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Catalog, Metropolitan State College of Denver, 1994-1995

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Catalog, Metropolitan State College of Denver, 1994-1995
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Metropolitan State College of Denver
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Denver, CO
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Metropolitan State College of Denver
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English

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Metropolitan State University of Denver
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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AURARIA LIBRARY
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AR Arts Building PE Physical Education Facility SA St. Cajetans Center
AU Auraria Library BSB Baseball Field SI Science Building
BR Bromley Hall FTB Football Field SO South Classroom Building
CD Child Development Center MUL Multipurpose Area ST Student Union
CN Central Classroom Building SFB Softball Field TC Terracentre
DR Dravo Building SOC Soccer Field TE Technology Building
NC North Classroom Building TEN Tennis Courts TR Tramway Building
NP Ninth St. Park TRK Track TV Tivoli
WC West Classroom Building


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TABLE OF CONTENTS 3
A
TABLE OF CONTENTS :
(See Alphabetical Index for Specific Topics) :


Equal Opportunity and Americans With Disabilities Act Statement....................................... 4 :
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act......................................................... 4
Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act..................................................... 4 :
Trustees of The State Colleges in Colorado........................................................ 5 :
Officers of Administration........................................................................ 5
General Information............................................................................... 8
Student Services................................................................................ 11
Admission and Registration........................................................................... 15
Financial Aid.................................................................................... 24
Special Programs..................................................................................... 29 t
Academic Information............................................................................. 33
General Studies Information...................................................................... 45 :
Degrees and Programs............................................................................. 55
School of Business............................................................................... 56
African-American Leadership Institute............................................................ 65
Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity.................................................... 65
Small Business Institute..........................................................................65
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences............................................................. 66
Division of Humanities........................................................................... 67
Division of Social Sciences...................................................................... 88
Division of Science and Mathematics............................................................. 100
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services.................................................114
Institute for Womens Studies and Services.......................................................116
School of Professional Studies...................................................................118
Division of Education............................................................................119
Division of Technology...........................................................................135
Division of Public Service Professions...........................................................157
Institute for Gerontology........................................................................180
Course Descriptions..............................................................................181
Faculty..........................................................................................342
Alphabetical Index...............................................................................325
Admission Application Instructions...............................................................357
Campus Map.........................................................................Back Inside Cover
Admission Application Instructions............................................................Insert
Cover Art: The cover was illustrated by Carlos Fresquez, a Metro State alumnus and part-time art instructor for five years. Fresquez was bom and raised in Denver, and he received his bachelor of fine arts degree from Metro State in 1980. He joined the art faculty at the college in 1990. In his cover painting, Fresquez has depicted the historic Tivoli Brewery. During the 1994-95 academic year, all Student Union offices and services except the health clinic are expected to move to the Tivoli, the most exciting and unusual student union facility in the country. In contrast to the modem, square buldings on campus and glass skyscrapers in nearby downtown Denver, the brewery resembles a Bavarian castle. The earliest phase of its construction completed in 1870, the brewery is characterized by its rathskeller with high arches, brick walls, and stone floor; the Italianate style Turn Halle, featuring a 4-inch-thick rock maple floor, 75-foot ceiling, and Golden Horseshoe balcony; and two-story copper kettles. In 1973, the Tivoli was placed on the Register of Historic Places, protecting not only the historic brewery structure, but also the major brewing equipment still in place.
Photography: Dave Neligh, Peggy ONeill Jones, H. Keith Williams Produced by: The Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of Publications 1994
o
Printed on Recycled Paper


4 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
COLLEGE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
: Equal Opportunity and ADA Statement
t Metropolitan State College of Denver is an equal opportunity employer; applications from minorities
and women are particularly invited. Metropolitan State College of Denver does not discriminate on the ; basis of race, color, creed, national origin, sex, age, sexual orientation, or disability in admissions or
access to, or treatment of employment in, its educational programs or activities. Inquiries concerning
the college grievance procedures may be directed to the designated MSCD officials. Inquiries concem-
; ing Title VI and Title IX may be referred to Dr. Percy Morehouse, Jr., MSCD Office of Equal Oppor-
| tunity, Campus Box 63, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, (303) 556-2939. Inquiries con-
; ceming ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) or 504 may be referred to Ms. Helen Fleming, ADA
1 Coordinator, MSCD, Campus Box 47, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, (303) 556-8514, Mr.
Andy Chitwood, ADA Coordinator, AHEC, Campus Box 001, P.O. Box 173361, Denver, CO 80217-
; 3361, (303) 556-8376, or Ms. Karen Rosenchein, Manager. Otherwise, all inquiries may be referred to
J the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1244 Speer Boulevard, Denver, CO 80204,
| (303) 844-3723.
i Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
' Metropolitan State College of Denver hereby gives notice that it has designated the following categories of personally identifiable information as directory information under section 438(a)(5)(B) of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). Subject to the Colorado Public Records Act, directory information concerning students at the college may be released without the prior consent of the student as permitted by FERPA unless within ten (10) days after registration a student has notified Metropolitan State College of Denver, Office of Admissions and Records, located in the Central Classroom Building, Room 103, that such information should not be released without his or her consent. Directory information at Metropolitan State College of Denver is as follows:
name address dates of attendance degrees received
Requests for disclosure of directory information must be submitted in writing to the MSCD Office of Admissions and Records, Central Classroom Building, Room 103. In the case of emergencies, directory information may be released, without written requests, at the colleges discretion. Prospective employers or their agents may request information concerning verification of student degrees received or dates of attendance directly from the MSCD Office of Admission and Records without submitting a written request to the college.
The Student Right-to-Know Act and The Campus Security Act Campus Crime Information
During the past three years, the following crimes were committed on campus at the Auraria Higher Education Center, serving the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver:
Occurrences of criminal offenses on campus:
Offense 1993 1992 1991
Murder 0 0 0
Rape 1 0 0
Robbery 4 5 2
Aggravated Assault 17 15 7
Burglary 28 33 42
Vehicle Theft 20 21 6
Sexual Assault* 8 14 5
*Includes sexual assaults other than 1st and 2nd degree sexual assaults (rape), such as indecent exposures, and 3rd degree sexual assaults.
Number of arrests for the following crimes on campus:
Arrests 1993 1992 1991
Liquor Law Violation* 8 3 0
Drug Abuse Violation 6 3 0
Weapons Possession 4 3 1
* Excludes DUI arrests
These statistics were provided by the Auraria Department of Public Safety in compliance with the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990.
The programs, policies, statements, and procedures contained in this catalog are subject to change by the college without prior notice. Metropolitan State College of Denver reserves the right to withdraw courses at anytime, policies, calendar, curriculum, graduation procedures, and any other requirements affecting students. Changes will become effective whenever the proper authorities so determine and will apply to prospective students.


ADMINISTRATION
TRUSTEES OF THE STATE COLLEGES IN COLORADO
Date of Present
First Term
Appointment
Anne Steinbeck, Chair..................................................... 1987.
John Roybal, Vice Chair....................................................1991.
Harriet Barker, Boulder....................................................1991.
Aims C. McGuinness, Jr., Denver........................................... 1989.
George Brantley, Denver................................................... 1993.
Cole Finnegan, Denver..................................................... 1993.
James Fleming, Grand Junction..............................................1991.
Elizabeth Friot, Faculty, MSCD............................................ 1993.
Matthew Bates, Student, MSCD.............................................. 1993.
Glenn Burnham, Ph.D., President of The State Colleges in Colorado........1990
Expires
1995
1995
1995
1997
1997
1997
1995
1994
1994
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION
Office of the President
President..................................................................Sheila Kaplan, Ph.D.
Executive Assistant to the President.......................................Yvonne Flood, B.S.
Equal Opportunity Director and Assistant to the President......Percy A. Morehouse, Jr., Ph.D.
Associate Vice President for Community Outreach....................Antonio Esquibel, Ph.D.
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs........................David W. Williams, Ph.D.
Vice President for Administration and Finance..........................Joseph F. Arcese, MB. A.
Vice President for Institutional Advancement...........................Carolyn M. Schaefer, B.A.
Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs........................David W. Williams, Ph.D.
Executive Assistant to the Provost.................................Cynthia Luna Scott, Ph.D.
Associate Vice President...................................................Jett Conner, Ph.D.
Director of International Programs and Services........................Skip Crownhart, M.A.
Director of Cooperative Education Program..............................Susan Lanman, M.A.
Associate Vice President and Dean of
Admissions and Records.................................................Kenneth C. Curtis, Ph.D.
Assistant Vice President and Associate Dean of
Admissions and Records............................................Alonzo F. Rodriguez, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean of Admissions and Records........................Jeffrey W. Johnson, M.S.
Director of Student Records.........................................Lynn Denzin, M.Ed.
Assistant Dean of Admissions and Records...............................Thomas R. Gray, M.S.
Director of Recruitment and Outreach................................Pauline R. Reece, M.A.
Assistant Vice President.......................................C. LaVonne Moton-Teague, Ph.D.
Executive Director of Academic Assessment and Support Center...........Kelly Espinoza, M.A.
Director of Academic Exceptions Program.................................Betty Vette, B.A.
Director of Orientation.............................................Nancy Breckel, M.A.
Director of Student Support Services................................Patricia Trotman, M.A.
Director of Advising................................................Lydia Vasquez, B.A.
Assistant Vice President for Extended Education........................Andrew Breckel III, M.A.
Director of Adult Learning Services................................Eleanor M. Green, Ed.D.
Director of Extended Campus Programs...........................Gwendolyn S. Thornton, M.A.
Assistant Vice President...............................................Manuel Escamilla, Ph.D.
Director of High School Upward Bound Program.......................Charles Maldonado, B.S.
Director of Student Development Center.................................Martelle Chapital, M.S.
Director of Veterans Upward Bound Program .............................Glenn A. Morris, M.A.
Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Student Life..Karen J. Thorpe, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean of Student Life ............................Yolanda Ortega-Ericksen, M.P.A.
Director of Campus Recreation..........................................Anne McKelvey, M.A.


6 ADMINISTRATION
Director of Counseling Center........................................Barbara Vollmer, Ph.D.
Acting Director of Student Activities...................................Maggie Miller, M.S.
Director of the Student Health Clinic ..................................Steve Monaco, M.A.
Director of Student Legal Services ..........................................Spike Adams, J.D.
Director of Student Publications .......................................Kate B. Lutrey, B.A.
Director of Program Evaluation ............................................Frieda Holley, Ph.D.
Office of the Vice President for Administration and Finance
Vice President for Administration and Finance .............................Joseph Arcese, M.B.A.
Associate Vice President for Human Resources/Finance.......................Tim L. Greene, M.P.A.
Director of Accounting Services.........................................Sita M. Thomas, B.S.
Director of Personnel and Payroll Services...................................Sandi L. Jones
Benefits Administrator .................................................Elyse Yamauchi, B.A.
Associate Vice President for Information Technology.............................Leon Daniel, M.S.
Director of Academic Computing and User Services........................John T. Reed, Ph.D.
Manager of Information Technology Applications Services..............Steve Franzkowiak, B.A.
Technical Services Manager...................................................Jay Martin, B.A.
Director of Budgets........................................................Bruce Williams, M.B.A.
Assistant Vice President for Business Affairs..............................Michael Barnett, M.S.
Business Services Manager...............................................John P. Utterback, B.S.
Assistant Vice President for Financial Aid.................................Cheryl Judson, Ph.D.
Office of the Vice President for Institutional Advancement
Vice President for Institutional Advancement..........................Carolyn M. Schaefer, B.A.
Assistant Vice President for Development..............................Mary Konrad Feller, M.A.
Director of Information Resources for Development and Alumni..........Bradley Snyder, Ph.D.
Assistant Vice President for Communications and Media Relations..........Robert G. Brock, M.M.
Director of Alumni Relations....................................Carolyn Champion-Sloan, B.A.
Executive Director of the Foundation/Major Gifts..............................Len Meyer, M.A.
Academic Administrators School of Business
Dean..................................................
Associate Dean........................................
Department Chairs
Accounting.........................................
Computer Information Systems and Management Science.
Economics..........................................
Finance ...........................................
Management ........................................
Marketing..........................................
Director of the Institute for Entrepreneurship & Creativity Director of the African American Leadership Institute.
......Jerry L. Geisler, Ph.D.
. R. Michael Brown, Ph.D.
......Virginia Parker, Ph.D.
.......Stuart Monroe, Ph.D.
.....John P. Cochran, Ph.D.
.....Jerry D. Boswell, D.B.A.
Rajendra P. Khandekar, Ph.D.
.........Donald Glover, Ph.D.
......Courtney Price, D.P.A.
. .. Ronald M. Knights, Ph.D.
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Dean .............................
Interim Associate Dean ...........
Assistant to the Dean.............
Department Chairs
Art............................
Biology........................
Chemistry......................
Earth and Atmospheric Sciences .
English .......................
History .......................
Journalism.....................
Mathematical Sciences..........
Modem Languages................
Music .........................
.. Joan M. Foster, Ph.D.
.....James Dixon, Ph.D.
.....Tony Montoya, M.A.
. .. Susan Josepher, Ph.D. George C. Becker, Ph.D. Jack D. Cummins, Ph.D. .... John Kilcoyne, Ph.D. .... Elsie G. Haley, Ph.D. Stephen J. Leonard, Ph.D. ... Deborah Hurley, M.S. Charlotte Murphy, Ph.D. .... David Conde, Ph. D. .. .. Hal Tamblyn, D.M.A.


ADMINISTRATION
Philosophy.........................................
Physics............................................
Political Science .................................
Psychology ........................................
Sociology/Anthropology/Social Work ................
Speech Communications .............................
Director of the Institute for
Intercultural Studies and Services....................
Director of the Institute for Women's Studies and Services Director of the Center for Mathematics,
Science and Environmental Education...................
Acting Director of the Family Center...................
Stephen E. Benson, Ph.D.
. Jerry H. Wilson, Ph.D.
. Norman Provizer, Ph.D.
. Lyn Wickelgren, Ph.D.
Kenneth M. Keller, Ph.D.
. Carl L. Johnson, Ph.D.
Akbarali Thobhani, Ph.D.
Jodi Wetzel, Ph.D.
. Larry S. Johnson, Ph.D.
Kenneth M. Keller, Ph.D.
School of Professional Studies
Dean ....................................................
Associate Dean ..........................................
Department Chairs
Aerospace Science ....................................
Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology........
Criminal Justice and Criminology......................
Early Childhood and Elementary Education..............
Electronics Engineering Technology ...................
Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration .......
Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies..........
Human Services........................................
CoDirector of the Center for Addiction Studies......
CoDirector of the Center for Addiction Studies......
Industrial Studies and Mechanical Engineering Technology
Military Science (Army ROTC) .........................
Nursing and Health Care Management ...................
Reading ..............................................
Secondary Education ..................................
Technical Communications..............................
Director of Professional Education....................
Director of Clinical Services.........................
Director of the Corporate Training Institute..........
Director of the Academy for Teaching Excellence.......
Director of the Child Development Center..............
Director of the Institute for Gerontology ............
...............Bill Rader, Ph.D.
...........Mary A. Miller, Ph.D.
...........Robert K. Mock, M.S.
..........Hughart H. Brown, M.S.
.......Joseph G. Sandoval, J.D.
...........William Wiener, Ph.D.
......Larry G. Keating, M.S.E.E.
.......Raymond Langbehn, M.A.
.........Cheryl J. Norton, Ph.D.
............Jeffrey Haber, Ed.D.
.........Anne S. Hatcher, Ed.D.
.....Michael J. Faragher, Psy.D.
.............John Schmidt, Ed.D.
..............Major Hal Moore
Kathleen McGuire-Mahony, Ph.D.
.......J. Douglas Cawley, Ph.D.
...........Marilyn Taylor, Ed.D.
.....Peggy O'Neill-Jones, M.S.S.
............Mark O Shea, Ed.D.
............Daniel Alfaro, Ph.D.
..............Steve Miller, M.S.
.......Charles V. Branch, Ed.D.
.............Marge Petersen, M.A.
...........Eugene Dawson, Ph.D.


8 GENERAL INFORMATION
The College
Metropolitan State College of Denver is one of the nations premier urban colleges, educating more Coloradans than any other institution of higher education in the state. Since the college was founded in 1963 as part of The State Colleges of Colorado, Metro has grown to a current enrollment of about 17,500 students, awarded degrees to nearly 27,000 graduates, and delivered educational programming to approximately 220,000 people.
Outstanding academic programs, complementary support services, competitively priced tuition, flexible scheduling, and convenient campus sites make Metro a highly attractive alternative for an increasing number of Colorado residents each year.
Located in downtown Denver, the college shares the Auraria Higher Education Center campus with the University of Colorado at Denver and the Community College of Denver. The concept of facility sharing affords the Metro student the flexibility of taking lower-division courses at the community college, as well as graduate or specialized professional courses at the university. Proximity to downtown means exciting cultural, business, and internship possibilities.
Metro is a comprehensive academic institution, granting bachelor of arts, bachelor of fine arts, and bachelor of science degrees, offering more than 2,000 course sections during the fall and spring semesters. Students can choose from 50 majors and 68 minors offered through three schools: Business; Letters, Arts and Sciences; and Professional Studies. Programs range from the traditional disciplines, such as accounting and teacher licensure, to contemporary fields of study, such as drug abuse counseling and entrepreneurship. Unique majors for Coloradans include aerospace science, criminal justice, human services, and land use.
Metros emphasis is on teaching. All classes are taught by professors, not graduate assistants. The colleges more than 325 full-time faculty are teachers first. Many have extensive professional backgrounds, with more than 88 percent having doctorates or the highest level of academic degrees attainable in their fields. Part-time faculty work in the metro Denver community and bring to the classroom their expertise in business, law, politics, communications, science, technology, and the arts.
Small classesthe average class size is 22ensure students greater access to faculty, a highly interactive atmosphere, and a personalized learning experience.
As an urban school committed to serving the local community, Metro attracts students from a rich and diverse mixture of age groups, socioeconomic classes, ethnic backgrounds, and lifestyles. The colleges curriculum and philosophy reflect the diversity of the student population and the realities of urban life. While upholding high academic standards, the faculty seek to accommodate the myriad needs of non-traditional students, offering classes on weekdays, evenings, and weekends at four locations in the metropolitan area. The college also provides a network of support services.
The Campus
Metropolitan State College of Denver is located in the Auraria Higher Education Center, a 171-acre campus in downtown Denver at Speer Boulevard and West Colfax Avenue. The Community College of Denver (CCD) and the University of Colorado at Denver (UCD) share the facilities with Metro State (MSCD).
More than one million square feet of space for classrooms, laboratories and offices are included in the facility. Some administrative offices are in restored Victorian homes in Denvers historic Ninth Street Park located within the Auraria site. Other administrative offices occupy the Terracentre at 1100 Stout. The campus features a child-care center; a block-long gymnasium with a swimming pool; areas for handball, soccer, baseball, and track; a student union; and a library, housing more than 600,000 volumes.
The proximity of the Auraria Higher Education Center to downtown Denver enables students and faculty to use the community as a learning laboratory and to weave classroom theory into the social, political, cultural, and economic practice of the city.
The campus features excellent physical facilities, such as the physical education/events center with a swimming pool, a weightroom, game courts, dance studios, and event seating for 3,000; a comprehensive library; and a childcare center. In the 1994-95 academic year, the Student Union offices will move to the historic, Bavarian-style Tivoli Brewery building, the most exciting and unusual student union facility in the country.


GENERAL INFORMATION
Auraria Parking and Transportation Services
Parking Services Department
Daily Fee Parking: (In-and-out privileges in Lot E only); daily fees range from $1.25 to $2.50. Several lots are unattended and require quarters to purchase a receipt from the vending machine. Change is available from the Parking Office, a parking attendant in an attended lot, or the Student Union. Make sure that the parking receipt is placed face-up on the drivers side of the dashboard. Receipts are valid only on the day and in the lot where purchased and are not transferable from one vehicle to another. For easy ehtrance/exit to the Parking and Transportation Centre and Lots D, K and H, a reusable debit card can be purchased for $1.00 and a cash value can be encoded on its magnetic strip. Debit cards are available on the first floor of the Student Union and at the southwest entry by the phone bank in the North Classroom. Permit Parking: Limited Parking is available on a semester basis. Contact the Parking Office (556-2000) for information.
Motorist Assistance Program: Personnel will help jump-start dead batteries and assist in fixing flats. Jumper cables, bumper jacks, tire tools and gasoline cans are also available at no cost to campus park-ers. Call 556-2000 for help. The Parking Services Department is located at 777 Lawrence Way (first floor of parking garage); hours are from 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m. (M-F).
Community Services Department Handivan: The wheelchair-accessible handivan provides free on-cam-pus transportation for students, faculty, and staff from 7:00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., Monday-Thursday; and from 7:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. on Friday.
Nightrider: The Nightrider is a free security escort service from any campus building to any campus parking lot. Service is available from dusk to 10:30 p.m., Monday-Thursday.
Auraria Public Safety
The Public Safety Division provides law enforcement services for the Auraria Higher Education Center. Peace officers patrol the campus on a 24-hour basis; trained dispatchers are on duty at all times to receive calls. Services include: crime prevention; investigation of offenses and taking crime reports; responding to first aid and emergency calls for assistance; monitoring of alarm systems throughout the campus; monitoring facilities for suspicious activity and unauthorized use; and enforcement of parking and traffic regulations, including taking accident reports; and vehicle assistance
The Campus Security Act of 1990 requires security reports to be made available to students. These reports are available through the Student Life Office. The Public Safety Department is located at 1200 7th Street; routine calls556-3271; EMERGENCY CALLS556-2222.
Accreditations/Approvals
Metro State is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Individual academic programs within the following areas are accredited or approved by the following agencies:
Program Accreditation/Approval Agency
Human Performance, Sports and Leisure Studies* National Park Association/American Association for Leisure and Recreation
Nursing* National League of Nursing
Teacher Education* National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
Music* National Association of Schools of Music
Civil Engineering Technology*, Electronics Engineering Technology,* and Mechanical Engineering Technology* Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
Human Services** Council for Standards in Human Services Education
Chemistrv ** American Chemical Society
Center for Addiction Studies** Colorado Department of Health
Accounting** Colorado State Board of Accountancy
Aerospace Science** Federal Aviation Administration
Health Care Management** Association of University Programs in Health Administration
* Accreditation ** Approval


GENERAL INFORMATION
The Office of State Colleges in Colorado
The member institutions governed by the Trustees of The Office of State Colleges in Colorado are Adams State College, Mesa State College, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and Western State College. The purpose of The Office of State Colleges is to identify and facilitate cooperative efforts among the institutions.
Each member institution can provide any student in good standing with the materials needed to enroll temporarily in any other member institution without incurring additional matriculation costs. Information concerning tuition is available at the host institution.
The enrollment status of the student at the host institution is determined by the students status at the home institution. Students should ascertain in advance of enrolling at an institution that desired courses will satisfy degree requirements at the home institution. The process of enrolling as a system student should begin at least one month prior to the beginning of the registration period at the host institution.


STUDENT SERVICES 1
Academic Advising
Academic advising is available in the Academic Assessment and Support Center. Continuing and prospective students seeking these services should communicate with the coordinator of advising for the appropriate school. The Academic Assessment and Support Center is responsible for the advising of all undeclared majors at Metro State. For additional information, please call 556-4327.
Auraria Child Care Center
The center provides high quality early childhood care and education to the children of students, staff, and faculty. A discovery, child-oriented approach is provided by a professional teaching staff to children aged 12 months to 6 years. These programs typically have a waiting list; therefore, pre-registration is recommended. The center is open 7:00 a.m..-8:30 p.m. (M-Th); and 7:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. (F). Currently there is no waiting list for evening care.
The Auraria Library
The Auraria Library provides a wide variety of learning resources for the students and faculty of Metropolitan State College of Denver and the other Auraria institutions. The library has almost 600,000 volumes of books, microforms, and bound periodicals in addition to more than 2,500 current periodical and newspaper subscriptions. Collection development efforts are focused on providing a strong base for leaming/teaching efforts on campus and on developing in-depth collections in the fields of public administration, architecture and planning, applied mathematics, education, and business. The main collection is supplemented by the Architecture and Planning Branch Library which is located on the fourth floor of the CU-Denver Building. As a member of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries (CARL), the Auraria Library has access to collections from Colorado member libraries and, through a national network, to an additional 15 million volumes available through inter-library loan or document delivery.
A 45-minute self-guided audio tape tour of the library and a printed library tour guide are available. Services offered include an on-line catalog, library instruction and orientation sessions for groups, a U.S. and Colorado depository for government publications, media listening and viewing facilities, and a growing CD-ROM collection, some of which is on a local area network.
Campus Recreation
Campus Recreation at Auraria offers myriad individual and group programs and services which help enrich, develop and retain the student-population. The program is composed of informal recreation (the Drop-in program), intramurals, Club Sports, Outdoor Adventure, and the Physically Challenged. Student membership is free with a current, validated student ID.
The Drop-in program provides group and individual activities for students, faculty, staff, alumni and guests. Facilities include four basketball courts, 12 tennis courts, volleyball courts, a 25-yard indoor pool, eight handball/racquetball courts, two squash courts, a weight room, a fitness center, a dance studio, a baseball field, softball fields, and a track. In addition, Campus Recreation offers high/low impact aerobics, step aerobics, aqua aerobics, and stretch and tone sessions daily. Please check the Campus Recreation Drop-in schedule in PER 108 or call 556-3210 for a listing of available times.
The Intramural program consists of individual and team activities open to all students, faculty and staff members. The emphasis of the program is on participation, sportsmanship, and social interaction. Whenever possible, competitive and recreational divisions are offered to ensure participation for all ability levels. Activities include flag football, basketball, floor hockey, volleyball, racquetball, and squash leagues, as well as tennis and golf tournaments.
Club Sports provides students, faculty and staff members the opportunity to develop their individual athletic abilities in an organized group setting. The present clubs, which are all student-initiated, include mens rugby, co-ed dance, co-ed Tae Kwon Do, mens bowling, mens volleyball, co-ed waterpolo, coed team handball, co-ed outdoor club, and mens lacrosse.
Outdoor Adventure provides the opportunity to experience the beauty and challenge of nature through organized trips. The program provides outdoor recreational experiences emphasizing skill acquisition, social interaction, environmental awareness, and safety. Some of the many adventures offered are downhill skiing, cross-country skiing, kayaking/rafting, canoeing, sailing, hiking, biking, rock climbing, ice climbing, naturalist outings, and family fun outings. The program also provides rental equipment including mountain bikes, cross country skis, roller blades, canoes, and camping and hiking gear. The office is located in the basement of the PER building.


12 STUDENT SERVICES
; The Physically Challenged program offers a variety of sporting, recreational, and fitness opportunities I for students with physical or learning limitations. The adaptive programs/services encompass one-on-j one or group sessions which assist in utilizing the recreational facility. Information on planned group ; activities or individual help sessions is available in PER 108. Call 556-3120 for more details on avail-
able programs and services.
: Career Services

Career Services offers assistance to students and alumni in planning their careers, finding off-campus ; jobs while enrolled, and seeking employment upon graduation. Specific services include career inter-
est and personality testing, and workshops focusing on career planning, resume preparation, job search
strategies and interviewing skills. Professional counselors are available for appointments. The student ; employment service and job vacancy listing are also housed in the Career Services Center, located in
Arts Building 177. The telephone number is 556-3664.
; The Campus Career library contains resources to help with the career planning and job search process. I Information such as employer directories, salary surveys, and career assessment resources are available.
1 The Colorado Career Information Center is a computerized guidance system located in the Campus | Career Library. Trained advisors offer assistance in its use. This system includes specific occupation y information for Colorado, career assessment inventories with immediate results, and nationwide college information. Services are available by appointment at 556-2246.
Counseling and Support Services
The Metropolitan State College of Denver Counseling Center is an accredited member of the International Association of Counseling Services. It provides psychological services to assist students in dealing with personal and situational problems that interfere with their acadeinic goals. The center also provides educational programs related to personal development and improving the campus climate. Services include personal counseling, group programs, stress management, crisis intervention, and testing. Services are offered to all Metro State students. Appropriate referrals may be made to other counseling services in the community. All records and information about clients are confidential.
Counseling Center staff members are on call and available to help students with a personal crisis. Students have emergency priority and will be seen as quickly as possible. After hours, call Bethesdas Support Line, 758-1123.
Group programs are open to all students, faculty, and staff. Groups and workshops usually available include: Stress Management (biofeedback, time management, relaxation and test anxiety), Diversity Support Groups, Developing Healthy Relationships, Substance Abuse, Couples Communication, Self-Esteem, Coming Out, Parenting Skills, Life/Work Planning, Family Issues, Loss, Study Skills, Spirituality, Womens and Mens Support Groups, and Assertiveness Training.
Various personality, interest and ability inventories are available to assist clients in understanding themselves and identifying their goals. Clients may wish to discuss with their counselor what kind of testing might be helpful. A nominal fee is assessed on each inventory.
The Metro Connections program is an informal helping network. Students, faculty and staff who are nominated as natural helpers participate in a number of programs such as peer helpers to new students, an advice column in The Metropolitan, and conferences on topics designed to improve the campus environment.
Metro Alternatives is a substance abuse prevention program. Established in 1991, it works actively with many campus departments and community agencies to provide proactive programs for students, faculty and staff, such as National Collegiate Alcohol and Drug Awareness Weeks and Safe Spring Break Week. Assessment, intervention and referral services are offered. Students can become actively involved in Metro Alternatives through internships, volunteer work and peer education.
Disabled Student Services
The Auraria Office of Disabled Student Services provides academic support services to disabled students at Metro State and University of Colorado Denver. Services include note taking, interpreting, provision of taped texts, admissions and registration assistance, exam assistance, handicapped parking permits, and information.


STUDENT SERVICES
Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Student Services
Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Student Services is open to all Metro State students as a resource for exploring sexual orientation issues. This program offers a variety of support, education and advocacy services for the entire campus community, including:
Support for members of the campus community who may have questions about their own sexual orientation or that of a friend or family member.
Advocacy for students experiencing discrimination or harassment based on a real or perceived gay, lesbian or bisexual identity.
Speakers for events, workshops and classes on various aspects of sexual orientation and lesbian, gay or bisexual life.
Training programs and workshops about working with the gay, lesbian and bisexual communities more effectively and combating homophobia.
Programs such as Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Awareness Week and other forums providing information and dialogue about gay, lesbian and bisexual issues.
The GLB Student Services office is staffed by a half-time coordinator with the support of student volunteers. Input and involvement from the entire campus community is welcomed.
Information and Referral Services
This office is a central information source at Auraria which provides assistance to prospective students seeking enrollment at Community College of Denver, Metro State, or University of Colorado Denver. Tri-institutional tours of the Auraria campus are provided to prospective students on a prearranged
basis.
Recruitment and Retention of Students from Ethnic Groups
Metropolitan State College of Denver strives to enhance the educational opportunities for Denver area residents by offering a variety of well-structured early intervention, recruitment and retention activities. Metro State has established a strong network in the metropolitan area that assists students and other members of the community and informs them about higher education opportunities and how to go about receiving these benefits. A variety of counselors from different areas including admissions, financial aid, academic affairs, and student affairs are available to provide higher education counseling for both new and transfer students. Individuals from underrepresented groups interested in attending Metro State should contact the Office of Admissions and Records at 556-3058 for additional information.
Student Activities
Metropolitan State College of Denvers Office of Student Activities provides a variety of ways for students to meet others and become involved in the Metro community. The Metro Activities Council staff produces an average of twenty-five concerts, lectures, and special events each semester, which range from jazz performances to rap concerts, and from topical discussions to comedy hours.
The PEAK Leadership Program offers a wide range of learning opportunities for students who want to develop and sharpen their skills. PEAK training includes such topics as coalition-building, group dynamics, and leadership theory and typology. The training is structured to fit into the busy schedules of students who work part-time and full-time.
The Club Support Services staff can help students find a club to meet their needs, or help them to establish a new club, raise funds for programming, and keep their ledger balanced. Metro currently has 100 active professional, social, academic honorary, and special interest clubs on campus.
The office is located on the second floor of the Student Activities Center wing of the Auraria Student Union. The office number is 556-2595, and hours are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday.
Student Health Center
All Metro State students are entitled to medical services at the Health Center (student insurance is not required). Physicians, physicians assistants, nurse practitioners and nurses staff the facility daily. Students will be asked to show a current I.D. card at every check-in and to complete a health history form every two years. Brief office visits for illnesses are free with reduced charges for extended office visits, medications, supplies, procedures and well-care. Payment is required at the time of service.


14 STUDENT SERVICES
; Services include:
; Evaluation and treatment of health problems, illnesses, musculoskeletal injuries, emergencies,
I womens health care (i.e., pap smears, birth control counseling and supplies), and well-care phys-
icals for both men and women.
1 Lab testing, x-ray access, special clinical procedures (i.e., colposcopy, cryotherapy, casting) and
; medications which can be purchased at the Health Center at the time of your visit.
Health education programs such as smoking cessation, nutritional and eating disorder counsel-! ing.
; AIDS information and HIV testing/counseling, sexually transmitted disease screening and treat-
I ment, and safer sex instruction and supplies.

Walk-in service opens at 8:00 a.m. Monday through Friday. Access is on a first-come, first served basis,
; and varies daily. Please check with the front desk to confirm walk-in availability. The Student Health
! Center is located in the Student Union, Room 140, lower level. For specific hours of operation, and/or
additional information, please call 556-2525.
: Student Publications
; The student newspaper, The Metropolitan, is published by the Office of Student Publications, Student Y Union room 156, 556-8361. The newspaper offers students the opportunity to explore fields such as journalism, advertising sales, marketing, graphic arts, publishing, photography, business and accounting through work experiences. The Metropolitan is written and produced by and for the students of Metro State and is published weekly during the fall and spring semesters and once during the summer semester. Students interested in working on the paper should contact the current student editor at 556-2507.
Metrosphere is Metro States annual student literary and arts publication and contains poetry, fiction, non-fiction, art, photography and graphics. It is written, composed and produced entirely by students. Submissions are accepted during the fall semester. Copies are distributed free to Metro State students in the spring semester. For more information, contact the current student editor at 556-3940.
The office also produces the Student Handbook as well as provides graphic art services at reduced costs to on-campus offices, departments, organizations and individuals.
The Metro State Board of Publications is the advisory board to the editors of Metrosphere and The Metropolitan. The Board appoints the editors from applicants each spring for the following academic year and deals with complaints or questions regarding content. The Board is composed of five students, three administrators and three faculty and meets monthly during the fall and spring semesters.
Student Union
The Auraria Student Union is the focal point for many cultural, social, and recreational activities of the college community. The Student Union contains a bookstore, game room, cafeteria, bar, meeting and conference facilities, student activities offices, health center, student organizations, and a variety of lounges for study and relaxation. The Student Unions lower corridor contains a housing board, ride board, and other public transportation information.
The Conference Services Office is located within the Student Union. This operation schedules all facilities for non-academic use and coordinates any services necessary for the events of campus departments or organizations. For information or to reserve a room, call 556-2755.
The Student Union is located at Ninth and Lawrence streets.
During the 1994-95 academic year, all Student Union offices and services except the health clinic will be moving to the historic Tivoli Brewery.
Womens Services
The Institute for Womens Studies and Services provides referrals to campus and community resources, information about scholarships, assistance to community women with the process of entering Metro State, advocacy services for students dealing with harassment or discrimination, and programs and events which focus on issues of particular concern to women. The institute houses a small library with a variety of books and other resource materials on womens experiences, histories, and contributions to society. Students who need assistance should make an appointment with the coordinator of womens services.


ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION
Admissions and Registration
Students who have not previously attended Metropolitan State College of Denver should review the colleges admission requirements.
All continuing students in good standing at Metropolitan State College of Denver are eligible to register each semester.
Students may maintain the status of continuing student while absent from the college; however, following two full semesters of absence, students should review their status with the Office of Admissions and Records to determine whether an updated application for re-admission will be required.
A student may register for classes in several ways. Information on the registration procedure and registration dates are published in the Class Schedule which is mailed to all continuing students. Students are responsible for insuring that there is a correct and up-to-date address on file with the college. Address changes may be made with the Office of Admissions and Records.
Registration procedures and dates for module classes are described in the Class Schedule. For further information regarding registration, please call 556-2950.
Application Instructions
Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they are received each semester. All credentials which are received by the college become the property of Metropolitan State College of Denver and will not be returned to the student. It is the responsibility of the applicant to notify the Office of Admissions and Records of any demographic or academic changes on the application for admission prior to the first day of classes. If demographic changes are not reported to the Office of Admissions and Records, it could delay the registration process for subsequent semesters. Failure to report academic changes may result in rejection, dismissal, and/or loss of credit. International (visa) applicants are referred to the section on Admission of International Students in this catalog.
To apply for admission:
1. Complete the application for admission included in the back of this catalog. Additional applications are available from the Metropolitan State College of Denver, Office of Admissions and Records at Campus Box 16, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, Colorado, 80217-3362; 303/556-3058.
2. A $25 non-refundable application fee ($40 for international students) must be submitted with the application for admission. The application fee must either be received or waived before the application can be considered. The application fee does not apply to tuition and fees. Re-admit applicants do not have to pay this fee.
3. Submit the completed application and application fee directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. The application and all required credentials (see admissions requirements below) should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes.
4. It is the students responsibility to request that all required credentials be mailed directly from the issuing institution or agency to the Office of Admissions and Records at Metropolitan State College of Denver. No hand-carried documents will be accepted.
5. Although an applicants record may be summarized on one transcript, official transcripts from each institution are required.
6. The applications for admission and all credentials received by the college will be kept on file for three semesters after which time the file will no longer be maintained. Applicants wishing to attend Metro State must begin the admission process again.
Admissions Requirements
The college classifies applicants into two categories by agethose who are less than 20 years of age and those who are 20 years of age or older. Based on the colleges modified open admissions system, each category has its own admissions requirements and procedures.
Applicants Younger Than 20 Years of Age
If you are younger than 20 years old by September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall semester, or February 15 for the spring semester, you will be classified as a traditional applicant.


16 ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION
Freshman (first-time college student)
1. Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the high school or testing agency:
a. ACT or SAT test results
b. high school grade point average
c. high school class rank
2. This information may be submitted at the end of the sixth, seventh, or eighth semester of high school but no later than four weeks before the expected term of enrollment. A final, official transcript with date of graduation is required no later than the fourth week of the term of enrollment. Students should request and verify that the high school transcript with date of graduation has been mailed by the high school and has been received by the Office of Admissions and Records.
3. Metropolitan State College of Denver will admit students who are likely to successfully complete an academic program and who meet state requirements for the college as established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE).
4. Applicants who do not meet the stated admission requirements will be considered on an individual basis after careful review of all credentials, including letters of recommendation and/or personal interview. Some students may be accepted after successful completion of the Summer Bridge Program, which has been established with the Community College of Denver at Auraria.
5. Applicants who have not graduated from high school but have received the Colorado General Education Development (GED) Certificate or its equivalent will be accepted. ACT or SAT test results are not required with a GED.
College Transfer
1. Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the high school, testing agency, and/or college or university:
a. ACT or SAT test results
b. high school transcript
c. transcript from each college or university attended or currently attending
d. if currently attending, verification of enrollment
2. These credentials should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes. All required credentials must be received before a final admissions decision can be made.
3. Metropolitan State College of Denver will admit students who are most likely to successfully complete an academic program and who meet state requirements for the college as established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE).
4. Applicants who have less than a cumulative 2.00 grade point average from all colleges and universities attended will be considered on an individual basis after careful review of all credentials including letters of recommendation and a personal interview with an admissions counselor. Please call the Office of Admissions for additional information.
Applicants 20 Years of Age or Older
Applicants who are 20 years old or older by September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall semester, or February 15 for the spring semester, should read the requirements below for either a firsttime college student or a college transfer student:
Freshman (first-time college student)
1. Applicants will be admitted to Metropolitan State College of Denver upon indicating on the application for admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have received a General Education Development Certificate (GED).
2. By signing the application for admission, degree-seeking applicants are certifying that they will request either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test scores be sent to the Office of Admissions and Records. Degree-seeking students will not be permitted to register for a second semester until this credential is received.
3. By signing the application for admission, non-degree-seeking applicants understand that they do not have to submit credentials to continue at Metro State.
4. The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but is highly recommended for advising purposes.


ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION 1
College Transfer
1. Applicants will be admitted to Metropolitan State College of Denver, regardless of their cumulative college GPA, if they indicate on their application for admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have received a General Education Development Certificate (GED).
2. By signing the application for admission, degree-seeking applicants are certifying that they will request either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test scores be sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. In place of these credentials, college transfer students may have college transcripts, which indicate at least 30 semester hours or 45 quarter hours of transferable C work, sent directly to Metro State.
3. Degree-seeking transfer applicants are required to have all college and university transcripts on file to receive a transfer evaluation.
4. By signing the application for admission, non-degree-seeking applicants understand that they do not have to submit credentials to continue at Metro State.
5. Applicants who indicate on their application for admission that they are not seeking a degree from Metro State may change their status by completing a Change of Status Form and submitting all required transcripts to the Office of Admissions and Records.
6. The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but is highly recommended for advising purposes.
Degree and Non-Degree Seeking Status
Degree Seeking
Students who plan to seek a degree at Metropolitan State College of Denver are categorized as degree seeking students. In order to have degree seeking status, students must submit all credentials; transfer students must have transcripts submitted from all colleges and universities attended. A graduation application and $20 fee must be paid by intending degree candidates by the stipulated deadline of a students declared semester of graduation.
Students who plan to seek a degree at Metropolitan State College of Denver may list their intended major on the application for admission. The intended major is temporary until students officially declare their major either with the academic department or the Academic Advising and Assessment Center. The official major may be declared when all credentials have been received.
Please Note: Until students are officially categorized as degree seeking, financial aid, veterans benefits, and registration priority will be affected.
Non-Degree Seeking
Non-degree seeking students are those who do not intend to seek a degree at Metro State or who are unsure if they wish to pursue a degree at the time of application. Non-degree seeking students may change their status to degree seeking by completing a change of status form with the Office of Admissions and Records, by submitting all credentials, and by receiving a transfer evaluation if they are transfer students.
Declaring a Major
Intent-to-Major
First-time Metropolitan State College of Denver students may indicate an intent to major on the Metro State application form. Stating an intent to major on the application form is not an official declaration of major. Students with fewer than 60 hours who wish to major in the School of Business may so indicate on a School of Business Intent-to-Major form.
Official Declaration of Major
All degree-seeking students who have completed 60 or more semester hours including hours transferred from other institutions must officially declare a major no later than the semester following the one in which they complete 60 or more hours.
To declare a major, students must complete an official Declaration/Change of Major form which is available from the major department or from the Academic Assessment and Support Center and obtain appropriate signature approval. Procedures for declaring a major depend upon the school and the number of semester hours completed as outlined below. Students who transfer to Metro State cannot officially declare a major until all credentials are received and evaluated.


18 ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION
: Majors in the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
or the School of Professional Studies
: Students, including transfers with Metro State officially evaluated transcripts, may officially declare a | major in the Schools of Letters, Arts and Sciences or Professional Studies at any time. Students who ; have completed 29 or fewer semester hours must declare their major through the Academic Assessment and Support Center in consultation with an academic advisor. Students who have completed 30 or more
j hours must declare their major through the proposed major department.

Majors in the School of Business
; Students having completed fewer than 60 semester hours, including transfers with Metro State officially ! evaluated transcripts, may declare an intent-to-major in the School of Business through the Academic
Assessment and Support Center. Students who have completed 60 or more semester hours must offi-dally declare their major through the academic department of the proposed major during the semester
following the one in which they complete 60 or more hours.
; Verification of Major: To verify the correctness of the officially declared major, students should refer I to the information contained on their class confirmation notice.

: Admission of Previously Enrolled Students
y Former students or readmit students are defined as any individual who has been accepted, has registered for a course, and has received a grade or grade notation at the college.
Former students who have not been in attendance at Metropolitan State College of Denver for one or more years should adhere to the following procedures:
1. Submit a completed application for admission which can be found in the back of this catalog. Check off the re-admission box on the top, right comer of the application. No application fee is required for re-admission.
2. To insure processing, the application and any required credentials should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
3. Former students who have attended other collegiate institutions since last attending Metro State must follow the appropriate admissions requirements for transfer students.
4. Former students who are re-admitting after nine years of absence from the college are required to resubmit all credentials. Only non-degree-seeking Metro State graduates do not have to resubmit credentials.
Additional Admissions Programs
Summer Semester Only
Applicants who have graduated from high school or have received a General Education Development Certificate (GED) and are applying for the summer semester and who do not wish to continue at Metro State after the summer semester may be admitted under a provisional status and are not required to submit admissions credentials. Please check the appropriate box under MSCD Plans on the application for admission. Applicants applying for the summer semester and who wish to continue for the fall or spring semester must meet stated admissions requirements before the semester begins.
High School Student Education and Enrichment Program
The Student Education and Enrichment Program (SEE) is Metropolitan State College of Denvers High School Concurrent Enrollment Program for college-ready students. SEE is designed to supplement a students existing education through early participation in college-level classes. This advanced program should not be interpreted as an alternative to high school completion but is, instead, a cooperative col-lege/high school effort to provide educational enrichment and early college attendance to qualified high school students. Typically, the SEE student meets the following criteria:
1. is currently registered in a Colorado high school
2. is maintaining a GPA of 3.0 or better
3. is preferably in the senior year of high school
4. can benefit from specialized or accelerated classes
5. has demonstrated the ability to do college-level work


ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION 1
To apply for admission, the student must, in consultation with the appropriate high school authority, submit to the Office of Admissions at Metro State an admissions application with the required $25 application fee accompanied by the following documents:
1. recommendation from a high school counselor or administrator stating how the student will benefit from early college attendance
2. written parental approval
3. an official high school transcript
Upon receipt of these documents, the students record is reviewed and the admissions decision is made. However, if additional or supporting information is required, the student may be required to have an admissions interview with an Metro State admissions counselor. The admissions decision will be based on the students academic preparation, past performance, the recommendation of the high school official, and the students personal motivation and readiness for a traditional college experience.
Postsecondary Enrollment Options Program
The Postsecondary Enrollment Options Program (PSEOP) is a program enacted by state law in 1988 which provides juniors and seniors in high school under the age of 22 the opportunity to take college classes for both high school and college credit. The program is intended to provide high school students with an optional learning environment.
The PSEOP is a sponsorship program whereby the high school district agrees to pay for college tuition and the student is then responsible for college fees and books. Counseling offices in Colorado high schools are provided with PSEOP application packets which include instruction sheets, application forms, and billing authorization forms. Application deadlines are scheduled 45 days prior to the first day of classes every fall and spring semester. Specific deadlines and further information relative to this program and the application process may be obtained by calling the Metro State Office of Admissions at 556-3058.
Assessment Requirements
Reading, Writing, and Mathematics Placement Examinations
All first-time college students are required to take a series of three exams before registering for their first semester classes. The exams measure college entry-level skills in reading, writing, and mathematics, and the scores are used to help advisors and students select appropriate courses. For additional information please call 556-3677.
Reading, Writing, and Mathematics Proficiency Examinations
Prior to or at the completion of 60 semester hours at Metro State, students may be asked to take a series of three exams that measure proficiency in reading, writing, and mathematics. These exams should be taken concurrent with or after appropriate coursework in the academic area has been completed. For additional information please call 556-3677.
General Studies Examinations
In their junior year, students may be required to participate in an assessment of their general education.
The Metro State faculty has determined educational goals or outcomes that it wants its graduates to achieve. A copy of those goals and the methods by which their achievement will be measured can be obtained from the department office.
International Education
In order to fulfill its appropriate role as a public urban institution, Metropolitan State College of Denver must be responsive to the changing qualities of the community it serves. Because Denver is a national center for commerce and technology, Colorado is affected by dynamic global relationships as well as national, state, and local policies. As technology draws the nations of the world closer together and Colorado becomes increasingly aware of its international role, educational institutions must increase their commitment to providing opportunities for international education. These opportunities exist for nationals enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver who wish to be involved with an academic experience outside of the United States, as well as internationals who feel they will gain from study at Metropolitan State College of Denver.


20 ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION
Admission of International Students
All students who declare a country of citizenship other than the United States on their applications for admission must contact the Office of Admissions and Records.
1. Admission of resident aliens (or refugees, political parolees, and political asylum cases, etc.) and students on temporary visas other than F-l:
a. Official transcripts including secondary level education should be submitted four weeks prior to the beginning of the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
b. Applicants may be required to pass an English proficiency examination.
c. Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
2. Admission of applicants on student (F-l) visas:
a. International application for admission and fee must be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes for the semester of enrollment.
b. Applicants are required to submit the following documents as part of their application to the college: international student application form, application fee, official transcripts from all secondary and postsecondary schools attended, evidence of English proficiency, and financial support documents.
c. Official academic credentials should be submitted in the original language as well as in official English translation. Transcripts from American institutions should be sent directly to the college from the issuing institution.
d. English proficiency may be demonstrated by attaining a score of at least 500 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Only scores from the international or special testing programs will be considered.
e. The first semesters tuition and fees will be required prior to course registration for international students. Scholarship recipients are exempt from this requirement.
f. Students are required to complete a minimum of 12 semester hours with a minimum 2.00 (C) GPA each fall and spring semester.
g. Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
h. More detailed information is contained in the international student brochure available in the Office of Admissions and Records.
If students are academically admissible and have met the minimum English proficiency requirements, they will be issued the U.S. Immigration Form 1-20. Questions regarding the admission of students from abroad or permanent residents should be directed to the Office of Admissions and Records.
English as a Second Language/Immigrant and Refugee Services
The English as a Second Language Program provides assistance to students for whom English is a second language. The program provides assessment, tutoring, intensive academic and personal advising, and assistance with financial aid forms; refers students with limited English proficiency to the appropriate curricula; and monitors student progress. For additional information, please call 556-2533.
The Spring International Language Center at Auraria
Intensive English classes at Spring International focus on all language skills: grammar, reading, writing, and listening/speaking, in addition to special electives that students can choose each term, such as TOEFL preparation, vocabulary building, and pronunciation.
Five nine-week terms are offered throughout the year to enable students to complete their English study quickly. Students are placed into one of five levels, with standardized evaluation tests at the completion of each level.


ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION
Transfer Credit Evaluation
Once all final official transcripts for degree-seeking students are received by the Office of Admissions and Records, the evaluation process begins. The student receives a transfer evaluation card which must be signed by the students major department or school advisor. The card is then submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records. Within approximately four weeks, students receive two copies of the transfer credit evaluation, one of which is taken to the major and minor departments for advice on how credits might apply to their programs.
Transfer credits will be accepted under the following guidelines:
1. Credit must have been earned at an institution of higher education holding full regional accreditation.
2. Grades earned must be A, B, C, or equivalent; however, only the credits will be shown on the Metro State academic record. Courses with grades of D, F, or similar grades will not be accepted in transfer.
3. Course content should be similar to those courses offered at Metropolitan State College of Denver.
4. A maximum of 64 semester hours from a two-year institution will be accepted and applied toward an Metro State degree. A maximum of 90 semester hours of credit will be given for acceptable work completed at a four-year institution or combination of two- and four-year institutions.
5. Students earning an AA or AS degree will enter with junior standing at Metro State, provided all courses included in the degree carry a grade of C or better and otherwise meet minimum Metro State standards for transfer credit, and with the understanding that some students will need to complete additional Metro State lower division program requirements.
6. Applicants having completed the Colorado Community College core curriculum, as certified on their Community College transcript, are considered to have satisfied the colleges minimum general studies requirements. However, additional, specific, lower-division courses may be required for certain degree programs.
Questions pertaining to transfer credit evaluation should be referred to the Director of Orientation and Transfer, CN 108, 556-4327.
Changes in Registration
Enrolled students may adjust schedules by dropping and/or adding classes during the first 15 percent of each semester. See the current semester Class Schedule for complete information concerning the tuition and fee refund schedule.
Students who reduce their course load after 15 percent of the term through the end of the fourth week of classes will receive an NC notation for each course they have dropped and a refund, if applicable. An NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Additional restrictions regarding assigning the NC notation may be set by each school, department, and/or faculty member for the period between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of the semester (or proportional timeframe). Students reducing their course load between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of classes during fall and spring semesters may receive an NC notation for each course, provided faculty approval is granted. Students are advised to seek faculty signatures well before the deadline. An NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Office of Admissions and Records. See the sections on grades, notations, course load, and class attendance in this catalog.
Proportional time frames are applied for modular courses, workshops, and summer terms. Procedures for adding or dropping a modular course after the course has begun are described in the current Class Schedule.


22 ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION
Inter-Institutional Registration
Students enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver may register for courses at Arapahoe Community College, Community College of Denver, Front Range Community College, and Red Rocks Community College. Courses taken at these institutions in no way alter existing Metropolitan State College of Denver degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requirements subject to specific approval by Metro State. Students should be aware that courses taken inter-institutionally will be counted as part of the 64 semester hours from community colleges applicable to an Metro State degree. Interinstitutional credits will not satisfy academic residence requirements at Metro State. In the event a conflict exists between the policies/procedures of Metro State and one of the colleges listed above, the most restrictive policy prevails. Students are advised to confer with department chairs and/or coordinators of academic advising before registering inter-institutionally.
Information concerning current procedures for enrolling for courses at these other institutions is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Concurrent Enrollment
Concurrent enrollment differs from interinstitutional enrollment in that the student is simultaneously matriculated and enrolled at two different institutions. Students who find it necessary to be registered at Metropolitan State College of Denver and another college at the same time must obtain a letter of permission from the registering authority of each institution. Failure to receive advance permission may result in denial of transfer credit. Failure to do so will result in Metro State not recognizing credit from other institutions. Students concurrently enrolled are affected by the academic policies of both institutions. Metro State students enrolling concurrently at other institutions also should check with Metro State department chairs concerning the acceptance of credits.
Course Audit Policy
Students may audit a class with the permission of the instructor and if seating is available. Academic credit is not awarded for an audited course. The cost for auditing a course is based on regular tuition as published in the current Class Schedule. Audit approval forms are available in departmental offices.
Graduation Agreement
Degree-seeking students formally declare their degree plan by filing a Graduation Agreement. The agreement should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records one year prior to the intended term of graduation but no later than the appropriate deadline stated in the Class Schedule.
Students should complete their Graduation Agreement in consultation with their advisor. When it is ready for signatures and a formal evaluation, students should submit the completed agreement to the minor department. The minor department will forward the signed agreement to the major department for signature; the major department will forward it to the dean of the school. The school will submit the agreement to the Office of Admissions and Records for final review. Once approved, and after the completion of each subsequent semester of academic work, the student will receive an up-to-date Academic Status Report.
Students may appeal to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions to request a variance from college academic requirements. Their graduation agreement should be completed before the appeal. Valid reasons for variances must accompany all petitions, and the petitions must be signed by the appropriate dean and department chair.
A graduation application and $20 fee must be paid by intending degree candidates by the stipulated deadline of a students declared semester of graduation.
Transcripts of Records
A transcript is a certified copy of a students permanent record and shows the academic status of the student at time of issuance. Copies are available at $1 each. There is a $5 charge for same-day transcript service. Transcripts will be released by the Office of Admissions and Records upon formal written request by the student. Transcripts will also be issued to firms and employers if written authorization is received from the student. Requests should include the students full name as recorded while attending Metro State, student identification number, last term of attendance, number of copies desired, and to whom and where transcripts are to be sent. Transcripts may be withheld because of indebtedness to the college or for other appropriate reasons. Transcripts from other institutions which are on file in the Office of Admissions and Records will be issued upon signed request by the student. A charge of $5 per request is assessed for this service. Students from other institutions taking Metro State courses under the state college system or interinstitutional registration programs must request transcripts from their home institution.


ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION


24 FINANCIAL AID
Philosophy
The Metropolitan State College of Denver financial aid program provides assistance and advice to students who would be unable to pursue their education at the college without such help. Scholarships, grants, loans, and part-time employment are available singly or in various combinations to meet the difference between what the student and the students family could reasonably be expected to provide and the expected cost of attending Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Estimated Expenses
The 1993-1994 academic year expenses are as follows:
Resident Nonresident
Tuition and Fees... .. $2,180 ... .... $6,340
Room and Board .. .. 5,260 .. . 5,260
Books and Supplies. .... 520.... 520
Transportation .... 930.... 930
Miscellaneous . 1 250 ... . 1.250
$10,140 $14,300
; Tuition and fees are set by The Office of State Colleges in Colorado and are subject to change without notice. All students are placed on a single-person budget. Additional allowances are made for students 1 with dependent children day-care costs and for expenses related to disabilities not paid by another ^ agency. (P.L. 99-498).
Eligibility and Need
To qualify for financial aid, a student must be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen, be registered with Selective Service (if required), have financial need, be degree or certificate seeking, be making satisfactory academic progress and not be in default or owe a refund on a Federal grant or Federal education loan.
Application Procedures
Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid to determine financial aid eligibility. Returning Metro State students may request application forms from the Financial Aid Office. Transfer students can obtain application forms from their current college or university. Entering college freshmen should obtain application forms from their high schools or from the Metro State Financial Aid Office; students should obtain forms as early as possible, preferably by mid-February. Transferring applicants must supply the Metro State Financial Aid Office with financial aid transcripts from all schools previously attended. Detailed information concerning application procedures is available in the Metro State Financial Aid Office.
Financial Aid Programs
Undergraduate students who have a bachelors degree are not eligible for Federal Pell Grants, Federal SEOG, CSG or CSIG. The amount of funds made available to students depends upon the maximum award allowed by regulation of each program, the students established financial need, duration of the students enrollment, and funds allocated to the college by the state and federal governments.
Grants
Grants are gift money from the federal or state government. These types of funds do not have to be repaid.
Federal Pell Grants are federal funds and may be awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a bachelors degree and who are United States citizens or permanent residents. The amount of the award is based on each students financial eligibility and the number of hours for which the student is enrolled. The amount of Federal Pell grant awards for the 1994-95 academic year will range from $400 to $2,300 for those students who qualify. Less-than-half-time, half-time or full-time students may qualify for a Federal Pell Grant.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are federal funds awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a bachelors degree and are United States citizens or permanent residents. Awards are based on an individuals need and are usually awarded to students demonstrating exceptional need. Students must be enrolled full-time to receive a Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant at Metro State. The amount of FSEOG awards range from $100 to $1,000.


FINANCIAL AID
Colorado State Grants (CSG) are state funds awarded to Colorado residents. Awards are based on a students eligibility as determined by the Office of Financial Aid. Students must not have earned a prior bachelors degree and must be enrolled full time at Metro State. The amount of CSG awards range from $50 to $2,000. Part-time CSG funds are also available to less-than-full-time students who demonstrate need. Students must be enrolled a minimum of six hours to receive part-time CSG funds.
Colorado Student Incentive Grants (CSIG) are a combination of federal and state funds awarded by the same criteria as CSG. Students must be enrolled full-time to receive CSIG funds.
Scholarships
Presidential Scholarships: The scholarships include four-year scholarships for entering high school students and two-year scholarships for transfer students. Scholars receive up to $600 per semester to pay mandatory tuition and fees.
Colorado Scholarships: Grants of $500 per semester, not exceeding the cost of resident tuition and mandatory fees per academic year, are available through the academic departments. Recipients must be Colorado residents. Interested students should contact their departments for applications.
Athletic Scholarships: Metro State has a limited number of athletic scholarships. Applications and additional information are available from the Metro State Athletics Department.
Private Scholarships: Students should refer to the Metro State Financial Aid and Scholarship Hand-book for information and a listing of scholarships. Students should also contact academic departments and the reference desk at the Auraria Library for assistance in locating sources of scholarships.
Loans
Federal Family Education Loans (FFEL) are loans that enable students and/or their parents to borrow funds to help with educational expenses. This loan program includes the following types of loans: Federal Stafford Loan, unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan, and Federal PLUS Loans. To borrow these funds, students and/or their parents must complete a separate lender application in addition to the need analysis application (FAFSA). Students must also be enrolled at least half-time and be degree or certificate seeking. Interest rates vary between each type of loan and also vary depending on when the student borrowed the first Federal Family Education Loan. For further information on interest rates, check with the Financial Aid office or the lender.
Federal Stafford Loans: Eligibility for the Federal Stafford Loan is based on the students need as determined by the Office of Financial Aid. For Stafford Loans disbursed on or after July 1, 1993, the annual loan limits are: $2,625 for freshmen, $3,500 for sophomores, and $5,500 for all other undergraduates.
Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans: This loan has many of the same terms and conditions as the Federal Stafford Loan. The main difference is that the borrower is responsible for the interest that accrues while he/she is in school and during the six month grace period. A student may borrow against either parent or student contribution and, therefore, students who do not qualify for the Stafford Loan may qualify for the unsubsidized Stafford Loan. The annual limits for the unsubsidized Stafford Loan are the same as the Stafford Loan. Students may borrow under both programs but the total of these two loans cannot exceed the annual loan limits for the Stafford Loan.
Federal Plus Loans: These loans are available to parents of dependent students. Applications are available from Metro State or from lenders which participate in the program. Applications must first be submitted to the Financial Aid office for processing. At Metro State, parents of dependent students may borrow up to the cost of education minus amount of financial aid, per student per year.
Metro State-Emergency Loans: Should there be a delay in the disbursement of funds, the Financial Aid office is able to advance limited funds to students, provided that financial aid has been previously awarded. The average loan is $200 per semester. The loan must be repaid at the end of the semester in which the funds were received or as soon as financial aid funds are disbursed to students, whichever comes first.
Information on additional alternative loan programs from private sources is available at the Financial Aid office.
College Work-Study
The State of Colorado and federal work-study programs provide part-time employment during the summer and academic year. Only permanent Colorado residents are eligible for State of Colorado work-study awards. Awards range from $200 to $5,000 per fiscal year. The average award is $2,000. The maximum hours students may work is 30 hours per week average while classes are in session and a maximum average of 40 hours per week between semesters.


26 FINANCIAL AID
Employment
Many students who do not qualify for work-study find part-time employment to cover a portion of their educational expenses. The Auraria Placement Office assists students in finding part-time jobs.
Other Forms of Assistance
Colorado No-Need Work-Study: Students enrolled at least half-time who are permanent residents of Colorado and have either unmet need eligibility, or who do not qualify for need-based financial aid, are eligible for this award. Students may apply for these funds at the Financial Aid office.
Financial Aid as a Form of Payment: Students who have been awarded financial aid have the option of using that aid as their form of tuition payment during phone registration each semester. Once the award has been verified by the Business Office, the student will not be required to pay the tuition and fee charges until the aid is disbursed. Students receiving any type of financial aid are eligible for this service each semester for which aid has been awarded. Related information is provided in mail-in and phone-in registration materials and in class schedules.
Resource Expectations
Students attending Metro State must assume responsibility for the cost of their education. Tax-sup-ported aid programs exist to supplement student financial resources, not to replace them. Prospective financial aid applicants should refer to the Financial Aid Office for details concerning students resource expectations.
The Aid Package
Once student eligibility is determined, an aid package is developed that depends upon the availability of funds and the eligibility of the applicant in relation to that of other students. Although it is not always possible to do so, the-Financial Aid Office attempts to fully meet student eligibility. To facilitate the work of the Financial Aid Office, applicants must obtain all information and forms from designated sources and submit the required materials to the appropriate office according to established schedules.
Receiving a scholarship may affect a students financial aid award. Students receiving federal and/or state aid are limited to a maximum amount of aid. A student whose full need has been met prior to receipt of a scholarship will have his or her aid reduced by an amount equal to the scholarship. If the students full eligibility has not been met, the scholarship can be allowed to satisfy the unmet eligibility. Each students situation is treated individually.
Award Notification
When the Financial Aid Office has determined the kind and amount of aid for which a student qualifies, the student is notified of the award by letter. The letter also stipulates the conditions of the award. Students awarded aid must sign the statement of education purpose on the award letter and the Anti-Drug Abuse Act certification.
Disbursement Procedures:
1. Federal Family Education Loan Programs: All Federal Stafford Loans and Federal PLUS Loans are required to be disbursed in two disbursements. Contact the Financial Aid office for disbursement dates. The first disbursement is usually available within 35 days of the beginning of the semester for which the loan is intended. Federal Stafford checks will be processed at the Financial Aid office and released through the Business Office. Students are required to pay any outstanding balance owed to Metro State at the time the check is released. Federal PLUS checks are mailed from lenders to the Metro State Financial Aid office. Eligibility is verified and then the check is mailed to the parent borrower.
2. Work Study: Work study earnings are paid monthly and are treated as wages earned. Outstanding balances owed to Metro State are not deducted from these earnings. Students are strongly advised to pay any outstanding balance as soon as a work-study check is received.
3. All other aid: Beginning on the first day of classes each semester, students receiving aid other than those listed above may come to the Metro State Business Office to pick up their financial aid. The Business Office will deduct any outstanding balance owed to Metro State and issue a check for any remaining funds. Students who still owe a balance after all aid has been paid will be issued a bill.


FINANCIAL AID
Repayment Policy
Students who withdraw from Metro State prior to completion of a term must repay a portion of financial aid and scholarships. All required financial aid repayments must be made to Metro State before the end of the current academic year or before additional Title IV funds may be disbursed to the student, whichever occurs first. Repayment is made to the Metro State Business Office.
Student Rights and Responsibilities
Academic Progress Requirements
Financial aid recipients are required to maintain satisfactory progress towards their educational objectives in order to continue to receive aid (2.00 GPA; complete at least two-thirds of the credits attempted each semester; and be enrolled the equivalent of not more than 12 full-time semesters). Detailed information outlining the requirements is available in the Financial Aid Office. Failure to maintain satisfactory progress may result in cancellation of aid for subsequent terms of school years.
Change in Status
The financial aid award may be adjusted throughout the award period to reflect any change in the students resources or enrollment status or in institutional, state, or federal funding.
Renewal of Financial Aid
Students must apply each year for continued aid. Renewal of financial assistance depends on the students academic performance, financial eligibility, and the availability of student financial aid funds.
Students should contact the Financial Aid Office for details concerning Metropolitan State College of Denver financial aid policies and procedures.
Costs
The Board of Trustees of The Office of State Colleges in Colorado, the governing board of the college, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees for any semester without notice.
Tuition and College Service Fees
Tuition and College Service fees are determined by the Trustees shortly before the beginning of each academic year. Information regarding tuition and fees is published in the current Class Schedule.
Tuition and fees are payable at the time of registration.
Standard Fees
An application fee is required of all applicants for admission to the college. This fee is non-refundable
and will not be applied to tuition.
Application Fee.................................................$25
International Student Application Fee...........................$40
Transcript fee, per transcript..................................$1
Same Day transcript fee, per transcript.........................$5
Graduation fee..................................................$20
Special Fees
Returned check penalty..........................................$17
Tuition Classification
A student is classified as an in-state or out-of-state student for tuition purposes at the time of admission. This classification is based upon information supplied by the student on the application for admission and is made in accordance with the Colorado Tuition Classification Law, CRS S23-7-101 et seq. (1973), as amended. Once determined, a students tuition classification status remains unchanged unless satisfactory evidence that a change should be made is presented. A Petition for In-State Tuition Classification form and the evidence requested should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records if a student believes she or he is entitled to in-state status.
The tuition classification statute requires that in order to qualify for in- state status, a student (or the parents or legal guardian of the student in the case of students under 22 years of age who are not emancipated), must have been domiciled in Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the first day of the semester for which such classification is sought.


28 FINANCIAL AID
; Domicile for tuition purposes requires two inseparable elements: (1) a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado with no intent to be domiciled elsewhere. Some exam-; pies of connections with the state which provide objective evidence of intent are: (1) payment of Colo-
: rado state income tax as a Colorado resident, (2) permanent employment in Colorado, (3) ownership of
residential real property in Colorado, (4) compliance with laws imposing a mandatory duty on any ; domiciliary of the state, such as the drivers license law and the vehicle registration law, and (5) regis-
tration to vote. Other factors peculiar to the individual can also be used to demonstrate the requisite ; intent.
; Any questions regarding the tuition classification law should be directed to an admissions officer at the
college. In order to qualify for in-state status for a particular semester, the student must prove that domi-; cile began not later than one year prior to the first day of classes for that semester. The dates for quali-I tying and for submitting petitions are published in the Class Schedule each semester.
: Other Cost Information
; The cost of books and supplies averages $350 to $500 per academic year with the highest cost during I the first semester of attendance. Other costs such as room, board, clothing, transportation, and other j expenses will vary according to individual need.
| Tuition Adjustments
y Please see the Class Schedule for the current semester.
Student Health Insurance
The Student Health Center Insurance is a group Mandatory-with-Waiver policy for all full-time students (ten credit hours in fall/spring or eight credit hours in summer). The insurance premium for full time students is automatically included with the semester charges/fees and is identified on a students bill as Insurance. Students who have comparable insurance coverage may waive the insurance premium and not participate in the program. Proof of comparable insurance and a waiver form must be completed and turned in to the Business Office within the first four weeks of the fall and spring semesters, and within the first two weeks of the summer semester. A waiver, once in place, will continue until rescinded in writing by the student. For additional information regarding the waiver, please contact the office of Student Accounts at 820-2001.
Students who are not full time, as defined above, are not eligible for the colleges group insurance coverage. In addition, if a full-time student decreases the amount of semester hours to below full-time status (ten hours during fall and spring semesters; eight hours during summer semester) within 28 calendar days from the first day of the semester, the student loses insurance eligibility.
Optional coverage is available for dependents of insured students who are enrolled for ten or more semester hours during fall and spring semesters and eight or more semester hours during summer semester. Premiums for optional coverage must be paid at the Business Office during the first three weeks of each semester.
Those students enrolled for spring semester health insurance have the option of purchasing summer insurance coverage without attending classes provided they pay the premium at the Business Office by the date listed in the summer Class Schedule.
The policy is in effect 24 hours a day and covers the period of time from the first day of classes of the semester to the first day of classes of the following semester. Insurance brochures listing other benefits as well as insurance claim forms and information are available at the Student Health Center, Room 140, Student Union, 556-3873.


SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2'
Child Development CenterMetro State
The Metro State Child Development Center provides exemplary, on-campus childrens programs: during the fall and spring semesters the center offers pre-school programs; in the summer it provides a Summer Enrichment Program for elementary age children. Available to the Auraria campus and to the Denver community, these programs are part of the Metro State Teacher Education Division.
The classrooms are under the direction of master teachers who are trained and experienced in either early childhood or elementary education. The master teachers plan an age-appropriate program to provide quality learning experiences which meet the developmental needs of the children. Metro State teacher education students also work in the classroom providing a high adult/child ratio with opportunities for small groups and individual attention.
The preschool program is accredited by the National Academy for Early Childhood Education. There are two preschool classes available: 8:30-11 :30 a.m. for children 21/2 to 4 years old; 12:30-3:30 p.m. for children 4 years old by September 15. There is also an hour of child care available before and after each preschool class.
The Summer Enrichment Program is academic in content but recognizes childrens needs for fun and different learning experiences in summer. There are two classrooms: the younger one for children entering kindergarten or first grade in the fall; the older one for children entering second or third grade in the fall. There is a Day Program from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and an Extended Program from 7:00 to 9:00
a.m. and from 3:30 to 6:00 p.m. Call 556-2759 for more information.
Cooperative Education
The Cooperative Education Internship Center places students in work experiences related to their academic major. The purpose of the internships is to integrate academic training with actual work experience. This combination allows students to make realistic career decisions, gain valuable work experience, obtain recommendations for graduate school, and earn money to help defray college expenses. Students work in large corporations, small businesses, government, and nonprofit agencies throughout the metropolitan area. Most co-op students are paid by their employers, but in those professional fields where co-op salaries are not available, volunteer internship placements are offered to help students gain essential work experience.
Co-op internship placements are available in most academic majors and minors. Students must complete 30 semester hours of college coursework with a minimum 2.50 GPA and have a declared major to be eligible for registration with co-op. No fees are charged to the student or employer for participation in the program, and each students interests and job requirements are discussed individually with a professional coordinator.
Students may choose from three different work schedules based on the academic calendar. The alternating plan provides full-time periods of work every other semester with intervening semesters spent in full-time study. The parallel schedule places students in a job while they simultaneously attend school. These positions are usually part-time. The short term/summer plan allows students to elect a work experience which lasts for no more than one semester.
The college awards academic credit for supervised cooperative education placements. Students must complete a credit application available from the co-op office, and this application must be approved by a faculty member from the department in which credit is to be granted. No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward Metro State degree requirements. Credit earned for the co-op education work experiences are not applicable toward general studies requirements. Additional departmental restrictions may apply to certain majors.
298-1-3 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor
An entry level work experience in a private company or an agency of the federal or state government related to the students major and supervised by a competent professional on the work site. Credit is awarded by an Metro State faculty member in the appropriate academic department for learning related to academic goals enumerated in the learning contract of each student.
398-1-12 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of instructor
An advanced work experience in a private company or governmental agency related to the students major and supervised by a competent professional on the work site. Credit is awarded by an Metro State faculty member in the appropriate academic department for learning related to academic goals enumerated in the learning contract of each student. For more information on the program and the placement opportunities in your academic major, contact the Cooperative Education and Internship Center office at 1045 9th Street Park. Phone: (303) 556-3290.


30 SPECIAL PROGRAMS
: Service-Learning Program
The Metro State Service-Learning Program combines the classroom with service to the metropolitan ; community. Participating students receive credit for appropriate public service which is both beneficial 1 to the community and expands student horizons in intellectually and personally meaningful ways.
! Emerging from a wide variety of disciplines, service-learning courses are structured by faculty to weave
; service in community-based and government agencies with classroom reflection and analysis of the
; learning offered through these experiences. The courses are also designed to address real needs in our multicultural world, such as homelessness, at-risk youth, domestic violence, the environment, culture
and the arts and mental illness. Agencies that have provided service opportunities include Fort Logan ; Mental Health Center, the Denver Commission on Aging, Big Sisters, the Colorado Historical Society,
the Rape Assistance and Awareness program and numerous elementary and high schools, senior cen-
ters and nursing homes.
; Service-learning credit is available in most academic majors and minors, and prerequisites and other 1 requirements vary with each department. For assistance in learning how to participate in this program, including discussions of placement options, students should call 556-2382 or visit the Service-Learning ; Program office in CN 112-J to schedule an interview.
Extended Education
; The Extended Education Division of Metropolitan State College of Denver is committed to providing
a purposeful learning experience to a diverse metropolitan community. Extended Education addresses changing educational needs through programs and services which emphasize accessibility, innovation, lifelong learning, and responsive delivery systems.
Adult Learning Services
Adults entering or returning to college often have questions and problems that are different from those of younger students. Adults who would like assistance in re-entering the formal education system and in planning their educational goals may contact the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342.
Contract Major/Minor Degree Program
Students may design an individualized interdisciplinary major or minor program when their educational goals are not met by majors and/or minors listed in the Metro State College Catalog. Each contract major or minor is supervised by a faculty committee chosen by the student. For further information, contact the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342.
Metro-Meritus
People 60 or older, who do not wish to earn credit, are invited to attend tuition-free classes of their choice at either Metropolitan State College of Denver or at an Extended Campus location, on a space available basis. Metro-Meritus is designed to give special encouragement and assistance to retired citizens to continue their personal educational growth in a stimulating and friendly campus setting. For information and to enroll, call the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342.
Extended Campus Program
Metro States Extended Campus Program provides access to the college in the Denver metropolitan area by offering courses, and/or degree programs and services at three convenient sites. Metro South, located at 5660 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard in Arapahoe County, serves the south and southwest area. Metro North, located at 11990 Grant Street in Adams County, serves the north and northwest area. Each site is located 14 miles from the Auraria Campus along the 1-25 corridor. Metro on the Mall, located at 1554 California Street, provides credit classes, noncredit educational seminars, and tours for residents and professionals living and working in the center of Denver. Metro on the Mall also houses the Office of Continuing Professional Education which provides services and workshops to professional groups and responds to the demand for on-site training and education.
The First Year Program
The First Year Program is designed to unify and coordinate college efforts to help entering students toward a successful first year. The program provides intensive advising, course selection guidance, and academic monitoring throughout the first year, as well as coordinating academic support services for freshmen. Additionally, the program offers a First Year Seminar course which provides appropriate readings and written work enabling students to discuss and write about current issues including the value of higher education. All first-time Metro State students may enroll in the First Year Seminar course and other appropriate courses as determined by assessment at entry. The program furnishes an environment where problem solving, creativity, and peer interaction are encouraged. For additional information, please call 556-8447.


SPECIAL PROGRAMS 3
Health Careers Science Program
The Health Careers Science Program is designed to encourage women and ethnic minority groups who have traditionally been excluded from careers in science and technology. Students are provided with tutoring and other support to ensure their success in the science and technology areas. For additional information, please call 556-3215.
High School Upward Bound
The program is designed to generate the skills and motivation necessary for success in and beyond high school for youths who are low-income and first generation college-bound students. The program provides intensive academic instruction during the school year, as well as a six-week summer session. Basic academic skill preparation in reading, writing, and mathematics is part of a comprehensive counseling and enrichment program for the purpose of developing creative thinking, effective expression, and positive attitudes toward learning. The students are recruited at the beginning of their sophomore year in high school from five target area high schools located in Denver County (East, Lincoln, Manual, North, and West high schools).
The Honors Program
The Metro State Honors Program provides an intense, interdisciplinary academic program for highly motivated students whose capabilities suggest a broader spectrum of needs and interests. The program encourages individuality by responding to the diverse educational needs of students. Its integrated approach strengthens the programs foundation and provides a cross section of thought-provoking perspectives. Honors students realize their learning potential through creative inquiry, independent thought, and critical examination. Honors professors serve as mentors to guide students in fulfilling their intellectual pursuits and dreams. Finally, while the Honors Program encourages independent thought and individuality, it also inspires students to work together, forming a community of scholars who learn from one another. Classes are generally small to ensure the exchange of knowledge and philosophies.
Available to students are both the honors core and a number of departmental honors courses. There are three Honors Awards available: 1) Junior Honors Award (15 semester hours); 2) Senior Honors Award (15 semester hours which includes a thesis or senior seminar); and 3) an Metro State Honors Program designation on the Metro State diploma (27 semester hours).
An official Metro State Honors Application form may be obtained from the Metro State Honors Program director. In addition to the Metro State application form, an interview by the Honors Council is required of prospective honors students. It is highly recommended that all honors applications be completed by mid-July. Furthermore, there are a number of Colorado scholarships available. Additional information on the Honors Program is available by calling 556-4865, or in CN 101B. The Honors Program reports to the Dean of the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences.
Required Honors Core Semester Hours
HON 275 The Legacy of Arts & Letters I*............................3
HON 276 The Legacy of Arts & Letters II*...........................3
HON 295 The Art of Critical Thinking*.............................3
HON 380 Revolutions and Social Change I*...........................3
HON 381 Revolutions and Social Change II*..........................3
HON 385 American Culture I*.......................................3
HON 386 American Culture II*......................................3
HON 492 Senior Honors Seminar.....................................3
HON 495 Senior Honors Thesis...................................... 3
Total Hours for Honors Core.......................................27
*Approved General Studies courses.
International Studies
Semester Abroad Programs: Two semester abroad programs, in London, England, and in Guadalajara, Mexico, operate each year in cooperation with the American Institute for Foreign Study. Students who are in good academic standing and feel they could benefit from a semester of study in England or Mexico should contact the coordinator of International Studies at 556-3173.
Study Abroad Trips: Short-term study abroad experiences during the summer are offered each year. These trips are always led by a full-time professor and are usually for two to four weeks in length. Academic credit is normally available. In past summers, Study Abroad trips have gone to Mexico, Peru, China, Italy, France, Spain, Egypt, West Africa, Israel, England, and Russia. Contact the coordinator of International Studies at 556-3173 for information on forthcoming trips.


32 SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Office of International Programs and Services: Metro State provides assistance to visiting faculty and international students. Important information and counseling is offered on: visas, school transfers, work permission, housing, banking, and cultural and academic adaptation. The office also provides assistance to students who wish to arrange individualized study abroad opportunities. For information contact the director of International Programs and Services at 556-3660.
Metro States Language and Culture Institute
The Metropolitan State College of Denver Language and Culture Institute was established in 1976 to organize study and travel abroad. The institute currently operates a summer program in Mexico, a summer intensive language institute in West Germany, and a winter study and travel program in Mexicos Yucatan Peninsula and Central America. The institute offers credit through the Department of Modem Languages and the Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services.
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services
The college provides an opportunity for students to study formally in international courses offered by various academic departments. Students interested in international coursework should contact the academic advisor of any of the three schools of the college. A cross-disciplinary contract major and minor arranged in International Studies blends historical, political, economic, cultural, and linguistic approaches and provides a diversified global perspective. Those interested in these or related degree fields should contact the director of Adult Learning Services.
Servicemens Opportunity College
Metropolitan State College of Denver has received recognition as a Servicemens Opportunity College. Further information can be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Student Support Services Program
The purpose of the Student Support Services Program at Metropolitan State College of Denver is to provide educational assistance for selected students who, because of financial and/or other circumstances, may otherwise be denied a chance for participation in higher education programs. Academic assistance is provided for students on the basis of individual need. Courses in English and reading are offered for college credit, coupled with tutorial assistance. These courses are designed to strengthen and supplement a students basic educational skills so that she or he may better address the requirements of a college course load. Other supportive services available are counseling, testing, assistance with financial aid forms, and, when possible, assistance in attending social and cultural events to enhance the students experience at Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Veterans Services
The Office of Veterans Services is designed to provide student veterans, and veterans in the community, with a variety of outreach, recruitment, and retention services. These include assistance with problems involving checks, tutorial and counseling assistance, and many referrals to both on-campus offices and community services. The office also certifies student veterans and dependents for their VA educational benefits.
Veterans Upward Bound
Veterans Upward Bound at Metropolitan State College of Denver is a federally funded program designed to identify, recruit, and motivate veterans to use their VA benefits in pursuit of personal career goals through higher education.
Veterans Upward Bound provides refresher and tutorial help so that survival in academic or voca-tional/technical programs is maximized. This is accomplished during a 12-week trimester. Ancillary services such as career counseling, financial aid advisement, psychological counseling, and job placement are also provided for participants.
Weekend Addition Program
Metropolitan State College of Denver offers a variety of courses on Friday evenings and Saturdays under the auspices of the Weekend Addition Program. The program has its own office which provides general assistance to students on specified weekends in the areas of advising, retrieval of college forms, scheduling, and assistance with student concerns which cannot be addressed during weekdays. The Weekend Office is located in the West Classroom Building, Room 108E.


ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Academic Information
The college operates on the semester system with each semester during the academic year consisting of 15 weeks of instruction followed by a week of examinations. Running concurrently with the 16-week course schedule are modules, scheduled to begin on the first, sixth and eleventh week of the 16-week semester. During any 16-week semester students may enroll in 16-week courses, five-week courses, or combinations of both, as long as the limitations outlined under course load are not exceeded.
The college also offers either an eight- or 10-week summer term during which students may enroll for either eight- or 10-week courses, four- or five-week courses, or combinations of both. The course load restrictions are adjusted to be equivalent to those of the regular academic year.
Classes are scheduled during the day and in the evening in order to accommodate people who are employed. Students who are planning to take the majority of their classes in the evenings should check with appropriate department chairs about the availability of courses in their major during evening hours. Enrollment can be on a full-time or part-time basis and can be for the purpose of pursuing a bachelors degree, improving vocational or professional competence, or learning about particular areas of interest for cultural or intellectual reasons. Please refer to the Class Schedule for current calendar information.
Academic Honesty
Students have a responsibility to maintain standards of academic ethics and honesty. Cases of cheating or plagiarism are handled within the policies of Academic Affairs in accordance with procedures outlined in the Metro State Class Schedule.
Conduct of Students
Metropolitan State College of Denver policy provides students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. The college publishes standards of conduct, however, to which students are expected to adhere. Information regarding students rights and responsibilities, including the Student Due Process Procedure (the procedural rights provided to students at Metro State before disciplinary action is imposed), is available in Central Classroom 313.
Class Attendance
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a students absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
If students anticipate a prolonged absence, they should contact their instructors. If they find that they cannot communicate with the instructor, they should contact the chair of that department, who will inform instructors of the reasons for the anticipated absence. Whenever an instructor determines that a students absences are interfering with academic progress, that instructor may submit a letter to the chair of the department informing that office of the situation.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned: Freshmen fewer than 30; sophomores 30 or more, but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more, but fewer than 90; seniors 90 or more.
Semester Hours Credit
Course credit is based upon units designed as semester hours. One semester hour or one base contact hour equals a minimum of 750 minutes; this translates to a minimum of 15, 50-minute class hours per semester. Time required for class preparation is not a consideration in the calculation of course credit. Omnibus courses involving laboratory work give one semester hour of credit for each two, three, or four hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week. Internships require a minimum of 2,250 minutes for each hour of credit.
Preparatory Course Credit Policy
No preparatory courses are applicable toward a Metro State degree after spring 1993. For details, please see an advisor in the Academic Assessment and Support Center.


34 ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Course Load
The average course load per 16-week semester is 15 or 16 semester hours. Students who are academically strong may take up to 18 semester hours during fall and spring semesters and up to 12 semester hours during the summer semester. During fall and spring semesters, students with cumulative grade point averages of 3.25 or higher may take 19 or 20 semester hours and those students with grade point averages of 3.50 or higher may take 21 semester hours. Authorization for overloads without these grade point average minimums must be obtained from the students major department chair and appropriate dean. Authorization for overloads in excess of 21 semester hours is given by the Board on Academic Standards Exceptions, following a successful formal appeal prior to the beginning of the semester. The student should begin the appeal by obtaining a petition from an academic advising coordinator in the Academic Assessment and Support area. Please note: The college is reviewing course load requirements. Students should consult the Class Schedule for any changes pertaining to course loads.
Course Numbers, Titles, Descriptions, and Offerings
Before starting registration, students should study course descriptions for information on the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, content, and prerequisites.
The first digit in a three-digit course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 100 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores, 300 through 399 primarily for juniors, and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors. Although, in general, while students should not take courses above the level of their class (based upon semester hours earned), they may do so at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites. In special cases, students may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for their class if, in addition to meeting the requirements for prerequisites, they obtain the permission of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course.
After each course number is a figure specifying the semester hours of credit. As an example, CHE 180-4 is a freshman level, four-credit course. After the course number is the course title which may be followed by a second set of numbers in parentheses indicating the division of time between lecture and laboratory, or field experience. The first number represents the number of lecture hours each week and the second number indicates the number of laboratory, shop, or field hours. For example, CHE 180-4 General Chemistry I (4 + 0) represents the general chemistry course which has four hours of lecture and zero hours of laboratory each week. Such a course would earn four hours of credit, four for lecture and zero for laboratory work.
Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course. If there is a prerequisite that must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the course, this information is listed above the course description.
A list of all courses, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is published in the Class Schedule, which is printed in advance of the beginning of each semester, and is available to all students.
Omnibus Courses
The omnibus courses listed below are designed to provide flexible learning opportunities. Experimental topics courses, seminars, and workshops deal with novel subjects and current problems. Independent study allows students to investigate problems of special interest. Supervised field study and internships, conducted cooperatively with business, industry, government and other agencies, provide practical on-the-job learning opportunities. Content of these courses should not duplicate that of regular courses listed in the catalog. Omnibus courses may be offered by all academic departments of the college.
A specific course plan for topic and group workshop courses, which covers content and semester hours, must be submitted by an instructor and approved by the chair of the department or discipline, and dean of the school before such a course can be listed in the schedule of classes. These same approvals are required for plans of study which individual students submit for registration in a workshop course (when individualized) or an independent study course.
No more than 30 semester hours earned in all of the omnibus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements.
The following course numbers are the same for omnibus courses in all disciplines; and, when listed in class schedules, registration forms and college records, the course number will carry the prefix of the discipline in which the course is offered. In addition to prerequisites listed under a course and the approvals outlined above, other prerequisites appropriate to the study and departmental objectives may be added.


ACADEMIC INFORMATION
190 (Credit Variable) Topics
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
An introductory level class to study selected topics especially appropriate for lower-division students. 390 (Credit Variable) Advanced Topics Prerequisite: Permission of instructor An in-depth inquiry into selected problems.
480 (Credit Variable) Workshop Prerequisite: Approval of department
An advanced program of study, often of concentrated nature, designed primarily for students majoring in a particular department or discipline. Involves independent and/or group appraisal and analysis of major problems within a particular area.
490 (Credit Variable) Seminar Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Presentations, discussions, reports, and critiques of various problems within the discipline in which the seminar is offered.
498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed six semester hours) Independent Study
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department chair
Independent investigation of problems within the students major discipline. The course must be offered in that department/discipline and be supervised by a faculty member of that area.
Field Experience/Internship Courses
Field experience or experiential education courses are courses whose major instructional activities are conducted outside the regular classroom, but whose syllabi are formally approved by the institution and maintained as an integral part of a departments curriculum. These courses incorporate actual experience with information assimilation and adhere to policies set forth by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education. Certain degree, certification, and licensure programs, such as teacher education or nursing, require experiential education courses as a part of the required coursework. Other departments offer experiential education courses, generally as a part of the students major or minor, for credit applicable to graduation requirements. Five terms identify field experience courses offered at Metropolitan State College of Denver: external laboratory, practicum, internship, student teaching, and independent study.
External Laboratory
A controlled environment or organized activity emphasizing experimentation in which guided observations and participation, under the guidance and supervision of the faculty member and the cooperating supervisor, enhance the integration of theory and practice (as in child development). The external laboratory is distinguished from the on-campus laboratory which is devoted to experimental study in any branch of the natural or applied sciences.
Practicum
A unit of work that involves apprenticeship in the practical application of previously studied theory under the observance and supervision of a skilled practitioner and faculty member (as a practicum in reading).
Internship
A work-oriented training period of actual service in an agency, institution, or technical/business establishment that provides an in-depth learning experience for the student under the direct supervision of an on-site supervisor as well as the scrutiny and guidance of a faculty member (as in cooperative education).
Student Teaching
Faculty supervised learning experience in which the student applies knowledge gained in the Teacher Education Licensure Program to a classroom setting (as in practice teaching).
Independent Study
A student-initiated creative or research project conducted under the direct guidance and supervision of a faculty member of an academic department or discipline (as a thesis or special upper-division project).
Guidelines for Field Experience/Internship Courses
1. Credit may vary from one to 15 hours, depending upon the instructional activity.
2. Students are expected to meet the minimum base clock hours established by CCHE policy which requires two to three times the clock hours established for regular classroom instruction.


36 ACADEMIC INFORMATION

3. Approved cooperating agencies provide learning opportunities, prepare written statements of assignments, monitor students performance, confer with the supervising faculty member, and provide a written evaluation,
4. An average of one hour a week, minimally, is spent in seminar and discussion or in conference with the adjunct faculty at the field experience locale and/or in conference with the supervising faculty member.
5. The supervising faculty member evaluates students performance and, in consultation with the adjunct faculty member, assigns the grade for the course according to grading policies stated in the college catalog.
6. Omnibus courses (299, 397, 498, 499) emphasizing field experiences are subject to guidelines established for regular field-based courses, as well as omnibus course guidelines, and must be approved by the Office of Academic Affairs.
299 (Credit Variable) Field Experience/lnternship Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor
A supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
397 (Credit Variable) Practicum
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor
A class involving a unit of work that involves apprenticeship in the practical application of previously studied theory under the observance and supervision of a skilled practitioner and faculty member (as a practicum in reading).
498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed six semester hours) Independent Study
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department chair
Independent investigation of problems within the students major discipline. The course must be offered in that department/discipline and be supervised by a faculty member of that area.
499 (Credit Variable) Advanced Field Experience/ Internship Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
An advanced level supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
7. Cooperative Education courses (298, 398variable credit) are subject to guidelines established for regular field experience courses as well as Cooperative Education guidelines. No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward Metro State degree requirements.
Grades and Notations
Should a clerical error occur in the reporting of student grades, it is the prerogative of the faculty to adjust that grade to the actual grade earned.
Grades
Alphabetical grades and status symbols used at Metropolitan State College of Denver are as follows:
ASuperior............................4 quality points per semester hour attempted.
BAbove Average.......................3 quality points per semester hour attempted
CAverage.............................2 quality points per semester hour attempted.
DBelow Average but Passing...........1 quality point per semester hour attempted.
FFailure.............................0 quality points per semester hour attempted.
Notations
NCNo Credit IIncomplete
SSatisfactory (Limited to student teaching and HPS/LES 489 internships)
PPass
XGrade assignment pending. Student must see faculty for an explanation or assignment of grade. Courses taken through interinstitutional registration are normally assigned the X notation until grades are received and posted to the academic record.
The No Credit (NC) notation is not a grade. It may indicate withdrawal from the course or course repetition. The NC notation may also be used in self-paced courses to indicate that the student and/or the faculty have decided to extend the students exposure to the course in order to increase the students proficiency. In order to earn credit, the student must re-register for and pay for the course in a subsequent term.


ACADEMIC INFORMATION 3
The Incomplete (I) notation may be assigned when a student was unable to take the final examination and/or did not complete all of the out-of-class assignments due to unusual circumstances such as hospitalization. Incomplete work denoted by the Incomplete (I) notation must be completed within one calendar year or earlier, at the discretion of the faculty member. If the incomplete work is not completed within one calendar year, the Incomplete (I) notation will change to an F. Registering in a subsequent semester for a course in which an Incomplete (I) has been received will not remove the I. The Incomplete (I) notation may not be awarded in a self-paced course.
The following minimal requirements shall be required throughout the college and shall be a part of all school, departmental, or individual faculty policies:
1. The NC notation shall be available to students in all instances through the fourth week of classes for fall and spring terms.
2. Requests by students for an NC notation in a given course shall not be granted after the tenth week of the fall and spring semesters. The Incomplete (I) notation may be used during this period provided the conditions specified above apply.
3. Proportional time frames are applied for modular courses, weekend courses, workshops, and summer terms.
4. A written policy statement describing the use of the NC notation shall be given to each student for each class in which the student enrolls.
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a students absences have reached a point that they jeopardize the students success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
Additional requirements for an NC notation may be set by each school, department, and/or faculty member.
Quality Points
The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of semester hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received. The cumulative grade point average is calculated by dividing the total by the number of semester hours attempted.
To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must, in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements, have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of semester hours attempted. The notations NC, I, S, and P have no effect on the grade point average.
Final Examinations
It is the general policy of the college to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, with the possible exception of seminar courses or special projects.
Pass-Fail Option
The pass-fail option encourages the students to take courses outside of their major and minor fields and thereby broaden their educational experience. The pass notation has no effect on the grade point average; the failure grade is equivalent to the grade of F.
Students having already completed at least one Metro State course with at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average may choose to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass-fail basis rather than by letter grade. Courses taken on a pass-fail basis will apply to major, minor, or teacher licensure requirements only with the approval of the appropriate department chair. Self-paced courses may not be taken under the pass-fail option. Maximum graduation credit for these ungraded courses is 18 semester hours, earned in no more than six courses, limited to one course per semester or module.
A student must declare interest in the pass-fail option no later than the last day to add classes (during the first 15 percent of the term) for a particular semester or module by contacting the Office of Admissions and Records. The instructor will assign and record the pass-fail grade on a final grade list which identifies students electing and eligible for pass-fail grading. Students who request the option and are later declared ineligible, will receive notification from the Office of Admissions and Records during the semester and will be assigned a regular letter grade in the course. Once approved, the request for the pass-fail option is irrevocable.
Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a pass notation is given. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work should determine whether the institution of their choice will accept the credit before registering for courses under the pass-fail option.


38 ACADEMIC INFORMATION
: Repeated Courses (Last Grade Stands)
A student may repeat any course taken at Metro State regardless of the original grade earned. By doing
; so, only the credit and the grade for the latest attempt at the course will remain on the students Metro
j State academic record. The grade for the prior attempt(s) will be changed to the NC notation. The ; courses must carry the same title, course number, and semester hours. To effect such a change, the stu-l dent must reregister and pay tuition for the course in question, complete the course with a letter grade,
and complete the necessary form in the Office of Admissions and Records indicating that the course has J been repeated. Otherwise, the grade change will be made administratively at the time of degree evalu-
ation or earlier, as identified. Credit duplication involving transfer, interinstitutional, or state college ; system courses may be treated differently from the above procedure. This policy cannot be utilized for 1 the purpose of altering grades assigned prior to the receipt of a degree from Metro State.
: Warning/Probation/Suspension Policy
: Academic Satisfactory Progress/Good Standing
A student is deemed to be making satisfactory progress toward his or her academic goal if the student maintains a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher. This student is deemed to be in academic good stand-
ing with the institution (hereafter referred to in this section as good standing.) However, other acade-; mic standards may apply to specific programs and a student must satisfy those different academic stan-T dards in order to be deemed in academic good standing with that program. Please see information on
the program of interest to determine specific standards for that program.
Academic Warning Status
A student in good standing whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.00 will be on academic warning status with the institution (hereafter referred to in this section as warning status) his or her next semester at Metro State. A student will be removed from this warning status and be in good standing if he or she achieves a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 at the end of his or her semester on warning status. More restrictive standards may apply to given programs or schools. Please see information on the program of interest.
Academic Probation
A student who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 at the end of his or her semester on warning status will be put on academic probation with the institution (hereafter referred to in this section as academic probation) his or her next semester at Metro State. A student will be on academic probation as long as he or she has a cumulative GPA below 2.00 but is making progress toward good standing as explained below and has not been on academic probation for more than three semesters. Other conditions may apply to given programs or schools. Please see information on the program of interest.
A student is removed from academic probation and is in good standing the semester after he or she achieves a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00.
Any semester a student is on academic probation the student must make progress toward good standing with the institution by taking all of the following actions:
achieving a semester GPA of 2.20 or higher
registering and completing a minimum of three but no more than 12 semester hours (three to six semester hours for summer semester)
taking required activities as negotiated with the Director of Academic Exceptions Program. These may include certain classes, repeated courses, tutoring, or other activities.
While on academic probation, a student may pre-register the semester following the academic warning status semester, but is prohibited from pre-registering any other semester. For these other academic probation status semesters, verification must occur that the semester GPA is at least 2.20 prior to a student being allowed to register.
Academic Suspension
A student on academic probation not making progress toward good standing with the institution will be prohibited from registering at the institution for one calendar year through academic suspension from the institution. Appeal of suspension for this reason will be submitted to the Director of Academic Exceptions Program. The Director of Academic Exceptions Program in turn will deliver the appeal materials to the Student Academic Review Committee, which will review the appeal and notify the student of its decision on the appeal. A student may appeal a suspension, at most, two times in his or her academic career at Metro State.


ACADEMIC INFORMATION
A student making progress towards good standing with the institution whose cumulative GPA remains below a 2.00 after three or more semesters on probation will have his or her academic progress reviewed each semester by the Student Academic Review Committee to determine whether the student should be placed on suspension. In both cases, the decision of the Student Academic Review Committee is final.
Any student returning to Metro State after the one calendar year suspension must reapply and will be readmitted on academic probation with the institution. For these students, all probation rules as outlined above will apply.
A student who is suspended for a second time will be readmitted only if he or she has successfully completed an associate degree program from a community college after suspension from Metro State or can demonstrate to the Student Academic Review Committee that chances for successful completion of an educational program have been greatly improved.
Student Grade Appeal Procedure
If students have reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course, they must make their request for a change before the end of the third week of the semester following the completion of the coursethe following fall semester in the case of the preceding spring semester. The Grade Appeal Guidelines may be obtained from the students respective dean. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate a grade appeal within the time line, and to follow the procedures specified for grade appeals in the Metro State Students Rights and Responsibilities Handbook. The handbook may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs. All decisions of the Grade Appeal Committee will be reviewed by an Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Adaptive Self-Paced Learning
Adaptive self-paced learning is a phrase used to describe classes in which students are allowed to proceed at a pace that is suited to their personal learning needs and learning style. Students may proceed rapidly, finishing a course well in advance of the end of a semester or module, with the advantage of being able to begin new studies or to concentrate on other courses. Students may proceed slowly without time limitations that might interfere with the mastery of each required skill.
This personalized system of learning relies heavily on learning aids and media so that tutors, student proctors, and faculty are free to devote additional time to individualized instruction and assistance.
Self-paced courses are identified in the Class Schedule by SP or self-paced. Information on the method of instruction and the nature of the program is available in each department. Self-paced courses are optional and are open to all students who qualify.
Students who do not complete the work of a self-paced course during a semester are given the notation of NC and must re-enroll in and pay for the course in a subsequent semester in order to continue in that course. A letter grade is awarded during the semester in which the work is completed satisfactorily.
Nontraditional Credit Options in Lieu of Course Requirements
Successful completion of special examinations and/or completion of a prior learning portfolio which, assessed for credit, may be substituted for the completion of course requirements, may permit placement in advanced courses, or may be used as the basis for awarding credit. A student may earn up to 60 semester hours of credit toward degree requirements using nontraditional credit options. Approved credit of this sort will be posted to the students record after the completion of eight semester hours of classroom (resident) credit. Nontraditional credit may not be used toward the last 12 semester hours of a degree program, does not substitute for residency requirements, and may not be used to challenge prerequisite courses for courses already completed. Students are advised that letter grades are not assigned for nontraditional credit, and some institutions may not accept transfer credits which do not include letter grades.
Advanced Placement Examinations
Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate advanced placement examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, may have official AP scores submitted directly to the Office of Admissions and Records for consideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate department chair, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted.


40 ACADEMIC INFORMATION
: International Baccalaureate
I Metropolitan State College of Denver recognizes the greater potential for success of International Bac-
calaureate students. Accordingly, academic departments may award credit for demonstrated proficiency
; on a case-by-case basis. Students who have international baccalaureate results at the higher level may
I have an official transcript sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records for consideration for
; college credit.
| College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
For the past 20 years, the College Board has offered a program of examinations designed to evaluate ; non-accredited college-level learning to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge.
This program, known as the College-Level Examination Program, or CLEP, consists of two series of ; examinations: the general examinations and the subject examinations.
The general examination series includes five separate examinations covering the areas of English com-
position, humanities, natural sciences, math and social science-history. Based on the results of these
; examinations, the college may award up to a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit in the freshman I general studies requirement areas. Thus, the successful student may test out of many of the traditional
; courses required during the freshman year. Metro State does not allow CLEP credit for ENG 102, which
is the Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, & Documentation course.
i The subject examination series consists of more than 45 examinations which apply to specific college
courses. Metro State allows credit for 15 of these examinations. Thirty semester hours of credit also may be awarded under this series, making a total of 60 semester hours of credit obtainable under a combination of the two series of examinations.
Credit obtained under CLEP at another institution will be re-evaluated according to Metro State CLEP policies.
Any interested student should contact the coordinator at 556-3677 for complete information about this program before registering to take any of these exams.
Attainment Examinations
Any student may take attainment examinations in certain departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation, entitles students to substitute their own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the course.
Departmental Course Examinations
In special cases a department may grant students credit toward graduation for college courses in which they request and pass special college examinations. Under this provision, a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be awarded by the college. A fee of $10 per semester hour credit will be charged. Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a regular course offered by the college (omnibus-numbered courses are excluded), and the credit granted will be for the corresponding course, provided the student has no previous collegiate enrollment for a similar course and the credit is applicable toward the students graduation requirements. Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department chair no later than the third week of classes in a semester. Permission for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recommendation of the department chair.
No application for credit by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degree-seeking curriculum in the college. Credit by examination will not be approved for a student who is within 12 classroom semester hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for a course in which a student has been officially enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver or at another institution, whether or not the course has been completed and a grade awarded. Credit by examination cannot be obtained for college courses attended as a listener, visitor, or auditor.
When students have completed a course in the same discipline, higher in number than the course for which they are seeking examination credit, permission will be granted provided the two courses are unrelated and approval is granted by the appropriate department chair and dean. In a given discipline, no credit by examination can be obtained for a course lower in number in a sequence than the highest-numbered course already completed by that student. If a student is registered for, but has not completed a higher-numbered course in a sequence, the examination for the lower-numbered course must be com-


ACADEMIC INFORMATION
pleted within the first three weeks of the semester. Exceptions must be appealed to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions following endorsement of the department chair or dean. Examinations cannot be taken to raise grades, to remove failures, or to remove NC, SP, or I notations. Credit by examination is not applicable toward academic residence requirements.
Examples of unrelated subject matter:
ART 212......Human Anatomy for Artists
ART 103......Basic Photography Methods
ITS 241......Introduction to Photography
ITS 101......Introduction to Wood
Examination for credit will be taken at a time specified by the department, but after the special examination fee has been paid. No examination for credit in a college course may be repeated. A grade equivalent to A or B must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credits so earned for the course will be recorded without grade reference on the students permanent record. Credits in courses for which credit is earned by examination are not considered in computing college grade point averages. Credit by examination will be posted after a student has completed eight semester hours of credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver and after an evaluation of all possible transfer credits has been completed.
Credit for Prior Learning
Students may apply for credit for college-level learning gained through experience through the Credit for Prior Learning program. Information and assistance is available through the Office of Adult Learning Services. Prior learning credit is available in most, but not all, academic departments.
Credits are awarded on the basis of a careful assessment of the prior learning portfolio by faculty in the department from which credit is sought. The prior learning portfolio is developed with the assistance of the Office of Adult Learning Services. Applicants for credit for prior learning will generally be required to take EDU 268-1, the Portfolio Development Workshop. Prior learning portfolios are submitted to Adult Learning Services, which submits the portfolio to the appropriate academic department. Students are advised not to enroll in classes for which credit for prior learning may be sought.
A fee of one-half the part-time student tuition is charged for credit for prior learning; $40 of the total fee is due prior to the assessment of the portfolio by faculty for credit. The remainder of the fee is due if and when credit is awarded. Policies governing nontraditional credit options apply to credit for prior learning. Contact the office of Adult Learning Services for assistance and further information (556-8342). Information sessions about portfolio assessment and other nontraditional credit options at Metro State are held on a regular basis by the office of Adult Learning Services.
Credit for Military Training and Other Training Programs
Military training and other training programs which have been assessed for college credit by the American Council on Education will be evaluated by the Office of Admissions and Records for transfer credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver. For formal military training, copies of training certificates and a copy of the DD-214 should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records. For other training, official ACE transcripts should be submitted. Credit limit is 30 semester hours.
Honors and Awards
Metropolitan State College of Denver annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadership and service to the college and community, excellence in scholastic achievement, and outstanding personal character and integrity. Recognition of students includes:
The Presidents Award (one senior); the Special Service Award for Academic Affairs (one senior) and for Student Affairs (one senior); Outstanding Student Awards (seniors from each school); Whos Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges (seniors); American Association of University Women (AAUW) Award (senior woman). Other awards include Special Service Award for Exceptionally Challenged Students, Associated Students of Metropolitan State College of Denver, Charles W. Fisher Award, and the Colorado Engineering Council Award.
Information and applications for these awards are available in CN 313. Awards are presented at the annual banquet the night before graduation.
In addition to annual awards, students with outstanding academic achievements are recognized by being named on Metropolitan State College of Denver Honor Lists. The Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative grade point average of


42 ACADEMIC INFORMATION
3.85 or higher. The Vice Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative grade point average of between 3.50 and 3.84, inclusively.
Computation will occur initially when the student has completed between 30 and 60 hours at Metro State, then again between 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours.
Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability in their baccalaureate degree while attending Metropolitan State College of Denver. Honors designations are determined according to the following criteria:
1. Summa Cum LaudeTop five percent of graduates within each school with cumulative Metro State GPA of no less than 3.65
Magna Cum LaudeNext 5 percent of graduates within each school with cumulative Metro State GPA of no less than 3.65.
Cum LaudeNext 5 percent of graduates within each school with cumulative Metro State GPA of no less than 3.65.
2. To determine each honors category, grade point averages for the previous spring semester graduates are arrayed in rank order. This rank ordering is then used to determine the honors recipients among the following summer, fall, and spring graduates.
3. To qualify for graduation honors recognition, a student must have completed a minimum of 50 semester hours of classroom credit at Metro State prior to the term of graduation.
4. Courses completed during the term of graduation and transfer credits are not considered when determining honors.
Honors designations are added to the students official academic record; no other notification will be sent. For additional information regarding graduation honors, contact the office of Academic Affairs at 556-3907.
Diplomas and Commencement
Students who have met all requirements for graduation are granted diplomas at the end of the semester for which they are degree candidates. A formal commencement ceremony is held at the conclusion of each semester.
Catalog Requirements for Bachelors Degree
Students must use a single catalog to meet all their degree requirements including those in the general studies, major, and minor. All degree programs must adhere to overriding current policies at Metro State. All students should refer to the General Studies for Bachelors Degree section in this catalog for important information.
Students are responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to their program contained in this catalog and elsewhere. The final responsibility for completing the requirements for a degree rests with the students, and it is recommended that they seek advice. Students should never assume that they have approval to deviate from a stated requirement without a properly signed statement to that effect.
For degree requirement purposes, students must normally select a Metropolitan State College of Denver Catalog in effect while they are enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver, provided that the catalog contains their complete program of study. A student interrupting enrollment for any three consecutive semesters or more may select only the current catalog in effect after returning to the institution.
A student transferring from a regionally accredited Colorado community college may complete degree requirements using a Metro State catalog in effect while enrolled at the community college, subject to the following conditions.
1. The catalog followed does not predate the current Metro State catalog by more than three years.
2. The catalog selected may have been in use at any time from the time the student was continually enrolled at a regionally accredited Colorado community college to the semester for which the student is enrolling.*
Continuous enrollment is defined as not interrupting enrollment for three or more consecutive semesters (one calendar year). Continuous enrollment must be maintained from the period of the designated catalog to the point of Metro State degree completion.


ACADEMIC INFORMATION 4!
Orientation
All first-time college students, regardless of age, and all transfer students less than 20 years old are required to attend an orientation session. Re-admit students are encouraged to attend an orientation session. Information is provided concerning college requirements, class scheduling, registration procedures, college services and resources, transfer of credit, academic advising, choice of major, and career counseling. Information is also available regarding special programs offered by the college and its various departments. Orientation sessions are offered to freshmen, transfer students, adults, reentry women, and parents of new freshmen. For additional information, call 556-4055.
Requirements for All Bachelors Degrees
To earn a bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree, a student must satisfy the following minimum requirements plus any others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
1. Complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher for all Metropolitan State College of Denver coursework.
2. Complete at least 40 semester hours in upper-division courses (300- and 400-level courses).
3. Complete all general studies requirements listed for the degree and major.
4. Complete a three-hour multicultural course requirement.
5. Complete a three-hour senior experience course requirement. This course must be taken at Metro State.
6. Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 30 semester hours. With certain exceptions (see the Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College of Denver section of this catalog), complete a minor consisting of at least 18 semester hours. If a student completes two majors, the second major satisfies the minor requirement. Completing two areas of emphasis under one major does not constitute the completion of two majors. Completion of two majors does not result in two degrees or diplomas. Coursework used to meet requirements for one major or minor may not be used to meet requirements for another major or minor. Students may not major and minor in the same discipline and are encouraged to obtain verification from an advisor if uncertainty exists.
7. Complete all special requirements of a department and school.
8. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all Metro State courses which satisfy the requirements for the major and for all Metro State courses which satisfy requirements for a minor. Students should check with an advisor for special GPA program requirements.
9. Complete a graduation agreement.
10. Academic Residency (classroom credit) requirements:
a. Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver, including the last 12 semester hours applicable to the degree.
b. Complete at least eight upper-division (300- and 400-level) semester hours of the major and three upper-division hours of the minor at Metropolitan State College of Denver (classroom credit).
c. Students should be aware that UCD pooled courses and courses taken interinstitutionally or at one of the other state colleges will not satisfy academic residence requirements at Metro State.
d. Complete the senior experience requirement.
11. Credit Limitations:
a. Not more than 30 semester hours of omnibus-numbered courses may be applied toward graduation requirements.
b. Not more than 30 semester hours taken by extension and/or correspondence may be applied toward a bachelors degree.
c. Not more than four semester hours in human performance and leisure activity or varsity sports courses will be counted toward a bachelors degree for students who are not majoring in human performance, sport and leisure studies.
d. Not more than seven semester hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a bachelors degree for students who are not majoring in music.


44 ACADEMIC INFORMATION
| Requirements for a Second Degree
J For an additional bachelors degree, the student will comply with the following:
; 1. The first bachelors degree must be recognized by Metropolitan State College of Denver.
; 2. Student must complete all requirements for a new major with a minimum of eight Metro State
* classroom upper-division semester hours in the major department.
1 3. Student must complete a minor, if required by the major department for the contemplated degree.
; 4. The student must spend at least two additional semesters in residence.
; 5. A minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at Metro State is required in addition to the
J credits completed by the student for the earlier degree.
6. General studies will be considered complete unless deficiencies exist according to the major
department.
j 7. Credit limitations for a bachelors degree will continue to exist for the second degree.
! 8. A graduation agreement must be completed as outlined in this catalog.
: Contract Major/Minor Program
; Even with the wide diversity of the majors and minors presently offered at Metropolitan State College of Denver, the need arises for an academic program which is individual in nature, meets the specific
V needs of the students and is responsive to emerging educational requirements. The contract major/minor is an organized degree program written by the student in consultation with a contract major/minor faculty advising committee. Working with faculty from selected disciplines enables students to complete a specific, individual, educational objective which cannot be satisfied by any existing catalog major and/or minor programs. The degree sought may be either a bachelor of arts or bachelor of science. For further information, contact the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342.


GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION
GENERAL STUDIES FOR BACHELORS DEGREES
Students must use a single catalog to meet all degree requirements including those in the general studies, major, and minor. Some changes in General Studies requirements have been made retroactive. As a consequence, many General Studies requirements and policies described in this catalog may be followed by students by students using earlier catalogs. All degree programs must adhere to overriding current policies at Metro State.
Courses and specific prerequisites/corequisites approved for the current program are described in the Course Description section of this catalog. Students should consult an advisor in the Academic Assessment and Support Center when planning their programs.
Philosophy of the General Studies Program
Metropolitan State College of Denver seeks to prepare its graduates for a lifetime of learning, which, in our changing and complex society, requires focused expertise (such as that provided by a major area of study) and the abilities to communicate with, as well as to learn from, experts in other fields. At Metropolitan State College of Denver, undergraduate education fosters the critical thinking necessary for the exploration of unfamiliar disciplines and for the synthesis of learning, and exposes students to the richness and variety of the intellectual universe.
Through its General Studies Program, Metropolitan State College of Denver encourages students to use their mastery of skills in an exploration of knowledge in a variety of disciplines. The General Studies Program provides two levels of experience, each with separate goals:
Level ISkills
Level I courses provide students the basic skills of reading and listening critically, recognizing faulty reasoning, drawing conclusions from quantitative data, organizing ideas, and communicating clearly. Level IIBreadth of Knowledge
Level II courses provide the breadth characteristic of the educated person, encourage an open attitude toward different approaches to problems, and cultivate an informed awareness of the principal achievements in history, arts and letters, social science, and science.
Distribution and Credit Requirements
To complete their General Studies Program, students must take approved courses that fulfill the following distribution and credit requirements:
Category Semester Hours
Level I1
Composition..............................................................6
Mathematics..............................................................3
Communications...........................................................3
Level W
Historical...............................................................3
Arts and Letters.........................................................6
Social Sciences..........................................................6
Natural Sciences........................................................ 6
Total Hours Required3...................................................33
'A transfer course or courses of at least two semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Level l course.
2One hour deviations in the General Studies Level II categories may be allowed.
3A student s completed General Studies program must contain at least 33 semester hours.
Basic Rules
1. Only approved courses may be used to satisfy the general studies requirements. A current listing of these courses is published in this section, in a General Studies, Multicultural, and Senior Experience Requirements pamphlet, and in the Course Description section of this catalog.
2. General studies courses need not be counted toward general studies requirements. They may be taken instead as electives or to satisfy requirements in the major or degree program.
3. Departments or programs whose curricula are guided by accrediting agencies may specify, by prefix and number, some general studies courses in addition to courses required for the major or a professional credential.
4. Courses taken using the pass-fail option cannot be counted for General Studies.


46 GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION
Level I Requirements: Composition, Mathematics, and Communication; Freshman Assessment: Reading, Writing, and Mathematics Placement Exams
First time college students are required to complete the reading, writing, and mathematics placement exams (see Assessment Requirements section). Exam results will serve as the basis for academic advising. To increase the students opportunity for success at Metropolitan State College of Denver, students may be required to take courses below the level of first-year courses offered by Metropolitan State College of Denver. Students should be aware, however, that no credit is given for courses that are below the college level.
Placement Test Prerequisites
Students must have a passing score on the appropriate placement test before they will be allowed to register for Level I General Studies courses in English, mathematics, and reading. Exceptions will be made for students who have earned at least a grade of C in the community college course specified by the department. The Academic Assessment and Support Center administers the placement tests. Students should consult an advisor in the Academic Assessment and Support Center for guidance in selecting the appropriate Level I courses.
Composition: Required Courses Semester Hours
; ENG 101 Freshman Composition: The Essay....................................3
ENG 102 Freshman Composition: Research, Analysis and Documentation...3
T Rules: Composition Requirement
1. Students must complete the ENG 101 requirement within their first 30 semester hours at Metropolitan State College of Denver and the ENG 102 requirement within their first 60 semester hours. These requirements may be postponed only if the postponement is approved in writing by the Department of English.
2. Students must demonstrate the adequacy of their writing skills in the placement exam before enrolling in ENG 101. Those students whose writing skills are inadequate will be counseled on steps to improve those skills. Students may be required to complete additional coursework.
3. Students shall have satisfied the Level I Composition requirements if they
a. satisfactorily complete ENG 101 and ENG 102, or
b. pass a CLEP or AP examination approved by the Department of English (ENG 101 only), or
c. transfer equivalent courses.
Mathematics: (Minimum 3 semester hours*) Semester Hours
MTH 108 Mathematical Modes of Thought.........................................3
MTH 111 College Algebra.......................................................4
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics............................................4
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences.............4
MTH 161 Mathematical Concepts for Teachers in Presecondary Schools............4
*A transfer course or courses of at least two semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Level I course.
Rules: Mathematics Requirement
1. Students will take the mathematics placement exam to determine their abilities to calculate with fractions, decimals, and percents, and to know and use elementary geometrical formulas. Those whose skills are inadequate will be required to complete college arithmetic coursework before enrolling in a Level I mathematics course. Some courses have additional requirements.
2. Students must complete the Level I mathematics requirement within their first 30 semester hours at Metropolitan State College of Denver. This requirement may be postponed on an individual basis if the postponement is approved in writing by the Department of Mathematical Sciences.
3. Students shall have satisfied the Level I mathematics requirement if they
a. pass a mathematics course that has been approved for Level I mathematics credit (see courses listed above), or
b. pass a CLEP or AP exam approved by the Department of Mathematical Sciences, or
c. successfully complete a mathematics course for which a Level I mathematics course is a pre requisite, or
d. transfer an equivalent course.


GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION
Communication: (Minimum 3 semester hours*) Semester Hours
FRE 102 Elementary French II.............................................5
GER 102 Elementary German II.............................................5
HON 295 The Art of Critical Thinking.....................................3
PHI 111 Language, Logic, and Persuasion..................................3
RDG 151 Cognitive Strategies for Analytical Reading......................3
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II............................................5
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication.............................3
Sfe 171 Interpersonal Communications: Individual as a Communicator.......3
* A transfer course or courses of at least two semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Level / course.
Rules: Communication Requirement
1. Students must complete the required Level I communication course within their first 30 semester hours at Metropolitan State College of Denver.
2. Students shall have satisfied the Level I communication requirement if they
a. pass an approved Level I communication course (listed above), or
b. pass a CLEP or AP test approved by a department offering a Level I communication course, or
c. transfer an equivalent course.
d. transfer a second semester, four-or-five-semester hour foreign language course or a more advanced language course that is taught in a language not offered at Metro State.
e. pass or transfer an advanced foreign language course that is taught in the foreign language and that has Metro States FRE 102, GER 102, and SPA 102 or equivalent coursework, or more advanced coursework, as a prerequisite.
f. pass or transfer an advanced public speaking course for which Metro State s SPE 101 or a comparable course is a prerequisite.
Students who have satisfied the communications requirement using (e) or (f) above must place the course used to satisfy (e) or (f) in the Level I communications requirement slot. Level II General Studies courses used to satisfy the Level I communications requirements cannot also be counted in the Level II category.
Level II Requirements
Courses approved to satisfy the Level II requirement are distributed among four categories. The categories, together with the minimum number of semester hours a student must accumulate to satisfy this requirement are given below. On hour deviations in the General Studies Level II categories may be allowed, provided the students completed General Studies program contains at least 33 semester hours. Level II Categories: Semester Hours
Historical............................................................................3
Arts and Letters......................................................................6
Social Science........................................................................6
Natural Science.......................................................................6
Rules: Level II Requirement
1. Prerequisites: Level II general studies courses have at least the following pre- or corequisites, and some courses have additional prerequisites (see course descriptions in this catalog) a. Historical and Arts and Letters:
(1) Courses numbered 100 to 199:
Minimum performance standard scores on the reading and writing preassessment placement tests;
(2) Courses numbered 200 to 299:
Satisfaction of the Level I Mathematics course requirement and either ENG 101 or the Level I communication course requirement
(3) Courses numbered 300 and above:
Satisfaction of all Level I General Studies course requirements


48 GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION
; b. Natural Science and Social Science
(1) Courses numbered 100 to 199:
Minimum performance standard scores on the reading, writing and mathematics preassess ; ment placement tests.
| (2) Courses numbered 200 to 299:
Satisfaction of the Level I mathematics course requirement and either ENG 101 or the Level ; I communication course requirements.
(3) Courses numbered 300 and above:
I Satisfaction of all Level I General Studies course requirements.
I 2. Students may not use courses having the same prefix as their major discipline to satisfy the Level
II requirement.
3. Students may not apply more than eight semester hours of credit with the same course prefix to
the Level II requirements.
I 4. Students may use either prefix for a cross-listed course, i.e., one designated XXX /YYY .
They must select the prefix they wish to use at registration; the selection may not be changed ; later.
5. History majors must take three extra semester hours at Level II in the Social Sciences, Arts and ; Letters, or Natural Sciences categories in lieu of the three hours in the Historical category.
t Historical Courses (Minimum 3 semester hours*)
Historical courses aim to impart a broad knowledge of history with emphasis upon the major forces, persons, and events that have shaped the modem world.
The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies Historical requirement. Other courses may have been approved for such use after the publication of this catalog. For more recent information contact the Academic Assessment and Support Center.
*A one hour deviation in the General Studies Historical requirement may be allowed, provided the students completed General Studies program contains at least 33 semester hours.
Semester Hours
AAS 113/HIS 194mc Survey of African History...........................3
AAS 213/H1S 295mc West African Civilizations...........................3
CHS 101/H1S 191mc History of Meso-America:
Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods...................3
FRE 355 French Historical Perspectives.......................3
HIS 100 American Civilization................................3
HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1715.........................3
HIS 102 Western Civilization since 1715......................3
HIS 111 Colorado History I...................................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ............................3
HIS 122 American History since 1865..........................3
HIS 165/WMS 165 Women in U.S. History................................3
HIS 191/CHS lOlmc History of Meso-America:
Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods...................3
HIS 193/NAS 193mc History of Indigenous/Hispanic Americans............3
HIS 194/AAS 113mc Survey of African History............................3
HIS 201 Contemporary World History...........................3
HIS 295/AAS 213mc West African Civilizations...........................3
HIS 303 Ancient Orient and Greece............................3
HIS 306 Rome and the Caesars.................................3
HIS 309mc Native Americans in American History.................3
HIS 312 Medieval History.....................................3
HIS 314 Renaissance and Reformation..........................3
HIS 331 England to 1714......................................3
HIS 332 England since 1714...................................3
HIS 381 Latin America: Republics.............................3
HON 385 American Culture 1...................................3
HON 386 American Culture II..................................3
NAS 193/H1S 193mc History of Indigenous/Hispanic Americans.............3
WMS 165/HIS 165 Women in U.S. History................................3
meThis course will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.


GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION
Arts and Letters Courses (Minimum 6 semester hours*)
Arts and Letters courses impart a broad knowledge of important works and major schools of thought from at least two centuries. They also provide a foundation for critical evaluation within the discipline.
The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies Arts and Letters requirement. Other courses may have been approved for such use after the publication of this catalog. For more recent information contact the Academic Assessment and Support Center.
*A one hour deviation in the General Studies Arts and Letters requirement may be allowed, provided the student 's completed General Studies program contains at least 33 semester hours.
Semester Hours
AAS 324/ENG 324mc African American Literature....................................3
ART 104 Art Appreciation Survey.................................3
ART 309mc Art and Cultural Heritage...............................3
ART 395/WMS 395 Womens Art/Womens Issues..............................3
ENG 110 Introduction to Literature..............................3
ENG 111 Introduction to Fiction.................................3
ENG 112 Introduction to Drama...................................3
ENG 131 Introduction to Shakespeare.............................3
ENG 303 Semantics...............................................3
ENG 324/AAS 324mc African American Literature....................................3
ENG 342 English Bible as Literature.............................3
ENG 343 Classical Mythology.....................................3
ENG 346 Childrens Literature...................................3
FRE 311 Survey of French Literature I...........................3
FRE 312 Survey of French Literature II..........................3
GER 320 German Culture and Civilization.........................3
HON 275 Legacy of Arts and Letters 1............................3
HON 276 Legacy of Arts and Letters II...........................3
MUS 100 Introduction to Music...................................3
MUS 304 Music and the Arts......................................3
PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy..............................3
PHI 103 Ethics..................................................3
PHI 300 History of Greek Philosophy.............................3
PHI 302 History of Modem Philosophy.............................3
PHI 336 Business Ethics.........................................3
PSC 305 Political Theory........................................3
RDG 306 Critical Reading/Thinking...............................3
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain.......................3
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture & Civilization.................3
SPA 322 Folklore & Culture of the Mexican Southwest.............3
SPE 221 Introduction to Theatre.................................3
SPE 277/WMS 277 Gender and Communication................................3
SPE 308 Great American Speakers.................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication.............................3
SPE 376mc Cultural Influences on Communication....................3
WMS 277/SPE 277 Gender and Communication................................3
WMS 351 Feminist Theory.........................................3
WMS 395/ART 395 Womens Art/Womens Issues..............................3
me This course will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.


50 GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION
Social Science Courses (Minimum 6 semester hours*)
Social Science courses aim to explore the formation, behavior, and interaction of various social, cultural, political, or economic groups and institutions.
The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies Social Science requirement. Other courses may have been approved for such use after the publication of this catalog. For more recent information contact the Academic Assessment and Support Center.
*A one hour deviation in the General Studies Social Science requirement may be allowed, provided the students completed General Studies program contains at least 33 semester hours.
Semester Hours
AAS lOlmc Introduction to African American Studies...........3
AAS 220/PSC 220mc Politics and Black People..........................3
AAS 330/SOC 314mc The Black Community................................3
AAS 355/SOC 344 The Black Family...................................3
ACC 101 Accounting for Non-Business Majors.................3
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology..............3
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication.......................3
ANT 331 Ethnography of North American Indians..............3
ANT 348 Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness...........3
CHS lOOmc Introduction to Chicano Studies....................3
CHS 310/SOC 313mc The Chicano Community..............................3
ECO 201 Principles of EconomicsMacro......................3
ECO 202 Principles of EconomicsMicro......................3
EDU 264mc Urban and Multicultural Education..................3
EDS 320 Educational Psychology Applied to Teaching........3
FRE 356 Contemporary Socio-Cultural Issues.................3
GEG 100 World Regional Geography...........................3
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography....................3
GEG 202 Geography of Colorado..............................3
HES 105 Dynamics of Health.................................3
- HIS 366 Recent U.S., 1945-1970s...........................3
HMT 185mc Multicultural/Multinational Cultural
Adjustment/Readjustment..........................3
HON 380 Revolutions and Social Change I....................3
HON 381 Revolutions and Social Change II...................3
HPS 272 Fundamentals of Coaching...........................2
HSP 349mc Multicultural Issues in Human Services.............4
ITS 281 Technology, Society, and You.......................3
LES 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society.........3
NAS lOOmc Introduction to Native American Studies............3
NAS 320/PSC 320mc Native American Politics...........................3
PSC 101 American National Government.......................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas........................3
PSC 220/AAS 220mc Politics and Black People..........................3
PSC 320/NAS 320mc Native American Politics...........................3
'' PSY 101 Introductory Psychology............................3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment.........................3
PSY 221 Psychology of Human Development....................3
PSY 325 Child Psychology...................................3
PSY 326 Psychology of Adolescence..........................3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology..........................3
SOC 104mc Introduction to Social Gerontology.................3
SOC 201 Current Social Issues..............................3
SOC 313/CHS 310mc The Chicano Community..............................3
SOC 314/AAS 330mc The Black Community................................3
SOC 322/WMS 322mc Race, Sex, and Ethnic Groups.......................3
SOC 344/AAS 355 The Black Family...................................3
WMS 101 Introduction: Woman in Transition..................3
WMS 322/SOC 322mc Race, Sex, and Ethnic Groups.......................3
WMS 346mc Women and the Social Sciences (Variable Title)....3
me This course will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.


GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION 5
i
Natural Science Courses (Minimum 6 semester hours*)
Natural Science courses provide an opportunity for students to experience the systematic formulation ; and testing of hypotheses and to learn the importance of accurate observation and measurement. Stu- ; dents will differentiate among fact, speculation, evidence, inference, belief, theory, law, and general- ization. ;
The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies Natural Science requirement. Other ; courses may have been approved for such use after the publication of this catalog. For more recent infor-mation contact the Academic Assessment and Support Center.
*A one hour deviation in the General Studies Natural Science requirement may be allowed, provided the stu- ; dent's completed General Studies program contains at least 33 semester hours. *
Semester Hours
ANT 101 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory..............3
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy..........................................3 :
AST 304 Modem Cosmology...................................3
BIO 100 Human Biology for Non-Majors.......................................3
BIO 101 Ecology for Non-Majors............................3
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology...................4
BIO 330 Advanced Human Biology for Non-Majors..............................3 ;
BIO 355 Urban Ecology.....................................4
CHE 101 Chemistry and Society.............................3
CHE 110 Principles of Chemistry...........................5
CHE 180 & CHE 185* General Chemistry I...............................6
CHE 181 & CHE 185* General Chemistry I...............................6
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I...............................4
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory....................2
GEG 110 Introduction to Physical Geography................3
GEG 120 Introduction to Environmental Sciences............3
GEG 140 World Resources...................................3
GEL 101 General Geology...................................4
GEL 102 Geology of Colorado...............................3
GEL 115 Oceanography......................................3
HES 204 Introduction to Nutrition.........................3
HES 345 Dynamics of Disease...............................3
HON 280 History of Science................................3
HON 281 Development of Experimental Science...............3
HPS 330 Anatomical Kinesiology............................3
HPS 334 Physiology of Exercise............................3
MET 355 Rocket and Stars A Space Trek...................3
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology.......................3
MTR 350 Hazardous Weather.................................3
PHY 100 Introduction to Physics...........................4
PHY 125 Physics of Technology.............................6
PHY 201 & PHY 203 College Physics I and Laboratory..................5
PHY 202 & PHY 204 College Physics II and Laboratory.................5
PHY 231 & PHY 232 General Physics I and Laboratory..................5
PHY 233 & PHY 234 General Physics II and Laboratory.................5
PHY 362 Sound and Music...................................3
SCI 280 Conceptual Science and Mathematics................6
*Completion of both CHE 180 and CHE 185 with passing grades is required to receive General Studies credit.
The same is true of the combination CHE 181 & 185.


52 GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION
j Additional Graduation Requirements
| Multicultural and Senior Experience Course Requirements
In addition to completing the General Studies requirements, a student must complete a three-hour mul-; ticultural course and a three-hour Senior Experience course or selection of courses to be awarded a I bachelors degree from Metropolitan State College of Denver. The rules pertaining to those require-; ments and the courses that will satisfy those requirements are described below.
: Multicultural Course Requirement (Minimum 3 semester hours)
: Multicultural courses are designed to increase students appreciation and awareness of diverse cultures, j Students may use the course to satisfy General Studies, major, or minor requirements if the course is ; approved for that use. If the course is used for General Studies, the Level II General Studies restrictions I remain in effect, e.g., no courses with the major prefix may be used. The multicultural requirement
became effective for students entering fall 1992 and after.
J Semester Hours
AAS 101 Introduction to African American Studies........3
AAS 113/HIS 194 Survey of African History.......................3
AAS 213/HIS 295 West African Civilizations......................3
AAS 220/PSC 220 Politics and Black People.......................3
; AAS 324/ENG 324 African American Literature.....................3
AAS 330/SOC 314 The Black Community.............................3
ART 309 Art and Cultural Heritage.......................3
CHS 100 Introduction to Chicano Studies.................3
CHS 101/HIS 191 History of Meso-America:
Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods..............3
CHS 310/SOC 313 The Chicano Community...........................3
EDU 264 Urban and Multicultural Education...............3
ENG 324/AAS 324 African American Literature.....................3
HIS 191/CHS 101 History of Meso-America:
Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods..............3
HIS 193/NAS 193 History of Indigenous/Hispanic Americans........3
HIS 194/AAS 113 Survey of African History.......................3
HIS 295/AAS 213 West African Civilizations......................3
HIS 309 Native Americans in American History............3
HMT 185 Multicultural/Multinational Cultural
Adjustment/Readjustment.........................3
HSP 349 Multicultural Issues in Human Services..........4
MGT 483 Workforce Diversity.............................3
NAS 100 Introduction to Native American Studies.........3
NAS 193/HIS 193 History of Indigenous/Hispanic Americans........3
NAS 320/PSC 320 Native American Politics........................3
PSC 220/AAS 220 Politics and Black People.......................3
PSC 320/NAS 320 Native American Politics........................3
SOC 104 Introduction to Social Gerontology..............3
SOC 313/CHS 310 The Chicano Community...........................3
SOC 314/AAS 330 The Black Community.............................3
SOC 322/WMS 322 Race, Sex, and Ethnic Groups....................3
SPE 376 Cultural Influences on Communication............3
WMS 322/SOC 322 Race, Sex, and Ethnic Groups....................3
WMS 346 Women and the Social Sciences (Variable Title)..3
XXX* 119 First Year Seminar..............................3
* Variable course prefixes, e.g., ENG, PSC, RDG, SOC, SPE


GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION
Senior Experience Requirement (Minimum 3 semester hours)
The Senior Experience provides a culmination of the undergraduate experience, allowing students to synthesize their learning using critical analysis and logical thinking. Students may use the course to satisfy major or minor requirements if the course is approved for that use. Students should consult with their advisor and check prerequisites. Students must complete a Senior Experience at the end of the undergraduate program and must take the course or courses at Metro State. Senior Experience courses have the following minimal prerequisites: satisfaction of all Level I and Level II General Studies course requirements and senior standing. In some cases students may need to take two courses to satisfy the requirement.
Semester Hours
ART 401 Modem Art History: Theory & Criticism.............3
ART 475 Senior Experience Studio: Portfolio
Development and Thesis Show......................3
BIO 451 Microbial Ecology.................................3
BIO 454 Plant Ecology.....................................4
BIO 485 Evolution.........................................3
CEN 460 Senior Seminar....................................3
CHE 495 Senior Experience in Chemistry....................3
CJC 465 Ethics for the Criminal Justice Professional......3
COM 441 Budgeting & Planning for Audio-Visual Productions 3
COM 479 Senior Seminar in Technical Communications........3
f CSI421 Software Development & Engineering...............4
ECO 460 History of Economic Thought.......................3
EDS 429 Student Teaching & Seminar: Secondary.. . 6, 8, 10 ,12
EDU 419 Student Teaching & Seminar: Elementary. . 6, 8, 10, 12
EDU 438 Teaching Practicum in Pre-primary Early
Childhood Education.............................3-6
EDU 439 Student Teaching & Seminar-Early Childhood
(Preschool through 3rd grade)..............6, 8, 10
EDU 469 Professional Practicum..........................1-6
EET 410 Senior Project I..................................1
EtiT 411 Senior Project II.................................2
ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction,
Poetry, or Drama..................................3
ENG 461 Theories & Techniques in Literary Criticism.......3
ENG 464 Teaching English in Secondary Schools.............3
ENG 466 Teaching Literature and Language K-6..............3
FRE 452 Modem French Theater..............................3
FRE 453 The French Novel..................................3
GEG 496 Global Environmental Challenges...................3
GEL 496 Environmental Field Studies.......................3
GER 411 The German Novel of the 19th and
Early 20th Centuries..............................3
GER 412 German Drama of the 19th & 20th Centuries.........3
HCM 451 Health Care Management Practicum..................6
HIS 482 Senior Seminar....................................3
HMT 404 Senior Hospitality Research Experience I..........2
HMT 440 Senior Hospitality Research Experience II.........2
HSP479 Professional Internship..........................12
MET 401 Advanced Manufacturing Technology.................3
MET 407 Computer Aided Design.............................3
MGT 483mc Workforce Diversity...............................3
MGT 495 Strategic Management..............................3
MTH 421 Probability Theory................................4
MTH 422 Stochastic Processes..............................4
MTH 441 Advanced Calculus 1...............................4
MTH 448 Numerical Analysis I..............................4
MUS 411 Analysis of Music.................................2
MUS 434 Secondary School Music Methods and................2


54 GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION
MUS 439 Supervised Field Experience........................1
MUS 451 Instrumental Conducting............................2
MUS 474 Performance VIII...................................4
MUS 479 Senior Recital.....................................1
MUS 495 Senior Project.....................................3
NUR 485 Nursing Process: Application.......................5
PHI 410 Senior Seminar.....................................3
PHY 462 Computational Physics II...........................2
PHY 472 Advanced Physics Laboratory II.....................2
PHY 492 Physics Senior Seminar.............................1
PSC 402 Special Studies....................................3
PSY 451 History and Systems of Psychology..................3
SOC 460 Advanced Research in the Social Sciences...........3
SPA 420 Spanish American Essay: 19th & 20th Centuries.....3
SPA 431 History of the Spanish Language....................3
SPE 409 Classical Rhetoric.................................3
SPE 412 Freedom of Speech..................................3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life... 3
WMS 475 Senior Seminar.....................................3
me This course will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.


DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College of Denver
Metropolitan State College of Denver is organized into three schools. These are listed below with the majors and minors offered by each. The curriculum requirements for each of the programs are described in the catalog under special sections prepared by each school. Programs marked with an asterisk (*) do not require completion of a minor.
Bachelors Degree Major Minor
School of Business
Accounting*..............................x .... x
Computer Information Systems
and Management Science*..................x
Economics (Business Emphasis*) **........x .... x
Finance*.................................x .... x
General Business..............................x
Information Systems...........................x
Management*..............................x .... x
Marketing*...............................x .... x
Real Estate...................................x
**The Department of Economics offers a bachelor of arts
degree, rather than a bachelor of science degree.
School of Professional Studies
Division of Education
Bilingual/Bicultural Education....................x
Early Childhood Education.........................x
Parent Education..................................x
Reading...........................................x
Special Education/Gifted Education................x
Teacher Licensing: Early Childhood, Elementary, and
Twelve Secondary Fields Division of Technology
Airframe and Power Plant Mechanics...................x
Aviation Management.........................x ... . x
Aviation Technology.........................x
Civil Engineering Technology................x .... x
Drafting Engineering Technology......................x
Electronics Engineering Technology..........x .... x
Industrial Design*..........................x
Industrial and Technical Studies*...........x .. .. x
Mechanical Engineering Technology...........x .... x
Private Pilot........................................x
Professional Pilot...................................x
Surveying and Mapping.......................x .... x
Technical Communications....................x .... x
Technical and Industrial Administration* .... x Division of Public Service Professions
Criminal Justice and Criminology..............x .... x
Health and Safety....................................x
Health Care Management (upper-division).......x .. x
Holistic Health and Wellness (multi-minor)...........x
Hospitality, Meeting and
Travel Administration*......................x
Hotel Administration.................................x
Human Performance and Sport.................x .... x
Human Services*.............................x .... x
Leisure Studies.............................x .... x
Meeting Administration...............................x
Nursing (upper-division for R. N.s)........x
Restaurant Administration............................x
Travel Administration................................x
Institute for Gerontology
Gerontological Services..............................x
Bachelors Degree Major Minor
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Division of Humanities
Art**......................................x .... x
English....................................x .... x
French.............................................x
German.............................................x
Industrial Design*.........................x
Journalism.................................x .... x
Language and Linguistics...........................x
Modem Foreign Languages....................x
Music..............................................x
Music Education*...........................x
Music Performance*.........................x
Philosophy.................................x .... x
Practical Writing..................................x
Public Relations...................................x
Spanish....................................x .... x
Speech Communications......................x .... x
**Art offers a bachelor of fine arts degree.
Division of Science and Mathematics
Biology....................................x .... x
Chemistry..................................x ... x
Computer Science*..........................x .... x
Criminalistics.....................................x
Geography..........................................x
Geology............................................x
Land Use...................................x
Mathematics................................x .... x
Meteorology................................x .... x
Physics....................................x .... x
Theoretical Physics................................x
Division of Social Sciences
Anthropology...............................x .... x
Behavioral Science.........................x
History....................................x .... x
Interdisciplinary Legal Studies....................x
Political Science..........................x .... x
Psychology.................................x .... x
Public Administration..............................x
Social Work*...............................x
Sociology..................................x .... x
Urban Studies* **..........................x ... . x
**Urban Studies offers a bachelor of arts degree and a bachelor of science degree.
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services
African American Studies..................x ... x
Chicano Studies...........................x ... x
Institute for Womens Studies and Services
Womens Studies...............................x


56 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
The School of Business provides the student with a background of general education, familiarity with basic principles of business, and specialized knowledge
in a selected field


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
The philosophy of the School of Business is to devote its resources to high-quality undergraduate programs. The curriculum of this school is designed to provide the student with a background of general education, familiarity with basic principles of business, and specialized knowledge in a selected field of business. The school offers the bachelor of science degree, while the Department of Economics offers a bachelor of arts degree.
Undergraduate programs within the School of Business are designed:
1. To offer the student the opportunity to receive the baccalaureate degree. This degree program consists of a broad foundation in general education, a thorough grounding in basic business courses, and specific competence in one or more significant functional areas of business.
2. To offer a diverse undergraduate program to meet the interests of those residents of the metropolitan area, and others, who desire to study business-oriented subjects without undertaking a degree program, and to meet the needs of the Denver business and professional community for continuing education programs.
3. To strengthen students powers of imaginative and innovative thinking, self-reliance, creative independent analysis, and sensitivity to social and ethical values.
4. To instill in students a desire for learning that will continue after they have graduated and taken their places in the community.
5. To convey to each student the spirit of pioneering, risk, and progress that is essential to the continued development of the United States economic system.
Admissions Requirements
Admission into the School of Business will be granted to those students who have achieved an overall GPA of 2.25; this 2.25 GPA must be maintained while a student is enrolled in a major area of study within the School of Business. If a students overall GPA falls below a 2.25, the student will be placed on academic probation and have one semester to raise the overall GPA to 2.25. Status will be changed to undeclared major if the students GPA is not raised to 2.25 or better.
Acceptance into the School of Business is contingent upon the completion of all Level I and Level II General Studies courses, plus all required 200 level courses in the School of Business and necessary prerequisites. The student must have 60 credit hours.
Upon completion of the above-mentioned requirements, a student may apply, and be accepted, for admission into the School of Business. Specific required courses are listed below. Many of the required courses may also be used to fulfill general studies requirements. New and transfer students who intend to major in business are encouraged to see an advisor in the appropriate department before registering for classes.
Required Courses
ENG 101 Freshman Composition: The Essay.................................................................3
ENG 102 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, and Documentation...............................3
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences.......................................4
MTH 132 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences.................................................3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication............................................................3
HIS xxx (American History Course).......................................................................3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro...................................................................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics-Micro...................................................................3
either
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology.........................................................................3
or
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.......................................................................3
either
PSC 101 American National Government....................................................................3
or
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas.....................................................................3
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting 1......................................................................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II.....................................................................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems...............................................................3
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business.................................................................._3
Total Required Courses........................................................................................43
Additional Hours..............................................................................................12
Credit Hours needed for admission to the School of Business...................................................60


58 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
BACHELOR OF ARTS
Economics
Economics is a scientific study which deals with the allocation of scarce or limited resources. The study of economics offers an opportunity for the student to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions. This training is extremely valuable to the student regardless of her or his specific career objective. The bachelor of arts program has been designed to provide the student with a fundamental knowledge of domestic as well as foreign economies, and the quantitative tools necessary for independent analytical research and thought. Specialized courses are provided to develop the students ability in the use of the tools of economic theory and analysis. Such training is essential for graduates who wish to qualify for positions as professional economists. Employment opportunities in economics are available in national and international business, federal, state and local government, and in various nonprofit organizations.
Required Courses
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics..................................................................4
ECO 301 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory...........................................................3
ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory...........................................................3
ECO 315 Econometrics................................................................................3
ECO 460 History of Economic Thought...............................................................
Approved Electives
15 hours of upper-division economics electives selected in consultation with and approved by the
Department of Economics..................................................................................15
Total....................................................................................................31
Minor
18 hours must be completed to fulfill the minore requirement
Total....................................................................................................18
General Studies (minimum)................................................................................36
Free Electives......................................................................................... 35
Program Total...........................................................................................120
Business Emphasis in Economics
This emphasis prepares the student for entry into the growing professions of economics and business. It provides training that will enable the student to enter the profession and provide assistance to gov-
ernment and business in solving problems and formulating policies.
General Studies, Level I and Level II (minimum).......................................................33
Business Core (See Business Core for Bachelor of Science Degree in School of Business)................33
Required Economics Courses
ECO 301 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory.........................................................3
ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory.........................................................3
ECO 315 Econometrics..............................................................................3
ECO 460 History of Economic Thought ............................................................. 3
Total.................................................................................................12
Approved Economics Electives
12 hours of upper-division economics electives selected in consultation with


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Accounting
Computer Information Systems and Management Science Finance Management Marketing
The School of Business offers majors in accounting, computer information systems and management science, finance, management, and marketing. The accounting major is designed to prepare students for a career in public, industrial, tax, systems, or governmental accounting. The computer information systems and management science major is designed to prepare students for a career in the rapidly expanding fields of business, data processing, systems design, or management science. The finance major is designed to prepare students for a career in corporate financial analysis, insurance, personal financial management, international financial management, accounting, real estate, investments, or financial institutions. The major in management provides areas of emphasis in personnel and human resource management, production, or managerial entrepreneurship. The marketing major prepares students for entry positions in the dynamic areas of distribution/retailing, promotion/advertising, sales, marketing research, marketing for nonprofit organizations, or marketing management.
In order to be awarded a degree, the student must conform to the colleges general specifications for the bachelors degree listed under Requirements for all Degrees. A summary of the course program which she or he must complete within the School of Business is, as follows:
General Studies.(Level I and Level II)...............................................................(minimum) 33
Business Core....................................................................................................33
Major in School of Business......................................................................................24
Electives Within the School of Business (Upper Division)..........................................................9
Other Nonbusiness Courses....................................................................................... 21
Total Hours (minimum)...........................................................................................120
General Studies and Multicultural Requirements
Students seeking a bachelors degree in accounting, computer information systems and management science, economics (business emphasis), finance, management, or marketing must complete the general studies and multicultural requirements for Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Business Core
In addition to the general studies requirements, students majoring in any area of business administration must complete the following business courses:
Required Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting 1.........................................................................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II........................................................................3
MKT 304 Managerial Communications..........................................................................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems..................................................................3
CMS 330 Principles of Quantitative Management Systems......................................................3
CMS 332 Quantitative Decision Making.......................................................................3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance.................................................................................3
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business I..................................................................3
MGT 300 Organizational Management..........................................................................3
MGT 495* Strategic Management...............................................................................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing.........................................................................._2.
Total...........................................................................................................33
Senior Experience Capstone Course taken during the final semester of the senior year.


60 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Admission and Graduation Requirements
Students majoring in any area of business administration must complete the following nonbusiness courses. Many of these required courses may also be used to fulfill general studies requirements. See your advisor.
The school of Business is in the process of reviewing residency requirements for Business programs. Please check with an advisor for current information.
After admission to the School of Business or declaration of a major in business, the student should complete (and have approved) a graduation agreement within the first semester.
ENG 101
ENG 102
MTH 131
MTH 132
SPE 101
HIS XXX
PHI 336
ECO 201
ECO 202
either
PSY 101
or
SOC 101
either
PSC 101
or
PSC 102
Freshman Composition: The Essay..........................
Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research and Documentation. Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences ...
Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences..........
Fundamentals of Speech Communication.....................
(American History Course)................................
Business Ethics..........................................
Principles of Economics-Macro............................
Principles of Economics-Micro............................
Introductory Psychology..................................
Introduction to Sociology................................
American National Government.............................
Political Systems and Ideas..............................
3
3
4 3 3 3 3 3 3
3
3
3
3
Accounting
Courses in Metropolitan States Department of Accounting prepare students for a career in public, industrial, tax, systems, or governmental accounting. In addition, a wide variety of internships are available through Metropolitan States Cooperative Education Office.
Accounting students have three hours of accounting electives (to be selected from ACC 310, 320, 341, 409, 410, 430, 445, 452, and 460) and nine hours of upper division business electives available. A careful selection of these electives should be made in accordance with career objectives. Students are encouraged to consult with accounting faculty on the selection of electives.
Accounting Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACC 309 Income Tax I....................................................................................3
ACC 330 Introduction to Accounting Systems..............................................................3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting.................................................................................3
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I.......................................................................3
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II......................................................................3
ACC 420 Auditing........................................................................................3
ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I..........................................................................
Subtotal......................................................................................................21
Plus 3 hours from the following courses:
ACC 310 Income Tax II...................................................................................3
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting.........................................................................3
ACC 341 Cost Accounting II..............................................................................3
ACC 409 Tax Procedure & Research........................................................................3
ACC 410 Tax Planning....................................................................................3
ACC 430 Advanced Auditing...............................................................................3
ACC 445 Oil and Gas Accounting..........................................................................3
ACC 452 Advanced Accounting II......................................................................... 3
Total......\..................................................................................................24
The Department of Accounting requires 60 college credit hours (junior standing) prior to taking 300-and 400-level accounting courses. Nonbusiness students may not take more than 30 credit hours in business courses. At least 12 hours of accounting courses in the minor must be completed in residency, and the acceptance of transfer credits will be governed by standards and policies of the School of Business and the Department of Accounting.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 6
Required Courses
ACC 201 Principals of Accounting 1...........................................................................3
ACC 202 Principals of Accounting II..........................................................................3
ACC 309 Income Tax I..........................................................................................3
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting 1...........................................................................3
Approved Electives.................................................................................................. 6
Total...............................................................................................................18
*A student may elect any courses in the accounting program or curriculum provided they are approved by the accounting department advisor.
Computer Information Systems and Management Science
This major offers a rich variety of courses in the rapidly expanding, stimulating area of information systems in the business world. Students can look forward to challenging careers in computer information systems or using their computer information systems education within any of the other functional areas of business. Students majoring in CMS are encouraged to select particular courses that best meet their needs in specific areas such as systems development, programmer analyst, office systems, data communications, local and wide area networks, management information systems, or management science. Advising for these areas is available from the department and individual faculty members. All CMS majors must adhere to the following:
(1) Completion of CMS 211, CMS 305, CMS 306,
(2) Completion of a 400-level CMS course,
(3) A maximum of nine hours of language-type courses
(4) Completion of 12 hours of advisor approved courses in addition to (1) and (2) above. Computer Information Systems and Management Science
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
CMS 211 Business Problem Solving: A Structured Programming Approach..............................3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design..............................................3
CMS 306 File Design and Database Management......................................................2.
Total..................................................................................................9
Electives
A 400 level CMS course................................................................................3
Approved CMS Electives...............................................................................12
Total for CMS major...................................................................................24
Finance
The finance major is designed to prepare students for careers that concentrate on the dynamic process of managing the funds of individuals, businesses, and governments. Career opportunities are available in the fields of managerial finance and the financial services industry. The field of managerial finance is concerned with activities associated with managing the financial affairs of businesses and governments. These activities include opportunities in budgeting, financial forecasting, cash management, credit administration, investment analysis, and funds management. Career paths in the financial services industry include positions in banks, savings and loans, other financial institutions, opportunities in brokerage firms, insurance companies, and the real estate field. The most dramatic increase in career opportunities is personal financial planning where professionals are needed to provide advice to consumers on the management of their personal financial affairs. Metropolitan States Department of Finance has been approved to offer the academic courses required of individuals who desire to take the national exams leading to the Certified Financial Planner professional designation.
All finance majors must take FIN 301, 360, 385, and 495. To complete the major, a minimum of 12 additional semester hours of upper-division finance or closely related courses are required, with at least six hours at the 400 level, selected in consultation with and approved by the students Finance Department graduation agreement advisor or by the Finance Departments chair. (At least a C grade is required for courses in the major.)


62 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Finance Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
FIN 301 Financial Markets and Institutions.....................................................................3
FIN 360 Investments............................................................................................3
FIN 385 Intermediate Finance...................................................................................3
FIN 495 Financial Strategies and Policies..................................................................... 3
Total.................................................................................................................12
Approved Electives
12 hours of upper-division finance electives selected in consultation and
approved by the Finance Department.....................................................................................12
Total Hours for Major..................................................................................................24
Management
The management major is designed to prepare students in starting and managing businesses and other
organizations in the context of a diverse, technologically dynamic, global environment. The program ; consists of required courses that build a broad conceptual foundation in identifying and solving man-C agerial problems. Students have the flexibility to develop special skills in human resource management, operations management, or entrepreneurship.
t Management Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGT 302 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship................................................................3
MGT 322 Legal Environment of Business II................................................................3
MGT 353 Human Resources Management......................................................................3
MGT 355 Manufacturing and Service Management............................................................3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior.........................................................................3
MGT 482 International Business......................................................................... 3
Total.........................................................................................................18
Two additional course electives from the following:
MGT 321 Commercial and Corporate Law....................................................................3
MGT 400 Management Decision Analysis....................................................................3
MGT 402 Entrepreneurial Creativity......................................................................3
MGT 405 Purchasing and Materials Management.............................................................3
MGT 442 Entrepreneurial Business Planning...............................................................3
MGT 455 Project Management..............................................................................3
MGT 461 Labor/Employee Relations........................................................................3
MGT 462 Appraisal and Compensation......................................................................3
MGT 464 Employee Training and Development...............................................................3
MGT 465 Managing Productivity...........................................................................3
MGT 483 Workforce Diversity.............................................................................3
Total Elective Hours.......................................................................................... 6
Total Hours for MGT Major.....................................................................................24
Marketing
Metropolitan States Department of Marketing prepares students for entry-level positions in such dynamic areas as sales management, distribution, advertising, marketing research, retailing, and marketing management.
In addition to the departments well-rounded selection of courses, the curriculum also offers students a combination of conceptual and applied learning experiences. Through the development of marketing plans, advertising campaigns, and marketing research studies, students have the opportunity to work with Denver area businesses on current marketing issues and problems. Students are also exposed to a variety of marketing speakers from the business community. Part-time positions are often available for marketing students through the colleges Cooperative Education Office.
Many students in the department are already involved in some aspect of marketing and, to accommodate their busy schedule, the department holds a variety of day and evening classes, as well as classes at neighborhood locations through the Extended Campus Credit Program.
Faculty members in the Marketing Department have an excellent combination of academic background and practical experience. All members stay current in their fields with activities both on and off campus.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Marketing Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
MKT 301 Marketing Research..........................................................................3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior...........................................................................3
MKT 456 Marketing Management........................................................................3
Fifteen hours of marketing electives*.....................................................................X5
Total Hours for major.....................................................................................24
*Business Communications courses can be used as business electives, but not as marketing electives.
Minors in the School of Business
General Business Minor
The School of Business offers the general business minor for nonbusiness majors. Students minoring in general business must take ECO 201 and ECO 202 as part of their general studies requirements. In addition to the required 24 credit hours below, students may select six additional credit hours within a specific business discipline for a total not to exceed 30 credit hours within the School of Business. If a student wishes to enroll in other business courses beyond the above 30 hours, the student must declare a major with the School of Business.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting 1.........................................................................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II........................................................................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems..................................................................3
CMS 330 Principles of Quantitative Management Systems......................................................3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro*.....................................................................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics-Micro*.....................................................................3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance.................................................................................3
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business I....................................................................3
MGT 300 Organizational Management..........................................................................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing........................................................................... 3
Total hours.....................................................................................................30
*Prerequisite Credit applied in general studies.
Accounting Minor (Nonbusiness)
The Department of Accounting provides a minor designed primarily for nonbusiness students. This minor offers students an opportunity to enhance their education and careers by becoming knowledgeable in accounting.
The minor offers students a broad-based education in accounting, while affording flexibility for emphasizing a particular field within this discipline, such as financial accounting, managerial accounting, tax accounting, and governmental accounting.
Economics Minor
The economics minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with an opportunity to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions, as well as the quantitative tools necessary for analytical research and thought.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro...........................................................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics-Micro...........................................................3
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional semester hours of upper-division economics courses, selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics.
Finance Minors (Nonbusiness)
The Department of Finance provides two minors designed primarily for nonbusiness minors: the finance minor and the real estate minor. These minors offer students an opportunity to enhance their education and careers by becoming knowledgeable in finance or real estate.
Finance Minor
This minor is designed to provide nonbusiness majors with an opportunity to enhance their education and career choices by becoming knowledgeable in the finance area. The minor offers students a broad-based education in finance, while affording the flexibility for emphasizing a particular field within this discipline, such as personal financial planning, investments, managerial finance, financial institutions, and international finance.


64 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
For the finance minor, the student must have completed ACC 201 and 202, Principles of Accounting I and II (or equivalent), and ECO 201 and 202, Principles of Economics-Macro and Micro, that may be applied to the students general studies or elective requirements as applicable. The Department of Finance requires 60 college credit hours (junior standing) prior to taking 300 and 400 level finance courses. Nonbusiness students may not take more than 30 credit hours in business courses. A minimum grade of C and a 2.25 GPA in finance courses are required for completion of the minor. At least 12 hours of finance courses in the minor must be completed in residency, and the acceptance of transfer credits will be governed by standards and policies of the School of Business and the Department of Finance.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FIN 301 Financial Markets and Institutions .................................................................3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance....................................................................................3
FIN 360 Investments...........................................................................................3
Approved Electives*................................................................................................. 9
Total...............................................................................................................18
1 * A student may elect any courses in the finance program or curriculum provided they are approved by the Finance Depart-
I ment advisor.
Real Estate Minor
This minor is designed to provide nonbusiness majors with the opportunity to enhance their education y and career choices by becoming knowledgeable in real estate. The minor prepares students for employment and a career in this field, as well as for their personal financial affairs dealing with real estate.
For the real estate minor, the student must have completed ACC 201 and 202, Principles of Accounting I and II (or equivalent), and ECO 201, Principles of Economics-Macro, that may be applied to the students general studies or elective requirements as applicable. The Department of Finance requires 60 college credit hours (junior standing) prior to taking 300 and 400 level finance courses. Nonbusiness students may not take more than 30 credit hours in business courses. A minimum grade of C and a 2.25 GPA in finance and real estate courses are required for completion of the minor. At least 12 hours of finance courses in the minor must be completed in residency, and the acceptance of transfer credits will be governed by standards and policies of the School of Business and the Department of Finance.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FIN 380 Real Estate Practice and Law......................................................................3
FIN 381 Advanced Real Estate Practice and Law.............................................................3
FIN 382 Real Estate Finance...............................................................................3
FIN 484 Real Estate Appraisal.............................................................................3
FIN 485 Commercial and Investment Real Estate ............................................................3
Approved Elective*............................................................................................. 3
Total..........................................................................................................18
Approved Electives
FIN 225 Personal Money Management.........................................................................3
FIN 301 Financial Markets and Institutions................................................................3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance................................................................................3
FIN 342 Principles of Insurance...........................................................................3
FIN 360 Investments.......................................................................................3
ECO 450 Business and Economic Forecasting.................................................................3
Information Systems Minor
This minor is designed for students majoring in a nonbusiness discipline. The minor will provide a basic understanding of the concepts, current methodology, and rapid changes in the design, development, and use of computer-oriented systems for business and organizations. Students electing this minor are encouraged to have elective courses in accounting, management, marketing, or finance.
Required Courses Semester Hours
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems.............................................................3
CMS 211 Business Problem Solving: A Structured Programming Approach...................................3
or
CMS 327 Micro-Based Software..........................................................................3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design...................................................3
CMS 306 File Design and Data Base Management..........................................................3
Approved CMS 300-level courses............................................................................ 6
Total hours required for minor............................................................................18


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Management Minor
The management minor is designed for nonbusiness majors. It provides them an opportunity to gain familiarity with managerial concepts and skills that can enhance their performance in managing people and organizations.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGT 300 Organizational Management.......................................................................3
MGT 353 Human Resources Management......................................................................3
MGT 355 Manufacturing and Service Management............................................................3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior.........................................................................3
MGT 482 International Business..........................................................................3
Management Elective.......................................................................................... 3
Total.........................................................................................................18
Marketing Minor
The marketing minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of business and sufficient familiarity with marketing skills to work in a business environment.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing.....................................................................3
MKT 301 Marketing Research..........................................................................3
MKT 304 Managerial Communications...................................................................3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior...........................................................................3
MKT 452 Seminar in Marketing Management.............................................................3
Electives
Select one other marketing course. One of the following is recommended: MKT 311, MKT 312, MKT 314, MKT 330,
or MKT 371. No other communications course with an MKT prefix may be used as a marketing elective........ 3
Total....................................................................................................18
African American Leadership Institute
The African American Leadership Institute operates on the belief that all members of our society should have an equal opportunity to pursue their goals and aspirations. The institute provides a unique approach to the particular problems and concerns of African Americans in the Denver metropolitan area with three underlying tenets that form its philosophy.
1. To identify, motivate, and train future community leaders.
2. To acquaint these individuals with problems and needs of the community while investigating alternative approaches and solutions.
3. To create an opportunity for these individuals to join together and exchange ideas with current leaders for the purpose of networking for national, state, and local community improvements.
Seminars cover topics that reflect current community issues, including regional business and economics, local and state government, education, health care, human services, the arts, and cultural affairs.
Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity
The Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity has introduced entrepreneurial education into the regions academic arena through weekend courses for professionals and entrepreneurial seminars and forums. The purpose of the institute is to discover, foster, and mold the visions of todays aspiring entrepreneurs. It provides degree and non-degree students from the community with opportunities to learn about entrepreneurship, to understand the entrepreneurial process, to practice skills that lead to successful entrepreneurship, and to enhance creativity and innovation.
Small Business Institute
The Small Business Institute is sponsored by the Small Business Administration (SBA) and involves a contractual relationship between SBA and Metropolitan Sate College of Denver. The Small Business Institute offers a practical opportunity which supplements academic studies with real case studies. The Small Business Institute utilizes senior-level students, under faculty supervision, to provide business counseling and technical assistance to small business clients in the community.


66 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences provides high quality liberal arts education designed to meet the educational needs of the urban student.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS AND SCIENCES
The programs in Letters, Arts and Sciences provide high-quality liberal arts education designed to meet the educational needs of the urban student. Whether in humanities, social sciences, or mathematics and science, the programs directly address personal and professional goals of students. The faculty exert leadership in their disciplines, helping to shape new directions, as well as responding to new ideas and developments.
The school offers the bulk of the General Studies curriculum required for all degrees. Students wishing to earn licensure as teachers choose from Letters, Arts and Sciences majors.
The Colorado Alliance for Science, a statewide effort to encourage science and mathematics teaching and learning, is housed in the school. The member colleges and universities work with public schools throughout the state, offering assistance and support to teachers and students.
The Health Careers Science Program is designed to encourage women and ethnic minority groups who have traditionally been excluded from careers in science and technology. Students are provided with tutoring and other support to ensure their success in the science and technology areas. For additional information, please call 556-3215.
The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences houses two interdisciplinary centers. These centers tie the college to important state and national educational movements.
The Center for Mathematics, Science and Environmental Education provides leadership in reforming science and mathematics education in Colorado and in the nation. Through the centers involvement in the Colorado Statewide Foundation, close ties exist between the college, the Denver Public Schools, other school districts in Colorado, the Colorado Department of Education, and other institutions of higher education. The center also provides a continuing focus on the issues of the environment as a special area of integrated science education.
The Family Center, housed in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work, provides a wide range of education, training, and policy research on family issues. Through various contracts and grants, the Center
develops curriculum
provides training for county, entry-level social workers
publishes an on-the-job training manual
infuses family preservation curriculum into the Metro State social work major
provides family literacy education for low-income Denver families
provides policy research on related literacy issues.
The school also offers internships and cooperative education opportunities in a number of departments and programs. Depending on their major, students may be assigned to the legislature, state and local agencies, the media, business, or industry.
DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
The humanities curricula are offered in the departments of Art, English, Modem Languages, Music, Philosophy, and Speech Communication. In these programs, students develop an understanding and appreciation of the worlds of art, music, and ideas. The programs offered by the institutes for Intercultural and Womens Studies broaden awareness of social issues related to cultural diversity, ethnicity, and gender. Students may complete the bachelors degree and, in conjunction with programs in education, earn teacher licensure at the secondary level (except in philosophy). Majors in journalism, preprofessional writing, and music performance are also offered. Art students earn a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree in studio work and in art history.
Department of Art
The Department of Art offers a full range of studio art courses in the areas of fine arts (drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, video, and sculpture); design (advertising design and computer graphics; crafts (ceramics, metalwork, jewelry making, and art furniture) leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree; art history (studies emphasize contemporary, modem, ancient, and non-western art) leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree; and licensure in art education.


68 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
; Goals: Undergraduate studies in art and design should prepare students to function in a variety of artistic I roles. In order to achieve these goals, instruction should prepare students to:
1. read the non-verbal language of art and design
; 2. develop responses to visual phenomena, and organize perceptions and conceptualizations both
1 rationally and intuitively
3. become familiar with and develop competence in a number of art and design techniques ; 4. become familiar with major achievements in the history of art, including the works and intentions
1 of leading artists in the past and present and demonstrate the way art reflects cultural values
| 5. evaluate developments in the history of art
; 6. understand and evaluate contemporary thinking about art and design
1 7. make valid assessments of quality in design projects and in works of art.

! Art Major for Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
l Core Requirements for AH Studio Art Majors Semester Hours
ART 110 Basic Drawing 1...........................................................................3
ART 111 Basic Drawing II..........................................................................3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I...........................................................3
l ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II..........................................................3
l ART 201 Survey of Modem Art: Impressionism to 1960................................................3
! ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present.........................................._2
Total...................................................................................................18
f Senior Experience Requirements for Studio Art Majors:
ART 401 Modem Art History: Theory and Criticism...................................................3
ART 475 Senior Experience Studio: Portfolio Development and Thesis Show...........................2
Total...................................................................................................6
Students may choose one of the three areas of emphasis: fine arts, design, or crafts.
Semester Hours
Fine Arts Area of Emphasis.............................................................................21
Fifteen hours in area of concentration in: drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, or photography Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas:
Design..........................................................................................6 or 9
Crafts..........................................................................................6 or 9
ART 200 General History of Art....................................................................3
Art History (upper-division)........................................................................... 3
Semester Hours
Design Area of Emphasis................................................................................21
Fifteen hours in area of concentration in: advertising design or computer graphics Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas:
Crafts..........................................................................................6 or 9
Fine Arts.......................................................................................6 or 9
ART 200 General History of Art....................................................................3
Art History (upper-division)........................................................................... 3
Semester Hours
Crafts Area of Emphasis................................................................................21
Fifteen hours in area of concentration in: ceramics, jewelery, or art furniture Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas:
Applied Arts....................................................................................6 or 9
Fine Arts.......................................................................................6 or 9
ART 200 General History of Art..........................................................................3
Art History (upper-division)..........................................................................._2
Total Hours Required...................................................................................66
(A minimum of 33 upper-division art hours required.)
Minor requirements for art majors are optional.
Art History Major for Bachelor of Fine Arts
Core Requirements for AH Art History Majors Semester Hours
ART 110 Basic Drawing I.................................................................................3
ART 111 Basic Drawing II................................................................................3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I...........................................................3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II..........................................................3
ART 201 Survey of Modem Art: Impressionism to 1960................................................3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present.........................................._2
Total..................................................................................................18


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 6
Senior Experience General Studies Requirement for Art History Majors:
ART 401 Modem Art History: Theory and Criticism.....................................................................2
Total................................................................................................................3
Art History (required)..............................................................................................15
ART 200..............................................................................................................3
Fine Arts.......................................................................................................3 or 6
Design..........................................................................................................3 or 6
Crafts..........................................................................................................3 or 6
Art Electives......................................................................................................._£
Total hours required................................................................................................60
*Fifteen hours are required among these three categories.
(A minimum of 27 upper-division art hours required.)
Minor requirements for art majors are optional.
Industrial Design Major for Bachelor of Arts Degree
For advising in this program, please see the Department of Industrial Studies and Mechanical Engineering Technology in the School of Professional Studies.
Art Licensure: K-12
Teacher licensure for art majors is available through the Art Department. An art major is required.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ART 338 Introduction to Art Education......................................................................4
EDS 221 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary Schools..................................................3
EDS 222 Field Experience in Urban Secondary Schools........................................................2
EDS 320 The Adolescent as a Learner........................................................................3
EDS 321 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom Management...............................................3
EDS 322 Field Experience in Tutoring and Materials Construction............................................2
SED 360 The Exceptional Learner in the Classroom...........................................................3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content Areas...............................................4
ART 438 Art Methods/Materials: K-12........................................................................4
EDU 419* Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary (K-6).....................................................8
EDS 429* Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary (6-12).....................................................8
ART 439 Integrating the Arts for Gifted & Talented........................................................_2
Total............................................................................................................47
In addition to field experiences included in required coursework, students must present evidence of having completed at least 200 hours of work with children. This may be accomplished through organizations such as Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, church groups, tutorial programs, or similar institutional activities. Students should plan their volunteer work in consultation with the Art Education advisor.
Students who seek licensure must pass a public speaking course (SPE 101) with a grade of B or better, or obtain a waiver. Students must also achieve satisfactory scores on the state licensure examination.
Student teaching is composed of daily full-time work during 15 weeks, split eight and seven weeks between elementary and secondary levels.
Minor in Art
Required Courses Semester Hours
ART 110 Basic Drawing I...............................................................................3
ART 111 Basic Drawing II..............................................................................3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I..............................................................3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II.............................................................3
ART 201 Survey of Modem Art: Impressionism to 1960...................................................3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present............................................._3
Subtotal......................................................................................................18
Electives....................................................................................................._2
Minimum of one upper division studio course and one upper division art history course Total.....................................................................................
27


70 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
English Department
The Department of English offers instruction in a variety of areas: literature, writing, language and linguistics, and elementary and secondary education. Courses in each area appeal to students in every school of the college who wish to read and understand representative literatures of the world; to examine the principles underlying how language works; and to cultivate their writing skills.
The department invites students in other disciplines to elect English courses to enhance their general education. Students may also choose a major or minor from different areas of emphasis.
Students who are considering a major or minor in the Department of English are expected to consult with faculty for advising.
The English major may choose an emphasis in
1. literature
2. elementary school teaching, leading to licensure
3. secondary school teaching, leading to licensure
4. creative writing
5. preprofessional writing
The English minor may choose an emphasis in
1. literature
2. dramatic literature
3. language and linguistics
4. practical writing
5. secondary school teaching
6. creative writing
The English Department will assess the major in designated capstone courses. Portfolios of papers assigned through these courses will be read by several members of the faculty. Capstone courses should not be taken until the students final year of study. Because a capstone course may not be offered every semester, students should discuss scheduling with English Department advisors. Further information is available in the English office.
English Major for Bachelor of Arts Literature Emphasis
The English major or minor, literature emphasis, encompasses a full range of American, British, and world literature. The program provides a strong foundation of courses in literature and language, sequenced to cultivate a sense of literary development, fostering an increasing familiarity with major works and writers, critical theory, literary terminology, and research materials. Because of their command of the written language, their ability to deal with ideas and concepts as well as facts, and their broader understanding of human nature and social realities, literature majors are valued in many fields of endeavor, including academe and the world of business.
Required Core Semester Hours
Each of the following courses:
ENG 210 Introduction to Literary Studies..........................................................................3
ENG 244 Myth, Symbol, Allusion in Literature......................................................................2
Subtotal..................................................................................................................6
Each of the following courses:
ENG 211 World Literature: Beginnings to 1600......................................................................3
ENG 221 American Literature: Beginnings through the Civil War................................................... 3
ENG 231 British Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare................................................................2
Subtotal..................................................................................................................9
Two of the following courses:
ENG 212 World Literature: 17th Century to Present.................................................................3
ENG 222 American Literature: Civil War to Present............................................................... 3
ENG 232 British Literature: Donne to Johnson......................................................................3
ENG 233 British Literature: Blake to Beckett......................................................................2
Subtotal..................................................................................................................6
The following course:
ENG 310 Roots of British Literary Tradition.......................................................................3
Required Upper-Level Courses
ENG 302 History of the English Language...........................................................................3


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES i
Select three of the following courses:
ENG 321 Development of American Drama..................................................................3
ENG 323 Development of the American Novel..............................................................3
ENG 331 Development of British Drama: Mysteries to Melodrama...........................................3
ENG 333 Development of the British Novel...............................................................3
ENG 340 Development of Modem Poetry....................................................................3
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature..........................................................2
Subtotal.........................................................................................................9
Select two of the following courses (at least one from 413):
ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature....................................................................3
ENG 412 Selected Themes in Literature.....................................................................3
ENG 413 Major Authors ....................................................................................3
ENG 414 Modem Continental, British, and American Drama....................................................3
ENG 431 Shakespeare: Comedies, Histories, Sonnets.........................................................3
or
ENG 432 Shakespeare: Tragedies and Ethical Problem Plays.................................................2.
Subtotal.........................................................................................................6
The following course:
ENG 461 Theories and Techniques in Literary Criticism...................................................._2
Total Semester Hours Required.................................................................................45
Elementary School Teaching Area of Emphasis
The elementary school teaching emphasis in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Education licensure program, prepares future teachers of elementary education to understand and teach the diverse subject matter required for licensure. The program will provide students with a strong foundation in literature and literary genres; a solid perspective on the English language, including its history, structure, and constituents; and both theory and practice in composition, language arts, communication, and teaching methodology. It also addresses the need to prepare teachers to teach multi-cultural literature, accommodate cultural and ethnic diversity in language and writing, and communicate effectively with a diverse population of students.
Required Courses
I. Literature Core Courses:
ENG 210 Introduction to Literary Studies.............
ENG 222 American Literature: Civil War to Present
ENG 244 Myth, Symbol, and Allusion in Literature.
ENG 310 Roots of British Literary Tradition..........
Semester Hours Required..............................
II. Language/Linguistics Core Courses:
ENG 201 The Nature of Language.................................................................................3
and
ENG 302 History of the English Language........................................................................2
Semester Hours Required........................................................................................6
III. Writing/Composition Courses:
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition...............................................................................3
or
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing.......................................................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition...................................................................................2
Semester Hours Required........................................................................................6
III. Language Arts Core Courses:
ENG 346 Childrens Literature..................................................................................3
ENG 465 Teaching Composition in Elementary Schools.............................................................3
ENG 466 Teaching Literature and Language K-6...................................................................3
RDG 313 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School K-6..................................................*
Semester Hours Required........................................................................................9
V. English Electives
Two upper division English courses selected in consultation with and approved by designated English advisor...6
Recommended Electives:
Communication
ENG 363 Teaching Communications................................................................................3
Writing
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Prerequisite: ENG 252)...................................................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing.........................................................................3
Semester Hours
.............3
.............3
.............3
............^
............12


72 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
Language
ENG 301 Modem English Language Studies (Prerequisite: ENG 201)....................................................3
ENG 303 Semantics (Prerequisite: ENG 201).........................................................................3
Literature
ENG 324 African American Literature...............................................................................3
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature....................................................................3
ENG 342 The English Bible as Literature...........................................................................3
ENG 343 Classical Mythology.......................................................................................3
ENG 347 Young Adult Literature....................................................................................3
ENG 349 Chicano Folklore of the Southwest.......................................................................
Total Semester Hours Required...........................................................................................39
*RDG 313 meets the reading requirements for Colorado State licensure but is carried under the students 42-semester hour
professional education requirements.
: Secondary School Teaching Emphasis

l The education emphasis in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of
Education licensure program, prepares future teachers of English to understand and teach the diverse
l subject matter required for licensure. This program equips students with a wide variety of language
principles and skills; practical experience in developing and presenting the process of writing; sound
l knowledge of approaches to literature and literary genres, periods, and authors (including a special focus
l on young adult literature); and an understanding of communication and media as used in English studies.
jf In addition to meeting specified state and departmental requirements, this program offers students the
opportunity to develop further specialization in writing, language, or literature to complement the major.
Required Courses Semester Hours
I. Literature Core Courses:
ENG 210 Introduction to Literary Studies............................................................................3
ENG 221 American Literature: Beginnings through the Civil War.......................................................3
or
ENG 222 American Literature: Civil War to Present...................................................................3
ENG 244 Myth, Symbol, and Allusion in Literature....................................................................3
ENG 310 Roots of British Literary Tradition........................................................................ 3
Subtotal..................................................................................................................12
II. Language/Linguistics Core Courses:
Required for Licensure
ENG 201 The Nature of Language...........................................................................3
ENG 302 History of the English Language..................................................................3
Select one of the following:
ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar.......................................................................3
ENG 301 Modem English Language Studies..............i...................................................3
ENG 303 Semantics........................................................................................2
Subtotal........................................................................................................9
III. Writing/Composition Courses:
ENG 351 Advanced Composition.............................................................................3
ENG 463 Composition Teaching Workshop....................................................................6
or
ENG. 362 Teaching Composition in the Secondary Schools................................................3
and
ENG 364 Teaching Creative Writing in the Secondary Schools...............................................2
Subtotal........................................................................................................9
IV. English Education Core Courses:
ENG 347 Young Adult Literature...........................................................................3
ENG 363 Teaching Communications..........................................................................3
ENG 464 Teaching English in Secondary Schools............................................................3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content Areas.............................................*
Subtotal........................................................................................................9
V. English Electives:
Two upper-division English courses selected in consultation with and approved by designated English advisor..._£
Total Semester Hours Required..................................................................................45
RDG 328 meets the reading requirements for English licensure but is carried under the students professional education requirements.
NOTE: Students with a bachelor of arts in English from an accredited institution who are seeking English licensure will receive credit for Sections I and V, in addition to any other courses in Sections II, III, and IV for which they have existing credits.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES /
Creative Writing Emphasis
The creative writing emphasis provides extensive writing practice in various genres of literature as well as a good foundation in the appreciation of the literary heritage available in the English language.
Courses should be selected after consultation with a creative writing faculty advisor.
I. Literature Courses:
Lower Division Literature Courses:
200-level, including either ENG 210 or ENG 244..................................................................15
Three of the 15 hours must emphasize modem literature.
Upper Division Literature Courses:
300-level and/or 400-level......................................................................................._2
Total Semester Hours of Literature Required......................................................................24
II. Writing Courses:
Entry Course:
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing...................................................................3
Genre Courses: (Select three)
ENG 351 Advanced Composition...............................................................................3
ENG 352 Drama Writing Workshop.............................................................................3
ENG 352 Fiction Writing Workshop...........................................................................3
ENG 352 Poetry Writing Workshop............................................................................2
Subtotal..........................................................................................................9
Specialized Writing Course:
ENG 382 Creative Writing Studio (two distinct titles)......................................................6
Exit Course:
ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing......................................................................... 3
Total Semester Hours of Writing Required.........................................................................21
Total Semester Hours Required....................................................................................45
Preprofessional Writing Emphasis
Every profession benefits from having among its members people who write exceptionally well; rewards tend to accrue to such people. This emphasis is designed to enable talented writers majoring in other fields to develop their writing abilities and, thereby, enhance their career opportunities. For this reason it is expected that the preprofessional writing emphasis will be a second major for those who pursue it.
The program provides the student with an intensive, coherent sequence of instruction in writing and linguistics interspersed with appropriate study of fine writing from the English language literary
heritage.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition......................................................................3
ENG 201 The Nature of Language........................................................................3
or
ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar....................................................................3
ENG 303 Semantics.....................................................................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition..........................................................................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing................................................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication...................................................................3
or
ENG 363 Teaching Communications...................................................................... 3
Subtotal..................................................................................................18
Students will take six literature courses of which at least two must be upper-division; these courses must be distributed among at least four of the following five areas:
1. world or continental literature
2. British literature: beginnings to seventeenth century
3. British literature: seventeenth century to nineteenth century
4. American literature
5. Twentieth century literature
Subtotal.........................................................................................................IS
Total Semester Hours Required.....................................................................................36


74 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
: English Minor
Creative Writing Emphasis
; The English minor with emphasis in creative writing serves students who desire instruction and practice
! in the production of imaginative literature. The minor includes a foundation in the appreciation of
literature and criticism.
; Courses should be selected after consultation with a creative writing faculty advisor.
2 I. Literature Courses:
1 Lower Division Literature Courses:
2 200-level, including either ENG 210 or ENG 244....................................................................6
Three of the six hours must emphasize modem literature.
2 Upper Division Literature Courses:
2 300-level and/or 400-level......................................................................................._6
Total Semester Hours of Literature Required......................................................................12
1 II. Writing Courses:
Entry Course:
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing..................................................................3
2 Genre Courses:
2 ENG 351 Advanced Composition..............................................................................3
J ENG 352 Drama Writing Workshop............................................................................3
V ENG 352 Fiction Writing Workshop..........................................................................3
RDG 352 Poetry Writing Workshop...........................................................................2
Subtotal.........................................................................................................6
Exit Course:
ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing.......................................................................__2
Total Semester Hours of Writing Required........................................................................12
Total Semester Hours Required...................................................................................24
Dramatic Literature Emphasis
The English minor with emphasis in dramatic literature serves students who wish to develop skills in reading, writing, and thinking about the texts of drama. The program is designed to meet the needs of anyone involved in the history, teaching, writing, production, or performance of drama.
I. Introductory Courses:
ENG 112 Introduction to Drama.............................................................................3
A second course, introductory in nature, is to be selected by agreement of the student and the department advisor.
The course need not be an English course, but if not, it should be an introductory course related to the students
major interest in the use of drama...............................................................................3
II. Writing Course(s) One of the following courses:
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing..................................................................3
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop: Scriptwriting..........................................................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing....................................................................3
Subtotal.........................................................................................................3
III. Literature Electives (nine hours to be chosen in consultation with an advisor):
ENG 131 Introduction to Shakespeare.......................................................................3
ENG 321 Development of American Drama.....................................................................3
ENG 331 Development of British Drama: Mysteries to Melodrama..............................................3
ENG 431 Shakespeare: Comedies, Histories, Sonnets.........................................................3
ENG 432 Shakespeare: Tragedies and Ethical Problem Plays..................................................3
ENG 413 Major Authors (Playwrights).......................................................................3
ENG 414 Modem Continental, British, and American Drama....................................................3
ENG 461 Theories and Techniques in Literary Criticism.....................................................2
Subtotal.........................................................................................................9
IV. Final Study One of the following:
ENG 480 Workshop..........................................................................................3
ENG 498 Independent Study.................................................................................3
ENG 499 Internship........................................................................................2
Subtotal........................................................................................................_2
Total Semester Hours Required...................................................................................21
NOTE: The final study undertaken in 480, 498, or 499 presents the opportunity for students electing the minor to devote significant attention to one in-depth project for completion of the study. The project should be based on the reading of a dramatic text, but should combine this experience with some other area of design, management, performance, or writing. The project should combine the skills of reading drama with those of the associated area of expertise. The project is to be proposed by the student, approved by an advisor in the Department of English, and directed in collaboration with a second advisor, associated with the other area of expertise fundamental to the study. The study may take the form of a workshop, an independent study, an internship, or a practicum.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES ]
Literature Emphasis
I. The following course:
ENG 210 Introduction to Literary Studies......................................................................3
II. Two of the following courses:
ENG 211 World Literature: Beginnings to 1600..................................................................3
or
ENG 212 World Literature: 17th Century to Present.............................................................3
ENG 221 American Literature: Beginnings through the Civil War.................................................3
or
ENG 222 American Literature: Civil War to Present.............................................................3
ENG 231 British Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare............................................................3
or'
ENG 232 British Literature: Donne to Johnson..................................................................3
or
ENG 233 British Literature: Blake to Beckett..................................................................3
Subtotal..............................................................................................................6
III. One of the following courses:
ENG 201 The Nature of Language................................................................................3
ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar............................................................................3
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition..............................................................................3
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing......................................................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition..................................................................................3
Subtotal..............................................................................................................3
IV. Two of the following courses:
ENG 321 Development of American Drama.........................................................................3
ENG 323 Development of the American Novel.....................................................................3
ENG 331 Development of British Drama: Mysteries to Melodrama..................................................3
ENG 333 Development of the British Novel......................................................................3
ENG 340 Development of Modem Poetry...........................................................................3
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature................................................................3
Subtotal..............................................................................................................6
V. Two of the following courses (one must be 413):
ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature........................................................................3
ENG 412 Selected Themes in Literature.........................................................................3
ENG 413 Major Authors.........................................................................................3
ENG 414 Modem Continental, British and American Drama.........................................................3
ENG 431 Shakespeare: Comedies, Histories, Sonnets.............................................................3
or
ENG 432 Shakespeare: Tragedies and Ethical Problem Plays......................................................3
ENG 461 Theories and Techniques in Literary Criticism.........................................................3
Subtotal............................................................................................................. 6
Total Semester Hours Required........................................................................................24
Language and Linguistics Minor
The language and linguistics minor offers concepts about, theories of, and analytical techniques in natural language. It represents an intellectual discipline in itself and simultaneously serves the interests of future teachers, students of literature and writing, and others who have a continuing fascination with language as language. Taken in an appropriate order made evident by careful advising, the courses in the program educate students both to use and to appreciate their language. The minor requires students to engage in vigorous, progressively more explicit and precise analysis and synthesis as they examine facts and fallacies about the miracle of language.
Required Core Semester Hours
ENG 201 The Nature of Language........................................................................3
ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar....................................................................3
ENG 301 Modem English Language Studies................................................................3
ENG 302 History of the English Language...............................................................3
ENG 303 Semantics.....................................................................................3
ENG 401 Studies in Linguistics....................................................................... 3
Subtotal....................................................................................................18
Any one of the following specific titles:
Applied Linguistics
Descriptive Linguistics
Psycholinguistics
Sociolinguistics
Stylistics


76 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
Interdisciplinary Elective Courses (chosen in consultation with and approved by departmental advisor) any one of the
following:
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication...........................................................................3
EDU 337 Language Arts and Social Studies Curricula for Early Childhood Education...............................4
PHI 111 Language, Logic, and Persuasion........................................................................3
SPE 352 Language Acquisition...................................................................................3
Subtotal.............................................................................................................2i4
Total Semester Hours Required....................................................................................21-22
Practical Writing Minor
The practical writing minor is a humanities-based, career-oriented program enabling students to develop writing skills as an adjunct to any major. Students will be prepared to do the practical writing found in magazines, newspapers, and newsletters. Students completing the program are expected to be versatile writers capable of applying the principles of good writing to different audiences and purposes.
Required Core Semester Hours
l ENG 107 English Usage and Grammar........................................................................3
l ENG 201 The Nature of Language...........................................................................3
ENG 303 Semantics........................................................................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition.............................................................................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing.................................................................._2
l Subtotal........................................................................................................15
l Elective Courses (Choose three from the following):
4 ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Prerequisite ENG 252).................................................3
ENG 398 Cooperative Education: English Internship........................................................3
ENG 498 Independent Study: Writing Project...............................................................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and Newswriting..............................................................3
JRN 381 Feature Writing for Newspapers...................................................................3
JRN 481 Feature Writing for Magazines....................................................................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing.............................................................. 3
MKT 305 Business Research and Report Writing.............................................................3
SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy.......................................................................3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion.........................................................................2
Subtotal......................................................................................................_2
Total Semester Hours Required.................................................................................24
In addition to pursuing the practical writing minor, some students may wish to seek the recognition of competency award as qualified practical writers. A student seeking this award must apply to the Department Composition Committee before completing nine hours applicable to the minor, and, if approved, must work out with the committee a coordinated sequence of courses, one of which must be English 498, independent study. The recognition procedure will include development of a portfolio that will be prepared under the guidance of the committee. This portfolio, designed to demonstrate student proficiency, will include such items as a letter in which students describe the development of their skills in writing and the extent to which they see these as valuable to their careers, and two different demonstrations of their ability to write and edit under pressure. The portfolio materials will be juried by at least two members of the Composition Committee. Some of the preparation may carry up to three hours credit under English 498.
Secondary School Teaching Emphasis
This minor does not satisfy Metro State requirements for licensure in secondary English, but does meet requirements for those seeking to teach English as a second area in secondary schools accredited by the North Central AccreditationAssociation. Students working toward this minor are expected to plan and carry out their programs in consultation with designated English department advisors.
Semester Hours
I. Each of the following courses:
ENG 347 Young Adult Literature.............................................................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition...............................................................................3
ENG 362 Teaching Composition in Secondary Schools..........................................................3
ENG 464 Teaching English in Secondary Schools............................................................. 3
Subtotal........................................................................................................12
II. One of the following courses:
ENG 301 Modem English Language Studies.....................................................................3
ENG 302 History of the English Language....................................................................3
ENG 303 Semantics..........................................................................................2
Subtotal.........................................................................................................3
III. Three English electives from 300-level or 400-level courses selected in consultation with, and approved by, designated English Department advisors.
Subtotal........................................................................................................_2
Total Semester Hours Required...................................................................................24


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Journalism Department
Journalism Major for Bachelor of Arts
The journalism major prepares students for careers dealing with news and information media, including the press, and public relations. Proficiency in standard written English is a prerequisite for all journalism courses. Students without such proficiency should not register for any journalism course beyond JRN 181. The faculty may recommend that the student take ENG 101 and ENG 102 before taking any journalism course beyond JRN 181.
Require^ Courses Semester Hours
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism and Mass Media.........................................................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing..............................................................3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading............................................................3
JRN 286* Intermediate Reporting and News Writing...........................................................3
JRN 381* Feature Article Writing for Newspapers............................................................3
JRN 383 Contemporary Issues...............................................................................3
JRN 385 Public Affairs Reporting..........................................................................3
JRN 386 College Newspaper Practicum.......................................................................3
JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines.............................................................3
JRN 482 Advanced News Editing, Copyreading and Principles of Layout.......................................3
JRN 486 Advanced Reporting and News Writing...............................................................3
JRN 487 Ethical Issues in Journalism....................................................................._3
Total Semester Hours Required..................................................................................36
Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282.
JRN 286 is a prerequisite for JRN 381, 383, 385, 386, 481 and 486.
JRN 381 is a prerequisite for JRN 481.
Journalism Minor
Semester Hours
I. Each of the following courses:
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism........................................................................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing..............................................................3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading............................................................3
JRN 286* Intermediate Reporting and News Writing.......................................................... 3
Subtotal.......................................................................................................12
II. Three of the following courses:
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers............................................................3
JRN 383 Contemporary Issues...............................................................................3
JRN 385 Public Affairs Reporting..........................................................................3
JRN 386 College Newspaper Practicum.......................................................................3
JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines.............................................................3
JRN 482 Advanced News Editing, Copyreading and Principles of Layout.......................................3
JRN 486 Advanced Reporting and News Writing...............................................................3
JRN 487 Ethical Issues in Journalism......................................................................1
Subtotal.......................................................................................................
Total Semester Hours Required..................................................................................21
Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282.
Public Relations Minor
The public relations minor prepares students for careers related to institutional and organizational information distribution. Emphasis in the program is on strong news writing skills, problem solving and planning, and publication production.
Required Courses Semester Hours
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism.......................................................................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing.............................................................3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading...........................................................3
JRN 284 Fundamentals of Public Relations.................................................................3
JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing..........................................................3
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers...........................................................3
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategies..........................................................3
JRN 398 Cooperative Education Public Relations.......................................................... 3
Total Semester Hours Required.................................................................................24
A suitable basic photography course may, upon approval of the advisor, be substituted for one of the above courses.
Other courses may be recommended by the advisor, depending on the students particular needs.
With the approval of the journalism faculty, journalism majors may substitute certain courses for required courses as a part of their major.


78 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
Modern Languages
; The Department of Modem Languages offers major programs in Spanish and modern foreign ; languages, minor programs in French, German, and Spanish, and teacher education programs in Spanish
and modem foreign languages. Courses in other foreign languages and in occupational or professional ; fields are offered in order to meet student and community needs. In addition, the department administers ; several education programs abroad.
1 Registration for courses is in accordance with previous preparation. Consequently, students will register | for foreign language courses as follows: No previous study, or less than one year in high school101;
; students with one year in high school who feel their background is weak101; one semester in
; college102; one year in college211 and/or 231 for German and Spanish and 201 for French; two
years in high school211 and/or 231 for German and Spanish and 201 for French, or 102, if needed;
three years in high school or one and one-half years in college212 and/or 232 for German and Spanish
; and 202 for French; or 211 and/or 231 for German and Spanish and 201 for French, if needed; four years
t in high school or two years in college300 level courses, or 212 and/or 232 for German and Spanish
1 and 202 for French, if needed.
The above regulations may not be applicable if students have had no professional instruction in their
; chosen foreign language within the past two years. If students feel that they have insufficient preparation
! for the required level, they should strengthen their background by taking a course recommended by the
? Modem Language Department. Elementary courses do not apply toward the major or minor y requirements.
Students seeking elementary and secondary credentials in French, German, or Spanish must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of Metro State in addition to all of the major requirements. They must also demonstrate sufficient mastery of the target language or languages through an appropriate proficiency exam.
Spanish
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish...............................................................................3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation...................................................................3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I..................................................................3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II.................................................................3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation..............................................................................3
SPA 314 Advanced Composition...............................................................................3
SPA 315* Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice............................................................3
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain
or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization
or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest......................................................3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish........................................................3
SPA 340 Survey of Spanish Literature I
or
SPA 341 Survey of Spanish Literature II....................................................................3
SPA 351 Masterpieces of Latin American Literature..........................................................3
SPA 401 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I.............................................................3
SPA 402 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II............................................................3
SPA 411 Contemporary Spanish Literature
or
SPA 412 Contemporary Latin American Literature.............................................................3
MDL 496* Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools...............................................3
Spanish electives**..............................................................................................3
Total.......................................................................................................48***
Required only when seeking a teacher certificate.
Must be advanced courses and taken with department approval.
Only 42 semester credit hours for those not seeking Teacher Licensure.
Minor in Spanish
Required Courses Semester Hours
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish.....................................................................3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation........................................................3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I.......................................................3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II......................................................3


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation...............................................................................3
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization
or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest.......................................................3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish..............................................................
Total............................................................................................................21
Minor in French
Required Courses Semester Hours
FRE 201 Intermediate French 1...............................................................................3
FRE 202 Intermediate French II..............................................................................3
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation.....................................................................3
FRE 301 Introduction to Advanced French Studies.............................................................3
FRE 311 Survey of French Literature I.......................................................................3
or
FRE 312 Survey of French Literature II......................................................................3
FRE 355 French Historical Perspectives......................................................................3
or
FRE 356 Contemporary Sociocultural Issues...................................................................3
French electives*................................................................................................
Total.............................................................................................................21
Must be a course at the 300- or 400-level.
Minor in German
Required Courses Semester Hours
GER 211 * German Reading and Conversation.....................................................................3
GER 212* German Civilization.................................................................................3
GER 231* German Vocabulary Building and Grammar..............................................................3
GER 232* German Composition and Free Writing................................................................ 3
Subtotal..........................................................................................................12
Select one of the following literature courses:
GER 321** Survey of German Literature 1.....................................................................3
GER 322** Survey of German Literature II....................................................................3
GER 323** Contemporary German Writers.......................................................................3
GER 351** Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller.....................................................................2
Subtotal...........................................................................................................3
Select two of the following skills courses:
GER 301 Third Year German Conversation......................................................................3
GER 331 Advanced German Composition and Grammar.............................................................3
GER 340 German for Business.................................................................................3
GER 341 Translation Techniques for Scientific Materials.....................................................2
Subtotal.........................................................................................................
Total.............................................................................................................21
Higher level course may be substituted with departmental approval.
Fourth year course may be substituted with departmental approval.
Modern Foreign Languages Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses
The composite modem foreign languages major involves a minimum of 48 hours in any two modem languages, at least 12 hours in each. Students are advised into intermediate and advanced classes in each language on the basis of individual background and need. The minimum 12 hours in each of the two
chosen languages must be taken as follows:
Spanish
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish...............................................................................3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation...................................................................3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I.............................................................3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II............................................................ 3
Subtotal.......................................................................................................12
French
FRE 201 Intermediate French 1..............................................................................3
FRE 202 Intermediate French II.............................................................................3
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation....................................................................3
FRE 301 Introduction to Advanced French Studies........................................................... 3
Subtotal.......................................................................................................12


80 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
German
GER 211 German Reading and Conversation................................................................3
GER 212 German Civilization............................................................................3
GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar.........................................................3
GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing........................................................... 3
Subtotal.....................................................................................................12
The remaining hours to complete the 48 hours required must be taken with department approval.
For those seeking a teacher certificate in modem foreign languages (French, German, Spanish), all of the courses in one of the following areas of emphasis are required.
: French Area of Emphasis
FRE 201 Intermediate French 1.............................................................................3
FRE 202 Intermediate French II............................................................................3
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation...................................................................3
FRE 301 Introduction to Advanced French Studies...........................................................3
l FRE 311 Survey of French Literature I.....................................................................3
FRE 312 Survey of French Literature II....................................................................3
l FRE 315 French Phonetics: Theory and Practice.............................................................3
! FRE 331 Advanced French Composition and Grammar..........................................................3
l FRE 332 Advanced Conversation.............................................................................3
I FRE 355 French Historical Perspectives....................................................................3
l FRE 356 Contemporary Sociocultural Issues.................................................................3
l FRE 452 Modem French Theater..............................................................................3
y FRE 453 The French Novel..................................................................................3
FRE 475 Senior Seminar in French Studies..................................................................3
MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools.............................................. 3
Total...........................................................................................................45
German Area of Emphasis
GER 211 German Reading and Conversation...................................................................3
GER 212 German Civilization...............................................................................3
GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar............................................................3
GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing...............................................................3
GER 315 German Phonetics: Theory and Practice.............................................................3
GER 321 Survey of German Literature 1.....................................................................3
GER 322 Survey of German Literature II....................................................................3
GER 323 Contemporary German Writers.......................................................................3
GER 331 Advanced German Composition and Grammar...........................................................3
GER 351 Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller.....................................................................3
GER 411 The German Novel of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries..................................3
or
GER 412 German Drama of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries............................................3
GER 421 Advanced Conversation: Present-day Germany........................................................3
German electives.................................................................................................3
MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools.............................................. 3
Total...........................................................................................................42
Spanish Area of Emphasis
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish..............................................................................3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation..................................................................3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I.................................................................3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II................................................................3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation.............................................................................3
SPA 314 Advanced Composition..............................................................................3
SPA 315 Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice............................................................3
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain.................................................................3
or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization.........................................................3
or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest.....................................................3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish.......................................................3
SPA 340 Survey of Spanish Literature 1....................................................................3
or
SPA 341 Survey of Spanish Literature II...................................................................3
SPA 401 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I............................................................3
SPA 402 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II...........................................................3
SPA 411 Contemporary Spanish Literature...................................................................3
or
SPA 412 Contemporary Latin-American Literature............................................................3
MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools.............................................. 3
Total...........................................................................................................42


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Music
Metropolitan State College of Denver is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. The Department of music offers majors in music education and music performance, and a minor in music.
The department also offers courses specifically designed for non-music students wishing to enhance their general understanding and enjoyment of music. Musically-talented students from all areas of the college are encouraged to participate in the wide variety of large and small music ensembles, including band, orchestra, choir, and chamber music.
The majors in music education and music performance are professional degree programs designed for students wishing to prepare themselves for careers as music teachers or performers. Students pursuing these majors are not required to complete a minor for graduation.
The music education degree program prepares students for careers teaching instrumental and/or choral music at the levels K-12. To be admitted to this program, students must pass the Music Education Entrance Examination. By taking an additional 16 semester hours beyond the bachelors degree (EDU 419 and 429), the student becomes eligible for K-12 licensure in the State of Colorado. With these additional 16 hours, this degree program is approved by the Colorado State Department of Education and has full accreditation by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. Students seeking teaching credentials in music must pass the Music Education Comprehensive Examination and must also satisfy all applicable requirements of the teacher education and licensure programs in the Division of Education in the School of Professional Studies.
The music performance degree program prepares students for further graduate study or for careers as performers or private studio teachers. To be admitted to this program, students must demonstrate the capability of developing a high level of musicianship in performance by passing the Music Performance Audition upon completion of MUS 172 (Private Instruction II).
Further information, including examination policies, procedures and requirements, is provided in the departmental publication entitled Advising Information. All music majors and minors should familiarize themselves with this document.
New and transfer students wishing to major or minor in music should be prepared to take placement examinations in the areas of music theory and music history and to perform an audition in their primary performance area. For placement and audition appointments, contact the Department of Music at least two weeks prior to the beginning of the semester.
Music Education Major for Bachelor of Arts Core Requirement for all Music Education Majors
Required Courses Semester Hours
MUS 111 Music Theory 1........................................................................................3
MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I....................................................................................1
MUS 113 Music Theory II.......................................................................................3
MUS 114 Music Theory Lab II...................................................................................1
MUS 211 Music Theory III......................................................................................3
MUS 212 Music Theory Lab III..................................................................................1
MUS 213 Music Theory IV.......................................................................................3
MUS 214 Music Theory Lab IV...................................................................................1
MUS 121 Music Literature I.................................................................................. 3
MUS 122 Music Literature II...................................................................................3
MUS 321 Music History I.......................................................................................3
MUS 322 Music History II......................................................................................3
MUS 171 Private Instruction I (Primary Performance Area)......................................................2
MUS 172 Private Instruction II (Primary Performance Area)............................................... 2
MUS 271 Private Instruction III (Primary Performance Area)....................................................2
MUS 272 Private Instruction IV (Primary Performance Area).................................................. 2
MUS 371 Private Instruction V (Primary Performance Area).................................................... 2
MUS 372 Private Instruction VI (Primary Performance Area)....................................................2
MUS 161 Class Voice I.........................................................................................1
MUS 161 Class Piano I*........................................................................................1
MUS 162 Class Piano II*.......................................................................................1
MUS 261 Class Piano III*......................................................................................1
MUS 262 Class Piano IV*.......................................................................................1
* Note: Students whose primary performance area is piano may elect another area of study in place of class piano; however, they still must pass the Piano Proficiency Examination before enrolling in MUS 352 or 353.


82 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
Select 10 hours from the following:**
: MUS 281 Ensemble**......................................................................................1
J MUS 381 Ensemble**......................................................................................1
! Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All 10 hours may be earned in any one course number or in any
combination of the above numbers. Ensembles must be chosen from those appropriate to the students area of emphasis:
l choral majors must enroll in at least eight hours of choral ensembles and instrumental majors must enroll in at least eight hours
l of instrumental ensembles. Students majoring in music education must enroll in an ensemble during each semester of full-
time residence except when student teaching.
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging...................................................3
MUS 341 String Techniques and Materials.................................................................2
MUS 342 Guitar Techniques and Materials.................................................................2
l MUS 345 Brass Techniques and Materials..................................................................2
l MUS 346 Percussion Techniques and Materials.............................................................2
l MUS 351 Basic Conducting................................................................................2
l MUS 433 Elementary School Music Methods and Materials...................................................2
J MUS 439 Supervised Field Experience: Elementary School Methods and Materials............................1
l MUS 434 Secondary School Music Methods and Materials....................................................2
MUS 439 Supervised Field Experience: Secondary School Methods and Materials.............................1
l RDG 328 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content Areas............................................4
l EDU 212 Elementary Education in United States...........................................................3
l EDU 264 Urban and Multicultural Education...............................................................3
l EDS 320 Educational Psychology Applied to Teaching......................................................3
! SED 360 The Exceptional Learner in the Classroom......................................................
T Total.........................................................................................................90
In addition to the above core requirement, music education majors must select one of the following emphases:
Choral Emphasis
MUS 140 Vocal Diction...................................................................................3
MUS 352 Choral Conducting and Literature................................................................3
MUS 442 Vocal Pedagogy..................................................................................2
Total..........................................................................................................9
Instrumental Emphasis
MUS 343 Woodwind Techniques and Materials...............................................................2
MUS 348 Marching Band Techniques and Materials..........................................................2
MUS 353 Instrumental Conducting and Literature..........................................................2
Total..........................................................................................................7
Music Performance Major for Bachelor of Arts Core Requirement for all Music Performance Majors
Required Courses Semester Hours
MUS 111 Music Theory 1..................................................................................3
MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I..............................................................................1
MUS 113 Music Theory II.................................................................................3
MUS 114 Music Theory Lab II............................................................................ 1
MUS 211 Music Theory III................................................................................3
MUS 212 Music Theory Lab III............................................................................1
MUS 213 Music Theory IV.................................................................................3
MUS 214 Music Theory Lab IV.............................................................................1
MUS 121 Music Literature I..............................................................................3
MUS 122 Music Literature II.............................................................................3
MUS 321 Music History I.................................................................................3
MUS 322 Music History II................................................................................3
MUS 171 Private Instruction I (Primary Performance Area)................................................2
MUS 172 Private Instruction II (Primary Performance Area)...............................................2
MUS 273 Performance III (Primary Performance Area)......................................................4
MUS 274 Performance IV (Primary Performance Area).......................................................4
MUS 373 Performance V (Primary Performance Area)........................................................4
MUS 374 Performance VI (Primary Performance Area).......................................................4
MUS 473 Performance VII (Primary Performance Area)......................................................4
MUS 474 Performance VIII (Primary Performance Area).....................................................4
Select 2 hours from the following:*
MUS 161 Class Instruction (Secondary Performance Area)*.................................................1
MUS 162 Class Instruction (Secondary Performance Area)*.................................................1
MUS 171 Private Instruction (Secondary Performance Area)*...............................................2
*Note: Must be Class Piano I and II unless student is able to pass the Private Instruction Audition in piano.
Exception: Students electing the organ emphasis must take Class Voice I and II unless student is able to pass the Private Instruction Audition in voice.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Select 12 hours from the following:**
MUS 281 Ensemble**.....................................................................................1
MUS 381 Ensemble**.....................................................................................1
**Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All 12 hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combination of the above numbers. Ensembles must be chosen from those appropriate to the students area of emphasis. Students majoring in music performance must enroll in an ensemble during each semester of full-time residence.
MUS 351 Basic Conducting...............................................................................2
MUS 479 Senior Recital................................................................................_L
Total.......................................................................................................73
In addition to the above core requirement, all music performance majors must select one of the following emphases:
Voice Emphasis
MUS 140 Vocal Diction..................................................................................3
MUS 442 Vocal Pedagogy.................................................................................2
Total.......................................................................................................6
Piano Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint.............................................................................3
MUS 441 Piano Pedagogy...........................................................................2
Total.................................................................................................6
Organ Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint..............................................................................3
MUS 352 Choral Conducting and Literature.........................................................2
Total...................................................................................................6
Guitar Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint..................................................................................3
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging................................................2
Total.......................................................................................................6
Woodwind, Brass, String or Percussion Emphasis
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging...........................................................3
MUS 353 Instrumental Conducting and Literature..................................................................2
Total...................................................................................................................6
Minor in Music
Required Courses Semester Hours
MUS 111 Music Theory 1...........................................................................3
MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I.......................................................................1
MUS 113 Music Theory II..........................................................................3
MUS 114 Music Theory Lab II......................................................................1
MUS 211 Music Theory III.........................................................................3
MUS 212 Music Theory Lab III.....................................................................1
MUS 121 Music Literature.........................................................................3
MUS 122 Music Literature II......................................................................3
MUS 171 Private Instruction I............................................................................2
MUS 172 Private Instruction II............................................................................2
Select 2 hours from the following:*
MUS 281 Ensemble*......................................................................................1
MUS 281 Ensemble*......................................................................................1
*Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit; both hours may be earned in either course number.
Upper-Division Elective in music theory, history, literature, or pedagogy....................................._2
Total.........................................................................................................27


84 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
Philosophy
Philosophy is the oldest of intellectual disciplines. Its questions are of the most enduring interest because they are the most fundamental to our intellectual and practical concerns. As such, philosophy can be taken to be a critical investigation into the assumptions and implications associated with all ideas across all disciplines, and, in this respect, it is interdisciplinary in character. However, this type of inquiry requires technical concepts and methods, and, hence, it takes on the character of a specialized discipline. Philosophical inquiry is an interaction between speculative and critical thought recognizing no pre-established limits in terms of the scope of either its interests or its critical examinations. Therefore, philosophy as a study program enlarges the students horizons of ideas throughout the various disciplines in the college, while simultaneously providing the critical skills necessary to analyze and synthesize these ideas. It encourages students to explore creatively the full range of philosophical options, to consider alternate points of view, and to penetrate deeply into profound issues. Because of the subject matter, attitudes, and methods employed in philosophy, the student will be much better prepared for leadership in personal life, civic responsibilities, and pursuit of a career.
In addition to offering a variety of courses for students who are planning to take only one or two courses in philosophy, the department offers two programs both of which feature flexibility and individualized training:
1. A major for students seeking a solid, general training/background which can serve either as a basis for graduate studies in such varied areas as philosophy, the humanities, law, medicine, business, urban planning and development, etc., or as a basis for a career in which the specialized training required is provided by the employer, such as careers in corporate management, government, politics, banking, or education.
2. A minor for students who have already chosen a career and seek to complement their specialized training^ackground with the opportunities afforded by philosophy to increase their career options and generally to increase the quality of their lives.
Metro State students whom either major or minor in philosophy are encouraged to take appropriate UCD courses whenever such courses contribute to the requirements or the balance of their philosophy experience. These students should consult the chair of the Philosophy Department at Metro State when planning to take UCD courses.
Philosophy Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
PHI 144 Logic..........................................................................................3
PHI 300 History of Greek Philosophy....................................................................3
PHI 302 History of Modem Philosophy....................................................................3
PHI 410 Senior Seminar................................................................................ 3
Total........................................................................................................12
Additional Course Subject Areas Required Lower Division:
Introductory Courses..........................................................................................6
Upper Division:
Metaphysics and/or Epistemology...............................................................................3
Ethics and/or Social Philosophy...............................................................................3
One philosophical problem or one philosopher..................................................................3
One course relating philosophy to another field, for example religion, art, science, or history............. 3
Total........................................................................................................18
Additional electives at any level............................................................................_6
(Selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Philosophy)
Total upper-division semester hours required for major.......................................................18
Total semester hours required for Philosophy Major...........................................................36
Minor in Philosophy
Required Courses Semester Hours
PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy.....................................................................3
PHI 103 Ethics.........................................................................................3
PHI 111 Language, Logic, and Persuasion................................................................3
Total.........................................................................................................9
Electives
A minimum of 11 additional semester hours of which seven are upper-division courses in philosophy selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Philosophy to make a total of 20 semester hours.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The multi-minor may be arranged through the Department of Philosophy and includes the required courses listed under the holistic health and education multi-minor on page 180 of this catalog.
Speech Communication
Speech communication is one of the most important human qualities. Proficiency in one of the areas of speech opens up many careers to the graduate.
For instance, in mass communication, radio, television, and film, a graduate might aspire to careers in on-air operations, mass media ideas, promotion, public affairs, or radio-television sales. Graduates might become consultants in advertising, specialists in instructional or educational television or in the public broadcasting service. Careers are open as broadcasting specialists in public relations, public information, business, industry, and government.
Speech pathology graduates who meet the standards of the American Speech and Hearing Association may find careers in public and private schools, community clinics, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, private practice, colleges and universities, industry, or state and federal government agencies.
Graduates in rhetoric and public address have achieved success in law, industrial and organizational communication, educational administration, public relations, speech writing for political figures, teaching, public relations, and theology.
Professional and educational theater occupations are open to theater graduates with specialties in stagecraft, sound, engineering, script writing, directing, and acting.
Communications Theory and Organizational Communication: Communication consulting/training as well as conference planning both present lucrative and satisfying careers to speech graduates specializing in these areas of communication. Job opportunities are available in education, government, business, and industry as well as private practice as a consultant.
Speech Communication Major for Bachelor of Arts
1. Core courses are required for all areas of emphasis.
2. Independent study, topic courses, and experiential education courses such as practicums and internships may be taken in each of the program areas.
3. Additional semester hours in speech courses will be selected in consultation with the advisor approved by the Department of Speech Communication.
4. Total minimum semester hours for a major in speech communication: 36
Basic Core Required Courses Semester Hours
SPE 10! Fundamentals of Public Speaking ......................................................... 3
SPE 320 Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry........................................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication.............................................................. 2
Total......................................................................................................9
Broadcasting Area of Emphasis
Required Courses Semester Hours
SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and Television Broadcasting ....................................... 3
SPE 343 Radio-Television Announcing........................................................... .3
SPE 344 Television Production..................................................................... .3
SPE 345 Broadcast Journalism: Radio......................................................... .3
or
SPE 445 Broadcast Journalism: Television.............................................................3
SPE 348 Workshop in Radio Production .............................................................. 3
SPE 448 Seminar Practicum in Broadcasting............................................................3
SPE 298 Cooperative Education fpr Speech Communication.............................................1-6
or
TLC 249 Beginning Internship in Radio, TV. Film, and Mass Communications...........................1-6
SPE 398 Cooperative Education fpr Speech Communication............................................1-15
or
TLC 349 Advanced Internship in Radio, TV, Film, and Mass Communications........................ 1-15
Total..................................................................................................20-39


86 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
: Communication Theory Area of Emphasis
I Required Courses Semester Hours
SPE 170 Communication Theory.....................................................................3
SPE 171 Interpersonal Communication: The Individual as a Communicator............................3
SPE 211 Discussion Methods.......................................................................3
SPE 272 Nonverbal Communication................................................................
! Total.................................................................................................12
Organizational Communication Area of Emphasis
Required Courses Semester Hours
l SPE 170 Communication Theory.....................................................................3
l SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking.......................................................3
SPE 311 Strategies of Organizational Leadership..................................................1
Total..................................................................................................9
: Public Address and Rhetoric Area of Emphasis

l Required Courses Semester Hours
SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy...............................................................3
SPE 408 Rhetorical Criticism of Public Address...................................................3
SPE 409 Classical Rhetoric.......................................................................3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion................................................................_2
t Total................................................................................................12
Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Area of Emphasis
Required Courses Semester Hours
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics, Voice, and Diction...................................................3
or
SPE 353 Voice Science: Pathology and Technology........................................................3
SPE 350 Speech Pathology I.............................................................................3
SPE 351 Speech Pathology II............................................................................3
SPE 360 Audiology I....................................................................................3
SPE 361 Audiology II.................................................................................
Total........................................................................................................15
Theater Area of Emphasis
Required Courses Semester Hours
ENG 112 Introduction to Drama..........................................................................3
or
ENG 210 Introduction to Literary Studies...............................................................3
SPE 221 Introduction to Theater........................................................................3
SPE 222 Techniques in Acting 1.........................................................................3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft.....................................................................3
SPE 322 Stage Movement.................................................................................3
SPE 328 Stage Directing............................................................................... 3
Total......................................................................................................'.18
Speech Education Area of Emphasis
Required Courses for the Secondary Teacher Education Program in Speech Communication Arts Semester Hours
Basic Core ...................................................................................................9
SPE 211 Discussion Methods.............................................................................3
SPE 221 Introduction to Theater........................................................................3
SPE 222 Techniques of Acting I.........................................................................3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft.....................................................................3
SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and Television Broadcasting..............................................3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking.......................................................................3
SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy.....................................................................3
SPE 328 Stage Directing................................................................................3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics, Voice and Diction....................................................3
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools.................................................................3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion...................................................................... 3
Total........................................................................................................42


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 87
Electives for the Secondary Teacher Education Program
A minimum of six semester hours in speech courses is recommended in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech Communication. These six hours are to be selected from the following list:
SPE 305 Intercollegiate Forensics..........................................................................1
SPE 308 Great American Speakers............................................................................3
SPE 322 Stage Movement.....................................................................................3
SPE 350 Speech Pathology I.................................................................................3
SPE 360 Audiology I........................................................................................3
SPE 408 Rhetorical Criticism of Public Address.............................................................3
SPE 420 Readers Theater...................................................................................3
SPE 426 Theater: Practicum 1...............................................................................1
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life.................................................
Total minimum hours required....................................................................................48
Students seeking secondary licensure in speech education must satisfy the teacher education program of Metro State in addition to all of the major requirements.
The Speech Communication Minor
All Speech Communication minors are required to take a minimum of 24 hours including the core (SPE 101, SPE 320, SPE 374).
Hours taken beyond the core are to be determined in consultation with a speech communication advisor.
Telecommunications
Telecommunications is one of the most beneficial internship programs for communication students in broadcasting. Under the auspices of the Department of Speech Communication, the student is afforded the opportunity to gain first-hand experience through current internships in radio, television, and film, provided by industry, government, business, public, and commercial telecommunications centers. The student may begin this program upon the completion of six hours in broadcasting-telecommunications courses at Metro State. Students should contact :the advisor in broadcasting for details relative to eligibility and placement in the telecommunications internships. Internship telecommunications courses are offered every semester during each of the modules as well as on a full semester basis.


88 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, 8. SCIENCES
DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
In the social sciences, students may choose bachelors degree programs in anthropology, history, political science, psychology, sociology, social work, urban studies, multidisciplinary programs in behavioral science and gerontology, and an array of emphasis areas and minors. These curricula develop students understanding of the subject area and their skills in working with individuals, groups, and large organizations. Courses range from the traditional liberal arts based curriculum to professional internships in social work and legislative government, to studies in popular culture and research practicums. Programs prepare students for beginning level practice in helping services and social work agencies, and graduate education in law. Graduates focus on the social and behavioral science disciplines, research in the social and behavioral sciences, work with the elderly, public administration, or secondary school teaching.
History
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
l HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1715.......................................................................3
HIS 102 Western Civilization since 1715....................................................................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865...........................................................................3
l HIS 122 American History since 1865 .......................................................................3
y HIS 482 Senior Seminar.................................................................................... 3
Total............................................................................................................15
Electives
A minimum of 23 additional semester hours in history is required, 18 hours of which must be upper-division. No more than four hours in HIS 389 readings courses may be counted toward the major without prior written approval from the department. Course Distribution
A minimum of 23 additional semester hours in history is required, 18 hours of which must be upper division. In the minimum of 23 additional semester hours required, students must include at least three hours in each of the broad areas of history: United States, European, Developing World.
Grade Average
Students majoring in history must maintain at least a 2.0 average in their history courses.
Advising
History majors should consult with a departmental advisor to select the courses in other disciplines that complement their area of concentration in the major.
Minor in History
There are four different areas of emphasis available to students seeking a history minor: (I) regular history area of emphasis, (II) American popular culture area of emphasis, (III) American West history area of emphasis, (IV) twentieth-century studies history area of emphasis.
I. Regular History Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1715......................................................................3
HIS 102 Western Civilization since 1715...................................................................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865.........................................................................3
HIS 122 American History since 1865 ....................................................................... 3
Total.............................................................................................................12
Electives
A minimum of nine additional semester hours in history is required. The hours must be upper-division and should be selected in consultation with a departmental advisor. No more than two hours in HIS 389 readings courses may be counted toward the minor without prior written approval from the department.
II. American Popular Culture Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 122 American History since 1865 ...................................................................3
HIS 151 Movies and History.............................................................................3
or
HIS 152 Rock Music and Social History..................................................................3
or
HIS 153 Sports in America..............................................................................2
Total........................................................................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional history hours is required, of which nine must be upper-division. Courses must be related to American popular culture.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
III. American West History Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 110 American West.................................................................................3
HIS 111 Colorado History 1............................................................................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865......................................................................3
HIS 122 American History since 1865.................................................................
Total.....................................................................................................12
Electives
A minimum of nine additional history hours treating the American West is required, all of which must be upper-division.
IV. Twentieth-Century Studies History Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 122 American History since 1865 ................................................................ 3 J
HIS 201 Contemporary World History..................................................................2 |
Total......................................................................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional hours treating twentieth-century history is required, of which nine must be upper-division. Grade Average
Students minoring in history must maintain a 2.0 average in their history courses.
Secondary School Education Licensure in Social Sciences
Students majoring in history may combine their major with other courses in the social sciences and in education to earn secondary education licensure. The requirements of this program are included under the Education Department section of this catalog.
Prelaw Courses
Several history courses are of particular importance to legal studies. These include HIS 121, HIS 122, HIS 346, and HIS 368. Students interested in prelaw courses are urged to contact the departmental advisor.
Minor in Interdisciplinary Legal Studies
The interdisciplinary legal studies minor is designed to show students how the various disciplines in the humanities and social sciences treat questions of law and justice. The interdisciplinary legal studies minor is not a pre-law preparatory program or paralegal training. Its goal is to cross disciplines so that students can understand how the humanities and social sciences illuminate the principles, practices, and policies of the law.
Required Courses Semester Hours
CJC 110 Evolutionary Legal Concepts in Criminal Justice.....................................................3
HIS 368 The Court in Crisis.................................................................................3
PHI 343 Philosophy of Law...................................................................................3
SOC 355 Sociology of Law....................................................................................3
ENG 370 Literature and the Law..............................................................................3
PSC 312 American Constitutional Law.........................................................................3
xxx xxx Seminar in Legal Topics (Interdisciplinary team taught course)................................... 3
Total..............................................................................................................21
Students will select one law-related course from the courses listed below or approved by the interdisciplinary legal studies minor advisor:
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business I.....................................................................3
MGT 322 Legal Environment of Business II....................................................................3
CJC 210 Substantive Criminal Law............................................................................3
HIS 346 The Constitution and the New Nation, 1787-1848......................................................3
SOC 350 Criminology.........................................................................................3
WMS 331 Women and the Law.................................................................................._2
Total Hours Required for Minor.....................................................................................24


90 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
Political Science
The study of political science is mainly the study of governments: their social and economic environments, how they are organized, how and why they decide upon and carry out policies, and how nation-states interact on the world scene. It also includes the study of political ideas and values, past and present, citizen behavior, and recent trends in methods of research and analysis aimed at enlarging our knowledge of political processes.
In this sense, the Department of Political Science provides students with the perspective and background necessary to understand the complex and often confusing reality of politics.
To focus that search for understanding, each political science major will select a primary area of study either in American politics or international/comparative politics. Course listings for each area are available in the department office.
The department also houses the colleges Public Administration and Urban Studies programs. Prelaw
The Department of Political Science also offers prelaw advising to all students at the college, regardless of students major fields of study. If you are thinking of applying to law school or would like more information on the LSAT or law schools, please contact the departments prelaw advisor.
Political Science Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
PSC 101 American National Government....................................................................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas.....................................................................3
PSC 202 Conducting Political Analysis...................................................................3
or
PSY 231 Introduction to Statistics for Social and Behavioral Sciences...................................3
PSC 305 Political Theory................................................................................3
PSC 402 Special Studies (Senior Experience)............................................................ 3
Subtotal......................................................................................................15
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours of political science must be completed. At least 18 of these 21 hours must be upper-division courses (300- and 400-level) and must be approved by the department. Generally, students may apply only 12 hours of credit in non-classroom courses toward the major as approved electives.
Total hours required for major.........................................................................................36
Course Distribution and Area Concentration
Of the 21 elective hours in political science, 12 must be in the students primary area of study: American politics or international/ comparative politics. A minimum of three hours must be drawn from the remaining area of concentration and six hours can be selected at the students discretion.
Minor in Political Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
PSC 101 American National Government...................................................................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas....................................................................3
PSC 305 Political Theory...............................................................................2
Subtotal...................................................................................................9
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional semester hours are required in political science courses. At least nine of these 12 hours must be in upper-division courses (300 and 400 level) and must be approved by the department. Generally, students may apply only six hours of credit in non-classroom courses toward the major as approved electives.
Total semester hours required for a PSC minor..................................................21
Minor in Public Administration
Public administration is the study of governmental organizations, their management, and how government policies are formulated and carried out. The Political Science Department offers a minor in public administration available to students interested in a career in government service, to students presently employed in government who wish to increase their skills and job status, and to students planning to take postgraduate work in public administration.
Required Courses Semester Hours
I. Basic courses required for all public administration minors:
PSC 101 American National Government....................................................................3
PSC 302 Introduction to Public Administration...........................................................3


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
II. Two of the following courses:
PSC 322 Public Policy........................................................................................3
PSC 324 Intergovernmental Relations..........................................................................3
PSC 326 Politics of Budgeting................................................................................3
PSC 328 Public Personnel Administration......................................................................3
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting..............................................................................3
III. One of the following courses:
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems....................................................................3
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics...........................................................................4
IV. Internship PSC 412 or substitute course (minimum)..............................................................2
Total..........................................................................................................19-20
A governmental internship will be required of all students for a minimum of one semester and a minimum of three semester hours. This requirement may be waived for students with at least one calendar year of administrative work experience in a government agency.
It is recommended that public administration minors also take a course in both public speaking and in technical writing.
Also available to students is a program of courses leading to a recognition of completion award in public administration presented by the Political Science Department. Students may earn the award by successfully completing a selection of courses amounting to 26 semester hours. Contact the Political Science Department for details.
Major and Minor in Urban Studies
Please see the Urban Studies section of this catalog.
Internships
In addition to scheduled classes, political science students are encouraged to enroll for at least one off-campus internship. Students may receive credit for practical work experience in various areas of government service. Placement in a governmental position may be initiated by the student, Cooperative Education, or the Political Science Department. Interested students should contact the Political Science Department for details.
Courses with Variable Topics
Not listed among the regular courses are a variety of topics courses and self-paced courses which are offered each semester and give the student a greater variety of choice. Please be sure to check the current Class Schedule for these classes, which can be repeated for credit under different titles.
Washington, D.C. Program
During the summer session, the department offers a special program in Washington, D.C. aimed at providing students with a unique perspective on the nations political system. The program combines a four-week module held in Washington with on-campus meetings and relevant readings. Please contact the department about this program. Also, the department works with students interested in an intern experience in Washington during the summer or during the fall or spring semesters.
Golda Meir Center for Political Leadership
The Golda Meir Center for Political Leadership is connected to the historic Golda Meir House on the Auraria campus. The center is organized and operated through the Political Science Department. The centers purpose is to develop programs that: examine the role of leaders and leadership at all levels of the political process; blend together theoretical and applied politics; and emphasize voices and perspectives that expand the boundaries of traditional leadership analysis.
Urban Studies Program
A bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree with a major in urban studies is offered. The bachelor of science degree is recommended for those students desiring a stronger background in quantitative aspects of urban studies. Coursework is jointly offered by Metro State and the University of Colorado at Denver; the major is offered at Metro State. The emphasis of this program is an interdisciplinary approach to learning. To support this approach six areas of emphasis are offered within the major.
1. local govemment/urban planning
2. housing patterns and alternatives
3. cultural lifestyles
4. transportation and communication
5. nonprofit organization administration
6. business, management, and urbanization


92 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
T
Urban Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts
The requirements total 46 semester hours and include:
1. Five-27 hours of core courses
2. Nine hours selected from each of four areas of process
3. Two hours in an area of emphasis to be selected by the student.
4. Six additional hours for a bachelor of science degree
5. Urban studies majors who do not wish to pursue a minor in some other discipline will be required to take at least 14 semester hours for a total of 60 semester hours. The 14 semester hours must be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.
6. There are different requirements for the nonprofit business administration, business, management, and urbanization emphases.
Required Courses
Semester Hours
URS 100 Introduction to Urban Studies................................................................................3
URS 200 An Inside Look at Urban Institutions.........................................................................3
URS 300 World Patterns of Urbanization...............................................................................3
URS 380 Applied Urban Research Methods...............................................................................3
URS 489 Interdisciplinary Seminar....................................................................................4
URS 499* Internship in Urban Studies.................................................................................3
Advanced writing course, which may be taken from nonprofit business administration, English or communications...........*3-4
Statistics, which may be taken from economics, geography, mathematics, psychology, or sociology
Total.
25-27
Nonprofit organization administration students may elect to fulfill these requirements within the nonprofit organization administration area of emphasis.
A total of nine hours should be selected from the following areas of process. Nonprofit organization administration students will take one course from two areas for a total of at least six hours. Substitutions for these courses should be arranged through an Urban Studies advisor.
Urban Spatial Structuring Processes
URS 310 Internal Structure of the City.....................................................................3
URS 351 Community Development and Planning.................................................................3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game..............................................................................4
GEG 204 Geography of Denver................................................................................3
GEG 360 Urban Geography....................................................................................3
GEG 461 Urban and Regional Planning........................................................................3
Urban Political Processes
URS 210 An Analysis of Urban Boundaries....................................................................3
URS 350 Emerging Urban Political Systems...................................................................3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game..............................................................................4
PSC 300 American State and Local Government................................................................3
PSC 302 Introduction to Public Administration..............................................................3
SOC 371 Politics and Power.................................................................................3
Urban Economic Processes
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro....................................................................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro....................................................................3
ECO 330 State and Local Finance............................................................................3
ECO 335 Urban Economic Analysis............................................................................3
ECO 340 Transportation Economics...........................................................................3
ECO 345 Environmental Economics............................................................................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America.................................................................................3
Urban Social Processes
GEG 130 Geographic Analysis of Current Social Issues.......................................................3
GEG 362 Population, Resources, and Land Use................................................................3
GEG 462 Land Use: Residential..............................................................................3
SOC 309 Urban Sociology....................................................................................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America.................................................................................2
Total.............................................................................................................9
Area of Emphasis
In each of the first four following areas of emphasis, the student will select a minimum of 12 hours with a minimum of six in urban studies. The student may take any combination of interdisciplinary courses related to the area of emphasis to be selected in consultation with an advisor. One of the courses should be a skills course related to the area of emphasis.
Local Government Urban Planning
This area of emphasis concentrates on the basic conceptual and theoretical planning processes as they relate to and actually appear in urban government occupations and professions. The area of emphasis is designed for students seeking entry into government occupations or seeking advanced study in public administration or urban planning beyond the bachelors degree.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
URS 250 New Front Range Communities....................................................................3
URS 289 Urban Problems: Topics.......................................................................1-3
URS 351 Community Development and Planning.............................................................3
URS 389 Readings in Urban Studies....................................................................1-3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game........................................................................1-4
URS 410 Urban Environmental Perception.................................................................3
URS 450 Cities of the Future...........................................................................3
URS 451 Community Involvement Methods..................................................................3
URS 471 The Urban Elderly: Prisoners of Space..........................................................3
Housing Patterns and Alternatives
This area of emphasis will concentrate on the assembly and development of residential land, the nature of public and private programs to provide housing and the maintenance and rebuilding of neighborhoods. A broad range of topics will include the evolution of public intervention in housing and residential renewal, the conflict between physical and human criteria in housing decisions, and constraints on the publics ability to deal with housing issues. Completion of this area of emphasis provides a foundation for graduate work and/or employment with a wide range of public and private housing agencies.
URS 171 Introduction to Denver Neighborhoods..............................................................3
URS 230 Introduction to Urban Housing Problems............................................................3
URS 250 New Front Range Communities.......................................................................3
URS 289 Urban Problems: Topics..........................................................................1-3
URS 330 Housing: Issues and Policies......................................................................3
URS 389 Readings in Urban Studies.......................................................................1-3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game...........................................................................1-4
URS 450 Cities of the Future..............................................................................3
MGT 300 Organizational Management.........................................................................3
FIN 380 Real Estate Practice and Law......................................................................3
Cultural Lifestyles
This area of emphasis concentrates on the impacts on the urban landscape of the lifestyles of various cultures be they ethnic, racial, chronological, religious, economic, or gender. The consequences of these impacts are viewed as among the most significant determinants of urban structure, form, function, and social interaction. The student is provided with specialized training and experience for entry into professions with public or private agencies that deal directly with these groups within
a pluralistic urban environment.
URS 250 New Front Range Communities.....................................................................3
URS 371 Ethnic Groups in U.S. Cities....................................................................3
URS 389 Readings in Urban Studies.....................................................................1-3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game.........................................................................1-4
URS 410 Urban Environmental Perception..................................................................3
URS 471 The Urban Elderly: Prisoners of Space...........................................................3
Transportation and Communication
The transportation-communication area of emphasis has three basic academic foci: (1) to aid students in refining their perceptions of the various networks that exist in the urban setting; (2) to provide tools and techniques to analyze these networks; and (3) to increase the students understanding that transportation and communication are interdependent with such factors as land use, politics, and demography. Completion of this area of emphasis provides a foundation for a professional
career or further graduate training.
URS 228 Introduction to Transportation Systems............................................................... 3
URS 289 Urban Problems: Topics..............................................................................1-3
URS 328 Transportation: Issues and Policies...................................................................3
URS 389 Readings in Urban Studies...........................................................................1-3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game...............................................................................1-4
URS 450 Cities of the Future..................................................................................3
Nonprofit Organization Administration
This area of emphasis combines classroom theory and practical experience in a comprehensive format. Students formal classroom experiences are supplemented by at least 20 hours per week during two semesters in placement experiences. All field work will be carefully supervised and student progress will be measured against learning objectives cooperatively developed for each course by the student, agency supervisor, and the college coordinator or faculty member.
This area of emphasis is designed to provide an educational program for a very specific administrative level in nonprofit agencies and organizations. The directive skills include development and management of volunteer programs, fund-raising.
proposal writing, program and human resource development.
Course Requirements Include:
1. URS Required Core Courses..................................................................................16
2. Selected Electives..........................................................................................7
3. NOA Area of Emphasis......................................................................................20
HSP 201 Principles of Nonprofit Administration...........................................................4
HSP 321 Organizational Stability of Nonprofit Organization...............................................4
HSP 361 Financial Accountability and Organizational Control of NPOs.....................................4
HSP 402 Fundraising and Proposal Writing for NPOs.......................................................4
HSP 431 Human Resource Development in NPOs............................................................._4
Total..........................................................................................................43


94 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
Business, Management, and Urbanization
This area of emphasis will stress the interrelationships between the private business sector and the public policy and urban life designers and decision-makers. Public sector/private sector/policy makers cooperation, or the lack thereof, in the future, will have a direct effect on urban lifestyle. Issues to be addressed or focused upon in this emphasis are: the roles of business and urban government in the overall process of urbanization; the functions of managing business and managing government; the importance of sales tax revenues to both business and government; and, with less governmental employment in the future, the changes that are in store for small and medium sized businesses. This area of emphasis is expressly directed toward the student seeking an undergraduate major in management or administration of government organizations at the local, state or
l federal level, or in management positions in private industry.
Course Requirements Include:
l 1. URS Required Core Courses...............................................................................25-27
2. Business, Management, Urbanization Emphasis.................................................................21
l MGT xxx (Any Metro State introduction to business course)...............................................3
l MGT 250 Small Business Management.......................................................................3
I MGT 300 Organizational Management.......................................................................3
l MKT 300 Principles of Marketing.........................................................................3
Six Hours to be Selected From:
ECO 350 Managerial Economics............................................................................3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior.........................................................................3
MKT 301 Marketing Research..............................................................................3
MKT 311 Advertising Management..........................................................................3
! MKT 330 Marketing of Services...........................................................................3
l MKT 331 Consumer Behavior...............................................................................3
y ACC 308 Small Business Taxation.........................................................................3
Urban Studies Major for Bachelor of Science
The requirement for the major in urban studies leading to the bachelor of science degree includes six semester hours in addition to the bachelor of arts degree. The six hours must be taken from the following
list of courses.
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems.............................................................3
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Programming Assembler.......................................................3
CMS 223 Word Processing...............................................................................3
CMS 312 BASIC Programming and Graphics for Computers..................................................3
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences.....................................4
Urban Studies Minor
Minors for both the bachelor of science degree and the bachelor of arts degree are available. The minor can be designed to provide the student with course experiences that are most relevant to her or his occupational and educational goals.
Students, in consultation with the department offering related courses and the students urban studies faculty advisor, will develop individual minors that will reflect the best possible elective curriculum, and will insure that an urban emphasis is maintained.
Required Courses
URS 100 Introduction to Urban Studies............................................................................3
URS 200 An Inside Look at Urban Institutions.....................................................................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing....................................................................... 3
Subtotal...............................................................................................................21
Twelve additional semester hours are required to complete the minor. The elective courses are to be selected in consultation
with a URS faculty advisor.
Elective Courses.......................................................................................................12
Total semester hours required for the minor............................................................................21
Psychology
Department of Psychology Student Outcome Goals
Upon completion of a degree program in psychology at Metropolitan State College of Denver, students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate a knowledge of the major historical contributions and themes, basic principles, current issues, and emerging developments in psychology.
2. Demonstrate the ability to communicate knowledge of the field of psychology both orally and in writing, the latter following the American Psychological Association guidelines.
3. Demonstrate the ability to relate psychological principles and methodology to the problems and issues in other disciplines.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 9
4. Demonstrate the ability to conduct independently a basic literature search on a given problem in psychology and the ability to integrate this new information into a coherent understanding of the basic issues relating to this problem.
5. Demonstrate an understanding of and the ability to apply the fundamentals of research methodology and statistical analysis to the interpretation and evaluation of research reports.
6. Express an appreciation for the value of psychological knowledge in improving our world and for individual differences and universal commonalties in human experience.
The major or minor program is to be planned in consultation with an advisor from the Psychology Department by the beginning of the junior year or upon transfer into the department.
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses
PSY 101 PSY 231 PSY 232 PSY 331 PSY 332 PSY 451 Subtotal ..
Introductory Psychology....................................
Introduction to Statistics for Social and Behavioral Sciences,
Inferential Statistics.....................................
Psychological Research Methods I...........................
Psychological Research Methods II..........................
History and Systems of Psychology..........................
In addition, students must choose one course from each category:
Social.
PSY 215
PSY 241
PSY 305
PSY 347
Experimental
PSY 357
PSY 359
PSY 430
PSY 431
PSY 439
Cross-Cultural Psychology
Social Psychology
Psychology of Gender
Psychology of Violence and Aggression
Cognitive Psychology Theories of Motivation Sensation and Perception Physiological Psychology Psychology of Learning
Clinical/Personality........................
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment
PSY 300 Theories of Personality
PSY 310 Psychology of Counseling
PSY 362 Abnormal Psychology
Developmental. PSY 221 PSY 325 PSY 326 PSY 327
Psychology of Human Development Child Psychology Psychology of Adolescence Adulthood and Aging
Subtotal
Total hours of required courses. Electives
Semester Hours
..............3
..............3
..............3
..............3
..............3
............_!
............18
3
3
3

12
30
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours in psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by a Department of Psychology advisor, making a total of 45 hours in psychology. No more than nine of these hours may be PSY 295 Variable Topics courses, and no more than six of these hours may be PSY 498 Independent Study. The maximum number of hours in psychology a student may count toward a bachelor of arts degree is 60.
Total hours for major..........................................................................................45
Additional Requirement
BIO 100 Human Biology for Non-Majors....................................................................3
or
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology.................................................................4
or equivalent
This additional requirement may be applied toward General Studies, the minor, or degree electives.
Students considering advanced degrees should be aware that, in addition to coursework in the areas listed above, graduate programs often have specific undergraduate course prerequisites. Required or recommended courses, depending on the graduate program, include Theories of Personality, Abnormal Psychology, Psychology of Learning, Child Psychology, Physiological Psychology, Industrial Psychology, Sensation and Perception, Cooperative Education in Psychology, Teaching of Psychology, and Advanced Statistics. Therefore, students should consult with a Psychology Department advisor to choose appropriate psychology electives.
Students interested in the Gerontology area of emphasis must select a minimum of 30 hours (see list under Department of Sociology, Gerontology Area of Emphasis) in addition to the 30 hours of required courses for the psychology major. This must be done in consultation with and approved by a Department of Psychology advisor. The gerontology emphasis may be applied in lieu of the 15 elective hours in the psychology major and the minor requirement. Students may not count the same course twice toward meeting requirements in both the major and the gerontology emphasis; different courses must be chosen to complete the major hours and the gerontology hours.


96 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES
Students desiring secondary licensure in social studies should contact an advisor in the Department of Teacher Education.
In meeting the requirements for the psychology major (described above), transfer students must take a minimum of 15 semester hours of psychology coursework at Metro State, of which at least nine must be upper-division credits.
NOTE: The Psychology Department does not count CLEP credit toward the total number of semester hours required for the major or minor; extra coursework is necessary to make up the difference. The Psychology Department does not accept correspondence study courses toward the total number of semester hours required for a major or minor. However, both CLEP and correspondence study credit can count toward the degree. Students who wish to use psychology courses to fulfill general studies requirements must earn additional hours to fulfill the total hours for either the major or minor in psychology. The only exception is PSY 451, History and Systems of Psychology, which may be used as a Senior Experience without being replaced in the major or minor. Please consult with an advisor.
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The multi-minor may be arranged through the Department of Psychology and includes the required courses listed under the holistic health and wellness education multi-minor on page 180 of this catalog.
Minor in Psychology
Required Courses Semester Hours
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology................................................................3
PSY 451 History and Systems of Psychology......................................................1
Total...............................................................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours in psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by a Department of Psychology advisor is required, making a total of 21 hours in psychology. No more than six semester hours may be PSY 295 Variable Topics courses, no more than three semester hours may be PSY 397 Practicum, and at least two electives in psychology (six semester hours) taken at Metro State must be upper-division. See also above NOTE.
Sociology
The study of sociology emphasizes understanding people in groups small groups like the family, the all-pervasive bureaucratic organizations of American society, political parties, football crowds, groups in conflict, and society as a whole. It includes the study, from a variety of theoretical models, of past and present societies and social processes, and the analysis, using modem research methods of contemporary social issues.
The sociology program offers to its majors and minors, and to students from all academic disciplines, courses that focus on important issues and trends in todays complex societies.
Sociology Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology...........................................................................3
SOC 201 Current Social Issues...............................................................................3
SOC 332 Sociological Theory: Past and Present...............................................................3
SOC 360 Research in the Social Sciences.....................................................................3
SOC 460 Advanced Research in the Social Sciences........................................................... 3
Total............................................................................................................15
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours in sociology courses is required, constituting a total of 36 semester hours. At least 12 upper-division semester hours in sociology must be completed at Metropolitan State College of Denver by students majoring in the field.
Grade Requirements in the Major
Students must attain a course grade of C or above in all sociology courses that count toward the sociology major. A grade of D or below will not count toward the 36 hours necessary for a major in sociology.
Optional Areas of Concentration in Sociology
Each area of concentration includes a number of courses designed to give the student an in-depth exploration of the knowledge, challenges, issues, and research in a specific subdiscipline of sociology.
I. The Urban Community
This concentration is particularly recommended for those interested in urban studies and all students whose career plans are aimed toward management, planning, or administration in the urban setting.
SOC 322 Race, Sex, and Ethnic Groups.......................................................................3
SOC 355 Sociology of Law...................................................................................3
SOC 373 Mass Media and Social Behavior.....................................................................3
SOC 381 Population Issues..................................................................................3


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AURARIA LIBRARY U18701 9800938

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AA Arts Building AU A urana Library BR Bromley Hall CD Child Development Center CN Central Classroom Butldtng DR Dravo Bu1lding NC North Classroom 8UIIdtng NP N1nth Sl. Park Mall 8 PE Physical Education Faciltty BSB Baseball Field FTB Football Field MUL Multipurpose Area SFB Field SOC Soccer Field TEN Tennis Courts TRK Track SA Sl. Ca)etan's Center 51 Sctence Building SO South Classroom Buildtng ST Studenl Un1on TC Terracentre TE Technology Bu1ldi ng TR T ramway Building TV TIVOli WC West Classroom Build1ng

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS (See Alphabetical Index for Specific Topics) Equal Opportunity and Americans With Disabilities Act Statement ......................................... ................... 4 F amily Educational Rights and Privacy Act................................................................................................. 4 Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act.. ............. .......................................... .............................. 4 Trustees of The State Colleges in Colorado.................................................................................................. 5 Officers of Administration ...... :................................ ...................................................................................... 5 Generaiinformation........ .................................................... ............... ........................................................... 8 Student Services ............................ .................................................................................. ........... ................. II Admis ion and Registration..................................................................... ... ........ ........................................ 15 Financial Aid ......................... ......................... ......... .............. ....... ................ ................... ................ ...... 24 Special Programs ......... .................................................................................................................................. 29 Academic Information.................................................. ............................................ .............. ...... ............ ... 33 General Studies Information ..................................... ................................................................................. 45 Degrees and Programs .......................... .......... ...... .... ... ............... ................................................. .......... 55 School of Business........ ............... ...... .... .............. ........................................... ............................................ 56 African-American Leadership Institute ........ ............ ... ...... ........................................................................... 65 Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity .............................................................. .................................. 65 Small Business Institute .................... ... ................................. ....... ......... ............................. ..... ..... ................ 65 S chool of Letters, Arts and Sciences ............................................................................................................. 66 Division of Humanities .............................. .......... .... ..................... .............. ........................ .................. ..... 67 Divi ion of Social Sciences................... ....................................................................................................... 88 Div ision of Science and Mathematic ......................................................................................................... 100 Institute for Inte r cultural Studie and Services ........................................................... .................................. 1 1 4 Institute for Women' Studies and Serv ices .................................................................. ............................... 116 School of Professional Studies ...................................................................................................................... 1 1 8 Division of Education .................. ............................. .................... .... ..... ................................ . ............ 1 1 9 Division of Technology .................... ........................................................ .................................................... 135 Division of Public Service Profession ............................................... ............................ ............................ 157 Institute for Gerontology ............... ........... ........................................................................................... .......... 180 Course Descriptions ................................................... .......................... ...... ............................................. .... 181 Faculty ................................................................................. .................................... ... ......... ....................... .342 Alphabeticallndex ............... .......... .................................. ...................................................................... ..... .325 Admission Application Instructions ... .......................................................................................... .............. .357 C ampus Map .......................................................................................................................... Back In ide Cover Admission A pplication Instructions ............................................................. .......... .......... ..... ............. .... .Insert C over A r t : The cover was illustrated b y Carlos Fresquez, a Metro State alumnus and part-time art instrucror for jive years. Fresquez was born and raised in Denver and h e received his bachelor of fin e arts degree f rom M etro State in 1980. He joined the art faculty at the college in 1990. I n his cover painting, Fresquez has depicted the historic Tivoli Brewery. During the 1994 95 academic year all Student Union offices and services except the health clinic a r e expected to move t o the Tivoli, the most exciting and unusual student union facility in the country. In contrastro the modem, squar e buldings o n campus and glass sky scrapers in nearby downtown Denver, the brewery resembles a Bavarian castle. The earliest phase of its construction com pleted in 1870, the brewery is characterized by its rathskeller with hig h arches, brick walls, and sron ejioor; the ltalianate styl e Tum Halle, featuring a 4 -inc h -thick rock maple floor, 75-foot ceiling, and Golden H o rseshoe balcony; and two story copper keules. In 1973, the Tivoli was placed o n the Register of Historic Places, protecting not only the historic brewery stmcture, but also the major brewing equipment still in place. Pho t ogr aph y : Dave Neligh, Peggy O'Neill Jones, H Keith Williams Pr o du ce d b y: The Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of Publication s 1994 Primed o n Recycled Paper Q + .

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4 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES COLLEGE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES EQUAL 0PPORTU ITY AND ADA STATEMENT Metropo litan State College of Denver i s an eq ual opportunity employer ; applications from minorities and wo men are particularly invited. Metropolitan State College of Denver doe s not di scri minate on the ba s i s of race, colo r creed, national origin, sex age, sex ual orie nt ation, or disability in admissions or access to, or treatment of employment in, it s educational programs or activities. Inquiries concerning the college grievance procedures m ay be directed to the designated MSCD officials Inquiries conce rn ing Title VI and Title IX may be referred to Dr. P ercy Moreho u se, Jr. MSCD Office of Equal Oppor tunity, Campu s Box 63, P O Box 173 362, Denver CO 80217-3362, (303) 556-2939 Inquiries con cerning ADA (A merican s with Di sa bilitie s Act) or 504 may be referred to Ms. Helen Fleming, ADA Coordinator, MSCD Campus Box 47 P O Box 17336 2, Denver, CO 80217-3362, (303) 556-8514, Mr. Andy Chitwood ADA Coordinator AHEC, Campus Box 001 P .O. Box 173361, Denver, CO 80217336 1 (303) 556-8376 or Ms. Karen Ro se nchein, Manager. Otherwise all inquiri es may b e referred to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education 1 244 Speer Boulevard Denver CO 80204, (303) 844-3723. f FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT Metropolitan State College of D enver hereby gives notice that it ha s de s ignated the following categories of personally identifiab l e information as directory information under sec tion 438(a) ( 5 )( B) of the Fam ily Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). Subject to the Colorado Publi c Record s Act, directo r y information co n cerning students a t the college may be relea s ed wi thout the prior con se nt of the student as permitted by FERPA unle ss within ten (10) day s after registratio n a student ha notified Metropolitan State College of Denver Office of Admi ss ion s a nd R ecord located in the Central Class room Buildin g, Room 103 that s uch information s hould not be released without hi s o r her consent. Directory information at Metropolitan State College of Denver is as follows: name address date s of attendance degree s re ce ived Requests for disclosure of directory information mu s t be s ubmitted in writing to the MSCD Office of Admiss ion s and R ecords, Central Cla s room Buildin g, Room 103 In the case of emergencies directory informa t ion ma y be rele ase d without written reque s t s, at the co llege's di cretion. Prospective emp loy ers or their agents may request information co ncern ing verifica tion of student degrees received or dates of atte ndan ce directly from the MSCD Office of Admi ssio n and Re cords without submitting a written request to the college. THE STUDENT RIGHT-To-KNow AcT AND THE CAMPUS SECURITY AcT Campus Crime Information During th e past three years, th e following c rimes were committe d on campus at the Auraria Hig her Edu catio n Center serv ing the University of Colorado a t D enve r Metropolitan State College of D enver, and the Community College of Denver: Occurrences of criminal offenses on campus: Offense 1993 1992 1991 Murder 0 0 0 Rape I 0 0 R o bbery 4 5 2 Aggravated Assault 17 15 7 Burglary 28 33 42 Vehicle Theft 20 21 6 Sexual A ssault* 8 14 5 *Includes sexual assaults othe r than I st and 2nd degree sexual assaults (rape), su c h as ind ecent exposures, a n d 3rd degree sexual assaults. Number of arre s t s for the following crimes on campus : Arrests 1993 1992 1991 L iquo r Law Violation* 8 3 0 Dru g Abuse Violati o n 6 3 0 W eapo n Pos sess ion 4 3 I Exclu d es OUT arrests These s t a tisti cs were provided b y the Auraria Depart ment of Publi c Safety in c omplian c e with the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1 990 The programs, policies, statements and procedures contained in this catalog are subject to change by the college without prior notice. Metropolitan State College of Denver reserves the right to withdraw courses at anytime policies calendar, curriculum, graduation procedures, and any other requirements affecting students Changes will become effective whenever the proper authorities so determine and will apply to prospective students.

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ADMINISTRATION TR U STEES OF THE STATE COLLEGES IN COLORADO D a t e of First P rese nt Term Appo intmmt Expires Ann e St e inb ec k Chair .............. ............ ................. 19 87 .......... 1 9 9 5 J o hn R oy b a l, Vice Cha ir ............. ... ......... .... ........... 1991 .......... / 9 95 H a rri e t Bark e r B o uld e r ........................... ........ ........ 1 991 .......... 1995 Aim s C. M c Guinn ess, Jr., D e nver ...... . ........... .............. 198 9 ......... 199 7 G eo r ge Br a ntl ey, D e nver ... .................... .... .... ......... 1993 ......... 199 7 Col e F i nn egan, D e n ver ...................................... ...... 199 3 ...... ... 1 99 7 Jam es Fl e ming, Grand Jun c t io n ............... .... ... .. ........ ... 1991 .... ... .. 1 99 5 Elizab e th Fri o t F ac ulty, M S CD ....................... .... .......... 199 3 ........ 1 99 4 Matth ew B a tes, Stud e nt MSCD .................................... 199 3 ......... 1 994 Gl enn B urnham Ph.D Pr es id e nt o f The Stat e C o ll e ges in C o l o rad o ....... 1 990 METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION Offic e o f th e Pr es id e n t Pr es id e nt .... ............... ................................... Shei l a Kaplan Ph.D. E xec utive Assi s t a nt t o the P resi d e nt ............................ ....... Yvonne Floo d B S Equal Opp o r t uni ty Dir ec t o r and A s si s tant t o the Pr es id e nt ..... P e r cy A M o r e h o use, J r., Ph.D A ssoc iat e Vice Pr es id e nt fo r C o mmun ity Outr eac h ................... A nt o n io Es quib e l, Ph.D Pr ovos t a nd Vice Pr es id e nt f o r Aca d e mi c Affair s ... ........ .... .... Da vi d W. W i lliams, Ph.D V i ce Pr es id e nt f o r Administrati o n and Fin a n ce .... ..... .......... J ose ph F. A r cese, M .B.A. Vice P r es id e nt fo r I n s tituti o n a l A d v an ceme nt .... ................ Car o l y n M Sc ha efe r B.A. Offi ce o f t h e Pr ovost and V i ce Pr es id e nt for Ac ad e mi c A ffairs Pr ovos t a nd Vice Pr es id e nt fo r Aca d e mi c A ffa ir s ................ ...... David W. Willi a ms, Ph.D E xec utive Ass i s t a nt t o th e Pr ovos t .... ....................... Cy nthia Lun a S co tt Ph.D. A ssoci at e Vice Pr es id e nt . ................................. ....... l e tt C o nn e r Ph.D Dir ec t o r of I nt e rnati o nal P r og ram s and S erv i ces ... . .... .... . Skip Cr ow nhart M A Dir ec t o r of Coo p e rative Edu c ati o n Pr og ram ......... ....... ...... Su sa n Lanman M A Assoc i a t e Vice Pr es id e nt and D e an o f Admi ss i o n s and R eco rd s ........................................ K e nn e t h C. Curtis, Ph.D A ss i s t a nt V i ce Pr es id e nt and Associa t e D e an of A dmi ss i o n s and R eco rd s ........................... ... .... A l o n zo F R o dri g uez, Ph. D A ss istant D e an o f Adm i ss i o n s and R eco rd s . ................ Jeffr ey W. J o h nson M.S Dir ec tor of Stud e nt R eco rd s ............................. ........ L ynn D e n zin, M Ed A ss i s t a nt D e an o f Admi ss i o n s and R eco rd s . ....... ............ Tho ma s R Gray, M S Dir ector of R ec ruitm e nt and Outr eac h ............................ Paulin e R R eece, M.A. A s sist a nt Vice Pr es id ent ...... ........ .................... C. La Vonn e M o r o nT e a g ue, Ph. D E xec uti ve Dir ec t o r of A ca d e m ic A ssess m e nt and Supp o r t Cent e r .......... K e ll y Es pin oza, M.A. Dir ecto r of Acade mi c Exce pti o n s P rog ram .... ....... .... ........ B e t ty V e tt e B.A. D i r ec tor o f Ori e ntati o n ......... ................................ N a n cy Br ec k e l, M A Dir ec t o r of Stud e nt Supp ort S erv i ces ........... ................ Patr ici a Tr o tman M .A. D i r ec tor o f Adv i sing ......................... ................... L y dia Vasq uez, B.A Assis t ant Vice Pr es id e nt fo r E x t ende d Edu c ati o n ...... .............. Andr ew Br e ck ellll M A Dir ec t o r of Adult Lea rnin g Serv i ces .............................. El e an o r M. Gr ee n Ed D Dir ec t o r of Ex t ended C a mpu s Pr og r a m s ....................... G wendo l y n S. Th o rnt o n M A A ss i s t a nt Vice Pr es id e nt . . . . . . . . . . Manu e l Esc amilla Ph.D. Dir ec t o r of High S c h oo l Upward B o und P rog ram .................. C h a rl es M a ld o n a do, B S Dir ecto r of Stud e nt D eve l o pm e nt C e nt e r ......................... Mane ll e Chapital M.S. Dir ec t o r o f V e t e ran s U p w ard B o und Pr og ram ...................... Gl e nn A. Morris, M.A. A ss i s tant Vice Pr es id e nt fo r S t ud e nt A ffa i rs and D e an of Stud e nt Life ....... K are n J Thorpe, Ph.D. Ass i s t a nt D ea n of S tud e nt L ife ........................... Y o landa Ort eg aEri ck sen, M.P.A. Dir ec t o r of C ampu s R ec r e ati o n .......................... .... .... A nn e M c K e lvey, M.A

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6 ADMINISTRATION Director of Counseling Center ..... .............................. Barbara Vollmer Ph.D. A c ting Dire c tor of Student A c tivitie s ....... .......................... Maggie Miller M .S. Director of the Student Health Clinic ................................ St eve Monaco M.A. Dire c tor of Stud e nt Legal Servi ces ............... .................... Spike Adams J D Director of Student Publi c ations .................................... Kate B Lutrey, B .A. D i r ec tor of Pr og ram E va luati o n ....... ............................ Fri e da Holley, Ph.D. Office of the Vice President for A dm inistra tion and Fi nanc e Vice Presid e nt for Administration and Finance .......... .............. Joseph Arcese, M.B.A. Associate Vice Pr es ident for Human R eso ur c es/Finan ce ............. ..... Tim L Greene M P.A Dire c tor of A cco untin g S erv i ces ..................... ............... Sita M Thomas B.S Director of Personnel and Pa y roll Services ................................ Sandi L. Jones B e nefit s Administrator ........................... ........... ..... El yse Yamau c hi B .A. Associate Vice President for Informati o n T ec hnolo gy ......... .... .... ....... Leon D aniel M .S. Director of Academic Computing and User Servi ces .... ....... ....... John T. R eed, Ph.D. Manag e r of Information T ec hn o l ogy Applications Services ............ Steve Franzkowiak B A T ec hni ca l Services Mana ge r .... .................. .................... Ja y Martin, B A Director of Budgets .......................................... ... Bru ce Williams M B A Assistant Vice Pre s id e nt for Busin ess Affairs ............................ Mi chae l Barn ett M.S. Bu s ine ss Services Manag e r ...................................... J ohn P Utterback B.S Ass i s tant Vice Presid e nt for Financial Aid ........ ........ ........... Cheryl Judson Ph.D Office of the Vice President for Institutional Advancement Vice Pr es id ent for Instit utional Advan ce ment ...................... Carolyn M Schaefer B.A. Assistant Vice Pr esi dent for D eve l opme nt ........................... Mary Konrad Feller M .A. Dire ctor of Information Re so ur ces for Developm ent and Alumni ......... Bradl ey Snyder Ph.D A ss istant Vice President for Communi ca tions and Media R e lation s ......... R obert G. Brock, M.M. Dir ec tor of Alumni R e lation s ........................... ... .. Carol y n Champion-Sloan B .A. Executive Dir ec t o r of th e Foundation/Major Gift s ......... ................. Len M eye r M A Academic Administrators Schoo l of Business D e an .................................. ........ ................. J erry L. Geisler Ph .D. A ssoc iat e D ea n .................... ........ ...... .... ....... R Michael Br own Ph.D. D ep artment Chairs A c counting ........................ ............ .............. Vir g inia Parker Ph .D. Computer Information S ys t e m s and Manag e m e nt S c i e n ce ............... Stuart Monroe, Ph.D Economics ................... ............................... J ohn P Cochran Ph.D Finance ................................................... Jerry D Boswell D B .A. Manag e ment ... ....................... ................ Rajendra P Khandekar Ph.D Marketin g ............ ...................... ........... ...... Donald Glover Ph .D. Dir ecto r of the Insti tute for Entrepreneurship & Cr e ati vity ............... Courtn ey Price, D P.A Dir e ctor of the Afri ca n American Lead e rship Institute ................. R onald M Knights Ph D School of Lette r s, Arts and Scie n ces D e an ... .... ............................... ............ ......... Joan M Foster Ph.D Int e rim Associate D e an ........ .... .................... .............. James Dixon Ph.D. Assistant t o th e D ea n ............................................ ... T o n y Montoya, M A D epa rtment Chair s Art ...... ............ ......... ............................ Susan Josepher, Ph. D Biolog y ......................... ................ .......... George C. B ecker Ph.D. Chemistry ... .............................. ............... .. Ja ck D Cummins Ph. D Earth and Atmospheric Sciences ... ...... .......... ............ J o hn Kilco y ne Ph. D English ....................................................... Elsie G Hal ey, Ph. D History .. ................................................. Stephen J Leonard, Ph. D J o urnali s m ........................ ........................... Deborah Hurl ey, M.S. Mathematical S c ien ces .......... ............................. Charlotte Murphy, Ph. D Modern Lan g ua ges ........ ........ ......................... David Conde, Ph. D Music .. ......... ............................. ............. Hal Tambl y n D M.A.

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ADMINISTRATION Phil oso ph y ................. . ...... .... .......... ... Steph e n E B e n so n P h.D P h y si cs ..... ......... .......... ............ ......... ..... J e rry H. Wilson, P h D P oliti c al Sc i e n ce ... ..... . .......... ........... ........ N o rman P rovi ze r Ph. D Psy chol ogy ........... ........ . ............ ........ L y n Wick e l g r en, P h D S o ci o l ogy /Anthr o pol ogy/Soc ial W o rk . .............. ...... Kenn eth M Kell er, Ph. D Spee c h C o mm uni c ations ........... .... .... ...... ........... C arlL. J ohnso n Ph. D D i r e ct o r o f the I n s titut e f o r I nt e r c ultural Studi es and S e rvi ces ...................... . .... Akbarali Tho bhani, Ph. D Di r ec t o r of the Ins t i t ut e f o r Wom en's Studi es and S e rvi ces ......... .......... J o di W e tzel Ph. D Dir ec tor o f the C e nt e r fo r Mqth e matics, S c i e n ce and Env ir onme ntal E du c ati o n ............. .... ....... ..... Larry S. J ohnso n Ph. D A c ting Direc t o r of the Famil y C e nt e r .... ....... .......... ........ K e nn eth M. K e ll e r Ph. D S chool of Profe ss ion a l S tudi es D e an ........... ............. ...... .... ......... .. .. ... ........ Bill R ad e r Ph. D A s s oc ia t e D e an ..................... ......... ................ M ary A. Mill e r Ph. D D e p a rtm e nt C h a ir s Ae ro s pa ce S cie n ce ................................. ... .... .... Rob e rt K. M ock M .S. Ci v il and Env i r o nm e n t al Enginee rin g T ec hn o l ogy ................... Hu g h art H. Br ow n M.S Criminal Jus ti ce a nd Crimin o l ogy ...... . ........ . ...... J ose ph G. S andova l J D Earl y C hildh oo d and El e m e ntary Edu c ati o n ...... ..... ....... William Wie n er, Ph. D El ec tr o ni cs Eng in ee ring T ec hn o l ogy ........... ........... Larry G Keating, M .S. H os pit a lity, M ee tin g and Travel Admini s trati o n .................. Ra y m o nd Lan g b e hn M.A. H uman P erfo rmance, Sp ort a nd Lei s ur e Studi es ...... ............ Chery l J N o r to n Ph. D H uman S e rvi ces .................... ............................. J effrey H a b e r Ed. D C o D ir ecto r of the C e nt e r fo r Addi c ti o n Studi es ............... ..... Ann e S Hatc h e r E d D CoDir ecto r of th e Ce nt e r f o r Addi c ti o n Studi es ................. Mi c ha e l J. Fara g h e r Psy.D I ndus t ria l Studi es and M ec hani c al Enginee rin g T ec hn o l ogy .............. J o hn S c hmid t Ed D Milita ry S c i e n ce ( Arm y R OTC ) ... ..... ......... ..... ............. M ajo r H a l M oo r e Nur sing and Health C a r e Man age m e nt ............ .... ... Kat hl ee n M c Guire-Mah o n y Ph. D R ea din g . ............... ........ ..................... J D o u g l as Cawley, Ph.D S eco ndary Edu c ati o n ............... ........... ................. M a r i l y n T ay l o r Ed D T ec hni c al C o mmuni ca tion s ............ ..................... P eggy O N e illJ o nes, M S.S Dir ec t o r of Pr o f ess i o n a l Edu c ati o n . .................. .......... Mark O Sh e a Ed.D Dir ec t o r of Cli n i c al S e rvi ces . ..... ........ ................... D a ni e l Alfa ro, Ph. D Dir ec tor of the C orporat e Tr a inin g I n s titut e ...... ...... ............. S t eve Mill e r M .S. Dir ec t o r o f the A ca d e m y f o r T e a c hin g E xce ll e n ce .................. Charl es V B ran c h E d D. D ir ec t o r o f the Child D eve l o pm e nt C e nt e r ........................... Mar ge P e t e r se n M.A. Dir ec t o r of the I n s t i tut e f o r G e r o nt o l ogy ........................... Eu ge n e Da wso n Ph.D.

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8 GENERAL INFORMATION The College Metropolitan State Coll e ge of D e nver is one of the n atio n's premi er urban colleges educating more Coloradans than any other in stit ution of higher educatio n in the state. Since the co lle ge was found e d in 1963 as part of The Sta te Colleg e of Colorado, Metro has g rown to a c urr ent enrollment of about 17, 500 students, awarded degre es to n early 27,000 graduates, and delivered educational programming to approximately 220,000 people Outstanding academic programs complemen tary s upport se rvices, co mpetitively pric e d tuition flexible sc heduling, and convenient campu s sit es make M etro a highly attractive a lternati ve for an increa s in g number of Col o rado resi dent s each year. Located in downtown Denver, the co lle ge s hare s the Auraria Higher Education Center campus with the University of Colorado a t Denver and the Co mmunity College of Denver. The concept o f facility s harin g afford s the M etro student the flexibilit y of taking l ower-div i s ion courses at the community college as well as graduate or s pecialized profe ssio nal courses at the univer sity. Proximity t o downtown mea n s exciting cultural busine ss, and internship possibilities. Metro i s a comprehensive aca d em i c instit ution granting bachelor of arts, ba c helor of fine arts, and bachelor of scie nce degrees, offerin g m ore than 2,000 course sec tion s during the fall and s pring se me s ters Student s can choose from 50 m ajo r s and 68 min ors offered throu gh thre e sc h oo l : Busine ss; Let ters Art s and S c iences ; and Profe ssio nal Studies Pr ograms range from the traditional disciplines s uch as accounting and teacher licen s ur e, to co nt e mpor ary fields of s tudy s uch as drug abuse co un se lin g and entrepre neur s hip Unique m ajors for Coloradans include aeros p ace cie nc e, criminal justice, human se rvices, and l a nd u se. Metro s empha sis i s on teaching All classes a r e t a u ght b y profes sors, n o t g r a duate ass i sta nts. The co l lege's more than 325 full-ti me faculty are teacher first. Many have exte n sive prof essio nal background s, with more than 88 per cent ha ving doctorate s or the highest level of academic d eg re es attai nable in their fields Part-time faculty work in the m etro Denv e r comm unity a nd bring t o the classroom their ex per tise i n busine ss, l aw, politi cs, co mmuni catio ns, scie n ce, technology and the arts. Small classes-the ave r age cla ss size i s 22--en s ur e s tudents g r eater access t o faculty, a highl y interac tive atmosphere and a personali ze d l earning experien ce. A s a n urban sc hool co mmitted to serving the l ocal comm unity, M etro attrac t st ud e nts from a rich and diverse mixture of age gr oup s, socioeconomic classe s, ethnic ba ckgrounds, and life sty l es. The college's curric ulum and philo s ophy reflect the diver s ity of the s tudent popul atio n and the realitie s of urban life. While upholding high aca demi c s tandard s, the faculty seek to accommodate the m yria d need s of non traditional s tudent s, offering cla sses o n weekdays eve nin gs, and weekends at four lo ca tion s in the met ropolitan area The college als o provid es a network of s upport services The Campus Metropolitan State College of Denver i s located in the Auraria Hig her Education C e nter a 171-acre campus in downtown Denver a t Sp ee r B o ulevard and West Colfax Avenue The Community College of Denver (CCD) and the University of Colorado a t Denver (UCD ) s hare the facilitie s with Metro State ( MSCD). More than on e milli o n s quare feet of space for cla ss rooms l a bor atories and offices are inc lud e d in the facility Some administrative offices are in restored Victorian hom es in Den ve r's his t oric Ninth Street Park located within the Auraria s ite. Other admin i strative offices occupy the Terra ce ntre at 1100 Stout. The campus features a c hild-care ce nter ; a block l ong gym nasium with a swi mmin g po o l ; areas for hand ball soc cer b ase ball a nd track ; a s tud ent union ; and a library, h ousing more than 600,000 volumes The proximity of the Auraria Hig her Educatio n Center to downtown Denver enable s s tudent s and fac ulty to u s e the community as a learnin g laboratory and to weave clas s room theory into the socia l polit ical, cul tur al, and economic pract ice of the c ity The campus features exce llent physical faci litie s, s u c h as the physical ed ucation/e vents center with a swi mmin g pool a weightroom, ga me courts, d a n ce studios, and e vent sea tin g for 3,000; a comprehensive library ; and a c hild care center. In the 1994-9 5 aca d emic year, the Student Union offices will move to the his tori c, Bavarian -s tyle Tivoli B rewery buildin g, the mo s t exci tin g and unu s ual student union facility in the co untry

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GENERAL INFORMATION AURARIA PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION SERVICES Parking Services Department Daily Fee Parking: (In-and-out privileges in Lot E only); daily fee range from $1.25 to $2.50. Several lots are unattended and require quarters to purchase a receipt from the vending machine. Change i s available from the Parkin g Office, a parking attendant in an attended lot or the Stude nt Union Make ure that the parking receipt is placed face-up on the driver's side of the dashboard. Receipt s are valid only on the day and in the lot where purchased and are not transferable from one vehicle to another For easy e h trance/exit to the Parking and Tran spo rtation Centre and Lots D K and H, a reu able debit card can b e purchased for $1.00 and a cas h value can be e n coded on its magnetic strip. Debit cards are avail ab le on the first floor of the Student Unio n and at the southwest entry by the phone bank in the North Classroom. Permit Parking: Limited P arki n g is avai l ab le on a semester basis Contact the Parkin g Office (556-2000) for information Motorist Assistance Progr am: Per so nnel will help jump -s tart dead batteries and assist in fixing flats. Jumper cab le s, bumper jacks tire tools and gasoline cans are also available at no cost to campus park ers. Call 556-2000 for help The Parking Services Department i s located a t 777 Lawrence Way (first floor of parking garage); hours are from 7:30a.m. 5:30p.m. (M-F). Community Services Department Handi van: The wheelchair-accessible handivan provides free on-cam pu s transportation for st udent s, facu l ty, and staff from 7:00a.m. to 10:30 p.m., Monday-Thursday; and from 7:00 a.m.-5:00p.m. on Friday. Nightrider: The Nightrider is a free security escort service from a n y campus building to any campus parking lot. Service is available from dusk to 10:30 p.m., Monday-Thur day. AURARIA PuBLIC SAFETY The Public Safety Division provides l aw enforcement services for the Auraria Higher Ed u cation Cen ter. Peace officers patrol the campus on a 24-hour basis ; trained dispatchers are on duty at all times to r ece i ve cal ls. Services include : crime prevention; investigation of offenses and taking crime reports; responding to first aid and emergency calls for assistance; monitoring of alarm sys tem s throughout the ca mpus; monitoring facilities for s u spicious activity and unauthorized use; a nd enforcement of parking and traffic regulations including taking accident reports; and vehicle assistance The Campus Security Act of I 990 requires security reports to be made available to st udent s. These reports are available through the Student Life Office The Public Safety Department is located at 1200 7th Street; routine calls-556-327 I ; EMERGENCY CALLS-556-2222. Accreditations/ Approvals Metro State is accredited by the orth Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Individual acade mic programs within the following areas are accredited or approved by the following agencies : Program Accreditation/Approval Agency Human Perfonnance Sport s and Leisure Studies National Park Association/American Associat ion for Le su re and Recreat'on Nursin2* National Lea2ue of Nur s in2 Teacher Education National Counc l for A ccr editation of Teacher Education Mus ic* National Association of Schools of Music Civil Engineering Technology, Technology Acc r editation Commission of the Accreditation E l ectronics Engineering Technolo gy,* B oar d for Engineering and Techno logy and Mechanical En2ineerin2 Technolo2v* Human Services** Council for Standards in Human Service s Education Chemistrv Amerkan_C_hemical Societv Center for Addiction Studies** Colorado Deoartment of Health Ac co untin2** Colorado State Board of Accountancv Aerosoace Science Federal Aviation Administration He alt h Care Management A ssoc iation of Unive rsit y Programs in Health Administration Accreditation Approval

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10 GENERAL INFORMATION The Office of State Colleges in Colorado The member institutions governed by the Trustees of The Office of State Colleges in Colorado are Adams State College, Mesa State College, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and Western State College. The pu rpose of The Office of State Colleges is to identify and facilitate cooperative efforts among the institutions Each member institution can provide any student in good standing with the materials needed to enroll temporari l y in any other member institution without incurring additional matriculation costs. Informa tion concerning tuition is avai l ab l e at the host institution. The enro llm ent status of the student at the host in s titution is determined by the student's status at the home institution. Students sho uld ascertain in adv ance of enro llin g at an institution that des i red courses will satisfy degree r equiremen t s at the home i nstitution. The process of enro llin g as a system stude nt should begin at least one month prior to the beginning of the registration period at the host institution.

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STUDENT SERVICES 1 ACADEMIC ADVISING Academic advising is available in the Academic Asse ss ment and Support Center. Continuing and prospective students seeking these services should communicate with the coordinator of advising for the appropriate school. The Academic Asse ss ment and Support Center is r esponsible for the advising of all und eclared majors at Metro State For additional information, please cal l 556-4327 AURARIA CHILD CARE CENTER The provides high quality early childhood care a nd education to the children of students, staff, and faculty. A discovery child-oriented approach is provided by a profe ss ional teaching s taff to chil dren aged 12 months to 6 years. These programs typically have a waiting list; therefore pre-regi s tration is recommended The center is open 7:00 a.m .. -8:30 p.m (M-Th) ; and 7:00 a.m.-6:00p.m. (F). Cur rently there i s no waiting list for evening care. THE AURARIA LmRARY The Auraria Library provides a wide variety of learning re so ur ces for the students and faculty of Met ropolitan State College of Denver and the other Auraria institutions. The library ha s almost 600,000 volumes of books microforms, and bound periodical s in addition to more than 2,500 current periodical and new s paper s ub sc riptions. Collection development efforts are focused on providing a stro n g base for learning/teaching efforts on campus and on developing in-depth collections in the fields of public administration, architecture and planning applied mathematics, education, and bu s ine ss The main col lection is s upplemented by the Architecture and Planning Branch Library which is located on the fourth floor of the CU Denver Building As a member of the Colorado Alliance of Research Librarie s ( CARL), the Auraria Library ha s access to collections from Colorado member librarie s and, through a national network, to an additional 15 million volumes available thr o u gh inter-library l oan or document delivery A 45-minute self-guided audio tape tour of the library and a printed Library tour g u ide are available. Services offered include an on-Line catalog, library instruction and orientation sessions for groups, a U .S. and Colorado depository for government publication s, media listening and viewing facilities, and a growing CD-ROM collection, some of which i s on a local area network CAMPUS RECREATION Campus Re creation at Auraria offers myriad individual and group program s and serv ice s which help enrich develop and retain the student-population. The program is composed of informal recreation (the "Drop-in" program) intramurals, Club Sports, Outdoor Adventure, and the Physically Challenged Stu dent member s hip is free with a current, validated student ID The Drop-in program provides group and individual activities for students, faculty, s taff alumni and guests. Facilities include four b asketball courts 1 2 tennis courts, volleyball co urt s, a 25-yard indoor pool, eig ht handball/racquetball courts, two squash courts, a weight room, a fitness center, a dance stu dio a baseball field, softball fields and a track. In addition, Campu s Recreation offers higMow impact aerobics, step aerobics, aqua aerobics and stretc h and tone sessio n s daily Please check the Campu s Recre a tion Drop-in schedule in PER 108 or call 556-3210 for a listing of available times. The Intramural program consi ts of individual and team activities open to all students, fac ult y and staff members. The emphasis of the program i s on participation, sportsma n ship, and social interaction. Whene ver po sible, competitive and recreational divisions are offered to ensure participation for all ability levels. Activities include flag football basketball, floor hockey volleyball, racquetball, and squash leagues as well as tennis and golf tournaments. Club Sports provides students, faculty and s taff member the opportunity to develop their individual athletic abilities in an organized group setting. The present clubs, which are all st udent-initiated include men's rugby, co-ed dance, co-ed TaeKwonDo, men's bowling men's volleyball, co-ed waterpolo co ed team handball, co-ed o utdoor club and men's lacro sse. Outdoor Adventure provides the opportunity to experience the beauty and challenge of nature through organized trips. The program provides outdoor re c r eational experie nc es emphasizing skill acquisition, social interaction, environmental awareness, and s afety. Some of the many adve ntur es offered are downhill skiing, cross-country skiing, kayaking/rafting, canoeing, sai ling hiking, biking, rock climb ing ice climbing, naturalist outings, and family fun outing s. The program also provides rental equ ip ment including mountain bikes, cross country skis, roller blades canoes, and camping and hiking gear. The office is located in the basement of the PER building

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12 STUDENT SERVICES The Phys i cally C hall enged program offers a variety of porting, recreational, and fitne s o pp ortu niti es for s tudent s with ph ys ical or lea rnin g limitations The adap tive pr ograms/se r v i ces e n com p ass one-o n o n e or group session which ass i s t in ut ilizing th e recreatio nal facility. Information on planned group activities or individ ual h elp sessions is avai l able in PER I 08. Call 556-3120 for more details on avail able progr ams and services. CAREER SERVICES Career Servi ces offers assistance to s tud e nt s and a lumni in p l annin g their caree r finding off-campus job s while enrolled, and seeki n g employment upon gra duation Spe cific services include career inter est and per sonali ty testing, and workshops focu ing on caree r plannin g, resume p reparatio n job searc h stra t eg i es and int erviewing s kills. Pro fessional counselors are available for appointme nt s The st ud e nt e mploym e nt serv i ce and job vaca n cy listing are a l so housed in th e Career S e r vices Center, l ocate d in Arts Build ing 177. The telephone num ber is 556 -3664. The Campus Career library co ntain re o ur ces to h elp with the career planning a nd job earc h process Information such as employer directorie s, sa lary urv ey a nd career asses ment resource s are avai labl e The Colorado Career Inf ormation Center is a co mput erized g uid ance system located in the Campus Caree r Libr ary. Trained advisor offer assi tanc e in its use. Thi s y tern inc lude s pecific occupation T information for Colorado, c ar ee r as es men t inven t ories with immediate re ult s, and nationwide colle ge informa tion Service a r e avai l ab l e b y appoi ntm ent at 556-2246. C O UNSELING AND SUPPORT SERVICES The M e tr opo lit a n State College of D enver Coun eling Center i s an accredi t ed m ember of the Int e rnational Association of Counseling Services It pr ovides p yc holo g i cal ervices t o assi t s tudent s in deal i n g with p e r so n a l and itu atio n a l problems th a t interfere with thei r acadel]lic goals. The ce nt e r a l so pr o vide educational programs related to personal development and improving the cam pu s cli m a t e. S erv i ces inc lud e person a l counseling, gro up pro g r ams, stress man agement, cris i s intervention and te s t ing Service are offered to all M etro State s tud e nts. A ppropriate referrals m ay be made t o other cou n seLing services in the community. All reco rd and informatio n about clients are confidential. Counseling Center s t aff member s are on call and available to help stude nt s with a per onal crisis. Stu dent hav e eme r ge n cy pri ority and will be se en a quickly as pos s ibl e. After h o ur s, call B ethesda's Sup port Line, 758-1123. Group p r ograms are open to all s tud e nt s, facu l ty, an d s taff Group s and workshops u s u a ll y avai lab l e include: Str ess Management ( biofeedb ack, tim e management, relaxation a nd t est anxiety), D iversi t y Support Gr oups, De velo pin g Health y R elatio n s hip s, Substance Abuse Couples Communication, Self Esteem, C o ming Out Parenting Skills Life/Work PLanning, Family Is ues, Los Study Skill Spiritu ality, Women' and M e n's Supp ort Group and As se rtiveness Training Various p ersonality, interes t and ability inve nt ories are avai l a ble to assist clien t s in under tandin g them selve and identifying their goals. Clients may wi h to di cuss with th e ir counse lor w hat kind of te s tin g might be h elpful. A nominal fee is asse se d o n each inven t ory. The Metr o Connections program is an informal helping network. Students, fac ult y and staff w ho are nominated as natural helper s" parti cipate in a number o f program s s uch as peer help ers t o n ew stu dents, an advice co lumn i n The M etropolita n and confere n ces o n topics de s igned to improve the ca m pu e nvironm ent. Metro A l tern atives i s a s ubstanc e abuse prevention pr og r a m Established in 1991, i t works ac tively with many campus d e partment s and communit y age ncie s to provide pr oactive programs for tudent fac ulty and s taff, s u c h as National Collegiate Alco h o l and Dru g Awareness W eeks and S afe Spring Break W ee k Assessment, intervention and referra l se r v i ces are offered Students can become actively involved in Metro Alternatives th rough internship voluntee r work and peer ed u catio n D ISABLED STUDE T SERVICES The Auraria O ffice of D isable d Stud ent Service provide aca de mic upport service to disabled s tu d e nt a t M etro State and Univers it y of Co lorad o Denver. S ervices inclu d e n ote taking, interpreting, provi s ion of taped texts, a dmi ssio n s and r eg i stration assis t a nce, exam assis t a n ce, handi ca pped parking permits, and information.

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STUDENT SERVICES GAY, LESBIAN AND BISEXUAL STUDENT SERVICES Gay, Lesbian and Bi sexual Student Service s is open to all Metro State s tudent s as are ource for explor ing sex ual orientation issues. This program offers a variety of support, education and advocacy services for the entire campus community, including : Support for members of the campus comm unit y who may have questions a b out their own sexua l orientat ion or that of a friend or family member. Advocacy for s tudents experiencing discrimination or harassment based on a real or perceived gay, le sb ian or bisex ual identity. Speakers for events, work s hops and classes on various aspects of sexual orientation and le sbia n gay or bisexual life. Training programs and work s h ops about working with the gay, lesbian and bi sex ual communi ties more effectively and combating homophobia Programs such as Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Awareness Week and other forums providing infor mation and dialogue about gay, lesbian and bisexual issues. The GLB Stu dent Services office is staffed by a half-time coordinator with the support of student vol unteer Input and involvement from the entire campus commu nit y is welcomed I NFORMATION AND REFERRAL SERVICES This office is a central information source at Auraria which provides assistance to pro spective stu dent s seeki ng enrollment a t Community College of Den ver, Metro State, or University of Colorado Denver. Tri-institutional tour s of the Auraria campus are provided to prospective students on a prearranged b as is. RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF STUDE TS FROM ETHNIC GROUPS Metropolitan State College of Denver strives to enhance the educational opportunities for Denver area residents by offering a variety of well-s tructured early intervention, recruitment and retention activities Metro State ha s established a stro n g network in th e m etropo litan area th at assists studen t s and other members of the comm unit y and informs them about higher education opportunities a nd ho w to go about receiving these benefits A variety of counse lor s from different areas including admissio n s, financial aid academic affairs and st u dent affairs are available to provide higher education counseling for both new and transfer students. Individuals from underrepresented groups interested in attending Metro State s hould contac t the Office of Admissions and Rec ords at 556-3058 for add itional information. STUDENT ACTIVITIES Metropolitan State College of Denver's Office of Student Activities pro vides a variety of ways for stu dents to meet o ther s and become involved in the Metro community. The Metro Activities Council staff produces a n average of twenty five concerts lectures and specia l events each semester, which ran ge from jazz performances to rap co n certs, and from topical discussions to comedy hours The PEAK Leadership Program offers a wide range of learning opportun itie s for st u dents who want to develop and sharpe n their skills. PEAK training includes such topics as coalition-bui ldin g, group dynamics, and leadership theory and typology. The training is structured to fit into the busy schedules of stude nts who work part-time and full-time. The Club Support Services staff can help students find a club to meet their needs or h elp them to estabLish a new club, raise funds for programming, and keep their ledger balanced Metro c urrently has 100 active professional social academic hon orary, and special interest clubs on campus. The office i s located on the seco nd floo r of the Student Activities Center wing of the Auraria Student U nion The office number i s 556-2595, and hour s are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p .m., Monday-Friday. STUDENT H EALTH CENTER All Metro State st udent s are entitled t o medical services at the Health Center (student insurance is not required) Phy sicians, physician's as s istants, nurse practitioners and nur ses staff the facility daily. Stu dent s will be asked to s how a current J.D. card at every c he ck-in and to complete a health history form every two years. Brief office v i s it s for illnesses are free with reduced charges for extended office vis it s medications, supplies, procedu r es and well-care Pa y ment is required at the time of service.

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14 S T UDEN T SERVICES Services include: Evaluation and treatment of health problem s, illne ss es, musculoskeleta l injuries, emergencies, women's health care ( i.e., pap smears, birth control coun eling and upplies), and well-care phys icals for both men and women. Lab te sti ng x-ray access special clinical procedur es (i.e., colposcopy, cryotherapy, casting) and medication s which can be purchased at the Health Center at the time of your visit. Health education programs s uch as s moking cessatio n nutritional and eating disorder counseling. AIDS information and HIV testing/counseling sex ually tran smitted disea se scree ning and treatment and safer ex instruction and s upplie s Walk-in service opens at 8:00a.m. Monda y through Friday Access is on a first-come first erved basis, and varies daily Plea se check with the front desk to confirm walk-in availability. The Student Health Center is located in the Student Union, Room 140, lower level. For specific hours of operation, and/or ad ditional information, please call 556-2525. STUDENT PUBLICATIONS The student newspaper, The Metropolitan, is published by the Office of Student Publications, Student f Union room 156, 556-8361. The newspaper offers students the opportunity to explore fields u ch as journalism, advertising sa le s, marketing graphic arts, publi hing, photography, bus ine ss and account ing thro ugh work experiences. The M e tropolitan i s written and produ ce d by and for the s tudents of Metro State and is pub l i s hed weekly during the fall and sp ring se m esters and once during the summer semes ter. Student s interested in working on the paper should contact the current student editor at 5562507. Metrosphere is Metro State's annual student literary and arts publication and contains poetry fiction, non-fiction, art, photography and graphics. It i s written composed and produced entirely by students. Submissions are accepted during the fall semes ter. Copies a r e distribut ed free to Metro State stude nts in the s pring semeste r For more information, contact the current student editor at 556-3940. The office also produces the Student Handbook as well as provides graphic art services at reduced costs to on-campus offices, department s, organizations and individua ls. The Metro State Board of Publications is the advisory board to the editors of Metro sphere and The Met ropolitan. The Board appoints the editors from applicants each spring for the following academic year and dea l s with comp l aints or questions regarding content. The Board is com posed of five s tudent s, three administrator s and three faculty and meets monthly durin g the fall and spring semesters STUDENT UNION The Auraria Student Union is the focal point for man y cu ltural social, a nd recreational activities of the college community. The Student Union contains a book tore, game room cafeteria, bar, meeting and conference facilities st udent activities offices health center, student organizations, and a variety of lounges for study and relaxation. The Student Union's lower corridor co ntain s a housing board ride board, and other public transportation information The Conference Services Office i s located within the Student Union. This operation sche dule s all facil ities for non -aca demic use and coordinates any se rvice s necessary for the events of cam pu s departments or organizations. For information or to reserve a room, call 556-2755. The Student Union is located at Ninth and Lawrence streets. During the 1994-95 academic year, all Student Union offices and services except the health clinic will be moving to the historic Tivoli Brewery WOMEN'S SE R VICES The Institute for Women's Studie s and Services provide s referrals to campus and community resources, information about scholarships, assistance to community women with the process of entering Metro State, a d vocacy services for stude nts dealing with hara ss ment or discrimination, and progr ams and events which focus on issue s of particular concern to women. T h e in s titute ho u ses a mall library with a variety of books and other resource materials on women's experiences, historie s, a nd contributions to soc iety. Students who need assistance shoul d make an appointment with the coordinator of women's services.

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ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION Admissions and Registration Student who have not previously attended Metropolitan State College of Denver should review the col lege's admission requirements. All continuing students in good standing at Metropolitan State College of Denver are eligible to regis ter each semester. Students may maintain the status of con t inuing student while absent from the college; however fol lowing two full semesters of abse n ce, students shou l d review their status with the Office of Admissions and to determine whether an updated application for re-admission will be required. A student may register for classes in several way Information on the registration procedu r e and regis tration dates are published in the Class Schedule which is mailed to all continuing students. Students are responsible for insuring that there is a correct and up-to-date address on file with the college. Address changes may be made with the Office of Admi sions and Records. Registration procedures and dates for module classes are described in the Class Schedule. Fo r further information regarding registration, please call 556-2950. Application Instruction s Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they a re received each semester. All credentials which are received by the college become the property of Metropolitan State College of Denver and will not be returned to the student. I t is the responsibility of the applicant to notify the Office of Admission and Records of any demographic or academic changes on the application for admission prior to the fir t day of classes. If demographic changes are not reported to the Office of Admissions and Records, it could delay the registration process for subsequent semesters. Failure to report acade mic changes may result in rejection dismissal, and/or loss of credit. International (visa) applicants are referred to the section on Admission of International Students" in this catalog. To apply for admission : 1. Complete the application for admission included in the back of this catalog Additional applica tions are available from the Metropolitan State College of Denver Office of Admissions and Records at Campus Box 16, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, Co l orado, 80217-3362; 303/556-3058. 2. A $25 non-refundable appLication fee ($40 for international students) must be submitted with the application for admission The application fee must either be received or waived befo r e the appli cation can be considered The application fee doe s not apply to tuition and fees Re-admit appli cants do not have to pay this fee. 3. Submit the comp l eted appLication and application fee directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. The application and all required credentials ( s ee admissions requirements below) should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes. 4. It is the student s responsibility to request that all required credentials be mailed directly from the issu i ng institution or agency to the Office of Admissions a n d Records at Metropo l itan State College of Denver. No hand-carried documents will be accepted 5. Although an applicant's record may be summarized on one transcript, official transcripts from each institution are required. 6. The applications for admission and all credentials received by the college will be kept on file for three semesters after which time the file will no longer be maintained. Applicants wishing to attend Metro State must begin the admission process again. Admis s ion s Requir e ment s The college classifies applicants into two categories by age tho e who are less than 20 years of age and those who are 20 years of age or older. Based on the college s modified open admissions system, each category has its own admissions requirements and procedures APPLICANTS You GE R THA 2 0 YEARS OF AGE If you are younger than 20 years old by September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall se m es ter, or February 15 for the spring semester you will be classified as a traditional applicant.

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16 ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION Freshman (first-time college student) I. Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Office of Admis s ions and Record s from the high schoo l or testing agency: a. ACT or SAT tes t results b high school grade point average c high sc hool class rank 2 This information may be s ubmitted at the end of the sixth, seven th, or eighth semester of high school but no later than four weeks before the expected term of enrollment. A final official tran sc ript with date of graduation is required no later than the fourth week of the term of enrollment. Students s hould request and verify that the high sc hool transcript with date of graduation has been mailed by the high school and has been received by the Office of Admissions and Records 3 Metropolitan State College of Denv er will admit stude nt s who are likely to successfully complete an academic program and who meet state requirement s for the college as established by the Colo rado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE) 4 Applicants who do not meet the stated admission requirement s will be considered on an individ ual basi s after careful review of all credentials, including letter s of recommendation and/or per sonal interview. Some students may be accepted after successful completion of the Summer Bridge Program, which ha s been e tablished with the Community College of Denver at Auraria 5. Applicant s who have not graduated from high school but ha ve received the Colorado General Education Development (OED) Certificate or its equivalent will be accepted. ACT or SAT test results are not required with a OED College Transfer I Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Office of Admis sions and Record s from the high sc hool testing agency, and/or college or university : a. ACT or SAT test res ults b high sc hool transcript c transcript from each college or university atte nded or currently attending d. if currently attending, verification of enrollment 2 These credentials s hould be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes All required credentials must be received before a final admissions decision can be made. 3. Metropolitan State College of Denver will admit st udents who are most likely to successfully complete an academic program and who meet state requirements for the college as established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CC HE ) 4. Applicants who have les s than a cumulative 2 00 grade point average from all colleges and uni versities attended will be considered on an individual basis after careful review of all credentials including letter s of recommendation and a personal interview with an admissions counselor. P l ease call the Office of Admission s for additional information APPLICANTS 20 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER Applicants who are 20 years old or older by September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall semester, or Februaty 15 for the spring semes ter, sho uld read the requirements below for either a first time college student or a college tr a nsfer st udent: Freshman (first-time college student) I. Applicants will be admitted to Metropol.itan State College of Denver upon indicating on the application for admission that they have graduated from high sc hool or that they have received a General Education Development Certificate ( OED). 2 By signing the application for admission, degreeseeki ng applicants are certifying that they will request either a high school transcript with date of graduation or OED test scores be sent to the Office of Admissions and Records. Degreeseeking st udents will not be permitted to register for a second se mester until thi s credential is recei ved. 3. By signing the application for admission, non-degree -see king applicants under s tand that they do not have to submit credentials to continue at Metro State 4. The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but is highly recommended for advising purposes

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ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION 1 College Transfer I. Applicants will be admitted to Metropolitan State College of Denver regardless of their cumu lative college GPA, if they indicate on their application for admission that they have graduated from high school or that the y have received a Genera l Educatio n Development Certificate ( GED). 2. B y s igning the application for admissio n degree-seeking applicants are certifying that they will reques t either a high school tr a n sc ript with date of grad u ation or GED test scores be sent directly to the Office of Admissions a n d Re cords. In place of these credentia l s, college transfer st udent s may h ave college tran sc ript s, which indicate at least 30 semester hours or 45 quarter hours of transferable "C" work, sent directly to Metro State. 3. Degre e-seeki ng transfer applicants are required to have all college and university transcripts on file to receive a transfer eva lu atio n 4. By sig ning the application for admission, n ondegr ee-seeking ap pli cants understand that they do not h ave to su bmit credentials to continue at Metro State 5 Applicants who indicate on their application for a dmi ssion that they are not seeking a degree from Metro State may c hange their status by comp letin g a Change of Status Form and submit ting all requir ed transcripts to the Office of Admissions a nd Record s 6 The ACT or SAT is not required for a dmi ssion but i s highly recommended for advising purposes Degree and Non-Degree Seeking Status D EGREE SEEKING Student s who plan to seek a degree at Metropolitan State Co lle ge of Denv er are categorized as deg r ee seeking students. In order to h ave degre e seeking stat us, st udent s mus t s ubmit all crede nti a l s; transfer s tud e nt s must have tran sc ripts submitted from all co lle ges and univ ersities attended. A graduation appl i cation and $20 fee must be paid by intending 9egree candidates by the stipulated deadline of a s tud ent's declared se mester of g raduation Student s who plan to see k a degree at Metropolitan State College of Den ver may list their intended major on the app l ication for a dmi ssion. The intended major is temporary until students officially declare their major eit h er with the academic department or the Academic Advising and Assessment Center. The officia l major m ay b e declared when all c redenti als have been r eceived. Plea se No te: U n til students are officially categorized as degree seeki n g, financial aid, vete ran's benefits and registration priority will be affected NON-DEGRE E SEEKING Non-degree seeki n g st udents are those who do not int end to seek a degree at Metro State or who are un s ur e if they wish to pursue a degree at the time of applica tion Non-degree seeking s tud e nt s may change their status to degree seeking by com pletin g a change of status form with the Office of Admis sio n s and Records, by ubmittin g all credentials, and b y receiving a tran sfe r eva luation if they are trans fer s tudents Declaring a Major INTENT -TOMAJOR First time Metropolitan Sta t e College of Denver tudents may indi cate an intent to major on the Metro St ate application form. Stating a n i nt ent to major on the a pplication form i s not a n official declaratio n of major Student s with fewer than 60 hour s who wish to major in the School of Business may so indi cate on a School of Busine ss Intent-to-M ajor form O FFICIAL D ECLARATION OF MAJOR All degreesee king s tud e nts who ha ve completed 60 or more semes t er hours incl udin g hours transferred from other institution s must officially declare a major no later than the semeste r following the one in which they co mpl e t e 60 or more h ours. To declare a major, st udent s m u st complete an official D ec laration/Chan ge of Major form which is availab le from the major department or from the Academic Assessment and Support Cente r and o btain appropriate signat ur e approval. Procedure s for declarin g a major depend up on the sc h ool a n d the num ber of semester h o u rs completed as o u tlined below Student s who transfer to Metro State cannot offi cially declare a major until all cre dential s are rece ived and eva lu ated.

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18 ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION MAJORS IN THE S C HOOL OF L ETTERS, ARTS AND SCIENCES OR THE SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Students, including transfers with Metro State officially evaluated transcripts, m ay officially declare a major in the School s of Letters, Arts and Sc i ences or Profe ss ional Studies at any time. Student s who have completed 29 or fewer semester hours mus t d eclare their major throug h the Academic A ssess ment and Support Center in cons ultati o n with an aca demi c advisor. Students who have completed 30 or more hours must declare thei r major thr o u gh the proposed major department. MAJORS IN THE SCHOOL OF B USl ESS Students having comple ted fewer than 60 semester hours including transfers with Metro State officially evaluate d tran scri pt s, ma y de c l are an intent to-major in the Sc h ool of Business throu g h the Academic Assessment and Support Center Students who h ave comple ted 60 or more se mes ter h o ur s must offi cially declare their major through the acade mic department of the proposed major during the semeste r followi n g the one in which they complete 60 or more hours Verification of Major: To verify the correc tnes s of the officia lly declared major st udent s s hould refer to the information contained on their class co nfirmati on n otice. Admission of Previously Enrolled Students f Former s tudent s or readmit students are defined as any individua l who has been acce pt e d has r egistered for a co ur se, and h as received a grade or gra de n otation at the colle ge. Former students who have not b ee n in attendance at Metropo lit an State College of Denver for one or more years s hould adhere to the following procedures: I Submit a co mplet ed application for admission whic h ca n be found in the back of this cata l og. C h eck off the re-admission box on the top, right comer of the app lication. No application fee i s required for re-admission. 2. To insure processing the application an d any required c redential s sho uld be rec eived at le ast four weeks prior to the first day of classe s of the semester for which admissio n i s sought. 3 Former stu dent s who h ave attended other collegiate instit u tions since l ast a tt ending Metro State m u st follow the appropriate admi ss ions requir ements for transfer s tudents 4. Former stu dent s who are re-a dmitting afte r nine years of a b sence from the college are required t o res ubmit all cre denti als. Only n on-degree-seeking Metro Stat e grad uate s do not have to resubmit crede ntials. Additional Admissions Programs SUMMER SEMESTER ONLy Applicants who have graduated from high sc h oo l or h ave received a General Education Development Certificate (GE D ) and are a pplying for the s ummer semester a nd who do not wish to conti nue at Metro State after the s umm er semes ter may be a dmitted under a provi s ional status and are not required to sub mit a dmi ssions c r e denti a ls. Ple ase c he ck the appropriate box under MSCD Pl a n s" o n the applicatio n for a dmi ss ion App l icants applying for the s ummer semester and who wish to contin u e for the fall or s pring se mester must meet stated admissions requirements before the semes ter begins. IIIGH SCHOOL STUD ENT EDUCATION AND ENRICHMENT PROGRAM The Student Education and Enrichment Program (SEE) is Metro p olitan State College of Denver's High Schoo l Concurrent E nr ollment Pro gram for college-ready s tudents. SEE is des i gned to s uppl eme nt a stude n t's existing education through early participation in college -l evel classes. Thi s advanced program sho uld not be interpreted as an alternative to hig h sc h ool com pletion but is, instead a coo perative col lege/high schoo l effort to provide educationa l enrichment and early college attendance to qualifi ed hig h sc hool st ud ents Typic ally, the SEE student meet s the followi n g criteria: I. is currently registered in a Colorado high school 2. i s maintaining a GPA of 3.0 or better 3 i s preferably in the se nior year of high school 4. can benefit from special i zed or accele r a ted classes 5 h as demon s trated the ab ilit y to do college l eve l work

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ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION 1 To apply for admission, the student mu t, in consultation with the appropriate high school authority, submit to the Office of Admissions at Metro State an admissions application with the required $25 application fee accompanied by the following documen ts: I. recommendation from a high school counse l or or administrator stating how the student will benefit from early college attendance 2 written parental approval 3. an official high school tran cript Upo n receipt of these documents, the student s record is reviewed and the admission decision is made However, if additio nal or supporting information is required, the tudent may be required to have an admissions interview with an Metro State admis ions coun elor. The admissions decision will be based on the stude nt's academic preparation, past performance the recommendation of the high school offi cial, and the student s personal motivation and readiness for a traditional college experience. POSTSEC ONDAR Y E N RO LLMENT OPTIONS PROGRAM The Postsecondary Enrollment Options Program (PSEOP) is a program enacted by state law in 1988 which provides juniors and seniors in high school under the age of 22 the opportunity to take college classes for both high school and college credit. The program is intended to provide high school students with an optiona l learning environment. The PSEOP is a sponsorship program whereby the high school district agrees to pay for college tuitio n and the student is then responsib l e for college fees and books. Coun eling offices in Colorado high sc h ools are provided with PSEOP application packets which include instruction sheets, application forms and billing authorization forms. Application deadlines are scheduled 45 days prior to the first day of classes eve r y fall and spring semester. Specific deadlines and further information relative to this pro gram and the application process may be obtained by calling the Metro State Office of Admissions at 556-3058. Assessmen t Requirements READING, W RITING, AND MATHEMATICS P LACEMENT EXAMINATIONS AU first-time college students are required to take a series of three exams before registering for their first semester classes. The exams measure college entry-level skills in reading writing and mathemat ics, and the scores are used to hel p advisors and students select appropriate courses. For additional infor mation please call 556-3677. REA D ING, WRITING, AND MATHEMATICS P ROFICIENCY EXAMINATIONS Prior to or at the completion of 60 semester hours at Metro State, students may be asked to take a series of three exams that mea ure proficiency in reading, writing and mathematics These exams should be taken concurrent with or after appropriate coursework in the academic area has been completed For additional information please call 556-3677. G ENERAL STUDIES EXAMINATI ONS In th eir junior year, st u dents may be required to partic i pate in an assessment of their general education. The Metro State faculty has determined educational goals or outcomes that it wants its graduates to achieve A copy of those goals and the methods by which their achievement will be measured can be obtained from the departme n t office International Education In order to fulfill its appropriate role as a public urban institution, Metropolitan State College of Den ver must be respon ive to the changing qualities of the comm u nity it serves Because Denver is a natio n al center for commerce and technology, Colorado is affected by dynamic g l obal relationships as well as national, state, and local po l icies. As techno l ogy draws the nations of the world closer together and Colorado becomes increasingly aware of its international role, educational institutions must increase their commitment to providing opportunities for international education. These opportunities exist for nationals enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver who wish to be involved with an academic experience outside of the United States, as well as internationals who feel they will gain from study at Metropolitan State College of Denver.

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20 ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION ADMISSION OF INTERNA TIO AL STUDENTS All st udent s who de c lar e a country of citize n s hip other than the United States on their a pplications for admissio n mus t contact the Office of Admissions and R ecords. I Admission of res ident alie n s (or refugees, political paro l ees and po liti cal asylum cases, etc.) and s tudent s o n temporary visas other than F-1: a. Official tran cri pt s including seconda r y l evel ed u ca tion shou ld be s ubmitted four weeks prior to the beginning of the fir t day of c la sses of the semes ter for which admission is so ught. b. Applicants may be required to pa s an English proficiency exami n ation. c. Applicants may be required to register for and co mplete certain courses durin g their first two semesters. 2 Admission of applican t s on s tudent ( F-1) visas : a. Int e rnation a l a pplication for ad mission and fee must b e received at least four weeks prior to the first day of c l asses for the semes ter of enrollment. b. Applicants are required to s ubmit the following documents as part of their a pplication to the co lle ge: international s tud ent application form, application fee official transcript s from all sec ondary a nd postsecondary sc h ools a ttended evi den ce of English profici e ncy, and financial s up port documents. c. Offi c ial academic c redenti als hould be s ubmitt e d in the original l a n guage as well a s in offi cial English translation. Tran scripts from American ins titution s s hould be sent directly to the co l lege from the iss uing institution. d English profi cie ncy may be demonstrated by atta inin g a score of at lea s t 500 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Only sc ores from the international or s pecial testing program s will b e co n side red e. The first se m ester's tuition and fees will be r eq uired prior to course regi stratio n for interna tion a l students. Scholarship recipients are exempt from this requirement. f Students are requir e d to comp lete a minimum of 12 semeste r hours with a minimum 2.00 ("C") GPA each fall and spring emes ter. g Applicant s may be r eq uir ed to register for and co mplete certai n co ur ses during their first two semesters h More detail ed information i s con tain ed in the international s tudent brochur e avai labl e in the Office of Admissions and Re cords If s tudent s are academically a dmi ssible and h ave met the minimum English proficiency requirements they will be i ss ued the U S Immi gration Form I -2 0 Questions regard i ng the admission of students from abroa d or permanent residents s hould be directed to the O ffice of Admissions and Records. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE/IMMIGRANT AND REFUGEE SERVICES The E n glish as a Second Language Pro g ram provide s assistance to stud ent s for whom English i s a sec ond lan g u age. The program provide s assess ment tutoring intensive academic and personal advisi ng and assistance with financial aid form s; refers students with L imited English proficiency to the appro priate curricula; and monitors st udent progress. For additiona l information, please call 556-2533. THE SPRING INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE CENTER AT AURARIA Intensive English classes at Spring International focus on all langu age skills: grammar, reading, writ ing a nd liste ning/speaking, in addition t o s pecial electives that students can choose each term, such as TOEFL preparation, vocabulary build ing and pronunci at ion Five nine week terms are offered throughout the year to enab l e students to complete their English study quickly Student s are pla ce d into one of five le ve ls, with s tandardized evaluation tests at the completion of each level.

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ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION Transfer Credit Evaluation Once all final official tran scripts for degrees eeking s tudents are received by the Office of Admission s and Records, the evaluation process begins. The student receives a transfer evaluation card which must be signed by the student's major department or sc h oo l advisor. The card is then s ubmitt ed to the Office of Admissions and Records. Within approximately four weeks, students receive two copies of the trans fer credit evaluation one of which is taken to the major and minor departments for advice on how cred its might apply to their programs. Transfer credits will be accep t ed under the following guidelines : I. Credit mus t have been earned at an institution of higher education holding full regional accredi tation. 2. Grades earned must be A ," B ," "C, or equivalent ; however only the credits will be shown on the Metro State academic record Courses with grades of "D," "F," or similar grades will not be accepted in transfer. 3 Course content should be similar to those course s offered at Metropolitan State College of Den ver. 4 A maximum of 64 semester hours from a two-year institution will be accep t ed and applied toward an Metro State degree. A maximum of 90 semester hours of credit will be given for acceptable work completed at a four-year in s titution or combination of two and four year insti tutions. 5. Students earning an AA or AS degree will enter with junior stan din g at Metro State provided all courses included in the degree carry a grade of "C" or better and otherwise meet minimum Metro State standards for tran s fer credit, and with the understanding that some s tudents will need to complete additional Metro State lower division program requirements. 6 AppUcant s having comp l eted the Colorado Community College core curriculum, as certified on their Community College transcript, are considered to have satisfied the college's minimum gen eral studies requirement However additional, specific, lower-division courses may be required for certain degree program Questions pertaining to transfer credit evaluation should be referred to the Director of Orientation and Transfer CN 108, 556 -4327. Changes in Registration Enrolled studen t s may adj u st schedules by dropping and/or adding classes during the first 1 5 percent of each semester. See the current s emester Class S c hedule for complete information concerning the tuition and fee refund schedule. Students who reduce their course load after 15 percent of the term through the end of the fourth week of classes will receive an NC notation for each course they have dropped and a refund if applicab l e. An NC/Withdrawal Form must be subm itt ed by the deadline to the Office of Admissions and R ecords. Additional restrictions regarding assigning the NC notation may be set by each school department, and/or faculty member for the period between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of the emester (or proportional timeframe). Students reducing their co ur se load between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of classes during fall and spring semesters may receive an NC notation for each course provided faculty approval is gr a nted. Student s are advised to seek faculty sig nature well before the deadline An NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Office of Admissions and Records. See the sections on grades, notations, course load, and class atten dance in this catalog Proportional time frames are applied for modular cour s es, workshops and summer terms. Procedures for adding or dropping a modular cour s e after the cour s e ha s begun are described in the current Cla ss Schedule

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22 ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION Inter-Institutional Registration Students enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Den ver may regi ster for courses at Arapahoe Com munity College, Community College of Denver, Front Range Community College and Re d Rocks Community College. Courses taken at these instit ution in no way alter existing Metropolitan State Col lege of Denver degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requirements su bject to specific approval by Metro State Students s hould be aware that co u rses taken inter-institutionally will be counted as part of the 64 se me ster hou rs from community colleges applicable to an Metro State degree Interinstitutional c redit s will not satisfy academic residence requirements at Metro State In the event a con flict exists between the policies/procedures of Metro State and one of the colleges listed a b ove, the mo t restrictive po l icy prevai l s Student s are adv i se d to confer with department chairs and/or coordina tors of academic advising before registering in t e r institutionally. Information concerning current procedures for enrolling for courses at these other institutions is avail able from the Office of Admissions and Records. Concurrent Enrollment Concurrent enrollment differ s from interinstitutional enro llment in that the s tudent is simultaneously matriculated and enrolled at two different instit u tions. Students who find it necessary to be registered at Metropolitan State College of Denver and another college at the same time m u st obtain a letter of per missio n from the regi steri ng authority of eac h institution Failure to receive advance permission may result in denial of tran sfer credit. Failure to do so will result in Metro State not r ecognizing credit from other institutions. Student conc urr e ntl y enrolled are affected by the academic p ol i cies of both in s titu tions Metro State st udents enrolling concurre ntl y at other institution s also should c h eck w ith Metro State department chairs concerning the accep tance of credits Course Audit Policy Students may audit a class with the permission of the instructor and if seati ng is available. Academic credi t is not awarded for an audited course. The cost for auditing a course is based on regular tuition as published in the current Class Schedule Audit approval form are available in departmental offices. Graduation Agreement Degree-seeking tudents formally de clare their degr ee plan by filing a Graduation Agreement. The agreement shou l d be s ubmitted to the Office of Admissions and Records one year prior to the intended term of graduation but no l a ter than the ap propriate deadline s tated in the Class Sch ed ule Students hould co mpl ete their Graduation Agreement in co n sultation with their adv i sor. When it is ready for s ignature s and a formal evaluation, students s hould s ub mit the comp l eted agreement to the minor department. The minor department will forward the sig n ed agreement to the major department for signa ture ; the major department will forward it to the dean of the sc hool. The schoo l will s ubmit the agreement to the Office of Admissions and Records for final review Once approved, and after the com pletion of each sub equent semester of academic work the stu dent will receive an up-to-date Academic Status Report Students may appeal to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions to request a variance from college academic requirements Their graduation agreement s h oul d be completed before the appeal. Valid rea sons for variances must accompany all petitions, and the petitio n s must be s igned by the appropriate dean and department chair. A grad u ation application and $20 fee must be paid by intending degree candidates by the stipulate d deadline of a student's declared semester of graduation Transcripts of Records A transcript is a certified copy of a student's perman ent record and shows the academic status of the student at time of issuance Copies are availab l e at $1 eac h T h ere is a $5 c h arge for same-day transcript service. Transcripts will be released by the Offi ce of Admissions and Records upon formal writte n request by the st udent. Transcripts will also be i ss ued to firms and employers if written a uth orizatio n is received from the student. Requests should incl ud e the stu dent s f ull name as recorded w h i l e a tt endi ng Metro State, student identification number, l ast term of attendance, number of copies de sire d and to whom and where transcripts are to be se nt. Transcripts may be w ithh eld beca u se of indeb t edness to th e college or for other appropria t e reasons. Transcripts from other i n stitutio n s which are on file in the Office of Admissions and Record s will be issued upon signe d req u est by the student. A c h arge of $5 per request is assessed for this service. Students from other i n sti tution s taking Metro State co ur ses under the state college system or interinstitutional registration programs must request transcripts from their home institution.

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ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION

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24 FINANCIAL AID PHILOSOPHY The Metropolitan State College of Denver financial aid program provide s assistance and advice to stu dents who would be unable to purs ue their education at the college without s uch help Scholarships grants, loans, and part time employment are available si n gly or in various combinations to meet the dif ference between what the student and the s tudent's family co uld rea sonably be expected to provide and the expected cost of attending Metropolitan State College of Denver. The 1993-1994 academic year expenses are as follows: Resident Nonresident Tuit ion and Fees ..... $2,180 ........ $6,340 Room and Board ..... 5 ,26 0 ........ 5,260 Books and Supplies ..... 520 ........... 520 Tra n s portation ......... 930 ........... 930 Miscellaneous ...... ....... $10,140 $14,300 Tuition and fees are set by The Office of State College s in Colorado and are subject to change without notice. All students are placed on a single-person budget. Additional allowa nce s are made for stude nt s with dependent children day-care costs and for expenses related to disabilities not paid by another agency (P.L. 99-498). ELIGIBILITY AND NEED To qualify for financial aid a s tudent must be a U S citizen or eligible noncitizen, be registered with Selective Service (if required) h ave financial ne ed, be degree or certificate seeking, be making satis factory academic progress and n ot be in default or owe a refund on a Fe deral grant or Federal educa tion loan APPLICATION PROCEDURES Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid to determine financial aid eligi bility Returning Metro State s tudent s may reque s t a pplication form s from the Financial Aid Office. Transfer students can obtain application forms from their curre nt college or univer sity. Entering college freshmen should obtain application form s from their high schoo l s or from the Metro State Financial Aid Office; s tudent s s hould obtain forms as early as possible, preferably by mid-February Transferring a pplicants mus t s upply the Metro State Financial Aid Office with financial aid transcripts from all sc hools previou sly attended Detailed information concerning application procedures i s available in the Metro State Financial Aid Office FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Undergraduate tudent s who have a bachelor's degree are not eligible for Federal PeU Grants, Federal SEOG CSG or CSIG The amount of funds made available to students depend s upon the maximum award allowed by regulation of each pro g ram the s tudent's es tabl ished financial need, duration of the s tudent s enrollment, and funds allocated to the college by the state and federal governments Grants Grants are gift money from the federal or sta t e governme nt. These types of f und s do not hav e to be repaid Federal Pell Grants are federal funds and may be awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a bachelor's degree and who are United States citize n s or permanent residents. The amount of the award is based on each student's financial e l igibility and the number of hours for which the s tudent is enrolled The amount of Federal Pel! gran t award s for the 199 4-95 academic year will range from $400 to $2,300 for those students who qualify Le ssthan half-time, half-time or full-time students may qualify for a Federal Pell Grant. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are federal funds awarded to undergraduate tudents who have not yet received a bachelor's de gree and are United States citizens or permanent residents Awards are based on an individual's need and are usually awar ded to studen t s demon trating exceptional need Student s must be enrolled full-time to receive a Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant at Metro State The amount of FSEOG awards range from $100 to $1,000.

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FINANCIAL AID Colorado State Grants (CSG) are tate fund awarded to Colorado residents. Awards are ba ed on a s tudent's eligibWty as determined by the Office of Financial Aid. Student s mus t not have earned a prior bachelor's degree and must be enrolled full time at Metro State The a mount ofCSG awards range from $50 to $2 000. Part-time CSG funds are also available to less-than-full-time st udent s who demonstrate need Student s mus t be enrolled a minimum of six hour s to receive part-time CSG funds. Colorado Student Incentive Grants (CSIG) are a combination of federal and state funds awarded by the s ame c riteri a as CSG. Stud e nt s mu s t be enrolled full-time t o receive C SIG funds Scholarships Presidential Scholarships: The sc h o lar s hip s include four-year sc h o larship s for en t ering high sc h ool s tudents and two-year scholar hip s for transfer st udents Scholars receive up to $600 per semes ter t o pay mandatory tuition and fees. Colorado Scholarships : Grants of $500 per s eme s ter not exceeding the cos t of resident tuition a nd mandatory fees per academic year, are avai lable through the aca demi c departments. R ec ipient s must b e Colorado residents. Interested s tudent s s hould co ntact their department s for applications Athletic Scholarships: Metr o St ate h as a limit ed number of athletic sch o l arshi ps. Applications and additional information are available from the Metro State Athletics Departm ent. Private Scholarships: Student s should refer to the Metro State Financial Aid and S c holar s hip Hand book for information a nd a lis tin g of sc holarship Student s s hould a l so contact academic departm e nt s and the reference d esk a t the Auraria Library for ass i s tanc e in l oca tin g sou r ces of sc h o lar s hips. Loans Federal Family Education Loans (FFEL) are l oa n s tha t e n a ble s tudent s and/o r their parent s to bor row funds to help with educational expen ses. Thi s l oan pro g ram inc lude s the following type s of loa ns: Federal Stafford Loan unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan and Federal PLUS Loans. T o borr ow the se funds, s tudents and/or their parent mus t complete a s ep a r ate lend e r a pplic at i o n in a dditi o n to the need analysis application (FAFSA). Students must also be enr olle d at least half -t ime and b e degr ee or ce r tificate s eeking. Intere s t rate s vary between each type of loa n and a l so vary depending on when the s tu dent borrow e d the first Federa l Family Education Loan. For further inform a t io n o n interest r a t es, check with the Fin a n c ial Aid office or the lend er. Federal Stafford Loans: Eligibility for the Federal Stafford Loan i s ba ed on the s tudent's n ee d as determined by the Office of Financial Aid For Stafford L oans disbursed o n .or after Jul y I 1 993, the annual loan limits are : $2, 625 for freshmen, $3,500 for sophomo r es, and $5,500 for all o ther under graduates. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans: This loa n ha s man y o f the same term s and co ndition s as the Federal Stafford Loan The main differen ce i s tha t the borrower i s responsible for the interest that accrues while he/she is i n school and durin g the six month g race period A s tudent m ay borrow against either parent or s tudent contrib ution and therefore s tudent s who do not qualify for the Stafford Loan may qualify for the un s ubsidized St afford Loan The annu a l limit s for the uns ubsidize d St afford Loan are the sa me as the Stafford Loan Student s may borrow under b oth pro g ram s but the total of the se two loan s cannot exceed the annual loan limit s for the Stafford Loan Federal Plus Loans: These lo ans are available to parents o f dependent s tud e nts. Applications are avai l able from Metro State or f rom l e nders which parti c ipate in the pro g ram Applications mus t fir s t be s ub mitted to the Financ ial Aid office for proce ss ing At Metro State, parent s of dependent s tudent s may borrow up to the cost of education minus a mount of financial aid per st udent per year Metro State-Emergency Loans: Should there be a dela y in the dis bur s ement of fund s, the Financial Aid offi c e is able to advance limited fund s t o student s pro v ided that financial aid has been previou sly awarded The av erage loan i s $2 00 per semes ter The loan mus t be repaid a t the e nd of the semester in which the fund s were r ece i ve d or as soo n as finan cia l aid f unds are dis bur se d to s tud e nts, whichever come s first. Information on additional alternative l oan program s from private so ur ces is avai l ab l e a t the Financia l Aid office. College Work-Study The St a te of Colorado and federal work-study pro g ram s pr ovide part time employment during the sum mer and academic year. Only permanent Colorado residents are eligible for State of Colorado work study a wards Award s range from $ 200 to $ 5 000 per fiscal year. The a ver age award i s $ 2,000 The maximum hour s tudents may work i s 30 h o ur s per week ave r age w hile clas ses are in sessio n and a maximum average of 40 hour s per week between se me s ters.

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26 FINANCIA L AID Em pl oy m ent Many st u dents who do not qualify for work-study find part time employment to cover a portion of their educational expense The Auraria P l acement Office assists students in finding part-time jobs. Other Fo r ms of Assistance Colorado No-Need Work-Study : Student enrolled at least half-time who are permanent residents of Colorado and have either unmet need eligibility, or who do not qualify for need-based financial aid, are eligible for thi s award. Students may apply for the se funds at the Financial Aid office Financia l Aid as a Form of Payment: Students who h ave been awarded financial aid ha ve the option of using that aid as their form of tuition pa yme nt during phone regi s tration each se mester. Once the awar d has been verified by the Business Office the student will not be required to pay the t u ition and fee charges until the aid is dis bur sed. Students receiving any type of finan c ial aid are eligible for this serv ice each semester for which aid ha s been awarded. Related information i s provided in mail-in and phone-in regi s tration materials and in clas sc h edules. RESOU RCE EXPECTATIONS Students attending Metro State must assume res pon s ibilit y for the cos t of their education. Tax-sup ported aid programs exist to supp l ement st udent financial re ources, not to replace them. Prospective financia l aid applicants s hould r efer to the Financial Aid Office for detail concerning st udents' resource expectations. THE AID PACKAGE Once s tudent eligibility is determined an aid package is deve l oped that depends upon the availability of funds and the eligibility of the applicant in relation to tha t of other stu dents Although it is not always possible to do so, the Financial Aid O ffice attempts to fully meet s tudent eligibility. To facilitate the work of the Financial Aid Office applicants must obtain all information and form s from de ignated so urces and s ubmit the required material s to the appropriate office according to established schedules. Receiving a scholarship may affect a stude nt's financial aid award. Students receiving federal and/or s tate aid are limited to a maximum amount of aid. A s tudent who se full need has been met prior to receipt of a sc holars hip will have his or her aid reduced by an amount equal to the sc ho l arship If the tudent's full eligibility ha s not been met, the scholarship ca n be allowed to satisfy the unmet eligibil ity Each st udent's situation i s treated individually. AWARD NOTIFICATION When the Financial Aid Office h as determined the kind and a mount of aid for which a st udent qu a lifies the student is notified of the award by letter. The l etter also stip u late s the conditions of the award. Stu dents awarded aid mus t sign the statement of educ atio n purpose on the award l etter and t h e Anti Drug Abuse Act certification. D i s b ursement Proce du res: I Federal Family Education Loan Pro g rams : All Federa l Stafford Loans and Federal PLUS Loans are required to be dis bur ed in two di bursement s. Contact the Financial Aid office for disburse ment dates. The first disbur se ment i s usually availab l e within 35 day s of the beg i nning of the se me s ter for which the loan i s int e nded Federal Stafford checks will be proce sse d at the Finan cial Aid office and relea s ed throu g h t h e Bu siness Office Students are required to pay any o u t standing balance owed to Metro State a t the time the check i s relea se d Federal PLUS checks are mailed from lender s to the Metr o State Financial Aid office. Eligibility i s verified and then the check is mailed to the parent b orrower. 2. Work Study: Work study earning are paid monthly and are treated as wages earned. Outs tand ing balance s owed to Metro State are not d educte d from the se earnings. Students are stro ngly advised t o pay any outstanding balance as soon as a work-study c he c k i s received 3. All other aid: Beginning on the first day of cla sses eac h semester, st u dents receiving aid o th e r than tho se listed above may come to the Metro State Busine ss Office to pick up their financial aid. The Bu s iness Office will deduct any outstanding balan ce owed to Metr o State and iss ue a check for any remaining funds. Stude n ts who s till owe a balance after all aid has been paid w ill be i ss ued a bill.

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FINANCIAL AID REPAYMENT POLICY Students who withdraw from Metro State prior to completion of a term must repay a portion of finan cial aid and sc holar ships. All required financial aid repayments must be made to Metro State before the end of the current academic year or before additional Title IV funds may be disbursed to the student, whichever occurs first. Repa yment is made to the Metro State Business Office. STUDENT RIGHTS AND REsPONSffiJLITIES Aca demic Progress Requirements Financial aid recipients are required to maintain satisfactory progres s towards their educational objec tives in order to continue to receive aid (2.00 GPA; comp l ete at least two-thirds of the credits attempted each semes ter ; and be enrolled the equivalent of not more than 12 full time semesters). Detailed infor mation outlining the requirements is available in the Financial Aid Office Fai lur e to maintain satisfac tory progress may result in cancellation of aid for s ub sequent terms of school years. Change in Status The financial aid award may be adjusted throughout the award period to reflect any change in the stu dent's resources or enrollment status or in institutional state, or federal funding. Renewal of Financial Aid Students must apply each year for continued aid. Renewal of financial assistance depends on the stu dent's academic performance, financial eligibi lity, and the avai l ability of student financial aid funds Students should contact the Financial Aid Office for details concerning Metropolitan State College of Denver financial aid policies and procedures Costs The Board of Trustees of The Office of State Colleges in Colorado, the governing board of the college, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees for any semester without notice TUITION AND COLLEGE SERVICE FEES Tuition and College Service fee s are determined by the Trustees shortly before the beginning of each academic year. Information regarding tuition and fees is published in the current Class Schedule. Tuition and fee are payable at the time of registration. STANDARD FEES An applicatio n fee is required of all applicants for admission to the college. This fee is non-refundable and will not be a pplied to tuition Application Fee .......................... ............. $25 International Student Application Fee .................... .. $40 Tran cri pt fee, per transcript. .............................. $1 Same Day transcript fee, per transcript ...................... $5 Graduation fee ............... ...... .................. $20 SPECIAL FEES Returned check penalty ................................. $17 TUITION CLASSIFICATION A s tudent is classified as an in -s tate or out-of-state stu dent for tuition purposes at the time of admission. This classification is based upon information supplied by the student on the application for admission and is made in accordance with the Colorado Tuition Classification Law CRS S23-7 -101 et seq. (1973), as amended. Once determined, a stude nt' s tuition classification stat u s remains unchanged unless satis factory evidence that a change sho uld be made is presented. A Petition for InState Tuition Classifica tion form and the evidence requested should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records if a stu dent believes she or h e is entitled to in-state status. The tuition classification sta tut e requires that in order to qualify for instate status, a student (or the par ents or legal guardian of the studen t in the case of students under 22 years of age who are not emanci pated), must have been domiciled in Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the first day of the semester for which such classification is soug ht.

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28 FINANCIAL AID Domicile for tuition purposes requires two in eparable elements: (I) a permane n t place of habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado with no intent to be domiciled e l sewhere. Some exam ples of connections wi th the state w h ich provide objective ev i de n ce of intent are: ( 1 ) paymen t of Colo rado state income tax as a Colorado re si dent (2) permanent emp l oyment in Co l o r ado, (3) ownership of residentia l real property in Colorado, (4) comp l iance with laws imposing a mandatory duty on any domici l iary of the state, such as the drivers' license law and the vehicle registration law and (5) regis tration to vote. Other factors pec u liar to the i ndividual can a l so be used to demonstrate the requisite intent. Any question s regarding the tuition classification law s hould be directed to an admissions officer a t the college. I n order to qua l ify for i n-state status for a particular se m ester, the s tudent must prove that domi cile began not later than one year prior to the first d ay of classes for that semester. The dates for quali fying and for submitting petitions are published in the Class Schedule each se mester O THE R COST I NFORMATION The cost of books and s upplies averages $350 t o $500 per academic year with the highe st cost during the first semester of attendance. Other costs such as room, board clothing, transportation, and other expenses will vary according to individual need. TuiTION ADJUSTMENTS l Please see the Class Schedule for the current semester. S tudent Health Insuranc e The S t udent Health Center Insurance is a group "Mandatory-with-Waiver" po l icy for all full-time st u dent (ten credit hours in fall/spring or eight credit hours in s ummer ). The ins u rance premium for full time st u dents is a u to m atically inc l uded with t h e semester charges/fees and i s identified o n a stude nt's bill as "Ins urance ." Students who have co mparab l e insurance coverage may waive the insurance pre mium and not participate in the program Proof of comparable insurance and a waiver form must be comp l e t ed and turned in to the B u s i nes s Office within the first four weeks of the fall and spring semes ter and within the first two weeks of the s ummer se me s ter. A wa i ver, once in place will continue until rescinded in writing by the student. For additio nal information regarding the waiver, p l ease contact the office of Student Accounts at 820-200 I Stude n ts who are not full time a s defined above, are not eligib l e for the college's group i nsurance cov erage. In addition, if a full-time student decreases the amount of semester ho u rs to below full-time status (ten hour s during fall and spring semes ters ; eight hours during summe r semester) within 28 calen dar days from the first day of the s eme s ter the st u dent loses i n s u rance e l igibility. Optio n al coverage i s available for dep e ndent s of ins ured students who are enrolled for ten or more semes ter hours during fall and spring se meste r s and eight o r more semeste r hours during summer emester. Premiums for optional coverage must be paid at the Busine ss Office during the fir s t three weeks of each semester. Those s t udents enrolled for spring semester hea lth insurance h ave the option of purchasi n g summer insurance coverage without attending classes provided they pay the premium at the Business Office by the date listed in t he summer Class Schedule. The po l icy is in effect 24 ho urs a day and covers the period of time from the first day of classes of the semeste r t o the first day of classe of the following semes ter. I n surance brochures listing other benefits as well a in urance claim forms and inform a tion are availab le at the Student Hea l th Center, Room 140 Student Union, 556 -3873.

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SPECIAl PROGRAMS 2 CHILD DEVELOPMENT CE TER-METRO STATE The Metro State Child Development Center provide s exemplary on-campus children's progr a ms: dur ing the fall and spring semesters the ce nter offers pre -sc hool programs; in the s ummer it provide s a Summer Enrichment Program for elementary age children. Available to th e Auraria ca mpus and to the Den ver community, these programs are part of the Metro State Teacher Education Division The classrooms are under the direction of master teacher s who are trained and experienced in either early childhood or elementary education. The master teachers plan a n age-a ppropri a te program to pro vide quality learning experiences which meet the developmental needs of the children. Metro State teacher education students also work in the classroom providing a hig h adult/child ratio with oppo rtu nitie s for small groups and individual attention The preschool program i s accred it ed by the National Academy for Early Childhood Education. There are two preschool classes available : 8:30-11 :30 a.m. for children 2112 to 4 years old; 12:30-3 :30 p.m for children 4 years old by September 15. There is also a n hour of child care available before and after each preschool c la ss. The Summer Enrichment Program is academic in co ntent but recognizes c hildren's needs for fun and different learning experiences in s ummer There are two classrooms: the younger one for children enter ing kindergarten or fir s t grade in the fall; the older o n e for childre n entering seco nd or third grade in the fall. There is a Day Program from 9 :00a. m to 3:30 p.m and an Extended Program from 7:00 to 9:00 a .m. and from 3:30 to 6:00p. m Call 556 -2759 for more information COOPERATIVE EDUCATION The Cooperative Education Internship Center place s s tudents in work experiences related to their aca demi c major. The purpose of the internships is to integrate academic training with actual work experi ence This combination allows stu dent s to make reali s tic career deci s ions gain valuable work experi ence, obtain recommendations for graduate school, and earn money to help defray college expenses Student s work in large corporations, small busine sses, government, and nonprofit agencies throughout the metropolitan area. Most co-op students are paid by their employers, but in those profe ssio nal fields where co-op sa laries are not available, volunteer intern s hip placements are offered to help s tudent s gain e ss ential work experience. Co-op intern s hip placements are avai labl e in mo s t academic major s and mioors Student s must com plete 30 semester hour s of college c our se work with a minimum 2.50 GPA an d have a declared major to be eligible for registration with co-op No fees are charged to the student or employer for participa tion in the program, and each stude nt's int erests and job requirements are discussed individually with a professional coordinator Students may choose from three different work schedules based on the academic calendar The alter n ating plan provides f ull time periods of work every o th e r semeste r with intervening se mesters spent in full-time study The parallel sc h edule place s student s in a job while they s imultaneou sly attend sc hool. These positions are u s ually part-time. The s hort term/ s ummer plan allows students to elect a work expe rience which last s for no more than one semester. The college awards academic credit for s upervised cooperative education placements Students must comp let e a credit application available from the co op office and thi s application must be approved by a faculty member from the department in which credit is to be gra nt ed. No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative ed ucation credit will be applied toward Metro State degree requirements Credit earned for the co-op ed ucation work experiences are not applicable toward general studies requirements. Addi tional departmental restrictions may apply to certai n majors 298-1-3 (Variable credit ) Cooperative Education Prerequisite : Sophomore s tanding and permission of instructor An entry level work experience in a private company or a n a gency of the federal or state government related to the student's major and supervised by a competent professional on the work-site. Credit is awarded by an Metro State faculty member in the a ppr opriateacademic department for learning related to academic goals enumerated in the learning contract of eac h student. 398-1-12 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education Prerequisite: Junior s tanding and permis sion of ins tructor An advanced work experience in a private company or gove rnmental agency rel ated to the s tudent's major and s upervi se d by a competent professional on the work site. Credit i s awarded by an Metro State faculty member in the appropriate academic department for learning related to academic goals enume r ated in the learning contract of each student. For more informati on on the program and the placement opportunities in your academic major contac t the Cooperative Education and Intern s hip Center office at I 045 9th Street Park Phone : (303) 556-3290.

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30 SPECIAL PROGRAMS SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAM The Metro State Service-Learning Program combines the classroom with serv i ce to the metropolitan community. Participating students receive credit for appropriate public service which is both beneficial to the community and expands student horizons in intellectually and persona.lly meaningful ways Emerging from a wide variety of di ciplines, service-learning courses are structured by faculty to weave service in community-ba ed and government agencies with classroom reflection and analysis of the learning offered through these experiences. The courses are a l so designed to address real needs in our multicultural world, such as homelessne ss, at-risk youth, domestic violence, the environment cu ltur e and the arts and mental illness Agencie that ha ve provided service opportu nitie s include Fort Logan Mental Health Center the Denver Commission on Aging, Big Sister the Colorado Historical Society the Rape Assistance and Awareness program and numerou elementary and high schools, senior cen ter s and nursing homes Service-learning credit i s available in most academic majors and minors, and prerequisites and other requirements vary with each department. For assi tance in l earning how to participate in this program, includi n g discus ions of placement options, student s hould call 556-2382 or visit the Service-Learning Program office in CN 112-J to schedule a n interview. EXTENDED EDUCATION The Extended Education Divi sio n of Metropolitan State College of Denver is committed to providing a purposeful learning experie nc e t o a diverse metropolitan community. Extended Education addresses changing educational needs t hrou gh programs and services which emphasize accessibility, innovation lifelong learning andre ponsive delivery sys tems Adult Learning Services Adults entering or returning to college often have question and problems that are different from those of younger s tudents Adults who would like assistance in re-entering the formal education system and in planning their educational goals may contact the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342. Contract Major/Minor Degree Program Student s may design an individualized interdi sci plinary major or minor program when their educa tional goals are not met by majors and/or minors listed in the Metro State College Catalog. Each contract m ajo r or minor is supervised by a faculty comm itt ee chosen by the student. For further information contact the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342. Metro-Meritus People 60 or older, who do not wish to earn credit, are invited to attend tuition-free classes of their choice at either Metropolitan State College of Denver or at an Extended Campus l ocation, on a space available basis Metro Meritus i s designed to give special encouragement and assistance to retired citizens to continue their personal educational growth in a stimu l ati n g and friendly campus setting. For information and to enroll, call the Office of Adult Learning Services at 556-8342. Extended Campus Program Metro State' Extended Campus Program provides access to the college in the Denver metropolitan area by offering courses, and/or degree programs and services at three convenient sites. Metro South, located at 5660 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard in Arapahoe County, serves the south and southwest area Metro North, located at 11990 Grant Street in Adams County serves the north and northwest area. Each ite is located 14 miles from the Auraria Campus along the 1-25 corridor. Metro on the Mall, located at 1554 California Street, provides credit classes, noncredit educational seminars, and tours for residents and professionals living and working in the center of Denver. Metro on the Mall also houses the Office of Continuing Profe ss ional Education which provides services and workshop s to pro fessional groups and responds to the demand for on-site training and education. THE FIRST YEAR PROGRAM The First Year Program is designed to unify and coo rdinate college effort to help entering students toward a successful first year. The program provid es intensive advi ing, course selectio n guidance, and academic monitoring throughout the first year, as well a coo rdin ating academic upport services for freshmen. Additionally, the program offers a First Year Seminar course which provides appropriate readings and written work enabling s tudents to discuss and write about current issues including the value of higher education. All firs t-time Metro State stude nt s may enroll in the First Year Seminar course and other appropriate cour es as determined by as essment at entry. The program furnishes an environment w her e problem solving, creativity, and peer i nter action are encouraged. For add ition a l information please ca.ll556-8447.

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SPECIAl PROGRAMS 3 HEALTH CAREERS SCIENCE PROGRAM The Health Careers Science Program is designed to e n courage women and ethnic minority groups who have traditionally been excluded from ca reer s in sc ience and technology Students are provided with tutoring and other s upport to ensure th eir s ucce ss in th e science and technology areas. For additional information please call 556-32 1 5. HIGH SCHOOL UPWARD BOUND The program i desi g ned to gene rate the s kills and moti vatio n ne cessary for success in a nd beyond high sc h ool for youths who are low-income and firs t generation college bound s tudents. The program pro vides intensive academic in s truction during the sc hool year, as well as a six-week ummer session. Ba sic academic skill preparation in reading, writing, and mathematic s is part of a comprehensive coun se lin g and enrichment program for the purpose of developing creative thinking, effective expression, and positive att itude s toward learning The students are recruited a t the beginning of their so phomore year in high sc hool from five target area high sch ools located in Denver County (East, Lincoln, Man ual, North a nd West high schools) THE HONORS PROGRAM The Metro State Honor s Program provide s an inten se, interdi sc iplinary aca demic program for highly motivated s tudents whose capabilities suggest a broader s pectrum of need s and intere sts. The program encourages individu a lity by responding to the diverse educational needs of st udent s It s integrated approach strengthens the program's foundation and provide s a cross sectio n of thought-provoking per spectives. Honor s students realize their learning potential through creative inquiry independent thought and critical examination. Honor s profes so r s se rve as mentors to g uide stude nt s in fulfilling their intellectual pursuit s and dreams. Finally, while the Honor s Program encourages independent thought and individuality it also inspires s tudent s to work together forming a community of scholar s who learn from one a nother Classes are generally s mall to ensure the exchange of knowledge and philosophies. Available to students are both the honor s core and a number of departmental honors courses. There are three Honor s Awards avai lable : I ) Junior Honor s Award ( 15 se me s ter hour s); 2) Senior H ono r s Award (15 se mester hour s which includes a the sis or senio r se minar); and 3) an Metro State Honors Program de s i gnation on the Metro State diploma (27 se me ste r hour s). An official Metro State Honor s Application form may be obta ined from the Metro State Honor s Pro gram director. In addition to the Metro State application form an interview by the Honor s Council is required of prospective honor s stu d e nts. It is highly re commended tha t all honor s appl i cations be com pleted by mid July. Furthermore, there are a number of Colorado scholar s hip s available. Additional information on the Honor Progr am is available b y calling 556-4865 or inC 1018. The Honor s Pro gram report s to the Dean of the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences. Required Honors Core Semester Hours HON 275 The Legacy of Arts & Letter s I ..... .................... 3 HON 276 The Legacy of Arts & Letter s II ............... ...... 3 HON 295 The Art of Critical Thinking .... ................. .... 3 HON 380 Revolution s and Social Change I ........................ 3 HO 381 Revolution s and Soc ial Change II* ...................... 3 HON 385 American Culture I ..................... ............. 3 HON 386 American Culture II* ................................ 3 HON 492 Senior Honors Seminar ....... ............... ....... 3 HON 495 Senior Honor s Thesis ............. ................. _1 Total Hour s for Honors Core .................................... 27 Approved General Studies co ur ses. INTERNATIONAL STUDlES Semester Abroad Programs: Two s emester abroad programs, in London England, and in Guadala jara Mexico, operate each year in cooperation with the American Ins titute for Foreign Study Student s who are in good academic s tanding a nd feel they could benefit from a se me s ter of s tudy in England or Mexico s h ould contact the coordinator of International Studie s at 556-3173. Study Abroad Trips: Short-term s tudy abroad experiences during the s ummer are offered each year. These trips are always Jed by a full-time profes so r and are usually for two to four weeks in l ength Aca demic credit is normally availab le. In past summers, Study Abroad trip s have go ne to Mexico Peru China Italy, France, Spain Egypt West Africa, Israel England, and Russ ia. Contact the coordinator of International Studies at 556-3173 for information on forthcoming trips. .

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32 SPECIAL PROGRAMS Office of International Programs and Services: Metro State provides assis tance to visiting faculty and international stude nts. Important information and counseling is offe red on: visas, school transfers work permis sion, housing, banking and c ultura l and academ ic adaptation. The office also provide s assista n ce t o s tudents who wish to arrange individualized s tudy abroad opport unities. For information con t act the director of Int ernatio nal Pr ograms and Services at 556 -3660. METRO STATE'S LANGUAGE AND CULTURE INSTITUTE The Metropolitan State College of Denver Language and Culture Insti tute was established in 1976 to organize s tud y and travel abroa d The ins titute currently operates a summer program in Mexico, a sum mer intensive language institu t e in We t Germany and a winter study and travel program in Mexico's Yucatan P eninsu l a and Central America The institute offers c redit through the Department of Modem Languages and the In stit ut e for Intercultur a l Studie s and Services. INSTITUTE FOR INTERCULTURAL STUDIES AND SERVICES The co lle ge provides an op portunity for s tudent s t o study formally in international courses offered by va rious academic departments Student s interested in interna tional coursewo rk s hould co ntact the aca demic advisor of any of the thr ee sch ools of the college A cross-d i scipli nary contract major and minor arranged in International Studies blends historical, political eco nomi c, cultural, and linguistic approac he s and provides a diver s ified glo b a l per s pective Those interested in the se or related degree fields sho uld contact the director of Adult Learning Service s. SERVICEMEN'S OPPORTUNITY COLLEGE Metropolitan State Coll ege of D enver ha s received recognition as a Servicemen's Opportunit y College. Further information can be obta in ed from the O ffice of Admissions and R ecords. STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES PROGRAM The purpose of the Student Support Services Pr ogram at Metropolitan State College of Denver is to pro v ide ed ucati onal assistance for se le cted s tudents w h o, becau e of financial and/or other circumstances, m ay otherwise be denied a chance for participation in higher education programs Academic assistance i s provided for stude nt s on the ba s i s of indiv idual need Courses in Englis h and readin g are offered for co llege credit co upled with tutori a l assis t a nce The se co ur ses are designed to stre ngthen and supple men t a st ud ent's basic educational skills so that she or he may better address the requirements of a col lege course load. Other s upportive services available are counseling, testing assistance with financial aid forms and, when possible assistance in attending social and cultural events to enhance the s tudent's experie nce at Metropolitan State College of Denver VETERANS SERVICES The Office of Veterans Services is de signed to provide st udent veterans and veteran s in the commu nity with a variety of outreach, recruitment and retention se rvice s These i nclude assistance with prob lems involving c h ecks, tutoria l and counsel ing as s i s tance, and man y referrals to both on -c ampus offices and community serv i ces. The office also ce rtifie s s tudent veterans an d dependent s for their VA educa tional benefit s. VETERANS UPWARD BOUND Veterans Upward B o und at Metropolitan State College of D enve r is a federally funded program designed to identify, recruit and motivate veter ans to use their VA benefits in pursuit of personal career goa l s through higher education. Veteran s Upward Bound provide s refre s her and tutorial h elp so that su r v ival in academic or voca tional/techni ca l program s i s maximized. This i s accompl i s hed during a 12-week trime s ter. Ancillary services s u ch a career counse lin g, financial aid adviseme nt p syc h o lo gica l cou n sel ing and job place ment are a l so provided for participant s WEEKEND ADDITION PROGRAM Metropolitan State College of Denver offers a variety of courses o n Friday evenings and Saturdays under the au pices of the Weekend Additio n Pro gram The program has its own office which provide s general as sista nce to s tudents on specified weekend in the areas of adv ising, retrieval of college forms, sc heduling and assistance with s tudent co ncern s which cannot be addressed during weekdays. The Weekend Office is l oca t ed in the West Classroom Building Room 108E.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION Academic Information The college operates on the semester system with each semester during the academic year consisting of 15 weeks of instruction followed by a week of examinations. Runnin g concurrently with the 16-week course sc hedul e are modules, sc h e duled to begin on the first sixth and eleventh week of the 16-week semester. During any 16-week semester students may enroll in 16-week courses five-week courses or combinations of both, as long as the limitations outlined under course load are not exceeded. The co lle ge also offers eit her an eightor 10-week summer term during which stude nt s ma y enroll for either eightor 10-week courses, fouror five-week co ur ses, or combinations of both The course load restrictions are adjusted to be equivalent to those of the regular academic year. Classes are sched uled during the day and in the evening in order to accommodate people who are employed. Students who are planning to take the majorit y of their c l asses in the evenings s h ould check with appropriate department chairs abou t the availability of courses in their major during evening hours. Enrollment can be on a full-time or pan-time basis and can be for the purpose of pursuing a bachelor degree, improving vocatio nal or professional competence, or learning about particular areas of interest for cultural o r intellectual rea so ns. Ple ase refer to the Class Schedule for current cale ndar information. ACADEMIC HONESTY Students have a responsibility t o maintain standards of academ i c ethics and honesty Cases of cheating or plagiari sm are handled within the policies of Academic Affairs in accordance with procedures outlined in the Metro State Class Schedule. CONDUCT OF STUDENTS Metropolitan State College of Denver policy provides students the largest degree of freedom consis tent with good work and orderly co nduct. The college publi s he s sta ndard s of conduct, however to which st udent s are expected to adhere Information regarding s tud ents' rights and respons ibiliti es, including the Student Due Pr ocess Procedure (the procedural rights provided to stude nt s at Metro State before dis cip linary action is imposed) is available in Central Clas s room 313. CLASS ATTENDANCE Students are expected to attend all session of courses for which they are registered Each instructor deterrnines when a student's absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may recei ve a failing g rade for the course. If students anticipate a prolonged absence, they s hould contact their instructors. If they find that they cannot communicate with the instructor, they sho uld contact the chair of that department who will inform instructors of the reasons for the anticipated absence Whenever an instructor determines that a s tudent's absences a r e interfering with academic progress that instructor may s ubmit a l etter to the c hair of the department informing that office of the sit uation STUDENT CLASSJFICA TION Students are classified according to the number of se me ster hours of credit earned: Freshmen fewer than 30; so phomore s 30 or more, but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more but fewer than 90; seniors 90 or more SEMESTER HouRS CREDIT Course credit is based upon unit s designed as semeste r hours. One semester hour or one base contact hour equals a minimum of 750 minutes; this translate s to a minimum of 15, 50-minute class hours per semester. Time required for cla ss preparation is not a consideration in the calculation of course credit. Omnibus courses involving laboratory work give one semester hour of credit for each two, three or four h o urs of sc heduled work in the lab oratory during a week. Internships require a minimum of 2,250 min utes for each hour of credit. PREPARATORY COURSE CREDIT POLICY No preparatory courses are applicable toward a Metro State degree after spring 1993. For detail s, please see an advisor in the Academic Assessment and Support Center.

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34 ACADEMIC INFORMATION COURSE LOAD The average course load per 16-week semester is 15 or 16 semester hours Students who are academi cally strong may take up to 18 semester hours during fall and spring s emesters and up to 12 semester hours during the s umm er semester. During fall and spring semesters students with cumulative grade point averages of 3.25 or higher may take 19 or 20 semester hour s and those st ud ents with grade point averages of 3 50 or higher may take 21 semester hours. Authorization for overloads without these grade point average minimums must be obtained from the student's major department chair and appropriate dean. Authorization for overloads in exces s of 21 semester hours is given by the Board on Academic Standards Exceptions, following a s u cces sful formal appeal prior to the beginning of the semester. The student s hould begin the appeal by obtaining a petition from an ac a demic advising coordinator in the Academic Assessment and Support area. Please note : The college is reviewing course load require ments. Students sho uld cons ult the Class S c hedule for any c h anges pertaining to course l oads. COURSE NUMBERS, TITLES, DESCRIPTI ONS, AND OFFERINGS Before starting registration, students should study course descriptions for information on the level of instruction credit, course sequence content, and prerequisites. The first digit in a three digit cou r se number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered I 00 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores 300 through 399 primarily for juniors, and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors. Although in general while student hould not take courses above the level of their class (based up on semester hour s earned), they may do o at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites. In special cases students may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for their c l ass if, in addition to meeting the require ments for prerequisites, they obtain the permission of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the cou r se. After each cour s e number is a figure specifying the eme s ter hours of credit. As an example, CHE 1804 is a freshman level, four-credit course After the course number is the course title whi c h may be fol lowed by a second set of numbers in parentheses indicating the division of time between lecture and laboratory, or field experience The first number represent s the number of lecture hour each week and the second number indicates the number of l a b oratory shop, or field hours. For example, CHE 180-4 General Chemistry I ( 4 + 0) represents the general chemistry course which has four hours of l ecture and zero hours of laboratory each week. Such a co ur se would earn four hours of credit, four for l ecture and zero for laboratory work Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the co ur se. If there is a prerequisite that must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the cour s e this information i s listed above the course description. A list of all courses instructors clas s meeting times, and locations i s published in the Class S c hedule, which is printed in advance of the beginning of ea c h s emester and i available to all s tudents. OMNIBUS COURSES The omnibus courses listed below are de s igned to provide flexible learning opportunities Experimen tal topics courses seminars, and workshops deal with novel subjects and current problems. Independent study a llow s students to investigate problems of special interest. Supervised field study and internships conducted cooperatively with business, industry, government and other agencies, provide practical on the-job learn ing opportunitie Content of these course s should not duplicate that of regular courses listed in the catalog. Omnibus co ur ses may be offered by all academic departments of the college A specific course plan for topic and group workshop courses which cover s content and semester hours must be submitted by an instructor and approved by the chair of the department or discipline and dean of the school before s u ch a course can be lis ted in the sched ule of classes. These same a ppr ova l s are requ ir ed for plan s of study which individual students submit for registration in a workshop course (when individualized ) or an independent study course. No more than 30 semester hours earned in all of the omnibus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements. The following co ur se numbers are the same for omnibus co ur ses in all disciplines ; and when listed in class schedul es registration forms and college records, the co ur se number will carry the prefix of the discipline in which the course is offered In addition to prerequisites listed und er a course and the approvals outlined above other prerequisites appropriate to the study and departmental objectives may be added

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190 (Credit Variable ) Topics Prerequisite: Permi ssion of ins tructor ACADEMIC INFORMATION An introductory l eve l etas t o study selected t opics especially appropriate for lower divi sion students. 390 (Credit Variable) Advanced Topics Prerequi site : P ermission of instructor An in-de pth inquiry into selected problems. 480 (Cred it Variable) Workshop Prerequi site: Approval of departm ent An advanced program of study, often of concentra ted n a ture de s igned primarily for s tudent s majorin g in a parti c ular department or discipline Invol ves indepen dent and/or group app r aisa l and a n alysis of major probl ems within a particular area. 490 (Credit Variable) Seminar Prerequi site: Permissi o n of inst ructor Presentati o ns, disc u ssio ns, reports, and critique s of various problem s within the disc ipline in which the s eminar is offered 498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed six semester hours ) Independent Study Prerequi sites: Seni or sta nding and permission of the department c hair Independent inve stigatio n of probl ems within the s tudent's major disc ipline The c ourse mus t be offered in that department/disciplin e and be supe rvi se d b y a facult y member of that area Field Experience/Internship Courses Field experience or experiential education courses are co ur ses whose major ins tructional activities are conducted out ide the regular classroom, but whose sylla bi are formall y approved by the in s titution and maintained as an inte g ral part of a department's c urriculum The se c ours es incorpor a te actual experi ence with information assimi l ation and adhere to policie s set forth by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education. Certain degr ee, certification, and licen s ure programs such as teacher education or nur s in g, require experiential education co ur s e s as a part of the required coursework Other departments offer experiential education co urse s, generally as a part of the s tudent's major or minor, for credi t applicable to graduation requirements Five term s identif y field experience courses offered at Metro politan State College of Denv er: extemallabora t ory, pr actic um intern s hip stu dent teaching, and inde pendent s tud y. External Laboratory A co ntrolled e nvir o nment or o r ganize d activity emp hasizin g ex perimentation in which guided observations and participation under the guidance and s upervi s ion of the faculty member and the cooperating supervisor, enhance the integration of theory and practice (as in child development ). The external l abo r a t ory is di s tin guis hed from the o n-cam pu s labor a tory which i s devoted to experimental study in any bran ch of the natural o r ap plied sciences. Practicum A unit of work th a t involves apprenticeship in the pr actical a pplication of pre vio u s l y studied the ory under th e observance and supervisio n of a ski lled pr acti tioner and facu lt y member (as a pra ctic um in re a ding). Internship A work -o rient e d training period of actua l serv ice in an age n cy, ins tituti o n or technical/busines s establis hment that provide s an in-depth learning experience for the s tudent under th e direct s upervi sio n of an o n-si te s upervi sor as well as the crutiny and g uidan ce of a faculty member (as in cooperative educat i on). Student Teaching Facu l ty s upervi se d learnin g experience in which the s tudent applies knowled ge gained in the Teacher Education Licensure Pro g r a m to a classroom se tting (as in pr ac tice te aching) Independent Study A s tudent-initiated c reative or research project co ndu c ted under the direct guidance and s upervi s ion o f a fac ult y member of an academic d e partment or di sc iplin e (as a thesis or s pecial upper division project). Gu i deline s for Field Experience/Internship Courses I. Credit may vary from one to 15 h o ur s, dependin g upon the ins tru ctional activity 2. Student s are expected to meet the minimum ba se clock hour s e sta blished by CCHE policy which requires two t o three times the c lock hou rs established for regular clas s room ins truc tion

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36 ACADEMIC INFORMAT ION 3. Approved cooperating agencies provide l earni n g opportunities, prepare written s tatement s of assignments monitor students performanc e, co nfer with the supervising faculty member, and provide a written evaluation. 4. An average of one hour a week, minimally, is s pent in semi nar and discu ssio n or in confer enc e with the adjunct faculty at the field experience locale and/or in conference with the supervising faculty member. 5 The s upervising faculty member eval u ates st udent s' performance and, in consultation with the adju n ct faculty member assigns the g r ade for the co ur se according to grading policies stated in the college catalog 6. Omn i bu s cour ses (299, 397 498, 499) emphasizing field experie nce s are subjec t to guide line s established for regular field-based courses, as well as omnibus course guidelines, and mus t be app r oved by the Offi ce of Academic Affairs. 299 (Credit Varia b le) F i e ld Experience/Internship Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor A supervise d in-service field or l abora tory experience in an area related to the student's major con duct e d by an affiliated organizatio n in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the stu dent is majoring. 397 (Credi t Variable) Practicum Prerequisites: Sophomore s tanding and permi ssio n of instructor A clas s involv i n g a unit of work that involves apprenticeship in the pra ctical a ppli catio n of previ ously s t u died theory u n der the o bservanc e and supervi s ion of a skilled practitioner and faculty m embe r (as a practicum in reading). 498 ( Cre di t Variab l e, no t to exceed six semester hours) Indepen d ent Study Prer e quisites: Senior s tanding and permi ssio n of the departm ent c hair Indepe ndent investigatio n of problems within the s tude n t 's m ajor discipline Th e course must be offered in tha t d e partment/di scipline and be s upervised by a faculty member of that area 499 (C r e dit Variab le) A d va n ced Fie ld Experience/Internship Prerequisite: P ermissio n of instructor An advanced l evel supervised i n -se rvice field or laboratory experie nce in an are a r e l a t e d to the student s major conducted by an affilia ted organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the s tudent is majori ng. 7 Cooperative Education course s (2 98 398-variable credit ) are s ubject to g uid eli ne s esta blis hed for regular field experience courses as well as Cooperative Education guidelines No more t h an 15 se mester hour s of cooperative education c r edi t will be applied toward Metro State degre e requirements. GRADES AND NOTATIONS Should a cleri cal error occur in the r eporti ng of st udent grades, it i s the prerog ative of the faculty to adju s t that grade to the actual grade earned G r a d es Alphabetical grades and s tatus sy mbol s use d at Metr opolitan State College of Denver are as follows : A-Superior. ....................... 4 qualit y point s per se mester hour a ttempted B-Above Avera ge .................. 3 quality point s per se me s ter hour attempted C Average ......... . ........... 2 quality points per se me s ter hour attempted D-Below Avera ge but Pa ssi ng ........ I quality point per s emester hour a ttempted F-Failure ......................... 0 quality points per se me s t e r hour attempted. Nota tion s NC No Credit !-Incompl ete $-Satis factory (Li mited to s tudent teachin g and HPSILES 489 internships) P-Pass X-Grade assignment pending Student mus t s ee faculty for an explanation or assignment of grade Co u rses taken thro u g h interinstitutional registration are normally assigned the X n otatio n until grades are received and posted to the academic re c ord The No Credit (NC) notation i s not a g r ade It ma y indicate withdrawal from the cour se or course rep etition The NC notation may a l s o be u se d in se l f-paced courses to indicate that the st u dent and/or the faculty have decided to extend the s tudent's expo s ure to the cour s e in order to increase the s tudent s proficiency. In order to earn credit, th e s tudent mu s t re-register for and pay for the cour se in a s ubse quent term.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION 3 The Incomplete (I) notation may be assigned when a tudent was unable to take the final examination and/or did not complete all of the out-of-clas assignments due to unusual circumstance such as hos pitalization. Incomplete work denoted by the Incomplete ( I ) notation must be completed within one cal endar year or earlier, at the discretion of the faculty member. If the incomplete work is not completed within one calendar year the Incomplete (I) notation will change to an "F." Registering in a subsequent semester for a course in which an Incomplete ( I ) has been received will not remove the "1." The Incom plete (I) notation may not be awarded in a self-paced course The following minimal requirements shall be required throughout the college and shall be a part of all school, departmental or individual faculty policies: I The NC notation shall be av a ilable to students in all instance s through the fourth week of classes for fall and s pring terms 2. Requests by students for an NC notation in a given course shall not be granted after the tenth week of the fall and spring semesters. The Incomplete (I) notation may be used during thl s period provided the conditions specified above apply. 3. Proportional time frame s are applied for modular courses weekend courses, workshops, and summer terms 4. A written policy statement describing the use of the NC notation shall be given to each student for each cla s s in which the student enrolls Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student s absences have reached a point that they jeopardize the student's success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a fail ing grade for the course. Additional requirements for an C notation may be set by each school department, and/or faculty member. QUALITY POINT S The number of qualit y points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of semes ter hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received. The cumulative grade point ave r age is calculated by dividing the total by the number of semester h o ur s attempted. To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of semester h ours attempted The nota tions C, I S, and P have no effect on the grade point average. FINAL EXAMINATIONS It is the general policy of the college to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit with the possible exception of seminar courses or special projects PASS-FAIL OPTION The pass-fail option encourages the s tudents to take cour s es outside of their major and minor fields and thereby broaden their educationa l experience. The pass notation ha no effect on the grade point aver age; the failure grade is equivalent to the grade of "F. Students having already completed at least one Metro State course with at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average may choose to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass-fail basis rather than by letter grade. Courses taken on a pass-fail basis will apply to major, minor or teacher licensure requirements only with the approva l of the app r opriate department chair. Self-paced courses may not be taken under the pass-fail option. Maximum graduation credit for these ungraded courses is 18 semester hours, earned in no more than six courses, limited to one course per semester or module A student must declare interest in the pass-fail optio n no later than the last day to add classes (during the first 15 percent of the term) for a particular semester or module by contacting the Office of Admis sions and Records The instructor will assign and record the pass-fail grade on a final grade list which identifies students electing and eligible for pass-fail grading. Students who request the option and are later declared ineligible will receive notification from the Office of Admissions and R ecords during the semester and will be assigned a regular l etter grade in the course. Once approved the request for the pass-fail option is irrevocable Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a pass notation is given. Therefore students who plan to transfer or take graduate work s hould determine whether the institution of their choice will accept the credit before registering for courses under the pass-fail option .

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38 ACADEMIC INFORMATION REPEATED COURSES (LAST GRADE STANDS) A st udent may repeat any cour e taken at Metro State regard less of the original grade earned. By doing so, only the credit and the grade for the latest attempt at the co u rse will remain on the s tudent's Metro State academic record. The grade for the prior attempt(s) will be changed to the NC notation. The co ur ses must carry the same title, co ur se number and semes ter hours. To effect such a c hange, the stu dent must reregister and pay tuition for the course in question, complete the course with a letter grade, and complete the nece ssary form in the Office of Admissions and R ecords indicating that the course has been repeated Otherwi se, the grade c hange will be made administratively at the time of degree evalu atio n or earlier, as identified Credit duplication involving transfer interinstitutional, or s tate college sys tem courses may be treated differentl y from the above procedur e. This policy cannot be utili ze d for the purpo se of altering gra d es assig n ed prior to the receipt of a degr ee from Metro State Warning/Probation/Suspension Policy ACADEMIC SATISFACTORY PROGRESS/GOOD STANDING A s tudent is deemed to be makin g satisfactory pro gress toward his or her aca demic goal if the st udent maintains a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher. Thi s tudent is de emed to be in academic good s tand ing with the institution (hereafter referred to in this sectio n as good s tanding.) However other acade mic standards may apply to specific programs and a stude nt must satisfy tho se different aca demi c stan dards in order to be de eme d in academic good standing with that program Plea se see information on the pro g ram of interest to determine spec ific s t andards for that pr ogram. Aca demic Warning Status A s tudent in go od s tanding who se cumulative GPA falls below 2 00 will be on academic warning sta tus with the institution (hereafter referred to in thi s sectio n as warning sta tus ) his or her next emester at Metro State. A student will be remo ve d from thi s warning s tatu s and be in good s tanding if he or she ac hieves a c umul ative GPA of a t le ast 2 00 at the end of his or her semester on warning stat us. More restrictive sta ndard s may a pply to given programs or schoo ls. Ple ase see i nformation on the program of interest. Aca demic Probation A s tudent who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of at l east 2.00 at the end of his or her semester on warning status will be put on academic probation with the institution ( herea f ter referred to i n thi s sec tion as academic probation) his or h e r next se me s ter at Metro State. A s tudent will be on academic pro bation as lon g as he or s he h as a c umul ative GPA below 2.00 but is making progr ess toward good s tand ing as exp lained below and has not been on academic probation for more than three semesters. Other co ndition s may apply to give n program s or sc h oo l s Ple ase see information on the program of interest. A st udent is removed from academic probation and is in goo d standi n g the se me s ter after he or she ach iev es a c umulative GPA of at lea st 2. 00. Any se me ster a s tudent is on aca demi c probation the tudent mus t make progress toward good st anding with the institutio n by taking all of the following actions: achieving a semester GPA of 2.20 or higher registering and completing a minimum of three but no mor e than 1 2 se me ster hours ( thre e to six se me s ter hours for s ummer semest er) taking required activities as negotiated with the Director of Academic Exceptions Program These may include certain clas es, repeated co ur ses, tutoring, or other activities. While on aca d e mic probation, a s tudent may pre -regis ter the semester following the academic warning stat u s se me ster, but i s prohibited from pre-reg i steri n g any other semester For the se other academic pro bation s t atus se me s ter s, verification must occur that the se mester GPA is at least 2.20 prior to a s tudent being allowed to register. Academic Suspension A st udent on aca demic probation not making progre s toward good sta nding with the institution will be prohibited from regi steri ng at the institution for one cale ndar year through academic s u spension from the ins titution Appea l of s uspen s ion for this reason will be submitted to the Director of Academic Exceptions Program The Dire c tor of Academic Exceptions Program in tum will deli ve r the appeal materials to the Student Academic Review Committ ee, which will review the appeal and notify the stu dent of its decision on the appeal. A st udent may appeal a s uspen sion, at most two time s in his or her aca d emic career at Metro State

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION A s tudent making pr ogress t owar d s goo d s t a ndin g with the institution whose cumulative GPA remain s below a 2.00 afte r thre e or more se me s ters on prob a tion will have h i s or h er academic progres s reviewed each s eme s ter by the Student Academic Review Committee to determine whether th e s tudent s hould b e placed on sus pen sio n ln both cases, the deci ion of the Student Academic R ev iew Committee is final. Any s tudent returning to Metro State after th e one calendar year s u s pen s ion must reapply and will be readmitt e d on aca demi c prob a tion with the in s titution For these s tudents all probation rule s as o utlined a b ove will apply. A s tudent who i s s u s pended for a se co n d time will be re admitted on l y if he or s he ha s s ucce ss fully com p l eted an associate degree pro gra m from a comm u nity co lle ge after s u s pen sio n from Metro State or can dem o n s tr ate to the Student Academic R eview Co mmittee that cha nce s fo r s u ccessful completion of an educational pro gram h ave been greatly improved. STUDENT GRADE APPEAL PROCEDURE If st udent s ha ve rea on to qu es tion the validity of a g rad e received i n a course, they m u st make their requ es t for a change before th e end of t h e third week of th e se me ste r following the co mpl etio n of th e co urse-the following fall semester in the case of the preceding s prin g se me s t e r The Grad e Appeal Guidelin es ma y be obtained from the s tudent's r es pe ctive dean. It i s the re s p o n s ibi l ity of th e s tudent to initiate a grade appeal within the time line and to follow the pr oce dure s s pecified f o r g r ade appeals in the Metro State Student s Rig ht s and Re sponsi bili ties Handb ook. The handbook ma y b e obtained from the Office of Student Affairs All d ecisions of the Grade Appeal Committee will b e revi ewed by an A ssis tant Vice Pre s ident for Academic Affairs. Adapti v e Self-Pac e d Learning Ada ptive se lf paced l earni n g i s a phr ase u se d to de sc rib e classes in which stude nts are a llow ed to pro ceed at a pace th a t is s uited t o their p e r so nal learnin g need s and l earn in g style. Students ma y proceed rapidly, finishing a co u rse well in advance of the end of a se me s t e r or module with th e ad va ntage of b eing a ble to begin n ew st udie s o r to co ncentr a t e o n other co ur ses Students may proceed s l ow l y w ith out t ime limit atio n s that mig ht interfere w ith the mastery of eac h required skill. Thi s personalized sys tem of l earning relies h eav ily on l earn ing aids and media so that tutor s, s tudent p r octors, a nd facu l t y are free t o devote addition a l time t o i ndividu a l ized instructio n and assistance. Self-pa ced courses are identified in th e Class Schedule b y SP or se lf p ace d Inf ormatio n o n the method of ins truction and th e natur e of the progr a m i s available in each department. Se l f paced courses are optional a nd a re o p e n t o all s tud e nt s w h o qual i fy. Students who do not complete the work of a selfp ace d co ur se d u rin g a se m este r are give n the n o tatio n of NC and mu s t re-enroll in and pay for the course in a s ub se quent se mest e r in o rder t o continue in that course. A lett er g r ade i s awar d ed during th e semester in which the work i s com pl e ted satisfac t ori ly. Nontraditional C redit Op t ions in Lieu of Cour s e Requirements Su ccessful completion of s p ecia l exami n atio n s a nd/ or completio n of a pri or learning p ortfol i o whic h assesse d for c r edi t may be subs tituted for th e co mpleti on of course r e quirem e nt s, may permit place ment i n advanced courses, or may be u se d as the b as i s for awarding c redit. A st ude n t ma y earn up to 60 se m es ter h o ur s of c r edit toward degree requirements u s ing nontraditional cre dit o ptions Approved credit of thi s sort will be po s ted to the st udent's record after the co mpletion of eight semes ter hour s of classroom ( re s ident ) c redit. Nontradition a l c redit may not be used toward the la s t 12 se mester hours of a degree program doe s not s ub s titute f o r residency r e q u irements, and m ay n o t be u se d to c hallen ge pre requisite co ur ses for co ur ses alrea d y comple ted Student are advi sed that letter g rade s are not assigned for nontr a ditional cred it and so me institution s m ay n o t accep t tran s fer c redit s which d o not include let ter grades. ADVA CED PLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS Student s who have performed satisfac t orily in s p ecia l college-level cour ses while in hig h scho ol, and who h ave pa sse d appropriate ad va nced placement examinations con ducted by the College E ntrance Examination Board, ma y have offic ial AP scores s ubmitted directly to the Office of Admi ss ion s a n d Record s for consideration for college credit. Thi s office, in consultation with the a ppropriate dep a rtment c hair determine s the a mount and n a ture of the cred it and/or advanced placement granted

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40 ACADEMIC INFORMATION INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREAT E Metropolitan State College of Denver recognizes the greater potential for s u ccess of International Bac calaureate students. Accordingly, academic department s may award credit for demonstrated proficiency on a case-by-case basis Students who have international baccalaureate results at the higher level may have an official transcript sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records for cons ideration for college credit. COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) For the past 20 years, the College Board has offered a program of examinatio n s designed to evaluate non-accredited college-level learning to award credit for s uccessful demonstration of this knowledge This program known as the College-Level Examination Program or CLEP, consists of two series of examinations: the general examinations and the subject exam in ations. The general examination series includes five separate examinations covering the areas of EngHsh com position, humanities, natural scie n ces, math and soc ial sc ience-history. Based on the results of these examinations, the college may award up to a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit in the freshman general studies requirement area s. Thu s, the s u ccessful s tudent may test out of many of the traditional courses required during the fres hman year. Metro State doe s not allow CLEP credit for ENG I 02 which is the Freshman Composition : Analysis, Research, & Documentation course. The subject examination series consists of more than 45 examinations which apply to s pecific college courses. Metro State allows credit for 15 of these examinations. Thirty semester hours of credit also may be awarded under this series, making a total of 60 semeste r hours of credit obtainable under a combi nation of the two s eries of examinations. Credit obtained under CLEP at another institution will be reevaluated according to Metro State CLEP policies. Any intere s ted st udent sho uld contact the coordinator at 556-3677 for co mplete information about this program before registering to take any of these exams. ATTAINMENT EXAMINATIONS Any student may take attainment examinations in certain departments for the purpose of waiving spe cific graduation requirements Passing such a n examination, a lthou gh not reducing the number of cre d its required for graduation, entitles students to substitute their own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the co ur se. DEPARTMENTAL COURSE EXAMINATIONS In special case a department may grant s tudents credit toward graduation for college courses in whic h they request and pass special college examinations Under thi s provision, a maximum of 30 semes ter hours of credit may be awarded by the college. A fee of $10 per semester hour credit will be charged. Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a regular co ur se offered by the college (o mnibus-numbered courses are excluded), and the credit gra nted will be for the corresponding co urse provided the student ha s no previous collegiate enrollment for a similar course and the c redit is applic able toward the student's graduation requirements Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department c hair no later than the third week of classes in a semester. Permi ss ion for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recom mendation of the department chair. No a ppli cation for credit by examination will be approved for a student who i s not currently enrolled in good standing in a degree-seeking curricu lum in the college. Credit by examination will not be approved for a s tudent who is within 12 classroom semester hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for a course in which a student has been officially enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver or at another instit ution whether or not the course has been com pleted and a grade awarded. Credit by examination cannot be obtained for college courses attended as a lis tener, visitor, or auditor. When students have completed a course in the same discipline, higher in number than the course for which they are se eking examination credit, permission will be granted provided the two courses are unrelated and approval is gran ted by the appropriate department chair and dean In a given discipline, no credit by exami n ation can be obtained for a course lower in number in a se quence than the highest numbered course already comp l eted by that student. If a stude nt is registered for but has not comp leted a higher-numbered course in a sequence, the examination for the lower-numbered course must be com-

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION I pleted within the first three weeks of the semester. Exceptions must be a pp ealed to the B oard of Acad emic Standard s Exceptions following endorsement of the d e partment c hair o r dean Exami n ations can not be taken to r a i se gra de s, to remove failures, or t o r emove NC SP or I notations. Credit by exami nation i s n o t a pplicable toward aca d emic residence req uir emen ts. Examples of unrelated s ubject m a tter : ART 2 1 2 .... ... Human Anatomy for Artists ART 103 .... ... Basic Pho t ography Methods ITS 24 1 ... ..... Introdu ctio n to Photo g r aphy ITS 101 ...... Introdu ctio n t o W ood Examination for credit will be take n at a time s p ecified by the department but after the s p ec ial exami n a tion fee ha s been paid N o examination for c r e dit in a college co ur se m ay be repeated. A grade equ ivalent to A" o r B m u st b e attain e d on the examination in order to receive credi t but credits so earned for the course will be recorded without g r a d e reference on the tudent s permanent re cord. Credits in co ur es for which credit i s earned b y exam ination are n ot co n s id e r ed in comp utin g co llege g r a d e point averages. Credit b y exami n atio n will be posted after a student ha s completed eight se mester h ours of credit a t Metropolitan State College of Denver and after an evaluation of all possib l e transfer credits h as b ee n co mpleted. CREDIT FOR PRIOR L EARNING Student s may apply for c redit for college level learning gained throu gh experience thr ough the Credit for Prior Learning pro gram. Inf o rmati o n and ass i stance i s available throu g h the Office o f Adu lt Learn i n g Service Pri or learning c r edit is availab l e in m ost, but not all, academic departments. Credits are awarded on the basis of a careful asse sment of the prior learning portfolio by faculty in the department from which cre dit i s so u ght. The pri or l earning p o rtf olio is de veloped with the assista n ce of the Offi ce of Adult Learn in g Services Applicants for credit for prior learning will ge n erally be required to take EDU 2681 the Portf olio De ve l opment W o rk s h op Pri or l earning portfolios are s ubmitt ed to Adult Learning Servi ces, which s ubmit s the portfolio to the ap p ro pri ate academic department. Students are a dvi sed not to e nr oll in classes for whic h credit for prior l earni n g may be so u ght. A fee of one-half the part-time s tud ent tuiti o n i s c har ged for credi t for p rior learning ; $ 40 of the tota l fee is due prior to the assess ment of the portfolio by faculty for credit. The remainder of the fee is due if and when c redit is awarded P olic ie s gove rnin g nontraditional credit optio n s a ppl y to credit for prior learning. Contact the office of Adult Learning Services for assistance and furth er information (5568342). Information sess ion s a bout portfolio assessment and o ther nontraditi ona l credi t optio n s at Metro State are h eld on a regular b asis by the office of Adult Learni n g Services. CREDIT FOR MILITARY TRAINING AND OTHER TRAINING PROGRAMS Military trainin g and other training pr og r a ms which h ave been assessed for college credit by the Amer ican Council on Education will be evaluated b y the Office of Admissions and Records for tran sfer credit at Metropolitan State College of Denv er. For formal milit ary training, copies of training certificates and a co p y of the DD -2 1 4 s h o uld be s ubmitt ed to th e Office of Admissions and R ecords. For other traini n g, official ACE transcripts s hould be s ubmitted. Credit l imit i s 30 semeste r h ours Honors and Awards Metropolitan State College of D e n ver annually recognizes s tudent s w h o show ou t sta ndin g leadership and service t o the college and co mmunity, excelle nce in sc holastic achievemen t and outstandi n g per s onal character and integrity Re cog nition of s tud ents includes : The Pr eside nt's Award (o ne senior); the Special Service Award for A ca demic Affairs (o ne senior) and for Student Affairs ( on e se nior); Outst a ndin g Stud e nt Awards (se nior s from eac h sc h oo l); Who's Wh o Among Students in American Univers it ies and Colleges (se niors); American Association of University Women (AAUW) Award (senio r woman ) Other awar d s incl ude Special Service Award for Exceptionall y Challenged Students Associated Students of Metropolitan State College of D enve r Charles W. Fis h er Award, and the Colorado Engineering Council Award Informatio n a nd applications for these awar d s are avai l ab l e in CN 313. Awards are presented at th e annual banqu et the n ig ht b efore gra du atio n In addition to annual awards, s tudent s w ith o ut s tandin g academic achievements are r ecog niz ed b y bein g named on M e tropolitan State College of D enver Honor Lists. The Pr esident's Honor List carries the nam es of s tud e nt s who, at the time of compu tati o n h ave achieve d a c umul ative grade point average of

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42 ACADEM I C INFORMATION 3.85 or higher. The Vice President's Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of com putation, h ave achieved a cum u lative grade point average of between 3 50 and 3.84, inclusively. Computation will occur initially when the student has completed between 30 and 60 hours at Metro State, then again between 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability in their baccalaureate degree while attending Metropolitan State College of Denver. Honors designations are determined according to the following criteria: I. S u mma Cum Laude-Top five percent of graduate with i n each school with cumulative Metro State GPA of no less than 3 65 Magna Cum Laude-Next 5 percent of graduates wit hin each school with cumu l ative Metro Sta t e GPA of no less than 3.65. Cum Laude-Next 5 percent of graduates within each school with cumulative Metro State GPA of no less t h an 3.65. 2 To determine each honors category, grade point averages for the previous spring semester grad uates are arrayed in rank order. Thi rank ordering is then used to determine the honors recipi ents among the following summer, fall, and spring graduates. 3. To qualify for graduation honors recognition, a student must have completed a minimum of 50 semester hours of classroom credit at Metro State prior to the term of graduation. 4 Co u rses comp l eted duri n g the term of graduation and transfer credits are not considered when determining h o n ors Honors designations are added to the student's official academic record; no other notification will be sent. For additional information regard ing graduation h onors, contact the office of Academic Affairs at 556-3907. Diploma s and C omm e nc e m e n t Students who have met all requirements for grad u ation are granted diplomas at the end of the semester for which they are degree candidates. A formal commencement ceremony is held at the conclusion of each semester. C atalog R e quir e ment s for Ba c helor 's De g re e Students must use a single catalog to meet all their degree requirements including those in the general studies, major and minor. All degree programs must adhere to overriding current policies at Metro State All students should refer to the General Studies for Bachelor' s Degree section in this catalog for important information. Students are responsib l e for f ull knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to their pro gram contained in this catalog and elsewhere. The final responsibility for completing the requirements for a degree rests with the students, and it is recommended that they seek advice Students should never assume that they have approval to deviate from a stated requirement without a properly signed state ment to that effect. For degree requirement purposes, students must normally select a Metropolitan State College of Den ver Cata l og in effect w h i l e t h ey are enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver, provided that the catalog contains their complete program of study A tudent interrupting enrollment for any th ree con secutive semesters or more may select only the current catalog i n effect after returning to the institutio n A stude n t transferring from a regionally accredited Colorado community college may comp l ete degree requirements using a Metro State catalog in effect while enrolled at the community college, subject to the following conditions I. The catalog followed doe not predate the current Metro State catalog by more than three years. 2. The catalog selected may have been in use at any time from the time the student was continually enrolled at a regionally accredited Colorado community college to the semester for which the stu de n t is enro l ling.* Continuous enrollment is defined as not interrupting enrollment for three or more consecutive s emes ters (one calendar year). Continuous enrollment mu t be maintained from the period of the designated catalog to the point of Metro State degree comp l etion

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION 4 i Orientation All first-time college st udents, regardle ss of age, and all tran sfe r s tudent s less tha n 2 0 years old are required to attend an orientation sess ion Re-admit s tudents are encouraged to attend an orientation ses sion. Information is provided concerning college requirements, c l ass scheduling regi s tr atio n proce dure s college serv ice s and resources transfer of credit, academic advisi n g, choice of major, and career coun eling Information is also available regarding specia l programs offered by the co llege and its var ious departments. Orientation sess ions are offered to freshmen transfer students adults, reentry wome n and parents of new freshmen. For additional information call 556-4055. Requirements for All Bachelor 's Degrees To earn a bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree, a student must satisfy the following minimum requirement s plus any others s tipulated for the degree for which a s tudent is a candidate. I. Complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher for all Metropolitan State College of Den ver coursework. 2. Complete at least 40 semester hour s in upper divi sion courses (300 and 400 level courses). 3 Complete all general studies requirements lis ted for the degree and major. 4. Complete a three hour multicultural course requirement. 5. Complete a three-hour sen i o r experience course requirement. This course mus t be taken at Metro State. 6 Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 30 se mester hours With certain excep tions (see the Degrees and Programs Available a t Metropo}jtan State College of Denver se ction of this catalog), complete a minor consisting of at least 18 semester hours If a student completes two majors the second major satisfies the minor requirement. Completing two areas of empha sis under one major does not constitute the completion of two majors. Completion of two major s does not result in two degree s or diplomas. Coursework used to meet requirements for one major or minor may not be used to meet requirements for another major or minor Students may not major and minor in the s ame disc ipline and are encouraged to obtain verification from an advi so r if uncertainty exists. 7 Complete all s pecial requirements of a department and sc hool. 8. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all Metro State courses which sa t isfy the requirements for the major and for all Metro State cour s es which sa tisfy requirements for a minor. Students sho uld check with an advisor for s pecial GPA program requirements. 9. Complete a graduation agreement. 10. Academic Residency (classroom credit) requirements: a. Complete a minimum of 30 semester h ou r s of cla ss room credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver including the last 12 semester hour s applicable to the degree b Complete at least eight upper-division (300and 400-level) semester hour s of the major and three upper-division hours of the minor at Metropolitan State College of Denver (c l assroom credit). c. Students s hould be aware that UCD pooled courses and courses taken interinstitutionally or at one of the other state co lle ges will not sati fy academic residence requirements at Metro State d. Complete the senior experience requirement. I I. Credit Limitations : a. Not more than 30 semester hour s of omnibu snumbered co ur ses may be applied toward grad uation requirements. b Not more than 30 semester hour s taken by extension and/or correspondence may be applied toward a bachelor's degree. c. Not more than four semester hours in human performance and lei s ure activity or varsity s ports co ur ses will be counted toward a bachelor' s degree for s tudent s who are not majoring in human performance, sport and leisure studies d Not more than s even semester hours in music ensemb l e courses will be counted toward a bachelor's degree for students who are not majoring in music.

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44 ACADEMIC INFORMATION Requirem e nts for a Second Degr ee Fo r a n addi tio n al b ac h e l o r's d egree, th e st ud e nt will comp l y with t h e follo win g : I. The fir st b ac h e l o r s d egree mus t be r ecognized b y Me trop olitan State College of D e n ver. 2. St u d e nt m u s t co mp l et e all r equi r e m e nt s for a n ew m ajor with a minim u m of e i g ht M e tr o Stat e cl assroom upp er-div i s i o n se m es t er h o ur s in the majo r d e p artment. 3. Stud e nt mus t co mpl e t e a m i n or, if req u i red b y the majo r d e p artme nt for the co n te mp l ated degr ee. 4. T h e s tud e n t mus t s p end a t l eas t t wo additi o n a.l se m es t e r s in r esi d e n ce. 5. A mini m u m o f 30 se m es t er h o ur s of c l ass r oo m c redit a t M etro State i s re qu ired i n addi tio n to the c r edits co mp l e t e d b y th e s tud e nt for th e earlier d egree. 6. G e n eral studie will b e co n sidere d c ompl e t e unl es d efic i e n c i es ex i s t acco rdin g to the m ajor d e p artment. 7. Credit l i mit atio n s for a ba c h e l o r d eg r ee w ill co ntinu e to ex i s t for th e s e co n d degr ee. 8. A gra du a tion agree m e nt mus t b e comple t e d as o utline d in thi ca t alog. C ontrac t Major/Minor Program Eve n w ith the wi d e dive r s it y of th e m ajors and min ors presently offered a t M etro p o l itan St a t e College of D e n ve r the need ari ses f o r a n academic progr am w h ic h i s ind ivid ual i n n a tur e mee t s th e s p ecific n e ed s of the s tud e nt s and is r es p o n s i ve t o e mer ging e du catio n a.l requ ire m e nts. Th e co ntr ac t m a j o r/minor is an o r ganize d degr ee p rog r a m w ritt e n by th e s tud e nt i n co n sult ation with a co ntr act m ajor/ min o r f aculty ad vising co mmi ttee. W o rkin g wit h facu.lty f r o m selected di scipli n es e n a b l es stude n t t o co mpl e t e a s p ecific indi v idu a l e du ca tion a l objective w h i c h canno t b e satisfied b y a n y exis tin g catal og m ajor an d/ o r m i n o r progr ams. T h e d eg r ee so u g h t ma y b e ei th e r a b ac h e l or of arts o r b ac h e l o r of sc i e n ce F o r furth e r information, co nt act t he O ffice of Adul t L earni n g Se r v i ces at 556-8342

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GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION GENERAL STUDIES FOR BACHELOR'S DEGREES Students must use a single catalog t o meet all degree requirements including those in the general stud ies, major, and minor. Some changes in General Studie s requirements have been made retroactive As a consequence, many General Studies requirements and policies described in this catalog may be followed b y stude nt s by students using earlier catalogs. All degree programs must ad her e to overriding current poLicies at Metro State Courses and s pecific prerequisites/corequisite s approved for the current program are described in the Course Description section of this ca t alog. Students s hould consult an advisor in the Academic Asse ss ment and Support Center when planning their programs PmLOSOPHY OF THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM Metropolitan State College of Denver seeks to prepare it s graduates for a lifetime of learning which in our changing and complex soc iety, requires focused expertise (s uch as that provided by a major area of s tudy ) and the abilities to comm un icate with, as well as to learn from, experts in o ther fields. At Met ropolitan State College of Denver, und ergraduate ed u cation fosters the critical thinking necessary for the exploration of unfamiliar disciplines and for the syn thesis of learning, and exposes students to the richness and variety of the intellectual universe Through it s General Studies Program Metropolitan State College of Denver encourages students to u se their mastery of skills in an exploration of knowledge in a variety of disciplines The General Studie s Pro gram provides two level s of experience, each with separate goa ls: Leve l 1-Skill s Levell courses provide students the basic skills of reading and lis tening critically, recognizing faulty reasoning drawing concl u sio n s from quantitative data, organizing ideas, and communicating c learly. Level D-Breadth of Knowl e dge Level 11 courses provide the breadth characteristic of the educated person, encourage an open atti tude t oward different approaches to problems and cultivate an informed awareness of the principal achievements in his tory, art s and letters social science, and science. DISTRIBUTION AND CREDIT REQUIREMENTS To complete their General Studies Program s tud ents must take approved courses that fulfill the fol lowing distribution and credit requirements: Category Semester Hours Level I' Composition ...... ......... ........................................ 6 Mathematics ....................................................... 3 Communications ...................... .............................. 3 Leve l 0 2 Historical ........................................ ............... 3 Arts and Letters ..................................... .... ........... 6 Social Science s ................................. ................... 6 Natural Science s ................................ ....... ........... _Q Total Hours Required 3 ............................................ 33 A transfer co urs e or co urses of at least two semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and con tent t o a Levell co ur se will satisfy an individual Levell co ur se requirem e nt Equivalency will be determined b y the department offering the Levell course. 20ne hour deviations in the Gen e ral Studies Levell/ categories may be allowed. 3A s tud e nt's completed General Studies program must con tain at least 33 semester hours. BASIC RULES I Only approved courses may be u ed to satisfy the general studies requirements. A current listing of these courses is published in this section, in a General Studies Multicultural, and Senior Expe rience Requirements pamphlet, and in the Course Description section of this catalog. 2. General studies courses need not be counted toward general studies requirements They may be taken instead as electives or to satisfy requirements in the major or degree program. 3. Departments or programs whose curricula are guided by accrediting agencies may specify, b y prefix and number, some general st udies cour es in addition to co ur ses required for the major or a professional credential. 4 Courses tak en using the pass-fail option cannot be counted for General Studies.

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46 GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION t LEVEL I REQUIREMENTS: COMPOSITION, MATHEMATICS, AND COMMUNICATION; FRESHMAN ASSESSMENT: READING, WRITING, AND MATHEMATICS PLACEMENT EXAMS First time college stude nt s are required to co mplet e the reading, writing and mathematics pla ceme nt exams (see A ssessmen t Requirement s section). Exam results will serve as the ba s i s for academic advis ing To increa se the student's opportunity for s ucc ess at Metropolitan State College of D e nver, students may be required to take courses below the level of first-year co ur ses offered b y Metropolitan Stat e Col lege of Denver. Students s hould be aware, however, that no credit is give n for courses that are below the college l evel. Placement Test Prerequisites Students must have a pa ss ing score on the appropriate placement te s t before they will be allowed to reg ister for Level I General Studies co ur ses in English, mathematics, and reading Exceptions will be made for stude nt s who have earned at l east a g rade of "C" in the co mmun ity co llege co ur se specified by the department. The Academic A ssess ment and Support Center administers the placement te ts. Students sho uld consult an advisor in the Academic Assessment and S upport Center for guidance in se l ecting the appropriate Level I courses. Composition: Required Courses Semester Hours ENG 101 Fre s hman Compo s ition : The Essay ...... ...................... 3 ENG 102 Freshman Composition: Re sear ch Analysis and Documentation ...... 3 Rules: Composition Requirement I. Students mus t complete the ENG 101 requirement within their first 3 0 se me ste r hours at Metro politan State College of Denver and the ENG 102 requirement within their first 60 semester hours. The se requirements m ay be po s tponed only if the postponement i s approved in writing by the Department of English. 2. Studen ts must demonstrate the adequacy of their writing skill in the placement exam before enrolling in ENG 101. Those students who se writing ski lls are inadequate will be counse l ed on steps to improve tho se skills. Students may be required to complete additional coursework 3 Student s s hall have satisfie d the Level I Composition requirem e nt s if they a satisfactorily complete ENG 101 and ENG 102, or b. pas s a CLEP or AP examination a pproved by the Departm ent of English (EN G 101 only), or c. tran sfe r equivalent cour es. Mathematics: (Minimum 3 semester hours*) Semester Hours MTH 108 Mathematical Mode s of Thought. .... .............. .............. 3 MTH 111 College Algebra .......... .................................... 4 MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics ............................ ...... ...... 4 MTH 131 Finite Mathematic s for the Managem e nt and Social Sciences ........... 4 MTH 161 Mathem atical Concept s for Teac her s in Pre seco ndary Schools .......... 4 *A transfer course o r co ur ses of at l eas t two se m es ter hours judged to be simila r in s kill development and con tent to a Levell co urse will sa tisfy an individual Levell course requirement Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Level l course Rules: Mathematics Requirement I. Student s will take the mathematic s placement exam to determine their abilities to calculate with fractions, decimals, and percents and to know and use elementary geometrical formulas Those whose skills are inadequate will be required to co mplete college arithmetic co u rsework before enrolling in a Level I mathemati cs co ur se Some courses have additional requirements 2. Students must comp let e the Level I mathematic s requirement within their first 30 se me s ter hours at Metropolitan State College of Denver Thi s require m ent ma y be po s tponed on an individual basis if the postponement i s approved in writing by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. 3. Students shall have satisfied the Level I mathematics requirement if they a. p ass a mathematics course that has been approved for Level I mathematics credit (see courses lis ted above), or b pass a CLEP or AP exam approved b y the Department of Mathematical Science s, or c successf ull y comp l ete a mathematics course for which a Level I mathemati cs course is a pre requisite, or d. tran s fer an equivale nt course

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GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION Communication: (Minimum 3 semester hours*) Semester Hours FRE I 02 Elementary Frenc h II .................. ..................... 5 GER 102 Elementary German II ....................................... 5 HON 295 The Art of Critical Thinking .................... ....... . ... 3 PHI Ill Language, Logic, and Per s uasion .............. ................ 3 RDG 151 Cognitive Strategies for Analytica l R eading .. ............... ... 3 SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II ....................................... 5 SPE 10 I Fundamentals of Speech Communication ............. . .... ... 3 SPE 171 Interpersonal Communi cations : Individual as a Communicator ..... ... 3 A transfer cour se o r co ur ses o f at leas t two se m es t e r hour s judge d t o b e similar in skill dev e l o pment and content t o a Levell cour se will s atisfy an individual Levell co ur s e r e quirement Equival e n cy will b e d e ter min e d b y the d e partm e nt o fferin g the Levell co urse. Rules: Communication Requirement I Students mu st complete the r eq uir ed Level I communication co ur se within their first 30 semes ter hours at Metropolitan State College of Denver 2. Students shall h a ve sati s fied the Level I communi cation requirement if they a. pass an approved Level I communication co ur se (listed above), or b pa s s a CLEP or AP test approved by a department offerin g a Level I communication course or c transfer an equivale nt co ur se. d transfer a second seme s ter four-or five-semester hour foreign language course or a more advanced language course that is taught in a l a nguage not offered at Metro State. e. pa s s or tran s fer an advanced foreig n language course th at is taught in the foreign language and that h a s Metro State's FRE 102 GER 102 and SPA 102 or equivalent cou r s ework, or more advanced cou r s ework a s a prerequi s ite. f. pass or tran s fer an adva n ced public speaking course for whic h Metro State s SPE 101 or a comparable course i s a prerequisite Student s who h a ve satis fied the communication requirement using ( e ) or ( f) above must place the course used to sa tisfy ( e) or (f) in the Level I communi c a tions req uir ement s lot. Leve l II G eneral Stud ies courses u s ed to sati sfy the Level I commun ications requirement s cannot als o be counted in the Leve l II category Level II Requirements Cour s es approved to s atisfy the Level Il requirement are distributed among four categories The cate gorie s together with the minimum number of semester hours a student mu s t accumulate to satisfy this requirement are given below On hour deviation s in the General Studies Level II ca t egories may be allowed provided the s tudent's comp l eted Gener a l Studie s program contai n s at lea s t 33 s emester hour s Level II Categories: Semester Hours Historical ............................................................. 3 Arts and Letters ............. ....... ............... ........... ....... 6 Social Science ..... ... .............. .................... ........... 6 Natural Science ......................................... ............. 6 Rules: Level II Requirement I. Prerequisites: Level II gene r al studies cour ses have at least th e following pre -or co requi si te s, and s ome cours es have additional prerequisite s ( see course description s in this catalog ) a His torical and Art s and Letters : (I) Course s numbered 100 to 199: Minimum performance s tandard s c ore s on the reading and writing preasses s ment placement te t s; (2) Cour s e s numbered 200 to 299 : Sati s faction of the Level I Mathematics cours e requirement and either ENG I 0 I or the Level I communication cours e requirement (3) Cour se s numbered 300 and above : Satisfaction of all Level I General Studies cours e req uir eme nt s

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48 GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION b Natural Science and Social Science (I) Cour ses numbered I 00 to 199: Minimum performance standard sc ore s on the reading, writing and mathem atics pre assess ment placement tests (2) Courses numbered 200 to 299: Satisfaction of the Level I mathematics co u rse req uirement and either ENG 101 or the Level I comm uni cation course requirements. (3) Courses numbered 300 and above: Satisfaction of all Level I General Studie course requirements. 2. Students may not u se courses hav ing the same prefix as their major discip line to satisfy the Level II requirement. 3. Students may not apply more than eight semester hours of credit with the same course prefix to the Level fl requirements. 4. Students may use either prefix for a cross-listed course, i.e. one designated XXX -IYYY -. They must se l ect the prefix they wish to u e at registration; the selection may not be changed later. 5. Hi s tory majors must take three extra emester hours at Level II in the Social Sciences, Arts and Letters, or Natural Science categories in l ieu of the three hour s in the Historical ca tegory HISTORICAL COURSES (Minimum 3 semester hours*) Historica l courses aim to impart a broad knowledge of history with emphasis upon the major forces, persons, and events that have s h aped the modem world The following courses may be u sed to satisfy the General Studies Historical requirement. Other courses may have been approved for such u se after the publicat ion of this catalog. For more recent information contact the Academic Assessment and Support Center. *A one hour deviation in the General Studi es Hist orical r eq uirement ma y b e allowed, provided the student's com pl e ted General Studi es program co ntain s at least 33 semester hours AAS 113/HIS 194mc AAS 213/HIS 295mc CHS 101/HlS 19lmc FRE 355 HlS 100 HIS 101 HIS 102 HIS Ill HIS 121 HIS 122 HIS 165/WMS 165 HIS 191/CHS lOimc HIS 193/NAS 193mc HIS 194/AAS 113mc HIS 201 HIS 295/AAS 213mc HIS 303 HIS 306 HIS 309mc HIS 312 HIS 314 HIS 331 HIS 332 HIS 381 HON 385 HON 386 AS 193/HIS 193mc WMS 165/HIS 165 Semester Hours Survey of African History ......................... 3 West African Civilizations ......................... 3 History of Meso-America : Pre -Co lumbian and Colonial Periods ................. 3 French Historical Per spectives .................. .... 3 American Civilization ............................. 3 Western Civilization to 1715 ....................... 3 We tern Civilization since 1715 ..................... 3 Colorado His tory I ............................... 3 American Hi tory to 1865 ....... .... ........ ... 3 American History since 1865 ... .... .... .... ....... 3 Women in U.S. History ............ .............. 3 His tory of Meso-America : Pre-Co lumb ian a nd Colonial Periods ................. 3 History of Indige n ous/Hispanic Americans ............ 3 Survey of African History ............... ...... 3 Contemporary World History ..... ............. ..... 3 West African Civilizations ......................... 3 Ancient Orient and Greece ..................... .... 3 Rome and the Caesar s ............................. 3 Native Americans in American His tory ............... 3 Medieval History ............................ 3 Renais ance and Reform ation ....................... 3 England to 1714 ................................. 3 England since 171 4 ............................... 3 Latin America : Republic s ...................... .... 3 American Culture I .............................. 3 American Culture I1 .............................. 3 History of Indigenous/Hi s panic Americans ............ 3 Women in U.S. History ........................... 3 me-Thi s course will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.

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GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION ARTS AND LETTERS COURSES (Minimum 6 semester hours*) Art s and Letter s c our ses impart a broad knowledge of important works and major sc hool s of thou g ht from at lea t two ce nturi es. They al o provide a foundation for critical evaluation within the discipline. The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studie s Art s and Letters requirement Other courses may h ave been approved for s uch u se after the publication of this catalog. For more recent infor mation contac t the Academic Asse ss ment and Support Center. A one hour deviation in the Gen e r al Studi es Arts and Letters r eq uir e m e nt may be allowed provided the stu dent's co mpleted General Studies program contains at least 33 semes t e r hours. AAS 324/E G 324mc ART 104 ART 309mc ART 395/WMS 395 ENG 110 ENG Ill ENG 112 ENG 131 ENG 303 ENG 324/AAS 324mc ENG 342 ENG 343 ENG 346 FRE311 FRE 3 1 2 GER 320 HON 275 HON 276 MUS 100 MUS 304 PHI 1 0 1 PHI 103 PHI300 PHI 302 PHI 336 PSC 305 RDG 306 SPA 320 SPA 321 SPA 322 SPE 221 SPE 277/WMS 277 SPE 308 SPE 374 SPE 376mc WMS 277/SPE 277 WMS 351 WMS 395/ART 395 Semester Hours Afri can American Literature .................... ... 3 Art Appreciation Survey ..... ...................... 3 Art and Cultural Heritage ................ ......... 3 Women s Art/Women's Iss ues ...................... 3 Introduction t o Literature ................... ...... 3 Introduction to Fiction ............................ 3 Introduction to Dram a .......................... 3 Introduction to Shakespeare .............. ......... 3 Semantics ... .................. ................ 3 Afri can American Literature ..... ................. 3 Engli s h Bible as Literature ........... ............. 3 Cla s ical Mythology ........ ...................... 3 Children's Literature .............................. 3 Survey of French Literature I ....................... 3 Survey of French Literature II ...................... 3 German Culture and Civilization ..... ............... 3 Legacy of Arts and : Letters I. ...................... 3 Legacy of Art s and Letter s II ....................... 3 Introduction to Music ............................. 3 Mu sic and the Arts .............. ................ 3 Introduction to Philosophy ......................... 3 Ethic s .......................................... 3 His tory of Greek Philo so phy ..... ................. 3 His tory of Modem Philo so ph y ...................... 3 Bu s iness Eth ic s .................................. 3 Political Theory ...................... .' ........... 3 Critical Readingffhinking ......................... 3 Culture and Civilization of Spain .................... 3 Spanish-American Culture & Civilization ............. 3 Folklore & Culture of the Mexican Southwest ......... 3 Introduction to Theatre .......................... 3 Gender and Communication .......... ............ 3 Great American Speaker s .......................... 3 Psychology of Communication .......... ............ 3 Cultural Influenc es o n Communication .................. 3 Gender and Communication .................. ......... 3 Feminist Theory ......................... ........ 3 Women's Art/Women's I ssues ......................... 3 me -This course will also satisfy the Multi cu ltural requirement.

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50 GENERAL STUDIES INFORMA T ION SOCIAL SCIENCE COURSES (Minimum 6 se mester hours*) Social Science co u r ses aim to explore the formation behav i or and interaction of various social, cul tura l poli t ical, or economic groups and institutions. The following course may b e u sed to satisfy the General Studie s Social S c ience requirement. Other cou rses may have been approved for s uch use after the publication of this cata log For more recent infor mation contact the Academic Asse smen t and Support Center. *A one hour deviation in the Gen e ral Studies So cial Science requir ement may be allowed, pro v id e d the stud e nt 's co mpl ete d G ene ral Studi es pro g ram contains at l e ast 33 semester hours AAS IOimc AAS 220/PSC 220mc AAS 330/SOC 314mc AAS 355/SOC 344 ACC 101 ANT 131 ANT233 ANT 331 ANT 348 CHS 100mc CHS 310/SOC 313mc ECO 201 ECO 202 EDU 264mc EDS 320 FRE 356 GEG 100 GEG 130 GEG202 HES 105 HIS 366 HMT 1 85mc Se mester Hours Introduction to African American Studies .......... 3 Politi cs and B l ack People ...................... 3 The Black Community ............... ......... 3 The Black Fami l y ...... ....................... 3 Accounting for Non-Business Major ............. 3 Introdu ctio n to Cultur al Anthropology ............. 3 Cross-Cultura l Communication .................. 3 Ethnography of North American Indian s ... ........ 3 Cultural Diversity in Health and lllne ss ............ 3 Introduction to Chicano Studies .................. 3 The Chicano Community ....................... 3 Principle s of Economics-Macro ........ ....... 3 Principle s of Economics-Micro ................. 3 Urban and Multicultural Education ............... 3 Educational Psycholo gy Applied to Teaching ....... 3 Contemporary Socio -Cultu ral Issue s .............. 3 World Regiona l Geography ................... 3 Introduction to Human Geograp h y ...... .... ..... 3 Geography of Colorado ......................... 3 Dynamic s of Health .. ......................... 3 Rece nt U.S .. 1945-1970' s ...................... 3 MulticulturaUMultinational Cultural Adjustment/Readjustment ...... ............... 3 HON 380 Revolutions and Social Change I ................. 3 HON 38 I R evo l utions a nd Social Change II ....... ........ 3 HPS 272 Fundamentals of Coaching ...................... 2 HSP 349mc Multicultural Iss u es in Human Service s ........... 4 ITS 281 Technology, Society, and You ................... 3 LES 473 Sociology of Athleti cs in American Society ........ 3 NAS 100mc Introdu ctio n to Native American Studie s ........... 3 NAS 320/PSC 320mc Native American Politi cs .... ................... 3 PSC 101 American Natio nal Government. ........... ..... 3 PSC 1 02 Po l itical Syste m s and Ide as ...................... 3 PSC 220/AAS 220mc Politics and B l ack People ................. ...... 3 PSC 320/NAS 320mc Native American Politi c ....................... 3 ...... PSY 101 Introductory Psychology ........................ 3 PSY 216 Per so nality and Adju stme nt .............. ....... 3 PSY 221 P syc hology of Human De ve lopment .............. 3 PSY 325 Child P syc ho l ogy ............................. 3 PSY 326 Psychology of Adole sce nce ..................... 3 SOC 101 introduction to Sociology ................ ....... 3 SOC 1 04mc Introduction to Social Gerontology ............... 3 SOC 201 Current Social Issue s ........................... 3 SOC 313/CHS 310mc The Chicano Community .. ... ................ 3 SOC 314/AAS 330mc The Black Community ..... .......... ........ 3 SOC 322/WMS 322mc Race Sex, and Ethnic Groups ....... .... ........ 3 SOC 344/AAS 355 The Bla ck Family .................. ........... 3 WMS 101 Introdu ctio n : Woman in Transition ............... 3 WMS 322/SOC 322mc Race Sex and Et h nic Groups ................... 3 WMS 346mc Women and the Social Sciences (Variable Title) ..... 3 me -This course w ill also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.

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GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION 5 NATURAL SCIENCE COURSES (Minimum 6 semester hours*) Natural Science course s provide an opportunity for students to experience the systematic formulation and testing of hypotheses and to learn the importance of acc urate observation and measurement. Stu dents will differentiate among fact, spec ulation ev iden ce, inference, belief, the ory, law and general ization The following co u rses m ay be u se d to satisfy the General Studi es Natural S cie nc e requirement. Oth e r co ur ses may have been approved for s uch u se after the publi ca tion of this ca talo g For m ore recent infor mation contact the Academic As sess ment and Support Center. A o n e h o ur d eviation in the General Studies Natural Sci e n ce requirement m ay b e allowed, provided the stu dent 's comple t ed G ene ral Studies program co nt ains at least 33 semester hours. ANT 101 AST 104 AST 304 BIO 100 BIO 101 BIO 108 BIO 330 BIO 355 CHE 101 CHE 110 CHE 180 & CHE 185* CHE 181 & CHE 185* CHE 310 CHE 312 GEG 110 GEG 120 GEG 140 GEL 101 GEL 102 GEL 115 HES 2 04 HES 345 HON280 HON281 HPS 330 HPS 334 MET 355 MTR 140 MTR 350 PHY 100 PHY 1 2 5 PHY 20 I & PHY 20:3 PHY 202 & PHY 204 PHY 231 & PHY 232 PHY 233 & PHY 234 PHY 362 SCI 280 Semester Hours Physical Anthropo l ogy and Prehi s tory ............. 3 Introducti o n t o Astronomy ........ .............. 3 Modern Co s mology ............................ 3 Human Biology for Non-Majors .................. 3 Ecology for Non Major s ..... ......... ..... .... 3 General Introduction to Biology .................. 4 Advanced Human Biolo gy for Non-Majors ......... 3 Urban Ecology ............................... 4 Chemi s try and Society ......................... 3 Principle s of Chemi stry ......... .......... .... 5 General Chemistry I ......... ............ ...... 6 General Chemistry I .. ......................... 6 Organi c Chemi stry I ........................ 4 Organic Chemi s try I Laboratory .................. 2 Introduction to Phy sica l Geogra ph y ........... .... 3 Introduction to Environmental S ciences ............ 3 World Re so urce s .............................. 3 G e neral Ge o logy .............................. 4 Geology of Colorado ................... ...... 3 Oc e anography ................................ 3 Introduction to Nutrition ................... .... 3 Dynamics of Disease ........................ 3 His tory of Science ............................. 3 Development of Experimental S c ience .... ....... 3 Anatomic a l Kine s iolog y ........................ 3 Physiology of Exercise ......................... 3 Rocket and Star s A Space Trek ............... 3 Introduction to Meteorol ogy ....... ....... .... 3 Hazardou s Weather. ........................... 3 Introdu c tion to Phy sics ......................... 4 Physi cs of Technology ......................... 6 College Phy s ic s I and Laboratory ................. 5 College Physic s II and Laboratory ................ 5 General Ph ys ic s I and Lab o r at ory ......... ....... 5 General Phy s ic s II and Laboratory ................ 5 Sound and Musi c ............................. 3 Conceptual Science and Mathematic s ............. 6 *Co mpl e ti o n of both CHE 1 80 and CHE 1 85 w ith passing grades is r eq uir ed to re ceive General Studies c redit The same is tru e of the co mbination CHE 1 8 1 & 1 85.

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52 GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION Additional Graduation Requirements MULTICULTURAL AND SEN10R EXPERIENCE COURSE REQUIREMENTS In addition to co mpleting the General Studies requirements, a student must comp l ete a three-hour mul ticultura l course and a three-hour Senior Experience course or selection of co u rses to be awarded a bache lor's degree from Metropolitan State College of Denver. The rules pertaining to those require ments and the courses that will satisfy those requirement s are de scribed below MULTICULTURAL COURSE REQUIREMENT (Minimum 3 semester hours) Multic ultu ral courses are designed to increase s tudents' ap preciation and awareness of diver se cultures Students may use the course to satisfy General Studies, major or minor requirements if the course is approve d for that use If the co ur se is used fo r General Studies, the Level II General Studies restrictions remai n in effect e.g no courses with the m ajor prefix may be u sed The multi cultural requireme nt became effective for stude nt s en terin g fall 1992 and after. AAS 101 AAS 113/HIS 194 AAS 213/HIS 295 AAS 220/PSC 220 AAS 324/ENG 324 AAS 330/SOC 314 A RT 309 CHS 100 CHS 101/HIS 191 CHS 310/SOC 313 EDU 264 ENG 324/ AAS 324 HIS 191/CHS 101 HIS 193/NAS 193 HIS 1 94/AAS 113 HIS 295/ AAS 213 HIS 309 HMT 185 Seme ster Hours Introduction to African American Studies ....... ... 3 S u rvey of African History ....................... 3 We t African Civili zations ........... ......... 3 Politi cs and Black P eople ................ ... .... 3 African American Literature ..................... 3 The Black Community ......................... 3 Art and Cultura l Herita ge ....................... 3 Introduction to C h icano Studies .................. 3 History of Meso-America : Pre-Columbia n and Colonia l P eriods .............. 3 The Chicano Community ....................... 3 Urban and M ulti cultural Education ............... 3 African Ame rican Liter ature ..................... 3 History of Meso-America : Pre-Columbian and Colonial Period s ..... ........ 3 History of Ind i genous/Hispanic Americans ......... 3 Sur vey of African History ... ................... 3 West African Civilizatio n s ...................... 3 Native America n s in American Hi story ............ 3 Multicultural/M ultin ational Cu ltu ral Adjustment/Readjustment. ............... ....... 3 HSP 349 Multicultural Issues in Human Services ........... 4 MGT 483 Workforce Diver sity ........................... 3 NAS 100 Introd u ction to Native American Studies .... ..... 3 NAS 193/HIS 193 His tory of Indigenous/Hispanic Americans ......... 3 NAS 320/PSC 320 Native American Politi cs ...................... 3 PSC 220/AAS 220 Politics and Black People .................. .... 3 PSC 320/NAS 320 Native American Politi cs ....................... 3 SOC I 04 Introduction to Social Geronto l ogy ............... 3 SOC 313/CHS 310 The Chicano Community ............. ......... 3 SOC 314/AAS 330 The Bla ck Community ......................... 3 SOC 322/WMS 322 R ace, Sex, and Ethnic Groups ................... 3 SPE 376 Cultural Influences on Communication ... ....... 3 WMS 322/S OC 322 Ra ce, Sex, and Ethnic Groups ................... 3 WMS 346 Women and the Soc ial Sciences (Variable Title) ..... 3 XXX* 119 First Year Seminar ........ ................... 3 Variab l e cou rse p r efixes, e.g ENG PSC, RDG, SOC SPE

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GENERAL STUDIES INFORMATION SENIOR EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT (Minimum 3 semester hours) The Senior Experience provides a culmination of the undergraduate experience, allowing students to synthesize their learning using critica l analysis and logical thinking. Students may use the course to sat isfy major or minor requirement s if the course i s approved for that use Student s should consult with their advisor a nd check prerequisites. Students must complete a Senior Experie n ce at the end of the undergraduate program and must take the cour e or course at Metro State Senior Experience course have the following minimal prerequi s ites: satisfac tion of all Level I and Level 11 General Studies course requirement s and se nior standing. In some cases student may need to take two courses to satisfy the requirement. ART401 ART475 BIO 451 BIO 454 BIO 485 CEN 460 CHE495 CJC 465 COM44l COM 479 CSI42l ECO 460 EDS 429 EDU 419 EDU 438 EDU 439 EDU 469 EET410 EET411 ENG452 ENG 461 ENG 464 ENG 466 FRE452 FRE453 GEG 496 GEL 496 GER4ll GER412 HCM451 HIS 482 HMT404 HMT440 HSP 479 MET40l MET407 MGT483mc MGT495 MTH 421 MTH 422 MTH441 MTH 448 MUS4ll MUS 434 Semester Hours Modem Art History: Theory & Criticism ........... 3 Senior Experience Studio : Portfoli o Development and The sis Show ................... 3 Microbial Ecology ............................. 3 Plant Ecology ................................ 4 Evolution .................................... 3 Senior Seminar ............................... 3 Senior Experience in Chemi s try ................. 3 Ethics for the Criminal Justice Profes s ional ..... .... 3 Budgeting & Pla nning for Audio -Visual Production s 3 Senior Seminar in T echnical Communication s ...... 3 Software Development & Engineering ............. 4 His tory of Economic Thought ................... 3 Student Teaching & Seminar: Secondary ... 6, 8, 10, 1 2 Student Teachin g & Seminar: E l ementary .. 6 8, 10, 12 Teaching Practicum in Pre primary Early Childhood Education ......................... 3-6 Student Teaching & Seminar Early Chi ldh ood ( Preschool through 3rd grade) ............. 6, 8 I 0 Profe ss ional Practicum ............. ... ...... 1-6 Senior Project I ............................... I Senior Project II .............................. 2 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction Poetry or Drama ............................. 3 Theories & Techniques in Literary Criticism ........ 3 Teaching English in Secondary School s ..... .... 3 Teaching Literature and Language K-6 ............ 3 Modem French Theater ...................... ... 3 The French Novel ............................. 3 Global Environmental Ch a llenges ................ 3 Environmental Field Studie s ..................... 3 The German Novel of the 19th and Ear l y 20th Centuries ......................... 3 German Drama of the 19th & 20th Centuries ....... 3 Health Care Management Practicum ... .......... 6 Senior Seminar .......... . ................ 3 Senior Hospitality Re search Experience I .... .... 2 Senior Ho s pitality Re searc h Experience II .......... 2 Profe ss ional Intern s hip ........................ 12 Advanced Manufacturing Techno l ogy ............. 3 Computer Aided De ign .............. ..... . 3 Workforce Diversity ........ ................ 3 Strategic Management .......... ................ 3 Probability Theory ................... ....... 4 Stochastic Proce sses ................... ........ 4 Advanced Calculus I ............... ....... ..... 4 Numerical Analy s i s I .......................... 4 Analysis of Music .... ......................... 2 Secondary School Music Methods and ............. 2

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54 GENERAL STUDIES INFORMAT I ON MUS 439 MUS 451 MUS 474 MUS 479 MUS 495 NUR485 PHI 410 PHY 462 PHY 472 PHY 49 2 PSC 402 PSY 451 soc 460 SPA 4 20 SPA 431 S PE409 SPE 412 S PE449 WMS 475 Superv i se d Fie l d Experi ence ............ .... ..... I ill s trumentruCond u cting ........................ 2 P e rforman ce VITI ............................. 4 Senior Re c ita l ................................ 1 Senior Proje c t .............. ........ .......... 3 Nursing Process: Application .................... 5 S e nior Seminar .......................... ... 3 Computational Phy s ic s ll ....................... 2 Ad va nced Phy sics Laboratory ll .................. 2 Phy sics Senior Seminar ....... .......... ........ 1 Speciru Studies ............................... 3 Hi s tory and Sy t erns of P ycho l ogy ........ ....... 3 Advanced R esearch in the Social Sciences ......... 3 Spani s h American Essay : 19th & 20th Centuries ..... 3 His tory of the Spani s h Lan g uage ................. 3 Cla s ical Rhetoric ............................. 3 Freedom of S p eech .................... ..... 3 Effects of Radio Televi sio n o n Co n temporary L i fe ... 3 Senior Seminar ............................ ... 3 m e -This co ur se wi ll also sa t isfy the Mult ic ultur a l r eq uir e m e nt

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DEGREES AND PROGRAMS Degree s and Program s Available at Metropolitan State College of Denver M etropo lit an Stat e C ollege o f D e nver i s orga ni zed int o thr ee schoo ls. These a r e lis t ed be l ow w i th the majors and minors offered b y eac h Th e cuniculum r e quir e m e nts f o r eac h o f the pr ograms are d escribe d i n the cata l og u n d e r s pec i a l sect i o n s pre pared by eac h sc h ool. Programs marke d with an as t erisk (*)do not r eq uir e compl etio n of a minor. Bach e lors D eg r e e S CHOOL O F B USINESS Acco unting ..... Co mputer ln formatio n Sys t ems Major Mino r ..... X .... X an d M anageme nt S cience ............... x Eco n omics (Bu siness E mph as i s ) ........ x .. x Finance ......... ...... X .... X Gen era l Bu s ine ss . ... X [ nformatio n Sys t ems. ... X M anage m e n t . . . . x .. x M ar k e ting* . x . x R eal Estate .. .. .. ...... X **Th e D e p a rtm ent o f Eco n omics o ff ers a bach e l o r of arts degree, ra th e r than a bac h e l o r of sc i e n ce d egree S C HOOL O F PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Divis i o n of Ed u ca ti on Bi ling u a l/Bi c ultur a l Edu ca t io n ................... x Ear l y C hildh ood Edu cation ... ...... ......... x P are nt Educatio n . ... x R eadi n g. x S pec ial Edu cation/Gif t ed Education ... x Teac h er L i censing : Ear l y Ch ildh ood, E l e m entary, and Twelve Seco n dary Fie l ds Di vis ion o f Techno lo gy Airframe and P ower Plant Mec h a n ics X Aviatio n M a n agement . .. x x A v i atio n T echno l ogy . . . ... x C ivil E n gineering Tec hnol ogy . ...... x .... x Dr afti n g E ngin eeri n g T e chno l ogy . .. ... x E l ectro n ics E n ginee rin g Tec hn o l ogy ... x .. x Indu stria l D es ign ....... lndu strial and T echnical Stu dies ... M ec h anica l E n gineering T ec hnol ogy .. Privat e Pilo t ....... P rofessio n a l P i l o t ........ Surveyin g and M a ppin g ... X .. X .... X .. X .. X X X .. X T echnica l C o mmun icatio n s . .. x T ech n ical and Ind u s trial Administratio n .... x .. X X Di vis ion o f Publi c Se r vice Profess io ns C rim i nal Ju s t ice and C rimin ology .......... x .. x H ealth and S afety . . . . . x H ea lth Car e Man age m ent (upper-di v ision ) ..... x .... x H oli stic H ealth and W ell nes s ( m ulti mino r ) .... x H os pitality, M ee tin g an d Trave l A dmin is tr at i o n H ote l A d min i stratio n ... Human P e rf orma n ce and Sport H uman Services ........ Leis ur e Stud ies .... X .. X ... X .. X X .... X ..x .. x M eetin g Admi ni s tr at i o n ................. X urs in g ( u pperd iv i sio n for R N.'s ) x R es t a ur ant A d min i stratio n ........... ........ x T ravel A dministra tion ........... X Institute f o r Ger o n to l ogy Ge r o nt o l og i ca l S erv i ces .. ... ....... X B ac h e lors D eg r ee Maj o r Minor S CH OOL OF L ETTERS, A R TS A D S CIENCES Divisio n o f Humanit ies Art** .. E n glis h F r e n c h German. X .... X X ... X .X X Indu strial D esign . . . . . x J o urn a l i s m . .................. x .... x Language and Lin guistics . . . . x M odem Foreig n Languages ........... x Mus i c M u sic Edu cation .... Mus i c P erforma nce .. Philosophy P ractica l Writin g ... ....... Pub l i c R e l a t i o n s .. Spanis h .. ..... X X .... X ... X ... X ... X .. ... X X .. X Speec h Co mm unication s . x X Art offers a b ache l o r of fine art s degree. D ivis i on o f Scie n ce a n d Mathematics Bio logy.. ................... x .X .x C h emistry .. Com put e r Scie n ce ..... Crimi nali stics G eography Geo l ogy .x .. X ... X X ... X .. X La n d U s e .... .. .,,,, X M athematics ....... x x M e t eo r o l ogy ........................ x x Physics . . . . . .. x .... x Th eo r e t ical Ph ysics Div i sion o f Socia l Scie n ces A nthr opo l ogy . ......... .......... X ......... X .... X B e h aviora l Sc i e n ce ... H is t ory ................ I nt e r d i sc i plinary Legal S tudi es. Political Sc i e nce .. P syc h o l ogy Public A dm i ni stra t ion ............ Social W ork ... S oc i o logy. .X X .... X .X X .... X . X X X X .X .X Urban Stud i es . . ... x ... x Urban S tud i es off ers a bach e l o r of arts d egree and a bac h e l or o f sc i e n ce deg ree. I nstitute f o r Inte r cultural Studi es and Se r vic es Africa n A m e r i ca n S tudies ................ x .. x C h ica n o Studies ................ . x ... x I ns titute f o r Wo m e n's Studies and Services W o m e n's S tudies ................ .... X

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56 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS The philo so phy of the S c h oo l of Busin es is to devote its resources to hig h-qu a lit y undergraduate pro g rams. The cuniculum of this schoo l is designed to provide the s tudent w ith a background of general e ducation familiarity with b as ic principl es of busine s, and specialized knowledge in a selected field of business. The school offers the bachelor of science degree while the Department of Eco n omics offers a ba c helor of arts degree. Undergraduate program s withi n the Schoo l of Bu siness are designed: I. To offe r th e s tudent the o pportunit y to receive t h e b accala ur eate degree This degree program con sists of a broad foundatio n in general educatio n a thorough gro undin g in basic bus ine ss co ur ses, a nd specific compe ten ce in o n e or more significan t functional areas of bus in ess. 2. T o offer a diverse undergraduate program to meet the interests of those r esiden t s of the metro polit a n area, and others, who desire to s tud y busin ess-orie nted s ubje c t s without undertakin g a degree program, and to meet the needs of the Denver busines s and professional comm unit y for co ntinuin g education programs 3. To strengthen students' powers of ima ginative and innovative thinking se lf-r eliance, creative independent analy s is and sensitiv ity to soc ial and ethical values. 4. To instill in s tudent s a de s ire for learning that will continue after they have graduated and taken their places in the comm unity. 5 To convey to each s tud ent the spiri t of pioneering ris k and progress that i s essential to the con tinued development of the United States economic sys tem Admissions Requirements Admi ss ion into the School of Busin ess will be granted to those st udent s who have achieved an overall GPA of 2.25; this 2.25 GPA must be maintained whi l e a stude nt i s enrolled in a major area of study within the Schoo l of Business. lf a st udent's overall GPA falls below a 2.25, the st ud ent will be placed on aca dem ic probation and have one se mester to raise the overall GPA to 2.25. Statu s will be cha n ged to undeclar ed major if the s tudent's GPA is not raised to 2.25 or better. Acceptance into the School of Bu s ines s is contingent upon the comp l etion of all Level I and Leve l II General Studie s co ur es, plus all required 200 level courses in the School of Bu siness and necessary pre requisites The student must have 60 credit hours. Upon comp l etio n of the a bove-mentioned requirements a student may apply, and be accepted, for admission i nt o the School of Busin ess. Specific required courses are listed below Many of the r eq uir ed courses m ay also be u se d t o fulfill ge neral stud i es requiremen ts. New and transfer students who intend to major in business are encouraged to see an advisor in the appropriate department before registering for classes. Required Courses ENG I 0 I Freshman Composition : The Essay .. ..3 ENG I 02 Freshman Composition: Analysi s, Research, and Documemation. ....... .................... 3 MTH 131 Fini t e Mathematic s for th e Management a nd Social Scien ces ........................... 4 MTH 132 Calculus for the M anagemem and Social Sciences .. ... 3 SPE I 0 I Fundamentals of Speech Communication ........... .. ... 3 HIS xxx ( Am erica n History Cour se) ..... .. ....... 3 ECO 20 J Principles of Economics-Macro .. .. ... 3 ECO 202 Principle s of Economics Mi cro .. .. 3 either PSY 101 J ntr oductory P sy chology ............. ..... .. 3 or soc 101 either Intr oduction to Sociology .......................................................... 3 PSC 101 American National Government . . . . .... .......... .. .3 .3 ..... 3 or PSC 102 Political S ys tems and Ideas. ACC 20 J Prin cip l es of Accounting J ........ ACC 202 Principle s of Accounting II CMS 201 Prin c ipl es of Informatio n System s. MGT 221 Legal Environ men! of Bus ines s Total R equired Courses .. Additional H ou r s .. .. ........... 3 ..... 3 .. ..1 .............................................. 43 u Credit Hours needed for admissio n to the School of Business .. 60

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58 SCHOOL O F BUSINESS B ACHE LOR O F A R TS Ec onomi cs Economics is a scientific st u dy which deals with the allocatio n of scarce or Limited resources T h e st u dy of eco n omics offers an o p portunity for the s tud ent to acquire a gener a l know l edge of the operatio n of eco n omic syste ms and i n stitutio n T h is trai nin g i s extreme l y valuable to the st ud e n t regard l es of h e r or his s p ecific caree r objective Th e b ac h e l or o f a rt s progra m h as b een desig n e d t o p rovide t h e s tud e nt w ith a fun d amenta l know l e d ge o f d o m estic as well as fore i g n e con omies and the quantit ative too l n ec essary for ind e p ende nt a n alytica l r esearch and tho u g ht. Spec iali ze d courses are p rovide d to d eve l o p the stu d ent's ability i n t h e u se of t h e t oo l of eco n omic theory a nd analysis. Suc h training is e ss entia l for grad u ates who wish to q u alify for po s ition s as profe ssi onal eco n omi s ts. Emp l oyment opportunities i n economics are avai l ab l e in natio nal and international bu s iness, federal, tate and local government, and in vario u s nonprofit o r ganizatio ns. R equire d Courses MT H 1 2 1 Introduct i o n t o Stat i stics . ............... ................................... 4 ECO 30 I Intermediate Microeco n omic Theory ....................... ............ ....... ... ...... 3 ECO 302 Int e rmediat e Macr oeco nomi c Theory ..................................................... 3 ECO 315 Econometrics . .. . . . .. . .. . .. .. .. .. . .. .. . 3 ECO 460 History o f Economic Th o u g ht . . . . .... ........................ _1 Total ............................................................ . ............................. 16 A pproved E l ec ti ves 15 hours of upper divi s ion eco nomic s electives se lected i n co n s ult atio n with and a pproved by the Departme nt of Economics. . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . ...... U. Total .................................................................... ........................ 31 MINOR 18 hours must be co mpl e ted to fulfill the minore requirement Total ......................................... . ......... ..... ................................. 18 General Studi es (m inimum ) ..................... ..................................... ........... 36 Free Electives . . .... ............... ............ . ........... ..................... Pr og ram T o tal. . ... 1 20 BUSINESS E MPHASIS IN E CON O MICS T h is e mph as i s pr e p ares the student for entry int o the growing pr ofessio n of eco n om i cs and b usin ess. It p rovides traini n g that will e n able t h e stud ent to e n ter t h e pr ofession and provide assis t a n ce to gov ernme nt and business i n solvi n g prob l ems a nd formu l ating p o l icies General Studi es, Level l and Level U ( minimum) . . . . . ................................... 33 Business Core ( See Bus ine ss Core for Bachelor of Science D egree in S c hool o f Business) . ............ 33 R e q uire d Eco n o m ics C ou rses ECO 30 I Intermediat e Microeco n omic Theory . . . . . . ... 3 ECO 302 I ntermedia t e Macroeco n omic Theory . . . . . . . . .... ......... 3 ECO 3 1 5 E co nometric s .................................................................. ....... 3 ECO 460 His t ory of Economic Th o u g h t . . ....... .............. ...................... _1 T o t a l .. .............. ............... 1 2 A p p ro v ed Ec on o mi cs E l ec ti ves 1 2 hours of upper-divi sio n eco nomic s e l ectives se le c ted in co n sultatio n with

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BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Accounting Computer Information Systems and Management Science Finance Management Marketing SCHOOl OF BUSINESS The School of Busine ss offers major s in acco unting computer information systems and management science, finance, management, and marketing The acco unting major is designed to prepare students for a career in public, industrial, tax, system s or governmental accounting. The computer information sys tems and management science major is designed to prepare s tudent s for a career in the rapidly expand ing field of busine ss, data proce ss ing syste m s de s ign or management science. The finance major i s designed to prepare students for a career in co rporate financial a nal ys i s, insurance, personal financial management, international financial management, accounting, real estate, investments, or financial ins titutions. The major in management provides areas of emphasis in personnel and human resource management production or managerial e ntr epreneurs hip The marketing major prepares students for entry position s in the dynamic areas of distribution/retailing, promotion/advertising, sales marketing research marketing for nonprofit organizations or marketing management. In order to be awarded a de gree, the s tudent must conform to the college's general specifications for the bachelor's degree listed under Requirements for all Degree s A summary of the cou r se program which s h e or he must complete within the School of Business is, as follows : General Studies.(Level I and Level II) . . . ..... ...... ( minimum ) 33 Business Core . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ...................... 33 Major in School of Business . . . . ......................... ... .................. 24 Electives Within the School of Business ( Upper Division) ........... ................. ............. ........ 9 Other Nonbusiness ...... ...2.1 Total H ours (minimum ) ........... .......... .. 120 General Studies and Multicultural Requirements Students seeking a bachelor s degree in accounting, computer information systems and management science, economics (b usine ss emphasis), finance, management, or marketing must complete the general studies and multicultural requirements for Metropolitan State College of Denver. Business Core In addition to the general studies requirement s, students majoring in any area of business administra tion must comp l ete the following busi ne ss co ur ses : Required ACC 20 I Principles of Accounting I ....................... ........... ....................... .... 3 ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II . . . ... ............... 3 MKT 304 Managerial Communication s . . . . . . . . ........ ..... 3 CMS 20 I Principle s of Information Systems . . . . . . . . .... 3 CMS 330 Principles of Quantitative Management System s ............. 3 CMS 332 Quantitative Decision Making . . . . . . . . ....... 3 Fl 330 Managerial Finance . .................... 3 MGT 22 1 Legal Environment of Bu s ine ss I ..... .................... .... ........... ................ 3 MGT 300 Organizational Management ....................... ....... ... ... .... ................. 3 MGT 495* Strategic Management . ......... ......................... ............... 3 MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ...... _.3. Total ...... .. 33 *Senio r Experience Capstone Co ur se taken during the final seme s ter o f the senior year

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60 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Admission and Graduation Requirements Students majorin g i n a n y area of business admin i s tr ation mus t complete the roll owing nonbu s ine ss courses. Many of these required co ur ses may also be u se d to fulfill general s tudie s requirements. See yo ur advisor The sc hool of Bu s iness is in the pr ocess of reviewing resi dency requirements for Busi ne ss pro grams. Ple ase c heck with a n advisor for current information. After admission to the School of Bus ine ss or declar ation of a major in business, the s tudent s hould co mplete (an d h ave a pproved ) a gra du ation ag r ee m ent withi n the firs t semes ter. ENG 1 0 1 Fres hm an Compositio n : The E ssay . ................................ ........... 3 ENG 102 Fres hm an Co m positio n : Analysis, Research and D ocume ntation. . . ............ 3 MT H 131 Finite Mathematic s for the Manageme nt a nd Social Scie n ces . ............ 4 MTH 1 32 Calc ulu s for t h e Ma n age m ent and Social Sciences...... ..................... 3 SPE 101 Fundamental s of Speech Communicatio n ................................... ...... 3 HIS xxx ( A m erica n History Course) . . ......... .... . .......................... ... ..... 3 PHI 336 Bu si nes s E th ics ... ................ ......... .... ............ ......... ........... 3 ECO 20 I Principle s of Economic s -Macro ....... .......... .......... ............... ......... 3 ECO 202 Princip l es of Economics-Micro . .......... ...... .... ..... ...... ......... 3 eit h e r PSY 101 or soc 101 either PSC 1 0 1 o r Int rod u c tory P syc h o l ogy In trod u ct i o n to Socio l ogy Ameri can National Government ... PSC 1 02 P o litic a l Systems and Ideas ................................... ... 3 .. 3 .. .. 3 .. .. 3 Accounting C o urse s in Metrop o lit a n State's Dep artme nt of Accounti ng prepar e stu d ents f o r a career in public industrial, t ax, syste ms or governmental acco untin g In add ition a wide variety of int erns hip s are avail a ble through Metropolitan State's Cooperative Edu cation O ffice. Accounting s tudent s have three hour s of acco untin g e l ec tive s (to be se le c t e d from ACC 310, 32 0 341, 409 410 430 445 452 and 460) and nine hours of upp e r division busine ss ele c tive s ava ilable. A care ful se lection of the se e l ectives s hould b e mad e in accor dance with caree r objectives Student s are e n co ur age d t o co n s ult with accounting fac ulty on the selec tion of e l ectives ACCOUNTING MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Required Courses Semester Hours ACC 3 09 In co me Tax I ......... 3 ACC 330 Introduction to Acco unt ing Systems .. ......... ................. 3 ACC 340 Cos t Accounting . . ........ ..................................... 3 ACC 35 1 Intermedia te Accounting I ...... .. ... 3 ACC 352 Intermedia te Acco untin g II ..... .. ... 3 ACC 420 A u d itin g .................... ............. 3 ACC 45 1 Advanced Acco untin g I ...... .. ......... _1 Subtotal ................... .. .. 2 1 Plus 3 hours from the following courses: ACC 310 Inc ome Tax II......... .... .. .. ....................... 3 ACC 320 Governme nt a l Accounting.... .............. ....... 3 ACC 34 1 Cost Accounting I I. . . ...................... ... ....... 3 ACC 409 Tax Pr oce dur e & Researc h . . . . ....... 3 ACC 410 Tax Plannin g . . . . .. .. .. 3 ACC 430 Adva n ce d A udit ing . . . ... 3 ACC 445 Oil and Ga s Acco untin g. . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 ACC 452 Adva n ced Accounting II ..................................... .......... .... ..J Total. .... \.............. .... ...................................... . . ............ 24 T he Department of Accounting requi r e s 60 college c redit hours Uunior sta nding ) prior to taking 300a nd 400-level accounting courses. No nbu s iness s tudent s may not take more than 30 credit hours in busi ne ss co ur ses. At lea s t 12 hour s of accounting cour ses in th e minor mu st be c ompleted in residency and the acceptance of transfer credits will be go verned by sta ndard s and policies of the School of Bu s ines s and the Department of Accounting

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 6 Required Courses ACC 20 I Principals of Accounting I . . 3 ACC 202 Principal s of Accounting ll . . . . 3 ACC 309 Incom e Tax I . . . . . . . . 3 ACC 351 lntenn e diate Accounting I. . .. .. . . .. .. . .. . . 3 Approved Electives. . . . . . ......................... ..1! Total....... . . . . . . . . . . . .... 18 A s tud ent may e l ec t a ny courses in the acco unting program o r curricu lum provided they are approved by the accou ntin g department advisor Computer Information Systems and Management Science This major offe r s a ric h variety of co ur ses in th e rapidl y ex pandin g, stimulating area of informat i on sys t ems in th e busines s world. Students can l ook forward to challengi n g careers in com put e r information syste m s or using th e ir co mpu te r inf o rmati on systems education within a n y of th e othe r functional areas of business Students majoring in CMS are encouraged to select particular courses that best meet their need s in specific areas such as sys t ems d evelopment, programmer ana l yst office systems, data com munications, local a nd wide area n e tw orks, management information sys t ems, or management science. Advising for these areas is available from the department and individual faculty members. All CMS major s mu st a dhere to the following: (I) Completion ofCMS 211, CMS 305, CMS 306, (2) Completion of a 400-level CMS course, (3) A maximum of nine hours of l ang u age-type co u rses (4) Completion of 12 hours of adviso r approved courses in addit i on to ( I ) an d (2) above. COMPUTER I FORMATION SYSTEMS AND MANAGEMENT Scm CE MAJOR FO R BACHELOR OF Scm CE Required Courses Semester Hours CMS 211 Bu siness Problem Solving: A Structured Pr ogramming Approach . . . . ...... 3 CMS 305 Fundamental s of Sys tems Analysi s and Design .................................. 3 CMS 306 File De sig n and Database Management .......................... l Tot al. Electives ..... 9 A 400 level CMS course. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Approved CMS Electives .................. ..................... ....... ......... ................ J.l Total for CMS major. .. .... 24 Finance The finance major is de s igned to prepare stude nt s for careers that concentrate on the dynamic process of managing th e f und s of i ndi vid u als, businesses and governments. Career opportunitie are avai l ab l e i n th e fields of managerial finan ce and the financia l services ind u stry. The field of managerial finance i s co n ce rned with activ itie s assoc iated with managing the financial affai r s of bu s inesses and governme nt s These activities include opportunities in budgeting, fina n cial forecasti n g, cas h m a n age m e nt c r e dit admini strat i on, investment analysi s, and funds management. Career path s in the financ ial servic es industry include po sitio n s in banks savi n gs a nd l oa ns, o th er financia l institutions opportunities in b ro kerage firms, insurance com p a n ies, and the real es t a te field. The most dramatic inc r ease in career oppor tunities is per sonal financial planning w here pr ofessio nal s are n eeded t o provide adv i ce to consumers o n th e man age m e nt of th eir per so nal financial aff a irs. Metropolitan State' s Dep a rtm e nt of Finance ha s be e n approved t o offer th e academic co ur es required of i nd iv idu als who desire t o t ake the n atio n a l exams leading to the Certified F inan cial Planner prof ess i ona l designation All finance maj ors mu st take FIN 301, 360 385, a nd 495 To comple t e the major a minimum of 1 2 additional se me s t er hour s of upper -d ivi sio n fin a n ce or c l osely re l ated courses are required, with at least s i x hour s at the 400 level selec ted in consultation with and approved b y the s tudent' s Finance Depart ment grad u atio n agreement advisor or by the Finan ce Department's chair. (A t leas t a "C" grade i s required for cou r s es in the major. )

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62 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS FINANCE MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Required Courses Semester Hours FIN 301 Financial Markets and Ins titution s . . . . . . . . ................... 3 FIN 3 60 Inves tments . . . . . . . ........................ ............ 3 FIN 385 lntennediate Finan ce ........................... ........... ......................... 3 Fl 495 Financial Strategies a nd Poli c i es ...................................................... _J. Total.. ... . . . . . . ................ .................... 1 2 Approved Electives 12 hour s o f upper -div i s i o n financ e electives selec ted in con s ultati on and ap proved by the Finance Depanment ........................ .u Total Hour s for Maj o r ..... .............................. 24 Management The man agement major is designed to prepare students in starting and managing businesses and other organizatio n s in the context of a diver s e technologically dynamic glo bal environment. The program consists of required courses that build a broad conceptual foundation in identifying and so lving man ageria l problems. Students have the flexibility to de ve l op specia l skills in human resource management ope rations management, or entrepreneurship. f MANAGEMENT MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Required Courses MGT 3 02 Fundam e n tals of Entreprene urship ............. MGT 322 Legal Environment of Bu s ine ss II ................ MGT 353 Human Re so urce s Management ................ MGT 355 Manufacturing and Service Man age ment .. Semester Hours . . . . ............ 3 ........................... .. 3 ............................... 3 ........... ................... 3 MGT 453 Org anizational Behavior .. MGT 482 International Busine ss .. ............... ..... . ....... 3 .... ........ ............. ....... ....3. Total.. .......................... .... ...... ..... 18 Two additional course electives from the following: MGT 321 Commercial and Corporate Law ............ ....... ... ....... ................. .... 3 MGT 400 Management De c i s ion Analy s i s ................................... ...... ........... 3 MGT 402 Entrepreneurial Cre ativ ity . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3 MGT 405 Pur c h as ing and Material s Man age ment. ........ .............................. 3 MGT 442 Entrepreneurial Bu siness Pla nnin g . . . . . ....... 3 MGT 455 Proj ec t Mana ge ment . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MGT 461 Labor/Emp l oyee Relations. . . . . ............................. 3 MGT 46 2 Appraisal and Compensation. . ................. ..................... 3 MGT 464 Employee Training and Deve l op ment. . . . ................... .......... ... 3 MGT 465 Mana g ing P r oductivit y .............................................................. .. 3 MGT 483 Workforce Diver s ity . .... . ............ ... .... ............ ...... ............... 3 Total Elective H o urs . .... ...... . ........ ........ ........... ......... Total Hour s for MGT M a j o r .... .... ....... ........................ ............. ........ ...... 24 Marketing Metropolitan State's Department of Marketing prepares s tudents for entry-level posttiOns in s uch dynamic area s a s s ales management dis tribution, advertising, marketing research retailing, and mar keting mana geme nt In a ddition to the department's well-rounded se l ection of courses, the curric ulum also offers stude nts a combination of conceptual and applied learning experiences. Through the development of marketing plans, advertising ca mpai gns, a nd marketing re s earch studies, st udent s have the opportunity to work with Denver area businesses on current marketing issues and problems. Students are also exposed to a variety of marketing speakers from the business community Part -time positions are often available for marketing students through the co llege's Cooperative Ed ucation Office. Many students in the department are alrea dy involved in some aspect of marketing and, to accommo date their busy schedule the department holds a variety of day and evening classes as well as classes at neighborhood locations through the Extended Campus Credit Program Faculty members in the Marketing Department have an excellent combination of acade mic background and practical experience. All member s stay current in their fields with activities both on and off campus.

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MARKETING MAJOR FOR BACH ELOR OF SCIENCE Required Courses Semes ter Hours MKT 30 I Marketing Resea r c h . . . . . . . 3 MKT 331 Con umer Beh avior. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MKT 456 Marketin g M a nagement . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fifteen h o urs of marketing electives *. . . U Total H o ur s for major .................. *Business Communic atio n s cou r ses can be u se d as bus ine ss electives. but not as marketing electives. Minors in the School of Business GENERAL BUSINESS MINOR 24 The School of Business offers the general business minor for nonbusiness majors Students minoring in general busine ss must take ECO 201 and ECO 202 as part of their general studies requir ements. In additio n to the required 24 credit hours below students may select six additional credit hours within a specific business discipline for a total not to exceed 30 credit hour s within the School of Business. If a s tudent wishes to enroll in other bu i n ess courses beyond the above 30 hour s, the student must declare a major with the School of Business Required Courses Semester Hours ACC 201 Principle s of Accounting I . . . . . . . . .... 3 ACC 202 Prin c iples of Accountin g II . . . . . .......................... 3 CMS 20 I Principl es of Information Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CMS 330 Principle s of Quantitative Management Sy s t e m s ... 3 ECO 20 I Principle s of Eco n o mic sMacro*. . . . ..... 3 ECO 202 Principle s o f Economic sMicro* . . . . . . . ..... 3 Fl 330 Man ag erial Finan ce . . . . .. 3 MGT 221 Legal Environment of Bus ine ss I ................................................... ....... 3 MGT 300 Or ganizatio nal M anagemen t . . . . . . 3 MKT 300 Principles of Mark e ting. . . . . ....3. Total hours ....................... .... .. .. 30 Prerequi s ite Credit ap plied in ge neral s tudie s. ACCOUNTING Ml OR (NONBUSINESS) The Department of Accounting pro v ide s a minor de s igned primarily for nonbu siness students. This minor offers students an opportunity to enhance their education and career by b eco min g knowledge able in accou ntin g The minor offers s tudent s a broad-based education in accounting, while affording flexibility for empha s izing a particular fiel d within this discipline such as financial accounting, managerial accounting, tax accounting, and governmental accounting ECONOMICS MINOR The econom ic s minor is designed for nonbusine ss majors and provides them with an opportunity to acquire a general knowled ge of the operation of economic syste m s and institutions, as well as the quan titative tools necessary for analytical re searc h and thought. Required Courses ECO 20 I Prin ciples of Economics M acro ...... ECO 202 Principle s of Economics Micro .... Electives Semester Hours .3 ..3 A minimum of 1 2 additional semes ter h o u rs of upper divi s ion eco n omics co ur ses, se lected in co nsultation with and approved by the Department of Economic s FINANCE MINORS (NONBUSINESS) The Department of Finance provides two minor de signed primarily for nonbu s ines s minors: the finance minor and the real estate minor. The se minors offer s tudents a n opportunity to enha n ce their education and careers by becoming knowledgeable in finance or real estate FINA CE MINOR Thi s minor is designed to provide nonbusines s major s with an opportunity to enhance their education and career choices by becoming knowledge a ble in the fina nce area. The minor offers students a broad based educat ion in finance while affording the flexibilit y for emphasizing a particular field within this discipline, s uch as per sonal financial planning investments, managerial finance, financial in titutions and internationa l finance

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64 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS For the finance minor, the student mu st have co mpl eted ACC 20 1 and 202, Prin c ipl es of Accounting I and II (or equivalent), and ECO 20 I and 202 Principle s of Economics-Macro and Micro, that ma y be applied to the student s general studies o r elective requ ir ement s as ap plic ab l e The Department of Fi nance requires 60 college credi t h ours (junior standing) prior to taking 300 and 400 level finance co ur ses. No nbusin ess s tudents may not take more than 30 credit hours in bus ine s s co ur ses A minim um grade of "C and a 2 25 GPA in finance cour s es are required for completion of the minor. At least 12 hours of finance courses in the minor must be completed in residency and the acceptance of tran s fer c r edi t s will be governed b y stan dards and policies of the School of Busines s and the Department of Finance. Required Courses Semester Hours FIN 301 Finan c ial Marke t s and Ins tituti o n s . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FIN 3 3 0 M a n ageria l Finan ce . . . . . . . . . ... . ....... 3 FIN 360 Inv e s tment s . . . . . . . . ......... 3 Approved E l e c tive s . . . . . . . . . .... ...... ...2 T ot al. . . . . . . . ............... 18 A s tudent m ay el ec t a n y co urse s in the fina n ce pro gram o r c urri c ulum p r ovided the y a r e approved b y the Finan c e Depart ment advisor. REAL ESTATE MINOR This minor is designed to provide nonbu s iness major s with the opportu nit y to enhance their education and career choices by becoming knowledgeab l e in real esta t e The minor prepares stude nt s for employ ment and a career in this field as well a s for th eir personal financial affairs de a lin g with rea l estate For the real estate minor the st ud ent must h ave completed ACC 201 and 202 Principles of Acco unt ing I and II ( or equiva l ent), and ECO 201, Principle s of Econom i c s -Mac r o, that may be a pplied to th e s tude nt's general st udi es or e l ective requirements a s applica ble. The Department of Fi nanc e requires 60 college credit hours (juni or standi n g) prior to t aking 300 a nd 400 level fin a nce co ur ses. Nonbusiness s tude n t s m a y not take more than 30 credit hours in business cour s es A minimum grade of "C" an d a 2 .25 GPA in finance and real es t ate cour s es are r eq u ired for co mpl etion of the min or. At lea s t 1 2 hour s of finance cour s e s in the minor must be completed in reside nc y and the acce pt ance of transfer credits will be governed by standards and policie s of the School of Bu sines s and the D epartme nt of Finance. Required Co urses Semester Hours F I N 38 0 R eal Est a t e Pr actic e and La w . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 3 FIN 3 8 1 Alfva n ce d R eal Estate Practice and Law . . . . . ......... ....... ..... 3 FIN 382 R ea l Estat e Financ e . . . . ........... ..... ... ...... ... 3 FIN 4 84 Real E s t ate App raisal. . . . . . ...... ....... ...... 3 F l 4 8 5 C omme r c i a l and Inv e s tment R ea l Es tate . . .... .... ... ...... ................. 3 A pproved Elective*. . . . ... . ..... ....... .............. ........ ....3. Tot al.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8 Ap proved Electives FIN 225 Pers o n a l M o ney Management .... ....... .... ... 3 FIN 30 I Finan c i a l Market s and Ins tituti o ns. . ..... ....... ................. 3 FIN 3 30 Man ag erial Finance ... ........ ....... .... ...... . .... .................. . ...... 3 FIN 34 2 Principles of Ins urance. . . ....... .... ....... .... .... ..... . .... ...... 3 FIN 3 60 Inv e s tment s . . . . . ... ... . . . ....... . . ......... .. 3 ECO 450 Bus ine ss and Eco nomic F o re cas ting. .... ............. ............. ... 3 INFORMATION SYSTEMS MINOR This minor i s de s igned for stude n t s majoring in a nonbusiness discipline The minor will provide a b asic understanding of the concepts, current methodology and rapid c h ange s in the de sign development, and use of compute r orie nt ed sys t ems for business a nd organizations Students e l ecting thi s minor are enco ur aged to have e l e c tive cour s e s in acco untin g managemen t marketing, o r finance. Required Courses Semester Hours CMS 20 I Prin c iple s o f Inf ormatio n S y stems .. .......... .. ..... 3 CMS 211 Bus ine ss Problem Sol ving : A Stru c tured Programmin g Appro ac h .. .... .... . 3 or CMS 327 Mic r o B as ed Software. . . . . . . . . . .... .... .......... 3 CMS 305 Fund a mental s of Sy s tem s Analysi s and De s ign ........ .... .... .......... .. ... .... ... 3 CMS 3 06 Fil e Design and Data B as e M anag ement. . . ....... .... ... .... .... ..... ... . 3 Appro v ed CMS 300 leve l cour ses . . . . . . .... T otal hou r s required for min o r . .... ... .. ..... ... 18

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT MINOR The management minor is designed for nonbusiness major s It provide s them a n opportunity to gai n familiarity with managerial concepts and skills that can enhance their performance in managing people and organizations R e qu i red Cou rses Semester Ho u rs MGT 300 Or ga nizati o nal M a n age ment . ....... ................... . ........... ....... 3 MGT 353 Human Re sources Management . 3 MGT 355 Manuf acturing and Service Management . . . ...... 3 MGT 453 Organizational B e h avio r .............. ...................... 3 MGT 482 Intern a tional Business . . . .................... ............ ......... 3 Mana ge ment Elective . .................................... .................. ...... _..l Total..... . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 1 8 MAR KETIN G MINOR The marketing min or i s de sig ned for nonbusin ess m ajors and provide s them with th e opportunity to develop an under s tanding of bu si ne ss and suffic ient familiarity with marketing skills t o work in a busi ness environme nt. Req u ired C ou rses Semes ter Ho u rs MKT 300 Principle s of Marketing . . . .. 3 MKT 301 Marketing Re search... . . . . . . . . ..... .... . 3 MKT 304 Managerial Communication s ................................. .......................... 3 MKT 33 1 Consumer Behavior. . . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 MKT 452 Seminar in Marketing Management . . . 3 E lectives Select one o ther mark e ting course. One of the following is rec om m e nded : MKT 311, MKT 312, MKT 314 MKT 3 3 0 o r MKT 371. No other communications co u rse with an MKT prefix may be used as a marketin g elective ............. _..l Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 African American Leadership In s titut e The African American Leadership Institute operates on the belief that all member s of our society s hould have an equal opportunity to pursue their goa l s and aspirations. The ins titute provide s a un i qu e approach to the particular problems and concerns of African Americans in the Denver metropolitan area with three u n derlying tenets that form its philo so phy. I. To identify, motivate, and train future community leaders. 2 To acquaint these individ u al s with problems and need s of the community while inve s tigatin g alternative approaches and so lut ions 3. To create an opportu n ity for these individuals to join together and exchange ideas with current leaders for the p u rpose of networking for national sta te and loc a l co mmunity improvements. Semi n ars cover topics that reflect c u rrent community i ss ue s, including re g ion al bus ine s s and econom ics, local and state government, education, health care h u man services the arts, and cultu r a l affairs. Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativit y The Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity has introduced entrepreneurial education into the region's academic arena through weekend courses for profes s ionals and entrepreneurial s eminars and f o ru ms. T h e p u rpose of the i nstitute is to discover, foster and mold the visionsoftoday's aspiring entre p r eneurs It provides degree and n on degree students from the community with opportunities to learn about entrepreneurs h ip to under s tand the entrepreneurial pr oc e ss, to pract ice skills that lea d to s uc cessful entrepreneurship, and t o en h a n ce creativity and innovation Small Business Institute The Small B u siness Institute is sponsored by the Small Busin ess Administration ( SBA ) and involves a co n tractual relationship between SBA and Metropolitan Sate College of D e nver. The Small Bu s iness I nstitute offers a p r actical opportunity which supplements aca dem i c s tudie s with real case st udie s The Small Business I nsti t ute utilizes se n ior-level st u dent s, u nder faculty s upervi s ion to provide bus ines s co u nseling and tec h nical assistance to s mall bus ines s c lient s in the co mmunity.

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66 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES

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SCHOOl OF lETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS AND SCIENCES The programs in Letters, Arts and Sciences provide high-quality liberal arts education designed to meet the ed u cationa l n eeds of the urban s tudent. Whether in humanities, social sciences, or mathematics and scie nce, the program s directly address personal and profes s ional goals of s tudents The faculty exert leadership in their disciplin es, helping to s hape new directions as well as responding to new idea s and de ve lopments. The school off ers the bulk of the General Studies curric ulum required for all degrees Students wishing to earn licen s ure as teacher s c h oose from Letters, Art s and Science majors The Colorado Alliance for Science a statewide effort to encourage sc ience and mathematics teaching and learning, i s housed in the s chool. The member colleges and uni versities work with public sc hools throughout the s tate, offering ass i sta n ce and support to tea c hers and s tudents The Health Careers Science Program is de s igned to encourage women and ethnic minority groups who have traditionally been excluded from careers in sc ience and technology Student s are provided with tutoring and other s upport to ensure their s ucces in the sc ience and technology areas. For additional informati o n please call 556-3215. The School of Letters Art s and Science s h ouses two interdiscipli nary centers. The se centers tie the college to important state and n a tional educational movements. The Center for Mathematics Science and Environmental Education provides leadership in reforming science and mathematic s education in Colorado and in the nation Through the cente r's involvement in the Colorado Statewide Foundation, close tie s exist between the college the Denver Public Schools other sc hool districts in Colorado the Colorado Department of Education and other institution s of hig her education. The center also provide s a continuing focus on the is sues of the environment as a special area of integrated science education The Family Center hou sed in the Department of Sociology Anthropology and Social Work, pr ovi de s a wide range of education training and policy research on family issues. Through various contracts and grants, the Center develops c urri cu lum provides training for county, e ntry -level soc ial workers publishes an on-the-job training manual infuses family preservation curricul um into the Metro State social work major provides family literacy ed ucation for low-income Denver familie s provide s policy research on related literacy issues. The sc hool also offer s internships and cooperativ e ed u cation opportunitie s in a number of departments and programs Depending on their major, s tudent s may be assigned to the legi s lature state and local agencies, the media busi ness, o r indu s try DIVISION OF HUMANITIES The humanitie s' c urricul a are offered in the department s of Art, English Modern Languages, Music Philo sop hy, and Speech Communication. In these programs s tud e nt s develop an under standing and appreciation of the worlds of art, music and ideas The program s offered by the ins titute s for Intercultura l and Women's Studies broaden aware nes s of soc ial issues related to cultural diversity, ethnicity and gender. Students may complete the bachelor's degree and in conjunction with programs in education earn teacher licensure at the seco ndary level (exce pt in philosophy) Majors in journalism, preprofe ss ional writing, and music performance are also offered. Art s tudents earn a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree in s tudio work and in art his tory Department of Art The Department of Art offers a full range of s tudio art co urses in the areas of fine arts (drawing, p ainting, printmaking, photography video, and sculpture); des ign (a dvertising design and computer graphics; crafts (ce ramics, metalwork, jewelry making, and art furniture) leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree; art history (studies emphasize co ntemporary modern ancient, and non-we s tern art ) leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree ; and licensure in art education

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68 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES Goal s : Undergraduate s tudies in art and design s hould prepare st udent s to function in a variety of artistic roles In' order to ach iev e these goals, in s truction s h ould prepare student s to : I. read" the non -ver bal language of art and de sign 2. develop res pon s es to visual phen omena, and organize percepti ons and co n cept ualizations both rationall y and intuitively 3. become familiar with and dev elop com peten ce in a number of art and de s i g n techniques 4 become fam iliar with major achievements in th e his tory of art including the works and intention s of leadin g artist s in the past a nd pre se nt and dem onstrate the way art reflect s cu ltural values 5 eval u ate developments in the his tory of art 6 under stan d and evaluate contemporary thinkin g about art and de s ign 7. make valid a ss essments of quality in design proj ects and in work s of art ART MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS DEGREE Core Requirements for All Studio Art Majors Semester Hours ART II 0 B asic Dra w in g I .... . ............................. ................ ....... 3 ART Ill B asic Dra wi n g II .......................................... ..................... 3 ART 1 2 0 Desig n Pr ocess e s an d Con ce pt s I ........ ............ ............. .................. 3 ART 121 Desi g n Processes and C o n ce pt s II.... ... . . . ............... . ..... 3 ART 201 Survey of Modem Art : Im pressionism t o 1960 ................................................ 3 ART 202 Survey of Contemporary An: 1960 to the Pre sent ....... ...... .... .... .... ..... ....... _1 TotaJ . . . . . . . . . ...... . ............ ...... ...... 18 '. Seuior Experience Requirements for Studio Art Majors: ART 401 Modem Art Hi s to ry: Th eory and Critic ism ..... .... ........................................ 3 ART 4 7 5 Senior Experie nce Studio: P ortfolio Devel o pm e nt and Thes i s Show. . . .3. Total. .............. 6 Studen t s m ay c h oose o n e of the thre e areas of emph as i s : fine art s, de s ign o r c raft s. Semester Hours FINE ARTS AREA OF EMPHASIS .............................................................................................................. 21 Fift ee n h ours in area of co n ce ntrati o n in : d rawing, pai n t in g, sc ulpture, printmakin g, or photography Sele c t a combin a ti on of 15 h o u rs from the f ollowi n g two areas: De s ign . . . . . . . 6 o r 9 Craft s ..................................................................................... 6 o r 9 ART 200 G ene ral Hi s tory of Art ...... ........ .... ........ .......................... .... 3 Art Hi s t o ry ( upper -div i sio n). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Semester Hours D ES IGN AREA OF EMPHASIS ................................................................................................................... 21 Fiftee n h ou r s in area of co ncentr a ti o n in : a dverti s ing design or com put e r gra phi cs Select a combin atio n of 15 h o urs from the followi n g two areas: Crafts ................ ................................................................ ..... 6 o r 9 Fine Arts .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ............................. 6 o r 9 ART 200 General Hi s t ory of Art . .................................... 3 Art Hi s tory ( upper-di v i s ion ) . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Semester Hours CRAFTS AREA OF EMPHASIS ................................................................................................................... 21 Fifteen h o ur s in area of co ncentr a ti o n in : ceramics j e welery or art furniture Sele c t a co mb ination o f 1 5 hours from the following two areas: Applied Arts .................... .................. ......... . ..................... 6 or 9 Fin e Art s . . . . . ....... .......... ....... ..... ...... .......... 6 or 9 ART 200 General Hi s t ory of Art ............ .... ..... ............................. ........... 3 A rt His tory ( up perdivi s i o n). ................. ....... ......... ............. ......... _1 Tota l H o urs Required ..... ...................... ........... ..... .............. ...... ...... 66 ( A minimum of 33 upper divi s i o n a rt h o u rs requir e d .) Minor requirements for art m a j ors are o pti o nal ART HISTORY MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS Core Requirements for All Art Histor y Majors Semester Hours ART 110 B as i c D rawing I.... ...................................... ....... ............. 3 ART Ill Basic Drawin g II . . . . . . . . . . .... ............... 3 ART 120 Design Pr ocesses and Conc e pt s I . . . . . . . . ............. ......... 3 ART 121 De s ign Pr ocesse s and C o ncept s II. . ......................... ............ ........... 3 ART 20 1 Survey of Modem Art: Impre ss i onis m t o 1960 .... ............. . .......... ........ ... 3 ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 t o th e Pre sent . . . . . . . ... _1 Total. ................ ................................................................ 18

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 6 Senior Experience General Studies Requirement for Art Histor y Majors: ART 401 Mod ern An His t ory: Theory and Criti c i s m Total.. A n His t ory (required ) ART 200 ... .3. .. .. 3 .. 1 5 Fine Ans .......... ........... ...... ...... ...... .............. .. .... 3 3 o r 6 3 o r 6 3 o r 6 De s i g n . .................... craf ts . . . ....... .... .......... ................... An E l e c tive s ..................... ._fi To ta l h o ur s r e quir e d ......... ...................................... ............ 6 0 F iftee n h o ur s ar e r e quir e d a m o n g ihese thr ee ca t ego ries. ( A minimum o f 2 7 upper divi s ion a n h o ur s requir e d.) Min o r requiremen ts fo r a n m ajors are optio n al. IND UST RIAL DESIGN MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE For a dvising in this program, please s ee the Department of Indu s trial Studies and Mechanical Engi n eerin g Techno l ogy in the School of Professional Studies. ART LICENSURE : K-12 Teacher licensure for art major s i s available through the Art Department. An art major i s required R equire d Co urse s Semester Hours ART 33 8 Introdu ctio n t o An Edu catio n . . . . . 4 EDS 22 1 P roc e ss e s o f Edu catio n in Urba n S ec ond ary Sch oo ls. . . . 3 EDS 22 2 Field E x peri e nce i n U rban S eco nd ary S c h oo ls. . .................... 2 EDS 3 20 Th e Ad o l escent as a Learn e r . . . .......... 3 EDS 321 S eco nd ary S c h oo l Curri c ulum a nd Cl ass r oo m Mana g em ent ....... ... .......................... 3 EDS 322 Field E x peri e n c e in Tut o rin g a nd Ma terial s Co n s tru c t ion . . . ...... . 2 S E D 3 60 Th e Exce pti o nal Learner in the Cl ass room . . . . ........ 3 RDG 328 T eac h i n g o f R ea din g a nd Writin g i n the C ontent A r eas. . . . . . .. 4 ART 4 38 An Methods/Mat e ria ls: K -12. . .... ......... 4 E D U 419 Stud ent T eac hing and S e min ar : Ele ment ary ( K-6). ..................................... 8 EDS 4 29* Stud ent T eac h i ng and Seminar : S eco ndary (6-12). ................... ............. ....... 8 ART 4 3 9 Int eg r a tin g the Arts f o r Gif t ed & Ta l e nt e d . . . . .................. .... _.3. To tal.. ....................... 4 7 In a dditi o n t o field ex peri e n ces includ e d in r e quir e d co ur se work s tud ents m u s t pre s ent e vidence o f having c o mpl e ted a t le as t 2 00 h o ur s o f w ork with c hildren Thi s may be acco mpli s h e d thr o u g h o r gan i zatio n s s u c h as B oy S couts G irl S cou t s, c hur c h g r o ups, tut oria l pr og r a m s o r s imilar ins tituti o n a l activities. Stud e nt s s h o uld p l a n the ir v o lunt e er w o rk in co n s ult atio n with the An Edu ca tion a dvi sor. Students who s eek licen s ure mus t pa ss a publi c s peaking co ur se ( SPE I 0 I ) with a g r a d e of B" o r better, o r o bt ai n a waiv er. Stud e nts mus t also ac h ieve satisf a c t ory scores o n the state lice n s u re examinatio n Student t eac hing i s co m pos ed o f d a i l y full -t i m e w ork durin g 15 w eeks spli t ei ght and seve n w ee k s betw e e n e lem e n tary a nd seco nd ary lev e ls. MI OR IN ART Required Courses ART I I 0 B as i c Dr a win g I ART Ill B as i c D rawing II .. ART 1 2 0 Des i g n Pr oc e ss es a nd C o n cepts I .......... ART 1 2 1 D es i g n Pr ocess e s a n d Con cepts II. ART 2 0 I Surv ey of M odern An: Impr ess i onis m t o 1 960. ART 202 Su rvey of Co nt e m po r ary A n : 1 960 t o the Pr esent Sub t o tal Elec t ives .................................................. .... Se m ester Hours .... .... ....... .. .. 3 .. .. .................. ....... 3 .. ........................... 3 ............. .. .3 ..... ..... ....................... 3 ................ .. ....... _.3. .. 1 8 .._2 Minimum o f o n e upper divisio n s tudio co urse and o n e upper div i s i o n a n hist o ry co ur se Tot al... . . ....... ..... .. 27

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70 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES English Department The Department of English offers instruction in a variety of areas : literature, writing, language and linguistics, and elementary and secondary education. Courses in each area appeal to students in every sc hool of the college who wish to read and understand representative literatures of the world; to examine the principles underlying how language works; and to cultivate their writing ski lls. The department invites students in other disciplines to elect Engli s h courses to enhance their general education Student s may also choose a major or minor from different areas of emphasis Students who are considering a major or minor in the Department of English are expected to consult with faculty for advising. The English major may choose an empha sis in I. literature 2. elementary school teaching leading to licensure 3. secondary school teaching leading to licensure 4 creative writing 5. preprofessional writing The English minor may choose an emphasis in I. literature 2. dramatic literature 3. language and linguistic s 4. practical writing 5. secondary school teaching 6. creative writing The English Department will assess the major in de s ignated capstone courses Portfolios of papers assig ned through these courses will be read by several members of the faculty. Capstone courses should not be taken until the student's final year of study. Becau se a capstone course may not be offered every semes ter students s hould disc uss sc heduling with English Department advisors. Further information is available in the English office ENGLISH MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS LITERATURE EMPHASIS The English major or minor, literature emphasis, encompasses a full range of American British and world literature The program provide s a strong foundation of co urses in literature and language, se quenced to cultivate a sense of Literary development fostering an increasing familiarity with major works and writers, critical theory literary terminology, and re searc h materials Because of their command of the written language their ability to deal with ideas and concepts as well as facts and their broader understanding of human nature and social realities, literature majors are valued in many fields of endeavor, including academe and the world of business. Required Core Semester Hours Each of the following courses: EN G 210 Introduction to Literary Studies ... .... ............. ............ ............ ......... 3 ENG 244 Myth, Symbol Allusion in Literature .... . .................................... 3. Subtotal ................. ...... .......... ................................................... 6 Each of the following courses: EN G 211 World Literature : Beginning s to 1600 ................... .. ................................ 3 ENG 221 American Literature: Beginning s through the Civil War ...... .......... ........ ............. 3 ENG 231 Briti sh Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare .................................................. 3. S ubtotal ....... . . .................... ................ .................. .. ..... ........ 9 Two of the following courses: ENG 2 1 2 World Literature: 17th Century to Pre s ent .... ...... ................ ....... ........ 3 ENG 222 American Literature: Civil War to Pre sent ........ ...... ......... ...................... 3 EN G 232 Briti s h Literature : Donne to J o hn so n ............. .......................... .... .... 3 ENG 233 Briti sh Literature: Blake to B eckett ............... ... . ............... .. ........ 3. Subtotal .................................. ................ ....... ............ ....... .. ........ 6 The following course: ENG 3 1 0 R oots of Briti s h Literary Tradition ....................................................... 3 Required Upper-Level Courses ENG 302 His tory of the English Language ......... ........................................ .... 3

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Select three of the following courses : ENG 321 Development of American Drama .... ..... .... . .... .... ................ 3 ENG 323 Development of the American Novel . . . . . . . . . . 3 ENG 331 Development of British Drama : Mysteries to Melodr a ma .... .... ........ ........... ......... 3 ENG 333 Development of the Briti s h Novel. . . . ............. 3 ENG 340 Development of Modem Poetry . . . . . .............. 3 ENG 341 Masterpieces of Conti nent al Literature ..... .... ..... J Subtotal .. ..9 Select two of the following cour.;e s (at least one fr o m 413): ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature. 3 ENG 412 Selected Theme s in Literature .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3 ENG 413 Major Author.; . . . .. ...................................... .... 3 ENG 414 Modem Continental Briti sh, and Ameri c an Drama............ ....................... .. .... 3 ENG 431 Shakespeare : Comedies His t ories, Sonnets .. ............... .... ............. ... ........ 3 or ENG 432 Shakespeare : Tragedie s and Ethical Problem Play s Subtotal .... The following course : .. .. J ..6 ENG 461 Theorie s and Technique s in Literary Criticism ........................ ................. ,....J Total Semester Hour.; Required ... .......... 45 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHING AREA OF EMPHASIS The elementary sc hool teaching emphasis in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Education licensure program prepares future teachers of elementary education to under sta nd and teach the diverse su bject matter required for licen s ure The program will provide students with a strong foundatio n in literature and l iterary genres; a so lid per s pective on the English language, including its history, struc ture, and constituents; a nd both theory and practice in composition, language arts, communication and teaching methodology It also addresses the need to prepare teacher s to teach multi -c ultural liter ature, accommodate cultural and ethnic diversity in lan guage and writing, a nd communicate effectively with a diver se population of st udent s. Required Cou rses Semester Hours I. Literature Core Cour.;es : ENG 210 Introduction to Literary Studie s . ... ................. ... ... ......... . .... 3 ENG 222 American Literature: Civil War to Present . . . . ............... 3 ENG 244 Myth Symbol and Allusion in Literature. . . . . . .... 3 ENG 310 Roots of Briti s h Literary Tradition . .... ...... ................. ................. ....3. Semester Hour.; Required .................. II. Language/Lingui s tics Core Courses : ENG 20 I Th e Nature of Language ..... and ENG 302 History of the Engli s h Language .. Semester Hour s Required ....... III. Writing/Composition Cour.;es: ENG 251 Intermediate Compo s ition or ENG 252 I n troduction to Creative Writing ENG 351 Advanced Compo s ition ...... .. 12 ..3 ..J 6 ..3 ............. 3 J Semester Hours Required . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 III Language Arts Core Courses : ENG 346 Children s Literature . . . . . . . . . 3 ENG 465 Teaching Composition i n Elementary Schools . . . . . . . . . 3 ENG 466 Teaching Literature and Language K-{; . . . . . . . 3 RDG 313 Teaching Read i ng in the Elementary School K-{; ......... Semester Hours Required ....................... 9 V Engl,sh Electives Two upper division English courses selected in con s ultation with and appr o ved by designated Engli s h advisor .. 6 Recommended Electives : Communication ENG 363 Teaching Communication s .. ............... 3 Writing ENG 352 ENG 353 Creative Writing Works h op (Prerequisite : ENG 252). . . . . . . . . 3 Techniques of Critical Writing . . . . . . . . . 3

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72 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES Langu a ge ENG 301 ENG 303 Modem Englis h Language Studie s ( Prerequi s ite : ENG 20 I ) ............ . .................. 3 Semanti cs (Prerequi s ite : ENG 20 I ) ....... ........................................ ..... 3 Literature ENG 3 2 4 African American Literature .............. ............... ......................... 3 E N G 3 4 1 M as terpiece s of Contin e ntal Literature ....................... .................... ... ... 3 ENG 342 The Engli s h Bible as Literature ....................................... ............. 3 ENG 343 C l ass ical M y th ology ...................................... ....... .... ....... ....... 3 ENG 347 Young Adult Literature ....... .... . ............ . ................ .............. 3 ENG 349 Chi c ano Folldore of the Southwe s t . ...... ..... ................. ....... ...... ....3. Total Semester Hours Required .................................... ....................... .... ...... 39 RDG 3 1 3 meet s the reading requirement s for Co l orado State lice n s ure but is carried under the s tudent's 42 se me s t er hour pr ofess ional edu ca tion r e quirements SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHING EMPHASIS The education emphasis in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Education licen s ure program prepare s future te achers of English to understand and teach the diverse s ubject matter required for licen s ure This program equips students with a wide variety of language principles and ski lls; practical experience in developing and pre senting the process of writing ; so und knowledge of approaches to literature and literary genres periods, and authors (including a spec ial focus on young adult lit e rature ); and an und erstanding of commu nication and media as used in English stu dies In addition to meeting specified state and departmental requir ements, this program offers students the opport unity to develop further specia l ization in writing, lang u age, or literature to compleme nt the major. Required Courses Semeste r Hours I. Literature C ore C o u rses : ENG 2 1 0 Introdu c tion to Literary Studi es ............... ........ ...... .......... ................ 3 ENG 2 2 1 Ame rican Literature : Beginnin gs through the Civil War ........... ...................... 3 o r ENG 2 2 2 American Lit e rature: Civil War to Present ....... ............... . ................... 3 EN G 2 44 Myth S y mbol and Allu sion i n Literat ure ................................................. 3 ENG 3 1 0 R oots o f Briti s h Literary T ra d itio n .................................................. ....3. Subt otal .............................................. ...... .................................... 12 n Language/Lin guistics Cor e Co u rses : R e quired for Lic en s ure ENG 20 I The Nature of Language ...... ................... .... . ...... ...... .......... 3 ENG 3 02 His tory of the E n gli s h Language ........... .... ........... ........................ 3 Se l e c t one of the following : ENG 202 Sy s tem s of English Grammar ..... ................ ............................ ... 3 ENG 3 0 I Modem Engli s h Language Stud ies ............. ... . .... ........................... 3 ENG 3 0 3 S e mantic s ..................... . . .... ............... .............. ....... 3. Subt otal ............. ....................... ................................................ 9 III. Writing/C o mpo s ition C o urses: ENG 351 Adv a nced Composition .......................... ... ... .... .... .... .... ....... 3 E G 463 C o mpo s ition Teaching Worksh o p ...................... ........ ............ .......... 6 or ENG 362 Tea c hin g Composition in the Se c ondary School s ............................................ 3 and ENG 364 T ea ching Creative Writing in the Se c ondary S c h oo l s .............. ............................. 3. Subtotal................ .... ..... ................................................... 9 IV. English Education Core Courses: ENG 347 Young Adult Literature ................................. ..... ....................... 3 ENG 363 Teachin g Communication s . . . . . ............................... 3 ENG 464 Teaching English in Secondary S c hool s ......... . ...... .... .................... .... 3 RDG 328 Teaching of Reading a nd Writin g in the Content Areas. . . ................... Subtotal ..................................................... ............... .............. 9 V Englis h Ele ctiv es: Two upper division English course s se l ected in consultation with and approved by de s ignated Engli s h advi s or ......... _Q Total Seme s ter Hours Required ...................................................................... 45 RDG 3 28 meets the r ea ding r e quirement f o r Englis h lic e n s ure but i s c arried under the s tudent's profe ss ional edu c ation requirements NOTE: Student s with a bachel o r of arts in Engli s h from an a ccredited ins tituti on who are seeking Engli s h l icen s ure will re c eive c redit f o r Section s I and V in additi o n t o any othe r courses in Se ctions II, IU, and IV for which they have exi s ting c redits.

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 7 CREATIVE WRITING EMPHASIS The creative writing emphasis provides exten s ive writing practice in various genres of literature as well as a good foundation in the appreciation of the literary heritage availab l e in the English language. Courses s hould be selected after con s ultation with a creative writing faculty advisor. I. Literature Cour.;es: Lower Division Lite ra tur e Cour.;es : 200-level, including either ENG 210 or ENG 244.. ............ ............. ... ...... ................... 1 5 Three o f the 15 h our.; mus t emphasize modem literature U pper Divi sion Lit e rature Course s : 300le vel and/or 400-Ievel .................. ... .... .....2 Total Seme ster H our.; of Literature Required ....... .... ....................................... 24 11. Writing Cour.;es: Entry Course : E G 252 Introdu ction to Creative Writing ......... .... .. 3 Genre Cour.;es: ( Select thr ee) ENG 351 Advanced Composition....................................... . 3 ENG 352 Drama Writing W o rkshop . . . . . . . . . . 3 ENG 352 Fiction Writing Work s hop ....................................... ..... .................. 3 ENG 352 P oetry Writ i ng W o rk s hop . . . . . . . . ...................... :l Subtotal ..... .... ......... .. .. ....... ...................................................... 9 Specialized Writing Course : ENG 382 Creative Writing Studio (two distinct title s) .... .... .... ............................... 6 Exit Cour.;e : ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writin g .............. ......... _l Total Seme ster Hours of Writing Requir ed ................ .. ....... ll Total Semester Hours Required ........ ............ ....... 45 PREPROFESSIONAL WRITING EMPHASIS Every profession benefits from having among its member s people who write exceptionally well; rewards tend to acc rue to such people. This emphasis is designed to enable talented writers majoring in other fields to develop their writi n g abilities and, thereby, enhance their career opportunities For this reason it is expected that the preprofessional writing emphasis will be a second major for those who pursue it. The program provides the student with an intensive, coherent sequence of instruction in writing and linguistics interspersed with appropriate study of fine writing from the English language literary heritage Required Courses Semester Hours E G 251 Intermediate Compo s ition ............... ......................... ...... .. .. 3 ENG 20 I The Nature of Language .................................. ............... 3 or ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar .............. .......... ............ .... ........ .......... 3 ENG 303 Semantics.......... ............. ............. ................ .............. 3 ENG 35 1 Advanced Composition .............. ....................................... 3 ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing . . . . 3 SPE 374 or ENG 363 Subtotal .... P syc hology of Communication Teaching Communications ... .... 3 .. ._l ... 18 Students will take six literature courses of which at l eas t two must be upper division: the se cour.;es must be di s tributed among at least four of the following five areas: I world or co ntinental literature 2 Briti s h literature : beginnings t o seventeenth century 3. Briti s h literature : seve nteenth century to nineteenth ce ntury 4 American literature 5 Twentieth century literature Subtotal .......................... ....... .. ............... 18. Total Seme s ter Hour.; Required ....... ............... ............................. 36

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74 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES ENGLISH MINOR CREATIVE WRITING EMPHASIS The English minor with emphasis in creative writing serves students who desire instruction and practice in the production of imaginative literature. The minor i ncludes a foundation in the appreciation of literature and criticism. Courses should be se lected after con ultation with a creative writing faculty advisor. I. Literature Courses : Lower Division Literature Courses : 200level including either ENG 210 o r ENG 244 ............ ........................................... 6 Three of the six hours mus t emphasize modem literature. Uppe r Division Literature Courses: 300level and/or 400-level .......... ............... . ...... ... .............. .................. Total Semester Hours of Literature Required ...................... ............. .... ....... .... ......... 12 U Writing Courses : Entry Course: ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing ...... .............. ........................ 3 Genre Courses : ENG 351 Advanced Composition ...... ..... ............... ....... ............... 3 .................. . ................. 3 .............. ...................................... 3 . .. .............. .. ...... .. ................... .:1 ENG 352 Drama Writing W o rk shop ....... ENG 352 Fiction Writing Work s h op ....... RDG 352 Poetry Writing Work s hop .... Subtota l ................................... .................... 6 Exit Course : ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing ................................ .................... ....3. Total Semester Hours of Writing Requir ed . . . . . . . .............. 12 Total Semester Hours Required .... ....... .... ....... ... ..................... ... ...... ..... 24 DRAMA TIC LITERATURE EMPHASIS The English minor with emphasis in dramatic literature serves students who wish to develop skills in reading, writing and thinking about the texts of drama The program is de sig ned to meet the needs of anyone involved in the history teaching, writing, production, or performance of drama I. Introductory Courses : ENG 112 Introduction to Drama .......................................... ... ............. ........ 3 A secon d course, introd u ctory in nature is to be se l ec ted by agreemen t of the student and the department advisor The course need not be an English course but if not, it s hould be an introduc tory course related t o the stude nt' s major interest in the u se of drama ....... .... ....... ........... ..... ...... ...................... ... 3 U. Writing Course (s) One of the following courses: ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing ........... .............. ................. ...... 3 ENG 352 Creative Writing Work s hop : Scriptwriti ng .................... .............. ............ 3 ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing . . . . . . ................ _:l Subtotal ........................................................ ........... ............ ......... 3 Ul. Literature Electives ( nine h ours to be chosen in consultation with an advisor): ENG 131 Introduction to Shakespeare .................... . ...... .... ........................ 3 ENG 321 Development of American Drama .......... .... ....................................... 3 ENG 331 Development of Briti s h Drama : Mysteries to Melodrama ...................................... 3 ENG 431 Shakespeare : Comedies Hi stories Sonnets .............................. ... ...... ........... 3 ENG 432 Shakespeare : Tragedie s and Ethical Prob l em Play s ............ ............. .... .......... 3 ENG 413 Major Authors ( Playwrights ) ................................................. ............. 3 ENG 4 1 4 Modem Continental, Briti s h and American Drama ............ .............................. 3 ENG 461 Theories a nd Techniques in Literary Criticism. . .. . .. .. . .. .. .. ......... _:l Sub t o tal ........ ........... . ................................. ......................... 9 IV Final Study One of th e following : ENG 480 Work s hop ............ ........... ............................... .............. 3 ENG 498 Independent Study ...... ................... ......................................... 3 ENG 499 Internship ............. ................... .................................... l Subtotal . . .... ..... ....... ..... ............................ ... .......... .... ....3. Total Semester H ours Required ........................................................................ 21 NOTE: The final study undertaken in 480 498, or 499 presents the oppo rtunity for s tudents electing the minor to devote significan t attention to one in-depth project for com pletion of the s tudy The proje ct should be based on the reading of a dramatic text but should combine this experience with some other area of design management, performance, or writing The project s hould combine the skills of reading drama with those of the associa ted area of expertise. The project is to be proposed by the s tudent approved by an advisor in the Department of English, and directed in collaboration with a second advisor, associated with the other area of expertise fundame ntal t o the study The study may take the form of a workshop, an i nd epe ndent study, an internship, or a practicum

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SCHOOL OF lETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES LITERATURE EMPHASIS I. The following course : ENG 210 Introduction to Literary Studies ... ....................................... 3 II. Two of the following courses: ENG 211 World Literature: Beginnings to 1600 ...... ......... ..... ............. 3 or ENG 212 ENG 221 World Literature: 1 7th Century to Present ............ American Literature: Beginning s through the Civil War .... 3 .... 3 or ENG 222 American Literature: Civi l War t o Present ..... .... 3 ENG 231 Britis h Literature : Beowulf to Shakespeare ..... 3 or' ENG 232 Briti s h Literature : Donne to John s on . ..... 3 or ENG 233 Briti sh Literature : B lake t o B ecke tt ........................... ........ ................ ..... :l S ubt o t a l ........ ...................... ................ ............... ..................... 6 Ill One of the following courses : ENG 20 I The Nature of Language ........................... .... ...... . ...... ............. 3 ENG 202 Systems of English Grammar ........................... ..... ....... ....... ......... .. 3 ENG 251 Intermediate Composition .... .......................................... . ......... .. 3 ENG 252 Introdu ction to Creative Writing .................................................... . 3 ENG 351 Advanced Composition ........................................................... :l Subtotal ..................... .......... ................................................. ..... 3 IV Two of the following course s: ENG 321 Development of American Dram a..... . .... ........... ....................... 3 ENG 323 De ve lopment of the American Nove l ......... ............ .... ................... 3 ENG 331 Development of Briti s h Drama: Mysterie s to M e lodrama . . . . . ..... 3 ENG 333 Development of the Briti s h Novel. . . . . . .. .. . .. .. .. 3 ENG 340 Development of Modern P oetry . . . . . . . . . . .... 3 ENG 341 M aste rpiec es of Continental Literature ................................................. :l Subtotal ....................................... ............... ... ......... ....................... 6 V Two of the foll owing courses (one mu s t be 413): ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature . . . . ....... ..... .......... ........... 3 ENG 412 Sele c ted Themes in Lite rature . .. .. . .. .............. 3 ENG 413 Major Authors . . . . . . . .................................... 3 ENG 414 Modern Continental, British and Ameri c an Drama. . . ............................ 3 ENG 431 Shakespeare : Comedies Hi s torie s, Sonnets ............................ 3 or ENG 432 Shakespeare: Tragedie s and Ethical Problem Plays .... .... .............. ................. ... 3 ENG 461 Theories and Techniques in Literary Critic i sm ...... ... . .................. .............. :l S ubt o tal . . . . . . . . . . . . ..................... _ll Total Semester Hours Required ........................ .. 24 LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS MINOR The langu age and linguistics minor offers co ncept s abo ut, theorie s of, and analytical tech n iques in natural langu age. It represents an int ellectual discipline in itself and simultan eously serves the interests of future teachers, s tudent s of literature and writing, and others who hav e a continuing fascination with langu age as languag e T ake n in an a ppropriat e or der made evi d e nt by careful advisi ng, the courses in th e pr ogram educate stude n ts both t o u se and to a ppr eciate their lan guage. The minor requires students to engage in vigorous, pr ogressive l y mor e ex pli cit and precise analysis and synthesis as they examine facts and fallacies abou t the miracle of lan guage. Required Core ENG 201 ENG 202 ENG 301 ENG 302 ENG 303 ENG 401 Semester Hours The Nature of Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Systems of Englis h Grammar ........................... 3 Modern English Language Studies ........... .... ......................................... 3 History of the Englis h Language ........................................ ........... .... 3 Semantic s ........... ...... ...... ....... ........ .... ........ ........................ 3 Studie s in Linguistics .......... .... .......... ..................................... ...3. Subtotal ..................... ............. ...... .................................................. 18 Any o ne of the following specific titles : Applied Linguistics Descriptive Lingui s tics P s ycholinguistics Sociolinguistic s Stylistic s

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76 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES Interdi sc iplinary Elective Co u rses (chosen in cons ultation with and ap proved by depanmental advisor) any one of the following: A T 233 Cross Cu ltural Communication ...... ............................ . ..................... 3 EDU 337 Language Arts and Social Studie s Curricula for Early Chi ldh ood Education ... ................ 4 PHI Ill Language, Logic, and Persu asion . .......... ............... ...................... 3 SPE 352 Language Acquisition ................... .......... . ................. .............. 3 Subtotal . .............................................. ..................... ........ .... ____l:1 Total Semester Hours Required ........................................ .... ........................ 21-22 PRACTICAL WRJTING MINOR The practical writing minor i s a humaniti esba se d career-orie nted pro g ram enabling st udent s to de ve lop writing skills as an adjunct to any major Students will be prepared to do the practical writing fo und in magaz ine s, newspaper and newsletters Students completing the program are expected to be versati l e wri t ers ca pabl e of app ly ing the principle s of good writing to different audiences and purpo es. Required Core Semester Hours ENG I 07 Eng l ish U s age and Grammar .............................. ............................. 3 ENG 20 1 The Nature of Language .... ...... ............... ........................... ...... 3 ENG 303 Semantics ........................................ .............................. 3 ENG 351 Advanced Composition ..... .................... ..... .............................. 3 ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing ......................................... ............... ....1 Subtotal ......................... . ................. ..... ...................................... 15 E lective Courses (Choose three from the following): ENG 352 C r eative Writin g W orks h op ( P rerequ i s ite ENG 252) ................................... 3 ENG 398 Cooperative Educatio n : E n glis h Int erns hip . . . ........ ...................... ... 3 ENG 498 Independ ent Study: Writin g Pr ojec t ... .................. ....... .... .......... ........ 3 JRN 1 82 Beginning R epo rting and Newswriti n g ....... ... .... ..... . .......................... 3 JRN 381 Feature Writing for Newspapers ............................ ......................... 3 JRN 481 Feature Writing for Magazin es .................................. ..................... 3 COM 261 Introduction t o Techni ca l Writin g . ....................... . ....................... 3 MKT 305 Business Researc h and R epon Writing ........................... ............. ....... 3 SPE 309 Argumentation and Adv ocacy .......... ........ ......... . ...................... 3 SPE 410 Techniq u es of Per s uasi on .... ...... ......... .......... . ..... ................ .3. Subtotal ........ ....... ....................................................... ....... ....2 Total Semester Hours Required ..... . ...... . ....................... . . .... . ....... 24 In ad diti on to pursuing the practical writing minor, orne stu dents may wi h to seek the recognition of compete ncy award as qualified pra ctical writers A stude nt seeking this award must a ppl y t o th e Department Composition Committee before completing nine hours app l icable to the minor, and, if a pproved mu st work out with the commi tte e a coor d inated s equen ce of co u rses, one of which mus t be E ngli s h 498 independent st udy Th e recognitio n pr oced ur e will includ e d eve l opment of a portfolio that will be prepar ed under the g uidan ce of the co mmitt ee This portf olio, designed to d e mon tr a t e s tudent proficiency, will inc lude suc h items as a letter in which stude nts describe the development of their skills in writing and the exten t to which they ee the e as valua ble to their careers, and two different demo n stratio n s of their ability to write and e dit und er pres ure The portfo l io materials will be juried b y at least two members of the C o mpo sition Com mitt ee. Some of the prep aration may carry up to three hour's cred it under English 498. SECONDA R Y S C HOO L TEACHING EMPHAS I This minor does n ot satisfy Metro State requirements for lice n s ure in seco ndary English, but doe s meet req uir e ment s for tho se see kin g to teach E n glis h a Jill
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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Journalism Department JOURNALISM MAJOR FO R BA CHELOR OF ARTS The journalism major prepares s tudent s for careers dealing with new s and information media, including the press, and public relations. Proficiency in s tandard writte n English is a prerequisite for all journalism courses Students without such proficiency s hould not register for any journalism course be yond JRN 181. The faculty may recommend that the stude nt take ENG 101 and ENG 102 before taking any journalism course beyond JRN 181. Requirep Co u rses JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism and Ma s s Media ... JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing ...... JRN 282 Beginning New s Editing and Copyreading .... JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and ews Writing ..... JRN 38 1 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers JRN 383 Contemporary Issue s ............. JRN 385 Public Affairs Reporting .......... JRN 386 College Newspaper Practicum ...... JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazine s JRN 482 Advanced News Editing Copyreading and Principle s of Layout. JRN 486 Advanced Reporting and New s Writing . .... .... JRN 487 Ethical I s sues in J ournalism ...... Total Semester Hours Required *Typi n g proficiency is required for every journ alism co ur se beyond JRN 282. JRN 286 i s a prerequisite for JRN 381, 383, 385, 386 481 and 486 JRN 381 i a prerequisite for JRN 481. JouRNALISM MINoR I. Each of the following cour s es : Semester Houl'li ..3 -... 3 ..3 .. 3 ..3 .. 3 .. 3 .. 3 ..... 3 ........ 3 .. 3 .. .. __1 ..... 36 Se mester Hours JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism ........... ......................... . 3 JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and New s Writing. . . . . . . . . . 3 JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading ........ ......... ..... .... .................. 3 JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and New s Writing ........ .... ......................... .......... ...1 Subtotal . . . ...... .............. ........................... 1 2 II. Thre e of the following courses: JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers . ... ... .............. ...................... 3 JRN 383 Contemporary Issue s . ... ...... ..... .... ........ ....... .......... 3 JRN 385 Public Affairs Reporting . ....... .... .................. ....... .......... 3 JRN 386 C o llege ewspaper Practicum . . . ............... ... .......... 3 JRN 481 Feature Article Writi n g for Magazine s..... . . . ....... ................ ...... 3 JRN 482 Advanced News Editing, Copyreading and Principles of Layout. ....... ......... .... .......... 3 JRN 486 Advanced Reponing and News Writing . . ........................ ... ... 3 JR 487 Ethical Is s ues in Journali s m . . . ..... ........................... 3. Subtotal . . . . . . . . . ...... ......................... _2 Total Semester Hours Required ................................................. 21 Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282. PUBLI C RELATIONS MINOR The public relations minor prepares students for careers related to institutional and organizational information di s tribution Emphasis in the program is on strong new s writing skills problem solving and planning, and publication production Required Cou rses JRN 181 Introduction to J ournalism ............................. ... JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing ............................ JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading ............ ..... JRN 284 Fundamentals of Public Relations JRN 286 lntennediate Reporting and News Writing JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers ................ JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategie s ... JRN 398 Cooperative Education Public Relations Se mester Houl'li .. 3 3 3 .. ... 3 ... 3 .... 3 .. .. 3 ._1 Total Seme s ter Hours Required ............................ . . . . . 24 A s uitable ba sic photography course may, upon approval of the advisor be sub s tituted for one of the above courses. Other course s may be recommended by the adv i so r depending on the student's particu lar needs. With the approval of the journalism faculty journalism majors may substitute certain courses for required courses as a part of their major

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78 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES M odern Language s The Department of Modern Language s offer major programs in Spanish and modern foreign languages, minor programs in French German, and Spani h, and teacher education programs in Spanish and modem foreign languages Course in other foreign languages and in occupational or professional fields are offered in order to meet student and community needs. In addition, the department administers everal education programs abroad Registration for co ur ses is in accordance with previou preparation. Con se quent ly, students will register for foreig n l anguage co urse s as follows : No previou s study, or l ess than one year in high sc hool 101; studen t s with one year in high chool w ho feel their background is weak-101; one semester in college-I 02 ; one year in college-211 and/or 231 for German and Spanish and 20 I for French ; two years in high scbool-211 and/or 231 for German and Spanish and 201 for French, or I 02, if needed; three years in high school or one and one-half years in college-212 and/or 232 for German and Spanish and 202 for French ; or 211 and/or 231 for German and Spanish and 20 I for French, if needed ; four years in high sc h ool or two years in college 300 l eve l courses, or 212 and/or 232 for German and Spanish and 202 for French if n eede d The above regulation s may not be applicable if students have had no professional instruction in their chose n forei gn language within the past two year If s tudent feel that they have insufficient preparation for the required l evel, they s hould strengthen their background by taking a course recommended by the Modern Lan guage Department. Elementary co ur ses do not apply toward the major or minor f requirements Stude nt s seeking e l ementary and secondary c r e dential s in Frenc h German, or Spanish mus t satisfy the Teacher Educ atio n Program of Metro State in a dditi o n to all of the major requirements. T h ey must also demonstrate sufficient mastery of the target l a n guage or languages through an ap prop riate proficiency exam. SPANISH MAJOR FOR B ACHELOR OF ARTS Required Courses Semester Hours SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish ........ ...................................................... 3 SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation ................... ........................... 3 SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I ....... ..... ...... ................. ......... 3 SPA 232 Spani s h Grammar and Compo si tion U ................. ................................. 3 SPA 311 Advanced Conversation ......... ................... ............ ..... ...... . . ...... 3 SPA 3 1 4 Advan ced Composition ............................ ............ ................ 3 SPA 315 Spani s h Ph onetics : Theory and Pra ctice ............. . . ................. ..... ... 3 SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain or SPA or SPA SPA SPA or SPA SPA SPA SPA SPA o r 321 322 325 340 341 351 401 402 411 Spani h Arnerican Culture and Civilization Folklore and Culture of the Mexi ca n Southwe s t. ...... ...... ............ .......... 3 Introdu ction to Literary Studies in Spanish .............................................. 3 Survey of Spanish Literature I Survey of Spanish Liter ature U ......... .... .... .............. .... .................. 3 Masterp ieces of Latin American Literature ............... ................ ................... 3 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I .................... ............ ............ 3 Advanced Spanish Writin g and Grammar II. . . . ................. 3 Contemporary Spani s h L i ter ature SPA 412 Contemporary Latin American Literature . ..... . ...... ......... ................. 3 MDL 496 Teaching Forei g n Languag es in the Secondary Schools ........................... ............. 3 Spani s h e l ectives ........................................ ........ .............. ............. 3 Total ...... ..................... ......................... ............... ...... ... 48 Required only when seeking a teacher certifi ca te Must be advanced courses and taken with depanment approval. Only 42 semester credit hours for tho se not eek:ing Teacher Licen s ure MINOR IN SPANISH Required Courses emester Hours SPA 211 Int ermediate Spanish ............. ........................ .................... 3 SPA 2 1 2 Spanish Read i ng and Conversation ........................................................ 3 SPA 231 Spani sh Grammar and Compo sitio n I ................. ........ .................. 3 SPA 232 Spani s h Grammar and Composition ll ... . ........... ....................... ... .... 3

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SPA SPA or 311 320 SPA 321 or SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Adva nced Conversation .. ............................. 3 Culture and Civilization of Spain Spanish American Culture and Civiliza t ion SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southw es t. ..... ............ 3 SPA 325 Introductio n to Lit e rary Studie s in Spani s h.. . . . . . . . . . . ....3. Total. . . .. .. . . . .. ............. .............................. ......... 2 1 MINOR IN FRENCH Required Courses Semester Hour s FRE 201 lntennediate Fren ch I. .. .... .. .. .... ... .... ... . .... .3 FRE 202 lntennediate French a .......... . ....... ... .................... ....... ... ...... 3 FRE 211 French R eadi n g and Conversa t ion .... .... ...... ............... .... .................... 3 FRE 30 I I ntroduction to Advanced French Studies FRE 311 Survey of French Literature I ........ or FRE 3 1 2 Survey of French Literature a FRE 355 Fre n ch Hi s torical P erspect i ves. or FRE 356 Contemporary S oc iocultural I ssues French electives ............ Total ..... Mu s t be a course at the 300or 400-level. MINOR IN GERMAN Required Courses GER 211* Gennan R ea din g a nd Conversation .. GE R 2 1 2* Gennan Civilization. GER 23 1 Gennan Vocabulary Building a nd Grammar GE R 232* Gennan Composition and Free Writing Subtotal ......... Select o ne of the following literatur e courses : GER 32 1 ** S u rvey of Gennan Literature I. GE R 322** Survey of Gennan Literature II GER 323** Contemporary German Writers GER 351** Lessing Goeth e, and Schiller Subtot a l .............. .... Select two of the following ski lls courses: GER 301 Third Year German Conversation GER 33 1 Advanced German Composition and Grammar GER 340 German for Bu s ine ss ................. . GER 341 Trans l ation Techniques for Scientific Material s Sub t otal .. Total. .... . .... ................................ 3 ... ........... ...................... ........ 3 .. 3 ... .... ............ ................. 3 .3 .. .... ....3. 2 1 Sem ester Hours ...3 ................ 3 ........................................ 3 .. ........... ....3. . ....... ... 1 2 .. ... ..... 3 ...3 .. .3 ...3. .. .3 ...3 .... 3 .. .. 3 ...... 3. ._!i .. 21 Higher l eve l course may be s ubstituted with departmental approval. ** Fourth year course may be s ub stituted with departmental approval. MODERN FOREIGN LA GUAGES MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS Required Courses The composite modem foreign lan guage's major invo l ves a minimum of 48 hour s in any two modem l a nguage s, at lea s t 1 2 hours in eac h Student s are advi se d into intermediate and advanced c l asses in each langua ge on the ba s i s of indi v idu a l b ac kground and need The minimum 1 2 hour s in each o f the two chosen langu ages mu st b e tak e n as follows: Spanish SPA 211 SPA 2 1 2 SPA 23 1 SPA 232 I ntermediate Spani sh ............ Spanish R eading and Conversation Span is h Grammar a nd Composition I Spani s h Grammar and Composition II ... ............... 3 ............... 3 ... 3 .. ....3. Subtotal .......... ................. ............. ... ... ..... 1 2 French FRE 201 l nt e nnediate French I. . .. .. .... 3 FRE 202 Int ermed i ate French lJ . . . ....... .. 3 FRE 211 Frenc h R eading and Conversatio n ..... ..... .... ........................... ....... 3 FRE 301 I ntrodu ctio n to Advanced French Studies. ..... ... ... ........ ............ .... ........ ....3. S u bto t al .... ....... .......... ................... .......... 1 2

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80 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCI E NCES German GER 211 German Reading and Conver sat ion ............. o o o o o o o o 3 GER 212 German Civilization 0 ............................. o ............ ...... o ........... 3 GER 23 1 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar .... ..... o 0 0 o 0 0 o 0 o 3 GER 232 German Compo s ition and F r ee Writing ....... 0 o 0 o o 0 o 0 o o o 0 0 o o o 0 o o o ....3. Subtotal ...................................... ..................... 0 0 0 o 0 o 0 o o o o 12 The remaining h o urs to complete the 48 h o urs required mus t be taken with departm ent approval. For those seeking a teacher certificate in modem foreign languag es (French German, Spanish), all of the courses in one of the followi n g area s of emphasi s are required FRENCH AREA OF EMPHASIS FRE 20 I Intermediate French I. ................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 FRE 202 Intermediate French n .......... 0 0 o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 3 FRE 211 French Re ading and Conversation ... ...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o o o 3 FRE 30 I Introduction to Advanced Fren c h Studies ..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o o o 3 FRE 311 Surve y of French Literature I ......................... o o ........ .... .............. o 3 FRE 312 Survey of French Literatur e [( ................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 o o o o o 3 FRE 315 French Phonetics: Theory and Pra c tice ............................. ......................... 3 FRE 331 Advanced French Compo s ition and Grammar .... 0 0 0 0 0 0 o o 0 3 FRE 332 Advanced Conversation .... .... .......... ... 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 o o 3 FRE 355 French His torical P erspectives ........... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 3 FRE 356 Contemporary Sociocultur a l I ss ue s .... o 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 o 0 o o o o o o o 3 FRE 452 Modem French Th ea t er .... ........ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 o 0 o 0 o o o 3 FRE 453 The French Novel .... .... ......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 FRE 475 Senior Seminar in French Studies ...................... o o o o o o o 0 3 MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Language s in the Secondary School s .... 0 o o 0 o 0 o 0 ....3. Total ..... ................................................. o o o o o o o o 45 GERMAN AREA OF EMPHASIS GER 211 German R eading and Conver sa tion .......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 GER 212 German Civilization ........................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 GER 232 German Composition and Fre e Writing ......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 GER 315 German Phonetic s : Theory and Practice .............. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 GER 321 Survey of German Literature I. ............. 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 o o 0 3 GER 322 Survey of German Literature 11 .. ... . .......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 GER 323 Contemporary German Writers ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 GER 331 Advanced German Compo sitio n and Grammar 0 o o o o o 3 GER 351 Lessing, Goethe and S c hill e r ..... 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 3 GER 411 The German Nove l of th e Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centurie s 0 0 o o o 3 or GER 412 German Drama of the Ninet ee nth and Twentieth Centurie s .... ....... 0 0 0 0 0 3 GER 421 Advan ce d Con v ersation : Present-day Germany ....... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 German electives ....................................... 0 . ............. 0 .... 0. 0 .... 0 .......... 3 MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Language s in the Secondary School s ....... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ....3. Total. ............................................... .... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42 SPANISH AREA OF EMPHASIS SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish .......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SPA 2 1 2 Spanis h Reading and Conver s ation ....... 0 0 0 o o 0 0 0 0 0 3 SPA 231 Span i sh Grammar and Compo s ition I ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SPA 232 Spanis h Grammar and Compo s ition 11 ....... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SPA 311 Advanced Conversation . ......... .......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SPA 314 Advanced Composition ..................... o o o o o o o o 0 o 0 0 3 SPA 3 1 5 Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice ........ o o o o 0 0 0 0 0 3 SPA 320 Culture a n d Civilization of Spain ..... ..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 or SPA 32 1 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization ........ o 0 0 0 ............... 3 or SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest. .... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studie s in Spanis h ......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SPA 340 Survey of Spanish Liter a ture I. .............. 0 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 or SPA 341 Survey of Spanish Literature 11 ............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SPA 401 Advanced Spanish Writin g and Grammar l ..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SPA 402 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar ll ..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SPA 411 Contemporary Spanish Literature ............. 0 0 0 o 0 o 0 0 0 0 3 or SPA 412 Contemporary Latin American Literature ............................. 0 ...................... 3 MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Language s in the Secondary School s ..... ... 0 .... 0 0 0 0 0 0 ..... 0 0 0 ....3. Total ....... 0 0. 0 0 0. 0 0 0 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0 0 0. 0 0 42

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SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Music Metropolitan State College of Denver is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music The Department of music offers major s in music education and music performance, and a minor in music The department also offers courses s pe cifically de signed for non-music s tudents wis hing to enhance their general under stan ding and enjoyment of mu s ic Musically-talented students from all areas of the college are encouraged to participate in the wide variety of large and small mu sic ensembles, including band orchestra choir and chamber music. The major s in music education and music performance are profe ss ional degree program s de s i g ned for students wishing to prepare themselves for careers as mu sic teac her s or performers Students pursuin g these majors are not required to complete a minor for graduation. The mu sic education degree program prepare s st udent s for careers teaching instrumental and/or chora l music at the levels K -12. To be admitted to this program students mu s t pa ss the Music Education Entrance Examination B y taking an additional 16 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree (E DU 419 and 429), the student be co me s eligible for K 1 2 licens ur e in the State of Colorado With these additional 16 hours, this degree program is approved by the Colorado State Department of Education and has full accreditation by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education Students seeki ng teaching credentials in music must pass the Music Education Comprehensive Examination and must also satisfy all applicable requirements of the teacher education and licen s ure programs in the Division of Education in the School of Professional Studies The music performance degree program prepare s students for further graduate s tudy or for careers as performers or private studio teachers. To be ad mitted to this program s tudent s must d e mon strate the capability of de ve loping a hig h level of musicianship in performance by pa ssi ng the Mu sic Performanc e Audition upon completion of MUS 172 (Private Instruction II). Further information, including exami nation policie$ pro cedures and requirements, i s provided in the departmental publication entitled Adv i si ng Information All music majors and minors should familiarize themselve s with this document. New and transfer students wishing to major or minor in music s hould be prepared to take place ment examinations in the areas of music theory and music his t ory and to perform an audition in their primary performance area For placement and a uditi on appointments, contact the Department of Music at lea st two weeks prior to the beginning of the semester. MUSIC EDUCATION MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS C ore Requirement for all Music Education Majors Required Courses Semester Hours MUS Ill MUS 112 MUS 113 MUS 114 MUS 211 MUS 212 MUS 213 MUS 214 MUS 121 MUS 122 MUS 321 MUS 322 MUS 171 MUS 172 MUS 271 MUS 272 MUS 371 MUS 372 MUS 161 MUS 161 MUS 162 MUS 261 MUS 262 Music Theory I. . . . . . . . . . . 3 Music Theory Lab 1 .... 0 .. 0 0 0 ........ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .. 0 0 .. 0 .. 0 ... 1 Music The ory 11 0 . 0 ................................. 3 Music Theory Lab 11 ... 0 ..................... 0 0 ... 0 .. 0 0 ... 1 Music Theory Ill . 0 ......... ......... 0 ......................... 0 0 0 0 ... 3 Music Theory Lab Ill 0 0 0 ... 0 0 ....... 0 ....... 0 .. 0. .. 1 Music Theory IV 0 0 0 ... 0 0 0 0 0 .. 0 0 0 .... 0 ...... 0 ........................ 3 Music Theory Lab IV ........ ... ........... 0 0 0 0 .... 0 ... 0 0 1 Music Literature I 0 0 0 0 ...... 0 .. 0 ..... 0 .......... 0 0 0 3 Music Literature 110 0 0 ..... 0 0 .. 0 .. 0 0 .. 0 3 Music History I .. 0 .................... 0 .... 0 0 0 0 0 . . . 3 Music His tory 110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ..................... 0.. 0 0 0 3 Private Ins truction I (Primary Performance Area) ... 0 ... 2 Private Instruction 11 ( Primary Performance Area) .............. 0 .. 0 0 .. 0 2 Private Ins truction [[[ ( Primary Perf orma n ce Area) 0 0 0 .. 0 ...... 0 . 0 .. 2 Private Instruction IV ( Primary Performance Area) . 0 ............. 2 Private Ins truction V ( Primary Performance Area ) .......... 00 .... 00 0 ....... 00 ............ 0 2 Private Instruction VI ( Primary Perf ormance Area) 0 0 0 ....... 0 0 0 2 Cla ss Voice I 0 ... 0 0 0 0 .. 0 0 .. 0 . 0 ....... 0 0 1 Class Piano I 0 0 0 0 . ....... 0 0 0 0 0 0 ......................... 0 oooool Class Piano 11* ... oooooooooooOooOooOOOOOo oooool Class Pian o m 0 ... 0 0 ... 0 0 0 .... 0 0 .... 0 ........... I Clas s Piano IV* .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Note : Students whose primary performance area i s piano may elect another area of study in pla ce of clas piano ; however they s till must pass the Piano Proficiency Examination before enrolling in MUS 352 o r 353

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82 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES S e l ec t 10 hours fr o m the foll o wing :** M U S 281 Ens emble .... . M U S 381 Ense mbl e** ....... . . ........ . .... ....... . ................... 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Note: The s e co u rse number s m a y be r e pe a ted for c redit. All I 0 h o urs may be earned in any one cou rs e number or in any co mbin a tion o f the above numbers. Ense mbl e s mus t be ch ose n f r o m thos e appr o pri ate to the s tudent' s area o f emphasis : c h ora l m a j ors mus t enr oll in a t l eas t eight h o urs of c h oral e n s embles an d i n s trumental m a j ors mus t enr oll in a t lea s t eight hour s of i n s trum e ntal ense mbl es Stud e nt s maj o rin g i n music e du ca t io n must e nr oll i n an e n se mbl e during eac h s em es t e r of full tim e r es idence exce pt w h e n s tud e nt t eac hin g M U S 315 Ins trum e ntal a nd Choral S co rin g and Arran ging ...... . ..... .... ... .... . ........ 3 M U S 341 Strin g T ec hnique s and M a t eria l s ........ .......... ............. ............... .... ...... 2 M U S 342 Gui tar T ec hniqu es and M a t erials ... ..... .... .... ...... .... ............ ..... 2 MUS 3 45 B rass T echniques and M a t erials ... . ..... ..... ............. ... . ..... ...... 2 M U S 3 46 Percussi o n Techniqu es and M a t erials .................. ......... ...... .... . ..... 2 M U S 351 Basi c Co nductin g .... .... ....... .... .... .... ....... ........ .. ............ .... 2 M U S 43 3 Elem entary Sch oo l Mus i c Meth ods and M a t eria l s ......... ............. .... .... .......... 2 M U S 439 S upervi se d Field Experi e n ce : E l e m e ntary S c h oo l M e thod s a n d Mat e rial s .... ..... .............. I M U S 434 Se co ndary S c hool Mus i c M e thod s and M a t eri a ls ... .......... .... ......... . ....... 2 M U S 439 Supervi se d Field Experien ce : S eco ndary S c h oo l M e thod s and Materi a l s .. ... .... .............. I RDG 328 T eac hin g o f R ea din g and Writin g in the C ontent Areas . . ..... ...... .. ...... .... 4 E D U 2 1 2 Ele m e nt ary Edu c ati o n in U nit ed St a te s ... .......... ...... .................. .... .... .... 3 EDU 2 64 Ur b a n and Multicu ltural Edu catio n ..... ................. ................. .... . .... 3 EDS 320 Edu ca t io n a l Ps y c h o l ogy Appli ed t o Teachin g . . ........ ...... ........ ..... 3 S E D 3 60 Th e E xceptional Leam e r in the C l ass room ....... .... ....... ........ . ............ _l T otal. .... . . ......... 90 In a ddition to the a bov e c o r e requirem ent, mus i c e du c ation maj o r s mus t s elect one o f the f ollowing emp h a s es: CHORAL EMPHASIS M U S 1 4 0 V ocal Dictio n .......... . ...... ....... .......... .... .......... 3 M U S 3 5 2 Ch oral C onduc tin g a nd Lite r a tur e ..... .... .... ... . ....... ...... ..... . .... .... 3 M U S 44 2 V oca l P e d agogy .... .......... ... ........ .... . ............ ... ....... .:1 T o t al. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 INSTRUMENTAL EMPHASIS M U S 3 4 3 W ood wind T ec hniqu es and M a t eria l s . ..... ..... ... ... ............ .......... ...... 2 MUS 3 4 8 M arc h i n g Band Te c hniqu es a n d M a terial s ................ ....... . .... . ... .. ... . 2 MUS 3 5 3 Ins trum e n ta l C o ndu c t i n g an d Lit era ture . .... . . .... . . ................ .:1 T otal. ................. .... .... ... .. ... ... MUSIC PERFORMANC E MAJOR FOR B ACHELOR OF ARTS Co re Requirement for all Music Performance Majors ... ... ...... .................... 7 Required Courses Semes ter Hours M U S Ill Mus i c Th eory I. . .......... . ................ . ......... . .... .......... .... 3 M U S 112 Mus i c Th eory Lab I ...................... ............... .... ....... ............... I M U S 113 Mus i c Th eory L1 .............. . . ....... .. .... ............ .......... ....... 3 M U S 114 Mus ic The ory Lab II . ...... . '..... .......... .. ...... ...... ... . ......... I M U S 211 Mus i c The ory Ill ... .... ..... .... .... ..... ......... ... ..... . . .......... . 3 M U S 2 1 2 Music Th eory Lab Ill. .... .... ........ . ..... . ....... . .... .... I M U S 2 1 3 Mus ic Th eory IV ...... . .............. ,.......... ........... . ................. 3 M U S 214 Mus i c Th eory Lab I V . . . ... ... ..... . .... .... ..... ......... . .... I M U S 1 2 1 Mus ic Literatur e I . ..... ........ .... . .. .. .. . .. ......... .......... 3 M U S 1 2 2 Music Lit e r a ture II .......... .... . . . . ..... . . ....... 3 M U S 32 1 Mus i c His t ory I . . . ....... . .... ............ . ... .. ... . 3 M U S 322 Mus i c His tory II. . . . .. . . . ......... ...... 3 MUS 171 Priv ate Ins tru c tion I (Prim ary P e rf o rman c e Are a) ... . . ..... .... .... . . ....... 2 M U S 1 72 Privat e Instruc tion II ( Prim ary P e rf o rman c e Ar ea) ....... ....... .... ........ ............. 2 M U S 273 P e rf o rman ce Ill (Prim ary P e rf o rmance Area ) ........ ...... ......... ........... . . 4 M U S 2 74 Perf o rman ce IV ( Prim ary P erfo rm a n c e Ar ea) . .... ....... ....... ....... ... . ... ... ... 4 M U S 373 P e rf o rman ce V ( Primary P e rf o rman ce Are a) ....... .... ........ ..... . .......... .... 4 MU S 3 74 P e rf o rmance VI ( Prim ary P erfo rman c e Are a) ........ ... . . . ....... ...... ..... 4 MUS 473 Performan ce Vll (Primary P e rf orma nce Ar ea) ....... ..................... ... . .... ..... 4 MUS 474 Performan ce VIII ( Prim ary P e rf o rma n ce Area ) .... ...... .. .......... ......... .......... 4 S e l ec t 2 h o urs fro m th e following:* MUS 161 Class I n s tru ctio n ( S eco n dary P e rf o rman c e A rea) ............. .. ........ ............. ..... I M U S 162 C l ass Ins tru ctio n ( Sec o ndary P e rf o rmance Ar ea)* .......... .... . .... ........ .......... I MUS 171 Pri va t e Instructi on ( Se condary P e rf o rmance A r ea)* ... ........ ........ .............. ....... 2 N o t e : Mu s r b e Cl ass P iano I and II unl ess srudenr is a bl e r o pass r he Pri v a t e Instru c t io n Auditi o n in piano. Ex c e pti o n : Srud enrs e l ec t i n g the o r g an e m p h as i s mus t rake Cl ass Voi ce I and II unl ess s tudent is abl e ro pas s rhe Pri v at e Ins tru c ti o n Auditi o n in vo ice.

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SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Sele c t 12 hours from the following: MUS 281 Ensemble** . . ... ................. ......................... ......... I MUS 381 Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... I Note : The se c ourse numb ers ma y be rep ea ted f o r c r e dit All 12 h o ur s ma y be earned in any o ne co ur se numb e r or in any co mbination of the a bove numb e rs. Ens e mbl es must be c h ose n f r o m tho s e appr opri at e t o the s tud e nt 's are a of e mph as i s Stud e nts maj o rin g in musi c performa n c e must enroll in an e nsembl e during e a c h s e me s ter of full tim e r e sidence. MUS 351 B asic Conducting .. . . .................... 2 MUS 479 Senior R ec ital. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _.1 Total . .. 7 3 In addition to the a bove core requirement all mus i c performance m a j ors mus t selec t one o f the f o llowin g e mph ases: VOICE EMPHASIS MUS 140 Voc a l Dicti o n ............ ...................................... ....... ....... ...... 3 MUS 442 Vocal Pedagogy . . ............................................ 3. Total . . . ............. .......................... ................. ............. 6 PIANO EMPHASIS MUS 310 C o unterpoint..................... ................................................ 3 MUS 44 1 Piano Pedagogy ................................................................ 3. T o tal.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 6 ORGAN EMPHASIS MUS 310 Counterpoint. ... .... ............ ... ............. 3 M U S 352 Choral C o ndu c ting and Literature .............. ...3. Total ..... ...... ... ............ ... 6 GUITAR EMPHASIS MUS 310 Counterpoint. .... .... ....... ... . .... ...................................... 3 MUS 315 Ins trumental and Choral Sc o ring and Arranging. . ............ 3. Total. ....................................................................................... .. 6 WOODWIND, BRASS, STRING OR PERCUSSION EMPtJASIS MUS 315 Ins trumental and Choral S co ring and Arrangin g ........................................... 3 MUS 353 Ins trumental Conducting and Literature . ...... .... .......... .................. 3. Total ...... . . . . . . ............................ 6 MINOR IN MUSIC Required Co urses Semester Hours MUS I I I Mus i c The ory I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. 3 MUS 112 Musi c The ory Lab I ................ ..................... ...................... . I MUS 113 Music Theory II ...................................... . ............ ....... ......... 3 MUS 114 Mus i c Th eory Lab II . . . . . . ....... I MUS 211 Mus i c Theory lil . . . ...... ............................................ 3 MUS 212 Music Theory Lab Ill.................... . . . . . ...... I MUS 1 2 1 Mus i c Liter a ture ............ ................. ......... .... .......................... 3 MUS 1 22 Mu s i c Literature II .............. ......... ......................................... 3 MUS 171 Private Instru c tion I . . . . ...................... 2 MUS 172 Pri v ate Ins tru c tion II . . . . . . . . . . 2 Sele c t 2 hours from the following:* MUS 281 Ensemble ................................. .. I MUS 281 Ensemble . ....... ..I N o te: Thes e c our se number s ma y b e repe a ted f o r c redit; b oth hour s m ay be e arn e d i n e ith e r co ur se numb e r Upper Division Elective in music theory, his tory literature, or pedago g y ...................... .... ....... _3. Total.................. . . . . . . . ...... 2 7

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84 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES P hilo s oph y Philo ophy is the oldest of intelle c tual disc ip lines It s questions are of the mo s t e ndurin g intere s t beca u se they are the most fundamental to o ur intellectual and practi cal co n ce rn s As suc h philo so phy ca n b e taken to be a critical investigatio n into the ass ump tio n and impli catio n s associated with all ideas aero s a ll disciplines, and, in thi s r espect, it is i n terdisc iplinary in character. Ho weve r thi s type of inq uiry require t ec hni ca l co ncept s and m e thod s, and, hence, it takes on the c hara c t er of a specia lized disc ip l ine Philo so phical inquiry i s an interaction b etwee n spec ulativ e and critical thou g ht recognizing no pr e-es tabli s h e d l imit s in term s of th e sc ope of ei ther its intere s t s or its critical examinatio n s Therefore, philosophy as a s tudy pro gram e n lar ge the tudent' s hori zo n s of id eas throughout the various di scipli n es in the co llege, while sim ultane ously providing the critical slcills ne cessary to analyze and sy nthe size these ideas It encourage s tudents t o exp l ore c reati vely the full range of philo so phical options, to consider alternate points of view, and t o penetrate deepl y into profound is ue B eca u se of the s ubject matter attitu d es, and method s e mp l oyed in phi l osophy the st ud e nt will be much better prepared for l eader hip in personal life, civic re s pon sibilities, and pur s uit of a caree r In addition to offering a variety of co u rses for s tud e nts who are plannin g to take only one or t wo courses in philosophy the department offer s two programs both of whic h feature flexibility and individualized training: I A m ajor for st ud e nt s seelcing a olid, ge ner a l training/background w h ic h can serve ei th e r a a ba s i s for g r aduate st udi es in s uch varied areas a phil o op hy, the humaniti es, l a w m edic ine bus iness urban pla nnin g and de ve lopm e nt etc., o r as a b a is for a career in which the spec ial i ze d traini n g required i s provided b y the e mpl oye r s u c h as caree r s i n corporate mana geme nt gove rnment, politics, banking, or e du catio n 2. A minor for st ud e nt s who h ave already c ho sen a caree r and seek to com plem ent th eir specializ ed training/background with the opportu nitie s afforded by phil osophy to increase their caree r options and general l y to increase the quality of their lives Metro Stat e st ud en t s who m ei th er major or minor in philosophy are e n co ur age d to tak e a ppropriate UC D co ur ses wheneve r s u c h co ur ses contri bute t o th e req uir e ments or th e balan ce of their philo so p h y experie n ce These tudents s h o uld con ult the c h air of the Philo sop h y D epartme nt a t Metro State when plan nin g to take UCD courses. PHILOSOPHY MAJOR FOR B ACHELOR OF ARTS Require d Courses Sem ester H o urs PHI 144 Log i c ............ .............. ........................... ................. ... ..... 3 PHl 300 His tory of Greek Phil osophy .............................. ................................ 3 PHl 302 His tory of Modern Ph i l o so phy ... .................................................. 3 PHl 410 Senior Seminar ................ ...... .... . ...... .......... ............. _3. To!al. ........ ........................... ..... ................. ................ ...... 12 Additional Course Subject Areas Req u ired Lower Division : Introdu c tory Course s ..................... ............................ ....................... 6 Upper Division : Me!aphysics and/or Epistemology ............... ............................. ......... ............ 3 Ethics a nd/or Social Philosop hy . .............................................. ................ . 3 One philo s ophical problem or one philo sop h er ........... ............ .............. ................ .... 3 One co urse rel ating philosophy to another field, for example religion an, sc ien ce, or history ... ........... ....... _3. Total. .......................................... ................................... ............ 18 Additio n a l e l ectives at a n y level. .............. ........................................... ......... ... .Jl (Selec ted i n consu l tation with a n d ap p roved by the Depanment of Philo sophy) Total upper-divi sion semester hours required for major .............................. ........ ....... ...... 18 Total semester hours required for Philo sophy Major ..... ..... .................................... 16 MINOR IN Plm..OSOPHY Req u ired Courses emester Ho urs PHI I 0 I Introduction to Phil osophy .......... .... ..... .................................... 3 PHl I 03 Ethic s . ................... ...... ....................... ................. 3 PHl Ill Language Logic, and Persua s ion ..... . ......... . ........ .... . .......... 3 Total ... ........ .................................. ........ . .... ...... .... ........ ... .. ..... 9 E lectives A m i nimum of II additional s emester h ours of which seve n are upper-divisio n courses in philos ophy selected in consul tation with and approved b y the Depanment of Phil o ophy to make a t otal of 20 se m ester hours

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES H OLISTIC H EALTH AND W ELLNESS E D UCAT ION M ULT I-MINOR The multi-minor may be arranged throu g h the Department of Philo so phy and includes the required courses listed under the ho listic health and education multi-minor o n pa ge 180 of thi cata l og. Speech Communication Speech communication is one of the most import ant hum a n qualities Pr ofic i e n cy in o n e of the areas of s pee c h opens up many careers to the g radu ate. For instance in mas s comm uni catio n r ad i o, tel ev i sion, and film a graduate might aspire to careers in o n-air operations m ass m e dia ide as, promotion, publi c affa irs, or radio tele v i s ion sales. Grad uates might be co me co nsultant s in a d vertis in g, spec iali s t s in ins tructi o n a l o r ed u cationa l television or in the publi c broad casti n g se r vice. C a reers are ope n as broadcasting s peciali sts in public relation s, public information, busine ss, i ndu s try and gove rnment. Speech p a tholo gy graduates w ho meet the s t a ndard of the American Speech and H eari n g Association may find careers in public and private sc hool s community clinics, ho s pital s, r e habilitation centers, private practi ce, colleges and univer sities, industry, o r s t ate and federal government agencie Graduate s i n rhetoric an d public a ddre ss have achieved s ucce ss in law indu s tri a l an d organiza tion a l communication, educational administration public relations, s peech writing for political figure s, teaching, publi c relations and theology. Profe ss ional a nd educational theater occ up atio n s a re ope n to theater gra duate s with s pecialtie s in stagec raft so und engineering sc ript writing dir ecting, and ac ting. Commu n icatio n s Th eory and Organi zat ion a l Communi ca tion : Communication co n s ultin g/ tr a inin g as well as conference planning both pre se nt lucrative and satisfyi n g caree r s to speec h grad uates s peci a lizing in the se areas of co mmuni ca tion Job opportunities are availa ble in e du catio n gove rnment, bu s ine ss, and indu s try as well as pri va te practice as a consultant. S P EECH COMMUNICATION M A J O R FO R B ACHELOR OF A RTS I Core courses are required for all a re as of emphasis. 2. Independent study, topic courses, and experiential education co ur s es suc h as pra c ticum s and internships may be taken in each of the pr og r am areas 3. Additional se me s ter hou r s in s peech courses will be selec ted in cons ultati o n w ith the a dvi so r approved by the Department of Speech Communication. 4 Total minimum se me ster hour s for a major in s peech communicatio n : 36 Basic Core R e quir e d Courses SPE 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking ..... SPE 320 Ora l Interpretati o n : Pr ose and Poetry SPE 374 P syc h o l ogy of Communi catio n .. Total. BROADCASTING AREA OF EMPHASI S R equired Co u rs es SPE 240 Introdu ctio n to R adio and Television Broadc as tin g .. SPE 343 Radi o -T elev ision Announcing .. S P E 344 Televi sion Produ ction ......... SPE 345 or SPE 445 SPE 348 SPE 448 SPE 29 8 or Broad c a s t Journ alism : R adio ..... B roadcas t J ou rnali s m : Tel evis i o n Work s hop in Radi o Produ ctio n Seminar Pr acticum in Br oa d cas ting .. Cooperative Education fpr Speech Communication Semester Hou r s ..... 3 .3 J. ..... 9 Semester H o u rs . . . . ....... 3 ...... ... ... .... ....... .. 3 ....... 3 ... 3 .3 .. 3 . . . . . . . .. 3 .... 1 6 TLC 249 SPE 398 Beginning Int ernship in R adio. TV, Film. and M ass Communication s Cooperative Edu ca tion fpr Speec h Communication .. .. 1-6 1 -15 or TLC 349 Adv a n ced Int e rn s hip in R adio. TV F ilm and Ma ss Communicat i o n s ............. ...... ...... T ota l. .. ... 20-39

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86 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES COMMUNICATION THEORY AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Courses Semester Hours S P E 1 70 Co mmuni catio n The ory ....................................... ......................... 3 SPE 171 Interper sonal Co mmuni cation: Th e Individual as a Co mmunicat or .......... ................ 3 SPE 211 Discu ssio n Method s ........... ..... ............................................... 3 SPE 272 Nonverbal Communication ........................ ........................ ........ ...1 Total ............................................................ ............................ 1 2 0RGANIZA TIONAL COMMUNICATION AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Courses Semester Hours SPE 170 Commu n ication The ory ...... ........................................................ 3 SPE 3 1 0 Bu siness and Professio n a l Speaking ........................................................ 3 SPE 311 Str a te gies of Or ga n iza tional Leaders hip ............ .................................... ;l Total ............................................................................... ............ 9 PuBLIC ADDRESS AND RHETORIC AREA OF EMPHASIS R e quired Courses Semester Hours SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy ........... ....................... .... .... ............... 3 SPE 408 Rhetori ca l Criticism of Publi c Addre ss .................. ......................... ....... 3 SPE 409 Classical Rhe t o ric .................................................................. 3 SPE 410 Techniques of Persu asio n ...................................... ................. ...1 Total. .................................... ......................................................... 12 SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY AND A U DIOLOGY AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Courses Semester Hours SPE 330 V oice Science: Phoneti cs V oice, and Dict i on ............................ ............ 3 o r SPE 353 SPE 350 SPE 351 SPE 360 SPE 36 1 Voic e Science: P atho l ogy and Te chno l ogy ................................. .... ............ 3 Speech Path o logy I ............................................ .................... 3 Speech P athology II ............... .................................................... 3 Audiology I ............................................. ........... ......... 3 Audio l ogy 11 .............. .. ..... ...... ..... ...................... ...1 Total .................................... . . ......... .................................... 15 THEATER AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Courses Semester Hours ENG 112 Introduction t o Dram a ........ . ..... ....................................... 3 o r ENG 2 1 0 Introduction t o Lit erary Studies ............................................ .... ............ 3 SPE 221 Introdu ctio n to Theater ......... .............. ............ ....................... 3 SPE 222 Techniques in Acting I. ................................................. ............ 3 SPE 224 Introdu c tion to Stagecraft ............................................ ...... 3 SPE 322 Stage Movem ent ................................................................. 3 SPE 328 Stage Dir ecting .................................................... ............. ...1 Total ............................................................................... ............. : 1 8 SPEEC H EDUCATION AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Courses for the Secondary Teacher Education Program in Speech Comm unication Arts Semester Hours Basic C o r e .............................. ... ... ............................................. 9 SPE 211 Disc u ssio n Methods ..................................................................... 3 SPE 221 Introduction to Theat e r ....... ... .................................... .... ............. 3 SPE 222 Techniq u es of Acting I ................................. ............... ..... ..... 3 SPE 224 Introdu c tion to Sta gecraft .... .... ..... ............... .............................. 3 SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and Television Broadc asting ......... ................ ................. 3 SPE 30 I Advanced Public Speakin g .................................................... ..... 3 SPE 309 Argum entation and Advocacy ........ ..... ............................................ 3 SPE 328 Stage Dire c tin g ........................ ............. ................................. 3 SPE 330 Voice S cie n ce: Phoneti cs, Voice and Diction ... ................. ...................... 3 SPE 359 Speech Problem s i n the S c h ools ......... ............................................ 3 SPE 410 Techniques of Persua sion ................................. .......................... ...1 Total. .................................. ................... ............................. 42

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' SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 87 Elect i ve s for the Secondary Teacher Education Program A minimum of six semester hours in s peech course s is recommended in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech Communication These six hour s are to be sele c ted from the f o llowing lis t : SPE 305 Intercollegiate Forensic s .............................................................. I SPE 308 Great American Speakers . . . . . . . . ...... ..... ...... 3 SPE 322 Stage Movement ................................................................. 3 S P E 350 Speech Pathology I .................................................................. 3 SPE 360 Audiology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SPE 408 Rhetorical Critici s m of Public Addre ss .............................................. 3 SPE 420 Reader' s The a ter . . . ........ .. ............................ 3 S P E 426 Theater : Pra cticum I. . . . . . ...... .... .... .... .... .... .... I SPE 449 Effects of Radi oTelevision on Contemporary Life .................................. __J Total minimum h o urs r equire d . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Students seeki n g s econdary lic en s ure in spee c h edu c ati o n mus t satis f y the teacher educa tion program o f Metro State in addition to all of the maj o r requirements THE SPEECH COMMUNICATION MINOR All Spe ec h Communication minors are require d to take a minimum of 24 hours including the core (SPE 101, SPE 320 SP E 374). Hou rs taken beyond the core are to be d etermi n ed in co n sultation with a speech communication adv i so r TELECOMMUNICATIONS Telecommu nicati ons is one of the most beneficial internship program s for communication students in broadcasting Under the auspices of the Department of Speech Comm u nication the student i s afforded the opport unit y to gain first-hand experience through current internsh ip s in radio, television and film, provided by industry, govern ment business, public, and commerc i a l telecommunications ce nt ers The st uden t may begin this program upon the com pletion of six hours in bro adcasti n gt e l ecom mun icatio n s courses at Metro State Students s hould contac t :the advisor in broadcasting for details relative to eligibility a nd pla cement in the telecommunicaclons interns hips. Internship telecommunications co ur s es are offered every s emester during each of the modules as well as on a full semester basis.

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88 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES DIVISIO N OF SOCIAL SCIENCES In the social sciences, students may choose bachelor s degree programs in anthropology, history, politica l scie nce psychology sociology, socia l work, urban st u dies, mul tidisciplinary program s in behavioral scie n ce and geronto l ogy, and an array of emphasis areas and minors. These curricula develop students under s tanding of the s ubject area and their skiUs in working with individuals, groups, and large organizations. Courses range from the traditional Liberal arts based curriculum to professional internships in social work and legislative government, to studies in popular culture and research practicums Programs prepare st udent s for beginning level practice in helping services and social work agencies and grad u ate education in Law. Graduates focus on the social and behavioral science disciplines, research in the s ocia l and behaviora l sciences, work with the elderly, public administration, or seco ndary sc hool teaching. History MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS Required Courses Semester Hours HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1715 ................................ ......................... 3 HIS I 02 Western Civilizatio n s ince 1715 . ................................ ...... . ........ 3 HIS 121 American His tory to 1 865 ........ ...... ......... ..... ................... .... . 3 HIS 1 22 American His tory s ince 1 865 ....... ... .......... ........... .............. ......... 3 HIS 48 2 Senior Seminar .......................... ........... ............... .... .... ...... _l Total .............................................................. ....................... 15 Electives A ntinimum of 23 a dditional se mester hou rs i n h is t o ry i s required 18 hours of whi c h mu s t be upper-divi s ion No more than four hours in HIS 389 reading s c o urse s may be counted toward the m ajor without prior written approval from the depamnent. Course Distribution A ntinimum of 23 additional seme s ter h ours in his tory i s requi red 18 hours of which mu s t be upper divi s ion. I n the minimum of 23 additional seme s t er hours required s tudents mu s t include at lea s t three hours in ea c h of the broad areas of his t ory: Uni t ed St a te s, European Developing World Grade Average Students maj o ring in history mus t m a int a in at l eas t a 2 .0 avera ge in their his tory cou rses. Advising Hi s tory m ajors s hould consult with a departmental advi sor to se le c t the cour s e s in other disc ipline s th a t complement their area of concentration in the major. MINOR IN HISTORY There are four different areas of emphasis available to studen t s seeking a history minor : (I) regular history area of emp ha sis, (II) American popular c ultur e area of emphasis, (III) American West history area of emphasis, (IV ) twentieth-century studies history area of emphasis I. REGULAR HISTORY AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Courses HJS 101 Western Civilization to 1 715 ........ ........................ ............................ 3 HIS 102 Western Civilization s i n ce 1715 ..... . ...... ....... ... ... ......... ................... 3 HJS 121 American His tory to 1 865 .......... ....................... ........... ....... ........ 3 HJS 122 American H is tory s in ce 1865 .............................................. ......... _l Total ....................................................................... ............ ....... 12 Electives A minimum of nine additional semester hours in history is required The hours mu s t be upper-divi s ion and should be selected in consultation with a depamnental advi sor. No more than two hours in HIS 389 reading s cou rses may be counted toward the minor without prior written approval from the departme nt. II. AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Courses HJS 122 American His t o ry s in ce 1865 ............................................. ............. 3 HIS 151 Movies and His tory ....................................... .......... .................. 3 or HJS 152 Rock Music and Social His tory ................ . ........................... 3 or HIS 153 Sports in Ameri ca ....... ......... ......... .... ..... ....... ............. ..... :i Total. ....................... ............. .............. ................................... 6 E l ectives A minimum of 15 additional hi s tory hours is required of whi c h nine must be upper-di v i s ion Courses must be related to American popular culture

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SCHOOL OF lETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES III. AMERICAN W EST HISTORY AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Courses HIS 110 Ameri can West. .. ............................................ ......... ................ 3 HIS Ill Colorado History 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HIS 121 Ameri c an His tory t o 1865 . .. .. . . . .. .. .. .. ...................... 3 HIS 122 American Hist ory since 1865 . . . . . . . . ................. .1 Total. ....... ............................................................ ...... ......... 12 E l ectives A minimum of nine additional history hour s treating the American Wes t is requ ired, all of which must be upper-divi sio n IV. TwENTIETH-CENTURY STUDIES HISTORY AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Courses HIS 122 American History since 1865 .......................................................... 3 HIS 20 1 Contemporary World History ................... ...................................... J_ Total.......................... ............................................................. 6 Electives A minimum o f 15 additional hour s treating twentieth -c entury h is tory is required. of which nine must be u pper-divisio n Gra d e Average Students min ori ng in history mu st maintain a 2.0 average in th eir history cour ses. SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION LICENSURE IN SOCIAL SCIENCES Student s majoring in history may combine their major with other courses in the soc ial sc iences and in education to earn secondary education licensure The requirement s of thi s program are included under the Education Department sectio n of thi s catalog PRELAW COURSES Several history courses are of particular importance to legal s tudies. These include HIS 121, HIS 122, HIS 346, and HIS 368. Students intere s ted in prelaw courses are urged to co ntact the departmental advisor. MINOR IN I NTERDISCIPLINARY LEGAL STUDIES The i nterdi scip linary legal studies minor is designed to show studen t s how the various di sc ipline s in the humanitie s and social scie n ces treat que s tions of law and justice. The interdisciplinary legal s tudie s minor is not a pre -law preparatory program or paral ega l training It s g oal is to cro ss disciplines so that stu dents can understand how the humanities and social sc iences illuminate the principles, practices, and policie s of the law Required Courses Sem ester Hours CJC 110 Evolutionary Legal Concept s in Criminal Ju stice . . . . . . .... 3 HIS 368 The Court in Crisis. . . . . . . .... ..................................... 3 PHI 343 Phil osop hy of Law. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. 3 SOC 355 Sociology of Law .............................. ............... ..... .............. 3 ENG 370 Lit era tur e and the Law . . . . . . ...................... .... ........... 3 PSC 312 American Constitutional Law . . . . . . .... ........................ 3 xxx xxx Seminar in Legal Topics ( Int e rd isci plinary team taught co u rse) ........... ... ...... .......... ....3. Total........... . . . . . . . . . ......................... 21 Students will s el ec t o ne l aw-re lated cou rse fr o m the courses listed below o r app r oved by the interdiscip l i nary legal stud ies minor advisor: MGT MGT CJC HIS soc WMS 221 322 210 346 350 33 1 Legal Enviro nm ent o f Bu siness I Legal Env iro nment of Busin ess 11. Substantive Criminal Law ...... The Constitution and the N ew Nation, 1787-1848. Criminology ..... W o m e n a nd the Law Total Hours Required for M i nor ................... .. 3 .. 3 .. .. ... .. .. 3 .3 .. .......... 3 .. ....3. .... 24

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90 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES 0 Political Science The s tudy of politi ca l scie nce is mainly the s tudy of governments : their social and eco nomic environments how they are organized, ho w and why they decide upon and carry out policies, and how nation-states interact on the world scene It also includes the s tudy of political idea s and values, past and present, citizen behavior, and recent trend s in method s of r ese arch and analysis aimed at enlargin g our knowledge of political pr ocesses In thi s se n se, the Department of Political Scien ce pro v ide s st ud ents with the perspective and backg r ound n ecessary to under s tand the co mplex a nd often co n f u sing reality of politi cs. To foc u s that searc h for under s tanding eac h politi ca l scie nce major will se le c t a primary area of s tudy ei ther in American politic s or internati o n a U co mpar ative politics Course lis tin gs for eac h area are avai l able in the department office. The departmental o h ouses the co lleg e s Public Administration and Urban Studies programs PRELAW The Departm ent of P o l itical S cie nce also offe r s pr e l aw advising to all stude nts at the college, regardless of st ud ents major field s of st udy If yo u are thinkin g of app l ying t o law sc hool or would lik e m ore information o n the LSAT or law sc hool s, plea se co nta ct the department s prelaw advisor. POLITICAL SCIENC E MAJOR F OR B ACHELO R OF ARTS Required Courses Se m este r Hours P SC I 0 I A m erica n National Government . . . . . . . . . . . ........... 3 PSC 102 Political Systems and Ide as ................ ........................... ......... 3 PSC 202 Conducting P olitical Analysi s .................................. .................. 3 or PSY 231 Introductio n to Stati s tic s for Socia l and Behavi oral Sciences ....................... . ........ 3 PSC 305 Political Theory ....... ..... ........ ............. ..................... ............ 3 PSC 402 Special Studies ( Seni o r Experien c e ) ............. ..... . ............................... _l Subtotal ............... .. ... ...... ..... ............ ......... .................................. 15 Elec tives A minimum of 21 additional se me s ter h o urs of politica l sc ien ce mu s t be co mplet ed A t least 1 8 of the s e 21 h ours must be upper divi s ion course s (300and 400-Ievel ) and mu s t be approved by the depanment Generally, s tud ents may a pply only 12 hours of credit in non-cia sroom co urse s toward the major a s approved e l ectives. Total hours r equired for major .................................................. ...................... 36 Course Distributi o n and Area Concentration Of the 2 1 e l ective h ou r s in political sc i ence 12 must be i n the s tud ent's primary area of study: American politics or i m ernat ionaU com parative politics A minimum of three hours must be drawn from the rema inin g area of co nce n tration and six h o urs can be selec ted at the st udent's discretion MINOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE Required Courses Semester Hours PSC 101 American National Government ... ....................................................... 3 PSC 102 Political Sys tem s and Ideas.. . . ..... ..... ..... ........ ..................... 3 PSC 305 Political Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . .......... 3. Subtotal ..................................................................... ... ................... 9 E lectives A minimum of 12 additional seme.ster hours are required in political sc ience co urses At least nine of these 1 2 hours must be in upper division co ur ses (300 and 400 l evel ) a nd must be approved by the departm ent. Gene r ally st u de nt s may apply o nly six h o ur s of c r edit in non clas s room co u rses toward the m ajor as approve d electives Total se m este r hours required for a PSC minor ...................................... ...................... 2 1 MINOR IN PuBLIC ADMINISTRATION Publi c administration is the s tudy of governmental organizations their man age ment and how gove rnment policies are formulated and carried out. The Political Scien ce Department offe r s a minor in public administration avai lable to students inter ested in a career in gove rnment service, to stu dents presently employed i n gove rnment who wish to increase their skills and job s tatu s, a nd to s tudents planning to take postgraduate work in public administration. Required Cou rses Semester Hours I. Basic co ur ses r equired for all public admini s tration min ors : PSC 1 0 1 A m erica n National Go ve rnm ent ... ........................ 3 PSC 302 I ntroduction to Public Admini stratio n ................ ........................ 3

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES ll. Two of the following courses: PSC 322 Public Policy ..................................... ................................ .... 3 PSC 324 l ntergovernrnental Relation s . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PSC 326 Politic s of Budgeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PSC 328 Public Personnel Admini stration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACC 320 Governmental Accounting................ ... ... ........ .......... .. 3 ill. One of the following courses : CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems.... . . . . . . . . ...... 3 MTH I 2 I Introduction to Statistics . . . ........... ..... .... ............................ 4 IV. Intern shi p PSC 412 or substitute course ( minimum ) ...... .... ...... ..... .... ......... ......... _____:)_ Total.................................................. . . . ......... 19-20 A gove rnment a l intern s hip will be required of all students for a minimum of one se me ste r and a minimum of thr e e se me s ter hours. This requirement may be waived for st udent s with a t lea st one cale ndar year of a dmini strative work experience in a governme nt age ncy. It is re commende d that public a dmini stratio n minor s a l so take a co ur se in both public s peaking and in technical writing. Also available to s tudent s is a pr ogram of co ur ses l ead in g t o a recognition of completion award in publi c a dmini stratio n pre se nt e d b y the Politi ca l Science D e p artment. Student s may earn the award by s u ccessfully completing a se l ectio n of courses amounting to 26 semes ter hours. Contact the Political Science D e partment for details MAJOR AND MINOR IN URBAN STUDIES Plea se see the Urban Studie sectio n of thi s ca tal og. I NTERNSHIPS In addition to sc heduled classes, political science s tudent s are enco ur aged to enroll for at least one off campus intern s hip Student s may receive credit for practical work experience in various areas of gove rnment service. Place m ent in a governme ntal position may be initiated by the stude nt Cooperative Education or the Politi cal Science D epartment. Interested s tudent s sh o uld contact the Political Science Departm e nt for details. C O URSES WITH VARIABLE TOPICS Not lis t ed amon g the regular course s are a var i ety of topic s co ur ses and self-paced courses which are offe r e d eac h semes t er and give the s tudent a greater variety of c h oice. Plea se be s ur e to check the c urrent Class Schedule for these c l asses, w hich ca n b e repeat e d for credit under different title WASHINGTON, D.C. PROGRAM Durin g the s umm e r sessio n the department offers a spec ial program in Wa shington, D .C. aimed at providin g s tudent with a unique perspective o n the nation's political system The program combines a four-week modul e h eld in Washin g t o n with on-campus meetings and relevant rea din gs Please contact the department about this pro g r a m Also, the d epartment works w ith students intere s ted in an intern experience in Wa s hin g ton durin g the s umm er o r durin g the fall or spri n g se mesters. GOLDA MEIR CENTER FO R POLITICAL LEADERSHIP T h e Golda Meir Center for Politi ca l Leadership is connected to the historic Golda Meir Hou e on the Auraria campus. The ce nter i s organized and o per a ted through the P olitical Science D e p artment. The center's purpo se is to develop pro g r a m s that: exami n e the role of l eaders and leadership at all l eve l s of the political proce ss; blen d tog e ther theoretical and ap plied politics ; and emphasize voices and perspectives that expan d the boundaries of traditional l eade r ship ana lysis. Urban Studie s Program A bachelor of arts or a bachelor of s cience d eg r ee with a major in urban st udie s i s offered The bachelor of scie n ce de gree is recommended for tho e students desiring a s tronger b ackgro und in quantitativ e aspects of urb a n s tudi es. Co ur ework i s jointly offered by Metro Sta t e and the University of Colorado at D enver; the m ajor is offe red at Metro State. The emphasis of this program is an interdisciplinary approach to learning To s upport this approach s i x areas of emphas i s are offered wit hin the major. I l ocal gove rnment/urban planning 2. h o usin g pattern s and a lt ernatives 3. c ultural lifes tyles 4 transportation and com muni cation 5. n on profit organization administration 6 business management and urbanization

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92 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES URBAN STU DIES MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS The req u irements total 46 se mester hours and include : I. Fi ve-27 hours of core co ur ses 2. Nine hour s elec t ed from each of four areas of proces 3. Two h ours in an area of emphasis to be se l ected by the student. 4. Six additional hour s for a b ac h elor of scie n ce degree 5. Urba n s tudies' majors who do not wish t o pur sue a mino r in some other discipline w ill be r equired t o t ake a t least 14 semester h o ur s for a tot a l of 60 se mester h ours. The 1 4 semeste r h o ur s must be se l ected in co n s ult ation with a faculty a dvi sor. 6. There are different r equire m e nt s for the nonprofit busi n ess administrat i o n business m anageme nt and urbanization emphases. Require d Cou rses Se mester Hours URS I 00 Introdu ctio n to U rb an Studie s . . . . . . . . . ................ 3 URS 200 An Inside Look a t Urban Ins titution s . ............................ ......... ... ....... 3 URS 300 World Pauerns o f Urbanization ................... ........ .............. ......... ...... 3 URS 380 Applied Urban Re s earch Method s ............................... ...................... 3 URS 489 Interdi sci plinary Seminar. ................................................................ 4 URS 499 Int ernship in U rban Studie s ....................... . ................................... 3 Ad va nced wri t ing course. which may be taken from nonprofit bus ine ss adminis trati on Eng li s h or communications ..... *3-4 Stati s tic s, which m ay be taken from economi cs, geog raphy mathem a t ics, psycholog y, or soc iology... . . . *3-4 Tot al.... . . . . . . ... .......... 25-27 Nonprofit o r ga nization administrat i on student s may e l ec t t o fulfill these requir ements within the nonprofi t o r ganization ad mini s trati on a r ea o f emphasis. A t otal of nin e h ou r s s hould be s e l ec t ed from the f ollowing a r eas of process. Nonprofit orga nization admini tration s tudent s will take o ne co urse from two areas for a t o tal o f at l eas t six h ours Substitutio n s for the s e co ur ses s h ould be arranged through a n Urban Studie s advisor. Urban Spatial Structuring Processes URS 3 I 0 Intern a l Stru c ture of the City. . . . . ... .............. 3 URS 35 I Community Deve lopm ent and Plan ning . . . . .... .... 3 URS 400 Ur ban Simulat io n/Game . . . . . . . . .. 4 GEG 204 G eog r ap h y of Denver. . . . . . . . . .......... 3 GEG 360 Urban Geography. . . . . . . . . . . . . ............ 3 GEG 46 I U rban and Regi onal Plannin g ........................ ..................................... 3 Urban Politi ca l Processes URS 2 1 0 URS 350 URS 400 PSC 300 PSC 302 soc 371 An Analysis of Urban B o undaries. Emerging Urban P o l itical System s Urba n Simulation/Game ... American State and L ocal Government. ............... Introduction to Public Admini s tr atio n ...................... .......... 3 .......... 3 ..... 4 .............. 3 .. .................. 3 Politi cs and Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Urban Economic Processes ECO 20 I Prin ci ple s of Economics M acro ...................... ............. ...... ........... 3 ECO 202 Prin c iple s o f Economics Micro ....................................................... 3 ECO 330 State and L ocal Finance . . ...... .............. ................................. 3 EC O 335 Urban Economic Analy s i s ..................................... ......................... 3 ECO 340 Tra n spo rtati o n Economics .......................... ..... ............................. 3 ECO 345 Environmental Economics. ......................................................... 3 SOC 324 Po ve rty i n America ............... ..................................... 3 Urban Soc ial Processes GEG 130 GEG 362 GEG 462 soc 309 soc 324 Total.. Geographic Analysi s of Current Soc i a l I ss ue s .......................................... 3 Popu l at i o n Reso urces, and Land U s e ......... ..... .......... . . . . 3 Land Use: Resident i a l ....... .......... ........ ................. 3 Urban Sociology .............. ........... ... ......... 3 Poverty in America .................... .............. ;1 ...................... 9 Area of Emphasis In each o f the first f o ur f ollo wing areas o f emph asis. the s tudent will se lect a minimum o f I 2 hours wit h a minimum of six in urban s tudies. Th e s tudent may take any combination of interdi s ciplinary co ur ses related to the area of empha sis to be selec t ed in con s ult ation with an a dvi so r One of the course s s h o uld be a kill' s course relat e d to the area of emphasis. LOCAL GOVERNMENTURBAN PLANN I G Thi s area of empha s i s concentrates on the ba sic concept u a l and theo retica l plannin g processes as the y relate to and actually a ppear in urban government occ upati o n s and pr ofess i o ns. The area o f emphasis i s designed for s tud ents eeking entry into gove rnment occupations o r seeking advanced s tudy in publi c a dmini s tra t io n or urban planni n g beyond the bache l o r's degree.

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES URS 250 New Front Range Communitie s . . ................. 3 URS 289 Urban Problem s : Topics . . . . . . ........ . ..... 1-3 URS 351 Community Development and Planning . . . . . . . ............ ... 3 URS 389 Reading s in Urban Studies ........................... . .......... .... ........ ..... 1 3 URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game . . . ........... 1-4 URS 410 Urban Environmental Percepti on. . . 3 URS 450 Cities of the Future . . . . . . ............ 3 URS 451 Community Involvement Methods . . . . ........ 3 URS 471 The Urban Elderly : Pri s oners of Space . . . . . . . . . . .. 3 HOUSING P ATTERNS AND ALTERNATIVES This area of emphasis will concentrate on the assembly and development of residential land, the n atu r e of public and private programs to provide housing and the maintenance and rebuildin g of neighborhoods A broad range of t opics will include the evolution of public in t ervention in housi n g and re si de n tial renewal the conflict between phy sica l and hum a n criteria in housing deci sions and constraints on the public's ability to deal with housing issues. Completion of thi s area of emphasis provides a foundation for graduate work and/or em ployment with a wide range of public and private housing agencies URS 171 I ntrod uction to Denver Neighborhoods. . . . . . ... .... ...... 3 U RS 230 Introdu ctio n t o Urban Housing Problem s . ..... .. ........ ................... 3 URS 250 New Front Range Communities . . . . ... ................... 3 URS 289 Urban Pr o blems : Topic s ... .............................. ..... .... ....... ... 1 3 URS 330 Hou s ing : Iss ues and P o l icie s ........... .................. .......... .......... ........... 3 URS 389 Reading s in Urban Studie s ......................... ... . ............... . ......... 1-3 URS 400 Urban Simulation/Gam e . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 URS 450 Cities of the Future . 3 MGT 300 Organizational Management .. 3 FIN 380 Re a l Estate Practice and Law 3 CULTURAL L I FESTYLES This area of emphasis concentra te s o n the impacts on the urban land sca pe of the life s tyle s of various c u lture s be they ethnic, racial, chronological, reli g i ous, economic, or gender. The con seq uence s of these impacts are viewed as among the m ost s ignificant determinants of urban s tructure form, fun c tion and s ocial interaction. The student i s provided with specialized training and experience for entry into profes s ion with public or private age n c i es tha t deal directly with the s e group s within a plurali stic urban environment. URS 250 New Front Range Communitie s ............. ... 3 URS 371 Ethnic Groups in U S. Cities. .. .... 3 URS 389 Reading s in Urban Studies ............. ...... . 1-3 URS 400 Urban S imulation/Game ........ .. .. 1-4 URS 410 Urban Environmental P erception ..... .. .. .... 3 URS 47 1 The U rban Elderly: Pri so ne rs of Space. ... 3 T RANSPO R TATION AND COMMUNI CAT ION The transportation-communication area of emphasis ha s three ba s i c acade mi c foci : (I) to aid students in refining their percepti o n s of the variou s networks that exist in the urban setting; (2) to provide tool s a nd techniques to analyze the se networks ; and (3) to increase the s tudents unde rstan d i ng that transportation and comm uni catio n are interdependent with s uch factors as land use politic s, and demography Completion of thi s area of empha s i s provides a foundation for a professional career or further gra duate training. URS 228 Introduction t o Tran sponation Sy s tem s. . . . . . . . . ........ 3 URS 289 Urban Problems : Topic s . . . . . . . . ............... 1-3 URS 328 Tran sponatio n : I ss ue s and Poli c i es . . . . . . . ........ 3 URS 389 Readings in Urban Studie s. . . . . . . . . 1-3 URS 400 Urban Simulation/G ame . . . .. 1-4 URS 450 Citie s of the Future . . . . . ........................ 3 NONPROFI T ORGAN I ZAT ION ADMI NISTRATION This area of emphasis combines class room theory and pra c tical experience in a comprehensive format Students' formal c l assroom experiences are s upplemented by a t le as t 20 ho u r s per wee k during two se mesters i n p l acement experience s. All field work will be carefully supervised and s t u dent prog r ess will be measured agai n st learning objectives cooperatively developed for each course by the s tud ent, agency s upervisor and the college coo rdinator o r faculty member. This area of emphasis is designed to provide an educational program for a very specific administrative level in nonprofit agencie s and organizations The di r ective s kills include deve l opme n t and management of voluntee r program s. fund-raising, proposal writing, program and human res o urce development. Co u rse R eq u irem e n ts Includ e: l. URS Required Core Courses .............. ....... ............ .... ......................... I 6 2. Se l .octed Electives. .... ...... .... ............................................ 7 3. NOA Are a of Emphasis . . . . . . ............................... 20 HSP 201 Principle s of Nonprofit Admini stratio n ........... ... ........... ...... 4 HSP 321 Organizational Stability of Nonprofit Organization . . ........................... 4 HSP 361 Fin ancial Accountability and Organ iza tional Control of NPO's ........... .................... 4 HSP 402 Fun draising and Proposal Writing for NPO's. . . . .... ....... ............. . 4 HSP 431 H uman Resource Development in NPO's ................... .... .... ...... . .......... Total ......... ........... ............................................. ......... ............ 43

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94 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES BUSINESS MANAGEMENT, AND URBANIZATION This area of emphasis will stress the interrelationships between the private bu sine ss sector and the public policy and urban life designers and decision-makers. Public sector/priva t e sec t or/policy makers' cooperation or the l ack thereof in the future, will have a direct effec t on urban Hfesty l e I ssues to be addres s ed or focused upon in this em pha s i s are: the r o l es of business and urban government in the overall p rocess of urbanization; the functions of managing bus in e ss a nd managi n g government; th e importance of s ales tax revenues to both busines s an d government; and, with l ess governmen t a l employment in the future the changes that are in s tore for small and medium sized bu s ines s es This area of emphasi s is ex pr e ss ly directed toward the s tudent s eeking an undergraduate major in manageme nt or admini s tratio n of government o r ganizations a t the l ocal, s t a t e or federal level, or in management position s in private ind u stry Course Requirements Include: I. URS Required Core Courses ........ ........... . .......... ......... . ............... 25 27 2 Busines s Management Urbanization Emphasi s ................................. ..... ...... ... 2 1 MGT xxx (Any Metro State introduction to business course ) ............. ......... . ..... 3 MGT 250 Small Business Management. ...... .................................. .... .... ... 3 MGT 300 Organizational Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MKT 300 Principle s of Marketing ............ ................ .............. .................... 3 Six Hours to be Sele c ted From : ECO 350 Managerial Economic s . . ......... .............................................. 3 MGT 453 Organizational Behavior ........................................ ...... ............. 3 MKT 301 Marketing R esearch ......... ....... ........... . .............. ............. .... 3 MKT 311 Adverti s ing M a n agement. ...................... ........ ................ ..... 3 MKT 330 Marketing of Services ...................... ............... ............ 3 MKT 33 1 Consume r B e havior .... . ..... .... . .... .......................... 3 ACC 308 Small Business Taxation ... . . . . .... .... . ............................. 3 URBAN STUDIES MAJOR FOR B ACHELO R OF SCIENCE T he req u irement for the major in urb an s tudie s l eading to the ba chelor of scie n ce degre e include s s i x ernes t e r hour in a ddition to the ba c hel or of arts de gree. The six hour s must be taken fro m the following list of courses CMS 20 1 Principles of I nformation System s .... ............ .... ...... .. ... .................... 3 CMS 2 1 4 Fundamentals of Programming A s semb l er .......... ............ .......... ........... 3 CMS 223 Word Processing ..... .......... ............................... .... ............ 3 CMS 3 1 2 BASIC P rogramming and Graphi c s for Computers . .... .................. . ... ... 3 MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Scie n ces .... .................. ..... 4 URBAN STUDIES MINOR Minors for both the bachelor of sc ience d eg ree a nd the b ac h e lor of art s degree are avai l ab l e The minor ca n be de sig ned to provide the s tudent with course experie nce s that are most rele v ant to her or his occ upational and ed u cational goa ls. Students, in consultation with the department offering related cour ses and the s tud e nts urb a n studies fac ulty a dvi so r will develop individual minors that will reHect the best po ss ible elective c urriculum and will insure that an urb a n emphasis i s maintain ed. Required Courses URS I 00 Introduction to Urban Studies . ............. ...................................... 3 URS 200 An I nside Look at Urban In s titutions ................ ................................... 3 COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing .................... .............. ... ... ...... ..... .J Subtotal ........ ....... .. ... . .... ....... .... . ............................................. 21 Twelve ad diti onal s e m ester hours are r eq uir ed to complete the minor The e lecti ve cou rses are to be selected in con s ultati o n with a URS faculty advisor Elective Cou rse s .... ........ . ............................................. ....... 12 Tot a l se m es t er hours required for the min or. .... ............................ ................. 2 1 Psychology DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT O UTCOME GOALS Upo n completion of a de gree progr am in p syc holo gy at Metropolitan State College of D e nv er, s tudent s will be able to: I. Demonstrate a knowledge of the major hi torical co ntributi ons and them es b asic principles, c urr ent i s ue s and e mergin g developments in p syc hology 2 D e mon stra t e the a bility to communicate knowledg e of the field of p syc holo gy both orally and in writing the latter following the American P syc hologi cal A ssociatio n guidelines 3. D e m o n stra t e the ability to r e lat e psyc h ological princip l es and methodo l ogy to the problem s and i ss u es in ot her disci plines

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SCHOOL Of LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 9 4 Demo n stra t e the ability to co n d u ct independently a basic literature search on a given problem in psyc h o l ogy a n d the ability t o int egrate this n ew i nformation i nt o a coherent understanding of the basic issues relating to thi problem. 5 Demonstrate an understanding of and the abi l ity to app l y the fundamentals of research metho d ology and statistical analysis to the interpretation and eva l uation of research reports. 6. Exp r ess an appreciation for the valu e of p syc hological knowledge in impro ving our wor l d and for individual differences and u n iversal commonal t ies i n human experience The major or minor program i s to be planned in consultation wit h an advisor from the Psychology Department by the beginnin g of the junior year or upon transfer into th e department. MAJOR F OR B ACHELO R OF A R TS Required Courses Semester Hours PSY 101 Introdu c t ory P sychology . . . . . ........ 3 PSY 23 1 I ntroduction to Statistic s for Social and Behavioral Sciences ... ............................ 3 PS Y 232 Inferential Statistics . . . ......... 3 PS Y 33 1 P syc h o l ogica l Re search M ethods I . . . . ... 3 PSY 332 P sycho l ogical R esearc h Method s II. . . . 3 PSY 451 Hi story and Systems of P sychology . . .... ..2 Subtotal .... In ad diti on stu dent s must choose one course from each category : Social ..... PSY 215 PSY 241 PSY 305 PSY 347 Cross-Cultural P sycho l ogy Social P sychology P s ychology of Gender P syc h ology of Violence and Aggression Experimental ........ .... .... PSY 357 Cognitive P syc h o l ogy PSY 359 Theories of Motivation PSY 430 Sensation and Perc eption PSY 431 P h ysiological Psycholo gy PSY 439 P sycho l ogy of Learning 18 ..... ..... ... ............ ......... .... 3 .. 3 Clinical/Personality ............. ............ ... ..... ....... ..... ....................... ..... ... 3 PSY 216 Pe rsonality and Adjustment PSY 300 Theories of Pe rsona lity PSY 310 P sychology of Counseling PSY 362 Abnormal P syc holo gy D evelopme nt al. ......... ...... .. PSY 221 PSY 325 PSY 326 PSY 327 P sycho logy of Human De velopme n t Child P syc h ology P syc hol ogy of Adolescence Adulthood and Aging ... _2 Subtotal ... .............. ............. ............................ 12 Total hours of required co urse s ......... ... ... .......... ............ .... ................. ............ 30 E l ectives A minimum of 15 additional emester hours in p s ychology course s s elec t ed in consultation with and approved by a Departm en t of P sycho l ogy a dvi so r m aking a t ota l of 45 h o urs in psychology. No m o r e than nine of these hours may be PSY 2 95 Variable Topics co u rses and n o m ore than s i x of these hours may be PSY 498 Ind ependent Study The maximum number of hours in psychology a student may count toward a bachelor of art s degree is 60. Total h o ur s for major ... .. ... . 45 Addit ion a l R equire m ent BlO 100 Hum an Biology for Non-Majors. 3 o r B l O 108 General I n trod u ctio n t o Biology .... 4 o r equivalent This additio nal r equi r ement may be applied toward General Studies the minor or degree electives. Stud e nt s con si d e ring a dv anced degre es s h ould be aware that in addition to coursework in the areas listed above graduate programs often have s pecific under gra du ate course prerequis it es R equired or recommended cours es, d epe ndin g o n the grad uate program include Theories of P ersonality A bn ormal Psychology, P s ychology o f Learning. Child Psychology, Ph ysio lo gical P sychology Indu s trial P syc h ology Sensation and P ercep tion Cooperative Education in P syc hol ogy Teaching of P syc h o l ogy, an d Advanced Statistics. Therefore stude nts should con s ult with a P sychology Department advisor to choose appropriate psychology elective s. Students interested in the Gerontology area of emph asis must select a minimum of 30 hours (see list under Department of Sociology, Gerontology Area of Emphasis) in addition to th e 30 hours of re quired courses for the psychology major. This mu s t be d one in consultation with and approved by a Department of P s ychology advisor The gerontology empha s i s may be applied in lieu of the 15 elective h o urs in the p syc hology major and the min o r requirement. Students may not co unt the same course twice t oward meeting requirements in both the major and the geron t ology emphasi ; different courses m u st be chosen t o co mplet e the major h o ur s and the ge r o nt o l ogy hours.

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96 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES StudenlS de s iring sec ondary licensure in s ocial s tudies s hould contact an advisor in the Department of Teacher Education In meeting the requirement s f o r the p sychology major (described above), transfer s tudenlS mus t take a minimum of 15 se m es ter hours of p syc hology coursework at Metro State, of which at least nine mus t be upper-division credilS NOTE : The Psyc hology D epartment doe s not count CLEP c redit toward the total number of se mester hours required for the major o r min o r ; extra co ursework i s neces sary to make up the difference The P sychology Department doe s not accept co rr es pondence s tudy co ur s e s toward the total number of se mester hour s required f o r a major or minor. However both CLEP and correspondence s tudy credi t can count toward the degree Student s who wish to u s e p syc hology cou rse s t o fulfill ge n eral s tudie s' requir ements mus t earn additional hours t o fulfill the total hours for either the major or minor in psychology The only excep tion is PSY 451, His t ory and Sy s tem s of Ps ychology, which may be used as a Senior Experience without being replaced in the major o r minor Plea se co nsult with an advisor. HOLISTIC HEALTH AND WELLNESS EDUCATION M U LTI-MINOR The multi -minor may be arranged through the Department of Psychology an d includes the required course s listed under the holistic health and well ness education multi-minor on page 180 of this catalog. MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY Required Courses Semester Hours PSY 101 Introduct ory P s ycholog y ........ ..... ........................................ 3 PSY 451 His tory and Systems o f Psyc h o l ogy .......... . .............. .......................... 3_ To t al. Electives ................................................ .................................... 6 A minimum of 15 a dditional semes ter hours in p syc h o logy co u rses selec ted in consultation with and approved by a Department of P syc holog y advisor is required, making a total of 2 1 hours in p s ychology. No more than six se me s ter hours may be PSY 295 Variab l e Topic s co urses, n o more than three semes t e r h our s may be PSY 397 Practicum and at lea s t two electives in p syc hology (six e m es ter hours ) taken at Metro State mus t be upper-division See als o above NOTE. Sociology The st udy of soc iology emp h asizes under tanding people in gro ups-sm all groups like the family, the all-pervasive bureaucratic organization s of American soc iety p olitical parties, football crowds, grou p s in conflict, and s ociety as a whole. It include the study, from a variety of theoretical models, of past and present soc ietie s and soc ial proce ses, and the analysis using modern research methods of contemporary social issues. The s ociology program offers to its majors and minor s, and to student from all academic disciplines, courses tha t focus on important is ues and trends in today's complex societies. SOCIOLOGY MAJOR FOR B ACHELO R OF ARTS Required Courses Semester Hours SOC 101 Introdu ct i o n t o Sociology ............................................ .... .... ....... 3 SOC 20 I Current S oc ial Issue s ............ .......... ............................................ 3 SOC 332 S ociolog ical Theory: Past and Pre sent . .......... ......... ..................... 3 SOC 360 R esearch in the Social S cie nc es. . . ..................... ......... ..... ...... 3 SOC 460 Advanced Research in the Social Sciences. ........................ .... __.3. Total. .................. .... . ..................................... ..................... ...... 15 Electives A minimum of 2 1 a dditi o n a l se mester h o urs in socio logy course s i s required, constituting a total of 36 semester hours At least 1 2 upper-divi sio n se me s t er h o urs in soc iolog y mus t be completed a t Metropolit an State College of Denver by s tudents majoring in the field Grade Requirements in th e Major Student s mus t auain a course grade of C" or above i n all sociology co u rses that count towa r d the socio logy major A g rad e of D or below will not co unt toward the 36 hour s necessary for a majo r in sociology Optional Areas of Co ncentration in Soc iolo gy Each a r ea of co n ce ntrati o n include s a number of co u rses de s igned to give the st udent an in-depth exploration of the knowledge, challenges i ss ues, and re search in a s pecific s ubdi sci pline of so ciology l. The Urban Community This co ncentra tio n i s p artic ularly recommend ed for tho se intere ted in urban studies and all s tudent s whose career plans are aimed toward management planning or administrat ion in the urban seuing. SOC 322 R ace. Sex and Ethnic Group s ............................................... ....... 3 SOC 355 Sociology of Law .............................................................. 3 SOC 373 M ass Media and Social Beh avior ........................................... .... 3 SOC 381 P o pulation I ss ues ........................ ... ......... . ......... ..... ...... 3

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SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES U. Social Deviance This co n ce ntrati o n is particularly r ecom mended for c rim inal ju stice human serv i ces. prelaw and p syc hology major s and all s tude nt s whose caree r goals involve w o rkin g in prevention treatment a nd/ or rehabilitation pr ogra ms. SOC 20 I C u rrent Social Issu es . . . . ... 3 SOC 250 Deviant B ehavior in Societ y 3 SOC 350 Crimi n o l ogy . .............. .... . . 3 SOC 351 Ju venile Delinquenc y . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SOC 355 Soc i o l ogy of Law ..................................................... ........ 3 SOC 383 Mental Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ill. The Family and A lt ernative Life Sty les This co n ce ntrati o n i s p artic ularly re co mmended for t eac h e r edu catio n hum a n s ervices, and psych o l ogy major s and all s tudent s wh o plan peoplese rving careers SOC 240 The Chicano Family. . . . . . . 3 SOC 310 Death and Dying . .................. ........... ....... ... .......... 3 SOC 340 C hildh ood and Adole sc e nt S ocia liz ation .......... ......... ................ ...... ....... 3 SOC 341 The Family in Tran s ition . . .... .......................... ........... 3 SOC 342 Educatio n in a Changing Society . . . . . . 3 SOC 343 Soci o l ogy of Sex R oles . . . . . 3 SOC 344 Th e Black Fami l y . . . ................................. 3 SOC 346 Sociolo g y o f Sexualit y. 3 SOC 351 Juvenil e D e l inquency . ...... ......... 3 IV. Medici n e a nd Health Thi s co ncentr ation is particularly reco mm ended for he alt h care management nursin g, pr emed and p syc holog y majors. SOC 104 Introdu c tion t o Geronto l ogy . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SOC 304 Contemporary Issues in Ger ontology .............................. 3 SOC 3 I 0 Death and Dying . . . . ....... 3 SOC 380 H ealth and H ealers . . . . . . . . . ..... 3 SOC 381 P o pulati o n Issues . . . . ... 3 SOC 383 Mental Di so rders . . . . 3 V. Socia l C l ass and S tratifi cation Thi s co n ce ntr a tion focu ses on the v ariou s ways in whic h soc iet ies are divided It i s recomme n ded for all s tudent s wis hing to gain further unde rstanding of confiic t and ineq u a lit y in groups and socie tie s and t o explo r e poss ible so luti o n s to the se pr o blems. SOC 20 I Current Social I ss u es . ...... 3 SOC 320 S oc ial Classes in Americ a . . . ......... 3 SOC 322 R ace Sex and E thni c G r oups . . . .. 3 SOC 324 Poverty in America 3 SOC 343 Sociology of Sex R oles . . . ........ 3 VI. Cha n ging Socia l Institutions Thi s concentration offe r s a br oa d overview o f the dominant ins tituti o n s in soc iet y those institutions tha t provide the frame w ork for ou r work, fami l y lif e, and general soc ia l int eraction SOC 320 Social Clas s es i n America . . . ........ ......... .... .... ... ........ ...... 3 SOC 341 The Family i n Tra n s ition . . . . . .... .... ....... .... ......... .... ... 3 SOC 342 Edu catio n in a Changing Society . . . . . . 3 SOC 346 Soci ology of Sex u ality. . . . . .. ............ 3 SOC 355 Sociology of Law . . .. .. .. .. .. .. 3 SOC 371 P o liti cs and P o wer . . . . . 3 SOC 380 Health and Healer s. . . . . . . . .. 3 SOC 391 R eligio u s M ove m ents in Americ a . . . . . ... 3 SOC 430 S ocial Change . . . . . . . . . ... 3 Introducti o n t o Statistics f o r S ocia l and B ehavioral Sciences ( PSY 311) i s strOngl y recommended for socio l ogy majors who plan t o go o n for gra duat e study and/or have caree r goals invo l v ing researc h (Thi s co u rse will n o t be u se d as a sociology e l ective.) Soci o logy majo r s are a l so u rged to includ e field experience in their co lle ge plans, eit her through enrollin g in SOC 470 or through a cooperative educatio n pla ce ment Students de s irin g secon d ary licens u re in social s tud ies s h o uld see the Department of Teacher Education GERONTOLOGY AREA OF EMPHASIS Gerontology de a l s with th e ca u ses and con se quences-bio l og ic a l psychol og ica l and soc i a l-
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98 SCHOOl OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES t soc 310 soc 324 soc 341 soc 380 soc 381 soc 383 soc 470 PSY 216 PSY 221 PSY 227 PSY 3 27 PSY 398 HES 1 05 HES 204 Total Death and Dying . ....... . .... ........ ..... ....... ........... ... ... ...... 3 Poverty in America . ....... ......... ............... .... ..................... 3 The Family in Transition .... ...... ................ .... ....... ..... .... ... ...... 3 Health and Healers. . . . . . . . . ............... 3 Population I s sue s ................ ... .......... .................... ...... 3 Mental Disorders .......... ...... ....... .... .......... ..... .... .... . ... 3 Ad v anced Field Intern s hip. . . ...................................... ....... 3 Personality and Adjustment. . ......... ........... ......................... .... 3 P sy chology of Human Development ...... ....... ... ..... .... ....... ........... ..... 3 De ath and Dying .................................... ... ... ... ...... ........ ...... 3 Adulthood and Aging ....... .... . ................... ...... . . .............. 3 Cooperative Education : Psychology ..... ..... . ............ .......... ........ 3 Dynamics of Health ................... ...... . ............ . .... .... .... .... 3 Introdu c tion to Nutrition ........... ................................. ....... .... -1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 45 MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY Required Courses SOC 10 1 Introduction to Sociology ........ ..... ................................... 3 Electives A minimum of 15 additional s eme s ter hou rs in s ocio l ogy c o urs es, se lected in con s ultation with a department advi sor is required bringing the total to 18 semes ter hours At least six upper di v ision s eme s ter hours of the minor mu s t be completed at Metropolitan State College of Denver. It is sugge s ted that s tudents consider focu s ing their ele c tive choic es in one of the areas o f concentrati o n in sociology. Anthropology Anthropology is the exploration of human diversity The combination of cultural archaeological and biological perspectives offer a viewpoint that is unique in studying the problems related to the survival and well-being of the human species From the livin g and vanis hed cultures of Colorado to those of New Guinea or South America anthropo l ogy can be applied to assist our understanding of human differences. ANTHROPOLOGY MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS Required Courses Semester Hours ANT 101 Phy s ical Anthropology a nd Prehi s tory . ....... . ......................... ...... 3 ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropo l ogy .................................. .................... 3 ANT 210 Human Evolution... . . ....... ............... ........ . ........ 3 ANT 233 Cross -Cultural Communication ........ . .......... ....... ........................ 3 ANT 264 Archaeolo gy ................................ ........................... .... ...... -1 T o tal. ..................................... ............ .... ......... ........................... 15 Electives A minimum of 2 1 addition a l se mester hours in anthropology i s required bringing the total to 36 semes ter hours. At least 12 upper divi s ion s emester hours in anthropology mu s t be compl e ted a t Metropolitan State College of Denver by s tudents majorin g in the field Student s desiring teacher licensure in social studie s should see the Department of Teacher Education. MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY The minor provides an opportunity for students to bring a unique anthropo logical perspective to their already chosen area of interest. Anyone having to deal with human or cultural differences would benefit from selecting a focus in cross-cultural contact, archaeology or human diversity Required Courses ANT 101 Phy s ical Anthropology and Prehi s tory .......................... ...... ............. 3 ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology .................... ........... ...................... J_ Total.... ................ .......... . ....... .......... .... .................. ..... . 6 Electives A minimum o f 15 additional s eme s ter hours in anthropology i s required bringing the total to 21 seme s ter hours. At least six upper-division seme s ter h o urs must be completed a t Metropolitan State College of Den ver.

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES I Behavioral Science MAJOR FO R B ACHELOR OF ARTS This is a distributed m ajor, offering s tudent s a s tructured overv ie w of the social and behavioral sc ience s, e mph asizing breadth of coverage rather than in-depth st udi es. Parti cularly applicab le for stu dent s intere s ted in licensure in the e l ementary a nd seco ndary e ducation areas. Required Courses ANT 131 I ntroducti on to C ultur a l Anthropo l ogy EC O 20 I Principles of Eco n omics: Macro HIS 366 R ece nt U.S., 1 945 to the 1970s. PSC I 02 Political Sy s tem s and I deas Semester Hours ...... 3 .. 3 ... 3 3 PSY 101 Intr oductory P syc holo gy SOC 101 Intr oduction to Sociology ........ ......... .......................... .... ....... ...... 3 ....... .............. ... ............. _j_ Total ... E lect ives ........... .................. ........................... ...... .... .... 1 8 A minimum of 1 8 additiona l up per-division elective hours in anthropology, economics, history political science, p syc h o l ogy, and sociology is required, bringin g the t o t a l to 36 semes t er h o u rs. No more than six upper-division hours may be applied from any one discipline and must be selected in con s ult atio n with, and have the a ppr oval of, the adviso r At l east 1 2 upperdivi s i o n hours mu s t be comp leted at M e tr opo litan Sta t e College of Denv e r b y students majoring in this field. Eac h stu dent in thi s major must have th e preliminary approval of an assigned advisor. Students desirin g t eac he r lice n s ur e in social s tudies s h ould see the D epartment of Teacher Education. No M inor Offer ed Social Work MAJOR FOR B ACHELO R OF SCIENCE Social work i s a pr ofessiona l pr actice The prim ary education goa l of the major i s prepar a tion for beginning l eve l ocial work practi ce in soc i a l agencies. Alth o ugh a Contrac t Minor i s avai l a ble it doe s n o t prepar e the s tud ent for profe ss ional practice It comp l ements the studen t's m ajor. In addition, the soc ial work major pro v ide s a n ap pr opria t e foundation for gra duat es who pla n t o pur s u e adva nc e d degree s in s ocial work ( M.S W.). So c ial wor k m ajo r s a c quir e the know l e d ge, s kills, values, and e thi cs r eq uir ed for ge n eralis t pr ac tic e with individuals, families, grou p s, co mmuniti es, a n d l arger sys tems. Theoretica l knowledge and fiel d work experience s provide preparation for social work with div erse popu l atio n s in a variety of fields of practice and se ttings, s u c h as c hild we lfar e, m enta l h ealth, co rr ections, g eronto l ogica l (ag ing ) soc i a.l work, health publi c wel fare occ up ational social work, d omes tic vio len ce, and dev e l opme ntal disa biliti es R equired Courses SWK 1 0 1 Introduction to Socia l W o rk Service s ...... SWK I 04 H uman B ehavio r and the Social Envi r on m ent .. SWK I 05 Family Social Services . ............ SWK 20 I Social Work Services and P opulations a t Risk SWK 202 S ocial W o rk Servic es and W omen SWK 24 1 Pra cticum in Social W ork Services ..... .... ........... Semester Hours ....... 3 .. 4 .4 3 .3 6 SWK 378 Social W ork P o li cy .... ...................... ......... ........... ...... 3 SWK 379 R esearch in Social Work ............................ ....... ...... ......... ..3 .. 4 SWK 40 I Pr ac tic e in Socia l Work Services. SWK 441 Cross-Cultural S oc ial Work Services ......... ....... SWK 479 P rofessional Int e rn s hip .. ..4 .. ..... _jj Total.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 43 Electives in Social W o r k .................................... ........ .... ....... ................ l.Q T o tal..... ....... ............. ...................... .............. 53 CASE MA AGEMENT PROGRAM The S ocia l W ork Progr a m and the Hum a n S e rvi ces D e partm ent h ave d eve l oped a joint pr ogram in case m a n age ment and de velopmental disa biliti es. T h e purp ose of the pr og r am i s to prepar e s tudent s to perform the role s and function s of a case mana ge r A n Award of Completi o n is granted t o indi viduals w h o co mpl e t e the r eq uir e d co ur ses For further inf ormation ca.ll 556-4679 or 556-3167.

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100 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES DIVISION OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS Science and mathematics programs are offered in the departments of Biology Chemistry, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Mathematical Sciences, and Physics. Curricula are flexible, including interdisciplinary, career-oriented bachelor s degree program s both in the traditional areas of sc ience and mathematics and in more career-oriented areas s uch as training for health related fields land use app lied mathematics, computer science statis tics, air pollution monitoring, or occupational health and s afety. In cooperation with local colleges, universities, and health agencies s tudent s may complete a bachelor of s cience or bachelor of art s degree from Metropolitan State College of Denver and earn licensure in medical tech nology The Department of Chemistry offer s a minor in criminalistics, one of the few such programs in the co untry Biology The Department of Biol ogy offers two majors the bachelor of science in biology and the bachelor of arts in biology. While it is not necessary to declare an em pha s i s within the se majors, a stu dent may choose to emphasize botany medi cal tec hnology microbiology or zoo logy Supportive courses associate d with paramedical s tudi es, crimi nali s tic s and the Drug and Alcohol Institute, as well as ge neral course s for enrichment of the nons cience student s background are offered b y the department Students seeking seco ndary licensure in sc ience should s ee the Department of Teacher Education. f A bio l ogy minor i s offered to students with related majors or a s pe cial interest in the field. BIOLOGY MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Required Courses Semester Hours BIO 108 General Intr od u ct i on to B io lo gy ....................................................... 4 BIO 360 General Geneti cs ........ ...... . ....... ......... ......... ....................... 3 Select tw o of the follo wing : BIO 2 1 0 General Botan y ........................................... ......... ....... ....... 5 BIO 220 Gen eral Zoology . . . .... ....... ......................... 5 BIO 240 General Mi c robiology . . . . ................ ..... .... 4 S e le c t one of th e following: BIO 355 Urban Ecology . . . . ....... -........................ 4 BIO 454 Plant Ecology ......... ..... ..... ..... ........................... -.... . 4 BIO 455 Animal Ecology ... .............. .................... ............. ........... __ 4 Subtotal .......................................................... .... .............. 20--21 Electives Biology courses se lected from the 200, 300, and 400 se rie s and a pp rove d by faculty advisors in th e Department of Biology must be completed t o bring the total of biolo gy co urse s approved for the major to 40 se me s ter h ours. At lea s t 14 of the se elec tive se me s ter h o urs mus t be from the 300 and 400 courses of th e Department of Biology. Tota l Hour s Required in Biology ......... . . 40 Required Non-Biology Courses One year of co llege genera l c he mi stry, one se me s ter of upper -divis ion organic c he mi stry, one semester of upper -div i s i on bi oc hemistry and one year o f mathematic s start in g with MTH Ill are requisites for the biol og y m ajo r BIOLOGY MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS Required Courses Semester Hours BIO 108 General Introdu c tion to Biology . . . . ................... 4 BIO 360 General Genetic s ...... . .... ........ . .... .................... .... ........ 3 Selec t two of the following: BIO 210 General B o tany ............... ....... . .... ... ... .......... .................... 5 BIO 220 G e neral Zoology .......... .......... ....... ....... ... .... .. .... ............. 5 BIO 240 General Mi cro biolog y ............................. ......................... ........ 4 Sele c t o ne of the following: BIO 355 Urban Ecology ...................... .................... ... ... . . .......... 4 BIO 454 Pla nt Ecology ..... ......... ....... .......... ........... ..... .................... 4 BIO 455 Animal Ecology ................................ . . . ...... ____3 Subtotal .................. ......... ...................... .... ....... . ................ 20--21

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 Electives Biology courses selected from the 200, 300, and 400 series, and approved by faculty advisor.; in the Department of Biolo gy, must be completed to bring the total of biology course s approved for the major t o 40 semester hour.;. At least 14 of the s e elective semester hour.; must be from the 300 and 400 courses of the Department of Biology Total Hours Required in Biol ogy Required Non-Bio lo gy Courses One year of General Che mi stry (equivale nt to the present courses C H E I I 0 and C H E 21 0). BOTANY AREA OF EMPHASIS .. .... .. ... ... . 40 Requirement s for eithe r a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of scie nce degree in biology must be sa tisfied, and the 40 hour.; of biology cou rses must include BIO 210 General Botany ; BIO 454 Plant Ecology ; and 15 s emester hour.; from the follow i ng botany electives: E lecti ve Courses Semester Hours BIO 314 Plant Phy s iology .............................. ................ .. .... 5 ..... 2 .. 4 BIO 315 Plant Hormones... . . . . ........... B 10 3 I 6 Plant Anatomy and Morphology . ........ BIO 318 Vascular Plant Taxonomy. .. .................. .............. 4 BIO 412 Algology .. 4 BIO 416 Mycology .... ....................................................... 4 BIO 456 F i eld Method s in Plant Ecology BIO 485 Evolution Subtotal .. 2 .....3. .. 15 BIO 301, Microtechnique and BIO 305, Cell and Molecular Biology are both applicable to the field s of botany, microbiol o gy, and zoology and are recommended as additional electives for all three areas of emphasis MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY AREA OF EMPHASIS St ud ents mu s t satisfy the requirements lis t ed for the Metro State bachelor of sc i e n ce degree in biol ogy includin g BIO 240 General Microbiology Students must also take BIO 335 I mmunology; BIO 444 Virology ; and BIO 445 Pathogenic Microbiology Additional hour s must be taken from the courses listed below t o complete the 20 h our.; of upper-division courses and a total of 40 semes ter cre dit h o ur s in biology Elective Courses Semester Hours BIO 321 His tology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 4 BIO 327 Parasitology . . . . . . . . .... 4 BIO 336 Animal Physiology ................ ... .................. . ......... ....... .......... 4 BIO 416 Myc ology.. . . . ...... ....... 4 BIO 422 Protozoolog y . . . . . ............... ....3. Subtotal ..... Internship Completion of a medical technology intern s hip at an a pprov e d sc h oo l of m e dic a l technology Required Non-Biology Courses ..................... 19 The student must satisfy the requirement s lis ted for non-biology courses for the b ac hel o r of science major and com plete the requirements for a minor in chemistry. MICROBIOLOGY AREA OF EMPHASIS Students must satisfy the requirements lis ted for the bachelor of science major in biolo gy, incl udin g BIO 240 General Microbiology Students must also take BIO 335, Immunology ; BIO 340 Microbial Ph ysio l ogy; BIO 445, Patho genic Mi cro biology; and BIO 447 Mi cro bial Genetic s Additional hour.; from the course s listed below or appropriate omnibus courses as se lected by the s tudent and approved by the microbiol ogy faculty must be taken t o co mplete the 20 hour s of upper division courses and a total o f 40 semester hour s in biology. Elective Courses Semester Hours BIO 305 Cell and Molecular Biology ............ . . . . . . . . . ..... 4 BIO 327 Parasitolog y . . . . . 4 BIO 412 Algology.... .............................................................. 4 BIO 4 I 6 Myc o logy . .......................................................... 4 810 422 Protozoology . . . 3 BIO 444 Virology............. ........... ..... ...... .... ............ ......... ..1 Subtotal ... .... 20 BIO 301. Microtechnique. and BIO 305 Cell and Molecular Biology are both applicable to the fields of botany, micr o biology and zoology and are recommended as additional electives for all three areas of emphasis. Required Non-Biology Courses The s tudent mu s t satisfy the requirements lis ted for non-biolog y cou r ses for the bachelor of scie nce major including one course in biostatistics or calculus and a computer science course t o fulfill the required o ne year of college mathematics. In additio n the student mus t complete CHE 300 and 301, Analytical Chemistry with laboratory ; CHE 432 Biochemistry II; and one year of college phy sics.

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102 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES ZOOLOGY AREA OF EMPHASIS Student s must s ati s f y the requirement s for the b ac h e l o r of s c ien ce de g r ee in biolog y and mus t include in the 40 seme s ter hours o f biology course s BlO 2 2 0 Gener a l Zoology ; BIO 455, Anim a l Ecology; and 15 s eme s ter hours from the following list of zoo logy e l ective s : Elective Courses Semester Hours BlO 3 2 1 His t o l ogy ................................. 4 BIO 322 Comparative Vertebrate An a tomy.. ......... ................ 5 BIO 3 25 Arthr o pod Zoolo gy . . . . . . . . . . 4 BIO 3 2 7 Parasit o l ogy . . . . . . . . . 4 BIO 3 3 4 Endoc rin o logy . . . . . . . . . . 3 BIO 3 3 6 Animal Phy s iol o gy.. . . . . . . 4 BIO 422 Pr o tozoology . . . . . . . 3 BIO 425 Ent o mo l o g y . . . . . . . 4 BIO 427 Herpetolo g y . . . . . . 3 BIO 428 Ornith o lo gy . . . . . . . . . .. 4 BIO 429 Mamm a lo gy. . . . ..... 3 BIO 481 Vertebrate Embryology......... . ........ Subtotal ..... ..... .... .... ........... 15 BIO 301, Microte c hnique and BIO 305 C e ll and Mol ec ular Bi o logy, are both a pplicable to th e field s o f botany mic robiolo g y a nd zoo lo g y a nd are re c ommended as addition a l e l ec t iv e s for all thre e areas of emph as i s. MINOR IN BIOLOGY Required Courses Semester Hours BIO 108 Generallntroduction to Biol ogy . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4 Se l ect 2 of the following: BIO 210 General Botan y . . .... ... .. ........................... ... 5 B 10 220 General Zoology . . . . ........ . ....... ............... .............. 5 BIO 240 G e neral Microbiology ........ ........ ... .. ...... . .... .... 4 BIO 231, 232 Human Anatomy and Human Phy s io lo gy I and II ......... .... ....... ........ .... ...... 8 Sele c t I of the f o llowing: BIO 355 Urban Ecol o g y ........ ........ ...... ............ ........ .............. ........ 4 BIO 360 Gener a l G e neti cs ...... ..... . ...... ...... . ................................ 3 BIO 454 Plant Ecolo gy .......... .... ..... .... ....... ... ....... ...................... 4 BIO 455 Anim a l Ecology ............. .......... ...... ............................ __ 4 Subtotal ...... ... ..... ...... ......... ............................. 16-21 Electives Biolo g y c ourse s from the 200 300, and 400 series, a pproved b y th e Departm e nt o f Bio l ogy, mu s t be co mpl e ted t o bring the t o ta l of biology cours es approved for the min o r t o 24 seme s ter h o ur s. Total Hours R e quir e d in Biology .............................. .................................. 24 Senior Experience for Biology Majors A s tudent majo ring in biol o gy may fulfill the S enio r Experien c e requirement with a n y co ur s e approved for the purpo s e by the Genera l Studie s Committ ee. Any bio l ogy cour se a pproved by the General S tudi e s C o mmittee a nd the Department o f Biology f o r Senior Experience credit may b e c ounted t o ward the S enio r E xperien c e requirem e nt of Gen e ral Studie s, or toward a b i olog y major/bi o lo gy min o r but n o t b o th. Chemistry The Department of Chemistry is approved by the American Chemical Society and offers several degree programs : the bachelor of science in chemistry; bachelor of sci ence in chemistry-occupational health and safety area of emphasis; bachelor of science in chemistry criminalistics area of emphasis; and the bachelor of arts in chemistry. Minors in c hemi stry and criminali stics are also availab l e. Students who plan to pursue a career in chemistry after graduation or plan to attend graduate school in chemistry should choose the bachelor of science in chemistry program The bachelor of arts in chemistry program is designed for s tud ents who plan a career in a field related to chem i stry but who do not intend to attend graduate school. The bachelor of arts option whic h require s fewer hour s, may be especia ll y attractive to those wis hing a second major or to those s tudents de siring secondary education licensure. Criminalistics is the scientific investigation, identifi c ation, and comparison of physical evidence for crimina l or civil co urt proceedings Crimi nali sts must be trained in many disciplines including chem i stry, biology law enforcement, physics, and mathematics The four-year criminalistics curric ulum leads to a bachelor of science degree and include s a half time i ntern ship in a criminalistics laboratory during the senior year. Student s in the criminalistics program are encouraged to complete all the requirements for a degree in chemistry approved by the American Chemical Society while comp l e tin g the criminalistics degree program. Graduates of the program are prepared for employment in criminalistics and h ave completed the requirement s for admission to gradua te school in chemistry or criminalistics medical school, dental school, or law s chool.

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 Students electing the chemistry major with the occupational health and safety emphasis will be trained in the recognition evaluation, and control of hazards in the workplace. This area of emphasis includes cour es equivalent to those required for the b ac helor of arts major in chemistry as well as s upporting scie nce and mathematics co ur ses and courses in instrumental analy is, toxicology, safety, and occupational health and safety. A mandatory internship during the junior or sen ior year provides valuable practical experie nc e. Graduates of this program are prepared for immediate employment in the field of occupational health and safety or the field of c hemi stry. Graduate s in this emphasis area also meet the requirements for admissions to medical school dental school veterinary school, or graduate sc hool in industrial hygiene or chemistry For further information a bout the occupational health and safety or criminalistics programs s tudents should contact the Chemistry Department. Students seeking secondary education lic e n s ure in scie nc e shou ld consult the Metro State Teacher Education Department for requirements The following courses constitu te the basic core and are required in all chemistry degree programs except for the minor in chemistry Basic Chemistry Core Semester Hours CHE 180 General Chemistry I. .................. ......... ..... ....... . .................. ...... 4 CHE 181 General Chemistry II ......................... ....... .... .... .... .......... ....... 4 CHE 185 General Chemistry Laboratory . .. . .. .. ................... 2 CHE 300 Analyti cal Chemi s try . ............. .............................. ............... 3 CHE 30 I Analytical Chemi s try Laboratory ........ ...................... . ......... ............ 2 CHE 310 Organi c Chemistry I. . ...... .............. ........ .... ..... ... ............... 4 C H E 311 Organic Chemistry II . . . .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. 3 CHE 312 Organic Chemi s try I Laboratory ............................ ............................... 2 CHE 313 Organic Chemistry 11 Laboratory .............................................. ........... ...l Total H o urs Required in Ba sic Core . . . .............. ........................ 26 CHEMISTRY MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Required Courses Semester Hours Ba s ic Chemistry Core ....................... 2 6 Additional Required Chemistry Courses: CHE 325 Phy s ical Chemistry I . . . . . . 4 CHE 326 Phy s ical Chemistry ll. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CHE 328 Physical Chemistry I Laborat o ry . . . . . .................... ......... 2 CHE 329 Ph ys ical Chemistry II Laboratory . . . .... .... ....2 Subtotal ................... ... . ....... .... . ..... ... 1 2 Electives A minimum of 10 se me s ter h o urs in chemi s try c o urse s s elected in cons ultation with and approved by the Department of Chemistry is requir e d Total Hours Required ......... ... . .... .... ................ .... .................... 48 Bachelor of Science Required Ancillary Courses MTH 141 Calculu s I .................................................... 4 MTH 241 C a lculu s II ... ............................ ............ ............. .................... 4 MTH 2 42 Calculus Ul. . . .............. .................. ............................ 4 PHY 231 General Physic s I . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 and PHY 2 33 General Phy s i cs II or PHY 201 C o llege Ph y si cs I ...... and PHY 202 College Physi cs II Total Ancillary Courses Required ... American Chemical Society Approval To meet American Chemi c al Society degree criteria the following c ourse s must be completed : .4 4 ..... _A ............... 20 CHE 230 Inorganic Chemistry ......... 3 CHE 340 Chem i cal Literature Sear c h ................ ...... ...... ........... ............ ...... I CHE 410 Instrumental Analysi s . .... ............................. .................... 3 CHE 411 Ins trumental Analy s i s Lab ........... ..... ................................................ 2 CHE 430 Advanced Inorganic C h emi stry. . . . . . . . . . . . . ... ...l Subtotal .............................. ....... .......... .... 1 2 Electives An additional s ix credit hour s o f advanced level elective s are required E lective s s hould be selected in c onsultation with the Department of Chemi s try The f o llowing courses ma y be appropriate : CHE 40 I CHE 40 2, and CHE 432. Total hours required . . . . . . . . ........... 56 .

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104 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES CHEMISTRY MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS Required Courses Semester Hours Ba sic Chemistry C o r e . ....... ...... 26 Additional Required Chemistry Courses: CHE 319 Surve y o f Phys ical Chemi s try .......... ................................ 4 CHE 320 Survey of Physical Chemi s try Laboratory .............. ........... ........... ............. I Electives A minimum of six se me s ter hours in chemi s try co urse s s e l ected in c on s ultati o n with and approved b y the Department of Chemistry is required Total Hours Required . . . ............... ............. ....... ................ 3 7 Bachelor of Arts Required Ancillary Courses MTH 141 Cal c ulu s I.... .......................................... ....... . 4 PHY 20 I College Physic s I ... 4 Total Ancillary C o urse s Required . .......... ...... ...................... 8 OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY AREA OF EMPHASIS Student s electin g thi s pro g ram o f s tudy mu s t co mplete the ba sic c hemi s try c o re (26 h o ur s) in addition t o the following r e quired course s The requirement of a minor i s wai ved for s tuden ts in this program. Required Courses Semester Hours B as i c Chemistry Core .... ......... 26 Additional Required Chemistry Courses: CHE 319 Surve y of Ph ys ical Chemistry. . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . .. ...... 4 CHE 320 Surve y of Ph y si cal Chemi s try Laboratory.... . . . . . . 2 CHE 410 Ins trument a l Analy s is . . . ........................ ..... ....... 3 CHE 411 In s trumental Analy s is Labor a tory .... ... ... .... ........ ...... 2 CHE 431 Bioc hemi s try I . . . . . . . . 4 CHE 435 Biochemi s try Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Required Occupational Health and Safety Courses: CHE 250 Introdu ctio n t o Occupation a l He a lth and Safety. . . . . . . . . 3 CHE 350 O c cup a tional Safety. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CHE 415 Ins trumentation and Analysi s in the Occupation a l Environment . . . . . ... 4 CHE 420 Evalu a tion and Control of Air Quality . ............................... 3 C HE 425 Principl es of Occupational H ea lth and Safety. . . . . . .. 3 CHE 450 O cc up a tional Toxi co logy . . . . . .. .. . .. . .. . .. . ... 3 CHE 475 O cc up atio nal Health and Safet y Internship ............ .............. ..................... 8 Required Ancillary Courses: BIO 108 General introduction to Biology ............................. . . ........... ....... 4 BIO 232 Human Anatomy and Physi o logy II . . . . . . 4 BIO 240 General Microbiology .............................. ............. ..... .... ....... 4 MTH 121 Introdu ctio n t o St a tistic s .............................. ....... ......................... 3 MTH 141 Calculu s I.... . .... . . .. . . .. . . .. .. . 4 PHY 20 I College Phy s ics I ......... .... ..... .... ..... ............ ........... . .... 4 PHY 203 College Phy s ic s I Labor a tory ...................... .................. .... .............. ..l Tota l Hours Required .... ...... . .... ... ... ........ Electives The following course s are recommended as ele ctives: ............. ........ 92 SPE 10 I Fundam e ntal s of Spee c h C o mmunication .................................... ............ 3 COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writi ng ....................... ............ ........ ........... 3 ECO 20 I Principle s of Economic s -M ac ro . . . . . . . ...... 3 MGT 461 Labor/Employee Relations.... . . . . . . . ............. 3 CRIMINALISTICS AREA OF EMPHASIS Students e le cting thi s program of study mus t complete the b asic c hemistry cor e (26 hour s) in a ddition to the foll o win g required cour s e s. The r e quir e ment o f a min o r i s waived for s tud e n ts i n thi s program Required Courses B as i c Chemistry Core .................................... .... Additional Required Chemistry Courses: Semester Hours 26 CHE 319 Survey of Physical Chemi s try . . .. .. . ..... .................... 4 CHE 320 Survey of Physical Chemi s try Lab .................................................... I CHE 410 Ins trumental Analy s i s .. . . . .. . ............................ 3 CHE 411 Ins trumental Analy s is Laborat ory .. ... . ....... . .......................... .......... 2 CHE 431 Biochemistry I . . . . . . . . . . 4 CHE 435 Biochemi s try Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . ...... I

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SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 Required Criminalistics Courses: CHE 37 0 Criminalisti cs I. . . . . . . . .. 4 CHE 371 Criminalistic s II . . . .. .. .. .. . .. . . . .. .. .. .. .. 4 CHE 47 0 Criminali stics I Intern s hip . . . . . . . . . . 7 CHE 471 Criminalistics II Intern s hip . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Required Criminal Justice Courses: CJC 101 Introducti o n to the Criminal Ju stic e Sy s tem .................. ..... ....... .................... 3 CJC 210 Substantive Criminal L a w . . 3 CJC 212 E v iden c e and Courtroom Procedure s . . .... ..... ....... 3 CJC 312 C o n s titutional Law . . . . . . . ... 3 Require(! Ancillary Courses: BIO 108 General Introdu c tion t o Bio l o g y .. ... 4 .4 BIO 240 General Mi c robiology BIO 360 Genera l Geneti cs ..... MTH 121 Intr oduction to Stati s ti cs MTH 141 C al culu s I PHY 20 I C o lle g e Phy sics I .... and PHY 203 College Ph ys ics I Labor a tory .. o r PHY 231 General Ph ys i cs I ... and PHY 232 General Physics I Laboratory Total Hour s Required .......... MINOR IN CHEMISTRY .............. ...... ... ................. ................. 3 ............. 4 ........................ 4 4 ... ...... .............. .. .................... ........ .... 4 .... ....! .. 99 Students completing the basic chemistry core (26 hours) qualify for a minor in c hemi stry. Students may elect to substitute five semester hour s in upper-division chemistry cour s es for CHE 311 and CHE 313 Basic Chemistry Core Semester Hours CHE 180 General Chemistry I. ................... .. ... ....... ................. . 4 CHE 181 General Chemistry II ... CHE 185 General Chemistry Laboratory CHE 300 Anal ytical Chemi s try ..... .......... 4 ...................................................... ... 2 3 C H E 30 I Analyti cal Chemi s try Laboratory .................... .................. .... ... 2 CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I. . . . . . . . . . 4 CHE 311 Organi c Chemistry II ... 3 CHE 312 Organic Chemi s try I Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CHE 313 Organi c Chemi s try II Laborat o ry ...... _.2 Total Hours Required in Ba s i c Core ... 26 MINOR IN CRIMINALISTICS Required Courses Semester Hours C H E II 0 Principles of Chemi s try .... 5 CHE 270 Introdu c tion to Criminali s tic s . ....... .......................... ...... 4 C H E 275 Ar son and Explo s ives . . ....................... 3 CHE 276 Field Tes ting and Laboratory Anal y si s o f Drug s . . . . . . . . . . . I CHE 360 Crime S c e n e Inv estigation I. . . . . ............. 4 CHE 361 Crime S cene Investigation U . . . . . 4 CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedure s .................... ....J. Total Hours Required . . . . . . . . . ............... .......... 24 Earth and Atmospheric Sciences The Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department is composed of three separate disciplines : geogra phy geology, and meteorology. The department offers a bachelor of sc ience degree in meteorology and a bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree in land use The bachelor of science degree is recommended for tho se st udents desiring a stronger background in the physical and quantitative aspects of the environment. Minor programs are available in geography, geo l ogy, and meteorology. Students working toward teacher licensure in either scie n ce or social studies may take courses in geo lo gy geography, or meteorology. Students interested in Environmental Science or Earth Space Science may develop a contract major through Adult Learning Services.

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106 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES t LAND USE The Land Use program is very broad in scope and can be utilized for a number of career objectives and grad uat e school programs Opportunities exist in such areas as planning, cartography, geographic information systems ( GIS), air photo and s ate llit e imagery interpretation environmental and resource management, travel and transportation mining and mineral resources residential and industrial development recreational land use, population analy is and a variety of other interrelated fields. This program provides a solid foundation for conti nu ed s tudy at the graduate level. LAND USE MAJOR FOR B ACHELOR OF ARTS Required Core Semester Hours MTH 121 Introdu ctio n to Statisti cs ...... ................. ................... . ......... 4 GEG 1 22 Map U s e ........................................ ......... . ................ 2 Choose one from each of the following sets: GEG 100 W o rld Regional Geography ........................ .................................. 3 or GEG 1 3 0 Introduction to Human G eogra ph y ........ .... . . ..................... ..... 3 GEG 110 Introdu c tion to Phy s ical G eogra ph y ......... . ........ ................................. 3 or G E L 101 General Geology ......................................... ... . ..................... 4 GEG 225 Introdu c tion to Geographi c Info rm a tion Sy s tems ....... .......... . . .... ........ 3 or GEG 321 I ntroduction to Cartography ...................................... . .............. 4 GEG 36 1 Principle s of Land Use ....................... ......... .... ... ....... ......... 3 or GEG 401 Environmental Hazards and Planning . . . ....... ..... ............ ...... 3 GEG 495 Intern s hip in Geography ...... ...................... ....... ..................... 2 or GEL 495 ..... ..................... ....... 2 Internship in Geology ..................... (' Senior Capstone Course: GEG 496 Gl o bal Environmental Chall e n ges ............. ...... .... ......................... 3 or GEL 496 Environmental Field Studi es .......... ..... ...... ................................... _..3. Core Total ..................................... ......... ............................... 2 3 25 Emphasi s Area Total . ........ ... ... . ....................... .......... ........... .... 12=21. Land U s e Maj o r Total . ................. ............................. ............... 42-46 Required Areas of Emphasis In addition to the required Land Use core ea c h s tudent mus t c ompl e t e ONE of the areas o f emphasi s lis ted below Within the are a of empha s i s, s tudent s must complete a s et of required c ou rses plu s e lectives Ele c tive s are cho se n in con s ultation with a departmental advi sor and are de s igned to provide an integrated and well-planned p a ttern of c ourse s related to the student' s ed uc ational and career g oals. Urban Land Use Core Semester Hours GEG 336 Geography of Economic Activ i t y ................. . ............... ................... 3 GEG 360 Urban Geography ............................ ........................................ 3 GEG 461 Urban and R egional Plannin g ....................... ............................ 3 URS 450 Cities of the Future ..................................................................... 3 Urban Land U s e Elective s ..... .... ............... ..... .................................... ...1. ( Choo s e a minimum of s even hours of elective c redit in c Ohsuuati o n with a departmental advisor ) Subtotal . . ..... ...... ............................ .............. . . ............. .... 19 Geographi c Information Systems Core Se m este r Hours GEG 225 Introduction to GIS .... . .............. ...... .............................. .... 3 or GEG 321 Cartography ..................................... .... .... ..... . ....... . ....... 4 (Whichever cours e w as not taken as part of the cor e) GEG 32 2 Intermediate C a rtography .............. ........... ............................... 3 GEG 325 Computer Cartography ....................... ...... ............... . ......... 3 GEG 485 Advan c ed Geographic Inform atio n Sy s tems. . .. . .. . .. .. .. ....... ..... .... 3 CSI 101 Introducti o n to Computer Scie nce ...................... ................................... 3 Geographi c Information Sy s tems Electiv es ........................................... .............. ..... .Ji ( Ch oos e a minimum of s ix hours of elec tive c redit in c on s ultati o n with a departmental a dvi s or. ) Subtotal ........ ............. ..... ..... ............... . . ............................... 2 1

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 Environment and R esources Cor e Semester Hours GEG 120 Introduction to Environmental Science............ . . . 3 GEG 140 W o rld Reso urc es . ........... 3 GEG 484 Rem ote S ensing .................. .......... ...... .................... .......... 3 ECO 345 Envi r onmental Eco n omics_ . . . . ............... 3 Environment and Resou r ce s E l ectives . . . . . ............. ......... ..2. ( Choose a minimum of seve n hour s of elective credit in consultation with a departmental advisor. ) Su bt o t a l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Geology Core Semester Hours ( NOTE : s tud e n ts selecting this area of emph asis will be required to minor in geo l ogy) GEL 312 Advanced Geomorphology GEL 342 Soil Resou r ces ... ........ GEL 344 Energy and Mineral R esources GEL 400 E nvironment a l Geology ............. Geology Electives .... ....................... .... ....................... 4 ... 4 .. 4 .......... .. ........ 3 ............ .... __5_ (C h oose a minimum of five hour s o f e lectiv e c r ed it, in co n su l tation with a d e partm e ntal advisor.) Subtotal .... ..... .................. ZQ Total H ours Required for the Maj o r -.'-.-'-. .-' -'. '.--.'-' '' 43 Required Minor Exce pt for the geologic area of emphasi s, the field of study selected as a minor is at the option o f the s tud ent. LA D USE MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE To fulfill the requir e ment s for the ba c h elor of scie n ce with a major in l and use a s tudent must complete th e r eq uir e m e nt s as listed a b ove und e r the b ac hel or of arts; however, the s tudent must minor in o n e of the sc iences, or scie n ce-oriente d fields as app r oved by the Earth a nd Atmosp h eric Science s D epart m ent. MINOR IN G E OLOGY Require d Core Se m es t e r Hours GEL 101 General Geology ............. .''.'' '.' .... ' '.' '.' '' .. .. .. .4 A n y 100 le ve l GEL course .......... .3-4 GEL 201 R ocks and Minerals. .. .................................. 4 GEL 202 The Stratigraphy and Structure of the Earth ................. ............................. 4 Any 300 o r 400 l evel GEL courses .. .. ....... ..... __8 Total Hours Requir ed ... .. .. .. .. ' ' 23 -24 MINOR IN G E OGRAPHY Required Core Sem ester Hours GEG 112 Orienteering ... ..... I GEG 122 Map Use ...... GEG 130 I ntroduction to Human Geography ........ ... ...... ............. ..................... ..2 3 GEG 1 23 Weather and Climate or MTR 140 Introdu ction t o M e t eo r o l ogy Structured E lecti ves 3 .. 3 A minimum o f 13 addit i o nal hours mu s t be se l ec ted in co n su lt ation wi th a departmental advisor. At l east one course must be selected from each of the following groups to satisfy this requirement. Ph ysica l (3) GEG 110 Introdu ction to Physical Geography ... '-' -.. 3 GEG 124 Landforms o f the U S. ........ .. .. 3 GEL 101 General Geology ........ .. .. 4 Re so u rces and E n vi ronment (3) GEG 120 Introdu ctio n to Environmental Sc ien ce .......................... ..3 GEG 140 World R eso ur ces .......... .. ... 3 GEG 340 W ater R esources ........................................................ 3 GEL 342 S oil R esources ... ........... ,, ........ ... .. . .... .... 4 GEL 344 Energy and Mineral R esources .. 4 Spatial Analy s i s and Plannin g ( 3) GEG 360 U rban Geography ... -'-........... .... .. ..... .. '-'-3 GEG 36 1 Prin c ipl es of Land Use. "" 3 GEG 362 Populat io n R esources, and Land Use_ .. .... 3 GEG 363 T ransportation Planning and Land Use. .. ........... 3 GEG 462 Land Use: Re si dential .................................................. 3

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108 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES Urba n Studie s Regi onal Geography (3) GEG 100 World R egional G e o graph y ........... ............................................. 3 GEG 2 0 2 Geography o f Colorado ............................................... ........... 3 GEG 210 Geography of Latin America ......................................................... 2 GEG 220 Geography of the U nit ed State s ... .......... ......... .... . ... ... ............ 3 GEG 300 H i s torical Geography of the Uni ted S t a t e s ............... ........ ............... ......... ....3. Plu s one a dditi o nal hour of field s tudy in e ith er g eogra phy o r g e o logy for a total of 22 hours. T otal H o ur s R equired for the Min or ................................. ................................. 22 Mete orolo gy Meteorology is the scie nce of the atmosphere. Modem meteorolog ists are involved in weather ob erving, forecasting, researc h and di se mination of wea ther information to the public Meteorologists als o s tudy global wea ther and climate and inve tigate the influence that human beings exert on the Earth s climate Metropolitan State s forecasting Laboratory includes a co mputerized ob erving station, daily weather map atellite image and acce to the national weather databas e The ba c helor of scie n ce degr ee in meteorology foll ow s American Meteorological Society re comme ndation s for und e r g radu ate programs. Student s hould co nta c t a met eorology faculty member to disc u ss degree programs, career opportunities and graduate sc h ool optio n s t METEOROLOGY MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Required Courses Semes ter Hours MTR 140 Introduction to M e te o r olo g y ....... ............ ........ .. ....................... 3 MTR 1 42 Introdu ctio n t o Met eo r ology Lab ..... .... .. .. .. .... ................ .... . .... 1 MTR 2 4 1 Meteorologi cal Instrumentati o n ................. .... ..................... ........... 3 MTR 3 40 Synoptic Meteorology I ............. ......... .................................... 4 MTR 341 S y nopti c Meteorology II ................................ ........... .................... 4 MTR 3 4 3 Dynamic Meteorology I. ............... ............................... .... ........ 3 MTR 344 Physical Meteorolog y ........... .. .......... ......... ...... .... ........ ........... 3 MTR 345 Dynami c Meteorology 11 ........ ............. .... ....... ..... ............. .... 3 MTR 441 Numeri cal Weather P redi ctio n ........... .................................... .... . 3 MTR 442 lndu trial Meteorology ............ .............. ................. .. ....... ....... 3 MTR 444 Cli matology .............. ............................. ................ .... 3 Elec tiv e mete o rology c ourse s . ......... ..... .... ....................... . ........... .......... ...:J. Subtotal ................ ............. .. ....... .. ........ ......... ..... ................ 40 Ad ditional Course Requirements ENG 101 F reshman Co mpo sitio n : The E ssay ............................... ..... ..... .......... 3 ENG 102 Freshman Composition : Ana l ysis, R esearch and Docu m e ntati on ........ . ...... ............. 3 MTH 1 2 1 Introduction t o Statistics ................................. ........ .............. .. ... ... 4 MTH 141 Cal culus I. .......................................................................... 4 MT H 151 Computer Programm ing: F o rtran ...... .. ....... ................. ............. ........ 4 MTH 241 Cal culus II .................................................. ..................... 4 PHY 231, 232 General Ph y s ics I and Lab ............................................................... 5 PHY 2 33 2 3 4 General Phy sics 11 and Lab .... ...... .................................... .......... 5 CHE 180 General Chemi s try I. .................................... ......... .................... 4 Le vel I Communication s ..................................................................... 3 Level 11 Art s and Le tt ers .... . .......... .................. . ....... . .... ...... ........ 6 Leve l II Historical .... .......... ....... .. ....... ......... ........... ........ ............ 3 Leve l II Soci a l Science ........... ...... .. .. .... .. .......... . ....... ........ ...... 6 Leve l Ill Seni or Experie n ce .... ...... ... .. ............................................... ....3. Subto t a l ................. . .... . .. .... ........ ................... ................. 58 Approved E l ective s ................... ........ . ....... ......................... ............ 1Q Tot a l. ............................................... ...... ................................. 1 26 Student s mus t co n s ult a f a culty advi s or regardin g gene r a l s tudie s' require m ents MINOR IN METEOROLOGY Required Courses Semester Hours MTR 140 I ntroduction to Meteorology . . . . ................................... 3 MTR 142 Introduction to Meteorology Lab ................... ............................... ... 1 MTR 340 Synopti c Meteorology I ................... ............. .................. ...... 4 MTR 34 1 Synoptic Meteorology II ......................... ............................... 4 Approved elect i v es .......... ................................ ... .. ............................ _8. Total. ................. .... . . .. .. ... .. .. .............. . .... ............. 20

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 Mathematical and Computer Sciences The Departm ent of Mathematical Sciences offers bachelor of arts and bachelor of science degrees in mathematics and a bachelor of science degree in computer science The department offers both a mathematics and computer science minor, both of which comp l ement such majors a s engineering technology, the other sciences, and economics In addition, the minor program in computer science complements the mathematics major. In addition to the general mathematics major, the department offers a mathematics major in five areas of emphasis encompassing a variety of significant mathematical ideas. These areas of emp h asis give the student background for graduate school in theoretical mathematics, as well a s background for both graduate schoo l and employment in mathematically related fields including classical mathematics applications scientific computing probability and statistics, and mathematics educa tion. The degree program in computer science adheres to nationally recognized s tandards and provide s student s with a more technical alternative to the mathematics emphas i s in computer science All students who are considering a major or minor in mathematics or computer science are expected to consult with faculty for advising. A degree in mathematics is useful in a variety of profe s sional fields including, among many other s business economics computer s cience government edu ca tion, technology, and science Students a re invited to cons ult with the department concerning career potentials All majors in mathematics are required to complete the following basic core of courses (with a required minimum grade of C in each of the se core cour s es): Basic Mathematics Core Semester Hours MTH 141 Calculus I.. . . . . . ............ 4 MTH 241 Calculus II . ............................... ...... ... ........... ......... .. 4 MTH 24 2 Cal c ulus III. . . . . . . . . ... 4 MTH 310 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs ............. .......................... .............. _3 T otal H ours i n B asic C ore .......... ........... 15 In addition to the core, each major except for one in secondary education is required as part of the accountability requirements of the department, to take a cour s e that is used for assessment. For mathematics majors this is a one hour course that als o includes an overview of the major. Each major is also required to take a senior experience cou r se and to comple t e a minor. The following mathematics course s have been approved as s enior experience courses : MTH 421, MTH 441, and MTH 448 MAJOR lN MATHEMATICS FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers co ur sework leading to the bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree The s tudent may choo s e either degree consi s tent with her or his career objectives. The s tudent may choose to complete a mathematics major in: I Mathematics General 2. Mathematic s Applied Mathematics Emphasis 3 Mathematics-Computer Science Empha sis 4 Mathematics Secondary Education Emphasi s 5 Mathematics-Statistics and Probability Emphasis 6. Mathem a tics -Theoretical Mathematics Empha sis The requirements for each are as follows: MATHEMATICSGENERAL Required Courses B asic C ore ... MTH 439 T otal .... Mathemati cs Seminar ..... ........................ .... ...... .... Semester Hours .. 15 ... _1 ..... 16 A minimum of24 c redit h o urs ch ose n from MTH 151. MTH 214*. o r a n y upper divi s ion m a thematic s co urses. The 2 4 cr e dit hours must include at leas t 2 0 upper -div i sio n h o urs, a t leas t o n e senior e xperience co u rse in m a themati c s and one of the following s equen c es : MTH 311-314; MTH 321 -322; MTH 342-344 ; MTH 4214 2 2 ; MTH 441 442 : and MTH 448 44 9 . . . .... ... ............... ........ ......... Total Hour s Required ..................... ..................... . 40 N o c redit i s allowed f o r MTH 214 if MTH 3 1 4 is also taken

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110 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES MATHEMATICS-APPLIED MATHEMATICS EMPHASIS The emphasis in applied mathematic s i s designed to meet the need s of the sc ientific technical, and co mputer ba sed economy and t o pr e par e the s tudent for gra duate s tudy. Required Courses Semester Hours B asic C o re ............................... . .......................... ................... 15 MTH 151 Computer Pro gram min g : FORTRAN . . . . .... ....... 4 MTH 314 Linear Al ge bra .......................... ...... ...................... .............. 4 MTH 321 Probability and Stati s tics......... ......... ........ . ...... . . . .... 4 MTH 342 Differ en tial Equati o n s ...................... ...... ......... . .... ............... 4 MTH 344 Part ial Differential Equati o n s ...... ......... ..... . . .............. ..... .... ...... 4 MTH 448 Numerical Anal ys i s I ......................................... ........ .... . .... 4 MTH 449 Numerical Analysis II . . ......... . ..................... 4 MTH 459 Applied M a them atics S enio r Seminar .... .......... ...................... .... ........ __! Total Hours Required . . . . . . . . . . ............ 44 It is recomm e nd e d tha t student s take one or mor e of th e following courses in ad dition to th e r eq uirem e nts: MTH 322, MTH 325, MTH 34 7 MTH 421, MTH 441, MTH 442, a nd MTH 445. MATHEMATICSCOMPUTER SCIENCE EMPHASIS Thi s emphasis is de sig ned for the student who wants to combine applied mathematic s or s tati stics with computer scie nce The required computer scienc e minor includes the core courses for the computer scie nce major. Required Courses B asic Core .... Semester Hours .... 15 MTH MTH MTH MTH 314 321 342 448 Linear Al g ebra . . ........ 4 Probabilit y a nd Stati s tic s ....... . . . ........ 4 Differential Equation s . . . . . . . . . 4 Numerical Analysis I . ..... ....... ............................................ 4 Two of the following courses: MTH 322 De s ign of E xpe rim e nts. ........... ........ .... .... .... ......... .......... ........... 4 MTH 344 Partial Differential Equati o n s ................. ............. ............................ 4 MTH 421 Probability Theo ry .................................... .... ........ ............. 4 MTH 422 Stochastic Pr ocesses . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MTH 449 Numerical Analys i s II . . . . . . .......... 4 One of the following cou rses: MTH 429 Senior Stati stics Proj ec t . . . . . . . . . ....... .... I MTH 4 3 9 Mathem a tic s Senior Seminar. . . . . . . ............ I MTH 459 Applied M a themati cs Seni o r Seminar ..... ............................ ..... ........ _l Total Hour s Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. 40 Required Computer Science Minor Semester Hours C SI 130 Introduction t o Stru c tured P rogram ming ...................... ............................ 4 CSI 230 Advanced Programming and D a t a Structure s . . . . . ............ 4 CSI 240 Computer Organizati o n and Assembly Lan g u age. . . . . ............ . ........ 4 CSI 310 Discret e Mathemati cs .................................. .... . ..................... 4 C SI 330 Found a tion s of File Stru c tur es. . . . . . . ............ 4 One of the following courses: CSI 421 S o ftware Devel o pment and Engineering ................ .. ............ 4 CSI 430 Advanced Data Structure s and Algori thm Analy sis ........ .. .......... .. .......... Total Hour s Required for Minor .... .............. . ... 24 MATHEMATICS SECONDARY EDUCATION EMPHASIS The emphasis in secondary education i s for the preparation of classroom teachers of mathematics Students seeking teacher licensure in mathematic s must sa tisfy the Teacher Education Program requirements of Metro State in a ddition t o all of the mathematics major requirements Required Courses Bas ic Core Semester Hours ..... ....... 15 CSI 130 Introduction to Structured Progr a mming ................. ................................ 4 MTH 311 Abstract Algebra I ... ...... .............. .... ..... .... .......... .............. 3 MTH 314 Linear Algebra ........................................................................ 4 MTH 321 Pr obability and Statistics .............................. .................................. 4 MTH 360 Hi s tory of Mathem a tic s . . . . . . . . . . ........ 3 MTH 361 Method s o f Teaching Math e m atics ........................... ............................. 3 MTH 365 Foundation s o f Geometry ........................ ..... .... ...................... ...... 3 A Senior Experienc e in Mathematics .......................................................... Minimum Total Hours Requ ired ...................... ................ ............................ 4 3 EDS 429 or EDU 419 ma y be s ubstituted

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES MATHEMATICS STATIST I CS AND PROBABILITY EMPHASIS The emphasis in statis t ics and probability s tr esses the a ppli cation of the principle s and m ethods of s tatistic s and probability in the biolo gical, physical and social sciences and engineering This emphasis also prepare s the s tudent for graduate study Semester Hours Required Courses Bas ic Core ... ............................................................................... 15 MTH 151 C o mputer Programming : FORTRAN . . . .............................. 4 MTH 214 Compu tational Matrix Algebr a* . ... ..................................... 2 MTH 321 Prob abili t y and Statistics. ................... .... ....... .... 4 MTH 322 De s ign of Experimen ts. . ... ... .................................... .............. 4 MTH 325 Optimization T ec hniques I. . . . . . . . ....... ...... 4 MTH 421 Prob a bili ty Theory . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MTH 422 Stochastic Proce sses. . . ........... ....... . .... ...... ....... ....... ...... 4 MTH 429 Seni o r Stati s tics Proj ec t . . . . . . . ................. _l Total Hours Requir ed . ....................................... .... . ........... .... ..... 4 2 MTH 3 1 4 ma y be s ub s tituted f o r MTH 214. MATHEMATICS-THEORETICAL MATHEMATICS EMPHASIS Th e emphasis in theor etica l mathem atics prepar es the st udent for further specia li zed study at the graduate level as well as being a daptable for preparation for position s in business industry and government. Required Courses Semester Hours B as i c Core ......................................................................................... 15 MTH 311 A b stract Algebra I . . . . . . . . ... . ......... 3 MTH 314 Linear Al g ebra ............... ,. .. .. .. . . ........ ......... .......... 4 MTH 439 Mathemati cs Senior Seminar ....... ............... ........... .... ...... ... .... .... I MTH 441 Advan ced Calculus I ................................................................... 4 MTH 442 Advanced Calculu s II.. . . . . ............................................ 3 A minimum of se ven c redit hours c ho se n fr o m any upper divisi o n m a th e mati cs c o urse s . ...................... Total H ours R e quired . . . . . . . . . ......... 37 MINOR IN MATHEMATICS Basic Core MTH 141 Calculus I .... .... MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN ... or CSI 130 Introduction to Structured Pr o gramming .. MTH 241 Calculus II ...... Subt o tal ..................... ... .... ... Electives Semester Hours ..... 4 ........... 4 4 .. 1 2 A minimum of 10 hours at least seven of w h i c h mu s t be at the upper division l evel. The se 10 hour s m ay include MTH 242 an y upper divi s ion mathematic s c ourse o r any cours e appro ved b y the Departmenl of Math e mati cal S c ien ces Electives .... ... ..... l.Q Total Minimum Hou rs Required ......... ......... 2 2 MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE The department offers a co mplet e degree program in computer scie nce that adheres to the nationally recognized stan dard s set by the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board Student s are encouraged to contact the department for further details. The Senior Experience course in computer sc ience is CSI 421. No minor i s requir ed in the CSI pro g ram Required Courses Semester Hours CSI 130 Introdu ction to Structured Pr o gramming ......................................... ........ 4 CSI 230 Advanced Programming and Data Structur es .......... ............ ............... .... ...... 4 CSI 240 Computer Organization and A s sembly Language ......... ................................... 4 CSI 310 Discrete Mathematics.. . . . .. . .................................. ...... 4 CSI 312 Organizati o n and Structure of Operating S ys tem s . . ... .... ......... 4 CSI 32 1 Principles of Programming Language s . . . . . . . . . . 4 CSI 330 Foundation s of File Structures . . . . . . . . ................... 4 CSI 421 Software Development and Engineering . ................................ .......... 4 CSI 430 Advanced Data Structure s and Algorithm Analy s i s . ....... .......... .............. 4 CSI 459 Computer Science Senior Practicum .. ... ...... .. ... .......... ............... .... ... ....2 Total. .......................... ........................ 38

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112 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES Req u ired Ancillary Courses COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing. . . . . . ............. ....... ...... 3 EET 231 Digital Logic and Telecommun ica tions ....................... ........ ................. 4 CSUCMS Approved Upper Division Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....3. Total ......................................................... . ................ ..... .... 10 A minimum of three hours is req uired Required Mathematics Courses MTH 141 Calculus I. ......................... ........ ................................ .... ...... 4 MTH 241 Calculus ll . . . . . . . . 4 MTH 32 1 Probability and Statistics... . . . . . . . . . . 4 A minimum of seven hours c h osen from the following: MTH 242 Calculu s ill. . . . . . . . . . . ............. 4 MTH 314 Linear Algebra .................................. ... ... . ................ . 4 MTH 325 Optimization Te c hnique s. . . . . . . . ............ 4 MTH 342 Differential Equation s . . . . . . . . . . . .............. ... 4 MTH 448 Numeric a l Analysis ............................. ..... ........................ ......... ....:! Tot a l. ................................................ ... .... ..... .......................... 1 9 MTH 214 may be s ubstituted for MTH 314. Required Laboratory Science Courses Any I 0-hour sequence chosen from the following : PHY 231-234 General Phy sics and General Phy sics L a b o r atory I ll ..... ...................... 10 CHE 180 General Chemi s try I. . . . . ....... ... ... ................... .... ..... 4 EET IIQ-11 3 Circuits and Circuits Laboratory I -II . . . . . . .. .. .. . .. .. ..... l.Q Total. . . . . . . . . . ... ....... l.Q Subtotal ............. ...... 77 General s tudie s and free electives ..... .................... . ......... .... .. ......... ....:!J Total H o urs R equired for Major. . . .... ......... .. . .. . .... .. .. 120 MINoR IN CoMPUTER SCIENCE Required Courses Semester Ho urs CSI 130 Introduction to Structured Programming .................................................... 4 CSI 230 Advanced Programming and Dat a Structure s ......... . .............................. 4 Electives A minimum of 12 semester hours chosen from CSI 240 and upper-divi sio n CSI courses T otal Minimum Hours R equired ................................. . Phys i cs 12 .. 20 The Department of Phy s ic s offers co ur sework leading to a bachelor of scie n ce and to a bache l or of arts degree. Minor s in phy si c s and theoretical physic s are also offered. Undergraduates pr e paring for work in industry or for gra duate s tudy s hould t a ke the bachelor of science in physics. Students preparing to teach secondary school physic s s hould take the bachelor of arts in physics in addition to satis fying the requirements for licensure in sc ience. See the Division of Teacher Education for detail s The Physics Program is offered jointly by the facu l ties of Metro State and the University of Colorado a t Denver and Metro State students will receive ins truction from the faculty of both institutions. The Department of Phy s ics a l so offers courses in astronomy, which are de s igned primarily as genera l interest courses. PHYSICS MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS Req u i r e d Courses Semester Hours PHY 231 General Physics I. ............................................................ ...... 4 PHY 233 General Phy sics II . . . .... . ...... .. ...... ....... ......................... 4 PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I .................................. ......... ....... I PHY 234 General Physic s Laboratory ll ..... ............ ................ ...................... I PHY 281 Modern Ph ysics ........ ........................... ..... ..... ................. .... 3 PHY 282 Classical Phys i cs .......... ..................... ............... .............. 3 PHY 32 1 Analytical Mechanics ........... . ................................... ... ....... 4 PHY 381 Quantum Mechanic s .................... . .... .... ........ ........ ... ........ 3

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SCHOOl OF lEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 R equired O pti o n (Select A or B) Optio n A: PHY 371 PHY 472 PHY 492 Option B : PHY 461 PHY 462 PHY 492 E l ectives Ph ys i cs Laboratory I Advan c ed Phy sics Labo r atory II Phy sics S enior Seminar ........ Comput atio nal Ph ysics I ..... Computational Phys i cs II. Ph ysics Senior Semin a r ................ . ....... .. ....... .. .. 2 .. 2 .. ... I .. .. .. 2 .. .. 2 .. .. 1 A minimum of I 0 a dditi o nal s emester hours of upperdivi s i o n physi cs co ur ses se l ec t e d in co n s ultat i o n with and a ppr oved b y the D e partm e nt o f Ph ys i cs . . . . . . ..... .... .. ... lQ Total H o ur s Required . . . . . . . . . . ..... 38 A o ne -y ear seq u e n ce of PHY 201-202-203204 may be subs titut ed for the PHY 231-233-232-234 r equirements wit h the con sent of the Dep a rtm ent of Physi cs The s tudent i s ur ge d t o take o n e year o f ge n eral chemistry a nd o n e yea r o f e lectronic s Th ese cour ses h o uld be chose n in co n s ultation with the s tudent s adviso r in the Depanm e nt of Physics PHYSICS M AJOR FO R B ACHELO R OF SCIENCE R equi r e d Cou rses Semes ter Hours PHY 231 Gener a l Ph ys i cs I . . . . . . . . . .. 4 PHY 233 Gener a l Phys i cs II . . . . . . . . ... 4 PHY 232 General Ph ysics Laboratory I . . . I PHY 234 General Ph ys i cs Labora t ory II . . . . . . . . . . . . ... I PHY 28 1 Modem Physics . . . .. 3 PHY 282 Classical Phy sics . . . . . . . . . ... 3 PHY 32 1 Analy t ica l Mechanic s. . . . . 4 PHY 333 E lectri ci ty a nd M agnetism. . . ... 4 P H Y 341 Thennal Ph ysics.. . . .. . .. .. . ........ ... ................... ... .. 3 PHY 371 Ph ysics Laborat ory I . . . . . 2 PHY 38 1 Quantum M ec hani cs ... 3 PHY 481 Atomic and Mole cular Stru c ture ... 3 Required Optio n (Se l ect A or B ) Optio n A: PHY 471 P H Y 472 PHY 492 O pti o n B : PHY 46 1 PHY 462 PHY 492 E l ectives Advance d Ph ysics Laborat ory I. ........... Advanced Ph ys i cs Laboratory II ..... ....... ... Phy sics Seni o r Seminar . ........ Computati o nal Ph ysics I Compu tationa l Ph ys i cs II. Physics Seni o r Seminar ... .. .. .. ......... 2 2 .. ... I ............... 2 .. 2 . . . . I A minimum of eig h t additional semester hours in upperdivi s ion phys ics co ur ses mus t b e se l ec ted in co n s ult atio n w ith and app r oved by the Depanment of Physi cs . . . . . . . . . . ....8 Tota l H o ur s R e quir e d . . . . . 48 A o ne -yea r seq uen ce of PHY 201-202-203-204 may be s ub s tituted f o r t he PHY 231-233-232-234 r equi r e ments with t he con s ent o f the D epartment of Physics. The s tudent is ur ge d t o t a ke o ne year of genera l c h e mistry a n d o ne yea r of e l ec tr onics. These co ur ses s h o uld be chose n in co n s ulta tio n with the s tudent's a d v i sor in the Depanment of Physics MIN OR I N PHYSICS R equire d Courses PHY 23 1 General Physics I. PHY 233 General Phy s ics II ......... PH Y 232 General Ph ysics Laboratory I Semester Hou rs 4 .. 4 ... I PHY 234 Gener a l Ph ysics Labor a tory II ...... ... ................ ....................... ....... PHY 28 1 Modem Ph ysics ..3 PHY 282 Cl assical Ph ysics ...... ...... .. ..... 3 A minimum of eight additional se m es ter h o ur s in upper-di v i s i o n ph ysics cour ses mus t be se l ected in con s ult atio n with and approved by the Department of Ph ysics . . . ..... ....8 T otal H o ur s Requir ed . . . 24 A o ne -year se quen c e of PHY 20 1-202-203-204 m ay be s ub s titut ed f o r the PHY 231-233-232-234 requirements w i th th e consent of the Department of Phy sics.

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114 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES MINOR IN THEORETICAL PHYSIC S Students entering thi s program are expected to ha ve facility in u sing ordi nary differential equations, vec tor calculus and linear a lgebra These s kill s are norma lly acquired in MTH 242, MTH 314, and MTH 342 or in PHY 311 and PHY 312 With the consent of the Department of Physics, stu dent s with strong backgro und s in physics m ay elect not to complete PHY 231 and PHY 233 and may substi tute eight semeste r credit hour s of approved physics electives. Required Courses Se m es ter Hours PHY 231 General Ph ysics I ..... ..... ........ ....... . .................... ............. 4 PHY 233 Genera l Ph ysics II ............................. ............. ....... ............. 4 PHY 32 I Analytica l Mechanics ....... ........... . ... ........ .... .... . .... ........... 4 PHY 333 Electricity and Mag n eti s m ............. ............ ...... ..... ...... ...... ....... 4 PHY 34 I Thermal Phy sics ............. ........................ ... .... .... .................. 3 PHY 46 I Comp utati onal Physics I ..... . ......... .................. ................ .... 2 PHY 463 Contin uum Phy sics ........................................... ..... ... .... ....... _l Tota l Hours R equired .... ........ . . ..... ........ . ........................ .... ........ 24 INSTITUTE FOR INTERCULTURAL STUDIES AND SERVICES The Institute for Intercultural Studie s and Services takes an interdisciplinary approach to the s tudy of f cult ure, offering a major and a minor in African American s tudi es and Chicano s tudie s The insti tute provides the stude nt with aca demic skills leadi n g to better unders t anding of social interaction and provides serv ices at the local, national, and internatio nal level. Thro u g h th e institute, students s tudy with faculty from diverse academic background s and may travel and study i n Spain Africa, and Mexico. African American Studies The Institute for Intercultural St udi es and Services offers a range of courses i n African American s tudies that present the dimension of the black experience in this co untry These courses encompass and afford a co mprehen sive under stan ding of the African h eritage. They pre sent African links and potential ; co ntribution s of black people in the growth and development of the U.S.; black culture and lifestyles; the black community; political activity and potential ; religiou s development and importance; comm unity service and reso u rce assistance; and progno sis and poten tial for social change. The courses may apply in the general s tudie s' requirements and as electives for graduatio n Students are urged to consult with the faculty in African American st udie s abo ut ne w courses n ow being desig n ed as well as special offerings. The major in African American studies (w hich lead s to a bac h elor of arts degree) and the minor program must be planned in consultation with an advisor in the AAS Program Students desiring secondary licensure in social studies should see the Department of Teacher Educ ation AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES MAJOR FOR B ACHEL OR O F ARTS Required Co urses Semester Hours AAS 1 0 1 Introduction to African American Studies ............ .............. .. ......... .......... 3 AAS I 1 3 Survey of African History (HIS 194) . . .... ............................. ..... 3 AAS 200 Social Movements and the Black Experie n ce ( SOC 200) .... .... ...... .................. 3 AAS 330 The Black Community ( SOC 314 ) ........................ .......... ........ ....... 3 AAS 370 P s ychology of Raci s m and Group Prejudi ce (PSY 370 ) ... . ......... ..................... 3 AAS 485 Research Seminar in African American Studies ............................ .... ....... 3 From the following selec t one : MUS 2 0 I Topics in Ethnic Music : Variable Title .................. ...... . ..... ............ 3 ART 304 African Art ....... .... ..................................... . ................... 3 AAS 324 Africa n American Literature ( ENG 324) .............................. .... .... . 3 Electives ..... . ....... . . ......... .... ....... .... ....... ...... ................ 18_ Total Hour s Required ........... ........... . .......... .... .... ...... ........... ........ 39 Elect ives Elective hours in African American stu die s courses are se l ec ted in consu ltation with the advisor

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 MINOR IN AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES Required Courses Semester Hours AAS 101 I ntroduction to African Ameri can Studies.. . . . . . . 3 AAS 200 Social M o vement s & the Black Experience (SOC 200) ......... .... ......... .............. :l_ Total ............................................................................................... 6 E lectives A minimum of 15 additional s emester hours i s required in Afri can American cours es, thre e hours of w hi c h mu s t be an A frican course, sele cted in con s ultati o n with and a p proved by the African Americ a n study's advisor assig ned the s tudent. T o tal hours for th e minor are 21. Assessment Test Du r in g the final semester stude nt s will be required to tak e a comprehensive assessmen t te st. Chicano Studies The Institute for Intercultural Studie s and Services offers a bachelor of arts degree in Chicano st udi es. The Chicano and other Hispanic historical experiences are u se d as point s of departur e toward expanding awareness of the multicultural world and the co ntribution s of Chicanos Th e pro g r a m i s de s i g ned to assist in the preparation of sc holar s as well as human se rvice provider s CmcANO STUDIES MAJOR FOR BACHELOR oF ARTS The requirement s include core courses in the m ajo r basic knowledge of Spanish lan guage, plu s approved electives Required Core Courses Semester Hours CHS I 00 Introduction to Chicano Studie s . . . . . . . ......... 3 CHS 10 I Hi s tory of Meso-Americ a: Pre -Columbian and Colonial Period s ......................... ........ 3 CHS I 02 Hi story of the Chicano in the Southwes t : Mexi can and U S Periods . ........ 3 CHS 200 Living Culture and Language of the Mexican a nd Chicano ............. ... ......... ...... .... 3 CHS 20 I Survey of Chicano Literature .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. _l Subtotal ... .... ............. ...... .... ............... ... ..... . .............................. 1 5 Language Requirements: SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I. ......... ......... ............... SPA I 02 Elementary Spani s h II SPA 211 Intermediate Spani s h o r SPA 212 Spani s h Rea ding & Convers a tion .................. Subtot a l ... .. Approved Electives ........................ Total Hours Required for M ajo r .. ................... 5 .. .......... .. 5 ... _l 1 3 .......... ..... .u 40 A minimum of 12 semes ter h o urs of elect i ves in Chica n o s tudies select e d i n con s ul tatio n with th e in s titut e director is requir e d MINOR IN CmcANo STUDIES The minor can be designed to provide the student with co urse experiences that are most relevant to occupational and educational goals. Students, in consultation with a faculty advisor in Chicano s tudie s, will develop individual minors that reflect the be s t pos s ibl e e l ective c urri cula and which will in s ure that a rele van t emphasis is maintained. Total hour s for the minor are 21. Required Courses Semester Hours CHS 100 Introduction to Chi cano Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 CHS 101 Hi s tory of Meso-A merica : Pre-Columbian and Colonial Period s. ...... ......... ........... 3 CHS 102 His tory of the Chicano in the S outhwest: Mexi ca n and U.S Periods . . ............ 3 CHS 200 Living Culture and Language of the Mexican and Chicano. 3 CHS 201 Survey of Chicano Literature . . . . .................................. _l Total. .......... . ..... 15 Electives A minimum o f six emeste r hours o f e l ectives is r e quired t o complete th e minor. Th e courses are to be selected in cons ult atio n with a Chicano s tudies faculty a d visor. Assessment Test Durin g th e final semester s tudent s w ill be required to take a comprehensive assess ment test.

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116 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, & SCIENCES INSTITUTE FOR WOMEN'S STUDIES AND SERVICES The institute offers a range of academic courses, both interdisciplinary and in the disciplines, which study the diversity of women s lives and experiences in the United States and elsewhere. Students may elect to minor in women's studies or may choose a contract major or minor. Several women's studies courses are offered for general studies course credit or in fulfillm ent of the multicultural graduation requirement. Students seeking licensure as secondary education teachers of the social sciences may select from a number of women's studies courses in fulfilling their requirements Also offered are Cooperative Education Internships in business, government and community organizations Women's studies, valuing a diverse curriculum, fosters the inclusion of ma teri al on all women men of color, and ethnic minorities in courses throug h out the college. It identifies and encourages faculty, administrative, and professional mentoring of women st ud ents and facilitates collaborative interdisciplinary research on women. The institute also provides s upport services for all women stude nt s whether or not they elect women s studies courses. These services includ e advising, information, and referral; workshops, conferences, and seminars; a newsletter; resources such as the Women s Action Guide and The Scholarship Search and a smal l mul ti-media library containing books periodicals manuscripts, video and audio tapes, and newspaper files all focusing on women s iss u es. Information and application materials for a number of scho l ars hip s are avai lable through the institute, among them the Pamela McintyreMarcum Scholarship, and the Executive Women International Scholarship. During the academic year th e institute co n venes the interdisciplinary Front Range Feminist Scholars Colloquium bringing together faculty, grad uate students, and independent scho l ars from the metropolitan area to share research c urri c ulum development, and applications of feminist scholars hip The institute a l so engages in cooperative ventures with women s organizations in education, business government and the community for example, the American Association of University Women; the Colorado Women's Agenda; African American Women 40+; and the Colorado Committee for Women's History. Finally, to encourage and recognize excellence, the institute sponsors Outstanding Women Awards annually in the spring Women's Studies CONTRACT MAJOR Through the Office of Adu lt Learning Services, students may construct an individualized interdisciplinary major combining work in women s studies with work in other disciplines. Students should consult the director of the institute and the director of adult learning services to initiate planning. The women's studies contract major is appropriate for any st udent particularly those who plan to work specifically with female populations. Faculty strongly recommend a cooperative education internship. A women's studies degree can be combined effectively with course s in management organizatio nal development, psychology, history, English, ed u cation nursing human services, law enforcement, advertising public relations, marketing, finance, and other field s appropriate to the stude nt s interest. Students gain a se n sitivity to women s issues and are thus prepared to work with both ge neral and female populations in a variety of areas Employ ment opportunities for women's studies students may be found in managin g wome n's resource centers and battered women's shelters. Students might also work in community counseling and consulting or develop workshops or special programming for women in business and industry Alumnae are also employed in banking and as executives in professional associations. Students who plan to work in higher education, law, or medicine may find a wome n's studies degree a useful base for graduate or prof essional study. MINOR Also interdisciplinary, the women s studies minor uses faculty expertise from many different departments. Faculty strongly recommends a cooperative education internshi p The objectives of both the contract major and the minor include: heightened awareness for women themselves; review of the cultural patterns that define wome n ; the study of the historical ac hi evements of women in aU disciplines; and the exploration of emerging n eeds and opportunities for women Emphasis is on both personal and professional growth These objectives are met within the co nte xt of the new scholarship on women, includi n g women of color, ethnic minority women, and international women. The courses are appropriate for students in education gui dan ce and counse ling law enforcement, human services business management, advertising public r e lati ons communication, liberal arts, and the behavioral and social sciences

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 Men are welcome and encouraged to s tudy the sc holar s hip that focuses on women They may find from s u c h s tudy a co n ce ptual framework that will e n a ble them to better und ers t a nd appreciate a nd work with women Required Courses Semester Hours WMS 10 I Int roduc t io n : Woman in T ra n s ition .... . ........... ... .............. .............. . 3 WMS 165 W ome n in U.S. History........ .... . .............................. .............. 3 WMS 331 W o men and the Law .................. ....... ........ ............ .......... ....... 3 WMS 351 Femini st The ory . . . . . . ............... ................ 3 WMS 475 Senior Seminar . .... .... ............... . .......... ........................ 3 Electives ... ..................... .....2 Total ....... ..... ..... .... ..... ... 24 Electives: In additio n to the co re co ur ses, nine semester hours of electives acceptable to or taught through women's s tudie s are required, bringing the total number of se me ste r h o ur credits for a women' s studies minor to 24. The se co u rses some of which are int er di scipli n ary, are se lected in co n sultation with th e women s s tudie s facu l t y and are approved by the ins t itute. Additional Study W o m e n' s s tudi es co r e co ur ses are suppl emented each semester by topic s, c urr en t issues, and cluster co urse s ( WMS 342 344, 345, 346 367, and 425); in addition s tudents s h o uld check the Class Schedule for other relevant offerings. Appropriate elective s are oft en liste d in other departments and m ay be cross-li s ted with wome n's s tudie s For exa mple, s tudents may Lake WMS 331 W ome n and the Law for either women's s tudi es credi t or for cre dit in Criminal Ju s tice and Criminol ogy ( CJC 371). Students may also Lake WMS 165, Women in U.S Hi s tory for either women's s tudie s credi t o r for credit in his tory (HIS 165). Similar offerings are avai l ab l e in hum anities fine arts, and soc ial and beh avio ral scie n ces. Additi onal course s in other departments are cross-reference d for the s tudent's information While these m ay n ot h ave women' s s tudi es co u rse numbers (in s t ead the y will have co ur se numbers in other de partm e nts), they may with permi ss ion of th e wome n s s tudie s faculty, co unt toward elective credits for the co ntract major o r minor. An example is PSY 295, The P syc hology of Sex R o l es A lso i n cluded are certain courses in com municati o n s ( COM), his t ory (HIS), and mathematics ( MTH ). Studen ts s hould check the Clas s Schedule eac h se m ester for appropriate cross -lis ted and crossref erenced cour s es. WOMEN'S SER VICES The institute is committed to the e mp owe rm e nt of women through education In o rd e r to assist women with a po s itive college experience, women s serv ice s provides referral s to ca mpu s and co mmunity re so ur ces, inf o rm atio n abo ut sc hol arshi ps, assistance with the pr ocess of e nt eri n g Metro State to community women advocacy se rvice s for s tudent s d eal ing with har ass ment o r disc rimination and pr ograms and eve nts that focus o n issues of parti c ular co n cern t o women The insti tute h o u ses a s m all library with a variety of books and other re so urce materi a l s on women's expe rien ces, histories, and contributions to soci ety Students who need ass i s tance s hou l d mak e a n a ppointm e nt with the coordinator of w o men s serv i ces

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118 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

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SCHOOl OF PROFESSIONAl STUDIES 1 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES The School of Professional Studies offers many and varied degree and teaching l ice n s ure programs. Every program is de signed not only to prepare grad u ates for s u ccess in a specific caree r but to provide a broad ed u cational background for career and lif e enhancement. The m ajor purpo se of the school is to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and performance com p etencies ne e ded to s u ccessfully e nter a chosen profe ssio n T h e School of Pr ofess i o n a l Studies includes three divisio n s, 14 departments, and other a dmini strative units. The Divis i on of Education consists of thr ee academic departments: Early Childhood and Elementary Education ; Secondary Ed u cation; and Reading The div i s i on a l so inc lud es a p are nt/ c hild devel op ment center, an educational re so ur ce center Den ver Public Sch oo l s/Metropolitan State College of Denver partner s h ip sc h oo l s, and the Office of C l inical Service s, includin g the Academy of Te ac hin g Excellence and Corporate Tr aining In stitute. The three academic departments in the Div i sio n of Education offer teacher licen s ur e programs in early childhood, e l ementary education, and 12 secondary e du cation fields The D ivision of Technology consists of five departments: Aerospace Science, Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology, Electronics Engineering Technology, Mechanical Engineeri n g Technology, Technical Communications and Indu strial Stud i es and Mechanica l Engineering Techno l ogy. The five academic departments offer n ine major and 10 minor degree program s The Divi sio n of Publi c Service Pr ofessio n s co n s i s t s of s i x departments: Criminal Ju stice and Criminol ogy; Ho s pitality Meetin g, and Trave l Administration; Human Services; Military Science; Nursing and H ealth Care M a nagement ; Human Performance Sport and Leisure Studies; the Institute for Gerontol ogy, and the Center for Addiction Studies The six academic department s offer s i x majors and nine minor degree programs The Corporate Training Institute provides needs-based training and educational assistance to business indu stry, health care, and governme n ta l agencies. It is a cooperative arrangement between Metro State and it s customers within the city, region, state, nation and international community The objectives of the i nstitute inc lud e delivering workforce lit e racy and technical trainin g to business and ind u stry; pro vidi ng technical assistance to improve productivity of small business; providing assistance to start-u p companies ; and assisting the international community thr o u g h educational partnerships Th e purpose of the Academy for Teaching Excelle nce is to meet the e du catio nal soc ial and economi ca l demands of the 21st ce ntury b y providing programs, activities, and services to improve teaching a nd learning at Metro State in the public sc hool s, and in the local bu s ine ss communi t y The Academy serves the need s of Metro St a te faculty b y providin g workshops, semi n ars, assistance in conducting applied re searc h c u rriculum and program development and prov idi n g resources o n teaching effective ne ss. The Academ y houses the Metro State Center for Critical Th in king, a reg i onal ce nter of the National Center for Excellence in Critical Thinking Instruction. There are more than 250 full-time and part-time facu l ty, ad mini stra tor s and s upport per so nn el in the School of Profe ssio nal Studies that are highl y committed to assisti ng students attain their career goals. DIVISION OF EDUCATION The Division of Education is co mpo ed of the Department of Early Childhood and Elementary Educa tion ; the Dep artment of Seco nd ary Education ; the Dep artment of R eadi ng; the Office of Clinic a l Serv ices; the Child Development Center ; and the Education Resource Center. Th e Education Pro grams at Metropolitan State College of D e n ver are fully accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of T eac h er Educatio n and the Co l orado Department of Ed u cation. The Department s of Early Childhood and Elemen t ary Education and Se co nda ry Educatio n offe r minors i n early chi ldh ood and speciaVgifted edu ca tion P rofessional cou r ses leading t o lice n s ure in the areas of early chi ldh ood education, elementary ed ucation and secondary education are also offered. The Divi s ion of Education, with the cooperation of the Modem Languages Departm ent and Chicano s tudie s (located in the Instit ut e for Intercultural Studies and Services) offers a minor and a n endorse ment in bilingual/bicultural education The Department of R eading offers one of the few under g raduate reading minors in the area. Course offerings provide the pro s pective teacher with the skills to teach developmental and remedial reading at the ear l y child h ood, elementary, and seco ndary sc ho o l leve l s T h e department also offers collegelevel reading co ur ses

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120 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES The Office of Clinical Services serves to integrate the laboratory experiences in the professional education programs. In addition to the student teaching programs requests for observations, research projects and s tudies, and tutoring situations, utilizing off-camp u s laboratory setting s are coordinated through this office. The Child Development Center is a preschool laborat ory that serves as a training facility for students enrolled in early childhood and other educat ional programs. The center prov ide s a setting for college students to observe and participate in an ongoing educational program for you n g children. The partner s hip schools are a cooperative endeavor of Metropolitan State College of Denver and selected public sc hools. The purposes of the partner s hip schoo l s are : ( 1 ) to provide more effective edu catio n for the pupils and the Division of Education s tudents ; (2) to provide professional development and colla b orate opportunities for both faculties; and (3) to fully utilize all avai l able resources of the Auraria campus and communities The Teacher Education Division participates in the John Goodlad Partnership for Educational Renewal effort. The Education Resource Center is a facility designed to provide material s, resources and advanced technology for teacher education students and faculty members for coursework, field experie nce s and laboratories The resource center presents guest l ectures, works h ops, and sem inars. PLEASE NOTE: The Di vis ion of Teache r Education has been di vided into two departments: The Department of Early Childhood and Elementary Education, and the Department of Secondary Educa tion. The tea c her licensure pro g ram s in both d e partm ents are currently being r evised. Please consult w ith either the Department of Early Childhood and Elementary Education at 556-6228, or the Depart ment of Se condary Education at 556-6227 for c urrent program information Teacher Education, Licensure, and Related Programs The Teacher Education Division offers professional preparation for teaching and education-related careers. These programs inc lud e initial teacher licensure and endorsement to teach in public schools in Colorado at three l evels: early chi ldh ood ( pre sc hool through second grade); elementary (kindergarte n through s i xth grade); and secondary (seventh through 12th grade); plus art, music and physical educa tion lic ensure (kindergarten through 1 2th grade) Minors are available in ear l y childhood education, special education/gifted education, bilingual/bicultural educat i on with endorsement, and parent ed u ca tion. Courses and workshops are offered to meet Colorado Department of Education relicensure require ments and Colorado Department of Social Services group leader and director qualifications. Early childhood programs include: I. A professional teaching sequence leading to a Colorado teaching license with endorsement to teach preschool through third grade. 2 A profes sional teaching seq u ence, which, taken in co njunction with the Elementary Educatio n Program fulfills requirements both for a minor and endorsement in early childhood education. Students are eligible for a Colorado teaching license and endor se ment to t each preschool through sixth grade. 3. A minor in early childhood education 4. A minor in early childhood education plus the ne cessary courses to qua lify for administration of early childhood centers. Students may also take just the courses required to be gro up leader a nd be director-qualified for the Colorado Department of Social Services. The elementary ed u cation program consi t s of a profe ssional teaching se quence leading to a Colorado teaching l icense with endorseme nt to teach kindergarten through sixth grade. The secondary education program consists of a professional teaching sequence leading to a Colorado teaching license to teach secondary sc hool (7th-12th grades) with endorsement in art, business, Eng lish, industrial arts, mathematics, modem languages, phy s ical education, scie n ce, social studies, Span i s h and speech. Licensure is also available in elementary physical education and K-12 art music a nd physical education. The special education/gifted education program prepare s teachers and other human serv i ce profession als to work with special education/gifted education children in any educational setting. The minor i s appropriate for a bachelor's degree and also contains a core of courses that will meet basic requirements for graduate schools in Colorado. The interdi scipli nar y bilingual/bicultural education minor prepares students to work in bilingual/bicul tura l classrooms and schools. A bilingual/bicultural endorsement i s availab le Parent education programs inc lude an interdisciplinary minor in parent educatio n and a program in par ent education for students who already have b achelor's degrees

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 All teacher education and licensure program s are approved by the Col o r a do Department of Education and have full accreditation by the National Cou n cil for Accreditation of Te ac her Education ( NCATE). Relicensure courses are available for Colorado teacher lice nse holders. REQUIREMENTS FO R ALL LICENSURE STUDE TS Students seeking a bachelor's degree from Metropolitan State College of Denver must meet all require ments for a bachelor' s degree and the course of study leading to the de s ired licen s ure and endorsement. Students who already have a bachelor's or higher degree should consult with an advisor to determine the applicability of their previou s degree(s) and coursework to current requirements Specific cour se requirements are given under each l icensure and major program Requirement s for entry to Metropolitan State College of Denver s pro g rams for initial teacher licensure are established by the Colorado Department of Education and Metropolitan St ate College of Denver. I. Prior to or during their first course in the profe ss ional education se quence students must A Meet one of the following requirements: 1 Rank in the top two quartiles of the candidate's high school graduating class. 2. Score at or above 19 on the Americ a n College Test (ACT) or score 825 or above on the Scholastic Aptitude Te s t (SAT). 3. Have a grade point average (GPA) of at l east 2 50 on a 4.00 scale for at least 30 sem ester hour s of the most recent college or univer ity coursework B. Pass the California Achievement Test in mathematics, spelling, and langua ge usage at or above the 75th percentile C Demonstrate oral competence. Student s see king ba c helor's degrees s hould pass a public speak ing course with a grade of B or above. Student s who earn a grade of "C" may attempt an oral examination. Students who have bachelor s degrees but did not pa s a speech course with a grade of B or above may attempt an oral examination D. Complete 50 clock hour s of s uccessful experience working with children and youth. Students may not take a dditional teacher licen s ure courses until they meet these requirements. St u den t s who fail one or more of the basic skills (Ca l ifornia Achievement Test) examinations will be notified and provided with a lis t of resources for each area in which remediation is needed Students are expected to take the initiative to seek out these resources and bring their skills in the identified areas up to an acceptable level. Candidates failing one or more sectio ns of the basic ski lls te st ma y be retested using alternate testing forms for a total of not more than three additional attempts in each of the sec tions failed within a four-year period No minimum wait time between the initial te s t and the first two r etests is requ i red ; however a minimum of 10 weeks between the third and fourth testing sessions is required to allow for remediation II. To be formally admitted to the Teacher Licens u re Programs st u dent s should A. Complete a Declaration of Intent form available in the Teacher Education Office, C 2028, or in the first cour e in each profes s ional sequence B Complete an Admi ss ion to Teacher Education form providing evidence of h aving met require ment s as lis ted in section 1., above, endorsed by an advisor. C Obtain an admission card from the Teacher Education Office or from the ins tructors in begin ning level courses The admission card verifies that initia l requirement s have bee n met and w ill admit students to class, provided prerequi s ite s and GPA requirement s have been met. III For admission to student t eachi ng, students must A. Complete a minimum of 90 semeste r hours of college level course work. Students transferri n g more than 60 se mester hour s from another institution to Metro State, or those who already ho l d bachelor's degrees, must complete a minimum of 20 se me s ter hour s of college-level course work and two semesters before they can be admitted to s tudent teaching. B Comple t e 200 clock hour s of experience with children and youth before entering 300-leve l courses. Thi s service may be with any c hild or youth group s uch a the Boy Scouts Girl Sco u ts Campfire Girls Head Start, YMCA YWCA c hur c h groups o ther boys and girls' clubs, camps, recreational progr ams, or sc h ool or child care and education programs. Experience may be paid or volunteer, but should be with a group of children. C Have a minimum GPA of 2 .75 for the following: I. All college work attemp t ed 2. All coursework in their major area 3 All education courses attempted to date

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122 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES D Complete all profe ss ional courses required for lice n s ure with a g rade of "C" or better E. Complete all s ubject area co ur ses in the s tudent's te ac hin g area(s) required by the North Cen tral Association of Colleges and Secondary S chools F. Compl e te all item s in the per so n a l s tudent t eachi n g folder to be obtai ned in the Divi sio n of T eac h er Education. G Ha ve recommendations from two Metro St ate facul ty memb ers and/or evaluations from pre student teaching field experiences. H Have a physical examination rep ort includin g tuberculosis clearance on file with the Student He a lth Service s Offi ce. I. Have ap prov a l by the a ppropri ate scree ning committee when a pplicable. J Compl e te formal applica tion for stu dent teac hin g to be s ubm itted to the Di visi on of Teacher Education no l a ter than the following date s : I For fall se me s ter s tudent teaching Fe bru ary 15. 2. For s prin g se m ester st ud ent teaching-September 15 Students who have co mplet e d s tudent teaching r equirements a t another institution or another te aching l eve l may reque s t to take st udent t eac hin g for six semeste r hours ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Al l st udent s s hould m ee t with an advisor in their endorsement area to develop a pro gram plan Transfer s tudent s or s tudent s who a lready h ave a bachelor's degree may have to take s pe cifie d general st ud ies co ur ses if they h ave not fulfilled the se re quirement s in their pre vious work Student s who have pre vio u s work in educa tion s hould meet with an education adviso r for an eval uation before enrolling. The Divi s ion of T eac her Education s ub s titutes no co ur sewo rk older than 10 years for required courses in the licen s ure seq uence The department may not accept more re cent co ur se wo rk if there h ave been sig nificant c h anges in co ntent. Grades below a C in th e profe ssio nal courses will n ot be accepted. Courses for which a grade below a "C-" i s re ceive d must be r epea ted a nd th e college p olicy on l ast gra d e stan d s will apply. Information co n c erning requi re ment s and co ur s e s of s tudy are based upon current requireme nt s of the State of Colorado and Metropolitan State College of D enver. Requi reme nt s are s ubj ect to modification therefore, stu d e nt s are advi sed to co n su lt the Div i sion of Teacher Ed u cation for the c urrent s tatu s of re quirement s PLEASE NOTE: The Division of Teacher Education has been divided int o two departments : The D epa rtm e nt of Early Childhood and Elementary Education, and the Department of Secondary Educa tion The t eache r licensure programs in both d e p artm e nts a r e c urr entl y being revised. Pl ease cons ult with eithe r the D epart m ent of Earl y Childhood and Elementary Edu cation at 556-6228, or the Depart ment of Secondary Education a t 556-6227 for c urr ent pro gram information Early Childhood Programs The early childhood progr a m s at Metro State offer four op tion s : I. Profe ssiona l t eac her lice n s ur e and e ndor sement i n ear l y childhood: pre school through second g r ade (ages 3-8). 2. Profe ssio n a l tea c her licensure and en dorsement in ear l y childhood in conjunction w ith an ele menta ry endorsement. Thi s seq u e n ce fulfill s the bachelor's degree req uirem e nt s for a minor in ear l y c hildhood education 3 A min or in early c hildh oo d e du catio n 4 Ear l y c hildho od a dm inistration which includes the ed u ca tion a l requirements for a minor in early c hildh oo d education and meet s director qu alifica tions for the Colorado Department of Social Ser vices Students may a l so take only tho se course s required by the Color a do Department of Soci a l Services. Co lorado Teacher Licensure and Ear l y Chi ldhood Endorsement: Pre sc hool through Third Grade ( Ages 3-8) T h ere are four part s to Metr o State s early c hildh ood teacher education and licensure programs: I The profes s i o nal tea c her e du catio n se quence in early c hildhood education 2. A major in an academic di sci plin e 3. A min or in a n academic di sc ipline or a profe ssional e ducation area. 4 Metro State general st udie s requirement.

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 1. PROFESSIO AL EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION LICENSURE S E QUEN CE Required Cou rses Semester Hours EDU 234 Urban Earl y Childhood Education . . . .. 3 EDU 2 35 Urb a n Earl y Childhood Edu ca tion Field E x perience ...... 2 E D U 2 3 6 E x pre s i v e Art s f o r the Y o ung Child . . . . . . . ..... 2 EDU 335 A ss es s ment and M e asurement in the Early Childhood C l as s r oo m . 3 E D U 3 37 Lan g ua g e Arts and S oc i a l Studie s Curricul a f o r Early Childh o od Edu cati ...... ........ ............ 3 S E D 3 60 Th e E xce pti onal Learner in the Cl as r oo m . . . 3 EDU 3 64 Curriculum and Management: Pre primary-6. .... ....... ................... ....... 4 E DU 4 3 1 Parents as Partn e r s in Edu ca t ion . . .. ......... 3 EDU 4 33 S c i e nce a nd Mathematic s f o r the Youn g Child.... . . ............... 2 EDU 437 Pla nnin g a Developmentally Appropriate Ear l y Childhood Cl as sr oo m .... ......... ............... 3 E D U 4 3 9 Student T eac hin g and S e minar : Earl y Childhood .... I 0 RDG 312 D e velopin g Print Liter acy: Preschool Third Grade . . . _ot Total Hour s Required for Licen s ur e . 2. APPROVED METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER MAJORS Anthropology Art Behavioral Science Biology Chemistry English History Journalism Mathematics Modem Languages Music Education Philosophy Physic s Political Science P s ychology Sociology Spanish Speech Comm uni cation Human Development (transfer s tudents ) 3. R ECOMME DED MINORS BilinguaJ/BiculturaJ Education Ear l y Childhood E du cat i on Parent Education Reading Special Educat i on/G i f t ed Educatio n 4 2 4. GENE RAL STUDIES REQUIREMENT S SPECIFIC TO EARLY CHILDHOOD LICE SURE Students are required to comp l ete the general studies requirements of Metropolitan State College of Denver. Please consult a faculty adv i sor in the Divi s i o n of Teacher Edu cation for gu idan ce in selectio n of a ppropri ate ge n e ral st udie s co ur ses for th e early c hildh ood e du catio n licens ure program COLORADO T EAC HER LICENSURE AND ENDORSEMENT IN BOTH EARLY CHILDHOOD AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Students seeking an endorsement in e l ementary education can f ulfill their requirements for a minor b y taking the ear l y c h i ldh ood minor. B y fulfillin g the minor requirement and the additional requirements as specified below s tudents may receive endorsement in both ear l y c hildh ood and elementary education R equired Courses Semester Hours Earl y c hildhood edu c ati o n min o r ........ ........ .................... ...... 2 2 2 5

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124 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Additional Requirements: An acce p table majo r ge nera l studies coursework and coursework in the e l e m entary educatio n professional se quen ce w h ich fulfills e l e m e nt ary lice n s ure r eq u ire m e nts. ENG 346 Children' s Literat u re .................................................................... 3 RDG 312 Developing Print Litera cy: Pre school-Third Grad e ................. .............. ......... 4 An a dditio n al six se m es t e r h o urs of student teaching at the earl y childhood level ....... ................. Total...................................... . . . ............................... 35-38 E ARLY CHILDHOOD ADMI N I S TRATIO N St u de nts w h o w i s h to adm i n is t er ear l y chi l d h ood pr ograms will m eet Colorado D epartment of Socia l Services q u alificatio n s b y taking the early chi ldh ood minor i n a d ditio n to courses specified by the Colo rado D e p artment of Socia l Services as show n b e l ow Stude nts d o n ot have to be a d mitted to the teache r licens ure pr og r am to take this se qu e n ce of co ur ses, nor do they h ave to be degree-seeking Required Cou rses Se m es t e r Hours Early chi ldh ood ed u cation minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 22-25 Additional R equired C ou rses for Administratio n PSY 10 I Introduc t ory P syc h ology ......................................................... ...... 3 PSY 180 Developmental Educational P syc h o l ogy HES EDU soc 204 334 ( prerequi si te to all 300and 400-level early c hildh ood education courses) ........ .. ... ............ 4 Introducti o n t o Nutrition . . . . . . . ...................... 3 Administration of Early Childhood Program s ................................................. 4 1 0 1 Int r o d uctio n t o Soc i o l ogy . . . .... ........ .... ... .. 3 o r EDU 431 Parent s as Partner s in Edu ca t ion ..... . ........... .... ......... .... .... . ____3. Total. ....... ........................... ............ ............... ............ ......... 42-45 Note: Students seeki n g on l y d i r ec t o r qu a lifi c ations may r ake just those co urs es r eq uir ed by th e Colorado Depanmenr of Social Servi c es Col orado D epanme nt of S ocia l Services regulations ma y be c h a n ge d Consult w ith the Tea c h e r Edu c ation Divisio n for a dditional info nnation. Hi g hl y R ecommended Courses HPS 206 Advanced First Aid and Cardi op ulmo nary R e s u s citation ............ .............. .... . 3 EDU 332 Care and Nurture of Infants a nd Toddlers ...................... ..................... 3 M I N OR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCA TIO N Required Courses Sem es t e r Hours EDU 234 U rban Early Childhood Edu cation. . . . . . . . . . . ....... 3 EDU 235 Urban Ear l y Chil d hood Educa tion Fie l d Experien ce ..... .................................... 2 EDU 236 Express i ve Art s for th e You n g Child .......................................... .... 2 EDU 335 Asses ment and Mea s urement i n the Early Childhood Clas s r oom ...................... .......... 3 EDU 337 Language Art s and Social Studies Curricu l a for Early Childhood Educati ....................... 3 E D U 431 P are n ts as Partners in Education ......... ...................... ....... .... ......... ...... 3 EDU 437 Pla nn ing a Developmentally Appropria t e Early Childhood Cla ssroom ................. ......... 3 EDU 438 Teac h i n g Prac tic u m in Pre prim ary Ear l y Childh ood Education .............................. ____3.=li T ota l H o urs R equired for Mi nor ..... ............. 22-25 Note : PSY /80 D eve l o pm e ntal Edu ca tional P sycho l ogy is a prerequisite to all 300 and 400 l eve l early c hildh ood e du c ation courses. H i g hl y R ecommended Cou rses EDU 332 Care and Nurture of I nfant s and Todd l e r s . .... ...... ... . ....... .... 3 EDU 436 Cultu ra l l nHuence on the S ocializa tion of Childr en ... ............. ....... .............. .... 4 PLEASE NOTE : The Di v ision of T eac her Edu c ation has been di v ided into two departments : The Depa rtm e nt of E arl y C h ild h ood and Elementary Education, and t he Departme n t of Secondary Ed u ca tion T h e t eacher li censure p r og r ams in both d epartments a r e c u r r ently being r evised. P lease cons ult w ith either the Department of Earl y Childhood and Elementary Education a t 556-6228 or the Depart m e nt of Secondary Edu c ation at 556 -6227 for current program information. Elementary Education Program Co lorado T eac h e r Lice n s u re a nd E l e m entary E nd orse m ent ( Kind ergarte n t hrou g h 6th Gra d e) T h ere are four parts to Metro S ta t e's eleme nt ary teacher licens ure program : I T h e p rofessio nal teac h er education seq u e n ce in eleme n tary education 2. A m ajor i n a n acade m ic d i scipline 3. A min or i n an aca d em i c discipli n e or a pr ofessio n a l education area 4. M e t ro S tate ge n e r a l studies requi r ement

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 1. PROFESSIONAL ELEME TARY EDUCATION AND LICENSURE SEQUENCE Required Courses Semester Hours EDU 212 Elementary Education in the United States. 3 EDU 213 Activities and Health for the Elementary C hild . 3 EDU 264 Urban and Multicultural Education . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 3 EDU 3XX An and Music Method s f o r the Elementary Tea c her . . . 2 SED 360 Th e Exceptional Leamer in the Classroom . ........... ............................. 3 EDT 361 Introdu c tion t o Edu c ational Technology ............................... 2 EDU 364 Curri c ulum and Management: Pre primary-6.. .............. ..... ............. ..... 4 EDU 410 Language Arts and Social Studie s Curriculum : Pr e -primary-6......................... .. 4 EDU 412 S c i e n c e and Math Curriculum: Pre primary-6......... .................................. 4 EDU 419 Stud ent Tea c hing & Seminar: Elementary K-6 . . . . . . . 10 RDG 3 1 3 Tea c hing Reading in the Elementary S c h ool K-6 .......................... T o tal Hours Required for Licensur e 0 0 0 0. 0 0 42 2. APPROVED METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER MAJORS Anthropology Art Behavioral Science Biology Chemistry English History Mathematics Modern Languages Music Education Philo so phy Phy sics Political Science P syc hology Sociology Spanish Speech Communication Human De velo pment (tra n sfer s tudent s) 3. RECOMMENDED MINORS Bilingual/Bicultural Early Childhood Education Parent Education Reading Special Education/Gifted Education *Con c urrent e nd o r se m ent available in early c hildh oo d elementary. o r b ilin gual/bicultu r al e du ca tion. 4. GENERAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS SPECIFIC TO ELEMENTARY EDUCATIO LICENSURE Students are required to complete the general st udie s requirements of Metropolitan State College of Denver Please consult a faculty advisor in the Divi sion of Teacher Education for guidance in selection of appropriate general studies courses for the elementary education licensure program PLEASE NOTE: The Division of T e ach e r Edu c ation has been divided into two departments : The D epanment of Earl y Childhood and Elementary Edu c ation and the D e partm e nt of Secondary Edu c a tion. The tea c her li ce nsur e pro g ram s in both departm e nts are curren tl y b eing revi se d Please co nsult with either the Departm ent of Earl y Childhood and El e mentary Education at 556-6228 or the Depart m e nt of S eco ndary Edu ca ti o n at 556-622 7 for c urr e nt program information

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126 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Secondary Level Students may be certified at the secondary level, b eing endorsed to teach in the following areas: art, E n glis h industrial arts, mathematics music education, physical education science, soc ial st udies Spanis h French German a nd speec h Students s hould ask for advisors in the Division of Teacher Education as well as in the department s of their major and minor fields of s tud y In addition to a major in the above areas, st udent s must complete the following professional course program: Required Courses Semester Hours Social and Cultural Bases of Secondary Schools A block of two courses to be taken conc urr ently EDS 22 1 Processe s of Edu catio n in Urban Seco ndary Schools. ............... ... .. ........... 3 EDS 222 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary Schools .. .. 2 Psychological and Physiological Bases of Secondary Education EDS 320 Edu cational Psychology Applied t o Teaching . .... ........... ... ........... 3 RDG 328 Teaching of Re adi n g a nd Writing in the Content Areas . ... .............. .... ..... 4 SED 360 The Exceptional Leamer in the Classroom ......................... ........ ....... ........ 3 Instead of SED 360, physical education licensure students take: HPS 462 Adaptive Hum a n Performan ce and Spans Activities .. ................ .......... 3 Processes of Teaching in the Secondary Schools A block of two courses to be taken concurrently and not earlier than two se m esters before st ud ent teaching EDS 321 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom Management . . . . . ........... 3 EDS 322 Fie ld Experience in Teaching Materia l s Construction and Classroom Management . . 2 EDT 361 Introduction t o Educational Technology . ....... .... . 2 Teaching Practice EDS 429 Student Teaching a nd Se min ar: Seco nd ary 7-1 2 ... ............. 6.....8...l1r.. Total... . ..... ... .... ....................... ....... 28-34 Students who see k secondary licen sure sho uld also check the general licensure requirements listed under Teach er Education Program. Before enrolling for st udent teaching, stude nts are directed to take a course in method s of teaching their major and minor field of st udy offered in the res pe ctive departments The following co ur se of st udy is suggested for tho se st udents who h ave a bachelor's or higher degree, and who are primarily completi n g licen s ure courses at Metro State Completion of the program takes a minimum of three semesters. Additional time may be required to comp lete subject area courses. Semester I EDS 221 Proces s es of Education in Urban Secondary Schools . . . . . . . 3 EDS 222 Field Experience in Urban Secondary School s .... .......... .... ... .. ..................... 2 EDS 320 Educational Psychology Applied to Teaching . . . ....... . .............. 3 Semester I or II To be taken as offered, or as these courses fit into the student' s sc hedule SED 360 The Exceptional Leamer in the Classroom .. ................ ............... ....... ..... 3 EDT 361 Introdu ctio n to Educational Technology. . . . . ................ 2 Methods of Teaching Major Subject Method s of Teaching Second Teaching Field if a pplicable RDG 328 Teaching of R eading and Writing in the Content Areas .... .......... ..... ....... 4 Semester II EDS 32 1 Secondary School Curric ulum and C la ssroom Management ...... .......... ..... 3 EDS 322 Field Experience in Teaching Ma t eria l s Construction, and Classroom Management ................. 2 ALL OF THE ABOVE LISTED COURSES ARE PREREQUISITES FOR STUDENT TEACHING Semester III EDS 429 Student Teaching and Seminar: Seco nd ary 7-12 ( Not avai l able summer t erm) .. 6, 8, or 12 SCIENCE LICENSURE PROGRAM The program i nclude s a major in one area of science, an area of emphasis in a second area, and a sam pling from addit ional areas of science and mathem atics. The program satisfies both major and minor requirements, so no further minor i s required

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 12 Major S tud e nt s mus t compl e t e a n academic m ajor a t M e tr opolitan S t ate College of D enve r in one of the fo l l owi n g areas: B i o l ogy 2 h emistry E arth Sp ace Scie n ce P h ysics > l ease co n s ult with th e Teac h er Education D ivisio n for a list of approved and/or required courses i n the najor and for licensure. ; cience Support Area >tude n ts mu s t comple t e o n e of the followi n g t eaching areas of emphasis other than th at of the major. liol ogy HO 108 110 210 110 220 110 355 or -10 360 ubtotal ..... 'hemis try HE 180 HE 1 8 1 HE 300 HE 301 HE 3 1 0 HE 312 tb t otal .... Se mester Hours General I ntroduction to Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 4 General Botany . . . . . . .............................. 5 General Zoology . . . . . .. 5 Urban Ecology .. .. ................................ .. ........ 4 General Gen etics .......... .................... .... ............... ...... .... ..... ____.1 .. 17-18 General Chemi stry I. .............. ................... ........ ......... .... ... ....... 4 General Chem istry II . . .......... ....... ....... 4 Analytical Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Analytical C h emistry Laboratory . . . ...... .......... 2 Organic Chemistry I. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4 Organi c Chemi stry Laboratory I . . . . . . . . . . . . ...2 21 Dmpute r S ci e nce ) I 1 30* Introductio n to Structured Programming . . . . . . . . . . 4 ) I 230 Advanced Programming and Data Structures ..... .... ........... ... ... .... ..... ........... 4 >I 330 Foundations of File Struct u res . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4 us n i n e addi t ional hou rs of CS I . . . . . . . . . . . ....2 btotal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 rerequisiresfor CS //30 are CS//01 and MTH Ill or eq uivalents. :rtb Sci e nc e : L 101 : L 103 : a 100 :a 123 : a 124 T 104 General Geology ................ .... ......... ............................ 4 Hi s torical Geology. . . . . . ..... 4 World Regional Geography . . . . . . . . . .. 3 Weather and Climate ........ .......... ................ ... ........................ .. 3 Landforms of the U.S . . . . . . . . ...... ............ 3 Introduction to A s tronomy . . . . . . . _..l ....................................................... 20 :tbematics H 141 H 24 1 H 310 H 361 I 130 Calcu l us I ............................ ......... ................. 4 Calc ulu s II . . . . . . . . . . . .......... .... ..... 4 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs.. . . . . . .. 3 Methods of Teac h ing Mathema t ics . . . .... 3 Introduction to Structured Progra m ming... .... 4 s three additional hours to be selected from : 'H 3 1 1 Abstrac t A l geb r a . . . . . . . . .. 3 'H 321 Probabiliry and Stati stics . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. 4 'H 360 History of Mathematics .......... .......... ......... ............ ... .......... .... . 3 H 365 Fo u ndatio n s of Geometry . ............... .......... ... ... _..l total s ics 231 232 233 234 21 General Physic s I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 4 Genera l Physics Laboratory I . . . . . . . . . . . . ... I General Phy s ic s II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 General Physics Laboratory II . .... ....................................... ........... I e i g h t additional hours in p h ysics ... ................... _8 : otal .. .. 21 +

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128 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Gene ral Requirements These may be fulfilled in the academic major or teaching area of emphasis. Choose at least one course from each of the followin g areas: Spe cific co ur ses are requi red for some majors. Biology BIO 1 08 General I ntroduction to Biol ogy .......................... (suggested) 4 Chemistry CHE 110 or CHE 180 Computers Principles of Chemis t ry ...... General Chemistry 1. ...... (A com put er course approved by yo ur a dvisor ) Earth Science AST 104 Introdu c tion to Astronomy .. or GEG 100 or (suggested) 5 ......... 4 .............. ... 3-4 .. ...... 3 .. ...... 3 GEL 101 World Re gional Geog r aphy. General Ge o logy .............................................................. 4 Environmental Studies Physics PHY 20 I College Phy s ics 1 or PHY 231 General Physics 1 and PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory Mathemati cs* MTH Ill College Algebra .. and MTH 1 1 2 College Trigonometry ..... or MTH 140 Pre-Calculu s Mathemati cs .... or MTH 1 4 1 Calculus 1 *St ud e nts must t ake b at h MTH I I I and MTH I 1 2 or choose MTH 140 or MTH 141. Science This course is required: .. ........ 5 ....... .. 4 .4 .3 ............ 4 .4 SCI 395 Method s of Teaching Science ... ............................................... ___3. Sub t otal Notes The courses listed below are required t o meet licensure requirement s in these majors: Biology CHE 1 80 and CHE 210 MTH Ill and MTH 112* o r MTH 140 *S tudents must take both MTH I I I and MTH I 12 o r choose MTH 140 Chem i s tr y MTH 141 Eanh Science MTH 141 Phy sics AST 104 EETOOO* MTH 141 MTH 241 MTH242 MTH 342 ..... 22-25 Students who elect the eanh science or physics teaching areas of emphasis must choose at least one upper-division cou rse in additio n to SCI 395 *Co nsu l t with department c hair.

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 SOCIAL STUDIES LICENSURE PROGRAM The program includes a major in one area of social scie nce an area of emphasis in a second area, and a samp l ing from every social/behavioral science. The program meets both major and minor requirement s; an additional minor is not required Major Students must complete an academic major at Metropolitan State College of Denver in one of the fol lowing areas: African American Studies Anthropology Behavioral Science Chicano Studie s Economics Geography His tory Political Science Psychology Sociology Plea se consult with the Teacher Education Divi sio n for list of approved and/or r eq uired courses in the major and for licen s ure SOCIAL STUDIES AREA OF EMPHASIS Students mu s t complete one of the following teaching areas of emphasis. History must be selec ted unless the academic major is history History HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1715. ....... .3 HIS 102 Western Civilization since 1 715 .. .................... 3 HIS 121 American History to 1865 ..... 3 HIS 122 American History since 1865 ................... 3 Non-western His tory ......... ..... 3 Three a dditi onal uppe r division history hours selected in consultation with the department. Reading courses will n ot apply. ............... __3_ Subtotal .... ..18 African American Studies AAS AAS 101 200 Introdu ction to African American Studies ................. ........... .. 3 Social Movement a nd the Bla ck Experience ...... ...... ..... 3 Six additio nal h ours in African American studies ; three must be upper division African American History is recommended Student s shoul d consult with a faculty advisor regarding selectio n of these course ...... _(i 12 Subtotal . . . . . . . . ......... Ant hropology ANT I 0 I Physical Anthropology and Prehistory ................. .. ................. 3 ANT I 31 Introduction t o Cultural Anthropology ......... . ..3 Six additional upper-division hours in anthropology ...... ................ ............................ _(i Subtotal ....... .... .. 12 Chicano Studies CHS 100 Introduction to Chicano Studies .......... .... ........ ............... ... 3 CHS 101 History of Me s o-A m erica: Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods .3 CHS 102 Hi s to ry of the Chicano in th e Southwest: Mexico a nd U S Periods .. .......... 3 Three additional upper division hours in Chicano studie s ... __3_ Subtotal .. ........... 1 2 Econo mics (18 semester hours ) ECO 201 Princi pl es of Eco n o mic s Macro ...... ............................... 3 ECO 202 Principles of Eco nomics-Micro ...... Twelve a ddition a l upper-division hours in econ o mi cs Subtotal ...... Geography GEG 123 Weather and Climate GEG 130 I ntroduction to Human Geography ... GEG 140 World R esources .... ........... Three additional upper d ivisio n hours .............. Subtotal . . ... ................... ......... ....... ...... 3 .. ll ......... ................ 18 ... 3 .. .... 3 .3 ..... ........... __3_ .. ...... 12

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130 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Political Science PSC 101 America n National Government ................... ........................... ............. 3 PSC 102 P o liti cal Sy s tem s and Ideas ................ ... ................... .... ............... 3 PSC 300 American State and Local Government. ...... ..... ............................. ....... 3 PSC 305 P o litical Theory ............. .......................................... ....... ... ....3. Sub t otal ................................................. .................................... 1 2 P sy chology PSY 101 Introductory Psychology . .. . .. ......... .......... .......................... 3 PSY 211 Educational P syc hol ogy ............................................ ........ ........ ... 3 PSY 326 P syc h o logy of Adolescen ce .......... ...... ............ ................... ............ 3 Three a dditi o nal hours of e l ectives. Sugge s ted : PSY 216,221 and 241. Consult with P sy chology Department a d v isor in choosing electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... ......... ....3. Subtotal .... ................................................... ...... .... .... ...... 1 2 Socio logy SOC I 0 I Introduction to Sociology . . . . . . . . ........... .... 3 SOC 360 R esearc h in the Social S cie n ces . ......... .... . ..... ....... .... ............ 3 Six a dd itional h ours of e l ectives, three of whi c h must be upper divisio n . ................................. __2 Sub t otal ............ .... ....... ........ . ...... . . ................................ 1 2 General Requirements (So me may be satisfied in the academic major o r s upport area ) HIS 401 Method s of Te ac h i n g Social Science: Second ary Schoo l ................ .......... ........ 3 Select one co u rse from eac h of the followi n g areas : African Ameri can Studies Anthro p o logy Chica n o Studies Eco n omics Gen der Studie s Ge og raphy* International Studie s Political Scienc e Psychology Socio l ogy Africa n Ameri ca n History o r other co ur se d eali n g with Afri can America n ex p e rience in the U nit e d States **GEG 100-3 W o rld R egional Geog r ap h y o r GEG 140-3 W o rld R eso ur ce s sug ges ted. These c r e di ts are t o b e taken as pan of genera l s tudies. SPECIAL EDUCATION/GIFrED EDUCATION MINOR The minor in spec ial education/gifted education i s de s igned to prepare teachers physical educators r ec reational ther apis ts, counselors, and professional s t o work with exceptio nal students in educational therapeutic, and recreational settings The minor also will s erve as a p re requisite c ore for Metro State teacher education s tudents who de s ir e to pursue graduate program s in special education/gifted education Required for Either Emphasis: Semester Hours SED 360 The Exceptional Learner in the C l ass r oom ......... ..... ....... .......................... 3 SPECIAL EDUCATION EMPHASIS Select a minimum of 15 hours: SED 338 Teaching Students with Learning and B e h avio r Disorders ............. ....... ................ 3 SED 341 Diagnosi s and Evaluatio n of Exceptio n a l Student s .................... ....... ............... 3 SE D 343 Field Experie n ce in Special Education ............................. ........ ........... 3 SED 344 Counseling Parent s of Exceptional C hildr en .................... ... ... ..... ....... .......... 3 SE D 420 Language Development and Learning Disa biliti es .............. ............. ....... ......... 3 SED 425 C l assroo m Man age m ent f o r Exceptional Stud ents .. .......... ..................... ........ ....3. Total H ours Requ ired ................................... .. .. ... .......................... .......... 1 8 GIFI'ED EDUCATION EMPHASIS Select one course (3 hours ) from the Spe c ial Education Emphasis plu s the following se quence: EDU 346 Introdu ctio n to the Educ a tion of the Gifted and Talented ............ ........ ......... ... ... 3 ART 439 Integrating the Arts for Gifted and Talented ......... .............. ........................... 3 EDU 442 Method s and M a teri a l s for Teaching the Gifted ........ ...... . .... .......... ...... 3 E D U 443 Field Experience in Gift ed and Talented ..... .................................. .......... I E D U 444 Teaching Thinking Skill s to the Gifted ............. . .......................... ....... ...l Subtotal .................................... .... . . .................. ........ . ..... ll Tota l H o urs Requir e d ..... ..... .......... .......................... ................ . ..... 1 8

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAl STUDIES 1 BILINGUAL/BICULTURAL EDUCATION MINOR The Divi s ion of Education offers a minor in bilingu a l/bicultural education The minor i s an interdi sc i plinary pr ogram spo n so red b y Chicano Studi es, the Teacher Edu ca tion Divi s i on, th e Modem Lan g uage Department, and the Readin g Department. The principal objective of the bilinguallbiculrur a l minor i s to prepare future t eac h ers w h o will be able to co ndu ct all ph ases of classroom ins tru ctio n in a bilingual and bicultur a l se tting. In the development a l se quenc e, the minor will provide the potenti a l teacher with a ba c kground of the Me x ican herita ge a nd with a n under s t a ndin g of pr ese nt d ay Hispano/C hi cano c ul ture. Profi c iency in the Spanish lan g uage i s requir e d of all s tudent s before they complete the minor Thi s proficien cy will prepar e the te ac her to under stan d and further develop th e n ative tongue of bilin g ual/bicultural children while offering a second langua ge to man y other c hildren. In addition, the minor will provide the teac her with s ufficient field and academic ex perien ces and resources in order to de ve lop implement, and eva lu a te c urricul ar methods, technique s and m a teri a l s in the bilingu a l/bicul tural classroom For s tudent s who do not s tudent teach in a b i lingual/bicultural pro gram, the pr ac ticum in bilin g ual/bicultural e du cat i o n will be required Required Courses and Recommended Sequenc e Semester Hours CHS 102 His t ory of the Chicano in the Southwest : Mexi co and U.S. P eriods .. .. .. 3 E DU 351 P erspectives in Bilin g u a l/Bi c ultural Ed u catio n . 4 RDG 353 Teaching R eading t o Non English Speakers. . . . . .. 2 SPA 3 1 0 Spanish Terminology for th e Bilin gual C l ass room.... 2 RDG 358 Re a ding i n the Bil i n g u al/B i c ultural C l assroom . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EDU 451 Developmem of Methods and Materials for the Bilingual/B i cultural Cla ss r oom .... 4 CHS* Elec t ives... . . . .... .... ... ....... 3 SPA* Elective s. . . . . . . . . . . . . _l T o tal. .......... Must be advan ce d co urses and taken with the approval of the bilingual advisor Courses Strongly Recommended in Chicano Studies and Spanish ... 24 CHS 31 0 The Chicano Community . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3 CHS 33 0 Edu catio n of Chicano Childre n . . . ......... 3 SPA 311 Adv a n ce d Conversa t ion .... .......... ....................... .................. 3 SPA 315 Spanish Phonetic s and Diction . . 3 SPA 322 Folklore a nd Cu ltur e of the Mexi ca n So uth wes t. . . . . . . . 3 Required when student teaching in a bilinguallhicultural program i s not completed : E D U 452 Practicum in Bilingual/Bi c ultural E duc atio n . .................................... ..3 Preparation Requirements Language Profi c ien cy: Proficiency in oral a nd written Spani s h will be det e rmin ed b y a commi ttee co m po s ed o f Spani sh-s peakin g member s of th e Modem Langu age Department Chicano Studie s, and the Division of Teacher Education The four-skills exam i s u se d as th e profi c ienc y mea s ure. Student s who fail to ac hie ve a satisfac t ory sco re on th e profici ency exa mination will b e required to take s ufficient Spanish class es to enable them to pa ss the profi c ienc y examination. The following co ur ses a re de s i g ned to help students meet the pr oficie nc y requir e ment s bef ore th e completion of the bilingual/bicultural minor : SPA 101 SPA 1 02 SPA 211 SPA 2 1 2 Ele m entary Spanis h I ..... ...................... E lem e nt ary Spanis h II lm ermediate Spani sh ................... ........ ............. Spani s h Readin g a nd Co nver sation ..................... HOLISTIC HEALTH AND WELLNESS EDUCATION MULTI-MINOR .. ... 5 ... 5 ... 3 .. ...... 3 The multi min o r m ay be arranged thr o u g h the Divi sio n of Education and includes the r e quir e d courses lis ted under the holi s tic health and education multi minor on page 180 of this catalog. Parent Education The purpo s e of the parent e ducation minor is twofold. F irs t the program is designed to provide s tudent s entering profe ss ion s where they will de a l with c hildren and families with the inf o rmation and s kill s nec essary t o conduct parent ed ucation pr og r ams. Se co nd th e program addresses a ne e d identified in the community for people with s pe cific prepar atio n for the role of parent educator. Many agencies offer or are intere s ted in offering parent education program s, yet no s pecific preparati o n for that r o l e ha s bee n available Thi s minor is de sig ned both to m ake the field of parent education more credible b)\ providing s tudent s with education for that role and to give student s a se t o f s kill s that are in c reasingl y i h demand .

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132 SCHOO L O F PROFESSIONAL STUDIES The minor is seen as particularly appropriate for s tudents entering familyand child-related fielc including (but not limited to) education, health care management human serv ice s, criminal justi (especially juvenile justice ), nursing and nurse practitioner programs, p syc hology, sociology, soci welfare, speech and women s st udies People entering the se fields might well be in a po s ition de velo p and co nduct parent education program s; a minor in parent education s hould serve them well the employment market. Other fields, also, might provide opportunities to utilize this background; pl ent education happens in settings ranging from c hurc h e s to industry and is not ljmited to educatior se tting s in the usual s ense. The parent education minor encompasses three areas of preparation. One se t of cla ses i s intended to gi s tud e nt s basic information necessary for effective parenting (c hild development, parenting techniqu. family management, health care). The second face t of the program gives s tudents the skills necessary 1 developing and conducting parent education program s such as group techniques and program develc ment. The third component of the program e n tails actual field experience working in parent education p1 grams. Thi s experience is incorporated int o a number of classes and is the central co mponent of the fir co u rse in the minor. A field placement i s required in the final semes ter. Placem e nt opportunities inclu parent education in ho s pitals, soc ial se rvice agencies p u blic and priv ate schools, and bus i ness and indt try. Students work closely with a PAR program advisor to ensure an appropriate field placement. MINOR IN PARENT EDUCATION Required Courses Semester H01 PAR 2 0 5 Introduction 10 Parent Education ... PSY 1 80 Developmental Educational P syc h o logy. or PSY 22 1 Psychology of Hu man Deve lopment. ................................ ....... .... ........ or PS Y 325 C hild Psychology .................. ..... . ...... ............. .... ........ ....... HSP 204 Family Function Dysfunction and Therapy ............................................ PSY 224 P arenting Techniques ... . ................. ........................... ... ...... PAR 307 Worldng with the Contemporary Family ............................................... H ES 307 Parental H ealth Care I ss ue s .................................. ........... ........ ...... EDU 407 De sig nin g and Impl ementing Program s for Adult Learners ... .... ..... .......... . ........ PAR 489 P arent Education Field Placement. ........................................... .... Subtotal ................ ....... ................................................................ 25Field Placement: A minimum of three hours from the courses listed The program director works close l y with stu d e nt s 1 community age ncies i n settin g up appropria t e field p l acements. PAR 489 Parent Education Field Pl ace m e nt ....... .................... .......................... PSY 493 S e minar in Developm e n ta l P syc hol ogy ........... ................ ................ E D U 469 Pr o f essio nal Pra cticum ... .... ..... . ............... .... ................ I HSP 479 Professional Int ernship ............................................................ NUR 485 Nurs in g P rocess : Application ..................................................... Total Hours Required for Minor . . . . . . .......................................... 29Min imum hours required fo r th e minor are 29-30 (depending o n cou rses selected). If th e PAR minor i s combined with a m1 in any of the following departments (EDU, HSP NUR, PSY ), th e combined total se mester hours for major and minor m be 60 hours Such a program mu 1 include al l courses required for the major and those listed here as required for the P minor. Approval by both departments will be n ecessary for suc h a combined program Note: For descriptions of other courses included in the minor see appropriate depamnenr listings : EDU Education ; HE H ealth Services ; HSP Human S ervices; NUR Nursing ; PSY-P sychology; SOC-Sociology; WMSWomen 's Studi es PARENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Pr e r e qui s ites: A degree (B.A B S., M .A., M.S ) in a field s uch as education, psychology social w fare, human services, chi l d de ve lopment, or nursing. Required Courses Semester H o PAR 205 Introdu c tion to Parent Education . . . . .. .. . .. .. . ...... ... HSP or HSP PSY PAR H ES E D U PAR T o t a l. 202 204 295 307 307 407 489 Small Group Dynami cs: Theory and Experiences ...... . . ...... ...... ............ Family Function Dysfunction, and Therapy ........................ ................ P are nting Techniques .................................. ............................ Working with the Contemporary Family ................................................ P arental H ealth Care I ssues . . . . . . . . . ............. De sig ning and Impl ementi n g Program s for Adult Learners ...................... .......... Pare nt Education Field Placement ........ ................................... ...........

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 S u gges ted E l ec ti ves PAR 480 Special T o pic s in Parent Education PSY 326 Psyc holo gy of Adole sce nce . . ..... ........... ................... ........ 3 HSP 204 Family Function D ysfunctio n and Ther a p y. ......................... .......... ..... 4 SOC 341 The Family in Tran s ition ...... .... .... ........ ...... ............................. 3 WMS 101 W oman in Tran sitio n...... . . . . . .......... .... .................. 3 WMS 218 A sse rtiv e ne ss Training....... . . . .. .. .. 3 SED 344 C o unseling Parent s of Exceptional Children . . . ........ .............. ...... 3 HSP 104 Beh avio r Modific a tion . ................. .......................... 4 CHS 221 The Chican o Family ...................................... ....................... ........ 3 SWK I 04 Human Beh av i o r an d the Social Environment ..................... ... .................... 4 SWK 105 Farrlily Social Servi ces . . ...... ... ... . ....... .......... ............... 4 SWK 30 I S oc ial Welfare Servi ces for Children and Adolescents ... . ............. 4 AAS 355 Th e Black Family..... . . ............................. 3 Physical Education Licensure T h e followi n g professional teac her educatio n sequences are required for licen s ure : ELEMENTA R Y PHYS I CAL E D UCATI O N LICENSURE R eq u ire d Cou rses Semester Ho urs SPE 101 Fundamental s of Speech Communication ........................... .... . .... ... 3 EDU 212 Elementary Education in the United St a te s .............. ............ ... ......... ......... 3 E DT 361 Introdu ctio n to Educational Technology . . . . . . ............. 2 EDU 364 Curri c ulum and Manag e m ent: Pr eprim ary-6 ......................... ........... .......... 4 HPS 462 Adaptive Human Perf ormance & Spons Activities . . . ............. 3 RDG 313 Te ac hing Readin g in the Elementary S c h oo l : K-6. . . .................. ........... 4 EDU 419 Stud ent Tea c h i n g and Sem i nar : E lementary K-6 ................... ............ ... ......... 10 PSY 180 Dev elopmental Educational Psycho log y .................................................... Total .............................................. ... ................ ........................ 33 K-12 PHYS I CAL EDUCATI O N LICENSURE R equired Co u rses Semester Hours SPE 101 Fun d a mental s of Speech Communication.. ... ...................................... 3 EDS 221 Pr ocesses of Education i n Urban S econdary Sch oo l s ................... .......... .... ......... 3 E DS 222 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary Sch oo l s . . . ... ..... 2 EDS 320 Educational P syc h o l ogy Applied to T eachi n g . . . . . . . . . .... 3 RDG 328 Teaching of Read i n g and W riti n g in the Content Areas. . . . . . . . 4 EDT 361 Introduction to Educational Technology. . . . ....... 2 EDU 364 Curriculum and M a nagem ent: Pr e-p rim ary-6 . . . . . . . ....... 4 E DU 419 Student Te ac hing and Seminar: Elementary...... ....... . ... 6 or 1 2 co mbined EDS 429 Student Teaching a nd S emi nar: Secondary 7-1 2............... ........ 6...8...JlLU HPS 462 Adaptive Human P erformance & Spons Activitie s (in lieu of SED 360) ....3. Total. ................ 42 SECONDAR Y PHYSICAL E D UCATI O N LICENSURE R equired C o urses Semester Ho urs EDS 22 1 Pr ocesses of Education in Urban S eco ndary Schools. .... 3 EDS 222 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary Schools . ................. 2 EDS 320 Educational Psyc h o logy Applied t o Te aching . ............. .... ...... 3 RDG 328 Teaching of Readin g and Writing in the Content Areas . ........ ..................... 4 HPS 462 Adaptive Hum a n Performan ce & Spons Activitie s (in lie u of SED 360) . . . ......... 3 EDS 321 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom Man age ment . . . . . . . . 3 EDS 322 Field Experience in Teaching M a t erials Construction and Clas s room Manag e ment. . .. 2 E DT 361 Introdu ctio n t o Educational Technology . . . . ................ 2 EDS 429 Student Te ac hing and Sem i nar: Secondary 7-12 .... .... . ......................... ..... J.2 Total . . . . . . . . . . . .... ................ 34 PLEASE NOTE: The Division of Teach e r Edu c a t ion ha s been divide d int o two d e partm e nts: The D e partm e nt of Earl y Childho o d and Elementa ry Edu ca ti o n, and the Departm e nt of Secondary Educa tion The teacher li ce n s ur e pro g ram s in b oth departm e nt s are c urr e ntl y being rev ised Pl ease co ns ult with e ith e r t h e Department of Earl y Childhood and Elem e ntary Education at 556-6228, or the Depart ment of Secondary Edu ca tion at 556-622 7 for c urrent prog ram information

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134 SCHOOL OF PROFES S I ONAL S TUDIES Re adi ng The Department of Reading offers two outstanding literacy programs. One program provides for the refineme n t of critical and analytical reading skill s, which enable college s tudent s to enhance the qual ity of their undergraduat e education RDG 151, Co g niti v e Strategies for Analytical Reading is designed as a colleg e le v el reading course that s atisfies a Gen e ral Studies Level I communication s requirement. RDG 306 Critical Readingffhinking provides further practice in the employment of cognitive s trate gies to dis cover fallacies recognize ob s tacles to critical thinking, and judge the validity of expository writing. This cour s e sati sfies a General Studies Level ll Arts a n d Letters requirement. The second program is a dynamic minor in reading that prepares students for careers in busine s s, indus try government, and education as instructional leaders in literacy program s The minor includes knowl edge of the re a ding process factor s influencing emergent literacy preparation and pre s entation of read ing lesson s development of instru c tional material s, identification of reading dis ability correlates ass e ss ment and interpretation of tes t re s ult s, and a c lo s ely s upervi s ed remedial reading tutorial experi ence Student s planning to complete teacher licen s ure requirements at all level s are encouraged to elect thi s minor N ote: A l e tt e r g rade of at l e a s t a "C" mu s t b e attain e d in e a c h of the co ur se s in the read ing minor READING MINOR Req u i r ed Courses Semester Ho urs Co mplete o n e o f the follo win g co urses : RDG 312 Developin g Print Litera c y : Pre s chool 3rd Gr a d e ... . ..... . . .... ........... ....... 4 RDG 313* T eac hing Rea d i n g in the Ele m entary School K-6 ... ..... .......... .... ........ .... .... 4 RDG 315* Middle S c h oo l Ins tructi o n a l R ea ding/Writin g S tra t eg i es . .... . . . .... ........ 4 RDG 328 T eac hin g R ea d i n g & Writin g in the C ontent Areas .... ...... .......................... 1 Subt otal....... . . .... ............. ........... ....... . .... .................. 4 To be completed by all reading minors: RDG 314 Who l e Lan guag e inte gratio n Acr os s the C urric ulu m ..... ..... .... .... .... ... ..... ......... 2 RDG 360 P racticum i n T ea chin g R eading ... ................................... ........... . 3 RDG 42 5 L it eracy A ssess ment : Th eory a nd Practi ce ....... .... ......... ........ ....... ............ .. 4 RDG 4 3 4 Development o f Reading/Writin g Instructio n a l M a t eria l s and Pr oc edure s .................. ...... 2 RDG 460 Practic um in Literacy Enh a n ce m ent ............ .... ............ .... . . ....... ....3. S ubt otal ...... . ..... ....... . . .................. ..... ....... . .......... .... ..... H T o tal . . .... RDG 3 1 2 i s r eq uir e d f o r e arl y c hildhood e du c a tion li ce n sure RDG 313 is r e quir e d for e l e m e ntary edu c ation licensure RDG 315 i s r e quir e d f o r middl e schoo l endo r s e m e nt RDG 3 2 8 i s r eq uir e d for s eco nda ry edu ca ti o n li c e nsur e High l y Recommended ..... ... ....... .... ........ ...... 18 RDG 316 Strate g i es f o r Enhan cing Adult Lit e r acy .... . ..... .... . .... ......... .......... 4 RDG 3 5 3 Te a chin g Reading to Non -Englis h Speakers. . . . . . . .... ... ... 2 RDG 3 58 R ea din g in the Bilin g ual/Bicult ural Cl assroo m ( C o mpet e n cy in S panis h r e quir e d ) ............... . 3 RDG 4 50 Lang u age Ans and the Clas s room Comput e r .............................. ................. 3

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 THE DIVISION OF T E CHNOLOG Y The Division of Technology provide s technical education to prepare graduates for employment in a wide variety of technical fields. Instruction emphasizes the development of technical competence at a level suitable for success in the various areas offered The programs include courses in humanities and social sciences to broaden the students general education The various fields housed in this division offer great opport u nities for women in non traditional roles. The Division of Technology offers degree programs in Aviation Management and Professional Pilot ; Civil Engineering Technology; Surveying and Mapping; Electronics E n gineering Technology ; Indus tria l a n d Technical Studies ; Technical and Industrial Administration; Industrial Design ; Mechanical Engineering Technology; and Technical Communications T h e Aerospace Science Prog r ams combine a thorough practical and technical training background with a general college education to prepare graduates for a wide variety of careers in aerospace Met ropolitan State College of Denver's Aerospace Scie n ce Department is a fully certified ground school approved by the Federal Aviation Administration, for private instrument and commercial FAA rating s T h e department has FAA airway's science accreditation for the aircraft s ystems management and avia tion maintenance ma n agement programs The Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology Department offers programs in civil engineering technology, d rafti n g, and surveying and mapping. Environmenta l impact studies and the application of engineering principle are used in the planning and construction of highways building s, bridge s, and other structu r es. The surveying and mapping deg r ee program is designed to prepare the graduate fo r registration as a profe s ional land surveyor, as well as other careers in the field. The Electronics Engineering Technology degree program fuses the e n gineering principles and technical aspects of electronics and prepares graduates for a variety of po itions in research and development, design electronic manufacturing, and s ervice engineering This program empha s ize s applications of theory in l aboratory sett i ngs. The Department of Industrial Studies and Mechanical Engineering Technology is divided into two pro gram areas: I n d u strial and Tec h nical Studies and M ec h anical E ngin eering Technology Industrial and Technical Studies offers teaching, bu iness and internship areas of emphasis The Mechanical Engi neering Technology program has areas of emphasis in mechanical and manufacturing engineering The Department of Technical Communications spec i alizes in technical writing and editing, industrial communications, and technical media communications. Department of Aerospace Science Co l orado is one of the nation's aerospace centers Military installations, major aerospace industries increased interest in private and corporate flying, and the airlines that serve Denver provide employment opportunities. Local Federal Aviation Administration and other government offices offe r excellent so u rces for i nformatio n Beca u se of this proximity, studen t s also have the opportunity to visit these facilities and to take courses that are taught by personnel from the various organizations. The bachelor degree programs d escribed below h ave been carefully plan n ed t o m ee t the n eeds of both the s t udent and the industry All of the technical courses have been developed in cooperation with the FAA and pro s pective employers ; stu dents comp l eti n g them are eligible to take a variety of FAA exami n ations l eading to certification. The av i ation management program prepares the graduate to enter a wide variety of administrative posi tio n s withi n the vario u s segments of the aviation i ndustry T h e airframe and powerplant (A& P ) courses are not offered by Metropo l itan State College of Denver. However student s ho l ding a valid FAA Airframe and Powerplant certificate from a recognized P art 147 schoo l may ap ply for 25 h ou r s of c r edit toward a b ac h e l or of scie n ce d egree providi n g certain va l i dation papers are presented with the application and a comprehensive exam is passed successfully All programs i n the Department of Aerospace Science h ave been developed to meet the College Avi a tion Accreditation G u idelines of the University Aviation Association The airway science emphasis is an approved FAA program Requ i reme nts are subject to modification; therefore, students are advised to consult the aerospace sci ence department for the current status of requirements.

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136 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL S TUDIES BACHELOR OF SCIENCE The Department of Aerospace Science offers baccalaureate degree programs with majors in the fol lowing areas : Aviation Management ( AMG) Airway Science Management Emphasis Airway Science Maintenance Management Emphasis Aviation Techno l ogy CATV) (formerly Professional Pilot) Air Carrier/General Aviation Emphasis Air craft Systems Management Emphasis Minors Aviation Management (AMG) Professional Pilot (PPT) Airframe and Powerplant Mechanics (APL) Private Pilot (PRP) These programs combine a thorough, practical and technical training background with a general college education to prepare a graduate for a wide variety of careers in the aerospace industry These four-year bachelor degree programs have been developed upon the two-p l us-two concept (a bachelor of science degree program built upon a AAS two-year degree). This concept makes it extremely easy for a com munity/junior college graduate in an aerospace program to transfer to Metro State and earn a bachelor of science degree in our aviation program In order to be awar d ed the bachelor of science degree, the student must comply with the college's genera l requirements for the bachelor's degree listed in this cat alog under Requirements for All Degrees. FAA APPROVED GROUND SCHOOL Metro State Aerospace Science Department is a fully certified and approved ground school for the pri vate, instrument and commercial FAA ratings approved by the Federal Aviation Administration Vet erans Administration flight students should see the Aero s pace Science Department chair for informa tion on approved flight training program FLIGHT COURSES Flig h t training is contracted by the student, with the flight trai n ing schools under contract with Metro State. In order to enroll in all flight courses and receive academic credit, the student must fly with Metro State s co n tract flight schoo l s Students must receive permiss i on from the department before enrolling in flight courses. The cost of the flight training is in addition to regular tuition and college services fees. This cost will vary depending upon how frequently the student i able to fly d u ring the semester and how much tota l time the student requires to gain the necessary proficiency. T h e college instructor helps the student achieve an understanding of the relationship of flight theory to flight practice in order to acquire the knowledge required to meet FAA certification standards Flights are scheduled by the student with the contract flight training school. CREDIT BY EXAMINATION PROCEDURES The basic provision for obtaining credit-by-examination (a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit) i s outlined in this catalog under aca d emic information. The following procedures are estab l ished by the Departme n t of Aerospace Science t o implement t his provisio n : I. A student entering Metro State for the first time must make application for credit by examination during the first three weeks of the first semester. All examinations must be completed within the first semester. 2 A student will not be approved to take a course of a lower number than any course she or he has taken previously 3 If a student is registered for, but has not completed a hig h er-numbered course the examination for the lower numbered course must be completed wit h i n the first three weeks of the semester. 4. Examinations will not be graded during the summer session 5. Courses authorized for credit by examination and the appropriate FAA license and/or rating are listed below:

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Course Title FAA Certificate Hours Required Credit AES 110 Aviation Fundamental s Private 6 AES 180 Commercial/Instrument Ground Commercial/Instrument 6 AES 300 Aircraft Sy s tem s and Propulsion Fit. Engineer 3 AES 353 Aerodynamics Fit. Engineer 3 AES 404 Aircraft Perf ormance Fit. Engineer 3 AES 450 Flight Multi Engine Multi-Engine I AES 451 Flight Ins tructor Fit. Instructor 1 AES 452 Flight Ins tru ctor-Instrumen t Fit. Instructor I AES 453 Fit. Instructor-Multi-Engine Fit. Inst. Multi I AES 455 Flight Helicopter Heli copter I AES 457 Airline Transpon Pilot ATP Ratin g I BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN AEROSPACE SCIENCE PROGRAMS A summary of the course program and semester h ours that a s tudent must comp l ete for a bachelor of science degree is as follows: General Studie s Major ( Sele c t One ) Aviation Management Aviation Management Semester Hours .... 37 .. 54-56 Aviation Maintenance Management .... ........................ ........................ ... 42 57 Aviation Technology Air Carrier/General Aviation ............ ....................... .............. ...... ..... 56 Air craft Systems Management Minor or Approved E l ectives Outside Aerospace Science ............ Airframe and Powerplant (A& P ) Minor ... 54 . . . ......... 18 . . . ....... ........ 36 Free electives ............... ................ ......................................... ----.0::::2 Total .... .................... 120-134 A recommended seq uen ce for taking all courses in a se l ec ted major o r minor and a list of r eq uired ge neral studies may be obtained from the Depanment of Aerospa ce Science All air carrie r /gene ra/ aviation majors must possess, as a minimum rhe FAA co mm ercia l pi/or ce nifi care wirh an instrument rari n g and rhe FAA Advanced Gro und Instru c t o r ce nifi ca t e to r eceive a bachelor of science degree. **Ele c tives program musr be approved b y a department advisor. ***The c redit hour s awarded are ba se d o n the number of clock ho urs required by the FAA for the award of the A & P li ce n se and the credi t s normall y awarded b y juni o r /co mmunity colleges. rhus the increased number of hours for the aviation mainte nan ce managemem emphasis major o r A&P min o r GENERAL STUDIES Students seeking a bachelor degree in aerospace sc ience programs must complete the general st udie s requirements of Metro State Students must consult with a faculty advisor for the selection of approved general studies courses. AVIATION MA AGEMENT (AMG) MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AIRWAY SCIENCE MANAGEMENT EMPHASIS (AV2)* Required Courses Semester Hours AES I 10 Aviation Fundamentals . . . . . . . . 6 AES 120 Fundamental s of Air Traffic Control. ................................ 3 AES 321 Aviation Economi cs and Regulation s . . . . 3 AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management . . . ...................... ......... 3 AES 324 Airline Planning and Management . . . . .......... ...................... 3 AES 420 Airpon Planning . . . . . . . . . 3 AES 421 Airpon Management . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . .. .. 3 AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ...... . . . . . .............. ........... 3 AES 424 Air Cargo . . . . . 3 AES 486 Aviati o n Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... 3 AES 491 Aviation Management Problem s and Job Targeting ..... ... ....... ............ ......... 3 AES Elective . . . . . . . . ....3. Subtotal .. 39 General Studies for all AES Majors ... ................... 37

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138 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES t Ad ditional Ge neral Studi es PSY 101 Introduction to P syc h o logy .......................... .............................. 3 PSY 3 4 3 Industrial P syc holog y ............ ...... .... .... . ............................... 3 MTH 112 College Trigonometry ............................ ............ ...................... 3 MTH 121 Introduction to S t atistics ............................ ................................ .. 4 MTH 132 Calculus for the Managem ent and Social Scien ces ........................... .............. 3 SPE 310 Bus ine ss and Professional Speakin g ........................... ....... .... ... ...... ..... ....3. Subtotal ........................ . ........ .................................... ............... 1 9 Management MGT 300 MGT 353 MGT 357 MGT 400 MGT 453 MGT Prin ciples of Management ............. ............................. ............ ... 3 Personne l Manage ment .......................... . ............ ... ..... .... .... . 3 Labor/Employee R elatio n s .................................... ..... ................. 3 Organizational Deci sio n Makin g ...... .... ........ ..... ..... ... ..................... 3 Organizational Behavior ......................... ................... ..... ........ 3 Elective .............. ....... . .............. .................. ............ ....3. Subtotal ............... ... .............. ........................................................ 18 Computer Information Systems a nd Management Science CMS 20 I Principles of Information Sy stems .......... ............. .... ................ ....... 3 CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysi s ........ ...... .......................... ... ....... 3 CMS A ppr oved Electives (CMS 211, 306 323, 327, or 390 ) .................. ...... ........................ :l Subtotal . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... ....... ...... _.2 Tota l Hour s R eq uir ed .......................... ................ ..... . ... ....... ....... ......... 122 This is an appr oved FAA Airwa y Scie n ce Emp h asis MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AIRWAY SCIENC E MAINTENANCE MANAGE MENT EMPHASIS (A V 4)* Required Courses Semester Hours Airframe and P owe rplant Certificate . . . . . ........... 25 AES II 0 Aviation Fundamentals ........... . .......... ........... ......... ............ 6 AES 1 60 Avionics for Aviators ............... ........... ........................................ 3 AES 300 Sy s t ems and Propul sio n ................... ...................... ..... ............... 3 AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management ...... .... .............................. ..... .. 3 AES 486 Aviation Safety ................................. .................. ..... ....... 3 AES E l ectives (AES 387 and AES 487 r ecommended ......... ............... .......... ............. _.6 Subtota l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .... ........ 49 Genera l Studie s for all AES Majors ............. ................ ..... ........... ..... ......... 37 Additional General Studi es PSY I 0 I Introduction to Psycholog y ....... . . ........ ................................... 3 CHE II 0 Principl es of Chemistry .............. . ........ .................................. ... .. 5 MTH 112 College Trigonometry ............................ .................. ........... .... 3 MTH 121 Introduction to Stati stics ............... .... . ... ...... . .......... ....... .. 4 MTH 132 Calcul us for the Managem ent and Social Science s. . . . . . . ............ ....3. Subtotal ........... ....... ...... ....... .................. .... ........... ................ 18 Management MGT 300 Principle s of Management ..... ......... ......... . ............. ..................... 3 MGT 453 Organizational B ehav i or . ..... ........ ...... ............ ....... ....... ........ 3 MGT E l ective (300/400 l evel). . . . . . . . . . . :l Subtotal ....... ................ .......... .......................... . .................. 9 Computer Information Systems and Management Scie nc e CMS 20 I Principles of Informatio n Sy s t em s ........ .... ....... .... ... ... .... .... ..... ........ 3 CMS 305 Fundamentals of System s Analysis ................... .............. ...... .... ....... 3 CMS Approved Elective (CMS 211, 306,323,327, o r 390) ......................... ............... :l Subtotal ............................................................ ........................ _.2 Total H ours R equired ........................ ... .......... .................................. 122 *T his is an approved FAA Airwa y Science Emphasis

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 AVIATION TECHNOLOGY (ATV) MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AIR CARRIER/GENERAL AVIATIO EMPHASIS (ATl) Requir e d Courses Sem ester Hours AES 110 Aviation Fu ndam entals . . 6 AES 141 Aerospace Mete o rology . . ... 2 AES 171 Single Engine Flight Simulation I ........... .... ...... ....... ............................. 3 or AES 176 Single Engine Flight Simulation II .. .3 AES 180 Commercial/Instrument Ground I nstructor Certification 6 AES 196 Advanced Ground Instructor Certification ...... 0 AES 197 Professional Pilot Documentation . . ............ ................................... 0 AES 27 1 Ins trum ent Flight Simulation I. . . . . . . . .. 3 AES 300 Aircraft System s and Propulsion . . . . .. 3 AES 346 Meteorology a nd Flight Operations . . . . 3 AES 353 Aerodynamics . . . . . . 3 AES 385 Hum an Factors and Phy iology of Flight ................................................... 3 AES 404 Aircraft Performance . . ................................................... 3 AES 437 Adva n ced Naviga tion Systems . . . . . . 3 AES 486 Aviation Safety . . . . . . . .... ....... 3 AES 491 Aviation Management Problems and J o b Targeting . . . ......... Subt otal .... ..... .... ......... .................. 44 Plus a minimum of 14 semester hours from th e following: AES 320 National Airspace Operations . . . . ........... 3 AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations ..................................................... 3 AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management ........ .... ...... 3 AES 323 Commuter Airline Mana gemen t . . . . . . . 3 AES 324 Airline Plannin g and Management . . . . . ............... 3 AES 390 Flight Instructor-CFI CFII, AGI, MEl Ground . . . . . . .. 3 AES 413 Flight Engineer Duties and Re spo n sib ilities. ........... ............ ................... 4 AES 414 B-727 Systems... .. ... .......................................... 4 Subtotal...... . . . . . H General Stud ies for all AES Majors ........... .......................... 37 Minor or a ppro ved electives from outside Aerospace Science Department ............................. .......... 18 Electives . . .... __:]_ Total H ours R equired ......... MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AIRCRAIT SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT EMPHASIS (A T2)* Required Courses AES II 0 Aviation Fundamenta l s . ............. .. AES 14 I Aerospace Meteorology . ........... AES 171 Si n g l e Eng ine Flight Simulation I .. o r 120 Se m ester Hours .. ........... 6 .. ..... 2 .. ...................... 3 AES 176 Single Engine Flight Simulation II . . .... ........... ....................... 3 AES 180 Commerc i alllnstru m e nt Ground In s tructor Certification ................. ...................... 6 AES 197 Pr ofessio nal Pilot Documentation . . . . ........................................ 0 AES 198 Multi-engine CFI, CFII Documentation . . . . ............ 0 AES 215 Avionics for Avia tors.................. ............. 3 AES 271 ln trum e nt Flight Simulation I. . . . ........... 3 AES 300 Aircrait Systems and Propulsion . . . . . . . . ........ .... 3 AES 320 National Airspace Operations .............. .... .............. ...................... ...... 3 AES 322 Aviation Law and Ri sk Management ................... ................................... 3 MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operation s . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 AES 353 Aerodynamics . . . . . . . . . . 3 AES 404 Aircrait P erfo rman ce . ................. 3 AES 437 Advanced Navigation Systems . . . 3 AES 486 Aviation Safety . . . . . . . . . 3 AES 491 Aviation Management Problems and Job Targeting........ . ....... 3 AES Upper Division Electives. . . . . . . . . . . Subtotal . . . . . ..................... .......... ...... ....... 53 General Studies for all AES Majo r s .............. ........................................... 37

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140 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Ad ditional General Studies PSY 10 I Introdu ctio n to P syc h o logy .......... ....... ........ ...................... 3 MTH 112 College Trigonometry .............................................. ................... 3 MTH 1 2 1 Introdu ctio n to Statistics . . . . . . . . . .... ...... 4 MTH 1 32 Calculus for the Management and Social Scien ces ................ ....... ......... ....... ....3. Subtotal ..................................... ..................... .... .... . ................. 13 Management MGT 300 Organizational Management ...... ................ ....... .... ......... ........ 3 MGT 453 Organizational Beh avior ............ .............. ................................ 3 MGT Elective (300/400 level ) ..... ......... ...... ....... ........ ...... ..... ... ... ............ 3. Subtotal ...... . ....... ....... ... ................................... ....................... 9 Computer Information Systems and Manage ment Science CMS 20 I Principles oflnformation System s ...................................................... 3 CMS 305 Fundamentals of Sy s tem s Analy sis and D esign ............. .............................. 3 CMS Approved Electives (CMS 211,306,323, 327, or 390) ................. ............ ............... 3. Subto tal ................... ................................ ................ ......... .......... ___..2 Total H ours R equi red ................. ....... . . ... ... ................................ 121 This is an approved FAA Airway Scien ce Emphasis MINORS The following aerospace minor s ar e d es igned primaril y to afford major s in other areas within the col lege with the opportun ity to develop an understandin g of the aerospace wor ld and s ufficient familiarity with av i ation s kill s to u se in furtherance of their primary job. Aerospac e majors norm ally may not elect the aviation management or profe ssio n a l pilot min ors Exception: aviation technolo g y ( ATV ) majors, enro lled in the A Tl e mph asis, may minor in airframe and powerplant mechanics. AVIATION MANAGEMENT MINOR (AMG) Required Courses Semester Hours AES II 0 Aviatio n Fundam entals ..................... . ................... .................. 6 MTR 141 Aerospa c e Meteorology ... ............................ ....................... 2 AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regul ations . ........ ........ .... ............................. 3 AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Mana gement ........... ............. ......... ......... ..... ....3. Total ................ ................. ........................................................ 14 Plu s nine h ours se lected from the following courses: AES 300 Aircraft Systems and P ropulsio n .... ....... ........... .... . ............ ........ 3 AES 323 Commuter Airline Management ............. ..... .............. .................. 3 AES 324 Airline Planning and Management . ...... .......... ...... .................... 3 AES 385 Human Factors and Phy sio lo gy of Flight .................. .... ........................ 3 AES 420 Airport Planning ........................................................................ 3 AES 421 Airport Management ........................................... ......................... 3 AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ............. ...... ........ . ..... ...................... 3 AES 424 Air Cargo . . . . . .... . ......... . .... ............. ....... 3 AES 486 A viatio n Safety ......................... ...................................... 3 AES 491 Aviation Management Problem s and J o b Targeting .... ........ ............ . .... ..... 3. Subtotal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... ... .... _2. Total ............................... .................................... ... ................. 23 PROFESSIONAL PILOT MINOR (PPT) Required Courses Semester Hours AES II 0 Aviatio n Fundame n ta l s ............................ . ....... ............... ..... 6 MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology ........... ... ....... .......................... ..... ...... .... 2 AES 1 80 Commercialllnstrument Ground .................................. ............ ...... 6 AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propu.lsio n ....................... ............ .... .... ..... 3 MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations ...................................................... 3 AES 385 Human Factors and Physiolog y of Flight .......................... ......... ........... 3 AES 486 Aviation S afe t y ........................... ...................... .... .... ..... ....3. Total .... .... . ................................... ............ ............................ 26 In addition, all professional pilot minors must possess as a minimum the FAA commercial certificate with an instrument rating

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 AIRFRAME AND POWERPLANT MECHANICS MINOR (APL) Students who wish to enroll i n the airframe and powerplant (A&P ) mechanics minor s hould co mplete an A&P program prior to or while attending Metro St ate. R equired Courses Completion of an FAA approved A&P program with appropria t e college c redi t ( u s ual s eme s ter hour s awarded ........ 25) Plus: AES AES 423 486 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ............ ........ ............ .... .......... ...... ......... 3 Aviation Safety . . . . . ................... ....3. Total H d ur s R eq uired ........ ....... ........ ... . ............ ................ .............. .... ... 3 I PRJVA TE PILOT MINOR (PRP) Required Courses Semester Hours AES II 0 Aviation Fundamental s . . . . . .. .......... .......... . 6 MTR 141 Aerospace M eteoro l ogy. .... 2 AES 171 Single Engine R igh t Simulation I. . . . . 3 AES 197 Private Pilot Docum e ntati o n................ ....... ............... .... 0 AES 271 Ins trum ent Right Simulation I. . ... 3 AES 385 Hum a n F ac t ors and Phy s iology of Right ................ ......... ........ .... ........... 3 One of the two follo win g co ur ses : AES 300 Airc r aft Sy s t e m s and Propulsion ......... .... ...... ................... ................ 3 AES 404 Aircraft P erfo rman ce . . . . . . . . . . . ....3. T otal. ................. .... .... 18 In addition all private pilot min ors mus t pos s es s, a s a minimum the FAA private pil o t cert i ficate Air Force ROTC Program Students m ay register and recei ve credit at Metro State for Air Force Reserve Officer s' Training Corp s (AF ROTC) classes at the Univer s ity of Colorado Bould er. The Air Force Department of Aerospace Studie s offers two Air Force ROTC pro g rams le a ding t o a c ommi ss ion in the active Air For ce upon earning a bachelor s de g ree Four Year Program The four-year program con s i sts of the General Military Course ( GMC ) and the Professional Officer Course ( POC ) Emphasis i s focused upon bas i c leadership qualitie s and prepara tion for the Air Force while enrolled in a baccalaureate degree program Upon comp leti on of the GMC, students attend a four-week field training camp at an air force ba se Field training is de s igned to encour age leadership development and to introduce students to the a cti ve Air For c e environment. The POC taken during the la s t tw o years prepare s st udents for active duty through practical experiences as a cadet officer. In thi s phase, students will conce ntr ate on adva nced leader s hip training in final preparation for an Air Force co mmi ssion Four-year programs are avai lable to s tudent s with a minimum of eight s eme s ter s remaining at Metropolitan State College of Denver. Application for the se program s s hould be made after consultation with a profe ss or of aerospace s tudie s, University of Colorado. Two Year Program The two year program consists of the POC and a s ix-week field training camp. Stu dents with two y ear s of full time college remainin g at the undergr a duate, g raduate l eve l or both, are eligible to ap ply. Once se le cted, students must s uccessfully comp l ete the s ix-week field trainin g that includes 60 hour of academic s tudy in addition to the r eg ular curriculum of the four-week camp The POC phase i s identical to that explained in the four-year program Students should co nt act a professor of aerospace s tudie s University of Colorado for s pecific require ments and options available, based on each s tudent's stat u s at the time of program entry. Application s are accepted betw een September 1 and December 15. Flight Training: Limited enrollment in expense-paid ground sc hool and flig ht training is open to cadets approved and qualified for future USAF pilot training. Air Force College Scholarship Program: Student s participating in AFROTC may be eligible to compete for AFROTC college sc holarships Student s selected for this program are placed on g rant s that pay tuition book costs, non refundable education fee and s ub s i s ten ce of $100 per month tax free. All cadet s enrolled in the POC re c eive $100 per month during the regular academic year Student s are also eligible to compete for two, three, or four -y ear s cholar s hip s open to both men and women

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142 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES For furth e r information co nta ct: Professor of Air Force Aeros p ace Studies Air Force ROTC D etachme nt 105 Fo l so m St adium, Room 223 University of Colorado Boulder Colorado 80309 Telephone: 303-492-8351 PROGRAM OF STUDY F our-Year Program The following courses are req ui red during the first two years: Semester H ours AFR 103 Developm en t of Air P owe r I . . . . . . . . . . . .......... I AFR 104 Development of Air Power II ....... ......................... ..... .................... I AFR 203 U. S. Military Forces I ............................ ...... .... . . .... ........ .... I AF R 204 U. S. Military Forces II . . . . . . . . .... .. I The following co ur ses are required durin g the l ast two years of th e program : AFR 30 I USAF M anage ment and Leadership I . . . . . ............... 3 AFR 302 USAF Man ageme nt and Leadership II ..................... ... .... ........ ......... ... 3 AFR 401 National Security Forc es I. . . . . . . . . ................... 3 AFR 402 Natio nal Sec urit y F o r ces II ........ .... .............................. .............. ..... 3 Two-Year Program Veterans of military service, r eservists s tudent s with Junjor ROTC Civil Air Patrol o r e qui valent expe rie nc e, may be allowed adva nc ed placement for all or a portion of the first two years Students who s u c cess fully comp let e the six-week s ummer camp a r e allowed to enroll in the pro g r am at the 300 course level. ALL students must comp l ete the courses l i ted under the second parag raph of the four -year pro gram above. Su pplemental Courses and Language Requirements All AF RO TC sc holar s hip students in the GMC mus t successf ully complete a course in English compo sitio n befor e they can a dvance to the POC All AFROTC s cho l ars hip s tudents must also s ucce ssf ully co mplete a course in an Indo-European o r Asian lan guage prior to commissio ning All POC st udents must successfully complete a course in mathematical rea s o n i n g prior to co mmis sio ning Army ROTC Program Stu dent s may enroll in Army ROTC classes available on camp u s in the Department of Mili t ary Science. Fo r further details and p rogram offerings, refer to the military science sec tion of thi s ca talog. Civil Engineering Technology The specia l ize d fields within the D epartme nt of Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology in clude pro grams in c ivil e ngineerin g tech nolo gy dr afting, a nd s u rveying. The s urv eyi n g pro g ram i s a se parat e, speciaJjzed four-year program. The indi vidual curric ulum requireme nt s are lis ted se p arately. Civi l e ngin eering techno l ogy g r ad u ates app l y engineering principle s in performing many of the task s necessary for the plannin g and co n s truction of hig h ways bui ldin gs railroads brid ges, reservoir s, dams, irriga tion works, wa t er sys tem s, airports, and other struct ur es. In planning for a co n s truction project, they m ay participate in estimati n g costs, preparing specifications for materials, and participate in s ur veyi n g, drafting, and de s ign work. During the construction pha se, they work closely with the co ntrac to r and the superintendent in sc h eduling field l ayout, const ructi on activities and the inspection of the work for conformity to specifications. In rece nt years, a major wor k area for civi l and environmental engi n eering technology relates s pecifically to environmental problems. Thjs i nclud es design and co n s truction of water s upply facilities de sig n of wastewater co llection and treatment facilities, de sig n of air pollu tion co ntrol facilities and de sig n of s olid and toxic waste dis posal facilities The development of e n v ir o nm e ntal impact studies and enviro nm e ntal imp act report s are also included in thl s area Fo llo w in g are the curriculum requirement s for the various degrees minors and areas of emphasis

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE The four-year bachelor of science degree is awarded up on the completion of the required courses and either a struc ture s, an environmental or a urveying area of emphasis or an approved minor. This program is accredited by the Technology Ac c reditation Commi ss ion of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Required Technical Studies Semester Houn; CEN 110 Civil Technolog y . . . . . . . . . . . ........ 3 CEN 120 Technical Drawin g I . . . . ........................................ 4 CEN 121 Technical Drawing 11. . . . . . ... 4 CEN 210 Structural Drawing ........................ ................ .... ......... ............. 4 CEN 215 Mechani cs I -Statics. . . . . ......... 3 SUR 151 Surveying I. . . . ........ 4 SUR 252 Surveyin g 11. .... . . . . . . . . . . .... 4 CEN 31 0 Construction M e thod s . . . . . . . . . . 3 CEN 3 1 2 E ng i neerin g Economy . ............. .................. ............. ..... 3 CEN 313 Me c hani cs o f Materials . . . . . . . . . ... 3 CEN 314 Mechani cs o f M ate ri a ls-Laboratory...................... ............ .... ..... I CEN 316 Mechani cs II Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CEN 317 Introdu c tion to Structural Analy sis . . . . . . . . . ... 3 CEN 3 1 8 Auid M echanics I ..................... ......... ................................... 3 CEN 319 Auid Mechani cs II. . . . . . . . . . . .. 3 CEN 413 Soils M ec hani cs . . . . ........................ 3 CEN 460 Senior Seminar ... ...... ................ ................................... ....... 3 COM 261 Introduction to Tec hnical Writin g . . . . . . 3 MET 311 Thermod y namic s I. ............................ ............ ............................ 3 CSI 102 BASIC Computer Programming .... . . . . . . . ......... .... 2 Approved upper divi s ion t ec hnical elective . . . . . ..2 Subtotal . . . . . . . . . . . .................... ... 64 Additional Requirements SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ................ .............. ... .. 3 4 .. 3 CHE 180 General Chemistry I. ............................ ....... .......... ECO 201 Principle s o f Economics Ma c r o or ECO 202 Principle s o f Economic s M ic r o ................................. ... ..................... 3 MTH I II College Algebra . . . . . . ..... 4 MTH 112 College Tri go nometry ................. . ............................. ..... .... . 3 MTH 141 Calculus I.. ... . ................... .... ................... .... ........ 4 MTH 24 1 Calc ulu s II . . . . . . . . . . . .... 4 PHY 23 1 & 232 General Phy sics UGen e ral Phy s ics Laboratory I . . . . . . ....... 5 o r PHY 20 I & 203 College Ph ys i cs UCollege Ph ysics Laboratory I. .......... .... .......... . 5 5 PHY 233 & 234 General Phy s ic s IUGe n e r a l Ph ys i cs Laboratory II ................ o r PHY 202 & 204 Colleg e Phy s ics IUCollege Phy s ic s Laboratory II Total. .. ................... ENVIRONMENTAL AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Technical Studies .... .... .. ..... ....5_ ....... 35 CEN 332 Environmental Impact Statements ...... ........................... ................ 3 CEN 333 Environmental Technolog y Pr ocesses. . . . . .......... ....................... 3 CEN 450 Water Suppl y and Treatment .............. . ............................ 3 CEN 451 Was tewater Treatment and Disposal . . . . . . . . . . 3 MTR 140 Introdu c ti o n to Meteorolog y ...................... ....... ............................. 3 Approved upper-divi s i o n te c hnical elective .............. ...... ..... .... .... ........... .... ......... ...l T o tal . . .... .... ......... ...... ................. ....................................... 1 8 STRUCTURES AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Technical Studies CEN 412 Conc r ete Design I ...................... CEN 414 Concrete De s ign II ............................ CEN 440 Steel Desig n I. . . .......... CEN 441 Ste e l D esig n 11... .................. .............. ... ... .. 3 ......................... 3 ....................... .. 3 ....... ...... .... .... 3

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144 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES CEN 333 Environmental Te c hnolog y Pr ocesses ... ..... ...... ............ ..................... 3 or CEN 450 Water Suppl y and Trea tm ent .... ...................................... ................ 3 o r CEN 451 W as tew a ter Treatment and Dis po sal .. Approved upper di visio n technical e l ec tive ......... Total ............................................ ............................................... 3 ........................ ...................... _1 .... .......................... 18 ENGINEERING AND LAND SURVEYING AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Technical Studies SUR 253 R o ute Surve ying ............ ....... ............ ......... .... ...................... 4 SUR 262 Survey Drafting . ........................................ ...................... 3 SUR 354 Boundary Law I .................. .... .......... .... ........................... 3 S U R 453 Site Plannin g ... .............................. .............. ...................... 3 S U R 454 Bound ary Law II . ...................................... ..................... 3 Surveying Elective .............................. ...... ................... ........... ..... ____3=::! Total ..... ................ ............................................ ..................... 19-20 CONTROL S URVEYING AND MAPPING AREA OF EMPHASIS Required Technical Studies SUR 262 Survey Draftin g .............. ................. ..... ............................... 3 SUR 265 Ph o t ogrammetry I . ... .................. ... ............. .................. 3 SUR 362 Canographic Surveys ....................................................... 3 SUR 366 Land Information Sy s tem s .............. .......... . ............. ... ............... 3 SUR 474 Geod etic a nd Spe cia l Survey s .... . ............. ....... .................... 4 SU R 453 Site Planning ................................... ................................. ...l Total............................................. .... ................................... 19 MINOR IN CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Required Technical Studies CEN 110 Civi l Technology ..................................................................... 3 CEN 120 T ec hni ca l Drawing I .............................................................. 4 CEN 215 Mec hani cs I Stati cs .................................... ........................ ....... 3 CEN 310 Construction Method s ............. ....... .............. ... ...................... 3 S U R 151 Surv eying I. ..................... .................... .... ........ ................... 4 Approved l ower-divis i o n t ec hn ical elective .... ..... ................................ ................... 3 Approved upper-divi sio n t ec hnic a l elective .................................. ..................... ...l Total.............................. .............. .......... ..... .... .... ....... ......... 23 MINOR IN DRAFTING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Required Technical Studies CEN 120 Technical Drawing I . . . . . . . . . . . . ......... 4 CEN 121 T ec hni cal Drawin g II ....... . ........ ........................................ ... 4 CE 221 Architectural Drawing ....................... ..................................... 3 CEN 320 Advanced T ec hnic a l Drawin g ......... . ................................ ............. 3 Approved lower-divisi o n tec hnical elective ...... ....................................... ............ 3 Approved upper-divi s ion technical elective .................... .............. .................. ...l Total. ......................................................... ..... ..... ................... 20 Surveying and Mapping The bachelor of scie n ce in surveying and mapping is the only one of its kind in Colorado or the region. It is designed to prepare the graduate for registration a s a profes sional land surveyor, but is broad enough to prepare him or her for a career in any other areas of surveying and mapping as well, or for grad u a te s tudy Graduate s are in professional-level pos itions with the Bureau of Land Management and o ther federal, state and local government agencies, utilities, and private companies Several have beco m e presidents of their s ocieties (Professional Land Surveyors of Colorado and the Colorado Sec tion of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping). A relatively new employment area for graduates is in land information systems (sto ring information on land parcels, public utilities, natural resources, etc., in computer systems for recordkeeping and planning purposes)

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 SURVEYING AND MAPPING MAJOR F OR BACHE L OR O F S ClENCE Required Technic al Studies Sem este r H o urs CEN 120 SUR 151 SUR 252 SU R 253 SUR 255 SU R 262 SUR 265 SU R 27 1 SUR 354 SU R 362 SUR 366 SUR 376 SU R 448 SUR 453 SUR 454 SUR 465 SUR 474 GEL 101 GEG 484 Technical Drawing I ....... .. .. .. . . . . .......... ....... 4 Surveying I. . ... ..... ................................................. .......... 4 Surveying II . . . . . . . ... ........ .............. 4 Ro u te Surveyi n g ..................................... ....... .......... ..... ........ 4 Surveying Computations .............................................................. 3 Survey D r afting . . . . . ............ ............... ............. 3 Pho t ogra m me t ry I ... ...... .... . ......... ........ .... ............. ........... 3 A stro nomy for Surveyors ..................................................... 2 Boundary Law I . .......................... .... ............ ....... ..... 3 Cartograp h ic Surveys ............................................................ 3 Land I nformation Sy s tem s ................ ............. ..... ...... ............ 3 Surveying Data Adju trnent. ................................ ........................... 3 Geodesy .... ...... . . . . . ...... ................. 3 Site Planning ............. ..................... .................. ... .......... 3 Boundary Law II ............. .................... .... ....... .... ...... ........ 3 Photogrammetry II ........................ ......... ....... . ....................... 3 Geodetic and Special Surv eys ............................................. ............. 4 General Geology ... ........... .......................... ............. .. ......... ... 4 Remote Sensing ........... .... ............. ... ... ..... ................ ....... ....3. S u btotal ................................................. ...................... .... 62 Additional Course R equirements ENG 101 Fre s hman Composition: The Essay.................... ............................. 3 ENG 102 Fre s hman Composition : Analy s is, Resear c h. and Documentation ... ......... ............. 3 MTH 140 Pre Calculu s Mat hematics................. ... ........................... 4 PHY 231 General Physic s I ............................... .... ............. .. ... .............. 4 PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I . . ............... .............. I PHY 233 General Physics II ........................ .. ...................... .... ............. 4 PHY 234 General Ph ysics Laboratory II ............... ........... .... .... ....... ........ ....... I SPE 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking.. . . . . . . . . . 3 COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing ...... ........ .. ... .... ... .. .. ..... .... ...... 3 MGT 300 Organizational Management .... ...... .... ............. ......................... 3 Social!Behavioral Electives ............................................ .................. ............ 9 H umanities E l ectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ji Subtotal ............. ....... .............. ......... .... ... .. ......... 44 App r oved Tec h nical Electives ..... .. .. 4 Required Math Minor MTH 141 Calculus I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MTH 151 Compu ter Prog r ammi n g : FORT R AN . . . . . . . 4 MTH 214 Matrix Algebra ......... ......... .............. ........... ............................. 2 MTH 241 Calculus II ... .... .... .............. ... ... ................... ................. 4 MTH 321 Probability and Stati s tic s ...................................................... ... ... . 4 Approved math elective. . . . . . . . . .............. (m in .) _2 Subtotal . . . . . . . . . . . . .................... ...2ll Total........................................................... ........................... 130 General Studies R equi r ements ( The level I mathematics requirements do no t apply to the Surveying and Mapping Program be ca u se it includes a Math Minor and SUR 376.) At least one elective must be 300or 400-level. At lea s t two te c hni cal elective cre dits must be used to com plete the Math Minor. MINOR IN S U R V EYING R equired Technical Studies SUR 151 Surveying I. ..................................... .................... .............. 4 SUR 252 Surveying II . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ 4 SUR 262 Survey Drafting ... ...... .... .... ...... ......... ........................... ..... 3 SUR 265 Photogrammetry I ......................................... .................. 3 SUR 271 A s tronomy for Surve yors ..................... ...................................... 2 SUR 362 Cartographic Survey s . ........ ... ... ......... . ..... . .......... ... .............. 3 SUR 465 Photogrammetry II .............. ................ .... ............. ... .... ...... ....3. Total...... .................. ... .......... ....... ................ ............... 22

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146 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Electronics Engineering Technology Graduates are emp l oyed in a variety of po s itio n s in the followi n g fun c tional areas : REsEARCH A D D EVELO PM ENT Te c hnical activitie in res earch and development are primarily directed toward obtaining new informa tion and new knowledge of the field The engineering techno l ogist i s a member of the r esearch team. This specific work may involve the development and co n s truction of prototype s, te s t and evaluation of equip ment or other activitie s necessary to render technical s upport to a researc h project. MANUFACTURING A g raduate empl o y e d in a manufacturin g facility might be involved in actual manufacturing fabrica tio n tes t prototype development c alibration, and qualit y c o n trol. In s ome case s, students may al s o b ec ome involved in sa le s or mana g ement. SERVICES S e rvice engine e rin g h as become a field of it s own. Thi s area i nvolv e s e x t e n s i ve activitie s in the fields of c omputers c ommuni ca tion s, in s trumentation new product de v elopm e nt and numerou s other a c tiv i tie s involving e lectrical and e l e ctroni c sys tem s DESIGN Some grad u ate s design electronic eq u ipment and system s, where the d es ign is application orie nt ed The EET curri c ulum pro v ide s a foundation in mathem atics and s cience as well as a thorough treatment of the c haracteri s tic s of electric circuits and electronic devi ces. In this four year program specialization may be ac hieved by s e l ection of an area of emphas i s in computers communication s (in cluding sate l lite fiber optic s microwave and la s er), co ntr o l s y s t ems ( inclu din g robotics), and powe r (including solar energy). ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING T ECHN OLOGY MAJOR FOR B ACHE LOR OF SCIENC E B ec au s e the pro g ram e mpha s ize s appli ca tion s of theory s tudents are required to take concurrent labo r a t ory courses. In the EET 100 s eri es of c ourse s, s tudents who drop or c hange to No Credit in the the ory/laboratory c ours e mus t make the arne change in the companion l a boratory/theory course. The bachelor of s cience degree i s awarded upon completion of the cour s es listed below Student s s h o uld c o ntact the department for rece nt change s to thi s m ajor. Thi s program i s acc redited by the Te chno logy A cc redit a tion Commi ss i o n of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Techno l ogy R e quired Technical Courses Se m este r Hours EET II 0 Ci r cuits I. . . . . . ......... .......... ........ ............. ..... 4 EE T Ill Circuits I Laborat ory . . . ............ ........................ .... I EET 1 1 2 Cir cuits U .... .............. .......... ..... ...... . ............................. 4 EET 113 Circ u its II Laboratory ............................................ ............ ..... 2 EE T 214 Electron ics I. ....... .................................................................. 4 EET 2 1 5 E l ec tron ics II ..... .......... ...... ................. ............................ 4 EE T 2 3 2 Digita l Circuits I .................................................... .............. 3 EE T 234 T e chni ca l Pr o grammin g Appli catio n s ..... ... .... .... ........ .... .... .. ....... 2 EE T 235 Advan ce d T ec hnical Pr o gramm i n g ..... . ............ ............... ....... ...... .... 3 EE T 311 C ir c uit Ana lysi s with Lapl ace ......................................................... 4 E ET 312 Advan ce d Analog Electr onics ................................ ...................... 4 EET 33 3 D igita l Cir c uit s II ..... ...... . ................ ... ................ ................ 3 EET 3 3 6 Micro pr oc e sso rs ........................................................................ 3 EE T 3 6 2 Ana lo g and Digital C ommun icat i o n s ................... . . ...................... 3 EE T 371 C o ntr o l Syste m s Analysi s ...... ...................................... ..... .......... 3 EET 410 S e n i o r Proj ec t I ................................................................... I EE T 411 S e nior Proj ec t II ....................... ....... .... .... .......................... 2 M E T 3 06 Statistics and D y nami cs. . . . . . . ..... ......... ...... .......... 4 MET 311 Thermod y nami cs ....... . .......................... ... ........................ ... 3 XXX XXX U pper div i s i o n E ET e l ectives (or MIS 40 1 and MIS 402 may be substi tuted ) ........ ....... .. ..Ji Subt ota l ............. ............. . .............. ........................... ............... 63 Ad ditional Course Requirements ENG 10 I Fr eshman C o mpo sitio n : Th e Essay ....................................................... 3 ENG 102* Fr es hman C o mposition : Analy s i s R ese arch and D ocume ntation .............. ................ 3 MTH 140 Precalculu s Math ( MTH 111/112 m a y be s u b s tituted ) ............ .... . ....... ........... 4

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MTH 141* MTH 241 PHY 231* PHY 232* PHY 233* PHY 234 C H E 180 COM 261 SPE 101* XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX XXX Subtotal ...... I SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Calculu s I .. ......................................... 4 Calcu lu s II . . . . . . . .. 4 General Phy sics I . . . ............. ... .. 4 General Phy sics Laboratory I . . . I General Ph ys ics II . . .................. 4 General Physics Labora t ory II. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. I General Chemistry I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Introdu ction t o T ec hni cal Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fundamentals of Spe ec h Communication ............ .................................... 3 Level II General Studies-Hist orical . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Level II General Studies-Arts and Letters ............................ 6 Level II General Studies-Social Science . . . ........... ......................... .Ji .. .. 54 *These co urs es co unt as General Studies Courses. At least three h o ur s of Leve l II General Studies Courses must be upper division Multicultural requirement o f thr ee c redits ma y b e applied to any Levell/ cate gory o r taken as additional h o urs. Areas of Emphasis (Only o n e area needs to be chosen) COMPUTER Required EET Courses Semester Hours EET 432 Digital Filters . . . ....... ....... .......................................... 3 EET 433 Data Communications . . . . . . . . . .... . 3 EET 434 Int erface Techniques . . . ........................................ 3 EET 437 Microcomrollers ................................... .......... .............. ......... 3 XXX XXXX Upper-divisio n EET electives . . . . . . . . ............. .Ji Subtotal ..... ............... ......... .......... ........... ......... 18 CoMMUNICATIONs EET 363 Electromagnetic Fields . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EET 364 Communications Laboratory ........... .... ............ .......... ........... 3 EET 367 Measurement s for Communications Sy ste m s ......................................... 3 EET 433 Data Communications ... ...... ...... .......... .... ................................... 3 EET 462 Advanced Communication S ys t ems . . . . . . ...... 3 EET 464 Communication Circuit De s ign . . .. .. .. . .. .. . ....3. Subtotal CONTROL SYST EMS Required EET courses 18 EET 342 Electric P o wer Distrib ution . . . . . . . 3 EET 372 Control Sy s tem s Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I EET 373 Proce ss Contro l Systems . . . . . . . . ... 2 EET 374 Programmable Logic Controller s. . . . . . . . . 2 EET 433 Data Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 EET 434 Interfa ce Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EET 471 Digital Control System s De s ign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _A S ubt otal.. . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8 POWE R Required Courses EET 341 Electric Machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EET 342 Electri c Power Di stri buti on . . . . . . . . . .. 3 EET 343 Power Generation Using Solar Energy . . . . . . . . . . 3 EET 372 Control Systems Laboratory . . . I EET 373 Proce ss Control Systems . . . . . . . . . 2 EET 374 Programm a ble Logic Controllers. .................... .............................. 2 MET 312 Heat Tran sfer.... .. ............. 2 XXX XXX Upper-division EET electives . . . . . ... _.2 Subtotal .... Totals ... ... ..... 18 Required Technical Courses ...................................... ... ... ......................... 63 Additional Courses ... .... ........... .. ............... 54 Area of Emphasis ......... ....... ... ................ .... ...... ... ............... _li Pro gra m Total ....... .... 1 35 **A minor in ano ther d epa nment m ay be substituted for area of emphas is with prior approval of c hairpers o n of the Ele c tr o ni cs and Mec hani cal Engineering T ech nol ogy Depanment. Thi s approval is lli2J. u s uall y g iven.

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148 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES MINOR IN ELECfRONICS ENGINEERING T ECHNOLOGY Required EET Courses Semester Hours EET 200 E l ec tr onic Circ uit s a n d Ma c h i nes .............................................. ......... 3 (The sequ e nce EET I I 0, EET I I I EET I 1 2, EET I I 3 may be subs tituted) EET 234 Technical P rogramming Applica tio n s ........ ....... . ......................... ....... 2 (Any o n e of th e foUowing m ay s ub s titut e: CSI I 30, CSI 222, CMS 2 I I MTH I 5 I or MET 32 I ) EET 3 0 I Industrial Ele c tronics .. ... ......................... ............. ...................... 4 (The seque nc e EET 2 I 4 and 2 I 5 may be s ubstituted ) EET 232 Digi t al Cir c uits I ....................... ....... .................................... 3 (EET 23 I may be s ub s tituted f o r computer sc ience majors ) EET 333 Digital Circuits II. . . . ........... . . . ....... .... 3 EET 336 Micropr ocesso r s .................. .... .... . . .............................. ___1 T o tal ... ..... .... .......................................... .... .... ......... 1 8 Industrial and Technical Studies The Indu strial and Technical Studies program offers the followi n g majors : Bache l o r of Science : Indu strial and Technical Studie (ITS) Industrial Arts Teachi n g Area of Emphasis Busin ess Area of Emphasis Technical and Industrial Administr ation (T IA ) Bachelor of Arts : Indu strial Design (IND) Mino rs: Indu s trial Arts Teaching Area of Emphasis GENERAL STUDIES Students must consult with a faculty a dvisor regarding general studies requirements CREDIT BY EXAMINATION Ofte n students se le c tin g the industrial and technical st udies m ajor h ave exte n sive experie nc e in busi ness, indu s try or the mil itary that paral l els the co nt en t of so me of the courses T o re ceive c r e dit for suc h ex pe rie n ce the st ud ent mus t contact the program coordinator for evaluation INDUSTRIAL AND T ECHNICAL STUDIES MAJOR FOR BACHE LO R O F S CIE CE D EGREE In order t o be awar d e d the bachelor of scie nce d egree in Industrial and Technica l Studies, the s tudent must meet the college's general s p ecificatio n s for the bachelor's degr ee and must complete the courses req uir ed for one of the two areas of emphasis ( indu strial arts teaching, or business ) as lis ted below. No minor required. I. INDUSTRIAL A RT S TEACHING AREA OF EMPHASIS Grad u ates meet all the s tate requirements for