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Catalog, Metropolitan State College of Denver, 1991-1993

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Catalog, Metropolitan State College of Denver, 1991-1993
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Metropolitan State College of Denver
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Denver, CO
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Metropolitan State College of Denver
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Metropolitan State University of Denver
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Auraria Library
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Metropolitan State College of Denver Campus Box 16 P.O. Box 173362 Denver, CO 80217-3362 Bound Printed Matter Blk Rt US Postage Paid Denver, CO Permit No. 973
$3.00


Metropolitan State College of Denver
CATALOG
1991-1993


Metropolitan State College of Denver
CATALOG 1991-93
Contents
Officers of Administration...........................3
General Information..................................7
Application Instructions.............................8
Admissions Requirements..............................8
Applicants Less Than 20 Years of Age.................8
Applicants 20 Years of Age or Older..................9
Admission of Previously Enrolled Students............9
Transfer Credit Evaluation...........................9
International Education.............................10
English Language....................................10
International Studies...............................10
Recruitment and Retention
of Students from Ethnic Groups......................11
Tuition Classification..............................11
Education Policy for People Over 60.................11
Financial Aid Procedure.............................11
Costs...............................................13
Academic Information ...............................18
Orientation.........................................18
Assessment Requirements.............................18
Warning/Probation/Suspension Policy.................19
Honors Program......................................19
Omnibus Courses.....................................25
Requirements for All Degrees........................27
Graduation Agreement................................28
General Studies.....................................28
Degrees and Programs Available......................32
School of Business..................................34
African-American Leadership Institute...............37
Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity.......37
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences................38
Division of Humanities..............................38
Division of Social Sciences.........................51
Division of Science and Mathematics.................58
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services....66
Institute for Womens Studies and Services..........67
School of Professional Studies......................68
Division of Education...............................68
Division of Technology..............................77
Division of Public Service Professions..............88
Course Descriptions................................102
Faculty.............................................181
Alphabetical Index..................................189
Campus Map..........................................192
Admissions Application..............................193
Metropolitan State College of Denver does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national or ethnic origin, age, handicaps, or sex. Inquiries concerning the college grievance procedures may be directed to the designated MSCD officials.
Metropolitan State College of Denver is an equal opportunity employer; applications from minorities and women are particularly invited. Metropolitan State College of Denver does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, sex, age, or handicap in admissions or access to, or treatment or employment in, its educational programs or activities. Inquiries concerning Title VI and Title IX may be referred to Dr. Percy Morehouse, Jr., Director of Equal Opportunity/Assistant to the President, P.O. Box 173362, Campus Box 63, Denver, CO 80217-3362, (303) 556-2999. Inquiries concerning Section 504 may be referred to AHEC, P.O. Box 4615-P, Denver, CO 80204, (303) 556-8387. Or, inquiries may be referred to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1961 Stout Street, Denver, CO 80294.
The programs, policies, statements, and procedures contained in this catalog are subject to change by the college without prior notice. Metropolitan State College of Denver reserves the right to withdraw courses at anytime, rules, calendar, curriculum, graduation procedures, and any other requirements affecting students. Changes will become effective whenever the proper authorities so determine and will apply to prospective students.


Administration
TRUSTEES OF THE STATE COLLEGES IN COLORADO
Vickie L. Ford, Center, Vice Chair...............................
Gary M. Reiff, Denver............................................
David M. Herrera, Fort Collins, Chair............................
Aims C. McGuinness, Jr., Denver..................................
James E. Miller, Colorado Springs................................
Anne Steinbeck, Gunnison.........................................
Thomas Thornberry, Craig.........................................
Ted Violett, Faculty, Western State College......................
Chris Terranova, Student, Western State College..................
Glenn Burnham, Ph.D., President of the State Colleges in Colorado
Date of First Appointment 1985 1989 1985 1989 1989 1987 1987
1989
1990 1990
Present Term Expires 1991 1993 1991 1993 1993 1991 1991
1990
1991
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION
President................................................................................................
Assistant to the President..........................................................................
Athletic Director of Intercollegiate Athletics..................................................
Director of Sports Information and Promotions and Assistant Director of Intercollegiate Athletics
Director of Planning................................................................................
Director of Institutional Research..............................................................
Equal Opportunity Director and Assistant to the President...........................................
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs..........................................................
Vice President for Administration and Finance............................................................
Interim Vice President for Institutional Advancement.....................................................
Vice President for Community Outreach....................................................................
.... Thomas B. Brewer, Ph.D.
.....Charles M. Dobbs, Ph.D.
.....William M. Helman, M.A.
......Gregory C. Smith, B.A.
. Carol Werner Futhey, Ph.D.
........Paul H. Wilken, Ph.D.
Percy A. Morehouse, Jr., Ph.D.
.....David W. Williams, Ph.D.
.... Joseph F. Arcese, M.B.A.
.........Patricia J. Kelly, B.A.
......Antonio Esquibel, Ph.D.
Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs........................................
Executive Assistant to the Provost.....................................................
Associate Vice President...............................................................
Director of Educational Services for the Rocky Mountain World Trade Center Association
Director of International Programs and Services....................................
Director of Cooperative Education Program..........................................
Director of Honors Program.........................................................
Associate Vice President and Dean of Admissions and Records............................
Assistant Dean of Admissions and Records...........................................
Director of Veterans Services..................................................
Assistant Dean of Admissions and Records...........................................
Assistant Dean of Admissions and Records...........................................
Director of High School/College Relations......................................
Assistant Vice President...............................................................
Acting Director of Academic Exceptions Program.....................................
Director of Orientation............................................................
Director of Special Services.......................................................
Assistant Vice President for Extended Education........................................
Director of Adult Learning Services................................................
Director of Extended Campus Programs...............................................
Assistant Vice President...............................................................
Director of High School Upward Bound...............................................
Director of Student Development Center.............................................
Director of Veterans Upward Bound..................................................
Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Student Life..................
Assistant Dean of Student Life.....................................................
Executive Director of Student Affairs..............................................
Director of Program Evaluation.........................................................
Director of Grants and Sponsored Research..............................................
Director of Campus Recreation..........................................................
Assistant Director.................................................................
Coordinator of Outdoor Adventure...................................................
Coordinator for Intramural/Club Sports/Fitness Center..............................
......David W. Williams, Ph.D.
......Cynthia Luna Scott, Ph.D.
.............Jett Conner, Ph.D.
...........Karin C. Millett, Ph.D.
..........Skip Crownhart, M.A.
..........Susan Lanman, M.A.
........Alain D. Ranwez, Ph.D.
.......Kenneth C. Curtis, Ph.D.
.....Alonzo F. Rodriguez, Ph.D.
...........Lynn Denzin, M.Ed.
......Jeffrey W. Johnson, M.S.
..........Thomas R. Gray, M.S.
.......Pauline R. Reece, M.A.
......C. Lavonne Moton, Ph.D.
..............Betty Vette, B.A.
...........Nancy Breckel, M.A.
...........Kelly Espinoza, M.A.
.......Andrew Breckel III, M.A.
.......Eleanor M. Green, Ed.D.
.. Gwendolyn S. Thornton, M.A.
.......Manuel Escamilla, Ph.D.
......Charles Maldonado, B.S.
.........Martelle Chapital, M.S.
...........Glenn A. Morris, M.A.
..........Karen J. Thorpe, Ph.D.
Yolanda Ortega-Ericksen, M.P.A.
...........Ron L. Veatch, Ph.D.
...........Frieda Holley, Ph.D.
.......Miltren Hardwick, M.Ed.
...........Anne McKelvey, M.A.
.........Patty McConnell, M.S.
.... Timothy A. Jorgensen, B.A. .............Scott Reetz, M.A.
3


Administration
Counseling Center
Director of Counseling Center
Staff Psychologist.........
Staff Psychologist.........
Sr. Counselor..............
Career Counselor...........
Counselor..................
.. Barbara Vollmer, Ph.D.
......Don Sugar, Psy.D.
. Jose Rodriguez, Psy.D. Barbara Mclntire, M.S.W. .. Donna Merrifield, M.S. ... Jose Rodriguez, M.A.
Financial Aid
Director of Financial Aid
Associate Director.....
Assistant Director.....
Financial Aid Counselor Financial Aid Counselor Financial Aid Counselor Financial Aid Counselor Financial Aid Counselor. Financial Aid Counselor Financial Aid Counselor. Financial Aid Counselor
. Cheryl Judson, Ph.D. Judith J. Lichtenfeld, B.S. .. Susan McGinley, B.S.
........Jill Baloun, M.S.
... Bennett Buenconsejo .... Juree Jacques, B.A. . Donelyn James, B.S. .. Dawn McCrocklin, B.S. .. Brenda Sebastian, B.A.
........Cindy Hejl, B.S.
.... Douglas Futch, B.S.
Student Activities
Director of Student Activities.........................................................................................To be appointed
Student Health Clinic
Director of the Student Health Clinic.............................................................................Steve Monaco, M.A.
Student Legal Services
Director of Student Legal Services.........................................................................Spike Adams, J.D.
Student Publications
The Metropolitan, Metrosphere
Director of Student Publications..............................................................Kate B. Lutrey, B.A.
Office of the Vice President for Administration and Finance
Vice President for Administration and Finance..............................................................Joseph Arcese, M.B.A.
Associate Vice President for Business Services...........................................................Robert F. Rizzuto, M.B.A.
Director of Accounting Services..........................................................................Sita M. Thomas, B.S.
Accounts Payable Supervisor...................................................................................Sylvia Atencio
Business Manager......................................................................................John P. Utterback, B.S.
Director of Student Accounts/Cashiering..................................................................Michael Barnett, B.S.
Associate Vice President for Human Resources...............................................................Tim L. Greene, M.P.A.
Director of Personnel and Payroll Services....................................................................Sandi L. Jones
Benefits Administrator...................................................................................Elyse M.Y. Nieto, B.A.
Associate Vice President for Information Technology...........................................................Leon Daniel, M.S.
Director of Academic Computing and User Services.........................................................John T. Reed, Ph.D.
Manager of Information Technology Applications Services...............................................Steve Franzkowiak, B.A.
Technology Service Manager....................................................................................Jay Martin, B.A.
Director of Budgets........................................................................................Bruce Williams, M.B.A.
Office of the Vice President for Institutional Advancement
Interim Vice President for Institutional Advancement........................................................Patricia J. Kelly, B.A.
Assistant Vice President for Institutional Advancement......................................................Patricia J. Kelly, B.A.
Director of Public Relations...........................................................................Nancy Munser, M.P.A.
Director of Promotions and Advertising.................................................................Ann Dickerson, B.A.
Assistant Vice President for Development and Alumni Relations..........................................Mary Konrad Feller, M.A.
Director of Alumni Relations..................................................................Carolyn Champion-Sloan, B.A.
Executive Director of the Foundation.............................................................................Len Meyer, M.A.
Director of Support Services...........................................................................Bradley Snyder, Ph.D.
4


Administration
Academic Administrators
School of Business
Dean...................................................................................................Joe D. Megeath, Ph.D.
Associate Dean.......................................................................................R. Michael Brown, Ph.D,
Department Chairs
Accounting...................................................................................Patricia D. Duckworth, Ph.D.
Computer Information Systems and Management Science..............................................Gwynne E. Larsen, Ph.D.
Economics.........................................................................................John P. Cochran, Ph.D.
Finance...........................................................................................Jerry D. Boswell, D.B.A.
Management..........................................................................................Robert Lucas, D.B.A.
Marketing...........................................................................................Donald Glover, Ph.D.
Director of the Institute for Entrepreneurship & Creativity.............................................Courtney Price, D.P.A.
Director of the African American Leadership Institute................................................Ronald M. Knights, Ph.D.
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Dean....................................................
Associate Dean..........................................
Assistant to the Dean...................................
Assistant to the Dean...................................
Department Chairs
Art.................................................
Biology.............................................
Chemistry...........................................
Earth and Atmospheric Sciences......................
English.............................................
History.............................................
Journalism..........................................
Mathematical Sciences...............................
Modem Languages.....................................
Music...............................................
Philosophy......... .....................J..........
Physics.............................................
Political Science...................................
Psychology..........................................
Sociotogy/Anthropotogy..............................
Speech Communications...............................
Director of the Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services Director of the Institute for Womens Studies and Services .. Director of the Center for the Visual Arts..............
.. Larry S. Johnson, Ph.D. .... Joan M. Foster, Ph.D.
......Tony Montoya, M.A.
Joseph W. Threadgill, M.A.
... Susan Josepher, Ph.D. .. George C. Becker, Ph.D. .. Jack D. Cummins, Ph.D. Roberta A. Smilnak, Ph.D.
.....Elsie G. Haley, Ph.D.
Stephen J. Leonard, Ph.D. ... Barbara H. Ryan, M.S. George S. Donovan, Ph.D.
......David Conde, Ph.D.
.....Hal Tamblyn, D.M.A.
. Stephen E. Benson, Ph.D. .. .. Jerry H. Wilson, Ph.D. ... Norman Provizer, Ph.D. .. Lyn Wickelgren, Ph.D. .. Kenneth M. Keller, Ph.D. .. Carl i. Johnson, Ph.D. Akbarali Thobhani, Ph.D.
.......Jodi Wetzel, Ph.D.
......Sally Perisho, M.A.
School of Professional Studies
Dean....................................................................
Associate Dean..........................................................
Department Chairs
Aerospace Science...................................................
Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology......................
Criminal Justice and Criminology....................................
Electronics Engineering Technology..................................
Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration......................
Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies........................
Human Services......................................................
Military Science (Army ROTC)........................................
Nursing and Health Care Management..................................
Reading.............................................................
Teacher Education and Director of Teacher Education and Certification....
Director of the Child Development Center........................
Director of Student Teaching....................................
Technology and Technical Communications.............................
Director of the Institute for Gerontology...............................
Director of the Institute for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol and Addictive Behaviors
................Bill Rader, Ph.D.
...........Mary A. Miller, Ph.D.
...........Robert K. Mock, M.S.
.........Eldon Lindimore, Ph.D.
......Joseph G. Sandoval, J.D.
......Larry G. Keating, M.S.E.E.
......Raymond Langbehn, M.A.
...........Marc Ftabinoff, Ed.D.
.............Jeffrey Haber, Ed.D.
...........Major Steve E. Miller
Kathleen McGuire-Mahony, Ph.D.
......J. Douglas Cawley, Ph.D.
.........R. Jerrald Shive, Ed.D.
.........Marjorie Petersen, M.A.
..............Daniel Alfaro, Ph.D.
................J.O. Yunker, M.S.
.. Eugene E. Dawson, Jr., Ph.D. .........Anne S. Hatcher, Ed.D.
5


AR........Arts Building
AU........Auraria Library
BU........Parking Office
CC........Child Care Center
CD........Child Development Center
CN........Central Classroom
EG........Emmanuel Gallery
MR........Mercantile Restuarant
NC.........North Classroom
PE.........Physical Education
PP.........Physical Plant
PS.........Public Safety
RO.........Rectory Office
SA.........St. Cajetan's Center
SE.........St. Elizabeth's Church
SF.........St. Francis Center
SI........Science Building
SO........South Classroom
SU........Student Union &
Book Center
TE.........Technology Building
TV........Tivoli
WC........West Classroom


The College
The College
Metropolitan State College of Denver is the largest public, four-year, urban college in the United States with modified admission standards. Leaders in quality baccalaureate education, MSCD students, faculty, staff and alumni work to share the responsibility of the future.
Since its creation in 1965, the college has contributed to the vitality of downtown Denver and changed the face of learning in the metropolitan area with its phenomenal growth to approximately 17,800 students.
Metropolitan State College of Denvers success is reflected in the faces of its creative and determined students. Eighteen-year-olds take the first steps toward establishing a career, while young professionals seek career advancement. People re-entering higher education explore new careers and all find new opportunities. The average student is 27 years old, making classes a unique blend of the eagerness of youth and the wisdom that comes with maturity. Because the student population is so diverse, education at MSCD is a mutual learning experience for students and professors alike. There is a give and take between young and old, student and teacher all learning from one another.
While MSCDs students are committed to learning, the faculty is committed to teaching. Other colleges emphasize research; MSCDs more than 360 full-time faculty members are first, and most importantly, teachers. They are available to their students both in the classroom and in their offices for extra help and advice. Many have extensive professional backgrounds, adding an invaluable dimension to their knowledge, and more than 80 percent have earned the highest level of academic degree attainable in their fields.
MSCD offers bachelor of arts and bachelor of science degrees in more than 55 areas in business, human services, education, engineering technology, liberal arts, professional studies, science, and mathematics. Students can also pursue specific, individualized career choices through a contract major or minor. Several academic programs are the only ones of their type offered in the region, and many enjoy national reputations for excellence.
MSCD is not limited to degree-seeking students. A class in the latest computer technology may attract a Realtor with a fascination for high tech. Adults who are already successful in their careers may take a literature, philosophy, or history class and share a love of ideas. Active businesspeople may take advantage of an extended campus evening class in management or conversational French at Metro South or Metro North.
MSCDs impact upon the metropolitan community continues to grow each year as Denver increasingly becomes a national center of commerce and technology. The college considers itself a partner in Denvers future and seeks ways to contribute to the quality of urban life. MSCD students work for local businesses as interns, and many classes revolve around community issues. MSCD also extends learning opportunities beyond the boundaries of the Auraria campus through the Division of Off-Campus Programs, offering credit classes at locations throughout the metropolitan area, including special seminars and workshops for area professionals.
Additionally, the college reinforces its partnership with the community through jointly sponsored events which both entertain and educate MSCD students and the metropolitan community. Lectures by nationally known figures, concerts and plays, foreign-study programs, and community learning projects all bring the wealth of MSCDs resources into the neighborhoods of metropolitan Denver.
Metropolitan State College of Denver provides equal education and employment opportunities for all, regardless of race, color, creed, religion, age, sex, national origin, or veteran status.
Accreditation/Approvals
MSCD is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Individual academic programs are accredited by the National Recreation and Park Association, National League for Nursing, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the National Association of Schools of Music, and the Association of University Programs in Health Administration. The Civil Engineering Technology, Electronics Engineering Technology, and the Mechanical Engineering Technology programs are accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. The Department of Human Services has approval from the Council for Standards in Human Service Education, and the baccalaureate program in chemistry is approved by the American Chemical Society. The Drug, Alcohol, and Addictive Behavior Counselor program has the approval of the Colorado Department of Health. The Department of Accounting is approved by the Colorado State Board of Accountancy, and the Aerospace Science program has the approval of the Federal Aviation Administration.
Campus
Metropolitan State College of Denver is located in the facilities of the Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC). The 169-acre campus is located adjacent to downtown Denver at Speer Boulevard and West Colfax Avenue. The Community College of Denver (CCD) and the University of Colorado at Denver (UCD) share the facilities with MSCD.
More than one million square feet of space for classrooms, laboratories and offices are included in the facility. Some administrative offices are in restored Victorian homes in Denvers historic Ninth Street Park located within the Auraria site. Other administrative offices have recently occupied quality space in the Terracentre at 1100 Stout. The campus features a child-care center; a block-long gymnasium with a swimming pool; areas for handball, soccer, baseball, and track; a student union; and a library, housing more than 600,000 volumes.
The Auraria Higher Education Center provides a variety of educational opportunities that meet the needs of the urban student. The three Auraria institutions are governed by separate boards and maintain their distinctive roles and missions. However, the concept of facility sharing affords the MSCD student the flexibility of taking lower-division courses at the community college, and graduate or specialized professional courses at the university. Metropolitan State College of Denvers four-year degree programs are coordinated with those of the other two institutions, and students may cross register for classes at the three institutions.
The proximity of the Auraria Higher Education Center to downtown Denver enables students and faculty to use the community as a learning laboratory and to weave classroom theory into the social, political, cultural, and economic practice of the city.
The Auraria Higher Education Center originated with the need to provide permanent facilities for three rapidly growing urban institutions. In 1974, the Colorado legislature created the Auraria Board of Directors to plan the campus, construct the buildings, provide a variety of additional centralized support services, and maintain the facilities. In 1972, the Colorado Legislature
7


The College
appropriated nearly $40 million for the construction of the Auraria campus. Additional funds were contributed by the City of Denver, the federal government through the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the State of Colorado. The Auraria Higher Education Center constitutes an example of creative cooperation by government at all levels.
Office of State Colleges in Colorado
The member institutions governed by the Trustees of the Office of State Colleges in Colorado are Adams State College, Mesa State College, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and Western State College. The purpose of the Office of State Colleges is to identify and facilitate cooperative efforts among the institutions. Such efforts lead to broader educational opportunities for students.
The registering authority of each member institution can provide any regularly enrolled student in good standing with the materials needed to enroll temporarily in any other member institution without incurring additional matriculation costs. Information concerning tuition is available at the host institution.
The enrollment status of the student at the host institution will be determined by the students status at the home institution. Students should ascertain in advance of enrolling at an institution that desired courses will satisfy degree requirements at the home institution. The process of enrolling as a system student should begin at least one month prior to the beginning of the registration period at the host institution.
Application Instructions
Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they are received each semester. All credentials which are received by the college become the property of Metropolitan State College of Denver and will not be returned to the student. It is the responsibility of the applicant to notify the Office of Admissions and Records of any demographic or academic changes on the application for admission prior to the first day of classes. If demographic changes are not reported to the Office of Admissions and Records, it could delay the registration process for subsequent semesters. Failure to report academic changes may result in rejection, dismissal, and/or loss of credit.
To apply for admission:
1. Complete the application for admission included in the back of this catalog. Additional applications are available from the Metropolitan State College of Denver Office of Admissions and Records at Campus Box 16, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, Colorado, 80217-3362; 303/556-3058.
2. A $10 non-refundable application fee must be submitted with the application for admission. The application fee must either be received or waived before the application can be considered. The application fee does not apply to tuition and fees. Re-admit applicants do not have to pay this fee.
3. Submit the completed application and application fee directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. The application and all required credentials (see admissions requirements below) should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes.
4. It is the students responsibility to request that all required credentials be mailed directly from the issuing institution or agency to the Office of Admissions and Records at Metropolitan State College of Denver. No hand-carried documents will be accepted.
5. Although an applicants record may be summarized on one transcript, official transcripts from each institution are required.
Admissions Requirements
The college classifies applicants into two categories by age those who are less than 20 years of age and those who are 20 years of age or older. Based on the colleges modified open admissions system, each category has its own admissions requirements and procedures.
APPLICANTS WHO ARE LESS THAN 20 YEARS OF AGE
If you are less than 20 years old by September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall semester, or February 15 for the spring semester, you will be classified as a traditional applicant.
Freshman (first-time college student)
1. Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the high school or testing agency:
a. ACT or SAT test results
b. high school grade point average
c. high school class rank
2. This information may be submitted at the end of the sixth, seventh, or eighth semester of high school but no later than four weeks before the expected term of enrollment. A final, official transcript with date of graduation is required no later than the fourth week of the term of enrollment to insure registration for the subsequent semester. Students should request and verify that the high school transcript with date of graduation has been mailed by the high school and has been received by the Office of Admissions and Records. Students will not be permitted to register after their initial enrollment unless this final transcript is received.
3. Metropolitan State College of Denver will admit students who are likely to complete an academic program successfully and who meet state requirements for the college as established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE).
4. Applicants who do not meet the stated admission requirements will be considered on an individual basis after careful review of all credentials, including letters of recommendation and/or personal interview. Some students may be accepted after successful completion of the Summer Bridge Program, which has been established with the Community College of Denver at Auraria.
5. Applicants who have not graduated from high school but have received the Colorado General Education Development (GED) Certificate or its equivalent will be accepted.
College Transfer
1. Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the high school, testing agency, and/or college or university:
a. ACT or SAT test results
b. high school transcript
c. transcript from each college or university attended or currently attending
d. if currently attending, verification of enrollment
2. These credentials should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes. All required credentials must be received before a final admissions decision can be made.
3. Metropolitan State College of Denver will admit students who are most likely to complete an academic program successfully and who meet state requirements for the college as established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE).
8


The College
4. Applicants who have less than a cumulative 2.00 grade point average from all colleges and universities attended will be considered on an individual basis after careful review of all credentials including letters of recommendation and a personal interview with an admissions counselor. Please call the Office of Admissions for additional information.
APPLICANTS WHO ARE 20 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER
Applicants who are 20 years old or older by September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall semester, or February 15 for the spring semester, should read the requirements below for either a first-time college student or a college transfer student:
Freshman (first-time college student)
1. Applicants will be admitted to Metropolitan State College of Denver upon indicating on the application for admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have received a General Education Development Certificate (GED).
2. By signing the application for admission, applicants are certifying that they will request either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test scores be sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records.
3. Until the credential discussed in #2 above is received, a student will not be permitted to register for a second semester.
4. The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but is highly recommended for advising purposes.
College Transfer
1. Applicants will be admitted to Metropolitan State College of Denver upon indicating on the application for admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have received a General Education Development Certificate (GED).
2. By signing the application for admission, applicants are certifying that they will request either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test scores be sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. In place of these credentials, college transfer students may have college transcripts, which indicate at least 30 semester hours or 45 quarter hours of transferable C work, sent directly to MSCD.
3. Until the credential listed in #2 above is received, a student will not be permitted to register for a second semester.
4. Applicants who indicate on their application for admission that they are seeking a degree at MSCD will be classified as non-degree-seeking until all required transcripts and the Transfer Credit Evaluation Card have been received by the Office of Admissions and Records. Applicants who indicate on their application for admission that they are not seeking a degree from MSCD may change their status by completing a Change of Status Form and submitting all required transcripts and the Transfer Credit Evaluation Card to Admissions and Records.
5. The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but is highly recommended for advising purposes.
3. Degree-seeking transfer applicants are required to have all college and university transcripts on file to receive a transfer evaluation.
Admission of Previously Enrolled Students
Former students who have not been in attendance at Metropolitan State College of Denver for one or more years should adhere to the following procedures:
1. Submit a completed application for admission which can be found in the back of this catalog. Check off the re-
admission box on the top, right corner of the application. No application fee is required for re-admission.
2. To insure processing, the application and any required credentials should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
3. Former students who have attended other collegiate institutions since last attending MSCD must follow the appropriate admissions requirements for transfer students.
4. Former students who are re-admitting after nine years of absence from the college are required to resubmit all credentials. Only non-degree-seeking MSCD graduates do not have to resubmit credentials.
Additional Admissions Programs Summer Semester Only
Applicants who are applying for the summer semester and who do not wish to continue at MSCD after the summer semester may be admitted under a provisional status and are not required to submit admissions credentials. Please check the appropriate box under MSCD Plans on the application for admission. Applicants applying for the summer semester and who wish to continue for the fall or spring semester must meet stated admissions requirements.
High School Student Education and Enrichment Program
The Student Education and Enrichment Program (SEE) is Metropolitan State College of Denver's High School Concurrent Enrollment Program for college-ready students. SEE is designed to supplement a students existing education through early participation in college-level classes. This advanced program should not be interpreted as an alternative to high school completion but is, instead, a cooperative college/high school effort to provide educational enrichment and early college attendance to qualified high school students. Typically, the SEE student meets the following criteria:
1. is currently registered in a Colorado high school
2. is maintaining a GPA of 3.0 or better
3. is preferably in the senior year of high school
4. can benefit from specialized or accelerated classes
5. has demonstrated the ability to do college-level work
To apply for admission, the student must, in consultation with the appropriate high school authority, submit to the Office of Admissions at MSCD an admissions application with the required $10 application fee accompanied by the following documents:
1. recommendation stating how the student will benefit from early college attendance from a high school counselor or administrator
2. written parental approval
3. an official high school transcript
Upon receipt of these documents, the students record is reviewed and the admissions decision is made. However, if additional or supporting information is required, the student may be required to have an admissions interview with an MSCD admissions counselor. The admissions decision will be based on the students academic preparation, past performance, the recommendation of the high school official, and the students personal motivation and readiness for a traditional college experience.
Transfer Credit Evaluation
Once all final official transcripts for degree-seeking students are received by the Office of Admissions and Records, the evaluation process begins. The student receives a transfer evaluation card which must be signed by the students major department or school advisor. The card is then submitted to the Office of
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Admissions and Records. Within approximately four weeks, students receive two copies of the transfer credit evaluation, one of which is taken to the major and minor departments for advice on how credits might apply to their programs.
Transfer credits will be accepted under the following guidelines:
1. Credit must have been earned at an institution of higher education holding full regional accreditation.
2. Grades earned must be "A," B, C," or equivalent; however, only the credits will be shown on the MSCD academic record. Courses with grades of D," F, or similar grades will not be accepted in transfer.
3. Course content should be similar to those courses offered at Metropolitan State College of Denver.
4. A maximum of 64 semester hours from a two-year institution will be accepted and applied toward an MSCD degree. A maximum of 90 semester hours of credit will be given for acceptable work completed at a four-year institution or combination of two- and four-year institutions.
5. Students earning an AA or AS degree will enter with junior standing at MSCD, provided all courses included in the degree carry a grade of C" or better and otherwise meet minimum MSCD standards for transfer credit, and with the understanding that some students will need to complete additional MSCD lower division program requirements.
International Education
In order to fulfill its appropriate role as a public urban institution, Metropolitan State College of Denver must be responsive to the changing qualities of the community it serves. Because Denver is a national center for commerce and technology, Colorado is affected by dynamic global relationships as well as national, state, and local policies. As technology draws the nations of the world closer together and Colorado becomes increasingly aware of its international role, educational institutions must increase their commitment to providing opportunities for international education. These opportunities exist for nationals enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver who wish to be involved with an academic experience outside of the United States, as well as internationals who feel they will gain from study at Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Admission of International Students
All students who declare a country of citizenship other than the United States on their applications for admission must contact the Office of Admissions and Records.
1. Admission of resident aliens (or refugees, political
parolees, and political asylum cases, etc.) and students
on temporary visas other than F-1:
a. Official transcripts including secondary level education should be submitted four weeks prior to the beginning of the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
b. Applicants may be required to pass an English proficiency examination.
c. Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
2. Admission of applicants on student (F-1) visas:
a. International application for admission and fee must be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes for the semester of enrollment.
b. Applicants are required to submit the following documents as part of their application to the college: international student application form, application
fee, official transcripts from all secondary and postsecondary schools attended, evidence of English proficiency, and financial support documents.
c. Official academic credentials should be submitted in the original language as well as in official English translation. Transcripts from American institutions should be sent directly to the college from the issuing institution.
d. English proficiency may be demonstrated by attaining a score of at least 500 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Only scores from the international or special testing programs will be considered.
e. The first semesters tuition and fees will be required prior to course registration for international students. Scholarship recipients are exempt from this requirement.
f. Students are required to complete a minimum of 12 semester hours with a minimum 2.00 (C) GPA each fall and spring semester.
g. Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
h. More detailed information is contained in the international student brochure available in the Office of Admissions and Records.
If students are academically admissible and have met the minimum English proficiency requirements, they will be issued the U.S. Immigration Form I-20. Questions regarding the admission of students from abroad or permanent residents should be directed to the Office of Admissions and Records.
English Language ESL Program
Metropolitan State College of Denver, like most colleges and universities throughout the United States, has found it necessary to establish ESL classes for limited English proficient students who are academically accepted into the college but who lack language skills necessary to succeed fully in a four-year college. The ESL program is designed to meet the specific needs of MSCD students.
The Spring International Language Center at Auraria
Intensive English classes at Spring International focus on all language skills: grammar, reading, writing, and listening/speaking, in addition to special electives that students can choose each term, such as GMAT or TOEFL preparation, vocabulary building, business concepts, and English for computers.
Five nine-week terms are offered throughout the year to enable students to complete their English study quickly. Students are placed into one of five levels, with standardized evaluation tests at the completion of each level.
International Studies London Semester
Metropolitan State College of Denver, in cooperation with the American Institute for Foreign Study, has developed the London Semester and offers it with a slightly different academic focus each semester. Students who are in good academic standing and feel that they could benefit from a semester of study in London should contact the coordinator for International Education at 556-3143. Extended Studies Trips
Metropolitan State College of Denver provides opportunities for academically qualified students to participate in study-abroad programs. These programs vary in length from a few weeks to a full semester. For further information, contact the coordinator for International Education at 556-3173 or the Extended Studies Office at 721-1313.
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MSCD's Language and Culture Institute
The Metropolitan State College of Denver Language and Culture Institute was established in 1976 to organize study and travel abroad. The institute currently operates a summer program in Mexico, a summer intensive language institute in West Germany, and a winter study and travel program in Mexicos Yucatan Peninsula and Central America. The institute offers credit through the Department of Modern Languages and the Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services.
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services
The college provides an opportunity for students to study formally in international courses offered by various academic departments. Students interested in international coursework should contact the academic advisor of any of the three schools of the college. A cross-disciplinary contract major and minor arranged in International Studies blends historical, political, economic, cultural, and linguistic approaches and provides a diversified global perspective. Those interested in these or related degree fields should contact the director of Adult Learning Services.
Intercultural Curriculum
The college provides an opportunity for students to study formally in international courses offered by various academic departments. Students interested in international coursework should contact the academic advisor of any of the three schools of the college. Additionally, students may pursue a contract degree program such as international studies or international business. Those interested in these or related degree fields should contact the director of Adult Learning Services.
Recruitment and Retention of Students from Ethnic Groups
Metropolitan State College of Denver strives to enhance the educational opportunities for Denver area residents by offering a variety of well-structured early intervention, recruitment and retention activities. MSCD has established a strong network in the metropolitan area that assists students and other members of the community and informs them about higher education opportunities and how to go about receiving these benefits. A variety of counselors from different areas including admissions, financial aid, academic affairs, and student affairs are available to provide higher education counseling for both new and transfer students. Individuals from underrepresented groups interested in attending MSCD should contact the Office of Admissions and Records at 556-3058 for additional information.
Tuition Classification
A student is classified as an in-state or out-of-state student for tuition purposes at the time of admission. This classification is based upon information supplied by the student on the application for admission and is made in accordance with the Colorado Tuition Classification Law, CRS S23-7-101 et seq. (1973), as amended. Once determined, a students tuition classification status remains unchanged unless satisfactory evidence that a change should be made is presented. A Petition for In-State Tuition Classification form and the evidence requested should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records if a student believes she or he is entitled to in-state status.
The tuition classification statute requires that in order to qualify for in- state status, a student (or the parents or legal guardian of the student in the case of students under 22 years of age who are not emancipated), must have been domiciled in Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the first day of the semester for which such classification is sought.
Domicile for tuition purposes requires two inseparable elements:
(1) a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado with no intent to be domiciled elsewhere.
Some examples of connections with the state which provide objective evidence of intent are: (1) payment of Colorado state income tax, (2) permanent employment in Colorado, (3) ownership of residential real property in Colorado, (4) compliance with laws imposing a mandatory duty on any domiciliary of the state, such as the drivers license law and the vehicle registration law, and (5) registration to vote. Other factors peculiar to the individual can also be used to demonstrate the requisite intent. Any questions regarding the tuition classification law should be directed to an admissions officer at the college. In order to qualify for in-state status for a particular semester, the student must prove that domicile began not later than one year prior to the first day of classes for that semester. The dates for qualifying and for submitting petitions are published in the Class Schedule each semester.
Education Policy for People Over 60
Older area citizens are encouraged to participate in Metropolitan State College of Denvers programs and activities.
1. People 60 years or older who do not wish to earn credit are invited to attend class on a space-available basis, in classes of their choice, at either Metropolitan State College of Denver or at Extended Campus locations. There is no cost for these classes. These people may attend classes beginning the sixth day of each semester. Interested people should obtain a registration form from the Metro-Meritus Program in the Office of Adult Learning Services (556-8342). This form must be signed by the instructor granting approval and returned to the Office of Adult Learning Services. No college records of participation will be maintained.
2. People 60 years or older who wish to enroll for credit should submit required admissions and registration materials to the Office of Admissions and Records, Central Classroom Building, Room 103,1006 11th Street. A college record of participation will be maintained.
Financial Aid Procedure
Philosophy
The Metropolitan State College of Denver financial aid program provides assistance and advice to students who would be unable to pursue their education at the college without such help. Scholarships, grants, loans, and part-time employment are available singly or in various combinations to meet the difference between what the student and the students family could reasonably be expected to provide and the expected cost of attending Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Estimated Expenses
For the 1991-1992 academic year, projected expenses are estimated as follows:
Resident Nonresident
Tuition and Fees $1,746 $5,460
Room and Board 4,620 4,620
Books and Supplies 482 482
Transportation 896 896
Miscellaneous 1,096 1,096
$8,840 $12,554
Tuition and fees are set by the Office of State Colleges in Colorado and are subject to change without notice. All students are placed on a single-person budget. Additional allowances are made for students with dependent children day-care costs and for expenses related to disabilities not paid by another agency. (P.L. 99-498).
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Eligibility and Need
To qualify for financial aid, a student must demonstrate financial need, be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident alien, and be enrolled as at least a half-time student. Part-time students who qualify may be eligible for Pell Grants, Colorado Scholarships, Presidential Scholarships, Stafford Loans, Supplemental Loans to Students, PLUS Loans, Colorado Student Grant, Income Contingent Loans, and work-study awards.
Application Procedures
MSCD uses the American College Testing (ACT) Service, a national, nonprofit, need analysis organization, to determine financial aid eligibility. Returning MSCD students may request application forms from the Financial Aid Office. Transfer students can obtain application forms from their current college or university. Entering college freshmen should obtain application forms from their high schools or from the MSCD Financial Aid Office; students should obtain forms as early as possible, preferably by mid-February. Transferring applicants must supply the MSCD Financial Aid Office with financial aid transcripts from all schools previously attended. Detailed information concerning application procedures is available in the MSCD Financial Aid Office.
Financial Aid Programs
The aid programs introduced below are available to undergraduate students only. Students who hold baccalaureate degrees are eligible to apply for Stafford Loans, Supplemental Loans to Students, PLUS Loans, and Colorado Work Study only. The amount of funds made available depends upon the maximum award allowed by regulation of each program, the students established financial need, duration of the students enrollment, and funds allocated to the college by the state and federal governments.
Grants
Pell Grant: Eligibility is restricted to undergraduates enrolled at least half time (six semester hours a term). The maximum award for students enrolled full time is $2,400.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG):
Eligibility for the SEOG is restricted to undergraduates enrolled full-time in a degree program who demonstrate a high need for financial assistance. The amount of the award varies from $100 to $4,000 per year, according to the availability of funds.
Colorado State Grant (CSG): Students enrolled at least half-time who are permanent residents of Colorado are eligible for this grant. Awards vary from $50 to $2,000 per year.
Colorado Student Incentive Grant (CSIG): Full-time students who are permanent residents of Colorado are eligible for this grant. A maximum award is $2,500 per year.
Scholarships
Scholarships administered by the Financial Aid Office are based on scholastic ability. Please contact the Financial Aid Office for a complete listing of available scholarships.
Presidential Scholarships: The scholarships include four-year scholarships for entering high school students and two-year scholarships for transfer students. Scholars receive up to $600 per semester to pay mandatory tuition and fees.
Colorado Scholarships: Grants of $500 per semester, not exceeding the cost of resident tuition and mandatory fees per academic year, are available through the academic departments. Recipients must be Colorado residents. Interested students should contact their departments for applications.
Athletic Scholarships: MSCD has a limited number of athletic
scholarships. Applications and additional information are available from the MSCD Athletic Department.
Private Scholarships: Students should refer to the MSCD Student Scholarship Handbook for information and a listing of scholarships. Students should also contact academic departments and the reference desk at the Auraria Library for assistance in locating sources of such scholarships.
Loans
Each of the following is a loan which must be repaid by the student: Perkins Loans: Undergraduate students enrolled full-time in a degree program are eligible for this loan. During the freshman and sophomore years, a student may borrow up to $4,500; through the junior and senior years and postbaccalaureate study, a student may borrow a total of $9,000. Upon request, the Financial Aid Office provides additional information concerning Perkins loans.
Stafford Loan: This loan is available to undergraduates and postbaccalaureate students enrolled in a degree or certificate program. Applications are available from the students lender of choice or from any college financial aid office. Applications must first be submitted to the Financial Aid Office for preliminary processing. At MSCD, freshmen and sophomores may borrow up to $2,625 per year. Juniors, seniors, and postbaccalaureates may borrow up to $4,000 per year. The aggregate amount that may be borrowed throughout a students college education is $17,250. Because MSCD does not offer masters and doctoral degrees, postbaccalaureate students at MSCD are limited to undergraduate loan maximums.
Supplemental Loans for Students (SLS) and PLUS Loans: At
MSCD these loans are available to independent students officially admitted and enrolled at MSCD and to parents of dependent, students. Applications are available from MSCD or from lenders which participate in this program. Applications must first be submitted to the Financial Aid Office for preliminary processing. At MSCD independent students may borrow up to $4,000 per year with an aggregate limit of $20,000. At MSCD, parents of dependent students may borrow up to $4,000 per year, per student with an aggregate limit per student of $20,000.
Income Contingent Loan (ICL): This loan is available to undergraduates enrolled at least half-time in a degree program. Postbaccalaureate students are not eligible. Freshmen and sophomores may receive up to $2,500 per year, juniors up to $3,500, and seniors up to $4,500. The aggregate maximum is $17,500.
Additional Loan Programs
Raymond R. Uhl Loan: Established in memory of Raymond R. Uhl, former MSCD student killed in Vietnam, this fund is to assist students who need financial help but are not eligible for other types of aid. Maximum loan is $2,000 and terms of repayment are arranged according to the individual students circumstances.
MSCD Foundation and Other Emergency Loans: Should there be a delay in the disbursement of funds, the Financial Aid Office is able to advance limited funds to students, provided that financial aid has been previously awarded. The average loan is $200 per semester. The loan must be repaid at the end of the semester in which the funds were received or as soon as financial aid funds are disbursed to students, whichever comes first.
Information on additional alternate loan programs from private sources is available at the Financial Aid Office.
College Work-Study: The State of Colorado and federal work-study programs provide part-time employment during the summer and academic year. Undergraduate students may receive either type of award. Postbaccalaureate students are eligible to receive only State of Colorado work-study. Only permanent Colorado residents are eligible for State of Colorado work-study awards.
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Awards range from $200 to $5,000 per fiscal year. The average award is $2,000. The maximum hours students may work is 30 hours per week average while classes are in session and a maximum average of 40 hours per week between semesters.
Employment: Many students who do not qualify for work-study find part-time employment to cover a portion of their educational expenses. The Auraria Placement Office assists students in finding part-time jobs.
Other Forms of Assistance
Colorado No-Need Work-Study: Students enrolled at least halftime who are permanent residents of Colorado and have either unmet need eligibility, or who do not qualify for need-based financial aid, are eligible for this award. Students may apply for these funds at the Financial Aid office.
Financial Aid as a Form of Payment: Students who have been awarded financial aid have the option of using that aid as their form of tuition payment during phone registration each semester. Once the award has been verified by the Business Office, the student will not be required to pay the tuition and fee charges until the aid is disbursed. Students receiving any type of financial aid are eligible for this service each semester for which aid has been awarded. Related information is provided in mail-in and phone-in registration materials and in class schedules.
Resource Expectations: Students attending MSCD must assume responsibility for the cost of their education. Tax-supported aid programs exist to supplement student financial resources, not to replace them. Prospective financial aid applicants should refer to the Financial Aid Office for details concerning students resource expectations.
The Aid Package
Once student eligibility is determined, an aid package is developed which depends upon the availability of funds and the eligibility of the applicant in relation to that of other students. Although it is not always possible to do so, the Financial Aid Office attempts to fully meet student eligibility. To facilitate the work of the Financial Aid Office, applicants must obtain all information and forms from designated sources and submit the required materials to the appropriate office according to established schedules.
Receiving a scholarship has no effect on a students aid if he or she is not receiving funds from ICL, GSL, Perkins, SEOG, CSG, CSIG, or College Work-Study. Students receiving aid from any of these programs are limited to a maximum amount of aid. A student whose full need has been met prior to receipt of a scholarship will have his or her aid reduced by an amount equal to the scholarship. If the students full eligibility has not been met, the scholarship can be allowed to satisfy the unmet eligibility. Each students situation is treated individually.
Award Notification
When the Financial Aid Office has determined the kind and amount of aid for which a student qualifies, the student is notified of the award by letter. The letter also stipulates the conditions of the award. Students awarded aid must sign the statement of education purpose on the award letter and the Anti-Drug Abuse Act certification.
Disbursement Procedures: a. Stafford Loans, Supplemental Loans to Students and PLUS loans: All Stafford Loans and Supplemental Loans to Students are required to be disbursed in two disbursements. Contact the Financial Aid Office for disbursement dates. The first disbursement is usually available within 35 days after the beginning of the semester for which the loan is intended. Stafford and SLS checks will be processed at the Financial Aid Office and released through the Business Office. Students are required to pay any outstanding balance owed to
MSCD at the time the check is released. PLUS checks are mailed directly from lenders to parent borrowers and may or may not be disbursed in two disbursements.
b. Work Study: Work study earnings are paid monthly and are treated as wages earned. Outstanding balances owed to MSCD are not deducted from these earnings. Students are strongly advised to pay any outstanding balance as soon as a work-study check is received.
c. All other aid: Beginning on the first day of classes each semester, students receiving aid other than those listed above may come to the MSCD Business Office to pick up their financial aid. The Business Office will deduct any outstanding balance owed to MSCD and issue a check for any remaining funds. Students who still owe a balance after all aid has been paid will be issued a bill.
Repayment Policy
Students who withdraw from MSCD prior to completion of a term must repay a portion of financial aid and scholarships. All required financial aid repayments must be made to MSCD before the end of the current academic year or before additional Title IV funds may be disbursed to the student, whichever occurs first. Repayment is made to the MSCD Business Office.
Student Rights and Responsibilities
Academic Progress Requirements
Financial aid recipients are required to maintain satisfactory progress towards their educational objectives in order to continue to receive aid (2.0 GPA; complete at least two-thirds of the credits attempted each semester; and be enrolled the equivalent of not more than 12 full-time semesters). Detailed information outlining the requirements is available in the Financial Aid Office. Failure to maintain satisfactory progress may result in cancellation of aid for subsequent terms of school years.
Change in Status
The financial aid award may be adjusted throughout the award period to reflect any change in the students resources or enrollment status or in institutional, state, or federal funding.
Renewal of Financial Aid
Students must apply each year for continued aid. Renewal of financial assistance depends on the students academic performance, financial eligibility, and the availability of student financial aid funds.
Students should contact the Financial Aid Office for details concerning Metropolitan State College of Denver financial aid policies and procedures.
Costs
The Board of Trustees of the Office of State Colleges in Colorado, the governing board of the college, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees for any semester without notice.
Tuition and College Service Fees
Tuition and College Service fees are determined by the Trustees shortly before the beginning of each academic year. Information regarding tuition and fees is published in the current Class Schedule.
TUITION AND FEES ARE PAYABLE AT THE TIME OF REGISTRATION.
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Standard Fees
An application fee is required of all applicants for admission to the college. This fee is non-refundable and will not be applied to
tuition.................................................$10
Transcript fee, per transcript...........................$1
Graduation fee..........................................$20
Special Fees
Returned check penalty..................................$17
Course Audit Policy
Students may audit a class with the permission of the instructor and if seating is available. Academic credit is not awarded for an audited course. The cost for auditing a course is based on regular tuition as published in the current Class Schedule. Audit approval forms are available in departmental offices.
Health Insurance
Single coverage is mandatory for students registered for 10 or more semester hours providing no other comparable health insurance is in effect. Students may apply for a waiver if they have other coverage. A waiver need only be submitted once, because once established, it will remain in effect until rescinded in writing by the applicable deadline. Students enrolled for less than the fulltime amount (10 hours during fall and spring semester; eight during summer semester) are not eligible for the colleges group coverage. In addition, if a full-time student decreases the amount of semester hours to below full-time status (10 hours during fall and spring semester; eight during summer semester) within 28 calendar days from the first day of the semester, the student loses insurance eligibility. Students who have coverage in the spring semester are eligible to purchase insurance coverage in the following summer semester even though they may not be registered for classes in the summer. For complete details, contact the Accounts Receivable Office at 556-3100. Optional coverage is available for dependents of full-time students.
Other Cost Information
The cost of books and supplies averages $350 to $500 per academic year with the highest cost during the first semester of attendance. Other costs such as room, board, clothing, transportation, and other expenses will vary according to individual need.
Tuition Adjustments
Please see the Class Schedule for the current semester.
Student Affairs
The Office of Student Affairs coordinates a wide range of service programs, such as financial aid, recreation, legal services, student activities, student publications, health services, and counseling. Students are encouraged to get involved in several activities and use the support services whenever necessary.
Conduct of Students
Metropolitan State College of Denver policy provides students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. The college publishes standards of conduct, however, to which students are expected to adhere. Information regarding students rights and responsibilities, including the Student Due Process Procedure (the procedural rights provided to students at MSCD before disciplinary action is imposed), is available in Central Classroom 107-A.
Counseling Center
The Counseling Center exists for the purpose of providing professional assistance in three related areas to all students presently enrolled at MSCD or MSCD alumni: (1) academic support programs, (2) career development and career decisionmaking, and (3) counseling for personal growth and change. These services are provided in a variety of forms and settings that include formal classes, workshops, seminars, counseling, and educational groups, as well as the traditional one-to-one setting. Most group programs begin at the start of each semester and interested students should register prior to or during the first week of classes. Students desiring assistance are encouraged to contact the center personally to arrange an appointment or to register for one of the programs listed below.
The Counseling Center is an accredited member of the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc.
Academic Support Programs:
Test Anxiety Reduction: This workshop is designed for students whose anxiety about taking tests interferes with studying and test performance. Participants will learn skills to change the thinking that leads to anxiety, learn to relax, and learn to study and take tests more effectively.
Career Development and Career Decision-Making:
Self-Assessment/Life-Planning Workshops: These three-session workshops are held at various times throughout the semester and participants will complete exercises and inventories to indicate interests, values, achievements, and personality characteristics. Workshops are free for MSCD students; a fee is charged for non-students.
Career Assessment Screening: Students who are initiating the career decision-making process will meet for initial screening. Career testing will be carried out, and an overview of the process and the services available will be presented. Participants will then be referred to an appropriate program.
Personal Growth and Change:
Emphasis is placed on helping students with any problems that interfere with achieving success at the college. The student must initiate contact, or be referred by a member of the professional staff of the college, in order to receive assistance. Information disclosed in counseling is held in strictest confidence and is never released without the written consent of the student. Private one-to-one assistance in each of the areas described below is available for those students who do not choose to become a member of a workshop, seminar, or group.
Personal Growth and Development Program: Participation in this low-structure group setting is designed to develop skills in communicating honestly, directly, and comfortably with other people and to promote personal growth and change through selfexploration in a supportive atmosphere. The group deals with personal problems such as fears, doubts, frustrations, conflicts about school, job, family, sex, loneliness, and dating.
Rational Living Workshop: The workshop provides an opportunity to become acquainted with the fundamentals of rational emotive training and to apply these principles to problem areas specific to each individuals life. The process involves developing an awareness of self and of the emotional self-defeating thought patterns that have been learned. This opportunity to learn effective emotional management and positive behavior skills is provided through discussions, lecture, role playing, and group interaction.
Anxiety Reduction Workshops: Anxiety is a learned emotional reaction that can be reduced or eliminated entirely by relearning. The Counseling Center utilizes the desensitization technique (i.e.,
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relaxation and counter-conditioning) to help eliminate inappropriate anxiety reactions. Four two-hour workshops are required to complete the program.
Introduction to Biofeedback Training: This two-session group is designed for those people who want more information about biofeedback training. Participants who desire treatment will be scheduled for continuation in the biofeedback lab. Decision-Making/Goal-Setting: Participants complete an assessment inventory that provides information about the manner of gathering and processing information and making decisions. The results are discussed during the second session and provide a framework for learning additional decision-making and goalsetting techniques.
Assertiveness Training: Participants learn techniques to help eliminate difficulties in asserting themselves. They learn (1) how to recognize assertion problems, (2) simple ways to rid themselves of anxiety, and (3) ways to build assertive skills to deal effectively with a wide variety of common problems.
Stress Reduction/Relaxation Techniques: Students learn and practice a progressive relaxation technique. A theoretical understanding of the benefits and the practical application of relaxation are emphasized.
Stress Management Workshop: A variety of techniques for managing fears, anxiety, and generalized stress are taught.
Veterans Upward Bound
Veterans Upward Bound at Metropolitan State College of Denver is a federally funded program designed to identify, recruit, and motivate veterans to use their VA benefits in pursuit of personal career goals through higher education.
Veterans Upward Bound provides remedial and tutorial help so that survival in academic or vocational/technical programs is maximized. This is done during a 12-week trimester. Ancillary services such as career counseling, financial aid advisement, psychological counseling, and job placement are also provided for the participant.
High School Upward Bound
The program is designed to generate the skills and motivation necessary for success in and beyond high school for youths who are low-income and first generation college-bound students. The program provides intensive academic instruction during the school year, as well as a six-week summer session. Basic academic skill preparation in reading, writing, and mathematics is part of a comprehensive counseling and enrichment program for the purpose of developing creative thinking, effective expression, and positive attitudes toward learning. The students are recruited at the beginning of their sophomore year in high school from, five target area high schools located in Denver County (East, Lincoln, Manual, North, and West high schools).
Special Services Program
The purpose of the Special Services Program at Metropolitan State College of Denver is to provide educational assistance for selected students who, because of financial and/or other circumstances, may otherwise be denied a chance for participation in higher education programs. Academic assistance is provided for students on the basis of individual need. Courses in English, reading, and communication are offered for college credit, coupled with tutorial assistance. These courses are designed to strengthen and supplement a students basic educational skills so that she or he may better address the requirements of a college course load. Other supportive services available are counseling, testing, assistance with financial aid forms, and, when possible, assistance in attending social and cultural events to enhance the students experience at Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Servicemens Opportunity College
Metropolitan State College of Denver has received recognition as a Servicemens Opportunity College. Further information can be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Veterans Services
The Office of Veterans Services is designed to provide student veterans, and veterans in the community, with a variety of outreach, recruitment, and retention services. These include assistance with problems involving checks, tutorial and counseling assistance, and many referrals to both on-campus offices and community services. The office also certifies student veterans and dependents for their VA educational benefits.
Student Health Clinic
All MSCD students enrolled for at least one credit are entitled to medical services at the health center. Students are not required to carry the Student Health Insurance to use the health center. Your health plays a vital role in how successfully you achieve your academic, social, and personal goals during college.
Many medical services are provided by the health center physicians, nurse practitioners, and walk-in R.N.'s who help staff the health center. These services include the evaluation and treatment of health problems/illnesses, lab testing, physicals, and women's health care (pap smears, birth control supplies). Medications can be purchased at the health center at the time of your visit.
Measles/Mumps Immunizations
Beginning fall semester, 1992, all newly admitted students bom after January 1, 1957, will be required to submit proof of two (2) doses of measles/mumps vaccine administered after the age of 1 year by a licensed physician or authorized health care provider. By July 1,1995, all students born after January 1,1957 will be required to comply with these immunization provisions. Specific instructions will be included in the class schedules beginning with fall semester, 1992.
Student Health Insurance
The Student Health Insurance is a group mandatory-with-waiver policy for full-time students. The insurance premium for students taking 10 or more semester hours is included in the student fee assessment each semester. Students enrolled for less than the full-time amount of semester hours (10 hours during fall and spring semesters; eight hours during summer semester) are not eligible for the colleges group coverage. In addition, if a full-time student decreases the amount of semester hours to below full-time status (10 hours during fall and spring semesters; eight hours during summer semester) within 28 calendar days from the first day of the semester, the student loses insurance eligibility. The Student Health Clinic coordinates all insurance claims and forwards them to the insurance company for payment of benefits.
Eligible students who have comparable insurance coverage may waive the insurance premium and not participate in the program. Proof of comparable insurance and a waiver form must be completed and turned in to the Business Office within the first three weeks of the semester. A waiver, once in place, will continue until rescinded in writing by the student.
Optional coverage is available for dependents of insured students who are enrolled for 10 or more semester hours during fall and spring semesters and eight or more semester hours during summer semester. Premiums for optional coverage must be paid at the Business Office during the first three weeks of each semester.
The policy is in effect 24 hours a day and covers the period of time from the first day of classes of the semester to the first day of
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The College
classes of the following semester. Insurance brochures listing other benefits, as well as insurance claim forms and information, are available at the Student Health Clinic, Room 140, Student Union. The group policy number is G 3392.
Student Activities
Metropolitan State College of Denvers Office of Student Activities offers concerts, dances, leadership development programs, student clubs and organizations, lectures series, art shows, and a myriad of other co-curricular activities for the students of Metropolitan State College of Denver.
In addition to providing social, cultural, and recreational activities, the Office of Student Activities encourages and supports the development of a wide range of professional, social, academic honorary, and special interest student organizations.
The Office of Student Activities is on the second floor of the three-story Student Activities Center wing of the Auraria Student Union. The activities wing houses the clubs and organizations, student publications, and the administrative offices of the Student Activities staffs of the three colleges on the Auraria campus.
Campus Recreation
The Campus Recreation Program at Metropolitan State College of Denver offers a comprehensive leisure service for the students, faculty, and staff of MSCD. It complements the academic mission of the college through enrichment of student life and development of a lifetime recreational philosophy. The program is composed of the following five major components: informal recreation, leagues and tournaments, club sports, outdoor adventure, and special events.
Informal recreation, the largest component, is designed to make the facilities available for recreational use for the general population of the college community. Among the facilities available are a 25-yard indoor swimming pool, eight handball/racquetball courts, two squash courts, two weight rooms, volleyball courts, four basketball courts, twelve tennis courts, a dance studio, and outdoor athletic areas (baseball field, softball field, and track). In addition, two aerobic sessions are offered each weekday.
Organized intramural events are offered throughout the year. Whenever possible both competitive and recreational divisions are offered to ensure participation for all ability levels. Included are activities such as golf, racquetball, and tennis tournaments, flag football, softball, and basketball leagues.
Club sports is intended to meet the needs of individuals and groups who are involved in sport activities at an extramural level. Some clubs which have longevity in the program are TaeKwonDo, lacrosse, rugby, and cheerleaders.
Outdoor adventure provides organized trips, equipment rental, workshops, and seminars. The goal of this division is to provide alternative activities for individuals interested in outdoor pursuits.
During the academic year, Campus Recreation conducts activities that appeal to the general college population. These events provide the opportunity to participate in many activities that are associated with college life.
Auraria Child Care Center
The Auraria Child Care Center is a nonprofit organization which provides a high quality child care and preschool program for the children of students, faculty, and staff of the Auraria Higher Education Center.
The center operates from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services to serve 150 children. It is divided into two toddler, three preschool, and one kindergarten/after school classroom. Children must be 18 months to eight years of age to attend.
The philosophy of the center is to foster the development of competence in intellectual and social skills and to provide a safe, nurturing environment. The childrens program involves the assessment of individual needs and establishing goals and activities appropriate for development. Close parent-teacher communication is a key to the responsive, individually oriented program provided at the center.
Parents may register their children on a full-time, part-time, or hourly basis to accommodate students' varying class schedules. For additional information, please call 556-3188.
Career Services
Career Services offers assistance to students and alumni of MSCD in planning their careers, finding off-campus jobs while enrolled, and seeking employment upon graduation.
Specific services offered by the center include career interest and personality testing, and workshops focusing on career planning, resume preparation, job search strategies and interviewing skills. Professional counselors are available for individual appointments. The student employment service and job vacancy listing are also housed in the Career Services Center. The Career Services Center is located in Arts Building 177 and the telephone number is 556-3477.
Campus Career Library
This library contains resources to help with the career planning and job search process. Information such as employer directories, salary surveys, and career assessment resources are available.
Discover
Discover is a computerized guidance system which contains specific occupation information, assessment inventories with immediate results, and nationwide college information. Trained advisors are available to assist users of the system.
On-Campus Interviewing with Employers
Employees visit the campus October through December and February through May to interview students graduating in any particular academic year.
Disabled Student Services
The Office of Disabled Student Services provides academic support services to disabled students at MSCD and UCD. Services include notetaking, interpreting, provision of taped texts, admissions and registration assistance, exam assistance, and handicapped parking permits and information.
Information and Referral Services
This office is a central information source which provides assistance to prospective students seeking enrollment at CCD, MSCD, or UCD. Tri-institutional tours of the Auraria campus are provided to prospective students on a prearranged basis.
International Programs
The Office of International Programs assists MSCD students by providing counseling on immigration issues; host family accommodations; support for personal adjustment; liaison with consulates, missions, embassies, and foreign organizations; and other pertinent information for foreign students. The office also provides information on study abroad programs to U.S. and foreign students.
Off-Campus Housing Services
This office helps students locate housing. Services offered include computerized rental and roommate listings and housing fairs on the first day of classes. Counseling on budgeting, on landlord/tenant rights and responsibilities, and roommates is also provided.
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Colorado Rehabilitation Services
The Office of Colorado Rehabilitation Services is a campus branch of the State Department of Social Services. Services offered to help eligible disabled students to become suitably employed include job seeking, skills training, vocational testing, counseling and guidance, physical and mental restoration services, and referral to additional sources of financial aid.
The Auraria Library
The Auraria Library provides a wide variety of learning resources for the students and faculty of Metropolitan State College of Denver and the other Auraria institutions. The library has almost 600,000 volumes of books, microforms, and bound periodicals in addition to more than 1,900 current periodical and newspaper subscriptions. Collection development efforts are focused on providing a strong base for learning/teaching efforts on campus and on developing in-depth collections in the fields of public administration, architecture and planning, applied mathematics, educational administration, and education technology. The main collection is supplemented by the Architecture and Planning Branch Library which is located in the Dravo Building, third floor, and open to the entire campus. As a member of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries (CARL), the Auraria Library has access to 2,500,000 volumes from Colorado member libraries and, through a national network, to an additional 15 million volumes available through inter-library loan.
All students are encouraged to take the 50-minute self-guided audiotape tour of the library in order to familiarize themselves with the resources and services available to support their academic pursuits. Special services offered by the library include an on-line public access catalog, computerized bibliographic searches, library orientation and instruction for groups and individuals, a depository of U.S. and Colorado government publications, and media listening and viewing facilities.
The Media and Telecommunications Division of the library also has an internship program and a self-service graphics lab which might be of particular interest to students.
Student Union
The Auraria Student Union serves as the location for out-of-class activities and services for all Auraria campus students and staff. It is the focal point for many cultural, social, and recreational activities of the college community. The Student Union contains a bookstore, gameroom, cafeteria, Mission, meeting and conference facilities, student activities offices, health center, student organizations, and a variety of lounges for study and relaxation. The Student Unions lower corridor contains a housing board, ride board, and other public transportation information.
The Conference Services Office is located within the Student Union. This operation schedules all facilities for non-academic use and coordinates any services necessary for the events of campus departments or organizations. For information or to reserve a room, call 556-2755.
The Student Union is located at Ninth and Lawrence streets.
The classrooms are under the direction of master teachers who are trained and experienced in either early childhood or elementary education. The master teachers plan an age-appropriate program to provide quality learning experiences which meet the developmental needs of the children. MSCD teacher education students also work in the classroom providing a high adult/child ratio with opportunities for small groups and individual attention.
The preschool program combines the best thinking and research in early childhood education. There are two preschool classes available: 8:30-11:30 a.m. for children 2 1/2 to 4 years old; 12:30-3:30 p.m. for children 4 years old by September 15. There is also an hour of child care available before and after each preschool class, allowing parents the option of placing their children for up to five hours.
The Summer Enrichment Program is academic in content but recognizes childrens needs for fun and different learning experiences in summer. Our approach ensures that children enjoy their summer learning opportunities. There are two classrooms: the younger one for children entering kindergarten through second grade in the fall; the older one for children entering second grade through fourth grade in the fall. There is a Day Program from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and an Extended Program from 7:00 to 9:00 a.m. and from 3:30 to 6:00 p.m.
The staff is proud of these programs and welcomes your visit to observe the facility and programs at the Child Development Center on the Auraria Campus. Please stop by the center or call 556-2759 for more information.
Auraria Department of Public Safety
The Department of Public Safety provides professional law enforcement services for the Auraria Higher Education Center. Peace officers patrol the campus 24 hours a day; trained dispatchers are on duty at all times to receive calls. Calls warranting police or emergency services should be directed through the emergency number: 556-2222.
The Transportation Department offers many options to Auraria commuters. Parking is available in daily fee lots at $1.25-52.00 per day. The Parking and Transportation Center (PTC) located at 7th and Walnut has added more than 1,700 new parking spaces to the campus. Parking is available in the PTC for $2.00 per day. For easy entrance/exit to the PTC and other designated lots, a reusable debit card can be purchased and a cash value encoded on its magnetic strip.
Visit or call the parking office, located in the PTC, for brochures, maps, and additional information about locations, costs, handicapped parking, motorcycle parking, evening escort service, and the Motorist Assist Program. Auraria Safety and Transportation/Division: 556-2000.
Metropolitan State College of Denver Child Development Center
The MSCD Child Development Center provides exemplary, on-campus childrens programs: during the fall and spring semesters the center offers pre-school programs; in the summer it provides a Summer Enrichment Program for elementary age children. Available to the Auraria campus and to the Denver community, these programs are part of the MSCD Teacher Education Department and demonstrate a model of excellence for MSCD teacher education students.
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Academic Information
Academic Information
The college operates on the semester system with each semester during the academic year consisting of 15 weeks of instruction followed by a week of examinations. Running concurrently with the 16-week courses are modules, scheduled to begin on the first, sixth and eleventh week of the 16-week semester. During any 16-week semester students may enroll in 16-week courses, five-week courses, or combinations of both, as long as the limitations outlined under course load are not exceeded.
The college also offers either an eight- or 10-week summer term during which students may enroll for either eight- or 10-week courses, four- or five-week courses, or combinations of both. The course load restrictions are adjusted to be equivalent to those of the regular academic year.
Classes are scheduled during the day and in the evening in order to accommodate people who are employed. Students who are planning to take the majority of their classes in the evenings should check with appropriate department chairs about the availability of courses in their major during evening hours. Enrollment can be on a full-time or part-time basis and can be for the purpose of pursuing a bachelor's degree, improving vocational or professional competence, or learning about particular areas of interest for cultural or intellectual reasons. Please refer to the Class Schedule for current calendar information.
Admission and Registration
Students who have not previously attended Metropolitan State College of Denver should review the colleges admission requirements.
All continuing students in good standing at Metropolitan State College of Denver are eligible to register each semester.
Students may maintain the status of continuing student while absent from the college; however, following two full semesters of absence, students should review their status with the Office of Admissions and Records to determine whether an updated application for re-admission will be required.
A student may register for classes in several ways. Information on the registration procedure and registration dates are published in the Class Schedule which is mailed to all continuing students. Students are responsible for insuring that there is a correct and up-to-date address on file with the college. Address changes may be made with the Office of Admissions and Records.
Registration procedures and dates for module classes are described in the Class Schedule. For further information regarding registration, please call 556-2950.
Orientation
All first-time college students, regardless of age, and all transfer students less than 20 years old are required to attend an orientation session. Re-admit students are encouraged to attend an orientation session. Information is provided concerning college requirements, class scheduling, registration procedures, college services and resources, transfer of credit, academic advising, choice of major, and career counseling. Information is also available regarding special programs offered by the college and its various departments. Orientation sessions are offered to freshmen, transfer students, adults, reentry women, and parents of new freshmen. For additional information, call 556-4055.
Assessment Requirements
Reading, Writing, and Mathematics Placement Examinations
All first-time college students are required to take a series of three exams before registering for their first semester classes. The
exams measure college entry-level skills in reading, writing, and mathematics, and the scores are used to help advisors and students select appropriate courses. For additional information please call 556-3677.
Reading, Writing, and Mathematics Proficiency Examinations
Prior to or at the completion of 60 semester hours at MSCD, students must take a series of three exams that measure proficiency in reading, writing, and mathematics. These exams should be taken concurrent with or after appropriate coursework in the academic area has been completed. All students who have completed more than 60 semester hours at MSCD and have not passed all three exams will have their registration encumbered the following semester until they see an advisor in the Academic Assessment and Support Center. For additional information please call 556-3677.
General Studies Examinations
In their junior year, students may be required to participate in an assessment of their general education.
The MSCD faculty has determined educational goals or outcomes that it wants its graduates to achieve. A copy of those goals and the methods by which their achievement will be measured can be obtained from the department office.
The First Year Program
The First Year Program is designed to unify and coordinate college efforts to help entering students toward a successful first year. The program provides intensive advising, course selection guidance, and academic monitoring throughout the first year, as well as coordinating academic support services for freshmen. Additionally, the program offers a First Year Seminar course which provides appropriate readings and written work enabling students to discuss and write about current issues including the value of higher education. All first-time MSCD students are required to enroll in the First Year Seminar course and other appropriate courses as determined by assessment at entry. The program furnishes an environment where problem solving, creativity, and peer interaction are encouraged. For additional information, please call 556-8447.
Academic Advising
Academic advising is available in the Academic Assessment and Support Center. Continuing and prospective students seeking these services should communicate with the coordinator of advising for the appropriate school. The Academic Assessment and Support Center is responsible for the advising of all undeclared majors at MSCD. For additional information, please call 556-4327.
International Student Advising
Special academic advising is available for foreign born students; the major emphasis of this advising is on the unique aspects of the foreign students academic study. Assistance is available to assess and place students in English as a Second Language (ESL) classes which are appropriate for their individual needs and which will enhance academic success. For additional information, please call 556-2533.
International Studies
Metropolitan State College of Denver provides opportunities for academically qualified students to participate in study-abroad programs. These programs vary in length from a few weeks to a full semester. For further information, contact the Office of Off-Campus Programs.
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Academic Information
The Honors Program
The MSCD Honors Program provides an intense, interdisciplinary academic program for highly motivated students whose intellectual capabilities suggest a broader spectrum of needs and interests. The program encourages individuality by responding to the diverse educational needs of students. Its integrated approach strengthens the program's foundation and provides a cross section of thought-provoking perspectives.
Honors students realize their learning potential through creative inquiry, independent thought, and critical examination. Honors professors serve as mentors to guide students in fulfilling their intellectual pursuits and dreams. Finally, while the Honors Program encourages independent thought and individuality, it also inspires students to work together, forming a community of scholars who learn from one another. Classes are generally small to ensure the exchange of knowledge and philosophies.
Available to students are both the honors core and a number of departmental honors courses. There are three Honors Awards available: 1) Junior Honors Award (15 semester hours); 2) Senior Honors Award (15 semester hours which includes a thesis); and 3) an MSCD Honors Program designation on the MSCD diploma (24 semester hours).
An official MSCD Honors Application form may be obtained from the MSCD Honors Program director. In addition to the MSCD application form, an interview by the Honors Council is required of prospective honors students. It is highly recommended that all honors applications be completed by mid-July. Furthermore, there are a number of full tuition scholarships available. Additional information on the Honors Program is available by calling 556-4865.
Semester
Required Honors Core Hours
HON 275 The Legacy of Arts & Letters 1.........................3
HON 276 The Legacy of Arts & Letters II........................3
HON 295 The Art of Critical Thinking...........................3
HON 380 Revolutions and Social Change I .......................3
HON 381 Revolutions and Social Change II.......................3
HON 385 American Culture 1.....................................3
HON 386 American Culture II....................................3
HON 492 Senior Honors Seminar..................................3
HON 495 Senior Honors Thesis...................................3
Total Hours for Honors Core........................................27
Cooperative Education
The Cooperative Education Internship Center places students in work experiences related to their academic major. The purpose of the internships is to integrate academic training with actual work experience. This combination allows students to make realistic career decisions, gain valuable work experience, obtain recommendations for graduate school, and earn money to help defray college expenses.
Students work in large corporations, small businesses, government, and nonprofit agencies throughout the metropolitan area. Most co-op students are paid by their employers, but in those professional fields where co-op salaries are not available, volunteer internship placements are offered to help students gain essential work experience.
Co-op internship placements are available in most academic majors and minors. The college requires that a student must complete 30 semester hours of college coursework with a minimum 2.5 GPA and have a declared major to be eligible for registration with co-op. No fees are charged to the student or employer for participation in the program, and each students interests and job requirements are discussed individually with a professional coordinator.
Students may choose from three different work schedules based on the academic calendar. The alternating plan provides full-time
periods of work every other semester with intervening semesters spent in full-time study. The parallel schedule places students in a job while they simultaneously attend school. These positions are usually part-time. The short term/summer plan allows students to elect a work experience which lasts for no more than one semester.
The college awards academic credit for supervised cooperative education placements. Students must complete a credit application available from the co-op office, and this application must be approved by a faculty member from the department in which credit is to be granted. No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward MSCD degree requirements. Credit earned for the co-op education work experiences are not applicable toward general studies requirements. Additional departmental restrictions may apply to certain majors.
298-1-3 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor
An entry level work experience in a private company or an agency of the federal or state government related to the students major and supervised by a competent professional on the work-site. Credit is awarded by an MSCD faculty member in the appropriate academic department for learning related to academic goals enumerated in the learning contract of each student.
398-1-12 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education
Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of instructor
An advanced work experience in a private company or governmental agency related to the students major and supervised by a competent professional on the work site. Credit is awarded by an MSCD faculty member in the appropriate academic department for learning related to academic goals enumerated in the learning contract of each student.
For more information on the program and the placement opportunities in your academic major, contact the Cooperative Education and Internship Center office at 1045 9th Street Park. Phone: (303) 556-3290.
Health Careers Science Program
The Health Careers Science Program is designed to encourage women and ethnic minority groups who have traditionally been excluded from careers in science and technology. Students are provided with tutoring and other support to ensure their success in the science and technology areas. For additional information, please call 556-3215.
English as a Second Language
The English as a Second Language Program refers students with limited English proficiency to the appropriate curricula in order to allow them to integrate listening, reading, and composition used in their college work. The program provides tutoring, intensive academic advising, and monitoring of progress throughout the students college career. For additional information, please call 556-2533.
Warning/Probation/Suspension Policy
Academic Satisfactory Progress/Good Standing
A student is deemed to be making satisfactory progress toward his or her academic goal if the student maintains a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher. This student is deemed to be in academic good standing with the institution (hereafter referred to in this section as good standing.) However, other academic standards may apply to specific programs and a student must satisfy those
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Academic Information
different academic standards in order to be deemed in academic good standing with that program. Please see information on the program of interest to determine specific standards for that program.
Academic Warning Status
A student in good standing whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.00 will be on academic warning status with the institution (hereafter referred to in this section as warning status) his or her next semester at MSCD. A student will be removed from this warning status and be in good standing if he or she achieves a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 at the end of his or her semester on warning status. More restrictive standards may apply to given programs or schools. Please see information on the program of interest.
Academic Probation
A student who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 at the end of his or her semester on warning status will be put on academic probation with the institution (hereafter referred to in this section as academic probation) his or her next semester at MSCD. A student will be on academic probation as long as he or she has a cumulative GPA below 2.00 but is making progress toward good standing as explained below and has not been on academic probation for more than three semesters. Other conditions may apply to given programs or schools. Please see information on the program of interest.
A student is removed from academic probation and is in good standing the semester after he or she achieves a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00.
Any semester a student is on academic probation the student must make progress toward good standing with the institution by taking all of the following actions:
achieving a semester GPA of 2.20 or higher
registering and completing a minimum of three but no more than
12 semester hours (three to six semester hours for summer
semester)
taking required activities as negotiated with the Director of Academic Exceptions Program. These may include certain classes, repeated courses, tutoring, or other activities.
While on academic probation, a student may preregister the semester following the academic warning status semester, but is prohibited from preregistering any other semester. For these other academic probation status semesters, verification must occur that the semester GPA is at least 2.20 prior to a student being allowed to register.
Academic Suspension
A student on academic probation not making progress toward good standing with the institution will be prohibited from registering at the institution for one calendar year through academic suspension from the institution. Appeal of suspension for this reason will be submitted to the Director of Academic Exceptions Program. The Director of Academic Exceptions Program in turn will deliver the appeal materials to the Student Academic Review Committee, which will review the appeal and notify the student of its decision on the appeal. A student may appeal a suspension, at most, two times in his or her academic career at MSCD.
A student making progress towards good standing with the institution whose cumulative GPA remains below a 2.00 after three or more semesters on probation will have his or her academic progress reviewed each semester by the Student Academic Review Committee to determine whether the student should be placed on suspension.
In both cases, the decision of the Student Academic Review Committee is final.
Any student returning to MSCD after the one calendar year suspension must reapply and will be readmitted on academic probation with the institution. For these students, all probation rules as outlined above will apply.
A STUDENT WHO IS SUSPENDED FOR A SECOND TIME WILL BE READMITTED ONLY IF HE OR SHE HAS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM FROM A COMMUNITY COLLEGE AFTER SUSPENSION FROM MSCD OR CAN DEMONSTRATE TO THE STUDENT ACADEMIC REVIEW COMMITTEE THAT CHANCES FOR SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF AN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM HAVE BEEN GREATLY IMPROVED.
Womens Services
The goal of the services component of the Institute for Womens Studies and Services is to assist women with a successful, positive college experience. A variety of assistance is available in the form of support groups, seminars, workshops, financial assistance information, and employment listings. There is also a small library which houses materials of interest to women and men who wish to learn about womens contributions and about issues that have a special effect on womens lives.
Womens Services works closely with other departments in the college and with the University of Colorado at Denver and Community College of Denver in order to provide immediate and appropriate referrals to on- and off-campus agencies. Women and men who need assistance or are concerned about women's issues should make an appointment with the coordinator of women's services.
Weekend Addition Program
Metropolitan State College of Denver offers a variety of courses on Friday evenings and Saturdays under the auspices of the Weekend Addition Program. The program has its own office which provides general assistance to students on specified weekends in the areas of advising, retrieval of college forms, scheduling, and assistance with student concerns which cannot be addressed during weekdays. The Weekend Office is located in the West Classroom Building, Room 147C.
Extended Education
The changing nature of society has always created new responsibilities and challenges for educators. During the past decade, those changes have come more rapidly and have been more comprehensive. Preparing people for successful and contributing roles in the society requires careful coordination with many areas of the community, as well as a keen awareness of the educational needs of the state and nation.
In order to fulfill its educational responsibility, the Extended Education Division has been designed by Metropolitan State College of Denver to meet the diverse higher education needs of the five-county metropolitan area. The offices of Extended Campus Program, Continuing Professional Development, and Adult Learning Services are the core of Extended Education. Through these offices, educational opportunities for students, faculty and the community have been developed. Partnerships have been established between MSCD and other institutions and businesses which are creating new models and standards for the development and delivery of innovative, high quality education.
Adult Learning Services
Adults entering or returning to college often have questions and problems that are different from those of younger students. Adults who would like assistance in re-entering the formal education system and in planning their educational goals may contact the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342.
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Academic information
Credit for Prior Learning
In many academic departments at MSCD, students may apply for credit for college-level learning gained through experience. Information and assistance are available through the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342.
Contract Major/Minor Degree Program
Students may design an individualized interdisciplinary major or minor program when their educational goals are not met by majors and/or minors listed in the MSCD College Catalog. Each contract major or minor is supervised by a faculty committee chosen by the student. For further information, contact the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342.
Metro-Meritus
People 60 or older, who do not wish to earn credit, are invited to attend tuition-free classes of their choice at either Metropolitan State College of Denver or at an Extended Campus location, on a space available basis. Metro-Meritus is designed to give special encouragement and assistance to retired citizens to continue their personal educational growth in a stimulating and friendly campus setting. For information and to enroll, call the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556- 8342.
Extended Campus Program
The Extended Campus Program provides fully accredited MSCD courses at convenient locations throughout the Denver metropolitan area. Courses are selected and scheduled to accommodate business professionals pursuing career advancement, degree-seeking students, and those interested in personal enrichment. Educational programs are held at two primary locations. Metro South is located near the Denver Tech Center, at 5660 Greenwood Plaza Blvd. Metro North is located at the Metro North Plaza, 120th Avenue and Grant Street, just east of I-25. Other locations are Metro on the Mall, located in downtown Denver, and various schools, churches, and community facilities. Extended Campus classes are open to regular MSCD students and other area residents. Tuition rates vary from the regular tuition schedule. Students may apply at Metro South, Metro North, Metro on the Mall, or with the Office of Admissions and Records. After being accepted, students may register by phone. Other Extended Campus Programs are telecourses and correspondence classes. Additional information concerning the Extended Campus Program is available at (303) 721-1313.
Metro on the Mall
A center designed to give downtowners greater access to MSCD, Metro on the Mall is located at 1554 California, Suite 200. Open 10:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, Metro on the Mall provides information on MSCD services such as academic programs, admissions and registration, adult re-entry assistance, cooperative education, financial aid, and special events. In addition, Metro on the Mall serves as a focus for downtown educational activity, offering classes, lecture series, seminars and workshops, open houses, and MSCD orientations, all at times convenient for downtowners.
World Trade Center
Metropolitan State College of Denver is a member of the World Trade Center, an international organization of business and educational institutions offering services to the international trade community.
All educational services at the World Trade Center are coordinated by Metropolitan State College of Denver. The primary mission of the World Trade Center Educational Services is to help businesseslocally and regionallyto acquire the knowledge,
attitudes, and skills that will prepare them to meet the challenge of operating in a global economy.
Interinstitutional Registration Denver Area Colleges
Students enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver may register for courses at Arapahoe Community College, Community College of Denver, Front Range Community College, and Red Rocks Community College. Courses taken at these institutions in no way alter existing Metropolitan State College of Denver degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requirements at MSCD subject to specific approval by MSCD. Students should be aware that courses taken interinstitutionally will be counted as part of the 64 semester hours from community colleges applicable to an MSCD degree. Interinstitutional credits will also not satisfy academic residence requirements at MSCD. In the event a conflict exists between the policies/procedures of MSCD and one of the colleges listed above, the most restrictive policy prevails. Students are well advised to confer with department chairs and/or coordinators of academic advising before registering interinstitutionally.
Information concerning current procedures for enrolling for courses at these other institutions is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Concurrent Enrollment
Concurrent enrollment differs from interinstitutional enrollment in that the student is simultaneously matriculated and enrolled at two different institutions. Students who find it necessary to be registered at Metropolitan State College of Denver and another college at the same time must obtain a letter of permission from the registering authority of each institution. Failure to receive advance permission may result in denial of transfer credit. Failure to do so will result in MSCD not recognizing credit from other institutions. Students concurrently enrolled are affected by the academic policies of both institutions. MSCD students enrolling concurrently at other institutions also should check with MSCD department chairs concerning the acceptance of credits.
Semester Hours Credit
Course credit is based upon units designed as semester hours. One semester hour or one base contact hour equals a minimum of 750 minutes; this translates to a minimum of 15 50-minute class hours per semester. Time required for class preparation is not a consideration in the calculation of course credit. Omnibus and laboratory courses give one semester hour of credit for each two, three, or four hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week. Internships require a minimum of 2,250 minutes for each hour of credit.
Course Load
The average course load per 16-week semester is 15 or 16 semester hours. Students who are academically strong may take up to 18 semester hours during fall and spring semesters and up to 12 semester hours during the summer semester. During fall and spring semesters, students with cumulative grade point averages of 3.25 or higher may take 19 or 20 semester hours and those students with grade point averages of 3.50 or higher may take 21 semester hours. Authorization for overloads without these grade point average minimums must be obtained from the students major department chair and appropriate dean. Authorization for overloads in excess of 21 semester hours is given by the Board on Academic Standards Exceptions, following a successful formal appeal prior to the beginning of the semester. The student should begin the appeal by obtaining a petition from
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an academic advising coordinator in the Academic Assessment and Support area. Please note: The college is reviewing course load requirements. Students should consult the Class Schedule for any changes pertaining to course loads.
Course Numbers, Titles, Descriptions, and Offerings
Before starting registration, students should study course descriptions for information on the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, content, and prerequisites.
The first digit in a three-digit course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 100 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores, 300 through 399 primarily for juniors, and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors. Although, in general, while students should not take courses above the level of their class (based upon semester hours earned), they may do so at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites. In special cases, students may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for their class if, in addition to meeting the requirements for prerequisites, they obtain the permission of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course.
After each course number is a figure specifying the semester hours of credit. As an example, CHE 120-5 is a freshman five-credit course. After the course number is the course title which may be followed by a second set of numbers in parentheses indicating the division of time between lecture and laboratory. The first number represents the number of lecture hours each week and the second number indicates the number of laboratory, shop, or field hours. For example, CHE 120-5 General Chemistry I (4 + 2) represents the general chemistry course which has four hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory each week. Such a course would earn five hours of credit, four for lecture and one for laboratory work.
Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course. If there is a prerequisite that must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the course, this information is listed above the course description.
A list of all courses, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is published in the Class Schedule, which is printed well in advance of the beginning of each semester, and is available to all students.
Changes in Registration
Enrolled students may adjust schedules by dropping and/or adding classes during the first 15 percent of each semester. See the current semester Class Schedule for complete information concerning the tuition and fee refund schedule.
Students who reduce their course load after 15 percent of the term through the end of the fourth week of classes will receive an NC notation for each course they have dropped and a refund, if applicable. An NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Students reducing their course load after the fourth week of classes through the end of the tenth week of classes during fall and spring semesters may receive an NC notation for each course, provided faculty approval is granted. An NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Office of Admissions and Records. See the sections on grades, notations, course load, and class attendance in this section.
Proportional time frames are applied for modular courses, workshops, and summer terms.
Procedures for adding or dropping a modular course after the course has begun are described in the current Class Schedule.
Class Attendance
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student's absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
If students anticipate a prolonged absence, they should contact their instructors. If they find that they cannot communicate with the instructor, they should contact the chair of that department, who will inform instructors of the reasons for the anticipated absence.
Whenever an instructor determines that a students absences are interfering with academic progress, that instructor may submit a letter to the chair of the department informing that office of the situation.
Adaptive Self-Paced Learning
Adaptive self-paced learning is a phrase used to describe classes in which students are allowed to proceed at a pace that is suited to their personal learning needs and learning style. Students may proceed rapidly, finishing a course well in advance of the end of a semester or module, with the advantage of being able to begin new studies or to concentrate on other courses. Students may proceed slowly without time limitations that might interfere with the mastery of each required skill.
This personalized system of learning relies heavily on learning aids and media so that tutors, student proctors, and faculty are free to devote additional time to individualized instruction and assistance. Self-paced courses are identified in the Class Schedule by SP or self-paced. Information on the method of instruction and the nature of the program is available in each department. Self-paced courses are optional and are open to all students who qualify. Students who do not complete the work of a self-paced course during a semester are given the notation of NC and must re-enroll in and pay for the course in a subsequent semester in order to continue in that course. A letter grade is awarded during the semester in which the work is completed satisfactorily.
Preparatory Course Credit
No preparatory courses will apply toward a MSCD degree after spring 1993. Selected preparatory courses may apply toward a degree up through spring 1993 under certain circumstances. These circumstances include a student being eligible to follow all degree requirements according to an MSCD catalog effective during the period when the preparatory courses were offered at MSCD and having taken preparatory courses during this period. For details, please see your advisor.
Nontraditional Credit Options in Lieu of Course Requirements
Successful completion of special examinations and/or completion of a prior learning portfolio which, assessed for credit, may be substituted for the completion of course requirements, may permit placement in advanced courses, or may be used as the basis for awarding credit. A student may earn up to 60 semester hours of credit toward degree requirements using nontraditional credit options. Approved credit of this sort will be posted to the student's record after the completion of eight semester hours of classroom (resident) credit. Nontraditional credit may not be used toward the last 12 semester hours of a degree program, does not substitute for residency requirements, and may not be used to challenge prerequisite courses for courses already completed. Students are advised that letter grades are not assigned for nontraditional credit, and some institutions may not accept transfer credits which do not include letter grades.
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Departmental Course Examinations
In special cases a department may grant students credit toward graduation for college courses in which they request and pass special college examinations. Under this provision, a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be awarded by the college. A fee of $10 per semester hour credit will be charged.
Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a regular course offered by the college (omnibus-numbered courses are excluded), and the credit granted will be for the corresponding course, provided the student has no previous collegiate enrollment for a similar course and the credit is applicable toward the students graduation requirements. Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department chair no later than the third week of classes in a semester. Permission for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recommendation of the department chair.
No application for credit by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degreeseeking curriculum in the college. Credit by examination will not be approved for a student who is within 12 classroom semester hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for a course in which a student has been officially enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver or at another institution, whether or not the course has been completed and a grade awarded. Credit by examination cannot be obtained for college courses attended as a listener, visitor, or auditor.
When students have completed a course in the same discipline, higher in number than the course for which they are seeking examination credit, permission will be granted provided the two courses are unrelated and approval is granted by the appropriate department chair and dean. In a given discipline, no credit by examination can be obtained for a course lower in number in a sequence than the highest-numbered course already completed by that student. If a student is registered for, but has not completed a higher-numbered course in a sequence, the examination for the lower-numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester. Exceptions must be appealed to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions following endorsement of the department chair or dean. Examinations cannot be taken to raise grades, to remove failures, or to remove NC, SP, or I notations. Credit by examination is not applicable toward academic residence requirements.
Examples of unrelated subject matter:
ART 212, Human Anatomy for Artists ART 103, Basic Photography Methods ITS 241, Introduction to Photography ITS 101, Introduction to Wood
Examination for credit will be taken at a time specified by the department, but after the special examination fee has been paid. No examination for credit in a college course may be repeated. A grade equivalent to A" or B must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credits so earned for the course will be recorded without grade reference on the students permanent record. Credits in courses for which credit is earned by examination are not considered in computing college grade point averages.
Credit by examination will be posted after a student has completed eight semester hours of credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver and after an evaluation of all possible transfer credits has been completed.
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
For the past 20 years, the College Board has offered a program of examinations designed to evaluate nonaccredited college-level
learning to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge. This program, known as the College-Level Examination Program, or CLEP, consists of two series of examinations: the general examinations and the subject examinations.
The general examination series includes five separate examinations covering the areas of English composition, humanities, natural sciences, math and social science-history. Based on the results of these examinations, the college may award up to a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit in the freshman general studies requirement areas. Thus, the successful student may test out of many of the traditional courses required during the freshman year. MSCD does not allow CLEP credit for ENG 102, which is the Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, & Documentation course.
The subject examination series consists of more than 45 examinations which apply to specific college courses. MSCD allows credit for 18 of these examinations. Thirty semester hours of credit also may be awarded under this series, making a total of 60 semester hours of credit obtainable under a combination of the two series of examinations.
Credit obtained under CLEP at another institution will be reevaluated according to MSCD CLEP policies.
The above policy applies to students following the General Studies Program requirements stated in the catalogs prior to and including the 1988-89 edition. Students who must fulfill General Studies Program requirements subsequent to 1989 must contact the MSCD C.A.T./CLEP coordinator for information. Any interested student should contact the coordinator at 556-3677 for complete information about this program before registering to take any of these exams.
Credit for Prior Learning
Students may apply for credit for college-level prior learning gained through experience by submitting a prior learning portfolio to the Office of Adult Learning Services which will forward it to the appropriate academic department for evaluation and assessment. Credits are awarded on the basis of careful evaluation of the prior learning portfolio which documents the applicants prior learning experience. Students should check with departments for specific departmental guidelines in addition to college guidelines. The award of credit will be recommended by the departments and must receive final approval from the Prior Learning Assessment Committee composed of a faculty representative from each school of the college. Applicants for credit for prior learning will generally be required to take the Portfolio Development Workshop. A fee of $30 per credit hour (resident) or $120 (non-resident) will be assessed; $40 (resident) of the total fee per course will be due before the portfolio is assessed for credit and is nonrefundable. The remainder of the fee becomes due when and if the credit requested is granted. Policies governing nontraditional credit options apply for credit to prior learning. Contact the Office of Adult Learning Services for assistance and further information at 556-8342.
Attainment Examinations
Any student may take attainment examinations in certain departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation, entitles students to substitute their own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the course.
Advanced Placement Examinations
Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate advanced placement examinations conducted by the
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College Entrance Examination Board, may submit the results to the Office of Admissions and Records for consideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate department chair, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted.
Credit for Military Training and Other Training Programs
Military training and other training programs which have been assessed for college credit by the American Council on Education will be evaluated by the Office of Admissions and Records for transfer credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver. For formal military training, copies of training certificates and a copy of the DD214 should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records. For other training, official ACE transcripts should be submitted. Credit limit is 30 semester hours.
Pass-Fail Option
The pass-fail option encourages the students to take courses outside of their major and minor fields and thereby broaden their educational experience. The pass notation has no effect on the grade point average; the failure grade is equivalent to the grade
of F.
Students having already completed at least one MSCD course with at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average may choose to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass-fail basis rather than by letter grade. Courses taken on a pass-fail basis will apply to major, minor, or teacher certification requirements only with the approval of the appropriate department chair. Self-paced courses may not be taken under the pass-fail option. Maximum graduation credit for these ungraded courses is 18 semester hours, earned in no more than six courses, limited to one course per semester or module.
A student must declare interest in the pass-fail option no later than the last day to add classes (during the first 15 percent of the term) for a particular semester or module by contacting the Office of Admissions and Records. The instructor will assign and record the pass-fail grade on a final grade list which identifies students electing and eligible for pass-fail grading. Students who request the option and are later declared ineligible, will receive notification fromthe Office of Admissions and Records during the semester and will be assigned a regular letter grade in the course. Once approved, the request for the pass-fail option is irrevocable.
Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a pass notation is given. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work should determine whether the institution of their choice will accept the credit before registering for courses under the pass-fail option.
Final Examinations
It is the general policy of the college to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, with the possible exception of seminar courses or special projects.
Grades
Alphabetical grades and status symbols used at Metropolitan State College of Denver are as follows:
A Superior..................... 4 quality points per
semester hour attempted.
B Above Average................ 3 quality points per
semester hour attempted
C Average...................... 2 quality points per
semester hour attempted.
D Below Average but Passing... 1 quality point per semester
hour attempted.
F Failure...................... 0 quality points per
semester hour attempted.
Notations
NC No Credit I Incomplete
S Satisfactory (Limited to student teaching and HPS/LES 489 internships)
P Pass
X Grade assignment pending. Student must see faculty for an explanation or assignment of grade. Courses taken through interinstitutional registration are normally assigned the X notation until grades are received and posted to the academic record. When posted, a new report is mailed to the student.
The No Credit (NC) notation is not a grade. It may indicate withdrawal from the course or course repetition. The NC notation may also be used in self-paced courses to indicate that the student and/or the faculty have decided to extend the students exposure to the course in order to increase the students proficiency. In order to earn credit, the student must re-register for and pay for the course in a subsequent term.
The Incomplete (I) notation may be assigned when a student was unable to take the final examination and/or did not complete all of the out-of-class assignments due to unusual circumstances such as hospitalization. Incomplete work denoted by the Incomplete (I) notation must be completed within one calendar year or earlier, at the discretion of the faculty member. If the incomplete work is not completed within one calendar year, the Incomplete (I) notation will change to an F." Registering in a subsequent semester for a course in which an Incomplete (I) has been received will not remove the "I." The Incomplete (I) notation may not be awarded in a self-paced course.
The following minimal requirements shall be required throughout the college and shall be a part of all school, departmental, or individual faculty policies:
1. The NC notation shall be available to students in all instances through the fourth week of classes for fall and spring terms.
2. Requests by students for an NC notation in a given course shall not be granted after the tenth week of the fall and spring semesters. The Incomplete (I) notation may be used during this period provided the conditions specified above apply.
3. Proportional time frames are applied for modular courses, weekend courses, workshops, and summer terms.
4. A written policy statement describing the use of the NC notation shall be given to each student for each class in which she or he enrolls.
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a students absences have reached a point that they jeopardize the students success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
Additional requirements for an NC notation may be set by each school, department, and/or faculty member.
Repeated Courses (Last Grade Stands)
A student may repeat any course taken at MSCD regardless of the original grade earned. By so doing, only the credit and the grade for the latest attempt at the course will remain on the students MSCD academic record. The grade for the prior attempt(s) will be changed to the NC notation. The courses must carry the same title, course number, and semester hours. To effect such a change, the student must reregister and pay tuition for the course in question, complete the course with a letter grade, and complete the necessary form in the Office of Admissions and Records indicating that the course has been repeated. Otherwise, the grade change will be made administratively at the time of degree
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evaluation or earlier, as identified. Credit duplication involving transfer, interinstitutional, or state college system courses may be treated differently from the above procedure. This policy cannot be utilized for the purpose of altering grades assigned prior to the receipt of a degree from MSCD.
Quality Points
The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of semester hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received. The cumulative grade point average is calculated by dividing the total by the number of semester hours attempted.
To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must, in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements, have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of semester hours attempted. The notations NC, I, S, and P have no effect on the grade point average.
Transcripts of Records
A transcript is a certified copy of a students permanent record and shows the academic status of the student at time of issuance. Copies are available at $1 each. Transcripts will be released by the Office of Admissions and Records upon formal written request by the student. Transcripts will also be issued to firms and employers if written authorization is received from the student. Requests should include the students full name as recorded while attending MSCD, student identification number, last term of attendance, number of copies desired, and to whom and where transcripts are to be sent. Transcripts may be withheld because of indebtedness to the college or for other appropriate reasons. Transcripts from other institutions which are on file in the Office of Admissions and Records will be issued upon signed request by the student. A charge of $5 per request is assessed for this service. Students from other institutions taking MSCD courses under the state college system or interinstitutional registration programs must request transcripts from their home institution.
Student Grade Appeal Procedure
If students have reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course, they must make their request for a change before the end of the third week of the semester following the completion of the course the following fall semester in the case of the preceding spring semester. The Grade Appeal Guidelines may be obtained from the student's respective dean. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate a grade appeal within the time line, and to follow the procedures specified for grade appeals in the MSCD Students Rights and Responsibilities Handbook. The handbook may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs. All decisions of the Grade Appeal Committee will be reviewed by an Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Academic Honesty
Students have a responsibility to maintain standards of academic ethics and honesty. Cases of cheating or plagiarism are handled within the policies of Academic Affairs in accordance with procedures outlined in the MSCD Student Handbook.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned: Freshmen fewer than 30; sophomores 30 or more, but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more, but fewer than 90; seniors 90 or more.
Honors and Awards
Metropolitan State College of Denver annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadership and service to the college and community, excellence in scholastic achievement,
and outstanding personal character and integrity. Recognition of students includes:
The Presidents Award (one senior); the Provost's Award for Academic Affairs (one senior) and for Student Affairs (one senior); Outstanding Student Awards (seniors from each school); Whos Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges (seniors); American Association of University Women (AAUW) Award (senior woman). Other awards include Special Service Award for Exceptionally Challenged Students, Associated Students of Metropolitan State College of Denver, Charles W. Fisher Award, and the Colorado Engineering Council Award.
Information and applications for these awards are available in CN 313. Awards are presented at the annual banquet the night before graduation.
In addition to annual awards, students with outstanding academic achievements are recognized by being named on Metropolitan State College of Denver Honor Lists. The Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative grade point average of 3.85 or higher. The Vice Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative grade point average of between 3.50 and 3.84, inclusively.
Computation will occur initially when the student has completed between 30 and 60 hours at MSCD, then again between 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours.
Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability in their baccalaureate degree while attending Metropolitan State College of Denver. Honors designations are determined according to the following criteria:
1. Summa Cum Laude Top five percent of graduates within each school with cumulative MSCD GPA of no less than 3.65
Magna Cum Laude Next 10 percent of graduates within each school with cumulative MSCD GPA of no less than 3.65.
2. To determine each honors category, grade point averages for the previous spring semester graduates are arrayed in rank order. This rank ordering is then used to determine the honors recipients among the following summer, fall, and spring graduates.
3. To qualify for graduation honors recognition, a student must have completed a minimum of 50 semester hours of classroom credit at MSCD prior to the term of graduation.
4. Courses completed during the term of graduation and transfer credits are not considered when determining honors.
Additional information regarding graduation honors is available in the Office of Admissions and Records, CN 103-H.
Omnibus Courses
The omnibus courses listed below are designed to provide flexible learning opportunities. Experimental topics courses, seminars, and workshops deal with novel subjects and current problems. Independent study allows students to investigate problems of special interest. Supervised field study and internships, conducted cooperatively with business, industry, government and other agencies, provide practical on-the-job learning opportunities. Content of these courses should not duplicate that of regular courses listed in the catalog. Omnibus courses may be offered by all departments in the college.
A specific course plan for topic and group workshop courses, which covers content and semester hours, must be submitted by an instructor and approved by the chair of the department or discipline, and dean of the school before such a course can be listed in the schedule of classes. These same approvals are
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required for plans of study which individual students submit for registration in a workshop course (when individualized) or an independent study course.
No more than 30 semester hours earned in all of the omnibus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements.
The following course numbers are the same for omnibus courses in all disciplines; and, when listed in class schedules, registration forms and college records, the course number will carry the prefix of the discipline in which the course is offered. In addition to prerequisites listed under a course and the approvals outlined above, other prerequisites appropriate to the study and departmental objectives may be added.
190 (Credit Variable) Topics Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
An introductory level class to study selected topics especially appropriate for lower-division students.
390 (Credit Variable) Advanced Topics
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor An in-depth inquiry into selected problems.
480 (Credit Variable) Workshop
Prerequisite: Approval of department
An advanced program of study, often of concentrated nature, designed primarily for students majoring in a particular department or discipline. Involves independent and/or group appraisal and analysis of major problems within a particular area. 490 (Credit Variable) Seminar
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Presentations, discussions, reports, and critiques of various problems within the discipline in which the seminar is offered.
498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed six semester hours) Independent Study
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department chair
Independent investigation of problems within the students major discipline. The course must be offered in that department/discipline and be supervised by a faculty member of that area.
Field Experience/lnternship Courses
Field experience or experiential education courses are courses whose major instructional activities are conducted outside the regular classroom, but whose syllabi are formally approved by the institution and maintained as an integral part of a departments curriculum. These courses incorporate actual experience with information assimilation and adhere to policies set forth by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education. Certain degree and certification programs, such as teacher education or nursing, require experiential education courses as a part of the required coursework. Other departments offer experiential education courses, generally as a part of the students major or minor, for credit applicable to graduation requirements.
Five terms identify field experience courses offered at Metropolitan State College of Denver: external laboratory, practicum, internship, student teaching, and independent study.
External Laboratory
A controlled environment or organized activity emphasizing experimentation in which guided observations and participation, under the guidance and supervision of the faculty member and the cooperating supervisor, enhance the integration of theory and practice (as in child development). The external laboratory is distinguished from the on-campus laboratory which is devoted to experimental study in any branch of the natural or applied sciences.
Practicum
A unit of work that involves apprenticeship in the practical application of previously studied theory under the observance and supervision of a skilled practitioner and faculty member (as a practicum in reading).
Internship
A work-oriented training period of actual service in an agency, institution, or technical/business establishment that provides an in-depth learning experience for the student under the direct supervision of an on-site supervisor as well as the scrutiny and guidance of a faculty member (as in cooperative education).
Student Teaching
Faculty supervised learning experience in which the student applies knowledge gained in the Teacher Education Certification Program to a classroom setting (as in practice teaching).
Independent Study
A student-initiated creative or research project conducted under the direct guidance and supervision of a faculty member of an academic department or discipline (as a thesis or special upper-division project).
Guidelines for Field Experience/lnternship Courses
1. Credit may vary from one to fifteen hours, depending upon the instructional activity.
2. Students are expected to meet the minimum base clock hours established by CCHE policy which requires two to three times the clock hours established for regular classroom instruction.
3. Approved cooperating agencies provide learning opportunities, prepare written statements of assignments, monitor students performance, confer with the supervising faculty member, and provide a written evaluation.
4. An average of one hour a week, minimally, is spent in seminar and discussion or in conference with the adjunct faculty at the field experience locale and/or in conference with the supervising faculty member.
5. The supervising faculty member evaluates students' performance and, in consultation with the adjunct faculty member, assigns the grade for the course according to grading policies stated in the college catalog.
6. Omnibus courses (299, 397, 498, 499) emphasizing field experiences are subject to guidelines established for regular field-based courses, as well as omnibus course guidelines, and must be approved by the Office of Academic Affairs.
299 (Credit Variable) Field Experience/lnternship
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor
A supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
397 (Credit Variable) Practicum
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor
A class involving a unit of work that involves apprenticeship in the practical application of previously studied theory under the observance and supervision of a skilled practitioner and faculty member (as a practicum in reading).
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498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed six semester hours) Independent Study
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department chair
Independent investigation of problems within the students major discipline. The course must be offered in that department/discipline and be supervised by a faculty member of that area.
499 (Credit Variable) Advanced Field Experience/ Internship
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
An advanced level supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
7. Cooperative Education courses (298, 398 variable credit) are subject to guidelines established for regular field experience courses as well as Cooperative Education guidelines. No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward MSCD degree requirements.
Catalog Requirements for Bachelors Degree
Students must use a single catalog to meet all their degree requirements including those in the general studies, major, and minor. All degree programs must adhere to overriding current policies at MSCD. All students should refer to the General Studies for Bachelor's Degree section in this catalog for important information.
Students are responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to their program contained in this catalog and elsewhere. The final responsibility for completing the requirements for a degree rests with the students, and it is recommended that they seek advice. Students should never assume that they have approval to deviate from a stated requirement without a properly signed statement to that effect.
For degree requirement purposes, students must normally select a Metropolitan State College of Denver Catalog in effect while they are enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver, provided that the catalog contains their complete program of study. A student interrupting enrollment for any three consecutive semesters or more may select only the current catalog in effect after returning to the institution.
A student transferring from a regionally accredited Colorado community college may complete degree requirements using a MSCD catalog in effect while enrolled at the community college, subject to the following conditions.
1. The catalog followed does not predate the current MSCD catalog by more than three years, and the designated catalog does not predate the 1988-1989 catalog year.
2. The catalog selected may have been in use at any time from the time the student was continually enrolled at a regionally accredited Colorado community college to the semester for which the student is enrolling. *
Continuous enrollment is defined as not interrupting enrollment for three or more consecutive semesters (one calendar year). Continuous enrollment must be maintained from the period of the designated catalog to the point of MSCD degree completion.
Requirements for All Bachelors Degrees
To earn a bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree, a student must satisfy the following minimum requirements plus any
others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
1. Complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher for all Metropolitan State College of Denver coursework.
2. Complete at least 40 semester hours in upper-division courses (300- and 400-level courses).
3. Complete all general studies requirements listed for the degree and major.
4. Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 30 semester hours. With certain exceptions (see the Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College of Denver section of this catalog), complete a minor consisting of at least 18 semester hours. If a student completes two majors, the second major satisfies the minor requirement. Completing two areas of emphasis under one major does not constitute the completion of two majors. Coursework used to meet requirements for one major or minor may not be used to meet requirements for another major or minor. Students may not major and minor in the same discipline and are encouraged to obtain verification from an advisor if uncertainty exists.
5. Complete all special requirements of a department and school.
6. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all MSCD courses which satisfy the requirements for the major and for all MSCD courses which satisfy requirements for a minor. Students should check with an advisor for special GPA program requirements.
7. Complete a graduation agreement.
8. Academic Residency (classroom credit) requirements:
a. Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver, including the last 12 semester hours applicable to the degree.
b. Complete at least eight upper-division (300- and 400-level) semester hours of the major and three upper-division hours of the minor at Metropolitan State College of Denver (classroom credit).
c. Students should be aware that UCD pooled courses and courses taken interinstitutionally or at one of the other state colleges will not satisfy academic residence requirements at MSCD.
9. Credit Limitations:
a. Not more than 30 semester hours of omnibus-numbered courses may be applied toward graduation requirements.
b. Not more than 30 semester hours taken by extension and/or correspondence may be applied toward a bachelors degree.
c. Not more than four semester hours in human performance and leisure activity courses will be counted toward a bachelors degree for students who are not majoring in human performance, sport and leisure studies.
d. Not more than seven semester hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a bachelors degree for students who are not majoring
in music.
ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS
Individual programs at MSCD may require students' participation in assessment activities. Students may obtain information on programs assessment requirements from the department office.
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Academic Information
GRADUATION AGREEMENT
Metropolitan State College of Denver students who will complete degree requirements by the end of fall semester, 1992, should file a graduation agreement which must be received by the Office of Admissions and Records by the appropriate deadline stated in the Class Schedule.
Students should complete their graduation agreement in consultation with their advisor. When it is ready for signatures and a formal evaluation, students should submit the completed agreement to the minor department. The minor department will forward the signed agreement to the major department for signature; the major department will forward it to the dean of the school. The school will submit the agreement to the Office of Admissions and Records for final review. After the completion of each subsequent semester of academic work, the student will receive an up-to-date Academic Status Report.
Students may appeal to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions to request a variance from college academic requirements. Their graduation agreement should be completed before the appeal. Valid reasons for variances must accompany all petitions, and the petitions must be signed by the appropriate dean and department chair.
All students planning degree completion after the summer semester, 1992, will be able to declare their degree plans by consulting with their academic advisor(s) and using the new Academic Progress Report segment of the Academic Monitor System.
Degree and Non-Degree Seeking Status Degree Seeking
Students who plan to seek a degree at Metropolitan State College of Denver are categorized as degree seeking students. In order to have degree seeking status, students must submit all credentials; transfer students must have transcripts submitted from all colleges and universities attended. A graduation application and $20 fee must be paid by intending degree candidates by the stipulated deadline of a student's declared semester of graduation.
Students who plan to seek a degree at Metropolitan State College of Denver may list their intended major on the application for admission. The intended major is temporary until students officially declare their major either with the academic department or the Academic Advising and Assessment Center. The official major may be declared when all credentials have been received. Please Note: Until students are officially categorized as degree seeking, financial aid, veterans benefits, and registration priority will be affected.
Non-Degree Seeking
Non-degree seeking students are those who do not intend to seek a degree at MSCD or who are unsure if they wish to pursue a degree at the time of application. Non-degree seeking students may change their status to degree seeking by completing a change of status form with the Office of Admissions and Records, by submitting all credentials, and by receiving a transfer evaluation if they are transfer students.
DECLARING A MAJOR
Intent-to-Major
First-time Metropolitan State College of Denver students may indicate an intent to major on the MSCD application form. Stating an intent to major on the application form is not an official declaration of major. Students with fewer than 60 hours who wish to major in the School of Business may so indicate on a School of Business Intent-to-Major form.
OFFICIAL DECLARATION OF MAJOR
All degree-seeking students who have completed 60 or more semester hours including hours transferred from other institutions must officially declare a major no later than the semester following the one in which they complete 60 or more hours.
To declare a major, students must complete an official Declaration/Change of Major form which is available from the major department or from the Academic Assessment and Support Center and obtain appropriate signature approval. Procedures for declaring a major depend upon the school and the number of semester hours completed as outlined below. Students who transfer to MSCD cannot officially declare a major until all credentials are received and evaluated.
Majors in the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences or the School of Professional Studies
Students, including transfers with MSCD officially evaluated transcripts, may officially declare a major in the Schools of Letters, Arts and Sciences or Professional Studies at any time. Students who have completed 29 or fewer semester hours must declare their major through the Academic Assessment and Support Center in consultation with an academic advisor. Students who have completed 30 or more hours must declare their major through the proposed major department.
Majors in the School of Business
Students having completed fewer than 60 semester hours, including transfers with MSCD officially evaluated transcripts, may declare an intent-to-major in the School of Business through the Academic Assessment and Support Center. Students who have completed 60 or more semester hours must officially declare their major through the academic department of the proposed major during the semester following the one in which they complete 60 or more hours.
Verification of Major: To verify the correctness of the officially declared major, students should refer to the information contained on their class confirmation notice.
DIPLOMAS AND COMMENCEMENT
Students who have met all requirements for graduation are granted diplomas at the end of the semester for which they are degree candidates. A formal commencement ceremony is held at the conclusion of the spring and summer semesters. Students who officially graduated the previous fall semester are invited but are not required to participate in the spring commencement.
General Studies for Bachelors Degrees
Students must use a single catalog to meet all degree requirements including those in the general studies, major, and minor. All degree programs must adhere to overriding current policies at MSCD.
Courses and specific prerequisites/corequisites approved for the current program are described in the Course Description section of this catalog. Students should consult an advisor in the Academic Assessment and Support Center when planning their programs.
Freshman Assessment; Reading, Writing, and Mathematics Placement Exams
First time college students are required to complete the reading, writing, and mathematics placement exams (see Assessment section). Exam results will serve as the basis for academic advising. To increase the students opportunity for success at Metropolitan State College of Denver, students may be required to take courses below the level of first-year courses offered by Metropolitan State College of Denver. Students should be aware, however, that no credit is given for courses that are below the college level.
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Academic Information
Philosophy
Metropolitan State College of Denver seeks to prepare its graduates for a lifetime of learning, which, in our changing and complex society, requires focused expertise (such as that provided by a major area of study) and the abilities to communicate with, as well as to learn from, experts in other fields. At Metropolitan State College of Denver, undergraduate education fosters the critical thinking necessary for the exploration of unfamiliar disciplines and for the synthesis of learning, and exposes students to the richness and variety of the intellectual universe.
Through its General Studies Program, Metropolitan State College of Denver encourages the student to grow from mastery of skills through acquisition of knowledge in the major disciplines to synthesis of knowledge and skills. Therefore, the General Studies Program provides four levels of experience, each with separate goals:
Level I Skills
Level I courses provide students the basic skills of reading and listening critically, recognizing faulty reasoning, drawing conclusions from quantitative data, organizing ideas, and communicating clearly.
Level II Introduction to Content Areas
Level II courses provide the breadth characteristic of the educated person, encourage an open attitude toward different approaches to problems, and cultivate informed awareness of the principal achievements in history, arts and letters, society, and science.
Level III Senior Experience
Level III courses allow students to synthesize learning through critical analysis and logical thinking and affords them the opportunity to work closely with an individual faculty member over a significant period of time. The Senior Experience demands independent and critical thought as well as the synthesis of ideas.
Multicultural Requirement
The intent and purpose of multicultural education at Metropolitan State College of Denver is for students, staff, faculty, and community to increase their appreciation and awareness of the American culture and the diverse cultures to which they contribute. The three credit hour requirement may be applied to any category in Level II or Level III of approved multicultural courses without increasing the 36 credit hour total General Studies requirements. Alternatively, these credits may be applied to the major, minor, or elective requirements of a degree. Please see an advisor for a current list of courses designated as multicultural. The multicultural requirement will be effective fall 1992.
Distribution and Credit Requirements
To complete their General Studies Program, students must take approved courses that fulfill the following distribution and credit requirements:
Semester
Category Hours
Level I
Composition ......................................................6
Mathematics*......................................................3
Communications....................................................3
Level II**
Historical........................................................3
Arts and Letters..................................................6
Social Sciences...................................................6
Natural Sciences..................................................6
Level III
Senior Experience.................................................3
Multicultural***......................................................_3
Total Hours Required..................................................36
Any of several 100 level courses, the content of which is to be determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences and the General Studies Committee through preassessment.
"At least three of the 21 Level II semester hours must be upper division. "'These credits may be applied to any category in Level II or Level III of approved multicultural courses without increasing the 36 credit hour total General Studies requirements. Alternatively, these credits may instead be applied to the major, minor, or elective requirements of the degree.
Basic Rules
1. Only approved courses may be used to satisfy the general studies requirements. A current listing of these courses is published in the Course Description section of this catalog.
2. General studies courses need not be counted toward general studies requirements. They may be taken instead as electives or to satisfy requirements in the major or degree program. No Level II course, however, can be used to satisfy more than one graduation requirement.
3. Departments or programs whose curricula are guided by accrediting agencies may specify, by prefix and number, some general studies courses in addition to courses required for the major or a professional credential.
Level I Requirements: Composition, Mathematics, and Communication:
Semester
Composition: Required Courses Hours
ENG 101 Freshman Composition: The Essay.........................3
ENG 102 Freshman Composition: Research, Analysis and
Documentation......................................3
Rules: Composition Requirement
1. Students must complete the ENG 101 requirement within their first 30 semester hours at Metropolitan State College of Denver and the ENG 102 requirement within their first 60 semester hours. These requirements may be postponed only if the postponement is approved in writing by the Department of English.
2. Students must demonstrate the adequacy of their writing skills in the placement exam before enrolling in ENG 101. Those students whose writing skills are inadequate will be counseled on steps to improve those skills. Students may be required to complete additional coursework.
3. Students shall have satisfied the Level I Composition requirements if they
a. satisfactorily complete ENG 101 and ENG 102, or
b. pass a CLEP or AP examination approved by the Department of English (ENG 101 only), or
c. transfer equivalent courses.
Semester
Mathematics: (Select one course) Hours
MTH 108 Mathematical Modes of Thought.........................3
MTH 111 College Algebra.......................................4
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics............................4
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management and
Social Sciences......................................4
MTH 161 Mathematical Concepts for Teachers in
Presecondary Schools.................................4
'One approved course of at least three semester hours is required. To avoid difficulties, students should consult an advisor in the Academic Assessment and Support Center for guidance in selecting the appropriate mathematics course after taking the mathematics placement exam (see Rules: Mathematics Requirement).

29


Academic Information
Rules: Mathematics Requirement
1. Students will take the mathematics placement exam to determine their abilities to calculate with fractions, decimals, and percents, and to know and use elementary geometrical formulas. Those whose skills are inadequate will be required to complete college arithmetic coursework before enrolling in a Level I mathematics course. Some courses have additional requirements.
2. Students must complete the Level I mathematics requirement within their first 30 semester hours at Metropolitan State College of Denver. This requirement may be postponed on an individual basis if the postponement is approved in writing by the Department of Mathematical Sciences.
3. Students shall have satisfied the Level I mathematics requirement if they
a. pass a mathematics course that has been approved for Level I mathematics credit (see courses listed above), or
b. pass a CLEP or AP exam approved by the Department of Mathematical Sciences, or
c. successfully complete a course for which a Level I mathematics course is a prerequisite, or
d. transfer an equivalent course.
Semester
Communication: (Select one course)* Hours
FRE 102 Elementary French II....................................5
GER 102 Elementary German II.................................5
HON 295 The Art of Critical Thinking........................3
PHI 111 Language, Logic, and Persuasion.....................3
RDG 151 Cognitive Strategies for Analytical Reading.........3
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II................................5
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication.................3
SPE 171 Interpersonal Communications: Individual as a
Communicator.........................................3
"One approved course of at least three semester hours is required. To avoid difficulties, students should consult an advisor in the Academic Assessment and Support Center for guidance in selecting the appropriate communication course.
See the course descriptions in this catalog for prerequisites to these courses.
Rules: Communication Requirement
1. Students must complete the required Level I communication course within their first 30 semester hours at Metropolitan State College of Denver.
2. Students shall have satisfied the Level I communication requirement if they
a. pass an approved Level I communication course (listed above), or
b. pass a CLEP or AP test approved by a department offering a Level I communication course, or
c. transfer an equivalent course.
Level II Requirement
Courses approved to satisfy the Level II requirement are distributed among four categories. The categories, together with the minimum number of semester hours a student must accumulate to satisfy this requirement are
Semester
Level II Categories*: Hours
Historical............................................................3
Arts and Letters......................................................6
Social Science........................................................6
Natural Science.......................................................6
*At least three of the 21 Level II semester hours must be upper-division. The specific courses within each of these categories approved as satisfying general studies requirements are printed in this catalog.
Rules: Level II Requirement
1. Level II general studies courses have at least the following pre- or corequisites, and some courses have additional prerequisites (see course descriptions in this catalog)
a. Historical and Arts and Letters:
(1) Courses numbered 100 to 199:
Minimum performance standard scores on the reading and writing preassessment placement tests;
(2) Courses numbered 200 to 299:
Satisfaction of ENG 101 and the Level I General Studies communication course requirement
(3) Courses numbered 300 and above: students shall have satisfied all Level I General Studies course requirements
b. Natural and Social Science:
(1) Courses numbered 100 to 199:
Minimum performance standard scores on the reading, writing and mathematics preassessment placement tests.
(2) Courses numbered 200 to 299:
Satisfaction of the Level I Mathematics course requirement and either ENG 101 or the Level I communication course requirement
(3) Courses numbered 300 and above: satisfaction of all Level I General Studies course requirements
2. Students may not use courses having the same prefix as their major discipline to satisfy the general studies Level II requirement.
3. Students may apply to the Level II requirement not more than eight semester hours of credit bearing the same course prefix.
4. At least three of the 21 semester hours of Level II courses must be upper division (numbered 300 and above).
Level III Requirement
The Level III Senior Experience courses are numbered 400 and above and are at least three semester hours. Students must complete a Senior Experience at the end of the undergraduate program. Level III General Studies courses must have the following minimal prerequisites: satisfaction of all Level I and Level II General Studies requirements and senior standing.*
'The specific courses within each of these categories approved as satisfying General Studies requirements are printed in this catalog.
Requirements for a Second Degree
For an additional bachelors degree, the student will comply with the following:
1. The first bachelors degree must be recognized by Metropolitan State College of Denver.
2. Student must complete all requirements for a new major with a minimum of eight MSCD classroom upper-division semester hours in the major department.
3. Student must complete a minor, if required by the major department for the contemplated degree.
4. The student must spend at least two additional semesters in residence.
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Academic Information
5. A minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at MSCD is required in addition to the credits completed by the student for the earlier degree.
6. General studies will be considered complete unless deficiencies exist according to the major department.
7. Credit limitations for a bachelors degree will continue to exist for the second degree.
8. A graduation agreement must be completed as outlined in this catalog.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
Metropolitan State College of Denver hereby gives notice that it has designated the following categories of personally identifiable information as directory information under section 438(a)(5)(B) of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). Subject to the Colorado Public Records Act, directory information concerning students at the college may be released without the prior consent of the student as permitted by FERPA unless within ten (10) days after registration a student has notified Metropolitan State College of Denver, Office of Admissions and Records, located in the Central Classroom Building, Room 103, that such information should not be released without his or her consent. Directory information at Metropolitan State College of Denver is as follows:
name
address
dates of attendance
degrees received
Requests for disclosure of directory information must be submitted in writing to the MSCD Office of Admissions and Records, Central Classroom Building, Room 103. In the case of emergencies, directory information may be released, without written requests, at the college's discretion. Prospective employers or their agents may request information concerning verification of student degrees received or dates of attendance directly from the MSCD Office of Admission and Records without submitting a written request to the college.
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Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College of Denver
Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College of Denver
Metropolitan State College of Denver is organized into three schools. These are listed below with the majors and minors offered by each.
The curriculum requirements for each of the programs are described under special sections of this catalog prepared by each school.
Programs marked with an asterisk (*) do not require completion of a minor.
Bachelors Degree Bachelors Degree
Major Minor Major Minor
School of Business
Accounting*.........................................x
Computer Information Systems and
Management Science*............................x
Economics* **................................................x x
Finance*............................................x
Management*.........................................x
Marketing*..........................................x
General Business................................... x
"The Department of Economics offers a bachelor of arts degree, rather than a bachelor of science degree.
School of Professional Studies
Division of Education
Bilingual/Bicultural Education...................................... x
Early Childhood Education........................................... x
Exceptional Child................................................... x
Parent Education.................................................... x
Reading............................................................. x
Teacher Certification:
Early Childhood, Elementary, and Twelve Secondary Fields
Division of Technology
Airframe and Power Plant Mechanics................................ x
Aviation Management.....................................x x
Civil Engineering Technology............................x x
Drafting Engineering Technology................................... x
Electronics Engineering Technology......................x x
Industrial Design*......................................x
Industrial and Technical Studies*.......................x x
Mechanical Engineering Technology.......................x x
Private Pilot..................................................... x
Professional Pilot......................................x x
Surveying and Mapping...................................x x
Technical Communications................................x x
Technical and Industrial Administration*................x
Division of Public Service Professions
Criminal Justice and Criminology........................x x
Fire Services Administration............................x
Health and Safety................................................. x
Health Care Management (upper-division).................x x
Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration*.........x
Hotel Administration.............................................. x
Human Performance and Sport.............................x x
Human Services*.........................................x x
Leisure Studies.........................................x x
Meeting Administration............................................ x
Nursing (upper-division for R.N.'s).....................x
Restaurant Administration......................................... x
Travel Administration............................................. x
Institute for Gerontology
Gerontological Services........................................... x
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Division of Humanities
Art"...................................................x x
English................................................x x
French.......................................................... x
German.......................................................... x
Industrial Design*................................... x
Journalism..........................1.................x x
Language and Linguistics...................................... x
Modern Foreign Languages...............................x
Music........................................................... x
Music Education*.......................................x
Music Performance*.....................................x
Philosophy.............................................x x
Practical Writing............................................... x
Public Relations....................j................. x
Spanish.............................\.................x x
Speech Communications................................ x x
Speech Pathology-Audiology...................................... x
"Art offers a bachelor of the fine arts degree. Division of Science and Mathematics
Biology..................................................x x
Chemistry................................................x x
Computer Science....................................... x x
Criminalistics.......................(.................. x
Geography....................................................... x
Geology........................................................... x
Land Use.................................................x
Mathematics..........................1...................x x
Meteorology..............................................x x
Physics..................................................x x
Theoretical Physics............................................. x
Division of Social Sciences
Anthropology........................................... x x
Behavioral Science...................J...................x
History..................................................x x
Interdisciplinary Legal Studies................................... x
Political Science....................j...................x x
Psychology...............................................x x
Public Administration............................................. x
Social Welfare*..........................................x
Sociology............................1...................x x
Urban Studies* **...................................... x x
"Urban Studies offers a bachelor of arts degree and a bachelor of science degree.
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services
African American Studies..........................x x
Chicano Studies...................................x x
Institute for Womens Studies and Services
Womens Studies..................j................ x
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Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College of Denver
Communications Multi-Major
The communications multi-major offers seven areas of emphasis for students with varying educational and career needs. Each student's program is planned with an advisor in the selected area of emphasis. Students may obtain information concerning the major from the department sponsoring the particular area of emphasis in which they are interested.
Area of Emphasis
Communications:
Communications:
Communications:
Communications:
Communications:
Communications:
Communications:
Visual Sponsored by Art
Technical Writing and Editing Sponsored by
Technical Communications
Organizational Sponsored by Technical
Communications
Technical Media Sponsored by Technical Communications
Broadcasting Sponsored by Speech Theater Administration Sponsored by Speech
Sports Sponsored by Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies
All communications multi-major areas of emphases comprise 42 semester hours of study, including six hours of required core courses as outlined below, courses in the area of emphasis, and a choice of free electives.
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Core Courses for All Areas of Emphases Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communications Concepts
and Systems........................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion...............................3
Option Requirements...........................................36
Total.........................................................42
Communications Multi-Major Summary
Sem. Hrs.
Sem. Hrs. Sem. Hrs. in Total
Areas of In Core In Area of Communic. Sem. Hrs.
Emphasis Communications: Courses Emphasis Electives In Major
Visual Communications: Technical Writing & 6 27 9 42
Editing Communications: 6 24 12 42
Organizational Communications: 6 24 12 42
Technical Media Communications: 6 24 12 42
Broadcasting Communications: Theatre 6 21 15 42
Administration Communications: 6 18 18 42
Sports 6 27 9 42
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The holistic health and wellness education multi-minor offers an area of concentration for students who recognize the increased emphasis on wellness in several professional fields and/or for health conscious individuals who wish to establish a selfenhancement program. The multi-minor is designed to complement a major chosen by a student which is relevant to the students career goals. The student arranges for the minor through one of the following departments: human performance, sport and leisure studies, human services, nursing and health care management, philosophy, psychology, sociology, or teacher education.
The multi-minor comprises 24 hours of study as outlined below:
Communications Free Electives List
Other courses approved by the advisor in the selected communications area of emphasis are acceptable as free electives.
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology..................3
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication...........................3
ART 101 Basic Drawing Methods..................................3
ART 102 Basic Design and Crafts Methods........................3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960-Present Day...........3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I....................................4
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II ..................................4
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition...............................3
ENG 303 Semantics..............................................3
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism and Mass Media..............3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing...................3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading.................3
JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing................3
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers.................3
PHI 144 Logic..................................................3
PSC 322 Public Policy..........................................3
PSC 352 American Political Thought.............................3
PSY 241 Social Psychology......................................3
PSY 342 Issues in Social-Personality Psychology................3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking...............................3
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking.....................3
SPE 322 Movement for the Stage.................................2
SPE 328 Stage Directing........................................3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice and Diction.........3
SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Art.........................3
SPE 412 Freedom of Speech......................................3
SPE 420 Readers Theatre.......................................3
SPE 426 Theatre Practicum I....................................1
SPE 427 Theatre Practicum II...................................2
SPE 448 Seminar: Practicum in Broadcasting.....................3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life.......3
Semester
Required Courses Hours
HES 105 Dynamics of Health........................................3
HES 204 Introduction to Nutrition.................................3
HSW 375 Holistic Health and High Level Wellness...................4
HSL 150 Skills and Methods: Teaching
Physical Fitness.........................................2
PHI 322 Personal Knowledge and Professional Growth................3
PSY 275 Introduction to Holistic Health...........................3
PSY 303 Research in Health and Wellness...........................3
Electives*...............................................3
Total.................................................................24
Practical experience is an integral part of this minor and contract major. Students are urged to enhance their education through field work. This can be achieved through practicums, internships and cooperative education offerings in one of the above listed departments or by using these elective hours.
Contract Major/Minor Program
Even with the wide diversity of the majors and minors presently offered at Metropolitan State College of Denver, the need arises for an academic program which is individual in nature, meets the specific needs of the students and is responsive to emerging educational requirements. The contract major/minor is an organized degree program written by the student in consultation with a contract major/minor faculty advising committee. Working with faculty from selected disciplines enables students to complete a specific, individual, educational objective which cannot be satisfied by any existing catalog major and/or minor programs. The degree sought may be either a bachelor of arts or bachelor of science. For further information, contact the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342.
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School of Business
School of Business
The philosophy of the School of Business is to devote its resources to high quality undergraduate programs. The curriculum of this school is designed to provide the student with a background of general education, familiarity with basic principles of business, and specialized knowledge in a selected field of business. The school offers the bachelor of science degree, while the Department of Economics offers a bachelor of arts degree.
Undergraduate programs within the School of Business are designed:
1. To offer the student the opportunity to receive the baccalaureate degree. This degree program consists of a broad foundation in general education, a thorough grounding in basic business courses, and specific competence in one or more significant functional areas of business.
2. To offer a diverse undergraduate program to meet the interests of those residents of the metropolitan area, and others, who desire to study business-oriented subjects without undertaking a degree program, and to meet the needs of the Denver business and professional community for continuing education programs.
3. To strengthen students powers of imaginative and innovative thinking, self-reliance, creative independent analysis, and sensitivity to social and ethical values.
4. To instill in students a desire for learning that will continue after they have graduated and taken their places in the community.
5. To convey to each student the spirit of pioneering, risk, and progress which is essential to the continued development of the U.S. economic system.
Admissions Requirements
Admission into the School of Business will be granted to those students who have achieved an overall GPA of 2.25; this 2.25 GPA must be maintained while a student is enrolled in a major area of study within the School of Business. If a students overall GPA falls below a 2.25, the student will be placed on academic probation and have one semester to raise their overall GPA to 2.25. Status will be changed to undeclared major if the student's GPA is not raised to 2.25 or better.
Acceptance into the School of Business is contingent upon the completion of all Level I and Level II General Studies courses (except the capstone course designated at Level III) plus all 200 level courses in the School of Business and necessary prerequisites. The student must have 60 credit hours.
Upon completion of the above-mentioned requirements, a student may apply, and be accepted, for admission into the School of Business. Specific required courses are listed below.
General Studies
Level I
Composition
ENG 101 Freshman Composition: The Essay................3
ENG 102 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research,
and Documentation.............................3
Mathematics
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management and
Social Sciences...............................4
MTH 132 Calculus for the Management and
Social Sciences...............................3
Communication
SPE xxx Any Level I General Studies Speech course....... 3
Total...........................................................16
Level II
History (American History Course)................................3
Arts and Letters
PHI 336 Business Ethics................................3
Elective....................................................3
Social Science
ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro..................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics-Micro..................3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology........................3
or
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology......................3
PSC 101 American National Government...................3
or
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas....................3
Natural Science
Electives..................................................^6
Total...........................................................27
Business Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.......................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II......................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems................3
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business....................^3
Total................................................................12
Additional hours of General Studies or Business......................^5
Total Required.......................................................60
Bachelor of Arts Economics
Economics is a scientific study which deals with the allocation of scarce or limited resources. The study of economics offers an opportunity for the student to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions. This training is extremely valuable to the student regardless of her or his specific career objective. The bachelor of arts program has been designed to provide the student with a fundamental knowledge of domestic as well as foreign economies, and the quantitative tools necessary for independent analytical research and thought. Specialized courses are provided to develop the students ability in the use of the tools of economic theory and analysis. Such training is essential for graduates who wish to qualify for positions as professional economists. Employment opportunities in economics are available in national and international business, federal, state, and local government, and in various nonprofit organizations.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics............................4
ECO 301 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory.....................3
ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory.....................3
ECO 315 Econometrics..........................................3
ECO 460 History of Economic Thought...........................3
Total.............................................................16
Approved Electives
15 hours of upper-division economics electives selected in consultation with and
approved by the Department of Economics...........................15
Total.............................................................31
Minor
18 hours must be completed to fulfill the minor requirement
Total.............................................................18
General Studies (minimum).........................................36
Free Electives....................................................35
Program total....................................................120
Business Emphasis in Economics
This emphasis prepares the student for entry into the growing professions of economics and business. It provides training that
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School of Business
will enable the student to enter the profession and provide assistance to government and business in solving problems and
formulating policies.
General Studies (See General Studies Requirements
for Bachelor of Science Degree in School of Business)..(minimum) 46
Business Core (See Business Core for
Bachelor of Science Degree in School of Business)................30
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ECO 301 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory.....................3
ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory.....................3
ECO 315 Econometrics..........................................3
ECO 460 History of Economic Thought...........................3
Total.............................................................12
Approved Electives
12 hours of upper-division economics electives selected in
consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics.....12
Total.............................................................24
Electives within the School of Business (Upper Division)...........9
Electives outside the School of Business..........................11
Program total....................................................120
Bachelor of Science
Accounting
Computer Information Systems and Management Science
Finance
Management
Marketing
The School of Business offers majors in accounting, computer information systems and management science, finance, management, and marketing. The accounting major is designed to prepare students for a career in public, industrial, tax, systems, or governmental accounting. The computer information systems and management science major is designed to prepare students for a career in the rapidly expanding fields of business, data processing, systems design, or management science. The finance major is designed to prepare students for a career in corporate financial analysis, insurance, personal financial management, international financial management, accounting, real estate, investments, or banking. The major in management provides areas of emphasis in insurance, personnel and human resource management, production, real estate, or managerial entrepreneurship. The marketing major prepares students for entry positions in the dynamic areas of distribution/retailing, promotion/advertising, sales, marketing research, marketing for nonprofit organizations, or marketing management.
In order to be awarded a degree, the student must conform to the colleges general specifications for the bachelors degree listed under Requirements for all Degrees. A summary of the course program which she or he must complete within the School of
Business is as follows:
General Studies.........................................(minimum) 46
Business Core.......................................................30
Major in School of Business.........................................24
Electives Within the School of Business (Upper Division).............9
Electives Outside the School of Business...........................11
Total..............................................................120
General Studies
Students seeking a bachelors degree in accounting, computer information systems and management science, economics (business emphasis), finance, management, or marketing must complete the general studies requirements for Metropolitan State College of Denver and the School of Business. The general studies requirements are listed below.
General Studies
Level I
Composition
ENG 101 Freshman Composition: The Essay................3
ENG 102 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research,
and Documentation..............................3
Mathematics
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management and
Social Sciences................................4
MTH 132 Calculus for the Management and
Social Sciences................................3
Communication
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication...........3
Total............................................................16
Level II
History (American History Course).................................3
Arts and Letters
Approved Level II LAS general studies course......................3
Elective 3 Social Science
ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro..................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics-Micro..................3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology........................3
or
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology......................3
PSC 101 American National Government...................3
or
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas....................3
Natural Science
Electives..................................................._6
Total............................................................27
Level III
MGT 495 Strategic Management.........................._3
Total............................................................46
Please Note: The School of Business requires 46 hours in general studies. In addition, we require 11 credit hours outside of the School of Business. Those 11 hours could be from coursework in the Arts and Sciences or Professional Studies.
Business Core
In addition to the general studies requirements, students majoring in any area of business administration must complete the following business courses:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I..............................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II.............................3
MKT 305 Business Research and Report Writing.....................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems........................3
CMS 330 Principles of Quantitative Management Systems...........3
CMS 332 Quantitative Decision Making.............................3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance 1.....................................3
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business 1..........................3
MGT 300 Organizational Management................................3
MGT 495 Business Policies........................................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing................................._3
Total................................................................33
Accounting
Courses in MSCD's Department of Accounting prepare students for a career in public, industrial, tax systems, or governmental accounting. In addition, a wide variety of internships are available through MSCDs Cooperative Education Office.
Accounting students have six hours of accounting electives (to be selected from ACC 310, 320, 341, 409, 410, 430, 445, 451, 452, and 460) and nine hours of upper division business electives available. A careful selection of these electives should be made in accordance with career objectives. Students are encouraged to consult with accounting faculty on the selection of electives.
35


School of Business
Accounting Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 309 Income Tax I...........................................3
ACC 330 Introduction to Accounting Systems.....................3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting........................................3
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I..............................3
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II.............................3
ACC 420 Auditing...............................................3
Plus 6 hours from the following courses:
ACC 310 Income Tax II..........................................3
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting................................3
ACC 341 Advanced Cost Accounting...............................3
ACC 409 Tax Procedure & Research...............................3
ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I..................................3
ACC 452 Advanced Accounting II.................................3
Total.............................................................24
Computer Information Systems and Management Science
This major offers a rich variety of courses in the rapidly expanding, stimulating area of information systems in the business world. Students can look toward to challenging careers in computer information systems or using their computer information systems education within any of the other functional areas of business. Students majoring in CMS are encouraged to select particular courses that best meet their needs in specific areas such as Systems Development, Programmer Analyst, Office Systems, Management Information Systems, or Management Science. Advising for these areas is available from the department and individual faculty members. All CMS majors must adhere to the following:
(1) Completion of CMS 211, CMS 305, CMS 306,
(2) Completion of a 400 level CMS course,
(3) A maximum of 9 hours of language-type courses
(4) Completion of 12 hours of advisor approved courses in addition to (1) and (2) above.
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CMS 211 COBOL..................................................3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design..........3
CMS 306 File Design and Data Base Management..................3
Total..........................................................9
Electives
A 400 level CMS course.........................................3
Approved CMS electives........................................12
Total for CMS major...........................................24
Finance
The finance major is designed to prepare the student for careers which concentrate on the dynamic process of managing the funds of individuals, businesses, and governments. Career opportunities are available in the field of managerial finance and the financial services industry. The field of managerial finance is concerned with activities associated with managing the financial affairs of businesses and governments. These activities include opportunities in budgeting, financial forecasting, cash management, credit administration, investment analysis, and funds management. Career paths in the financial services industry include positions in banks, savings and loans, other financial institutions, opportunities in brokerage firms, insurance companies, and the real estate field. The most dramatic increase in career opportunities is personal financial planning where professionals are needed to provide advice to consumers on the
management of their personal financial affairs. MSCDs Department of Finance is one of the few departments in the country which has been approved to offer the academic courses required of individuals who desire to take the national exams leading to the Certified Financial Planner designation.
All finance majors must take FIN 301, 360, 385, and 495. To complete the major, a minimum of 12 additional semester hours of upper-division finance or closely related courses is required, with at least six hours at the 400 level, selected in consultation with and approved by the student's Finance Department graduation agreement advisor or by the Finance Department's chair.
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
FIN 301 Financial Markets and Institutions........................3
FIN 360 Investments...............................................3
FIN 385 Intermediate Finance......................................3
FIN 495 Financial Strategies and Policies........................J3
Total................................................................12
Approved Electives
12 hours of upper-division finance electives selected in consultation and
approved by the Finance Department.................................12
Total Hours for Major..............................................24
Management
The objective of the Department of Management curriculum is to prepare graduates for challenging careers in business and other types of institutions. The program is designed to develop the students ability to think objectively, to analyze organizational problems, and make sound decisions.
Management Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Management
MGT 322 Legal Environment of Business II................3
MGT 353 Human Resources Management.....................3
MGT 355 Manufacturing and Service Management...........3
MGT 400 Management Decision Analysis...................3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior........................3
MGT 464 Employee Training and Development..............3
Approved management electives................................6
Total.......................................................24
Human Resources Management
MGT 322 Legal Environment of Business II...............3
MGT 353 Human Resources Management.....................3
MGT 400 Management Decision Analysis...................3
MGT 461 Labor/Employee Relations.......................3
MGT 462 Appraisal and Compensation.....................3
MGT 464 Employee Training and Development..............3
Approved management electives................................6
Total.......................................................24
Manufacturing and Service Management
MGT 355 Management and Service Management..............3
MGT 400 Management Decision Analysis...................3
MGT 405 Purchasing and Materials Management............3
MGT 455 Project Management.............................3
MGT 464 Employee Training and Development..............3
MGT 465 Managing Productivity..........................3
Approved management electives................................6
Total.......................................................24
Entrepreneurship
MGT 302 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship...............3
MGT 322 Legal Environment of Business II...............3
36


School of Business
MGT 402 Entrepreneurial Creativity..............................3
MGT 442 Entrepreneurial Business Planning.......................3
MKT 310 Retailing*..............................................3
FIN 385 Managerial Finance II...................................3
Approved management electives.........................................6
Total.................................................................24
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business 1..........................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems........................3
CMS 330 Principles of Quantitative Management Systems............3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing..................................3
MGT 300 Organizational Management................................3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance 1.....................................3
Note: Marketing Research, Industrial Marketing, or International Marketing may be substituted for Retail Marketing with the permission of the chair of the Department of Management.
Marketing
MSCDs Department of Marketing prepares students for entry-level positions in such dynamic areas as sales management, distribution, advertising, marketing research, retailing, and marketing management.
In addition to the department's well-rounded selection of courses, the curriculum also offers students a combination of conceptual and applied learning experiences. Through the development of marketing plans, advertising campaigns, and marketing research studies, students have the opportunity to work with Denver area businesses on current marketing issues and problems. Student are also exposed to a variety of marketing speakers from the business community. Part-time positions are often available for marketing students through the colleges Cooperative Education Office.
Many students in the department are already involved in some aspect of marketing and, to accommodate their busy schedule, the department holds a variety of day and evening classes, as well as classes at neighborhood locations through the Extended Campus Credit Program.
Faculty in the Marketing Department have an excellent combination of academic background and practical experience. All members stay current in their fields with activities both on and off campus.
Marketing Major for Bachelor of Science Required Courses
Semester
Hours
MKT 301 Marketing Research....................................3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior.....................................3
MKT 456 Marketing Management..................................3
Fifteen hours of marketing electives*........................... 15
Total hours for major...........................................24
Prerequisite Credit applied in General Studies.
Economics Minor
The economics minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with an opportunity to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions, as well as the quantitative tools necessary for analytical research and thought.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro........................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics-Micro........................3
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional semester hours of upper-division economics courses, selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics.
African American Leadership Institute
The African American Leadership Institute operates on the belief that all members of our society should have an equal opportunity to pursue their goals and aspirations. The institute provides a unique approach to the particular problems and concerns of African Americans in the Denver metropolitan area with three underlying tenets that form its philosophy.
1. To identify, motivate, and train future community leaders.
2. To acquaint these individuals with problems and needs of the community while investigating alternative approaches and solutions.
3. To create an opportunity for these individuals to join together and exchange ideas with current leaders for the purpose of networking for national, state, and local community improvements. Seminars cover topics which reflect current community issues, including regional business and economics, local and state government, education, health care, human services, the arts, and cultural affairs.
'Business Communications courses can be used as business electives, but not as marketing electives.
Minor in the School of Business
The School of Business offers the general business minor for non-business majors. Students minoring in general business must take ECO 201 and ECO 202 as part of their General Studies requirements. In addition to the required 24 credit hours below, students may select six additional credit hours within a specific business discipline for a total not to exceed 30 credit hours within the School of Business. If a student wishes to enroll in other business courses beyond the above 30 hours, the student must declare a major with the School of Business.
General Business Minor
Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity
The Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity has introduced entrepreneurial education into the regions academic arena through weekend courses for professionals and entrepreneurial seminars and forums. The purpose of the institute is to discover, foster, and mold the visions of today's aspiring entrepreneurs. It provides degree and non-degree students from the community with opportunities to learn about entrepreneurship, to understand the entrepreneurial process, to practice skills that lead to successful entrepreneurship, and to enhance creativity and innovation.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I..........................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II.........................3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro*.......................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics-Micro*.......................3
37


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
The programs in Letters, Arts and Sciences provide high quality liberal arts education designed to meet the educational needs of the urban student. Whether in humanities, social sciences, or mathematics and science, the programs directly address personal and professional goals of students. The faculty exert leadership in their disciplines, helping to shape new directions, as well as responding to new ideas and developments.
The school offers the bulk of the General Studies curriculum required for all degrees. Students wishing to earn certification as teachers choose from Letters, Arts and Sciences majors.
The Colorado Alliance for Science, a statewide effort to encourage science and mathematics teaching and learning, is housed in the school. The member colleges and universities work with public schools throughout the state, offering assistance and support to teachers and students. The Health Careers Science Program encourages women, minorities, and other under-represented groups to follow careers in health and health-related areas.
The school also offers internships and cooperative education opportunities in a number of departments and programs. Depending on their major, students may be assigned to the legislature, state and local agencies, the media, business, or industry.
Division of Humanities
The humanities curricula are offered in the departments of Art, English, Modern Languages, Music, Philosophy, and Speech Communication. In these programs, students develop an understanding and appreciation of the worlds of art, music, and ideas. The programs offered by the institutes for Intercultural and Women's Studies broaden awareness of social issues related to cultural diversity, ethnicity, and gender. Students may complete the bachelors degree and, in conjunction with programs in education, earn teacher certification at the secondary level (except in philosophy). Majors in journalism, preprofessional writing, and music performance are also offered. Art students earn a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree in studio work.
Department of Art
The Department of Art offers a full range of studio art courses in the areas of fine arts (drawing, painting, printmaking, photography and sculpture); design (advertising design, computer graphics, and product and industrial design); crafts (ceramics, metalwork and jewelry making, and design in wood) leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree; art history (studies emphasize contemporary, modern, ancient, and non-western art) leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree; and certification classes in art education.
Art Major for Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree Semester
Core Requirements for All Studio Art Majors Hours
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts 1....................3
ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts II...................3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I ....................3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II....................3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impressionism to 1960.........3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present.....3
Total..........................................................18
Level 3 General Studies Requirements for Studio Art Majors:
ART 401 Modern Art History: Theory and Criticism............3
ART 475 Senior Experience Studio: Portfolio
Development and Thesis Show........................3
Total...........................................................6
Students may choose one of the three areas of emphasis: fine arts, design, or crafts.
Fine Arts Area of Emphasis Semester
Hours
Fine Arts (15 hours in area of concentration)..................21
Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas:
Design..................................................6 or 9
Crafts..................................................6 or 9
ART 200 General History of Art..............................3
Art History (upper division)....................................3
Total..........................................................42
Design Area of Emphasis Semester
Hours
Applied Arts (15 hours in area of concentration)...............21
Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas:
Crafts..................................................6 or 9
Fine Arts...............................................6 or 9
ART 200 General History of Art.............................................3
Art History (upper-division)..............................................J3
Total.....................................................................42
Crafts Area of Emphasis
Semester
Hours
Crafts (15 hours in area of concentration)........................21
Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas:
Applied Arts............................................6 or 9
Fine Arts...............................................6 or 9
ART 200 General History of Art.....................................3
Art History (upper-division)........................................3
Total..............................................................42
Total Hours Required...............................................66
(A minimum of 33 upper-division art hours required.) Minor requirements for art majors are optional.
Art History Major for Bachelor of Fine Arts
Core Requirements for All Art History Majors Semester
Hours
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts 1..................3
ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts II.................3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I...................3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II..................3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impressionism to 1960.....3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present...3
Total........................................................18
Level 3 General Studies Requirement for Art History Majors:
ART 401 Modern Art History: Theory and Criticism.............................3
Total........................................................................3
Art History (required).................................................15
ART 200 ................................................................3
"Fine Arts..........................................................3 or 6
Design.............................................................3 or 6
Crafts.............................................................3 or 6
Art Electives...........................................................6
*15 hours are required between these 3 categories.
Total......................................................................39
Total hours required...........................................60
(A minimum of 27 upper-division art hours required.)
Minor requirements for art majors are optional.
38


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Industrial Design Major for Bachelor of Arts Degree
No minor is required
The industrial design major is a joint program offered through the Art Department and Industrial and Technical Studies leading to a bachelor of arts degree.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
General Studies...........................................36
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts 1..........................3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I ..........................3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II..........................3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art Impressionism to 1960...............3
ART 240 Beginning Advertising Design..............................3
ART 245 Beginning Product and Industrial Design...................3
ART 300 Art Nouveau...............................................3
or
ART 303 History of Art Between World Wars.........................3
ART 340 Intermediate Advertising Design...........................3
ART 345 Intermediate Product and Industrial Design................3
ART 445 Advanced Product and Industrial Design I................3
ART 446 Advanced Product and Industrial Design II................3
ITS 101 Introduction to Woodworking...............................4
ITS 103 Finishing Materials & Processes...........................2
ITS 113 Introduction to Plastics..................................3
ITS 120 Introduction to General Metals: Cold Metals...............2
ITS 122 Introduction to General Metals: Hot Metals................2
ITS 143 Introduction to Industrial Drawing........................2
ITS 255 Introduction to Photography...............................3
ITS 341 Computer Aided Drafting for Industry......................3
ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production..........................4
ITS 403 Advanced Wood Processes...................................4
PSY 441 Human Factors Engineering.................................3
Elective courses........................................................19
(Selected in consultation with advisor, at least 10 of which must be upperdivision).
Total..................................................................120
Art Certification: K-12
Teacher certification for art majors is available through the Art Department. An art major is required.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ART 338 Introduction ot Art Education..........................4
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban
Secondary Schools......................................3
EDU 222 Field Experience in Urban Secondary Schools............2
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner............................3
EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum and
Classroom Management...................................3
EDU 322 Field Experience in Tutoring and
Materials Construction.................................2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom.................3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the
Content Areas..........................................4
ART 438 Art Methods/Materials: K-12............................4
EDU 419* Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary (K-6)........8, 10
EDU 429* Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary (6-12)..................................8, 10
ART 439 Integrating the Arts for Gifted & Talented.............3
Total.......................................................................47-51
In addition to field experiences included in required coursework, students must present evidence of having completed at least 200 hours of work with children. This may be accomplished through work with Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, church groups, tutorial programs, or similar activities. Students should plan their volunteer work in consultation with the Art Education advisor.
Students who seek certification must pass a public speaking course (SPE 101) with a grade of B or better, or obtain a waiver. Students must also achieve satisfactory scores on the basic skills exams in reading, mathematics, and spelling (C.A.T.).
Student teaching is comprised of daily full-time work during 15 weeks, split eight and seven weeks between elementary and secondary levels for K-12.
Minor in Art
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts 1.......................3
ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts II......................3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I........................3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II.......................3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impressionism to 1960............3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to
the Present............................................3
Subtotal...........................................................18
Electives...........................................................9
Minimum of one upper division studio course and one upper division art
history course _
Total..............................................................27
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Communications: Visual Sponsored by the Department of Art
The visual communications area of concentration offers students a sequence of art courses in graphic communications, including drawing and design as well as a broad acquaintance with the visual arts in contemporary and historical perspective.
To become knowledgeable in the arts as related to present day communications media, students have the opportunity to pursue graphic courses in the fine arts of drawing, painting and printmaking, or in the applied art fields of graphic communications and advertising design, photography and video.
Semester
Required Core Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts
and Systems..........................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion...........................J3
Subtotal..........................................................6
Required Lower-Division Courses
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts 1....................3
ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts II...................3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I.....................3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II....................3
ART 201 Survey of Modem Art: Impressionism to 1960.........^3
Subtotal.........................................................15
Required Art History (select 3 hours)
ART 303 History of Art Between World Wars...................3
or
ART 401 Modern Art History: Theory and Criticism...........J3
Subtotal..........................................................3
Required Studio Courses Fine Arts (select 6 hours)
ART 210 Beginning Life Drawing..............................3
ART 215 Beginning Painting..................................3
ART 225 Beginning Printmaking...............................3
ART 220 Beginning Photography.............................,_3
Subtotal..........................................................6
Applied Arts
ART 240 Beginning Advertising Design........................3
ART 340 Intermediate Advertising Design....................J3
Subtotal..........................................................6
Electives
Six hours elected from upper-division art courses................_6
Total............................................................42
39


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
English Department
The Department of English offers instruction in a variety of areas: literature, writing, language and linguistics, and elementary and secondary education. Courses in each area appeal to students in every school of the college who wish to read and understand representative literatures of the world, to examine the principles underlying how language works, and to cultivate their writing skills. The department invites students in other disciplines to elect English courses to enhance their general education. Students may also choose a major or minor from different areas of emphasis.
All students who are considering a major or minor in any of the areas of emphasis in the Department of English are expected to consult with faculty for advising.
The English major may choose an emphasis in
1. literature
2. elementary school teaching, leading to certification
3. secondary education, leading to certification
4. creative writing
5. preprofessional writing
The English minor may choose an emphasis in
1. literature
2. dramatic literature
3. language and linguistics
4. practical writing
5. secondary education
6. creative writing
English Major for Bachelor of Arts Literature Emphasis
The English major or minor, literature emphasis, encompasses a full range of American, British, and world literature. The program provides a strong foundation of courses in literature and language, sequenced to cultivate a sense of literary development, fostering an increasing familiarity with major works and writers, critical theory, literary terminology, and research materials. Because of their command of the written language, their ability to deal with ideas and concepts as well as facts, and their broader understanding of human nature and social realities, literature majors are valued in many fields of endeavor, including academe and the world of business.
Semester
Required Core Hours
Each of the following courses:
ENG 240 Interpreting Literature: Poetry, Fiction, Drama............3
ENG 244 Myth, Symbol, Allusion in Literature.......................3
Subtotal...............................................................6
Each of the following courses:
ENG 211 World Literature: Homer to Cervantes.......................3
ENG 221 American Literature: Bradford to Whitman...................3
ENG 231 British Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare.................3
Subtotal...............................................................9
Two of the following courses:
ENG 212 World Literature: Moliere to Sartre........................3
ENG 222 American Literature: Dickinson to Oates....................3
ENG 232 British Literature: Donne to Johnson.......................3
ENG 233 British Literature: Blake to Beckett.......................3
Subtotal...............................................................6
The following course:
ENG 310 Roots of British Literary Tradition........................3
Required Upper-Level Courses
ENG 302 History of the English Language...........................3
Select three of the following courses:
ENG 321 Development of American Drama.............................3
ENG 323 Development of the American Novel.........................3
ENG 331 Development of British Drama: Mysteries to Melodrama ... 3
ENG 333 Development of the British Novel.......................3
ENG 340 Development of Modern Poetry...........................3
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature................_3
Subtotal............................................................9
Select two of the following courses (at least one from 413):
ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature.........................3
ENG 412 Selected Themes in Literature..........................3
ENG 413 Major Authors..........................................3
ENG 414 Modern Continental, British, and American
Drama...................)..............................3
ENG 431 Shakespeare: Comedies..................................3
or
ENG 432 Shakespeare: Tragedies................................J3
Subtotal............................................................6
The following course:
ENG 461 Theories and Techniques in Literary Criticism.........J3
Total Semester Hours Required......................................45
Elementary School Teaching Area of Emphasis
The elementary school teaching emphasis in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Education certification program, prepares future teachers of elementary education to understand and teach the diverse subject matter required for certification. The program will provide students with a strong foundation in literature and literary genres, a solid perspective on the English lanugage, including its history, structure, and constituents; and both theory and practice in composition, language arts, communication, and teaching methodology. It also addresses the need to prepare teachers to teach multi-cultural literature, accommodate cultural and ethnic diversity in language and writing, and communicate effectively with a diverse population
of students.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
I. Literature Core Courses:
ENG 240 Interpreting Literature: Poetry, Fiction, Drama.....3
ENG 222 American Literature: Dickinson to Oates..................3
ENG 244 Myth, Symbol, and Allusion in Literature............3
ENG 310 Roots of British Literary Tradition................_3
Semester Hours Required.........................................12
II. Language/Linguistics Core Courses:
ENG 201 The Nature of Language..............................3
or
ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar..........................3
ENG 302 History of the English Language.....................^
Semester Hours Required..........................................6
III. Writing/Composition Courses:
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition............................3
or
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing....................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition..............................._3
Semester Hours Required..........................................6
III. Language Arts Core Courses:
ENG 346 Children's Literature...............................3
ENG 465 Teaching Composition in Elementary Schools..........3
ENG 466 Teaching Literature and Language K-6................3
RDG 313 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School K-6......J_
Semester Hours Required..........................................9
V. English Electives
Two upper division English courses selected in consultation with and
approved by designated English advisor...........................6
Recommended Electives:
Communication
ENG 363 Teaching Communications.............................3
Writing
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop...........................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing......................3
40


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Language
ENG 301 Modem English Language Studies
(Prerequisite: ENG 201)..................................3
ENG 303 Semantics (Prerequisite: ENG 201).........................3
Literature
ENG 324 African American Literature...............................3
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature....................3
ENG 342 The English Bible as Literature...........................3
ENG 343 Classical Mythology.......................................3
ENG 347 Literature for Adolescents................................3
ENG 349 Chicano Folklore of the Southwest.........................3
Total Semester Hours Required........................................39
'RDG 313 meets the reading requirements for Colorado State certification but is carried under the student's 42-semester hour professional education requirements.
Secondary School Teaching Emphasis
The education emphasis in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Education certification program, prepares future teachers of English to understand and teach the diverse subject matter required for certification. This program equips students with a wide variety of language principles and skills; practical experience in developing and presenting the process of writing; sound knowledge of approaches to literature and literary genres, periods, and authors (including a special focus on literature for adolescents); and an understanding of communication and media as used in English studies. In addition to meeting specified state and departmental requirements, this program offers students the opportunity to develop further specialization in writing, language, or literature to complement the major.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
I. Literature Core Courses:
ENG 221 American Literature: Bradford to Whitman.................3
or
ENG 222 American Literature: Dickinson to Oates..................3
ENG 240 Interpreting Literature: Poetry, Fiction, Drama..........3
ENG 244 Myth, Symbol, and Allusion in Literature.................3
ENG 310 Roots of British Literary Tradition....................
Subtotal............................................................12
II. Language/Linguistics Core Courses:
Required for Certification
ENG 302 History of the English Language..........................3
Select two of the following:
ENG 201 The Nature of Language...................................3
ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar...............................3
ENG 301 Modern English Language Studies..........................3
ENG 303 Semantics................................................3
Subtotal.............................................................6
Note: Language/linguistics certification requirements are under review. Consult a designated advisor.
III. Writing/Composition Courses:
ENG 351 Advanced Composition.................................3
ENG 463 Composition Teaching Workshop........................6
Subtotal.........................................................9
Note: A combination of ENG 352 and ENG 362 may be substituted for ENG 463.
IV. English Education Core Courses:
ENG 347 Literature for Adolescents.....................3
ENG 361 Teaching English in Secondary Schools..........3
ENG 363 Teaching Communications........................3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading and
Writing in the Content Areas.................
Subtotal..................................................9
V. English Electives:
Two upper-division English courses selected in
consultation with and approved by designated English advisor...........6
Total Semester Hours Required..........................................45
*RDG 328 meets the reading requirements for English certification but is carried under the student's professional education requirements.
NOTE: Students with a bachelor of arts in English from an accredited institution who are seeking English certification will receive credit for Sections I and V, in addition to any other courses in Sections II, III, and IV for which they have existing credits.
Creative Writing Emphasis
The creative writing emphasis is designed to give the creative writer extensive practice in various genres of literature as well as a good foundation in appreciation of the English language literary heritage. Courses are also offered to assist the creative writer in finding markets for literary work and assessing the potential of writing as a career.
Semester
Required Core Hours
I. Each of the following courses:
ENG 240 Interpreting Literature: Poetry, Fiction, Drama.........3
ENG 244 Myth, Symbol, Allusion in Literature....................3
II. Two of the following courses:
ENG 211 World Literature: Homer to Cervantes....................3
ENG 221 American Literature: Bradford to Whitman................3
ENG 231 British Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare..............3
III. Two of the following courses:
ENG 212 World Literature: Moliere to Sartre.....................3
ENG 222 American Literature: Dickinson to Oates.................3
ENG 232 British Literature: Donne to Johnson....................3
ENG 233 British Literature: Blake to Beckett....................3
IV. The following course:
ENG 310 The Roots of British Literary Tradition.................3
Required Courses
I. Entry Course:
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing........................3
II. General Writing Courses (select one):
ENG 107 English Usage and Grammar...............................3
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition....................................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing..........................3
III. Creative Writing Workshops (select any five):
ENG 352 Drama Workshop..........................................3
ENG 352 Fiction Workshop........................................3
ENG 352 Magazine Editing Workshop...............................3
ENG 352 Poetry Workshop.........................................3
ENG 352 Science Fiction Workshop................................3
ENG 352 Scriptwriting Workshop..................................3
ENG 352 Writing as a Profession.................................3
ENG 352 Writing for the Markets.................................3
ENG 352 Writing the Novel Workshop..............................3
ENG 352 Writing Your Autobiography..............................3
IV. Exit Course:
ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing...............................3
Total Semester Hours Required......................................45
Pre-Professional Writing Emphasis
Every profession benefits from having among its members people who write exceptionally well; rewards tend to accrue to such people. This emphasis is designed to enable talented writers majoring in other fields to develop their writing abilities and, thereby, enhance their career opportunities; for this reason it is expected that the pre-professional writing emphasis will be a second major for those who pursue it.
The program provides the student with an intensive, coherent sequence of instruction in writing and linguistics interspersed with appropriate study of fine writing from the English language literary heritage.
41


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition..........................3
ENG 201 The Nature of Language............................3
or
ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar........................3
ENG 303 Semantics.........................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition..............................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing....................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication.......................3
or
ENG 363 Teaching Communications.........................._3
Subtotal.......................................................18
Students will take six literature courses of which at least two must be upper division; these courses must be distributed among at least four of the following five areas:
1. world or continental literature
2. British literature: beginnings to seventeenth century
3. British literature: seventeenth century to nineteenth century
4. American literature
5. Twentieth century literature
Total Semester Hours Required........................................36
English Minor Creative Writing Emphasis
The English minor with emphasis in creative writing serves students who desire instruction and practice in the production of fiction, poetry and/or plays. The minor includes a good foundation in the appreciation of literature and criticism. Courses are also offered to assist the creative writer in finding markets for literary work and assessing the potential of writing as a career.
Required Courses Semester
Hours
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing..........................3
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshops (combination of three distinct
topics)....................................................9
ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing.................................3
Subtotal................................................................15
One of the following:
ENG 107 English Usage and Grammar.................................3
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition..................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition......................................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing..........................,_3
Subtotal.................................................................3
Two of the following:
ENG 211 World Literature: Homer to Cervantes......................3
ENG 212 World Literature: Moliere to Sartre.......................3
ENG 221 American Literature: Bradford to Whitman..................3
ENG 222 American Literature: Dickinson to Oates...................3
ENG 231 British Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare................3
ENG 232 British Literature: Donne to Johnson......................3
ENG 233 British Literature: Blake to Beckett......................3
Subtotal................................................................_6
Total Semester Hours Required...........................................24
Dramatic Literature Emphasis
The English minor with emphasis in dramatic literature serves students who wish to develop skills in reading, writing, and thinking about the texts of drama. The program is designed to meet the needs of anyone involved in the history, teaching,
writing, production, or performance of drama.
I. Introductory Courses:
ENG 112 Introduction to Drama........................................3
A second course, introductory in nature, is to be selected by agreement of the student and the department advisor. The course need not be an English course, but if not, it should be an introductory course related to the students major interest in the use of drama.....................3
II. Writing Course(s) One of the following courses:
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing.......................3
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop: Scriptwriting...............3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing.......................
Subtotal.............................................................3
III. Literature Electives (nine hours to be chosen in consultation with an advisor):
ENG 131 Introduction to Shakespeare............................3
ENG 321 Development of American Drama..........................3
ENG 331 Development of British Drama:
Mysteries to Melodrama.................................3
ENG 431 Shakespeare: Comedies..................................3
ENG 432 Shakespeare: Tragedies.................................3
ENG 413 Major Authors (Playwrights)............................3
ENG 414 Modem Continental, British, and American
Drama..................................................3
ENG 461 Theories and Techniques in Literary Criticism........._3
Subtotal.............................................................9
IV. Final Study One of the following:
ENG 480 Workshop...............................................3
ENG 498 Independent Study......................................3
ENG 499 Internship............................................_3
Subtotal............................................................^3
Total Semester Hours Required.......................................21
NOTE: The final study undertaken in 480, 498, or 499 presents the opportunity for students electing the minor to devote significant attention to one in-depth project for completion of the study. The project should be based on the reading of a dramatic text, but should combine this experience with some other area of design, management, performance, or writing. The project should combine the skills of reading drama with those of the associated area of expertise. The project is to be proposed by the student, approved by an advisor in the Department of English, and directed in collaboration with a second advisor, associated with the other area of expertise fundamental to the study. The study may take the form of a workshop, an independent study, an internship, or a practicum.
Literature Emphasis
I. Three of the following:
ENG 211 World Literature: Homer to Cervantes.......................3
or
ENG 212 World Literature: Moliere to Sartre.......................3
ENG 221 American Literature: Bradford to Whitman..................3
or
ENG 222 American Literature: Dickinson to Oates...................3
ENG 231 British Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare................3
or
ENG 232 British Literature: Donne to Johnson......................3
or
ENG 233 British Literature: Blake to Beckett....................._3
Subtotal................................................................9
II. One of the following courses:
ENG 201 The Nature of Language....................................3
ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar................................3
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition..................................3
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing..........................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition.....................................^3
Subtotal................................................................3
III. Two electives from the following courses:
ENG 321 Development of American Drama.............................3
ENG 323 Development of the American Novel.........................3
ENG 331 Development of British Drama:
Mysteries to Melodrama....................................3
ENG 333 Development of the British Novel..........................3
ENG 340 Development of Modern Poetry..............................3
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature..................._3
Subtotal................................................................6
IV. Two electives from the following courses (one must be 413):
ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature.............................3
ENG 412 Selected Themes in Literature.............................3
42


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
ENG 413 Major Authors...........................................3
ENG 414 Modern Continental, British and American Drama..........3
ENG 431 Shakespeare: Comedies or
ENG 432 Shakespeare: Tragedies.................................^3
Subtotal............................................................J5
Total Semester Hours Required.......................................24
Language and Linguistics Minor
The language and linguistics minor offers concepts about, theories of, and analytical techniques in natural language. It represents an intellectual discipline in itself and simultaneously serves the interests of future teachers, students of literature and writing, and others who have a continuing fascination with language as language. Taken in an appropriate order made evident by careful advising, the courses in the program educate students both to use and to appreciate their language. The minor requires students to engage in vigorous, progressively more explicit and precise analysis and synthesis as they examine facts and fallacies about the miracle of language.
Semester
Required Core Hours
ENG 201 The Nature of Language..............................3
ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar..........................3
ENG 301 Modern English Language Studies.....................3
ENG 302 History of the English Language.....................3
ENG 303 Semantics...........................................3
ENG 401 Studies in Linguistics.............................^3
Subtotal.......................................................18
Any one of the following specific titles:
Applied Linguistics Descriptive Linguistics Psycholinguistics Sociolinguistics Stylistics
Interdisciplinary Elective Courses (chosen in consultation with and approved by departmental advisor). Any one of the following:
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication.............................3
EDU 337 Language and Cognitive Development.......................4
PHI 111 Language, Logic, and Persuasion..........................3
SPE 352 Language Acquisition.................................. 3
Subtotal......................................................... 3-4
Total Semester Hours Required...................................21-22
Practical Writing Minor
The practical writing minor is a humanities-based, career-oriented program enabling students to develop writing skills as an adjunct to any major. Students will be prepared to do the practical writing found in magazines, newspapers, and newsletters. Students completing the program are expected to be versatile writers capable of applying the principles of good writing to different audiences and purposes.
Semester
Required Core Hours
ENG 107 English Usage and Grammar............................3
ENG 201 The Nature of Language...............................3
ENG 303 Semantics............................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition.................................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing.......................^
Subtotal........................................................15
Elective Courses (Choose three from the following):
ENG 352 Writing as a Profession..............................3
ENG 398 Cooperative Education: English Internship............3
ENG 498 Independent Study: Writing Project...................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and Newswriting..................3
JRN 381 Feature Writing for Newspapers.......................3
JRN 481 Feature Writing for Magazines........................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing............................3
MKT 305 Business Research and Report Writing....................3
SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy..............................3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion................................_3
Subtotal............................................................^9
Total Semester Hours Required.......................................24
In addition to pursuing the practical writing minor, some students may wish to seek the recognition of competency award as qualified practical writers. A student seeking this award must apply to the Department Composition Committee before completing nine hours applicable to the minor, and, if approved, must work out with the committee a coordinated sequence of courses, one of which must be English 498, independent study. The recognition procedure will include development of a portfolio which will be prepared under the guidance of the committee. This portfolio, designed to demonstrate student proficiency, will include such items as a letter in which students describe the development of their skills in writing and the extent to which they see these as valuable to their careers, and two different demonstrations of their ability to write and edit under pressure. The portfolio materials will be juried by at least two members of the Composition Committee. Some of the preparation may carry up to three hours credit under English 498.
Semester
Secondary School Teaching Emphasis Hours
i. Each of the following courses:
ENG 347 Literature for Adolescents...........................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition.................................3
ENG 361 Teaching English in Secondary Schools................3
ENG 362 Teaching Composition in Secondary Schools..........._3
Subtotal........................................................12
II. One of the following courses:
ENG 301 Modern English Language Studies......................3
ENG 302 History of the English Language......................3
ENG 303 Semantics...........................................^3
Subtotal.........................................................3
III. Three English electives from 300 level or 400 level courses selected in consultation with and approved by designated
English Department advisors.....................................J)
Total Semester Hours Required..................................24
This minor does not satisfy MSCD requirements for certification in secondary English, but does meet minimum requirements for those seeking eligibility to teach English in secondary schools accredited by the North Central Association. Students working toward this minor are expected to plan and carry out their programs in consultation with designated English Department advisors.
Journalism Department
Journalism Major for Bachelor of Arts
The journalism major prepares students for careers dealing with news and information media, including the press, and public relations. Proficiency in standard written English is a prerequisite for all journalism courses. Students without such proficiency should not register for any journalism course beyond JRN 181. The faculty may recommend that the student take ENG 101 and ENG 102 before taking any journalism course beyond JRN 181.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism and Mass Media.............3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing..................3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading................3
JRN 286* Intermediate Reporting and News Writing..............3
JRN 381 * Feature Article Writing for Newspapers...............3
JRN 383 Contemporary Issues...................................3
JRN 385 Public Affairs Reporting..............................3
JRN 386 College Newspaper Practicum...........................3
JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines.................3
JRN 482 Advanced News Editing, Copyreading and
Principles of Layout................................3
43


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
JRN 486 Advanced Reporting and News Writing......................3
JRN 487 Ethical Issues in Journalism............................._3
Total Semester Hours Required.......................................36
Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282.
JRN 286 is a prerequisite for JRN 381, 383, 385, 386, 481 and 486.
JRN 381 is a prerequisite for JRN 481.
Semester
Journalism Minor Hours
I. Each of the following courses:
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism.............................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing..................3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading................3
JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing...............^
Subtotal..........................................................12
II. Three of the following courses:
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers.................3
JRN 383 Contemporary Issues...................................3
JRN 385 Public Affairs Reporting..............................3
JRN 386 College Newspaper Practicum...........................3
JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines..................3
JRN 482 Advanced News Editing, Copyreading and
Principles of Layout..................................3
JRN 486 Advanced Reporting and News Writing...................3
JRN 487 Ethical Issues in Journalism.........................J3
Subtotal.........................................................
Total Semester Hours Required.....................................21
Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282.
Public Relations Minor
The public relations minor prepares students for careers related to institutional and organizational information distribution. Emphasis in the program is on strong news writing skills, problem solving and planning, and publication production.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism.............................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing ..................3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading.................3
JRN 284 Fundamentals of Public Relations.......................3
JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing................3
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers.................3
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategies................3
JRN 398 Cooperative Education Public Relations...............3
Total Semester Hours Required....................................24
A suitable basic photography course may, upon approval of the advisor, be substituted for one of the above courses.
Other courses may be recommended by the advisor, depending on the students particular needs.
With the approval of the journalism faculty, journalism majors may substitute certain courses for required courses as a part of their major.
Modern Languages
The Department of Modern Languages offers major programs in Spanish and modern foreign languages, minor programs in French, German, and Spanish, and teacher education programs in Spanish and modern foreign languages. Courses in other foreign languages and in occupational or professional fields are offered in order to meet student and community needs. In addition, the department administers several education programs abroad.
Registration for courses is in accordance with previous preparation. Consequently, students will register for foreign language courses as follows: No previous study, or less than one year in high school -101; students with one year in high school who feel their
background is weak -101; one semester in college 102; one year in college 211 and/or 231 for German and Spanish and 201 for French; two years in high school 211 and/or 231 for German and Spanish and 201 for French, or 102, if needed; three years in high school or one and one-half years in college 212 and/or 232 for German and Spanish and 202 for French; or 211 and/or 231 for German and Spanish and 201 for French, if needed; four years in high school or two years in college 300 level courses, or 212 and/or 232 for German and Spanish and 202 for French, if needed.
The above regulations may not be applicable if students have had no professional instruction in their chosen foreign language within the past two years. If students feel that they have insufficient preparation for the required level, they should strengthen their background by taking a course recommended by the Modern Language Department. Elementary courses do not apply toward the major or minor requirements.
Students seeking secondary credentials in French, German, or Spanish must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSCD in addition to all of the major requirements. They must also demonstrate sufficient mastery of the target language or languages through an appropriate proficiency exam.
Spanish
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish.....................................3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation.........................3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I.....................3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II.....................3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation....................................3
SPA 314 Advanced Composition.....................................3
SPA 315* Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice...................3
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain
or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest..........3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish............3
SPA 340 Survey of Spanish Literature I
or
SPA 341 Survey of Spanish Literature II.........................3
SPA 351 Masterpieces of Latin American Literature...............3
SPA 401 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I..................3
SPA 402 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II................3
SPA 411 Contemporary Spanish Literature
or
SPA 412 Contemporary Latin American Literature.................3
MDL 496* Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools ... 3
Spanish electives"................................................... 3
Total..........................................................48"*
Required only when seeking a teacher certificate.
"Must be advanced courses and taken with department approval.
"Only 42 semester credit hours for those not seeking Teacher Certification.
Minor in Spanish
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish....................................3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation........................3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I.......................3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II......................3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation...................................3
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain
or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization
or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest...........3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish............_3
Total..............................................................21
44


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
French
Minor in French
Required Courses
FRE 201 Intermediate French I.......................................3
FRE 202 Intermediate French II......................................3
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation.............................3
FRE 301 Introduction to Advanced French Studies.....................3
FRE 311 Survey of French Literature 1...............................3
or
FRE 312 Survey of French Literature II..............................3
FRE 351 French Culture and Civilization.............................3
French electives'........................................................_3
Total..................................................................21
'Must be course at the 300 or 400 level.
German
Minor in German
Required Courses
GER 211' German Reading and Conversation.........................3
GER 212' German Civilization.....................................3
GER 231' German Vocabulary Building and Grammar..................3
GER 232' German Composition and Free Writing...................._3
Subtotal...........................................................12
Select one of the following literature courses:
GER 321 "Survey of German Literature I...........................3
GER 322"Survey of German Literature II...........................3
GER 323"Contemporary German Writers..............................3
GER 351 "Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller..........................^3
Subtotal............................................................3
Select two of the following skills courses:
GER 301 Third Year German Conversation...........................3
GER 331 Advanced German Composition and Grammar..................3
GER 340 German for Business......................................3
GER 341 Translation Techniques for Scientific Materials........._3
Subtotal...........................................................^6
Total..............................................................21
'Higher level course may be substituted with departmental approval. "Fourth year course may be substituted with departmental approval.
Modern Foreign Languages Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses
The composite modern foreign languages major involves a minimum of 48 hours in any two modern languages, at least 12 hours in each. Students are advised into intermediate and advanced classes in each language on the basis of individual background and need. The minimum 12 hours in each of the two chosen languages must be taken as follows:
Spanish
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish..................................3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation......................3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I...................3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II..................J3
Subtotal..........................................................12
French
FRE 201 Intermediate French I.................................3
FRE 202 Intermediate French II................................3
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation.......................3
FRE 301 Introduction to Advanced French Studies..............^3
Subtotal..........................................................12
German
GER 211 German Reading and Conversation.......................3
GER 212 German Civilization...................................3
GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar................3
GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing.......................^3
Subtotal..........................................................12
The remaining hours to complete the 48 hours required must be taken with department approval.
For those seeking a teacher certificate in modern foreign languages (French, German, Spanish), all of the courses in one of the following areas of emphasis are required.
French Area of Emphasis
FRE 201 Intermediate French I...................................3
FRE 202 Intermediate French II.................................3
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation.........................3
FRE 301 Introduction to Advanced French Studies.................3
FRE 311 Survey of French Literature 1...........................3
FRE 312 Survey of French Literature II.........................3
FRE 315 French Phonetics: Theory and Practice..................3
FRE 331 Advanced French Composition and Grammar.................3
FRE 332 Advanced Conversation .................................3
FRE 351 French Culture and Civilization.........................3
FRE 440 Existentialism.........................................3
FRE 452 Modern French Theater..................................3
FRE 453 The French Novel.......................................3
FRE 475 Senior Seminar in French Studies.......................3
French electives.....................................................3
MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary
Schools...............................................^3
Total...............................................................48
German Area of Emphasis
GER 211 German Reading and Conversation.........................3
GER 212 German Civilization....................................3
GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar..................3
GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing....................3
GER 315 German Phonetics: Theory and Practice..................3
GER 321 Survey of German Literature I...........................3
GER 322 Survey of German Literature II.........................3
GER 323 Contemporary German Writers............................3
GER 331 Advanced German Composition and Grammar.................3
GER 351 Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller...........................3
GER 411 The German Novel of the Nineteenth and Early
Twentieth Centuries....................................3
or
GER 412 German Drama of the Nineteenth and Twentieth
Centuries..............................................3
GER 421 Advanced Conversation: Present-day
Germany................................................3
German electives.....................................................3
MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary
Schools...............................................J3
Total...............................................................42
Spanish Area of Emphasis
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish....................................3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation.......................3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I.......................3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II.....................3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation...................................3
SPA 314 Advanced Composition...................................3
SPA 315 Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice.................3
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain......................3
or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization...............3
or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest..........3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish............3
SPA 340 Survey of Spanish Literature I.........................3
or
SPA 341 Survey of Spanish Literature II.........................3
SPA 401 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I..................3
SPA 402 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II................3
SPA 411 Contemporary Spanish Literature.........................3
or
SPA 412 Contemporary Latin-American Literature.................3
MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary
Schools...............................................^3
Total...............................................................42
45


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Music
Metropolitan State College of Denver is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. The Department of Music offers two NASM-accredited degree programs, music education and music performance, for students wishing to prepare themselves for careers in music. Students pursuing these majors are not required to fulfill a minor for graduation. In addition, the contract major is available for students seeking a more personalized degree program in music.
The music education degree program is designed to prepare students for careers teaching instrumental and/or choral music at the levels K-12. By taking an additional 18 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree (EDU 419 and 429), the student becomes eligible for K-12 certification in the State of Colorado. With these additional 18 hours, this degree program is fully accredited by the Colorado State Department of Education. Students seeking teaching credentials in music must satisfy ail requirements of the Teacher Education Program in the Division of Education in addition to all requirements of the Department of Music.
The music performance degree program is designed to prepare students for careers in music performance, further graduate specialization or private studio teaching. In order to pursue this course of study, the student must demonstrate, through audition, the capability of developing a high level of musicianship in performance.
Students wishing to gain a broad, general coverage of the field of music may pursue the minor in music. The department offers a wide range of courses, including some specifically designed for non-music students wishing to enhance their general appreciation and enjoyment of music. Non-music students may also participate in large and small music ensembles, including band, orchestra, choir, and chamber music.
All students majoring or minoring in music must participate in the departmental advising program scheduled during the first week of each semester. Transfer students should be prepared to take placement examinations in the areas of music theory and music history and to perform an audition in their primary performance area. For advising, placement, and audition appointments, contact the Department of Music.
Music Education Major for Bachelor of Arts Core Requirements for all Music Education Majors
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MUS 111 Music Theory I...........................................3
MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I.......................................1
MUS 113 Music Theory II..........................................3
MUS 114 Music Theory Lab II......................................1
MUS 211 Music Theory III.........................................3
MUS 212 Music Theory Lab III.....................................1
MUS 321 Music History I..........................................3
MUS 322 Music History II.........................................3
MUS 171 Private Instruction I (Primary Performance Area).........2
MUS 172 Private Instruction II (Primary Performance Area)........2
MUS 271 Private Instruction III (Primary Performance Area).......2
MUS 272 Private Instruction IV (Primary Performance Area)........2
MUS 371 Private Instruction V (Primary Performance Area).........2
MUS 372 Private Instruction VI (Primary Performance Area)........2
MUS 161 Class Piano I............................................1
MUS 162 Class Piano II ..........................................1
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging............2
MUS 332 Secondary School Choral Methods and Materials............2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Secondary School Choral
Methods and Materials....................................1
MUS 351 Basic Conducting.........................................2
MUS 365 Basic Techniques of Composition..........................2
MUS 411 Analysis of Music........................................2
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting......................................2
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication....................3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content Areas.....4
EDU 212 Elementary Education in United States.....................3
EDU 264 Urban and Multicultural Education.........................3
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner...............................3
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom..................._3
Total..................................................................64
In addition to the above core requirements, music education majors must select one of the following emphases:
Choral Emphasis
MUS 161 Class Voice I......................................1
MUS 261 Class Piano III....................................1
MUS 262 Class Piano IV.....................................1
Select 14 hours:*
MUS 281 Large Ensemble*....................................2
MUS 282 Small Ensemble*....................................1
MUS 381 Large Ensemble*....................................2
MUS 382 Small Ensemble*....................................1
"Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All 14 hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combination of the above numbers.
MUS 331 Elementary School Music Methods and
Materials..............j.............................2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Elementary School Music
Methods and Materials.................................1
MUS 341 String Techniques and Materials.......................2
MUS 345 Brass Techniques and Materials.......................2
MUS 346 Percussion Techniques and Materials...................2
MUS 421 Choral Literature.....................................2
Total.............................................................28
Instrumental Emphasis
Select 12 hours:*
MUS 281 Large Ensemble*.......................................2
MUS 282 Small Ensemble*.......................................1
MUS 381 Large Ensemble*.......................................2
MUS 382 Small Ensemble*.......................................1
"Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All 12 hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combination of the above numbers.
MUS 333 Elementary School Instrumental Music
Methods and Materials....................................2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Elementary School
Instrumental Music Methods and Materials..............1
MUS 334 Secondary School Instrumental Music Methods
and Materials............................................2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Secondary School
Instrumental Music Methods and Materials...............1
MUS 341 String Techniques and Materials..........................2
MUS 343 Woodwind Techniques and Materials........................2
MUS 345 Brass Techniques and Materials...........................2
MUS 346 Percussion Techniques and Materials......................2
MUS 348 Marching Band Techniques and Materials.................._2
Total.................................................................28
Music Performance Major for Bachelor of Arts Core Requirements for all Music Performance Majors
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MUS 111 Music Theory I.........................................3
MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I.....................................1
MUS 113 Music Theory II........................................3
MUS 114 Music Theory Lab II....................................1
MUS 211 Music Theory III...................................... 3
MUS 212 Music Theory Lab III...................................1
MUS 321 Music History 1........................................3
MUS 322 Music History II.......................................3
MUS 171 Prtvate Instruction I (Primary Performance Area).......2
MUS 172 Private Instruction II (Prtmary Performance Area)......2
MUS 273 Performance III (Primary Performance Area).............4
MUS 274 Performance IV (Primary Performance Area)..............4
46


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
MUS 373 Performance V (Primary Performance Area)..................4
MUS 374 Performance VI (Primary Performance Area).................4
MUS 473 Performance VII (Primary Performance Area)................4
MUS 474 Performance VIII (Primary Performance Area)...............4
Select 2 hours from the following:*
MUS 161 Class Instruction (Secondary Performance Area)............1
MUS 162 Class Instruction (Secondary Performance Area)............1
MUS 171 Private Instruction (Secondary Performance Area)..........2
Note: Must be Class Piano I and II unless student is able to pass the private instruction audition in piano.
Exception: Students electing the organ emphasis must take Class Voice I and II unless student is able to pass the private instruction audition in voice.
MUS 161 Class Instruction (Performance Area).................1
and
MUS 162 Class Instruction (Performance Area).....................1
or
MUS 171 Private Instruction I (Performance Area).............2
MUS 381 Large Ensemble*......................................2
or
MUS 382 Small Ensemble*......................................1
Total............................................................24
'Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit; all four hours may be earned in one course number or in any combination of the above numbers.
Select 12 hours:*
MUS 281 Large Ensemble*....................................2
MUS 282 Small Ensemble*....................................1
MUS 381 Large Ensemble*....................................2
MUS 382 Small Ensemble*....................................1
'Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All 12 hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combination of the above numbers. The ensemble experience throughout the bachelor's degree program should be varied both in size and nature, and should be chosen from those appropriate to the area of specialization.
MUS 351 Basic Conducting..........................................2
MUS 365 Basic Techniques of Composition...........................2
MUS 411 Analysis of Music..........................................2
MUS 479 Senior Recital............................................1
Music History or Literature elective..................................._3
Total.................................................................70
In addition to the above core requirements, all music performance majors must select one of the following emphases:
Voice Emphasis
MUS 141 German Diction and Literature for Singers..............2
MUS 142 French Diction and Literature for Singers..............2
MUS 143 Italian Diction and Literature for Singers.............2
MUS 421 Choral Literature......................................2
MUS 442 Vocal Pedagogy........................................_2
Total..............................................................10
Piano Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint...........................................3
MUS 324 Piano Literature.......................................3
MUS 441 Piano Pedagogy.........................................2
Total...............................................................8
Organ Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint...........................................3
MUS 421 Choral Literature......................................2
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting....................................2
Total...............................................................7
Guitar Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint...........................................3
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging..........2
Total...............................................................5
Woodwind, Brass, String or Percussion Emphasis
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging..........2
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting..................................,_2
Total...............................................................4
Philosophy
Philosophy is the oldest of intellectual disciplines. Its questions are of the most enduring interest because they are the most fundamental to our intellectual and practical concerns. As such, philosophy can be taken to be a critical investigation into the assumptions and implications associated with all ideas across all disciplines, and, in this respect, it is interdisciplinary in character. However, this type of inquiry requires technical concepts and methods, and, hence, it takes on the character of a specialized discipline. Philosophical inquiry is an interaction between speculative and critical thought recognizing no preestablished limits in terms of the scope of either its interests or its critical examinations. Therefore, philosophy as a study program enlarges the students horizons of ideas throughout the various disciplines in the college, while simultaneously providing the critical skills necessary to analyze and synthesize these ideas. It encourages students to explore creatively the full range of philosophical options, to consider alternate points of view, and to penetrate deeply into profound issues. Because of the subject matter, attitudes, and methods employed in philosophy, the student will be much better prepared for leadership in personal life, civic responsibilities, and pursuit of a career.
In addition to offering a variety of courses for students who are planning to take only one or two courses in philosophy, the department offers two programs both of which feature flexibility and individualized training:
1. A major for students seeking a solid, general training/background which can serve either as a basis for graduate studies in such varied areas as philosophy, the humanities, law, medicine, business, urban planning and development, etc., or as a basis for a career in which the specialized training required is provided by the employer, such as careers in corporate management, government, politics, banking, or education.
2. A minor for students who have already chosen a career and seek to complement their specialized training/ background with the opportunities afforded by philosophy to increase their career options and generally to increase the quality of their lives.
MSCD students who either major or minor in philosophy are encouraged to take appropriate UCD courses whenever such courses contribute to the requirements or the balance of their philosophy experience. These students should consult the chair of the Philosophy Department at MSCD when planning to take UCD courses.
Minor in Music Required Courses
Semester
Hours
Philosophy Major for Bachelor of Arts
MUS 111 Music Theory I... MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I MUS 113 Music Theory II ... MUS 211 Music Theory 111... MUS 321 Music History I. .. MUS 322 Music History II .
1 Required Courses
3 PHI 144 Logic........................
3 PHI 300 History of Greek Philosophy .
3 PHI 302 History of Modern Philosophy
3 Total....................................
Semester
Hours
......3
......3
..... 3
......9
47


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Additional Course Subject Areas Required Lower Division
Introductory Courses.................................................6
Upper Division
Metaphysics and/or Epistemology......................................3
Ethics and/or Social Philosophy......................................3
One Philosophical Problem or One Philosopher.........................3
One Course Relating Philosophy to another field,
for example Religion, Art, Science, or History.......................3
Total...............................................................18
Additional electives at any level....................................9
(Selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Philosophy)
Total upper-division semester hours required for major..............18
Total semester hours required for Philosophy Major..................36
Speech Communication Major for Bachelor of Arts
1. 101-3, Fundamentals of Speech Communication, is required of all speech majors and minors.
2. Independent study, topic courses, and experiential education courses such as practicums and internships may be taken in each of the areas.
3. Additional semester hours in speech courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech.
4. Total minimum semester hours for a major in speech communication: 36.
5. All speech majors are required to take a minimum of one class in each of the following six program areas.
6. The six subject areas include:
Minor in Philosophy
Required Courses
PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy...............................3
PHI 103 Ethics..................................................3
PHI 111 Language, Logic, and Persuasion..........................3
Total...............................................................9
Electives
A minimum of 11 additional semester hours of which seven are upper-division courses in philosophy selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Philosophy to make a total of 20 semester hours.
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The multi-minor may be arranged through the Department of Philosophy and includes the required courses listed under the holistic health and education multi-minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSCD section of this catalog.
Speech Communication
Speech communication is one of the most important human qualities. Proficiency in one of the areas of speech opens up many careers to the graduate.
For instance, in mass communication, radio, television, and film, a graduate might aspire to careers in on-air operations, mass media ideas, promotion, public affairs, or radio-television sales. Graduates might become consultants in advertising, specialists in instructional or educational television or in the public broadcasting service. Careers are open as broadcasting specialists in public relations, public information, business, industry, and government.
Speech pathology graduates who meet the standards of the American Speech and Hearing Association may find careers in public and private schools, community clinics, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, private practice, colleges and universities, industry, or state and federal government agencies.
Graduates in rhetoric and public address have achieved success in law, industrial and organizational communication, educational administration, public relations, speech writing for political figures, teaching, public relations, and theology.
Professional and educational theatre occupations are open to theatre graduates with specialties in stagecraft, sound, engineering, script writing, directing, and acting.
Communications Theory and Organizational Communication: Communication consulting/training as well as conference planning both present lucrative and satisfying careers to speech graduates specializing in these areas of communication. Job opportunities are available in education, government, business, and industry as well as private practice as a consultant.
Theatre and Oral Interpretation
SPE 221 Introduction to Theatre.................................3
SPE 222 Techniques in Acting I.................................3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft.............................3
SPE 320 Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry..................3
SPE 322 Movement for Stage.....................................2
SPE 325 Introduction to Scenic Design and Theatre Lighting.....3
SPE 328 Stage Directing........................................3
SPE 420 Readers Theatre.......................................3
SPE 426 Theatre: Practicum I...................................1
SPE 427 Theatre: Practicum: II.................................2
Mass Communication (Radio-Television-Film)
SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and Television Broadcasting......3
TLC 249 Internship in Radio, T.V., Film, and
Mass Communications....................................6
SPE 343 Radio-Television Announcing............................3
SPE 344 Radio-Television Production............................3
SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Art.........................3
SPE 348 Workshop in Radio-Television Production................3
TLC 349 Advanced Internship in Radio, T.V., Film, and
Mass Communications.................................1-15
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life.......3
Communication Disorders and Voice Science
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice and Diction.........3
SPE 350 Speech Pathology I.....................................3
SPE 351 Speech Pathology II.....................................3
SPE 352 Language Acquisition...................................3
SPE 355 Speech Pathology: Observation I........................2
SPE 356 Speech Pathology: Observation II.......................1
SPE 357 Methods of Speech Pathology-Audiology: Diagnostic
Procedures.............................................3
SPE 358 Methods in Speech Pathology: Articulation and Stuttering .. 3
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools..........................3
SPE 360 Audiology 1............................................3
SPE 361 Audiology II............................................3
SPE 450 Clinical Practice in Speech Pathology-Audiology......1-3
SPE 455 Practicum in Speech Pathology..........................1
SPE 457 Medical Aspects of Speech and Hearing Disorders........3
SPE 463 Practicum in Audiology.................................1
Organizational Communication
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking.....................3
SPE 311 Strategies of Organizational Leadership.................3
SPE 313 Conference Leadership and Parliamentary Procedure.....3
Communication Theory
SPE
SPE
SPE
SPE
SPE
SPE
SPE
SPE
SPE
170 Oral Communication Theory....................
171 Interpersonal Communication: The Individual as a
Communicator..................................
271 Interpersonal Communication: The Dynamics of Group
Communication.................................
272 Nonverbal Communication......................
273 Communication and Interpersonal Conflict.....
374 Psychology of Communication....................
376 Cultural Influences on Communication.........
377 Interpersonal Communications and the Family..
476 Communication and the Elderly..................
3
3
48
CO CO CO CO CO CO CO


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Rhetoric and Public Address
SPE 211 Discussion Methods.....................................3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking...............................3
SPE 305 Intercollegiate Forensics..............................1
SPE 308 Great American Speakers................................3
SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy.............................3
SPE 405 Advanced Intercollegiate Forensics.....................2
SPE 408 Theories and Criticism of Public Address...............3
SPE 409 Persuasion in the Greek and Latin Traditions...........3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion...............................3
SPE 412 Freedom of Speech......................................3
Speech Education
Required Courses for the Secondary Teacher Education Program in Speech Communication Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication...................3
SPE 211 Discussion Methods.....................................3
SPE 221 Introduction to Theatre................................3
SPE 222 Techniques of Acting I.................................3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft.............................3
SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and Television Broadcasting......3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking...............................3
SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy.............................3
SPE 320 Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry..................3
SPE 328 Stage Directing........................................3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice and Diction.........3
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools.........................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication............................3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion...............................3
Total..............................................................42
Electives for the Secondary Teacher Education Program
A minimum of six semester hours in speech courses recommended in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech. These six hours are to be selected from the following list:
SPE 305 Intercollegiate Forensics................................1
SPE 308 Great American Speakers..................................3
SPE 320 Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry....................3
SPE 322 Movement for Stage.......................................2
SPE 350 Speech Pathology I.......................................3
SPE 360 Audiology 1..............................................3
SPE 408 Theories and Criticism of Public Address.................3
SPE 420 Reader's Theatre.........................................3
SPE 426 Theatre: Practicum I.....................................1
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life.........3
Total minimum hours required for the Secondary Teacher Education Program in Speech Communication Arts: 48 hours.
Students seeking secondary credentials in speech education must satisfy the teacher education program of MSCD in addition to all of the major requirements. Recent changes in Colorado law affecting teacher certification have necessitated changes in advising procedures. All students in the speech education program who are seeking a certificate must, therefore, contact the Speech Department for modifications, changes, and advising relative to changes in Colorado law affecting teachers.
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts
Communications: Broadcasting Sponsored by the Department of Speech
This area of emphasis is offered through the Cooperative Program for Careers in Communications (interdisciplinary). In addition to the requirements listed below, students must complete a minimum of 18 upper-division hours as well as supporting proficiencies (see an advisor).
Semester
Required Courses Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts and
Systems.........................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication............................3
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion...............................3
Total................................................................6
Required Area and Broadcasting Courses
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft.............................3
SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and Television Broadcasting......3
TLC 249 Internship in Radio-Television-Film-
Mass Communication...................................1-6
SPE 343 Radio-Television Announcing............................3
SPE 344 Radio-Television Production............................3
SPE 348 Workshop in Radio/Television Production................3
TLC 349 Advanced Internship in Radio-Television-
Film-Mass Communication.............................1-15
Total...............................................................21
Recommended Electives
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice and Diction.........3
SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Art.........................3
SPE 448 Seminar Practicum in Broadcasting......................3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life.......3
ART 220 Beginning Photography..................................3
COM 244 Writing for Radio......................................3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television........3
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategies................3
JRN 383 Contemporary Issues....................................3
MGT 300 Organizational Management..............................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing................................3
or other designated electives
Total electives.....................................................15
Total...............................................................42
Communications: Theatre Administration
Sponsored by the Department of Speech
This area of emphasis is offered through the Cooperative Program for Careers in Communications (interdisciplinary). In addition to the requirements listed below, students must complete a minimum of 18 upper-division hours as well as supporting proficiencies (see an advisor).
Semester
Required Courses Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts and
Systems................................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication...........................3
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion............................
Total...............................................................6
Required Area and Theatre Arts Courses
SPE 221 Introduction to Theatre...............................3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft............................3
SPE 299 Internship............................................3
SPE 320 Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry.................3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice and Diction........3
SPE 499 Advanced Internship.................................._3
Total..............................................................18
Recommended Electives
COM 244 Writing for Radio.....................................3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television.......3
ENG 414 Modern Continental, British, and American Drama.......3
MGT 300 Organizational Management.............................3
SPE 322 Movement for Stage....................................2
SPE 420 Reader's Theatre......................................3
SPE 426 Theatre: Practicum I..................................1
SPE 427 Theatre: Practicum II.................................2
SPE 480 Workshop in Theatre Arts............................T-3
and/or other designated electives
Total electives....................................................18
Total..............................................................42
49


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Communications Free Electives List
Other courses approved by the advisor in the selected communications area of emphasis are acceptable as electives.
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology.................3
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication..........................3
ART 101 Basic Drawing Methods.................................3
ART 102 Basic Design and Crafts Methods.......................3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to
the Present............................................3
ART 220 Beginning Photography.................................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I...................................4
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II..................................4
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition..............................3
ENG 303 Semantics.............................................3
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism and Mass Media.............3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing..................3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading................3
JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing...............3
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers................3
PHI 144 Logic.................................................3
PSC 322 Public Policy.........................................3
PSY 241 Social Psychology.....................................3
PSY 342 Issues in Community/Social Psychology.................3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking..............................3
SPE 322 Movement for the Stage................................2
SPE 328 Stage Directing.......................................3
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking....................3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice and Diction........3
SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Art........................3
SPE 412 Freedom of Speech.....................................3
SPE 420 Reader's Theatre......................................3
SPE 426 Theatre Practicum I...................................1
SPE 427 Theatre Practicum II..................................2
SPE 448 Seminar: Practicum in Broadcasting....................3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on
Contemporary Life......................................3
The Speech Communication Minor
1. The speech minor is required to take SPE 101-3.
2. All speech minors are required to take a minimum of one class in at least three of the subject areas adopted for speech majors. This requirement does not apply to students interested in teacher education.
3. Required courses should be decided upon in consultation with an advisor.
4. Additional semester hours in speech courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech.
5. Total minimum semester hours for a minor in speech communication: 18 semester hours.
Speech Pathology-Audiology Minor
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice and Diction.........3
SPE 350 Speech Pathology I.................................3
SPE 351 Speech Pathology II................................3
SPE 360 Audiology 1............................................3
SPE 361 Audiology II...........................................3
SPE 450 Clinical Practice in Speech Pathology-Audiology......1-3
SPE 463 Practicum in Audiology................................... 1
Total..........................................................17-19
Electives
A minimum of two additional courses selected from the following list in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech. Approved psychology courses may be substituted for
electives.
SPE 352 Language Acquisition...................................3
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools.........................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication............................3
SPE 455 Practicum in Speech Pathology..........................1
Total minimum hours required for a minor in speech pathology-audiology:. 21
Telecommunications
Telecommunications is one of the most beneficial internship programs for communication students in broadcasting. Under the auspices of the Department of Speech Communication, the student is afforded the opportunity to gain first-hand experience through 92 current internships in radio, television, and film, provided by industry, government, business, public, and commercial telecommunications centers. The student may begin this program upon the completion of six hours in broadcasting-telecommunications courses at MSCD. Students should contact the advisor in broadcasting for details relative to eligibility and placement in the telecommunications internships. Internship -telecommunications courses are offered every semester during each of the modules as well as on a full semester basis.
50


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Division of Social Sciences
In the social sciences, students may choose bachelors degree programs in anthropology, history, political science, psychology, sociology, social welfare, urban studies, multidisciplinary programs in behavioral science and gerontology, and an array of emphasis areas and minors. These curricula develop students understanding of the subject area and their skills in working with individuals, groups, and large organizations. Courses range from the traditional liberal arts based curriculum to professional internships in social welfare and legislative government, to studies in popular culture and research practicums. Programs prepare students for beginning level practice in helping services and social work agencies, and graduate education in law. Graduates focus on the social and behavioral science disciplines, research in the social and behavioral sciences, work with the elderly, public administration, or secondary school teaching.
History
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1715..............................3
HIS 102 Western Civilization since 1715..........................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ...............................3
HIS 122 American History since 1865..............................3
HIS 482 Senior Seminar...........................................3
Total................................................................15
Electives
A minimum of 23 additional semester hours in history is required, 18 hours of which must be upper division. No more than four hours in HIS 389 readings courses may be counted toward the major without prior written approval from the department.
Course Distribution
A minimum of 23 additional semester hours in history is required, 18 hours of which must be upper division. In the minimum of 23 additional semester hours required, students must include at least three hours in each of the broad areas of history: United States, European, Developing World.
Grade Average
Students majoring in history must maintain at least a 2.0 average in their history courses.
Advising
History majors should consult with a departmental advisor to select the courses in other disciplines which complement their area of concentration in the major.
Minor in History
There are four different areas of emphasis available to students seeking a history minor: (I) regular history area of emphasis, (II) American popular culture area of emphasis, (III) American West history area of emphasis, (IV) twentieth century studies history area of emphasis.
I. Regular History Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1715..............................3
HIS 102 Western Civilization since 1715...........................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ................................3
HIS 122 American History since 1865...............................3
Total.................................................................12
Electives
A minimum of nine additional semester hours in history is required. The hours must be upper division and should be selected in consultation with a departmental advisor. No more than two hours in HIS 389 readings courses may be counted toward the minor without prior written approval from the department.
II. American Popular Culture Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 122 American History since 1865..........................3
HIS 151 Movies and History...................................3
or
HIS 152 Rock Music and Social History
or
HIS 153 Sports in America........................................3
Total............................................................9
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional history hours is required, of which nine must be upper division. Courses must be related to American popular culture.
III. American West History Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 110 American West......................................3
HIS 111 Colorado History I.................................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ..........................3
HIS 122 American History since 1865 .......................3
Total.........................................................12
Electives
A minimum of 9 additional history hours treating the American West is required, all of which must be upper division.
IV. Twentieth-Century Studies History Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 122 American History since 1865 ......................3
HIS 201 Contemporary World History.........................3
Total.........................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional hours treating twentieth-century history is required, of which nine must be upper-division.
Grade Average
Students minoring in history must maintain a 2.0 average in their history courses.
Secondary School Education Certification in Social Sciences
Students majoring in history may combine their major with other courses in the social sciences and in education to earn secondary education certification. The requirements of this program are included under the Education Department section of this catalog.
Prelaw Courses
Several history courses are of particular importance to legal studies. These include HIS 121, HIS 122, HIS 346, and HIS 368. Students interested in prelaw courses are urged to contact the departmental advisor.
Minor in Interdisciplinary Legal Studies
The interdisciplinary legal studies minor is designed to show students how the various disciplines in the humanities and social sciences treat questions of law and justice. The interdisciplinary legal studies minor is not a pre-law preparatory program or paralegal training. Its goal is to cross disciplines so that students can understand how the humanities and social sciences illuminate the principles, practices, and policies of the law.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CJC 110 Evolutionary Legal Concepts in Criminal Justice.........3
HIS 368 The Court in Crisis.....................................3
PHI 343 Philosophy of Law.......................................3
51


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
SOC 355 Sociology of Law.............................................3
ENG 370 Literature and the Law.......................................3
PSC 312 American Constitutional Law..................................3
xxx xxx Seminar in Legal Topics
(Interdisciplinary team taught course)...................3
Total.....................................................................2\
Students will select one law-related course from the courses listed below or approved by the interdisciplinary legal studies minor advisor:
Minor in Public Administration
Public administration is the study of governmental organizations, their management, and how government policies are formulated and carried out. The Political Science Department offers a minor in public administration available to students interested in a career in government service, to students presently employed in government who wish to increase their skills and job status, and to students planning to take postgraduate work in public administration.
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business 1.......................3
MGT 322 Legal Environment of Business II......................3
CJC 210 Substantive Criminal Law..............................3
HIS 346 The Constitution and the New Nation. 1787-1848........3
SOC 350 Criminology...........................................3
WMS 331 Women and the Law.....................................3
Total Hours Required for Minor...................................24
Political Science
The study of political science is mainly a study of governments: their social and economic environments, how they are organized, how and why they decide upon and carry out policies, and how nation-states interact on the world scene. It also includes the study of political ideas and values, past and present, citizen behavior, and recent trends in methods of research and analysis aimed at enlarging our knowledge of political processes.
The Department of Political Science offers prelaw advising to all students at the college, regardless of students major fields of study. If you are thinking of applying to law school or would like more information on the LSAT or law schools, please contact the departments prelaw advisor.
The Department of Political Science provides students with the perspective and background necessary to understand the complex and often confusing reality of politics.
Students interested in majoring or minoring in political science should see a department advisor about pending changes in major and minor requirements.
Political Science Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses
PSC 101 American National Government...........
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas............
PSC 305 Political Theory.......................
PSC 402 Special Studies........................
Total..........................................
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours of political science must be completed. At least 12 of these 21 hours must be upper-division courses (300- and 400-level). Total semester hours required for a PSC major: 33.
Minor in Political Science
Required Courses
PSC 101 American National Government PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas...
Total.................................
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional semester hours are required in political science courses. Total semester hours required for a PSC minor: 18.
In addition to the scheduled classes, political science students are encouraged to enroll for at least one off-campus internship. Students may receive credit for practical work experience in various areas of government service. Placement in a governmental position may be initiated by the student or by the Political Science Department. Interested students should contact the Political Science Department for details.
Semester
Hours
.........3
......._3
.......fi
Semester
Hours
........3
........3
........3
...... 3
......12
Semester
Required Courses Hours
I. Basic courses required for all public administration minors:
PSC 101 American National Government.............................3
PSC 302 Introduction to Public Administration...................3
II. Two of the following courses:
PSC 322 Public Policy...........................................3
PSC 324 Intergovernmental Relations.............................3
PSC 326 Politics of Budgeting...................................3
PSC 328 Public Personnel Administration.........................3
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting.................................3
III One of the following courses:
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems........................3
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics...............................4
IV. Internship PSC 412 or substitute course (minimum) 3
Total............................................................19-20
A governmental internship will be required of all students for a minimum of one semester and a minimum of three semester hours. This requirement may be waived for students with at least one calendar year of administrative work experience in a government agency.
It is recommended that public administration minors also take a course in both public speaking and in technical writing.
Also available to students is a program of courses leading to a recognition of completion award in public administration presented by the Political Science Department. Students may earn the award by successfully completing a selection of courses amounting to 26 semester hours. Contact the Political Science Department for details.
Not listed among the regular courses are a variety of topics courses and self-paced courses which are offered each semester and give the student a greater variety of choice. Please be sure to check the semester class schedule for these.
During the summer session, the department offers a special program in Washington, D.C. aimed at providing students with a unique perspective on the nation's political system. The program combines a four-week moduleduring late May and early Juneactually held in Washington with on-campus meetings and discussions exploring the Washington experience and relevant readings. Please contact the department about this special program.
Urban Studies Program
A bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree with a major in urban studies is offered. The bachelor of science degree is recommended for those students desiring a stronger background in quantitative aspects of urban studies. Coursework is jointly offered by MSCD and the University of Colorado at Denver; the major is offered at MSCD. The emphasis of this program is an interdisciplinary approach to learning. To support this approach six areas of emphasis are offered within the major.
1. local government/urban planning
2. housing patterns and alternatives
3. cultural lifestyles
4. transportation and communication
5. community service development
6. business, management, and urbanization
52


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Urban Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts
The requirements total 46 semester hours and include:
1. 5-27 hours of core courses
2. Nine hours selected from each of four areas of process
3. Two hours in an area of emphasis to be selected by the student.
4. Six additional hours for a bachelor of science degree
5. Urban studies majors who do not wish to pursue a minor in some other discipline will be required to take at least 14 semester hours for a total of 60 semester hours. The 14 semester hours must be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.
6. There are different requirements for the community service development, business, management, and urbanization emphases.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
URS 100 Introduction to Urban Studies...............................3
URS 200 An Inside Look at Urban Institutions........................3
URS 300 World Patterns of Urbanization..............................3
URS 380 Applied Urban Research Methods..............................3
URS 489 Interdisciplinary Seminar.....................................4
URS 499* Internship in Urban Studies..................................3
Advanced writing course which may be taken from community service development, English
or communications.............................................*3-4
Statistics, which may be taken from economics,
geography, mathematics, psychology, or sociology..............*3-4
Total...............................................................25-27
'Community service development students may elect to fulfill these requirements within the community service development area of emphasis.
A total of 9 hours should be selected from the following areas of process. Community service development students will take one course from two areas for a total of at least six hours. Substitutions for these courses should be arranged through an Urban Studies advisor.
Urban Spatial Structuring Processes
URS 310 Internal Structure of the City........................3
URS 351 Community Development and Planning.....................3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game.................................4
GEG 204 Geography of Denver...................................3
GEG 360 Urban Geography.......................................3
GEG 461 Urban and Regional Planning...........................3
Urban Political Processes
URS 210 An Analysis of Urban Boundaries.......................3
URS 350 Emerging Urban Political Systems......................3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game.................................4
PSC 300 American State and Local Government...................3
PSC 302 Introduction to Public Administration.................3
SOC 371 Politics and Power.....................................3
Urban Economic Processes
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro........................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro.......................3
ECO 330 State and Local Finance...............................3
ECO 335 Urban Economic Analysis...............................3
ECO 340 Transportation Economics..............................3
ECO 345 Environmental Economics...............................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America....................................3
Urban Social Processes
GEG 132 Geographic Analysis of Current Social Issues..........3
GEG 362 Land Use and Population...............................3
GEG 462 Land Use: Residential.................................3
SOC 309 Urban Sociology.......................................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America....................................3
Total.............................................................9
Areas of Emphasis
In each of the first four following areas of emphasis, the student will select a minimum of 12 hours with a minimum of six in urban studies. The student may take any combination of interdisciplinary courses related to the area of emphasis to be selected in consultation with an advisor. One of the courses should be a skills course related to the area of emphasis.
Local Government Urban Planning
This area of emphasis concentrates on the basic conceptual and theoretical planning processes as they relate to and actually appear in urban government occupations and professions. The area of emphasis is designed for students seeking entry into government occupations or seeking advanced study in public administration or urban planning beyond the bachelors degree.
URS 250 New Front Range Communities...........................3
URS 289 Urban Problems: Topics..............................1-3
URS 351 Community Development and Planning....................3
URS 389 Readings in Urban Studies...........................1-3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game...............................1-4
URS 410 Urban Environmental Perception........................3
URS 450 Cities of the Future..................................3
URS 451 Community Involvement Methods.........................3
URS 471 The Urban Elderly: Prisoners of Space.................3
Housing Patterns and Alternatives
This area of emphasis will concentrate on the assembly and development of residential land, the nature of public and private programs to provide housing and the maintenance and rebuilding of neighborhoods. A broad range of topics will include the evolution of public intervention in housing and residential renewal, the conflict between physical and human criteria in housing decisions, and constraints on the publics ability to deal with housing issues. Completion of this area of emphasis provides a foundation for graduate work and/or employment with a wide range of public and private housing agencies.
URS 171 Introduction to Denver Neighborhoods....................3
URS 230 Introduction to Urban Housing Problems..................3
URS 250 New Front Range Communities.............................3
URS 289 Urban Problems: Topics................................1-3
URS 330 Housing: Issues and Policies............................3
URS 389 Readings in Urban Studies.............................1-3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game.................................1-4
URS 450 Cities of the Future....................................3
MGT 300 Organizational Management...............................3
FIN 380 Real Estate Practice and Law............................3
Cultural Lifestyles
This area of emphasis concentrates on the impacts on the urban landscape of the lifestyles of various cultures be they ethnic, racial, chronological, religious, economic, or gender. The consequences of these impacts are viewed as among the most significant determinants of urban structure, form, function, and social interaction. The student is provided with specialized training and experience for entry into professions with public or private agencies which deal directly with these groups within a pluralistic urban environment.
URS 250 New Front Range Communities..........................3
URS 371 Ethnic Groups in U.S. Cities.........................3
URS 389 Readings in Urban Studies..........................1-3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game..............................1-4
URS 410 Urban Environmental Perception.......................3
URS 471 The Urban Elderly: Prisoners of Space................3
Transportation and Communication
The transportation-communication area of emphasis has three basic academic foci: (1) to aid students in refining their perceptions of the various networks that exist in the urban setting; (2) to provide tools and techniques to analyze these networks; and (3) to increase the students understanding that transportation and communication are interdependent with such factors as land
53


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
factors as land use, politics, and demography. Completion of this area of emphasis provides a foundation for a professional career or further graduate training.
URS 228 Introduction to Transportation Systems...................3
URS 289 Urban Problems: Topics.................................1-3
URS 328 Transportation: Issues and Policies......................3
URS 389 Readings in Urban Studies..............................1-3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game..................................1-4
URS 450 Cities of the Future.....................................3
Community Service Development
This area of emphasis combines classroom theory and practical experience in a comprehensive format. Students formal classroom experiences are supplemented by at least 20 hours per week during two semesters in placement experiences. All field work will be carefully supervised and student progress will be measured against learning objectives cooperatively developed for each course by the student, agency supervisor, and the college coordinator or faculty member.
This area of emphasis is designed to provide an educational program for a very specific administrative level in nonprofit agencies and organizations. The directive skills include development and management of volunteer programs, fund-raising, proposal writing, program and human resource development.
Course Requirements Include:
1. URS Required Core Courses...................................16
2. Selected Electives...........................................7
3. CSD Area of Emphasis........................................28
CSD 200 Introduction to Community Service
Development............................................1
CSD 201 Principles of Community Service
Development............................................4
CSD 300 Applied Development and Seminar I........................2
CSD 321 Conflict Resolution and Decision-Making..................2
CSD 341 Development and Use of Inexpensive Media................3
CSD 361 Financial Accountability of Non-Profit Programs..........3
CSD 401 Assessment and Evaluation of Non-Profit
Programs and Projects..................................3
CSD 402 Fundraising and Proposal Writing for
Community Services.....................................4
CSD 431 Development and Administration of
Volunteer Programs.....................................3
CSD 451 Politics of Agency Survival..............................3
Total.............................................................51
Business, Management, and Urbanization
This area of emphasis will stress the interrelationships between the private business sector and the public policy and urban life designers and decision-makers. Public sector/private sector/policy makers cooperation, or the lack thereof, in the future, will have a direct effect on urban lifestyle. Issues to be addressed or focused upon in this emphasis are: the roles of business and urban government in the overall process of urbanization; the functions of managing business and managing government; the importance of sales tax revenues to both business and government and, with less governmental employment in the future, the changes that are in store for small and medium sized businesses. This area of emphasis is expressly directed toward the student seeking an undergraduate major in management or administration of government organizations at the local, state or federal level, or in management positions in private industry.
Course Requirements Include:
1. URS Required Core Courses...................................25-27
2. Business, Management, Urbanization Emphasis....................21
MGT xxx (Any MSCD introduction to business course).................3
MGT 250 Small Business Management..................................3
MGT 300 Organizational Management..................................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing....................................3
FIN 300 Financial Markets and Institutions.........................3
Six Hours to be Selected From:
ECO 350 Managerial Economics...................................3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior................................3
MKT 301 Marketing Research.....................................3
MKT 311 Advertising............................................3
MKT 330 Marketing of Services..................................3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior......................................3
ACC 308 Small Business Taxation................................3
Major for Bachelor of Science Urban Studies
The requirements for the major in urban studies leading to the bachelor of science degree includes six semester hours in addition to the bachelor of arts degree. The six hours must be
taken from the following list of courses.
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems......................3
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Programming Assembler................3
CMS 223 Word Processing........................................3
CMS 312 BASIC Programming and Graphics for Computers...........3
PSY 311 Introduction to Statistics for Social and Behavioral
Sciences..............................................3
PSY 312 Inferential Statistics..................................3
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management and
Social Sciences........................................4
Urban Studies Minor
Minors for both the bachelor of science degree and the bachelor of arts degree are available. The minor can be designed to provide the student with course experiences which are most relevant to her or his occupational and educational goals. Students, in consultation with the department offering related courses and the students urban studies faculty advisor, will develop individual minors which will reflect the best possible elective curriculum, and will insure that an urban emphasis is maintained.
Required Courses
URS 100 Introduction to Urban Studies...................................3
URS 200 An Inside Look at Urban Institutions.......................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing...........................3
Subtotal................................................................21
Elective Courses........................................................12
Twelve additional semester hours are required to complete the minor. The elective courses are to be selected in consultation with a URS faculty advisor.
Total semester hours required for the minor.........................21
Psychology
The major or minor program is to be planned in consultation with an advisor from the Psychology Department by the beginning of the junior year or upon transfer into the department.
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology...................................3
PSY 311 Introduction to Statistics for Social and
Behavioral Sciences.......................................3
PSY 312 Inferential Statistics....................................3
PSY 331 Research Techniques, Experimental I.......................3
PSY 332 Research Techniques, Experimental II......................3
PSY 451 History and Systems of Psychology........................_3
Total.................................................................18
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours in psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by a Department of Psychology advisor, making a total of 39 hours in psychology.
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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
The field of psychology includes a number of possible areas for future specialization. The department recommends that students sample from among all of these areas: experimental, clinical, social and personality, industrial, developmental, gerontology, and human factors.
Students considering advanced degrees should be aware that graduate programs often have specific undergraduate course prerequisites. Many graduate schools require a mix of courses such as social psychology, developmental or child psychology, abnormal psychology, industrial psychology, learning, physiological psychology, and sensation and perception. Additional required or recommended courses, depending on the graduate program, include theories of personality, cooperative education in psychology, teaching of psychology, and advanced statistics. Therefore, students should consult with a Psychology Department advisor to choose appropriate psychology electives.
Students interested in the gerontology area of emphasis must select a minimum of 42 hours (see list under sociology gerontology area of emphasis) in addition to the 18 hours of required courses for the psychology major. This must be done in consultation with and approved by a Department of Psychology advisor. The gerontology emphasis may be applied in lieu of the 21 elective hours in the psychology major and the minor requirement.
Students desiring secondary certification in social studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The multi-minor may be arranged through the Department of Psychology and includes the required courses listed under the holistic health and wellness education multi-minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSCD section of this catalog.
Minor in Psychology Required Courses
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology............
PSY 451 History and Systems of Psychology Total......................................
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours in psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by a Department of Psychology advisor is required, making a total of 21 hours in psychology.
Semester
Hours
........3
........ 3
fi
Sociology
The study of sociology emphasizes understanding people in groups small groups like the family, the all-pervasive bureaucratic organizations of American society, political parties, football crowds, groups in conflict, society as a whole. It includes the study, from a variety of theoretical models, of past and present societies and social processes, and the analysis, using modern research methods, of contemporary social issues.
The sociology program offers to its majors and minors, and to students from all academic disciplines, courses that focus on important issues and trends in todays complex societies.
Sociology Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses
Semester
Hours
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.................................3
SOC 201 Current Social Issues.....................................3
SOC 332 Sociological Theory: Past and Present.....................3
SOC 360 Research in the Social Sciences...........................3
SOC 460 Advanced Research in the Social Sciences..................3
Total................................................................15
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours in sociology courses is required, constituting a total of 36 semester hours. At least 12 upper-division semester hours in sociology must be completed at Metropolitan State College of Denver by students majoring in the field.
Optional Areas of Concentration in Sociology
Each area of concentration includes a number of courses designed to give the student an in-depth exploration of the knowledge, challenges, issues, and research in a specific subdiscipline of sociology.
I. The Urban Community
This concentration is particularly recommended for those interested in urban studies and all students whose career plans are aimed toward management, planning, or administration in the
urban setting.
SOC 322 Race, Sex, and Ethnic Groups..............................3
SOC 355 Sociology of Law..........................................3
SOC 373 Mass Media and Social Behavior............................3
SOC 381 Population Issues.........................................3
II. Social Deviance
This concentration is particularly recommended for criminal justice, human services, prelaw, and psychology majors and all students whose career goals involve working in prevention, treatment, and/or rehabilitation programs.
SOC 201 Current Social Issues..................................3
SOC 250 Deviant Behavior in Society............................3
SOC 350 Criminology............................................3
SOC 351 Juvenile Delinquency...................................3
SOC 355 Sociology of Law.......................................3
SOC 383 Mental Disorders.......................................3
III. The Family and Alternative Life-Styles
This concentration is particularly recommended for teacher education, human services, and psychology majors and all
students who plan people-serving careers.
SOC 240 The Chicano Family.....................................3
SOC 310 Death and Dying........................................3
SOC 340 Childhood and Adolescent Socialization.................3
SOC 341 The Family in Transition...............................3
SOC 342 Education in a Changing Society........................3
SOC 343 Sociology of Sex Roles.................................3
SOC 344 The Black Family.......................................3
SOC 346 Sociology of Sexuality.................................3
SOC 351 Juvenile Delinquency...................................3
IV. Medicine and Health
This concentration is particularly recommended for health care management, nursing, pre-med, and psychology majors.
SOC 104 Introduction to Gerontology............................3
SOC 304 Contemporary Issues in Gerontology.....................3
SOC 310 Death and Dying........................................3
SOC 380 Health and Healers.....................................3
SOC 381 Population Issues......................................3
SOC 383 Mental Disorders.......................................3
V. Social Class and Stratification
This concentration focuses on the various ways in which societies are divided. It is recommended for all students wishing to gain further understanding of conflict and inequality in groups and societies and to explore possible solutions to these problems.
SOC 201 Current Social Issues...................................3
SOC 320 Social Classes in America...............................3
SOC 322 Race, Sex and Ethnic Groups.............................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America.......................................3
SOC 343 Sociology of Sex Roles..................................3
VI. Changing Social Institutions
This concentration offers a broad overview of the dominant institutions in society, those institutions that provide the framework for our work, family life, and general social interaction.
SOC 320 Social Classes in America......................................3
SOC 341 The Family in Transition.......................................3
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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
SOC 342 Education in a Changing Society..........................3
SOC 346 Sociology of Sexuality....................................3
SOC 355 Sociology of Law..........................................3
SOC 371 Politics and Power........................................3
SOC 380 Health and Healers........................................3
SOC 391 Religious Movements in America............................3
SOC 430 Social Change.............................................3
Introduction to Statistics for Social and Behavioral Sciences (PSY 311) is strongly recommended for sociology majors who plan to go on for graduate study and/or have career goals involving research. (This course will not be used as a sociology elective.) Sociology majors are also urged to include field experience in their college plans, either through enrolling in SOC 470 or through a cooperative education placement.
Students desiring secondary certification in social studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Gerontology Area of Emphasis
Gerontology deals with the causes and consequencesbiological, psychological, and socialof aging. Drawing from many fields of academic study, this area of emphasis prepares the student for professional and para-professional careers in human services for the aged population.
problems related to the survival and well-being of the human species. From the living and vanished cultures of Colorado to those of New Guinea or South America, anthropology can be applied to assist our understanding of human differences.
Anthropology Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses
Semester
Hours
ANT 101 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory......................3
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology.....................3
ANT 210 Human Evolution...........................................3
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication..............................3
ANT 264 Archaeology...............................................^
Total.................................................................15
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours in anthropology is required, bringing the total to 36 semester hours. At least 12 upper-division semester hours in anthropology must be completed at Metropolitan State College of Denver by students majoring in the field.
Students desiring teacher certification in social studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Minor in Anthropology
To complete the gerontology area of emphasis, a student selects, (in addition to the 15 hours of required courses in the sociology major), in consultation with and approved by the Department of Sociology/Anthropology, a minimum of 45 hours from the following list of courses. The gerontology area of emphasis may be applied in lieu of the 21 elective hours in the sociology major and the minor requirement.
Semester
Hours
SOC 104 Introduction to Gerontology.............................3
SOC 204 Aging in American Society...............................3
SOC 304 Contemporary Issues in Gerontology......................3
SOC 309 Urban Sociology.........................................3
SOC 310 Death and Dying.........................................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America......................................3
SOC 341 The Family in Transition................................3
SOC 380 Health and Healers......................................3
SOC 381 Population Issues.......................................3
SOC 383 Mental Disorders........................................3
SOC 470 Advanced Field Internship...............................3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment..............................3
PSY 221 Psychology of Human Development.........................3
PSY 295 Contemporary Issues in Psychology: Death and Dying.....3
PSY 327 Adulthood and Aging.....................................3
PSY 398 Cooperative Education: Psychology.......................3
PSY 493 Seminar in Developmental Psychology: Senescence.........3
HES 105 Dynamics of Health......................................3
HES 204 Introduction to Nutrition..............................^3
Total...............................................................45
Minor in Sociology Required Courses
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.............................3
Electives
The minor provides an opportunity for students to bring a unique anthropological perspective to their already chosen area of interest. Anyone having to deal with human or cultural differences would benefit from selecting a focus in cross-cultural contact, archaeology, or human diversity.
Required Courses
ANT 101 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory....................3
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology.................._3
Total...............................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours in anthropology is required, bringing the total to 21 semester hours. At least 6 upper-division semester hours must be completed at Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Behavioral Science
Major for Bachelor of Arts
This is a distributed major, offering students a structured overview of the social and behavioral sciences, emphasizing breadth of coverage rather than in-depth studies. Particularly applicable for students interested in certification in the elementary and secondary education areas.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology........................3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics: Macro...............................3
HIS 366 Recent U.S., 1945 to the 1970s...............................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas..................................3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology......................................3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology....................................^
Total...................................................................18
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours in sociology courses, selected in consultation with a department advisor is required, bringing the total to 18 semester hours. At least 6 upper-division semester hours of the minor must be completed at Metropolitan State College of Denver.
It is suggested that students consider focusing their elective choices in one of the areas of concentration in sociology.
Anthropology
Anthropology is the exploration of human diversity. The combination of cultural, archaeological, and biological perspectives offers a viewpoint that is unique in studying the
Electives
A minimum of 18 additional upper-division elective hours in anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology, and sociology is required, bringing the total to 36 semester hours. No more than six upper-division hours may be applied from any one discipline and must be selected in consultation with, and have the approval of, the advisor. At least 12 upper-division hours must be completed at Metropolitan State College of Denver by students majoring in this field. Each student in this major must have the preliminary approval of an assigned advisor.
Students desiring teacher certification in social studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
No Minor Offered
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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Social Welfare
Major for Bachelor of Science
The Social Welfare Program offers preparation for beginning professional practice in social services, corrections, and social work agencies. Students are also encouraged to pursue graduate degrees such as the M.S.W. and the Ph.D., or D.S.W.
The basic objectives of the program are to enable students to enter beginning level social work practice, achieve effective active participation in community affairs based upon an understanding of complex social welfare programs, and to encourage graduate study.
The curriculum reflects these objectives in its required courses which focus upon field experience; methods of helping individuals, families, small groups, organizations, and communities; human growth and development; human diversity; social policy analysis and research. Particular emphasis is placed upon understanding and coping with bureaucratic processes and structures.
The field of social welfare includes the following specialty areas: child welfare, family social work, correctional services, social services (public assistance agencies), medical and mental health, developmental disabilities, aging, private practice, industrial social work, and others.
Students who major in social welfare are not required to complete a minor. Students desiring a contract minor in social welfare should consult a social welfare faculty advisor.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SWF 101 Introduction to Social Welfare Services..................3
SWF 104 Human Behavior and the Social Environment................4
SWF 105 Family Social Services..................................4
SWF 201 Social Welfare Services and Populations at Risk.........3
SWF 202 Social Welfare Services and Women.......................3
SWF 241 Practicum in Social Welfare Services....................6
SWF 378 Social Welfare Policy...................................3
SWF 379 Research in Social Welfare..............................3
SWF 401 Practice in Social Welfare Services.....................4
SWF 441 Cross-Cultural Social Welfare Services..................4
SWF 479 Professional Internship.................................6
Total................................................................43
Electives in social welfare..........................................10
Credits to be selected from the following:
SWF 301 Social Welfare Services for Children and
Adolescents.............................................4
SWF 302 Case Management in Social Welfare Services..............4
SWF 303 Social Services for Adults and Aging....................4
SWF 480 Workshop (Variable Topics)............................2-4
SWF 490 Seminar (Variable Topics).............................2-4
Total................................................................53
Case Management Program
The Social Welfare Program and the Human Services Department have developed a joint program in case management and developmental disabilities. The purpose of the program is to train individuals interested in performing the functions of a case manager. Required courses are listed under the Department of Human Services. For further information call 556-3167, or 556-4679.
Contract Minor Available
For additional information call 556-4679 or 556-3167.
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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Division of Science and Mathematics
Science and mathematics programs are offered in the departments of Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Mathematical Sciences, and Physics. Curricula are flexible, including interdisciplinary, career-oriented bachelors degree programs both in the traditional areas of science and mathematics and in more career-oriented areas such as training for health related fields, land use, applied mathematics, computer science, statistics, air pollution monitoring, or occupational health and safety. In cooperation with local colleges, universities, and health agencies, students may complete a bachelor of science or bachelor of arts degree from Metropolitan State College of Denver and earn certification in medical technology. The Department of Chemistry offers a minor in criminalistics, one of the few such programs in the country.
Biology
The Department of Biology offers two majors, the bachelor of science in biology and the bachelor of arts in biology. While it is not necessary to declare an emphasis within these majors, a student may choose to emphasize botany, microbiology or zoology. Supportive courses associated with paramedical studies, criminalistics and the Drug and Alcohol Institute, as well as general courses for enrichment of the nonscience students background, are offered by the department.
Students seeking secondary certification in science should see the Department of Teacher Education.
A biology minor is offered to students with related majors or a special interest in the field.
Biology Major for Bachelor of Science Required Courses
Semester
Hours
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology..........................4
BIO 360 General Genetics.........................................3
Select 2 of the following:
BIO 210 General Botany...........................................5
BIO 220 General Zoology..........................................5
BIO 240 General Microbiology.....................................4
Select 1 of the following:
BIO 355 Urban Ecology............................................4
BIO 454 Plant Ecology............................................4
BIO 455 Animal Ecology...........................................4
Subtotal..........................................................20-21
Electives
Biology courses selected from the 200, 300, and 400 series, and approved by faculty advisors in the Department of Biology, must be completed to bring the total of biology courses approved for the major to 40 semester hours. At least 14 of these elective semester hours must be from the 300 and 400 courses of the Department of Biology.
Total Hours Required in Biology..........................40
Required Non-Biology Courses
One year of college general chemistry, one semester of upper-division organic chemistry, one semester of upper-division biochemistry, and one year of mathematics starting with MTH 111 are requisites for the biology major.
Biology Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology.........................4
BIO 360 General Genetics........................................3
Select 2 of the following:
BIO 210 General Botany.........................................5
BIO 220 General Zoology........................................5
BIO 240 General Microbiology...................................4
Select 1 of the following:
BIO 355 Urban Ecology..........................................4
BIO 454 Plant Ecology..........................................4
BIO 455 Animal Ecology.........................................4
Subtotal........................................................20-21
Electives
Biology courses selected from the 200, 300, and 400 series, and approved by faculty advisors in the Department of Biology, must be completed to bring the total of biology courses approved for the major to 40 semester hours. At least 14 of these elective semester hours must be from the 300 and 400 courses of the Department of Biology.
Total Hours Required in Biology.......................40
Required Non-Biology Courses
One year of General Chemistry (equivalent to the present courses CHE 110 and CHE 210).
Botany Area of Emphasis
Requirements for either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree in biology must be satisfied, and the 40 hours of biology courses must include BIO 210, General Botany; BIO 454, Plant Ecology; and 15 semester semester hours from the following botany electives:*
Semester
Elective Courses Hours
BIO 314 Plant Physiology......................................5
BIO 315 Plant Hormones........................................2
BIO 316 Plant Anatomy and Morphology..........................4
BIO 318 Vascular Plant Taxonomy...............................4
BIO 412 Algology..............................................4
BIO 416 Mycology..............................................4
BIO 456 Field Methods in Plant Ecology........................2
BIO 485 Evolution............................................^3
Subtotal........................................................15
Microbiology Area of Emphasis
Students must satisfy the requirements listed for the bachelor of science major in biology, including BIO 240, General Microbiology. Students must also take BIO 335, Immunology; BIO 340, Bacteriology; BIO 445, Pathogenic Microbiology; and BIO 447, Microbial Genetics. Additional hours from the courses listed below or appropriate omnibus courses as selected by the student and approved by the microbiology faculty must be taken to complete the 20 hours of upper-division courses and a total of 40 semester hours in biology.*
Semester
Elective Courses Hours
BIO 305 Cell and Molecular Biology...............................4
BIO 327 Parasitology.............................................4
BIO 412 Algology.................................................4
BIO 416 Mycology.................................................4
BIO 422 Protozoology.............................................3
BIO 444 Virology.................................................4
Subtotal...........................................................20
Required Non-Biology Courses
The student must satisfy the requirements listed for non-biology courses for the bachelor of science major including one course in biostatistics or calculus and a computer science course to fulfill the required one year of college mathematics. In addition, the student must complete CHE 300 and 301, Analytical Chemistry with laboratory; CHE 432, Biochemistry II; and one year of college physics.
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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Zoology Area of Emphasis
Students must satisfy the requirements for the bachelor of science degree in biology and must include in the 40 semester hours of biology courses BIO 220, General Zoology; BIO 455, Animal Ecology; and 15 semester hours from the following list of zoology electives:*
Semester
Elective Courses Hours
BIO 321 Histology..............................................4
BIO 322 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy.........................5
BIO 325 Arthropod Zoology......................................4
BIO 327 Parasitology...........................................4
BIO 334 Endocrinology..........................................3
BIO 336 Animal Physiology......................................4
BIO 422 Protozoology...........................................3
BIO 425 Entomology.............................................4
BIO 427 Herpetology............................................3
BIO 428 Ornithology............................................4
BIO 429 Mammalogy..............................................3
BIO 481 Vertebrate Embryology..................................4
Subtotal..........................................................15
*BIO 301, Microtechnique, and BIO 305, Cell and Molecular Biology, are both applicable to the fields of botany, microbiology, and zoology and are recommended as additional electives for all three areas of emphasis.
Minor in Biology
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology........................4
BIO 210 General Botany.........................................5
Select 2 of the following:
BIO 220 General Zoology........................................5
BIO 240 General Microbiology...................................4
BIO 231,232 Human Anatomy and
Human Physiology I and II......................8
Select 1 of the following:
BIO 355 Urban Ecology..........................................4
BIO 360 General Genetics.......................................3
BIO 454 Plant Ecology..........................................4
BIO 455 Animal Ecology.........................................4
Subtotal.......................................................16-21
Electives
Biology courses from the 200, 300, and 400 series, approved by the Department of Biology, must be completed to bring the total of biology courses approved for the minor to 24 semester hours.
Total Hours Required in Biology......................24
Senior Experience for Biology Majors
A student majoring in biology may fulfill the Senior Experience requirement with any course approved for the purpose by the General Studies Committee. Any biology course approved by the General Studies Committee and the Department of Biology for Senior Experience credit may be counted toward the Senior Experience requirement of General Studies, or toward a biology major/biology minor, but not both.
Medical Technology Program
See chair of Biology Department for details.
Chemistry
The Department of Chemistry is approved by the American Chemical Society and offers several degree programs: the bachelor of science in chemistry; bachelor of science in chemistry occupational health and safety area of emphasis; bachelor of science in chemistry criminalistics area of emphasis; and the bachelor of arts in chemistry. Minors in chemistry and criminalistics are also available.
Students who plan to pursue a career in chemistry after graduation
or plan to attend graduate school in chemistry should choose the bachelor of science in chemistry program. The bachelor of arts in chemistry program is designed for students who plan a career in a field related to chemistry, but who do not intend to attend graduate school. The bachelor of arts option, which requires fewer hours, may be especially attractive to those wishing a second major or to those students desiring secondary education certification.
Criminalistics is the scientific investigation, identification, and comparison of physical evidence for criminal or civil court proceedings. Criminalists must be trained in many disciplines including chemistry, biology, law enforcement, physics, and mathematics. The four-year criminalistics curriculum leads to a bachelor of science degree and includes a half-time internship in a criminalistics laboratory during the senior year. Students in the criminalistics program are encouraged to complete all the requirements for a degree in chemistry approved by the American Chemical Society while completing the criminalistics degree program. Graduates of the program are prepared for employment in criminalistics and have completed the requirements for admission to graduate school in chemistry or criminalistics, medical school, dental school, or law school.
Students electing the chemistry major with the occupational health and safety emphasis will be trained in the recognition, evaluation, and control of hazards in the workplace. This area of emphasis includes courses equivalent to those required for the bachelor of arts major in chemistry as well as supporting science and mathematics courses and courses in instrumental analysis, toxicology, safety, and occupational health and safety. A mandatory internship during the junior or senior year provides valuable practical experience. Graduates of this program are prepared for immediate employment in the field of occupational health and safety or the field of chemistry. Graduates in this emphasis area also meet the requirements for admissions to medical school, dental school, veterinary school, or graduate school in industrial hygiene or chemistry.
For further information about the occupational health and safety or criminalistics programs, students should contact the Chemistry Department. Students seeking secondary education certification in science should consult the MSCD Teacher Education Department for requirements.
The following courses constitute the basic core and are required in all chemistry degree programs except for the minor in chemistry.
Semester
Basic Chemistry Core Hours
CHE 120 General Chemistry 1.....................................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II....................................5
CHE 300 Analytical Chemistry....................................3
CHE 301 Analytical Chemistry Lab................................2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry 1.....................................4
CHE 311" Organic Chemistry II....................................3
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Lab I.................................2
CHE 313* Organic Chemistry Lab II................................2
Total Hours in Basic Core.........................................26
Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Science Required Courses
Basic Chemistry Core.........................
Additional Required Chemistry Courses:
CHE 325 Physical Chemistry I.................
CHE 326 Physical Chemistry II................
CHE 328 Physical Chemistry Lab I.............
CHE 329 Physical Chemistry Lab II............
Subtotal
Electives
A minimum of 10 semester hours in chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Chemistry is required.
Semester
Hours
......26
........4
........4
.......2
........2
12
59


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
American Chemical Society Approval
To meet American Chemical Society degree criteria the following
courses must be completed:
CHE 230 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry.........................3
CHE 340 Chemical Literature Search...............................1
CHE 410 Instrumental Analysis....................................3
CHE 411 Instrumental Analysis Lab.................................2
CHE 430 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry............................_3
Subtotal..............................................................12
Electives
An additional 6 credit hours of advanced level electives are required. Electives should be selected in consultation with the Department of Chemistry. The following courses may be appropriate: CHE 401, CHE 402, and CHE 432.
Total hours required...........................................66
ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro.........................3
MGT 461 Labor/Employee Relations..............................3
Criminalistics Area of Emphasis
Students electing this program of study must complete the basic chemistry core (26 hours) in addition to the following required courses. The requirement of a minor is waived for students in this program.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Basic Chemistry Core.............................................26
Additional Required Chemistry Courses:
CHE 319 Survey of Physical Chemistry........................4
CHE 320 Survey of Physical Chemistry Lab....................1
CHE 410 Instrumental Analysis...............................3
CHE 411 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory....................2
CHE 431 Biochemistry I......................................5
Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Basic Chemistry Core
Required Criminalistics Courses:
CHE 370 Criminalistics I
Semester CHE 371 Criminalistics II
Hours CHE 470 Criminalistics Internship I.
26 CHE 471 Criminalistics Internship II
3
3
7
7
Additional Required Chemistry Courses:
CHE 319 Survey of Physical Chemistry.............................4
CHE 320 Survey of Physical Chemistry Lab............................ 1
Electives
A minimum of six semester hours in chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Chemistry is required.
Total Hours Required.......................................37
Occupational Health and Safety Area of Emphasis
Students electing this program of study must complete the basic chemistry core (26 hours) in addition to the following required courses. The requirement of a minor is waived for students in this program.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Required Criminal Justice Courses:
CJC 101 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System.............3
CJC 210 Substantive Criminal Law................................3
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures.......................3
CJC 312 Constitutional Law......................................3
Required Ancillary Courses:
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology.........................4
BIO 240 General Microbiology....................................4
BIO 360 General Genetics........................................3
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics..............................4
MTH 141 Calculus 1..............................................4
PHY 201 College Physics 1.......................................4
and
PHY 203 College Physics Lab I...................................1
or
PHY 231 General Physics I.......................................4
and
PHY 232 General Physics Lab I........................................ 1
Total Hours Required.............................................97-98
Basic Chemistry Core..............................................26
Additional Required Chemistry Courses:
CHE 319 Survey of Physical Chemistry..............-...............4
CHE 320 Survey of Physical Chemistry Lab......................1
CHE 410 Instrumental Analysis.................................3
CHE 411 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory......................2
CHE 431 Biochemistry I........................................5
Minor in Chemistry
Students completing the basic chemistry core (26 hours) qualify for a minor in chemistry. Students may elect to substitute five semester hours in upper-division chemistry courses for CHE 311* and CHE 313*.
Semester
Required Occupational Health and Safety Courses:
CHE 250 Introduction to Occupational Health and Safety........3
CHE 350 Occupational Safety...................................3
CHE 415 Instrumentation and Analysis in the
Occupational Environment.............................4
CHE 420 Evaluation and Control of Air Quality.................3
CHE 425 Principles of Occupational Health and Safety..........3
CHE 450 Occupational Toxicology...............................3
CHE 475 Occupational Health and Safety Internship.............8
Required Courses Hours
CHE 120 General Chemistry 1..................................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II................................5
CHE 300 Analytical Chemistry................................tK.
CHE 301 Analytical Chemistry Lab............................2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry 1..................................4
CHE 311* Organic Chemistry II.................................3
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Lab I..............................2
CHE 313* Organic Chemistry Lab II............................^2
Required Ancillary Courses:
Total Hours in Basic Core
26
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology.......................4
BIO 232 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.....................4
BIO 240 General Microbiology..................................4
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics............................3
MTH 141 Calculus 1............................................4
PHY 201 College Physics 1.....................................4
PHY 203 College Physics Laboratory 1..........................1
Total Hours Required..............................................92
Electives
The following courses are recommended as electives:
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication..................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing.....................3
Minor in Criminalistics
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHE 110 Principles of Chemistry..................................5
CHE 270 Introduction to Criminalistics...........................4
CHE 275 Arson and Explosives.....................................3
CHE 276 Field Testing and Laboratory Analysis of Drugs............1
CHE 370 Criminalistics I..........................................3
CHE 371 Criminalistics II........................................3
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures......................._3
Total Hours Required..................................................22
60


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
The Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department is comprised of three separate disciplines: geography, geology, and meteorology. The department offers a bachelor of science degree in meteorology and a bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree in land use. The bachelor of science degree is recommended for those students desiring a stronger background in the physical and quantitative aspects of the environment.
Minor programs are available in geography, geology, and meteorology. Students working toward teacher certification in either science or social studies may take courses in geology, geography, or meteorology. Students interested in Environmental Science or Earth Space Science may develop a contract major through Adult Learning Services.
Land Use
GEG 363 Transportation Planning and Land Use..................3
GEG 462 Land Use: Residential.................................3
GEG 464 Land Use: Recreation..................................3
GEG 471 Legal Aspects of Land Use.............................3
BIO 355 Urban Ecology.........................................4
ECO 335 Urban Economic Analysis...............................3
ECO 430 Public Finance........................................3
Urban Studies.........................................^3
Subtotal............................................................19
Geographic Information Systems (15 Hours Required)
GEG 225 Introduction to GIS ..................................3
or
GEG 321 Cartography..................................................4
(Whichever course was not taken as part of the core)
GEG 322 Intermediate Cartography..............................3
GEG 325 Computer Cartography..................................3
GEG 485 Advanced Geographic Information Systems...............3
CSI 101 Introduction to Computer Science......................3
The Land Use program is very broad in scope and can be utilized for a number of career objectives and graduate school programs. Opportunities exist in such areas as planning, cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), air photo and satellite imagery interpretation, environmental and resource management, travel and transportation, mining and mineral resources, residential and industrial development, recreational land use, population analysis, and a variety of other interrelated fields. This program provides a solid foundation for continued study at the graduate level.
Land Use Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Core Hours
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics................................4
GEG 100 World Regional Geography..................................3
or
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography...........................3
GEG 110 Introduction to Physical Geography........................3
or
GEL 101 General Geology...........................................4
GEG 122 Map Use...................................................2
GEG 225 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems............3
or
GEG 321 Introduction to Cartography...............................4
GEG 361 Principles of Land Use....................................3
GEG 495 Internship in Land Use....................................2
or
GEL 495 Internship in Geology.....................................2
Senior Capstone Course for General Studies
GEG 496 Global Environmental Challenges...........................3
or
GEL 496 Environmental Field Studies.................................. 3
Total.............................................................23-25
Required Areas of Emphasis
Each student shall select one of the following areas of emphasis. Within the area of emphasis the student will complete a set of required courses plus electives for a total of 42 hours for the major. Electives should be selected to provide an integrated and well-planned pattern of courses related to the student's educational and career goals.
Required Core Semester
Urban Land Use (12 Hours Required) Hours
GEG 336 Geography of Economic Activity.....................3
GEG 360 Urban Geography....................................3
GEG 461 Urban and Regional Planning........................3
URS 450 Cities of the Future...............................3
Minimum of 7 Hours of Electives
GEG 204 Geography of Denver................................3
GEG 230 Geographic Analysis of Social Issues...............3
GEG 300 Historical Geography of the U.S....................3
GEG 362 Population, Resources, and Land Use................3
Minimum of 6 Hours of Electives
GEG 360
GEG 362
GEG 461
GEG 471
GEG 484
GEG 490
CSI 102
CSI 451
SUR 151
SUR 265
SUR 366
Subtotal
Urban Geography...................
Population, Resources, and Land Use
Urban and Regional Planning.......
Legal Aspects of Land Use.........
Remote Sensing....................
GIS Database Management...........
Basic Programming.................
Computer Graphics.................
Surveying I.......................
Photogrammetry I..................
Land Information Systems..........
Applied Statistics................
Environment and Resources (12 Hours Required)
Introduction to Environmental Science.....
World Resources...........................
Remote Sensing............................
Environmental Economics...................
f 7 Hours of Electives
Weather and Climate.......................
Landforms.................................
Geography of Economic Activity............
Water Resources...........................
Population, Resources, and Land Use.......
Recreational Land Use Planning............
Oceanography..............................
Soil Resources............................
Energy and Mineral Resources..............
Environmental Geology.....................
Environmental Hazards and Planning........
Urban Ecology.............................
Regional Economics........................
Introduction to Meteorology...............
Environmental Politics....................
Applied Statistics Biology or Chemistry OSH A Safety Training
Subtotal..............................................
GEG 120
GEG 140
GEG 484
ECO 345
Minimum o
GEG 123
GEG 124
GEG 336
GEG 340
GEG 362
GEG 464
GEL 115
GEL 342
GEL 344
GEL 400
GEL 401
BIO 355
ECO 435
MTR 140
PSC 323
Geology (15 Hours Required)
(NOTE: students selecting this area of emphasis will be required to minor in geology)
GEL 312 Advanced Geomorphology.................................
GEL 342 Soil Resources.........................................
GEL 344 Energy and Mineral Resources...........................
GEL 400 Environmental Geology..................................
Minimum of 5 Hours of Electives
GEL 115 Oceanography...........................................
GEL 315 Hydrogeology...........................................
GEL 401 Environmental Hazards and Planning.....................
GEG 120 Introduction to Environmental Science..................
GEG 123 Weather and Climate....................................
GEG 124 Landforms..............................................
GEG 340 Water Resources........................................
GEG 484 Remote Sensing.........................................
BIO 355 Urban Ecology..........................................
61
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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
ECO 345 Environmental Economics..................................3
Advanced MTH or CSI Biology, Chemistry, Meteorology, or Physics Subtotal........................................................20
Total Hours Required for the Major..............................43
Required Minor
Except for the geologic area of emphasis, the field of study selected as a minor is at the option of the student.
Land Use Major for Bachelor of Science
To fulfill the requirements for the bachelor of science with a major in land use, a student must complete the requirements as listed above under the bachelor of arts; however, the student must minor in one of the sciences, or science-oriented fields as approved by the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department.
Minor in Geology Required Core
Semester
Hours
GEL 101 General Geology .......................................4
Any 100 level GEL course.........................................3-4
GEL 201 Rocks and Minerals ....................................4
GEL 202 The Stratigraphy and Structure of the Earth............4
Any 300 or 400 level GEL courses................................ 8
Total Hours Required.............................................23-24
Minor in Geography Required Core
Semester
Hours
GEG 112 Orienteering...........................................1
GEG 122 Map Use................................................2
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography........................3
GEG 123 Weather and Climate....................................3
OR
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology............................3
Structured Electives
A minimum of 13 additional hours must be selected in consultation with a departmental advisor. At least one course must be selected from each of the following groups to satisfy this requirement.
Physical (3)
GEG 110 Introduction to Physical Geography..................3
GEG 124 Landforms...........................................3
GEL 101 General Geology.....................................4
GEL 212 Geomorphology of the U.S............................3
Resources and Environment (3)
GEG 120 Introduction to Environmental Science...............3
GEG 140 World Resources.....................................3
GEG 340 Water Resources.....................................3
GEL 342 Soil Resources......................................4
GEL 344 Energy and Mineral Resources........................4
Spatial Analysis and Planning (3)
GEG 360 Urban Geography.....................................3
GEG 361 Principles of Land Use..............................3
GEG 362 Population, Resources, and Land Use.................3
GEG 363 Transportation Planning and Land Use................3
GEG 462 Land Use: Residential...............................3
Urban Studies
Regional Geography (3)
GEG 100 World Regional Geography............................3
GEG 202 Geography of Colorado...............................3
GEG 210 Geography of Latin America..........................2
GEG 220 Geography of the United States......................3
GEG 300 Historical Geography of the United States...........3
Plus one additional hour of field study in either geography or geology for a total of 22 hours.
Total Hours Required for the Minor...........................22
Meteorology
Meteorology is the science of the atmosphere. Modern meteorologists are involved in weather observing, forecasting,
research, and dissemination of weather information to the public. Meteorologists also study global weather and climate, and investigate the influence that human beings exert on the Earth's climate. MSCD's forecasting lab includes a computerized observing station, daily weather maps, satellite images, and access to the national weather database. The bachelor of science degree in meteorology follows American Meteorological Society recommendations for undergraduate programs. Students should contact a meteorology faculty to discuss degree programs, career opportunities, and graduate school options.
Meteorology Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology............................3
MTR 142 Introduction to Meteorology Lab........................1
MTR 241 Meteorological Instrumentation.........................3
MTR 340 Synoptic Meteorology I.................................4
MTR 341 Synoptic Meteorology II................................4
MTR 343 Dynamic Meteorology I..................................3
MTR 344 Physical Meteorology...................................3
MTR 345 Dynamic Meteorology II.................................3
MTR 441 Numerical Weather Prediction............................3
MTR 442 Industrial Meteorology.................................3
MTR 444 Climatology............................................3
Elective meteorology courses........................................7
Subtotal...........................................................40
Additional Course Requirements*
ENG 101 Freshman Composition: The Essay........................3
ENG 102 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, and
Documentation..........................................3
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics.............................4
MTH 141 Calculus 1..............................................4
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN..........................4
MTH 241 Calculus II............................................4
PHY 231, 232 General Physics I and Lab..............................5
PHY 233,234 General Physics II and Lab..............................5
CHE 120 General Chemistry 1....................................5
Level I Communications..............................................3
Level II Arts and Letters...........................................6
Level II Historical.................................................3
Level II Social Science.............................................6
Level III Senior Experience........................................J3
Subtotal...........................................................58
Approved Electives.................................................10
Total.............................................................126
'Students must consult a faculty advisor regarding general studies requirements.
Minor in Meteorology Required Courses
Semester
Hours
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology................................3
MTR 142 Introduction to Meteorology Lab............................1
MTR 340 Synoptic Meteorology I.....................................4
MTR 341 Synoptic Meteorology II....................................4
Approved electives......................................................Ji
Total..................................................................20
Mathematical Sciences
The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers bachelor of arts and bachelor of science degrees in mathematics and a bachelor of science degree in computer science. A minor program in mathematics is also offered which complements such majors as engineering technology, the physical sciences, and business. A minor in computer science is also offered to complement the mathematics major as well as majors in the sciences, technologies, and business.
The department provides courses in several emphasis areas encompassing a variety of significant mathematical ideas. Thus,
62


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
for those primarily interested in the use of mathematics in the study of some aspect of the physical or human world, courses that stress the classical and current development and applications in analysis, computer science, statistics and probability, business and economics, technical mathematics, and operations research are available.
A degree in mathematics is useful in a variety of professional fields including, among many others, business, economics, computer science, government, education, technology, and science. Students are invited to consult with the department concerning career potentials.
The degree program in computer science adheres to nationally recognized standards and provides students with a more technical alternative to the emphasis in computer science. Please contact the director of computer science in the Mathematics Department for more information about this program.
Major in Mathematics for Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science
The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers coursework leading to the bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree. The student may choose either degree consistent with her or his career objectives.
All majors in mathematics are required to complete a minimum of 36 hours consisting of the following basic core of courses (with a required minimum grade of C in each of these core courses) and electives:
Semester
Basic Core Hours
MTH 141 Calculus 1................................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II...............................................4
MTH 242 Calculus III..............................................4
MTH 310 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs.......................^
Total................................................................15
Electives
The student must complete a coherent program of mathematics courses, including 19 upper-division hours, to be planned in consultation with the students advisor and approved by the department. This program must be formulated before the last 10 credit hours of mathematics are taken. The only courses applicable to the major as electives are MTH 151, 214, and any upper- division course.
The student may choose to complete one of five emphases previously approved by the department. These emphases are: applied mathematics, computer science, mathematics, secondary education, and statistics and probability, as outlined below:
Applied Mathematics Emphasis
The emphasis in applied mathematics is designed to meet the needs of the scientific, technical, and computer based economy and to prepare the student for graduate study.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Basic Core...........................................................15
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN...........................4
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics..............................4
MTH 342 Differential Equations..................................4
MTH 344 Partial Differential Equations..........................3
MTH 448 Numerical Analysis I....................................3
MTH 449 Numerical Analysis II...................................3
MTH 459 Applied Mathematics Senior Seminar......................1
A minimum of 3 hours chosen from the following courses:
MTH 314 Linear Algebra..........................................4
MTH 322 Design of Experiments...................................4
MTH 325 Optimization Techniques I...............................4
MTH 347 Applied Combinatorial Mathematics.......................3
MTH 421 Probability Theory......................................4
MTH 445 Complex Variables......................................^_3
Total Hours Required.................................................41
Computer Science Emphasis
This emphasis studies the fundamental concepts of computer science as well as processes of analyzing, designing, implementing, and testing computer software systems. The computer science emphasis is designed to prepare individuals to enter this field.
The computer science offerings undergo frequent revision and development. Such changes may necessitate special arrangements to accommodate students already in progress. Students are directed to consult advisors in the department for information concerning any changes.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Basic Core (CSI 310 replaces MTH 310).............................16
CSI 130 Introduction to Structured Programming...............4
CSI 230 Advanced Programming and Data Structures.............4
CSI 240 Computer Organization and Assembly Language..........4
CSI 312 Organization and Structure of Operating Systems......4
CSI 321 Principles of Programming Languages..................4
CSI 330 Foundations of File Structures.......................4
CSI 421 Software Development and Engineering.................4
or
CSI 430 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis......4
CSI 459 Senior Seminar.......................................1
MTH 214 Matrix Algebra'......................................2
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics..........................^4
Total Hours Required..............................................51
MTH 314 may be substituted for MTH 214.
Mathematics Emphasis
The emphasis in mathematics prepares the student for further specialized study at the graduate level as well as being adaptable for preparation for positions in business, industry, and government.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Basic Core......................................................15
MTH 311 Abstract Algebra I...................................3
MTH 411 Abstract Algebra II..................................3
MTH 441 Advanced Calculus I.................................3
MTH 442 Advanced Calculus II................................3
A minimum of 9 hours chosen from MTH 151, MTH 214,
or any upper-division mathematics courses.......................Ji
Total Hours Required............................................36
Secondary Education Emphasis
The emphasis in secondary education is for the preparation of classroom teachers of mathematics for secondary schools. Students seeking secondary credentials in mathematics must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSCD in addition to all of the mathematics major requirements.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Basic Core.........................................................15
CSI 130 Introduction to Structured Programming................4
MTH 311 Abstract Algebra I....................................3
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics............................4
MTH 360 History of Mathematics................................3
MTH 361 Methods of Teaching Mathematics.......................3
MTH 365 Foundations of Geometry...............................3
At least one course must be chosen from MTH 161 or any upper division
Mathematics courses................................................H4
Minimum Total Hours Required.......................................36
Statistics and Probability Emphasis
The emphasis in statistics and probability stresses the application of the principles and methods of statistics and probability in the biological, physical, and social sciences and engineering. This emphasis also prepares the student for graduate study.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Basic Core..................................................15
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN........................4
63


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
MTH 214 Matrix Algebra*...........................................2
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics................................4
MTH 322 Design of Experiments.....................................4
MTH 325 Optimization Techniques I.................................4
MTH 421 Probability Theory........................................4
MTH 422 Stochastic Processes......................................4
MTH 429 Senior Statistics Project...............................,_1
Total Hours Required...................................................42
*MTH 314 may be substituted for MTH 214.
Minor in Mathematics Basic Core
Semester
Hours
MTH 141 Calculus 1..............................................4
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN........................4
or
CS1130 Introduction to Structured Programming........................4
MTH 241 Calculus II.............................................4
Electives
A minimum of 10 hours at least 7 of which must be at the upper division level. These 10 hours may include MTH 242, any upper divisionmathematics course, or any course approved by the
Department of Mathematical Sciences..............................10
Total Minimum Hours Required....................................22
Computer Science Major for Bachelor of Science
The department offers a complete degree program in computer science which adheres to the nationally recognized standards set by the computing sciences Accreditation Board. Students are encouraged to contact the departmental director of computer science for further details. No minor is required in the CSI program.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CSI 130 Introduction to Structured Programming................4
CSI 230 Advanced Programming and Data Structures..............4
CSI 240 Computer Organization and Assembly
Language...............................................4
CSI 310 Discrete Mathematics..................................4
CSI 312 Organization and Structure of
Operating Systems......................................4
CSI 321 Principles of Programming Languages...................4
CSI 330 Foundations of File Structures........................4
CSI 421 Software Development and Engineering..................4
CSI 430 Advanced Data Structures and
Algorithm Analysis.....................................4
CSI 459 Senior Seminar........................................1
Total..............................................................37
Required Ancillary Courses
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing.....................3
EET 231 Digital Logic and Telecommunications..................4
CSI/CMS Approved Upper Division Electives..........................3*
Total..............................................................To
*A minimum of three hours is required.
Required Mathematics Courses
MTH 141 Calculus 1............................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II...........................................4
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics............................4
Minimum of 7 hours chosen from the following:
MTH 214 Matrix Algebra........................................2
MTH 242 Calculus III..........................................4
MTH 314 Linear Algebra........................................4
MTH 325 Optimization Techniques...............................4
MTH 342 Differential Equations................................4
MTH 448 Numerical Analysis....................................3
Total..............................................................19
Required Laboratory Science Courses
Any 10-hour sequence chosen from the following:
PHY 231-234 General Physics and General Physics Lab l-ll...........10
CHE 120-121 General Chemistry l-ll......................................10
EET 110-113 Circuits and Circuits Lab l-ll..............................K?
Total...................................................................10
Subtotal................................................................76
General studies and free electives......................................44
Total Hours Required for Major.........................................120
Minor in Computer Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CSI 130 Introduction to Structured Programming..............4
CSI 230 Advanced Programming and Data Structures............4
Electives
A minimum of 12 semester hours chosen from CSI 240 and upper division
CSI courses........................................12
Total Hours Required............................................20
Physics
The Department of Physics offers coursework leading to a bachelor of science and to a bachelor of arts degree. Minors in physics and theoretical physics are also offered. Undergraduates preparing for work in industry or for graduate study should take the bachelor of science in physics. Students preparing to teach secondary school physics should take the bachelor of arts in physics in addition to satisfying the requirements for certification in science. See Department of Teacher Education for details.
The Physics Program is offered jointly by the faculties of MSCD and the University of Colorado at Denver and MSCD students will receive instruction from the faculty of both institutions.
The Department of Physics also offers courses in astronomy which are designed primarily as general interest courses.
Physics Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses
PHY 231 General Physics I ............
PHY 233 General Physics II............
PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I .
PHY 234 General Physics Laboratory II.
PHY 281 Modern Physics................
PHY 282 Classical Physics.............
PHY 321 Analytical Mechanics..........
PHY 381 Quantum Mechanics.............
Required Option (Select A or B)
Option A:
PHY 371 Physics Laboratory I.....................................2
PHY 472 Advanced Physics Laboratory II...........................2
PHY 492 Physics Senior Seminar..............................1
Option B:
PHY 461 Computational Physics I.............................2
PHY 462 Computational Physics II............................2
PHY 492 Physics Senior Seminar..............................1
Electives
A minimum of 10 additional semester hours of upper-division physics courses selected in consultation with
and approved by the Department of Physics.....................10
Total Hours Required..........................................38
A one-year sequence of PHY 201-202-203-204 may be substituted for the PHY 231-233-232-234 requirements with the consent of the Department of Physics.
The student is urged to take one year of general chemistry and one year of electronics. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the students advisor in the Department of Physics.
Semester
Hours
.......4
.......4
.......1
.......1
.......3
.......3
.......4
.......3
64


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Physics Major for Bachelor of Science Required Courses
Semester
Hours
Minor in Physics Required Courses
Semester
Hours
PHY 231 General Physics I .......................................4
PHY 233 General Physics II.......................................4
PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I.............................1
PHY 234 General Physics Laboratory II............................1
PHY 281 Modern Physics...........................................3
PHY 282 Classical Physics........................................3
PHY 321 Analytical Mechanics.....................................4
PHY 333 Electricity and Magnetism................................4
PHY 341 Thermal Physics..........................................3
PHY 371 Physics Laboratory I.....................................2
PHY 381 Quantum Mechanics........................................3
PHY 481 Atomic and Molecular Structure...........................3
Required Option (Select A or B)
PHY 231 General Physics I......................................4
PHY 233 General Physics II.....................................4
PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I...........................1
PHY 234 General Physics Laboratory II..........................1
PHY 281 Modern Physics..........................................3
PHY 282 Classical Physics.......................................3
A minimum of 8 additional semester hours in upper-division physics courses must be selected in consultation
with and approved by the Department of Physics.....................8
Total Hours Required...............................................24
A one-year sequence of PHY 201-202-203-204 may be substituted for the PHY 231 -233-232-234 requirements with the consent of the Department of Physics.
Option A:
PHY 471 Advanced Physics Laboratory 1.......................2
PHY 472 Advanced Physics Laboratory II......................2
PHY 492 Physics Senior Seminar..................................1
Option B:
PHY 461 Computational Physics I.............................2
PHY 462 Computational Physics II............................2
PHY 492 Physics Senior Seminar..................................1
Electives
A minimum of 8 additional semester hours in upper-division physics courses must be selected in consultation
with and approved by the Department of Physics................. 8
Total Hours Required..........................................48
A one-year sequence of PHY 201-202-203-204 may be substituted for the PHY 231-233-232-234 requirements with the consent of the Department of Physics.
The student is urged to take one year of general chemistry and one year of electronics. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the students advisor in the Department of Physics.
Minor in Theoretical Physics
Students entering this program are expected to have facility in using ordinary differential equations, vector calculus, and linear algebra. These skills are normally acquired in MTH 242, MTH 314, and MTH 342 or in PHY 311 and PHY 312.
With the consent of the Department of Physics, students with strong backgrounds in physics may elect not to complete PHY 231 and PHY 233 and may substitute eight semester credit hours of approved physics electives.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PHY 231 General Physics I ......................................4
PHY 233 General Physics II......................................4
PHY 321 Analytical Mechanics....................................4
PHY 333 Electricity and Magnetism...............................4
PHY 341 Thermal Physics.........................................3
PHY 461 Computational Physics I.................................2
PHY 463 Continuum Physics.......................................3
Total Hours Required..............................................24
65


School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services
The Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of culture, offering a major and a minor in African American studies and Chicano studies. The institute provides the student with academic skills leading to better understanding of social interaction and provides services at the local, national, and international level. Through the institute, students study with faculty from diverse academic backgrounds and may travel and study in Spain, Africa, and Mexico.
African American Studies
The Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services offers a range of courses in African American studies that present the dimension of the black experience in this country. These courses encompass and afford a comprehensive understanding of the African heritage. They present African links and potential; contributions of black people in the growth and development of the U.S.; black culture and lifestyles; the black community; political activity and potential; religious development and importance; community service and resource assistance; and prognosis and potential for social change. The courses may apply in the general studies requirements and as electives for graduation.
Students are urged to consult with the faculty in African American studies about new courses now being designed as well as special offerings.
The major in African American studies (which leads to a bachelor of arts degree) and the minor program must be planned in consultation with an advisor in the AAS Program.
Students desiring secondary certification in social studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
African American Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AAS 101 Introduction to African American Studies...............3
AAS 113 Survey of African History..............................3
AAS 200 Social Movements and the Black Experience..............3
AAS 330 The Black Community....................................3
AAS 370 Psychology of Racism and Group Prejudice
(PSY 370)..............................................3
AAS 485 Research Seminar in African American Studies...........3
From the following select one:
MUS 201 Topics in Ethnic Music: Variable Title.................3
ART 304 African Art............................................3
AAS 324 African American Literature (ENG 324)..................3
Electives..........................................................18
Total Hours Required..............................................39
Electives
Elective hours in African American studies courses are selected in consultation with the advisor.
Minor in African American Studies
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AAS 101 Introduction to African American Studies................3
AAS 200 Social Movements & the Black Experience................3
Total...............................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours is required in African American courses, three hours of which must be an African course, selected in consultation with and approved by the African American studies advisor assigned the student. Total hours for the minor are 21.
Chicano Studies
The Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services offers a bachelor of arts degree in Chicano studies. The Chicano and other Hispanic historical experiences are used as points of departure toward expanding awareness of the multicultural world and the contributions of Chicanos. The program is designed to assist in the preparation of scholars as well as human service providers.
Chicano Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts
The requirements include core courses in the major, basic knowledge of Spanish language, plus approved electives.
Semester
Required Core Courses Hours
CHS 100 Introduction to Chicano Studies..........................3
CHS 101 History of Meso-America: Pre-Columbian
and Colonial Periods (HIS 191)......................3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest:
Mexican and U.S. Periods (HIS 192)..................3
CHS 200 Living Culture and Language of the Mexican
and Chicano (ANT 236)...............................3
CHS 201 Survey of Chicano Literature (ENG 241)..................^3
Subtotal........................................................15
Language Requirements:
SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I.....................................5
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II |..................................5
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish or
SPA 212 Spanish Reading & Conversation..........................^3
Subtotal........................................................13
Approved Electives..............................................12
Total Hours Required for Major..................................40
A minimum of 12 semester hours of electives in Chicano studies selected in consultation with the institute director is required.
Minor in Chicano Studies
The minor can be designed to provide the student with course experiences which are most relevant to occupational and educational goals. Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor in Chicano studies, will develop individual minors which reflect the best possible elective curricula and which will insure that a relevant emphasis is maintained. Total hours for the minor are 21.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHS 100 Introduction to Chicano Studies.........................3
CHS 101 History of Meso-America: Pre-Columbian
and Colonial Periods....................................3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest:
Mexican and U.S. Periods...............................3
CHS 200 Living Culture and Language of the Mexican
and Chicano.............................................3
CHS 201 Survey of Chicano Literature...........................J3
Total..............................................................15
Electives
A minimum of six semester hours of electives are required to complete the minor. The courses are to be selected in consultation with a Chicano studies faculty advisor.
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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Institute for Womens Studies and Services
Institute for Womens Studies and Services
In 1985, the Womens Resource Center and the Department of Womens Studies merged to form the Institute for Womens Studies and Services. The goals of the institute are:
1. To offer academic course work in womens studies, including a minor and a contract major.
2. To foster the inclusion of material across the curriculum on women, people of color, and ethnic minorities
3. To provide services for women students, including advising, information and referral, support groups, workshops, conferences, and seminars.
4. To identify and encourage faculty, administrative, and professional mentors for women students.
5. To facilitate collaborative interdisciplinary research.
6. To engage in cooperative ventures with womens organizations in education, business, government, and the community.
A Western States Project on Women in the Curriculum grant was awarded to the institute in 1985. The purpose of the grant was to incorporate the new scholarship concerning women into the college curriculum. Additional grants further this objective. In cooperation with the Colorado Council on the Future of Women in the Workplace, and the Alliance of Professional Women, the institute offers women students opportunities to interact with and learn from professional women in education, business, and government. The institute conducts the Denver Area Teaching and Research Colloquium on Women, bringing together faculty and graduate students from six metropolitan Denver institutions to share results of curriculum development and feminist scholarship.
Womens Studies
Contract Major
Through the Office of Adult Learning Services, students may construct an individualized interdisciplinary major combining work in womens studies with work in other disciplines. Students should consult the director of the institute and the director of adult learning services to initiate planning. The womens studies contract major is appropriate for every student particularly those who plan to work specifically with female populations. Faculty strongly recommend a cooperative education internship.
A womens studies degree can be combined effectively with majors in management, organizational development, psychology, history, English, education, nursing, human services, law enforcement, advertising, public relations, marketing, finance, and other fields appropriate to the students interest. Students gain a sensitivity to women's issues and are thus prepared to work with both general and female populations in a variety of areas. Employment opportunities for womens studies students may be found in managing womens resource centers and battered women's shelters. Students might also work in community counseling and consulting or develop workshops or special programming for women in business and industry. Alumnae are also employed in banking and as executives in professional associations. Students who plan to work in higher education, law, or medicine may find a womens studies degree a useful base for graduate or professional study.
Minor
Also interdisciplinary, the womens studies minor uses faculty expertise from many different departments. Faculty strongly recommend a cooperative education internship. The objectives of both the contract major and the minor include: heightened awareness for women themselves; review of the cultural patterns which define women; the study of the historical achievements of women in all disciplines; and the exploration of emerging needs and opportunities for women. Emphasis is on both personal and professional growth.
These objectives are met within the context of the new scholarship on women, including women of color, ethnic minority women, and international women.
The courses are appropriate for students in education, guidance and counseling, law enforcement, human services, business management, advertising, public relations, communication, liberal arts, and the behavioral and social sciences.
Men are welcome and encouraged to study the scholarship which focuses on women. They may find from such study a conceptual framework that will enable them to better understand, appreciate, and work with women.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
WMS 101 Introduction: Woman in Transition.....................3
WMS 165 Women in U.S. History.................................3
WMS 331 Women and the Law.....................................3
WMS 351 Feminist Theory.......................................3
WMS 475 Senior Seminar........................................3
Total............................................................15
Electives:
In addition to the core courses, nine semester hours of electives acceptable to or taught through womens studies are required, bringing the total number of semester hours credit for a womens studies minor to 24. These courses, some of which are interdisciplinary, are selected in consultation with the womens studies faculty and are approved by the institute.
Additional Study
Womens studies core courses are supplemented each semester by topics, current issues, and cluster courses (WMS 342, 344, 345, 346, 367, and 425); in addition, students should check the Class Schedule for other relevant offerings. Appropriate electives are often listed in other departments and may be cross-listed with womens studies. For example, students may take WMS 331, Women and the Law for either womens studies credit or for credit in Criminal Justice and Criminology (CJC 371). Students may also take WMS 165, Women in U.S. History for either womens studies credit or for credit in history (HIS 165). Similar offerings are available in humanities, fine arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Additional courses in other departments are cross-referenced for the students information. While these may not have womens studies course numbers (instead they will have course numbers in other departments), they may, with permission of the womens studies faculty, count toward elective credits for the contract major or minor. An example is PSY 295, The Psychology of Sex Roles. Also included are certain courses in communications (COM), history (HIS), and mathematics (MTH). Students should check the Class Schedule each semester for appropriate cross-listed and cross-referenced courses.
Womens Services
The goal of the services component of the Institute for Womens Studies and Services is to assist women with a successful, positive college experience. A variety of assistance is available in the form of support groups, seminars, workshops, financial aid information, and employment listings. There is also a small library which houses materials of interest to women and men who wish to learn about womens contributions and about issues that have a special effect on womens lives.
Womens Services works closely with other departments in the college, and with the University of Colorado at Denver and Community College of Denver in order to provide immediate and appropriate referrals to on- and off-campus agencies. Women and men who need assistance or are concerned about women's issues should make an appointment with the coordinator of womens services.
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School of Professional Studies
School of Professional Studies
The School of Professional Studies offers many and varied degree and teaching certification programs. Every program is designed not only to prepare graduates for success in a specific career, but to provide a broad educational background for career and life enhancement.
The major purpose of the school is to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and performance competencies needed to successfully enter a chosen profession. The School of Professional Studies includes three divisions, twelve departments, and other administrative units. The Division of Education consists of two academic departments: teacher education and reading. The division also includes a parent/child development center, an educational resource center, Denver Public Schools/Metropolitan State College of Denver laboratory schools, and the Office of Student Teaching.
The two academic departments in the Division of Education offer teacher certification programs in early childhood, elementary education, and 12 secondary education fields.
The Division of Technology consists of four departments: aerospace science, civil engineering and environmental technology, electronics engineering technology, and technology and technical communications. The four academic departments offer nine major and ten minor degree programs.
The Division of Public Service Professions consists of six departments: criminal justice and criminology; hospitality, meeting, and travel administration; human services; military science; nursing and health care management; human performance, sport and leisure studies; the Institute for Gerontology; the Institute for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol and Addictive Behaviors; and the Urban Studies Program. The six academic departments and the Urban Studies Program offer seven majors and ten minor degree programs.
In addition to the many and diverse degree programs offered in the 12 academic departments, student support programs also are available: the Student Advising Program, and the Basic Skills Testing Program.
There are more than 250 full-time and part-time faculty, administrators, and support personnel in the School of Professional Studies that are highly committed to assisting students attain their career goals.
Division of Education
The Division of Education is composed of the Department of Teacher Education; the Department of Reading; the Parent Education Program, and the Child Development Center and the Education Resource Center.
The Teacher Certification Program at Metropolitan State College of Denver is fully accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education and the Colorado Department of Education.
The Department of Teacher Education offers minors in early childhood and exceptional child. Professional courses leading to certification in the areas of early childhood education, elementary education, and secondary education are also offered.
The Division of Education, with the cooperation of the Modern Languages Department and Chicano studies (located in the Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services), offers a minor and endorsement in bilingual/bicultural education.
The Department of Reading offers one of the few undergraduate reading minors in the area. Course offerings provide the prospective teacher with the skills to teach developmental and remedial reading at the early childhood, elementary, and secondary school levels. The department also offers college-level reading courses.
The Office of Student Teaching serves to integrate the laboratory experiences in the professional education programs. In addition to the student teaching programs, requests for observations, research projects and studies, and tutoring situations, utilizing off-campus laboratory settings are coordinated through this office.
The Child Development Center is a preschool laboratory which serves as a training facility for students enrolled in early childhood and other educational programs. The center provides a setting for college students to observe and participate in an ongoing educational program for young children.
The laboratory schools are a cooperative endeavor of Metropolitan State College of Denver and selected public schools. The purposes of the laboratory schools are: (1) to provide more effective education for the elementary school pupils and the Division of Education students; (2) to provide professional development and collaborate opportunities for both faculties; and (3) to fully utilize all available resources of the Auraria campus and communities.
The Education Resource Center is a facility designed to provide materials and resources for teacher education students and faculty members for coursework, field experiences and laboratories. The resource center presents guest lectures, workshops, and seminars.
workshops are offered to meet Colorado Department of Education recertification requirements and Colorado Department of Social Services group leader and director qualifications.
Teacher Education, Certification, and Related Programs
The Teacher Education Department offers professional preparation for teaching and education-related careers. These programs include initial teacher certification and endorsement to teach in public schools in Colorado at three levels: early childhood (preschool through second grade); elementary (kindergarten through sixth grade); and secondary seventh through twelfth grade); plus art, music, and physical education certification (kindergarten through twelfth grade). Minors are available in early childhood education, the exceptional child, bilingual/bicultural education with endorsement, and parent education. Courses and
Early childhood programs include:
1. A professional teaching sequence leading to a Colorado teaching certificate with endorsement to teach preschool through second grade.
2. A professional teaching sequence which, taken in conjunction with the Elementary Education Program, fulfills requirements both for a minor and endorsement in early childhood education. Students are eligible for a Colorado teaching certificate and endorsement to teach preschool through sixth grade.
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School of Professional Studies
3. A minor in early childhood education.
4. A minor in early childhood education plus the necessary courses to qualify for administration of early childhood centers. Students may also take just the courses required to be group leader and be director-qualified for the Colorado Department of Social Services.
The elementary education program consists of a professional teaching sequence leading to a Colorado teaching certificate with endorsement to teach kindergarten through sixth grade.
The secondary education program consists of a professional teaching sequence leading to a Colorado teaching certificate to teach secondary school (seventh-twelfth grades) with endorsement in art, business, English, industrial arts, mathematics, modern languages, physical education, science, social studies, Spanish, and speech. Certification is also available in elementary physical education and K-12 art, music, and physical education.
The exceptional child program prepares teachers and other human service professionals to work with exceptional children in any educational setting. The minor is appropriate for a bachelor's degree and also contains a core of courses that will meet basic requirements for graduate schools in Colorado.
The interdisciplinary bilingual/bicultural education minor prepares students to work in bilingual/bicultural classrooms and schools. A bilingual/bicultural endorsement is available.
Parent education programs include an interdisciplinary minor in parent education and a program in parent education for students who already have bachelor's degrees.
All teacher education and certification programs are approved by the Colorado Department of Education, and have full accreditation by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Recertification courses are available for Colorado teacher certificate holders.
Requirements for All Certification Students
Students seeking a bachelor's degree from Metropolitan State College of Denver must meet all requirements for a bachelors degree and the course of study leading to the desired certification and endorsement. Students who already have a bachelor's or higher degree should consult with an advisor to determine the applicability of their previous degree(s) and coursework to current requirements. Specific course requirements are given under each certification and major program.
Requirements for entry to MSCDs programs for initial teacher certification are established by the Colorado Department of Education and Metropolitan State College of Denver.
I. Prior to or during their first course in the professional education sequence, students must
A. Meet one of the following requirements:
1. Rank in the top two quartiles of the candidates high school graduating class.
2. Score at or above 19 on the American College Test (ACT) or score 950 or above on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).
3. Have a grade point average of at least 2.50 on a 4.00 scale for at least 30 semester hours of the most recent college or university coursework.
B. Pass the California Achievement Test in mathematics, spelling, and language usage at or above the 75th percentile.
C. Demonstrate oral competence. Students seeking bachelor's degrees should pass a public speaking course with a grade of B or above. Students who earn a grade of C may attempt an oral examination. Students who have bachelor's degrees but did not pass a speech course with a grade of B or above may attempt an oral examination.
D. Complete 50 clock hours of successful experience working with children and youth.
Students may not take additional teacher certification courses until they meet these requirements.
Students who fail one or more of the basic skills (California Achievement Test) examinations will be notified and provided with a list of resources for each area in which remediation is needed. Students are expected to take the initiative to seek out these resources and bring their skills in the identified areas up to an acceptable level. Candidates failing one or more sections of the basic skills test may be retested using alternate testing forms for a total of not more than three additional attempts in each of the sections failed within a four-year period. No minimum wait time between the initial test and the first two retests is required; however, a minimum of 10 weeks between the third and fourth testing sessions is required to allow for remediation.
II. To be formally admitted to the Teacher Certification
Programs, students should
A. Complete a Declaration of Intent form, available in the Teacher Education Office, NC 2028, or in the first course in each professional sequence.
B. Complete an Admission to Teacher Education form, providing evidence of having met requirements as listed in section I., above, endorsed by an advisor.
C. Obtain an admission card from the Teacher Education Office or from the instructors in beginning-level courses. The admission card verifies that initial requirements have been met and will admit students to class, provided prerequisites and grade point average (GPA) requirements have been met.
III. For admission to student teaching, students must
A. Complete a minimum of 90 semester hours of college level coursework. Students transferring more than 60 semester hours from another institution to Metropolitan State College of Denver, or those who already hold bachelor's degrees, must complete a minimum of 20 semester hours of college-level coursework and two semesters before they can be admitted to student teaching.
B. Complete 200 clock hours of experience with children and youth before entering 300-level courses. This service may be with any child or youth group such as the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Campfire Girls, Head Start, YMCA, YWCA, church groups, other boys and girls clubs, camps, recreational programs, or school or child care and education programs. Experience may be paid or volunteer, but should be with a group of children.
C. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 for the following:
1. All college work attempted
2. All coursework in their major area
3. All education courses attempted to date
D. Complete all professional courses required for certification with a grade of C or better.
E. Complete all subject area courses in the students teaching area(s) required by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
F. Complete all items in the personal student teaching folder, to be obtained in the Department of Teacher Education.
G. Have recommendations from two Metropolitan State College of Denver faculty members and/or evaluations from pre-student teaching field experiences.
H. Have a physical examination report including tuberculosis clearance and measles vaccination on file with the Student Health Services Office.
I. Have approval by the appropriate screening committee when applicable.
J. Complete formal application for student teaching, to be submitted to the Department of Teacher Education no later than the following dates:
1. For fall semester student teaching February 15
2. For spring semester student teaching September 15
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School of Professional Studies
Students who have completed student teaching requirements at another institution or another teaching level may request to take student teaching for six semester hours.
Additional Information
All students should meet with an advisor in their endorsement area to develop a program plan. Transfer students or students who already have a bachelor's degree may have to take specified general studies courses if they have not fulfilled these requirements in their previous work. Students who have previous work in education should meet with an education advisor for an evaluation before enrolling.
The Department of Teacher Education substitutes no coursework older than seven years for required courses in the certification sequence. The department may not accept more recent coursework if there have been significant changes in content. Grades below a C- in the professional courses will not be accepted. Courses for which a grade below a C- is received must be repeated and the college policy on last grade stands will apply.
Information concerning requirements and courses of study are based upon current requirements of the State of Colorado and Metropolitan State College of Denver. Requirements are subject to modification, therefore, students are advised to consult the Department of Teacher Education for the current status of requirements.
Early Childhood Programs
A new major in Child, Family and Community is being developed and may be available fall semester 1992. Consult the Department of Teacher Education for more information.
The early childhood programs at Metropolitan State College of Denver offer four options:
1. Professional teacher certification and endorsement in early childhood: preschool through second grade (ages 3-8).
2. Professional teacher certification and endorsement in early childhood in conjunction with an elementary endorsement. This sequence fulfills the bachelor's degree requirements for a minor in early childhood education.
3. A minor in early childhood education.
4. Early childhood administration, which includes the educational requirements for a minor in early childhood education and meets director qualifications for the Colorado Department of Social Services. Students may also take only those courses required by the Colorado Department of Social Services.
Colorado Teacher Certification and Early Childhood Endorsement: Preschool through Second Grade (Ages 3-8)
There are four parts to Metropolitan State College of Denvers early childhood teacher education and certification programs:
1. The professional teacher education sequence in early childhood education.
2. A major in an academic discipline.
3. A minor in an academic discipline or a professional education area.
4. MSCD general studies requirement.
1. Professional Early Childhood Education Certification Sequence
Semester
Required Courses Hours
EDU 234 Urban Early Childhood Education.......................3
EDU 235 Urban Early Childhood Education
Field Experience.....................................2
EDU 236 Expressive Arts for the Young Child......................2
RDG 312 Developing Print Literacy: Preschool-Third Grade.........4
EDU 335 Assessment and Measurement in the
Early Childhood Classroom............................3
EDU 337 Language Arts Curriculum for Early
Childhood Education.....................................3
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom..................3
EDU 364 Curriculum and Management: Preprimary-6.................4
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in Education........................3
EDU 433 Science and Mathematics for the Young Child.............2
EDU 435 Planning and Organizing the Early Childhood
Classroom................................................3
EDU 439 Student Teaching and Seminar: Early Childhood..........10
Total Hours Required for Certification..............................42
2. Approved Metropolitan State College of Denver Majors
Anthropology
Art
Behavioral Science
Biology
Chemistry
English
History
Journalism
Mathematics
Modern Languages
Music Education
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science Psychology Sociology Spanish
Speech Communication
Human Development (transfer students)
3. Recommended Minors
Parent Education Reading
Early Childhood Education Exceptional Child Bilingual/Bicultural Education
4. General Studies Requirements Specific to Early Childhood Certification
Students are required to complete the general studies requirements of Metropolitan State College of Denver. Please consult a faculty advisor in the Department of Teacher Education for guidance in selection of appropriate general studies courses for the early childhood education certification program.
Colorado Teacher Certification and Endorsement in Both Early Childhood and Elementary Education
Students seeking an endorsement in elementary education can fulfill their requirements for a minor by taking the early childhood minor. By fulfilling the minor requirement and the additional requirements as specified below, students may receive endorsement in both early childhood and elementary education.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Early childhood education minor.......................22-25
Additional Requirements:
An acceptable major, general studies coursework, and coursework in the elementary education professional sequence
which fulfills elementary certification requirements.
RDG 312 Developing Print Literacy: Preschool-
Third Grade................................................4
ENG 346 Children's Literature................................3
An additional six semester hours of student teaching
at the early childhood level.............................................6
Total................................................................35-38
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School of Professional Studies
Early Childhood Administration
Students who wish to administer early childhood programs will meet Colorado Department of Social Services qualifications by taking the early childhood minor plus additional courses specified by the Colorado Department of Social Services, as shown below. Students do not have to be admitted to the teacher certification program to take this sequence of courses, nor do they have to be
degree-seeking.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Early childhood education minor.................................22-25
Additional Required Courses for Administration
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology...............................3
PSY 180 Developmental Educational Psychology (prerequisite
to all 300- and 400-level early childhood
education courses.....................................4
HES 204 Introduction to Nutrition.............................3
EDU 334 Administration of Early Childhood Programs............4
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.............................3
or
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in Education......................3
Total...........................................................42-45
Note: Students seeking only director qualifications may take just those courses required by the Colorado Department of Social Services. Colorado Department of Social Services regulations may be changed. Consult with the Teacher Education Department for additional information.
Highly Recommended Courses
HPS 206 Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.... 3
EDU 332 Care and Nurture of Infants and Toddlers...........3
Minor in Early Childhood Education
Semester
Required Courses Hours
EDU 234 Urban Early Childhood Education........................3
EDU 235 Urban Early Childhood Education
Field Experience....................................2
EDU 236 Expressive Arts for the Young Child................2
EDU 335 Assessment and Measurement in the Early
Childhood Classroom.................................3
EDU 337 Language Arts Curriculum for Early Childhood
Education...........................................3
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in Education...................3
EDU 435 Planning and Organizing the Early Childhood
Classroom...........................................3
EDU 438 Teaching Practicum in Pre-primary Early
Childhood Education...............................3-6
Total Hours Required for Minor..............................22-25
Note: PSY 180 Developmental Educational Psychology is a prerequisite to all 300 and 400 level early childhood education courses.
Highly Recommended:
EDU 332 Care and Nurture of Infants and Toddlers.............3
EDU 436 Cultural Influence on the Socialization of Children..4
Elementary Education Program
Colorado Teacher Certification and Elementary Endorsement (Kindergarten through 6th Grade)
There are four parts to Metropolitan State College of Denvers elementary teacher certification program:
1. The professional teacher education sequence in elementary education;
2. A major in an academic discipline
3. A minor in an academic discipline or a professional education area
4. MSCD general studies requirement.
1. Professional Elementary Education and Certification Sequence
Semester
Required Courses Hours
EDU 212 Elementary Education in the United States................3
EDU 264 Urban and Multicultural Education........................3
EDU 213 Activities and Health for the Elementary Child...........3
EDU 3XX Art and Music Methods for the Elementary
Teacher..................................................2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom...................3
EDU 361 Introduction to Educational Technology...................2
EDU 364 Curriculum and Management: Pre-primary-6.................4
EDU 410 Language Arts and Social Studies Curriculum:
Pre-primary-6............................................4
EDU 412 Science and Math Curriculum: Pre-primary-6...............4
RDG 313 Teaching Reading in the Elementary
School K-6...............................................4
EDU 419 Student Teaching & Seminar: Elementary K-6..............10
Total Hours Required for Certification................................42
2. Approved Metropolitan State College of Denver Majors
Anthropology
Art
Behavioral Science
Biology
Chemistry
English
History
Mathematics
Modern Languages
Music Education
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science Psychology Sociology Spanish
Speech Communication
Human Development (transfer students)
3. Recommended Minors
Early Childhood Education*
Parent Education Reading
Exceptional Child Bilingual/Bicultural*
Concurrent endorsement available in early childhood, elementary, or bilingual/bicultural education.
4. General Studies Requirements Specific to Elementary Education Certification
Students are required to complete the general studies requirements of Metropolitan State College of Denver. Please consult a faculty advisor in the Department of Teacher Education for guidance in selection of appropriate general studies courses for the elementary education certification program. A middle school endorsement program is being developed and may be available fall semester 1992. Consult the Department of Teacher Education for more information.
Secondary Level
Students may be certified at the secondary level, being endorsed to teach in the following areas: art, business (BED courses will not be offered after spring 1992), English, industrial arts, mathematics, music education, physical education, science, social studies, Spanish, French, German, and speech.
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School of Professional Studies
Students should ask for advisors in the Department of Teacher Education as well as in the departments of their major and minor fields of study.
In addition to a major in the above areas, students must complete the following professional course program:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Social and Cultural Bases of Secondary Schools
A block of two courses to be taken concurrently.
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary Schools....3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary Schools.......2
Psychological and Physiological Bases of Secondary Education
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner........................3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content Areas.4
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom.............3
In lieu of EDU 360, physical education certification students take:
HPS 462 Adaptive Human Performance and Sports Activities.....3
Processes of Teaching in the Secondary Schools
A block of two courses to be taken concurrently and not earlier than two semesters before student teaching.
EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom
Management..........................................3
EDU 322 Field Experience in Tutoring and Materials
Construction........................................2
EDU 361 Introduction to Educational Technology..............2
Teaching Practice
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary 6-12............................6, 8,10 or 12
Total.....................................................................28-34
Students who seek secondary certification should also check the general certification requirements listed under Teacher Education Program.
Before enrolling for student teaching, students are directed to take a course in methods of teaching their major and minor field of study offered in the respective departments.
The following course of study is suggested for those students who have a bachelors or higher degree, and who are primarily completing certification courses at Metropolitan State College of Denver. Completion of the program takes a minimum of three semesters. Additional time may be required to complete subject area courses.
Semester I
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary
Schools..............................................3
EDU 222 Field Experience in Urban Secondary Schools...............2
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner...............................3
Semester I or II
To be taken as offered, or as these courses fit into the students schedule
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content Areas.....4
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom...................3
EDU 361 Introduction to Educational Technology...................2
---- ----- Methods of Teaching Major Subject
---- ----- Methods of Teaching Second Teaching Field,
if applicable
Semester II
EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom
Management..........................................3
EDU 322 Field Experience in Tutoring and Materials
Construction........................................2
ALL OF THE ABOVE LISTED COURSES ARE PREREQUISITES FOR STUDENT TEACHING
Semester III
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary 6-12
(Not available summer term).....................12
Business Certification Program
BED courses will not be offered after spring 1992. The program requires the completion of degree requirements in the School of Business; the secondary level professional sequence; the requirements for vocational credentials; two of the teaching fields listed below; and the following courses:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BED 360 Principles of Business Education....................2
BED 361 Methods of Teaching Typewriting/Keyboarding
and Word processing.................................3
One three semester hour course in beginning or intermediate
typing..........................................................3*
Bookkeeping and Accounting
ACC 309 Income Tax I.......................................3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting....................................3
or
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting............................3
BED 363 Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping, Accounting,
and Basic Business (fall semesters).................3
Consumer Economics and Basic Business
FIN 225 Personal Money Management...........................3
BED 363 Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping, Accounting,
and Basic Business (fall semesters).................3
PHI 390 Business Ethics.....................................3
Data Processing
BED xxx Teaching Data Processing course.....................3
CMS 327 Micro-based Software ... ..........................3
CMS 350 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design........3
Secretarial
CMS 223 Word Processing....................................3
BED 362 Methods of Teaching Stenography.....................3
One three semester course in office practices and
procedures......................................................3^
Total...........................................................17
Requirements for Vocational Credentials
1. 4,000 hours of related work experience within the past 10 years, 2,000 of which must have been completed within the past five years.
2. Completion of the following three vocational courses (two semester hours credit each):
a. Foundations of Vocational Education*
b. Coordinating Techniques*
c. Student Organizations*
'Students should consult with a faculty advisor regarding the completion of these non-MSCD courses.
Science Certification Program
The program includes a major in one area of science, an area of emphasis in a second area, and a sampling from additional areas of science and mathematics. The program satisfies both major and minor requirements, so no further minor is required.
Major
Students must complete an academic major at Metropolitan State College of Denver in one of the following areas:
Biology
Chemistry
Earth-Space Science Physics
PLEASE CONSULT WITH THE TEACHER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT FOR A LIST OF APPROVED AND/OR REQUIRED COURSES IN THE MAJOR AND FOR CERTIFICATION.
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School of Professional Studies
Science Support Area
Students must complete one of the following teaching areas of emphasis other than that of the major.
Semester
Biology Hours
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology.......................4
BIO 210 General Botany........................................5
BIO 220 General Zoology.......................................5
BIO 355 Urban Ecology.........................................4
or
BIO 360 General Genetics........................................... .. 3
Subtotal........................................................17-18
Chemistry
CHE 120 General Chemistry 1...................................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II..................................5
CHE 300 Analytical Chemistry..................................3
CHE 301 Analytical Chemistry Lab..............................2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry 1...................................4
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Lab I...............................^
Subtotal...........................................................21
Earth Science
GEL 101 General Geology.......................................4
GEL 103 Historical Geology....................................4
GEG 100 World Regional Geography..............................3
GEG 123 Weather and Climate...................................3
or
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology...........................3
GEG 124 Landforms.............................................3
or
GEL 212 Gemorphology of the U.S...............................3
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy.............................3
Subtotal...........................................................20
Mathematics
MTH 141 Calculus 1............................................4
MTH 310 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs...................3
MTH 361 Methods of Teaching Mathematics.......................3
10 additional hours to be selected from:
MTH 241 Calculus II...........................................4
CSI 130 Introduction to Structured Programming................4
MTH 311 Abstract Algebra I....................................3
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics............................4
MTH 360 History of Mathematics................................3
MTH 365 Foundations of Geometry..............................J3
Subtotal...........................................................20
Physics
PHY 231 General Physics I ....................................4
PHY 232 General Physics Lab I.................................1
PHY 233 General Physics II....................................4
PHY 234 General Physics Lab II ...............................1
Plus eight additional hours in physics..........................
Subtotal...........................................................21
A support area in computer science is being proposed. Check with the Teacher Education Department or Mathematics Department for further information.
General Requirements
These may be fulfilled in the academic major or teaching area of emphasis.
Choose at least one course from each of the following areas:
Biology
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology......................4
Chemistry
CHE 110 Principles of Chemistry..............................5
or
CHE 120 General Chemistry 1..................................5
Earth Science
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy............................3
or
GEG 100 World Regional Geography.............................3
or
GEL 101 General Geology.......................................4
Physics
PHY 201 College Physics 1.....................................5
or
PHY 231 General Physics I ....................................4
Mathematics
MTH 111 College Algebra.......................................4
or
MTH 112 College Trigonometry..................................3
or
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics............................4
or
MTH 140 Pre-Calculus Mathematics..............................4
or
MTH 141 Calculus 1............................................4
or
CSI 130 Introduction to Structured Programming................4
or
MTH 320 Biostatistics.........................................3
or
MTH 360 History of Mathematics................................3
Science
This course is required:
SCI 395 Methods of Teaching Science...................... 3
Subtotal.......................................................22-25
Notes
Physics majors should choose AST 104 and MTH 151 to meet certification requirements.
Students who elect the earth science or physics teaching areas of emphasis must choose at least one upper-division course in addition to SCI 395.
A course in environmental concerns/conservation will soon be required by the Colorado Department of Education.
Permission is being sought for mathematics to be included as an area of emphasis. Check with the Teacher Education Department.
Social Studies Certification Program
The program includes a major in one area of social science, an area of emphasis in a second area, and a sampling from every social/behavioral science.
The program meets both major and minor requirements; an additional minor is not required.
Major
Students must complete an academic major at Metropolitan State College of Denver in one of the following areas:
African American Studies
Anthropology
Behavioral Science
Chicano Studies
Economics
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
PLEASE CONSULT WITH THE TEACHER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT FOR LIST OF APPROVED AND/OR REQUIRED COURSES IN THE MAJOR AND FOR CERTIFICATION.
Social Studies Area of Emphasis
Students must complete one of the following teaching areas of emphasis. History must be selected unless the academic major is history.
History
HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1715.....................................3
HIS 102 Western Civilization Since 1715..................................3
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School of Professional Studies
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ..............................3
HIS 122 American History Since 1865 ...........................3
Six additional upper-division history hours selected in consultation
with the department. Reading courses will not apply.................6
Subtotal...........................................................18
African American Studies
AAS 101 Introduction to African American Studies...............3
AAS 200 Social Movement and the Black Experience...............3
Six additional hours in African American studies; three must be upper-division. African American History is recommended.
Students should consult with a faculty advisor regarding selection
of these courses....................................................6
Subtotal...........................................................12
Anthropology
ANT 101 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory...................3
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology..................3
Six additional upper-division hours in anthropology.................6
Subtotal...........................................................12
Chicano Studies
CHS 100 Introduction to Chicano Studies........................3
CHS 101 History of Meso-America: Pre-Columbian and
Colonial Periods......................................3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest: Mexico
and U.S. Periods......................................3
Three additional upper-division hours in Chicano studies............3
Subtotal...........................................................12
Economics (18 semester hours)
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro........................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro........................3
Twelve additional upper-division hours in economics................12
Subtotal...........................................................18
Geography
GEG 123 Weather and Climate....................................3
or
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology............................3
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography........................3
GEG 140 World Resources........................................3
GEG 496 Global Environmental Challenges........................3
Subtotal...........................................................12
Political Science
PSC 101 American National Government...........................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas............................3
PSC 300 American State and Local Government....................3
PSC 305 Political Theory.......................................3
Subtotal...........................................................12
Psychology
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology................................3
PSY 211 Educational Psychology.................................3
PSY 326 Psychology of Adolescence..............................3
Three additional hours of electives. Suggested: PSY 216, 221,241.
Consult with Psychology Department advisor in choosing electives....3
Subtotal...........................................................12
Sociology (12 semester hours)
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology..............................3
SOC 360 Research in the Social Sciences........................3
Six additional hours of electives, three of which must
be upper-division...........................................6
Subtotal...........................................................12
General Requirements
(Some may be satisfied in academic major or support area.)
HIS 401 Methods of Teaching Social Science: Secondary School ... 3
Select one course from each of the following areas:
African American Studies*
Anthropology Chicano Studies
Economics
Geography**
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
African American History or other course dealing with African American experience in the United States.
**GEG 100-3 World Regional Geography or GEG 140-3 World Resources suggested. These credits are to be taken as part of general studies.
A course in international studies will soon be required by the Colorado Department of Education.
Exceptional Child Minor
The minor in exceptional child is designed to prepare teachers, physical educators, recreational therapists, counselors, and professionals to work with exceptional children in educational therapeutic and recreational settings. The minor also will serve as a prerequisite core for MSCD teacher education students who desire to pursue graduate programs in special education or gifted education.
Semester
Required for Either Emphasis: Hours
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom..................3
One 3 hour course from alternate emphasis............................3
Gifted Education Emphasis
EDU 346 Introduction to the Education of the Gifted
and Talented...........................................3
ART 439 Integrating the Arts for Gifted and Talented............3
EDU 442 Methods and Materials for Teaching the Gifted...........3
EDU 443 Field Experience in Gifted and Talented.................1
EDU 444 Teaching Thinking Skills to the Gifted..................2
Total Hours.........................................................15
Special Education Emphasis Select a minimum of 12 hours:
SED 340 Educational Exceptionality and Human Growth.............3
SED 343 Field Testing Remedial Techniques in Special
Education..............................................3
SED 344 Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children..............3
SED 349 Education of the Learning Disabled......................3
HPS 462 Adaptive Human Performance and Sports
Activities.............................................3
Total........................................................... .12
Total Hours Required.............................................18-21
Bilingual/Bicultural Education Minor
The Division of Education offers a minor in bilingual/bicultural education. The minor is an interdisciplinary program sponsored by Chicano Studies, the Teacher Education Department, the Modern Language Department, and the Reading Department. The principal objective of the bilingual/bicultural minor is to prepare future teachers who will be able to conduct all phases of classroom instruction in a bilingual and bicultural setting. In the developmental sequence, the minor will provide the potential teacher with a background of the Mexican heritage and with an understanding of present day Hispano/Chicano culture. Proficiency in the Spanish language is required of all students before they complete the minor. This proficiency will prepare the teacher to understand and further develop the native tongue of bilingual/bicultural children, while offering a second language to many other children. In addition, the minor will provide the teacher with sufficient field and academic experiences and resources in order to develop, Implement, and evaluate curricular methods, techniques, and materials in the bilingual/bicultural classroom. For students who do not student teach in a bilingual/bicultural program, the practicum in bilingual/bicultural education will be required.
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School of Professional Studies
Semester
Required Courses and Recommended Sequence Hours
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest:
Mexico and U.S. Periods..................................3
EDU 351 Perspectives in Bilingual/Bicultural Education..............4
RDG 353 Teaching Reading to Non-English Speakers....................2
SPA 310 Spanish Terminology for the Bilingual Classroom.............2
RDG 358 Reading in the Bilingual/Bicultural Classroom...............3
EDU 451 Development of Methods and Materials for the
Bilingual/Bicultural Classroom...........................4
CHS* Electives.......................................................3
SPA* Electives.......................................................3
Total................................................................24
'Must be advanced courses and taken with the approval of the bilingual advisor.
Courses Strongly Recommended in Chicano Studies and
Spanish
CHS 310 The Chicano Community...................................3
CHS 330 Education of Chicano Children...........................3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation....................................3
SPA 315 Spanish Phonetics and Diction...........................3
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest...........3
Required when student teaching in a bilingual/bicultural program is not completed:
EDU 452 Practicum in Bilingual/Bicultural Education.............3
Preparation Requirements
Language Proficiency: Proficiency in oral and written Spanish will be determined by a committee composed of Spanish-speaking members of the Modern Language Department, Chicano Studies, and the Department of Teacher Education. The four-skills exam is used as the proficiency measure. Students who fail to achieve a satisfactory score on the proficiency examination will be required to take sufficient Spanish classes to enable them to pass the proficiency examination. The following courses are designed to help students meet the proficiency requirements before the completion of the bilingual/bicultural minor:
SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I....................................5
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II...................................5
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish....................................3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation........................3
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The multi-minor may be arranged through the Department of Education and includes the required courses listed under the holistic health and education multi-minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSCD section of this catalog.
Parent Education
The purpose of the parent education minor is twofold. First, the program is designed to provide students entering professions where they will deal with children and families with the information and skills necessary to conduct parent education programs. Second, the program addresses a need identified in the community for people with specific preparation for the role of parent educator. Many agencies offer or are interested in offering parent education programs, yet no specific preparation for that role has been available. This minor is designed both to make the field of parent education more credible by providing students with education for that role and to give students a set of skills that are increasingly in demand.
The minor is seen as particularly appropriate for students entering family- and child-related fields, including (but not limited to) education, health care management, human services, criminal justice (especially juvenile justice), nursing and nurse practitioner programs, psychology, sociology, social welfare, speech, and womens studies. People entering these fields might well be in a position to develop and conduct parent education programs; a minor in parent education should serve them well in the employment market. Other fields, also, might provide opportunities to utilize this background; parent
education happens in settings ranging from churches to industry and is not limited to educational settings in the usual sense.
The parent education minor encompasses three areas of preparation. One set of classes is intended to give students basic information necessary for effective parenting (child development, parenting techniques, family management, health care). The second facet of the program gives students the skills necessary for developing and conducting parent education programs such as group techniques and program development. The third component of the program entails actual field experience working in parent education programs. This experience is incorporated into a number of classes and is the central component of the final course in the minor. A field placement is required in the last semester. Placement opportunities include parent education in hospitals, social service agencies, public and private schools, and business and industry. Students work closely with a PAR advisor to ensure an appropriate field placement.
Minor in Parent Education
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PAR 205 Introduction to Parent Education.......................3
PSY 180 Developmental Educational Psychology...................4
or
PSY 325 Child Psychology.......................................3
HSW 202 Small Group Dynamics: Theory and Experience............4
HSW 204 Family Functions, Dysfunction, and Therapy.............4
PSY 295 Parenting Techniques...................................3
PAR 307 Working with the Contemporary Family...................3
HES 307 Parental Health Care Issues............................3
EDU 407 Designing and Implementing Programs for Adult Learners.. 3
Subtotal.......................................................26-27
Field Placement: A minimum of three hours from the courses listed. The program director works closely with students and community agencies in setting up appropriate field placements.
PAR 489 Parent Education Field Placement.......................3
PSY 493 Seminar in Developmental Psychology....................3
EDU 469 Professional Practicum.................................1-6
HSW 479 Professional Internship.................................12
NUR 485 Nursing Process: Application...........................5
Total Hours Required for Minor..............................29-30
Minimum hours required for the minor are 29-30 (depending on courses selected). If the PAR minor is combined with a major in any of the following departments (EDU, HSW, NUR, PSY), the combined total semester hours for major and minor must be 60 hours. Such a program must include all courses required for the major and those listed here as required for the PAR minor. Approval by both departments will be necessary for such a combined program.
Note: For descriptions of other courses included in the minor, see appropriate department listings: EDU Education; HES Health Services; HSW Human Services; NUR Nursing; PSY Psychology; SOC Sociology; WMS Womens Studies
Parent Education Program
Prerequisites: A degree (B.A., B.S., M.A., M.S.) in a field such as education, psychology, social welfare, human services, child development, or nursing.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PAR 205 Introduction to Parent Education.......................3
HSW 202 Small Group Dynamics: Theory and Experiences...........4
or
HSW 204 Family Functions, Dysfunction, and Therapy.............4
PSY 295 Parenting Techniques...................................3
PAR 307 Working with the Contemporary Family...................3
HES 307 Parental Health Care Issues............................3
EDU 407 Designing and Implementing Programs for Adult
Learners...............................................3
PAR 489 Parent Education Field Placement.......................3
Total..............................................................22
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Suggested Electives
PAR 480 Special Topics in Parent Education
PSV 326 Psychology of Adolescence................................3
HSW 204 Family Functions, Dysfunction, and Therapy...............4
SOC 341 The Family in Transition.................................3
WMS 101 Woman in Transition......................................3
WMS 218 Assertiveness Training...................................3
SED 344 Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children...............3
HSW 104 Behavior Modification....................................4
CHS 221 The Chicano Family.......................................3
SWF 104 Human Behavior and the Social Environment................4
SWF 105 Family Social Services...................................4
SWF 301 Social Welfare Services for Children
and Adolescents.........................................4
AAS 355 The Black Family.........................................3
Physical Education Certification
The following professional teacher education sequences are required for certification:
Elementary Physical Education Certification
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication....................3
EDU 212 Elementary Education in the United States...............3
EDU 361 Introduction to Educational Technology..................2
EDU 364 Curriculum and Management: Pre-primary-6................4
HPS 462 Adaptive Human Performance & Sports
Activities.............................................3
RDG 313 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School: K-6..........4
EDU 419 Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary K-6...........10
PSV 180 Developmental Educational Psychology....................4
Total.............................................................33
K-12 Physical Education Certification Required Courses
Semester
Hours
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication....................3
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary Schools.......3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary Schools............2
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner.............................3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content Areas....4
EDU 361 Introduction to Educational Technology..................2
EDU 364 Curriculum and Management: Pre-primary-6................4
EDU 419 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Elementary............................6 or 12 combined
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary.................6 or 12 combined must total 18
HPS 462 Adaptive Human Performance & Sports
Activities (in lieu of EDU 360)....................................3
Total...........................................................................42
Secondary Physical Education Certification
Semester
Required Courses Hours
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary Schools.......3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary Schools............2
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner.............................3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content Areas....4
HPS 462 Adaptive Human Performance & Sports
Activities (in lieu of EDU 360)........................3
EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom
Management.............................................3
EDU 322 Field Experiences in Tutoring and Materials
Construction...........................................2
EDU 361 Introduction to Educational Technology..................2
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary................12
Total..............................................................34
RDG 151 is designed as a basic college level reading course which satisfies a General Studies Level I communications requirement. In order to enroll in this course, students must attain a minimal preassessment test score as established by the Reading Department.
The reading minor is designed to produce well-trained classroom teachers. In the sophomore and junior years, students take coursework in methods and techniques of teaching reading and receive supervised experience teaching groups of children in a school classroom setting.
In the senior year, students learn to administer a complete reading diagnosis, write a comprehensive case report based on the study of current remedial theory, develop materials for students with reading difficulties, and work in the reading clinic on a one-to-one basis with children who have severe reading problems. NOTE: A letter grade of at least a C must be attained in each of the courses in the reading minor.
Reading Minor Required Courses
Semester
Hours
RDG 312* Developing Print Literacy: Preschool-3rd Grade.............4
RDG 313* Teaching Reading in the Elementary School K-6............4
RDG 328* Teaching Reading & Writing in the Content Areas..........4
RDG 314 Whole Language Integration Across
the Curriculum...........................................2
RDG 360 Practicum in Teaching Reading............................3
RDG 425 Remedial Reading Theories and Diagnosis..................4
RDG 434 Development of Reading Materials.........................2
RDG 460 Practicum in Teaching Remedial Reading..................^3
Total...............................................................18
Early childhood education certification students take RDG 312; elementary education certification students take RDG 313; secondary education certification students take RDG 328.
Highly Recommended
RDG
RDG
RDG
353
358
450
Teaching Reading to Non-English Speakers. Reading in the Bilingual/Bicultural Classroom
(competency in Spanish required)...........
Language Arts & the Classroom Computer..
Reading
The Reading Department offers college level reading courses for all students and a reading minor for early childhood, elementary, and secondary education certification students.
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Division of Technology
The Division of Technology provides technical education to prepare graduates for employment in a wide variety of technical fields. Instruction emphasizes the development of technical competence at a level suitable for success in the various areas offered. The programs include courses in humanities and social sciences to broaden the students general education. The various fields housed in this division offer great opportunities for women in non-traditional roles.
The Division of Technology offers degree programs in aviation management and professional pilot; civil engineering technology and surveying and mapping, electronics engineering technology; industrial and technical studies, technical and industrial administration and industrial design; mechanical engineering technology; and technical communications.
The aerospace science programs combine a thorough, practical, and technical training background with a general college education to prepare graduates for a wide variety of careers in aerospace. MSCDs Aerospace Science Department is a fully certified ground school approved by the Federal Aviation Administration, for private, instrument, and commercial FAA ratings. The department has FAA airways science accreditation for the aircraft systems management and aviation maintenance management programs.
The Civil Engineering and Environmental Technology Department offers programs in civil engineering technology, drafting, and surveying and mapping. Environmental impact studies and the application of engineering principles are used in the planning and construction of highways, buildings, bridges, and other structures. The surveying and mapping degree program is designed to prepare the graduate for registration as a professional land surveyor, as well as other careers in the field.
The electronics engineering technology degree program fuses the engineering principles and technical aspects of electronics and prepares graduates for a variety of positions in research and development, design, electronic manufacturing, and service engineering. This program emphasizes applications of theory in laboratory settings.
The Department of Technology and Technical Communications is divided into two program areas: industrial and technical studies and technical communications. Industrial and technical studies offers teaching, business and internship areas of emphasis. Technical communications specializes in technical writing and editing, organizational, and technical media communications.
The mechanical engineering technology program has areas of emphasis in mechanical and manufacturing engineering.
Department of Aerospace Science
Colorado is one of the nations aerospace centers. Military installations, major aerospace industries, increased interest in private and corporation flying, and the airlines that serve Denver provide employment opportunities. Local Federal Aviation Administration and other government offices offer excellent sources for information. Because of this proximity, students also have the opportunity to visit these facilities and to take courses that are taught by personnel from the various organizations. The bachelor degree programs described below have been carefully planned to meet the needs of both the student and of industry. All of the technical courses have been developed in cooperation with the Federal Aviation Administration and prospective employers; students completing them are eligible to take a variety of FAA examinations leading to certification.
The aviation management program prepares the graduate to enter a wide variety of administrative positions within the various segments of the aviation industry.
The airframe and powerplant (A&P) courses are not offered by Metropolitan State College of Denver. However, students holding a valid FAA Airframe and Powerplant certificate may apply for 30 hours of credit to apply toward a bachelor of science degree providing certain validation papers are presented with the application.
All programs in the Department of Aerospace Science have been developed to meet the College Aviation Accreditation Guidelines of the University Aviation Association.
The airway science emphasis is an approved FAA program. Students majoring in any of the airway science emphases must minor in systems management.
Requirements are subject to modification; therefore, students are advised to consult the aerospace science department for the current status of requirements
Bachelor of Science
The Department of Aerospace Science offers baccalaureate degree programs with majors in the following areas:
Aviation Management (AMG)
General Aviation Emphasis Airway Science Management Emphasis Aviation Maintenance Emphasis Airway Science Maintenance Management Emphasis Professional Pilot (PPT)
General Aviation Emphasis Flight Engineer Emphasis
Airway Science Aircraft Systems Management Emphasis Minors
Aviation Management (AMG)
Professional Pilot (PPT)
Airframe and Powerplant Mechanics (APL)
These programs combine a thorough, practical and technical training background with a general college education to prepare a graduate for a wide variety of careers in the aerospace industry. These four-year bachelor degree programs have been developed upon the two-plus-two concept (a bachelor of science degree program built upon a AAS two-year degree). This concept makes it extremely easy for a community/junior college graduate in an aerospace program to transfer to MSCD and earn a bachelor of science degree in our aviation program. In order to be awarded the bachelor of science degree, the student must comply with the colleges general requirements for the bachelors degree listed in this catalog under Requirements for All Degrees.
FAA Approved Ground School
MSCD Aerospace Science Department is a fully certified and approved ground school for the private, instrument and commercial FAA ratings, approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. Veterans Administration flight students should see the Aerospace Science Department chair for information on approved flight training program.
Flight Courses
Flight training is contracted for, by the student, with the flight training schools under contract with MSCD. In order to enroll in all flight courses and receive academic credit, the student must fly with MSCDs contract flight schools. Students must receive permission from the department before enrolling in flight courses.
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School of Professional Studies
The cost of the flight training is in addition to regular tuition and college services fees. This cost will vary depending upon how frequently the student is able to fly during the semester and how much total time the student requires to gain the necessary proficiency. The college instructor helps the student achieve an understanding of the relationship of flight theory to flight practice in order to acquire the knowledge required to meet FAA certification standards. Flights are scheduled by the student with the contract flight training school.
Credit by Examination Procedures
The basic provision for obtaining credit-by-examination (a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit) is outlined in this catalog under academic information. The following procedures are established by the Department of Aerospace Science to implement this provision:
1. A student entering MSCD for the first time must make application for credit by examination during the first three weeks of the first semester. All examinations must be completed within the first semester.
2. A student will not be approved to take a course of a lower number than any course she or he has taken previously.
3. If a student is registered for, but has not completed a higher-numbered course, the examination for the lower numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester.
4. Examinations will not be graded during the summer session.
5. Courses authorized for credit by examination and the appropriate FAA license and/or rating are listed below:
Course Title FAA Certificate Hours
Required Credit
AES 110 Aviation Fundamentals Private 6
AES 180 Commercial/lnstrument Commercial/
Ground Instrument 6
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion Fit. Engineer 3
AES 353 Aerodynamics Fit. Engineer 3
AES 404 Aircraft Performance Fit. Engineer 3
AES 450 Flight Multi-Engine Multi-Engine 1
AES 451 Flight Instructor Fit. Instructor 1
AES 452 Flight Instructor-Instrument Fit. Instructor 1
AES 453 Fit. Instructor-Multi-Engine Fit. Inst. Multi 1
AES 455 Flight Helicopter Helicopter 1
AES 457 Airline Transport Pilot ATP Rating 1
Bachelor of Science Degree in Aerospace Science Programs
A summary of the course program and semester hours which a student must complete for a bachelor of science degree is as follows:
Semester
Hours
General Studies..............................................36-39
Major (Select One)...........................................47-59
Aviation Management**
General Aviation
or Airway Science Management"......................47
Aviation Maintenance
or Airway Science Maintenance Management"..........57
Professional Pilot
General Aviation* .................................51
Air Carrier*
or Airway Science Aircraft Systems Management".....59
Business/Meteorology Minor/Meteorology or
Approved Business Electives"*................................18-30
Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) Minor"**...................36
Free electives................................................0-19
Total......................................................120-134
A recommended sequence for taking all courses in a selected major or minor and a list of required general studies may be obtained from the Department of Aerospace Science.
General Studies
Students seeking a bachelor degree in aerospace science programs must complete the general studies requirements of Metropolitan State College of Denver. Students must consult with a faculty advisor for the selection of approved general studies courses.
'All professional pilot majors must possess, as a minimum, the FAA commercial pilot certificate with an instrument rating to receive a bachelor of science degree.
"Students choosing a major in any of the airway science emphases must complete a 21 semester hour concentration in computer information systems.
"Electives program must be approved by a department advisor.
""The credit hours awarded are based on the number of clock hours required by the Federal Aviation Administration for the award of the A&P license and the credits normally awarded by junior/community colleges, thus the increased number of hours for the Aviation Maintenance emphasis major or A&P minor.
Aviation Management (AMG)
Major for Bachelor of Science
General Aviation Emphasis AV1
& Airway Science Management Emphasis AV2
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 110 Aviation Fundamentals..............................6
AES 222 Flight Dispatcher/Load Planning....................3
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion....................3
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations.................3
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management...................3
AES 323 Commuter Airline Management........................3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management....................3
AES 420 Airport Planning...................................3
AES 421 Airport Management.................................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing.........................3
AES 424 Air Cargo..........................................3
AES 486 Aviation Safety....................................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems and Job
Targeting..........................................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology..............................2
AES Upper Division AES Elective.........................3
Total .........................................................47
Suggested Electives
AES 170 SimulatorInstruments and Navigation...............2
AES 205 Aviation History and Future Development............3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management....................3
AES 353 Aerodynamics.......................................3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology of Flight.............3
AES 387 Aircraft Accident Investigation....................3
AES 404 Aircraft Performance...............................3
AES 460 Space Flight.......................................3
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations..................3
Aviation Maintenance Emphasis AV3
& Airway Science Maintenance Management Emphasis AV4
Students who wish to enroll in the aviation management major with the aviation maintenance area of emphasis should complete an airframe and powerplant program prior to or while attending MSCD.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Completion of the FAA approved Airframe and Powerplant program with appropriate college credits awarded (30 semester hours) plus:
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations................3
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management .................3
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AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology of Flight
AES 420 Airport Planning ..................
AES 421 Airport Management...............
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ..............
AES 486 Aviation Safety ...................
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems and
Job Targeting .....................
AES Upper Division AES Elective..........
Total ...........................................
Suggested Electives
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
MTR
170 SimulatorInstruments and Navigation
222 Flight Dispatcher/Load Planning.....
320 National Airspace Operations........
323 Commuter Airline Management ......
324 Airline Planning and Management
353 Aerodynamics........................
387 Aircraft Accident Investigation ....
404 Aircraft Performance................
346 Meteorology and Flight Operations
Professional Pilot (PPT)
Major for Bachelor of Science General Aviation Emphasis
Required Courses
AES 110 Aviation Fundamentals...................
Simulator-Instruments and Navigation ..
Commercial/lnstrument Ground........
Professional Pilot Documentation....
Simulator-Cross Country Flight......
Aircraft Systems and Propulsion.....
National Airspace Operations........
Aviation Economics and Regulations .
Commuter Airline Management ........
Aerodynamics........................
Human Factors and Physiology of Flight
Aircraft Performance................
Advanced Navigation Systems.........
Aviation Safety ....................
Aviation Management Problems and
Job Targeting ......................
Aerospace Meteorology ..............
Meteorology and Flight Operations...
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
170
180
197
270
300
320
321 323 353 385 404 437 486 491
141
346
MTR MTR
Total ...............................................
Suggested Electives
AES 222 Flight Dispatcher/Load Planning..............
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management ............
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management..............
AES 370 SimulatorIFR Procedures & Approaches....
AES 387 Aircraft Accident Investigation .............
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ..................
AES 424 Air Cargo ...................................
AES 460 Space Flight.................................
AES 470 Advanced Simulator & Navigational Computers
Flight Engineer Emphasis
Required Courses
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
AES
110 Aviation Fundamentals....................
170 Simulator-Instruments and Navigation
180 Commercial/lnstrument Ground.............
197 Professional Pilot Documentation.........
270 Simulator-Cross Country Flight...........
300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion..........
320 National Airspace Operations...........
321 Aviation Economics and Regulations.....
323 Commuter Airline Management .............
353 Aerodynamics.............................
385 Human Factors and Physiology of Flight ..
404 Aircraft Performance.....................
413 Flight Engineer Duties and Responsibilities
.3 AES 414 B-727 Systems........................................4
. 3 AES 437 Advanced Navigation Systems..........................3
.3 AES 486 Aviation Safety .....................................3
. 3 AES 491 Aviation Management Problems and
. 3 Job Targeting ......................................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology ..................................2
. 3 MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations....................^
^3 Total ............................................................59
57
Suggested Electives
3 AES 222 Flight Dispatcher/Load Planning......................3
. 3 AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management ....................3
3 AES 324 Airline Planning and Management .....................3
3 AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ..........................3
.3 AES 424 Air Cargo ...........................................3
. 3 AES 460 Space Flight ........................................3
.3
3 Airway Science Aircraft Systems Management Emphasis
Semester
Hours
.......6
.......2
.......6
.......0
.......2
.......3
.......3
.......3
.......3
.......3
.......3
.......3
.......3
.......3
.......3
.......2
......_3
......51
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
Semester
Hours
......6
......2
......6
.......0
.......2
......3
......3
......3
.......3
.......3
.......3
.......3
.......4
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 110 Aviation Fundamentals...............................6
AES 170 Simulator-Instruments and Navigation ...............2
AES 180 Commercial/lnstrument Ground........................6
AES 197 Professional Pilot Documentation....................0
AES 270 Simulator-Cross Country Flight......................2
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion.....................3
AES 320 National Airspace Operations........................3
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations..................3
AES 323 Commuter Airline Management ........................3
AES 353 Aerodynamics........................................3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology of Flight .............3
AES 404 Aircraft Performance................................3
AES 413 Flight Engineer Duties and Responsibilities.........4
AES 414 B-727 Systems.......................................4
AES 437 Advanced Navigation Systems.........................3
AES 486 Aviation Safety ....................................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems and
Job Targeting .......................................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology ...............................2
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations...................J3
Total ...........................................................59
Suggested Electives
AES 222 Flight Dispatcher/Load Planning.....................3
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management ...................3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management ....................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing .........................3
AES 424 Air Cargo ..........................................3
AES 460 Space Flight.........................................3
Minors
The following aerospace minors are designed primarily to afford majors in other areas within the college with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the aerospace world and sufficient familiarity with aviation skills to use in furtherance of their primary job. Aerospace majors normally may not elect the aviation management or professional pilot minors. Exception: aviation management (maintenance emphasis) may minor in professional pilot; professional pilot majors may minor in airframe and powerplant mechanics.
Aviation Management Minor
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 110 Aviation Fundamentals..............................6
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology .............................2
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations.................3
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management ................._3
Total ........................................................14
Plus nine hours selected from the following courses:
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion....................3
AES 323 Commuter Airline Management .......................3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management ...................3
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School of Professional Studies
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology of Flight ...............3
AES 420 Airport Planning .....................................3
AES 421 Airport Management....................................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ...........................3
AES 424 Air Cargo ............................................3
AES 486 Aviation Safety ......................................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems and
Job Targeting ........................................3
Subtotal...........................................................9
Total ............................................................23
Professional Pilot Minor
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 110 Aviation Fundamentals.................................6
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology.................................2
AES 180 Commercial/lnstrument Ground..........................6
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion.......................3
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations.....................3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology of Flight ...............3
AES 486 Aviation Safety ......................................3
Total ...........................................................26
In addition, ail professional pilot minors must possess, as a minimum, the FAA commercial certificate with an instrument rating.
Airframe and Powerplant Mechanics Minor
Students who wish to enroll in the airframe and powerplant (A&P) mechanics minor should complete an airframe and powerplant program prior to or while attending MSCD.
Required Courses
Completion of an FAA approved airframe and powerplant program with appropriate college credit (usual semester hours awarded) 30
Plus:
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ...............................3
AES 486 Aviation Safety ...........................................3
Total ..................................................................36
Private Pilot Minor Required Courses
Semester
Hours
AES 110 Aviation Fundamentals................................6
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology.................................2
AES 170 SimulatorInstruments and Navigation.................2
AES 197 Private Pilot Documentation...........................0
AES 270 SimulatorCross-Country Flight........................2
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology of Flight ..............3
One of the two following courses:
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion......................3
AES 404 Aircraft Performance..................................3
Total ...........................................................18
In addition, all private pilot minors must possess, as a minimum, the FAA private pilot certificate.
Air Force ROTC Program
Students may register and receive credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver for Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) classes at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The Air Force Department of Aerospace Studies offers two Air Force ROTC programs leading to a commission in the active Air Force upon earning a bachelor's degree.
Four-Year Program. The four-year program consists of the General Military Course (GMC) and the Professional Officer Course (POC). Emphasis is focused upon basic leadership qualities and preparation for the Air Force while enrolled in a baccalaureate degree program. Upon completion of the GMC, students attend a four-week field training camp at an air force base. Field training is designed to encourage leadership development and to introduce students to the active Air Force environment. The POC taken during the last two years prepares students for active duty through
practical experiences as a cadet officer. In this phase, students will concentrate on advanced leadership training in final preparation for an Air Force commission. Four-year programs are available to students with a minimum of eight semesters remaining at Metropolitan State College of Denver. Application for these programs should be made after consultation with a professor of aerospace studies, University of Colorado.
Two-Year Program. The two-year program consists of the Professional Officer Course (POC) and a six-week field training camp. Students with two years of full-time college remaining at the undergraduate, graduate level, or both, are eligible to apply. Once selected, students must successfully complete the six-week field training which includes 60 hours of academic study in addition to the regular curriculum of the four-week camp. The POC phase is identical to that explained in the four-year program.
Students should contact a professor of aerospace studies, University of Colorado, for specific requirements and options available based on each students status at the time of program entry. Applications are accepted between September 1 and December 15.
Flight Training: Limited enrollment in expense-paid ground school and flight training is open to cadets approved and qualified for future USAF pilot training.
Air Force College Scholarship Program: Students participating in Air Force ROTC may be eligible to compete for Air Force ROTC college scholarships. Students selected for this program are placed on grants that pay tuition, book costs, non-refundable education fees, and subsistence of $100 per month, tax free. All cadets enrolled in the Professional Officer Course receive $100 per month during the regular academic year. Students are also eligible to compete for two-, three-, or four-year scholarships open to both men and women.
For further information, contact:
Professor of Air Force Aerospace Studies Air Force ROTC Detachment 105 Folsom Stadium, Room 223 University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80309 Telephone: 492-8351
Program of Study Four-Year Program
The following courses are required during the first two years:
Semester
Hours
AFR 103 Development of Air Power I ............................1
AFR 104 Development of Air Power II............................1
AFR 203 U. S. Military Forces I................................1
AFR 204 U. S. Military Forces II ..............................1
The following courses are required during the last two years of the program:
AFR 301 USAF Management and Leadership I ......................3
AFR 302 USAF Management and Leadership II......................3
AFR 401 National Security Forces I................................3
AFR 402 National Security Forces II...............................3
Two-Year Program
Veterans of military service, reservists, students with Junior ROTC, Civil Air Patrol, or equivalent experience, may be allowed advanced placement for all or a portion of the first two years. Students who successfully complete the six-week summer camp are allowed to enroll in the program at the 300 course level. ALL students must complete the courses listed under the second paragraph of the four-year program above.
Supplemental Courses and Language Requirements All AFROTC scholarship students in the General Military Course must successfully complete a course in English composition before they can advance to the Professional Officer Course. All AFROTC scholarship students must also successfully complete a course in
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School of Professional Studies
an Indo-European or Asian language prior to commissioning. All Professional Officer Course students must successfully complete a course in mathematical reasoning prior to commissioning.
Army ROTC Program
Students may enroll in Army ROTC classes available on campus in the Department of Military Science. For further details and program offerings, refer to the military science section of this catalog.
Civil Engineering Technology
The specialized fields within the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology include programs in civil engineering technology, drafting, and surveying. The surveying program is a separate, specialized four-year program. The individual curriculum requirements are listed separately.
Civil engineering technology graduates apply engineering principles in performing many of the tasks necessary for the planning and construction of highways, buildings, railroads, bridges, reservoirs, dams, irrigation works, water systems, airports, and other structures. In planning for a construction project, they may participate in estimating costs, preparing specifications for materials, and participate in surveying, drafting, and design work. During the construction phase, they work closely with the contractor and the superintendent in scheduling field layout, construction activities and the inspection of the work for conformity to specifications. In recent years, a major work area for civil and environmental engineering technology relates specifically to environmental problems. This includes design and construction of water supply facilities, design of wastewater collection and treatment facilities, design of air pollution control facilities, and design of solid and toxic waste disposal facilities. The development of environmental impact studies and environmental impact reports are also included in this area. Following are the curriculum requirements for the various degrees, minors, and areas of emphasis.
Civil Engineering Technology Major for Bachelor of Science
The four-year bachelor of science degree is awarded upon the completion of the required courses and either a structures, environmental or surveying area of emphasis or an approved minor.
This program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.
Semester
Required Technical Studies Hours
CEN 110 Civil Technology ......................................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ...................................4
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II ..................................4
CEN 210 Structural Drawing ....................................4
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics .................................3
SUR 151 Surveying I ...........................................4
SUR 252 Surveying II...........................................4
CEN 310 Construction Methods...................................3
CEN 312 Engineering Economy ...................................3
CEN 313 Mechanics of Materials.................................3
CEN 314 Mechanics of Materials Laboratory...................1
CEN 316 Mechanics II Dynamics ...............................3
CEN 317 Introduction to Structural Analysis ...................3
CEN 318 Fluid Mechanics I .....................................3
CEN 319 Fluid Mechanics II.....................................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing......................3
MET 311 Thermodynamics I ......................................3
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN .........................4
Approved technical electives (CEN)................................J5
Subtotal.........................................................64
Additional Requirements
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ..................3
CHE 120 General Chemistry I ...................................5
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro ..........................3
or
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro...........................3
MTH 111 College Algebra ...........................................4
MTH 112 College Trigonometry.......................................3
MTH 141 Calculus I ................................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II................................................4
PHY 231 & 232 General Physics l/General Physics Lab 1............5
or
PHY 201 & 203 College Physics l/College Physics Lab I............5
PHY 233 & 234 General Physics ll/General Physics Lab II ...........5
or
PHY 202 & 204 College Physics ll/College Physics Lab II............5
Total ...............................................................36
Environmental Area of Emphasis Required Technical Studies
CEN 330 Water Supply and Treatment ................................3
CEN 331 Wastewater Treatment and Disposal .........................3
CEN 332 Environmental Impact Statements ...........................3
CEN 430 Environmental Technology...................................3
CEN 431 Environmental Technology Practices ........................3
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology .............................J3
Total ...............................................................18
Structures Area of Emphasis
Required Technical Studies
CEN 410 Structural Design ...................................3
CEN 411 Steel Design.........................................3
CEN 412 Concrete Design I....................................3
CEN 413 Soils Mechanics .....................................3
CEN 414 Concrete Design II ..................................3
CEN 330 Water Supply and Treatment ..........................3
or
CEN 331 Wastewater Treatment and Disposal ...................3
or
CEN 430 Environmental Technology.............................3
or
CEN 431 Environmental Technology Practices ................._3
Total ...........................................................18
Engineering and Land Surveying Area of Emphasis
Required Technical Studies
SUR 253 Route Surveying......................................4
SUR 262 Survey Drafting......................................3
SUR 354 Boundary Law I.......................................3
SUR 453 Site Planning .......................................3
SUR 454 Boundary Law II .....................................3
Surveying Elective...............................................3-4
Total..........................................................19-20
Control Surveying and Mapping Area of Emphasis Required Technical Studies
SUR 262 Survey Drafting......................................3
SUR 265 Photogrammetry I.....................................3
SUR 362 Cartographic Surveys.................................3
SUR 366 Land Information Systems.............................3
SUR 474 Geodetic and Special Surveys.........................4
SUR 453 Site Planning .....................................,_3
Total ............................................................19
Minor in Civil Engineering Technology Required Technical Studies
CEN 110 Civil Technology.....................................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I .................................4
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics ...............................3
CEN 310 Construction Methods.................................3
SUR 151 Surveying I .........................................4
Approved lower-division technical elective.........................3
Approved upper-division technical elective........................T3
Total ............................................................23
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School of Professional Studies
Minor in Drafting Engineering Technology
Required Technical Studies
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I .............................................4
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II ............................................4
CEN 221 Architectural Drawing............................................3
CEN 320 Advanced Technical Drawing.......................................3
Approved lower-division technical elective...............................3
Approved upper-division technical elective.............................._3
Total ..................................................................20
Surveying and Mapping
The bachelor of science in surveying and mapping is the only one of its kind in Colorado or the region. It is designed to prepare the graduate for registration as a professional land surveyor, but is broad enough to prepare him or her for a career in any other area of surveying and mapping as well, or for graduate study. Graduates are in professional-level positions with the Bureau of Land Management and other federal, state and local government agencies, utilities, and private companies. Several have become presidents of their societies (Professional Land Surveyors of Colorado and the Colorado Section of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping). A relatively new employment area for graduates is in land information systems (storing information on land parcels, public utilities, natural resources, etc., in computer systems for recordkeeping and planning purposes).
Surveying and Mapping Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Technical Studies Hours
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ...............................4
SUR 151 Surveying I .......................................4
SUR 252 Surveying II.......................................4
SUR 253 Route Surveying....................................4
SUR 255 Surveying Computations ............................3
SUR 262 Survey Drafting....................................3
SUR 265 Photogrammetry I...................................3
SUR 271 Astronomy for Surveyors ...........................2
SUR 354 Boundary Law I.....................................3
SUR 362 Cartographic Surveys...............................3
SUR 366 Land Information Systems ..........................3
SUR 376 Surveying Data Adjustments ........................3
SUR 448 Geodesy............................................3
SUR 453 Site Planning .....................................3
SUR 454 Boundary Law II ...................................3
SUR 465 Photogrammetry II .................................3
SUR 474 Geodetic and Special Surveys.......................4
GEL 101 General Geology ...................................4
GEG 484 Remote Sensing.....................................3
Subtotal........................................................ 62
Required Math Minor
MTH 141 Calculus I ........................................4
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN .....................4
MTH 214 Matrix Algebra ....................................2
MTH 241 Calculus II........................................4
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ........................4
Approved math elective.....................................(min.)2
Subtotal..........................................................^
Total ..........................................................130
Minor in Surveying Required Technical Studies
SUR 151 Surveying I .......................................4
SUR 252 Surveying II.......................................4
SUR 262 Survey Drafting....................................3
SUR 265 Photogrammetry I...................................3
SUR 271 Astronomy for Surveyors ...........................2
SUR 362 Cartographic Surveys...............................3
SUR 465 Photogrammetry II .................................3
Total ...........................................................22
Electronics Engineering Technology
Graduates are employed in a variety of positions in the following functional areas:
Research and Development
Technical activities in research and development are primarily directed toward obtaining new information and new knowledge of the field. The engineering technologist is a member of the research team. This specific work may involve the development and construction of prototypes, test and evaluation of equipment, or other activities necessary to render technical support to a research project.
Manufacturing
A graduate employed in a manufacturing facility might be involved in actual manufacturing, fabrication, test, prototype development, calibration, and quality control. In some cases, students may also become involved in sales or management.
Services
Service engineering has become a field of its own. This area involves extensive activities in the fields of computers, communications, instrumentation, new product development, and numerous other activities involving electrical and electronic systems.
Design
Some graduates design electronic equipment and systems, where the design is application oriented.
The EET curriculum provides a foundation in mathematics and science as well as a thorough treatment of the characteristics of electric circuits and electronic devices. In this four-year program, specialization may be achieved by selection of an area of emphasis in computers, communications (including satellite, fiber optics, microwave, and laser), control systems (including robotics), and power (including solar energy).
Electronics Engineering Technology Major for Bachelor of Science
Because the program emphasizes applications of theory, students are required to take concurrent laboratory courses. In the EET 100 series of courses, students who drop or change to No Credit in the theory/laboratory course must make the same change in the companion laboratory/theory course.
The bachelor of science degree is awarded upon completion of the courses listed below. Students should contact the department for recent changes to this major.
This program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.
Semester
Required Technical Courses Hours
EET 110 Circuits I ...............................................4
EET 111 Circuits I Lab............................................1
EET 112 Circuits II...............................................4
EET 113 Circuits II Lab...........................................2
EET 214 Electronics I ............................................4
EET 215 Electronics II............................................4
EET 232 Digital Circuits I........................................3
EET 234 Technical Programming Applications .......................2
EET 235 Advanced Technical Programming............................3
EET 311 Advanced Circuits I.......................................4
EET 312 Advanced Circuits II .....................................4
EET 333 Digital Circuits II ......................................3
EET 336 Introduction to Microprocessors...........................3
EET 362 Analog and Digital Communications.........................3
EET 371 Automatic Control Systems I ..............................3
EET 410 Senior Project I..........................................1
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School of Professional Studies
EET 411 Senior Project II .....................................2
CEN 305 Statics and Dynamics...................................4
MET 312 Heat Transfer (MET 311-3 may be substituted)...........2
Upper-division EET electives
(or MIS 401 and MIS 402) ...........................................6
Subtotal...........................................................62
Additional Course Requirements
ENG 101 Freshman Composition: The Essay........................3
ENG 102 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research and
Documentation..........................................3
MTH 140 Pre-calculus Math (MTH 111/112 may be substituted).....4
MTH 141 Calculus 1.............................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II............................................4
PHY 231 General Physics I......................................4
PHY 232 General Physics Lab I..................................1
PHY 233 General Physics II ....................................4
PHY 234 General Physics Lab II.................................1
CHE 120 General Chemistry I (CHE 110 may be substituted).......5
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing......................3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication...................3
Level II General StudiesHistorical.................................3
Level II General StudiesArts and Letters...........................6
Level II General StudiesSocial Science............................J5
Subtotal...........................................................54
Minor or EET Area of Emphasis.................................(min.) 18
(An area of Emphasis is recommended; minor must be approved by EMET Chair).
Total............................................................ 134
Students should consult with department chair regarding the status of these electives.
Minor in Electronics Engineering Technology
Required EET Courses
EET 110 Circuits I ................................................4
EET 111 Circuits I Lab.............................................1
EET 112 Circuits II................................................4
EET 113 Circuits II Lab ...........................................2
EET 231 Digital Logic and Telecommunications.......................4
or
EET 232 Digital Circuits I.........................................3
EET 301 Industrial Electronics ............................... 4
Total...............................................................18-19
Industrial and Technical Studies
The Industrial and Technical Studies program offers the following majors:
Bachelor of Science:
Industrial and Technical Studies (ITS)
Industrial Arts Teaching Area of Emphasis Business Area of Emphasis Technical and Industrial Administration (TIA)
Bachelor of Arts:
Industrial Design (IND)
Minors:
Industrial Technology Industrial Arts Teaching
Communications Area of Emphasis Required EET Courses
Semester
Hours
EET 363 Electromagnetic Fields.............................3
EET 364 Communications Lab ................................3
EET 367 Measurements for Communications Systems ...........3
EET 433 Data Communications ...............................3
EET 462 Advanced Communication Systems.....................3
EET 464 Communication Circuit Design......................J3
Subtotal......................................................18
General Studies
Students must consult with a faculty advisor regarding general studies requirements.
Credit by Examination
Often students selecting the industrial and technical studies major have extensive experience in business, industry or the military that parallels the content of some of the courses. To receive credit for such experience the student must contact the program coordinator for evaluation.
Power Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
EET 341 Electric Machines......................................3
EET 342 Electric Power Distribution ...........................3
EET 343 Power Generation Using Solar Energy....................3
MET 311 Thermodynamics I ......................................3
Upper-division EET electives ......................................Ji
Subtotal........................................................... 18
Control Systems Area of Emphasis
Required EET courses
EET 342 Electric Power Distribution ..........................3
EET 372 Control Systems Laboratory............................1
EET 433 Data Communications ..................................3
EET 434 Interface Techniques .................................3
EET 471 Automatic Control Systems II..........................4
Upper-division EET elective........................................_4
Subtotal..........................................................18
Computer Technology Area of Emphasis Required EET Courses
EET 334 Minicomputer Programming and Operation .............4
EET 432 Digital Filters.....................................3
EET 433 Data Communications ................................3
EET 434 Interface Techniques ...............................3
Upper-division EET elective ....................................._5
Subtotal........................................................18
Industrial and Technical Studies Major for Bachelor of Science Degree
In order to be awarded the bachelor of science degree in Industrial and Technical Studies, the student must meet the colleges general specifications for the bachelor's degree and must complete the courses required for one of the two areas of emphasis (industrial arts teaching, or business) as listed below.
No minor required.
I. Industrial Arts Teaching Area of Emphasis
Graduates meet all the state requirements for a secondary teaching credential and are qualified to teach industrial arts in both junior and senior high schools. Courses are also offered which are designed for those already in teaching and desire to further their professional growth.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
General Studies .........................................................36
ITS 101 Introduction tc Woodworking ....................................4
ITS 103 Finishing Materials and Processes.............................2
ITS 113 Introduction to Plastics.....................................3
ITS 120 Introduction to General Metals: Cold Metals..................2
or
ITS 122 Introduction to General Metals: Hot Metals...................2
ITS 143 Introduction to Industrial Drawing...........................2
ITS 150 Introduction to Graphic Arts 1...............................2
or
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School of Professional Studies
ITS 151 Introduction to Graphic Arts II...........................2
ITS 166 Introduction to Power.....................................^
Subtotal................................................................18
Choose 2 of 3 from ITS 171,172, or 175 ITS 171 Consumer Electricity/Electronics:
Communication Systems......................................2
ITS 172 Consumer Electricity/Electronics:
Control Systems............................................2
ITS 175 Consumer Electricity/Electronics:
Residential Systems........................................2
ITS 269 Alternate Energy and Transportation.......................2
ITS 281 Technology, Society, and You..............................3
ITS 283 Manufacturing Organization and Processes..................2
ITS 341 Computer Aided Drafting for Industry......................3
ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production..........................4
ITS 481 Curriculum & Methods of Teaching Industrial Arts..........3
ITS 483 Organization & Administration of Industrial Arts..........3
ITS 484 Emerging Technologies.....................................2
ITS 486 Research in Industrial Technology.........................2
ITS Upper Division Electives (two different areas).............8
Subtotal................................................................32
Teaching Certification Requirements
EDU 221 Process of Learning in Urban Secondary Schools............3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary Schools..............2
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner...............................3
EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum & Classroom Management. ... 3
EDU 322 Field Experiences in Tutoring &
Materials Construction.....................................2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom....................3
EDU 361 Introduction to Educational Technology....................2
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary..................12
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading & Writing in the Content Areas........4
Total .................................................................124
II. Business Area of Emphasis
Selection of the business emphasis prepares students to enter business and industry in a variety of capacities. Sales, manufacturing, management and small business operation provide diverse opportunities for graduates. Within this emphasis, speciality areas are available in:
-drafting -electricity/electronics
-graphics -metals
-woods
Industrial and Technical Studies Core Non-Teaching
The following core courses are required for all specialty areas
within the business emphasis.
ITS 101 Introduction to Woodworking ...............................4
ITS 103 Finishing Materials and Processes..........................2
ITS 113 Introduction to Plastics...................................3
ITS 120 Introduction to General Metals: Cold Metals................2
ITS 122 Introduction to General Metals: Hot Metals.................2
ITS 143 Introduction to Industrial Drawing..........................2
ITS 150 Introduction to Graphic Arts 1.............................2
ITS 151 Introduction to Graphic Arts II............................2
ITS 166 Introduction to Power......................................^3
Subtotal..................................................................22
Choose 2 of 3 from ITS 171,172, or 175 ITS 171 Consumer Electricity/Electronics:
Communication Systems.......................................2
ITS 172 Consumer Electricity/Electronics:
Control Systems.............................................2
ITS 175 Consumer Electricity/Electronics:
Residential Systems........................................_2
Subtotal...................................................................4
ITS 269 Alternate Energy and Transportation.........................2
ITS 281 Technology, Society, and You................................3
ITS 283 Manufacturing Organization and Processes....................2
ITS 341 Computer Aided Drafting for Industry........................3
ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production.......................4
ITS 486 Research in Industrial Technology......................2
ITS 496 Industrial Internship............................... 4
Subtotal.......................................................... 20
Total ..............................................................46
General Studies.....................................................36
Science and/or Mathematics for Electricity/Electronics
Specialty
MTH 111 College Algebra ........................................4
PHY 100 Introduction to Physics................................4
Business Core
Choose from the following:
ITS 370 Industrial Safety .....................................3
ITS 371 Developments in Industrial and Technical Processes......3
ITS 372 Characteristics of Industrial and Technical
Personnel Selection, Supervision, and Evaluation.......3
ITS 473 Assessment of Trade and Technical Enterprises..........3
ITS 474 Organizational Structures for Technical Enterprises....2
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I..............................3
ACC 308 Small Business Taxation................................3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro.........................3
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business I ........................3
MGT 250 Small Business Management..............................3
MGT 300 Organizational Management .............................3
MGT 321 Commercial and Corporate Law............................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing..............................._3
Total ..............................................................24
Specialty Areas Drafting
ITS 341 Computer Aided Drafting for Industry I..................3
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts..................................4
ITS 441 Computer Aided Drafting for Industry II ................3
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and Technical Studies....5
CEN 210 Structural Drawing ....................................4
CEN 221 Architectural Drawing...................................3
Electricity/Electronics
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines.........................3
EET 232 Digital Circuits I.....................................3
EET 333 Digital Circuits II ...................................3
EET 336 Introduction to Microprocessors........................3
ITS 487 Special Studies in Electronics ........................4
Graphics
ITS 255 Introduction to Photography............................3
ITS 341 Computer Aided Drafting for Industry I..................3
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts..................................4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and Technical Studies....5
TEI 200 Airbrush I (CCD Course)................................6
Metals
ITS 231 Art Metal, Silversmith and Lapidary ....................2
ITS 321 Advanced Metalworking...................................4
ITS 341 Computer Aided Drafting for Industry I..................3
ITS 420 Welding Technology.....................................4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and Technical Studies....5
Wood
ITS 341 Computer Aided Drafting for Industry I..................3
ITS 403 Advanced Wood Processes................................4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and Technical
Studies...............................................12
Electives ..........................L. >.......................... 0-7
Total..........................................................121-122
Industrial and Technical Studies Minor
This minor must be approved in writing by the program coordinator. The coordinator must approve the plan of study and will take into account the students previous experience and future occupational goal.
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School of Professional Studies
Industrial Arts Teaching Minor
Required Courses
ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production............................4
ITS 481 Curriculum and Methods of Teaching Industrial Arts ..........3
ITS 483 Organization and Administration of
Industrial Arts .........................................3
ITS Lower-Division Elective .........................................8
ITS Upper-Division Elective .........................................4
Total .................................................................22
Technical and Industrial Administration
The technical and industrial administration major builds on the technical expertise attained through completion of an associate of applied science, associate of science, or associate of arts degree with specialties from within the field of trade and industry (T&l) or technical education. This major provides students with an increased opportunity for career mobility and advancement in jobs related to, or associated with, their technical background.
Students who have met MSCDs general studies requirements should be able to complete the bachelor of science degree in four to five semesters. Technical credits earned in the associate degree will be accepted and applied toward requirements for a minor. Students entering this program must possess an associate degree and complete the following requirements.
Technical and Industrial Administration Major for Bachelor of Science Degree
Semester
Required Courses Hours
General Studies .....................................................36
Technical and Industrial Administration .............................20
ITS 370 Industrial Safety ......................................3
ITS 371 Development in Industrial and Technical Processes ......3
ITS 372 Characteristics of Industrial and Technical
Personnel Selection, Supervision and
Evaluation..............................................3
ITS 473 Assessment of Trade and Technical
Enterprises.............................................3
ITS 474 Organizational Structures for Technical
Enterprises.............................................2
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.............................3
MGT 300 Organizational Management ..............................3
Select 1-12 semester hours.........................................1-12
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and Technical Studies...1-5
ITS 471 Trade and Technical Practicum ..........................8
ITS 496 Professional Internship.................................4
Electives to complete 30 credit hour major..........................0-9
ACC 308 Small Business Taxation.................................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ......................3
FIN 225 Personal Money Management ..............................3
FIN 342 Principles of Insurance.................................3
MGT 250 Small Business Management...............................3
MKT 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications ..............3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing.................................3
MKT 301 Marketing Research......................................3
MKT 310 Retail Marketing........................................3
COM Upper-division courses ITS Upper-division courses
Minor Four upper-division credit hours must be completed in addition to technical credits transferred from associate degree. These courses must be selected in consultation
with and approved by an ITS program advisor.........................4
Associate degree credits..........................................50-60
Total ..............................................................120
Industrial Design
The industrial design major is a joint program offered through the Art Department and Industrial and Technical Studies leading to a bachelor of arts degree.
Industrial Design Major for Bachelor of Arts Degree No Minor Required
Semester
Required Courses Hours
General Studies ........................................................36
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts I...........................3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I.........................3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II .......................3
ART 201 Survey of Modem Art: Impressionism to 1960 ................3
ART 240 Beginning Advertising Design...............................3
ART 245 Beginning Product and Industrial Design ...................3
ART 300 Art Nouveau
or
ART 303 History of Art Between World Wars .........................3
ART 340 Intermediate Advertising Design............................3
ART 345 Intermediate Product and Industrial Design.................3
ART 445 Advanced Product and Industrial Design I...................3
ART 446 Advanced Product and Industrial Design II .................3
ITS 101 Introduction to Woodworking ...............................4
ITS 103 Finishing Materials & Processes............................2
ITS 113 Introduction to Plastics...................................3
ITS 120 Introduction to General Metals: Cold Metals................2
ITS 122 Introduction to General Metals: Hot Metals ................2
ITS 143 Introduction to Industrial Drawing.........................2
ITS 255 Introduction to Photography................................3
ITS 341 Computer Aided Drafting for Industry.......................3
ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production...........................4
ITS 403 Advanced Wood Processes....................................4
PSY 441 Human Factors Engineering..................................3
Elective courses (selected in consultation with advisor,
10 of which must be upper-division).....................................19
Total .................................................................120
Mechanical Engineering Technology
The program has been developed considering the needs of industry. A group of technical people from various engineering companies, industrial companies, and consulting firms in the greater Denver area serve the mechanical engineering technology program in an advising capacity.
The mechanical engineering technology program offers the bachelor of science degree in MET. It is structured with two distinct areas of emphasis. The student may select to follow: (1) a series of courses with an emphasis on manufacturing; or (2) a group of design, heat power related courses under the designated mechanical emphasis.
Graduates take creative ideas and concepts and translate them into practical applications in new machines, products, or manufacturing processes.
The mechanical engineering technology program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Students should contact the department for recent changes to this major.
Mechanical Engineering Technology Major for Bachelor of Science Degree
Mechanical Engineering Technology Core
The following core courses are required for all mechanical
engineering technology areas of emphasis:
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing Technology...............3
MET 101 Manufacturing Processes..............................3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance .....................3
MET 220 Materials of Engineering.............................3
MET 221 Mechanical Drawing...................................3
MET 222 Computer Aided Drafting for Engineering
Technology............................................3
MET 301 Fluid Flow I.........................................3
MET 307 Machine Design.......................................3
MET 311 Thermodynamics 1.....................................3
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School of Professional Studies
MET 341 Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing..................3
MET 400 Project Engineering....................................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I (or equivalent experience).........4
CEN 215 Mechanics l/Statics....................................3
CEN 313 Mechanics of Materials.................................3
CEN 314 Mechanics of Materials Lab.............................1
CEN 316 Mechanics ll/Dynamics..................................3
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines.........................3
EET 301 Industrial Electronics...................................... 4
Subtotal.........................................................50-54
Additional Course Requirements:
ENG 101,102 Freshman Composition, Freshman Composition: Analysis,
Research, and Documentation*...........................6
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication*...................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing.......................3
MTH 140 Pre-Calculus Mathematics
(MTH 111 and MTH 112 may be substituted)...............4
MTH 141 Calculus I*.............................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II.............................................4
MTH 151 Computer Programming....................................4
PHY 201,203 College Physics I and Lab*...............................5
PHY 202,204 College Physics II and Lab*..............................5
CHE 120 General Chemistry 1....................................5
ECO 201 Principles of Economics*................................3
PHI 103 Ethics*................................................3
Level II General Studies Historical*...............................3
Level II General Studies Arts and Letters*.........................3
Level II General Studies Social Science*.......................... ... 3
Subtotal.........................................................58-61
The student then selects one of the following areas of emphasis:
I. Manufacturing Area of Emphasis:
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis ...............................4
MET 310 N/C Computer Programming .............................3
MET 325 Tool Design and Production Tooling....................3
MET 330 Statistical Process Control ..........................3
MET 333 Robotics for Manufacturing............................3
MET 401 Advanced Manufacturing Technology.....................3
MET 408 Computer Aided Manufacturing ........................ 3
Subtotal..........................................................22
II. Mechanical Area of Emphasis:
MET 302 Fluid Flow II ........................................3
MET 312 Heat Transfer ........................................2
MET 314 Heat Transfer Laboratory .............................1
MET 331 Thermodynamics II.....................................3
MET 332 Instrumentation Laboratory............................3
MET 407 Computer Aided Design.................................3
MET 428 Advanced Energy Technology ...........................3
Upper-division technical elective .................................3
Subtotal..........................................................21
* These courses count as General Studies Courses. At least three hours of Level II must be upper-division.
MET Major/Mechanical Area of Emphasis Grand Total................129-136
MET Major/Manufacturing Area of Emphasis Grand Total............130-137
Mechanical Engineering Technology Minor
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing Technology..................3
MET 101 Manufacturing Processes..................................3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance ........................3
MET 220 Materials of Engineering................................3
Upper Division MET Electives..........................................6
Total ...............................................................18
Technical Communications
The technical communications program offers three areas of emphasis under the communications multi-major and a technical communications minor. The three areas of emphasis are technical writing and editing, organizational, and technical media. Each area of emphasis offers training in one or more communications areas that are most in demand by industry and government. Technical writing and editing prepares an individual to write, edit, and publish
the wide variety of reports, manuals, and other technical or lay publications produced by industry and government. The organizational emphasis is designed for the person who desires to manage the flow of information within a company or government agency or between industries and agencies. The technical media emphasis meets two needs of industry and government: (1) people prepared to design and implement internal training programs, and (2) people seeking careers to provide technical information through visual media.
The technical communications minor provides a general background in preparing technical information designed to meet the minimal needs of industry and government with opportunity to emphasize the area of most interest to the individual student. The minor is particularly useful to people majoring in scientific and technological disciplines as a means of expanding their employment skills.
The program welcomes students from the community and other areas of the college whose professional or academic work will benefit from one or more of the program offerings. Persons enrolling in one of the major areas of emphasis or the minor must confer with a program advisor because all degree plans are tailored to the career goals of the individual student.
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Communications: Technical Writing and Editing Sponsored by the Program in Technical Communications
This communications area of emphasis provides the student with both the theory and production practices of technical writing and editing used by industry and government. It includes coursework in the writing, editing, design, and production of technical reports, proposals, and manuals in addition to professional experience, hands-on practice with computer hardware, and the production of software instructions and manuals.
Semester
Required Core Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communications Concepts
and Systems.............................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion ...............................^3
Total ...............................................................6
Required Area of Emphasis Courses 24 hours from the following:
COM 243 Introduction to Industrial Visual Media .................3
COM 244 Writing for Radio........................................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing........................3
COM 299 Internship............................................arr.
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television .........3
COM 354 Developing Computer-Assisted Instruction.................3
COM 361 Advanced Technical Writing...............................3
COM 362 Industrial Editing and Production .......................3
COM 363 Designing Technical Publications.........................3
COM 364 Writing Computer-User Software
Documentation...........................................3
COM 366 Variable Topics in Industrial and Technical
Communications..........................................3
COM 378 Communications Law.......................................3
COM 462 Critical Readings in Industrial and Technical
Communications..........................................3
COM 479 Senior Seminar in Technical Communications...............3
COM 480 Workshop .....................,...........................arr.
COM 499 Advanced Internship ..................................arr.
ITS 151 Introduction to Graphic Arts II..........................2
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts....................................4
Total ..............................................................24
Electives
12 hours of electives from any of the areas of emphasis and/or courses approved by the students advisor that would specifically
benefit the student's career goals..................................V2
Total ..............................................................42
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School of Professional Studies
Communications: Organizational
Sponsored by the Program in Technical Communications
This Communications area of emphasis prepares the student for a career in managing the flow of information within and between technical and industrial communications networks and systems. It includes practical experience and theoretical understanding of developing organizational communications theory, the cultures that exist within corporations, conflict management, and various methodologies for the dissemination of information within industrial, governmental, and other large organizations.
Semester
Required Core Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communications Concepts
and Systems............................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion .............................3
Total ..............................................................6
Required Area of Emphasis Courses 24 hours from the following:
COM 243 Introduction to Industrial Visual Media ..............3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing.....................3
COM 299 Internship.........................................arr.
COM 351 Organizational Communication..........................3
COM 352 Communication of Power and Authority..................3
COM 353 Corporate Cultures....................................3
COM 354 Developing Computer-Assisted Instruction..............3
COM 356 Variable Topics in Organizational
Communicating..........................................3
COM 378 Communications Law....................................3
COM 479 Senior Seminar in Technical Communications............3
COM 480 Workshop ..........................................arr.
COM 499 Advanced Internship ...............................arr.
MGT 355 Manufacturing and Service Management..................3
MGT 461 Labor/Employee Relations..............................3
PSY 345 Industrial Psychology ................................3
PSY 441 Human Factors Engineering.............................3
SOC 316 Industry and Occupations..............................3
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking....................3
SPE 313 Conference Leadership & Parliamentary Procedure......J3
Total .............................................................24
Electives
12 hours of electives from any of the areas of emphasis and/or courses approved by the student's advisor that would specifically benefit the
student's career goals......................................................12
Total .....................................................................42
Communications: Technical Media
Sponsored by the Program in Technical Communications
This communications area of emphasis provides the student with the theoretical understanding and the practical experience required to design, write, and produce multi-image slide and video-tape productions for non-broadcast use in industry, government, and other large organizations. Such productions are frequently used for training, image creation, and technical information dissemination.
Semester
Required Core Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communications Concepts
and Systems.........................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion ...........................3
Total .........................................................6
Required Area of Emphasis Courses 24 hours from the following:
COM 241 Basic Multi-Image Production........................3
COM 242 Basic Industrial Videotape Production ...................3
COM 243 Introduction to Industrial Visual Media .................3
COM 244 Writing for Radio........................................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing........................3
COM 299 Internship ..............................................3
COM 341 Advanced Multi-Image Production .........................3
COM 342 Advanced Industrial Videotape Production.................3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television .........3
COM 354 Developing Computer-Assisted Instruction.................3
COM 378 Communications Law.......................................3
COM 441 Budgeting and Planning for Audio-Visual
Productions..............................................3
COM 479 Senior Seminar in Technical Communications...............3
COM 480 Workshop .............................................arr.
COM 499 Advanced Internship ..................................arr.
ITS 151 Introduction to Graphic Arts II..........................2
ITS 255 Introduction to Photography..............................3
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts....................................4
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking.......................3
SPE 313 Conference Leadership & Parliamentary Procedure..........^
Total .................................................................24
Electives
Twelve hours of electives from any of the areas of emphasis and/or courses approved by the student's advisor that would specifically benefit
the students career goals.................................................12
Total .....................................................................42
Technical Communications Minor
The technical communications minor is designed to provide additional skills for the student majoring in a scientific or technological discipline that will increase his or her employability. In addition to the required core courses, the student selects five courses which may be in one of the specialized areas or may be divided among the areas offered by the technical communications program to provide an overview of the discipline.
I. Each of the following courses:
COM 243 Introduction to Industrial Visual Media ..............3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing.....................3
COM 272 Introduction to Communications Concepts
and Systems...........................................J3
Semester Hours Required .............................................9
II. Five of the following courses:
COM 241 Basic Multi-Image Production..........................3
COM 242 Basic Industrial Videotape Production ................3
COM 244 Writing for Radio.....................................3
COM 341 Advanced Multi-Image Production ......................3
COM 342 Advanced Industrial Videotape Production..............3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television ......3
COM 351 Organizational Communication..........................3
COM 352 Communication of Power and Authority..................3
COM 353 Corporate Cultures....................................3
COM 354 Developing Computer-Assisted Instruction..............3
COM 356 Variable Topics in Organizational
Communicating..........................................3
COM 361 Advanced Technical Writing............................3
COM 362 Industrial Editing and Production ....................3
COM 363 Designing Technical Publications......................3
COM 364 Writing Computer-User Software
Documentation .........................................3
COM 366 Variable Topics in Industrial and Technical
Communications.........................................3
COM 378 Communications Law....................................3
COM 441 Budgeting and Planning for Audio-Visual
Productions............................................3
COM 462 Critical Readings in Industrial and Technical
Communications.........................................3
COM 479 Senior Seminar in Technical Communications...........^3
Semester Hours Required ............................................15
Total Semester Hours Required.......................................24
87


School of Professional Studies
Division of Public Service Professions
The Division of Public Service Professions is composed of six departments, three programs, and one institute: The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology; the Department of Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration; the Department of Human Services; the Department of Military Science; the Department of Nursing and Health Care Management; the Department of Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies; the Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps Program; the Institute for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol and Addictive Behaviors; and an Adult Fitness Assessment Center.
The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology offers a bachelor of science degree with a choice of five areas of emphasis: law enforcement/public safety, corrections, youth advocacy, criminal justice administration, and corporate security. The department also offers a bachelor of science degree in Fire Services Administration.
The Department of Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies offers a major in human performance and sport with six emphasis areas and a major in leisure studies with two emphasis areas with minors in human performance and sport, leisure studies, and health and safety. The Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration Department provides a flexible and individualized interdisciplinary program leading to the bachelor of arts degree, with minors in hotel, restaurant, meeting and travel administration.
The Department of Human Services provides a core service in programs of rehabilitation and training which emphasizes client self-help. Such programs conducted by local, state, and federal institutions and private agencies have created expanded opportunities for a variety of interesting new and existing careers.
The Department of Military Science offers Army ROTC programs leading to a commission in the active Army, Army Reserve or National Guard. The purposes of the baccalaureate registered nurse program and the health care management program are to provide diploma and associate degree R.N. graduates and other health care professionals with a broadened educational base for improvement of health care practice and preparation for meeting future health care needs of society.
The Air Force ROTC Program allows students to register and receive credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver for Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps (AFROTC) classes at the University of Colorado, Boulder.
The Institute for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol and Addictive Behaviors is designed to provide opportunities for people seeking to become state certified addictions counselors to meet those requirements through a degree in human services with an addictions emphasis or a non-degreed program through the institute.
The Institute for Gerontology was established to coordinate the interdisciplinary activities and gerontological programs at Metropolitan State College of Denver. Program areas of emphasis are offered in health care management, sociology, psychology and leisure studies.
Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology
The present and future needs of American society require substantially greater numbers and more highly educated persons in criminal justice agencies at all levels of government. Increasingly, the demand by potential employers is for applicants who have had professional education. In addition, there is considerable interest at all levels in the criminal justice system to increase professionalization through education. The present curriculum not only provides a solid foundation in police-related areas, but also prepares students who are interested in further study in the areas of probation and parole, corrections, juvenile agency work, criminal justice administration and private/corporate security. Course offerings within these professional fields are related to the human services program, public administration, urban studies and commercial enterprise.
Criminal Justice and Criminology Major for Bachelor of Science
The bachelor of science in criminal justice and criminology major is designed to provide professional courses, as well as a broad general education. The curriculum is structured for the student seeking either preservice or inservice education. Recognizing that many interested in such education are already employed in some form of criminal justice work and that many have completed coursework at the college level, the department has developed a four-year program which provides comprehensive fundamental subjects in the first two years (lower division) and emphasizes subjects of an advanced, specialized and administrative nature in the second two years (upper division). The curriculum is structured to facilitate transfer from two-year police science/criminal justice programs.
A minor in sociology, psychology, political science, business management or urban studies is strongly recommended, but others are accepted. A contract minor may also be designed to meet the individual students area of interest.
Students must meet the colleges requirements for the bachelor's degree, including general studies and should consult with a faculty advisor regarding general studies courses, the selection of a criminal justice area of emphasis and the minor.
Areas of Study
The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology offers a bachelor of science degree with a choice of five areas of emphasis. These areas of emphasis recognize the growing specialization within the criminal justice system and the expanding information base in the fields of law enforcement, corrections, youth advocacy, criminal justice administration and corporate security. The areas also acknowledge the educational and professional needs of the criminal justice and criminology student by providing to all graduates a commonality of learning experiences through core courses required for all areas of emphasis in criminal justice and criminology.
Criminal Justice and Criminology Major for Bachelor of Science
Criminal Justice Core Semester
Required Courses for All Areas of Emphasis Hours
CJC 101 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System..........3
CJC 110 Evolutionary Legal Concepts in Criminal Justice......3
CJC 210 Substantive Criminal Law..........................3
CJC 465 Ethics for the Criminal Justice Professional......3
Total.......................................................12
In all areas of emphasis, students must complete a minimum of 18 upper- division semester hours.
88


School of Professional Studies
Area of Emphasis I: Law Enforcement/Public Safety
this emphasis is designed for those students who seek academic preparation for careers within law enforcement agencies or who may be considering law school or other graduate school
programs.
Semester
Required Courses in Addition to Core: Hours
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures......................3
CJC 214 Criminal Procedure.....................................3
CJC 312 Constitutional Law.....................................3
Total................................................................9
Students electing this area of emphasis must select 18 hours from the following courses to complete the law enforcement/public safety area of emphasis:
CJC 215 Municipal Law..........................................3
CJC 220 Law Enforcement Operations ............................3
CJC 291 Critical Issues in Criminal Justice..................1-2
CJC 314 Juvenile Law...........................................3
CJC 320 Criminal Justice Administrative Behavior...............3
CJC 335 Seminar in Delinquency Causation, Prevention
and Control............................................3
CJC 340 Criminal Behavior and Criminal Careers.................3
CJC 341 Criminal Justice and the Social Structure..............3
CJC 350 Criminal Investigation.................................3
CJC 370 Civil Law for Criminal Justice Administration..........3
CJC 440 Criminal Justice Planning, Policy Analysis,
Evaluation and Budgeting Systems.......................3
CJC 441 Special Topics in Law Enforcement......................3
Total...............................................................18
CJC 335
CJC 340
CJC 345
CJC 466
PSY 325
PSY 326
Total .
Seminar in Delinquency Causation, Prevention
and Control.................................
Criminal Behavior and Criminal Careers......
Behavior Development and Treatment Plans .
Youth Advocacy Initiatives..................
Child Psychology............................
Psychology of Adolescence...................
NOTE: PSY 325 and PSY 326 have prerequisites.
. .3 ...3 ....3 1-15 .3 .3 22-36
Area of Emphasis IV: Criminal Justice Administration and Management
Designed to enhance the career skills of students preparing for specialization in criminal justice management and administration, based on competencies acquired as criminal justice practitioners or transferring from a two-year program in criminal justice/law enforcement. Students completing an associate degree in a criminal justice program are encouraged, but not required, to complete a minor.
Semester
Required Courses in Addition to Core: Hours
CJC 312 Constitutional Law........................................3
CJC 320 Criminal Justice Administrative Behavior..................3
CJC 370 Civil Law for Criminal Justice Administration.............3
CJC 440 Criminal Justice Planning, Policy Analysis,
Evaluation and Budgeting Systems..........................3
CJC 467 Research Seminar in Criminal Justice
Administration............................................5
Total.................................................................17
Area of Emphasis II: Corrections, Probation and Parole Administration
This emphasis is designed for those students seeking academic preparation for careers within the adult corrections systems at the
community or institutional level.
Semester
Required Courses in Addition to Core: Hours
CJC 214 Criminal Procedure......................................3
CJC 312 Constitutional Law......................................3
CJC 328 Classification and Treatment of the Offender............3
Total.................................................................9
Students electing this area of emphasis must select at least 20
hours from the following courses to complete the corrections, probation, and parole administration area of emphasis:
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedure........................3
CJC 314 Juvenile Law............................................3
CJC 320 Criminal Justice Administrative Behavior................3
CJC 329 Probation and Parole....................................3
CJC 334 Counseling Skills for Corrections Personnel.............3
CJC 340 Criminal Behavior and Criminal Careers..................3
CJC 430 Penology................................................3
CJC 431 Correctional Law.........................................3
CJC 440 Criminal Justice Planning, Policy Analysis,
Evaluation and Budgeting Systems........................3
CJC 442 Practicum in Corrections................................5
CJC 462 Special Topics in Corrections Administration..........._3
Total............................................................20
Area of Emphasis III: Youth Advocacy/Delinquency Control
This emphasis is designed for students transferring from a two-year program in criminal justice/law enforcement and for those who wish to prepare and enhance career skills for specialization in youth advocacy and delinquency control, based upon competencies acquired as a practitioner in this field. Students completing an associate degree in a criminal justice program are encouraged, but not required, to complete a minor.
Semester
Required Courses in Addition to Core: Hours
CJC 312 Constitutional Law..........................................3
CJC 314 Juvenile Law................................................3
Students electing this area of emphasis must complete 12 semester hours from the following courses to meet requirements in the criminal justice administration and management area of
emphasis:
CJC 310 Logic and the Law......................................3
CJC 314 Juvenile Law...........................................3
CJC 325 Criminal Justice Delivery of Services and
Decision-Making........................................3
CJC 410 Advanced Jurisprudence.................................3
CJC 443 Comparative Criminal Justice...........................3
CJC 461 Special Topics in Criminal Justice
Administration.........................................3
Total..............................................................12
Area of Emphasis V: Private Security Administration and Management
Designed for students seeking professional careers in the diverse areas of private or corporate security.
Semester
Required Courses in Addition to Core: Hours
CJC 201 Introduction to Private Security.........................3
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures.......................3
CJC 214 Criminal Procedure......................................3
CJC 312 Constitutional Law......................................3
CJC 320 Criminal Justice Administrative Behavior................3
CJC 341 Criminal Justice and the Social Structure................3
CJC 370 Civil Law for Criminal Justice Administration...........3
CJC 385 Corporate Security Management...........................3
CJC 475 Crime Prevention and Loss Reduction.....................3
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I...............................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems......................._3
Total................................................................33
Minor in Criminal Justice and Criminology
CJC 101 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System..............3
CJC 110 Evolutionary Legal Concepts in Criminal Justice.........3
CJC 465 Ethics for the Criminal Justice Professional............3
CJC Electives selected in consultation with and
approved by the department advisor, at least four
hours of which must be upper-division........................J)
Total................................................................18
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School of Professional Studies
Fire Services Administration
Major for Bachelor of Science
The bachelor of science degree in Fire Services Administration is designed to enhance professional skills of students preparing for or employed in the fire services industry. The purpose of the curriculum is to provide students who have earned an associate degree in a fire service related field with the opportunity to complete a bachelor of science degree in fire service administration. Students pursuing a degree in this area must fulfill the colleges general studies curriculum as well as other college requirements and must have earned an associate degree in a fire science related field. No minor is required.
Semester
Required Courses in Addition to Core: Hours
General Studies..................................................36
Required courses in addition to general studies and community
college transfer credits:
FSA 301 Advanced Fire Services Administration.................3
FSA 302 Political and Legal Foundations of Fire Protection....3
FSA 303 Analytic Approaches to Public Fire Protection.........3
FSA 401 Community and the Fire Threat.........................3
FSA 402 Disaster and Fire Defense Planning....................3
FSA 403 Human Resource Management for the Fire Services..3
PSC 302 Introduction to Public Administration.................3
PSC 324 Intergovernmental Relations...........................3
PSC 326 Politics of Budgeting.................................3
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting...............................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems.....................3
MGT 400 Organizational Decision Analysis......................3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior...............................3
MGT 462 Appraisal and Compensation............................3
Total............................................................42
Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration
Major for Bachelor of Arts
The Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration Department provides a flexible and individualized interdisciplinary major program leading to the bachelor of arts degree and four academic minor programs.
Students are offered areas of emphasis in hotel administration, meeting administration, restaurant administration or travel administration. Each area of emphasis is designed for the individual student to provide both the theoretical knowledge and practical experiences to prepare for employment in these rapidly expanding industries.
To be awarded a degree, the student must complete the general studies requirement of MSCD. Students must consult with faculty advisors for selection of approved general studies courses.
In addition to meeting degree requirements, including the general studies requirement, the HMTA student must:
1. Maintain a grade point average of 2.25.
2. Demonstrate a typing proficiency of 35 wpm.
3. Present CPR and first aid certification.
4. Demonstrate a basic competence in a foreign language.*
5. Present verification of 1,200 clock hours of on-the-job experience in the HMTA areas of emphasis. These may be secured through paid job experience, cooperative education, externships, or a combination of the three. No more than nine semester hours in cooperative education will be accepted, and these hours must contain specific descriptions of the job duties performed.
6. Travel students must present certification of 40 clock hours of computer reservation training.
7. Complete a graduation agreement and have it approved by the advisor no later than the third semester of enrollment (second semester for transfer students) in the HMTA Program.
'Competence to be certified by MSCD Modern Language Department as
having the equivalence of, or taking SPA/FRE 111 or 112 (or other approved language) and earn a grade of C or better.
Semester
HMTA Core (Required of all HMTA Majors) Hours
HMT 102 Principles of Hotel/Restaurant
Administration...........................................3
HMT 103 Principles of Meeting/Travel Administration..............3
HMT 109 Job Search Strategies*...................................2
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication.............................3
MGT 300 Organizational Management*...............................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication..............................3
HMT 465 Hospitality Employee Resource Development................3
CMS 101 Introduction to Computers*.............................._3
Total.................................................................23
*Or equivalent approved by HMTA faculty advisor.
Hotel Administration Emphasis Required Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I..............................3
HMT 256 Hotel Financial Accounting..............................3
HMT 351 Hotel Administration I...................................3
HMT 352 Hotel Administration II.................................3
HMT 356 Hotel/Restaurant Law....................................3
HMT 357 Hospitality Marketing...................................3
HMT 360 Beverage Control........................................3
HMT 365 Hospitality Property Management.........................3
HMT 366 Restaurant Administration I.............................3
HMT 466 Training & Development in Hospitality..................J3
Subtotal............................................................30
In addition to the above courses, students must choose a minimum of three courses from the following list:
HMT 161 Kitchen Procedures & Production I........................4
HMT 162 Kitchen Procedures & Production II......................4
HMT 200 Externship I............................................3
HMT 250 Applied Hotel/Restaurant Operations.....................2
HMT 276 Meeting Administration I................................3
HMT 361 Enology: The Study of Wine..............................3
HMT 367 Restaurant Administration II............................3
HMT 375 Promotional Materials: Analysis & Design................3
HMT 400 Externship II...........................................3
HMT 401 Externship III..........................................1
HMT 450 Hospitality Sales.......................................3
HMT 459 Seminar in Hotel Administration.........................2
HMT 473 Principles of Negotiation J...........................3
HMT 479 Seminar in Meeting (Variable Topics).......................... 2
Subtotal......................................................... 8-11
Total.............................................................38-41
Restaurant Administration Emphasis Required Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I..............................3
HMT 161 Kitchen Procedures and Production I......................4
HMT 162 Kitchen Procedures and Production II....................4
HMT 265 Restaurant Financial Accounting.........................3
HMT 356 Hotel/Restaurant Law....................................3
HMT 357 Hospitality Marketing...................................3
HMT 360 Beverage Control.............I..............................3
HMT 361 Enology: The Study of Wine...............................3
HMT 365 Hospitality Property Management.........................3
HMT 366 Restaurant Administration I.............................3
HMT 367 Restaurant Administration II............................3
HMT 466 Training and Development in Hospitality................J3
Total................................................................38
Meeting Administration Emphasis Required Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I i............................3
JRN 284 Fundamentals of Public Relations........................3
HMT 276 Meeting Administration I................................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ................................3
HMT 375 Promotion Materials: Analysis and Design................3
HMT 376 Meeting Administration II...............................3
HMT 479 Seminar in Meeting: Variable Topics....................^2
Subtotal.............................................................20
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School of Professional Studies
Electives: It is strongly recommended that meeting administration students utilize their electives and a minor to secure an area of specialization in the meeting field.
Category I (Select three hours plus MGT 400-3 Organizational Decision Making):
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro........................3
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business 1........................3
MKT 311 Advertising............................................3
MKT 312 Promotional Strategy...................................3
ECO 315 Econometrics...........................................3
MKT 316 Sales Management.......................................3
ECO 350 Managerial Economics...................................3
MKT 371 International Marketing................................3
Subtotal.............................................................6
Category II (Select six hours)
COM 243 Introduction to Industrial Visual Media................3
HMT 378 Leadership by Objectives...............................3
HMT 472 Meeting Law............................................3
HMT 473 Principles of Negotiation..............................3
Subtotal.............................................................6
Category III (Select six hours)
HMT 181-4 Basic Ticketing and Reservation Procedures..............4
HMT 250-2 Applied Hotel/Restaurant Operations.....................2
HMT 351-3 Hotel Administration I..................................3
HMT 352-3 Hotel Administration II.................................3
HMT 366-3 Restaurant Administration I............................3
HMT 367-3 Restaurant Administration II............................3
HMT 481-4 Tour Management.........................................4
Subtotal............................................................
Total...............................................................38
Travel Administration Emphasis Required Courses
Semester
Hours
HMT 181 Basic Ticketing and Reservations Procedures.........4
HMT 182 Travel References and Case Studies..................2
HMT 183 Cruise Development, Marketing, and Sales............4
HMT 284 Tour Operations.....................................4
HMT 286 Tourism.............................................2
HMT 385 Financial Management in the Travel Industry.........4
HMT 386 Incentive Travel....................................2
HMT 481 Tour Management.....................................4
HMT 482 Marketing in the Travel Industry....................4
HMT 483 Corporate Travel Management.........................2
HMT 484 Travel Industry Management..........................4
HMT 489 Seminar in Travel: Variable Topics................._2
Subtotal.......................................................38
Select two hours of credit in a travel specialization from the categories below:
Air Travel Specialization:
HMT 383 Inflight Services...........................................2
HMT 384 Airport Services............................................3
HMT 485 Airline Sales...............................................2
Travel Agency Specialization:
HMT 285 Travel Agency Accounting....................................3
Travel students verification of 40 clock hours of computer reservation training by a qualified reservation trainer or manager.
Minor requirements are listed below.
Hotel Administration Minor Semester
Required Courses Hours
HMT 102 Principles of Hotel/Restaurant Administration...........3
HMT 351 Hotel Administration I..................................3
HMT 352 Hotel Administration II.................................3
HMT 356 Hotel/Restaurant Law....................................3
HMT 357 Hospitality Marketing...................................3
HMT 366 Restaurant Administration I.............................3
HMT 465 Hospitality Employee Resource Development...............3
HMT electives (approved by faculty advisor)..........................J3
Total................................................................24
Restaurant Administration Minor Required Courses
HMT 102 Principles of Hotel/Restaurant Administration..........3
HMT 161 Kitchen Procedures and Production I....................4
HMT 162 Kitchen Procedures and Production II...................4
HMT 356 Hotel/Restaurant Law...................................3
HMT 357 Hospitality Marketing..................................3
HMT 360 Beverage Control.......................................3
HMT 366 Restaurant Administration I............................3
HMT 367 Restaurant Administration II...........................3
HMT 465 Hospitality Employee Resource Development..............3
Total Minor........................................................29
Meeting Administration Minor
Required Courses
HMT 102 Principles of Hotel/Restaurant Administration...........3
HMT 181 Basic Ticketing and Reservations Procedures.............4
HMT 276 Meeting Administration I................................3
HMT 375 Promotion Materials: Analysis and Design................3
HMT 376 Meeting Administration II...............................3
HMT 378 Leadership by Objectives................................3
HMT 472 Meeting Law.............................................3
HMT 473 Principles of Negotiation.............................
Total Minor.........................................................25
Travel Administration Minor
Required Courses
HMT 181 Basic Ticketing and Reservations Procedures........4
HMT 182 Travel References and Case Studies.................2
HMT 183 Cruise Development, Marketing, and Sales...........4
HMT 284 Tour Operations....................................4
HMT 375 Promotional Materials: Analysis & Design...........3
HMT 385 Financial Management in the Travel Industry........4
HMT 481 Tour Management....................................4
HMT 482 Marketing in the Travel Industry...................4
HMT 483 Corporate Travel Management........................2
HMT 489 Seminar in Travel: Variable Topics................_2
Total Minor...................................................33
Corporate Travel Specialization:
HMT 485 Airline Sales............................................................2
Total........................................................................35-36
HMTA Minors
The Hospitality Meeting and Travel Administration Department offers minors in all four areas of emphasis. Students are expected to know any prerequisites for courses in other departments. Non-course requirements:
300 clock hours of on-the-job experience CPR and first aid certification Language competence Typing proficiency of 35 WPM
Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies
The Department of Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies offers course work leading to the bachelor of arts degree. Students preparing for work in industry or graduate study should take the emphasis areas of adult fitness and exercise science, athletic training, sport and allied fields, communications multimajor, or a major emphasis in leisure studies, either recreation and parks administration or therapeutic recreation. Those students preparing to teach at the elementary, secondary, or K-12 levels should take the elementary, secondary, K-12, or secondary physical education/athletic training, or secondary physical education/coaching emphasis.
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School of Professional Studies
Minors in human performance and sport include emphasis areas in elementary physical education, secondary physical education (non-certification programs), sport and allied fields, coaching, dance, athletic training, adult fitness and exercise science, holistic health and wellness education multi-minor, and health and safety. Students seeking teaching credentials in physical education must satisfy the Teacher Certification Program at MSCD in addition to all the requirements of the Department of Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies. Requirements for formal admission to the teacher certification programs,as listed under the teacher education programs section of this catalog must also be met. Students should contact the Teacher Education Department for information regarding teacher certification programs.
Additional Requirement: A grade of C or better in all HPSL courses included in major/minor programs.
Human Performance and Sport Major for Bachelor of Arts
A. Elementary Physical Education Emphasis
1. Professional Activity Courses (HSL 150)
a. Basic Skills (all of the following):
Fundamentals of Movement...............................2
Physical Fitness.......................................2
Tumbling...............................................2
b. Team Sports (four of the following):
Volleyball.............................................2
Basketball.............................................2
Soccer/Speedball.......................................2
Football/Flag Football.................................2
Softball...............................................2
Field Hockey/Floor Hockey..............................2
c. Miscellaneous (two of the following):
Square and Folk Dance..................................2
Track and Field........................................2
Wrestling..............................................2
Advanced Lifesaving....................................2
Racquetball and Handball...............................2
Total Credits.......................................................18
2. Additional Elementary Activity Courses
HPS 250 Activities for the Young Child..........................3
HPS 252 Rhythms for the Young Child.............................2
HPS 258 Movement Education......................................3
Total Credits........................................................8
3. Theory Classes (all of the following):
HPS 160 Introduction to Human Performance and Sports............2
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology..................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise..................................3
HPS 346 Evaluation and Measurement in Human
Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies.................3
HPS 350 Methods of Teaching Human Performance and
Sports for Children....................................3
HPS 450 Psychology of Motor Learning............................3
HPS 460 Organization, Administration of Human
Performance and Sports Programs........................3
Approved electives...................................................3
Total Credits.......................................................23
NOTE: Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take HPS 206 or obtain valid Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation cards from the American Red Cross.
Total Minimum Hours for Majors.........................................49
Physical education teacher certification required course:
HPS 462 Adaptive Human Performance and Sports
Activities...............................................3
NOTE: See Teacher Education Department for Colorado Teacher Certification Requirements.
B. Secondary Physical Education Emphasis 1. Professional Activity Courses (HSL 150)
Secondary physical education majors must present proof of proficiency in 15 different activities. A total of 32 credits will be
counted toward completion of the major requirements. Students must present proof of proficiency by receiving a grade of C or better in HPSL courses.
Semester
Hours
a. Basic Skills (all of the following):
Swimming.................................................2
Fundamentals of Movement.................................2
Physical Fitness.........................................2
Tumbling.................................................2
b. Team Sports (four of the following):
Volleyball...............................................2
Football/Flag Football...................................2
Field Hockey/Floor Hockey................................2
Soccer/Speedball.........................................2
Softball.................................................2
Basketball...............................................2
c. Individual Sports (five of the following):
Advanced Lifesaving......................................2
Gymnastics...............................................2
Track and Field..........................................2
Tennis...................................................2
Archery and Badminton....................................2
Golf.....................................................2
Racquetball and Handball.................................2
Personal Defense.........................................2
d. Miscellaneous (three of the following):
Square and Folk Dance....................................2
Ballroom Dancing.........................................2
Wrestling................................................2
Improvisation and Choreography...........................2
Weight Training..........................................2
Total Credits.........................................................32
2. Theory Courses (all of the following):
HPS 160 Introduction to Human Performance and Sports............2
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology..................................3
HPS 332 Biomechanics............................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise..................................3
HPS 340 Methods of Teaching Human Performance and
Sports for the Adolescent and Young Adult................3
HPS 346 Evaluation and Measurement in Human
Performance, Sport, and Leisure Studies..................3
HPS 460 Organization, Administration of Human
Performance and Sport Programs...........................3
Approved electives................................................... 3
Total Credits.........................................................23
NOTE: Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take HPS 206 or obtain valid Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation cards from the American Red Cross.
Total Minimum Hours for Major.......................................55
Physical education teacher certification required course:
HPS 462 Adaptive Human Performance and Sports Activities............3
NOTE: See Teacher Education Department for Teacher Certification Requirements.
C. K-12 Physical Education Emphasis 1. Professional Activity Courses (HSL 150)
Students must be proficient in 16 different activities, selected from the categories below. A maximum of 32 credits will be counted toward completion of the major requirements.
Semester
Hours
a. Basic Skills (all of the following):
Swimming..................................................2
Fundamentals of Movement..................................2
Physical Fitness..........................................2
Tumbling..................................................2
b. Team Sports (four of the following):
Volleyball................................................2
Football/Flag Football....................................2
Field Hockey/Floor Hockey.................................2
Soccer/Speedball..........................................2
Softball..................................................2
Basketball................................................2
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School of Professional Studies
c. Individual Sports (five of the following):
Advanced Lifesaving.....................................2
Gymnastics..............................................2
Track and Field.........................................2
Tennis..................................................2
Archery and Badminton...................................2
Golf....................................................2
Racquetball and Handball................................2
Personal Defense........................................2
d. Miscellaneous (three of the following):
Square and Folk Dance...................................2
Ballroom Dancing........................................2
Wrestling...............................................2
Improvisation and Choreography..........................2
Repertory Choreography..................................2
Weight Training.........................................2
Total Credits.......................................................32
2. Theory Classes
HPS 160 Introduction to Human Performance and Sports...........2
HPS 250 Activities for the Young Child.........................3
HPS 252 Rhythms for the Young Child............................2
HPS 258 Movement Education.....................................3
HPS 278 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries...............3
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology.................................3
HPS 332 Biomechanics...........................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise.................................3
HPS 340 Methods of Teaching Human Performance and
Sport for the Adolescent and Young Adult................3
HPS 346 Evaluation and Measurement in Human
Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies..................3
HPS 350 Methods of Teaching Human Performance and
Sports for Children.....................................3
HPS 450 Psychology of Motor Learning...........................3
HPS 460 Organization, Administration of Human
Performance and Sport Programs..........................3
HPS 399* Field Experience in Human Performance and Sport...........3
Total Credits....................................................38-40
Total Minimum Hours for Major....................................70-72
'This course must be taken during the senior year in a secondary school at the level in which the student does not do student teaching.
NOTE: Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take HPS 206 or obtain valid Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation cards from the American Red Cross.
Physical education teacher certification required course:
HPS 462 Adaptive Human Performance & Sports Activities.........3
NOTE: See Teacher Education Department for Teacher Certification Requirement.
D. Secondary Physical Education/Athletic Training Area of Emphasis
This major area is designed for the student who desires to major in human performance and sport and also obtain an emphasis in the area of athletic training, but emphasis does not meet all NATA
requirements.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
I. Completion of Secondary Physical Education emphasis
(must include HSL 150, Weight Training).........................55
II. Athletic Training Courses:
HES 204 Introduction to Nutrition............................3
HPS 206 Advanced First Aid and CPR...........................3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment...........................3
HPS 278 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries.............3
HPS 300 Health Programs in Human Performance
and Sport............................................3
HPS 370 Psychology of Coaching...............................2
HPS 478 Advanced Athletic Training...........................3
Total Minimum Hours for Major...................................75
III. Teaching certification requirement would be the same as the secondary physical education. Completion of this program eliminates requirement of a minor.
E. Secondary Physical Education/Coaching
This emphasis is designed for the student who desires to major in human performance and sport and also wishes to obtain an emphasis in the area of coaching. Upon completion, the student may pursue "master coach" certification from the American Coaching Effectiveness Program (ACEP).
I. Complete the 55 required credit hours in the Secondary Human Performance & Sport Major.
A. Must include HSL 150 Weight Training in the miscellaneous area.
II. Take the following courses which are specific to the Coaching
Emphasis:
HPS 278 Care & Prevention of Athletic Injuries................3
HPS 370 Psychology of Coaching................................2
HPS 372 Science & Art of Coaching & Athletic Administration...3
HPS 466 Legal Liability for Physical Educators, Coaches,
& Administrators.......................................3
Select nine hours from the following:
LES 371 Administration of Intramural Sports & Student
Recreation.............................................2
LES 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society............3
HPS 399 Field Experience in Human Performance & Sports.....1-3
HSW 147 Addictive Experiences: Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll........3
HES 204 Introduction to Nutrition.............................3
Total Hours Coaching................................................20
Hours Human Performance and Sport Secondary.......................55
Total Major Hours...................................................75
III. Teaching Certification requirement as stated by Teacher Education Department.
Completion of these combined areas of emphasis eliminates the requirement of a minor.
Semester
F. Sport and Allied Fields Areas of Emphasis Hours
HSL 150 Professional Activities
(select any 12 credits)...............................12
HPS 160 Introduction to Human Performance and Sports...........2
HPS 206 Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary
Resuscitation (or valid American Red
Cross Card)............................................3
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology.................................3
HPS 332 Biomechanics...........................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise.................................3
HPS 362 Trends and Issues in Human Performance
and Sports.............................................2
LES 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society.............3
Approved electives..................................................13
To be selected in accordance with students intended career objectives. Must be preplanned with an advisor in HPSL Department and approved by the chair.
Total Minimum Hours for Major............................44
G. Athletic Training Area of Emphasis
The emphasis area is designed for those primarily interested in athletic training at the high school, college, or professional level and is complimentary to allied fields, e.g., biology.
Semester
Hours
HSL 150 Physical Fitness.......................................2
HSL 150 Weight Training........................................2
HPS 206 Advanced First Aid and CPR.............................3
HPS 278 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries...............3
HPS 300 Health Programs in Human Performance and Sport.........3
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology.................................3
HPS 332 Biomechanics...........................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise.................................3
HPS 370 Psychology of Coaching.................................2
HPS 462 Adaptive Human Performance and Sports Activities.......3
HPS 478 Advanced Techniques in Athletic Training...............3
HPS 489 Internship............................................10
HES 204 Introduction to Nutrition..............................3
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School of Professional Studies
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment.............................3
BIO 231 Human Anatomy and Physiology I..........................4
BIO 232 Human Anatomy and Physiology II......................._4
Total Minimum Hours for Major......................................54
Requirements to enter and complete program:
To be accepted into the program, students must:
a. Have a declared major in human performance and sports with an athletic training emphasis.
b. Complete a minimum of 15 semester hours at MSCD
c. Complete these prerequisite courses:
HPS 206 Advanced First Aid & CPR/or equivalent BIO 231/232 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II or acceptable transfer course
d. Have a GPA of 2.75 (must be maintained).
To complete the program, students must:
1. Complete 1,500 volunteer hours of work with a certified athletic trainer (required to obtain National Athletic Training Association certification but not required for graduation).
2. Pass the NATA certification exam and all other requirements of NATA (not required for graduation).
H. Adult Fitness and Exercise Science Emphasis
Adult fitness and exercise science is an emphasis program for those seeking an entrance into the adult fitness profession as an instructor or who have aspirations in the exercise science field through advanced degree work in exercise physiology. For those interested and capable of pursuing an advanced graduate degree with adult fitness and exercise science as a foundation, there are careers in research, college teaching, and private corporate fitness program development.
Semester
1. Professional Activity Courses: Hours
HSL 150 Stress Management..........................................2
HSL 150 Physical Fitness...........................................2
HSL 150 Weight Training............................................^
Total Credits.......................................................6
2. Basic Theory Courses:
HES 204 Introduction to Nutrition..................................3
PSY 241 Social Psychology..........................................3
HPS 278 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries...................3
LES 307 Health and Movement Problems in the Aging Adult............3
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology.....................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise.....................................3
HPS 378 Fitness Programs for Special Populations...................2
HPS 466 Legal Liability for Physical Educators, Coaches,
and Administrators.....................................3
HPS 468 Advanced Exercise Assessment Techniques....................2
HPS 484 Comparative Fitness Programs...............................2
HPS 489 Internship.............................................10
*HPS Approved Electives................................................2
'(Selected in accordance with student's intended career objectives. Must
be preplanned with an advisor in the HPSL Department and approved by the chair of the HPSL Department).
Total Credits......................................................39
Total Minimum Hours for Major......................................45
I. Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Communications: Sports
Sponsored by the Department of Human Performance, Sport, and Leisure Studies
This area of emphasis is offered through the Cooperative Program for Careers in Communication. It is imperative that an area of emphasis advisor be consulted. Sports communication multimajors are expected to engage in practical experiential situations in either sports broadcasting or sports journalism. At least one three-semester-hour internship in these areas must be considered the minimum. At least 50 percent of all major coursework should be completed prior to the internships in journalism.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts and Systems .... 3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication............................3
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion............................. 3
Total................................................................6
Required Area of Emphasis Courses
SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and TV Broadcasting..............3
SPE 343 Radio-Television Announcing
(Prerequisite: SPE 240 and SPE 330)...................3
or
SPE 344 Radio-Television Production
(Prerequisite: SPE 240)................................3
SPE 348 Radio and TV Production Workshop
(Prerequisites: SPE 240 and 343 or 344)...............3
COM 378 Communications Law.....................................3
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism and Mass Media..............3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing...................3
HSL 150 Fundamentals of Movement...............................2
HSL 150 (Select one two-hour HSL 150 Course)...................2
HPS 370 Psychology of Coaching.................................2
LES 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society.............3
HPS 498 Independent Study Sports Communication
(must develop and research sports topics related
to specific sports, for two two-hour courses)..........4
Total Hours.........................................................31
Recommended Electives
Student must take electives in three different areas; three hours
must be in HSL/HPS.
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft............................3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice and Diction........3
SPE 347 Evolution and Cinematics as Art.......................3
SPE 448 Seminar Practicum in Broadcasting.....................3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio and TV on Contemporary Life..........3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading................3
JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing...............3
JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines.................3
HPS 210 Officiating (by course title).........................2
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology................................3
HPS 332 Biomechanics..........................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise................................3
HPS 362 Trends and Issues in Human Performance and Sports....2
HPS 372 Science and Art of Coaching and Athletic Administration ... 3
COM 244 Writing for Radio.....................................3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television.......3
JRN 499 Omnibus Courses (Related to Sports Communication,
i.e.. Sports Writing, Photojournalism) Select Three... 3
Category Total.....................................................^9
Total Minimum Hours for Major......................................46
Human Performance and Sport Minors
The human performance and sport minor emphasis areas are for non-majors in human performance and sport. Programs are open to all other disciplines of study within the college. The primary objective is to provide instructional studies in a liberal arts institution in human performance, sport and leisure studies, thereby enhancing ones knowledge, understanding, and skillful utilization of human performance, sport and leisure studies to pursue a better quality of life.
Minor programs will not meet requirements for teacher certification with the State Department of Education in Colorado.
Additional requirement: A grade of C or better in all HPSL courses included in major/minor program.
Semester
A. Elementary Area of Emphasis Hours
HSL 150 Professional Activities...................................4
HPS 206 Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary
Resuscitation and/or valid Advanced American
Red Cross Card and 3 hours of HPSL
Department electives.................................3
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School of Professional Studies
HPS 250 Activities for the Young Child.........................3
HPS 252 Rhythms for the Young Child.............................2
HPS 258 Movement Education.....................................3
HPS 350 Methods of Teaching Human Performance and
Sports for Children.....................................3
HPS 460 Organization, Administration of Human
Performance and Sports Programs.........................3
Total Credits.......................................................21
B. Secondary Area of Emphasis
HSL 150 Fundamentals of Movement...............................2
HSL 150 Professional Activities................................8
HPS 206 Advanced First Aid and CPR (or valid Advanced
American Red Cross Card. Students with valid Red Cross Cards, must substitute 3 hours HPSL
Department electives)...................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise.................................3
HPS 340 Methods of Teaching Human Performance and
Sports for the Adolescent & Young Adult.................3
Approved electives (150 or above of HPSL
Department electives).............................................. 3
Total Credits.......................................................22
C. Sport and Allied Fields Area of Emphasis
HSL 150 Professional Activities................................6
HPS 160 Introduction to Human Performance & Sports.............2
HPS 206 Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary
Resuscitation (or valid Advanced American Red Cross Card plus 3 hours of HPSL
Department electives....................................3
HPS 362 Trends and Issues in Human Performance
and Sports..............................................2
LES 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society.............3
Approved electives: Selected in accordance with student's intended career objectives. Must be preplanned with an
advisor in HPSL Department.........................................,J_
Total Credits.......................................................23
D. Coaching Area of Emphasis
HSL 150 Fundamentals of Movement...............................2
HSL 150 Weight Training........................................2
HSL 150 Physical Fitness.......................................2
HSL 150 Professional Activity Courses (select in
consultation with an advisor)...........................2
HPS 278 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries...............3
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology.................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise.................................3
HPS 370 Psychology of Coaching.................................2
HPS 372 Science and Art of Coaching and Athletic Administration ... 3
HPS 466 Legal Liability for Physical Educators, Coaches,
and Administrators......................................3
Total Credits.......................................................25
E. Dance Area of Emphasis
HSL 150 Fundamentals of Movement...............................2
HSL 150 Repertory Choreography.................................2
HSL 150 Improvisation and Choreography.........................2
HSL 150 Ballroom Dancing........................................2
HSL 150 Teaching Dance (Ballet/Jazz/Modern).....................2
HPS 244 Dance Production........................................3
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology.................................3
HPS 450 Psychology of Motor Learning...........................3
Select one of the following electives:
HSL 150 Rhythmic Activities for Special Populations............2
or
HPS 252 Rhythms for the Young Child.............................2
or
HPS 278 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries................3
Total Credits..................................................21-22
F. Athletic Training Area of Emphasis
HSL 150 Physical Fitness.......................................2
HSL 150 Weight Training........................................2
HES 204 Introduction to Nutrition...............................3
HPS 206 Advanced First Aid and CPR.............................3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment..............................3
HPS 278 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries................3
HPS 300 Health Programs in Human Performance
and Sport.............................................3
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology................................3
HPS 332 Biomechanics..........................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise................................3
HPS 478 Advanced Techniques in Athletic Training..............3
Total Credits.....................................................31
G. Adult Fitness and Exercise Science Emphasis
HES 204 Introduction to Nutrition.............................3
PSY 241 Social Psychology.....................................3
LES 307 Health and Movement Problems in
the Aging Adult.......................................3
HPS 378 Fitness Programs for Special Populations..............2
HPS 399 Field Experience in Human Performance
and Sports..........................................1-3
HPS 468 Advanced Exercise Assessment Techniques...............2
HPS 484 Comparative Fitness Programs..........................2
HPS Electives (selection based on exercise science needs)........... 3
Total Credits..................................................19-21
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The multi-minor may be arranged through the Department of Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies and includes the required courses listed under the holistic health and education multi-minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSCD section of this catalog.
Health and Safety Education
Minor in Health and Safety
The emphasis in health education is intended to prepare students to teach health education at either the secondary, elementary, or both levels. This is an excellent area of emphasis for the student who is obtaining a teaching major in another area or for those nurses who are interested in the area of school health nurse.
Health Education Area of Emphasis
CJC 351 Drug Abuse: Legal Issues and Treatment................3
HPS 202 Community Health.....................................3
HES 204 Introduction to Nutrition............................3
HPS 206 Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary
Resuscitation........................................3
HPS 300 Health Programs in Human Performance and Sport.......3
HPS 391 Safety Education......................................3
PSY 325 Child Psychology
or
PSY 326 Psychology of Adolescence..........................._3
Total...........................................................21
Leisure Studies
The major in leisure studies is intended to prepare students to enter recreation-related jobs that are available at both local and national levels. The major consists of a common core of courses deemed essential for all recreation personnel and emphasizes field work with various types of recreation, parks, conservation, and other social service agencies.
In conjunction with the core course selections, the student will select one area of emphasis. The areas of emphasis provide the student with specialized knowledge and skills related to particular job functions provided by the various recreation-related service agencies. The areas of emphasis from which the student may select are:
1. Therapeutic Recreation Services
2. Recreation and Park Administration
In summary, leisure studies majors have the following degree requirements or options:
A. Core Courses................................................18 hours
B. Emphasis Area.....................................................27
C. Internship (required for NRLA/AALR certification)...................12
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D. MSCD General Studies Requirements*..............................36
E. Minor........................................................18-22
F. Electives.....................................................jj-9
Total..............................................................120
The following courses are required by the Leisure Studies
program to meet NRPA/AALR Accreditation Standards.
MTH 108 or higher.............................................3-4
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication....................3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology.................................3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology...............................3
PSY 221 Psychology of Human Development.........................3
CMS 101 Introduction to Computers...............................3
"Students should consult with an advisor for guidance in the selection of general studies courses.
Additional requirement: A grade of C or better in all HPSL courses included in major/minor program.
Leisure Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses for All Students Semester
A. Core Courses Hours
LES 187 Introduction to Recreation and
Leisure Services.....................................2
LES 211 Leadership Techniques in Leisure Services.............3
LES 235 Leisure Education and Recreation for
Special Populations..................................3
HPS 346 Evaluation and Measurement in Human
Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies...............3
LES 387 Recreation Internship Seminar.........................1
LES 411 Recreation Program Construction and
Control Processes....................................3
LES 413 Administration of Recreation and Leisure
Resources............................................3
Total Credits....................................................18
NOTE: Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take HPS 206 or obtain valid Advanced First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation cards from the American Red Cross.
B. Emphasis Area (27 hours)
Students will be required to select one of two areas of special emphasis courses designed to provide the student with high degree of specialization in a chosen area of interest. These emphasis areas consist of 27 hours of course work offered by the department and other disciplines within the college.
C. Internship
LES 489 Internship.........................................12
This practical learning experience is designed primarily to help students make the transition from the classroom to the practical situation. Opportunity is provided for students to assume normal responsibilities involved in the delivery of services commensurate with degree emphasis. Course Evaluation will be S satisfactory or U unsatisfactory. This experience is also required for state registration.
Total hours................................................57
Areas of Emphasis
A. Therapeutic Recreation Services (select 27 hours)
Select six hours from the professional activities courses listed below. Students may also substitute HPS 480 omnibus (activity related) courses as approved by their advisor and chair of the
department.
HSL 150 Activity and Fitness Programs for the Elderly...........2
HSL 150 Rhythmic Activities for Special Populations.............2
HSL 150 Camping for Special Populations.........................2
HSL 150 Sports Programs for Special Populations.................2
Total Credits.......................................................6
Theory Courses:
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology..................................3
LES 333 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation
Services...............................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise......................................3
LES 337 Group Leadership in Therapeutic Recreation..................3
LES 359 Teaching the Handicapped to Swim............................2
LES 437 Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation....................... 3
Total Credits......................................................17
Electives Select four hours from the following:
HSL 150 Stress Management...........................................2
LES 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts..................................2
HPS 378 Fitness Programs for Special Populations....................2
LES 463 Recreation Programs for the Elderly........................J3
Total Credits......................................................^4
Total Hours Required for Emphasis..................................27
Total Hours Required for Core......................................18
Total Hours Required for Internship................................12
Total Hours Required...............................................57
NOTE: Areas of study recommended for minor for students with a therapeutic emphasis of study include: physical disabilities; psychiatric disorders; corrections, drug, and alcohol; special education; early childhood development; and gerontology. Consult with advisor in leisure studies.
B. Recreation and Park Administration (select 27 hours)
LES 215 Maintenance of Recreation Facilities and Equipment.......3
LES 341 Camping and Outdoor Recreation...........................3
LES 383 Open Space and Leisure Resource Development..............3
LES 455 Management of Aquatic Resources..........................3
LES 481 Grants and Financial Aid Programs in Recreation..........3
LES 485 Management & Operations of Leisure Services
and Resources.......................................3
MGT 300 Organizational Management................................3
MGT 353 Human Resources Management ..............................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing.................................J3
Total Hours Required for Emphasis...............................27
Total Hours Required for Core...................................2?
Total Hours Required for Internship.............................12
Total Hours Required............................................57
Leisure Studies Minor
The leisure studies minor emphasis areas are for non-leisure studies majors, but are open to all other disciplines of study within the college. The primary objective is to provide instructional studies in a liberal arts institution in leisure studies and resource development thereby enhancing ones knowledge, understanding and skillful utilization of recreational pursuits for a better quality of life.
Additional requirement: A grade of C or better in all HPSL courses included in major/minor program.
A. Recreation and Park Administration Area of Emphasis
LES 211 Leadership Techniques in Leisure Service...............3
LES 215 Maintenance of Recreation Facilities and Equipment.....3
LES 383 Open Space and Leisure Resource Development............3
LES 411 Recreation Program Construction and Control
Processes..............................................3
LES 413 Administration of Recreation and Leisure Resources.....3
LES 455 Management of Aquatic Resources........................3
LES 465 Urban Recreation Program Services......................3
LES 481 Grants and Financial Aid Programs in Recreation.......^3
Total Hours Required............................................. 24
B. Therapeutic Recreation Area of Emphasis
HSL 150 Professional Activity Courses..........................4
(select in consultation with departmental advisor.)
Select four hours from the following:
HSL 150 Rhythmic Activities for Special Populations............2
HSL 150 Camping for Special Populations........................2
HSL 150 Sports Programs for Special Populations................2
HSL 150 Activity and Fitness Programs for the Elderly........,_2
Total Credits.......................................................4
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School of Professional Studies
LES 235 Leisure Education and Recreation for Special
Populations.............................................3
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology..................................3
LES 333 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation Services.........3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise..................................3
LES 337 Group Leadership in Therapeutic Recreation..............3
LES 359 Teaching the Handicapped to Swim........................2
LES 437 Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation..................
Total Hours Required................................................24
C. General Recreation Area of Emphasis
HSL 150 Professional Activity Courses (select four
hours in consultation with advisor).....................4
LES 187 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services.........2
LES 211 Leadership Techniques in Leisure Services...............3
LES 215 Maintenance of Recreation Facilities and Equipment......3
LES 235 Leisure Education and Recreation for Special
Populations.............................................3
LES 341 Camping and Outdoor Recreation..........................3
LES 411 Recreation Program Construction and Control
Processes...............................................3
LES 413 Administration of Recreation and Leisure Resources......3
Total Hours Required................................................24
D. Aquatic Recreation Area of Emphasis
HSL 150 Professional Activity Courses...........................6
Select six hours from the following:
HSL 150 Swimming................................................2
HSL 150 Advanced Lifesaving.....................................2
HSL 150 Competitive Swimming and Diving.........................2
HSL 150 Synchronized Swimming...................................2
HSL 150 Water Polo............................................. 2
Total Credits.......................................................10
LES 187 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services.........2
LES 215 Maintenance of Recreation Facilities and
Equipment...............................................3
HPS 216 Water Safety Instructor Certification...................3
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology..................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise..................................3
LES 359 Teaching the Handicapped to Swim........................2
LES 455 Management of Aquatic Resources........................_3
Total Hours Required................................................25
E. Gerontology Activity Specialist Area of Emphasis
HSL 150 Professional Activity Courses...........................6
Select six hours from the following:
HSL 150 Activity and Fitness Program for the Elderly............2
HSL 150 Camping for Special Populations.........................2
HSL 150 Sports Programs for Special Populations.................2
HSL 150 Rhythmic Activities for Special Populations.............2
Total Credits........................................................6
LES 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts..............................2
LES 233 Advocacy and Social Action Programs
for the Aged............................................3
LES 307 Health and Movement Problems in
the Aging Adult.........................................3
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology..................................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise..................................3
LES 463 Recreation Programs for the Elderly....................J3
Total Hours Required................................................23
NOTE: Minor programs will not meet requirements for professional registration with the Colorado Parks and Recreation Society or the National Recreation and Park Association or the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification.
Human Services
The term human services has been applied to a family of occupations whose purpose is to help people with special problems. Human services has become one of the countrys major industries.
The human services worker developed through this curriculum provides a core service in programs of rehabilitation and training
which emphasizes client self-help. Such programs conducted by local, state, and federal institutions and private agencies have created expanded opportunities for a variety of interesting new and existing careers. There are rapidly increasing demands for specialized staff in rehabilitation, corrections, welfare, mental health, mental retardation, employment, drug and alcohol counseling, and other social services. This is a challenging career field which provides the opportunity for personal satisfaction in helping those with mental health problems.
The Human Services Program is approved by the Council for Standards in Human Service Education.
Human Services Major for Bachelor of Science
The student must meet the colleges general requirements for a bachelors degree, meet the general studies requirements of the college, and complete the program of core courses listed below. Students who major in human services are not required to complete a minor.
Semester
Required HSW Core Courses Hours
HSW 101 Introduction to Human Services and
Community Resources.....................................4
HSW 104 Behavior Modification...................................4
HSW 202 Small Group Dynamics: Theory and Experiences............4
HSW 203 Introduction to Theory and Techniques in
Interviewing and Psychotherapy..........................4
HSW 204 Family Functions, Dysfunction, and Therapy...............4
HSW 205 Human Services Practicum 1...............................8
HSW 206 Human Services Practicum II.............................8
HSW 432 Psychopathology and the Mental Health Clinician..........4
HSW 479 Professional Internship................................12
Total...............................................................52
'Students must consult with a faculty advisor to select appropriate general studies courses.
Electives Within Human Services Department (Approval of Advisor Required)
Select 16 hours from the following:
HSW 111 Introduction to Developmental Disabilities...............4
HSW 211 Individual Programming for the
Developmentally Disabled...............................3
HSW 311 Human Services for Handicapped Persons...................4
HSW 323 Contemporary Diagnostic and Treatment
Programs in Corrections................................4
HSW 345 Crises Intervention and Legal Issues....................4
HSW 347 Counseling the Substance Abuser.........................4
HSW 375 Holistic Health and High Level Wellness.................4
HSW 411 Understanding the World of the Disabled Adult............2
HSW 436 Advanced Intervention Techniques........................4
HSW 449 Contemporary Issues in Human Services.................1-4
HSW 465 Group Facilitation and Group Counseling.................4
HSW 468 Supervisory Techniques for Health Care..................4
Total...............................................................16
Electives Inside or Outside of Human Services Department............22
Community Service Development Area of Emphasis
This specialization is designed for students whose emphasis is on human resource development and administration in profit and nonprofit human services agencies and private industry. This track will emphasize the development and management of community services agencies in such endeavors as employee assistance programs, staff training, fund development, community relations, and labor arbitration and mediation. In addition, this emphasis area is suited for students who desire a graduate degree in social work administration or public administration. The advisement track consists of 68 credit hours of selected and required coursework with the approval of a faculty advisor from the courses listed below or other approved courses. Students must complete the core requirements for the human services major as described below and the 28 hour CSD program.
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School of Professional Studies
Semester
Required Courses Hours
HSW Core (except for HSW 479, Professional Internship)............40
HSW Electives......................................................8
Electives Outside HSW..............................................8
Required Community Service Development Courses:
CSD 200 Introduction to Community Service Development.........1
CSD 201 Principles of Community Service Development...........4
CSD 300 Applied Development and Seminar 1.....................2
CSD 321 Conflict Resolution and Decision-Making...............2
CSD 341 Development and Use of Inexpensive Media..............3
CSD 361 Financial Accountability of Nonprofit Programs........3
CSD 401 Assessment and Evaluation of Nonprofit
Programs and Projects.................................3
CSD 402 Fundraising and Proposal Writing for
Community Services....................................4
CSD 431 Development and Administration of Volunteer
Programs..............................................3
CSD 451 Politics of Agency Survival...........................3
Total CSD Hours Required..........................................28
Total Hours Required for Emphasis.................................84
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The multi-minor may be arranged through the Department of Human Services and includes the required courses listed under the holistic health and wellness education multi-minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSCD section of this catalog.
Minor in Human Services
The minor offered by the department is designed to provide students with course experiences which are relevant to their educational and occupational goals. The student will choose a minimum of 24 semester hours, eight of which must be in the upper-division. The selection of coursework must be approved by the chair of the department.
Case Management Program
The program in case management is jointly administered and offered by the Human Services and Sociology Departments. The purpose of the program is to train individuals interested in performing the functions of a case manager.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
HSW 111 Introduction to Developmental Disabilities..........4
HSW 211 Individual Programming for the
Developmentally Disabled............................3
SWF 302 Case Management in Social Welfare Services..........4
SWF 378 Social Welfare Policy.............................._3
Total.........................................................14
Institute for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol and Addictive Behaviors
Housed in the School of Professional Studies with its academic courses in the Department of Human Services, the Institute for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol and Addictive Behaviors (ISDAAB) offers two programs:
1. Counselor training program in drugs, alcohol and addictive behavior counseling (38 hours of prescribed coursework).
2. Bachelor of science degree in human services with emphasis on drug, alcohol and addictive behaviors.
Each student in the institute has a program individually tailored leading to the college degree and state certification as a drug/alcohol counselor, as well as a counselor for other addictive behaviors such as smoking, gambling, food disorders, etc.
In addition to classroom instruction, the drug, alcohol, and addictive behavior counselor training program utilizes metro Denver area facilities for experiential training of students. Many course offerings are outreach or community oriented. Graduates attain understandings, skills, and attitudes necessary to function as professional addiction counselors. Individuals interested in institute programs should contact the institute for further information and application at 556-2951 or 556-3105.
Baccalaureate Program Emphasis Courses
(Includes HSW Core; Drug/Alcohol Counselor Training Program courses and electives selected with advisor):
HSW 101 Introduction to Human Services and
Community Resources......................................4
HSW 104' Behavior Modification....................................4
BIO 106' Pharmacology of Drugs and Alcohol........................3
HSW 147 Addictive Experiences: Drugs, Sex, Rock & Roll............3
HSW 202' Small Group Dynamics: Theory and Experiences.............4
HSW 203* Introduction to Theory and Techniques in
Interviewing and Psychotherapy...........................4
HSW 204' Family Functions, Dysfunction, and Therapy...............4
HSW 248' Addictions Practicum 1...................................6
HSW 249' Addictions Practicum II..................................6
HSW 341 Alcoholism Family Counseling Advanced Topics..............3
HSW 343' Addictive Behaviors......................................3
HSW 344 Addictions Research Seminar...............................3
HSW 347' Counseling the Substance Abuser..........................4
HSW 432 Psychopathology and the Mental Health Clinician...........4
HSW 436 Advanced Intervention Techniques..........................4
HSW 449 Contemporary Issues in Human Services,
Variable Topics........................................1-4
(May be taken more than once under different titles)
HSW 465 Group Facilitation and Group Counseling...................4
HSW 479 Professional Internship..................................12
Total Hours for Training Program......................................38
Total Hours Required for Emphasis..................................76-79
'Denotes 38 hours drug/alcohol counselor training program courses
Military Science (Army ROTC)
The Department of Military Science offers two Army ROTC programs leading to a commission in the active Army, Army Reserve or Army National Guard. Class work is conducted on the Auraria campus.
Four-Year Program. The standard four-year program consists of two phases, the basic and advanced courses. The basic course, normally completed during the freshman and sophomore years, is comprised of courses in the areas of military science, officer career development, leadership theory, and management. The advanced course coincides with the junior and senior academic years. Subject areas include leadership techniques, methods of instruction, tactics and unit operations, military law, history, national strategy, and Army policies. Completion of a six-week advanced camp in the summer is required prior to commissioning, with attendance at this camp normally between the junior and senior academic years.
Two-Year Program. An abbreviated two-year program consists of the same courses offered in the advanced course. However, both undergraduate and graduate students may become qualified for this program through the successful completion of a six-week summer basic camp.
Students should contact a professor of military science for specific requirements and options available based on each students status at the time of program entry. Students who are veterans of military service, or participated in Junior ROTC or similar organizations may have a portion or all of the basic course requirements waived by a professor of military science.
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Metropolitan Coliege of D enve r Campus Box 1 6 P.O. Box 173362 D enve 1 ; C O 80217-3362 $3.00 Bound Printed Matter Blk R t 8 Po tag Paid Denver ; CO P ermit o. 973

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State College of Denver CATALOG 1991-1993

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Metropolitan College of Denver C A T A L 0 G 1 9 9 1 9 3 Contents Officers of Administration ........................ 3 Requ i rements for All Degrees ................... 27 General Information ............................ 7 Graduation Agreement ......................... 28 Application Instructions .................... ..... 8 General Studies ............................ .. 28 Admissions Requirements ....................... 8 Degrees and Programs Available ................. 32 Applicants Less Than 20 Years of Age .............. 8 School of Business ..... ...................... 34 Applicants 20 Years of Age or Older ............... 9 African-American Leadership Institute ............ 37 Admission of Previously Enrolled Students ........ .. 9 Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity ........ 37 Transfer Credit Evaluation ....................... 9 School of Letters Arts and Sciences ..... .. ....... 38 International Education ... ............. .. ...... 1 0 Division of Humanities ......................... 38 English Language ........... ................ 10 Division of Social Sciences .................... 51 International Studies .......................... 10 Division of Science and Mathematics ............. 58 Recruitment and Retention Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services ....... 66 of Students from Ethn i c Groups .................. 11 Institute for Women s Studies and Services ......... 67 Tuition Classification ........................... 11 School of Professiona l Studies ................... 68 Education Policy for People Over 60 ............ 11 Division of Education .......................... 68 Financial Aid Procedure ..................... 11 Divis i on of Technology ............ ............. 77 Costs ................... ............ ....... 13 Divis i on of Public Service Profess i ons ............. 88 Academic Information ......................... 18 Course Descriptions .......................... 102 Orientation ................................. 18 Faculty ... .......... ... .. ............. .... 181 Assessment Requirements ..................... 18 Alphabetical Index ....... .................... 189 Warning / Probation/Suspens i on Policy .......... 19 Campus Map ........ ....................... 192 Honors Program ............ .... ............. 19 Admiss i ons Applicat i on .... .......... ........ 193 Omnibus Courses ............................. 25 Metropolitan State College of Denver does not d iscr i minate on the bas is of race, color religion national or ethn i c origin age handicaps, or sex. Inquiries concerning the college grievance procedures may be directed to the designated MSCD offic i als Metropolitan State College of Denver is an equal opportunity employer ; applications from minorities and women are particular ly i nvited Metropol i tan State College of Denver does not discrim i nate on the bas is of race color, creed, nat ional or ig in, sex age or hand i cap i n admissions or access to or treatment or employment in, its educa t ional programs or act i v iti es Inquir i es concern in g T i tle VI and ntle IX may be referred to Dr Percy Morehouse Jr., D irector of Equal Opportun ity/ Assistant to the President P .O. Box 173362 Campus Box 63 Denver CO 80217-3362 (303) 556 2999 Inquiries concerning Section 504 may be referred to AHEC P O Box 4615-P Denver CO 80204 (303) 556-8387 Or inquiries may be referred to the Off ice for C i vil R ights U .S. Depa rtmen t of Education 1961 Stout Street, Denver CO 80294 The programs policies statements an d procedur es conta i ned in this catalog are subject to chan ge by the college without prior notice Metropo litan State College of Denver rese rves the right to w i thdraw courses at anytime, rules calendar curricu lum, graduation procedures and any other requirements affecting students Changes will become effective whenever the proper authorit ies so determine and will apply to prospect ive students.

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TRUSTEES OF THE STATE COLLEGES IN COLORADO Vickie L. Ford Center V i ce Chai r ................................................... ..... Gary M Reiff, Denver ..... ....................... ..... ................ . ....... Dav i d M Herrera For t Coll i ns Cha ir ..... ............................................ Aims C McGuinness Jr. Denver ........ .................... ..... . .............. James E Miller, Colorado Spr i ngs ............................................... ..... Anne Steinbeck Gunnison ................................. .......... .... ......... Thomas Thornberry Cra i g ............... ... ............... ...... ... ...... ........ Ted Violett Faculty Western Sta t e College ... .................................... ..... Chr i s Terranova, Student Western State College .......................... ........... .... Glenn Burnham Ph D., Pres i dent of t h e State Colleges i n Co l orado ...................... .. ..... Date of First Appointment 1985 1989 1985 1989 1989 1987 1987 1989 1990 1990 Administration P r esent Term Exp i res 1991 1993 1991 1993 1993 1991 1991 1990 1991 METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION President ...... ..................... ................... ..... ............ .......... Thomas B Brewer Ph D Assi stant to the Pres i dent ............................................... .... ...... . . Charles M Dobbs Ph D Athletic Director of Intercollegiate Athletics ...... ......................................... William M He l man M.A. D i rector of Sports I nformat i on and Promot i ons and Assistant D i rector of Intercollegiate Athletics . . Gregory C Smith B.A. Director of Plann i ng ......... .................. ......................................... Carol Werner Futhey Ph. D D i rector of Institut i onal Research .... ............ ................. ........ .............. Paul H Wilken Ph. D Equal Opportunity D i rector and Assistant t o the Pres i dent ................................... Percy A. Morehouse Jr. Ph. D Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs ............ ...................... ................. David W W i lliams Ph. D Vice President for Admi n i stration and F i na n ce .......................... ........ ....... . ....... Joseph F. Arcese M B A Interim Vice Presidentfor Institutiona l Adva ncement ............ ...... ... ...... ........................ Patr i c i a J Kelly B A Vice President for Community Outreac h ............................................................ Antonio Esqu ibel Ph .D. Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs .................... ............................. David W. W illi ams Ph. D Executive Assistant to the Provos t ......................... . .......... . .................. Cynthia Luna Scott Ph.D Associate Vice Pres i dent ....................................................................... .... Jett Conner, Ph D Director of Educat i onal Serv i ces for the Rocky Mountain World Trade Center Association . ................ Karin C Millett Ph. D D i rector of Internat i ona l Programs and Services ............. ....... .... ............... .... ... Sk i p Crown hart M.A. Director of Cooperative Education Program .................. ...... . ...... .......... ........ Susan Lanman M A Director of Honors Program ........................... . .............. ... ...... .......... Alain D Ranwez Ph. D Associate V i ce President and Dean of Admissi ons and Reco r ds ......... . . ....... ........... Kenneth C Cu rti s Ph D Assistant Dean of Admissions and Records ........... ........ . ............... ....... Alonzo F. Rodriguez Ph D D i rector of Veterans Serv i ces ............................. ...... ............ ................ Lynn Denz i n M Ed Assistant Dean of Admi ssions and Records ................. . ......... ........... ........ Jeffrey W. Johnson M S Assistant Dean of Admi ssions and Records ......... ..... ..... .................. ........ ..... Thomas A Gray, M S D i rector of High Schoo V College Relat i ons ............ ... ... .... ..... ....... .......... Paul i ne A. Reece M A Assistant V i ce President ..... . .................. ........... ............ ..... ....... C Lavonne Moton Ph D Acting Director of Academic Except i o n s Program ............ ... ... ....... ............ ............... Betty Vette B A D i rector of Orientation .................................. ........... ............ .............. Nancy Breckel M A Director of Spec ial Serv i ces .... ................................................................ Kelly Espinoza M A Assistant Vice President for Extended Educat i on ............ . ........................... ......... Andrew Breckellll, M.A Director of Adult Learn ing Services .................... .......... ........................ . Eleanor M Green Ed D Director of Extended Campus Programs .......... ............. ... .... ................ .. Gwendolyn S Thornton M.A. Assistant V i ce President ........................ ........ ......... ... ....... .............. Manuel Escamilla Ph. D. D i rector of H igh School Upward Bou n d .................................. ...... ....... ........ Char l es Maldonado B S Director of Student Development Center .................... .......... ...... ... ...... ...... Martelle Chap i tal, M S Director of Veterans Upward Bound .............. ........... ....... ........................ Glenn A. Morris M A Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Student Life ........ ....... ..... . ........ Karen J Thorpe Ph D Assistant Dean of Student Life ........... ...................................... .... Yolanda Ortega-Ericksen, M P A Execut ive Director o f Student Affa i rs .... ............ ............ ....... .......... ............. Ron L. Veatch Ph.D. Director of Program Evaluat i on ...... ...................... ....... ................................. Frieda Holley Ph .D. Director of Grants and Sponsored Resea r c h ................. ...................................... Miltren Hardwick, M Ed Director of Campus Recreat i on ................ .............. ......... ....... ........ ............ Anne McKelvey M A Assi stant Dire ctor .......... .................................. ............................. Patty McConnell M S Coord i nator of Outdoo r Adventure ................................... .................. . T i mothy A. Jorgensen B A Coord i nator for lntramura V Ciub Sports/F i tness Center ... ... . ............ .................... .... Scott Reetz M.A.

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Administration Counseling Center Director of Counseling Center ............................... ..................................... Barbara Vollmer Ph.D Staff Psychologist .......... .......................................................... ....... Don Sugar, Psy.D Staff Psychologist ................................. ... ......................................... Jose Rodriguez Psy D Sr. Counselor . ....................................... ............... ................... Barbara Mcintire M S.W Caree r Counselor ......................... ................ ............................. ...... Donna Merr i field M S Counselor ............................... .................................................... Jose Rodriguez M.A Financial Aid Director of Financial A i d .......................................................................... Cheryl Judson Ph. D Assoc iate D irec tor ........................................................................... Jud ith J Lichtenfeld, B S Assi stant D irector ............ .... .................... .......... .............................. Susan McGinley B S Financ i a l Aid Counselor .............................................................................. Jill Ba lou n M S Financ ial Aid Counselor ...... ... .................... ..... ............................... ........ Bennett Buenconsejo Financ ial Aid Counselor .......................................................................... Juree Jacques B A Financ ial Aid Counselor ..... ............................ ........................................ Donelyn James B S Financ ial Aid Counselor ........................................................................ Dawn McCrocklin B S Financ ial Aid Counselor ............................... ................ ........................ Brenda Sebastian B.A. Financ ial Aid Counselor .............................................................................. Cindy Hejl B S Financ ial A i d Counselor ........................................................................... Douglas Futch, B S Student Activities Directo r of Student Activiti es .......................................................... ................. To be appointed Student Health Clinic Director of the Student Health Clinic ................................................................. Steve Monaco, M A Student Legal Services Dire ctor of Student Legal Services .................................................................... Spike Adams J D Student Publications The Metropolitan, Metrosphere Director of Student Publications ................................ ..................................... Kate B Lutrey B.A Office of the Vice President for Administration and Finance Vice President for Administration and Finance .................................................... Joseph Arcese M .B A Assoc i ate V ice Pres i dent for Business Services .................................................... Robert F. Rizzuto M .B A D i rector of Accounting Services ................................. ............................... Sita M. Thomas, B S Accounts Payable Supervisor ........ .................. .......... ................................. Sylvia Atencio Business Manager ................................................................ .......... John P. Utterback B.S D i rector of Student Accounts/Cashiering ........................... ............ .................. Michael Barnett B S Assoc i ate Vice President for Human Resources ...................................................... Tim L. Greene M P A D i rector of Personnel and Payroll Services ............................................ ................. Sandi L. Jones Benefits Admi nistrator ............................................ ........................... Elyse M Y Nieto B A Assoc i ate Vice Pres iden t for Information Technology ....................................... ............... Leon Dan iel, M S D i rector of Academic Computing and User Services .................................................. John T Reed Ph. D Manager of Information Technology Applications Services .......................................... Steve Franzkowiak, B.A. Technology Service Manager ...................................... ................................. Jay Martin, B.A. Director of Budgets ................................................. ........................ Bruce Williams M B.A. Office of the Vice President for Institutional Advancement Interim Vice President for Institutional Advancement ................................................. Patricia J Kelly, B A Assistant Vice Pres i dent for Institutional Advancement. .............................. .... .............. Patric i a J Kelly B A D irector of Pub lic Relations .................................................................... Nancy Munser M P A D irector of Promot i ons and Advertising ................................... ......................... Ann Dickerson, B A Assistant Vice Pres i dent for Development and Alumn i Relations ....................................... Mary Konrad Feller, M A D i rector of Alumn i Relations ............................................................ Carolyn Champion-Sloan, B.A. Executive Director of the Foundation ................ ............... ................................... Len Meyer M.A. D i rector of Support Services .......................... ............................ ........... Bradley Snyder Ph. D 4

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Administration Academic Administrators School of Business Dean ............................ ........ 0 o 0 0 0 Joe D Megeath Ph.D Associate Dean ......... 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 R. M i chael Brown Ph.D Department Chairs Accounting ... ...................................... 0 0 Patricia D Duckworth Ph. D Computer Information Systems and Management Science .............. 0 Gwynne E Lar sen Ph. D Economics ............................................. 0 0 0 0 John P Coc h ran Ph. D. F i nance ........ ... .. o o 0 0 0 0 Jerry D Boswell D. B.A. Management ............ o 0 0 0 0 0 0 Robert Lucas D. B.A Marketing .................. ....... ........ ...... .... 0 0 0 Donald Glover Ph. D. Director of the Institute for Entrepreneurship & Creativity ............... ................. ..... 0 Courtney Pr ic e D P A Director of the Afri can American Leadership Institute ...................... 0 0 0 Ronald M. Kn i ghts Ph. D School of Letters, Arts and Sciences Dean ............. ... ........................ 0 0 0 0 0 Larry S Joh ns on Ph.D. Assoc i ate Dean ........... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Joan M Foster Ph. D Assistant to the Dean ........ 0 0 0 0 0 0 Tony Mo nt oya M .A. Ass i stant to the Dean ......... 0 0 0 0. 0 0 0 Joseph W Th r eadgill M.A Department Chairs Art ............... 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Susan Josep her, Ph D Biology .................. ... 0 0 0 0 George C Becker Ph D Chemistry ....................... ..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Jack D Cumm i ns, Ph D. Earth and Atmospheric Sci ences ....... 0 0 0 Roberta A. Smilnak Ph. D English ............... ..... ....... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Elsie G Haley Ph D H i story ............ 0 0 0 0 0 Stephen J Leonard Ph D Journalism ....... . o o 0 0 Barbara H Ryan M.S. Mathematical Sci ences ..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 George S Dono v an Ph. D Modern Languages ......................... 0 0 0 0 Dav i d Conde Ph.D. Mus i c ............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Hal Tamblyn D M A Philosophy ...... o o .;/ 0 0 0 Stephen E Benson Ph .D. Phys i cs ..... ..... o 0 0 0 0 0 0 Jerry H Wilson Ph D Pol i t i cal Science ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Norman Prov i zer Ph D Psychology ... ....... .................. 0 0 Lyn W i cke l gr e n Ph. D Sociology / Anthropology ........... ...... ....... 0 0 0 Kenneth M K ell er Ph D Speech Communications .......... ................... 0 0 0 0 0 Carl I. Johnson Ph D Director of the Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services . ..... 0 0 0 Akbaral i Thob h ani, Ph D Director of the Institute for Women s Studies and Services ....... 0 0 0 Jodi Wetzel Ph. D D i rector of the Center for the Visual Arts ............ .............. 0 0 0 0 Sally Perisho M.A. School of Professional Studies Dean ................. : ... ......... 0 0 0 0 0 Bill Rader Ph D Assoc i ate Dean .......... .... ..... .... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mary A M ill er, Ph D Department Chairs Aerospace Science ........ ....................... 0 0 0 Robert K Mock M S Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology ............... 0 0 0 Eldon Lindimore Ph D Cri minal Justice and Cri minology ......... ...... 0. 0 0 0 0 0 Joseph G Sandoval J.D Electronics Engineer i ng Technology .... ..... ......... 0 0 0 Larry G Keating M S E E Hosp i tality, Meeting and Travel Administration .................... 0 0 0 o Raymond Langbehn M A Human Performance Sport and Le i sure Studies . .... 0 0 Marc Rab i noff Ed. D Human Services ................................... 0 0 o Jeffrey Haber Ed D M i l i tary Science (Army ROTC) .................................... 0 0 Ma j or Steve E. Miller Nursing and Health Care Management ........ ................ 0 0 0 Kathleen McGuire Mahony Ph. D Read ing ......................................... ....... ..... 0 0 J Douglas Caw l ey Ph. D Teacher Education and Director of Teacher Education and Certification . 0 0 0 0 A Jerrald Sh i ve Ed .D Director of the Child Development Center ............................... .... 0 0 Marjorie Petersen M A Director of Student Teaching ............ 0 0 0 0 0 0 Daniel Alfa r o Ph.D. Technology and Technical Communications ......... 0 0 0 J O Yunker M S Director of the Institute for Gerontology ...................... ............ .... 0 Eugene E Dawso n Jr., Ph D Director of the Institute for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol and Addictive Behaviors .... ..... 0 0 Anne S Hatcher Ed. D. 5

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AR ................ Arts Building NC ............ North Classroom SI ............... ... Science Building AU ..... ........ Auraria Library PE ................. Physical Education SO .............. South Classroom BU ................ Parking Office PP ................. Physical Plant SU ................. Student Union & CC ................ Child Care Center PS ................. Public Safety Book Cent er CD ................ Child Development Center RO ................ Rectory Office TE ................. Technology Building CN ................ Central Classroom SA ................. St. Cajetan 's Center TV ................. Tivoli EG ...... ....... Emmanuel Gallery SE ................. St. Elizabeth's Church WC ................ West Classroom MR ............ .... Mercantile Restuarant SF ................. St. Francis Center

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The College The College Metropolitan State College of Denver i s the larges t public, four year urban college in the United States with modified admission standards Leaders in quality baccalaureate education MSCD students faculty, staff and alumni work to share the responsibil ity of the future Since its creation in 1965 the college has contributed to the vitality of downtown Denver and changed the face of learning in the metropolitan area with its phenomenal growth to approximately 17,800 students. Metropolitan State College of Denver s success is reflected in the faces of its creative and determined students Eighteen-year-aids take the f irst steps toward establishing a career, while young professionals seek career advancement. People re-entering higher education explore new careers and all find new opportunities. The average student is 27 years old, making classes a unique blend of the eagerness of youth and the wisdom that comes with maturity Because the student population is so diverse education at MSCD is a mutual learning experience for students and professors alike There is a give and take between young and old, student and teacherall learning from one another. While MSCD' s students are committed to learning, the faculty is committed to teaching Other colleges emphasize research ; MSCD' s more than 360 full-time faculty members are first and most importantly, teachers They are available to their students both in the classroom and in their offices for extra help and advice Many have extensive professional backgrounds adding an invaluable dimension to their knowledge and more than 80 percent have earned the highest level of academic degree attainable in their fields MSCD offers bachelor of arts and bachelor of science degrees in more than 55 areas -in business, human services, education engineering technology liberal arts, professional studies science, and mathematics. Students can also pursue specific, individualized career choices through a contract major or minor. Several academic programs are the only ones of their type offered in the region and many enjoy national reputations for excellence. MSCD is not limited to degree-seeking students A class in the latest computer technology may attract a Realtor with a fascination for high tech Adults who are already successful in their careers may take a literature philosophy or history class and share a love of i deas Active businesspeople may take advantage of an extended campus evening class in management or conversational French at Metro South or Metro North MSCD s impact upon the metropolitan community continues to grow each year as Denver i ncreasingly becomes a nati onal center of commerce and technology The college considers itself a partner i n Denver s future and seeks ways to contribute to the quality of urban life MSCD students work for loca l businesses as interns and many classes revolve around community issues MSCD also extends learning opportunities beyond the boundaries of the Auraria campus through the Division of OffCampus Programs offering credit classes at location s throughout the metropol itan area includ ing special seminars and workshops for area professionals Additionally the college reinforces its partnership with the commun ity through jointly sponsored events which both entertain and educate MSCD students and the metropol itan community Lectures by nationally known figures concerts and plays foreign study programs and community learning projects all bring the wealth of MSCD's resources into the neighborhoods of metropolitan Denver Metropolitan State College of Denve r provides equal education and employment opportunities for all regardless of race, color creed religion age, sex, national origin or veteran status Accreditation/ Approvals MSCD is accredited by the North Central A ssociation of Colleges and Schools. Indiv i dual academic programs are acc redited by the National Recreation and Park Assoc iation Nationa l League for Nursing the National Counc il for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the National Association of Schools of Music and the Association of University Programs in Health Administration. The Civil Engineering Technology, Electronics Engineering Technology, and the Mechanical Engineering Technology programs are accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology The Department of Human Services has approval from the Council for Standards in Human Service Education and the baccalaureate program i n chemistry is approved by the America n Chemical Society The Drug Alcohol, and Addictive Behavior Counselor program has the approval of the Colorado Department of Health. The Department of Accounting is approved by the Colorado State Board of Accountancy and the Aerospace Science program has the approval of the Federal Aviation Administration Campus Metropolitan State College of Denve r is located in the facilities of the Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC) The 169-acre campus is located adjacent to downtown Den ver at Speer Boulevard and West Colfax Avenue The Community College of Denver (CCD) and the University of Colorado at Denver (UCD) share the facilities with MSCD. More than one million square feet of space for classrooms, laborato ries and offices are included in the fac ility Some administrative offices are in restored Victorian homes in Denver's histor ic Ninth Street Park located within the Aura ria s ite Other administrative offices have recently occupied quality space in the Terracentre at 1100 Stout. The campus features a childcare center ; a block-long gymnasium with a swimming pool ; areas for handba ll, soccer, baseball and track ; a student union ; and a library housing more than 600,000 volumes. The Auraria Higher Educat ion Center provides a variety of educational oppor tunities that meet the needs of the urban student. The three Auraria institutions are governed by separate boards and maintain their distinctive roles and mission s However, the concept of facility sharing affords the MSCD student the flexibility of taking lower-di vision courses at the community college and graduate or specialized professional courses at the university Metropol itan State College of Denver s four-y ear degree programs are coordinated with those of the other two institutions and students may cross register for classes at the three institutions. The proximity of the Auraria Highe r Education Center to downtown Denver enables students and faculty to use the community as a learning laboratory and to weave classroom theory into the social, poli tical cultural, and economic practice of the city. The Auraria Higher Education Center originated with the need t o provide permanent facilities for three rapidly g rowing urban institutions In 1974 the Colorado legislature created the Auraria Board of Directors to plan the campus construct the buildings provide a variety of additional centralized support services and maintain the facilities. In 1972 the Colorado Legislature 7

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The College appropr i ated nearly $40 million for the construction of the Auraria campus Additional funds were contributed by the City of Denver the federal government through the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the State of Colorado. The Auraria H i gher Educat ion Center constitutes an example of creative cooperation by government at all levels Office of State Colleges in Colorado The member institut i ons governed by the Trustees of the Office of State Colleges in Colorado are Adams State College, Mesa State College Metropolitan State College of Denver and Western State College The purpose of the Office of State Colleges is to identify and facilitate cooperative efforts among the institutions. Such efforts lead to broader educational opportunities for students The registering authority of each member institution can provide any regularly enrolled student in good standing with the materials needed to enroll t emporarily in any other member institution without incurring additional matriculation costs Information concerning tuition i s available at the host institution The enrollment status of the student at the host institution will be determ i ned by the student's status at the home institution Students should ascertain in advance of enrolling at an institution that des ired courses will satisfy degree requirements at the home institution The process of enrolling as a system student should begin at least one month prior to the beginning of the registration period at the host i nstitution Application Instructions Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they are received each semester All credentials which are received by the college become the property of Metropolitan State College of Denver and will not be returned to the student. It is the respons i bility of the applicant to notify the Office of Admissions and Records of any demograph i c or academic changes on the app li cation for admission prior to the first day of classes If demographic changes are not reported to the Office of Admissions and Records, it could delay the registration process for subsequent semesters Failure to report academic changes may result in reject ion, dismissal and/or loss of credit. To apply for admiss ion: 8 1 Complete the application for admission included in the back of this catalog Additional applications are available from the Metropolitan State College of Denver Office of Admissions and Records at Campus Box 16, P .O. Box 173362 Denver, Colorado 80217-3362 ; 303/556-3058. 2 A $10 non-refundable application fee must be submitted with the application for admission The application fee must either be received or waived before the application can be considered The application fee does not apply to tuition and fees. Re-admit applicants do not have to pay this fee 3 Submit the completed application and application fee directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. The application and all required credentials (see admissions requirements below) should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes 4 It is the student's responsibility to request that all required credentials be mailed directly from the issuing institution or agency to the Office of Admissions and Records at Metropolitan State College of Denver No hand-carried documents will be accepted 5 Although an applicant s record may be summarized on one transcript official transcripts from each institution are required Admissions Requirements The college classifies applicants into two categories by age those who are less than 20 years of age and those who are 20 years of age or older Based on the college s modified open admissions system each category has its own admissions requirements and procedures. APPLICANTS WHO ARE LESS THAN 20 YEARS OF AGE If you are less than 20 years old by September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall semester, or February 15 for the spring semester, you will be classified as a traditional applicant. Freshman (first-time college student) 1 Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the high school or testing agency : a ACT or SAT test results b high school grade point average c high school class rank 2 This information may be submitted at the end of the sixth seventh or eighth semester of high school but no later than four weeks before the expected term of enrollment. A final official transcript with date of graduation is required no later than the fourth week of the term of enrollment to insure registration for the subsequent semester Students should request and verify that the high school transcr i pt with date of graduation has been mailed by the high school and has been received by the Office of Admissions and Records Students will not be permitted to register after their initial enrollment unless this final transcript is received. 3 Metropolitan State College of Denver will admit students who are likely to complete an academic program successfully and who meet state requirements for the college as established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE). 4 Applicants who do not meet the stated admission requirements will be considered on an individual basis after careful review of all credentials including letters of recommendation and/or personal interview. Some students may be accepted after successful completion of the Summer Bridge Program which has been established with the Community College of Denver at Auraria 5 Applicants who have not graduated from high school but have received the Colorado General Education Development (GED) Certificate or its equivalent will be accepted. College Transfer 1 Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the high school testing agency and/or college or university : a. ACT or SAT test results b high school transcript c transcript from each college or university attended or currently attending d if currently attending verification of enrollment 2. These credentials should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes. All required credentials must be received before a final admissions decision can be made. 3 Metropolitan State College of Denver will admit students who are most likely to complete an academic program successfully and who meet state requirements for the college as established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE).

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4 Applicants who have less than a cumulative 2 .00 grade point average from all colleges and universities attended will be considered on an individual basis after careful review of all credentials including letters of recommendation and a personal interview with an admissions counselor. Please call the Office of Admi ssions for additional information APPLICANTS WHO ARE 20 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER Applicants who are 20 years old or older by September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall semester or February 15 for the spring semester should read the requirements below for either a first-time college student or a college transfer student: Freshman {first-time college student) 1 Applicants will be admitted to Metropolitan State College of Denver upon indicating on the application for admi ssion that they have graduated from high school or that they have received a General Education Development Certificate (GED) 2 By signing the application for admission applicants are cert i fying that they will request either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test scores be sent directly to the Office of Admi ssions and Records 3. Until the credential discussed in #2 above is received a student will not be permitted to register for a second semester 4 The ACT or SAT i s not required for admission but is highly recommended for advising purposes College Transfer 1 Applicants will be admitted to Metropolitan State College of Denver upon indicating on the application for admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have received a General Education Development Cert i ficate (GED) 2. By signing the application for admission applicants are certifying that they will request either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test scores be sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. In place of these credentials college transfer students may have college transcripts, which indicate at least 30 semester hours or 45 quarter hours of transferable c work sent directly to MSCD. 3 Unt i l the credent i a l l i sted in #2 above is received, a student will not be permitted to register for a second semester 4 Applicants who indicate on their application for admission that they are seek ing a degree at MSCD will be classified as non-degree-seeking until all required transcripts and the Transfer Credit Evaluation Card have been received by the Office of Admissions and Records Applicants who indicate on their application for admission that they are not seeking a degree from MSCD may change their status by completing a Change of Status Form and submitting all required transcripts and the Transfer Credit Evaluation Card to Admissions and Records 5 The ACT or SAT i s not required for admission but is high ly recommended for advising purposes 3 Degree-seeking transfer applicants are required to have all college and university transcripts on file to receive a transfer evaluat ion. Admission of Previously Enrolled Students Former students who have not been in attendance at Metropolitan State College of Denver for one or more years should adhere to the following p r ocedures : 1 Submit a comp l eted application for admission which can be f ound in the back of this catalog Check off the re-The College admission box on the top, right corner of the application No application fee is required for re-admission 2 To insure processing, the application and any required credentials should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. 3. Former students who have attended other collegiate institutions since last attending MSCD must follow the appropriate admissions requirements for transfer students 4 Former students who are re-admitting after nine years of absence from the college are required to resubmit all credentials Only non-degree-seeking MSCD graduates do not have to resubmit credent i als Additional Admissions Programs Summer Semester Only Applicants who are applying for the summer semester and who do not wish to continue at MSCD after the summer semester may be admitted under a prov i sional status and are not required to submit admissions credentials Please check the appropriate box under MSCD Plans" on the application for admission Applicants applying for the summer semester and who wish to continue for the fall or spring semester must meet stated adm issions requirements High School Student Education and Enrichment Program The Student Education and Enrichment Program ( SEE) is Metropolitan State College of Denver s High School Concurrent Enrollment Program for college-ready students SEE i s designed to supplement a student s existing education through early participation in college-level classes This advanced program should not be interpreted as an alternative to h i gh school completion but is, instead a cooperat ive college/high school effort to provide educational enrichment and early college attendance to qualified high school students Typically the SEE student meets the following criteria : 1 is currently regi stered in a Colorado high school 2 is maintaining a GPA of 3 0 or better 3 is preferably in the senior year of high school 4 can benefit from specialized or accelerated classes 5 has demonstrated the ability to do college-level work To apply for admission the student must in consultation with the appropriate high school authority, submit to the Office of Admissions at MSCD an admissions application with the required $10 application fee accompanied by the following documents : 1 recommendation stating how the student will benefit from early college attendance from a high school counselor or administrator 2 written parental approval 3 an official high school transcript Upon receipt of these documents, the student' s record is reviewed and the admissions decision is made. However if additional or supporting information i s required the student may be required to have an admissions interview with an MSCD admissions counselor The admissions decision w ill be based on the student's academic preparation past performance the recommendation of the high school official and the student s personal motivation and readiness for a traditional college experi ence Transfer Credit Evaluation Once all final offic ial transcripts for degree-seeking stu dents are received by the Office of Admissions and Records the evaluation process begins The student receives a transfer evaluation card which must be signed by the student's major depa rt ment or school advisor The card is then submitted to the O f f i ce of 9

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The College Admissions and Records. Within approximately four weeks, students receive two copies of the transfer credit evaluation one of which is taken to the major and minor departments for advice on how credits might apply to their programs Transfer cre dit s will be accepted under the following guidelines : 1 Credit must have been earned at an institution of higher education holding full regional accreditation 2 Grades earned must be A," B," C," or equivalent ; however, only the credits will be shown on the MSCD aca d emic record Courses with grades of D," F," or similar grades will not be accepted in transfer 3 Course content should be similar to those courses offered at Metropolitan State College of Denver. 4 A maximum of 64 semester hours from a two-year institution will be accepted and applied toward an MSCD degree A maximum of 90 semester hours of credit will be given for acceptable work completed at a four-year institution or combination of two-and four-year institutions 5 Students earning an AA or AS degree will enter with junior standing at MSCD, provided all courses included in the degree carry a grade of C or better and otherwise meet minimum MSCD standards for transfer credit and with the understanding that some students will need to complete additional MSCD lower division program requirements. International Education In order to fulfill its appropriate role as a public urban institution Metropolitan State College of Denver must be responsive to the changing qualities of the community it serves Because Denver is a national center for commerce and technology Colorado is affected by dynamic global relationships as well as nat i onal state and local policies As technology draws the nations of the world closer together and Colorado becomes increasingly aware of its international role educational instituti ons must increase their commitment to providing opportunities for internat ional education These opportunities exist for nationals enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver who wish to be involved with an academic experience outside of the United States, as well as internat i onals who feel they will gain from study at Metropolitan State College of Denver Admission of International Students All students who declare a country of citizenship other than the United States on their applications for admission must contact the Office of Admissions and Records 10 1 Admission of resident aliens (or refugees, political parolees and political asylum cases etc ) and students on temporary visas other than F-1: a Official transcripts including secondary level education should be submitted four weeks prior to the beginning of the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. b Appl ic ants may be required to pass an English proficiency examination c Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters 2 Admission of applicants on student (F-1) v isas: a. International application for admission and fee must be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes for the semester of enrollment. b Appl ic ants are requ i red to submit the following documents as part of their application to the college : international student application form application fee official transcripts from all secondary and postsecondary schools attended, evidence of English proficiency and financial support documents c. Official academic credentials should be submitted in the original language as well as in official English translation Transcr ip ts from American institutions should be sent directly to the college from the issuing institution d English proficiency may be demonstrated by attaining a score of at least 500 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (T OEFL ) Only scores from the international or special testing programs will be considered e The f ir st semester s tuition and fees will be required prior to course registration for international students Scholarship recipients are exempt from this requirement. f. Students are required to complete a minimum of 12 semester hours with a minimum 2 .00 ("C") GPA each fall and spring semester g. Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters. h. More detailed information is contained in the international student brochure available in the Office of Admissions and Records If students are academ ic ally admissible and have met the minimum English proficiency requirements, they will be issued the U S. Immigration Form 1-20. Questions regarding the admission of students from abroad or permanent residents should be directed to the Office of Admissions and Records English Language ESL Program Metropolitan State College of Denver, like most colleges and universities throughout the United States has found it necessary to establish ESL classes for limited English proficient students who are academically accepted into the college but who lack language skills necessary to succeed fully in a four-year college The ESL program is designed to meet the specific needs of MSCD students The Spring International Language Center at Auraria Intensive English classes at Spr i ng International focus on all language sk ills: grammar, reading, writing and listening/speaking, in addition to special electives that students can choose each term such as GMAT or TOEFL preparat ion, vocabulary building business concepts and English for computers Five nine-week terms are offered throughout the year to enable students to complete thei r English study quickly Students are placed into one of five levels with standardized evaluation tests at the completion of each le>Jel. International Studies London Semester Metropolitan State College of Denver in cooperation with the American Inst itute for Foreign Study has developed the London Semester and offers it with a sli ghtly different academic focus each semester. Students who are in good academic standing and feel that they could benefit from a semester of study in London should contact the coordinator for International Educat ion at 556-3143 Extended Studies Trips Metropolitan State College of Denver provides opportunities for academically qualified students to participate in study-abroad programs These programs vary in length from a few weeks to a full semester For further information, contact the coordinator for International Education at 556-3173 or the Extended Studies Office at 721-1313

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MSCD's Language and Culture Institute The Metropolitan State College of Denver Language and Culture Inst itute was established i n 1976 to organ ize study and travel ab r oad The i nstitute currently operates a summer program i n Mexico a summer intens ive language inst i tute in West Germany, and a w i nter study and travel program i n Mexico s Yucatan Peninsu l a and Central America The i nst i tute offers cred i t t hrough the Department of Modern Languages and the Inst i tute for Intercultural Studies and Services Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services The college provides an opportunity for students to study formally in international courses offered by various academic departments Students i nterested in internat i onal coursework should contact the academ i c advisor of any of the three schoo l s of the college A cross-disciplinary contract major and m inor arranged in Internat i onal Studies b l ends historica l political econom i c cultural and linguistic approaches and provides a d i versified global perspect ive. Those interested i n these or related degree fields should contact the d i recto r of Adult Learn ing Services Intercultural Curriculum The college provides an opportunity for students to study fo r mally in internat i onal courses offered by various academic departments Students interested i n international coursework should contact the academ i c advisor of any of the three schools of the college Addit i onally students may pursue a co n t r act degree program such as i nternational studies or internat i onal business Those interested in these or related degree fields should contact the director of Adult Learning Serv i ces Recruitment and Retention of Students from Ethnic Groups Metropol itan State College of Denver strives to enhance the educational opportunities for Denver area resi dents by offering a variety of well structured early intervention recruitment and retent ion activ ities MSCD has established a strong network in the metropolitan area that assi sts students and other members of the community and infor ms them about h igher educati on opportun it ies and how to go about rece i v ing these benefits A variety of counselors from different areas i ncluding adm i ssions financial a i d academic affa irs, and student affa irs are available to provide h i gher educat ion counseling for both new and transfer students Indi viduals from u n derrepresented groups interested i n attend i ng MSCD should contact the Off i ce of Admiss i ons and Records at 556-3058 for additional information Tuition Classification A student i s classified as an i n-state or out-of state student for tuition purposes at the t ime of admiss ion. This classification is based upon information supplied by the student on the application for adm i ssion and is made in accordance with the Colorado Tuit ion Classification Law CAS S23 7 -101 et seq (1973 ) as amended Once determined a student s tuit i on class i f i cation status remains unchanged unless sat i sfactory evidence that a change should be made is presented A Petition for In-State Tuition Classification form and the evidence requested should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records if a student believes she or he is ent i tled to in-state status The tuit ion classification statute requires that i n order to qualify for instate status a student (or the parents or legal guardian of the student i n the case of students under 22 years of age who are not emanc i pated) must have been domiciled i n Colorado for one year or more i mmediately preceding the first day of the semester for which such classification i s sought. Domi cile f or tuit ion purposes requires two i nsepa r able e l ements : (1) a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain i n Colorado with no intent to be domic i led elsewhere The College Some examples of connections with the state wh ic h provide objective evidence of intent are : (1) payment of Colorado state income tax, (2) permanent employment in Colorado (3 ) ownership of resident i a l real property i n Colorado (4) c o m pliance with laws imposing a mandatory duty on any dom i c ili ary of the state such as the dr i vers license law and the vehicle regi stration law and (5) registrat i on to vote Othe r factors pec ulia r t o the indi v i dual can also be used to demonstrate the requis i t e intent. Any questions regarding the tuition classification law should be directed to an admiss i ons officer at the college In orde r to qualify for i n-state status for a particular semester the st ude n t must prove that domicile began not later than one year pr i o r to the first day of classes for that semester. The dates for qualifying and for subm i tt ing pet i tions are published i n the Class Sch e d ule each semester Education Policy for People Over 60 Older area citizens are encouraged to participate in Metropolitan State College of Denver's programs and activities 1 People 60 years or older who do not wish to earn credit are invited to attend class on a space-available basis in c l asses of the i r choice at e i ther Metropo l i tan State College of Denver or at Extended Campus loc at i ons There is no cost for these classes These people may attend classes beginning the s ixth day of eac h se mester Interested people should obt a i n a registrat i o n form from the Metro-Meritus Program i n the Office of Adul t L earning Services (556-8342) This form must be signed by the instructor grant ing approval and returned to t he Office of Adult Learni ng Services. No college records of participation will be maintained 2 People 60 years or olde r who wish to enroll f or credit should subm it required adm i ss i ons and reg i s tration materials to the Office of Admissions and Records Central Classroom Building Room 103 1006 11th Street. A college record of participat ion will be maintaine d Financial Aid Procedure Philosophy The Metropolitan State College of Denver f i nancia l a i d p rogr a m provides assistance and advice to students who would b e unable to pursue their education at the college without su c h help Scholarships grants loans, and part time emp l o yme nt a r e ava i lable singly or i n various combina t ions to meet the d iff eren c e between what the student and the student' s fam il y could reasonably be expected to provide and the expec ted cost of attend ing Metropol i tan State College of Denver Estimated Expenses For the 1991-1992 academic yea r projected exp ens es are estimated as follows : Tuit ion and Fees Room and Board Books and Supplies Transportation Miscellaneous Resident $1,746 4 620 482 896 1 096 $8,840 Nonresident $ 5,460 4 ,620 482 896 1 ,096 $12,554 Tu i t i on and fees are set by the Off i ce of State Co ll eges in Colorado and are subject to change without notice All students are placed on a single person budget. Addi t i onal allowances are made for students w ith dependent child ren day care c o s ts and for expenses related to disabilities not paid by another agency (P.L. 99-498) 11

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The College Eligibility and Need To qualify for financial aid a student must demonstrate financial need be a U S citize n or permanent resident alien and be enrolled as at least a half-time student. Part-time students who qua lify may be eligible for Pell Grants, Colorado Scholarships Pres iden t ia l Scholarships Stafford Loans, Supplemental Loans to Students, PLUS Loans Colorado Student Grant, Income Contingent Loans and work -study awards Application Procedures MSCD uses the American College Testing {ACT) Service a national nonprofit need analysis organ ization to determ ine financial aid eligibility Return ing MSCD students may request application forms from the Financial Aid Office Transfer students can obtai n application forms from their current college or univ ersity Entering coll ege freshmen should obta i n application forms from their h igh schools or from the MSCD Financial Aid Office ; students should obtain forms as early as possible preferably by m id-Fe bruary Transferring applicants must supply the MSCD Financial Aid Offic e with financial aid transcripts from all scho ols previously attended Detailed information concerning application procedures is ava ilable in the MSCD Financial Aid Off ice Financial Aid Programs The aid programs introduced below are available to undergraduate students only Students who hold baccalaureate degrees are eligible to apply for Stafford Loans Supplemental Loans to Students PLUS Loans and Colorado Work Study only The amount of funds made available depends upon the maximum award allowed by regulation of each program the student's established financial need, dura tion of the student s enrollment and funds allocated to the college by the state and federal governments Grants Pell Grant: Eligibil i ty is restr icted to undergraduates enrolled at least half time {six semester hours a term) The maximum award for students enrolled full time is $2,400. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant {SEOG) : Eligibility for the SEOG is restricted to unde rgraduates enrolled full-time i n a degree program who demonstrate a high need for financial assistance The amount of the award varies from $100 to $4, 000 per year according to the availability of funds Colorado State Grant {CSG): Students enrolled at least half-time who are permanent residents of Colorado are eligible for this grant. Awards vary from $50 to $2,000 per year Colorado Student Incentive Grant (CSIG) : Full-time students who are permanent resi dents of Colorado are eligible for this grant. A maximum award is $2,500 per year Scholarships Scho larships administered by the Financial Aid Office are based on scholastic abi lity Please contact the Financial Aid Office for a complete listing of available scholarships Presidential Scholarships: The scholarships include four-year scholarships for entering high schoo l students and two-year scholarships for transfer stude nts Scholars receive up to $600 per semester to pay mandatory tuition and fees Colorado Scholarships: Grants of $500 per semester, not exceeding the cost of resident tuition and mandatory fees per academic year are ava ilable through the academic departments Recipients must be Colorado resi dents Interested students should contact thei r departments for applications Athletic Scholarships: MSCD has a limited number of athletic 12 scholarships Applications and additional i nformation are available from the MSCD Athletic Department. Private Scholarships: Students should refer to the MSCD Student Scholarship Handbook for information and a listing of scholarships. Students should also contact academic departments and the reference desk at the Auraria Library for assistance in locating sources of such scholarships Loans Each of the following is a loan which must be repaid by the student: Perkins Loans: Undergraduate students enrolled full-time in a degree program are eligible for this loan During the freshman and sophomore years a studen t may borrow up to $4 500 ; through the junior and senior years and postbaccalaureate study a student may borrow a total of $9,000. Upon request, the Financial Aid Off ice prov i des additional information concerning Perkins loans Stafford Loan : This loan is available to undergraduates and postbaccalau reate studen ts enrolled in a degree or certificate program Applicati ons are available from the student s lender of choice or from any college financial aid office Applications must first be submitted to the Financial Aid Office for preliminary processing At MSCD, freshmen and sophomores may borrow up to $2,625 per year Juniors seniors, and postbaccalaureates may borrow up to $4,000 per year. The aggregate amount that may be borrowed throughout a student s college education is $17,250 Because MSCD does not offer masters and doctoral degrees postbaccalaureate students at MSCD are limited to undergraduate loan maximums Supplemental Loans for Students (SLS) and PLUS Loans : At MSCD these loans are ava ilable to independent students officially admitted and enrolled at MSCD and to parents of dependent students Application s are available from MSCD or from lenders which partic i pate i n this program. App lications must first be submitted to the Financial Aid Office for preliminary processing At MSCD independent students may borrow up to $4 ,000 per year with an aggregate limit of $20, 000 At MSCD parents of dependent students may borrow up to $4 000 per year per student with an aggregate limit per student of $20, 000 Income Contingent Loan (ICL): This loan is available to undergraduates enrolled at least half-time in a degree program Postbaccalaureate studen ts are not eligible. Freshmen and sophomores may receive up to $2,500 per year juniors up to $3,500, and seniors up to $4 500. The aggregate maximum is $17 ,500. Additional Loan Programs Raymond R. Uhl Loan: Established in memory of Raymond R Uhl, former MSCD student k i lled in Vietnam this fund is to assist students who need financ i a l help but are not eligible for other types of aid. Maximum loan i s $2,000 and terms of repayment are arranged according to the individual student's circumstances MSCD Foundation and Other Emergency Loans: Should there be a delay in the disbursement of funds the Financial A i d Office is able to advance lim i ted fun ds to students, prov id ed that financial aid has been prev iously awarded The average loan is $200 per semester. The loan must be repaid at the end of the semester i n which the funds were received or as soon as financial aid funds are disbursed to students whichever comes first. Information on additi onal alternate loan programs from private sources is available at the Financial Aid Office. College Work-Study: The State of Colorado and federal work study programs provide part-time employment during the summer and academic year Unde rgraduat e students may receive either type of award. Postbaccalaureate students are eligible to receive only State of Colorado work-study Only permanent Colorado residents are eligible for State of Colorado work-study awards

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Award s r ange from $200 to $5,000 per f i scal year The average award i s $2, 000 The maximum hours students may work is 30 hours per week average while classes are in session and a maximum average of 40 hours per week between semesters. Employment : Many students who do not qualify for work-study find part-t ime employment to cover a portion of their educational expenses The Aurar i a Placement Office assists students in f inding part time jobs Other Forms of Assistance Colorado No-Need Work-Study: Students enrolled at least half time who are permanent residents of Colorado and have either unmet need eligibility or who do not qualify for need-based financ i a l aid are eligible for this award Students may apply for these funds at the Financial Aid office. Financial Aid as a Form of Payment: Students who have been awarded financial aid have the option of using that aid as their form of tui tion payment dur ing phone registration each semester Once the award has been verified by the Business Office the student w ill not be required to pay the tuition and fee charges until the aid is d i sbursed Students receiving any type of financial aid are eligible for this service each semester for which aid has been awarded Related information is prov i ded i n mail-in and phonei n registrat ion mater i als and in class schedules Resource Expectations: Students attending MSCD must assume responsibility for the cost of their education Tax supported a i d programs exist to supplement student financial resour c es not to replace them Prospective financial aid applicants should refer to the Financ ial Aid Office for details concern ing students resource expectations The Aid Package Once student eligibility i s determined, an aid package is developed which depends upon the availability of funds and the eligib i lity of the appl i cant in relation to that of other students Although it is not always possible to do so the Financ ial Aid Office attempts to fully meet student eligibility. To facilitate the work of the Financial Aid Office, applicants must obtain all i nformat ion and forms from designated sources and submit the required materials to the appropriate office accordi ng to established schedules Recei v ing a scholarship has no effect on a student's aid if he or she is not receiving funds from ICL GSL, Perkins SEOG, CSG, CSIG, or College Work Study Students receiving aid from any of these prog r ams are l i mited to a maximum amount of aid A student whose full need has been met prior to receipt of a scholarsh i p will have his or her aid reduced by an amount equal to the scholarship If the student's full eligibility has not been met, the scholarship can be allowed to satisfy the unmet eligibility Each s tudent s situation i s treated individually. Award Notification When the Financial Aid Office has determined the kind and amount of aid for which a student qualifies the student is notified of the award by letter The letter also stipulates the conditions of the award. Students awarded aid must sign the statement of educat ion purpose on the award letter and the Anti-Drug Abuse Act cert i ficat ion. Disbursement Procedures: a. Stafford Loans, Supplemental Loans to Students and PLUS loans : All Stafford Loans and Supplemental Loans to Students are required to be disbursed in two d isbursements. Contact the Financial Aid Office for disbur s ement dates The first disbursement is usually available within 35 days after the beginning of the semester for which the loan is i ntended Stafford and SLS checks will be processed at the F i nanc ial Aid Office and released through the Business Office Students are required to pay any outstanding balance owed to The College MSCD at the time the check is released PLUS checks are mailed directly from lenders to parent borrowers and may or may not be disbursed in two disbursements b Work Study : Work study earnings are paid monthly and are treated as wages earned Outstanding balances owed to MSCD are not deducted from these earnings Students are strongly advised to pay any outstanding balance as soon as a work-study check is received c All other aid: Beginning on the first day of classes each semester students receiving aid other than those listed above may come to the MSCD Business Office to p ick up their f i nancial aid The Business Office will deduct any outstanding balance owed to MSCD and issue a check for any remain i ng funds Students who still owe a balance after all aid has been paid will be issued a bill. Repayment Policy Students who withdraw from MSCD prior to complet ion of a term must repay a portion of financia l aid and scholarships. All required financial aid repayments must be made to MSCD before the end of the current academic year or before additional Title IV funds may be disbursed to the student, whichever occurs first. Repayment is made to the MSCD Busi ness Office Student Rights and Responsibilities Academic Progress Requirements Financial aid rec i p i ents are requ i red to maintain sat i sfactory progress towards their educational objectives in order to continue to receive aid (2. 0 GPA ; complete at least two-thirds of the credits attempted each semester ; and be enrolled the equivalent of not more than 12 full-time semesters) Detailed information outlining the requirements is available in the Financial Aid Office Failure to maintain satisfactory progress may result in cancellation of aid for subsequent terms of school years. Change in Status The financial aid award may be adjusted throughout the award period to reflect any change i n the student's resources or enrollment status or in institutional state or federal funding Renewal of Financial Aid Students must apply each year for continued aid Renewal of financial assistance depends on the student' s academic performance, financial eligibility and the availability of student financial aid funds Students should contact the Financial Aid Office for details concerning Metropolitan State College of Denver financial a i d policies and procedures Costs The Board of Trustees of the Office of State Colleges in Colorado the governing board of the college, reserves the right t o alter any or all tuition and fees for any semester without notice Tuition and College Service Fees Tuit ion and College Service fees are determined by the Trustees shortly before the beginning of each academic year Information regarding tuition and fees is publ i shed in the current Class Schedule TUITION AND FEES ARE PAYABLE AT THE TIME OF REGISTRATION. 13

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The College Standard Fees An application fee is required of all applicants for admission to the college This fee is non-refundable and will not be applied to tuition ............................................. $10 Transcript fee, per transc ript .................... ....... $1 Graduation fee .... .............. ................... $20 Special Fees Returned check penalty .............................. $17 Course Audit Policy Students may audi t a class with the permission of the instructor and if seating is available. Academic credit is not awarded for an audited course The cost for auditing a course is based on regular tuition as published in the current Class Schedule Audit approval forms are available in departmental offices Health Insurance Sing le coverage is man datory for students registered for 10 or more semester hours providing no other comparable health i nsurance is in effect. Students may apply for a waiver if they have other coverage A waiver need only be submitted once, because once established it will remain in effect until rescinded in writing by the applicable deadline Students enrolled for less than the full time amount (1 0 hours during fall and spring semester ; eight during summer semester) are not eligible for the college's group coverage. In addition if a full-time student dec reases the amount of semester hours to below full-time status (1 0 hours during fall and spring semester ; eight during summer semester) within 28 calendar days from the first day of the semester, the student loses insurance eligibility Students who have coverage in the spring semester are e li g ible to purchase insurance coverage in the following summer semester even though they may not be registered for classes in the summer. For complete details, contact the Accounts Receiva ble Office at 556-3100 Optional coverage is available for dependents of full-time students Other Cost Information The cost of books and supplies averages $350 to $500 per academic year with the highes t cost during the first semester of attendance. Other costs such as room, board, clothing, transportation, and other expenses will vary according to individual need Tuition Adjustments Please see the Class Schedule for the current semester. Student Affairs The Office of Student Affairs coordinates a wide range of service programs, such as financial aid recreation, legal services student activities student publications, health services and counseling Students are encouraged to get inv olved in several activities and use the support services whenever necessary. Conduct of Students Metropolitan State College of Denver policy provides students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. The college publishes standards of conduct however to which students are expected to adhere. Informat ion regarding students rights and responsibilities, including the Student Due Process Procedure (the procedural rights provided to students at MSCD before disciplinary action is imposed) is available in Central Classroom 107-A. 14 Counseling Center The Counseling Center exists for the purpose of providing professional assistance in three related areas to all students presently enrolled at MSCD or MSCD alumni : (1) academic support programs (2) career development and career decision making and (3) counseling for persona l growth and change These services are provided in a variety of forms and settings that include formal classes, workshops, seminars, counseling, and educational groups as well as the tradit i onal one-to-one setting Most group programs begin at the start of each semester and interested students should register prior to or during the first week of classes Students desiring assistance are encouraged to contact the center personally to arrange an appointment or to register for one of the programs listed below The Counseli ng Center is an accredited member of the International Association of Counseling Services Inc Academic Support Programs : Test Anxiety Reduction: This workshop is designed for students whose anxiety about taking tests interferes with studying and test performance. Participants will learn skills to change the thinking that leads to anxiety learn to relax and learn to study and take tests more effectively Career Development and Career Decision-Making: Self-Assessment/Life-Planning Workshops: These three session workshops are held at various times throughout the semester and participants will comp lete exercises and inventories to indicate interests, values achievements and personality characteristics Workshops are free for MSCD students ; a fee is charged for nonstudents Career Assessment Screening: Students who are init i ating the career decision making process will meet for initial screening Career testing will be carried out, and an overview of the process and the services available will be presented Participants will then be referred to an appropriate program Personal Growth and Change: Emphasis is placed on helping students with any problems that interfere with achieving success at the college The student must initiate contact or be referred by a member of the professional staff of the college, in order to receive assistance. Information disclosed in counseling is held in strictest confidence and is never released without the written consent of the student. Private one to-one assistance in each of the areas described below is available for those students who do not choose to become a member of a workshop, seminar, or group Personal Growth and Development Program: Part i cipation in this low-structure group setting is designed to develop skills in communicating honestly d ir ectly and comfortably with other people and to promote personal growth and change through self exploration in a supportive atmosphere The group deals with personal problems such as fears, doubts frustrations, conflicts about school job, family, sex loneliness and dating Rational Living Workshop: The workshop provides an opportunity to become acquainted with the fundamentals of rational emotive training and to apply these principles to problem areas specific to each individual's life The process involves developing an awareness of self and of the emotional self defeating thought patterns that have been learned. This opportunity to learn effective emotional management and positive behavior skills is provided through discussions lecture role playing and group interaction Anxiety Reduction Workshops: Anxiety is a learned emotional reaction that can be reduced or eliminated entirely by relearning The Counseling Center utilizes the desensitization technique (i.e.,

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relaxation and counter-conditioning) to help eliminate inappropr ia te anxiety reactions Four two-hour workshops are required to complete the program. Introduction to Biofeedback Training : This two-session group is designed for those people who want more information about biofeedback training. Participants who desire treatment will be scheduled for continuation in the biofeedback lab. Decision-Making/Goal-Setting: Participants complete an assessment inventory that provides information about the manner of gathering and process ing information and making decisions. The results are discussed during the second session and provide a framework for learning additional decision-making and goal setting techniques. Assertiveness Training: Participants learn techniques to help eliminate difficulties in asserting themselves They learn (1) how to recognize assertion problems, (2) simple ways to rid themselves of anxiety and (3) ways to build assertive skills to deal effectively with a wide variety of common problems. Stress Reduction/Relaxation Techniques: Students learn and practice a progressive relaxation technique. A theoretical unders tanding of the benefits and the practical application of relaxation are emphasized Stress Management Workshop: A variety of techniques for managing fears, anxiety, and generalized stress are taught. Veterans Upward Bound Veteran s Upward Bound at Metropolitan State College of Denver is a federally funded program designed to ident ify recruit, and motivate veterans to use their VA benefits in pursuit of personal career goals through higher education Veter ans Upward Bound provides remedial and tutorial help so that survival in academic or vocationaVtechnical programs is maximized This is done during a 12-week trimester Ancillary services such as career counseling, financial aid advisement, psychological counseling and job placement are also provided for the part icipant. High School Upward Bound The program is designed to generate the skills and motivation necessary for success in and beyond high school for youths who are low-income and first generation college-bound students The program provides intensive academic instruction during the school year, as well as a six-week summer session. Basic academic skill preparation in reading, writing and mathematics is part of a comprehensive counseling and enrichment program for the purpose of developing creative thinking effective expression and positive attitudes toward learning. The students are recruited at the beginning of the ir sophomore year in high school from five target area high schools located in Denver County (East, Lincoln Manual North and West high schools) Special Services Program The purpose of the Special Services Program at Metropol it an State College of Denve r is to provide educational assistance for selected students who, because of financial and/or other circumstances, may otherwise be denied a chance for participation in higher education programs Academic assistance is provided for students on the basis of individual need. Courses in English reading, and commun ication are offered for college credit, coupled with tutorial assistance. These courses are designed to strengthen and supplement a student's basic educational skills so that she or he may better address the requirements of a college course load. O ther supportive services available are counseling, testing assistance with financ ial aid forms, and when possible assistance in attending soc ial and cultural events to enhance the student's experience at Metropol itan State Colleg e of Denver. The College Servicemen's Opportunity College Metropolitan State College of Denver has received recognition as a Servicemen s Opportunity College Further information can be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records Veterans Services The Office of Veterans Services is designed to provide student veterans, and veterans in the community, with a variety of outreach, recruitment, and retention services. These include assistance with problems involving checks, tutorial and counseling assistance and many referrals to both on ca mpus offices and community services. The office also certifies student veterans and dependents for their VA educational benef i ts Student Health Clinic All MSCD students enrolled for at least one credit are entitled to medical services at the health center Students are not required to carry the Student Health Insurance to use the health center. Your health plays a vital role in how successfully you achieve your academic, social, and personal goals during college Many medical services are provided by the health center physicians, nurse practitioners and walk-in R N.'s who help staff the health center These services i nclude the evaluation and treatment of health problems/illnesses lab testing physicals and women' s health care (pap smears, birth control supplies). Medications can be purchased at the health center at the t i me of your visit. Measles/Mumps Immunizations Beginning fall semester 1992, all newly admitted students born after January 1 1957, will be required to proof of two (2) doses of measles/mumps vaccine administered after the age of 1 year by a licensed physician or authorized health care provider By July 1 1995 all students born after January 1 1957 will be required to comply with these immunization provisions Specific instructions will be included in the class schedules beginning with fall semester, 1992. Student Health Insurance The Student Health Insurance is a group mandatory-with-waiver policy for full-time students The insurance premium for students taking 1 0 or more semester hours is i ncluded in the student fee assessment each semester Students enrolled for less than the full-time amount of semester hours (1 0 hours during fall and spring semesters ; eight hours during summer semester) are not eligible for the college s group coverage. In addition, if a full-time student decreases the amount of semester hours to below full-time status (1 0 hours during fall and spring semesters ; eight hours during summer semester) within 28 calendar days from the first day of the semester, the student loses insurance eligibility The Student Health Clinic coordinates all ins uran ce claims and forwards them to the insurance company for payment of benefits Elig ible students who have comparable insurance coverage may waive the insurance premium and not participate in the program Proof of comparable insurance and a waiver form must be completed and turned in to the Business Office within the first three weeks of the semester. A waiver, once in place, will continue until rescinded in writing by the student. Optional coverage is available for dependents of insured students who are enrolled for 10 or more semester hours duri ng fall and spring semesters and eight or more semester hours during summer semester Premiums for optional coverage must be paid at the Business Office during the first three weeks of each semester The policy is in effect 24 hours a day and covers the period of time from the first day of classes of the semester to the first day of 15

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The College classes of the following semester Insurance brochures listing other benefits, as well as insurance claim forms and information are available at the Student Health Clinic, Room 140 Student Union The group policy number is G 3392. Student Activities Metropolitan State College of Denver's Office of Student Activities offers concerts dances, leadership development programs student clubs and organizations lectures ser ies art shows, and a myriad of other co-curricular activities for the students of Metropolitan State College of Denver In addition to providing social cultural, and recreational activities the Office of Student Activities encourages and supports the development of a wide range of professional, social, academic honorary, and special interest student organizations The Office of Student Activities is on the second floor of the three story Student Activities Center wing of the Auraria Student Union The activities wing houses the clubs and organizations student publications, and the administrative offices of the Student Activities staffs of the three colleges on the Auraria campus Campus Recreation The Campus Recreation Program at Metropolitan State College of Denver offers a comprehensive leisure service for the students faculty and staff of MSCD. It complements the academic mission of the college through enrichment of student life and development of a lifetime recreational philosophy The program is composed of the following five major components : informal recreation leagues and tournaments club sports outdoor adventure and special events Informal recreation the largest component, is designed to make the facilities available for recreational use for the general population of the college community. Among the facilities available are a 25-yard indoor swimming pool, eight handball/racquetball courts, two squash courts two weight rooms volleyball courts four basketball courts, twelve tennis courts, a dance studio and outdoor athletic areas (baseball field, softball field and track) In addition, two aerobic sessions are offered each weekday. Organized intramural events are offered throughout the year Whenever possible both competitive and recreational divisions are offered to ensure participation for all ability levels Included are activities such as golf, racquetball, and tennis tournaments, flag football, softball and basketball leagues Club sports is intende d to meet the needs of individuals and groups who are involved in sport activities at an extramural level. Some clubs which have longevity in the program are TaeKwonDo lacrosse, rugby, and cheerleaders Outdoor adventure provides organized trips equipment rental, workshops, and seminars. The goal of this division is to provide alternative activities for individuals interested in outdoor pursuits During the academic year, Campus Recreation conducts activities that appeal to the general college population These events provide the opportunity to part icipate in many activities that are associated with college life. Auraria Child Care Center The Auraria Child Care Center is a nonprofit organization which prov i des a high quality child care and preschoo l program for the children of students, faculty, and staff of the Auraria Higher Education Center The center operates from 7 a.m. to 6 p .m. and is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services to serve 150 children It is divided int o two toddler, three preschool, and one kindergarten/after school classroom. Children must be 18 months to eight years of age to attend 16 The philosophy of the center is to foster the development of competence in intellectual and social skills and to provide a safe nurturing env i ronment. The children s program involves the assessment of individual needs and establishing goals and activities appropriate for development. Close parent-teacher communication is a key to the responsive, individually oriented program provided at the center Parents may register their children on a full-time part-time or hourly basis to accommodate students varying class schedules For additional information please call 556-3188. Career Services Career Services offers assistance to students and alumni of MSCD in planning their careers, finding off-campus jobs while enrolled, and seeking employment upon graduation Specific services offered by the center include career interest and personality testing, and workshops focusing on career planning resume preparation, job search strategies and interviewing skills Professional counselors are available for individual appointments The student employment service and job vacancy l isting are also housed in the Career Services Center The Career Services Center is located in Arts Building 177 and the telephone number is 556-34 77. Campus Career Library This library contains resources to help with the career planning and job search process Info r mation such as employer directories salary surveys and career assessment resources are available Discover Discover is a computerized guidance system which contains specific occupation information assessment inventories with immediate results, and nationwide college information. Trained advisors are available to assist users of the system On-Campus Interviewing with Employers Employees visit the campus October through December and February through May to interview students graduating in any particular academic year Disabled Student Services The Office of Disabled Student Services provides academic support services to disabled students at MSCD and UCD Services include notetaking, interpreting provision of taped texts admissions and registration assistance exam assistance and handicapped parking permits and information Information and Referral Services This office is a central information source which provides assistance to prospective students seeking enrollment at CCD MSCD, or UCD. Tri-institutional tours of the Auraria campus are provided to prospective students on a prearranged basis International Programs The Office of International Programs assists MSCD students by providing counseling on immi gration issues ; host family accommodations ; support for personal adjustment; liaison with consulates, missions, embassies, and foreign organizations; and other pertinent information for foreign students The office also provides information on study abroad programs to U S and foreign students Off-Campus Housing Services This office helps students locate housing Services offered include computerized rental and roommate listings and housing fairs on the first day of classes. Counseling on budgeting, on landlord/tenant rights and responsioilities, and roommates is also provided

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Colorado Rehabilitation Services The Off i ce of Colorado Rehabilitation Services is a campus branch of the State Department of Social Services. Services offered to help eligible d i sabled students to become suitably employed include job seeking, skills tra i ning, vocational testing counseling and guidance physical and mental restoration services and referral to additional sources of financial aid The Auraria Library The Auraria Library provides a wide variety of learning resources for the students and faculty of Metropo litan State College of Denve r and the other Auraria institutions The library has almost 600,000 volumes of books microforms and bound periodicals in addition to more than 1 900 current periodical and newspaper subscriptions Collection development efforts are focused on providing a strong base for l earning/teach ing efforts on campus and on developing in-depth collections i n the fields of public administration, architecture and planning applied mathematics educational administration and education technology The main collection i s supplemented by the Architecture and Planning Branch Library which is located in the Dravo Building, third floor and open to the entire campus As a member of the Colorado Alliance of Research Librar ies (CARL) the Auraria Library has access to 2 500 000 volumes from Colorado member libraries and, through a nat ional network, to an additional 15 m i llion volumes available through inter library loan. All students are encouraged to take the 50minute self -gui ded audiotape tour of the library i n order to familiarize themselves w ith the resources and services available to support their academ i c pursuits Special services offered by the library include an online public access catalog computerized b i bliographic searches, library orientation and instruction for gro ups and individuals, a depos itory of U S. and Colorado government publications and media listening and v i ewing facilities The Media and Telecommun i cations Divi s ion of the library also has an internship program and a self service graphics lab which might be of particular interest to students Student Union The Aura r i a Studen t Union serves as the location for out-of class activities and services for all Auraria campus students and staff. It is the foca l point for many cultural, soc i al, and recreat i onal activities of the college community The Student Union contains a bookstore, gameroom, cafeteria, M ission, meeting and conference facilities student activit i es off i ces health center student organizations and a variety of lounges for study and relaxat ion. The Student Union s lower corr i dor contains a hous ing board r ide board and other public transportat ion information The Conference Serv i ces Office is located within the Student Union This operation schedules all facilities for non-academic use and coordinates any services necessary for the events of campus departments or organizations For information or to reserve a room, call 556-2755 The Student Union is located at Ninth and Lawrence streets Metropolitan State College of Denver Child Development Center The MSCD Child Development Center p r ovides exemplary on campus children s programs : during the fall and spring semesters the center offers pre-schoo l programs ; in the summer it prov i des a Summer Enrichment Program for elementary age children Availabl e to the Auraria c ampus and to the Denver community these programs are part of the MSCD Teacher Educat i on Department and demonstrate a model of exc ellence for MSCD teacher education students The College The classrooms are under the direction of master teachers who are trai ned and experienced in either early ch ildhood or elementary educati on The master teachers plan an ag e appropriate program to provide quality learning experiences which meet the developmental needs of the children MSCD teacher education students also work in the classroom providing a high aduiVchild ratio with opportunities for small groups and individual attent ion. The preschool program combines the best thinking and r esearch in early childhood education. There are two preschoo l classes available : 8 :30-11:30 a m for children 2 1 / 2 to 4 years old ; 12:303 :30 p.m. for children 4 years old by September 15. There is also an hour of child care available before and after each preschoo l class allowing parents the option of plac ing their children for up to five hours The Summer Enrichment Program i s academic in content but recognizes children s needs for fun and different l earning experiences in summer Our approach ensures that children enjoy their summer learning opportunities There are two classrooms : the younger one for children enter i ng kindergarten through second grade in the fall ; the older one for children entering second grade through fourth grade in the fall. There is a Day Program from 9 :00 a m to 3 :30 p. m and an Extended Program from 7 :00 to 9 :00 a m and from 3 :30 to 6 :00 p. m The staff is proud of these programs and welcomes your visit to observe the fac ility and programs at the Child Development Center on the Auraria Campus Please stop by the center or c all 556-2759 for more i nformat ion. Auraria Department of Public Safety The Department of Public Safety provides professional law enforcement services for the Auraria Higher Education Center Peace officers patrol the campus 24 hours a day ; train e d d i spatchers are on duty at all t i mes to receive ca ll s Calls warranting police or emerge ncy serv i ces should be d i rected through the emergency number : 556-2222 The Transportation Department offers many options to Auraria commuters Parking is available in daily fee lots at $1. 25-$2 .00 per day. The Parking and T r ansportation Center (PTC) located at 7th and Walnut has added more than 1 700 new parking spaces to the campus Parking is available in the PTC for $2.00 per day For easy entrance/exit to the PTC and other designated lot s a re usable debit card can be purchased and a cash value encoded on its magnetic strip Visit or call the parking office located in the PTC, for brochures maps and additional information about location s costs, handi capped parking motorcycle parking evening escort service and the Motori st Ass i st Program. Auraria Sa f e ty and Transportation/Div i s ion: 556-2000 17

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Academic Information Academic Information The college operates on the semester system with each semester during the academic year consisting of 15 weeks of instruction followed by a week of examinations Running concurrently with the 16-week courses are modules scheduled to begin on the first, sixth and eleventh week of the 16-week semester. During any 16week semester students may enroll in 16-week courses, five-week courses, or combinations of both as long as the limitations outlined under course load are not exceeded The college also offers either an eightor 1 0-week summer term during which students may enroll for either eightor 1 0-week courses fouror five-week courses or combinations of both The course load restrictions are adjusted to be equivalent to those of the regular academic year. Classes are scheduled during the day and in the evening in order to accommodate people who are employed Students who are planning to take the majority of their classes in the evenings should check with appropriate department chairs about the availability of courses in their major dur ing evening hours Enrollment can be on a full-time or part-time basis and can be for the purpose of pursuing a bachelor's degree improving vocational or professional competence or learning about particular areas of interest for cultural or intellectual reasons Please refer to the Class Schedule for current calendar information Admission and Registration Students who have not previous ly attended Metropolitan State College of Denver should review the college' s admission requirements All continuing students in good standing at Metropolitan State College of Denver are eligible to register each semester Students may maintain the status of continuing student while absent from the college ; however following two full semesters of absence students should review their status with the Office of Admissions and Records to determine whether an updated application for re-admission will be required. A student may register for classes i n several ways Information on the registration procedure and registration dates are published in the Class Schedule which is ma i led to all continuing students Students are responsible for insuring that there is a correct and up-to date address on file with the college Address changes may be made with the Office of Admiss i ons and Records Registration procedures and dates for module classes are described in the Class Schedule For further i nformation regarding registration, please call 556 2950 Orientation All first-time college students regardless of age and all transfer students less than 20 years old are required to attend an orientation session Re-admit students are encouraged to attend an orientation session Information is provided concerning college requirements, class scheduling registration procedures college services and resources transfer of credit academ i c advising choice of major and career counseling Information is also available regarding special programs offered by the college and its various departments Orientation sessions are offered to freshmen, transfer students, adults reentry women and parents of new freshmen For additional i nformation, call 556-4055 Assessment Requirements Reading, Writing and Mathematics Placement Examinations All first-time college students are required to take a series of three exams before registering for their first semester classes The 18 exams measure college entry-level skills In reading writing and mathematics and the scores are used to help advisors and students select appropriate courses. For additional information please call 556-3677 Reading Writing and Mathematics Proficiency Examinations Prior to or at the completion of 60 semester hours at MSCD students must ta ke a series of three exams that measure proficiency i n reading wr iting, and mathemat i cs These exams should be taken concurrent with or after appropriate coursework in the academ ic area has been completed All students who have completed more tha n 60 semester hours at MSCD and have not passed all three exams will have their registration encumbered the following semester until they see an advisor in the Academic Assessment and Support Center For additional information please call556-3677. General Studies Examinations In their junior year students may be required to participate in an assessment of the ir general education The MSCD faculty has determined educational goals or outcomes that it wants its graduates to achieve A copy of those goals and the methods by which their achievement will be measured can be obtained from the department office The First Year Program The First Year Program is designed to unify and coo rdinat e college efforts to help entering students toward a successful first year The program provides intensive advising, course selection guidance and academ i c monitoring throughout the first year as well as coordinating academic support services for freshmen Additionally the program offers a First Year Seminar course which provides appropr iate readings and written work enabling students to discuss and write about current issues including the value of higher education All first-time MSCD students are required to enroll i n the First Year Seminar course and other app ro priate courses as determined by assessment at entry The program furnishes an environment where problem solving c r eat i v ity and peer interact ion are encouraged. For additional information please call 556-8447 Academic Advising Academic adv i sing i s available in the Academic Assessment and Support Center Continuing and prospective students seeking these services should communicate with the coordinator o f advising for the appropria te school. The Academic Assessmen t and Suppo rt Center is responsible for the advising of all undeclared majors at MSCD For additional information, please call556-4327 International Student Advising Special academic advising is available for foreign born students ; the major emphasis of this advising is on the unique aspects of the foreign student s academic study. Assistance is available to assess and place students in English as a Second Language (ESL) c l asses which are appropr i ate for thei r individual needs and which will enhance academic success. For addit i onal information please call 556-2533 International Studies Metropol itan State College of Denver prov ides opportunities for academically qualified students to participate in study-abroad programs These programs vary In length from a few weeks to a full semester For further inf ormation contact the Off ice of Off Campus Programs

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The Honors Program The MSCD Honors Program provides an intense interdisciplinary academic program for highly motivated students whose intellectual capabilities suggest a broader spectrum of needs and interests The program encourages individuality by responding to the diverse educational needs of students Its integrated approach strengthens the program s foundation and provides a cross section of thought-provoking perspectives Honors students realize their learning potential through creative inquiry indepen dent thought, and critical examination Honors professors serve as mentors to guide students in fulfill ing their intellectual pursuits and dreams Finally while the Honors Program encourages independent thought and individuality, it also inspires students to work together, forming a community of scholars who learn from one another. Classes are generally small to ensure the exchange of knowledge and philosophies. Available to students are both the honors core and a number of departmental honors courses There are three Honors Awards available : 1) Junior Honors Award (15 semester hours); 2) Senior Honors Award (15 semester hours which includes a thesis) ; and 3) an MSCD Honors Program designation on the MSCD diploma (24 semester hours) An official MSCD Honors Application form may be obtained from the MSCD Honors Program director. In addition to the MSCD application form, an interview by the Honors Council is required of prospective honors students It is highly recommended that all honors applications be completed by m id-July. Furthermore there are a number of full tuition scholarships available Add itional information on the Honors Program is available by calling 5564865 Semester Required Honors Core Hours HON 275 The Legacy of Arts & Letters I ........................ 3 HON 276 The Legacy of Arts & Letters II .... .................. 3 HON 295 The Art of Critical Thinking ......... .. ............ 3 HON 380 Revolutions and Social Change I ..................... 3 HON 38t Revolutions and Social Change II ........ . ........ 3 HON 385 American Culture I ............................ .... 3 HON 386 American Culture II . . .... ............. 3 HON 492 Senior Honors Seminar ....................... ...... 3 HON 495 Seni or Honors Thesis .......... ................. 3 Total Hours for Honors Core .............. ................... 27 Cooperative Education The Cooperative Education Internship Center places students in work experiences related to their academic major The purpose of the internships is to integrate academic training with actual work experience This combination allows students to make realistic career decisions, gain valuable work experience, obtain recommendations for graduate school and earn money to help defray college expenses Students work in large corporations, small businesses, government and nonprofit agencies throughout the metropol itan area. Most co-op students are paid by their employers, but in those professional fields where co-op salaries are not ava ilabl e volunteer internshi p placements are offered to help students gain essential work experience Co-op internshi p placements are available i n most academic majors and minors. The college requires that a student must complete 30 semester hours of college coursework with a minimum 2 5 GPA and have a declared major to be elig ible for registration with co-op. No fees are charged to the student or employer for participation in the program and each student's interests and job requirements are discussed individually with a profes sional coordinator Students may choose from three different work schedules based on the academic calendar. The alternating p lan provides full-time Academic Information per iods of work every other semester with intervening semesters spent in full-time study The parallel schedule places students in a job while they simultaneously attend school. These positions are usually part-time The short term/summer plan allows students to elect a work experience which lasts for no more than one semester The college awards academic credit for supervised cooperative education placements. Students must complete a credit application available from the co-op office and this application must be approved by a faculty member from the department in which credit is to be granted No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward MSCD degree requ ireme nts Cred i t earned for the co-op education work experiences are not applicable toward general studies requirements Additional departmental restrictions may apply to certain majors 298-1-3 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education Prerequisite : Sophomore standing and permiss ion of instructor An entry level work experience in a private company or an agency of the federal or state government related to the student's major and supervised by a competent professional on the work-site Credit is awarded by an MSCD faculty member in the appropriate academic department for learning related to academic goals enumerated in the learning contract of each student. 398-1-12 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education Prerequisite : Jun ior standing and permission of instructor An advanced work experience in a private company or governmental agency related to the student's major and supervised by a competent professional on the work s ite. Credit is awarded by an MSCD faculty member in the appropriate academic department for learning related to academic goals enumerated in the learning contract of each student. For more information on the program and the placement opportunities in you r academic major contact the Cooperative Education and Internship Center office at 1045 9th Street Park Phone : (303) 556-3290 Health Careers Science Program The Health Careers Science Program is designed to encourage women and ethnic minority groups who have traditionally been excluded from careers in science and technology Students are prov i ded with tutoring and other support to ensure their success in the science and technology areas For additional information please call 556-3215 English as a Second Language The English as a Second Language P rogram refers students with limited English profic iency to the appropriate curricula i n order to allow them to integrate listening reading, and compos i tion used in their college work The program provides tutoring i ntensive academic advising and monitoring of progress throughout the student's college career For additional information, please call 556-2533 Warning/Probation/Suspension Policy Academic Satisfactory Progress/Good Standing A student is deemed to be making satisfactory progress toward his or her academic goal if the student maintains a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher. This student is deemed to be in academic good standing with the institution (hereafter referred to in this section as good stand ing ) However other academic standards may apply to specific programs and a student must sat i sfy those 19

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Academic Information different academic standards in order to be deemed in academic good standing with that program Please see informa tion on the program of interest to determine specific standards for that program Academic Warning Status A student in good standing whose cumulative GPA falls below 2 .00 will be on academic warning status with the institution (hereafter referred to in this section as warning status ) his or her next semester at MSCD. A student will be removed from this warning status and be in good standing if he or she achieves a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 at the end of his or her semester on warning status More restrictive standards may apply to given programs or schools Please see inf ormation on the program of int erest. Academic Probation A student who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2 .00 at the end of his o r her semester on warning status will be put on academic probation with the institution {hereafter referred to in this section as academic probation) his or her next semester at MSCD A student will be on academic probation as long as he or she has a cumulative GPA below 2 .00 but is making progress toward good standing as explained below and has not been on academic probation for more than three semesters Other conditions may apply to given programs or schools. Please see information on the program of interest. A student is removed from academic probat ion and is in good standing the semester after he or she achieves a cumulative GPA of at least 2 .00. Any semester a student is on academic probation the student must make progress toward good standing with the institution by taking all of the following actions : ac hieving a semester GPA of 2 .20 or higher reg istering and completing a minimum of three but no more than 12 semester hours (three to s ix semester hours for summer semester) tak ing required activities as negotiated w ith th e Directo r of Academic Exceptions Program These may include certain classes repeated courses, tutor ing, or other activ i ties While on academic probation a student may preregister the semester following the academic warning status semester but is prohibited from preregistering any other semester For these other academic probation status semesters verification must occur that the semester GPA is atleast2.20 prior to a student being allowed to register Academic Suspension A student on academic probation not making progress toward good standing with the institution will be prohibited from registering at the institution for one calendar year through academic suspension from the institution. Appeal of suspension for this reason will be submitted to the Director of Academic Exceptions Program The Director of Academic Exceptions Program i n turn will deliver the appeal materials to the Student Academic Rev iew Committee, which will review the appeal and notify the student of its decision on the appeal. A student may appeal a suspension, at most two times in his or her academic career at MSCD. A student making progress towards good standing with the institution whose cumulative GPA remains below a 2 00 after three or more semesters on probation will have his or her academic progress reviewed each semester by the Student Academic Review Committee to determine whether the student should be placed on suspension In both cases the decision of the Student Academ ic Review Committee is final. 20 Any student returni ng to MSCD after the one calenda r year suspension must reapply and will be readmitted on academ ic probation with the institution For these students all p robation rules as outlined above will apply A STUDENT WHO IS SUSPENDED FOR A SECOND TIME WILL BE READMITTED ONLY IF HE OR SHE HAS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM FROM A COMMUNITY COLLEGE AFTER SUSPENSION FROM MSCD OR CAN DEMONSTRATE TO THE STUDENT ACADEMIC REVIEW COMMITIEE THAT CHANCES FOR SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF AN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM HAVE BEEN GREATLY IMPROVED. Women's Services The goal of the services component of the Institute for Women s Studies and Services is to assist women with a successful positive college experience A variety of assistance is available in the form of support groups seminars workshops financial assistance informa tion and employment listings There is also a small l i brary which houses materials of interest to women and men who wish to learn about women s contributions and about issues that have a special effect on women s lives. Women s Services works closely with other departments in the college and w i th the University of Colorado at Den ver and Community College of Denver in order to prov ide immediate and appropriate referrals to on-and off-campus agencies Women and men who need assistance or are concerned about women's issues should make an appointment with the coordinator of women's services Weekend Addition Program Metropolitan State College of Denver offers a variety of courses on Friday even i ngs and Saturdays under the auspices of the Weekend Addition Program The program has its own office which provides general assistance to students on specified weekends in the areas of advising, retrieval of college forms schedul ing, and assistance with student concerns whic h cannot be addressed during weekdays The Weekend Office is located in the West Classroom Building Room 147C. Extended Education The changing nature of society has always created new responsibilities and cha llenges for educators Dur ing the past decade, those changes have come more rapidly and have been more comprehensive Preparing people for successful and contributing roles in the society requires careful coordination with many areas of the community, as well as a keen awareness of the educational needs of the state and nation In order to fulf i ll i ts educat ional responsibility the Extended Education Division has been designed by Metropolitan State College of Denver to meet the diverse higher education needs of the five-county metropolitan area. The offices of Extended Campus Program Cont inuing Professional Development and Adult Learn i ng Services are the core of Extended Education. Through these offices, educational opportunities for students faculty and the community have been developed. Partne rships have been establishe d between MSCD and other institutions and businesses which are creating new models and standards for the development and del ivery of i nnovative high quality education Adult Learning Services Adults entering or returning to college often have questions and problems that are different from tHose of younger students Adults who would like assistance in re-entering the formal education system and in planning their educational goals may contact the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342.

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Credit for Prior Learning In many academic departments at MSCD, students may apply for cred it for c o l lege level l earning ga i ned t hr ough exper i ence Informat ion and assistance are availab l e through the Off i ce of Adult Learn ing Services at 556-8342 Contract Major/Minor Degree Program Students may design an indi v i dualized i nterdisciplinary major or minor program when the i r educationa l goals are not met by majors and/or minors listed in the MSCD College Catalog Each contract major or m i nor i s supervised by a faculty comm ittee chosen by the student. For further information contact the Office of Adult Learn ing Services at 556-8342 Metro-Meritus People 60 or older who do not wish to earn c redit are inv ited to attend tui t ionfree classes of their choice at e ither Metropol i tan State Colleg_e of Denver or at an Extended Campus location on a space available basis Metro Meritus is designed to give special encouragement and assistance to retired cit izens to continue their persona l educat i onal growt h i n a stimulat ing and friendly cam pus setting For i nformation and to enroll call the Office of Adult Learn i ng S ervi ces at 5568342 Extended Campus Program The Extended Campus Program provides fully accredited MSCD courses at convenient locations throughout the Denver metropo lita n area Cou r ses a r e selected a n d scheduled to accommodate business professional s pursuing career advancement degree-seeking students and those interested in personal enr i chment. Educational programs are held at two primary locat ions. Metro South is located near the Denver Tech Center at 5660 Greenwood Plaza Blvd Metro North i s located a t the Metro North Plaza 120th Avenue and Grant Street just east of 1 25 Ot her locations are Metro on the Mall located i n downt ow n Denver, and va rious schools, churches, and commun i ty fac i lities Extended Campus c l asses are open to regular MSCD students and other area residents Tuition rates vary from the regular tuition schedule Students may apply at Metro South, Metro North Metro on the Mall o r w ith the Off i ce of Admiss i ons and Records After being accept e d students may reg i ster b y phone Othe r E x tended Campus Programs are telecourse s and correspondence classes Addit i onal information concerning t h e Extended Campus Program i s available at ( 303) 721-1313 Metro on the Mall A center des igned to give downtowners greater access to MSCD Metro o n t h e Mall is located at 1554 Cali forn i a Suite 200 Open 10:30 a m to 2 :00p. m., Monday through Fri day Metro on the Mall provides i nformation on MSCD services such as academic programs admissions and registration adult reentry assi stance cooperat i ve education f i nancial aid and special events In addition Metro on the Mall serves as a f ocus for downtown educat ional act i vity offer ing classes lecture ser ies, seminars and workshops open houses and MSCD orientat i ons all at t i mes conven i ent for downtowners. World Trade Center Metropo l itan State College of Denver is a member of the World Trade Center an international organization of business and educationa l institutions offering services to the i nternational t rade commun ity. All educational services at the World Trade Center are coord i nated by Metropo litan State College o f Denver. The primary mission of the World Trade Center Educational Servi ces is to help businesses locally and regionally-to acqu ir e the knowledge Academic Information att i tudes and sk ills that will prepare them to meet the challenge of operating i n a global economy Interinstitutional Registration Denver Area Colleges Students enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver may regi ster for courses at A r apahoe Community College Community College of Denver Front Range Community College and Red Rocks Community College Courses taken at these inst i tutions in no way alter existing Metropolitan State College of Denver degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requirements at MSCD subject to specific approval by MSCD. Students should be aware that courses taken interinstitutionally will be counted as part of the 64 semester hours from community colleges appl i cable to an MSCD degree Inter i nstitutional credits will also no t satisfy academic residence requirements at MSCD. In the event a conflict exists between the policies/procedures of MSCD and one of the colleges listed above the most restrictive policy prevails Students are well advised to confer with department chairs and/or coordinators of academic advi sing before reg istering inter institutionally Informat i on concern i ng current procedures for enrolling for course s at these other i nstitutions is available from the Off ice of Admissions and Records Concurrent Enrollment Concurrent enrollment d i ffers from inter i nstitutional enrollment in that the student is simultaneously matriculated and enrolled at two different institutions Students who find it necessary to be registered at Metropolitan State College of Denver and another college at the same time must obtain a letter of permission from the reg i stering author ity of each institution Failure to r eceive adva n ce permission may result in denial of transfer cred it. Failure to do so will result in MSCD not recognizing credit from other inst itut i ons. Students concurrently enrolled are affected by the academic policies of both institutions MSCD students enrolling concurrently at other institutions also should check with MSCD department chairs concerning the acceptance of credits Semester Hours Credit Course credit is based upon units designed as semester hours One semester hour or one base contact hour equals a m i nimum of 750 minutes ; th i s translates to a minimum of 15 50-minute class hours per semester. Time required for class preparation is not a cons i deration i n the calculat ion of course credit. Omnibus and laboratory courses give one semester hour of cred i t for each two three or four hours of scheduled work in the laboratory dur ing a week Internships require a minimum of 2,250 minutes for each hour of credit. Course Load The average course load per 16-week semester is 15 or 16 semester hours Students who are academically strong may take up to 18 semester hours during fall and spring semesters and up to 12 semester hours during the summer semester During fall and spring semesters students with cumulative grade point averages of 3 .25 or h i gher may take 19 or 20 semester hours and those students with grade point averages of 3 .50 or higher may take 21 semester hours Authorization for overloads without these grade point average minimums must be obtained from the student' s major department chair and appropriate dean Authorizat ion for overloads in excess of 21 semester hours is given by the Board on Academic Standards Exceptions following a successful formal appeal prior to the beginning of the semester The student should begin the appeal by obtaining a pet i tion from 21

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Academic Information an academic advising coordinator in the Academic Assessment and Support area. Please note : The college is reviewing course load req uirements Students should consult the Class Schedule for any changes pertaining to course loads Course Numbers, Titles, Descriptions, and Offerings Before starting registration, students should study course descriptions for infor mation on the level of instruction credit course sequence content, and prerequisites The first digit in a three-digit course number designates the level of instruction Only courses numbered 100 or above will be included in cred its toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and inclu ding 199 are primarily for freshmen 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores, 300 through 399 primarily for juniors and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors A lthough, in general, while students should not take courses above the level of their class (based upon semester hours earned) they may do so at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites In special cases students may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for their class if, in addition to meeting the requirements for prerequisites they obtain the permiss ion of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course After each course number is a figure specifying the semester hours of credit. As an example CHE 120-5 is a freshman five credit course After the course number is the course title which may be followed by a second set of numbers in parentheses indicating the division of time between lecture and laboratory The first number represents the number of lecture hours each week and the second number indicates the number of laboratory shop or field hours For example CHE 120-5 General Chemistry 1 (4 + 2) represents the general chemistry course which has four hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory each week Such a course would earn five hours of credit four for lecture and one for laboratory work Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course If there is a prerequisite that must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the course this information is listed above the course description. A list of all courses, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is published in the Class Schedule which i s printed well in advance of the beg i nning of each semester and is available to all students Changes in Registration Enrolled students may adjust schedules by dropping and/or adding classes during the first 15 percent of each semester See the current semester Class Schedule for complete information concerning the tuition and fee refund schedule Students who reduce their course load after 15 percent of the term through the end of the fourth week of classes will receive an NC notation for each course they have dropped and a refund, if applicable. An NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Office of Admiss i ons and Records Students reducing their course load after the fourth week of classes through the end of the tenth week of classes during fall and spring semesters may receive an NC notation for each course provided faculty approval is granted An NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Office of Admissions and Records See the sections on grades notations course load and class attendance in this section Proportional t i me frames are applied for modular courses, workshops, and summer terms Procedures for adding or dropping a modular course after the course has begun are described in the current Class Schedule 22 Class Attendance Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered Each instr uctor determines when a student's absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize success in a course When absences become excess ive the student may receive a failing grade for the course If students anticipate a prolonged absence they should contact their instructors If they find that they cannot communicate with the instructor they should contact the chair of that department who will inform instructors of the reasons for the anticipated absence Whenever an instructor determines that a student's absences are interfering with academic progress, that instruct or may submit a letter to the chair of the department informing that office of the situation Adaptive Self-Paced Learning Adaptive self-paced learning is a phrase used to descr ibe classes in which students are allowed to proceed at a pace that is suited to their personal learning needs and learning style Students may proceed rapidly, finishing a course well in advance of the end of a semester or module, with the advantage of being able to begin new studies or to concentrate on other courses. Students may proceed slowly without time limitations that might interfere with the mastery of each requ ired skill. This personalized system of learning relies heavily on learning aids and media so that tutors student proctors and faculty are free to devote additional time to individualized instruction and assistance Self-paced courses are identified in the Class Schedule by SP or self-paced Information on the method of instruction and the nature of the program is available in each department. Self-paced courses are optional and are open to all students who qualify. Students who do not complete the work of a self-paced course during a semester are given the notation of NC and must re-enroll in and pay for the course in a subsequent semester in order to continue in that course A letter grade is awarded during the semester in which the work i s completed satisfactorily Preparatory Course Credit No preparatory courses will apply toward a MSCD degree after spring 1993 Selected preparatory courses may apply toward a degree up through spring 1993 under certain circumstances These circumstances include a student being eligible to follow all degree requirements according to an MSCD catalog effective during the per iod when the pre paratory courses were offered at MSCD and having taken preparatory courses during this period For details please see your advisor Nontraditional Credit Options in Lieu of Course Requirements Successful completion of special examinations and/or completion of a pr ior learning portfo lio which assessed for credit, may be substituted for the completion of course requirements may perm i t placement in advanced courses or may be used as the basis for awarding cred it. A student may earn up to 60 semester hours of credit toward degree requirements us ing nontraditional credit options Approved credit of this sort will be posted to the student's record after the completion of eight semester hours of classroom (resi dent) credit. Nontraditional credit may not be used toward the last 12 semester hours of a degree program does not substitute for residency requirements and may not be used to challenge prerequisite courses for courses already completed. Students are advised that letter grades are not assigned for nontraditional credit and some institutions may not accept transfer credits which do not include letter grades

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Departmental Course Examinations In special cases a department may grant students credit toward graduation for college courses in which they request and pass special college examinations Under this provision a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be awarded by the college A fee of $10 per semester hour credit will be charged. Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a regular course offered by the college (omnibus-numbered courses are excluded) and the credit granted will be for the corresponding course, provided the student has no previous collegiate enrollment for a similar course and the credit is applicable toward the student s graduation requirements Evidence of work justify ing an examination for credit must be presented to the department chair no later than the third week of classes in a semester Permission for such exam i nation must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recommendation of the department chair No application for credit by exami nat ion will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degree seeking curriculum in the college Credit by examination will not be approved for a student who is within 12 classroom semester hours of completing degree requirements No credit by examination can be obta ined for a course in which a student has been officially enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver or at another inst itut ion, whether or not the course has been completed and a grade awarded Credit by examination cannot be obtained for college courses attended as a listener visitor or auditor When students have completed a course in the same discipline higher in number than the course for wh ic h they are seeking examination credit perm ission will be granted provided the two courses are unrelate d and approval is granted by the appropriate department chair and dean In a given d iscipline, no credit by examination can be obtained for a course lower in number in a sequence than the highest -numbere d course already completed by that student. If a student is registered for, but has not completed a higher-numbered course in a sequence, the examination for the lower numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester. Exceptions must be appealed to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions following endorsement of the department chair or dean. Examinations cannot be taken to raise grades to remove failures or to remove NC, SP, or I notations Credit by examination is not applicable toward academic resi dence requirements Examples of unrelated subject matter: ART 212 Human Anatomy for Artists ART 103 Basic Photography Methods ITS 241, Introduction to Photography ITS 101, Introduction to Wood Examination for credit will be taken at a time specified by the department, but after the special examination fee has been paid. No examination for credit in a college course may be repeated A grade equivalent to A or B must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credits so earned for the cou rse will be recorded without grade reference on the student 's permanent record Credits in courses for which credit i s earned by examination are not considered i n compu ting college grade point averages. Credit by examination will be posted after a student has completed eight semester hours of credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver and after an evaluation of all possible transfer credits has been completed College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) For the past 20 years the College Board has offered a program of examinat i ons designed to evaluate nonaccred ited college-level Academic Information learn ing to award credit for successfu l demonstrat ion of this knowledge. This program, known as the College-Level Exam in ation Program, or CLEP consists of two seri es of examinations: the general examinati ons and the subject examinations. The general examination series includes five separate examinations covering the areas of English compositio n human i ties natural sciences math and social science -history. Based on the results of these exam inatio ns the college may award up to a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit i n the freshman general studies requirement areas. Thus, the successful student may test out of many of the traditiona l courses required during the freshman year. MSCD does not allow CLEP credit for ENG 102, which is the Freshman Composition : Analysis Research & Docume ntation course The subject examination series consists of more than 45 examinat i ons which apply to specific college courses MSCD allows credit for 18 of these examinations Thirty semester hours of credit also may be awarded under thi s series, making a total of 60 semester hours of credit obtainable under a combinat ion of the two series of examinations Cred i t obtained under CLEP at another institution w ill be re evaluated according to MSCD CLEP policies The above policy applies to students following the General Stud ies Program requirements stated in the catalogs prior to and including the 1988-89 edit ion. Students who must fulfill General Studies Program requirements subsequent to 1989 must contact the MSCD C A T ./CLEP coordinator for information. Any interested student should contact the coordinator at 5563677 for complete information about this program before registering to take any of these exams Credit for Prior Learning Students may apply for credit for college-leve l prior learning gained through experience by submitting a prior learning portfolio to the Office of Adult Learning Services which will forward it to the appropriate academic department for evaluation and assessment. Credits are awarded on the basis of careful evaluation of the prior learn ing portfolio which documents the applicant's prior learning experience Students should check with departments for specific departmental guidel i nes in addition to college guide lines The award of credit will be recommended by the departments and must receive final approval from the Prior Learning Assessment Committee composed of a faculty representative from each school of the college Applicants for credit for prior learning will generally be required to take the Portfolio Development Workshop A fee of $30 per credit hour (resident) or $120 (non-resident) will be assessed ; $40 (resident) of the total fee per course will be due before the portfolio is assessed for credit and is nonrefundable The remainder of the fee becomes due when and if the credit requested is granted Policies governing nontraditional credit options apply for credit to prior learning Contact the Office of Adult Learning Services for assistance and further information at 556-8342 Attainment Examinations Any student may take attainment examinations in ce r tain departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Pass ing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation entitles students to substitute their own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the course Advanced Placement Examinations Students who have performed satisfactorily in special collegelevel courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate advanced placement examinations conducted by the 23

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Academic Information College Entrance Examination Board, may submit the results to the Office of Admissions and Records for consideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate department chair determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted Credit for Military Training and Other Training Programs Military training and other train ing programs which have been assessed for college credit by the American Council on Education will be evaluated by the Office of Admission s and Records for transfer credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver. For formal military training, copies of train ing certificates and a copy of the DD214 should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records For other training, official ACE transcripts should be submitted Credit limit is 30 semester hours Pass-Fail Option The pass-fail option encourages the students to take courses outs i de of their major and minor fields and thereby broaden their educational experience The pass notation has no effect on the grade point average ; the failure grade is equivalent to the grade of F." Students having a l ready completed at least one MSCD course with at least a 2 .00 cumulative grade point average may choose to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass-fail basi s rather than by letter grade Courses taken on a pass-fail basi s will apply to major minor or teacher certification requirem ents only with the approval of the appropriate department cha ir Self-paced courses may not be taken under the pass-fail opt ion Maximum graduation credit for these ungraded courses is 18 semester hours earned in no more than six courses limited to one course per semester or module A student must declare interes t in the pass-fail option no later than the last day to add classes (durin g the first 15 percent of the term) for a particular semester or module by contacting the Off ice of Admissions and Records The instru ctor will assign and record the pass-fail grade on a final grade list which identifies students electing and eligible for pass fail grading Students who request the option and are later declared ineligible, will receive notification fromthe Office of Admissions and Records during the semester and will be assigned a regular letter grade in the course Once approved the request for the pass -fail option is irrevocable Some ins t itutions do not accep t credits for courses in which a pass notation is given Therefore students who plan to transfer or take graduate work should de termine whethe r the institution of their choice will accept the credit before registering for courses under the pass -fail option Final Examinations It is the general policy of the college to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit with the possible exception of seminar courses or special projects Grades Alphabetical grades and status symbols used at Metropolitan State College of Denver are as follows : A Superior . . . . 4 quality points per semeste r hour attempted B Above Average . . . 3 quality points per semester hour attempted C Average . . . . 2 qual ity points per semester hour attempted D Below Average but Passing 1 qual ity point per semester hour attempted. F Failure . . . . 0 quality points per semester hour attempted. 24 Notations NC -No Credit 1-lncomplete S Satisfactory (Lim ited to student teaching and HPS / LES 489 internships) P-Pass X Grade assignment pending. Student must see faculty for an explanation or assignment of grade Courses taken through i nterinstitutional regis trat ion are normally assigned the X notation until grades are received and posted to the academic record When posted a new report is mailed to the student. The No Credit (NC) notation is not a grade It may indicate withdrawal from the course or course repetition The NC notation may also be used in selfpaced courses to indicate that the student and/or the faculty have decided to extend the student s exposure to the course in order to increase the student's proficiency In order to earn credit the student must re-register for and pay for the course in a subsequent term The Incomplete (I) notation may be assigned when a student was unable to take the final examination and/or did not complete all of the out-of-class assignments due to unusual circumstances such as hospitalizat ion Incomplete work denoted by the Incomplete (I) notation must be completed within one calendar year or earlier at the discretion of the faculty member. If the incom plete work is not completed within one calendar year, the Incomplete (I) notation will change to an "F." Register ing in a subsequent semester for a course in which an Incomp lete (I) has been received will not remove the "I. The Incomplete (I) notation may not be awarded in a self paced course The following m i nimal requirements shall be required throughout the college and shall be a part of all school departmenta l or i ndividual facu lty policies : 1 The NC notation shall be available to students in all instances through the fourth week of classes for fall and spring terms 2 Requests by students for an NC notation in a g iv en course shall not be granted after the tenth week of the fall and spring semesters The Inco mplete (I) notation may be used during this period provided the conditions specified above apply 3 Proportional time frames are appl ied for modular courses weekend courses workshops, and summer terms 4 A written policy statement describing the use of the NC notation shall be given to each student for each class in which she or he enrolls Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered Each i nstructor determ ines when a student s absences have reached a point that they jeopardize the student s success in a course. When absences become excess iv e the student may receive a failing grade for the course Additional requirements for an NC not ation may be set by each school, department and/or faculty member Repeated Courses (Last Grade Stands) A student may r epeat any course taken at MSCD regardless of the original g rade earne d By so doing, only the credit and the grade for the latest attempt at the course will remain on the student 's MSCD academic record. The grade for the prior attempt(s) will be changed to the NC notation The courses must carry the same title course number and semester hours To effect such a change the student must reregister and pay tuition for the course i n question complete the course with a letter grade and complete the necessary form in the Office of Admissions and Record s indica ting that the course has been repeated Otherwise the grade change will be made admin i stratively at the time of degree

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evaluation or earlier, as iden t i fied Cred i t duplication i nvolving transfer, interi nstitutional or state college system courses may be treated d ifferently from the above procedure. This policy cannot be utilized for the purpose of altering grades assigned prior to the receipt of a degree from MSCD. Quality Points The number o f quality points awarded for a course is determined by mult iplying the numbe r of semester hours for that course by the qual ity point value of the grade rece ived. The cumulative grade point average is calculated by div iding the total by the number of semester hours attempted To be eligible for a degree a candidate must in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements, have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of semeste r hours attempted The notations NC, I S and P have no effect on ttle grade point average. Transcripts of Records A transcript is a certified copy of a student s permanent record and shows the academic status of the student at time of i ssuance Copies are available at $1 each. Transcripts w ill be released by the Off ice of Admi ssions and Records upon formal written request by the student. Transcr i pts will also be issue d to firms and employers if written authorizat ion is rece ive d from the student. Requests should include the student's full name as recorded while attending MSCD student identif icat ion number last term of attendance number of copies desired, and to whom and where transcr ipts are to be sent. Transcripts may be w ith held because of i ndebtedness to the college or for other appropriate reasons Transcr ipts from other ins t itution s which are on file in the Off ice of Admissions and Records will be i ssued upon signed reques t by the student. A charge of $5 per request is assessed for this service. Students from other institutions taking MSCD courses under the state college system or interinstitutional registration programs must request transcr ipts from their home i nstitution Student Grade Appeal Procedure If students have reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course, they must make the ir request for a change before the end of the third week of the semester following the completion of the course the follo wing fall semester i n the case of the preceding spring semester The Grade Appeal Guidel ines may be obtained from the student s respective dean It is the responsibility of the student to initiate a grade appeal within the time line and to follow the procedures spec ified for grade appeals in the MSCD Students Rights and Respons i bi lities Handbook The handbook may be obta ined from the Off ic e of Student Affa irs All decis ions of the Grade Appeal Comm ittee will be reviewed by an Assoc iate Vice President for Academic Affa irs Academic Honesty Students have a responsibility to maintain standards of academ ic ethics and hon esty Cases of cheating or plagiarism are handled within the policies of Academic Affa irs in accordance with procedures outlined in the MSCD Student Handbook. Student Classification Students are classified accord ing to the number of semester hours of credit earned : F reshmen fewer tha n 30; sophomores 30 or more but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more but fewer than 90; seniors 90 or more. Honors and Awards Metropo litan State College of Denver annually recogn ize s students who show outstand ing leadersh i p and service to the college and community excellence in scholastic achievement Academic Information and outstanding personal character and integrity Recognition of students i ncludes : The President's Award (one senior ) ; the Provost s Award for Academ i c Affairs (one sen i or) and for Student Affairs ( one senior); Outstanding Student Awards (seniors from each school ) ; Who s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges (seniors) ; American Association of Un i versity Wome n ( AAUW) Award ( senior woman) Other awards include Specia l Service Award for Exceptionally Challenged Students Ass oc i ated Students of Metropolitan State College of Denver Cha rles W Fisher Award and the Colorado Engineering Counc i l Award. Information and applications for these awards are available i n CN 313 Awards are presented at the annual banquet the n ight before graduation In add itio n to annual awards students with outstanding academic achievements are recognize d by being named on Metropolitan State College of Denver Honor Lists The President's Honor List carr ies the names of students who at the time of computation have achieved a cumulative grade point average of 3.85 or higher The Vice President's Honor List carries the names of students who at the time of computation have ach i eved a cumulative grade point average of between 3.50 and 3.84 inclusively Computation will occur initiall y when the student has completed between 30 and 60 hours at MSCD then again between 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours. Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated super i or academic abil i ty in their bacca laur eate degree while attending Metropolitan State College of Denver Honors designations are determined according to the following criteria : 1 Summa Cum Laude -Top f i ve percent of graduates within each school with cumulative MSCD GPA of no less than 3 .65 Magna Cum Laude -Next 10 percent of graduates within each school with cumulat ive MSCD GPA of no less than 3 .65. 2 To determine each honors category, grade point averages for the previous spring semester g r aduat e s are arrayed in rank order This rank ordering is then used to determine the honors recipients among the follo w ing summer, fall and spring graduates 3 To qualify for graduation honors recognition a stu den t must have completed a minimu m of 50 semeste r hours of classroom credit at MSCD prior to the term of graduation. 4 Courses completed during the term of graduat ion and transfer cred i ts are not cons ide red when det ermining honors Add itional informat ion regarding graduation honors is ava i lable i n the Office of Admiss i ons and Records CN 103-H Omnibus Courses The omnibus courses listed below are designed to prov ide flex i ble learn ing opportunities Experimental topics courses seminars and workshops deal with novel subjects and curren t problems Indep endent study allows students to investigate problems of specia l i nterest. Supervised field study and internships, conducted cooperatively with business industry government and other agenc ies provide practical on-the-job learning opportun i ties Content of these courses should not dupl i cate that of regular courses l isted in the catalog Omnibus courses may be offered by all departments in the college A specific course plan for topic and group workshop courses, which covers content and semester hours must be submitted by an i nstructor and approved by the chair of the depa rtment or disc i p line and dean of the school befor e such a course can be lis te d in the schedule of classes These same appro vals are 25

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Academic Information required for plans of study which individual students submit for registration in a workshop course (when individualized) or an indepen dent study course No more than 30 semester hours earned in all of the omnibus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements. The followin g course numbers are the same for omnibus courses in all disciplines; and, when listed in class schedules registration forms and college records, the course number will carry the prefix of the discipline in which the course is offered In addition to prerequisites listed under a course and the approvals outlined above, other prerequisites appropriate to the study and departmental objectives may be added 190 (Credit Variable) Topics Prerequisite: Permission of instructor An i ntroductory level class to study selected topics especially appropriate for lower-division students 390 (Credit Variable) Advanced Topics Prerequisite : Permission of instructor An in-depth inquiry int o selected problems. 480 (Credit Variable) Workshop Prerequisite: Approval of department An advanced program of study often of concentrated nature designed primarily for students majoring in a particular department or discipline. Involves independent and/or group appraisal and analysis of major problems within a particular area 490 (Credit Variable) Seminar Prerequisite : Permission of instructor Presentations discussions, reports, and critiques of various problems within the discipline in which the semi nar is offered 498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed six semester hours) Independent Study Prerequisites : Senior standing and permission of the department chair Independent investigation of problems within the student's major discipline The course must be offered in that departmenVdiscipline and be supervised by a faculty member of that area Field Experience/Internship Courses Field experience or experiential education courses are courses whose major instructional activities are conducted outside the regular classroom but whose syllab i are formally approved by the institution and maintained as an integral part of a department's curriculum. These courses incorporate actual experience with information ass imilatio n and adhere to policies set forth by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education Certain degree and certification programs, such as teacher educat ion or nursing require experiential education courses as a part of the required coursework. Other departments offer experiential education courses genera lly as a part of the student s major or minor, for credit applicable to graduation requirements Five terms identify field experience courses offered at Metropolitan State College of Denver : external laboratory practicum, internsh i p student teaching, and i ndependent study External Laboratory A controlled environment or organized activity emphasizing experimentation i n which guided observations and participation under the gui dance and supervision of the faculty member and the cooperating supervisor, enhance the integration of theory and practice (as in child development) The external laboratory is distinguished from the on-campus laboratory which is devoted to experimental study in any branch of the natural or applied sciences 26 Practicum A unit of work that involves apprenticesh i p in the practical application of previously studied theory under the observance and supervision of a skilled practitioner and faculty member (a s a practicum in reading) Internship A work-oriented training period of actual service in an agency institution, or technical/bus i ness establishment that prov i des an in-depth learning experience for the student under the direct supervision of an on-site supervisor as well as the scrutiny and guidance of a faculty member (as in cooperat iv e educat ion). Student Teaching Faculty supervised learning experience in which the student applies knowledge gained in the Teacher Education Cert i fication Program to a classroom setting (as in pract ice teaching) Independent Study A student-init i ated creative or research project conducted under the direct guidance and supervision of a faculty member of an academic department or d isci pline (as a thesis or special upper division project) Guidelines for Field Experience/Internship Courses 1. Cred it may vary from one to fifteen hours depending upon the i nstructional activity 2. Students are expected to meet the minimum base clock hours established by CCHE policy which requires two to three times the clock hours established for regular classroom instruction 3. Approved cooperating agencies provide learning opportunities prepare written statements of assignments mon itor students' performance, confer with the supervising faculty member, and provide a written evaluation 4. An average of one hour a week minimally is spent in seminar and discuss ion or in conference with the adjunct faculty at the field experielilce locale and/or in conference with the supervising faculty member. 5 The supervising faculty member evaluates students performance and, in consultation with the adjunct faculty member assigns the grade for the course according to grading policies stated in the college catalog. 6 Omnibus courses (299, 397, 498 499) emphasizing field exper i ences are subject to guidel i nes established for regular field-based courses, as well as omnibus course guidelines and must be approved by the Office of Academ ic Affa irs. 299 (Credit Variable) Field Experience/Internship Prerequisite : Sophomore standing and permission of instructor A supervised i n-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the student's major conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the departmenVdiscipl i ne in which the student is majoring 397 (Credit Variable) Practicum Prerequisites : Sophomore standing and perm ission of instructor A class involving a unit of work that involves apprenticeship in the practical application of previousl y studied theory under the observance and superv ision of a skilled practitioner and faculty member (as a practicum in reading).

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498 (Credit Variable not to exceed six semester hours) Independent Study Prerequisites : Senior standing and permission of the department chair Independent investigation of problems within the student s major discipline The course must be offered in that departmenVdiscipline and be supervised by a faculty member of that area 499 (Credit Variable) Advanced F i eld Experience/ Internship Prerequisite: Permission of instructor An advanced level supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the student s major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the departmenVd iscipl ine in which the student is majoring 7 Cooperative Education courses (298 398 variable credit) are subject to guidelines established for regular f ield experience courses as well as Cooperative Education guidelines No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward MSCD degree requirements Catalog Requirements for Bachelor's Degree Students must use a single catalog to meet all their degree requirements including those in the general studies, major, and minor All degree programs must adhere to overriding current policies at MSCD. All students should refer to the General Studies for Bachelor's Degree section in this catalog for important information. Students are responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to their program contained in this catalog and elsewhere. The final responsibility for completi ng the requirements for a degree rests with the students and it is recommended that they seek advice Students should never assume that they have approval to deviate from a stated requirement without a properly s i gned statement to that effect For degree requirement purposes, students must normally select a Metropol itan State College of Denver Catalog i n effect while they are enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver, provided that the catalog contains their complete program of study A student interrupting enrollment for any three consecutive semesters or more may select only the current catalog in effect after returning to the institution A student transferring from a regionally accredited Colorado community college may complete degree requirements using a MSCD catalog in effect while enrolled at the community college subject to the following cond iti ons 1 The catalog followed does not predate the current MSCD catalog by more than three years and the des i gnated catalog does not predate the 1988-1989 catalog year 2 The catalog selected may have been in use at any time from the time the student was continually enrolled at a regionally accredited Colorado community college to the semester for which the student is enroll ing. continuous enrollment is defined as not i nte rru p ting enrollment for three or more consecutive semesters ( one calendar year) Continuous enrollment must be maintained from the period of the designated catalog to the po i nt of MSCD degree completion Requirements for All Bachelor's Degrees To earn a bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree a student must satisfy the following minimum requirements plus any Academic Information others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate 1 Complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher for all Metropolitan State College of Denver coursework 2 Complete at least 40 semester hours in upper-division courses (300and 400-level courses) 3 Complete all general studies requirements listed for the degree and major 4. Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 30 semester hours With certain exceptions (see the Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College of Denver section of this catalog), complete a minor consisting of at least 18 semester hours If a student completes two majors the second major satisfies the minor requirement. Completing two areas of emphasis under one major does not constitute the completion of two majors Coursework used to meet requirements for one major or minor may not be used to meet requirements for another major or minor Students may not major and minor in the same discipline and are encouraged to obtain verifi cat i on from an advisor if uncertainty exists 5 Complete all special requirements of a department and school. 6 Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2 00 or higher in all MSCD courses which satisfy the requirements for the major and for all MSCD courses which satisfy requirements for a minor Students should check with an advisor for special GPA program requirements 7 Complete a graduation agreement. 8 Academic Residency (classroom credit) requirements : a Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver, including the last 12 semester hours applicable to the degree b Complete at least eight upper-division (300 and 400level) semester hours of the major and three upper division hours of the minor at Metropolitan State College of Denver (classroom credit) c Students should be aware that UCD pooled courses and courses taken interinstitutionally or at one of the other state colleges will not satisfy academic residence requirements at MSCD 9 Credit Limitations : a Not more than 30 semester hours of omnibusnumbered courses may be applied toward graduation requirements b Not more than 30 semester hours taken by extension and/or correspondence may be applied toward a bachelor's degree c Not more than four semester hours in human performance and leisure activity courses will be counted toward a bachelor's degree for students who are not majoring in human performance sport and leisure studies d Not more than seven semester hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a bachelor's degree for students who are not majoring in music ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS Individual programs at MSCD may requ ir e students' part i cipation in assessment activities Students may obtain information on programs assessment requirements from the department office 27

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Academic Information GRADUATION AGREEMENT Metropolitan State College of Denver students who will complete degree requirements by the end of fall semester 1992 should file a graduation agreement which must be received by the Off ice of Admissions and Records by the appropriate deadline stated in the Class Schedule Students should complete their graduation agreement in consultation with their advisor. When it is ready for signatures and a formal evaluat i on students should subm it the completed agreement to the minor department. The minor department will forward the signed agreement to the major department for signature; the major department will forward it to the dean of the school. The school will submit the agreemen t to the Office of Admi ssions and Records for final review After the completion of each subse quent semester of academic work the student will receive an up-to-date Academic Status Report St u dents may appeal to the Board of Academ ic Standards Exceptions to request a variance from college academic requirem ents The ir graduation agreement should be completed before the appeal. Valid reasons for variances must accompany all pet i tions and the petitions must be signed by the appropriate dean and departmen t chair. All students planning degree complet ion after the summer semester 1992, will be able to declare thei r degree plans by consulting with thei r academic adv i sor(s) and using the new Academic Progress Report segment of the Academic Monitor System. Degree and Non-Degree Seeking Status Degree Seeking Students who p lan to seek a degree at Metropo litan State College of Denver are categorized as degree seeking students. In orde r to have degree seeking status students must submit all credentials ; transfer students must have transcripts submitted from all colleges and universities attended A graduation application and $20 fee must be pa i d by intend ing degree candidates by the stipulated deadline of a student's declared semester of graduation Students who plan to seek a degree at Metropo litan State College of Denver may list their intended major on the application for admission. The inte nded major i s temporary until students officially declare their major either with the academic department or the Academic Advising and Assessment Center. The offic ial major may be declared when all credentials have been received Please Note : Unti l students are officially categor i zed as degree seeking financial aid, veteran s benefits, and registration priority will be affected Non-Degree Seeking Nondegree seek ing students are those who do not intend to seek a deg ree at MSCD or who are unsure if they wish to pursue a degree at the time of application Nondegree seeking students may change their status to degree seek in g by completing a change of status form with the Off ic e of Admissions and Records b y submitting all credentials, and by rece i ving a transfer eva l uat ion if they are transfer students DECLARING A MAJOR Intent-to-Major F irst-ti me Metropo litan State College of Denve r students may indicate an i nten t to major on the MSCD application form. Stating an intent to major on the application form is not an official declaration of major Students with fewer than 60 hours who w i sh to major in the School of Business may so indicate on a S chool of Bus i ness Intent-to-Major form 28 OFFICIAL DECLARATION OF MAJOR All degree-see king students who have completed 60 or more semester hours including hours transferred from other institutions must officially declare a major no later than the semester following the one in which the y complete 60 or more hours To declare a major, students must complete an official Declarat ion/Change of Major form which i s ava i lable from the major department or from the Academic Assessment and Support Center and obtain appropriate signature approval. Procedures for declaring a major depend upon the school and the number of semester hours completed as outlined below Students who transfer to MSCD cannot officially declare a major until all credentials a r e received and evaluated. Majors in the School of Letters Arts and Sciences or the School of Professional Studies Students inc l uding transfers with MSCD officially evaluated transcripts, may officially declare a major i n the Schools of Letters Arts and Sciences or Professional Studies at any time Students who have completed 29 or fewer semester hours must declare the i r major through the Academ ic Assessment and Support Center in consultati on with an academic advisor. Students who have comp l eted 30 or more hours must declare their major through the proposed major department. Majors in the School of Business Students hav i ng completed fewer than 60 semester hours including transfers with MSCD officially evaluated transcripts may declare an intent-to-major i n the School of Business through the Academic Assessment and Support Center Students who have completed 60 or more semeste r hours must officially declare their major through the academ i c department of the proposed major during the semester follow ing the one in which they complete 60 or more hours Verification of Major: To ver i fy the correctness of the officially declared major students should refer to the information contained on their clas s confirmation notice. DIPLOMAS AND COMMENCEMENT Students who have met a ll requirements for graduation are granted d i plomas at the end of the semester for which they are degree cand i dates A forma l commencement ceremony is held at the conclusion of the spring and summer semesters Students who officially graduated the previous fall semester are invite d but are not required to participate i n the spring commencement. General Studies for Bachelor s Degrees Students must use a single catalog to meet all degree requirements including those in the general studies major and minor. All degree programs must adhere to overriding current policies at MSCD Courses and specific prerequisites/corequisites approved for the current program a r e de scribed i n the Course Descript ion section of th i s cat alog. Studen t s should consult an advisor i n the Academic A ssess ment and Support Cen ter when planning the ir programs Freshman Assessment : Reading, Writing and Mathematics Placement Exams First time college students are required to complete the reading writ ing and mathe mat i cs placement exams (see Assessmen t section) Exam re sults will serve as the basis for academic advising To i ncrease the student's opportunity for success at Metropolitan State College of Denver students may be requ ired to take courses below the level of first -y ea r courses offered by Metropolitan State College of Denver Students should be aware however, that no cre dit is g iven for courses that are below the college level.

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Philosophy Metropo litan State Co llege of Denver seeks to p re pa re its gradua tes for a lifetime of learning which in our changing and complex society requires focused expert ise (such as that prov i ded by a major area of study) and the abilities to communicate with, as well as to learn from, experts in other fiel ds At Metropolitan State College of Denver undergraduate educat ion fosters the critical thinking necessary for the exploration of unfam i liar disc i plines and for the synthesis of learn ing and exposes students to the richness and variety of the i ntellec tual universe. Through its General Stud ies Program Metropolitan State College of Denver encourages the student to grow from mastery of skills through acquisition of knowledge in the major discipl ines to synthesis of knowledge and skills Therefo r e the General Stud ies Program provides fou r levels of experience each with separate goals : Level I Skills Level I courses provide students the basic skills of read ing and listening critically, recognizing faulty reasoning, drawing conclusions from quantitative data, organizing ideas, and commun icating clearly Level II Introduction to Content Areas Level II courses provide the breadth characte ristic of the educated person encourage an open attitude toward different approaches to prob l ems and cultivate informed aware ness of the principal achievements in history arts and letters society and science Level Ill Senior Experience Level Ill courses allow students to synthes ize learning through critical analysis and logical thinking and affords them the opportunity to work closely with an individual faculty member ove r a signif ican t period of time The Sen ior Experience demands i ndependent and critical thought as well as the synthesis of ideas Multicultural Requirement The intent and purpose of multicultural educat ion at Metropolitan State Col leg e of Denver is for students, staff, faculty and community to i ncrease the i r appreciation and awareness of the American culture and the diverse cultures to which they contribute The three credit h our requirement may be applied to any category in Level II or Level Ill of approved multicultural courses without increasing the 36 credit hour total Genera l Studies requirements Alternatively these credits may be applied to the major minor or elective requirements of a degree Please see an adv isor for a current list of courses des i gnated as multicultural. The mult icultural requirement will be effect ive fall 1992. Distribution and Credit Requirements To comp lete their General Studies Program stu dents must take approved courses that fulf ill the following distribution and credit requirements : Category Levell Semester Hours : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : Commun i cat i ons ..................... ......... ... ......... 3 Level W Historical ........................................... 3 Arts and Letters . ...... .... ........ ................. 6 Social Sciences ...................... ...... .............. 6 Natural S ciences ... ...... .... ....................... .... 6 Level Ill Senior Experienc e ... ..................................... 3 Academic Information Multicultural ............ .............................. 3 Total Hours Required .......................... ... .......... 36 Any of several 100 leve l courses the content of which is to be determined by the Department of Mathematical Sci ences and the Gene ral Studies Comm i ttee through preassessment. At l east three of the 21 Level II semester hours must be upper d ivisi on These credits may be app lie d to any category in Leve l II or Level Ill of app roved mul t icultural courses w i thout increasing the 36 cred it hour total Genera l Stud ies requ irements Alternative ly t hese credits may i nstead be applied to the major m i nor or elective requirements of the degree Basic Rules 1 Only approved courses may be used to satisfy the general stud ies requirements A current listing of these courses is published in the Course Description section of this catalog 2 General studies courses need not be counted toward general studies requirements They may be taken ins tead as electives or to satisfy requirements in the major or degree prog ram No Level II course however can be used to satisfy more than one graduation requirement. 3 Departments or programs whose curricula are guided by accrediting agencies may specify by prefix and number some general studies courses in addition to courses required for the major or a profess i onal credential. Level 1 Requirements: Composition, Mathematics, and Communication: Semester Composition: Required Courses Hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition : The Essay........ ....... 3 ENG 102 Freshman Composition: Researc h Analysis and Docume ntat ion ................................. 3 Rules: Composition Requirement 1 Students must complete the ENG 101 requirement within their first 30 semester hours at Metropo li tan State College of Denver and the ENG 102 requirement within their first 60 semester hours These requirements may be postponed only if the postponement is approved in writing by the Department of Engl ish. 2 Students must demonstrate the adequacy of their writing skills in the placement exam before enrolling in ENG 1 01. Those students whose writing skills are inadequate will be counseled on sfeps to improve those skills Students may be required t o complete additional coursework. 3 Students shall have satisfied the Level I Compos ition requirements if they a satisfactorily complete ENG 101 and ENG 102 or b pass a CLEP or AP exam ina tion approved by the Department of English (ENG 101 only) or c transfer equivale nt courses Semester Mathematics: (Select one course) Hours MTH 1 08 Mathematica l Modes of Thought ....... .... ........... 3 MTH 111 College Algebra ................................ 4 MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics ... .. ...... .... ............ 4 MTH 131 Finite Mat hematic s for the Management and Social Sci ences ........................ ........ 4 MTH 161 Mathemat i cal Concepts for Tea chers i n Presecondary Schools ................ ............. 4 one approved course of at least three semester hours is required To avo id difficulties students should consult an advisor in the Academ i c Assessment and Support Center for guidance in selecting the appropriate mathemat i cs course afte r tak ing the mathemat ic s p l acement exam (see Rules : Mathematics Requ ir ement) 29

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Academic Information Rules: Mathematics Requirement 1 Students will take the mathematics placement exam to determine their abilities to calculate with fractions decimals and percents and to know and use elementary geometrical formulas. Those whose skills are inadequate will be required to complete college arithmetic coursework before enrolling in a Level I mathematics course Some courses have additional requirements 2. Students must complete the Level I mathematics requ irement within the i r first 30 semester hours at Metropolitan State College of Denver This requirement may be postponed on an individual basis if the postponement is approved in writing by the Department of Mathematical Sciences 3 Students shall have satisfied the Level I mathematics requirement if they a pass a mat hematics course that has been approved for Level I mathematics credit (see courses listed above) or b. pass a CLEP or AP exam approved by the Department of Mathematical Sciences or c successfully complete a course for which a Level I mathematics course is a prerequisite or d transfer an equivalent course Semester Communication: (Select one course)* Hours FRE 102 Elementary French II ................... ...... ..... 5 GER 102 E lement ary German II .......... ................. 5 HON 295 The Art of Critical Think ing ...................... 3 PHI 111 Language Logic and Persuasion ........ ...... 3 RDG 151 Cognitive Strategies for Analytical Reading ............ 3 SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II ...... ....... ........ ..... 5 SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication .... ...... 3 SPE 171 Interpersonal Commu nications: Individua l as a Commun ica tor ............................ ....... 3 One approved course of at least three semester hours i s required To avoid difficulties students should consult an advisor i n the Academic Assessment and Support Center for guidance in select ing the appropriate communication course See the course descr i ptions in this catalog for prerequisites to these courses Rules: Communication Requirement 1. Students must complete the required Level I communication course within their first 30 semester hours at Metropolitan State College of Denver. 2 Students shall have satisfied the Level I communication requirement i f they-a pass an approved Level I communication course (listed above) or b pass a CLEP or AP test approved by a department offering a Level I communication course, or c transfer an equivalent course Level II Requirement Courses approved to satisfy the Level II requirement are distributed among four categories The categories, together with the minimum number of semester hours a student must accumulate to satisfy this requirem ent are -Semester Level II Categories* : Hours Historical ................ ............. ............. ... 3 Arts and Letters ........................... .... ........ 6 Social Science .... ......... .... ...................... ... 6 Natura l Science ............... ...... ..................... 6 'At l east three of the 21 Level II semester hours must be upper-division The specif i c courses w ithin each of these categories approved as satisfying genera l studies requi rements are printed in this catalog 30 Rules: Level II Requirement 1. Level II general studies courses have at least the following preor corequisites, and some courses have addit i onal prerequ isites (see course descriptions in this catalog) a Historical and Arts and Letters : (1) Courses numbered 100 to 199 : Minimum performance standard scores on the reading and writing preassessment placement tests; (2) Courses numbered 200 to 299 : Satisfaction of ENG 101 and the Level I General Studies communication course requirement (3) Courses numbered 300 and above : students shall have satisfied all Level I General Studies course requirements b Natural and Social Science : (1) Courses numbered 100 to 199 : Minimum performance standard scores on the reading writing and mathematics preassessment placement tests (2) Courses numbered 200 to 299 : Satisfaction of the Level I Mathematics course requirement and either ENG 101 or the Level I communication course requirement (3) Courses numbered 300 and above: satisfaction of all Level I General Studies course requirements 2 Students may not use courses having the same prefix as their major disc i pline to satisfy the general studies Level II requirement. 3 Students may apply to the Level II requirement not more than eight semester hours of credit bearing the same course prefix 4 At least three of the 21 semester hours of Level II courses must be upper division (numbered 300 and above) Level Ill Requirement The Level Ill Senior Expe rience courses are numbered 400 and above and are at least three semester hours Students must complete a Senior Experience at the end of the undergraduate program Level Ill General Studies courses must have the following minimal prerequ i sites : satisfaction of all Level I and Level II General Studies requirements and senior standing.* 'The specific courses within each of these categories approved as sat i sfying Genera l Studies requirements are printed i n this catalog Requirements for a Second Degree For an additional bachelor's degree, the student will comply with the following : 1 The first bachelor's degree must be recognized by Metropolitan State College of Denver. 2 Student must complete all requirements for a new major with a minimum of eight MSCD classroom upper-division semester hours in the major department. 3. Student must complete a minor, if required by the major department for the contemplated degree. 4. The student must spend at least two additional semesters in residence

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5. A minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at MSCD is required in addition to the credits completed by the student for the earlier degree 6 General studies will be cons idered complete unless deficiencies ex ist according to the major department. 7 Cre dit limitation s for a bachelor s degree will continue to exist for the sec ond degree. 8. A graduation agreement must be complete d as outlined in this cata log. Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Metropo litan State Co llege of Denver hereby g i ves not ice that it has des ignated the follo wing categ or ies of persona lly identifiable i nforma tion as directory in format ion under section 438(a)(5)(B) of the Family Educational Rights and P rivacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) Subject to the Colorado Publ ic Records Act directory i nfo rmation concerning students at the co lleg e m ay be release d without the prior consent of the student as perm itted by FER PA unless within ten ( 1 0) days afte r registr atio n a student has notified Metropol itan State College of Denver Offi ce of Admi ss ions and Reco rds lo cated in the Centra l Classroo m Building, Room 103, th at such infor mation should not be rele ased without his or her c onsent D irec tory informat ion at M etropolitan State C ollege of Denve r i s as follo ws : name address dates of attendanc e degrees received Request s for disclosure of directory information must be submitted in writing to the MSCD Offi ce of Admissions and Records Central Classroom Building Room 103. In the case of emergencies, directory information may be released w i thout written requests at the college s discretion Prospective employers or their agents may request i nforma tion concerni ng verification of student degrees received or dates of attendance direclly from the MSCD Office of Admi ssion and Records without submitting a written request to the college Academic Info r mation 31

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Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College of Denver Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College of Denver Metropolitan State College of Denver i s organized into three schools These are listed below with the majors and minors offer ed by each The curriculum requirements for each of the programs are described under special sections of this catalog prepared by each school. Programs marked with an asterisk (') do not require completion of a minor Bachelors Degree Major Minor School of Business Accounting ................................................................... ......... x Computer Information Systems and Management Sc i ence .......... ....................................... x Economics ..................... ...... .......... ................................... x x Finance .............................. ......................... ................. ........ x Management' ....................... ........... ......... ............. ................. x Marketing' ................................. ............. ...... .................... ..... x General Business ...... .............. ............ ................. ........ .... ... x "The Department of Economics otters a bachelor of arts degree rather than a bachelor of science degree School of Profess iona l Studies Division of Education BilinguaVBicultural Education ....... .... ........................... ..... .... .. Early Ch i ldhood Education .... ....... ....... ................................ .. Exceptional Child ......... ............ ...... ................................... .... Parent Education ...... .. ..... ............ .... .... ............. ..................... Reading ............................... ....... ................ ............. .............. Teacher Certification : Early Childhood Elementary and Twelve Secondary Fields Division of Technology A i rframe and Power Plant Mechanics ........ .................. ........ .. Av i at ion Management ................... .............. ....... ...... .............. x Civ il Engineering Technology .......................... .... ................... x Drafting Engineering Technology .................. ................ ........ Electron ics Engineer in g Technology ...... ................................ x Industrial Design .......... ....... ........................ ................. ......... x Industrial and Techn i cal Studi es ................................ .......... x Mechanical Eng i neering Technology ...... ................ ............... x Private Pilot .......... ................... ....................... ...................... Professional Pilot ....................................................... ...... ...... x Surveying and Mapping ...... ...... ........ .................... ................. x Techni cal Communications ............... .................. ................... x Techn i cal and Industr i al Administration' .... .............. .... .......... x Division of Pub lic Service Professions Criminal Justice and Criminology ................ ...... ..................... x F ir e Services Administrat ion ........ .......... ........ ............. ........... x Health and Safety ...... ...... ........................... ......................... .. Health Care Management (upper-division) .......... .................. x Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration' ...................... x Hotel Administration .... ........................... ...... .................. ...... .. Human Performance and Sport ...................... .... ........ .... ...... x Human Services ........ ......... ................. ... ...... .......... .............. x Leisure Studies ................................ ......... ........ ...... .... ........... x Meet in g Admin i strat i on ........ ............ ..................... .. ........ .... Nursing (upper-divis ion for R N.'s) ................ ........ .................. x Restaurant Admin i strat ion ..... ..... ........................................... Travel Administrat i on ..... ................ .......... ........... ....... .......... Institute for Gerontology Gerontological Serv i ces .... ................................ ........ ........... .. 32 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Bachelors Degree Major Minor School of Letters, Arts and Sciences Division of Humanities Art" ....................................................................... ................ X English ................... ................................................. ............ x French ........ ................. .......................................................... German .... ................. ................. ........ .............. ............... ..... .. Industrial Design' ............................ ....... ...... ....... .... ........... .... x Journal ism ...... ... ............. ..... ....................... ........... ................ x Language and linguistics ........ ............ .......... ...................... .. Modern Foreign Languages .......................... .............. .... ....... x Music ... ....... ....... .... ..... ................. .................. ........... .. ........... Music Education ...... ..................................... ................... ..... x Music Performance' .......................................................... ..... x Philosophy ..... ....... ....... ............ ................. ......................... ..... x Practical Wr iting ....... ............ ..... ............. ......... ....... ... ............ Public Relations .................................................................... Spanish ......................... ............ ................... .... ...................... x Speech Commun icati ons ..... .................................................. x Speech Pathology-Audiology ................. ..... ........ .................. .. Art otters a bachelor of the fine arts degree Division of Science and Mathematics X X X X X X X X X X X X X Biology ............ ............ ....... .... ................ ....... ....................... .. x x Chemistry ............. ....... ............. .... ................... .............. ........ x x Computer Science ................................................... ......... ...... x x Criminalistics ... .. ......... ..... .. ...... ................ ... ..... .......... ...... x Geography ............ ...... .... .......................................... ............. x Geology ...... ........ ..... ................... .... ................ ........................ x Land Use ............. ....... .... ........ ............. ..... ......... ... .... .............. x Mathemat i cs ............................................ ........................ ....... x x Meteorology ........................................................................... x x Physics .............. ............. ........ .... ......... ... ............ .... ............. ... x x Theoretical Phys ics ..... ... ... .. ......... ... ....... ..... ............ ........ ...... x Division of Social Sciences Anthropology ............. ........................ .......................... .... ....... x x Behavioral Science ................ ....... ................... .................... x His tory ..... .................. ............................ ......... ...... ................ x x Interdisciplinary Legal Studies .... ........ .... ........ .......... ............. x Political Science ..................... ................ ...... .......................... x x Psychology ........... .... ........................ .... ............... ................... x x Public Adm inistration .............................. ........ ............ ............ x Social Welfar e ........ ............ ......... ..................... ........ ........ .... x Sociology .................... ...... ... ... ............................................... x x Urban Stud i es .................. ................ ...................... ...... ....... x x "Urban Studies otters a bachelor of arts degree and a bachelor of science degree Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services African Amer ican Studies .......... .......... ................................... x x Chicano Stud ies ...... ............. ........ ........ ........ ..... ....... ............. x x Institute for Women s Stud ies and Services Women's Stud ies ...... .... ............ ..... ..... ........ .... ..... ................. X

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Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College of Denver Communications Multi-Major The commun icatio ns multi-major offers seven areas of emphasis for students with varying educational and career needs Each student 's program is planned with an adv isor in the selected area of emphasis. Students may obtain information concerning the major from the department sponsoring the particular area of emphasis in which they are intere sted Area of Emphasis Commun ications: Visua l Sponsored by Art Commun ications: Techn ical Writing and Editing Sponsored by Technical Communications Commun icatio ns : Organizational Sponsored by Technical Communications Commu nications : Technica l Media Sponsored by Technical Communications Commun ications : Broadca sting Sponsored by Speech Commun icati ons : Theater Administration Sponsored by Speech Communications : Sports Sponsored by Human Performance Sport and Leisure Stud ies All commun icati ons multi-major areas of emphases comprise 42 semester hours of study, including six hours of required core courses as outlined below courses in the area of emphasis and a choice of free electives Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Core Courses for All Areas of Emphases Hours COM 272 Introduction to Communications Concepts and Systems . . . . . . 3 SPE 374 Psychology of Communication or SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion. ..................... 3 Option Requirements ..... .... .................. 36 Total ..................... . . . ...... 42 Communications Free Electives List Other courses approved by the advisor in the selected communications area of emphasis are acceptable as free elect ives. ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology . ...... 3 ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication ....................... 3 ART 101 Basic Drawing Methods ............................. 3 ART 1 02 Basic Design and Crafts Methods . ........ 3 ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960-Present Day .......... 3 CEN 120 Technical Drawing I.................... .. 4 CEN 121 Technical Drawing II ............................... 4 ENG 251 Intermediate Composi t ion ......................... 3 ENG 303 Semantics ....................................... 3 JAN 181 Introduction to Journalism and Mass Medi a ............. 3 JAN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing. ... 3 JAN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading ...... .... 3 JAN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing. .. 3 JAN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers ................. 3 PHI 144 Logic . . . . ..... 3 PSC 322 Public Policy . . . . . . . 3 PSC 352 American Political Thought . .......... 3 PSY 241 Social Psychology .. ............................... 3 PSY 342 Issues in Social-Personality Psychology . ..... 3 SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking ................. ......... 3 SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking ................. 3 SPE 322 Movement for the St119e . . . . . 2 SPE 328 Stage Directing . . . . . . .. 3 SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice and D iction ....... 3 SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Art. . . .... 3 SPE 412 Freedom of Speech ... ............................. 3 SPE 420 Reader' s Theatre..... . . . . .... 3 SPE 426 Theatre Practicum I . . . . . ..... 1 SPE 427 Theatre Practicum II . ............ ...... 2 SPE 448 Seminar: Practicum i n Broadcasting ................... 3 SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life ......... 3 Communications Multi-Major Summary Sem. Hrs. Sem. Hrs. Sem. Hrs. in Total Areas of In Core In Area of Communic. Sem. Hrs. Emphasis Courses Emphasis Electives In Major Communications: V isu al 6 27 9 Communications : Technical Writing & Editing 6 24 12 Communications : Organizational 6 24 12 Communications: Technical Media 6 24 12 Communications : Broadcasting Communications: 6 21 15 Theatre Administration 6 18 18 Communications: Sports 6 27 9 Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 The holistic health and wellness educat ion multi-mino r offers an area of concentration for students who recognize the increas ed emphasis on wellness in several p rofessional fields and/or for health conscious individuals who wish to establish a self enhancement program. The multi-minor is designed to complement a major chosen by a student which is relevant to the student's career goals The student arranges for the minor through one of the following departments : human performance, sport and leisure studies human services nursing and heal th care management ph ilosophy psychology sociology or teacher education The multi-minor compr ises 24 hours of study as outlined below: Semester Required Courses Hours H ES 1 05 Dynamics of Health ............... ........ ......... 3 HES 204 Introduction to Nutrition . ........... 3 HSW 375 Holistic Health and H igh Level Wellness .............. 4 HSL 150 Skills and Methods: Teaching Physical F itness .............. ..................... 2 PHI 322 Personal Knowledge and Professional Grow1h ........... 3 PSY 275 Introduction to Holistic Health . ................ 3 PSY 303 Research in Health and Wellness . ............ 3 Electives ........................................ 3 Total .. .............................. 24 Practical experience is an integral part of this minor and contract major. Students are urged to enhance their education through field work. This can be achieved through practicums i nternships and cooperative education offerings i n one of the above listed departments or by using these elective hours. Contract Major/Minor Program Even with the wide diversity of the majors and minors presently offered at Metropolitan State College of Denver the need arises for an academic program which is individual in nature, meets the specific needs of the students and is responsive to emerging ed ucation al requirements The contract major/minor is an organized degree program written by the student in consultation with a contract major /minor faculty advising committee Working with faculty from selected disciplines enables students to complete a specific, indiv idual educational objective which cannot be satisfied by any exist ing catalog major and/or minor prog r ams. The degree sought may be either a bache lor of arts or bache lor of science For further information contact the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342 33

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School of Business School of Business The philosophy of the School of Business is to devote its resources to high quality undergraduate programs The curriculum of this school is designed to provide the student with a background of general education familiarity with basic principles of business and specialized knowledge in a selected field of business. The school offers the bachelor of science degree, while the Department of Economics offers a bachelor of arts degree Undergraduate programs within the School of Business are designed : 1 To offer the student the opportunity to receive the baccalaureate degree Th i s degree program consists of a broad foundation in general education, a thorough grounding in basic business courses, and specific competence in one or more significant functional areas of business 2 To offer a d i verse undergraduate program to meet the interests of those residents of the metropolitan area and others who desire to study business-oriented subjects without undertaking a degree program and to meet the needs of the Denver bus i ness and professional community for continuing education programs 3 To strengthen students powers of imaginative and innovative thinking self-reliance creative independent analysis and sensitivity to social and ethical values. 4 To instill in students a desire for learning that will continue after they have graduated and taken their places i n the community 5 To convey to each student the spirit of pioneering r i sk and progress which is essential to the continued development of the U S econom i c system. Admissions Requirements Adm i ss(on into the School of Business will be granted to those students who have achieved an overall GPA of 2 25 ; this 2 25 GPA must be maintained while a student i s enrolled in a major area of study with i n the School of Business If a student s overall GPA f alls below a 2 25, the student will be placed on academic probat i on and have one semester to raise their overall GPA to 2 25 Status will be changed to undeclared major if the student's GPA i s not raised to 2 25 or better Acceptance into the School of Business is contingent upon the comp l etion of all Level I and Level II General Studies courses ( except the capstone course des i gnated at Level Ill) plus all 200 level courses i n the School of Business and necessary pre r equ i sites The student must have 60 credit hours Upon completion of the above-mentioned requ i rements a student m ay apply and be accepted for admission i n t o the School of Bus i ness Specific required courses are listed be l ow General Studies Levell Compos i t i on ENG 101 ENG 102 Mathematics MTH 131 M T H 132 Communication F reshman Composition: The Essay ............. 3 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, and Documentation .......................... 3 F inite Mathematics for the Management and Soci a l Sciences ............................. 4 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences ................. .......... 3 SPE x x x A n y Levell General Studies Speec h course ....... 3 Total ........... ......................................... 16 Level II History (Amer i can H i story Course ) .... ........... ........ 3 Arts and Letters PHI 336 Business Ethics ......................... 3 Elective ......... .... .................................. 3 Soc i a l Science ECO 201 ECO 202 PSY 101 or soc 101 PSC 101 o r Principles of Economics-Macro ...... ........... 3 Principles of Economics-Micro ............... 3 Introductory Psych o logy . . . . . .. 3 Introduction to Sociology ...... ................ 3 American National Government. ............... 3 PSC 1 02 Polit ical Systems and Ideas .... .... ..... .... 3 Natural Science Electives ....... .......................... ............... 6 Total ............. .......................... ....... 27 34 Business Courses ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I .................... 3 ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II ... ... ...... . 3 CMS 201 Principles o f Information Systems ............... 3 MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business ................ Total .................................... ................. 12 Additional hour s of General Stu d ies or Business ........... ......... 5 Total Required .............................................. 60 Bachelor of Arts Economics Economics is a scientific study which deals with the allocation of scarce or l i m i ted resources The study of econom ics offers an opportunity for the student to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions This training is extremely valuable to the student regardless of her or his specif i c career object i ve The bachelor of arts program has been designed to provide the student with a fundamental knowledge of domestic as well as foreign econom i es and the quantitative tools necessary for independent analytical research and thought. Specialized courses are provided to develop the student s ability in the use of the tools of economic theory and analysis. Such training i s essential for graduates who wish to qualify for positions as profess i onal economists Employment opportunities in economics are ava ilable i n national and international business federal state and local government and in various nonprofit organizations Semester Required Courses Hours MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics ... ........................ 4 ECO 301 Intermediate M icroeconomic Theory .............. 3 ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory ......... ...... 3 ECO 315 Econometrics ........................... ... ....... 3 ECO 460 H istory of Economi c Thought .............. ..... Total ................... ................. ................. 16 Approved Electives 1 5 hours of upper-division economics electives selected i n consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics .................... .... Total .............. ... ........ ......................... 3 1 Minor 18 hours must be completed to f u l fill the minor requirement Total ........................................ ....... ..... 18 General Studies (minimum) .................................... 36 F ree Electives ................... ........... .... ..... 35 Program total ................................. ............ 120 Business Emphasis in Economics This emphasis prepares the student for entry into the growing professions of economics and business It provides training t h a t

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will enable the student to enter the p r ofession and provide assistance to government and business i n sol v ing problems and formulat ing policies General S t ud i es ( See Gene r a l St u d i es Require ments for Bache l o r o f Sc i ence Degree i n Sc h ool of Bus i ness) ..... (mi nimum) 46 Business Core (See Business Core for Bachelor o f Sc i ence Degree i n Sc h oo l of Bus i ness ) ................. 30 Semester Required Courses Hours ECO 30 1 I ntermediate M i croe c o nomi c Theo ry ................... 3 ECO 302 I ntermed i ate Mac r oec o nom i c Theory ...... . ....... 3 ECO 315 Econometrics ........... ........... ............. 3 ECO 460 History of Econom i c T h ought ................... ... Total ............... ..... ......... ...... .............. 1 2 Approved Electives 12 hours of upper-
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School of Business Accounting Major for Bachelor of Science Semester Required Courses Hours ACC 309 Income Tax I ............. .......... ............. 3 ACC 330 Introduct ion to Account ing Systems ................ 3 ACC 340 Cost Accounting ................................ 3 ACC 351 Intermed i a t e Account ing I ..... ..... ........ 3 ACC 352 Intermed i ate Account ing II ...................... 3 ACC 420 Auditing ..... ............................ .. .. 3 P lus 6 hours from the f ollowing courses: ACC 310 Incom e Tax II ..................................... 3 ACC 320 Govern m ental Account ing ........ ............ 3 ACC 341 Advanced Cost Account ing ........................ 3 ACC 409 Tax Procedure & Resea rch ........ ............... 3 ACC 451 Advanced Account ing I ..................... ....... 3 ACC 452 Advanced Account ing II ............ ............ Total .................... ................................. 24 Computer Information Systems and Management Science This major offers a rich variety of courses in the rapidly expanding stimulating area of information systems in the busi ness world Students can look forward to challenging careers in computer information systems or us i ng their computer i nformation systems education within any of the other functional areas of business Students major ing in CMS are encouraged to select particular courses that best meet thei r needs in specific areas such as Systems Development, Programmer Analyst Office Systems, Management Information Systems, or Management Science Advising for these areas is available from the department and i ndividual faculty members All CMS majors must adhere to the following: ( 1 ) Complet ion o f CMS 211, CMS 305, CMS 306 (2) Completion of a 400 level CMS course (3) A maximum of 9 hours of language-type courses ( 4 ) Complet ion of 12 hours of advisor app r oved courses i n addition to ( 1 ) and (2) above Major for Bachelor of Science Semester Required Courses Hours CMS 211 COBOL ..... ......... ............. ........... 3 CMS 305 F u ndamen t als of Systems Analysis a n d Design ......... 3 CMS 306 File Design and Data Base Manageme n t . .. 3 Total .............................. .... ................. 9 Electives A 400 level CMS course ..................................... 3 Approved CMS electives ......... ......................... 12 Tota l for CMS ma jor. . . ........ .... .... ... ....... 24 Finance The finance major is designed to prepare the student for careers which concentrate on the dynamic process of managing the funds of indi viduals busi nesses, and governments Career opportunit ies are available in the field of managerial finance and the financial serv i ces industry The field of managerial finance is concerned w ith activ it ies associated with managing the f i nancial affa irs of businesses and governments. These activities include opportunities in budgeting, f inancial forecasting, cash management cred it administrat i on investment analysis and funds management. Career paths in the f i nancial services industry include positions in banks savings and loans other financ ial institutions opportun i ties in brokerage firms insurance companies and the real estate field The most dramatic increase in career opportunit i es is personal financial planning where professionals are needed to provide advice to consumers on the 36 management of their personal financial affairs. MSCD's Department of Finance is one of the few departments in the country which has been approved to offer the academic courses required of ind i viduals who desire to take the national exams leading to the Certified Financial Planner designation All finance majors must take FIN 301, 360 385 and 495 To complete the major, a minimum of 12 additional semester hours of upper-division finance or closely related courses is required with at least six hours at the 400 level selected in consultation with and approved by the student s Finance Department graduation agreement advisor or by the Finance Department s chair Major for Bachelor of Science Semester Required Courses Hours FIN 301 F inancial Markets and Institutions . . ....... 3 FIN 360 Investments ........................... ........... 3 FIN 385 Intermediate Finance .................. .... .... 3 FIN 495 F i nancial Strateg ies and Policies ..................... Total ............. ...................................... 1 2 Approved Electives 12 hours of uppe r-di vision finan c e elect i ves selec ted i n consu l tat ion and approved by the Finance Department .... .... .... ... ... ..... 12 Total Hours for Major ........................ .... .......... 24 Management The objective of the Department of Management curriculum is to prepare graduates for challenging careers in business and other types of inst itutions The program is designed to develop the student's abil ity to think objectively to analyze organizational problems and make sound decisions Management Major for Bachelor of Science Required Courses Management Semester Hours MGT 322 Legal Environmen t of Business II . ............ 3 MGT 353 Human Resources Managemen t. ........... ..... .. 3 MGT 355 Manufactu ring and Serv ice Management ........ ....... 3 MGT 400 Management Deci s ion Analysis ......... ..... ..... 3 MGT 453 Organizationa l Behavi or .......................... 3 MGT 464 Empl oyee Training and Development .................. 3 Approved man agement elect ives ............................. Total ..................... ......... .... .......... ...... 24 Human Resources Management MGT 322 Legal Environment of Business II . . .... 3 MGT 353 Human Resources Management. .................. 3 MGT 400 Management Decis ion Analysis ..................... 3 MGT 461 Labor / Employee Relations . ..... ... ... 3 MGT 462 Appr aisal and Compensation . . ....... 3 MGT 464 Employee Train ing and Development ...... .. ... ..... 3 Approved management elect i ves ...... ................... ..... Total ......................................... ....... . 24 Manufacturing and Service Management MGT 355 Man agement and Service Managemen t ............... 3 MGT 400 Management Dec i s ion Analys i s ..... ................. 3 MGT 405 Purchasing and Materials Management ................ 3 MGT 455 P r o j ect Managemen t ............ ....... .......... 3 MGT 464 Employee Trai ning and D e velopment ........... ...... 3 MGT 465 Managing Product i v i ty .... ........... .............. 3 Approved management elective s ........................... . 6 Total .............. .. ...................................... 24 Entrepreneurship MGT 302 Fundamentals of Entrepreneursh i p ........ ..... ..... 3 MGT 322 Lega l Environment o f Bus iness II .............. ...... 3

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MGT 402 Entrepreneurial Creativity ........................... 3 MGT 442 Entrepreneurial Business Planning ............ ...... 3 MKT 310 Retailing ............ ....... .......... ........ 3 FIN 385 Managerial Finance II ...................... ........ 3 Approved management electives ................................ 6 Total ........ .............................................. 24 'Note: Marketing Research, Industrial Marketing, or International Marketing may be substituted for Retail Marketing with the permission of the chair of the Department of Management. Marketing MSCD s Department of Marketing prepares students for entry level positions in such dynamic areas as sales management distribution, advertising, marketing research retailing and marketing management. In add ition to the department s well-rounded selection of courses, the curr iculum also offers students a combination of conceptual and applied learning experiences. Through the development of marketing plans, advertising campaigns, and marketing research studies students have the opportunity to work with Denve r area businesses on current marketing issues and problems Student are also exposed to a variety of marketing speakers from the business community. Part -time positions are often available for marketing students through the college s Cooperative Education Office Many students in the department are already involved in some aspect of marketing and, to accommodate their busy schedule the depart ment holds a variety of day and evening classes as well as classes at neighborhood locations through the Extended Campus Credit Program Faculty in the Marketing Department have an excellent combination of academic background and practical experience All members stay current in their fields with activities both on and off campus Marketing Major for Bachelor of Science Required Courses Semester Hours MKT 301 Marketing Research ........ ...................... 3 MKT 331 Consumer Behavior .... ............ ........... 3 MKT 456 Marketing Management ............................. 3 Fifteen hours of marketing electi ves' ... ... . . . . . 15 Total hours for major ................ .......... ........... . 24 'Business Communications courses can be used as business electives but not as marketing electives. Minor in the School of Business The Schoo l of Business offers the genera l business minor for non-business majors Students minoring in general business must take ECO 201 and ECO 202 as part of their General Studies requirements In addition to the required 24 credit hours below students may select six add itional credit hours within a specific business discipline for a total not to exceed 30 credit hours within the School of Business. If a student wishes to enroll in other business courses beyond the above 30 hours the student must declare a major with the School of Business General Business Minor Semester Required Courses Hours ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ........................... 3 ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II ........................... 3 EGO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro' ... ..... ........... 3 EGO 202 Principles of Economics-Micro' ....................... 3 MGT CMS CMS MKT MGT FIN School of Business 221 Legal Environment of Business I . . . . . 3 201 Principles of Information Systems ... .................. 3 330 Principles of Quantitative Management Systems ........ 3 300 Principles of Marketing . . ......... 3 300 Organizational Management . .............. 3 330 Managerial F inance I . . . . ......... 3 'Prerequisite -Credit applied i n General Studies. Economics Minor The economics minor is designed for nonbus ines s majors and provides them with an opportunity to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and inst itutions as well as the quantitative tools necessary for analytical research and thought. Required Courses EGO 201 Principles of Economics Macro ....... Semester Hours ...3 EGO 202 Principles of Economics Micro .... .. ........... 3 Electives A minimum of 12 addit i onal semester hours of upper-divis i on economics courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics. African American Leadership Institute The African American Leadership Institute operates on the belief that all members of our society should have an equal opportunity to pursue their goals and aspirations The institute p r ov i des a unique approach to the particular problems and concerns of African Americans in the Denver metropolitan area with three underlying tenets that form its philosophy 1 To identify motivate and train future community leaders 2 To acquaint these individuals with problems and needs of the community while investigating alternative approaches and solutions 3 To create an opportunity for these individuals to join together and exchange ideas with current leaders for the purpose of networking for national state and local community improvements Seminars cover topics which reflec t current commun i ty i ssues including regional bus i ness and economics local and state government education health care human services the arts and cultural affairs Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity The Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity has i ntroduced entrepreneurial education int o the region s academic arena through weekend courses for profess ionals and entrepreneurial seminars and forums The purpose of the institute is to discover foster and mold the visions of today s aspiring entrepreneurs It provides degree and non-degree students from the community with opportunities to learn about entrepreneurship to understand the entrepreneurial process, to practice skills that lead to successful entrepreneurship and to enhance creativity and innovation 37

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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences School of Letters, Arts and Sciences The programs in Letters Arts and Sciences provide high quality liberal arts education des i gned to meet the educat i onal needs of the urban student. Whether in humanities social sciences, or mathematics and science the programs directly address personal and professional goals of students The faculty exert leadership i n their disciplines helping to shape new directions as well as respond ing to new ideas and developments The school offers the bulk of the General Studies curriculum required for all degrees Students wish i ng to earn cert i fication as teachers choose from Letters Arts and Sciences majors. The Colorado Alliance for Science a statewide effort to encourage science and mathemat i cs teaching and learning i s housed in the school. The member colleges and universities work with public schools throughout the state offering assistance and support to teachers and students. The Health Careers Science Program encourages women m i nor i ties and other under represented groups to follow careers in health and health -r elated areas The school also offe r s i nternships and cooperat i ve education opportun i ties in a number o f departmen t s and program s Depending on t heir major students may be assigned to the legislature state and local agencies the med i a business or i nd u stry Division of Humanities The humanities curricula are offered in the departments of Art, English, Modern Languages, Music, Phi losophy, and Speech Communication In these programs students develop an understand i ng and apprec i a ti on of the worlds of art m u s i c and ideas The prog r ams offered by t he institutes for Intercultural and Women s Studies broaden awareness of so c ial i ssues related to cultural d i vers i ty ethn i city and gender. Students may complete the bachelor s degree and in conjunction with programs in education earn teache r cert i fication at the secondary leve l ( except in philosophy) Ma j ors in journalism prep r ofess i onal wr itin g and mus ic pe rf ormance are a l so offered Art students earn a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree in studio work. Department of Art The Department of Art offers a full range of studio art courses in the areas of fine arts ( drawing paint i ng printmaking photography and sculpture) ; design ( advertising design, comp uter graphics and product and industr i a l design) ; crafts (ceramics metalwork and j ewe l ry making and design in wood ) leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree ; art h i story (studies emphasize contemporary modern anc i ent and non western art) leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree ; and certificat i on classes i n art education Art Major for Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree Semester Core Requirements for All Studio Art Majors Hours ART 110 Drawing P rocesses and Concepts I. .......... ......... 3 ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts II ....... ...... ..... 3 ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I ....... ......... . 3 ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II .................... 3 ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impressionism t o 1960 .... ........ 3 ART 202 Survey o f Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present. ....... Total ................................. .................... 1 8 Level 3 General Studies Requirements for Studio Art Majors: ART 401 M o dern Art H istory: Theory and Criti c ism ............... 3 ART 475 Senior E x p e r ience Studi o : Portfolio Development and Thesis Show . . ............... 3 Total............... .......... ............... .......... 6 Students may choose one of the three areas of emphasis : fine arts design or crafts Fine Arts Area of Emphasis Semester Hours Fine Arts (15 hours i n a rea of concentra tion) ..................... 21 Select a combination of 15 hours from the follow i ng two areas : Design ....... ...... ............ ................... 6 o r 9 Crafts .............. ....... ........................ 6 or 9 ART 200 General H istory of Art ....................... ....... 3 Art H istory (upper d ivis ion) ...................... ............... 3 Total ... ............................... ......... ........... 42 Design Area of Emphasis Semester Hours Applied Arts (15 hours in area of concentration) .... ............ 21 Se l ect a combination of 15 hours from the follow i ng two areas : C rafts . ..... ........... ..... ............. .... 6 or 9 F i n e Arts ........................................... 6 or 9 38 ART 200 General History of Art ......... ......... ....... 3 Art History (uppe r -division) ... ......... .... .. 3 Total ......... 4 2 Crafts Area of Emphasis Semester Hours Crafts (15 h o urs i n area of c on cent r a t ion ) ..... .... ........ 21 Select a combination of 15 hour s from the follow i ng two areas : Applied Arts ................. .... ............ ..... 6 or 9 Fine Arts ........................................ 6 or 9 ART 200 Genera l History of Art ............................. 3 Art History (upper-d i v ision) .... ..... ...................... .... 3 Total........ ... ............ ................. ..... 42 Total Hours R equ ired................. ................ 6 6 (A minimum of 33 upper-division art hours requir e d ) Minor requirements for art ma j ors are opt i onal. Art History Major for Bachelor of Fine Arts Core Requirements for All Art History Majors Semester Hours ART ART ART ART ART ART 110 111 120 121 201 2 0 2 Drawing Processes and C once pts I. ................... 3 Drawing Processes and Con cepts II ................... 3 D e s ign Processes and Concepts I . ... ..... ... 3 Design Processes and Concepts II . . ........ 3 Surve y o f Modern Art: Impressionism to 1960 ............ 3 Survey o f Conte mporary Art: 1960 to the P resent. ....... 3 Total ....... ....... ..... ... ......... ....... .... 1 8 Level 3 General Studies Requirement for Art History Majors: ART 401 Modern Art H i s t ory: Theory and Cri t i c ism .............. Total ....................................... ................ 3 Art History (required ) ......................................... 15 ART 200 ...... .... . ...................... ... ........ 3 'F ine Arts ................ ...... ............. ........ 3 or 6 'Design ...... ....... ............... .................... 3 or 6 'Craft s .................................................. 3 or 6 Art Electives ... .............. ......... ........... ...... 6 '15 hours are r equir e d between these 3 c ategories. Total.......... ...... ........................ 39 Total hours requ i red .......................................... 60 (A min i mum of 27 upper-divi s i on art hours requ i red ) Minor requirements for art majors are opt i onal.

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Industrial Design Major for Bachelor of Arts Degree No minor is required The industrial design major i s a joint program offered through the Art Department and Industrial and Technical Studies lead ing to a bachelor of arts degree Required Courses Semester Hours General Studies . . . . . ....... 36 ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts I. ........ .......... 3 ART 120 Des i gn Processes and Concepts I .................... 3 ART 121 Des i gn Processes and Concepts II .......... ... ....... 3 ART 201 Survey of Modern Art : Impression i sm to 1960 .......... 3 ART 240 Beg i nning Advert ising Design ........................ 3 ART 245 Beginning Produ ct and Industrial Design ... ............ 3 ART 300 Art Nouveau . . . . . . . 3 or ART 303 History of Art Between World War s . . 3 ART 340 Intermediate Advertising Des i gn . .......... 3 ART 345 Intermediate Product and Industr ial Design .............. 3 ART 445 Advanced Product and Industrial Design I ..... 3 ART 446 Advanced Product and Industr ial Des i gn II .............. 3 ITS 101 Introduc t ion to Woodworking .............. 4 ITS 103 Fin i shing Mate rials & Processes ...................... 2 ITS 113 Introduction to Plastics ........................... 3 ITS 120 Introduction to General Metals : Co l d Metals ............. 2 ITS 122 Introduction to General Metals : Hot Metals .............. 2 ITS 143 Introduction to Industrial Drawing . . ... 2 ITS 255 Introduction to Photography . ............ 3 ITS 341 Computer A i ded Drafting for Industry .................. 3 ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production . . ........ 4 ITS 403 Advan ce d Wood Processes ............ ............ 4 PSY 441 Human Factors Eng i neering ......................... 3 Elect ive courses .................... ......................... 19 (Selected in consul tation w it h advisor at least 10 of which must be upperdivis i on) Total............ ....... .......................... 120 Art Certification: K-12 Teacher certification for art majors is available through the Art Departm ent. An art major is required. Semester Required Courses Hours ART 338 Introduction ot Art Educat i on . . ........... 4 EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban EDU 222 EDU 320 EDU 321 EDU 322 EDU 360 RDG 328 ART 438 EDU 419' EDU 429' ART 439 Total Secondary Schoo l s . . . .......... 3 F i eld Experience i n Urban Secondary Schools ........... 2 The Adolescen t as a Learner ........... 3 Secondary Schoo l Curriculum and Classroom Management ........................... 3 Field Experienc e in Tutoring and Materials Const r uction ............................ 2 The Except i ona l Child i n the Classroom ................ 3 Teaching of Reading and Writing i n the Content Areas .................................... 4 Art Methods/Materials : K-12 ..................... 4 Student Teach i ng and Seminar : Elementary (K) ..... 8 10 Student Teach i ng and Seminar : Secondary (6-12 ) ............................... 8 10 Integ rat i ng the Arts for G i fted & Talented ............ 3 .... 47-51 In addition to field experiences included in require d coursework students must present evidence of having completed at least 200 hours of work with children This may be accom plished through work with Boy Scouts Girl Scouts church groups tutorial prog rams or similar activities. Students should plan their volunteer work i n consultat ion with the Art Education adv i sor Students who seek certif i cation must pass a public speaking course (SPE 101) with a grade of B or better or obtain a waiver Studen ts must also achieve satisfactory scores on the basic skills exams in reading, mathematics and spelling (C.A.T.). 'Student teach i ng i s comprised of daily full-time work dur i ng 15 weeks spl i t eight and seven weeks between elementary and secondary levels for K-12 School of Letters Arts and Sciences Minor in Art Semester Required Courses Hours ART 11 0 Drawing Processes and Concepts 1. . . . 3 ART 111 Drawing Processes and Co ncepts II ................... 3 ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I . . ... 3 ART 121 Des ign P rocess es and Concepts II . . ...... 3 ART 201 Survey of Modern Art : Impress ionism to 1960..... .. 3 ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art : 1960 to the Prese nt . . . . . . . . . 3 Subtotal ............................................. ...... 18 E lectives . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Minimum of one upper div isi on studio course and one upper division art h i story course Total ..... ................................................. 27 Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Communications: Visual Sponsored by the Department of Art The visual communicat i ons area of concentration offers students a sequence of art courses in graphic communications incl uding drawing and design as well as a broad acquaintance with the visual arts in contempo rary and historical perspective To become knowledgeable in the arts as related to present day communications media students have the opportunity to pursue graphic courses in the fine arts of drawing, painting and printmaking, or in the applied art fields of graphic communications and advertising design photography and video Semester Required Core Hours COM 272 Introduction to Communicat i on Concepts and Systems ................................... 3 SPE 374 Psychology of Communicat i on or SPE 41 0 Techn iques of Persuasion ....................... 3 Subtotal ................................................. 6 Required Lower-Division Courses ART 11 0 Drawin g Processes and Concepts I. .................. 3 ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts II .................. 3 ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I ................. 3 ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II .................... 3 ART 201 Survey of Modern Art : Impre ssionism to 1 960 ........... Subtotal . . . . . . . . . ...... 15 Required Art History (select 3 hours) ART 303 H i story of Art Between World Wars ................... 3 or ART 401 Modern Art H i story : Theory and Criticism .. ........... 3 Subtotal ... Required Studio Courses Fine Arts (select 6 hours) .......... .............. 3 ART 210 Beginn ing Life Drawing ............................. 3 ART 215 Beginn ing Pai nt i ng ............................... 3 ART 225 Beginn ing P rint making ... .......... .... ....... 3 ART 220 Beginn in g Photography .......... .................. Subtotal....... . . . . ........... ......... 6 Applied Arts ART 240 Beg i nn i ng Advertising Des ign ...... ................. 3 ART 340 Intermed iate Advertising Design ................... 3 Subtotal... ........................... .. .............. 6 Electives S i x hours elected from upper-division art courses ................ 6 Total .................................................. 42 39

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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences English Department The Department of English offers instruction in a variety of areas : literature, writing language and lingui stics and elementary and secondary education. Courses in each area appeal to students in every school of the college who wish to read and understand representative literatures of the world, to examine the principles underlying how language works and to cultivate their writing skills. The department invites students in other disciplines to elect English courses to enhance their general education Students may also choose a major or minor from different areas of emphasis All students who are considering a major or minor in any of the areas of emphasis in the Department of English are expected to consult with faculty for advising The English major may choose an emphasis in 1 literature 2 elementary school teach ing, leading to cert ifi cation 3 secondary education leading to certification 4 creative wr iting 5 preprofessional writing The English minor may choose an emphasis in 1. literature 2. dramatic literature 3 language and linguistics 4. practical writing 5 secondary education 6 creative wr i ting English Major for Bachelor of Arts Literature Emphasis The English major or minor literature emphas is, encompasses a full range of American British and world literature The program provides a strong foundation of courses in literature and language, sequenced to cultivate a sense of literary development fostering an increas ing familiarity with major works and writers critical theory literary terminology and research materials Because of their command of the written language their ability to deal with ideas and concepts as well as facts and their broader understan ding of human nature and social realities literature majors are valued in many fields of endeavor including academe and the world of business. Required Core Each of the follow ing cou rses : Semester Hours ENG 240 Interpret i ng Literature : Poetry Fiction Drama ........ .... 3 ENG 244 Myth Symbol Allus i on in Lite rature ... .............. Sub total .................. .......... ........................ 6 Each of the following courses : ENG 211 Wo rld Litera ture : Homer to Cervantes ......... .... . 3 ENG 221 Ame ric an Liter ature : Bradford to Whitman .............. 3 ENG 231 Br itish Literature : Beowulf to Shakespeare .............. 3 Subtotal ..................... ............................... 9 Two of the following courses : ENG 212 Wor ld Literature : Moliere to Sartre ...... ............... 3 ENG 222 Amer ic an Lite rature : D i ck i nson to Oates ..... ........... 3 ENG 232 Brit ish Literature: Donne to Johnson ..... ....... ..... 3 ENG 233 Br iti sh Li t erature: Blake to Beckett ................... 3 Subtotal .......... ............................... ........ 6 The following course : ENG 310 Roots of Brit ish Literary Tradition ................. 3 Required Upper Level Courses ENG 302 H i story of the English language ................... 3 Select three of the following courses: ENG 321 D evelopment of Ame rican Drama ..................... 3 ENG 323 De velopment of the Ame rican Novel ................... 3 ENG 331 Deve lopme nt of British Drama : Myster ies to Melodrama ... 3 40 ENG 333 Development of the Br i tish Novel ................. 3 ENG 340 Development of Modern Poetry ......... ........... 3 ENG 341 Masterpieces of Cont ine ntal Literature ............... Subtotal ............................... ...... ............... 9 Select two of the following courses (at least one from 413) : ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature ....................... 3 ENG 412 Se l ected Themes in Litera ture ........ ................ 3 ENG 413 Ma j or Authors ............... .............. ...... 3 ENG 414 Modern Continenta l Brit i sh and A merican Drama ...................................... 3 ENG 431 Shakespeare : Comed i es ....................... 3 or ENG 432 Shakespeare : Tragedies ........................ Subtotal .................................... ................ 6 The follow ing course : ENG 461 Theories and Techniques i n Literary Critic i sm ........... Total Semester Hours Required ................................. 45 Elementary School Teaching Area of Emphasis The elementary school teaching emphasis in English offered i n conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Education certification program prepares future teachers of elementary education to understand and teach the diverse subject matter required for certification The program will provide students with a strong foundation in literature and literary genres, a solid perspective on the English lanugage including its history structure and constituents ; and both theory and practice in composition language arts communication, and teaching methodology It also addresses the need to prepare teachers to teach multi-cultural literature accommodate cultural and ethn ic diversity in language and writing, and communicate effectively with a diverse population of students Required Courses I. Literature Core Courses : Semester Hours ENG 240 Interpretin g Literature : Poetry F i c tion Drama ............ 3 ENG 222 American Literature : Dickinson to Oates ................ 3 ENG 244 Myth Symbol and Allusion in Literature ............. 3 ENG 310 Roots of Br itish Literary Tradition ................. Semester Hou rs Required ..................... ......... 12 II. Language/Linguistics Core Courses: ENG 201 The Nature of Language ............ ........... 3 or ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar ..................... 3 ENG 302 History of the English Language .................... Semester Hour s Required ................ .... ................. 6 Ill. Writing/Composition Courses : ENG 251 Intermediate Composition .......................... 3 or ENG 252 Introduction to Creat i ve Wr i ting .................... 3 ENG 351 Advanced Composit i on .... ................ .. ... Semester Hours Required .......... .................. ......... 6 Ill. Language Arts Core Courses : ENG 346 Children s Literature ................................ 3 ENG 465 Teaching Compos i tion in Elementary Schools ........... 3 ENG 466 Teaching Literature and Language K-6 ................. 3 RDG 313 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School K-6 ... ........ Semester Hours Required : ........................... ... :9 V English Electives Two upper d ivision English courses selected in consultati on w ith and approved by des i gnated Engl ish adv i sor ..................... ..... 6 Recommended Electives : Communication ENG 363 Teaching Communicat i ons .............. ......... 3 Writing ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop .. ..................... 3 ENG 353 Techniques of Cr iti cal Writing .................. 3

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Language ENG 301 ENG 303 Literature ENG 324 ENG 341 ENG 342 ENG 343 ENG 347 ENG 349 Modem English Language Studies ( Prerequisite : ENG 201) . . ....... 3 Semant ics ( Prerequ i s ite: ENG 201)......... ....... 3 African American Literature ......................... 3 Masterpieces of Continental Literature . . .. 3 The English B i b l e as Literature ....................... 3 Class ical Mytho l ogy . . . . .. 3 Literature for Adol escents ....... ................. 3 Chi cano Folklo r e of the Southwest. ..... ........... 3 Total Semester Hours Requ ired ......... .................... ... 39 'RDG 313 meets the reading requirements for Colorado State cert i f i cat ion but is carried under the stude nt s 42-semester hour professional education requi rements Secondary School Teaching Emphasis The education emphasis in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorad o State Departm ent of Education certification program prepa res future teachers of English to understand and teach the dive rse subject matter required for certif i cation This program equips students with a wide variety of language princ iples and skills; practical experience in develop ing and presenting the process of writing ; sound knowle dge of approaches to literature and literary genres, periods and authors (including a special focus on literature for adoles cents ) ; and an understanding of communication and med i a as used in English studies. In addition to meeting specified state and departmental requirements this program offers students the opportunity to develop further specialization in writing language or literature to complement the major Required Courses I. Literature Core Courses : Semester Hours ENG 221 American Literat ure: Bradford to Whitman .............. 3 or ENG 222 American Literature : Dickinson to Oates ........ 3 ENG 240 Interpreting Literature : Poetry Fict ion, Drama ............ 3 ENG 244 Myth Symbol and Allusion in Literature . ... 3 ENG 310 Roots of British Lite r ary Tradition ............. .... .... 3 Subtota l . . . . . . ........ .......... 12 II. Langu age / Linguistics Core Courses : Required for Certification ENG 302 History of the English Language . ......... 3 Select two of the following : ENG 201 The Nature of Language ........................... 3 ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar ..................... 3 ENG 301 Modern English L anguage Studies . . ......... 3 ENG 303 Semantics . . . . . ............. 3 Subtota l .......... ........................................ 6 Note: Language /li nguistics c erti f i cat ion requ i rements are unde r review. Consult a des i g n ated adv i sor Ill. Writing/Composition Courses : ENG 351 Advanced Compos i t ion . ................... 3 ENG 463 Composition Teaching Workshop . ........... 6 Subtota l ............................................... .... :9 Note : A comb i nat ion of ENG 352 and ENG 362 may be substituted for ENG 463 IV. English Education Core Courses : ENG 347 Literature for Adolescents ........... ....... 3 ENG 361 Teaching English in Secondary Schools ......... 3 ENG 363 Teaching Communications ..... ............. 3 RDG 328 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content Areas .... ..... . .... Subtotal .................... .... . .... . . School of Letters Arts and Sciences V. English Electives : Two upper div i sion English courses selected i n consultat ion with and approved by designated English advisor . . 6 Total Semester Hours Requ i red ............................... 45 'RDG 328 meets the reading requi rement s for English certification but is carr ied under the studenrs professional education requirements NOTE : Students w ith a bachelor of arts i n Engl ish from an accredited i nstitution who are seek ing English certif i cation will rece ive cred i t for Sections I and V in addi tion to any other courses in Sections II, Ill and IV for which they have exi st ing credits Creative Writing Emphasis The creative wr iting emphasis is designed to give the creative writer extensive pract i ce in various genres of literature as well as a good foun dat ion in appreciation of the English language literary heritage. Courses are also offered to assist the creative writer i n finding markets for literary work and assessing the potential of writing as a career Semester Required Core Hours I. Each of the following courses : ENG 240 Interpret ing Literature : Poetry F i ct ion, Drama ............ 3 ENG 244 Myth Symbo l Allusion in Literature .............. ..... 3 II. Two of the follow ing courses: ENG 211 World Literature : Homer to Cervantes .... .... .... ... 3 ENG 221 American Literature: B radford to Whitman ............ 3 ENG 231 Bri tish Liter a ture: Beowulf to Shakespeare ..... ....... 3 Ill. Two of the following courses: ENG 212 World Literature : Moliere to Sartre ........... ......... 3 ENG 222 American Literature : Dickinson to Oates ........... 3 ENG 232 British Literature : Donne to Johnson ................ 3 ENG 233 British Literature: Blake to Beckett ..................... 3 IV. The following course : ENG 310 The Roots of Brit ish Literary Tradit ion . ......... 3 Required Courses I. Entry Course: ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Wri ting . ........... 3 II. General Writing Courses (select one) : ENG 107 English Usage and Grammar .................... 3 ENG 251 Intermed iate Composi tion ........................ ... 3 ENG 351 Advanced Composi tion .......................... 3 ENG 353 Techni ques of Crit i ca l Writing ...................... 3 Ill. Creative Writ ing Workshops (select any five): ENG 352 Drama Workshop... . . .................. 3 ENG 352 Fiction Workshop ................. ... .............. 3 ENG 352 Magazine Edi t ing Workshop . ................ 3 ENG 352 Poetry Works hop ................... ............. 3 ENG 352 Science Fict ion Workshop .......... ................ 3 ENG 352 Scriptwr i ting Workshop ................. ... .. 3 ENG 352 Writing as a Profession .............. ............ 3 ENG 352 Writing for the Markets ................. ........... 3 ENG 352 Writing the Novel Workshop .................... . 3 ENG 352 Writing Your Autobiography ........................ 3 IV. Exi t Course : ENG 452 Advanced Creat ive Writ ing ................ . ... 3 Total Semester Hours Requ i red . . . . ..... 45 Pre-Professional Writing Emphasis Every profession benefits from hav ing among its member s people who write exceptionally well; rewards tend to accrue to such peop le This emphasis i s designed to enable talented writers majoring in other fields to develop their writing ab i lit i es and thereby enhance the i r career opportunities ; for this reason it is expected that the pre-professional writing emphasis will be a second major for those who pursue it. The program provides the student with an intensive coherent sequence of instruct i on in writing and linguistics interspersed with appropriate study of fine writing from the English language literary heritage 41

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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences Semester Required Courses Hours ENG 251 Intermed i ate Compos i t ion .......................... 3 ENG 201 The Nature of Language .............. ........ ... 3 o r ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar ........................ 3 ENG 303 Semant ics .................................... 3 ENG 351 Advanced Composition ......................... 3 ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing .... ................... 3 SPE 374 Psychology of Communication .......... ........ 3 or ENG 363 Teaching Communications ..................... Subtotal .. ........................................... ..... 18 Students will take six literature courses of which at least two must be upper division ; these courses must be distributed among at least four of the following five areas : 1 world or continental literature 2 British literature : beginnings to seventeenth century 3 British literature : seventeenth century to nineteenth century 4 American literature 5 Twentieth century literature Total Semester Hours Required ............................... 36 English Minor Creative Writing Emphasis The English minor with emphasis in creative writing serves students who desire instruction and practice in the production of fiction poetry and/or plays. The minor includes a good foundation in the appreciation of literature and criticism Courses are also offered to assist the creative writer in finding markets for literary work and assessing the potential of writing as a career. Required Courses Semester Hours ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing ....................... 3 ENG 352 Crealive Writing Workshops (combination of three distinct topics) .................................. ........ 9 ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing ...................... 3 Subtotal ........................ ....... ................. 15 One of the following : ENG 1 07 English Usage and Grammar ................ 3 ENG 251 lnlermediate .................... ... 3 ENG 351 Advanced Compos i tion ............... ......... 3 ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing .................... Subtotal .......................... ........................ 3 Two of the following : ENG 211 World Uterature : Homer to Cervantes ................ 3 ENG 212 World Literature : Moliere to Sartre .................... 3 ENG 221 American Literature : Bradford to Whitman .......... 3 ENG 222 American Literature : Dickinson to Oates ............ .... 3 ENG 231 Brit ish Uteralure : Beowulf to Shakespeare .............. 3 ENG 232 Brit ish Lllerature : Donne to Johnson ................. 3 ENG 233 British Uterature: Blake to Beckett .................. 3 Subtotal ......... ................... .................... :6 Total Semester Hours Required .............................. 24 Dramatic Literature Emphasis The English minor with emphasis in dramatic literature serves students who wish to develop skills in reading writing and thinking about the texts of drama. The program is designed to meet the needs of anyone involved in the history teaching writing production or perfonnance of drama I. Introductory Courses : ENG 112 Introduct ion to Drama .............................. 3 A second course introductory in nature is to be selected by agreement of lhe student and the department advisor The course need not be an English course, but i f not, it should be an introductory course related to the student's major interest in the use of drama ...................... 3 42 II. Writing Course(s) One of the following courses : ENG 252 Int roduction to Creat ive Writing ................ ....... 3 ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop : Scriptwriting ............... 3 ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing ....................... Subtotal .................................................. .. 3 Ill. Literature Electives (nine hours to be chosen in consultation w ith an advisor) : ENG 131 Introduction to Shakespeare ........................ 3 ENG 321 Development of American Drama ..................... 3 ENG 331 Devel opment of British Drama: ENG ENG ENG ENG Mysteries to Melodrama ..................... ..... 3 431 Shakespeare : Comedies .......................... 3 432 Shakespeare : Traged ies ............................ 3 413 Major Aulhors (Piaywrighls) ......................... 3 414 Modern Continenta l B ritish, and American Drama .................................... ..... 3 ENG 461 Theories and Techni ques in Literary Criticism ........... Subtotal .................................................... 9 IV. Final Study One of the following: ENG 480 Workshop .................................... 3 ENG 498 Independent Study ................... ........ 3 ENG 499 Internship ...................................... Subtotal ................................................... 3 Total Semeste r Hours Required ............................... 21 NOTE : The final study undertaken in 480 498 or 499 presents the opportunity for students electing the minor to devote signnicant attention to one i n-depth project for comp letion of the study The project should be based on the reading of a dramat i c text but shoul d combine this experience with some other area of design, management performance or writing The project should corr.bine the sk ill s of reading drama with those of the associated area of expertise The project is to be proposed by the student approved by an advisor in the Department of English, and directed in collaboration with a second advisor assoc ia ted with the other area of expertise fundamental to the study The study may take the form of a workshop, an i ndependent study an internship or a practicum Literature Emphasis I. Three of the following : ENG 211 World Literature : Homer to Cervantes .................. 3 or ENG 212 World Literature : Moliere to Sartre ..................... 3 ENG 221 American Literature : Bradford to Whitman .............. 3 or ENG 222 American Literature : D ickinson to Oates ................ 3 ENG 231 British Literature : Beowulf to Shakespeare .............. 3 or ENG 232 British Literature : Donne to Johnson .................. 3 or ENG 233 Brit ish Literature : B lake to Beckett ..................... 3 Subtotal .................................................... 9 II. One of the following courses : ENG 201 The Nature of Language .................... .... 3 ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar ..................... .. 3 ENG 251 Int ermediate Composit ion ............... ............ 3 ENG 252 Introduction to Creat ive Wri ting ..................... 3 ENG 351 Advanced Compos ition ....................... Subtotal ... ........................................ ........ 3 Ill. Two electives from the following courses : ENG 321 Development of America n Drama ................. ... 3 ENG 323 Development of t h e American Novel ................ 3 ENG 331 Development of British Drama: Mysteries to Melodrama ......................... 3 ENG 333 Development o f the British Novel .. ........... ....... 3 ENG 340 Development of Modern Poetry .................... 3 ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature ............. Subtotal ...................... ........................ ..... 6 IV. Two electives from the following courses (one must be 413) : ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature ............. ......... 3 ENG 412 Selected Themes in Literature ............. ......... 3

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ENG 413 Major Authors .................................... 3 ENG 414 Modern Continental British and American Drama ........ 3 ENG 431 Shakespeare : Comedies or ENG 432 Shakespeare : Tragedies .......................... Subtotal ................................. .................. 6 Total Semester Hours Requ ired ........ ....................... 24 Language and Linguistics Minor The language and linguistics minor offers concepts about, theories of and analytical techniques in natural language It represents an intellectual discipline in itself and simultaneously serves the i nterests of future teachers students of literature and writing and others who have a continuing fascination with language as language Taken in an appropriate order made evident by careful advising, the courses in the program educate students both to use and to appreciate their language The minor requires students to engage in vigorous progressively more explicit and precise analysis and synthesis as they examine facts and fallacies about the miracle of language Semester Required Core Hours ENG 201 The Nature of Language ........................ 3 ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar ....................... 3 ENG 301 Modern English language Stud ies .......... ........ 3 ENG 302 History of the English Language .................. 3 ENG 303 Semantics .......................... ............. 3 ENG 401 Studies in Linguistics .. .......................... Subtota l .................................................. 18 Any one of the following specific titles : Applied Linguistics Descriptive Linguistics Psycholinguistics Sociolinguistics Stylist ic s Interdisciplinary Elective Courses (chosen in consultation with and approved by departmental advisor) Any one of the following : ANT 233 Cross Cultural Communication ....................... 3 EDU 337 language and Cognitive Development ................. 4 PHI 111 language logic, and Persuasion ......... ..... ....... 3 SPE 352 language Acquis i t ion ......... ................... Subtota l .................................................. 3 Total Semester Hours Required ............. .......... ... 21 Practical Writing Minor The pract i cal writing minor i s a humanities-based, career-oriented program enabling students to develop writing skills as an adjunct to any major Students w ill be prepared to do the practical writing found in magazines, newspapers, and newsletters. Students completing the program are expected to be versatile writers capable of applying the principles of good writing to d ifferen t audiences and purposes Required Core Semester Hours ENG 107 English Usage and Grammar ........................ 3 ENG 201 The Nature of Language .......................... 3 ENG 303 Semantics ................................... 3 ENG 351 Advanced Composition .......... ................... 3 ENG 353 Techniques of Cr i tical Writing .... .................. Subtota l ................................................... 15 Elective Courses (Choose three from the following) : ENG 352 Writing as a Profession .......................... 3 ENG 398 Cooperative Educat ion: English Internsh i p ............. 3 ENG 498 Independent Study : Writing Project .................... 3 JAN 182 Beginning Reporting and Newswriting ................. 3 JAN 381 Feature Writing for Newspapers ...................... 3 JAN 481 Feature Writ ing for Magazines ........................ 3 School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing ...................... 3 MKT 305 Business Research and Report Writing ............... 3 SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy ....................... 3 SPE 410 Techni ques of Persuasion ... .................... Subtotal ..................... .............. ............. 9 Total Semester Hours Required .... ............................. 24 In add i tion to pursuing the practical writing minor some students may wish to seek the recognition of competency award as qualified practical writers A student seeking this award must apply to the Department Composition Committee before completing nine hours applicable to the minor, and, if approved must work out with the committee a coordinated sequence of courses one of which must be English 498, independent study The recognition procedure will include development of a portfolio which will be prepared under the gui dance of the committee. This portfolio, des i gned to demonstrate student proficiency will include such it ems as a letter in which students describe the development of their skills in writing and the extent to which they see these as valuable to their careers and two different demonstrations of their ability to write and edit under pressure The portfolio materials will be juried by at least two members of the Composition Committee Some of the preparation may carry up to three hours credit under English 498 Secondary School Teaching Emphasis I. Each of the following courses : Semester Hours ENG 347 Literature for Adolescents ........................... 3 ENG 351 Advanced Composition ................. ........... 3 ENG 361 Teaching English in Secondary Schools ................ 3 ENG 362 Teaching Composition in Secondary Schools ............ 3 Subtotal ................................................... 12 II. One of the following courses : ENG 301 Modern English Language Studies ................ 3 ENG 302 History of the English language ................... 3 ENG 303 Semantics .................................... 3 Subtotal ................................................. 3 Ill. Three English electives from 300 level or 400 level courses selected i n consultat ion with and approved by designated English Department adv i sors . . . . .... 9 Total Semester Hours Required ................................. 24 This minor does not satisfy MSCD requirements for certification in secondary English but does meet minimum requirements for t hose seeking elig i b ili ty to teach English in secondary schools accredited by the North Central Association S tud ents working toward this m i nor are expected to plan and carry out the i r programs in consultation with des ignated English Department advisors Journalism Department Journalism Major for Bachelor of Arts The journalism major prepares students for careers dealing with news and information media including the press and public relations Proficiency in standard written English is a prerequisite for all journalism courses Students without such proficiency should not register for any journalism course beyond JRN 181. The faculty may recommend that the student take ENG 101 and ENG 102 before taking any journalism course beyond JRN 181. Required Courses Semester Hours JAN 181 Introduction to Journalism and Mass Media ............. 3 JAN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing ................. 3 JAN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading .............. 3 JAN 286 Intermed i ate Reporting and News Writing ............... 3 JAN 381. Feature Article Writing for Newspapers ................. 3 JAN 383 Contemporary Issues .............. ................ 3 JAN 385 Public Affa irs Reporting ............................ 3 JAN 386 College Newspaper Practicum .... .................. 3 JAN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines .................. 3 JAN 482 Advanced News Editing Copyreading and Princ i ples of Layout .... ............................ 3 43

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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences JRN 486 Advanced Reporting and News Writing ............ 3 JRN 487 Ethical Issues in Journalism ...... ....... ....... 3 Total Semester Hours Required ............ ....... ............. 36 Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282. 'JRN 286 is a prerequisite for JRN 381,383,385, 386 ,481 and 486 'JRN 381 i s a prerequisite for JRN 481. Journalism Minor I. Each of the following courses : Semester Hours JRN 181 Introduct ion to Journalism........... ........ 3 JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing ................. 3 JRN 282 Beginning News Edit ing and Copyreading .............. 3 JRN 286' Intermed i ate Reporting and News Writing ............... 3 Subtotal .............................. ..... ........... .. .. 12 II. Three of the following courses : JRN 381 Feature Art icle Writing for Newspapers ......... ...... 3 JRN 383 Contemporary Issues .............................. 3 JRN 385 Publi c Affa irs Reporting ............................. 3 JRN 386 College Newspaper Practicum ....................... 3 JRN 481 Feature Art icle Writing for Magazines ................. 3 JRN 482 Advanced News Editing Copyreading and Principles of Layout ................................ 3 JRN 486 Advanced Reporting and News Writing ............. .... 3 JRN 487 Ethical Issues in Journalism ......................... 3 Subtotal ............... ..................................... 9 Total Semester Hours Required ............................... 21 Typ ing profic i ency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282. Public Relations Minor The public relations minor prepares students for careers related to institutional and organizational information distribution Emphasis in the program is on strong news writing skills problem solving and planning and publication production Semester Required Courses Hours JRN 181 Introduct ion to Journa lism ........................... 3 JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing ............ .. 3 JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading ......... 3 JRN 284 Fundamentals of Public Relations .................... 3 JRN 286 Intermed iate Reporting and News Writing .............. 3 JRN 381 Feature Art i cle Writ ing for Newspapers ................ 3 JRN 382 Public Relations Wri ting and Strategies ................ 3 JRN 398 Cooperat ive Education Public Relations ....... Total Semester Hours Required ................................. 24 A suitable basic photography course may upon approval of the advisor, be substituted for one of the above courses Other courses may be recommended by the advisor depending on the student s particular needs With the approval of the journalism facu lty journalism majors may substitute certain courses for required courses as a part of their major. Modern Languages The Department of Modern Languages offers major programs in Span i sh and modern foreign languages, m inor programs in French German and Spanish and teacher education programs in Spanish and modern foreign languages Courses in other foreign languages and in occupational or professional fields are offered in order to meet student and community needs In addition, the department administers several education programs abroad Registration for courses is in accordance with previous preparation Consequently students will register for foreign language courses as follows : No previous study or less than one year in high school 101 ; students with one year in high school who feel their 44 background is weak101; one semester in college -1 02; one year in college -211 and/or 231 for German and Spanish and 201 for French; two years in high school211 and/or 231 for German and Spanish and 201 for French or 102 if needed ; three years in high school or one and one-half years in college 212 and/or 232 for German and Spanish and 202 for French ; or 211 and/or 231 for German and Spanish and 201 for French if needed ; four years in high school or two years in college 300 level courses, or 212 and/or 232 for German and Spanish and 202 for French if needed The above regulations may not be applicable if students have had no professional instruction in their chosen foreign language within the past two years. If students feel that they have insufficient preparation for the required level, they should strengthen their background by taking a course recommended by the Modern Language Department. Elementary courses do not apply toward the major or minor requirements Students seeking secondary credentials in French German or Spanish must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSCD in addition to all of the major requirements. They must also demonstrate sufficient mastery of the target language or languages through an appropr iat e proficiency exam. Spanish Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Courses Hours SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish.. .............. ........ 3 SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation .................. 3 SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I ...... ........... 3 SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II. ................. 3 SPA 311 Advanced Conversation ............................ 3 SPA 314 Advanced Comp osition ........ ..... ... ............. 3 SPA 315' Spanish Phonetics : Theory and Pra ctice ........... ..... 3 SPA 320 Cul ture and C ivilizat ion of Spain or SPA 321 Spani sh-American Cul ture and Civi liz ation or SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest ..... 3 SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish .............. 3 SPA 340 Survey of Spanish Literature I or SPA 341 Survey of Spanis h Literature II ....................... 3 SPA 351 Masterpieces of Latin American Literature .............. 3 SPA 401 Advanced Spanish Wri ting and Grammar I .............. 3 SPA 402 Advanced Spanish Wri ting and Grammar II ............. 3 SPA 411 Contemporary Spanish Literature or SPA 412 Contemporary Latin American Literature ............. ... 3 MDL 496' Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools ... 3 Spanish electives" .......................... ................ 3 Total .................................................. 48'" Required only when seeking a teacher certificate "Must be advanced courses and taken with departmen t approval. '"Only 42 semester credit hours fo r those not seeking Teacher Certif i cat ion. Minor in Spanish Semester Required Courses Hours SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish. ......... .... .......... 3 SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation .............. ..... 3 SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I .................. 3 SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Compos i tion II .................. 3 SPA 311 Advanced Conve rsation ........................... 3 SPA 320 Cul ture and Civilizat ion of Spain or SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization or SPA 322 Folk l ore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest .......... 3 SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish ............. Total.... ............. .............................. 21

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French Minor in French Required Courses FRE 201 Intermediate French I .............................. 3 FRE 202 Intermediate French II .............................. 3 FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation .... ........... ..... 3 FRE 301 Introduction to Advanced French Studies ............... 3 FRE 311 Survey of French Literature I ......................... 3 or FRE 312 Survey of French Literature II ........................ 3 FRE 351 French Culture and Civilization ....................... 3 French elect i ves .............. ............................ 3 Total .................................................... 21 Must be course at the 300 or 400 level. German Minor in German Required Courses GER 211 German Reading and Conversat ion ................... 3 GER 212 German Civilization ............................. 3 GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar ............. 3 GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing ................ Subtotal .................... ... ............................ 12 Select one of the following literature courses : GER 321survey of German Literature I ....................... 3 GER 322survey of German Literature II ........................ 3 GER 323contemporary German Writers .. ...................... 3 GER 351 Lessing Goethe and Schiller. ....... ................ Subtotal .......................................... ......... 3 Select two of the following skills courses : GER 301 Third Year German Conversation ........ ............ 3 GER 331 Advanced German Composition and Grammar ........... 3 GER 340 German for Busi ness .. ............... .............. 3 GER 341 Translation Techniques for Scientific Materials .......... Subtotal ............................................ ....... 6 Total ...................................................... 21 Higher lev e l course may be substituted with departmental approval. Fourth year course may be substituted with departmental approval. Modern Foreign Languages Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses The composite modern foreign languages major involves a minimum of 48 hours in any two modern languages, at least 12 hours i n each Students are advised into intermediate and advanced classes in each language on the basis of individual background and need. The minimum 12 hours in each of the two chosen languages must be taken as follows : Spanish SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish ............................... 3 SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation .................. 3 SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Compos ition I .................. 3 SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II. ................. 3 Subtotal . . . . . . .......... .... 12 French FRE 201 Intermediate French I ............................ 3 FRE 202 Intermediate French II ..................... ......... 3 FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation .................. 3 FRE 301 Introduction to Advanced French Studies ............... 3 Subtotal ...... ............................................ 12 German GER 211 GER 212 GER 231 German Reading and Conversation ................... 3 German C ivilization ...................... .... 3 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar ............. 3 School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences GER 232 German Composition and Free Wri ting ................ Subtotal ....... ........................ ................... 12 The remaining hours to complete the 48 hours required must be taken with department approval. For those seeking a teacher certificate in modern foreign languages (French German Spanish), ail of the courses in one of the following areas of emphasis are required French Area of Emphasis FRE 201 Intermed iate French I ....................... .. 3 FRE 202 Intermediate French II .............................. 3 FRE 211 French Reading and Conversat ion ................. 3 FRE 301 Introduct ion to Advanced French Studies ............. 3 FRE 311 Survey of French Literature I ......................... 3 FRE 312 Survey of French Literature II ..................... 3 FRE 315 French Phonetics : Theory and Practice ................. 3 FRE 331 Advanced French Compo sition and Grammar ... ....... 3 FRE 332 Advanced Conversation . . . . ........ 3 FRE 351 French Culture and C ivilizat ion .......... . ..... .... 3 FRE 440 Existential ism ........ .... ..................... 3 FRE 452 Modem French Theater ............................. 3 FRE 453 The French Novel ............................... 3 FRE 475 Senior Seminar in French Studies .................... 3 French electives ............................ ............... 3 MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages i n the Secondary Schools ......................................... 3 Total ............... .................................... 48 German Area of Emphasis GER 211 German Reading and Conversation ............ ... 3 GER 212 German Civilization ............................... 3 GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar ... ......... 3 GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing ......... ........ 3 GER 315 German Phonet ics: Theory and Practice .... ....... 3 GER 321 Survey of German Literature I ....................... 3 GER 322 Survey of German Literature II ......... ............. 3 GER 323 Contemporary German Writers ................. ...... 3 GER 331 Advanced German Composition and Grammar ........... 3 GER 351 Lessing, Goethe and Schiller .................... ... 3 GER 411 The German Novel of the N ineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries ................................ 3 or GER 412 German Drama of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries . . . . . . ..... ..... 3 GER 421 Advanced Conversation : Present-day Germany.... .......... . .... .......... 3 German electives ............................................ 3 MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages i n the Secondary Schools ..... .................................... 3 Total .............................. ......... ............. 42 Spanish Area of Emphasis SPA 211 Intermed i ate Spanish...................... ... 3 SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversat ion ................... 3 SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Compos i tion I ................. 3 SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II. .... .. .... 3 SPA 311 Advanced Conversation ............................ 3 SPA 314 Advanced Composition .......................... 3 SPA 315 Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice . .......... 3 SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain ................... ... 3 or SPA 321 Spanish -American Culture and Civilization .............. 3 or SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest .......... 3 SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies I n Spanish ............. 3 SPA 340 Survey of Spanish Literature I ................ ..... 3 or SPA 341 Survey of Spanish Literature II ..................... 3 SPA 401 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I .............. 3 SPA 402 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II ........... 3 SPA 411 Contemporary Spanish Literature .................... 3 or SPA 412 Contemporary Lat i n-American Literature ............... 3 MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages i n the Secondary Schools ................................. ....... 3 Total .................................................... 42 45

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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences Music Metropolitan State College of Denver is an accred ite d institutional member of the National Assoc iation of School s of Music The Department of Music offers two NASM-accredited degree programs music education and music performance for students wishing to prepare themselves for careers in mus!c Students pursuing these majors are not required to fulfill a minor for graduation In addition the contract major is available for students seeking a more personalized degree program in music The music education degree program is designed to prepare students for careers teaching instrumental and/or choral music at the levels K-12. By taking an additional18 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree (EDU 419 and 429) the student becomes eligible for K-12 certification in the State of Colorado With these additional 18 hours this degree program is fully accredited by the Colorado State Department of Education Students seeking teaching credentials in music must satisfy all requirements of the Teacher Education Program in the Division of Education in addition to all require ments of the Department of Music The music performance degree program is designed to prepare students for careers in music performance further graduate specialization or private studio teaching In order to pursue this course of study the student must demonstrate through audition the capability of developing a high level of musicianship in performance. Students wishing to gain a broad general coverage of the field of music may pursue the minor in music The department offers a wide range of courses inc luding some specifically designed for non-music students wishing to enhance their general appreciation and enjoyment of music. Non-mu sic students may also participate in large and small music ensembles including band orchestra choir, and chamber music All students majoring or minoring in music must participate in the departmental advising program scheduled during the first week of each semester Transfer students should be prepared to take placement examinations in the areas of music theory and music history and to perform an audition in the ir primary performance area. For advising placement and audition appointments, contact the Department of Music. Music Education Major for Bachelor of Arts Core Requirements for all Music Education Majors Semester Required Courses Hours MUS 111 Music Theory I . ............................ 3 MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I ............................ .. 1 MUS 113 MusicTheoryll .............................. 3 MUS 114 Music Theory Lab II ............................... 1 MUS 211 Music Theory Ill ............. .................... 3 MUS 212 MusicTheoryLablll.. ........... . ........... 1 MUS 321 Musi c History I .................................... 3 MUS 322 Musi c H i story II ................................... 3 MUS 171 Private Instruction I (Primary Performance Area) .......... 2 MUS 172 Private Instruction II (Primary Performance A rea) .......... 2 MUS 271 Private Instruction Ill (Primary Performance Area) .......... 2 MUS 272 Private Instruction IV (Primary Performance Area) ......... 2 MUS 371 Private Instruction V (Primary Performance Area) ......... 2 MUS 372 Private Instruction VI (Primary Performance Area) ......... 2 MUS 161 Class Piano I ..................................... 1 MUS 162 Class P i ano II .......... ....................... 1 MUS 315 Instrumental and Chora l Scoring and Arranging ........ 2 MUS 332 Secondary School Choral Methods and Materials ......... 2 MUS 339 Superv ised Field Exper ience : Secondary School Choral Methods and Mater i als ....... ...................... 1 MUS 351 Basic Conducting .................................. 2 MUS 365 Basic Techniques of Composition ... ............. .... 2 MUS 411 Analysis of Musi c.. . ....................... 2 MUS 451 Advanced Conducting .............................. 2 SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication .... ...... .. ... 3 46 RDG 328 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content Areas ..... 4 EDU 212 Elementary Educat ion i n United States ... ............. 3 EDU 264 Urban and Mult i cultural Education ........ ............. 3 EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner ....................... 3 EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom ........... .... 3 Total ........... .......................................... 64 In addition to the above core requirements music education majors must select one of the following emphases: Choral Emphasis MUS 161 Class Voice I ................................. 1 MUS 261 Class Piano Ill .............. ....... ........ 1 MUS 262 Class Piano IV .............. .................... 1 Select 14 hours : MUS 281 Large Ensemble' . . . ...... 2 MUS 282 Small Ensemble' ............ ..................... 1 MUS 381 Large Ensemble' ..... ..................... 2 MUS 382 Small Ensemble' ........ ........................ 1 'Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All 14 hours may be earned i n any one course number or i n any combination of the above numbers. MUS 331 Elementary Schoo l Music Methods and Materials . . . . . . ...... 2 MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience : Elementary School Music Methods and Materials ....................... ... ... 1 MUS 341 String Techniques and Materials ......... .......... 2 MUS 345 Brass Techniques and Materials .................. 2 MUS 346 Percussion Technique s and Materials ................. 2 MUS 421 Choral Literature ............................... 2 Total ...................................... ................ 28 Instrumental Emphasis Select 12 hours:* MUS 281 Large Ensemble' ................ ............... 2 MUS 282 Small Ensemble' ................................. 1 MUS 381 Large Ensemble ............ ..................... 2 MUS 382 Small Ensemble .................................. 1 'Note : These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All 12 hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combination of the above numbers MUS 333 Elementary School Instrumental Musi c Methods and Materials ............................. 2 MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Elementary School Instrumental Music Methods and Materials ............. 1 MUS 334 Secondary School Instrumental Musi c Methods and Materials ..................................... 2 MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience : Secondary School Instrumental Music Methods and Materials .............. 1 MUS 341 String Techniques and Materials ............ ....... 2 MUS 343 Woodw ind Techniques and Materials ........ . .... 2 MUS 345 Brass Techniques and Materials .................... 2 MUS 346 Percussion Techniques and Materi als .......... ....... 2 MUS 348 Marching Band Techni ques and Mater ials ............. Total.................. ................. ......... 28 Music Performance Major for Bachelor of Arts Core Requirements for all Music Performance Majors Semester Required Courses Hours MUS 111 Music Theory I ................................ .. 3 MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I . . .......... .... 1 MUS 113 MusicTheoryll ................................... 3 MUS 114 Music Theory Lab II ......................... .... 1 MUS 211 Music Theory Ill ..................... .' .. ....... 3 MUS 212 Music Theory Lab Ill ........... ......... ...... 1 MUS 321 Music History I ......................... ........... 3 MUS 322 Musi c History II . . . . . .. 3 MUS 171 Private Instruction I (Primary Performance Area) ........... 2 MUS 172 Private Instruction II (Primary Performance Area) ......... 2 MUS 273 Performance Ill (Pr i mary Performance Area) .... ........ 4 MUS 274 Performance IV (Pri mary Performance Area) ..... ... .... 4

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MUS 373 Performance V (Primary Performance Area) ............. 4 MUS 374 Performance VI (Primary Performance Area) ... 4 MUS 473 Performance VII ( Primary Performanc e Area) ............ 4 MUS 474 Performance VIII ( Primary Performance Area) ........... 4 Select 2 hours from the following: MUS 161 Class Instruct ion (Secondary Performance Area) ......... 1 MUS 162 Class Instruct ion (Secon dary Performance Area) ......... 1 MUS 171 Private Instruction ( Secondary Perfo rmance Area ) ........ 2 'Note : Must be Class Piano I and II unless student is able to pass the private instruction audition in piano Except ion: Students electing the organ emphas i s must take Class Voice I and II unless student is able to pass the private instruction audition in voice Select 12 hours : MUS 281 Large Ensemble' ................................ 2 MUS 282 Small Ensemble . . . . . . ...... 1 MUS 381 Large Ensemble'. . . . . ......... 2 MUS 382 Small Ensemble' . . . . . . .... 1 'Note : T hese course numbers may be repeated for cre dit. All 12 hours may be earned i n any one course number or in any combination of the above numbers The ensemble experience throughout the bachelor s degree program should be varied both in s ize and nature and should be chosen from those appropriate to the area of special i zation MUS 351 Basic Conducting .................................. 2 MUS 365 Basic Techniques of Composition ..................... 2 MUS 411 Analysis of Music .................................. 2 MUS 479 Seni or Recita l . . . . .... 1 Music History or Literature elective. . . . .. 3 Total.......... . . .......................... 70 In addition to the above core requirements all music performance majors must select one of the following emphases : Voice Emphasis MUS 141 German Diction and Literature for S ingers ............. 2 MUS 142 French D iction and Literature for S i ngers ............... 2 MUS 143 Italian Dict ion and Literature for Singer s .............. .. 2 MUS 421 Choral Literature .................................. 2 MUS 442 Vocal Pedagogy . . . . . . .. 2 Total ............ ............ 10 Piano Emphasis MUS 310 Counterpoint ..................................... 3 MUS 324 P i ano Literature ................................... 3 MUS 441 P i ano Pedagogy ................................. Total......... ....................................... 8 Organ Emphasis MUS 310 Counterpo int . ......................... 3 MUS 421 Choral Literature ........................ ......... 2 MUS 451 Advanced Conduct ing ... .... ...................... 2 Total ....................................................... 7 Guitar Emphasis MUS 310 Counterpo int . . ......... 3 MUS 315 Instrumenta l and Choral Scoring and Arranging ......... Total ............................... ........................ 5 Woodwind, Brass, String or Percussion Emphasis MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging .......... 2 MUS 451 Advanced Conduct ing ...................... ....... Total ............................. ....................... 4 Minor in Music Required Courses Semester Hours MUS 111 Music Theory I . . . . . . ..... 3 MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I .. ............ ................. 1 MUS 113 Music Theory II .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... 3 MUS 211 Music Theory Ill ..... .......... .................. 3 MUS 321 Music History I . . . . . . 3 MUS 322 Music H i story II ................. ........ .......... 3 School of Letters, Arts and Sciences MUS 161 Class Instruct ion ( Performance Area) .................. 1 and MUS 162 Class Instruction ( Performance Area) ...... ............ 1 or MUS 171 Private Instruction I (Performance Area) . ....... 2 MUS 381 Large Ensemble'. ..................... 2 or MUS 382 Small Ensemble' .... ................. 1 Total ..... ............................... ........... 24 'Note : These course numbers may be repeated for credit ; all four hours may be earned in one course number or in any combination of the above numbers Philosophy Philosophy is the oldest of intellectual d i sciplines Its questions are of the most endur ing interest because they are the most fundamental to our intellectual and practical concerns As such philosophy can be taken to be a critical investigation int o the assumptions and implications assoc iated with all i deas across all disciplines, and, in thi s respect it is interdiscip linary in charac ter. However this type of inquiry requ ires technical concepts and methods and, hence it takes on the character of a specialized d i sc i pline. Philosoph ica l i nquiry is an i nteract ion between speculative and cr it ical thought recognizing no preestablished limits in terms of the scope of either its interests or its critical examinations Therefore philosophy as a study program enlarges the student s horizons of ideas throughout the various disciplines in the college while simultaneously providing the critical skills necessary to analyze and synthesize these ideas It encourages students to explore creatively the full range of philosophical opt i ons to consider a l ternate points of view and to penetrate deeply into profound iss ues. Because of the subje ct matter attitudes and methods employed in philosophy, the student will be much better prepared for leadersh i p i n persona l life civic respons i bilities and pursuit of a career. In addition to offering a variety of courses for students who are plann i ng to take only one or two courses in philosophy the department offers two programs both of whic h feature flexibility and individualized training : 1 A major for students seeking a solid, general training/background which can serve either as a basis for graduate studies i n such varied areas as philosophy the humanities law, medicine business urban planning and development etc or as a basis for a career in which the specialized training required is provided by the employer, such as careers in corporate management government politics banking or educat ion. 2 A minor for students who have already chosen a career and seek to complement their specialized training/ background with the opportunities afforded by philosophy to increase their career options and generally to i ncrease the quality of their lives MSCD students who either major or minor in philos ophy are encouraged to take appropriate UCD courses whenever s uch courses contribute to the requirements or the balance of their philosophy experience These students should consult the chair of the Philosophy Department at MSCD when planning to take UCD courses Philosophy Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Courses Hours PHI 144 Logic . . . . . . ............. 3 PHI 300 History of Greek Philosophy .................... ..... 3 PHI 302 History of Modern Philosophy ........... ........... Total................... ...... ..................... 9 47

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School of Letters, Arts, and Sc i ences Add i tional Course Subject Areas Required Lower Division Introductory Courses .................. ................. 6 Upper Division Metaphysics and/or Epi stemology . . . . . . ... 3 Ethics and/or Social Philosophy ............................... 3 One Philosophical Problem or One P hilos opher .................... 3 One Course Relat ing Philosophy to another f ield, for example Religion Art, Science, or History ..................... Total ... ...... ........................................... 18 Additional electives at any level. ............................... 9 ( Se l ected in consultat i on w i lh and appro ved by the Department of Philosophy) Total upper-div i s ion semest e r hours required for ma jor ............... 18 Total semester hours required for Philoso phy Majo r ................. 36 Minor in Philosophy Required Courses PHI 101 Introduction to Philosoph y ....... ................... 3 PHI 103 Ethics ........................................... 3 PHI 111 Language Logic, and Persuasion .................... Total................................... ............. 9 Electives A minimum of 11 additional semester hours of which seven are upper-division courses in philosophy selected i n consultation with and approved by the Department of Philosophy to make a tota l of 20 semester hours Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor The multi-minor may be arranged t hrough the Department of Philosophy and includes the required courses lis ted under the holistic health and education multi-minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSCD sect ion of this catalog Speech Communication Speech communication is one of the most i mportant human qualit i es Prof ici ency i n one of the a r eas of speech opens up many careers to the graduate. For insta nce, in mass communication radio, television and film, a graduate might aspire to careers in on-air operat ions, mass media ideas promotion public aff airs, or radio-television sales Graduates m i ght become consultants in advert isin g special ists in i nstructional or educational television or in the public broadcas tin g service Careers are open as broadcasting specialists in public relations publ i c inform ation business industry and government. Speech pathology graduates who meet the standards of the American Speech and Hearing Association may find careers in public and private schools, comm un ity clinics, hospitals, rehabilitation centers private pract ice, colleges and universities industry, or state and federal government agenc ies G raduates in rhetoric and public address have achieved success i n law, industrial and organizat i onal communication, educational administration, public relations speech writ ing for political figures, teaching, public relations and theology Professional and educational the atre occupat ions are ope n to theatre graduates w i th speci a l t i es in stagecraft, sound, engineering script writing, directing and act ing. Communications Theory and Organ izationa l Communication : Communication consulting/training as well as conference planning both present lucrative and satisfying careers to speech graduates specializing in these areas of communication Job opportunities are availabl e in education, government, busine ss and industry as well as private practice as a consultant. 48 Speech Communication Major for Bachelor of Arts 1 101-3 Fundamenta ls of Speech Communication is required of all speech majors and minors 2 Independent study to pic courses and experiential educat ion courses such as prac ticums and internships may be taken in each of the areas 3 Additional semester hours in speech cou rses selected in con sultatio n w ith and approved by the Dep artment of Speech 4. Total minimum semest er hours for a major in speech communication : 36. 5 All speech major s are required to take a minimum of one class in each of the following six program areas 6 The six subject a reas i nclude : Theatre and Oral Interpretation SPE 221 Introduction to Theatre ..................... ... 3 SPE 222 Techniques in Acting I .............................. 3 SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft ........................... 3 SPE 320 Oral Interpretation : Prose and Poetry .................. 3 SPE 322 Movement for Stage ............................... 2 SPE 325 Introduction to Scenic Design and Theatre Lighting ....... 3 SPE 328 Stage Directing ................................. 3 SPE 420 Reader s Theatre .................... ............. 3 SPE 426 Theatre: Practicum I .... ........................ 1 SPE 427 Theatre : Practicum: II ....... .............. ....... 2 Mass Communication (Radio-Television-Film) SPE 240 Introduction to Radi o and Television Broadcasting ........ 3 TLC 249 Internship in Radi o T V., Film and Mass Communications ............................. 6 SPE 343 Radio-Television Announcing ............. ....... 3 SPE 344 RadioTelevision Product ion ....................... 3 SPE 347 Evolutio n of Cinematics as Art ....................... 3 SPE 348 Workshop in Radi o Televisio n Production ............... 3 TLC 349 Advanced Internsh i p in Radio, T.V., Film, and Mass Communicat ions ........................... 1-15 SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Televisio n on Contemporary Life ......... 3 Communication Disorders and Voice Science SPE 330 Voice Science : Phonetics and Voice and Diction ......... 3 SPE 350 Speech Pathology I ................................ 3 SPE 351 Speech Pathology II ............................ 3 SPE 352 Language A cquisition ........................... 3 SPE 355 Speech Pathology : Observation I .................. 2 SPE 356 Speech Pathology : Observation II ..................... 1 SPE 357 Methods of Speech Pathology-Aud i ology : Diagnost i c Procedures .......................... .......... 3 SPE 358 Methods i n Speech Pathology : Articulation and Stutter ing .. 3 SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools .... .............. 3 SPE 360 Audio l ogy I. ...... ...... ........................ 3 SPE 361 Audi ology II ........................... ........... 3 SPE 450 Cli nical Practice in Speech Pathology-Audi ology ........ 1 3 SPE 455 Practicum in Speech Pathology ....................... 1 SPE 457 Medical Aspects of Speech and Hearing Disorders ....... 3 SPE 463 Practicum in Audi ology ............................. 1 Organizational Communication SPE 310 B u siness and Professional Speak ing .................. 3 SPE 311 Strategies of Organizational Leadersh i p ................ 3 SPE 313 Conference Leadersh i p and Parliamentary Procedure ..... 3 Communication Theory SPE 170 Oral Communication Theory .......................... 3 SPE 171 Interpersonal Communi cation : The Individual as a Communicator .......................... .......... 3 SPE 271 Interpersonal Communication: The Dynamics of Group Communication ................................... 3 SPE 272 Nonverbal Communi cation .......................... 3 SPE 273 Communicat ion and Interpersonal Conflict . ......... 3 SPE 374 Psycho logy of Communication .. .......... .......... 3 SPE 376 Cultural Influences on Communica tion .......... ...... 3 SPE 377 Interpersonal Communications and the Family ........... 3 SPE 476 Communication and the Elderly ....................... 3

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Rhetoric and Public Address S P E 211 Discussion Methods .................. .......... 3 S P E 301 Advanced Public Speaking ......................... 3 S P E 305 Intercollegiate Forensics ........................... 1 SPE 308 Great American Speakers ........................... 3 S P E 309 Argumentation and Advocacy ............. ........... 3 S P E 405 Adva nced I ntercollegiate Forensics .................... 2 S P E 408 Theories and Criticism of Public Address ............... 3 S P E 409 Persuasio n i n the Greek a n d Latin Traditions ..... ... .. 3 SPE 410 Techn iques of P ersuasion . . . .... 3 SPE 412 Freedom of Speech ............... ................. 3 Speech Education Required Courses for the Secondary Teacher Education Program i n Speech Communicat ion Arts S em e st e r Requ ired Courses H o ur s S P E 101 Fundamentals of Speech Commun i cat ion ............... 3 SPE 211 D i scussion Methods .......................... ..... 3 S P E 221 I ntroduction to Theat r e .... ....... .............. 3 SPE 222 Techniques of Acting I . ........ .............. 3 SPE 224 Introduct ion to Stagecraft . . . . 3 SPE 240 Introdu ctio n to Radio and Television Broadcasting ........ 3 SPE 301 Advanced Publ i c Speaking .......................... 3 SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy . . . 3 SPE 320 Oral Interpretation : Prose and P oetry . ...... 3 SPE 328 Stage D irecting . . . . . . ... 3 SPE 330 Voice S cience : Phonetics and Voice and Diction ........ 3 SPE 359 Speec h P roblems in the Schools ..... ... ........ ..... 3 SPE 374 Psychology of Communication .......... ............. 3 SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion............... ..... 3 Tot al. "42 Electives f or the Secondary Teacher Education Program A minimum of six s e mester hours in speech courses r e commended in c o nsultation with and approved b y the Departme n t of Speech The s e six hours are t o be selec t e d from the following list: SPE 305 Intercollegiate Forensics . . . ...... .... 1 S P E 308 Grea t American Speakers ........................... 3 S P E 320 Oral i nterpretation: Prose and Poetry ............. 3 SPE 322 Movement for Stage . ................. 2 SPE 350 Speech Pathology I . . . ..... 3 SPE 360 Audiology I. . . . . . ........... 3 SPE 408 Theories and Crit i c ism of Public Address .... .......... 3 SPE 420 Reader s Theatre . . . ......... 3 SPE 426 Theatre: P racticum I 1 SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life ......... 3 Total minimum h ours required fo r the Secon dary Teacher Ed u cation Progra m in S peech C o mm unication Arts: 48 hours Stude nts seekin g secondary cre d entials in spee c h education must satisfy t h e teacher educa tion program of MSCD i n a d dition to all of the major requirements. Recent changes i n C olorado law affecting teacher certification have necessita ted c hanges in advising proce d ures All students in the spe e c h education program who are seeking a certificate must therefore, contact the Spee ch Depart ment for modif ic ations changes, a nd advisin g r elative to changes in Colorado law affecting teac h e r s Communicati ons Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Communications : Broadcasting Sponsored by the Department of Speec h T h i s area of emphasis is of f ered through the Co operative Program for Careers in Com mun ic a tions (inter d isciplinary) In addition to the requirements listed below students must complete a m inimum of 18 upper-divisi o n hours as well as supporting profi c iencies (see an advisor) Se m e st e r Required Courses Hours COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts and Systems. ............ .................. 3 School of Letters Arts and Sciences SPE 374 P s y chology of C ommuni c a tion ..... ............... 3 or SPE 410 Techniques of Pers u asion ........................... 3 Total ................................................ ....... 6 Requ ir ed Area and Broadcasting Courses S P E 224 I ntr oduction to Sta g e craft ........................... 3 SPE 240 Int r oduction to Radio and Televis ion Broadcasting ........ 3 TLC 249 Internship in RadioT e l evision-FilmM ass Communication .......... ................... 1-6 SPE 343 Radio-Tel evision Anno uncing ........................ 3 SPE 344 Radio-Tel ev i sion Production .. .. ..................... 3 SPE 348 W orkshop i n RadiofTelevision Produc tion ............... 3 TLC 349 A d vanced Internship in Radio-Televi sion-Film -Mass Commu n ication ........................ 1 1 5 Total .... ......................................... 2 1 Recommended Elect i ves SPE 330 V oice Sci ence : Phonetics and Voice and Dic tion ......... 3 SPE 347 Evolut ion of C i nema t ics as Art ..................... 3 SPE 448 Sem inar Practicum i n B roadcastin g ................. ... 3 S P E 449 Effects of Radio-Tele v ision on Contemporary Life ... ...... 3 ART 220 Beginning Photograp h y ............................. 3 COM 244 Writing for Radio .................................. 3 COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Televi sion ........... 3 JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategies ................. 3 JRN 383 Cont emporary Issues .............................. 3 MGT 300 Or ganizati onal Mana g ement .... .................... 3 MKT 300 Principles of Marketing .......................... ... 3 or other d esignated electives Total electives .............................................. 15 Total. ........................................ ........... 42 Communications: Theatre Administration Sponsored by the Department o f Speech This area o f e mphasis is of fered through t he Cooper a ti v e P rogram f o r C areers in C o mmunication s (int er d isciplinary) I n addition t o t h e requirements listed below st u dents must c omplete a mini mum o f 1 8 upper-divisio n hours as w ell as sup porting proficiencies (see an advisor) Semester Required Courses Hour s COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts and Systems ......................................... 3 SPE 374 P sychology of Communication ....................... 3 or SPE 410 T echniques of Persuasion ........................... 3 Total ....... ......... ............. ........................ 6 Requ i red Area and Theatre Arts Courses SPE 221 Int roduction to Theatre ... .................... 3 SPE 224 Introduct ion to Stagecraft ............. .......... . 3 SPE 299 Internship ...... ....................... 3 SPE 320 Oral Interpretation : Prose and Poetry ...... ......... 3 SPE 330 V oice Sci ence : Phonetics and Voice and Dict ion ......... 3 SPE 499 Advanced Internshi p ................... ..... 3 Total ... .............................................. . 1 8 Recommended Elect i ves COM 244 Writing for Radio . . . . . . . 3 COM 344 Corporate Scriptwri t i n g for Film and Televisio n ....... .... 3 ENG 414 Modern Continental B ritish and America n Drama ....... 3 MGT 300 O rgani zational Management . .............. 3 SPE 322 M o vement for Stage ......................... 2 SPE 420 Reader s Theatre ...... ........................... 3 SPE 426 Theatre : Pract icum I ................ .............. 1 SPE 427 Theatre : Pract icum I I ......................... 2 SPE 480 Workshop i n Theatre Arts..... ............. 1-3 and/or other designa ted electives Total electives ........... . .......................... 1 8 Total .............................. ...... ......... 42 49

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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences Communications Free Electives List Other courses approved by the advisor in the selected communications area of emphas is are acceptable as electives ANT 131 Introduc tion to Cultural Anthropology ... ............... 3 ANT 233 Cross-Cultura l Commun ication .... ................... 3 ART 101 Bas i c Drawing Methods ........................... 3 ART 102 Bas ic Desig n and Crafts Methods ..................... 3 ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present ..................................... 3 ART 220 Beginning Photography ...... ....................... 3 CEN 120 Technica l Drawing I ........................... ..... 4 CEN 121 Technica l Drawing II. ............................... 4 ENG 251 Intermed i ate Compos ition ........ ................... 3 ENG 303 Semant i cs ....................................... 3 JRN 181 I ntroduct ion to Journalism and Mass Media ............. 3 JRN 182 Beg inning Reporting and New s Writi ng ................. 3 JRN 282 Beginn i ng News Editing and Copyreading .............. 3 JRN 286 Intermed i ate Repo rting and News Wr i ting ............... 3 JRN 381 Feature Article Wr i ting for News pap ers ................. 3 PHI 144 Logic .................................... ....... 3 PSC 322 Publ i c Policy ..................................... 3 PSY 241 Soc ial Psychology ....................... ... ....... 3 PSY 342 Issues in Community / Soc ial Psychology ..... .......... 3 SPE 301 Advan ced Public Speak ing .......................... 3 SPE 322 Movemen t for the Stage .......................... 2 SPE 328 Stage D irecti ng ................................... 3 SPE 310 Business and Profess ional Speaking .................. 3 SPE 330 Voi ce Sci ence : Phonet ics and Voice and D iction ....... 3 SPE 347 Evolution of Cinemat ics as Art ................ ........ 3 SPE 412 Freedom of Speec h ................................ 3 SPE 420 Reader's Theatre .................................. 3 SPE 426 Theatre Practicum I ..... ........................... 1 SPE 427 Theatre Pract i cum II ............................... 2 SPE 448 Seminar : Practicum in Broadcast ing ................... 3 SPE 449 Effects of Radio Telev ision on Contemporary Life ................................ 3 The Speech Communication Minor 50 1 The speech minor is required to take SPE 1 01-3 2 All speech minors are require d to take a minimum of one class in at least three of the subject areas adopted for speech majors This requirement does not apply to students inter ested in teacher education. 3 Required courses should be decided upon in consultation with an advisor 4 Addit i onal semester hours in speech courses s e lected in consultation with and approved by the Dep artment of Speech 5 Tota l minimum semester hours for a minor in speech communication : 18 semester hours Speech Pathology-Audiology Minor Semester Req u i r ed Courses Hours SPE 330 Voice Science : Pho netics and Voice and D iction ........ 3 SPE 350 Speech Patho logy I ................................ 3 SPE 351 Speech Pathology II. ............................. 3 SPE 360 Audiology I .............. ............... ........ 3 SPE 361 Audiol ogy II ...................................... 3 SPE 450 Clinica l Pract ice in Speech Pathology-Audiology ........ 1-3 SPE 463 Practicu m in Audiology ......................... :...:...:...:.. Total ................................................. 17 19 Elec t i v es A minimum of two additional courses selected from the following list in consultation with and approved by the Departm ent of Speech Approved psycho l ogy courses may be substituted for electives. SPE 352 Language Acquis ition . . ........... ........ 3 SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools ................... 3 SPE 374 Psychology o f Communication ....................... 3 SPE 455 Practicum in Speech Pathology ... ............... Total minimum hours required for a minor in speech pathology-audiology: 21 Telecommunications Telecommunications is one of the most beneficial i nternship programs for commun i cation students in broadcasting Under the ausp i ces of the Departmen t of Spee ch Communication the student is afforded the opportunity to gain first-hand experience through 92 current internships in rad io television and f i lm p rovided by industry, gove rnment, business, public, and comme r cial telecommunications centers The student may begin this program upon the complet ion of six hours i n broadcas ting telecommunications courses at MSCD Students should contact the advisor in broadcasting for details relative to eligibi l ity and p la cement in the telecommunications internships. Internship telecommun i cations courses are offered every semester during each of the modules as well as on a full semester basis.

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School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences Division of Social Sciences In the social sciences, students may choose bachelor s degree programs i n anthropology history political sc i ence, psychology sociology social welfare urban studies multidisc iplinary programs in behavioral science and gerontology and an array of emphasis areas and minor s These curricula develop students understanding of the subject area and their skills in working with individuals groups and large organ i zat i ons Courses range from the traditional liberal arts based curriculum to professiona l internships in social welfare and legisl at ive govern ment, to studies in popular culture and research practicums Programs prepare students for beginning level prac tice in helping serv i ces and social work agencies and graduate education in law Graduates focus on the social and behavioral science disciplines research i n the social and behavioral sciences work with the elderly public administration or secondary schoo l teaching. History Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Courses Hours HIS 101 Western C i v ili zation to 1715 ................. ........ 3 HIS 102 W estern C ivi lization since 1715 ..................... 3 HIS 121 American H i story to 1865 .............. ........... 3 HIS 122 American H i story since 1865 ......................... 3 HIS 482 Senior Sem i nar ............................... 3 Total ...................... .... ................ .......... 15 Electives A minimum of 23 additional semester hours in history is required 18 hours of which must be upper d i v i s ion No more than four hours i n HIS 389 read i ngs courses may be counted towa r d the major without prior written approval from the department. Course Distribution A minimum of 23 additional semester hours i n history is required 18 hours of which must be upper div ision In the minimum of 23 additional semester hours required students must i nclude at least three hours in each of the broad areas of history: United States European Developing World Grade Average Students majoring in history must maintain at l east a 2 0 average i n the ir history courses Advising History majors should consult with a departmental adv i sor to select the courses in other disciplines which complement their area of conce ntration in the major Minor in History There are four different areas of emphasis available to students seek ing a history minor : (I) regular history area of emphasis (II) Amer ican popular culture area of emphasis, (Ill) American West history area of emphas i s (IV) twentieth century studies history area of emphasis I. Regular History Area of Emphasis Required Courses HIS 101 Western Civ iliz a tion to 1715 ........................ 3 HIS 102 Western Civil i zation s ince 1715 .... ................ 3 HIS 121 American History to 1865 ....................... 3 HIS 122 American History s i nce 1865 ........................ Total ....... .... ........ ............................. 12 Elect i ves A minimum of n ine additional semester hours in history is required The hours must be upper division and should be selected in consultation with a departmental advisor No more than two hours in HIS 389 readings courses may be counted toward the minor without pr i or written approval from the department. II. American Popular Culture Area of Emphasis Required Courses HIS 122 American H istory since 1865 ....................... 3 HIS 151 Movies and H i story .......................... .... 3 or HIS 152 Rock Mus i c and Social History or HIS 153 Sports in America .......... ...... ................ Total ... ................................................. 9 Electives A minimum of 15 additional history hours is requ ired of which nine must be upper d ivision. Courses must be related to American popular culture Ill. American West History Area of Emphasis Required Courses HIS 110 American West ................................... 3 HIS 111 Colorado H i story I ........................... 3 HIS 121 American History to 1865 ............... ....... .... 3 HIS 122 American History since 1865 ..................... 3 Total .............................. ... ............. 12 Electives A minimum of 9 additional history hours treating the American West is required all of which must be upper division IV. Twentieth-Century Studies History Area of Emphasis Required Courses HIS 122 American History since 1865 ................ ...... 3 HIS 201 Contemporary World History ........................ Total ....................................... ............. 6 Electives A minimum of 15 additional hours treating twentiet h-centur y h i story is required of which nine must be upper-divis ion. Grade Average Students minoring in h i story must maintai n a 2 0 average in their history courses Secondary School Education Certification In Social Sciences Students majoring in history may comb ine their majo r with other courses in the social sciences and in education to earn secondary education certification. The requirements of this program are included under the Education Department section of this catalog. Prelaw Courses Several history courses are of part i cular i mportan ce to legal studies These include HIS 121, HIS 122 HIS 346 and HIS 368 Students interested in prelaw courses are urged to contact the departmental adviso r Minor in Interdisciplinary Legal Studies The interdisciplinary legal studies minor is designed to show students how the var i ous disciplines in the humanities and social sc iences treat questions of law and justice The interdisc i plinary legal studies minor is not a pre-law preparatory program or paralegal training Its goal is to cross disciplines so that students can understand how the humanities and social sciences i lluminate the principles practices and policies of the law. Semester Required Courses Hours CJC 110 Evolutionary Legal Concepts in C riminal Just ice ........ 3 HIS 368 The Court i n C risis ................................ 3 PHI 343 Philosophy of Law ...... ........................... 3 51

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School of letters, Arts, and Sciences SOC 355 Sociology of Law ................... ............... 3 ENG 370 Literature and the Law .............................. 3 PSG 312 American Constitutional Law ......................... 3 xxx xxx Seminar i n Legal Topics (Interdisciplinary-team taught course) ................. 3 Total ...................................................... 21 Students will select one law-related course from the courses listed below or approved by the interdisciplinary legal studies minor advisor : MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business I ...................... 3 MGT 322 Legal Environment of Business II . 3 CJC 210 Substantive Criminal Law .......... ........ ........ 3 HIS 346 The Constitution and the New Nation, 1787-1848 ......... 3 SOC 350 Criminology . . . . . . .. 3 WMS 331 Women and the Law ............ ................... 3 Total Hours Required for Minor ........................ ... 24 Politi cal Science The study of political science is mainly a study of governments : their social and economic environments, how they are organi zed how and why they decide upon and carry out polic i es and how nation-states in teract on the wor l d scene It also includes the study of political idea s and values past and present citizen behavior and recent trends in methods of research and analysis aimed at enlarging our knowledge of political p r ocesses The Department of Political Science offers prelaw advising to all students at the colleg e regardless of students major fields of study If you are thinking of applying to law school or would like more information on the LSAT or law schools please contact the department s prelaw advi sor The Department of Political Science provides students w ith the perspective and background necessary to understand the complex and often conf using reality of politics Students interested in majo rin g or m i noring in political science should see a departme nt advisor about pending chan ges in majo r and minor requirements. Political Science Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Courses Hours PSG 101 American National Government. ........... ... ....... 3 PSC 102 Poli t ical Systems and Ideas ....... ... ........... .... 3 PSG 305 Political Theory . ................... 3 PSG 402 Special Studies .......... ............... .......... 3 Total...................... .... ......... ..... 12 Electives A minimum of 21 addi tional semester hour s of political science must be completed At least 12 of these 21 hours must be upper division courses (30 0and 400-level). Total semester hours required for a PSC maj or : 33. Minor in Political Science Semester Required Courses Hours PSG 101 American National Government. ...................... 3 PSG 102 Poli t ical Systems and Ideas.... ..... ........ ..... 3 Total . . . . . . . . ...... 6 Electives A minimum of 12 ad dit ional semester hours are requ ired in political science courses. Total semester hours require d for a PSC minor: 18 In addition to the sche duled classes politica l science students are encouraged to enroll for at least one off-campus intern sh i p Students may receive credit for practical work experience i n various areas of government service. Placement in a governmental position may be i nitiated by the student or by the Political Science Department. Interested student s should contact the Political Science Department for details. 52 Minor in Public Administration Public administration is the study of governmental or ganizatio ns, their management and how government policies are formulated and carried out. The Polit ical Science Department offers a minor in public administration available to students inte rest e d in a career in government service, to students presently employed in government who wish to increa se the ir skills and job stat us, and t o students planning to take postgraduate work in pub lic administration Required Courses Semester Hours I. Basic courses required for all public administration minors : PSG 101 American National Government. ...................... 3 PSG 302 Introduction to Public Administration ............. .... 3 II.T wo of the following courses : PSG 322 Public Policy . .... ......................... 3 PSG 324 Intergovernmental Relations .................... ..... 3 PSG 326 Polit ics of Budgeting ............................... 3 PSG 328 Public Personnel Administration ................ .... 3 ACC 320 Governmental Accounting .......................... 3 Ill. One of the following courses : CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems . . . . .. 3 MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics . ...................... 4 IV. Internship PSC 412 or substit ute course (minimum) 3 Total . . . . . . . . . . . 19-20 A governmental internship will be requ ired of all students for a minimum of one se me ster and a minimum of three semester hours. This requirem ent may be waived for studen t s w ith at least one calendar year of administrative work experience in a government agency. It is recommended that public administration minors also take a course in both public speaking and in technical writing Also available to st ud ents is a program of courses leading to a recognition of completion award in public administration presented by the Political Science D epartment Students may earn the award by s uc cessfully co mpletin g a se lection of courses amounting to 26 semester hours. Contact the Political Science Department for details Not listed among the regula r courses are a variety of topics courses and self-paced courses which are offered each semester and give the student a greater varie ty of choice Please be sure to check the semester class schedule for these During the summer session the dep artment offers a special program in Washington D C aimed at providing students with a unique perspective on the nation's politi cal system The program combines a four-week module-during late May and early June-actually held in W ashing ton with on-campus me etings and discussions exploring the Washin gton experience and relevant read ings. Please contact the department about this special program Urban Studies Program A bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree with a major in urban studies is offered. The bachelor of science degree is recommended for t llo se s tud ents desiring a stronger background in quantitative aspects of urban studies Coursework is jointly offered by MSCD and the Unive rsity of Colorado at Denver ; the major is offered at MSCD The emphasis of this program is an interdisciplinary approach to lea rning To support this approach six areas of emphasis are offered within the major 1 local governmenVurban planning 2 hous ing patterns and alterna t ives 3 culturallifestyles 4. transportation and comm unication 5 community service development 6 business management and urb anization

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Urban Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts The requirements total 46 semester hours and include: 1. 5-27 hours of core courses 2 Nine hours selected from each of four areas of process 3 Two hours in an area of emphasis to be selected by the student. 4. Six additional hours for a bachelor of science degree 5 Urban studies majors who do not wish to pursue a minor in some other discipline will be required to take at least 14 semester hours for a total of 60 semester hours The 14 semester hours must be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor 6 There are different requirements for the community service development, business management and urban ization emphases Semester Required Courses Hours URS 100 Introduction to Urban Studies ...................... 3 URS 200 An Ins i de Look at Urban Institu tions ............... .... 3 URS 300 World Patterns of Urbanization ................ . 3 URS 380 Appl i ed Urban Research Methods ........... ......... 3 URS 489 Interdisciplinary Seminar ......................... 4 URS 499 Internshi p in Urban Studies . . . . . 3 Advanced writing course which rnay be taken from community serv i ce development English or communications ................................... .4 Statistics which may be taken from econom i cs geography mathemat i cs psychology or soc iology ........ 3 4 Total ................................................... 25 27 community service development students may e lect to fu l f ill t h ese requirements within the commun i ty service development area of emphas is. A total of 9 hours should be selected from the following areas of process Community service development students will take one course from two areas for a total of at least six hours. Substitutions for these courses should be arranged through an Urban Studies advisor Urban Spatial Structuring Processes URS 310 Internal Structure of the City .... ............ ......... 3 URS 351 Community Development and Planning ................ 3 URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game ............................ 4 GEG 204 Geography of Denver .............................. 3 GEG 360 Urban Geography ... ... .......................... 3 GEG 461 Urban and Reg ional Planning ...................... 3 Urban Political Processes URS 210 An Analysis of Urban Boundar i es ................... 3 URS 350 Emerging Urban Po l itica l Systems .................... 3 URS 400 Urban Simulat i on/Game ............................ 4 PSC 300 American State and Local Government. ................ 3 PSC 302 Introducti on to Public Administration ... ................ 3 SOC 371 Pol i tics and Power ................................ 3 Urban Economic Processes ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro ..................... 3 ECO 202 Principles of Econom i cs Micro ..................... 3 ECO 330 State and Local F i nance ...................... ... 3 ECO 335 Urban Economic Analysis ..... ................ ... 3 ECO 340 Transportation Econom i cs ........................... 3 ECO 345 Environmental Economics ...... .................... 3 SOC 324 Poverty in Ame rica ............................... 3 Urban Social Processes GEG 132 Geographic Analysis of Current Soc ial Issues ............ 3 GEG 362 Land Use and Population ........... ........... ... 3 GEG 462 Land Use: Res ident ial . . . . .... 3 SOC 309 Urban Sociology .............................. .... 3 SOC 324 Poverty i n A merica .............................. 3 Total ............................... ........................ 9 School of Letters, Arts and Sciences Areas of Emphasis In each of the first four foll owing areas of emphasis the student will select a minimum of 12 hours with a minimum of six i n urban stud ies. The student may take any combination of interd isci plinary courses related to the area of emphasis to be selected in consultation with an advisor One of the courses should be a skills course related to the area of emphasis Local Government Urban Planning Thi s area of emphas i s conc entrates on the basic conceptual and theoretical planning processes as they relate to and actually appear in urban government occupations and professions The area of emphasis is designed for students seeking entry into government occupations or seeking advanced study in public administrat ion or urban planning beyond the bachelor's degree URS 250 New Front Range Commun i ties ....................... 3 URS 289 Urban Problems : Topics ........................... 1 3 URS 351 Community Development and Planning .............. 3 URS 389 Readings i n Urban Studies ................ ......... 1-3 URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game .. ................... ...... 1-4 URS 41