Citation
Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1997-1998

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Title:
Catalog, Community College of Denver, 1997-1998
Creator:
Community College of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
Community College of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Record Information

Source Institution:
Community College of Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
9842420 ( OCLC )

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library
Community College of Denver Collections

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Published by
Community College of Denver Office of Institutional Advancement
Pat Jensen
Director of Development and Communications Richard Jividen
Director of Marketing and Publications
Clare Lewis
Catalog Coordinator
Gretchen Occhionero
Designer
Mary Kelly O'Donnell
Vice President
Web Site
http://www.ccd.cccoes.edu/
July 1997
This publication is available in alternative formats. Call (303) 556-3300


com
ollege of denver
Dr. Byron McClenney, President
CCD AURARIA CAMPUS
1111 West Colfax Avenue P.O.Box 173363 Denver, CO 80217-3363 Information (303) 556-2600 Voice/TDD (303) 556-3622 FAX (303) 556-8555
TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTERS TEC North
6221 Downing Street
Phone (303) 289-2243 / Fax (303) 289-1044
TEC East
3532 Franklin Street
Phone (303) 293-8737 / Fax (303) 292-4315
TEC West
2420 West 26th Avenue Suite 100D Phone (303) 477-5864 / Fax (303) 477-5894
CCD DENTAL HYGIENE CENTER Lowry Higher Education Center
960 Xanthia Street, Building #753 Phone (303) 556-2472/ Fax (303) 556-4583
DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION Parkway Center
1391 North Speer Boulevard Suite 200
Denver, CO 80204-2552
Phone (303) 620-4433 / Fax (303) 620-4942
CCD ADVISORY COUNCIL
Bruce Rockwell, Chair James FI. Daniels Tony Hernandez John Lay Jeanne M.Orrben Adele Phelan
COLORADO STATE BOARD FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION
Dr. Jerome Wartgow, System President
Julianne F. Haefeli, Chair, Greeley Ralph G.Torres, Vice Chair, Denver Rolf F. Anderson, Pueblo Susan Ayres Davies, Durango Glenda C. Barry, Northglenn John M. Frew, Denver William H. Hornby, Denver James D. Lucas, Colorado Springs Kristy A. Schloss, Arapahoe County


CCD Auraria Campus Map..................................v
Technical Education Centers Locations ..............ii,vi
1996-97 Academic Calendar.............................vii
Telephone Directory ...................................iv
Guide to Degree and Certificate Programs.............viii
College Guarantees ....................................xi
Guarantee of Transfer Credit Guarantee of Job Competency
CCD Accountability ....................................xi
General Information ....................................1
Getting Started.........................................4
Advising Admission Policy
Money Matters ..........................................8
Tuition, Fees,
Financial Aid and Refunds
Need More Help?........................................12
Student Services
Academic Support Center ...............................15
Special Programs.......................................16
Auraria Campus Facilities .............................18
Grievance Procedure ...................................25
Graduation Requirements................................27
Continuing Education Programs..........................29
Weekend College Guided Independent Study Reading Guide to
Degree and Certificate Programs.....................30
Associate Degree Programs.................................32
Associate of Arts Programs..........................32
Associate of Science Programs ......................35
Associate of General Studies Programs ..............39
Associate of Applied Science Programs...............46
Certificate Programs......................................71
Technical Education Centers (TEC) Programs................89
Course Descriptions......................................102
College Staff............................................147
Faculty .................................................151
Index................................................155-158


Admissions, Registration and Records.............556-2430
Arts and Humanities..............................556-2473
Arabic; Art; American Sign Language; Communication; Chinese; English; French; Graphic Arts; Graphic Design; History; Humanities; Journalism; Japanese; Literature; Multimedia; Music; Paralegal; Philosophy; Photography;
Spanish; Speech; Theatre
Auraria Interfaith Center .......................556-8591
Book Center, Auraria ............................556-3230
Business and Governmental Studies................556-2487
Accounting; Business Administration;
Business Technology: Office Management & Secretarial Studies; Computer Information Systems; Construction Trades; Economics; Political Science
Business and Industry Services ...............620-4427
Cashier ......................................556-2075
Campus Closure................................556-2401
Campus Operator ..............................556-2400
Campus Recreation.............................556-3210
Career Development Services Center............556-3609
Center for Persons with Disabilities .........556-3300
Child Development Center .....................556-2439
Computer Labs.................................556-3628
Computer Training for
People with Disabilities ................556-3300
Continuing Education .........................620-4433
Extended-Campus Credit Classes; Guided Independent Study: Home Study,Television Courses, On-line Courses;
Weekend College
Cooperative Education .......................556-3607
Dental Hygiene, Lowry Campus ................364-4821
Education and Academic Services..............556-8455
Academic Support Center; Early Childhood Education; Education; English as a Second Language;
General Education Development; Pre-collegiate English; Pre-collegiate Mathematics; Reading;
Special Learning Support Program;
Test Center; Supplemental Services;
Student Support Services
Educational Opportunity Center ....................629-9226
Educational Planning and Advising..................556-2481
Financial Aid .....................................556-2420
Health and Human Services......................556-2472
Anthropology; Dental Hygiene; Gerontology; Health and Wellness Management; Human Services; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Mammography; Nuclear Medicine Technology; Nursing; Nutrition; Perioperative Nursing; Psychiatric Technician; Psychology; Radiologic Technology; Recreational Assistant; Sociology; Surgical
Technology
Information .....................................556-2600
International Student Services ..................556-2600
Learning Development Center......................556-2497
Library, Auraria ................................556-2741
Office of Institutional Advancement .............556-3380
Parking and Transportation, Auraria..............556-2000
President of CCD ................................556-2411
Public Safety ...................................556-3271
Emergency .......................................911
Recruitment and Outreach.........................556-2600
Refugee Student Services.........................556-2600
Science and Technology...........................556-2460
Biology; Chemistry Computer-Aided Drafting; Computer Science; Drafting for Industry; Electronics; Geography; Geology; Mathematics; Physics; Environmental and Refrigeration Technology
Student Activities ...............................556-2597
Student Assistance Center
and Women's Services ........................556-2343
Teaching/Learning Center .........................556-3598
Technical Education Centers
East ........................................293-8737
North .......................................289-2243
West.........................................477-5864
Testing Center ...................................556-3810
Veteran's Office..................................556-2452
Vice President for Instruction....................556-2414
Vice President for Student Services...............556-2413
Vice President for Technical Education Centers___289-2243


ccd on the
I I u I 1 I || | I || auraria campus
RTD Light Rail Station on Auraria Campus
West Colfax Avenue, between Lipan and Mariposa Streets
RTD Routes to the Auraria Campus
Via Auraria Parkway: #0, #15 Via Colfax: #1,#9, #16, #29L, #30, #31, #36L Via 7th Street: #10
4 Hours of Free Parking
in Lot G for prospective students who are being assessed and/or registering. Bring your ticket to South Classroom Building room 134 for validation.
Your student fee-paid RegionalTransportation District (RTD) bus pass entitles you to ride buses and Light Rail free in the Denver area. For an additional fee, your bus pass also gives you regional service.
v


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technical education centers & dental hygiene program
TEC EAST
1-70
A N PHILLIPS CENTER L | COLORADO
3 35TH ST. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd Iblvd
\ E. COLFAX (US-40) | FRANKLIN ST. YORK ST.
\ I4TH AVE.
X
TEC EAST PHILLIPS CENTER 3532 FRANKLIN
TEC WEST
LOWRY HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER
i-L
A
N
3 0 t
3 O
1ITH AVE.
LOWRY CAMPUS
6TH AVE. O
CCD DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM
Lowry Higher Education Center
960 Xanthia. Bldg. 753 Denver. CO 80220
A
N
Denn 1 Parking
Clinic
TEC East
3532 Franklin, Denver, CO 80205 293-8737
TEC North
6221 Downing, Denver, CO 80216 289-2243
TEC West
Diamond Hill Complex
2420 W. 26th Ave., # 100D, Denver, CO 80211
477-5864
CCD Dental Hygiene Program
Lowry Higher Education Center
960 Xanthia, Bldg 753 Denver, CO 80220 364-4821


mic calendar
Fall 1997
Registration July 1-Aug. 29
Classes begin Aug. 25
Labor Day Holiday Sept. 1
CCD Project Success Day Campus Closed .Oct. 8
CCD Advising Day Nov. 18
Thanksgiving Day Holiday Nov. 27
Friday after Thanksgiving Campus Closed Nov. 28
Classes End Campus Open, No Classes Dec. 13
MSCD/UCD Final Exams Start . Dec. 15
MSCD/UCD Final Exams End .. Dec. 20
Spring 1998
Registration Nov. 18,-Jan. 26
Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday . Jan. 19
Classes Begin Campus Open, No Classes Jan. 20
CCD Project Success Day March 4
Spring Break March 16-21
CCD Advising Day April 21
Classes End May 13
MSCD/UCD Final Exams Start . May 11
MSCD/UCD Final Exams End .. May 16
Summer 1998
Registration April 21-June 6
Memorial Day Holiday May 25
Classes Begin Campus Closed June 1
Independence Day Holiday ... July 4
Classes End Campus Closed Aug. 8


guide
i certifi
Degree Programs AURARIA CAMPUS
Associate of Arts (AA)
University Parallel,Transfer Program Art
Behavioral Sciences Gerontology Psychology Sociology Communications Economics English/Literature History
Humanities/Philosophy
Music
Photography Political Science Speech Theatre
Associate of Science (AS)
University Parallel,Transfer Program Biology Chemistry Computer Science Earth Science Engineering Cluster
Pre-Engineering General Pre-Applied Mathematics Major Pre-Computer Science Major Pre-Electrical Engineering Major Pre-Civil Engineering Major Pre-Mechanical Engineering Major Mathematics Medical Cluster Pre-Dental Pre-Medical
Pre-Medical Technology Pre-Pharmacy Pre-Physical Therapy Pre-Physician Assistant Pre-Veterinary Science Physics
Associate of General Studies (AGS)
University Parallel,Transfer Program Option Generalist Business Graphic Design Human Services Paralegal
Photography
Teacher Education: Early Childhood Education Teacher Education: Early Childhood Education/ Violence Counseling
Teacher Education: Elementary Education
Associate of Applied Science (AAS)
Accounting
General Accounting Commercial Credit Management *Airframe/Power Plant Business Administration Commercial Credit Customer Service Finance
International Business
Management
Marketing
Business of Travel and Tourism Customer Information Services Insurance
Postal Service Management Real Estate
Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies
Administrative Assistant Legal Secretarial Medical Secretarial Secretarial Word Processing Computer Information Systems Computer Specialist Applications Programmer PC Specialist/LAN Administrator Dental Hygiene Drafting for Industry Civil/Topographic Electrical Mechanical Process Piping Structural
Early Childhood Education Electronics Technology Environmental and Refrigeration Technology Commercial/lndustrial Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning Graphic Arts (Printing)
Graphic Design
Health and Wellness Management Human Services
* In conjunction with Emily Griffith Opportunity School and/or the Joint Apprenticeship Training Committees
y i i I


Multimedia Design Computer Graphics Graphic Arts Graphic Design Music
Photography
Video Production/Communications Nursing Nursing
Nursing: Advanced Placement Paralegal Photography Radiography Recreational Assistant Trades
Construction
Certificate Programs AURARIA CAMPUS
Accounting
Accounting
Accounting with Computer Applications Business Administration
Commercial Credit Management I
Commercial Credit Management II
Customer Information Services Agent
Entrepreneurship I
Entrepreneurship II
International Business
Marketing
Professional Selling
Small Business
Supermarket Management
Travel and Tourism
Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies General Clerical I General Clerical II Medical Secretarial Stenographic Word Processing I Word Processing II Computer Information Systems Applications Programmer PC Specialist/LAN Administrator Computer Specialist Computers and Multimedia Windows NT Network Administration Novell 4x Network Administration Novell 3x Network Administration Drafting
Computer-Aided Drafting-CAD Drafting for Industry Early Childhood Education
Early Childhood Education Director Early Childhood Education Group Leader
Electronics Technology
Principles of Electronics Advanced Solid State, Digital & 1C Principles Broadcast Technologist Environmental & Refrigeration Technology Apartment Manager Major Appliance Repair Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Gerontology Graphic Arts Printing Prepress Graphic Design
Computer Graphics Graphic Design Service Bureau Human Services
Case Management/Residential Service Aide Paralegal General Nursing
Practical Nursing Perioperative Nursing Photography Psychiatric Technician
Psychiatric Technician
Psychiatric Technician: Advanced Placement Radiologic Health Sciences
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technology Mammography Nuclear Medicine Technology Recreational Assistant Surgical Technology
Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree Programs TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTERS
TEC North
Accounting
Computerized Accounting Specialist Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies Office Specialist Computer Information Systems PC Applications Specialist PC Network Specialist Trades
CNC Machine Tool Operator Fabrication Welder
* In conjunction with Emily Griffith Opportunity School and/or the Joint Apprenticeship Training Committees


TEC East
Accounting
Computerized Accounting Specialist Business Administration Travel Service Agent
Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies Office Specialist Medical Records Clerk Medical Secretary Medical Transcriptionist Medical Unit Coordinator Comprehensive Medical Assistant Clinical Medical Assistant Radiology/Orthopedic Assistant Computer Information Systems PC Applications Specialist
TEC West
Accounting
Computerized Accounting Specialist Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies Office Specialist Computer Information Systems PC Applications Specialist
Certificate Programs TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTERS
TEC North
Accounting
Computerized Accounting Specialist Bookkeeper Payroll Clerk Business Administration
Customer Service Specialist Customer Service Representative Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies Office Specialist Word Processor Receptionist/Office Clerk Microsoft Office Pro Data Entry Clerk Computer Information Systems PC Applications Specialist PC Network Specialist Human Services
Special Education Paraprofessional Special Education Aide Trades
CNC Machine Tool Operator Machine Tool Operator Lathe Operator
Mill Operator Fabrication Welder Arc Welder Welder
TEC East
Accounting
Computerized Accounting Specialist Bookkeeper Payroll Clerk Business Administration Travel Service Agent Customer Service Specialist Customer Service Representative Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Skills Office Specialist Word Processor Receptionist/Office Clerk Microsoft Office Pro Data Entry Clerk Allied Health-Related:
Medical Records Clerk Medical Secretary Medical Transcriptionist Medical Unit Coordinator Medical Clerk
Comprehensive Medical Assistant Clinical Medical Assistant Radiology/Orthopedic Assistant Nurse Assistant Nurse Aide
Computer Information Systems PC Applications Specialist
TEC West
Accounting
Computerized Accounting Specialist Bookkeeper Payroll Clerk Business Administration
Customer Service Specialist Customer Service Representative Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Skills
Office Specialist Word Processor Receptionist/Office Clerk Microsoft Office Pro Data Entry Clerk Computer Information Systems PC Applications Specialist Early Childhood Education
Early Childhood Educator/Group Leader


pi i in a
college guarantees
ccd accountability
Guarantee for Transfer
To graduates of the Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) degrees, Community College of Denver (CCD) guarantees that AA and AS credits, as identified in the CCD catalog, will transfer to all Colorado public colleges and universities.
To graduates of articulated Associate of General Studies (AGS) degrees, CCD guarantees that the articulated AGS degrees or credits, as identified in the CCD catalog, will transfer into the Colorado college and university professional schools as identified in the CCD catalog.
To students who complete the CCD general education core curriculum, CCD guarantees that the general education core curriculum will fulfill the lower division general education requirements for liberal arts and sciences majors at all Colorado public colleges and universities.
To students who have completed the AA, AS, articulated AGS or general education core curriculum, CCD will refund the tuition paid for any course identified in the CCD catalog as an accepted part of these curriculums that does not transfer under this guarantee.
Guarantee for Job Competency
To graduates of Certificate programs and Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degrees, CCD guarantees job skills. Within one year of graduation, if an employer finds a Certificate or AAS graduate lacking in the technical job skills identified as exit competencies for his/her program, CCD will provide up to nine tuition-free credits of retraining related to the identified skills deficiencies.
The graduate must have passed the CCD Certificate or AAS capstone course. The employer must identify the job skill deficiencies in writing. The graduate, employer and program faculty must develop a written retraining plan for the student to complete within one year.
CCD Accountability
Excellence Through Accountability
Between 1987 and 1996, CCD increased total graduates by 95 percent.
Between 1987 and 1996, people of color as a percent of total graduates increased from 20 percent to 46.5 percent.
Between 1987 and 1996, CCD increased graduates of color by 422 percent (from 83 to 350 graduates).
90.7 percent of all CCD graduates between 1991 and 1995 who applied for transfer were accepted into Colorado four-year public colleges and universities.
The average cumulative GPA of CCD transfer graduates in 1994-95 at four year schools was 2.9 on a four point scale.
94 percent of 1994-95 graduates are satisfied with their CCD educational program.
96 percent of 1996 currently enrolled students and 1994-95 graduates are satisfied with the teaching they have received.
100 percent of employers surveyed in 1996 are satisfied with the skills of CCD graduates.
Of vocational graduates who completed their educational goals at
CCD in 1994-95:
95 percent either continue their education or are employed within one year of program completion.
72 percent of those who enter the job market, enter directly into degree related employment.
11 percent are unemployed, seeking employment.
Of CCD students who transferred to public colleges or universities in 1996:
51.9 percent transferred to Metropolitan State College.
32.9 percent transferred to the University of Colorado-Denver.
15.2 percent transferred to another Colorado public or private college or university.
Of CCD AA/AS/AGS Degree graduates who transferred to Colorado public four-year colleges during academic years 1990-1993:
71.6 percent had either attained a bachelor's degree or
were still enrolled at their transfer institutions as of fall 1995.


You have taken a step in the right direction to prepare for the future your future.
Welcome to Community College of Denver (CCD)
on the downtown Auraria Campus. You have taken a step in the right direction to prepare for the future your future.
Our doors are open and our faculty, administration and staff will steer you onto the right educational track. They also will help you stay on track, whether you are taking a few refresher courses or you are working toward a certificate or associate degree. CCD provides many student support services, including tutoring, advising and career planning, and you'll get individualized attention from award-winning faculty. CCD guarantees transferability of credits from our school to four-year Colorado public colleges and universities. (See CCD Guarantees section of this catalog.) We even guarantee job competencies. We are here to help you succeed, because your success is our success.
Education at CCD is affordable: we have the lowest tuition rate on the Auraria Campus. We offer convenient payment options and financial aid is available to qualified students. You can choose from day, evening or weekend classes, classes on the Auraria Campus or at three Technical Education Centers (TEC), classes on TV or over the Internet. The choice is yours. The future is yours!
CCD is in the heart of the city and within walking distance of myriad downtown activities. At CCD you are close to Larimer Square and the 16th Street Mall; Mile High Stadium, home of the NFL Broncos; Coors Stadium, home of the Colorado Rockies baseball team; McNichols Sports Arena, home of the NHL Avalanche and NBA Nuggets; and the Colorado Convention Center and the Denver Center for the Performing Arts complex.
We know youll get a lot out of your CCD experience, and we're glad you are here!
CCD's History
The Colorado legislature created CCD in 1967. Three years later, its doors opened to students in a renovated auto showroom close to Denver's Civic Center. Enrollment increased so rapidly, the college immediately expanded into rental store fronts near the main building. In 1975, CCD moved to the 171-acre Auraria Higher Education Center campus in downtown Denver on the west bank of Cherry Creek, originally the site of the 1858 frontier town of Auraria. We even have the oldest-standing structure in Denver on our campus, Emmanuel Gallery, used today as exhibition space for student and faculty art work.
CCD is one of 12 institutions in the Colorado Community College and Occupational Education System and the third largest with 6,000-plus students enrolled in its Auraria Campus programs. CCD is the only community col-
lege in the city and county of Denver and the only truly urban community college in Colorado. It also is the only community college in the nation to share a campus with a four-year college and a university, Metropolitan State College of Denver and the University of Colorado at Denver. The three institutions share classroom buildings, a regional library, recreational facilities, student union, and other amenities. At Auraria, CCD provides all two-year programs, awards all two-year degrees and occupational certificates and implements remedial instruction, adult basic education and GED preparation.
In 1985, CCD took over the system's fast-track skills center, the Technical Education Center (TEC) at 6221 Downing in Adams County, six miles northeast of Auraria. TEC, now known as TEC North, is an open-entry/open-exit fast-track training center that meets industry employment needs. TEC East at 3532 Franklin St. in the Cole neighborhood, opened in 1993. TEC West, at 2420 W. 26th Ave. in the Diamond Hill Complex, also opened in 1993, the same year all TEC sites began offering traditional general education college courses.
With a minority student body of more than 50 percent, CCD has the most diverse student population of all higher education institutions in Colorado. It no longer has an ethnic majority and its diversity truly reflects the inner-city population. At CCD, our students can choose from more than 90 programs that will prepare them for a new career, allow them to earn a certificate or associate degree, or enable them to transfer to four-year schools.
Our Philosophy
CCD is a comprehensive, student-oriented urban college, providing open access to a diverse population.
CCD pledges open admissions and appropriate support to every individual who seeks the opportunities available at the college for life-long education and personal development.
Educated citizens make a significant and positive impact on the economy, their local communities and the nation. CCD strives for excellence in transfer educational and occupational programs, seeks to meet the needs of employers, and finds new and effective ways of extending educational opportunities throughout its service area.
1 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


CCD's Mission Statement
Community College of Denver pledges, responsibility for the following:
Transfer programs for the baccalaureate degree,
Occupational programs for job-entry skills or upgrading,
General education courses,
Remedial instruction and GED preparation,
Continuing education and community services,
Cooperative inter-institutional programs.
Cultural Pluralism at Community College of Denver
CCD believes all students are entitled to a quality education. This education must provide the student with an understanding and appreciation of our interdependence as individuals and nations.
Education must be meaningful to multi-ethnic students. In addition.it must provide the student body,faculty and staff with an understanding of cultural pluralism. To that end, CCD provides an educational environment that fosters cultural diversity, international understanding and global awareness.
CCD recognizes that the environment can exist only with an administration, faculty and staff that reflect the cultural diversity of its students. Therefore, the administration unconditionally endorses affirmative action.
Statement of Values for Teaching Excellence
CCD faculty are committed to a teaching/learning process that:
1. Enables students to become independent learners.
2. Demonstrates a commitment to student outcomes (job readiness, skill levels, mastery of subject matter).
3. Provides an opportunity for critical thinking and problem solving.
4. Provides linkages between instruction and real-world applications.
5. Demonstrates an excitement about teaching and learning.
6. Maintains high but realistic expectations.
7. Demonstrates appreciation of a diverse student population.
8. Encourages growth in students'self-esteem.
Campus Choices
We offer traditional semester courses, English as a second language, GED preparation and a number of"enroll-any-timecourses on the downtown Auraria campus. CCD's administrative offices also are located at Auraria. CCD provides fast-track job training, English as a second language, GED preparation, adult basic education and general education courses at its three TEC sites. In addition, the college offers adult basic education, GED prep., and English as a
second language at more than 10 community sites around the city. The college's Division of Continuing Education offers homestudy, television courses, on-line courses, evening and weekend courses and employee training programs at the work site or other convenient locations. All major CCD facilities are accessible to individuals with disabilities.
Campus Security
The Auraria Higher Education Center Public Safety Office has prepared a report to comply with the Student-Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990. The report describes security practices and procedures at the Auraria Higher Education Center and lists crime statistics for the most recent calendar year and the two preceding calendar years. A copy of the report can be obtained from the Vice President for Student Services in South Classroom Building, room 305.
Campus Crime Information
During the past three years, the following crimes were committed on campus at the Auraria Higher Education Center, serving the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College at Denver and Community College of Denver.
Occurrences of criminal offenses on campus:
Offense 1996 1995 1994
Murder 0 0 0
Rape 0 0 0
Robbery 1 4 1
Aggravated Assault 6 10
Burglary 23 24 17
Vehicle Theft 11 10 11
Sexual Assault* 5 4 13
Hate Crimes 0 2 ** 1
* Includes sexual assaults other than first- and second-degree sexual assaults (rape), such as Indecent exposure and third-degree sexual assaults.
** One incident, two offenses, simple assault and intimidation.
Number of Arrests for the following crimes on campus:
Arrests 1996 1995 1994
Liquor Law Violation* 10 2 0
Drug Abuse Violation 40 6 2
Weapons Possession 4 1 1
* Excludes DUI arrests
Statistics provided by the Auraria Campus Police and Security Division in compliance with the Crimes Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990.
GENERAL INFORMATION 2


Notice of Nondiscrimination
CCD does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, sex, age or handicap in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in its educational programs or activities. Inquiries concerning Title VI,TITLE IX and Section 504 may be referred to the Vice President for Student Services, Campus Box 203, Community College of Denver, P.O. Box 173363, Denver, CO 80217-3363 (556-2413) or to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1961 Stout Street, Denver, CO 80294.
Americans with Disabilities Act
Discrimination based on disability in admission to,access to and the operation of programs, services, or activities of CCD is prohibited by the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Questions, complaints, and requests for additional information may be directed to the ADA Coordinator, John Hutchins, Campus Box 900, P.O. Box 173363, Denver,CO 80217-3363,(303) 556-6319.
E-mail: CDJOHNH@CCCS.CCOES.EDU
Approval
The operation of CCD is approved by the state of Colorado. All programs are approved by the Colorado State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education. In addition, the Colorado Commission on Higher Education reviews and approves all programs leading to the associate degree.
Accreditation
Community College of Denver is accredited by the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.
Comprehensive Medical Assistant/TEC East
American Association of Medical Assisting Dental Hygiene
American Dental Association Nursing
Colorado State Board of Nursing Radiography Technology
Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation Joint Review Committee on Education for Radiologic
Technology
Real Kids Center, Auraria Campus
National Association for Education ofYoung Children (NAEYC). Center accredited.
Surgical Technology
American Medical Association
Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation
Community College of Denver is a member of the American Association of Community Colleges.
Alumni Association
Organized in October 1991, the Alumni Association encourages graduates and students who have completed at least three credit hours to become members.
The alumni sponsor special events, a yearly reunion picnic, and an annual meeting and reception. Scholarships, mentoring and other programs help current students succeed and promote recognition of their achievements.
Joining the Alumni Association is an opportunity to meet and network with fellow alumni while serving CCD. Sign up by calling the Alumni Office at 556-2891.
African-American Council
CCD's African-American Staff Council brings college faculty, staff, students and administrators of the same heritage together. The council provides a forum to discuss ethnicity issues and other problems and helps the college develop programs to address diversity, collaborative sensitivity, retention of students and staff and create an accessible environment for African-Americans. For more information, contact Ken Swiney, 556-2424.
Hispanic Council
Comprised of Hispanic administrators, faculty and staff, the Hispanic Council promotes retention and recruitment of Hispanic students. For additional information, contact Michelle Muniz, treasurer, 556-4963.
3
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


getti
i
J
Campus Visits
For individual and group tours of the campus or to visit classes, contact the Educational Planning and Advising Center at 556-2481.
Advising Philosophy
Advising is critical to your success, so our advising program includes the exploration of life and career goals, an examination of academic and career skills, and the selection of instructional programs and courses. You and your advisor share responsibility for the advising process.
After taking 12 credits of courses numbered 100 or above, you should have a major field of study, a faculty advisor and a signed educational planning guide.
We recommend the Educational Planning and Advising Center be your first point of contact at CCD. Our advisors can help you enroll, plan your college programs and remove barriers that may interfere with your success in school and life. You can stop by at any time.
The Educational Planning and Advising Center staff also conducts orientation sessions, provides information on and interpretation of assessment programs, and advises students who have not been accepted into a major area of programs and courses. Advisors also can refer you to community and campus resources. Special advisors assist refugee and international students.
The Educational Planning and Advising Center is in the South Classroom Building, room 134,556-2481.
Admission Policy
As an open-door institution, CCD admits students who are 16 years of age or older. Admission to the college does not guarantee enrollment in specific programs that may have prereguisites. The college may deny admission to individuals whose backgrounds indicate their presence would endanger the health, safety, welfare or property of others, or would interfere with the function of the college. CCD has the right to deny admission or continued enrollment to persons who have misrepresented their credentials or backgrounds.
Follow These Steps
1. If you are a new student, submit an Application for Admission (form at end of the catalog) to the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records. A permit to test will be given to you to allow you to take the Basic Skills Assessment Test. You also will receive official notification by mail of your acceptance to CCD.
2. Next, make an appointment to take the Basic Skills Assessment Test. A permit from the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records is reguired for admission to the
testing session. Under certain conditions, as listed in this catalog (see College Policies and Academic Standards section), the assessment may be waived. For assessment dates and times, check the current Schedule of Classes, stop by room 230 in South Classroom Building, or call 556-3810. After you take the test, sign up in the Testing Center to attend an orientation.
3. If you are enrolling for the first time at CCD and plan to be a full-time student, you also must complete the Academic Profile, which assesses your general education knowledge and skills. It takes only 45 minutes to complete. Students should call the Testing Center at 556-3810 to make a test appointment. Results do not affect entry to the college or placement in classes. Profile results help evaluate student learning between entering CCD and graduation.
4. After you attend an orientation, stop by the Educational Planning and Advising Center (South Classroom Building, room 134,556-2481) and make an appointment with an advisor to help you plan your educational goals and schedule classes.
5. Your next step is to register for your classes, either by telephone or at the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records during scheduled registration dates each semester. Call Admissions, Registration and Records at 556-2430, or stop by the South Classroom Building, room 133, for more information.
Veterans using VA benefits also must submit transcripts of all previous postsecondary education and training no later than the end of the first semester of attendance.
International Students on F, M, J, B, or FI visas must make an appointment with the International Student Advisor before submitting any documents. International students must submit the following documents in addition to an official International Application for Admission:
1. an official, certified English translation of a high school, college, or equivalent transcript.
2. a statement of sufficient financial resources to provide for staying in the United States.
3. proof of a minimum score of 475 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or a score of 75 on the Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency. Students still must take the levels of English Proficiency (LOEP) Computerized Placement Test.
All students on F, M,J, B,or FI visas do not qualify for financial aid or scholarships. These students will pay Colorado nonresident tuition.
GETTI
CCD guarantees transferability of credits from our school to four-year Colorado public colleges & universities.
N G S T A R T E D 4


For more information, contact the International Student Advisor in the South Classroom Building, room 134, (303) 556-3605.
Directory Information
Community College of Denver designates the following items as Directory Information:
student name,
permanent address,
dates of attendance,
degrees and
awards received.
The college may disclose any of these items without prior written consent, unless notified in writing to the contrary by the 5th dav of classes each semester.
CCD complies fully with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), which is designed to protect the privacy of students'educational records. Refer questions to the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records, South Classroom Building, room 133, or call (303) 556-2430.
Release Of Information
Other than directory information which may be released to the general public, the college will not permit release of educational records without the student's written consent, This consent must be signed and dated by the student and must indicate which records are to be released.
Parents of a dependent student can obtain release of that student's records only with written consent of the student, since the rights given to parents transfer to the student when he or she attends a postsecondary educational institution.
Transcripts Requests
Student may request copies of their academic records accumulated while at CCD. Transcripts are available from the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records. Cost of transcripts is $1 per copy, payable in advance. All transcripts must be requested by the student and all requests must be made in writing.
Transcript requests cannot be honored from those students whose financial and academic records at the college are not cleared.
Transferring Credit to CCD
1. Transfer of academic credit is done for current applicants and/or currently enrolled students by the academic credential evaluator in the Office of Admissions,
Registration and Records upon receipt of an official transcript. Official transcripts are sent by the previous institution and received by CCD through the U.S. Postal Service. Hand-carried transcripts or transcripts issued to the student are not considered official, although they may be used for informal advising purposes. Issuing institutions should address transcripts to CCD
Admissions, Registration and Records, Campus Box 201, P.O.Box 173363, Denver,CO80217-3363. Documents become the property of the college and will not be released to the student or transferred to other institutions.
2. CCD reserves the right to evaluate all credits according to the policies of the Admissions, Registration and Records Office. Evaluation is done for general acceptance of all transferrable credit and is not confined to any specific degree or certificate program. Students will need to meet with their program advisors to determine how accepted transfer credits will apply to their intended program. Note: Credits evaluated for general acceptance may or may not be applicable to specific degree or certificate programs.
3. CCD will accept transfer credit from postsecondary institutions that are accredited by one of the six regional accrediting associations. Transfer credit also may be accepted from CCCOES-approved institutions with which CCD has current articulation agreements. (See the catalog section on associate degree programs.)
4. Credits earned by a student enrolled in another state system community college that are applicable to the AA, AS or AAS degrees or a certificate program shall be accepted as meeting degree or certificate requirements in comparable or equivalent programs at CCD.
5. Lower division credits earned by students enrolled in baccalaureate-granting institutions which are applicable to BA or BS degrees shall be accepted as meeting requirements for comparable or equivalent programs leading to an AA or AS degree at CCD
6. Students who have attended international institutions and wish evaluation of transfer credit will need to provide official transcripts and/or other educational documents in the native language along with certified English translations. Accepted documents become the property of the college. Contact the academic credentials evaluator in the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records for additional information.
Credit for Prior Learning
You may earn credit for college-equivalent education acquired through earlier schooling, work, or other life experiences. Such prior learning must be comparable to CCD courses or curricula and must relate to your educational objectives.
Prior learning may be documented through standardized tests (AP, CLEP, challenge examinations, published guides [ACE-Military and ACE-Non-Collegiate],or portfolio assessment.
1. Standardized Tests
a. Advanced Placement Program (AP) high school students can receive credit through the AP examinations.
b. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) CCD recognizes selected CLEP general examinations and subject examinations. A list of CLEP exams, their cut-off scores
5
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


and their CCD course equivalents are available from the Credit for Prior Learning Office, South Classroom Building, room 134,556-3603. The CLEP examination may be taken in the CCD Testing Center.
2. Challenge Examinations
Currently enrolled students may challenge a course by taking a comprehensive examination. Only one exam for a particular course will be arranged for during any one semester. ($10/credit)
3. Published Guides
ACE-Military CCD uses the credit recommendation of the American Council on Education (ACE), as published in The Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services, to evaluate military training and learning experiences.
ACE-Non-Collegiate CCD uses the credit recommendations from the ACE program on Non-Collegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI), as published in The National Guide to Educational Credit for Training Programs, to evaluate industrial and corporate training programs.
4. Portfolio of Learning Outcomes
Currently enrolled students may petition for credit by developing a portfolio that describes and documents pertinent learning comparable to that available in CCD courses. A faculty member in the appropriate program area evaluates the portfolio and determines commensurate credit. Only one portfolio evaluation for a particular course will be arranged for during any one semester.
($ 15/credit)
You may receive a maximum of 50 percent of the requirements for a degree or certificate through CLEP, AP, Challenge Exams, or Published Guides, and a maximum of 25 percent by Portfolio Assessment. For more details on Credit for Prior Learning options, attend one of the Credit for Prior Learning Orientations in the Educational Planning and Advising Center, South Classroom Building, room 134,556-3605.
Add/Drop/Withdrawal
The final date to add or drop a course is predetermined and printed in the current semester's Schedule of Classes. After the first week of classes, you may not add courses without the written approval of the faculty member whose class is being added. Weekend College, Extended Campus and Telecourses require the written approval of an advisor in the Educational Planning and Advising or the director of the Non-Traditional Learning Programs. This requirement does not apply to open-entry or modular classes. On or before the census date,you may drop courses and receive a full refund. Courses you drop before the census date will not appear on your official transcript.
After the census date, you may withdraw from courses, but you will not be eligible for refunds. Courses you drop after the census date will appear on the transcript with a grade of W. You may not withdraw from courses after the
date published in the Schedule of Classes (usually four to five weeks before the end of term in the fall and spring semesters).
To drop or withdraw from courses, fill out appropriate forms in the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records, South Classroom Building, room 133. To add courses after the first week of classes, obtain the appropriate form from Educational Planning and Advising, South Classroom Building, room 134.
Definitions
Census date The census date for a standard or module course is that point when 15 percent of the days for the term of the class are over. The census date for standard courses is listed in the Schedule of Classes. The census date for open-entry courses is that point when 15 percent of the balance of the term from the date of registration has passed.
Add An add occurs when you enroll in a class after initial registration.
Drop A drop occurs when you officially exit a class before census date.
Withdrawal A withdrawal occurs when you exit a class after census date.
Transferring to Four-year Institutions
CCD's AA and AS degrees are guaranteed to transfer to Colorado public four-year colleges and universities. Students with AA and AS degrees enter four-year institutions as juniors. CCD also has a number of programs leading to the AGS Degree that transfers to Metropolitan State College of Denver or to the University of Colorado at Denver. Consult the Associate Degree Program section in this catalog for more information about these transfer degrees.
On some occasions the Associate of Applied Science degree may transfer.
If you intend to transfer, familiarize yourself with the requirements of the school you wish to attend. You also should consult the advisor in the Transfer Center in South Classroom Building, room 134.
The Transfer Center stocks catalogs from Colorado and many U.S. four-year colleges and universities. Admissions counselors from four-year colleges and universities make regular visits to CCD. Inquire about specific times in the Transfer Center or call 556-2481. A transfer bulletin board by South Classroom 125 has postings of visits from four-year college representatives and other pertinent information.
Orientations for CCD students who intend to transfer are on the first Monday of the month at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. in South Classroom Building, room 136A.
GETTING STARTED 6


Veterans'Academic Standards of Progress
The following policy applies to all students who are veterans and other eligible persons receiving VA benefits:
1. Grade Point Requirements
Veterans must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 for all course work attempted. Veterans whose cumulative GPA is below 2.0 will be placed on academic probation for the following term. If the GPA is not raised to 2.0 during the probationary term, you will be suspended for one academic term. Reinstatement will occur only after approved counseling.
Suspension of the veteran under the Veterans'Academic Standards of Progress Policy will result in CCD's not certifying enrollment to the Veterans Administration.
Veterans in this status may still attend CCD; however, they will be subject to the provisions of the Academic Standards of Progress Policy requirements for continuation of enrollment.
2. Other Special Grades
AU Grade indicates the student "audited" the course. No credit is allowed for audited courses, nor is the grade certifiable to the VA.
I Gradeindicates "incomplete." An incomplete or"l* grade must be made up no later than the next consecutive 15-week semester. For veterans, if anTgrade is not completed in this required period, the "I" will revert to a NC (no credit) and the veteran's certification will be adjusted back to the beginning date of the term in which the "I" grade was received.
SP Grade indicates "satisfactory progress, which will be treated the same as an "I," incomplete grade.
3. Attendance
Veterans who stop attending class, but do not officially withdraw, may be dropped administratively. VA certification will be adjusted accordingly.
4. Mitigating Circumstances
(As defined by P.L. 94-502) Mitigating circumstances that directly hinder an eligible veteran's or other person's pursuit of a course are judged to be out of the student's control. Following are some general categories of mitigating circumstances (not all-conclusive):
a. Serious illness of the eligible veteran or person.
b. Serious illness or death in the eligible veteran's or other person's immediate family.
c. Immediate family or financial obligations that require a change in terms or place of employment, precluding pursuit of course work.
d. Discontinuance of a course by the college.
e. Active military duty, including active duty for training.
f. Withdrawal from a course or receipt of a non-puni-tive grade upon completion of a course due to unsatisfactory work may be considered mitigating circumstances if the student can demonstrate good faith pursuit of the course up to the point of withdrawal or completion. You must submit evidence that you applied for tutorial aid, consulted a Veterans Administration counselor, or consulted a CCD academic counselor or advisor in an attempt to remedy the unsatisfactory work before withdrawal or completion.
When mitigating circumstances prevail, CCD will attempt to intervene on behalf of the veteran with the Veterans Administration.
Extra Services Available
We encourage you to take advantage of CCD's many student services, listed under the Need More Help? section of this catalog. For all your academic, personal and career needs, you can save time by regularly talking to your counselor.
Good luck!
7 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Tuition
Tuition is determined by the State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education and is subject to change annually. Fees also can change.
Tuition for 1997-98 is set at $54.30 per credit hour for resident students and $252.25 for non-resident students. In addition,fees are set at $8.50 per credit hour. Community College of Denver (CCD) also charges a $9 non-refundable registration fee per semester per student, and $16.70 per semester fee is charged for the Regional Transportation District Bus Pass. The college will continue to assess a bad check"fee of $17 for checks returned by the banking system. Rates are subject to change without advance notice.
Residency Classification
For residency classification, you must have lived in Colorado for 365 days prior to the first day of the term in which you wish to enroll. Active duty military personnel and their dependents qualify as residents. Classification of students under age 23 is determined by the residency of their parents or legal guardian. Call the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records for details at 556-2430.
If you are classified as non-resident and believe you qualify for resident status, you may file a petition for In-state Residency at the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records by the first day of the term. Late petitions are not accepted.
Senior Citizens
In-state residents over the age of 60 may take courses for credit and pay 50 percent of the tuition charges and 100 percent of student fees. In-state senior citizens who are not interested in receiving credit may attend classes on a space-available basis at no charge as long as they are residents.
Visit the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records,
South Classroom Building, room 133, for a Senior Citizen/Non-Credit form, or call 556-2430. Senior citizens may not take courses listed as "non-credit" free of charge.
State Employee Benefit
State employees can take CCD classes and pay 50 percent of in-state tuition and 100 percent of fees. Employees must present a signed eligibility form from their employer at registration.
Veterans Benefits
VA educational benefits may apply for an advanced payment. Veterans who have not applied for advanced payment must make full payment of tuition before applications can be forwarded to the VA. The last date to apply for VA advanced payment is 45 days prior to the first day of classes. Visit the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records, South Classroom Building, room 133, or call 556-2430.
Tuition Refund Policy
Students may receive a 100 percent refund of tuition and fees through the census date for any class(es) dropped and/or for any class canceled by the college. The census date for standard classes is listed in the Schedule of Classes. Call the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records for the census date of open-entry courses.
No refunds or financial credits are given after the census date of the class or for courses concentrated into one week or less. Students may obtain drop forms from the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records.
Students may receive a 100 percent refund of tuition and fees (except for the non-refundable registration fee) through the census date. Call the Cashier (556-2075) for the census date of continuous enrollment courses.
No refunds or financial credits will be given after the census date of the class. Students may obtain drop forms from the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records.
CCD normally mails tuition refund checks each Friday to all students eligible for refunds as of the close of business Tuesday. Students owed a refund as of Tuesday will be required to pay for all classes added after refunds are issued. Please check your class schedule for any amount owed to the college. Please direct questions regarding your account balance to the Cashier's Office.
Fees
All students on the Auraria Campus pay student fees. This money is for student activities and benefits, including student publications, operation of student government, cultural activities, recreational activities, and clubs and organizational activities. Student fees also help pay off construction debts for the Auraria Student Union, Child Care Center and the Physical Education and Recreation Building. Student Government approves expenditure of student fee monies.
Students enrolled in certain courses may be required to purchase individual supplies and materials,and to rent uniforms. A $17 fee is charged for bad checks.
Education at CCD is affordable. We have the lowest tuition rate on the Auraria Campus.
MONEY MATTERS 8


Financial Aid
Early Application
The Office of Financial Aid administers federal and state programs to assist eligible students in meeting the cost of their CCD education. Financial aid funds are limited,and we encourage students to start the application process several months before enrolling. Information brochures and applications are available at the Office of Financial Aid, South Classroom Building, room 135,556-2420, and at all Technical Education Centers (see listing/addresses on page vi).
Application Procedures
Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid. To apply for grants, scholarships, work-study employment, William D. Ford Federal Direct Loans and PLUS, complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Loans and scholarships require an additional application.
Financial aid applicants also may have to supply supporting documents, such as Federal Income Tax forms or statements of welfare, social security, vocational rehabilitation benefits, employment, etc.
Priority in awarding financial aid goes to students who apply early. To be on time, you must have mailed your application by March 1,and completed your file and submitted all documents by May 1. Applications received after the above dates will be considered based on the availability of funds.
Four to six weeks after applying, you will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR). Review it for correctness. CCD will receive the results of your financial aid status electronically if you included our school code (009542) on your application.
Check with the Office of Financial Aid for the school year priority dates.
Student Budget
The cost of a CCD education includes tuition, fees, books and supplies. In addition, you may have expenses for room and board, transportation and personal items. We base our standard student budget on current estimated living costs. Budgets are adjusted for living arrangements (such as living with parents) and the length of enrollment. Standard living allowances:
Living with parents $510
Living away from parents $960
A child care allowance may be added if you use day care. Allowances are subject to change without advance notice.
Ability to Benefit
If you are entering CCD without a high school diploma or GED and are applying for financial aid, you are classified as an Ability to Benefit Student. Ability to Benefit Students:
1. are admitted as regular students,seeking a degree or certificate.
2. must complete the regular assessment process and plan a schedule with an advisor.
3. must meet minimum qualifications on a test approved by the U.S. Department of Education for determining eligibility to receive financial aid.
4. are eligible to apply for financial aid for up to 30 credits of remedial courses (numbered 099 or below). Students who have not successfully completed the required remedial courses by the end of 30 attempted remedial credit hours may no longer apply for financial aid.
If you pass the GED test before attempting 30 credit hours, you no longer are classified as an Ability to Benefit Student.
Eligibility
Financial need determines most types of financial aid awards. Financial need is the difference between the cost of attending college and your available resources. Resources include parents'contributions, your earnings, spouse's earnings, and veteran's, social security, vocational rehabilitation, welfare and unemployment benefits.
If you have a baccalaureate, master's or other advanced degrees, you may be eligible to apply for student loans and Colorado Scholars, after you complete 12 credits at CCD. Contact the Office of Financial Aid.
You must complete applications for financial aid once each year to determine eligibility.
Financial aid applicants must maintain satisfactory academic and measurable progress both prior to applying for financial and during the semester(s) aid is received. The minimum requirements are a 2.0 cumulative grade point average and 75 percent cumulative completion rate for all attempted course work. Students may receive aid for up to 150 percent of the credits required to complete their program. All credit hours taken at CCD, as well as transfer hours, are counted to determine satisfactory/measurable progress even if no financial aid was received. Students denied aid based on this policy may file an appeal. Appeal forms and copies of the complete policy are available from the Office of Financial Aid, South Classroom Building, room 135.
Students enrolled in programs that require fewer than 16 credits are not eligible for financial aid. Approval is pending for financial aid eligibility for programs of 16 to 23 credits and is expected from the U.S. Department of education prior to the fall 1997 semester.
9
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Refund and Repayment Policies
If you do not begin attending a class, you will not receive financial aid for the class, but will be charged tuition and fees if you fail to officially withdraw by the published date.
If you receive financial aid from CCD and then withdraw from classes or stop attending, you may be subject to repayment of a portion of the financial aid you received.
You may be eligible for a tuition refund if you withdraw from classes. (See Tuition Refund Policy.) If any portion of the your tuition and fees was paid from any financial aid fund, the refund will be returned to the account(s) from which you were paid in the order listed under Distribution of Refunds. An administrative fee, not to exceed the lesser of 5 percent of the institutional charges or $100, will be charged.
If you only receive Colorado state financial aid, you are subject to CCD's Institutional Refund Policy outlined in this catalog and the Financial Aid Repayment Policy.
Refund/Repayment Policies do not apply to students who do not begin attendance in classes. These students are considered ineligible, and any financial aid disbursed must be repaid. Students who fail to withdraw from classes prior to the published census date will be held responsible for any tuition/fee charges and repayment of disbursed financial aid.
Pro-Rata Refund
If you are enrolling at CCD for the first time and are a Title IV financial aid recipient, then withdraw or cease to attend prior to completing 60 percent of your first semester, you will have a pro-rated portion of your tuition/fees calculated. The amount refunded will be the greater of the institutional, pro-rata or federal refund.
Federal Refund
Title IV recipients who are not eligible for pro-rata refund and who withdraw from CCD during the first 50 percent of the semester may be eligible for a refund of charges to the
financial aid programs in accordance with the following schedule:
Percentage ofTime Prior to Withdrawal Percentage to be Refunded
0-15% 100%
16-25% 50%
26-50% 25%
51% 0%
Distribution of Refunds
Refunded amounts are distributed in the following order:
1. Unsubsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loan
2. Subsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loan
3. Federal Direct Plus Loan
4. Federal Pell Grant
5. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
6. Other Title IV Programs
7. Other Federal Sources of Aid
8. Colorado Student Incentive Grant
9. Colorado State Financial Aid
10. Private Funds
11. CCD Funds
12. The Student
Repayment
If you receive cash disbursements from federal and/or state financial aid programs and withdraw prior to mid-term (approximately the seventh or eighth week), you must repay a portion of the financial aid received if the disbursement exceeds educational expenses. Total financial aid disbursed (less student loans and work-study earnings) minus eligible expenses will equal the amount of your financial aid repayment.
Repayments are applied to a financial aid account(s) in the following order:
1. Federal Pell Grant
2. Federal SEOG
3. Other Title IV Federal Programs
4. Other Federal Sources of Aid
5. Colorado Student Incentive Grant
6. Colorado State Financial Aid
7. Private Funds
8. CCD Funds
If you withdraw and owe a repayment of financial aid funds, you will not be eligible for further financial aid from CCD or any other postsecondary educational institution until payment is made.
Contact the Financial Aid Office, 556-2420, for more detailed policy information and application examples.
Financial Aid Programs
Grants and Work-Study
Federal Pell Grant Federally funded Pell Grants assist with educational expenses. Award amounts range up to $2,700 depending on student eligibility.
Colorado Student Grant (CSG) Available to Colorado residents based on financial need. Awards range up to $5,000 per academic year.
Colorado Student Incentive Grant (CSIG) Available on a need basis. The maximum award is $5,000 per year. Colorado and the federal government contribute to the award.
MONEY MATTERS 10


Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) Federally funded grants range from $200 to $5,000, depending on financial need. Pell Grant recipients with the lowest family contributions receive priority.
Diversity Grant Colorado provides grants of $200 to $5000 to members of underrepresented populations. Awards are based on financial need.
Colorado Work-Study The Colorado work-study program provides part-time employment opportunities for Colorado residents who demonstrate financial need as defined by CCD.
Federal Work-Study The federal work-study program provides part-time employment for students who demonstrate financial need.
Colorado Work-Study (No-Need) Colorado also provides limited funds to employ students part-time who do not demonstrate financial need and who are Colorado residents for tuition purposes.
Scholarships
Colorado Scholars Program Scholarships are available to Colorado residents who have completed a minimum of 12 credit hours at CCD with at least a 3.0 grade point average in all courses attempted. Apply using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Scholarship awards depend on the availability of funds. Award amounts range up to resident tuition and fees.
High school graduates with a 3.0 grade point average or counselor's recommendation can apply, using a separate application.
Institutional and community scholarships are posted on the Office of Financial Aid scholarship board. Other scholarship listings and information resources include: The Educational Opportunity Center, 629-9226; Career Services Center, 556-6202; and Student Assistance Center and Women's Services, 556-3300.
William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Programs
Loan applicants first must complete the FAFSA form. In addition, you must attend an entrance and an exit loan counseling interview to ensure you understand your loan repayment responsibilities.
CCD recommends first-year students'loan borrowing from all loan programs be limited to $2,625 per academic year, or $1,313 per semester. We also recommend total student loan borrowing be limited to a maximum of $10,000, including any loans borrowed at other schools. Call the Office of Financial Aid, 556-2420, to learn more about student loan eligibility.
Federal Direct Subsidized Loan This program provides loans at a variable rate. Federal program limits allow students to borrow up to $2,625 per year as freshmen. Sophomores who have finished 30 credit hours of college-level work may borrow up to $3,500 per year. Loans
have a six-month grace period prior to the first payment. The Federal Direct Subsidized Loan is a need-based program. The interest rate is variable and paid by the Federal Government until the grace period ends.
Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan The Direct Unsubsidized Loan program provides loans for students' remaining Stafford eligibility. The federal limits are $4,000 for freshmen and sophomores. You may borrow the cost of education minus any other aid. No family contribution is subtracted from the loan. You will pay the interest rate from the date of disbursement.
Federal Direct Loans to Parents Parents may borrow for their students from the Federal Direct PLUS loan program. Repayment must begin within 60 days after disbursement. The interest rate is variable and the parent has up to 10 years to repay the loan. The Federal Servicer will provide for credit checks.
1 1
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Student Services
Community College of Denver (CCD) offers an array of student services that have one goal to increase your access to quality education and help you achieve your educational objectives. They are listed in alphabetical order for your convenience.
Career Development Center
The Career Development Center in South Classroom Building, room 136, offers:
full-time career placement;
part-time employment;
career counseling and testing;
cooperative (Coop) education;
job search skills: resume writing and interviewing;
career Resource Library;
Colorado Career Information System;
career planning; and
career laboratory.
For an appointment, call 556-3609.
Center for Persons with Disabilities
Students with disabilities should contact the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD) about free services to assist them at CCD. Services include academic advising and registration assistance; tutoring, classroom assistance, and curriculum and test modification; consultation with instructors; text recording, note-taking and use of adaptive equipment-accessible parking and campus orientation; sign language and oral interpreting; liaison with rehabilitation agencies and other Colorado postsecondary institutions; and housing and transportation information. CPD is in the South Classroom Building, room 134,556-3300.
In addition to CPD, other resources useful to students with disabilities are Computer Training for People with Disabilities, Academic Support Center, Special Learning Support program and the Computer Access Center.
CCD complies with and fully supports Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, with amendments of 1974, regarding nondiscrimination on the basis of handicap. Inquiries concerning Title VI,TITLE IX and Section 504 may be referred to the Lil Hunsaker, CCD Campus Box 203, P.O. Box 173363, Denver, CO 80217-3363, South Classroom Building, Room 134,556-2413, or to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1961 Stout Street, Denver, CO 80294.
Child Care Services
CCD provides quality child care at three sites: the Auraria Campus,TEC North and TEC West. Each center provides a full-day program in early childhood care and education. Children have numerous opportunities to practice being competent, creative, caring and self-sufficient. Materials, equipment and activities are nonsexist and multicultural to prepare children for a diverse society.
The Auraria Campus Real Kids Center is licensed by the Colorado Department of Human Resources and accredited by the National Academy for the Education of Young Children. Center hours are Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The center accepts children between the ages of 2 1/2 and 6 years old. The Real Kids Center is popular.so enroll early. Call for current information: 556-2439.
TEC North and TEC West Centers are licensed by the Colorado Department of Human Resources. Hours are Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. TEC sites accept children between the ages of 6 weeks and 6 years. For information, call TEC North 289-2243;TEC West 477-0901.
Educational Opportunity Center
The Educational Opportunity Center (EOC) is a community service program that provides educational planning, information and assistance, including:
career counseling;
college/university admission assistance;
vocational-technical school enrollment assistance;
academic assessment coordination;
federal and state student financial aid application assistance; and
educational planning workshops.
CCD is in the heart of the city &
Services are free. EOC is located at the Parkway Center,
1391 Speer Blvd., 3rd floor, Suite 430. Call 629-9226 for an appointment.
Evening Services
Students who attend college during the evening hours can obtain help and information in the Educational Planning and Advising Center in the South Classroom Building, room 134. Academic planning and career advising are available by appointment Monday through Thursday, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., when classes are in session. The offices of Admissions, Registration and Records, Financial Aid, Educational Planning and Advising, Career Services and Business Services also are open until 6 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings when classes are in session. Call 556-2600 for more information.
within walk-ing distance of myriad downtown activities.
NEED MORE HELP? 12


GED Institute
The GED Institute has off-campus sites in the City and County of Denver. Students who are interested in obtaining a Colorado High School Equivalency Diploma or learning English as a second language (ESL) are invited to participate. GED and pre-GED classes are self-paced labs, while ESL classes are directed by the instructor. For further information including location, days times and admission requirements, please call 556-3805.
Health Services
CCD students may use the outpatient Metropolitan State College of Denver Student Health Clinic at a low cost. The clinic provides direct, confidential health care services that emphasize wellness and preventive medicine. The Tivoli Student Health Clinic is in the Student Union, room 140, 556-2525.
Insurance
Students may purchase an accident and sickness insurance plan after registering. Brochures are available at the Student Health Clinic, the Student Life and Activities Office (Tivoli Student Union) and the Office of the Vice President for Student Services, South Classroom Building, room 305, 556-2413.
International Student Services
The International Student Office assists international students from more than 50 countries, providing support services and helping bridge campus cultural gaps. Services include counseling on immigration transactions; information about American and international cultural events, on- and off-cam-pus employment, and housing accommodations; pre- and post-admissions advising;and liaison with various consulates, embassies and other international organizations. For more information, contact the International Student Advisor in South Classroom Building, room 134, (303) 556-2600.
PLACE Program for Licensing Assessments for Colorado Educators
All candidates (whether prepared in Colorado or other states) for initial educator licenses (provisional licenses) in Colorado are required to take and pass the PLACE assessments including basic skills, liberal arts and sciences, professional knowledge, and content areas, such as elementary education. Please contact the Education and Academic Services Division for further information at 556-8455.
ROTC Information
CCD students may participate in two Army ROTC programs that lead to a commission in the active Army, the Army Reserve, or the Colorado National Guard. CCD students may participate through inter-institutional registration in the ROTC program. Contact the Department of Military Science, Metropolitan State College of Denver, Campus Box 93, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3363, or call 556-3491.
Student Assistance Center and Women's Services
Services are available to all students. The center offers academic and crisis counseling, transition counseling for students who are making a change from home to the work force and assistance to AFDC clients.
The center hosts a variety of workshops, covering topics such as women's health issues, self-esteem and time management. Support groups offer help with divorce adjustment, welfare client support, personal growth and single parenting.
The center houses a lending library and books on women's issues. It also provides referrals to legal, day care, health, housing, and employment resources, and also helps students with abuse and economic issues.
The Student Assistance Center and Women's Services is in the South Classroom Building, room 134,556-2343.
Student Life and Activities
The Student Life and Activities Office develops and implements programs and activities to meet the academic, social and recreational interests of CCD students and the community.
Programs offered through or supported by the Student Life and Activities Office include: Student Government and student organizations, intramural and recreational activities, social and cultural activities, health services, student leadership training programs, and student publications and student newspaper. These activities provide constructive experiences to stimulate personal growth and social development and add to students'enjoyment of life. Student Life and Activities is located on the third floor of the Tivoli Student Union, room 309,556-2597.
Student Legal Services
Student Legal Services is a tri-institutional student fee-funded program.lt provides students with legal advice and assistance. Services are offered at no cost.They include legal counseling, document preparation, legal self-help workshops and related activities. Services do not include representation in court or action against the college, or any state or local government entity. Legal Services is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 308,556-6061.
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COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Testing Center
The Testing Center offers a variety of testing services to CCD students and staff. Please contact the center for information regarding dates,times, applications and registration fees,
South Classroom Building, room 230,556-3810.
Academic Profile
The Academic Profile is a test of general education knowledge and skills. It is required of all first-time freshmen and graduating students. Test data help measure institutional effectiveness and improve the quality of instruction and learning.
Basic Skills Assessment
Basic Skills Assessment is required of all first-time entering freshmen students by State Board policy. It assesses the areas of English (writing), mathematics, reading and study skills that are minimally required for student success in college-level course work. ESL (English as a Second Language) skills also are assessed. Counselors and instructors advise students based on the results of the assessments.
Class Testing
Self-paced and Continuing Education course exams are administered in the center. Make-up exams can be taken with faculty permission. Students may also take exams from other colleges or universities from their Continuing Education Departments.
CLEPCollege-level Examination Program A national program of credit by examination that offers the opportunity to obtain recognition for college-level achievement. (See pages 5-6, Credit for Prior Learning.)
Nursing Mobility Profile
Required of students designated by the Nursing Department. Includes three subjects: Foundations of Nursing; Nursing Care During Childbearing; and Nursing Care of the Child.
Psychological
Available by referral to the Special Learning Support program.
Workman's Compensation
Physicians Accreditation Test required by the State of Colorado for certain specialties. Assesses knowledge of Workman's Compensation Laws as it relates to Physicians rights and responsibilities.
Veterans Affairs Office
The Veterans Affairs Office provides information about veterans'federal, state and community benefits;assistance with VA inquiries; and gives referrals for emergency food, clothing, housing, legal aid and employment. The Veterans Affairs Office is located in the South Classroom Building, Room 133, 556-2452.
Work and Family Resource Center
Because child care issues can have an impact on student success directly and dramatically, CCD's Work and Family Resource Center provides child care information and referral services to help students find child care. One of the Work and Family Resource Center's national award-winning services is the 4 Parents Helpline (620-4444), a free, non-medical telephone"warmline"that provides information and support for parents to further the healthy development of their children and deal with the complexities of modern family life. The 4 Parents Helpline is available Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Messages may be left at any time.
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NEED MORE HELP?


academic
port center
We are here to help you succeed, because your
Located in South Classroom Building, room 142, the Academic Support Center (ASC) provides free tutorial assistance in basic skills to all CCD students. Other tutoring in various subjects is available.
You may request tutoring in any course at the college. For some classes, you may be referred to the divisions for tutoring. Numerous tutoring services are available on a drop-in or appointment basis. In addition to finding help with individual courses, you are invited to use services provided in the following specialized labs:
Lab Tutoring*
English as a Second Language (ESL)
ESL tutors help you with pronunciation,conversation, grammar, reading and other subject areas such as math, biology, chemistry and computer science. Computers, language learning software and other equipment also are available for
you to use. (Room M)
Colorado High School Equivalency Diploma (CHSED formerly GED)
You can prepare to pass the CHSED test battery and earn a
CHSED diploma. (Room J)
Reading and Study Skills
Tutors and computerized assistance help you to strengthen your abilities in reading, note taking, organizational skills, test taking and other techniques designed to enhance your success in college. (Open area and room 139)
Mathematics
Tutors and instructors help you gain greater experience and knowledge of mathematical principles. Practice your skills on IBM computer tutorials, watch course videos and participate in specialized workshops and study groups. (Rooms Q,
R&S)
success is our success.
Special Learning Support
Tutors help you to learn compensatory techniques for your special learning needs. At the same time, you also can strengthen you skills in math, reading, study skills and many other academic content areas. (Rooms L, U & V)
Writing Center
Tutors work with you on all types of writing at every level. You can use Macintosh computers in the center to plan, compose and revise your papers. (Rooms N, P &T)
* Lab schedules are posted at the entrance of South Classroom
142 and outside each lab.
Special ASC Programs**
For more information on ASC services, or to make an appointment for counseling or tutoring, call 556-2497.
Spedal Learning Support Program (SLSP)
Learning disabled adults can take specialized classes and receive individualized tutoring through this program. You receive diagnostic evaluations and counseling related to your unique needs. This provides the foundation for counseling and specialized educational planning. (Office: Room 142L; Lab: Room 142U&V)
Student Support Services (SSS)
Counselors create an individualized success plan with you that includes services such as tutoring, peer mentoring and peer advocacy. Counselors also advise you on college survival and financial aid. Eligibility is based on income, disability and/or first-generation status. (Room 142E)
Supplemental Services (SS)
You may request tutorial assistance for your vocational classes through this program. Specialized services include small group or one-on-one tutoring, English as a Second Language for vocational classes and referrals to other programs. (Room 142F)
** Students apply for these services.
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special programs
Computer Training for People with Disabilities
The Computer Training for People with Disabilities (CTPD) program is a nationally recognized and award-winning computer training program. You can apply for both certificate and associate degree programs in either application programmer or PC specialist/LAN administrator. If you have a disability, we encourage you to apply to the CTPD program. Our program offers special services, support and placement for participants.
CTPD admission requirements include:
1. successful completion of a computer aptitude test battery.
2. personal interview with members of the CTPD Business Advisory Council.
You can obtain application information from the Center for Persons with Disabilities, South Classroom Building, room 134, (303) 556-3300, or from the Division of Business and Governmental Studies, Plaza Building, room 262,
(303) 556-2487.
Cooperative Education Program
CCD's Cooperative Education program provides opportunities to supplement course work with practical work experience related to your educational and occupational objectives. You can earn credit for working part-time in an area directly related to your educational program. We encourage you to apply at least one semester prior to the semester during which you wish to work. For more information, call or drop by the Cooperative Education Office, South Classroom Building, room 136,556-3607.
Developmental Studies Program
To be successful at CCD, you must be able to use your reading, math, writing and study skills. We offer a comprehensive academic program in these skill areas. They include:
1. assessment of basic academic skills;
2. test results interpretation by skilled faculty and counselors;
3. a variety of skill development courses in reading, mathematics, writing and study skills;
4. support with computer-assisted instruction;
5. preparation for GED;and
6. english as a Second Language instruction and support.
For more information, contact the Division of Education and Academic Services, South Classroom Building, room 313, 556-8455.
Honors Program
The Flonors program allows qualified students to receive honors credit by contracting with instructors to do individual honors work within existing courses or by taking designated honors courses. Honors work can help you develop sophisticated, creative, critical thinking and research skills while enhancing your academic resume. For more information, visit the Honors program office in South Classroom, room 244A, or contact Stephen Thomas, Honors Program Coordinator, at 556-3861.
Denver Education Network
Started in 1992, the Denver Education Network is one of 17 urban projects across the United States funded by the Ford Foundation. The purpose of the Ford Foundation's decade-long initiative is to increase the participation and advancement rates of urban, minority students in two-year and four-year colleges primarily through systematic change within the public school systems elementary, secondary and higher education. The Denver Education Network's goal is to provide a seamless web of services to Denver students, especially for those students most at-risk of academic failure.
International Study Programs
CCD is a member of the Colorado Consortium for International Programming (CCIP). Through this organization you may find opportunities to live and study abroad while earning CCD credit. For more information about study possibilities in foreign countries, contact Professor Richard Hart at (303) 556-3829.
La Familia Scholars Program
The La Familia Scholars program provides a model environment for first-generation students in higher education that attends to the academic, social, technological and human needs of students based on the culture of "La Familia." La Familia Scholars selected for the program must enroll in a six-hour community class that combines technology, educational and career planning and the critical skills. Learning community classes are taught in a state-of-the-art computerized classroom. Students also have access to a computerized lab for tutoring and computer support.
Case managers and peer mentors provide comprehensive advising and centralized information to students. La Familia staff also work closely with CCD faculty and staff to assist students in adapting to college life so they persist in
SPECIAL
CCD is a comprehensive, student'Oriented urban college, providing open access to a diverse population.
R 0 G R A M S 16


college to receive a two-year college degree and transfer to a four-year college or university. Because this program is supported by Hispanic-Serving Institution(HSI) funding, Hispanic/Latino first-generation college students are given priority when they apply to the program; however, other first-generation students are welcome to apply until the program reaches its enrollment limit.
Summer Bridge Program
The Summer Bridge program is a well-established, intensive program that offers participants a firm foundation on which to begin and build a successful college education. For more than eight years, CCD has worked diligently to blend the right ingredients for a thorough summer program, including financial assistance, First Year Experience courses, academic development courses, student support services, career exploration, college program sampling and a variety of enrichment activities. The Summer Bridge program aims to motivate students to pursue a college education and equip them with the skills and confidence needed to complete that education. Applications are accepted from January through April; the eight-week program begins in June. Applicants must be recent high school or Colorado High School Equivalency graduates between the ages of 18 and 22. For more information and for specific entrance requirements, contact Yvonne Frye, Education and Academic Services, South Classroom Building, room 313,556-8455.
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Auraria Library
The Auraria Library has more than 560,000 volumes of books, microforms and bound periodicals, and more than 1,700 current periodical and newspaper subscriptions. As a member of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries (CARL), the Auraria Library has access to an additional six million volumes through inter-library loans.
You can take a 50-minute, self-guided,audiotape tour of the library to become familiar with its services and resources, including: computerized bibliographic searches, library orientation and instruction for groups and individuals, a depository of U.S.and Colorado government publications, and media listening and viewing facilities. Rooms for individual study, group conferences and typing also are available. For information about library services and hours, call 556-2741.
Campus Recreation
Campus Recreation offers unique opportunities to develop athletic skills, leadership abilities and team spirit. Major campus attractions include noon-hour aerobics,swimming pool, weight room and handball/racquetball courts. The outdoor adventure program offers a variety of one-day and multi-day trips for wind surfing, skiing, snow-shoeing, bicycling, crosscountry skiing and ice sailing. The intramural program includes touch football, basketball, racquetball, tennis, 3-on-3 basketball, floor hockey, volleyball and inner tube water polo.
Club sports provide a high level of competition in rugby, lacrosse,Tae Kwon Do, weight lifting, soccer, football, karate, skiing and volleyball.
Stop by room 108 of the Events Center for semester schedules and to check out team sports equipment. For more information, call 556-3210. Make handball/racquetball reservations and check in for these activities at room 111, 556-3211.
Education of Young Children. Hours are Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The Center accepts children between the ages of 2 1/2 and 6 years old. Call 556-2439 for current information.
Interfaith Ministry
The Auraria Interfaith Ministry (AIM) is a cooperative endeavor of several church denominations. AIM provides programs and counseling and promotes individual spiritual growth. AIM offices are in the St. Francis Center. For more information, call 556-8591.
Parking and Transportation Services
Prospective students and new students coming to the college for advising, orientation, Basic Skills Assessment, financial aid workshops, or registration may park in Lot G, at the corner of Lawrence Way and 9th Street. Validate your parking ticket for four hours of free parking in South Classroom Building, room 134. Once you register, you no longer are eligible for free parking.
Parking is available in daily fee lots ranging in price from $1.25 to $2 and the parking garage at Seventh St. and Lawrence Way. The $2 daily fee for the Parking Garage and Lots H ($2) and D ($1.75) may be paid in cash or by debit card. Debit cards may be purchased for $1 in the basement of the Student Union next to the postal vending machines or at the Parking and Transportation Center Office in the elevator lobby on the first level of the parking garage.
A student ID is required for parking in Lot R. A limited number of monthly permits is available. Students also may park free for 20 minutes in Lot G to go to the Parking Office. Bring your ticket with you for validation.
The Parking Office is open Monday through Friday,
7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For more information about the following services, call 556-2000.
Auraria Child Care Center
The center provides child care for children of students, faculty and staff on the Auraria Campus. It is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services. Space is available for 30 toddlers, aged 18 months to 3 years, and 120 children, aged 3 to 8 years. Professional staff provide a toddler, preschool and state certified kindergarten program. Call 556-3188.
Real Kids Center
The Auraria Campus Real Kids Center provides a full-day program in early childhood care and education. The center is licensed by the Colorado Department of Human Resources and accredited by the National Academy for the
Free carpool-matching assistance
Carpool parking discounts
Free on-campus transportation for disabled students on the wheelchair-accessible handivan
Free campus shuttle service for evening students on the Auraria Evening Express (Monday through Thursday, dusk to 10 p.m.)
Public Safety
Public Safety provides professional 24-hour crime prevention and law enforcement service for the Auraria Campus. For routine calls to Public Safety, phone 556-3271 ;for emergency calls, phone 911.
AURARIA CAMPUS FACILITIES 18


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college policies & academic standards
So you'll know what you can expect of us at Community College of Denver (CCD) and what well expect of you, please read this alphabetized section carefully. Your counselor, advisor, or a staff member in Student Services, South Classroom Building, room 134, can help if you have additional questions.
Academic Standards
Attendance
Your regular and punctual attendance is expected, and each instructor will keep a complete record of your attendance for the entire length of each course. You will be counted absent from missed class meetings, beginning with the first official date of enrollment or the first day of classes, whichever is later.
Faculty may give a failing grade to any student who has a 15 percent or greater absence from a class, starting from the first class meeting. You are responsible for informing the instructor of the reason for an absence and for doing so in a timely fashion. You, whether present or absent, are responsible for obtaining all material presented and completing all course assignments.
The attendance policy for certain programs, such as health careers, may differ from the general policy because of clinical requirements or requirements of approving agencies.
You are responsible for properly processing a withdrawal.
Course Load
A full-time course load is 12 to 15 credits. If you are registered for fewer than 12 credits, you are classified a part-time student.
Eighteen credits is considered a heavy load. Twenty credits is the maximum load for all students without special permission of the instructional division dean.
Academic Standards of Progress
1. You are required to maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 for all course work attempted.
2. If your cumulative grade point average falls below the required 2.0 on an attempted six or more credits,you will be placed on academic probation for the following term of enrollment.
3. Should you fail to raise your cumulative GPA to 2.0 by the end of the probationary instructional term, CCD will consider suspending you academically for a minimum of one term.
4. If you are placed on academic suspension, you must meet with the vice president for Student Services to determine eligibility for continued enrollment.
5. You may appeal your suspension to the Suspension Review Board. Decisions of the board are final.
Appeal Procedure
Students wishing to appeal academic suspension or seeking information about the appeal procedure, should contact the Office of the Vice President for Student Services, 556-2413.
Assessment
1. Basic Skills Assessment
If you are a first-time CCD student, you must take a basic skills assessment test for English, math, reading and study skills unless you meet one of the following criteria for an exemption.
a. You have associate or higher degree with a "C" grade or better in English 121 and Math 121 or their equivalents.
b. You enrolled for employment in-service or upgrading.
c. You reached the 50th percentile on ACT (minimum composite score of 20 with minimum score of 20 in subject area test) or SAT (minimum scores of 900, composite; 420, verbal; 480, math).
d. You successfully completed ENG 121 and MAT 121 or their equivalents with a "C"grade or better within the last five years. (Students taking math or English must take that portion of the assessment).
e. You enrolled in one course for personal enrichment.
f. You can provide assessment and placement scores from another accredited institution that meet CCD criteria.
If you initially enrolled in one course for personal enrichment or job upgrading and have not been assessed, you must participate in assessment before entering into a certificate or degree program.
Our assessment methods include one or both of the following:
1. a comprehensive review of your past records such as standardized test results, high school and college transcripts and prior learning experiences.
2. a test battery that includes writing, study skills, reading, mathematics and English as a Second Language.
Either assessment method includes a personal interview with an advisor to review test results and your academic and personal background to determine classes for which you are academically ready.
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If your score is below program-entry level in writing, study skills, reading and/or mathematics,you should take review courses beginning your first semester at CCD. You are expected to pursue basic skills until you reach college-level competency. Usually,you can enroll in certificate and degree requirement classes at the same time you take review courses. However, if the review course is a prerequisite, you must complete it before enrolling in a higher-level course.
2. English as a Second Language
If English is your second language, you should take tests to assess your level of English. You will take the Levels of English Proficiency (LOEP) Reading and Language Use tests and a listening comprehension test. If your score on the Language Use test is high, you will write a short essay. You will take these tests in the Test Center, South Classroom Building, room 232. When you receive your test scores, talk with an advisor to help you choose the classes you need to improve your English.
CCD Rights
CCD reserves the right to change provisions, requirements and fees in this catalog. Without notice, CCD may cancel any course or program or change its content, description, timing,availability, location,academic creditor any other aspect.
Cooperative Programs with Emily Griffith Opportunity School
CCD provides advanced placement status in various programs to students who have credits from many Emily Griffith programs. See your advisor for details.
Drug-Free Schools
In compliance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendment of 1989, Public Law 101-226, CCD informs all students and employees about its drug and alcohol abuse prevention program.
I. Standard of Conduct. Students and employees shall not engage in the unauthorized or unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, use/abuse of alcohol and/or illicit drugs on college property or use as a part of college activities.
II. Legal Sanctions for Violation of the Standards of Conduct. Any student or employee who is convicted of the unlawful manufacture,distribution, dispensation, production, use/abuse of illicit drugs or alcohol is subject to criminal penalties under local, state and federal law.
These penalties range in severity from a fine of up to $100 to life imprisonment and/or a fine of $8,000,000.
III. Penalties Which May Be imposed by the College.
Students and/or employees who violate the above standard of conduct will be subject to disciplinary action under student and employee disciplinary policies.The
sanctions include, but are not limited to, a requirement to complete an appropriate rehabilitation or re-entry program; expulsion from college or termination of employment; and/or referral to authorities for prosecution; possible loss of financial aid.
IV. Health Risks Associated with Use of Illicit Drugs and Alcohol Abuse. Health risks associated with drug and alcohol abuse include, but are not limited to: malnutrition, brain damage, heart disease, pancreatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, mental illness, death, low birth weight babies, and babies with drug addictions.
V. Available Counseling,Treatment, Rehabilitation or Reentry Programs. Information on available counseling, treatment, rehabilitation or re-entry programs is available through the Colorado Department of Health and as follows:
For Information on Substance Abuse, contact:
MSCD Student Health Clinic SU-140,556-2525 Bethesda PsycHealth System
758-1123 (24 hours)
CCD Referral
SO 134,556-2600
For Information on treatment centers, call:
Adams Community Mental Health Center 287-8001 (24 hours)
Arapahoe Mental Health Center
761-0620
Boulder County Mental Health Center
447-1665 (24 hours)
Denver Mental Health Corporation
377-4300
Jefferson County Mental Health Center
425-0300 (24 hours)
Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974
This act protects the privacy of education records, establishes the right of students to inspect and review their educational records and provides guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings.
Students have the right to file complaints with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by CCD to comply with the act.
The CCD policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the act's provisions. Copies of the policy are available from the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records and the Office of the Vice President for Student Services. These offices also maintain a Directory of Records that lists all educational records maintained on students by CCD.
Please refer questions about the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act to the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records, 556-2430.
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Grades
Grade A A distinguished grade for superior work
1. You mastered the content and objectives of the course, can apply what you learned to new situations and can relate it to other knowledge.
2. You consistently distinguish yourself in examinations, reports, projects, class participation and laboratory or training situations.
3. You show independent thinking in assignments and class discussion.
4. Your work is consistently in proper form, shows satisfactory evidence of careful research (where required) and is submitted punctually.
5. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, you consistently demonstrate superior skills, ability and performance.
6. You complied with the instructor's attendance requirements.
Grade B A better-than-acceptable grade
1. You consistently show mastery of the course content and objectives and usually apply what you learned to new situations or relate it to other knowledge.
2. Your work is in proper form, shows satisfactory evidence of research (where required) and is submitted punctually.
3. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, you consistently demonstrate above average skills, ability and performance.
4. You complied with the instructor's attendance requirements.
Grade C An acceptable grade permitting progress forward in
course sequence
1. You show evidence of a reasonable comprehension of the subject matter of the course and have an average mastery of the content sufficient to indicate success in the next course in the same field.
2. You consistently make average scores in examinations, reports, projects, class participation and laboratory or training situations.
3. If the subject carries transfer credit, your work indicates sufficient competence in the content to continue in the subject field upon transfer.
4. You complete your assignments in good form and on time.
5. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, you consistently demonstrate average skills, ability and performance.
6. You complied with the instructor's attendance requirements.
Grade D A less-than-acceptable, passing grade
1. You fall below the average in examinations, projects, reports, class participation and laboratory or training situations, but show some competence in the assigned subject matter of the course.
2. The competence demonstrated is insufficient to indicate success in the next course in the subject field.
3. Assignments are completed in imperfect form, are sometimes late, or of inconsistent quality.
4. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, you consistently demonstrate below-average skills, ability and performance.
5. You complied with the instructor's attendance requirements.
Grade F A failing grade
1. With respect to examinations, projects, reports, class participation and laboratory or training situations, you fail to perform at the "D" grade level.
2. You show little or no competence in the assigned subject matter of the course.
3. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, you fail to perform at the "D" or above grade level.
4. You did not comply with the instructor's attendance requirements.
Credit/No Credit
CCD offers some courses on a credit/no credit basis. Upon successful completion of such a course, unit credit is awarded. However, courses taken on a credit/no credit basis are not used in the computation of a student's grade point average (GPA). Regulations for such courses follow:
1. In authorized credit/no credit courses, the credit grade is granted for performance equivalent to the letter grade of "C"or better.
2. Credit/no credit-graded courses must be designated by the respective division. Each term,CCD will specify courses that fall into this category in the class schedule. Departments may require majors to obtain letter grades in that department's major subjects.
Grade SP Satisfactory progress
Some courses, designated as open-entry/open-exit, may extend beyond the normal end of a semester. Upon successful completion of such courses, CCD will award unit credits and a grades. Regulations for such courses follow:
1. In courses for which this grade is authorized, the SP will be given in either of the following cases, a. You attended for a full term and show satisfactory progress, but have not yet mastered required course objectives.
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b. Under the college's continuous enrollment policy, you enrolled late in the semester and are making satisfactory progress, but have not had sufficient time to master required course objectives.
2. You may be required to reregister for a course in which you received an SP grade, if you do not complete the course work by the end of the next consecutive 15-week semester. When the remaining time needed for completion is short,or when other extenuating circumstances occur, the dean may waive the requirement for re-enroll-ment.
3. You must, before the end of the term, make arrangements with the instructor to complete the course. If you receive financial aid, you must finish the course within the semester you register. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for more information.
4. An SP grade will revert to NC (no credit) after the end of the next consecutive 15-week term.
5. Home study and on-line courses are open-entry/open-exit and must comply with the above regulations. If you receive financial aid,you must complete the class in the semester in which you enroll for the class.
Grade I Incomplete
1. You have not completed the course requirements due to extenuating circumstances.
2. A minimum of two-thirds of the course work has been satisfactorily completed.
3. You must, before the end of the term, make arrangements with the instructor to complete the course. These arrangements include a formal contract with a deadline date on or before the end of the next 15-week semester.
4. You must complete the necessary course work prior to the deadline date.
5. An 1" grade that is not made up reverts to an "NC" grade.
6. Home study and open-entry/open-exit courses are not eligible for incomplete grades.
Grade W Withdrawal
You officially withdrew from the class after the add/drop deadline as published in the class schedule.
Grade AU Audit
You audited the course.
Grade AW Administrative Withdrawal
You attended one or more class sessions, but too few to be appropriately evaluated or to receive an "I" grade.
Grade Changes
Grade changes are made by the faculty person who administered the grade. In cases where the faculty is not available to consider a grade change, such change may be made by the instructional dean in consultation with the vice presi-
dent for Instruction. Grade appeals go to the dean responsible for the course, then to the vice president for Instruction.
Grade Point Average
Grade points measure your achievement for the number of credits completed. To calculate your grade point average, multiply the number of grade points by the number of credits for each course. Total the credits and points, then divide the grade points by the total number of credits.
A = 4 grade points B = 3 grade points C = 2 grade points D = 1 grade point F = 0 grade points
Note: All other grades (AU, AW, F, & SP) are not calculated into the CCD GPA.
The following example will help you calculate your grade point average:
Course ANT 111 Credits Grade Points
Principles of Anthropology BIO 111 3 A 12(3x4)
General College Biology CIS 115 I5 A 20 (5x4)
Intro, to Computing ENG 121 3 B 9 (3 x 3)
English Comp. Essay Writing POS111 3 D 3(3x1)
American Government 3 F 0 (3 x 0)
TOTALS 17 41
Total grade points divided by total credits equals the cumulative grade point average. Therefore, the grade point average for the above example is 41 divided by 17 for a 2.41 GPA.
Recognition of Achievement or Continuing Education Units (CEU)
CCD offers many courses, conferences, workshops and seminars for upgrading job skills and for personal enrichment. Successful completion of courses of this type may result in the granting of a Recognition of Achievement or a CEU that may be requested from the appropriate instructional division.
Repeating Courses
A. You may repeat a course only once if you receive a D or F grade.
B. You must request a "Petition to Repeat a Course Form from the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records, South Classroom Building, room 133, complete it and turn it in when registering for the class you wish to repeat.
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POLICIES & STANDARDS


C. All forms must be submitted prior to Census Date, posted in the class schedule.
D. You may, while enrolled at CCD, register inter-institution-ally to repeat a course originally taken at CCD at Metropolitan State College of Denver or University of Colorado at Denver.
E. The GPA will be changed only once for the same class.
F. Under extenuating circumstances, you may appeal to the dean of the division responsible for offering a course for permission to retake a course and/or adjust a grade more than once.
Student Code of Conduct
Admission to CCD implies that you agree to respect the rights of others and observe moral and civil laws.
Interference with the normal processes of education in the classroom or elsewhere on the campus will be regarded as unacceptable conduct, warranting suspension or dismissal.
Disciplinary proceedings for violations of standards of conduct are the responsibility of the vice president for Student Services.
Conduct for which students are subject to discipline includes the following factors:
1. Dishonesty, such as cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information to the college.
2. Forgery, alteration or misuse of college documents, records or identification.
3. Obstruction or disruption of teaching, administration, disciplinary procedures or other college activities.
4. Physical abuse of or action that threatens the health or safety of any person on college-owned or controlled property or at college-sponsored functions.
5. Theft of, misuse of, or damage to property.
6. Unauthorized entry to or use of college facilities: unauthorized use of college equipment.
7. Manufacture, possession, control, sale, transmission, or use of any substance in violation of state or federal laws.
(The college has the policy of full cooperation with law enforcement agencies in such cases.)
8. Disorderly, indecent, or obscene conduct on college-owned or controlled property or at college-sponsored functions.
9. Abuse or unauthorized use of alcohol. (See State Liquor Code).
10. Condoning any act by another student that violates college policy.
11. Unauthorized representation or contracting in the name of the Community College of Denver. (A student may not claim to be an official representative of the college for any commercial purpose.)
12. Verbal or written communication that threatens, or unlawfully exposes, any individual or group to hatred, contempt, or ridicule, and thereby injures the person, property, or reputation of another.
13. Sexual harassment, verbal or written, will not be tolerated.
14. Dress that fails to meet established safety or health standards in specific classes and on college-owned or controlled property or at college-sponsored activities.
15. Possession of weapons, fireworks, or explosives.
(Weapons are defined as firearms, knives, explosives, inflammable materials, or any other items that may cause bodily injury or damage to property.)
Student Grievance Procedure
CCD has a grievance procedure for students who believe their rights have been violated. If you have a grievance, contact the vice president for Student Services no later than 15 days after the occurrence.
The Grievance Procedure for Students begins on page 25 of this catalog. Additional copies are available in the Student Life and Activities Office (Tivoli Student Union, room 309) and the Office of the Vice President for Student Services (South Classroom Building, room 305).
Student Recognition
President's Honors List First Honors
Students are selected for the President's Honors List during the semester preceding their graduation from CCD. To be eligible for this academic honor, you must be completing at least 30 semester credit hours in a certificate program, or be completing the requirements for one of the four associate degrees. In addition,you must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.85, based on all courses attempted while enrolled at CCD. Selection for the First Honors List is printed on your permanent academic transcript.
Vice President's Honors List Second Honors
Each semester, students who take six or more credits may be considered for the Vice President's Honors list. To be eligible for this academic honor,you must have completed at least 15 semester credit hours toward a certificate or degree program. In addition, the student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5, based on all courses attempted while enrolled at CCD. You will be notified by mail of this honor. Selection for the Second Honors List is printed on your permanent academic transcript.
Dean's Honors List
Each semester, students who take six or more credits may be considered for the Dean's Honors List. To be eligible for this academic honor, you must have completed at least nine semester credit hours in a certificate or degree program. In addition, you must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0, based on all courses attempted while enrolled at CCD. You will be notified by mail of this honor. Selection for the Dean's Honors List is printed on your permanent academic transcript.
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COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Phi Theta Kappa
Phi Theta Kappa, the national scholastic honorary society for two-year community and junior colleges, recognizes student academic excellence at CCD and promotes academic community at the college.
To be eligible for membership in CCD's Alpha Mu Mu Chapter, you must have a 3.5 grade point average after completing 12 or more credit hours of college-level work, and carry three or more credit hours during the current academic year. Phi Theta Kappa members are honored at graduation for their outstanding academic achievements. Eligible students are invited to join each semester.
In spring 1996, Alpha Mu Mu received two international Hallmark Awards for Distinguished Chapter and Distinguished Chapter President. We scored in the top one percent of more than 1,200 chapters worldwide, based on how our members fulfilled the four hallmarks of leadership, service, scholarship and fellowship. Alpha Mu Mu also received the 1996 Most Distinguished Chapter in the Colorado Region, capturing three Hallmark Awards for outstanding programs in scholarship, leadership and service. In addition, CCD's advisor received the regional Horizon Award for outstanding chapter advisor.
For more information, interested and eligible students should contact any current executive board member or the faculty sponsors by calling 556-4521,556-3848 or 556-2461.
Student Rights and Responsibilities
CCD students have all the rights and responsibilities of other citizens and are subject to the same federal, state and local laws as non-students. As members of the college community, you also are subject to the rules and regulations of the college. If you believe your rights have been violated, you may file a grievance using the Grievance Procedure for Students, which begins on page 25 of this catalog.
A detailed copy of'Students' Rights and Responsibilitiesis available in the Student Life and Activities Office (Tivoli Student Union, room 309) and the Office of the Vice President for Student Services (South Classroom Building, room 305).
Student Right-to-Know Information
Of the 542 first-time, full-time, degree-seeking students who entered CCD in the fall of 1993,34.1 percent either had graduated or transferred to another Colorado public postsecondary institution at the end of three academic years (by the end of summer 1996). Another 12.0 percent were enrolled still at CCD in the fall 1996. The overall completion, transfer and persistence rate of 46.1 percent (34.1 percent +
12.0 percent) is above the statewide community college average of 41.1 percent during the same time period.
2 4
POLICIES
STANDARDS


grievance
1
J
The objective of these procedures is to provide for the prompt, fair and equitable resolution of all student grievances. If you believe your rights or freedoms have been violated, you are advised to use the grievance procedure.
This procedure is not intended to be used when the college takes disciplinary action against a student for violation of the Student Code of Conduct or related student actions. Grievance procedures could apply to college admissions, access to the college, treatment by the college in its educational programs, or college activities.
Student rights and freedoms include, but are not limited to, such things as discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, disability, religion, age and sexual preference, as well as sexual harassment and other provisions of the Students Rights and Responsibilities College Policy.
We hope our students will attempt to resolve problems first through the informal grievance procedure (Step 1 below). If the grievance is not resolved satisfactorily through the informal procedure as detailed in Step 1, students may file a formal written grievance (Step 2). Petitions for change of grade are limited to Step 1. Where a student is uncomfortable discussing the harassment with the alleged harasser, s/he may satisfy the first step by working directly with the vice president for Student Services.
Definitions
A. Grievant: Enrolled student, a client or volunteer who is providing a service to benefit the college under the supervision and control of a college employee. A client or volunteer may only grieve a decision that bans him or her from the campus.
B. Grievance: A grievable offense is any alleged action that violates or inequitably applies written college policies or procedures. The grievant must be personally affected by such violation or inequitable action. A grievance must be brought to the formal stage within 20 calendar days of the date the student knew or reasonably should have known about the action.
C. Vice President for Student Services: The college employee designated by the college president to administer student grievances. Grievances alleging discrimination issues may be referred to the employee responsible for ensuring equal opportunity and access.
D. Remedy: The relief the grievant is requesting.
E Respondent(s): Another student, volunteer, client, faculty member and/or administrator identified by the grievant as causing or contributing to the grievance.
F. Non-grievable matters: The following matters are not grievable under this procedure except as noted: matter over which the college is without authority to act;
grades and other academic decisions unless there is an allegation that the decision was motivated by illegal discrimination; and disciplinary actions taken pursuant to BP 4-30.
Step 1 The Informal Grievance Procedure
Grievant is encouraged to resolve the issue with the respondent or his/her supervisor. In the case of grievances based on one's race, color, creed, national origin or ancestry, disability, age or gender, the grievant may first contact the college employee responsible for affirmative action to seek informal resolution of the issues. If the complaint alleges facts that might constitute a violation of SP 3-120a, concerning sexual harassment, the administrator shall investigate and process the complaint under that procedure. While the grievant is encouraged to resolve the issues through the informal process, he or she may at any time elect to go to the formal stage by following the process outlined below.
Step 2 The Formal Grievance Procedure
A. Grievant timely files a written statement of the actions complained of and describes the remedy he or she is seeking with the vice president for Student Services. A matter could also be referred to this process by the college president or his/her designee. Once a written grievance is filed or referred, the vice president for Student Services or designee will determine whether or not the situation states a grievable offense. The matter will be closed if the situation is determined not grievable and the grievant will be notified of the reasons.
B. If the matter is determined to be grievable, the vice president for Student Services or designee (which may be an individual or a committee) shall hear the grievance. A hearing will be held that will give the grievant, respondent, and others invited to appear, the opportunity to explain what they know about the issues surrounding the grievance. Considering the oral and written statements and documents, the vice president for Student Services or designee shall issue a decision within 10 calendar days of close of the hearing. The decision shall be served upon the grievant and the respondent personally or by certified mail to the addresses on file in the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records. The decision shall reject the grievance or grant the grievance and make recommendation(s) to resolve the issue(s). The vice president for Student Services or designee's decision is final unless a Petition for Review is filed with the president by either party within five (5) calendar days of service of the decision.
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COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


C. Upon receipt of a Petition for Review, the college president will review the record and issue a written decision within 10 calendar days of receipt of the Petition for Review. The president's decision is final.
D. The vice president for Student Services or designee may extend the scheduling timelines described above for good cause.
E. If the grievance is against the vice president for Student Services, the vice president of Instruction or other person designated by the president shall perform the duties of the vice president for Student Services.
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GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE


graduation requi
Degree Requirements
All degrees and certificates will list the degree or certificate only, not the emphasis.
If you are applying for a Community College of Denver (CCD) degree program, you must meet all of the following requirements. The vice president for Instruction may approve exceptions.
1. Complete a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit in approved course work.
2. Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 ("C" average). Courses counting toward the general education core curriculum must be completed with a grade of'C" or higher. Some programs, as stated in the current catalog, may require a student to earn at least a "C" in specific course work. Students should check with their instructional division or advisor for information about the minimum grade point average requirement.
3. Complete a minimum of 15 credits at CCD in the program area.
4. Complete the Academic Profile, a general education assessment, during your final academic semester.
5. Complete your program's capstone course with a"C'or better grade.
6. Complete all courses taken to fulfill general education requirements with a"C"or better.
7. Complete the required survey of all graduating students.
General Education Requirements
All associate degrees have general education requirements that meet goals for general education established by the State Board for Colorado Community Colleges and Occupational Education. They are:
1. to build skills for advanced and lifelong learning.
2. to expose students to the mainstream of thought and interpretation in the humanities, sciences, mathematics, social sciences, communications and the arts.
3. to integrate learning in ways that cultivate a student's broad understanding and ability to think about a large and complex subject, formulate and analyze valid concepts, solve problems and clarify values.
In addition, the following rationale for the Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) general education core curriculum was developed by AA/AS faculty and adopted by CCD, the Colorado Community College and Occupational Education System and the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.
"General education addresses the needs of all students regardless of program area, degree sought, or major since all people share certain experiences and have certain life goals that are unrelated to any specific discipline of study. The core curriculum is that set of courses that satisfy the general education portion of the requirements for an AA,an AS, or an Associate of General Studies (AGS) degree.
All courses in the core curriculum are designed to transfer to baccalaureate, degree-granting colleges and universities. Core courses are academically rigorous and of such quality that transfer students may be assured of their ability to compete successfully on transfer.
"The offerings within the core curriculum are designed to stimulate students to think deeply, clearly and logically about a variety of human questions. These offerings provide a balanced, broadly-based program that will require students to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills, to analyze, synthesize and communicate information, and to use knowledge and technology intelligently and responsibly.
"These core offerings:
expose students to the mainstreams of thought and interpretation in humanities, sciences, communications, mathematics, social sciences and arts, and develop students'understanding of the interrelationships among these fields of study.
expand students' interpersonal, intercultural and international understanding and develop their perceptions of the evolving nature of societies and the interdependence among all peoples.
develop students'skills in self-understanding, oral and written communication, numerical calculations and reasoning to help them achieve personal independence.
develop students'skills in leadership and in group dynamics.
increase students'knowledge of the value of physical and environmental well-being to help them fulfill their roles as citizens within a free and changing society.'
Certificate Requirements
All CCD certificate program graduates must meet the following requirements. The vice president for Instruction may approve exceptions.
1. Complete the specified requirements of an approved vocational/technical program.
2. Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 ("C"). Some programs, as stated in the current catalog, may require you to earn at least a'C'grade in specific course work. Check with your instructional division and your advisor
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COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


for information about the minimum grade point average required for graduation.
3. Complete a minimum of 15 credits in the program area at CCD.
4. Complete the capstone course.
Graduation Requirements
Degrees and certificates will be granted during the semester in which the final requirements are completed. Students need to apply for graduation by the deadline date published in the class schedule. If the deadline date is missed, the student will automatically be added to the next semester graduating class.
If you receive an (I) in a course required for graduation in your final semester, you will not graduate until the semester in which the (I) is replaced by a letter grade. During that semester, you must reapply for graduation. You will not need to retake the Academic Profile.
Students must take at least 15 credit hours at CCD to receive a diploma from this institution.
Other Graduation Policies
1. You can apply no more than six semester hours of courses numbered "299(independent study course work) toward an associate degree program.
2. There is no limit on special topics courses allowed to count toward a degree. In individual cases, the limit is determined by the program area. If you take special topic courses, consult with your advisors about how these credits apply toward a degree.
3. Degrees and certificates will be granted during the semester in which the final requirements are completed. For example, if you receive an (I") in a course required for graduation in your final semester, you will not graduate until the semester in which the ("I") is replaced by a letter grade. During that semester, you must reapply for graduation. You will not need to retake the Academic Profile.
Catalog Requirements for Graduation
You may graduate under the catalog requirements listed for the academic year in which you were first enrolled. If you interrupt attendance for one year or more and then return, the catalog of the re-admission year is the document of authority. If graduation requirements and policies change, you may choose to follow the catalog of the year of initial entry or the current catalog. Obtain and keep a copy of the catalog published the year in which you enter or are readmitted. The instructional division or program will determine the extent to which semester credit hours previously earned will apply to degree requirements listed in the most current college catalog.
The catalog should not be considered a contract between you and CCD. The college retains the right to cancel or change programs or course offerings where enrollments are insufficient or for any other reason. Every course listed in the catalog may not be offered every semester.
Petitioning for Waivers and/or Program Substitutions
Due to extenuating circumstances, you may wish to petition for a waiver and/or substitution of program requirements. You must complete a "Waiver/Program Substitution Request Form." The form is available in each instructional division office.
Please complete the request and have it approved by the program coordinator, the division dean and the vice president for Instruction. The Office of Admissions, Registration and Records will keep the form on file.
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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS


Non-Traditional Learning Programs
The Division of Continuing Education extends campus programs into the community and makes lifelong education and personal development available to all who seek it. We offer college-level courses at times, days and locations convenient for people who cannot enroll in regular on-campus college classes. Continuing Education courses cover the same material as do traditional classes and are offered for the same credit.
Guided Independent Study courses require an amount of work from the average student equal to 135 hours for a 3-credit course (approximating six-nine hours of work per week during a 15 week-semester). Guided Independent Study credit hours are based on identical instructional outcomes and objectives as traditional classroom credit hours and on Community College of Denver's (CCD) existing curricula. These courses demand an equal commitment from you as would any class offered on campus.
For more information about CCD's Continuing Education programs, contact the Division of Continuing Education, 1391 N. Speer Blvd., Suite 200, Denver, (303) 620-4433.
Guided Independent Study: Home Study
You study at home or the office for these open-entry/open-exit credit courses. You have the semester in which you register and the following 15-week semester to complete course work. If you receive financial aid, you have only the semester in which you register to complete course work. After registration, you will attend an orientation. Instructors are available and course materials will explain procedures, assignments and textbook information. Student/instructor contact is by phone, mail and electronic mail (E-mail). See the Schedule of Classes Home Study section for current offerings.
Guided Independent Study: On-line Courses
These credit courses are identical to the home-study courses (see above) except that the primary form of communication is via electronic mail (E-mail) and/or the Internet's World Wide Web (WWW). Students must have access to a computer and an internet provider. Student accounts are available. See the Schedule of Classes On-line Courses section for complete listings.
Guided Independent Study: Television Courses
Televised credit classes (telecourses) offered through Channel 6 and Channel 54 allow maximum flexibility for the busy, self-motivated student. Most of the offerings qualify as core courses that can apply toward certificate or degree programs. After registration, you'll attend an orientation. Instructors are available and you'll receive course materials, assignments and textbook information. Student/instructor contact is by phone, mail and E-mail and optional meetings.
See the Schedule of Classes Television Courses section for complete listings.
Weekend College
Weekend College offers a variety of traditional credit classes on Friday evenings and Saturdays. These courses are offered for students who may not be able to attend classes during the week or have weekday scheduling conflicts. See the Schedule of Classes Weekend College section.
Extended Campus
CCD offers Extended Campus courses for credit at off-campus locations. Credit courses apply toward certificate or associate degree programs.
Business and Industry Services
Business and Industry meets our business community's training needs through credit and non-credit offerings at the work site or at CCD's training center. Companies may select from current college programs or tailored courses and workshops. Training ranges from basic skills to professional management development. Contact the Business and Industry Services director at the Corporate Training Center, 1391 N. Speer Blvd., Suite 200, Denver, (303) 620-4433.
Computer Consulting and Training Services
CCD's state-of-the-art, networked, Pentium-based computer lab offers beginning, intermediate and advanced computer instruction in an expanding range of software packages, including MS-DOS/PC-DOS, Paradox,WordPerfect, Windows, Excel, Lotus 1 -2-3, Quattro Pro, Harvard Graphics, Word, Microsoft Office, Access and Netscape. Call the CIS coordinator at (303) 620-4433.
The Small Business Development Center
The Small Business Development Center (SBDC) provides small business owners and would-be entrepreneurs with guidance in small business planning and start-up preparation, loan package preparation, bid package preparation, contract identification and marketing plan development. SBDC personnel work extensively with grant writing and funding for small businesses with small business computerized databases and information networking. The Small Business Development Center is at 1445 Market St., Denver, CO 80202, (303) 620-8076.
Work and Family Resource Center
The Work and Family Resource Center offers a broad spectrum of services to working families and employers. These include enhanced corporate child care resource and referral, workplace needs assessments and employer consultation, parent-education seminars, advocacy provider recruitment and support services. In addition, we offer a community information and referral telephone counseling service to help citizens find child care. For more information, call (303) 534-3789.
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COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


nmnr
& certificate programs
Definitions
Area of Emphasis
In the Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) Degree programs, the area of emphasis refers to 12 or more credit hours in a subject field in preparation for transfer and selection of a major at a baccalaureate college.
Capstone Courses
These are courses, usually taken during the final semester, in which program competencies are reviewed and assessed.
All courses identified as Capstone courses require a grade of "C"or better for graduation. Capstone courses must be taken at CCD.
Contact Hour
This is a 50-minute period of classroom or lab contact between student and instructor.
Core Curriculum
These are courses that fulfill lower division general education requirements as defined and agreed upon between the State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education and the governing boards of all public four-year institutions in Colorado.
Corequisite
This is a course or requirement that must be completed during the same semester as the course that identifies the corequisite.
Open Entry
This course designation allows the student to start at any time prior to the last date to drop classes published in the Schedule of Classes. The student must complete all course requirements by the end of the semester, regardless of entry date.
Open-entry/Open-exit
This course designation allows students to enroll at any time prior to the last date to drop classes and progress at their own learning pace. If the student does not complete course requirements by the end of the semester, an "SP" (Satisfactory Progress) grade will be given and the student may continue in the course the following semester at no additional tuition charge.
Prerequisite
This is a required course that must be completed satisfactorily before registering for the course that identifies that prerequisite.
Speech Intensive Courses
Associate of Applied Science "Speech Intensive" courses combine the requirements of SPE 115 with the content of vocational classes. Students who transfer a course from another college that is noted as "speech intensive" at CCD may meet the SPE 115 requirements only by taking SPE 115 as a separate course.
Credit Hour
This is the basic unit of academic credit. Generally, one-credit hour is earned by attending a lecture class for a 50-minute period, once a week, for a full semester. In a laboratory course, one-credit hour is granted for two to three 50-minute periods per week in the laboratory.
Credit or Contact Hours in Parenthesis
Course options from which you may choose. These options are not individually included in the total credit or contact hours listed below the parenthetical numbers.
General Education
General Education is the liberal arts component of a baccalaureate degree that may include lower division and upper division courses as defined by each institution.
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READING GUIDE TO DEGREE & CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS


Program Titles and Course Prefixes
Accounting.........................................ACC
Administrative Health Assistant....................AHA
Anthropology ......................................ANT
Appliance Repair Technology........................APT
Art ...............................................ART
American Sign Language.............................ASL
Arabic.............................................ARB
Astronomy..........................................AST
Biology ...........................................BIO
Business Administration ...........................BUS
Business Technology: Office Management and
Secretarial Studies .............................BTE
Business of Travel and Tourism ....................BTT
Chemistry..........................................CHE
Chinese............................................CHN
Commercial Credit Management.......................CRM
Communications ....................................COM
Computer-Aided Drafting............................CAD
Computer Information Systems.......................CIS
Computer Science ..................................CSC
Dental Hygiene.....................................DEH
Drafting for Industry..............................DRI
Early Childhood Education..........................ECE
Economics .........................................ECO
Education..........................................EDU
Electronics Technology.............................ELT
English............................................ENG
English as a Second Language ......................ESL
French.............................................FRE
General Education Development......................GED
Geography..........................................GEO
Geology............................................GEY
Gerontology........................................GNT
Graphic Arts.......................................GRA
Graphic Design.....................................GRD
Health and Wellness Management ....................HWM
Health Occupations ................................HOC
History............................................HIS
Human Services.....................................HSE
Humanities.........................................HUM
Japanese ..........................................JPN
Journalism ........................................JOU
Literature.........................................LIT
Machine and CNC Tool Operator .....................MTO
Magnetic Resonance Imaging ........................MRI
Mammography........................................MAM
Mathematics .......................................MAT
Multimedia Design .................................MUM
Music..............................................MUS
Nuclear Medicine Technology........................NMT
Nursing ...........................................NUR
Nutrition .........................................NUT
Paralegal..........................................PAR
Personal Growth and Development ...................PGD
Philosophy.............................................PHI
Photography............................................PHO
Physics ...............................................PHY
Political Science......................................POS
Postal Service ........................................PST
Psychiatric Technician.................................LPT
Psychology ............................................PSY
Radiography ...........................................RTR
Reading ...............................................REA
Real Estate (Emily Griffith Opportunity School) .......REE
Recreational Assistant ................................RAE
Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning
(Commercial-Industrial) ............................RAC
Science ...............................................SCI
Sociology .............................................SOC
Spanish................................................SPA
Special Learning Support Program ......................SLS
Speech ................................................SPE
Surgical Technology ...................................5TE
Technical Health Assistant.............................THA
Theatre................................................THE
Welding and Fabrication ...............................WEF
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COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE
University Parallel, Transfer Program
An Associate of Arts (AA) degree provides a learning foundation in communications, social science,arts or humanities. Some students work toward the Associate of Arts degree for purposes of personal enrichment. Many others plan to transfer to four-year colleges and universities to continue their work toward baccalaureate degrees and preprofessional training in such fields as law, education, the arts and social sciences.
The Associate of Arts degree is sometimes referred to as a 'university parallel" or "transfer" degree. The general education core requirements, when completed at CCD, meet the lower division general education requirements of all public baccalaureate colleges and universities in the state of Colorado. Students graduating with the AA degree may transfer into liberal arts programs in all public baccalaureate colleges and universities with junior standing. Courses to be counted toward the general education core curriculum must be completed with a grade of"C"or higher. Students planning to transfer should familiarize themselves with the full requirements of the school they plan to attend. These are available in the Transfer Center in South Classroom Building, room 134.
Student Performance Objectives for Transfer Education (AA Degree)
1. Students will plan and write well-structured compositions demonstrating the writing capabilities to express, inform, analyze, evaluate, persuade, argue, conduct research, and use primary and secondary sources logically and stylistically.
2. Students will compose and deliver oral presentations, providing ideas and information, and using delivery skills suitable to the topic, purpose and audience. Students will demonstrate an understanding of speeches and be able to evaluate speeches.
3. Students will read and think critically about a variety of interdisciplinary topics, demonstrating college-level reading skills in a variety of disciplines, including humanities, social sciences and the natural sciences.
4. Students will demonstrate orally and in writing the critical-thinking skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation.
5. Students will analyze and use numerical data and qualitative reasoning skills, including applying proper formulas to mathematical data and calculating results, illustrating quantitative data graphically, rearranging general formulas to solve for any term, and interpreting graphic data and assessing the importance of the portrayed trends.
AA Degree Program Entry
Students must apply for entry to the Associate of Arts degree program. Students are encouraged to apply to a program by the time they have completed 12 credits of 100-level courses. At the time of application, students are encouraged to identify an area of emphasis. Program
application forms are in South Classroom Building, room 134, and division offices. Students should obtain an Advising Transcript from the registrar's office and attach it to the program application.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
2. Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature.
AA Degree Program Requirements
Within the AA degree, the college offers 12 possible areas of emphasis: Art, Behavioral Sciences, Communications, Economics, English/ Literature, History, Humanities/Philosophy, Music, Photography, Political Sciences, Speech or Theatre.The same course may not count toward both general education requirements and an area of emphasis. An area of emphasis consists of four identified courses in one academic area. If students do not select an area of emphasis or have fewer than 60 credit hours with their core courses and area of emphasis, they should take transfer electives as needed to complete the 60 credit hours required for the Associate of Arts degree. Up to 3 credits of physical education may apply toward this degree. All general education core and capstone courses must be completed with a C or better. All graduates of the Associate of Arts (AA) degree must meet the following program requirements.
General Education Core Credit Hours
1. English 6
ENG 121, ENG 122
II. Speech 3
SPE 115
III. Mathematics 3-5
(Select any 1 of the following) MAT 121,125,135,201,202
IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 4-5
(Select any 1 of the following) AST 101,102 BIO 105,111,112 CHE 101,102,111,112 PHY 105,111,112,211,212 GEY 111,121
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
3 2


V. Social & Behavioral Sciences (Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ANT 101,111 ECO 201,202 GEO 105
HIS 101,102,201,202 POS 105,111 PSY 101,102 SOC 101,102
VI. Humanities
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ART 110,111,112 HUM 121,122,123 Any foreign language 111 or higher LIT 115,201,202 MUS 120,121,122 PHI 111,112,113 THE 105,211,212
General Education Sub-Total 34-37
Area of Emphasis (Optional)
and/or electives (Must include a minimum of 6 credit hours in 200-level courses.)
Sub-Total 20-23
Capstone Course 3
HUM 285 Seminar in Critical Thinking or
SCI 285 Critical Thinking
Total Hours 60
Approved Electives for the AA Degree
ANT all courses
ART all courses
AST all courses
BIO 105 and higher
CHE - 101 and higher
COM - all courses
CIS 118
CSC 150,230
ECO - 201 and higher
ENG - 121 and higher
Any foreign language 111 or
GEO - all courses
GEY - all courses
HIS all courses
HUM - all courses
JOU all courses
LIT all courses
MAT - 121 and higher
9 MUS - all courses
PER - all courses
PHI - all courses
PHY - all courses
POS - all courses
PSY - 101 and higher
REA - 151,223 (approved by MSCD only)
SOC - all courses
SPE - all courses
9 THE - all courses
Courses in any prefix whose numbers begin with 0 will not meet requirements for the AA degree. English and math courses with numbers below 121 will not meet requirements for the AA degree.
Credit and Contact Hours
Credits are the hours of credit awarded to the course. An Associate degree requires a minimum of 60 credits. Contacts are the in-class contact hours required for the course. Credit or contact hours in parenthesis, e.g., (3), are options from which students may choose. They also may be course-embedded content.They are not included in the total credit or contact hours listed below. An average full-time student course load is 15 credit hours. An Associate of Arts degree takes four semesters of 15 credits each semester, assuming that all courses taken count toward the degree.
AA Degree Areas of Emphasis
ART EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
ART 122 Drawing ll/Mixed Media (Prerequisite ART 121, Drawing I) 3 90
ART 131 Design I 3 90
ART 211 Painting I 3 90
ART 212 Painting II 3 90
Total 12 360
The following may be taken as Art electives:
ART 132 Design II (3) (90)
ART 151 Fundamentals of Black & White Photography (3) (90)
GRD 100 Lettering & Typographic Design (3) (90)
MUM 101 Intro, to Multimedia (3) (68)
ART 213 Painting III (3) (90)
ART 214 Painting IV (3) (90)
ART 231 Watercolor I (3) (90)
ART 232 Watercolor II
ART 270 Figure Drawing I
ART 290 Special Topics (with instructor consent) 0-3) (15-45)
HUM 285 Seminar in Critical Thinking (Capstone) (3) (45)
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BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES EMPHASIS HISTORY EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
Select four courses from one option, or from among the three options Select 4 courses from the following: 12 180
listed below. At least three must be 200-level courses: HIS 101 Western Civilization 1 (3) (45)
HIS 102 Western Civilization II (3) (45)
Gerontology Emphasis Credits Contacts HIS 201 United States History 1 (3) (45)
GNT 201 Intro, to Gerontology (3) (45) HIS 202 United States History II (3) (45)
GNT 213 Psychology of Aging (3) (45) HIS 225 Colorado History (3) (45)
GNT 214 The Social Aspects of Aging (3) (45) Total 12 180
GNT 215 Aging in a Diverse Society (3) (45)
GNT 221 Services & Resources of the Aging (3) (45) HUMANITIES/PHILOSOPHY EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
GNT 237 Death & Dying (3) (45) PHI 111 intro, to Philosophy 3 45
GNT 297 Leadership Development (3) (45)
*Select 1 course from the following: 3 45
Psychology Emphasis HUM 121 Survey of Humanities 1 (3) (45)
PSY 101 General Psychology 1 (3) (45) HUM 122 Survey of Humanities II (3) (45)
PSY 102 General Psychology II (3) (45) HUM 123 Survey of Humanities III (3) (45)
PSY 227 Psychology of Death & Dying (3) (45)
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth (3) (45) Select 2 courses from the following: 6 90
& Development PHI 112 Ethics (3) (45)
PSY 249 Abnormal Psychology (3) (45) PHI 113 Logic (3) (45)
PSY 295 Leadership Development (3) (45) PHI 115 Myth & Religion (3) (45)
PHI 250 Topics in Philosophy (3) (45)
Sociology Emphasis HUM 116 Intro, to African-American Studies (3) (45)
SOC 101 Intro, to Sociology (3) (45) HUM 121 Survey of Humanities 1 (3) (45)
SOC 102 Intro, to Sociology II (3) (45) HUM 122 Survey of Humanities II (3) (45)
SOC 205 Sociology of Marriage & Family (3) (45) HUM 123 Survey of Humanities III (3) (45)
SOC 215 Contemporary Social Problems (3) (45) HUM 185 Cultural Diversity in the Humanities (3) (45)
SOC 220 Race, Gender, Class, Culture (3) (45) HUM 225 Contemporary Chicano Studies (3) (45)
SOC 237 Death & Dying (3) (45) HUM 250 Topics in Humanities (3) (45)
SOC 260 Sociology of Deviance (3) (45) Total 12 180
Total 12 180
MUSIC EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
COMMUNICATIONS EMPHASIS Credits Contacts MUS 101 Music Theory 1 3 45
SPE 125 Interpersonal Communication 3 45 MUS 102 Music Theory II 3 45
COM 126 Intro, to Mass Media 3 45 MUS 142 Private Instruction (Voice) 1 30
JOU 106 or Fundamentals of Reporting Select 1 course from the following: 3 45
COM 251 Intro, to Television Production 3 45 MUS 120 Music Appreciation (3) (45)
COM 255 Survey of Film 3 45 MUS 121 Survey of Music History 1 (3) (45)
Total 12 180 MUS 122 Survey of Music History II (3) (45)
Total 12 195
ECONOMICS EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
ECO 105 Intro, to Economics 3 45 PHOTOGRAPHY EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45 ART 151 Fundamentals of Photography 3 90
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics 3 45 ART 153 Fundamentals of Color Photography 3 90
Total 9 135
ENGLISH/LITERATURE EMPHASIS Credits Contacts * Students wishing to take the entire sequence of HUM 121, HUM 122, and
Select 4 courses, at least 2 of which are ENG: 12 180 HUM 123 may do so. These three courses also are listed in the third
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 1 (3) (45) grouping.
ENG 132 or Technical Writing II (3) (45)
ENG 221 Creative Writing 1 (3) (45)
ENG 227 Poetry Writing (3) (45)
LIT 115 Intro, to Literature (3) (45)
LIT 201 Masterpieces of Literature 1 (3) (45)
Total 12 180
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 34


Select a total of 6 credits from the following: 6 135-180
ART 157 History of Photography (3) (45)
ART 154 Intermediate Color Photography (3) (90)
ART 152 Intermediate Black & White (3) (90)
Photography
ART 253 View Camera Technique (3) (90)
ART 255 Points of View (Special Topics) (3) (90)
(Workshop at selected locations)
Total 12 315-360
POLITICAL SCIENCE EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
POS 105 Intro, to Political Science 3 45
POS 111 American Government 3 45
POS 125 American State & 3 45
Local Government
POS 205 International Relations 3 45
Total 12 180
SPEECH EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
SPE 125 Interpersonal Communication 3 45
SPE 205 Voice & Diction 3 45
SPE 216 Principles of Speech Communication II 3 45
SPE 219 Group Dynamics 3 45
Total 12 180
THEATRE EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
THE 111 Acting 1 3 45
THE 112 Acting II 3 45
Select 2 courses from the following: 6 90
THE 105 Intro, to Theatre Arts (3) (45)
THE 211 Development ofTheatre 1 (3) (45)
THE 212 Development ofTheatre II (3) (45)
Total 12 180
ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE
University Parallel, Transfer Program
The Associate of Science (AS) degree provides a learning foundation in mathematics and the sciences. Although some students work toward the Associate of Science degree for personal enrichment, many plan to transfer to four-year colleges and universities to continue work toward a baccalaureate degree and professional training in such fields as engineering, medicine, biology, chemistry and physics.
The Associate of Science degree is sometimes referred to as a "university parallel or "transfer degree. The general education core requirements, when completed at CCD, meet the lower division general education requirements of all public Colorado baccalaureate colleges and universities in the state of Colorado. Students graduating with the AS degree may transfer into liberal arts or sciences programs in all Colorado public baccalaureate colleges and universities with junior standing. Courses to be counted toward the general education core curriculum must be completed with a grade of "Cor higher. Students planning to transfer should familiarize themselves with the full requirements of the school they plan to attend. These are available in the Transfer Center in South Classroom Building, room 134.
Student Performance Objectives for Transfer Education (AS Degree)
1. Students will plan and write well-structured compositions demonstrating the writing capabilities to express, inform, analyze,evaluate, persuade, argue, conduct research, and use primary and secondary sources logically and stylistically.
2. Students will compose and deliver oral presentations, providing ideas and information, and using delivery skills suitable to the topic, purpose and audience. Students will demonstrate an understanding of others' speeches and be able to evaluate others' speeches.
3. Students will read and think critically about a variety of interdisciplinary topics, demonstrating college-level reading skills in a variety of disciplines, including humanities, social sciences and the natural sciences.
4. Students will demonstrate orally and in writing the critical-thinking skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation.
5. Students will analyze and use numerical data and qualitative reasoning skills including applying proper formulas to mathematical data and calculating results, illustrating quantitative data graphically, rearranging general formulas to solve for any term, and interpreting graphic data and assessing the importance of the portrayed trends.
AS Degree Program Entry
Students must apply for entry into the Associate of Science degree program. Students are encouraged to apply to a program by the time they have completed 12 credits of 100-level courses. At the time of application, students are encouraged to identify an area of emphasis. Program application forms are in SO 134 and SO 306. Students should obtain an Advising Transcript from the Registrar's Office and attach it to the program application. To complete the program application, the student will need to meet with a designated advisor for his or her probable emphasis area.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
2. Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature.
AS Degree Program Requirements
Within the Associate of Science degree, the college offers eight areas of emphasis: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Science, Mathematics, Medical Cluster, Pre-Engineering Cluster and Physics.The same course may not count both toward general education requirements and toward an area of emphasis. If students do not select an area of emphasis or have fewer than 60 credit hours with their core courses and area of emphasis, they should take transfer electives as needed to complete the 60 credit hours required for the Associate of Science degree. Up to three credits of physical education may count
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toward this degree. All general education core and capstone courses must be completed with a C or better. All graduates of the Associate of Science (AS) degree must meet the following program requirements.
General Education Core Contact Hours
I. English 6
ENG 121,122
II. Speech 3
SPE115
III. Mathematics 4-5
(any 1 of the following)
MAT 121,125,201,202
IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 8-10
(any 2 of the following)
AST 101,102 BIO 111,112 CHE 111,112 GEY 111,121 PHY 111,112,211,212
V. Social & Behavioral Sciences 6
(6 credit hours from 2 disciplines)
ANT 101,111 ECO 201,202 GEO 105
HIS 101,102,201,202 POS 105,111 PSY 101,102 SOC 101,102
VI. Humanities 6 (any 2 of the following)
ART 110,111,112
HUM 121,122,123
Any foreign language 111 or higher
LIT 115,201,202
MUS 120,121,122
PHI 111,112,113
THE 105,211,212
Approved Electives for the AS Degree
An area of emphasis consists of four identified courses in one academic area. Students who do not select an area of emphasis or who have fewer than 60 credit hours with their core courses and their area of emphasis should take general electives as needed to complete the 60 credit hours required for the Associate of Science degree.
Approved Electives for the AS Degree
ANT - all courses
ART - all courses
AST - all courses
BIO - 111 and higher
CHE - 111 and higher
COM - all courses
CIS - 118
CSC - 150,230
ECO - 201 and higher
ENG - 121 and higher
Any foreign language 111 or higher
GEO - all courses
GEY - all courses
HIS - all courses
HUM - all courses
JOU - all courses
LIT - all courses
MAT - 121 and higher
MUS - all courses
PER - all courses
PHI - all courses
PHY - 111 and higher
POS - all courses
PSY - 101 and higher
REA - 151,223 (approved by MSCD only)
SOC - all courses
SPE - all courses
THE - all courses
General Education Sub-Total 33-36
Area of Emphasis (Optional)
and/or electives 21-24
(12 credits must be in science or math prefixes, 6 credits must be in 200-level courses)
Capstone Course 3
HUM 285 Seminar in Critical Thinking or
SCI 285 Critical Thinking
Total 60
Any course whose number begins with a "0" in any prefix will not meet requirements for the AS degree. English and mathematics courses must be numbered 121 or above.
Credit and Contact Hours
Credits are the hours of credit awarded to the course. An Associate degree requires a minimum of 60 credits. Contacts are the in-class contact hours required for the course. Credit or contact hours in parenthesis, e.g., (3) are options from which students may choose. They also may be course-embedded content.They are not included in the total credit or contact hours listed below. An average full-time student course load is 15 credit hours. An Associate of Science degree takes four semesters of 15 credits each semester assuming that all courses taken count toward the degree.
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 36


Areas of Emphasis for the AS Degree
Students should complete the courses listed under the emphasis area if planning to transfer to a four-year degree program in one of these emphasis areas, or planning to enter a professional school in an area listed. An associate degree can be earned without completing an emphasis area, and associate degree requirements may be fulfilled before all the courses listed under an area of emphasis have been completed. Any courses completed beyond those required for an associate degree can be applied to a four-year degree program. Courses shown In bold under the emphasis area meet core requirements. Students must complete a total of 60 semester hours for the associate degree.
Of these, 21-24 must be from courses listed below having science or math prefixes and not used to fulfill the core requirements. Requirements in four-year or professional programs sometimes change yearly. We recommend students speak frequently with the appropriate advisor in the Division of Science and Technology (SO 306) while completing degree requirements.
BIOLOGY EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
BIO 111 General College Biology I 5 90
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 90
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 105
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trigonometry 3 45
PHY 111 Physics: Algebra-Based 1 5 105
PHY 112 Physics: Algebra-Based II 5 105
Total 37 705
CHEMISTRY EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 105
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trigonometry 3 45
MAT 201 Calculus 1 5 75
MAT 202 Calculus II 5 75
PHY 111 Physics: Algebra-Based 1 5 105
PHY 112 Physics: Algebra-Based II 5 105
Total 37 675
COMPUTER SCIENCE EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
CSC 150 PASCAL Programming 3 45
CSC 230 C++ Programming 1 3 45
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trigonometry 3 45
MAT 135 Intro, to Statistics 3 45
MAT 201 Calculus 1 5 75
MAT 202 Calculus II 5 75
PHY 211 Physics: Calculus-Based 1 5 105
PHY 212 Physics: Calculus-Based II 5 105
Total 40 668
Recommended:
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
EARTH SCIENCE EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
BIO 112 General College Biology II (5) (90)
GEY 111 Physical Geology (4) (60)
GEO 105 Geography (3) (45)
BIO 118 Human Ecology & the Environment
or
GEO 200 Human Ecology (3) (45)
or
GEY 225 Planet Earth (3) (45)
Total 13-14 195-225
ENGINEERING CLUSTER
PRE-ENGINEERING GENERAL EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
MAT 201 Calculus 1 5 75
MAT 202 Calculus II 5 75
MAT 203 Calculus III 4 60
MAT 3191 Applied Linear Algebra (CU-Denver) 3 45
MAT 3200 Elementary Differential Equations
(CU-Denver) 3 45
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
PHY 211 Physics: Calculus-Based 1 5 105
PHY 212 Physics: Calculus-Based II 5 105
Total 35 615
Also required for Applied Mathematics majors:
CSC 150 PASCAL Programming 3 45
ENGR 1025 Engineering Graphics/CAD
(CU-Denver) 3 45
Also required for Computer Science majors:
CSC 150 PASCAL Programming 3 45
CSC 2421 Data Structures & Program Design
(CU-Denver) 3 45
CSC 1510 Logic Design (CU-Denver) 3 45
Also required for Electrical Engineering majors:
CSC 150 PASCAL Programming 3 45
CSC 1510 Logic Design (CU-Denver) 3 45
ME 2023 Statics (CU-Denver) 3 45
ME 2033 Dynamics (CU-Denver) 3 45
Also required for Civil Engineering majors:
GEY 111 Physical Geology 4 60
CSC 1100 Computing with FORTRAN (CU-Denver) 3 45
ENGR 1025 Engineering Graphics/CAD
(CU-Denver) 3 45
CE 2121 Analytical Mechanics 1 (CU-Denver) 3 45
Also required for Mechanical Engineering majors:
CSC 1100 Computing with FORTRAN (CU-Denver) 3 45
ENGR 1025 Engineering Graphics/CAD
(CU-Denver) 3 45
ME 2023 Statics (CU-Denver) 3 45
ME 2033 Dynamics (CU-Denver) 3 45
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MATHEMATICS EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trigonometry 3 45
MAT 135 Intro, to Statistics 3 45
MAT 201 Calculus 1 5 75
MAT 202 Calculus II 5 75
MAT 203 Calculus III 4 60
MAT 265 Ordinary Differential Equations 3 45
Total 27 405
MEDICAL CLUSTER
PRE-DENTAL EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
BIO 111 General College Biology 1 5 90
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 90
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 105
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trigonometry 3 45
PHY 111 Physics: Algebra-Based 1 5 105
PHY 112 Physics: Algebra-Based II 5 105
Total 37 705
PRE-MEDICAL EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
BIO 111 General College Biology 1 5 90
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 90
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 105
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trigonometry 3 45
PHY 111 Physics: Algebra-Based 1 5 105
PHY 112 Physics: Algebra-Based II 5 105
Select 2 courses from the following: 6 90
LIT 115 Intro, to Literature (3) (45)
LIT 201 Masterpieces of Literature 1 (3) (45)
LIT 202 Masterpieces of Literature II (3) (45)
Total 43 795
PRE-MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
BIO 201 Anatomy & Physiology 1 4 75
BIO 205 Microbiology 4 75
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 105
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trigonometry 3 45
MAT 135 Intro, to Statistics 3 45
PHY 111 Physics: Algebra-Based 1 5 105
PHY 112 Physics: Algebra-Based II 5 105
Total 38 720
PRE-PHARMACY EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
BIO 111 General College Biology 1 5 90
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 90
BIO 215 Microbiology 4 75
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 105
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trigonometry 3 45
MAT 201 Calculus 1 5 75
Select 2 courses from the following: 6 90
ANT 101 Cultural Anthropology (3) (45)
HIS 101 Western Civilization 1 (3) (45)
HIS 102 Western Civilization II (3) (45)
HIS 201 United States History 1 (3) (45)
HIS 202 United States History II (3) (45)
PSY 101 General Psychology 1 (3) (45)
PSY 102 General Psychology II (3) (45)
SOC 101 Intro, to Sociology 1 (3) (45)
SOC 102 Intro, to Sociology II (3) (45)
Total 42 735
PRE-PHYSICAL EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
BIO 111 General College Biology 1 5 90
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 90
BIO 201 Anatomy & Physiology 1 4 75
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 105
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trigonometry 3 45
MAT 135 Intro, to Statistics 3 45
PHY 111 Physics: Algebra-Based 1 5 105
PHY 112 Physics: Algebra-Based II 5 105
Select 2 courses from the following: 6 90
PSY 101 General Psychology 1 (3) (45)
PSY 102 General Psychology II (3) (45)
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & (3) (45)
Development
PSY 249 Abnormal Psychology (3) (45)
Total 50 915
PRE-PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
BIO 111 General College Biology 1 5 90
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 90
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 105
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 135 Intro, to Statistics 3 45
PSY 101 General Psychology 1 3 45
PSY 102 General Psychology II 3 45
Total 33 585
PRE-VETERINARIAN SCIENCE EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
BIO 111 General College Biology 1 5 90
BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 90
CHE 111 General College Chemistry 1 5 105
CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 105
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trigonometry 3 45
MAT 135 Intro, to Statistics 3 45
PHY 111 Physics: Algebra-Based 1 5 105
Total 35 645
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 38


PHYSICS EMPHASIS Credits Contacts
MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60
MAT 122 Trigonometry 3 45
MAT 201 Calculus 1 5 75
MAT 202 Calculus II 5 75
PHY 211 Physics: Calculus-Based 1 5 105
PHY 212 Physics: Calculus-Based II 5 105
Total 20 405
ASSOCIATE OF GENERAL STUDIES DEGREE
CCD offers two types of Associate of General Studies degrees. Both require the lower division core general education courses that transfer to all majors at all state baccalaureate colleges and universities. Only grades of C or better are acceptable for the core general education requirements. Up to three credits of physical education may apply toward this degree.
1. The Associate of General Studies-Generalist Degree (AGS-G).
In addition to the general education core requirements, the degree allows students to self-select 23 credits of transfer and/or career courses. The general education core courses fully meet the general education requirements of all baccalaureate schools.
Transferability of the career courses is not guaranteed. If students select this option, they should request and consult with a faculty advisor. Students are strongly encouraged to develop specific career goals and to transfer to the CCD degree program appropriate to those goals.
Entry requirements: the AGS-G degree is the only degree that does not require application for program entry. All CCD certificate and degree-seeking students are classified as Associate of General Studies-Generalist students until they apply and are accepted into another certificate or degree program. Any CCD career/vocational course from any CCD campus may count as an elective for the AGS-Generalist degree. All students who pursue this degree plan should be assigned to a faculty advisor after completing 12 semester hours.
Program Admission Requirements
None
2. All other Associate of General Studies (AGS) Degrees.
Most AGS degrees (with the exception of the AGS-G degree) are the result of articulation agreements and provide a transfer option for students in vocational programs. The career courses are fully transferable only into the particular program and college identified by the articulation agreement. Consult with a faculty advisor.
Entry requirements: students must apply for entry. Students are encouraged to apply to a program by the time they have completed 12 credits of 100-level courses. At the time of application, students must identify which Associate of General Studies degree program they desire to enter. Program application forms are in South Classroom Building, room 134, and appropriate division offices. Entry requirements are the same as for the matching AAS degree.
Program Admission Requirements
See individual articulated degree options.
Credit and Contact Hours
Credits are the hours of credit awarded to the course. An Associate degree requires a minimum of 60 credits. Contacts are the in-class contact hours required for the course. Credit or contact hours in parenthesis, e.g., (3) are options from which students may choose. They also may be course-embedded content.They are not included in the total credit or contact hours listed below. An average full-time student course load is 15 credit hours. An Associate of General Studies degree of 60 credit hours takes four semesters of 15 credits each semester assuming that all courses count toward the degree. AGS degrees of more than 60 credit hours may take more than four semesters to complete.
AGS Degree Program Requirements All AGS degrees require the following:
Credit Hours
General Education Core Courses 34-37
Electives or Courses Prescribed by
Articulation Agreements 20-23
Capstone Course 3
Total 60
Courses to be counted toward the core General Education requirement must be completed with a grade of"Cor better.
ASSOCIATE OF GENERAL STUDIES-GENERALIST DEGREE (AGS-G)
All CCD certificate and degree-seeking students are classified as Associate of General Studies-Generalist students until they apply and are accepted into another certificate or degree program. Students remain in the AGS-G program if they want to complete a broad program of both career and transfer courses without the constraints of specialization.
The AGS-G general education core curriculum transfers to and fully meets the lower division general education requirements of all public baccalaureate colleges and universities in Colorado. Transferability of AGS-G career courses depends upon the courses taken and the receiving institution. Students should see their advisors. All students who have completed 12 college-level credits should see a faculty advisor in their area of interest.
Students may take either the Associate of Arts (AA) core curriculum or the Associate of Science (AS) core curriculum. The AA core follows.
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General Education AA Core Credits Hours
I. English 6
ENG 121,ENG 122
II. Speech 3
SPE 115
III. Mathematics 3-5
(any 1 of the following)
MAT 121,125,135,201,202
IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 4-5
(any 1 of the following)
AST 101,102 BIO 105,111,112 CHE 101,102,111,112 PHY 105,111,112,211,212 GEY 111,121
V. Social & Behavioral Sciences 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ANT 101,111 ECO 201,202 GEO 105
HIS 101,102,201,202 POS 105,111 PSY 101,102 SOC 101,102
VI. Humanities* 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ART 110,111,112
HUM 121,122,123
Any foreign language 111 or higher
LIT 115,201,202
MUS 120,121,122
PHI 111,112,113
THE 105,211,212
* Many four-year schools prefer a concentration of 2 classes in same prefix.
General Education Sub-Total 34-37
* Elective Sub-Total (Must include a minimum of 6 hours in 200-level courses.) 20-23
Capstone Course 3
HUM 285 Seminar in Critical Thinking or
SCI 285 Critical Thinking
Total 60
* Any course whose number begins with "Of in any prefix will not meet requirements for theAGS-G degree. English and mathematics courses numbered before the core general education courses will not meet requirements for the AGS-G All general education and capstone courses must be completed with a "Cor better for all AGS degrees.
ASSOCIATE OF GENERAL STUDIES ARTICULATED DEGREES
Associate of General Studies Degree BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (AGS-BUS)
This is a business transfer agreement between Colorado public community colleges and Colorado public four-year institutions of higher education. In accordance with HB 85-1187 and SB 93-136, the Schools of Business agree to the following policies and conditions governing the transfer of credit earned at a Colorado community college into a business program offered at any of the Colorado public four-year colleges and universities participating.
Community college students who completed the Colorado community college core curriculum, as certified on their community college transcript, are considered to have satisfied the college's lower division general education requirements. The following courses represent the CCD/Colorado Commission on Higher Education transfer agreement in business. Students completing these courses will be admitted as juniors in the Colorado public four-year colleges and universities participating in this agreement (Adams State College, Colorado State University, Ft. Lewis College, Mesa State College, Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD), University of Colorado at Denver (CU-Denver) and Western State College).
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
2. Completion of ACC 121 with a C or better grade.
General Education AA Core Credit Hours
(AS General Education Core is acceptable)
I. English 6
ENG 121,ENG 122
II. Speech 3
SPE 115
III. Mathematics 3-5
(Select any 1 of the following)
MAT 121,*124,125,135,201,202
IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 4-5
(Select any 1 of the following)
AST 101,102 BIO 105,111,112 CHE 101,102,111,112 PHY 105,111,112,211,212 GEY 111,121
V. Social & Behavioral Sciences 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ANT 101,111 ECO 201,202 GEO 105
HIS 101,102,201,202 POS 105,111 PSY 101,102 SOC 101,102
* recommended for all business majors
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 40


VI. Humanities 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ART 110,111,112
HUM 121,122,123
Any foreign language 111 or higher
LIT 115,201,202
MUS 120,121,122
PH1111,112,113
THE 105,211,212
General Education Sub-Total 34-37
Course Requirements for Area of Emphasis in the College of Business Administration
Institutions will accept in transfer the following business courses:
Credits Contacts
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business 3 45
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 226 Business Statistics 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
'BUS 228 Principles of Management 3 45
'BUS 236 Principles of Marketing 3 45
* The following prerequisite course completions are required before enrolling in BUS 228 and BUS 236: ACC 121,122, ECO 202, MAT 135 (or BUS 226), BUS 115 and sophomore standing.
Business Course Sub-Total Hours 30 503
Capstone Course (Required)
SCI 285 or HUM 285 Critical Thinking 3 45
Total 67-68 043-1158
Associate of General Studies Degree: MSCD/CU-Denver GRAPHIC DESIGN (AGS-GRD)
The following courses represent CCD/MSCD and CCD/CU-Denver Fine Arts transfer agreements. Students completing these degree requirements will have completed their lower division general education requirements and will be admitted to MSCD or CU-Denver as juniors in Fine Arts.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
2. Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature.
General Education Core Credit Hours
I. English 6
ENG 121 English Composition I
ENG 122 English Composition II
II. Speech 3
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
III. Mathematics 3-5
(any 1 of the following)
MAT 121,125,135,201,202
IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 4
(any 1 of the following)
AST 101,102; BIO 105,111,112;
CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111,112;
PHY 105,111,112,211,212.
V. Social & Behavioral Sciences 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ANT 101,111, ECO 201,202; GEO 105;
HIS 101,102,201,202; POS 105,111;
PSY 101,102; SOC 101,102
VI. Humanities 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ART 110,111,112; HUM 121,122,123;
LIT 115,201,202; FRE, SPA, JPN,
MUS 120,121,122; PHI 111,112,113;
THE 105,211,212
General Education Sub-Total 34-36
Major Requirements (MSCD ONLY)
*ART 111 Art History 1 3
*ART 112 Art History II 3
ART 121 Drawing 1 3
ART 131 Design 1 3
ART 132 Design II 3
GRD 100 Lettering & Typographic Design 3
GRD 103 MAC Computer Art 3
GRD 105 Advertising Typography & Layout 3
GRD 207 Graphic Design Production & Prepress II 3
Capstone Course
GRD 285 Creative Graphic Design & Portfolio Preparation 3
* Students who take ART 111 and ART 112 as general education should add ART 122 and GRD 200.
Arts Subtotal 30
Total 64-66
Major Requirements (CU-Denver ONLY)
ART 121 Drawing I 3
ART 131 Design I 3
ART 211 Painting I 3
GRD 100 Lettering & Typographic Design 3
GRD 103 MAC Computer Art 3
GRD 105 Advertising Typography & Layout 3
GRD 200 Advertising Design & Portfolio 3
Preparation (Speech Intensive)
4 1
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


GRD 206 Graphic Design Production & Prepress 1 3
GRD 207 Graphic Design Production & Prepress II 3
Capstone Course
GRD 285 Creative Graphic Design & Portfolio Preparation 3
Arts Subtotal 30
Total 64-66
Associate of General Studies Degree: MSCD HUMAN SERVICES (AGS-HSE)
The following courses represent CCD/MSCD Human Services transfer agreement. Students completing these degree requirements will be admitted to MSCD as juniors in Human Services.
Major Requirements
HSE 106 Survey of Human Services 3 45
Offered Fall Semester Only:
HSE 107 Interviewing Principles & Practices 3 45
HSE 205 Human Services for Groups 3 45
HSE 206 Human Services for Families 3 45
HSE 211 Human Services Practicum II 4 150
Offered Spring Semester Only:
HSE 108 Intro, to Therapeutic Systems 3 45
HSE 115 Human Services Practicum I 4 150
HSE 212 Human Services Practicum III 7 285
(Capstone)
Total 64-67 1320-1365
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 1 b or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
2. Signature authorization on program application from HSE faculty advisor.
General Education AA Core Credits
I. English 6
ENG 121 English Composition I
ENG 122 English Composition II
II. Speech 3
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
III. Mathematics 3-5
MAT 121,125,135,201,202
IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 4-5
AST 101,102; BIO 105,111,112;
CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111;
PHY 105,111,112,211,212.
V. Social & Behavioral Sciences 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ANT 101,111; ECO 201,202; GEO 105;
HIS 101,102,201,202; POS 105,111;
PSY 101,102; SOC 101,102
VI. Humanities 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ART 110,111,112; HUM 121,122,123;
LIT 115,201,202; FRE, SPA, JPN,
MUS 120,121,122; PHI 111,112,113;
THE 105,211,212
General Education Sub-Total 34-37
Contacts
90
45
45-75
60-75
135
135
510-555
Associate of General Studies Degree: CU-Denver PARALEGAL (AGS-PAR)
The following courses represent the CCD/CU-Denver paralegal transfer agreements. Students completing these degree requirements will have completed their lower division general education requirements and will be admitted to the CU-Denver as juniors in sociology or political science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS).
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
2. Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature.
General Education AA Core Credit Hours
I. English 6
ENG 121 English Composition I
ENG 122 English Composition II
II. Speech 3
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
III. Mathematics 3-5
(any 1 of the following)
MAT 121,125,135,201,202
IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 4-5
(any 7 of the following)
AST 101,102; BIO 105,111,112;
CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111,
112; PHY 105,111,112,211,212.
V. Social & Behavioral Sciences 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ECO 201,202; GEO 105; HIS 101,102,
201,202; POS 105,111; PSY 101,102;
SOC 101,102
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 42


VI. Humanities 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ART 110,111,112; HUM 121,122,123;
LIT 115,201,202; FRE, SPA, JPN,
MUS 120,121; PHI 111,112,113;
THE 105,211,212
General Education Sub-Total 34-37
Major Requirements
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3
PAR 121 Intro, to Paralegal 3
PAR 124 Legal Research 3
PAR 221 Civil Procedures 3
PAR 222 Evidence 3
PAR 223 Computers & the Law 3
PAR 280 Paralegal Workshop 6
PAR 285 Paralegal II Synthesis (Capstone) 3
Total 27
Select 9 hours from any of the following: 9
PAR 105 Torts (3)
PAR 109 Property (3)
PAR 115 Domestic Relations (3)
PAR 125 Tax Law (3)
PAR 126 Creditor/Debtor/Bankruptcy (3)
PAR 201 Business Organizations (3)
PAR 205 Probate (3)
PAR 207 Legal Research Seminar 1 (3)
PAR 208 Legal Research Seminar II (3)
PAR 214 Administrative Law (3)
PAR 231 Investigations 1 (3)
PAR 239 Criminal Law (3)
PAR 241 Environmental Law 1 (3)
PAR 252 Constitutional Law (3)
PAR 258 Contracts (3)
PAR 297 Cooperative Education (3-6)
PAR 299 Independent Study (1-3)
Total 65-66
Associate of General Studies Degree: MSCD/CU-Denver PHOTOGRAPHY (AGS-PHO)
The following courses represent the CCD/MSCD and CCD/CU-Denver Fine Arts transfer agreements. Students completing these degree requirements will have completed their lower division general education requirements and will be admitted to MSCD or CU-Denver as juniors in fine arts.
Recommended Humanities General Education Requirement
ART 111,112, Art History I & II
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
General Education AA Core Credit Hours
I. English 6
ENG 121 English Composition I
ENG 122 English Composition II
II. Speech 3
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
III. Mathematics 3-5
(any 1 of the following)
MAT 121,125,135,201,202
IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 3-5
(any 1 of the following)
AST 101,102;BIO 105, 111, 112
CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111,112;
PHY 105,111,112,211,212.
V. Social & Behavioral Sciences 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ANT 101,111; ECO 201,202; GEO 105;
HIS 101,102,201,202; POS 105,111;
PSY 101,102; SOC 101,102
VI. Humanities 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
*ART 110,111,112; HUM 121,122,123;
LIT 115,201,202; FRE, SPA, JPN,
MUS 120,121,122; PH1111,112,113;
THE 105,211,212
* Must be taken as general education or extra electives.
General Education Sub-Total 33-37
Major Requirements
ART 121 Drawing I 3
ART 131 Design I 3
PHO 101 Fundamentals of Photography 3
PHO 102 Fundamentals of Color Photography 3
PHO 111 Intermediate Black & White Photography 3
PHO 112 Intermediate Color Photography 3
Select 1 course from the following: 3
PHO 201 View Camera Techniques (3)
PHO 202 Studio Lighting (3)
PHO 203 The Fine Print (3)
Select 1 course from the following: 3
PHO 211 Portrait Photography (3)
PHO 212 Landscape Photography (3)
PHO 213 Craft & Expression (3)
4 3
COMMUNITY COLLEGE Of DENVER


Electives
Select a minimum of 3 credit hours from the following: 3
PHO 205 Photography Workshop (3)
PHO 215 Seminar in Photography (3)
GRD 103 MAC Computer Art (3)
GRD 105 Advertising Typography & Layout (3)
BUS 115 Intro, to Business (3)
PHO 107 History of Photography (3)
PHO 297 Cooperative Education (3)
CU-Denver will not accept
Capstone Course
PHO 285 Seminar in Photography 3
Total 63-67
Associate of General Studies Degree: MSCD
TEACHER EDUCATION: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
(AGS-ECE)
The following courses represent the CCD/MSCD Early Childhood Education (ECE) Teacher Education 2-plus-3 transfer agreement. Students completing degree requirements will be admitted to MSCD as juniors in the ECETeacher Education program. A grade ofC"or better is required in all degree classes. Graduate exit competency is measured by successful completion ("Cor better) of the ECE capstone course.
Any student not completing CCD's capstone course must successfully complete with a"C"or better the exit competency test prior to approval of graduation.
V. Social & Behavioral Sciences 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ANT 101, 111; ECO 201,202; GEO 105;
HIS 101,102,201,202; *PSY 101 or 102;
*SOC 101 or 102
VI. Humanities 9
ART 110,111,112; HUM 121,122,123;
Any foreign language 111 or higher; LIT 115,201,202;
MUS 120,121,122; PHI 111,112,113;
THE 105,211,212
General Education Sub-Total 34-36
* Required for Colorado Department of Human Resources Director License ** Required courses to complete MSCD ECE Teacher Education requirements.
Teacher Education majors will need to declare an academic major when they transfer to MSCD. Courses from the CCD core may be used for lower division major or minor courses.
Major Requirements
The MSCD courses that will substitute for CCD courses are listed in parentheses.
ECE 101 Intro, to ECE (MSCD 234-4) 3
ECE 102 ECE Lab Experience (MSCD 235-2) 2
ECE 110 Child Growth & Development (MSCD PSY 180-4) 4
ECE 115 Curriculum: Creative Activities (MSCD EDU 236-3) 3
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 4 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
General Education Credit Hours
1. English **ENG 121 English Composition I **ENG 122 English Composition II 6
II. Speech **SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3
III. Mathematics (any 1 of the following) MAT **121,125,**135,201,202 3-4
IV. Physical & Biological Sciences (any 1 of the following) AST 101,102; BIO **105,111,112; CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111; PHY 105,111,112,211,212. 4-5
Electives or Contract Minor
These courses may be used as electives or contract minor courses but
DO NOT substitute for MSCD-ECE licensure courses:
ECE 105 Nutrition & the Young Child 3
ECE 111 Infants & Toddlers: Developmental (3)
Theories & Practices (Optional)
ECE 117 MethodsVTechniques:
Curriculum Development Theories & Practices 3
ECE 120 Classroom Management Techniques 3
Capstone Course
ECE 126 Administration of ECE Programs 4
Total 60-65
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 44


Associate of General Studies Degree: MSCD
TEACHER EDUCATION: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION/
VIOLENCE COUNSELING (AGS-ECE/VC)
The following courses represent the CCD/MSCD Early Childhood Education (ECE) Teacher Education 2-plus-3 transfer agreement. Students completing degree requirements will be admitted to MCSD as juniors in the ECE Teacher Education program. A grade of"C"or better is required in all degree classes. Graduate exit competency is measured by successful completion ("C"or better) of the ECE capstone course. Any student not completing CCD's capstone course must successfully complete with a "Cor better the exit competency test prior to approval of graduation.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 4 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
General Education Core Credit Hours
I. English 6
ENG 121 English Composition I
**ENG 122 English Composition II
II. Speech 3
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
III. Mathematics 3-4
(any 1 of the following)
MAT **121,125, **135,201,202
IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 4-5
(any I of the following)
AST 101,102; BIO **105,111,112;
CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111;
PHY 105,111,112,211,212.
V. Social & Behavioral Sciences 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ANT 101,111; ECO 201,202; GEO 105;
HIS 101,102,201,202; *PSY 101 or 102;
*SOC101 or 102
VI. Humanities 9
ART 110,111,112; HUM 121,122,123;
Any foreign language 111 or higher; LIT 115,201,202;
MUS 120,121,122; PHI 111,112,113;
THE 105,211,212
General Education Sub-Total 34-36
* Required for Colorado Dept, of Human Resources Director License ** Required courses to complete MSCD ECE Teacher Education requirements.
Teacher Education majors will need to declare an academic major when they transfer to MSCD. Courses from the CCD core may be used for lower division major or minor courses.
Major Requirements
The MSCD Courses that will substitute for CCD courses are listed in parentheses.
ECE 110 Child Growth & Development (MSCD PSY 180-4) 4
ECE 115 Curriculum: Creative Activities (MSCD EDU 236-3) 3
ECE 171 Intro, to ECE/Violence Counseling (MSCD EDU 234-3) 3
ECE 172 ECE Field Experience: ECE Violence Counseling Strategies (MSCD EDU 235-2) 3
Electives or Contract Minor
These courses may be used as electives or contract minor courses but DO NOT substitute for MSCD ECE licensure courses:
ECE 105 Nutrition & the Young Child 3
ECE 111 Infants & Toddlers: Developmental Theories & Practices (Optional) (3)
ECE 117 Methods/Techniques: Curriculum Development 3
ECE 120 Classroom Management Techniques 3
ECE 225 Curriculum: Anti-Bias 3
ECE 271 ECE Violence Counseling Strategies 3
ECE 272 Curriculum: Violence Prevention 3
Capstone Course
ECE 126 Administration of ECE Programs 4
Total 69-73
Associate of General Studies Degree: MSCD
TEACHER EDUCATION: ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
(AGS-EE)
The following courses represent the CCD/MSCD Elementary Education (EE) Teacher Education 2-plus-3 transfer agreement. Students completing degree requirements will be admitted to MSCD as juniors in the EE Teacher Education program.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 4 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
General Education Core Credit Hours
I. English 6
**ENG 121 English Composition I
**ENG 122 English Composition II
II. Speech 3
**SPE115 Principles of Speech
III. Mathematics 3-4
(any 1 of the following)
MAT*121,125,135,201,202
4 5
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 4-5
(any 1 of the following)
AST 101,102; BIO **105,111,112;
CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111;
PHY 105,111,112,211,212.
V. Social & Behavioral Sciences 9
(Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.)
ANT 101,111; ECO 201,202; GEO 105;
HIS 101,102, **201, **202; POS 105, **111 PSY 101 or 102; SOC 101 or 102
VI. Humanities 9
ART 110,**111,112; HUM 121,122,123;
Any foreign language 111 or higher; LIT 115,201,202;
MUS **120,121,122; PHI 111,112,113;
THE 105,211,212
General Education Sub-Total 34-36
** Required courses to complete MSCD Elementary Teacher Education requirements.
Teacher Education licensure students will need to declare an academic major and minor when they transfer to MSCD. Courses from the CCD core may be used for lower division major or minor courses.
Major Requirements
The MSCD courses that will substitute for CCD courses are listed in parentheses.
EDU 161 Elementary Education in US
(MSCD EDU 212-3) 3
EDU 162 Urban & Multicultural Education
(MSCD EDU 264-2) 3
ECE 110 Child Growth & Development
(MSCD PSY 180-4) 4
Electives or Contract Minor
MAT 161 MSCD 3
ENG 346 MSCD 3
One approved course in any major or minor field 3
Capstone Course
EDU 285 Issues & Trends in Education 3
Additional Recommended General Studies
HPL Any Class 2
Total 60
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS
The AAS degree prepares students for entry-level employment in a given occupation or upgrades employable skills.
While not intended for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program, all AAS degrees have limited transferability. In each AAS program, some of the courses are articulated with and accepted by at least one specific baccalaureate program.Talk with an advisor for specific details.
Student Performance Objectives for Vocational Education (AAS Degree Programs)
Students who complete vocational programs will be able to perform the following:
1. Basic and advanced academic skills appropriate to the profession.
a. Basic skills: reading, writing, mathematics, speaking, listening.
b. Thinking skills: ability to learn, reason, make decisions, solve problems.
2. General occupational skills appropriate to the profession.
a. Information: ability to acquire and evaluate data, organize and maintain files, use computers to process information.
b. Interpersonal: ability to work on teams and with people, teach others, serve customers, lead, negotiate; value and serve, work well with and for people from diverse cultures.
c. Personal: responsibility, self-management, integrity; personal, professional and social ethics.
d. Resources: ability to allocate time, money, materials, space and staff.
e. Systems: understand technological, organizational and social systems; monitor and correct performance, design or improve systems.
f. Technology: select equipment, apply technology to specific tasks.
3. Specific occupational skills that include all aspects of the profession. These include planning, management, finances, underlying principles of technology, technical skills, labor and community issues, health and safety and environmental issues.
Each vocational program has identified student performance objectives for each vocational program area.These performance objectives are given to students during the advising process. They are collectively bound and published for general distribution and constitute the college's guarantee to the employer. Copies are available in division and counseling offices.
AAS Degree Program Entry
Students must apply for entry to all Associate of Applied Science degree programs. Students are encouraged to apply to a program by the time they have completed 12 credits of 100-level courses. At the time of application, students must identify which Associate of Applied Science degree program they desire to enter. Program application forms are in South Classroom Building, room 134, and division offices.
AAS Degree Program Requirements
The AAS degree requires a minimum of 60 credit hours, 15 of which must meet General Education requirements (completed with a C or better) and 45 of which must meet specific program requirements.
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 46


General Education Requirements Credit Hours
1. English ENG 100 or Higher 3
II. Mathematics MAT 103 or higher 3-5
III. One course from 3
of the following 4 areas: 9-13
A. Speech SPE 115
SPE 115 may be earned through "Speech Intensive'programs.
(See specific AAS program recommendations or an advisor.)
B. Physical and Biological Sciences AST 101,102
BIO 105,111,112*
CHE 101,102,111,112 GEY 111,121
PHY 105,111,112,211,212 Nursing requires BIO 201,202 and 205.
**Health Occupations require BIO 201 and 202
C. Social & Behavioral Science ANT 101,111
ECO 201,202 GEO 105
HIS 101,102,201,202 PSY 101,102*
POS 105,111 SOC 101,102
Nursing requires PSY 235.
ECE and HSE allow PSY 235
D. Humanities ART 110, 111, 112 CIS 118
HUM 121,122,123 LIT 115,201,202 MUS 120,121,122 PHI 111,112,113
Any foreign language 111 or higher THE 105,211,212
Program-specific requirements including a Capstone Course 45
Total 60-66
Individual departments may specify particular courses that may be counted toward the general education requirements.
Credit and Contact Hours
Credits are the hours of credit awarded to the course. An Associate degree requires a minimum of 60 credits. Contacts are the in-class contact hours required for the course. Credit or contact hours in parenthesis, for example (3), are options from which students may choose and are not individually included in the total credit or contact hours listed below the parenthetical numbers. An average full-time student course load is 15 credit hours. An Associate of Applied Science degree of 60
credit hours takes four semesters of 15 credits each semester, assuming that all courses count toward the degree. AAS degrees of more than 60 credit hours may take more than four semesters to complete.
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN ACCOUNTING
GENERAL ACCOUNTING EMPHASIS
This is a technical degree in accounting. If planning to transfer to a senior institution, students may design, in conjunction with an accounting advisor, their associate degree program for maximum transferability. Students should contact an advisor early to plan their programs.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
2. Completion of ACC 121 with a C or better.
3. Overall GPA of 2.0 or higher in business and business-related courses.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics (or MAT 124 or 125) 3-4 45-60
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I (Corequisite ACC 110 or Level 3 math placement) 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
ACC 110 Business Math 3 45
ACC 111 Individual Income Tax 3 45
ACC 113 Computerized Accounting 4 68
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting (Capstone) 3 45
ACC 221 Cost Accounting 3 45
BTE Keyboarding Elective 2 30
BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch 2 23
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 226 Business Statistics 3 45
Select 2 courses with advisor approval: 6-7 90-165
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting (Must be taken prior to ACC 121 to be counted for graduation.) (3) (45)
ACC 215 Accounting Systems (3) (45)
ACC 297 Cooperative Education (Prerequisite ACC 122) (3) (120)
CIS 156 Advanced Spreadsheets (3) (45)
CIS 260 COBOL Language Programming (3-4) (45-60)
4 7
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Select 2 courses with advisor approval: 6 90
BUS 115 Intro, to Business (3) (45)
BUS 116 Intro, to Management/Supervision (3) (45)
BUS 118 Intro, to Marketing (3) (45)
BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business (3) (45)
Total 65-66 984-1074
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Accounting COMMERCIAL CREDIT MANAGEMENT EMPHASIS
This program is specifically designed to train and to upgrade skills of credit managers, assistants and other credit personnel who work in the area of extension of commercial credit and desire an associate degree.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
2. Completion of 12 semester hours of college level courses with overall GPA of 2.0. **
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN AIRFRAME/POWER PLANT
Students must register for airframe/power plant courses at Emily Griffith Opportunity School. Upon completion of airframe/power plant courses, students will receive an FAA certificate. With an additional 15 semester hours at CCD, students may receive an AAS degree. Other FAA certificates may be substituted for Emily Griffith Opportunity School courses. This program also allows students to readily transfer into a Bachelor of Science degree program with a major in Technical and Industrial Administration. Please see the division dean in Science and Technology for information on this program.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 2 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro.to Computers 4 68
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
(or MAT 121,124, or 125)
PSY 101 General Psychology I 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 110 Business Math 3 45
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
BTE 152 or Microsoft Word 3 45
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 116 Intro, to Management/Supervision 3 45
BUS 118 Intro, to Marketing 3 45
BUS 125 Intro, to Finance 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business 3 45
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
*CRM 217 Business Credit Principles (Capstone) 3 45
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics 3 45
**AIB Financial Statement Analysis 3 45
Total 63 953
This program provides a broad exposure to general business functions and fundamental management concepts. Upon completion, students are qualified for an entry-level position in a wide variety of general business occupations. Students already employed are able to acquire skills necessary for personal development directed toward job security and advancement. A grade of"C"or better must be maintained in business core area.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Completion of MAT 103 and BUS 115 with a C or better.
3. Overall GPA of 2.5 on all college-level work after completing 12 semester hours.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
Elective Math MAT 103,121,124 or 125 3-4 45-60
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
* Taken at the National Association of Credit Management Office Building
** Taken at American Institute of Banking
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 48


Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 116 Intro, to Management/Supervision 3 45
BUS 118 Intro, to Marketing 3 45
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
BTE 152 or Microsoft Word
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business 3 45
BUS 226 Business Statistics 3 45
BUS 228 Principles of Management (Capstone) 3 45
Business Electives (with advisor approval) 12 135
Total 63-64 923
Custom programs can be designed with a business advisor or students may choose one of the following areas of emphasis: Commercial Credit, Customer Service, Finance, International Business, Management, or Marketing. All custom programs must be approved by a business advisor. All general electives for custom programs must have a course number greater than 100.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration COMMERCIAL CREDIT EMPHASIS
Select 12 credits from the following: 12 160
ACC 110 Business Math (3) (45)
BUS 125 Intro, to Finance (3) (45)
ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting (3) (45)
ACC 215 Accounting Systems (3) (45)
CRM 217 Business Credit Principles (3) (45)
All American Institute of Banking courses and other electives must be approved by business advisor.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration CUSTOMER SERVICE EMPHASIS
Select 12 credits from the following: 12 160
PSY 101 General Psychology 1 (3) (45)
BUS 117 Time Management (1) (30)
BUS 207 Teleservices (3) (45)
BUS 237 Customer Service (3) (45)
Other electives must be approved by business advisor.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration FINANCE EMPHASIS
Select 12 credits from the following: 12 160
ACC 110 Business Math (3) (45)
BUS 125 Intro, to Finance (3) (45)
CIS 156 Advanced Spreadsheets (3) (45)
ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting (3) (45)
ACC 215 Accounting Systems (3) (45)
ACC 226 Cost Accounting (3) (45)
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics (3) (45)
Other electives must be approved by business advisor.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS EMPHASIS
Select 12 credits from the following: 12 160
ACC 110 Business Math (3) (45)
BUS 125 Intro, to Finance (3) (45)
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics (3) (45)
BUS 210 International Business (3) (45)
BUS 211 International Marketing (3) (45)
Other electives must be approved by business advisor.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration MANAGEMENT EMPHASIS
Select 12 credits from the following: 12 160
ACC 110 Business Math (3) (45)
BUS 117 Time Management (1) (30)
BUS 125 Intro, to Finance (3) (45)
CIS 156 Advanced Spreadsheets (3) (45)
BUS 210 International Business (3) (45)
ACC 215 Accounting Systems (3) (45)
BUS 235 Retail Marketing & Management (3) (45)
BUS 236 Principles of Marketing (3) (45)
BUS 297 Cooperative Education
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration MARKETING EMPHASIS
Select 12 credits from the following: 12 160
BUS 210 International Business (3) (45)
BUS 211 International Marketing (3) (45)
BUS 231 Principles of Sales (3) (45)
BUS 235 Retail Marketing & Management (3) (45)
BUS 236 Principles of Marketing (3) (45)
BUS 237 Customer Service (3) (45)
BUS 239 Advertising & Promotion (3) (45)
BUS 297 Cooperative Education (3) (45)
Other electives must be approved by business advisor.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration BUSINESS OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM
This program provides a broad exposure to general business functions and fundamentals of the travel and tourism industry. Upon completion, students are qualified for an entry-level position in a wide variety of general travel and tourism occupations. Students already employed are able to acquire skills necessary for personal development directed toward job security and advancement. A grade of "C"or better must be maintained in business core area.
49 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Completion of MAT 103 and BUS 115 with a grade of C or better.
3. GPA of 2.5 on all college-level work after completing 12 semester hours.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
Elective Math 3-4 45-60
MAT 103,121,124 or 125
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 116 Intro, to Management/Supervision 3 45
BUS 118 Intro, to Marketing 3 45
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business 3 45
BUS 239 Advertising & Promotion 3 45
BTT 110 Intro, to Travel 3 45
BTT 111 Travel Geography 1 3 45
BTT 112 Travel Geography II 3 45
BTT 113 Selecting & Selling Cruises 3 45
BTT 210 Domestic Ticketing 3 45
BTT 211 International Travel 3 45
BTT 212 Computer Reservations 1 3 45
BTT 213 Computer Reservations II (Capstone) 3 45
Total 68-69 1028-1043
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration CUSTOMER INFORMATION SERVICES
This program provides a basis for developing customer information services for client service, survey-taking, appointment making, direct sales and follow-up. Includes paper flow management, telephone skills, terms and concepts, along with some job skills necessary for entry-level positions. The customer information services industry is growing and offers considerable employment opportunity for those persons prepared and who exhibit unique abilities. Client services orientation, call center management and outsourcing of services from a contractual point of view will be explored.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
PSY 101 General Psychology 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Major Requirements
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 3 45
BUS 116 Intro, to Management/Supervision 3 45
BUS 118 Intro, to Marketing 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BTE 139 Professional Development 3 45
BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 45
BUS 207 Teleservices 3 45
BUS 237 Customer Service 3 45
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
BTE 152 or Microsoft Word
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
BUS 117 Time Management 1 30
Product Specific Electives: e.g Novell, 9 135
Airline Reservations, travel, etc.,
with advisor approval
BUS 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3-6 135-270
Total 62-65 1043-1178
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration INSURANCE
The AAS degree program in Business Administration: Insurance is offered jointly by CCD and Emily Griffith Opportunity School. The program consists of a maximum of 12 semester credit hours of insurance-specific credits. Students may earn these credits via technical education course work at Emily Griffith Opportunity School, plus a minimum of 48 credit hours of core general education courses at CCD.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
2. Official transcript showing completion of Emily Griffith Opportunity School's insurance program.
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 5 0


Transfer Credits from Emily Griffith Opportunity School
Credits Contacts
INS 290 Insurance Special Topics 6 135
INS 299 Insurance Independent Study 6 135
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 116 Intro, to Management/Supervision 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
Select 1 course from the following AAS Physical and Biological Sciences requirements: AST 101,102; BIO 105,111,112; CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111; PHY 105,111,112,211,212 4-S 80-1 OS
Select 2 courses from the following AAS 6-10 90-1 SO
Humanities requirements:
ART 110,111,112; HUM 121,122,123;
LIT 115,201,202; MUS 120,121,122;
PH1111,112,113; Any foreign language 111 or higher;
THE 105,211,212
Select 2 courses from the following AAS 6 90
Social and Behavioral Sciences requirements:
ANT 101,111; ECO 201,202; GEO 105;
HIS 101,102,201,202; PSY 101,102;
POS 105,111; SOC 101,102
Total 60-65 1018-1103
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration POSTAL SERVICE MANAGEMENT
The Postal Service Management (PSM) Associate in Applied Science degree is designed to prepare the student with the necessary knowledge and skills to gain employment and/or to advance to positions of increased responsibility within the United States Postal Service (USPS).
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
2. Completion of 12 semester hours of college-level work with a C or better.
3. GPA of 2.0 on all college-level work.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
ENG 122 English Composition II 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
Elective Science 4-5 60-75
(any course listed below: AST 101,102, BIO 105,111,112, CHE 101,102,111,112,GEY 111,121, PHY 105,111,112,211,212)
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
Elective Humanities 3 45
(any course listed below: ART 110,111,112,HUM 121,122,123, LIT 115,201,212, MUS 120,121, PHI 111,112,113 Any foreign language 111 or higher, THE 105,211,212)
Major Requirements
PST 105 Postal Service History & Organization 3 45
PST 106 Postal Service Finance 3 45
PST 112 Postal Mail Processing 1 3 45
PST 114 Delivery & Collections 3 45
PST 200 Postal Service Automation 3 45
PST 205 Personnel Services 3 45
PST 226 Labor Relations 1 3 45
PST 227 Labor Relations II (Capstone) 3 45
Select a minimum of 12 credit hours from the following: 12 540
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 (4) (60)
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics (3) (45)
BUS 115 Intro, to Business (3) (45)
BUS 226 Business Statistics (3) (45)
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts (3) (45)
BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45)
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
BUS 217 Business Communications (3) (45)
PSY 265 Psychology of Personality (3) (45)
SOC 101 Intro, to Sociology 1 (3) (45)
SOC 102 Intro, to Sociology II (3) (45)
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 1 (3) (45)
BUS 227 Human Resources Management (3) (45)
Total 62-63 1295-1310
5 1
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration REAL ESTATE
The AAS degree program in Business Administration: Real Estate is offered jointly by CCD and Emily Griffith Opportunity School. The program consists of a maximum of 12 semester credit hours of real estate-specific credits. Students may earn these credits via technical education course work at Emily Griffith Opportunity School, plus a minimum of 48 credit hours of core general education courses at CCD.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
2. Official transcript showing completion of Emily Griffith Opportunity School's real estate program.
Transfer Credits from Emily Griffith Oppoptunity School
Credits Contacts
REE 290 Real Estate Special Topics 6 135
REE 299 Real Estate Independent Study 6 135
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 116 Intro, to Management/Supervision 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
Select 1 course from the following AAS Physical and Biological Sciences requirements: AST 101,102; BIO 105,111,112; CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111; PHY 105,111,112,211,212 4-5 80-105
Select 2 courses from the following AAS 6-10 90-1 SO
Humanities requirements:
ART 110,111,112; HUM 121,122,123;
LIT 115,201,202; MUS 120,121,122;
PH1111,112,113; Any foreign language 111 or higher;
THE 105,211,212
Select 2 courses from the following AAS 6 90
Social and Behavioral Sciences requirements:
ANT 101,111; ECO 201,202; GEO 105;
HIS 101,102,201,202; PSY 101,102;
POS 105, 111; SOC 101,102
Total 60-65 1018-1103
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY: OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND SECRETARIAL STUDIES
These Business Technology program options are designed to prepare students for entry-level positions and advancement in business, governmental and medical agencies and other institutions that employ persons in secretarial and administrative support areas.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology:
Office Management and Secretarial Studies ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
Elective Economics or Political Science (with advisor approval) 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
Major Requirements
(With the help of the faculty advisor, select 47 credits from the following.
BTE 297 must be included.) 47 705
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting or Accounting Principles 1 (3) (45)
ACC 121 (4) (60)
BTE 155 Spreadsheets for Office Management (3) (45)
BUS 115 Intro, to Business (3) (45)
BUS 116 Intro, to Management/Supervision (3) (45)
BTE 101 Keyboarding 1 (5) (83)
BTE 202 Keyboarding II (5) (83)
BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding (4) (60)
BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch (2) (23)
BTE 120 Filing & Records Control (4) (68)
BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45)
BTE 152 Microsoft Word (3) (45)
BTE 133 Word Processing Communications & Applications (3) (45)
BUS 217 Business Communications (3) (45)
(Speech Intensive)
BTE 139 Professional Development (Speech Intensive) (3) (45)
BTE 230 Machine Transcription (5) (83)
BTE 288 Model Office (4) (68)
BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
Total 60 900-1128
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 52


Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology:
Office Management and Secretarial Studies LEGAL SECRETARIAL
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
Elective Economics or Political Science Course 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
Major Requirements
(With the help of the faculty advisor, select 47 credits from the following.
BTE 297 must be included.) 47 70S
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting (3) (45)
ACC 121 or Accounting Principles 1 (4) (60)
BUS 115 Intro, to Business (3) (45)
BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business (3) (45)
PAR 124 Legal Research (3) (45)
BTE 101 Keyboarding 1 (5) (83)
BTE 202 Keyboarding II (5) (83)
BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding (4) (60)
BTE 120 Filing & Records Control (4) (68)
BTE 121 Alpha Speedwriting 1 (4) (60)
BTE 133 Word Processing Communications (3) (45)
& Applications
BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45)
BTE 152 Microsoft Word (3) (45)
BUS 217 Business Communications (3) (45)
(Speech Intensive)
BTE 139 Professional Development (3) (45)
(Speech Intensive)
BTE 155 Spreadsheets for Office Management (3) (45)
BTE 209 Legal Terminology (2) (40)
BTE 288 Model Office (4) (68)
BTE 230 Machine Transcription (5) (83)
BTE 251 Advanced WordPerfect (3) (45)
BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
Total 60 900-1128
AAssociate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology:
Office Management and Secretarial Studies
MEDICAL SECRETARIAL
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
Elective Social & Behavioral Sciences 3 45
(with advisor approval)
Major Requirements
(With the help a faculty advisor, each student must select 47 credits from
the following. BTE 297 must be included.) 47 705
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting (3) (45)
ACC 121 or Accounting Principles 1 (4) (60)
HOC 100 Medical Terminology (1) (15)
BUS 115 Intro, to Business (3) (45)
BTE 101 Keyboarding 1 (5) (83)
BTE 202 Keyboarding II (5) (83)
BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding (4) (60)
BTE 121 Alpha Speedwriting 1 (4) (60)
BTE 108 Business Machines:
Ten Key by Touch (2) (23)
BTE 120 Filing & Records Control (4) (68)
BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45)
BTE 152 Microsoft Word (3) (45)
BTE 133 Word Processing Communications (3) (45)
& Applications
BTE 155 Spreadsheets for Office
Management (3) (45)
BUS 217 Business Communications (3) (45)
(Speech Intensive)
BTE 139 Professional Development (3) (45)
(Speech Intensive)
BTE 206 Health Insurance (3) (45)
Methods & Claims
BTE 230 Machine Transcription (5) (83)
BTE 288 Model Office (4) (68)
BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
Total 60 900-1128
5 3
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology:
Office Management and Secretarial Studies SECRETARIAL
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
Elective Economics or Political Science (with advisor approval) 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
Major Requirements
(With the help of their faculty advisor, students must select 47 credits
from the following. BTE 297 must be included.) 47 70S
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting or Accounting Principles (3) (45)
ACC 121 (4) (60)
BTE 155 Spreadsheets for Office Management (3) (45)
BUS 115 Intro, to Business (3) (45)
BTE 101 Keyboarding I (5) (83)
BTE 202 Keyboarding II (5) (83)
BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding (4) (60)
BTE 121 Alpha Speedwriting I (4) (60)
BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch (2) (23)
BTE 120 Filing & Records Control (4) (90)
BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45)
BTE 152 Microsoft Word (3) (45)
BTE 133 Word Processing Communications & Applications (3) (45)
BUS 217 Business Communications (Speech Intensive) (3) (45)
BTE 139 Professional Development (Speech Intensive) (3) (45)
BTE 230 Machine Transcription (5) (83)
BTE 251 Advanced WordPerfect (3) (45)
BTE 288 Model Office (4) (68)
BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
Total 60 900-1128
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology:
Office Management and Secretarial Studies WORD PROCESSING
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
Elective Social & Behavioral Sciences (with advisor approval) 3 45
Major Requirements
(With the help of their faculty advisor, students must select 47 credits from the following. BTE 297 must be included.)
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting or Accounting Principles (3) (45)
ACC 121 (4) (60)
BTE 155 Spreadsheets for Office Management (3) (45)
BUS 115 Intro, to Business (3) (45)
BTE 101 Keyboarding I (5) (83)
BTE 202 Keyboarding II (5) (83)
BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding (4) (60)
BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch (2) (23)
BTE 120 Filing & Records Control (4) (90)
BTE 133 Word Processing Communications & Applications (3) (45)
BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45)
BTE 152 Microsoft Word (3) (45)
BTE 251 Advanced WordPerfect (3) (45)
BUS 217 Business Communications (Speech Intensive) (3) (45)
BTE 139 Professional Development (Speech Intensive) (3) (45)
BTE 230 Machine Transcription (5) (83)
BTE 288 Model Office (4) (68)
BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
Total 60 900-1128
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 54


ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Computer Information Systems COMPUTER SPECIALIST
This program prepares the student as an entry-level specialist in working with and utilizing personal computers. Upon completion of the program, students will be competent to set up and configure personal computers and their peripherals, to configure application systems, manage communications and/or networks and use many major software packages. Students may select an emphasis in their program, such as networking or multimedia, by choosing courses in the elective section.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
2. Completion of CIS 118 with a grade of C or better.
3. GPA of 2.0 or higher in CIS courses.
4. Completion of 12 semester hours of college-level work.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
Elective Math 3-4 45-60
MAT 121, MAT 135, or BUS 226
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Select 1 course from the following: 3 45
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics (3) (45)
or
POS 105 Intro, to Political Science (3) (45)
Major Requirements
CIS 119 Intro.to Programming 3 45
CIS 131 Intro, to the Internet & World Wide Web 3 45
CIS 145 Database Concepts 3 45
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
CIS 179 Software System Survey 3 45
CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 45
CIS 275 Telecommunications 3 45
CIS 254 Networks: Windows NT Client 4 68
or
CIS 255 Networks: Novell 4x Administration
CIS 256 or Networks: Novell 3x Administration
CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design 3 45
(Note: CIS 276 is the capstone course for a CIS degree.)
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
BTE 152 or Microsoft Word
Select 1 course from the following: 3 45
CSC 150 PASCAL Programming (3) (45)
CSC 230 C++ Programming 1 (3) (45)
CIS 260 COBOL Language (3) (45)
Programming
CIS 178 Visual BASIC with Windows (3) (45)
CIS 176 BASIC with DOS (3) (45)
Select any 9 credit hours from the following: 9-12 135-188
CIS 111 Intro, to Internet (2) (45)
CIS 132 Business Applications on the
World Wide Web (3) (45)
CIS 135 Graphics Technology (PowerPoint) (2) (30)
CIS 156 Advanced Spreadsheets (3) (45)
CIS 175 Intro, to UNIX (3) (45)
CIS 206 Intro, to Multimedia Technology (3) (45)
CIS 208 Advanced Multimedia Systems (3) (45)
CIS 226 Computer Diagnosis & Repair (3) (45)
CIS 254 Networks: Windows NT Client (4) (68)
CIS 255 Networks: Novell 4x Administration (4) (68)
CIS 256 Networks: Novell 3x Administration (4) (68)
CIS 282 Networks: Advanced Novell
Administration (4) (68)
CIS 283 Networks: Windows NT Server (4) (68)
GRD 103 MAC Computer Art (3) (90)
Any 3 credit hours of self-paced courses 3 45
BTE 100 Intro, to Keyboarding 3 68
Total 67-70 976-1029
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Computer Information Systems APPLICATIONS PROGRAMMER
This program serves the general student population, but is designed, developed, and operated for and by the nationally recognized and award winning Computer Training for People with Disabilities (CTPD) Program. The program prepares students for careers as applications programmers emphasizing the COBOL language. This is a fast-track program that can be completed in 13 months or more depending on the semester the student begins the curriculum and the amount of remediation, general studies and adaptation skill development required. The program has a fall and spring semester curriculum. Students must have completed the prerequisites to fall semester and are encouraged to complete the general education requirements prior to beginning the fall and spring curriculum.
Students with disabilities are encouraged to make application to the Computer Training for People with Disabilities program that offers special services, support and placement for program participants. Application information may be obtained from the Center for Persons with Disabilities, South Classroom Building, room 134, or by phone at (303) 556-3300.
All students must satisfy the following program admission requirements prior to beginning the program:
5 5
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
2. Students with a disability requiring adaptive equipment must be functioning at a professional level. Skills are assessed and evaluated by the CTPD Coordinator.
* Prerequisites to Fall Semester
Business Core Credits Contacts
*ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 218 Advanced Computer Applications 2-3 30-45
or
CIS 119 Intro, to Programming
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics 3 45
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Fall
CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design 3 45
CIS 260 COBOL Language Programming 3 45
CIS 145 Database Concepts 3 45
CIS 277 Operating Systems & JCL (mainframe emphasis) 3 45
CIS 266 On-line Program Development (TSO) 3 45
Spring
CIS 261 Advanced COBOL 3 45
CIS 263 CICS/COBOL Programming 3 45
CIS 230 C++ Programming 1 3 45
CIS 240 Oracle 3 45
May 15-July 15
CIS 297 Cooperative Education/ Internship (Capstone) 6 270
Total 61-62 1103-1118
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Computer Information Systems PC SPECIALIST/LAN ADMINISTRATOR
This program serves the general student population, but is designed, developed, and operated for and by the nationally recognized and award winning Computer Training for People with Disabilities (CTPD) Program. The program prepares students for careers as PC specialists, emphasizing the LAN Administration. This is a fast-track program that can be completed in 13 months or more depending on the semester the student begins the curriculum and the amount of remediation and adaptation skill development required. The program has a fall and
spring semester curriculum Students must have completed the "prerequisites to the fall semester" and are encouraged to complete the general education requirements prior to beginning the fall and spring curriculum. Applications should be submitted by May 1.
Students with disabilities are encouraged to make application to the Computer Training for People with Disabilities program which offers special services, support and placement for program participants. Application information may be obtained from the Center for Persons with Disabilities, South Classroom Building, room 134, or by phone at (303) 556-3300.
All students must satisfy the following program admission requirements prior to beginning the program:
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C orbetter;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
2. Students with a disability requiring adaptive equipment must be functioning at a professional level. Skills are assessed and evaluated by the CTPD Coordinator.
* Prerequisites to Fall Semester
Business Core Credits Contacts
*ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 218 Advanced Computer Applications or Intro, to Programming 2-3 30-45
CIS 119
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics 3 45
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Fall
CIS 145 Database Concepts 3 45
CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 45
CIS 255 Networks: Novell 4x Administration 4 68
CIS 266 On-line Program Development (TSO) 2 30
CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design 3 45
CIS 277 Operating Systems & JCL 3 45
(Microcomputer emphasis)
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 56


Spring
CIS 240 Oracle 3 45
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
CIS 179 Software System Survey 3 45
CIS 275 Telecommunications 3 45
CIS 282 Networks: Advanced Novell
Administration 4 68
May 15-July IS
CIS 297 Cooperative Education/lnternship 6 270
(Capstone)
Total 68-69 1224-1239
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN DENTAL HYGIENE
This program prepares the student to practice as a professional dental hygienist following successful completion of two semesters of pre-professional prerequisites and four semesters of professional study. Completion of the prerequisites and the full two-year Dental Hygiene program curriculum with a grade of C or better results in an Associate of Applied Science degree. After receiving the AAS degree, students are eligible to take the licensure exam to become registered dental hygienists.
Dental hygienists are licensed preventive oral health professionals who provide educational, clinical and therapeutic services in dentistry. Dental hygienists perform procedures such as oral prophylaxis, application of preventive agents, exposure of dental radiographs, patient education and nutritional counseling. Career opportunities for hygienists are available in a variety of settings, including private dental practices, community dental health clinics, public schools, clinical and basic science research laboratories, state and federal health facilities and management positions. Licensure by national and state examination is required.
Application materials must be submitted no later than March 1 to be considered for admission into the class beginning fall of the next academic year. Eligible applicants are selected according to overall GPA, GPA for prerequisite science courses, prior experience in health care, a commitment to a health care career and interpersonal skills. Because of the competitive admissions process, all prerequisite courses must be taken for a letter grade. Applicants not accepted are considered for the following year; however, reapplication is necessary. Graduate exit competency is measured by successful completion of the capstone course, DEH 252, Dental Hygiene Clinic Care III.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
2. Submit the CCD application to the Registrar's Office, South Classroom Building, room 133, on the Auraria Campus.
3. Submit a completed Dental Hygiene application form and packet. Dental Hygiene application packets can be requested by calling (303) 364-4821.
4. Complete the following general education prerequisites with a grade of C or better. Sciences courses must show cumulative GPA of 2.8 or better prior to the beginning of the fall semester of the intended year of entry. Courses in progress and those to be completed by August of the year in which application is made will be considered. Proof of successful completion of these courses must be submitted to both the CCD registrar and the CCD Dental Hygiene program at the end of each semester in which they are taken. An official, final transcript must be forwarded to both CCD Admissions and the CCD Dental Hygiene program as soon as it becomes available.
5. All prerequisite courses must be taken for a letter grade. Foreign students must take the Anatomy and Physiology I and II, Microbiology and Chemistry courses in an accredited institution within the United States or Canada to prepare them with medical terminology/nomenclature skills.
6. A personal interview with the Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee is required. The interview will be scheduled by the Dental Hygiene program following a preliminary screening of applicants.
7. Following acceptance into the program, the student must present documentation of a CPR Certification and Dental and Medical Examination that includes up-to-date immunization records. More information on this subject will be sent to the applicant following acceptance into the program.
General Education Requirements
Must be completed with a grade ofC"or better. Science courses must
show cumulative GPA of 2.8 or better prior to enrollment date:
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 121 English Composition 3 45
BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 4 50
BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 60
BIO 205 Microbiology 4 60
CHE 106 General, Organic & Biochemistry 4 60
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
SOC 101 Intro, to Sociology or General Psychology 1 or Psychology of Human Growth & 3 45
PSY 101
PSY 235
Development
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
NUT 100 Intro, to Nutrition 3 45
Total 31 455
DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM
First Semester Credits Contacts
DEH 101 Pre-Clinic Dental Hygiene Science 2 30
DEH 102 Pre-Clinic Care 2 90
DEH 103 Embryology & Histology 2 30
DEH 105 Radiology 3 45
DEH 107 Head & Neck Anatomy 2 30
DEH 109 Dental Anatomy 3 45
DEH 111 Medical & Dental Emergencies 2 60
5 7
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Second Semester
DEH 150 Dental Hygiene Clinic Science 1 2 30
DEH 152 Dental Hygiene Clinic Care 1 3 90
DEH 154 Periodontology 1 3 45
DEH 156 Applied Pharmacology 3 45
DEH 158 General & Oral Pathology 3 45
DEH 160 Preventive Dentistry 3 45
Total First Year 33 630
Third Semester Credits Contacts
DEH 201 Dental Hygiene Clinic Science II 2 30
DEH 203 Dental Hygiene Clinic Care II 4 180
DEH 205 Dental Materials 3 45
DEH 209 Local & Regional Dental
Anesthesiology 3 45
DEH 211 Community Dental Health 3 45
Fourth Semester
DEH 250 Dental Hygiene Clinic Science III 2 30
DEH 252 Dental Hygiene Clinic Care III
(Capstone) 4 180
DEH 254 Periodontology II 3 45
DEH 256 Community Field Experience 3 90
DEH 258 Ethics & Issues in Dental Hygiene 2 30
DEH 260 Practice Management 1 15
Total Second Year 30 735
Total for Program 94 1820
(Includes General Education Courses)
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN DRAFTING FOR INDUSTRY
The AAS Drafting for Industry includes five emphases:
Civil/Topographic, Mechanical, Structural, Process Piping and Electrical. All drafting exit competencies in all drafting programs will be measured by portfolio review at the end of the program.This program also allows students to transfer readily into a Bachelor of Science degree program to major in Technical and Industrial Administration.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Drafting for Industry CIVIL/TOPOGRAPHIC EMPHASIS
Drafting for Industry, Civil/Topographic emphasis, prepares students for job-entry positions on drafting teams for local, state and federal government agencies and petroleum, geological, civil engineering, mineral development and planning companies.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C orbetter;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Completion of DR1105 and 106 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
AAS requirements in Arts, Humanities
and Social Studies 5 75
Major Requirements
DRI 105 Intro, to Drafting 5 113
CAD 110 Computer-Aided Drafting 1 3 68
DRI 106 Dimensioning &Tolerancing 2 45
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 45
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 45
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry
& Auxiliary Views 2 45
DRI 113 Intersections & Developments 3 68
DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 113
DRI 200 Intro, to Civil/Topographic Drafting 3 68
DRI 203 Intro, to Architectural Drafting 3 68
DRI 205 Intro, to Process Piping Drafting 2 45
DRI 207 Intro, to Structural Drafting 2 45
DRI 209 Intro.to Electrical Drafting 2 45
DRI 230 Civil/Topographic Drafting 1 8 180
DRI 235 Civil/Topographic
Drafting II (Capstone) 4 90
Total 63 1323
With permission of the program faculty, DRI297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be used in place of other drafting courses.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Drafting for Industry ELECTRICAL EMPHASIS
Drafting for Industry, Electrical emphasis, prepares students for job-entry positions on drafting and design teams in electrical,architectural and mechanical engineering firms.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C orbetter;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Completion of DR1105 and 106 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
AAS requirements in Arts, Humanities
and Social Studies 5 75
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 58


Major Requirements
DRI 105 Intro, to Drafting 5 113
CAD 110 Computer-Aided Drafting 1 3 68
DRI 106 Dimensioning &Tolerancing 2 45
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 45
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 45
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry 2 45
& Auxiliary Views
DRI 113 Intersections & Developments 3 68
DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 113
DRI 200 Intro, to Civil/Topographic Drafting 3 68
DRI 203 Intro, to Architectural Drafting 3 68
DRI 205 Intro, to Process Piping Drafting 2 45
DRI 207 Intro, to Structural Drafting 2 45
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 2 40
DRI 209 Intro, to Electrical Drafting 2 45
DRI 260 Electrical Drafting (Capstone) 6 136
Total 62 1289
With permission of the program faculty, DRI297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be taken in place of other drafting courses.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Drafting for Industry MECHANICAL EMPHASIS
Drafting for Industry, Mechanical emphasis, prepares students for job-entry positions on drafting teams in industrial plants, engineering and manufacturing firms and governmental agencies.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Completion of DR1105 and 106 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
AAS requirements in Arts, Humanities
and Social Sciences 5 75
Major Requirements DRI 105 Intro, to Drafting 5 113
CAD 110 Computer-Aided Drafting 1 3 68
DRI 106 Dimensioning & Tolerancing 2 45
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 45
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 45
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry 2 45
DRI 113 & Auxiliary Views Intersections & Developments 3 68
DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 113
DRI 200 Intro, to Civil/Topographic Drafting 3 68
DRI 203 Intro, to Architectural Drafting 3 68
DRI 205 Intro, to Process Piping Drafting 2 45
DRI 207 Intro, to Structural Drafting 2 45
DRI 209 Intro, to Electrical Drafting 2 45
DRI 220 Advanced Mechanical Drafting I 8 180
DRI 225 Advanced Mechanical 4 90
Drafting II (Capstone) Total 63 1323
With permission of the program faculty, DRI 297 Cooperative Education (variable credit), and DRI 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be taken in place of other drafting courses.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Drafting for Industry PROCESS PIPING EMPHASIS
Drafting for Industry, Process Piping emphasis, prepares students for job-entry positions on drafting and design teams in the petro/chemical industry, and design, engineering and manufacturing firms that supply that industry.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Completion of DR1105 and 106 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
AAS requirements in Arts, Humanities 5 75
and Social Sciences
Major Requirements DRI 105 Intro, to Drafting 5 113
CAD 110 Computer-Aided Drafting 1 3 68
DRI 106 Dimensioning & Tolerancing 2 45
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 45
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 45
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry 2 45
DRI 113 & Auxiliary Views Intersections & Developments 3 68
DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 113
DRI 200 Intro, to Civil/Topographic Drafting 3 68
DRI 203 Intro, to Architectural Drafting 3 68
DRI 205 Intro, to Process Piping Drafting 2 45
DRI 207 Intro, to Structural Drafting 2 45
DRI 209 Intro, to Electrical Drafting 2 45
DRI 250 Process Piping Drafting 1 8 180
DRI 255 Process Piping 4 90
Drafting II (Capstone) Total 63 1323
5 9
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


With permission of the program faculty, DRI297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be taken in place of other drafting courses.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Drafting for Industry STRUCTURAL EMPHASIS
Drafting for Industry, Structural emphasis, prepares students for job-entry positions on drafting and design teams for local, state and federal government agencies;civil, architectural and mechanical engineering firms; and petroleum, mineral and planning firms.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Completion of DRI 105 and 106 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
AAS requirements in Arts, Humanities 5 75
and Social Studies
Major Requirements
DRI 105 Intro, to Drafting 5 113
CAD 110 Computer-Aided Drafting 1 3 68
DRI 106 Dimensioning &Tolerancing 2 45
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 45
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 45
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry 2 45
& Auxiliary Views
DRI 113 Intersections & Developments 3 68
DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 113
DRI 200 Intro, to Civil/Topographic Drafting 3 68
DRI 203 Intro.to Architectural Drafting 3 68
DRI 205 Intro, to Process Piping Drafting 2 45
DRI 207 Intro, to Structural Drafting 2 45
DRI 209 Intro, to Electrical Drafting 2 45
DRI 240 Structural Drafting 1 8 180
DRI 245 Structural Drafting II (Capstone) 4 90
Total 64 1323
With permission of the program faculty, DRI 297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI 299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be taken in place of other drafting courses.
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
This program meets the vocational training needs for personnel involved in the care and education of young children (birth through 8 years) and all Colorado Department of Human Services licensing academic requirements. A grade of"C"or better is required in all degree classes. Graduate exit competency is measured by successful completion (C or better) of the ECE capstone course. Any student not completing CCD's capstone course must successfully complete with a C or better the exit competency test prior to approval of graduation.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 4 or completion of ENG 060 with a C orbetter;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
ENG 100 Composition, Style & Technique 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
SOC 101 Intro, to Sociology I 3 45
PSY 235 Psychology of Growth & Development or General Psychology 3 45
PSY 101
Course from AAS Humanities Requirement 3 45
Major Requirements
ECE 101 Intro, to Early Childhood Education 3 45
ECE 102 ECE Lab Experience 3 90
ECE 105 Nutrition & the Young Child 3 45
ECE 110 Child Growth & Development 4 60
ECE 117 Methods/Techniques: Curriculum Development 3 45
ECE 120 Classroom Management Techniques 3 45
ECE 126 Administration of ECE Programs 4 60
ECE 235 Curriculum: Music/Movement & the Young Child 3 45
ECE 250 Supervised Student Practicum/Seminar I 5 188
ECE 251 Supervised Student 5 188
Practicum/Seminar II (Capstone)
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 60


Select 9 credits from the following: 9 135
ECE 111 Infants & Toddlers: Development Theories & Practices (3) (45)
ECE 115 Curriculum: Creativity & the Young Child (3) (45)
ECE 215 Curriculum: Science/ Math & the Young Child (3) (45)
ECE 225 Curriculum: Anti-Bias (3) (45)
ECE 245 Curriculum: (3) (45)
Art & the Young Child Total 63 1302
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY
This program prepares students with job-entry skills in assembly, testing, repair and maintenance of electronic equipment. Basic knowledge to advance into more detailed and specific areas with further training and experience is provided.This program also allows students to readily transfer into a Bachelor of Science degree program to major in Technical and Industrial Administration.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Complete ELT100 and 101 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 1 (must be completed in first 2 semesters) 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
Major Requirements
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 101 DC Circuits & Magnetism 2 40
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 2 40
ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 60
ELT 104 Complex Circuit Analysis 3 60
ELT 110 Diode Circuits 3 60
ELT 111 Transistor Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 112 JFET's & Oscillators 2 40
ELT 114 1C Operational Amplifiers 3 60
ELT 200 Pulse & Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 201 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals 2 40
ELT 203 Microprocessor & Microcomputer Systems 3 60
ELT 210 Communications 1 3 60
ELT 211 Instruments & Measurements 1 3 60
ELT 285 Troubleshooting Techniques for Analog & Digital Systems (Capstone) 5 100
Total 63 1198
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Environmental and Refrigeration Technology
COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL REFRIGERATION, HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING
This program prepares students with job-entry skills in the fields of commercial-industrial refrigeration, heating and air conditioning. Demonstrated mastery of skills is required. Programs are open-entry/open-exit. Students may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to either complete the program for a certificate or degree or upgrade specific skills.To satisfy the requirements for an Associate degree, the RAC courses must be taken in the listed sequence. Exit competencies will be measured by a comprehensive examination and final "hands-on" project assigned by the instructor.This program also allows students to transfer readily into a Bachelor of Science degree program, majoring in Technical and Industrial Administration.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Complete RAC 111 and 112 with a C or better.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing l 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
SOC 101 Intro, to Sociology 3 45
Major Requirements
CAD Computer-Aided Drafting Elective 3 68
RAC 111 Electricity & Electronics I 3 68
RAC 112 Electricity & Electronics II 2 45
RAC 114 Fundamentals of Refrigeration I 2 45
RAC 116 Fundamentals of Refrigeration II 3 68
RAC 200 Refrigeration Systems, Components & Applications 3 68
RAC 205 Heat Loads & System Development 2 45
RAC 208 Special Refrigeration Systems 3 68
RAC 211 Installation & Service Refrigeration Systems 3 68
RAC 212 Fundamentals of Air Conditioning 3 68
ELT 113 Waveforms, Harmonics & Direct Digital Sensors 2 45
RAC 214 Unitary & Central Station Systems 3 68
RAC 215 Air Flow Principles & Distribution 2 45
RAC 216 HVAC Control Systems 3 68
RAC 297 Cooperative Education or Independent Study
RAC 299 3 90-135
1
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


RAC 285 Troubleshooting & Servicing (Capstone) 4 75
Total 60 1229-1252
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN GRAPHIC ARTS (PRINTING)
This program prepares students with job-entry skills to accomplish most operations necessary on the process camera and the offset press. Students also will be able to work in basic bindery, stripping, general layout and composition, electronic page make up and prepress. Upon completion of the program, students will be equipped to enter positions with commercial print shops, trade shops, in-plant shops and any other operation requiring printers.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 2 or completion of ENG 060 with a C orbetter;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
2. Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
PSY 101 General Psychology 1 3 45
Select 1 course from the following AAS
General Education Requirements: 3 45
ART 151; LIT 115,201,202; MUS120;
CHN 101, JPN 101,SPA 101
Major Requirements
GRA 101 Intro, to Graphic Arts &
Traditional Layout 3 67.5
GRA 102 Electronic Composition Art &
Copy Prep 3 67.5
GRA 103 Line & Halftone Photography 3 67.5
GRA 104 Digital Halftone Photography 3 67.5
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45-67.5
or
GRA 105 R6sumb & Portfolio
GRA 109 Microcomputing 1 22.5
GRA 111 Beginning Offset Presses 3 60
GRA 112 Stripping, Image Assembly,
Platemaking & Inks 3 60
GRA 113 Paper & Ink Management 3 60
& Print Production 1
GRA 114 Intermediate Offset Press 3 60
& Print Production II
GRA 201 Electronic Graphics 3 68
GRA 202 Electronic Page Layout 3 68
GRA 203 Electronic Scanner & Color Theory 3 68
GRA 204 Electronic Prepress 3 68
GRA 205 Photo Manipulation 3 68
GRA 185 Bindery & Portfolio (Speech Intensive) 3 60
or
GRA 285 Printers Portfolio & Advanced Printing Techniques (Capstone) (Speech Intensive)
GRA 299 Independent Studies/ GRA Internship 3-6 68-136
Total 61-64 1225.5-1324
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN GRAPHIC DESIGN
This program is designed to provide the skills necessary for entry into the field of graphic design.The graphic design field broadly covers production of paste-up art, graphic or advertising design and illustration. The Graphic Design program allows students to develop basic skills common to all three specialties while developing an emphasis in one.
Students are expected to buy their own tools and materials.The beginning program courses require an original investment of between $100 and $300, and students are expected to add needed tools and materials as the program progresses.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 2 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
2. Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
Select AAS general education courses from 2 of the following 3 areas: 6 90
Arts and Humanities Physical and Biological Sciences Social and Behavioral Sciences
Major Requirements
ART 121 Drawing I 3 90
ART 131 Design I 3 90
GRD 100 Lettering & Typographic Design 3 90
GRD 103 MAC Computer Art 3 90
GRD 105 Advertising Typography & Layout 3 90
GRD 107 Rendering/Mixed Media 3 90
GRD 200 Advertising Design & Portfolio Preparation 3 90
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 62


GRD 203 Adobe Illustrator 3 90
GRD 206 Graphic Design Production &
Prepress I 3 90
GRD 207 Graphic Design Production &
Prepress II 3 90
GRD 209 Quark Express 3 90
GRD 220 Intro, to Photoshop 3 90
GRD 297 Graphic Design Internship 3 135
GRD 285 Creative Graphic Design & 3 90
Portfolio Preparation (Capstone)
Select 2 courses from the following: 6 158-180
ART 122 Drawing ll/Mixed Media (3) (90)
ART 132 Design II (3) (90)
ART 151 Fundamentals of
Black & White Photography (3) (90)
ART 211 Painting I (3) (90)
MUM 101 Intro, to Multimedia (3) (68)
Total 63 1688-1710
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN HEALTH AND WELLNESS MANAGEMENT
This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level employment in the broad field of health and wellness. Some the occupations for which students will be prepared include personal care providers, home health aides, fitness center staff, health promotion and wellness coordinators within business and industry, wellness educators with health insurance companies or national health organizations (i.e. American Cancer Society), diet center staff, fitness resort staff, and fitness event coordinators or staff (i.e.Run for the Cure").
It is possible many of the occupations for which students will be prepared have not yet been created. Health and wellness promotion is "on the cutting edge" of health care, fitness, social services and education. As health care reform takes hold, we expect the health and wellness job market to explode.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
2. Signature authorization on completed program application from the Health and Wellness Management program coordinator.To apply to the program, arrange an appointment with the program coordinator in the South Classroom Building, room 301,(303) 556-2472.
General Education Requirements
Must be completed with a grade of Cor better
Credits Contacts
BIO 111 General College Biology 1 5 90
ENG 121 English Composition 3 45
or
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 1
MAT 121 College Algebra 3-4 45-60
or
MAT 135 Intro, to Statistics
soc 101 Intro, to Sociology 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
PSY 101 General Psychology 1 3 45
or
ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics
AAS Humanities requirement 3 45
Major Requirements
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 236 Principles of Marketing 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 3 45
GNT 201 Intro, to Gerontology 3 45
HWM 101 Essentials of Total Fitness & Wellness 3 45
HWM 103 First-aid & CPR 2 30
HWM 201 Health Psychology 3 45
HWM 205 Educational Principles of
Health & Wellness 3 45
NUT 100 Nutrition 3 45
PER 100 Aerobics 2 45
HSE 213 Substance Abuse:
A Multi-Model Approach 3 45
or
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth &
Development 3 45
HWM 285 Health & Wellness Practicum (Capstone) 2 90
Total 63-64 1035-1050
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN HUMAN SERVICES
This program prepares students for entry-level employment in communities and institutions that serve clients with a variety of human needs. Students may choose to focus on specific skill areas, such as social service agencies, health care centers, youth services, substance abuse programs, geriatric centers, child abuse, community corrections, crisis centers and domestic violence.
With the exception of MAT 103, the AAS in human services degree at CCD may be transferred to the Human Services Department at MSCD. Students who wish to meet the MSCD Human Services Department's mathematics requirement while at CCD are advised to take MAT 135. AAS students in human services must earn a grade of "C"or better in all general education and major course requirements.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 1 b or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
2. Signature authorization on program application from Human Services faculty advisor.
6 3
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing I
or 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics or higher 3-5 45-75
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
PSV 101 Intro, to Psychology
or
sex: 101 Intro, to Sociology
or
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Development 3 45
AAS Humanities requirement 3 45
Major Requirements
HSE 105 Intro, to Social Welfare 3 45
HSE 106 Survey of Human Services 3 45
Offered Fall Semester Only;
HSE 107 Interviewing Principles & Practices 3 45
HSE 109 Social Issues in Human Services 3 45
HSE 205 Human Services for Groups 3 45
HSE 206 Human Services for Families 3 45
HSE 207 Community Organization 3 45
HSE 211 Human Services Practicum II 4 150
Offered Spring Semester Only:
HSE 108 Intro, to Therapeutic Systems 3 45
HSE 115 Human Services Practicum I 4 150
HSE 208 Social Welfare Policy 3 45
HSE 209 Crisis Theory & Intervention 3 45
HSE 212 Human Services Practicum ill 7 285
(Capstone) Total 60-62 1260-1290
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN MULTIMEDIA DESIGN
This program is designed to provide students with skills necessary for entry into the field of multimedia design. Students may choose to focus on specific skill areas, such as computer graphics, graphic design, music, video production, or graphic arts. The Multimedia Design program allows students to develop basic skills common to all five specialties while developing an emphasis in one.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3 or completion of REA 115 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Signature authorization on program application from MUM faculty advisor.
3. All students are required to be computer literate before entering the program. Students may complete deficiencies (GRD 102, Intro, to Macintosh) concurrently with the beginning courses in the program.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
Total 9 135
Select AAS general education courses from 2 of the following 3 areas: 6-8 90-120
Arts and Humanities Physical and Biological Sciences Social and Behavioral Sciences
Major Requirements
GRA 109 Microcomputing 1 22.5
MUM 100 Intro, to Macintosh 1 22.5
MUM 101 Intro, to Multimedia 3 68
MUM 104 Design for the Computer 3 68
GRD 103 MAC Computer Art 3 90
MUM 105 Image Processing & Manipulation 3 68
MUM 107 Integrated Video Production Studio 3 68
MUS 202 Music Theory IV 3 45
MUM 206 Fractal Design Studio 3 68
MUM 207 Multimedia Animation Studio 3 68
MUM 285 Multimedia Portfolio Preparation (Speech Intensive Capstone) 3 68
MUM 297 Multimedia Internship 3-6 135-270
Total 33 739-806
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Multimedia Design COMPUTER GRAPHICS EMPHASIS
ART 131 Design 1 3 90
GRD 203 Adobe Illustrator 3 90
GRD 209 Quark Xpress (Capstone) 3 90
GRD 220 Introduction to Photoshop 3 90
MUM 210 3-D Modeling and Animation 3 90
Total 15 450
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Multimedia Design GRAPHIC ARTS EMPHASIS
GRA 102 Electronic Composition, Art &
Copy Preparation 3 67.5
GRA 103 Line & Halftone Photography 3 67.5
GRA 104 Digital Halftone Photography 3 67.5
GRA 107 Intro, to Web & Homepage 3 67.5
GRA 202 Electronic Page Layout 3 68
Total 15 338
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Multimedia Design GRAPHIC DESIGN EMPHASIS
GRD 100 Lettering & Typographic Design 3 90
GRD 105 Advertising Typography & Layout 3 90
GRD 200 Ad Design & Portfolio Preparation 3 90
GRD 206 Graphic Design Production & Prepress 1 3 90
GRD 285 Creative Graphic Design & Portfolio Preparation (Capstone) 3 90
Total 15 450
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 64


Associate of Applied Science Degree in Multimedia Design MUSIC EMPHASIS
MUS 101 Music Theory 1 3 45
MUS 102 Music Theory II 3 45
MUS 220 Computer Music Composing 3 45
MUS 221 Computer Music Arranging 3 45
Total 12 180
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Multimedia Design PHOTOGRAPHY EMPHASIS
PHO 101 Fundamentals of Photography 3 90
PHO 102 Fundamentals of Color Photography 3 90
PHO 107 History of Photography 3 90
PHO 204 Intro, to Digital Imaging 3 90
PHO 205 Non-Chemical Printing 3 90
Total 15 450
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Multimedia Design VIDEO PRODUCTION/COMMUNICATIONS
COM 251 Intro, to Television Production 3 45
COM 255 Survey of Film 3 45
COM 257 Videography 3 45
COM 258 Script & Storyboard Writing 3 45
COM 259 Media Writing/Media Overview 3 45
Total 15 225
Program Total 62-65 1144-1511
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN NURSING
This program prepares the student to practice as a professional nurse through a two-year course of study. The program begins in the fall term, and continues fall and spring semesters for two academic years. After the first semester, students receive a nurse aide certificate and are eligible for state certification. After successfully completing the first year, students will receive a certificate in practical nursing, while completion of the full two-year program results in an Associate of Applied Science degree. After students receive the AAS degree, they are eligible to take the licensure exam to become a registered nurse.
Application materials must be submitted by March 1,to be considered for admission into the class beginning fall of the academic year. Eligible applicants are selected first come, first served, based on the date their applications were received by the Nursing Office, South Classroom Building, room 312. Applicants not accepted are considered for the following year. Graduate exit competency is measured by successful completion of the capstone course, NUR 285 Comprehensive Nursing.
The Nursing program is a member of the Colorado Nursing Articulation Project. Credit earned by completing the AAS degree is accepted by Colorado baccalaureate-level nursing programs under the terms of the articulation agreement.
Program Admission Requirements
There are four steps for admission into the nursing program.
1. Qualify for an application by meeting the following criteria:
a. English assessment level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. math assessment level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better;
c. reading assessment level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better; and
d. study skills assessment level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better.
All prospective nursing students must take the Basic Skills Assessment.
There are no exceptions.
2. Submit a Nursing program application. Students must attend a mandatory nursing orientation, held every Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. in the South Classroom Building, room 246. Students should bring a copy of their Basic Skills Assessment results and student transcripts of course work at CCD or other colleges attended.
Students should submit their application as soon as they meet the above qualifications. Applicants are considered for admission according to the date the complete application packet is received in the Nursing office.
A completed application packet includes the program application, a copy of the Basic Skills Assessment, two sealed letters of reference dated within the past two years (one letter must be from a supervisor or teacher) and official transcripts from other colleges attended. Official transcripts also must be sent to the CCD registrar for credit evaluation and official transfer of course work.
3. Be enrolled in BIO 202 by March 1 of the year of intended entry. Students must have completed BIO 201 with a "C"or better and also have completed one other general education prerequisite course listed in #4 below.
4. Complete the following first-year prerequisites with a C or better by the beginning of the fall of the year of intended entry.
First-year Prerequisites Credits Contacts
and/or General Education
NUT 100 Intro, to Nutrition 3 45
*BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 75
*BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75
MAT 100 or higher 3-5 45-75
(MAT 121 or 135 are recommended for students expecting to transfer to a four-year college.)
*PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth 3 45
& Development
ENG 121 English Composition 3 45
Second-year Prerequisites and/or General Education
Humanities Core Elective (See AAS curriculum
for list of approved courses.) 3 45
*BIO 205 Microbiology 3-4 60-75
(Courses taken at another institution must have lab component.)
* Must have been completed within the past 10years.
Major Requirements First and Second Year
NUR 101 Core Concepts of Pharmacology 1 22.5
NUR 102 Core Concepts of Nursing 1 22.5
NUR 103 Pharmacology for Nursing 2 45
NUR 109 Basic Nursing Skills 6 135
NUR 111 Nursing Concepts & Issues 6 135
NUR 112 Nursing Care of the Hospitalized Client 1 4 90
6 S
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


NUR 113 Nursing Care of the Older Adult 4 90
NUR 114 Family-Centered Nursing 1 4 90
NUR 202 Management of Intravenous Therapy 1 17
NUR 208 Nursing Assessment & Diagnosis 4 90
NUR 211 Mental Health Nursing 4 90
NUR 212 Nursing Care of the
Hospitalized Client II 4 90
NUR 210 Family-Centered Nursing Care II 4 90
NUR 214 Nursing Leadership & Management 4 90
NUR 285 Comprehensive Nursing Internship 3 135
(Capstone)
Total 78-81 1667-1712
NURSING: ADVANCED PLACEMENT
Graduates of approved schools of practical nursing may enter the second year of the Nursing program to become graduate professional nurses. Applicants must meet the following admission requirements: provide two letters of recommendation and submit transcripts of PN education and other related course work to both the registrar and the nursing coordinator. The Nursing program is a member of the Colorado Nursing Articulation Project. Applicants must have their practical nurse education evaluated under the terms of the articulation agreement. If the student graduated 10 years or more from the practical nurse level, or from an out-of-state non-college program, ACT-PEP or NLN Mobility Testing must be completed to validate education. Students will receive advising regarding preparation for testing. Under the articulation agreement, students are given 30 hours of credit from the practical nurse level.
Applicants must complete BIO 201 and BIO 202, and three other general education courses before enrolling in NUR 126, the bridge course. Admission into the clinical courses depends on completion of all general education courses and NUR 126, and is subject to available clinical space. Program begins in the fall semester only.
Applicants should contact the nursing coordinator or program assistant at (303) 556-3624 for information and application.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a Cor
better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
Prerequisites and/or General Education Credits Contacts
* BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 75
BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
*PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth 3 45
& Development
MAT 100 or higher 3-5 45-75
*BIO 205 Intro, to Microbiology 3-4 60-75
(If course taken at another institution,
must have lab component.)
Humanities Core Elective (See AAS curriculum
for list of approved courses.) 3 45
NUR 126 Nursing Process: Concepts & Skills 1 15
Credit awarded for Practical Nurse Education
under Colorado Nursing Articulation Agreement. 28 338
Major Requirements Second Year NUR 202 Management of Intravenous Therapy 1 17
NUR 208 Nursing Assessment & Diagnosis 4 90
NUR 211 Mental Health Nursing 4 90
NUR 212 Nursing Care of the Hospitalized Client II 4 90
NUR 210 Family-Centered Nursing Care II 4 90
NUR 214 Nursing Leadership & Management 4 90
NUR 285 Comprehensive Nursing Internship 3 135
(Capstone) Total 76-81 1345-1390
* Transfer credit accepted if completed within last Wyears.
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN PARALEGAL
This program is designed to prepare students with job-entry skills for the general paralegal field. Emphasis is placed on practical skills such as interviewing, research and document drafting.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
2. Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
MAT 121 College Algebra or MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 4 60
3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Select 1 course from the following
MS Humanities requirements: ART 111,112; CIS 118; 3-5 45
HUM 121,122,123; LIT 115,201,202 MUS 120,121,122; PHI 111,112,113 Any foreign language 111 or higher;
THE 105,211,212
Select 1 course from the following
MS Social & Behavioral Sciences requirements: 3 45
ANT 101,111; ECO 201,202; GEO 105;
HIS 101,102,201,202; PSY 101,102;
POS 105,111; SOC 101,102
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 66


Major Requirements PAR 121 Intro, to Paralegal 3 45
PAR 124 Legal Research 3 45
PAR 221 Civil Procedures 3 45
PAR 222 Evidence 3 45
PAR 223 Computers & the Law 3 45
PAR 280 Paralegal Workshop 6 225
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
Select 9 courses from the following: 25-30 375-450
PAR 105 Torts (3) (45)
PAR 109 Property (3) (45)
PAR 115 Domestic Relations (3) (45)
PAR 125 Tax Law (3) (45)
PAR 126 Creditor/Debtor/Bankruptcy (3) (45)
PAR 185 Paralegal Synthesis 1 (3) (45)
PAR 201 Business Organizations (3) (45)
PAR 205 Probate (3) (45)
PAR 207 Legal Research Seminar 1 (3) (45)
PAR 208 Legal Research Seminar II (3) (45)
PAR 214 Administrative Law (3) (45)
PAR 231 investigations 1 (3) (45)
PAR 239 Criminal Law (3) (45)
PAR 241 Environmental Law 1 (3) (45)
PAR 252 Constitutional Law (3) (45)
PAR 258 Contracts (3) (45)
PAR 297 Cooperative Education (3-6) (30-180)
PAR 299 Independent Study (1-3) (30-90)
PAR 285 Paralegal Synthesis II (Capstone) 3 45
Total 67-72 1005-1080
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN PHOTOGRAPHY
This program provides technical and aesthetic training to prepare graduates with the skills necessary to enter the field of professional photography, including freelance, portrait and creative photography.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 2 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
2. Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature.
Select 2 courses from the following three areas: 6 90
AAS Arts & Humanities requirements
AAS Physical & Biological Sciences requirements
AAS Social & Behavioral Sciences requirements
Major ART Requirements 121 Drawing 1 3 90
ART 131 Design 1 3 90
PHO 101 Fundamentals of Photography 3 90
PHO 102 Fundamentals of 3 90
PHO 107 Color Photography History of Photography 3 90
PHO 111 Intermediate Black & 3 90
PHO 112 White Photography Intermediate Color Photography 3 90
Select : 2 courses from the following: 6 180
PHO 201 View Camera Techniques (3) (90)
PHO 202 Studio Lighting (3) (90)
PHO 203 The Fine Print (3) (90)
Select : 2 courses from the following: 6 180
PHO 211 Portrait Photography (3) (90)
PHO 212 Landscape Photography (3) (90)
PHO 213 Craft & Expression (3) (90)
Select : a minimum of 9 credit hours 9 270
from the following: ART 211 Painting I (3) (90)
ART 132 Design II (3) (90)
BUS 115 Intro, to Business (3) (45)
GRD 103 MAC Computer Art (3) (90)
GRD 105 Advertising Typography & Layout (3) (90)
GRD 220 Intro, to Photoshop (3) (90)
PHO 290 Special Topics (1-3) (30-90)
PHO 295 Job Search Workshop (1) (15)
PHO 297 Cooperative Education (3-6) (30-180)
PHO 285 (variable credit) Seminar in Photography (Capstone) 3 90
Total 60 1755
General Education Courses Credits Contacts
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
MAT 121 College Algebra or Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
MAT 103
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
67 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN RADIOGRAPHY
The Radiography program prepares the student for an entry-level position as a radiographer in a variety of medical settings. The program consists of five semesters of course work that includes classroom, laboratory and clinical internship experience. Graduates earn an Associate of Applied Science degree and are eligible to apply for registration by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists.
The program begins fall semester of each year. Information and requirements can be obtained from the Educational Planning and Advising Center. Students who are interested in articulating their career with a Bachelor of Science degree should contact the degree-awarding institution for information regarding transferable prerequisite course work.
Program Admission Requirements
There are two steps for admission into the radiography program.
1. Qualify for an application by meeting the following criteria:
a. English assessment level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. math assessment level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better;
c. reading assessment level 3 or completion of REA 151 with a C or better; and
d. study skills assessment level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better.
All prospective Radiography students must take the Basic Skills Assessment. There are no exceptions.
To get an application, students must meet with a radiography program advisor. Call (303) 556-2472 to make an appointment. Bring a copy of the Basic Skills Assessment results and student transcripts of course work at CCD, or other colleges attended.
It is important to submit an application as soon as the above qualifications are met. Applicants are accepted for admission by the date the completed application packet is received.
A completed application packet includes the program application, copies of Basic Skills Assessment results, a copy of the high school diploma or GED and an educational plan.
2. Complete the following general education requirements with aC" or better prior to starting the program.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
Select either BIO 119, or both BIO 201 and 202: 4-8 60-150
*BIO 119 Radiographic Anatomy or both (4) (60)
*BIO 201 Anatomy & Physiology 1 and (4) (75)
*BIO 202 Anatomy & Physiology II (4) (75)
Select 1 course from the following: 3-4 45-60
MAT 100 Elementary Algebra (3) (60)
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics (3) (45)
MAT 105 Intermediate Algebra (4) (60)
MAT 121 College Algebra (4) (60)
MAT 135 Intro, to Statistics (3) (45)
Select 1 course from the following: 3 45
soc 101 Intro, to Sociology 1 (3) (45)
PSY 101 General Psychology 1 (3) (45)
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth (3) (45)
& Development
* Must have been completed within the past five years.
Radiography Program Credits Contacts
Fall
RTR 102 Radiographic Imaging I 3 45
RTR 103 Radiographic Equipment 3 45
RTR 104 Radiographic Internship I 5 225
RTR 105 Radiographic Patient Care I 3 45
Spring
RTR 112 Radiographic Imaging II 3 45
RTR 113 Radiographic Equipment II 3 45
RTR 114 Radiographic Internship II 5 225
RTR 115 Radiographic Patient Care II 3 45
Summer
RTR 124 Radiographic Internship III 7 315
Fall
RTR 202 Imaging III (Speech Intensive) 3 45
RTR 203 Radiation Biology/Protection 2 30
RTR 204 Radiographic Internship IV 8 360
Spring
RTR 214 Radiographic Internship V 11 495
RTR 216 Radiography Capstone 3 45
Total 75-78 2205-2310
6 8
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS


ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN RECREATIONAL ASSISTANT
The Recreational Assistant program awards either the AAS degree or the certificate of program completion. Upon successful completion of 400 hours of externship experiences, the graduate qualifies under the National Recreation and Park Association as a Certified Leisure Assistant. This program is currently in the process of articulating with bachelor's degree programs for transfer of credits for the BS degree in recreation therapy. Two of the program's courses are offered as"open enrollment" and can be taken by anyone interested in the Recreation Assistant program, or in the activities taught. To earn the AAS degree in the Recreational Assistant program, the student must complete all required courses with a "C'or better.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
2. Signature authorization on completed program application from the Recreational Assistant program coordinator.To apply to the program, arrange an appointment with the program coordinator in the South Classroom Building, room 301, (303) 556-2472.
General Education Requirements Credits Contacts
BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 75
ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45
or
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing I
MAT 135 Intro, to Statistics 3 45
PSY 101 General Psychology I 3 45
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Development 3 45
SOC 101 Intro, to Sociology 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
AAS Humanities requirement 3 45
Other Required Courses
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 3 45
Recreational Assistant Program Credits Contacts
Fall
RAE 201 Intro, to Recreational Leisure 3 45
RAE 202 Intro, to Recreational Therapy 3 45
RAE 205 Recreational Assistant Externship I 4 180
RAE 207 Specialized Areas in Recreation Electives (Open enrollment. Offered spring semester, also.) 4 60
SOC 103 Sociology of Health Care 3 45
Spring
RAE 203 Recreation & Leisure in Special Populations 3 45
RAE 204 Health & Safety in Recreation & Leisure 3 45
RAE 207 Specialized Areas in Recreation Electives (Open enrollment. Offered fall semester, also.) (4) (60)
RAE 285 Recreational Assistant Externship II 5 225
Total 59 1170
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN TRADES
The Trades AAS degree program consists of a maximum of 58 semester credit hours of trade-specific credits. Students may earn this credits via apprenticeship training (classroom and on-the-job hours) or technical education course work and training, plus a maximum of 20 credit hours of core general education courses at CCD. For those registered apprentices who complete a three-year registered apprenticeship program, 20 CCD credit hours will be required; for those completing a four-year or five-year apprenticeship program, 17 CCD general education credits will be required. Students completing CCD/TEC certificate course sequences and wishing to pursue the AAS degree must complete a minimum of 25 semester hours of general education credit and a minimum of 60 credit hours as noted below.
Associate of Applied Science Degree in Trades CONSTRUCTION
This program is offered jointly by CCD, Emily Griffith Opportunity School and the Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee. Students enrolled in apprenticeship training part of this program are not eligible for financial aid from CCD.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
2. Official transcript showing completion of Emily Griffith Opportunity School's Apprenticeship program.
Apprenticeship Training Credits Contacts
Four- to five-year training and Capstone 43 3870
Three-year training and Capstone 40 3600
General Education Requirements
ENG 121 or 131 3 45
MAT 103 or 121 4 60
69 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Select 1 course from the following
AAS Physical and Biological Sciences requirements: 4-5
AST 101,102; BIO 105,111,112*
CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111;
PHY 105,111,112,211,212
Select 1 course from the following
AAS Humanities requirements: 3-4
ART 111,112; CIS 118;
HUM 121,122,123; LIT 115,201,202 MUS 120,121,122; PHI 111,112,113 Any foreign language 111 or higher;
THE 105,211,212
Select 1 course from the following
AAS Social & Behavioral Sciences requirements: 3
ANT 101, 111,-ECO 201,202;GEO 105;
HIS 101,102,201,202; PSY 101,102;
POS 105,111; SOC 101,102
SPE 115 Intro, to Speech 3
(3-year apprenticeship program only)
Total 63-68
80-105
45-68
45
45
3985-4295
7 0
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS


certificate program
D

In addition to associate degree programs, specially designed courses and sequences leading to the awarding of certificates have been designed in cooperation with business, commerce and local government. These certificates provide opportunity and rewards for persons seeking to improve skills in their occupational fields. Courses in certificate sequences are applicable to appropriate associate degree programs.
Student Performance Objectives for Vocational Education (Certificate Programs)
Students who complete vocational programs will be able to perform the following:
1. Basic and advanced academic skills appropriate to the profession.
a. Basic skills: reading, writing, mathematics, speaking, listening;
b. Thinking skills: ability to learn, reason, make decisions, solve problems;
2. General occupational skills appropriate to the profession.
a. Information: ability to acquire and evaluate data, organize and maintain files, use computers to process information.
b. Interpersonal: ability to work on teams and with people, teach others, serve customers, lead, negotiate; value and serve, work well with and for people from diverse cultures.
c. Personal: responsibility, self-management, integrity; personal, professional and social ethics.
d. Resources: ability to allocate time, money, materials, space and staff.
e. Systems: understand technological, organizational and social systems; monitor and correct performance, design or improve systems.
f. Technology: select equipment, apply technology to specific tasks.
3. Specific occupational skills that include all aspects of the profession. These include planning, management, finances, underlying principles of technology, technical skills, labor and community issues, health and safety and environmental issues.
Each vocational program has identified student performance objectives for each vocational program area. These performance objectives are given to students during the advising process. They are collectively bound and published for general distribution and constitute the college's guarantee to the employer. Copies are available in division and counseling offices.
Certificate Program Entry Requirements
Students must apply for entry to all certificate programs. Program application forms are available in the South Classroom Building, room 134 and in instructional division offices.
ACCOUNTING
This is recommended for students who wish to study basic business fundamentals while developing entry-level accounting skills, and constitutes an acceptable first-year curriculum in accounting and business for an associate degree.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
ACC 110 Business Math 3 45
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 3-4 45-60
or
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 (Corequisite ACC 110 or Level 2b Math placement)
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
or
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II
ACC 113 Computerized Accounting 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
Elective BTE Keyboarding 2 30
BTE 108 Business Machines 1 15
BTE 120 Filing & Records Control 3 45
Total 32-33 488-503
Accounting
ACCOUNTING WITH COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This program prepares the student for entry-level positions: accounting clerk, data entry clerk, accounts payable clerk, accounts receivable clerk and accounting assistant. Students will develop specialized computer skills in word processing,accounting software, spreadsheet and computer programming most requested by today's employers.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C orbetter;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
7 1
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Credits Contacts
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I (Corequisite ACC 110 or Level 3 math placement) 4 60
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
ACC 110 Business Math 3 45
ACC 113 Computerized Accounting 3 45
ACC 215 Accounting Systems 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
Select 6 credits with advisor approval: 6 90-105
CIS 145 Database Concepts (2) (40)
CIS 156 Advanced Spreadsheets (3) (45)
CIS 176 BASIC with DOS (3) (45)
or
CIS 178 Visual BASIC with Windows (3) (45)
CIS 260 COBOL Language Programming (3) (45)
BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45)
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
ACC 297 Cooperative Education (Prerequisite ACC 122) (3) (45)
Total 334 95-510
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Business Administration
COMMERCIAL CREDIT MANAGEMENT
These certificate programs for students working in commercial credit management are specifically designed to train and upgrade skills of credit managers, assistants and other credit personnel who work in the area of exterior or commercial credit.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
Certificate Option 1 Credits Contacts
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
CRM 217 Business Credit Principles 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business 3 45
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
Total 19 285
Certificate Option II Credits Contacts
ACC 226 Cost Accounting 3 45
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60
BUS 116 Intro, to Management/Supervision 3 45
BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business 3 45
BUS 226 Business Statistics 3 45
CRM 217 Business Credit Principles 3 45
Total 22 330
Business Administration
CUSTOMER INFORMATION SERVICES AGENT;
Call Center Management,Teleservices Agent/Rep
This program provides a basis for developing customer information services for client service, survey-taking, appointment making, direct sales and follow up. Includes paper flow management, telephone skills, terms and concepts, along with other job skills necessary for entry-level positions. The customer information services industry is growing and offers considerable employment opportunity for those persons prepared and who exhibit these unique abilities. Client services orientation, call-center management and outsourcing of services from a contractual point of view will be explored.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
REA 090 College Preparation Reading 3 45
MAT 033 General Skills in Math I 3 45
ENG 100 Composition Style & Technique 3 45
SPE 125 Interpersonal Communication
or
SPE 205 Voice & Diction 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BTE 139 Professional Development 3 45
BTE 101 Keyboarding I 4 80
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
BUS 217 Customer Service 3 45
BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 45
BUS 207 Teleservices 3 45
BUS 297 Cooperative Education/lnternship
(Capstone) 3-6 135-270
Total 41-44 733-868
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 72


Business Administration
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This program provides the concepts and skills necessary to succeed in business. Enrollment in this curriculum will engage students in entrepreneurial activities. Students will learn key concepts of small business, management and marketing.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
Certificate Option 1 Credits Contacts
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 3 45
ACC 110 Business Math 3 45
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 45
Electives With faculty advisor approval 12 180
Total 24 360
Certificate Option II Credits Contacts
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
ACC 110 Business Math 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
BUS 118 Intro, to Marketing 3 45
Electives With faculty advisor approval 4 60
BUS 185 Business Certificate (Capstone) 1 15
Total 25 383
Business Administration
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
This program is designed for individuals and businesses who would like to explore the possibilities of doing or improving their business in international markets. Basic essentials of foreign trade and cultural understanding will be necessary for an effective business relationship.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
BUS 115 Intro, to Business Credits 3 Contacts 45
BUS 185 Business Certificate (Capstone) 1 15
BUS 210 International Business 3 45
POS 205 International Relations 3 45
BUS 211 International Marketing 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
Select 10 credit hours from foreign languages 10 ISO
Total 27 413
Business Administration
MARKETING
This program is part of a two-year Associate degree in Business Administration. All courses are applicable to the advanced degree.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
ACC 110 Business Math 3 45
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
BUS 118 Intro, to Marketing 3 45
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 45
BUS 239 Advertising & Promotion 3 45
BUS 116 Intro, to Management/Supervision 3 45
BUS 297 Business Administration
Cooperative Education 3 45
BUS 185 Business Certificate (Capstone) 1 15
Total 32 488
Business Administration
PROFESSIONAL SELLING
This program is designed to give a motivated student the entry-level skills necessary to get a job in the lucrative field of sales. All these classes apply toward a two-year Associate degree, Business Administration in Marketing option.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
First Semester
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 45
SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45
Second Semester
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
BUS 118 Intro, to Marketing 3 45
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
BTE 139 Professional Development 3 45
73 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Third Semester
BUS 297 Marketing Cooperative Education 3 45
BUS 185 Business Certificate (Capstone) 1 15
Total 32 488
Business Administration
SMALL BUSINESS
This program provides the basic fundamentals for success as a small business entrepreneur. Students receive the essentials of small business operations from initiating the small business plan to getting and maintaining customers and clients.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 3-4 45-60
or
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
ACC 110 Business Math 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business 3 45
Elective BUS 3 45
ACC 111 Individual Income Tax 3 45
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
orbit 152 Microsoft Word
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
BUS 185 Business Certificate (Capstone)
Total 31-32 473-488
Business Administration
SUPERMARKET MANAGEMENT
This program is designed to give the student the necessary knowledge and skills to gain employment and/or to advance to positions of increased responsibility within the supermarket industry.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 1 c or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 116 Intro, to Management/Supervision 3 45
BUS 118 Intro, to Marketing 3 45
BUS 170 Supermarket Loss Prevention 3 45
BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business Law 3 45
BUS 227 Human Resources Management 3 45
BUS 229 Motivation & Management 3 45
BUS 270 Business Ethics 3 45
BUS 235 Retail Marketing & Management 3 45
(Capstone)
Select 1 course from the following: 3-4 45-68
ACC 110 Business Math (3) (45)
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 (4) (60)
ECO 118 Labor Economics (3) (45)
BUS 217 Business Communications (3) (45)
BUS 228 Principles of Management (3) (45)
BUS 239 Advertising & Promotion (3) (45)
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers (4) (68)
ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics (3) (45)
Total 30-31 450-473
Business Administration
TRAVEL AND TOURISM
This two-semester certificate program provides entry-level skills for employment in the travel, tourism and hospitality industries. Courses prepare students for jobs such as entry-level reservations assistant, clerk and travel agent trainee.
Courses must be taken in the sequence as shown.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
BTT 110 Principles of Travel Administration Credits 3 Contacts 45
BTT 210 Domestic Ticketing 3 45
BH 211 International Travel 3 45
BTT 111 Travel Geography 1 3 45
BTT 112 Travel Geography II 3 45
BTT 113 Selecting & Selling Cruises 3 45
BTT 212 Computer Reservations 1 3 45
BTT 213 Computer Reservations II (Capstone) 3 45
Total 24 360
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 74


BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY: OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND SECRETARIAL STUDIES
Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies GENERAL CLERICAL
Designed to prepare students for jobs in offices where general clerical opportunities exist (filing, word processor, clerk, etc.)
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better. Certificate Option I 1 Semester
(with permission of faculty advisor) Credits Contacts
BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding 4 60
BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch 2 23
BTE 120 Filing & Records Control 4 68
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
Total 16 331
Certificate Option II 2 Semesters (with permission of faculty advisor)
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 3-4 45-60
or
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1
BTE 101 Keyboarding 1 5 83
BTE 202 Keyboarding II
BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding 4 60
BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch 2 23
BTE 120 Filing & Records Control 4 68
BTE 133 Word Processing Communications 3 45
& Applications
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
BTE 139 Professional Development 3 45
BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
Total 50-31 564-579
Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies MEDICAL SECRETARIAL
Designed to prepare students for jobs such as medical records clerk, medical secretary, etc.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 3-4 45-60
or
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I
HOC 100 Medical Terminology 1 15
BTE 101 Keyboarding I 5 83
or
BTE 202 Keyboarding II
BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding 3 45
BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch 2 23
BTE 120 Filing & Records Control 4 68
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
BTE 133 Word Processing Communications & Applications 3 45
BTE 139 Professional Development 3 45
BTE 206 Health Insurance Methods & Claims 3 45
BTE 230 Machine Transcription 5 83
BTE 288 Model Office 4 68
BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
Total 42-43 770-775
Business Technology: Office Management and
Secretarial Studies
STENOGRAPHIC
Designed to prepare students for jobs such as secretary, stenographer, word processor and office assistant/specialist.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
7 5
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Credits Contacts
BTE 101 Keyboarding 1 nr 5 83
BTE 202 Ul Keyboarding II
BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding 4 60
BTE 121 Alpha Speedwriting 1 4 60
BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch 2 23
BTE 120 Filing & Records Control 4 68
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
BTE 133 Word Processing Communications 3 45
& Applications
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BTT 288 Model Office 4 68
BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
Total 35 632-647
Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies WORD PROCESSING
Designed to prepare students as entry-level word processors.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better. Certificate Option I 1 Semester (with permission of instructor/
faculty advisor)
Credits Contacts
BTE 202 Keyboarding II 5 83
BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding 4 60
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
BTE 133 Word Processing Communications & Applications 3 45
BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
Total 18 368
Certificate Option 11 2 Semesters
Designed to prepare students as entry-level word processors.
Credits Contacts
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
BTE 101 Keyboarding I 5 83
BTE 202 Keyboarding II 5 83
BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding 4 60
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
BTE 133 Word Processing Communications & Applications 3 45
BTE 139 Professional Development 3 45
BTE 251 Advanced WordPerfect 3 45
BTE 288 Model Office 4 68
BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135
Total 36 654
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Computer Information Systems
APPLICATIONS PROGRAMMER
This program serves the general student population, but is designed, developed, and operated for and by the nationally recognized and award-winning Computer Training for People with Disabilities (CTPD) program. The certificate program prepares students for careers as applications programmers emphasizing the COBOL language. This is a fast-track program that can be completed in 13 months or more depending on the semester the student begins the curriculum and the amount of remediation, general studies and adaptation skill development required. The program has a fall and spring semester curriculum. Students must have completed the "prerequisites to fall semesterand are encouraged to complete the general education requirements prior to beginning the fall and spring curriculum. Applications should be submitted by May 1.
Students with disabilities are encouraged to make application to the CTPD program, which offers special services, support and placement for program participants. Application information may be obtained from the Center for Persons with Disabilities, South Classroom Building, room 134, or by phone at (303) 556-3300.
All students must satisfy the following program admission requirements prior to beginning the program.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
2. Students with a disability requiring adaptive equipment must be functioning at a professional level. Skills are assessed and evaluated by the CTPD coordinator.
* Prerequisites to Fall Semester
Business Core Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
*ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 4 60
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 218 Advanced Computer Applications 2-3 30-45
or
CIS 119 Intro, to Programming
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 76


Prerequisites to Fall Semester
Fall CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design 3 45
CIS 260 COBOL Language Programming 3 45
CIS 145 Database Concepts 3 45
CIS 277 Operating Systems & JCL 3 45
CIS 266 (mainframe emphasis) On-line Program Development (TSO) 3 45
Spring CIS 261 Advanced COBOL 3 45
CIS 263 CICS/COBOL Programming 3 45
CIS 230 C++ Programming 1 3 45
CIS 240 Oracle 3 45
May CIS 15-July 15 297 Cooperative Education/ 6 270
Internship (Capstone) Total 49-50 923-938
Computer Information Systems
PC SPECIALIST/LAN ADMINISTRATOR
This program serves the general student population, but is designed, developed, and operated for and by the nationally recognized and award-winning Computer Training for People with Disabilities (CTPD) program. The certificate program prepares students for careers as PC specialists,emphasizing the LAN Administration. This is a fast-track program that can be completed in 13 months or more depending on the semester the student begins the curriculum and the amount of remediation and adaptation skill development required. The program has a fall and spring semester curriculum Students must have completed the "prerequisites to the fall semester" and are encouraged to complete the general education requirements prior to beginning the fall and spring curriculum. Applications should be submitted by May 1.
Students with disabilities are encouraged to make application to the CTPD program, which offers special services, support and placement for program participants. Application information may be obtained from the Center for Persons with Disabilities, South Classroom Building, room 134, or by phone at (303) 556-3300.
All students must satisfy the following program admission requirements prior to beginning the program.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
2. Students with a disability requiring adaptive equipment must be functioning at a professional level. Skills are assessed and evaluated by the CTPD coordinator.
#
Business Core Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
*ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60
*BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45
CIS 218 Advanced Computer Applications 2-3 30-45
or
CIS 119 Intro, to Programming
Fall
CIS 145 Database Concepts 3 45
CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 45-72
CIS 255 Networks: Novell 4x Administration 4 68
CIS 266 On-line Program Development (TSO) 2 30
CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design 3 45
CIS 277 Operating Systems & JCL (Microcomputer emphasis) 3 45
Spring
CIS 240 Oracle 3 45
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
CIS 179 Software System Survey 3 45
CIS 275 Telecommunications 3 45
May 15-July 15
CIS 297 Cooperative Education/lnternship (Capstone) 6 270
Total 52-53 976-1018
Computer Information Systems
COMPUTER SPECIALIST
This program is designed to train students in microcomputer use and operations, with a focus on the currently popular software packages used by business and industry.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
CIS 119 Intro, to Programming 3 45
CIS 179 Software/Systems Survey 3 45
CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 45
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45
CIS 275 Telecommunications 3 45
CIS 276 System Analysis & Design 3 45
7 7
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Select any 9 credits from the following: 9 135
CIS 111 Intro, to Internet (2) (45)
CIS 131 Intro, to the Internet &
World Wide Web (3) (45)
CIS 132 Business Applications on the
World Wide Web (3) (45)
CIS 135 Graphics Technology (PowerPoint) (2) (30)
CIS 145 Database Concepts (3) (45)
CIS 156 Advanced Spreadsheets (3) (45)
CIS 175 Intro, to UNIX (3) (45)
CIS 176 BASIC with DOS (3) (45)
CIS 178 Visual BASIC with Windows (3) (45)
CIS 206 Intro, to Multimedia (3) (45)
CIS 208 Advanced Multimedia Systems (3) (45)
CIS 254 Networks: Windows NT Client (4) (68)
CIS 255 Networks: Novell 4x Administration (4) (68)
CIS 256 Networks: Novell 3x Administration (4) (68)
CIS 260 COBOL Language Programming (3) (45)
BTE 100 Intro, to Keyboarding (3) (45)
Any 3 credits of self-paced courses (3) (45)
Total 37 563
Computer Information Systems
COMPUTERS AND MULTIMEDIA
This program is designed to train students in microcomputer use and operations with a focus on the hardware and software that is used to create and develop multimedia presentations.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
CIS 179 Software/Systems Survey 3 45
CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 45
CIS 206 Intro, to Multimedia Systems 3 45
CIS 208 Advanced Multimedia Systems 3 45
CIS 275 Telecommunications 3 45
BUS 115 Intro, to Business 3 45
CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design 3 45
Select any 9 credits from the following: 9 135
CIS 111 Intro, to Internet (2) (45)
CIS 131 Intro, to the Internet &
World Wide Web (3) (45)
CIS 132 Business Applications on the
World Wide Web (3) (45)
CIS 135 Graphics Technology (PowerPoint) (2) (30)
CIS 145 Database Concepts (3) (45)
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts (3) (45)
CIS 156 Advanced Spreadsheets (3) (45)
CIS 175 Intro, to UNIX (3) (45)
CIS 176 BASIC with DOS (3) (45)
CIS 178 Visual BASIC with Windows (3) (45)
CIS 254 Networks: Windows NT Client (4) (68)
CIS 255 Networks: Novell 4x Administration (4) (68)
CIS 256 Networks: Novell 3x Administration (4) (68)
CIS 260 COBOL Language Programming (3) (45)
BTE 100 Intro.to Keyboarding (3) (45)
BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45)
BTE 152 or Microsoft Word (3) (45)
Any 3 credits ; of self-paced courses (3) (45)
Total 34 518
Computer Information Systems
WINDOWS NT NETWORK ADMINISTRATION
This program prepares the student for employment as a computer network administrator. Upon completion of the program, the student will be able to install, configure, administer and optimize a Windows NT network. Additionally, the program prepares the student for evaluation as a certified network administrator (CNA).
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
CIS 119 Intro, to Programming 3 45
CIS 176 BASIC with DOS 3 45
CIS 178 Visual BASIC with Windows 3 45
CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 45
CIS 254 Networks: Windows NT Client 4 68
CIS 283 Networks: Windows NT Server 4 68
Select any 6-7 credits from the following: 6-7 90-105
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I (4) (60)
CIS 131 Intro, to the Internet &
World Wide Web (3) (45)
CIS 132 Business Applications on the
World Wide Web (3) (45)
BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45)
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
CIS 111 Intro, to Internet (2) (45)
CIS 145 Database Concepts (3) (45)
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts (3) (45)
CIS 175 Intro, to UNIX (3) (45)
CIS 179 Software/Systems Survey (3) (45)
CIS 275 Telecommunications (3) (45)
CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design (3) (45)
Total 30-31 474-489
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 78


Computer Information Systems
NOVELL 4X NETWORK ADMINISTRATION
This program prepares the student for employment as a computer network administrator. Upon completion of the program, the student will be able to install, configure, administer and optimize a Novell 4x network. Additionally, the program prepares the student for evaluation as a certified network administrator (CNA).
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
CIS 119 Intro, to Programming 3 45
CIS 176 BASIC with DOS 3 45
CIS 178 Visual BASIC with Windows 3 45
CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 45
CIS 255 Networks: Novell 4x Administration 4 68
CIS 282 Networks: Advanced Novell
Administration 4 68
Select any 6-7 credits from the following: 6-7 90-105
ACC 121 Accounting Principles I (4) (60)
CIS 131 Intro, to the Internet &
World Wide Web (3) (45)
CIS 132 Business Applications on the
World Wide Web (3) (45)
BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45)
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word (3) (45)
CIS 111 Intro, to Internet (2) (45)
CIS 145 Database Concepts (3) (45)
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts (3) (45)
CIS 175 Intro, to UNIX (3) (45)
CIS 179 Software/Systems Survey (3) (45)
CIS 275 Telecommunications (3) (45)
CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design (3) (45)
Total 30-31 474-489
Computer Information Systems
NOVELL 3X NETWORK ADMINISTRATION
This program prepares the student for employment as a computer network administrator. Upon completion of the program, the student will be able to install, configure, administer and optimize a Novell 3x network. Additionally, the program prepares the student for evaluation as a certified network administrator (CNA).
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
CIS 119 Intro, to Programming 3 45
CIS 176 BASIC with DOS 3 45
CIS 178 Visual BASIC with Windows 3 45
CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 45
CIS 256 Networks: Novell 3x Administration 4 68
Select any 6-7 credits from the following: 6-7 90-105
ACC 121 Accounting Principles 1 (4) (60)
CIS 131 Intro, to the Internet &
World Wide Web (3) (45)
CIS 132 Business Applications on the
World Wide Web (3) (45)
BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45)
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word (3) (45)
CIS 111 Intro, to Internet (2) (45)
CIS 145 Database Concepts (3) (45)
CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts (3) (45)
CIS 175 Intro, to UNIX (3) (45)
CIS 179 Software/Systems Survey (3) (45)
CIS 275 Telecommunications (3) (45)
CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design (3) (45)
Total 26-27 406-421
DRAFTING
Drafting
COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING-CAD
The Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) certificate program prepares students for entry positions as CAD operators in industrial plants, engineering firms, manufacturing firms and government agencies.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2 or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Completion of DRI105,106, and CAD 110 with a C or better.
7 9
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


DRI 105 Intro, to Drafting Credits 5 Contacts 100
DRI 106 Dimensioning & Tolerancing 2 40
CAD 110 Computer-Aided Drafting I 3 68
CAD 111 Computer-Aided Drafting II 3 60
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing I 3 45
CAD 210 Computer-Aided Drafting III 3 60
JSW 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
CAD 211 Computer-Aided Drafting IV 3 60
(Capstone) Total 27 516
The DR1105 Intro, to Drafting and DR1106 Dimensioning and Tolerancing can be waived with proof of prior experience in the drafting field.
Drafting
DRAFTING FOR INDUSTRY
The Drafting for Industry certificate program prepares students for entry positions on drafting teams in industrial plants, engineering and manufacturing firms and government agencies.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2 or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Completion of DRI 105 and 106 with a C or better.
DRI 105 Intro, to Drafting Credits 5 Contacts 100
CAD 110 Computer-Aided Drafting 1 3 68
DRI 106 Dimensioning & Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 40
DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 40
DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry 2 40
DRI 113 & Auxiliary Views Intersections & Developments 3 60
JSW 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 100
(Capstone) Total 25 498
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
Early Childhood Education
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION DIRECTOR
This program prepares graduates for director-qualified positions in day care and preschool services. This curriculum meets Colorado Human Services licensing education requirements.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 4 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math: N/A
ECE 101 Intro, to Early Childhood Education Credits 3 Contacts 45
ECE 102 ECE Lab Experience 3 90
ECE 105 Nutrition & the Young Child 3 45
ECE 110 Child Growth & Development 4 60
ECE 117 Methods/Techniques: 3 45
ECE 120 Curriculum Development Classroom Management Techniques 3 45
ECE 126 Administration of ECE Programs 4 60
SOC 101 (Capstone) Intro, to Sociology 3 45
PSY 101 General Psychology 3 45
or
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Development
Select 1 course from the following: 3 45
ECE 111 Infants & Toddlers: Developmental Theories & Practices or (3) (45)
ECE 115 Curriculum: Creative Activities (3) (45)
& the Young Child Total 32 510
Early Childhood Education
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION GROUP LEADER
CCD offers Colorado Group Leader Certificate or child development associate (CDA) training and advisement in conjunction with the following Early Childhood Education courses at CCD. Students completing this sequence will receive a Colorado Group Leader Certificate from CCD. In addition to this academic requirement, the Colorado Department of Human Services requires nine (9) months, (1392 hours) of work experience. Students desiring a CDA will need to contact the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition prior to beginning the process.
ECE 101 Intro, to Early Childhood Education (ECE) 3 45
ECE 102 ECE Lab Experience 3 90
ECE 110 Child Growth & Development 4 60
ECE 120 Classroom Management Techniques 3 45
Select 1 course from the following: 3 45
ECE 111 Infants & Toddlers: Developmental Theories & Practices or (3) (45)
ECE 117 Methods/Techniques: Curriculum Development (3) (45)
Total 16 285
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 80


ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY
The electronics certificate options offer the opportunity for specialization and upgrading. All courses have a prerequisite of the preceding course or proof of competency.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2 or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Completion of ELT100 and 101 with a C or better.
Electronics Technology
PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRONICS
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals Credits 3 Contacts 60
ELT 101 DC Circuits & Magnetism 2 40
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 2 40
ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 60
ELT 104 Complex Circuit Analysis 3 60
ELT 110 Diode Circuits 3 60
ENG 100 Composition Style & Technique or Intro, to Technical Writing I (recommit 3 45
ENG 131 ;nded)
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45
ELT 111 Transistor Amplifiers (Capstone) 3 60
Total 25 470
Electronics Technology
ADVANCED SOLID STATE, DIGITAL & 1C PRINCIPLES
Credits Contacts
ELT 112 JFETs & Oscillators 2 40
ELT 114 Operational Amplifiers 3 60
MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics or College Algebra (recommended) 3 45
MAT 121
PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75
ELT 200 Pulse & Digital Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 201 Digital Circuits 3 60
ELT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals 2 40
ELT 203 Microprocessor & Microcomputer Systems (Capstone) 3 60
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 1 3 45
Total 26 485
Electronics Technology
BROADCAST TECHNOLOGIST
This program prepares the student for entry-level positions in the broadcast industry. Job titles include master control operator, production technician, video production assistant and maintenance technician.
Credits Contacts
ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60
ELT 101 DC Circuits & Magnetism 2 40
ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 2 40
COM 251 Intro, to Television Production 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
ELT 217 Basic Television &
Video Systems (Capstone) 3 60
Select 9 credits from the following: 9 225-315
SPE 115 Principles of Speech (3) (45)
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing 1 (3) (45)
ELT 297 Cooperative Education (3-6) (135-270)
Total 26 538-628
ENVIRONMENTAL AND REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY
Programs are open-entry/open-exit. Students may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to either complete the program for a certificate or degree or upgrade specific skills. Students may waive 100-level courses with prior knowledge and experience. The advanced placement credit is by portfolio and must be approved by the instructor. To satisfy the requirements for a certificate, the following courses must be taken in the listed sequence.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1; and
d. math at level 2 or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Completion of RAC 111 and 112 or equivalent with a C or better.
Environmental and Refrigeration Technology
APARTMENT MANAGER
This program prepares students to enter the field of apartment management. It includes training in basic service and installation of common appliances used in apartments, an introduction to basic electricity, refrigeration, air conditioning and heating and training in areas needed by persons managing an apartment complex.
Credits RAC 111 Electricity & Electronics 1 Contacts 3 60
RAC 112 Electricity & Electronics II 2 40
RAC 114 Fundamentals of Refrigeration 1 2 40
RAC 214 Unitary & Central A/C Systems 3 60
APT 220 Kitchen Equipment 1 3 60
APT 225 Refrigerators & Freezers 1 3 60
RAC 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15
ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 3 45
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers 4 68
APT 226 Room Air Conditioners (Capstone) 3 60
Total 27 508
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COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Environmental and Refrigeration Technology
MAJOR APPLIANCE REPAIR
This program prepares the student for entry-level positions in small and major appliance repair. Most graduates work for small repair
businesses.
RAC 111 Electricity & Electronics 1 Credits 3 Contacts 60
RAC 112 Electricity & Electronics II 2 40
RAC 114 Fundamentals of Refrigeration 1 2 40
RAC 116 Fundamentals of Refrigeration II 3 60
APT 218 Automatic Washers 1 3 60
APT 219 Clothes Dryers 1 3 60
APT 220 Kitchen Equipment 1 3 60
APT 225 Refrigerator/Freezers 1 3 60
APT 226 Room Air Conditioners 3 60
APT 228 Clothes Dryers II 3 60
APT 229 Kitchen Equipment II 3 60
APT 230 Refrigerator/Freezers II 3 60
JSW 295 Job Search Workshop 1 20
APT 285 Automatic Washers II (Capstone) 6 120
Total 41 820
Environmental and Refrigeration Technology
REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING
This program prepares the student with job-entry skills in the fields of commercial-industrial refrigeration, heating and air conditioning. Job skills cover installation, maintenance and servicing. Job titles include HVAC maintenance technician, environmental control technician and refrigeration maintenance technician.
RAC 111 Electricity & Electronics 1 Credits 3 Contacts 68
RAC 112 Electricity & Electronics II 2 45
RAC 114 Fundamentals of Refrigeration 1 2 45
RAC 116 Fundamentals of Refrigeration II 3 68
RAC 200 Refrigeration Systems, Components 3 68
RAC 205 & Applications Fleat Loads & System Development 2 45
RAC 208 Special Refrigeration Systems 3 68
RAC 211 Installation & Service 3 68
RAC 212 Refrigeration Systems Fundamentals of Air Conditioning 3 68
RAC 214 Unitary & Central Station System 3 68
RAC 215 Air Flow Principles & Distribution 2 45
RAC 216 HVAC Control Systems 3 68
JSW 295 Job Search Workshop 1 20
RAC 285 Troubleshooting & 4 75
Servicing (Capstone) Total 37 819
GERONTOLOGY
CCD offers the only gerontology certificate program at the community college level in Colorado. Through courses, practical experiences and seminars, this program provides theory and experience regarding the physical, social and psychological aspects of aging. This certificate enhances the human services program, the health sciences programs and the behavioral sciences program by developing a specialization in aging studies and services. It also is a professional development program for persons already active in the gerontology field.
All potential applicants to the gerontology program should call (303) 556-3891 for an appointment with the gerontology program coordinator.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
GNT 201 Intro, to Gerontology 3 45
GNT 285 Practicum in Gerontology 3 110
BIO 204 Physiological Aspects of Aging (3) (45)
GNT 213 Psychology of Aging (3) (45)
GNT 214 Social Aspects of Aging (3) (45)
GNT 215 Aging in a Diverse Society (3) (45)
GNT 221 Overview of Services &
Resources for the Aging (3) (45)
GNT 236 Nutrition & Aging (3) (45)
GNT 237 Death & Dying (3) (45)
GNT 295 Leadership Development (3) (45)
Total 24 425
GRAPHIC ARTS
Graphic Arts
PRINTING
This program will prepare students with job-entry skills to accomplish most operations necessary on the process camera and the offset press, and to function in the areas of basic bindery, stripping, and general layout and composition work. Upon completing the program, students will be equipped to enter positions with commercial print shops, trade shops, in-plant shops and any other operation requiring printers.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 2 or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2 or completion of MAT 030 with a C or better.
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 82


Credits Contacts
GRA 101 Intro, to Graphic Arts & Traditional Layout 3 67.5
GRA 102 Electronic Composition, Art & Copy Prep 3 67.5
GRA 103 Line & Halftone Photography 3 67.5
GRA 104 Digital Halftone Photography 3 67.5
GRA 105 R6sum6 & Portfolio (Capstone) 3 67.5
GRA 111 Beginning Press Operations 3 60
GRA 112 Stripping, Image Assembly, Platemaking & Inks 3 60
GRA 113 Paper & Ink Management & Print Production 1 3 60
GRA 114 Intermediate Offset Press & Print Production II 3 60
GRA 185 Bindery & Portfolio 3 60
Total 30 637.5
Graphics Arts
PREPRESS
This program prepares students with job-entry skills to accomplish most operations necessary for the process camera, general layout and composition work. It also provides skills to use state-of-the-art electronic equipment for graphics, page make-up, photo manipulation and scanning. Upon completing the program students will be equipped to enter positions with desk-top publishing businesses, commercial print shops, trade shops and in-plant shops.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 1 or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 1 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 1 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 1 or completion of MAT 030 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
GRA 101 Intro, to Graphic Arts & Traditional Layout 3 67.5
GRA 102 Electronic Composition, Art & Copy Preparation 3 67.5
GRA 103 Line & Halftone Photography 3 67.5
GRA 104 Digital Halftone Photography 3 67.5
GRA 105 R£sum6 & Portfolio (Capstone) 3 67.5
GRA 201 Electronic Graphics 3 68
GRA 202 Electronic Page Layout 3 68
GRA 203 Electronic Scanner & Color Theory 3 68
GRA 204 Electronic Prepress 3 68
GRA 205 Photo Manipulation 3 68
Total 30 677.5
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Courses in the certificate sequence are applicable to the Associate of Applied Science degree and normally can be completed in two semesters. Upon completion of major requirements, students may choose one of three emphases, each of which will prepare students fora career in graphic design. Instructor permission is required to omit GRD 102, which could be substituted with an elective. GRD 103 is prerequisite to all computer classes.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 1 b or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 1 b or completion of MAT 030 with a C or better.
Major Requirements Credits Contacts
ENG 100 Composition Style & Technique 3 45
ART 121 Drawing 1 3 90
ART 131 Design 1 3 90
GRD 100 Lettering & Typographic Design 3 90
GRD 102 Intro, to Macintosh 3 90
GRD 103 MAC Computer Art 3 90
GRD 105 Advertising Typography & Layout 3 90
Total 21 585
Graphic Design
COMPUTER GRAPHICS
Credits Contacts
Major Requirements 21 585
Select 2 courses with advisor approval: 6 180-225
ART 132 Design II (3) (90)
GRD 185 PageMaker Design (3) (90)
GRD 203 Adobe Illustrator (3) (90)
GRD 220 Intro, to Photoshop (3) (90)
GRD 297 Graphic Design Internship (3) (135)
GRD 209 Quark Xpress on Macintosh
(Capstone) 3 90
MUM 210 3-D Modeling & Animation (3) (90)
Total 30 855-900
Graphic Design
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Credits Contacts
Major Requirements 21 585
Select 2 courses with advisor approval: 6 180-225
ART 122 Drawing ll/Mixed Media (3) (90)
GRD 185 PageMaker Design or GRD 209 Quark Xpress GRD 200 Advertising Design & (3) (90)
Portfolio Preparation GRD 206 Graphic Design Production & (3) (90)
Prepress 1 (3) (90)
8 3
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


GRD 297 Graphic Design Internship (3) (135)
GRD 285 Creative Graphic Design & 3 90
Portfolio Preparation (Capstone)
Total 30 855-900
Graphic Design
SERVICE BUREAU
Credits Contacts
Major Requirements 21 585
GRA 204 Electronic Prepress 3 68
Select 1 class with advisor approval: 3 90-135
GRD 185 PageMaker Design (3) (90)
or
GRD 209 Quark Xpress
GRD 200 Advertising Design & Portfolio
Preparation (3) (90)
GRD 206 Graphic Design Production & Prepress 1 (3) (90)
GRD 297 Graphic Design Internship (3) (135)
GRA 203 Electronic Scanner & Color Theory 3 68
(Capstone)
Total 30 811-856
HUMAN SERVICES Human Services
CASE MANAGEMENT/RESIDENTIAL SERVICE AIDE
This program prepares students for entry-level positions as case management aides or residential aides. The certificate program is transferable to the AAS and AGS in Human Services. Students must complete all certificate course work with a C or better.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 1 b or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better.
Electives Basic Skills Credits 6 Contacts 90
HSE 106 Survey of Human Services 3 45
HSE 107 Interviewing Principles & Practices 3 45
Elective HSE or Core 5 75
Offered Spring Semester Only: HSE 209 Crisis Theory & Intervention 3 45
HSE 115 Human Services Practicum I 4 60
(Capstone) Total 24 360
PARALEGAL
Paralegal
GENERAL
This program is designed to prepare individuals with job-entry skills for the general paralegal field. Emphasis is placed on practical skills such as interviewing, researching and document drafting.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 1 b or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 1 b or completion of MAT 030 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
PAR 121 Intro, to Paralegal 3 45
PAR 124 Legal Research 3 45
PAR 221 Civil Procedures 3 45
PAR 222 Evidence 3 45
PAR 223 Computers & the Law 3 45
PAR 280 Paralegal Workshop 6 225
Elective PAR 3 45
BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45
or
BTE 152 Microsoft Word
CIS 140 Microcomputers Databases 3 45
PAR 185 Paralegal Synthesis I (Capstone) 3 45
Total 33 630
NURSING
PRACTICAL NURSING
This program represents the first year of the two-year Associate of Applied Science degree in nursing. It begins in the fall term and continues through the spring semester. Prospective applicants must complete the necessary prerequisite course work with a "C" grade or better.
After successful completion of this program, which is a C grade or better in each course, students receive a Certificate of Practical Nursing and are eligible to take the examination for licensure as a practical nurse. After the first semester, students receive a Nurse Aide Certificate and are eligible for state certification. The Nursing program is a member of the Colorado Nursing Articulation Project. Credit earned by completing the Practical Nurse Certificate is accepted by other Colorado nursing programs under the terms of the articulation agreement.
Application materials must be submitted by March 1 to be considered for admission to the class beginning fall of that academic year. To be eligible for consideration, applicants must meet all admission requirements by March 1 of their expected entry. Eligible applicants then are selected first come, first served, based on the date their application was received by the Nursing Office, South Classroom Building, room 312. Applicants not accepted are placed in the waiting pool for the following year. More specific program information may be obtained from the Division of Health and Human Services.
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 84


Program Admission Requirements
There are four steps for admission into the Nursing program.
1. Qualify for an application by meeting the following criteria:
a. English assessment level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. math assessment level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better;
c. reading assessment level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better; and
d. study skills assessment level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better.
All prospective nursing students must take the Basic Skills Assessment. There are no exceptions.
2. Submit a Nursing program application. Students must attend a mandatory nursing orientation, held every Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. in the South Classroom Building, room 246. Students should bring a copy of their Basic Skills Assessment results and student transcripts of course work at CCD or other colleges attended.
Students should submit their application as soon as they meet the above qualifications. Applicants are considered for admission according to the date the completed application packet is received in the Nursing Office.
A completed application packet includes the program application, a copy of the Basic Skills Assessment, two sealed letters of reference dated within the past two years (one letter must be from a supervisor or teacher), and official transcripts from other colleges attended. Official transcripts also must be submitted to the CCD registrar for credit.
3. Be enrolled in BIO 202 by March 1 of the year of intended entry. Students must have completed BIO 201 with a"C"or better and also have completed one other general education prerequisite course listed in #4 below.
4. Complete the following first-year prerequisites with a C or better by the beginning of the fall of the year of intended entry.
Prerequisites and/or General Education Credits Contacts
* BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 4 75
*BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75
*PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth 3 45
& Development
NUT 100 Intro, to Nutrition 3 45
MAT 100 or higher-level course 3-5 45-75
ENG 121 English Composition 3 45
Requirements Credits Contacts
NUR 101 Core Concepts in Pharmacology 1 22.5
NUR 102 Core Concepts of Nursing 1 22.5
NUR 103 Pharmacology for Nursing 2 45
NUR 109 Basic Nursing Skills 6 135
NUR 111 Nursing Concepts & Issues 6 135
NUR 112 Nursing Care of the Hospitalized Client 1 4 90
NUR 113 Nursing Care of the Older Adult 4 90
NUR 114 Family-Centered Nursing Care 1 4 90
Total 48-50 990
* Must have been completed within the past 10 years.
PERIOPERATIVE NURSING
This program prepares the student to practice as an operating room nurse after completing 14 credit hours of study. Students enrolled in this program are not eligible for financial aid.The program begins in the fall semester and continues through the spring semester with an individualized practicum experience. After successfully completing the program, students receive a certificate in perioperative nursing.
Application materials must be submitted by May 1 to be considered for admission into the class beginning fall of the academic year. Eligible applicants are selected first-come-first-served, based on the dates applications are received by the Surgical Technology/
Perioperative Nursing Office, South Classroom Building, room 301. Applicants not accepted are considered for the following year. Graduate exit competency is measured by successful completion of the capstone course, NUR 221, Perioperative Nursing II.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. All applicants must be eligible for licensure as registered nurses.
3. Applicants must submit a Perioperative Nursing program application, available from the office of Health and Human Services, South Classroom Building, room 301, or by calling 556-2472 to have an application mailed.
A completed application packet includes the program application; a copy of current licensure as a registered nurse, or documentation of pending licensure as a registered nurse; two sealed letters of reference dated within the past two years (one letter must be from a supervisor or teacher); a copy of the high school diploma or GED; and official transcripts from other colleges attended. Official transcripts also must be submitted to the CCD registrar.
4. Applicants must submit a separate application to the college. Applications are available in the South Classroom Building, room 136, or by calling 556-2600 to have an application mailed.
5. Applicants must schedule an interview with the Perioperative Nursing program coordinator. Please call 556-2464 for an appointment.
Major Requirements Fall Credits Contacts
NUR 220 Perioperative Nursing I 4 60
Spring
NUR 221 Perioperative Nursing II 10 390
Total 14 450
8 5
COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


PHOTOGRAPHY
This program provides technical and aesthetic training to prepare students with the skills necessary to enter the field of professional photography, including freelance, portrait and creative photography.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 1 b or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 1 b or completion of MAT 030 with a C or better.
Credits Contacts
ART 121 Drawing I 3 90
ART 131 Design I 3 90
ENG 121 English Composition 3 45
PHO 101 Fundamentals of Photography 3 90
PHO 102 Fundamentals of Color 3 90
PHO 111 Intermediate Black & White 3 90
PHO 112 Intermediate Color Photography 3 90
Select a minimum of 6 credits from the following: 6 120-270
GRD 105 Advertising Typography & Layout (3) (90)
BUS 115 Intro, to Business (3) (90)
PHO 201 View Camera Techniques (3) (90)
PHO 202 Studio Lighting (3) (90)
PHO 203 The Fine Print (3) (90)
PHO 205 Photography Workshop (3) (90)
PHO 211 Portrait Photography (3) (90)
PHO 213 Craft & Expression (3) (90)
PHO 215 Photography Seminar (3) (90)
PHO 297 Cooperative Education (3-6) (30-180)
PHO 185 Advanced Photography (Capstone) 3 90
Total 30 795-945
PSYCHIATRIC TECHNICIAN Psychiatric Technician
This program prepares the student to practice as a psychiatric technician in specialized health care settings with client populations experiencing psychiatric disorders and/or developmental disabilities. The program begins fall semester and continues spring semester for one academic year. After the first semester, students are eligible for state licensing as a psychiatric technician with an emphasis in developmental disabilities. After completing the second semester, students are eligible for state licensing as a psychiatric technician with an emphasis in mental illness.
Application materials must be submitted by March 1 to be considered for admission into the class beginning fall of the academic year. Eligible applicants are selected first-come, first-served, based on the dates applications are received by the program coordinator, South Classroom Building, room 312. Applicants not accepted are considered for the following year. Graduate exit competency is measured by successful completion of the capstone course, LPT 111, Nursing Principles of Psychiatric Care and Clinical Application for the Psychiatric Technician.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
All prospective students must take the Basic Skills Assessment. There are no exceptions.
2. Attend a mandatory orientation, held every Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. in the South Classroom Building, room 243. Bring a copy of the Basic Skills Assessment results and copies of official transcripts from other colleges attended. At orientation, the student will receive the Psychiatric Technician program application.
3. Submit a Psychiatric Technician program application with two sealed letters of reference dated within the past two years (one letter must be from a supervisor or teacher) and a copy of the high school diploma or GED to the program coordinator in the South Classroom Building, room 312.
Major Requirements Credits Contacts
BIO 114 Biology of Humans for Psychiatric Technicians 3 45
HSE 113 Human Services for Persons with Developmental Disabilities 3 45
NUR 101 Core Concepts of Pharmacology 1 22.5
NUR 109 Basic Nursing Skills 6 135
LPT 110 Fundamental Concepts & Clinical Application 2 45
LPT 111 Nursing Principles of Psychiatric Care 6 135
Total 21 427.5
Psychiatric Technician: Advanced Placement
Graduates of Colorado Board of Nursing-approved psychiatric technician programs with an emphasis in developmental disabilities may enter CCD's Psychiatric Technician program in the LPT 111, Nursing Principles of Psychiatric Care and Clinical Application for the Psychiatric Technician course.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. Submit two letters of recommendation, a copy of high school diploma or GED, a Certificate of Completion of Colorado Board of Nursing Accredited Psychiatric Technician Developmental Disabilities program, and a copy of Colorado License as Psychiatric Technician with Developmental Disability emphasis. Students are awarded 15 credit hours from the approved Psychiatric Technician Developmental Disabilities program.
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 86


Major Requirements Credits Contacts
Completion of Psychiatric Technician DD program 15 297
LPT 111 Nursing Principles of Psychiatric Care 6 135
Total 21 432
RADIOLOGIC HEALTH SCIENCES
Offered to registered radiologic technologists, these certificate programs provide opportunity for cross training and enhancing professional competence and employability. These programs are offered on an "as-needed basis. Please call the coordinator at 556-2472 for more information about any of the Radiologic certificate programs. Check with the Office of Financial Aid for program eligibility for the following programs.
Radiologic Health Sciences
MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI) TECHNOLOGY
Offered on an "as-needed" basis, this certificate program limits application to those who have registry and/or certification in another diagnostic imaging modality (nuclear medicine technology or registered diagnostic medical sonography, radiologic technology). Call the MRI coordinator for more information at 566-2472.
Radiologic Health Sciences
MAMMOGRAPHY
Offered on an "as-needed" basis, this program is designed to meet the needs of the working radiographer. Call the Radiography program coordinator, 556-3846, for more information.
Radiologic Health Sciences
NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY
Offered on an "as-needed basis, this program provides course work and clinical experiences necessary to qualify for the nuclear medicine registry. Call the Nuclear Medicine coordinator at 556-3845 for more information.
RECREATIONAL ASSISTANT
Program applicants who previously have earned credits for general education courses, or have documented equivalencies for these courses, may apply directly to the Recreational Assistant program and complete the Recreational Assistant program courses only. Upon successful completion of course work and 400 hours of externship experience, the graduate qualifies under the National Recreation and Park Association as a certified leisure assistant. The program is currently in the process of articulating with bachelor's-degreed programs for transfer of credits for the BS degree in recreational therapy. Two of the program's courses are offered as'bpen enrollment" and can be taken by anyone interested in the activities taught.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better.
2. Proof of general education equivalencies:
BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I ENG 121 English Composition I
or
ENG 131 Intro, to Technical Writing I
MAT 135 Intro, to Statistics
PSY 101 General Psychology I
PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Development
SOC 101 Intro, to Sociology
SPE 115 Principles of Speech
AAS Humanities requirement
BUS 115 Intro, to Business (optional)
CIS 118 Intro, to Computers (optional)
3. Application to the Recreational Assistant program.
Fall
RAE 201 Intro, to Recreational Leisure 3 45
RAE 202 Intro, to Recreational Therapy 3 45
RAE 205 Recreational Assistant Externship 1 4 180
RAE 207 Specialized Areas in Recreation Electives 4 60
(Open enrollment;also offered fall semester.)
SOC 103 Sociology of Health Care 3 45
Spring
RAE 203 Recreation & Leisure in Special
Populations 3 45
RAE 204 Health & Safety in Recreation &
Leisure 3 45
RAE 207 Specialized Areas in Recreation
Electives (4) (60)
(Open enrollment; also offered
spring semester.)
RAE 285 Recreational Assistant Externship II 5 225
Total 28 690
SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
This program begins the summer term and continues for 12 months. Applications and all applicable documentation and test results need to be submitted to the Surgical Technology coordinator by the last day in February of each calendar year for the program starting the following summer. Admission information may be obtained from the Educational Planning and Advising Center or the Health and Human Services Division. Enrollment is limited to 25 students.
The Surgical Technology program at CCD depends upon voluntary affiliation by clinical affiliates for clinical practicum spaces.
Students must recognize that due to the need to utilize all available clinical resources, they may have to travel some distance to sites outside the Denver metropolitan area.
87 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER


Program Admission Requirements
1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows:
a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better;
b. reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better;
c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and
d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better.
2. All applicants must schedule an interview with the program coordinator. Please call 556-2464 to schedule an interview.
3. All applicants must submit two sealed letters of reference dated within the past two years (one letter must be from a supervisor or teacher), a copy of the high school diploma or GED,a copy of the GATB score, and an official transcript from any other college attended (students also must send the CCD registrar an official transcript), and schedule an interview with the program coordinator.
4. Application material must be submitted by March 1 to be considered for admission into the class beginning summer of the academic year. Eligible applicants are selected first-come, first-served, based on the dates applications are received by the Surgical Technology Office, South Classroom Building, room 301-H. Applicants not accepted are considered for the following year.
Prerequisites and/or General Education Credits Contacts
BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 4 75
BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75
MAT 103 or higher 3-5 45-75
(MAT 121 or 135 are for students expecting to transfer to a four-year college)
ENG 121 English Composition 1 3 45
Summer
HOC 100 Medical Terminology 1 15
STE 100 Intro, to Surgical Technology 4 60
Fall
STE 105 Pharmacology for Surgical Technology 2 30
STE 106 Surgical Skills 6 120
STE 107 Surgical Instrumentation 3 60
Spring
STE 109 Surgical Technology Laboratory Experience 3 128
STE 110 Surgical Technology Practicum (Capstone) 7 315
STE 115 Surgical Pathology & Intervention 4 60
Total 30 773
Surgical technology students wishing to complete the requirements for the Associate degree/General Studies must complete the requirements for a certificate in surgical technology and meet the other core general education requirements for the AGS degree. Students should contact their advisor for specific courses.
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 8


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COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Downtown Auraria Campus South Classroom Building, Room 134 1111 West Colfax Avenue P,O, Box 173363 Denver, CO 80217-3363 (303) 556-2600 Technical Education Centers TEC East 3532 Franklin Street Denver, CO 80205 TEC North 6221 Downing Street Denver, CO 80216 TECWest Diamond Hill Complex 2420 West 26th Avenue # 1000 Denver, CO 80211

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community colleg l e of d e n Published by Community College of Denver Office of Institutional Advancement Pat Jensen Director of Development and Communic a tions Richard Jividen Director of Marketing and Publications Clare Lewis Catalog Coordinator Gretchen Occhionero Designer Mary Kelly O'Donnell Vice Presi dent Web Site http ://www.ccd.cccoes.edu/ July 1997 This publication is available in alternative formats. Call (303) 556-3300

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i i com ollege of denver Dr. Byron McClenney, President CCD AURARIA CAMPUS 1111 West Colfax Avenue p. O Box 173363 Denver, CO 80217-3363 Information (303) 556-2600 VoicelTDD (303) 556-3622 FAX (303) 556-8555 TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTERS TEC North 6221 Downing Street Phone (303) 289-2243/ Fax (303) 289-1044 TEe East 3532 Franklin Street Phone (303) 293-8737/ Fax (303) 292-4315 TECWest 2 420 West 26th Avenue S uite 100D Phone (303) 477-5864 / Fax (303) 477-5894 CCD DENTAL HYGIENE CENTER lowry Higher Education (enter 960 Xanthia Street, Building #753 Phone (303) 556-2472/ Fax (303) 556-4583 DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION Parkway (enter 1391 North Speer Boulevard S uite 200 Denver, CO 80204-2552 Phone (303) 620-4433 / Fax (303) 620-4942 CCD ADVISORY COUNCIL Bruce Rockwell, Chair James H Daniels Tony Hernandez John Lay Jeanne M Orrben Adele Phelan COLORADO STATE BOARD FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION Dr. Jerome Wartgow, System President Julianne F. Haefeli, Chair, Greeley Ralph G. Torres, Vice Chair Denver Rolf F Anderson, Pueblo S usan Ayres Davies, Durango Glenda C. Barry, Northglenn John M Frew, Denver William H Hornby Denver James D. Lucas, Col orado Springs Kristy A. Schloss, Arapahoe County

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CCD Auraria Campus Map ................................ v Technical Education Centers Locations ............... .ii vi 1996-97 Academic Calendar .......... .. .. ..... .. . . . vii Telephone Directory ...................... .......... .iv Guide to Degree and Certificate Programs ..... .......... viii College Guarantees ............................ . ...... .xi Guarantee ofTransfer Credit Guarantee of Job Compet ency CCD Accountability ....... . ..... .. . .................. .xi General Information .................................... 1 Getting Started ......................................... .4 Advising Admission Policy Money Matters ........ ......... . ..................... 8 Tuition, Fees, Financial Aid and Refunds Need More Help? ....................................... 12 Student Services Academic Support Center .............................. 15 Special Programs ................. ... .............. .... 16 Auraria Campus Facilities ........ . .. ................... 18 Grievance Procedure ................. .................. 25 Graduation Requirements ... .. ........ ........... . .... 27 Continuing Education Programs ....................... .. 29 Weekend College Guided Independent Study Reading Guide to Degree and Certificate Programs ................. .30 Associate Degree Programs ............... ............ .32 Associate of Arts Programs ....... ................ .32 Associate of Science Programs ................... .35 Associate of General Studies Programs ............ .39 Associate of Applied Science Programs ............. 46 Certificate Programs .... ............................... .71 Technical Education Centers (TEC) Programs ............. 89 Course Descriptions ............................. . .... 102 College Staff.......................... .. ........ 147 Faculty .. .. . ..................... ........... .. . . 151 Index ......................................... .. 155-158 iii

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i v Admissions, Registration and Records ............ .556-2430 Arts and Humanities ........................ .... .556-2473 Arabic; Art ; American Sign Language; Communication; C hine s e ; English; French; Graphic Arts; Graphic Design; History; Humanities; Journalism; Japanese; Literature ; Multimedia; Music; Paralegal; Philosophy; Photography ; Spanish; Speech; Theatre Auraria Int erfaith Cente r .......... ............ .556-8591 Book Center, Auraria ............................ .556-3230 Business and Governmental Studies . ..... . .... .556-2487 Accounting; Business Admi nistration ; Business Technology: Office Management & Secretarial Studies; Computer Information Systems; Construction Trades; Economics; Political Science Business and Industry Services ..... .. . .......... 620-4427 Cashier ..... ......... . .. ..................... .556-2075 Campus Closure .......... ...... . ............. .556-2401 Campus Operator . . ................... . ..... .556-2400 Campus Recreation ............................. .556-3210 Career Dev elopment Services Center .. .......... .556-3609 Center for Persons with Disabilities .............. .556-3300 C hild Development Center .... .. ........ ....... .556-2439 Computer Labs ............ ..... ............... .556-3628 Computer Training for People with Disabilities ............. ..... .556-3300 Continuing Education ........................... 620-4433 Extended-Campu s Credit Classes; Guided Independent Study: Home Study, Television Courses, On-line Courses; Weekend College Cooperative Education ..... .. .. .. .... ....... .556-3607 Dental Hygiene, Lowry Campus ....... . ... ... .364-4821 Education and Academic Services .. ............ .556-8455 Academic Support Center; Early Childhood Education; Education; English a s a Second Language; General Educ ation Development ; Pre-collegiate English; Pre-collegiate Mathematics ; Reading; Special Learning Support Program; Test Center ; Supplemental Services; Student Support Services Educational Opportunity Center . .. . . ......... 629-9226 Educationa l Planning and Advising ..... ........ .556-2481 Financial Aid ........ . ......................... .556-2420 Health and Human Services ...... ......... .... .556-2472 Anthropology ; Dental Hygiene ; Gerontology ; Health and Well ness Management; Human Services; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Mammography; Nuclear Medicine Techn ology; Nursing; Nutrition; Peri operative Nursing; Psychiatric Technician; Psychology; Radiologic Technology ; Recreational Assistant; Soci o logy; Surgical Technology Information ............ .. .. .. ............... .556-2600 International Student Services .................. .556-2600 Learning Development Center ...... ... ......... .556-2497 Library, Auraria .... ............................ .556-2741 Office of Institutional Advancement ..... .... .556-3380 Parking and Transportation, Auraria .............. .556-2000 President of CCD ....... ....................... .556-2411 Public Safety .............. . . ............ ... .556-3271 Emergency .......................... ........... 911 Recruitment and Outreach ...................... .556-2600 Refugee Student Services ................... .. .556-2600 Science and Technolo g y .. .. ............. ...... .556-2460 Biology ; Chemis tr y Computer-Aided Drafting ; Computer Science; Drafting for Industry; Electronics; Geography; Geology; Mathematics; Physics; Environmental and Refrigeration Technol ogy Student A ctivi tie s . ........................... .556-2597 Student Assistance Center and Women' s Services ...... ............... .556-2343 Teaching/Learning Center .. ........... .. ... .556-3598 Technical Education Centers East .......... .. . . .. .. ..... .... .. .... 293-8737 North .......... ............................ 289-2243 West .................. .. ........... .. . .. .477-5864 Testing Center ........... ..................... .556-3810 Veteran's Office ........... ..... .. ..... ........ .556-2452 Vice President for Instruction .. . .. ........... .. .556-2414 Vice President for Student Services ............. .556-2413 Vice President for Technical Education Center s .... 289-2243

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I campus r ccd on lhe auraria RTD light Rail Station on Auraria Campus 5th SI. D Prinling & Distribution Center (PO) West Colfax Avenue, between Lipan and Mariposa Streets RTD Routes to the Auraria Campus Via Auraria Parkway: #0, #15 Via Colfax: #1, #9, #16, #29L. #30,#31,#36L Via 7th Street: #10 4 Hours of Free Parking in Lot G for prospective students who are being assessed and/or registering. Bring your ticket to South Classroom Building room 134 for validation. Your student fee-paid Regional Transportation District (RTD) bus pass entitles you to ride buses and Light Rail free in the Denver area. For an additional fee, your bus pass also gives you regional service.

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y i TEe NORTH TEC NORTH I I 6221 DOWNING TEe EAST 17 0 A-PHilLIPS N C E NTER 35TH ST. N Martin Luther K l ng}r 10 L Bt.d "'-. <-:. A C t: E. COlfAX (U5--40) "'-JHH AVE. TEC EAST flHILUflS CENTER ]531 FRANKUN TEe WEST 10 AN o 27TH 25TH TEC WEST 2<20 w 26TH AVE. SUITE 1000 PARKING -< 0 '" '" () 0 5 j!! LOWRY HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER I I I I I 10 AN l z 0 S 0 I ITH AVE. LOWRY CAHrUS 6TH AVE. \ 0 IITHAVE. CCD DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM A-Jf Lowry Higher Education Center :I N ;! 960 Xanthla. B ldg. 753 Denver. CO 80220 ill TEC East 3532 Franklin, Denver, CO 80205 293-8737 TEC North 6221 Downing, Denver, CO 80216 289-2243 TECWest Diamond Hill Complex 2420 W. 26th Ave., # 1 000 Denver, CO 80211 477-5864 CCD Dental Hygiene Program lowry Higher Education Center 960 Xanthia, B ldg 753 Denver, CO 80220 364-4821 6TH AVE. 0 > 0 Z

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Fall 1997 Registration . .. .. ... ...................... July 1-Aug. 29 Classes begin ................... ....... ........ . Aug. 25 Labor Day H o liday ............................... .sept. 1 Campus C losed CCD Project Success Day ....... ................... Oct. 8 CCD Advising Day .. .. .. ...... .. ..... .. ......... Nov. 1 8 Thanksgiving Day Holiday ........................ Nov. 27 Campus Clos e d Friday after Thanksgiving ........ .. .. . ...... Nov.2 8 Campus Open, No Classes Classes End . .. ..................... ............. Dec.1 3 MSCD/UCD Final Exams Start ..................... Dec. 15 MSCD/UCD Final Exams End . .. . .. ....... . .. . Dec. 20 Spring 1998 Registration . . . . ............. ....... .. Nov. 18, -Jan. 26 Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday ..... .. . ..... ...... Jan. 19 Campus Open, No C lasses Classes Begin . ........... ...... .. .. .. .. . . .. Jan. 20 CCD Project Success Day ....................... March 4 Spr ing Break ....................... .. ........ March 16-21 CCD Advising Day ............................... April 21 Classes End ......................... .. .. ......... May 13 MSCD/UCD Final Exams Start ...................... May 11 MSCD/UCD F inal Exams End ....................... May 1 6 Summer 1998 Registration ....................... ....... April 2l-June 6 Memorial Day Holiday ........................... May 25 Campus Closed Classes Begin ..................................... June 1 Independence Day Holiday ........................ July 4 Campu s Closed Classes End .................. ..... ............... Aug. 8 vii

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y iii Degree Programs AURARIA CAMPUS Associate of Arts (AA) University Parallel, Transfer Program Art Behavioral Sciences Gerontology Psychology Sociology Communications Economics Engli sh/Literature History Humanities/Philosophy Music Photography Political Science Speech Theatre Associate of Science (AS) University Parallel, Transfer Program Biology Chemistry Computer Science Earth Science Engineering Cluster Pre-Engineering General Pre-Applied Mathematics Major Pre-Compute r Science Major Pre-Electrical Engineering Major Pre-Civil Engineering Major Pre-Mechanical Engineering Major Mathematics Medical Cluster Pre-Dental Pre-Medical Pre-Medical Technology Pre-Pharmacy Pre-Physical Therapy Pre-Physician Assistant Pre-Veterinary Science Physics Associate of General Studies (AGS) University Parallel, Transfer Program Option Generalist Business Graphic Design Human Services Paralegal Photography Teacher Education: Early Childhood Education Teacher Education: Earl y Childhood E ducation / Violence Counseling Teacher Education: Elementary Education Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Accounting General Accounting Commercial Credit Management *Airframe/Power Plant Business Administration Commercial Credit Customer Service Finance International Business Management Marketing Business ofTravel and Tourism Customer Inform ation Services *Insurance Postal Service Management *Real Estate Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies Administrative Assistant Legal Secretarial Medical Secretarial Secretarial Word Processing Computer Information Systems Computer Specialis t Applications Programmer PC Specialist/LAN Administrator Dental Hygiene Drafting for Industry Civil/Topographic Electrical Mechanical Process Piping Structural Early Childhood Education Electronics Technology Environmental and Refrigeration Technology Commercial/Industrial Refrigeration, Heating and Air Condit ioning Graphic Arts (Printing) Graphic Design Health and Wellness Management Human Services In conjunction with Emily Griffith Opportunity School ond /or the Joint Apprenticeship Training Committees

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Multimedia Design Computer Graphics Graphic Arts Graphic Design Music Photography Video Production /Co mmunications Nursing Nursing Nursing: Advanced Placement Paralegal Photography Radiography Recreational Assistant Trades 'Construction Certificate Programs AURARIA CAMPUS Accounting Accounting Accounting with Computer Applications Business Adminis tration Commercial Credit Management I Commercial Credit Management II Customer Informa tion Services Agent Entrepreneurship I Entrepreneurship II International Business Marketing Professi onal Selling Small Business Superma rket Management Travel and Tourism Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies General Clerical I General Clerical II Medical Secretarial Stenographic Word Processing I Word Processing I I Computer Information Systems Applications Programmer PC Specialist/LAN Administrator Computer Specialist Computers and Multimedia Windows NT Network Administration Novell 4 x Network Administration Novell 3x Network Administration Drahing Computer-Aided Drahing-CAD Drahing for Industry Early Childhood Education Early Childhood Education Director Early Childhood Education Group Leader Electronics Technology Principles of Electronics Advanced Solid State, D i g ital & IC Principles Broadcast Technologist Environmental & Refrigeration Technology Apartment Manager Major Appl iance Repair Refri geration and Air Condit ioning Gerontology Graphic Arts Printing Pre press Graphic Design Computer Graphics Graphic Design Service Bureau Human Services Case Management/Residential Service A ide Paralegal General Nursing Practical Nursing Perioperative Nursing Photography Psychiatric Technician Psychiatric Technician Psych iatric Technician: Advanced Placement Radi o logi c Health Sciences Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technology Mammography Nuclear Medicine Technology Recreational Assistant Surgical Technology Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree Programs TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTERS TEC North Accounting Computerized Accounting Specialist Business Technology: O ffic e Management and Secretarial Studies Office Specialist Comput e r Information Systems PC Applications Specialist PC Network Specialist Trades CNC Machine Tool Operator Fabrication Welder I n conj unction with Emily Griffith Opportunity School and/or the Joint Apprenticeship Training Committees i x

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TEe East Accounting Computerized Accounting Specialist Business Administration Travel Service Agent Business Technology: Office Manage ment and Secretarial Studies Office Specialist Medical Records Clerk Medical Secretary Medical Transcriptionist Medical Unit Coordinator Comprehensive Medical Assist a n t Clinical Medical Assistant Radiology/Orthopedic Assistant Computer Informat i o n Systems PC Applications Specialist TEe West Account ing Computerize d Account ing Specialist Business Technology : Office Management and Secretarial Studies Office Specialist Comput e r Information Systems PC Applications Specialist Certificate Programs TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTERS TEe North Accounting Computerized Accounting Specialist Bookkeeper Payroll Clerk Business Administration C ustomer Service Specialist Customer Service Representative Business Technology : Office Management and Secretarial Studies Office Specialist Word Processor Receptionist/Office Clerk Microsoft Office Pro Data Entry Clerk Comp uter Informat ion Systems PC Applications Specialist PC Network Specialist Human Services Special Education Paraprofessional Special Education Aide Trades CNC Machine Tool Operator Machine Tool Operator Lathe O perator TEe East Mill Operator Fabrication Welder Arc Welder Welder Accounting Computerized Accounting Specialist B ookkeeper Payroll Clerk Business Administration Travel Service Agent Customer Service Specialist Customer Service Representative Business Technology : Office Management and Secretarial Skills TEe West Office Specialist Word Processor Receptionist/Office Cler k Micro soft Office Pro Data Entry Clerk Allied Health-Related: Medical Records Clerk Medical Secretary Medical Transcrip tionist Medical Unit Coordinator Medical Clerk Comprehensive Medical Assistant Clinical Medical Assistant Radiology/Orthopedic Assistant Nurse Assistant Nurse Aide Computer Information Systems PC App lications Specialist Accounting Computerized Accounting Speciali s t Bookkeeper Payroll Cler k Business Administration Customer Service Specialist Customer Service Representative Business Technology : Office Management and Secretarial Skills Office Specialist Word Processor Receptionist/Office C lerk Microsoft Office P r o Data Entry Clerk Computer Information Systems PC Applications S pecialist Early C hildhood Education Early Childhood Educator/Group Leader

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(ollege Guarantee for Transfer To graduates of the Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) degrees, Community College of Denver (CCD) guarantees that AA and AS credits, as ident ified in the CCD catalog, will transfer to all Colorado public colleges and universities. To graduates of articulated Associate of General Studies (AGS) degrees, CCD guarantees that the articulated AGS degrees or credits, as identified in t h e CCD catalog, will transfer into the Colorado college and university profession al schools as identified in the CCD catalog. To students who complete the CCD general education core curriculum, CCD guarantees that the general education core curriculum will fulfill the lower division general education requirements for liberal arts and sciences major s at all Colorado public colleges and universities. To students who have completed the AA, AS, articu lat ed AGS or general education core curriculum, CCD will refund the tuition paid for any course identified in the CCD catalog as an accepted part of these curr i culums that does not transfer under this guarantee. Guarantee for Job Competency To graduates of Certificate prog rams and Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degrees, CCD guarantees job skills. Within one year of graduation, if an employer finds a Certificate or AAS graduate lacking in the techn ical job skills identified as exit competencies for his/her program CCD will provide up to nine tuition-free credits of retraining relat ed to the identified skills deficiencies. The graduate must have passed the CCD Certificate or AAS capstone course. The employer must identify the job skill deficiencies in writing. The graduate, employer and program faculty must develop a written retraining plan for the student to complete within one year. CCD Accountability Excellence Through Accountability Between 198 7 and 1996 CCD increased total graduates by 95 percent. Between 1987 and 1996, people of color as a percent of total g raduates increased from 20 percent to 46.5 percent. Between 1987 and 1996, CCD increased graduates of color by 422 percent (from 83 to 350 graduates). 90.7 percent of all CCD graduates between 1991 and 1995 who applied for transfer were accepted into Colorado four-year public colleges and universities. The average cumulative GPA of CCD transfer graduates in 1994-95 at four year schools was 2.9 on a four point scale. 94 percent of 1994-95 graduates are satisfied with their CCD educational program. 96 percent of 1996 currently enrolled students and 199495 graduates are satisfied with the teaching they have received. 100 percent of employers surveyed i n 1996 are satisfied with the skills of CCD graduates. Of vocational graduates who completed their educational goals at CCD in 1994-95: 95 percent either continue their education or are employed within one year of program completion 72 percent of those who enter the job market, enter directly into degree related employment. 11 percent are unemployed, seeking employment. Of CCD students who transferred to public colleges or universities in 1996: 51.9 percent transferred to Metropolitan State College. 32.9 percent transferred to the University of Colorado Denver. 15.2 percent transferred to another Colorado public or private college or university. Of CCD AA/AS/AGS Degree graduates who transferred to Colorado public four-year colleges during academic years 1990-1993: 71.6 percent had either attained a bachelor's degree or were still enrolled at their transfer institutions as of fall 1995. x i

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You have taken a step in the right direction to prepare for the future-your future. n WELCOME TO COMMUNITY COLLEGE O F DENVER (CCD) on the downtown A uraria Campus. You have taken a step in the right direction to prepare for the futu r e your future Our doors are open and our faculty, administration and staff will s teer you onto the right educational track. They also will help you stay on t rack, whether you are taking a few ref resh e r courses or you a r e working toward a certificate o r associate degree. CCD provides many s tudent support ser vices, i ncluding tutoring, advising and career planning, and you'll get individualized attention from award-winning faculty. CCD guarantees transferability of credit s from our school to four-year Colorado p u blic colleges and universities. (See CCD Guarantees section of thi s catalog. ) We even guarantee job competencies. We are here to help you succeed, because your success i s our success. Education at CCD is affordable: we have the lowest tuition rate on the Auraria Campus. We offer convenie nt payment options and financial aid is available to qualified students. You can choose from day, evening or weeken d classes, classes on the Auraria Campu s or at three Technical Education Centers (TEC), classes on TV or over the Internet. The choice is yours. The future is yours! CCD is in the heart of the city and within walking dis tance of m y riad downtown activities. At CCD you are close to Larimer Square and the 1 6th Street Mall; Mile High Stadium, home of the NFL B roncos; Coor s Stadium, home of the Colorado Rockies baseball team; McNichols Sports Arena, home of the NHL Avalanche and NBA Nuggets; and the Colorado Convention Center and t h e Denver Center for the Performing Arts complex. We know you 'll get a l ot out of your CCD experience, and we're glad you are here! CCO's History The Colorado legislatu r e created CCD in 1967. Three years later, its door s opene d t o s tudents in a r e novated auto s howroom close to Denver's Civic Center. Enrollment increased so rapidly, the college imme diat e l y expand e d int o r ental stor e f ronts near the main building. In 1975, CCD moved to the 1 71-acre Auraria Higher Education Center campus in downtown Denver on the west bank of Cherry C reek, originally the s it e of the 1858 front ier town of Aur aria. We even have the oldest standing s tructure in Denver on our campus, Emmanuel Gallery, used today as exhibitio n space for student and faculty art work. CCD is one of 12 i nstitution s in t h e Col orado Community College and Occupational Education System and the third largest wit h 6,000-plus student s enrolled in its Auraria Campus programs. CCD is the onl y community col-C OMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER lege in the cit y and county of Denver and the only truly urban community college in Colorado. It also is the only community college in the nation to share a campus with a four-year college and a unive rsity, Metropolita n State College of Denver and the University of Colorado at Denver. The three institutions share classroom buildings, a regional library, recreational facilities, student union, and other amenities. At Auraria, CCD provides all two-yea r programs, awards all two -year degrees and occupationa l certificates and implements remedial instruction adult basic education and GED preparation. In 1985, CCD took over the system's fast-track skills center, the Technical Education Center (TEC) at 6221 Downing i n Adams County, six miles northeast of Auraria. TEC, now known as TEC North, is an open-entry/open-ex it fast-track training center that meets industry employmen t needs. TEC East at 3532 Franklin St. in the Cole neighborhood, opened in 1993. TEC West, at 2420 W. 26th Ave. in the Diamond Hill Complex, also opened in 1993, the same year all TEC sites began offering traditional general education college courses. With a minority student body of more than 50 percent, CCD has the most diverse student populatio n of all higher education institutions in Colorado. It no longe r has an ethni c majority and its diversity truly reflects the inner-city popula tion. At CCD,our students can choose from more than 90 programs that will prepare them for a new career, allow them to earn a cert ificate or associate degree, o r enable them to transfer to four-year schools. Our Philosophy CCD is a comprehensive student-oriented urban college, providing open access to a diverse population CCD pledges open admissions and appropriate support to every individual who seeks the oppo rtunities available at the college for life-long education and personal development. Educated citizens make a significant and positive impact on the economy, their local commun ities and the nation. CCD strives for excellence in transfer educational and occupational programs, seeks to meet the need s o f employ ers, and finds new and effective ways of extending educa tional opportunities throughout its service area.

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CCO's Mission Statement Community College of Denver pledges, responsibility for the following: Transfer programs for the baccalaureate degree, Occupational programs for job-entry skills or upg rading, General edu cation courses, Remedial instruction and GED preparation Continuing education and community services, Cooperative int e r-institutional programs. Cultural Pluralism at Community College of Denver CCD believes all student s are entitled to a quality education. This education must provide the student with an under standing and appreciatio n of our interdependence as individuals and nations. Education must b e meaningful t o multi-ethnic students. In addition it must provide the student body faculty and staff w ith an understanding of cultural pluralism. To that end, CCD provides an educational environment that fosters cultural diversity, international understanding and globa l awareness. CCD recognizes that the envir onment can exist only with an administration, faculty and staff that reflect the cul tural diversity of its s tudents Therefore, the administration unconditionally endo rses affirmati v e action Statement of Values for Teaching Excellence CCD faculty are comm itte d to a teaching/learning process that: 1. Enables students to become independe nt learners. 2. Demonstrates a commi tment to student outcomes Gob readiness, skill levels, mastery of subject matter). 3. P rovides a n oppo rtunity for critical thinking and problem solving. 4. Provides linkages between instruction and real-world applications. 5. Demonstrates an excitement about teaching and learning. 6. Maintai n s high but r ealistic expectations. 7. Demonstrates appreciation of a diverse student popu l ation. 8. Encourages growth in s tudents' self-esteem. Campus Choices We offer traditional semester courses, English as a second language, GED preparation and a number of enroll -any time' courses on the downtown Auraria campus. CCD' s administrative offices also are located at Auraria. CCD provides fast -track job training, English as a second language GED preparation adult basic education and general educa tion courses at its three TEC sites. In addition, the college offers adul t basic educat io n GED prep., and English as a second language at more than 10 community sites around the city. The college's Division of Continuing Education offers homestudy television courses, on-line courses, evening and weekend courses and employee training pro grams at the work site or other convenient locations All major CCD facilities are accessible to individuals with disabilities. Campus Security The Auraria Higher Education Center Public Safety Office has prepared a report to comply with the Student-Right toKnow and Campus Security Act of 1990. The report describes security practice s and procedures at the Auraria Higher Education Center and lists crime statistics for the most recent calendar year and the two preceding calendar years. A copy of the report can be obtained from the Vice President for Student Services in South Classroom Building, room 305. Campus Crime Infonnation During the past three years, the following crimes were com mitted on campus at the Auraria Higher Education Center, serving the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College at Denver and Commun ity College of Denver. Occurrences of criminal offenses on campus: Offense 1996 1995 1994 Murder 0 0 0 Rape 0 0 0 Robbery 4 Aggravated Assault 7 6 10 Burglary 23 24 17 Vehicle Theft 11 10 11 Sexual Assault* 5 4 13 Hate Crimes 0 2 ** Includes sexual assaults other than first-and second-degree sexual assaults (rape), such as indecent exposure and thirddegree sexual assaults. *" One incident, two offenses, simple assault and intimidation. Number of Arrests for the following crimes on campus: Arrests 1996 1995 1994 Liquor Law Viol ation* 10 2 0 Drug Abuse Violation 40 6 2 Weapons Possession 4 Excludes DUI arrests Statistics provided by the Auraria Campus Police and Security Division in compliance with the Crimes Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990. G ENERA L INFORMAT ION

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Notice of Nondiscrimination CCD does not discriminate on the basi s of race, colo r c reed, national origin, sex, age or handicap in admission or access to or treatment or emp l oyment in its educational programs or activities. Inqui ries concerning Title VI, TITLE IX and Section 504 may be referred to the Vice President for Student Services, Campus Box 203, Community College of Denver, P.O. Box 173363, Denver, CO 80217-3363 (556-2413) or to t h e Office for Civil Rights, U.s. Department of Education, 1961 S tout Street, Denver, CO 80294. Americans with Disabilities Act Discrimination based on disab ility in admission to, access to and the operation of p rograms, services, or activities of CCD is p r ohibited by the Americans with Disabilities Act. Questions, complaints, and requests for additional infor mation may be directed to the ADA Coordinator, John Hutchins, Campus Box 900, P.O. Box 173363, Denver, CO 80217-3363, (303) 556-6319. E -mail: CD_JOHNH@CCCS.CCOES.EDU Approval The operation of CCD is approved by th e state of Colorado. All programs are approved by the Colorado State Board for Community Colleges and Occupationa l Education. In a d di tion, the Colorado Commission on Higher Education reviews and approves all programs leading to the associate degree. Accreditation Community College of Denver is accredited by the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Comprehensive Medical AssistantlTEC East American Association of Medical Assisting Dental Hygiene American Dental Association Nursing Colorado State Board of Nursing Radiography Technology Committee on Allied Health Educ ation and Accredita tion Joint Review Committee on Education for Radiologic Technology Real Kids Center, Auraria Campus National Association for Education of Young Children (NAEYC). Center accredited. Surgical Technology American Medical Association Committee on Allied Health Education a n d Accreditat ion Community College of Denver is a member of the American Association of Community Colleges. COMMUNIT Y COLLEGE OF DENVER Alumni Association Organized in October 1991 the Alumni Association encourages graduates and students who have completed at least three credit hours t o become members. The alumni sponsor special events, a yearly reunion picnic, and an annual meeting and reception. Scholarships, mento r ing and other programs help current students succeed and promote recognition of their achievements. Joining the Alumni Association is an opportunity to meet and network with fellow alumni while serving CCD. Sign up by calling the Alumni Office at 556-2891. African-American Council CCD' s Af rican-American Staff Council brings college faculty, staff, students and administ rators of the same heritage together. The council provides a forum to discuss ethnicity issues and other problems and helps the college develop programs to address diversity collaborative sensitivity, reten tion of s t udents and staff and create an accessible environ ment for African-Americans. For more i nformation, contact Ken Swiney, 556-2424. Hispanic Council Comprised of Hispanic administrators faculty and staff, the Hispanic Council promotes retention and recruitment of Hispanic students. For additional information, contact Michelle Muniz, treasurer, 556-4963.

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ta t d Campus Visits For individual and group tours of the campus or to visit class es, contact the Educational Planning and Advising Center at 556-2481. Advising Philosophy Advising is critical to your success, so our advising program includes the explor ation of life and career goals, an examinat ion of academic and career skills, and the selection of instructional programs and courses. You and your advisor share responsibility for the advi s ing process. After taking 12 credits of courses numbered 100 or above, you should have a major field of study, a faculty advisor and a signed educational planning guide. We recommend the Educational Planning and Advising Center be your first point of contact at CCD. Our advisors can help you enroll, plan your college programs and remove barriers that may interfere with your success in school and life. You can stop by at any time. The Educational Planning and Advising Center staff also conducts orientation sessions, provides infor mati o n on and interpretation of assessment programs, and advises students who have not been accepted into a major area of programs and courses. Advisors also can refer you to community and campus resources. Special advisors assist refugee and inter national students. The Educational Planning and Advising Center is in the South Classroom Building room 134,556-2481. Admission Policy As an open-door institution, CCD admits student s w h o are 16 years of age or older. Admission to the college does not guarantee enrollment in specific programs that may have prerequisites The college may deny admission to individuals whose backgrounds indicate their presence would endanger the health s afety welfare or property of others, or would interfere with the function of the college CCD has the right to deny admission or contin ued enrollmen t t o persons who have misrepresented their credentials or backgrounds Follow These Steps 1. If you are a new student, submit an Application for Admission (form at end of the catalog) to the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records. A permit to test will be given to you to allow you to take the Basic Skills Assess mentTest. You also will receive official not i ficat ion by mail of your acceptance to CCD. 2 Next, make an appointment to take the Basic Skills Assessment Test. A permit from the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records is required for admission to the testing session. Under certain conditions as listed in this catalog (see College Policies and Academic Standards section), the assessment may be waived. For assessment dates and times, check the current Schedule of Classes, stop by room 230 in South Classroom Building or call 556-3810. After you take the test, sign up in the Testing Center to attend an orientation 3. If you are enrolling for the first time at CCD and plan to be a fulltime student, you also must complete the Academic Profil e which assesses your general education knowledge and skills. It takes only 45 minutes to com plete Students should call the Testing Center at 5563810 to make a test appointment. Results do not affect entry to the college or placement in classes. Profile results help evaluate student learning between entering CCD and graduation 4. After you attend an orientation, stop by the Educational Planning and Advising Center (South Classroom Building, room 134,556-2481) and make an appointment with an advisor to hel p you p lan your educationa l goals and schedule classes. 5 Your next step is to register for your classes, either by telephone or at the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records during scheduled registration dates each semester. Call Admissions, Registration and Records at 556-2430, or stop by the South Classroom Bui lding room 133, for more information Veterans using VA benefits also must submit transcript s of all previous postsecondary education and training no later than the end of the first semester of attendance International Students on F, M, J B, or H visas must make an appointment with the Internationa l Student Advisor befor e submitting any documents. International students must submit the following documents in addit ion to an officia l International Application for Admission: 1 an official, certified English translation of a high school, college, or equivalent transcript. 2. a statement of sufficient financial resources to provide for staying in the United States. 3. proof of a minimum score of 475 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or a score of 75 on the Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency. Students still must take the levels of English Proficiency (LOEP) Computerized Placement Test. All students on F M J B or H visas do not qualify for financial aid or scholarships. These students will pay Colorado non resident tuition CCD guarantees transferability of credits from our school to Colorado public colleges & universities. GETT ING STARTE D 4

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For more Information, contact the Internat ional Student Advisor in the South Classroom Building, room 134, (303) 556-3605. Directory Information Community College of Denver designates the following items as Directory Informat ion: student name, permanent address, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received. The college may disclose any of these items w i thout prior written consent, unless notified in writing to the contrary by the 5th day of classes each semester. CCD compl ies fully with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), which is designed to p rot ect the privacy of students' educational records. Refer questions to the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records, South Classroom Building, room 133, or call (303) 556-2430. Release Of Information Other than directory i nformation which may be released to the general public, the college will not permit release of educational records without the studen t's written consent This consent must be signed and dated by the student and must indicate which records are to be released. Parents of a dependent student can obtain release of that student's records only with written consent of the student since the rights given to parent s transfer to the s tuden t when he or she attends a postsecondary educational institu tion Transcripts Requests Student may request copies of their academic records accumulated while at CCD. Transcripts are available from the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records. Cost of transcripts i s S 1 per copy, payable in advance. All transcript s must be requested by the student and all requests must be made in writing. Transcript requests cannot be honored from those students whose financial and academic records at the college are not cleared. Transferring Credit to CCO Transfer of academic credit is done for current applicants and/or currently enrolled students by the academic cre dential evaluator in the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records upon receipt of an official transcript. Official transcripts are sent by the previous insti tution and received by CCD through the U.S. Postal Service. Hand-carried transcripts or transcripts issued to the student are not considered official. although they may be used for informal advising purposes. Issuing instit utions should address transcripts to CCD S COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Admissions, Registration and Records, Campus Box 201, p.o. Box 173363, Denver, CO 80217-3363. Documents become the property of the college and will not be released to the student or transferred to other institutions 2 CCD reserves the right to evaluate all credits according to the policies of the Admissions, Registration and Records Office. E valuation is done for general acceptance of all transferrable credit and is not confined to any specific degree or certificate program. Students will need to meet with their program advisors to determ ine how accepted transfer credits will apply to their intended program. Note: Credits evaluated for general acceptance mayor may not be applicable to specific degree or certificate programs. 3 CCD will accept transfer credit from postsecondary insti tutions that are accredited by one of the six regional a ccrediting associations. Transfer credit also may be accepted from CCCOES-approved institutions with which CCD has current articulation agreements. (See the catalog section on associate degree programs.) 4. Credits earned by a student enrolled in another state system community college that are applicable to the AA, AS or AAS degrees or a certificate program shall be accepted as meeting degree or certificat e requirements in comparable or equivalent programs at CCD. 5. Lower division credits earned by students enrolled i n baccalaureate-granting institutions which are applicable to BA or BS degrees shall be accepted as meeting requirements for comparable or equivalent programs leading to an AA or AS degree at CCD 6. Students who have attended international institutions and wish evaluation of transfer credit will need to provide official transcripts and/or other educational docu ment s in the native language along with certified English translations. Accepted documents become the propert y of the college. Contact the academic creden tials evaluator in the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records for additional info rmation. Credit for Prior learning You may earn credit for college-equivale nt education acquired through earlier schooling, work, or other life experiences. Such prior learning must be comparable to CCD courses or curricula and must relate to your educational objectives. Prior learning may be documented through standardized tests (AP, CLEp, challenge examinations, published guides [ACE-Military and ACE-Non-Collegiate), or portfolio assessment. 1 Standardized Tests a. Advanced Placement Program (AP) -high schoo l students can receive credit through the AP examinations. b College Level Examination Program (CLEP) CCD recognizes selected CLEP general examinations and subject examinations. A list of CLEP exams, their cut-off scores

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and their CCD course equivalents are available from the Credit for Prior Learning Office, South Classroom Building, room 134,556-3603. The CLEP examination may be taken in the CCD Testing Center. 2 Challenge examinations Currently enrolled students may challenge a course by tak ing a comprehensive examination. Only one exam for a particular course will be arranged for during anyone semester. ($ 1 O/credit) 3. Published Guides ACE-MilitaryCCD uses the credit recommendation of the American Council on Education (ACE), as published in The Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services, to evaluate military training and learning experiences. ACE-Non-Collegiate CCD uses the credit recommenda tions from the ACE program on Non-Collegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI), as published in The National Guide to Educational Credit forTraining Programs, to evaluate indus trial and corporate training programs. 4 Portfolio of Learning Outcomes Currently enrolled students may petition for credit by developing a portfolio that describes and documents pert inent learning comparable to that available in CCD courses. A faculty member in the appropriate program area evaluates the portfolio and determines commensurate credit. Only one portfolio evaluation for a particular course will be arranged for during anyone semester. ($ 1 5/credit) You may receive a maximum of 50 percent of the require ments for a degree or certificate through CLEp, Ap, Challenge Exams, or Published Guides, and a maximum of 25 percent by Portfolio Assessment. For more details on Credit for Prior Learning options, attend one of the Credit for Prior Learning Orientations in the Educational Planning and Advising Center, South Classroom Building room 134,556-3605. Add/OropIWithdrawal The final date to add or drop a course is predetermined and printed i n the current semester's Schedule of Classes. After the first week of ciasses, you may not add courses without the written approval of the faculty member whose class is being added. Weekend College. Extended Campus and Telecourses require the written approval of an advisor in the Educational Planning and Advising or the dir ector of the Non-Traditional Learning Programs. This requirement does not apply to open-entry or modular ciasses. On or before the census date, you may drop courses and receive a full refund. Courses you drop before the census date will not appear on your official transcript. After the census date, you may withdraw from courses. but you will not be eligible for refunds. Courses you drop after the census date will appear on the transcript with a grade ofW. You may not wi thdraw from courses after the date published in the Schedule of Classes (usually four to five weeks before the end of term in the fall and spring semesters). To drop or withdraw from courses fill out appropriate forms in the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records, South Classroom Building room 133. To add courses after the first week of ciasses, obtain the appropriate form from Educational P lanning and Advising, South Classroom Building room 134 Defin i t ions Census date -The census date for a standard or module course is that point when 15 percent of the days for the term of the ciass are over. The census date for standard courses is listed in the Schedule of Classes. The census d ate for open-entry courses is that point when 15 percent of the balance of the term from the date of registration has passed. Add -An add occurs when you enroll i n a ciass after initial registration. Drop -A drop occurs when you offiCially exit a ciass before census date. Withdrawal-A withdrawal occurs when you exit a ciass after census date. Transferring to Four-year Institutions CCD's AA and AS degrees are guaranteed to transfer t o Colorado public four-year colleges and universities Students with AA and AS degrees enter four-year instit utions as juniors. CCD also has a numbe r of programs leading to the AGS Degree that transfers to Metropolitan State College of Denver or to the University of Colorado at Denver. Consult the Associate Degree Program section i n this catalog for more i nformation about these transfer degrees. On some occasions the Associate of Applied Science degree may transfer. If you intend to transfer, familiarize yourself wit h the requirements of the school you wish to attend. You also should consult the advisor in the Transfer Center i n South Classroom Building, room 134. The Transfer Center stocks catalogs from Colorado and many u.s. four-year colleges and universities. Admissions counselors f rom four-year colleges and universities make regular visits to CCD. Inquire about speCific times in the Transfer Center o r call 556-2481 A t ransfer bulleti n board by South Classroom 125 has postings of visits from four -year college representatives and o ther pertinent information Orientations for CCD students who intend to transfer are on the first Monday of the month at 10 a .m. and 6 p m in South Classroom Building, room 136A. GETTING STARTED 6

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Veterans' Academic Standards of Progress The following policy applies to all students who are veterans and othe r eligible persons receiving VA benefits: 1 G rade Point Requirements Veterans must maintain a cumulat ive grade point average of 2.0 for all course work attempted. Veterans whose cumulative GPA is below 2.0 will be placed on academic probation for the following term If the GPA i s not raised to 2.0 dur ing the probationary term, you will be suspended for one academic term. Reinstatement will occur only after approved counseling. S uspension of the veteran under the Veterans' Academic Standards of Progress Policy will result in CCD's not certifying enrollment to the Veterans Administration. Veterans in this status may still attend CCD; however they will be subject to the provisions of the Academic Standards of Progress Policy requirements for continua tion of enrollment. 2 Other Special Grades AU Grade -indicates the student audited the course. No credit is allowed for audited courses, nor is the grade certifiable to the VA. I Grade -indicates "incomplete." An incomplete o r "I" grade must be made up no later than the next consecutive 1 5-week semest e r For veterans, if an I grade is not completed in this required period, the"I'wili revert to a NC (no credit) and the veteran's cert ification will be adjusted back to the beginning date of the term in which the I grade was received. SP Grade -indicates "satisfactory progress: which will be treated the same as an I ,"incomplete grade. 3 Attendance Veterans who stop attending class, but do not offiCially withd raw, may be d r opped adminis tratively. VA certifica tion will be adjusted accordingly. 4 M itigating Circumstances (As defined by PL. 94-502) Mitigating circumstances that directly hinder an eligible veteran's or other person's pur suit of a course are judged to be out of the student'S control. Following are some general categories o f miti gating circumstances (not all-conclusive): a. Serious illness of the eligible veteran or person. b Seriou s illness or death in the eligible veteran's or other person's immediate family. c. Immediate family or financial obligations that require a change in terms or place of employment, precluding pursuit of course work. d. Discontinuance of a course by the college. e Active military duty including active duty for training. 7 COMMUNITY COLLEGE Of DENVER f. Withdrawal from a course or receipt of a non-punitive g rade upon comp l etion of a cou rse due to unsatisfactory work m a y be considered mitigating circumstances if the s tuden t can demonstrate good faith pursuit of the course up to the point of withdrawal or completion. You must submit evidence that you applied for tutorial aid, consulted a Veterans A dm inistration counselor, or consulte d a CCD academic counselor or advisor in an attempt to remedy the unsatisfactory work before withdrawal or com pletion. When mitigating circumstances prevail, CCD will attempt to intervene on behalf of the vet e ran with the Veterans Administ r atio n. Extra Services Available We encourage you to take advantage of CCD's many student services, listed under the Need M o r e Help? section of this catalog. For all your academic, personal and career needs, you can save time by regularly talking to your counselor. Good luck!

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fY Tuition Tuition is determined by the State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education and is subject to change annually. Fees also can change. Tuition for 1997-98 is set at $54.30 per credit hour for resident students and $252.25 for non -resident students. In addition, fees are set at $8.50 per credit hour. Community College of Denver (CCD) also charges a $9 non-refundable registration fee per semester per student, and $ 16.70 per semester fee is charged for the Regional Transportation District Bus Pass. The college will continue to assess a "bad check" fee of $ 1 7 for checks returned by the banking system. Rates are subject to change without advance notice. Residency Classification For residency classification, you must have lived in Colorado for 365 days prior to the first day of the term in which you wish to enroll. Active duty military personnel and thei r dependents qualify as residents. Classification of students under age 23 is determined by the residency of their parents or legal guardian Call the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records for details at 556-2430. If you are classified as non-resident and believe you qualify for resident status, you may file a petition for In-state Residency at the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records by the first day of the term. Late petitions are not accepted. Senior Citizens In-state residents over the age of 60 may take courses for credit and pay 50 percent of the tuition charges and 100 percent of student fees. In-state senior citizens who are not interested in receiving credit may attend classes on a space available basis at no charge as long as they are residents. Visit the Office of Admissions, Registratio n and Records, South Classroom Building room 133, for a Senior Citizen/Non-Credit form, or call 556-2430. Senior citizens may not take courses listed as non-credit free of charge. State Employee Benefit State employees can take CCD classes and pay 50 percent of in-state tuition and 100 percent of fees. Employees must present a signed eligibility form from their employer at registration. Veterans Benefits VA educational benefits may apply for an advanced payment. Veterans who have not applied for advanced pay ment must make full payment of tuition before applications can be forwarded to the VA. The last date to apply for VA advanced payment is 45 days prior to the first day of classes. Visit the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records, South Classroom Building room 133, or call 556-2430. Tuition Refund Policy Students may receive a 100 percent refund of tuition and fees through the census date for any class(es) dropped and/or for any class canceled by the college. The census date for standard classes is listed in the Schedule of Classes. Call the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records for the census date of open-ent r y courses. No refunds or financial credits are given aher the census date of the class or for courses concentrated into one week or less. Students may obtain drop forms from the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records. Students may receive a 100 percent refund of tuition and fees (except for the non-refundable registration fee) through the census date. Call the Cashier (556-2075) f o r the census date of continuous enrollment courses. No refunds or financial credits will be given aher the census date of the class. Students may obtain drop forms from the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records. CCD normally mails tuition refund checks each Friday to all students eligible for refunds as of the close of business Tuesday. Student s owed a refund as ofTuesday will be required to pay for all classes added aher refunds are issued. Please check your class schedule for any amount owed to the college. Please direct questions regarding your account balance to the Cashier' s Office. Fees All students on the Auraria Campus pay student fees. This money is for student activ ities and benefits inclu ding student publications, operation of student government, cultural activities recreational activities, and clubs and organizational activities. Student fees also help payoff construction debts for the Auraria Student Union, Child Care Center and the Physical Education and Recreation Building. S tudent Government appro ves expenditure of student fee monies. Students enrolled in certain courses may be required to purchase individual supplies and materials, and to rent uniforms. A $ 17 fee is charged for bad checks. Education at CCO is affordable We have the lowest tuition rat e on the Auraria Campus. MONEY MATTER S 8

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Financial Aid Early Application The Office of Financial Aid administers federal and state programs to assist eligible student s in meeting the cost of their CCO education. Financial aid funds are limited,and we encourage students to start the application process several months before enrolling. Information brochures and appli cations are available at the Office of Financial Aid, South Classroom Building, room 135,556-2420, and at all Technical Education Centers (see listing/addresses on page vi). Application Procedures Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid. To apply for grants, scholarships, work-study employment William O Ford Federal Direct Loans and PLUS, complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Loans and scholarships require an additional application. Financial aid applicants also may have to supply supporting documents, such as Federal Income Tax forms or statements of welfare, social security vocational rehabilita tion benefits employment, etc. Priority in awarding financial aid goes to students who apply early. To be on time, you must have mailed your appli cation by March 1 and completed your file and submitted all documents by May 1 Applications received after the above dates will be considered based on the availability of funds. Four to six weeks after applying, you will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR). Review it for correctness. CCD will receive the results of your financial aid status electronically if you included our school code (009542) on your application. Check with the Office of Financial Aid for the school year priority dates. Student Budget The cost of a CCD education includes tuition fees, books and supplies. In addition, you may have expenses for room and board, transportation and personal items. We base our stan dard student budget on current estimated living costs. Budgets are adjusted for living arrangements (such as living with parents) and the length of enrollment. Standard living allowances: Living with parents Living away from parents $510 $960 A child care allowance may be added if you use day care. Allowances are subject to change without advance notice. 9 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Ability to B enefit If you are entering CCO without a high school diploma or GED and are applying for financial aid, you are classified as an Ability to Benefit Student. Ability to Benefit Students: 1. are admitted as regular students, seeking a degree or certificate. 2. must complete the regular assessment process and plan a schedule with an advisor 3. must meet minimum qualifications on a test approved by the u.s. Department of Education for determ ining eli gibility to receive financial aid. 4. are eligible to apply for financial aid for up to 30 credits of remedial courses (numbered 099 or below) Students who have not successfully completed the required remedial courses by the end of 30 attempted remedial credit hours may no longer apply for financial aid. If you pass the GED test before attempting 30 credit hours, you no longer are classified as an Ability to Benefit Student. Eligibility Financial need determines most types of financial aid awards. Financial need is the difference between the cost of attending college and your available resources. Resources include parents' contributions, your earnings, spouse's earn ings, and veteran's, social security, vocational rehabilitat ion welfare and unemployment benefits. If you have a baccalaureate, master's or other advanced degrees, you may be eligible to apply for student loans and Colorado Scholars, after you complete 12 credits at CCD. Contact the Office of Financial Aid. You must complete applications for financial aid once each year to determine eligibility. Financial aid applicants must maintain satisfactory academic and measurable progress both prior to applying for financial and during the semester(s) aid is received. The min imum requirements are a 2.0 cumulative grade point average and 75 percent cumulative completion rate for all attempted course work. Student s may receive aid for up to 150 percent of the credits required to complete their program. All credit hours taken at CCD, as well as transfer hours, are counted to determine satisfactory/measurable progress even if no financial aid was received. Students denied aid based on this policy may file an appeal. Appeal forms and copies of the complete policy are available from the Office of Financial Aid, South Classroom Building, room 135. Students enrolled in programs that require fewer than 16 credits are not eligible for financial aid. Approval is pending for financial aid eligibility for program s of 16 to 23 credits and is expected from the U.s. Department of education prior to the fall 1997 semester.

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Refund and Repayment Policies If you do not begin attending a class, you will not receive financial aid for the class, but will be charged tuition and fees i f you fail to officially withdraw by the published date. If you receive financial aid from CCD and then with draw from classes or stop attending you may be subject to r epayment of a portion of the financial aid you received. You may be eligible for a tuit ion refund if you withdraw from classes. (See Tuition Refund Policy.) If any portion of the your tuition and fees was paid from any financial aid fund, the refund will be r eturned to the account(s) from which you were paid in the order listed under Distribution of Refunds. An adminis trative fee, not to exceed the lesser of 5 percent of the insti tutional charges or $100, will be charged. If you only receive Colorado state financial aid, you are subject to CCD' s Institutional Refund Policy outlined in this catalog and the Financial Aid Repayment Policy. Refund/Repayment Policies do not apply to students who do not begin attendance in classes. These students are considered ineligible, and any financial aid disbursed must be repaid. S t udents who fail to withdraw from classes prior t o the published cen s u s date will be held responsible for any tuition/fee charges and repayment of dis bursed finan cial aid. Pro-Rata Refund If you are enrolling at CCD for the first time and are a Title I V financial aid recip ient, then withdraw or cease to attend prior to completing 60 percent of your first semester, you will have a pro-rated portion of your tuition/fees calculated. The amount r efunded will be the greater of the institutional, pro-rata o r federal refund. Federal Refund Title IV recipients who are not e l igible for p ro-rata refund and who withdraw from CCD during the first 50 percent of the semester may be eligible for a refund of charges to the financial aid programs in accordance with the following schedule: Percentage ofTime Prior to Withdrawal 0-15% 16-25% 26-50% 51% Percentage to be Refunded 100% 50% 25% 0% Distribution o f Refunds Refunded amounts are distributed in the following order: 1. Unsubsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loan 2. Subsidized Federal Dir ect Stafford Loan 3. Federal Direct Plus Loan 4 Federal Pell Grant 5. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant 6. Other Title IV Programs 7. Other Federal Sources of Aid 8. Colorado Student Incentive Grant 9. Colorado State Financial Aid 10. Private Funds 11. CCD Funds 12. The S tudent Repayment If you receive cash disbursements from federal and/or state financial aid programs and withdraw prior to mid-term (approximately the seventh or eighth week), you must repay a portion o f the financial aid received if the disbursement exceeds educational expenses. Total financial aid disbursed (less student loans and work-study earnings) minus eligible expenses will equal the amount of your financial aid repayment. Repayments are applied to a financial aid account(s) in the following order: 1 Federal Pell Grant 2. Federal SEOG 3. Othe r Title IV Federal Programs 4 Other Federal Sources of Aid 5. Colorado Student Incentive Grant 6. Colorado State Financial Aid 7. Private Funds 8. CCD Funds If you withdraw and owe a repayment of financial aid funds, you will not be eligible for further financial aid from CCD or any other postsecondary educational institution until payment is made. Contact the Financial Aid Office, 556-2420, for mor e detailed policy information and application examples. Financial Aid Programs Grants and Work-Study Federal Pell Grant Federally funded Pell Grants assist with educational expenses. Award amounts range up to $2,700 depending o n s tudent eligibility. Colorado Student Grant (CSG) Available to Colorado res ident s based on financial need. Awards range up to $5,000 per academic year. Colorado Student Incentive Grant (CS/G) Available on a need basis. The maximum award is $5,000 per year. Colorado and the federal government contribute to the award. MONEY MATTERS 10

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Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) Federally funded grants range from $200 to $5,000, depend ing on financial need. Pell Grant recipients with the lowest family contribut ions receive prio rity. Diversity Grant Colorado provides g rants of $200 to $5000 to members of underrepresented populations Awards are based on financial need. Colorado Work-Study -The Colorado work-study program provides part-time employment opportunities for Colorado residents who demonstrate financial need as defined by CCD. Federal Work-Study -The federal work-study program provides part-t ime employment for students who demonstrate financial need. Colorado Work-Study (No-Need) Col orado also provides limited funds to employ students part-time who do not demonstrate financial need and who are Colorado residents for tuition purposes Scholarships Colorado Scholars Program Scholarships are available to Colorado residents who have completed a minimum of 12 credit hours at CCD with at least a 3.0 grade point average in all courses attempted. Apply using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Scholarship awards depend on the availability of funds. Award amounts range up to resident tuition and fees. High school graduates with a 3.0 grade point average or counselor s r ecommendation can apply, using a separate application Institutional and community scholarships are posted on the Office of Financial Aid scholarship board. Other scholarship listings and information resources include: The Educational Opportunity Center, 629-9226; Career Services Center, 556-6202; and Student Assistance Center and Women' s Services, 556-3300. William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Programs Loan applicants first must complete the FAFSA form. In addi tion, you must attend an entrance and an exit loan counsel ing interview to ensure you understand your loan repayment responsibilities. CCD recommends first-year students' loan borrowing from all loan programs be limited to $2,625 per academic year, or $1,313 per semester. We also recommend total student loan borrowing be limited to a maximum of $10,000, including any loans borrowed at other schools. Call the Office of Financial Aid, 556-2420, to learn more about student loan eligibility. Federal Direct Subsidized Loan -This program provides loans at a variable rate. Federal program limits allow students to borrow up to $2,625 per year as freshmen. Sophomores who have finished 30 credit hours of college-level work may borrow up to $3,500 per year. Loans 11 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER have a six-month grace period prior to the first payment. The Federal Direct Subsidized Loan is a need-based program. The interest rate is variable and paid b y the Federal Government until the grace period ends. Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan -The Direct Unsubsidized Loan program provides loans for students' remaining Stafford eligibility. The federal limit s are $4,000 for freshmen and sophomores. You may borrow the cost of education minus any other aid. No family contribu tion is subtracted from the loan. You will pay the interest rate from the date of disbursement. Federal Direct Loans to Parents Parents may borrow for their students from the Federal Direct PLUS loan program. Repayment must begin within 60 days after disbursement. The interest rate is variable and the parent has up to 10 years to repay th e loan. The Federal Servicer will provide for credit checks.

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need Student Services Community College of Denver (CCD) offers an array of student services that have one goal to increase your access to quality education and h elp you achieve your educational objectives. They are listed in alphabetical order for your convenience. Career Development Center The Career Development Center in South Classroom Building, room 136, offers: full-time career placement ; part-time employmen t ; career counseling and testing ; cooperative (Coop ) education; job search skills: resume writing and interviewing; career Resource Library; colorado Career Informat ion System; career planning; and career laboratory. For an appointment, call 556-3609. Center for Persons with Disabilities Students with disabilities should contact the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPO) abo ut free services to assist them at CCD. Service s include a c ademic advising and registration assistance; tutoring classr oo m assistance, and curricu lum and test modification; consultation with instructors; text recording note-taking and use of adaptive equipment; accessible parking and campus orientation; sign language and oral interpret ing ; liaison with rehabilitation agencies and othe r Col orado postsecondary i nstitutions ; and housing and trans portation information. CPO is i n the South Classroo m Building, room 134,556-3300. In addition to CPO, other resources useful to students with disabilities are Compu ter Training for People with Disabilities, Academic Suppo rt Center, Special Learning Support p rogram and the Computer Access Center. CCD complies with and fully supports Section 504 of the Rehabi l itat ion Act of 1973, with amendments of 1974, regarding nondiscrimination on the basis o f handicap. Inquiries concerning Title VI, TITLE IX and Section 504 may be referred to the Lil Hunsaker, CCD Campus Box 203, P.O. Box 173363, Denver CO 80217-3363, South Classroom Building Room 134,556-2413, or to the Office for Civil Rights, U .S. Department of Education, 1961 S t o ut Street, Denver, CO 80294. Child Care Services CCD provides quality child care at three sites: the Aurar i a Campus, TEC North and TEC West. Each center provides a full-day program in early childh oo d care and education. Children have numerous oppo r tunities to pract ice bein g competent creative, caring and s elf-sufficient. M ater ials, equipment and activ ities are nonsexist and multicultural to prepare children for a diverse s ociety. The Auraria Campus Real Kids C enter is licensed by the Colorado Department of Human Resources and accredited by the National Academy for the Education of Young Children. Center hours are Monda y thro u g h Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 :30 p m The center a c cept s children between the ages of 2 1/2 and 6 year s old The Real Kid s Cent e r is popular so enroll early. Call for current informati on: 5562 4 3 9 TEC North and TEC West Centers are lic e n s e d by the Colorado Department of Human Resources. H ours are Monday through Friday, 7 a m to 6 p m TEC sites acce pt children between the ages of 6 w e e k s and 6 years For info r mation call TEC North 289-2243; T E C West 477-0901. Educational Opportunity Center The Educational Opportunity C ent e r (EOC) is a community service program that pro vides education a l planning, infor mation and assistance, including : career counseling; college/university admi ssion assistance; vocationa l -technical scho o l enroll m e n t assistance; academic assessment c oordinati o n ; federal and state student financial aid a pplication assistance;and e ducational planning w orks h o ps. Services are free. EOC is located a t the Parkway Center, 1391 Speer Blvd., 3rd fioor, S uite 430. Call 629-9226 for an appointment. Evening Services S tudent s who attend college during the evening h ours can obtain help and informati o n in the E ducational P lanning and Advising Center in the South Classr oom Building, room 134. Academic p lanning and career advising are availabl e by appointment Monday thr o ugh Thurs day, 5 p.m to 6 p.m. when classes are i n s ession. The offices of Admissions, Registration and Records, Financ i a l Aid, Educational Planning and Advising, Career Ser v ices and Business Services also are open until 6 p m o n Tuesday and Wednesday evenings when classes are in session. Call 556-2600 for more information "" '*4< f!, .. CCD is in the heart of the city & within ing distance of myriad downtown a ctivities. NEED MORE HELP? 12

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GED Institute The GED Institute has off-campus sites I n the City and County of Denver. Students who are interested in obtaining a Colorado High School Equiva lency Diploma or learning English a s a second language (ESL) are i nvited to participate GED a n d pre-GED classes are self-paced labs, while ESL classes are directed by the Instructor. For further information including location days times and admission requirements, please call 556-3805. Health Services CCD students may use the outpatient Metropolitan State College of Denver Student Health Clinic at a low cost. The clinic provides direct confident ial health care services that emphasize well ness and preventive medicine The Tivoli Student Health Clinic is in the Student Union, room 140, 556-2525. Insurance Students may purchase an accident and sickness insurance plan after registering. Brochures are available at the Student Health Clinic, the Student Life and Activities Office (Tivoli Student Union) and the Office of the Vice President for Student Services, South Classroom Building, room 305, 556-2413. International Student Services The International Student Office assists international students from more than 50 countries, providing support services and helping bridge campus cultural gaps. Services include counseling on immigration transactions; information about American and international cultural events, on-and off-campus employment and housing accommodations; pre-and post-admissions advising; and liaison with various consulates, embassies and other i nternational organizations. For mor e information, contact the International Student Advisor in South Classroom Building, room 134, (303) 556-2600. PLACE -Program for licensing Assessments for Colorado Educators All candidates (whether prepared in Colorado or other states) for initial educator licenses (provisional licenses) in Colorado are required to take and pass the PLACE assessments including basic skills, liberal arts and sciences, professional knowledge, and content areas, such as elementary education. Please contact the Education and Academic Services Division for further information at 556-8455. 13 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER ROTC Information CCD students may participate in two Army ROTC programs that lead to a comm ission in the active Army, the Army Reserve, or the Colorado National Guard. CCD students may participate through interinstitutional registration in the ROTC program. Contact the Department of M i litary Science, Metropolitan State College of Denver, Campus Box 93, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3363, or call 556-3491. Student Assistance Center and Women's Services Services are available to all students. The center offers academic and crisis counseling, transition counseling for students who are making a change from home to the work force and assistance to AFDC clients. The center hosts a variety of workshops, covering topics such as women's health issues, self-esteem and time management. Support groups offer help with divorce adjustment, welfare client support personal growth and sin gle parenting. The center houses a lending library and books on women's issues. I t also provides referrals to legal, day care, health, housing, and employment resources, and also helps students with abuse and economic issues. The Student Assistance Center and Women's Services is in the South Classroom Building room 134,556-2343. Student life and A c tivities The Student Life and Activities Office develops and imple ments programs and activities to meet the academic, social and recreational interests of CCD students and the community. Programs offered through or supported by the Student Life and Activities Office include: S tudent Government and student organizations, intramural and recreational activities, social and cultural activ it ies, health services, student leadership training programs, and student publications and student newspaper. These activities provide constructive experiences to stimulate personal growth and social develop m e nt and add to students' enjoyment of life. S tud ent Life and Activities is located on the third floor of the Tivoli Student Union, room 309,556-2597. Student Legal Services Student Legal Services is a tri-in stitutional student fee-funded program. It provides students with legal advice and assistance. Services are offered at no cost. They includ e legal counseling, document preparation legal self help workshops and related activities. Services do not include representatio n in court or action against the college, or any state or local government entity. Legal Services is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 308,556-6061.

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Testing Center The Testing Center offers a variety of testing services to CCD students and staff. Please contact the center for information regardin g dates, times, applications and registr ation fees, South Classroom Building,room 230,556-3810. Academic Profile The Academic Profile is a test of general education know l edge and skills. It is required of all first-time freshmen and graduating students. Test data help measure institutional effectiveness and improve the quality of inst ruction and learning. Basic Skills Assessment Basic Skills Assessment is r equired of all first-time entering freshmen students by Stat e Board policy. It assesses the areas of English (writing), mathematics, reading and study skills that are minimally required for studen t success in college-level course work. ESL (English as a Second Language) skill s also are assessed. Counselors and instructors advise students based on the results of the assessments. Class Testing Self-paced and Conti nuing Education cours e exams are administered in the center. Make-up exams can be taken with facult y permission. S tudent s may also take exams from other colleges or universities from thei r Continuing Edu cation Departments. CLEP-College-Ievel Examination Program A national program of cred it by examination that offers the oppo r tunity to obtain recognition for college-level achievement. (See pages 5-6, Credit for Prior Learning.) Nursing Mobility Profile Required of students designated by the Nursing Department. Includes three subjects: Foundations of Nursing; Nursing Care During Childbearing; and Nursing Care of the Child. Psychological Available by referral to the Special Learning Support program. Workman' s Compensation Physicians Accreditation Test required by the State of Colorado for certain specialties. Assesses knowledge of Workman's Compensation Laws as it relates to Physicians rights and responsibilities. Veterans Affairs Office The Veterans Affairs Office provides inf ormation about veter ans'federal, state and c ommunity benefits ; assistance with VA inquiries ; and gives referrals for emergency food, clothing, housing, legal aid and employment. The Veterans Affairs Office is l ocated in the South Classroom Building Room 133, 556-2452. Work and Family Resource Center Because child care issues can have an impact on student success dir e ctly and dramatically, CCD' s Work and Family Resource Center provides child care inf ormation and referral services to hel p students find child care. One of t h e Work and Family Resource Center's national award-winning services is the 4 Parents Helpline (620-4444), a free, nonmedical telephone warmline that provides i nformation and support for parents to further the healthy development of their chil dren and deal with the comp lexities of modern fami l y life. The 4 Parents H elpline is available Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p m Messages may be left at any time. NEED MORE HELP ? 14

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We are here to h elp you succeed, because your success is our success. academic sUiPport center Located in South Classr oom Building, room 142, the Academi c Support Center (ASC) provides free tutorial assis tance in basic skills to all CCD students Other tutoring i n various subjects is available. You may request tutoring in any course at the college. For some classes, you may be referred to the divisions for tuto r ing Numerous tutoring services are available on a drop-in or appoin tment basis. In addition t o find ing help wit h individual courses, you a r e i nvited to use services provided in the following specialized labs: Lab Tutoring* English as a Second Language (ESL) ESL tutors help you with pronunciation, conversation, grammar, reading and othe r s ub ject areas such as math, b iology, chemistry and computer science. Computers language learning software and other equipm ent also are available for you to use. (Room M) Colorado High School Equivalency Diploma (CHSED formerly GED) You can prepare t o pass the CHSED test batter y and earn a CHSED diploma. (Room J ) Reading and Study Skills Tutors and computerized assistance help you t o strengthen your abilities in reading, note taking, organizational skills, test taking and other techniques designed to enhance your s uccess in college. (Open area and room 139) Mathematics Tutors and instructo r s h elp you gain g reater experie nce and knowledge of mathematical principles. Practice your skills o n IBM compute r tutorials watch course videos and part icipate in specialized workshops and study groups. (Rooms Q, R&S) Special Learning Support Tutors help you to learn compensatory techniques for your special learning needs. At the same time you also can str e n gthen you skills in math, reading, s tud y skills and many ot h e r academi c content areas. (Room s L, U & V) Writing Center Tutor s wo r k with you o n all types of writing at every level. You can use Macintosh computers in the center to plan, compose and revise your papers. (Rooms N P & T) Lab schedules are posted at the entrance of South Classroom 142 and outside each lab. '5 C OMMUNITY C O LLEGE O f DENVER Special AS( Programs** For more infor mation on ASC services, or to make an appointment for counseling or tutoring, call 556-2497. Special Learning Support Program (SLSP) Learning disabled adults can take specialized classes and receive individualized tutoring through this pr ogram. You receive diagnost i c evaluations and counseling related to your unique needs. Thi s provides the foundation for coun seling and specialized educational planning. (Office: Room 142L; Lab: Room 142U &V) Student Support Services (SSS) Counselors create an individualized success plan with you that includes services such as tutoring, peer mentoring and peer advocacy. Counselors also advise you on college sur vival and financial aid. Eligibility is based on income disabili ty and/or first-generat ion status. (Room 142E) Supplemental Services (SS) You may request tutorial assistance for your vocat ional classes throug h this program Specialized services i nclude small group or one-on-one tutoring English as a Second Language for vocational classes and referrals to other programs. (Room 142F) .. Students apply for these services.

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special programs Computer Training for People with Disabilities The Computer Training for People with Disabilities (CTPD) program is a nationally recognized and award-winning com puter training program. You can apply for both certificate and associate degree programs in either application pro grammer or PC specialist/LAN administrator. If you have a disability, we encourage you to apply to the CTPD program. Our progr am offers special services, suppo rt and placement for participants. CTPD admission requirements include: 1. successful completio n of a computer aptitude test battery. 2. personal interview with members of the CTPD Business Advisory Council. You can obtain applicatio n information from the Center for Person s with Disabilities, South Classroom Building, room 134, (303) 556-3300, or from the Division of Business and Governmental S tudies, Plaza Building, room 262, (303) 556-2487. Cooperative Education Program CCD's Cooperative Education program provides opportuni ties to supplement course work with practical work experi ence related to your educational and occupational objec tives. You can earn credit for working part-time in an area directly related to your educational program. We encourage you to apply at least one semester prior to the semeste r dur ing which you wish to work. For more information, call or drop by the Cooperative Educati on Office, South Classroom Building room 136,556-3607. Developmental Studies Program To be successful at CCD, you must be able to use your read ing, math, writing and study skills. We offer a comprehensive academic program in these skill areas. They include: 1. assessment of basic academic skills; 2. test results interpretatio n by skilled faculty and counselo rs; 3. a variety of skill development courses in read ing, mathematics, writing and study skills; 4. support with computer-assisted instruction; 5. preparation for GED; and 6. engl ish as a Second Language instruction and suppo rt. For more info rmation contact the Division of Education and Academic Services, South Classroom Building, room 313, 556-8455. Honors Program The Honors program allows qualified students to rece ive honors credit by contracting with instructors to do individual honors work within existing courses or by taki n g designated honors courses. Honors work can help you deve lop sop histi cated, creative, critical thinking and research skills while enhancing your academic resume. For more information, visit the Honors program office in South Classroom, room 244A, or contact Stephen Thomas, Honors Program Coordinator, at 556-3861. Denver Education Network Started in 1992, the Denver Education Network is one of 17 urban projects across the United States funded by the Ford Foundation. The purpose of the Ford Foundation's decade long initiative i s to increase the participation and advancement rates of urban, minority students in two-year and four year colleges primarily through systematic change within the public school system s elementary seconda r y and higher education. The Denver Education Network's goal is to provide a seamless web of services to Denve r s tu dents espe cially for those students most at-risk of academic failure International Study Programs CCD is a member of the Colorado Consortium for International Programming (CClP). Through this organization you may find opportunities to live and study abroad while earning CCD credit. For more information about study possi bilities in foreign countries, contact Professor Richard Hart at (303) 556 3829 La Familia Scholars Program The La Familia Scholars program pro vides a model environ ment for first-generation students in higher education that attends to the academic, social, technological and human needs of students based on the culture of "La Familia." La Familia Scholars selected for the program must enroll in a six-hour co m m u nity class that combines technology, educa t ional and career planning and the critical skills. Learning community classes are taught in a state-of-the-art computerized classroom. Students also have access to a computer ized lab for tutoring and computer support. Case manager s and peer mentors provide comprehen sive advising and cent ralized i nformati on to students La Familia s taff also work closely with CCD faculty and staff to assist students in adapting to college life so they persist in CCD i s a comprehensive, urba n college, providing open access to a diverse p opulatio n. SPECIAL PROGRAM S 16

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college to receive a two-year college degree and transfer to a four-year college or university. Because this program is supp orted by Hispanic-Serving Institution(HSI) funding, Hispanic/Latino first-generation college students are give n priority when they appl y to the program; however, other first-generation student s are welcome t o apply until the program reaches its enrollment limit. Summer Bridge Program The Summer Bridge program is a well-established, intensive prog ram that offe r s participants a firm foundation on which to begi n and build a s uccessful college education For more than eight year s CCD has worked diligently to blend the right ingredients for a thorough summer program, including financial assistance, First Year Experience courses, academic developme nt courses, student support services, career explo ration college program sampling and a vari e t y of enrich ment activ ities. The Summer Bridge program aims to motivate s tudents to pursue a college education and equip them with the skills and confidence needed to comp lete that education. Applications are accepted from January through April; the eight-week program begins i n June. Applicants must be r ecent high sch ool or Col orado High School Equival ency graduates between the ages of 1 8 and 22. For more information and for specific entrance requirements, contact Yvonne Frye, Education and Academic Services, South Classr oo m Building, room 313, S56-8455. 17 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER

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Auraria library The Auraria Library has more than 560,000 volumes of books, microforms and bound periodicals, and more than 1)00 current periodica l and newspaper subscriptions. As a member of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries (CARL), the Auraria Library has access to an additional six mil lion volumes through inter-library loans. You can take a 50-minute self-guided, audiotape tour of the librar y to become familiar with its services and resources, including: computerized bibliographic searches, library orientation and instruction for groups and individuals, a depository of u.s. and Colorado government publications, and media listening and viewing facilities. Rooms for indi vidual study, group conferences and typing also are available. For information about library services and hours, call 556-2741. Campus Recreation Campus Recreation offers unique opportunities to develop athletic skills, leadership abilities and team spirit. Major campus attractions include noon -hour aerobics, swimming pool, weight room and handball/ racquetball courts The outdoor adventure program offers a variety of one-day and mUlti-day trips for wind surfing, skiing, snow-shoeing, bicycling, crosscountry skiing and ice sailing. The intramural program includes t ouch football, basketball, racquetball, tennis, 3-on-3 basketball, floor hockey, volleyball and inner tube water polo. Club sports provide a high level of competition in rugby, lacrosse, Tae Kwon Do, weight lifting, soccer, football, karate, skiing and volleyball. Stop by room 108 of the Events Center for semester schedules and to check out team sports equipment. For more information, call 556-3210. Make handball/racquetball reservations and check i n for these activities at room 111, 556-3211. Auraria Child Care Center The center provides child care for children of students, facul ty and staff on the Auraria Campus. It is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services. Space is available for 30 toddlers aged 18 months to 3 years, and 120 children, aged 3 to 8 years. Professional staff provide a toddler preschool and state certified kindergarten program. Call 556-3188. Real Kids Center The Auraria Campus Real Kids Center provides a full-day program in early childhood care and education. The cente r is licensed by the Colorado Department of Human Resources and accredited by the National Academy for the Education of Young Children. Hours are Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The Center accept s children between the ages of 2 1/2 and 6 years old. Call 556-2439 for current information. Interfaith Ministry The Auraria Inte rfaith Ministry (AIM) is a cooperative endeavor of several church denominations. AIM provides programs and counseling and promotes individual spiritual growth AIM offices are in the St. Francis Center. For mo r e i nforma tion, call 556-8591. Parking and Transportation Services Prospective students and new students comi n g to the college for advising, orientation, Basic Skills Assessment, financial aid workshops, or registration may park in Lot G, at the corner of Lawrence Way and 9th Street. Validate your parking ticket for four hours of free parking in South Classroom Building, room 134. Once you register, you no longer are eligible for free parking. Parking is available in dail y fee lots ranging in price from $1.25 to $2 and the parking garage at Seventh St. and Lawrence Way. The $2 daily fee for the Parking Garage and Lots H ($2) and D ($1.75) may be paid in cash or by debit card. Debit cards may be purchased for $1 in the basement of the Student Union next to the postal vending machines or at the Parking and Transportation Center Office in the ele vator lobby on the first level of the parking garage. A student ID is required for parking in Lot R. A limited number of monthly permits is available. Students also may park free for 20 minutes in Lot G to go to the Parking Office. Bring your ticket with you for validation. The Parking Office is ope n Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For more information about the following services, call 556-2000. Free carpool-matching assistance Carpool parking discounts Free on-campus transportation for disabled students on the wheelchair-accessible hand ivan Free campus shuttle service for evening students on the Auraria Evening Express (Monday through Thursday, dusk to 10 p.m.) Public Safety Publi c Safety provides professional 24-hour crime prevent io n and law enforcement service for the Auraria Campus. For routine calls to Public Safety, phone 556-3271; for emergency calls, phone 911. AURARIA CAMPUS FACILITIES 18

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college So you'll know what you can expect of u s at Community College of Denver (CCD) and what we'll expect of you, please read this alphabetized section carefully. Your coun selor, advisor, or a staff member in Student Services, South Classroom Building, room 134, can help if you have additional questions. Academic Standards Attendance Your regular and punctual attendance i s expected, and each i nstructor will keep a complete record of your attendance for the entire length of each course. You will be counted absent from missed class meetings, beginning with the first official date of enroll m ent or the first day of classes, whichever is later. Faculty may give a failing grade to any student who has a 15 percent o r g reater absence fro m a class, s tart ing from the firs t class meeting You are r esponsible for informing the instructor of the reason for an absence and for doing s o in a tim e ly fashion. You, whether present or absent, are responsible f o r obtaining all materia l presented and completing all cours e assignments. The attendance policy for certain programs, such as health careers, may differ from the general policy because of clinical requirements o r requirements o f approving agencies. You are responsible for properly processing a withdrawal. Course Load A full-time course load is 12 to 15 credits. If you are registered for fewer than 12 credits, you are classified a part-time student. Eighteen credits is considered a heavy load. Twenty credit s is the maximum load for all students without special permission of the instructional division dean. Academic Standards of Progress 1. You are required to maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 for all course work attempted. 2 If your cumulative grade point average falls below the required 2.0 on an attempted six or more credits, you will be placed on academic probation for the following term of enrollment. 3 Should you fail to rais e your cumu lative GPA to 2.0 by the end of the probationar y i n s tructional term, CCD will consider s u s pending you academically for a minimum of one term. 4. If you are placed on academic suspension, you must meet with the vice pres ident for Student Services to determine eligi bilit y for continued enrollment. 1 9 COMMUNITY COLLEG E O F DENVER 5. You may appeal your suspension to the Suspension Review Board. Decisions of the board are final. Appeal Procedure Students wishing to appeal academic suspension or seeking information about the appeal procedure shoul d contact the Office of the Vice President for Student Services, 556-2413. Assessment 1. Basic Skills Assessment If you are a first-time CCD student, you must take a basic skills assess ment test for English, math, reading and study skills unless you meet one of the following criter i a for an exemption. a. You have associate o r higher degree w it h a"C" grade or better in English 121 and Math 121 or their equivalents. b. You enrolled for emp l oyment in-service or upgrad ing. c. You reached the 50th percentile on ACT (minimum composite score of 20 with minimum score of 20 i n s ubj ect area test) or SAT (minimum scores of 900, composite; 420, verbal ; 480, math). d. You successfully completed ENG 121 and MAT 121 or their equivalents with a'C grade or better within the last five years. (Students taking math or English must take that portion of the assessment). e. You enrolled in one course for personal enrichment. f You can provide assessment and placement scores from another accredited institution that meet CCD criter ia. If you initially enrolled in one course for personal enrichment or job upgrading and have not been assessed, you must participate in assessment before ente ring into a certificate or degree program Our assessment methods include one or both of the following: 1 a comprehensive review of your past records such as standardized test results, high school and college transcripts and prior learning experiences. 2. a test battery that includes writing, study skills, reading mathematics and English as a Second Language. Either assessment method includes a personal inter view wit h an advisor to review test results and your academic and personal background to determine classes for which you are academically ready.

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If your score is below program-entry level in wri ting study skills, reading and/or mathematics, you should take review courses beginning your first semester at CCD. You are expected to pursue basic skills until you reach college-level competency. Usually, you can enroll in certificate and degree requirement classes at the same time you take review courses. However, if the review course is a prerequisite, you must complete it before enrolling in a higher-leve l course. 2. English as a Second Language If English is your second language, you should take tests to assess your level of English. You will take the Levels of English Proficiency (LOEP) Reading and Language Use tests and a listening comprehension test. If your score on the Language Use test is high you will write a short essay. You will take these tests in the Test Center, South Classroom Buil d ing, r oom 232. When you receive your test scores, tal k with an advisor to help you choose the classes you need to imp rove your English. CCD Rights CCD reserves the right to change provisions, requirements and fees in this catalog. Without notice, CCD may cancel any course or program or change its content, description, timing, availability, locat ion, academic credit or any other aspect. Cooperative Programs with Emily Griffith Opportunity School CCD provide s advanced placement status in various programs to students who have credits from many Emily Griffith programs. See your advisor for details. Drug-Free Schools In compliance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendment of 1989, Public Law 101-226, CCD informs all students and employees about its drug and a lcohol abuse prevention program Standard of Conduct. Students and employees shall not engage in the unauthorized or unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, use/abuse of alcohol and/or illicit drugs on college prope r ty or use as a part of college activities II. Legal Sanctions for Violation of the Standards of Conduct. Any student or employee who is convicted of the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, pro duction use/abuse of illicit drugs or alcohol is s ubje ct to criminal penalties under local, state and federal law. These penalties range in severity from a fine of up to $100 to life imprisonment and/or a fine of $8,000,000. III. Pena l tie s Which May Be Imposed by the College. S tudent s and/or employees who violate the above stan dard of conduct will be subject to disciplinary action under student and employee disciplinary policies .The sanctions include, but are not limited to, a requirement to complete an appropriate rehabilitation or re-entry program; expulsion from college or terminatio n of employ ment; and/or referral to authoritie s for prosecution; possi ble loss of financial aid. IV. Health Risks Associated with Use of Illicit Drugs and Alcoho l Abuse. Health risks associated with drug and alcoho l abuse include, but are not limited to: malnutri tion, brain damage heart disease, pancreatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, menta l illness, death, low birth weig ht babies, and babies with drug addictions V. Available Counsel ing, Treatment, Rehabilitation or Re entry Programs. Information on available counseling, treatment, rehabilitation or re-entry programs is available through the Colorado Department of Health and as follows: For Information on Substance Abuse, contact: MSCD Student Health Clinic SU-140, 556-2525 Bethesda PsycHealt h System 758-1123 (24 hours) CCD Referral SO 134,556-2600 For Information on treatme nt centers, call: Adams Community Mental Health Center 287-8001 (24 hours) Arapahoe Mental Health Center 761-0620 Boulder County Mental Health Center 447-1665 (24 hours) Denver Menta l Health Corporation 377-4300 Jefferson County Mental Health C e n t e r 425-0300 (24 hours) Family Education R ights and Privacy Act of 1974 This act protects the privacy of education records, establish es the right of students to inspect and review their educa tional records and provides guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data thr oug h informal and formal hearings. Student s have the right to file complaints with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) con cerning alleged failures by CCD to comply with the act. The CCD policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the act's provisions. Copies of the policy are available from the.Office of Admissions, Registration and Records and the Office of the Vice President for Student Services. These offices also maintain a Directory of Records that lists all educational records maintained on students by CCD. Please refer questions about the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act to the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records, 556-2430. POLICIES & STANDARDS 20

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Grades Grade A -A distinguished grade for superior work 1. You mastered the content and objectives o f the course, can apply what you learned to new situations and can relate it to other knowledge 2 You consistently distinguish yourself in e x aminations reports, projects, class participation and laboratory or training situations. 3. You show independent thinking in assignme nt s and class discussion. 4. Your work is consistently in proper form, s hows satisfactory evidence of careful research (where required) and is submitted punctually. 5. Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, you consistentl y demonstrate superior skills, abilit y and performance 6 You complied w ith the instructor's attendance require ment s Grade B -A better-than-acceptable grade 1. You consistently show mastery of the course content and objectives and usually apply what you learned to new situations or relate it to other knowledge. 2. Your work is in proper form, shows satisfactory evidence of research (where required) and is submitted punctually 3 Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills, you consistentl y demonstrate above average skills, ability and performance. 4 You complied with the instructor's attendance require ments Grade C -An acceptable grade permitting progress forward in course sequence 1 You show evidence of a reasonable comprehension of the subject matte r of the course and have an average mastery of the content sufficient to indicate s uccess in the next course in the same field. 2. You consistently make average scores i n examinations, reports, projects, class participation and laboratory or training situations. 3 If the subject carries transfer credit, your work indicates suffiCi ent competence in the content to continue in the subject field upon transfer. 4 You complete your assignments i n g oo d form and on time 5 Where achievement in the course involves development of hand or body skills you consistently demonstrate average skills, ability and performance. 6 You complied with the instructo r's attendance requirements. 11 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Grade 0 A less-than-acceptable, passing grade 1 You fall belo w the average in examinations, projects reports class participation and laboratory or training situations, but show some competence in the assigned subject matter of the course. 2. The competence demonstrated is insufficient to indicate success in the next course in the subject field. 3. Assignments are completed in imperfect form, are sometimes late, or o f inconsistent quality. 4 Where achievement in the course i nvolves development of hand or bod y skills, you consistently demon s trate below-average skills, ability and performance. 5. You complied with the instructor's attendance require ments Grade F A failing grade 1 With respect to examinations, projects, reports class part i cipation and laboratory or trainin g situations, you fail to perform at th e 0 grade level. 2 You s h ow little or no competence in the assigned s ub ject matter of the course. 3. Where achievement in the course invo lves dev elopment of hand or bod y skills, you fail to perform at the 0 or above grade level. 4. You did n ot comply with the i nstructor s attendance requirements. Credit/No Credit CCO offe r s some courses on a credit/no credit basis. Upon successful completion of such a course, unit credit is awarded. However, courses taken on a c redit/no credit basis are not used in the computation of a student's grade point average (GPA). Regulations for such courses follow : 1. In authorized credit/no credit courses, the credit grade is granted for performance equivalent to the letter grade of C or better 2 Credit/no credit-gra ded courses must be designated by the respective division. Each term, CCO will specify courses that fall into thi s category in the class schedule. Departments may require majors to obtain letter grades in that department s major subjects. Grade SP -Satisfactory progress Some courses, designated as open-entry open-exit, may extend beyond the normal end of a semester. Upon successful completion of such courses, CCO will award unit credits and a grades. Regulations for such courses follow: 1. In courses for whic h this grade is author ized, the SP will be given in either of the following cases. a You attended for a full term and show satisfactory progress, but have not yet mastered required course objectives.

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b Under the college's cont inuous enrollment policy, you enrolled late in the semester and are making satisfactory progress, but have not had sufficient t ime to master required course obj ectives 2 You may be required to reregis ter for a course in which you received a n S P grade if you do not complete the course work by the end of the next consecutive 1 S-week semester. When the remaining time needed for comp le tion is short, or when other extenuating circumstances occur the dean may waiv e the requirement for re-enroll ment. 3 You must, before the end of the term make arrangem ents with the instructor to complete the course. If you receive financial aid, you must finish the course within the semester you register. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for more information. 4 An SP grade will revert to NC (no credit) after the end of the next consecutiv e l s-week term 5. Home study and on-line courses are open-entry /ope n exit and must comply with the above regulations. If you receive financial aid,you must complete the class in the semester in which you enroll for the class. Grade I-Incomplete 1. You have not comp leted the course requirements due to extenuating circumstances. 2. A minimu m of two-t hird s of the course work has been satisfactorily completed. 3 You must before the end of the term make arrangements with the instr uctor to complete the course. These arrangements includ e a formal contract with a deadline date on or before the end of the next lS-week semester. 4 You must complete the necessary course work prior to the deadline date. 5 An I grade that i s not made up reverts to an "Ne grade. 6 Home study and open-entr y/open-exi t courses are not eli gible for inco mplete grades Grade W -Withdrawal You officia lly withdrew f r om the class after the add/ drop deadline as publ ished in the class schedule. Grade AU -Audit You audited the course. Grade AW -Administrative Withdrawal You attended one o r more class sessions, but too few t o be appropr i ately evaluated or to receiv e an "I" grade. Grade Changes Grade changes are made b y the faculty person who administered the grade. In cases where the fac ulty is not available to conside r a grade change, such change may be made by the inst ructional dean i n consultation with the vice presi-dent for Instruction. Grade appeals go to the dean responsi ble for the cour s e then to the vice president for I nstruction Grade Point Average Grade points measure y our achievement for the number of credits completed To calculate your grade point average, mUltiply the number of grade points by the number of credits for each course. Total the credits and po ints, the n divide the grade points b y the total number of credits. A = 4 g rade points B = 3 grade points C = 2 grade points D = 1 grade point F = 0 grade points Note: All other grades (AU, AW. F. & S P ) are not calculated into theCCDGPA. The following example will help you calculate your grade point average: Course ANT 111 Principles of Anthropol o g y BIO 111 General College Biolog y CIS 115 Intro to Compu t ing ENG 121 English Comp o Essa y Writing POS 111 American Government TOTALS Credits Grade IS 3 17 A A B o F Points 12 (3 x 4 ) 20 (5 x4) 9 (3 x 3) 3 (3 xl) 0(3 x 0) 41 Total grade points divided by total credits equals the cumu lative grade point a verage. Therefore, the grade point average for the above example is 4 1 divided b y 17 for a 2.41 GPA. Recognition of Achievement or Continuing Education Units (CEU) CCD offers many courses, conferences, workshops and seminars for upgrad ing job skills and for personal enrichment. Successful completion of courses of this type may result in the granting of a Recognition of Achievement o r a CEU that may be requested from the appropr iate instructional division. Repeating Courses A. You may r epeat a cour s e only once i f you receive a D o r F grade. S. You must r equest a 'Petition to Repeat a Course Form" from the Office o f Admissions, Registration and Records, South Classroom Building, room 133, complete it and turn it in when registering for the class you wish to repeat. POLICIE S & S TANDARDS 22

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C. All forms must be submitted prior to Census Date, posted i n the class schedule. D You may, while enrolled at CCD, register inter-institution ally to repeat a course originally taken at CCD at Met r opolitan Stat e College of Denver or U n iversity of Col o rado at Denver. E. The GPA will be changed only once for the same class. F. Under e xt enuating circumstances, you may appeal to the dean of the division r esponsible for offering a course for permission to retake a course and/or adjust a grade m o r e than once. Student Code of Conduct Admission to CCD i m p lies that you agree to respect the rights of others and observe moral and civil laws. Inte rference with t h e normal processes of education in the classroom or elsewhere on the campus will be regarded as unacceptable conduct, warranting suspension or dismissal. D isciplinary p r oceedings for v i o lations of stand a rds of condu ct are the resp o n s i bility of the vice president for Stude n t Services. Conduct for w hich students are subject to discipline includes t h e following factors: 1 Dishonesty, such as cheating, p lagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information to the college 2. Forgery, alteration or misuse of college documents, records or ident ific a tion 3. O b struction or disr uption of teaching, admin istration, dis ciplinary procedures or other college activities. 4 Physical abuse of o r action that threatens the health or safet y of any person on college-ow ned or controlled prope r ty or at college-sponsored functions. 5. Theft of, misuse of, or damage to property 6. U n authorized entry to or use of college facilities; unauthorized use of college equipment. 7. Manufacture, possession, cont r o l sal e transmission, or use of any substance in violation of state or federal laws. (The college has the polic y of full cooperation with law enforcement agencies in such cases.) 8. Disorderly, indecent, or obscene conduct on college owned or controlled property or at college-sponsored functions 9 Abuse or unauthorized use of alcohol. (See State Liquor Code). 10. Condoning any act by another stu dent that violates col lege policy. 11. Unauthorized representation or contracting in the name of t h e Community College of Denver. (A student may not claim to be an official representative of the college for any commercia l purpose.) 12. Verbal or written communication that threatens, or u nlawfully exposes, any individua l or group to hatred, contempt ,or ridicule,and thereby injures the person, p r operty or repu tat ion of anot her. 23 COMMUNITY COLLEGE Of DENVER 1 3 Sexual harassment, verb a l or written, will not be tolerated 14. Dress that fails to meet established safety or health standards in specific classes and on college-owned or con trolled property or at college-sponsored activities. 15. Possession of weapons, fireworks or explosives. (Weapon s are defined as firearms, knives, explosives, inflammable materials, or any other items that may cause bodily injury or damage to property. ) Student Grievance Procedure CCD has a grievance procedure for students who believe their rights have been violated. If you have a grievance con tact the vice president for Student Services no later than 15 days after the occurrence. The Grievance Proced u r e for Students begin s on page 25 of this catalog. Additio n a l copies are available in the Student Life and Activities Office (Tivoli Student Union room 309) and t h e Office of the Vice President for Student Services (South C lassroom Building, r oom 305). Student Recognition President's Honors Ust -First Honors Students are sel ected for t h e President's Honors List during the semester preceding t h eir graduation from CCD. To be eligible for this academic honor, you must be completing at least 30 semester credit hours in a certificate program or be completing the requirements for one of the four associate degrees. In addition you mus t have a c u mulative grade point average of at least 3.85, based on all courses attempted while enrolled at CCD. Sel ection for the First Honors List is printed on your permanen t academic transcript. Vice President's Honors Ust Second Honors Each semester, students w h o take six or more credits may be considered for the Vice President's Honors list. To be eligible for this academic honor, you must have comp l eted at least 1 5 semester credit hours towa r d a certifica t e or degree program. In a d dition the student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5, based on all courses attempted while enrolled at CCD. You will be notified by mail of this honor Selection for the Second Honors List is printed on you r permanent academic transcript. Dean' s Honors List Each semester, students who take six or more credits may be considered for the Dean's Honors List. To be eligible for this academic honor, you must have comp l eted at least nine semester credit hours in a certificate or degree program. In addition,yo u must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0, based on all courses attempted while enrolled at CCD. You will be notifie d by mail of th i s honor Selection for the Dean's Honors List is printed on your perman ent academic transcript.

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Phi Theta Kappa Phi Theta Kappa, the national scholastic honorary society for two-year community and junior colleges, recognizes student academic excellence at CCD and promotes academic com munity at the college To be eligible for membership in CCD's Alpha Mu Mu Chapter, you must have a 3.5 grade point average after com pleting 12 or more credit hours of college-level work, and carry three or more credit hours during the current academic year. Phi Theta Kappa members are honored at graduation for their outstanding academic achievements Eligible students are invited to join each semester. In spring 1996, Alpha Mu Mu received two internation al Hallmark Awards for Distinguished Chapter and Distinguished Chapter President. We scored in the top one percent of more than 1,200 chapters worldwide, based on how our members fulfilled the four hallmarks of leadership, service, scholarship and fellowship. Alpha Mu Mu also received the 1996 Most Distinguished Chapter in the Colorado Region, capturing three Hallmark Awards for out standing programs in scholarship, leadership and service. In addition, CCD's advisor received the regional Horizon Award for outstanding chapte r advisor. For more information, interested and eligible students should contact any current executive board member or the faculty sponsors by calling 556-4521,556-3848 or 556-2461. Student Rights and Responsibilities CCD students have all the right s and responsibilities of other citizens and are subject to the same federal, state and local laws as non-students As members of the college communi ty, you a lso are subject to th e rules and regulation s of the college. If you believe your rights have been violated you may file a grievance using the Grievance Procedure for Students, which begins on page 25 of this catalog. A detailed copy of "Students' Rights and Responsibilities' is available in the Student Life and Activities Office (Tivoli Student Union, room 309) and the Office of th e Vice President for Student Services (South Classroom Building, room 305). Student Right-to-Know Information Of the 542 first-time full-time, degree-seeking students who entered CCD in the fall of 1993, 34.1 percent either had graduated or transferred to another Colorado public postsecondary institu tion at the end of three academic years (by the end of summer 1996). Another 12.0 percent were enrolled still at CCD in the fall 1996. The overall completion, transfer and persistence rate of 46.1 percent (34.1 percent + 12.0 percent) i s above the statewide community college average of 41.1 percent during the same time period. POLICIES & STANDARDS 24

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The objective of these procedures i s to provide for the prompt, fair and equitable resolution of all student grievances. If you believe your rights or freedoms have been v io lated you are advised to use the grievance procedure. This procedure is not intended to be used when the college takes disciplinary action against a student for vio la tion of the Student Code of Conduct or related student act i o ns. Grievance procedures could apply to college admissions, access to the college, treatment by the college in its edu cational programs, or college activities. Student rights and freedoms include but are not lim i t ed to, such things as discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, disability, religion age and sexual preference, as well as sexual harassment and other provisions of the Students Rights and Responsibilities College Policy. We hope our s tudent s will attempt to resolve problems first through the informal grievance procedure (Step 1 below). If the grievance is not resolved satisfactoril y throug h the informal procedure as detailed in Step 1, students may fil e a formal writte n grievance (Step 2). Petitions for change of grade are limite d to Step 1 Where a student is uncom fortab l e discussing the harassment with the alleged harasser, s/he may satisfy the first step by working directly with the vice president for Student Services. Definitions A. Grievant: Enrolled student, a client o r volunteer who is providing a service to benefit the college under the supervision and control of a college employee. A client or volunteer may only grieve a decision that bans him or h e r from the campus. B. Grievance: A grievable offense i s any alleged action that violates or inequitably applies written college policies or procedures. The grievant must be personally affected by such violation or inequitable acti o n A grievance must be brought to the formal stage w ithin 20 calendar days o f the date the s tud ent knew or reasonably s h ould have known about the action C. Vice President for Student Services: The college emp loy ee designated by the college president to administer student grievances. Grievances alleging discrimination issues may be referred to the employee responsible for ensuring equal opportunity and access. D. Remedy: The rel ief the grievant is requesting. E Respondent(s): Another student, volunteer, client, facul ty member and/o r administrator identified by the grievant as causing or contributing to the grievance. F. Non-grievable matters: The following matters are not gr ievable under this procedure except as noted: matter over which the college i s witho ut authority to act; 2S COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER grades and other academic decisions unless there is an allegation that the decision was motivated by illegal discrimination; and disciplinary actions taken pursuant to BP 4-30. Step 1 -The Informal Grievance Procedur e Grievant is encouraged to resolve the issue with the respondent or his/her supervisor. I n the case of grievances based on one's race, color, creed, national origin or ancestry, disabili ty age or gender the grievant may first contact the college employee responsible for affirmative action to seek informal resolution ofthe issues. Ifthe complaint alleges facts that m ight consti tu t e a violation of SP 3-120a, concerning sexual harassment, the admi nistrator shall investigate and process the comp l aint under that procedure While the grievant is encouraged to resolve the issues through the informal process, he or she may at any time elect to go to the formal stage by following the process outlined below. Step 2 -The Formal Grievance Procedure A. Grievant timely files a written statement of the actions comp lained of and describes the remedy he or she is seeking with the vice president for Student Services. A matter could also be referred to this process by the college president or his/ her designee. Once a written grievance is filed or referred, the vice presi dent for Student Services or designee will determine whether or not the situation states a grievable offense. The matter will be closed if the situation is determ ined not grievable and the grievant will be notified of the reasons. B If the matter is determined to be grievable, the vice president for Student Services or designee (which may be an individual or a committee) shall hear the grievance. A hearing will be held that will give the grievant respondent, and others invite d t o appear, the opportunity to explai n what they know about the issues surrounding the grievance Con s i derin g the oral and written statements and documents th e vice president for Student Services or designee shall issue a decision within 10 cal endar days of close of the hearing. The decision shall be served upon the grievant and the respondent personally or by certified mail to the addresses on file in the Office of Admissions, Registration and Records. The decision shall r eject the grievance or grant the gr ievance and make recommend a tion(s) to resolve the issue(s). The vice president for Student Services or designee's decision is final unless a Petitio n for Review is filed with the president by either party within five (5) calendar days of service of the decision.

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C. Upon receipt of a Petition for Review, the college president will review the record and issue a wr itten decision within 10 calendar days of receipt of the Peti tion for Review. The p resident's decision is final. D. The vice president for Student Services or designee may extend the scheduling timelines described above for good cause. E I f t h e grievance is against the vice president for Student Services, the vice president of Instruction or other person designated by the president shall perform the d uties of the vice p r esident for Student Services. GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE 2 6

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Degree Requirements All degrees and certificates will list the degree o r certificate only, not the emphasis. If you are appl ying for a Community College o f Denver (CCD) degre e program, you must meet all of the following requirements The vice president for Instruction may approve exceptions 1 Complete a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit in approved course work 2 Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 ("C a verage). Courses counting toward the general education core curriculum must be completed with a grade of"C or higher Some programs, as stated in the current catalog, may require a student to earn at least a"C i n specific course work. S tudent s should check with their instruc tional division or advisor for information about the mini mum grade point average requirement. 3. Complete a m i nimum of 15 credit s at CCD in the program area. 4 Complete the Academic Profile, a general education assessment, during your final academic semester. 5 Complete your program's capst one course with a"C or better grade. 6. Complete all courses taken to fulfill general e ducation requireme nt s w ith a "C or better. 7. Complete the required survey of all g r aduating students. General Education Requirements All associate degrees hav e general education requirements that meet goals for general educatio n established by the State Board for Colorado Community Colleges and Occupational Education. They are: 1. to build skills for advanced and lifelong learning 2 to expose s tudents to the mainstream of thought and i nterpretation in the humanities, sciences, mathematics, social sciences, communications and the art s 3. to i ntegrate learning in ways that culti vate a student's broad understanding and abilit y to thin k about a large and complex subject, formulate and analyze vali d concepts, solve problems and clarify values. In addition, the foll owing rationale for the Associate of Art s (A A) and Associate of Science (AS) general education core cur riculum was d eveloped by ANAS faculty and adopted by CCD, the Colorado Community College and Occupational Education System and the Colorado Commission on H i g h e r Education. 27 COMMUNIT Y COLLEGE OF DENVER "General education addresses the needs of all students -regardless of program area, degree sought or major -since all people share certain experiences and have certain life goals that are unrelated t o any specific discipline of s tudy. The core curricu lum is that set of c ourses that satisfy the general education portion of the requirements for an AA, an AS, or an Associate of General Studies (AGS) degree. All courses in the core curriculu m are designed to transfer to baccalaureate, degree-grantin g colleges and universities. Core courses are academicall y rigorous and of such qual ity that transfer students may be assured of their ability to compete successfully o n transfer. "The offering s within the core curriculum are designed to stimulate s tudent s to think deeply, clearly and logically about a variety of human quest ions. These offerings provide a balanced, broadly-based program that will require students to develop critical thinking and proble m-sol ving skills, to analyze, synthesize and communicate information, and to use know ledg e and technology intelligen tly and responsibly. 'These core offerings: expose student s to the mainstreams of t hough t and inte rpretation in humanities, sciences, communications, mathematics social sciences and arts, and develop students' understanding of th e interrelationships among these fields of study. expand s tudents interpersonal inte rcultural and interna tional under standin g and devel op their perceptions of the evolving nature of societies and the interdependence among all peoples. dev elop students skills in self-understanding, oral and written communication numerical calculations and reasoning to help them achieve personal independence. develop students skills in leadership and in group d ynamics. increase students know l edge of the v a lue of physical and environmental w ell-being to help them fulfill their roles as citizens withi n a free and changing society .' Certificate Requirements All CCD certificate program graduates must meet the follow ing requirements The vice president for Instruction may approve exceptions. 1 Complet e the specified requirements o f an approved vocational/technica l program. 2. Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2 0 ('C). Some programs, a s stated i n the current catalog, may require you to earn at least a "C grade in specific course work. Check w ith your instructional division and your advisor

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for inf ormation about the minimum grade point average required for graduat ion. 3. Complete a minimum of 15 credits in the program area at CCD. 4 Complete the capstone course. Graduation Requirements Degrees and certificates will be granted during the semester in which the final requir ements are comp leted. Student s need t o apply for graduation by the deadline date published i n the class schedule. If the deadline dat e is missed, the student will automatically be added to the next semester grad uating class. If you receive an (I) in a course required for graduatio n i n your final semester you will not graduate until the semester in which the (I) is replaced by a letter grade. During that semes ter, you must reappl y for graduat i on. You will not need t o retake the Academic Profile. S tudents must take at least 15 credit hours at CCD to receive a diploma from this institution. Other Graduation Policies 1. You can apply no more than six semester hours of courses numbered "299" (independe nt study course work) toward an associate degree program 2. T here is no limit on special topics courses allowed to count toward a degree. In individua l cases, the limi t is det ermined by the program area. If you take special top i c courses,consult with your advisor s about h ow these credits apply toward a degree. 3. Degrees and certificates will be granted during the semester in which the final requiremen t s are completed. For example, if you receive an ('I") in a course required for graduation in your final semester, you will not graduate until the semester in which the ('I') is replaced by a lette r grade. During that semester, you must reappl y for graduation. You will not need to retake the Academic Profile. Catalog Requirements for Graduation You may graduate under the catalog requirements listed f o r the academic year in which you were first enrolled If you interrupt attendance for one year or more and then return, the catalog of the re-admission year is the document of authority. If graduation requirements and policies change, you may choose to follow the catalog of the year of initial ent r y or the current catalog. Obtain and keep a copy of the catalog published the year in which you e nter or are readmitted. The instructional division or program will deter mine t h e extent to whic h semester credit h ours previo u s l y earned will apply to degree requirements listed in the most current college catalog. The catalog should not be considered a contract between you and CCD. The college retains the right to can cel o r c hange programs or course offerings where enroll ments are insufficient or for any other reason. Every cour s e listed in the catalog may not be offered ever y semester. Petitioning for Waivers and/or Program Substitutions Due to extenuating circumstances, you may wish to pet ition for a waiver and/or substit ut ion of program requirements. You must complete a 'Waiver/Program Substitut ion Request Form.' The form is available i n each instructiona l division offic e Please complete the request and have it approved by the program coord i nator the division dean and the vice president for Instruct ion. The Office of Admissions, Registration and Records will keep the form on file. GRADUATI O N REQU IREMENTS 28

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conti Non-Traditional Learning Programs The Division of Continuing Education extends campus programs into the community and makes l ifelong education and personal develo pmen t available to all who seek it. We offe r college-level courses at times, days and locations con venient for people who cannot enroll in regular on-campus college classes. Continuing Education courses cover the same material as do traditional classes and are offered for the same credit. Guided Independent Study courses require an amount of work from the average student equal to 135 hours for a 3credit course (approx imatin g six-nine hour s of work per week during a 15 week-semester). Guided Independent Study credit hours are based on identical instructional outcomes and objectives as traditional classr oom credit hours and on Community College of Denver's (CCD) existing cur ricula. These courses demand an equal commitment from you as would any class offered on campus. For more i nformation about CCD's Continuing Education programs, contact the Division of Continuing Education, 1391 N. Speer Blvd., Suite 200, Denver, (303) 620-4433. Guided Independent Study: Home Study You study at home or the office for these open-entry/open exit credit courses. You have the semester in which you register and the following 15-week semester to complete course work If you receive financial aid, you have only the semester in which you register to complete course work After registration you will attend an orientation. Instructors are available and course materials wil l explain procedures, assignments and textbook information. Student/instructor contact is by phone, mail and electronic mail (E-mail). See the Schedule of Classes Home Study section for current offerings Guided Independent Study: On-line Courses These credit courses are ident ical to the home-study courses (see above) except that the primary form of communicatio n is via electronic mail (E-mail) and/or the Internet's World Wide Web (VWVW). Students must have access to a com puter and an internet provider. Student accounts are avail able. See the Schedule of Classes On-line Courses section for complete listings. Guided Independent Study: Television Courses Televised credit classes (telecourses) offered through Channel 6 and Channel 54 allow maximum flexibility for the busy, self mot ivated student. Most of the offerings qualify as core courses that can apply toward certificate or degree programs. After registration, you'll attend an orientation. Instructors are available and you'll receive course materials, assignments and textbook information. Student/instructor contac t is by phone, mail and E-mail and optional meetings 29 COMMUNITY COLLEGE Of DENVER See the Schedule of Classes Television Courses section for complete listings. Weekend College Weekend College offers a variety of traditional credit classes on Friday evenings and Saturdays. These courses are offered for students who may not be able to attend classes dur ing the week o r have weekday scheduling conflicts. See the Schedul e of Classes Weekend College section. Extended Campus CCD offe r s Extended Campus courses for c r edit at offcampus locations. Credit courses apply toward certificate or associate degree programs. Business and Industry Services Business and I ndustry meets our business community's training needs through credit and non-credit offerings at the work site or at CCD's training center. Companies may select from current college programs or tailored courses and work shops. Training ranges from basic skills to professional management development. Contact the Business and Industry Services director at the Corporate Training Center, 1391 N Speer Blvd., Suite 200, Denver (303) 620-4433. Computer Consulting and Training Services CCD's state-of-the-art, networked, Pentium-based computer lab offers beginning inte rmediate and advanced computer instruction in an expanding range of software packages, including MS-DOS/PC-DOS, Paradox, WordPerfect, Windows, Excel, Lotus 1-2-3, Quattro Pro, Harvard Graphics, Word, Microsoft Office, Access and Netscape. Call the CIS coordina tor at (303) 620-4433. The Small Business Development Center The Small Business Development Center (SBDC) provides small business owners and would-be entrepreneurs with guidance in small business planning and start-up prepara tion,loan package preparation bid package preparation, contract identification and marketing plan development. SBDC personnel work extenSively with grant writing and funding for small businesses with small business computerized databases and inf ormation networking. The Small Business Development Center is at 1445 Market St., Denver, CO 80202, (303) 620-8076. Work and Family Resource Center The Work and Family Resource Center offers a broad spectrum of services to working families and employers. These include enhanced corporate child care resource and referral. work place needs assessments and employer consultation, parent education seminars, advocacy provider recruitment and sup port services. In addition, we offer a community information and referral telephone counseling service to help citizens find child care. For more infor mation ,call (303) 534-3789.

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Definitions Area of Emphasi s In the Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) Degree programs, the area of emphasis refers to 12 or more credit hours in a subject field in preparation for transfer and selection of a major at a baccalaureate college. Capstone Courses These are courses, usually taken during the final semester, in which program competencies are reviewed and assessed. All courses identified as Capstone courses require a grade of "(' or better for graduation. Capstone courses must be taken at CCD. Contact Hour This is a 50-minute period of classroom o r lab contact between student and instructor. Core Curriculum These are courses that fulfill lower division general education requirements as defined and agreed upon between the State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education and the governing boards of all public four-year i nstitutions in Colorado. Corequisite This is a course or requirement that must be completed dur ing the same semester as the course that identifies the corequisite. Credit Hour This is the basic unit of academic credit. Generally, one-credit hour is earned by attending a lecture class for a 50-minute period, once a week, for a full semester. In a laboratory course, one-credit hour is granted for two t o three 50-minute periods per week in the laboratory. Credit or Contact Hours in Parenthesis Course options from which you may choose. These options are not individually included in the total credit or contact hours listed below the parenthetical numbers. General Education General Education i s the liberal arts compo nent of a baccalaureate degree that may include lower division and upper division courses as defined by each institution. e programs Open Entry This course designation allows the student to start at any time prior to the last date to drop classes published in the Schedule of Classes. The student must complete all course requirements by the end of the semester, regardless of entry date. Open-entry/Open-exi t This course designation allows students to enroll at any time prior to the last date to drop classes and progress at their own learning pace. If the student does not complete course requirements by the end of the semester, an "SP" (Satisfactory Progress) grade will be given and the student may continue in the course the follow ing semester at no additional tuition charge. Prerequisite This is a required course that must be completed satisfactorily before registering for the course that identifies that prerequisite. Speech Intensive Courses Associate of Applied Science "Speech Intensive" courses combine the requirements of SPE 11 S with the content of vocational classes. Students who transfer a course from another college that is noted as 'speech intensive at CCD may meet the SPE 115 requirements only by taking SPE 115 as a separate course. READING GUIDE TO DEGREE & CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 30

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Program Titles and Course Prefixes Philosop h y ...... ..... .. ........................... . . PHI P hotog raphy ..... .. ....... . . ........... .......... PHO A c counting .................. . .. . .... . . .. .... ACC Physics .. . .. . . . ................ .. . ............. PHY Administrati v e Health Assistant .. . . .... . . . ...... AHA P olitical Science .............................. ........ .POS Anthropology . .. ............ .. .. .... . .. ..... .... ANT Postal Ser v ice . . .. ...... . . . . ...... ..... .PS T A ppliance R epai r Technology ..... ....... ........ APT Psychiatric Tec h nician. . . . . . . .............. .LPT Art ................. . .. ................ . ..... .... ART Psych ology ................ . . ....... .. ............ .PSY American S ign Language . .. . ............... ..... . ASL Radiograp h y . ........ .. .............. . . ......... RTR Arabic ............... . .... . ..... ........... . . ARB Reading .............................................. REA A s tr o nomy .................. . . ..... .. .... .. ...... AST Real Estate (Emily Griffith O pp ortunity Sch ool) ..... . ... REE Biology . .. . . .. ............. . .. .. ....... . . . BIO Recreational Assistant ....................... . .... RAE Business Admi nistration . .. .... ..... .. ......... .... BUS Ref r i g e r atio n Heati n g and Air Con ditio ning Business Technology: Office Management and (Commercial-Indu s trial ) .. ....... RAC Secretarial S tudies ............ ...... ..... .. ...... .. BTE Sci e n c e .. .. ....... .. ..... .. .sCI Business ofTravel and Tourism .......... .. . . ......... BIT Sociology .. ................. .. ......... .. SOC Chemis try .. . .. .............. . ...... ....... .. .... CHE S panish ................................ . . ........ .sPA Chinese . ...... .. . ...... ......... . .......... . . CHN S pecial Learning Supp o rt Program .................... .sLS Commerc ial Credit Management . . .. . . ........... CRM S peech . ................ ..... .. ..... . .. .... . . .sPE C o mmunica tio n s ....... .. . . .. . ...... ............ COM S urgical Technolo g y .................................. .sTE C o mputer A i ded Drafting .. . . ........ .. ...... . .. CAD Technical Health Assi stant .. . ..................... . . THA Computer Information Systems . ........ .......... .... ClS Theatre ..................... .. . . . ....... . ........ .TH E Compute r Science . .. ...... .. .. ....... ............. CSC W elding a n d F abrication .. .... . . ....... ..... ..... WEF Dental Hygiene .. ..... . ..... . .. . . . .. ........... DEH Drafting for Industry .. . .. .. .. .. ........ ....... .... DRI E arly Childh oo d Education ........ ....... . . .. . .. ECE E c onomic s . ......................................... ECO Education . .. . ........ .... ........ . . ........ . EDU Electronic s Tec hnology .. . ............... ..... ....... ELT English ........ ..... ......... . . . ..... . .......... ENG English as a S e c ond Language . .. .... . ........ .. .. ESL French . . ...... ......... .... . . . ...... .... ...... FRE General Education Development ....... . ..... . . GED Geography .... .................. . . ....... .. . . ... GEO Geology .. .. ........ .. ......... ..... ...... . .. . GEY G e rontolog y .... ..... . ................ .... .. . .. . GNT Gra phic Arts . .. . .......... ........ ..... .. .......... GRA Graphic Design ..... .......... . .. .............. . GRD Health and W ell ness Management .... .... .... ...... HWM Health Occupat ions .. . . . ..... .. . . .. ...... . .. HOC H istory .. . . . ..... .. . .......... . ... ... . . .... ... HIS Human S ervices ............ . . . . . ......... ........ HSE H u manitie s ......... .. . . . . . .... . ....... .. .. HUM Japanes e ......... ............... . .. ............... JPN Journalism ....... . .. . .. . .... ....... . .......... JOU Literature ... ..... . .. . .. . .. . . .................. . LlT Machin e and CNC Tool Operator ...... .......... .. .. MTO Magnetic Resonance Imaging ...... ...... ........... MRI Mammograph y . . .. .. . ........... ..... . .. . ..... MAM Mathemat i c s . ..................................... MAT Multimed i a Design .. ........ . .. .. . .. ...... . . .. MUM Music . .. .... .... .. .. . ........... . . .. .. ...... MUS Nuclear Medicine Technology .. ....... .... . .......... NMT Nursing ................ . ...... . ........... .. . NUR Nut r ition .. ............... .... ........ ..... .. . . .. NUT Para l egal . .. ........ . .. . ....... ..... .. ........... PAR Personal Growt h and Development . .... . . . . .. . PGD 31 COMMUNITY C OLLEG E O F DENVE R

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. & aSSOUa t e ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE University Parallel, Transfer Program An Associate of Arts (AA) degree provides a learning foundation in communications, social science, arts or humanities. Some students work toward the Associate of Arts degree for purposes of personal enrichment. Many others plan to transfer to four-year colleges and universities to continue their work toward baccalaureate degrees and pre professional training in such fields as law, education the arts and social sciences. The Associate of Arts degree is sometimes referred to as a "university parallel" or "transfer" degree. The general education cor e r equirements, when completed at CCD, meet the lower division general education requirements of all public baccalaureate colleges and universities in the state of Colorado. Students graduating with the AA degree may transfer into liberal arts p rograms in all public baccalaureate colleges and universities with junior standing. Courses to be counted toward the general educatio n core curriculum must be completed with a grade of C or higher. Students planning to transfer shou l d familiarize themselves with the full requirements of the school they plan to attend. Thes e are available in the Transfer Center in South Classroom B u ilding, room 134. Student Performance Objectives for Transfer Education (AA Degree) 1 Students will plan and write well-structured compositions demon strating the writing capabilitie s to express, inform, analyze, evaluate, persuade, argue, conduct research, and use primary and secondary sources logically and stylistically. 2 Students will compose and deliver oral presentations providing ideas and information and using delivery skills suitable to the topic purpose and audience. Students will demonstrate an under standing of speeches and be able to evaluate speeches. 3 Students will read and think critically about a variety of interd isci plinary topics demonstrating college-level reading skills in a variety of d isciplines, includ ing humanities, social sciences and the natural sciences. 4. Students will demonst rate orally and in w ritin g the critical-t h i nking skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation. 5. Students will analyze and use numerical data and qualitative reasoning skills, including applying proper formulas to mathematical data and calculating results, illustrating quantitative data graphically, rearranging general formulas to solve for any term, and inter preting graphic data and assessing the importance of the portrayed t rends. AA Degree Program Entry Students must apply for entry to the Associate of Arts degree program Students are encouraged to apply to a program by the time t hey have completed 1 2 credits of 100-level courses. At the time of application, students are encouraged to i dentify an area of emphasis. Program application forms a r e in South Classroom Building room 134, and division offices. Students should obtain an AdviSing Transcript from the registrar's office and attach it to the program application. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or bett e r ; b reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better. 2. Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature AA Degree Program Requirements Within the AA degree, the college offers 1 2 possible areas of emphasis: Art Behavioral Sciences, Communications, Economics, English/ literature, History, Humanities /Philosophy, Music, Photo graphy P o l i tical Sciences, Speech or Theatre.The same course may not count to ward both general education requirements and an area of emphasis. A n area of emphasis consists of four identified courses in one academic area. If student s do not sel ect an area o f emphasis or have fewer than 60 credit hours with their core courses and area of emphasis, the y should take transfer electives as needed to comp lete the 60 cre d it hours required for the Associate of Arts degree. Up to 3 credit s of physical education may apply toward this degree. All general education core and capstone courses must be completed with a C or b e tt e r All graduates of the Associate of Arts (AA) degree mus t meet the following program requirements. General Education Core Credit Hours I. English 6 E N G 121,ENG 122 II. Speech 3 SPE 115 III. Mathematics 3-5 (Select any 1 of the f ollowing) MAT 121, 125, 135,201,202 IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 4-5 (Select any 1 of the follow ing) AST 101,102 BIO 105,111,112 CHE 101,102,111,112 PHY 105, 111,112,211,212 GEYll1,121 ASSO C IATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 32

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V. Social & Behavi o r a l Sciences (Select 9 credit hour s from a minimum of 2 disciplines ) ANT 101, 111 ECO 201,202 GEO 105 HIS 101,102,2 01,20 2 POS 105,111 PSY 101,102 SOC 101,102 VI. Humanities (Select 9 credit hour s from a minimum of 2 disciplines.) ART 110, 111, 112 HUM 121, 122,123 Any foreign language 111 or higher LIT 115,201,202 MUS 120, 1 2 1 ,122 PH1111, 112, 113 THE 105,211,212 General Education Sub-Total Area of Emphasis ( Optional) 9 9 3437 and/or e lectives (Must include a minimum of 6 credit hours in 200-level courses. ) Sub-Total Capstone Course HUM 285 Seminar in Critical Thinking or SCI 285 Critical Thinking Total Hours Approved Electives for the AA Degree ANT all courses ART all courses AST all courses BIO 105 and higher CHE 101 and higher COM all courses CIS 118 CSC 150,230 ECO 201 and higher ENG 121 and higher Any foreign language 111 or higher GEO all courses GEY all courses HIS all courses HUM all courses JOU all courses LIT all courses MAT 121 and higher 33 COMMUNITY COLLEGE Of DENVER 20-23 3 60 MUS all courses PER all courses PHI all courses PHY all courses POS all courses PSY 101 and highe r REA 151,223 (approved by MSCD only) SOC all courses SPE all courses THE all courses Courses in any prefix whose numbers begin with will not meet requirements for the AA degree. English and math courses with num bers below 121 will not meet requirements for the AA degree. Credit and Contact Hours C r e dits are the hours of credit awarded to the course. An Associate degree requires a minimum of 60 credits. Contacts are th e in-class contact hours required for the course. Credit o r contact hours in parenthesis, e.g., (3), are options from which students may choose. They a lso may be course-embedde d cont ent.They are not included in the total c redit or c ontact hours listed below An average full-time student course load is 15 credit hours. An Associate of Arts degree takes four semesters of 15 credits each semester, assuming that all courses taken count toward the degree. AA Degree Areas of Emphasis ART EMPHASIS Credits Contacts ART 122 Drawing II/Mixed Media 3 90 (Prerequ isite ART 121, Drawing I) ART 131 Design I 3 90 ART 211 Painting I 3 90 ART 212 Painting II 3 90 Total 12 360 The following may be taken as Art elect ives: ART 132 Design II (3) (90) ART 151 Fundamentals of (3) (90) Black & White Photography GRD 100 Lettering & Typographic Design (3) (90) MUM 101 Intro to Multimedia (3) (68) ART 213 Painting III (3) (90) ART 214 Painting IV ( 3 ) (90) ART 231 Watercolor I (3) (90) ART 232 Watercolor II ART 270 Figure Drawing I ART 290 Special Topics (1-3) (15-45) (wit h instructor consent) HUM 285 Seminar in Critical Thinking (Capstone) (3) (45)

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BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES EMPHASIS Select four courses from one option, or from among the three options listed below. At least three must be 200-level courses : Gerontology Emphasis GNT 201 Intro. t o Gerontology GNT 213 Psych ology of Ag ing GNT 214 GNT 215 GNT 221 GNT 237 GNT 297 The Social Aspe cts of Aging Aging in a Diverse Society Services & Resource s of the Agi ng Death & Dying Leadership Developmen t P s ychology Emphasis PSY 101 General Psychology I PSY 102 General Psycholo g y II PSY 227 Psychology of Death & Dyi ng PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Developmen t PSY 249 Abnormal Psychology PSY 295 Leadership Development Sociology Emphasis SOC 101 Intro. to Socio logy SOC 102 Intro. to Socio logy II SOC 205 Sociology of Marriage & Family SOC 215 SOC 220 SOC 237 SOC 260 Contempor a r y Social Prob lems Race, Gende r Class, Culture Death & Dying Sociology of Deviance Total COMMUNICATIONS EMPHASIS SPE 125 Int erpersonal Communication COM 126 Intro. to Mass Media or JOU 106 Fundamentals of Reporting COM 251 I ntro. to Televis ion Production COM 255 S urvey of Film Total ECONOMICS EMPHASIS ECO 105 Intro. to Economics ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics ECO 202 Principles of Micr o Economics Total ENGLISH/LITERATURE EMPHASIS Select 4 courses at least 2 of which are ENG: ENG 131 Intro. to Technical Wr i ting I or ENG 132 Technical Writing II ENG 221 C reative Writing I ENG 227 Poetry Writing LIT 115 Intro to Literature LIT 201 Masterpieces of Literature I Total Credits (3) (3) ( 3 ) (3) (3) (3) (3) ( 3 ) ( 3 ) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 12 Credits 3 3 3 3 12 Credits 3 3 3 9 C r edits 12 (3) (3) ( 3 ) (3) (3) (3) 12 Contacts (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) 180 Contacts 45 45 45 45 180 Contact s 45 45 45 135 Contact s 180 (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) 180 HISTORY EMPHASIS Select 4 courses from the followin g : HIS 101 Western Civilization I HIS 1 02 Western Civilization II HIS 201 United S tates H istory I HIS 202 United S tate s H istory II HIS 225 Colo rado History Total HUMANITIES / PHILOSOPHY EMPHASIS PHI 111 Intro. to Philosoph y Select 1 course from the following: HUM 1 2 1 S ur vey o f Humanitie s I HUM 122 Sur vey of Humanities II HUM 123 S urvey of Human ities III Select 2 courses from the following: PHI 112 Ethics PHI 113 Log ic PHI 115 Myth & Religion PHI 250 Topics in Philosophy HUM 116 HUM 121 HUM 122 HUM 123 HUM 185 HUM 225 HUM 250 Intro. to African-American Studies S ur vey of Hum anities I S urvey of Hum anities II S ur vey of Human ities III Cultura l Diversit y i n the Humanitie s Contemporar y Chicano S tudie s Topics in Human ities Total MUSIC EMPHASIS MUS 101 Music Theory I MUS 1 02 Music Theory II MUS 142 Priv ate Instruction (Voice) Select 1 course from the following: MUS 120 Music Appr eciation MUS 121 S urve y of Music History I MUS 122 Survey of Music History II Total PHOTOGRAPHY EMPHASIS ART 151 Fundamentals of Photography ART 153 Fundamentals of Color Photography Credits 12 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 12 Credits 3 3 (3) (3) (3) 6 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 12 Credits 3 3 3 (3) (3) (3) 12 Credits 3 3 Contacts 180 (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) 180 Contacts 45 45 (45) (45) (45) 90 (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) 180 Contacts 45 45 30 45 (45) (45) (45) 195 Contacts 90 90 Students wishing to take the entire sequence of HUM 121, HUM 122, and HUM 1 2 3 may do 50. These three courses also are listed in the third grouping. ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 34

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Select a total of 6 credits from the follow ing: 6 135 180 ART 157 History of Photography (3) (45) ART 154 Intermediate Color Photography (3) (90) ART 152 Intermediate Black & White (3) (90) Photography ART 253 View Camera Technique (3) (90) ART 255 Points of View (Special Topics) (3) (90) (Workshop at selected locations ) Tot a l 12 315 360 POLITICAL SCIENCE EMPHASIS Credits Contacts POS 105 Intro. to Political Science 3 45 POS 111 American Government 3 45 POS 125 American State & 3 45 Local Government POS 205 International Relations 3 45 Total 12 180 SPEECH EMPHASIS Credits Contacts SPE 125 Interpersonal Communication 3 45 SPE 205 Voice & Diction 3 45 SPE 216 Principles of Speech Communication II 3 45 SPE 219 Group Dynamics 3 45 Total 1 2 180 THEATRE EMPHASIS Credits Contacts THE 111 Acting I 3 45 THE 112 Acting II 3 45 Select 2 courses from the following: 6 90 THE 105 Intro to Theatre Arts (3) (45) THE 211 Development ofTheatre I (3) (45) THE 212 Development of Theatre II (3) (45) Tot a l 12 180 ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE University Parallel, Transfer Program The Associate of Science (AS) degree provides a learning foundation in mathematics and the sciences. Althoug h some student s work toward the Associate of Science degree for personal enrichment, many plan to transfer to four-year colleges and universities to continue work toward a baccalaureate degree and professional training in such fields as engi neering, medicine, biology, chemistry and phYSics. The Associate of Science degree is sometimes referred to as a uni versity parallel" or "transfer" degree. The general education core require ments, when completed at CCD, meet the lower division general educa tion requirement s of all public Colorado baccalaureate colleges and universities in the state of Colorado. Students graduating with the AS degree may transfer into liberal arts or sciences programs in all Colorado public baccalaureate colleges and universities with junior standing. Courses to be counted toward the general education core curriculum must be completed with a grade of"Cor higher Students planning to transfer should familiarize themselves with the full require ments of the school they plan to attend These are available in the Transfer Center in South Classroom Building room 134. 35 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Student Performance Objectives for Transfer Education (AS Degree) l. Students will plan and write well-structured composit ions demonstrating the writing capabil ities to express, inform, analyze, evaluate, persuade, argue, conduct research, and use primary and secondary sources logically and stylistically. 2. Students will compose and deliver oral presentations prov i ding ideas and information, and using delivery skills suitable to the topic purpose and audience. Students will demonstrate an understanding of others' speeches and be able to evaluate others' speeches. 3. Students will read and think critically about a vari ety of interdisciplinary topics, demonstrating college-level reading skills in a variety of disciplines, including humanities social sciences and the natural sciences. 4 Students will demonstrate orally and in writing the critical-thinking skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation 5 Students wil l analyze and use numerical data and qualitative rea-soning skills including applying proper formulas to mathematical data and calcul ating results, illustrating quantitative data graphical-Iy, rearranging general formulas to solve for any term, and interpret-ing graphic data and assessing the importance of the portrayed trends. AS Degree Program Entry S tudent s must appl y for entry into the Associate of Science degree program. Students are encouraged to apply to a program by the time they have comp leted 12 credits of 100-level courses. At the time of application students are encouraged to identify an area of emphasis. Program application forms are in SO 134 and SO 306. Students should obtain an Advising Transcript from the Registrar's Office and attach it to the program application. To comp lete the program application the student will need to meet with a designated advisor for his or her probable emphasis area. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English a t level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 o r completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level 3 or comp l etion of MAT 105 with a C or better. 2. Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature. AS Degree Program Requirements Within the Associate of Science degree, the college offers eight areas of emphasis: B iology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Science, Mathematics, Medical Cluster, Pre-Engineering Cluster and Physics.The same course may not count both toward general education require ments and toward an area of emphasis. If students do not select an area of emphasis or have fewer than 60 credit hours with their core courses and area of emphasis, they should take transfer electives as needed to comp lete the 60 credit hours required for the Associate of Science degree. Up to three credits of physical education may count

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toward this degree. All general education core and capstone courses Approved Electives for the AS Degree must be completed with a C or better. All graduates of the Associate of An a rea of emphasis consists of four identified courses in one academic Science (AS) degree must meet the following program requirements. area. Students who do not select an area of emphasis or who have fewer than 60 credit hour s with their core courses and thei r area of General Educat i on Core English ENG 1 2 1 ,122 II. Speech SPE 115 III. Mathematics (any 1 of the following) MAT 121, 125,201,202 IV. Physical & Biological Sciences (any 2 of the following) AST 101,102 BIO 111,112 CHE 111,112 GEY 111, 121 PHY 111, 112,211,212 V. Social & Behavioral Sciences (6 credit hours from 2 disciplines) ANT 101, 111 ECO 201,202 GEO 105 HIS 101,102,20 1 ,202 POS 105,111 PSY 101,102 SOC 101,102 VI. Humanities (any 2 of the following) ART 110, 111, 112 HUM 121,122,123 Any foreign language 111 or higher LIT 115,201,202 MUS 120,121,122 PHI 111, 112, 113 THE 105,211,212 General Education Sub Total Area of Emphasis (Optional) and/or electives Contact Hours 6 3 4-5 8-10 6 6 3336 21-24 (12 credits must be in science or math prefixes,6 credits must be in 200-level courses) Capstone Course HUM 285 Seminar in Critical Thinking or SCI 285 Critical Thinking Total 3 60 emphasis should take general electives as needed to complete the 60 credit hours required for the Associate of Science degree. Approved Electives for the AS Degree ANT all courses ART all courses AST all courses BIO 111 and higher CHE 111 and higher COM all courses CIS 118 CSC 150,230 ECO 201 and higher ENG 121 and higher Any foreign language 111 or higher GEO all courses GEY all courses HIS all courses HUM all courses JOU all courses LIT all courses MAT 121 and higher MUS all courses PER all courses PHI all courses PHY 111 and higher POS all courses PSY 101 and higher REA 151,223 (approved by MSCD only) SOC all courses SPE all courses THE all courses Any course whose number begins with a "0' in any prefix will not meet requirements for the AS degree. English and mathematics courses must be numbered 121 or above. Credit and Contact Hours Credits are the hours of credit awarded to the course. An Associate degree requires a mini mum of 60 credits. Contacts are the i n-class con tact hours required for the course. Credit or contact hours in parenthe sis, e g., (3) are op tions from which students may choose. They also may be course-embedded content.They are not included in the total credit or contact hours listed bel ow An average full time student course load is 15 credit hours. An Associate of Science degree takes four semesters of 15 credits each semester assuming that all courses taken count toward the degree. A SSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 36

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Areas of Emphasi s for the AS Degree Students should complete the courses listed under the emphasi s area i f plann ing to transfer to a four-year degree program i n one o f these emphasi s areas, or planning to enter a professional school i n an area listed. An associate degree can be earned without completing an emphasi s area, and associate degree requirements may be fulfilled before all the courses listed under an are a of emphasis have been com pleted Any courses comp leted beyond those required for an associate degree can be applie d to a four-year d egree program Courses shown In bold under the emphasis area meet core requirements. Students must comp lete a total of 60 semester hours for the associate degree. Of these, 21-24 must be from courses listed below having science or math prefixes and not used to fulfill the core requirements. Requ irements in four-year or profess ional programs sometimes change yearly. We recommend students speak frequently with the appropr iate advisor i n the Divis ion of Science and Technology (SO 306) whil e com pleting degree requirements BIOLOGY EMPHASIS BIO 111 BIO 112 CHE 111 CHE 112 MAT 121 MAT 122 PHY 111 PHY 112 General College Biology I General College Biology II General College Chemistry I General College Chemistry II College Algebra T r igo nometr y Physics: Algebra-Based I Physics: Algebra-Based II Total CHEMISTRY EMPHASIS CHE 11 1 CHE 112 MAT 121 MAT 122 MAT 201 MAT 202 PHY 11 1 PHY 112 General College Chemistry I General College Chemistry II College Algebra Trigonometr y Calculus I Calculus" Physics: Algebra-Based I Physics: Algebra-Based II Total COMPUTER SCIENCE EMPHASIS C I S 1 1 8 Int ro. t o C o mputer s CSC 150 PASCAL Programming CSC 230 C++ Programming I MAT 121 College Algebra MAT 122 T r igo nometr y MAT 1 3 5 Int ro. t o S tatistics MAT 201 Calculus I MAT 202 PHY 211 PHY 212 Calculus II Physics: Calculus-Based I Physics: Calculus-Based II Total Recommended: CHE 1 1 1 Gen eral Colle g e Chemistr y I 37 COMMU NITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Credits 5 5 5 5 4 3 5 5 37 Credit s 5 5 4 3 5 5 5 5 37 Credit s 4 3 3 4 3 3 5 5 5 5 40 5 Contacts 90 90 lOS lOS 60 45 105 lOS 705 Contacts lOS lOS 60 45 75 75 lOS lOS 675 Contacts 68 4 5 4 5 60 45 45 75 7 5 lOS lOS 668 lOS EARTH SCIENCE EMPHASIS BIO 112 General College Biology II GEY 111 Physical Geology GEO 105 Geography BIO 118 Human Ecology & th e Envi ronme nt or GEO 200 Human Ecology or GEY 225 Planet Earth Total ENGINEERING CLUSTER PRE-ENGINEERING GENERAL EMPHA51S MAT 201 MAT 202 MAT 203 Calculus I Calculus II Calculus III MAT 3 191 Applied Linear Algebra (CU-Denver ) MAT 3200 Elementary D i fferential Equations (CU-Denver) CHE 1 1 1 General College Chemistry I PHY 211 Physics: Calculus-Based I PHY 212 Physics: Calculus-Based II Total Also required for Applied Mathematics majors: CSC 150 PASCAL Programming ENG R 1025 Engineering Graphics/CAD (CU-Denver ) Also required for Computer Science majors: CSC 150 PASCA L Progra m m ing CSC 2 4 2 1 Data Structures & Program Design (CU-Denver) CSC 1510 Logic Design (CU-Denver) Also required for Electrical Engineering majors: CSC 150 PASCAL Pro gramming CSC 1510 Logic Design (CU -Denver) M E 2023 Statics (CU-Denver) M E 2033 Dynamics (CU-Denver) Also required for Civil Engineering majors: GEY 1 1 1 P h ysic a l Geolog y CSC 1 100 Compu ting w i t h FORTRAN (CU -Denver) ENGR 1025 E ngin eering Graphics/CAD (CU Denver ) C E 2121 Analytical Mechanics I ( C U-Denver) Also required for Mechanical Engineering majors: CSC 1100 Comput ing wit h FORTRAN (CU D e nver ) ENGR 1025 Enginee r i n g Graphics/CAD (CU-Denver ) ME 2023 Statics (CU-Denver) M E 2033 Dynamics (CU-Denver) Credits (5) (4) (3) (3) (3) 13-14 Credits 5 5 4 3 3 5 5 5 35 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Contacts (90) (60) (45) (45) (45) 19S-225 Contacts 75 75 60 45 45 105 lOS 105 615 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 60 45 45 45 45 45 45 45

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MATHEMATICS EMPHASIS MAT 121 College Algebra MAT 122 Trigonometry MAT 135 MAT 201 MAT 202 MAT 2 0 3 MAT 265 Intro. to Statistics Calculus I Calculus II Calculus III Ordinary Differ ent i a l Equations Total MEDICAL ClUSTER PRE-DENTAL EMPHASIS BIO 111 General College Biology I BIO 112 General College Biology II CHE 111 CHE 112 MAT 121 MAT 122 PHY 111 PHY 112 General College Chemistry I General College Chemistry II College Algebra Trigonometry Physics: Algebra-Based I Physics: Algebra-Based II Total PRE-MEDICAL EMPHASIS BIO 111 General College Biology I BIO 112 General College Biology II CHE 111 General College Chemistry I CHE 112 General College Chemistry II MAT 121 College Algebra MAT 122 Trigonometry PHY 111 Physics : Algebra-Based I PHY 112 Physics: Algebra-Based II Select 2 courses from the following : LIT 11 S Intro. to Literature LIT 201 Masterpieces of Literature I LIT 202 Masterpieces of Literature II Total PRE-MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY EMPHASIS BIO 201 Anatomy & Physiology I BIO 205 CHE 111 CHE 112 MAT 121 MAT 122 MAT 135 PHY 111 PHY 112 Microbiology General College Chemistry I General College Chemistry II College Algebra Trigonometry Intro to Statistics Physics: Algebra-Based I Physics: Algebra-Based II Total PRE-PHARMACY EMPHASIS BIO 111 BIO 112 BIO 215 CHE 111 CHE 112 MAT 121 General College Biology I General College Biology II Microbiology General College Chemistry I General College Chemistry II College Algebra Credits 4 3 3 5 5 4 3 27 Credits 5 5 5 5 4 3 5 5 37 Credits 5 5 5 5 4 3 5 5 6 (3) (3) (3) 43 Credits 4 4 5 5 4 3 3 5 5 38 Credits 5 5 4 5 5 4 Contacts 60 45 45 75 75 60 45 40S Contacts 90 90 lOS lOS 60 45 lOS lOS 705 Contacts 90 90 lOS lOS 60 45 lOS lOS 90 (45) (45) (45) 795 Contacts 75 75 105 lOS 60 45 45 lOS lOS 720 Contacts 90 90 75 lOS lOS 60 MAT 122 Tri gonometry MAT 201 Calculus I Select 2 courses from the following: ANT 101 Cultural Anthropology HIS 101 Western Civilization I HIS 102 Western Civilization II HIS 201 United States History I HIS 202 PSY 101 PSY 102 SOC 101 SOC 102 United States History II General Psychology I General Psychology II Intro. to Sociology I Intra to Sociology II Total PRE-PHYSICAL EMPHASIS BIO 111 BIO 112 BIO 201 CHE 11 1 CHE 112 MAT 121 MAT 122 General College Biology I General College Biology II Anatomy & Physiology I General College Chemistry I General College Chemistry II College Algebra Trigonometry MAT 135 Intro. to Statistics PHY 111 Physics: Algebra-Based I PHY 112 Physics: Algebra-Based II Select 2 courses from the following: PSY 101 General Psychology I PSY 102 General Psychology II PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Development PSY 249 Abnormal Psychology Total PRE-PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT EMPHASIS BIO 111 General College Biology I BIO 112 General College Biology II CHE 111 General College Chemistry I CHE 112 MAT 121 MAT 135 PSY 101 PSY 102 General College Chemistry II College Algebra Intro. to Statistics General Psychology I General Psychology II Total PRE-VETERINARIAN SCIENCE EMPHASIS BIO 1 1 1 General College Biology I BIO 1 12 General College Biology II CHE 111 General College Chemistry I CHE 112 MAT 121 MAT 122 MAT 135 PHY 111 General College Chemistry II College Algebra Tri gonometry Intro to S tatistics Physics : Algebra -Based I Total 3 5 6 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 42 Credits 5 5 4 5 5 4 3 3 5 5 6 (3) (3) (3) (3) 50 Credits 5 5 5 5 4 3 3 3 33 Credits 5 5 5 5 4 3 3 5 35 45 75 90 (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) 735 Contacts 90 90 75 lOS lOS 60 45 45 105 lOS 90 (45) (45) (45) (45) 915 Contacts 90 90 lOS lOS 60 45 45 45 585 Contacts 90 90 lOS lOS 60 45 45 lOS 645 ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 38

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PHYSICS EMPHASIS Credits Contacts MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60 MAT 122 Trigonometry 3 45 MAT 201 Calculus I 5 75 MAT 202 Calculus II 5 75 PHY 211 Physics: Calculus-Based I 5 105 PHY 212 Physics: Calculus-Based II 5 105 Total 20 40S ASSOCIATE OF GENERAL STUDIES DEGREE CCD offers two types of Associate of General Studies degrees. Both r e quir e the lower division core gener a l education courses that transfer to all majors at all state baccalaureate colleges and unive rsities. Only grades of C or bette r are acceptable for the core general education requirements Up to three credits of physical education may apply toward this degree. 1. The Associate of General Studies-Generalist Degree (AGS-G). In addition to the general education core requirements, the degree allows students to self-select 23 credits of transfer and/or career courses. The general education core courses fully meet the general education requirements of all baccalaureate schools. Transferability of the career courses is not guaranteed. If students select this option, they should request and consult with a faculty advisor. Students are strongly encouraged to develop specific career goals and to transfer to the CCD degree program appropriate to those goals. Entry requirements: the AGS-G degree is the only degree that does not require application for program entry. All CCD certificate and degree-seeking students a r e classified as Associate of General Studies-Generalist students until they apply and are accepted into a nother certificate or degree program. Any CCD career/vocational course from any CCD campus may count as an elective for the AGS-Generalist degree. All students who pursue thi s degree plan s h ould be assigned to a faculty advisor after com pleting 12 semester hours. Program Admission Requirements None 2. All other Associate of General Studies (AGS) Degrees. Most AGS degrees (with the exception of the AGS-G degree) are th e result of a rticulation agreement s and provide a transfer option for s tudents in vocational programs. The career courses are fully transferable only into the particula r program and college identified by the articulation agreement. Consult with a fac ulty advisor. Entry requirements: students must apply for entry. Students are encouraged to apply to a program by the time they have com pleted 12 credits of l00-level courses. At the time of application, students must identify which Associate of General S tudies degree program they desire to enter. Program application forms are in South Classroom Building room 134, and appropriate division offices. Entry requir ements are the same as for the matching AAS degree. 39 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Program Admission Requirements See individua l a r ticulated degree op tions. Credit and Contact Hours C redits are the hour s of credit awarded to the course. An Associate degree requires a minimum of 60 credits. Contacts are the in-class contact hours required for the course. Credit or contact hour s in parenthe sis, e.g., (3) are options from which students may choose. They also may b e course-embedded content.They are not included in the total credit or contact hours listed below. An average full-time student course load is 15 credit hours. An Associate of General Studies degree of 60 credit hours takes four semesters of 15 c redits each semester assuming that all courses count toward the degree. AGS degrees of more than 60 credit hour s may take more than four semesters to complete AGS Degree Program Requirements All AGS degrees require the following: General Education Core Courses Electives or Courses Prescribed by Articulation Agreements Capstone Course Credit Hours 34-37 20-23 3 Total 60 Courses to be counted toward the core General Education requirement must be comp leted with a grade of"(" or better. ASSOCIATE OF GENERAL STUDIES-GENERALIST DEGREE (AGS-G) All CCD certificate and degree-seeking students are classified as Associate of General Studies-Generalist students until they apply and are accepted into another certifica t e or degree program. Students remain in the AGS-G program if they want to comp lete a broad program of both career and transfer courses without the constraints of specialization. The AGS-G general education core curriculum transfers to and fully meets the l ower division general education requirements of all public baccalaureate colleges and universities in Colorado Transferability of AGS-G career courses depends upon the courses taken and the receiving institution Students s hou l d see their advisors. All students who have completed 12 college-level credits should see a faculty advisor in their area of inte rest. Students may take either t h e Associate of Arts (AA) core curricu lum or the Associate of Science (AS) core curriculum The AA core follow s

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General Education AA Core English Credits H o urs ENG 121,ENG 122 II. Speech SPE 115 III. Mathematics (any 1 of the following) MAT 121, 125, 135,2 0 1 ,2 0 2 IV. Physical & B i ological Sciences (any 7 of the following) AST 101, 102 BIO 105,111,112 CHE 101,102,111,112 PHY 105,111,112 211,2 1 2 GEY 1 11, 121 V. Social & Behavioral Science s (Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.) ANT 101, 111 ECO 201,202 GEO 105 HIS 101,1 02,201,202 pas 105,111 PSY 101, 102 SOC 101 ,102 VI. Humanities* (Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.) ART 110,111,112 HUM 121,122,123 Any foreign language 1 1 1 or higher LIT 115,201,202 MUS 120,121,122 PHI 111, 112, 113 THE 105,211,212 6 3 3-5 4-5 9 9 Many four-year schools p refer a concentration of 2 classes in same prefix. General Education Sub-Total Elective SubTotal (Must include a minimum of 6 hours in 2OG-level courses.) Capstone Course HUM 285 Seminar in Critical Thinking or SCI 285 Crit ical Thinking Total 34-37 20-23 3 60 Any course whose number begins with '0' in any prefix will not meet requirements for the AGS-G degree. English and mathematics courses numbered before the core general education courses will not meet requirements for the AGS-G All general education and capstone courses must be completed with a 'C or berter for all AGS degrees. ASSOCIATE OF GENERAL STUDIES ARTICULATED DEGREES Associate of General Studies Degree BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (AGS-BUS) This is a business transfer agreement between Colorado public commu nity colleges and Colorado public four -year institutions of higher educatio n I n accordance with HB 85-1187 and SB 93-136, the Schools of Business agree to the following policies and conditions governing the transfer of credit earned at a Colorado community college into a business p rogram offered at any of the Colorado public four-year colleges and universities participating Community college students who completed the Colorado com munity college core curriculum as certified on their com munity college t ranscript, are considered to have satisfied the college's lower division general education requirements. The f ollowing courses r epresent the CCD/Colorado Commission on Higher Education transfer agreement in business. Students completing these courses will be admitted as jun iors in the Colorado publi c four-year colleges and universities participating in this agreement (Adams State College, Colorado State University, Ft. Lewis College, Mesa State College, Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD), University o f Colorado at Denver (CUDenver) and Western State College). Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or cour s e equivalents as follows: a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. s tudy skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better 2. Completion of ACC 121 with a C or better grade. General Education AA Core (AS General Education Core i s acceptable) I. English ENG 121,ENG 122 II. Speech SPE 115 III. Mathematics (Select any 1 of the following) MAT 121, *124,*125, 135,201,202 IV. Physical & Biological Sciences (Select any 7 of the following) AST 101, 102 BI0105 ,111,112 C H E 101,102,111,112 PHY 105,111,112,211,212 GEY 111,121 V. Social & Behavioral Sciences (Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 d isciplines. ) ANT 101, 111 ECO 201,202 GEO 105 HIS 101,102,201,202 pas 105,111 PSY 101, 102 SOC 101,102 recommended for all business majors Credit Hours 6 3 3-5 4-5 9 ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 40

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VI. Humanities (Select 9 credit hours from Q minimum of 2 disciplines. ) ART 1 10, 1 11, 1 12 HUM 121,122, 123 Any foreign language 111 or higher LIT 115,201,202 MUS 120,121,122 PHil 11, 1 12, 1 13 THE 105,211,21 2 General Education Sub-Total Course Requirements for Area of Emphasis in the College of Business Administration Ins t i tut ions will accept in transfer the following business courses: 9 34-37 Credits Contacts ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60 ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60 BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business 3 45 BUS 115 Intro to Business 3 45 BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45 BUS 226 Business Statistics 3 45 C I S 118 Intro to Computers 4 68 *BUS 228 Principles of Management 3 45 *BUS 236 Principles of Marketing 3 45 The following prerequisite course completions are required before enrolling in BUS 228 and BUS 236: ACC 727, 722,EC0202,MAT735 (or BUS 226), BUS 7 75 and sophom ore standing. Business Course Sub-Total Hours 30 S03 Capstone Course (Required ) SCI 285 or HUM 285 Critical Thi nking 3 45 Total 67-68 043-1158 Associate of General Studies Degree: MSCD/CU-Denver GRAPHIC DESIGN (AGS-GRD) The f ollowing courses represent CCD/MSCD and CCD/CU-Denver Fine Art s transfer agreements. Students complet ing these degree require ments will have completed their lower div ision general education requirements and will be admitted to MSCD or CU-Denver as juniors i n Fine Arts. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b reading at level 3a o r comple t ion of REA 090 wit h a C o r better; c. stud y skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better. 2 Meet with a facult y program advisor and obtai n an authorized signature. 41 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER General Education Core English ENG 121 English Composition I ENG 122 English Composition II II. Speech SPE 1 15 Principles of Speech III. Mathematics (any 1 of the follow ing) MAT 121,125,135,201,202 IV. Physical & Biological Sciences (any 1 of the follow ing) AST 101, 102;B10 105,111,1 12; CHE 101,102,111,11 2; GEY 111,112; PHY 105, 11 1 1 12,21 1,212. V Social & Behavioral Sciences VI. (Select 9 credit hours from Q minimum of 2 disciplines.) ANT 101,11 1 ECO 201,202; GEO 105; HIS 101,102,201,202; POS 105, 111; PSY 101, 102; SOC 101,102 Humanities (Select 9 credit hours from Q minimum of 2 disciplines.) ART 1 10, 1 1 1, 11 2; HUM 121, 122, 123; LIT 115,201,202; FRE, SPA, JPN MUS 120, 121. 1 22; PHI 11 1 1 12, 11 3; THE 105,211,212 General Education Sub-Total Major Requirements (MSCD ONLY) *ART 111 A rt History I *ART 112 ART 121 ART 131 ART 132 GRD 100 GRD 103 GRD lOS GRD 207 Art History II Drawing I Design I Design II Lettering & Typographic Design MAC Computer Art Advertising Typography & Layout G raph i c Design Production & Prepress II Capstone Course Credit Hours 6 3 3-5 4 9 9 34-36 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 GRD 285 Creative Graphic Design & Portfolio Preparation 3 Students who take ART 7 7 7 and ART 7 72 as general educatio n s hould add ART 722 and GRD 200. Arts Subtotal Total Major Requirements (CUDenver ONLY) ART 121 Drawing I ART 131 Design I ART 211 Painting I GRD 100 Lettering & Typographic Des ign GRD 103 MAC Computer Art GRD lOS Advertising Typography & Layout GRD 200 Advertising Design & Por tfolio Preparation (Speech Intensive) 30 64-66 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

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GRD 206 Graphic Design Production & Pre press I GRD 207 Graphic Design P roduc tion & Pre pres s II Capstone Course GRD 285 Creative Graphic Design & Portfolio Preparation Arts Subtotal Total Associate of General Studies Degree: MSCD HUMAN SERVICES (AGS-HSE) 3 3 3 30 64-66 The follow in g courses represent CCD/MSCD Human Services transfer agreement. Student s completing these degree requirements will be admitted to MSCD as juniors in Human Services. Program Admiss ion Requirements 1. Assessment scores or co urse equivalents as foll ows: a English at level 1 b or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better; b reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C o r better; c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better. 2. Signature authorization on program application from HSE faculty advisor. General Education AA Core English Credits 6 II. III. IV. V. ENG 121 English Composition I ENG 122 English Composition II Speec h SPE 115 Principles of Speech Mat h e m atics MAT 121, 125, 135,201,202 Physica l & Biological Science s AST 101, 102; BIO 105, 11 1 112; CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 1 11; PHY 105, 11 1, 1 12,211,212. Social & Behavioral Science s 3 3-5 4-5 9 ( Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 discip lines ) ANT 101,111 ; ECO 201,202; GEO 105; HIS 101,102 ,201, 202 ; POS 105,111; PSY 101 ,102; SOC 101,102 VI. Humanities 9 (Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines ) ART 110, 111, 112; HUM 121,122,123; LIT 115,201,202; FRE, SPA, JPN, MUS 120,121 ,122; PHil 11,112 ,113; THE 105,211, 212 General Educat ion SubTotal 34-37 Contacts 90 45 45-75 60-75 135 135 510-555 Major Requirements HSE 1 06 Survey o f Human Services Offered Fall Semester Only: HSE 107 Interviewing Principles & Practices HSE 205 Human Services for Groups HSE 206 HSE 211 Human Ser vices for Families Human Serv i c e s Practicum II Offered Spring Semester Only: HSE 1 08 Intro. to T h e rap eutic Systems HSE 115 Human Services Practicum I HSE 2 1 2 Huma n Ser v i c e s P r actic u m III (Capstone) 3 45 3 45 3 45 3 45 4 150 3 45 4 150 7 285 Total 64-67 1320-1365 Associate of General Studies Degree: CU-Denver PARALEGAL (AGS-PAR) The following courses represent the CCD/CU-Denver paralegal transfer agreeme nts. Students co m pleting these degree requireme nts will have completed their lower division genera l education requirements and will be admitted to t h e CU-Denver as juniors in sociology or politi cal scie n ce in the Co l lege o f Libera l Arts and Sciences (CLAS). Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at leve l 3 o r completion of ENG 100 with a C o r better ; b. reading at leve l 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C o r better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C o r b etter 2. Meet with a faculty p r ogram advisor and obtain an authorized s i g n at ure. General Education AA Core English II. III. IV. v. ENG 121 English Composition I ENG 122 English Co m position II Speech SPE 1 15 Principles of Speech Mathematics (any 1 of the following) MA T 121,1 25,135,20 1 ,202 Physical & Biologica l Sciences (any 1 of the following) AST 101, 102 ; BIO 105,111 ,112; CHE 101,102,1", 112; GEY 111, 1 1 2; PHY 105, 1 ", 1 1 2, 211,212. Social & Behavioral Sci ences ( Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.) ECO 201,202; GEO 105; HIS 101,102, 201,202;POS lOS, "1;PSY 101,102; SOC 101,102 C r edit Hours 6 3 3-5 4-5 9 ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 42

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VI. Humanities (Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.) ART 110.111, 112;HUM 121,122,123; LIT 115,201,202; FRE, SPA, JPN, MUS 120,121; PHI 111,112,113; THE 105,211,212 General Education Sub Total Major Requirements BTE 151 WordPerfect PAR 121 Intro. to Paralegal PAR 124 Legal Research PAR 221 Civil Procedures 9 3437 3 3 3 3 Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level 3 or comp l etion of MAT 105 with a C or better. General Education AA Core English Credit Hours 6 II. ENG 121 English Composition I ENG 122 English Composition II Speech 3 PAR 222 Evidence 3 SPE 115 Principles of Speech PAR 223 Computers & the Law PAR 280 Paralegal Workshop PAR 285 Paralegal II Synthesis (Capstone) Total Select 9 hours from any of the following : PAR 105 Torts PAR 109 Property PAR 115 Domestic Relations PAR 125 Tax Law PAR 126 Creditor/Debtor/Bankruptcy PAR 201 Business Organizations PAR 205 Probate PAR 207 Legal Research Seminar I PAR 208 Legal Research Seminar II PAR 214 Administrative Law PAR 231 Investigations I PAR 239 Criminal Law PAR 241 Environmental Law I PAR 252 Constitutional Law PAR 258 Contracts PAR 297 Cooperative Education PAR 299 Independent Study Total Associate of General Studies Degree: MSCD/CU-Denver PHOTOGRAPHY (AGS-PHO) 3 6 3 27 9 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3-6) (1-3) 65 -66 The following courses represent the CCD/MSCD and CCD/CU-Denver Fine Arts transfer agreements. Students completing these degree requirements will have completed their lower division general educa tion requirements and will be admitted to MSCD or CU-Denver as juniors in fine arts. Recommended Humanities General Education Requirement ART 111, 112,Art History I & II 43 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER III. Mathematics (any 1 of the following) MAT 121, 125, 135,201,202 IV. Physical & Biological Sciences (any 1 of the following) AST 101 ,102; BIO 105,111,112 CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111,112; PHY 105,111,112,211,212. V. Social & Behavioral Sciences (Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines. ) ANT 101,111;ECO 201, 202;GEO 105; HIS 101,102,201,202; POS 105,111; PSY 101, 102;SOC 101, 102 VI. Humanities (Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines.) ART 11 0, 111, 112; HUM 121, 122, 123; LIT 115,201,202; FRE, SPA, JPN, MUS 120,121,122; PHI 111,112,113; THE 105,211,212 Must be taken as general education or extra electives. General Education Sub Total Major Requirements ART 121 Drawing I ART 131 Design I PHO 101 Fundamentals of Photography PHO 102 Fundamentals of Color Photography PHO 111 Intermediate Black & White Photography PHO 112 Inte r mediate Color Photography Select 1 course from the following: PHO 201 V iew Camera Techniques PHO 202 Studio Lighting PHO 203 The Fine Print Select 1 course from the following : PHO 211 Portrait Photography PHO 212 Landscape Photography PHO 213 Craft & Expression 3-5 3 5 9 9 33-37 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 (3) (3) (3) 3 (3) (3) (3)

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Electives Select a minimum of 3 credit haurs from the following: 3 PHO 205 Photography Workshop (3) PHO 215 Seminar in Photography (3) GRD 103 MAC Computer Art (3) GRD 105 Advertising Typography & Layout (3) *BUS 1 1 5 Intro. to Business (3) PHO 107 H istory of Photography (3) *PHO 297 Cooperative Education (3) CU-Denver will not accept Capstone Course PHO 285 Seminar in Photography 3 Total 63-67 Associate of General Studies Degree: MSCD TEACHER EDUCATION: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (AGS-ECE) The following courses represent the CCD/MSCD Early Childhood Education (ECE) Teacher Education 2-plus-3 transfer agreement. Students comple ting degree requirements will be admitted to MSCD as junio r s in the ECE Teacher Education program. A grade of C or better is required in all degree classes. Graduate exit competency i s measured by successful completion (C or better) of the ECE capstone course. Any student not complet ing CCD' s capstone course must successfully complete wit h a C or better the exit competency test prior to approval of graduatio n. Program Admis s ion Requi rements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 4 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or bette r ; and d. mat h at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better. General Education Credit Hours English 6 **ENG 121 English Composition I **ENG 122 English Composition II II. Speech 3 **SPE 1 15 Principles of Speech III. Mathematics 3-4 ( any 1 of the following) MAT**121,125 **135,20 1 ,202 IV. Physical & Biological Sciences 4-5 ( any 1 of the following) AST 101, 102;B10 **105, 1 1 1 1 12; CHE 101,102, 1 ,112; GEY 111; PHY 105, 1 "2, 2 1 1,212. V Social & Behavioral Sciences 9 (Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 1 d isciplines.) ANT 101, 1 ; ECO 201,202; GEO 105; HIS 101, 1 02,20 1,202;*PSY 101 or 102; *SOC 101 or 102 VI. Humanities 9 ART 1 10, 1 1 1 2; HUM 1 2 1 122, 123; Any foreign language 111 or higher; LIT 1 15,201,202; MUS 120,121,122; PHI" 1 ,112,113; T H E 105,211,212 General Education Sub-Total 34-36 Required for Colorado Department of Human Resources Director License ** Required courses to complete MSCD ECE Teacher Education requirements. Teacher Education majors will need to declare an academic major when they transfer to MSCD. Courses from the CCD core may be used for l owe r division major or minor courses. Major Requirements The MSCD courses that will substitute for CCD courses are listed i n parentheses. ECE 101 Intro. to ECE (MSCD 234-4) ECE 102 ECE Lab Experience (MSCD 235-2) ECE 1 1 0 Child Growth & Dev elopment (MSCD PSY 180-4) ECE 115 Curriculum: Creative Activities (MSCD EDU 236-3) Electives or Contract Minor 3 2 4 3 These cou rses may be used as electives or contract minor courses but DO NOT substitute for MSCD-ECE licensure courses: ECE 105 Nutrition & the Young Child 3 ECE 111 Infants & Toddlers: Developm ental (3) Theories & Practices (Optiona l ) ECE 117 Methods/Technique s : Curriculum Development Theorie s & Practices 3 ECE 120 Classroom Management Technique s 3 Capstone Course ECE 126 Administration of ECE Programs 4 Total 60-65 ASS O CIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 44

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Associate of General Studies Degree: MSCD TEACHER EDUCATION: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION/ VIOLENCE COUNSELING (AGS-ECENC) The following courses represent the CCD/MSCD Early Childhood Edu cation (ECE) Teacher Education 2-plus-3 transfer agreement. S tudents completi n g degree requirements will be admitted to MCSD a s juniors in the ECE Teacher Education program. A grade of"e or bet ter Is required in all degree classes. Graduate exit competency is measured by successful comp l etion (MC' or better) of the ECE capstone course. Any student not comp l eting CCD' s capstone course must suc cess f ully complete w ith a"(" or bette r the exit competency test prior to approval of graduation. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 4 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or bet t e r ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d math at level 2a or comp letion of MAT 056 with a C or better. General Educat io n Core English Credit Hours 6 Ii. -ENG 121 English Composition I **ENG 122 English Compositio n II Speech **SPE 115 Principles of Speech III. Mathematics (any 1 o f the followin g ) MAT**121, 125, **135,201,202 IV. Physical & Biological Sciences (any 1 of the followi ng ) v. AST 101, 102; BIO **105,111,112; CHE 101, 102, 111, 112; GEY 111; PHY 105,111,112,211,212. Social & Behavioral Sciences (Selec t 9 c r edit hours from a minimum of 2 dis cipline s ) ANT 101, 111; ECO 201,202;GE O 105; HIS 101, 102,201,202; *PSY 101 or 102; *SOC 101 o r 102 VI. Humanities ART 110, 111, 112;HUM 121,122,123; Any foreign language 111 or higher ; LIT 115,20 1,202; MUS 120, 121, 122; PHI 111. 112. 113; THE 105,211,212 3 3-4 4-5 9 9 Genera l Education Sub-Total 34-36 Required for Colorado Dept. of Human Resources Director License ** Required courses to complete MSCD ECE Teacher Education requirements. Teacher Education majors will need t o declare an academic major when they transfer to MSCD. Courses from the CCD core may be used for lower division major or minor courses. 45 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Major Requirements The MSCD Cours e s that will s ubsti tute for CCD c o u rses are list e d i n parentheses. ECE 110 Child Growth & Dev e l o pment (MSCD PSY 180-4 ) ECE 115 Curriculum : Creative A ctivitie s (MSCD EDU 236-3) ECE 171 I ntro to ECE/Violence C ounseling (MSCD EDU 234-3) ECE 172 ECE Field Experience: ECE Violence Counseling Str a tegies (MSCD EDU 235-2) Electives or Contract M i nor 4 3 3 3 These courses may be used a s e l e c tive s or contract minor course s but DO NOT subst itut e for MSCD ECE licensure c ourses: ECE 105 N ut rition & the Y oung Child 3 ECE 111 Infant s & Toddlers: D e v e lopmental Theories & Practices (Optional) ECE 117 Methods/Techni ques: Curriculum Develop ment ECE 120 C lassroom Management Techniques ECE 225 Curriculum : AntiBias ECE 271 ECE Violence Counseling Strategies ECE 272 Curriculum: Violence Prevention Capstone Course ECE 126 Administration of ECE Programs (3) 3 3 3 3 3 4 Total 6973 Associate of General Studies Degree: MSCD TEACHER EDUCATION: ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (AGS-EEl The following courses represent the CCD/MSCD E l ementary Education (EE) Teacher Education 2-plus-3 t ransfer agreement. Students completing degree requirements will be admitted to MSCD as juniors in the EE Teacher Education program. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a English at level 4 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or better ; b. readin g at level 3a or completi o n of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study s k ills at level 3 or com pletion of REA 109 w ith a C or bette r ; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better General Education Core English Credit Hours 6 II. III. **ENG 121 English Composition I -ENG 122 English Composition II Speech **SPE 1 1 5 Principles o f S p e ech Mathematics ( any 1 of the following) MAT **121, 125, 135,201,202 3 3-4

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IV, V Physical & Biological Sciences (any 7 of the following) AST 101, 102;BI0**105, 111, 112; CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111; PHY 105, 111, 112,211,212. Social & Behavioral Sciences (Select 9 credit hours from a minimum of 2 disciplines. ) ANT 101,111; ECO 201,202; *GEO 105; VI. HIS 101,102, **201, *; POS 105, *111 PSY 101 or 102; SOC 101 or 102 Humanities ART 110, **111,112 ; HUM 121,122,123; Any foreign language 111 or h i gher ; LIT 115,201,202; MUS **120, 121, 122; PHI 111,112, 113; THE 105,211,212 General Education Sub-Total 4-5 9 9 34-36 Student Performance Objectives for Vocational Education (AAS Degree Programs) Students who complete vocational programs will be able to perform the following: 1 Basic and advanced academic skills appropriate to the profession. a. Basic skills: reading, writing mathematics, speaking, listening. b. Thinking skills: ability to learn, reason, make decisions, solve problems 2. General occupational skills appropriate to the profession. a. Information: ability to acquire and evaluate data, organize and maintain files, use computers to process information. b. I nterpersonal: ability to work on teams and with people, teach others, serve customers, lead, negotiate; value and serve, work well with and for people from diverse cultures. c. Personal: responsibility self-management, integrity; personal, ** Required cours e s to complete MSCD Elementary Teacher Education professional and social ethics. requirements. Teacher Education licensure s tudents will need to declare an academic major and m inor when they transfer to MSCO. Courses from the CCO core may be u sed for lower division major or minor courses. Major Requirements The MSCO courses that will substitute for CCO courses are listed in parentheses. EDU 161 Elementary Education in US (MSCD EDU 212-3) EDU 162 Urban & Multicultural Educatio n (MSCD EDU 264-2) ECE 110 Child Growth & Development (MSCD PSY 180-4) Electives or Contract Minor MAT 161 MSCD ENG 346 MSCD One approved course i n any major or minor field Capstone Course EDU 285 Issues & Trends in Education Additional Recommended General Studies HPL Any Class 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 2 Total 60 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS The AAS degree prepares students for entry -level employment in a given occup ation or upgrades employable skills. While not intended for transfer to a baccalaureate degree pro gram, all AAS degrees have limited transferability In each AAS program some of the courses are articulated w ith and accepted by at least one specific baccalaureate program.Talk with an advisor for specific details. d. Resources: ability to allocate time money, materials, space and staff. e Systems: understand technological, organizational and social systems; monitor and correct performance, design or improve systems. f. Technology: select equipment, apply technology to specific tasks. 3. Specific occupational skills that include all aspects of the profession. These include planning, management, finances, underlying principles of techno logy, technical skills,labor and comm unit y issues, health and safety and environmental issues. Each vocational program has identifie d student performanc e objectives for each vocational program area. These performance objectives are given to students during the adviSing process. They are collec tively bound and published for general distribution and constitute the college s guarantee to the employer. Copies are available in division and counseling offices. AAS Degree Program Entry Students must apply for entry to all Associate of Applied Science degree programs. Students are encouraged to apply to a program by the time they have completed 12 credits of 1 OO-Ievel courses. At the time of application, students must identify which Associate of Applied Science degree program they desire to enter. Program application forms are in South Classroom Building room 134, and division offices. AAS Degree Program Requirements The AAS degree requires a minimum of 60 credit hours, 15 of which must meet General Education requirements (completed with a C or better) and 45 of which must meet specific program requirements. ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM S 46

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General Education Requirements English -ENG 100 or Higher II. Mathematics -MAT 103 or higher III. One course from 3 of the following 4 areas: A. Speech SPE 115 B. SPE 115 may be earned through "Speech Intensive" programs. (See specific AAS program recommendations or an advisor.) Physical and Biological Sciences AST101,102 BIO 105, 111, 112* CHE 101,102,111,112 GEY 111, 121 PHY 105,111,112,211,212 Credit Hours 3 3 5 9 -13 *Nursing requires BIO 201,202 and 205. **Health Occupations require BIO 201 and 202 c. Social & Behav ioral Science ANT 101, 111 ECO 201,202 GEO 105 HIS 101,102,20 1 ,202 PSY 101,102* POS 105,111 SOC 101,102 *Nursing requires PSY 235. ECE and HSE allow PSY 235 D. Humanities ART 110, 111, 112 CIS 118 HUM 121,122,123 LIT 115,201,202 MUS 120,121,122 PHI 111, 112, 113 Any foreign language 111 or higher THE 105,211,212 Program-specific requirements including a Capstone Course 45 Total 60-66 Individual departments may specify particular courses that may be counted toward the general educ ation requirements. Credit and Contact Hours Credit s are the hours of credit awarded to the course. An Associate degree requires a m i nimum of 60 credits. Contacts are the in-class con tact hour s required for th e course. Credit or contact hours in parenthe sis, for example (3), are options from which students may choose and are not individ ually included in the total credit or contact hour s listed below the parenthetical numbers An average full-time student course load is 15 credit hours. An Associate of Applied Science degree of 60 47 COMMUNITY COLLEGE Of DENVER credit hours takes four semesters of 15 credits each semester, assuming that all courses count toward the degre e AAS degrees of more than 60 credit hours may take more than four semesters to complete ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN ACCOUNTING GENERAL ACCOUNTING EMPHASIS This is a techn ical degree i n accounting If planning to transfer to a senior institution students may design, i n conjunction with an accounting advisor, their associate degree program for maximum transferability Students shou l d contact an advisor early to plan their programs. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 w ith a C o r better; b reading at level 3a or complet ion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 w ith a C or better; and d math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better. 2 Comple tion of ACC 121 with a C or better. 3. Overall GPA of 2 0 or higher i n business and business-related courses. General Education Requirements Credits Contacts CIS 118 Intro. to Computers 4 68 ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45 ENG 121 English Compositio n I 3 45 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3-4 45-60 (or MAT 124 or 125) SPE 115 Pri nciples of Speech 3 45 Majo r Requirements ACC 121 Account ing Principles I 4 60 (Corequisite ACC 110 or Level 3 math placement) ACC 122 Account ing Principles II 4 ACC 110 Business Math 3 ACC 111 Individual Income Tax 3 ACC 113 Computerized Account ing 4 CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting (Capstone) 3 ACC 221 Cost Account ing 3 BTE Keyboarding Elective 2 BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touc h 2 60 45 45 68 45 45 45 30 23 45 45 BUS 217 Business Communications BUS 226 Business Statistics Select 1 courses with advisor approval : ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting (Must be taken prior to ACC 121 to be counted for graduation.) ACC 215 Accountin g Systems ACC 297 Cooperative Education (Prerequisite ACC 122) CIS 156 Advanced Spreads heet s CIS 260 COBOL Language Programming 3 3 6-7 (3) (3) (3) 90-1 6 5 (45) (45) (120) (3) (45) (3-4) (45-60)

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Select 2 courses with advisor approval: 6 90 BUS 115 Intro. to Business (3) (45) BUS 116 Intro to Management/Supervision (3) (45) BUS 118 Intro. to Marketing (3) (45) BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business (3) (45) Total 65-66 984-1074 Associate of Applied Science Degree in Accounting COMMERCIAL CREDIT MANAGEMENT EMPHASIS This program is specifically designed to train and to upgrade skills of credit managers,assistants and other credit personnel who work in the area of extension of comme r cial credit and desire an associate degree. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or b etter; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or bette r ; and d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better. 2. Completion of 12 semester hours of college level courses with overall GPA of 2.0. General Education Requ i rements Credits Contacts CIS 118 Intro to Compute r s 4 68 ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45 ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 (or MAT 121, 124,or 125) PSY 101 General Psychology I 3 45 SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 Major Requirements ACC 110 Business Math 3 45 ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60 ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60 BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45 or BTE 152 Microsoft Word 3 45 BUS 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 BUS 116 Intro. to Management/Supervision 3 45 BUS 118 Intro to Marketing 3 45 BUS 125 Intro to F inance 3 45 BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45 BUS 221 Legal Environment o f Business 3 45 CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45 *CRM 217 Business Credit P r i nciples (Capstone) 3 45 ECO 202 Principles of Micr o E conomics 3 45 **AIB Financial Statement Analysis 3 45 Total 63 953 Taken at the National Association of Credit Management Office Building ** Taken at American Institute of Banking ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN AIRFRAME/POWER PLANT Students must register for airframe /powe r plant courses at Emily Griffith Opportunity School. Upon completion of airframe/power plant courses, students will receive an FAA certificate. With an additional 15 semester hours at CCD, students may receive an AAS degree. Other FAA cert ificates may be substituted for Emily Griffith Opportunity School courses. This program also allows students to readily transfer into a Bachelor of Science degree program with a major in Technical and Industrial Administration. Please see the division dean in Science and Technology for information on this program. Program Admiss i on Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 2 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or better ; b reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 1; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better. ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION This program provides a broad exposure to general business functions and fundamental management concepts. Upon completion, students are qualified for an entry-level position in a wide variety of general business occupations. Students already employed are able to acquire skills necessary for person a l development d irected towar d job security and advancement. A grade OfM(" or better must be maintained in business core area. Program Admiss i on Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. Englis h at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 1; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better 2. Completion of MAT 103 and BUS 115 with a C or better. 3. Overall GPA of 2.5 on all college-level work after completing 12 semester hours. General Education Requirements Credits Contacts CIS 118 Intro. to Computers 4 68 ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45 ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45 Elective Math 3-4 45-60 MAT 103, 121, 124 or 125 SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 48

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49 Major Requirements ACC 121 Accou nt ing Principles I 4 60 ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4 60 BUS 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 BUS 116 Intro to Management/S u pervision 3 45 BUS 118 Intro. to Market ing 3 45 BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45 or BTE 152 Microsoft Word CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45 BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45 BUS 221 Legal Environment of B usiness 3 45 BUS 226 Business Statistics 3 45 BUS 228 Principles of Manageme n t (Capstone) 3 45 Business Electives (with advisor approval) 12 135 Total 63-64 923 Custom programs can be designed with a business advisor or students may choose one of the following areas of emphasis: Commercial Credit, Customer Service, Finance, Internat ional Business, Management, or Marketing. All custom programs must be approved by a business advisor. All general electives for custom programs must have a course number greater than 100. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration COMMERCIAL CREDIT EMPHASIS Select 12 credits from the following: 12 ACC 110 Business Math (3) BUS 125 I ntro. to Fi na nce (3) ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting (3) ACC 215 Accounting Systems (3) CRM 217 Business Credit Principles (3) 160 (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) All American Institute of Banking courses and other e l ectives must be approved by business advisor. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration CUSTOMER SERVICE EMPHASIS Select 12 credits from the following: 12 PSY 101 General Psychology I (3) BUS 117 Time Management (1) BUS 207 Teleservices (3) BUS 237 Customer Service (3) Ot h e r electives m u s t be approved by business advisor. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration FINANCE EMPHASIS Select 12 credits from the following : 12 ACC 110 Business Math (3) BUS 125 Intro. to Finance (3) C I S 156 Advanced Spreadsheet s (3) ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting (3) ACC 215 Accou nting Systems (3) COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER 160 (45) (30) (45) (45) 160 (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) ACC 226 Cost Accounting ECO 202 Principle s of Micro E conomics (3) (3) Other electives must be approved by business advisor Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS EMPHASIS Select 12 credits from the following: 12 ACC 110 Business Math (3) BUS 125 Intro. to Finance (3) ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics (3) BUS 210 International Business (3) BUS 211 I nternational Marketing (3) Other electives must be approved by business advisor. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration MANAGEMENT EMPHASIS Select 12 credits from the following: 12 ACC 110 Business Math (3) BUS 117 Time Management (1) BUS 125 Intro to Finance (3) CIS 156 Advanced Spreadsheets (3) BUS 210 International Business (3) ACC 215 Accounting System s (3) BUS 235 Retail Marketing & Management (3) BUS 236 P r inciples of Marketing (3) BUS 297 Cooperative Education Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration MARKETING EMPHASIS Select 12 credits from the following: 12 BUS 210 Intern ational Business (3) BUS 211 International Marketing (3) BUS 231 Pri nciples of Sales (3) BUS 235 Retail Marketing & Management (3) BUS 236 Principle s of Marketin g (3) BUS 237 C u stomer Service (3) BUS 239 Adverti s ing & Promotion (3) BUS 297 Cooperative Education (3) Other e lectives must be approved by business advisor. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration BUSINESS OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM (45) (45) 160 (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) 160 (45) (30) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) 160 (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) This program pro vides a broad exposure to general business functions and fundamentals of the travel and tourism industry. Upon comple tion s tud e nt s are qualified for an entry-leve l posi tion in a wide variety of general travel and tourism occupations. Student s already employed are able to acquire skills necessar y for personal development directed toward job security and advancement. A grade of "C" or better must be maintained in business core area

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Program Admiss i on Requ i rements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a English at level 3 or completion of E N G 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 1; and d. math at level 2a o r completion of MAT 035 with a C or better. 2. Completion of MAT 103 and BUS 115 wit h a grade of C or better. 3. GPA of 2.5 on all college-level work after completing 12 semester hours. General Education Requirements Credits Contacts CIS 118 Intro to Com pute r s 4 68 ECO 201 Princi ples of Macro Economics 3 45 ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45 Elective Math 3-4 45-60 MAT 103, 121 124 or 125 SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 Major Requirements ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60 BUS 115 Intro. to 8usiness 3 45 BUS 116 Intro to Management/Supervisio n 3 45 BUS 118 Intro to Marketing 3 45 BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45 or BTE 152 Microsoft Word CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45 BUS 217 Business Commun ications 3 45 BUS 221 Legal Environmen t of Business 3 45 BUS 239 Advertising & P romot ion 3 45 Bn 110 Intr o to Travel 3 45 Bn 111 Travel Geography I 3 45 Bn 112 Travel Geograph y II 3 45 Bn 113 Selecting & Selling Cruises 3 45 Bn 210 Domestic Ticketing 3 45 Bn 211 International Travel 3 45 Bn 212 Computer Reservations I 3 45 Bn 213 Computer Reser vations II (Capstone) 3 45 Tota l 68-69 1028 1043 Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration CUSTOMER INFORMATION SERVICES This program provides a basis for developing customer information services for client service, survey-taking, appointment making, direct sales and follow-up Includes paper flow management telephone skills, terms and concepts, along with s ome job skills necessary for entry-level positions. The customer infor matio n services industry is growing and offers considerable e mployment opportunity for those persons prepared and who exhibit unique abilities. Client services orientation, call center management and outsourcing of services from a contractual point of view will be explored. Program Admiss i on Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or completion o f ENG 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or completio n of REA 090 wit h a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level 2 b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better. General Education Requirements Credits Contacts CIS 118 Intro. to Computers 4 68 ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45 PSY 101 General Psychology I 3 45 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 Major Requirements BUS 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 3 45 BUS 116 Intro to Management/Supervision 3 45 BUS 118 Intro to Marketing 3 45 BUS 2 1 7 Business Communications 3 45 BTE 139 Profession a l Development 3 45 BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 45 BUS 207 Teleservices 3 45 BUS 237 Customer Service 3 45 BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45 or BTE 152 Microsoft Word CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concept s 3 45 BUS 117 Time Management 1 30 Product Specific Electives: e.g., Novell, 9 135 Airline Reservations, travel, e tc., with advisor approval BUS 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3-6 135-270 Total 62-65 1043117 8 Associate of Applied Science Degree i n Business Administration INSURANCE The AAS degree program in Business Admini stration : Insurance is offered jointly by CCD and Emily Griffith Opportunity School. The p rogram consists of a maximum of 12 semester credit hours of insurancespeCific credits Students may earn these credits via technical education course work at Emily Griffith Opportuni t y School, plus a minimum of 48 c r edit hours of core general education courses at CCD. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or completion o f ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. r eading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d. math at level 2b o r completion of MAT 103 with a C or better. 2. Official transcript showing completio n of Emily Griffith Opportunity School's insurance program. ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 50

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Transfer Credits from Emily Griffith Opportunity School General Education Requirements Credits Contacts Credits Contacts ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45 INS 290 Insurance Special Topics 6 135 ENG 122 English Composition II 3 45 INS 299 Insurance Independent Study 6 135 SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 General Education Requirements Credits Contacts Elective Science 4-5 60-75 ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60 (any course listed below : BUS 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 AST 101, 102, BIO 105,111,112 BUS 116 Intro to Management/Supervision 3 45 CHE 101,102,111, 112,GEY 111,121, BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45 PHY 105, 111, 112,211,212) BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 45 ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45 CIS 118 Intro to Computers 4 68 CIS 118 Intra to Computers 4 68 ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 45 Elective Humanities 3 45 ENG 121 English Compositio n I 3 45 (any course listed below: SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 ART 110,111, 112,HUM 121,122,123, MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 LIT 115,201,212,MUS 120,121, PHI 111,112,113 Select 1 course from the following AAS 4-5 80-105 Any foreign language 111 or higher, Physical and Biological Sciences requirements: THE 105,211,212) AST 101, 102; BIO 105, 111, 112; CHE 101,102,111,112; GEY 111; Major Requirements PHY 105, 111, 112,211,2 1 2 PST 105 Postal Service History & Organization 3 45 PST 106 Postal Service Finance 3 45 Select 2 courses from the following AAS 6-10 90-150 PST 112 Postal Mail Processing I 3 45 Humanities requirements: PST 114 Delivery & Collection s 3 45 ART 110,111,112 ; HUM 121,122,123; PST 200 Postal Service Automation 3 45 LIT 115,201,202 ; MUS 120,121,122; PST 205 Personnel Services 3 45 PHI 111, 112, 113; Any foreign language 111 or higher; PST 226 Labor Relations I 3 45 THE 105,211,212 PST 227 Labor Relations II (Capstone) 3 45 Select 2 courses from the following AAS 6 90 Select a minimum of 12 credit hours 12 540 Social and Behavioral Sciences requirements: from the following: ANT 101, 111;ECO 201,202;GEO 105; ACC 121 Accounting Principles I (4) (60) HIS 101, 102,201,202;PSY 101,102; ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics (3) (45) pas 105,111; SOC 101,102 BUS 115 Intro to Business (3) (45) Total 60-65 1018-1103 BUS 226 Business Statistics (3) (45) CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts (3) (45) Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45) POSTAL SERVICE MANAGEMENT or The Postal Service Management (PSM) Associate in Applied Science BTE 152 Microsoft Word degree is designed to prepare the student with the necessary knowlBUS 217 Business Communications (3) (45) edge and skills to gain employment and/or to advance to positions of PSY 265 Psychology of Personality (3) (45) increased responsibility within the United States Postal Service (USPS). SOC 101 Intro to Sociology I (3) (45) SOC 102 I ntro to Sociology II (3) (45) Program Admission Requirements ENG 131 Intro to Technical Writing I (3) (45) 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: BUS 227 Human Resources Management (3) (45) a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; Total 62-63 1295-1310 b reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better 2. Completion of 12 semester hours of college-level work with a C o r better. 3. GPA of 2.0 on all college-level work. 51 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER

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Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration REAL ESTATE The AAS degree program i n Business Admin istr ation: Real Estate i s offered jointly by CCD and Emily Griffith Opportunity School. The pro gram consists of a maximum of 12 semester credit hours of real estate-specific credits. S tudents may earn these credits via technical education course work at Emily Griffith Opportunity School, plus a minimum of 48 credit hours of core general education courses at CCD. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a Cor better; and d mat h at level 2b or co m pletion of MAT 103 with a C or better 2. Official transcript showing completion of Emil y Griffith Opportunity School's real estate program. Transfer Credits from Emily Griffith Oppoptunity School Credits Contaas REE 290 Real Estate Special Topics 6 135 REE 299 Real Estate Independent Study 6 135 General Education Requirements Credits Contacts ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60 BUS 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 BUS 116 Intro to ManagemenVSupervision 3 45 BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45 BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 45 CIS 118 I ntro. to Computers 4 68 ECO 201 P r inciples of Macro Economics 3 45 ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45 SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 Select 1 course from the fol/owing AAS 4-5 80-105 Physical and Biological Sciences requirements: AST 101, 102; BIO 105,111,112; CHE 101,102,111, 112; GEY 111; PHY 105, 111,112 ,211,212 Select 2 courses from the fol/owing AAS 6-10 90 150 Humanities requirements : ART 110,111,112; HUM 1 2 1 ,122,123; LlT115,201 ,202; MUS 120,121,122; PHI 111,112,113; Any foreign language 111 or h i gher ; THE 105,211,212 Select 2 courses from the fol/owing AAS 6 90 Social and Behavioral Sciences requirements: ANT 101,111; ECO 201,202; GEO 105; HIS 101, 102,201,202;PSY 101,102; POS 105, 111;SOC 101,102 Total 60-65 1018 1103 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY: OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND SECRETARIAL STUDIES These Business Techno l ogy program options are designed to prepare students for entry-level positions and advancement in business, gov ernmental and medical agencies and other institutions that employ persons in secretarial and administrative s upp ort areas. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C better ; and d math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better General Education Requirements Credits Contaas CIS 118 Intro. to Computer s 4 68 Elective Economics or Political Science 3 45 (with advisor approval) ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 Major Requirements (With the help of the faculty advisor, select 47 cred i ts from the fol/owing. BTE 297 must be included J 47 7 05 ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting (3) (45) or ACC 121 Accounting Principles I (4) (60) BTE 155 Spreadsheets for Office Management (3) (45) BUS 115 Intro. to Business (3) (45) BUS 116 Intro. to ManagemenVSupervision (3) (45) BTE 101 Keyboarding I (5) (83) BTE 202 Keyboarding II (5) (83) BTE 104 Keyboarding Speed building (4) (60) BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch (2) (23) BTE 120 Filing & Records Control (4) (68) BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45) BTE 152 Microsoh Word (3) (45) BTE 133 Word Processing Communications (3) (45) & Applications BUS 217 Business Communications (3) (45) (Speech Intensive) BTE 139 Professional Development (3) (45) (Speech Intensive) BTE 230 Machine Transcripti on (5) (83) BTE 288 Model Office (4) (68) BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135 Total 60 900 1128 ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 52

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Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology: AAssociate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies Office Management and Secretarial Studies LEGAL SECRETARIAL MEDICAL SECRETARIAL Program Admission Requirements Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalent s as follows: 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or comp letion of ENG 100 with a C or better; a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a e or better; b. reading at level 3a or comp l etion of REA 090 w i th a C or better; b. reading at level 3a o r completion of REA 090 with a e or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C better; and and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a e o r better. d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better. General Education Requirements Credits Contacts General Education Requirements Credits Contacts Elective Economics or Political Science Course 3 45 CIS 118 Intro. to Computers 4 68 ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45 ENG 121 English Composi tion I 3 45 CIS 118 Intro. to Computers 4 68 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematic s 3 45 Elective Social & Behavioral Sciences 3 45 (with advisor approval) Major Requirements (With the help of the faculty advisor select 47 credits from the following. Major Requirements BTE 297 must be included.) 47 705 (With the help a faculty advisor, each student must select 47 credits from ACC 101 Fundamental s of Accounti n g (3) (45) the fol/owing. BTE 297 must be included.) 47 705 or ACe 101 Fundamentals of Accounting (3) (45) ACC 121 Accounting Principles I (4) (60) or BUS 115 I ntro. to Busi ness (3) (45) ACC 121 Accounting Principles I (4) (60) BUS 221 Legal E n vironment of Business (3) (45) HOC 100 Medical Terminol ogy (1) (15) PAR 124 Legal Research (3) (45) BUS 115 Intro. to Business (3) (45) BTE 101 Keyboarding I (5) (83) BTE 101 Keyboarding I (5) (83) BTE 202 Keyboarding II (5) (83) BTE 202 Keyboarding II (5) (83) BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuildin g (4) (60) BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding (4) (60) BTE 120 Filing & Records Control (4) (68) BTE 121 A lpha Speedwriting I (4) (60) BTE 121 Alpha Speedwriting I (4) (60) BTE 108 Business Machines: BTE 133 Word Processing Communications (3) (45) Ten Key byTouc h (2) (23) & Applications BTE 120 Filing & Records Control (4) (68) BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45) BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45) BTE 152 Microsoft Word (3) (45) BTE 152 Microsoft Word (3) (45) BUS 217 Business Communicat ions (3) (45) BTE 133 Word Processing Communications (3) (45) (Speech Intensive) & Applications BTE 139 Professional Development (3) (45) BTE 155 Spreadsheets for Office (Speech Intensive) Management (3) (45) BTE 155 Spreadsheets for Office Management (3) (45) BUS 217 Business Communications (3) (45) BTE 209 Legal Terminology (2) (40) (Speech Intensive) BTE 288 Mode l Office (4) (68) BTE 139 ProfeSSional Development (3) (45) BTE 230 Machine Transcription (5) (83) (Speech Intensive) BTE 251 Advanced WordPerfect (3) (45) BTE 206 Health Insurance (3) (45) BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135 Methods & Claims Total 60 900 1128 BTE 230 Machine Transcription (5) (83) BTE 288 Model Office (4) (68) BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135 Total 60 900-1128 53 COMMUNITY COLLEGE Of DENVER

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Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology: Associate of Applied Science Degree In Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies Office Management and Secretarial Studies SECRETARIAL WORD PROCESSING Program Admission Requirements Program Admi ssion Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a E n g lish at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 w it h a C or better ; b. reading at leve l 3a or comp letion o f REA 090 w ith a C or better ; b read ing at level 3a or completion of REA 090 w ith a C or better; c. stud y skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 w ith a C better ; c. study skills at level 3 or comp letion of REA 109 with a C or and better ; and d math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better d math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better General Education Requirements Credits Contad s General Education Requirements Credits Contads CIS 118 I n tro to C ompu ters 4 6 8 C I S 118 Intro to Computers 4 68 Elective Economics or Political Science 3 45 ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45 (with advisor approval) MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 ENG 121 English Composit ion I 3 45 Elective Social & Behavioral Sciences 3 45 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 ( with advisor approval) Major Requirements Major Requirements (With the help of their faculty advisor, students must select 47 credits (With the help of their faculty advisor, students must select 47 credits from the following. BTE 297 must be included.) 47 705 from the following. BTE 297 must be included.) ACC 101 F u ndamentals of Account ing (3) (45) ACC 101 Fundamental s of Accounting (3) (45) or or ACC 121 Account ing Principles (4) (60) ACC 121 Account ing Principles ( 4 ) (60) BTE 155 Spreadsheets for Office BTE 155 Spreadsheets for Office Management (3) (45) Management (3) (45) BUS 115 I ntro to Business (3) (45) BUS 115 Intro to Business (3) (45) BTE 101 Keyboarding I (5) (83) BTE 101 Keyboarding I (5) (83) BTE 202 Keyboarding II (5) (83) BTE 202 Keyboarding II (5) (83) BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding (4) (60) BTE 104 Keyboarding Speed building (4) (60) BTE 121 Alpha Speedwriting I ( 4 ) (60) BTE 108 Business Machines: BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch (2) (23) Ten Key by Touch (2) (23) BTE 120 Filing & Records Control (4) (90) BTE 120 F i ling & Records Control (4) (90) BTE 133 Word Processing Communications (3) (45) BTE 151 W o rdPerfect (3) (45) & Applications BTE 152 Microsoft Word (3) (45) BTE 151 WordPe rf ect (3) (45) BTE 133 Word Processing Communications ( 3 ) (45) BTE 152 Microsoft Word ( 3 ) (45) & App l ications BTE 251 Advanced WordPerfect (3) (45) BUS 217 Business Communications (3) (45 ) BUS 217 Business Communications (3) (45) (Speech Intensive) (Speech Inte n s ive) BTE 139 Professional Development (3) (45 ) BTE 139 Professional Development (3) (45) (Speech Intensive) (Speech Inte nsive) BTE 230 Machine Transcription (5) (83) BTE 230 Machine Transcription (5) (83) BTE 251 Advanced WordPerf ect (3) (45) BTE 288 Mod e l Office (4) (68) BTE 288 Mode l Office (4) (68) BTE 297 Cooperative Education 3 135 BTE 2 9 7 Cooperative Education 3 135 (Capstone) (Capstone) Total 60 900-1 1 28 Total 60 900 1128 A S SOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM S 54

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ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS Associate of Applied Science Degree in Computer Information Systems COMPUTER SPECIALIST T his program prepares the s tude n t a s an ent r y -level s pecialist i n work i n g wit h a n d u tilizing personal computers. Upon c ompleti o n of t h e program, stude nt s will be compe t e nt to set up and configure personal comput e r s and t heir peripherals, t o configur e a ppli c a tion systems, m anage commun i c a tio n s and/ o r networks a n d use many major software packages. S t u dent s may s e lect an emphasi s i n t h e i r program, such as networking or mult imedia, by c hoosing courses in t h e e lective section Program Admission Requirements 1 Ass essmen t scores or course equivalents as follows: a E n gli s h at level 3 or compl e t i o n of E N G 100 w ith a C o r b e t ter ; b reading at l evel 3a or c ompl e tio n of R E A 090 w ith a C or better ; c. s tudy skills at level 3 or c o mpletion of REA 109 w it h a C or better ; and d math at l e v e l 3 or comp letion of MAT 105 wit h a C o r better. 2. Com p l et ion o f C I S 1 1 8 with a g rade of C or b e tte r 3 GPA of 2 0 or higher i n CIS courses. 4 Completion o f 12 semester hour s of college-level work. General Education Requirements C redit s Contac t s C I S 118 I ntro t o Compute r s 4 68 ENG 1 2 1 E ngli s h Compositio n I 3 45 Elective Math 3-4 45-60 MAT 1 2 1 ,MAT 135,o r BUS 2 2 6 SPE 115 P rincipl e s of S p eech 3 45 Select 7 course from the following: 3 45 ECO 201 P r inciple s of Macro Economics (3) (45) or POS 105 Intr o to P o l it i cal Scie nce (3) (45) Major Requirements C I S 119 Intr o to Pro gramming 3 45 C I S 131 Int r o to the I n t ernet & World Wide Web 3 45 C I S 145 Dat abas e Con c ept s 3 45 C I S 155 Spr eads h e e t C o n cept s 3 45 CIS 179 Softwa r e S ystem S urvey 3 45 CIS 2 1 6 Mic rocomput e r Hardware 3 45 CIS 275 Telecommunications 3 45 C I S 254 Networks: W indows NT Client 4 6 8 or C I S 255 Netw o r ks: Novell 4 x Administration or CIS 256 Networks: Novell 3 x Admin istrat io n CIS 276 System s Ana lysis & Design 3 45 ( Note : C I S 276 is the capstone course for a CIS degree.) BUS 115 I n tro. t o Business 3 45 ACC 121 Accounting Pri nciple s I 4 60 55 COMMUNITY COLL EGE O F DENVER BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45 or BTE 152 M icrosoft Wor d Select 7 course from the following: 3 45 CSC 150 PASCAL Programmin g (3) (45) C S C 230 C + + Programming I (3) (45) C I S 260 COBOL Langu a g e (3) (45) Prog r amming CIS 178 Vis u a l BASIC w ith Windows (3) (45) C I S 176 BAS I C with DOS (3) (45) Select any 9 credit hours from the following: 9-7 2 7 35 -788 CIS 1 1 1 I n tro. t o Internet (2) (45) CIS 132 Business Appl i catio n s on the W o rld Wide Web (3) (45) CIS 135 G raphics Technology (PowerPoint) (2) (30) C I S 156 Advanced Spreads heets (3) (45) CIS 175 Intro. t o UNIX (3) (45) C I S 206 Intro. t o Multimedia Tech nology (3) (45) CIS 208 Advanced Mult i m edia Systems (3) (45) CIS 226 C ompu ter Diagnosi s & Repair (3) (45) C I S 254 N e t wo rks: Windows NT Client (4) (68) C I S 255 N e t wo rks: Novell 4 x Admin istratio n (4) (68) CIS 256 N e tw o rks: Novell 3x Administ r ation (4) (68) CIS 282 N e t wo rks: Advanced Novell Admi n istration (4) (68) C I S 283 N e tworks: Windows NT Server (4) (68) GRD 103 MAC Computer A r t (3) (90) Any 3 credit hour s of self-paced courses 3 45 BTE 100 Intro. to Keyboarding 3 68 Total 67 70 9 7 6 1029 Associate of Applied Science Degree in Computer Information Systems APPLICATIONS PROGRAMMER This program serves the general student populat ion, but is desi gned developed and operated for and by the nationally recognized and award winning Computer Training for People with Disabilities (CTPD) Program. The program prepares students for careers as applications prog rammers e m p hasizing t h e COBOL language. This is a fast-track program that can be comp l e t e d in 13 months o r more depending on the semester th e student begin s t h e curriculu m and the amount of remediatio n g e n e ral studies a n d adaptation skill development requir e d The p rogram has a fall and spring semester curriculum. S tudent s m u s t have comple t e d t h e prerequ isites to fall semester" and a r e e ncourag e d to complete th e general education requirements prior t o b eginning th e fall and sprin g cur riculum Students w ith disabilities a r e encouraged t o make application to the Comp uter Tra i ning for People with Disabilities program that offers s p ecia l services, s up port and placement for program participants. Appl ication inf o r mation may be o b tained from the Center for Persons with Disab ilities, South Classroom B uilding, room 134, or by phone at (303) 556-3300. All stude nt s must satisfy t h e following prog ram admission requi rement s prior to beginning th e program:

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P rogram Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 o r completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better. 2. Students with a disability requiring adaptive equipment must be functioning at a professional level. Skills are assessed and eval uat ed by the CTPD C oordinator Prerequisites to Fall Semester Business Core "ACC 121 Accounting Principles I "BUS 115 Intro to Business "BUS 217 Business Communications "CIS 218 Advanced Computer Applications or "CIS 119 Intro to Programming General Education Requirements "CIS 118 ECO 202 ENG 131 MAT 103 SPE 115 Fall CIS 276 CIS 260 CIS 145 CIS 277 CIS 266 Spring CIS 261 CIS 263 C I S 230 CIS 240 Intro to Computers Principles of Micro Economics Intro to Technical Writing I Contemporary College Mathematics Principles of Speech Systems Analysis & Design COBOL Language Programming Database Concepts Operating Systems & JCL (mainframe emphasis) On-line Program Development (TSO) Advanced COBOL CICS/COBOL Programming C ++ Programming I Oracle May 1 S -July 1 S CIS 297 Cooperativ e Education/ Internship (Capstone) Total Credits 4 3 3 2-3 Credits 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Contacts 60 45 45 30-45 Contacts 68 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 3 45 3 45 3 45 3 45 6 270 61-62 1103-1118 Associate of Applied Science Degree in Computer Information Systems PC SPECIALIST/LAN ADMINISTRATOR Thi s p rogram serves the general student population but i s designed developed, and operated for and by the nationally recognized and award winning Computer Training for People w ith D i sabilities (CTPD) Program. The program prepares students for careers as PC specialis t s emphasizing the LAN Administration. This is a fast-track program that can be comp leted in 13 months or more depending on the semester the student begins the curriculum and the amount of remediation and adaptation skill development required. The program has a fall and spring semester curricu lum S tudents must have completed the "prerequisites to the fall semester" and are encouraged to complete the gene ral education requir ement s prior to beginning the fall and spring curriculum Applications should be submitted by May 1. Students with disab ilities are encouraged to make appli cation to the Computer Training for People w ith Disabilities program which offers s pecial services, support and placement for program participants. Application information may be obtained from the Center for Persons with Disabilities, South C lassroom Building, room 134, or by phone at (303) 556-3300. All students must satisfy the following program admission requir e ments pr io r to beginning the program: Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C orbetter ; 2. b reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better. Students with a disability requiring adaptive equipment must be funct i oning at a professional level. Skills are assessed and evaluated b y the CTPD Coordinator Prerequisites to Fall Semester Business Cor e "ACC 121 Accounting Principles I "BUS 115 Intro. to Business "BUS 217 Business Communications "CIS 218 Advanced Computer Application s or "CIS 119 Intro. to Programming General Education Requirements "CIS 118 Intro. to Computers ECO 202 Principles of Micr o Economics ENG 131 Intro. to Technical Writing I MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics SPE 115 Principles of Speech Fall CIS 145 Database Concepts CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware CIS 255 Networks: Novell 4 x Administration CIS 266 On-line Program Development (TSO) CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design CIS 277 Operating Systems & JCL ( Microcomputer emphasis) Credits 4 3 3 2-3 Credits 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 3 3 Contacts 60 45 45 30-45 Contacts 68 45 45 45 45 45 45 68 30 45 45 ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM S 5 6

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Spring CIS 240 Oracle 3 45 CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45 C I S 179 Software System Survey 3 45 C I S 275 Telecommunications 3 45 CIS 282 Networks: Advanced Novell Administration 4 68 May 1 S-July 15 CIS 297 Cooperative Education/Inte rnship 6 270 (Capstone) Total 68-69 1224-1239 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN DENTAL HYGIENE This program prepares the student to practice as a professional dental hygienist following successful completion of two semesters of pre-professional prerequisites and four semesters of professional study Completion of the prerequisites and the full two-year Dental Hygiene program curriculum with a grade of C or better results in an Associate of Applied Science degree. After receiving the AAS degree, students are eligible to take the licensure exam to become registered dental hygienists. Dental hygienists are licensed preventive oral health professionals who provide educational, clinical and therapeutic services in dentistry Dental hygienists perform procedures such as oral prophylaxis, applica tion of preventive agents, exposure of dental radiographs, patient educa tion and nutritiona l counseling. Career opportunities for hygienists are available in a variety of settings, including private dental practices, com munity dental health clinics, public school s cli n ical and basi c science research lab oratories, state and federal health facilities and management positions. Licensure by national and state examination is required. Applicatio n materials must be submitted no later than March 1 to be considered for admission i nto the class beginning fall of the next academic year. Eligible applicants are selected according to overall GPA, GPA for prerequisite science courses, prior experience in health care, a commitmen t to a health care career and interpersona l skills. Because of the competitive admissions process, all prerequisite courses must be taken for a letter grade. Applicants not accepted are consid ered for the following year; however, reapplication is necessary. Graduate exit competenc y is measured by successful completion of the capstone cours e DEH 252, Dental Hygiene Clinic Care II I. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C o r better ; b. reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better 2. S ubm it the CCD applicat i o n to the Registrar's Office, South Classroom Building room 133, on the Auraria Campus 3. Submit a completed Dental Hygiene application form and packet. Dental Hygiene appli catio n packets can be requested by calling (303) 364-4821. 57 COMMUNITY C OLLEGE OF DENVER 4 Complete the following general education prerequisites with a grade of C or better Sciences courses must show cumulative GPA of 2 8 or bett e r prior to the begi nning of the fall semester of the intended year of entry. Courses in progress and those to be com pleted by August of the year in which appl ication is made will be considered Proof of successf u l completion of these courses must be submitted to both the CCD registrar and th e CCD Dental Hygiene program at the end of each semester i n which they are taken. An official, final transcript must be forwarded to both CCD Admi ssions and the CCD Dental Hygiene program as soon as it becomes available. 5 All prerequisite courses must be taken for a letter grade. Foreign students must take the Anatom y and Physiology I and II, M i crobiology and Chemistry courses in an accredited institution within the Unite d States or Canada to prepare them with medical term i nology/nomenclature skills. 6 A personal inte rview with the Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee is required The interview will be scheduled by the Dental Hygiene program follow ing a preliminar y screening of applicants 7 Following acceptance into the p rogram, the student must present documentation of a CPR Certification and D e ntal and Medical Examination that includes up -to-date i mmunization records. More information on this subject will be sent to the applicant following acceptance into the program. General Education Requirements Must be completed with a grade of 'Cor better Science courses must show cumulative GPA of 2 8 or better prior to enrollment date: General Education Requirements Credits Contacts ENG 121 English Composition 3 45 BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 50 BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physi ology II 4 60 BIO 205 Microbiolog y 4 60 CHE 106 General, Organic & Biochemistry 4 60 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 SOC 101 Intro to Sociology 3 45 or PSY 101 General Psy chology I or PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Development SPE "5 Principles of Speech 3 45 NUT 100 Intro to Nutrition 3 45 Total 31 455 DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM First Semester Credits Contacts DEH 101 Pre-Clinic Dental Hygiene Science 2 30 DEH 102 Pre-Clinic Care 2 90 DEH 103 Embryology & Histolog y 2 30 DEH 105 Radiology 3 45 DEH 107 Head & Neck Anatomy 2 30 DEH 109 Dental Anatomy 3 45 DEH 1" Medical & Dental Emergencies 2 60

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Second Semester DEH 150 Dental Hygiene Clinic Science I 2 DEH 152 Dental Hygiene Clinic Care I 3 DEH 154 Periodontology I 3 DEH 156 Applied Pharmacology 3 DEH 158 General & Oral Pathology 3 DEH 160 Preventive Dentistry 3 Total First Year 33 Third Semester Credits DEH 201 Dental Hygiene Clinic Science II DEH 203 Dental Hygiene Clinic Care II DEH 205 Dental Materials DEH 209 Local & Regional Dental Anesthesiology DEH 211 Community Dental Health Fourth Semester DEH 250 Dental Hygiene Clinic Science III DEH 252 Dental Hygiene Clinic Care III (Capstone) DEH 254 Period ontology II DEH 256 Community Field Experience DEH 258 Ethics & Issues in Dental Hygiene DEH 260 Practice Management Total Second Year Total for Program (Includes General Education Courses) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN DRAFTING FOR INDUSTRY The AAS D raftin g for Indust r y i ncludes five emphases: 2 4 3 3 3 2 4 3 3 2 30 94 30 90 45 45 45 45 630 Contacts 30 180 45 45 45 30 180 45 90 30 15 735 1820 C ivil /Topographic Mechanical, Structural, Process Piping and Electrical. All drafting exit competencies in all drafting programs will be measured by portfolio review at the end of the program. This program a lso allows students to transfer readily into a Bachelor of Science degree program to major in Technical and Industrial Administration. Associate of Applied Science Degree i n Drafting for Industry CIVILITOPOGRAPHIC EMPHASIS Drafting for Industry Civil/Topographic emphasis, prepares students for job-e n try position s on drafting teams for local, state and federal govern ment agencies and petroleum, geological, civil engineering, mineral development and planning companies. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C orbetter; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 w it h a C or better ; c. study skills at level 1; and d math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better 2 Completion of DRI 105 and 106 with a C or better General Education Requirements Credits Contacts ENG 131 Intro. to Technical Writing I 3 45 MAT 103 Contempora r y College Mathematics 3 45 PHY lOS Conceptua l Physics 4 75 AAS requirements in Arts, Humanities and Social Studies 5 75 Major Requirements DRI 105 Intro. to Drafting 5 113 CAD 110 Computer-Aided Drafting I 3 68 DRI 106 Dimensioning & Tolerancing 2 45 DRI 107 Geometric Toleranci ng 2 45 DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 45 DRI 1" Descriptive Geometry & Auxiliary Views 2 45 DRI 113 Intersections & Developments 3 68 DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 113 DRI 200 Intro. to Civil/Topographic Drafting 3 68 DRI 203 Intro to Architectural Draftin g 3 68 DRI 205 I ntro to Process Piping Drafting 2 45 DRI 207 Intro. to Structural Drafting 2 45 DRI 209 Intro. to Electrical Drafting 2 45 DRI 230 Civil/Topographic Drafting I 8 180 DRI 235 Civil/Topographi c Drafting II (Capstone) 4 90 Total 63 1323 With permission of the program faculty. DRI297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be used in place of other drafting courses. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Drafting for Industry ELECTRICAL EMPHASIS Drafting for Industry Electrical emphasis, prepares students for job entry position s on drafting and design teams in electrical, architectural and mechanical engineering firms. Program Admission Requi rements 1 Assessment scores o r course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C orbetter ; b reading at level 3a or completio n of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 1; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better. 2. Completion of DRI 105 and 106 with a C or better. General Education Requirements Credits Contacts ENG 131 Intro. to Technical Writing I 3 45 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 PHY lOS Conceptual Physics 4 75 AAS requirements in Arts, Humanities and Social Studies 5 75 ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS S8

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Major Requirements DRI 105 Intro. to Drafting CAD 110 Computer-Aided Draft ing I DRI 106 Dimensioning & Tolerancing DRI 1 07 Geo metric Tolerancing DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing DRI 111 Descr iptive Geometry & Aux iliar y Views DRI 113 Intersections & Developments DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting DRI 200 Intro. to Civil/Topograp hi c Drafting DRI 203 Intro. to Architectural Drafting DRI 205 Intro. to Process Piping Drafting DRI 207 Intro. to Structural Drafting ELT 100 DC Fundam entals ELT 102 AC Fundamentals DRI 209 Intro. to Electrical Drafting DRI 260 Electrica l Drafting (Capstone ) Total 5 3 2 2 2 2 3 5 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 6 62 113 68 45 45 45 45 68 113 68 68 45 45 60 40 45 136 1289 With permission of the program faculty, DRI297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be raken in place of ot h e r drafting courses. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Drafting for Industry MECHANICAL EMPHASIS Drafting for Indu s try, Me chanical emphasis, prepares students for jobent r y positions on drafting teams in industrial plants, engineering and manufacturing firms and governme ntal agencies. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment sco res or course e quival ents as follows: a English at level 3 or comple tion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. read ing at l eve l 3a or co mpletion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at l evel 1 ; and d. math at leve l 2a or complet i o n of MAT 035 with a C or better 2. Completion of DRI 105 and 106 with a C or better. General Education Requirements ENG 131 Intro. to Technical Writing I MAT 103 Conte mporar y College Mathematics PHY 105 Conce ptual Physics AAS requirements i n Arts Humanities and Social Sciences Major Requirements DRI 105 Intro. to D r afting CAD 110 Computer-Aided Drafting I DRI DRI DRI DRI DRI 1 06 Dime nsioning & Toleranc in g 1 07 Geome tric Tolerancing 109 Pictorial Drawing 111 Descriptive Geometry & Auxiliary Views 113 Intersec tion s & Developments DRI 116 Mecha nical Detail Drafti ng 59 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Credit s 3 3 4 5 5 3 2 2 2 2 3 5 Contacts 45 45 75 75 113 68 45 45 4 5 45 68 113 DRI 200 Intro to Civil/Topogr aphic Drafting DRI 203 Intro to Architectural D rafting DRI 205 Intro to Process Piping Drafting DRI 207 Intro to Structural Drafting DRI 209 Intro to Electrical Drafting DRI 220 Advanced Mechanical Drafting I DRI 225 Advanced Mechanical Drafting II (Capstone) Total 3 3 2 2 2 8 4 63 68 68 45 45 45 180 90 1323 With permission of the program faculty, DRI297 Cooperative Education (variable credit), and DRI299 Independent Study (variable credit) may be taken in place of other drafting courses. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Drafting for Industry PROCESS PIPING EMPHASIS Drafting for Industry, Process Piping emphasis, prepares students for job-entry positions on drafting and design teams in the petro/chemical industry, and design, engineeri ng and manufacturing firms that supply that industry Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b read ing at level 3a or complet i on of REA 090 with a C or bet ter ; c. study skills at level 1 ; and d math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better. 2 Completion of DRI 105 and 106 with a C or better General Education Requirements Credits ENG 131 Intro to Technical Writing I 3 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 PHY 105 Conce ptua l Physics 4 AAS requirements in Arts Humanities 5 and Social Sciences Major Requirements DRI 105 Intro to Drafting CAD 110 Computer-Aide d Drafting I DRI 106 Dimension i ng & Tolerancing DRI 107 Geometr i c Tolerancing DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing DRI 111 Descriptive Geometry & Auxil iary Views DRI 113 Intersections & Developments DRI 116 Mechan ical Detail Drafting DRI 200 Intro to Civil/Topogra ph ic Drafting DRI 203 Intro. to Architectural Drafting DRI 205 DRI 207 DRI 209 DRI 250 DRI 255 Intro to Process Piping Drafting Intro to Structural Drafting Intro to Electrical Drafting Process Piping Drafting I Process Piping Drafting II (Capsto ne) Total 5 3 2 2 2 2 3 5 3 3 2 2 2 8 4 63 Contacts 45 45 75 75 113 68 45 45 45 45 68 113 68 68 45 45 45 180 90 1323

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With permission of the program faculty, DRI297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI 299 Independenr Study (variable credit) may be taken in place of other drafting courses. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Drafting for Industry STRUCTURAL EMPHASIS Drafting for I ndustry Structural emphasis, prepares students for job entry positions on drafting and design teams for local, state and federal government agencies; civil, architectura l and mechanical enginee ring firms; and petroleum, mineral and planning firms. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 1 ; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better. 2. Completion of DRI 105 and 106 with a C or better General Education Requirements Credits Contacts ENG 131 Intro to Technical Writing I 3 45 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 PHY 105 Conceptual Physics 4 75 AAS requirements in Arts, Humanities 5 75 and Social Studies Major Requirements DRI 105 Intro to Drafting 5 113 CAD 110 Computer-Aided Drafting I 3 68 DRI 106 Dimensioning & Tolerancing 2 45 DRI 107 Geometr i c Toleranci ng 2 45 DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 45 DRI 111 Descript ive Geometry 2 45 & Auxiliary Views DRI 113 Intersections & Developments 3 68 DRI 116 Mechanical Detai l Drafting 5 113 DRI 200 Intro. to CivilfTopographic Drafting 3 68 DRI 203 Intro. to Architectural Drafting 3 68 DRI 205 Intro to Process Piping Drafting 2 45 DRI 207 Intro to Structural Drafting 2 45 DRI 209 Intro to Electrical Drafting 2 45 DRI 240 Structural Drafting I 8 180 DRI 245 Structural Drafting II (Capstone) 4 90 Total 64 1323 With permission of the program faculty, DRI297 Cooperative Education (variable credit) and DRI 2991ndependenr Study (variable credit) may be taken in place of other drafting courses. ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION This program meets the vocational trai ning needs for personnel involved in the care and education of young children (birth through 8 years) and all Colorado Department of Human Services licensing academic requirements. A grade of'(" or better is required in all degree classes. Graduate exit competency is measured by successful comple tion (C or better) of the ECE capstone course. Any student not com pleting CCD's capstone course must successfully complete with a C or better the exit competency test prior to approval of graduation. Program Admiss i on Requirement s 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 4 or completion of ENG 060 with a C orbetter; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 109 with a Cor better ; and d math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better General Educat i on Requ i rements Credits Contacts MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 ENG 100 Composition, Style & Technique 3 45 SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 SOC 101 Intro to Sociology I 3 45 PSY 235 Psychology of Growth & Development 3 45 or PSY 101 General Psychology Course from AAS Humanities Requirement 3 45 Major Requirements ECE 101 Intro. to Early Childhood Education 3 45 ECE 102 ECE Lab Experience 3 90 ECE 105 Nutrition & the Young Child 3 45 ECE 110 Child G r owth & Development 4 60 ECE 117 MethodsfTechnique s : 3 45 Curriculum Development ECE 120 Classroom Management 3 45 Techniques ECE 126 Administration of ECE Programs 4 60 ECE 235 Curriculum: Music/Movement 3 45 & the Young Child ECE 250 Supervised Student 5 188 Practicum/Semina r I ECE 251 Supervised Student 5 188 Practicum/Seminar II (Capstone) A S SOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM S 60

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Select 9 credits from the following: ECE 111 Infants & Toddlers : Development Theories & Practices ECE 115 Curriculum: Creativity & the Young Child ECE 215 Curriculum: Science/ Math & the Young Child ECE 225 Curriculum: Anti-Bias ECE 245 Curriculum: Art & the Young Child Tot a l ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN ElEGRONICS TECHNOLOGY 9 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 63 135 (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) 1302 This program prepa res students with job-entry skills in assembly test ing, repair and maintenance of electronic equipment. Basic knowledge to advance into mor e detailed and specific areas with further training and experience is p r ov id ed This prog r am also allows students to readily transfer into a Bachelor of Science degree program to major in Technical and Industria l Administration. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 1; and d math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better. 2. Complete ELT 1 00 and 101 with a C or better. General Education Requirements Credits MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 PHY 105 Concept ual Physics 4 SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 ENG 131 Intro to Technical Writing I 3 (must be completed in first 2 semesters) CIS 118 Intro to Computers Major Requirements ELT 100 DC Fund amentals ELT 101 DC Cir c u its & Magnetism ELT 102 AC Fundamentals ELT 103 AC Circuits ELT 104 Complex Circuit Analysis ELT 110 Diode Circuits ELT 111 Transistor Ampl ifiers ELT 112 JFETs & Oscillators ELT 114 IC Operational Amplifiers ELT 200 Pulse & Digital Fundamentals ELT 201 Digita l Circuits ELT 202 Micro pr ocessor Fundamentals ELT 203 Microprocessor & Microcomputer Systems ELT 210 Communications I ELT 211 Instrum ents & Measurements I ELT 285 Troubleshooting Techniques for Analog & Dig ital Systems (Capstone) Total 61 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER 4 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 5 63 Contacts 45 75 45 45 68 60 40 40 60 60 60 60 40 60 60 60 40 60 60 60 100 1198 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY Associate of Applied Science Degree in Environmental and Refrigeration Technology COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL REFRIGERATION, HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING This program prepares students with jobentry skills in the fields of commercial industrial refrigeration, heating and air conditioning Demonstrated mastery of skills is requ ired. Programs are open entry/open-exit. Students may complete some of the courses, enter the work force then retum at any time to either complete the program for a certificate or degree or upgrade specific skills. To satisfy the requirements for an Associate degree the RAC courses must be taken in the listed sequence. Exit competencies will be measured by a com prehensive examination and fina l "hands -on' project assigned by the instructor This program also allows students to transfer readily into a Bachelor of Science degree program majoring in Technical and Industrial Administration Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 1; and d math at level 2a or compl etion of MAT 035 with a C or better. 2. Complete RAC 111 and 112 w i th a C or better. General Education Requirements ENG 131 Intro. to Technical Writing I MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics PHY 105 Conceptua l Physics SPE 115 Principles of Speech SOC 101 Intro to Sociology Major Requirements CAD Computer-Aided Drafting Elective RAC 111 Elect r icity & Electronics I RAC 112 RAC 114 RAC 116 RAC 200 RAC 205 RAC 208 RAC 211 RAC 212 Elect r icity & Electronics II Fundamentals of Refrigerat ion I Fundamentals of Refrigeration II Refrigerat i on Systems, Components & Applicat ions Heat Loads & System Development Special Refrigera tion Systems Installation & Service Refri geration Systems Fundamentals of Air Conditioning ELT 113 Waveforms Harmonics & RAC 214 RAC 215 RAC 216 RAC 297 Direct Digital Sensors Unitary & Central Station Systems Air Flow Pri nciples & Distr i bution HVAC Control Systems Cooperative Education or RAC 299 Independent Study Credits 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 Contacts 45 45 75 45 45 68 68 45 45 68 68 45 68 68 68 45 68 45 68 90-135

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4 75 RAC 285 Troubleshooting & Servicing (Capstone) Tota l 60 1229 1252 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN GRAPHIC ARTS (PRINTING) This program prepares students with job-entry skills to accomplish most operati o n s necessar y o n t h e process cam e r a and the offset p r ess. Students a lso will be able to work in basic bindery, stripping, general layout and composition, elect r onic page make up and prepress. Upon completion of the program, students will be equipped to enter positions with commercial print shops, trade shops, in-plant shops and any other operati o n requiring pri nters. Program Adm issi on Requirements 1. Assessm ent scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 2 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or bett er; b reading at level 3a or completion of R E A 090 with a C o r b etter; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or bet ter ; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better. 2. Meet w i th a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature. General Education Requirements ENG 131 Intro. to Technical Writing MAT 103 PSY 101 Contemporary College Mathematics General Psychology I Select 1 course from the fol/owing AAS General Education Requirements: ART151; LIT 115,201,202; MUS 120; CHN 101,JPN 101. SPA 101 Major Requirements GRA 101 Intro. to Graphic Arts & Traditional Layout GRA 102 Electronic Composition Art & Copy Prep GRA 103 Line & Halhone Photography GRA 104 Digital Halhone Photography SPE 115 Principles of Speech or GRA 105 Resume & Portfolio GRA 109 Microcomputing GRA 111 Beginning Offset Presses GRA 112 Stripping Image Assembly, Platemaking & Inks GRA 113 Paper & Ink Man agement & Print Production I GRA 114 Intermediate Offset Press & Print Production II GRA 201 Electronic Graphics GRA 202 Electronic Page Layout Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Contad s 45 45 45 45 67.5 67.5 67.5 67.5 45-67.5 22.5 60 60 60 60 68 68 GRA 203 Electronic Scanner 3 68 & Color Theory GRA 204 Electronic Pre press 3 68 GRA 205 Photo Manip ulation 3 68 GRA 185 Bindery & P o r tfolio 3 60 (Speech Intensive) or GRA 285 Printers Por tfolio & Advanced Printing Techniques (Capstone) (Speech Intensive) GRA 299 Independent 5tudies/ 3-6 68-136 GRA Internsh ip Total 61-64 1225.5 132 4 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN GRAPHIC DESIGN This p rogram is designed t o provide the skills necessary for entry into the field of graphic deSign The graphic design field broadly covers pro ductio n of paste-up art, graphic or advertisin g design and illustration. The Graphic Design program allows students to develop basic skills common to all three specialties while developing an emphasis in one. S t udents are expected to buy thei r own tools and materials. The beginning program courses require an original investment of between $100 and $300, and students are expected to add needed tools and materials as the program progresses. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 2 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better 2 Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature. General Educat i on Requirement s SPE 115 Principles of Speech ENG 121 English Composition I MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathemat ics Selec t AAS general education courses from 2 of the fol/ow ing 3 areas: Arts and Humanities Physical a n d Biological Sciences Social and Behavioral Sciences Major Requ irements ART 121 Drawing I ART 131 Design I GRD 100 Lettering & Typographic Design GRD 103 MAC Computer Art GRD 105 Advertising Typography & Layout GRD 107 Rendering/Mixed Media GRD 200 Advertisin g Design & Portfolio Preparation Credits 3 3 3 6 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Contads 45 45 45 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 ASSO CIATE DEGREE PROGRAM S 62

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GRD 203 Adobe Illu strator GRD 206 Graphic Design Produ ct i o n & P r epress I G R D 207 G raphic Design P r o du c tion & Prepress II GRD 209 Quark Express GRD 220 Intr o to Pho tosh o p GRD 297 Graphic Design I n terns h i p GRD 285 Creativ e G r aphic D esig n & Port f o lio Pre p a r atio n (Capstone ) Select 2 c ourses from the following: ART 122 Drawing II/Mixed Media ART 132 Design II ART 151 Fundamentals of Black & Whi t e P h o t o graph y ART 211 Painting I MUM 101 Intro. t o Multimedia Total ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN HEALTH AND WELLNESS MANAGEMENT 3 90 3 90 3 90 3 90 3 90 3 135 3 90 6 158 180 (3) (90) (3) (90) (3) (90) (3) (90) (3) (68) 63 1688 1710 This program is designed t o prepare s tudent s for entry -level employ m e nt i n th e b road field of health and well ness. S ome the occupations for w hich students will be prepared i nclude per sonal care providers h o m e heal t h aides, fitness center staff health promotion and well ness coo rdinat o r s wi thin business and indu s tr y wellness educators with healt h insurance companies or national heal th o rganizations (i.e. Amer ican Cancer Soci e ty), diet center staff, fit ness resort staff, and fit ness event coo r di na tor s or staff (i.e'-Run for the Cure' ) I t i s p ossible many o f t h e oc cupations for whi c h students will be prepa r e d have not y et been created H e alth a nd well ness promotion i s on the cutting edg e o f healt h care, fitne s s social services and educatio n As heal t h care reform takes hold, we e x pect the health and wellness job market to exp lode P ro g r am Admission Requ i r e ments 1 Assessment scores o r course e qui valents as f o llows : a. English at level 3 o r completio n o f ENG 100 with a C or better ; b reading at level 3 a or compl e tion o f REA 090 with a C or bette r ; c. s tud y skills at level 3 o r completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d math at level 3 o r completio n of MAT 105 with a C or better 2 S i g n a tur e authorizatio n o n comp l eted program application from the H e a l th and Well ness Manag e ment program coordinator .To apply to t he p rogram, arrange an app o intm e nt w ith the program coordinator i n the South Classr oo m Build ing, r oo m 301, (303) 556-2472. Genera l Education Requ i r e m e nts Must be complete d w ith a grad e o f"(" or be tter Credits Contacts BIO 1 1 1 Gener a l College Biol o g y I 5 90 ENG 121 English Comp ositio n 3 45 o r E N G 131 Intro to Tec h n ical Writ i n g I 6 3 COMMUNIT Y COLLEGE OF DENV E R MAT 121 College Algebra 3-4 45-60 or MAT 135 Intro. to Statistics SOC 101 Intro. to Soci ology 3 45 SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 PSY 101 General Psychology I 3 45 or ECO 202 Principle s of Micro Economics AAS Humanities requirement 3 45 Major Requ i rements ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60 BUS 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 BUS 236 Principles of Marketing 3 45 CIS 118 Intro to Computers 3 45 GNT 201 Intro. to Gerontology 3 45 HWM 101 Essentials of Total Fitness & Wellness 3 45 HWM 103 First-aid & CPR 2 30 HWM201 Health Psychology 3 45 HWM205 Educational Principle s of Health & Well ness 3 45 NUT 100 Nutrition 3 45 PER 100 Aerobics 2 45 HSE 213 S ubstance Abuse: A Multi-M o del Approa c h 3 45 or PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Development 3 45 HWM 285 Health & Well nes s Practicum (Caps tone) 2 90 Total 63 -64 1 03 51050 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN HUMAN SERVICES This program prepares s tudents for entrylevel employment i n commu nities and institu t ions that serve clients with a variety of human needs. Students may choose to focus on specific skill areas, such as social service agenCies, health care centers, youth services, substance abuse programs, geriatric center s child abuse, community corrections cri sis centers and domestic violence With the except ion of MAT 103, the MS in human services degree at CCD may be transferred to the Human Services Department at MSCD. Students who wish to meet the MSCD Human Services Department's mathemat ics requirement while at CCD are advised to take MAT 135. AAS students in human services must earn a grade of 'e or better in all general education and maj or course requirements. Program Adm i s s ion Requ i rements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 1 b or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better; b reading at level 2 or comp letion of REA 060 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 2 or complet i on of REA 060 w i th a C or better ; and d math at level 2a or complet i on of MAT 056 with a C or better. 2. Signature authorization on program application from Human Services faculty advisor

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General Educa t ion Requi rements Credits Contacts G e neral Education Requirements Credits Contacts ENG 131 I ntro to Technical Writing I SPE 115 Principle s o f S peech 3 45 or 3 45 ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45 ENG 121 English Composition MAT 103 Cont e m po r a r y College Mathematics 3 45 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3-5 45-7 5 T otal 9 135 or h i gher SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 Select AAS gen eral educat i o n c ourses from PSY 101 Intro. to Psyc holog y 2 of the following 3 a r e a s : 6-8 90 120 or A rts and Humanities SOC 101 Intro to Sociology P hysica l and B iologica l Sci e nces Social and Behavioral Sciences or PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth 3 45 & Development Major Requir e ments GRA 1 0 9 Mic r oco mp uting 22.5 AAS Hum anities requirement 3 45 MUM 100 I ntro t o Macintosh 1 22.5 M U M 101 Intro. t o Mult imedia 3 68 Maj o r Requirements MUM 104 Design for the Computer 3 68 HSE 105 Intro to Social Welfare 3 45 GRD 103 MAC Comp u ter Art 3 90 HSE 106 Survey of Human Services 3 45 MUM 1 0 5 Image P rocessing & Manipulation 3 68 Offered Fall Semester Only : MUM 107 Integrat e d Video Productio n Studio 3 68 HSE 107 Interviewing Principles & Practices 3 45 MUS 202 Music Theory IV 3 45 HSE 109 Soci a l Issues i n Human Services 3 4 5 M U M 206 Fractal Design Studio 3 68 HSE 205 Human Services for Groups 3 45 MUM 207 Multimedia A n imation Stu d i o 3 68 HSE 206 Human Services for Families 3 4 5 MUM 285 Mult i media P ortfolio Prepar ation 3 68 HSE 207 Commun ity Organization 3 4 5 (Speech Intensive Capstone) HSE 211 Human Services Practi cum II 4 150 MUM 2 9 7 Multimedia Internship 3-6 135-270 Offered Spring Semester Only: T o t a l 33 739 806 HSE 108 I ntro to Therapeutic Systems 3 45 HSE 115 Human Services Practicum I 4 150 Associate of Applied Science Degree i n Multimedia D esign HSE 208 Social Welfare Policy 3 4 5 COMPUTER GRAPHICS EMPHASIS HSE 209 Crisis Theory & Intervention 3 45 ART 131 Design I 3 90 HSE 2 1 2 Human Services Prac t icum III 7 285 G R D 203 Adobe Illustrator 3 90 (Capstone) GRD 209 Q u a r k Xpress (Capstone) 3 90 Total 60-62 1260 1290 GRD 2 2 0 Introductio n to Photoshop 3 90 MUM 2 1 0 3-D Modeling and Animation 3 90 T otal 15 450 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN MULTIMEDIA DESIGN Associate of Applied Science Degree in Multimedia Design Thi s program is desi gned to provide s t udents with skills necessary for GRAPHIC ARTS EMPHASIS entry int o the field o f mul t imedi a design S tudents may c h oose to GRA 102 Electronic Composition, Art & focus on specific skill areas, such as computer graphics, graphic design, Copy Prepar ation 3 67.5 music, video production or graphi c arts. The Mult i med i a Design pro-GRA 103 Line & Halft o n e Photography 3 67.5 gram allows students to develop basi c skills common t o all five specialGRA 104 Digital H a l ftone Photography 3 67.5 ties while develop ing an emphasis i n o ne. GRA 107 Intro to Web & Homepage 3 67.5 GRA 202 Electr onic Page Layout 3 68 Program Admissi on Require ment s T ota l 15 338 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a English at level 3 or comp l etion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; Associate of Applied Science Degree i n Multimedia Design b reading at level 3 or complet ion of REA 115 w it h a C or better; GRAPHIC DESIGN EMPHASIS c. study skills at level 1 ; and G R D 100 Lettering & Typographic Design 3 90 d. mat h at level 2 a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better. GRD 105 A dvertising T ypography & Layout 3 90 2. Signature auth orizat ion on program application from M U M G R D 200 Ad Design & Portfoli o Preparation 3 90 faculty advisor. GRD 206 Graphic Design Production & Pre press I 3 90 3 All students are required to be co mputer literate before entering GRD 285 Creative G r aphic Design & Portfoli o 3 90 the program Student s may comp lete deficiencies (GRD 102, Preparation (Capstone) I ntro to M acintosh) concurrently w ith the beginn ing cour ses in Tot a l 15 450 the program ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 6 4

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Associate of Applied Science Degree in Multimedia Design MUSIC EMPHASIS MUS 101 Music Theory I 3 MUS 102 Music Theory II 3 MUS 220 Computer Music Composing 3 MUS 221 Computer Music Arranging 3 Total 12 Associate of Applied Science Degree in Multimedia Design PHOTOGRAPHY EMPHASIS 45 45 45 45 180 c. reading assessment level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or bette r ; and d study skills assessment level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better All prospective nursing students must take the Basic Skills Assessment, There are no exceptions 2 Submit a Nursing program application Students must attend a mandatory nursing orientation, held every Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. in the South C lassroom Building, room 246. Students should bring a PHO 101 Fundamentals of Photography 3 90 copy of their Basic Skills Assessment results and student transcripts PHO 102 Fundamentals of Color Photography 3 90 of course work at CCD or other colleges attended PHO 107 History of Photography 3 90 Student s should submit their application as soon as they PHO 204 Intro to Digital Imaging 3 PHO 205 Non-Chemical Printing 3 Total 15 Associate of Applied Science Degree in Multimedia Design VIDEO PRODUCTION/COMMUNICATIONS COM 251 Intro to Television Production 3 COM 255 Survey of Film 3 COM 257 Videography 3 COM 258 Script & Storyboard Writing 3 COM 259 Media Writing /Media Overview 3 Tot a l 15 90 90 450 45 45 45 45 45 225 Program Total 62 65 1144-1511 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN NURSING This program prepares the student to practice as a professional nurse through a two -year course of study The program begins in the fall term, and continues fall and spring semesters for two academic years. After the first semester, students receive a nurse aide certificate and are eligible for state certification. After successfully comp leting the first year, students will receive a certificate in practical nursing, while com pletion of the full two-year program results in an Associate of Applied Science degree. After students receive the AAS degree, they are eligi ble to take the licensur e exam to become a registered nurse. Application materials must be submitted by March 1 to be considered for admission into the class beginning fall of the academic year. Eligible applicants are selected first come, first served, based on the date their applications were received by the Nursing Office, South Classr oom Building, room 312. Appl icants not accepted are considered for the following year. Graduate exit competency is measured by suc cessful completion of the capstone course, NUR 285 Comprehensive Nursing. The Nursing program is a member of the Colorado Nursing Articulation Project. Credit earned by completing the AAS degree is accepted by Colorado baccalaureate-level nursing programs under the terms of the articulation agreement. Program Admission Requirements There are four steps for admission into the nursing program. 1. Qualify for an appl ication by meeting the following criteria: a E nglish assessment level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. math assessment level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better ; 65 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER meet the above qualifications. Applicants are considered for admission according to the date the complete application packet is received in the Nursing office A completed application packet includes the program appli cation, a copy of the Basic Skills Assessment, two sealed letters of reference dated with i n the past two years (one letter must be from a supervisor or teacher) and official transcripts from other colleges attended. Official transcripts also must be sent to the CCD registrar for credit evaluation and official transfer of course work. 3. Be enrolled in BIO 202 by March 1 of the year of intended entry Students must have completed BIO 201 with aC' or better and also have completed one other general education prerequisite course listed in #4 below. 4. Complete the following first-year prerequisites with a C or better by the beginning of the fall of the year of intended entry. Firstyear Prerequisites Credits Contacts and/or General Education NUT 100 Intro. to Nutrition 3 45 *BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 75 *BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75 MAT 100 or higher 3-5 45-75 (MAT 121 or 135 are recommended for students expect ing to transfer to a four-year college.) *PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth 3 45 & Development ENG 121 English Composition 3 45 Secondyear Prerequisites and/or General Education Humanities Core E l ective (See AAS curriculum for list of approved courses.) 3 45 *BIO 205 Microbiology 3-4 60-75 (Courses taken at another institution must have lab component.) Must have been completed within the past 10 years. Major Requirements First and Second Year NUR 101 Core Concepts of Pharmacolo gy 22.5 NUR 102 Core Concepts of Nursing 1 22.5 NUR 103 Phar macology for Nursing 2 45 NUR 109 Basic Nursing Skills 6 135 NUR 111 Nursing Concepts & Issues 6 135 NUR 112 Nursing Care of the Hospitalized Client I 4 90

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NUR 113 Nursing Car e of the Older Adult 4 90 NUR 114 Family-Centered Nursing I 4 90 NUR 202 Management of Intravenous Therapy 1 17 NUR 208 Nursing Assessment & Diagnosis 4 90 NUR 211 Mental Health Nursing 4 90 NUR 212 Nursing Care of the Hospitalized C lient II 4 90 NUR 210 Family-Centered Nursing Care II 4 90 NUR 214 Nursing Leader s hip & Management 4 90 NUR 285 Comprehensive Nursing I nternship 3 135 (Capstone) Total 78-81 1667-1712 NURSING: ADVANCED PLACEMENT Graduates o f approved schools of practical nursing may enter the second year of the Nursing program to become graduate professional nurses. Applicants must meet the following admission requirements : provide two letters of recommendation and submit transcripts of PN educatio n and other related course work to both the registrar and the nursing coordinator. The Nursing program is a member of the Colorado Nursing Articula tion Project. Applicants must have their practical nurse education evaluated under the terms of the articulation agreement. If the student graduated 10 years or more from the practi cal nurse level, or from an o ut-of-state non-college program ACT-PEP or NLN Mobil ity Testing must be completed to validate education. Students will receive advising regarding preparation for testing. Under the articulation agreement students are given 30 hours of credit from the practical nurse level. Applicants must comp lete BIO 201 and BIO 202, and three other general education courses before enrolling in NUR 126, the br i dge course. Admission into the clinical courses depends on c ompletion of all general edu cation courses and NUR 126, and is subject to available clinical space. Program begins in the fall semester only. Applicants should contac t the nursing coordinator or program assistant at (303) 556-3624 for informat ion and application. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equi v alent s a s follows: a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 w ith a C or better ; b. reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 w it h a Cor better ; and d math at level 2a o r c ompletion of MAT 035 with a C or better Prerequisites and/or General Education *BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I *BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II ENG 121 English Composition I *PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Development Credits 4 4 3 3 Contacts 75 7 5 45 45 MAT 100 or higher 3-5 45-75 BIO 205 I ntro to Microb i ology 3-4 60-75 (If course taken at another inst itution must have lab component.) Humanities Core Elective (See AAS curriculum for list of approved courses.) 3 45 NUR 126 Nursing Process: Concepts & Skills 15 C redit awarded for Practical Nurse Education unde r Colorado Nursing Art iculation Agreement. 28 338 Major Requirements Second Year NUR 202 Management of Intravenous Therapy 1 17 NUR 208 Nursing Assessment & Diagnosis 4 90 NUR 211 Mental Health Nursing 4 90 NUR 212 NurSing Care of the Hosp italized Client II 4 90 NUR 210 Family-Centered Nursing Care II 4 90 NUR 214 Nursing Leadership & Management 4 90 NUR 285 Comprehensive Nursing Internship 3 135 (Capstone) Total 76-81 1345 -1390 Transfer credit accepted if completed within last 10 years. ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN PARALEGAL This program is designed t o prepare s tudents w ith job-entry skills for the general paralegal field. Emphasis is placed on practical skills such as interviewing research and d ocument drafting Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or c ourse equivalent s as follows: a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completio n of REA 109 with a C or better; and d math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better. 2 Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain an authorized signature. General Education Requirements Credits Contacts ENG 121 English Compo sition I 3 45 MAT 121 College Algebra 4 60 or MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 Se/t 7 course from the following AAS Humanities requirements: 3 5 45 ART 111, 112; CIS 118; HUM 121, 122,123; LIT 115,201,202 MUS 120,121.122; PHI 111,112 ,113 Any foreign language 111 or higher ; THE 105,211,212 Se/t 7 course from the following AAS Social & Behavioral Sciences requirements: 3 45 ANT 101,lll;ECO 201,202;GEO 105; HIS 101,102,20 1 ,202; PSY 101,102; POS lOS, 111;SOC 101,102 ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 66

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Major Requirements 1 from following 6 90 PAR 121 Int ro. to Paralegal 3 45 AAS Arts & Humanities requirement s PAR 124 Legal Research 3 45 MS Physical & B i ological Sciences requirements PAR 221 Civil Procedures 3 45 AAS Social & Behavioral Sciences requirements PAR 222 Evidence 3 45 PAR 223 Comp uters & the Law 3 45 Major Requirements PAR 280 Paralegal Workshop 6 225 ART 121 Drawing I 3 90 BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45 ART 131 Design I 3 90 PHO 101 Fundamentals of Photography 3 90 Select 9 courses from the following: 1530 375 .... 50 PHO 102 Fundamentals of 3 90 PAR 105 Torts (3) (45) Color Photography PAR 109 Propert y (3) (45) PHO 107 H istory of Photography 3 90 PAR 115 Domestic Relations (3) (45) PHO 111 Intermed iate Black & 3 90 PAR 125 Tax Law (3) (45) White Photography PAR 126 Creditor / Debtor / Bankruptcy (3) (45) PHO 112 Intermediate Color Photography 3 90 PAR 185 Paralegal Synthesis I (3) (45) PAR 201 Business Organizations (3) (45) Select 2 courses from the following: 6 180 PAR 205 Probate (3) (45) PHO 201 View Camera Tech nique s (3) (90) PAR 207 Legal Research Seminar I (3) (45) PHO 202 Studio Lighting (3) (90) PAR 208 Legal Research Seminar II (3) (45) PHO 203 The Fine Print (3) (90) PAR 214 Administrative Law (3) (45) PAR 231 Investigations I (3) (45) Select 2 courses from the following : 6 180 PAR 239 Criminal Law (3) (45) PHO 211 Portrait Photography ( 3 ) (90) PAR 241 Environmental Law I (3) (45) PHO 212 Landscape Photography (3) (90) PAR 252 Constitutional Law (3) (45) PHO 213 Craft & Expression (3) (90) PAR 258 Contracts (3) (45) PAR 297 Cooperative Education (3-6) (30180) Select a minimum of 9 credit hours 9 270 PAR 299 Indepe ndent Study (1-3) (30-90) from the following: PAR 285 Paralegal Synthesis II (Capstone) 3 45 ART 211 Painting I ( 3 ) (90) Total 67 72 1 ooSl 080 ART 132 Design II ( 3 ) (90) BUS 115 Intro. to Business (3) (45) GRD 103 MAC Computer Art (3) (90) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN GRD 105 Advertising Typography & Layout (3) (90) PHOTOGRAPHY GRD 220 I ntro to Photoshop (3) (90) This program provides technical and aesthetic trainin g to prepare gradPHO 290 Special Topics (1-3) (30-90) uates with the skills necessary to enter the field of professional photog PHO 295 Job Search Workshop (1) (15) raphy, including f reelance, portrait a n d creative pho tography. PHO 297 Cooperative Education (3-6) (30-180) (variable credit) P r ogram Adm ission Requirements PHO 285 Seminar in Photography (Capstone) 3 90 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: Total 60 1755 a English at level 2 o r completion of ENG 060 w ith a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion o f REA 090 w ith a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or comp l etion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d. math at level 2a or comple tion of MAT 056 with a C or better 2. Meet with a faculty program advisor and obtain a n authorized s i gnature General Educat i on Courses Credits Contacts ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45 MAT 121 College Algebra 3 45 or MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 67 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER

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ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN RADIOGRAPHY The Radiography program prepares the student for an entry-level position as a radiographer in a variety of medical settings. The program consists o f five semesters of course work that includes classroom, labo ratory and clinical internship experience. Graduates earn an Associate of Applied Science deg ree and are eligible to apply for registration b y the American Registry of Radiol ogic Technolog i s ts. The program begins fall semester of each year. Info rmation and requirements can be obtaine d from the Educational Planning and Advising Center. Students who are interested in articulating their career with a Bachelor of Science degree should contact the degree-awarding institution for information regarding transferable prerequisite course work. Program Admission Requirements There are two steps for a dmission into the radiography program. 1. Qualify for an applicatio n b y meet ing the following criteria: a English assessment level 3 or completion of ENG 100 w ith a C or better ; b. m a th assessment level 2a o r c ompletion of MAT 035 with a C o r b etter; c. reading assessmen t level 3 o r complet io n of REA 151 with a C o r b e tt e r ; and d. study skills assessment level 3 or completion of REA 109 wit h a C o r better. All prospective Radiography students must take the Basic Skills Assessment. There are no exceptions. To get an application studen t s must meet with a radiography prog ram advisor. Call (303) 556-2472 t o make an appo intment. Bring a copy of the Basic Skills Assessment results and student transcri pt s of c ourse work at CCD, or other colleges attended It is important to submit an application a s soon as the above qual ifications a r e met. Applicants are accepted for admission by the date the comp leted application packet is received. A completed applicatio n packet includes the program application copies of Basic Skills Assessment results, a copy of the high s chool diploma or GED and an educational plan. 2 Compl e t e the following gen eral educat i o n requirements w ith a'e or better prior to starting the program General Educat i on Requirements ENG 121 English Composition I Select either 810119 or both 810 201 and 202 : *BIO 119 Radiographic Anatomy or both *BIO 201 Anatomy & Physiology I and *BIO 202 Anatomy & Physiol ogy II Select 1 course from the following: MAT 100 E l ementary Algeb r a MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics Credits 3 4 8 (4) (4) (4) 3-4 (3) (3) Contacts 45 60-150 (60) (75) ( 75) 45-60 (60) (45) MAT 105 Intermedia t e Algebra (4) MAT 121 College A lgebra (4) MAT 135 Intro to Statistics (3) Select 1 course from the following: 3 SOC 101 Intro. to Sociology I (3) PSY 1 0 1 General Psychology I (3) PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth (3) & Development Must have been completed within the past five years. Radiography Program Fall RTR 102 Radiographic Imaging I RTR 103 Radio graphic Equipment RTR 104 Radiographic Internship I RTR 105 Radiographic Patient Care I Spring RTR 112 Radiographic Imaging II RTR 113 Radi ographic Equipment II RTR 114 Radiographic Internship II RTR 115 Radiographic Patient Care II Summer RTR 124 Radiographic Internship III Fall RTR 202 Imaging III (Speech Intensive) RTR 203 Radiation Biology/Protectio n RTR 204 Radiographic Internship IV Spring RTR 214 Radi ograp hic Int ernship V RTR 216 Radiography Capstone Total Credits 3 3 5 3 3 3 5 3 7 3 2 8 11 3 75-78 (60) (60) (45) 45 (45) (45) (45) Contacts 45 45 225 45 45 45 225 45 315 45 30 360 495 45 2205 -231 0 A SSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 68

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ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN RECREATIONAL ASSISTANT The Recreational Assistant program awards either the AAS degree or the certificate of program completion. Upon successful complet ion of 400 hours of extern ship experiences, the graduate qualifies under the Nation a l Recreation a n d Park Association as a Certified Leisure Assistant. This program is currently in the process of articulating with bachelor's degree programs for transfer of credits for the BS degree in recreation therapy. Two of the p rogram' s courses are offered as open enrollment and can be taken by anyone interested in the Recreation Assistant pro gram, or in the activities taught. To earn the AAS degree in the Recreational Assistan t program, the stu dent must complete all required courses with a C' or better Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 3 or comple tion of ENG 100 wit h a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d math at level 2b or completio n of MAT 103 with a C or better 2 Signature authorization on comp l e ted program application from the Recreational Assistant program coordinator.To apply to the program arrange an appointment with the program coordinator i n the South Classroom Building.room 301,(303) 556-2472. General Education Requirements Credits C ontacts BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physi o l ogy I 4 7 5 ENG 121 English Composi t ion I 3 45 or ENG 131 Intro to Technical Writing I MAT 135 Intro. to Statistics 3 45 PSY 101 General Psychology I 3 45 PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Development 3 45 SOC 101 Intro. to Sociol ogy 3 45 SPE 115 Principles of Speech 3 45 AAS Humanities requirement 3 45 Othe r Required Courses BUS 115 Intro to Business 3 45 CIS 118 Intro. to Computers 3 45 Recreati onal A s s i stant Program Credits Contacts Fall RAE 201 Intro. to Recreational Leisure 3 45 RAE 202 Intro to Recreational Therapy 3 45 RAE 205 Recreational Assistant Externshi p I 4 180 RAE 207 Specialized Areas in Recreation Electives 4 60 (Open enrollment. Offered spring semester, also.) SOC 103 Sociol ogy of Health Care 3 45 69 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Spring RAE 203 Recreation & Leisure i n Special Populatio n s 3 45 RAE 204 Health & Safety in Recreation & Leisure 3 45 RAE 207 Specialized Areas in Recreation E lectives (4) (60) (Open enrollment. Offered fall semester, also.) RAE 285 Recreational Assistant Externship II 5 225 Total S9 1170 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN TRADES The Trades AAS degree program consists of a maximum of 58 semester credit hours of trade-specific credits. Students may earn this credits via apprenticeship training (classroom and on-the-job hours) or technical education course work and training, plus a maximum of 20 credit hours of core general education courses at CCD. For those registered apprentices who complete a three-year registered apprenticeship program, 20 CCD credit hour s will be required; for those completing a four-year or five-year apprenticeship program, 17 CCD general education credits will be required. Students completing CCDfTEC certificate course sequences and wishing to pursue the AAS degree must complete a m i n i mum of 25 semester hours of general education credit and a mini mum of 60 credit hours as noted below Associate of Applied Science Degree in Trades CONSTRUCTION This program is offered joi ntly by CCD, Emily Griffith Opportunity School and the Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee Students enrolled in apprenticeship training part of this program are not eligible for financial aid from CCD. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assess ment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 3 or comp l etion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b reading at level 3a or complet ion of REA 090 w i th a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 w ith a C or better 2 Official transcri pt showing completion of Emily Griffith Opportunity School's Apprenticeship program. Apprenticeship Training Credits Fourto five-year trai ning and Capstone 43 Three-year training and Capstone 40 General Education Requirements ENG 121 o r 131 3 MAT1030r121 4 Contacts 3870 3600 45 60

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Select 7 course from the following AAS Physical and B iological Sciences requirements: 4 5 80-705 AST 101, 102; 810105, 111,112 (HE 101, 102, 111, 112; GEY 111; PHY 105,111,112,211,212 Select 7 course from the following AAS Humanities requirements: 3-4 45-68 ART 111, 112; CIS 118; HUM 121,122,123; LIT 115,201,202 MUS 120,121,122 ; PHI 111, 112, 113 Any foreign language 111 or higher ; THE 105,211,212 Select 7 course from the following AAS Social & Behavioral Sciences requirements: 3 45 ANT 101, 111;ECO 201,202;GE O 105; HIS 101, 102,201,202;PSY 101,102; POS 105, 111;SOC 101,102 SPE 115 Intro. to Speech 3 45 (3-year apprent iceship program only) Total 63 -68 3985-4295 ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 70

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In addition t o associate degree programs, specially desi g ned courses and sequences leading to the awarding of certificates have been designed in cooperation with business, commerce and local government. These certificate s provide o pportun ity and rewar d s for persons seeking to improve skills in their occupational fields. Courses in certificate sequences are applicable t o appropriate associate degree programs. Student Performance Objectives for Vocational Education (Certificate Programs) Student s who complete vocationa l p rograms will b e able to perform the following: 1 Basic and advanced academic skills appropriate to the profession. a Basic skills: reading, writing, mathematics speaking, listening ; b. Thinking skills: ability to learn, reason, make decisions, solve problems; 2. General occupational skills appr o p riate t o the profession. a. Information : abilit y to acquir e and evaluate data, organize and maintain files, use compute r s t o process information. b. I nterpersona l : abilit y to work o n teams and with people teach othe rs, serve customers, lead negotiate; value and serve, work well with and for people from diverse cultures. c. Personal: responsibility, self -management, i ntegrity ; personal, professional and social e thics. d Resources: ability to allocate time, money, materials, space and staff. e. Systems: unde rstand technolog ical, organizational and social systems; monitor and correct performance, design or improve syst e ms. f Technology: sel ect equipment, apply technology to specific tasks. 3. Specific occupational skills that includ e all aspects of the profession. These include planning, management finances, underlying principles of technology, technical skills, labor and community issues, health and safety and environmental issues. Each vocational prog ram has identifie d student performance objectives for each vocational p rogram area. These p e rformance objective s are given t o s tudent s during the advising process. They are collectively bound and publishe d for general distr i bution and constitute the college's guarantee to the employer. Copies are available in division and counselin g offices. Certificate Program Entry Requirements Student s must apply for entry to all certificate programs. Program application forms are available in the South Classroom Building room 134 and in instructional division offices. 71 COMMUNITY COLLEG E OF D ENVER ACCOUNTING This is recommended for students who wish to s tudy basic business fundamentals while developing entry-level accounting skills, and con s t itutes an acceptable first-year curriculum in accounting and business for an associate degree. Program Admission Requi rements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or compl etion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b reading at level 3a or compl etion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or compl etion of REA 109 with a Cor better; and d. math at level 2b or comp l etion of MAT 103 with a C or bett er. ACC 110 Business Math ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting o r ACC 121 Accounting P r inciples I (Corequisite ACC 110 o r Level 2b Math placement ) ACC 121 ACC 122 ACC 113 CIS 118 CIS 155 BUS 115 BUS 2 1 7 Elective BTE 108 BTE 120 Accounting Accounting Principle s I or Accounting Principles II Computerized Accountin g Int ro. to Compute r s Spreadsheet Concepts Intro. to Business Business Communication s BTE Keyboarding Business Machines F iling & Records Control Total Credits 3 3-4 4 3 4 3 3 3 2 1 3 32 33 ACCOUNTING WITH COMPUTER APPLICATIONS Contacts 45 45-60 60 45 68 45 45 45 30 15 45 4885 0 3 This program prepares the student for entry -level positions: accounting clerk, data ent r y clerk, accounts payable clerk, accounts receivable clerk and accounting assistant. S tudents w ill dev e lop specialized com put e r skills in word processing, accounting software, spreadsheet and computer programming most requested by today's emp loyers. Program Admission Requi rements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalent s as follows : a English at level 3 or comp l etion of ENG 100 with a C orbetter; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C o r better; c. study skills at level 3 or complet io n of REA 109 with a C or better; and d math a t level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better

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Credits Contacts ACC 121 Accounting Pri nciples I 4 60 (Corequisite ACC 110 or Level 3 math placement) ACC 122 Accounting P r i nciples II 4 60 ACC 110 Business Math 3 45 ACC 113 Computerized Accounting 3 45 ACC 215 Accounting Systems 3 45 CIS 118 Intro. to Comp uters 4 68 CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45 BUS 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 Select 6 credits w ith advisor approval : 6 90 105 CIS 145 Database Concepts (2) (40) CIS 156 Advanced Spreadsheets (3) (45) CIS 176 BASIC with DOS (3) (45) or CIS 178 Visual BASIC with Windows (3) (45) CIS 260 COBOL Language Programming (3) (45) BTE 151 WordPerfect (3) (45) or BTE 152 Microsoft Wor d ACC 297 Cooperative Education (3) (45) (Prerequisite ACC 122) Total 334 95-510 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Business Administration COMMERCIAL CREDIT MANAGEMENT These certificate programs for students working in commercial credit management are specifically designed to train and upgrade skills of credit managers, assistants and other credit personnel who work in the area of exterior or commercial credit. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C o r better Cer t i ficate Option I Credits Contacts BUS 115 Intro to Business 3 45 CRM 217 Business Credit P r inciples 3 45 BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45 ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60 BUS 221 Legal Environme n t of Business 3 45 CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45 Total 19 285 Certificate Option II ACC 226 Cost Accounting BTE 151 WordPerfect or BTE 152 Microsoft Word ACC 122 Accounting Principles II BUS 116 Intro to Management/Superv ision BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business BUS 226 Business S t a tistics CRM 217 Business Credit Principles Total Business Administration Credits 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 22 CUSTOMER INFORMATION SERVICES AGENT; Call Center Management, Teleservices Agent/Rep Contacts 4 5 45 60 45 4 5 4 5 45 330 This program provides a basis for developing custome r informa t ion services for client service, survey-taking, appointment m a k ing, d i rect sales and follow up. Include s paper fiow management, tele phone s k ills, terms and concepts, along with othe r job skills necessary for entr y level positions. The customer information services ind u s try i s gro w ing and offers considerable employment opportunity for those persons prepared and who exhib i t these unique a b ilities. Client services orien tation, call-center management and outsourcing of services f r om a contractual point of view will be e xplored. Program Adm issi on Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: REA a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C o r b ette r ; b. r eading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 w ith a C or better ; and d math at level 2b or completio n of MAT 103 w ith a C or b ette r Credits Contacts 090 College Preparation Reading 3 45 MAT 033 General Skills in Math I 3 45 ENG 100 Compositio n Style & Technique 3 45 SPE 125 Interpersonal Communication or SPE 205 Voice & Diction 3 45 BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45 BTE 139 Professional Development 3 45 BTE 101 Keyboarding I 4 8 0 BUS 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 CIS 118 Intro. to Computer s 4 6 8 BUS 217 Customer Service 3 45 BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 45 BUS 207 Teleservices 3 45 BUS 297 Cooperative Education/Internship (Capstone) 3-6 135-270 Total 41-44 733 -868 CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 72

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7 3 Business Administration ENTREPRENEURSHIP This p r ogram provi des the concepts and skills necessary to succeed in business. Enrollment in this cur riculum will engage students in entre preneurial activities. Students will learn key concepts of small business. management and marketing Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a English at level 3 or complet ion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b reading at level 3a or comp l etion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d. math at level 2b or comple tion of MAT 103 with a C or better Cert ificate Opt i o n I ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting ACC 110 Business Math BUS 115 Intro to Business BUS 231 Pri ncip les of Sales Electives With faculty advisor approval Total Certificate Option II BUS 217 Business Communications SPE 115 Pri ncip les of Speech ACC 110 Business Math CIS 118 Intro to Computers ACC 121 Accoun t ing Principles I BUS 118 Intro to Mar keting Electives With facu lty advisor approval BUS 185 Business Certificate (Capstone) Total Business Administration INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Credits Contacts 3 45 3 45 3 45 3 45 12 180 24 360 Credits Contacts 3 45 3 45 3 45 4 68 4 60 3 45 4 60 15 2S 383 This program is desi g ned for individ u a l s and businesses who would like to explore the possibilities of doing or improving the i r business in internat ional markets. Basic essentials of foreign trade and cultural underst anding will be necessary for a n effect ive business relationship Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equ ivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; BUS BUS BUS POS BUS CIS b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or comp l etion of REA 109 w i th a C or better; and d. math at level 2b or complet i o n of MAT 103 wit h a C or better. Credits Contacts 115 Intro to Business 3 45 185 Business Certificate (Capstone) 1 15 210 Interna tional Business 3 45 205 International Relations 3 45 211 Interna tional Marketing 3 45 118 Intro to Computers 4 68 Se/Kt 1 0 hours from fon/gn languages 10 150 Total 27 413 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Business Administration MARKETING This program is part of a two-yea r Associate degree in Business Administration All courses are a p plicable to the advanced degree Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a English at level 3 or comp l etion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or comp l etion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or bette r ; a n d d math at level 2b or comp l etion of MAT 103 with a C or better. ACC 110 Business Math BUS 115 Intro. to Business BUS 217 Business Comm unications CIS 118 I nt ro. to Compute r s BUS 118 Intro to Marketing E N G 121 E n glish Composition I BUS 231 Principles of Sales BUS 239 Advertising & Promot ion BUS 116 I ntro. to Management/Supervision BUS 297 Business Administration Cooperative Education BUS 185 Business Certificate (Capstone) Total Business Administration PROFESSIONAL SELLING Credit s Contac t s 3 45 3 45 3 45 4 68 3 45 3 45 3 45 3 45 3 45 3 45 15 32 488 This program is designed to give a motivated student the entr y-level skills necessary to get a job in t h e l ucrative field of sales. All these class es apply toward a two-year Associate degree Business Admi nistration in Marketing op tion Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or comp l etion of ENG 100 with a C or bett e r ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 w i th a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or complet ion of REA 109 w ith a C or better; and d math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or bett e r Credits Contacts First Semester BUS 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 BUS 217 Business Comm u nications 3 45 CIS 118 I ntro. to Compute r s 4 6 8 BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 45 SPE 115 Princip les of Speech 3 45 Second Semester CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45 BUS 118 Intro to Marketing 3 45 MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 45 BTE 139 Professional Develop ment 3 45

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Third Semester BUS 297 Marketing Cooperative Education BUS 185 Business Certificate (Capstone) Total Business Administration SMALL BUSINESS 3 32 45 15 488 This program provides the basic fundamentals for success as a small business entrepreneur Students receive the essentials of small business ope ration s from init iating the small business plan to getting and maintaining customers and clients. Program Admissi o n Requi rements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : ACC ACC BUS ACC BUS CIS CIS BUS a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better. Credits Contacts 101 Fundamentals of Account ing 3-4 45-60 or 121 Accounting Principles I 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 110 Business Math 3 45 217 Business Communications 3 45 118 Intro. to Compute r s 4 68 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45 221 Legal Environmen t of Business 3 4 5 Elective BUS 3 45 ACC 111 Individual Income Tax 3 45 BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45 orbit 152 Microsoh Word or BTE 152 Microsoh Word BUS 185 Business Certificat e (Capstone) Tot a l 31-32 473-488 Business Administration SUPERMARKET MANAGEMENT This program is designed to give the student the necessary know ledg e and skills to gain employment and/or to advance to posit ions of increased responsibility within the supermarket indu s tr y Program Admission Requir ement s 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b reading at level 3a or complet ion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C o r better; and d. math at level 1 c or completion of MAT 035 with a C o r better Credits Contacts BUS 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 BUS 116 Intro. to Management/Supervision 3 45 BUS 118 Intro to Marketing 3 45 BUS 170 Supermarket Loss Prevention 3 45 BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business Law 3 45 BUS 227 Human Resources Management 3 45 BUS 229 Motivation & Management 3 45 BUS 270 Business Ethics 3 45 BUS 235 Retail Marketing & Management 3 45 (Capstone) Select 7 course from the following: 3-4 45-68 ACC 110 Business Math (3) (45) ACC 121 Accounting Principles I ( 4 ) (60) ECO 118 Labor Economics (3) (45) BUS 217 Business Communications (3) (45) BUS 228 Pri nciples of Management (3) (45) BUS 239 Advertising & Promotion (3) (45) CIS 118 Intro. to Computers (4) (68) ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics (3) (45) Total 30-31 450-473 Business Administration TRAVEL AND TOURISM This two-semester certificate program provides entry-leve l skills for e mployment i n the travel, tourism and hospital ity indus tr ies. Courses prepare s tudents for jobs such as entry -level reservatio n s assistant, clerk and travel agent trainee. Courses must be taken in the sequence as shown. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents a s follows: Bn Bn Bn Bn Bn Bn Bn Bn a. English at level 3 or complet io n of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or bett e r ; and d math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better 110 210 211 111 112 113 2 1 2 213 Principles ofTravel Administration Domestic Ticketing International Travel Travel Geography I Travel Geography II Selecting & Selling Cruises Compute r Reservations I Computer Reservations II (Capstone) Total Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Contacts 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 360 C ERTIF ICATE PROGRAMS 74

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BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY: OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND SECRETARIAL STUDIES Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies GENERAL CLERICAL Designed to prepare students for jobs in offices where general clerical opportunities exist (filing word processor, cler k etc.) Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 w i th a C or better; b reading at level 3a or comp letion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d. math at level 2a or comp l etion of MAT 103 with a C o r better. Certificate Option I -1 Semester (with permission of faculty advisor) Credits Contacts BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding 4 60 BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch 2 23 BTE 120 Filing & Records Control 4 68 BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45 or BTE 152 Microsoft Word BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135 Total 16 331 Certificate Option II 2 Semesters (with permission of faculty advisor) ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 3-4 45-60 or ACC 121 Accounting Principles I BTE 101 Keyboarding I 5 83 BTE 202 Keyboarding II BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding 4 60 BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch 2 23 BTE 120 Filing & Records Control 4 68 BTE 133 Word Processing Communications 3 45 & App lications BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45 or BTE 152 Microsoft Word BTE 139 Professional Dev elopment 3 45 BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135 Total 30-31 564-579 75 COMMUNITY C OLLEGE Of DENVER Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies MEDICAL SECRETARIAL Designed to prepare students for jobs such as medical records clerk, medical secretary, etc. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d math at level 2a or comp l etion of MAT 103 with a C or better. Credits Conta cts ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 3-4 45-60 or ACC 121 Accounting Principles I HOC 100 Medical Terminology 15 BTE 101 Keyboarding I 5 83 or BTE 202 Keyboarding II BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuildin g 3 45 BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch 2 23 BTE 120 Filing & Records Control 4 68 BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45 or BTE 152 Microsoft Word BTE 133 Word Processing Communications 3 45 & Applications BTE 139 Professional Development 3 45 BTE 206 Health Insurance Method s & Claims 3 45 BTE 230 Machine Transcription 5 83 BTE 288 Model Office 4 68 BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) 3 135 Total 42-43 770-775 Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies STENOGRAPHIC Designed to prepare students for jobs such as secretary, stenographer, word processor and office assistant/specialist. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or comp l etion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or comp l etion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 109 with a C or bette r ; and d math at level 2a or comp l etion of MAT 103 with a C or better

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BTE 101 Keyboarding I Credits 5 or BTE 202 Keyboarding II BTE 104 Keyboarding Speed building BTE 121 Alpha Speedwriti n g I BTE 108 Business Machines: Ten Key by Touch BTE 120 Filing & Records Control BTE 151 WordPerfect or BTE 152 Microsoft Word BTE 133 Word Processing Commun ications & Applications BUS 217 Business Commu n ications BTI 288 Model Office BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) Total Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies WORD PROCESSING 4 4 2 4 3 3 3 4 3 35 Designed to prepare student s as entry-level word processors. Program Admiss i on Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : Contacts 83 60 60 23 68 45 45 45 68 135 632-647 a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 w ith a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 w ith a C or better; c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 109 with a C o r better; and d. math at level 2a or comp letion of MAT 103 w it h a C or bet ter. Certificate Option I -1 Semester (with permission of instructor! faculty advisor) BTE 202 Key boarding II BTE 104 Keyboarding Speed build ing BTE 151 WordPerfect or BTE 152 Microsoft Word BTE 133 Word Processing Communications & Applications BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) Total Certificate Opti on 112 Semesters Credits 5 4 3 3 3 Contacts 83 60 45 45 135 18 368 Designed to prepare students as entry -level wo r d processors. Credits Contacts BUS 217 Business Communications 3 45 BTE 101 Keyboarding I 5 83 BTE 202 Keyboarding II 5 83 BTE 104 Keyboarding Speedbuilding 4 60 BTE 151 W ordPerfect 3 45 or BTE 152 Microsoft Word BTE 133 Word Processing Communications 3 4 5 & Applications BTE 139 Professional Development BTE 251 Advanced WordPerfect BTE 288 Model Office BTE 297 Cooperative Education (Capstone) Total COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS Computer Information Systems APPLICATIONS PROGRAMMER 3 45 3 45 4 68 3 135 36 65 4 This program serves the genera l student popula ti on but i s design e d developed, and operated for and by the nationa lly r ecognized and award winn i ng Computer Trai n i ng fo r People w i th D i sabilities (CTPD ) program The certificate program prepares students for careers a s applications programme r s emphasizing the COBOL language. This is a fast-track program that can be completed in 13 months or more depending on the semester the student begins the curriculum and the amount of r e med iat i on, general studies and adaptation skill d evelop ment required. The program has a fall and spring semester curriculum. Student s mus t have completed the "prerequisites to fall semester" and are encouraged to comp lete the general education requirements prior to beginning the fall and spring curriculum. Applicat ions should be submitted by May 1 Student s w ith disabilitie s are encouraged to make application to the CTPD program, which offers special services, support and place ment for program participants. Application information may be obtaine d from the Center for Persons with Disabilities, South Classroom Building, room 134, o r by phone at (303) 556-3300. All students must satisfy the following program admission requirement s prior to beginning the program. Program Adm issi on Requireme n t s 1. Assessment scores o r course equivalents as follows : a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a o r completio n o f REA 090 with a C o r better; c. s tud y skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C o r better. 2 Students with a disability requiring adaptive equipmen t must be func tioning at a p rofessional level. Skills a r e assessed and evaluated b y th e CTPD coordinator Prerequisites to Fall Semester Business Core Credits Contacts "CIS 118 Int ro. to Computers 4 68 "ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4 60 "BUS 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 "BUS 2 1 7 Business Communications 3 45 "CIS 218 Advanced Computer Applications 2-3 30-45 or *CI S 119 Intro. to Programming CERTifiCATE PROGRAMS 7 6

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Fall CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design 3 45 CIS 260 COBOL Language Programming 3 45 C I S 145 Database Concepts 3 45 CIS 277 Operating Systems & JCL 3 45 (mainf rame emphasis) CIS 266 On-line Program Development (TSO) 3 45 Spring CIS 261 Advanced COBOL 3 45 CIS 263 CICS/COBOL Programming 3 45 CIS 230 C++ Programming I 3 45 CIS 240 Oracle 3 45 May 1 5-July 15 CIS 297 Cooperative Education/ 6 270 Internsh i p (Capstone) Total 49 50 923 938 Computer Information Systems PC SPECIALIST/LAN ADMINISTRATOR This program serves the general student population, but is designed, developed, and operated for and by the nationally recognized and award-winning Computer Training for People with Disabilities (CTPD) program The certificate program prepares students for careers as PC specialists, emphasizing the LAN Administrat ion. This is a fast-track program that can be completed in 13 months or more depending on the semester the student begins the curriculum and the amount of remedi ation and adaptation skill development required. The program has a fall and spring semester curriculum Students must have completed the 'prerequisites to the fall semester" and are encouraged to complete the general education requirements prior to beginning the fall and spring curriculum. Applications should be submitted by May 1. Students wit h disabilities are encouraged to make application to the CTPD program, which offers special services, support and place ment for program participants. A pplication information may be obtained from the Center for Persons with Disabilities, South Classroom Building, room 134, or by phone at (303) 556-3300. All students must satisfy the following program admission requirement s prior to beginning the program Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 3 or comple tion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C o r better 2 Students wit h a disability requiring adaptive equipment must be functioning at a professional level. Skills are assessed and evaluat ed by the CTPD coordinator. 77 COMMUNIT Y COLLEGE OF DENVER Prerequisites to Fall Semester Business Core *CIS 118 Intro. to Comput e r s *ACC 121 Accounting Prin ciples I *BUS 115 Int ro. to Business *BUS 217 Business Commun ications *CIS 218 Advanced Computer Applications or *CIS 119 Intro to Programming Fall CIS 145 Database Concepts CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware CIS 255 Networks: Novell 4x Administration CIS 266 On-line Program Development (TSO) C I S 276 Systems Analysis & Design CIS 277 Operating Syst e m s & JCL (Microcomputer emphasis) Spring CIS 240 Oracle CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts CIS 179 Software System Survey CIS 275 Tel ecommunications May 1 5 -July 15 CIS 297 Cooperative Education/I nternship (Capstone) Total Computer Information Systems COMPUTER SPECIALIST Credits Contacts 4 68 4 60 3 45 3 45 2-3 30-45 3 45 3 45-72 4 68 2 30 3 45 3 45 3 45 3 45 3 45 3 45 6 270 52-53 976-1018 This program is designed to train students in microcomputer use and operations, with a focus on the currently popular software packages used by business and indust ry. Program Admission Requi rements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better. Credits Contacts CIS 118 I ntro to Compute r s 4 68 CIS 119 I nt r o to Programming 3 45 CIS 179 Software/Systems Survey 3 45 CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 45 BUS 115 Intro. to Business 3 45 BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45 or BTE 152 M i c r osoft Word CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts 3 45 CIS 275 Telecommunications 3 45 CIS 276 System Analysis & Design 3 45

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Select any 9 credits f r om the following : CIS 111 Intro. to Int ernet CIS 131 Intro. to the Internet & World Wide Web CIS 132 CIS 135 CIS 145 CIS 156 CIS 175 CIS 176 CIS 178 CIS 206 CIS 208 CIS 254 CIS 255 CIS 256 CIS 260 BTE 100 Business Applications on the World Wide Web Graphics Technology (PowerPoint) Database Concepts Advanced Spreadsheets Intro to UNIX BASIC with OOS Visual BASIC with Windows Intro. to Multimedia Advanced Multimedia Systems Networks: Windows NT Client Networks: Novell4x Administration Networks: Novell 3x Administration COBOL Language Programming Intro. to Keyboarding Any 3 credits of self-paced courses Tota l Computer Information Systems COMPUTERS AND MULTIMEDIA 9 (2) (3) (3) (2) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (4) (4) (4) (3) (3) (3) 37 735 (45) (45) (45) (30) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (68) (68) (68) (45) (45) (45) 563 This program is designed to train students in microcomputer use and operations with a focus on the hardware and sohware that is used to create and develop multimedia presentations. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or comp letion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or better. CIS CIS 118 Intro to Computers 179 Sohware/Systems Survey CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware CIS 206 Intro to Multimedia Systems CIS 208 Advanced Multimedia Systems CIS 275 Telecommunications BUS 115 CIS 276 I ntro to Busi ness Systems Analysis & Design Select any 9 credits from the following : CIS 111 Intro. to Internet CIS 131 Intro. to the Internet & World Wide Web CIS 132 Business Applications on the World Wide Web CIS 135 Graphics Technology (PowerPoint) CIS 145 Database Concepts CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts CIS 156 Advanced Spreadsheets CIS 175 Intro to UNIX Credits 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 9 (2) (3) (3) (2) (3) (3) (3) (3) Contacts 68 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 735 (45) (45) (45) (30) (45) (45) (45) (45) CIS 176 CIS 178 CIS 254 CIS 255 CIS 256 CIS 260 BTE 100 BTE 151 BASIC with DOS Visual BASIC with Windows Networks: Windows NT Client Networks: Novell 4x Administration Networks: Novell 3x Administration COBOL Language Programming Intro to Keyboarding WordPerfect or BTE 152 Microsoh Word Any 3 credits of self-paced courses T otal Computer Information Systems (3) (3) (4) (4) (4) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 3 4 WINDOWS NT NETWORK ADMINISTRATION (45) (45) (68) (68) (68) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) 5 18 This program prepares the student for employment as a computer net work administrator. Upon completion of the program, the student will be able to install, configure, administer and optimize a Windows NT network. Additionally, the program prepares the student for evaluation as a certified network administrator (CNA). Program Admiss ion Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. s tud y skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d. math at level 3 o r completion of MAT 105 with a C o r better CIS 118 Intro to Computers CIS 119 Intro. to Programming CIS 176 BASIC with DOS CIS CIS CIS CIS 178 216 254 283 Visual BASIC with Windows Microcomputer Hardware Networks: Windows NT Client Networks: Windows NT Server Select any 6 7 credits from the follow ing: ACC 121 Accounting Principles I CIS 131 Intro. to the Internet & World Wide Web CIS 132 Business Applications on the World Wide Web BTE 151 WordPerfect or BTE 152 Microsoh Word CIS 111 Intro. to Internet CIS 145 Database Concepts CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts CIS 175 Intro. to UNIX CIS 179 Sohware/Systems Survey CIS 275 Telecommunications CIS 276 Systems Analysis & Design Total Credits 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 6-7 (4) (3) (3) (3) (2) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 3 0 -31 Contacts 68 45 45 45 45 68 68 90-70 5 (60) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) (45) 474-489 CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 78

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Computer Information Systems NOVELL 4X NETWORK ADMINISTRATION This program p r epares the student f o r emp loy ment as a computer net wo r k a d ministrator. Upon comple ti o n o f the program, th e s tudent will be a ble to install, con figure adminis t e r and optimize a Novell 4 x net wo rk. Additionally, the program prepares the stud e n t f o r eval uat ion as a cert ified netwo r k a d ministrator (CNA). Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as f ollows: a. English at level 3 or comp l e ti o n of E N G 1 0 0 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of R E A 090 w i th a C or b e t ter ; c. s t u d y skill s at level 3 or comp letio n of REA 109 wit h a C or bette r ; and d. mat h at level 3 or compl etio n o f MAT 105 wit h a C o r b ette r C r e dit s Contads C I S 118 Int r o t o Computers 4 68 C I S 119 Intro. to P rogramming 3 45 C I S 176 BASIC w i t h DOS 3 45 CIS 178 Visu a l BASIC with W indows 3 45 C I S 216 Mic r ocomputer Hard ware 3 45 CIS 255 Networ ks: Novell4x Admi nist ration 4 68 C I S 282 Netwo rks: Advanced Novell Adminis tr ation 4 68 Select any 6 7 credits from the following: 6-7 90-705 ACC 121 Account i n g Principles I (4) (60) C I S 131 Intro t o t h e I nterne t & Worl d W ide Web (3) ( 45) C I S 132 Business A p plicatio n s on the World W i d e Web (3) (45) BTE 151 WordPe rf ect (3) ( 45) or BTE 152 Microso ft Word ( 3 ) (45) CIS 111 Intro. t o I nt ernet (2) (45) CIS 145 Database Concepts (3) (45) C I S 155 5preadsheet Concepts (3) (45) C I S 175 Intro. t o UNIX (3) (45) C I S 179 Software/Systems Survey (3) (45) CIS 275 Telecommunications (3) (45) C I S 276 Systems Analysis & Design (3) (45) Total 3 0 -31 474-489 Computer Information Systems NOVELL 3X NETWORK ADMINISTRATION Thi s program prepares the stude nt for e m ployme n t as a comput e r net work admi nistrato r Upon comple tion of the program, th e student will b e abl e to install, configu re, admi n i s t e r and opti m ize a Novell 3x n e t work. A d d i tionally, the program prepares the stude nt for evaluatio n a s a cert ified networ k administrator (CNA). 79 COMMUNIT Y COLLEG E OF DENVER Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or cours e equivalent s as follows: a Engli s h a t level 3 or comple tion of ENG 100 w i th a C or bette r ; CIS C I S C I S C I S C I S CIS b reading at level 3a or comp leti o n of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. stud y skills at leve l 3 or comp let ion of REA 109 with a C or bette r ; and d math at level 3 or complet ion of MAT 105 w i th a C o r b e tter Credits Con t acts 118 Intro. t o Computers 4 6 8 119 Intr o t o P r o g r amming 3 45 176 BASIC w it h D O S 3 45 1 7 8 Visual BASIC with Windows 3 4 5 2 1 6 Microcomputer Hardwar e 3 4 5 256 Networks: N ovell 3 x Administration 4 68 Select any 6-7 credits from the following: 6-7 90-705 A C C 121 Account ing Pri nciples I (4) (60) C I S 131 Intro to the I nternet & World W i d e W e b ( 3 ) (45) CIS 132 Busines s Appli c ations o n the World W i de Web (3) (45) B T E 151 WordPerf e ct (3) (45) or B T E 152 Micro s o ft Word (3) (45) CIS 111 Intro to Internet (2) (45) CIS 145 Database Concepts (3) (45) C I S 155 Spreadshee t C oncepts (3) (45) CIS 175 Intro to U NIX (3) (45) C I S 179 Software/ S ystems Survey (3) (45) CIS 275 Telecommun i cations (3) (45) C I S 276 Systems Analysis & Design (3) (45) Total 26-27 406-421 DRAFTING Drafting COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING-CAD The Compute r -Aid e d Draftin g (CAD) certific a te program prep a res students for entry posi tions as CAD ope rators i n industrial plants, engi neering firms, m anufacturing firm s and government agencies. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment s cores or course equivalents a s follows: a English a t level 3 or complet io n of E N G 100 with a C or better ; b. read i n g at l e vel 3 a or compl et ion of R E A 090 with a C o r better ; c. study skills at level 1 ; and d mat h a t level 2 or compl etio n of MAT 035 wit h a C o r b ette r 2. Comp l et i o n o f DRI 105 1 06, CAD 1 1 0 w ith a C o r better.

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Credits Contacts DRI 105 I ntro to Drafti ng 5 100 DRI 106 Dimensioning & Tolerancing 2 40 CAD 110 Computer-Aided Drafting I 3 68 CAD 111 Computer-Aided Drafting II 3 60 CIS 118 Intro to Computers 4 68 ENG 131 Intro to Technical Writing I 3 45 CAD 210 Computer-Aided Drafting III 3 60 JSW 295 Job Search Workshop 1 15 CAD 211 Computer-A ided Drafting IV 3 60 (Capstone) Total 27 516 The DRI 105 Intro to Drafting and DRI 106 Dimensioning and Tolerancing can be waived with proof of prior experience in the draft ing field. Drafting DRAFTING FOR INDUSTRY The Drafting for Industry certificate program prepares students for entry positions on drafting teams in indust rial plants, engineering and manufacturing firms and government agencies. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 1; and d. math at level 2 or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better 2 Completion of DRI 105 and 106 with a C or better. Credits DRI 105 Intro to Drafting 5 CAD 110 Computer-Aide d Drafting I 3 DRI 106 Dimensi oning & Tolerancing 2 DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 DRI 109 Pictorial Drawing 2 DRI 111 Descri ptive Geometry 2 & Auxiliary Views DRI 113 Intersections & Developments 3 JSW 295 Job Search Workshop 1 DRI 116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 (Capstone) Total 25 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Early Childhood Education EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION DIRECTOR Contacts 100 68 40 40 40 40 60 15 100 498 This program prepares graduates for director-qualified positions in day care and preschool services. This curriculum meets Colorado Human Services licensing education requirements Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 4 or completion of ENG 060 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d. math:N /A Credits Contacts ECE 101 Intro. to Early Childhood Education 3 45 ECE 102 ECE Lab Experience 3 90 ECE 105 Nutrition & the Young Child 3 45 ECE 110 Child Growth & Development 4 60 ECE 117 MethodslT ech n iques: 3 45 Curriculum Development ECE 120 Classroom Management Techniques 3 45 ECE 126 Administration of ECE Programs 4 60 (Capstone) SOC 101 Intro. to Sociology 3 45 PSY 101 General Psychology 3 45 or PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Development Select 1 course from the following : 3 45 ECE 111 Infants & Toddlers: (3) (45) Developmental Theories & Practices or ECE 115 Curr iculu m : Creative Activities (3) (45) & the Young Child Total 32 510 Early Childhood Education EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION GROUP LEADER CCD offers Colorado Group Leader Certificate or child development associate (CDA) training and advisement in conjunction with the fol lowing Early Childhood Education courses at CCD. S tudents completing this sequence will receive a Colorado Group Leader Certificate from CCD. In addition to this academic requirement, the Colorado Department of Human Services requires nine (9) months, (1392 hours) of work experience. Students desiring a CDA will need to contact the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition prior to beginning the process. ECE 101 Intro. to Early Childhood Education (ECE) ECE 102 ECE Lab Experience ECE 110 Child Growth & Development ECE 120 Classroom Management Technique s Select 1 course from the following : ECE 111 Infants & Toddlers: Developmental Theories & Practices or ECE 117 MethodslTechniques: Curriculum Development T otal 3 3 4 3 3 (3) (3) 16 45 90 60 45 45 (45) (45) 285 CERTIFICATE PROGRAM S 80

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ELEaRONICS TECHNOLOGY The electronics certificate options offer the opportunity for specialization and upgrading. All courses have a prerequisite of the preceding course or proof of competency Electronics Technology BROADCAST TECHNOLOGIST This program prepares the student for entry-level positions in the broadcast ind ustry Job titles include master control operator, produc tion technician, video productio n assistant and maintenance techni-Progra m Admission Requirements ciano 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or comp letion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 1 ; and d. math at level 2 or completion of MAT 035 wit h a C or better. 2. Completion of ELT 100 and 101 wit h a C or better Electronics Technology PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRONICS ELT 100 DC Fundamentals ELT 101 DC Circuits & Magnet ism ELT 102 AC Fundamentals ELT 103 AC Circuits ELT 104 Complex Circuit Analysis ELT 110 Diode Circuits ENG 100 Composition Style & Technique or Credits 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 ENG 131 Intra. to Technical W ritin g I (recommended) MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 ELT "1 Transistor Amplifiers (Capstone) 3 T otal 2 5 Electronics Technology Contacts 60 40 40 60 60 60 45 45 60 470 ADVANCED SOLID STATE, DIGITAL & IC PRINCIPLES ELT I 1 2 JFETs & Oscillators ELT 114 Operat i o n a l Amplifiers MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics or MAT 121 College Algebra (recommended) PHY lOS Conceptual Physics ELT 200 Pulse & Digital Fundamentals ELT 201 Digita l Circuits ELT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals ELT 203 Microprocessor & Microcomputer Systems (Capstone) ENG 131 Intra. to Technical Writing I T o tal .1 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Credits 2 3 3 4 3 3 2 3 3 26 Contacts 40 60 45 75 60 60 40 60 45 485 Credits Contacts ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 60 ELT 101 DC Circuits & Magnetism 2 40 ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 2 40 COM 251 Intra. to Television Production 3 45 CIS 118 Intro. to Computers 4 68 ELT 217 Basic Television & Video Systems (Capstone) 3 60 Select 9 credi t s from the following: 9 225 -375 SPE lIS Principles of Speech (3) (45) ENG 131 Intra. to Technical Writing I (3) (45) ELT 297 Cooperative Education (3-6) (135-270) Total 2 6 53 8-628 ENVIRONMENTAL AND REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY Programs are open-entry/open-exit. Students may complete some of the courses, enter the work force, then return at any time to either com plete the program for a certificate or degree or upgrade specific skills. Students may waive 1OD-level courses with prior knowledge and experience. The advanced placement credit is by portfolio and must be approved by the instructor. To satisfy the requirements for a certificate, the following courses must be taken in the listed sequence. P rogra m Admission R e quirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 1; and d. math at level 2 or comp l etion of MAT 035 with a C or better. 2 Completio n of RAC 1 I I and I 12 or equivalent with a C or better. Environmental and Refrigeration Technology APARTMENT MANAGER This program prepares students to enter the field of apartment management. It includes training in basic service and installation of com mon appliances used in apartments an introduction to basic electricity, refrigeration air conditioning and heating and training in areas needed by persons managing an apartment complex Credits Contacts RAC III Electricity & Electronics I 3 60 RAC 112 Electricity & Electronics II 2 40 RAC 114 Fundamentals of Refrigeration I 2 40 RAC 214 Unitary & Central NC Systems 3 60 APT 220 Kitchen Equipment I 3 60 APT 225 Refrigerators & Freezers I 3 60 RAC 295 Job Search Workshop 1 IS ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 3 45 CIS 118 Intro to Computers 4 68 APT 226 Room Air Conditioners (Capstone) 3 60 T otal 27 508

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Environmental and Refrigeration Technology MAJOR APPLIANCE REPAIR This program prepares the student for entry-level positions i n small and major appliance repai r Most graduates work for small repair businesses. Credits Contacts RAC 111 Electricity & Electronics I 3 60 RAC 112 Electricity & E l ectronic s II 2 40 RAC 114 Fundamentals of Refrigeration I 2 4 0 RAC 116 Fundamentals of Refrigeratio n II 3 60 APT 218 Aut omatic Washers I 3 60 APT 219 C lothes Dryers I 3 60 APT 220 Kitchen Equipment I 3 60 APT 225 Refrigerator/Freezers I 3 60 APT 226 R oom Air Conditioner s 3 60 APT 228 Clothes Dryers II 3 60 APT 229 Kitchen Equipment II 3 60 APT 230 Refrigerator/Freezers II 3 60 JSW 295 Job Search Workshop 20 APT 285 Aut omatic Washers II (Capstone) 6 120 Total 41 820 Environmental and Refrigeration Technology REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING This program prepares the studen t with jo b-entry skills in the fields of comme rcial-industrial refrigeration, heating and air conditioning. Job skills cover i n stallation, maintenance and servicing. Job t itles include HVAC maintenance technician, env ir onmental control technician and refrige ration m aintenance tec hnician. Credits Contacts RAC 111 Electricity & Elec tronic s I 3 68 RAC 112 Electrici ty & Electronics II 2 45 RAC 114 Fundamental s of Refrig e ration I 2 45 RAC 116 Fundamentals of Refrigeration II 3 68 RAC 200 Refrigeration Systems, Compo nents 3 68 & Applications RAC 205 Heat Loads & System Development 2 45 RAC 208 Special Refri geration Systems 3 68 RAC 211 Installation & Service 3 68 Refrige ration System s RAC 212 Fundamentals of Air Cond i t i oning 3 68 RAC 214 Unitary & Central Station System 3 68 RAC 215 Air Flow Principles & Distr ib ution 2 45 RAC 216 HVAC Control System s 3 68 JSW 295 Job Search Workshop 20 RAC 285 Troubleshooting & 4 75 Servicing (Capstone) Total 37 819 GERONTOLOGY CCD offers the only gerontology certificate progra m at the commun ity college level i n Colorado Through courses, practica l experien c e s and seminars, this program provides theory and experience regarding the physical, social and psychological aspects of aging. This certificate enhances the human services program the health sciences programs and the behavioral sciences program by develo ping a specialization in aging studies and services. It also is a professional deve lopmen t program for persons already active in the gerontology field All potentia l applicants to the gerontology program should call (303) 556-3891 for an appo i ntment with the gerontology progra m coo rdinator Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a English at level 3 or comple t ion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or com pletion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d. math at level 3 or completion of MAT 105 with a C or bett e r Credits Contacts GNT 201 Intro to Gerontology GNT 285 Practic um in Gerontology 810 204 Physiological Aspects of Aging GNT 213 Psychology of Aging GNT 214 Social Aspects of Aging GNT 215 Aging i n a Diverse Society GNT 221 Overv iew of Services & Resources for the Aging GNT 236 Nutrition & Aging GNT 237 Death & Dying GNT 295 Leadership Development Total GRAPHIC ARTS Graphic Arts PRINTING 3 45 3 110 (3) (45) (3) (45) (3) (45) (3) (45) (3) (45) (3) (45) (3) (45 ) (3) (45) 24 425 This program will prepare s tudents w it h jo b -entry skills to a ccomplish most operations necessary on the process camera and the offset press, and to function i n the areas of basic bindery, s tr ip ping and general lay out and composition work Upon completing the program, students will be e qu ippe d to enter pOSitions w i th commercial pr i nt shops, trade shops, inplant s hops and any other operation requiring p rinter s Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a English at level 2 or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better ; b reading at level 2 or com pletion of REA 060 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better ; and d. math at level 2 or completion of MAT 030 with a C or better C ERTIF ICAT E PROG RAMS 82

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GRA 10 1 Intro. to Graphic Arts & Traditional Layout G R A 102 Electronic Composition, Art & Copy Prep GRA 103 Line & Halftone Photography GRA 104 Digital Halftone Photog r aphy GRA 105 Resume & Portfolio (Capstone) GRA 111 Beginning Press Operations GRA 112 Stripping, Image Assembly, Plate mak ing & Inks GRA 1 1 3 Paper & Ink Management & Print Production I GRA 114 Intermediate Offset Press & Pri nt Prod uction II GRA 185 Bindery & P ortfolio Tot al Graphics Arts PREPRESS Credits Contacts 3 67.5 3 67.5 3 67.5 3 67.5 3 67.5 3 60 3 60 3 60 3 60 3 60 30 637 5 This program prepares students with job-entry skills to accomplish most operations necessary for the process camera, general layout and composition work. It also provides skills to use state-o f the-art elec tronic equipment for graphics, page make-up photo manipulation and scanning. Upon completing the program students w ill be equipped to enter position s with desk-top publishing businesses, commercial print shops, trade shops and in-plant shops. Program Adm issi on Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 1 or compl etion of ENG 030 with a C or better; b reading at l evel 1 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; c. st udy skills at level 1 or compl etion of REA 060 with a C or better ; and d math at leve l 1 or completion o f MAT 030 with a C or better. GRA 101 Intro. to G r aphic Arts & Traditional Layout GRA 102 Electronic Composition, Art & GRA 103 GRA 1 04 GRA 105 G R A 201 G R A 202 GRA 203 GRA 204 GRA 205 Copy Preparat ion Line & Halftone Photography Digita l Halftone Photog r aphy Resume & Portfolio (Capstone) Electronic Graphics Electronic Page Layout Electronic Scanner & Color Theory Electronic Prepres s Photo Manipulation Total IJ COMMUNITY COLLEGE Of DENVER C r edits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 Contacts 67.5 67.5 67.5 67.5 67.5 68 68 68 68 68 677 .5 GRAPHIC DESIGN Courses in the certificate seq uence are applicab l e to the Associate of Applied Science degree and normally can be completed in two semesters. Upon completion of major requ irements, students may choose one of three emphases each of which will prepare students for a career in graphic des ign Instructor permission is required to omit GRD 102, which could be substituted with an elective. GRD 103 is prerequisite to all computer classes. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. Englis h at l evel 1 b or compl etion of ENG 030 with a C or better; b. reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; and d. math at l evel 1 b or compl etion of MAT 030 w ith a C or better. Majo r Requirement s ENG 100 Composition Style & Technique ART 121 Drawing I ART 131 Design I GRD 100 Lettering & Typog raphi c Design GRD 102 GRD 103 GRD 105 Intro. to Macintos h MAC Computer Art Advertising Typog rap h y & Layout Total Graphic Design COMPUTER GRAPHICS Major Requi rements Select 2 courses w ith advisor approval: ART 132 Design II GRD 185 PageMaker Design GRD 203 Adobe Illustrator GRD 220 Intro. to Photoshop GRD 297 Graphic DeSign Internship GRD 209 Quark Xpress on Macintosh (Capstone) MUM 210 3-D Modeling & Animation Tot al Graphic Design GRAPHIC DESIGN M ajor Requirements Select 2 c ourses with adviso r approval: ART 122 Drawing II/Mixed Media GRD 185 PageMaker Design or GRD 209 Quark Xpress GRD 200 Advertising Design & Portfolio Preparation GRD 206 Graphic Design Production & Prepress I Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 1 Credits 21 6 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 3 (3) 3 0 Credits 2 1 6 (3) (3) (3) (3) Contacts 45 90 90 90 90 90 90 5 8 5 Contacts 585 780225 (90) (90) (90) (90) (135) 90 (90) 8 55900 Contacts 585 7 80 -225 (90) (90) (90) (90)

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GRD 297 Graphic Design Internship GRD 285 Creative Graphic Design & Portfolio Preparation (Capstone) Total Graphic Design SERVICE BUREAU Major Requirements GRA 204 Electronic Prepress Select 7 class with advisor approval: GRD 185 PageMaker Design or GRD 209 Quark Xpress GRD 200 Advertising Design & Portfolio Preparation (3) 3 30 Credits 21 3 3 (3) (3) GRD 206 Graphic Design Production & Prepress I (3) GRD 297 Graphic Design Internship (3) GRA 203 Electronic Scanner & Color Theory 3 (Capstone) Total 30 HUMAN SERVICES Human Services CASE MANAGEMENT/RESIDENTIAL SERVICE AIDE (135) 90 855 900 Contads 585 68 90-735 (90) (90) (90) (135) 68 811856 This program prepares students for entry-level positions as case management aides or residential aides. The certificate program is transfer able to the AAS and AGS in Human Services. Students must complete all certificate course work with a C or better. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 1 b or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better; b. reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 2 o r completion of REA 060 with a C or better; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 056 with a C or better. Credits Contacts Electives Basic Skills 6 90 HSE 106 Survey of Human Services 3 45 HSE 107 Int erviewing Principles & Practices 3 45 Elective HSE or Core 5 75 Offered Spring Semester Only : HSE 209 C risis Theory & Intervention 3 45 HSE 115 Human Services Practicum I 4 60 (Capstone) Total 24 360 PARALEGAL Paralegal GENERAL This program is designed to prepare individuals with job-ent r y skills for the general paralegal field. Emphasis is placed on practical skills such as interviewing, researching and document draft ing. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 1 b or completion of ENG 030 w ith a C or better; b reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a Cor better; and d. math at level 1 b or completion of MAT 030 with a C or better. Credits Contacts PAR 121 Intro. to Paralegal 3 45 PAR 124 Legal Research 3 45 PAR 221 Civil Procedures 3 45 PAR 222 Evidence 3 45 PAR 223 Computers & the Law 3 45 PAR 280 Paralegal Workshop 6 225 Elective PAR 3 45 BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 45 or BTE 152 Microsoft Word CIS 140 Microcomputers Databases 3 45 PAR 185 Paralegal Synthesis I (Capstone) 3 45 Total 33 630 NURSING PRACTICAL NURSING This program represents the first year of the two-year Associate of Applied Science degree in nursing. It begins in the fall term and con tinues through the spring semester. Prospective applicants must com plete the necessary prerequisite course work with a C grade or better. After successful comp l etion of this p rogram, which is a C grade or bette r in each course, students receive a Certificate of Practical Nursing and are e l igible to take the examination for licensure as a practical nurse. After the first semester, students receive a Nurse Aide Certificate and are eligible for state certification. The Nursing program is a member of the Colorado Nursing Articulation Project. Credit earned by completing the Practical Nurse Certificate is accepted by other Colorado nursing programs under the terms of the articulation agreement. Application materials must be submitted by March 1 to be considered for admission to the class beginning fall of that academic year. To be eligible for consideration applicants must meet all admission requirements by March 1 of their expected entry. Eligible applicants then are selected first come, first served, based on the date their appli cation was received by the Nursing Office, South Classroom Building room 3 12. Applicants not accepted are placed in the waiting pool for the following year. More specific program informat ion may be obta ined from the Division of Health and Human S ervices. C ERTIFI CATE PROGRAM S 84

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8 S Program Admission Requirements There are four steps for admission into the Nursing program. 1. Qualify for an application by meeting the following criteria: a English assessment level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better ; b. math assessment level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better; c. reading assessment level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better ; and d study skill s assessment level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better. All prospective nursing students must take the Basic Skills Assessment. There are no exceptions. 2. Submit a Nursing program application. Students must attend a mandatory nursing orientation, held every Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. in the South Classroom Building, room 246. Students should bring a copy o f their Basic Skills Assessment results and student transcripts of course work at CCD or othe r colleges attended. Students should submit their application as soon as they meet the above qualifications. Applicants are considered for admission accordin g to the date the completed application packet is received in the Nursing Office. A comp leted applicatio n packet includes the program appli cation, a copy of the Basic Skills Assessment, two sealed letters of reference dated w ithin the past two years (one letter must be from a supervisor o r teacher), and official transcripts from other colleges attended. Official transcripts also must be submitted to the CCD registrar for credit. 3. Be enrolled in BIO 202 by March 1 o f the year of intended entry. Students must have complete d B I O 201 with a"C" or better and also have completed one othe r general education prerequisite course listed in #4 below. 4 Complete the follo wing first-year prerequisites with a C or better by the beginning of the fall of the year of intended entry Prerequisites and/or General Education Credits Contacts *BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 75 *BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75 *PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth 3 45 & Development NUT 100 Intro. to Nutr ition 3 45 MAT 100 or higher-level course 3-5 45-75 ENG 121 English Composition 3 45 Requirements Credits Contacts NUR 101 Core Concepts in Pharmacology 22.5 NUR 102 Core Concepts of Nursing 22.5 NUR 103 Pharmacology for Nursing 2 45 NUR 109 Basic Nursing Skills 6 135 NUR 111 Nursing Concepts & Issues 6 135 NUR 112 Nursing Care of the Hospitalized Client I 4 90 NUR 113 Nursing Care of the Older Adult 4 90 NUR 114 Family-Centered Nursing Care I 4 90 Total 48-50 990 Must have been completed within the past 10 years. COMMUNITY COLLEGE o F DENVER PERIOPERATIVE NURSING This program prepares the student to practice as an operat ing room nurse after completing 14 credit hours of study Students enrolled in this program are not eligible for financial aid. The program begins in the fall semester and continues thr ough the spring semester with an individualized practicum experi e nce. After successfully completing the program, students receive a cert i ficate in perioperative nursing. Application materials must be submitted by May 1 to be consid ered for admission into the class beginn i ng fall of the academic year. Eligible applicants are selected first-come-first-served based on the dates applications are received by the Surgical Technology/ Perioperative Nursing Office, South Classroom Building room 301. Applicants not accepted are considered for the following year. Graduate exit competency is measured by successful completion of the capstone course, NUR 221, Perioperative Nursing II. Program Admission Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows : a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better ; c. study skill s at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better. 2. All applicants must be eligible for licensur e as registered nurses. 3 Applicants must submit a P e r ioperative Nursing program applica tion available from the office of Health and Human Services, South Classroom Building room 301, or by calling 556-2472 to have an application mailed. A completed application packet includes the program appli cation ; a cop y of current licensure as a registered nurse, or docu mentation of pending licensure as a registered nurse; two sealed letters of reference dated within the past two years (one letter must be from a supervisor or teacher); a copy of the high school diploma or GED; and official transcripts from other colleges attended Official transcripts also must be submitted to the CCD registrar. 4 Applicants must submit a separate application to the college. Applications are available in the South Classroom Building, room 136, or by calling 556-2600 to have an application mailed. 5. Applicants must schedule an interv iew with the Peri operative Nursing program coordinator. Please call 556-2464 for an appoint ment. Major Requirements Credits Contacts Fall NUR 220 Perioperative Nursing I 4 60 Spring NUR 221 Perioperative Nursing II 10 390 Total 14 450

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PHOTOGRAPHY This prog ram provides technical and aesthetic training to prepare students with the skills necessary to enter the field of professional photography, including freelance, portrait and creative photography. Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 1 b or completion of ENG 030 with a C or better; b reading at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 2 or completion of REA 060 with a C or better; and d math at level 1 b or completion of MAT 030 with a C or better Credits Contaas ART 121 Drawing I 3 90 ART 131 Design I 3 90 ENG 121 English Composition 3 45 PHO 101 Fundamentals of Photography 3 90 PHO 102 Fundamentals of Color 3 90 PHO 111 I ntermediate Black & White 3 90 PHO 112 Intermediate Color Photography 3 90 Select Q minimum of 6 credits from the following: 6 120 -270 GRD 105 Advertising Typography & Layout (3) (90) BUS 115 Intro to Business (3) (90) PHO 201 View Camera Techniques (3) (90) PHO 202 Studio Lighting (3) (90) PHO 203 The Fine Print (3) (90) PHO 205 Photography Workshop (3) (90) PHO 211 Portrait Photography (3) (90) PHO 213 Craft & Expression (3) (90) PHO 215 Photography Seminar (3) (90) PHO 297 Cooperative Education (3-6) (30-180) PHO 185 Advanced Photography (Capstone) 3 90 Total 30 795 -945 PSYCHIATRIC TECHNICIAN Psychiatric Technician This program prepares the student to practice as a psychi atric technician in specialized health care settings with client populations experiencing psychiatric disorders and/or developmental disabilities. The program begins fall semester and continues spring semester for one academic year. After the first semester, students are eligible for state licensing as a psychiatric technician with an emphasis in developmental disabilities. After completing the second semester, students are eli g i ble for state licensing as a psychiatric technician with an emphasis in mental illness. Application materials must be submitted by March 1 to be considered for admission into the class beginning fall of the academic year. Eligible applicants are selected first-come first-served, based on the dates applications are received by the program coordinator South Classroom Building, room 312. Applicants not accepted are considered for the following year. Graduate e xit competency is measured by suc cessful completion of the capstone course, LPT 111, Nursing Principles of Psychiatric Care and Clinical Application for the Psychiatric Technician. P r ogram Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better All prospect i ve students must take the Basic 5k ills Assessment. Th e r e are no except i ons. 2. Attend a mandatory orientation, held every Tuesday a t 3:30 p .m. in the South Classroom Building room 243. Bring a copy of the Basic Skills Assessment results and copies of official transcrip t s f rom other colleges attended. At orientation the student will receive the Psych iatric Technician program application. 3. Submit a Psychiatric Technician program application with two sealed letters of reference dated within the past two years (one let ter must be from a supervisor or teacher) and a copy of the high school diploma or GED to the program coordinator in the South Classroom Building, room 312. Major Requ i rements Credits Contacts BIO 114 Biology of Humans for Psychiatric Technicians 3 45 HSE 113 Human Services for Persons with 3 45 Developmental Disabilities NUR 101 Core Concepts of Pharmacology 1 22.5 NUR 109 Basic Nursing Skills 6 135 LPT 110 Fundamental Concepts & 2 45 Clinical Application LPT 111 Nursing Principles of Psychiatric Care 6 135 T otal 21 4 2 7 5 Psychiatric Technician: Advanced Placement Graduates of Colorado Board of Nursing-approved psychiatric technician programs with an emphasis in developmental disabilities may enter CCD's Psychiatric Technician program in the LPT 111, Nursing Principles of Psychiatric Care and Clinical Applicat io n for the Psychiatric Technician course. Program Adm issi on Requirements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better ; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better ; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better. 2. Submit two letters of recommendat io n a copy of high school diploma or GED, a Certificate of Completion of Colorado Board of Nursing Accredited Psychiatric Technician Developmental Disabilities program, and a copy of Colorado License as Psychiatric Technician with Developmental Disability emphasis. Students are awarded 15 credit hours from the approved Psychiatric Technician Developmental Disabilities program. CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 86

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Major Requirements Credits Completion of Psychiatric Technician DD program 15 LPT 111 Nursing Principles of Psychiatric Care 6 Total 21 RADIOLOGIC HEALTH SCIENCES Contacts 297 135 432 Offered to registered radiologic tech nologists these certificate programs provide oppo rtunity for cross training and enhancing profession al competence and employability. These programs are offered on an "as-needed' basis. Please call the coordinator at 556-2472 for more information about any of the Radiologi c certificate p rograms. Check with the Office of Financial Aid for program eligibility for the following programs. Radiologic Health Sciences MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI) TECHNOLOGY Offered on an 'as-needed' basis, this cer tificate program l imits applica tion to those who have registry and/or certification in another diagnos tic imaging modality (nuclear medicine technology or registered diag nostic medical sonography, radiolog i c technology) Call the MRI coordi nator for more info rmation at 566-2472. Radiologic Health Sciences MAMMOGRAPHY Offered on an 'as-needed' basis, this program is designed to meet the needs of the working radiographer. Call the Radiography program coordinator 556-3846, for more information Radiologic Health Sciences NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY Offered on an "as-needed' basis, this program provides course work and clinical e xperiences necessary to qualify for the nuclear medicine registry Call the Nuclear Medicine coordi nator at 556-3845 for more infor mation RECREATIONAL ASSISTANT Program applicants who previously have earned credits for general education courses, or have documented equivalencies for these cours es, may apply directly to the Recreational Assistant program and com plete the Recreational Assistant program courses only. Upon successful completion of course work and 400 hours of externship experience, the graduate qualifies under the National Recreation and Park Association as a certified leisure assistant. The program is currently in the process of articulating with bachelor's-degreed programs for transfer of credits for the B S degree in recreational therapy Two of the program s courses are offered as open enrollment and can be taken by anyone interested in the activities taught. Program Admission Requir ements 1 Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b reading at level 3a or completion of REA 090 with a C or better ; 87 COMMUNITY C OLLEGE OF DENVER c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 with a C or better; and d math at level 2b or completion of MAT 103 with a C or better 2 Proof of general education equivalencies: BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I ENG 121 English Composition I or ENG 131 Intro to Technical Writing I MAT 135 Intro to Statistics PSY 101 General Psychology I PSY 235 Psychology of Human Growth & Development SOC 101 Intro to Sociology SPE 115 Principles of Speech AAS Humanities requirement BUS 1 1 5 Intro to Business (optional) CIS 1 18 I ntro to Computers (optional) 3. Application to the Recreational Assistant program Fall RAE 201 Intro. to Recreational Leisure 3 RAE 202 Intro to Recreational Therapy 3 RAE 205 Recreational Assist ant Externship I 4 RAE 207 Specialized Areas in Recreation Electives 4 (Open enrollment; also offered fall semester.) SOC 103 Sociology of Health Care 3 Spring RAE 203 Recreation & Leisure in Special Populations 3 RAE 204 Health & Safety in Recreation & Leisure 3 RAE 207 Specialized Areas in Recreation Electives (4) (Open enrollment; also offered spring semester.) RAE 285 Recreational Assistant Externship 5 T otal 28 SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY 45 45 180 60 45 45 45 (60) 225 6 90 This program begins the summer term and continues for 12 months. Applications and all applicable documentation and test results need to be submitted to the Surgical Technolog y coordinator by the last day in February of each calendar year for the program starting the following summer Admission information may be obtained fr om the Educational Planning and Advising Center or the Health and Human Services Division. Enrollment is limited to 25 students. The Surgical Technology program at CCD depends upon volun tary affiliation by clinical affiliates for clinical practicum spaces. Students must recognize that due to the need to utilize all available clinical resources, they may have to travel some distance to sites outside the Denver metr opolita n area.

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Program Admission Requirements 1. Assessment scores or course equivalents as follows: a. English at level 3 or completion of ENG 100 with a C or better; b. reading at level 3b or completion of REA 151 with a C or better; c. study skills at level 3 or completion of REA 109 w ith a C or better ; and d. math at level 2a or completion of MAT 035 with a C or better. 2 All applicants must schedule an interview with the program coordinator. Please call 556-2464 to schedule an interview. 3 All applicants must submit two sealed letters of reference dated within the past two years (one letter must be from a supervisor or teacher), a copy of the high school diploma or GED, a copy of the GATB score, and an official transcript from any other college attended (students also must send the CCD registrar an official transcript), and schedule an interview with the program coordinator. 4. Application material must be submitted by March 1 to be considered for admission into the class beginning summer of the academic year. Eligible applicants are selected first-come first-served, based on the dates applications are received by the Surgical Technology Office, South Classroom Building, room 301-H. Applicants not accepted are considered for the following year. Prerequisites and/or General Education Credits Contacts BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 75 BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 75 MAT 103 or higher 3-5 45-75 (MAT 121 or 135 are for students expecting to transfer to a four-year college) ENG 121 English Composition I 3 45 Summer HOC 100 Medical Terminology 15 STE 100 Intro to Surgical Technology 4 60 Fall STE 105 Pharmacology for Surgical Technology 2 30 STE 106 Surgical Skills 6 120 STE 107 Surgical Instrumentation 3 60 Spring STE 109 Surgical Technology Laboratory Experience 3 128 STE 110 Surgical Technology Practicum 7 315 (Capstone) STE 115 Surgical Pathology & Intervention 4 60 Total 30 773 Surgical technology students wishing to complete the requirements for the Associate degree/General Studies must complete the requirements for a certificate in surgical technology and meet the other core general education requirements for the AGS degree. Students should contact their advisor for specific courses. CERTifiCATE PROGRAMS 8 8

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TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTERS North, East and West Campuses TEC North 6221 Downing Street Denver, CO 80216 289-2243 TEC East 3532 Franklin Street Denver, CO 80205 293-8737 TECWest 2420 West 26th Avenue, #1 OOD Denver, CO 802" 477-5864 Technical Education Center Programs Community College of Denver's (CCD) Technical Education Centers (TEC) offer fast-track job training certificate programs and Associate of Applied Science degrees at each campus. Fast-track trai ning permits students to complete TEC certificate programs in as few as 15 weeks and as many as 30 weeks, assuming full-time attendance and depending on which job training program is chosen. CCD grants college credit for all courses successfully completed. Certificate programs are open-entry/open-exi t and operate yearround. Instruction is provided in an individualized and self-directed format that allows students to enroll at any time throughout the year and complete a program at any time when requirements are met. Full-time students attend classes an average of six hours per day, five days each week. All courses offered at TEC campuses provide 24 contact hours (1,200 minutes) of instru ction for each credit; except cooperative edu cation and internship courses that require 45 contac t hours (37.5 clock hours) of paid or unpaid work experience for each credit. TEC campuses also provide classes in Career Exploration,GED Preparation, Basic Academic Skills, English as a Second Language, and Parenting. Career assessment, GED testing, case management support and job placement assistance are available services. CCDITEC Certificate and Associate of Applied Science Degree Programs All certificate and AAS degree programs are designed in coope ration with business, industry and local government to provide current and relevant trai ning to persons seeking to gain or improve job skills and employability TEC provides certificate programs in three tiers of length and intensity : QuickTrain, XpressTrain and WorkTrain. Each tier is part of the next tier; and the top tier, WorkTrain, is part of an AAS degree. Together these programs form a ladder of career training. 89 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER QuickTrain programs are the shortest in length and focus on one or two specific occupations. These programs average 15 weeks in length at full-time attendance and require that students have at least eighth grade level basic academic skills, as measured by the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE). QuickTrain program credits are accepted into the next tier of programs, XpressTrain. XpressTrain programs average 30 weeks in l ength at full-time attendance and develo p skills in several related occupations. These programs require at least ninth grade level basic academic skills as measured by the TABE and credits are accepted into the next tier of programs, WorkTrain. WorkTrain is the most extensive set of certificate programs and averages 30 to 34 weeks to complete at full-time attendance. These programs cover the skills needed to enter a cluster of occupations or an occupation that requires a high level of training for entry Basic academic skills at the ninth grade level as measured by the TABE are required. All WorkTrain program credits are accepted into a specific Associates of Applied Science degree program. The Associates of Applied Science degree program s are the next step in the ladder of career programs at TEe. All WorkTrain program credits plus a general studies core of 25 credits of academic classes comprise this degree. These classes are available at the CCD Aurari a campus in each of the three tradi tiona l academic semesters, as well as at TEC campuses on a limited basis. At full-time enrollment, these classes require an additional two semesters of work to complete the degree. General Studies Core courses: Credits ENG 121 English Composition I 3 SPE "5 Principles of Speech 3 MAT 121 College Algebra 4 PSY 101 General Psychology I 3 SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 HUM 121 Survey of Humanities I 3 PHI "1 Introduction to Philosophy 3 PHI 112 Ethics 3 Total 25 Student Performance Objectives for Certificates and Associate of Applied Science Degrees Students who complete certificates or Associate of Appl ied Science degrees are able to do : 1. basic and advanced academic skills appropriate to the profession. a Basic Skills: read, write, compute speak, and listen. b Thin k ing skills: earn, reason, make decisions and solve problems 2 general occupational skills appropr iate to the profession. a Information: acquire and evaluate data, organize and maintain files and use computers to process information. b Interpersonal: work on teams and with people; teach others

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serve customers, lead, negotiate ; value and work well with and for people from diverse cultures c. Personal: demonstrate responsibility, self-management, integrity; and personal, professional and social ethics. d. Resources: allocate time, money, materials, space and personnel. e. Systems: understand technological organizational and social systems; monitor and correct system performance or design. f Technology: select equipment and apply technology to specific tasks. 3. specific occupat ional skills that include all aspects of the profession. These include planning, management, finance, principles of technology technical skills, labor and community issues, health and safety and environmental issues. Each certificate and Associate of Applied Science program has identified student performance objectives. These performance objectives are available to students during career planning activities and as part of case management processes. They are collectively bound together for distribution and constitute the college s guarantee to employers. Copies are available in the campus offices ofTEC Deans and case managers. Child Development Services The infan V t oddler/pre-school c hild developme n t centers a t TEC North and TEC West accommodate children from 6 weeks to 6 years of age. Space is limited. Call TEC North, 289-2243, or TEC West, 477-0901.for more information. Official GED Test Center TEC North is an official state-sanctioned GED test center. Testing times are Monday from 8 a .m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a m and Thursday from 5 p m to 9 p.m. TEC West is a satellite test center with testing on Friday from 8:30 a m to 4:30 p m TEC East is a satellite test center with testing on Tuesday from 12:30 p.m. to 4 :30 p .m. Test fees are $ 7 for each of the five GED tests and $ 7 for each test re-take. Effective September 1 ,1997, all GED tests and re-takes are $10 each. For information, contact the GED test center at 289-2243. ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE ACCOUNTING Computerized Accounting Specialist This degree is comprised of the 25 credits defined as the General Education Core, listed earlier in the CCDITEC Certificate and AAS degree section, a n d the 39 credits listed below in the WorkTrain Computerized Account ing Specialist cert ificate program COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING SPECIALIST CERTIFICATE TEe North TEe East, TEe West Computerized accounting specialist is a WorkTrain program designed for completion in two 17-week semesters. It prepares students with the job entry skills necessary to perform both manual and computerized full-charge bookkeeping activities that include: financial statements, general journals, ledgers, accounts payable and receivable, bank reconciliation, payroll, bad debts, depre ciation and inventory. Students gain skills in computerized accounting and payroll applications for personal computers; MicroSoft Office software that includes Word, Access, Excel a n d Powerpoint applicat ions; and use of E-mail, the I n ternet and the World Wide Web. Keyboard skills of 40 words per minute and 10key skills of 100 strokes per minute are minimum standards for comple tion. Program graduates are prepared for jobs such as full-charge bookkeeper computerized accounting cler k computerized payroll clerk and general office clerk. The WorkTrain Computerized Accounting Specialist cert ificate prog ram credits and the previously listed General Education Core credits complete the requirements of the AAS degree in account ing, com puterized accounting specialist. Program Admission Requir ements : Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enroll m ent in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting ACC 113 Computer ized Accounting (Capstone) ACC 115 Computerized Payroll ACC 121 Accounti n g Principles I BTE 101 Keyboarding I BTE 160 Data E n t r y I BTE 200 Office Procedures or ACC 297 Co-op. Work Experience CIS 111 Introduction to the Internet CIS 118 Introduction to Computers CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processors, MSWor d CIS 135 Graphics Technology, Powerpoint CIS 140 Microcomputer Databases, Access CIS 150 Electronic Spreadsheets, Excel PSY 115 Psychology of Adjustment Total BOOKKEEPER CERTIFICATE TEe North TEe East, TEe West Credits Contacts 3 72 4 96 2 48 5 120 4 96 3 72 3 72 3 135 2 48 3 72 3 78 1 24 2 48 2 48 2 48 39 93 6-999 Bookkeeper is an XpressTrain program designed for completion in two, 15-week semesters. It prepares students with th e job entry skills necessary to perform bookkeep ing activities that include : financial statements, general journals, ledgers, accounts payable and receivable and payroll. Students gain skills in computerized payroll applications and MicroSoft Word and Excel applications Keyboard skills of 35 word s per minute and 10-key skills of 100 strokes per minute are minimum standards for completion. Program graduates are prepared for jobs such as bookkeeper, accounts payable and/or receivable clerk, payroll clerk and general office clerk. All XpressTrain Bookkeeper certificate program credits apply toward the WorkTrain Computerized Accounting Specialist certificate program requirements. TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER PROGRAMS 90

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P r ogram Admission Requirements: Min imum TABE assessment scor e of 9th grade o n reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting ACC 115 Comput erized Payroll ACC 121 Accounting Principles I (Capstone) BTE 101 Keyboarding I BTE 200 Office Procedures or ACC 297 Co-op. Work Experience CIS 118 Introduction to Computers CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processors, Word CIS 150 Electronic Spreadsheets, Excel PSY 115 Psychology of Adjustment Total PAYROll CLERK CERTIFICATE TEe North, TEe East, TEe West 3 72 2 48 5 120 4 96 3 72 3 135 3 72 3 72 2 48 2 48 27 624-687 Payroll cler k is a QuickTrain program designed for completion in one, 15-week semester. It prepares s tudents with the job entry skills necess a r y t o perform manual and computerized payroll activities Students gain skills in computerized payroll applications and MicroSoft Word and Excel applications. Keyboard skill s of 20 words per minute and 10-key skills of 100 strokes per minute are minimum standards for completion Program graduates are prepared for job s such as payroll clerk and gen eral office clerk. All QuickTrain Payroll Clerk certificate program credits apply toward the XpressTrai n Bookkeeper certificate program requirements. Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 8th grade on reading and mathematics, or coenrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts ACC 101 Fundamental s of Accounting 3 ACC 115 Computerized Payroll (Capstone) 2 BTE 101 Keyboarding I 4 CIS 118 Introd u ction to Computers 3 CIS 120 Microcom puter Word Processors, Word 3 CIS 150 Electronic Spreadsheets, Excel 2 Total 17 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Travel Service Agent 72 48 96 72 72 48 408 This degree is comprised of the 25 credits defined as the General Education Core, listed earlier in the CCDfTEC Certificate and AAS degree section, and the 36 credits listed below in the WorkTrain Travel Service Agent certificate program 91 COMMUNI T Y COLLEGE OF DENVER TRAVEL SERVICE AGENT CERTIFICATE TEe East Travel service agent is a WorkTrain program designed for completion in two 1 7-week semesters. It prepares students to keyboard at 30 words per minute input data, use and understand personal computers, use MS Office applications for word processing and database manage ment, use princ iples of sales and customer service, and use knowledge and skills to provide travel planning services and domestic ticketing using the Apollo reservations system. Program graduates are prepared to enter po s itions as a travel agent assistant, corporate travel coordina tor airline reservations/sales agent, conservation/collections represen tative, audit processor, customer relations representative member service representative and quality assurance representative The WorkTrai n Travel Service Agent certificate program credits and the previously listed General Education Core credits complete the requirement s of the AAS degree in Business Administration, travel service agent. Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits BTE 101 Keyboarding I 5 BTE 160 Data Entry I 3 or BIT 297 Co-op. Work Experience 3 BIT 110 Introduct ion to Travel 3 BIT 111 Travel Geography I 3 BIT 210 Domestic Ticketing 3 BIT 212 Computer Reservations I (Capstone) 3 BUS 118 Introdu ction to Marketing 3 BUS 207 Teleservices 3 CIS 118 Intr oduction to Computers 3 CIS 120 Microcomput e r Word Processors, Word 3 C I S 140 Microcomputer Databases, Access 2 PSY 115 Psychology of Adjustment 2 Total 36 CUSTOMER SERVICE SPECIALIST CERTIFICATE TEe North, TEe East, TEe West Contacts 120 72 135 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 48 48 864-927 Customer service specialist is an XpressTrain program designed for completion in two 1 5-week semesters. It prepares students to keyboard at 30 words per minute, input data, use and understand personal computers use MS Office applications for word proceSSing and database management, and use principles of sales and customer service. Program graduates are prepared to enter positions such as conservation/collections representative, audit processor, customer relations representative, member service representative and quality assurance representative. All XpressTrain Customer Service S pecialist certificate program credits apply toward the WorkTrain Travel Service Agent certificate program requi rements.

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Program Admission Requirements : Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts BTE 101 Keyboarding I 5 120 BTE 160 Data Entry I 3 72 or BIT 297 Co-op. Work Experience 3 120 BUS 118 Introduction to Market ing 3 72 BUS 207 Teleservices (Capstone) 3 72 CIS 118 Introduction to Computers 3 72 CIS 120 M icrocom puter Word Processors, Word 3 72 CIS 140 Microcomputer Databases, Access 2 48 PSY 115 Psychology of Adjustment 2 48 Total 24 576-639 CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE CERTIFICATE TEe North, TEe East, TEe West Customer service representative is a QuickTrain program designed for completion in one, 1 5-week semester. It prepares students to keyboard at 20 words per minute, use and underst a nd personal comput ers, use MicroSoft Word for word processing, and use prinCiples of sales and customer service. Program graduates are prepared to enter positions as customer relations, member service, and quality assurance representatives. All QuickTrain Customer Service Representative cert i ficate p ro gram credit s apply toward the XpressTrain Customer Service Specialist certificate program requirements Program Admission Requirements : Minimum TABE assessment score of 8th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollme n t i n REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts BTE 101 Keyboarding I 4 96 BUS 118 Introduction to Marketing 3 72 BUS 207 Teleservices (Capstone ) 3 72 CIS 118 Introduction to Computers 3 72 CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processors, Word 3 72 Total 16 384 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY: OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND SECRETARIAL STUDIES Office Specialist This degree i s comprised of the 25 credits defined as the General Education Core, listed earlier in the CCDITEC Certificate and AAS degree section, and the 37 credits listed below in the WorkTrain Office Specialist certificate program OFFICE SPECIALIST CERTIFICATE TEe North, TEe Eas t TEe West Office specialist is a WorkTrain program designed for completion in two, 1 7-week semesters. It prepares students to wr ite business letters, input data, use and understand personal comp uters, use the Int ernet, and use MS Office applications for word processing, database management, spreadsheet functions and graphic presentations Program graduates are prepared to ente r position s such as receptionist, data entry clerk, secretary, word processor, office assistant and office specialist. The WorkTrain Office Specialist certifi cate program credits and the previously listed General Education Cor e credits complete the requirements of the AAS degree in Business Technology: office management and secretarial studies, office specialist. Program Admission Requir ement s : Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading mathematics and language skills, or co enrollment in REA 060, MAT 033, and/or ENG 060. Credits Contacts BTE 101 Keyboarding I 4 96 BTE 103 Typing Deve l opment I 3 72 BTE 160 Data Entry I 3 72 BTE 200 Office Procedures (Capstone) 3 72 BTE 202 Keybo arding II 3 72 BTE 297 Co-op. Work Experience 3 135 o r BUS 218 Business Communications II 3 72 BUS 2 1 7 Business Communications 3 72 CIS 111 Introducti o n to the Internet 2 48 CIS 118 Introduct io n t o Computers 3 72 CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processors, Word 3 72 CIS 135 Graphics Technology Powerpoint 1 24 CIS 140 Microcomputer Databases, Access 2 48 CIS 150 E l ectronic Spreadsheets, Excel 2 48 PSY 115 Psychology o f Adjustment 2 48 Total 37 888951 TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER PROGRAMS 92

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WORD PROCESSOR CERTIFICATE TEe North, TEe East, TEe West Word processor is an XpressTrai n program designed for completion in two, 1 5-week semesters. It prepares students to write business letters, inp ut data, use and understand personal computers and use MicroSoft Word for word processing applications Program graduates are prepared to enter positions such as receptionist data entry clerk, secretary and word processor. All XpressTrain Word Processor certificate program credits apply toward the WorkTrain Office Specialist certificate program requirements Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading, mathematics and language skills, or co enrollment in REA 060, MAT 033, and/or ENG 060. Credits Contacts BTE 101 Keyboarding I 4 96 MICROSOFT OFFICE PRO CERTIFICATE TEe North, TEe East, TEe West MicroSoft office pro is a QuickTrain program designed for completion in one, 15-week semester. It prepares students to perform general office functions, use and understand personal computers and use MS Office applications for word processing, database management and spreadsheet functions. Program graduates are prepared to enter posi tions such as MicroSoft appli cations specialist and office clerk. All QuickTrain MicroSoft Office Pro certificate program credits, except CIS 140 and CIS 1 SO, apply toward the XpressTrain Word Processor certificate program requirements CIS 140 and CIS 150 apply toward the WorkTrain Office Specialist program Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 8th grade on reading and mathematics, or sea-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts BTE 103 Typing Development I 3 72 BTE 101 Keyboarding I 4 96 BTE 160 Data Entry I 3 72 BTE 200 Office Procedures 3 72 BTE 200 Office Procedures (Capstone) 3 72 C I S 118 Introduction to Computers 3 72 BTE 202 Keyboarding II 3 72 CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processors, or Word (Capstone) 3 72 BTE 297 Co-op. Work Experience 3 135 CIS 140 Microcomputer Databases, Access 2 48 BUS 217 Business Communications 3 72 CIS 150 Electronic Spreadsheets, Excel 2 48 CIS 118 Introd uction to Computers CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processors, Word PSY 115 Psychol ogy of Adjustment Total RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE CLERK CERTIFICATE TEe North, TEe East, TEe West 3 3 2 27 72 72 48 648-711 Receptionist/Office clerk is a QuickTrain program designed for comple tion in one, 15-week semester. It prepares students to, perform general office functions use and understand personal computers and use MicroSoft Word for word processing applications Program graduates are prepared to ente r positions such as receptionist and office clerk. All QuickTrain Receptionist/Office Clerk certificate program credits apply toward the XpressTrain Word Processor certificate program requirements Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 8th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts BTE 101 Keyboarding I 4 96 BTE 103 Typing Development I 3 72 BTE 200 Office Procedures (Capstone) 3 72 CIS 118 Introd uction to Computers 3 72 CIS 120 Microco mputer Word Processors, Word 3 72 Total 16 384 93 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER Total DATA ENTRY CLERK CERTIFICATE TEe North, TEe East, TEe West 17 408 Data entry clerk is a QuickTrain program designed for completion in one, 15-week semester. It prepares students to perform general office functions input data and use MicroSoft Word for word processing applications. Program graduates are prepared to enter data entry and office clerk positions. All QuickTrain Data Entry Clerk certificate program credits apply toward the XpressTrain Word Processor certificate program requirements. Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 8th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts BTE 101 Keyboarding I 4 96 BTE 103 Typing Development I 3 72 BTE 160 Data Entry I (Capstone) 3 72 BTE 200 Office Procedures 3 72 CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processors, Word 3 72 Total 16 384

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Associate of Applied Science Degree i n Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies Medical Records Clerk This degree is comprised of the 25 credits defined as the General Education Core,listed earlier in the CCDfTEC Certificate and AAS degree section, and the 39 credits listed below in the WorkTrain Medical Records Clerk certificate program MEDICAL RECORDS CLERK CERTIFICATE TEC Eas t Medical records clerk is a WorkTrain program designed for completion in two 17-week semesters. It prepares students to use MicroSoft Word for word processing, manage medical files, medical coding, prepare admissions and discharge records, and assemble and analyze medical data. Program graduates are prepared to enter medical records c1erkpositions. The WorkTrain Medical Records Clerk certificate program credits and the previously listed general studies core credits complete the requirements of the AAS degree in Business Technology : office management and secretarial studies, medical records clerk. Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts AHA 152 Medical Office Communications 3 72 AHA 155 The Medical Manager 3 72 AHA 160 Coding I 2 48 AHA 200 Medical Transcription I 4 96 AHA 204 Medical Records I 3 72 AHA 250 Medical Records II -(Capstone) 3 72 AHA 297 Internship Work Experience 2 90 or BTE 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding I 2 48 BTE 101 Keyboarding I 4 96 CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processors, Word 3 72 PSY 115 Psychology of Adjustment 2 48 THA 110 Medical Terminology I 2 48 THA 111 The Human Body 4 96 THA 112 Social Issues in Health 3 72 THA 114 Medical Emergencies 24 Tot a l 39 936978 Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies Medical Secretary This degree is comprised of the 25 credits defined as the General Education Core, l isted earlier in the CCDfTEC Certificate and AAS degree section, and the 37 credits listed below in the WorkTrain Medical Secretary certificate program MEDICAL SECRETARY CERTIFICATE TEC East Medical secretary i s a WorkTrain program designed for complet ion in two, 17-week semesters. It prepares students to use MicroSoft Word for word processing and to prepare various medical office correspon dence, papers forms and data base information and insurance forms. Program graduates are prepared to become medical secretaries. The WorkTrain Medical Secretary certificate program credits and the p reviously listed general studies core c r edits complete the requirements of the AAS degree in Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies, medical secretary. Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading and mathematics or co-enro llme nt in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. AHA 152 AHA 155 AHA 200 AHA 211 AHA 297 BTE 104 BTE 101 BTE 120 CIS 120 PSY 115 THA 110 THA 111 THA 112 THA 114 Credits Medical Office Communica tions 3 The Medical Manager 3 Medical Transcription I 4 Medical Secretary Skills -(Capstone) 4 Internship Work Experience 2 or Typewriting Speedbuild ing I 2 Keyboarding I 4 Filing and Records Control 2 Microcomputer Word Processors, Word 3 Psychology Of Adjustment 2 Medical Terminology I 2 The Human Body 4 Social Issues in Health 3 Medical Emergencies Total 37 Contacts 72 72 96 96 90 48 96 48 72 48 48 96 72 2 4 888-930 TEC HNICAL EDUC ATION C ENTER PROGRAM S 9 4

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Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial S tudies Medical Transcriptionist This degree is comprised of the 25 credits defined as the General Education Core, listed earlier in the CCD/TEC Certificate and AA5 degree section, and the 39 credits listed below in the WorkTrain Medical Transcription ist certificate program. MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTIONIST CERTIFICATE TEe Eas t Medical transcriptionist is a WorkTrain program designed for comple tion in two, 17-week semesters. It prepares students to use MicroSoft Word for word processing and medical coding to prepare insurance billings and to transcibe general, medical, surgical and radiological data. Program graduates are prepared to enter medical transcriptionist positions The WorkTrain Medical Transcriptionist certificate program credits and the previously listed general studie s core credits complete the requirements of the AAS degree in Business Technology : Office Management and Secretarial Studies, medical transcriptionist. Program Admission Requir ements : Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts AHA 152 Medical Office Commun ications 3 72 AHA 155 The Medical Manager 3 72 AHA 156 Basic Coding 2 48 AHA 200 Medical Transcription I 4 96 AHA 207 Medical Transcription II -(Capstone) 6 144 AHA 297 Internship Work Experience 2 90 or BTE 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding I 2 48 BTE 101 Keyboardi n g I 4 96 CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processors, Word 3 72 PSY 115 Psychology of Adjustme nt 2 48 THA 110 Medical Terminology I 2 48 THA 111 The Human Body 4 96 THA 112 Social Issues in Health 3 72 THA 114 Medical Emergencies 24 Total 39 936-978 Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies MEDICAL UNI T COORDINATOR This degree is comprised of the 25 c r e dit s defined as the General Education Core, listed earlier in the CCD/TEC Certificate and AAS degree section, and the 38 credits listed below in the WorkTrain Medical Unit Coordinator certificate program. 9S C OMMUNIT Y C OLLEGE OF DENVER MEDICAL UNIT COORDINATOR CERTIFICATE TEe East Medical unit coordinator is a WorkTrain program designed for comple t i o n in two, 17-week semesters. I t prepares studen t s to use MicroSoft Word for word p rocessing, organize non-cl inical f u nctions of the nursing unit, provide liaison between physicians, nurses, patients family members and other departmen t s and plan/coordinate the daily activities of the nursing unit. Program g raduates are prepared to enter med ical unit coordi nator positions. The WorkTrain Medical Unit Coordinator cert ificate program credits and the previo usly listed general studies core credits complete the requirements of the AAS degree i n Business Technology : Office M anagement a n d Secretari a l S tudies, medical unit coordinato r Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grad e on reading and mathematics, or sco-enrollment i n REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts AHA 152 Medical Office Communications 3 72 AHA 155 The Medical Manager 3 72 AHA 158 Medical Unit Coordin ator I 44 A H A 209 Medical Unit Coordinator II -(Capstone) 5 120 AHA 297 Internship Work Experience 2 90 or BTE 104 Typewriting Speed b u ilding I 2 48 BTE 101 Keyb oarding I 4 96 C I S 120 Microcomputer Word Processors, Wor d 3 72 PSY 115 Psych ology of Adjustment 2 48 THA 110 Medical Terminology I 2 48 THA 111 The Human Body 4 96 THA 112 Social Issues i n Health 3 72 T H A 114 Medical Emergencies 24 Total 38 912 -954 MEDICAL CLERK TEe East Medical clerk is a n XpressTrain program designed for completion in two, 15-week semesters. It prepares students to use MicroSoft Word for word processing, to prepare basic medical office papers and forms, and to p rocess office files and records. Program graduates are prepared to ente r positions as medical clerks. All XpressTrain Medical Cler k certificate prog ram credits apply toward the WorkTrai n Medical Secretary certificate program requirements ; all but BTE 120 transfer to Medical Records Clerk, Medical Transcriptionist a n d Medical U nit Coordinator p rograms. Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading a n d mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts AHA 155 The Medical Manager -(Capstone) 3 72 AHA 297 Internship Work Experience 2 90 or B T E 104 Typewr it ing Speedbuilding I 2 48 BTE 101 Keyboarding I 4 96

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BTE 120 Filing and Records Control 2 48 CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processors, Word 3 72 PSY 11S Psychology of Adjustment 2 48 THA 110 Medical Terminology I 2 48 THA 111 The Human Body 4 96 THA 112 Social Issues in Health 3 72 THA 114 Medical Emergencies 24 Total 26 624-642 Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies Comprehensive Medical Assistant This degree is comprised of the 25 credits defined as the General Education Core, listed earlier in the CCDITEC Certificate and AAS degree section, and the 48 credits listed below in the WorkTrain Comprehensive Medical Assistant certificate program COMPREHENSIVE MEDICAL ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE TEC East Comprehensive medical assistant is a WorkTrain program designed for completion in three, 15-week semesters. It is a nationally certified program. It prepares students to perform front office tasks such as insurance forms, office appointments, and ICD-9 and CPT coding. Students also are prepared in back office tasks such as conducting patient evalu ations, taking and recording clinical measurements, giving injections and providing other patient treatments This program is nationally certified by the American Association of Medical Assisting through which graduates can obtain certification status by examination. Program graduates are prepared to enter positions such as certified medical assistants and medical assistants. The WorkTrain Comprehensive Medical Assistant certificate program credits and the previously listed general studies core credits com plete the requirements of the AAS degree in Business Technology: office management and secretarial studies, comprehensive medical assistant. Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts AHA 152 Medical Office Communications 3 72 AHA 155 Medical Manager 2 48 AHA 156 Basic Coding 2 48 AHA 211 Medical Secretary Skills 4 96 BTE 102 Basi c Keyboarding Applications 3 72 PSY 115 Psychology of Adjustment 2 48 THA 110 Medical Terminology I 2 48 THA 111 The Human Body 4 96 THA 112 Social Issues in Health 3 72 THA 114 Medical Emergencies 1 24 THA 151 Technical Procedures 3 72 THA 153 Medical Terminology II 2 48 THA 205 Pharmacology Practices 4 96 THA 212 Internship Seminar 1 24 THA 230 Clinical Procedures 8 192 THA 297 Internship Work Experience (Capstone) 4 180 Total 48 1236 Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies Clinical Medical Assistant This degree is comprised of the 25 credits defined as the General Education Core, listed earlier in the CCDITEC Certificate and AAS degree section, and the 37 credits listed below in the WorkTrain Clinical Medical Assistant certificate program. CLINICAL MEDICAL ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE TEC East Clinical medical assistant is a WorkTrain p rogram designed for comple tion in two 17-week semesters. It prepares students to conduct patient evaluations, take and record clinical measurements, give injections and provide other patient treatments. Program graduates are eligible to take the Certified Medical Assistant examination and are prepared to enter positions such as clinical medical assistants and medical assistants. The WorkTrain Clinical Medical Assistant certificate program credits and the previously listed general studies core credits complete the requirements of the AAS degree in Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies, clinical medical assistant. Program Admission Requirements : Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts BTE 102 Basic Keyboarding Applications 3 72 PSY 115 Psychology of Adjustment 2 48 THA 110 Medical Terminolog y I 2 48 THA 111 The Human Body 4 96 THA 112 Social Issues in Health 3 72 THA 114 Medical Emergencies 1 24 THA 151 Technical Procedures 3 72 THA 153 Medical Terminology II 2 48 THA 205 Pharmacology Practices 4 96 THA 212 Internship Seminar 1 24 THA 230 Clinical Procedures 8 192 THA 297 Internship Work Experience (Capstone) 4 180 Total 37 972 TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER PROGRAMS 96

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Assodate of Applied Sdence Degree in Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies Radiology/Orthopedic Assistant Thi s degree is compr ised of the 25 c redit s defined as th e General Education Core,listed earlier i n the CCDITEC Certificate and AAS degree section, and the 37 credits listed below in the WorkTrain Radiology/O rthopedic Assistant cert ificate program. RADIOLOGY/ORTHOPEDIC ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE TEe East Radiology/Orthopedic assistant is a WorkTrain prog ram designed for comp l e tion in two, 17-week semesters. It prepares student s to conduct patient evaluations, take and record clinical measurements, assist in radiological procedures, process radiological film and assist in orthope dic procedures. Program graduates are prepared to enter positions as radiology assistants and orthopedic technicians. The WorkTrain Radiology/Ort hopedic Assistant certificate program credits and the previously listed general studies core credits complete the requirements of the AAS degree in Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies, radiology / orthopedic assistant. Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade o n reading and mathematics or co-enrollm ent in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. C redits Contacts BTE 102 Basic Keyboarding Applications 3 72 PSY 115 Psychology of Adjustment 2 48 THA 110 Medical Terminology I 2 48 THA 111 The Human Body 4 96 THA 112 Social Issues in Heal th 3 72 THA 114 Medical Emergencies 1 24 THA 151 Technical Procedures 3 72 THA 153 Medical Terminology II 2 48 THA 210 Radiology Assisting 6 144 THA 2 1 2 I nt ernship Seminar 1 24 THA 220 Orthoped i c Technology 6 144 THA 297 Internship Work Experience -(Capstone) 4 180 Total 37 972 97 COMMUNIT Y COLLEGE OF DENVER NURSE ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE TEe East Nurse assistant is an XpressTrain program designed for completion in two, 15-week semesters. It prepares students to use medical terminolo gy, adhere to healt h care standards, use CPR and first-aid procedures and provide patient services in a professional manner. This program is approved by the State Board of Nursing, and graduates are eligible to take the examination for certified nurse aide. Program graduates are prepared to e nter positions as nurse assistants, patient car e providers, nurse aides and home health aides. All XpressTrai n Nurse Assistant certificate program credits except NUR 100, apply toward the WorkTrain Comprehensive Medical Assistant, Clinica l Medical Assistant and Radi o l ogy/Orthopedi c Assistant p rogram requirements. Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment scor e of 9th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. NUR 100 Nurse Aide Practices and Concepts PSY 115 Psychology of Adju stment T H A 110 Medical Terminology I THA 111 The Human Body THA 112 Social Issues in Health THA 114 Medical Emergencies T H A 212 Internship Seminar THA 297 Internship Work Experience (Capstone) Total NURSE AIDE CERTIFICATE TEe East Credits Contacts 9 216 2 48 2 48 4 96 3 72 24 2 4 3 135 25 663 Nurse aide i s a QuickTrain program designed for completion in one, 15-week semester. It prepares students to use medical terminology, adhere to health care standards, use CPR and fir s t-aid p rocedures and provid e patient services in a professional manner. This program is approved by the State Board of Nursing and graduates are eligible to take the examination for certifie d nurse aide. Program graduates are prepared to becom e nurse and h ome healt h aides. All QuickTrain Nurse Aide certificate program credits apply toward the XpressTrain Nurse Assistant certificate program r equirements Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment scor e of 8th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. NUR 100 Nurse Aide Practices and Concepts THA 110 Medical Terminology I THA 114 Medical Emergencies THA 212 Internship Seminar THA 297 Internship Work Experience (Capstone) Total C redits 9 2 Contacts 216 48 24 24 3 135 16 447

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ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS P C Network Specialist This degree is comprised of the 25 credits defined as the General Education Core,listed earlier in the CCDfTEC Certificate and AAS degree section and the 37 credits listed below in the WorkTrain PC Network Specialist certificate program PC NETWORK SPECIALIST CERTIFICATE TEe N orth P C network specialist is a WorkTrain program designed for completion in two 1 7-week semesters. It prepares students with the job entry skills necessary to install PC applicat ions; use E-mail, the Internet and the World Wide Web; use BASIC and Visual Basic programming; perform minor P C repairs and install PC upgrades; and set up and manage 3x Novell and Windows NT LANs and connecting equipment. Program graduates are prepared to enter positions as PC network and PC support specialists. The WorkTrain PC Network Specialist certificate program credits and the previously l isted General Studies Core credits complete the requirements of the AAS degree in Computer Information Systems, PC network specialist. Progr a m Admission Requir eme n ts: Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts BTE 102 Basi c Keyboarding Applications 2 48 CIS 111 Introduction to the Internet 2 48 CIS 118 Introduct io n to Computers 3 72 CIS 119 Introduction to Programming 3 72 CIS 138 Microcompute r Interfaces, Windows 95 3 72 CIS 1 7 8 Visual Basic with Windows 3 72 CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 72 CIS 226 Computer Diagnosis and Repair 3 72 CIS 254 Networks : Windows NT Client (Capstone) 4 96 CIS 256 Networks : Novell 3x Administration 3 72 CIS 275 Telecommunications 3 72 or CIS 297 Co-op. Work Experience 3 135 CIS 283 Networks : Windows NT Server 3 72 PSY 115 Psychology of Adjustment 2 48 Total 3 7 888 -951 Associate of Applied Science Degree i n Computer Information Systems PC APPLICATIONS SPECIALIST This degree is comprised of the 25 credits defined as the General Education Core,listed earlier in the CCDfTEC Certificate and AAS degree section, and the 36 credits listed below in the WorkTrain PC Applications Specialist certificate program. PC APPLICATIONS SPECIALIST CERTIFICATE TEe North T E e East, TEe W est PC applications specialist is a WorkTrain program designed for comple tion in two 1 7-week semesters. It prepares students with the job e ntry skills necessary to install PC applications; use and instruct others to use MicroSoft Office software that includes Word, Access, Excel and Power point applications; use E-mail, the Int ernet the World Wide Web and develop home pages; use BASIC programming ; use multimedia authorware ;a nd perform minor PC repairs and install PC upgrades. Program graduates are prepared to enter positions such as PC applica tions/support specialists, PC help desk specialists and netscapeIWWW developers The WorkTrain PC Application s Specialist certificate program credits and the previously listed General Studies Core credits complete the requirements of the AAS degree in Computer Information Systems, PC applications specialist. Program Admission Requir eme nt s : Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts BTE 102 Basic Keyboard Applications 2 48 CIS 111 Introd uction to the Internet 2 48 CIS 1 1 8 Introduction to Computers 3 72 CIS 119 Introd u ction to Programming 3 72 CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processors, Word 3 72 CIS 135 Graphics Technology Powerpoint 24 CIS 138 Microcomputer Interfaces, Windows 95 3 72 CIS 139 Integration Software (Capstone) 4 96 CIS 140 Microcomputer Databases, Access 2 48 CIS 150 Electronic Spreadsheets, Excel 2 48 CIS 206 Introduction to Multimedia Technology 3 72 or CIS 297 Co-op. Work Experience 3 135 CIS 216 Microcomputer Hardware 3 72 CIS 226 Computer Diagnosis and Repair 3 72 PSY 115 Psychology of Adjus tment 2 48 Total 36 864-92 7 TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER PROGRAMS 98

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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATOR/GROUP LEADER CERTIFICATE TECWest Earl y childhood e duc a t or/group leader is a QuickTrain p rogram designed for complet ion in one, 15-week semester. I t prepares student s to perfor m group leader dut ies for infants and toddlers, or for p re-sch ool children Program grad u ates are prepared t o enter posit i o n s as child care gr o up leader and c h i l d care wor k e r The next progr a m level in this career ladder is available at the CCD Aur a ria Campu s and not at TEe. This is the Earl y Chil d hood E d ucator/Director c ert ificate program. All credits from the QuickTrain Early Childhood Educat or/Group Leader program are accepted into this certificate p rogr a m The Associat e of Applied Science degree at Auraria is the Early Childhood Education and Management program. See t h e earlier CCD Aur aria sections for specific progr a m requirement s a n d design. Prog ram Admission R e q uiremen t s : Minimum TABE assessment scor e of 8th grade o n reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment i n R E A 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts E C E 101 Introd u ction to Early Childhood Educatio n 3 72 ECE 102 ECE Lab Experience 3 72 ECE 111 Infants and Toddlers: Developmental Theories a n d Practices 3 72 o r ECE 117 Met h o dslTechniques: Curriculum Development 3 72 ECE 120 Classr oom Management 3 72 ECE 238 Chil d Development and Growth (Capst o ne) 4 96 Total 16 384 SPECIA L EDUCATION PARAPROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE TEC North Special education paraprofessional is a n XpressTrain program design e d for comp letion in two, 15-week semesters. It prepares students to pro v ide services to specia l populations and their parents in a public school o r agency environme nt. Working under the direct supervision of a cer tified teacher or ot h e r p rofessional, the special educatio n paraprofes sional communica tes with provides s upervision to, deliver s d irect ins truction and o ther services to, provides emergency first-aid t o and is sen s itive t o t h e nee d s of s pecial education populatio n s Program grad u a tes are p repared t o e nter positions s uch as special edu cation para pr ofessionals, special education aides and teachers aides. Employment ofte n r e quires a Colorado Bureau of Investigation backgr ound check. T h e next step in this career ladder is not at TEe. HSE 110, HSE 114 and HSE 297 are accepted into the Associate of Applied Science degree in Human Services on the Aur a ria Campus. 99 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER P r ogram Admission R equirements : Minimum TABE assessment score of 8th g rade on reading and mathematics, or coenrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. HSE 110 Over view of Special P opulations HSE 111 Com municat ion Skills/ Special Populatio n s HSE 112 Firs t-ai d /CPR HSE 114 Student Supervisi o n /Behavior Management HSE 141 Basic Instruct ional Techniques HSE 142 Transitional Support Skills HSE 217 Cultural Diversity in Human Services HSE 297 Internship Work Experience (Capstone) PSY 115 Psych ology of A d j u s t ment Total SPECIAL EDUCATION AIDE CERTIFICATE TEC N orth Credits C ontacts 3 72 3 72 24 3 72 3 7 2 3 72 3 72 6 270 2 48 27 77 4 Special education a ide i s a QuickTrain program designed for comp l etion in one, 15-week semester. It p repares students to provide services to special populations and their parents i n a public sch ool or agency environment. Working under the dir ect supervision of a certified teacher or o ther p rofessional, the special education aide commu nicates with pro vides supervision to, delivers direct i nstructio n to and pro vides emergency fir s t-aid to special education populations P rogram graduate s are prepared to enter positions as special education aide and teachers aide. All QuickTrain Special Education A ide cer tificate program credits apply toward the XpressTrain Special Education Paraprofes s ional cert ificate pr ogram requirements. P r ogram Admissio n R equirement s : Minimum TABE asses sment score of 8th grade o n reading and mathematics, o r co-enrollment in REA 060 and/o r MAT 033. Credits Contacts HSE 110 Overview of Special Populations 3 72 HSE 111 Communication Skills/Special Populations 3 72 HSE 112 First-aid/CPR 24 HSE 114 Student Supervisi o n/Behavior Management 3 72 HSE 141 Basic I nstruction a l Tec hniques 3 72 HSE 297 Internship Work Experience (Capstone) 3 135 T o tal 16 447

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ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN TRADES CNC Machine Tool Operator This degree i s comprised of the 25 credits defined as the General Education Core, listed earlier in the CCD(TEC Certificate and AAS degree section, and the 40 credits listed below in the WorkTrain CNC Machine Tool Operator certificate p rogram. CNC MACHINE TOOL OPERATOR CERTIFICATE T E e North CNC machine tool operator i s a WorkTrain program designed for com pletion in two 17-week semesters. It prepares students with the job entry skills necessary to perform most operations on the vertical mill horizontal mill, lathe, grinde r/shaper, CNC mill a nd CNC lathe. Program graduates are prepared to enter positions such as CNC machine tool operators or can enter apprentice programs for CNC machinists. The WorkTrain CNC Machine Tool Operator certificate program credits and the previously listed general studies core credits complete the requirements of the AAS degree in Trades, CNC machine tool operator. P rogram Admiss ion Requirements: Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits MTO 130 Intr oduction to Machine Shop MTO 131 Machine Math and Prints I MTO 132 Vertical Mills I MTO 133 Engine Lathes I MTO 140 Metrology MTO 141 Vertical Mills II MTO 142 Machine Math and Prints II MTO 143 Engine Lathes II MTO 221 Engi n e Lathes III MTO 223 Job Shop Machining I or MTO 297 Co-op. Work Experience MTO 250 Auto Cad I MTO 251 CNC Operation s (Capstone) MTO 252 CNC Principles MTO 253 CNC Mathemat ics I Total MACHINE TOOL OPERATOR CERTIFICATE TEe North 1 3 4 4 2 4 2 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 40 Contacts 24 72 96 96 48 96 48 96 96 72 135 72 48 48 48 9601023 Machine tool operator is an XpressTrain program designed for comple tion in two 15-week semesters. It prepares student s with the j ob entry skills necessary to perform most operations on the vertical mill, horizon tal mill, lathe, and grinder/shapero Program graduates are prepared to enter positions such as machine tool operators or enter apprentice programs for machinists. All XpressTrain Machine Tool operator certificate program credits apply toward the WorkTrain CNC Machine Tool Operator program requirements. Program Adm i ssion Requirements : Minimum TABE assessment score of 9th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enro llme nt in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts MTO 130 Introductio n to Machine Shop 1 24 MTO 131 Machine Math and Prints I 3 72 MTO 132 Vertical Mills I 4 96 MTO 133 Engine Lathes I 4 96 MTO 140 Metrology 2 48 MTO 141 Vertical Mills II 4 96 MTO 143 Engine Lathes II (Capstone) 4 96 MTO 223 Job Shop Machining I 3 72 or MTO 297 Co-op. Work Experience 3 135 Total 2S 6 00-663 LATHE OPERATOR CERTIFICATE TEe North Lathe operator is a QuickTrain program designe d for completion in one, 15-week semester. It prepares students with the job entry skills necessary to perform most operations on the lathe. Program graduates are prepared to enter posit ions as lathe operators. All QuickTrain Lathe Operator certificate program credits apply toward the XpressTrain Machine Tool Operator certificate program requirements. Program Adm i ssion Requirements : Minimum TABE assessment score of 8th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts MTO 130 Int roduction to Machine Shop MTO 131 Machine Math and Prints I MTO 133 Engine Lathes I MTO 140 Metrology MTO 143 Engine Lathes II MTO 223 Job Shop Machining I (Capstone) Total Mill OPERATOR CERTIFICATE TEe North 1 24 3 72 4 96 2 48 4 96 3 72 17 408 Mill operator is a QuickTrain program designed for completion in one, 15-week semester. It prepares students with the job entry skills necessary to perform most operations on mills. Program graduates are prepared to enter positions as mill operators. All QuickTrain Mill Operator certificate program credits apply towards th e XpressTrai n Machine Tool Operator certificate p rogram requirements. TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER PROGRAM S 100

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Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TASE assessment score of 8th grade on reading and mat hematics, or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts MTO 130 Intro duction to Machine Shop 1 24 MTO 131 Machine Math and Prints I 3 72 MTO 132 Vertical Mills I 4 96 MTO 140 Metro l ogy 2 48 MTO 141 Vertical Mills II 4 96 MTO 223 Job Shop Machining I (Capstone) 3 72 Total 17 408 Associate of Applied Science Degree in Trades Fabrication Welder This degree is comprised of the 25 credits defined as the General Education Core, listed earlier in the CCDITEC Certificate and AAS degree section, and the 39 credits listed below in the WorkTrain Fabrication Welder certificate program FABRICATION WELDER CERTIFICATE TEe North Fabrication welder is a WorkTrain program designed for completion in two, 17-week semesters. It prepares s tudent s wit h the job entry skills necessary to perform most operation s in oxyacetylene welding, shield ed metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding and gas tungsten arc welding on materials that range from heavy plate to thin gauge sheet metals and are composed of various steels and aluminum Program graduates are prepared to enter positions such as arc welders, plate welders, industrial welders, production welders, fabrication welders, TIG or MIG welders, or construction welders. The WorkTrain Fabrication certificate program credit s and the previousl y listed General Studies Core credits comp lete the requirements of the AAS degree in Trades, fabrication welder Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TASE assessment score of 8th grade on reading and mathematics or co-enrollment in REA 060 and/or MAT 033. Credits Contacts WEF 100 Oxyacetylene Welding I 3 72 WEF 102 Air Arc Gouging 2 48 or WEF 297 Co-op. Work Experience 2 90 WEF 108 SMAW Set Up and Padding 4 96 WEF 109 SMAWI 4 96 WEF 110 SMAWII 4 96 WEF 111 SMAW Structural I 4 96 WEF 112 SMAW Structural II 3 72 WEF 114 Welding Math and Prints I 3 72 WEF 130 GMAWSet Up 2 48 101 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER WEF 205 GMAWThin Gauge and Structural WEF 207 GTAWSet Up WEF 208 GTAWThin Gauge and Allo y (Capstone) Total ARC WELDER CERTIFICATE TEC North 4 96 2 48 4 96 39 936-978 Arc welder is an XpressTrain program designed for completion in two 15-week semesters. It prepares students with the job entry skills neces sary to perform mo s t operations in oxyacetylene welding and shielded metal arc welding on various sizes of steel materials Program gradu ates are prepared to enter positions such as arc welders, plate welders and construction welders. All XpressTrain Arc Welder certificate program credits apply toward the WorkTrain Fabrication Welder program requirements Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TASE assessment score of 8th grade on reading and mathematics, or co-enrollment i n REA 060 and/or MAT 033. WEF 100 Oxyacetylene Welding I WEF 102 Air Arc Gouging or WEF 297 Co-op. Work Experience WEF 108 SMAW Set Up and Padding WEF 109 SMAWI WEF 110 SMAWII WEF 111 SMAW S tructural I WEF 112 SMAW Structural II (Capstone) WEF 114 Welding Math and Prints I Total WELDER CERTIFICATE TEC North Credits Contacts 3 72 2 48 2 90 4 96 4 96 4 96 4 96 3 72 3 72 27 648-690 Welder is a QuickTrain program designed for completion in one, 15-week semester. It prepares student s with job entry skills necessary to perform most operations in s hielded metal arc welding on common sizes of steel materials. Program graduates are prepared to enter posi tions such as welder or arc welder. All QuickTrain Welder certificate program credits apply toward the XpressTrain Arc Welder cert i ficate program requirements. Program Admission Requirements: Minimum TASE assessment score o f 8th grade on reading and mathematics o r co-enrollment i n REA 060 and/or MAT 033. C redits Contacts WEF 108 SMAW Set Up and Padding 4 96 WEF 109 SMAWI 4 96 WEF 110 SMAWII 4 96 WEF 111 SMAW Structural I (Capstone) 4 96 Total 16 384

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(ours Course descriptions are listed in a l phabetica l order by prefix and course number. P lease refer to the semester class schedules for the list of courses offered each semester. Alternative Delivery Methods Courses delivered through traditional methods often are delivered also through alternative methods, such as telecourses o r 'on-line' courses. The course delivered thro ugh alternative methods uses the identical content guide, requires the identical student outcomes and awards the iden tical student credi t hours a s the same course delivered through traditional methods Study Abroad Course credits are based on the type of instruc tiona l delivery and must meet the same criteria as courses delivered on campus. Course Modifications The courses listed in the following pages are an indication of college course offerings. Cour s e s and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester. Courses Common to More Than One Program 085 Recitation Variable C redit Designed for students with limited science or mathematics background. Provides opport u nities for the student to practice study skills and strategies for learning biolo gy chemistry, mathematics and physics. 290 Special Topics Course Carries 1 to 6 credits and 15 to 90 contact hours. Course titles ( topics) will vary. Permission of the instructo r and division director is required prior to registration. Four-year institutions var y in their policies regarding acceptance of special topics courses. Students planning to transfer should keep a portfolio of their work. 295 Job Search Workshop Variable Credit Present s i nformation on the nature of work, employer expectations, resume writing,job i nterview techniques and job search skills. 297 Cooperative Education (Co-op.) Provides opportunities to supplement course work w i th practical work experiences related to the student's educational program and occupational objective Credit and contact hours are variable. Permission of the i nstructor/coordinator and the cooperative jo b supervisor is required. Four-year institutions vary in their policies regarding acceptance of cooperative education credit. Students who plan to transfer should consu l t an advisor. 199,299 Independent Study Variable credit and contact hours. Students contract with a faculty member for a program-related independent project not covered by existing c urriculum. Each credit hour assi gned corresponds to a plan for a minimum of 30, 50minute hours of student time Permission of the faculty and division dean is required prior to registration. Students planning to transfer should consult with an advisor; four-year inst itutions vary in their policies regarding acceptance of independent study. Students with fewer than 30 college-leve l credits take 199. Students with mor e than 30 collegelevel credits take 299. Accounting ACC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 3 Credit Hours/ 4 5 Contact Hours Emphasizes the basic element s of the accounting cycle through statement preparation. Include s common bookkeeping procedure s for handling cash receipts and disbursements and working with accounts receivable and payable. Includes practice in handling journals and ledgers. ACC 110 Business Math 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 035 or equivalent Emphasizes the application of math to business situations. Teaches problem-solv ing technique s in areas of mer chandising accounting, general business and personal finance. ACC 111 Individual Income Tax 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 121 Introduces taxation and explains how the incom e tax affects individuals. ACC 113 Computerized Accounting 4 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 101 Corequisite: ACC 121 Introduces data entry procedures on the computer for accounting applications. Includes a review of manual procedures with extensi v e hands-on experience with computerized accounting systems. Thi s course is the certificate capstone course. ACC 115 Computerized Payroll 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Provides the student with a better under standing of the laws governing payroll and the theory and procedures for setting up payroll systems. ACC 121 Accounting Principles I 4-5 Credit Hours/60-120 Contact Hours Corequisite: ACC 110 or equivalent Introduces the study of accounting princi ples to give the student an understanding of the theory and logic that underlie procedures and practices. ACC 122 Accounting Principles II 4-5 Credit Hours/60-120 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ACC 121, 11 0 Introduces the study of partnership and corporate accounting systems and issues. Provides an overview of financial statement analysis, manufacturing cost control, and management planning and budgeting techniques. ACC 211 Intermediate Accounting (Capstone) 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 122 Studies the asset valuation process. Acquaints students with the historical, con ceptual and pragmatic dimension of a wide range of major accounting issues that are integral to the development of balance sheets, income statements and s tatements of changes in financial positions for the complex organization This is a capstone course. COURSE DESCRIPTION 102

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ACC 215 Accounting Systems 3 Credit HoursJ45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 122 Studies the principles, concepts and tools used in the design, implementation and integration of accounting systems, controls and procedures. Illustrates manual and computerized systems through p ractical application projects. ACC 226 Cost Accounting 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 122 Introduce s the theory, concept and proce dures of cost accounting. Gives student s a basic understanding of managerial and cost accounting systems used in manufacturing businesses. ACC 251 BPI Computer Account i ng 5 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 121 Introduces the student to comp uterized accounting systems. Reviews manual accounting procedures and applies the theory of computerized accounting techniques to a hypothetical business. Students will create work sheets and com plete a business project. Administrative Health Assistant AHA 152 Medical Office Communication 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Develops the skills of expression of ideas when speaking and writ ing; addresses listening skills and improves awareness of correct speech patterns and listening for incorrect grammar usage; and introduces beginning medical filing with an emphasis placed on alphabetic and numeric metho ds. AHA 155 The Medical Manager 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BTE 101,Cls 120,THA 114 Uses the softwar e package titled Medical Manager to explore activities such as making appointments, entering patient information, recording superbills, bill ing insurance companies and posting receipts of payments. Also covers regulations governing insurance billing. 103 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER AHA 156 Basic Coding 2 Credit Hours/48 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BTE 101,ClS 120,THA 114 Introduces the basic coding principles for using the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revisions, Clinical Modifications (ICD-9-CM), as well as some special coding situations. The student also will be introduced to procedure codes through the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT). AHA 158 Medical Unit Coordinating I 6 Credit Hours/l44 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BTE 101,CI S 120,THA 114 Introduces the history, growth and devel opment of medical unit coordinating and provides an orientation t o the work environment. Includes the knowledge and skills necessary to perform the coordina tion duties needed in a medical facility, including safety for patients and others, transcription of docto rs' orders and other medical tasks as required. AHA 160 Coding I 2 Credit Hours/48 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BTE 101, CIS 120, THA 114 Introduces the basic rules and principles of medical coding, using International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM) formats and conventio ns, including V Codes and E Codes. Also int roduces procedural codes through the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT). AHA 200 Medical Transcription I Prerequisites: BTE 101,ClS 120,THA 114 4 Credit Hours/96 Contact Hours I ntroduces the use of transcription equipment, principles of grammar, proofreading and word processing skills. Provides practice in transcribing history and physical reports, discharge s ummarie s and other reports used in common medical procedures. AHA 204 Medical Records I 3 Credit Hours172 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BTE 101,ClS 120,THA 114 Explores the development and conte nt of the hospital medical record, medical records for ambulatory care, long-term care and mental health. Management of record content medical forms and filing methods also are presented. AHA 207 Medical Transcription II 6 Credit Hours/l44 Contact Hours Prerequisites: AHA 200 Continues the topics of Medical Tran scription I and introduces advanced terminolog y and technical reports. Specialty areas of surgery, radiology and general reports are covered. Practice tapes contain various medical background noise and use d ictators with foreign accents. AHA 209 Medical Unit Coord i nating II 5 Credit Hours/120 Contact Hours Prerequisites: AHA 158 Continues the topics of AHA 158, Medical Unit Coordinating I and includes laboratory orders, diagnostic orders, treatment orders, miscellaneous orders, health unit coordina tor procedures, management techniques, communications and medical/legal considerations. AHA 210 Pha r macology 2 Credit Hours/48 Contact Hours Provides an overview of medication measur ement regulation forms, classifications, dosage parameters, safety and routes of administration. AHA 21 1 Medical Secretarial 5kills 4 Credit Hours/96 Contact Hours Prerequisites: AHA 152, 155,200 Covers secretarial topics such as recordkeeping duties bank reconciliation, accounting terminology and basic accounting practices. Types of mailing procedures, basic insurance filing and making referral appointments also are presented. AHA 250 Medical Records II 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Prerequisites: AHA 200 Continues the topics of AHA 204, Medical Records I and presents indexes, registers, statistics, medical records in reimbursement, computer and information systems, legal aspects and quality assurance. Anthropology ANT 101 Cultural Anth r opology 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Studies human cultural patterns and learned behavior. Includes linguistics, social and political organization, religion, culture and personality, cul ture change and applied anthropology.

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ANT 107 Introduction to Archaeology 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Surveys the recovery of human prehistoric and historic past through excavation, analy sis and interpretation of material remains, including the archaeology and prehistory of several areas of the world. Covers the work of archaeologists along with discus sions of major theories and excavations. ANT 11 1 Physical Anthropology 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Studies human biology and its effects on behavior. Includes principles of genetics and evolution, vertebrates and primates, human origins, human variations and ecology. Appliance Repair Technology APT 218 Automatic Washers I 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RAC 116 or equivalent experiences Examines control devices and the electrical circuits common to most automatic wash ers and the methods of troubleshooting electrical circuits. APT 219 Clothes Dryers I 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RAC 116 or equivalent experiences Examines circuits, control devices, diagnostic and repair procedures on various makes of automatic electric clothes dryers. APT 220 Kitchen Equipment I 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RAC 116 or equivalent experiences Examines the repair of automatic dish washers and disposals. APT 225 Refrigerators and Freezers I 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RAC 116 or equivalent experiences Presents the procedures for the repair of various makes and models of upright refrigerator/freezers and chest freezers. APT 226 Room Air Conditioners (Certificate Capstone) 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RAC 116 or equivalent experiences Presents circuits, control devices, diagnostic and repair procedures on various makes of room air conditioners. APT 228 Clothes Dryers II 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RAC 116 or equivalent experiences Presents circuits control devices, diagnostic and repair procedures on various makes of automatic gas clothes dryers. APT 229 Kitchen Equipment II 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RAC 116 or equivalent experiences Presents the study and repair of gas and electric ranges, microwave ovens and trash compactors. APT 230 Refrigerators and Freezers II 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or equivalent experiences Presents the study and repair of various makes and models of upright refrigerator/freezers and chest freezers. APT 285 Automatic Washers II (Capstone) 6 Credit Hours/136 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RAC 100 Series or equivalent experiences Continues to present the concepts of washing machine components and opera tion and apply them to customer repair. Arabic ARB 1 1 1 First Year Arabic I 5 Credit HourS/75 Contact Hours Art Gives student s a fundamental understanding of the Arabic language while develop ing their basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. ART 110 Art Appreciation 3 Credit HourS/45 Contact Hours Introduces the cultural significance of the visual am, to include painting, photography, sculpture, crafts, design and architecture. Surveys the techniques, terminology and traditions of art, as well as current trends. Provides students with opportunities to visit galleries and museums of art in the Denver area. ART 111 Art History I 3 Credit HourS/45 Contact Hours Provides the knowledge base to under stand the visual am, including works from Western and non-Western cultures. Surveys the visual arts from the ancient through the medieval periods. ART 112 Art History II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Provides the knowledge base to under stand the visual am, including works from Western and non-Western cultures. Surveys the visual arts from the Renaissance through the modern periods. ART 121 Drawing I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Introduces various approaches and media designed to develop drawing skills and visual awareness. ART 122 Drawing II/Mixed Media 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ART 121 Continues topics introduced in ART 121 with emphasis in the use of a variety of contemporary media and drawing materials, individual expressive style, color and advanced composition. ART 131 Design I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Studies basic design elements, visual per ception, form and composition ART 132 Design II 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ART 131 Continues Design I with further examination of composition, modular repetition, color effect and three-dimensional design. ART 135 Computer Graph ics Art I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRD 102,GRD 103 Corequisite: GRA 109 Approaches fine arts through use of the computer. Computer software based on natural media -pencils, brushes, charcoal, oils, etc. -make fine art results possible. Introduces photo manipulation and graph ic design to the field of computer graph ics. ART 151 Fundamentals of Black and White Photography 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Covers basic black and white photographic craft. Places special emphasis on approaching photography as a visual lan guage. Include s the language of photog raphy, the camera, film exposure and pro cessing, printing, print finishing and photo graphic criticism. COURSE DESCRIPTION 104

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ART 152 Intermediate Black and White Photography 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ART 151 Familiarizes the student with the basic principles of the Zone System for black and white pho to graphy ; use of mathematics in photography; basic sensitometry and film analysis; data plotting graphing and inter preting; testing procedures; light meter ing techniques; cont r olling film exposure and develop ment ; visualization for expressive black and w hite p r ints. ART 153 Fundamentals of Color Photography 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Introduces colo r theory the nature of light and light sources, the reproduction of color, color films and processing. Emphasizes buil din g individual experience with color transparency films and potential expression through color photography. ART 154 Intermediate Color Photography 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ART 151, 153 Covers printing from color negatives, the most popular mod e in use. Emphasizes creative expression coupled with sound lab procedures. ART 157 History of Photography 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Surveys the history of photography from it s beginnings to the present. Emphasizes individual pho tographers who have made significant cont ribution s to the field. Includes technical, artistic commercial and social develop ment of photography as a f orm of visual communication. ART 21 0 Asia, Africa and the Americas: An Introduction to Non-Western Art 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ART 111 or 112 Introduces the art of non-Western c ulture Provides a know l e dge base to under s tand the visual arts outside the Western tradi tion. ART 211 Paint i ng I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Introduce s a fundamental technical and formal foundation for the beginning stu dent, including composition, color, materi als and techniq ues of acrylic painting. lOS COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER ART 212 Painting II 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours P rerequisite: ART 211 Emphasizes color, comp osition, techniques and formal visual concepts as they r e late to oil painting. ART 213 Painting III 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ART 2 1 2 Continues advanced work with consistent thematic development, sophisticated color relationships, formal and technical con cerns. ART 214 Painting IV 3 Credi t Hours/90 Contact H ours Prerequisite: ART 213 Continues advanced wor k with thematic devel opment, sophis ticated color relationships, experimentation in conceptua l forms, formal and technical concerns, conceptual ization and consistent progression o f subject matter. ART 231 Watercolor I 3 C redit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ART 121 Introduces a fundamental, technical and formal foundation for t h e beginning stu dent to include col o r composition, materi als and techniques of watercolor painting ART 232 Watercolor II 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hour s Prerequisite: ART 231 Continues study of wat ercolo r techniques with an emphasis o n subject development form, color and theme ART 251 The Fine Print 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ART 151, 152, 153 Introduces and refines advanced skills of the student interested in producing better qualit y black and w hite prints The experience and instruction gained in this class prepare students for a variety of career objectives, including original fine art printing of the highest caliber. ART 252 Studio Light i ng 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ART 151, 152, 153 Introduces basic concepts and principles needed to produce personally expressive photographs with s tudio ligh ting e quip ment, especially electronic flash. Includes working with a variety of c amera formats, from 35mm to 4x5 view camera. ART 253 View Camera Techniques 3 Cred it Hours/ 9 0 Contact Hour s Prerequisites: ART 151, 153 P rovides each student with an i ntroduction to t h e visual aesthetics o f photographic images and light making use of hands-on photographi C experience with the 4x5 view camera. Covers processing techniques. ART 255 Points of View 3 Credit Hours/90 Contac t Hours Prerequisites: ART 151, 152 P rovides each student with on-site photo graphic opportun itie s and direct experience w ith the changin g light and colors of t h e fabulous American West environment. ART 270 Figure Drawing I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ART 121 Int roduces the basic techniques of drawing t h e human figure, to include general anatomy and gesture drawing using a variety of medi a American Sign Language ASL 101 American Sign Language I 3 Cred i t Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces American Sign Language (ASL ) Includes both an awareness of American deaf c ulture and methods by which the American deaf interrelate. Includes basic ability to communicate with deaf individu als using ASL, and topics of places, names and the ability to ask and answer questions that include w ho, what, where and how type s of questions ASL 102 American Sign Language II 3 C redit Hours/4 5 Conta c t Hours Prerequisite: ASL 101 Continues to pics i ntr oduced in ASL 101. Emphasizes critical and logical thinking in ASL. Assists the non-native user of ASL to better integrate s igning into the larger deaf c ommunity. Also, s tudents will add to thei r basic ability to communicate w it h the deaf in social and individual settings

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Astronomy AST 101 Astronomy I 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Examines methods of science, overall content and s tru cture of the universe, motions of the sun, moon and stars, history of astronomy, tools of the astronomer, the composition, structu re, characteristics and origins of the solar system and potential for extraterrestria l life. Course includes labora tory and observational experience. AST 102 Astronomy II 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: A S T 101 Studies the nature of light, stellar spectra, s tellar energy sources, structure and life cycle of stars, the sun galaxies, and the ori gin and evolution of the universe. Course includes laboratory and observational experience. Biology BIO 105 Science of Biology 4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Designed for non-science majo rs. Examines the basis of biology in the modern world and surveys the current knowledge and conceptual framework of the dis cipline. B iology as a science, a process of gaining new knowledge, i s explored as is the imp act of biological science on society. Includes laboratory experiences. BIO 111 General College Biology I 5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Reading Assessment level 3 or REA 090, Englis h Assessment level 3 or ENG 100 Examines the fundamental molecular cellu lar and genetic principles characterizing plants and animals. Includes cell structure, function and the metabolic processes of respiration and photosynthesis as well as c ell reproduction and basic concepts of heredity Includes laboratory experience BIO 112 General College Biology II 5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BIO 111 or instructor consent Cont inues General College Biology I. Includes ecology evolution, claSSification, s tru cture, and function in plant s and animals. Includes laboratory experience. BIO 114 Biology of Humans for Psychiatric Technicians 3 Credit Hours/45 Conta ct Hours Prerequisite: Admission to the Psychiatric Technician (LPT) program or instructor con s ent Provides a brief survey of the anatomy and phySiology of all systems. Concentration will be on the nervous system along with the muscular system, related drug physiolo gy the endocrine system and the lymphatic system with immunity BIO 116 Human Biology 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Reading Assessment level 2 or REA 060 Introduces human anatomy and physiology for those who have no background in science. Does not substitute for a year-lon g anatomy a n d physiology course with a laboratory. Topics include : atoms, molecules, cells, energetics, genetics and a brief survey of systems. BIO 118 Human Ecology and the Environment 3 C redit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 100 and MAT 100 or Assessment level 3 in English and 2b in Math Explores the ways in which human popula tion ecology has an impact on global environmental balance and is, in turn affected by it. Topics focus on popula tion natural resources and land use. BIO 119 Radiographic Anatomy 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Provides a brief survey of anatomy with very limite d physiology for all of the body systems. Concentrates on the skeletal sys tem, anatomical landmarks, cross-sectional anatomy and details of those features that are used by technicians i n radiography and the radiolog i c health sciences. BIO 201 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 Credit Hours!75 Contact Hour s Prerequisites: Stud y Skills Assessment level 3 o r REA 109, Reading Assessment level 3 or REA 090, one year of high school chemistry o r instructor consent Includes atomic, molecular cellular, histol ogy, gross morphology and physiolo gy of the skeletal. muscular, nervous and endocrine systems. Includes a required lab oratory. BIO 202 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 Credi t HourS/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BIO 201 Includes atomic molecular cellular, histol o gy gross morphology and physi olog y of the reproductive integ umentary urinary, cardiovascular, Iymphvascular, digestive and r espiratory systems plus homeostati c mechanisms. Includes required laboratory. BIO 204 Physiological Aspects of Aging 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 105 or above or instru ctor consent Covers the normal or expected changes that the older adult may experience. Addresses normal structure and function of body systems, the changes w ith aging and pathologic conditions that are commonly obseNed i n the aged individual. Reviews health maintenance practices. BIO 205 Microbiology 4 C r edit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BIO 111 or instru c tor consent Studies microorganisms with an emphasi s on their structure, development, physiology, classification and identification. The laborator y experience i n cludes c ulturing, identify ing,con troll ing microorganisms and the study of the role of microorganisms in infectious disease. BIO 228 Field Biology 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hour s Prerequisite: BIO 112 Introd u ces students to field experiences and ecology. Include s i dentification of plants and animals in their natural environment. The course includes mandatory field trips to nearby natural areas. Business Administration BUS 115 Introduction to Business 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MAT 035, REA 090 o r basic skills assessment levels of 1 c and 3 respectively Introduces students to the broad spec trum of business a c tivities. Introduces and define s appropriate vocabulary used in the various aspects of business. BUS 116 Introduction to Management/Supervision 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BUS 115 Explores the fundamentals o f management practice and acknowledges that management concept s have universal application to all problem -solving situations. COURSE DESCRI PTION 106

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BUS 117 Time Management 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours P rovides the student with the con c eptual knowledge and tools to make better use of time in management functions and /or for personal use. BUS 118 Introduction to Marketing 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces students to the broad field of marketing. Examines the importance of target markets, pricing and promot ion. BUS 125 Introduction to Finance 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BUS 115, ACC 110, 121 Surveys financial markets, the place of finance in the business economy, the role of the financial manager, the organization of finance intermediaries and the bas i c techniques of financial analysis. Primarily reflects the needs of non-finance majo rs. BUS 170 Supermarket Loss Prevention 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Familiarizes managers from all areas of the supermarket with the broad spectrum of supervisory areas that can cause losses to profits within an overall supermarket company environment and what they might do to prevent those occu rrences. BUS 185 Business Certificate (Capstone) 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ACC 121, BUS 115,217,221, ECO 201 Reviews and focuses on preceding management and business study; to be com pleted during the final semester befor e receiving a certificate in management. BUS 205 Small Business Management 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BUS 115,ACC 101 Explores the fundamentals of organizing and operating a small business. Recognizes the variations i n application suited to indi vidual needs. S tudies problems of labo r location financing, management account ing, entrepreneurship and resear ch. Provides a view of entrepreneurship in the economy. BUS 207 Teleservices 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BUS 1 1 8 Introduces the various components of the teleservices industry, including outsourcing. P rovides emphasis on the telep h o n e as a vehicle for customer service. 107 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER BUS 210 International Business 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BUS 115 Introduces students to the concept, development present and future i mportance of int ernational business. BUS 211 International Marketing 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BUS 115 Provides a foundation for developing marketing strategies that apply to export and import operation with international business es. BUS 215 International Business Environments 3 C r edit Hours/45 Contact Hours E xamines the business relationship among nation states, including business environ ments, business relations, economics power diplomacy, nationalism conflict and cooperation, and economic balance of p ower and i nfluence BUS 217 Business Communications 3 Credit Hours!45-72 Contact Hours Helps meet the demands of today s businesses seeking employees w i th good com munication skills. Introduces students to the pri nciple s of good communica tions and alerts them to barriers in communications. BUS 218 Business Communications II 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BUS 217 or instructor consent Continuation of BUS 217 Business Communications. Students continue to dev elop skills in grammar, sentence skill development and spelling. BUS 221 Legal Environment of Business 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ACC 121, BUS 115 Corequisite: BUS 228 Intr oduces the study of business law and includes topics such as: foundat ions of the legal s ystem, contracts, sales (UCC) agency and property (real and personal). BUS 226 Business Statistics 3 Credit Hours!45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BUS 115,and MAT 100 or 103 Covers statistical study, descript ive statistics, mobilit y and the binomial distr i bution, index numbers, time series, decision theory, confidence intervals, hypothes i s testing, testing of 10 samples, chi-square and ANOV A linear regreSSion and correlation BUS 227 Human Resources Management 3 Credit Hours!45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BUS 115 Designed to assess the role, organization and evaluation of one of an organization's most valuable resources -personnel. Covers skills and knowledge of human resources (HR) managers in making strategic plans and decision making and their contribut ions toward the achievement of organizational objectives. BUS 228 Principles of Management 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ACC 121, ECO 202, MAT 135, BUS 226 Presents the basic fundamentals of management practice and acknowledges that management concepts have universal application to all problem-solving situat ions. Thi s course should be completed during the final semes ter before comp leting a degree in business administration. BUS 229 Motivation and Management 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces motivation as an inner force that results from an individual's desire to satisfy unmet needs. Produc t ivity is a result of the behavior of members of an organiza tion; influenc ing behavior through motiva tion is a manager's key to increasing productivity. BUS 231 Principles of Sales 3 Credit Hours!45-72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BUS 115 Introduces proper sales techniques. Covers the role of selling in the marketing process, consumer behavioral consideration in the buying-selling proc e s s sales techniques and sales management. BUS 235 Retail Marketing and Management 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact H ours Prerequisite: BUS 115 Familiarizes students with the business activities collectively referred to as "retailing : BUS 236 Principles of Marketing 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ACC 122, ECO 202, MAT 135, BUS 226 Enables the student to obtai n a broad understanding of marketing as a functional process and managerial variabl e Presents marketing strategies as an inte grated system of the marketing mix designed to plan, promote price, and distribute goods and services to businesses and consumers.

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BUS 237 Customer Service 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BUS 115, SPE 115 Enables students to learn th e relationship of self to one's customers, do problem solving and understand the importance of communicating with customers. BUS 238 Customer Service" 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BUS 237 Covers voice quality and the telephone, telephone technology, effective teamwork, service delivery jo b enrichment and career paths. BUS 239 Advert i s i ng and Promotion 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BUS 115 Offers an overview of the socia/, economic and marketing environment in which advertising functions. BUS 270 Business Ethics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ACC 121, BUS 115, 116, 118 Teaches students to discern ethical issues and the influence these issues have on management decision making. Considers social, ethical and public issues from a strategic perspective. Includes appropriate business response and management approaches for dealing w i t h social issues. Business Technology: Office Management and Secretarial Studies BTE 100 Introduction to Keyboarding 3 Credit Hours/45-68 Contact Hours Introduces touch keyboarding, as well as basic operations and functions of equipment. Emphasizes learning the alphanumeric keyboard, proper techniques, and speed and control. Designed for students who have minimal or no keyboarding skills. BTE 101 Keyboard i ng I 4-5 Credit Hours/75-113 Contact Hours Introduces keyboard, machine pans, correct techniques and accuracy i n keyboarding applications of centering, tabulating leners and manuscripts. BTE 102 Basic Keyboarding Applications 2-3 Credit Hours/45-68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BTE 100 or 15 wpm Designed for students with minimal keyboarding skills. Introduces tables, memos and reports Emphasizes speed and accuracy. BTE 103 Typing Development I 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BTE 101 Improves typing speed and accuracy using the Cortez Peters Championship Typing Method. BTE 104 Typewriting Speedbuilding 1-5 Credit Hours/20-1 00 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BTE 101 Builds keyboarding speed and improves accuracy through the use of course tech nique and concentrated effort using the Cortez Peters Championship Typing Method. BTE 108 Business Machines : Ten Key by Touch 1-2 Credit Hours/23-45 Contact Hours Introduces th e student to touch control of a 10-key pad. The class emphasizes the development of speed and accuracy using proper technique. BTE 120 Filing and Records Control 2-4 Credit Hours/45-90 Contact H ours Corequisite: BTE 101 or instructor consent Develops the abili ty to file and retrieve docume nt s using alphabetic, numeric, subject and geographic systems. Provides the participant with records management skills, including emphasis on PC computer management. BTE 121 Alpha Speedwriting I 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BTE 101 Covers the theory of an alphabetic system of shorthand. Develops skills in brief forms, theory, dictation speed and transcription. BTE 133 Word Processing Communications and Applications 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BTE 101,151 Prepares students for the central roles they will play in the electronic office. Provides them with the opportunity to acquire the conceptual knowledge essential to today's and tomorrow's office environment. Presents a thorough explanation of the rapidly changing and expanding nature of office tech nology. BTE 138 Windows 95 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Introduces the functions of an environment or shell. Demonstrates the use of Windows 95 showing the mechanisms of control and of file manipulation as well as program and graphic regulation BTE 139 Professional Development 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Helps the student find the key to success and professional development. Examines the role of professional ethics, job search strategies and professional image. Integrates speech comm unication throughout the course. BTE 151 WordPerfect 3 Credi t Hours/45-72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BTE 101 Provides instruction in WordPerfect, which includes the preparation of business documents for the modern office, using basic software commands and functions. This includes originating processing and editing documents using WordPerfect. BTE 152 Microsoft Word 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BTE 101 Provides instruction in Microsoft Word, which includes the preparation of business documents for the modern office, using basic software commands and functions. This includes originating, processing and editing documents using Microsoft Word. BTE 155 Spreadsheets fo r Office Management 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 Covers such topics as basic spreadsheet functions, Excel, LOTUS command structure, file saves, retrieval, combining, printing, database development extracts, macros, graphics, fonts, menu-driven macros and what-if tables. BTE 156 Typing Deve lopment" 2 Credit Hours/48 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BTE 103 Designed to continue improving typing speed and accuracy using the Cortez Peters Championship Typing Method. BTE 160 Data Entry I 3 Credit Hours/60-72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BTE 101 Introduces basic data-entry activities for the m i crocomputer A number of activities provide source documents wit h fields for entering information; speed and accuracy in keyboarding will be stressed. COURSE DESCRIPTION 108

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BTE 200 Office Procedures 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BTE 101 Acquaints students with the many dimensions of a professional secretary. Acquaints the student with the managerial functions of the office, as well as how to perform the operationa l functions of the office. BTE 202 Keyboarding II 3-5 Credit Hours/6 9 -113 Contact Hours Prer equisite : BTE 101 Reinforces fundamentals of keyboarding procedures. Develops speed and accuracy in more advanced levels of production work using the p revailing business forms. Emphasizes q u ality of output. BTE 204 Typewriting Speed building 1-5 Credit Hours/2 4 -120 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BTE 101 Builds greater keyboarding speed and improves accuracy through the use of course technique and concentrated effort. BTE 206 Health Insurance Methods Claims 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BTE 101 Instructs students i n the general types of health insurance plans on the market, methods of payment, common insurance terms, benefits, and limitations of govern ment-sponsored and mandated insurance plans. BTE 207 Typing Development III 2 Credit Hours/48 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BTE 156 Designed to continue improving typing speed and accuracy using the Cortez Peters Championship Typing Method BTE 209 Legal Terminology 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BTE 101 Provides a background in basic legal termi nology. BTE 230 Machine Transcription 4-5 Credit Hours/90-113 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 100 Helps the student attain competency in these major areas: transcribing from machine dictation, using the language arts and formatting office papers. 109 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER BTE 2S1 Advanced WordPerfect 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BTE 101 Provides advanced instruction in the appli cation of word processing concepts using the microcomputer. Teaches word p rocessing and applications using com m e rcial software, the manufacturer s manuals a n d supplementary text and exercises. BTE 288 Model Office 4 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BTE 104 or 202, 108, 151 or 152, and 230 Prepares students to make the transition from college to the workplace. Assimilated office environment gives students a realis tic work experience in answering the tele phone using the fax machine, personal computers, making deci sions and increasing proficiency in all office-related skills. Business ofTravel and Tourism BTl 103 Sales for the Travel Industry (TEC East only) 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Provides training in developing and marketing a travel product choosing target audiences, creating advertising, and imple menting customer service. Teaches how t o turn marketing strategies into powerful sales techniques. BTl 110 Introduction to Travel 3 C redit Hours/45-72 Contact Hours Introduces various components of the trav el and tourism industry, including career opportunities. Provides product knowl edge and develops basic skills in researching and selling. BTl 111 Travel Geography I 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contact Hours Presents the location of countries and capi tal cities, as well as major tourist attract ions throughout the Western hemisphere. Gives a broad knowledge of the geography and understanding of the culture, with an emphasis on planning travel itineraries. BTl 112 Travel Geography II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Presents the location of countries and capi tal cities, as well as major tourist attractions throughout the Eastern hemisphere. Gives a broad knowledge of the geography and understanding of the culture, with an emphasis on planning travel itineraries. BTl 113 Selecting and Selling Cruises 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces the student to the cruise product. Primarily a hands-on course covering t h e techniques of selecting selling and reserving accommodations on a cruise to the client s intended destination during the t ime period stipulated b y the client, and on a ship of the client's choice and price range. BTl 210 DomesticTicketing 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contact Hours Gives the student experience in manually issued travel documents as required by the Airlines Reporting Cor poration. Emphasizes manually issuing airline tickets, interpreting fare and rule displays, and refunding and exchanging a irline tickets BTl 21 1 International Travel 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Provides the student with information on international travel details such as pass ports visas, customs, time zones and currencies. An itinerary is planned using codes, flight schedules, fares and rules. P rovides hands-on e xperience in manually constructing air fares for worldwide itiner aries, combining several currencies and exchange rates. BTl 212 Computer Reservations I 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contact Hours Introduces the student to United Airlines' Apollo reservation system to make sched u led air reservations. Training includes fli ght availability, selling, canceling and rebooking, finding the best fare, creating a PNR and issuing tickets. BTl 213 Computer Reservations II (Capstone) 3 C redit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BIT 212 o r instructor consent, CIS 118 Introduces the student to advanced Apollo computer skills, including seat aSSignment, special services, queues, car and hotel avail ability selling and canceling and converting Apollo to other reservation systems.

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Chemistry CHE 085 Problem Solving 1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours Corequisite for All CHE Courses. A tutorial class designed to assist students i n developing problem-solving skills. CHE 101 Introduction to Chemistry I 5 Credi t Hours/90 C o ntact Hours Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra, MAT 100, or math assessment level 2b, and REA 090 or reading assess ment level 3. Algebra or i nstructor consent and Assess ment scores assuring entrance int o REA 151 Corequisite: CHE 085 For non -science majors, students in occupational and heal th programs, or students with no chemistry background Includes the study of measurements, atomic theory, chemical bond ing, nomenclature stoichiometry, solutions acid and base, gas laws and condensed states. Laboratory experiments demonstrate the above concepts qualitat ivel y and quantitatively CHE 102 Introduction to Chemistry II 5 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CHE 101 Corequisite: CHE 085 Includes the study of hybridization of atomic orbitals for carbon, nomenclature of organic compounds, properties of different funct ional groups nomenclature of various biologically important compounds, their properties and their biological pathways. Laboratory experiments demonstrate the above topics quantitatively and qualitatively CHE 106 General, Organic and Biochemistry 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Introduces the fundamentals of inorganic, organic and b i ochemistry Primarily for students in health or life sciences. CHE 111 General College Chemistry I 5 Credit Hours/1 05 Contact Hours Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry or instructor consent. Reading assessment level 3 or REA 090. Corequisites: CHE 085, college algebra or instruc tor consent. Preand post-assessment tests are required for science and enginee ring majors. Includes t h e study of measurement atomic theory, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, gases, condensed states, solutions and ther mochemistry A lso includes problem-solv ing skills and descriptive contents for these t opics. Laboratory techniques used in the experiments w ill demonstrate the above concepts, as well as the qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques i nvolved i n chemistry. CHE 112 General College Chemistry II 5 Credit Hours/105 Contact Hours Prerequisites: CHE 111 Corequisite: CHE 085 Includes the study of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibrium i onic equilibr ium, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry and organi c chemistry. I ncludes prob lems olving skills and descriptive contents Organic chemistry may be included i f t ime permits. Laboratory experiments demonstrate both qualitative and quant i tative analytical techniques Chinese CHN 101 Conversational Chinese I 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Gives s tudents a fundamental understanding of the Chinese language while devel op ing basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Emphasizes practical conversation, basic sentence structure vocabulary and cultu r e CHN 111 First -Year Chinese I 5 Credi t Hours175 Contac t Hours Gives students a fundamental under s tanding of the C h inese language while dev eloping their l istening, speaking, reading and writ ing skills. CHN 112 First Year Chinese II 5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CHN 111 Continues devel op ing students skills i n lis tening speaking, reading and w r iting. Emphasizes basic competency in further use of the Chinese language. Commercial Credit Management CRM 217 Business Credit Principles (Capstone) 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ACC 1 21, CIS 1 1 8 or instructor consent Acquaints the student w ith the concepts and princip les of credit and identifying the i nterdependent types of credit encoun tered in everyday life. Concepts include department organization, personnel, train ing, policies, procedures and systems devel opment, techn iques used to gather credi t informat ion and making credit decisions. Communications COM 126 Introduction to Mass Media 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Examines the basi c concepts, principles and social issues relating to various tradi tional and emerging mass media for the communications, journalism and general student COM 251 Introduction to Television Production 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours I ntrodu ces students to television studio product ion. Emphasizes skills in the operat ion of video equipment and product ion of television p rograms. COM 255 Survey of Film 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces students to the history and appreciation of film Explores the major movements and issues i n the cinema. Covers visual literac y skills used in the analysi s of film. COM 257 Videography 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: COM 251,255, ENG 257 Introduces theory and practice, history and processes of camera and editing formats that will be integrated with instruction or digital editing software/platforms. COM 258 Script and Storyboard Writing 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ENG 121, 122 Introduces theory and practice of scri pt writing and storyboarding within a mult i media environment i ncorporating graph ics, v ideo, text, animation and interactivity. COM 259 Media Writing/Media Overview 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ENG 121, 122 Surveys the history of mass media and i ndustry including structure,legal issues, regulation, ethics and future trends from a cri t ical perspectiv e Incorporates wr i ting for the media in light of these issues and pract ices. C OURSE DESCRIPTION 110

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Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) CAD 110 Computer Aided Drafting I 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRl105 and DRI106 Introduces computer-aided drafting for drafting majors and non-majors. Includes an overview of equipment, CAD applica tions in various engineering, drafting and architectural environments Concepts include the CAD menu, two-dimensional drawing commands, drawing set-up procedures, editing and viewing commands, basic plotting techniques basic blocks and symbols, basic dimensioning and basic text commands. CAD 111 Computer Aided Drafting II 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CAD 110 Introduces basi c 3-D concepts, intermediate usage of blocks, symbols and shapes, attributes and data extractions, menu cus tomization and techniques. Introduces Autolisp, intermediate plotting techniques, assembling multiple drawings,and use of macros and script files. CAD 210 Computer-Aided Drafting III 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CAD 111 Introduces students to three-dimensional and surface modeling extended and wire frame construction and editing 3-D objects. Covers customization of AutoCAD with macros and menus. CAD 211 Computer A i ded D r afting IV 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CAD 210 Continuation of CAD 210 with t h e customization of AutoCAD with macros, menus and A u tolisp. Also introduces students to Autolisp and how AutoCAD and Autolisp work together. Students will be able to maximize AutoCAD through the use of Autolisp. Computer Information Systems CIS 10S Introduction to the PC (Aura ria only) 1 C redit Hour/24 Contact Hours Offers the beginning computer user hands-on experience in the elementary use of the personal computer. Introduces the basic features of and the terminology associated with personal comp uters, including topics such as database, spreadsheets and word processing. 111 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER CIS 110 Microcomputer Operating Systems (Auraria only) 2-3 Credit Hours/45-74 Contact Hours Introduces concepts, terminology and skills in the use of an operating system. Emphasizes understanding and using the operating system in practical ways. May be designated as PC-DOS, MS-DOS, UNI X o r OS/2 WARP. CIS 111 Introduction to Interne t 2 C r edit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces Internet fundamentals. Includes Unix for Internet, connectivity, E-mail conferencing, newsgroups, FTP,Telnet,ar chie gopher and veronica. (Self-paced. ) CIS 117 Computer Access Methods for the Physically Handicapped (Aura ria only) 2-4 Credit Hours/45-90 Contact Hours Acquaints student with the concepts and principles of adaptations for disabilities These concepts include initial terminology, application packages, adaptation packages, etc. CIS 118 Introduction to Computers 3-4 C r edit Hours/45-68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: English assessment level 2 or ENG 060, math assessment level 2b or MAT 100, reading assessment level 3a or REA 090, study skills assessment level 3 or REA 109. Introduces the use of computers in a business/work environment. Focuse s on computer concepts and terminology. Reviews standard software packages available to support microcomputer-based work stations. Focuses on the hands-on experience of the software most often applied in the business world to meet work-related problems. CIS 119 Introduction to Programming 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 Introduces major programming concepts, including numbering systems, program documentation and design, the OOS oper ating system and authoring comp u ter p rograms. Uses the BASIC programming lan guage. CIS 120 Microcomputer Word Processors 2-3 C redit Hours/45-74 Contact Hours Introduces the features of a word processing software package. Includes creating, editing, formatting and printing documents. Also includes tables and some graphic features. May be designated Microsoft Word or WordPerfect. CIS 121 Advanced Word Processing (Aura ria only ) 2-3 Credi t Hours/45-60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 120 Demonstrates advanced word processing techniques Includes macros, graphic features, font utilization and transferring files to other software. May be designated as WordPerfect or Microsoft Word. CIS 131 Introduction to the Internet and World Wide Web (Auraria only) 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 or instructor consent Displays, demonstrates and illustrates the Internet and World Wide Web as a powerful and useful tool for business and personal use. Hands-on and interactive the course will familiarize students with web background tools, types of websites, new tech nologies, business applications and issues. CIS 132 Business Applications on the World Wide Web (Aura ria only) 3 C redit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 or i n structor consent Explores, demonst rates and illustrates the World Wide Web as a powerful business tool. Hands-on and interactive, the course will familiarize students with web tools, transactional web sites, electronic commerce, and business applications in a variety of areas and industries. CIS 13S Graphics Technology (PowerPoint) 1-2 Credit Hours/22-30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 Introduces the student to a presentation graphics application that includes creating, mod ifying, enhancing a presentation, and i ntegrating MS Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint. CIS 138 Microcomputer Interfaces 2-4 Credit Hours/30-72 Contact Hours Prerequisi tes: Instructor consent Int roduces the functions of an environment or shell. Demonstrates the use of GraphicUser-Interfaces (GUI), showing the mechan isms of control and of file manipulation, as well as program and graphic regulation. May be designated by any state-of-the-ar t package such as Windows 95, OS/2 and W indows NT. CIS 139 Integration Softwa r e 1-5 Credit Hours/24-120 Contact Hours Prereq u isite: Instructor consent Covers the basic mechanisms of using an office package word processor, spreads heet, graphics, telecommunications and

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database. Emphasizes moving inform a tion among the various sub-programs of th e package to create composite documents May be desi gnated as MS Office, Corel Perfect, etc. CIS 140 Microcomputers Databases 2-3 Credit Hours/45-74 Contact Hours Introduces the fundions of a database. Includes skills such as file crea tion searches, sorts, indexing and editing. May be desig nated as ACCESS, dBase, Foxpro, or Paradox. CIS 141 Advanced Databases (Aura ria only) 2 3 Credit Hours/45-60 Contad Hours Prerequisite: CIS 140 Introduces databases, prog r amming prob lem solving and advanced r eport writing Continues work with query language May be desi gnated as advanced ACCESS, advanced dBase, advanced Foxpro, or advanced Paradox. CIS 14S Database Concepts (Auraria only) 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 or instructor consent Covers the operat ions database p ackage, i ncluding file creation, searches, sorts, editing, designing pri nted reports, report and screen generation, file manip ulation, app li cations programm ing and systems design. CIS 1 SO Electronic Spreadsheets 2-3 Credit Hours/45-74 Contact Hours Introduces the student to concepts and applications of an eledronic spreadsheet. Includes calculations, built-in functions and spreadsheet design. Introd uces graphics, databases and macros. May b e designated as Excel, Lotus, or Quattro CIS 151 Advanced Electronic Spreadsheets (Auraria only) 2-3 Credit Hours/45-60 Contad Hours Prerequisite: CIS 130 I ntroduces menu-dr iven macros, graphics, fonts, and interfacing with other software packages. May be desi gnated as advance d Excel, advanced Lotus, or advanced Quattro CIS 155 Spreadsheet Concepts (Auraria only) 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Covers such topics as basic spreadsheet functions, command strudu res, file com mands, printing techniques, database development data extraction, data what-if tables, macros, graphs, fonts and formatting and menu-driven macros. CIS 1 S6 Advanced Spreadsheets (Aura ria only) 3 Credit HourS/45 Contact Hours Prere quisite : CIS 155 Involves advanced study of LOTUS 1-2-3 and Excel software and b usiness applica tions. Includes advanced database applica tions m acro programming and graphic presentation of business information CIS 175 Introduction to UNIX (Auraria only) 3 Cre dit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 Introduces the UNIX operating system. Includes UNIX fundamentals, loggingi n the UNIX file strudure listings searching, com paring sor ting, text editors, manual pages and KornShell programming CIS 176 BASIC with DOS (Aurar i a only) 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contact Hour s Prerequisites: CIS 119 Covers t h e coding and execution of BASIC programs, including I/O operations batc h and i nteractive processing, strin g and ari th metic operations and file handling Continues DOS system operations BAT files, system utilities, system configuration and system optimization. CIS 178 Visual BASIC with Windows ( Aura ria and TEC North only) 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: C I S 119 Acquaints the student with the concepts and princip les of event-driven program ming in Windows. These concentrate on the Windows environment file manager and utilities, visual basic environment forms and fundion a lity variables/operators and functions, control and data structures, dialog boxes, debugging and file handling. CIS 179 Software System Survey (Aura ria only) 3 Credit Hours/45-68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 Compares numerous software packages (word processors, databases, spreadsheets, etc. ) using hands-on analysis. Reviews the processes of various operating systems. Demonstrates the techniques of a variety of other softw are packages. CIS 206 Introduction to Multimedia Technology (Auraria, TEC North and East only) 3 Credit Hours/45 Con tad Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 Defines multimedia and its impact on art, biology, business, education entertainment government, music and science. Provides multimedia too lbox and shows h ow to use it. Introduces the information superhigh w ay. Emphasizes hardware, explaining how to purchase, install, and configure multime dia comp uter and components. CIS 20a Advanced Multi media Systems (Aurar i a only ) 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 206 Explores multimedia on the Internet and investigates practical elements of multime dia production Aids in developing plans with samples and examples. Demonstrates the latest technologies of multimedia for presentations and the virtua l worlds of sight, sound and motion. CIS 210 Hardware and Telecommunica tion s (TEC North and East on l y ) 3 Credit Hours/60-72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 Acquaints the student with the concepts and principles of data commun ications, including data transmission, communica tion networking techniques, computer architecture, integrated services digital net work and other related topiCS. CIS 216 Microcompute r H ardware ( A ur a ria, TEC North and TEC Eas t on l y ) 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contad Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 Introduces the maintenance and installa tion of microcomputers and peripheral devices, including printers, expanded memory, modems, video display terminals and secondary storage devices. Introduces electronics and microcomputer architec ture. CIS 217 Advanced Computer Access Meth o d s for the Handicapped (Aur a ria only ) 2-4 Credit Hours/45-90 Contact Hours Prerequisite : CIS 117 Continues the concepts and principles of adaptations for students with disabilities. Emphasizes the more sophisticated c apabilit ies for their adaptation. Includes advanced terminology in adaptations and appl ications. CIS 21a Advanced Computer Applicat i on s (Aura r i a only ) 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Corequisite: CIS 118 Focuses on advanced computer concepts and terminology. Reviews advanced appli cations of standard word p rocessing, spreadsheets and database software. COURSE DESCRIPTION 1 1 2

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CIS 220 PC Data Recovery and Software Repair (Aura ria only) 3 Credit H ours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 Covers how data is stored on personal computers, how to recover data from bad disk medi a and how to handle flip alloca tion problems, disk errors and comp uter b oot problems. CIS 226 Computer Diagnosis and Repair (Auraria, TEC North and TEC East only) 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 216 Covers the maintenance and installation of microcomputer networks and peripheral devices, includ ing printers expanded memory, modems, video displays and secondar y storage devices. CIS 230 Programming in C++ (Aura ria only) 3 Credit Hours/45 Conta c t Hours Prerequisite: C I S 119 or 218 Introduces the C programming language a m i d-level l anguage whose econ omy of expression and data manipul ation features allow a programmer to deal w ith the com puter at a "low level: CIS 240 Oracle (Auraria only) 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: CIS 145 and CIS 119 or 218 Acquaints students w i th the concepts and pr inciples of using the Oracle package. These concepts include database funda mentals, creating and populating, organiz ing a database, screen forms and r eports, queries expressions and functio ns, relat iona l databases, database systems, program ming and othe r related topics. CIS 254 Networks : Windows NT Client (Aura ria and TEC North only) 3-4 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: 12 CIS credits Introduces Windows NT adminis trat ion, including login, file systems, security, print services, network architecture, performance mon itoring and event viewin g CIS 255 Networks : Novell 4x Administration (Aura r i a only) 3-4 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: 12 CIS credits Introduces Novell 4 x network admini stration, including l ogin, file systems, Netware director y services, secur i ty, login scripts, menus and printing Includes common CLUs, menu utilities, NLMs and network management. 113 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER CIS 256 Networks : Novell 3x Admi nistration (Auraria and TEC North only) 3-4 Credit H ours/68-72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: 12 CIS credits Introduces Novell 3x network administra tion, including login, file systems, security, l ogin scripts, menus and printing Includes common CLUs, menu utilities NLMs and netw ork management. CIS 260 COBOL Language Programming (Auraria only) 3 C redit Hours/45 Cont act Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 Examines program design coding, debug ging and document solutions to a variety of business problems using COBOL language. Includes I/O operations edit ing math operations, IF statements, tables, sorts and searches. CIS 261 Advanced COBOL Language Programming (Auraria only) 3 C r e d it Hours/45 Contact Hour s Prerequisite: CIS 118,260 Continues the study of the COBOL program ming language. Emphasizes sequential file maintenance, subprog rams, i ndexed files, multi-level tables and mainframe topics. CIS 263 CICS/COBOL Programm ing (Auraria only) 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hour s Prerequisites: any programming language, but BAS IC, or instructor consent Introduces the student to the basics of CICS command-level programming. Includes an overview of a ClCS online system the CICS language, terminal device concepts and programming techniques for mapping the terminal screen. CIS 264 COBOL and JCL Seminar (Aura r i a only) 3 C r edit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites : CIS 118,257 Provides students with a brief overview of COBOL and Job Control Language (JCL) as they relate to local area network administration. CIS 266 On-line Program Development (Auraria only) 2-3 Credit Hours/30-45 Contact Hours Prer equisite: CIS 118 Acquaints the student with the various technique and software packages used to develop computer program s on a n IBM mainframe computer running under OS/MVS, utilizing IBM's times haring option (150) and interaction system produc ti vity (lSPF) to develop, test and execute COBOL source programs and JCL job streams. CIS 275 Telecommunications (Auraria and TEC North only) 3 Credit H ours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: CIS 118 Acquaints the student with the concepts and principles of telecommunications I ncludes essential features, codes and characters, media and hardware, transm ission c haracteristics, terminal equipment data link protocols, erro r handling networks, mainframe to micro links and other related topics. CIS 276 Systems Analysis and Design ( Aura ria only ) 3 C redi t H ours/45 Contac t Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 I ntroduces the materials techniques, proce dures and human i n terrelations invo l ved i n develop ing a computerized business system Includes systems approach, fact gath ering techniques, f orms design, input/out put file design, file organizat ion, system audits, project management and evaluation. CIS 277 Operating Systems and JCL (Aur a ria only) 2-3 Credit Hours/30-45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: CIS 118 and one programming language I nt r oduces the IBM OSNS operating system and Job Contr o l Language. Includes components of the operating system, JOB EXEC and DO statements for sequential, partit ioned and indexed data sets, instream and cataloged data sets, utility routines and the fun ction of virt ual storage CIS 278 Introduction CICS (Aura ria only) 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hour s Prerequis ites: CIS 118,174,277 Acquaints students with the following con cepts and prinCiples: 1) creating and utiliz ing a BMS mapset; 2) writing structured t echniques to code a pseUdo-conversational program in ClCS using COBOL; 3) working with data sets in ClCS; and 4) upd ating all CICS t r ansactions and tables CIS 282 Networks: Advanced Novell Administrat ion (Aura ria only) 3-4 Credi t Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 255 or 256 Covers server and work station installation, mail-handling services, backup procedures, CD ROM manuals, n etwork performance optimizat ion, indus tr y access, LAN analyzing and certification preparation.

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CIS 283 Networks: Windows NT Server (Aura ria and TEC North only) 3-4 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: 12 CIS credits Cover s server and work station installation, customizing the interface, configuring sys tem settings, server and network management, E-mail. hardware adaptations and scheduling. Computer Science CSC 150 PASCAL Programming 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: CIS 118,MAT 121 Acquaints the student with the concepts and principles of PASCAL programming. CSC 230 C++ Programming I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CSC 150, MAT 121 Introd uces the C++ programming lan guage, a mid-level language whose economy of expression and data manipulation features allow a programme r to deal with the com puter at a low Dental Hygiene DEH 101 Pre-Clinic Dental Hygiene Science 2 Credi t Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisites: 810201,202,205, CHE 106 Corequisites: DEH 102,103,105,107,109 Explores the pract ice of dental hygiene, i ncluding infect ion control, recording med ical and dental histories, providing oral health car e instructions, scaling and polish ing teeth and applying fluorides. The lab work includes the application of diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic procedures of current dental hygiene practice. DEH 102 PreClinic Care 2 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 101,103,105,107,109,111 Introduces dental hygiene students to the basics of clinical care in a laboratory setting. DEH 103 Embryology and Histology 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 101,105,107,109 Explores t h e origin and structure of the tissues of the head w i th emphasis on the teeth, face and oral cavity. Discussion will focus on the sequencing of formation and the possibility of malformat ions. DEH 105 Radiology 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 101,103,107,109 Studies dental radi ography the techn iques of film placement exposure, processing, mounting and interpreta tion Radiation safety, dosage and hazards will be considered for both patients and operators. DEH 107 Head and Neck Anatomy 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 101,103,105,109 Explores the anatomy of the head and neck wit h emphasis on the skull, mandible nasal and oral cavities. Focus is on clinical application for the purposes of recording patient information. DEH 109 Dental Anatomy 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 101,103,105,107 Explores the anatomy of the teeth and surrounding structure of the mouth Students are expected to become proficient at i den tifying extracted specimens as to their den tition arch, class and order. DEH 111 Medical and Dental Emergencies 2 Credit Hour/60 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 101,102, 103,105,107,109 Provides practicum instruction and certifi cation in basic cardiopulmo n a r y resuscitation according to American Heart Association standards. Introduces begin ning skills in evaluating the reason for the emergency, suggestions for preventing these occurrences, and familiarity with equipment and procedures. DEH 150 Dental Hygiene Clinic Science I 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DEH 101,102,103,105,107,109,111 Provides theory and discussion of begin ning dental hygiene cli nical practice DEH 152 Dental Hygiene Clinic Care I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DEH 101, 1 0 2 ,103,105,107,109,111 Provides clinical experienc e in treat ing patients, including providing health assessment dental charting, periodontal evalua tions oral health instruct ions and scaling and polishing of tooth surfaces. DEH 154 Periodontology I 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contac t Hours Corequisites: DEH 150, 152, 156, 158, 160 Provides a comprehensive study of the periodontium I ntroduce s the structure and normal functions of the oral t issues as well as periodontal diseases, their etiology, epidemio l ogy and pathogenic mechanism. DEH 156 Applied Pharmacology 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 150, 152, 154, 158, 160 Introduces fundamentals of pharmacology for the dental hygienist. Groups of drugs are studied with special emphasis on dosage, therapeutic effects and side effects. DEH 158 General and Oral Pathology 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 150, 152, 154, 156, 160 Explores general and oral pathology includ ing systemic pathologic manifestations of the mouth. Oral disorders are discussed in terms of pathology, pathogenesis, clinical signs and symptoms and the disease process. DEH 160 Preventive Dentistry 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 150, 152, 154, 156, 158 Provides an in-depth study of principles of interpersonal communicatio n in order to practice nutritional c ounseling Explores the problems associated with special popu lations and their nutritional choices. DEH 201 Dental Hygiene Clinic Science II 2 Credi t Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisites: First-year DEH courses Corequisites: DEH 203,205,207,209 2 1 1 Provides lecture discussion and student presentations to s upport and reinforce DEH 203. Special emphasiS focused on caring for handicapped persons. DEH 203 Dental Hygiene Clinic Care II 4 Credit Hours/180 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 201,205,207,209, 211 Provides continued cli n ical experience to treat patients with more advanced levels of periodontal disease. The place of occlusal sealants and amalgam polishing is added to the variety of services available. DEH 205 Dental Materials 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 201,203,207 ,209 ,211 P rovides i nformation on the physical properties of those materials commonly used in dentistry Provides e xperience in the manipulat ion and preparation of those materi a l s most often used in the practice o f dentistry COURS E DESCRIPTIO N 114

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DEH 209 Local and Regional Dental Anesthesiology 3 C r edit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 201,203,205,207,211 Introduces basic and current concepts of pain control as used in the practice of den tistry Topics covered include pharmaco logical agents, physical and emotional eval uation of patients, anatomy and neuro physiology, emergency procedures. Handson practice in administering local anesthesia and nitrous oxide is included. DEH 211 Community Dental Health 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 201,203,205,209 Explores, through practicum experience, the principles of research, epidem i ology of dental disease, health care agencies, federal and state responsibility comm unity preventive measures and program planning. Explores the role of dental hygienists as health educators; a special focus is on underserved dental populations in the community. DEH 250 Dental Hygiene Clinic Science III 2 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours P rerequisites: DEH 201,203,205,207,209 Corequisites: DEH 252,254,256,258,260,211 Explores the practices of dental specialties and the options available for private practice. Students develop a case study system for evaluating and creating clinical patients, as well as self-eval uation skills in p reparation for entry into the dental hygiene profession. DEH 252 Dental Hygiene Clinic Care III (Capstone) 4 Credit Hours/180 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 250,254,256,258,260 Provides clinical experiences so students a r e prepared to offer the full range of den tal hygiene services, including administering pain control measures. Serves as capstone course for dental hygiene. DEH 254 Periodontology II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 250,252,2 56,258,260 Explores applied periodontics with patients presenting advanced levels of periodontal disease. Topics are immediately used and applied in the clinic section o f this course. 115 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER DEH 256 Community Field Experience 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 250,252,254,258,260 Provides practical application of communi ty dental health theory and "best practice" techniques in a field setting. DEH 258 Ethics and Issues in Dental Hygiene 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 250,252,254,256,260 Explores the ethical considerations associated with the practice of dental hygiene. Reviews professional, community and individual ethical concerns and how to evaluate them. Includes a discussion of legal considerations, standards of practice and the concept of negligence. DEH 260 Practice Management 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Corequisites: DEH 250,252,254,256,258 Presents a variety of management and leadership styles; explores recall systems and marketing strategies as they appl y to the practice of dental hygiene. Financial considerations, occupational hazards, continuing education and future employment options are covered. Drafting for Industry DRI 105 Introduction to Drafting 5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Prerequisites: reading assessment at level 3 or REA 090, and math assessment at level 2 or MAT 103 Introduces drafting for drafting major s and non-majors. Includes lettering line work, reproduction methods and geometric constructions, o r thographic projections a n d sketching, isometric sketching, orthographic and sectioning drafting practices and introduction to inking. DRI106 Dimensioning and Tolerancing 2 C redit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRl105 Introduces the principles of basic dimensioning and tolerancing practices. Uses cumulative, aligned fractional and unidirec tional, coordinate and decimal dimensional systems. DRI 107 Geometric Tolerancing 2 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 106 Introduces the principles of geometric tol erancing practices. Includes terms and datums, straightness, flatness, roundness, cylindricity, parallelism, perpendicu larity, angularity, concentricity and runouts. DRI109 Pictorial Drawing 2 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 107, CAD 110 Int roduces the principles of pictorial drawing practices. Includes isometric drawing, oblique drawing, perspective drawing, charts and graphs. DRI111 Descriptive Geometry and Auxiliary Views 2 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: DRI 109 Int roduces line problems: true length, point view, bearing, slope, azimuth and p l a n e problems; edge view dihedral angles, true size and shape of any plane; true l e n gth of a line by principal line method; and shortest distance between parallel and non-parallel lines, lines and planes, and inte rsecting lines and planes. DRI113 Intersections and Developments 3 Credi t Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI 111 and CAD 110 Int roduces the principle of flat-and curved surface intersectio n and their resulting d evelopments in terms of thin materials and heavy plate applications. Completes rig h t and oblique prisms, cylindrical and conical surface transitions, and their result ing intersections and developments. DRI116 Mechanical Detail Drafting 5 Credit Hours/113 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI 113 and CAD 110 Introduces the drawing of threads, fasten ers, springs. Also covers welding drawings, along with gear and cam drawings and manufacturing processes. DRI 200 Introduction to CivillTopographic Drafting 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI116 and CAD 110 Introduces various techniques of civil/topo g raphic drafting, utilizing a specified plat. Includes working from field notes, bearings and distances, traverses, coordinates, plat maps, plot or site plans, contours and various civil and topographic conventions. DRI 203 Introduction to Architectural Drafting 3 C redit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI200 and CAD 110 Introduces the field of architectural drafting by preparing the students to draw a small single-family residence. Requires floor plans, foundation plans, elevations and all necessary detail plans along with roofing plan.

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DRI 205 Introduction to Process Piping Drafting 2 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI 203 and CAD 110 Introduces the equipment, terms and drafting symbols, flanges, fittings and various valves. Covers flow diagrams and symbols, piping and general specifications along with piping details. DRI 207 Introduction to Structural Drafting 2 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI 205 and CAD 110 Introduces a general overview of structural drafting to include drawing, checking, correcting and the revising process. Covers product fabrication and s h ipping and structural connections. DRI 220 Advanced Mechanical Drafting I 8 Credit Hours/180 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI 116 and CAD 110 Introduces the drawing of mechanical and operating mechanical assemblies and sub assemblies and may include cast, welded, o r machined materials and purchased parts. Includes preparation of appropriate assembly drawings and necessar y detail drawings, utilizing required parts, callouts and material list and appr op riate dimenSioning for the subject matter. DRI22S Advanced Mechanical Drafting II (Capstone) 4 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI220 and CAD 110 Introduces the development of large mechanical assemblies, their subassemblies and detailed drawings pertinent to their manufacturing and assembly. DRI 230 CivilfTopographic Drafting I 8 Credit Hours/180 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI209 and CAD 110 Introduces methods and theories used in civil/topographic drafting, the use of map scales and measurements, standard civil drafting symbols and abbreviations, inter pretation of surveyor's notations, legal land descriptions, map drafting procedures, and plats and subdivisions. DRI 235 CivilfTopographic Drafting II ( Capstone) 4 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI 230 and CAD 110 Introduces topographic mapping transportation mapping, municipal mapping and structural drafting as it applies to the civil/topographic drafting area. DRI 240 Structural Drafting I 8 Credit Hours/180 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI 209 and CAD 110 Introduces structural steel drafting, i ncluding steel framing plans, steel connections, steel sections, fabrication details and bills of material. Covers the area of pre-cast con crete drafting, pre-cast concrete framing plans, concrete sections and concrete fabrication details and pre-cast concrete bill of materials. DRI 245 Structural Drafting II (Capstone) 4 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI 240 and CAD 110 Continues Structural Drafting I and covers structu ral poured-in-place concrete foundations, walls and columns, concrete floors systems, and stairs and ramps. Also covers structural wood drafting with structural wood flooring systems, structural wood walls, structural wood roofs, and structural wood posts, beams, girds and arches. DRI 250 Process Piping Drafting I 8 Credit HourS/180 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI 209 and CAD 110 Introduces piping drawings, control stations, orifice flanges, meters, runs, pipe racks, instrume nt details and speci fications Covers isometric definitions, dimensioning, spools and call-outs. DRI 255 Process Piping Drafting II (Capstone) 4 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: DRI 250 and CAD 110 Reviews equipment foundations, piping specifications and general specifications, standard piping details and general piping details. Students draw major project -plan, elevation, sections and isomet ric pipe runs of depropanizer area. Early Childhood Education (ECE) ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contact Hours Corequisite: ECE 102 Introduces the field of early childhood education, including various philosophies, goals and purposes for early childhood education programs for children ages birth through 8. Examines basic child growth and development, services available to parents, quality programs, curriculum, facilities, professional opportunities and teacher competencies. ECE 102 ECE Lab Experience 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Corequisite: ECE 101 Presents skills for observing and recording children's behaviors. Examines and practices appropriate methods for guiding and interacting with young children. ECE 105 Nutrition and the Young Child 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ECE 110 or advisor approval This course provide s parents and teachers with comprehensive nutritional informa tion and its implications for the optimal growth and development of young children. Students participate in planning meals and snacks appropriate to the needs of the young child. In addition, activities will be included for planning nutritional curricula for young children. ECE 110 Child Growth and Development 4 Credit Hours/60-96 Contact Hours Identifies the growth and development of the child from the prenatal stage through age 8. Explores patterns and mechanisms of developmental change. Investigates and applies theories of child development and current research. Emphasizes the inte gration and relationship of physical, per ceptual, language cognitive and socialemotional development at all stages of growth. ECE 111 Infants and Toddlers: Developmental Theories and Practice s 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisite: ECE 112 Explores the developmental stages and issues of infants and toddlers in the areas of social, emotional, intellectua l and physi cal development. Relates theories to developmental stages and interac tion s in group settings. Analyzes state requirements for licensed infant-toddler homes and centers. ECE 112 Care and Nurtu rin g of Infants and Toddlers Lab 3 Credit Hours!72 Contact Hours Prerequisites: Health check, TB tine test, CBI check, and 3 letters of reference Corequisite: ECE 111 Teaches student s to interact with infants and toddlers in an open, supervised, approved lab site. Priority is in three areas: observation skills, developmentally appro priate practice and learning oppo rtunities. COURSE DESCRIPTION 116

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ECE 113 Responsive Caregiving for Infants and Toddlers Prerequisites: Health check, TB tine test, CBI check,3 letters of reference 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Explores the roles and skill development of the care giver in the areas of a child's behavior, feeding and communication through r outine-based play. ECE 114 Environments for Children Ages Birth to 3 Years Prerequisites: Health check, TB tine test, CBI check, 3 letters of reference 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Explores the roles of the family, care giver, child development program and commu nity in providing a supportive environment for children ages birth to 3 years. ECE 115 Curriculum: Creative Activities and the Young Child 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contact Hours Considers the facilitation of children's creative expression and problem solving in music, movement, art, drama, lite rature and other forms. Emphasizes ways to create a curriculum and maintain a classroom atmosphere and environment that allows creative expression, and encourages and supports self-expression and creativity in individual c h ildren. ECE 117 MethodslTechniques: Curriculum Development 3 Credit Hours/45-72 Contact Hours This course includes the overall and specific processes of planning appropriate learn ing environments, materials and experiences that meet the developmen tal needs of individuals or group s of children from birth through age 8 in a classroom setting. ECE 120 Classroom Management Techniques 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Explores various techniques and theories for understanding and guiding children individually and in groups. Analyzes various contemporary approaches to management and guidance. ECE 126 Administration of ECE Programs 4 Credit Hours/60-96 Contact Hours Examines and interprets Colorado's mini mal requirements pertai ning to the estab lishment and operation of centers for young children. Focuses on site selection, policy formation, administrative forms, staffing needs and patterns, fiscal manage ment, the selection of appropriate eqUip ment program and curriculum develop ment/evaluation, leadership, and adminis trative styles and techniques. 117 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER ECE 150 Supervised Lab for InfantslToddlers and Preschoolers 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Prerequisites: Health check, TB tine test, CBI check,3 letters of reference Facilitates interaction with infants/todd lers and preschoolers in an open, supervised, approved lab site. At the completio n of ECE 150, the student will decide upon a specialty in ECE. ECE 215 Curriculum: Science/Math and the Young Child 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Examines Piaget's theory of cognitive development as a framework for conceptu alizing the manner in which young chil dren acquire scientific and mathemat ical skills, concepts and abilities. Includes researching and developing appropriate individual and group scientific/mathemati cal activities for young children. ECE 225 Curriculum: Anti-Bias 3 C r edit Hours/45 Contact Hours Presents an analysis of anti-bias issues that have an impact on the early childhood care and education work force. Emphasizes planning curriculum and creating an atmosphere in the classroom through an anti-bias lens, embracing developmentally appropriate practices (DAP) philosophy, technique and content. ECE 235 Curriculum: Music/Movement and the Young Child 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Teaches early childhood educators techniques for facilitating music and movement with young children. ECE 245 Curriculum: Art and the Young Child 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prepares students to plan and implement a comprehensive and developmentally appropr iate art program for young chil dren. Investigates the development o f self taught art techniques in young children. ECE 250 Supervised Student Practicum/Seminar I 5 Credit Hours/188 Contact Hours Develops understanding of children's growth and behavior and the ability to meet their individual and group needs. Focuses on the teaching styles and ways of relating to children and adults. Requires a weekly seminar. ECE 251 Supervised Student Practicum/Seminar II (Capstone) 5 Credit Hours/188 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ECE 250 Includes organizing, management and i mplementation of instruction, resources, administration Requires a weekly seminar. Economics ECO 105 Introduction to Economics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours P rovides an introduction to economic thinking through an examination of the h istory of economic thought and a brief discussion of contemporary concepts. ECO 118 Labor Economics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours I ntroduces national labor trends and ana lyzes labor trends using contemporary labor market theory. Explores the econom ics of collective bar gaining, labor law, the role of government and additional union labor topics affecting business. ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics 3 Cred it Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: 8asic Skills Assessment levels of 3 in math, 3b in reading and 3 in English or instructor consent P resents an overview of the American economy, stressing the interrelationships among the consumer, business and gov ernment sectors. Analysis of savings and investment decisions, underemployment, i n flation, national income accounting, Federal Reserve system, and the money and banking systems. ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: Basic Skills Assessment levels of 3 in math, 3B in reading and 3 in English or ECO 105 Analyzes the firm as it relates to the economy as a whole and economic issues. Students construct and study several econ omic models related to the firm: perfect competition, mono poly, oligopoly and monopolistiC competition. Education EDU 161 Elementary Education in the USA 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisite: EDU 162 Provides students with an understanding of elementary education within the context of the preschool through 12th grade perspective from a variety of philosophical, histori cal sociological and psychological contexts.

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EDU 162 Urban and Multicultural Education 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Corequisite: EOU 161 Acquaints education students with a changing technological society. Investigates cultural and ethnic variations, human relations and the school as a social instit ution within an inte rdisciplinary envi ronment. EDU 205 Review for PLACE Exam: Basic Skills 1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours Assesses knowledge and skills of candi dates for admission to educator preparation programs and for licensure in Colorado. Covers the following areas: reading, mathematics and writing. EDU 206 Review for PLACE Exam: Liberal Arts and Sciences 13 Credit H ours/15-45 Contact Hours Assesses knowledge and skills in the follow ing areas: scientific processes, historical and social scientific awareness, artistic expres sion and the humanities, communication skills a n d written analysis/expression. EDU 207 Review for PLACE Exam: Professional Knowledge 1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours Assesses pedagogical knowledge of candi dates seeking teaching licenses. Covers knowledge and skills i n the following areas: knowledge of the learner, instructional planning and assessment, instructional delivery, the professional environment and written performance assignment. EDU 285 Issues and Trends in Education 3 Credit HourS/45 Contact Hours Corequisites: EOU 161,162 Gives students relevant experience i n iden tifying historical and curren t issues and trends relating to education in the United States. EDU 295 Job Search Skills 3 Credit HourS/45 Contact Hours Provides ESL students with basic preemployment skills that include developing a resume, completing applications inter viewing for a job, calling for information about a job, focusing the jo b search and discussing other job search skills. EDU 297 School Internship (Elementary Grades only) 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Must pass CAT assessm ent Corequisite: EOU 212 (MSCD Course) Gives the prospective teacher an opportu nity to translate theoretical information from course work to practical settings in elementary schools, and to gain better understanding of the social and cultural issues in such schools. Electronics Technology ELT 100 DC Fundamentals 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Assessment scores that assure placement in REA 105,MAT 103 and ENG 100 Introduces the student to simple compo nents and D C circuits, while developing safe work habits. The student w ill construct and evaluate series and parallel circuits to show relationships of voltage, current, resis tance and power, using DC meters to mea sure circuit values. ELT 101 DC Circuits and Magnetism 2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 100 Continues the study of DC circuits by examining properties of magnetism induc tance and capacitance, series-parallel resis tive circuits, such as loaded voltage dividers, and RCiRL time constant circuits. ELT 102 AC Fundamentals 2 Credit HourS/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 101 Introduces AC concepts and circuits, using AC meters, oscilloscopes and signal genera tors. Students construct and analyze series and parallel circuits with inductance or capacitance and resistance to show rela tionships of voltage current phase, power and impedance with phasor analysis. ELT 103 AC Circuits 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 102 Continues the study of AC circuits with RCL phasor analysis. Students construct analyze and troubleshoot complex series-parallel circuits, both on and off resonance, with fil ter applications ELT 104 Complex Circui t Analysis 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 103 Applies advanced analysis to AC and DC circuits with Thevenin's, Norton's, Superposition and Maximum Power Transfer theorems. Students also construct and analyze vacuum tube amplifiers, using DC load lines and curve families. ELT 110 Diode Circuits 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 104 Introduces the fundamentals of solid-state devices, both diodes and transistors. Students construct and analyze diode cir cuits, including rectifiers, clippe r s and clam pers, and examine characteristics of zener and transistor-related power supplies. ELT 111 Transistor Amplifiers (Certificate Capstone) 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequi s ite: ELT 110 Continues the study of transistors byexam ining three basic amplifier configurations for AC and DC characteristics, using load lines and equivalent circuits. Students con struct class A and B power amps, phase splitters and phase inverters. ELT 112 JFETs and Oscillators 2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 111 Continues the study of amplifiers with classes C, D and S, and introduces the junc tion field-effect transistor and principles of oscillation. Students construct and analyze JFET amplifiers and oscillator circuits, i ncluding multivibrators phase-shift, and Hartley Culp i tt s and Schmitt triggers ELT 113 Waveforms, Harmonics and Direct Digital Sensors 2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 112 Examines a variety of special-application solid-state devices. The student will deter mine operating characteristics of MOSFETs, SCRs, UJTs,TRIACs, LEOs and opto-couplers, while constructing power-control and other circuits. ELT 114 Operational Amplifiers 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 113 Examines the OP amp by analyzing and demonstrating a wide range of applica tions Students construct differential and IC operational amplifier circuits, including summers, integrators differentiators, a ctive filters and 555 timers. COURSE DESCRIPTION 118

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ElT 200 Digital Fundamentals 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 114 Introduces digital electronics Students demonstrate the princ iples of digital inte grated circuits, using b inary, octal, hexadec imal and other codes, logic gates, truth tables, Boolean algebra and combinational logic. ElT 201 Digital Circuits 3 C redit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 200 Continues the study of digital circuits by dem o nstrating the principles and operation of logic circuits, includin g flip-flops, counters, registers and memory circ uits. Include s algeb raic techniques and Karnaugh mapping as tools for circ u it sim plification ElT 202 Microprocessor Fundamentals 2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hour s Introduces the microprocessor byexamining the arithmetic logic unit, microprocessor families, memories and bus con struc tion Demonstrates the operatio n of a computer using t h e 8080A and 6800 microprocessor. ElT 203 Microprocessor and Microcomputer Systems (Certificate Capstone) 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 202 Continues the study o f microprocessors by writing assembly language programs for an 8080A and 6800A, continuing converting programs to machine code,applying digital t o a real computer by examin ing interfacing and timing cycles for computer systems, including display and p rinter. Includes minor trouble shoot ing and align ment, using sohware and other test equip ment. ElT 205 Microcomputer System Assembly 9 Credit H ours/180 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 101 Assembles a m i crocomputer system from power s upply chassis, memory and adapter components ; interfaces the system to peripheral devices; and troubleshoots with diagnostic sohware breakout box, DMM and logic probes. Designed for students seeking the Microcomputer Repair Technician certificate 119 COMMUNITY COLLEGE Of DENVER ElT 206 Microcomputer Software Installation and Testing 3 Credi t Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 205 Introduces students to the parameters of installing features of common sohware packages and testing them for operation with periphe rals. Features DOS, spread sheet, word processing, database and desktop publishing sohware. ElT 210 Communications I 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 204 Introduces the theory of communications b y examinin g and demonstrating the prin ciples of amplitude and frequency modula tion and single sideband transmission. Covers both trans mitter s and receivers at th e cir cuit level. ElT 211 Instruments and Measurements 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 204 Demonstrates principles of measurements and measuring systems w ith selection, application and l i mitation of test instruments. Examines operation special applica tions and circuitry of analog and digita l meters, oscilloscopes and function generators. ElT 21S Instruments and Measurements II 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours P r erequisite : ELT 211 Examines applications and limi tations of specialized test equipment including frequency counters, spectrum analyzers a n d storage scopes. Students select and apply signal conditioners and transducers and test citizens band transceivers. ElT 217 Basic Television and Video Systems 3 Credi t Hours/60 Contact Hours P rerequisites: ELT 210 or AAS, instructor consent Prepares the student for an entry-level position in the video industry. Covers the fundamentals of television and video sys tem s Qualifies students to take the broadcast technician certifi cation exam from the Society of Broadcast Engineers. ElT 222 Introduction to Biomedical Technology 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 203 Applies terminology and theory of optics, electromagnetism, transducers, fluid dynamics and basic physiology to servicing medical equipment including autoclaves and incubators. ElT 223 High Frequency and Clinical lab Instrumentation 4 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 222 Demonstrate s principles of operation of telemetry, diathermy, ultrasound and electrosurgica l equipment, and examines b l ood chemicals and cell-counting tests/measurements. ElT 224 Biophysical Measurements, EKG Equipment and Troubleshooting 4 Credit Hours175 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 223 Presents concepts relating to the cell, car diovascular system EEG, EMG, blood pressure and fibrillators. Emphasizes instru mentation, using and ser v i cing of the same,and development and operation of EKG instrumentations. Laboratory exercises on the EK5 and Datascope 720 or more advanced equi pment as required ElT 225 Hospital Internship (Capstone) 2 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 224 Provides clinical exposure for students in the Biomedical program Students observe and apply theory under supervision at a local h ospital. ElT 285 Troubleshooting Techniques for Analog and Digital Systems (Capstone) 5 Credit Hours/100 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ELT 204 Provides students with opportunities to apply all accumulated theory by analyzing and isolating representative circuit faults, using t r oubleshooting procedures such a s signal tracing and signal substitution, and voltage and signal measurements. English ENG 005 English Grammar 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Reviews the basics of traditional English g rammar and the conventions of academic and professional punctuation mechaniCS, and usage. E xplains common sentence errors and how to correct them and the construction of clear effec tive sentences, paragraphs and essays. ENG 030 Basic language Skills 3 C redit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequi s ite : Assessment Placement Reviews basic gramm a r usage and punctuation. Emphasizes sentence structure and ot her elements of effective writing. Introduces paragraph format.

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ENG 060 Language Fundamentals 1-5 Credit Hours/15-225 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 030 Advances the student from sentence to paragraph structure Incorporates critical thinking skills through formulation of topic sentences and effective paragraph devel opment. Emphasizes writing as a process, including prewriting and revising activities, and reviews grammar usage and punctuation ENG 061 Language Fundamentals II 1-5 Credits/1 5 -255 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 060 Utilizes various approaches to develop writ ing and/or study techniques according to the student s needs. Can focus on basic paragraph, essay writing o r study skills criti cal for student success. ENG 070 Applying Technology to Writing 1-3 Credit HourS/1 5-45 Contact Hours Utilizes techno logy (word processing tools) to improve writing for wr iters at all levels. Offers support for working on wr i ting assignments in a structure d setting. ENG 080 Workshop in Reading, Writing and Speaking 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Provides students with an understanding of the interrelationsh i p among reading, writ ing and speaking. Aids students in devel oping language fluency necessary in other comm unicat ion-based classes. ENG 100 Composition Style and Technique 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces academic writing with emphasis on the writin g process, infor mation sources, and organization and development of writ ten assignments for specific audiences and purposes. Examines composition tech including language fluency effect ive diction and appropriate sentence, paragraph and essay s tru c ture ENG 121 English Composition I 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 100 or assessment level 3, instructor/advisor consent Emphasizes the planning, writing and revising of c ompositions, including the develop ment of critical and logical thinking skills. Includes a minimum of five (5) compositions, whi c h may i nclude expressive and i nformative wr i t ing, but stress analytical, evaluative and persuasive writing ENG 122 English Composition II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 121 Expands and refines the objectives of English Compositio n I. Emphasizes critical/logical th i nking and reading, prob lem definition research strategies, and writing anal yt ical, evaluative and/or persuasive papers that incorporate research. ENG 131 Introduction to Technical Writing I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 100 or assessment level 3 Develops profiCiency in technical wr i ting, emphasizing principles for organizing drafting and revising a variety of documents for industry business and government. ENG 132 Technical Writing II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 131 or i nstructo r consent Expands and refines the objectives of ENG 131 for students whose jobs or majors require advanced skills in technical wr i ting ENG 221 Creative Writing I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Instructor consent Teaches techniques for creative writing. Explores i m aginative uses of language through writing short stories, drama, poetry and/or creative nonfiction. ENG 222 Creative Wr i ting II 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 221 Continues development of expression through writing ; provides instruction i n lit erary forms such as poetry, fiction and/or nonfic tion; emphasizes techniques for developing and controlling such forms; and stresses the multicultural and d iverse nature o f language. ENG 227 Poetry Writing 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 221 or i nstructor consent Teaches techniques for creating poems, including the study and appreciation of the language, forms and sound patterns of poetry English as a Second language (ESl) ESL 001 ESL Spelling Strategies 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Int roduces ESL students to techniques that increase basic spelling skills in English. Includes s tructured word analysis, rule analysiS and word attac k skills for word s n o t governed by rules. ESL 011 Basic Pronunciat i on 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Provides listening and speaking activities that help students recognize and produce English vowel and consonant sounds, and common stress and i ntonation patterns. ESL 012 Intermediate Pronunciation 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ESL 011 Provides listening, speaking and reading activities that help students recognize and produce a variety of stress and intonat ion patterns i n English. Focuses on help ing ESL students speak and read English more clearly and c onfide ntly ESL 021 Basic Grammar 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Assists the non-native speaker of English in mastering basic s tru ctures in English grammar. ESL 022 Intermediate Grammar 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ESL 021 Reviews basic s tructures in English grammar and introduces m ore advanced structures. ESL 023 Advanced Grammar 3 Credi t H ours/4 5 Contac t Hours Prerequisite: ESL 022 Assists the non nativ e speaker of English in developing and using more advanced structures in English grammar. Prepares the student for introductory ESL composition cours es. ESL 031 Basic Conversation 3 C redit Hours/45 Contact Hours Provides speaking and listening activities that help the s tudent communicate more compe tentl y Develops vocabulary use and also assists in developing clearer pro nunciation COURSE DESCRIPTION 120

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ESL 032 Intermediate Conversation 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ESL 031 Provides speaking and listening activities that increase the student s communicative skills. Continues to help the student increase vocabulary range and improve pronunciation skills. ESL 041 Basic Reading 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Assists the student in improving comprehension of simp l e written texts by discussing the meaning, developing word analysi s skills and improving vocabulary range. ESL 042 Intermediate Reading 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ESL 041 Assists the student to read more quickly and accurately and understand a variety of more complex reading material. ESL OS2 Intermediate Composition 3 Credit HourS/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ESL 023 Introduces the fundamentals of paragraph organization and development. Assists the student in developing sentence variety and grammatical competency within well organized paragraphs. ESL 053 Advanced Composition 3 Credit Hours/45 C ontact Hours Prerequisite: ESL 052 Reviews paragraph organization and structure and i ntroduces the student to essay wr i ting Emphasizes writing as a process, and continues to assist students in improv ing syntactic and grammatical competency in English. ESL 061 Vocational ESL I 1-4 Credit Hours/24-96 Contact Hours Teaches l i mited English vocational students basic commun ication skills in preparation for vocational training and work. ESL 062 Vocational ESL II 1-4 Credi t Hours/24-96 Contact Hours Provides instruction in advanced English skills for those with limited English for vocational courses and employment. 121 COMMUNITY COLLEGE Of DENVER ESL 080 High Intermediate Language Skills 6-15 Credit HourS/90-225 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ESL assessment score at the high intermediate level Provides high i ntermediate English lan guage students with intensive instruction and practice in reading, writing and speaking English. Teaches int ermediate and advanced-level grammar concepts. Prepares students for further academic and vocational study. ESL 090 VESL Recitation 1-3 Credit Hours/30-90 Contact Hours Corequisite: Vocational program and faculty consent Facilitates English language development of key concepts and terminology related to core content curricula. Finance (FIN) COURSES HAVE CHANGED TO BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUS). SEE BUS. French 111 First-Year French I S Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Instructs the student in the pronunciation of all the French sounds and introduces first-semester basic grammatical structures. Immerses students in the culture and flavor of France through the innovat ive materials of French i n Action. FRE 112 First-Year French II 5 Credit Hours/73-75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: FRE 111 Teaches the student how to establish and maintain average conversation in French and introduces second-semester grammat ical structure Immerses student in detailed culture and flavor of France through the innovat ive material s of French in Action FRE 211 Second-Year French I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite : FRE 112 Teaches the student how to establish and maintain an advanced conversation in French and introduces th ird-semester grammatical structure and wr i ting Gives more detailed culture and flavor of France. General Education Development GED 001 GED Preparation 1 -12 Credit Hours/15 -1BO Contact Hours Prepares the student for the five areas of the GED test: wr i ting, social studi es, science, interpreting literature and the arts and mathematics. Includes diagnostic and sim ulated GED test practice. GED 052 GED Preparation (Off-campus) 1 -12 Credit Hours/15 -1BO Contact Hours Prerequisite : Student must be 17 years of age Prepares the student for the five areas of the Colorado H i gh School Equivalenc y Examination ( formerly GED Test): wr i t ing, social studies, literature and mathematics Includes d i agnostic assessment and simu lated test practice. Offered by the GED Institute at c ommunity -based sites. Geography GEO 105 World Regional Geography 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Includes concepts of spatial relationships between and among the geographic regions of the world Includes demographic and cultural (political econom i c and his toric) forces related to the physical environ ment s of selected regions. Analyzes i nter relationships between devel oped and develop ing regions. GEO 125 Geography of Colorado 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Surveys Colorado, includ ing physical and c ultural aspects, such as land forms, weath er and climate natural resources, economic activities, cultural migration and trends. Also studies regional differences and human impact upon the envi ronment. GEO 200 Human Ecology 3 C redit Hours/45 Contact Hours Surveys wor l d resources, the natur e of resources, attitude toward resources, envi ronmental principles and the i mpact of population on resourc e bases. Geology GEY 111 Physical Geology 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hour s Studies the materi a l s of the earth, i t s s truc ture surface features and the geo logi c processes involved in its development. Includes laboratory experience.

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GEY 225 Planet Earth 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces students to an interdisc i plinary approach to earth sciences and human ecology Topics i nclude continental drift, paleomagnetism, theories of climate change, the origin of the solar system the sun's effect on earth, earth resources and humans' impact on the environment. Gerontology GNT 101 Nutrition 3 Credit H o u rs/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ENG 100, REA 090, MAT 105 Intro duces basic nutrition with emphasis on personal nutr i tion Satisfies the nutrition r equi r e m ent for students enter ing the Nursing program Attendan c e at first session is required. GNT 201 Introduction to Gerontology 3 Credit Hoursl45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: Program enrollment and instructo r consent Acquaints students with the majo r issues a n d concepts pert i nent to the field of gerontology Intro du ces various th eoretica l perspect ives on aging, changing trends in life expectancy and other demographic considerations, the i nterrelationsh ips between e lders and key social insti tutions, and provides an overview of physical and psychologica l facto r s associated w i th aging GNT 213 Psychology of Aging 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequis ites: GNT 201 and instr ucto r consent Studies adult development and aging Con t rasts existing myths about adult development with the best available scientific data to separate fact from fiction. I dentifies i mportant questions for the existing scien tific or emp irical data. GNT 214 The Social Aspects of Aging 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GNT 201 and instructor consent Educates s tudents i n the various social aspects of the aging process and the ways i n w hich an aging population affects social structure Introduces demographic processes, demo graphi c characteristics of the current older population, the importance of understanding the social context of aging individuals, and SOCiological perspect ives on time and aging as a social issue. GNT 215 Aging in a Diverse Society 3 Credit Hoursl45 Contact Hours Corequisite: GNT 201 o r instr u cto r consent Explores ethnic, religious and sexual diversity issues as they relate to older Americans. Ties together gerontologica l and diversity concerns to develop students into more sensitive and effective prac titi o ners when dea ling with older adults. GNT 221 Overview of Programs and Services to the Aged 3 Credit Hoursl45 Contact Hours Corequisite: GNT 201 Prerequi s ites: Program admission and instructo r consent Examines the myriad programs and ser vices available to elderly individuals and thei r families. Explores legislative, h istoric and demographic trends in th e field of aging: healt h and mental health, i nforma tion and referral, i ncome maintenance housing, transportation long-term care, nutr itio n employment and senior centers. For anyone who interacts with the elderly either professionally or personally. GNT 236 Nutrition and Aging 3 C redi t Hoursl45 Conta ct Hours Prerequisit e : GNT 212 Emphasizes that aging is not synonymous w i th deterioration and many of the signs and symptom s of chronic nutr itional imbalances are often identified a s c hanges attributed to aging. Studies effects of various nutrients upon the aging process. GNT 237 Death and Dying 3 Credit Hoursl45 Contact Hours Preor Corequisite: GNT 101 or instructor consent Examines the event of death and the process of dying. Explores the causes of death and th e experience of dying i n nursing homes, emergency rooms and hospices. Reviews the ethical and poli tical issues o f death and dying GNT 285 Gerontology Practicum (Capstone) 3 Credit Hoursl45-90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GNT 201 Provides the student with a practical e xperience in gerontology. Emphasizes devel oping o bser vation skills, individual growth in self-awareness, establishing effective communication and unde r standing case management skills. GNT 29S leadership Development 3 Credi t Hoursl45 Contact Hours Prerequisit e : ENG 100, PSY 101, or instr uctor consent Studies and applies the theories and techniques of leadership and group processes. Introduces leadership skills and experience with application s in a group sett ing. Graphic Arts GRA 101 Introduct i on to Graphic Arts and Traditional layout 3 Credit Hours/67.5 Contact Hours Introduces the student to offset p r inting processes and job oppo rtunities Teaches the basics of traditional layout. GRA 102 Electronic Composition. Art and Copy Preparation 3 Credi t Hours/67.5 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 101 Introduces concepts and techn iques of desktop publishing Covers treatment of orig inal art and graphics for reproductio n and paste up of electron i c mechanicals, including display type illustratio ns, registration work a nd typesetting elements. GRA 103 line and Halftone Photography 3 Credit Hours/67.5 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRA 101,102 Introduces the student t o basic d arkroom work and theory Teaches the production of halftone photos and various methods of exposur e and developm ent including various types of film paper and chemistry used in the darkroom GRA 104 Digital Halftone Photography 3 Credi t Hours/67.5 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRA 101,102,103 Introduces the student to d i g ital halftone photography. Teaches the proper use of digital camera images and their conversion i nto a format that can be accessed through a computer GRA 105 Resume and Portfolio (Capstone ) 3 Credit Hours/67.5 Contact Hour s Corequisites: GRA 101,102,103,104 Introduces the student to portfolio presen tation and preparation. Teaches resume writing including composing the cover let ter and comparing job o p portunities in th e graphic a rt s industry. COURSE DESCRIPT ION 122

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GRA 107 Introduction to Web and Homepage 3 Credit Hours/67.5 Contact Hours Introduces students to the Internet its history and functionality. This course will consist of using the computer browsing the World Wide Web, and creating web presentations and on-line teaching/learning. GRA 109 Micr ocomputing 1 Credit Hour/22.5 Contact Hours Corequisites: GRA 201-205, GRD 102,103,203, ART 135 Provides student individualized training in software programs including PageMaker, Adobe Illustrator and Quark Xpress, to better prepare students to undertake projects required in selected graphic arts, graphic design and art classes. GRA 111 Beginning Offset Presses 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRA 101,102,103,104,105 Introduces basic concepts of how to set up and operate an offset press. Teaches press set up for paper feeder, register board, delivery and pri nting. GRA 112 Stripping, Image Assembly, Platemaking and Inks 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRA 101 102,103,104,105,111 Introduces basic concepts of how to strip negatives into flats for plate making and how to make plates. Increases expertise in small press preparation while learning sim ple, advanced book and process color strip ping, as well as the use of register pins. GRA 113 Paper and Ink Management and Print Production I 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 101,102,103,104, 105,111,112 Introduces the student to the different facets of paper and ink while he/she experiences small production jobs. Presents data on paper, small press and production time GRA 114 Intermediate Offset Press and Print Production II 3 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 101,102,103,104,105,111, 112,113 Introduces the student to large presses and the quick-copy system while presenting more detailed i nf ormation o n small presses. Instruct s students on pressure settings and adjustments registering tech niques, the 25-inch press, and multi color registering and running. 123 COMMUNITY COLLEGE O F DENVER GRA 185 Bindery and Portfolio (Capstone) 3 C r edit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 101,102,103,104,105,111. 112,113,114 Introduces the student to small and large bindery operations and to small press operations while learning about paper, jo b pric ing,job planning, scheduling work flow and portfolio p reparation. GRA 201 Electronic Graphic 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hour s Corequisite: GRA 109 Introduces the combination of traditional skills and applicable Macintosh electronic pre press technology necessary to begin the preparation of camera-ready art. GRA 202 Electronic Page Layout 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 201 Corequisite: GRA 109 Continue s topics introduced in GRA 201 app lying Macintosh computer skills for assembling workable solutions to various types of print media. GRA 203 Electronic Scanner and Color Theory 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRA 202 Corequisite: GRA 109 Int roduces the use of the scanner and Macintosh computer equipment for bringing black and white and color images into an electronic manipulation environment. GRA 204 Electronic Prepress 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRA 203 Corequisite: GRA 109 Contin ues topics introduced in GRA 201 GRA 202, GRA 203: working with photo imaging service bureaus i n the industry, a s well as within the Graphic Arts department. Students produce camera-ready art. GRA 205 Photo Manipulation 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRA 204 Corequisite: GRA 109 Continues topics introduced in GRA 201 GRA 202, GRA 203, GRA 204: combining images, design elements and type into a single image as camera-ready art. GRA 285 Printer Portfolio and Advanced Printing Techniques (Capstone) 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRA 212 Continues to prepare student for printing presentation and job interviewing techniques. Develops skills for competing in t h e local job market. Includes developing specs. and estimating for the industry. Graphic Design GRD 100 Lettering and Typographic Design 3 Credi t H ours/90 Contact Hours Introduces the history and concepts of typograph y as applied to graphic communications. Explores appropriate use of typograph y in a variety of design and advert ising applications, emphasizing hand and d igital lettering. Covers type recogni tion and typographic terms. Explores career possibilit ies with tours. GRD 102 Introduction to Macintosh 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Corequisite: GRA 109 Acquaints students with the Macintosh computer, its termino l ogy and develop ment, system management graphics applications and business applications. GRD 103 MAC Computer Art 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: CIS 118 or instructor consent Corequisite : GRA 109 Introduces met hods for creating artistic output using various computer software program s currently used by the graphic design industry. Emphasizes skills with two-d imensional media that are applicable to a variety of visual communication professions. GRD 105 Advertising Typography and Layout 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRD 100 Covers production of layouts for graphic projects from conceptualization and research, to copy fitting and indication of headlines, subheads and text. Develops skills i n rendering of thumbnail s and rough and comprehensive layouts, as well as skills in working with clients and presenting designs. Introduces digital layout.

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GRD 107 Rendering / Mixed Medi a 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ART 121 Introduces product rendering in a variety of media, including opaque water media, scratch and textured board, and pen and ink for both two-and three-dimensional design projects. Prepares for print produc tion, both tradit i onally and digitally. Explores freehand and electronic methods. GRD 185 PageMaker Desi gn 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRD 103 Corequisite: GRA 109 Introduces the MAC llei computer and PageMaker software to solve fundamental graphic design problems in page layout, grid development and electronic type for the print medium. GRD 200 Advert i s i ng Design and Portfolio Preparation 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: GRD 100, 103, 105 Covers the process of comp rehensive prob lem solving of complex and advanced print design. Provides experience in d i gital pro duction of designs using multiple computer applications and in exploring a variety of color output options. GRD 203 Adobe Illustrator 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRD 103 Uses the computer to create object-based graphics for color illust ration applications that range from designing ads, brochures and packing to logos or any other print project. Students work with scanners to i nput existing art and photographs for manipulation on the c omputer. GRD 206 Graphic Des i gn Product i on and Prepress I 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRD 100 Introduces the production of final printready art, both mechanically and electronically. Emphasizes black and white, one two-and three-color processes and the production of d i g ital prepress files for print ed projects. GRD 207 Graphic Design Production and Prepress II 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: G R D 100,103, 105,206 Continues to explore digital p r e press pro duction emphasizing more complex, multi color printing projects, including the four color process. Includes pro blem solving from initial concept to the final printed piece and mastering the necessary com puter applications. GRD 208 Illustration 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: G R D 207 Develops competencies in illustration Develops proficiency in a variety of tradi tional, as well as experimental techniques. (Entry-level skills: demonst r a t e d drawing and layout skills.) GRD 209 Quark Xpress ( Capstone) 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRD 103 Corequisite: GRD 209 Uses advanced electronic software on the comp uter to create all types of publica tions. Instructs students on black and white page layout to multicolor magazine layouts wit h Quark, demo n s t r a t ing how this desktop publishing software i s being used by the graphic design industry GRD 220 Introduction to Photoshop 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRD 103 Acquaints students with Adobe's Photoshop software its tools and features. Exercises in photo retouching and manipu lat ion and image generation for preparation of print medium or as finished product GRD 285 Creative Graphic Design and Portfolio Preparat i on ( Capstone) 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hour s Prerequisites: GRD 100, 103, 105,200 Corequisite : GRD 209 Continues to explore the production of comprehe nsive and complex design pro jects to display advanced design and com puter skills. Provides further experience in dig ital production of designs, in application of multip l e computer programs and in preparation of a portfolio. GRD 297 Graphic Design Internship 3-6 Credit Hours/1 35-225 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRD 206 Introduces students to an on-site internship experience in a wide variety of graphic design-related situations. Health Occupations HOC 100 Medical Term i n ology 1 -3 Credi t Hours/1 5-45 Contact Hours Surveys the origin and structure of medical terms; helps the student interpret and pro nounce medical terms used in various health-related areas. HOC 107 Speedy Span i s h f o r Medica l Personnel 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Provides health professionals the opportu nity to learn basic conversation a l Spanish needed to communicate w i th clients and families in a variety o f situations. Health and WeI/ness Management HWM 101 Essentia l s ofTota l F i tness an d Wellnes s 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: PSY 101 or SOC 101 Provides a systematic i ntroduction to explore health-related fitness and well ness; general prinCiples of exercise for health and fitness; connections among nutrition, health and fitness; and connec tions among exercise, diet and weight control. Explores relationships of exercise to the environ ment to rehabilitation and to disease prev ention HWM 103 First aid and CPR 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Presents basic inf ormation and prac tice in identifying ways to prevent injury and/or illn ess, recognize emergencies, follow three emergency action steps in any emergency, and provide basic care for injury and/or sudden illness until victim receives medical help. Upon successful demonstration of specific skills and 80 percent o r h igher score on written exam, s tudent will receive an American Red Cross certificate. HWM 201 Health Psychology 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HWM 101 Provides systematic int rodu ctio n to explore the psychologica l procedures in prevention diagnosis and treatment of such med ical problems as cardiovascular disorders, headaches, obesity, asthma and chronic pain. Explores psychological factors that contribute to promotion and maintenance of good health and to recover y of existing illness. COURSE DESCRIPTION 124

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HWM 205 Educational Principles of Health andWeliness 3 C r edit Hours/45 Con t a ct Hours Prerequisite: HWM 101 Provides a systematic intro duction to the princ i ples of health and well ness education Provides opportunity for students to analyze various m e thods of heal t h and well ness instr uction and to prepar e teaching units appropriate for K -12 and for adult education. HWM 285 Health and Well ness Management Practicum (Capstone) 2 Credi t Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: HWM 101,103,201,205 Provides practical experience in health and wellness management that facilitat e s students' learning h ow to apply theo r e tical concepts to hands-on situations and how to problem solve given practical lim itations of real world environment. Emph a s i zes developing prof e ssional behavior s and skills addressing individual need s of clients, and developing research, entrepreneuri a l and job-search skills. History HIS 101 Wester n Civilization I 3 Credit HourS/45 Contact Hours Explores the major political, econ o mic, social, d i plomatic/military cultu ral and i n tellectual event s and roles of key persona lities that shaped Western civilizat i o n from the prehistoric e r a t o 1715. HIS 102 Western Civilization II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: HIS 101 Explores the major political economic, social, d i p l omat i c/military cultural and intellectual events and the roles of key personalities that shaped Western c iviliza tion from 1650 to present day. HIS 201 United States History I 3 Credit HourS/45 Con tact Hours Examines the major polit ical, economic, social, diplomatic/military cultural and intellectual events in America n h istory from the first inhab itants through C ivil War reconstruction HIS 202 United States History II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HIS 201 E x amines the major political, economiC, social, dip lom atic/military cultural and intellectual events in American history from reconstruction to present. 125 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER HIS 205 Women in History 3 Cred it Hours/45 Contact Hours Conveys the primar y ideas of women's history and uses these ideas to analyze the lives of American women from many cultures and to assess the i mpact of their lives on the h istory of the United States. HIS 218 Vietnam History,Culture 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Explores the socio-political, religious and cultural developments from ancient to present-day Vietnam. HIS 225 Colorado History 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces students to Colorado history. The course stresses historically impor tant fact and analysis, as well as more col orful historical issues. HIS 226 H istory of Denver 3 C redit HourS/45 Contact Hours Focuses primarily on the history of Denver from its founding in the Pikes Peak Gold Rush down to the present time The prime focus is on the colorful people and the major events by which Denver established i tself as the"Queen City of the High Plains: HIS 235 The American West 3 C r edit Hours/45 Contact Hours Traces the major political social, economic cultural and environmental forces that have made the American West a d istinct region. Human Services HSE 105 Introduct ion to Social Welfare 3 C r edit HourS/45 Contact Hours Examines the historical and philosophical background of statutes, i deologies, politica l process, policy making, decision rules and influential leaders who have had an impact on shaping the social welfare inst i tutions in the United States. HSE 106 Survey of Human Services 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Provides a philosophical, political statutory and contemporary overview of social p r ob lems as they relate to social work. Includes future trends. HSE 107 Inte r v iewing Principles and Practices 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Identifies basic concepts of the i nterview relationship with emphasis on the helping interview Examines the principles, p rocesses, documentation and techniques o f interviewing Gives opportunity to engage in practice interviews role playing and feedback. Includes principles of speech requirements. Offered during the fall semester only. HSE 108 Introduction to Therapeut i c Systems 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: HSE 107 or instructor consent Introduces basic concepts of major thera peutic systems, inclu ding backgrounds developmental theories and pract ices of specific systems from psychoanalysis to reality therapy Offered dur ing the spring semester only HSE 109 Social Issues in Human Services 3 Credit Hours/4 5 Contact Hours Prerequisites: HSE 105 or i nstructor consent Provides an analytical overview of the social functions of human services. Examines the welfare system from the lib eral, conservative and radical perspectives. Presents idealism and pragmatism of the present state of human services and trends for the future Offered during the fall semester only. HSE 110 Overview of Special Populations 3 C redit Hours/72 Contact Hours Provides students with knowledge in the areas of laws and history of special education ; roles and responsibilities of paraprofessionals in schools; planning for students with disabilities; basic learning concepts; and cognitive, communicative, physical and affective needs of students w i th disabilities. HSE 111 Communication Skills with Special Populations 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Provides knowledge in the areas of effective communication skills, problem-solving skills and analyzing self as a communicator. HSE 112 First-aid/CPR 1 Credit Hour /24 Contact Hours Provides students with knowledge in the areas of health and safety issues in schools, b asic first-ai d procedures and CPR procedures.

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HSE 113 Human Services for Persons with Developmental Disabilities 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: REA 060, 109, MAT 035, ENG 060 Provides a basic overview of the historical development, philosophy and values of rehabilitative services for those who plan to work with persons w i th dev e lopment a l dis abilities. Offered during the fall semester only HSE 114 Student Behavior Management 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Provides students with knowledge in the areas of behavior modificati on, teaching appropr iate behaviors, contingenc y con tracts, observing and recording behavior, lunchroom supervision and p layground supervision. HSE 115 Human Services Practlcum I ( Certificate Capstone) 1-6 Credit Hours/45-150 Contact Hours Prerequisites: Instructor consent Provides experience in various service agencies to familiarize students with agency work. Emphasizes develop ing observational skills, individual growth in self-awareness, inte rviewing skills, introduc tio n to agencies and client systems. A weekly classroom seminar complements the agency experience. Offered during the spring semester only. HSE 116 Public Assistance Practicum 3 Credit Hours/lOS Contact Hours Provides practical experience in a social setting where students learn to apply human services theoretical concepts to hands-on situations. Presents students with the practi cal limitations and specialized program offerings available to clients in the context of a publi c assistance servi c e delivery setting. HSE 117 Confidentiality 1 Credit Hour/15 Contact Hours Emphasizes working with mental health and substance abuse clients, using confi dentiality in a clinical practice. Details specific p rovisions of federal and state statutory regulations involved with client confi dentiality. HSE 141 Basic Instructional Techniques 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 111 Provides students with knowledge in the areas of delivering instruction, grouping students, reading with students, modifying instructional materials and using technolo gy and adaptive equipment. HSE 142 Transitional Support Skills 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 111 Provides students with knowledg e in the areas of transition planning, job coa chin g and stude nt self-advocacy. HSE 205 Human Services for Groups 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 108 or instructor consent Introduces the concepts, pri ncip les, goal s and skills of group work as a method of providing hum a n services. Emphasi s i s on basic practice skills and i ntervention techniques. Offered during the fall semester only. HSE 206 Human Services for Families 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 108 or instructor consent Introd uces family theory and practice Covers such topics as: systems theory, communication theorists, structure thera p ists, developmenta l theory and future directions in research of family therapy Offered during the fall semester only HSE 207 Community Organization 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 108 or instructor consent Examines the theory and p ractice of orga nizing commun ities, neighborhoods com mittees and advisory boards as they relate to the social services delivery system. Offered during the fall semester only. HSE 208 Social Welfare Policy 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 109 or instructor consent Present s model s for social policy analysis, program planning and evaluation Applies models to relevant social welfare issues. Offered dur ing the spring semester only HSE 209 Crisis Theory and Intervention 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: HSE 107, HSE 108, HSE 115 Introduces basic theories and princ iples of crisis intervention from a historical and practical orientation. Offered during the spring semester only HSE 211 Human Services Practicum II 4 Credit Hours/150 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 115 or instructo r consent Provides placement i n a service agency where the student applies the values, con cepts and skills gained in theory courses to the actual process of helping peop l e Emphasi s is on s h arpening skills and knowledge, use of self in the hel p ing process, understanding systems and use of commu n i ty resources. Offered during the fall semester only. HSE 212 Human Services Practicum III (AAS Capstone) 7 Credi t Hours/285 Contact Hours Prerequi s ites: HSE 211 Provides practica l experience working in an approved social service agency. The student participates i n various service agency functions as a group member and leader, and furthe r develops skills and know ledge i n the use of self and systems in the help ing process. Offered during the spring semester only. HSE 213 Substance Abuse: A Multi-Model Approach 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 108 Provides a study of major treatment modalities in the area of substance abuse. Topics include the history of treatme n t approaches, prevention with emphasis on adolescent groups and the families. Major emphasis is on the delivery of services in helping peo ple with substance abuse problems. Offered dur ing the spring semester only HSE 215 Introduction to Delinquency and Justice 3-7 Cred it Hours/45-150 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 108 or instruc t o r consent Provides a historical and philosophical background of theories, ideologies statutes, political processes and policies of the American Juvenile Justice System. Examines juvenile process from predelin quency and adjudication, through correct ions. HSE 217 Cultural Diversity in Human Services 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: HSE 107, 108 Presents an analysis of multicultural issues that can have an impact on the human services work force. Emphasizes cultural differences and backgrounds of AfricanAmericans, Hispanics, Native Americans and immigrants of Asian heritage, and how they respond to mental health services. COURSE DESCRIPTION 126

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HSE 221 Sub s t a nce Abuse Counseling 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Emphasizes two areas of Drug and Alcohol Counselor preparatory work for state certi fication : basic counseling skills a n d client records management. Prepares students for entry-level work in the substance abuse treatment field Include s the development of treatment p lans, clinical notes, discharge summary and demonstration, HSE 225 Clinica l Techniques i n Substance Abus e 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: HSE 221 Corequisites: HSE 107, 1 DB Applies advanced counseling skills and staff supervision techniques to clinical practices in substance abuse and mental health setting s Reviews the role o f a clini cal supervisor and details the process of therapeutic counseling practices, H5E 297 Intern s hip Work Experience 1-6 C r e dit Hours/30-1BO Contact Hour s Prerequisites: HSE 114 or 217 Provides students desiring jobs as paraprofessionals with the guided oppo rtunity to practice skills that have been learned in the classroom, Hospitality and Travel Administration (HTA) COURSES HAVE CHANGED TO BUSINESS OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM ( BIT), SEE BIT. Humanities HUM 115 I ntroduction to Chicano Studies 3 Credit H ours/45 Contact Hours Introduces student s to skills development in multicultural education, Consists of Chicano history, migr ation and labor, education law and Chicano culture, HUM 1 16 Af ricanAmerican Stud ies 3 C redit H ours/45 Contact Hours Emphasizes significant contributions of African-American writers, artists, scientists and political leaders to American civilization, Examines key African-American cultural contributo r s 127 COMMUNITY COLLEGE O F DENVER HUM 117 Introduction to Asian-American Studies 3 Credit Hoursl45 Contact Hours Examines the conte mporary experiences, as well as the historical background of Asi a n s in America, Students will be introduced and will introduce each other to characteristics of diverse Asian-American popula tions Variables such as culture cuisine, history, family politics and society, which shape the Asian-American character, will be studied, Classroom sessions will be enriched by activ ities such as b i ographical interviews and field trips, HUM 121 Survey of Humanities I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces students to the history of ideas in Western cultures through a study of the visual arts, literature, drama, music and phi losophy of early civilizations, Greek and Roman antiquity and Christian eras, Emphasizes connections among the arts, values and diverse cultures, HUM 122 Survey of Humanities" 3 Credit Hoursl45 Contact Hours Examines the medieval, Renaissance and baroque periods through a study of the visual arts, literature music and philosophy, Compares and contrasts diverse cultural ideas, and feminine and masculine viewpoints, HUM 123 Survey of Humanities III 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Examines the cultures of the 17th through the 20th centuries by focusing on the inter relatedness of the arts, ideas and histo ry, Considers the influences of industrialism, scientific development and non-European peoples, HUM 185 Cultural Diversity in the Humanit ies 3 Credit Hoursl45 Contact Hours Introduces students to the various aspects of social and c ultural diversity Promotes development of critical thought and growth of multicultu ral, multisocial and mult i lingual understanding HUM 215 Ideas in a Changing Society 1-3 Credit Hours/15-45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 121 or instructor consent Presents an interdisciplinary study of the modes of change as manifested in the arts, mass culture language, or lifestyles, HUM 251 Curander i smo : A Cultural Approach to Holi s tic Medicine 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduce s students to intercultural alter native and holistic approaches to health, diet and medical care, HUM 28S Sem i nar in Critical Thinking (Capstone) 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hour s Prerequisites: ENG 121, MAT 135, SPE 115 Shows the i nterconnections among the various courses required for CCD's AA and AGS degrees, Reviews both the commo n and unique properties of the subj e c t areas studied, Japanese JPN 101 Conversational Japanese I 3 Credi t Hours /45 Contact Hour s Introduces basic vocabulary and grammar to student s with no knowledge of Japanese, Includes s impl e vocabulary, sen tence structure the writing system and emphasizes practical conversational skills to develop a basic understanding of the language, JPN 111 FirstY ear Japanese I 5 Credit Hours /75 Contact Hour s Emphasizes continued development of conversational abili t y reading and w r iting skills and more comple x grammatical forms Intended for students having a basic prior understanding of Japanese phrases and simple sentence structure JPN 112 First Year Japanese" 5 Credit Hours/75 Contact H ou r s Prerequisite: JPN 111 Emphasizes conversational ability while introducing complex grammatical structures, colloquial forms and more"kanji" characters, Intended for students having a good understanding of Japanese sentence s tructure, vocabulary and the wr itin g system, JPN 211 Second Year Japanese I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contac t Hour s Prerequisite: JPN 112 Introduces complex grammatical struc tures, emphasizes developmen t of conver sational ability, and stresses additional reading/writing skills for students havin g a good understanding of Japanese sen tence structure, vocabular y and the w riting system,

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Journalism JOU 105 Introduction to Mass Media 3 Cred i t Hours/45 Contact Hours Examines the basic concept s and principles of various mass media for the journalism student and average consumer of mass media. JOU 106 Fundamentals of Reporting 3 Credit Hours/45 Contad Hours Prerequisites: JOU 105 Examines the basic principles of print media r eporting Designed for journalism students and for other students interested in learning to write clearly, succinctly and accurately. Literature LIT 115 Introd uction to literature 3 C redit Hours/45 Contad Hours Introduces students to fiction, poetry and drama. Emphasizes adive and responsive reading. LIT 150 The Bible as literature 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 121 or instr uctor consent Intr oduces various Biblical texts and the exegetical methods of reading and interpreting such texts. Emphasizes the aesthetics and multiplicity of meaning in Biblical literature through the discussion of various Biblical writings published a cademic exegeses and student exegeses. LIT 201 Masterp ieces of literature I 3 Credit H ours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ENG 121 Examines significant writings in world liter ature from the ancients through the Renaissance. Emphasizes careful reading and under standing of the works and their cultural backgrounds. LIT 202 Masterpieces of literature II 3 C redit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 121 Examines s i gnificant writings in world liter ature from the 17th c entury to the present. Emphasizes careful reading and understanding of the works and their c u ltural backgrounds. LIT 225 Introduction to 5hakespeare 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: E N G 121 or instructor consent Provides guided reading and i nterpretation of Shakespeare' s most popular plays. Examines the i r c u ltural background as well as t heir significance to contemporary society. LIT 235 Science Fiction 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Examines the techniques and issues of s cience fidion through a close reading of a variety of writer s in the genre. LIT 236 Fantasy literature 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Examines the unique qual it ies of representative works from literature that present mythica l unreal or imaginary worlds LIT 245 literature of the American West 3 Credit HourS/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 121 Examines works in various genres by writers of the American West. Investigates predominant themes and social and historical backgrounds. Machine and CNC Tool Operator MTO 130 Introduction to Machine Shop 1 Credit Hour/24 Contact Hours Provides basic instru ctio n on the use o f hand bench tools power saws, drill presses, pedestal grinders, heattreat equi pment drill gr i nding machine, belt sanders and hardness testing equi pment. MTO 131 Machine Math and Prints I 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Provides instruction for basic math and blueprint reading needed i n machine tool operations, including whole-number concepts, common fradions, decimal fractions, direct measure, compute r measure, propor tions, geometry trigonometry and shop finance. MTO 132 Vertical Mills I 4 Credit Hours/96 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MTO 130 Introduces the student to the parts and fundions of the vertical mill including how to set feeds and speeds, c utter seledions and identification, identify and use a vise, edge l ocator and indi cators. MTO 133 Engine Lathes I 4 Credit Hours/96 Contact Hours Prerequisite : MTO 130 Introduces the student to the engine lathe, i ncluding how to use and mount the three jaw chunk on the spindle of the lathe, how to set lathe tools on center drill and drill, ream, knurl, tap and chamfer. MTO 140 Metrology 2 Contact Hours/48 Contact Hours Introduces the s tude nt to English and metric measurements by using outside, inside, depth and internal micro-meters, scales, combination square set, protractors vernier gauges, sine bar, gauge blocks, indicators, inspectio n devices, optical comparator, and telescoping and small hole gauges. MTO 141 Vertical Mills II 4 C redit Hours/96 Contad Hours Prerequisite: MTO 132 Develops advanced knowledge of vertical mill operation, including rotary table operation, computation of coordina t e locations for hole circles, slots and angles, and the selection of metals. MTO 142 Machine Math and Prints II 2 Credit Hours/48 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MTO 131 Provides advanced machine s hop math, including division of decimal fractions, gear computations speed and feed calculations for cylindrica l tools, taper calculations powers, roots, equations, circles and polygons, and numerical control drawing fun damenta ls. MTO 143 Engine Lathes II 4 Credit Hours/96 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MTO 133 Provides the knowledge and skills required to perform lathe operations at tolerances of plus/minus .005: Includes single point external and interna l threads holding toler ances of class 2 and 3, and use of the taper attachment and "radius" forming. MTO 1 SO Machine Shop Lab 1-5 Credit H ours/24-120 Contact Hours Allows student s to practice on basic machine equipment for the purpose of upgrading job skills. COURSE DESCRIPTION 128

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MTO 221 Engine Lathes III 4 Credit Hours/96 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MTO 143 Continues MTO 143, Engine Lathes II. Stu dent will develop more advanced skill and knowledge on the engine lathe, holding tolerances to plus or minus .002 or .0005. MTO 223 Job Shop Machining I 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MTO 221 Covers the fabrication process. Students will produce machine parts and machinist tools from an already prepared shop blue print, write process sheets, select metal and estimate machining time to performance level expected in industry MTO 250 AutoCAD I 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MTO 251 Provides more advanced i nstruction on using the CNC for production of parts, and introduces the student to the use of A utoCAD software. MTO 251 CNC Operations 2 Credit HourS/48 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MTO 221 Provides introductory skills i n the use of CNC digital readouts and the operations of a CNC vertical mill and CNC lathe. MTO 252 CNC Principles 2 Credit Hours/48 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MTO 141,221 Provides skills and knowledge on preparatory funct ions and operations of a CNC milling machine and a CNC lathe. I nclude s safety, system start up, and use of pre-written programs, as well as macros. MTO 253 CNC Mathematics I 2 Credit Hours/48 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MTO 142 Develops skills in calculations and mathe matical operations that are used in the operation of CNC milling machines and CNC lathes. MTO 261 IBM DOS for CNC 1 Credit Hour/24 Contact Hours Provides an overview of the basic use of the Disk Operating System. MTO 262 CNC WordPerfect 1 Credit Hour/2 4 Contact Hours Provides basi c instruction i n using the WordPerfect word processing software to enable CNC operators to comfortabl y do programming. 129 COMMUNIT Y COLLEG E OF DENVE R MTO 263 CNC Programming I 3 Credit Hours/?2 Contact Hours Prerequi sites: MTO 251,252,253 Provides beginning instruction, using BOSS 10, on programming for the CNC, inclu ding word processing skills, language, blocks, coordinate words, and functions of G Codes and M Codes. MTO 264 AutoCAD II 3 Credit Hours/72 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MTO 250 Continues MTO 250, AutoCAD I. Provides more advanced instruction in the use of the AutoCAD software. MTO 265 CNC Programming II 3 Credit Hours/?2 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MTO 261 ,263 Continues MTO 263,CNC Programming I. Include s more advanced instruction in programming for the CNC, which includes Z Axis canned cycles, canned milling cycles, cutter diameter compensation feed functions and auxiliary machine contro l functions. Magnetic Resonance Imaging MRI274 Clinical Applications of Magnetic Resonance Imaging I 1 Credit Hour/1 5 Contact Hours Prer equisite : Program acceptance Corequisites: MRI 276,277,278 Covers the imaging procedures performed and explains the results in i maging from MRI clinical protocols. Includes parameters for setting instrumentation and emphasizes expected results in normal (non pathological) studies. Commences in the fall, and is presented in a self-study/self paced format. MRI 276 Physics and Instrumentation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Program acceptance Corequisites: MRI 274 ,277,278 Provides the physical theory of electro magnetism and explains how physical principle s are applied in obtaining diagnostic magnetic resonance images of internal human anatomy Commences in the fall semester, and i s presented in a selfpaced/self-study format. MRI 277 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Laboratory 1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Program accep tance Corequisites: MRI 274,276,278 Provides for students' observation and limit ed involvement in the actual clinical environment. Includes experience in communications with and preparation of patients, equipment familiarization and introduc tion to actual procedural protocols. Thirt y contact hours are arranged at the clinically affiliated site for 1 credit in the fall. MRI 278 Cross-Sectional Anatomy in Imaging 1 Cred it Hour/1 5 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Program acceptance Examines human anatomy as viewed in transaxial, sagittal and coronal planes. Incorporates magnetic resonance images as a basis of recognition for anatomy in other d i agnostic imaging modalities. Selfpaced/self-study format. MRI 284 Clinical Applications of Magnetic Resonance Imaging II 2 C redit Hours/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MRI 277 Corequisite: MRI 287 Expands upon clinical applications of MRII with emphasis on the in-depth knowledge of protocol s as applied to patholog ies and recognition of pathologies in MRI images. P resented in a self-study format in the spring semester. MRI 287 Clinical Internship in Magnetic Resonance Imaging 9 Credit Hours/4 1 2 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MRI 278 Corequisit e : MRI 284 Provides for experience in the actual practice of MRI technology. Gives the student a n opportunity to apply theoretic k n owledge, learn and/or refine skills needed in the practice of magnetic resonance imaging technology Upon completion of 412 contact hours at a clinically affiliated site, t h e student earns 9 credit hours.

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Mammography MAM 274 Mammographic Theory 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ARRT Registered Radiographer Corequisite: MAM 276 Provides the theoretical framework to be a competent mammographer. Includes: psychosocial aspects, anatomy, physiology, patho logy, positioning, clinical breast exam, instrumentation, mammography technique, special procedures and patient education. MAM 276 M a mmograph i c Interns hi p 2 Credit Hours/86 Contact Hours Corequisites: MAM 274 Applies theoretical concept s in the actual practice of mammography. Mathematics MA T 013 Basic Ope r at i on s I 1-5 Credit HourS/24-120 Contact Hours Provides revi ew of basic math through multiplication. MAT 014 Basic Ope r ations II 1-5 Credit Hours/24-120 Contact Hours Provides review of multiplication, place values, long division and word problems MAT 030 Operat i o n s of Whole Numbers Decimals and Per cents 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Reviews multiplic ation tables and strengthens skills in adding, subtracting multiplying and dividing whole number s and decimals. Teaches the concepts of roots, prime factoring and least common multiples. Includes percents and solving basic percent and simple/compound-interest word problems. MAT 033 General S kills in Math 1-10 Credit HourS/24-225 Contact Hours Reviews arithmetic principles i ncluding fractions, decimals, percents, and ratios and proportions Prepares students for basic math skills needed in vocational programs. MAT 035 Fractions, Proportions and Applied Geometry 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Reviews adding subtracting, multiplying and dividing both arithmetic and simple algebraic fractions, including order of operations. Reviews proportions and their applications in general and in percent word problems. Deals with basic terminology in geometry similar a n d right triangles with applications, perimeters, areas and volumes of basic geometric figures. MAT 056 Pre-Algebra 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: Basic skills assessment level 1 cor MAT 035 Teaches integer operations and how to solve linear equations in one variable, as well as solving them for one variable in terms of others. The second half of the semester will be devoted to solving a variety of word problems taken from various courses using the techniques covered in the first half of the semester. MAT 080 Basic Mathematics Review 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Reviews basic arithmetic. Includes whole numbers, decimals, percents, fractions, pro portions, and pre-algebrai c and geometric concepts and applications. May review set theory, probability, logic and the Cartesian Coordinat e System. MAT 100 Elementary Algebra 3 Credit Hours/50 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 035 or basic skills assessment level2a Includes manipulation of algebraic expressions, solving first-degree equations in one and two variables, factoring, solving quadratic equations using factors, solving fractional equations graphing and oral problem solving. MAT 103 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Presents a practical approach to basi c operations in arithmetic, fractions, decimals, percents, e lements of algebra, geometry ratios and proportion, triangular trigonometry graphing, business applications and problem solving. Optional material may include one or more of the following topics: inequalities, probab ili ty and statistics and sets and logic. MAT lOS Intermediate Algebra 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 100 or high school algebra,or assessment level 2b Covers sets, axi omat i c approach to the set of real numbers, extension of exponents radicals, first-and second-degree equations in one and two variables and graphs. MAT 121 College Algebra 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT lOS or equivalent or basic skills assessment level 3 Includes a brief review of intermediate algebra, equations and inequalities, func tions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, linear and non-linear systems, selection of topics from among graphing of the conic sections, introduc t ion to sequences and series, progressions, permutations and combinations, the binomial theorem and theory of equations. MAT 122 College Tri gonometry 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 121 or instructor consent Includes trigonometric function (with graphs and inverse functions), identities and equations, solutions of triangles complex numbers and other topics as time permits. MAT 124 F i nite Mathematics 3-4 Credit Hours/45-60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT lOS or instructor consent Designed primarily for students majoring in business, social science, or computing Includes function evaluation and graphing, matrix operations, linear equations and inequalities, and introduction to set theory combinatorics and probability. Fourth credit hour is used for extended topics and applications. MAT 125 Survey of Calculu s 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 121,124 Includes derivatives, integrals and their applications, with attention restricted to algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions. For business, life science and/or social science majors. MAT 135 Introduct i on to Statistics 3 Credi t Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 105 Includes data presentation and summarization, int rodu ction to probability concepts and distributions, statistical inference estimation, hypo thesis-testing comparison of populations, correlation and regression. MAT 201 Calculus I 5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 122 Introduces single variable calculus and analytic geometry. COURSE DESCRIPTION 130

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MAT 202 Calculus II 5 Credit Hours/75 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 201 Extends and further develops concepts of single variable calculus and analyti c geom etry studies as found in MAT 201. Emphasis on applications of differentiation, integration and techniques of i ntegration and infinite series. MAT 203 Calculus III 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 202 Completes the traditional subject matter of single variable calculus not covered in MAT 201 and MAT 202 and introduces vector analysis, multi-variable calculus, solid analytiC geometry and dimensional vector space. MAT 226 Computer Applications for Statistica l Procedures 1 Credit Hour/30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 105 Corequisite: MAT 135 Includes comp uter applications of statistical procedures such as correlation, chi square analysis. Data analysis will be done by using commercially prepared computer software. Laboratory course. MAT 26S Ordinary Differential Equations 3 C r edit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MAT 202 Introduces ordinary differential equations. Includes equations of first and second order with applications, linear equations, series methods and transformation methods. Multimedia Design MUM 100 Introduction to Macintosh 1 Credit Hour/22.5 Contact Hours Introduces the student to the skills neces sary to understand and operate the Macintosh computer for computer graphic applications. MUM 101 Introduction to Multimedia 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MUM 100, GRD 103 Corequisite: GRA 109 Examines the latest developments in the field of multimedia production. Produces a multimedia project on the compu ter 131 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER MUM 104 Design for the Computer 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MUM 100 Cor equisite : GRA 109 Introduces the stud e n t to the computer skills necessary for visual production for multimedia presentations, color theory, shape, design and composition. Continuity for the storyboard will be taught. MUM lOS Image Processing and Manipulat i on 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MUM 100, l04,GRD 103 Corequisite: GRA 109 Introduces the student to the skills neces sary to process and manipulate visual images from photographic and video graphic input for the production of mult i media assets. MUM 107 Integrated Video Production Studio 3 Credi t Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MUM 100, 1 0 1,GRA 103,ENG 257 Corequisite: GRA 109 Introduces practices and issues in transition from trad itiona l analog studio production to studio production in digital multimedia environment. MUM 206 Fractal Design Studio 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours P rerequisites: GRD 103, MUM 100, 104 Corequisite: GRA 109 Introduces the student to a paint software for digital illustration and painting for mul timedia applications. MUM 207 Multimedia Animation Studio 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MUM 100, 101,GRD 103 Corequisite: GRD 109 I ntroduces the student to 2-D and 3-D solid modeling with ani mation for the pro duct ion of multimedia assets. MUM 210 3 D Modeling and Animation 3 C r edit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRD 103 Familiarizes students with desktop multi media using the Macintosh Includes color illustration 3-D illustration, animation, audio processing and video imaging. Due to t h e advanced nature of the material, students are required to have prior Macintosh expe rience. MUM 28S Multimedia Portfolio Preparation 3 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GRA 109 Introduces the student to the processes i nvolved in produci n g a visual and audio computer-animated CD-ROM portfolio of work produced in previous multimedia courses. MUM 297 Multimedia Internship 3-6 Credit Hours/68 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MUM 100, 101,GRD 103 Corequisite: GRA 109 Introduces the student to an 'on-site" expe rience as an intern working in a multimedia production facility. Music MUS 100 Fundamental Music Theory 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Provides each student with a working k n ow l edge of musicianship, and includes t h e study of melody h armony and rhythm. MUS 101 Music Theory I 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hour s Prerequisite: MUS 100 or instructor consent Corequisite: MUS 111 Reviews music fundamentals and empha sizes diatonic, four-part harmony, analysis, ear train ing and keyboard harmony. MUS 102 Music Theory II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hour s Prerequisite: MUS 101 or instructor consent Corequisite: MUS 112 E mphasizes diatonic, four-part harmony, analysis, ear training and keyboard harmony. MUS 111 Ear Train ing and Rhythm Drill I 2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Corequis ite: MUS 101 Provides instruction and drill in the aural percept ion of intervals, chords, rhythmic patterns and the interpretation of these in perf o rmance. MUS 112 Ear Training and Rhythm Drill II 2 Credit Hours/4 0 Contact Hour s Prerequisite: MUS 111 Corequis ite: MUS 102 Con tinues instruction and drill in the aural perception of interva ls, chords and rhyth mic patterns and the int erpretation of these in performance.

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MUS 120 Music Appreciation 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Outlines what is needed to develop a thor ough appreciation of music. Introduces studen t s to basic musical terms and con cepts; then a discussion of selected historical eras and their musical styles. MUS 121 Introduction to Music History I 3 Credit Hours/4 5 Contac t Hours Studies the various periods of music histo r y with regard to the composers, aesthetics, forms and genres of each period Considers music from the Middle Ages through the classical period MUS 122 Introduct i on to Music H i story II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Continues Introd uction to Music His tory I with a s tud y of music from the early Romantic Movement to the present. MUS 131 Performance Class I 1-2 Credit Hours/3D-60 Contact Hours None may be repeated for credit Applies the fundamentals of music to the piano, voice o r guitar, plus introduces basic technique, repertoire and sightreading. E v aluation will be on written and practical skills. MUS 141 Privat e Instruction I (in Guitar Piano or Voice ) 1-2 Credit HourS/15-30 Contact H ours Prerequisite: MUS 100, audition Emphasizes practical skills and informatio n relevant to performing and includes the s tudy of techniques and repertory Intended f or musicians with more than an elementar y knowledge of performan c e techniques. Consist s o f one, 30-minute les son a week, practice 30 minute s plus. MUS 142 Pri vate I n s truction II (in Gu i tar Piano or Voice ) 1-2 Credit Hours/15-30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MUS 141 Emphasizes practical skills and i nformation relevant to performing and includes the study o f technique and repertory Intended for musicians with more than an e lementary knowle dge of performance techniques. Consists of one, 3D-minute les son a week, practice 30 minutes plus. Continues practical skills and information relevant to performing and intensifies the study of technique and repert o ry. MUS 143 Private Instruction III (in Guitar, Piano or Voice) 1-2 Cred it Hours/15-30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MUS 142 Emphasizes practical skills and information relevant to performing and includes the s tudy of techn ique and repertory Intended for musicians with more than an elementary knowledge of performance techniques Consists of one, 30-minute les son a week, practice 30 minutes p lus. Continues practical skills and information relevant to performing and intensifies the study of technique and repertory. MUS 144 Private I nstruction IV (in Guitar Piano or Voice) 1-2 Credit Hours/15-30 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MUS 143 Emphasizes pract ical skills and information relevant to performing and includes the s tudy of technique and repertory. Intended for musicians with more than an e l ementary knowledge of performance techniques. Consists of one, 30-minute les son a week. prac tice 30 minutes plus. Continues practical skills a n d information relevant to performing and intensifies the study of technique and repertory. MUS 180 Music and the Media 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Provides students with an understanding of career opportunities and surviva l skills within the music i ndustry and an under standing of the relationship of music to the media world MUS 190 Introduct i on to Computer Music 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Acquaints the s tudent with the fundamentals of music writing on the personal com puter, including s equencing and music engraving. MUS 201 Music Theory III 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MUS 102 and 116 Present s chromatic harmonic materials, form and analysis and modulation formulae. MUS 202 Music Theory IV 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MUS 102 and 116 Presents 20th century composition tech niques. MUS 211 Performance (Ear Training and Rhythm Drill) III 2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MUS 102, 111, and 112 Provides the student with instruction and drill in the complex rhythmic and melodic pattern s o f the 20th century musical per formance. MUS 212 Performance (Ear Train ing an d Rhythm Drill) IV 2 Credit Hours/40 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MUS 211 Provides instruction and drill in the complex rhythmic and melodic pattern s of 20th century musical performance. MUS 220 Computer Music Composing 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: MUS 100,121 Introduces students to music composition utilizing the MIDI system. MUS 221 Compute r Music Arranging 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: MUS 220 Instructs t h e student to synch ronize MIDI and digital audio systems in arranging music. Nuclear Medicine Technology NMT 210 Nuclear Medicine Physics 4 Credit Hours/60 contact Hours Prerequisites: MAT 121 Provides an in-depth study of atomic and nuclear stru cture Includes t erminology and symbols specific t o the understanding of radioactive decay modes. Explains radia tion's interactions with matter and the con sequent detection of radiation. Explains statistical interpretation of dete ction as it applies in Nuclear Medicine Technology. NMT 21 1 Clinical Applications I 2 Credit Hours/30 Contact Hours Analyzes each procedure performed in the nuclear medicine department: mecha nisms of localization of radiopharmaceuti cals to speCific organs and/or organ sys tems, techniques for performing proce dures, parameters for defining norma l anatomy and physiolo gy. COURSE DESCRIPTION 132

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NMT 212 Clinical Applications II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: NMT 211 Integrates the anatomy, physiol ogy and methodology of nuclear medicine studies. Includes diagnostic in-vivo and in-vitro studies and radionuclide therapy. Emphasizes common pathologic findings in diagnosis. (Speech intensive.) NMT 213 Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation 4 Credit Hoursl60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: NMT 222 Provides a study of basic scintilla tion detectors gas detectors sci ntillati o n spectr o metry well counters, stationary-and moving-imaging devices, photographic media, calibrators and compute r s and qualit y assurance procedures for all major instrumentation used in nuclear medicine departments NMT 21S Radiopharmaceutical Preparations 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: NMT 221 Describes the basic theor y and practice of radiopharmaceutical preparation and qual i ty control in nuclear medicine. Emphasizes the design and function of radionuclide generators, labeling procedures, sterility and pyrogenicity considerations, radionuclide and radiochemical qual ity control procedures. NMT 216 Radioassay Procedures 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: NMT 215 Examines the theory of radioassay procedures performed in nuclear medicine: radioimmunoassay, competitive protein binding, hemato l ogy and urinalysis. Also includes quality control and trou bleshooting. NMT 21 7 Computers in Nuclear Medicine 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: NMT 216 Corequisite: NMT 224 Provides the theoretic basis of computer operations and medical applications in the nuclear medicine department. Provides hands-on experience with comp uterized systems at hospital sites. NMT 221 Clinical Internship I 6 Credit Hours/270 Contact Hours Introduces students to nuclear medicine technology: patient care, radiation safety, quality control, record keeping, scheduling and routine diagnostic procedures. Provides the opportunity to practice basic procedures at the hospital site. First in a series of four internship courses. 133 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER NMT 222 Clinical Internship II 8 Credit Hours/360 Contact Hours Prerequisite : NMT 221 Provides the opportunity to practice more advanced procedures and techniques at the hospital site. Continues the first internship and introduces skills needed to perform procedures in the third internship course. NMT 223 Clinical Internship III 8 Credit Hours/360 Contact Hours Prerequisite: NMT 222 Provides the opportun i ty to pract ice radiopharmaceut ical preparation and quality control radloassay procedures, cardiovascular nuclear medicine and other computer applicat ions. Third I n the series of four internship courses. NMT 224 Clinical Internship IV (Capstone) 9 Credit Hours/405 Contact Hours Prerequisite: NMT 223 Corequisite: NMT 217 Refines all skills associated with nuclear medicine technology. Offers the opportu nity to study and discuss social, political, b ioethical and personal stressors encountered by the technologist. Culminates in a review and practice registry examination. Nursing NUR 100 Nurse Aide Practices and Concepts 1-9 Credit Hours/24-216 Contaa Hours Demonstrates and provides practice of clinical skills essential for five nurse aide roles. Includes basic understanding of health care principles for the patient, including illness and patient needs, patient care skills, critical thinking, and effective oral and written communication skills for nursing. NUR 101 Core Concepts of Pharmacology 1 Credit Hour/22.5 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 201,202, ENG 121, MAT 100 or higher, PSY 235 for NUR students Corequisites: NUR 102, 109, 111 for NUR stu dents; BIO 114, HSE 113, LPT 110, NUR 109 for LPT students Introduces general core concepts and ethi cal/legal implications of pharmacology, including the nursing process and biopsychosocial aspects of medication adminis tration Demonstrates and provides practice of medication administration and dose calculation. NUR 102 Core Concepts of Nursing 1 Credit Hour/22.5 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 201,202, ENG 121, MAT 100 or higher, NUT 100, PSY 235 Corequisites: NUR 101,109,111 I nt roduces concepts of nursing roles, nursing process, critical thinking the diversity of the health care client and environment, and effeaive oral and written communica tion skills for nursing. Concludes with labo ratory practicum that incorporates concepts in a clinical simulation NUR 103 Pharmacology for Nursing 2 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: NUR 101,102,109,111 Corequisites: NUR 112, 113, 114 Combines details of the clinical use of drugs with i mplications for nursing practice, emphasi z ing absorption, distr i bution, biotransformation, excretion of drugs, interactions, indications, contraindications, side/adverse effects and dosing Provides medication administration practice in the laboratory. NUR 109 Basic Nursing Skills 6 Credit Hoursl135 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 201,202, ENG 121, MAT 100 or higher, NUT 100, PSY 235 for acceptance i nto LPT program Corequisites: NUR 101,102,111 for NUR students; BIO 114, HSE 113, LPT 110, NUR 101 for LPT students Demonstrates and provides praaice of clinical skills essential for the nursing role of care provider, including maintenance of a safe, effective care environment, task organization and implementation time management documentation and applica tion of critical thinking to solve clinical p roblems. NUR 111 Nursing Concepts and Issues 6 Credit Hour/135 Cont a c t Hours Prerequisites: BIO 201,202, ENG 121, MAT 100, NUT 100, PSY 235 Corequisites: NUR 101,102,109 Introduces concepts and behaviors of nursing roles within the context of the nursing process, holistic health care and the health care industry Develops skills of critical thinking, communication and health care education. Examines nursing issues across the lifespan with emphasis on the aging adult.

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NUR 112 Nursing Care of the Hospi talized Client I 4 Cre d it Hours/90 Contact H our s Prerequisit es: NUR 101,102,109,111 Corequisit es: NUR 103, 113, 114 P r o v i des practice of nur sing care for the acutely ill client who r e quires hospitalization, emph a s izing m a int e n ance of a safe, e ff e ctive envi ronment and protect ion of physiological and psychosocial int e grity Includes t h e c a uses, pathology treatment and nur sing care of c ommonly occurr ing d i s eases in a dults Presents ethi c a l dilem m a s c o mmo n when c aring for hospit alized adult s NUR 113 Nursing Care of the Older Adult 4 Credi t Hou rs/90 Conta ct Hours P r e requis ites: NUR 101,102,109,111 Corequisites: NUR 112, 103, 114 Provides p r a ctice of nursin g care for the e lderly clie nt emphasizing mai ntenance of a safe, effective environment and protection of physiological and psychosoci a l i n tegr ity Includes the causes, pathology treatment princ iples of r ehabilitat ion and nursin g c a r e of c o mmonly occurring d ise ases in the elderly adult. Discusses ethical dilemmas common in h e alth care of the eld erly, and develops concepts of loss, death and dying NUR 114 Family-Centered Nursing Care I 4 Cred i t H o urs/90 Contact H o urs Prerequisites: NUR 101,102,111,109 Corequ i s i tes: NUR 103, 112, 113 Presents concepts of and provides practice for the nursing care of g r owing families, inclu ding obstetrical care, growth and d evel opment across the life span, common health prob lems in children, and health prom otion and mainten ance of the entire fam i ly. NUR 202 Management of Intravenous Therapy 1 C r edit H our/17 Contact Hour s Teaches concepts and techniques required f o r the administration of i ntravenous ftuids and medications in the treatment of health problems. The student p ractices intravenous therapy techniques in the laboratory b ef o r e applying this skil l to clinical practice. NUR 208 Nursing Assessment and Diagnosis 4 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequis it es: NUR 103,112,113,114, BIO 205 Corequisites: NUR 202,211,212 Develops skills of nursing assessment of the health client across the life span using effective interv iew and examination; devel ops ability to analyze data to i dentify actual or potential health care needs or problems Intro duces concepts of health promotion and m a intenance of physiologic and psy chologic a l integrity. NUR 210 Family-Centered Nursing Care II 4 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: NUR 208,211,212 Corequisites: NUR 214,285 Provides practice in the nursing care of families facing health concerns in both clin ical and commun i ty settings. Includes concept s o f f a mily theory a n d issues related to contraception, inf ertility, unwanted preg n ancy, teen pregnancy and disturbances of psychosocial and physiologic integrity of family members. NUR 211 Mental Health Nursing 4 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: BIO 105, NUR 103, 113, 112, 114 Corequisites: NUR 208, 212 Develops the concept s of psychosocial integrity and emphasizes the function and responsibility of nursing in promoting and maintaining mental health of individuals and families through the use of the therapeutic relationshi p and nursing process. NUR 212 Nursing Care of the Hospitalized Client II 4 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: BIO 205, NUR 103, 1 13, 112, 114 Corequisites: NUR 208,211 Presents the causes, pathology and treat ment of complicated illnesses of adults requiring hospitalizatio n ; provides clinical practice of nursing care, emphasizing maintenance of a safe, effective environment, and protection of physiological and psy chosocial integrity. NUR 214 Nursing Leadership and Management 4 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: NUR 208,211,212 Corequisites: NUR 210,285 Provides nursing practice and instruction in the health care environment, while devel oping basic principles of leadership and management, including leadership styles, management issues and professional responsibilitie s NUR 220 Perioperative Nursing I 4 Credit Hours/60 Contact Hours Prerequisites: RN or BSN required Delineates the role of the perioperative nurse in the operating room, focusing on intraoperative nursing care. Traditional, endoscopic and laser surgery will be included. NUR 221 Perioperative Nursing II (Certificate Capstone) 10 Credit Hours/390 Contact Hours Provides second-semester perioperat ive nursing students with a supervised clinical experience desi gned to provide a directed i ntroduction to the operating room envi ronment, to apply the concepts and techniques learned in NUR 220 and to assess student performance of course objectives. NUR 285 Comprehensive Nursing Int e rnship 3 Credit Hours/135 Contact Hours Prerequisites: NUR 101,102,103,109,111,112, 113,114,208,211,212 Corequisites: NUR 210,214 Facilitates the transition from student to graduate nurse by applying all principles and concepts of nursing to clinical practice during a structured internship. Faculty collaborate with clinical preceptor and student to design an internship that individu alizes the student S learning needs and prepares job readiness. Includes review of nursing theory. Nutrition NUT 100 Nutr ition 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: ENG 100, REA 090, MAT 105 Introduces basic nutrition with emphasis on personal nutr ition. Satisfies the nutri tion requirement for students enter ing the Nursing program. Attendance at first session is required. NUT 236 Nutrition o f Aging 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: GNT 212 Emphasizes that aging is not synonymous with deterioration and that many of the signs and symptoms of chronic, nutritional imbalances are often (mis)identified as changes attributed to aging. Studies the relationships between the aging process and various nutrients. COURSE DESCRIPTION 1 3 4

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Paralegal PAR 105 Torts 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces basic area of law dealing with civil wrongs, with emphasis in negligence, defamation and products liability PAR 109 Property 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Emphasizes substantive legal rules related to property law with added emphasis in real estate law p ractice. PAR 115 Domestic Relations 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Emphasizes substantive legal rules related to domestic relations law with an emphasis in dissolution of marriage. PAR 121 Introduction to Paralegal 3 C r edit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces students to the paralegal field, including, but not limited to, legal terminol ogy and scope of paralegal skills and responsibilities, v is-a-vis the practice of law. PAR 124 Legal Research 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces basic concepts and method s of legal research, emphasizing practical applications by the preparation of two case opinion briefs and two memorandums. PAR 126 Creditor/Debtor/Bankruptcy 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Gives students basic understanding of bankruptcy law covering the vario u s types of bankruptcy cases with emphasi s on the documentation utilized in such cases. PAR 185 Paralegal Synthesis I ( Capstone) 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisites: PAR 124,221,222 Helps the studen t synthesize information and skills previ o usly learned in such courses as legal research civil procedures and evidence. Includes legal terms, p reparation of legal briefs, documents and legal research. PAR 201 Business Organizations 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Emphasizes substantive legal rules related to corporations, partnerships, agency and securities law. 135 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER PAR 205 Probate 3 C redit Hours/45 Contact Hours Emphasizes the drafting of wills, settling estates and the creation of trusts, plus the impact of tax law in these areas. PAR 207 Legal Research Seminar I 3 C redit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: PAR 124 Introduces student s to computer-assisted legal research. Student s will draft legal memorandums and a trial court brief. PAR 208 Legal Research Seminar II 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours P rerequisite: PAR 124,207 Continues from Legal Research Seminar I with computer-assi sted legal research utilized in drafting appeals court briefs. PAR 214 Administrative Law 3 C redi t Hours/45 Contact H ours Introduces administrat ive and regulator y agencies, their jurisdic tion, rule-making and decision-making processes and how the paralegal can work within the legal context. PAR 221 Civil Procedures 3 C r edit Hours/45 Contact H ours Provides students with an introductio n to the civil procedural rules and their applica tion by use of a trial n o t ebook assignm e nt and other related exercises. PAR 222 Evidence 3 C r edit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 121 Introduces the student to the basic con cepts and term ino l ogy of evidence as they apply in Colorado courts, and the basic methods of marshalling of evidence and investigative procedures. PAR 223 Computers and the Law 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact H ours Prerequisite: PAR 221,222,ClS 120,140 Introduces students to compute r-assisted litigation support systems. Utilizatio n o f computers includes use of dBase III Litide x and time management systems. PAR 231 Investigation 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prer e quisite: Instructo r consent Introduces general techniques of investigation of cases pertaining to a wide variet y of law situations, civil and criminal. PAR 239 Criminal Law 3 C redit Hours/4 5 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 121 Int roduces basic concepts of criminal law and criminal procedu re, including Colorado and procedural rules related to this area. PAR 241 Environmental Law 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Emphasizes federal and Colorado regulations and their application in environmental cases. PAR 252 Constitutional Law 3 C redit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces basic concepts of constitutional law, i ncluding information relating to federal government stru cture and powers, and indiv idual liberties granted under the federal Constitution. PAR 258 Contracts 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 121 Introduces basic ter minology and concepts i n contract law as applied in Colorado and a basic system for contract preparation PAR 280 Paralegal Internship 6 Cred i t Hours/270 Contac t Hours Prerequisite: To be taken in student's last semester in p rogram. I n troduces students to an on-site experience a s an intern in training in a wide varie ty of law situations. PAR 285 Paralegal Synthesis II (Capstone) 3 Cred it Hours/45 Contact Hour s Prerequisites: All required courses in Certificate and AAS degree programs Emphasizes a synthesis of the information a n d skills that s tudents learned throughout t h eir paralegal studies. Personal Growth and Development PGD 091 Parenting 1-3 C r e dit Hours/24-72 Contact Hours Provides skills in under standing and inte grating child values, behavior, diSCipline, development, emotio n s and special needs i n the processes of positive parenting practices. PGD 098 Career Exploration 1 C r e dit Hours/24 Contact Hours Direct s s tudent s to seled a career using i n terest testing, aptitude testing, values clarification field trips, market research and job o pp ortunity evaluation

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Philosophy PHl111 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 121, REA 090, or reading assessment level 3 Introd uces s ignificant human ques t ions. Emphasizes understanding the meaning and methods of philosophy. Includes the human condition knowledge freedom, his tory, ethics, the future and religion PHI 112 Ethics 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 121, REA 090, or reading assessment level 3 Examines human life, experience and thought to discover and develop the principles and values for pursuing a more fulfilled existence. Applies ethical theories to a selection of conte mporar y social issues. PHI 113 Logic 3 Cred i t Hours/45 Contact Hours Prerequisite: ENG 121, REA 090, or reading assessment level 3 Studies effective thinking. Provides tools and develops skills for creative and critical thinking Emphasizes the develo pment of decision-making and probl em-solving skills. PHI 115 World Religions West 3 Credit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces students to the concepts predominant in the religions originating i n the Middle East, which became majo r religions of the Western Hemisphere. Includes socio logical, political, psychological and philosophical aspects of a variety of belief systems. PHI116 World Religions -East 3 C redit Hours/45 Contact Hours Introduces s tudent s to common and d ifferent concept s predominant in the relig ions originating in Asia. Includes sociologic al, political, psychological and philosophic a l aspects of a variety of belief systems. Photography PHO 101 Fundamentals of Photography 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Cover s basic black and white photographic craft. Places special emphasis on appr o aching photography a s a visual language. Includes the language of photography the camera, film exposure and processing printing print finishing and photographic criticism. PHO 102 Fundamentals of Color Photography 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Introduces color theory, the nature of light and ligh t sources, the reproduction of color, color films and processing. Emphasizes build ing individua l experiences with colo r transparency films and potential expressions through color photography. PHO 107 History of Photography 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Surveys the h istory of photography from its beginnings to the present. Emphasizes individual photographers who have made significant contributions t o the field. Includes technical, artistic, commercial and social developm ent o f photography a s a form of visual communication PHO 111 Intermediate Black and White Photography 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hour s Prerequisites: PHO 101, 102 Familiarizes the s tudent with th e basic principles of the Zone System f o r black and white photography: use o f mathematics in photography; basic sensi tometr y and film analysis; data plo tting, graphing and inter pretation; testing procedures; light metering tec hniques; controlling film exposure and development ; and visualization for expressive black and wh i t e prints. PHO 112 Intermediate Color Photography 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: PHO 101,102 Presents the s tudent with basic prinCiples of color printing and provides practical experience in the areas of physics o f light colo r film and paper and human color vision. PHO 185 Advanced Photography (Capstone) 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: PHO 101,102 Introd uces professional quality techniques, t h e zone system, the view camera, photo graphic chemistry prope r use o f the ligh t meter, how t o produce a professional-quali ty black and white print. Emphasizes practical testing and application o f the technical controls that augment expression. PHO 201 View Camera Techniques 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: PHO 101,102 Provides eac h student with an introduction to the visual aesthetics of photographic images and light, making use of hands-on photographic experience with the 4x5 camera. Covers theory of lenses, depth-offield practice and sheet film exposure/processing techniques PHO 202 Studio Lighting 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: PHO 101, Ill, 112 Introduces basic concepts and principles needed to produce personally expressive photographs with studio lighting equip ment especially Rash. Includes working with a variety of camera formats, from 35 mm to 4xS view camera. PHO 203 The Fine Print 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: PHO 101,102,111,112 Introduces and refines advanced skills of the student interested in producing profes sional-quality black and white prints. Integrates concepts of zone system with tone reproduc tion PHO 204 Introduction to Digital Imaging 3 C r edit Hours/90 Contact Hour s Prerequisites: PHO 101, 111 Introduces digita l imaging to students who have no p revious compu ter experience, but are familiar w ith still photography. Covers film formats, basic color, and black and white scanning and image manipulation i n photoshop. PHO 205 Non Chemical Printing 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisites: PHO 101,111 Explores a variety of digital imaging printing methods from scanned photographs and image files. Includes an introduction to color separation, halftone screens, and pho tographic style printing by electronic means. 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PHO 211 P o rtrait Photography 3 C r e d it Hours/90 Contact Hours Prer equisite : PHO 101,111 Explores personal style of portraiture, history of the field and portra i ture as visual language and creative expression. P H O 212 landscape Photography 3 Credit Hours/90 Contact Hours Prerequisite: PHO 101,102 Introduces basic conc