manuscripts. NOTE: SEC 099 and SEC 100 are equivalent to SEC 101.
SEC 101 Typewriting I 4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Introduces keyboard, machine parts, correct techniques and accuracy in typewritten applications of centering, tabulation, letters and manuscripts.
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SEC 101 or Equivalent
Reinforces fundamentals of typewriting procedures. Develops speed and accuracy in more advanced levels of production work using the prevailing business forms. Emphasizes quality of output.
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SEC 103 College Term Paper Typing
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Assists students in the correct formatting and typing of college term papers.
SEC 104 Typewriting Speed Building
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Builds typewriting speed and accuracy through the use of proper techniques, individualized drills, audio tapes and concentrated effort.
SEC 111 Alpha Speedwriting I
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SEC 101 or Equivalent (SEC 111 and SEC 101 may be
taken concurrently.)
Introduces the theory of alphabetic speedwriting.
SEC 112 Alpha Speedwriting II 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Equivalent SEC 111
Continues SEC 111. Reinforces basic alpha shorthand theory and develops skills in taking dictation.
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
Stresses operating a 10-key calculator by the touch system for developing speed and accuracy. Timed tests are administered periodically under office conditions and job applications testing simulations.
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Develops the ability to file and retrieve documents using alphabetic, numeric, subject and geographic systems; and provides the participant with records management skills, including emphasis on micro-records management.
SEC 121 Gregg Shorthand I
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SEC 101 Typewriting I or Equivalent (SEC 121 and
SEC 101 may be taken concurrently.)
Introduces the theory of Gregg Shorthand.
SEC 122 Gregg Shorthand II 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SEC 121 or Equivalent
Reinforces basic Gregg theory and develops skills in taking dictation.
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces word processing systems, equipment, vocabulary and reprographics. Explores career paths in this field, both in class and by visiting word processing installations.
SEC 133 Word Process Communications 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SEC 099 or 101 or Equivalent Knowledge of Typing
Reviews language art skills through the use of realistic office correspondence, including a review of typing principles. Emphasis on proofreading and editing skills as they relate to word processing applications.
SEC 200 Office Procedures
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SEC 101 or Equivalent
Introduces the business world and the various office duties. Includes organization of office work, incoming and outgoing mail, postal and shipping techniques, maintenance and control of office supplies and business and social conduct. A practicum correlates classroom discussion with related office projects in the student's specialized areas.
SEC 203 Typewriting III
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Emphasizes professional levels of speed and accuracy, especially in production output. Concentrates on problem typewriting with the student assuming the initiative for determining correct action and using appropriate business forms in completing the work.
SEC 204 Advanced Typewriting Speed Building
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SEC 104
Increases speed and accuracy potential through the use of selected, individualized student drills, accelerated audio tape drills and timed writings.
SEC 206 Health Insurance Methods and Claims
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores general types of health insurance plans on the market, methods of payment, common insurance terms, benefits and limitations of government-sponsored and mandated insurance plans. Includes expediting, logging and processing of insurance forms and the proficiency necessary to minimize the rejection of insurance claims in the doctor's office.
SEC 230 Machine Transcription
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SEC 102
Combines production typing and machine transcription. Reviews letter styles, rules of transcription and punctuation. Emphasizes production of mailable letters and other correspondence from transcribing machines.
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SOCIOLOGY
SOC 101 Introduction Sociology I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the basic concepts and principles of sociology that pertain to the individual in society. Studies culture, social organization, socialization, stratification and inter- group relations.
SOC 102 Introduction to Sociology II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Analyzes factors that contribute to social and cultural changes and resistance to change; examines problems associated with populations growth, urbanization, collective behaviors, mass communication and deviance.
SOC 215 Current Social Problems 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces the major and current social issues. Examines issues such as wealth and power, racial and ethnic minorities, sex roles and sexism, social deviance, populations, and problems with the environment.
SOC 250 Marriage and The Family 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores the social role of marriage and family living, and those factors that affect family relations. Examines the family as a universal institution with diverse forms and patterns related to culture. Also explores alternative family life styles and current trends.
SPANISH
SPA 101 Conversational Spanish I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Emphasizes understanding and speaking Spanish. Includes basic conversation patterns for enjoyment and/or practical use.
SPA 102 Conversational Spanish II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SPA 101 or Permission of Instructor
Develops further skills in oral proficiency through practical experience in speaking Spanish by simulating real-life situations.
SPA 111 Spanish I 5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours
Begins a sequence dealing with the development of functional proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing the language.
SPA 112 Spanish II 5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SPA 111 or Permission of Instructor
Continues Foreign Language I in the development of functional proficiency in listening, speaking reading and writing the language.
SPA 225 Spanish for the Professional 1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Covers job-related Spanish, including technical vocabulary for the professional.
SPEECH
SPE 115 Principles of Speech Communication 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Combines the basic theory of speech communication with public speech performance skills. Emphasizes speech delivery, preparation, organization, support, and audience analysis.
SPE 231 Voice and Diction 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SPE 111 or Permission of Instructor
Explores the mechanisms of voice production and aids with the improvement of individual voice utilization.
SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
STE 100 Introduction to Surgical Technology 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Admission to STE Program or Permission of Instructor
Introduces surgical care. Emphasizes theoretical application in areas of asepsis, anesthesia, hemostasis, radiology and care of the surgical patient in the operating room.
STE 105 Pharmacology for Surgical Technology
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Co-requisites: STE 106, 107 Explores chemical therapy utilized preoperatively, intra- operatively and postoperatively for the patient undergoing surgical intervention. Emphasizes drug types, effects/side effects, principles of administration and appropriate personnel actions.
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STE 106 Surgical Skills
6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisites: STE 100, BIO 141
Presents principles and application of basic operating room skills with emphasis upon safe and efficient use of mechanized and non-mechanized equipment common to surgery.
STE 107 Surgical Instrumentation
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Co-requisites: STE 105, 106
Presents application of principles related to use and management of instruments, sutures, needles, sponges and dressings commonly utilized in major surgical procedures.
STE 108 Surgical Trends 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Surveys historical aspects of surgical care, emphasizes individualistic approaches to continuing education and discusses professional, legal and ethical responsibilities in surgical emergencies or death.
STE 109 Surgical Technology Laboratory Experience
5 Credit Hours/115 Contact Hours Prerequisites: STE 100, 105, 106, 107 and 108 Applies surgical principles in the clinical setting under supervision of instructor. Emphasizes skill refinement and performance evaluation.
STE 110 Surgical Technology Practicum
7 Credit Hours/315 Contact Hours Prerequisites: STE 105, 106, 107, 108 Co-requisite: STE 109
Emphasizes refinement of skills begun in STE 109, application of proper aseptic technique, and provision of quality patient care in the clinical setting under supervision of hospital personnel.
STE 115 Surgical Pathology and Intervention
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141, 142 Co-requisite: STE 109, 110
Presents surgical intervention theory related to pathology of body systems with focus on preoperative, intra-operative and postoperative progression; prognosis; complications and appropriate actions by operating room staff. Covers surgical procedures of abdomen, chest, head, and reproductive system and cancer, plastic and pediatrics surgical procedures. This course deals with functions of the surgical technician related to instrumentation and supplies.
STE 290 Selected Topics in Surgical Technology
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: STE 105, 106, 107, 108
Reviews theory/skills content and focuses on integration of concepts in preparation for certification exam. Emphasizes job- entry skills and functions of a surgical technician in the operating room and/or related area.
STE 297 Clinical Refresher Course 4-7 Credit Hours/60-315 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Provides the graduate surgical technologist, the certified or certification eligible technologist an opportunity to expand or review basic skills after a period of dormancy. Student must obtain clinical site and approval of instructor. Course uses cooperative education format, as amended.
TECHNICAL ILLUSTRATION
TEI 200 Rendering and Airbrush I 6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours
Introduces fundamentals necessary to produce line and continuous tone drawings through the use of graphic pencil, various types of pens and inks, basic airbrush techniques.
TEI 201 Airbrush I for Non-Majors 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Provides training in preparing art for technical manuals and diversified art. Includes airbrush techniques used in shading.
TEI 205 Airbrush II 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: TEI 200 or 201
Provides training in advanced airbrush techniques in shading and introductory photo retouching techniques.
TEI 207 Special Problems 6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: TEI 205
Requires preparation of a presentation portfolio preparatory to employment. Includes work in black and white as well as color. Includes assemblies, cut-aways, exploded views and visual aids.
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