Citation
Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1991-1992

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Title:
Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1991-1992
Creator:
Community College of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
Community College of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Source Institution:
Community College of Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
9842420 ( OCLC )

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library
Community College of Denver Collections

Full Text


Community College of Denver
Downtown Auraria Campus
South Classroom Building, Room 134
1111 West Colfax Avenue
Campus Box 203
P.O. Box 173363
Denver, CO 80217-3363
(303) 556-2600
NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID
PERMIT NO. 1849 DENVER, CO


COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER
1991-92 CATALOG
1111 West Colfax Avenue P.O. Box 173363 Denver, CO 80217-3363 (303) 556-2600


Visitor Parking
Lot C
RTD Routes to the Auraria Campus
Via Auraria Parkway (north campus): #0, #10, #15 Via Colfax (south campus): #1, #9, #16, #30, #31
Information
(303) 556-2600 Voice/TDD (303) 556-3622 FAX (303) 556-8555
Cover Design
Tish Lawlor
CCD Graphic Design Student
Photography by
Misha Secore
ii


Table of Contents
MAP OF CAMPUS...............................................ii
1991-92 ACADEMIC CALENDAR...................................iv
TELEPHONE DIRECTORY.........................................iv
GUIDE TO DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES PROGRAMS...................v
COLLEGE GUARANTEES.........................................vii
Guarantee of Transfer Credit Guarantee of Job Competency
GENERAL INFORMATION..........................................1
STUDENT SERVICES.............................................3
AURARIA CAMPUS FACILITIES....................................6
ADMISSIONS AND TRANSFERS OF CREDIT...........................8
MONEY MATTERS...............................................11
Tuition, Fees and Refunds...............................11
Financial Aid...........................................12
COLLEGE POLICIES............................................14
ACADEMIC STANDARDS..........................................19
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS.....................................23
SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS................................25
READING GUIDE TO DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS............27
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS...................................29
Associate of Arts Programs..............................29
Associate of Science Programs...........................31
Associate of General Studies Programs...................33
Associate of Applied Science Programs...................35
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS........................................52
TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER NORTH AND EAST PROGRAMS..........63
TEC COURSE DESCRIPTIONS.....................................66
AURARIA CAMPUS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS..........................75
COLLEGE STAFF..............................................134
FACULTY....................................................139
INDEX......................................................143
COLLEGE APPLICATION........................................145
iii


1991-92 Calendar
Summer 1991
Orientation Registration Classes Begin Independence Day CCD Classes End April 18, May 21 May 23 May 28 July 4 August 6
Fall 1991
Orientation Registration Classes Begin Labor Day- No Classes Thanksgiving Holiday Classes End July 23, August 14 July 15-August 22 August 26 September 2 November 28, 29 December 11
Spring 1992 Orientation Registration Classes Begin Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Spring Break Classes End November 26, January 8 November 15-January 10 January 14 January 20 March 16-20 May 5
Telephone Directory
Admissions Center................... 556-2600
Arts and Humanities................. 556-2473
Auraria Interfaith Center........... 556-8591
Book Center, Auraria................ 556-3230
Business and Governmental Studies 556-2487
Business Office..................... 556-3625
Campus Recreation................... 556-3210
Center for the Physically Disadvantaged 556-3300
Child Development Center............ 556-2439
Community Relations................. 556-3380
Computer Labs....................... 556-2497
Continuing Education................ 556-3356
Cooperative Education............... 556-2600
Developmental Studies............... 556-8455
Educational Opportunity Center...... 629-9226
Educational Planning and Advising. 556-2600 Evening Center...................... 556-2600
Financial Aid............................ 556-2420
Health and Human Services................ 556-2472
International Student Services........... 556-2600
Learning Development Center.............. 556-2497
Library, Auraria........................ 556-2741
Minority Student Services................ 556-2600
Parking and Transportation, Auraria 556-8493
President of CCD........................ 556-2411
Refugee Student Services................. 556-2600
Registration and Records................. 556-2430
Science and Technology................... 556-2460
Student Activities....................... 556-2597
Technical Education Center............... 289-2243
Testing Center........................... 556-3810
Veteran's Office......................... 556-2452
Vice President for Instruction........... 556-2414
Vice President for Student Services .... 556-2413
IV


Guide to Community College of Denver Degrees and Certificates
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS (A.A.)
University Parallel, Transfer Program
Areas of Emphasis Art English/Literature
Behavioral Sciences History
Communications Music
Economics Political Science
ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE (A.S.) University Parallel, Transfer Program
Areas of Emphasis Biology Pre-Medical
Chemistry Pre-Nursing
Computer Science Pre-Veterinary
Earth Sciences Physics
Mathematics Medical Cluster Pre-Engineering
Pre-Dental
ASSOCIATE OF GENERAL STUDIES (A.G.S.)
University Parallel, Transfer Program Option
Pre-Business Public Administration
Pre-Professional Teacher Education
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE (A.A.S.)
Accounting Airframe/Power Plant Computer Information Systems
Computer Programming for Business Microcomputer Specialist Computer Training for the Handicapped Construction Trades Culinary Arts2 Drafting for Industry Civil/Topographic Electrical Mechanical Process Piping Structural
Early Childhood Education and Management Electronics
Biomedical Equipment Repair Electronics Technology Elementary School Instructional Aide Environmental and Refrigeration Technology Commercial/lndustrial Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning Major Appliance Repair Financial Services Banking
Commercial Credit Management Credit Union Savings & Loan Graphic Arts (Printing)
Graphic Design Human Services Management
Food Production Management Hispanic Entrepreneurship Business Management Transportation Management Marketing
International Trade Marketing
Advertising (Broadcast)
Advertising (Print/Graphic Arts) Fashion Merchandising International Marketing Sales Nursing
Nursing Advanced Placement Paralegal Photography
Radiologic Health Sciences
Nuclear Medicine Technology Radiation Therapy Radiologic Technology Radiography Secretarial and Administrative Support Occupations Administrative Assistant Legal Secretarial Medical Secretarial Secretarial Word Processing
hn conjunction with Emily Griffith Opportunity School
2ln conjunction with Emily Griffith Opportunity School and the Joint Apprenticeship Training Committees


CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Auraria Campus
Accounting
Accounting with Computer Applications Accounting Transfer Certificate Bookkeeping
Governmental Accounting Income Tax Preparer Chartered Property Casualty Underwriter Program Computer Information Systems
Computer Programming for Business Computer Training for the Handicapped Microcomputer Specialist Drafting
Computer Aided Drafting Drafting for Industry Early Childhood Education Group Leader/Director Electronics Technology
Biomedical Equipment Technician I & II Computer Field Service Technician Basic Electronics Communications Digital Fundamentals Instrumentation Microcomputer Systems Solid State Theory Troubleshooting Techniques Environmental & Refrigeration Technology Apartment Manager Major Appliance Repair Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Financial Services
Commercial Credit Management Graphic Arts (Printing)
Graphic Design
Computer Graphics Production Human Services
Case Management/Residential Service Aide Management
Hispanic Entrepreneurship Small Business Management Supervisory Management Transportation Management Marketing Insurance
International Business Real Estate Telemarketing
Nursing (L.P.N.)
Paralegal
Law Office Management Photography
Radiological Health Sciences
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technology Nuclear Medicine Technology Secretarial and Administrative Support General Clerical Medical Secretarial Stenographic
Word Processing Options I & II Surgical Technology Travel and Hospitality
Hospitality & Restaurant Management Travel and Tourism Agent Travel and Tourism Management
Technical Education Center North
Bilingual Bookkeeping
Data Entry/Bookkeeping Clerk Bookkeepi ng/Accou nti ng
Data Entry/Bookkeeping Clerk Accounting Clerk Chemical Operator Cooperative Education Machine Tool
Mill/Lathe Operator Machine Tool Operator CNC Operator Secretarial Secretary Word Processor Teen Parent Program Welding Welder
Fabrication Welder
Technical Education Center East
Bookkeeping/Accounting
Data Entry/Bookkeeping Clerk Accounting Clerk Cooperative Education Secretarial Secretary Word Processor
VI


College Guarantees
Guarantee of Transfer Credit
The Community College of Denver guarantees to its degree graduates the transferability of course credits to Colorado colleges or universities (as identified and defined in the CCD Transfer Guide), or the Community College will refund the tuition of non-transferring courses.
Agreements between Colorado's Community/Junior Colleges and Colorado's four-year colleges and universities (as identified in the CCD Transfer Guide) guarantee to CCD's Associate of Arts and Associate of Science graduates the transferability of CCD's general education core program to fulfil lower division general education requirements.
Special Conditions Transfer Credit
Transferability means the acceptance of credits toward a degree. Classes must be identified as transferable in transfer guides dated 1988-89 or later.
Limitations on total number of credits accepted in transfer, grades required, and duration of transferability apply as stated in the Transfer Guide.
The formal agreements with Colorado's public four year colleges and universities for the transfer of the core will become effective in the fall of 1989. Please refer to the Transfer Guide for details.
Guarantee of Job Competency
Any Associate of Applied Science graduate judged by his/her employer to be lacking in the technical job skills identified as exit competencies for his/her specific degree program will be provided up to nine tuition-free credit hours of additional skill training under the conditions of the guarantee policy.
Special Conditions Job Competency
The graduate must have earned the A.A.S. degree beginning May 1990 or thereafter in an occupational program identified in the college catalog.
The graduate must have completed the A.A.S. degree at CCD (with a majority of the credits being earned at CCD) and must have completed the degree within a four-year time span.
Graduates must be employed full-time in an area directly related to the area of program concentration as certified by the Job Placement Office.
Employment must commence within 12 months of graduation.
The employer must certify in writing that the employee is lacking entry-level skills identified by CCD as the employee's program competencies and must specify the areas of deficiency within 90 days of the graduate's initial employment.
The employer, graduate, division dean, job placement counselor and appropriate faculty member will develop a written educational plan for retraining.
Retraining will be limited to nine credit hours related to the identified skill deficiency and to those classes regularly scheduled during the period covered by the retraining plan.
All retraining must be completed within a calendar year from the time the educational plan is agreed upon.
The graduate and/or employer is responsible for the cost of books, insurance, uniforms, fees and other course-related expenses.
The guarantee does not imply that the graduate will pass any licensing or qualifying examination for a particular career.
Students sole remedy against CCD and its employees for skill deficiencies shall be limited to nine credit hours of tuition-free education under conditions described above.
Governance
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER
Dr. Byron McClenney, President
COLLEGE ADVISORY COUNCIL
Ralph G. Torres, Chair
Dr. Alicia Cuaron James H. Daniels Richard C. D. Fleming Adele Phelan Bruce Rockwell
STATE BOARD FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION
Dr. Jerome Wartgow, System President
Jay L. Fox, Chair Julianne Haefeli, Vice Chair Rolf F. Anderson Glenda C. Barry Robert Duncan Reuben Gutierrez Dr. Anita Sanchez Charles "Chuck" Traylor Raymond "Buzz" Wilder


IIIA


General Information
College Philosophy
The Community College of Denver is a comprehensive, student-oriented urban college, providing open access to a diverse population.
Believing that the opportunity for life-long education and personal development should be accessible to all who seek it, the College pledges open admissions and supportive services to every individual who can profit from instruction.
Believing that educated citizens will make a significant and positive impact on a local community and local economy, the College strives for excellence in transfer education and occupational programs, pledges a sensitivity to the changing needs of area employers and seeks new and effective ways of extending its campus throughout its service area.
College Mission
The College shares the Auraria campus with Metropolitan State College and the University of Colorado at Denver. Among the Auraria institutions, the Community College of Denver pledges responsibility for the following:
Transfer courses for students pursuing a baccalaureate degree,
Occupational programs for those seeking job-entry skills or upgrading,
General education,
Remedial instruction and developmental studies,
Continuing education and community services,
GED preparation, and
Cooperative inter-institutional programs for personal and career advancement.
Cultural Pluralism at Community College of Denver
The Community College of Denver supports the belief that all students are entitled to the opportunity to obtain a quality education. Without question, that education must include the fostering, understanding and appreciation for the increasing interdependence of every individual and the nations of the world.
Education must be meaningful to the multi-ethnic, minority students. In addition, it must provide the majority student body and faculty with an understanding of cultural pluralism. To that end, CCD endeavors to provide an educational environment which fosters cultural diversity, international understanding, and global awareness in all the various subject curricula, activities and projects.
The institution recognizes that this environment can be made viable and self perpetuating only with the appropriate administration, faculty and staff. Therefore, the school embraces unconditional endorsement at the executive level of its affirmative action policies.
History
In September, 1970, the college opened its doors, operating in several rented buildings in central Denver. Since that time the Community College of Denver (CCD) has provided the core city with education conveniently close to home.
In December of 1975, CCD moved to its present site downtown, sharing location and facilities with Metropolitan State College and the University of Colorado at Denver on the Auraria campus. While the Auraria Campus is new in concept, the site historically has been intertwined with the development of Denver. In the mid-nineteenth century, the news of gold brought thousands of fortune-seekers to "Denver City." Many settled where the waters of Cherry Creek tumbled into the Platte River, while other prospectors struck roots in a part of the settlement called Auraria.
Much of the heritage of the original site has been preserved to co-exist with 17 modern buildings, designed to accommodate over 33,000 students. A cluster of 16 restored Victorian-era buildings are the campus hub. St. Cajetan's, a mission-style structure, is now the campus auditorium. The oldest standing structure in Denver, Emmanuel Gallery, displays modern student art. Preserving the flavor of yesteryear, the landmark Tivoli Brewery, adjacent to the campus, has been restored into an elegant shopping center.
CCD is within walking distance of Larimer Square and downtown Denver, Mile High Stadium, home of the NFL Broncos; McNichols Sports Arena, home of the NBA Nuggets; Currigan Exhibition Hall, and the Denver Center for the Performing Arts.
CCD is the only community college within the city limits of Denver, one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the United States. Rapidly developing energy, aerospace, engineering and high-tech industries have supplanted gold as a lure, but the pioneering spirit remains in the "Queen City of the Rockies". Tourism, a major Colorado industry, attracts 4 million visitors a year to the Denver area and the nearby Rocky Mountains.
Approval
The operation of Community College of Denver is approved by the state of Colorado. All programs are approved by the Colorado State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education. In addition, the Colorado Commission on Higher Education reviews and approves all programs leading to the associate degree.
General
Informatioi
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General
Information
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2
Statement of Values for Teaching Excellence
The shared values developed by the faculty of the Community College of Denver relative to the teaching/ learning process at CCD are as follows:
1. Enable students to become independent learners.
2. Demonstrate a commitment to student outcomes (job readiness, skill levels, mastery of subject matter).
3. Provide an opportunity for critical thinking and problem solving.
4. Provide linkages between instruction and real-world applications.
5. Demonstrate an excitement about teaching and learning.
6. Maintain high but realistic expectations.
7. Demonstrate an appreciation for an understanding of a diverse student population.
8. Encourage growth in students' selfesteem.
Notice of Nondiscrimination
Community College of Denver does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, sex, age or handicap in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its educational programs or activities. Inquiries concerning Title VI, TITLE IX and Section 504 may be referred to Lillian Hunsaker, Director of Student Development, Box 203, Community College of Denver, 1111 W. Colfax, Denver, CO 80204 (556-3617) or to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1961 Stout Street, Denver, CO 80294.
Accreditation
Community College of Denver is accredited by the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The Nursing Program is accredited by the Colorado State Board of Nursing. The following programs are accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation (CAHEA):
Nuclear Medicine Technology
Joint Review Committee on Education for Nuclear Medicine Technology
Radiation Therapy Technology
Joint Review Committee on Education for Radiation Therapy Technology
Radiologic Technology
Joint Review Committee on Education for Radiologic Technology
Surgical Technology
Joint Review Committee on Education for Surgical Technology
Community College of Denver is a member of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges.
2


Student Services
Community College of Denver offers a broad array of student services. These are supplemented by the Auraria Student Assistance Center, a shared campus facility. Student support services all have one goal to increase students' access to quality education and help them achieve their educational objectives.
Educational Planning and Advising Center
The Community College of Denver believes that advising is an integral factor in a student's success. Advising includes the exploration of life and career goals, an examination of academic and career skills, and the selection of instructional programs and courses. Both the student and the advisor are active participants and share responsibility for the advising process.
The Educational Planning and Advising Center is the first contact many students have with the college. Its purpose is to facilitate the entry of students into the college, to help students plan their college work and also to assist students in removing barriers which interfere with their abilities to be successful in school.
The Educational Planning and Advising Center assists new students with the admissions process, conducts orientation sessions, provides information on and interpretation of assessment programs, and advises students who have not declared a major on programs and courses.
Advisors have a wide range of knowledge of community and campus resources which students may want to utilize.
All new students are encouraged to contact the Educational Planning and Advising Center. Special advisors assist refugee and international students, as well as single parents.
Career advising is available on an individual or small group basis. Interest inventories, career assessment tools, and computerized occupational information are utilized. The Educational Planning and Advising Center is located in the South Classroom Building, Room 134. The phone is 556-2600.
Evening Services
Students who attend college during the evening hours can obtain help and information in the Educational Planning and Advising Center in the South Classroom Building, Room 134. Academic planning and career advising are available by appointment Monday through Thursday, 5-7:00 p.m. when classes are in session. The offices of Registration and Records, Financial Aid, and Business Services are open until 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings when classes are in session. Persons needing other assistance should call 556-2600 for more information.
Educational Opportunity Center
The Educational Opportunity Center is a community service program providing educational planning information and assistance services:
Career exploration counseling,
College/university admission coaching,
Vocational-technical school enrollment assistance,
Academic assessment coordination,
Federal and state student financial aid advising, and
Educational planning workshops.
This service is free and is located at 1391 Speer Blvd., 5th floor, Suite 550. Please call 629-9226 for an appointment.
Center for the Physically Disadvantaged
Students with disabilities (including the learning disabled and those with physical, sensory and temporary disabilities) are encouraged to contact the Center for the Physically Disadvantaged (CPD), regarding free services to assist them at CCD. These include specialized career counseling and vocational assessment; academic advising and registration assistance; tutoring, classroom assistance and curriculum and test modification; consultation with instructors; text recording, note-taking and use of adaptive equipment; job development and placement assistance; handicapped parking and campus orientation; sign language and oral interpreting; liaison with rehabilitation agencies and other Colorado postsecondary institutions; and housing and transportation information. CPD is located in the South Classroom Building, Room 134. For more information of CPD and other resources listed, call 556-3300.
In addition to CPD, other resources at the college which are useful to students with disabilities are the College for Living, the Computer Training for the Handicapped Program, the Learning Development Center, the Special Learning Support Program and the microcomputer laboratories. Also, Colorado Rehabilitation Services has an office on the Auraria campus.
Community College of Denver complies with and fully supports Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, with amendments of 1974, regarding nondiscrimination on the basis of handicap. Inquiries concerning Title VI, TITLE IX and Section 504 may be referred to Lillian Hunsaker, Director of Student Development, Box 203, Community College of Denver, 1111 W. Colfax, Denver, CO 80204 (556-3617) or to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1961 Stout Street, Denver, CO 80294.
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Student
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CCD Child
Development Lab School
The Community College of Denver Child Development Center provides a full-day program in Early Childhood care and education. The program addresses the cognitive, language, social and emotional development of young children.
The Center is open all day, Monday through Friday. Children between the ages of two and one-half to six years of age may attend the full-day program or the morning session which runs from 8:00 to 11:30 a.m. only. Tuition costs are $80 a week for the full program or $35 a week for the morning session.
The Center, licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services, provides a child-initiated, cognitive approach to individualized learning. Pre-registration is suggested. For more information, call 556-2439.
Challenge Program
The Challenge program is an educational/vocational support program for adult ex-offenders and high risk youth who are on probation or parole or for whom high school is not appropriate. Challenge serves both males and females, coordinating services that will assist these students to enter and successfully complete GED and/or post-secondary programs at CCD on the Auraria campus or at CCD's Technical Education Center.
Challenge staff have linkages with parole and probation officers, community corrections and other correctional facilities. Services such as aptitude and vocational testing, career exploration and training, academic advising, personal counseling and referral, job placement assistance, and advocacy are designed to meet the special needs of the ex-offender and high-risk youth.
Challenge staff are located in the South Classroom Building, Room 134, on the Auraria campus and in the Student Services area at the Technical Education Center, 6221 Downing. For further information, call 556-3615.
Veteran Affairs Office
Funded through the Veterans Educational Outreach Program (U.S. Office of Education), this office provides comprehensive service to veteran students, as well as to veterans in the community. The program was established to enable Vietnam era veterans to use their VA and other federal, state and community benefits, and to aid the educational institutions in meeting the Vietnam era veterans' special needs.
Services available include: information about veterans benefits federal, state and community; assistance with VA inquiries; and referral for emergency food, clothing, housing, legal aid and employment. The Veteran Affairs Office is located in the South Classroom Building, Room 133, 556-2452.
Womens Resource Center
The CCD Women's Resource Center provides assistance and support to all in need of their services. The Center offers various types of counseling including academic, crisis, and personal. Transition counseling is available for those who are making a transition from home to the work force. Assistance is provided for AFDC clients who want to attend an educational institution and need to work within confines of AFDC regulations.
A variety of workshops and on-going support groups are offered. The workshops cover topics such as women's health issues, financial aid, time management, etc. The support groups deal with divorce adjustment, welfare client support, personal growth and single parenting.
The Center houses a lending library of books on women's issues and job related information. Referral information can be obtained regarding legal, day care, health, housing, abuse, employment, and economic assistance.
The Women's Resource Center, located on the Auraria Campus, South Classroom, 134, is "A Place To Come Together." For more information call 556-2600.
Vocational
Rehabilitation Services
This campus office of the State of Colorado Rehabilitation Services assists disabled students in becoming fully employable and self-supporting. The office works cooperatively with the Center for the Physically Disadvantaged. Vocational rehabilitation services include job-seeking skills training, vocational testing and evaluation, vocational counseling, provision of occupational tools and materials, and referral to additional sources of financial aid. The Colorado Rehabilitation Services Office is located in the Arts Building, Room 177, 556-2785.
4


Job Placement
Job Placement information is located in the South Classroom Building, Room 134. A counselor will assist students with full-time and part-time employment. Job placement assistance also is available in the Career Services Office in the Auraria Student Assistance Center in the Arts Building, Room 177, 556-3474. For more information, contact the Educational Planning and Advising Center, South Classroom Building, Room 134, or call 556-2600.
Career Services
CCD students have several opportunities to get help regarding their careers. Career exploration and planning is available through CCD's Educational Planning and Advising Center. Students may receive individual consultation or work in small groups. Interest inventories, career assessment, and computerized occupational information are available. The Educational Planning and Advising Center is located in Room 134, South Classroom Building. The phone number is 556-2600.
CCD students may also use the Auraria Student Assistance Center's Office of Career Services. Career planning, student employment and graduate placement are provided. Individual counseling, testing, workshops and resources are available to students and alumni in planning their careers. Listings of part-time and temporary jobs are available to currently enrolled students. Individual counseling, workshops, on-campus interviews with employers, computerized job match and employer information are offered to graduating students and alumni. Schedules of workshops, on-campus interviews, and other activities are included in the "Spotlight," a bi-monthly newsletter. The Office of Career Services is located in the Auraria Student Assistance Center, Arts Building, Room 177. The phone number is 556-3474.
CCD Student Activities
The Student Activities Office develops and implements programs and activities to meet the academic, social and recreational interests of the students and community.
Programs and activities offered through or supported by the Student Activities Office include the Student Government and student organizations, intramural and recreational activities, social and cultural activities, health services, student publications and student newspaper, and student leadership training programs. These activities provide constructive experiences to stimulate personal growth and social development and add to the students' enjoyment of life.
For information regarding the Student Representative Council (SRC), clubs and organizations, CCD special events, or other student activity related items, contact the Student Activities office located on the second floor of the Auraria Student Union; room 255; 556-2597.
Student Legal Services
Student Legal Services is a tri-institutional student fee funded program designed to provide students with legal advice and assistance concerning matters which, if unaddressed, could cause an interruption in the student's educational progress. Services, including legal counseling, document preparation, legal self-help workshops and related activities, are offered for a limited number of legal matters at no cost. The legal services program does not include representation in court or action against the college, or any state and local government entity. For more information call 556-3333 or stop by their office, SU 255FJ.
ROTC Information
Community College of Denver students may participate in two Army ROTC programs that lead to a commission in the active Army, the Army Reserve, or the Colorado National Guard. CCD students may participate through inter-institutional registration in the ROTC program. For specific information contact: Department of Military Science, Metropolitan State College, Box 93, Denver, CO 80204, or call 556-3491.
Health Services
CCD students may use the MSC Student Health Clinic, an accessible out-patient health care clinic. The Student Health Clinic provides direct, confidential health care services that emphasize wellness and preventative medicine. The Student Health Clinic is located in the Student Union, Room 140, 556-2525.
Accident Insurance
An accident and sickness insurance plan is available to students at reasonable cost. Applications for students and their dependents are provided at the time of registration. Brochures are available in the Student Health Services, the Student Activities Office, and the Educational Planning and Advising Center, South Classroom Building, Room 134.
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Auraria Campus Facilities
Auraria
Campus
Facilities
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Student Union
The Auraria Student Union is a focal point for students and staff, combining campus services with service to the surrounding community, and encouraging exchanges of ideas and interests through a number of activities.
The Auraria Student Union manages the food services on campus and Auraria Book Center, and houses the student activities, clubs and organization offices. Student Union food services offer a wide variety of items guaranteed to satisfy any food craving. The cafeteria serves breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as snacks. The garden level Larimer Street Mission features Mexican food, chicken, pizza, a char grill and beer, and becomes a relaxing outdoor cafe in the summer.
The fireplace, TV, and general study lounges offer opportunities for relaxation. Billiards, arcade games, outdoor patio and beer are just a few of the features of the Gameroom. ID cards also may be obtained here.
The Student Union Administrative Office is located on the second floor, Room 210. The office operates a lost-and-found, magazine checkout and other student services such as pop machine refunds and club key checkout and locker assignments.
The southwest wing of the Student Union houses offices for over 30 clubs and organizations of the Auraria institutions. The Student Activities Office, Room 255, offers support services and develops a myriad of extracurricular student activities.
The Auraria Book Center, located on the garden level of the Student Union, sells all required class texts, general books and supplies, including art and engineering materials. Information is available by calling 556-3230. Candy, magazines and other articles may be purchased at the Convenience Store, which includes a photo copy center.
Across from the Convenience Store is the Postal Center which has a package drop and scales, and a stamp machine. Down the hall is the MSC Health Clinic, free to all MSC students and available to other students for a small fee. Also on the garden level are electronic banking services, RTD bus schedules and housing information.
Auraria Library
CCD students are fortunate to have access to the Auraria Library, which serves all three colleges and houses up-to-date, comprehensive collections and modern services. The Auraria Library provides a wide variety of learning resources for students and faculty. The library has over 560,000 volumes of books, microforms and bound periodicals, and over 1,700 current periodical and newspaper subscriptions. In addition, as a member of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, the Auraria Library has access to an additional six million volumes through inter-library loans. Students are encouraged to take a 50 minute, self-guided, audiotape tour of the
library to become familiar with the services and resources available. Special services offered by the library include computerized bibliographic searchers, library orientation and instruction for groups and individuals, a depository of U.S. and Colorado government publications and media listening and viewing facilities. Rooms for individual study, group conferences and typing are available. For information about library hours, call 556-2740.
Campus Recreation
Campus Recreation offers unique opportunities to develop athletic skills, leadership abilities, and team spirit through recreational activities. Drop-in activities, intramural programs, special events, club sports and an outdoor adventure program provide opportunities for the student's involvement.
Major campus attractions include noon-hour aerobics, swimming pool, weight room and handball/rac-quetball courts. The outdoor adventure program offers a variety of one-day and multi-day trips for wind surfing, skiing, snow-shoeing, bicycling, cross-country skiing and ice sailing. The intramural program includes touch football, basketball, racquetball, tennis, 3-on-3 basketball, floor hockey, volleyball and innertube water polo. Club sports provide a high level of competition in rugby, LaCrosse, Tae Kwon Do, weight lifting, soccer, football, karate, skiing and volleyball.
Room 108 of the Physical Education and Recreation (PER) building is the campus recreation hub. Stop by for semester schedules, to make handball/racquetball reservations, check out equipment, or check in for activities. Call 556-3210 for further information.
Auraria Student Assistance Center
The Student Assistance Center offers a broad range of programs and services including an information and referral service, career services, international programs, off-campus housing, vocational rehabilitation services. Prearranged tours of the campus are also available. For more information, visit or call the Auraria Student Assistance Center, Arts Building, Room 177, 556-3474.
International Programs
Located in the Auraria Student Assistance Center, the office assists international students from some 80 countries, providing support services and helping bridge any campus cultural gaps. Services include counseling on immigration transactions, host family accommodations, support for personal adjustment, acculturation and peer interaction, newsletter, post-admissions follow-up, and liaison with consulates, missions, embassies and foreign organizations. The office also provides information to those U.S. students who want to study abroad.
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Off-Campus Housing Services
This office helps students locate housing and roommate-wanted situations. Full-time students also are eligible to be referred to live in a residence hall at a local residential college campus. Off-Campus Housing Services is located in the Auraria Student Assistance Center, Arts Building, Room 177.
Auraria Child Care Center
Providing child care for students, faculty and staff on the Auraria campus, the Auraria Child Care Center is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services. Space is available for 30 toddlers, aged 18 months to 3 years, and 120 children, aged 3 to 8 years. Professional staff provide a toddler, preschool and state certified kindergarten program. Information may be obtained by calling 556-3188.
Interfaith Ministry
The Auraria Interfaith Ministry (AIM) is a cooperative endeavor of several church denominations. AIM provides program and counseling services and promotes a church-campus partnership to support individual spiritual growth. The AIM offices are located in the St. Francis Center. For more information, call 556-8591.
Parking and Transportation Services
Auraria students, faculty and staff can choose from the following parking payment options: monthly permit, daily fee, express parking debit card or hourly rate in visitor lots.
Permits, sold at the Office, may be purchased month to month or for a semester. If choosing to pay a daily fee or to employ the daily fee parking debit card, commuters must also purchase an "Auraria Vehicle Registration Decal" at the Office. Visitor lot parking does not require a permit or decal. The Office is located at 777 Lawrence Way ( and Transportation Centre), 556-8493.
The Personal Express Debit (PEP) card is a reusable, personal card which has a cash value encoded in its magnetic strip to allow easy entry/exit from the and Transportation Centre and to some lots. PEP cards are available on the first floor of the Student Union and in the first floor elevator lobby of the and Transportation Centre.
Fees in the daily lots range from $1.25 to $2.00 per day. The Vehicle Registration Decal required to park in the daily fee lots is $3.75 each semester, and can be purchased at the Office upon presentation of a current Auraria identification card and state vehicle registration. In order to obtain a decal for a vehicle registered in someone else's name, the registered owner must complete a permission form available at the Office.
Transportation Options
1. Park free with a decal at Mile High Stadium and take a Trolley Ride to the Auraria campus. The Auraria Shuttle costs $1.25 round trip with a current campus identification card. The trolley runs continuously from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday-Friday during fall and spring semesters. Monthly passes are available for $20 at the Auraria Campus Ticket Service.
2. Park at the Denver Arts Center garage (13th and Arapahoe) for $3 daily with campus identification.
3. Rideshare to campus. Contact the Campus Transportation Coordinator at 556-3640 for information on carpooling and other transportation alternatives.
4. Catch The Ride. RTD now offers student discounted monthly bus passes, which can be purchased at the Auraria Ticket Booth outside the Student Center gameroom upon presentation of a current campus identification card.
5. Nightrider, an on-campus shuttle bus, provides free rides to and from classroom buildings and Auraria parking lots. The Nightrider runs Monday through Thursday from sundown to 10:30 p.m. "On-call" service is available by contacting the Office. Wait time usually is no longer than 10 minutes. For service, call 556-2002 or ext. 2002 from an on-campus extension.
6. Handicapped and temporarily disabled persons may make arrangements with the Office for the special HANDIVAN campus pick-up service. Service is available Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. If prior arrangements for the HANDIVAN have not been made, 45 minutes advance notice is requested. For information or service, call 556-2002 or ext. 2002 from an on-campus extension.
Weekend Parking
Students who do not have semester permits must pay daily fees on Saturday. Sunday parking is free. Auraria parking decals are not required on weekends. Bronco home game parking and special events may require special fees. Handicapped and loading zone parking regulations are enforced at all times.
Motorist Assistance Program
The Motorist Assistance Program provides free help to persons who have car trouble while on campus. To receive help, call the Parking and Transportation office at 556-3257. Services available include jump starting dead batteries, helping with a flat tire, and loaning a gasoline can.
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Admissions and Transfers of Credit
Admission Policy
Colorado state system community colleges are defined by law as open door institutions. As such, they will admit any person over the age of sixteen years, regardless of previous academic experience and regardless of race, age, sex, religion, color, national origin, or handicap, subject to the following guidelines:
A. Pursuant to the Board's statutory authority, state system community colleges may review and may deny the admission, continued enrollment, or reenrollment of any individual whose personal history and background indicates that his or her presence at the college would endanger the health, safety, welfare, or property of the college community or interfere with the orderly and effective performance of the college's functions. Further, state system community colleges have the right to deny admission, continued enrollment, or re-enrollment to any individual who has misrepresented his/her credentials or background.
B. Persons over the age of sixteen years who are enrolled in a regular program of kindergarten through grade twelve in a public, independent, or parochial school may be simultaneously enrolled in a state system community college. If they wish to take classes scheduled for a time when they would normally be attending the other school in which they are enrolled, there must be a covering agreement with the other school or the appropriate school district.
C. Enrollment in a state system community college does not necessarily guarantee enrollment in specific programs. Colleges have the right, obligation, and responsibility to establish prerequisites for specific programs which will facilitate successful completion of such programs. Further, it is the intention of the Board that occupational students receive training which will provide them with salable skills. Therefore, appropriate requirements may be included in the prerequisites for programs when the occupational field in question places restrictions on employability.
Admission Procedure
1. All new students must submit an official Application for Admission. Applications can be obtained from the Registrar's Office or at the back of this catalog.
2. Make an appointment to take the Basic Skills Assessment Test. Under certain conditions this test may be waived. Call 556-3810 for assessment dates and times, and for conditions of waiver.
3. Make an appointment with an advisor in Room 134 of the South Classroom Building to assist in planning and scheduling classes.
Veterans Veterans using VA benefits must, in addition, submit transcripts of all previous post-secondary education and training no later than 30 days after the beginning of the first semester of attendance.
International Students Students on F1 Visas must make an appointment with the International Student Advisor before submitting any documents. This office is located in the South Classroom Building Room 1 34, (303) 556-2600. In addition to submitting an official Application for Admission, the International Student must submit the following documents:
1. An official, certified English translation, high school, college, or equivalent transcript.
2. A statement of financial resources sufficient to provide for staying in the United States.
3. Proof of a minimum score of 475 on the Test of English As a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or a score of 79 on the Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency.
Former Students Former students, returning after an absence of one year or more, must submit a new Application for Admission to the Registrar's Office.
Basic Skills Assessment Policy
All students enrolling at CCD must be assessed in basic skills unless s/he meets one of the following exemption criteria:
a. possesses an Associate or higher degree,
b. has enrolled for employment inservice or upgrading,
c. has reached the 35th percentile on ACT/SAT exams,
d. has successfully completed ENG 121 and MAT 121 or their equivalent with a C or better within the last 2 years,
e. is enrolled in one course for personal enrichment,
f. provides assessment and placement scores from another accredited institution that meet CCD criteria.
NOTE: Students who initially enroll in one course for personal enrichment and who later enroll in an approved certificate or degree program must participate in assessment at the time they enroll in that program.
Assessment methods include the use of one or more of the following methodologies:
1. A comprehensive review of the student's past records including standardized test results, high school transcripts, college transcripts, prior learning experiences, and other identifiable, normative practices which can be documented.
2. A test battery which includes writing, study skills, reading and mathematics.
Either assessment method includes advising with a designated faculty member or advisor using a standardized interview format which reviews test results and/or the student's academic and personal background in order to make a determination regarding first semester course work.
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Students who score below program entry level in writing, study skills, reading and/or mathematics are required to take appropriate preparatory courses beginning their first semester at CCD. Students are also expected to pursue basic skills until they reach college level skills. Students may enroll in certificate or degree program courses and required preparatory courses concurrently, provided the required courses are not prerequisites for the courses in which the student seeks to enroll.
CCD/MSC Reading Assessment Placement Cooperative Agreement
Community College of Denver notifies all CCD students that if they intend to transfer to MSC with fewer than 40 semester credit hours, they will be subject to MSC's freshman proficiency standard in reading, and if they intend to transfer to MSC with 41 or more semester credit hours, including AA and AS degrees, they will be subject to the MSC sophomore proficiency standard in reading.
Transferring Credit to CCD
1. To transfer credit to CCD, contact the Office of Registration and Records for transcript evaluation. Transcripts will not be evaluated on registration days.
2. CCD reserves the right to evaluate all credits. Course work found to be obsolete will require updated credit.
3. CCD will accept transfer credit only from accredited post-secondary institutions. Transfer
credit may be accepted from other institutions approved by the Colorado Community Colleges and Occupational Education System (CCCOES), as a result of special agreements between CCD and those institutions.
4. Credits earned by a student enrolled in a state system community college which are applicable to the AA, AS, or AGS degrees shall be accepted as meeting AA, AS, or AGS degree requirements at any other state system community college. Credits earned by a student enrolled in a state system community college which are applicable to a specific AAS degree or occupational certificate at any state system community college shall be accepted as meeting degree or certificate requirements in comparable or equivalent programs at any other state system community college.
5. Credits earned by a student enrolled in a local district community/junior college which are in compliance with the board policy on degree standards (BP 9-40) shall be accepted as meeting AA, AS, or AGS requirements at any of the state system community colleges. Credits earned by a student enrolled in a local district community/junior col-
lege which are applicable to specific AAS or occupational certificate programs which are approved by the Board shall be accepted as meeting degree or certificate requirements in comparable or equivalent programs at any of the state system community colleges.
6. Lower division credits earned by students enrolled in baccalaureate-granting institutions (accredited by nationally recognized regional accrediting associations) of higher education which are applicable to BA or BS degrees shall be accepted as meeting requirements for the AA or AS degrees at any of the state system community colleges.
Cooperative Programs with Emily Griffith Opportunity School
CCD provides advance placement status in various programs to students with credits from many Emily Griffith programs. See an advisor for details.
Credit for Prior Learning
Students can earn credit for college equivalent education, acquired through earlier schooling, work, or other life experiences. Such prior learning must be comparable to Community College of Denver courses or curricula and must relate to the student's educational objectives.
Prior learning may be documented through any of the following: Standardized Tests (APP, CLEP, Challenge Examinations, Published Guides (ACE-Military & ACE-Non-Collegiate), or Portfolio Assessment. Four year colleges and universities will not accept Credit for Prior Learning as part of the transferable core curriculum.
1. Standardized Tests
Advanced Placement Program (APP) The Advanced Placement Program offers high school students the opportunity to receive credit through the APP examinations.
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Community College of Denver recognizes selected CLEP general examinations and subject examinations. A list of CLEP exams, their cut-off scores and their CCD course equivalences are available from the Credit for Prior Learning Office. The CLEP examination may be taken in the Testing Center at CCD.
2. Challenge Examinations Currently enrolled students may challenge a course by taking a comprehensive examination. Only one exam for a particular course will be arranged during any one semester.
3. Published Guides
ACE-Military The credit recommendation of the American Council on Education (ACE), as published in The Guide to the Evaluation of Educational
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Experiences in the Armed Services, is used to evaluate military training and learning experiences. ACE-Non-Collegiate The credit recommendations form the ACE Program on Non-Collegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI) as published in The National Guide to Educational Credit for Training Programs is used to evaluate industrial and corporate training programs.
4. Portfolio of Learning Outcomes Currently enrolled students may petition for credit by developing a portfolio that describes and documents pertinent learning comparable to that available in Community College of Denver courses. The one credit hour course, EDU 090: Portfolio Development is offered to help students complete their portfolios. A faculty member in the appropriate program area will evaluate the portfolio and award commensurate credit. Only one portfolio evaluation for a particular course will be arranged during any one semester.
A student may receive a maximum of 50 percent of the requirements for their degree or certificate through CLEP, APP, Challenge Exams, or Published Guides, and a maximum of 25 percent by Portfolio Assessment.
For more details on Credit for Prior Learning options, come to a Credit for Prior Learning Orientation offered weekly in the Educational Planning and Advising Center, South Classroom Building, Room 134, 556-3603.
Transferability of Credit to Four-year Institutions
If you are attending the Community College of Denver to prepare for transfer to a four-year college or university, familiarize yourself with the general education requirements of that institution. Since graduation requirements vary among institutions, it is important to obtain assistance from an advisor in planning a transferable program of study. Students intending to transfer to another institution should see an advisor in the Educational Planning and Advising Center, South Classroom Building, Room 134. A Transfer Guide to Colorado colleges and universities is available in the Educational Planning and Advising Center.
In addition, each major field of study at a particular institution has specific course requirements. It is extremely important for you to follow a prescribed transfer program (recommended by an advisor) in order to make a smooth transition to the four-year college or university.
For all associate degrees, the transcript of a student should reveal the exact nature of the program completed and whether the Core courses qualify for transfer under Core Transfer Program agreements. A grade of "C" or better is required in each core course in order to be accepted for transfer under the Core Transfer Agreements.
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Money Matters
Tuition, Fees and Refunds
Tuition Policy
Tuition is determined by the State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education and is subject to change annually. At publication deadline of this document, tuition and fee rates for the Academic Year 1991-92 had not been confirmed. New tuition and fee rates will be available in the summer of 1991 following approval of the State Board. For current rates, contact the Educational Planning and Advising Office, South Classroom Building, Room 134, 556-2600.
For information and budget planning purposes, in the 1991-92 Academic Year, tuition was $39.25 per credit hour for resident students and $144 per credit hour for non-resident students. Tuition for resident students taking a full load (12-15 credit hours) was $471 and for non-residents taking a full load, $1,884. Fees were $6.50 per credit hour and limited to $78 for twelve hours of credit and above. The College assesses a bad check fee of $ 15 for checks returned by the banking system. Published charges for tuition and fees are subject to change as circumstances may require.
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
At the time of application for admission, the applicant is classified for tuition purposes as either an in-state or out-of-state resident, according to provisions of Colorado law. To be considered a Colorado resident for tuition purposes, a person must have resided in Colorado for the immediate preceding 365 days and must meet other requirements.
A student who is classified as a non-resident and can provide further information to qualify as a resident is advised to obtain and complete a petition form for instate status from the Registrar's office.
It is the student's responsibility to ensure that petitions and all supportive documentation are submitted to the Office of the Vice President for Student Services. The Office cannot assume responsibility for mailed petitions which arrive after the deadline. Petitions will not be accepted after the deadline.
The final decision regarding tuition status is determined by the Vice President for Student Services. Changes in classification will not occur after the published deadline, and petitions received after the deadline will not be considered until the following semester. Changes in classification, whether from out-of-state to in-state or the reverse, shall become effective at the time of the student's next registration. All questions regarding residency classification should be addressed to the Vice President for Student Services. Military personnel on active duty in Colorado, and their dependents, are considered residents.
Tuition Policy for Senior Citizens
In-state residents, 60 years or older, may take regularly scheduled courses for credit provided they pay 50 percent of the tuition charges. If they do not wish credit, no tuition will be charged, and they may sit in a class on a space available basis. Senior citizens must pay regular charges for community service non-credit offerings. The Registrar's Office in Room 133 of the South Classroom Building can provide further information. Senior citizens must meet the requirements for satisfactory progress in order to maintain eligibility.
Fees
All enrolled students will be asked to pay a student fee if taking classes on campus. This money is used for various student activities and benefits, including student publications, operation of student government, cultural activities, recreational activities, clubs and organizational activities. Student fees are also allocated to retire debt related to the construction of the Auraria Student Union and Child Care Center. Expenditure of student fee monies is made with the approval of the Student Government Association. Students enrolled in certain courses may be required to purchase individual supplies and materials, and to rent uniforms. There is a special fee of $15.00 for a bad check.
Add/Drop/Withdrawal Policy
Definitions:
Census date The census date for a standard course or a module course is that point when 15 percent of the class days of the term of the class have occurred. Census date for continuous enrollment courses is that point when 15 percent of the balance of the term from the date of registration has occurred.
Add An add occurs when a student enrolls in a class after the original registration.
Drop A drop occurs when a student officially exits a class prior to the appropriate census date.
Withdrawal A withdrawal occurs when a student exits from a class after the appropriate census date.
Note: The difference between a drop and a withdrawal is the time in which it occurs.
The final date to add or drop a course is a predetermined census date, noted in the current semester class schedule. Until the census date, students may add or drop classes and tuition will be recalculated.
After census date, students may add a class only with the permission of the instructor, and students will be assessed the tuition and student fees of all added classes. After census date, students may not drop classes. Students may withdraw from classes after the census date, but they will not be eligible for refunds.
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Financial Obligations of Students
Payments for tuition, fees and books are due and payable on the published specified date, or at the time the obligations are incurred. Under unusual circumstances or in emergencies, special payment arrangements may be considered and approved by the Vice President for Student Services.
Withdrawal Procedure
If a complete withdrawal is necessary, check with the Office of Registration and Records for the proper procedures and to obtain the necessary forms. Withdrawal after the published add/drop deadline, as published in the class schedule, will result in a "W" grade on the student's transcript.
Refund Policy
To be eligible for tuition refunds, students must officially drop the credit hours. This applies to cancelled classes also. The processing period is usually two weeks from the time a class is dropped to the time the refund is mailed.
There is no refund for credits beyond 12 hours, within the 12 to 18 hour credit range, if no additional tuition was paid for those credit hours. Otherwise refunds are made as follows:
1. 100 percent tuition and fees will be refunded for courses dropped between the day of registration and on, or before, the census date of the class.
2. No refund will be made after the census date of the class. Also, no refunds will be made for courses concentrated into one (1) week or less.
3. Students are entitled to a 100 percent refund of tuition and fees paid for any class(es) cancelled by the college. The college will initiate the refund process through the Office of Registration and Records.
4. Refunds to Open Entry courses will be made within the first 15 percent of the number of days left in the semester, from the day of registration.
Financial Aid
Early Application
The Office of Financial Aid administers a full range of federal and state financial aid programs to assist eligible students in meeting the cost of education at CCD. Financial Aid funds are limited, and students are encouraged to start the application process several months before enrolling. The Office of Financial Aid publishes an information brochure detailing the financial aid program. Information/applications are available at the Office of Financial Aid, South Classroom Building, Room 135, or phone 556-2420, and the Technical Education Center, 289-2243.
Student Budget
The cost of education at CCD includes tuition, fees, books and supplies. In addition, the student may have expenses for room and board, transportation and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid establishes a standard student budget based on the estimated costs of living during the time of enrollment. Budgets are adjusted for living arrangements (such as living with parents) and the length of enrollment. The student's monthly living allowance is as follows:
Fiving with parents $482
Fiving away from parents $844
A child care allowance of $200 per month may be added for students using day care. Allowances are subject to change without advance notice.
Eligibility
Most types of financial aid are based on financial need as determined by the Office of Financial Aid. Financial need is the difference between the cost of attending the college and the student's available resources. Resources include parents' contributions, student warnings, spouse's earnings, Veteran's benefits, social security, vocational rehabilitation, welfare, unemployment, etc.
5tudents who have earned a baccalaureate, master's or other advanced degree may not be eligible for some types of aid. Students in this category are advised to contact the Office of Financial Aid.
Applications for financial aid must be completed once each year to determine eligibility.
Application Procedures
All applications are available at the Office of Financial Aid. To apply for grants, work-study employment, the Guaranteed Student Foan, PLUS and SLS, complete the Singlefile Form from USAF. Loans and scholarships require a separate application.
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Additional supporting documents may be requested by the Office of Financial Aid, such as Federal Income Tax Forms 1040A, 1040EZ and 1040, statements of welfare, social security, vocational rehabilitation benefits, employment, etc.
Priority in awarding financial aid will be given to students who apply early. For the 1991-92 school year to be considered an On Time Applicant, you must mail your application by March 15, 1991, and have your file completed and all documents submitted by May 15, 1991.
Applications received after the above dates will be considered based on the availability of funds.
Requirements for Continued Financial Aid
Financial aid recipients must maintain satisfactory and measurable progress each semester. Aid recipients must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete 75% of all attempted course work to remain eligible.
Financial aid recipients may be eligible to apply for financial aid for up to six semesters of financial assistance. For more detailed information contact the Office of Financial Aid, or refer to the "Financial Aid Information Booklet."
Students who have been denied aid and think they have circumstances that may justify receiving financial assistance may file a written appeal.
Repayment Policy
Students who withdraw during the semester may be required to repay a portion of the financial aid received. If tuition and fees were paid by financial aid funds, any refund will be returned to the financial aid account.
Types of Financial Aid
Grants and Work-Study
Pell Grant Federally funded Pell Grants assist with educational expenses. Award amounts range up to $2,400 depending upon the cost of education. Approximately six weeks after applying, students will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR). All copies of the SAR must be brought, or mailed, to the Office of Financial Aid.
Colorado Student Grant (CSG) Grants are available to Colorado residents based on financial need. Awards range up to $2,000 per academic year.
Colorado Student Incentive Grant (CSIG) Grants are available on a need basis. The maximum award is $2,000 per year. The state of Colorado and the Federal Government each contribute 50 percent of the available funds.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) Federally funded grants range from $200 to $2,000 depending on financial need. Pell Grant recipients with the lowest family contributions are given priority over recipients with the lowest family contribution who will NOT receive Pell Grants.
Colorado Work-Study Program The Colorado Work-Study Program provides part-time employment opportunities for Colorado residents demonstrating financial need as defined by the college. Hourly rates start at Federal minimum wage.
College Work-Study The Federal work-study program provides part-time employment for students demonstrating financial need as defined by the college.
Colorado Work-Study (No-Need) The state of Colorado provides limited funds to employ students part-time who do not demonstrate financial need, and who are Colorado residents for tuition purposes. Hourly rates start at federal minimum wage.
Diversity Grant The state of Colorado provides grants of $200-$400 to members of under-represented populations. Awards are based on financial need and grade point average.
Scholarships
Colorado Scholars Program Scholarships are available to Colorado residents who have completed a minimum of 12 credit hours at the college with at least a 3.0 grade point average in all courses attempted. Applications are available in the Office of Financial Aid. Scholarships are dependent upon the availability of funds. A limited number of scholarship awards also are available to non-resident students. Award amounts range up to resident tuition and fees.
High school graduates with a 3.0 grade point average or counselor's recommendation can apply.
Scholarships are also awarded in cooperation with community agencies and the CCD Honor's Program.
Educational Loan Programs
The Stafford Loan (GSL) program provides loans to students at 8 percent interest per year. Undergraduate students in their freshman and sophomore year may borrow up to $2,625 per year, not to exceed an aggregate amount of $17,250 for their undergraduate studies. Loans have a six-month grace period after graduation or termination of at least half-time student status before payments are due. Stafford Loans are need-based. All applicants must first complete the Single File form.
Loans to Parents The maximum amount a parent of a dependent undergraduate student may borrow for any one student in any academic year is $4,000. The aggregate loan limit is $20,000. The interest rate is 12 percent per annum and the parent has up to ten years to repay the loan. Repayment starts 60 days after the issuance of the loan.
Supplemental Loans for Students (SLS)
Independent students may borrow $4,000 maximum per year through the SLS program. The aggregate loan limit is $20,000. Interest rates and repayment procedures are the same as the Plus Loan.
All student loan applicants must attend both an entrance and an exit loan counseling interview. This is to outline their responsibility in the repayment of their loan.
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College Policies
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Students Rights and Responsibilities
Students enrolling in the Community College of Denver (CCD) assume an obligation for conduct compatible with college objectives. College regulations are based on respect for the rights of others and observance of civil law and current moral standards. CCD students have all the rights and responsibilities of other citizens, and are subject to the same federal, state, and local laws as non-students. As members of the college community, students are also subject to the rules and regulations of the college. If a student feels that his/her rights have been violated, he/she may file a grievance using the Grievance Procedure for Students described in this catalog.
Preamble
The Community College of Denver exists for the transmission of knowledge, development of occupational skills, and growth of students. Freedom of inquiry and expression are indispensable to the attainment of these goals. As members of the college community, students are encouraged to develop the capacity for critical judgment and to engage in a sustained search for truth. Institutional procedures for achieving these purposes may vary from time to time, but the minimum standards of academic freedom for students outlined below are essential to any learning community.
I. Freedom of Access to Higher Education
CCD is open to high school graduates, to non-graduates who are 18 years of age or older, and to any other persons who can benefit from instruction, although admission to CCD does not assure acceptance of a student in a particular course or program. Further elaboration on the Community College of Denver Admission Policy can be found in the college catalog.
Under no circumstances will a student be barred from admission to the Community College of Denver on basis of race, sex, age, religion, national origin or handicap.
A. Admissions
CCD has the right to review the applications of all persons wishing to enroll at that college. Those who do not appear to have the qualifications to profit from instruction may be denied admission to the Community College of Denver. When an applicant's qualifications for admission are questionable, the Vice President for Student Services will determine whether the applicant is to be admitted. The Vice President's decision may be appealed to the President of the college.
B. Continued Enrollment
Once admitted, if a student's actions on campus give reasonable cause to believe that he/she is unqualified to participate in the college's programs and activities, that
student may be denied further enrollment at that institution. Such a decision will be made after examination of issues associated with the student's behavior patterns. This will include consultation with a number of professional staff members at the college, as well as a medical or psychiatric evaluation at the student's expense by an outside consultant, if necessary.
II. In the Classroom
A. Protection of Freedom of Expression
Students are free to take reasoned exception to the interpretation of data or views offered in any course of study and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of any course in which they are enrolled.
B. Protection Against Improper Disclosure
Information about students' views, beliefs, and political associations are considered confidential, and under no circumstances will become a part of their records or transcripts. Judgments of ability and character may be provided under appropriate circumstances, with the consent of the student.
C. Protection Against Sexual Harassment
Students have protection against sexual harassment by CCD employees and other students as outlined in the college Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity policies.
D. Protection Against Instructor Unavailability
Students have a right to expect instructors, advisors, and counselors to post and maintain office hours.
III. Student Records
CCD has a policy regarding the information which comprises a student's permanent educational record and the conditions of its disclosure. The college adheres to the Family Rights and Privacy Act to minimize the risk of improper disclosure. Academic and disciplinary records must be separate, and conditions of access to each must be set forth in an explicit policy statement. Transcripts of academic records must contain only information about academic status. Information from disciplinary and counseling files is not available to unauthorized persons on campus, or to any persons off campus without the express consent of the student involved except under legal compulsion or in cases where the safety of a person or property is involved. No records may be kept which reflect political activities or beliefs of students. Provisions are made for the periodic routine destruction of non-current disciplinary records. Administrative staff and faculty members must respect confidential information about students which they acquire in the course of their work.
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CCD students' official transcripts will be released to persons outside the college only upon written request of the student. The same policy which applies to the official transcript applies to all student records, i.e., no student record or record-related information will be released to anyone outside the college except at the request of the student involved.
The general laws of invasion of privacy apply in questions of privileged or confidential communications. If the Community College of Denver receives communication from a person with the understanding that it will be held in confidence, CCD personnel will maintain the confidence until released by the person communicating with them. This applies up to but does not include a subpoena to testify in a court of law.
IV. Student Affairs
In student affairs, certain standards must be maintained if the freedom of the student is to be preserved.
A. Freedom of Association
Students bring to the campus a variety of interests previously acquired, and develop many new interests as members of the college community. They are free to organize and join associations to promote their common interest, as long as they do not disrupt the college or violate its rules and regulations.
1. The membership, policies, and actions of a student organization will be determined only by those persons who are enrolled as fees-paying students of the Community College of Denver.
2. Affiliation with an extramural organization is permitted providing the organization adheres to college policies, procedures and regulations. Such organizations must be open to all students without respect to race, sex, age, religion, national origin, or physical limitations (except for religious qualifications which may be required by the organizations whose aims are primarily sectarian).
3. College advisors approved by the Student Activities Office are required for each organization. If the student organization cannot secure an advisor, the resources of the Student Activities staff may be utilized until an advisor is secured as required by the student organizational council regulations. Advisors may advise organizations in the exercise of responsibility, but they do not have the authority to control the policy of such organizations.
4. Student organizations are required to submit a statement of purpose, criteria for membership, rules or procedures, and a current list of officers as a condition of institutional recognition.
5. A recognized club or organization may lose its official recognition and be suspended if actions of its officers or members, or activities of the organization as a whole, violate college policies, procedures or regulations.
B. Freedom of Inquiry and Expression
1. Students and student organizations are free to examine and discuss all questions of interest to them, and to express opinions publicly and privately. They shall always be free to support causes by orderly means which do not disrupt the operations of the college. In their public expressions or demonstrations, students and student organizations speak only for themselves.
2. Student organizations may invite anyone they choose to speak or exhibit on campus, providing state and college policies and procedures are followed. If a political speaker is invited, candidates or representatives of other political parties must also be given the opportunity for presentation. Institutional control of campus facilities may not be used as a device for censorship. Sponsorship of guest speakers does not necessarily imply approval of views expressed either by the sponsoring group or the institution. Use of the facilities is subject to the policies of the Auraria Higher Education Center.
3. Facilities and services of the college are open to all of its enrolled students provided they are used in a manner appropriate to the college community and in compliance with college procedures. The Student Activities Office maintains information on policies and procedures for use of facilities.
C. Student Participation and Institutional Government
As members of the college community, students are free, individually and collectively, to express their views on issues of institutional policy and on matter of general interest to the student body. The student body shall have clearly defined means to participate in the formulation and application of institutional policy affecting academic and student affairs. The role of the student government in both its general and specific responsibilities shall be made explicit, and the actions of the student government shall be reviewed only through orderly and prescribed procedures.
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D. Student Publications
Student publications and the student press are an invaluable aid in establishing and maintaining an atmosphere of free and responsible discussion and of intellectual exploration on the campuses. They are means of bringing student concerns to the attention of the faculty and institutional authorities, and of formulating student opinion on various issues on campuses and in the world at large.
The college, as the publishers of the student publications, may have to bear the legal responsibility for the content of the publications. In the delegation of editorial responsibility to students, the institution must provide sufficient editorial freedom and financial autonomy for the student publications to maintain their integrity of purpose as vehicles for free inquiry and free expression in an academic community.
Institutional authorities, in consultation with students and faculty, have a responsibility to provide written clarification of the role of student publications, the standards to be used in their evaluation, and the limitations of external control of their operation. At the same time, the editorial freedom of student editors and managers entails responsibilities to be governed by the canons of responsible journalism, such as the avoidance of libel, indecency, undocumented allegations, attacks on personal integrity, and techniques of harassment and innuendo. As safeguards for the editorial freedom of student publications, the following provisions are necessary:
1. The student press shall be free of censorship and advance approval of copy, and its managers and editors shall be free to develop their own editorial policies and news coverage.
2. Editors and managers of student publications may not be arbitrarily suspended or removed because of student, faculty, administrative, or public disapproval of editorial policy or content. Only for proper and stated causes shall editors and managers be subject to removal and then by orderly and prescribed procedures. The agency responsible for the appointment of editors and managers is the agency responsible for their removal.
3. All student publications financed and published by the college must explicitly state on the editorial page of the publication that opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the college or its student body.
E. Distribution of Literature
It is the intent of the college to provide for the exchange of written thoughts and ideas in an orderly fashion and without disruption to the college. The Community College of Denver makes a distinction between commercial and non-commercial literature, posters, handbills, and banners, and allows for the distribution and posting of literature in accordance with college procedures which are consistent with and identical to those procedures of the Auraria Higher Education Center.
V. Off-Campus Freedom of Students
A. Exercise of Rights of Citizenship
CCD students are both citizens and members of the college community. As citizens, students enjoy the same freedoms of speech, peaceful assembly, and right of petition that all other citizens enjoy and, as members of the college community, they are subject to the obligations which accrue to them by virtue of this membership. Faculty members and administrative officials must ensure that institutional powers are not employed to inhibit the intellectual and personal development of students promoted by their exercise of rights of citizenship both on and off campus.
B. Institutional Authority and Civil Penalties
In cases where activities of students result in violation of the law, college officials are prepared to inform students of sources of legal counsel and other assistance. Students who violate the law may incur penalties prescribed by civil authorities, but institutional authority must never be used merely to duplicate the function of general laws. Only where the institution's interests as an academic community are clearly involved shall special institutional authority be asserted. Students who violate college regulations in the course of their off-campus activities, such as those relating to class attendance, will be subject to no greater penalty than would normally be imposed. Institutional actions will not be influenced by community pressure.
VI. Standards of Disciplinary Proceedings
In developing responsible student conduct, disciplinary proceedings play a secondary role to example, counseling, guidance, and admonition. At the same time, educational institutions have a duty and corollary disciplinary powers to protect their purpose by the setting of standards of scholarship and conduct for students and through the regulation of institutional facility use. When the preferred means fail to resolve problems of student conduct, proper procedural safeguards will be observed to protect the student from unfair imposition of penalties.
The administration of discipline must guarantee procedural fairness to an accused student. Practices in disciplinary cases may vary with the gravity of the offense and the sanctions which may be applied. The presence or absence of an honor code must be taken into account as must the degree to which college officials have direct acquaintance with student life, as well as the circumstances of the case, the jurisdictions of faculty and student judicial bodies, the disciplinary responsibilities of college officials and the regular disciplinary procedures, including the student's right to disciplinary action. Minor penalties may be assessed informally under prescribed procedures.
In all situations, procedural fairness requires that students be informed of the charges against them, that they be given a fair opportunity to refute them, that the college not be arbitrary in its actions, and that there be provision for appeal of a decision. The following are recommended as proper safeguards in such proceedings when there are no honor codes offering comparable guarantees:
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A. Standards of Conduct Expected of Students
The college is obligated to clarify the standards of behavior which it considers essential to its educational mission and its community life. These general expectations and resultant specific regulations represent a reasonable regulation of student conduct, but students shall be as free as possible from imposed limitations that have no direct relevance to their education. Offenses shall be defined as clearly as possible, and interpreted in a manner consistent with the aforementioned principles of relevancy and reasonableness. Disciplinary proceedings will be instituted only for violations of standards of conduct. Standards of conduct are stated in the Student Code of Conduct published in this catalog.
B. Investigation of Student Conduct
1. Except under extreme emergency circumstances, premises occupied by student(s) and the personal possessions of student(s) may not be searched unless appropriate authorization is obtained. Appropriate and responsible authority must be designated to whom application must be made before a search is conducted. The application must specify the reasons for the search and the objects or information sought. The student(s) shall be present, if possible, during the search. For premises not controlled by the college, the ordinary requirements for lawful search must be followed.
2. Students detected or arrested in the course of serious violations of college regulations, or infractions of civil law, must be informed of their rights. Harassment may not be used by college representatives to coerce admissions of guilt or information about conduct of other suspected persons.
C. Status of Student Pending Final Action
Pending action on the charges, a student's status will not be altered, nor the right to be present on campus and to attend classes suspended, except in cases where the physical or emotional safety and the well-being of other students, faculty, or college property is involved.
D. Hearing Committee Procedures
To ensure maintenance of students' rights and freedoms, CCD utilizes due process procedures in their deliberation of disciplinary cases. Information on these procedures is available in the Office of the Vice President for Student Services and is published in this catalog under the heading "Grievance Procedure for Students.''
A more detailed copy of "Students' Rights and Responsibilities" is available in the Student Activities Offices and in the Office of the Vice President for Student Services.
Student Code of Conduct
Admission implies a recognition that the student should respect the rights of others and observe moral and civil laws. Interference with the normal processes of education in the classroom or elsewhere on the campus will be regarded as unacceptable conduct, warranting suspension or dismissal.
On-campus conduct for which students are subject to discipline falls into the following categories:
1. dishonesty, such as cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information to the College;
2. forgery, alteration or misuse of college documents, records or identification;
3. obstruction or disruption of teaching, administration, disciplinary procedures or other college activities, e.g.
a. Deliberate interference with academic freedom of speech, including disruption of a class, or interference with the freedom of any speaker invited by any section of the college community to express his/her views.
b. Forcible interference with the freedom of movement of any member or guest of the college.
c. Blocking entryways to buildings, rooms, sections of buildings, hallways, or stairways in such a way that people find it difficult or impossible to pass.
d. Blocking of vehicular traffic.
e. Noise-making or other physical behavior which is so distracting that it's difficult or impossible to conduct a class, meeting, or any other organized event; congregating in such a manner that creates a situation which could endanger life or property.
4. Physical abuse of or action which threatens the health or safety of any person on college-owned or controlled property or at college-sponsored functions.
5. Theft of, misuse of, or damage to property.
6. Unauthorized entry to or use of college facilities; unauthorized use of college equipment.
7. Manufacture, possession, control, sale, transmission, or use of any substance in violation of state or federal laws. (The college has the policy of full cooperation with law enforcement agencies in such cases.)
8. Disorderly, indecent, or obscene conduct on college-owned or controlled property or at college-sponsored functions.
9. Abuse or unauthorized use of alcohol (see State Liquor Code).
10. Condoning any act by another student which violates college policy.
11. Unauthorized representation or contracting in the name of the Community College of Denver. (A student may not claim to be an official representative of the college for any commercial purpose.)
12. Verbal or written communication which threatens, or unlawfully exposes, any individual or group to hatred, contempt, or ridicule, and thereby injures the person, property, or reputation of another.
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13. Dress which fails to meet established safety or health standards in specific classes and on college-owned or controlled property or at college-sponsored activities.
14. Possession of weapons, fireworks, or explosives. (Weapons are defined as firearms, knives, explosives, inflammable materials, or any other items that may cause bodily injury or damage to property.)
Approved Denver Area Council, May 3, 1984, revised by the Vice President for Student Services, July 1987.
Grievance Procedure for Students
It is the objective of these procedures to provide for the prompt, fair and equitable resolution of all student grievances as they occur so that constructive educational and developmental relationships can be maintained at Community College of Denver. This procedure is not intended to be used when the College takes disciplinary action against a student. Should a student believe that his/her rights or freedoms have been violated, the individual may seek redress through this grievance procedure for students.
Students are expected to first attempt to resolve problems through the established administrative channels (see Step 1 below). No one should resort to the Formal Grievance Procedure (Step 2) until all other avenues of resolution have been exhausted.
Definitions
A. Grievance: A written allegation by an affected student that a faculty member, an administrator, or a staff member has violated, misinterpreted, or improperly exercised his/her professional duties. (See Step 2 below.) The grievance should include statement of the remedy sought.
B. Grievant: An affected student who files a grievance.
C. Respondent(s): The faculty member(s) and/or administrator(s) identified by the affected student as causing or contributing to the grievance.
Step 1 The Informal Grievance Procedure
This informal grievance procedure must be initiated within 15 days after the grievant knows, or should have known, of the matter which gives rise to the grievance.
A. The grievant shall discuss and attempt to resolve the problem with the respondent(s). The grievant shall keep all records relevant to the alleged grievance.
B. If the problem is not mutually resolved at this time, the grievant shall confer and attempt to resolve the problem with the immediate supervisors) of the respondent(s). This will usually be the Dean of the Division to which the respondent(s) is assigned.
C. If satisfactory resolution is still not achieved, the grievant must confer and attempt to resolve the problem with the Vice President for Instruction or
Student Services. This meeting will be recorded and become part of the grievance record. All issues relating to grades shall end at the stage with the Vice President of Instruction. Grades are not subject to formal grievance.
Step 2 The Formal Grievance Procedure
A. If the grievance is not suitably resolved during Step 1, the student has the right to file a written grievance with the Vice President for Student Services within 30 days of the time that the grievant could, or should, have known of the action which is the basis of the problem. This written allegation shall indicate what has already been done to resolve the complaint in accord with Step 1. The preservation of relevant documents and of precise records of actions taken pursuant to Step 1 is advantageous. A copy of the written grievance must be mailed or handed to the respondent(s).
B. Upon receipt of the notice of grievance, the Vice president for Student Services shall establish a Grievance Committee. The Vice president for Student Services is responsible for keeping all records pertaining to grievances. If the grievance is against the Vice President, the President shall establish the Grievance Committee.
C. Composition of Grievance Committee
The Grievance Committee will be comprised of five (5) members and appointed at the filing of a grievance.
The Vice President for Student Services shall appoint one disinterested representative from each of the following groups:
Student Government Faculty Senate Administrative Council
Within five (5) school days of a written grievance petition, one additional member shall be selected by the grievant and one by the respondent.
D. The Vice President for Student Services will convene the Committee, set the date of the meeting and notify all involved persons.
The Vice President for Student Services will be responsible for informing the Grievance Committee of its role and responsibilities.
A record of the proceedings and recommendations will be made and retained by the Vice President for Student Services.
E. The hearing will be open, unless the grievant or the respondent requests that it be closed.
F. If either the grievant or respondent fails to appear at the hearing, the Committee may proceed and may determine its resolution of the problem in the person's absence.
G. The Grievance Committee's decision will be based on the greater relevant evidence.
H. The Committee will deliver a copy of its recommendation to the college President within three (3) days following the conclusion of the hearing.
I. A decision regarding the recommendation must be rendered within ten (10) days and both parties must be notified in writing of the decision.
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J. The grievant may withdraw the grievance in writing to the Vice President at any point in the proceedings.
K. The Vice President may grant an extension of the time limits for reasonable cause. This extension must be documented and is not automatic. The decision to grant an extension must be written and communicated to all concerned parties.
L. Within ten (10) school days of the Committee's decision, either party may file an appeal with the college President. The President's decision is final.
M. This policy is being implemented in accordance with Due Process as set forth in the Community College of Denver policy and in accordance with the State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education policy.
N. Inter-Institutional Student Grievance Procedure
In the event that two individuals or groups of individuals from different institutions on the Auraria Campus are involved in a grievance, the procedures which would normally be followed by the institution whose constituent is being charged with the grievance would apply. The Chief Student Affairs Officer from the other institution involved will be informed of the filing of the grievance and the outcome of the grievance procedure.
Grievance Committee Procedures
A. The Grievance Committee shall elect a chairper- son from among its members.
B. The chairperson of the Grievance Committee shall appoint a secretary who shall keep minutes and insure that the proceedings are tape recorded.
C. The procedures to be used during the hearing shall be left to the reasonable discretion of the chairperson of the Grievance Committee. However, in terms of the number of members required for a quorum, "Roberts Rules of Order" shall prevail.
D. The chairperson of the Grievance Committee shall notify the grievant and the respondent of a mutually acceptable date, time, and place of the scheduled hearing(s).
E. The grievant and the respondent shall have full responsibility for preparing and presenting evidence to support their cases.
F. Counsel may be present to advise the grievant or respondent, but may not take part in the hearing proceedings.
G. The Grievance Committee shall have access to all relevant information regarding the case.
H. If more than one grievant appeals for the same cause, the collective grievances may be heard at a single committee hearing.
Rights of the College
Community College of Denver reserves the right to change provisions, requirements and fees in this catalog. Without notice, CCD may cancel any course or program or change its content, description, timing, availability, location, academic credit, or any other aspect.
CCD also reserves broad rights with respect to student withdrawal for health reasons and for reasons having to do with established policies and procedures. Any student whose conduct is unsatisfactory may be put on probation. Any admission on the basis of false documents or statements may be grounds for a student's dismissal and loss of all credit for work completed.
Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974
Annually, CCD informs students of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended. This Act was designed to protect the privacy of education records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their education records and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings.
Students have the right to file complaints with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.
The CCD policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the Act's provisions. Copies of the policy are available from the Office of Registration and Records and the Office of the Vice President of Student Services. The Office of Registration and Records and Student Service's offices also maintain a Directory of Records which lists all educational records maintained on students by CCD.
Questions concerning the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Office of Registration and Records.
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Student Information and Messages
CCD will not release registration information, including a student's class location, to non-college personnel. Students who wish to be reached on campus should provide a copy of their schedule to a friend, family member, CCD Child Development Lab School or Auraria Child Care Center.
Emergency student messages may be telephoned into the Vice President for Student Services Office between 7
a.m. and 4 p.m. at 556-2413. Messages will be delivered between classes, as time and personnel allow.
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Academic Standards
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Attendance
Regular class attendance is necessary if a student is to obtain maximum benefits from instruction. Students are expected to comply with the attendance policy as set by individual instructors and divisions.
Course Load
The normal course load is 15 credit hours. Students who are registered for fewer than 12 credit hours are regarded as part-time students.
Eighteen (18) credit hours is considered a heavy load. Twenty (20) credit hours is the maximum load for all students without special permission.
Academic Standards of Progress
1. A student is required to maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 for all course work attempted.
2. A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below the required 2.0 and who has earned six or more credit hours will be placed on academic probation for the following term of enrollment.
3. A student who fails to raise the cumulative GPA to 2.0 by the end of the probationary instructional term will be considered for academic suspension for a minimum of one term.
4. A student placed on academic suspension will be required to meet with the Vice President of Student Services to determine eligibility for continued enrollment.
5. A student who wishes to appeal suspension may appeal to the Suspension Review Board. Decisions of the Suspension Review Board are final.
Appeal Procedure
Students wishing to appeal academic suspension, or seeking information about the appeal procedure, should contact the Office of the Vice-President for Student Services, 556-2413.
Financial Aid Standards of Progress
Financial Aid applicants must maintain satisfactory academic and measurable progress both prior to applying for aid and during the semesters aid is received. Only credit hours taken at Community College of Denver will be counted to determine Satisfactory/Measurable progress. For more complete information ask for a Financial Aid Information Handbook in Room 135 of the South Classroom Building.
Veterans Academic Standards of Progress
The following policy applies to all student veterans and other eligible persons receiving VA benefits:
1. Grade Point Requirements
Veteran students are required to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 for all course work. Veterans whose cumulative GPA is below 2.0 will be placed on academic probation for the following term. If the GPA is not raised to 2.0 during the probation term, the veteran will be suspended for one academic term. Reinstatement will occur only after approved counseling.
Suspension of the veteran student under the Veterans' Academic Standards of Progress Policy will result in CCD's not certifying enrollment to the Veterans Administration. Veterans in this status may still attend CCD; however, they will be subject to the provisions of the Academic Standards of Progress Policy requirements for continuation of enrollment.
2. Other Special Grades
AU Grade indicates that the student "audited" the course. No credit is allowed for audited courses, nor is the grade certifiable to the VA.
I Grade indicates "incomplete." An incomplete or "I" grade must be made up before the end of the following term (fall or spring). For veterans, if an "I" grade is not completed in this required period, the "I" will revert to a NC (no credit) after the next consecutive 15 week term and the veteran's certification will be adjusted back to the beginning date of the term in which the "I" grade was received.
SP Grade indicates "satisfactory progress", which will be treated the same as an "I", incomplete, grade.
3. Attendance
Veterans' attendance records showing each absence from regularly scheduled classes are required, and CCD is required to document such attendance records.
If a student veteran stops attending class, but does not officially withdraw, he is considered as "non-attending" and may be dropped administratively. VA certification will be adjusted accordingly. An administrative drop will be initiated by the instructor.
4. Mitigating Circumstances
(As defined by P.L. 94-502) Mitigating circumstances which directly hinder an eligible veteran's or other person's pursuit of a course, are judged to be out of the student's control. Following are some general categories of mitigating circumstances (not all-conclusive):
a. Serious illness of the eligible veteran or person.
b. Serious illness or death in the eligible veteran's or other person's immediate family.
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c. Immediate family or financial obligations which require a change in terms, or place of employment, precluding pursuit of course work.
d. Discontinuance of a course by the college.
e. Active military duty, including active duty for training.
f. Withdrawal from a course or receipt of a non-punitive grade upon completion of a course due to unsatisfactory work may be considered mitigating circumstances if the student can demonstrate good faith pursuit of the course up to the point of withdrawal or completion. The student must submit evidence that he/she applied for tutorial aid, consulted a Veterans Administration counselor, or consulted a school academic counselor or advisor regarding an attempt to remedy the unsatisfactory work before withdrawal or completion.
When mitigating circumstances prevail, CCD will attempt to intervene on behalf of the veteran with the Veterans Administration.
CCD Grading Standards
The following guidelines are used by faculty, subject to the needs of the program or courses, to establish their grading criteria.
Grade A A Distinguished Grade for Superior Work
1. The student has mastered the content and objectives of the course, is able to apply what he/she has learned to new situations and is able to relate it to other knowledge.
2. The student consistently distinguished himself/ herself in examinations, reports, projects, class participation and laboratory or training situations.
3. The student shows independent thinking in assignments and class discussion.
4. Work is consistently in proper form, shows satisfactory evidence of careful research (where required) and is submitted punctually.
5. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student consistently demonstrates superior skills, ability and performance.
6. The student complies with the instructor's attendance requirements.
Grade B A Better-than-Acceptable Grade
1. The student consistently shows mastery of the course content and objectives, and usually is able to apply what he/she has learned to new situations or relates it to other knowledge.
2. The student's work is in proper form, shows satisfactory evidence of research (where required), and work is submitted punctually.
3. xWhere achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student consistently demonstrates above average skills, ability and performance.
4. The student complies with the instructor's attendance requirements.
Grade C An Acceptable Grade
Permitting Progress Forward in Course Sequence
1. The student shows evidence of a reasonable comprehension of the subject matter of the course and has an average mastery of the content sufficient to indicate success in the next course in the same field.
2. The student consistently makes average scores in examinations, reports, projects, class participation and laboratory or training situations.
3. ' If the subject carries transfer credit, the student
has indicated sufficient competence in the content to continue in the subject field upon transfer.
4. Assignments are completed in good form and on time.
5. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student consistently demonstrates average skills, ability and performance.
6. The student complies with the instructor's attendance requirements.
Grade D A Less-than-Acceptable, Passing Grade
1. The student falls below the average in examinations, projects, reports, class participation and laboratory or training situations, but shows some competence in the assigned subject matter of the course.
2. The competence demonstrated is insufficient to indicate success in the next course in the subject field.
3. Assignments are completed in imperfect form, sometimes late, or of inconsistent quality.
4. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, the student consistently demonstrates below-average skills, ability and performance.
5. The student complies with the instructor's attendance requirements.
Grade F A Failing Grade
1. With respect to examinations, projects, reports, class participation and laboratory or training situations, the student fails to perform at the D level.
2. The student shows little or no competence in the assigned subject matter of the course.
3. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skill, the student fails to perform at the D or above level.
4. The student fails to comply with the instructor's attendance requirements.
Credit/No Credit
Some courses are offered on a credit/no credit basis. Upon successful completion of such a course, unit credit will be awarded. However, courses taken on a credit/no credit basis are not used in the computation of a student's grade-point average (CPA). Regulations for such courses are the following:
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1. In authorized credit/no credit courses, the credit grade is granted for performance which is equivalent to the letter grade of "C" or better.
2. Credit/no credit graded courses must be designated by the respective division. Courses falling into this category will be specified each term by CCD in the class schedules. Departments may require majors to obtain letter grades in that department's major subjects.
Grade SP Satisfactory Progress
Some courses, designated as open-entry/open-exit, may extend beyond the normal end of a semester since they are designed on a master-learning basis.
Upon successful completion of such a course, unit credit and a grade will be awarded. Regulations for such courses are the following:
1. In courses for which this grade is authorized, the SP will be given in either of the following cases:
a. The student has attended for a full term and has shown satisfactory progress but has not yet mastered required course objectives.
b. The student under the college's continuous enrollment policy has enrolled late in the semester and is making satisfactory progress but has not had sufficient time to master required course objectives.
2. A student may be required to re-register for a course in which he/she received an SP grade if the course work is not completed by the end of the next consecutive 15 week semester. When the remaining time needed for completion is short or when other extenuating circumstances occur, the dean may waive the requirement for re-enrollment. Home study courses must be completed within a calendar year from the date of registration.
3. The student must, before the end of the term, make arrangements with the instructor to complete the course.
4. SPwill revert to NC (no credit) after one year.



Grade I Incomplete
1. The student has not been able to complete the course requirements due to extenuating circumstances.
2. Two-thirds to three-fourths of the course work has been satisfactorily completed.
3. The student must, before the end of the term, make arrangements with the instructor to complete the course.
4. The student must complete the necessary course work prior to the end of the next consecutive 15 week semester.
5. "I" will revert to NC (no credit) after one year.
Grade W Withdrawal
The student has officially withdrawn from the college after the add/drop deadline as published in the class schedule.
Grade AU Audit
The student has audited the course.
Grade AW Administrative Withdrawal
The student has attended one or more class sessions but too few to be appropriately evaluated. This grade should be given by the faculty, but may be given by the Dean or Vice President in certain cases.
Grade Point Average
Grade Point Average Calculation
Under this system, grade points measure the achievement of the student for the number of credits completed. To calculate the grade point average, multiply the number of grade points by the number of credits for each course. Total the credits and points, and divide the grade points by the credits.
A equals 4 grade points B equals 3 grade points C equals 2 grade points D equals 1 grade point F equals 0 grade points
The following example will enable the student to calculate a grade point average:
Course Credits Grade Points
ANT 111 Principles of Anthropology 3 A 12 (3x4)
BIO 131 General College Biology I 4 A 16(4x4)
CSC 111 Introduction to Computing with BASIC 3 B 9 (3 x 3)
ENG 111 English Comp. Essay Writing 3 D 3(3x1)
POS 111 Introduction to Political Science 3 F 0 (3 x 0)
Totals: 16 40
Total grade points divided by total credits equals the cumulative grade point average. Therefore, the grade point average for the above example is 40 divided by 16 or 2.50.
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Repeating a Course
Students who receive a D, NC or F grade in a course may retake the same course. The higher of the two grades received will be computed in the student's transcript CPA. However, the transcript will indicate the grades for both courses. Students must file a request with the Registrar's Office to repeat a course under this policy, no later than the published deadline date for add/drops. A student may repeat a course only once.
Recognition of Achievement or Continuing Education Units (CEU)
CCD offers many courses, conferences, workshops and seminars for upgrading job skills as well as for personal enrichment. Successful completion of courses of this type may result in the granting of a Recognition of Achievement or a CEU which may be requested from the appropriate instructional division.
Vice Presidents Honors List
Students are selected for the Vice President's Honors List during the semester preceding their graduation from CCD. To be eligible for this academic honor, a student must be completing at least 30 semester credit hours in a certificate program, or be completing the requirements for one of the four associate degrees. In addition, the student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.85, based on all courses attempted while enrolled at CCD. Selection for the Vice President's Honors List is printed on the student's permanent academic transcript.
Phi Theta Kappa
Phi Theta Kappa, the national scholastic honorary society for two-year community and junior colleges, recognizes student academic excellence at CCD and promotes academic community at the college.
To be eligible for membership, students must have a 3.5 grade point average after completing 15 or more credit hours of college-level work, and carry three or more credit hours during the current academic year. Phi Theta Kappa members are honored at graduation for their outstanding academic achievements.
For more information, interested and eligible students should call Anita Fekete at 556-2487.
Graduation Requirements
Degree Requirements
All applicants for CCD degree programs must meet the following requirements:
1. Be enrolled in CCD classes for the semester in which he/she intends to graduate. Exceptions may be approved by the Vice President of Instruction.
2. Complete a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit in approved course work.
3. Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (C average). Courses to be counted towards the general education core curriculum must be completed with a grade of C or higher. Some programs, as stated in the current catalog, may require a student to earn at least a "C" in specific course work. Students should check with their instructional division as well as their advisor for information regarding the minimum grade point average requirement.
4. Complete a minimum of 15 credits at CCD in the program area. Exceptions may be approved by the Vice President of Instruction.
5. Complete the Academic Profile, a general education assessment, during the final academic semester at the college.
6. Complete program competency assessment required by the program.
7. File an "application of graduation'' form during the term in which the student intends to graduate, according to the deadline published in the schedule of courses for that item.
General Education Requirements
All associate degrees have general education requirements which adhere to goals for General Education established by the board of the Colorado Community College and Occupational Education System:
1. To build skills for advanced and lifelong learning.
2. To expose students to the mainstream of thought and interpretation in the humanities, sciences, mathematics, social sciences, communications and the arts.
3. To integrate learning in ways that cultivate the student's broad understanding and ability to think about a large and complex subject, formulate and analyze valid concepts, solve problems and clarify values.
4. To prepare individuals for their roles as effective citizens in a changing and complex society.
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Certificate Requirements
All CCD graduates of certificate programs must meet the following requirements:
1. Complete the specified requirements of an approved vocational/technical program.
2. Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (C). Some programs, as stated in the current catalog, may require a student to earn at least a "C" in specific course work. Students should check with their instructional division, as well as their advisor, for information regarding the minimum grade point average required for graduation.
3. File an "application of graduation" form during the term in which the student intends to graduate, according to the deadline published in the schedule of courses for that term.
4. Complete a minimum of 15 credits in the program area at CCD. Exceptions may be approved by the Vice President of Instruction.
Catalog Requirements for Graduation
Students may graduate under the catalog requirements listed for the academic year in which they were first enrolled. If students interrupt attendance for one year or more and then return, the catalog of the new readmission year is the document of authority. If graduation requirements and policies should change, students may choose to follow the catalog of the year of initial entry or the current catalog. Students should be sure to obtain and keep a copy of the catalog under which they enter or are readmitted.
The catalog should not be considered a contract between the Community College of Denver and any student. The College retains the right to cancel or change programs or course offerings where enrollments are insufficient or for any other reason. Every course listed in the catalog may not be offered every semester.
Other Graduation Policies
1. No more than six semester hours of courses numbered "299" (independent study course work) may be applied toward an associate degree program.
2. There is no limit on special topics courses allowed to count toward a degree. In individual cases, the limit will be determined by the program area. Students taking special topic courses should consult with their advisors as to how these credits will apply toward a degree.
3. CCD reserves the right to substitute or delete course work based on current curriculum. Students are assured that if the curriculum changes, CCD will make every effort to determine an equitable solution.
Petitioning for Waivers and/or Program Substitutions
Students who, due to extenuating circumstances, wish to petition for a waiver and/or substitution of program requirements must complete a "Waiver/Program Substitution Request Form." The form is available in each instructional division office.
The student should complete the request and have it approved by the program coordinator, the division dean, and the Vice President of Instruction. The form will then be kept on file in the Office of Registration and Records.
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Special Education Programs
Continuing Education Programs
The Division of Continuing Education extends professional development and educational opportunities to learners of all ages, circumstances, and locations. In cooperation with other academic divisions of the College, Continuing Education provides credit and noncredit learning opportunities at both on-campus and off-campus locations. Continuing Education Credits (CEUs) can be awarded for non-credit offerings.
The Division of Continuing Education offers the following programs:
Business and Industry Services
Assists the business community with its training needs through credit and non-credit offerings at the work site. Businesses and organizations may select from existing college programs or have courses and workshops tailored to their specific needs. A fully-equipped lab is available for customized computer training.
The Small Business Development Center
Provides small business owners and would-be entrepreneurs with guidance in the following areas: small business planning and start-up preparation, loan package preparation, bid package preparation, contract identification, and marketing plan development. Center personnel work extensively with grant writing and funding for small businesses and with small business computerized databases and information networking. The Small Business Development Center (SBDC) is located at 1445 Market St., Denver, CO 80202, (303) 620-8076.
Extended Campus Program
Provides credit and non-credit classes to off-campus locations in local neighborhoods. Courses can be applied to certificate or associate degree programs. Additional development and personal enrichment needs are met by non-credit offerings in specific topic areas.
Home Study
Designed for study at home in an open-entry/open-exit format. Students may register at any time for these courses and have up to one year to complete them. After registration, course materials which explain course procedures, indicate assignments, and provide textbook information are mailed to each student. Contact with the instructor is maintained by phone and mail.
Study Abroad London Semester
A one-semester study-abroad program. Courses are generally from the areas of behavioral sciences (anthropology, psychology, sociology), history (British, modern European), humanities (art history, literature, theater) and international business (banking, economics, trade).
Television Course Program
Offered in association with local TV channels, many of the courses are for credit and can be applied toward certificate or degree programs. Courses vary each semester and cover a wide range of topics. Course materials, assignments, and textbook information are mailed to the student after registration. Contact with the instructor is maintained by phone and mail, with optional meetings.
Weekend College Program
Credit courses leading toward certificate and degree programs and non-credit courses for professional development and personal enrichment are offered in various format options.
Work and Family Resource Center
To meet the needs of families and employees, the Center offers a broad spectrum of direct services and assistance: child care resource and referral services, parent education seminars, and resource materials relating to work and family issues including child and elder care services.
Cooperative Education Program
The Cooperative Education Program provides opportunities to supplement course work with practical work experience related to the student's educational and occupational objectives. A qualified instructor coordinates and supervises the total work experience program.
Students may earn credit for working part-time in an area directly related to their educational program. Students are encouraged to apply at least one semester prior to the semester they wish to work. For more information call or drop by the Cooperative Education Office, South Classroom Building, Room 134, 556-3607.
Developmental Studies Program
To be successful at the Community College of Denver, students must be able to apply reading, math, writing and study skills. CCD offers a comprehensive support program in these skill areas to help students achieve academic success. Offerings include:
1. assessment of basic academic skills, vocational aptitude and interest;
2. test results interpretation by skilled faculty and counselors;
3. a variety of skill development courses in reading, mathematics, writing and study skills;
4. the College for Living Program which assists developmentally disabled adults with independent living activities and pre-vocational skills;
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5. special assessment and tutorial support for the learning disabled;
6. computer literacy courses and support for computer assisted instruction;
7. tutoring for basic skills, general education and vocational programs;
8. preparation for GED; and
9. English as a Second Language.
Honors Program
An Honors Program is available for qualified students at CCD. Honors courses assist students to develop sophisticated creative and critical thinking skills along with primary and secondary research skills. Special honors sections are noted in each semester's schedule.
Learning Development Center
Located in the South Classroom Building, Room 142, the Learning Development Center (LDC) provides free tutorial assistance to all CCD students and helps them enter and complete the educational program of their choice. For more information, call 556-2497.
Tutoring One-to-one and small group tutoring is available to help students achieve proficiency in basic academic skills, apply those skills to course work, and prepare to challenge a course for credit or clear an incomplete grade.
Peer Tutoring This program provides student-to-stu-dent tutoring. Peer tutors must have successfully completed the courses they tutor and be recommended by faculty for the program. In addition, tutors must either have successfully completed the peer tutoring seminars (EDU 140) or be currently enrolled in EDU 140.
Supplemental Services Tutoring Supplemental Services provides vocational assessments, tutoring to students enrolled in vocational education programs and referrals to appropriate support pro-grams/agencies.
Special Learning Support Program This program offers diagnostic evaluation and prescriptive tutoring for adults with learning disabilities. The program also provides support services for faculty, referrals for students and assistance through an LD support group. Test Center The Test Center provides achievement, abilities, vocational interest, basic skills assessment and make-up exams. Students should check the schedule posted outside Room 142, South Classroom Building, at the beginning of each semester for Test Center hours.
Writing Center The Writing Center provides direct support for students enrolled in various English classes and assists students with writing projects from any course. Through individual instruction and the use of a variety of materials, the Center helps students develop and improve critical writing skills. Computer Labs Open laboratories of computers are provided for student and class use. Any student may use the facility at any time during the semester, including nights and weekends.
Technical Education Center North Technical Education Center East
CCD's Technical Education Centers are job training centers, offering business and industry-based training. All programs are open-entry/open-exit and operate year-round with individualized instruction allowing a student to enroll anytime and leave when program requirements are completed. Students attend class an average of six hours a day, five days each week.
Fast-track training permits students to complete a certificate program in seven months or less. CCD grants college credit for all courses successfully completed. These credits can be applied to an associate degree.
The centers also provide classes in job search techniques, GED preparation and basic study skills. Career assessment testing, case management counseling and job placement assistance also are available. TEC North is located at 6221 Downing Street, Denver, CO 80216. For more information, call 289-2243. TEC East is located at 3601 Martin Luther King Blvd., Denver, CO 80205. For more information, call 321-8567.
Official GED Test Center
The Technical Education Center North is designated as an official GED Test Center. Testing times are Monday from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm and Thursday from 5:00 pm to 9:00 pm. Test fees are $30.00 for all five tests, $6.00 per single test and $6.00 for each re-take. For information, contact Diana Casteel at 289-2243.
New Chance
The New Chance program operates at the Technical Education Center North. The objectives of New Chance are to prevent teen pregnancies, lessen dependence on public assistance, secure stable employment and to improve the cognitive, emotional and physical development of the student and child. New Chance will provide comprehensive services in these five areas:
1. Personal and Social Development
2. Case-Management Counseling
3. Educational Development
4. Employability Development
5. Services to Participants' Children
Child Care
The 60 bed infant/toddler day care center at TEC North accommodates children from six weeks to two and one-half years of age. Community College of Denver's Child Development Center Lab School on the Auraria campus offers a full day early childhood care for children two and a half to six years of age.
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Reading Guide to Degree and Certificate Programs
Definitions
Area of Emphasis
In the Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degree programs, the area of emphasis refers to twelve or more credits hours in a subject field in preparation for transfer and selection of a major at a baccalaureate college.
Capstone
Courses, usually taken during the final semester, in which program competencies are reviewed and assessed. All courses identified as capstone courses require a grade of C or better for graduation. Capstone courses must be taken at CCD.
Contact Hour
A 50-minute period of classroom or lab contact between student and instructor.
Corequisite
A course or requirement which must be completed during the same semester as the course which identifies the corequisite.
Credit Hour
The basic unit of academic credit. Generally, one credit hour is earned by attending a lecture class for a fifty-minute period, once a week, for a full semester. In a laboratory course, one credit hour is granted for two-to-three fifty-minute periods per week in the laboratory.
Open Entry
A course type which allows the student to start at any time prior to the latest date to drop classes. The Registrar establishes this date each semester. In this type of course, the student must complete all course requirements by the end of the semester regardless of entry date.
Open Entry/Open Exit
A course type in which a student may enroll at any time prior to the latest date to drop classes and progress at his or her own learning pace. If the student does not complete course requirements by the end of the semester, s/he will receive an "SP" (Satisfactory Progress) grade and may continue in the course the following semester at no additional tuition charge.
Prerequisite
A course or requirement which must be completed satisfactorily before registration for the course which identifies the prerequisite.
Speech Intensive Courses
AAS "Speech Intensive" courses combine the requirements of SPE 115 with the content of vocational classes.
Students who transfer a course from another college which is noted as "speech intensive" at CCD may meet the SPE 115 requirements only by taking SPE 115 as a separate course.
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Course Titles and Prefixes Insurance INS
Accounting ACC International Business INB
Accounting (TEC) ACT International Studies INT
Anthropology ANT Journalism JOU
Appliance Repair Technology APT Literature LIT
Art ART Machine Tool (TEC) MTO
Astronomy AST Magnetic Resonance Imaging MRI
Biology BIO Management MAN
Chemical Operations (TEC) CHO Marketing MAR
Chemistry CHE Mathematics MAT
College for Living CFL Mathematics (TEC) MTH
Computer Literacy (TEC) COL Music MUS
Commercial Credit Management CRM Nuclear Medicine Technology NMT
Communications COM Nursing NUR
Computer Aided Drafting CAD Nutrition NUT
Computer Information Systems CIS Paralegal PAR
Cooperative Education (TEC) CWE Personal Growth/New Chance (TEC) PGD
Drafting For Industry DRI Philosophy PHI
Early Childhood Education and Management ECE Photography PHO
Economics ECO Physics PHY
Education EDU Political Science POS
Electronics Technology ELT Psychology PSY
English ENG Radiation Therapy Technology RTT
English as a Second Language (TEC) ENS Radiologic Health Sciences RHS
English as a Second Language ESL Radiologic Technology Radiography RTR
Financial Services FIN Reading REA
Food Production Management FPM Reading (TEC) RED
French FRE Real Estate REE
General Education Development GED Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning
GED Preparation (TEC) GEQ Commercial-Industrial RAC
Geography GEO Secretarial (TEC) SCY
Geology GEY Secretarial SEC
Graphic Arts GRA Sociology SOC
Graphic Design GRD Spanish SPA
Health Occupations HOC Speech SPE
History HIS Surgical Technology STE
Hospitality and Restaurant Administration HRA Theatre THE
Human Services HSE Traffic and Transportation Management TTM
Humanities HUM Travel and Tourism Occupations TTO
Job Search Skills (TEC) JSS Welding and Fabrication (TEC) WEF
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Associate Degree Programs
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE
University Parallel, Transfer Program
An Associate of Arts Degree (AA) provides a learning foundation in communications, social science, arts or humanities. Although some students work toward the Associate of Arts Degree for purposes of personal enrichment, many others plan to transfer to four-year colleges and universities in order to continue their work toward baccalaureate degree and pre-professional training in such fields as law, education, the arts and social sciences.
The Associate of Arts Degree is sometimes referred to as a University Parallel or Transfer degree. CCD provides a wide variety of course offerings which parallel those found in the first two years of a university and which satisfy lower division (freshman/sophomore) requirements. Courses to be counted towards the general education core curriculum must be completed with a grade of C or higher.
Student Performance Objectives for Transfer Education (AA Degree)
1. Students will plan and write well-structured compositions demonstrating the writing capabilities to express, inform, analyze, evaluate, persuade, argue, conduct research and use primary and secondary sources logically and stylistically.
2. Students will compose and deliver oral presentations, providing ideas and information and using delivery skills suitable to the topic, purpose and audience. Students will demonstrate an understanding of others' speeches and be able to evaluate others' speeches.
3. Students will read and think critically about a variety of interdisciplinary topics, demonstrating college-level reading skills in a variety of disciplines including humanities, social sciences and the natural sciences. Students will demonstrate orally and in writing the critical thinking skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation.
4. Students will analyze and use numerical data and qualitative reasoning skills including applying proper formulas to mathematical data and calculating results, illustrating quantitative data graphically, rearranging general formulas to solve for any term, and interpreting graphic data and assessing the importance of the portrayed trends.
5. Students will analyze and/or synthesize data using scientific methods including utilizing standard methods of experimental data collection involving control and experimental groups, designing an experiment to test a hypothesis derived from an empirical or theoretical premise, and analyzing results of an experiment in terms of the initial hypothesis and/or existing theory.
AA Degree Program Requirements
Within the AA Degree, the College offers eight possible areas of emphasis: Art, Behavioral Sciences, Communications, Economics, English/Literature, History, Music, or Political Sciences. The same course may not count both toward general education requirements and toward an area of emphasis. An area of emphasis consists of four identified courses in one academic area. Students who do not select an area of emphasis or who have fewer than 60 credit hours with their core courses and their area of emphasis should take transfer electives as needed to complete the 60 credit hours required for the Associate of Arts Degree. All graduates of the Associate of Arts (AA) Degree must meet the following program requirements.
General Education Core Credit Hours
1. English ENG 121, ENG 122 6
II. Speech SPE 115 3
III. Mathematics (any 1 of the following) MAT 121, 125, 135, 201,202 3-4
IV. Physical & Biological Sciences (any 1 of the following) AST 101,102 BIO 105, 111, 112 CHE 101, 102, 111, 112 PHY 105, 111, 112, 211,212 GEY 111, 121 4-5
V. Social & Behavioral Sciences (9 credit hours from 2 disciplines) ECO 201,202 GEO 105 HIS 101, 102, 201,202 POS 111 PSY 101,102 SOC 101, 102 9
VI. Humanities (9 credit hours from 2 disciplines) ART 111, 112 SPA 111,112 FRE 111, 112 IPN 111,112 HUM 121, 122, 123 LIT 115, 201,202 MUS 120, 121 PHI 111, 112, 113 RUS 111, 112 THE 211, 212 9
VII. Capstone Course (Required) HUM 285 3
General Education Sub-Total Area of Emphasis (Optional) 37-39
and/or Electives Sub-Total 23-21
Total Hours 60
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Approved Electives for the AA Degree
ANT -All courses ART -All courses BIO -105 and higher CHE 101 and higher COM All courses CIS 115,160,260,276 CSC -200 ECO 201 and higher ENG 121 and higher FRE -111 and higher GEO All courses GEY All courses HIS All courses HUM All courses JOU All courses LIT All courses MAT 121 and higher MUS All courses PHI -All courses PHY All courses POS All courses PSY -101 and higher SOC -All courses SPA -111,112,211,212 SPE All courses THE -All courses
Courses whose number begins with 0 and other courses numbered below the general education requirements in any prefix will not meet requirements for the AA Degree.
AA Degree Areas of Emphasis
Art Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ART 122 Drawing II
(Prerequisite ART 121) 3 90
ART 132 Design II
(Prerequisite ART 131) 3 90
Select two courses from the following: 6 180
ART 212 Painting II
(Prerequisite ART 211) 3 90
ART 213 Painting III
(Prerequisite ART 212) 3 90
ART 232 Watercolor II
(Prerequisite ART 231) 3 90
ART 233 Watercolor III
(Prerequisite ART 232) 3 90
ART 270 Figure Drawing I
(Prerequisite ART 122) 3 90
ART 271 Figure Drawing II
(Prerequisite ART 221) 3 90
Total 12 360
Behavioral Sciences Emphasis
Cr. Ct.Hrs.
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology I 3 45
SOC 102 Introduction to Sociology II 3 45
PSY 101 General Psychology I 3 45
PSY 102 General Psychology II 3 45
Total 12 180
Communications Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Select four courses from the following: 12 180
SPE 125 Interpersonal Communication 3 45
COM 250 Elements of Argument 3 45
COM 251 Introduction to Broadcasting 3 45
COM 255 Survey of Film 3 45
COM 256 Media Survey 3 45
COM 261 Organizational Communication 3 45
Total 12 180
Economics Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics ; 3 45
ECO 206 Political Economy 3 45
ECO 218 Labor Economics 3 45
Total 12 180
English/Literature Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Select 4 courses, at least 2 which are ESIG 12 180
ENG 131 Technical Writing I 3 45
or ENG 132 Technical Writing II 3 45
ENG 221 Creative Writing 3 45
ENG 227 Poetry Writing 3 45
LIT 115 Introduction to Literature 3 45
LIT 201 Masterpieces of Literature I 3 45
Total 12 180
History Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Select four of the following: 12 180
HIS 101 Western Civilization 1 3 45
HIS 102 Western Civilization II 3 45
HIS 201 United States History I 3 45
HIS 202 United States History II 3 45
HIS 225 Colorado History I 3 45
Total 12 180
Music Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MUS 101 Music Theory I 4 60
MUS 102 Music Theory II MUS 141 Private Instruction 4 60
(instrumenl/voice) 1 30
Select one of the following: 3 45
MUS 120 Music Appreciation 3 45
MUS 121 Introduction to Music History I 3 45
MUS 122 Introduction to Music History II 3 45
Total 12 195
Political Science Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
POS 105 Introduction to Political Science : 3 45
POS 111 American Government POS 125 American State and 3 45
Local Government 3 45
POS 205 International Relations 3 45
Total 12 180
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ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE
University Parallel, Transfer Program
The Associate of Science Degree (AS) provides a learning foundation in mathematics and the sciences. Although some students work toward the Associate of Science Degree for personal enrichment, many plan to transfer to four-year colleges and universities to continue work toward a baccalaureate degree and professional training in such fields as engineering, medicine, biology, chemistry and physics.
The Associate of Science Degree is sometimes referred to as a University Parallel or Transfer degree.
CCD provides a wide variety of science and mathematics course offerings which parallel those found in the first two years of a university and which satisfy lower division (freshman/sophomore) requirements. Courses to be counted towards the general education core curriculum must be completed with a grade of C or higher.
Within the Associate of Science Degree, the College offers seven areas of emphasis: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Science, Mathematics, Medical Cluster, Pre-Engineering and Physics. The same course may not count both toward general education requirements and toward an area of emphasis. All graduates of the Associate of Science (AS) Degree must meet the following program requirements.
Student Performance Objectives for Transfer Education (AS Degree)
1. Students will plan and write well-structured compositions demonstrating the writing capabilities to express, inform, analyze, evaluate, persuade, argue, conduct research and use primary and secondary sources logically and stylistically.
2. Students will compose and deliver oral presentations, providing ideas and information and using delivery skills suitable to the topic, purpose and audience. Students will demonstrate an understanding of others' speeches and be able to evaluate others' speeches.
3. Students will read and think critically about a variety of interdisciplinary topics, demonstrating college-level reading skills in a variety of disciplines including humanities, social sciences and the natural sciences. Students will demonstrate orally and in writing the critical thinking skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation.
4. Students will analyze and use numerical data and qualitative reasoning skills including applying proper formulas to mathematical data and calculating results, illustrating quantitative data graphically, rearranging general formulas to solve for any term, and interpreting graphic data and assessing the importance of the portrayed trends.
5. Students will analyze and/or synthesize data using scientific methods including utilizing standard methods of experimental data collection involving control and experimental groups, designing an experiment to test a hypothesis derived from an empirical or theoretical premise, and analyzing results of an experiment in terms of the initial hypothesis and/or existing theory.
AS Degree Program Requirements
General Education Core Credit Hours
1. English 6
ENG 121, 122 II. Speech 3
SPE 115 III. Mathematics 4-5
(any 1 of the following) MAT 121, 125, 201,202 IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 8-10
(any 2 of the following) AST 101,102 BIO 111, 112 CHE 111, 112 GEY 111, 121 PHY 111, 112, 211,212 V. Social & Behavioral Sciences 6
(6 credit hours from 2 disciplines) ANT 101, 111 ECO 201,202 GEO 105 HIS 101, 102, 201, 202 POS 111 PSY 101, 102 SOC 101, 102 VI. Humanities 6
(any 2 of the following) ART 111, 112 HUM 121, 122, 123 LIT 115, 201,202 MUS 120, 121 PHI 111, 112, 113 SPA 111, 112 VII. Capstone Course SCI 285 Critical Thinking General Education Sub-Total Hours 36-39
Area of Emphasis (Optional) and/or Electives 24-21
Total Hours 60
Approved Electives for the AS Degree
An area of emphasis consists of four identified courses in one academic area. Students who do not select an area of emphasis or who have fewer than 60 credit hours with their core courses and their area of emphasis should take general electives as needed to complete the 60 credit hours required for the Associate of Science Degree.
ANT All courses ART All courses BIO -111 and higher CHE 111 and higher COM All courses CIS 115,160,260,276 CSC -200 ECO 201 and higher ENG -121 and higher FRE -111 and above GEO All courses GEY -All courses HIS -All courses
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HUM All courses JOU -All courses LIT -All courses MAT -121 and higher MUS All courses PHI -All courses PHY -111 and higher POS -All courses PSY -101 and higher SOC -All courses SPA -111,112,211,212 SPE All courses THE -All courses
Courses whose number begins with a 0 and other courses numbered below the general education curriculum in any prefix will not meet requirements for the AS Degree.
Areas of Emphasis for the AS Degree
Biology Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
BIO 111 General College Biology I 5 90
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 90
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 105
Total 20 390
Chemistry Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 105
PHY 111 Algebra Based Physics 1 5 105
PHY 112 Algebra Based Physics II 5 105
Total 20 420
Computer Science Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Select 4 of the following 5 courses: 12 180
CIS 115 Intro to Computers 3 45
CSC 200 Programming in PASCAL 3 45
CSC 230 Programming in 'C' 3 45
CSC 145 Programming in FORTRAN 3 45
MAT 135 Introduction to Statistics 3 45
Total 12 180
Earth Science Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Select 4 of the following 5 courses: 14-18 240-270
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 90
GEY 111 Physical Geology 4 75
GEY 121 Historical Geology 4 60
GEO 105 Geography 3 45
BIO 109 Human Ecology and
the Environment 3 45
GEO 200 or Human Ecology
GEY 225 or Planet Earth (Telecourse)
Total 14-18 240-270
Mathematics Emphasis
MAT 201 Calculus I Cr. 5 Ct. Hrs. 75
MAT 202 Calculus II 5 75
MAT 203 Calculus III 4 60
MAT 265 Differential Equations 3 45
Total 15-17 225-255
Medical Cluster
A. Pre-Dental Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
BIO 111 General College Biology I 5 90
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 90
BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 75
BIO 203 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75
Total 18 330
B. Pre-Medical Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
BIO 111 General College Biology 1 5 90
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 90
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
MAT 135 Introduction to Statistics 3 45
Total 18 330
C. Pre-Nursing Emphasis (non-CCD)
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 75
BIO 203 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75
BIO 215 Microbiology 4 75
MAT 135 Introduction to Statistics 3 45
Total 15 270
D. Pre-Veterinary Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
BIO 111 General College Biology I 5 90
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 90
CHE 111 General College Chemistry I 5 105
CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 105
Total 20 390
Physics Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
PHY 211 Physics: Calculus Based I 5 105
PHY 212 Physics: Calculus Based II 5 105
CHE 111 General College Chemistry I 5 105
BIO 111 General College Biology I 5 90
Total 20 405
Pre-Engineering Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
PHY 211 Physics: Calculus Based I 5 105
PHY 212 Physics: Calculus Based II 5 105
CHE 111 General College Chemistry I 5 105
MAT 201 Calculus I 5 75
Total 20 390
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ASSOCIATE OF GENERAL Pre-Business Emphasis
STUDIES DEGREE CCD/MSC
University Parallel, Transfer Program
The Associate of General Studies Degree (AGS) is available to students who want to complete a broad program of both career and transfer courses without the constraints of specialization, or for those students desiring a specific mix of career and traditional transfer courses. Transferability of the AGS depends upon the courses taken and the receiving institution. See your advisor and the Transfer Guide.
While many students take the AGS Degree because of the freedom to design their individual programs, others select one of the AGS Degrees the College has articulated with Metropolitan State College or the University of Colorado at Denver. All graduates of the Associate of General Studies Degree (AGS) must meet the following program requirements.
AGS Degree Program Requirements
I. General Education Requirements
(28 cr. hrs.): Credit Hours
a. English/Speech (ENG 121, 122) 6
b. (SPE 115) 3
C. Mathematics (MAT 121,1 24*,
125*,135, 201,202) 3
(*MSC recommended)
d. Science (AST 101, 102, BIO 105, 111,
112; CHE 101, 102, 111, 112; PHY 105,
111, 112, 211,212; GEY 111, 121) 4
e. Social & Behavioral Sciences Six
credits from 2 disciplines (ECO 201,202; GEO 105; HIS 101, 102, 201,202;
POS 111, PSY 101, 102; SOC 101, 102) 6
f. Humanities- Six credits from 2
disciplines. (ART 111, 112; any foreign language 111, 112 or higher; HUM 121,
122, 123; LIT 115, 201,202; MUS 120,
121, PHI 111, 112, 113, THE 211,212) 6
II. Professional education courses generally
recognized as transferable, i.e., college level courses in business, management, marketing, computer science and selected courses in technical education and health education, and/or other courses from General Education Core Requirements. (Consult an advisor.) 9
III. Vocational prefixed courses and/or general
electives. General electives must be general education prefixes numbered equal to or above the general education course numbers or numbered 111 or above. 23
Total 60
The following courses represent the CCD/MSC Pre-Business two-plus-two transfer agreement. Students completing these courses will be admitted as juniors in MSC's School of Business.
ENG 121 English Composition I ENG 122 English Composition II SPE 115 Principles of Speech MAT 124 Finite Math and MAT 125 Survey of Calculus
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
3 45
3 45
3 45
3 45
or
MAT 201 Calculus I 4-5 60-75
HIS 201 American History 3 45
Humanities Electives: (Students are required to have 6 hrs. from these listed electives ART 111 & 112, LIT 115,
PHI 111, 112, THE 211) 6 90
Social Science: (Students are required to complete 6 hrs. from these listed courses: PSY 101, 102, SOC 101,
POS 111, 121) 6 90
Science General Education Elective (Students are required to have 6 hrs. from these listed electives ANT 111, AST 101, BIO 111, CHE 101, 111, 112,
GEY 111, PHY 105, 111, 112, 211,212) 6 90
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics 3 45
ACC 121 Principles of Accounting I 4 60
ACC 122 Principles of Accounting II 4 60
BUS 115 Introduction to Business ! 45
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law & the Legal Environment** 3 45 Total Required Hours 64-65 960-975 Requires validation examination contact CCD advisor.
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Pre-Business Emphasis CCD/CU-Denver
The following courses represent the CCD/CU-Denver Pre-Business two plus two transfer agreement. Students completing these courses with a minimum of a B average will be admitted as juniors in CU-Denver's School of Business.
ENGLISH Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
ENG 122 English Composition II 3 45
HUMANITIES
SPE 115 Principles of Speech Communications 3 45
SOCIAL SCIENCE
ECO 201 Principles of MacroEconomics 3 45
ECO 202 Principles of MicroEconomics 3 45
POS 111 American Government 3 45
POS 105 Introduction to Political Science 3 45
PSY 101 General Psychology I 3 45
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 45
MATH/SCIENCE
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 125 Survey of Calculus 4 60
BIO, CHE, GEY, or PHY Electives 8 120
BUSINESS CORE
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers (Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law and the Legal Environment 3 45
HIS, PSY, or SOC Electives 6 90
Total 66 990
Transferability of BUS 221 is contingent upon a validation
exam given by CU-Denver every two years.
Pre-Professional Teacher Education Program CCD/MSC
The Pre-Professional Teacher Education Program of study is designed to meet the general education and some discipline specific requirements to complete an Associate of General Studies degree. The program is fully articulated with Metropolitan State College's Teacher Education program.
For detailed program information please consult an advisor in the Division of Developmental Studies, Arts & Humanities, Science & Technology or the Educational Planning and Advising Center.
Public Administration Emphasis CCD/MSC
The following courses represent the CCD/MSC Public Administration 2-plus-2 transfer agreement. Students completing these courses will be admitted as juniors in MSC's Public Administration Program.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
ENG 122 English Composition II 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 123 Finite Math 3 45
HIS 201 American History 3 45
Humanities General Education Electives (Students are required to have 6 hrs. from these listed electives: ART 111, 112, LIT 115, PHI 111, 112, THE 211, 212) 6 90
Science General Education Electives (Students are required to have 6 hrs. from these listed electives: ANT 111, AST 101, BIO 111, CHE 101, 111, 112, GEY 111, PHY 105, 111, 112, 211, 212) 6 90
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics 3 45
POS 111 American Government 3 45
POS 121 Introduction to Political Science POS 200 American State and 3 45
Local Government 3 45
ECO 210 Political Economy CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
(Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
Electives College Transferable Courses (Students are required to have 9 hrs. from these listed electives: ACC 122, BUS 21 7, BUS 221, BUS 115) 4 135
Total Required Hours 62 930
34


ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE
The Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS) prepares students for entry level employment in a given occupation or upgrades/stabilizes employable skills.
While not intended for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program, all AAS degrees have limited transfer-ability. In each AAS program, some of the courses are articulated with and accepted by at least one specific baccalaureate program. In some instances, AAS graduates transfer to full junior standing within a specific, articulated baccalaureate program. See your Transfer Guide and talk with your advisor for specific details.
AAS Degree Program Requirements
The AAS Degree requires a minimum of 60 credit hours, 15 of which must meet General Education requirements and 45-48 of which must meet specific program requirements.
General Education Requirements Cr. Hours
I. English-ENG 100 or ENG 121 3
II. Mathematics MAT 103 or higher 3
III. One course from 3 of the following 4 areas: 9-11
A. Speech SPE 115
SPE 115 may be earned through "Speech Intensive" programs. (See specific AAS program recommendations or an advisor.)
B. Physical and Biological Sciences AST 101,102
BIO 105, 111, 112*
CHE 101, 102, 111, 112 GEY 111, 121
PHY 105, 111, 112, 211,212
* Nursing requires BIO 141, 142 and 215. **Health Occupations Require BIO 141-142
C. Social and Behavioral Sciences ECO 201,202
GEO 105
HIS 101, 102, 201, 202 PSY 101, 102*
POS 111, 105 SOC 101, 102
* Nursing requires PSY 235.
D. Humanities ART 111, 112 CIS 115
HUM 121, 122, 123 LIT 115, 201, 202 MUS 120, 121 PHI 111, 112, 113
SPA 111, 112, FRE 111, 112 (any foreign language 111, 112 or higher)
THE 211,212
Program-Specific Requirements 45-43
Total 60
Individual departments may specify particular courses that may be counted toward the general education requirements.
Student Performance Objectives for Vocational Education (AAS Degree Programs)
Vocational education program completers will be able to perform the following:
a. Use communication skills (reading, writing, speaking) appropriate to the technical specialty.
b. Use mathematical data and qualitative reasoning skills appropriate to the technical specialty.
c. Use critical thinking and problem solving skills appropriate to the technical specialty.
d. Demonstrate knowledge of the theory involved in the technical specialty.
e. Perform specific tasks demonstrating the practical applications of theory appropriate to the technical specialty.
Each vocational program has identified student performance objectives for each vocational program area. These performance objectives are given to students during the advising process. They are collectively bound and published for general distribution and constitute the college's guarantee to the employer. Copies are available division and counseling offices.
Accounting
This program is designed for students whose objective is to obtain a technical degree in accounting. Students planning to transfer to a senior institution may design, in conjunction with an accounting advisor, their associate degree programs for maximum transferability. Students
should contact an advisor early in the program.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers
(Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
ACC 111 Individual Income Tax 3 45
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
Typewriting Elective 2-4 40-80
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting I 3 45
ACC 226 Cost Accounting 3 45
Select 1 course with advisor approval: 3 90
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 205 Small Business Management 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law and the
Legal Environment 3 45
MAN 226 Management and
Organizational Behavior 3 45
MAR 216 Principles of Marketing 3 45
Select 4 courses with advisor approval: 12 225
ACC 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
Degree
Programs
Page
35
35


ACC 113 Introduction to Accounting/ Microcomputer 3 45
ACC 215 Accounting Systems 3 45
ACC 216 Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting 3 45
ACC 297 Cooperative Education 3 120
CIS 145 dBASE III Plus (Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
CIS 155 LOTUS 1-2-3 (Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
Degree CIS 160 Programming in BASIC
Programs CIS 260 (Co-requisite CIS 075) Programming in COBOL 3 45
(Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
MAN 225 Managerial Finance 3 45
Page Capstone Course
ACC 285 Accounting Seminar 1
36 Total 62-64 945-965
CIS 075 does not count towards the 60-credit minimum for degree.
Airframe/Power Plant
Students interested in the Airframe/Power Plant Program may register for these courses at Emily Griffith Opportunity School. Upon completion of these courses, students receive an FAA certificate. With an additional 15 semester hours at CCD, students may receive an AAS Degree. Other FAA certificates may be substituted for Emily Griffith Opportunity School courses. This program also allows students to readily transfer into a Bachelor of Science degree program to major in Technical and Industrial Administration. Please see the Division Dean in Science and Technology for information on this pro-
gram.
Minimum General Education Requirements Cr. Ct.Hrs.
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 104* Introductory Algebra 3 45
PHY 105* Conceptual Physics 4 75
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
Elective in Arts & Humanities or Computer 2-3 30-60
Total 15-16 240-270
*Or higher
Computer
Information Systems
Computer Programming for Business
This program prepares the student as an entry-level programmer, programmer trainee, or junior programmer. Upon completion, the student will have completed a minimum of 50 computer programs ranging from simple business applications to the design and completion of a complex business system.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech Communications 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
ENG 231 Technical Writing II or elective 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAR 208 Principles of Salesmanship 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development 3 45
CIS 265 Programming in Assembler-BAL 3 45
CIS 276 Systems Analysis and Design 3 45
Select 18 CIS Electives Credits
from the following courses: 18 810
CIS 140 Microcomputer Data Base 3 45
CIS 150 Electronic Spreadsheets 3 45
CIS 175 UNIX Operating System 3 45
CIS 176 MS-DOS with BASIC 3 45
CIS 177 System Utilities 3 45
CIS 178 APPLE Systems 3 45
CIS 160 Programming in BASIC 3 45
CSC 200 Programming in PASCAL 3 45
CSC 230 Programming in "C" 3 45
CIS 260 Programming in COBOL 3 45
CIS 137 Presentation Graphics 3 45
CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 45
CIS 279 Systems Configuration 3 45
CIS 215 Computer Networks 3 45
CIS 275 Data Communications 3 45
CIS 277 Operating Systems and JCL 3 45
CIS 278 Introduction to
Command-level CICA 3 45
CIS 165 Programming in RPG (1) (15)
CIS 261 Advanced COBOL 3 45
CIS 266 On-line Program Development
on the IBM Mainframe 3 45
CIS 297 Cooperative Education 3 (135)
Capstone Course
CIS 285 Computer Seminar 1 15
Total 64 960
NOTE: CIS prefix requires CIS 075 Computer Lab as a corequisite.
Microcomputer Specialist
This program prepares the student as an entry-level packaged software, system design and configuration specialist. Upon completion of the program the student will be competent to configure a microcomputer application system, establish a network/data communications system, and apply most current major software packages.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Economics/Macro 3 45
ENG 231 Technical Writing 3 45
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication 3 45
Major Requirements
(Co-requisite CIS 075 for each CIS course)
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
SEC 139 Professional Development 3 45
SEC 099 Intro to the Typewriter Keyboard2 40
SEC 125 WordPerfect 3 45
CIS 140 Microcomputer Data Base 3 45
CIS 150 Electronic Spreadsheet 3 45
CIS 176 MS DOS W/Basic 3 45
CIS 177 System Utilities 3 45
CIS 178 APPLE Systems 3 45
36


CIS 137 Presentation Graphics 3 45
CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 45
CIS 279 Systems Configuration 3 45
CIS 215 Computer Networks 3 45
CIS 275 Telecommunications 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
CIS 179 Software/Systems Survey 3 45
CIS 285 Computer Seminar (Capstone) 1 15
Total 65 940
NOTE: CIS prefix requires CIS 075 Computer Lab as a co-requisite. SEC prefix requires SEC 095 Secretarial lab as a co-requisite.
Computer Training for the Handicapped
This AAS degree program begins each summer and is specifically designed to train selected handicapped persons for entry-level positions as computer programmers, emphasizing the COBOL language. It is designed for students seeking the Associate degree and who are willing to comply with industry and educational standards for entry-level employment. Applications should be submitted by March 1. Admissions information may be obtained from the Center for the Physically
Disadvantaged.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
ECO 202 Principles of Economics/Micro 3 45
ENG 131 Technical Writing 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Math 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 110 Introduction to
Microcomputer PC 1 15
CIS 260 COBOL 4 60
CIS 140 Introduction to Data Bases 4 60
CIS 277 Operating Systems and JCL 4 60
CIS 276 Systems Analysis and Design 4 60
CIS 265 Introduction to CIS 4 60
CIS 261 Advanced COBOL 4 60
CIS 265 On-Line Programming (TSO) 4 60
CIS 297 Cooperative Education 6 270
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
CIS 285 Computer Seminar (Capstone) 1 15
Total 61 1095
Construction Trades
This program is offered jointly by the Community College of Denver, Emily Griffith Opportunity School, and the Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee.
The Construction Trades AAS degree program consists of a maximum of 43 semester credit hours of trade-specific credits, earned via apprenticeship training (classroom and on-the-job hours), and a maximum of 20 credit hours of core general education courses at CCD. (For those registered apprentices who complete a three-year registered apprenticeship program, 20 CCD credit hours will be required; for those completing a four-year or five-year apprenticeship program, 1 7 CCD credit hours will be required.)
Apprenticeship Training Credits Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Four-Five Year Training (Capstone) 43 3,870
Three Year Training 40 3,600
General Education ENG 121 or 131 3 45
MAT 103 or 121 4 60
Physical Sciences from the core general education curriculum 4 80
Arts & Humanities from the core general education curriculum 3 45
Social & Behavioral Sciences from the core general education curriculum 3 45
SPE 115 Introduction to Speech (3 yr. apprenticeship program only) 3 45
Total 60
Culinary Arts
A program offered jointly by Community College of Denver, Emily Griffith Opportunity School, and the Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee.
The Culinary Arts program consists of 40 semester credit hours of Trade-specific credits, earned via the apprenticeship Training (classroom and on-the-job hours) and 20 credit hours of courses at CCD. This program also allows students to readily transfer into a Bachelor of Science degree program to major in Technical and Industrial Administration.
Apprenticeship Training Credits Cr. Ct. Hrs.
General Education Requirements 40 3,600
ENG 131 Technical Writing 1 MAT 103 Contemporary College 3 45
Mathematics Physical Science from the core 3-4 45-60
general education curriculum Arts & Humanities from the core 4-5 60-80
general education curriculum Social & Behavioral Sciences form 3 45
the core general education curriculum Business course from the following 3 45
group (one course required): 3 45
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communication MAN 200 Personnel/Human Resource 3 45
Management 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
BUS 285 Culinary Arts Seminar (Capstone)1 15
Total 60 3,900
Drafting For Industry
The AAS Drafting for Industry includes five (5) emphases: CivilTTopographic, Mechanical, Structural, Process Piping and Electrical. All drafting exit competencies in all drafting programs will be measured by portfolio review at the end of the program. This program also allows students to readily transfer into a Bachelor of Science degree program to major in Technical and Industrial Administration.
Degree
Programs
Page
37
37


Civil/Topographic Emphasis
Drafting for Industry, Civil/Topographic emphasis, prepares students for job entry positions on drafting teams for local, state and federal government agencies
and petroleum, geological, civil engineering, mineral development and planning companies.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 131 Technical Writing 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3
Degree 45
Prnprams PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
1 V/tl 1 I Ij Core Electives in Arts, Humanities
and Social Studies 5 75
Major Requirements
P'lnn DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 5 100
rage CAD 110 Introduction to Computer
38 Aided Drafting (CAD) 2 40
DRI 106 Dimensioning and Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 40
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry and
Auxiliary Views 2 40
DRI 113 Intersections and Developments 3 60
DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 100
DRI 200 Introduction to Civil/
Topographic Drafting 3 60
DRI 203 Introduction to
Architectural Drafting 3 60
DRI 205 Introduction to Process
Piping Drafting 2 40
DRI 207 Introduction to Structural
Drafting 2 40
DRI 209 Introduction to Electrical
Drafting 2 40
DRI 230 Civil/Topographic Drafting 1 8 160
DRI 235 Civil/Topographic Drafting II
(Capstone) 4 80
DRI 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total Required Hours 53 1195
With the permission of the program faculty, DRI 297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be used in place of other drafting courses.
Electrical Emphasis
Drafting for Industry, Electrical emphasis, prepares students for job entry positions on drafting and design teams in electrical, architectural and mechanical engineering firms.
General Education Requirements i Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 131 Technical Writing I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
Core Electives in Arts, Humanities and Social Studies 5 75
Major Requirements
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 5 100
CAD 110 Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) 2 40
DRI 106 Dimensioning and Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 40
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry and Auxiliary Views 2 40
DRI 113 Intersections and Developments3 60
DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 100
DRI 200 Introduction to Civil/
Topographic Drafting 3 60
DRI 203 Introduction to Architectural
Drafting 3 60
DRI 205 Introduction to Process
Piping Drafting 2 40
DRI 207 Introduction to Structural
Drafting 2 40
ELT 100 D.C. Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 102 A.C. Fundamentals 3 60
DRI 209 Introduction to Electrical
Drafting 2 40
DRI 260 Electrical Drafting (Capstone) 6 120
DRI 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total 63 1195
With the permission of the program faculty, DRI 297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be used in place of other drafting courses.
Mechanical Emphasis
Drafting for Industry, Mechanical emphasis, prepares students for job entry positions on drafting teams in industrial plants, engineering and manufacturing firms, and governmental agencies.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 131 Technical Writing I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College
Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
Core Electives in Arts, Humanities and
Social Sciences 5 75
Major Requirements
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 5 100
CAD 110 Introduction to Computer
Aided Drafting (CAD) 2 40
DRI 106 Dimensioning and Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 40
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry and
Auxiliary Views 2 40
DRI 113 Intersections and
Developments 3 60
DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 100
DRI 200 Introduction to Civil/
Topographic Drafting 3 60
DRI 203 Introduction to Architectural
Drafting 3 60
DRI 205 Introduction to Process
Piping Drafting 2 40
DRI 207 Introduction to Structural
Drafting 2 40
DRI 209 Introduction to Electrical
Drafting 2 40
DRI 220 Advanced Mechanical
Drafting I 8 160
DRI 225 Advanced Mechanical
Drafting II (Capstone) 4 80
DRI 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total Required Hours 63 1195
With the permission of the program faculty, DRI 297 Cooperative Education (variable credit), and DRI 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be used in place of other drafting courses.
38


Process Piping Emphasis
Drafting for Industry, Process Piping emphasis, prepares students for job entry positions on drafting and design teams in the petro/chemical industry, and design, engineering and manufacturing firms that supply that industry.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 131 Technical Writing 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College
Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
Arts, Humanities and Social Studies 5 75
Major Requirements
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 5 100
CAD 110 Introduction to Computer
Aided Drafting (CAD) 2 40
DRI 106 Dimensioning and Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 40
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry and
Auxiliary Views 2 40
DRI 113 Intersections and Developments 3 60
DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 100
DRI 200 Introduction to Civil/
Topographic Drafting 3 60
DRI 203 Introduction to Architectural
Drafting 3 60
DRI 205 Introduction to Process
Piping Drafting 2 40
DRI 207 Introduction to Structural
Drafting 2 40
DRI 209 Introduction to Electrical
Drafting 2 40
DRI 250 Process Piping Drafting 1 8 160
DRI 255 Process Piping Drafting II
(Capstone) 4 80
DRI 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total 63 1195
With the permission of the program faculty, DRI 297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be used in place of other drafting courses.
Structural Emphasis
Drafting for Industry, Structural emphasis, prepares students for job entry positions on drafting and design teams for local, state and federal government agencies; civil, architectural and mechanical engineering firms, and petroleum, mineral and planning firms.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 131 Technical Writing 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
Core Electives in Arts, Humanities and Social Studies 5 75
Major Requirements
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 5 100
CAD 110 Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) 2 40
DRI 106 Dimensioning and Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 40
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry and Auxiliary Views 2 40
DRI 113 Intersections and Developments 3 60
DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 100
DRI 200 Introduction to Civil/ Topographic Drafting 3 60
DRI 203 Introduction to Architectural Drafting 3 60
DRI 205 Introduction to Process Piping Drafting 2 40
DRI 207 Introduction to Structural Drafting 2 40
DRI 209 Introduction to Electrical Drafting 2 40
DRI 240 Structural Drafting I 8 160
DRI 245 Structural Drafting II (Capstone) 4 80
DRI 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total 63 1195
With the permission of the program faculty, DRI 297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be used in place of other drafting courses.
Early Childhood Education and Management
This program meets the vocational training needs for personnel involved in the care of young children (infancy through six years) and all Colorado Department of Social Services licensing requirements. Spanish tutorial and support is available for Spanish speaking students. Exit competencies are measured by a
comprehensive exam covering Early Childhood
principles and application.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MAT 103 Contemporary College
Mathematics 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication 3 45
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology I 3 45
PSY 235 Psychology of Growth and
Development 3 45
Humanities Elective 3 45
Major Requirements
ECE 101 Introduction to Early
Childhood Education 3 45
ECE 110 Child Growth and Development 3 45
ECE 117 Curriculum Development 3 45
ECE 102 Preschool Supervised Lab
Experience & Seminars 3 100
ECE 151 Supervised Student Teaching
& Seminar I 5 150
ECE 222 Classroom Management
Techniques 3 45
ECE 215 Early Childhood Education
Administration 2 30
ECE 216 Administration II 2 30
ECE 205 Nutrition for Young Children 3 45
Choose four of the following: 12 180
ECE 142 Developmentally Appropriate
Practices 0-36 months 3 45
ECE 225 Curriculum Language and
Cognition 3 45
ECE 115 Curriculum Music and
Movement 3 45
ECE 116 Curriculum Science & Math 3 45
ECE 228 Multi Cultural Curriculum 3 45
Capstone Courses
ECE 251 Supervised Student Teaching
& Seminar II 5 150
Total 62 1132
Degree
Programs
Page
39
39


Degree
Programs
Page
40
Electronics
Biomedical Equipment Repair
This program prepares individuals with job entry skills in biomedical equipment technology. Upon completion of the program, entry level technicians will be able to perform assembly, testing and nominal maintenance. Technicians currently working in the field may refresh their skills and advance into specialized areas. This program also prepares technicians for certification and allows students to readily transfer into a Bachelor of Science degree program to major in Technical and Industrial Administration.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MAT 103 Contemporary College
Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
ENG 131 Technical Writing 1 3 45
PSY 101 General Psychology 1 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication 3 45
Major Requirements
BIO 113 Anatomy & Physiology Concepts 1 15
BIO 101 Biomedical Terms 1 15
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 101 DC Circuits and Magnetism 3 60
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 60
ELT 104 Network Theorem &
Vacuum Tubes 3 60
ELT 110 Diode Circuits 3 60
ELT 111 Transistor Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 112 JFET's and Oscillators 3 60
ELT 113 Special Devices 3 60
ELT 114 Operational Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 200 Pulse and Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 201 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 203 Microprocessor Applications 3 60
ELT 222 Introduction to Biomedical
Technology 3 60
ELT 223 High Frequency and Clinical
Lab Instrumentation 4 75
ELT 224 Biophysical Measurements, EKG
Equipment and Troubleshooting 4 75
ELT 225 Hospital Internship (Capstone) 2 60
ELT 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total
74
1410
Electronics Technology
This program is designed to prepare individuals with job entry skills in assembly, testing, repair and maintenance of electronic equipment. Basic knowledge to advance into more detailed and specific areas with further training and experience is provided. This program also allows students to readily transfer into a Bachelor of Science degree program to major in Technical and Industrial Administration.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct.Hrs.
MAT 03 Contemporary College
Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
PSY 101 General Psychology I 3 45
ENG 131 Technical Writing 1 3 45
must be completed in first 2 semesters
CIS 111 Introduction to Computers
(Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
Major Requirements
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 101 DC Circuits and Magnetism 3 60
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 60
ELT 104 Network Theorem &
Vacuum Tubes 3 60
ELT 110 Diode Circuits 3 60
ELT 111 Transistor Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 112 JFET's and Oscillators 3 60
ELT 113 Special Devices 3 60
ELT 114 1C Operational Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 200 Pulse and Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 201 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 203 Microprocessor Applications 3 60
ELT 204 Microcomputer Systems 1 3 60
ELT 210 Communications 1 3 60
ELT 211 Instruments and Measurements 1 3 60
ELT 212 Troubleshooting Techniques for
Analog and Digital Systems 3 60
ELT 285 Fabrication Techniques
(Capstone) 3 60
ELT 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total 74 1410
Elementary School Instructional Aide
This program prepares participants to become instructional aides in elementary school classrooms (K-6). The AAS has been designed in conjunction with Metropolitan State College's teacher education program. Students will take courses at both Community College of Denver and Metropolitan State College to complete the AAS.
Students entering this program will be required to have skills equivalent to ENG 013, REA 002, and MAT
003. Students must arrange with their advisor to remedy
deficiencies in program requirements. General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 100 Composition, Style and Technique 3 45
MTH 161 Mathematical Concepts for Teachers in Presecondary Schools 4 60
GEO 105 Geography 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech Communication 3 45
CIS 115**lntroduction to Computers 3 45
40


Major Requirements
PSY 101 General Psychology I 3 45
PSY 102 General Psychology II 3 45
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology I 3 45
SOC 102 Introduction to Sociology II 3 45
ANT 101 Cultural Anthropology 3 45
SCI 280* Conceptual Science and
Mathematics 6 90
ECE 110 Child Growth and Development 5 75
ECE 120 Curriculum Development 5 75
HPS 206* Standard First Aid and CPR 2 30
ART 111 Art History I 3 45
HIS 201 United States History II 3 45
POS 111 American Government 3 45
EDU 297 School Internship 3-6 60-120
Total 61 -64 930-990
Courses offered at Metropolitan State College
Requires CIS 075 Computer Lab as a co-requisite.
Total Program Credit Hours = 61 -64 The English course listed is the minimum level. Students who have skill levels that would enable them to take a higher level course should do so.
Environmental
and Refrigeration Technology
Commercial-Industrial Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning
This program prepares the student with job entry skills in the fields of commercial-industrial refrigeration, heating and air conditioning. Demonstrated mastery of skills is required. Programs are open-entry and open-exit. Students may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to either complete the program for a certificate or degree or to upgrade specific skills. To satisfy the requirements for an Associate Degree, the following courses must be taken in the listed sequence. Exit competencies will be measured by a comprehensive examination and final "hands-on" project assigned by the instructor. This program also allows students to readily transfer into a Bachelor of Science degree program to major in Technical and Industrial Administration.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 131 Technical Writing I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
Core Electives in Arts & Humanities or SPE 115 3 45
Social Science 3 45
Major Requirements RAC 111 Fundamentals of Electricity I 3 60
RAC 112 Fundamentals of Electricity II 3 60
RAC 114 Fundamentals of Refrigeration I 3 60
RAC 115 Safety, Tools, and Piping 3 60
RAC 116 Fundamentals of Refrigeration II 3 60
RAC 200 Refrigeration Systems Comp.
& Applications 3 60
RAC 205 Refrigeration Heat Loads &
System Development 3 60
RAC 208 Special Refrigeration Systems 3 60
RAC ill Installation & Service
Refrigeration Systems 6 120
RAC 212 Fundamentals of Air
Conditioning 3 60
RAC 214 Unitary & Central Station
Systems 3 60
RAC 215 Air Flow Principles &
Distribution 3 60
RAC 216 Control Systems 3 60
RAC 217 Troubleshooting & Servicing
(Capstone) 3 60
RAC 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
RAC 297 Cooperative Education 3 90-135
RAC 299 or Independent Study 3 90-135
Total 68 1335-1425
Major Appliance Repair
To satisfy the requirements for an associate degree, the following courses must be taken in the listed sequence. Exit competencies will be measured by a comprehensive examination and final "hands-on" project assigned by the instructor. This program also allows students to readily transfer into a Bachelor of Science degree program to major in Technical and Industrial Administration.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 131 Technical Writing 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 45 3
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics Core electives in Arts & 4 90
Humanities or SPE 115 3 45
Social Science Major Requirements 3 45
RAC 111 Fundamentals of Electricity 1 3 60
RAC 112 Fundamentals of Electricity II 3 60
RAC 114 Fundamentals of Refrigeration 1 3 60
RAC 115 Safety, Tools, and Piping 3 60
RAC 116 Fundamentals of Refrigeration 113 60
APT 218 Automatic Washers 1 3 60
APT 219 Clothes Dryers 1 3 60
APT 220 Kitchen Equipment 1 3 60
APT 225 Refrigerator/Freezers 1 3 60
APT 226 Room Air Conditioning 3 60
APT 228 Clothes Dryers II 3 60
APT 229 Kitchen Equipment II 3 60
APT 230 Refrigerator/Freezers II 3 60
APT 231 Automatic Washers II (Capstone)6 120
APT RAC 295 297 Job Search Workshop Cooperative Education 1 15
RAC 299 or Independent Study 3 90-135
Total 65 1005-1050
Degree
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Degree
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42
Financial Services
Banking Emphasis
This degree program offers opportunities for entry-level positions and/or advancement in the career field of finance. This program is offered in cooperation with the American Institute of Banking, the Colorado Credit Union League and the Denver Chapter 4 of the Institute of Financial Education. All exit competencies in all Financial Services programs will be measured by capstone courses at the end of the program or a personal exit interview with selected faculty and advisory committee members.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers
(Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
Mathematics: MAT 103, 121, 122 or 135 3-4 45-60
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication
(Speech Intensive Program) 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
ACC 112 Accounting Principles II 4 60
ACC 110 Mathematics of Business/
Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
CIS 260 Programming in COBOL 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law & the Legal
Environment 3 45
MAN 226 Management &
Organizational Behavior 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
FIN 106 Principles of Banking 3 45
MAR 216 Principles of Marketing 3 45
American Institute of Banking Electives
MAR 297 Ul Cooperative Education or
General Electives 6-9 90-135
FIN 211 Money and Banking
(Capstone) 3 45
Total 62-66 930-990
Commercial Credit Management Emphasis
This program is specifically designed to train and to upgrade skills of credit managers, assistants, and other credit personnel who work in the area of extension of commercial credit and desire an associate degree.
General Education Requirements ( Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Economics/Macro
POS 105 or Introduction to Political Science 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Math
(or higher) 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication
(Speech Intensive Program) 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
CIS 120 WordPerfect 3 45
CIS 150 Lotus 1-2-3 3 45
CRM 105 Commercial Credit and
Collection 1 3 45
CRM 107 Credit Management Case
Problems 3 45
ECO 202 Principles of Economics/Micro 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction Business 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law & the Legal
Environment 3 45
MAN 226 Management & Organizational
Behavior 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
CRM 106 Commercial Credit and
Collection II (Capstone) 3 45
CRM 206 Credit Law (Capstone) 3 45
Total ( 52 930
Credit Union Emphasis
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers
(Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ECO 202 or Principles of Micro Economics
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
Mathematics: MAT 103, 121,124 or 135 3-4 45-60
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication
(Speech Intensive Program) 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
ACC 110 Mathematics of Business/
Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law & the Legal
Environment 3 45
MAN 221 Management & Organizational
Behavior 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
FIN 110 Introduction to Credit Unions 3 45
FIN 111 Credit Union Operations 3 45
FIN 112 Credit Union Financial
Management 3 45
FIN 113 Credit Union Accounting 2 30
FIN 215 Credit Union Auditing 3 45
FIN 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3 135
Electives 6
Total 60-61 900-915
42


Savings and Loan Emphasis
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers
(Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ECO 202 or Principles of Micro Economics
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
Mathematics: MAT 103, 121, 124 or 1 35 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication
(Speech Intensive Program) 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 110 Mathematics of Business/
Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law & the Legal
Environment 3 45
MAN 226 Management & Organizational
Behavior 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
FIN 115 Introduction to the Savings
Institution Business 2 30
FIN 116 Funds Transfer Service 2 30
FIN 117 Residential Mortgage Lending 2 30
FIN 118 Financial Planning 2 30
FIN 119 Deposit Accounts and Services 2 30
FIN 121 Savings Institutions Operations 2 30
FIN 205 Consumer Lending 2 30
FIN 210 Commercial Lending 2 30
FIN 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3 135
Electives 4
Total f 50 900
Graphic Arts (Printing)
This program prepares students with job entry skills to accomplish most operations necessary on the process camera and the offset press and to function in the areas of basic bindery, stripping, and general layout and composition work. Students completing the program will be equipped to enter positions with commercial print shops, trade shops, in-plant shops and any other operation requiring printers.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 131 Introduction to Technical Writing 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
*SPE 115 Principles of Speech Communication (Speech Intensive Program) 3 45
PSV 101 General Psychology I 3 45
LIT 115, 201, 202 Literature 3 45
Major Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
SEC 099 Introduction to the Typewriter Keyboard 2 40
GRA 100 Introduction to Graphic Arts 3 60
GRA 105 Beginning Process Camera (Speech Intensive) 3 60
GRA 106 Halftones on Process Camera 3 60
GRA 107 Composition 3 60
GRA 108 Process Camera II,
Composition II 3 60
GRA 109 Beginning Offset Presses 3 60
GRA 110 Stripping and Small Bindery 3 60
GRA 115 Intermediate Offset Presses 3 60
GRA 116 Paper, Management and Production 3 60
GRA 185 Inks, Plates and Introduction
to Large Bindery 3 60
GRA 200 Process Color Separation (Speech Intensive) 3 60
GRA 202 Desktop Publishing 3 60
GRA 205 Process Color Printing 3 60
GRA 206 Computerized Typesetting 3 60
GRA 207 Raised Printing 3 60
GRA 208 Basic Machine Maintenance 3 60
GRA 209 Silkscreening 3 60
GRA 285 Printing Management and
Marketing (Capstone) 3 60
GRA 299 Independent Study 5 150
Total 73 1450
Students have the option of taking the CRA Speech Intensive courses or SPE 115.
Graphic Design
This program is designed to give students the skills necessary for entry into the field of commercial art. The commercial art field broadly covers production of pasteup art, graphic or advertising design, and illustration. The Graphic Design Program allows the student to develop basic skills common to all three specialties while developing an emphasis in one.
Students are expected to buy their own tools and materials. The beginning program courses require an original investment of between $100 and $300 and the student is expected to add needed tools and materials as the program progresses.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
SPE 115 Principles of Speech Communication (Speech Intensive Program) 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Math 3 45
Select core general education courses from 2 of the following 3 areas: 6 90
Physical and Biological Sciences Social & Behavioral Sciences
Major Requirements
GRD 100 Lettering/Typographic Design and Career Survey 3 90
GRD 105 Advertising Typography and Layout 3 90
GRD 106 Descriptive Drawing and Rendering 3 90
GRD 107 Rendering for Advertising Design 3 90
GRD 200 Advertising Design and Portfolio Preparation (Speech Intensive) 3 90
GRD 206 Art Preparation for Reproduction 3 90
GRD 207 Advanced Art Preparation for Reproduction 3 90
GRD 275 Graphic Design Internship 3-5 90-150
ART 121 Drawing I 3 90
ART 122 Drawing II 3 90
Degree
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Degree
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44
ART 131 Design I 3 90
ART 132 Design II 3 90
Select 1 of the following: 5-6 90-120
GRD 185 Pagemaker/Quark Express 3 60
GRA 120 Process Camera and Halftones 6 120
Capstone Course
CRD 285 Creative Graphic Design and Portfolio Preparation
(Speech Intensive) 5 100
Total 72-75 1565-1685
Human Services
This program prepares individuals for entry-level employment in communities and institutions that serve clients with a variety of human needs. Students may choose to focus on specific skill areas, such as social service agencies, health care centers, youth services, substance abuse programs, geriatric centers, child abuse, community corrections, crisis centers and domestic violence.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 131 Technical Writing I or
ENG 121 English Composition 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College
Mathematics or
MAT 104 Introduction to Algebra 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication 3 45
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology or
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology or
PSY 235 Psychology of Human
Growth & Development 3 45
Humanities Elective 3 45
Major Requirements
HSE 105 Introduction to Social Welfare 3 45
HSE 106 Survey of Human Services 3 45
HSE 107 Interviewing Principles and
Practices 3 45
HSE 108 Introduction to Therapeutic
Systems 3 45
HSE 109 Social Issues in Human Services 3 45
HSE 115 Human Services Practicum I 4 150
HSE 205 Human Services for Groups 3 45
HSE 206 Human Services for Families 3 45
HSE 207 Community Organization 3 45
HSE 208 Social Welfare Policy 3 45
HSE 209 Crisis Theory & Intervention 3 45
HSE 211 Human Services Practicum II 4 150
HSE 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
HSE 212 Human Services Practicum III
(Capstone) 7 285
Total 61 1275
Management
Food Production Management Emphasis
This program prepares students for entry-level supervisory and management positions within the food service industry. It is designed particularly for those students with a minimum of 1200 clock hours of on-the-job work experience in the food service industry. Practical lab situations in which the students learn to prepare and serve foods is conducted in conjunction with Emily Griffith Opportunity School.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Economics/Macro 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Math
(or Higher) 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Total 15 225
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 200 Personnel/Human Resource
Management 3 45
MAN 285 Management Seminar 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAR 217 Customer Service 3 45
FPM 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total 26 390
Option 1 (Capstone Sequence)
FPM 101 Pantry 4 80
FPM 102 Steam Tables 4 80
FPM 103 Second or Dinner Cook 4 80
FPM 104 Fry Cook 4 80
FPM 105 Bakery 4 80
FPM 106 Brunch Preparation 4 80
FPM 107 Kitchen Management/
Food Cost Control 4 80
FPM 108 Dining Room 4 80
Total 32 640
Total Required Hours 73 1065
or Option II (Capstone Sequence)
FPM 110 Commercial Food Service 7 140
FPM 114 Food Production 4 80
FPM 112 Restaurant Management 11 220
Total 22 440
Total Required Hours 63 915
Plus Option III (Capstone Sequence)
FPM 120 Commercial Baking 3 60
FPM 121 Commercial Baking Advanced 2 40
FPM 122 Computers in Food Service 1 15
Total 26 115
Total Required Hours 69 1035
44


Hispanic Entrepreneurship
This program is designed to expose the concepts and skills necessary to succeed in small business. Focus is primarily Hispanic small business. Enrollment in this curriculum will engage students in entrepreneurial activities. Students will learn key concepts of small business operation, management and marketing.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Economics: Macro 3 45
ENG 131 Technical Writing I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Math 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Major Requirements
REA 005 Adv. Learn: Study Skills 3 45
MAT 003 Introduction to Math 3 45
BUS 215 Introduction to Business 3 45
EDU 003 College Seminar:
"Planning for Success" 1 15
MAR 208 Principles of Sales 3 45
MAN 205 Entrepreneurship I 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
ACC 110 Math of Business/
Personal Finance 3 45
ACC 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
MAN 185 Entrepreneurship II (Small
Business Management Seminar) 1 15
MAR 218 Marketing Small Business
Services 3 45
ACC 121 Principles of Accounting 1 4 60
MAR 216 Marketing Information 2 30
MAR 217 Customer Service 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law and the Legal
Environment 3 45
MAR 209 Advertising and Promotion 3 45
MAN 285 Entrepreneurship Seminar
(Capstone) 1 15
Total 60 900
Business Management Emphasis
This program provides a broad exposure to general business functions and fundamental management concepts. Upon completion, the student is qualified for an entry-level position in a wide variety of general business occupations. Students already employed are able to acquire skills necessary for personal development directed toward job security and advancement. A grade of "C" or better must be maintained in business core area.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers
(Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
Mathematics Elective: MAT 103,
121, 124 or 135 3-4 45-60
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law & the Legal
Environment 3 45
MAN 226 Management & Organizational
Behavior 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAN Elective 4 60
MAR 216 Principles of Marketing 3 45
MAN 225 Managerial Finance 3 45
MAN Elective: (with Approval of Advisor
select from MAN 110, 111, 112, 113,
117,200,205,218,231,297) 10-11 180-195
MAN 285 Management Seminar
(Capstone) 1 15
Total 60-61 915-945
Transportation Management Emphasis
This program is designed to prepare students for
careers in the freight/merchandise transportation industry. TTM courses are taught by Emily Griffith Opportunity School.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers
(Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
Economics: ECO 201,202, or 205 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
Mathematics: MAT 103, 121, or 135 3-4 45-60
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication
(Speech Intensive Program) 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
ACC 110 Mathematics of Business/
Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law and the Legal
Environment 3 45
MAN 226 Management & Organizational
Behavior 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAR 216 Principles of Marketing 3 45
TTM 151 Transportation Pricing 1 3 45
TTM 152 Transportation Pricing II 3 45
TTM 211 Economics of Transportation 2 30
TTM 221 Transportation Law 1 3 45
TTM 231 Transportation Management 1 2 30
TTM 232 Transportation Management II
(Capstone) 2 30
TTM 297 Cooperative Education or
Electives 3 135
TTM' Electives 2-3 30-45
Total 60-62 990-1020
Degree
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Degree
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46
Marketing
International Trade
As business expands to include a world market, CCD is making it easier to learn the language and the skills of international business. This program prepares people for
entry-level job opportunities in international trade.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Economics/Macro 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Math 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
ECO 206 Political Economics 3 45
GEO 105 Geography 3 45
INB 210 International Business 3 45
INB 211 International Marketing 3 45
INB 212 Export Operations 3 45
INB 213 Import Basics 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law & the Legal
Environment 3 45
MAR 216 Principles of Marketing 3 45
POS 205 International Relations 3 45
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 45
Foreign Language Electives* 6 45
INB 214 International Methods of
Payment (Capstone) 3 45
TTM 201 International Trade
Practices (Capstone) 3 45
Total 64 915
Marketing
This program provides a basic exposure to general education necessary to all informed citizens, general introductory business classes, basic marketing and computer courses, at the same time allowing each student to "customize" his/her program with a choice of one of five areas of marketing emphasis. Upon completion of this degree, the student will qualify for job entry into a wide variety of positions in the vast, ever-growing field of marketing. Students already employed in these areas will acquire academic and background skills necessary for personal development and job advancement.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
ENG 121 College English Composition I 3 45
MAT 103 College Mathematics OR
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
PSY 111 Principles of Psychology 3 45
SPE 111 Principles of Speech
Communication 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
MAN 226 Management & Organization Behavior 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development 3 45
MAR 216 Principles of Marketing 3 45
MAR 208 Principles of Sales 3 45
MAR 209 Principles of Advertising 3 45
Marketing Area Emphasis (See Below) 15-21 225-315
MAR 285 Marketing Seminar (Capstone) 1 15
MAR 297 Cooperative Education 3-6 135-270
Total 45-48 765-900
Choose from one of the following: Advertising (broadcast) Emphasis
MAR 227 Introduction to Marketing Research 3 45
MAR 219 Marketing Business Services 3 45
MAR 223 Advertising Copy Writing 3 45
MAR 235 Advertising Copy Writing 3 45
COM 251 Introduction to TV and Radio 3 45
Advertising (print/graphic arts) Emphasis
MAR 227 Introduction to Marketing Research 3 45
MAR 219 Marketing Business Services 3 45
GRA 100 Introduction to Graphic Arts 3 45
MAR 223 Advertising Copy Writing 3 45
CIS Desktop Publishing Elective 3 45
Total 21 315
Total 15 225
Fashion Merchandising Emphasis
MAR 213 Fashion Merchandising 3 45
MAR 217 Customer Service 3 45
MAR 220 Merchandise Buying 3 45
MAR 211 Wholesaling and Distribution 3 45
ACC 121 Principles of Accounting I 4 60
International Marketing Emphasis
INB 211 International Marketing 3 45
INB 210 International Business 3 45
INB 212 Export Ooerations and Procedures 3 45
INB 213 Import Basics 3 45
GEO 105 Introduction to Geography 3 45
Total 15 225
Total 16 240
Sales Emohasis
MAR 217 Customer Service 3 45
MAR 212 Sales Seminar 3 45
COM 139 Interpersonal Skills 3 45
COM 250 Elements of Argumentation OR
COM 261 Organizational Communication 3 45
MAR 207 Direct Marketing 3 45
Total 15 225
46


Nursing
This program prepares students to become practicing nurses through a two year course of study. The program begins in the fall term, and continues fall and spring semesters for two academic years. Students successfully completing the first year receive a certificate in practical nursing, while completion of the full two year program results in an Associate of Applied Science degree. Graduates receiving the AAS degree are eligible to take the licensure exam to become registered nurses.
The application process includes demonstrating entry level scores on the College Basic Skills Assessment Test, submitting a program application, two letters of recommendation, and transcripts of general education course-work for evaluation. Prospective and enrolled students must demonstrate a minimum C grade in both prerequisite and required courses. Prior to fall admission in the Nursing program, materials for application must be submitted by March 30th in the same calendar year. Graduate exit competency is measured by successful completion of the capstone course, NUR 212, Comprehensive Nursing. The Nursing program is a part of the Colorado Nursing Articulation Project; all course-work with the AAS degree is transferable toward earning a baccalaureate degree in nursing. Further information may be obtained from the Division of Health and Human Services.
Prerequisites Cr. Ct. Hrs.
NUT 100 Introduction to Nutrition 3 45
BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 75
BIO 203 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75
MAT 103, 121, or 135 (Also General
Education requirement but only
121 and 135 are transferable) 3 45
PSY 235 Psychology of Growth and
Development 3 45
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 121 English Composition 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
Elective: In Social Sciences, Humanities 3 45
BIO 215 Microbiology 3-4 60-75
Major Requirements
NUR 101 Basic Concepts in Pharmacology 2 30
NUR 111 Nursing Concepts I 10 195
NUR 112 Nursing Concepts II 14 270
NUR 115 Socialization into Nursing I
(Speech Intensive) 1 15
NUR 201 Advanced Pharmacology 2 45
NUR 210 Maternity Nursing 6 120
NUR 211 Psychosocial Nursing 6 120
NUR 212 Comprehensive Advanced
Nursing (Speech Intensive)
(Capstone Course) 14 270
NUR 214 Socialization into Nursing II
(Speech Intensive) 2 30
Total 83 -84 1530-1545
Nursing: Advanced Placement
Advanced placement into the second year of the nursing program, to complete the registered nurse portion of the curriculum, is available for graduates of approved schools of practical nursing who have been licensed as practical nurses. If the prospective student has completed the practical nurse program over ten years ago, or is out of state, the applicant must complete a battery of specialty nursing subject tests to become eligible for admission. Applicants must follow the application process required of prospective students, which includes demonstrating entry level scores on the College Basic Skills Assessment Test, submitting an application, two letters of recommendation, and transcripts of previous education for evaluation.
Applicants are given 30 hours of credit under the Nursing Articulation Agreement for their practical nurse education. Applicants must complete all general education coursework, and the bridge course, NUR 126, before entry into the second year nursing courses. Admission into the nursing program does not take place until NUR 126 has been successfully completed with a C grade, and it has been determined there is space available to enter the clinical course. Placement is therefore on a "rolling admission" space available basis in either the fall or spring semester.
Prerequisites and General Education Cr. Ct. Hrs.
BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 4 75
BIO 203 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
PSY 235 Psychology of Human
Growth & Development 3 45
MAT 103, 121, 135 (any one meets AAS
requirements but only MAT 121
and MAT 135 are transferable) 3 45
BIO 215 Introduction to Microbiology 3-4 60-75
Elective Social Sciences, Humanities 3 45
NUR 126 Nursing Process:
Concepts and Skills 4 60
Major Requirements
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
NUR 201 Advanced Pharmacology 2 30
NUR 210 Maternity Nursing 6 120
NUR 211 Psychiatric/Mental Health
Nursing 6 120
NUR 214 Socialization into Nursing II
(Speech Intensive) 2 15
NUR 212 Comprehensive Nursing
(Speech Intensive)
(Capstone Course) 14 270
Total 57-58 1005-1020
Degree
Programs
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Degree
Programs
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48
Paralegal
This program is designed to prepare individuals with job entry skills for the general paralegal field. Emphasis is placed on practical skills such as interviewing, research, and document drafting.
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 121 College Algebra OR 4 60
MAT 103 Contemporary College
Mathematics 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communications 3 45
Choose 1 course from each of the following areas:
Arts and Humanities 3 45
Social & Behavioral Sciences 3 45
Major Requirements
PAR 100 Introduction to Paralegal 3 45
PAR 107 Legal Research 3 45
PAR 108 Civil Procedures 3 45
PAR 127 Evidence 3 45
PAR 210 Paralegal Workshop 6 285
PAR 252 Computer Support Litigation
(Corequisite CIS 075) 4 65
CIS 125 WordPerfect
(Corequisite: CIS 075) 2 40
CIS 140 DBASE III+
(Corequisite: CIS 075) 2 40
Select 6 of the following courses: 18 90-190
PAR 105 Torts 3 45
PAR 106 Contracts 3 45
PAR 109 Property 3 45
PAR 115 Domestic Relations 3 45
PAR 201 Business Organizations 3 45
PAR 203 Constitutional Law 3 45
PAR 204 Criminal Law and Procedures 3 45
PAR 205 Probate 3 45
PAR 207 Legal Research Seminar I 3 45
PAR 208 Legal Research Seminar II 3 45
PAR 214 Administrative Law 3 45
PAR 215 Real Estate and Land Use Law 3 45
PAR 250 The Elements of Argument 3 45
PAR 290 Special Topics 3 45
PAR 297 Cooperative Education 3 (135)
PAR 299 Independent Study
Capstone Course
PAR 285 Paralegal II Synthesis 3 45
Total 63 985-1085
Photography
This program provides technical and aesthetic training to prepare graduates with the skills necessary to enter the field of professional photography, including freelance work, portrait photography and creative photography.
General Education Courses Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 121 College Algebra 3 45
OR
MAT 103 Contemporary College
Mathematics 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech Communications 3 45
Choose 2 courses from the following three areas: 6 90
Arts & Humanities, Physical & Biological Sciences, Social & Behavioral Sciences
Major Requirements
ART 131 Design 1 3 90
PHO 100 Fundamentals of Photography 3 90
PHO 102 Fundamentals of Color Photography 3 90
PHO 105 Advanced Photography 3 90
PHO 107 History of Photography 3 90
PHO 109 Advanced Color Photography 3 90
PHO 201 Professional Photography 3 90
PHO 209 Art of Photography 3 90
Select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following: 9 270
ART 132 Design II 3 90
ART 228 Printmaking 1 3 90
GRD 105 Advertising Typography and Layout 3 90
GRA 120 Process Camera and Halftones 6 120
MAN 105 Introduction to Business 3 45
PHO 290 Special Topics 1-3 30-90
PHO 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
PHO 297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) 3-6 30-180
Capstone Course
PHO 285 Seminar in Photography (Capstone) 3 90
Total 67 1325-1270
Radiologic Health Sciences
The Radiologic Health Science Program offers degrees in three radiologic career areas: Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Therapy and Radiography. All students complete a common required first level curriculum of two semesters. Upon completion of the first level, a student chooses an advanced placement option of four semesters in either Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Therapy or Radiography. Graduates earn an Associate of Applied Science Degree and are eligible to apply for national registry in their major. Graduates of any of the three programs can be eligible for registry in a second area by completing the advanced placement option for that specific career.
The program begins fall semester each year and a specific program application must be completed and returned to the Health and Human Services Division. Information and requirements can be obtained from the Educational Planning and Advising Center. This program is available for those students who are interested in articulating their career with a Bachelor of Science Degree.
48


Radiologic Health Sciences Core
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENG 131, 121 Technical Writing 1/
English Composition I 3 45
BIO 201 Anatomy & Physiology I 4 75
MAT 103 Contemporary College Math 3-4 45-60
MAT 121 College Algebra
(NMT and RTT)
soc 101 Introduction to Sociology I
PSY 101 or General Psychology I 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication
(Speech Intensive Program) 3 45
Major Core Requirements
CHE 101 Introduction to Chemistry I
(NMT only) 5 105
BIO 203 Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75
RHS 102 Radiologic Positioning 1 3 60
RHS 104 Radiologic Internship 1 5 225
RHS 106 Radiologic Patient Care 2 45
RHS 112 Radiologic Positioning II 3 60
RHS 113 Introduction to Radiologic
Technique 3 45
RHS 114 Radiologic Internship II 5 225
RHS 115 Introduction to Medical Physics 3 45
Total 46-47 1095-1110
Nuclear Medicine Technology
Upon completion of the Radiologic Health Sciences Core courses, the student declares a major in Nuclear Medicine. Students then continue through the second year of courses, prefixed "NMT."
The second year of course work commences with the fall semester and continues through the following summer semester. Upon successful completion of the second year, the graduate may apply to write the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and/or the Nuclear Medicine Technology Board (NMTCB) examination for certification. Exit competencies for Nuclear Medicine Technology are measured by preregistry exam.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
NMT 210 Nuclear Medicine Physics 4 60
NMT 211 Clinical Applications I 2 30
NMT 212 Clinical Applications II
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
NMT 213 Nuclear Medicine
Instrumentation 4 60
NMT 221 Clinical Internship I 6-8 270-360
NMT 215 Radiopharmaceutical Prep 3 45
NMT 217 Computers in Nuclear Medicine 3 45
NMT 222 Clinical Internship II
(Speech Intensive) 6-8 270-360
RHS 215 Radiation Biology & Pathology 2 30
NMT 216 Radioassay Procedures 3 45
NMT 223 Clinical Internship III
(Capstone Course) 6-15 270-675
RHS 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total 43-56 1185-1770
Radiation Therapy
Upon completion of the Radiologic Health Sciences core courses, the student declares a major in Radiation Therapy. Students then continue through the second year of courses, prefixed "RTT."
The second year of course work commences with the third (or summer) semester and continues through the following summer semester. Upon successful completion of the second year, the graduate may write the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist (AART) examination for certification.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
RTT 108 Positioning and Techniques 2 30
RTT 117 Radiation Therapy Internship I 3 160
RTT 200 Physics of Radiation Therapy I 2 30
RTT 205 Radiation Therapy Methodology
(Speech Intensive) 2 30
RTT 206 Radiation Oncology I
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
RTT 207 Radiation Therapy Internship II 11 490
RTT 208 Physics of Radiation Therapy II 2 30
RTT 209 Treatment Planning
(Speech Intensive) 2 30
RTT 210 Radiation Oncology II
(Speech Intensive) 1 15
RHS 215 Radiation Biology and Pathology 2 30
RTT 217 Radiation Therapy Internship III 11 490
RTT 227 Radiation Therapy Internship IV 9 405
RTT 285 Selected Topics in Radiation
Therapy (Capstone)
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
RHS 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total 54 1845
Radiologic Technology Radiography
Upon completion of the Radiologic Health Science core courses, the student declares a major in Radiography. Students then continue through the second year of courses, prefixed "RTR."
The second year of course work commences with the fourth (or fall) semester and continues through the following summer semester. Upon successful completion of the second year, the graduate may apply to write the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist (AART) examination for certification.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
RTR 122 Radiologic Positioning III 3 60
RTR 124 Radiologic Internship III 5 225
RTR 203 Radiographic Technique II 3 45
RTR 204 Radiographic Internship IV 11 495
RTR 206 Special Radiologic Procedures
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
RTR 214 Radiographic Internship V 12 540
RTR 215 Radiologic Science 1 15
RTR 224 Radiographic Internship VI 8 360
RHS 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
RHS 215 Radiation Biology and Pathology 2 30
RTR 207 Registry Examination Review
(Capstone) 2 30
RHS 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total 52 1875
Degree
Programs
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49


Degree
Programs
Page
50
Secretarial and Administrative Support Occupations
These secretarial program options are designed to prepare students for entry-level positions and advancement in business, governmental agencies and other institutions which employ persons in secretarial/administrative support areas. All options have a common core of ACC 103, ACC 110, ACC 121, BUS 115, SEC 101, SEC 102, SEC 104, SEC 115, SEC 120, SEC 125, SEC 131, BUS 217, SEC 139, SEC 230 and SEC 297.
Administrative Assistant Emphasis
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
Economics or Political Science 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Math 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication
(Speech Intensive Program) 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 103 Bookkeeping
ACC 121 or Accounting Principles I 3-4 45-60
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
CIS 150 Lotus 1-2-3 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 226 Management & Organizational
Behavior 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I 4 60
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 60
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 60
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 125 WordPerfect 3 45
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3 135
Total 61 -62 935-950
Legal Secretarial Emphasis
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
Economics or Political Science 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Math 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication
(Speech Intensive Program) 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 103 Bookkeeping n r
ACC 121 Vjl Accounting Principles 1 3-4 45-60
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law & Legal
Environment 3 45
PAR 107 Legal Research 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I 4 60
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 60
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 60
SEC 111 Alpha Speed writing I 4 60
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 125 WordPerfect 3 45
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 209 Legal Terminology 2 30
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3 135
Total 67-68 1115-1130
Medical Secretarial Emphasis
General Education Courses Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Math 3 45
Social & Behavioral Sciences 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication
(Speech Intensive Programs) 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 103 Bookkeeping nr
ACC 121 vjl Accounting Principles 1 3-4 45-60
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
HOC 100 Medical Terminology 1 15
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting 1 4 60
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 60
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 60
SEC 111 Alpha Speedwriting 1 4 60
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 20
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 125 WordPerfect 3 45
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 206 Health Insurance Methods &
Claims 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3 135
Total 63-64 1055-1070
Secretarial Emphasis
General Education Requirements ' Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
Economics or Political Science 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Math 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech Communications
(Speech Intensive Program) 3 45
50


Major Requirements
ACC 103 Bookkeeping or
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 3-4 45-60
ACC no Math of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
CIS 150 Lotus 1-2-3 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I
(Co-requisite SEC 095) 4 60
SEC 102 Typewriting II
(Co-requisite SEC 095) 4 60
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 60
SEC 111 Alpha Speedwriting I
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 15
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 125 WordPerfect 3 45
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3-6 135-290
Total 61 -64 990-1125
Word Processing Emphasis
General Education Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Math 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
Communication
(Speech Intensive Program) 3 45
Social and Behavioral Sciences 3 45
Major Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103 Bookkeeping
ACC 121 or Accounting Principles I 3-4 45-60
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
CIS 150 Lotus 1-2-3 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I 4 60
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 60
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 45
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 15
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 125 WordPerfect 3 45
SEC 127 Wang Word Processing
SEC 225 or Advanced WordPerfect 3 45
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development
(Speech Intensive) 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3 135
Total 64-65 1050-1065
Degree
Programs
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51


Certificate Programs
Certificate
Programs
Page
52
In addition to Associate Degree programs, specially designed courses and sequences leading to the awarding of certificates have been designed in cooperation with business, commerce and local government to provide opportunity for persons seeking to improve in their occupational fields. Courses in certificate sequences are applicable to appropriate associate degree programs.
Accounting
Accounting with Computer Applications
This program prepares students for entry level positions: accounting clerk, data entry clerk, and accounts payable and receivable clerk. Students will develop specialized computer skills in word processing, accounting software, spreadsheet and data base packages, and computer programming skills most requested by today's employers.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal Finance or MAT Elective w/Advisor Approval 3 45
ACC 215 Accounting Systems 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
Select 4 courses (12 credit) hours from the following: 12 180
ACC 113 Introduction to Accounting on the Microcomputer (Corequisite CIS 075) 3 45
ACC 297 Cooperative Work Experience 3 45
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers (Corequisite CIS 075) 3 45
CIS 140 Introduction to Data Base (Corequisite CIS 075) 2 40
CIS 150 Lotus 1 -2-3 (Corequisite CIS 075) 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
Select one course (Capstone)
from the following: 3 45
CIS 145 dBase III Plus (Corequisite CIS 075) 3 45
CIS 160 Programming in BASIC (Corequisite CIS 075) 3 45
CIS 260 Programming in COBOL (Corequisite CIS 075) 3 45
(Capstone Course)
ACC 185 Accounting Seminar 1 15
Total 33 495
Accounting Transfer Certificate
Recommended for students preparing for transfer to a four-year college or university. Constitutes an acceptable first-year curriculum in accounting or other business related Associate of Applied Science degrees. The curriculum is intended to improve skills and performance for accounting students preparing for transfer to a senior institution.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal
Finance or MAT Elective
w/Advisor Approval 3 45
ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
Select 4 classes from the following: 12- -13 240-255
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers
(Corequisite CIS 075) 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of MacroEconomics
ECO 202 or Principles of MicroEconomics 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
BUS 217 Business Law & the Legal
Environment 3 45
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
(Capstone Course)
ACC 185 Accounting Seminar 1 15
Total 30-31 510-525
Bookkeeping
Recommended for students who wish to study basic business fundamentals while developing entry-level bookkeeping skills. Constitutes an acceptable first-year curriculum in accounting and business for an Associate Degree.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC Accounting Elective 3-4 45-60
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers
(Corequisite CIS 075) 3 45
ACC 113 Introduction to Accounting
on the Computer 3 45
ACC 297 Cooperative Education
or Elective 3-6 45-90
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
Typewriter Elective 2-4 40-60
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 15
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
CIS Spreadsheet Elective 1-3 15-45
ACC 103 Bookkeeping n r
ACC 121 Ul Accounting Principles I 3-4 45-60
ACC 185 Accounting Seminar (Capstone) 1 15
Total 32-41 475
52


Governmental Accounting
Provides students with governmental accounting fundamentals to become entry level trainees for local, state or federal agencies. It is designed to meet the accounting principles and practices required by the public sector communities.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal Finance or MAT Elective w/Advisor Approval 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
ACC 216 Governmental Accounting 3 45
ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting 3 45
Select 4 classes (12 credit hours) from the following: 12 225
ACC 113 Introduction to Accounting on the Microcomputer 3 45
ACC 215 Accounting Systems 3 45
ACC 297 Cooperative Work Experience 3 45
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers (Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
CIS 150 Lotus 1-2-3 (Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
Economics or Political Science Elective (Capstone Course) 3 45
ACC 185 Accounting Seminar 1 45
Total 33 570
Income Tax Preparer
This program provides the student with the fundamental training in tax practices and procedures to become income tax preparers. Emphasis will be on the application of tax rules and guidelines for individuals and small businesses.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
ACC 132 Computerized Income Tax (Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal Finance or MAT Elective w/Advisor Approval 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
ACC 111 Individual Income Tax 3 45
ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting 3 45
Select 3 classes (9 credit hours) from the following: 9 180
ACC 113 Introduction to Accounting on the Microcomputer (Co-requisite CIS 075) 3 45
ACC 215 Accounting Systems 3 45
ACC 297 Cooperative Work Experience 3 45
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers (Corequisite CIS 075) 3 45
CIS 150 Lotus 1-2-3 (Corequisite CIS 075) 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business (Capstone Course) 3 45
ACC 185 Accounting Seminar 1 45
Total 33 570
Chartered Property
Casualty Underwriter Program (CPCU)
The 10 course college level CPCU curriculum is offered yearly to experienced insurance personnel who have a strong knowledge of insurance practices and some formal study of the insurance principles that underlie these practices. Each semester courses will prepare students for a three-hour national essay examination. Each September, CPCU courses 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 will be offered. Each January, CPCU courses 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 will be offered. Please check exact times and dates by calling Emily Griffith Opportunity School or Community College of Denver Business & Governmental Studies Division.
Computer
Information Systems
Computer Programming for Business
This program prepares the student as an entry-level programmer, programmer trainee or junior programmer.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
CIS 176 MS-DOS with BASIC 3 45
CIS 260 Programming in COBOL
or CIS Elective 3 45
CIS 261 Advanced COBOL
or CIS Elective 3 45
MAT 135 Introduction to Statistics
or Accounting Elective 3-4 45-60
CIS 278 Introduction to Command-
Level CICS 3 45
CIS 276 Systems Analysis and Design 3 45
CIS 265 Basic Assembler Language (BAL) 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development 3 45
CIS 185 Computer Seminar (Capstone) 1 15
Total 28-31 420-435
NOTE: CIS prefix requires CIS 075 Computer Lab as a corequisite.
Computer Training for the Handicapped
This 12-month program begins each summer and is specifically designed to train selected handicapped persons for entry-level positions as computer programmers, emphasizing the COBOL language. Applications should be submitted by March 1. Admissions information may
be obtained from the Center for the Physically Disadvantaged.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
CIS 110 Introduction to the PC 1 15
CIS 260 Programming in COBOL 4 60
CIS 278 Introduction to CICS 4 60
CIS 277 Operating Systems and JCL 4 60
CIS 261 Advanced COBOL 4 60
CIS 266 On-Line Program Development/TSO 4 60
CIS Elective 3 45
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design w/COBOL 4 60
Certificate
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Certificate
Programs
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54
CIS 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 6 270
CIS 185 Computer Seminar (Capstone) 1 15
Total 48 900
Note: CIS prefix courses require CIS 075 Computer Lab as a co-requisite.
Microcomputer Specialist
This program is designed to train students in microcomputer operations with a focus on the most popular software packages used by business and industry.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103 Bookkeeping or
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 3-4 45-60
ACC 113 Intro, to Accounting on Microcomputer 3 45
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal Finance or MAT Elective w/Advisor Approval 3 45
SEC 099 Introduction to the Typewriter Keyboard 3 40
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers
CIS 140 dBASE III Plus 3 45
CIS 155 Electronic Spreadsheet Elective 3 45
SEC Word Processing Elective 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development 3 45
CIS 185 Computer Seminar (Capstone) 1 15
Total 25-26 370-385
Note: CIS prefix courses requires CIS 075 Computer Lab as
a co-requisite. SEC prefix requires SEC 095 Secretarial Lab as a co-requisite.
Drafting
Computer Aided Drafting-CAD
The Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) certificate program prepares students for entry positions as CAD operators in industrial plants, engineering firms, manufacturing firms and government agencies.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 5 100
DRI 106 Dimensioning and Tolerancing 2 40
CAD 110 Introduction to Computer
Aided Drafting 2 40
CAD 111 Computer Aided Drafting 3 60
CAD 210 Computer Aided Drafting
Applications 3 60
CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processing 1 20
CIS 110 Microcomputer Operating
Systems 1 20
CIS 150 Electronic Spreadsheet 1 20
CAD 211 Advanced Computer Aided
Drafting Applications (Capstone) 3 60
Total 21 420
The DRI I 05 Introduction to Drafting and DRI 106
Dimensioning and Tolerancing can be waived with proof of prior experience in the drafting field.
Drafting for Industry
The Drafting for Industry Certificate Program prepares students for entry positions on drafting teams in indus-
trial plants, engineering and manufacturing firms, and government agencies.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 5 100
CAD 110 Introduction to Computer
Aided Drafting 2 40
DRI 106 Dimensioning and Tolerancing I 2 40
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 40
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry and
Auxiliary Views 2 40
DRI 113 Intersections and Developments 3 60
DRI 116 Mechanical Detailed Drafting
(Capstone) 5 100
Total 23 460
Early Childhood Education
Group Leader/Director Certificate
This program prepares graduates for group leader and director qualified level positions in day care and preschool centers and meets State Social Services licensing requirements. Spanish support and tutorial is available for Spanish speaking students.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3 45
ECE 110 Child Growth and Development 1 3 45
ECE 117 Curriculum Development 3 45
ECE 222 Classroom Management Techniques 3 45
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth and Development 3 45
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 45
ECE 215 Early Childhood Education Administration 4 60
ECE 205 Nutrition for Young Children 2 30
ECE 141 Preschool Supervised Lab Experience & Seminars (Capstone) 3 100
Total 27 460
Electronics
Biomedical Equipment Technician I
Prerequisite: Competency equivalent through 3rd semester Electronics (ELT 203).
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 222 Introduction to Biomedical Technology 3 60
ELT 223 High Frequency and Clinical Lab Instrumentation 4 75
ELT 224 Biophysical Measurements, EKG Equipment and Troubleshooting 4 75
ELT 225 Hospital Internship (Capstone) 2 60
Total 13 270
54


Biomedical Equipment Technician II
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 101 DC Circuits and Magnetism 3 60
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 60
ELT 104 Network Theorem & Vacuum Tubes 3 60
ELT 110 Diode Circuits 3 60
ELT 111 Transistor Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 112 JFET's and Oscillators 3 60
ELT II 1 Special Devices 3 60
ELT 114 1C Operational Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 200 Pulse and Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 201 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 203 Microprocessor Applications 3 60
ELT 222 Introduction to Biomedical Technology 3 60
ELT 223 High Frequency and Clinical Lab Instrumentation 4 75
ELT 224 Biophysical Measurements, EKC Equipment and Troubleshooting 4 75
ELT 225 Hospital Internship (Capstone) 2 60
ELT 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total 56 1125
Computer Field Service Technician
This program prepares students for entry level positions in computer leasing companies or computer repair facilities. The emphasis is on microcomputer configuration, board swapping, and peripheral matching.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 101 DC Circuits 3 60
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 205 Microcomputer System Assessment 9 180
ACC 110 Mathematics of Business/ Personal Finance 3 45
COM 121 Interpersonal Communication 3 45
ELT 206 Microcomputer Software Installation and Testing (Capstone Course) 3 60
ELT 207 Cooperative Education 6 60
Total 33 570
Electronics Technology
The electronics certificate options offer the opportunity for specialization and/or upgrading. All courses have a prerequisite of the preceding course or proof of competency.
Basic Electronics
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 101 DC Circuits and Magnetism 3 60
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 60
ELT 104 Network Theorems and Vacuum Tubes (Capstone) 3 60
Total 15 300
Solid State Theory
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 110 Diode Circuits 3 60
ELT 111 Transistor Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 112 JFETs and Oscillators 3 60
ELT 113 Special Devices 3 60
ELT l l 4 Operational Amplifiers
(Capstone) 3 60
Total 15 300
Digital Fundamentals
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 200 Pulse and Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 201 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 203 Microprocessor Applications
(Capstone) 3 60
Total 12 240
Troubleshooting Techniques
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 204 Microcomputer Systems 1 3 60
ELT 211 Instruments and Measurements 1 I 3 60
ELT 212 Troubleshooting Techniques for
Digital/Analog Systems 3 60
ELT 285 Fabrication Techniques
(Capstone) 3 60
Total 12 240
Microcomputer Systems
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 203 Microprocessor Applications 3 60
ELT 204 Microcomputer Systems 1 3 60
ELT 214 Microcomputer Systems II
(Capstone) 3 60
Total 12 240
Instrumentation
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 60
ELT 201 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 211 Instruments and Measurements I 3 60
ELT 215 Instruments and Measurements II
(Capstone) 3 60
Total 12 240
Communications
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ELT 104 Network Theorems and
Vacuum Tubes 3 60
ELT 114 Operational Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 210 Communications 1 3 60
ELT 216 Communications II (Capstone) 3 60
Total 12 240
Certificate
Programs
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55


Certificate
Programs
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56
Environmental and Refrigeration Technology
Programs are open-entry and open-exit. Students may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to either complete the program for a certificate or degree or upgrade specific skills. Students may waive 100 level courses due to prior knowledge and experience. The waiver must be approved by the instructor. In order to satisfy the requirements for a certificate, the following courses must be taken in the listed sequence.
Apartment Manager
This program prepares students to enter the field of Apartment Management. It includes training in basic service and installation of common appliances used in apartments, an introduction to basic electricity, refrigeration, air conditioning, and heating, and training in areas needed by persons managing an apartment complex.
The program has no prerequisites; however, the student must demonstrate proficiency in Math, English, Reading, and Study Skills comparable to a level two on
Community College of Denver assessment prior to completion of the certificate.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
RAC 111 Fundamentals of Electricity 1 3 60
RAC 112 Fundamentals of Electricity II 3 60
RAC 114 Fundamentals of Refrigeration 1 3 60
RAC 214 Unitary & Central a/c Systems 3 60
APT 220 Kitchen Equipment 1 3 60
APT 225 Refrigerators & Freezers 1 3 60
RAC 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
ACC 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
COM 121 Interpersonal Communications 3 45
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 15
(Capstone Course)
APT 226 Room Air Conditioners 3 60
Total 31 540
Major Appliance Repair
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
RAC 111 Fundamentals of Electricity 1 3 60
RAC 112 Fundamentals of Electricity II 3 60
RAC 114 Fundamentals of Refrigeration 1 3 60
RAC 115 Safety, Tools and Piping 3 60
RAC 116 Fundamentals of Refrigeration II 3 60
APT 218 Automatic Washers 1 3 60
APT 219 Clothes Dryers 1 3 60
APT 220 Kitchen Equipment 1 3 60
APT 225 Refrigerator/Freezers 1 3 60
APT 226 Room Air Conditioners 3 60
APT 228 Clothes Dryers II 3 60
APT 229 Kitchen Equipment II 3 60
APT 230 Refrigerator/Freezers II 3 60
APT 231 Automatic Washers II (Capstone) i 6 120
RAC 295 Job Search Workshop 1 20
Total 46 920
Refrigeration and Air Conditioning
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
RAC 111 Fundamentals of Electricity 1 3 60
RAC 112 Fundamentals of Electricity II 3 60
RAC 114 Fundamentals of Refrigeration 1 3 60
RAC 115 Safety, Tools and Piping 3 60
RAC 116 Fundamentals of Refrigeration II 3 60
RAC 200 Refrigeration Systems Comp.
& Applications 3 60
RAC 205 Refrigeration Heat Loads &
System Development 3 60
RAC 208 Special Refrigeration Systems 3 60
RAC ill Installation & Service
Refrigeration Systems 6 120
RAC 212 Fundamentals of Air
Conditioning 3 60
RAC 214 Unitary & Central Station System 3 60
RAC 215 Air Flow Principles &
Distribution 3 60
RAC 216 Control Systems 3 60
RAC 217 Troubleshooting & Servicing
(Capstone) 3 60
RAC 295 Job Search Workshop 1 20
Total 46 920
Financial Services
Commercial Credit Management Emphasis
These certificate programs for students working in commercial credit management are specifically designed to train and to up-grade skills of credit managers, assistants, and other credit personnel who work in the area of exterior or commercial credit.
Credit Management Certificate I
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CRM 105 Commercial Credit and Collections I 3 45
CRM 106 Commercial Credit and Collections II 3 45
CRM 206 Credit Law 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
CRM 107 Credit Management Case Problems (Capstone) 3 45
Total 15 225
Credit Management Certificate II
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law & the Legal Environment (Capstone) 3 45
Total 14 210
56


Graphic Arts (Printing)
This program will prepare the student with job entry skills to accomplish most operations necessary on the process camera and the offset press, and to function in the areas of basic bindery, stripping, and general layout and composition work. Students completing the program will be equipped to enter positions with commercial print shops, trade shops, in-plant shops and any other operation requiring printers.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
GRA 100 Introduction to Graphic Arts 3 60
GRA 105 Beginning Process Camera 3 60
GRA 106 Halftones on Process Camera 3 60
GRA 107 Composition 3 60
GRA 108 Process Camera II, Composition II 3 60
GRA 109 Beginning Offset Presses 3 60
GRA 110 Stripping and Small Bindery 3 60
GRA 115 Intermediate Offset Presses 3 60
GRA 116 Paper, Management and Production 3 60
GRA 185 Inks, Plates and Introduction to Large Bindery (Capstone) 3 60
Total 30 600
Production
Courses in the Certificate sequence are applicable to
the Associate of Applied Science and can normally be completed in two semesters.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
GRD 105 Advertising Typography and
Layout 3 90
GRD 206 Art Preparation for Reproductioi i 3 90
GRD 207 Advanced Art Preparation for
Reproduction 3 90
SEC 085 Secretarial Lab 1 20
SEC 099 Introduction to the Typewriter
Keyboard 2 40
GRA 120 Process Camera and Halftones 6 120
ENG 100 Composition, Style and
Technique 3 45
Electives: Choose one of the following: 3 45-90
GRD 100 Letterin^Typographic
Design & Career Survey 3 (90)
ART 131 Design I 3 (90)
Marketing Elective 3 45
Capstone Course
GRD 185 Pagemaker and Quark (Capstone)3 90
Total 33 630-705
Certificate
Programs
Page
57
Graphic Design
Computer Graphics
Courses in the Certificate sequence are applicable to the Associate of Applied Science and can normally be
Human Services
Case Management/
Residential Service Aide
This program prepares students for entry-level positions as case management aides or residential aides.
completed in two semesters. Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Cr. Ct. Hrs. HSE 106 Survey of Human Services 3 45
ART 121 Drawing I HSE 107 Interviewing Principles and
ART 132 Design 1 3 90 Practices 3 45
ENG 100 Composition, Style & Technique 3 45 HSE 209 Crisis Theory and Intervention 3 45
GRD 075 Computer Lab 1 30 Electives 6 90
CIS 111 Introduction to Computers 3 90 HSE 115 Human Services Practicum I
GRD 100 Lettering/Typographic Design (Capstone) 4/6 120
& Career Survey 3 90 Total 19-21 345
GRD 103 Introduction to MAC II Graphics 3 90
GRD 203 Illustration on the MAC II 3 60
CRD 275 Computer Graphics Internship Electives: Choose 6 to W credit hours from the following:
CAD 110 Introduction to Computer
Assisted Drafting 3 60
GRD 105 Advertising Layout and Typography 3 90
GRA 290 Desktop Publishing 3 60
PHO 100 Fundamentals of Photography 3 90
Capstone Course
GRD 185 Pagemaker and Quark 3 90
Total 40-42 635-665
Management
Hispanic Entrepreneurship Program
This program is designed to expose the concepts and skills necessary to succeed in business. Focus is primarily Hispanic small business. Enrollment in this curriculum will engage students in entrepreneurial activities. Students will learn key concepts of small business, management and marketing.
Certificate Option I Cr. Ct. Hrs.
REA 005 ADV. LEARN: Study Skills 3 45
MAT 003 Introduction to Math 3 45
BUS 215 Introduction to Business 3 45
EDU 003 College Seminar:
"Planning for Success" 3 45
MAR 208 Principles of Sales 3 45
MAN 205 Entrepreneurship 1 (Capstone) 3 45
Total 18 270
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Certificate
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58
Certificate Option II Cr. Ct. Hrs.
BUS 217 Business Communications OR (Speech Intensive) 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal Finance 3 45
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
CIS 075 Computer Lab 1 20
ACC 103 Bookkeeping 3 45
MAN 185 Entrepreneurship II (Small Business Management Seminar Capstone) 1 15
MAR 218 Marketing Small Business Services 3 45
Total 17 260
Small Business Management Emphasis
This program provides the basic fundamentals for success as a small business entrepreneur. Students receive the essentials of small business operations from initiating the small business plan to getting and maintaining customers and clients.
Transportation Management Emphasis
This program is designed to provide basic coverage of fundamentals of transportation management. For students studying transportation and distribution management, this program provides the necessary foundation for entry-level employment.
Course Requirements Cr. Ct. Hrs.
INB 214 International Methods of
Payment 3 45
TTM 115 Freight Claims 2 30
TTM 116 Air Express/Freight 2 30
TTM 151 Transportation Pricing I 3 45
TTM 152 Transportation Pricing II 3 45
TTM 201 International Trade Practices 3 45
TTM 202 Export Operations and
Procedures 3 45
TTM 211 Economics of Distribution 2 30
TTM 221 Transportation Law 3 45
TTM 231 Transportation Management I 2 30
TTM 232 Transportation Management II
(Capstone) 2 30
Total 28 420
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103 Bookkeeping or
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 3-4 45-60
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
ACC 110 Mathematics of Business/
Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
MAN 110 Exploring Small Business
Ownership 1 15
MAN 111 Financing a Small Business 1 15
MAR 112 Strategic Marketing for Small
Business 1 15
MAN 113 Liability Insurance & Tax
Requirements or 1-3 15-45
MAN 205 Small Business Management
BUS 221 Business Law & the Legal
Environment 3 45
MAR Elective 2 45
ACC 131 Individual Income Tax 3 45
MAR 185 Marketing Seminar (Capstone) or 1 15
MAN 185 Management Seminar (Capstone)
Total 28-30 435-480
Supervisory Management Emphasis
The Supervisory Management Certificate Program is designed to be delivered through alternative non-tradi-tional approaches. The entire program will be offered through home study, telecourse and computerized instruction.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAN 226 Management & Organizational
Behavior 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
BUS 221 Business Law & the Legal
Environment 3 45
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
MAN 185 Management Seminar (Capstone) 1 15
Total 26 390
Marketing
Insurance Emphasis
This program is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental practices and procedures of the broad field of insurance and to assist the student in gaining employment in the entry-level occupations.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
INS 104 Property and Liability Principles 3 45
INS 105 Personal Insurance 3 45
INS 106 Commercial Insurance 3 45
INS 117 Insurance Principles 3 45
INS 122 Principles of Risk Management & Insurance 3 45
INS 124 Commercial Property Risk Management Insurance 3 45
INS 125 Commercial Liability Risk Management Insurance 3 45
INS 206 The Legal Environment of Insurance 3 45
INS 216 Insurance Issues & Professional Ethics (Capstone) 3 45
Total 27 405
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International Business Emphasis
This program is designed for individuals and businesses who would like to explore the possibilities of doing or improving their business in international markets. Basic essentials of foreign trade and cultural understanding will be necessary for an effective business relationship.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
INB 210 International Business 3 45
INB 212 Export Operations and Procedures 3 45
INB 213 Import Basics 3 45
INB 214 International Methods of Payment 3 45
POS 205 International Relations 3 45
Select 12 credit hours of electives with advisor approval 12 180
INB 211 International Marketing and Sales (Capstone) 3 45
Total 30 450
Real Estate Emphasis
This program provides the student with the fundamental training in real estate practices and procedures to
become an entry level real estate professional.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
REE 103 Real Estate Practice and Law 3 45
REE 104 Real Estate Contracts and Law 2 30
REE 115 Introduction to Real Estate 3 45
REE 117 Real Estate Law 3 45
REE 118 Real Estate Appraisal I 2 30
REE 105 Real Estate Closings, Trust Accounts 3 45
REE 185 Finance & Advanced Law (Capstone) 3 45
Total 19 285
Telemarketing Emphasis
This program is designed for individuals and businesses who would like to gain the fundamental training in telemarketing practices and procedures. Emphasis will be on the application of sales techniques, marketing practices and guidelines for telemarketers and busi-
nesses.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 45
MAR 216 Principles of Marketing 3 45
MAR 208 Principles of Sales 3 45
MAR 209 Advertising and Promotion 3 45
MAR 295 )ob Search Workshop 1 15
MAR 297 Cooperative Education 3-6 45-90
SPE 115 Principles of Speech Communication 3 45
Electives 6 90
MAR 207 Telemarketing (Capstone) 3 45
Total 28-31 420-465
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
Electives: Choose at least 6 credits of coursework:
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 110 Mathematics of Business/ Personal Finance 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development 3 45
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers 3 45
INB 210 International Business 3 45
INB 211 International Sales and Marketing 3 45
MAN 117 Time Management 1 15
BUS 221 Business Law & the Legal Environment 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
Certificate completers must have 28 semester hours of credit to be awarded the certificate.
Nursing
Practical Nursing
This program represents the first year of the two year Associate of Applied Science degree in nursing. It begins in the fall term, and continues through the spring semester. Prospective applicants must complete the necessary prerequisite coursework with a C grade or better. The application process consists of demonstrating entry level scores on the college Basic Skills Assessment Test, submitting an application, two letters of recommendation, and transcripts showing prerequisite coursework for evaluation. Application materials must be submitted by March 30 prior to admission the following fall semester. Further information may be obtained from the Division of Health and Human Services.
After successful completion of this program, showing a C grade or better in each course, the student receives a Certificate of Practical Nursing and is eligible to take the examination for Licensure as a Practical Nurse.
Prerequisites Cr. Ct. Hrs.
BIO 141 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 1 4 75
BIO 142 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth
& Development 3 45
NUR 100 Introduction to Nutrition 3 45
MAT 103, 121, 135 (any one meets AAS
requirements but only MAT 121
and MAT 135 are transferable) 3 45
Requirements
ENG 121 English Composition 3 45
NUR 101 Basic Concepts in Pharmacology 2 30
NUR 111 Nursing Concepts 1 10 195
NUR 112 Nursing Concepts II
(Capstone Course) 14 270
NUR 115 Socialization into Nursing 1
(Speech Intensive) 1 15
Total 47 840
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Certificate
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Paralegal
Paralegal
This program is designed to prepare individuals with job entry skills for the general paralegal field. Emphasis is placed on practical skills such as interviewing, researching and document drafting.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
PAR 100 Introduction to Paralegal 3 45
PAR 107 Legal Research 3 45
PAR 108 Civil Procedures 3 45
PAR 127 Evidence 3 45
PAR 210 Paralegal Workshop 6 285
PAR 252 Computer Support Litigation
(Corequisite CIS 075) 4 45
Electives from Paralegal courses 9 133
CIS 125 Word Perfect
(Corequisite: CIS 075) 3 60
CIS 140 DBase III+
(Corequisite: CIS 075) 3 45
PAR 185 Paralegal Synthesis I (Capstone) i 3 45
Total 40 793
Law Office Management
This program is a special Certificate designed for current Paralegal students or persons looking for or holding a Law Office Manager position. Preparation includes coursework in management and supervision, accounting, marketing strategies for the law firm, and focused computer applications for effective office management.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
PAR 100 Introduction to Paralegal 3 45
PAR 107 Legal Research 3 45
PAR 108 Civil Procedures 3 45
PAR 210 Paralegal Workshop 3 45
PAR 252 Computer Support Litigation 3 60
(Corequisite CIS 075) 1 15
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
MAR 216 Principles of Marketing 3 45
CIS 125 WordPerfect 1 20
(Co-requisite: CIS 075) 1 15
CIS 140 dBase III 1 20
(Co-requisite: CIS 075) 1 15
CIS 150 Lotus 1-2-3 1 20
(Co-requisite: CIS 075) 1 15
PAR 220 Law Office Management
(Capstone) 3 45
Total 39 615
Radiologic Health Sciences
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technology
This certificate program limits application to those who have registry and/or certification in any other diagnostic imaging modality (Radiation Therapy, Nuclear Medicine Technology or Registered Diagnostic Medical Stenography). It is a two or three semester program which commences in the fall.
All lecture courses are taught in the evenings of the first (fall) semester and one course plus 410 clinical internship hours are completed within the following spring and, if necessary, summer semesters.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MRI 274 Clinical Applications I 1 15
MRI 276 Physics of MRI 2 30
MRI 277 Clinical Laboratory 1 30
MRI 278 Cross Sectional Anatomy 1 15
MRI 284 Clinical Applications II 2 30
MRI 287 Clinical Internship
(Capstone Course) 9 412
Total 16 532
Nuclear Medicine Technology
Commencing in the fall, this twelve month program is concurrent with the second year of the Associate Degree program. It allows for the entrance of applicants who are already licensed in another allied health profession or have a baccalaureate which includes the following
courses: college algebra (MAT 121), introductory chemistry (CHE 101), anatomy and physiology (BIO 141, 142), basic patient care (RHS 106) or equivalent.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
NMT 210 Nuclear Medicine Physics 4 60
NMT 211 Clinical Applications I 2 30
NMT 213 Nuclear Medicine
Instrumentation 4 60
NMT 221 Clinical Internship I 6-8 270-360
NMT 212 Clinical Applications II 3 45
NMT 215 Radiopharmaceutical Prep 3 45
NMT 217 Computers in Nuclear Medicine 3 45
NMT 222 Clinical Internship II 6-8 360
RHS 215 Radiation Biology & Pathology 2 30
NMT 216 Radioassay Procedures 3 45
NMT 223 Clinical Internship III
(Capstone Course) 6-15 270-675
RHS 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
Total 43-56 1275-1770
Photography
This program provides technical and aesthetic training to prepare graduates with the skills necessary to enter the field of professional photography, including freelance
work, portrait photography and creative photography.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
PHO 100 Fundamentals of Photography 3 90
PHO 102 Fundamentals of Color 3 90
PHO 107 History of Photography 3 90
PHO 109 Advanced Color Photography 3 90
PHO 185 Advanced Photography
(Capstone) 3 90
Total 15 450
60


Secretarial and
Stenographic Emphasis
Administrative Support
General Clerical Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
English Elective (w/advisor approval) 3 45
ACC 103 Bookkeeping
or
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 3-4 45-60
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting 1 4 60
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 60
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 45
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 15
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 125 WordPerfect 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development 3 45
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3 60-90
Total 33-34 510-555
General Clerical Emphasis
Option 1 1 1 Semester Cr. Ct. Hrs.
English or Math Elective (w/advisor approval! I 3 45
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 45
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 15
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 125 WordPerfect 3 45
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3 135
Total 16 330
Medical Secretarial Emphasis
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACC 103 Bookkeeping
ACC 121 or Accounting Principles 1 3-4 45-60
ACC 110 Math of Business/Personal
Finance 3 45
HOC 100 Medical Terminology 1 15
SEC 101 Typewriting 1 4 60
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 60
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 45
SEC 115 Business Machines 1 15
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 125 WordPerfect 3 45
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development 3 45
SEC 206 Health Insurance Methods and
Claims 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3 135
Total 41 -42 705
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
SEC 101 Typewriting I 4 60
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 60
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 45
SEC 111 Alpha Speedwriting 1 4 60
SEC I I 5 Business Machines 1 15
SEC 120 Filing and Records Control 3 45
SEC 125 WordPerfect 3 45
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts 3 45
SEC 136 Business Communications 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3 135
Total 35 525
Word Processing Option I (1 - Semester)
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 60
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 45
SEC 125 WordPerfect 3 45
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3 135
Total 20 390
Word Processing Option II (2 Semester)
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
English Elective (w/advisor approval) 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
SEC 101 Typewriting I 4 60
SEC 102 Typewriting II 4 60
SEC 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 3 45
SEC 125 WordPerfect 3 45
SEC 131 Word Processing Concepts 3 45
SEC 139 Professional Development 3 45
SEC 230 Machine Transcription 4 60
SEC 297 Cooperative Education
(Capstone) 3 135
Total 33 585
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Certificate
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Surgical Technology
Travel and Hospitality
This program begins in the summer and/or spring terms and continues for twelve months. Applications and all applicable documentation and test results need to be completed by the last day in February of each calendar year for the program starting the following summer. Applications for spring must be completed by the last day in September. Admission information may be obtained from the Educational Planning and Advising Center or the Health and Human Services Division. Enrollment is limited to 25 students.
The Surgical Technology Program at CCD depends upon voluntary affiliation by clinical affiliates for spaces for clinical practicum. Students must recognize that due to the need to utilize all available clinical resources, they may have to travel some distance to sites outside the Denver metropolitan area.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
HOC 100 Medical Terminology 1 15
STE 100 Introduction to Surgical
Technology 4 60
BIO 141 Human Anatomy and
Physiology 1 4 75
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
BIO 142 Human Anatomy and
Physiology II 4 75
STE 105 Pharmacology for Surgical
Technology 1 15
STE 106 Surgical Skills 6 120
STE 107 Surgical Instrumentation 3 60
STE 109 Surgical Technology Laboratory
Experience 3 68
STE 115 Surgical Pathology and
Intervention 4 60
STE 110 Surgical Technology Practicum
(Capstone Course) 7 315
Total 40 908
Surgical Technology students wishing to complete the
requirements for the Associate Degree/Ceneral Studies must complete the requirements for a Certificate in Surgical Technology and meet the other core General Education requirements for the AGS Degree. Contact advisor for specific courses.
Hospitality and Restaurant Management
This program is designed to provide entry-level employment and updating skills for those students already employed in the industry.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
HRA 130 Front Office Management 3 45
HRA 140 Salesmanship for the Hospitality Industry 2 30
HRA 201 Food & Beverage Management & Controls 3 45
HRA 205 Convention Management and Services 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
MAN 226 Management & Organizational
Behavior 3 45
MAN 216 Principles of Supervision 3 45
HRA 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
Electives 3 45
Total 26 480
Travel and Tourism Agent
This program is designed to prepare students for entry level employment in travel agencies, bus-lines, rail-lines and tourist offices.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
SEC Typewriting Elective 2-4 30-60
TTO 101 Geography for Travel & Tourism 3 45
TTO 102 Domestic Travel 3 45
TTO 105 Computer Reservations 3 45
TTO 103 International Travel (Capstone) 3 45
Total 14-16 210-240
Travel and Tourism Management
This program is designed to provide training in travel agency procedures and to develop tele-marketing skills for new and current employees.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
HRA 205 Convention Management and Services 3 45
TTO 104 Travel Agency Management & Procedures 3 45
TTO 201 Salesmanship for the Travel Industry 2 30
TTO 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
English Elective 3 45
Electives 3 45
Total 17 345
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Technical Education Center North and East Programs
Technical Education Center North
6221 Downing Street
Denver, Colorado 80216
For more information call: 289-2243
Technical Education Center East 3601 Martin Luther King Blvd.
Denver, Colorado 80205
For more information call: 321-8567
CCD's Technical Education Centers are job training centers, offering business and industry-based training. All programs are open-entry, open-exit and operate year-around with individualized instruction, allowing a student to enroll anytime and leave when program requirements are completed. Students attend class an average of six hours a day, 5 days each week.
Fast-track training permits students to complete a certificate program in seven months or less. CCD grants college credit for all courses successfully completed. These credits can be applied to an associate degree.
The centers also provide classes in job search techniques, GED preparation and basic study skills. Career assessment testing, case management counseling and job placement assistance are also available.
Bookkeeping/Accounting Certificates North & East
These programs are designed to prepare students for jobs such as Bookkeeping Clerk, Payroll Clerk, Inventory Clerk, Accounting Clerk and Data Entry Clerk.
First Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
PGD 099 Personal Growth & Development 2 40
ACT 100 Introduction to Keyboarding 2 40
ACT 102 Typewriting I 4 80
ACT 103 Typing Skill Development 3 60
ACT 105 Oral Communications 2 40
ACT 120 Records & Filing 2 40
ACT 200 Office Procedures 3 60
Total 18 360
Accounting Clerk Third Semester
Students who complete two semesters only may exit with a certificate for Data Entry/Bookkeeping Clerk after an additional enrollment in JSS 101, Job Search Skills.
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACT 108 Data Entry II 3 60
ACT 112 Accounting Principles II 5 100
ACT 115 Advanced Lotus 1 -2-3 2 40
ACT 118 BPI Computer Accounting (Capstone) 5 100
JSS 101 Job Search Skills 3 60
Total 18 360
Bilingual Bookkeeping North
This program is for limited English speaking students to prepare them for jobs such as Bookkeeping Clerk, Payroll Clerk, Inventory Clerk and Data Entry Clerk.
First Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENS 020 Vocational ESL I 5 100
RED 003 Reading and Study Skills 3 60
MTH 002 Processes of Math I 2 40
MTH 001 Basic Operations 2 40
ACT 100 Introduction to Keyboard 2 40
ACT 103 Typing Skill Development 3 60
JSS 100 Job Search Workshop 1 20
Total 18 360
Second Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ENS 021 Vocational ESL II 5 100
ACT 106 Introduction to Accounting 3 60
ACT 102 Typewriting I 4 80
ACT 117 Business Math by Machines 4 80
ACT 120 Records & Filing 2 40
Total 18 360
Third Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACT 104 Typing Speed Building 1 20
ACT 107 Data Entry 1 4 80
ACT 114 Lotus 1-2-3 2 40
ACT 200 Office Procedures 3 60
ACT 111 Accounting Principles 1
(Capstone) 5 100
JSS 101 Job Search Skills 3 60
Total 18 360
Data Entry/Bookkeeping Clerk Second Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
ACT 106 Introduction to Accounting 3 60
ACT 117 Business Math by Machine 4 80
ACT 107 Data Entry 1 4 80
ACT 114 Lotus 1-2-3 2 40
ACT 111 Accounting Principles 1 (Capstone) 5 100
Total 18 360
Technical Education Center North & East Programs Page 63
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Chemical Operations North
This program is designed to prepare students for jobs as chemical operators.
First Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MAT 104 Introduction to Algebra 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College
Mathematics 3 45
CHE 101 Introduction to Chemistry I 5 100
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 80
CHO 103 Introduction to Chemical
Operations 2 40
CHO 104 Hazardous Materials 3 60
Total 20 370
Second Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
CHO 105 Dissolution Operations 2 40
CHO 106 Ion Exchange Operations 3 60
CHO 107 Filtration Operations 2 40
CHO 108 Process Support Systems 3 60
CHO 109 Pyro-Chemical Operations 2 40
CHO 110 Assay Operations (Capstone) 3 60
JSS 101 Job Search Skills 3 60
Total 18 360
Cooperative Education
Certificate
North & East
This program is designed to prepare students for a wide variety of jobs through the use of paid job training stations and development of basic job seeking and job keeping skills.
CWE 101 Cooperative Education Cr. 9 Ct. Hrs. 180
CWE 102 Coop Seminar 6 120
JSS 101 Job Search Skills 3 60
Total 18 360
Machine Tool Operator
Certificates
North
This program is designed to prepare students for jobs such as Lathe Operator, Mill Operator, Shaper Operator, Grinder Operator and CNC Operator.
First Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MTO 105 Introduction to Machine Shop 4 80
MTO 117 Vertical Mills I 4 80
MTO 118 Vertical Mills II 4 80
MTO 126 Engine Lathes I 4 80
PGD 099 Personal Growth &
Development 2 30
Total 18 390
Mill/Lathe OperatorSecond Semester
MTO 100 Machine Shop Safety Cr. 3 Ct. Hrs. 60
MTO 106 Metrology 2 40
MTO 107 Machine Tool Blueprints 3 60
MTO 114 Machine Tool Math I 2 40
MTO 119 Horizontal Mills 4 80
MTO 127 Engine Lathes II (Capstone) 4 80
Total 18 345
Third Semester Option One
Machine Tool Operator Certificate
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MTO 116 Machine Tool Math II 2 40
MTO 120 Machine Shop Grinding 3 60
MTO 128 Engine Lathes III 4 80
MTO 201 Introduction to CNC-CAD/CAM 3 60
MTO 129 Job Shop Machining (Capstone) 3 60
JSS 101 Job Search Skills 3 60
Total 18 360
Third Semester Option Two CNC Operator Certificate
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
MTO 116 Machine Tool Math II 2 40
MTO 201 Introduction to CNC-CAD/CAM 3 60
MTO 202 CNC Operations 3 60
MTO 204 CNC Mathematics 3 60
MTO 203 Basic CNC Programming/ Advanced Blue Print Reading (Capstone) 4 80
JSS 101 Job Search Skills 3 60
Total 18 360
Students that complete the first and second semesters may exit with a certificate for Mill/Lathe Operator after an additional enrollment in JSS 101, Job Search Skills.
Secretary/Word Processing
Certificates
North & East
These programs are designed to prepare students for jobs such as Records Clerk, Filing Clerk, Receptionist, Clerk Typist, Office Secretary, Word Processor and Information Processor.
First Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
PGD 099 Personal Growth & Development 2 40
SCY 100 Introduction to Keyboarding 2 40
SCY 101 Typewriting I 4 80
SCY 103 Typing Skill Development 3 60
SCY 105 Oral Communications 2 40
SCY 120 Records and Filing 2 40
SCY 200 Office Procedures 3 60
Total 18 360
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Secretary Second Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
SCY 102 Typewriting II 4 80
SCY 107 Language Skills 3 60
SCY 136 Business Communications 3 60
SCY 215 Introduction to Word Perfect 2 40
SCY 203 Typewriting III (Capstone) 4 80
SCY 222 Medical Forms 2 40
Total 18 360
Word Processor Third Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
JSS 101 Job Search Skills 3 60
SCY 210 Secretarial Lab 3 60
SCY 219 Wang Word Processing 3 60
SCY 240 Pagemaker Publishing 2 40
SCY 224 Beginning Lotus 1-2-3 2 40
SCY 225 Advanced Word Perfect 2 40
SCY 230 Machine Transcription
(Capstone) 3 60
Total 18 360
Students who complete the first and second semesters only may exit with a certificate for Secretary after an additional enrollment in JSS 101, Job Search Skills.
Teen Parent Curriculum (New Chance)
North
The objectives of New Chance are to prepare teen parents with life competency skills, CED completion and basic academic skills before entering other training programs or classes.
First Semester
PGD 090 Child Development Cr. 4 Ct. Hrs. 80
PGD 091 Parenting Skills 4 80
PGD 092 Family Health 3 60
PGD 093 Family Planning 1 20
PGD 094 Life Management Skills 1 20
RED 010 College Reading Skills 1 3 60
RED 011 College Reading Skills II 2 40
Total 18 360
After the first semester, students in the Teen Parent Program can enter any of the other TEC North programs as well as other programs within CCD.
Welder Certificates North
This program is designed to prepare students for jobs such as Construction Welder, Industrial Welder, Production Welder, Arc Welder, MIG Welder, TIG Welder, Plate Welder, Pipe Welder and Sheet Welder.
First Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
PGD 099 Personal Growth &
Development 2 40
WEF 100 Oxyacetylene Welding 3 60
WEF 108 SMAW Safety & Set-Up 3 60
WEF 109 SMAW Surface Padding 3 60
WEF 110 SMAW Welding I 3 60
WEF 111 SMAW Welding II 4 60
Total 18 360
Welder- -Second Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
WEF 107 Welding Blueprints 3 60
WEF 114 Welding Math 3 45
WEF 130 GMAW Safety & Set-up 3 60
WEF 201 ASME Pipe Welding 3 60
WEF 203 SMAW Pipe Welding 3 60
WEF 115 Plate Code Test, E7018
(Capstone) 3 60
Total 18 330
Fabrication WelderThird Semester
Cr. Ct. Hrs.
JSS 101 Job Search Skills 3 60
WEF 207 GTAW Safety & Set-Up 3 60
WEF 208 GTAW Alloy Welding 3 60
WEF 209 GMAW Plate & Pipe Welding 3 60
WEF 210 GTAW Thin Gauge Welding 3 60
WEF 211 GMAW Thin Gauge Welding
(Capstone) 3 60
Total 18 360
Students who complete the first and second semesters may exit with a certificate for Welder after an additional enrollment in JSS 101, Job Search Skills.
Welding certification tests are available through a state approved testing company. Depending on a student's readiness, occupational goal, and the welding instructor's recommendation that a student has a high probability of testing success, sponsoring agencies may authorize funds for various tests.
Technical Education Center North & East Programs Page 65
65


TEC North and East Course Descriptions
Accounting
ACT 100 Introduction to the Keyboard
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Introduces the basic keyboard, machine parts and correct typing techniques, for students with no previous typewriting instruction.
ACT 102 Typewriting I
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Introduces basic formatting of typewritten applications of centering, tabulation, letters and manuscripts.
ACT 103 Typing Skill Development
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Designed to improve typing speed and accuracy through the use of the Championship Typing method. Includes diagnosis and analysis of typing performance.
ACT 104 Typing Speed Building
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours Provides additional practice in keyboarding for accounting students who need more speed and accuracy before entering more advanced data entry or keyboard courses.
ACT 105 Oral Communication
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Designed to improve oral communication skills for use in the office. Includes practice using correct grammar, appropriate word choice, eliminating slang and other oral communication skills needed in any office situation.
ACT 106 Introduction to Accounting
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Covers the basic elements of the accounting cycle through statement preparation, including financial statements, the accounting equation, journals, ledgers, trial balance, and worksheets for a service business.
ACT 107 Data Entry I
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Introduces data entry concepts including data entry operations, use of buffered keypunches, key-to-diskette devices and key-to-disk devices. Includes numeric and alphabetic keying, security and control, and methods of data validation.
ACT 108 Data Entry II
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Provides more advanced exercises in data entry with business applications. Includes producing reports or statements such as payroll, inventory control, accounting and student records.
ACT 111 Accounting Principles I
5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Introduces accounting principles and their application with emphasis on sole proprietorships. Includes the accounting cycle for service and merchandising businesses, notes receivable and payable, inventory, systems and controls, payroll and plant assets.
ACT 112 Accounting Principles II
5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACT 111
Reviews the accounting cycle and studies details of the conceptual framework of advanced accounting. Includes partnership accounting; changes in financial position and cash flow statement; accounting for manufacturing; cost accounting; management reports and special analysis.
ACT 113 BPI Computer Accounting
5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACT 106
Includes a review of manual accounting procedures, extensive hands on experience with computer accounting systems; applies the theory of computerized accounting techniques to a hypothetical business.
ACT 114 Lotus 1-2-3
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Introduces the basics of Lotus 1-2-3, including basic menu commands, creation of a spreadsheet, editing data, naming ranges, printing ranges, freezing titles and @ functions and graphing.
ACT 115 Advanced Lotus 1-2-3
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Continuation of ACT 114, Lotus 1-2-3; enables the student to more skillfully use Lotus spreadsheets. Includes transferring data between spreadsheets; string, financial and special functions; protecting worksheets; passwords; searching using criterion ranges; D functions; finding records; preparing database reports; sorting; data tables; and designing and writing macros.
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ACT 117 Business Math by Machines
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Provides a basic understanding of Business Math and develops the skills necessary to operate calculating machines efficiently.
ACT 120 Records and Filing
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Develops the ability to file and retrieve documents using alphabetic, numeric, subject and geographic systems; provides the participant with records management skills.
ACT 200 Office Procedures
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the student to the business world and the various office duties. Includes organization of office work, incoming and outgoing mail, correspondence, telephone techniques, reprographics, listening techniques, office communications.
Chemical Operations
CHO 103 Introduction to Chemical Operations
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Provides an introduction to chemical processing including vacuum systems, dissolution, filtration, glove-box operations, ion exchange, and industrial safety.
CHO 104 Hazardous Materials
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Demonstrates the environmental laws set forth by the Federal, State and Local governments. Emphasizes safe packaging, handling, storage, and shipping hazardous materials.
CHO 105 Dissolutions Operations
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Provides instruction on how to dissolve materials in solutions for later recovery. Includes the components of the system and how the system interrelates with itself and other systems.
CHO 106 Ion Exchange Operations
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Provides instruction on the difference between anion exchange and cation exchange. Through the application of basic math, chemistry and physics in the operation of this system, the students batch chemicals for feed preparation.
CHO 107 Filtration Operations
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Prepares the student for using the filtration system. Shows how to collect a suspended material and collect it back to a solid through the filtration process and the disposition of the solid and discarded liquid.
CHO 108 Process Support Systems
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Provides instruction on the operation of a vacuum system, tank surveillance, glovebox and chem-makeup process. Chemical make-up includes chemical safety, chemical hazards, emergency response, and chemical symbols.
CHO 109 Pyro-Chemical Operations
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Covers the four modules of operation including ER and Button Breakout, Molten Salt Extraction and Salt Scrub. Covers components of the system and how the system interrelates with itself and other systems.
CHO 110 Assay Operations
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Covers the three major modules of operations. Includes 3 NDA Counters, NDA Accountability, Shipping, Receiving, Burning and Sampling, and the Stacker/ Retriever Operations. Examines components of the system and how the system interrelates with itself and other systems.
Chemistry
CHE 101 Introduction to Chemistry I
5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours
Provides the fundamentals of chemistry including problem solving skills using math, identification of temperature scales, elements and sub-atomic particles. Designed for non-science majors, students in occupational programs or students without high school chemistry.
Computer Literacy
COL 101 DOS
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Introduces the Disk Operating System including storing, retrieving, and managing information, familiarize students with all DOS commands, create and edit files, and find explanations for the messages that appear on the screen.
COL 103 Beginning dBase IV
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Introduces students to the basics so they can begin productively using this software on the job. Included are designing a dBase IV information; indexing; browse and edit; conditional and compound expressions; and deletions.
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COL 104 Advanced dBase IV
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Continuation of COL 103, Beginning dBase IV; includes joining database files, sorting records, making calculations, printing reports, and restructuring the database.
COL 105 Beginning Lotus 1-2-3
2 Credit Hour/40 Contact Hours Introduces the basics of Lotus 1-2-3, including basic menu command, creation of a spreadsheet, editing data, naming ranges, printing ranges, freezing titles and @ functions.
COL 106 Advanced Lotus 1-2-3
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Continuation of COL 105, Beginning Lotus 1-2-3; enables the student to more skillfully use Lotus spreadsheets; included are transferring data between spreadsheets; string, financial and special functions; protecting worksheets; passwords; searching using criterion ranges; D functions; finding records; preparing database reports; sorting; data tables; and designing and writing macros.
COL 109 Word perfect I
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Introduces the student to using the Word Perfect Software including creating, editing and printing a document; formatting a document with hidden codes tabs, margins, justifying, underlining, bolding and centering; retrieving and saving documents; cut and paste within a document and between documents; and spell checking.
COL 111 Word Perfect II
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Continuation of COL 109, Word Perfect I. Includes merging from the console as wall as from a secondary file; using macros to speed up word processing; implementing headers, footers, mailing labels; becoming more proficient with math; search and replace; sorting; and use of the Word Perfect Thesaurus.
COL 112 Freelance Plus
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Provides hands-on training emphasizing skill development in enhancing existing graphs, creating words, charts, creating drawings and editing charts and drawings.
COL 113 Graphwriter
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Introduces the basics of graphing including how to select the correct graph type and building various charts: pie, bar, organization and area.
COL 114 Harvard Graphics
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Designed to introduce graphics concepts including creating charts, graphing data, creating templates, and preparing slide shows.
COL 115 Pagemaker Publishing
2 Credits/40 Contact Hours
Designed to teach advanced Word Processing students the layout and production of publications, from one page flyers to complete books.
COL 116 Paradox Database
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Designed to teach database concepts including creation of data entry forms, use of validity checks for data quality, multiple table queries, group calculations, advanced reporting, using scripts, and importing and exporting data from other programs.
Cooperative Education
CWE 101 Cooperative Education
9 Credit Hours/400 Contact Hours
Provides opportunities for work experience utilizing individual skills for the hard to place client. Includes development and ongoing reinforcement for job retention skills.
CWE 109 Coop Seminar
6 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Provides individual consultation with instructor, and opportunity for remediation/upgrade of basic academic skills and/or vocational skills.
English As A Second Language
ENS 001 Basic ESL I
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours Introduces simple English for the student who has no knowledge of spoken or written English. Emphasizes understanding and usage of vocabulary needed in survival skills.
ENS 002 Basic ESL II
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours Continues ENS 090. For the student who has a little basic knowledge of spoken or written English. Emphasizes increasing understanding and usage of vocabulary needed in survival skills. Includes some basic grammar skills.
ENS 003 Low ESL
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Provides instruction for the student who has some experience with spoken English. Emphasizes the understanding and usage of basic grammatical patterns and common vocabulary in conversation.
ENS 004 Intermediate ESL
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Continues ENS 003. Emphasizes increasing understanding and usage of basic grammatical patterns and vocabulary in conversation and improvement of pronunciation.
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ENS 005 Advanced ESL
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Continues ENS 004. Provides additional practice to increase fluency and comprehension of spoken English.
ENS 014 ESL Reading
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Continues ENS 005. Emphasizes the development of skills through discussion of social, political, or personal issues and cultural differences.
ENS 015 ESL Studies
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Provides listening and speaking practice in the intonation, rhythm and sound system of English for second language learners; covers more advanced grammatical structures, longer-paragraph organization, and more sophisticated vocabulary and syntax for the non-native speaker.
ENS 016 ESL Vocabulary
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Provides instruction in paragraph structure, syntax, organization and mechanics for the non-native speaker. Includes vocabulary and structure used in common rhetorical modes.
ENS 020 Vocational ESL I
5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours
Provides English skills for vocational programs which includes: following directions, reading comprehension, business communication, pronunciation, and communicating in the office.
ENS 021 Vocational ESL II
5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Continuation of ENS 020, Vocational ESL I; provides more advanced instruction in English skills needed in vocational programs including vocational vocabulary, writing exercises, resume writing, telephone skills and other business communication skills.
GED Preparation
OFFICIAL GED TEST CENTER
Technical Education Center North is designated as an official GED Test Center. Testing times are Monday from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm and Thursday from 5:00 pm to 9:00 pm. Test feeds are $30.00 for all five tests, $6.00 per single test and $6.00 for each re-take. For information, contact Diana Casteel or Levi Crespin at 289-2243.
GEQ 001 GED Studies I
1-5 Credit Hours/20-100 Contact Hours Provides beginning preparation for the GED tests: writing, social studies, science, reading and math. Includes pre-testing for placement.
GEQ 002 GED Studies II
1-5 Credit Hours/20-100 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GEQ 001 or Permission of Instructor Continues GEQ 001 including more advanced instruction for the GED tests: writing, social studies, science, reading and math. Includes taking GED practice tests.
GEQ 003 Writing Skills for GED
1 -5 Credit Hours/20-100 Contact Hours Provides instruction in writing to prepare for the GED Writing Test. Includes sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph style and organization in writing essays.
GEQ 004 Math for GED
1-5 Credit Hours/20-100 Contact Hours Provides advanced instruction in math to prepare for the GED Math Test. Includes measurement, algebra, geometry and trigonometry.
GEQ 005 Critical Reading for GED
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours Provides instruction for the student who needs more experience in critically analyzing verbal problems. Takes content from the areas of humanities, social science, math, and science. Emphasizes the cognitive approach in learning skills.
GEQ 006 Testing Skills
1 -3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours Improves test-taking skills and/or reduces the nervous tension experienced before or during a test. Involves stress reduction and the development of skills for taking multiple-choice, true-false and essay tests.
Job Search Skills
JSS 100 Job Search Workshop
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours Introduces the student to the world of work and the elements of a job search which are important including resume, application, work habits and interviews.
JSS 101 Job Search Skills
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Develops skills in resume preparation, job applications, job interviews, personal appearance, work habits and attitudes, and positive work relationships.
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Machine Tool
MTO 100 Shop Safety
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Covers safety policies and practices, in general, and deals specifically with the engine lathe, vertical mill, horizontal mill, drill press, pedestal grinder, bandsaw, hacksaw, heat treat areas, hand tools, belt sander, drill grinder and surface grinder.
MTO 105 Introduction to Machine Shop
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Covers the use, application and operation of hand bench tools, bandsaws, hacksaws, drill presses, pedestal grinder and heat treat equipment. Includes instruction on machine maintenance.
MTO 106 Metrology
2 Contact Hours/40 Contact Hours
Covers the English and Metric measurements by using outside, inside, depth and internal micrometers; scales; combination square set; protractors; vernier gauges; sine bar; gauge blocks; indicators; inspection devices and optical comparator; telescoping and small hole gauges.
MTO 107 Machine Tool Blueprints
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Covers the principles of mechanical drawings and related technical information needed to make shop sketches and read industrial drawings of machine parts and tools.
MTO 114 Machine Tool Math I
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Introduces math for machine shops including whole number concepts, fractions, geometry, algebra, trigonometry, measurements and shop finance.
MTO 116 Machine Tool Math II
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Provides instruction in Math for CNC operations including division of decimal fractions, combined operations with decimal fractions, speed and feed calculations for cylindrical tools, taper calculations, circles and polygons, sine bar calculations, measuring angles with discs, oblique triangles and incremental/absolute measurement calculations.
MTO 117 Vertical Mills I
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Develops skill and knowledge on the vertical mill, its parts and functions, speeds and feeds and cutter selection. Includes how to identify and use a vise, edge locator and indicators; and how to mill a flat surface, drilling and tapping, and square a workpiece.
MTO 118 Vertical Mills II
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Provides continued instruction on the vertical mill, learning indexing, rotary table operation, and figuring how to coordinate locations for hole circles, slots and angle cutting, and how to use a digital readout system.
MTO 119 Horizontal Mills
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Develops skills and knowledge on the horizontal milling machine; understanding parts and their functions, speeds and feeds, and accessories. Includes learning the various operations performed on the mill.
MTO 120 Machine Shop Grinding
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Covers the principles of grinding wheel selection, sharpening, surface grinding theory, and operations. Applies the knowledge to grinding parts made on the milling machines.
MTO 126 Engine Lathes I
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Provides instruction on how to use and mount the tree jaw chuck on the spindle of the lathe; how to set lathe tools on center drill; drill, ream, knurl, tap and chamfer. Students also will calculate the feeds and speeds on the lathe and hold tolerances of .015.
MTO 127 Engine Lathes II
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Develops the knowledge and skill of how to single point external and internal threads holding tolerances of Class 2 and 3 thread, how to use the taper attachment and to do "radius" forming.
MTO 128 Engine Lathes III
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Applies theory and operations in machining more difficult parts to develop more skills and knowledge. Students center round and square parts in a four jaw chuck and machine internal and external diameters holding tolerances of .0005.
MTO 129 Job Shop Machining
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Covers the fabrication process. Students produce machine parts and machinist tools from a shop blueprint, write process sheets and estimate machining time to performance level expected in industry.
MTO 201 Introduction to CNC-CAD/CAM
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Provides instruction in dimensioning and tolerancing symbols of Geometric Blue Print systems and control systems. Also introduces the display mode, function controls, alphanumeric keyboard, cycle controls, event keys, and other control related to CNC-CAM Machines.
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MTO 202 CNC Operations
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Provides instruction in safety on set-up and operations of CNC-CAM machines, loading programs, operating features set-up, set-up mode, tool length compensation set-up, part surface programming, tool set-up, proper speed and feed programming, and how to load a part. Also provides instruction on operating CNC-CAM machine to fabricate parts from a developed program.
MTO 203 Basic CNC Programming/ Advanced Blueprint Reading
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Provides instruction on developing basic CNC-CAM programs for given parts and then using the developed program to set-up and operate CNC machine to produce given parts.
MTO 204 CNC Mathematics
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Provides instruction on how to use the English and Metric math systems to work from Datum axis, Geometric characteristics, general tolerancing, symbols and terms, true position language related to development of a basic program for CNC-CAM.
Math
MTH 001 Basic Operations
1 -3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours Reviews basic math and strengthens skills in adding, subtracting and multiplication. Includes diagnostic testing and individualized instruction. Provides the opportunity for self-paced progress.
MTH 002 Processes of Math I
1 -3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours Provides review of multiplication, place values, long division and word problems. Includes diagnostic testing and individualized instruction.
MTH Oil Introduction to Mathematics
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Designed for students who need a comprehensive review of arithmetic. Topics include the fundamental operations of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percentages, proportions, powers of ten, operations with signed numbers and equations.
MTH 012 Processes of Math II
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours Continues MTH 002. Covers review of decimals and percents, fractions, ratios and proportions.
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics
3 Credit Hours
Presents a functional approach to basic operations in arithmetic, fractions, decimals, percents, elements of algebra, geometry, ratio and proportion, graphing, problem solving, probability and statistics. Optional material may include one or more of the following topics: inequalities, interest and consumer applications, sets and logic and computers.
MAT 104 Introductory Algebra
3 Credit Hours
Includes manipulation of algebraic expressions, solving first degree equations in one and two variables, factoring, solving fractional equations, graphing and verbal problem solving.
Personal Growth/New Chance
PGD 090 Child Development
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Provides instruction on child develop principles, prenatal and birth periods, infant development and toddler and pre-school development.
PGD 091 Parenting Skills
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Provides instruction on how children experience the world, values, behavior, discipline, development and special needs of the child, emotions of the child and the importance of play.
PGD 092 Family Health
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Assists participants in recognizing factors that contribute to their children's and their own health and well being; support the development of health-promoting habits and facilitate the use of the Health Care System to meet their needs.
PGD 093 Family Planning
1 Credit Hours/20 Contact Hours Assists students in understanding the value of Family Planning and its impact on personal goals and relationships with their children, significant others and extended families so as to support the affective use of Birth Control and Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Diseases.
PGD 094 Life Management Skills
1 Credit Hours/20 Contact Hours Designed to help students improve their skills in areas critical to successful transition from adolescence to adulthood including assertiveness, problem-solving, effective communication, decision-making, contingency planning and working in groups.
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PGD 099 Personal Growth and Development
2 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Stresses elements of self-esteem, assertiveness, consumer skills, life planning and personal health.
Physics
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics
4 Credit Hours
Provides basic understanding of the law of physics. Emphasis is on critical thinking skills which allows the student to apply the laws to a wide variety of fields. Applications are illustrated by demonstrations and simple hands-on exercises which involve careful observation, measurement analysis and interpretation of results.
Reading
RED 001 Basic Reading Skills
1-3 Credit Hours
Reviews basic reading concepts which include vocabulary building and basic reading comprehension. Builds on students' strengths and is recommended for students who have extreme difficulty in reading.
RED 002 Building Reading Skills
1-3 Credit Hours
Develops reading comprehension and vocabulary; examines and stresses the student's needs in the environment. Individualized and small group projects make the course relevant to student needs.
RED 003 Reading and Study Skills
1-3 Credit Hours
Provides continuation of RED 002, including vocabulary building and comprehension.
RED 010 Skills for College Reading I
1-3 Credit Hours
Provides instruction for students who want to improve reading skills in order to enhance success in the vocational program. Covers literal and critical comprehension, effective textbook reading skills and vocabulary development.
RED 011 Skills for College Reading II
1 -3 Credit Hours
Provides a continuation of reading comprehension processes. Includes textbook reading and vocabulary strategies for math, sciences, accounting, literature, social science and humanities.
RED 012 Reading for Content
1-3 Credit Hours
Utilizes a series of steps through reading exercise designed to help the student think through verbal problems.
RED 013 Writing Skills I
1-5 Credit Hours
Reviews grammar and basic writing skills. Teaches sentence structure, punctuation, basic paragraph style and organization. It will help prepare students for higher level English courses.
RED 014 Study Skills
1-3 Credit Hours
Orients the student who has been away from school for several years and needs a review of methods to improve study skills. Skills taught include motivational techniques and goal setting, time management and concentration, memory skills, textbook reading and study systems, note taking and listening skills, and test-taking techniques.
RED 015 Writing Skills II
1-3 Credit Hours
Utilizes various approaches to develop writing and/or study techniques according to the students' needs. Can focus on basic paragraph or essay writing, or study skills critical for student success.
Secretarial
SCY 100 Introduction to the Keyboard
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Introduces the basic keyboard, machine parts and correct typing techniques. For students with no previous typewriting instruction.
SCY 101 Typewriting I
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Introduces basic formatting of typewritten applications of centering, tabulation, letters and manuscripts.
SCY 102 Typewriting II
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SCY 101 or Equivalent Reinforces fundamentals of typewriting procedures. Develops speed and accuracy in more advanced levels of production work using the prevailing business forms. Emphasis on quality of output.
SCY 103 Typing Skill Development
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Designed to improve typing speed and accuracy through the use of the Championship Typing method. Includes diagnosis and analysis of typing performance.
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SCY 104 Typing Speed Building
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Provides additional practice in keyboarding for the student who needs more speed and accuracy before entering the more advanced typing courses.
SCY 105 Oral Communication
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Designed to improve the way we express ideas when speaking and writing.
SCY 107 Language Skills
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Develops English skills needed to write effective sentences and paragraphs. Includes parts of speech, parts of a sentence, punctuation, and using each of these in correct speech and writing.
SCY 120 Records and Filing
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Develops the ability to file and retrieve documents using alphabetic, numeric, subject and geographic systems; and provides the participant with records management skills.
SCY 136 Business Communications
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces a variety of skills required for effective business communication. Includes spelling and vocabulary; proofreading; use of reference manuals; oral communications and using the calculator.
SCY 200 Office Procedures
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces the business world and the various office duties. Includes organization of office work, incoming and outgoing mail, postal and shipping techniques, maintenance and control of office supplies and business and social conduct. A practicum correlates classroom discussion with related office projects in the student's specialized areas.
SCY 203 Typewriting III
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Emphasizes professional levels of speed and accuracy, especially in production output. Concentrates on problem typewriting with the student assuming the initiative for determining correct action and using appropriate business forms in completing the work.
SCY 204 Advanced Typing Speed Building
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Provides additional practice in keyboarding for the student who needs more speed and accuracy before entering the more advanced Word Processing courses.
SCY 210 Secretarial Lab
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Provides additional practice in a variety of activities including: computer literacy, spelling, vocabulary, 10-key drills, typing drills and oral communication.
SCY 215 Introduction to WordPerfect
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SCY 100 or Equivalent Skills
Introduces the student to using the WordPerfect software on the IBM PC including creating, editing and printing a document; formatting a document with hidden codes tabs, margins, justifying, underlining, bolding and centering; retrieving and saving documents; cut and paste within a document and between documents and spell checking.
SCY 219 Wang Word Processing
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: SCY 102
Introduces the student to essential terminology and general concepts involve din operating any display word processing system. Explains the components of a word processor and covers the steps involved in creating, revising, and printing documents, as well as the procedures commonly used to store and file documents.
SCY 222 Medical Forms
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Designed to familiarize the student with correspondence, records and forms that an entry-level typist might prepare in a medical office; includes introduction of medical terminology.
SCY 224 Beginning Lotus 1-2-3
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Introduces the basics of Lotus 1-2-3 including basic menu commands, creation of a spreadsheet, editing data, and other Lotus 1 -2-3 functions.
SCY 225 Advanced Word Perfect
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Continues Introduction to Word Perfect. Emphasis is on more advanced functions of Word Perfect word processing including merging, headers and footers; search and replace; sorting and use of the Word Perfect Thesaurus.
SCY 230 Machine Transcription
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Reviews letter styles, rules of transcription and punctuation. Emphasizes production of mailable letters and other correspondence from transcribing machines.
SCY 240 Pagemaker Publishing
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours
Designed to teach advanced Word Processing students the layout and production of publications, from one page flyers to complete books.
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Welding and Fabrication
WEF 100 Oxy-Acetylene Welding
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Introduces shop safety rules, oxy-acetylene welding and fuel gas burning.
WEF 107 Welding Blueprints
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Covers how to read welding shop drawings and identify various welding symbols; estimate the cost of materials and labor.
WEF 108 S.M.A.W. Safety and Set-Up
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Includes safety rules applicable to S.M.A.W. power supplies, identification of electrodes by the A.W.S. numbering system; applying the principles of electrode storage and reconditioning and heat input effects on electrodes.
WEF 109 S.M.A.W. Surface Padding
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Concentrates on the application of surface padding in designated positions.
WEF 110 S.M.A.W. Welding I
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Provides instruction on how to properly set-up and weld on plate the lap, tee, edge, butt and corner joints in all positions using specified electrodes.
WEF 111 S.M.A.W. Welding II
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours
Provides instruction on how to properly set-up and weld on pipe the root pass in all positions using the specified electrodes.
WEF 114 Welding Math
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Introduces math for welders including whole number concepts, fractions, decimals, percents, basic geometry and basic trigonometry.
WEF 115 Plate Code Test E-7018
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Provides experiences in welding beveled test plates using a backing strip in the 2G, 3G and 4G positions with E-7018, according to applicable welding standards.
WEF 130 G.M.A.W. Safety and Set-Up
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Provides instruction on uses and benefits of GMAW, safety precautions, equipment and material to use in GMAW.
WEF 201 A.S.M.E. Pipe Welding
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Emphasizes how to prepare joints for welding using a hand-held torch, automatic torch and beveling machine. Students demonstrate an ability to weld prepared pipe joints using E-6010 electrode in all positions.
WEF 203 S.M.A.W. Pipe Welding
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Reviews the common sizes of pipe and their O.D.'s. Students demonstrate an ability to weld pipe joints using the beveled butt joint in the rolled and 2G position and use the E-6010 electrode to test in the 2G and 5G positions according to appropriate root gap and welding standards.
WEF 207 G.T.A.W. Safety and Set-Up
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Applies the process of fusion welding of low carbon steel joints (lap, tee, open-butt), using the appropriate power supply and accessories. Also, use silicon bronze filler material to weld low carbon steel joints.
WEF 208 G.T.A.W. Alloy Welding
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prepares the student to weld stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon steel joints; includes welding in the four positions.
WEF 209 G.M.A.W. Plate and Pipe Welding
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Identifies various types of power supplies and accessories needed for the "MIG" welding process; employs the short-circuit method of welding on low carbon sheet steel, plate and pipe. Students demonstrate an ability to weld a test specimen on the 3G vertical down plate and the 5G pipe joint positions; also, demonstrate an ability to weld using the flux-core process.
WEF 210 G.T.A.W. Thin Gauge Welding
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Applies G.T.A.W. welding concepts using 22 gauge materials with carbon steel, stainless and aluminum on plate and pipe to meet industry standards. Students receive instruction using all types of wire.
WEF 211 G.M.A.W. Thin Gauge Welding
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Applies G.M.A.W. welding concepts using 22 gauge materials with carbon steel, stainless and aluminum on plate to meet industry standards. Students receive instruction in using all types of wire.
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Course Descriptions
Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by prefix and course number. Please refer to the semester Class Schedules for the list of courses offered each semester.
Course Modifications
The courses listed in the following pages are an indication of college course offerings. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not ail courses are offered every semester.
Courses Common to More Than One Program
075 Microcomputer Lab
Variable Credit
Provides access to the microcomputer labs for personal use or for instructional assistance necessary to complete assignments in many program/course prefix areas.
085 Problem Solving
Variable Credit
Provides additional problem solving tutorial time and exercises for science students in chemistry, biology and physics. Designed for students with limited science background as a supplement to the classes.
290 Special Topics Courses
Have a course/program prefix and are numbered 290. Carry 1 -6 credits and 15-90 contact hours. Permission of the instructor and division director is required prior to registration.
295 Job Search Workshop
Variable Credit
Presents information on the nature of work, employer expectations, resume writing, job interview techniques and job search skills.
297 Cooperative Education
Provides opportunities to supplement course work with practical work experiences related to the student's educational program and occupational objective. Courses have a program prefix and are numbered 297. Credit and contact hours are variable. Permission of the instructor/coordinator and the cooperative job supervisor is required. Four-year institutions vary in their policies regarding acceptance of cooperative education credit. Students who are planning to transfer should consult an advisor.
199, 299 Independent Study
Courses have a program prefix and are numbered 199 or 299. Credit and contact hours are variable. Permission of the instructor and division director is required prior to registration. Four-year institutions vary in their policies regarding acceptance of independent study credit. Students who are planning to transfer should consult with an advisor.
Accounting
ACC 103 Bookkeeping
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: Basic Skills Assessment: REA 3, MAT 3,
ENG 3, SS 3
Emphasizes the basic elements of the accounting cycle through statement preparation. Includes common bookkeeping procedures in handling cash receipts and disbursements, working with accounts receivables and payable. Practice in handling journals and ledgers is an integral part of the course.
ACC 110 Mathematics of Business/Personal Finance
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 100 or equivalent; Basic Skills Assessment Scores: MAT 3, REA 3, SS 3
Emphasizes the application of mathematics to business situations. Students learn problem solving techniques in the areas of merchandising, financial accounting, general business and personal finance.
ACC 111 Individual Income Tax
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: Basic Skills Assessment Score: MAT 3,
REA 3, SS 2
Analyzes individual tax payer responsibilities and explains the selection and use of appropriate forms. Coverage is limited to income tax preparation as required by the Internal Revenue Service and the Income Tax Division of the Colorado Revenue Department.
Course
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ACC 112 Computerized Income Tax
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 131 or Instructor Permission
Utilizes prepackaged individual and business software to solve and explain taxation questions.
ACC 113 Introduction to Accounting on the Microcomputer
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 103 or ACC 111 Corequisite: CIS 075, Computer Lab
Introduces data entry procedures on the computer in accounting applications. Includes a review of manual procedures with extensive hands on experience with computerized accounting systems.
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: Basic Skills Assessment Scores: MAT 3,
SS 2, REA 3, ENG 2
Presents accounting principles and their application with emphasis on sole proprietorships. Includes the accounting cycle for service and merchandising firms, notes receivable and payable, inventories, systems and controls, payroll and plant assets.
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: ACC 111; Basic Skills Assessment Scores:
REA 3, ENG 3, SS 2, MAT 3
Continues ACC 111 with emphasis on partnership and corporation accounting, department and branch accounting processes, cost accounting systems, management reports and special analysis.
ACC 185 Accounting Seminar for Certificate Programs
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Last semester of certificate program.
A capstone course. Reviews and culminates study for a specific certificate program.
ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 112
Reviews the accounting cycles in depth by providing a conceptual framework for analysis. Emphasis is on the corporate structure.
ACC 215 Accounting Systems
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 112; Basic Skills Assessment Scores: MAT 3, REA 3, ENG 3, SS 2 Studies the principles, concepts and tools used in the design, implementation and integration of accounting systems, controls and procedures. Practical application projects are used to illustrate manual and computerized systems.
ACC 216 Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 111 or Instructor Permission; Basic Skills Assessment Scores: MAT 3, ENG 3, REA 3, SS 2 Examines budgeting and funds control at the local, state and federal levels. Includes the forecast and preparation of the budgetary requirements and anticipated revenue at each level of government.
ACC 226 Cost Accounting
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 112; Basic Skills Assessment Scores: MAT 3, ENG 3, REA 3, SS 2 Studies cost accumulation methods and reports. Includes the concepts and principles of job order, process, standard and direct cost systems. Planning, budgeting, and cost controls are discussed.
ACC 285 Accounting Seminar
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Last semester of the AAS program.
A capstone course. Reviews and culminates study for the AAS Degree.
Anthropology
ANT 101 Cultural Anthropology
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Studies human cultural patterns and learned behavior. Includes linguistics, social and political organization, religion, culture and personality, culture change, and applied anthropology.
ANT 107 Introduction to Archaeology
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Surveys the recovery of human prehistoric and historic past through excavation, analysis and interpretation of material remains, including the archaeology and prehistory of several areas of the world. Covers the work of archaeologists along with discussions of major theories and excavations.
ANT 111 Physical Anthropology
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Studies human biology and its effects on behavior. Includes principles of genetics and evolution, vertebrates and primates, human origins, human variations, and ecology.
ANT 215 Indians of North America
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites/Corequisites: ANT 101 Introduces Indians of North America from Pre-European contact times to the present, covering archaeology, languages, religions, technologies and other cultural developments, and major influences in the cultures by European peoples.
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Appliance Repair Technology
APT 218 Automatic Washers I
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2+2)
Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences Examines control devices and the electrical circuits common to most automatic washers and the methods of troubleshooting electrical circuits.
APT 219 Clothes Dryers I
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2+2)
Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences Examines circuits, control devices, diagnostic and repair procedures on various makes of automatic electric clothes dryers.
APT 220 Kitchen Equipment 1
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2+2)
Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences Examines the repair of automatic dishwashers, disposal and domestic water conditioners.
APT 225 Refrigerators/Freezers I
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2+2)
Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences Presents the procedures for the repair of various makes and models of upright refrigerator/freezers and chest freezers.
APT 226 Room Air Conditioners
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2+2)
Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences Presents circuits, control devices, diagnostic and repair procedures on various makes of room air conditioners.
APT 228 Clothes Dryers II
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2+2)
Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences Presents circuits, control devices, diagnostic and repair procedures on various makes of automatic gas clothes dryers.
APT 229 Kitchen Equipment II
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2+2)
Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences Presents the procedures for the repair of gas and electric ranges and microwave ovens and trash compactors.
APT 230 Refrigerators/Freezers II
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours (2+2)
Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences Presents the procedures for the repair of various makes and models of upright refrigerator/freezers and chest freezers.
APT 231 Automatic Washers II
6 Credit Hours/ 120 Contact Hours (4+4)
Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or Equivalent Experiences Continues to present the concepts of washing machine components and operation and apply them to customer repairs.
Art
ART 110 Art Appreciation
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces the visual arts including language, concepts, process and history.
ART 111 Art History I
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides the knowledge base to understand the visual arts, especially as related to Western Culture. Surveys the visual arts from the Ancient through the Medieval periods.
ART 112 Art History II
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides the knowledge base to understand the visual arts, especially as related to Western Culture. Surveys the visual arts from the Renaissance through the Modern periods.
ART 121 Drawing I
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
investigates various approaches and media designed to develop drawing skills and visual awareness.
ART 122 Drawing II
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ART 121
Studies expressive drawing techniques, advanced composition, and development of individual expressive style.
ART 131 Design I
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Studies basic design elements, visual perception, form and composition.
ART 132 Design II
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Applies design elements and principles to both two and three dimensional problems.
ART 135 Computer Graphics I
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Introduces the processes of generating computer design for graphic application.
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ART 211 Painting I
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Includes fundamental techniques, composition, materials and procedures of studio painting.
ART 212 Painting II
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Emphasizes experimentation with materials, composition and color.
ART 213 Painting III
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Continues investigation of subject, color composition, and individual forms of expression.
ART 214 Painting IV
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Covers advanced work with theme development, sophisticated color relationships, experimentation in conceptual forms, and consistent progression of subject matter.
ART 221 Drawing III
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Further explores expressive drawing techniques and style.
ART 222 Drawing IV
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Emphasizes drawing problems with emphasis on individual style, subject, and content.
ART 228 Printmaking I
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Introduces the basic techniques and skills of printmaking as fine art media. Instruction will include an understanding of the visual concepts as they relate to print.
ART 231 Watercolor I
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Introduces the basic techniques and unique aspects of materials involved with using transparent and/or opaque water media.
ART 232 Watercolor II
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Continues study of watercolor techniques with an emphasis on original compositions and experimentation with materials.
ART 233 Watercolor III
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Advanced study of subject development, form, color, and theme.
ART 234 Watercolor IV
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Advanced study of techniques, individual style or expression, and consistency of compositional problem solving.
ART 270 Figure Drawing I
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Introduces the basic techniques of drawing the human figure.
ART 271 Figure Drawing II
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Continues the study of the various methods of drawing the human figure, with emphasis on the description of form and individual style.
ART 273 Figure Painting I
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Introduces painting the human figure including a brief survey of figure painting and instruction in the fundamental methods of composition and expression.
ART 274 Figure Painting II
3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Continues study of painting the human figure with advanced problem solving in composition and experimentation with materials and techniques.
Astronomy
AST 101 Astronomy I
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours
Studies the history of astronomy, the tools of the astronomer and the contents of the solar system: the planets, moons, asteroids, comets and meteoroids. Includes laboratory experience.
AST 102 Astronomy II
4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: AST 101
Studies the structure and life cycle of the stars, the sun, galaxies and the universe as a whole, including cosmology and relativity. Includes laboratory experience.
Biology
BIO 085 Problem Solving
1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours Corequisite: BIO 141 or 142 Tutorial assistance in mastering concepts and terms in biology. Recommended for students with limited background in life science.
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BIO 101 Biomedical Terms
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Corequisite: ELT 222
Introduces biological terminology related to the human body, that is required to work in biomedical equipment repair. Course is self-paced and uses programmed materials.
BIO 105 Science of Biology
4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours
Designed for non-science students. Examines the basis of biology in the modern world and surveys the current knowledge and conceptual framework of the discipline. Biology as a sciencea process of gaining new knowledgeis explored as is the impact of biological science on society. Includes laboratory experiences.
BIO 111 General College Biology I
5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Examines the fundamental molecular, cellular and genetic principles characterizing plants and animals. Includes cell structure, function, and the metabolic processes of respiration and photosynthesis as well as cell reproduction and basic concepts of heredity. Includes laboratory experience.
BIO 112 General College Biology II
5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: BIO 111 or equivalent or Permission of
Instructor
Continues Biology I. Includes ecology, evolution, classification, structure, and function in plants and animals. Includes laboratory experience.
BIO 113 Anatomy and Physiology Concepts
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours (1 +0)
Corequisite: ELT 222
Overviews the human body by systems with an emphasis on those concepts of human anatomy and physiology which relate directly to biomedical instrumentation and recordable parameters.
BIO 116 Human Biology
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Introduces human anatomy and physiology for those who have no background in science. Does not substitute for a year long anatomy and physiology with a laboratory. Topics include: atoms, molecules, cells, energetics, genetics and a brief survey of systems.
BIO 117 Drugs: Use and Abuse
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Studies drugs, both legal and illegal. Covers chemical structure, how drugs are made, effect on the body, and the psychology and social concerns connected with drug use.
BIO 118 Human Ecology and the Environment
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Explores the ways in which human population ecology impacts the global environmental balance, and is, in turn, affected by it. Topics focus on population, natural resources and land use.
BIO 119 Biology of Women
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Deals with all biological aspects of a woman's life from the basis of female roles through anatomy and physiology, sexuality, child bearing, and basic health and diet.
BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I
4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours
Includes atomic, molecular, cellular, tissue and gross morphology of the skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems. Includes required laboratory.
BIO 203 Human Anatomy & Physiology II
4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BIO 201
Includes atomic, molecular, cellular, tissue and gross morphology of the integumentary, urinary, cardiovascular, lymphvascular, digestive, respiratory and homeostatic mechanisms. Includes required laboratory.
BIO 215 Microbiology
3-4 Credit Hours/60-75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BIO 111 & 112 or BIO 201 & 203 Studies microorganisms with an emphasis on their structure, development, physiology, classification and identification. Includes laboratory experience of culturing, identifying and controlling microorganisms.
BIO 228 Field Biology
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BIO 111 & 112 Introduces the student to field experiences and ecology. Includes: identification of plants and animals in their natural environment. The course includes mandatory field trips to nearby natural areas.
BIO 270 Assessment:
Musculo/Skeletal Systems
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142 or Current Colorado RN License
Explores this system through anatomy/physiology, pathogenesis, interpretation of diagnostic findings, pharmacology, therapeutic measures, and clinical assessment. This class is part of a 10-course series which may be taken in any order. This course is accepted by the Colorado State Board of Nursing as CEU's for Registered Nurse re-licensure.
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BIO 271 Assessment: Nervous System
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142 or Current Colorado RN License
Explores this system through anatomy/physiology, pathogenesis, interpretation of diagnostic findings, pharmacology, therapeutic measures, and clinical assessment. This class is part of a 10-course series which may be taken in any order. This course is accepted by the Colorado State Board of Nursing as CEU's for Registered Nurse re-licensure.
BIO 272 Assessment: Endocrine System
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142 or Current Colorado RN License
Explores this system through anatomy/physiology, pathogenesis, interpretation of diagnostic findings, pharmacology, therapeutic measures, and clinical assessment. This class is part of a 10-course series which may be taken in any order. This course is accepted by the Colorado State Board of Nursing as CEU's for Registered Nurse re-licensure.
BIO 276 Assessment: Urinary System
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142 or Current Colorado RN License
Explores this system through anatomy/physiology, pathogenesis, interpretation of diagnostic findings, pharmacology, therapeutic measures, and clinical assessment. This class is part of a 10-course series which may be taken in any order. This course is accepted by the Colorado State Board of Nursing as CEU's for Registered Nurse re-licensure.
BIO 277 Assessment: Respiratory System
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142 or Current Colorado RN License
Explores this system through anatomy/physiology, pathogenesis, interpretation of diagnostic findings, pharmacology, therapeutic measures, and clinical assessment. This class is part of a 10-course series which may be taken in any order. This course is accepted by the Colorado State Board of Nursing as CEU's for Registered Nurse re-licensure.
BIO 273 Assessment:
Reproductive System
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142 or Current Colorado RN License
Explores this system through anatomy/physiology, pathogenesis, interpretation of diagnostic findings, pharmacology, therapeutic measures, and clinical assessment. This class is part of a 10-course series which may be taken in any order. This course is accepted by the Colorado State Board of Nursing as CEU's for Registered Nurse re-licensure.
BIO 274 Assessment: Digestive System
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142 or Current Colorado RN License
Explores this system through anatomy/physiology, pathogenesis, interpretation of diagnostic findings, pharmacology, therapeutic measures, and clinical assessment. This class is part of a 10-course series which may be taken in any order. This course is accepted by the Colorado State Board of Nursing as CEU's for Registered Nurse re-licensure.
BIO 275 Assessment:
Integumentary System
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142 or Current Colorado RN License
Explores this system through anatomy/physiology, pathogenesis, interpretation of diagnostic findings, pharmacology, therapeutic measures, and clinical assessment. This class is part of a 10-course series which may be taken in any order. This course is accepted by the Colorado State Board of Nursing as CEU's for Registered Nurse re-licensure.
BIO 278 Assessment:
Cardiovascular System
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142 or Current Colorado RN License
Explores this system through anatomy/physiology, pathogenesis, interpretation of diagnostic findings, pharmacology, therapeutic measures, and clinical assessment. This class is part of a 10-course series which may be taken in any order. This course is accepted by the Colorado State Board of Nursing as CEU's for Registered Nurse re-licensure.
BIO 279 Assessment:
Lymph/Immune System
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142 or Current Colorado RN License
Explores this system through anatomy/physiology, pathogenesis, interpretation of diagnostic findings, pharmacology, therapeutic measures, and clinical assessment. Part of a 10-course series which may be taken in any order. Accepted by the Colorado State Board of Nursing as CEU's for Registered Nurse re-licensure.
Business
BUS 115 Introduction to Business
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: Basic Skills Assessment Scores: REA 4,
ENG 4, MAT 2, SS 4
Surveys the business environment to include economics, the labor force, labor relations, management, ethics and responsibility, finance, accounting, marketing and physical distribution.
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BUS 217 Business Communications
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Course in English with Advisor Approval Introduces writing principles and practices in business reports, memorandums, and letters. Students will make oral presentations using basic speech communication fundamentals. Emphasis will be placed on proper format and communication strategies.
BUS 221 Business Law and the Legal Environment
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MAN 105 and permission of instructor; Basic Skills Assessment Scores: REA 5, ENG 4, SS 4 Develops the recognition of legal problems and their solutions. Introduces the court system and the legal process; covers the study of laws relating to business contracts, sales, agency relationships and the application of the Uniform Commercial Code; and details the legal concepts of property.
Chemistry
CHE 085 Problem Solving
1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours Corequisite for All CHE Courses.
A tutorial class designed to assist students in developing problem-solving skills.
CHE 101 Introduction to Chemistry I
5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: Algebra or Consent of Instructor and Reading Level 3
For non-science majors, students in occupational and health programs, or students with no chemistry background. Includes the study of measurements, atomic theory, chemical bondings, nomenclature, stoichiometry, solutions, acid and base, gas laws, and condensed states. Laboratory experiments demonstrate the above concepts qualitatively and quantitatively.
CHE 102 Introduction to Chemistry II
5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: CHE 101 and Reading Level 3 Includes the study of hybridization of atomic orbitals for carbon; nomenclature of organic compounds; properties of different functional groups, nomenclature of various biological important compounds, their properties and their biological pathways. Laboratory experiments demonstrate the above topics quantitatively and qualitatively.
CHE 111 General College Chemistry I
5 Credit Hours/105 Contact Hours Prerequisite: One year of High School Chemistry or Consent of Instructor and Reading Level 4 Corequisite: College Algebra or consent of instructor.
Pre and post assessment tests are required For science and engineering majors. Includes measurements, atomic theory, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, gases, condensed states, solutions, and thermochemistry. Also problem solving skills and descriptive contents for these topics. Laboratory techniques demonstrate the above concepts as well as the qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques involved in chemistry.
CHE 112 General College Chemistry 11
5 Credit Hours/105 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CHE 111 and Reading Level 4 Includes the study of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibrium, ionic equilibrium, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. Includes problem solving skills and descriptive contents. Organic chemistry may be included if time permits. Laboratory experiments demonstrate both qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques.
College for Living
CFL 001 The Employable Self
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Introduces the process of preparing for and securing a job. Concentrates on behaviors necessary for job retention: following directions, asking for assistance, demonstrating appropriate social skills, and timeliness.
CFL 002 Typing
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Introduces keyboard, machine parts and function and stresses proper typing technique. Accuracy up to 20 words per minute is stressed.
CFL 003 Arts and Crafts
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours Enhances manual dexterity through various craft projects, including work with clay, wood and plastic. Also includes work with watercolor and crayons for enhancing color awareness.
CFL 004 Golf
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Introduces golfing fundamentals including terminology, scoring and safety. Also familiarizes the student with proper equipment use and care.
CFL 005 Swimming
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Introduces recreational, adaptive and therapeutic swimming. Emphasizes water safety and emergency procedures.
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CFL 006 Aerobics
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Introduces exercise for conditioning, muscle tone and endurance. Low impact movements.
CFL 007 Cooking
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Introduces the basics of meal preparation, including comparative shopping skills, food handling and kitchen safety.
CFL 008 Money Management
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Introduces the relative value of dollars and cents, the pay process associated with work and the purchase of goods and services. Emphasizes effective strategies for counting and controlling money.
CFL 009 Reading I
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Introduces basic reading requirements for daily living. Includes public transportation schedules, menus, traffic signs, directions, and common consumer reading. Emphasizes effective strategies for seeking help. Reading level: 0-2
CFL 010 Beginning Sign Language
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Teaches the basics of American Sign Language (ASL), a natural language used by non speakers to communicate with each other. Emphasizes hand shape, movement, position and palm orientation.
CFL Oil Grooming, Fashion & Hygiene
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Develops in the student a sense that the way we look tells others a lot about how we feel. Teaches the importance of general appearance, hair styling, make up application, color coordination and proper grooming.
CFL 012 Abuse Awareness and Prevention
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Develops an awareness of the many forms of abuse and when it is likely to occur. Recognition, prevention and reporting are stressed.
CFL 018 Budgeting and Banking
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Introduces income sources and effective consumerism. Emphasizes appropriate decision making strategies, account payments and simple checking and banking procedures.
CFL 019 Reading II
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Continues CFL 009. Includes practical exercises in coping skills to identify key words in directions, job-related situations, and social interactions. Emphasizes vocabulary enrichment and comprehension strategies. Reading level: 2-5
Commercial Credit Management
CRM 105 Commercial Credit and Collections I
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Examines credit and collection principles and practice. Provides a review of the interrelationships of the major classifications of credit and discusses each as it affects the consumer, the businessman, and the national economy.
CRM 106 Commercial Credit and Collections II
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Emphasizes commercial and consumer credit management. Emphasizes general principles and procedures, covers some basic specific operations. Emphasizes credit management as an integral part of business administration.
CRM 107 Credit Management Case Problems
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Surveys general management principles and practices applicable to the activities of a credit manager. Covers the importance of management of funds as it relates to individual businesses and the dollar volume of business credit. Recognizes and reviews the complexities of situations involved in credit management. Uses practical applications.
CRM 206 Credit Law
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Covers the legal environment in which credit managers operate. Reviews various safeguards which the law affords and focuses on the discharge of responsibilities which the law imposes. Reviews legal principles which may apply in a given situation.
Communications
COM 250 The Elements of Argument
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 121 or Permission of Instructor Presents practical reasoning concepts which are applicable to both formal studies and ordinary life. Presents a scheme of practical analysis applied to a variety of interdisciplinary materials adaptable to the paralegal and communication fields.
COM 251 Introduction to Broadcasting
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces the electronic media with an emphasis upon applied theory in the media's written, spoken, and technical aspects.
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COM 255 Survey of Film
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Explores a variety of films in order to develop visual literacy and provides a comprehensive view of the possibilities of this newer art form.
COM 256 Media Survey
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Investigates the history, regulation, and impact of print, movies, radio, and television. Develops skills of evaluative thinking relative to these media.
COM 261 Organizational Communication
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: COM 121 or permission of instructor Introduces communication within larger formalized groups with emphasis upon formal and informal patterns and effective methods for communication.
Computer Aided Drafting
(CAD)
CAD 110 Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting (CAD)
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 105 or Equivalent
Introduces computer aided drafting for drafting majors and non-majors. Includes an overview of equipment, CAD applications in various engineering, drafting and architectural environments. Concepts included: the CAD menu; two dimensional drawing commands; drawing set up procedures, editing and viewing commands; basic plotting techniques; basic blocks and symbols; basic dimensioning; and basic text commands.
CAD 111 Computer Aided Drafting
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CAD 110
Introduces basic 3D concepts; intermediate usage of blocks, symbols and shapes; attributes and data extractions; menu customization techniques. Introduction to Auto Lisp; intermediate plotting techniques; assembling multiple drawings and use of Macros and Script files.
CAD 210 Computer Aided Drafting Applications
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CAD 111
Designed for the experienced CAD user. Emphasizes the advanced customizing features of CAD including Macros, Auto Lisp and interfacing with other CAD products or third party software packages. Tailored to each student's drawing discipline.
CAD 211 Advanced Computer Aided Drafting Applications
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CAD 210
Covers an indepth demonstration of the capabilities of AutoCad AEC. Includes covering and using every aspect of the AutoCad AEC master template and the mechanical template to create a complete set of architectural drawings.
Computer Information Systems
CIS 075 Microcomputer Lab
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours May be repeated for credit
Provides access to the microcomputer labs for personal use or for instructional assistance necessary to complete assignments in many program/course prefix areas.
CIS 110 Microcomputer Operating Systems
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours May be repeated for credit Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces concepts, terminology and skills in the use of an operating system. Emphasis on understanding and using the operating system in a practical way in order to compliment the student's use of a microcomputer. May be designated as PC-DOS, MS-DOS, MACINTOSH operating systems.
CIS 115 Introduction to Computers
1 -3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Assessment Scores: ENG 3, MAT 2, REA 3, SS 3
Corequisite: CIS 075
An overview of the needs for and roles of computer information systems (CIS). Emphasis on computer requirements in organizations, history, hardware functions, programming, system development and computer operations. Introduces computer applications and programming.
CIS 117 Computer Access Methods for the Physically Handicapped
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Corequisite: CIS 075
Teaches the physically handicapped or any interested persons special computer access methods for the handicapped. Uses word processing software to teach these concepts.
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CIS 118 Microcomputer Applications
2 Credit Hours/30-40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: consent of instructor Corequisite: CIS 075
Reviews standard software packages available to support a microcomputer-based work station. Included are descriptions of and hands-on work with word processors, spreadsheets, file and database management systems, and other common application packages.
CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processing
1 -3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours May be repeated for credit
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor; Assessment Scores: REA 3, SS 2 Corequisite: CIS 075
Uses state-of-the-art software to study the features of word processors. Includes creating, editing, formatting and printing documents. May be designated as several word processors such as WordPerfect, WordStar, MultiMate, and Microsoft Word.
CIS 121 Intermediate Word Processing
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours May be repeated for credit Prerequisite: CIS 120 or consent of instructor Corequisite: CIS 075
Continues to build on word processing skills learned in the beginning class. Students practice through hands-on exercises, such as hyphenation and columns. May be designated as Intermediate WordPerfect, Intermediate WordStar, Intermediate MultiMate, and Intermediate Microsoft Word.
CIS 122 Advanced Word Processing
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours May be repeated for credit Prerequisite: CIS 121 or consent of instructor Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces advanced word processing techniques, including "macros," graphics features, font changing, and transferring files between word processors. May be designated as Advanced WordPerfect, Advanced WordStar, Advanced MultiMate, and Advanced Microsoft Word.
CIS 135 Integrated Software
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours May be repeated for credit Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Corequisite: CIS 075
Covers the basic mechanics of using an integrated word processor, spreadsheet, graphics, telecommunications and database features of the software in a modular format. Emphasizes moving information among the various sub-programs of the package to create composite documents. May be designated as state-of-the-art integrated packages such as Symphony, Enable, and Framework.
CIS 136 Desktop Publishing
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours May be repeated for credit Prerequisite: consent of instructor Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces concepts and techniques of Desktop Publishing. Covers text input, framing, filing, text editing, drawing and style modification. May be designated as state-of-the-art desktop publishers such as Ventura or PageMaker.
CIS 137 Presentation Graphics
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 115 Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces computer graphics and desktop publishing, emphasizing Harvard Graphics, Ventura Publisher and PageMaker. Topics include elements of design, topography, creating a grid, types of charts, drawing, templates, macros, plotting and exporting files.
CIS 140 Microcomputer Database
1-3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours
May be repeated for credit
Prerequisite: CIS 115 or permission of instructor
Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces the functions of microcomputer databases, including file creation, searches, sorts, and editing. Includes designing printed reports, quick code, utilities, screen generators, and file matching. Introduces programming, problem solving and interfacing with other software packages. May be designated as state-of-the-art databases such as DBase III Plus, R-Base, Paradox, and Reflex.
CIS 141 Intermediate Database
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
May be repeated for credit
Prerequisite: CIS 140, or consent of instructor;
Assessment scores: MAT 4, ENG 4, SS 4, REA 4
Corequisite: CIS 075
Continues to build on database skills learned in the beginning class. Students practice through hands-on exercises, skills such as report generation and index use. May be designated as Intermediate DBase III Plus, Intermediate R-Base, Intermediate Paradox, and Intermediate Reflex.
CIS 142 Advanced Database
1 Credit Hours/20 Contact Hours May be repeated for credit Prerequisite: CIS 141 or consent of instructor Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces database programming, problem solving, and interfacing with other software packages. May be designated as Advanced DBase III Plus, Advanced R-Base, Advanced Paradox and Advanced Reflex software.
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CIS 150 Electronic Spreadsheet
1 -3 Credit Hours/20-60 Contact Hours May be repeated for credit Prerequisite: CIS 115, or consent of instructor; Assessment Scores: ENG 3, MAT 3, SS 4, REA 4 Corequisite: CIS 075
Gives the student a working knowledge of an electronic spreadsheet. Covers fundamental spreadsheet concepts and design, formatting, calculations and functions, graphic concepts and implementation, database capabilities, and macro commands. May be designated as any of the state-of-the-art spreadsheets such as LOTUS 1-2-3 and Quattro.
CIS 151 Intermediate Electronic Spreadsheet
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
May be repeated for credit
Prerequisite: CIS 150, or consent of instructor
Corequisite: CIS 075
Continues to build on spreadsheet skills developed in the beginning class. Students practice through hands-on exercises, such skills as Macros and database facilities. May be designated as Intermediate LOTUS 1-2-3 and Intermediate Quattro.
CIS 152 Advanced Electronic Spreadsheet
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours
May be repeated for credit
Prerequisite: CIS 151, or consent of instructor
Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces menu-driven Macros, graphics, fonts and interfacing with other software packages. May be designated as Advanced LOTUS 1-2-3 and Advanced Quattro.
CIS 160 Basic Language Programming
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 115, or consent of instructor Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces the BASIC programming language. Includes topics such as program design, input/output, loop control, string manipulation, and array and matrix processing.
CIS 165 RPG Language Programming
1 Credit Hour/20 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 11 5 Corequisite: 075
Introduces programming with the Report Program Generator language. Covers topics such as form specifications, arithmetic calculations, comparisons, single and multiple control breaks, headings, fetch overflow, arrays and tables, matching records, and file updating.
CIS 175 UNIX
3 Credit hours/45 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: CIS 115 and one programming language
course
Corequisite: CIS 075
Covers the structure and fundamentals of the operating system. Includes the files system and file processing, various utility programs and shell, multi-user operations, memory management, text processing, and communications.
CIS 176 MS-DOS With Basic
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 11 5 Corequisite: CIS 075
Covers the coding and execution of BASIC programs, including I/O operations, batch and interactive processing, string and arithmetic operations, and file handling. Includes MS-DOS system operations, BAT files, EDL1N, system utilities, and the establishment and use of directories.
CIS 177 System Utilities
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: 9 credits in CIS Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces numerous software utilities, including Norton Utilities, Clipper, MSAM (debug), Fastback, CopyllPC, Sideways, PC-Tools, Closeup, and virus protection software.
CIS 178 Apple Systems
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 115 Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces the Apple computer hardware and software with emphasis on the Macintosh. Explains graphical user interface emphasizing windows, mice, icons, and menus. Includes memory management, HyperCard, Macintosh configurations, Macpaint, Appletalk, MSword, MSworks, Pagemaker, and sharing peripheral devices using Appleshare.
CIS 179 Software/Systems Survey
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: 9 CIS credits, or consent of instructor
Corequisite: CIS 075
Compares numerous software packages, using hands-on analysis. Introduces the principles of the PICK and UNIX operating systems. Introduces expert systems.
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CIS 185 Computer Seminar (Certificate Capstone Course)
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and must be graduating semester Corequisite: CIS 075
Reviews concepts and principles of programming efficiency. These concepts include system documentation, software preparation, data representation, system preparation and other related topics. This is a capstone course for those students completing a certificate in Computer Information Systems.
CIS 215 Computer Networks
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: 6 CIS credits Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces local area networks, including security, access methods, modulation, protocols, media, topology, and bridges and routers. Involves hands-on configuration and manipulation of a NOVELLE network and the study of other major network systems.
CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 115 Corequisite: CIS 075
Covers the maintenance and installation of microcomputers and peripheral devices including printers, expanded memory, modems, video display terminals, and secondary storage devices. Introduces electronics and microcomputer architecture.
CIS 260 COBOL Language Programming
3-4 Credit Hour/45-60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 115, or consent of instructor Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces the student to the elements of the COBOL programming language. Students will design, code, execute, debug and document solutions to a variety of business-oriented problems.
CIS 261 Advanced COBOL Language Programming
3-4 Credit Hours/45-60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 260 Corequisite: CIS 075
Continues the study of the COBOL programming language. Emphasis is on the more sophisticated capabilities of COBOL, including the SORT verb, and advanced table and file concepts.
CIS 265 IBM Assembly Language Programming
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: MAT 121 and one programming language,
or consent of instructor
Corequisite: CIS 075
Covers the IBM system 370 assembly language in a mainframe environment. Topics include system organization, data representation, control structures, program analysis, and debugging techniques.
CIS 266 On-Line Program Development on the IBM Mainframe
3-4 Credit Hours/45-60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 115
Corequisite: CIS 075, and a mainframe programming language
Introduces the techniques and software packages use to develop computer programs on the IBM mainframe computer. Emphasizes the use of ISPF, TSO, TSO CLIST procedures, and program management facilities.
CIS 275 Telecommunications
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: CIS 115 Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces concepts of telecommunications. Includes hardware devices, transmission characteristics, network configurations, codes and modes of transmission, software, and protocols.
CIS 276 Systems Analysis and Design
3-4 Credit Hours/45-60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: CIS 115 and one programming language Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces materials, techniques, procedures and human interrelations involved in developing a computerized business system. Includes systems approach, fact gathering techniques, forms design, input/output, file design, file organization, various charting techniques, system audits and controls, project management, implementation and evaluation.
CIS 277 Operating Systems and OS JCL
3-4 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Prerequisites: CIS 115 and one programming language
Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces the IBM OS/VS operating system and Job Control Language. Includes sequential, partitioned and indexed data sets, instream and cataloged data sets, utility routines, and the function and use of virtual storage.
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CIS 278 Introduction to Command-Level
CICS/VS
3-4 Credit Hours/45-60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 115 and one programming language Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces the concepts of on-line systems and programs, use of the CICS/VS software product, and the creation of CICS maps using the Basic Mapping Support facility. Students develop and test procedural language programs which use CICS maps and command-level CICS facilities.
CIS 279 Systems Configuration
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: 9 CIS credits Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces materials, techniques and procedures used to design and implement a hardware/software microcomputer system.
CIS 285 Computer Seminar (AAS Capstone Course)
1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and must be graduating semester Corequisite: CIS 075
Acquaints the student with the concepts and principles of programming efficiency. Includes system documentation, software preparation, data representation, system presentation, and other related topics. A capstone course for students completing an associate degree in Computer Information Systems.
Computer Science
CSC 200 PASCAL Language Programming
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 115 Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces structured program design concepts and the use of the Pascal language to solve problems dealing with a variety of applications. Stresses data representation and data manipulation control structures.
CSC 230 C Language Programming
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: MAT 121 and any programming language
Corequisite: CIS 075
Introduces the C programming language, a mid-level language whose economy of expression and data manipulation features allow a programmer to deal with the computer at a "low-level."
Drafting for Industry
DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting
5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Introduces drafting for drafting majors and nonmajors. Includes: lettering, line work, reproduction methods and geometric constructions; orthographic projection and sketching; isometric sketching; orthographic and sectioning drafting practices; introduction to inking.
DRI 106 Dimensioning and Tolerancing
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 105
Introduces the principles of basic dimensioning and tolerancing practices. Uses cumulative, aligned fractional and unidirectional, coordinate and decimal dimensional system.
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 106
Introduces the principles of geometric tolerancing practices. Includes: terms and datums; straightness, flatness, roundness, cylindricity, parallelism, perpendicularity, angularity, concentricity and roundouts; tolerance.
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 107
Introduces the principles of pictorial drawing practices. Includes: isometric drawing; oblique drawing; perspective drawing; charts and graphs.
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry and Auxiliary Views
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 109
Introduces line problems true length, point view, bearing, slope and azimuth; plane problems edge view, dihedral angles, true size and shape of any plane, true angle between two planes, true length of a line by principal line method; shortest distance between parallel and non parallel lines and lines and planes; and intersecting lines and planes.
DRI 113 Intersections and Developments
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 111
Introduces the principle of flat and curved surface intersection and their resulting developments in terms of thin materials and heavy plate applications. Right and oblique prisms, cylindrical and conical surface transitions and their resulting intersections and developments will be completed.


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DRI116 Mechanical Detail Drafting
5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 113
Introduces the drawing of threads, fasteners, springs, also covers welding drawings along with gear and cam drawings.
DRI 200 Introduction to Civil/
Topographic Drafting
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 116
Introduces various techniques of civil/topographic mapping utilizing a specified plat. Content includes working from field notes, bearing and distance, traverses, coordinates, plat maps, plot or site plans, contours, and various civil and topographic conventions.
DRI 203 Introduction to Architectural Drafting
3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 200
Introduces the field of architectural drafting by requiring the student to draw a small single-family residence. Floor plans, foundation plans, evaluations and all necessary detail plans along with a roofing plan will be required of the student.
DRI 205 Introduction to Process Piping Drafting
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 116
Introduces the equipment, terms and drafting symbols; flanges, fittings and various valves. Flow diagrams and symbols, piping and general specifications along with piping details will be covered.
DRI 207 Introduction to Structural Drafting
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 205
Introduces a general overview of structural drafting to include drawing, checking, correcting and the revising process. Product fabrication and shipping and structural connections are also covered.
DRI 209 Introduction to Electrical Drafting
2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 207
Introduces electrical drafting and provides a general overview of the different types of electrical drawings and basic calculations required for electrical drafting.
DRI 220 Advanced Mechanical Drafting I
8 Credit Hours/160 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 209
Introduces the drawing of mechanical and operating mechanical assemblies and subassemblies and may include cast, welded or machined materials and purchased parts. Includes preparation of appropriate assembly drawings and necessary detail drawings utilizing required parts call outs and material list and appropriate dimensioning for the subject matter.
DRI 225 Advanced Mechanical Drafting II
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 220
Introduces the development of large mechanical assemblies, their subassemblies and detailed drawings pertinent to their manufacturing and installation.
DRI 230 Civil/Topographic Drafting I
8 Credit Hours/160 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 209
Introduces methods and theories used in civil drafting; the use of map scales and measurements; standard civil drafting symbols and abbreviations; interpretation of surveyor's notations; legal land descriptions; map drafting procedures; and plats and subdivisions.
DRI 235 Civil/Topographic Drafting II
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 230
Introduces topographical mapping, transportation mapping, municipal mapping and structural drafting as it is applied to the civil drafting area.
DRI 240 Structural Drafting I
8 Credit Hours/160 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 209
Introduces structural steel drafting including steel framing plans, steel sections, steel connection details, fabrication details and bills of materials. This course also covers the area of pre-cast concrete drafting, pre-cast concrete framing plans, concrete sections, concrete fabrication details and pre-cast concrete bill of materials.
DRI 245 Structural Drafting II
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 240
Continues Structural Drafting I and covers structural poured-in-place concrete foundations, walls and columns, concrete floors systems and stairs and ramps. Also covers structural wood drafting with structural wood flooring systems, structural wood walls, structural wood roofs and structural wood posts, beams, girders and arches.
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DRI 250 Process Piping Drafting I
8 Credit Hours/160 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 209
Introduces piping drawings, controls stations, orifice flanges, meters, runs, pipe racks, instrument details and specifications. Isometric definitions, dimensioning, spools and call outs are also covered.
DRI 255 Process Piping Drafting II
4 Credit Hours/80 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 250
Reviews equipment foundations, piping specifications and general specifications, standard piping details and general piping details. Students draw major project-plan, elevation, sections and isometric pipe runs of depropanizer area.
DRI 260 Electrical Drafting
6 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 209
Introduces electrical drawing, basic calculations, one line diagrams, schematic wiring diagrams, wiring and connection diagrams, lighting, power and grounding.
Early Childhood Education and Management
ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisite: ECE 102
Introduces the field of early childhood education including various philosophies, goals, and purposes for early childhood education programs for children ages birth through eight. Examines basic child growth and development, services available to parents, quality programs, curriculum, facilities, professional opportunities, and teacher competencies.
ECE 102 Introduction to ECE Lab Experience
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Develops skills for observing and recording children's behavior. Examines and practices appropriate methods for guiding and interacting with young children.
ECE 110 Child Growth and Development
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Identifies the growth and development of the child from the prenatal stage through age eight. Explores patterns and mechanisms of developmental change. Investigates and applies theories of child development and current research. Emphasizes the integration and relationship of physical, perceptual, language cognitive and social-emotional development at all stages of growth.
ECE 111 Care and Nurturing of Infants and Toddlers
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisite: ECE 112
Explores the developmental milestones and issues of infants and toddlers in the areas of social, emotional, intellectual, and physical developmental patterns and the interactions in group settings. Analyzes state requirements for licensed infant-toddler homes and centers.
ECE 116 Science/Math Education for the Young Child
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Examines Piaget's theory of cognitive development as a framework for conceptualizing the manner in which young children acquire scientific and mathematical skills, concepts and abilities. Includes researching and developing appropriate individual and group scien-tific/mathematical activities for young children.
ECE 117 Methods/Techniques:
Teaching Young Child
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Exposes students to historical, theoretical and ethical issues related to program development and implementation for children, ages birth through eight, and their families. Examines the philosophical and educational principles of models such as Montessori, open education, "Back to Basics," High scope and other integrated approaches.
ECE 151 Supervised Student Teaching and Seminar (Capstone Course)
5 Credit Hours/150 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ECE 102, ECE 11 7 Develops understanding of children's growth and behavior and the ability to meet their individual and group needs. Focuses on the teaching styles and ways of relating to children and adults. Requires a weekly seminar.
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ECE 195 Music for Young Children
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Teaches early childhood educators techniques for facilitating music and movement with young children.
ECE 205 Nutrition for Young Children
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Provides parents and teachers with basic nutrition information and its implications for the growth and development of young children. Students participate in planning meals and snacks appropriate to the needs of the young child. Includes activities for planning nutrition curricula for young children.
ECE 215 Administration of ECE Programs
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Examines and interprets Colorado's minimal requirements pertaining to the establishment and operation of centers for young children. Focuses upon site selection, policy formation, administrative forms, staffing needs and patterns, fiscal management, the selection of appropriate indoor and outdoor equipment, program development and evaluation, leadership, and administrative styles and techniques.
ECE 216 Administration II
2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours
Focuses upon the human relations component of an administrator's responsibilities. Addresses active listening, communication skills, director-staff relationships, parent involvement, staff development, leadership styles, and community involvement.
ECE 222 Classroom Management Techniques
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores various techniques and theories for understanding and guiding children both individually and in groups. Analyzes various contemporary approaches to management and guidance.
ECE 225 Curriculum Development: Language and Cognition
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Explores the relationship between language and cognitive development. Prospective early childhood teachers will have the opportunity to explore and utilize concepts, methods and resources relevant to the teaching of language arts. Speaking and listening are presented as background for reading and writing.
ECE 228 Multicultural Curriculum
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Presents an analysis of multicultural issues which impacts the ECE workforce. Emphasis in planning curriculum for the linguistically and culturally diverse student with emphasis on alternatives in approach and methodology.
ECE 251 Supervised Student Teaching and Seminar II (Capstone Course)
5 Credit Hours/150 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: Completes the Early Childhood Education
Degree sequence
Includes organizing, management and implementation of instruction, resources, administration. Requires a weekly seminar.
Economics
ECO 105 Introduction to Economics
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Traces the development of commercial economies from the pre-industrial world into the capital based economics of the modern world. Explores the spectrum of economic systems and philosophies.
ECO 106 Consumer Economics
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Develops consumer effectiveness based on: consumer choice theory; maximizing income through informed decision making; product utility and consumer satisfaction.
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Prerequisites: Basic Skills Assessment Scores 4 Math/
4 English or Permission of Instructor.
Overviews the American economy stressing the interrelationship among the consumer, business and government sectors. Includes saving and investment decisions, unemployment, inflation, GNP analysis, taxing and spending policies, the Federal Reserve System, money and banking and their relationship to the economy. Briefly covers International economics.
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours
Prerequisites: Basic Skills Assessment Scores 4 Math/4
English or Permission of Instructor.
Analyzes the firm as it relates to the economy as a whole and economic issues. Students construct and study several economic models related to the firm: perfect competition; monopoly; oligopoly; and, monopolistic competition.
ECO 205 Contemporary Economic Issues
3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ECO 201,202 Examines major national and international economic problems of the current era. Includes population explosion, rising expectations in the Third World, evolution of post WWII political blocks.
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