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Catalog, Metropolitan State College of Denver, 1997-1998

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Catalog, Metropolitan State College of Denver, 1997-1998
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Metropolitan State College of Denver
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Metropolitan State College of Denver
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Auraria Library
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Campuo Box 16 P.O. Box 175562 Denver, Colorado 80217-5562


welcome
Thu Catalog contains comprehensive information about The Metropolitan State College of Denver, the degrees and programs it offe is, and the re quire men to that must be satisfied before receiving a degree. This publication describes admissions and registration procedures, as well as services offered by the college. General tuition and fees
and financial aid packages procedures are also covered.
SELECTION OF CATALOG FOR REQUIREMENTS
Students must use a single MSCD Catalog to meet all their degree requirements, including the General Studies, major, and minor requirements. Students must select a Catalog in effect while they are enrolled at MSCD unless they are transferring from a regionally accredited Colorado community college, provided that the Catalog contains their complete program of study. Students not enrolling for three consecutive semesters or more are governed by the Catalog in effect upon their return. For effective dates of Catalogs, students should consult their academic advisers. All degree programs must adhere to overriding current policies at MSCD.
Students transferring from a regionally accredited Colorado com-nunity college may complete degree requirements using an MSCD Catalog in effect while enrolled at he community college, subject to the following conditions.
The Catalog selected does not predate the current Catalog by more than three years.
The Catalog selected may have been in use at any time from the time the student was continually enrolled* at a regionally accredited Colorado community college to the semester for which the student is enrolling at MSCD.
Continuous enrollment is defined as not interrupting enrollment for three or more consecutive semesters (one calendar year); summer is counted as a semester. Continuous enrollment must be maintained from the period of the designated MSCD Catalog to the point of MSCD degree completion.
POSSIBLE CHANGES OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS CATALOG
The programs, policies, statements, and procedures contained in this Catalog are subject to change by the college without prior notice.
The Metropolitan State College of Denver reserves the right to withdraw courses; revise the academic calendar; or change curriculum. policies, graduation procedures, and other requirements at any time. Changes will become affective whenever the proper authorities so determine and will apply to prospective students.


THE METROPOLITAN STATE
COLLEGE of DENVER
1997 -1998 Catalog


TABLE OF CONTENTS 3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
(See alphabetical index for specific topics.)
A
The College...............................................j........................4
Degrees and Programs.................................................................6
Basic Degree Requirements............................................................8
General Studies Program.............................................................10
Admissions..........................................................................22
Enrollment..........................................................................26
Registration........................................................................27
Tuition and Fees....................................................................28
Financial Aid..................................................................... 31
Special Programs....................................................................34
Alternative Credit Options................................|........................36
Cooperative Education...............................................................38
Academic Policies and Procedures....................................................39
Student Rights and Responsibilities.................................................44
Services for Students...............................................................45
Student Life........................................................................50
Equal Opportunity and ADA Statement.................................................52
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act......................................... 52
Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act..................................... 54
School of Business..................................................................55
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences................................................65
School of Professional Studies.....................................................121
Course Descriptions................................................................187
Trustees of The State Colleges in Colorado.........................................352
Officers of Administration.........................................................352
Faculty............................................................................355
Alphabetical Index.................................................................367
Auraria Campus Map.................................................Inside Front Cover
Extended Campus Location Map.......................................Inside Back Cover
Cover photo by: Chuck Carlton
Photography: Sidney Brock, Dave Neligh, Peggy ONeill-Jones, H. Keith Williams Produced by: The Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of College Communications 1997
Printed on Recycled Paper


4 GENERAL INFORMATION
: GENERAL INFORMATION
i The College
The Metropolitan State College of Denver is a comprehensive, baccalaureate-degree-granting, urban ; college that offers arts and sciences, professional, and business courses and programs to a diverse stu-; dent population. Excellence in teaching and learning is the college's primary objective.
; The institutional mission is to provide a high-quality, accessible, enriching education that prepares stu-1 dents for successful careers, postgraduate education, and lifelong learning in a multicultural, global, and
; technological society. The college fulfills its mission by working in partnership with the community at
large and by fostering an atmosphere of scholarly inquiry, creative activity, and mutual respect within
a diverse campus community.
The college awards bachelor of science, bachelor of arts, and bachelor of fine arts degrees. Students
; can choose from 50 majors and 69 minors offered through three schools: Business; Letters, Arts and
Sciences; and Professional Studies. Programs range from the traditional disciplines, such as history and
biology, to contemporary fields of study, such as Chicano studies and health care management. Unique ; majors for Coloradans include aerospace science, criminal justice, human services, and land use. Stu-Y dents may also design their own degree through the Individualized Degree Program.
At MSCD, the emphasis is on teaching. The college strives to provide students with every possible opportunity for success. The college has more than 385 full-time faculty, many with extensive professional backgrounds, who are appointed for their academic achievement and teaching abilities. Most of them hold the highest degree possible in their field. Part-time faculty work in the metropolitan Denver community and bring their expertise in the arts, business, communications, law, politics, science, and technology to the classroom. Small classes-the average size is 23ensure students greater access to faculty, a highly interactive atmosphere, and a personalized learning experience.
Because each student's success is so important, the college provides an extensive network of services, which are listed and described in this Catalog.
As an urban school committed to serving the local community, MSCD attracts students from a rich and diverse mixture of age groups, socioeconomic classes, ethnic backgrounds, and lifestyles. The college's curriculum and philosophy reflect that diversity and the realities of urban life.
The Campus
The Metropolitan State College of Denver is located at the Auraria Higher Education Center, a 175-acre campus in downtown Denver at Speer Boulevard and West Colfax Avenue. The Community College of Denver and the University of Colorado at Denver share the facilities with MSCD. Facility sharing affords students the flexibility of taking lower-division courses at the community college, as well as graduate or specialized professional courses at the university.
More than one million square feet of space for classrooms, laboratories, and offices are included in the facility. Some administrative offices are located in restored Victorian homes in Denver's historic Ninth Street Park located on the Auraria site. Other administrative offices occupy the Terracentre at 1100 Stout Street. The campus features a child care center, a comprehensive library housing 731,000 volumes, and one of the most unusual student union facilities in the country the historic Bavarian-style Tivoli Brewery Building. Excellent physical fitness facilities include a block-long physical educa-tion/events center with a swimming pool, a weight room, game courts, dance studios, and event seating for 3,000.
The proximity of the Auraria Higher Education Center to downtown Denver enables students and faculty to use the community as a learning laboratory and to connect classroom theory to the cultural, economic, social, and political practices of the city.
The college also has two satellite campus sites. Metro South, located at 5660 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard in Arapahoe County, services the south, southeast, and southwest metropolitan areas. Metro North, located at 11990 Grant Street in Adams County, serves the north, northeast, and northwest areas. Each site is located 14 miles from the Auraria campus along the 1-25 corridor.


GENERAL INFORMATION 5
A variety of courses are offered during the evenings and on Saturdays on the Auraria campus and at Metro South and Metro North. There are 24 degree programs that can be completed entirely by taking courses scheduled during the evenings and weekends, General information about these programs can be obtained from the Office of Admissions or the Academic Advising Center. The Class Schedule clearly identifies all evening and weekend courses.
The college's Extended Campus Program offers classes in traditional formats, as well as telecourses, online courses, and correspondence courses. The program has its own office, Central Classroom Building, room 318, which provides general assistance to students on specified weekends in the areas of advising, retrieval of college forms, scheduling, and assistance with student concerns that cannot be addressed during weekdays.


6 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
The Metropolitan State College of Denver is organized into three schools. These are listed below with the majors and minors offered by each. The curriculum requirements for each of the programs are described in this Catalog in the special sections prepared by each school. Programs marked with an
asterisk (*) do not require completion of a minor.
Bachelors Degree Major Minor
School of Business
Accounting*.........................X . x
Computer Information Systems &
Management Science*.................X
Economics (Business Emphasis*) **.... X .. .. x
Finance*..............................X . . . x
General Business.............................x
Information Systems..........................x
Management*...........................X ... . x
Marketing*............................X . .. x
Real Estate..................................x
y **The Economics Department offers a bachelor of arts
degree, rather than a bachelor of science degree.
School of Professional Studies
Teacher Education
Bilingual/Bicultural Education................x
Early Childhood Education.....................x
Parent Education..............................x
Reading.......................................x
Special Education/Gifted Education............x
Teacher Licensing: Early Childhood, Elementary,
and Twelve Secondary Fields Technology
Airframe and Power Plant Mechanics................x
Aviation Management....................X .. . . x
Aviation Technology....................X
Civil Engineering Technology...........X .... x
Drafting Engineering Technology...................x
Electrical Engineering Technology.....X . . . . x
Industrial Design*.....................X
Industrial and Technical Studies*......X . . .. x
Mechanical Engineering Technology .... X . x
Private Pilot.....................................x
Professional Pilot................................x
Surveying and Mapping.................X .. x
Communications (Multi-major-Technical) X .. x Technical and Industrial Administration*. X
Public Service Professions
Criminal Justice and Criminology.......X . x
Gerontological Services.........................x
Health and Safety...............................x
Health Care Management (upper-division) X . x Holistic Health & Wellness
Education Multi-minor.........................x
Hospitality, Meeting and
Travel Administration*...............X .. x
Hotel Administration............................x
Human Performance and Sport..............X . . .. x
Human Services*..........................X .. . . x
Leisure Studies..........................X . . . . x
Meeting Administration..........................x
Nursing (upper-division for RNs).......X
Restaurant Administration.......................x
Travel Administration...........................x
Bachelors Degree Major Minor
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Humanities
Art**..................................X-----------x
English................................X .... x
French.........................................x
German.........................................x
Journalism.............................X . . .. x
Language and Linguistics.......................x
Modem Foreign Languages................X
Music..........................................x
Music Education*.......................X
Music Performance*.....................X
Philosophy.............................X . . x
Writing........................................x
Public Relations...............................x
Spanish................................X .... x
Speech Communications..................X . . .. x
**Art offers a bachelor of fine arts degree.
Science and Mathematics
Biology................................X .... x
Chemistry..............................X . .. x
Computer Science.......................X . . x
Criminalistics.................................x
Geography......................................x
Geology........................................x
Land Use...............................X
Mathematics............................X . ... x
Meteorology............................X . x
Physics................................X .... x
Theoretical Physics............................x
Social Sciences
African American Studies...............X .... x
Anthropology...........................X .. .. x
Behavioral Science.....................X
Chicano Studies........................X . x
History................................X .... x
Interdisciplinary Legal Studies................x
Political Science......................X . . x
Psychology.............................X . . .. x
Public Administration..........................x
Social Work*...........................X
Sociology..............................X .... x
Urban Studies* **......................X . x
Institute for Women's Studies and Services Women's Studies....................................x
** Urban Studies offers a bachelor of arts degree and a bachelor of science degree.


Individualized Degree Program
Even with the wide diversity of the majors and minors presently offered at MSCD, the need may arise for an academic program that is individualized, meets the specific educational objectives of the student, and is responsive to emerging educational requirements in the workplace and community. An Individualized Degree Program major or minor is an organized, coherent degree program designed to meet the specific educational goals of the student. It is developed by the student working closely with a faculty mentor, and must be approved by the appropriate department chair, the director of Adult Learning Services and the dean of the school from which the majority of credit is drawn. A professional in the community with specific expertise in the student's field of study may also serve as a community consultant to the student's program.
The degree sought may be either a bachelor of arts or bachelor of science. All requirements for any bachelor's degree from the college apply. Information and assistance is available through the Office of Adult Learning Services at (303) 556-8342.
Certificates of Completion
Certificates of completion that recognize the completion of a selected set of courses are offered. These may be used to prepare for new careers and can be applied toward a degree. See the current Class Schedule.
Schqql qf Business;
Personal Financial Planning Real Estate
Noncredit Financial Planning Noncredit International Trade
School of Letters. Arts and Sciences
German Translation
Basic Competency in German
Basic Competency in French
Basic Competency in Spanish
Spanish Translation Program
Public Administration
Career and Personal Development Cluster
Gerontology (Liberal Arts Orientation)
School of Professional Studies
Gerontology (Professional Services Orientation)
International Technical Writing
Multimedia Production
Corporate Video Production
Technical Writing and Editing
Coaching
Activities for Older Adults Recreation Assistant Aquatics Assistant Extended Day Aids Conditioning Specialist Officiating Literacy Instructor
Accreditations/Approvals
The Metropolitan State College of Denver is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (30 North LaSalle St., Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602-2504, 1-800-621-7440). Individual academic programs within the following areas are accredited or approved by the following agencies:
Program Accreditation/Approval Agency
Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies* National Park Association/American Association for Leisure and Recreation
Nursing* National League for Nursing
Teacher Education* National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education; Colorado Department of Education
Music* National Association of Schools of Music
Civil Engineering Technology* Electronics Engineering Technology* and Mechanical Engineering Technology* Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc.
Human Services** Council for Standards in Human Services Education
Social Work* Council on Social Work Education
Chemistry ** American Chemical Society
Center for Addiction Studies** Colorado Department of Health
Accounting** Colorado State Board of Accountancy
Aerospace Science** Council on Aviation Accreditation
Health Care Management** Association of University Programs in Health Administration
* Accreditation ** Approval


8
BASIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Students are responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to their program contained in this Catalog and elsewhere. The final responsibility for completing the requirements for a degree rests with the students, and it is recommended that they seek advice. Students should never assume that they have approval to deviate from a stated requirement without a properly signed statement to that effect.
Requirements for All Bachelor's Degrees
To earn a bachelor of science, a bachelor of arts, or a bachelor of fine arts degree, a student must satisfy the following minimum requirements, plus any others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
Complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher for all coursework.
Complete at least 40 semester hours in upper-division courses (3000- and 4000-level courses).
Complete all General Studies requirements listed for the degree and major.
Complete a three-hour Multicultural course requirement.
Complete a three-hour Senior Experience course requirement. This course must be taken at MSCD.
Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 30 semester hours. With certain exceptions (see the Degrees and Programs section on page 6 of this Catalog), complete a minor consisting of at least 18 semester hours. If a student completes two majors, the second major satisfies the minor requirement. Completing two areas of emphasis under one major does not constitute the completion of two majors. Completion of two majors does not result in two degrees or diplomas. Coursework used to meet requirements for one major or minor may not be used to meet requirements for another major or minor. Students may not major and minor in the same discipline and are encouraged to obtain verification from an adviser if uncertainty exists.
Complete all special requirements of a department and school.
Achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in all MSCD courses that satisfy the requirements for the major, and for all MSCD courses that satisfy requirements for a minor. Students should check with an adviser for special GPA program requirements.
Complete a Graduation Agreement with the department when they have completed between 60-90 hours.
Academic residency (classroom credit) requirements:
=> Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at MSCD, including the last 12 semester hours applicable to the degree.
=> Complete at least 8 upper-division (3000- and 4000-level courses) semester hours of the major and 3 upper-division semester hours of the minor at MSCD (classroom credit).
=> Students should be aware that University of Colorado at Denver pooled courses and courses taken interinstitutionally or at one of the other state colleges will not satisfy academic residence requirements at MSCD.
=> Complete the Senior Experience requirement.
Credit limitations:
=> No more than 30 semester hours of omnibus-numbered courses may be applied toward graduation requirements.
=> No more than 30 semester hours taken by extension and/or correspondence may be applied toward a bachelor's degree.
=> No more than 4 semester hours in human performance and leisure activity or varsity sports courses will be counted toward a bachelor's degree for students who are not majoring in human performance, sport and leisure studies.
=> No more than 7 semester hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a bachelor's degree for students who are not majoring in music.


Requirements for a Second Degree
For an additional bachelor's degree, students must comply with the following:
The first bachelor's degree must be recognized by MSCD.
General Studies will be considered complete unless deficiencies exist according to the major department.
Students must complete all requirements for a new major with a minimum of eight MSCD classroom upper-division semester hours in the major department.
Students must complete a minor, if required by the major department for the contemplated degree.
Students must satisfy the Multicultural and Senior Experience course requirements for the second degree.
Students must spend at least two additional semesters in residence.
A minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at MSCD is required in addition to the credits completed by the student for the earlier degree.
Credit limitations for a bachelor's degree will continue to exist for the second degree.
A Graduation Agreement must be completed as outlined in this Catalog.


10
THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM
Philosophy of the General Studies Program
The Metropolitan State College of Denver seeks to prepare its graduates for a lifetime of learning, which, in our changing and complex society, requires focused expertise (such as that provided by a major area of study) and the ability to communicate with and learn from experts in other fields. Undergraduate education fosters the critical thinking necessary for the exploration of unfamiliar disciplines and for the synthesis of learning and exposes students to the richness and variety of the intellectual universe.
General Studies Information
Students must use a single catalog to meet all degree requirements, including those in the General Studies, major, and minor. Some changes in General Studies requirements have been made retroactive. As a consequence, many General Studies requirements and policies described in this Catalog may be followed by students using earlier catalogs.
General Studies Goals
The General Studies Program is designed to help graduates achieve the following competencies:
MSCD students should be able to:
1. Write and speak with clarity;
2. Read and listen critically;
3. Draw conclusions from quantitative data;
4. Recognize faulty reasoning;
5. Organize ideas; and
6. Communicate with experts in other disciplines and learn from them.
MSCD students should:
7. Have an open attitude toward different approaches to problems
8. Have an informed awareness of the principle human achievements in history, arts and letters, society, and science, and
9. Be introduced to the basic methods, knowledge, problems, or attitudes characteristic of a field.
Structure of the General Studies Program
The General Studies Program is structured to foster the development of skills and to encourage students to use their mastery of skills to explore knowledge in a variety of disciplines. The General Studies Program provides two levels of experience:
Level ISkills
Level I courses provide students with the basic skills of reading and listening critically, recognizing faulty reasoning, drawing conclusions from quantitative data, organizing ideas, and writing and speaking with clarity.
Level II-Breadth of Knowledge
Level II courses introduce students to the basic methods, knowledge, problems or attitudes characteristic of a field, encourage in students an open attitude toward different approaches to problems, enable students to communicate with experts in other disciplines and learn from them, and cultivate in students an informed awareness of the principle achievements in history, arts and letters, social science, and science. In addition, in Level II courses students will continue to develop their skills in language and mathematics.


11
Distribution and Credit Requirements
To complete their General Studies Program, students must take approved courses that fulfill the following distribution and credit requirements:
Category Semester Hours
Level I*
Composition......................................................................6
Mathematics......................................................................3
Communications...................................................................3
Level II**
Historical.......................................................................3
Arts and Letters.................................................................6
Social Sciences..................................................................6
Natural Sciences.................................................................6
Total***........................................................................33
*A transfer course or courses of at least 2 semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Level 1 course.
**One-hour deviations in the Level II categories may be allowed.
***A student's completed General Studies Program must contain at least 33 semester hours.
Basic Rules:
Only approved courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies requirements. A current listing of these courses is published in this section, in the General Studies, Multicultural, and Senior Experience Requirements pamphlet, and in the Course Descriptions section of this Catalog.
General Studies courses need not be counted toward General Studies requirements. They may be taken as electives or to satisfy requirements in the major or degree program.
Departments or programs whose curricula are guided by accrediting agencies may specify, by prefix and number, some General Studies courses in addition to courses required for the major or a professional credential.
Courses taken using the pass-fail option cannot be counted for General Studies.
Level I Requirements: Composition, Mathematics and Communication; Freshman Assessment: Reading, Writing and Mathematics Placement Exams
First-time college students are required to complete the reading, writing, and mathematics placement examinations (see Assessment Requirements section). Examination results serve as the basis for academic advising. To increase their opportunity for success, students may be required to take courses below the level of first-year courses offered by MSCD. Students should be aware, however, that no credit is given for courses that are below the college level.
Placement Test Prerequisites
Students must have a passing score on the appropriate placement test before they will be allowed to register for Level I General Studies courses in English, mathematics, and reading. Exceptions will be made for students who have earned at least a grade of "C" in the community college course specified by the department. The Assessment Center administers the placement tests. Students should consult an adviser in the Advising Center for guidance in selecting the appropriate Level I courses.
Composition Required Courses Semester Hours
ENG 1010 Freshman Composition: The Essay..................................3
ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, and Documentation......3
Rules: Composition Requirement
Students must complete the ENG 1010 requirement within their first 30 sernester hours at MSCD and the ENG 1020 requirement within their first 60 semester hours. These requirements
may be postponed only if approved in writing by the English Department.
Students must demonstrate the adequacy of their writing skills in the placement exam before enrolling in ENG 1010. Those students whose writing skills are inadequate will be counseled on how to improve those skills. Students may be required to complete additional coursework.


12
Students will have satisfied the Level I composition requirements if they:
=> satisfactorily complete ENG 1010 and 1020, or
=> pass a CLEP or AP examination approved by the English Department (ENG 1010 only), or => transfer equivalent courses.
Mathematics (minimum 3 semester hours*) Semester Hours
MTH 1080 Mathematical Modes of Thought.......................................3
MTH 1110 College Algebra.....................................................4
MTH 1210 Introduction to Statistics..........................................4
MTH 1310 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences...........4
MTH 1610 Mathematical Concepts for Teachers in Presecondary Schools..........4
Rules: Mathematics Requirement
Students will take the mathematics placement exam to determine their abilities to calculate with fractions, decimals, and percents, and to know and use elementary geometrical formulas. Those whose skills are inadequate are required to complete college arithmetic coursework before enrolling in a Level I mathematics course. Some courses have additional requirements.
Students must complete the Level I mathematics requirement within their first 30 semester hours at MSCD. This requirement may be postponed on an individual basis if the postponement is approved in writing by the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department.
Students will have satisfied the Level 1 mathematics requirement if they:
=> pass a mathematics course that has been approved for Level I mathematics credit (see courses listed above), or
=> pass a CLEP or AP exam approved by the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department, or
=> successfully complete a mathematics course for which a Level I mathematics course is a prerequisite, or
=> transfer an equivalent course.
*A transfer course or courses of at least 2 semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency is determined by the department offering the Level I course.
Communication (minimum 3 semester hours*) Semester Hours
FRE 1020 Elementary French II..............................................5
GER 1020 Elementary German II..............................................5
HON 2950 The Art of Critical Thinking......................................3
PHI 1110 Language, Logic, and Persuasion...................................3
RDG 1510 Cognitive Strategies for Analytical Reading.......................3
SPA 1020 Elementary Spanish II.............................................5
SPE 1010 Public Speaking...................................................3
SPE 1710 Interpersonal Communications: Individual as a Communicator........3
Rules: Communication Requirement
Students must complete the required Level I communication course within their first 30 semester hours at The Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Students will have satisfied the Level I communication requirement if they:
=> pass an approved Level I communication course (listed above), or
=> pass a CLEP or AP test approved by a department offering a Level I communication course, or
=> transfer an equivalent course.
=> transfer a second semester, four- or five-semester hour foreign language course or a more advanced language course that is taught in a language not offered at MSCD.
=> pass or transfer an advanced foreign language course that is taught in the foreign language and that has MSCD's FRE 1020, GER 1020, and SPA 1020 or equivalent coursework, or more advanced coursework, as a prerequisite.
=> pass or transfer an advanced public speaking course for which MSCD's SPE 1010 or a comparable course is a prerequisite.


Students who have satisfied the communications requirement using the advanced foreign language course or the advanced public speaking course must place that course in the Level I communications requirement slot. Level II General Studies courses used to satisfy the Level I communications requirements cannot also be counted in the Level II category.
*A transfer course or courses of at least 2 semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Level I course.
Level II Requirements
Courses approved to satisfy the Level II requirement are distributed among four categories. The categories, together with the minimum number of semester hours a student must accumulate to satisfy this requirement are given below. One-hour deviations in the General Studies Level II categories may be allowed, provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses.
Level II Categories Semester Hours
Historical....................................................................3
Arts and Letters..............................................................6
Social Science................................................................6
Natural Science...............................................................6
Rules: Level II Requirement
Prerequisites: Level II General Studies courses have at least the following prerequisites or corequisites, and some courses have additional prerequisites (see the Course Descriptions section in this Catalog).
Historical and Arts and Letters:
=> Courses numbered 1000 to 1990: minimum performance standard scores on reading and writing preassessment placement tests
=> Courses numbered 2000 to 2990: satisfaction of the Level I mathematics course requirement and either ENG 1010 or the Level I communication course requirement => Courses numbered 3000 and above: satisfaction of all Level I General Studies course requirements
Natural Science and Social Science:
=> Courses numbered 1000 to 1990: minimum performance standard scores on the reading, writing, and mathematics preassessment placement tests => Courses numbered 2000 to 2990: satisfaction of the Level I mathematics course requirement and either ENG 1010 or the Level I communication course requirements => Courses numbered 3000 and above: satisfaction of all Level I course requirements
Students may not use courses having the same prefix as their major discipline or crosslisted with their major discipline to satisfy the Level II requirement.
Students may not apply more than 8 semester hours of credit with the same course prefix to the Level II requirements.
Students may use either prefix for a cross-listed course, i.e., one designated XXX(/YYY(. They must select the prefix they wish to use at registration; the selection may not be changed later.
History majors must take three extra semester hours at Level II in the social sciences, arts and letters, or natural sciences categories in lieu of the three hours in the historical category.
History majors may not use courses that are crosslisted with history courses for General Studies.


I
Historical Courses (minimum 3 semester hours*)
Historical courses aim to impart a broad knowledge of history, emphasizing the major forces, people, and events that have shaped the modem world.
The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies historical requirement. Other courses may have been approved for such use after the publication of this Catalog. For more recent information, contact the Advising Center.
Semester Hours
AAS 1130/HIS 1940mc Survey of African History................................3
AAS 2130/H1S 2950mc West African Civilizations...............................3
CHS 1010/H1S 1910mc History of Meso-America:
Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods........................3
CHS 1020/HIS 1920mc History of the Chicano in the Southwest:
1810 to present...........................................3
FRE 3550 French Historical Perspectives............................3
HIS 1000 American Civilization.....................................3
HIS 1010 Western Civilization to 1715..............................3
HIS 1020 Western Civilization since 1715...........................3
HIS 1110 Colorado History 1........................................3
HIS 1210 American History to 1865 .................................3
HIS 1220 American History since 1865...............................3
HIS 1250 China, Japan, Korea since 1800............................3
HIS 1650/WMS 1650 Women in U.S. History.....................................3
HIS 1910/CHS lOlOmc History of Meso-America:
Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods........................3
HIS 1920/CHS 1020mc History of the Chicano in the Southwest: 1810
to Present..........................................3
HIS 1930/NAS 1930mc History of Indigenous/Hispanic Americans.................3
HIS 1940/AAS 1130mc Survey of African History................................3
HIS 2010 Contemporary World History................................3
HIS 2950/AAS 2130mc West African Civilizations...............................3
HIS 3030 Ancient Orient and Greece.................................3
HIS 3060 Rome and the Caesars......................................3
HIS 3090mc Native Americans in American History......................3
HIS 3120 Medieval History..........................................3
HIS 3140 Renaissance and Reformation...............................3
HIS 3310 England to 1714...........................................3
HIS 3320 England since 1714........................................3
HIS 3590 American Immigration History..............................3
HIS 3700 Modem China...............................................3
HIS 3740 Modem Japan...............................................3
HIS 3810 Latin America: Republics..................................3
HIS 4110/HON 3850 American Culture I........................................3
HIS 4120/HON 3860 American Culture II.......................................3
HON 3850/HIS 4110 American Culture I........................................3
HON 3860/HIS 4120 American Culture II.......................................3
NAS 1930/HIS 1930mc History of Indigenous/Hispanic Americans.................3
WMS 1650/HIS 1650 Women in U.S. History.....................................3
*A one-hour deviation in the General Studies historical requirement may be allowed, provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses. mc-This course will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.


Arts and Letters Courses (minimum 6 semester hours*)
Arts and letters courses impart a broad knowledge of important works and major schools of thought from at least two centuries. They also provide a foundation for critical evaluation within the discipline.
The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies arts and letters requirement. Other courses may have been approved for such use after the publication of this Catalog. For more recent information contact the Advising Center.
Semester Hours
AAS 3240/ENG 3240mc African American Literature.....................................3
ART 1040 Art Appreciation Survey.....................................3
ART 3090mc Art and Cultural Heritage...................................3
ART 3950/WMS 3950 Women's Art/Women's Issues........................................3
ENG 1100 Introduction to Literature..................................3
ENG 1110 Introduction to Fiction.....................................3
ENG 1120 Introduction to Drama.......................................3
ENG 1310 Introduction to Shakespeare.................................3
ENG 3030 Semantics...................................................3
ENG 3240/AAS 3240mc African American Literature.....................................3
ENG 3420 English Bible as Literature.................................3
ENG 3430 Classical Mythology.........................................3
ENG 3460 Children's Literature.......................................3
FRE 3110 Survey of French Literature 1...............................3
FRE 3120 Survey of French Literature II..............................3
GER 3200 German Culture and Civilization.............................3
HON 2750 The Legacy of Arts and Letters I............................3
HON 2760 The Legacy of Arts and Letters II...........................3
MUS 1000 Introduction to Music.......................................3
MUS 3000mc Musics of America...........................................3
MUS 3040 Music and the Arts..........................................3
MUS 3050 Musics of the World.........................................3
PHI 1010 Introduction to Philosophy..................................3
PHI 1030 Ethics......................................................3
PHI 3000 History of Greek Philosophy.................................3
PHI 3020 History of Modern Philosophy................................3
PHI 3360 Business Ethics.............................................3
PSC 3050 Political Theory............................................3
RDG 3060 Critical Reading/Thinking...................................3
SPA 3200 Culture and Civilization of Spain...........................3
SPA 3210 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization...................3
SPA 3220 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest...............3
SPE 2210 Introduction to Theatre.....................................3
SPE 2770/WMS 2770 Gender and Communication..........................................3
SPE 3080 Great American Speakers.....................................3
SPE 3740 Psychology of Communication.................................3
SPE 3760mc Cultural Influences on Communication........................3
WMS 2770/SPE 2770 Gender and Communication....................................3
WMS 3510 Feminist Theory.............................................3
WMS 3950/ART 3950 Women's Art/Women's Issues.................................3
*A one-hour deviation in the General Studies arts and letters requirement may be allowed, provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses.
mc-This course will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.


16
Social Science Courses (minimum 6 semester hours*)
Social science courses aim to explore the formation, behavior, and interaction of various social, cultural, political, or economic groups and institutions.
The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies social science requirement. Other courses may have been approved for such use after the publication of this Catalog. For more recent information contact the Advising Center.
Semester Hours
AAS lOlOmc Introduction to African American Studies...........3
AAS 2100/CHS 2100/ICS 2100/
NAS 2100/WMS 21 OOmc Women of Color.....................................3
AAS 2200/PSC 2200mc Politics and Black People..........................3
AAS 3300/SOC 3140mc The Black Community................................3
AAS 3550/SOC 3440 The Black Family...................................3
ACC 1010 Accounting for Non-Business Majors.................3
ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology..............3
ANT 2330mc Cross-Cultural Communication.......................3
ANT 3310mc Ethnography of North American Indians..............3
ANT 3480mc Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness...........3
CHS lOOOmc Introduction to Chicano Studies....................3
CHS 2100/AAS 2100/ICS 2100/
NAS 2100/WMS 21 OOmc Women of Color.....................................3
CHS 3100/SOC 3130mc The Chicano Community..............................3
CHS 3210/SOC 3470 The Chicano Family.................................3
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics(Macro......................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics(Micro......................3
EDS 3200 Educational Psychology Applied to Teaching.........3
EDU 2640mc Urban and Multicultural Education..................3
FRE 3560 Contemporary Socio-Cultural Issues.................3
GEG 1000 World Regional Geography...........................3
GEG 1300 Introduction to Human Geography....................3
GEG 2020 Geography of Colorado..............................3
GEG 3300/NAS 3300/
PSC 3300mc Land Use, Culture and Conflict.....................3
HES 1050 Dynamics of Health.................................3
HES 2000 Health Politics and Policy.........................3
HES 2180 AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency
Syndrome.........................................3
HIS 3660 Recent U.S., 1945( 1970s...........................3
HMT 1850mc Multicultural/Multinational Cultural
Adjustment/Readjustment..........................3
HON 3800 Revolutions and Social Change 1....................3
HON 3810 Revolutions and Social Change II...................3
HPS 2720 Fundamentals of Coaching...........................2
HSP 3490mc Multicultural Issues in Human Services.............4
ICS 2100/AAS 2100/CHS 2100/
NAS 2100/WMS 21 OOmc Women of Color.....................................3
ITS 2810 Technology, Society and You........................3
JRN 1010 Introduction to Journalism and Mass Media..........3
LES 4730 Sociology of Athletics in American Society.........3
MKT 2040 Managerial Communications..........................3
NAS lOOOmc Introduction to Native American Studies............3
NAS 2100/AAS 2100/CHS 2100/
ICS 2100/WMS 2100mc Women of Color.....................................3
NAS 3200/PSC 3200mc Native American Politics...........................3
PSC 1010 American National Government.......................3
PSC 1020 Political Systems and Ideas........................3
PSC 2200/AAS 2200mc Politics and Black People..........................3
PSC 3200/NAS 3200mc Native American Politics...........................3


PSC 3300/GEG 3300
NAS 3300mc Land Use, Culture and Conflict....................3
PSY 1001 Introductory Psychology...........................3
PSY 2160 Personality and Adjustment. .1....................3
PSY 2210 Psychology of Human Development...................3
PSY 3250 Child Psychology...........j.....................3
PSY 3260 Psychology of Adolescence.........................3
SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociology.........................3
SOC 1040mc Introduction to Gerontology.......................3
SOC 2010 Current Social Issues.............................3
SOC 3130/CHS 3100mc The Chicano Community.............................3
SOC 3140/AAS 3300mc The Black Community...............................3
SOC 3220/WMS 3220mc Race, Gender and Ethnic Groups....................3
SOC 3440/AAS 3550 The Black Family..................................3
SOC 3470/CHS 3210 The Chicano Family................................3
SWK 1010 Introduction to Social Welfare and Social Work...3
WMS 1001 Introduction: Woman in Transition.................3
WMS 2100/AAS 2100/CHS 2100
ICS 2100/NAS 21 OOmc Women of Color....................................3
WMS 3220/SOC 3220mc Race, Gender and Ethnic Groups....................3
*A one-hour deviation in the General Studies social science requirement may be allowed, provided the student's completed General Studies Program contains at least 33 semester hours.
me This course will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.
Natural Science Courses (minimum 6 semester hours*)
Natural science courses provide an opportunity for students to experience the systematic formulation and testing of hypotheses and to leam the importance of accurate observation and measurement. Students will differentiate among fact, speculation, evidence, inference, belief, theory, law, and generalization.
The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies natural science requirement. Other courses may have been approved for such use after the publication of this Catalog. For more recent information, contact the Advising Center.
Semester Hours
ANT 1010 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory..................3
AST 1040/AST 1040sp Introduction to Astronomy.............................3
AST 3040 Modem Cosmology.......................................3
BIO 1000/BIO lOOOsp Human Biology for Non-Majors..........................3
BIO 1010/BIO lOlOsp Ecology for Non-Majors................................3
BIO 1080/BIO 1080sp General Introduction to Biology.......................4
BIO 3300 Advanced Human Biology for Non-Majors.................3
BIO 3550 Urban Ecology.........................................4
CHE 1010 Chemistry and Society.................................3
CHE 1100 Principles of Chemistry...............................5
CHE 1800 & CHE 1850* General Chemistry I.........................................6
CHE 1810 & CHE 1850* General Chemistry II........................................6
CHE 3100 Organic Chemistry 1...................................4
CHE 3120 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory........................2
GEG 1100 Introduction to Physical Geography....................3
GEG 1200 Introduction to Environmental Sciences................3
GEG 1400 World Resources.......................................3
GEL 1010 General Geology.......................................4
GEL 1020 Geology of Colorado...................................3
GEL 1150 Oceanography..........................................3
HES 2040 Introduction to Nutrition.............................3
HES 2150 Alternative Therapies for Health and Healing..........3
HES 3450 Dynamics of Disease...................................3
HON 2800 History of Science....................................3
HON 2810 Development of Experimental Science...................3


18
HPS 3300 Anatomical Kinesiology.................................3
HPS 3340 Physiology of Exercise.................................3
MET 3550 Rocket and Stars ( A Space Trek........................3
MTR 1400 Introduction to Meteorology............................3
MTR 3500 Hazardous Weather......................................3
PHY 1000/PHY lOOOsp Introduction to Physics................................4
PHY 1250 Physics of Aviation....................................6
PHY 2010 & PHY 2030 College Physics I and Laboratory......................5
PHY 2020 & PHY 2040 College Physics II and Laboratory.....................5
PHY 2311 & PHY 2321 General Physics I and Laboratory......................5
PHY 2331 & PHY 2341 General Physics II and Laboratory.....................5
PHY 3620 Sound and Music........................................3
SCI 2800 Conceptual Science and Mathematics.....................6
*A one-hour deviation in the General Studies natural science requirement may be allowed, provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses.
*Completion of both CHE 1800 and 1850 with passing grades is required to receive General Studies credit. The same is true of the combination CHE 1810 and 1850.
me This course will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.
sp Self-paced
Additional Graduation Requirements Multicultural and Senior Experience Course Requirements
In addition to completing the General Studies requirements, a student must complete a three-hour Multicultural course and a three-hour Senior Experience course, or selection of courses, to be awarded a bachelor's degree from MSCD. The Multicultural class does not require three hours as a separate category and can be taken in the major, minor, or as an elective. The rules pertaining to those requirements and the courses that will satisfy those requirements are described below.
Multicultural Course Requirement (minimum 3 semester hours)
Multicultural courses are designed to increase students' appreciation and awareness of the American culture and the diverse cultures that contribute to it. Multicultural educational offerings examine the interactions of values and beliefs, traditions, identities, and cultural contributions of women, and racial and ethnic groups in the United States: African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and Native American. Students may use the course to satisfy General Studies, major, or minor requirements if the course is approved for that use. If the course is used for General Studies, the Level II General Studies restrictions remain in effect, e.g., no courses with the major prefix may be used.
A one-hour deviation in the Multicultural requirement will be allowed for courses judged to be similar in content to an existing Multicultural course. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Multicultural course.
Semester Hours
AAS 1010 Introduction to African American Studies..........3
AAS 1130/HIS 1940 Survey of African History.........................3
AAS 2100/CHS 2100/ICS 2100/
NAS 2100/WMS 2100 Women of Color....................................3
AAS 2130/HIS 2950 West African Civilizations........................3
AAS 2200/PSC 2200 Politics and Black People.........................3
AAS 3240/ENG 3240 African American Literature.......................3
AAS 3300/SOC 3140 The Black Community...............................3
ANT 2330 Cross-Cultural Communication......................3
ANT 3310 Ethnography of North American Indians.............3
ANT 3480 Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness..........3
ART 3090 Art and Cultural Heritage.........................3
CHS 1000 Introduction to Chicano Studies...................3
CHS 1010/HIS 1910 History of Meso-America:
Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods..............3
CHS 1020/HIS 1920 History of the Chicano in the Southwest:
1810 to Present.................................3


CHS 2100/AAS 2100/ICS 2100/
NAS 2100/WMS 2100 Women of Color................................. 3
CHS 3100/SOC 3130 The Chicano Community .. J.......................3
CHS 3200/CJC 3720 Chicanos and the Law ... J.....................3
CJC 3720/CHS 3200 Chicanos and the Law.............................3
EDS 3110 Processes of Education in Multicultural Urban
Secondary Schools...............................3
EDU 2640 Urban and Multicultural Education................3
ENG 3240/AAS 3240 African American Literature......................3
GEG 3300/NAS 3300
PSC 3300 Land Use, Culture and Conflict...................3
HIS 1910/CHS 1010 History of Meso-America:
Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods..............3
HIS 1920/CHS 1020 History of the Chicano in the Southwest:
1810 to Present..........i.....................3
HIS 1930/NAS 1930 History of Indigenous/Hispanic Americans.........3
HIS 1940/AAS 1130 Survey of African History .......................3
HIS 2950/AAS 2130 West African Civilizations.......................3
HIS 3090 Native Americans in American History.............3
HIS 3590 American Immigration History.....................3
HMT 1850 Multicultural/Multinational Cultural
Adjustment/Readjustment.........................3
HSP 3490 Multicultural Issues in Human Services...........4
ICS 2100/AAS 2100/CHS 2100/
NAS 2100/WMS 2100 Women of Color...................................3
NAS 3300/GEG 3300
PSC 3300 Land Use, Culture and Conflict...................3
MGT 4830 Workforce Diversity..............................3
MUS 3000 Musics of America................................3
NAS 1000 Introduction to Native American Studies..........3
NAS 1930/HIS 1930 History of Indigenous/Hispanic Americans.........3
NAS 2100/AAS 2100/CHS 2100/
ICS 2100/WMS 2100 Women of Color...................................3
NAS 3200/PSC 3200 Native American Politics.........................3
PSC 2200/AAS 2200 Politics and Black People........................3
PSC 3200/NAS 3200 Native American Politics.........................3
PSC 3300/GEG 3300
NAS 3300 Land Use, Culture and Conflict...................3
PSY 3170 Multicultural Service Learning...................3
SOC 1040 Introduction to Gerontology......................3
SOC 3130/CHS 3100 The Chicano Community............................3
SOC 3140/AAS 3300 The Black Community..............................3
SOC 3220/WMS 3220 Race, Gender, and Ethnic Groups..................3
SPE 3760 Cultural Influences on Communication.............3
WMS 2100/AAS 2100/CHS 2100/
ICS 2100/NAS 2100 Women of Color...................................3
WMS 3220/SOC 3220 Race, Gender and Ethnic Groups...................3
XXX* 1190 First-Year Seminar...............................3
*Variable course prefixes, e.g., ENG, PSC, RDG, SOC, SPE


20
: Senior Experience Course Requirement (minimum 3 semester hours)
| The Senior Experience course provides a culmination of the undergraduate experience, allowing stu-; dents to synthesize their learning, using critical analysis and logical thinking. Students may use the course to satisfy major or minor requirements if the course is approved for that use. Students should
consult with their adviser and check prerequisites. Students must complete a Senior Experience course ; at the end of the undergraduate program and must take the course or courses at MSCD. Senior Experi-' ence courses have the following minimal prerequisites: satisfaction of all Level I and Level II General ; Studies course requirements and senior status. In some cases students may need to take two courses to 1 satisfy the requirement.
Semester Hours
; ART 4010 Modem Art History: Theory and Criticism.......................3
I ART 4750 Senior Experience Studio: Portfolio
; Development and Thesis Show...................................3
I BIO 4510 Microbial Ecology.............................................3
BIO 4540 Plant Ecology.................................................4
; BIO 4850 Evolution.....................................................3
1 CEN 4600 Senior Seminar................................................3
CHE 4950 Senior Experience in Chemistry................................3
Y CHS 4850 Research Experience in Chicano Studies........................3
CJC 4650 Ethics for the Criminal Justice Professional..................3
COM 4410 Budgeting and Planning for Audio-Visual Productions...........3
COM 4790 Senior Seminar in Technical Communications....................3
CSI 4260 Software Engineering Practices................................4
ECO 4600 History of Economic Thought...................................3
EDS 4290 Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary................6, 8, 12
EDU 4190 Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary K-6........6, 8, 10, 12
EDU 4380 Teaching Practicum in Pre-primary Early Childhood Education. 3-6
EDU 4390 Student Teaching and Seminar-Early Childhood
(Preschool through Third grade).......................6, 8, 10
EDU 4690 Professional Practicum......................................1-6
EET 4100 Senior Project I..............................................1
EET 4110 Senior Project II.............................................2
ENG 4520 Advanced Writing..............................................3
ENG 4610 Theories and Techniques in Literary Criticism.................3
ENG 4640 Teaching English, 7-12........................................3
ENG 4660 Teaching Literature and Language K(6..........................3
FRE 4520 Modern French Theater.........................................3
FRE 4530 The French Novel..............................................3
GEG 4960 Global Environmental Challenges...............................3
GEL 4960 Environmental Field Studies...................................3
GER 4110 The German Novel of the 19th and Early 20th Centuries.........3
GER 4120 German Drama of the 19th and 20th Centuries...................3
HCM 4510 Health Care Management Practicum..............................6
HIS 4820 Senior Seminar................................................3
HMT 4040 Senior Hospitality Research Experience I......................2
HMT 4400 Senior Hospitality Research Experience II.....................2
HPS 4600 Organization, Administration of Human
Performance and Sports Programs.............................3
HPS 4870 Internship for Athletic Training.............................10
HPS 4880 Internship for Adult Fitness Major...........................10
HPS 4890 Internship for Human Performance.............................10
HSP 4790 Professional Internship......................................12
ITS 4960 Professional Industrial Internship............................4
JRN 4500 Ethical and Legal Issues in Journalism........................3
LES 4890 Internship for Leisure Studies...............................12
MET 4010 Advanced Manufacturing Technology.............................3
MET 4070 Computer-Aided Design.........................................3
MGT 4830mc Workforce Diversity...........................................3
MGT 4950 Strategic Management..........................................3
MTH4210 Probability Theory............................................4


MTH 4220 Stochastic Processes........................................ 4
MTH 4410 Advanced Calculus I..........................................4
MTH 4480 Numerical Analysis 1.........................................4
MUS 4110 Analysis of Music............................................2
MUS 4340 Secondary School Music Methods and Materials.................2
MUS 4390 Supervised Field Experience................................... 1
MUS 4510 Advanced Conducting..........................................2
MUS 4740 Performance VIII.............................................4
MUS 4790 Senior Recital...............................................1
MUS 4950 Senior Project...............................................3
NUR 4850 Nursing Process: Application.................................5
PHI 4100 Senior Seminar...............................................3
PHY 4620 Computational Physics II.....................................2
PHY 4721 Advanced Physics Laboratory II...............................2
PHY 4920 Physics Senior Seminar.......................................1
PSC 4020 Special Studies..............................................3
PSY 4510 History and Systems of Psychology............................3
RDG 4600 Practicum in Literacy Enhancement............................3
SOC 4600 Advanced Research in the Social Sciences.....................3
SOC 4710 Applied Sociology............................................3
SPA 4200 Spanish American Essay: 19th and 20th Centuries..............3
SPA 4310 History of the Spanish Language..............................3
SPE 4090 Classical Rhetoric...........................................3
SPE 4120 Freedom of Speech............................................3
SPE 4490 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life.............3
SWK 4810 Professional Internship II...................................5
WMS 4750 Senior Seminar...............................................3
me This course will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.
Assessment Examinations and Other Activities
In their senior year, students may be required to participate in an assessment of their general education. The faculty has determined educational goals or outcomes that it wants graduates to achieve. A copy of those goals and the methods by which their achievements are measured can be obtained from the department offices.


22 ADMISSIONS
: ADMISSIONS
: Admission Requirements
The college uses two categories for classifying applicants: those who are younger than 20 and those ; who are 20 or older. Based on the college's modified open admission system, each category has its own t admission requirements and procedures.
; Students maintain the status of continuing student while absent from the college for less than one year; I however, following two full semesters of absence, students should call the Registrar's Office to deter-; mine whether an updated application for re-admission will be required. For more information, see ; Admission of Previously Enrolled Students (page 24).
Applicants Younger Than 20
; Applicants who are younger than 20 on September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall semes-1 ter, or February 15 for the spring semester, will be classified as a traditional applicants. They will be
considered for admission using the requirements described below.
f Freshmen (first-time college students):
The college will admit students who are likely to complete successfully an academic program and who meet state requirements for the college as established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE).
Applicants who do not meet the stated admission requirements will be considered on an individual basis that includes a careful review of all credentials, including letters of recommendation and personal interview.
Applicants who have not graduated from high school but have received the Colorado General Educational Development (GED) certificate or its equivalent will be accepted. ACT or SAT test results are not required with a GED.
Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Admissions Office from the high school or testing agency:
=> ACT or SAT test results => high school grade point average => high school class rank
This information may be submitted at the end of the sixth, seventh, or eighth semester of high school, but no later than four weeks before the expected term of enrollment. An official transcript with date of graduation is required no later than the fourth week of the term of enrollment. Students should request and verify that the high school transcript with date of graduation has been mailed by the high school and has been received by the Admissions Office.
College Transfer:
The college will admit students who are most likely to complete successfully an academic program and who meet state requirements for the college as established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE).
Applicants who have less than a cumulative 2.0 grade point average from all colleges and universities attended will be considered on an individual basis that includes a careful review of all credentials, including letters of recommendation and a personal interview.
Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Admissions Office from the high school, testing agency, and/or college or university:
=> ACT or SAT test results => high school transcript
=> transcript from each college or university attended or currently attending => verification of enrollment if currently attending


2
These credentials should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes. All required credentials must be received before a final admission decision can be made.
Applicants 20 Years of Age or Older
Applicants who are 20 or older on September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall semester, or February 15 for the spring semester, will be considered for admission using the requirements described below for a first-time college student or a college transfer student:
Freshmen (first-time college students):
Applicants will be admitted to the college upon indicating on the application for admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have received a General Educational Development (GED) certificate.
By signing the application for admission, degree-seeking applicants are certifying that they will request either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test scores be sent to the Admissions Office. Degree-seeking students will not be permitted to register for a second semester until this credential is received.
By signing the application for admission, non-degree-seeking applicants understand that they do not have to submit credentials to continue at MSCD.
The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but is highly recommended for advising purposes. College Transfer:
Applicants will be admitted to the college, regardless of their cumulative college GPA, if they indicate on their application for admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have received a General Educational Development (GED) certificate.
By signing the application for admission, degree-seeking applicants are certifying that they will request that either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test scores be sent directly to the Admissions Office. In place of these credentials, college transfer students may have college transcripts that indicate at least 30 semester hours or 45 quarter hours of transferable "C" work sent directly to MSCD.
Degree-seeking transfer applicants are required to have all college and university transcripts on file to receive a transfer evaluation.
By signing the application for admission, non-degree-seeking applicants understand that they do not have to submit credentials to continue at the college.
Applicants who indicate on their application for admission that they are not seeking a degree from MSCD may change their status by completing a Change of Status Form and submitting all required transcripts to the Registrar's Office.
The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but is highly recommended for advising purposes.
Application Instructions
Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they are received each semester. All credentials received by the college become the property of MSCD and will not be returned to the student. It is the responsibility of the applicant to notify the Registrar's Office of any changes to the application for admission prior to the first day of classes. If changes are not reported to the Registrar's Office, the registration process could be delayed for subsequent semesters. Failure to report academic changes may result in rejection, dismissal, and/or loss of credit. International (visa) applicants are referred to the Admission of International Students section on page 25 in this Catalog.
To apply for admission:
Applications are available from The Metropolitan State College of Denver, Admissions Office, Campus Box 16, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, (303) 556-3058.
A $25 nonrefundable application fee ($40 for international applicants) is required with the application for admission. The application fee does not apply to tuition and fees. Re-admit applicants do not have to pay this fee.


24
; Submit a completed application and application fee directly to the Admissions Office. The
application and all required credentials (see Admission Requirements below) should be ; received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes.
It is the student's responsibility to request that all required credentials be mailed directly from
1 the issuing institution or agency to the Admissions Office. Hand-carried documents will not be
accepted.
Although an applicant's record may be summarized on one transcript, official transcripts from
; each institution are required.
The application for admission and all credentials received by the college will be kept on file
I for three semesters, after which time the file will no longer be maintained. Applicants wishing
' to attend MSCD must begin the admission process again.
: Admission of Previously Enrolled Students
I Former students or re-admit students are defined as individuals who have been accepted, have registered for a course, and have received a grade or grade notation at the college.
T Former students who have not been in attendance at MSCD for one or more years should adhere to the following procedures:
Submit a completed application for admission. Check the re-admission box on the top, right comer of the application. No application fee is required for re-admission.
To ensure processing, the application and any required credentials should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
Former students who have attended other collegiate institutions since last attending MSCD must follow the appropriate admission requirements for transfer students.
Former students who are returning after nine years of absence from the college are required to resubmit all credentials. Only non-degree-seeking MSCD graduates do not have to resubmit credentials.
Additional Admission Programs
Summer Semester Only
Applicants less than 20 years of age who have graduated from high school or have received a General Educational Development (GED) certificate and are applying for the summer semester and who do not wish to continue after the summer semester may be admitted under a provisional status and are not required to submit admission credentials. Please check the appropriate box under the MSCD Plans section on the application for admission. Applicants applying for the summer semester and who wish to continue for the fall or spring semester must meet stated admission requirements before the semester begins.
High School Concurrent Enrollment Programs (High School Students Only)
High School Student Education and Enrichment Program
The Student Education and Enrichment (SEE) program is The Metropolitan State College of Denver's High School Concurrent Enrollment Program for college-ready students. SEE is designed to supplement a student's existing education through early participation in college-level classes. This advanced program should not be interpreted as an alternative to high school completion but is, instead, a cooperative college/high school effort to provide educational enrichment and early college attendance to qualified high school students. Typically, the SEE student:
is currently registered in a Colorado high school
is maintaining a GPA of 3.0 or better
is preferably in the senior year of high school
can benefit from specialized or accelerated classes
has demonstrated the ability to do college-level work


2!
To apply for admission, the student must, in consultation with the appropriate high school authority, submit to the Admissions Office an admission application with the required $25 application fee accompanied by the following documents:
recommendation from a high school counselor or administrator stating how the student will benefit from early college attendance
written parental approval
official high school transcript
Upon receipt of these documents, the student's record is reviewed and the admission decision is made. However, if additional or supporting information is required, the student may be required to have an admission interview with an admissions counselor. The admission decision will be based on the student's academic preparation and past performance, recommendation of the high school official, and the student's personal motivation and readiness for a traditional college experience.
Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program
The Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program (PSEOP) is a sponsorship program enacted by state law in 1988 that provides juniors and seniors in high school younger than 22 the opportunity to take college classes for both high school and college credit. The program is intended to provide high school students with an optional learning environment.
Under the terms of the program, the high school district agrees to pay for college tuition and the student is then responsible for college fees and books. Counseling offices in Colorado high schools are provided with PSEOP application packets that include instruction sheets, application forms, and billing authorization forms. Application deadlines are scheduled 45 days prior to the first day of classes every fall and spring semester. Specific deadlines and further information relative to this program and the application process may be obtained by calling the Admissions Office at (303) 556-3058.
Metro-Meritls
Individuals 60 or older, who do not wish to earn credit, are invited to attend tuition-free classes of their choice on a space-available basis. Metro-Meritus is designed to give special encouragement and assistance to retired citizens to continue their personal educational growth in a stimulating and friendly campus setting. For information and to enroll call the Office of Adult Learning Services at (303) 556-8342.
Admission of International Students
All students who declare a country of citizenship other than the U.S. on their applications for admission must contact the Registrar's Office.
Admission of U.S. permanent residents (or refugees, political parolees, and political asylum cases, etc.) and students on temporary visas other than F-l or J1:
=> Official transcripts including secondary level education should be submitted four weeks prior to the beginning of the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
=> Applicants may be required to pass an English proficiency examination.
=> Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
Admission of applicants on student (F-l or Jl) visas:
Applicants should submit an International Student Application for Admission and other required documentation. Students who are academically admissible and have met the minimum English proficiency and financial support requirements, will be issued the U.S. Immigration Form 1-20. Questions regarding the admission of students from abroad or permanent residents should be directed to the Registrars Office.


26
: ENROLLMENT
Reading, Writing and Mathematics Placement Examinations
All first-time college students are required to take a series of three exams before registering for their ; first-semester classes. The exams measure college entry-level skills in reading, writing, and mathemat-
ics, and the scores are used to help advisers and students select appropriate courses. For additional infor-
mation call (303) 556-3677
Orientation
New Student Orientation offers a mandatory orientation program for all first-time college students and
; transfer students under 20. Transfer students 20 and older, as well as parents and non-degree seeking
I students, are welcome at orientation sessions. More than 100 sessions per year are offered, catering to
; the specific needs of first-time college students, transfer students, women, and parents of traditional age
freshmen. Sessions are scheduled on different days and at various times to accommodate the needs of | our diverse commuter populations. Sessions are also offered at the North and South campuses to pro-
; vide further flexibility. Orientation sessions cover a variety of topics including degree planning, acade-
mic concerns, students' rights and responsibilities, student support programs, commuter issues and an y opportunity to ask and discuss individual questions. Students are provided with a packet of valuable
information which includes a catalog, student handbook, general requirements brochure and brochures from many of the student support programs and services. Orientation is invaluable in laying a solid foundation for students' future academic success. Approximately 4,000 students and parents are served by this program each year. For further information see the Class Schedule or call 556-6168.
Academic Advising
All first-time-to-college students, initial transfer students, and students undecided about their majors are required to seek academic advising in the Academic Advising Center in order to register for classes. All students are encouraged to take advantage of advising services, which include: course scheduling; assistance in choosing a major; and ongoing developmental advising. Students who have decided on a major should meet with an adviser in their major department to plan their academic program and receive current materials. For additional information call (303) 556-3680.
Transfer Credit Evaluation
Once all final official transcripts for degree-seeking students are received by the Registrar's Office, the evaluation process begins. Within approximately four weeks, students receive two copies of the transfer credit evaluation, one of which is taken to the major and minor departments for advice on how credits might apply to their programs.
Transfer credits will be accepted under the following guidelines:
Credit must have been earned at an institution of higher education holding full regional accreditation.
Grades earned must be "A," "B," "C," or equivalent. Courses with "D," "F," or similar grades will not be accepted in transfer. A summary of transfer credit from each institution will be indicated on the MSCD academic record. Neither transfer course grades nor previous grade point averages will be indicated or affect the MSCD grade point average.
Course content should be similar to those courses offered at MSCD.
A maximum of 64 semester hours from two-year institutions will be accepted and applied toward a MSCD degree. A maximum of 90 semester hours of credit will be given for acceptable work completed at a four-year institution or a combination of two- and four-year institutions.
Transferable courses are accepted at the same level, i.e., lower-division or upper-division, at which they were offered at the previous institution. For example, all transferred community college courses will apply to the MSCD degree as lower-division credit.
Students who have earned an A.A. or A.S. degree will receive junior standing at MSCD, provided all courses included in the degree carry a grade of "C" or better and, based on the course-by-course evaluation, otherwise meet minimum MSCD transfer credit standards. Students may


need to complete additional MSCD lower-division requirements.
Applicants having completed the Colorado community college core curriculum, as certified on their community college transcript, are considered to have satisfied The Metropolitan State College of Denver's minimum General Studies requirements. However, additional specific lower-division courses may be required for certain degree programs.
Once transfer credits are evaluated, the total number of these credits applicable to a degree will not be reduced unless the student repeats already-awarded transfer credit at MSCD, or interrupts MSCD enrollment for three or more consecutive semesters and re-admits to the college under more restrictive transfer credit evaluation policies.
In accordance with policies established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education to address student disputes regarding student transfer between Colorado public institutions, MSCD has instituted procedures for resolving transfer credit disputes. These procedures are available from a transfer evaluator in the Registrar's Office.
Transfer Center
The Transfer Center offers assistance to students transferring from other institutions. Specific services include preliminary transcript evaluation, educational planning, transition to academic departments, and resolution of transfer problems. Transfer counselors are available by appointments and for walk-ins; evening appointments are available. The Transfer Center works closely with Transcript Evaluation to provide students information about their transfer credits and how those credits may be applied.
Questions pertaining to transfer credit evaluation should be referred to the Office of Admissions, Central Classroom Building, room 120, (303) 556-3069.
REGISTRATION
All continuing students in good standing at the college are eligible to register each semester.
Students are responsible for ensuring that there is a correct and up-to-date address on file with the college. Address changes may be made with the Registrar's Office.
A student may register for classes in several ways. Information on the registration procedure and registration dates is published in the Class Schedule, which is mailed to all continuing students.
Concurrent Enrollment
Students who find it necessary to be registered at MSCD and another college at the same time should check with MSCD advisers concerning the acceptance and application of transfer credits. Failure to do so may result in denial of transfer credit. Students concurrently enrolled are affected by the academic policies of MSCD, including the MSCD course load policy.
Interinstitutional Registration
Students enrolled at MSCD may register for courses at Arapahoe Community College, Community College of Denver, and Red Rocks Community College. Courses taken at these institutions in no way alter existing MSCD degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requirements subject to specific approval by MSCD. Students should be aware that courses taken interinstitutionally will be counted as part of the 64 semester hours from community colleges applicable to a MSCD degree. Interinstitutional credits will not satisfy academic residence requirements at MSCD. In the event a conflict arises between the policies/procedures of MSCD and one of the colleges listed above, the most restrictive policy prevails. Students are advised to confer with department chairs and/or coordinators of academic advising before registering interinstitutionally.
Enrollment Status
The enrollment status of the student at the host institution is determined by the student's status at the home institution (institution where the student is seeking a degree). Students should ascertain before enrolling at an institution that desired courses will satisfy degree requirements at the home institution.
Adams State College, Mesa State College, and Western State College together with MSCD form a system of state colleges. Each member institution can provide any student in good standing with the mate-


28
; rials needed to enroll temporarily in any other member institution without incurring additional matric-I ulation costs. Information concerning tuition is available at the host institution. The process of enrolling ; as a system student should begin at least one month prior to the beginning of the registration period at I the host institution.
Information concerning current procedures for enrolling for courses at these other institutions is avail-
able from the Registrar's Office.
| Course Audit Policy
Students may audit a class with the permission of the instructor and if seating is available. Academic
; credit is not awarded for an audited course. The cost for auditing a course is based on regular tuition as
published in the current Class Schedule. Audit approval forms are available in departmental offices.
: Changes in Registration
I Enrolled students may adjust schedules by dropping and/or adding classes. See the current Class Sched-I ule for complete information concerning dropping and/or adding classes and the tuition and fee refund ; schedule.
jf Students who reduce their course load after the fourth week of classes and before the beginning of the fifth week will receive an "NC" notation for each course they have dropped and a refund, if applicable. A NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Registrar's Office.
Students reducing their course load between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of classes during fall and spring semesters may receive an "NC" notation for each course, provided faculty approval is granted. Additional restrictions regarding assigning the "NC" notation may be set by each school, department, and/or faculty member for the period between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of the semester (or proportional time frame). Students are advised to seek faculty signatures well before the deadline. A NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Registrar's Office. See the sections on grades, notations, course load, and class attendance in this Catalog.
Proportional time frames are applied for modular course, workshops, and summer terms. Procedures for adding or dropping a modular course after the course has begun are described in the current Class Schedule.
TUITION AND FEES Tuition Classification
A student is classified as an in-state or out-of-state student for tuition purposes at the time of admission. This classification is based upon information supplied by the student on the application for admission and is made in accordance with the Colorado Tuition Classification Law, CRS S23-7-101 et seq. (1973), as amended. Once determined, a student's tuition classification status remains unchanged unless satisfactory evidence that a change should be made is presented. A Petition for In-State Tuition Classification Form and the evidence requested should be submitted to the Registrar's Office if a student believes she or he is entitled to in-state status.
The tuition classification statute requires that in order to qualify for in-state status, a student (or the parents or legal guardian of the student in the case of students under 22 years of age who are not emancipated), must have been domiciled in Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the first day of the semester for which such classification is sought.
Domicile for tuition purposes requires two inseparable elements: (1) a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado with no intent to be domiciled elsewhere. Some examples of connections with the state that provide objective evidence of intent are: (1) payment of Colorado state income tax as a Colorado resident, (2) permanent employment in Colorado, (3) ownership of residential real property in Colorado, (4) compliance with laws imposing a mandatory duty on any domiciliary of the state, such as the drivers' license law and the vehicle registration law, and (5) registration to vote. Other factors peculiar to the individual can also be used to demonstrate the requisite intent.
Any questions regarding the tuition classification law should be directed to an admissions officer at the college. In order to qualify for in-state status for a particular semester, the student must prove that domicile began not later than one year prior to the first day of classes for that semester. The dates for qualifying and for submitting petitions are published in the Class Schedule each semester.


Tuition and College Service Fees
The Board of Trustees of The State Colleges in Colorado, the governing board of the college, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees for any semester without notice.
Tuition and college service fees are determined by the trustees shortly before the beginning of each academic year. Information regarding tuition and fees is published in the current Class Schedule. Tuition and fees are payable at the time of registration.
Standard Fees
An application fee is required of all applicants for admission to the college. This fee is nonrefundable and will not be applied to tuition.
Application fee..............................................................$25
International student application fee........................................$40
Matriculation fee............................................................$25
Special fees
Returned check charge........................................................$17
Tuition Adjustments
Please see the Class Schedule for the current semester.
Student Health Insurance
All full-time students* are required to participate in the college-sponsored student health insurance coverage unless proof can be provided that a student has comparable and valid outside health insurance coverage.**
Full-time students are automatically billed for student health insurance on their tuition bill under the insurance heading. Students who have outside insurance coverage are responsible for completing a waiver form by the deadline indicated in each semesters Class Schedule in order to have the insurance charge removed from their tuition bill (deadline changes from semester to semester). Waiver forms will not be accepted after the deadline listed in each semester's Class Schedule. It is the student's responsibility to become familiar with the college's policies and to adhere to the deadlines listed. No refunds will occur after the waiver deadline. Waiver forms and insurance brochures are available at either the Student Health Insurance Office located in the Student Health Center (PL 150) or the Student Accounts Office (CN 110).
Health insurance waiver forms are valid for only one year. Continuing students must complete a waiver form ANNUALLY prior to each fall semester. Students with a break in academic enrollment, and those who begin classes in the spring or summer, must complete a waiver form by the appropriate deadline (listed in the Class Schedule) for the semester they enroll and every fall semester thereafter. Waiver form information will be mailed to the home address of all full-time students prior to the semester of enrollment. A waiver form is also included in the back of the Class Schedule.
Students who request a waiver form to provide proof of valid outside health insurance must:
Complete the student health insurance waiver form.
Attach a copy of a valid health insurance card to the back of the waiver form. Students who have valid outside insurance but have not been issued an insurance card must include the main policy holder's name, the insurance company's name, and the name and phone number of a contact person or the appropriate department at the insurance company that can verify current health insurance coverage.
Submit the waiver form by the deadline indicated in each semester's Class Schedule (deadline changes from semester to semester).
Note: Students who have not been issued a health insurance card by their insurance company are required to pay for the student health insurance when they pay their tuition and fees. Once outside health coverage is verified, the insurance fee will be refunded to the student. The time it takes to verify coverage varies, depending on processing demands and insurance carrier responsiveness.
All covered services at the Student Health Center are paid at 100 percent with no payment at the time of


30
; service, no deductible, and no need for claim forms. The pre-existing condition exclusion clause is waived for services performed. Please see the current Student Health Insurance Brochure for a summary of the ; plan benefits, requirements, and exclusions. Brochures can be obtained at the Student Health Center.
; Dependents of a student participating in the student health insurance program are also eligible for optional ; insurance coverage. However, dependents are not eligible to use the Student Health Center for their med-I ical care. In addition, students enrolled during the spring semester are given the option of purchasing sum-
; mer health insurance without attending classes, provided that payment is received by the deadline listed in
' the summer Class Schedule. This option also applies to seniors who graduate in the spring. Students with
questions regarding student health insurance should contact the Student Insurance Office.
*For insurance purposes, at least 10 credit hours is considered full-time for fall and spring semesters, ; and eight credit hours is considered full-time during the summer semester.
. **lndividual insurance plans that are not required to meet state and federal benefit mandates are not
considered comparable and consequently will not be considered proof of comparable coverage. As of
May 1, 1997, it is anticipated that in the fall semester of 1998 the "Colorado Resident Discount Pro-
; gram" will NOT be accepted as proof of comparable outside health insurance coverage for waiver pur-
I poses. This special program is not considered health insurance and was not designed by the state leg-y islature for this purpose.
Student Health Insurance
Voluntary Program for Part-Time Students
Based on the mandatory insurance requirement which the college has adopted, the Student Insurance Carrier has permitted the college to offer the following Voluntary Health Insurance Program to part-time students. This program is exclusively for part-time students taking 6-9 credit hours in the fall and/or spring semester(s) and 6-7 credit hours during the summer semester. Students taking more or less credit hours than indicated above are NOT eligible for this voluntary program.
The Voluntary Plan has the same deadlines (as listed in the Class Schedule), plan design, cost and benefit levels as does the mandatory insurance plan referenced in the previous section. Part-time students interested in the voluntary option should contact the Student Insurance Office at 556-3873 for application details.
Student Dental Insurance
Voluntary Program for all Students
Voluntary Dental Insurance is available to all students taking one credit hour or more. Information and application forms can be obtained at the Student Insurance Office in the Student Health Center (PL 150).


FINANCIAL AID 3
FINANCIAL AID
The MSCD financial aid program provides assistance and advice to students who would be unable to pursue their education at the college without such help. Scholarships, grants, loans, and part-time employment are available singly or in various combinations to meet the difference between what the student and the student's family could reasonably be expected to provide and the expected cost of attending MSCD.
Estimated Expenses
The 1997-98 academic year expenses are as follows:
Resident Nonresident
Tuition and Fees ....$2,690 $7,680
Room and Board 6,895 6,895
Books and Supplies., 650 650
Transportation 1080 1080
Miscellaneous 1,260 1,260
$12,575 $17,565
Tuition and fees are set by The State Colleges in Colorado and are subject to change without notice. All students are placed on a single-person budget. Additional allowances are made for students with day-care costs for dependent children and for expenses related to disabilities not paid by another agency (P.L. 99-498).
Eligibility and Need
To qualify for financial aid, a student must be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen, be registered with Selective Service (if required), have financial need, be degree-, certificate- or licensure-seeking, be making satisfactory academic progress, and not be in default on a federal education loan or owe a repayment on a federal grant.
Application Procedures
Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year to determine financial aid eligibility. Returning MSCD students may request application forms from the Office of Financial Aid. Transfer students can obtain application forms from their current college or university. Entering college freshmen should obtain application forms from their high schools or from the MSCD Office of Financial Aid. Some returning students will receive a Renewal Application directly from the federal government and that should be completed and mailed in place of a new FAFSA. Students should mail forms as early as possible, preferably no later than mid-February, in order to meet the priority deadline of March 1. Transferring applicants must supply the MSCD Office of Financial Aid with financial aid transcripts from all schools previously attended. Detailed information concerning application procedures is provided in the Financial Aid Handbook available in the MSCD Office of Financial Aid.
Financial Aid Programs
The amount of funds made available to students depends on the maximum award allowed by regulation of each program, the student's established financial need, duration of the student's enrollment, and funds allocated to the college by the state and federal governments.
Grants
Grants are gift money from the federal or state government and do not have to be repaid.
Federal Pell Grants are federal funds and may be awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a bachelor's degree and who are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens. The amount of the award is based on each student's financial eligibility and the number of hours for which the student is enrolled. The amount of Federal Pell grant awards for the 1997(98 academic year will range from $400 to $2,700 for those students who qualify. Full-time, half-time, or less than half-time students may qualify for a Federal Pell Grant.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are federal funds awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a bachelor's degree and are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens. This grant is awarded to students who demonstrate exceptional need. The amount of FSEOG awards ranges from $100 to $1,000.


32 FINANCIAL AID
Colorado State Grants (CSG) are state funds awarded to Colorado residents with eligibility determined by the Office of Financial Aid. Eligible students have no prior bachelor's degree, are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens, and are enrolled either full- or part-time at MSCD. The amount of the CSG award ranges from $50 to $2,000. CSG funds are available to part-time students who demonstrate need and are enrolled a minimum of six hours.
Colorado Student Incentive Grants (CSIG) are a combination of federal and state funds awarded by the same criteria as CSG. Students must be enrolled full-time to receive CSIG funds.
Scholarships
Students must be enrolled at least half-time, be degree-, certificate- or licensure-seeking, be making satisfactory academic progress, and not be in default on a federal education loan or owe a repayment on a federal grant to receive a scholarship.
Presidential Scholarships: These scholarships include four-year scholarships for entering high school students and two-year scholarships for transfer students. This scholarship covers the cost of tuition and mandatory fees per semester.
Colorado Scholarships: Scholarships of up to $500 per semester, not exceeding the cost of resident tuition and mandatory fees per academic year, are available through the academic departments. Recipients must be Colorado residents. Interested students should contact their departments for applications.
Athletic Scholarships: MSCD has a limited number of athletic scholarships. Applications and additional information are available from the MSCD Intercollegiate Athletics Office.
Private Scholarships: Students should refer to the MSCD Scholarship Guide for information about some of the scholarships and the free on-line scholarship search.
Receipt of a scholarship may affect a student's financial aid award because students receiving federal and/or state aid are limited in the maximum amount of aid which can be received. A student whose full need has been met by other types of financial aid prior to receipt of a scholarship will have that aid reduced by the amount of the scholarship. If the student's full eligibility has not been met, the scholarship will be allowed to satisfy the unmet need. Each student's situation is treated individually. All scholarships are based on the students continued eligibility and available funding.
Loans
Federal Perkins Loans are long-term federal loans which are awarded based on the student's need and MSCD's available funds. Federal Perkins Loan awards can range from $100 to $3,000. Repayment of the loan begins nine months after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled at least half-time in school. The interest rate is 5 percent and interest begins to accrue at repayment. All first-time borrowers at MSCD are required to attend a Perkins Loan Entrance Interview before loan funds can be released to them.
Family Education Loans Federal Family Education Loans (FFEL) include Federal Stafford Loans, unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans, and Federal PLUS Loans, which help students and/or their parents to borrow funds to help meet educational expenses. To borrow these funds, students and/or their parents must complete, in addition to the FAFSA, a separate lender application to the Office of Financial Aid. Loan applications may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid or the lender of the student's choice. Students must be enrolled at least half-time and be degree-, certificate- or licensure-seeking. Interest rates vary depending on the type of loan and the date the student borrows the first Federal Family Education Loan. For further information on interest rates, check with the Office of Financial Aid or the lender. First time borrowers are required to attend a Loan Entrance Interview before loans funds can be released to them.
Federal Stafford Loans: Eligibility for the Federal Stafford Loan is based on the student's need as determined by the Office of Financial Aid. The annual loan limits are $2,625 for freshmen, $3,500 for sophomores, and $5,500 for all other undergraduates. Interest does not begin to accrue until six months after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled in school at least half-time.
Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans: This loan has many of the same terms and conditions as the Federal Stafford Loan. The main difference is that the students are responsible for the interest that accrues while they are in school and during the six-month grace period after they graduates or cease to


FINANCIAL AID 3:
be enrolled in school at least half-time. Students who do not qualify for a Federal Stafford Loan, based on need, may qualify for the unsubsidized Stafford Loan. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for information concerning annual loan limits.
Federal Plus Loans: These loans are available to parents of dependent students. Applications are available from MSCD or from lenders that participate in the program. Applications must first be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid for processing. At MSCD, parents of dependent students may borrow per year up to the cost of education minus the amount of financial aid received by the student from other sources.
Please refer to the Financial Aid Handbook for more detailed information regarding educational loans.
College Work-Study
The State of Colorado, the federal government, and MSCD provide part-time employment programs for students. Work-study awards range from $2000 to $5,000 per fiscal year. The average award is $ 1,250/semester. The maximum hours a student may work is 30 hours per week while classes are in session, and 40 hours per week between semesters. The majority of all work-study awards are need-based. Flowever, there are a limited number of positions offered directly through various depart-ments/offices on campus that are no-need awards.
The Financial Aid Package
Once student eligibility is determined, an aid package is developed based on the availability of funds and the eligibility of the applicant. To facilitate financial aid packaging requirements, applicants must obtain all requested information and forms from designated sources and submit them before the established deadline.
Award Notification
After the Office of Financial Aid has determined the type and amount of aid for which a student qualifies (aid package), the student is mailed an Award Notification. The Award Notification and enclosed information stipulate the conditions of each award.
Disbursement Procedures:
Grants, Scholarships and Student Loans: All financial aid awards (with the exception of out-of-state loan checks, consortium checks and some scholarship funds) are disbursed into the student's account by the Office of Financial Aid. Once this money has disbursed into the student's account and the tuition and fees bill has been paid, the Business Office will issue the student a refund check for any remaining balance. The balance from the student's financial aid award (student's refund check) can be used to purchase books, pay rent, buy food, etc.
Parent Loans: Federal PLUS checks are mailed from lenders to MSCD's Office of Financial Aid. Eligibility is verified and then the check is mailed to the parent borrower.
Work Study: Work-study earnings are paid monthly and are treated as wages earned. Outstanding balances owed to MSCD are not deducted from these earnings; however, students are strongly advised to pay any outstanding balance as soon as a work-study check is received.
All other aid is disbursed to the student's account. MSCD's Business Office deducts any outstanding balance owed, including current tuition and fees, and issues a check for the remaining funds. This check is either mailed to the student or the student can pick it up at the cashiers window.
Repayment Policy
Students who receive financial aid and withdraw from MSCD prior to completion of a term will be required to repay a portion of financial aid and scholarships. All required financial aid repayments must be made to MSCD before the end of the current academic year or before additional Title IV funds can be disbursed to the student, whichever occurs first. Repayment is made to the MSCD Business Office.
Financial Aid as a Form of Payment
Students may use expected financial aid awards to defer payment of current tuition and fees beyond the published payment deadline. Review the current Class Schedule for more detailed information.


34 SPECIAL PROGRAMS
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Child Development Center
The Child Development Center provides exemplary, on-campus children's programs. During the fall and spring semesters, the center offers pre-school programs; in the summer it provides a Summer Enrichment Program for elementary age children. Available to the Auraria campus and to the Denver community, these programs are part of the college's teacher education program.
The classrooms are under the direction of master teachers who are trained and experienced in either early childhood or elementary education. The master teachers plan an age-appropriate program to provide quality learning experiences that meet the developmental needs of the children. MSCD teacher education students also work in the classroom providing a high adult/child ratio with opportunities for small groups and individual attention.
The preschool program is accredited by the National Academy for Early Childhood Education. There are two preschool classes available: 8:30-11 :30 a.m. for children 2 1/2 to 4 years old and 12:30-3:30 p.m. for children 4 to 6 years old. There is also one hour of child care available before and after each preschool class.
The Summer Enrichment Program is academic in content, but recognizes childrens needs for fun and different learning experiences in summer. There are two classrooms: one for children entering kindergarten or first grade in the fall and one for children entering second or third grade in the fall. There is a Day Program from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and an Extended Program from 7 to 9 a.m. and from 3:30 to 6 p.m. Call (303) 556-2759 for more information.
The First-Year Program
The First-Year Program is designed to unify and coordinate college efforts to help entering students achieve a successful first year. The program provides intensive advising, course selection guidance, and academic monitoring throughout the first year, as well as coordinating academic support services for first year students. Additionally, the program offers a First-Year Seminar course, XXX 1190, which provides appropriate readings and written work enabling students to discuss and write about current issues including the value of higher education. All first-time MSCD students may enroll in the First-Year Seminar course and other appropriate courses as determined by assessment at entry. The program furnishes an environment where problem solving, creativity, and peer interaction are encouraged. For additional information call (303) 556-8447.
Health Careers Science Program
The Health Careers Science Program is designed to encourage women and ethnic minority groups who have traditionally been excluded from careers in science and technology. Students are provided with tutoring and other support to ensure their success in the science and technology areas. For more information call (303) 556-3215.
High School Upward Bound
This program is designed to generate the skills and motivation necessary for success in and beyond high school for youths who are low-income and first-generation college-bound students. The program provides intensive academic instruction during the school year, as well as a six-week summer session. Basic academic skill preparation in reading, writing, and mathematics is part of a comprehensive counseling and enrichment program. This program develops creative thinking, effective expression, and positive attitudes toward learning. The students are recruited at the beginning of their sophomore year in high school from five target-area high schools located in Denver County (East, Lincoln, Manual, North, and West High Schools).
The Honors Program
The Honors Program provides an intense, interdisciplinary academic program for highly motivated students whose capabilities suggest a broader spectrum of needs and interests. The program encourages individuality by responding to the diverse educational needs of students. Its integrated approach strengthens the programs foundation and provides a cross section of thought-provoking perspectives. Honors students realize their learning potential through creative inquiry, independent thought, and crit-


SPECIAL PROGRAMS 3
ical examination. Honors professors serve as mentors to guide students in fulfilling their intellectual pursuits and dreams. Finally, while the Honors Program encourages independent thought and individuality, it also inspires students to work together, forming a community of scholars who learn from one another. Classes are generally small to ensure the exchange of knowledge and philosophies.
Available to students are both the honors core and a number of departmental honors courses. There are three Honors Awards available: Junior Honors Award (15 semester hours); Senior Honors Award (15 semester hours that include a thesis or senior seminar); and an Honors Program designation on the diploma (27 semester hours).
An Honors application form may be obtained from the Honors Program director. In addition to the application form, an interview by the Honors Council is required of prospective honors students. It is highly recommended that all Honors Program applications be completed by mid-July. Furthermore, there are a number of Colorado scholarships available. Additional information on the Honors Program is available by calling (303) 556-4865, or by inquiring in Central Classroom Building, room 101B. The Honors Program director reports to the Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs for Curriculum and Programs.
Required Honors Core Semester Hours
HON 2750 The Legacy of Arts and Letters I*...........................3
HON 2760 The Legacy of Arts and Letters II*..........................3
HON 2950 The Art of Critical Thinking*..............................3
HON 3800 Revolutions and Social Change I*............................3
HON 3810 Revolutions and Social Change II*...........................3
HON 3850 American Culture I*.........................................3
HON 3860 American Culture II*........................................3
HON 4920 Senior Honors Seminar.......................................3
HON 4950 Senior Honors Thesis..................................... 3
Total Hours for Honors Core.........................................27
* Approved General Studies courses.
Education Abroad
Language and Culture Institute
The Language and Culture Institute was established in 1976 to organize study and travel abroad. The institute currently operates a summer program in Mexico, a summer intensive language institute in Germany, and a winter study and travel program in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and in Central America. The institute offers credit through the Modem Languages Department and the Institute for International and Intercultural Education.
Study-Abroad Trips
Short-term, study-abroad experiences during the summer are offered each year. These trips are always led by a full-time professor and are usually for two to four weeks in length. Academic credit is normally available. In past summers, study-abroad trips have been made to China, Egypt, England, France, Israel, Italy, Mexico, Peru, Russia, Spain, and West Africa. Contact the coordinator of International Studies at (303) 556-3173 for information about forthcoming trips.
Semester-Abroad Programs
Two semester-abroad programs, in London, England, and in Guadalajara, Mexico, operate each year. Students who are in good academic standing and believe they could benefit from a semester of study in England or Mexico should contact the coordinator of International Studies at (303) 556-3173.
Veterans Upward Bound
Veterans Upward Bound is a federally funded program designed to identify, recruit, and motivate veterans to pursue their personal career goals through higher education.
Veterans Upward Bound provides refresher courses and tutorial help so that survival in academic or vocational/technical programs is maximized. This is accomplished during a 12-week semester. Ancillary services such as career counseling, financial aid advisement, college counseling, and job placement are also provided for participants.


36
: ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS
: Credit for Prior Learning Options
; Successful completion of special examinations, completion of a prior learning portfolio, or assessment I of nonaccredited training programs through published guides, may be used to award credit or may per-; mit placement in advanced courses. A student may earn up to 60 semester hours of credit toward degree requirements using prior learning credit options. This type of approved credit will be posted to the stu- dent's record after the completion of 8 semester hours of classroom (resident) credit. Prior learning ; credit may not be used toward the last 12 semester hours of a degree program, does not substitute for 1 residency requirements, and cannot be used to challenge prerequisite courses for courses already com-; pleted. Students are advised that letter grades are not assigned for such credit, and some institutions ; may not accept transfer credits that do not include letter grades.
Advanced Placement Examinations
; Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and ; who have passed appropriate advanced placement examinations conducted by the College Entrance 1 Examination Board, may have official AP scores submitted directly to the Registrars Office for con-T sideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate department chair, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted.
International Baccalaureate
MSCD recognizes the greater potential for success of international baccalaureate students. Accordingly, academic departments may award credit for demonstrated proficiency on a case-by-case basis. Students who have international baccalaureate results at the higher level may have an official transcript sent directly to the Registrar's Office for consideration for college credit.
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
For the past 20 years, the College Board has offered CLEP, a program of examinations designed to evaluate nonaccredited college-level learning in order to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge. CLEP consists of two series of examinations: the general examinations and the subject examinations.
The general examination series includes five separate examinations covering the areas of English composition, humanities, natural sciences, mathematics, and social science/history. Based on the results of these examinations, the college may award up to a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit in the freshman General Studies requirement areas. Thus, the successful student may test out of many of the traditional courses required during the freshman year. MSCD does not allow CLEP credit for ENG 1020, the Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, and Documentation course.
The subject examination series consists of more than 45 examinations that apply to specific college courses. MSCD allows credit for 15 of these examinations. Thirty semester hours of credit also may be awarded under this series, making a total of 60 semester hours of credit obtainable under a combination of the two series of examinations.
Credit obtained under CLEP at another institution will be re-evaluated according to MSCD CLEP policies.
Contact the coordinator at (303) 556-3677 for complete information about this program before registering to take any of these exams.
Attainment Examinations
Any student may take attainment examinations in certain departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation, entitles students to substitute their own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the course.
Departmental Course Examinations
In special cases, a department may grant students credit toward graduation for college courses in which they request and pass special college examinations. Under this provision, a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be awarded by the college. A fee of $15 per semester credit hour will be charged.


3
Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a regular course offered by the college (omnibus-numbered courses are excluded). The credit granted will be for the corresponding course, provided the student has no previous collegiate enrollment for a similar course and the credit is applicable toward the student's graduation requirements. Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department chair no later than the third week of classes in a semester. Permission for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recommendation of the department chair.
No application for credit by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degree-seeking curriculum in the college. Credit by examination will not be approved for a student who is within 12 classroom semester hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for a course in which a student has been officially enrolled at MSCD or at another institution, whether or not the course has been completed and a grade awarded. Credit by examination cannot be obtained for college courses attended as a listener, visitor, or auditor.
If a student has completed a more advanced course than the course for which examination credit is desired, permission to take the exam will be granted if approved by the appropriate department chair and dean. If a student has already completed a sequence of courses, no examination credit can be given for courses lower in number than the highest-numbered course taken by the student. If a student has registered for a higher-numbered course in a sequence, the exam for the lower-numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester. Exceptions must be appealed to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions following endorsement of the department chair or dean. Examinations cannot be taken to raise grades, to remove failures, or to remove "NC," "SP," or "I" notations. Credit by examination is not applicable toward academic residence requirements.
Examination for credit will be taken at a time specified by the department after the special examination fee has been paid. No examination for credit in a college course may be repeated. A grade equivalent to "A" or "B" must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credit so earned for the course will be recorded without grade reference on the student's permanent record. Credits in courses for which credit is earned by examination are not considered in computing college grade point averages. Credit by examination will be posted after a student has completed 8 semester hours of credit at MSCD and after an evaluation of all possible transfer credits has been completed.
Portfolio Assessment
Students may apply for credit for college-level learning gained through experience by preparing and submitting a prior learning portfolio. Credit is awarded on the basis of a careful assessment of the prior learning portfolio by faculty in the department from which credit is sought. Portfolio assessment is available in many, but not all, academic departments.
The portfolio is developed with the assistance of the Office of Adult Learning Services. Portfolio assessment may be used to apply for credit for specific courses listed in the Catalog', credit is not available for courses which are considered omnibus courses. Applicants for credit through portfolio assessment will generally be required to take EDS 2680-1, The Portfolio Development Workshop.
A fee of one-half the part-time student tuition is charged for credit awarded through portfolio assessment; $40 of the total fee is due prior to the assessment of the portfolio by faculty. The remainder of the fee is due if and when credit is awarded. Policies which govern credit for prior learning options apply to credit awarded through the portfolio process.
Contact the Office of Adult Learning Services for assistance and further information at (303) 556-8342. Information sessions about portfolio assessment and other credit for prior learning options are held on a regular basis by the Office of Adult Learning Services.
Credit for Military Training and Other Training Programs
Military training and other training programs that have been assessed for college credit by the American Council on Education will be evaluated by the Registrar's Office for transfer credit at MSCD. For formal military training, copies of training certificates and a copy of the DD-214 should be submitted to the Registrar's Office. For other training, official ACE transcripts should be submitted. Credit limit is 30 semester hours.


38 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
The Cooperative Education Internship Center places students in work experiences related to their academic major. The purpose of the internships is to integrate academic training with actual work experience. This combination allows students to make realistic career decisions, gain valuable work experience, obtain recommendations for graduate school, and earn money to help defray college expenses.
Students work in large corporations, small businesses, government, and nonprofit agencies throughout the metropolitan area. Most co-op students are paid by their employers, but in those professional fields where co-op salaries are not available, volunteer internship placements are offered to help students gain essential work experience.
Co-op internship placements are available in most academic majors and minors. Students must complete 30 semester hours of college coursework with a minimum 2.50 GPA and have a declared major to be eligible for registration with co-op. No fees are charged to the student or employer for participation in the program, and each student's interests and job requirements are discussed individually with a professional coordinator.
Students may choose from three different work schedules based on the academic calendar. The alternating plan provides full-time periods of work every other semester with intervening semesters spent in full-time study. The parallel schedule places students in a job while they simultaneously attend school. These positions are usually part-time. The short term/summer plan allows students to elect a work experience that lasts for no more than one semester.
The college awards academic credit for supervised cooperative education placements. Students must complete a credit application, available from the co-op office, and this application must be approved by a faculty member from the department in which credit is to be granted. No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward MSCD degree requirements. Credit earned for the co-op education work experiences are not applicable toward General Studies requirements. Additional departmental restrictions may apply to certain majors.
Service-Learning
The Service-Learning Program combines classroom experience with service to the metropolitan community. Participating students receive credit for appropriate public service, which is beneficial to the community and expands student horizons in intellectually and personally meaningful ways.
Emerging from a wide variety of disciplines, service-learning courses are structured by faculty to weave service into community-based and government agencies, with classroom reflection and analysis of the learning offered through these experiences. The courses are also designed to address real needs in our multicultural world, such as homelessness, at-risk youth, domestic violence, the environment, culture and the arts, and mental illness. Agencies that have provided service opportunities include Fort Logan Mental Health Center, the Denver Commission on Aging, Big Sisters, the Colorado Historical Society, the Rape Assistance and Awareness program, and numerous elementary and high schools, senior centers, and nursing homes.
Service-learning credit is available in most academic majors and minors. Prerequisites and other requirements vary with each department. To learn how to participate in this program, including discussions of placement options, students should contact or visit the Service-Learning Program office to schedule an interview.


ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Semester Hours Credit
3
Course credit is based on units designed as semester hours. One semester hour or one base contact hour equals a minimum of 750 minutes; this translates to a minimum of 15,50-minute class hours per semester. Time required for class preparation is not a consideration in the calculation of course credit. Omnibus courses involving laboratory work give one semester hour of credit for each two, three, or four hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week. Internships require a minimum of 2,250 minutes for each hour of credit.
Course Load
The average course load per 16-week semester is 15 or 16 semester hours. Students who are academically strong may take up to 18 semester hours during fall and spring semesters and up to 12 semester hours during the summer semester. During fall and spring semesters, students with cumulative MSCD grade point averages (GPAs) of 3.25 or higher may take 19 or 20 semester hours and those students with GPAs of 3.50 or higher may take 21 semester hours. Students must have completed at least 15 semester hours at MSCD. Authorization for overloads for students without these qualifications must be obtained from the student's major department chair and appropriate dean. Authorization for overloads in excess of 21 semester hours for fall and spring and 14 semester hours for summer must be obtained from the Office of Academic Affairs. Forms are available in the department or deans' offices.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned: freshmen fewer than 30; sophomores 30 or more, but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more, but fewer than 90; seniors 90 or more.
Declaring a Major
Applicants to The Metropolitan State College of Denver may indicate their intended major on the MSCD Application for Admission. Non-degree-seeking students who wish to declare a major must first change to degree-seeking status by completing a Change of Status form with the Registrar's Office.
Changing a Major
Degree-seeking students who wish to change a major must complete a Declaration/Change of Major form, which is available from the major department or from the Academic Advising Center.
Graduation Agreement
Degree-seeking students formally declare their degree plan by filing a Graduation Agreement. The agreement should be submitted to the Registrar's Office two years prior to the intended term of graduation but no later than the appropriate deadline stated in the Class Schedule.
Students should complete their Graduation Agreement in consultation with department adviser. When it is ready for signatures and a formal evaluation, students should submit the completed agreement to the minor department. The minor department will forward the signed agreement to the major department for signature; the major department will forward it to the dean of the school. The school will submit the agreement to the Registrar's Office for final review. Once approved, and after the completion of each subsequent semester of academic work, the student will receive an up-to-date Academic Status Report.
Diplomas and Commencement
Students who have met all requirements for graduation are granted diplomas at the end of the semester for which they are degree candidates. A formal commencement ceremony is held at the end of the spring and fall semesters. Completion of two majors does not result in two degrees or diplomas.
Transcripts of Records
A transcript is a certified copy of a student's permanent record and shows the academic status of the student at time of issuance. Except for faxed transcripts, there is no charge. Transcripts will be released by the Registrar's Office upon formal written request by the student. Transcripts will also be issued to firms and employers if written authorization is received from the student. Requests should include the stu-


40
; dent's full name as recorded while attending MSCD, student identification number, last term of atten-I dance, number of copies desired, and to whom and where transcripts are to be sent. Transcripts may be ; withheld because of indebtedness to the college or for other appropriate reasons. Transcripts from other 1 institutions that are on file in the Registrar's Office will be issued upon signed request by the student. A
charge of $5 per request is assessed for this service. Students from other institutions taking MSCD ; courses under the state college system or interinstitutional registration programs must request tran-I scripts from their home institution.
: Honors and Awards
; The college annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadership and service to the college and community, excellence in scholastic achievement, and outstanding personal character and integrity. ; Recognition of students includes:
The President's Award (one senior); the Special Service Award for Academic Affairs (one senior) and ; for Student Services (one senior); Outstanding Student Awards (seniors from each school); Who's Who
Among Students in American Universities and Colleges (seniors); American Association of University ; Women (AAUW) Award (senior woman). Other awards include Special Service Award for Exception-1 ally Challenged Students, Student Government Assembly Award, Charles W. Fisher Award, and the V Colorado Engineering Council Award.
Information and applications for these awards are available in Central Classroom Building, room 313. Awards are presented at the annual banquet the night before graduation.
In addition to annual awards, students with outstanding academic achievements are recognized by being named on the college's Honor Lists. The President's Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.85 or higher. The Vice President's Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative GPA of between 3.50 and 3.84, inclusively. Computation will occur initially when the student has completed between 30 and 60 hours at MSCD, then again between 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours. Posting of the award occurs after the student receives their semester grade report. Questions should be directed to the Office of Academic Affairs at (303) 556-3907.
Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability in their baccalaureate degree while attending MSCD. Honors designations are determined according to the following criteria:
Summa Cum Laude Top five percent of graduates within each school with cumulative MSCD
GPA of no less than 3.65.
Magna Cum Laude Next five percent of graduates within each school with cumulative
MSCD GPA of no less than 3.65.
Cum Laude Next five percent of graduates within each school with cumulative
MSCD GPA of no less than 3.65.
To determine each honors category, GPA for the previous spring semester graduates are arrayed in rank order. This rank ordering is then used to determine the honors recipients among the following summer, fall, and spring graduates.
To qualify for graduation honors recognition, a student must have completed a minimum of 50 semester hours of classroom credit at MSCD prior to the term of graduation.
Courses completed during the term of graduation and transfer credits are not considered when determining honors.
Honors designations are added to the student's official academic record; no other notification will be sent. For additional information regarding graduation honors, contact the Office of Academic Affairs at (303) 556-3907.


Grades and Notations
Grades
Alphabetical grades and status symbols are as follows:
A Superior........................4 quality points per semester hour attempted
B Above Average ..................3 quality points per semester hour attempted
C Average.........................2 quality points per semester hour attempted
D Below Average but Passing .... 1 quality point per semester hour attempted
F Failure ........................0 quality points per semester hour attempted
Notations
I - Incomplete
NC .................................................................No Credit
S ......Satisfactory (limited to student teaching and HPS/LES 4890 internships)
P ..........................................................................Pass
X Grade assignment pending. Student must see faculty for an explanation or assignment of grade. Courses taken through interinstitutional registration are normally assigned the "X" notation until grades are received and posted to the academic record.
The I notation may be assigned when a student was unable to take the final examination and/or did not complete all the out-of-class assignments due to unusual circumstances (such as hospitalization). Incomplete work denoted by the Incomplete I notation must be completed within one calendar year or earlier, at the discretion of the faculty member. If the incomplete work is not completed within one calendar year, the I notation will change to an F. Registering in a subsequent semester for a course in which an I has been received will not remove the I notation.
The I notation may not be awarded in a self-paced course.
The NC notation is not a grade. It may indicate withdrawal from the course or course repetition. The NC notation may also be used in self-paced courses to indicate that the student and/or the faculty have decided to extend the students exposure to the course to increase the student's proficiency. To earn credit, the student must re-register for and pay for the course in a subsequent term.
The following minimal requirements are required throughout the college and are a part of all school, departmental, or individual faculty policies:
The NC notation is available to students in all instances through the fourth week of classes for fall and spring terms.
Students reducing their course load between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of classes during fall and spring semesters may receive an NC notation for each course, provided faculty approval is granted.
Additional restrictions regarding assigning the NC notation may be set by each school, department, and/or faculty member for the period between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of the semester (or proportional time frame).
Student requests for an NC notation in a given course will not be granted after the tenth week of the fall and spring semesters. The I notation may be used during this period, provided the conditions specified above apply.
Proportional time frames are applied for modular courses, weekend courses, workshops, and summer terms.
A written policy statement describing the use of the NC notation will be given to each student for each class in which the student enrolls.
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student's absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize the student's success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
Quality Points
The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of semester hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received. The cumulative GPA is calculated by dividing the total by the number of semester hours attempted.


42 GENERAL INFORMATION
; To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice
! the number of semester hours attempted in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements. The nota-
; tions "NC" "I," "S," and "P" have no effect on the GPA.
Pass-Fail Option
The pass-fail option encourages students to broaden their educational experience by taking courses out-; side their major and minor fields. The pass notation has no effect on the GPA; the fail notation is equiv-I alent to the grade of "F."
; Students who have completed at least one MSCD course with at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA may choose
to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass-fail basis rather than by letter grade. The pass-fail option ; may be used for general elective credit only. Major, minor, General Studies, and other courses required
for a degree or for teacher licensure, may not be taken on a pass-fail basis. Self-paced courses may not ; be taken under the pass-fail option. Maximum graduation credit for these ungraded courses is 18 semes-ter hours, earned in no more than six courses, limited to one course per semester or module.
; Students must declare interest in the pass-fail option no later than the last day to add classes (during the
1 first 15 percent of the total time frame of the semester) for a particular semester or module by contact-
| ing the Registrar's Office. The instructor will assign and record the pass-fail grade on a final grade list that identifies students electing and eligible for pass-fail grading. Students who request the option who are later declared ineligible will receive notification from the Registrar's Office during the semester. They will be assigned a regular letter grade in the course. Once approved, the request for the pass-fail option is irrevocable.
Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a pass notation is given. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work should determine whether the institution of their choice will accept the credit before registering for courses under the pass-fail option.
Repeated Courses (Last Grade Stands)
A student may repeat any course taken at MSCD regardless of the original grade earned. By doing so, only the credit and the grade for the latest attempt at the course will remain on the student's MSCD academic record. The grade for the prior attempt(s) will be changed to the NC notation. The courses must carry the same title, course number, and semester hours. To effect such a change, the student must reregister and pay tuition for the course in question, complete the course with a letter grade, and complete the necessary form in the Registrar's Office indicating that the course has been repeated. Otherwise, the grade change will be made administratively at the time of degree evaluation or earlier. Credit duplication involving transfer, interinstitutional, or state college system courses may result in transfer credit being disallowed. A failing course grade assigned as a result of academic dishonesty is considered a permanent "F" and is not subject to this policy. A student may not repeat a course after the award of a MSCD degree to make use of this policy.
Student Grade Appeal Procedure
If students have reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course, they must make their request for a change before the end of the third week of the semester following the completion of the course(the following fall semester in the case of the spring semester. The Grade Appeal Guidelines can be obtained from the students' respective deans. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate a grade appeal within the time limit, and to follow the procedures specified for grade appeals in the Student Rights and Responsibilities section of the 1994-1996 Student Handbook. The handbook may be obtained from the Office of Student Services. All decisions of the Grade Appeal Committee will be reviewed by the associate vice president for academic affairs.
Warning/Probation/Suspension Policy
Academic Satisfactory Progress/Good Standing
A student is deemed to be making satisfactory progress toward his or her academic goal if the student maintains a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher. This student is deemed to be in academic good standing with the institution. However, other academic standards may apply to specific programs. A student must satisfy those other academic standards in order to be deemed in academic good standing with that program. See information on the program of interest to determine specific standards for that program.


Academic Warning Status
A student in good standing whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 will be on academic warning status with the institution during his or her next semester. A student will be removed from this warning status and returned to good standing if he or she achieves a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of his or her semester on warning status. More restrictive standards may apply to certain programs or schools. See information on the program of interest.
Academic Probation
A student who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of his or her semester on warning status will be put on academic probation with the institution during his or her next semester at MSCD. A student will be on academic probation as long as he or she has a cumulative GPA below 2.0, but is making progress toward good standing as explained below and has not been on academic probation for more than three semesters. Other conditions may apply to given programs or schools. See information on the program of interest.
A student is removed from academic probation and is in good standing the semester after achieving a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0.
During any semester that a student is on academic probation, the student must make progress toward good standing with the institution by taking all of the following actions:
achieve a semester GPA of 2.2 or higher
register and complete a minimum of 3 but no more than 12 semester hours (3 to 6 semester hours for summer semester)
take required activities as negotiated with the director of the Academic Exceptions Program (may include certain classes, repeated courses, tutoring, or other activities)
While on academic probation, a student may pre-register for the first semester following the academic warning status semester, but is prohibited from pre-registering any other semester. For subsequent academic probation status semesters, a GPA of at least 2.2 must be verified prior to registration.
Academic Suspension
A student on academic probation not making progress toward good standing will be prohibited from registering for one calendar year from the date of suspension. Appeal of suspension for this reason will be submitted to the director of the Academic Exceptions Program. The director of the Academic Exceptions Program will then deliver the appeal materials to the Student Academic Review Committee, which will review the appeal and notify the student of its decision. A student may appeal a suspension only two times in his or her academic career at the college.
A student making progress toward good standing, whose cumulative GPA remains below a 2.0 after three or more semesters on probation, will have his or her academic progress reviewed each semester by the Student Academic Review Committee. The committee will determine whether the student should be placed on suspension. In both cases, the decision of the Student Academic Review Committee is final.
Any student returning to the college after the one-calendar-year suspension must reapply and will be readmitted on academic probation with the institution. For these students, all probation rules outlined above will apply.
A student who is suspended for a second time will be re-admitted only if he or she has successfully completed an associate degree program from a community college after suspension from MSCD or can demonstrate to the Student Academic Review Committee that chances for successful completion of an educational program are greatly improved.
Contact Student Intervention Services at 556-4048 for further information.


44
: STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
: Policies and Procedures
Generally, the policies and procedures contained in this Catalog must be followed by students officially | enrolling for the 1997 fall semester and the 1998 spring and summer semesters.
: Exceptions
I Students may appeal to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions to request a variance from college ; academic requirements. Their graduation agreement should be completed before the appeal. Valid rea-I sons for variances must accompany all petitions, and the petitions must be signed by the appropriate
dean and department chair.
: Academic Honesty
Students have a responsibility to maintain standards of academic ethics and honesty. Cases of cheating
or plagiarism are handled within the policies of Academic Affairs in accordance with procedures out-; lined in the MSCD Student Handbook.

Conduct of Students
MSCD policy provides students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. The Student Handbook contains standards of conduct to which students are expected to adhere. Information regarding students' rights and responsibilities, including the student due process procedure (the procedural rights provided to students at MSCD before disciplinary action is imposed) is available in Central Classroom Building, room 313.
Class Attendance
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student's absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
If students anticipate a prolonged absence, they should contact their instructors. If they find that they cannot communicate with the instructor, they should contact the chair of that department, who will inform the instructor of the reasons for the anticipated absence. Whenever an instructor determines that a student's absences are interfering with academic progress, the instructor may submit a letter to the department chair informing that office of the situation.
Students at MSCD who, because of their sincerely held religious beliefs, are unable to attend classes, take examinations, participate in graded activities, or submit graded assignments on particular days shall, without penalty, be excused from such classes and be given a meaningful opportunity to make up such examinations and graded activities or assignments provided that proper notice and procedures are followed. The policies and procedures designed to excuse class attendance on religious holidays are covered in the Student Rights and Responsibilities section of the MSCD Student Handbook.
Final Examinations
It is the general policy of the college to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, with the possible exception of seminar courses or special projects.
Preparatory Course Credit Policy
No preparatory courses are applicable toward an MSCD degree after spring 1993. For details, please see an adviser in the Academic Advising Center.


SERVICES FOR STUDENTS
Academic Advising
All first-time-to-college students, initial transfer students, and students undecided about their majors are required to seek academic advising in the Academic Advising Center in order to register for classes. All students are encouraged to take advantage of MSCD's advising services which include: course scheduling; assistance in choosing a major; and ongoing developmental advising. Students who have decided on a major should meet with an adviser in their major department to plan their academic program and receive current materials. For additional information call (303) 556-3680.
Adult Learning Services
Adults entering or returning to college often have questions and problems that are different from those of younger students. Adults who would like help re-entering the formal education system and planning their educational goals may contact the Office of Adult Learning Services at (303) 556-8342.
Career Services
Career Services offers assistance to students and alumni in planning their careers, finding off-campus jobs while enrolled, and seeking employment upon graduation. Specific services include career interest testing, personality testing, and workshops focused on career planning, resume preparation, job search strategies, and interviewing skills. Professional counselors are available for appointments. The student employment service and job vacancy listings are also housed in the Career Services Center.
The Career Library contains resources to help with career planning and the job search process. Information such as employer directories, salary surveys, and career assessment resources are available.
The Colorado Career Information Center is a computerized guidance system located in the Career Library. Trained advisers offer assistance in its use. This system includes specific occupation information for Colorado, career assessment inventories with immediate results, and nationwide college information. Services are available by appointment at (303) 556-2246.
Counseling Center
The Counseling Center is a full service, accredited center staffed by professionals who offer a wide array of services at little or no charge to the MSCD campus community. The Center is fully accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services. All records are strictly confidential. Services include:
Individual Counseling: The center offers short-term counseling on personal, relationship, and educational concerns during one to one sessions; sessions are free to MSCD students. Students will be interviewed to assess their needs when they first visit the center. An appointment is not necessary for an initial meeting; students may drop in anytime between 9-12 or 1-4 Monday through Thursday. Psychiatric services are available by referral at reasonable or no charge for students seeing a counselor at the center. Other referrals may be made to off-campus resources if it is determined to be in the best interest of the student.
Workshops and Group Sessions: Group sessions are free to all MSCD students, faculty, and staff. Topics include: test anxiety, assertiveness, parenting, self-esteem, relationships, family issues, support groups, and a variety of multicultural issues. A brochure of new topics is available at the center. A new brochure is produced at the beginning of each semester.
MSCD Connections Peer Educators Program: A peer educator is an upper-division student who can address personal and college concerns of students enrolled in the First-Year Experience classes. The peer educator acts as a resource to students and can assist students with "short cuts" to sometimes lengthy college procedures such as financial and registration problems. Students interested in being a peer educator should contact the Center
MSCD Alternatives Substance Abuse Prevention: This program works actively with campus departments and community agencies to offer substance abuse programs for students, faculty, and staff. Programs include National Collegiate Alcohol and Drug Awareness Week and Safe Spring Break.


46
; Consultation: Staff members at the center are available for free consultation to MSCD faculty,
staff, and student groups or clubs. Consultations can be one-to-one or meetings with a department, ; unit, or club. Common topics of consultation include: diversity, communication, conflict, etc.
Diversity Services: The center offers individual and group counseling, workshops, lectures, con-; sultation to departments and individuals on the issues of race, gender, sexual orientation, disabili-
1 ties, and more.
! The Counseling Center is located in CN 203 and is open 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. ; The center will move to Tivoli 651 during Fall, 1997. More information is available at (303) 556-3132.
: Disabled Student Services
I The Auraria Office of Disabled Student Services provides academic support services to disabled stu-; dents at MSCD and the University of Colorado at Denver. Services include an adaptive computer lab, 1 testing accommodations, note-taking services, taping services, student advocacy, sign language and oral j interpreters, orientation for incoming students, priority registration, limited tutoring, sale of parking per-1 mits, and a resource and referral library.
y English as a Second Language/Immigrant and Refugee Services
The English as a Second Language program provides assistance to students for whom English is a second language. The program provides assessment, tutoring, intensive academic and personal advising, and assistance with financial aid forms. The program also refers students with limited English proficiency to the appropriate curricula and monitors student progress. For more information call (303) 556-2533.
The Spring International Language Center at Auraria
Intensive English classes at the Spring International Center focus on all language skills: grammar, reading, writing, and listening/speaking, in addition to special electives that students can choose each term, such as TOEFL preparation, vocabulary building, and pronunciation. Five nine-week terms are offered throughout the year to enable students to complete their English study quickly. Students are placed at one of the six levels, with standardized evaluation tests at the completion of each level. Spring International Language Center is located on the fourth floor of the Tivoli Student Union, Room 454. For more information call (303) 534-1616.
Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Student Services
Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual (GLB) Student Services are open to all MSCD students as a resource for exploring sexual orientation issues. This program offers a variety of support, education, and advocacy services for the entire campus community:
support for members of the campus community who may have questions about their own sexual orientation or that of a friend or family member
advocacy for students experiencing discrimination or harassment based on a real or perceived gay, lesbian, or bisexual identity
speakers for events, workshops, and classes on various aspects of sexual orientation and gay, lesbian or bisexual life
training programs and workshops about working more effectively with the gay, lesbian, and bisexual communities and combating homophobia
programs such as Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Awareness Week and other forums providing information and dialogue about gay, lesbian, and bisexual issues
The GLB Student Services office is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 311, and is staffed by a professional coordinator with the support of student employees and volunteers. Input and involvement from the entire campus community is welcomed. For additional information call (303) 556-6333.


Institute for International and Intercultural Education
The college provides assistance to visiting faculty and international students. Important information and counseling is offered on visas, school transfers, work permission, housing, banking, and cultural and academic adaptation. The office also provides assistance to students who wish to arrange individualized study-abroad opportunities. The institute organizes numerous conferences and lectures on international issues throughout the year.
The institute also provides information on cross-disciplinary individualized degree major and minor programs in international studies, international courses offered by various departments, and intercultural courses. For information, contact the director of International and Intercultural Education at (303) 556-4004.
Student Development Center
The mission of the Student Development Center is to significantly improve the academic and intellectual achievements of students by providing comprehensive and individualized services that will lead to improved student retention and increased graduate rates. Services include: academic, personal, transitional, and social counseling; peer advising; mentoring programs; leadership development; multicultural programs and opportunities; workshops, forums, and discussion groups; and advocacy and referral services. Through Project Follow-Up, the center provides personal outreach to students who have been accepted to MSCD and need information and support in the initial processes of scheduling orientation, assessment tests, advising and financial aid.
Student Finance Resource Center (SFRC)
The Student Finance Resource Center offers the following:
short-term student loans
financial planning
budgeting workshops
individual budgeting sessions
credit union enrollment
tuition deferral budgeting
student travel
The SFRC is committed to providing students with the means to solve temporary and long-term financial problems by guiding and educating them in the area of college financing (i.e., budgeting, financial planning, emergency funding and travel). The Student Travel Program offers financial and planning assistance for clubs, student organizations, and individual students presenting papers at conferences and events within the domestic United States.
Student Health Center
All MSCD students are entitled to medical services at the Health Center. Student health insurance is NOT required to use the Health Center. Physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners and nurses staff the facility. Students will be asked to complete a sign-in sheet and show a current semester ID card each time they check in. In addition, students are required to complete a patient information sheet annually and a health history form biannually. Brief office visits are free for all MSCD students. Limited, extended, detailed, and comprehensive office visits; physicals; supplies; medications; tests; lab work; and procedures are available at reasonable charges. Payment is required at the time of service.
Services include treatment of illness and injuries, lab testing, medications, physicals, annual GYN exams, sexually transmitted disease information/testing, birth control information/services, minor surgery, cholesterol screening, immunizations, HIV testing, blood pressure checks, casting, suturing, and x-ray access. Classes regarding health-related topics are taught each semester.
Walk-in services begin at 8 a.m., Monday Friday. Access is on a first-come, first-served basis. Walk-in access varies daily, contingent upon when all patient slots have been filled; thus, the daily closure time for walk-in care is variable. Patients are encouraged to check in as early as possible. The Student Health Center is located in the Plaza Building, room 140, on the lower level. Brochures with additional information are available at the Health Center. For further details call (303) 556-2525.


48
Student Intervention Services
Student Intervention Services (SIS) monitors all students whose cumulative GPA is below a 2.0 for one, two, or three semesters. Students are notified by mail of their status, and encumbrances are placed on their registration. SIS also coordinates the Early Warning System, providing mid-term grade assessments, support, and referral services to students. For those students who are in academic difficulty, SIS provides an in-depth strategy for success including assistance with graduation plans, scheduling, and advising. The office is located in Central Classroom Building, Room 102, (303) 556-4048.
Student Support Services Program
The purpose of the Student Support Services Program is to provide educational assistance for selected students who may otherwise be denied a chance for participation in higher education programs. Academic assistance is provided for students on the basis of individual need. Courses in English and reading are offered for college credit, coupled with tutorial assistance. These courses are designed to strengthen and supplement a student's basic educational skills so that the student may better address the requirements of a college course load. Other supportive services available are counseling, testing, assistance with financial aid forms, and, when possible, assistance in attending social and cultural events to enhance the student's experience.
Summer Bridge/Mentoring Programs
The Summer Bridge Program encourages students who have just graduated from inter-city high schools to take a three credit class and attend a series of activities, seminars, and workshops that further encourage their bonding to a postsecondary institution.
The Mentoring Program is a campus-wide program which matches incoming and upper-level students. Social and educational initiatives are included, small group activities are offered. This year's plans include training workshops, cultural events and individualized services to mentors and students. Call 556-4737 for more information.
Tri-Institutional Student Legal Services
Tri-Institutional Legal Services is a student-fee funded program that serves registered students from The Metropolitan State College of Denver, the University of Colorado at Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The program is staffed by a licensed attorney who assists students with landlord-tenant problems, criminal prosecutions, traffic/DUI cases, and family/domestic issues. Specifically, the attorney engages in a problem-solving process with the student to develop and explore various legal strategies and options. If a case requires legal representation and/or is beyond the expertise of the program's attorney, the office will provide to the student information about community resources that may provide legal representation either on a no-cost or low-cost basis, depending upon the substantive area and the availability of attorneys. Because the program's budget only allows for 20 hours per week of the attorney's time, the office should be contacted to ensure an office visit or phone interview. Please note: this office is unable to advise on issues arising between students or involving any of the three institutions as this creates a conflict of interest. The attorney can neither represent the student nor make a court appearance on the student's behalf. The office is not staffed to respond to emergencies. More information is available at the Tivoli Student Union, room 308, or call 556-6061.
Tutoring Center
The Tutoring Center provides free tutoring assistance for all students enrolled at MSCD. The center is structured to accommodate the needs of culturally diverse students. Students may be referred to the Tutoring Center by an instructor, or can seek assistance on their own. Trained peer tutors will help students reach their educational goals. Group, individualized, and walk-in tutoring is available. The center is open weekend and evening hours also. The office is located in the St. Francis Center, second floor, (303) 556-8472.
Veterans Services
The Veterans Services Office is designed to provide student veterans and veterans in the community with a variety of outreach, recruitment, and retention services. These include assistance with problems involving checks, tutorial, counseling, and referrals to on-campus offices and services. The office also


Women's Services
The Institute for Women's Studies and Services is committed to the empowerment of women through education. To help women have a positive college experience, women's services provides referrals to campus and community resources, information about scholarships, assistance with the process of entering MSCD, advocacy services for students dealing with harassment or discrimination, and programs and events that focus on issues of particular concern to women. The institute houses a small library with a variety of books and other resource materials on women's experiences, histories, and contributions to society. Students who need assistance should make an appointment with the coordinator of women's services.
Writing Center
The Writing Center staff of composition instructors and trained writing tutors are committed to working with students in developing their writing abilities. Tutors help students identify problem areas and provide instruction on how to eliminate them. Through one-on-one instruction, tutors teach students to generate, organize, and develop ideas; to revise and edit with confidence; and to handle issues of format and documentation. For more information contact the Writing Center at (303) 556-6070.


50
: STUDENT LIFE
The Office of Student Life offers students a wide range of services and programs designed to enhance ; classroom experiences and encourage campus involvement. Services include Judicial Affairs, Student 1 Problem Action Network (SPAN), Student Activities, student clubs and organizations, Student Publi-
cations, Counseling Center, Campus Recreation, Student Health Center, Student Legal Services, Gay, 1 Lesbian, and Bisexual Student Services, Student Government Assembly (SGA) and the Student Finance
Resource Center. These student-fee-funded programs exist to provide a diverse range of experiences in ; leadership development and programs that encourage cultural, recreational, educational, and social
interaction. The Office of Student Life is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 307.
J Student Affairs Board (SAB)
The Student Affairs Board enables students to have a continuous voice in the use and allocation of their ; student fees. The SAB is comprised of student, faculty, and administrative representatives.
; Student Problem Action Network (SPAN)
The SPAN Program helps students resolve problems on campus. This program involves trained medi-
ators and advocates who can assist students in defining their problem, formulate a strategy of reaching ; a solution, and inform them about the institutional process for resolving the issue. This program is part V of the judicial affairs area and is staffed by volunteer faculty, staff, and students. For additional information, please refer to the Student Handbook or come to the Tivoli, room 307.
Student Activities
The Office of Student Activities provides a variety of ways for students to meet others and become involved in the college community. The council staff produces concerts, comedy shows, lectures, and special events each semester. The council also cosponsors events with clubs and offices on campus.
The Potential through Education, Awareness and Knowledge (PEAK) leadership program offers a wide range of learning opportunities for students who want to develop and sharpen their skills. PEAK training includes coalition-building, group dynamics, and leadership theory and typology. The training is structured to fit into the busy schedules of students who work.
The Club Resource Center staff can help students find a club that meets their needs, or help them establish a new club, raise funds for programming, and keep their ledger balanced. The college currently has 100 active professional, social, academic, honorary, and special interest clubs on campus. The office is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 305. The office number is (303) 556-2595, and hours are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday Friday.
Campus Recreation
The Campus Recreation at Auraria program is among the most affordable ways that students have found to enjoy themselves, and it is among the best recreation programs offered in Colorado. The program is composed of the Drop-In Program (informal recreation), Intramurals, Club Sports, Outdoor Adventure, and the Physically Challenged Program. Student membership is free with a current, validated student ID.
The Drop-in Program provides group and individual activities for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. Facilities include four basketball courts, 12 tennis courts, volleyball courts, a 25-yard indoor pool, eight handball/racquetball courts, two squash courts, a weightroom, a fitness center, a dance studio, a baseball field, softball fields, and a track. In addition, Campus Recreation offers high- and low-impact aerobics, step aerobics, and aqua aerobics daily. The Drop-in Program also offers a new instructional component, Healthy Lifestyles, which consists of a variety of noncredit instructional workshops, clinics, and seminars. Check the Drop-in Program schedule in room 108 of the Physical Education Building or call (303) 556-3210 for a listing of available times.
The Intramural Program consists of individual and team activities open to all students, faculty, and staff members. The emphasis of the program is on participation, sportsmanship, and social interaction. Whenever possible, competitive and recreational divisions are offered to ensure participation for all ability levels. Activities include flag football, basketball, floor hockey, volleyball, racquetball, and squash leagues, as well as tennis and golf tournaments.
Club Sports provides students, faculty, and staff members the opportunity to develop their individual athletic abilities in an organized group setting. The present clubs, which are all student initiated, include


aikido, fencing, men's lacrosse, men and women's rugby, men's volleyball, coed waterpolo, badminton, ski/snowbashers, and tai chi.
Outdoor Adventure provides the opportunity to experience the beauty and challenge of nature through organized trips. The program provides outdoor recreational experiences emphasizing skill acquisition, social interaction, environmental awareness, and safety. Some of the many adventures offered are biking, canoeing, cross-country skiing, downhill skiing, family-fun outings, hiking, ice climbing, kayak-ing/rafting, naturalist outings, rock climbing, and sailing. The program also provides rental equipment, including camping and hiking gear, canoes, cross-country skis, mountain bikes, and roller blades. The office is located in the basement of the Events Center.
The Physically Challenged Program offers a variety of sporting, recreational, and fitness opportunities for students with physical or learning limitations. The adaptive programs/services encompass one-on-one or group sessions that assist in using the recreational facility. Information on planned group activities or individual help sessions is available in the Events Center, room 108, (303) 556-3210.
Student Publications
The student newspaper, The Metropolitan, is published by the Office of Student Publications, Tivoli Student Union, room 313, (303) 556-8361. The newspaper offers students the opportunity to explore fields such as journalism, advertising sales, marketing, graphic arts, publishing, photography, business, and accounting through work experiences. The Metropolitan is written and produced by and for MSCD students. It is published weekly during the fall and spring semesters and once during the summer semester. Students interested in working on the paper should contact the student editor at (303) 556-2507.
Metrosphere is the annual student literary and arts publication. It contains poetry, fiction, nonfiction, art, photography, and graphics. It is written, composed, and produced entirely by students. Submissions are accepted during the fall semester. Copies are distributed free to students in the spring semester. For more information, contact the student editor at (303) 556-3940.
The office also produces the Student Handbook and provides graphic art services at reduced costs to on-campus offices, departments, organizations, and individuals.
MSCD's Board of Publications is the advisory board to the editors of Metrosphere and The Metropolitan. The board appoints the editors from applicants each spring for the following academic year and deals with complaints or questions regarding content. The board is composed of five students, three administrators, and three faculty members and meets monthly during the fall and spring semesters.


52
: POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
j EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AND AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT
The Metropolitan State College of Denver is an equal opportunity employer; applications from minori-; ties and women are particularly invited. The Metropolitan State College of Denver does not discrimi-
nate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, sex, age, sexual orientation, or disability in admis-; sions or access to, or treatment or employment in, its educational programs or activities. Inquiries ; concerning the college grievance procedures may be directed to the designated MSCD officials. Inquiries concerning Title VI and Title IX may be referred to Dr. Percy Morehouse, Jr., MSCD Office ; of Equal Opportunity, Campus Box 63, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, (303) 556-2939. Inquiries concerning the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or 504 may be referred to Ms. Helen
Fleming, Faculty and Staff ADA Coordinator, MSCD, Campus Box 47, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO
1 80217-3362, (303) 556-8514; Dr. Manuel Escamilla, Student ADA Coordinator, MSCD, Campus Box
: 42, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, (303) 556-4737; Mr. Dick Feuerbom, ADA Coordi-
; nator, AHEC, Campus Box 001, P.O. Box 173361, Denver, CO 80217-3361, (303) 556-8376; or Ms.
Karen Rosenchein, Manager. Otherwise, all inquiries may be referred to the Office for Civil Rights,
U.S. Department of Education, 1244 Speer Boulevard, Denver, CO 80204, (303) 844-3723.
^ FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT
Student Rights
The Metropolitan State College of Denver maintains educational records for each student who has enrolled at the college. A copy of the college's policy on student educational records may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar, Central Classroom Building, room 105. Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), 20 USC 1232g, and the implementing regulations published at 34 CFR part 99, each eligible student has the right to:
1. Inspect and review his/her educational records;
2. Request the amendment of the students education records to ensure that they are not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student's privacy or other rights;
3. Consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's educational records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent (see Nondisclosure and Exceptions below); and
4. File a complaint under 34 CFR 99.64, concerning alleged failures by the college to comply with the requirements of FERPA, with the Family Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202-4605.
Proc edure for Inspecting ..and He\tewin(_; Eihcational Records
Students may inspect and review their education records upon a written request submitted to the Registrar, Central Classroom, Room 105, or by mail to Campus Box 84, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, Colorado 80217-3362.
A. The request shall identify as precisely as possible the record or records the student wishes to inspect.
B. The record custodian or an appropriate staff person shall make the arrangements for access as promptly as possible and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. Access must be given in 45 days or less from the receipt of the request.
C. When a record contains information about more than one student, the student may inspect and review only the records which relate to that student.
Procedure eor Amending Educational Records A student may make a written request to amend a record.
1. In the request, the student should identify the part of the record to be changed and specify why the student believes it is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student's privacy or other rights.
2. The Metropolitan State College of Denver shall comply with the request or notify the student that the college will not comply with the request and advise the student of the student's right to a hearing to challenge the information believed to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student's rights.


3. Upon written request, The Metropolitan State College of Denver will arrange for a hearing, and notify the student, reasonably in advance, of the date, place and time of the hearing.
4. The hearing will be conducted by a hearing officer who is a disinterested party, but who may be an official of the institution. The student shall be afforded a full and fair opportunity to present evidence relevant to the issues raised in the original request to amend the student's education records. The student may be assisted by one or more individuals, including an attorney.
5. The Metropolitan State College of Denver will prepare a written decision based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing. The decision will include a summary of the evidence presented and the reasons for the decision.
6. If The Metropolitan State College of Denver decides that the challenged information is not inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student's right of privacy or other right, it will notify the student that the student has a right to place in the record a statement commenting on the challenged information and/or a statement setting forth reasons for disagreeing with the decision.
7. The statement will be maintained as part of the student's education records as long as the contested portion is maintained. If The Metropolitan State College of Denver decides that the information is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student's rights, it will amend the record and notify the student, in writing, that the record has been amended.
Nondisclosure AND ,JEXl'EETON>
Pursuant to FERPA, the college will not disclose a student's education records without the written consent of the student except to college officials with legitimate educational interests, to officials at other institutions in which the student seeks to enroll, in connection with providing financial aid to the student, to accrediting agencies in carrying out their functions, to federal, state or local authorities auditing or evaluating the college's compliance with education programs, to consultants conducting studies on behalf of the college, in compliance with a judicial order or subpoena, and in connection with a health or safety emergency involving the student. However, the college may release directory information without the prior written consent of the student unless within ten (10) calendar days after the first scheduled class day of each term, an enrolled student has notified the college's Office of the Registrar in writing that any or all types of directory information shall not be disclosed without the consent of the student. A request for nondisclosure will remain in effect until the student is no longer enrolled or cancels the request for nondisclosure.
A school official is a person employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position; or a person elected to the Board of Trustees; or a person employed by or under contract to the college to perform a special task, such as attorney, auditor, or consultant; or a student or other person serving on an official college committee or assisting a school official in performing the official's professional duties and responsibilities. A legitimate educational interest is the need of a school official to review educational records in order to fulfill that official's professional duties and responsibilities.
Directory Information
The Metropolitan State College of Denver has designated the following categories of personally identifiable information on students as directory information under section 438(a)(5)(B) of FERPA:
-name, address and telephone number
-e-mail address
-date and place of birth
-student classification
-major and minor fields of study
-participation in officially recognized activities and sports
-weight and height of members of athletic teams
-dates of attendance at the college
-degrees and awards received
-last educational institution attended


54
The Student Right-to-Know Act and the Campus Security Act
Campus Crime Information
During 1992, 1993, and 1994, the following crimes were committed on campus at the Auraria Higher Education Center, serving the University of Colorado at Denver, The Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver:
Occurrences of Criminal Offenses on Campus
Offense 1996 1995 1994
Murder . 0 . ...0... ...0
Rape .0.... . ... 0 ... . ... .0
Robbery . 1 . ... .4 . .... 1
Aggravated Assault .1 .... ...6.... . 10
Burglary .23 ... . 24 . . 17
Vehicle Theft .... .11 . . 10 . . 11
Sexual Assault*. . . 5 . . .4. . . 13
Hate Crimes . 0 . 2** , .. 1
Y *lncludes sexual assaults other than first- and second-degree sexual assaults (rape), such as indecent exposures, and third-degree sexual assaults.
**One incident, two offenses, simple assault and intimidation.
Number of Arrests for the Following Crimes on Campus Arrests 1996 1995 1994
Liquor Law Violation* .10..........2.........0
Drug Abuse Violation. .40..........6.........2
Weapons Possession ...4............1.........1
* Excludes Dili arrests; however, 22 of 55 total offense arrests in 1994 involved alcohol.
These statistics were provided by the Auraria Department of Public Safety in compliance with the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 55
A
The School of Buxine
provided dtudentd !
with a background of :
general education, j
familiarity with badic principled of budinedd, and a dpecialized knowledge in a delected field.


56 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
j School of Business
: OUR MISSION: We are committed to being the leader in the development and delivery of ; high-quality undergraduate business programs that meet the diverse and evolving educational needs of students, businesses, and other stake holders in the six-county service area of Metropolitan State Col-; lege of Denver.
All of our programs and activities instill and satisfy the important purpose of lifelong learning. Our pro-; grams help students confront and resolve work and life issues with multicultural, ethical, technological, | international, and environmental dimensions.
; Our baccalaureate degree programs provide a broad foundation in general education and exposure
C to all the functional areas of business, with specific competence in at least one of those areas.
: Residents of the metropolitan area may enhance their education as non-degree-seeking students,
or through certificate programs in various areas of business.
Businesses and other organizations may avail themselves of training and development through our
; outreach programs, which are custom-designed to strengthen human resources.
t Programs
The School of Business awards bachelor of science and bachelor of arts degrees and offers minors for non-business majors:
Bachelor of Science Degree Programs
Accounting
Computer Information Systems and Management Science
Finance
Management
Marketing
Bachelor of Arts Degree Program
Economics
Minors (for Non-Business Majors)
Accounting
Computer Information Systems
Economics
Finance
General Business
Management
Marketing
Real Estate
Declaring a Major/Minor in the School of Business
All students who qualify for admission to MSCD are eligible to declare a major or minor in the School of Business. Declaring a major or minor is the first step in the process of receiving appropriate advising. A student should declare a major as soon as possible by contacting an academic adviser, department chair, or faculty member. An undecided student may declare a pre-business major. For all degrees in the School of Business, at least 50 percent of the business credit hours received for the business degree must be earned in the School of Business.
New and transfer students intending to major in business are encouraged to see an adviser in the appropriate department before registering for classes. Students should develop a graduation agreement in consultation with their department adviser within the first semester of becoming a business major. The graduation agreement serves as a road map for course scheduling.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Structure of Bachelor of Science Degree Programs
All degree-seeking students must meet the colleges requirements for all bachelors degrees outlined in the General Information section on page 8 of this Catalog. Students desiring a bachelors degree from the School of Business must complete General Studies, the business core*, the required courses of the chosen major, and electives. A minor is not required except for the noted economics major. Requirements for each degree program total 120 credit hours:
General Studies (Level I and Level II)................................................... 43
Business Core*.....................................................j......................33
Major in School of Business................................................................24
Electives**................................................................................20
Total Hours (minimum)......................................................................120
*Not required for the standard economics major (with a minor).
**The School of Business requires 20 credit hours of electives, no more than 9 of which may be business electives.
A detailed description of these categories follows.
General Studies
The college requires 33 credit hours of General Studies. The School of Business requires 10 additional specific hours of general education, for a total of 43. Students desiring a bachelor of science degree from the School of Business should complete these courses as part of their first 60 credit hours.
General Studies Required by the School of Business Semester Hours
General Studies Level I
Composition
ENG 1010 Freshman Composition: The Essay.............................................3
ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research and Documentation..................3
Mathematics
MTH 1310 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences...................4
MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences.............................3
Communications
SPE 1010 Fundamentals of Speech Communication........................................3
General Studies Level II
Historical Studies
HIS _______ (American history course recommended).......................................3
Arts and Letters
PHI 1030 Ethics (Check General Studies guide for Level II Arts and Letters elective).3
-or-
PHI 3360 Business Ethics.............................................................3
Social Sciences
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro...............................................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro...............................................3
PSY 1001 Introductory Psychology
-or-
SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociology...................................................1.3
PSC 1010 American National Government
-or-
PSC 1020 Political Systems and Ideas.................................................3
Natural Sciences
______ ______ (Check General Studies guide for Level II Natural Sciences elective)........3
______ ______ (Check General Studies guide for Level II Natural Sciences elective)........3
Total of Required and Elective General Studies Credit Hours............................43*
*33 required for the standard economics major (with a minor).


58 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Business Core
The following courses are required for all business majors except those in the standard economics major
(with a minor).
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I.....................................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II....................................................3
MKT 2040 Managerial Communications......................................................3
CMS 2010 Principles of Information Systems..............................................3
CMS 3300 Principles of Quantitative Management Systems..................................3
CMS 3320 Quantitative Decision Making...................................................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance.............................................................3
MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business I................................................3
MGT 3000 Organizational Management......................................................3
MGT 4950* Strategic Management..........................................................3
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing........................................................3
Total Hours Required in Business Core.......................................................33
l *Senior Experience capstone course taken during the final semester of the senior year.
y Courses Required for Majors Accounting Department
Courses in the Accounting Department prepare students for careers in public, industrial, tax, systems, and governmental accounting. In addition, a wide variety of internships is available through the Cooperative Education Office.
Students interested in becoming certified public accountants should be aware of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants 150-hour requirement scheduled to take effect in 2000. MSCD offers classes that meet all aspects of the AICPAs requirement. Students should talk to an accounting faculty adviser to develop an appropriate academic program.
Accounting Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACC 3090 Income Tax I.................................................................3
ACC 3300 Introduction to Accounting Systems...........................................3
ACC 3400 Cost Accounting..............................................................3
ACC 3510 Intermediate Accounting I....................................................3
ACC 3520 Intermediate Accounting II...................................................3
ACC 4200 Auditing.....................................................................3
ACC 4510 Advanced Accounting I........................................................3
Subtotal..................................................................................21
Plus 3 hours from the following courses:
ACC 3100 Income Tax II................................................................3
ACC 3200 Governmental Accounting......................................................3
ACC 3410 Cost Accounting II...........................................................3
ACC 4090 Tax Procedure and Research...................................................3
ACC 4100 Tax Planning.................................................................3
ACC 4300 Advanced Auditing............................................................3
ACC 4520 Advanced Accounting II.......................................................3
Total Hours Required for Accounting Major.................................................24
Computer Information Systems and Management Science Department
A variety of courses in the rapidly expanding area of information systems in the business world are available through this major. Students can look forward to challenging careers in computer information systems or using their computer information systems knowledge within any other area of business. Students majoring in computer information systems and management science are encouraged to select advanced courses that best meet their needs in specific areas, such as systems analysis, design, development, programming, data base management, data communications and networks, or management of information systems. Advising for these areas is available from the department and individual faculty members.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 5
Computer Information Systems and Management Science Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
CMS 2110 Business Problem Solving: A Structured Programming Approach..............3
CMS 3050 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design..............................3
CMS 3060 File Design and Data Base Management.....................................3
CMS 3230 Telecommunications Systems...........................L......................3
Programming Language Group (includes CMS 3110, CMS 3130, and CMS 3260)...............3
Microcomputer Technology Group (includes CMS 3220 and CMS 3290)......................3
CMS Capstone Group (includes CMS 4050, CMS 4060, CMS 4070, and CMS 4410).............3
Approved CMS Electives...............................................................3
Total Hours Required for CMS Major...................................................24
Finance Department
The finance major prepares students for careers that concentrate on the process of managing the funds of individuals, businesses, and governments. Career opportunities are available in the fields of managerial finance and the financial services industry. The field of managerial finance deals with managing the financial affairs of businesses and governments and includes such activities as budgeting, financial forecasting, cash management, credit administration, investment analysis, and funds management. Careers in the financial services industry include positions in banks, savings and loans, other financial institutions, brokerage firms, insurance companies, and real estate. The most dramatic increase in career opportunities is in personal financial planning, where professionals are needed to provide advice to consumers on the management of their personal financial affairs. The Finance Department has been approved to offer the academic courses required for those who will take the national exams to become certified financial planners. A minimum grade of C is required for courses in the major.
Finance Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
FIN 3010 Financial Markets and Institutions............................................3
FIN 3600 Investments...................................................................3
FIN 3850 Intermediate Finance..........................................................3
FIN 4950 Financial Strategies and Policies.............................................3
Subtotal.................................................................................. 12
Approved Electives*.........................................................................12
Total Hours Required for Finance Major......................................................24
* Upper-division finance electives (six must be 4000-level) selected in consultation with and approved by the Finance Department.
Management Department
The management major is designed to prepare students to start and manage businesses and other organizations in a diverse and technologically dynamic global environment. The program consists of required courses that build a broad conceptual foundation for identifying and solving managerial problems. Students have options to develop special skills in human resource management, operations management, or entrepreneurship.
Management Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGT 3020 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship........................................ 3
MGT 3220 Legal Environment of Business II..........................................3
MGT 3530 Human Resources Management................................................3
MGT 3550 Manufacturing and Service Management......................................3
MGT 3820 International Business....................................................3
MGT 4530 Organizational Behavior...................................................3
Subtotal................................................................................18
Plus 6 hours from the following courses:
MGT 3210 Commercial and Corporate Law..............................................3
MGT 4000 Management Decision Analysis............................J......................3
MGT 4020 Entrepreneurial Creativity................................................3
MGT 4050 Purchasing and Contract Management........................................3
MGT 4420 Entrepreneurial Business Planning.........................................3


60 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
MGT 4550 Project Management.......................................................3
MGT 4610 Labor/Employee Relations.................................................3
MGT 4620 Appraisal and Compensation...............................................3
MGT 4640 Employee Training and Development........................................3
MGT 4650 Managing Productivity....................................................3
MGT 4830 Workforce Diversity......................................................3
Total Elective Hours..................................................................6
Total Hours Required for Management Major.............................................24
Marketing Department
The Marketing Department prepares students for career opportunities in such dynamic areas as sales management, distribution, advertising, marketing research, retailing, and marketing management.
In addition to the departments well-rounded selection of courses, the curriculum also offers students a combination of conceptual and applied learning experiences. Through the development of marketing plans, advertising campaigns, and marketing research studies, students have the opportunity to work with Denver-area businesses on current marketing issues and problems. Students are also exposed to a variety of marketing speakers from the business community. Internship positions are available for marketing students through the Cooperative Education Office.
Marketing Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
MKT 3010 Marketing Research.......................................................3
MKT 3310 Consumer Behavior........................................................3
MKT 4560 Marketing Management.....................................................3
Marketing Electives*.................................................................15
Total Hours Required for Marketing Major.............................................24
*Business communications courses can be used as business electives, but not as marketing electives.
Bachelor of Arts Economics Department
Economics is the scientific study of the allocation of scarce or limited resources. The study of economics provides a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions. This training is extremely valuable regardless of the students specific career objective. The bachelor of arts degree program gives students a fundamental knowledge of domestic and foreign economies and the quantitative tools necessary for independent analytical research and thought. Specialized courses develop the students ability to use the tools of economic theory and analysis. Such training is essential for graduates who wish to qualify for positions as professional economists. Employment opportunities are available in national and international business; federal, state, and local government; and various nonprofit organizations.
Economics majors may choose from two tracks of studies: the standard economics major, which requires a minor, or the business emphasis, which does not require a minor.
Economics Major for Bachelor of Arts (with a minor)
Required Courses Semester Hours
MTH 1210 Introduction to Statistics..................................................4
ECO 3010 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory...........................................3
ECO 3020 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory...........................................3
ECO 3150 Econometrics................................................................3
ECO 4600 History of Economic Thought.................................................3
Subtotal.................................................................................16
Approved Electives.......................................................................15
Total Hours Required for the Economics Major............................................31
Selected Minor
Must be completed to fulfill the degree requirement......................................18
General Studies (minimum)................................................................33
Electives................................................................................38
Total Hours Required for Bachelor of Arts in Economics..................................120


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Business Emphasis (with no minor)
This emphasis prepares the student for entry into the growing professions of economics and business. It trains the student to assist governments and businesses in solving problems and formulating policies.
Required Courses Semester Hours
General Studies (Level I and Level II) (minimum).........................................33
Business Core
(See business core for bachelor of science degree in School of Business)................33
Required Economics Courses
ECO 3010 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory..........................................3
ECO 3020 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory..........................................3
ECO 3150 Econometrics...............................................................3
ECO 4600 History of Economic Thought................................................3
Subtotal.................................................................................12
Approved Economics Electives*............................................................12
Total Hours of Economics.................................................................24
Electives within the School of Business (upper-division)..................................9
Other Non-Business Electives.............................................................21
Total Hours Required for a Bachelor of Arts in Economics with Business Emphasis.........120
* Upper-division economics electives selected in consultation with and approved by the Economics Department.
Minors in the School of Business
For non-business degree students, the School of Business offers eight minors in different business specialties. Most minors require 18 credit hours (plus prerequisites, if any). A student may not take more than 30 credit hours in the School of Business without declaring a business major.
Students should choose a minor that will help them in their chosen career. The general business minor should be declared after consultation with the associate dean. Other minors should be declared with the help of a faculty adviser or department chair of the appropriate department.
Accounting Minor
The Accounting Department provides a minor designed for non-business majors. The minor offers students a broad-based education in accounting, emphasizing a particular field within this discipline, such as financial accounting, managerial accounting, tax accounting, or governmental accounting.
The Accounting Department requires 60 credit hours (junior standing) before taking upper-division accounting courses. Non-business students are allowed to take only 30 credit hours in business courses. At least 12 hours of accounting courses in the minor must be completed in residency, and the acceptance of transfer credits will be governed by standards and policies of the School of Business and the
Accounting Department.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I.....................................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II....................................................3
ACC 3090 Income Tax I...................................................................3
ACC 3510 Intermediate Accounting I......................................................3
Approved Electives*.........................................................................6
Total Hours Required for Accounting Minor..................................................18
*A student may select any courses in the accounting program or curriculum provided they are approved by the Accounting Department adviser.
Computer Information Systems Minor
This minor is designed for students majoring in a non-business discipline. The minor will provide a basic understanding of the concepts, current methodology, and rapid changes in the design, development, and use of computer-oriented systems for businesses and organizations.
Required Courses Semester Hours
CMS 2010 Principles of Information Systems.......................................3
CMS 2110 Business Problem Solving: A Structured Programming Approach
-or-
CMS 3270 Micro-Based Software.........................................................3
CMS 3050 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design.............................3
CMS 3060 File Design and Data Base Management....................................3
Approved CMS 3000-Level Electives.....................................................6
Total Hours Required for CMS Minor....................................................18


62 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Economics Minor
The economics minor is designed for non-business majors and provides them with an opportunity to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions, as well as the quantitative tools necessary for analytical research and thought.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro.................................................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro.................................................3
Approved Electives *..................................................................12
Total Hours Required for Economics Minor..............................................18
I * Approved electives are upper-division economics courses selected in consultation with and approved
j by the Economics Department.
Finance Minors
I The Finance Department provides two minors designed primarily for non-business majors: the finance ; minor and the real estate minor.
Finance Minor
; This minor offers non-business majors a broad-based education in finance, emphasizing a particular Y field within this discipline, such as personal financial planning, investments, managerial finance, financial institutions, or international finance.
For the finance minor, the student must have completed ACC 2010 and ACC 2020 (or the equivalent) and ECO 2010 and ECO 2020, which may be applied to the students General Studies or elective requirements as applicable. The Finance Department requires 60 credit hours (junior standing) prior to taking upper-division finance courses. A minimum grade of C is required in all finance minor courses. At least 12 hours of finance courses must be completed in residency to satisfy the requirements of the minor. The acceptance of transfer credits will be governed by standards and policies of the School of
Business and the Finance Department.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FIN 3010 Financial Markets and Institutions.............................................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance.............................................................3
FIN 3600 Investments....................................................................3
Approved Electives*.........................................................................9
Total Hours Required for Finance Minor.....................................................18
*A student may select any courses in the finance program or curriculum provided they are approved by a Finance Department adviser.
Real Estate Minor
The minor prepares non-business majors for employment and a career in real estate, as well as for personal financial affairs dealing with this field.
For the real estate minor, the student must have completed ACC 2010 and ACC 2020 (or the equivalent) and ECO 2010, which may be applied to the students General Studies or elective requirements as applicable. The Finance Department requires 60 credit hours (junior standing) prior to taking upper-division finance courses. Non-business students are allowed to take only 30 credit hours in business courses. A minimum grade of C is required in all finance minor courses. At least 12 hours of finance courses in the minor must be completed in residency. The acceptance of transfer credits will be governed by standards and policies of the School of Business and the Finance Department.
Completion of FIN 3800, FIN 3810, and FIN 3820 fulfills the educational requirement for the Colorado
Real Estate Brokers License.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FIN 3800 Real Estate Practice and Law..................................................3
FIN 3810 Advanced Real Estate Practice and Law.........................................3
FIN 3820 Real Estate Finance..........................................................3
FIN 4840 Real Estate Appraisal.........................................................3
FIN 4850 Commercial and Investment Real Estate.........................................3
Approved Elective*........................................................................3
Total Hours Required for Real Estate Minor...............................................18


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 6
Approved Electives
FIN 2250 Personal Money Management.....................................................3
FIN 3010 Financial Markets and Institutions............................................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance............................................................3
FIN 3420 Principles of Insurance.......................................................3
FIN 3600 Investments...................................................................3
ECO 4500 Business and Economic Forecasting.............................................3
General Business Minor
The School of Business offers the general business minor for non-business majors. Students minoring in general business must take ECO 2010 and ECO 2020. These hours may be part of the students General Studies requirements. In addition to the required 24 credit hours below, students may take up to 6 additional credit hours within a specific business discipline for a total not to exceed 30 credit hours within the School of Business. If a student wishes to enroll in business courses beyond 30 hours, the
student must declare a major with the School of Business.
Prerequisites credits may be applied to General Studies Semester Hours
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics Macro.................................................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics Micro.................................................3
MTH 1310 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences.......................3
MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences.................................3
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I......................................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II.....................................................3
CMS 2010 Principles of Information Systems...............................................3
CMS 3300 Principles of Quantitative Management Systems...................................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance..............................................................3
MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business I.................................................3
MGT 3000 Organizational Management.......................................................3
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing.........................................................3
Minimum Total Hours Required for General Business Minor
(not to exceed 30 credit hours)...............................................................24
Management Minor
The management minor is designed for non-business majors. It gives them an opportunity to gain familiarity with managerial concepts and skills that can enhance their performance in managing people and
organizations.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGT 3000 Organizational Management.................................................3
MGT 3530 Human Resources Management................................................3
MGT 3550 Manufacturing and Service Management......................................3
MGT 3820 International Business....................................................3
MGT 4530 Organizational Behavior...................................................3
Approved Management Elective............................................................3
Total Hours Required for Management Minor...............................................18
Marketing Minor
The marketing minor is designed for non-business majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of business and sufficient familiarity with marketing skills to work in a busi-
ness environment.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing..................................................3
MKT 3010 Marketing Research.......................................................3
MKT 2040 Managerial Communications................................................3
MKT 3310 Consumer Behavior........................................................3
MKT 4520 Seminar in Marketing Management..........................................3
Approved Electives....................................................................3
Total Hours Required for Marketing Minor..............................................18


64 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
African American Leadership Institute
The African American Leadership Institute operates on the belief that all members of our society should have an equal opportunity to pursue their goals and aspirations. The institute provides a unique approach to the particular problems and concerns of African Americans in the Denver metropolitan area with three underlying tenets of its philosophy:
1. To identify, motivate, and train future community leaders;
2. To acquaint these individuals with the problems and needs of the community while investigating alternative approaches and solutions; and
3. To create an opportunity for these individuals to join together and exchange ideas with current leaders for the purpose of networking for national, state, and local community improvements.
Seminars cover topics that reflect current community issues, including regional business and economics, local and state government, education, health care, human services, the arts, and cultural affairs. For more information contact the School of Business.
Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity
The Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity has introduced entrepreneurial education into the regions academic arena through weekend courses for professionals and entrepreneurial seminars and forums. The purpose of the institute is to discover, foster, and mold the visions of todays aspiring entrepreneurs. It provides degree-seeking and non-degree-seeking students with opportunities to learn about entrepreneurship, to understand the entrepreneurial process, to practice skills that lead to successful entrepreneurship, and to enhance creativity and innovation. For more information contact the School of Business.
Small Business Institute
The Small Business Institute offers a practical opportunity that supplements academic studies with real case studies. The Small Business Institute employs senior-level students, under faculty supervision, to provide business counseling and technical assistance to small business clients in the community. For more information contact the School of Business.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 6
A
The School of Letters, ArU and Sciences j
provided high quality liberal artd education designed to meet the educational need.i of the urban dtudent.


66 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences offers programs of study in humanities and in social, natural, and mathematical sciences. The programs prepare students for careers, graduate work, and lifelong learning.
The school offers more than 30 major and minor programs through 18 departments and the Institute for Womens Studies and Services. The faculty teach the majority of the General Studies Program and help prepare students to be teachers. In addition, they arrange internships and other applied educational experiences in state and local agencies, business, industry, and the media.
Through centers and a special program, the school advances educational and social goals:
The Family Center provides a wide range of education, training, and research on policies related to family issues.
The Center for Mathematics, Science and Environmental Education leads the effort to reform science and mathematics education in Colorado. The center contributes to systemic change in education by building cooperative programs with other colleges and universities, public schools, and the Colorado Department of Education. The center is the focal point for the Colorado Alliance for Science, a statewide alliance.
The Colorado Alliance for Science, a statewide alliance of universities, offers assistance and support to students and teachers to strengthen the communitys interest in science and mathematics.
The Golda Meir Center for Political Leadership is a nonpartisan, educational project designed to foster greater public understanding of the role and meaning of leadership at all levels of civic life, from community affairs to international relations.
The Health Careers Science Program offers support and guidance to women and people of color who are interested in careers in science and technology.
African American Studies Department
The African American Studies Department offers a range of courses in African American studies that present the dimension of the black experience in this country. These courses encompass and afford a comprehensive understanding of the African heritage. They present African links and potential; contributions of black people in the growth and development of the United States; black culture and lifestyles; the black community; political activity and potential; religious development and importance; community service and resource assistance; and prognosis and potential for social change. The courses may apply in the General Studies requirements and as electives for graduation.
Students are urged to consult with the faculty in the African American Studies Department about new courses now being designed, as well as special offerings.
The major in African American studies, which leads to a bachelor of arts degree, and the minor program must be planned in consultation with an adviser in the African American Studies Department.
Students desiring secondary licensure in social studies should see the section on the teacher education
program.
African American Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
A AS 1010 Introduction to African American Studies.....................................3
AAS 1130 Survey of African History (HIS 1940).........................................3
AAS 2000 Social Movements and the Black Experience (SOC 2000).........................3
AAS 3300 The Black Community (SOC 3140)...............................................3
AAS 3700 Psychology of Racism and Group Prejudice (PSY 3700)..........................3
AAS 4850 Research Seminar in African American Studies.................................3
Select one from the following:
MUS 2010 Topics in Ethnic Music: Variable Title.......................................3
ART 3040 African Art..................................................................3
AAS 3240 African American Literature (ENG 3240).......................................3
Electives................................................................................18
Total....................................................................................39
Electives
Elective hours in African American studies courses are selected in consultation with the adviser.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 6
Minor in African American Studies
Required Courses Semester Hours
A AS 1010 Introduction to African American Studies..................................3
A AS 2000 Social Movements and Black Experience (SOC 2000) .. L...................3
Total...............................................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours is required in African American courses, 3 hours of which must be an African course, selected in consultation with and approved by the African American studies adviser assigned to the student. Total hours for the minor are 21.
Assessment Test
During the final semester, students majoring in African American studies will be required to take a comprehensive assessment test.
Art Department
The Art Department offers a full range of studio art courses in the areas of fine arts (drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, video, and sculpture); design (advertising design and computer graphics); and crafts (ceramics, metalwork, jewelry making, and art furniture) leading to the bachelor of fine arts degree; art history (studies emphasize contemporary, modem, ancient, and non-Westem art) leading to the bachelor of fine arts degree; and licensure in art education.
Goals
Undergraduate studies in art and design prepare students to function in a variety of artistic roles. In order to achieve these goals, instruction should prepare students to:
read the nonverbal language of art and design
develop responses to visual phenomena and organize perceptions and conceptualizations both rationally and intuitively
become familiar with and develop competence in a number of art and design techniques
become familiar with major achievements in the history of art, including the works and intentions of leading artists in the past and present and demonstrate the way art reflects cultural values
evaluate developments in the history of art
understand and evaluate contemporary thinking about art and design
make valid assessments of quality in design projects and works of art
Art Major for Bachelor of Fine Arts
Core Requirements for All Studio Art Majors Semester Hours
ART 1100 Basic Drawing I...........................................................3
ART 1110 Basic Drawing II..........................................................3
ART 1200 Design Processes and Concepts I......................................... 3
ART 1210 Design Processes and Concepts II..........................................3
ART 2010 Survey of Modem Art: Impressionism through Abstract Expressionism.........3
ART 2020 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present...........................3
Total.................................................................................18
Senior Experience Requirements for Studio Art Majors
ART 4010 Modem Art History: Theory and Criticism................................. 3
ART 4750 Senior Experience Studio: Portfolio Development and Thesis Show...........3
Total..................................................................................6
Students choose one of the four areas of emphasis: fine arts, design, crafts, or art history.
Fine Arts Emphasis.........................................................................21
15 hours in area of concentration in: drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, or photography (within the 21 above)
Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas:
Design.........................................................L...................6 or 9
Crafts.............................................................................6 or 9
ART 2000 World Art Prior to 1880...................................................3
Art History (upper-division)...........................................................3


68 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Design Emphasis................................................................................21
15 hours in area of concentration in: advertising design or computer graphics (within the 21 above) Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas:
Crafts.................................................................................6 or 9
Fine Arts..............................................................................6 or 9
ART 2000 World Art Prior to 1880...................................................3
Art History (upper-division)..............................................................3
Crafts Emphasis................................................................................21
15 hours in area of concentration in: ceramics, jewelry, or art furniture (within the 21 above).
Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas:
Design.................................................................................6 or 9
Fine Arts..............................................................................6 or 9
T
ART 2000 World Art Prior to 1880.................................................................3
Art History (upper-division).....................................................................3
Total...........................................................................................66
(A minimum of 33 upper-division art hours required.) Minor requirements for art majors are optional.
Art History Major for Bachelor of Fine Arts
Core Requirements for All Art History Majors Semester Hours
ART 1100 Basic Drawing I.........................................................3
ART 1110 Basic Drawing II........................................................3
ART 1200 Design Processes and Concepts I..........................................3
ART 1210 Design Processes and Concepts II.........................................3
ART 2010 Survey of Modem Art: Impressionism through AbstractExpressionism.........3
ART 2020 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present..........................3
Total.................................................................................18
Senior Experience Requirement for Art History Majors
ART 4010 Modem Art History: Theory and Criticism..........................................3
Total...........................................................................................3
Art History (required).........................................................................15
ART 2000 World Art Prior to 1880.......................................................3
Fine Arts*..................................................................................3 or 6
Design*.....................................................................................3 or 6
Crafts*.....................................................................................3 or 6
Art Electives...................................................................................6
Total..........................................................................................60
*75 hours are required among these three categories.
(A minimum of 27 upper-division art hours required.)
Minor requirements for art majors are optional.
Industrial Design Major for Bachelor of Arts
For advising in this program, please contact the office of the dean, School of Professional Studies.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Art Licensure: K-12
Teacher licensure for art majors is available through the Art Department. An art major is required.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ART 3380 Introduction to Art Education....................................................4
EDS 3110 Processes of Education in Multicultural Urban Secondary Schools..................3
EDS 3120 Field Experience in Multicultural Urban Secondary Schools........................3
EDS 3200 The Adolescent as a Learner......................................................3
EDS 3210 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom Management.............................3
EDS 3220 Field Experience in Teaching, Materials Construction, and Classroom Management... 3
SED 3600 The Exceptional Learner in the Classroom.........................................3
RDG 3280 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content Areas.............................4
ART 4380 Art Methods/Materials: K-12......................................................4
EDU 4190* Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary (K-6)..................................8
EDS 4290* Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary (6-12)..................................8
ART 4390 Integrating the Arts for Gifted and Talented.....................................3
Total.........................................................................................48
*Student teaching is composed of daily full-time work during 15 weeks, split 8 and 7 weeks between elementary and secondary levels.
In addition to field experiences included in required coursework, students must present evidence of having completed at least 200 hours of work with children. This may be accomplished through a variety of community organizations and institutional activities. Students should plan their volunteer work in consultation with the art education adviser.
Students who seek licensure must pass a public speaking course (SPE 1010) with a grade of B or better, or obtain a waiver. Students must also achieve satisfactory scores on the state licensure examination.
Minor in Art
Required Courses Semester Hours
ART 1100 Basic Drawing I...........................................................3
ART 1110 Basic Drawing II..........................................................3
ART 1200 Design Processes and Concepts I.............................................3
ART 1210 Design Processes and Concepts II............................................3
ART 2010 Survey of Modem Art: Impressionism through Abstract Expressionism...........3
ART 2020 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present.............................3
Subtotal.................................................................................18
Electives.................................................................................9
Minimum of one upper-division studio course and one upper-division art history course
Total....................................................................................27
Biology Department
The Biology Department offers two majors, the bachelor of science in biology and the bachelor of arts in biology. While it is not necessary to declare an emphasis within these majors, a student may choose to emphasize botany, medical technology, microbiology, or zoology. Supportive courses associated with paramedical studies and criminalistics, as well as general courses for enrichment of the nonscience students background, are offered by the department.
Students seeking secondary licensure in science should see an adviser in the teacher education program. A biology minor is offered to students with related majors or a special interest in the field.
Biology Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
BIO 1080 General Introduction to Biology.................................................4
BIO 3600 General Genetics................................................................4
Select two of the following:
BIO 2100 General Botany.................................................................5
BIO 2200 General Zoology.................................................................5
BIO 2400 General Microbiology............................................................4
Select one of the following:
BIO 3550 Urban Ecology...................................................................4
BIO 4540 Plant Ecology...................................................................4
BIO 4550 Animal Ecology..................................................................4
Subtotal................................................................................21-22


70 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Electives
Biology courses selected from the 2000-, 3000-, and 4000-level series, and approved by faculty advisers in the Biology Department, must be completed to bring the total of biology courses approved for the major to 40 semester hours. At least 14 of these elective semester hours must be from the 3000- and 4000-level courses of the Biology Department.
Electives..................................................................................18-19
Total.........................................................................................40
Required Non-biology Courses
One year of college general chemistry, one semester of upper-division organic chemistry, one semester of upper-division biochemistry, and one year of mathematics starting with MTH 1110, are requisites for
the bachelor of science major in biology.
Biology Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
BIO 1080 General Introduction to Biology.............................................4
BIO 3600 General Genetics............................................................4
Select two of the following:
BIO 2100 General Botany..............................................................5
BIO 2200 General Zoology.............................................................5
BIO 2400 General Microbiology........................................................4
Select one of the following:
BIO 3550 Urban Ecology...............................................................4
BIO 4540 Plant Ecology...............................................................4
BIO 4550 Animal Ecology..............................................................4
Subtotal...............................................................................21-22
Electives
Biology courses selected from the 2000-, 3000-, and 4000-level series, and approved by faculty advisers in the Biology Department, must be completed to bring the total of biology courses approved for the major to 40 semester hours. At least 14 of these elective semester hours must be from the 3000- and 4000-level courses of the Biology Department.
Electives......................................................................................18-19
Total..............................................................................................40
Required Non-biology Courses
One year of general chemistry (equivalent to the present courses CHE 1100 and CHE 2100).
Botany Emphasis
Requirements for either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree in biology must be satisfied, and the 40 hours of biology courses must include BIO 2100 and BIO 4540, and 15 semester hours from
the following botany electives:*
Elective Courses Semester Hours
BIO 3140 Plant Physiology............................................................5
BIO 3150 Plant Hormones..............................................................2
BIO 3160 Plant Anatomy and Morphology................................................4
BIO 3180 Vascular Plant Taxonomy.....................................................4
BIO 4120 Algology....................................................................4
BIO 4160 Mycology....................................................................4
BIO 4850 Evolution...................................................................3
Subtotal................................................................................15
*BlO 3010 and BIO 3050 are both applicable to the fields of botany, microbiology, and zoology and are recommended as additional electives for all three areas of emphasis.
Medical Technology Emphasis
Students must satisfy the requirements listed for the bachelor of science degree in biology, including BIO 2400. Students must also take BIO 3350, BIO 4440, and BIO 4450. Additional hours must be taken from the courses listed below to complete the 20 hours of upper-division courses and a total of 40
semester credit hours in biology.
Elective Courses Semester Hours
BIO 3210 Histology.....................................................................4
BIO 3270 Parasitology..................................................................4
BIO 3360 Animal Physiology.............................................................4
BIO 4160 Mycology......................................................................4
Subtotal...................................................................................16


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Internship
Completion of a medical technology internship at an approved school of medical technology.
Required Non-biology Courses
The student must satisfy the requirements listed for non-biology courses for the bachelor of science major and complete the requirements for a minor in chemistry.
Microbiology Emphasis
Students must satisfy the requirements listed for the bachelor of science major in biology, including BIO 2400. Students must also take BIO 3350, BIO 4400, BIO 4450, and BIO 4470. Additional hours from the courses listed below or appropriate omnibus courses as selected by the student and approved by the microbiology faculty must be taken to complete the 20 hours of upper-division elective courses and a total of 40 semester hours in biology.*
Elective Courses Semester Hours
BIO 3270 Parasitology...................................................................4
BIO 4120 Algology.......................................................................4
BIO 4160 Mycology...................................................................... 4
BIO 4440 Virology.......................................................................3
*BlO 3010 and BIO 3050 are both applicable to the fields of botany, microbiology, and zoology and are recommended as additional electives for all three areas of emphasis.
Required Non-biology Courses
The student must satisfy the requirements listed for non-biology courses for the bachelor of science major including one course in biostatistics or calculus and a computer science course to fulfill the required one year of college mathematics. In addition, the student must complete CHE 3000, CHE 3010,
CHE 4320, and one year of college physics.
Zoology Emphasis
Students must satisfy the requirements for the bachelor of science degree in biology and must include in the 40 semester hours of biology courses BIO 2200 and BIO 4550 and 15 semester hours from the
following list of zoology electives:*
Elective Courses Semester Hours
BIO 3210 Histology...................................................................4
BIO 3220 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy..............................................5
BIO 3250 Arthropod Zoology...........................................................4
BIO 3270 Parasitology................................................................4
BIO 3340 Endocrinology...............................................................3
BIO 3360 Animal Physiology...........................................................4
BIO 4250 Entomology........................................j.........................4
BIO 4270 Herpetology.................................................................3
BIO 4280 Ornithology.................................................................4
BIO 4290 Mammalogy...................................................................3
BIO 4810 Vertebrate Embryology. .....................................................4
Subtotal..................................................................................15
*B10 3010 and BIO 3050 are both applicable to the fields of botany, microbiology, and zoology and are recommended as additional electives for all three areas of emphasis.
Minor in Biology
Required Courses Semester Hours
BIO 1080 General Introduction to Biology...................*.........................4
Select two of the following:
BIO 2100 General Botany..............................................................5
BIO 2200 General Zoology...................................j.........................5
BIO 2400 General Microbiology..............................L.........................4
BIO 2310, 2320 Human Anatomy and Human Physiology I and II..........................8
Select one of the following:
BIO 3550 Urban Ecology............................................................. 4
BIO 3600 General Genetics............................................................4
BIO 4540 Plant Ecology....................................(..........................4
BIO 4550 Animal Ecology..............................................................4
Subtotal...............................................................................17-21


72 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Electives
Biology courses from the 2000-, 3000-, and 4000-level series, approved by the Biology Department, must be completed to bring the total of biology courses approved for the minor to 24 semester hours.
Total..............................................................................24
Senior Experience for Biology Majors
A student majoring in biology may fulfill the Senior Experience requirement with any course approved for the purpose by the General Studies Committee. Any biology course approved by the General Studies Committee and the Biology Department for Senior Experience credit may be counted toward the Senior Experience requirement, or toward a biology major/biology minor, but not both.
Chemistry Department
The Chemistry Department is approved by the American Chemical Society and offers several degree programs: the bachelor of science in chemistry; bachelor of science in chemistry occupational health and safety area of emphasis; bachelor of science in chemistry criminalistics area of emphasis; and the bachelor of arts in chemistry. Minors in chemistry and criminalistics are also available.
Students who plan to pursue a career in chemistry after graduation or plan to attend graduate school in chemistry should choose the bachelor of science in chemistry program. The bachelor of arts in chemistry program is designed for students who plan a career in a field related to chemistry, but who do not intend to attend graduate school in chemistry. The bachelor of arts option, which requires fewer hours, may be especially attractive to those wishing a second major or to those students desiring secondary education licensure.
Criminalistics is the scientific investigation, identification, and comparison of physical evidence for criminal or civil court proceedings. Criminalists must be trained in many disciplines including chemistry, biology, law enforcement, physics, and mathematics. The four-year criminalistics curriculum leads to a bachelor of science degree and includes a half-time internship in a criminalistics laboratory during the senior year. Students in the criminalistics program are encouraged to complete all the requirements for a degree in chemistry approved by the American Chemical Society while completing the criminalistics degree program. Graduates of the program are prepared for employment in criminalistics and have completed the requirements for admission to graduate school in chemistry or criminalistics, medical school, dental school, or law school.
Students electing the chemistry major with the occupational health and safety emphasis will be trained in the recognition, evaluation, and control of hazards in the workplace. This area of emphasis includes courses equivalent to those required for the bachelor of arts major in chemistry, as well as supporting science and mathematics courses and courses in instrumental analysis, toxicology, safety, and occupational health and safety. A mandatory internship during the junior or senior year provides valuable practical experience. Graduates of this program are prepared for immediate employment in the field of occupational health and safety or the field of chemistry. Graduates in this emphasis area also meet the requirements for admissions to medical school, dental school, veterinary school, or graduate school in industrial hygiene or chemistry.
For further information about the occupational health and safety or criminalistics programs, students should contact the Chemistry Department. Students seeking secondary education licensure in science should see an adviser in the teacher education program for requirements.
The following courses constitute the basic core and are required in all chemistry degree programs except
for the minor in chemistry.
Basic Core Semester Hours
CHE 1800 General Chemistry I............................................................4
CHE 1810 General Chemistry II...........................................................4
CHE 1850 General Chemistry Laboratory...................................................2
CHE 3000 Analytical Chemistry..........................................................3
CHE 3010 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory................................................2
CHE 3100 Organic Chemistry 1............................................................4
CHE 3110 Organic Chemistry II..........................................................3
CHE 3120 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory.................................................2
CHE 3130 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory................................................2
Total......................................................................................26


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES i
Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
Basic Core................................................................................26
Additional Required Chemistry Courses:
CHE 3250 Physical Chemistry 1........................................................4
CHE 3260 Physical Chemistry II.......................................................4
CHE 3280 Physical Chemistry I Laboratory............................................2
CHE 3290 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory............................................2
Subtotal..................................................................................12
Electives
A minimum of 10 semester hours in chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved
by the Chemistry Department is required...................................................10
Total Hours Required......................................................................48
Required Ancillary Courses for Bachelor of Science
MTH 1410 Calculus 1..................................................................4
MTH 2410 Calculus II.................................................................4
MTH 2420 Calculus III................................................................4
PHY 2311 General Physics I -and-
PHY 2331 General Physics II -or-
PHY 2010 College Physics I -and-
PHY 2020 College Physics II.................................................................8
Subtotal........................................................................................20
American Chemical Society Approval
To meet American Chemical Society degree criteria the following courses must be completed:
CHE 2300 Inorganic Chemistry..............................................................3
CHE 3400 Chemical Literature Search.......................................................1
CHE 4100 Instrumental Analysis............................................................3
CHE 4110 Instrumental Analysis Lab........................................................2
CHE 4300 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.....................................................3
Subtotal........................................................................................12
Electives
An additional 6 credit hours of advanced level electives are required. Electives should be selected in consultation with the Chemistry Department. The following courses may be appropriate:
CHE 4010, CHE 4020, and CHE 4320...............................................................6
Total...........................................................................................56
Occupational Health and Safety Emphasis
Please consult with the Chemistry Department regarding the availability of this emphasis and these courses.
Students electing this program of study must complete the basic chemistry core (26 hours) in addition to the following required courses. The requirement of a minor is waived for students in this program.
Required Courses Semester Hours
Basic Core...................................................................................26
Additional Required Chemistry Courses:
CHE 3190 Survey of Physical Chemistry...................................................4
CHE 3200 Survey of Physical Chemistry Laboratory........................................2
CHE 4100 Instrumental Analysis..........................................................3
CHE 4110 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory.........................I..........................2
CHE 4310 Biochemistry I.................................................................4
CHE 4350 Biochemistry Laboratory..................................[..........................1
Required Occupational Health and Safety Courses:
CHE 2500 Introduction to Occupational Health and Safety.................................3
CHE 3500 Occupational Safety............................................................3
CHE 4150 Instrumentation and Analysis in the Occupational Environment...................4
CHE 4200 Evaluation and Control of Air Quality..........................................3
CHE 4250 Principles of Occupational Health and Safety...................................3
CHE 4500 Occupational Toxicology........................................................3
CHE 4750 Occupational Health and Safety Internship......................................8


74 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
T
Required Ancillary Courses:
BIO 1080 General Introduction to Biology..................................................4
BIO 2320 Human Anatomy and Physiology II..................................................4
BIO 2400 General Microbiology.............................................................4
MTH 1210 Introduction to Statistics.......................................................3
MTH 1410 Calculus 1.......................................................................4
PHY 2010 College Physics I................................................................4
PHY 2030 College Physics I Laboratory.....................................................1
Subtotal......................................................................................93
Electives
The following courses are recommended as electives:
SPE 1010 Fundamentals of Speech Communication.....................................3
COM 2610 Introduction to Technical Writing........................................3
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro............................................3
MGT 4610 Labor/Employee Relations.................................................3
Criminalistics Emphasis
Students electing this program of study must complete the basic chemistry core (26 hours) in addition to the following required courses. The requirement of a minor is waived for students in this program.
Required Courses Semester Hours
Basic Core.....................................................................................26
Additional Required Chemistry Courses:
CHE 3190 Survey of Physical Chemistry......................................................4
CHE 3200 Survey of Physical Chemistry Laboratory...........................................1
CHE 4100 Instrumental Analysis.............................................................3
CHE 4110 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory..................................................2
CHE 4310 Biochemistry I....................................................................4
CHE 4350 Biochemistry Laboratory...........................................................1
Required Criminalistics Courses:
CHE 3700 Criminalistics 1..................................................................4
CHE 3710 Criminalistics II.................................................................4
CHE 4700 Criminalistics I Internship.......................................................7
CHE 4710 Criminalistics II Internship......................................................7
Required Criminal Justice Courses:
CJC 1010 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System..................................3
CJC 2100 Substantive Criminal Law.....................................................3
CJC 2120 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures............................................3
CJC 3120 Constitutional Law...........................................................3
Required Ancillary Courses:
BIO 1080 General Introduction to Biology...............................................4
BIO 2400 General Microbiology..........................................................4
BIO 3600 General Genetics..............................................................4
MTH 1210 Introduction to Statistics...................................................4
MTH 1410 Calculus I............../..........................................................4
PHY 2010 College Physics I and
PHY 2030 College Physics I Laboratory
-or-
PHY 2311 General Physics I and
PHY 2321 General Physics I Laboratory.................................................5
Total.......................................................................................99
Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
Basic Chemistry Core........................................................................26
Additional Required Chemistry Courses:
CHE 3190 Survey of Physical Chemistry.................................................4
CHE 3200 Survey of Physical Chemistry Laboratory......................................1
Electives
A minimum of 6 semester hours in chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Chemistry Department is required.
Subtotal...........................................................................................6


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES i
Required Ancillary Courses MTH 1410 Calculus I 4
PHY 2010 College Physics I 4
Total Ancillary Courses Required 8
Total 45
Minor in Chemistry
Students completing the basic chemistry core (26 hours) qualify for a minor in chemistry. Students may elect to substitute 5 semester hours in other upper-division chemistry courses for CHE 3110 and CHE 3130.
Core Semester Hours
CHE 1800 General Chemistry I...........................................................4
CHE 1810 General Chemistry II..........................................................4
CHE 1850 General Chemistry Laboratory..................................................2
CHE 3000 Analytical Chemistry..........................................................3
CHE 3010 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory...............................................2
CHE 3100 Organic Chemistry I......................................J.........................4
CHE 3110 Organic Chemistry II..........................................................3
CHE 3120 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory................................................2
CHE 3130 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory...............................................2
Total.......................................................................................26
Minor in Criminalistics
Required Courses Semester Hours
CHE 1100 Principles of Chemistry.......................................................5
CHE 2700 Introduction to Criminalistics................................................4
CHE 2750 Arson and Explosives..........................................................3
CHE 2760 Field Testing and Laboratory Analysis of Drugs................................1
CHE 3600 Crime Scene Investigation I...................................................4
CHE 3610 Crime Scene Investigation II..................................................4
CJC 2120 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures.............................................3
Total.......................................................................................24
Chicano Studies Department
The Chicano Studies Department offers a bachelor of arts degree in Chicano studies. The Chicano and other Hispanic historical experiences are used as points of departure toward expanding awareness of the multicultural world and the contributions of Chicanos. The program is designed to assist in the preparation of scholars as well as human service providers.
Chicano Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts
The requirements include core courses in the major, basic knowledge of the Spanish language, plus
approved electives.
Required Courses Semester Hours
CHS 1000 Introduction to Chicano Studies........................................3
CHS 1010 History of Meso-America: Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods (HIS 1910)........3
CHS 1020 History of the Chicano in the Southwest: 1810 to Present (HIS 1920)...........3
CHS 2010 Survey of Chicano Literature (ENG 2410).......................................3
CHS 3100 The Chicano Community (SOC 3130)..............................................3
CHS 4850 Research Experience in Chicano Studies........................................3
Subtotal.........................................................J..........................18
Language Requirements
SPA 1010 Elementary Spanish I.............................J...........................5
SPA 1020 Elementary Spanish II.........................................................5
SPA 2110 Intermediate Spanish
-or-
SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conversation..................j...........................3
Subtotal.........................................................1..........................13
Approved Electives...............................................L...........................9
Total......................................................................................40
A minimum of 9 semester hours of electives in Chicano studies selected in consultation with the department chair is required.


76 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Minor in Chicano Studies
The minor can be designed to provide the student with course experiences that are relevant to occupational and educational goals. Students, in consultation with a faculty adviser in Chicano studies, will develop individual minors that reflect the best possible elective curricula and ensure that a relevant
emphasis is maintained. Total hours for the minor are 21.
Required Courses Semester Hours
CHS 1000 Introduction to Chicano Studies...............................................3
CHS 1010 History of Meso-America: Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods...................3
CHS 1020 History of the Chicano in the Southwest: Mexican and United States Periods...3
CHS 2010 Survey of Chicano Literature.................................................3
Total......................................................................................12
Electives
; A minimum of 9 semester hours of electives is required to complete the minor. The courses are to be ; selected in consultation with a Chicano studies faculty adviser.
; Assessment Test
During the final semester, students majoring in Chicano studies will be required to take a comprehen-; sive assessment test.
^ Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department
The Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department is composed of three separate disciplines: geography, geology, and meteorology. The department offers a bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree in land use and a bachelor of science degree in meteorology. The bachelor of science degree is recommended for those students desiring a stronger background in the physical and quantitative aspects of the environment.
Minor programs are available in geography, geology, and meteorology. Students working toward teacher licensure in either science or social studies may take courses in geology, geography, or meteorology. Students interested in environmental science or earth space science may develop an Individualized Degree Program major through Adult Learning Services.
Land Use
The land use major is very broad in scope and can be used for a number of career objectives and graduate school programs. Opportunities exist in such areas as planning, cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), air photo and satellite imagery interpretation, environmental and resource management, travel and transportation, mining and mineral resources, residential and industrial development, recreational land use, population analysis, and a variety of other interrelated fields. This program provides a solid foundation for continued study at the graduate level.
Land Use Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Core Semester Hours
MTH 1210 Introduction to Statistics.....................................................4
GEG 1220 Map Use........................................................................2
Choose one from each of the following sets:
GEG 1000 World Regional Geography
GEG 1300 Introduction to Human Geography................................................3
GEG 1100 Introduction to Physical Geography
GEG 1010 General Geology................................................................4
GEG 2250 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
GEG 3210 Introduction to Cartography....................................................4
GEG 3610 Principles of Land Use
GEL 4010 Environmental Hazards and Planning.............................................3
GEG 4950 Internship in Geography
GEL 4950 Internship in Geology..........................................................2
Senior Experience
GEG 4960 Global Environmental Challenges
GEL 4960 Environmental Field Studies....................................................3
Core Total................................................................................23-25
Area of Emphasis Total....................................................................19-21
Land Use Major Total......................................................................42-46


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Required Areas of Emphasis for the Land Use Major
In addition to the required land use core, each student must complete one of the areas of emphasis listed below. Within the area of emphasis, students must complete a set of required courses plus electives. Electives are chosen in consultation with a departmental adviser and are designed to provide an integrated and well-planned pattern of courses related to the students educational and career goals.
Urban Land Use Emphasis Semester Hours
GEG 3360 Geography of Economic Activity.............................................3
GEG 3600 Urban Geography........................................-........................3
GEG 4610 Urban and Regional Planning................................................3
URS 4500 Cities of the Future...................................\........................3
Urban Land Use Electives*.......................................J........................7
Subtotal................................................................................19
*Choose a minimum of 7 semester hours of elective credit, in consultation with a departmental adviser.
Geographic Information Systems Emphasis Semester Hours
GEG 2250 Introduction to GIS
-or-
GEG 3210 Cartography....................................................................4
(whichever course was not taken as part of the core)
GEG 3220 Intermediate Cartography.......................................................3
GEG 3250 Computer Cartography...........................................................3
GEG 4850 Advanced Geographic Information Systems........................................3
CSI 1010 Introduction to Computer Science...............................................3
Geographic Information Systems Electives*....................................................6
Subtotal.....................................................................................21
*Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours of elective credit, in consultation with a departmental adviser.
Environment and Resources Emphasis Semester Hours
GEG 1200 Introduction to Environmental Science....................................3
GEG 1400 World Resources..........................................................3
GEG 4840 Remote Sensing...........................................................3
ECO 3450 Environmental Economics..................................................3
Environment and Resources Electives*..................................................7
Subtotal.....................................................[........................19
*Choose a minimum of 7 hours of elective credit, in consultation with a departmental adviser.
Geology Emphasis Semester Hours
GEL 3120 Advanced Geomorphology.................................................. 4
GEL 3420 Soil Resources............................................................4
GEL 3440 Energy and Mineral Resources..............................................4
GEL 4000 Environmental Geology.....................................................3
Geology Electives*.....................................................................5
Subtotal...............................................................................20
Note: students selecting this area of emphasis will be required to minor in geology.
*Choose a minimum of 5 semester hours of elective credit, in consultation with a departmental adviser.
Required Minor
Except for the geology area of emphasis, the field of study selected as a minor is at the option of the
student.
Land Use Major for Bachelor of Arts
To fulfill the requirements for the bachelor of science with a major in land use, a student must complete the requirements as listed above under the bachelor of arts; however, the student must minor in one of the sciences, or science-oriented fields as approved by the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department.
Minor in Geology
Required Core Semester Hours
GEL 1010 General Geology..............................................................4
Any 1000-level GEL Course................................................................3^4
GEL 2010 Rocks and Minerals...........................................................4
GEL 2020 The Stratigraphy and Structure of the Earth..................................4
Any 3000- or 4000-level GEL Courses.......................................................8
Total.................................................................................23-24


78 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Minor in Geography
Required Courses Semester Hours
GEG 1120 Orienteering..............................................................1
GEG 1220 Map Use...................................................................2
GEG 1300 Introduction to Human Geography...........................................3
GEG 1230 Weather and Climate
-or
MTR 1400 Introduction to Meteorology................................................3
Subtotal................................................................................ 9
Structured Electives
A minimum of 13 additional hours must be selected in consultation with a department adviser. At least one course must be selected from each of the following groups to satisfy this requirement.
Physical
GEG 1100 Introduction to Physical Geography........................................3
GEG 1240 Landforms of the United States............................................3
GEL 1010 General Geology...........................................................4
Resources and Environment
GEG 1200 Introduction to Environmental Science.....................................3
GEG 1400 World Resources...........................................................3
GEG 3400 Water Resources...........................................................3
GEL 3420 Soil Resources............................................................4
GEL 3440 Energy and Mineral Resources..............................................4
Spatial Analysis and Planning
GEG 3600 Urban Geography...........................................................3
GEG 3610 Principles of Land Use....................................................3
GEG 3620 Population, Resources and Land Use........................................3
GEG 3630 Transportation Planning and Land Use......................................3
GEG 4620 Land Use: Residential.....................................................3
Urban Studies Regional Geography
GEG 1000 World Regional Geography..................................................3
GEG 2020 Geography of Colorado.....................................................3
GEG 2100 Geography of Latin America................................................2
GEG 2200 Geography of the United States............................................3
GEG 3000 Historical Geography of the United States.................................3
Field study in either geography or geology...............................................1
Subtotal................................................................................13
Total...................................................................................22
Meteorology
Meteorology is the science of the atmosphere. Modem meteorologists are involved in weather observing, forecasting, research, and dissemination of weather information to the public. Meteorologists also study global weather and climate, and investigate the influence that human beings exert on Earths climate. The forecasting laboratory includes a computerized observing station, daily weather maps, satellite images, and access to the national weather database. The bachelor of science degree in meteorology follows American Meteorological Society recommendations for undergraduate programs. Students should contact a meteorology faculty member to discuss degree programs, career opportunities, and graduate school options.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Meteorology Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
MTR 1400 Introduction to Meteorology................................................3
MTR 1420 Introduction to Meteorology Lab.......................................... 1
MTR 2410 Meteorological Instrumentation....................I........................3
MTR 3400 Synoptic Meteorology I............................[........................4
MTR 3410 Synoptic Meteorology II...........................L........................4
MTR 3430 Dynamic Meteorology I......................................................3
MTR 3440 Physical Meteorology.......................................................3
MTR 3450 Dynamic Meteorology II.....................................................3
MTR 4410 Numerical Weather Prediction...............................................3
MTR 4420 Industrial Meteorology.....................................................3
MTR 4440 Climatology................................................................3
Elective Meteorology Courses.............................................................7
Subtotal................................................................................40
Additional Course Requirements*
ENG 1010 Freshman Composition: The Essay............................................3
ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, and Documentation................3
MTH 1210 Introduction to Statistics.................................................4
MTH 1410 Calculus 1.................................................................4
MTH 1510 Computer Programming: FORTRAN..............................................4
MTH 2410 Calculus II................................................................4
PHY 2311, 2321 General Physics I and Lab.................................................5
PHY 2331, 2341 General Physics II and Lab................................................5
CHE 1800 General Chemistry I........................................................4
Level I Communications...................................................................3
Level II Arts and Letters................................................................6
Level II Historical......................................................................3
Level II Social Science..................................................................6
Subtotal................................................................................54
An Approved Minor.......................................................................20
Approved Electives......................................................................12
Total..................................................................................126
*Students must consult a faculty adviser regarding General Studies requirements.
Minor in Meteorology
Required Courses Semester Hours
MTR 1400 Introduction to Meteorology................................................3
MTR 1420 Introduction to Meteorology Lab............................................1
MTR 3400 Synoptic Meteorology I..........................................................4
MTR 3410 Synoptic Meteorology............................................................4
Approved Electives.......................................................................8
Total...................................................................................20
English Department
The English Department offers instruction in literature, writing, language, and linguistics and in elementary and secondary English education. Courses in each area appeal to students in every school of the college who wish to read and understand representative literatures of the world; to examine the principles underlying how language works; and to cultivate their writing skills.
The department invites students in other disciplines to select English courses to enhance their general education. Students may also choose an English major or minor from areas listed below.
Students who are considering a major or minor in the English Department are expected to consult with faculty for advising. Students in elementary or secondary licensure programs should consult with advisers in the appropriate education department as well.


80 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
The English major may choose an emphasis in one of the following:
literature
writing
elementary school teaching, leading to licensure
secondary school teaching, leading to licensure
The English minor may choose an emphasis in one of the following:
language and linguistics
literature
writing
The English Department assesses the major in designated Senior Experience courses. Portfolios of papers assigned through these courses will be read by members of the faculty. Senior Experience courses should not be taken until the students final year of study. Because these courses may not be offered every semester, students should discuss scheduling with English Department advisers. Further information is available in the English Department office.
English Major for Bachelor of Arts Literature Emphasis
The English major, literature emphasis, encompasses a range of American, British, and world literature. The program provides a strong foundation of courses in literature and language, sequenced to cultivate a sense of literary development, and fosters an increasing familiarity with major works and writers, critical theory, literary terminology, and research materials. Because of their command of the written language, their ability to deal with ideas and concepts as well as facts, and their broader understanding of human nature and social realities, literature majors are valued in many fields, including academe, the
law, and the world of business.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ENG 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies...................................................3
ENG 3100 Studies in Chaucer, Shakespeare and Milton.........................................3
ENG 3440 Myth, Symbol and Allusion In Literature............................................3
ENG 4610 Literary Criticism (Senior Experience course)......................................3
Subtotal.........................................................................................12
Four of these courses, one of which must be ENG 2220:
ENG 2110 World Literature: Beginnings to 1600...............................................3
ENG 2120 World Literature: 17th Century to Present..........................................3
ENG 2210 American Literature: Beginnings through Civil War..................................3
ENG 2220 American Literature: Civil War to Present..........................................3
ENG 2310 British Literature: Beginnings to 1785 ............................................3
ENG 2330 British Literature: 1785 to Present................................................3
Subtotal.........................................................................................12
One of these courses:
ENG 2010 The Nature of Language.............................................................3
ENG 2020 Systems of English Grammar.........................................................3
ENG 3020 History of the English Language....................................................3
ENG 3030 Semantics..........................................................................3
Subtotal..........................................................................................3
Electives: In addition, 18 hours of English courses, at least 15 of which must be upper-division: four upper-division literature courses that include at least one development, one period, and one major authors course; one English upper-division writing course; and two English electives.
Subtotal.........................................................................................18
Total............................................................................................45
Elementary School Teaching Emphasis
The elementary school teaching emphasis in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Education licensure program, prepares future teachers of elementary education to understand and teach the diverse subject matter required for licensure. The program will provide students with a strong foundation in literature and literary genres; a solid perspective on the English language, including its history, structure, and constituents; and both theory and practice in composition, language arts, communication, and teaching methodology. It also addresses the need to prepare teachers to teach multicultural literature, accommodate cultural and ethnic diversity in language and writing, and communicate effectively with a diverse population of students.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Required Courses Semester Hours
Literature Core Courses
ENG 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies.................................................3
ENG 2220 American Literature: Civil War to Present........................................3
ENG 3100 Studies in Chaucer, Shakespeare and Milton......................................3
ENG 3440 Myth, Symbol and Allusion in Literature.........................................3
Subtotal.....................................................................................12
Language/Linguistics Core Courses
ENG 2010 The Nature of Language..........................................................3
ENG 3020 History of the English Language.................................................3
Subtotal.....................................................................................6
Writing/Composition Courses
ENG 2500 Art and Craft of Writing.........................................................3
-or-
ENG 2520 Introduction to Creative Writing.................................................3
ENG 3510 Advanced Composition............................................................3
Subtotal.......................................................................................6
Language Arts Core Courses
ENG 3460 Childrens Literature............................................................3
ENG 4650 Teaching Composition in Elementary Schools.......................................3
ENG 4660 Teaching Literature and Language: K-6 (Senior Experience course)................3
RDG 3130* Teaching Reading in the Elementary School: K-6.................................*
Subtotal.......................................................................................9
English Electives
Two upper-division English courses selected in consultation with and approved by a designated
English adviser................................................................................6
Recommended Electives Writing
ENG 3520 Creative Writing Workshop (prerequisite: ENG 2520)...............................3
ENG 3530 Techniques of Critical Writing...................................................3
Language
ENG 3010 Modem English Language Studies (prerequisite: ENG 2010).........................3
ENG 3030 Semantics (prerequisite: ENG 2010)..............................................3
Literature
ENG 3240 African American Literature.....................................................3
ENG 3420 The English Bible as Literature.................................................3
ENG 3430 Classical Mythology.............................................................3
ENG 3470 Young Adult Literature..........................................................3
ENG 3490 Chicano Folklore of the Southwest...............................................3
Total.........................................................................................39
*RDG 3130 meets the reading requirements for Colorado State licensure but is carried under the students 42-semester-hour professional education requirements.
Secondary School Teaching Emphasis
The secondary education emphasis in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Education licensure program, prepares future secondary teachers of English to understand and teach the diverse subject matter required for licensure. This program equips students with a wide variety of language principles and skills; practical experience in developing and teaching the processes of writing; sound knowledge of approaches to literature and literary genres; periods and authors (including a special focus on young adult literature); and an understanding of communication and media as used in English studies. In addition to meeting specified state and departmental requirements, this program offers students the opportunity to develop further specialization in writing, language, or literature to complement the major.


82 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS 8. SCIENCES
Required Courses Semester Hours
I. Literature Core
ENG 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies...............................................3
ENG 2210 American Literature: Beginnings through the Civil War..........................3
-or
ENG 2220 American Literature: Civil War to Present......................................3
ENG 3100 Studies in Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton....................................3
ENG 3440 Myth, Symbol, and Allusion in Literature.......................................3
ENG 3470 Young Adult Literature.........................................................3
Total........................................................................................15
II. Language Core
ENG 2010 The Nature of Language.........................................................3
ENG 3020 History of the English Language................................................3
Total.........................................................................................6
III. Composition Core
ENG 2500 The Art and Craft of Writing...................................................3
ENG 3510 Advanced Composition...........................................................3
Total.........................................................................................6
IV. Teaching English Core
ENG 3620 Teaching Composition, 7-12.....................................................3
ENG 4600 Teaching Literature and Communication, 7-12....................................3
ENG 4640 Teaching English, 7-12 (Senior Experience course)..............................3
Total.........................................................................................9
V. Upper Level Electives
Three upper-division English courses, at least two of which must be literature courses, selected in
consultation with and approved by a designated English adviser................................9
Total........................................................................................45
NOTE: Students with a bachelor of arts in English from an accredited institution who are seeking English licensure will receive credit for Sections I and V, in addition to any courses in Sections II, III, and IV for which they have existing credits. Transfer questions should be referred to the English Department.
Writing Emphasis
The writing emphasis major provides extensive study, practice, and opportunity for performance in various modes and genres of writing as well as a foundation in the appreciation of the literary heritage in English. The program immerses students in reading, writing, and language and helps prepare them for graduate school or vocation while clearly placing them in the tradition of the liberal arts.
Required Courses Semester Hours
I. Literature Courses
Lower-Division Literature Courses
2000-level, including ENG 2100...................................................................9
Three hours must emphasize modem literature.
Upper-Division Literature Courses:
3000-Level and/or 4000-Level.....................................................................9
Semester Hours of Literature Required...........................................................18
II. Language and Linguistics Course
Select one, in consultation with a faculty adviser, from the departments offerings.
Semester Hours of Language and Linguistics Required.............................................3
III. Writing Courses Entry Course:
ENG 2500 The Art and Craft of Writing............................................................3
Subtotal.........................................................................................3


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Writing Electives (In consultation with an English adviser, select four three must be 3000-level)
JRN 1100 Beginning Reporting........................................................3
ENG 2520 Introduction to Creative Writing...........................................3
COM 2610 Introduction to Technical Writing..........................................3
ENG 3510 Advanced Composition.......................................................3
ENG 352B Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction.........................................3
ENG 352A Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry.........................................3
ENG 352C Creative Writing Workshop: Drama..........................................3
ENG 3530 Techniques of Critical Writing.............................................3
ENG 3980 English Co-op Education....................................................3
Subtotal.................................................................................12
Specialized Writing Courses
ENG 3820 Writing Studio (must be repeated for credit under two distinct titles).....6
Subtotal......................................................\..........................6
Senior Experience Course
ENG 4520 Advanced Writing...........................................................3
Total Semester Hours of Writing Required................................................24
Total Semester Hours Required...........................................................45
English Minor
Writing Emphasis
The writing emphasis minor provides study, practice, and opportunity for performance in various modes and genres of writing as well as a foundation in the appreciation of the literary heritage in English. The program involves students in reading, writing, and language, and helps prepare them for graduate school or vocation, while clearly placing them in the tradition of the liberal arts.
Students must meet with a writing faculty adviser in order to understand prerequisites and select proper
courses.
I. Literature Course
Lower-Division Literature Courses:
2000-Level, Including ENG 2100................................................................6
Upper-Division Literature Course:
3000-Level or 4000-Level......................................................................3
Subtotal.........................................................f...........................9
II. Language and Linguistics Course:
Select one, in consultation with a faculty adviser, from departments offerings.
Semester Hours of Language and Linguistics Required...........................................3
III. Writing Course:
Entry Course:
ENG 2500 The Art and Craft of Writing........................................................3
Subtotal.................................................................................... 3
Writing Electives (select three two must be 3000-level)
JRN 1100 Beginning Reporting...........................................................3
ENG 2520 Introduction to Creative Writing..............................................3
COM 2610 Introduction to Technical Writing.............................................3
ENG 3510 Advanced Composition..........................................................3
ENG 352B Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction........................................... 3
ENG 352A Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry.............................................3
ENG 352C Creative Writing Workshop: Drama..............................................3
ENG 3530 Techniques of Critical Writing................................................3
ENG 3820 Writing Studio................................................................3
Subtotal......................................................................................9
Semester Hours of Writing Required...........................................................12
Total Semester Hours Required................................................................24
Literature Emphasis
The English minor with emphasis in literature serves students who seek to develop skills in reading, writing, and thinking about literary texts. The program is designed both for students interested in reading diverse texts from many ages, culture, and genres and for students who wish to focus on a single age, culture or genre, for example, dramatic literature.
Course should be selected in consultation with a faculty adviser in the Department of English.


84 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES

I. Introductory Course: Semester Hours
ENG 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies......................................................3
II. Two courses from the following:
ENG 2110 World Literature: Beginnings to 1600 .................................................3
ENG 2120 World Literature: 17th Century to Present.............................................3
ENG 2210 American Literature: Beginnings through Civil War.....................................3
ENG 2220 American Literature: Civil War to Present.............................................3
ENG 2310 British Literature: Beginnings to 1785 ...............................................3
ENG 2330 British Literature: 1785 to Present...................................................3
Subtotal.............................................................................................6
III. Any period course -or-
Any development course
(Choose one course from ENG 3110, ENG 3210, ENG 3230, ENG 3240, ENG 3310, ENG 3330, ENG
3400 or ENG 3410)
Subtotal.........................................................................................3
IV. Departmental Electives
One course at the 2000-level or above...........................................................3
Two literature courses at the 3000-level or above................................................6
One 4000-level literature or literary criticism course...........................................3
Subtotal........................................................................................12
Total Semester Hours Required...................................................................24
Note: This minor replaces both the literature emphasis and the dramatic literature emphasis of the 1994-95 Catalog.
Language and Linguistics Minor
The language and linguistics minor offers concepts about, theories of, and analytical techniques in natural language. It represents an intellectual discipline in itself and simultaneously serves the interests of future teachers, students of literature and writing, and others who have a continuing fascination with language as language. The minor is especially complementary for majors in anthropology, English, foreign language teaching, modem languages, philosophy, psychology, sociology, speech communication, and technical communication. The minor requires students to engage in vigorous, progressively more explicit and precise analysis and synthesis as they examine facts and fallacies about the miracle of language.
Required Core Courses Semester Hours
ENG 2010 The Nature of Language.........................................................3
Any four of the following six courses, chosen in consultation and with an approved departmental adviser.
ENG 3020 History of the English Language................................................3
ENG 3030 Semantics......................................................................3
ENG 3040 Morphology and Syntax..........................................................3
ENG 3050 Language and Society...........................................................3
ENG 3060 Modem Language Theory..........................................................3
ENG 4010 Studies in Linguistics (Variable Topics).......................................3
Subtotal.....................................................................................12
Interdisciplinary elective courses. Any two courses chosen in consultation with and approved by departmental adviser.
ANT 2330 Cross-Cultural Communication...................................................3
COM 3310 International Technical Communication..........................................3
ENG 4010 Studies in Linguistics (Variable Topics).......................................3
ENG 4990 Internship.....................................................................3
PHI 1110 Language, Logic, and Persuasion................................................3
PHI 3120 Philosophy of Language.........................................................3
PSY 3570 Cognitive Psychology...........................................................3
SED 4200 Language Development and Learning Disabilities.................................3
SPA 3150 Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice.........................................3
SPA 4310 History of the Spanish Language................................................3
SPE 3520 Language Acquisition...........................................................3
SPE 3540 Phonetics and Language Sample Analyses.........................................3
SPE 3740 Psychology of Communication....................................................3
SPE 3760 Cultural Influences on Communication...........................................3
WMS 2770 Gender and Communication.......................................................3
(SPE 2770)
Subtotal......................................................................................6
Total Semester Hours Required................................................................21


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
History Department
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
HIS 1010 Western Civilization to 1715..............................................3
HIS 1020 Western Civilization since 1715...........................................3
HIS 1210 American History to 1865.................................................3
HIS 1220 American History since 1865...............................................3
HIS 4820 Senior Seminar................................................................3
Total..................................................................................15
Electives
A minimum of 23 additional semester hours in history is required, 18 of which must be upper-division. No more than 4 semester hours in HIS 3890 readings courses may be counted toward the major without prior written approval from the department.
Course Distribution
In the minimum of 23 additional semester hours required, students must include at least 3 semester hours in each of the broad areas of history: United States, European, Developing World.
Grade Average
Students majoring in history must maintain at least a 2.0 average in their history courses.
Advising
History majors should consult with a departmental adviser to select the courses in other disciplines that complement their area of concentration in the major.
Minor in History
There are three different areas of emphasis available to students seeking a history minor: regular history area of emphasis, American West history area of emphasis, 20th-century studies history area of emphasis.
Regular History Emphasis
Required Courses Semester Hours
HIS 1010 Western Civilization to 1715................................................3
HIS 1020 Western Civilization since 1715.............................................3
HIS 1210 American History to 1865....................................................3
HIS 1220 American History since 1865.................................................3
Total...................................................................................12
Electives
A minimum of 9 additional semester hours in history is required. The hours must be upper-division and should be selected in consultation with a departmental adviser. No more than 2 semester hours in HIS 3890 readings courses may be counted toward the minor without prior written approval from the department.
American West History Emphasis
Required Courses Semester Hours
HIS 1100 American West........................................................3
HIS 1110 Colorado History I...................................................3
HIS 1210 American History to 1865.............................................3
HIS 1220 American History since 1865 ........................................ 3
Total.............................................................................12
Electives
A minimum of 9 additional history semester hours treating the American West is required, all of which must be upper-division.
Twentieth-Century Studies History Emphasis
Required Courses Semester Hours
HIS 1220 American History since 1865..................................................3
HIS 2010 Contemporary World History......................I.........................3
Total.......................................................1.........................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional hours treating 20th-century history is required, 9 of which must be upper-
division.


86 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Grade Average
Students minoring in history must maintain a 2.0 average in their history courses.
Secondary School Education Licensure in Social Sciences
Students majoring in history may combine their major with other courses in the social sciences and in education to earn secondary education licensure. The requirements of this program are included under the Secondary Education Department section of this Catalog.
Prelaw Courses
Several history courses are of particular importance to legal studies. These include HIS 1210, HIS 1220, HIS 3460, and HIS 3680. Students interested in prelaw courses are urged to contact the department adviser.
Minor in Interdisciplinary Legal Studies
The interdisciplinary legal studies minor is designed to show students how the various disciplines in the humanities and social sciences treat questions of law and justice. The interdisciplinary legal studies minor is not a prelaw preparatory program or paralegal training. Its goal is to cross disciplines so that students can understand how the humanities and social sciences illuminate the principles, practices, and
policies of the law.
Required Courses Semester Hours
HIS 3680 The Court in Crisis..............................................................3
PHI 3430 Philosophy of Law................................................................3
SOC 3550 Sociology of Law.................................................................3
ENG 3700 Literature and the Law...........................................................3
PSC 3120 American Constitutional Law......................................................3
CJC Introductory Course (see Criminal Justice and Criminology Department chair)...............3
xxx xxx Seminar in Legal Topics (interdisciplinary team-taught course).................3
Total.........................................................................................21
Students will select one law-related course from the courses listed below or approved by the interdisciplinary legal studies minor adviser:
MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business I..................................................3
MGT 3220 Legal Environment of Business II.................................................3
CJC 2100 Substantive Criminal Law.........................................................3
HIS 3460 The Constitution and the New Nation, 17871848....................................3
SOC 3500 Criminology......................................................................3
WMS 3310 Women and the Law................................................................3
Total.........................................................................................24
Journalism Department
Journalism Major for Bachelor of Arts
The Journalism Department prepares students for careers in news and information media by providing them with a sound education in the basics of journalism and/or public relations. The department has one of the strongest journalism teaching staffs in the state. All full-time and part-time faculty have worked in the journalism and/or public relations fields.
The Journalism Department is one of two journalism schools in the country to offer an internship program that allows students to get hands-on experience in political reporting. The Capitol Reporter is open to upper-division students, who spend an entire semester covering the Colorado legislature for credit. The editor is a full-time staff member, and the weekly newspaper is highly regarded by legislators, lobbyists, and the college community.
Proficiency in standard written English is a prerequisite for all journalism courses. Students are required to complete ENG 1010 before taking any journalism course beyond JRN 1010. Proficiency in typing is required for all courses beyond JRN 1010.
A list of suggested courses that should be taken for General Studies has been established by the department. Students should also select an adviser immediately to begin planning their course of study.
Students may not select both a major and minor from the Journalism Department.
Students will be required to take a journalism proficiency test upon completion of JRN 2100, Intermediate Reporting and News Writing, and/or JRN 2200, Intermediate News Editing. Students must pass the test before they will be allowed to take upper-division courses in their major or minor. Prerequisites are enforced.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 8i
Students will also take an assessment test toward the end of their studies to ensure they have reached the proficiency level necessary to pursue a career in journalism or public relations.
The Journalism Department offers a journalism major with three emphases news/editorial, photojournalism, and public relations and minors in print journalism and public relations.
Journalism Major for Bachelor of Arts
Core Courses for Journalism Major and Minors Semester Hours
JRN 1010 Introduction to Journalism and Mass Media....................................3
JRN 1100 Beginning Reporting and News Writing...................,..........................3
JRN 1200 Beginning News Editing.......................................................3
JRN 2100 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing......................................3
JRN 4500 Ethical and Legal Issues in Journalism.......................................3
Subtotal........................................................1..........................15
News/Editorial Emphasis
Journalism Core.............................................................................15
Required Courses
JRN 2200 Intermediate News Editing....................................................3
One or more of the following:
JRN 3100 Publication Practicum........................................................3
JRN 3980 Cooperative Education........................................................3
JRN 4150 The Capitol Reporter: Writing/Reporting......................................6
JRN 4160 The Capitol Reporter: Editing/Design.........................................3
And three of the following (each course is one credit hour):
JRN 3500 Topics in Journalism.........................................................3
Subtotal..................................................................................9-12
Electives
JRN 3150 Contemporary Issues..........................................................3
JRN 3400 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers.......................................3
JRN 3600 Photojournalism 1............................................................3
JRN 4100 Advanced Reporting...........................................................3
JRN 4200 Principles of Newspaper and Magazine Design..................................3
JRN 4400 Feature Article Writing for Magazines........................................3
JRN 4600 Photojournalism II...........................................................3
Subtotal.................................................................................12-15
Total....................................................................................3642
Photojournalism Emphasis
Journalism Core.............................................................................15
Required Courses
ART 1200 Design Processes and Concepts I...............................................3
ART 2200 Beginning Photography.........................................................3
JRN 2200 Intermediate News Editing....................................................3
JRN 3600 Photojournalism 1............................................................3
JRN 4600 Photojournalism II...........................................................3
Subtotal....................................................................................15
Electives
ART 3200 Intermediate Photography......................................................3
ART 3230 Color Photography.............................................................3
ART 3410 Computer Graphics.............................................................3
JRN 3100 Publication Practicum........................................................3
JRN 3150 Contemporary Issues..........................................................3
JRN 3400 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers.......................................3
JRN 3500 Topics in Journalism.........................................................1
JRN 4100 Advanced Reporting...........................................................3
JRN 4150 The Capitol Reporter: Writing/Reporting......................................6
JRN 4160 The Capitol Reporter: Editing/Design.........................................3
JRN 4200 Principles of Newspaper and Magazine Design..................................3
JRN 4400 Feature Article Writing for Magazines........................................3
Subtotal.....................................................................................9
Total.......................................................................................39


88 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS 8. SCIENCES
Public Relations Emphasis
Journalism Core..............................................................................15
Required Courses
JRN 2700 Fundamentals of Public Relations.............................................3
JRN 3700 Public Relations Writing.....................................................3
JRN 3980 Cooperative Education........................................................3
JRN 4700 Public Relations Strategic Planning..........................................3
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing......................................................3
SPE 3440 Television Production........................................................3
SPE 3100 Business and Professional Speaking...........................................3
SPE 4100 Techniques of Persuasion.....................................................3
Subtotal.....................................................................................24
Electives
COM 2420 Basic Corporate Videotape Production.........................................3
COM 2430 Introduction to Technical Media..............................................3
COM 2460 Presentation Graphics........................................................3
COM 3440 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television.............................3
JRN 3400 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers.......................................3
JRN 3500 Topics in Journalism.........................................................1
JRN 3550 Print Media Advertising Sales................................................3
JRN 3600 Photojournalism 1............................................................3
MKT 3110 Advertising Management.......................................................3
MKT 3120 Promotional Strategy.........................................................3
SPE 1700 Communication Theory.........................................................3
SPE 2400 Introduction to Radio and Television Broadcasting............................3
SPE 3130 Conference Leadership........................................................3
SPE 3430 Radio-Television Announcing..................................................3
SPE 3450 Broadcast Journalism: Radio..................................................3
SPE 3480 Workshop in Radio Production.................................................3
SPE 3740 Psychology of Communication..................................................3
SPE 4450 Broadcast Journalism: Television.............................................3
SPE 4480 Seminar Practicum in Broadcasting............................................3
SPE 4490 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life.............................3
Subtotal......................................................................................6
Total........................................................................................45
Journalism Minor Semester Hours
Journalism Core..............................................................................15
Required Courses
JRN 2200 Intermediate News Editing....................................................3
JRN 3500 Topics in Journalism.........................................................1
Subtotal......................................................................................4
Electives
JRN 3100 Publication Practicum........................................................3
JRN 3150 Contemporary Issues..........................................................3
JRN 3400 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers.......................................3
JRN 3600 Photojournalism 1............................................................3
JRN 4100 Advanced Reporting...........................................................3
JRN 4200 Principles of Newspaper and Magazine Design..................................3
JRN 4400 Feature Article Writing for Magazines........................................3
JRN 4600 Photojournalism II...........................................................3
Subtotal......................................................................................6
Total........................................................................................25


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 8
Public Relations Minor Semester Hours
Journalism Core..........................................................................15
Required Courses
JRN 2700 Fundamentals of Public Relations.............................................3
JRN 3700 Public Relations Writing.....................................................3
JRN 3980 Cooperative Education........................................................3
JRN 4700 Public Relations Strategic Planning..........................................3
Subtotal.................................................................................12
Total.................................................................................. 27
Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department
The Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department offers bachelor of arts and bachelor of science degrees in mathematics and a bachelor of science degree in computer science. The department offers both a mathematics and computer science minor, both of which complement such majors as engineering technology, the other sciences, and economics. In addition, the minor program in computer science complements the mathematics major.
In addition to the general mathematics major, the department offers a mathematics major in five areas of emphasis encompassing a variety of significant mathematical ideas. These areas of emphasis give the student background for graduate school in theoretical mathematics, as well as background for both graduate school and employment in mathematically related fields including applied mathematics, scientific computing, probability and statistics, and mathematics education. The degree program in computer science adheres to nationally recognized standards and provides students with a more technical alternative to the mathematics emphasis in computer science.
All students who are considering a major or minor in mathematics or computer science are expected to consult with faculty for advising.
Major in Mathematics for Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science
The Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences offers coursework leading to the bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree. The student may choose either degree.
The student may choose to complete a mathematics major in one of the following emphasis areas:
general
applied mathematics
computer science
mathematics education
probability and statistics
theoretical mathematics
A degree in mathematics is useful in a variety of professional fields including, among many others, business, economics, computer science, government, education, technology, and science. Students are invited to consult with the department concerning career potentials.
All majors in mathematics are required to complete the following basic core of courses (with a required minimum grade of C in each of these courses). The department strongly recommends that students interested in the applied mathematics emphasis take sections of calculus using Mathematica.
Basic Mathematics Core Semester Hours
MTH 1410* Calculus I or MTH 1450 Calculus and Mathematica I...........................4
MTH 2410* Calculus II or MTH 2400 Calculus and Mathematica II.........................4
MTH 2420* Calculus III or MTH 2450 Calculus and Mathematica III.......................4
MTH 3100 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs............................................3
Total..................................................................................15
*Some sections of this course have a Mathematica component.


90 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
For mathematics majors, except those in mathematics education, there is a one-hour course that synthesizes the material in the major. Each major is also required to take a Senior Experience course and to complete a minor. The following mathematics courses have been approved as Senior Experience courses: MTH 4210, MTH 4410, and MTH 4480.
The requirements for each are as follows:
General Emphasis
Required Courses Semester Hours
Basic Core..........................................................................15
MTH 4390 Mathematics Seminar.....................................................1
Subtotal............................................................................16
; A minimum of 24 credit hours chosen from MTH 1510, MTH 2140*, or any upper-division mathemat-
; ics courses. The 24 credit hours must include at least 20 upper-division hours, at least one Senior Expe-
! rience course in mathematics, and one of the following sequences:
* MTH 3110 MTH 3140; MTH 3210 MTH 3220; MTH 3420 MTH 3440; MTH 4210 MTH 4220;
I MTH 4410-MTH 4420; and MTH 4480 4490
Total.................................................................................40
C *No credit is allowed for MTH 2140 if MTH 3140 is also taken.
T Applied Mathematics Emphasis
The emphasis in applied mathematics is designed to meet the needs of the scientific, technical, and computer-based economy and to prepare the student for graduate study. The department has made every effort to have state of the art technologies and practices available for student use and strongly recommends that students interested in this emphasis take sections of calculus using Mathematica.
Required Courses Semester Hours
Basic Core..................................................................................15
MTH 1510 Computer Programming: FORTRAN..................................................4
MTH 3140 Linear Algebra.................................................................4
MTH 3210 Probability and Statistics.....................................................4
MTH 3420 Differential Equations.........................................................4
MTH 3440 Partial Differential Equations.................................................4
MTH 4480 Numerical Analysis I...........................................................4
MTH 4490 Numerical Analysis II..........................................................4
MTH 4590 Applied Mathematics Senior Seminar.............................................1
Total.......................................................................................44
It is recommended that students take one or more of the following courses in addition to the requirements: MTH 3220, MTH 3250, MTH 3470, MTH 4210, MTH 4410, MTH 4420, and MTH 4450.
Computer Science Emphasis
This emphasis is designed for the student who wants to combine applied mathematics or statistics with computer science. The required computer science minor includes the core courses for the computer sci-
ence major.
Required Courses Semester Hours
Core.........................................................................................15
MTH 3140 Linear Algebra...................................................................4
MTH 3210 Probability and Statistics.......................................................4
MTH 3420 Differential Equations...........................................................4
MTH 4480 Numerical Analysis I.............................................................4
Two of the following courses:
MTH 3220 Design of Experiments............................................................4
MTH 3440 Partial Differential Equations...................................................4
MTH 4210 Probability Theory...............................................................4
MTH 4220 Stochastic Processes.............................................................4
MTH 4490 Numerical Analysis II............................................................4
One of the following courses:
MTH 4290 Senior Statistics Project........................................................1
MTH 4390 Mathematics Senior Seminar.......................................................1
MTH 4590 Applied Mathematics Senior Seminar...............................................1
Total........................................................................................40


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 9
Computer Science Minor (required)
Required Courses Semester Hours
CSI 1300 Introduction to Structured Programming....................................4
CSI 2300 Advanced Programming and Data Structures..................................4
CSI 2400 Computer Organization and Assembly Language...............................4
CSI 3100 Discrete Mathematics......................................................4
CSI 3300 Foundations of File Structures............................................4
One of the following courses:
CSI 4250 Software Engineering Principles...........................................4
CSI 4300 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis...........................4
Total Hours Required for Minor..........................................................24
Mathematics Education Emphasis
The emphasis in mathematics education is for the preparation of classroom teachers of mathematics. Students seeking teacher licensure in mathematics must satisfy the teacher education program requirements of the college in addition to all of the mathematics major requirements. Content competency must be shown for mathematics course credit that is 10 or more years old.
Required Courses Semester Hours
Basic Core..................................................................................15
CSI 2610 Computer Programming for Educators...........................................4
MTH 3110 Abstract Algebra I...........................................................3
MTH 3140 Linear Algebra...............................................................4
MTH 3210 Probability and Statistics...................................................4
MTH 3600 History of Mathematics.......................................................3
MTH 3610 Methods of Teaching Mathematics..............................................3
MTH 3650 Foundations of Geometry......................................................3
A Senior Experience course in mathematics*..................................................4
Total.......................................................................................43
*EDS 4290 or EDU 4190 may be substituted.
Probability and Statistics Emphasis
The emphasis in probability and statistics stresses the application of the principles and methods of statistics and probability in the biological, physical, and social sciences and engineering. This emphasis
also prepares the student for graduate study.
Required Courses Semester Hours
Basic Core....................................................................................15
MTH 1510 Computer Programming: FORTRAN..................................................4
MTH 2140 Computational Matrix Algebra*..................................................2
MTH 3210 Probability and Statistics.....................................................4
MTH 3220 Design of Experiments..........................................................4
MTH 3250 Optimization Techniques I......................................................4
MTH 4210 Probability Theory.............................................................4
MTH 4220 Stochastic Processes...........................................................4
MTH 4290 Senior Statistics Project......................................................1
Total.........................................................................................42
*MTH 3140 may be substituted for MTH 2140.
Theoretical Mathematics Emphasis
The emphasis in theoretical mathematics prepares the student for further specialized study at the graduate level as well as being adaptable for preparation for positions in business, industry, and government.
Required Courses Semester Hours
Core....................................................................................15
MTH 3110 Abstract Algebra I.........................................................3
MTH 3140 Linear Algebra.............................................................4
MTH 4390 Mathematics Senior Seminar.................................................1
MTH 4410 Advanced Calculus 1........................................................4
MTH 4420 Advanced Calculus II.......................................................3
A minimum of 7 credit hours chosen from any upper-division mathematics courses..........7
Total...................................................................................37


92 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Minor in Mathematics
Required Core Semester Hours
MTH 1410 Calculus I or MTH 1450 Calculus and Mathematica I.......................4
MTH 1510 Computer Programming: FORTRAN
-or-
CSI 1300 Introduction to Structured Programming.................................4
MTH 2410 Calculus II or MTH 2400 Calculus and Mathematica II....................4
Subtotal...........................................................................12
Electives
A minimum of 10 hours at least 7 of which must be at the upper-division level. These 10 hours may include MTH 2420 or MTH 2450, any upper-division mathematics course, or any course approved by the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department.
Electives..........................................................................................10
Total..............................................................................................22
Major in Computer Science for Bachelor of Science
; The department offers a complete degree program in computer science that adheres to the nationally I recognized standards set by the Computer Sciences Accreditation Board. Students are encouraged to y contact the department for further details. The Senior Experience course in computer science is CSI
4260. The CSI program includes a required mathematics minor.
Required Core Courses* Semester Hours
CSI 1300 Introduction to Structured Programming**.....................................4
CSI 2300 Advanced Programming and Data Structures.....................................4
CSI 2400 Computer Organization and Assembly Language..................................4
CSI 3100 Discrete Mathematics.........................................................4
CSI 3210 Principles of Programming Languages..........................................4
CSI 3300 Foundations of File Structures...............................................4
Subtotal.................................................................................24
*A grade of C is required in each of the core courses.
**CSI 1300 is a core course and part of the MTH minor.
Required Advanced Courses
CSI 4250 Software Engineering Principles..............................................4
CSI 4260 Software Engineering Practices...............................................4
Choose two courses from:
CSI 3060 Computer Architecture and Systems Programming................................4
CSI 3310 Fundamentals of Database Systems.............................................4
CSI 4300 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis..............................4
A minimum of 8 additional credit hours selected from the following courses: CSI 3060, CSI 3120,
CSI 3280, CSI 3310, CSI 3510, CSI 4120, CSI 4300, CSI 4520, CMS 3050, MTH 4490...........8
Subtotal..................................................................................24
Required Ancillary Courses
COM 2610 Introduction to Technical Writing............................................3
EET 2310 Digital Logic and Telecommunications.........................................4
PHI 3360 Business Ethics..............................................................3
Subtotal..................................................................................10
Required Mathematics Minor*
MTH 1410 Calculus I or MTH 1450 Calculus and Mathematica I............................4
MTH 2140**Computational Matrix Algebra..................................................2
MTH 2410 Calculus II or MTH 2400 Calculus and Mathematica II..........................4
MTH 3210 Probability and Statistics (Calculus-based)..................................4
Two courses chosen from:
MTH 3220 Design of Experiments........................................................4
MTH 3250 Optimization Techniques I....................................................4
MTH 4480 Numerical Analysis I.........................................................4
Subtotal..................................................................................22
*CSI 1300 is part of the mathematics minor.
**MTH 3140 may be substituted for MTH 2140.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 9
Additional Course Requirements
ENG 1010* Freshman Composition: The Essay............................................3
ENG 1020* Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research and Documentation.................3
SPE 1010* Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................................3
PHY 2311-2341* General Physics I, Lab I, General Physics II, Lab II..................10
-or-
CHE 1800, CHE 1810, CHE 1850* General Chemistry I, II, and Laboratory..................10
XXX XXX* Level II General StudiesHistorical........................................3
XXX XXX* Level II General StudiesArts and Letters..................................3
XXX XXX* Level II General StudiesSocial Sciences...................................6
Six additional hours from the areas of communication, historical, arts and letters, and/or social
sciences.................................................................................6
Unrestricted Electives...................................................................3
Subtotal................................................................................40
*These courses, along with MTH 1410 or MTH 1450 and PHI 3360, count as General Studies courses. The Multicultural graduation requirement of 3 credit hours must also be satisfied.
Total..................................................................................120
Minor in Computer Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
CSI 1300 Introduction to Structured Programming......................................4
CSI 2300 Advanced Programming and Data Structures....................................4
Electives
A minimum of 12 semester hours chosen from CSI 2400 and upper-division CSI courses......12
Total...................................................................................20
Modern Languages Department
The Modem Languages Department offers major programs in Spanish and modem languages; minor programs in French, German, and Spanish; and teacher education programs in Spanish and modem languages. Courses in other foreign languages and in occupational or professional fields are offered in order to meet student and community needs. In addition, the department administers several education programs abroad, as well as certificate programs in basic French, German, and Spanish studies and Spanish translation.
Registration for courses is in accordance with previous preparation. Consequently, students should register for foreign language courses as follows: No previous study, or less than one year in high school 1010; students with one year in high school who feel their background is weak1010; one semester in college1020; one year in college2110 and/or 2310 for German and Spanish and 2010 for French; two years in high school2110 and/or 2310 for German and Spanish and 2010 for French, or 1020, if needed; three years in high school or one and one-half years in college2120 and/or 2320 for German and Spanish and 2020 for French; or 2110 and/or 2310 for German and Spanish and 2010 for French, if needed; four years in high school or two years in college3000-level courses, or 2120 and/or 2320 for German and Spanish and 2020 for French, if needed.
The above regulations may not be applicable if students have had no professional instruction in their chosen foreign language within the past two years. Students can also test if they feel that they have insufficient preparation for the required level or are not sure of that level. Elementary courses do not apply toward the major or minor requirements.
Students seeking elementary and secondary credentials in French, German, or Spanish must satisfy the teacher education program of MSCD in addition to all of the major requirements. They must also demonstrate sufficient mastery of the target language or languages through an appropriate proficiency exam.


94 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Spanish
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
SPA 2110 Intermediate Spanish.........................................................3
SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conversation.............................................3
SPA 2310 Spanish Grammar and Composition I............................................3
SPA 2320 Spanish Grammar and Composition II...........................................3
SPA 3110 Advanced Conversation........................................................3
SPA 3140 Advanced Composition.........................................................3
SPA 3150* Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice......................................3
SPA 3200 Culture and Civilization of Spain
-or-
SPA 3210 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization
-or
SPA 3220 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest................................3
SPA 3250 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish..................................3
SPA 3400 Survey of Spanish Literature I
-or
SPA 3410 Survey of Spanish Literature II..............................................3
SPA 3510 Masterpieces of Latin American Literature....................................3
SPA 4010 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar 1.......................................3
SPA 4020 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II......................................3
SPA 4110 Contemporary Spanish Literature
-or-
SPA 4120 Contemporary Latin American Literature.......................................3
MDL 4960* Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools.........................3
Spanish Electives**.........................................................................3
Total***...................................................................................48
*Required only when seeking a teacher license.
**Must be advanced courses and taken with department approval.
***Only 42 semester credit hours for those not seeking teacher licensure.
Minor in Spanish
Required Courses Semester Hours
SPA 2110 Intermediate Spanish.........................................................3
SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conversation.............................................3
SPA 2310 Spanish Grammar and Composition I.........................................3
SPA 2320 Spanish Grammar and Composition II.........................................3
SPA 3110 Advanced Conversation........................................................3
SPA 3200 Culture and Civilization of Spain
-or
SPA 3210 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization
-or-
SPA 3220 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest................................3
SPA 3250 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish..................................3
Total......................................................................................21
Minor in French
Required Courses Semester Hours
FRE 2010 Intermediate French I........................................................3
FRE 2020 Intermediate French II.......................................................3
FRE 2110 French Reading and Conversation..............................................3
FRE 3010 Introduction to Advanced French Studies......................................3
FRE 3110 Survey of French Literature I
-or-
FRE 3120 Survey of French Literature II...............................................3
FRE 3550 French Historical Perspectives
-or-
FRE 3560 Contemporary Sociocultural Issues............................................3
French Electives*...........................................................................3
Total......................................................................................21
*Must be a course at the 3000- or 4000-level.


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 9
Minor in German
Required Courses Semester Hours
GER 2110* German Reading and Conversation.................................................3
GER 2120* German Civilization.............................................................3
GER 2310* German Vocabulary Building and Grammar..........................................3
GER 2320* German Composition and Free Writing.............................................3
Subtotal.....................................................................................12
Select 1 of the following literature courses:
GER 3210** Survey of German Literature I..................................................3
GER 3220** Survey of German Literature II.................................................3
GER 3230** Contemporary German Writers....................................................3
GER 3510** Lessing, Goethe and Schiller...................................................3
Subtotal......................................................................................3
Select 2 of the following skills courses:
GER 3010 Third-Year German Conversation...................................................3
GER 3310 Advanced German Composition and Grammar..........................................3
GER 3400 German for Business..............................................................3
GER 3410 Translation Techniques for Scientific Materials..................................3
Subtotal.........................................................4...........................6
Total........................................................................................21
*Higher-level course may be substituted with departmental approval.
**Fourth-year course may be substituted with departmental approval.
Modern Languages Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses
The composite modem languages major involves a minimum of 48 hours in any two modem languages, at least 12 hours in each. Students are advised into intermediate and advanced classes in each language on the basis of individual background and need. The minimum 12 hours in each of the two chosen lan-
guages must be taken as follows:
Spanish
SPA 2110 Intermediate Spanish..........................................................3
SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conversation..............................................3
SPA 2310 Spanish Grammar and Composition I.............................................3
SPA 2320 Spanish Grammar and Composition II............................................3
Subtotal.....................................................................................12
French
FRE 2010 Intermediate French I.........................................................3
FRE 2020 Intermediate French II........................................................3
FRE 2110 French Reading and Conversation...............................................3
FRE 3010 Introduction to Advanced French Studies.......................................3
Subtotal.........................................................l...........................12
German
GER 2110 German Reading and Conversation...............................................3
GER 2120 German Civilization...........................................................3
GER 2310 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar........................................3
GER 2320 German Composition and Free Writing...........................................3
Subtotal.....................................................................................12
The remaining hours to complete the 48 hours required must be taken with departmental approval.
For those seeking teacher licensure in modem languages (French, German, Spanish), all of the courses in one of the following areas of emphasis are required.


96 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
French Emphasis
l FRE 2010 Intermediate French I...........................................................3
FRE 2020 Intermediate French II..........................................................3
FRE 2110 French Reading and Conversation.................................................3
l FRE 3010 Introduction to Advanced French Studies.........................................3
FRE 3110 Survey of French Literature I...................................................3
FRE 3120 Survey of French Literature II..................................................3
FRE 3150 French Phonetics: Theory and Practice...........................................3
l FRE 3310 Advanced French Composition and Grammar.........................................3
FRE 3320 Advanced Conversation...........................................................3
FRE 3550 French Historical Perspectives................................................3
l FRE 3560 Contemporary Sociocultural Issues...............................................3
l MDL 4960 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools.............................3
l Any 2 of the following:
l FRE 4520 Modem French Theater............................................................3
l FRE 4530 The French Novel................................................................3
FRE 4750 Senior Seminar in French Studies................................................3
l Total.........................................................................................42
y German Emphasis
GER 2110 German Reading and Conversation...............................................3
GER 2120 German Civilization...........................................................3
GER 2310 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar........................................3
GER 2320 German Composition and Free Writing...........................................3
GER 3150 German Phonetics: Theory and Practice.........................................3
GER 3210 Survey of German Literature I.................................................3
GER 3220 Survey of German Literature II................................................3
GER 3230 Contemporary German Writers...................................................3
GER 3310 Advanced German Composition and Grammar.......................................3
GER 3510 Lessing, Goethe and Schiller..................................................3
GER 4110 The German Novel of the 19th and Early 20th Centuries
-or-
GER 4120 German Drama of the 19th and 20th Centuries...................................3
GER 4210 Advanced Conversation: Present-day Germany....................................3
German Electives.............................................................................3
MDL 4960 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools...........................3
Total.......................................................................................42
Spanish Emphasis
SPA 2110 Intermediate Spanish..........................................................3
SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conversation..............................................3
SPA 2310 Spanish Grammar and Composition I.............................................3
SPA 2320 Spanish Grammar and Composition II............................................3
SPA 3110 Advanced Conversation.........................................................3
SPA 3140 Advanced Composition..........................................................3
SPA 3150 Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice........................................3
SPA 3200 Culture and Civilization of Spain
-or-
SPA 3210 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization
-or-
SPA 3220 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest.................................3
SPA 3250 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish...................................3
SPA 3400 Survey of Spanish Literature I
-or-
SPA 3410 Survey of Spanish Literature II...............................................3
SPA 4010 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar 1........................................3
SPA 4020 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II.......................................3
SPA 4110 Contemporary Spanish Literature
-or-
SPA 4120 Contemporary Latin-American Literature........................................3
MDL 4960 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools...........................3
Total.......................................................................................42


Full Text

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1r1a Campus

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Extended Campus Locations I 20th St. I R a disson I I N U'l F ir s t Traffic Light THE MET NORTH Orchard Rd.

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Thu Catalog contain1 comprehen:Jive information abou t The MetropoLitan State CoLLege of Denver; the degreeJ and p r ogramJ it offerJ, and the requirementJ that mUJt be Jatufied before receiving a degree. Thu pub L ication 1eJcribeJ admu Jion
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THE METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE of DENVER 1997-1998 CataLog

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 T A BL E O F C O NTEN TS (See alphabetical index for specific t o pi cs.) Th e Coll ege ............................................ ............... 4 Degree s and Program s ........ .... ............. ..... ................... 6 Ba sic De gree R e quir e m ents ................................................ 8 General Studies Pr ogram ................................................. I 0 Admi ss ion s ........................................................... 22 Enrollment ............... .... .......... ........................ ... 26 R egistratio n ........ ............. .................................... 2 7 Tuition a nd Fees ................. ................................... 28 Financial Aid .......................................................... 3 1 Sp ec ial Pro g ram s .................... ................................... 34 Alt e rnative Cred i t Option s . . ........... ............................. 36 Coop e r ative Education .................................................. 38 Academic Po l icie s and Procedur es ......................................... 39 Stud e nt Rig ht s and R espo n s ibilitie s .................... .................. ... 44 S e r v i ces for Students ....................... ................ ........... 4 5 Stud e nt Lif e ............................ .. ................... ......... 50 Equal Opportunity and ADA St ate m e nt. ..................................... 52 Family Educational Ri ghts and Pri vacy Act. ......... ........................ 52 Stud ent Rig ht-to-Kno w and Campu s Security Act .............................. 54 Scho o l of Bu siness ..................................................... 55 School of L e tters, Arts a nd Science s ........................................ 65 School of Profe ssiona l Studie s ............. ............................... 1 2 1 C o ur se De criptions ........................ ........................... 187 Tru stee of Th e Stat e Colleges in Colorado ........ .................. .... .... 352 Office r s of Administrati o n ...... ........................................ 3 52 Faculty ....................... ............. .. ... ...... .............. 355 Alphabetical Index ...................... ............................... 367 Aurari a Campu s Map ....................................... In s ide Front Cover Extended Campus Location M a p ............................. In side B ack Cover Cover p h oto by : Chuck Carlton P h otography : Sidney Brock, Dave Neligh, Peggy O 'Neill-Jones, H. Keith Williams Prod u ced by : The Office of A c ademic Affairs and the Office of College Comlllllll iC(I(ions 1997 Printed on R ecycled Paper 0

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4 GENERALINFORMATION GENE R AL I NF OR MATI O N THE COLLEGE The Metropolitan State College of D e nver i s a comp r e hen s ive, baccal a ureate-degr ee-g ranting, urban college tha t offer arts and sciences, professional, and bus iness courses and program s to a diver se stu dent popul a tion Excellence in te ac hing and l earning is th e college's primary objective. The institution a l mission i to provide a high quality accessib l e, enriching education t h at prepares st u dents for s ucce sfu l car ee r s, po s t gra duat e e du ca tion and lif e long l earning in a multicultural global, and technological society. The college fulfills its missio n by wo rking in partnership with the community at large and by fostering an a tmo sphere of scho l arly inquiry creative ac tivity and mutual respect w i thin a diverse campus community. The college awards bachelor of science, bachelor of arts, and bach e lor of fine arts degrees Students can choose from 50 majors and 69 minors offered through three schoo ls: Busin es ; Letter s, Arts and Sciences; and Prof ess ional Studies Programs ran ge from the traditional disc i plines suc h as history a n d bio l ogy, to co ntemporar y fiel d s of s tudy, s u c h a Chicano s tudies and health care management. Uni q u e majors for Coloradan s include aerospace sc i ence c riminal justice human services and land use. Stu dents m ay a l so de sign their own degree throu g h th e Individualized Degre e Program At MSCD the emphasis is on teaching T h e college trives to provide st u dents w i t h every possible opportunity for s u ccess. The college has more than 385 full-time faculty many with extensive profes sio nal backgrounds, who are appointed for their academic achievement and teaching abilities. Most of them hold the highest degree possible in their field. Part-time faculty work in the metropolitan Denver community and brin g their expertise in the ar ts, busines s, communications, law politics, science, and technology to the classroom. Sm all classes --the average size i s 23--ensure s tud e nts greater access t o faculty a highly interactive atmosphere, and a personalized learning experie n ce. B eca u se eac h s tudent' s s uccess is so important the college provid es an extensive network of erv i ces, which are lis t e d and described i n this Catalog. As an urban sc ho o l commi tted to serving the l ocal community, MSCD attracts s tudent from a rich and diverse mixture of age gro ups socioecono mic classes, e thnic backgrounds, and life s tyles. The college's curriculum and philo s ophy reflect that diversity and the r ea litie s of urban life THE CAMPUS The M etropo litan State College of D enver is lo ca t ed at the Auraria Higher Education Center, a 175-acre campus in downtown D e nver at Spe e r Boulevard and West Co lfax Avenue The Commu n ity College of Denver and the University of Colorado at D enve r s har e the faciliti es with MSCD. Facility s haring affor d s s tud ent th e flexibi l ity of tak ing low e r-divi sio n co ur ses a t the co mmunity co llege as well as g raduate or s pecializ ed professional courses at the univ e r s ity. Mo r e than one million sq u are feet of space for classrooms, l a b oratories, and offices are included in th e facility. Som e administrative offices are located in re tor ed Victorian homes in Denver's historic Ni n th Street Park located on the Auraria site. Oth er adminis trati ve offices occupy the Terracentre at 1100 Stout Street. The campus features a child care center a comprehensive library hou ing 731, 000 vol umes and one of the mo s t u nusual stude nt union facilities in t h e country --the h i storic Bavarian-sty l e Tivoli Br ewery Building. Excellent physica l fitnes s facilities include a block long phy s i cal educa tion/events center with a wimming pool a weight room game courts, dance s tudi os, and event sea ting for 3 000. The pro x imity of the Auraria Higher Educat i on Center to downtown Denver enables s tude n t s and fae ulty to u se the community as a learnin g laborator y and to co nnect classroom theory to the cultural, eco nomic, ocial, and political practi ces of the city. The college a l s o has two atellite campus s ites. Metro South l ocated at 5660 Greenwood P l aza Boule vard i n Arapahoe County, se rvic es the so uth s outhea st, and s o u thwest metropo l itan area Metro No rth located a t 11990 Grant Street in Adams County, serve the north north ea t, and northwe t areas. Eac h s ite i s l oca t ed 14 mile from the Auraria ca mpu s along the 1 25 corridor.

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GENERAL INFORMATION 5 A variety of co ur ses are offered during the eve nings and on Saturday on the Auraria campus and a t Metro South a nd Metro orth. There are 24 degree pro g r a m s that ca n be completed e ntirely by t aki n g co ur ses schedu l ed during the eve nin gs and weeke n ds, General information about the se pro grams can be obt ained from the Office of Adm i ssions or the Academic Advising Center. The Class Schedule c learly identifie s all eve nin g and weeke nd courses. The college's Extended Camp u s Pro gram offers c l asses in traditional format s, as well as telecourse s, o nlin e co ur ses, a nd corre pondence co ur ses. The pro gram h as its ow n office, Centra l C l as room Building, ro om 3 1 8, which provides ge n e r a l assis t a n ce t o s tud en t s o n specified weeke nd in t.he areas o f advi s ing retrieval of college forms, sc h edu lin g, and assistance wit h student concerns that carmot be addressed during weekdays.

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6 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS DEGREES AND PROGRAMS The Metropolitan State College of Denver i s o r ganized into thr ee schoo ls. The e are li ted below with the majors and minor s offe r ed b y each. The c urri culum requir ements for eac h of the programs a r e described in thi s Catalog in the s p ecial sec tion s prep ared by each school. Pr ograms marked w i t h an asterisk (*) do n ot require completion of a minor. Bachelor s Degree School of Business Major Minor Accounting* ..................... X . x Comp ut e r Information Systems & Management Science* ............. X Economics (Business Emphasis*) ** ... X ... x Finance ......................... X .... x General Bu siness ..... .................... x Inform a tion Systems ....................... x Management* ..................... X .... x Marketing* ....................... X .... x Real Esta t e .............................. x f **The Economics Department offers a bachelor of ar t s degree, rath er than a bachelor of science degree. School of Professional Studies TEACHER EDUCATION Bilin g u a l/Bi cultural Education ............... x Early Childhood Education .................. x Par ent Education ........ .................. x Re ading ............. ...... ............ x Specia l Education/Gifted Educatio n ........... x Teacher Licen ing : Early Child h ood, Elementary, and Twelv e Secondary Fields TECHNOLOGY Airframe and Power Plant Mechanics .......... x Aviation Managem e nt ............... X ... x Aviatio n Technology ................ X C i vil Engineering Tec hn ology ......... X .... x Drafting Engineering Technology ......... x Electrical Engineering Technology ...... X .... x Industrial Design* ................. X Industrial and Technical Studies* ....... X .... x Mechanical Engineering Technology .... X .... x Priv ate Pilot ............................. x Profes ional Pilot ......................... x Surveying and Mapping ............. X .... x Communications (Multi-major-Technical) X .... x Technical and lndu trial Administration*. X P BLIC SERVICE PROFES 10 S Crimi n a l Ju stice and Criminology ...... X .... x Ge r o nt o l og i cal Service s .................... x Health and Safe t y .... .... ................ x Health Care Management ( upper-divi s ion ) X .... x Holi s tic H ea lth & Wellne ss Education Multi minor ............ ...... x Ho spitali ty, Meeting and Trave l Ad mini tration* ............. X .... x Hotel Administration ...................... x Human Performan ce and Spon ......... X .. .. x Human Servi ces* .................. X .... x Leisure Studies ................... X .... x Meeting Administration .................... x Nursing ( u pper-division for RNs) . X Re s taurant Admin i stra tion .... ............ x Trave l Administration ..................... x B ac helor s Degree Major Minor Schoo l of Letters, Arts and Sciences H MANmES An** .... ... ... ... .............. X .... x English ........................ X .... x French ................................. x German .......... ...... ................. x Journalism ....................... X .... x Language and Linguistics ................... x Modern Foreign Languages ........... X ................................ x Music Education* ....... ...... .. X Music P erformance* ................ X Philosop h y ................... ... X .... x Wri t ing ................................. x Public Relation s .......................... x Spanis h ......................... X ... x Speech Communications ............. X .... x **Art offers a bachelor of fine arts degree. S !ENCE A D MATHEMATICS Biology .......................... X ... x Chemistry .... ..... ......... X ... x Computer Science ................. X .... x Criminalis t ics ............................ x Geography .............................. x Geo l ogy ........... .... ................ x Land Use .............. ....... X Mathematics ...................... X .... x Meteoro l ogy ..................... X .... x Physics ................... ....... X .... x Theoretical Phy sics ...................... x SOC IAL SerE CES African American Studies ............ X .... x Anthropology ...................... X .... x Behaviora l Science .......... ..... .. X Chicano Studie s .................... X .... x His tory ........................... X .... x Int erdisci plinary Legal Studie ............... x Politica l Science .............. ..... X .... x P yc hology ....................... X .... x Pub lic A dmi n istratio n ...................... x Socia l W o rk .... .... .... .... X Socio l ogy ......................... X .... x Urban Studies ** .................. X . x instit u te for Women 's S tudi es and Services Women's Studie s ................... . x ** Urban Srudies offers a bachelor of arts degree and a bachelor of science degree.

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INDIVIDUALIZED DEGREE PROGRAM Even with the wide diversity of the m ajors a nd minor s presently offered a t MSCD, the ne ed m ay arise for a n aca d emic program th a t is individu a liz e d me e t s the spec ific e du ea tion a l objectives of the s tudent and i s re s ponsive to emerging educational r e quirement s in the workplace and community. An Individ ualiz e d Degree Program m ajor or minor i s a n organized, coherent degr ee program designed to me et the s pecifi c educational goals of the s tudent. It i s dev e lop ed by the s tudent working close l y with a faculty mentor and mu s t be approved by the appropriate d e partm e nt chair, the dir ec tor of Adult Learnin g Ser vic es a nd the dean of the sc hool from which the majority of credit is drawn. A professional in the community with s pecific expertise in the s tudent's field of s tud y may a l so serve as a communit y consultant to the s tud e nt' progr am. The d egree so ught may be either a bach e lor of arts or ba c helor of sci ence All requirements for any ba c helor' s d egree from th e co lle ge apply. Information and assistance is availab l e throu g h th e Office of Adult Learning Servic es a t (303 ) 556-8342. CERTIFICATES OF COMPLETIO C e rtificate s of completion that recogniz e the co mpletion of a se lected se t of courses are offered. Th ese may be u se d to prepare for new careers and can be applied toward a degree See the current Class Schedule SCHOOL OF B USINESS: Per sonal Financial Planning Real Estate Noncredit Finan c ial Planning Noncredit International Trade SCHOOL OF LEITERS. ARTS AND SCrENCES Germ a n Translation Ba sic Competency in German Ba s i c Competency in Fr e nch Ba sic Competency in Spani s h Spani s h Translation Program Public Administration Career and Per sonal Development Clus ter Gerontology (Libera l Art s Orient a tion ) ACCREDITATIONS/ APPROVALS SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Gerontology (Professional Service s Orientation) Int e rnational Technical Writing Multimedia Produ c tion Corporate Video Produ ction Technical Writing and Editing Coaching Activities for Older Adults Re c reation Assistant Aquatics Assistant Extended Day Aids Conditioning Speci alis t Officiating Liter acy Inst ructor The M etro politan State College of D enver i s acc redited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (30 orth LaSalle St. Suit e 2400, Chic ago, lL 60602-2504 1 -800-62 1 -7440). Individu a l academic program s within the following areas are accredited or approved by the following age ncies: Program Accreditation/ Approval Agency Human Performance, Spon and Leisure Studies National P ark Assoc i ation/American Association for Leisure and Re c r ea tion Nur s ing National League for Nursing Teacher Ed u ca tion National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education ; Colorado D epanme nt of Edu cation Mu sic* National A ssoc iation o f School s of Mu sic Civil Enginee rin g Technology Technology Accreditation Commi ssio n of the A cc reditation Electronic s E n gineering Technology B oard for Enginee r ing and Technology l nc. and Mechanical Engineering Technology Human Services Co un cil for Standards in Human Services Education Social Work Co un cil on Social Work Edu ca tion Chemistry American Chemical Society Center for Addiction Studies Colorado Depanment of H ealth Accounting ** Co lorado State Board of Accountan cy Aerospace Science Council on Aviation Accreditation H ea lth Care Ma nagement A ssoc i ation of University Program s in Health Administration Accreditation **Approval

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8 BASIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Students are respon si ble for f ull knowledge of the provisio n s and regulations pertaining to their pro gram contained in thi s Catalog and elsewhere The final re s ponsibility for completin g th e requirements for a degree rests with the stude nt s, and it i s recomm e nd ed that they seek advice Students s h ould never ass um e that they h ave approva l to deviate from a stated requirement w ithout a properly s i g n ed sta t ement to that effect. REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL B ACHELOR'S DEGREES To earn a bachelor of scie nce a b ac helor of art or a bachelor of fine arts degree a student must sat isfy the following minimum requirem ents, plu s any othe r s s tipulated for the degree for which a s tudent is a candidate. Complete a minimum of 120 semest e r h ours with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher for all coursework. Complete at lea s t 40 semester hours in upper-divi s ion courses (300 0 and 4000-level courses). Complete all General Studi es requir e m en t s listed for the degree and major. Complete a three-hour Multi c ultural course requirement. Complete a three-hour Senior Experience course r e quirement. This cour se mu s t be taken a t MSCD. Complete one s ubj ec t major consisti n g of not l ess than 30 semes ter hours. With certain excep tion s (see th e Degrees and Program s sec tion on page 6 of thi s Catalog), complete a minor con s i sting of at le ast 1 8 semester hours. Jf a s tud ent compl etes two majors th e seco nd major satisfies th e minor requ ir e m e nt. Compl e tin g two areas of emphasis under one m ajor does not constit ut e the compl e tion of two major s Completion of two majors does not re s ult in two degrees or dipl omas. Coursework u se d to m eet req uir ements for one major or minor may not b e u sed to meet requirement s for another major or minor. Student s may not major and minor in th e same di scipline and are e n couraged t o obtain verification from an adviser if uncertainty exis t s. Complete all spec ial r equirements of a departme nt and school. Achieve a c umul ative GPA of 2.0 or higher in all MSCD courses that sati sfy the requirements for the major and for all MSCD cour ses th at atis fy requirement s for a minor. Student s s hould check with an adviser for specia l GPA program r e quirement s. Complete a Graduation Agreement with th e department when they have completed betwee n 60-90 h ours. Academic residency (c lassroom credit) requirements : Complete a minimum of 30 erne ter hours of c la ss room cre dit at MSCD, including the last 1 2 semester hours applicable to the deg re e. Complete at least 8 upp er-divisio n (3000and 4000-level cour ses) semester hours of th e major and 3 upper-divi s ion semes ter hours of the minor at MSCD (classroom credit). Students s hould be aware that U niv e r s it y of Colorado at Denver pooled courses and courses taken int erinstitu tionall y or at one of th e o ther s tate colleges w ill not sa tisfy academic res idence requirement s at MSCD. Complete the Senior Experience requirement. CREDIT LIMITATIONS: No more than 30 semester hours of omnibus-n umb e r ed co ur ses may b e applied toward graduation requirement No more than 30 se m ester hours taken b y ex t ens ion and/or corresponde nce may be app lied to ward a bachelor's degree. No more than 4 semester hours in hum an performance and leis ure activity or varsity s ports courses will be counte d tow a rd a b ac h e lor 's degree for students who are not majoring in human performance s port a nd leisure studi es. No more t han 7 se m ester hour s in mu s i c ensemble courses will be counted toward a bach e lor 's degree for s tudent w ho are not majoring in mu sic.

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REQUIREMENTS FOR A SECOND DEGREE For an additional bachelor's degree, s tud e nt s mu s t comply with the following: The first bachelor's degree must be r ecognized by MSCD. General Studi es will b e considered co mpl e t e unl ess deficienc i es ex i s t acc ording to the major department. Students must comp let e all requirements for a new major with a minimum of eig ht MSCD c l ass room upp er-div i s ion semes t er hours in th e major department. Students mu s t com plete a minor if r eq uir ed b y the major d e partm e nt for the co nt e mplated degree. Students mu st at i sfy the Multicultural and Senior Exper i e n ce co ur se r e quir e ment s for the second degr ee. Students must spe nd at l eas t t wo additiona l se m es t ers in r eside n ce A minimum of 30 se m es t e r h o ur s of c l assroom credi t at MSCD is required in addition to the cre dit s completed by the s tud e nt for th e earlier degree. Credit limitation s for a ba c h e l or's degree will co ntinu e t o exis t for the second degr ee. A Grad u at i on Agree m e nt mu st be co mpl e t ed as o utlin e d in thi s Catalog

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10 THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM PHILOSOPHY OF THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM The Metropolitan State College of D(!nver seeks to prepare i ts graduate s for a lifet im e of l earni ng, which, in our c han ging and complex soc i ety, requires focused ex pertise (such as th a t pro vided by a major area of st ud y) and the ability to communicate with and learn fro m experts in other fields. Undergraduate e du cation fosters the critical thinking neces sary for the exploration of unfamiliar disciplines and for the syn thesis of l earning and exposes students to the richnes s and variety of the intellectual universe GENE RAL STUDIES INFORMATION Students must use a s ingle ca talog to meet all d egree requirements including tho se in the General Stud ies major, and minor. Some changes in General Studies requirement s have been made r etroactive. As a conseq u ence many General Studie s r e quirement s and policies descr ibed in thi s Catalog may be fol lowed by students u s ing earlier catalogs. G ENE RAL STUDIES GOALS f The General Studies Program is designed to h e lp graduates achieve the fo llowin g competencies: MSCD students s hould be ab l e to : I. Write and s peak with clarity; 2. R ead and listen criti ca lly; 3 Draw co nclu sions from quantitative data ; 4. Re cog ni ze faulty reasoning ; 5 Organize idea s; and 6 Communicate with experts in other disciplin es and l earn from them. MSCD st udent s sho uld : 7. Hav e an open attit ud e toward different appro ac hes to probl ems 8. Have an informed awarene ss of the principl e human achievements in history, arts and letters, society a nd sc ience, and 9. Be introduced to the ba sic methods, knowledge, problem s, or attitudes c har acteristic of a field. STRUCTURE OF THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM The General Studies Program i s str u ctured to foster the development of skills and to e ncoura ge stude nts to use their mastery of skills to exp lor e know l edge in a variety of disciplines The General Studies Pro gram provides two levels of experience: Level 1-Skills Level I co ur ses provid e stud e nt s with the basic skills of reading and liste nin g critica lly re cogniz ing faulty reasoning drawing conclusions from quanti tat i ve data, organizing idea s, and w ritin g and speak ing with c larity Level ll-Breadth of Knowledge Level II course s introduce stude nt s to the basic m ethods, knowledge, problems or attitudes characteristic of a field encourage in st udent s an open atti tud e tow ard different approaches to problems, e nable s tudents to communicate with experts in other disciplines and learn from them and c ultiv ate in s tudents an informed awarene ss of the principle achieveme nts in his tory arts a nd letter s, soc ial sc i e n ce, and scie nce In addition, in Level II courses s tud e nts will co ntinu e to develop their s kill s in language and mathematics.

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DISTRIB U TION AND CRE DIT R EQUIREMENTS To complete their General Studies Program s tudent s mu s t take approved courses that fulfill the fol l owing di stri bution and c redit requirements: Category Semester Hour s Level I Composition ........... ..... ........................................ 6 Mathematic s ........................................................... 3 Communications ................................................... ... 3 Level II** His torical ............................................................. 3 Arts and Letter s ............ .............................. ............ 6 Social Scie n ces .............................. ..... ... ............... 6 Natura l Sciences ............. .......................................... 6 Total *** ......... ....... ................. .... ..................... 33 *A transfer co urse or co urses of at lea st 2 semester hour s judged to be sim ilar in skill development and content to a Level I course wi ll satisfy an individual L evell cou rs e requirement Equivalen cy will be determined by the department offering the Level l course. **One-hour deviations in the L evel II catego ri es may be allowed. ***A student's co mplet ed General Studies Pr ogram must contain at/east 33 semester hours BASI C RULES: Only a ppro ved courses may b e used to sat i sfy the Gene r a l Studie s requireme nts. A current listing of these courses is published in this sect i on, in the General Studies, Multicultura l and Senior Exper i ence R equireme nt s pamphlet and in the Course Description s sec tion of this Catalog. Genera l Studie s courses need not be co unt ed toward Ge n eral Studie s requirement s They may be t ake n as electives or to sat isfy requirement s in the major or degree program. Departments or programs w h ose curricu l a are guided by acc r editi n g agenc i es may specify, by prefix and number so m e Ge n eral Studies courses in addition to cou r ses required for the major or a profe ss ional c redential. Courses taken u sing the pa ss-fai l option cannot be counte d for G ene ral Studi es. LEVEL I R EQUIREMENTS: COMPOS ITIO M ATHEMA TIC S AND COMMUNICATION; FRESHMAN ASSESSMENT : READING, WRITING AND MATHEM ATICS PLACEMENT EXAMS First-time college s tud e nt s are required t o comp l e t e th e reading, writing, a n d mathematics placement examinatio n s (see Assessment R e qui remen t s section). Examination results serve as th e basi s for acad emic advisi ng. To increase their opportun i ty for success students may be r eq uired to take courses below the l evel of first -year courses offered by MSCD. Students s hould be aware however, that no credi t i s given for cou r ses that are below the college level. Placement Test Prerequisites Student s must h ave a passing score on the appropria t e placement t est b efore they w ill be allowed t o register for Level I General Studie s co ur ses in English, mathematics and reading Exception s will be m a d e for s tudents w ho have ea rn ed at least a grade of "C" in the comm unit y college co ur se pecified b y th e department. The Assess m e nt Center admin i s t ers the placement te sts. Students should consult a n adviser in th e Advising Center for guidance i n se lecting the appropriate Level I co ur ses. COMPOSITION R EQUI RED COURSES Semester Hours E G 1 010 Freshman Com p osition: The Essay .............. ................... 3 ENG 1020 Fre s hman Compos iti on: Analys i s, Re searc h and D oc um e ntation .......... 3 R U L ES: COMPOSITION R EQU IR EMENT Students mu st complete the ENG 1010 r equirement w ithin their firs t 30 semeste r hours a t MSCD and the ENG 1020 requirement w ithin th eir first 60 semester hours. These requir eme nts may be postpon ed only if approved in writing by the English D epartment. Stude nt s must demonstrate the adequacy of their writing skil l s in the placement exam before e nrolling in ENG 1010. Those students w h ose writing skills a r e inadequate will be counse led on how to improve t ho se skills Stude nt s may be required to complete add iti ona l coursework.

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12 Students will have satisfied the Leve l I compositio n r eq uirement s if they: => sat i sfactorily compl ete ENG 1010 and 1020 or => pas s a CLEP or AP examination approved by the English Department (ENG 1010 only), or => transfer equiva l e nt courses. MATHEMATICS ( minimum 3 semester hours*) Semester Ho u rs MTH I 080 Mathematica l Modes of Thought .... ......................... .... 3 MTH 1110 College Alge br a ........... ........... ....................... 4 MTH 1 210 Introduction to Stati s tics ......................................... 4 MTH 1310 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences ............. 4 MTH 1610 Mathematical Concepts for Teacher s in Pr eseco nd ary School s ............ 4 R ULES : MATHEMATICS R EQULREMENT Student s will take the mathematics placement exam t o determine their abi liti es to cal c ulate with fractions, decimals and percents, and to know and use e lement ary geometrical fo rmula s. Those whose skills a r e inadequate are required to complete college arithmetic coursework before enro llin g in a Level I mathematic s cou r se. Some courses ha ve a ddition a l r equire ment s. Students m u st compl ete the Leve l I mathematics requirement wit hin th e ir first 30 semeste r hours at MSCD. This requirement may be postponed on an individ ual basis if the postpone ment is approved in wr itin g by the Mathematical and Computer Sciences D epart m ent. Students will have satisfied the Level I mathematics r e quir emen t if they: => pas a m athematics course tha t ha s been app ro ved for Level I mathematics c r edit (see cour es listed above), or => pass a CLEP or AP exam approved by the Mathematical and Computer Science Depart ment or => successfully compl ete a mathe mati cs cour e for which a Level I mathematics cour se i s a prerequisite or => tra n sfer an equiva lent course. *A transfer co ur se or co urs es of at l east 2 semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level l co urs e will satisfy an individual Level l co urs e requirement. Equiva l ency is determined by the department offering the L evel l course. CoMMUNICATION (minimum 3 semester hours*) Semester Hours FRE 1020 E lement a r y French ll ............... .......................... 5 GER 1020 E l ementa r y G e rman II ........................................ 5 HO N 2950 The Art of Critical Thinki n g .............................. ... 3 PHI 1110 Language, Logic and Persuasion ............................ .... 3 RDG 1510 Cognitive Stra t egies for A n a l ytical Reading .................. . 3 SPA 1020 E l ementary Spanish fl .............. .......................... 5 SPE I 0 I 0 Public Speaking ............................. ............... 3 SPE 1710 Int erperso n a l Communicat i ons: Individual as a Communicator ...... ... 3 R ULES : COMMU !CATION R EQ fREMENT Students mu s t compl e t e the required L eve l I communi cation cour se w ithin their first 30 se m es ter h o ur s at The Metropolitan State College of Denver. Students will have satisfied the Leve l I communicatio n requirement if they: => pas s an approved Level I communi cation course (listed above), or => pa ss a CLEP or AP test approved by a department offering a Levell communicati on cour se, or => transfer an equiva l en t course. => transfer a seco nd sem ester, four-or five -semes ter hour foreign language course or a mor e adva n ced language course that is tau g h t in a language not offered at MSCD. => pass or transfer an advanced fore i g n l anguage cour se that is taught in the foreign language and that ha s MSCD's FRE 1020, GER 1020, and SPA 1020 or eq uiv a l e nt cour sewo rk, or more advanced coursework, as a prerequi site. => pass or tran sfe r a n advanced public speaking cour se for which MSCD's SPE 1010 or a com parab l e course i s a prerequisite

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Student s who have atis fied the co mmuni ca tion s r eq uir e m e nt u s ing the adva n ced foreign lan g uage cour se or th e a d vanced public s p eaki n g co ur se mu s t pla ce that co ur se in the L e v e l I communications requirement l ot. L eve l II G e n e ral Studi e co ur es u sed to satisfy the L eve l I com mun ica tion s require m e nt s ca nnot a l so be co unted in th e L eve l II category. *A tran sfe r cou rse or courses of at l eas t 2 semester hours judged to be similar in ski ll development and conte nt to a Le ve l I co ur se will satisfy an individual L evel I co ur se r equi r emen t Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Level l co urse. L EVEL II R EQUIREMENTS Cour ses approved to satisfy th e Lev e l II requireme nt are distributed among four ca t egories Thecategories, together with the minimum numb e r of se m es t e r hour s a s tud ent must acc umul a t e t o satisfy this requir eme nt ar e give n below. On ehour deviation s in th e Gen eral Studie s L eve l II ca t egories may b e allow e d provided the s tud e nt ha s co mpl eted at l eas t 33 semes ter h o ur s of General Studie s courses. L EVEL II CATEGORIES Semester Hours Hi s tori cal .................................... .................. 3 Ans and Letters ... ... ........ .................................. 6 Socia l Scien ce ..................................................... 6 atural S c i e n ce ........ ......... ....... ... ... ...... .... .... 6 R ULES : L EVEL II R EQ IRE ME T Prerequis ite s : L eve l IT G e n era l Studie s co ur ses h ave a t l east the following prer e qui s ite s o r co r e q uis it es, and so me co ur ses h ave ad diti o n a l pr e requi s it es (see the Course D escri pti o n s sec tion in this Cata lo g). Hi torical and Arts and L e tte rs: :::::> Cour es numb e red 1000 to 1 990: minimum performa n ce standa rd sco r es o n reading a nd writin g pr ea sess m e nt placement te s t :::::> Co ur ses numb e r ed 2 000 t o 2990: sat i s faction of the L eve l I mathematic s co ur se r eq uire ment and e ith e r E G 1010 o r the L eve l I comm uni cation course requirement :::::> Co ur ses number e d 3000 and above: satisfac tion of all L eve l I General Studie s co ur se req uir e m e nt Nat ural S c ienc e and So c ial Sci e n ce: :::::> Cour es numbered I 000 t o 1 990: minimum perfo rman ce standard sco r es on the reading, wr itin g, and math e mati c pr eassess m ent p l ace ment t es t s :::::> Cour ses number e d 2000 to 2990: sat i sfac tion of the L eve l l mathematics co ur se r eq uir e ment and e ith e r ENG 10 I 0 o r the L eve l I co mmuni ca tion cou r se requirement :::::> Cour ses numbered 3000 and above: satisfactio n of all Level I co ur se r eq uir eme n ts Stude nt s m ay not use c o u r ses h aving the sa m e pr efix as th e ir m ajor di c iplin e or c r osslis t e d w ith their m ajo r discipline t o satisfy the L evel II requirement. Student s m ay n o t ap ply mor e tha n 8 se m es t e r h o ur s of cre dit with the sa m e co ur se prefix to the L eve l IT r eq uir eme nts. Student s may u se e ith e r pr efix for a cross-lis t ed course. i e o n e designated XXX(/YYY(. They mu s t se l ec t th e prefix they wish to u se at r eg i strat ion ; the se l ectio n m ay not b e c h a n ged l a t er. History m ajo r s mu s t t ake thr ee extr a se m es t e r hours a t Lev e l IT in the soc i a l sc i e n ces, a r ts and l e tt e r or natural sc i e n ces ca t egor i es in lie u of the three hour s in the historical ca t egory. His tory m ajo r s may not u se co ur ses that are c r o sli sted with his t ory courses for General Studies.

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14 Historical Courses (m inimum 3 se mester hours*) Historical courses aim to impart a broad knowledge of his tory, emphasizing the major forc es, people, and events that have s haped the modem world. The foLlowing courses may be u sed to satisfy the General Studies historica l requir e ment. Other courses may have been approved for such u se after the pub! ica tion of this Catalog. For more recent information contact the Advising Center. Semester Hours AAS 1130/HIS 1940mc Surve y of African History ............................ 3 AAS 2130/HIS 2950mc West African Civilizations ..... ................. .... 3 CHS 1010/HIS 1910mc His tory of Meso-Ameri ca: Pre-Columbian and Colonial Period s ................... 3 CHS 1020/HIS 1920mc History of the Chicano in the Southwest: 1 810 to present .................................... 3 FRE 3550 French His torical Per spec tive s ............. ......... 3 HTS 1000 American Civilization ......................... ..... 3 HIS 1010 We s tern Civilization to 1715 .......... ....... .... 3 HIS 1020 We stern Civi liz ation since 1715 ........................ 3 T HIS 1110 Colorado History I ................... ............... 3 HIS 1210 American History to 1 865 ......... .......... ........ 3 HIS 1 220 American History since 1 865 .......................... 3 HIS 1250 China J apan, Korea s ince 1 800 .......... .............. 3 HlS 1650/WMS 1650 Wom e n in U.S. Hi tory .............................. 3 HlS 191 0/CHS lO LOme His tory of Meso-America: Pre-Columbian and Colonia l Period s .... ........... 3 HIS 1 920/CHS I 020mc His tory of the Chicano in the Southwe st: 1810 to Pre sent .................................... 3 HTS 1930/NAS 1 930mc History of Indigenou s/Hispa nic American s ... ........ .... 3 HlS 1940/AAS l l30mc Survey of African His tory ............................ 3 HTS 2010 Cont e mporary World His tory .......................... 3 HlS 2950/AAS 2130mc W est African Civili zatio n s ............................ 3 HIS 3030 Ancient Orient and Greece ..... ................ ....... 3 HIS 3060 Rome a nd the Cae sars ............................... 3 HlS 3090mc Native Amer i cans in American His tory ................. 3 HTS 3120 Medieval Hi s tor y ................................... 3 HTS 3140 Renai ssance and Reformation ................. .... . 3 HlS 3310 England to 1714 .................................... 3 HlS 3320 England s ince 1714 ................... ........ ..... 3 HTS 3590 American Immigration Hi s tory .... ...... ............. 3 HlS 3700 Modem China ................................ ..... 3 HTS 3740 Modem Japan ..................................... 3 HlS 3810 Latin America: Rep ubli c ... ............. ............ 3 HlS 4110/HON 3850 American Cu ltur e I ...... ......................... 3 HlS 4120/HON 3860 American C ultur e II ........................... .... 3 HON 3850/HIS 4110 American Cu ltur e I ............................. 3 HON 3860/HIS 4120 American Culture II .............................. 3 NAS 1930/HIS 1930mc History of Indigenou s/H i spa nic Ameri cans ............... 3 WMS 1650/HIS 1650 Women in U.S. Hi s tory ............... ............... 3 *A o ne h o ur d evia tion in the General Studies hi storica l requirement may be allowed provided the st ud en t has completed at l east 33 semes t e r h o ur s of General Studies courses. me This co urs e will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.

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Arts and Letter s Co ur ses ( minimum 6 se m este r hour s*) Art and letter s courses impart a broad knowledge of important works and major sc hool s of thought from a t l ea t two centuries. Th ey also provide a found at ion for critical eva luation withi n the discip l ine. The following cour es m ay be u se d to sat i sfy the G e n eral Studies arts and letter requirem e nt. Other cou r ses may hav e been approved for s uch use afte r the publication of this Ca t alog For more recent information contact the Advi ing C e nter. AAS 3240/ENG 3240mc ART 1040 ART 3090mc ART 3950/WMS 3950 E G 1100 ENG 1110 E G 1120 ENG 1 3 1 0 E G 3030 ENG 3240/AAS 3240mc ENG 3420 ENG 3430 ENG 3460 FRE 3110 FRE 3120 GER 3200 HO 2750 HON 2760 MUS 1000 MUS 3000mc MUS 3040 MUS 3050 PHI 1010 PHI 1030 PHI 3000 PH13020 PH13360 PSC 3050 RDG 3060 SPA 3200 SPA 3210 SPA 3220 SPE 2210 SPE 2770/WMS 2770 SPE 3080 SPE 3740 SPE 3760mc WMS 2770/SPE 2770 WMS 3510 WMS 3950/ART 3950 Se m e ter Hour s Afric a n American Literatur e .......................... 3 Art Appreciation Survey ............................. 3 Art and Cultural Herit age ........................ .... 3 Women's Art/Women's I ss ue .... ............... ... 3 Intr oduction to Literature ............................. 3 Introduction to Fiction ............................... 3 Intr o duction to Drama ............................... 3 Introduction to Shake s peare ................ ......... 3 Semantic s .................. .... ................ 3 Afric a n American Literature ........ ................. 3 English Bible as Literature . ........................ 3 Clas s ica l Mytholo gy ................................ 3 Childr e n's Literature ................................. 3 Surve y of French Literature l .......... ................ 3 Sur vey of French Literature n ........... ............. 3 German Culture and Civilization ....................... 3 The Legacy of Art s and Letter s l ....................... 3 The Legacy of Art and Letter s ll ...................... 3 Introdu ction to Mu ic ................................ 3 Musics of America ...................... ............ 3 Musi c and the Art s ................. ................. 3 Mu sic of the World ................................ 3 Intr od u ction to Philosophy ............................ 3 Ethics ............................................ 3 History of Greek Philo sop h y ..... .............. ...... 3 History of Modern Philo ophy .. ....................... 3 Busin ess Ethics .............. ........ .... .......... 3 Politi ca l Th eory .................................... 3 Critical R eading/T hinkin g ............................ 3 Culture and Civilization of Spain .............. ......... 3 Spani s h-American Culture and Civilization .......... .... 3 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwe s t ............ 3 Introduction to Theatre ................ .......... ..... 3 Gender and Communication ................ ... ... .... 3 Great American peaker ............................. 3 Psycho l ogy of Communication . ................. 3 Cultural Influence on Communication .................. 3 Gender and Commun ication ...................... .... 3 Femini s t Theory .................................... 3 Women' s Art/Women's I ss ues ....... ................. 3 A one-hour deviation in th e G ene ral Studies arts and letters requirement ma y be allowed provided the stud e m has co mpl e t ed at least 33 semester hours of G e n e ral Studies cou r ses. me-This co urse will also satisfy the Multi c ultural r e quir e m e nt

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16 Socia l Science Courses (m inimum 6 semeste r hours*) Social science courses aim to explore the formation, behavior, and interaction of various social, cultu ral political, or economic groups and institutions The following courses may be u sed to sat i sfy the General Studies social science requirement. Other courses may hav e been approved for such u se after the publication of this Catalog. For more recent information contact the Advising Center. Semeste r Hours AAS IOIOmc Introduction to African American Studies ........... 3 AAS 2100/CHS 2 100/ICS 2 100 / AS 21 00/WMS 21 OOmc Women of Color ................ .............. 3 AAS 2200/PSC 2200mc Politics and Black People ........... ............ 3 AAS 3300/SOC 3140mc The Black Community ......................... 3 AAS 3550/SOC 3440 The Black Family ......... .................... 3 ACC 1010 Accounting for on-Business Majors ............. 3 ANT 1 3 10 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology .............. 3 ANT 2330mc Cro ss -Cultural Communication ................... 3 ANT 3310mc Ethnography of orth American Indians ............ 3 ANT 3480mc Cultural Diver ity in Health and lllnes ............. 3 CHS 1000mc Introd u ction to Chicano Studies .................. 3 CHS 2100/AAS 2100/ICS 2100/ NAS 2100/WMS 2100 mc Women of Color .............................. 3 CHS 3100/SOC 3130mc The Chicano Community ..................... 3 CHS 3210/SOC 3470 The Chicano Family ........................... 3 ECO 2010 Principles of Economics( Macro ................... 3 ECO 2020 Princip l es of Economics(Micro ................... 3 EDS 3200 Educat i o nal Psychology Applied to Teaching ........ 3 EDU 2640mc Urban and Multicultural Education ................ 3 FRE 3560 Contemporary Socio-Cu1turallssues ............... 3 GEG 1000 World R egional Geography ...................... 3 GEG 1300 Introduction to Human Geography ............... 3 GEG 2020 Geography of Colorado ......................... 3 GEG 3300/NAS 3300/ PSC 3300mc HES 1050 HES 2000 HES 2180 HIS 3660 HMT 1850mc Land Use, Culture and Conflict ............... ... 3 Dynamics of Health .. ......................... 3 Health Politi cs and Policy ....................... 3 AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome ................................... 3 Recent U.S., l945(1970s ........................ 3 Multic ultu ral/Multinational Cultural Adjustment/Readjustment ................... .... 3 HON 3800 Revolutions and Social Change I. .. ............... 3 HON 3810 Revolutions and Social Change II ................. 3 HPS 2720 Fundamentals of Coaching ...................... 2 HSP 3490mc Multic ultural Is ues in Human Services ............. 4 ICS 2100/AAS 2 100/CHS 2 1 00/ NAS 2100/WMS 2100mc Women of Color .............................. 3 ITS 2810 Technology, Society and You .................... 3 JRN 1010 Introduction to Journalism and Mass Media ......... 3 LES 4730 Sociology of Athletic in American Society ......... 3 MKT 2040 Managerial Communications ...... ............. 3 NAS lOOOmc Introduction to Native American Studies ............ 3 NAS 2100/AAS 2100/CHS 2100/ ICS 2100/WMS 2100mc Women of Color .............................. 3 AS 3200/PSC 3200mc ative American Politics ................... .... 3 PSC 1010 American National Government ................. 3 PSC 1020 Political Systems and Ideas ..................... 3 PSC 2200/AAS 2200mc Politics and Black People ....................... 3 PSC 3200/NAS 3200mc Native American Politics ........................ 3

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PSC 3300/GEG 3300 AS 3300mc Land U se, Cu l ture and Conflict ..... .............. 3 P SY 1001 lntroductory P syc ho l ogy ........................ 3 PSY 2160 Personality and Adju s tment. .... . ............ 3 PSY 2210 P syc holo gy of Human D eve lopm ent ............... 3 PSY 3250 Child P syc ho l ogy ........ .... ............... 3 PSY 3260 P syc holo gy of Adolescence ................. ..... 3 SOC 10 I 0 introduction to Sociolo gy ......... .... ....... 3 SOC 1040mc lntrod u ction to G e ronto l ogy ..... .... ........ 3 SOC 2010 Current So cial I ssues ............. .... ....... 3 SOC 3 1 30/ C H S 3100mc The Chicano Community ...... ... .... ... ..... 3 SOC 3140/AAS 3300mc Th e Bla c k Communit y ........... ....... .... 3 SOC 3220/WMS 3220mc Race, G e nde r and Ethnic Group s .................. 3 SOC 3440/AAS 3550 Th e Black Famil y ............................. 3 S O C 3470/CHS 3210 Th e Chicano Famil y ................ ......... 3 SWK 1010 lntroduction to Social Welfar e and S ocial Work ... 3 WMS 1001 lntrod u ction: Woman in Tran s ition ................ 3 WMS 2100/AAS 2100/CHS 2100 I CS 2 1 00/NAS 2100mc Women of Co l or ......... ..................... 3 WMS 3220/SOC 3220mc R ace, G e nder a nd Ethnic Group s .................. 3 A one-hour deviati o n in the G e n e ral Studies social scie n ce r eq uir ement ma y b e allowed provided the s tud e nt' s com plet ed G e n era l Studies Pr ogram c ontains at l east 33 sem e ster hours m e This co urse will also s ati sfy the Multi c ultural requirement. Natura l Scie n c e C our ses ( minimum 6 se m este r h our *) atural s cience courses prov i de a n opportunity for s tud e nt s to ex peri ence the sys temati c formulation and testing of h ypothese s and to learn the importanc e of accurate observation and m eas ur e m ent. Student s will differentiate among fact, specu l ation, evide nce, inferen ce, beli e f theory, law, and ge n eral i zation. The foUowing courses may be u se d to satisfy the G e n eral Studie s natural sc ience r e quir e m e nt. Other co ur ses may h ave been approved for s u ch use afte r the publication of thi s Catalog. For more recent information contact the Advi s ing Cent er. ANT 1010 AST I 040/ AST 1040 s p AST 3040 B I O 1000/B I O IOOOs p B I O 1 0 1 0/B I O IOIOs p B I O 1 080/B I O 1 080 s p BIO 3300 BIO 3550 CHE 1010 CHE 1100 CHE 1800 & CHE 1850 CHE 1 8 1 0 & CHE 1 850* CHE 3100 CHE 3120 GEG 1100 GEG 1 200 GEG 1 400 GEL 1010 GEL 1020 GEL 1150 HES 2040 HES 2150 HES 3450 HON 2800 HON 281 0 Sem este r H ours Phy s ical Anthropolo gy and Prehi s tor y ................ 3 i ntroduction to Astronomy ............. . ... ..... 3 Modem Co s molo gy ........... .... .... ..... 3 Human Biolo gy for on-Majors ....... . .... ...... 3 Eco l ogy for Non Major s .... .... ...... . ..... 3 General Introduction to Biolog y ....... .... .......... 4 Advanced Human Biology for on-Majors ............. 3 Urban Eco l ogy ........... .................. 4 Ch emis try and Society ............................ 3 P rinc i p l es of C h em i tr y ....................... ... 5 G e neral Chemistry I .......... ........ ....... 6 General C h emistry i l .......... . o 6 Organ ic Ch emistry I .................... ....... 4 Organi c Chemistry I Laboratory ................ . 2 I ntrodu c tion to Phy s i ca l G eog raph y .............. ... 3 lntrodu c tion to Environmental S cie n ces .............. 3 World Reso ur ces ....................... ......... 3 General Geo l ogy .... ......................... ... 4 G eo logy of Colorado ............ ............... 3 Oceano g raphy ............. ..................... 3 Introduction to utrition ........................... 3 Alternative Therapi es for H ea lth and H ea lin g ...... ..... 3 Dynamic s of Disease ........................ o 3 His tory of Sci e nce ......................... ...... 3 D evelopment of Exp e rimenta l Sc i e n ce ................ 3

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18 HPS 3300 HP S 3340 MET 3550 MTR 1400 MTR 3500 PHY 1000/PHY I 000 p PHY 1 250 PHY 20 I 0 & PHY 2030 PHY 2020 & PHY 2040 PHY 2311 & PHY 232 1 PHY 2331 & PHY 234 1 PHY 3620 SCI 2800 Anatomical Kine sio logy ........................... 3 Ph ysio l ogy of Exercise ............... ............ 3 Rocket and Star s ( A Space Trek .................... 3 Introduction to Meteorology ............. ........... 3 H azardo us Weather ................... ........... 3 Introductio n to Ph y ic s ............... ........... 4 Phy ic of Aviation ................... ........... 6 College Phy s ic s I and Laboratory .................... 5 College Phys i cs II and Laboratory ................... 5 General Ph ys i cs I and Laboratory .................... 5 General Phy sics II and L a boratory ................... 5 Sound and Mu sic ... ...................... ...... 3 Conceptual Science and Mathematics ................. 6 *A onehour deviation in the Gen eral Studies natural scie n ce requirem ent ma y be allowed, provide d the student has comp l eted at least 33 semeste r hour s of General Studies courses Completion of both CHE 1800 and 1850 with passing grades is required to receive General Studies credit. The same is true of the combination CHE 1 810 and 1850. me-Thi s co ur se will also sa tisfy the Multicultural requirement. sp Self-paced ADDITIO AL GRAD ATION R EQ IREMENTS Multicultural and Senior Experience Course Requirements In additio n to completing the General Studies requirement s, a stud ent m u st complete a three-hour Mu l ticultural co u rse and a threehour Senior Experience course, or selection of cour ses, to be awarde d a bache l or's degree from MSCD. The Multicultural cia s doe s not r equire three hours as a sepa r ate cate go ry and can be taken in th e major minor or as an e lective. The rul es pertaining t o tho se r eq uirement s and the courses that will satisfy those requireme n ts are described b elow. M LTICULTURAL CO RSE REQUIREMENT (minimum 3 semester hours) Multicultural cour ses are design ed to increase s tud ents apprecia t ion and awareness of the American cu ltur e and the diver e c ultures that contri but e to it. Multi c ultur a l edu catio n a l offe rin gs examin e the int eractions of values and belie f s, tr aditions, ide ntit ies, a nd c ultural contributi ons of women and r ac i a l and ethnic groups in th e United Stat es: African American, As i a n American, Hispanic American, a nd ative American. Students may use the cour e to satisfy General Studie s, major or minor requirements if the cour e is approved for that u se. If the cour se is u sed for General Studie s, the Level II General Studies re triction s rem a in in effect, e.g., no cour ses with the major prefix may be u sed. A one-hour deviation in the Multicultural req uir ement will be allowed for courses judged to be s imi lar in co nt e nt to an existing Multic ultur al cour se. Equivalency will be determined by th e d e partment offer ing the Multicultural cour se. AAS 1010 AAS 1130/HIS 1940 AAS 2 1 00/CHS 2 100/ICS 2100/ NAS 2 100/WMS 2 100 AAS 2 1 30/HIS 2950 AAS 2200/PSC 2200 AAS 3240/E G 3240 AAS 3300/SOC 3140 ANT 2330 ANT 3310 ANT 3480 ART 3090 CHS 1000 CHS 1010/HJS 1910 CHS I 020/HIS 1 920 Semes t e r Hours Introduction to African American Studies .......... 3 Survey of African Hi s tory ..................... 3 Wome n of Col or. ............................ 3 West African Civilizatio n s ..................... 3 Politic s and Black People ....... .............. 3 African American Literature .................... 3 The Black Community ............ ............ 3 Cross-C ultur al Communi cation .................. 3 Ethnography of North American Ind ians .......... 3 Cultura l Di versity in Health and Illne ss ........... 3 Art an d Cultural Heritage .................. .... 3 Introduction to Chicano Studie s ................. 3 Hi tory of Me o-America: Pre-Co lumb ian and Colonial Period s ............. 3 Hi story of the Chicano in the Southwe st: 1810 to Pr esent. .............................. 3

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C HS 2100/AAS 2 100/ICS 2100/ NAS 2100/WMS 2 100 CHS 31 00/SOC 3 130 CHS 3200/CJC 3720 CJC 3720/CHS 3200 EDS 3110 EDU 2640 ENG 3240/AAS 3240 GEG 3300/NAS 3300 PSC 3300 HlS 1 910/CHS 1010 HlS 1 920/CHS I 020 HJS 1 930/NAS 1930 HJS 1 940/AAS 1130 HIS 2950/AAS 2 1 30 HIS 3090 HlS 3590 HMT 1 850 HSP 3490 ICS 2 100 /AAS 2100/C HS 2100/ NAS 2100/WMS 2100 AS 3300/GEG 33 00 PSC 3300 MGT 4830 MUS 3000 Women of Color .................... ....... 3 Th e Chi ca n o C o mmunity ................ ...... 3 Chicanos and th e Law ......... ...... ........ 3 Chicanos and the Law .... .... .............. 3 Proces ses of Education in Multicultur a l Urban S ec ond a r y S c hool s ........................... 3 Urba n and Multicultural Edu cation ...... ....... 3 African Am e rican Lite ratur e .................... 3 Land Use, Cultur e and Confli ct. ................. 3 His tory of Me so-A m e rica: Pr e -Columbian and Colonial Period s ............. 3 His tory of th e Chicano in the Southwest: 1810 t o Pr ese nt ... ........ .............. .... 3 His tory of Indig e nou s /Hi s pani c Americans ......... 3 Survey of African His tory ..................... 3 We s t African Civilization s ..................... 3 ative Americans in American His tor y ........... 3 American Immi gra tion His tory .................. 3 Multicultural/Multinational Cultural Adjustm e nt/Readju s tment ...... ................ 3 Multicultural I ss u es in Human Services ........... 4 Women of Color. ............................ 3 Land U se, Culture and Confli ct. ............... 3 Workforc e Diver sity .......................... 3 Musics of America ................... ....... 3 AS 1000 Introdu c tion to ative Am erican Studi es .......... 3 AS 1930/HIS 1 930 His tory of Indigenous/His panic Americans ..... ... 3 AS 2100/AAS 2100/CHS 2100/ res 2100/WMS 2100 NAS 3200/PSC 3200 PSC 2200/AAS 2200 PSC 3200/NAS 3200 PSC 3300/GEG 33 00 Women of Color. ............................ 3 Native American Politics ...................... 3 Politic s and Black P eop l e ................. .... 3 ative American P o litic s ................. ... 3 AS 3300 L and U se, Culture and Confli ct. ................. 3 PSY 3170 Multicultur a l S e r v i ce L earn in g .................. 3 SOC I 040 Introduction to G ero ntology ... ...... ..... .... 3 SOC 3130/CHS 3 100 Th e Chicano Community ............ .......... 3 SOC 3140/AAS 3300 Th e Bla ck Communit y ...................... .. 3 SOC 3220/WMS 322 0 R ace, G e nder, and Ethnic Group s ...... ..... ... 3 SPE 3760 Cultural Influen ces o n Communication ............ 3 WMS 2100/AAS 2 100/CHS 2100/ ICS 2100/NAS 2100 Women of Color ............................. 3 WMS 3220/SOC 3220 Rac e, G e nder and Ethnic Group s ................ 3 XXX 1190 Fir stYear S e min a r .................... ...... 3 *Variab l e co ur se prefixe s, e.g., ENG PSC, RDG SOC, S P E

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20 SE lOR EXP E R IE CE COURSE R EQ JREME T ( minimum 3 s emest e r hours) T h e Senior Exper i e n ce co ur se pr ov i des a c ulmin ation of the und e r g r ad u a t e ex p erie n ce, allowing s tu dent s to synthesize their learning u ing critica l analysis and l og i cal th i nking. S tud e nts m ay u e the course to satisfy major or minor requirements if the course is a p proved for tha t u se Stu dents s h o uld cons ult with their adviser a n d check prerequisites Stude nt s mu t comp l ete a S enio r Ex p e rien ce co ur se at the end of t he u ndergradua t e program and must take the co ur se or co u rses a t MSCD S e nior Ex p eri ence courses have the following minimal prerequisites : satisfact i on of all Level l a n d Leve l ll G ene r a l Studies course requirements and senior status. I n some cases s tu de nts may need to take t wo co ur ses to satisfy the requirement. ART401 0 ART 4750 B l O 4510 B IO 4540 BlO 4850 CEN 4600 CHE 4950 CHS 4850 CJC 4650 COM 44 1 0 COM4790 CSI 4260 ECO 4600 EDS 4290 EDU 4190 EDU 4380 EDU 4390 EDU 4690 EET 4100 EET 4110 ENG 4520 ENG 46 1 0 E G 4640 E G 4660 F RE4520 FRE4530 GEG 4960 GEL4960 GER 4 110 GER 4120 HCM 4510 HIS 4820 HMT4040 HMT4400 HPS 4600 HPS 4870 HPS 4880 HPS 4890 HSP 4790 I TS 4960 JRN 4500 LES 4890 MET401 0 MET4070 MGT4830mc MGT4950 MTH 42 1 0 Semes ter Hour s Modem Art His to ry: Theory and Crit icism .................. 3 Senior Experience S t udio : Por tfolio Development and T h esis Show ........................ 3 Mic r obial Ecology ..................................... 3 P l ant Ecology ....................................... 4 Evolution .... ............................. ......... 3 Se n ior Seminar ......... ............................. 3 Senior Experience in C h em istr y .......................... 3 Research Experience in Cnicano Studies .................... 3 Ethics for the Cri m i n a l Jus t ice P rofessional .................. 3 B u dge t ing and Pla nnin g for AudioVis u a l P roductio n s ...... 3 Sen i or Seminar in Technical Comm u nications ................ 3 Software Engineering Practices ..................... ...... 4 His t ory of Econo mic Thoug h t ............................ 3 Stu de n t Teaching a n d Seminar: Seco nd ary ............. 6, 8, 1 2 St u dent Teaching a n d Seminar: E l e m e n tary K-6 ...... 6, 8, 1 0, 1 2 Teaching Practicum i n Pre-prima r y Early Chi l d h ood Ed u catio n 3-6 Student Teaching a n d Seminar-Early Child h ood (P r eschool thro u g h Third grade) ..................... 6, 8, I 0 P r ofes ional Practic u m ........... ................. ... 1-6 Se n ior Project I .. ............. .............. .... .... I Senior Project II . .......................... ...... 2 Adva n ced Writi n g ............ ...... ............... 3 T h eories and Tec hni ques in Lit e r ary Criticism ............... 3 Teaching English, 71 2 .......................... ...... 3 Teaching Literature and Language K(6 ................. ... 3 Modern French T h ea t er .... ... ... ............... ...... 3 The French ove l .................................... 3 G l obal Environmental Challenges ...................... ... 3 E n v i ronmenta l F i e l d Studies ..................... ...... 3 T h e German Nove l of the 19th a n d Ear l y 20th Ce n t u r i es ........ 3 German Drama of t h e 19th and 20 t h Centuries ............... 3 Health Care Management Pract i cu m ............. .... ..... 6 Senior Seminar ....................................... 3 Senior Hospita l ity R esearch Exper i ence I ................... 2 Senior Hos pitality R esearch Experience fJ ........... ..... 2 O r ganization, Admin istration of Hum an Performance and Sport Programs ....................... 3 Internship for Ath l et i c Training ......................... I 0 I nternship for Ad ult Fitness Major .............. ........ 1 0 Internship for Human P e rformance ....................... 10 Professional Internship ................................ 1 2 Profess i onal I ndustria l Internship ...................... ... 4 Ethical and Legal I ssues in Journa l ism ..................... 3 lntemship for Leisure Studies ........................... 12 Adva n ced Manufact u ring Techno l ogy ..... .......... .... 3 Computer-Aided D es i gn ......................... ..... 3 Workforc e Diversity ....... ............................ 3 Strategic Management ..................... ........... 3 Pro b abi l ity Theo r y ...... .... ....................... 4

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MTH 42 20 MTH 44 1 0 MTH 448 0 M U S 4110 M U S 4340 MUS 43 90 MU S 45 1 0 M U S 4 7 4 0 M US 4790 M US 49 5 0 NUR 48 50 PHI 4 1 00 PHY 46 20 PHY 4 72 1 PHY 4920 PSC 4020 PSY 4 510 RD G 46 0 0 so c 4 6 00 so c 47 1 0 SPA 4 200 SPA 4310 SPE 4090 SPE 412 0 SPE 4490 SWK 4810 WM S 47 50 Sto c hastic Pr oces s es .............. .... ........ . 4 Advanced Cal c ulu s I ................................... 4 Numerica l Ana l ys i s I. .... ............................ 4 A n a l ys i s of Mu s i c ... . .... ................. . . 2 S econdary Sc h oo l M u ic M ethods and M a t e rial s ............. 2 Sup e rvi se d Field Exp erie n ce .................. ........... I Advanced Con d uc t ing .................................. 2 P e r fo rm a n ce V111 .... .... .... ............ ..... ...... 4 S enio r R eci t a l ....... . ..................... .... I S enio r Pr o j ec t .... ......... ................ . 3 Nur sing Pr ocess: A ppli catio n .... .................. .... 5 S enio r S e m i n ar ....... ...... ....... ......... .... 3 Co mput atio n a l Phy s i cs II. . ................ .... ...... 2 A d vanced Physi c L abo r a t o r y ll ...... .... ......... ..... 2 Ph ys i cs S enio r S e min a r ................ ........ ....... I Sp ecial Studi es ...... ................................ 3 Hi s t o r y an d Syst e m s of P syc h o l ogy ....... ............. 3 Pr acticum in L i t e r acy Enha n ce m e nt. .... .... ............. 3 Advan ce d R esearc h in the Soc i a l S c i e n ces ............ .... 3 A ppli e d S oc i o l ogy ..... ... ...... ......... ........ ... 3 Spani s h Am erica n E ssay: 1 9th and 2 0th C e nturi es ... ...... 3 His t o r y o f the Spanis h L a n g uage .................. ...... 3 C l ass ical Rhe t oric .................................. 3 Fr ee d o m o f Sp eec h ............................. ...... 3 E ffec t s of R ad i o-Te l ev i s i o n o n Co nt e mp o r ary L ife .... ....... 3 Prof ess i o n a l Interns hip ll .......................... .... 5 S enio r S e min a r .......................... ........... 3 me-T his c o ur se will a l so sa ti sfy t he M ulti c ultur a l r eq u i r eme nt ASSESSMENT EXAMl A TION S A D OTHE R A C TI V ITIES In th e ir senio r y ea r s tud ents m ay be r e quir e d t o partic ipat e in a n assess m e nt o f the ir ge n e r a l e du c ation. Th e fac ult y h as d e t e rmin ed e du catio n a l goa l s o r o ut co m es tha t it wa nt grad ua t e to achjeve. A co p y o f th ose goa l s and th e m e th ods b y whic h t h e i r achieve m ents a r e meas ur ed ca n be o bt ai n e d from the d e p a rt ment offices

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22 ADMISSIONS A DMISSIO NS ADMISSION R EQUIREMENTS Th e college u ses t wo categories for cia s ifying a ppli can ts: tho se w ho are younge r than 2 0 and those w h o a r e 2 0 or older. B ased o n the college's modifi ed ope n a dmi ssio n syste m eac h ca t egory h as it s ow n a dmission requir e m ents a nd pr oced ur es. Stud e nt s maintain the stat u s of co ntinuin g s tud e nt while a b ent fTom the college for l ess than one yea r ; how eve r followin g two full se m este r s of abse n ce, s tudents hould call th e R egis trar 's Office to deter mine whether a n upd ated a ppli cation for r e-a dmi ss ion will be r eq uir ed. For more inform a tion see Admission of Previously Enrolled Students ( p age 24). APPLICA TS You GER THAN 20 Applicant s who a r e younge r th a n 20 on September 1 5 for e ith e r the s umm e r se me s t er or the f all se mest e r or February 15 for the s prin g semes t e r will be c l assified as a traditional applicants. Th ey will b e co n idered for admi s ion u sing t h e requirements de sc r ibed be l ow f FRESHME N (FIRST-TIME COLLEGE STUDE T ) : The college will admit s tud e n t w ho are likely t o co mpl ete s u ccessf ully an aca demic program and w h o m ee t s t a t e r e quir e m ents for the college as esta bli s h e d b y the Colorado Commi ss ion o n Hig h e r Education (CCHE). Appli ca nt s w h o do not m eet the tated adm i ss ion r e quirem e nt s will be c on side r e d on an indi v idual ba s i s that inc lude a careful r ev i ew of all c r e d e ntial s, includin g l e tter s of r eco mmenda tion and p e r sona l interview. Applicant s who have n ot g radu a t e d from hig h sc hoo l but hav e r ece i ved the Co l o r ado Gene r a l Edu ca tion a l D eve l opment ( OED ) certificat e or it s e quival e nt will be accepted ACT o r SAT t es t r es ult are n o t r e quir ed with a OED Applicant s mu t request th at the following information be mailed directly to the Admiss ion s Offic e from th e hig h sc ho o l or tes tin g agen cy: => ACT or SAT t es t r es ult s => hig h sc ho o l g rad e point ave r age => hig h sc h ool c l ass rank Thi s inform ation may be s ubmitted at the end of the ixth seve nth or e i g hth se m es t e r of high school but n o l a t e r than four weeks b efore the expec ted t erm of e nrollment. An official tran sc ript with d a t e of graduation i s r e quired n o l a t e r than the fourth week of the t erm of e nroll ment Stud e nts s hould r equest and verify th a t the hig h school tran sc ript with dat e of g raduatio n ha s been mail ed b y the hig h schoo l and h as bee n r eceive d b y th e Admiss ion s Office COLLEGE TRANSFER: The coLlege will admit s tud ent w h o a r e m o t li ke l y to co mpl e t e s u ccess full y a n aca d emic p r o gram and w ho me e t s tat e r eq uir e m e nt s for the college as establis h e d by the Colorado Com mis s ion on Hig her Edu ca tion (CC HE) Applicants who h ave l ess than a c umu l ative 2.0 g r ad e p oint average from all colleges and uni ve rsitie s at t e nd ed will be consi d ere d on an individual bas i s tha t include s a carefu l r ev iew of all c red e ntial s, including l etter of recommendation and a p e r so n a l int erview Applicants mu st r e que s t tha t the followin g informa tion b e mailed dir ec t l y to the Admi ss ions Office f r om th e hig h sc h ool testing ag e ncy, a nd/or college or univers ity: => ACT or SAT t es t re ult s => hig h schoo l transcript => tran scr ipt fro m eac h college or univ e r sity a ttende d o r c urr ently attending => verificatio n of e nr o llm ent if c urr ently attendi n g

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These credentials should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes. All required crede n tials must be received before a final admis ion deci ion can be made. A pplicant s 2 0 Years of Age or Older App l icants who are 20 or older on September 15 for either the summe r se mester or the fall se mester or February 15 for the pring se me ster, will be considered for admission u s ing the requirements described below for a first-time college st udent or a college transfer student: FRESHMEN (FIR ST TIME COLLEGE STUDENTS) : Applicants will be admitted to the college upon indicating on the application for admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have received a General Educational Devel opment (GED) certificate. By signing the application for admission, degree-seeking applicants a re certifying that they will request either a high school transcript with date of grad u ation or GED tes t sco re s be se nt to the Admissions Office Degree-seeking s tud e nt will not be permitted to register for a sec ond semes ter until thi s credential is received. By signing the application for admission, non-degree-seeking app l icant s under s tand that they do not have to s ubmit credentials to continue at MSCD. The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but i s highly recommended for advising purposes. COLLEGE TRANSFE R: Applicants will be admitted to th e college, regardle ss of their cumulative college GPA if they indicate on their application for admission that they h ave graduated from high sc hool or that they have received a G e neral Educational Developm e nt ( GED ) ce rtifi cate. By signing the app l ication for admission, degreesee k i ng app l ica nt s are certify i ng that they will request that either a high school transcript with date of gra duation or GED t est scores be sent di.rectly to the Admi sions Offic e. In place of the se credential college tran fer s tudents may have college transcript s that indicate at least 30 semester hours or 45 quar t er hours of transferab l e C work ent directly to MSCD Degreesee king transfer applicants are required to ha ve all college and university transcript s on file to receive a transfer evalua t ion. By signing the a pplication for admission, non-degree-seeking applicants under s tand that they do not have to s ubmit credentials to continue at the college. App l icants who indicate on their application for admission that they are not seeki ng a degree from MSCD may change their status by completing a Change of Status Form and s ubmitting all required transcripts to the Regi s trar' s Office The ACT or SAT is not required for ad mission but i s hig hly reconm1ended for a dvi sing purposes. APPLICATI O N I NST RUCTIONS Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they a re receiv ed each se me s ter. All credentials received by the college become the property of MSCD and will not be returned to the stu de nt I t is the re s pon ib i lity of the app l icant to notify the Regi s trar's Office of any changes to the appli cation for admission prior to the first day of cia es. If changes are not reported to the Re g istrar 's Office, the regi tration process could be delayed for s ubsequent se m es ters. Failure to report academic changes m ay r es ult in r eject i on, dismissal, and/or l oss of credit. International (visa) applicants are referred to the Admission of Internation a l Student s section on page 25 in this Catalog. To apply for admission: Applications are available from The Metropolitan State College of Denv er, Admis ions Office, Campus Box 16, P.O. Box 173362 D enve r CO 80217-3362, (303) 556-3058. A $25 nonrefundable application fee ($40 for international app l icant s) is required with the application for admission. The application fee does not apply to tuition and fees. Re-admit applicants do not have to pay thi s fee.

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24 Submit a comple t ed application and application fee directly to the Admissions Office. The a pplication and aU r equired creden tial (see Admission Requirement below) should be received at lea s t four weeks prior to the firs t day of classes. It is the student's responsibility to requ est that all required credentials be mai l ed directly from the i ssuing institution or agency to the Admis s ions Office. Hand-carried do c ument s will not be accepted. Although an app licant' s r ecord may be s ummari zed o n one transcr ipt officia l tran sc ript s from each institution are r equired. The application for admission and all credentia l received by the college will be kept on file for three semesters, after which tim e the file will no l onger be maintained. Applicants wishing to attend MSCD must begin the admission proces again. ADMISSIO OF PREVIOUSLY ENROLLED STUDENTS Former students or r e-admit s tudent s are defined as individuals who have been accepted, have registered for a course and have received a grade or g rade notation at the college f Former students who have not been in attendance at MSCD for one or more years s hould adhere to the followin g procedures: Submit a comple ted application for admission. Check the re-admission box on the top, r i ght comer of the application. o applicat ion fee is required for re-admission. To ensure processing, the application and any required credentials sho uld b e received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the se mester for which admission i s so ught. Former s tudents who h ave attended other collegiate institutions since l ast attending MSCD must follow the appropriate admiss ion requirements for transfer stude nts. Former s tud e nt s w ho are r etu rning after nine years of a b sence from the college are required to resubmit all crede ntials. Only non-degree-seeking MSCD graduates do not have to res ubmi t credentials. ADDITIONAL ADMISSION PROG R AMS Summer Semester Only Applicants less than 20 years of age who have graduated from high school or h ave received a General Educational D eve lopm ent (GED) certificate and are applying for the summe r seme ter and who do not wish to continue after the summer semes t e r may be admitted under a provisional stat u s and are not required to s ubmit admissio n credentials. Please check the a ppropriat e box und er the MSCD Plans sec tion on the app lic ation for admission. Applicants applying for the summer semeste r and who wish to con tinue for the fall or spring se me ster must meet sta ted admission requirement s before the semester beg ins. HIGH SCHOOL CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT PROG R AMS (HIGH SCHOOL STUDE TS 0 LY) High School Student Education and En richment Program The Student Education and Enrichment ( SEE) pro gra m is The Metropolitan State College of Denver's High School Concurrent Enrollment Program for college-ready students. SEE i s designed to supp lement a student's existing e ducation thr ough early participation in college-level classes This advanced pro gram should not be interpreted as an alternative to high chool completion but i in tead, a coope r ative co lle ge/high sc hool effort to provide educa tional enrichment and early co llege attendance to qua lifi ed high chool students. Typically the SEE student: is current l y registered in a Colorado high schoo l is maintaining a GPA of 3.0 or bette r is preferably in the senior year of high schoo l can benefit from pecialized or acce l erated cia es has demonstrated the abil ity to do college-level work

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To apply for admi s ion th e student mu st, in co n s ult a tion w ith th e ap propri a t e hig h schoo l authority, s ubmit to th e Admissions Offic e an admission a ppli ca tion w ith the r equi r ed $25 a ppli cation fee accom pan i ed by the followi n g documents: r ec ommend a tion from a hig h sc hool counselor or admini s tr a to r stati n g h ow the s tudent will benefit from early college attendance written parental a pprov a l official hig h sc hool tran sc ript Upon receipt of th ese do c ument s the s tud e nt' s record i s r ev i ewe d and the admission decision i s made. H owever, if additional or s upp o rtin g information i s required, the tud e nt may be r eq uir ed to have an admission interview with an admissions co un se lor Th e admiss ion decision will be based o n th e st u dent' s aca d e mic pr e paration and p as t p erfo rman ce, r eco mmend at ion of the hig h school officia l and the s tudent' s personal motiv ation and r ea din ess for a traditional college experience. Po st-Seconda r y E nr o llm e nt Options Prog r a m Th e Po s t-S eco ndary Enrollment Option s Pro g r a m ( PSEOP ) i s a s pon so r s hip pr ogram e n acted by s t a t e l aw in 1988 that provide s junior and seniors in hig h sc ho o l younge r than 22 the o pp ortu n ity t o take co l le ge cla sses for both hi g h school and college c r e dit. Th e program i s intended t o provide hig h sc h oo l stu dent s with a n optional learning e n v ironm e nt. Under the t erms of the pro gra m th e hig h sc hool di s tri ct agrees t o pa y for college tuiti on and th e tudent is the n respon s i b le for college fees and books. Coun se ling offices in Colorado hig h schoo l s are provided with PSEOP application pa cke t s that include ins truction s h ee t s application forms and billing autho rization forms. Application deadlines a r e schedul e d 45 d ays pri o r to th e fir t day of classes eve ry fall and s pring se m es t er. Spe cific d ea dline s and furth er information relative to this program and the appli cation process m ay be obtained by ca llin g the Admissions Office a t (303) 556-3058. M ET R OMERITUS I n dividual s 60 or older who do not wish to earn credit are invit e d t o attend tuition -free cla ss es of the ir choice on a p ace-available ba s is. M etroM e ritu is d e igned to g i ve specia l encou r ageme nt and a ss is tance to retired c i ti ze n s to co ntinue their p e r so nal ed u cational g r ow th in a s timul a tin g and friendly cam pus etting. For informati o n a nd to enroll call the Offi ce of Adult L earni n g Services at (303 ) 556 8342 ADMISSION O F I N T E RNATIONAL STUD ENTS All s tudent s who d ec lare a co untry of citizenship o ther than the U.S on their a ppli catio n s for admi ss ion mus t contact t h e Registrar's Office Admission of U.S. permanent residents (o r refugees political par o l ees and political a s ylu m ca ses, e t c.) and s tudent s on t emporary visas oth e r th a n F-1 or J I : :::::> Offi cial tran cri pt s includin g eco ndaty l eve l educat ion s h o uld be submitted four weeks prior t o the beginning of the first day of c l asses of the se m es t e r for whic h admission i s sought. :::::> Applic an t s m ay be required to p ass an Engli h profi cie n cy exa min ation. :::::> App l icant s ma y be r e quired to r egiste r for and comp l e t e certain course s during their firs t two se m es t ers. Admission of a ppli can t s on s tud e nt (F-1 or J I ) visas : Applicants s hould su bmit an International Student Application for Admission and othe r r e quir ed docu ment a t i on. Student s w h o are aca demic ally a dmi ss ible a nd h ave met the minimum Englis h proficiency and financial s upport r eq uir eme nt s, will be issued the U S. Immi gration Form l20 Questions regarding the admi ss ion of s tud e nt s from abroad or permanent r eside nt s s h o uld b e dir ec t ed t o the R eg i s tr a r s Office.

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26 ENROLLMENT READT G, WRITING AND MATHEMATICS PLACEME T EXAMINATIONS All first-lime college stude nt s are required to tak e a series of three exams before registering for their first-seme ter classe The exams measure co lle ge entry-leve l skills in reading, writing, and mathemat ics, and the sco res are used to h elp advisers and s tud ents se lect appropriate courses. For additional infor mation call (303) 556-3677 0RIE TATIO ew Student Orientation offers a mandatory orientation program for all fir t-time college stude nt s and transfer st udents und er 20. Tran sfer stude nt s 20 and older, as well as parents and non-degre e seeking st udent are welcome at orientation sess ion s More than 100 sessions per year are offered, catering to the specific n ee d s of first-time college stu dents, transfer tudents, women, and parents of traditiona l age freshmen. Se sions are sc hedul ed on different days and at various times to accommodate the needs of our diver e commuter populations. Sessions are a l so offered at the North and South campuses to pro vide further Hexibility. Orientation sessions cover a variety of topics including degree planning aca de mic concerns, tudent rights and responsibilities student upport programs, comm uter i sues and an opportunity to ask and di cu individual question Students are provided with a packet of valuable information which includes a catalog, stu dent handbook general requirements brochure and brochures from many of the stude nt support programs and serv ices. Orientation i s invaluab l e in laying a sol i d foundation for s tudent s' future academic s u ccess. Approximately 4,000 tudent s and parent s are served by this program each year. For further information see the Class Schedule or call 556-6168. ACADEMIC ADVISI G All first-time to-college stude nt s, initial transfer tudents, and s tudent s undecided about their majors are required to seek academic advising in the Academic Advi ing Center in order to register for c i a ses. All s tudent s are encouraged to tak e advantage of advising serv ices which include: course sc heduling; assis tance in choosing a major ; and ongoing deve l opmental advisi ng. Student s who have dec i ded on a ma j or s hould meet with an advise r in their major departm ent to plan their academic program and receive cur rent materials. For additional information call (303) 556-3680. TRA FER CREDIT EVALUATIO Once all final official transcript for degree-seeking tudents are received by the Regi strar' Office, the eva luati on process begins. Within approxima t ely four weeks, students receive two copies of the tran s fer credit evaluation, one of which is taken to the major and minor departments for advic e on how cred it s might app l y to their programs. Transfer credi t s will be accepted under the following g uidelines: Credit must have been earned at an institution of high er ed ucation holdin g full regional accreditation. Grades earned must be "A," "8," "C," or equiva l e nt. Courses with D," "F," or s imil a r grades will not be accepted in transfer. A s umm ary of transfer credit from each institution will be indi cated on the MSCD academic record. Neither tran fer cour e grades nor previous grade point averages will be indicated or affect the MSCD g rade point average. Course content hould be similar to tho e cour e offered at MSCD. A maximum of 64 semester hour s from two-year institutions will be accepted and applied toward a MSCD degr ee A maximum of 90 semes ter hour s of c redit w ill be given for accept ab l e work completed a t a four-year instit ution or a combination of twoand four-year institu tions. Tran ferable co urse s are accepted a t the sa me l eve l i.e. low e r -div i sio n or upper-divi sio n at which they were offered at the previou institution. For examp l e, all transferred com mu n ity co lle ge cour e will apply to the MSCD degree as lower -division credit. Students who have earned an A.A. or A.S. degree will r eceive junior stan ding at MSCD, pro vided all courses includ ed in the degree carry a grade of "C" or better and, ba sed on the co u rse by-course eva luation, otherwise meet minimum MSCD transfer c redit s tandards. Students may

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ne e d to compl e t e a ddition a l MSCD l owe r -div i s i o n r e quir e m e nts. Appli c ants h aving c omp l e t e d t h e Color a do c omm u nit y coll eg cor e c urri c ulum as ce rtifi e d on th e ir c ommunit y c oll ege tra n sc ript a r e co nsid e r e d t o h ave satisfie d Th e M e tr o p o lit an S ta t e Colle ge o f D e n ve r's minimum G e n e r a l Studi es r e quir e m e nts. H oweve r a dditi o n a l s p ecific l ower d i v i s i on c ours es m a y be r e quir e d for ce r t ain d eg re e pro gra ms. Once tran s fer c r e dits a r e evalu a t e d, the total number of th ese c r e dit s a ppli c ab l e t o a degre e will not be r e duced unl ess th e s tud e nt r e p ea t s a lr ea d y awa rd e d tr a n s f e r c r e di t a t MSCD or int e r rupts MSCD e nr o llm e nt for thr ee o r m o r e co n secutive se m es t e r s a n d r e-ad mit s t o the college u nder mor e r es tr i ctiv e t r a n s f e r c r e dit eva l uati o n p olic i es In a ccordance w ith p olic i es es t a bli s h e d b y the Col o r a d o Commi ss i o n on Hi g h e r Educa ti o n to address student di sputes r egarding student tra n sfer b e t wee n Color a d o publi c in stitutions, MSCD h as in stitute d procedure s f o r r eso l v in g tra n sfe r c r edit di sputes T h ese procedures a r e availa bl e fro m a tra n sfe r eva luator in the R eg i stra r s Office TRA S F E R C E TE R Th e T r an s f e r Cente r o ffe r s assi t a n c e t o s tude nt s tr a n sfe rrin g f rom othe r inst ituti o n s Sp ecific ser v i ces includ e pr e l iminar y tr a nscript evaluatio n e du catio n a l p l a nnin g transitio n to aca d e mic d epart m e n ts, an d r es olut i o n o f tran s f e r probl e ms. Tra n s f e r co un se l o r s a r e avai l able b y a pp o intm e nt s and f o r w alk-ins; evening appointm e nt s ar e a vail able Th e Trans f e r C e nt e r wo rks c l ose l y w ith Tra n sc ript Evalua t i o n t o pr ovide s tud e nt s informatio n a b out thei r tra n sfe r c r ed its and h ow th ose c r ed its may be a ppli ed. Q u es tion s pe r t a inin g t o tr a n s f e r c r e d i t eval u atio n s h o uld be r efe rr ed to t h e O ffice of A dmi ssio n s, Ce n tr a l Cl ass r oo m Buildin g, r oo m 1 20 (303) 5 5 6-3069. REGISTRATION All conti nuing s tud e n t s in g ood sta n d i n g a t the c ollege a r e e l i gible t o r eg i s t e r ea ch se m es t er. S tude n t s ar e r es pon sible for e n s urin g tha t the r e i s a correc t and upt od a t e a ddress o n fil e w ith th e co l l e ge. Add r ess c h an ges m ay be mad e with th e R eg i s trar s Office. A s tud e nt m ay regi t e r for c l asses in seve r a l ways. Informatio n o n th e r eg i stratio n pr oce dur e and r eg i s tra t ion d a t e s i s p u bli s h e d in the C l ass Sc h ed ule, whic h i s m ailed to all co ntinuin g stude nts. CONCURRENT E R OLLME T Stud e n t s who find it n ecessary t o be r eg i s t e r e d a t MSC D a nd a n othe r college a t the sam e tim e s h o u l d c h ec k w ith MSCD ad v i se r s con ce rnin g the acce pt a n ce a n d a ppl icatio n of tr a n sfe r c r e dit s F a ilur e t o do so may result in d e n i a l of tran s f e r c r e dit. Stud e nt s co n c urr ently e nr olle d a r e affec t ed b y th e aca d emic poli c i es o f MSCD inc ludin g th e MSCD co ur se l oa d p olicy. INTE RI STITU TIONAL REGI S TR AT IO Stud e nt s enrolle d at MSCD m ay r eg i s ter for c our ses a t Ara p a h oe C o mmunit y C ollege, C o mmunit y C o l l ege of D env e r and R ed R oc k s Commu n it y Coll ege. C o ur ses tak e n a t these ins tituti o n s in n o way a lter e x i s tin g MSC D degr ee requ i r e m e nt s, but m ay a ppl y t owar d d egree r eq uir e m e nt s s ub jec t t o spec ific a pp rova l b y MSC D Stud e nt s s h o uld be awar e tha t c our ses tak e n int e rin t itut i o n ally will be co unt e d as p art of t he 64 se m es t e r hour s from co mmunit y colleges a ppli cable t o a MSCD degr ee. Int erins tituti o n a l c r e dit will n o t s ati sfy academic r eside nce re quir e m e nt s a t MSC D In the eve nt a c onfli c t arises be t wee n th e po lici e s /procedur es o f MSCD and o n e of th e colleges lis t e d a b ove, th e m os t r estrictive p o l icy pr e vai ls. Stud e nt s a r e advi se d t o c on fe r w ith de p a run e nt c h a irs and /o r coo rdin a t o r s of aca d emic adv i sing befor e r egis t e ring int e rin s tituti o nally. E N R OLLME T S TATUS T h e e n r ollm e nt s t a t u s of th e s t u d e nt a t t h e ho s t ins tituti o n i s de t e rmin e d b y t h e s tud ent' s s t atus a t the hom e ins tituti o n (ins tituti o n w h e r e th e s tud ent i s see kin g a d egree). Stud e nt s s h ould asce rt ain befo r e e nr olling a t an ins tituti o n th a t de s ir e d co ur ses wil l satis f y d egree r e quir e m e nt s a t th e h o m e ins tituti o n Adam s S t a t e Colle ge, M esa St a t e C ollege, and W es t ern Stat e College t ogethe r w ith MSCD form a ys t e m of s t at e c olle ge s E ac h m e m b e r ins t ituti o n c an provid e a n y s tudent in g o o d s t a ndin g w i t h th e m a t e-

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28 ria l s n ee d e d to e nroll t e mporari l y in any oth e r m e m be r in s titut i on w ithout inc urring add it i o n a l ma tric ula t ion cos ts. Inform a tion c o n ce rnin g tuition i s a v ailable a t the h o s t in s titu t ion The pro cess of e nro llin g as a s y s t e m s tud ent s h o uld b egin a t l eas t o n e m o n t h p r io r t o the be g innin g of th e regi s tr a tion p e riod a t the ho s t in s tit u t i o n Inform atio n c o n ce rnin g c ur r e nt pr oced ur es for e nr o llin g for courses a t these oth e r in s tituti o n s i s a v a i l a b l e from t h e R eg i s tr a r 's Offi ce. COUR SE AUDIT P OLICY Stud e nt m ay a udit a c l ass with the pe rmi ss ion of the i n s tru c tor and if ea tin g i s a v ailable. Ac ad e mic c r e dit i s n o t awarde d for a n a udit e d co ur se. Th e cos t for a uditin g a co ur se i s b ase d on regula r tuition a s publi s h e d in the c urr e nt C l ass S c h edule. A udit a pp rova l f o rm s are avai l able i n d e p art m e nt a l offices C H ANGES I N REGI ST RATION Enrolle d s tud e nt s m ay a dju s t sc h e dul es b y droppin g and/o r a ddin g cl asses S ee the c urrent C l ass S c h edul e for co mpl e t e informa t io n c on ce rnin g droppin g and/o r a ddin g classe s a nd the tuiti o n an d fee r e fund sc h e dul e. Stud e nt s w ho r e du ce the ir c our se l oad afte r the fourth week of cia e a n d befo r e th e beg innin g o f the fift h wee k will r ece i ve a n NC n o t atio n fo r e ach co ur se they hav e dr o pp e d a nd a r efund if a pp l i c ab l e A NC/Wi t h d raw a l Form m u st b e s ubmitt e d by the d ea d lin e t o th e R eg i s tr a r 's Office Stu d e nt s r e d u cin g the ir co u r se l oa d b e t wee n t h e b eg innin g of the fif th a nd the e nd of t h e t e nth w ee k of c l as es durin g fall and s prin g se m e t e r s m ay r ece i ve a n C notati o n for eac h co ur se, pro v id e d faculty a ppr ova l i s g r ante d Ad d itio n a l r es t rictio n s r ega rdin g a i g nin g th e C n o t atio n m ay be se t b y e ac h sc ho o l d e p a rtm e nt an d /o r facult y m e m be r for th e peri o d be tw ee n th e beg innin g o f the fifth an d th e e n d of t h e t e nth wee k of the se m es t er (o r p ro p o rtion a l tim e fr am e). S t ud e nt s a r e a d v i se d to see k f ac ult y s ig natur es well b e for e th e d ea d line. A N C/Wit h d r aw a l F orm mu s t be s ubmitt e d b y th e d e adline t o th e R eg i tr a r 's Offi ce. S ee t h e sec tion s o n gra d es, no t a t ion s co ur se lo a d and c l as atte ndanc e in thi s Ca ta l og. Pr o ponion a l tim e fram es are a pp l i e d for modular co u rse, wo rksh ops, and s umm e r t e rms. Pr oce dure s for a ddin g o r droppin g a m odula r c o urse afte r the c ours e h as begun are d escribed in the current C l ass S c h e dul e TUITION AND FE ES Thition Cla ss ification A s t u d e nt i s c l as ifie d as a n i ns t a t e o r o ut ofs tat e stud e nt f o r tuition purp oses a t t he tim e of a dmi ss i o n T h i s cia s ification i s b ase d u pon info rm a tio n s uppli ed b y the s tud e nt o n the a pplication f o r admi ss i o n and i s m a de in acc ord a n ce w ith the C o l o r a do T uitio n Cl assifica t ion L aw, CRS S 237-IO I e t se q ( 1 973 ) a s a m e nded On ce d e t e rmin e d a tud e n t's t uition c l assifica t ion s t atus r e m a in s u n c h a n g e d unl ess sa t isfac t o ry e vidence th a t a c h a n ge s hould be made i s pr ese nt ed. A P e titi o n f o r I n Sta t e Tuiti o n C l ass i ficatio n F onn a nd the ev id e n ce r e qu es t e d s h o uld b e s ubm itted t o th e R eg i s tr a r 's Offic e if a s tud e n t believes s h e or h e i s e ntitl e d t o ins t at e s t atus. T h e t uitio n c l a ss ificatio n s t a t u t e r e quir es that i n ord er t o qu a l ify for int a t e s tatu s, a stud e n t (or th e p a r e nt s or l e g a l g u a rdian of the s t u d e nt in the case o f s tud e nt s u n d e r 22 year s of ag e w h o a r e not e ma n c i p a t e d ), mu s t h ave b ee n d omicile d in C o l orado for on e year o r mor e imm edia t e l y p r e cedi n g the firs t d a y o f t h e se me s t e r for whic h s u ch cl assifica tion i s so u g ht. D o mi cile f o r tuiti o n p urp oses r e qu i r e s two in se p arab l e e l e m e nt s: ( I ) a pe rm a n e nt place of h a b it at io n in C o l o r a d o a nd (2) in te nt t o r e main in Co l o r a do w ith n o int e nt t o be d omicile d e l sew h e re. S o m e ex ample of c onn ectio n s w ith the s t a t e th a t p rovide obj ec t ive evide nc e of i n te nt a r e: ( I ) p ay m e nt o f C o lo r ado s t a t e inc o m e t a x a s a C o l o r ado r eside nt (2) p e r m a n e nt e mployment in C o l o r a do ( 3 ) o w n e r s hip o f r eside nti a l r e a l p ro p e rt y in Co l o r a d o (4) co m p l i a n c e w it h l a w s impo s i n g a m a n datory d ut y o n any d omi cili a r y of t h e s t at e, s u c h a s t h e dri ve r lice n s e l aw a nd the vehic l e reg i s tr a t i o n l aw, a nd ( 5 ) r eg i s tra t io n t o vo t e. Oth e r fac t o r pec uliar t o th e indi v idua l can a l so be u se d t o de m o n tr a t e th e r e qui s it e int e nt. A n y qu es tion s regardin g the tuit ion classific ation l aw h o uld be d i r ec t ed t o a n ad mi ss i o n s office r a t the college. In ord e r t o qu alify for i n -s t a t e status f o r a pa nicula r se m es t e r the tud e nt mu s t pr ove tha t domi c i l e b eg an n ot l at e r tha n o n e year p rio r t o t h e firs t day of classes f o r th a t se m es t er. Th e d a t es f o r qu alifying a n d for s ub mitt i n g pe titi o n s a r e p u blis h ed in t h e C l a ss S c h edul e eac h se mester.

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T uition a nd College Se r vice Fees Th e Board of Tru t ees of The State Colleg es in Color a do the governing board of the college, r ese rves the right to alter any or all tuition and f ees for any semes t e r w ithout noti ce. Tuition and college se rvice fee s are d e t ermined b y the tru s t ees s hortl y before the b eg innin g of eac h aca demic year Information regardin g tuition and fees i s published in the current C l ass Schedule. Tuition and fees are payable a t the tim e of regi s tr a tion Standard Fees An app l ication f ee i s requir e d of all applicant for admission to the college. This fee is nonrefundable and will n o t be a ppli e d to tuition. Appli ca tion fee ................................................ $25 Lnternation a l s tudent application fee ................................ $40 Matriculation fee ............................................... $25 S p ecia l fees R eturned check charge ......... .... ........................ ..... $ 1 7 TUITION ADJUSTMENTS Plea e see the Class Schedule for the current se m ester. STUDENT H EALTH I SURA CE All full-tim e s tudent s* are r eq uir ed to participate in the college-s pon so r ed s tud en t hea lth insurance cov e ra ge unl ess proof can be provided that a s tud en t has comparab l e and valid outside health ins ur ance coverage.** Full time s tudent s a r e automatically billed for s tud e nt h ealth insurance on their tuiti o n bill und e r the ins ur ance h e ading. Stud e nt s who h ave outside insurance cove r age are re spo nsible for co mpl e tin g a waiver form by the deadlin e indicated in eac h se m es ter Class Schedu l e in orde r t o have th e ins uran ce charge r e moved from their tuition bill (dead lin e c h anges f r om se me s ter to se mester). Waiver forms w ill not be acce pted after the deadline listed in each semester' s Class Schedule. It i s the s tud e nt' s respon s ibilit y to become familiar w ith the college's p olic i es and t o adhere t o the deadlines lis t ed. No refund s will occ ur after the waiver d ea dline. W a i ver forms and insurance brochures are avai l ab l e at e i th e r the Student H ea lth In s urance Offic e l ocated in the Student H ea lth Center ( PL 150 ) or the Student Ac co unt s Offi ce (C II 0) H ea lth in ur a nce wai ver form s are valid for only o n e year. Continuing students must complete a waive r form ANNUALLY prior to each fall se me ster. Students with a break in academic e nrollment and those who begin c l asse in the s prin g or s umm e r mu s t co mpl e t e a waiver form b y th e appropriate deadline (lis t e d in the Class Schedule) for the semes t e r they enroll and eve r y fall semester thereafter. W aiver form inform ation w ill be mailed t o the h o m e ad dr ess of all full-time stude nt s prior to the semes t e r of e nr o llm e nt. A waiver form i s a l so includ ed in the back of the C la ss Schedule. Stud e nt s who r e qu est a waive r fom1 to pro vide proof of valid outside health insurance must: Complete th e studen t h ea lth insurance waiver form. Att ac h a copy of a val i d he a lth ins uranc e card t o th e back of the waiver fonn. Students who h ave va lid outside ins ur ance but h ave n o t been iss u ed an insurance card must include the main policy hold e r 's n a m e, the insurance company 's n ame, and the n a m e and phone numb e r of a co n t act per so n or th e a ppropriat e d epar tm en t a t the insurance company that ca n verify c urr ent he a lth ins ur a n ce cove ra ge Submit th e waiv e r form b y the d ea dlin e indi cated in eac h semes t er's Class Schedu l e (deadline c han ges from semes t e r to semester). No t e: Students w h o have not b een issued a health insuran ce ca rd by their insurance co mpan y are r eq uir ed to pay for the student health insuran ce when they pay the ir tuition and fees. Once outside h e alth coverage is verifi ed, the insuran ce fee wi ll be refu n ded to the s tud e nt The time it takes t o veri fy coverage vari es, dependin g on process ing demands and insurance ca rrier responsiveness All cove r ed se rvice s a t the Studen t H ea lth Cent e r are paid a t 100 pe r ce nt with n o pa yme nt at the tin1e of

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30 service, no deductible and no need for claim fon11S. The pre-existing condition exclusion clause is waived for services performed. Please see the current Student Health Insurance Brochure for a umm ary of the plan benefits, requirements, and exclusions. Brochures can be obtained a t the Student Health Center. Dependents of a student participating in the student health insurance program are also eligible for optional insurance coverage. H owever, dependents are not eligible to u e the Student Health Center for their med ical care. In addition, students enroUed during the spring semester are given the option of purchasing sum mer he alth insurance without attending classes, provided that payment is r eceived by the deadline listed in the summer Clas s Schedule. This option also applies to seniors who grad uate in the sp ring. Students with questions regarding s tudent health insurance should contact the Student Ins urance Office. *Fo r insurance purposes, at/east 1 0 credi t hour s is conside red full-time for fall and spring semesters, and eight cre dit hour s i s co nsid ered full-time durin g the summer semester. **I ndividual insuran ce plans that are not required to meet state and federal benefit mandat es are not co nsid ered com parabl e and consequently will not be cons idered proof of co mparable coverage. As of May 1. 1997. it is anticipated that in the fall semester of 1 998 the "Colorado Resid e nt Di scount Pro g ram" will NOT be accep t ed as proof of co mparable outside h ea lth insurance coverage for waiver pur poses. This s p ecia l pr og ram is n o t conside r e d h ea lth insurance and was not designed by the state / eg'f islaturefor this purpose. STUDENT HEALTH INSURA CE Vo lun tary Program for Part-Time Students Based on the mandatory insurance requirement which the college has adopted, the Student Insurance Carr ier has pem1itted the college to offer the following Voluntary Health Insurance Program to part time students. This program is exclusively for part-time st udent s taking 6-9 credit h ours in the fall and/or s pring emester(s) and 6-7 credit hours during the s ummer semester. Student s taking more or l ess credit h ours than indicated above are OT eligible for this vol unt ary program. The Voluntary Plan has the sa m e deadlines (as listed in the C l ass Schedule), plan design, cost and ben efit l eve l s as does the manda t ory in uranc e p l an referenced in the previous section. Part-tim e stude nt s interested in the voluntary option s hould co nta c t the Student Insurance Office a t 556-3873 for app lica tion details. STUDENT DENTAL lNSURA CE Voluntary Program for all Students Voluntary Dental Insu rance i s available to all s tudents taking one credit hour or more. Information and application forms can be ob tain ed at the Student insurance Office in the Student Health Center (PL 150).

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FINANCIAL AID 3 I FINANCIAL AID The MSCD financial aid program provides assistance and advice to students who would be unable to pur sue their education at the college without such help. Scholarships, grants, loans, and part time employ ment are available singly or in various combinations to meet the difference between what the student and th e st u de nt's fami l y cou l d r easonab l y be expected to provide and the expected cost of attending MSCD. The 1997-98 academic year expen es are as follows: Resident Nonresident Tu i t i on and Fees ......... $2,690 ...... ................ $7,680 Room and Board ........... 6 ,89 5 .... ..... ..... ... .... 6,895 B ooks a n d Su p p l ies ... ....... 650 ................. ....... 650 Transportation ................ 1 080 ......... ... ..... ... ... 1080 Miscellaneous ............... 1 ,260 ..... ............... I ,26 0 $ 1 2,575 $17,565 Tuitio n and fees are set by The Sta t e Colleges in Colorado and are subject to change without notice All stu d ents are p l aced on a single-person budget. Additional allowances are made for students with day-care co ts for dependent children and for expenses related to disabilities not paid by another agency (P.L. 99-498). ELIGIDILITY AND NEED T o q u alify for fin ancia l aid, a stu d e nt must be a U.S. ci t izen or e l igib l e noncitizen, be registered with Se l ective Service (if required), have financial need be degree-, certificateor licensure-seeking, be mak ing satisfactory academic progre and not be in default on a federal education loan or owe a repay ment on a federal grant. APPLICATIO PROCEDURES S tudents mu t complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year to determine fin anc ial aid el i gi b ility. R eturni n g MSCD students may r equest applica t ion forms from the Office of Financial Aid Tran fer tudents can obtain application form from their current college or univer s ity. En t ering college fre hmen should obtain app l ication forms from their high schools or from the MSCD O ffice of Financ ial Aid Some returning tudents will receive a Renewal Application directly from the federal government and that hou l d be completed and mailed in place of a new FAFSA. Students hould m a i l forms as ear l y as possib l e, p r eferably no l ater than mid-February in order to mee t the priority deadline of March I. Transferring applicants must supply the MSCD Office of Financial Aid with finan cial aid transcri pt s from all schoo l s previously atte n ded. Detailed information concern i ng app l ication proce du res is provided in the Financial Aid Handbook available in t h e MSCD Office of Financial Aid. FlN A CIAL AID PRO G R A M S The amount of f u nds made available to students depend on the maximum award allowed by regulation of each program, the stude n t 's estab lish ed fin ancia l need, duration of t he studen t's enrollment, and funds allocated to the college by the state and federal governments. Grants G r a nt s are gift money from the federa l or state governmen t and do not have to be repaid. Federal Pell G rant s are federa l f u nds and may be awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a bachelor' degree and who are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens The amount of the award i s b ased o n eac h s tu de n t's fin anc i a l e ligibilit y and t h e number of ho urs for w h ich the student is enrolled. The amount of Federal Pel! grant awards for the 1997(98 academic year will range from $400 to $2,700 for t h ose stude nts who qualify. Full-t i me half-time or l ess than h alf-time students may qua l ify for a Fe d eral P el! Grant. Federal S upplem e nt a l Educatio n a l Opp o rtunit y G r a n ts (FSE OG) are federal fund s awa rded to und e r graduate st u dents who have not yet received a bachelor' s degree and are U.S. cit izens or e l igible non-citizens This grant is awarded to students who demon stra te exceptional need The amount of FSEOG awards r a n ges from $ 1 00 to $ 1 ,000.

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32 FINANCIAL AID Colorado State Grants (CSG) a r e sta t e fund s awar d e d to Colorado r eside nt s with eligibilit y deter min ed by the Offi ce of Financi a l Aid Elig ible s tud e nt s h ave no prior b ac h e lor 's degree a r e U.S. citi ze n s or elig ibl e n on-citizens and a r e enrolle d either f ull or p a rt-tim e at MSCD The amount of the CSG award rang es from $50 t o $2,000. CSG funds are avai l ab l e to part-tim e s tud e nt s who demon trate need and are enrolle d a minimum of s i x h ours Colorado Student Incentive Grants (CSIG) are a com bination of federal and s tate fund s awar ded by the sam e c rit eria as CSG. Stud e nt s mus t be e m olled fulltime to receiv e CSIG f und s Scholarships Stud e nt s mu st be enrolled a t l eas t h a l f-time, b e d egree-, ce rtificat eor lice n ure -seeking, be making sati sfac t o r y academic pr ogress, and n ot be in default on a federal e du catio n l oa n or owe a repa y m e nt on a federal g r ant to r eceive a sch o l ars hip Pres idential Scholarships: Th ese sc hol a r s hip s inc lud e four year sc h o l a r s hip s for e nt e rin g hig h school s tudent s and two year sc holar s hip for transfer tudent Thi s scholar s hip covers the cos t of tuition and mand a tory fees p er se m es t er. Colorado Scholarships: Sc h olarship s of up to $500 pe r e m es t e r n o t excee ding the cost of r eside nt tuition a nd mandat ory fees p e r academ i c year, a r e avai l able throu g h the academ i c d e p a rtm ents. Recip i e nt s mu s t b e Color ado re side nts. Int eres t e d s tud e nt s s hould contact the ir d e partment s for a pplications. Athletic Scholarships: MSCD h as a limited num ber of a thletic scholar s hips. Application s and addi tion a l information a r e avai l able f r om the MSCD Intercollegiate Athletics Office Priva te Scholar hip s: Student s h ould refe r t o th e MSCD Scholarship Guid e for inform at ion a bout so m e of the sc hol ars hip s a nd th e free onlin e sc hol ars hip sea r c h R ece ipt of a sc h o l arship may affect a s tudent' s finan c ial aid award becau e s tudent r eceiving federal and/or s t ate aid are limite d in th e maximum a m ount of aid which ca n be r eceive d A s tud e n t who e full need h as been m e t by othe r typ e of financial aid prior t o receipt of a c holar s hip will h ave tha t aid reduced by the amo unt of the schol ar hip. If the student's full eligi bility has not been m e t th e c holar s hip will b e allowed to sati fy the unmet need. Each tudent's sit u atio n i s treated indi vidua lly. All sc hol ars hip s are b ased o n the s tud ent' co ntinu e d elig ibilit y and avai l ab l e funding Loans Federal Perkins Loans are l ong-term fede r a l l oan whic h are awarde d b a ed on the s tudent's need a nd MSCD availab l e fund Federal P erkin Lo a n awards ca n rang e from $ 100 to $3,000. R epayme nt of the loan be gins nin e months aft e r the s tud e nt grad u ates or cease to be e nrolled a t l e a s t half-time in sc h ool. Th e int e r es t rate i s 5 p e r cent and int e r est begins to accrue at r e p ay ment. All firs t -ti me bor row e r at MSCD are r equired to a tt end a Perkin s L oa n Entra nc e Interview before lo an f und s can be r e l eased to th e m Family Education Loans Federal Family Education Loans (FFEL) inc lud e Federal Stafford Loans un ub idi zed Federal Stafford Loan and Fe d eral PLUS Loa n s, which h e lp st udent and/or th e ir par e nt s to borro w funds t o h elp m ee t educa tional expe n e To borro w th ese f und s, s tudent s and/or their par e nt s mu s t c ompl ete, in addi t ion t o the FAFSA, a epa rat e l ender a ppli ca tion t o th e Offic e of Finan c i a l Aid. Loan application s m ay b e obtaine d f r om the Office of Finan c i a l Aid o r the lend e r of the stu d e nt' s c h oice. Stud e nt s mu t b e enrolled a t l eas t h a l f-ti m e and be degree-, ce rtifi ca teor licensure-seeking. Int e r es t r a t e vary depending on the ty pe of l oan and the d ate the stude nt borrow the fir s t Federal Family Education Loan. Fo r furth e r informatio n on interest rat es, c h ec k wit h the Office of Financia l Aid o r the l ender. Firs t time borrower s are req uir e d t o a tt end a Loan Entrance Int erv i ew before lo a n s f und can be r e l ease d t o them. Federal Stafford Loans: Eli g ibilit y for th e Federal S t afford Loan i s ba se d o n th e s tud e nt' s n ee d as d ete rmin e d by the Office of Fin a n c i a l Aid. Th e annual loa n limits are $2, 625 for fre s hm en, $3 500 for ophomores, and $5,500 for all other und ergraduates. Int e r es t do es n o t begin t o accrue until s i x months aft e r the s tud e nt graduate or ceases to be e nroll ed in sc h oo l a t l eas t half-time. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan : This l oa n ha s m any of the sa m e terms and conditions as th e Fede ral Stafford Lo an. The main difference is tha t the tud e nt s are r es pon ible for the int eres t that accrues w hil e they a r e i n sc hool a nd during the s i x-mo nth grace period aft er t h ey gra du a t e or cease to

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FINANCIAL AID 3 be enrolled in schoo l at least half-time Students who do not qualify for a Federal Stafford Loan, based on need, may qualify for the unsubsidized Stafford Loan. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for infor mation concerning annual loan limits. Federal Plu s Loans: These loans are available to parents of dependent students. Applications are avail able from MSCD or from l e nder s that participate in the program. Applications must first be s ubmitt ed to the Office of Financial Aid for proces ing. At MSCD parents of dependent students may borrow per year up to the co t of education minus the amount of financial aid received by the s tud ent from other sources. Ple ase refer to the Financial Aid Han dbook for more detailed information regarding ed ucationa l loans. College Work-Study The State of Colorado the federal government, and MSCD provide part-time employment programs for s tud ents Workrudy awards range from $2000 to $5,000 per fiscal year. The average award is $1 ,250/semes ter. The maximum hours a stude nt may work is 30 hour s per week wh ile c la sses are in session, and 40 hours per week between semesters The majority of all work-study awards are need based. However there are a limited number of positions offered directly through various depart ment s/offices on campus that are no-need award THE FINANCIAL Am P ACKAGE Once student eligibility is determined, an aid package is developed based on the availability of funds and the eligibility of the app licant. To facilitate financial aid packaging requirements applica nt s must obtain all requested information and forms from designated sources and submit them before the estab lished deadline. AWARD NOTIFICATIO After the Office of Financial Aid has determined the type and amo unt of aid for which a student quali fies (aid package), the student is mailed an Award Notification. The Award otification and enclosed information stipulate the conditions of each award. Di sbursement Procedures: Grants, Scholarships and Student Loans: All financial aid awards (with the exception of out-of-state loan checks, consortium checks and some scholarship funds) are disbursed into the student's account by the Office of Financial Aid. Once this money has disbursed into the stu dent's account and the tuition and fees bill has been paid the Business Office will issue the stu dent a refund check for any remaining balance. The balance from the student's financial aid award (s tud ent's refund check) can be u sed to purchase books pay r ent, buy food e tc. Par en t Loan : Federal PLUS checks are mailed from lender to MSCD's Office of Financial Aid. Eligibility i verified and then the check is mailed to the parent borrower. Work Study: Work-study earnings are paid monthly and are treated as wages earned. Out standing balances owed to MSCD are not deducted from these earnings; however s tudent s are strongly advised to pay any outstanding balance as soon as a work-study check is received. All other aid is di bursed to the tudent's account. MSCD's Bu siness Office deducts any outstanding balance owed including current tuition and fees, and issues a check for the remaining funds. This check is either mailed to the s tudent or the s tudent can pick it up at the cashiers window. R E P AYMENT POLICY Students who r eceive financial aid and w i thdraw from MSCD prior to comp l etion of a term will be required to repay a portion of financial aid and scholarships. All required financial aid repayments must be made to MSCD before the end of the current academic year or before additional Tit l e TV funds can be disb ur sed to the student, wh ich ever occ ur s first. Repayment is made to the MSCD Busines s Office FI A C I AL Am AS A FORM OF P AYMENT Students may u se expected financial aid awards to defer payment of current tuition and fee beyond the pub l ished payment deadline R eview the current Class Schedule for more detailed information.

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34 SPECIAL PROGRAMS S PECIAL PROG R A M S CHILD DEVELOPME T C ENTE R Th e Child D eve l o p me nt C e nt e r p rovides exe mpl ary, o n -ca mpu s c hildr e n's p rogr ams. Du ring th e fall and prin g sem es t e r s the c ent e r offers p r ech oo l p rog r a ms; in t h e s umm e r it provid es a Summer En r i c hment Pro g r a m f o r e lem e nt ary age c hildr e n Available to th e Aurari a ca mpu s and t o the D e n ver c ommunity these progr a m s a r e p a rt of th e c ollege's t eac h e r e duc atio n pr ogra m Th e c l ass room s are unde r the dir ect i o n of m as t e r teac h e r s w ho are traine d an d ex p erie n c ed in e ith er ear l y c hildh oo d o r e l e m e nt ary ed u catio n Th e m aster teac h e r s pl an an age-a ppropri a t e pr ogra m t o pro vide q u a l i t y l e arnin g experie n ces that m ee t the d eve l o p me ntal n ee d s of t h e c hildr e n MS C D t eac h e r e du catio n s tud e nts also wor k i n the class r oo m p rovidi n g a hig h adult /c hild r at i o w i t h o pportuniti es for s m all g r oups and indi vid u a l att entio n Th e pr es chool pro gra m i s ac c r e dit ed b y the N atio n a l Aca d e my for E a r l y Chi l dhood Edu ca tion T h e r e a r e t wo pr esc h oo l c l asses a v ailable: 8 :30-11 :30 a.m for c hildr e n 2 1 /2 t o 4 years old and 1 2:30-3:30 p m for c h i ldr e n 4 to 6 yea r s old. T h ere i s a l so o n e h our of c hild ca r e available bef ore a n d afte r e ac h pr eschoo l c l ass. Th e Summ e r Enri c hm e nt Pro g r a m is aca d emic in co nt e nt but r ecognizes c hildr e n's n ee d s for f un a n d diff e r e nt learnin g e xp erie n ces in s umm er. Th e r e a r e t w o c lassrooms: on e f o r chil d r en e n t e rin g kin d e r ga r t e n o r firs t gra d e i n th e fall and o n e for childr e n e nt e r i n g se cond or third g r ad e in the f all. Th e re i s a D ay Pro g r a m fr o m 9 a.m. t o 3:3 0 p .m. and a n Ex t e n de d Pr ogr am fro m 7 t o 9 a.m and fr o m 3:3 0 to 6 p m C all (303) 556-2759 for m ore informatio n THE FIRST YEAR PROG RAM Th e Fir s t Y ea r Pro gra m i s d es i g n e d t o unify and coo rdin a t e c ollege e ffort s t o h elp ent e rin g tude nt s achieve a s u ccessful first year. Th e pr ogr am pro vides i nten sive ad v i sing, co ur e se l ec tion g uid a n ce, a nd aca d emic monit o rin g t hr o u g h o ut t h e first ye ar a well as c o o rdin a tin g aca d emic s upport se r v i ces for fir t yea r s tud ents. A d d i tion a lly, the progr am o f fe r s a F ir st Y ea r S e min a r co ur se, XXX 1190 whic h p ro vides ap propri a t e r ea d i n gs and w ritt en wo r k e n a blin g s tud e nt s t o di sc u and w rit e ab out c urr e nt i ss u e s inc ludin g the value of h ig h e r e du catio n All fir s t t ime MSC D s tud e nt s m ay e nr oll in th e Fir s t Y ear S em ina r co ur se and oth e r a ppropri a t e co ur ses as d e t ermi n ed b y assess m e nt a t e nt ry. Th e pro g r a m f urn i s h e s a n e n v ir onme nt w h e r e proble m o lvin g c r ea t i vity, an d p ee r int e r ac tion a r e e n co ura ge d F o r additio n a l inf ormatio n call (303) 556-8447. HEALTH CAREERS SCIENCE PROGRAM Th e H ea lth Careers Scie n ce Pr og r am i d es i g n e d t o e n co ur age wo m e n and e thni c m i n ority g roup s who h ave tr adit i o n ally b ee n exc lude d from car ee r s in sc i e n ce and t echno l ogy. Stud e nt s a r e pro vide d w i t h tut o rin g an d othe r s upp ort to e n s ur e the ir s u ccess i n the scie n ce and t echno l ogy a re as F o r m o r e i nfor m atio n ca ll (30 3) 5 56-32 I 5 HIGH SCH O O L UPWARD B O UND Thi s pro g r a m i s d es i g n e d to ge n e r ate the skills and m o tiv a tio n n ecessary f o r s u ccess in and be y ond hig h sc h oo l for yo u th s who a r e l ow i n com e and fir s t ge n e r a tion coll egebou n d s tud e n ts. T h e pro g r a m pr o vid es int e n s i ve aca d emic ins tru c tion d urin g th e sc h oo l yea r as well as a s i x -w e ek s umm e r sess i on B as i c aca d emic s kill prepa r atio n in reading, w ritin g an d m a th e m atics i s p ar t o f a c ompr e h e nsiv e c oune lin g and e nri c hm e nt p rogr a m This progra m d eve l ops c reative thinkin g, effective ex pr ess i o n and po s itive a ttitud es t oward lea rnin g Th e st u de nt s a r e r ec rui te d a t th e beginni n g of the ir s oph o m o r e ye a r in hig h sc h ool from five t arge t ar ea hig h sch oo l s l oca t e d i n D enve r C o unt y (Eas t Lincoln, M anua l No rth a n d W es t Hig h Scho o l s). THE HONORS PROGRAM Th e H o n o r s Progr am p r ovi d es an int ense, int e rdi c i pli n ary aca d e m ic progr a m for highly m otiva t e d s tu d e nt s w ho se ca p a bil it i es s u ggest a broa d e r s pectrum of n ee d s an d i nt e r ests. Th e progr a m e n co u r ages indi v idu a lit y b y r espo ndin g t o the d ive r se educatio n a l n ee d s of tud e nt s It s int egra t e d a pproach s tr e n g th e n s the pro gra m's found atio n a nd provid es a c r oss sec tion of tho u g ht provokin g per s p ec tives H o n or s s t u de n t s r ea l i ze th e i r l earnin g p o t e n t i a l throu g h c r ea t i v e inquiry ind e p e nden t thou g h t a nd c rit -

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SPECIAL PROGRAMS 3 ical exa mination. H onors profe ss ors se rve as mentor s to g uid e s tudent s in fulfilling their intellectual pur s uit s and dr ea ms. Finally while th e Honor s Pro g ram e n co ur ages independent thought and indi v idu ality, it also ins pir es s tudent s to wo r k t ogether, formin g a comm unity of sc holar s who learn from one another. Cla sses are ge nerally small to e n s ur e the exc h a ng e of knowl e dg e a nd philo sop hies. Available to stude nt s are both the honor s core and a number of department a l h onor courses There are three H onors Awards available: Junior Honor s Award (15 se m es ter hour s); Senior Honor s Award (15 se mester hour s that includ e a the sis o r se nior se minar); and a n Honor s Progr a m de s i g n atio n on the diploma ( 27 se me s t e r hour s). An H onors application form ma y be obtained from the H onors Pro gra m dir ec tor In addition to the application form an int erv i ew by the H onors Council i s r eq uired of pro s p ective honor s s tudent s It i s hig hly r ec ommended that all Honor s Pro g ram applications be completed by mid-July. Furth e rmore, ther e are a number of Colorado c holar hip ava ilable Additional information on the Honor s Program is ava ilabl e by ca llin g (303 ) 556 -48 65 or by inqui ri n g in C e ntral Classroom Buildin g room IOIB The Honor s Pro g ram dir ec tor r e port s to the Associate Vice Pr e ide nt of Academic Affairs for Curriculum and Programs. Required Honors Core Semester Hours HON 2750 The Legacy of Art s and Letter s I ........................ 3 HO 2760 Th e Legacy of Arts and Letter s 11* ..................... 3 HO 2950 Th e Art of Critic a l Thinking ........................... 3 HO 3800 R evo lution s and Soci a l Chang e I ........................ 3 HO 3810 R evo lution s and Social Chan ge 11* ....................... 3 HO 38 50 Am erican Culture I ... .... ........................ 3 HO 3860 Am eric an C ultur e 11* ................................. 3 HO 49 20 Senior H onors S e minar ................. .......... ..... 3 HO 4950 Senior H onors The s i s . ...... ....... . .... :...:...1.. Toral Hour s for H onors Core .. ... ...... .......... .......... 27 *App r oved G e n e ral Studi es co ur se EDUCATION ABROAD LANG AGE AND C LTURE INSTIT TE The Language and Cultur e In s titut e was established in 1 976 to o rganize s tudy and trav e l abroad. The ins titute c urrently operates a umm e r pr ogra m in M ex ico a s ummer inten s ive lan g u age ins t itu t e in G ermany, and a wint e r s tudy and travel pro g ram in Me x ico 's Yuc at an P e nin s ula and in C e ntral America. Th e ins titut e offers c r ed it through the Mod e m L a nguag es D e partment and the In s titut e for International a nd Inter c ultural Edu ca tion ST DY-ABROAD TRJPS Short-t erm, s tud y -abro ad experiences durin g the s umm e r are offered eac h year. Th ese trip s a re a l ways led by a full-time profe ss or and are u s u ally for two to four weeks in l e n g th Academic credit i s normally avai l able ln pas t s umm ers, study -a broad trip s have been mad e t o China Egypt England Franc e, I s ra e l Italy, Mexico, P e ru, Russia, Spain, and We s t Africa. Co nt act the coo rdinat or of International Studie s at (303 ) 556-3173 for information about forthcoming trips. SEMESTER-ABROAD PROGRAMS Two se me s t e r -abroad programs, in London England and in Guad a lajara M ex i co, operate eac h year. Stud e nt s who ar e in good academic s tanding and beli eve they could benefit from a se me s ter of s tud y in England or Mexico s hould contact the coo rdinator of Int erna tion a l Studi es a t (303 ) 556-3 1 73. VETERANS UPWARD BOUND Vet e ran s Upward Bound i s a federally funded program designed to ide ntify r ec ruit and moti va t e vet e r ans to pur s u e their per so n a l care e r goa l s throu g h hi g h e r e duc atio n Vet e rans Upward Bound provid es refresher cour ses and tutorial h elp so that s urvival in academic or vocational/technical pro g r ams is maximize d. Thi s i s accomplished durin g a 1 2-week se m es t er. Ancil l ary ervices s u ch a career co un se lin g, financial aid advise m e nt college counseling, and job placement are a l so provided for p a rticipants.

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36 ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS CREDIT FOR PRIOR LEARNING 0PTIO S Successful completion of s peci a l exami nation s, completi o n of a prior learnin g portfolio o r assessment of n o nac c redited tr aining pro g r a m s through publi s h ed g uid es, may be used to award credit or may p er mit plac e ment in advanced courses. A stude nt ma y earn up to 60 semester hour s of credit toward degree r e quir e ment s u s ing prior learnin g credit option s. This type of approved credit will be pos t e d to the s tu dent's record aft e r the compl e tion of 8 se mest e r h o ur s of cla ss room ( r es id e nt) credit. Prior learning c r edit may n o t be u ed to wa rd the Ia t 12 se me ster hour of a d egree program doe s not ub titute for re ide ncy requirements, a nd cannot be used to c h alle nge pr e r e qui ire co ur ses for cour se a lready completed. Students are adv ised that letter gra d es are not assigne d for u c h cred it and some in s titution s m ay not accep t transfer c redit s th at do not includ e l e tter grades. ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS Students w h o h ave perfo rmed sat isfactorily in specia l collegelevel cour ses w hil e in hig h schoo l and w h o have p assed appropria t e advanced placement examination s co n d u c t ed by the College Entrance Examination B oard may ha ve official AP sco r es ubmi tted dire ctly to the Regi s trar s O ffice for con side r atio n for college cred it. Thi s office, in consultation w ith the a ppr opria t e d e partm e nt c h a ir deter min es the amo unt a nd nature of the cre dit a nd /or advanced placem e nt granted. I TERNATIO AL BACCALA REATE MSCD recog ni zes the grea t e r potential for s u cces of internati on al baccalaureate s tudent s According l y, academic departments may award credi t for dem onstra t ed proficiency o n a caseb y-case basis. Student s w h o h ave int e rn a tion a l baccalaureate results at the hig her level m ay h ave an official tran c ript sent directly to the Regi strar's Offic e for con s ideration for college credit. COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) For the pa s t 20 years, the College B oard ha s offered CLEP a program of exami n a tion s de s i g ned to evalu ate n onacc r e dited collegel eve l l earning in order t o award c r e dit for s u cces ful demonstration of thi knowl edge CLEP co n sists of two series of examinations: the ge n e ral ex amin atio n and the subject examination s 1l1e gen e r a l exa minati o n serie s in cl ud es five se p ara t e examination s coverin g th e areas of English composition, humaniti es, natural sc i e n ces, m a them atics a nd soc ial sc i e n ce /hi s tory Based on the r es ult s of these exa minati o n s, th e co llege m ay award up t o a maximum of 30 erne ter hour of credit in the fresh m a n General Studi e r eq uirement areas. Thu s, th e s uccessful s tudent ma y t es t out of man y of the traditiona l cour ses requir ed during th e fres hman year. MSCD does n o t a llow CLEP credit forE G 1020 the Freshman Composition: Analy is R esea rch and D oc umentati o n cour e The s ubject examination ser i es con i ts of more than 45 examinations th a t a pply to specific c ollege cour es. MSCD allows c r e dit for I 5 of these examinatio ns. Thirty sem e ter hour s of credit a lso may be awarded und e r thi s serie makin g a total of 60 semester hours of credit o btain a ble und e r a combination of the two series of exam inati o n s. Credit obtained und e r CLEP at another instit uti on will be r e-eval uat ed acco rdin g to MSCD CLEP policies. Contact the coo rdin a t o r at (30 3) 556-3677 for compl e t e informati o n a b out this progr a m before regis tering t o take a n y of these exams. ATTAINMENT EXAMI ATIONS Any student may take a ttainm e nt exam ination s in cert ain d e partm e nt s for the purpo se of waiving pe c ific g r a du a tion r e quirem e nts. Pa si n g s u c h an examination althou g h not r e ducing the numb e r of credits r e quired for g radu a tion entitles s tud e nt s to s ub stitu t e the ir own c hoice for the required s ubject. The exa minati o n i s approx im a tel y the equiva l e nt of the final examin ation in the cour se. DEPARTME TAL COURSE EXAMINATIONS In s pecial cases, a department m ay g r an t s tud e nt s credit toward graduatio n for college cour ses in which th ey r e qu es t a n d p ass s pecial college exa minations. Under thi s provi s i o n a maximum of 30 se me s ter hour s of credit m ay b e awarded b y the college. A fee of $ 1 5 per se me s ter c redit hour will b e c harged

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Examination s for c r e dit mu s t be base d on w ork e qui va l e nt to a r eg ular co ur e o ffer e d b y the c oll e ge ( omnibus-numbered cour ses ar e ex clud e d). The cr e dit g r a nt e d will be for th e c orr es p o ndin g c our se, pro vided th e s tud e nt h as no pr e viou s coll e giate e nrollm e nt for a s imil a r c our e and th e c r e dit i s a ppli cable toward the s tudent' s g raduati o n r e quir e m e nt s Evid e n ce of w o rk justifying an exa min atio n for c r e d i t mu s t be pre se nted t o th e d e partm ent c h a ir n o l a t er th a n the third wee k o f c l asses in a se m es t er. P e rmi s s ion for s uch e xamination mus t be sec ur e d in advan c e fro m the appr o pri a t e d e an up o n r eco mm e ndati o n of th e d e partm e nt c h air. o a ppli c ati o n for c r e d i t b y examinati o n will be a ppro ved for a s tud e nt w h o i s n o t c u rr e ntl y e nr olle d in g ood s t a ndin g in a de g r ee-see kin g c urri c ulum in the c oll eg e. Cre dit b y exa min a tion will n o t b e a pprov e d for a s tud e nt w h o i s w ithin 1 2 cl ass r oo m se m es t e r h o ur s o f co mpl e tin g degree r eq u ire m e nt s. No c r e dit b y ex amination c an b e o btain e d for a c our se in w hi c h a s tud e nt h as b ee n offi c i ally e nroll e d a t MSCD o r at a noth e r ins titution w h ethe r or n o t the co ur se h as b ee n co mpl e t e d and a g r ad e aw ard e d Cr e dit b y exa min atio n cannot be obt aine d for c oll ege co ur ses attende d as a lis t e n e r v i s itor o r audit or. If a s tud e nt h as complet e d a m o r e a dvanced cour se than the co ur se f o r whic h ex amin a tion c r edit i s d es ired permi ss ion to t a k e th e exa m will b e g rant e d if a ppro ve d b y th e a ppropri a t e d e partm e nt c h a ir and de a n U a s tud e nt h as alrea d y c ompl e t e d a se qu e nce o f co ur ses, n o examinatio n c r e dit can be g i ve n for c our ses l o w e r in number than the hig h es t numb e red c our se tak e n b y th e s tud ent. If a s tud e nt h as r eg i s t e red for a hig h e r number e d cour se in a se qu e n ce, the exa m for th e lowe r num be r e d co ur e mus t be co mpl e t e d w ithin the firs t three wee k s of th e se m es t er. E xce ption s mu s t be a pp ea l e d t o th e Board of A ca demi c Standard s E xce ption s f o llo wing e ndor se m e nt of the d e partm e nt c h a ir o r d ean E xa min atio n s c a nnot be tak e n t o r a i se g r ad es, to r e m ove f a ilur es, o r t o r e move" C," SP," o r I n o t a tions. C r e dit b y e xa min a tion i s not a ppli cable t owa rd aca demi c r eside n ce r e quir e m e nt s E x amination for cr e dit will be taken a t a tim e s pe cifie d by th e d e partm e nt afte r th e s p ec i a l e xa minati o n f ee ha s bee n p a id o examin atio n f o r c r e d i t in a college co u rse m ay be r epea t ed. A gra d e e quival e nt to A or 8 mus t b e att aine d on the exa min a tion in ord e r to r eceive c redit but c r e dit so e arn e d f o r the c o ur se will be r ecorde d w ithout gra d e r efe r e n ce o n the s tud e nt's perma n e nt r ecord. C r edits in co ur ses for which c r e dit i s ea rn e d b y exa mination ar e not c on side r e d in co mputin g college g r ad e point a v e r ages. Cr e dit b y examin atio n w ill be p os t e d aft e r a s tud ent has co mpl e t e d 8 se m es t e r h o ur s of c r ed it a t MSC D and a ft e r an e v alua tion o f all p oss ibl e tr a n s f e r c r e dit s h as b ee n c ompl e t e d P O R TFOLIO ASSESSMENT Stud ents m a y a ppl y f o r c r e dit for collegel eve l l e arnin g gaine d thr o u gh ex p erie n ce b y pr e p a rin g and s ubmittin g a prior learnin g portfolio. Cr e dit i s a w arde d o n th e b as i s of a ca r e ful assess m e nt o f th e pri o r learnin g portfolio b y f aculty in the d e p artme nt from whic h c r e dit i s so u ght. P o rtf o lio assess m ent i s ava il able in m any, but not all, aca d emic d e p a rtm e nt s Th e portfolio i s d eve l o ped w ith th e assis t ance of th e Offi ce of Ad ult Le arnin g S e r v i ces P ortfolio assess ment m a y be u se d to a pply for c r e dit for s p ecific co ur ses lis t e d in the Cat a l og; c r e dit i s n o t av ail able f o r co ur ses which ar e con ide r e d o mnibu s co ur s e s A ppli ca nt s for c r e dit thr o u g h p o r tfolio assess m e nt will g enerally b e r e quir e d to take EDS 2 6 8 0 1 Th e Portf o lio D e v e lopm e nt W o rk s hop A f ee of o ne h alf th e p a rt time s tud e nt tuiti o n is char ge d for c r e dit aw arde d throu g h portfolio a ssess ment ; $4 0 of the tot a l f ee i s du e prior t o th e ass e ss m e nt of the p ortf oli o b y fac ulty. Th e r e m a ind e r of the f ee i due if and wh e n c redit i s aw a rd e d Poli c i es which go v ern c r e dit f o r prior l e arnin g opti o n s appl y t o c redit aw ard e d thr o u g h th e p ortfolio pro ces Cont ac t the Office o f Adult L e arning S e r v i ce f or ass i s tan ce and furth e r inf ormatio n a t (30 3) 556 8342. Inf orma tion se i o n s a b out p ortfolio as ess m e nt and othe r c r e dit f o r pri o r learnin g o pti o n s a r e h eld o n a r eg ular b as i s b y the Offi ce o f Adult Learnin g S e r v i c es. CREDIT FOR MILITARY TRAINING AND OTHER TRAJNI G PROGRAMS Milit a ry tr a inin g and othe r tr a inin g p rog r a m s tha t h ave bee n assesse d for college c r e dit b y the Am e ri can Coun cil on Educ a tion will b e e v alua t e d b y the R eg i strar s Offi ce for tr a n s f e r c r e dit a t MSCD F o r form a l milit ary tr a inin g, copies o f tr a inin g ce rtifi ca t es and a co p y of the DD -2 1 4 h o uld be s ubmitt e d to the Re g i s trar's Offi ce. For othe r trainin g, offic ial ACE transcript s s h o uld b e s ubmitted Cre dit limit i s 30 se m es t e r hour s

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38 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION COOPE RATIVE E DUCATION The Cooperative Education Internship Center places students in work experiences re l ated to their academic major. The purpose of the internship i s to integrate academic training with ac tual work experi ence. This combination allows students to make reali tic career decis i ons, gain val uab l e work exper i e n ce, obtain recommendations for graduate sc h ool and earn money to help defray college expenses. Students wo r k in large corpor ations small b u sinesses, government, and nonpr ofit agencies throug h o u t the metropol itan area Most co-op students are paid by their employers, but in those professional fiel ds where co-op salaries are not available, volunteer internship placements are offered to he l p students gain essential work experience. Co-op internship placements are available in most academic majors and minors. Students must com p lete 30 semester hours of college coursework with a minimum 2.50 GPA and have a declared m ajor to be eligib l e for registratio n with co-op. No fees are charged to the student or employer for participa tio n in the program, and eac h student's inte r ests and job requirements are discussed individually w i th a professional coordinator. Stud ents may choose from thr ee different wor k schedu l es based on the academic cal e n dar. The a lter nating plan provides full-time periods of wo r k every other semester with intervening semesters spent in full-time study. The paralle l sched u le places stu dents in a job while they simultaneo u sly attend sc hool. These positions are usually part-time. The short term/summer p lan allows students to e l ect a work expe rience that l asts for no more than one semest er. The college awards academic credit for supervised cooperative education placements. Students m u st complete a credit applicatio n available from t he co-op office, and this applicatio n must be approve d b y a faculty member from the department in which credit is to be granted. No more than 15 semester h o ur s of cooperative education credit will be applied toward MSCD degree requirements Credit earned for the co-op ed u cation work experiences are not applicable toward General Studies req u irements. A d d i tiona l departmenta l restrict i ons may apply to certain majors. SE RVICE-LEARNING The Service-Learning Program combines c lassroom experience with service to the metropolitan com munity. Participating students receive credit for appropriate p u blic service which is beneficial to th e community and expands student horizons in intellectually and personally meaningful ways Emerging from a wide variety of disciplines, service-learning courses are structured by faculty to weave service into community-based and government agencies, with classroom reflection and analysis of th e learning offered through these experiences. The courses are a l so designed to address real needs in o u r mu l ticul t ura l world, such as homelessness at-risk youth, domestic vio lence, the environment, culture and the arts, and mental ilLness. Agencies t h at have provided service opportunities i n c l ude Fort Logan Ment al Health Cen ter, the Denver Commission on Aging, Big Sisters, t h e Colorado Historical Societ y the R ape Assistance and Awareness program, and numerous e l ementary and high schoo l s, senior cen ters, and n u rsing homes. Service-learning credit is available in most academic majors and minors. Prereq u isites and other requirements vary with each department. To l earn how to participate in this program including disc u s sions of p lacement options, students should contact or visit the Service-Learning Program office t o schedule an interview.

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ACADEMIC POLIC I E S AND PROCED U RES SEMESTE R HOUR S CREDIT C o ur se c r e dit i s b ase d o n unit s d es i g n e d a se m es t e r h o urs. On e semes t e r h o ur o r o n e b ase co n tac t h o ur e qu a l s a minimum of 750 minut es; this tr a n s l a t es t o a minimum of I 5, 5 0minut e c l ass h o ur s p e r se m es t er. Tim e r e quir e d for c l ass pr e p a r at i o n i s n o t a co n sideratio n in the cal culatio n of co ur se c r e d it. Omnibu s co u r ses invo l ving l a b o r a tor y wo rk g i ve on e se m es t e r h o ur of c r e dit for eac h t w o thr ee or f o ur h o ur s of sc h e du led wor k in th e l a b o r a t ory d urin g a week. lntemsh ips req u i r e a minim um of 2 250 min ut es for eac h h o ur o f c r edit. COURSE LOAD Th e ave r age cour se l oa d p e r I 6-wee k se m es t e r i s I 5 o r I 6 se m es t e r hours. Stud e nt s w h o are aca d emi cally s t ro n g m ay t a k e up t o 1 8 se m es ter h o ur s durin g fall and s prin g se m es t e r s an d up t o 1 2 se m es t e r h o ur s durin g th e s umm e r se m es t er. Durin g f all and s prin g se m es t e r s, s tud e nt s with c umul ative MS C D gra d e p o int averages (GPAs) of3.25 o r hig h e r m ay t a k e I 9 o r 20 se m es t e r h o ur s and th ose s tud e nt s with GPA s o f 3.5 0 o r hi g h e r m ay tak e 2 I se m e t e r h o urs. Stud e nt s mus t h ave co mpl e t e d a t l east 1 5 se m es t e r h o ur s a t MSCD Auth o riz a tion for overloa d s for stude n ts with o ut these qu a li ficatio n s mu s t be obt ai n ed f r o m th e s tud e nt 's m ajo r d e p art m e nt c h air an d a ppr o pri a t e d ea n A uth orizatio n for overloa d s in excess of 2 1 se m es t e r h o ur s for fall and s prin g a n d 1 4 se m es t e r h o ur s fo r umm e r mu s t b e o bt aine d fro m the Offi ce of Aca d emic A ffairs. F o rm s are avai l ab l e in th e d e p a rtm e n t o r deans' offices. S TU DENT C LASSIF ICATION Stud e n ts a r e c l as ified acco rdin g t o the num be r of se m es t e r h o ur s of cre dit earned: fres hm e n fewe r tha n 30 ; so ph o m o r es 30 o r mo r e, but fewe r than 6 0 ; juni o r s 60 o r m o r e, but fewe r tha n 90 ; senio r s 9 0 o r m ore DECLARI G A M A JOR A p p l ican t s t o T h e M etro p o litan St a t e College of D enve r m ay indi ca t e th e ir int e n ded m ajor o n the MSCD Appli catio n f o r Admi ss i o n N o n-degr ee-see k i n g s tud e nt s w h o w i s h t o d eclare a m ajo r mu s t fir s t c h ange t o degr ee see k i n g sta tu s b y co mpl e tin g a C h a n ge o f St a tu s f o rm w ith the R eg i s tr a r 's O ffice C HANGING A MAJOR Degr ee-seeki n g tud e nt s w h o w i s h t o c h a n ge a m a j o r mu s t co mpl e t e a D eclara t i on / Ch a n ge of M ajo r f o rm whic h i s available fro m th e m a j o r d e p ar tm e nt o r fro m the Acade mi c Adv i sing C e nt er. GRA DUATION AGREEMENT D egree-see kin g s tud e nt s f o rm ally d ec l are th eir d egree p l a n by filin g a Gra du atio n Ag r ee m e nt. T h e ag r ee m e nt s hould be s ubm i t te d to the R eg i stra r 's O ffice two yea r s pri o r t o the int e nd e d t e rm o f g r a du atio n but n o l a t e r tha n the a ppropri a t e dea dlin e s t a t ed in the Class S c hedule Stu d e nt s s h o uld co mpl e t e the ir Gra du atio n A gree m e nt in co n s ult atio n w ith de p art m e n t a dvi se r Wh e n it i s r ea d y f o r s i g n a tur es and a form a l eva l uatio n s tud e nt s s h o uld s ubmit the co mpl e t e d agree ment to th e minor d e partm e nt. Th e min o r departm e nt w ill f o rward th e s i g n e d agree m e nt t o t h e m ajo r d e p artme nt for s i gna tur e; the m ajor d e p art m e nt w ill f o rw ard it t o the d e an of the s chool. Th e sc h o o l will s ubmit the agree m e nt t o the R eg i strar's O ffice for fin a l r ev i ew. On ce ap p roved a nd after the co mpl etio n of eac h s ub se qu e nt se m es ter o f a c a d emic work t h e s tud e nt will r ece i ve a n up-to d a t e A ca d emic St a t u s R e p ort. DIPLOMAS AND COMMENCE MENT St u d e nt s w h o have m e t all r e quir e m ents f o r g r a dua t ion a r e g r a nt e d diplomas a t the end o f the se me s t e r f o r whic h they a r e degr ee candida t es. A forma l co mm e n ce m e nt cere m o n y is h eld a t th e end of th e s prin g and fall se m es t e rs. C o mpl etio n o f t w o m a j ors does n o t r es ult in t w o degr ees o r diplo mas. TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS A tr a n sc ript i s a ce rt ifie d cop y o f a s tud e nt pem1a n e nt r eco r d and s how s the aca d e m i c s tat u s o f the st u d e nt a t t i m e of i s ua n ce. Exce pt for faxe d tr a n sc ript s t h e r e i s n o c h arge Transc ript s w ill be r e l ea e d b y the R eg i stra r 's O ffice u po n form a l w r itt e n r eq ues t b y the s tud e nt. Tra n sc ript s w ill a l s o b e i ss u e d to firm s a n d e m p l oye r s i f w r itte n a uth orizatio n i s r eceived f r o m th e stude nt. R eq ues t s s h ould include the st u 0 0 0 0

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40 dent' s full nam e as record e d whil e attending MSCD s tudent identification number, la s t term of atten dance, number of copies desired and to whom and w h ere tran scri pt s are to b e se nt. Tran sc ript s may be withheld because of indebtedn ess to the college or for o th e r appropriat e rea so ns. Tran sc ripts from other institutions that are on file in the R eg i s trar 's Office will be i ss u ed upon sig ned request by the s tudent. A charge of $5 per reque s t i s assessed for this se r v i ce. Students from other ins titution s takin g MSCD cou r ses under the s tate college syste m or interin s titution a l re g i s tration pro g r a ms mu s t reque s t tran sc rip ts from their h ome institution HONORS AND AWARDS The college annuall y recognizes studen t s w ho s h ow outstanding l ea der s hip and serv ice to the c olleg e and co mmunity, excellence in sc hol astic achievement, and outstanding personal character a nd integrity Re co gnition of s tud e nt s includes: The President' s Award (o ne se nior); the Spec ial Service Award for Academic Affairs (one se nior) and for Student Service s (o ne se nior); Out stan din g Student Awards (se nior s fro m eac h sc hool ); Who's Who Among Student s in Am e rican Universities and Colleges (se nior s); American A ssoc iation of University Women (AAUW) Award (se nior woma n). Other awards include Special Service Award for Exception ally Challenged Stud e nts, Stud e nt Government Assemb l y Award Charles W. Fis h e r Award, and th e Colorado Engineering Council Award Information and applications for these awar d s are avai l able in Central Classroom Buildin g, room 3 1 3. Awards are pre se nt e d at the annual banquet the night befo r e g r a du atio n In addit i on to annua l awa rds, students with outstanding aca d e mic achieve ment s a re recogniz ed by being n a med on the college 's Honor Lis ts. The Pr eside nt 's H o nor Lis t carr i es the name s of s tudent s who, at the time of co mpu tatio n h a v e achieved a cumulative GPA of 3 85 or higher. The Vice Pres ident 's Honor Li s t carri es the names of s tud e nt s who a t the time of computation have achieved a cumula tiv e GPA of between 3.50 and 3.84, inclu sive ly. Computation will occur initially w hen the stude nt ha s co m pleted between 30 and 60 hours a t MSCD, then agai n b etwee n 60 and 90 hour s, and finally after mor e than 90 hour s Po s tin g of the award occurs after the s tud e nt receives their se m es t e r grade r e p o rt. Ques tion s sho uld be dire c t e d to the O ffice of Academic Affai r a t (303) 556-3907 Graduation honor s a r e awarded t o stude nt s who h ave d emo nstr ated s up erio r academic ability in their baccalaureate de g r ee w hil e attendin g MSCD. Honor s des i g n a tion s a r e determined according to the fol l owing criteria: Summa Cum Laud e T op five percent of gradua t es w ithin each schoo l with c umulati ve MSCD GPA of no l ess than 3.65. Magna Cum Laude Next five percent of grad ua t es wit hin each schoo l with cu mulativ e MSCD G PA of no l ess tha n 3.65. Cum Laud e Next five p e rcent of grad uat es w ithin eac h sc hool with cumulative MSCD GPA of no l ess tha n 3.65. To determine each honor s category GPA for the previou s s pring semester graduates are arrayed in rank order. This rank ordering is then u sed to determine the honor s recipi ents among the following summe r fall and spring graduates. To qualify for graduation honors recognition, a student must have completed a minimum of SO semester hour s of classroom credit at MSCD prior to the term of graduation. Courses completed during the term of grad uation and transfer credits are not considered when determining honors. Honors designation s are added to the st udent 's officia l acade mi c r ecord; no other notificati o n will be se nt For add itional information r egard in g g raduati on honors, co nta c t the Offi ce of Academic Affairs at (3 03 ) 556-3907.

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GRADES A D NOTATIONS Grades Alphabeti ca l g r a d es and s t atus sy m bo l s a r e as foll ows: A" Sup e rior ... ............. 4 qualit y point s p e r s em es t e r hour att e mpt e d B"Ab ove A ve r age .... . ..... 3 qu a lit y p o int s per s em es t e r hour atte mpt e d C"Avera ge ........ ......... 2 quality point s p e r s em es t e r hour att e mpt e d D"Belo w Ave r age but P as sing .... I qu ality p o int p e r se m es t e r h o ur atte mpt e d F -Failure .... ............ 0 quality point s per s em es ter hour atte mpt e d Notations I ........... .... .......... ................. .... .... Incomplete C" -. . . . . . . . . . . . . o Cre dit S ..... Sati sfac tor y (limit e d to s tud e nt t e a c hin g and HPS!LES 4890 intern s hip s) "P"'................. .................................... ... Pas X -Grade ass i g nment p e ndin g Stud e nt must see f ac ulty for an expla nation or a ss i g nment of gra d e C o ur ses tak e n thr o u g h int e rin s tituti o n a l r eg i s tr atio n a r e nonn ally ass i g n e d the X n o tation until grad es a r e r ece i ve d and po s t e d t o the aca d emic record Th e not atio n m ay be ass ign e d w h e n a s tud ent was unable t o tak e the fina l exa min a tion and/or did not compl e t e all the out of-cl ass a ss i g nm e nt s du e to unu s ual cir c um s tance s (s uch as ho s pital i za tion ) Incompl e t e w ork d e n o t e d b y the Inc ompl e t e "!' not atio n mu s t be c ompl e t e d w ithin one c a l e ndar year or e arli e r at the disc r e tion of th e fac ulty m e mber. If the incomplete work i s not com pl e t e d w ithin o n e ca l endar year the I not atio n w ill c hang e t o a n F ." R eg i s t e rin g in a s ub se qu e nt s eme s ter for a c our se in which an 1 ha s b ee n r eceive d will not r e move the notation. The"! not atio n ma y n o t be aw ard ed in a se lf-p ace d co ur e Th e NC not a tion i s not a g rad e. It m ay indi c at e withdr a wal fro m the c our s e or c our se r e p e t i tion Th e C n o t atio n m ay als o be u se d in selfpa ced co ur ses to indi ca t e tha t the tud e nt a nd/or the fac ulty h a v e d ec ided to ext end the s tud e nt 's ex po s ur e to the c our s e to incr eas e the s tud e nt 's profi c i e n cy T o e arn c r e dit the s tud ent mus t r e -r eg i s ter f o r a nd p a y f o r th e c our se in a s ub se qu e nt t enn. Th e following minim a l requir e m e nt s a r e r e quir e d thr o u g h out the college an d ar e a p art of all sc hool departm e ntal or indi v idu a l f a cult y poli c i es : The" C n o t atio n i s available t o s tudent s in all ins t a n ces throu g h th e f o urth w ee k o f cla ss e s for f all and s prin g t ern1s. Stud e nt s r e du cing their c our se l o ad b etwee n th e b eg innin g of the fifth and the end o f the tenth week of classes durin g f all and prin g se m es t e r s m ay r eceive an C notati o n f o r eac h cours e provid e d fac ulty a pprov a l i s g r a nt e d Additi o n a l r e tri ctio n s r eg ardin g ass ignin g the NC" not a tion m ay be s et b y ea c h sc hool d e partm e nt and /o r fac ult y m e m be r for the p e riod b etwe en the be g innin g of the fifth and the end of the t e nth wee k of the se m es t e r (or prop ortio n a l tim e fram e) Stud e nt requ es t s for an "NC" n o t atio n in a g i ve n co ur se will not be g rant e d aft e r the t e nth week o f the f all and s prin g se m es t e r s Th e I n o tati o n m ay be u se d durin g thi s peri o d pr o v i d e d the co ndition s p ecifie d abo ve appl y Proportion a l tim e f r a m es ar e a ppli e d for m o dul a r co ur ses, w ee k end co ur ses, work s hop s, and s ummer terms. A writt e n poli cy s tat e m ent d esc ribin g th e u s e o f the NC not atio n will be give n to e a c h s tu d e nt for e a c h cla ss in whi c h the s tud e nt e nr olls Stud e nts a r e e xpect e d to a ttend all s ess i o n s o f cour ses f o r whic h they ar e re g i s t e r e d Ea c h ins tru c tor d e t ern1ines wh e n a s tud e nt 's a b se n ces h ave r eac hed a point a t whic h they j eo pardi ze the s tud ent's su cc e ss in a c our se. When ab se nc e be c o m e excess i ve, the s tud ent m ay r ece ive a f a ilin g g rad e for th e c our se. Q UALITY POI TS Th e num be r of qualit y point s a w ar d e d f o r a co ur se i s d e t e nnin e d by multipl ying the number of se mes ter hour s for that cour se b y the qu a lit y p o int v alu e o f th e gra d e r eceive d The c umulati ve GPA i s c al cul a t e d b y dividin g the tot a l by the num be r o f se m es ter h o ur s a tt e mpt ed.

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42 GENERAL INFORMATION T o be e ligible for a degree, a can dida t e m u s t h ave a minimum num be r o f qua l i t y point e qu al t o twic e the number o f erne ter h o ur s a tt e m p t ed i n additi o n t o mee t i n g o th e r pr escribe d r e quir e m e nts. Th e not a t ion s NC I S," and P hav e n o effec t on the G PA. PASS-FAIL OPTION Th e pa ss-fail opt i on e n co urage s s tud e nt s t o bro ad e n th e ir e du ca tional ex p erie n ce b y takin g c our se s out side the ir major and minor fie l d s Th e p ass not atio n h a no e ff e ct on th e GPA ; the f ail not a tion i s e quiv a l e nt to the g r ad e o f F." Stud e nt s who h ave c ompl e t e d at l eas t o n e MSCD co ur se w ith a t leas t a 2 0 c umulati ve GPA ma y c hoo s e t o be evalua t e d f o r a certa in c our se on a p assfail b a i s r athe r than b y l e tt e r g r a d e. Th e p assf ail option m ay be u se d f o r ge n e r a l e l ective cre dit o nly. M ajor, minor G e n e r a l Stu d i es, and othe r c our ses r e quired for a d egree or for t eac h e r lic e n s ur e, m ay n o t be t ake n o n a pa ss fa il b as i s S e lf p aced co ur ses m a y not be t ake n und e r the p ass-fa il option M axi mum g r ad u a tion c r e d i t for th ese ungra d e d c our se i s 1 8 se me s t e r h o ur s earne d in n o m o re than s i x co ur ses limit ed t o o ne c our s e pe r se m es t e r or module. Stud e nt s mu s t d ec l a r e int e re s t in th e p assfail opti o n n o l a t e r than th e last d ay t o add c l a sses ( during the fir s t 15 pe r ce nt o f th e t o t a l time fra m e of the se m es t e r ) for a parti cula r se m es t e r o r modul e by co ntact ing th e Regi s tr a r's O ffice. Th e instruc t o r will assi g n and r ec ord th e p assf ail g r a d e on a fina l gr ad e lis t th a t ide ntifi es s tud e nt s e l ec tin g and e l igible f or p ass-fail g r a ding. Stud e nt s w h o r e qu es t th e option who ar e l a t e r d ec l a r e d inelig ible will r eceive notifi c ation from th e R egis tr a r's O ffice durin g the se mester. Th e y will be ass i g n e d a r eg ular l ette r g r ad e in the co ur se. On ce approv e d the r e qu es t for the pa ss -fail option i s irrevocable. S o m e instit ution s d o n o t acce pt c r e dit s for co ur ses i n whic h a p ass n o t a tion i s g i ve n Th e r efo r e, s tudents w h o pla n t o tr ansfe r or take g r adu a t e wo rk s hould d e t e rmin e wh ethe r t h e i n s tituti o n o f the ir c h o i ce will acce pt the c r e dit befo r e r eg i s terin g for co ur ses und e r th e pa ss-fail o ption REPEATED COURSES (LAST GRADE STANDS) A s tud e nt m ay r epea t any c our se t ake n a t MSCD regardless o f the origin a l g r ad e earned B y d oing so only the c r e dit a nd th e gra d e for th e l a t es t a tt e mpt a t the co ur se wiJI r e m ain o n the s tud e nt s MSCD aca d emic r eco r d Th e gra d e f o r the pri o r atte mpt (s) will be c h a n ge d to the" C n o t a tion Th e co ur ses mu s t carry the sa m e title co ur se number and se m es t e r h o ur To e ff ec t s u c h a c han ge the s tud e nt mu s t rereg i s t e r and p ay tuition f o r the cour se in qu es tion co mpl e t e the cour s e with a l ette r g rad e, a nd c omp l ete the n ecess ar y form i n the Re g i s trar's O ffice indi ca t i n g tha t the cour se h as bee n r e p ea t e d Oth e r wise, the g rad e c h a n ge will be m ad e admini s tr at i ve l y a t the t i m e o f degr ee evalua t i o n o r e arli e r Cr e dit dupl i ca tio n inv ol ving t ra n sfe r int e rin s tituti o n a l o r s t a t e college sys tem c o ur ses may r esult in tr a n s f e r c redit being dis all owe d A faili n g c our se gra d e ass i g n e d as a res ult of aca d emic dis h o n es t y i s co n side r e d a per man e nt F a nd i s n o t s ubj ect to thi s p olicy. A s tud e nt m ay not r e p ea t a c our se af t e r the aw ard of a MSCD degr ee t o m ake u se of thi s p o l icy. STUDENT GRADE APPEAL PROCEDURE If s tud e nt s h ave r easo n t o qu estio n th e va lid i t y of a g r ade r ece i ved in a co ur e, they mu t m ake their requ es t f o r a c h a n ge befo r e the e nd of the third week of the se m este r f ollowing the c ompl e tion of the c our se( the follo w in g fall se me s ter in t h e case of the s prin g se m es t er. Th e Gra d e App ea l Guid e l i ne s can be obtain e d f rom the s tud e nts' r es p ec t ive d ea n s It i the r es pon s ibilit y of the s tud e nt to initi a t e a grade app e a l w ithin the tim e limit and to follow the pr oce dures s pe cifie d for g r a d e a pp ea l s in th e Student Rig ht s and R es p o n s ibiliti es s e ctio n o f th e 1 9941 996 Stud e nt Handbook Th e handb o ok m a y be o bt aine d from the O ffice o f Stud e nt S e r v i ces. All dec i s ion of th e Gr a d e App eal C o mmittee will be r ev i e w e d b y the assoc i a t e vice pr eside nt f or acad e mic affa irs. WARNING/PROBATION/SUSPENSIO POLIC Y Aca demic Satisfactory Progress / Good Standing A s tud e nt i s d ee m ed t o be makin g satisfac t ory pr ogres t oward his o r h e r aca d emic goa l i f the s tudent m a int ains a c umul ative GPA of 2.0 o r hig h e r Thi s tu d e n t i s d ee m ed t o be in academic good standing w ith the in s tituti o n H owever, oth e r academic s t a n dar d s m ay a ppl y to spec ific progr a ms. A s tud e nt mu s t satis f y tho se oth e r academic s tandard s in orde r t o be d ee m e d in aca d emic go od s t a ndin g with that pro gram. S ee information o n the pro g r a m of int e r es t to de t e nnin e s pecific s t andards for that pro g r am.

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Academic Warning Status A student in good stan ding whose cumulative GPA fall below 2.0 will be on academic warning status with the institution during his or her next semester. A student will be removed from thi s warning s tatu s and returned to good standing if he or he achieves a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of his or her semester on warning status. More restrictive s tandards may apply' to certain programs or schoo ls. Se e information on the program of intere st. Academic Probation A s tud ent who fails to ach i eve a cum ulativ e GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of his or her semester o n warn ing s tatu s will be put on academic probation with the institution during hi s or her n ex t semes ter at MSCD. A student will be on academic probation as long as he o r she ha s a c umul ative GPA below 2.0, but is making progre ss toward good tanding as explained below and ha s not been on academic proba tion for more than three semesters. Other cond ition s may apply to given programs or schools. See infor mation on the program of intere st. A student i s removed from academic probation and i s in good s tanding the se me s ter after achieving a c umul ative GPA of at least 2.0. During any semester that a tudent is on academic probation the s tudent mu s t make progre ss toward good s t a nding with the ins titution by taking all of the following actions: achieve a semester GPA of 2.2 or higher register and complete a minimum of 3 but no more than 12 semester hour s (3 to 6 se me s ter hours for summer se mester) take required activities as negotiated with the director of the A ca demic Exceptions Program (may include certain cla sses, repeated courses, tutoring or other activities) While on academ i c probation, a student may pre-register for the first semeste r following the academic warning s tatu s se me s t er, but is prohibited from pre-regi tering any other se mester. For sub equent aca demic probation status semesters, a GPA of at least 2.2 mus t be verified prior to registration. Academic Suspension A student on academic probation not making progress toward good s tan ding will be prohibited from registering for one calendar year from the date of s u spension. Appeal of suspension for thi s reason will be submitted to the director of the Academi c Exception s Program The director of the Academic Ex ceptions Program will then deliver the appeal materials to the Student Academic Review Committ ee, which will review the appeal and notify the s tudent of its decision A student may appea l a suspension only two times in his or her academic career at the college. A student making progre toward good s tanding, whose cumulative GPA remain s below a 2.0 after three or more se mester on probation, will have his or her academic progress reviewed each emester by the Student Academic R eview Committee. The committee will determine whether the s tudent s hould be placed on s u s pen s ion. In both cases, the deci sion of the Student Academic Review Committee is final. Any stude nt returning t o the college after the one-ca l endar-year s uspension mu s t reapply and will be re admitted on academic probation with the ins titution. For the se students, aU probation rule s outlined above will apply. A student who is suspended for a second time will be re-admitted only if he or she has success fully completed an as ociate degree program from a community college after suspension from MSCD or can demonstrate to the Student Academic Review Committee that chances for success ful completion of an educational program are greatly improved. Contact Student intervention Service s at 556-4048 for further information.

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44 STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES POLICIES AND PROCEDUR ES Gen e rally, the policies and procedur es co ntained in this Cata l og mu s t b e followed by s tud e nt s offic iall y enro llin g for the 1 997 fall se m ester and the 1998 s pring and summer se me s ters. EXCEPTIONS Students may appeal to the Board of Academ i c Standards Exception s to request a variance from co lle ge aca demic requirements. Their graduation agree ment sho uld be completed before the appeal. Valid r ea so n s for variances must accompany all petitions, and the p e tition s mu s t be signed by the appropria t e dean a nd departm e nt chair. ACADEMIC Ho ESTY Students have a re s pon s ibility to maintain s t andards of academic ethics and hon esty. Ca ses of chea tin g or plagiarism are handled within the policies of Academic Affairs in accordance with procedure s out lined in the MSCD Stud enr H andbook. CONDUCT OF STUDENTS MSCD policy provide s s tudent s the lar ges t degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly cond u ct. The Student Handbook contains s t andards of conduc t to which s tud ents are expected to ad here. Information regarding s tudents right s and responsibilities, including the student due process procedure (the procedural rights provided to s tud e nt s at MSCD before disciplinary action is imposed) i s avai lable in Central Classroom Building room 313. CLASS ATTENDANCE Students are expec t ed to attend all sess ions of courses for which they a r e registered. Each instructor determine s when a student's a b sences have reached a point a t which they jeopardize s u ccess in a co ur se. When absences become excessive, the s tudent ma y re ce ive a failing grade for the course. If s tudents anticipate a prolonged absence, they s hould contact their instructors. If th ey find that they cannot communicate with the ins tructor they s h ould contact the chair of that department who will inform the ins tructor of the rea so n s for the anticipated absence. Whenever an instructor determines that a s tudent's absences are interferin g w ith academic progress, the ins tructor may s ubmit a Jetter to the d e partment chair informin g that office of the s ituation. Students a t MSCD who because of their sincerely held religiou s be l iefs, are unable to attend classes, take examinations, parti c ipate in graded activities, or s ubmit graded ass ignm ents on particul ar days s hall without penalty, be exc u sed from s uch c l asses and be given a meaningful opportunity to make up such examinations and graded activities or a s i gnments provided that proper notice a nd procedures are followed. The policie s and procedure s des ign ed to exc u se c l ass attendance on religious holidays are covered in the Student Rights and R espo nsibilitie s sect ion of the MSCD Student Handbook FI AL EXAMINATIONS It is the general policy of the college to req uir e final exami n a tion s of all students in all co ur ses in which they are registered for credi t with the pos sible exception of seminar co ur ses or spec ial projects. PREPARATORY COURSE CREDIT POLICY No pr eparato r y courses are ap pli cable t oward an MSCD degree afte r spring 1993. For d etai ls, please see an advise r in the Academic Advising Ce nt er.

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SERVICES FOR STUDENTS ACADEMIC ADVISING All fir s t-tim et o college s tud e n ts, initia l tra n sfe r stude nt s a n d s tud e nt s u nd ec i de d a b out their m a j or a r e r e q u ired to seek a ca d emic advi sing in the Ac a d emic Advi sing C e nt e r in ord e r to r eg i s t e r f o r cl asses. All s tud e nt s a r e e n c our age d t o tak e a d van t age of MSCD s a d v i sing se r v i ces whic h include : co ur se sc h e d uling; a ss i s tan ce in c ho osing a m a j o r ; a nd o n going d eve l opme ntal ad v i sing Stud e n ts w h o h ave d ecide d on a major s hould m ee t w ith an a d v i se r in the ir maj o r d e partm e nt t o plan the ir aca d emic pro gra m and r ece i ve c urr e nt m a t eria ls. Fo r a dditi o n a l inform atio n call (303) 5 5 6 3680. ADULT LEARNT G SERVICES Adult s e nt e rin g o r r e turnin g to college o f t e n h ave qu es tion s a nd probl e m s tha t ar e di ffe r e nt f rom those of yo un ge r s tud ents. Adult s wh o w ould lik e h e lp r e e nt e rin g th e f o rm a l e du catio n sys t e m and pla nnin g the ir e du ca tion a l goal s m ay co nt ac t th e O ffice of Adult Learn i n g S e rvi ces a t (303) 556-8342. CAREER SERVICES Car ee r S e rvi ces offe r s a s i s tan ce t o s tud e nt s and alumn i in pla nnin g the i r caree r s fin ding offca m p u s j o b s w hil e e nroll e d a n d ee kin g e mpl oy m e nt up o n g r a du atio n S pec ific se r v i ces inc lud e ca r ee r int e r es t t es tin g, p e r sonality t es tin g, and work s hop s foc u se d o n ca r ee r pla nnin g, r es um e pr e p a rat i o n job sear c h s tr a t egies, a nd int erv i ewi n g s kills. Pr ofes s i o n a l co un se l o r s a r e avai l able for a pp oint m e nt Th e s tu de nt e mpl oy m e nt se rvi ce and j o b vaca n cy lis tin gs ar e a l so h o u se d in th e C are e r S e rvi ces Ce nt er. Th e C a r ee r Libr ary contain s r eso ur ces t o h e lp w ith caree r p l a nnin g a nd the job searc h p r ocess. inform atio n s uc h a s e mpl oye r dir ec tori es salary s urv eys, and car ee r assess m e nt r es our ces ar e available Th e C o l o r a do Caree r In f ormati o n C e nt e r i s a co mputerized g uid ance y t ern l oca t e d in t h e Caree r Libr ary. Traine d a d v i e r s o ff e r ass i s t a nce in it s u se. Thi s sy t ern inc lud es s pe cific occ upati o n inform a tion for Col orado c areer assess m e nt inv e ntori es with imm e diat e r es ult s, and n a tion wide college inf o r mati on. S e rvi ces a r e avai l able b y a pp o intm e nt a t (303) 556-2246. Cou SELING CENTER Th e Coun se ling Ce nt e r i s a full se rvi ce acc r e dit e d ce nt e r taff e d b y pro fess i o n a l s who offe r a wide arra y of se rvice s a t litt l e o r no c har ge t o th e MSCD ca mpu s co mmuni ty. Th e C e nt e r i s full y a ccr e dite d b y the Int erna tion a l A ssoc i a tion of C ounse lin g S e r v i ces. All r ecords are s tri ctly co nfid e nti al. S erv i ces include : Indi v idu a l C ouns eling : Th e ce nt e r offe r s s h o rt-t e rm counse lin g o n p e r o n a l r e l atio n s hip an d e du ca tion a l c on ce rn s durin g o n e t o o n e sess i o n s ; sess i o n s a r e f r ee t o MS C D stude nt s S tud ents w ill b e int e rvi ewe d t o assess th e ir n ee d w h e n they fir s t v i sit the ce nt e r A n a pp o intm e nt i s n o t n eces s ar y f o r a n initial m ee ting; s tud e nt s m ay dr o p in a n y tim e b e t wee n 9-12 o r 1-4 Mond ay throu g h Thur d ay. P sychiatr i c e r v i ces a r e avai l a bl e b y r e f erra l a t r easo n able or n o c h a r ge f or stude nt s seeing a c oun se lor a t th e cent er. Oth e r r e f e rr a l s m ay b e m a d e to off -ca mpu s r eso ur ces i f it i s d e t ermin e d t o b e in the be t int e r es t o f the s tud e nt. Work s hops and Group Se ss ion s : Gr o up sess ion s ar e free t o all MSCD s tudent s, f a cult y a nd s taff Topic s include: te s t a n x i e t y, asse rti ve n ess, par e ntin g, se l f es t ee m r e l atio n s hip s, famil y i ss ues, upp ort g roup and a v ari e t y of multi cult ur a l i ss ues. A br oc hur e o f new t opics i a vai l able a t the c e nt er. A n ew brochur e is produced a t the beginnin g o f e a c h se m es t er. MSCD Conn ectio n s P ee r Edu ca t o r s P rog r a m : A pee r ed uca t o r i s an u ppe r -d i v i s i o n tud e nt w h o can add r e s s p e r s onal and college co n c ern s of s tud e nt s e nr olle d in the Fir s t Yea r E x p erie n c e c l asses. The pee r e du ca tor ac t as a res our ce t o s tud e nt s a nd ca n ass i s t s tud e nt s w ith s h ort c uts" t o so m e tim es l e n gthy college procedur es s uc h as fin anc i a l and r eg i tr atio n proble ms. Stud e nt s inter es t e d in b eing a peer e du c ator s h o uld co nt ac t the Ce nt e r MSCD Altern atives Sub s tan ce A bu se P reve nti on: Thi s p rogra m works active l y with ca mpus d e part m e nts and communit y age n c i es to o ffe r subs t a n ce a bu se pro g ram s f o r tud e nt s, f ac ult y and t a ff Program s includ e atio nal C ollegi a t e A l co h o l an d Dru g Aware n ess W eek and S a f e Sprin g Br eak.

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46 Consultation: Staff members at the ce nt er are available for free consultatio n to MSCD faculty, staff, and student gro up s or clubs. Cons ult ation can be one-to-one or meetings with a department unit, or c lub Common topic s of consultation include: diversity, communication, conflict etc. Diversity Services: The center offers individual and group counseling, workshops, lectures con sultation to departments and individua l s on the issues of race gender, sex ual orientation, di sa bili ties, and more The Counseling Center is located inC 203 and is open 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Monday through Friday. The center will move to Tivoli 651 during Fall 1997 More information i s available at (303) 556-3 1 32. DISABLED STUDE T SERVICES The Auraria Office of Disabled Student Service s provides academic s upport serv ices to di sa bled stu dents at MSCD and the University of Colorado at Denver. Service s include an adaptive computer lab testing accommodations, note-taking services, tapin g se rvices student advocacy, sign language and oral interpreters, orientation for incoming st udents, priority registration, limited tutoring, sale of parking per mit and a resource and referral library l E GLISH AS A SECOND LA GUAGE/IMMIGRANT AND REFUGEE SERVICES The English as a Second Language program provide s assistance to students for whom Engli h is a sec ond lan guage. The program provide s assessme nt tutoring int ensive academic and personal advising, and assistance with financial aid forms. The program also refer s students with limit ed English profi cie n cy to the appropriate curr i cula and monitors student progress. For more informat i on call (303) 5562533 THE SPRING I NTE RNATIONAL LA GUAGE CENTER AT AURARIA Intensive English c l asses a t the Spring International Center focus on all l anguage skills: grammar, read ing writing and listening/speaking, in add ition to specia l e l ect i ves that s tudents can choose each term, s uch as TOEFL preparation, vocabulary building, and pronunciation Five nine-week term s are offered throughout the year to enab l e students to complete their English study quickly. Student s are placed at one of the six level s, with standardized evaluation t ests at the completion of each level. Spring Interna tional Language Cemer is located on the fourth floor of the Tivoli Student Union, Room 454. For more information call (303) 5341616 GAY, LESBIAN AND BISEXUAL STUDENT SERVICES Gay, Lesbian and Bi exual (GLB) Student Servic es are open to all MSCD stude nts as a resource for exploring sexual orientation i ssues. This program offers a variety of su pport, education, and a dvocacy services for the entire campus community: support for members of the campus community who may have que s tions about their own sex ual orientation or that of a friend or family member advocacy for stude nts experiencing discrimination or hara ss ment based on a real or perceived gay, l esbian, or bisexual identity speake r s for events, work s hop s, and c l asses on various aspects of sexua l orientation and gay, lesbian or bisex ual lif e training programs and workshops about working more effectively with the gay, lesbia n and bisexual communities and combating homophobi a program s uch as Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Awareness Week and other forum s providing infor mation and dialogue about gay, lesbian and bisexual issues The GLB Student Services office i located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 311, and is s taffed by a profe ssio nal coordinator with the support of student emp loyee s and volunteers. lnput and involvement from the entire campus community is welcomed. For additional information call (303 ) 556-6333.

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INS TIT UTE FOR I NTE RNATIO AL AND I NTERCULTURAL EDUCATIO The college provides as i stance to visiting faculty and international students. Imp ortant information and counse l ing i s offered on visas sc h oo l transfers work permission hou sing banking, and cu l tural a nd acade mi c adap t ation. The office a l so provides assi lance to student w h o wish to arrange individualized study-a bro ad opportunities. The institute o r ganize numerous confere n ces and lectures o n international issues throughout the year. The institute a l so provides inform a tion on cross-d i scip l inary indi v iduali zed degree major and minor program in international studies, international course offered by various department and intercul tural co ur ses. For information, con t act th e director of Int e rn atio nal a nd Int erc ultur a l Education a t (303) 556-4004. STUDENT DEVELO PMENT CE TER Th e mission of the Student D eve l op ment Center i s t o s i gnifica ntl y improv e th e academ i c and int e lle c tua.l achieveme nt s of students by providing comprehensive and individualized serv i ces tha t will lead t o improved s tud e nt retention and inc r eased grad u a t e rat es Services i nclude: academic, persona l tran s i tional, and social counseling ; peer advising; mentoring programs ; l eadersh ip development ; multicul tural programs an d opportunities; worksho p s, forums and discussion groups ; and advocacy and r efe r ral serv i ces. Th rough Pr oject Follow-Up, the cen ter provides personal outreac h to students who h ave been accepted to MSCD and need information and support in the initial processes of schedu lin g orien ta t ion, assessmen t t ests, advising and financial aid. ST DENT FINANCE R ESOURCE CENTER (SFRC) The Student Finance R e ource Center offers the following: s hort-t e rm s tudent loan s financial planning bud geting workshops individual budgeting sessions credit union enro llm ent tuition deferral budgeting student travel Th e SFR C i s committed to providing students with the means to solve temporary and l ong-term finan cia l probl e m s b y g uidin g and educa tin g them in the area of college financing (i.e., budge tin g, financ i a l planning, emerge n cy funding and travel). The Student Travel Program offers financial and planning ass i s t ance for clubs, s tud ent organizations and individu a l stude nt s pr ese ntin g papers a t confe r e n ces an d event within the domestic Uni t ed States. STUDENT HEALTH CENTER All MSCD studen t s are entitled to medical services at the Health Center. Student health insurance i s NOT requir e d to u se the H ea lth Center. Physicians, physician assista nt s, nurse practitioners a nd nur ses s taff the facility. Students will be asked to complete a sign-in sheet and show a current semester ID card eac h tim e they check in. In additio n s tud e nt s are r e quir e d to comp l e t e a p atie n t information s h eet ann u ally and a health history form biannu ally. Brief office visits are free for all MSCD students. Limit ed, ex tend e d detai l ed, and com pr e h e n sive office visit ; physical ; s uppli es; medications; tests; l ab wo rk; and procedures are avai l able at reasonable charges. Pa y ment is required at the time of service. Services inc lud e treatment of illn ess and injuries, l ab testing medications physica l s annual GYN exa m sex uall y transmitted disease information/testing, birth co ntro l information/services, minor s ur gery, c hol es t erol scree nin g, immuni zations, HJV testing, blood pressure checks, casting, s uturing, and x-r ay access. Cia ses regarding health-related topics are taught eac h semester. Walk-in se rvic es begin at 8 a .m. Monday-Friday. Access is o n a first-come, first-served b asis W a l kin access varies daily contingent upon when all patient slots have been filled; thus, the daily closure time for wa l k-in ca r e i variab l e P atie nt s are e n co ur aged to c h eck in as early as possible. The Student H ealt h Center i s l ocated in the Plaza Building, room 1 40, on the lower l evel. Brochures with addi tional information are avai lable a t the Health Center. For further details call (303) 556-2525.

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48 STUDENT INTERVENTION SERVICES Student Intervention Services (SIS) monitors all students whose cumulative GPA is below a 2.0 for one two or three semesters. Student s are notified by mail of their s t atus, and enc umbran ces are placed on their registration. SIS also coordinate s the Early Warning System, providing mid-term grade assess ments s upp ort, and referral services to studen t s For those s tud e nt s who are in aca demi c diffi cu lty, SIS provides an indepth stra tegy for s ucc ess including assista n ce with graduation plans, sc h edu lin g, and adv i sing The office is located in Centr a l Classroom Buildin g, Room 102 (303) 556-4048. STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES PROGRAM T h e purpo se of the Student Support Services Pro gram is to provide educat ion a l ass i s tanc e for se l ec ted students who may otherwise be denied a chance for participation in higher ed ucation programs Acad e mic ass i stance i s provided for students on the basi s of individual need. Course s in English and reading are offered for college c redit, co upl ed with tutorial assistance. Th ese co ur ses are designed to stre n g then and s uppl ement a s tudent's basic educationa l skills so that the stUdent may better address the require ments of a college course load Other s upportive services available are counseling t esting, assistance with financial aid forms, and, when possible as istance in a tt ending soc i a l and cultural even t s to enhance the student's experience. SUMMER BRIDGE/MENTORING PROGRAM S The Summer Bridge Program e n co ur ages stude nt s who have ju st grad u ate d from inter-city high sc hools to take a three c r ed it c l ass and attend a se ries of activitie s, se min ars, and works h ops that further e n co ur age their bonding to a postsecondary ins titution. The Mentoring Pr ogram is a campus-wide program which matches incoming and upper-level s tudents. Social a nd ed u cational initiative s are included small gro up activities are offered. This year's plans include training workshops, c ultur a l even t s and individualized services to m entors and s tud ents Call 556-4737 for more information. TRI-INSTITUTIONAL STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES Tri-Institutiona l Legal Services is a st udent-fee funded program that se rves r egistered stude nt s from The Metropolitan State College of D e n ver, the U niv e r sity of Colorado at Denver, a nd the Community Col l ege of D enver. The program i s s t affed by a lic e n sed a ttorney who ass i s t s s tud e nt s with landlord -te nant problems, c rimin a l prosecution traffic/DUl case and fami l y/domestic issues Specifically the a ttor n ey engages in a problem-solving proc ess w ith the st udent to develop and exp l o r e var iou s legal stra te gies a nd opt ions. If a case require s l egal representation and/o r is beyond the expertise of the program's at t orney, the office will provide to the stu dent information about comm unit y r eso urc es that may provide legal r e pr ese nt at ion either on a no -cost or low cost basis depending upon the s ub s tantive area and the availa bilit y of attorneys. Because the program's budget only allows for 20 hour s per week of the attor ney's time the office s hould b e contacted to e n s ur e an office v isit or phone int erv i ew. Plea se note: thi s office i s unable t o advise on i ss u es arising between stude nt s or involving any of the thr ee institutions as this c r eates a co nflict of interest. The attorney can neith e r represent the studen t nor make a co urt appear ance on the student's behalf. The office is not s taf fed to respond to emerge n c i es. More inform atio n is availab l e at the Tiv oli Stude nt Union room 3 08 or call 556-6061. TUTORING CENTER The Tutoring Center provides free tutorin g ass i s t ance for all s tudents enrolled at MSCD. The cente r i s s tructured to accommodate the n eeds of c ultur ally diverse st udents. Student s may be referred to the Tutoring Center by a n instructor or can seek assi s t ance o n their own Trained peer tutor s will h e lp stu dents r eac h their educationa l goals. Group individualized and walk-in tutorin g i s ava ilable. The ce nter is ope n weekend and eveni n g hour s also. The office i s l ocated in the St. Franci s Center, second floor, (303 ) 556-8472. VETERANS SERVICES The Veterans Services Office i s desi g ned to provid e stude nt veterans and veterans in th e community with a variety of o utr each, recruitment and retention serv i ces. These include assis tance with problems involving c h ecks, tutorial, co un se lin g, and referral s to on-ca mpu s offices and services. Th e office also

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ce rtifi es s tudent ve t e r a n s an d d e p endents for th e ir V A e du ca tion a l be nefits. WOMEN'S SERVICES Th e Ins titut e for Wom e n 's Studi es and S e r v i ces i s co mmitt ed t o the e mp owe rm ent o f wo m e n thr o u g h e du c ation. To h e lp wo m e n h ave a p ositive college ex p erie n ce, wo m e n 's se r v i ces pro vides r e f e rr a l s t o campu s and communit y r eso ur ces, inform atio n a b o ut sc h o l a r s hips, ass i t a n ce w ith the pr ocess of e nt e r ing MSCD advoca c y se r v i ces for s tud e nt s d ea lin g w ith h a r ass m e nt o r disc rimin atio n and program s and eve nt s that foc u s o n i ss ues o f p a rti cula r co n cern t o wo m e n Th e insr itut e h o u ses a s m all libr a r y w ith a variet y o f book s and o th e r r eso u rce m a t e rial s o n wo m e n 's ex p erie n ces, his t ories, a n d co ntributi o n s t o soc i e ty. Stud e nt s w h o need ass i s t a n ce s h ould m ake a n appoi ntm ent with the coo rdin a t o r of wo m e n 's serv i ces. WRITING CENTER Th e Wri ting C e nt e r s taff of co mp ositio n i n truc t ors a n d tr ai n ed w ritin g t uto r s are co mmi tted to wo rk ing w ith s tud e nt s in d eve l o pin g their wri tin g a bil itie Tuto r s h elp tud e nt s ident ify p r oble m areas a nd pro vide i n s tru ctio n o n h ow t o e l i min a t e th e m T hr o u g h o n e-o n -o n e ins t r u ctio n t u t o r s t eac h s tud e n ts to ge n e r a t e, o r g aniz e, and d eve l o p ideas; t o rev i se and ed it wi t h co n fide n ce; a n d to h a n d l e i ss ues of for m a t and d ocume nt ation. F o r m o r e informa tion co nt ac t t h e Wri ting Cent e r a t (303) 556 6070.

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so STUDENT LIFE The Office of Student Life offers studen t s a w i de range of services and programs des i gned to enhance classroom experiences and encourage campus involvement. Services inc lud e Judicial Affairs, Student Problem Action Network (SPAN), Student Activities, student clubs and organizations, Student Publi cati ons, Counse lin g Center, Campus R ecreation, Student Health Center, Student Legal Services, Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Student Services, Student Government Assembly (SGA) and the Student Finance Re so urce Center. Th ese student-fee-funded program s ex i s t to provide a diver e range of experiences in leader s hip deve l opment and program s that encourage cultural, recreational educ!ltional, and socia l interaction. The Office of Student Life is located in the Tivoli Student Union room 307. Student Affairs Board (SAB) The Student Affairs Board enables stude nt s to hav e a con tinuous voice in the u se and allocation of their s tudent fees. Th e SAB i s comprised of stude nt faculty and administrative repre se ntatives. Student Problem Action Network (SPAN) The SPAN Program helps students resolve problem s on camp us. Thi s program involves trained medi ators and advocates who can assist stu dents in defining their problem, formulate a strategy of reaching a so lution and inform them about the institutional pro cess for resolving the issue This program is part of the judicia l affairs area and is s taff ed by volunt ee r faculty, staff, and s tudents. For additional infor mation please refer to the Student H andbook or come to the Tivoli room 307. STUDENT ACTIVITIES Th e Office of Student Activities pro vides a variety of ways for s tudent s to meet others and become involved in the college co mmunity. The council staff produces concerts, comedy s hows, lectures, and special eve nt s eac h semester. The council also cosponsors events with clubs and offices on camp us. The Potential through Educat ion Awareness and Knowledge (PEAK) l eadership program offers a wide range of learning opportunities for s tudent s w h o want to develop and sharpen their skills PEAK train ing include s coalition-building group dynamics, and leadership theory and typology. The training is str uctur ed to fit into the busy sc hedul es of st udent s who work. The Club R eso urc e Center s taff can help st udent s find a club that meets their needs or help them es tablis h a new club, r aise funds for programming, and keep their ledger balanced The college currently has 100 active professional, soc ial academic, honorary and spec ial interest clubs on campus. The office i s located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 305. The office number is (303) 556-2595, and hour s are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday. CAMPUS RECREATION The Campus Recreation at Auraria program is among the most affordable way s that students have found to enjoy themse l ves, and it is among the bes t recreation programs offered in Colorado. The program is composed of the Drop-In Program ( informal recreation ), lntramurals, Club Sports, Outdoor Adventure, and the Phy s ically Challenged Program Stude nt member s hip is free with a current, va lid ated stude nt ID The Drop-in Program provides group and individu a l activities for students faculty, s taff, alumni, and guests. Facilities include four ba sketball courts, I 2 tennis courts, volleyball courts, a 25-yard indoor pool, e ight handb a ll/racqu e tball courts, two squash courts, a weightroom, a fitne ss center, a dance stu dio, a baseball field, softball fields, and a track. In addition, Campus Recreation offers high and low impact ae robi cs, step aero bics and aqua aerob i cs daily. The Drop-in Program also offers a new instruc tiona l component, H ea lthy Lifestyle s, which consists of a variety of noncredit instructional workshops, c lini cs, and seminars. Check the Drop-in Program sc hedule in room 108 of the Physical Education Building or call (303) 556-3210 for a lis tin g of availab l e times. The Intramural Program co nsists of individua l and t ea m activities open to all s tudents, faculty and s taff members The e mph asis of the program i s on participation, sportsmanship, and social interaction. Whenever po ss ible, competitive and recreat i onal divisions are offered to ensure participation for all ability lev e ls. Activities inc lud e flag football, ba sketball, floor hockey volleyball, racquetball, and squa s h l eagues, as well as tennis and go lf tournaments. Club Sports provid es stude nts, faculty, and s taff members the opportunity to develop their individual ath l etic abilitie s in an organ i zed gro up setti ng Th e present clubs, which are all s tudent initi ated, include

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aikido, fencing, men's lacrosse, men and women' rugby, men's volleyball, coed waterpolo badminton, ski/s nowb a h e rs, and tai chi. Outdoor Adventure provides the opportunity to experience the beauty and challenge of nature through organized trips. The pro gram provides outdoor recreational experiences emphasizing skill acquisition social interaction, environmental awareness, and safety Some of the many adventures offered are biking, ca noein g, c ro ss-co untry ski ing downhill sk iin g, family-fun o utin gs hikin g, ice c limbin g kayak ing/rafting, naturalist outings rock climbing, and sailing. The program als o provides rental equipment, inc lud ing camping and hikin g gear, ca no es, cross-co untr y sk i s, mountain bikes, and roller blades. The office is located in the basement of the Events Center. The Ph ysically Challenged Pr ogram offers a variety of spor tin g recreational and fitness opportunities for students wit h physical or learning limitations. The adaptive programs/services encompass one-on one or gro up sess ion s that assis t in u sing the recreational facility. Information on planned group activ ities or individual help sessions is availab l e in the Events Center, room I 08, (303) 556-3210. STUDE T PUBLICATIONS The student newspaper The Metrop o litan, is published by the Office of Student Publications Tivoli Student Unio n room 313, (303) 556-8361. The n ewspaper offers students the opportunity to exp lor e fields s u c h as journalism, advertising sales marketing graphic arts, publi hing photography business and accounting through work experiences. The Metrop o litan i s written and produced by and for MSCD st udent s It is published weekly during the fall and spring seme s ters and once during the summer semes ter. Students intere s ted in working on the paper shou l d contact the s tud en t editor at (303) 556-2507. Merrosphere i the annual student literary and arts publication. It contains poetry fiction nonfiction art, photo grap hy a nd g r aphics. It is written, composed and produced en tir e l y by students Submissions a r e accepted during the fall semester. Copies are distributed free to s tudent in the spring s emester. For more information, contact t he student ed itor at (303) 556-3940. The office a l o produces the Student H andbook and provides graphic art servic es at reduced costs to on cam pu s offices, departments, organizations, and individuals MSCD's Board of Publi cat i o n s is the advisory board t o the editors of M e rrosph e re and The Metropoli tan. Th e board appoints the editors from applicants each spring for the following academic year and deals w ith complaints or questions regarding conte nt The board i s composed of five s tud e nts, three adminis tr a tor s, a nd three fac ult y members and meets monthly during the fall and spring semesters.

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52 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AND A MERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT Th e M etro p o lit a n S t a t e College of D e n ve r i s a n equa l o pp o rtunit y e mpl oye r ; a ppli ca tion s fr o m minorities and wo m e n a r e pa rti c ularl y inv it e d Th e M etro p o l i t a n St ate Coll ege of D e n ve r do e not di sc rimi nate o n the basi o f r ace co lor creed n atio n a l origin sex age, sex ual ori e nt atio n or disabilit y in a dmis s i o n s o r access t o o r trea tm e nt o r e m p l oy m e nt i n its e duc a tion a l pr og r a m s o r ac tiviti es Inquirie s c once rnin g the coll ege grie v a n ce pr oce dures may be dir ec t e d to th e d e i g nate d MSCD officia l s Inquiri es co n ce rnin g T it l e V I a nd Ti t l e IX may be r eferre d t o Dr. P e r cy M o r e hou se, Jr. MSCD Office of Equ a l Opp o r t unit y Ca mpu s B ox 63, P O B ox 1 73362, D enve r CO 8 0 2 1 7 3362 (30 3) 5 5 6 -2939 Inq u i ri es co n cerning the A m e ric an s with Di a biliti e s Ac t ( ADA) o r 5 04 may be r e f e rr e d t o Ms. He l en Fl e min g F aculty a n d Staff AD A Coordi n a t or MSC D Campus Bo x 47 P O B ox 1 733 6 2 D e n ve r CO 802 1 7-3362 (303 ) 556-85 1 4; Dr. Man u e l Esca mill a, Stud ent A D A Coo rdin a t o r MSCD Campu s Box 42, P O B ox 1 73362 D enve r C O 802 1 7 3362 (303 ) 556 -4737 ; Mr D ick F e u e rb orn, A D A C o ordi n a t o r A HE C, Campu s Box 001, P O B ox 1 7336 1 D e n ve r CO 802 1 7 336 1 (30 3) 5 5 6-8376; o r Ms. K a r e n R ose n c h ein, M a n ager. Oth e rwis e, all inquiri e s m ay b e r e ferr e d t o the Offi ce f o r Ci vil Rig hts, U.S. D e p a rtm e nt of Educatio n 1 244 Speer B oulevar d D e n ve r CO 8 0 2 0 4 (30 3) 844-3723. FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT STUDENT RIGHTS Th e M e tr o politan St a t e Colleg e o f D e n ve r maint ains e du ca tional r eco rd s f o r eac h s tud e nt who has e nr olle d a t th e college A co p y of th e c ollege's p o l icy o n s tud e nt edu catio n a l r ecords may be obtained fr o m the Offi ce o f the Regi s trar C e n tral C l ass r oo m Buildin g, room 1 05 Unde r th e F a mil y Edu c ational Rig ht s and Pri vacy Ac t of 1 9 74 (FERP A ) 20 U S C 1 232g and th e impl e m e ntin g r egulatio n s publi s hed a t 34 C FR p a rt 99, eac h elig ibl e st u de n t h a th e rig h t to : I. Ins p ec t and review hi s /h e r ed u catio n a l r eco r ds; 2 R eques t the a m e ndm e nt of the s tud e nt 's ed u catio n r e cord s t o e n s ur e tha t they ar e not inac cu r a t e m i s l eadi n g, or othe rw i se i n vio l atio n of th e s tud e nt's priv ac y o r othe r rights; 3 Co n s ent t o di sc l os ur es of per o n ally identifiable info rmati o n co nt aine d in the s tud e nt's e du catio n a l r eco r ds, exce pt to th e ex t ent that FE RP A authoriz es di scl os ur e w ith out co n se nt (see N o ndiscl os ur e a nd Excepti o n s b e l ow); and 4. File a co mplaint under 3 4 CF R 99.6 4 co n ce rnin g all ege d failur es b y the coll ege t o c omply w ith the r e quir e m e nt s o f FERPA, w ith the Fa mil y Compli a n ce O ffice, U .S. D e p a rtment of Edu cation 400 M ary land Avenue, S W., W as hin g ton D .C. 2 0 20 2-46 05 PROCEDU R E FOR INS PE C T! G A D R E VIEWING EDUCATIO AL RECORDS Stud e nt s ma y in p ee l an d r ev iew their e du catio n r ecord upon a writt e n r eque t ubmitt e d t o th e Reg i s tr a r Ce ntral Cl assroom, Room I 05 or b y m ail t o Campus Bo x 8 4 P O B ox 1 733 6 2, D e n ve r Co l o r ad o 8 0 2 1 7-3362. A Th e reques t s hall ide ntify as preci se l y as pos ible the rec ord o r r ecords the tud ent w i s h es t o inspect. B. Th e r ec ord c u s todi a n or a n a pp ropria t e s t aff pe r so n s hall mak e the a rr a n ge m e nt s for access a s promptl y a p o sible and n otify the s tud e n t of the time and place w h e r e th e record s ma y be ins p ec t ed. A ccess mu s t be g i ve n in 4 5 day o r l e s from the r ece ipt of the r e qu est. C Wh e n a r ecord co ntain s inf ormatio n a bout m o r e than one s tud e nt, the s tud e nt m ay ins p e ct and r ev i ew only the r ec ord s whic h r e l a t e to tha t st u dent. PROCEDURE FOR AME NDING EDUCATIO N AL R EC ORDS A s tud e nt m ay m ake a w ritt e n requ es t t o a m end a r ecord. I. In the re qu e t the s tudent s h o uld ide ntif y the part of the re cord t o be c han ge d and pecify why the s tud e nt bel ieve i t i s inaccurat e mis l ea ding, o r in viola tion o f the tud ent' s privacy o r oth e r rights 2. Th e M etro p o lit an St a t e C ollege of D e n ve r s hall co mpl y w ith the r eq u e t or n otify th e s tudent that the college will not co mp ly w ith the r eq u e t and ad v i se the s tud e nt o f the tud e nt' s right to a h ea rin g t o c h alle n ge the informatio n b elieved to be inacc urat e mis l ea din g, or in v iol a tion of the tud e nt's rig hts.

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3 Upon written r e qu es t Th e M e tropolitan State College of D e n ve r w ill arrange for a hearin g, and notif y th e s tud e nt reaso nably in advance, of the d a t e, pla ce a nd tim e of the h earing. 4 The hearin g will be co ndu c t ed b y a he aring officer w h o i s a dis int e r es ted part y, but who may be an official of the in s titution Th e s tud e nt s h all be afforded a full and fair opp o rtunity t o pre se nt ev iden ce r e l evant t o the i ss u es rai sed in the orig inal r e qu es t t o a m e nd the s tud e nt 's ed uca tion re cords. Th e s tud e nt ma y b e ass i s t ed by one or mor e individuals, including a n a ttorn ey 5. The MetropoLitan State Coll ege of D e n ve r will pr e p are a w ritt e n de c i s ion ba sed so lely o n the evidence pr ese nted a t th e h ea ring. Th e d ec i sio n will includ e a s umm a r y of the evide n ce pre se nted and the r easo n s for th e de c i s ion. 6. I f The Metropolitan Stat e College of D enve r d ecides tha t the c h allenged inforn1 a tion i s n o t inac c ur ate, mis leadin g, o r in vio l ation of th e s tud e nt' s rig ht of priva cy or other right, it will notif y the s tud ent that the s tud e nt has a rig ht to place in the record a sta t ement com m e ntin g on the c h all e n ged inf o rmati o n and /o r a s t a t e m e nt se ttin g f01th reason s for disag r eeing with the d ec i s i on. 7. The s tatem e nt will be maintain e d as par t of th e s tud e nt's educatio n r ecords as l o n g as the cont es t ed portion i s maint a ined I f Th e M e tropolitan State College of D e n ve r d ec id es that the inform a tion is inacc ur a t e, mi s l ea din g, or in vio lation of the s tud ent's rights, it will a m end the r ecord and notif y the s tudent in writing, th a t the r ecord ha s been ame nd ed NONDIS C LOSURE AND EXCE PTIONS Pur s u a nt to FERPA the co lle ge will not disc lo se a rud en t ed u cation r ecords witho ut the writte n con se nt of the stude nt exce pt t o college officials with leg itim a t e e du ca tional inte r es ts, to officia l s at other in s tituti o n s in which th e s tudent see k s to e nroll in co nn ec t ion w ith providin g financial ai d to th e s tu d e nt to accrediting agencies in carry in g out their f unctions, to federal, t a t e or l oca l authorities audit in g o r eva lu a tin g th e college's complian ce w ith e ducation program s, to co n sultants co ndu c tin g s tudi es on behalf of the college, in co mplian ce with a judicial orde r or s ubp oe n a, and in co nn ectio n with a h ea lth o r sa f e t y e mergen cy involvin g th e s tudent. H owever the college m ay r e l ease dir ec tory i nfor m a tion w ith o ut th e prior writte n co n se nt of the s tud e nt unl ess w ithin t e n (I 0 ) ca l e nd a r da ys a ft e r the firs t sc h e dul ed c la ss day of eac h t erm, an e nroll e d s tud e nt h as notifi e d th e college's Office of the R eg i s tr ar in wri tin g tha t any or all type s of directory information s hall not b e disclosed witho ut th e co n sent of t h e s tud e nt. A r eques t for nondi sc lo s ur e will r e main in e ffe c t until the s tud e n t i s no l o n ge r enrolled or ca nc e l s the r e qu es t for n o ndi sc lo s ur e. A c ho o l offic i a l i s a per so n emp l oyed by th e college in a n adminis trati ve, s up e rvi sory, aca demi c o r re sea r c h or s upp o rt s taff po s iti on; or a p e r so n e l ec t ed to the B oa rd of Tru s t ee ; o r a person e mplo ye d by o r und e r co ntr act to th e co lle ge t o p e rform a spec ial t ask, u c h a attorney, a udit o r o r co n ult ant; or a s tudent or othe r p e r so n serving on an offic ial college co mmitt ee o r assis tin g a sc hool officia l in performin g the officia l 's prof ess i o n a l duti es and re s p o n s ibil ities. A l egitin1a t e ed u cationa l int e r es t i s the need of a sc hool official t o r ev ie w e du ca tion a l re cords in order t o fulfill that officia l 's professional duties and r es pon s ibiliti es. DIRECTORY I FORMATIO Th e Metropolitan State College of D enver ha s d es ign a t e d the followi n g ca t egories of p e r so n a ll y ide ntifiab l e information on s tud e nt s as dir ec t ory inform ation under sectio n 4 38(a)(5)( B ) of FE RPA: -name, address and tel e ph one number em ail a ddr ess -da t e a nd pla ce of birth student cla ssificat ion -major and minor fie ld s of s tudy -partic ip a tion in officially recognize d act ivities a nd s port s -w e i g ht a n d h eight of memb e r s of athle tic t ea m s -da t es of atte nd a nce a t th e college d egr ees a nd awards re c eiv e d l ast e ducational in s titution att ended

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54 THE STUDENT RIGHT-TO-KNOW ACT AND THE CAMPUS SEC URITY ACT Campus Crime Info F mation Durin g 1 992, 1 993, and 1994, the following crimes were commi tted on campu s a t th e A urari a Hi g her Education Center, serving the Univers it y of Colorado a t Denver, The Metropolitan State College of D e n ve r and the Communit y College of D e nver: O CCURRENCES OF CRIMlNAL OFFENSES ON CAMPUS Offense 1996 1995 1994 Murder .......... 0 . ... 0 ..... 0 Rape ............ 0 ...... 0 ....... 0 Robbery .......... I ....... 4 ....... I Agg r avated Assa ult 7 ...... 6 ...... 10 Burglary .... ... 23 ... 24 ...... 17 Vehicle Theft .... II ..... 10 ... ... II S e xual Assa ult .... 5 .... 4 ....... 13 H ate Crimes ....... 0 ...... 2** .... I NUMBER OF ARRESTS FOR THE F OLLOW G CR!MES ON CAMPUS Arr ests 1996 1995 1994 Liquor Law Violation*. 10 ....... 2 ....... 0 Drug Abuse Violat i o n .. 40 ....... 6 ....... 2 Weapons Possessio n ... 4 ....... I ....... I Excl udes DUI arres t s; h oweve r 22 of 55 t ota l offe n se arres t s in 1994 involved alcohol. *Includes sex ual assaults ot h er than firstand seco nd degree sex ual assaults (rape). s u c h as indecent exposures. and third -deg ree sex u al assaults. These statistics were provided b y the Auraria D e partment of Publi c Safety in comp lian ce w ith the Crime Awareness and Camp u s Sec ur ity A c t of 1 990. **One incident, two offenses, simple assault and intimid ation.

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I SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 55 The School of BlUineJti provide-J dtudentd with a background of general education_, familiarity with principled of badine-Jd_, and a knowledge in a fie/f). .

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56 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS School of Business OUR MISSION: We are committed t o b eing the lead e r in the development and delivery of high-quality und ergraduate bu siness programs that meet the diverse and evo lvin g e du ca tion a l needs of students, businesses, and o ther t ake holders in the s i x-co unt y serv i ce area of Metropolitan State Col lege of Denver. All of our programs and act iviti es instill and satisfy the important purpose of lif e l ong learning. Our pro grams help stude nt s con.fro nt and resolve wo rk and life is ues w ith multicultural, ethica l t ech n o logical international, and environme ntal dimensions. Our baccalaureate degree pro grams provide a broad foundation in ge n e r a l e du cation and expos ur e t o all the functional areas of business, w ith spec ific competence in at le ast one of tho se areas. R esiden t s of the metropolitan area may enhance their ed ucati o n as non-d eg r ee-seeki n g stude nts, or thr o u g h ce rtifi cate progr ams in var iou s areas of business. Businesses a nd other organizations may avail themselves of trainin g and deve l opment throu g h our o utr each programs, w hich are custom-des i gned to stre n gt h en hum an resources. l PROGRAMS The Schoo l of Bu siness awa rd s b achelor o f sc i e n ce and bache l o r of arts degree s a nd offers minors for non-business majors: Bachelor of Science Degree Programs Accounting Computer Information S ystems and Management S cie n ce Finance Management Marketing Bach elor of Arts Degree Pro gra m Economics Minors ( for Non-Business Majors) Acco unting Computer ln.formation System Economics Finance General Business Manageme nt Marketi n g R ea l Estate DECLARI G A MAJOR/MINOR IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS All studen t s who qu a lif y for admission to MSCD a r e eligib l e to declar e a m ajor or min o r in the Schoo l of Bu siness. D eclaring a major or minor is the first step in the proce ss of r ece ivin g appropriate adv i s ing. A student shou ld declare a major as soon as po sible by contacting an academic adviser, depart ment chair, or faculty member. An undecided student may declare a pre-business major. For all degrees in t h e Schoo l of Busin ess, at l east 50 percen t of the bu siness c r edi t hour s r ece i ved for the bu siness degree must be earned in the Sc h ool of Bu s ine ss. ew and transfer students intending to major in business are e n co ura ged to see an adviser in the appro priate department before reg i stering for classes. Students sho uld develop a grad uation agreement in co n s ultation with their department a dvi er w ithin the first se m es ter of becoming a busine ss major. The gra du at i o n agree m ent serves as a road map for course sc h e duling

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS I STR UCTU R E OF BACH ELO R OF SCIE CE DEGREE PROG R AMS All degree-seeking s tudent s mu s t meet the college 's requirement s for aU bachelor's degrees out lin ed in the Genera l I nformation section on page 8 of thi s Catalo g Students a bachelor's degree from the Schoo l of Bus ines s mu s t complete General Studie s, the business core* the required courses of the chosen major and electives. A minor i s not required except for the noted economics major. R e quire ment s for each de g ree program total 120 c redit hours: General Studies (Leve l I and Level II) .................. 0 0 0 43 Business Core . . . ...... 0 0 0 0 33 Major in School of Business ...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24 Electives "* ......... ... 0 0... 0 0 0 0. 20 Tot a l H o urs (minim um ) .................................... 0 o 0 0 0 120 *Not required for the sta ndard eco n omics major (with a minor). **The School of Business requires 20 credit hours of elec tiv es, no mor e than 9 of whi c h may be business e l ectives. A detai l ed de sc r ip tion of the se categories follows. G ENE RAL STU D lES The college r e quir es 33 credit hour s of General Studies. The School of Busin ess requires 10 additiona l s pe cific hour s of ge neral education, for a total of 43. Stud e nt s d es irin g a b ac h e lor of science degree from the School of Bus ine ss s hould complete the se courses as part of th e ir first 60 c redit hours. GE ERAL STUDIE R EQUlREO BY T H E SCHOOL OF BUSI 1 ESS Ge n e r a l S tudies Leve l I Semester Hours Compos iti o n E G 1010 ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: The Essay ............................... o 3 Freshman Composition: Analysis R esearch and Documentation . . .... 3 Math e m atics MTH 1 3 1 0 Finite M at h ematics for the Man agement and Social Science s ... 0 0 0 0 4 MTH 1 320 Calculus for th e Management and Social Sciences ........... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Communica ti o n s SPE I 0 I 0 Fundamentals of Speech Comm unicati on ....... 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Gen e r a l S tudies L eve l II Histori ca l Studi es H I S (Ame rican his tor y co ur se recommended) ....... ............... 3 A r ts and Letters PI-ll 1030 Ethics (C h ec k General Studies g uid e for Level II Arts and Letter s e l ective) ........ 3 --r -SOC 1010 PSC 1010 --<>r -Principles of Economics-Macro .. Prin ci ple s of Economics-Micro .... Introduct ory P syc h o l ogy Introduction to Sociology American ational Government PSC 1020 Politi ca l System and Idea ..... Natura l Sc i e n ces 0 0 0 0 3 ............. 3 .......... 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 ............. 3 ( Check Genera l Studies guide for Level II at ural Sciences elective) (Check General Studies g uid e for Level II at ural Sciences e l ective). .. . 3 .. 3 Total of R equired and Elective General Studies Credit H o urs ... 0 43* 33 required for the standard econom i cs major (with a minor).

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58 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Busr E s CoRE The following cour es are required for all busines s majors excep t those in the s tandard economics major (with a minor). Require d Courses Semester Hours ACC 20 I 0 Prin c iple s of Accounting I ......................... ..... .... .... 3 ACC 2020 Principle of Accounting II ... ....... ...... ........ .... ...... ...... 3 MKT 2040 Managerial Communi c ation ........................................ 3 CMS 2010 Prin c iples of Inf orm a tion Sys t em .... ...... ..... ........ ..... ...... 3 CMS 3300 Principles of Quantitative Mana g ement Sy s tems ..... .................... 3 CMS 3 3 2 0 Quantit a tive Deci s ion Making ............... ........................... 3 FIN 3 300 Mana g eria l Finance ..................... .... ....... .... ......... ... 3 MGT 2210 Le g al Environment of Bu s ine ss I ....... ................................ 3 MGT 3 000 Or g ani za tion a l Man age m ent ... ......... .... ............ ........ ........ 3 MGT 4950 Strat eg i c Mana ge m e nt ........... ..... .... ............... ........ 3 MKT 3 000 Prin c iples of Marketin g ...... ................. .................. 3 T o t a l H o ur s R e quir e d in Bu sine s s C o r e .... ........ .......................... ...... 33 S e ni o r E x p erie n ce c ap s t o n e co ur se t ake n durin g the fin a l se m e ster o f the se ni o r ye ar COURSES REQUIRED FOR M A JORS ACCOUNT! G D E PARTMENT Cour e s in the Accounting Dep artment prepare s tudents for careers in public industria l tax sys tem s, and governmental accounting. ln addition a wide variety of int ernships is avai l abl e through the Coop erative Educa t ion Office Student s intere s ted in becoming certified public accoun t ants sho uld be aware of the American Institute of Certified Public Accoun t an ts' 50-hour requirement scheduled to take effe c t in 2000. MSCD offers clas e s that meet all a p e cts of the A1CPA' s r equirement. Students should t a l k to an acco untin g faculty adv i ser to deve l op an approp riat e acad e mic program. A CCO Tl G MAJOR FOR BA CHELO R OF SCIENCE Required Courses Se me ster Hours ACC 3 090 Inco m e Tax I ......... ................... ....................... 3 ACC 3 300 I ntrodu c tion to Accountin g Syst e m s .... ..... ......... ............ ..... 3 ACC 3400 Co s t A cc o untin g ........................... .... ......... ............. 3 ACC 3 510 Inte rmediate Ac co untin g I .................................. . 3 ACC 3 5 2 0 l n t em1e diate Accountin g II ............ ........ .. ....................... 3 ACC 4200 Auditin g ................ .................... ... ............ ..... 3 ACC 4510 Adv a nc e d Accoumin g l ... ............ ............................... 3 Subt o tal ...... . ........... ..... .......... ........... .... .... ......... 21 Plu s 3 hours from the following courses: ACC 3100 lncomeTaxll ...................... ........... ....... ... ... .... 3 ACC 3200 Governmenta l Accounting ..... ................ ......... ..... 3 ACC 3 4 t 0 Co s t Ac c o unting II ............. ..................................... 3 ACC 4090 Tax Procedure and R e ea r c h ............................... .... ..... 3 ACC 4 1 00 T ax Planning ................ ........ .... .... ............... 3 ACC 4300 Ad v anc e d Auditing ................... ....... . ........... .......... 3 ACC 4520 Advanced Accountin g II ...................... ......................... 3 T o tal H o urs R e quir ed f o r A cco untin g Maj o r ......................... .................. 2 4 COMPUTER INFORMATIO SYSTEMS AND MANAGEMENT S C IENCE D EPARTMENT A var i e t y of co ur es in the rapid l y expanding area of information system s in the business world are availab l e thr oug h this major. Students can look forward to challengi n g career s in c ompu ter information sys t ems o r using their computer inform ation s ys t e m s knowledge within any other area of business. Students majoring in co mputer informa tion sy s tem s and m anagement cience are encouraged to selec t advance d co u rses that be s t meet their needs in s pe c ific a r ea s, s uch a s s y s tem s analy s i s, de s ign development pro gramming data ba s e management data com muni cation s and n etworks, or management of information systems Advising for these areas is availab l e from the departme nt and individ ua l fac ult y members.

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COMP UTE R I NFO R MATION SY TEMS AND MANAGEMENT S CJE CE MAJOR FO R BACH ELO R OF SCI ENCE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS R equire d Courses Se m es t e r H ours CMS 2 110 Bu ine s Pr oblem Solving: A Stru c tured Programmin g Approach ........ 3 CMS 30 50 Fundamental s of S ys t e m s Analy s i s a nd D esig n ..... ........... 3 CMS 3060 Fil e D es i g n and D a t a B ase Man ageme nt. ......... ....................... 3 CMS 3230 Telecommunications System s . ................. ... ..... 3 Programmin g Lan guage Group (includes CMS 3110 CMS 3130, and CM S 3260) ............... 3 Mic r oco mputer T ec hn ology Group (includes CMS 3220 and CM S 3290) ...................... 3 CMS C a p s tone Group ( includ es CMS 4050 CMS 4060, CMS 4070, and CMS 4410) .... ..... 3 Approv e d CMS Electives . . . . ................... 3 T ota l H o ur s R eq uir ed for CMS Maj o r ...... ....... ..... .... ................... 24 FINA CE D E P A R TMENT The finan ce major prepar e s tud e nt s for careers tha t concentrate on the proces s of managin g the funds of indi v idu a l s, b u sinesses, and governments. Career opportunities are available in the fields of man agerial financ e and th e financial services indu s try. The field of man age rial finance de a l s with managing the fin anc i a l affa irs of bu s ines ses and governments and include s such ac tiviti es as budgeting, financia l foreca s ting cash manag e ment c redit ad mini s tr a tion investment analysis, and fund s man age ment. Careers in the financi a l services indu s try include po s ition s in bank s, savings and l oans, other financia l inst itut ion brokerage firm s, ins uran ce companies, a nd r ea l es t a t e. Th e mo s t dramatic increa e in career opportun i ties i in per s onal financial plannin g, where pr ofess ional s are needed to prov i de advice t o co n s u me r s on the managem e nt of their personal financial affa irs. Th e Finance Dep a rtmen t ha s been approved to offer th e acad e mic co ur ses r e quir e d for tho se who will t a ke the national exams to become ce r tified financia l p l anners. A minimum grade of "C" is r equired for cour ses in the m ajor. FlNA CE M AJOR FO R BACH ELO R OF SCIENCE R equi r e d Courses Se m este r H ours FIN 30 I 0 Finan c i a l M arke t s and Ins tituti o n s .............................. . .... 3 FIN 3600 in ves tm e nts . . . ....... ............. .... 3 FIN 3850 int ermedia t e Finance ................................ ........ . ... 3 FIN 4950 Financial Strategies and Poli c i es ................ ...................... 3 Subtotal ...................................................................... 1 2 Approved E l ectives* ................................................... ..... ..... 12 T otal H ours R equired for Finan ce Major....... ... . ....................... 24 *Up p e r-di v i sionfmance e l ectives (six must be 4000 l eve/) selec t ed in co nsultati o n with and approved by the Fin a n ce Departmellf M A AGE M E T D E P A R TMENT T h e management major i s de s i g ned to pr e par e s tud e nt s to sta rt and m a nag e bu s ine sses and other orga nizat i on s in a diver se and technolo g i c all y dynamic g l o bal e nvironment. The program c onsi s t s of req uir ed co u rses that build a broad conceptual foundation for identifying and solving manageria l prob l ems. Studen t s have option to d eve lop spec ial s kill in human resource m a nag e ment operations man age m ent, or e ntrep r ene ur ship. M ANAGEME T MAJO R FO R BACHELOR OF SCI ENCE Require d Courses Se m es t e r H ours MGT 3020 Fund a m e ntal s of Entrepreneur s hip ........... ............... ..... 3 MGT 3220 Legal Environment of Busine s II .............. . . .............. 3 MGT 3530 Human R eso ur ces Mana ge m ent ................... .................... 3 MGT 3550 M a nuf ac turi n g and Servi ce M a n agement ............. .................. 3 MGT 3820 Int ernationa l Busin ess ............. ........... .................... 3 MGT 4530 Or ganizatio nal B e h av ior. . . ........................ ...... 3 Subtotal .............................. ......... . ............. ........... 1 8 Plu s 6 h o urs fro m t h e followi n g courses: MGT 32 1 0 Commercial and Corpo r a t e Law ......................................... 3 MGT 4000 Management D ecision Analy i s . ................ 3 MGT 4020 Entrepreneurial Creativity. . . . . . . ........... 3 MGT 4050 Purchasing a n d Contract Management . . . . . . . 3 MGT 4420 Entrepreneurial Business Plannin g ...................................... 3

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60 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MGT 4550 Proj ec t Management ....... ............... .......... . ............ 3 MGT 4610 Labor/Employee Relations ........ ....... ..... . ..... ............ 3 MGT 4620 Appraisa l and Compensatio n .................. .... ................... 3 MGT 4640 Employee Trainin g and D eve l opment ................................... 3 MGT 4650 Managing Pr oductivity ............................................... 3 MGT 4830 Workforce Diversity. . .................. ............... .... 3 Total E l ec t ive H o ur s .......... .... ...... .... .............. .... ...... ...... ... 6 Total Hours Required for Mana gemem Major ........... .... .... ....... ....... . 24 MARKETING D EPARTMENT Th e Marketing D epartme nt pr e p ares s tud e nt s for caree r opportunities in s u c h dynamic areas as s a l es man ageme nt distr ibuti on, adve rti sing, m a rk e tin g research retailin g, and marketing mana ge m ent. In addition to the d e partm e nt 's well-ro unded se l ectio n o f co ur ses, the c urri c ulum a l so offer s s tudents a co mbination of concept u a l and applied l ear nin g experie n ces Throu g h t h e d eve lopm e nt of marketing pla ns, advertising campaig ns, and marketing r esearch s tudie s, s tud en t s h ave the opportunity to work with D e n ver-area businesses on c urr ent marketing iss u es and probl ems. Students are a l so expose d t o a variety of marketing speakers from the business community Int erns hip positions are available for marT keting students through the Cooperative Education Office. MARKETLNG MAJOR FOR BACH ELOR OF S CIENCE R equire d Courses Semester Hours MKT 3010 Marketing Research . . ................................. 3 MKT 3310 Consume r B e h avior . . ............. .......................... 3 MKT 4560 Marketing Management ................................ ...... .... ... 3 Marke tin g Elec t ives* .... .... ...... ......................... .... .... .... .... 15 Total H ours R equired for Mark eting Major .............................. ............. 24 *Business communicatio n s courses can be used as business elec ti ves, bw nor as marketi n g electives. B ACHELOR OF ARTS ECONOMICS D EPARTMENT Economics is the scientific s tud y of the a llo ca tion of carce or limit ed r eso ur ces. T h e s tud y of eco n o m i cs provides a gene ral know l edge of the operation of eco nomic sys t e m s and ins titution s This training is ex tr eme l y valuab l e regard l ess of the s tud e nt 's specific c areer ob jecti ve The bachelor of arts degree program gives s tudent s a f undam e ntal know l edge of d o m es tic and foreig n eco nomies a nd the quantita tiv e t ools n ecessary for indepen d ent ana l y tical r esearc h a nd thou ght. Sp ec i a l ized course s d eve l o p the s tud e nt's abi lit y to u se the tool s of ec onomic theory and a nal ys i s Suc h tr a inin g is essentia l for g radu ates w h o w i s h to qu alify for po sitions as professional eco nomists. Emp l oy ment opport uni ties are a vail ab l e in n atio nal and internat i onal business; federal s t ate, and l ocal gove rnm e nt ; and variou nonprofit organizations. Economic s m ajors may c hoose from two track s of stu dies: the s tand ard eco n omics major which r e quire s a minor or the business e mpha s i s, which d oes not require a min or. ECONOMICS MAJOR FOR BA C H ELOR OF ARTS (WITH A MINOR) Required Courses Se me ster Hours MTH 1 2 1 0 Intr oductio n t o Statistics. . . .. .. ................... .... 4 ECO 3010 Intermediate Microe cono mic Th eory .... ................... .............. 3 ECO 3020 Int erme diate Macroeco nomic Theory ................................... 3 ECO 3 1 50 Econometrics . . ................ ....... .... .... .... 3 ECO 4600 His tory of Eco n omic Tho u ght. .......................................... 3 Subtotal . . . . . . . ............................ ....... 1 6 Approved Elective s ................................................. ........ .... 15 Total H o urs R equired for the Economics Major ................. ...................... 3 1 Se l ecte d Minor Mus t be completed to f ulfill the degree requirement ..................................... 18 General Studies ( minimum ) ... .... ............................ ........ ........ 33 Electives. . . . . . . . . . ......................... 38 Total H ours R equired fo r Ba c h elor of Arts in Economics ............ .... . ... ...... 1 20

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS B SfNE S EMPHAS I S (WTTH 0 MfNOR) Thi s emphas i s prepar es th e s tud e nt for entry int o th e g rowin g pro fess i o n s of econ o mi cs and bu siness. It tr a in s the s tud e nt t o ass i s t gove rnm e nt s and bu sinesses in so l vi n g pr oble m s and fom1ul a tin g p olic ie s. Required Courses Seme ster Hours G e n e r a l Studi es (Leve l I and Leve l II) ( min imum) . . . . . . . .... 33 Bu siness Core ( S ee business co r e for bac h e lor of scie n ce deg r ee in Sc h ool of B u s i ness) ..................... 33 Requ i red Economic s Courses ECO 30 1 0 Int ermed i a t e Microecono mic Theory ........... . .... ............ 3 EC O 3020 Intermed i a t e M ac r oeconomic Th eory ..................................... 3 EC O 3 1 50 Eco n o m e tri cs ................................ ...................... 3 E C O 4 600 His t ory of Eco n omic Th o u g ht. . . . 3 Subtotal ......... ...... .... . .................... ..... .... .... ..... 1 2 A pprov ed Eco n omics E l ectives . . ...... ........ . .... 1 2 T ota l H ours of Economics ................. ......... . .... . ....... . ... 24 E l ect i ves within the Sc h oo l of B usiness ( u pper division) . . . . . . . 9 Oth e r o n -Busin es E l ec t ives ...................................................... 21 T o t a l H o u rs R eq u ired for a B a c he lor of Arts in Economics with Business Emphasis .......... 1 20 *Uppe r -division economics electives selected in consultation with and approved by the Economi cs D eparrme m MINORS IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS For n o n bu s in e degree s tud e n ts, th e S c hool o f Bu iness offer s e i g ht min o r s in di ffe r e nt bu s in ess s p e cialti es. Mos t minors r e quir e 1 8 c r e dit hours ( plu s pr e r e qui sites, i f a n y) A s tud e nt m ay n o t tak e more than 30 c r e dit h o ur s in th e S c hool o f Bu s in e s with o ut d ecla rin g a bu s in ess major Stud e nt s s hould c h o ose a min o r th a t w ill h e lp th e m in th e ir c h ose n ca reer. The ge n e r a l bu s iness min o r s hould b e d e cl a r e d a ft e r c on s ult a tion with th e a s soc i a t e dean Oth e r min o r s s h o uld be declar e d w ith th e h e lp of a f a culty a d v iser or departme nt c h ai r o f th e approp r ia t e d e p a rtm e nt. Ac c o TfNG Ml OR The Acc ountin g D e partm ent pr ov ides a min o r d es i g n e d for n o n bu siness m a j ors. The min o r offe r s s tu d e nt s a broad based e ducatio n in acco untin g, e mph as i z in g a p a rti c ul a r field w i t hin thi disc ipl i n e, s u c h as fin a n c ia l acc ountin g m a n ageria l acco untin g t ax acco untin g, o r gove rnm e nt a l accountin g The Accountin g D e partm e nt r e quires 60 c r e dit h o ur s U unior s tan ding) befor e takin g up pe r di v i s ion accountin g courses. on-bu siness s tud e nt a r e allowed t o t ake o nl y 30 c r e dit h o ur s in bu iness cour ses At l eas t 1 2 h o ur s of acco un t in g cour se in th e min o r mu s t be compl eted in r e ide n cy, and th e acce p tanc e of transfe r c r e dit will be g ov e rn e d b y s tandard s and p olic ies o f th e S c hool of Bu siness and th e Accountin g D e partm e nt. Required Cours e s Seme ster Hours A CC 2 0 I 0 Prin ciples o f Acco untin g I . . . . . . . . .. 3 ACC 2020 Prin ciples o f Acco unt i n g U . . . . . ...... 3 ACC 3090 Income Tax I . . . . . ........................ 3 ACC 35 1 0 Int ermedia t e Acco untin g I . ....................... ......... 3 Appr ove d E l ectives* . . . . . . .... . . . ..... 6 Total H ours R equired for Accouming Minor .......................................... 18 *A studemmay se l ect any co u rses in the accou m ing program or c u rr i c u l u m provided they are a p p r oved by the Acco untin g D epartmem adv i ser. COMPUTER IN FORMA TIO SYST EMS MiN OR Thi s min o r i s d es i g n e d f o r s tud e nt s m a j o rin g in a non bu siness di sc iplin e. The min o r will provid e a b as i c und e r s t a ndin g of th e concept s, c urr e nt m e th o d o l ogy, and rapid c h a n ges in th e desi g n devel o p m e nt and u se of compu te r-orie nt e d sys t e m s fo r bu sinesses a n d o rganizatio n s. Required Courses C M S 2 0 I 0 Principles o f Informatio n Sys t e m s .................. C M S 2110 Business P roblem Solving: A S tru c t ured Programming Approac h -or Seme ster Hours .. ....... 3 CMS 327 0 Mic r oB ase d Soft wa r e . . . . . . . . . . .. 3 C M S 3050 Fundame nt a l s of Sys t ems A n a l ys i s and Des i gn ........................... 3 C M S 3060 Fil e D esig n and D a t a B ase M a n age m en t. . .... ..................... 3 Appr ove d CM S 3000-Leve l E l ectives. ............................... 6 T ota l H o ur s R eq u ired fo r C M S Minor ............ . . .. 1 8

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62 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS E ONOMICS MINOR T h e eco nomi c min o r i s des i g n ed for non-b u siness major s and pro vides them wi th a n opport unity to acq uir e a ge n e r a l knowl e dge of the operatio n of economic s y s tem s and ins titution s, as well as the quan titative tool s n ecessary for analytical researc h and thou g ht. Require d Courses Se m e ter Hours ECO 2010 P rincip l es of Economic sM ac r o ................................ ....... 3 ECO 2020 Prin c ipl es of E co nomi csMicro .............. ................. .......... 3 A ppr ove d E l ective ............... .............. .............................. 1 2 Total H o ur s R equired fo r Econ o mi cs Mino r ............................. .... .... ..... 18 *Approved eleCiives are upp er-division eco nomi cs co urs es se l ected in consu lt ation w ith and approved by the Economi cs Departmem. Finance Minor s Th e Finance D epa rtm ent pro vid es t wo min o r s d es i g n e d primari-ly for non-bu s ines s m ajors : the fina nce minor and the real estate minor. Fr A E MINOR Thi min o r offe r s non-bu s ine s major a broad-ba se d e ducation in financ e, e mph asizing a particular field within thi s disc iplin e, s uch as perso n a l financial pla nnin g investments, mana ge ria l finance, fin a n c i a l in titution s, or intern a tiona l fina n ce. For the finance minor, th e st u dent mu s t h a v e co mpl e t ed ACC 2 010 and ACC 2020 (o r the e quiva l e nt ) and ECO 2010 and ECO 2 0 20, which may b e app l ied to the s tud e nt's Genera l Studie or e l ec tiv e requirements as a ppli ca ble Th e Fin a n ce D e pa rtm e nt requir e 60 credit h o ur s U unior sta nding) prior to t aki n g upp e r-divi s ion finance courses. A minim um g rade of C i s r eq uir e d in all fin ance minor co u r ses. A t l east 1 2 hour s of finance co ur es mu s t b e compl e t e d in r eside n cy to sati fy the r eq uir e m e nt s of th e minor. The acceptance of tra n s f e r c r e dit s will b e governe d by s tand a rd s and policie s of the S c hoo l of Business and the Fin a n ce D e partm e nt. Required Cou rses Se me ster Hours FIN 30 I 0 Financia l M arkets a n d Instituti o n s .............. ......................... 3 Fl 3300 Manageria l Fin ance .......................................... ........ 3 FIN 3600 I nvestme nt s ............................. .... ...................... 3 A ppro ve d E l ectives ............................ ............. .................. 9 T o tal H o ur s Requir ed for Finance Min o r ................................... ........ 1 8 *A s tud e nt may sel ec t any courses in the .fin a n ce program or c u rr i c ulum provided they are approved by a Finan ce D epartment adv i ser. R EAL ESTATE MI OR Th e minor pr e p a r es non-bu siness m ajo r s for e mpl oymen t and a career in real es tate as well a s for p e r s ona l fina n c i a l affair s d ea l ing w ith thi s field. For the r eal es t a t e minor the student mus t ha ve comp l e t ed ACC 20 1 0 and ACC 2 020 ( or the eq u i va l ent) and ECO 20 1 0, whic h may b e ap pli e d to th e tudent Gener a l Studie s or e l ective r equireme nt s as app l icable Th e Fin ance D e partm en t require s 60 c r edi t hour Uunior t a ndin g) prior to taking upper divi ion financ e courses. o nbu s ine s s tudents are allowe d to t ake only 30 c redit hour in bu s i n es co ur ses. A minimum grade of C i s r e quired i n all fina n ce minor cour es. At l eas t 1 2 h o u rs of finance cou r se in the minor mu s t be compl e t e d i n r esiden cy. The acceptance of tr a n sfe r c r e dit will be gov erne d by s tandard s and polic i e s of the Schoo l of B u s ine ss and t h e Fin a nce D epa rtment. Comp l e tion of FIN 38 00 FIN 38 1 0 and FIN 3820 fulfills the e du catio n a l requireme n t for the Col o rado Real E s tat e Brok ers Lice n e R equire d Courses Semes ter Hours FIN 3800 R ea l Esta t e P rac t i ce and Law . . . . . . . ............ 3 FIN 3810 Advanced R ea l Estate Pra ctice and Law ....................... ............ 3 F I N 3820 R ea l Est a t e Fin a n ce .......................................... .... . 3 FLN 4840 R ea l Estate A ppr a i sa l .... ............................................ 3 FlN 4850 Commerc i a l and I nvestment R ea l Estate .................... ........... 3 Approved E l ective* .... .... ............ ........ ............... ............ . 3 Total H o u rs R equired for R eal Estate Minor ................. ......... .............. 18

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 6 Approved E l ectives FIN 2250 Personal Money Management ......................................... 3 FIN 30 I 0 Financial M arke t s and Ins tituti o n s ...................... ................. 3 FIN 3300 Managerial Finance .......... ...... ........ . ............... 3 FIN 3420 Principle s of I nsurance ................... ............................ 3 FIN 3600 I nvestments ...... ........ . .................................. 3 ECO 4500 Bu siness and Economic Forecasting ....... ... ........................... 3 GENERAL BUSINESS MINOR The S chool of Bus iness offers the gen e ral bus iness minor for non-business major s. Students minoring in gen e ral business mus t take ECO 20 I 0 and ECO 2020. These hours may be part of the student's Gen eral Studies requirements. In addition t o the required 24 credit h ours b elow, students may take up to 6 additional credit hours within a specific business discipline for a total not t o exceed 30 credit hours w ithin the School of Busine s. If a student wi s hes t o e nroll in bus iness course beyond 30 hours, th e student must declare a major with the School of Busi ness. Prerequisite s credits may be appli e d to Ge neral S tud ies Se m ester Hours ECO 20 I 0 Principles of Economic Macro . . . ... ...................... 3 ECO 2020 Prin c iple s of Econom i cs Micro ......................................... 3 MTH 1 3 1 0 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences ................... 3 MTH 1 320 Ca l c ulu for the Management and Social Sciences . . . . . 3 R equire d Courses Se m es t e r H ours ACC 20 I 0 Prin cip l es of Accounting I . . . . . . . . 3 ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting U ............ . .... . ................. 3 CMS 20 I 0 Principles of information Sys t ems ................................ ....... 3 CMS 3300 Principles of Quantitative Management Systems .......................... 3 FiN 3300 Managerial Finance ...................................... ............ 3 MGT 22 1 0 Legal Environment of Bu s iness I ........ ........ ............. ....... 3 MGT 3000 Organizational Management .... ............... .................... 3 MKT 3000 Prin cip l es of Marketing .... . ................................... 3 Minimum Total H ours R e quired for General Busine ss Min or ( n o t to exceed 30 credit hours) ...... ...................... .......... ............ 24 M A AGEMENT MI OR The management minor is designed for non-bu s iness majors. It g ives them an opportunity to gain famil iarity with managerial concepts and skills that can enhance their performance in managing peopl e and organizations. Require d Courses Semes ter H ours MGT 3000 Organizational M a n agement ............................................ 3 MGT 3530 Human R eso ur ces Management ........................................ 3 MGT 3550 Manuf ac turin g and Service Management .............................. ... 3 MGT 3820 Int ernationa l Busines ............................... ......... ........ 3 MGT 4530 Organizational B e h av i or .................... .... ...................... 3 Approved Management Elective ..................................................... 3 Total H ou r s R eq u ired for Managem ent Minor ... .... ...... .................... 1 8 M ARKETING MINOR The marketing minor is designed for non-bu iness majors and provide them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of business and ufficient familiarity with marketing s kill s to work in a bus i nes environment. Require d Cours e s Se me ster H o urs MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing . . . . . . . . .... .... 3 MKT 3010 Marketin g Researc h ........... ...... . ......... ................ 3 MKT 2040 Managerial Communications . . . . . . . . ... 3 MKT 3310 Consumer B e h avio r ............. ...... . ........................ 3 MKT 4520 Seminar in Marketing Management ........ ........................ ... 3 Approved Electives .................................... . ..................... 3 Total H o urs R equired for Marketing Minor .... ..................................... 18

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64 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AFRICAN AMERICAN LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE The African American Leadership In s titute operates on the belief that all members of our society s hould have an equal opportunity to pur s ue their goal and aspirations. The institute provides a unique approach to the p articular problems and concerns of African Americans in the Denver metropolitan area with three underlying tenets of its philosophy: l. To identify, motivate, and train futur e community l eaders; 2. To acq uaint the se ind i viduals with the problem s and needs of the community while investigat ing alternative approaches and so lutions; and 3. To create an opport unit y for these individu als to join together and exchange ideas with c urrent leader s for the purpose of networking for national, state, and local commun ity improveme nt s Seminars cover topi cs that reflect current community issues, including regional bus ine ss and eco nom ics, local and state governme nt education, h ea lth care, human services, the arts and cu l tural affa irs. For more information contact the School of Bu s iness. l STITUTE FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND CREATIVITY The Institute for Entrepreneurship and Crea tivi ty ha introduced entrepre n eurial education into the region 's academic arena through weekend co ur ses for professional s and entrepre n e urial seminars and forums The purpose of the institute i s to discover, foster, a nd mold the visions of today's aspiring e ntr e preneurs. It provides degree -see king and non degree eeking s tud ents with opportunities to learn about entrepreneurship, to understand the entrep r e n eurial process to practice skills that lead to success ful entrepreneurship, and to enhance creativity and innovation. For more information contact the Schoo l of Business. SMALL BUSINESS INSTITUTE The Small Business Institute offers a practica l opportunity that supplements academic st udi es w ith real case studies. The Small Business Institute employs senior-leve l students, und er faculty s upervi sio n to provide bus ine ss counseling and technical assistance to small business clients in the community. For more information contact the School of Bu s ine ss.

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 6 I . The School of ArttJ and ScienceJ provide.J high quality liberal education de.Jigned to meet the educational needd of the arhan . . .

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66 SCHOOL OF L ETIERS, ART S & SCIENCES School of Letters Arts and Sciences The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences offers programs of study in humanitie and in social, natural, and mathematical science The programs prepare tudents for careers, graduate work, and lifelong l earning. The sc hool offers m ore than 30 m ajor and minor pr ograms throu gh 1 8 departments and the Institute for Wom e n s Studie and Services. The faculty t eac h the majority of the General Studies Program and h e l p prepare stude nt s to be teachers.ln additio n they arrange internships an d oth e r app lied ed u catio n a l ex perie n ce in state and l ocal age n c i es bu s iness indu stry and the m edia. Through centers and a special pr ogram, the sch ool advances e duc ational and soc i a l goa ls: The Fami l y Center provide a wide range of education, trainin g and res earch on policies r e lat e d to family issues The Center for Mathematics, Science and Environmenta l Education l ead s the effort to reform scie n ce and mathematics e du cation in Colorado. The cen t er contributes t o s ystem i c change i n edu cation by building coo p erative programs with other colleges and univer s ities public schoo l s, and the Colorado D epartment of Education. The center is the focal point for the Co l o r ado Alliance for f Science a sta t ewide alliance. The Colorado Alliance for Science a s tat ewide alliance of uni versitie s, offe r s assistance a nd s up port to stude nt s a nd t eac her s t o stre n g then the comm unity 's interest in scie n ce and math e matics. The Golda M e ir Center for Political L ea d e r hip is a nonparti sa n ed u cationa l proj ec t de sig ned to fost er greater public und e r standing of the role and meaning of l eade r s hip at all l eve l s of civic l ife, from commu nit y affairs to international r e l ation s The Health Career s Science Program offer s upport and guidance to women and people of color who are intere ted in career in s cience and t e chnology AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES DEPARTMENT Th e African American Studies Department offer s a range of co u rse s in African American stud i es that pr esent the dimension of the black experie n ce in thi country. These cour s e s encompass and afford a co mpr ehe n sive und erstanding of the Africa n h eritage They pre sent African links and potential ; co ntri bution s of black people in the growth and development of the United States; black c ultur e and lifesty l es; the black co mmunity ; political activity and pot ential ; religious development and importance; co mmu nity serv i ce and r eso ur ce assistance; and pro g nosis and potential for socia l cha n ge The cour es may ap ply in the General Studies requ irements and as ele c tive s for graduat ion Students are urged to co n s ult with the faculty in the Africa n American Studie s Department abo ut new co ur se s n ow being de s igned as well a s s pecia l offerings. The major in African American studies, whi ch l e ad s to a bachelor of art degree, and the minor pro gram must be plann ed in co n ultation with a n advi er in the African American Studies D epartment. Students d e iring s econdary licensure in ocial s tudie hould see the ection o n the t eac h er ed ucation pro gram. A fr ican A m erican Stu dies Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses Semester Hours AAS I 010 Introduction to Afric a n America n Studie s ................. .... ... ... ... 3 AAS 1130 Survey of African History (HIS 1 940 ) ....................... ......... . 3 AAS 2 000 Social Movements and the Black Experience ( SOC 2 000 ) ......... ... .. .. .. 3 AAS 3300 Th e Black Community ( SOC 3140) ....... . ................. ......... 3 AAS 3700 P s ychology of Raci s m and Group Prejudi c e ( PSY 3700 ) ...... .............. 3 AAS 4850 Re earch Seminar in African Ameri c an Studie s .......... .... . ....... 3 Select o n e from the following: MUS 2010 Topic s in Ethnic Mu sic: Variable TiUe ......................... .......... 3 ART 3040 African Art ................ .................... .... ...... ........ 3 AAS 3240 Afri c an Ameri can Literature (E G 32 40 ) .... .................... ... 3 Elective s .......... ................. ........ .... . .......... ........... I 8 T o tal ...... ... .... ................................ ............ . ..... .... 39 Electives E l ective h o ur s in African American studie s course s are s e l ected in con ult ation with the adv i s er.

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SCHOOl OF lETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 6 MIN OR I N AFRICAN A ME RICAN STUDI ES R e qui re d Cour es Se m es ter H ours AAS 10 I 0 Introduction to African American Studie s. . ... ............... 3 AAS 2000 Social Movement s and Black Experience ( SOC 2000) ........................ 3 Total ... .... ............................................................... 6 E l e ct ives A minimum of 15 additional emester hours is required in African American courses, 3 hours of which must be an African course se l ected in consu l tation with and approved by the African American s tudie s adviser assigned to the st udent. Total hour s for the min or are 21 Assess m e n t Test During the final se me s t e r students majoring in African American studie will be required to take a com prehen sive asses ment test. ART D E P ARTMENT The Art Department offers a full range of studio art courses in the areas of fine arts (drawing, painting, printmaki n g, p h otography v i deo and scu l pture) ; design (advertising design and computer graphics); and crafts (ceramics, metalwork jewelry making, and art furnit u re) leading to the bachelor of fine arts d egree; art h i story (stud i es emphasize contemporary, modem ancient, and non-Western art) l eading to the bachelor of fine arts degree; and I icen s ure in art education. Goal s Undergraduate studie in art and design prepare students to function in a variety of artistic roles. In order to achieve t hese goa l s, in tr ucti o n s h ould p r epare students to: read the nonverbal language of art and de s i gn develop response to v i sua l phenomena and o r ganize percep t ions and concept u a l izat i ons both rationally and intuitively become familiar with and develop competence in a number of art and design tech n iques become familiar with major achievements in the his tory of art, including the works and intentions of leading artists in the pa s t and pre ent and demonstrate the way art reflects cultural values evaluate developments in the history of art understand and evaluate contemporary thinking about art and de ign m ake valid assessments of q u ality in design projects and works of art Art Major for Bachelor of Fine Arts Co r e R equire m ents f o r All S tudio Art Majors Semes t e r H o urs ART 1100 B asic Drawing I .. ........ . ...................................... 3 ART 1110 Ba sic Drawing II ............................................. ....... 3 ART 1200 De s ign Proces ses and Concepts I ................. ........ . .......... 3 ART 1210 Design Proce sses and Concepts D ...... .................................. 3 ART 20 I 0 Survey of Modern Art: I mpressionism through Abstract Expressionism ........... 3 ART 2020 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Pre se nt. ........................... 3 T o tal ........................................................ .............. 1 8 Se ni o r Ex p e ri e n ce R eq u i r e m e n ts for Studi o Art Maj o r ART 4010 Modern Art H i tory: Theory and Criticism ................................. 3 ART 4750 Senior Experience Studio : Portfolio Development and Thesis S how ............. 3 Total .................................................................. . .... 6 Students choose one of the four areas of empha is: fine arts, design, crafts, or art his tory Fine Arts Emphas i s ................................ ..... ........................ 21 1 5 hour s in area of concentration in: drawing painting scu lpture printmaking or photography (within the 21 above) Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas: Design .... .... ........ ...... .......................... ............... 6 or 9 Crafts ......................................................... .......... 6 or 9 ART 2000 World Art Prior to 1880 ............................... ... ............ 3 Art Hi s tory (u pper -div i s ion ) ..... ........ ................................... ...... 3

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68 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Design Emphasis ... ......... .... ................... ........................... 2 1 15 hours in area of conce ntr ation in: a dverti s in g de sig n o r co mput er graphics (within the 21 above) Selec t a co mbin a t ion of 1 5 h o ur s from the foU owing two areas: Craf t s ........ ................. ...................................... ...... 6 or 9 Fine Art s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 o r 9 ART 2000 World Art Prior to 1 880 ....... ....... . ...... ...... .............. ... 3 Art History ( up per-div i s ion ) ............. ......................... ............. 3 Crafts Emphasis ... ............ . ............ ....................... .... 2 1 1 5 hour s in area of conce ntr ation in: ce rami cs, j ewelry, o r art furnitur e (w ithin the 21 above). Sel ect a co mbin ation of 1 5 hour s from the following two areas: D esig n ........ ..................................... ............ ......... 6 or 9 Fin e Art s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 or 9 ART 2000 World Art Pri or to 1 880 ...................................... .... ... 3 Art History ( up per-d i v i s ion ) ............... .... ..... ...... ... .................... 3 Tota l ....................................................... . . .......... 66 ( A minimum o f 33 up per-d i vision art hour s r e qu ired.) Minor requirement s for art majors are o ptional. Art History Major for Bachelor of Fine A rts Core Requirements for All Art Hi story Majors Semester Hours ART 1100 B asic Drawing I ....................................... ............ 3 ART 1110 B as i c Drawi n g U ............ ........... .......................... 3 ART 1 200 De s i g n Pro cesses and Conce pt s l ............. ..................... .... 3 ART 1 210 D es ign Pro cesses and Co n ce pt s U ........................................ 3 ART 2010 Survey of Modem Art: lmpre s ioni sm through Ab s tra c tExpr ess i onism ............ 3 ART 2020 Survey of Con t emporary Art: 1 960 t o the Pr ese nt. ..................... ...... 3 Tarat .................................................... . ...... .......... 1 8 Senior Experien ce Requirement for Art Histor y Majors ART 4010 Mod e m Art His t ory : Theory and Crit icis m ............. .................. 3 T ot al .... .......................................... . .... .... .......... 3 Art His tory (re quired ) .... ..................................... .............. 15 ART 2000 World Art Prio r to 1 880 ...... ........ ............. .... ............. 3 Fine Arts* ........................................ ......................... 3 or 6 Desig n .................................................................... 3 or 6 Crafts* ............. ................................... ....... ...... ... 3 or 6 Art E l ectives .... .... ..... .................. .......... ...... ........ 6 Total....................... ... .. ....... ..... ..................... 60 I 5 h o urs are r eq uir e d amo ng these three c at egories. ( A minimum of 27 upp e r divi s i on art hour s r e quir e d.) Minor r eq uir e ment s for art major s are optio nal. Industrial Design Major for Bachelor of Ar ts For a d vi in g in this program, please co nt ac t the office of the de an, School of Professional Studie s

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Art Licen s ure: K-1 2 Teacher lic e n s ur e for art major s i s available throu g h the Art D e p artme nt. An art m ajo r is required. R equired Courses Semester Hours ART 3380 Introdu c tion to Art Educ a tion ........................................... 4 EDS 3 110 Pr oces es of Education in Multicultural Urban Secondary Schools ............... 3 E DS 3 1 20 Field Experience i n Multicultural U rb a n Secondary School s .... . . .... 3 EDS 3200 The Ado l escent as a Learner ........................................... 3 EDS 32 1 0 Secondary School C urri c ulum and Clas s room Management ............. .... 3 EDS 3220 Field Experience in Tea c hing Material s Construction, and Classroom Management ... 3 SED 3600 Th e Exceptional Leamer in th e C l ass room ................................. 3 RDG 3280 Teaching of R eading and Writing in the Conten t Areas . ..... .... . . 4 ART 4380 Art Methods/Materials: K-12 ....................................... 4 EDU 4190* Student Teaching and Semin ar: Ele m entary (K-6) ........ ............ ....... 8 E DS 4290* Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary (6-12) ......................... 8 ART 4390 Int egra tin g the Art for Gift ed and Talented ................................ 3 Total .. .......................................................... ..... ... 48 *S tud e nt t eaching is co mpo sed of dail y full-time work during 15 weeks split 8 and 7 weeks between elementary and secondary levels. In ad dition to field experie n ces included in r eq uir ed coursework, stud e nt s must present evide n ce of hav in g completed at l east 200 hour s of work with c hildr e n This may be accomp lished through a variety of communi ty organizations a nd institutional activities. Students s hould plan their vo lunt eer wo rk in co n s ultation wi th the art ed uc atio n a d vi er. Stud e nt s who eek lice n s ur e mu s t p ass a public speaking course (SPE 1010 ) with a grade of B or bet ter, or obtain a waiver. Students must a l so ac h ieve sat i sfactory scores o n th e sta t e licens ur e exa mination. M inor in A r t Required Cour e s Semester Hours ART 1100 B asic D rawing I.. ..................... . ........ ........ ..... 3 ART 1110 Basic Drawing IT .......... .. ....................... ....... .......... 3 ART 1 200 D es i g n Proces ses and Concept s I . ....................... .... 3 ART 1210 Design Proces es and Concepts IT ........ . .... .................... 3 ART 2010 Swvey of Modern Art : Imp ression i s m t hr o u g h Abstrac t Expressionism ........... 3 ART 2020 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Pre se nt ............................ 3 S ubt o t a l ...................................................................... 18 Electives ................................................................. ... 9 Minimum of one upper division studio co ur e and one upper di v i sion an hi tory co urs e Total ....... .............. ................. ............................... 27 B IOLOGY D E P A RTMENT The Biolo gy D e partm e nt offe r s two majors, the b ac h elor of science in biology and the bachelor of arts in biolo gy. Whil e it is not necessary t o d ec lar e an e mph asis wi thin these major a st udent m ay c ho ose to emphasize botany medical technology microbiology, or zoo l ogy. Supportive co ur ses assoc i ated with par a m e di ca l tudi es and c rimin a li stic as well as genera l co ur ses for enrichme nt of the nonscience stud e nt's background, are offe r ed b y the department. Stud ents seek in g econdary licensure in science s h o uld ee an a d v i ser in th e teacher ed u cation program. A bio l ogy minor i offered to s tudent with r e lated m ajo r or a pecial inter es t in the field. Biolog y Major for Bac helor of S cien c e Required Courses Semester Hou r s B!O 1080 General Introduction to B io l ogy ......................................... 4 BIO 3600 General Gen etics .......................................... .... .... 4 Select two of the following: BIO 2100 General Botany ......... ................... ........................ 5 BIO 2200 General Zool ogy ........................................... .... 5 BIO 2400 General Microbiology............................... . ...... 4 Sele c t o n e of the following: BIO 3550 Urban Eco l ogy . . . . . . . . . . . .... 4 BIO 4540 Plant Ecology ................................. ........ .. ............ 4 BIO 4550 Animal Eco l ogy .................. ......... ...................... 4 Sub t ota l. .................. ...... .......... ................... ............ 21-22

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70 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Electives Biology courses elected from the 2000-, 3000-, and 4000-leve l series, and approved by faculty advis ers in the Biology Department mus t be compl e ted to bring the t otal of biology co u rses approved for the major t o 40 semes ter hours. At least 14 of t h ese elective emes t e r hours must be from the 3000and 4000l eve l co ur ses of the Bio l ogy D e partment. E l ectives ............... .................................................. 18-19 Total .................................................. . ................. 40 R e quired Non -biolo gy Courses One year of college ge n eral chemi stry, one sem ester of upperdivi sion organic chemistry, one semeste r of upper-division biochem i s try and one year of mathematic s tarting with MTH Ill 0, are requi ites for the bachelor of scie nce major in biology. Biolog y Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses Semester Hours BIO I 080 General Intr oduction to Biology ......................................... 4 BIO 3600 General Genetics ........................ .......................... 4 Select two of the following: BIO 2100 General Botany ........................ .......................... 5 BJO 2200 General Zoology ................................................... 5 BIO 2400 General Microbiolo gy ............................. .................. 4 Select one of the following: BIO 3550 Urban Eco l ogy ....... ............................ ................... 4 BIO 4540 Plant Eco l ogy .................... .............................. 4 BIO 4550 Animal Eco l ogy ......... .... ........................................ 4 Subtotal ........... .............. ................................ ... 21-22 E l ectives Biology cou rses selected from the 2000-, 3000-, and 4000-leve l series, and approved by faculty advis ers in the Bio l ogy Department, must be comp l e t ed to bring the total of biology courses appr oved for the m a jor to 40 semester hours. At lea st 14 of these elective semes ter hours must be from the 3000and 4000l eve l courses of the Biology Department. Electives ................................................................ 18-19 Total ........................................................................ 40 Required on-biolog y Courses One year of general chem i stry (equivalent to the pr e ent courses CHE 1100 and CHE 2 1 00). Bota n y Emphas i s Requirement s for e ither a bach e lor of arts o r a bachelor of sci e nce degree in bi o logy must be atisfied, and the 40 hours of biology courses mu t include 810 2100 and 810 4540, and 15 seme ter hours fro m the following botany electives:* Elective Courses Sem este r Hour s BIO 3140 Plant Phy iology ..................................................... 5 BIO 3150 Plant Hormones ......................... ......... .... ........ ...... 2 BIO 3160 Plant Anatomy and Morphology ..................................... 4 BIO 3180 Va c ular P lant Taxonomy .............................................. 4 BIO 4 1 20 Algo1ogy .................................................. ...... 4 BIO 4 1 60 Mycology ...................................................... 4 BIO 4850 Evolution .......................................................... 3 Subtotal ...................................................................... IS *B/0 301 0 and 810 3050 are both applicable t o the fields of botany microbio lo gy, and zoo l ogy and are recommended as additiona l e l ectives for a ll thr ee areas of emp h as is. Medical Technology Emphas i s Students must satisfy the requirements listed for the bachelor of sci e nce degree in biology, including 810 2400. Stude n ts must a l s o tak e 810 3350, BIO 4440, a nd 810 4450. Additional hours must be taken fro m the courses l isted below to complete th e 20 hours of upper-division cour es a nd a total of 40 semester credi t hours in biology. Elective Courses e mest e r Hours BIO 3210 His tology ................... ................................. 4 BIO 3270 Para sito logy ...... ....... .......................................... 4 BIO 3360 Animal Physiology .................................. ................ 4 BIO 4160 Mycology ....................................................... 4 Subtota l ... .... .............................................. .... .... ....... 16

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES INTE R SHIP Completion o f a m edical t e chno l o gy intern s hip at an a ppro ved sc h oo l of m e d ica l t ec hnol ogy. R equired on-b i o l ogy Courses Th e student mus t satis f y the r equire m e nt s lis t e d for n o n -bio l ogy co ur ses f or the b ache l o r of sci e n ce m a j or and comple t e the r e qu ire m ents for a m i n o r in c h em i stry. Microbiology Emphas i s Stud e nts mu s t sati fy the requir e m e n ts li s t ed for the b ac h e l o r of sc i e n ce m a j o r in biolo gy, includin g BIO 2400 Stud e nt s mu s t als o tak e 810 3350 BIO 4400 BIO 4450 and 810 44 7 0 Addition a l h o ur s fr o m the c our ses lis t e d below or a ppropri a t e omnibu s c our ses as se l ec t e d by the s tud e nt a nd a pproved b y the mi c robio l o g y f ac ult y mu s t be t ak en to co mpl e t e th e 2 0 hour s of upper divi s i o n e l ec tiv e co ur ses and a tot a l of 40 se m es t e r hour s in bio l ogy.* E l ect i ve Courses Seme ster Hours BIO 3270 P arasito l ogy .................................................. 4 BIO 412 0 A l gology ............ ............ ........... ...................... 4 BIO 4 1 60 M yco l ogy . . .... ........ ................ . .... ...... 4 BIO 4440 Vir o l ogy .......... ... ... ... ....... ................... ...... 3 *810 301 0 a nd 810 3050 are both app li cab l e to the .fie l ds of botany, microbio l ogy, and zoology and are recomme n ded as addi t iona l elec ti ves for a ll t hr ee areas of emp hasi s. R equire d o n -b i o l ogy Courses Th e s tud ent mu t satisfy the r equire m e nts list e d for n o n -bio l ogy co ur ses for the bac h e l o r of sc i e n ce m a j o r includin g one co u rse in bios t at i stics o r c alculu s and a co mput e r sc i e n ce co ur se to fulfill the require d o n e year of college m athe m atics ln addit i o n t h e student mus t comple t e C H E 3000, C HE 30 I 0, C H E 432 0 an d o n e year of college physi cs. Zoology Emphasis Student s mu s t satis f y th e r e quir e m e n ts f or th e b ac h e lor of sc i e n ce d egree in bio l ogy and mu s t includ e in the 40 se m es ter hour s o f bio l o gy c our ses 810 22 00 and BIO 4550 and 15 e m es t e r hour s fr o m th e foll o win g lis t of z oo lo gy e l ectives:* E l ective Cou r ses Seme ster Hours BIO 32 1 0 H i t o l ogy ....... .... . .... ....... .............. ............. 4 BIO 3220 Comparative V e rt e brat e Ana t o my ........ ............................... 5 BIO 3250 Arthro pod Z oo l ogy ......... ...................................... 4 BIO 3270 P arasito l ogy .......... .............................................. 4 BIO 3340 Endocr i n o l ogy ........................................... . . 3 BIO 3360 Animal Physi o l ogy ......................................... . .... 4 BIO 4 250 Ento m o l ogy ......... ....... ....... . . . .... ......... 4 BIO 4270 H erpe t o l ogy ....................... ........ .... .................. 3 BIO 4 280 Ornith o l ogy .... ..... ..................................... ....... 4 BIO 4290 M amma l ogy . ............. .... ............................... ... 3 BIO 4 8 1 0 V e rt e b rate E mbryo l ogy ........................................ .... 4 Sub t o t a l .......................................................... . ...... 1 5 81 0 3010 and 81 0 3050 a r e both appl i cab l e to t h e .fields ofborany, microbiology, and zoology and are recomme nded as additiona l e l ectives for a// three areas of emphas i s. Minor in Biolog y R equire d Courses Semes ter Hours BIO 1 080 G e n era1l n tr odu ctio n t o Biolo gy ................... .............. ....... 4 Sel ec t t w o o f the followi ng: BIO 2100 G e n e r a l Botan y .... . ............. . .... ................. 5 BlO 2200 G e n e r a l Zoo l ogy .... .............. . ....................... ..... 5 BIO 2 4 00 Ge n era l Microbio l ogy .......................................... .... 4 BIO 2310,2320 Huma n Ana t o my and Human Physi o l ogy I and II...... ............ .... 8 Se l ec t o n e of the following : BIO 3550 Ur b an Eco l ogy ............................... .... . ............... 4 BIO 3600 Ge n eral Ge n e tics .... .......................................... 4 BIO 4540 Plant Eco l ogy ................... ................... . ......... 4 BIO 4 5 50 Animal Eco l ogy ......................... ........................ 4 S u bto t a l ...... ..... . ............. ..................... ........ 1 7-21

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72 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES E l ectives Biolo gy courses from the 2000, 3000-, and 4000-level eries, a pprov ed by the Biology Department must be completed to bring the total of biology courses approved for the minor to 24 se m ester hours. Total. . . . . . . . . . . . ......... 24 SE lOR EXPERIEN CE FOR BIOLOGY MAJORS A student majoring in biology may fulfill the Senior Experience requir eme nt with any course approved for the purpose by the General Studies Committee. Any biology cour e approved by the Gen era l S tud ies Committee and the Biology D epartmen t for Senior Experience credi t may be co unted toward the Senior Experience requirement, or toward a biology major/biology minor but not both. CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT The Chemistry D epar tm ent i s approved by the American Chemical Society and offers several degree programs: the bach elor of sc ience in chem i s try ; bachelor of sc ienc e in c hemi stry occupational health and safety area of emphasis; bach elor of science in chemistry c rimin alistics area of emphasis; and the bachelor of arts in chemistry Minor in chemistry and criminalis tic s are also availab l e Students who plan to pur ue a career in chemistry after graduation or plan t o attend graduate school in chemistry sho uld choo e the bachelor of sc ience in chemistry program. The bachelor of arts in chemistry program i s designed for student who plan a career in a field related to chemis try but who do not intend to attend graduate sc hool in chemistry. The bachelor of arts option, which requires fewer hours, may be espec i ally attractive to those wishi n g a second major or to those st udent s de siring seco ndary ed u cation licensure. Criminalistics is the scientific investigation, identification, and comparison of phy sica l evidence for crimi nal or civil court pro ceedings Criminalis t s mu t be trained in many disciplines including c hem istry, biology l aw e nfor ce ment physics, and mathematics. The four-year criminalis tic s curricul um l eads to a bachelor of sc i e nce de gree and inc lud es a half time internship in a crimi n alistics laboratory during the senior year Students in the crimin alistic program are encouraged to complete all the requirements for a degree in chemistry approved by the American Chemical Society while completing the criminalis tic s degree program Graduates of the program are prepared for emp loyment in criminal istics and ha ve completed the r eq uir ements for admi sion to graduate chool in c hemi try or crimina l istics, medical sc hool dental school, or law sc ho ol. Students electing the chemis try major with the occupational health and safety emp ha sis will be trai n ed in the recognition, evaluatio n and control of hazards in the workp l ace. This area of emphasis includes cou r ses equivalent to those required for the bachelor of arts major in chemistry, as well as suppo rting science and mathematics co ur ses and courses in instrumental analysi toxicology safety, and occ upa tional health and safety. A mandatory internship during the junior or senior year provides valuable prac tical experience. Graduates of thi s program are pr epared for immediate emp l oyment in the field of occu pational health and safety or the field of chemistry. Graduates in this emphasis a r ea a l so meet the requirements for admissions to medical schoo l dental schoo l veterinary c hool or graduate schoo l in industrial hygiene or chemis try For further information about the occupational health and safety or criminalistics program tudents s hould contact the Chemistry D epartment. Students seeking econdary education lic ensure in scie nce s hould see an adviser in the teacher education program for requirements. The following courses constitute the basic co r e and are required in all chemistry degree program s except for the minor in c h em i stry. Basic Core Semes ter Hours CHE 1 800 General C h emistry I .................................................. 4 CHE 1810 General C h emistry II . . ........... ........... ............. 4 CHE 1850 General Chem i s try Laboratory ......................................... 2 CHE 3000 Analytical C hemi stry ...... ........................................... 3 CHE 3010 Analytical Chemistry Labora tor y ............... ............ ... ........ 2 CHE 3100 Organic C h emistry l .... ............................................. 4 CHE 3110 Organic Chemistry ll .................... ................ . ......... 3 CHE 3120 Organi c Chemi try I Laboratory ................................ ...... 2 CHE 3!30 Organic Chemistry ll Laboratory ............................ ............ 2 T ota l ................................................ ...... ............... 26

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Science R equired Courses Semester H ours B as i c Core ........................................... .... I ....... ...... 26 Additional Requir ed C h emistry Co ur ses : CHE 3250 Physical C h emi try I. .................. ... .... 4 CHE 3260 Physica l C h e m istry ll ....... ................... 4 C H E 3280 Ph ysica l C h emistry l Labo r a t ory ................... ...................... 2 C H E 3290 Phys i ca l C h emis try U Lab ora t ory . ...................... .... 2 S ubt o t a l .......................................... ......... .... .............. 12 E l ectives A minimum of I 0 semes t er hour s in chemi s try co ur ses se l ec t ed in co n s ult ation with and a pprov ed by the Chemi stry D epartment i s required. . . . . . . . ............ I 0 T o tal H o ur s R eq u ired ...................................................... ...... 48 Required A n cillary Courses for Bachelor of Science MTH 1410 Calculus I.............. . . ... . ....................... 4 MTH 2410 Calcul u s n...................... . ......... . .. ..... 4 MT H 2420 Calculus Ill. . ...... .............................................. 4 PHY 2311 General Physics l -and PHY 233 1 General Physics U -or PHY 2010 College Physics I -and PHY 2020 College Phys i cs ll ... .................... ................... 8 Subtotal ........... .... ................................. ........... ......... 20 American C h e mi cal Society Approval To meet A m e rican C h emica l Society de g ree criteria the following courses mu s t be co mpl eted: C H E 2300 Inorganic C h emistry. . ............. ......... ..... 3 CHE 3400 Chemical Lit e r ature Search. . . . . . .. I CHE 4100 In trumental Analysis .................... ......... ......... ........... 3 CHE 4110 I n s trumental Analysi Lab ...... ....... ............................. 2 C H E 4300 Advanced Ino r ganic Chemistry ........................ ..... ... .......... 3 S u b t ota l ... ............................................................... 1 2 E l ectives An add it ional 6 credi t hours of advanced l eve l e l ectives are r eq uir e d Electives s h o uld be se l ec t ed in co n s ult ation with the C h emistry Department. The followin g courses m ay be app r o pri a t e: C H E 4010. CHE 4020. and C H E 4320.... ................................. 6 T o tal . .... ....... ....... .......................................... ...... 56 Occupational Health and Safety Emphas i s Please co n s ult w ith the Chemistry D e p a rtment r egarding the ava ilabilit y thi s e mph asis and these co ur ses. Student s e l ec tin g thi s pro g ram of s tud y must comp l ete the b as i c c hemi stry core (26 hour s) in a ddition to th e followi n g r eq u ired co ur ses. Th e r eq uir e ment of a minor i s waived for s tudents in thi s pro g ram R equired Courses Se me ster H ours B asic Co r e .............................................. ..................... 26 Additional Required Chemistry Courses: CHE 3 1 90 Survey of Physica l C h emi t ry. . ..................... 4 C H E 3200 Survey of Physical Chemistry Laboratory .......................... ....... 2 C H E 4 1 00 Ins trum e ntal Ana l ysis. ........... 3 C H E 4110 Inst rum enta l Analysis Laboratory. . . ..................... 2 C H E 4310 Biochemistry I............... .............. ......... . 4 CHE 4350 Biochemis tr y Laboratory . ............... R equi r ed Occupational Health and Safety Courses : C H E 2500 Intr od u ctio n t o Occupational H ealth and Safe t y . . . . . . 3 C H E 3500 Occupationa l Safety . . . . . . . . . ..... 3 C H E 4 1 50 Ins trum entatio n and Ana l ys i s in the Occupational Environment ............ ... 4 C H E 4200 Eva l uation and Co ntr o l of Air Qu a lity . . . ................. 3 C H E 4250 P rincip l es of Occupational Health and Safety ...... ............... ........ 3 C H E 4500 Occupational Toxicology . . . . ............ .... ..... 3 C H E 4 750 Occupationa l H ealth and Safety Internship. . ......... .............. 8

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74 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Required Ancillary Cou r ses: B!O 1080 General Introduction to Biology ......................................... 4 B!O 2320 Human Anatomy and Physiology ll .............. .................... 4 BIO 2400 General Microbiology ................. ............................... 4 MTH 1 2 1 0 In troduct ion t o Statistic s .... ........... ..................... .... ..... 3 MTH 1410 Calculus ...... .............. .................. ........ 4 PHY 2010 College Physic s I ................................................... 4 PHY 2030 College Physic s I Laboratory ......................................... 1 Subtotal ...................................................................... 93 Electives The fo llo wing courses are r ecommended as e l ectives: SPE 1010 Fundamentals of Speech Co mmuni cation ........................... ... 3 COM 2610 Introduction t o Technical Writing .............. .... ... .................. 3 ECO 2010 Pri nciples of Economics-Macro ...................................... 3 MGT 4610 Labor/Emp l oy ee Relation ... ......................................... 3 Criminalistics Emphasis Students e l ecti n g this program of study must complete the basic chemi try core (26 hour s) in add ition to the following required co ur ses. The require m e nt of a minor is waived for stude nt s in this program. Required Courses Semester Hours Ba sic Core .................................................. ................. 26 Additional Required Chemistry Courses: CHE 3190 Survey of Phy s ical Chemi try ........................................... 4 CHE 3200 Survey of Physical Chemistry Laboratory .................................. I CHE 4100 Instrumental Analysis .................. ... ........ ................... 3 CHE 4110 Instrumental Anal ysis Laboratory .. ...................................... 2 CHE 4310 Biochemi stry 1 ...................................................... 4 CHE 4350 Bioch e mistry Laboratory ............. ............................... I Required Crimin alistics Courses : CHE 3700 Criminalistics I. ............................................ ......... 4 CHE 3710 Criminali s tic s [] ..................................................... 4 CHE 4700 Criminalistics !Internship ...................... .................. ..... 7 CHE 4710 Criminalistic ll Internship ............................................. 7 Required Criminal Ju tice Courses: CJC 1010 Introduction to the Crimina l Ju stice System ................................ 3 CJC 2 1 00 Sub s tantive Criminal Law .............................................. 3 CJC 2 1 20 Evidence and Courtroom Procedure s ....... .... .... ................ .. .. 3 C J C 3 1 20 Co n s titutiona l Law ........................... ..................... 3 Require d Ancillary Courses: B !0 1080 GeneraJ Introduction to Biology .................................... 4 BIO 2400 General Microbiology ...................................... ........... 4 BIO 3600 Genera] Genetics .................... .......... ...................... 4 MTH 1 210 MTH 1 410 PHY 2010 PHY 2030 -{)r Introduction to Statistic s .......................................... 4 Calculu I ................................ .......................... 4 College Physics I and College Physic s I Laboratory PHY 2311 General Physics I and PHY 2321 General Phy sics I Laboratory ........................................... 5 Total ............................... ...... .................................. 99 Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses Semeste r Hours Ba sic C h emistry Core ............................................................ 26 Additional R equired Chem i try Courses: CHE 3190 Survey of Physical Chemistry ......................................... 4 CHE 3200 Survey of Phy sica l Chemistry Laboratory .................................. I E l ectives A minimum of 6 seme ter h ours in chemistry co ur ses se lected in con ultation with and approved by the Chemistry Department is required. -Subtotal ...... ............. ...................... ............... .... ........ 6

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SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Requir e d A ncillar y Courses MTH 1410 Calculus I ......................................................... 4 PHY 20 I 0 College Physics I .............. .................................... 4 T o tal Ancillary Courses R equ ir ed ............... ....... ...... ................ 8 Total ............................ ........................... ............. .... 45 Minor in Chemistry Students co mpl eting the basic c hemi try core (26 hour s) qualify for a minor in chemistry Students may e lect to s ubstitute 5 emester hour s in other upper -divisio n chemistry courses for CHE 3110 and CHE 3 1 30 Co r e Semeste r Hours CHE 1800 General Chemistry I. . . . . .. . .. ................. ... 4 CHE 1810 General Chemistry U ................... ........... ................... 4 CHE 1 850 General Chemistry Laboratory .................. ............... ..... 2 CHE 3000 Analytical Chemi try ......................... ...................... 3 CHE 3010 Analytica l Chemistry Laboratory ..... ......... ....................... 2 CHE 3100 Organic Chemistry I. .............. ................. .............. 4 CHE 311 0 Organic Chemistry Il ................................................. 3 CHE 3120 Or gan ic Chemistry I Laboratory ..................................... 2 CHE 3130 Organic Chemistry Il Laboratory ........................ ............... 2 Toral.... .... .................. .... .......................... 26 Minor in Criminalistics R equired Cour es Se m ester Hours CHE 1100 Principles of Chemistry ........................ ................... 5 CHE 2700 Introduction to Criminalistic ........................................... 4 CHE 2750 Arson and Explo ives ........................ ............... . .... 3 CHE 2760 Field Testing and Laboratory Analy sis of Drugs ........... ..... .......... I CHE 3600 Crime Scene Investigation I ............................................ 4 CHE 3610 Crime Scene Inve tigation Il ................................... ....... 4 CJC 2120 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures ..................................... 3 T ota l ..................................................................... 24 CHICANO STU D IES D E P A R TME T The Chicano Studie s Department offers a bachelor of arts degree in Chicano studie The Chicano and other Hispanic his torical experiences are u sed as points of departure t oward expanding awareness of the multicultura l world and the contrib ution s of Chicanos. The program i de igned to as s ist in the prepa r ation of scho lar s as well as human service providers. Chicano Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts The requirements include core co ur e in the major, basic knowledge of the Spanish lan guage, plus app ro ved elective R equ ired Courses Semester Hours CHS 1 000 Introduction to Chicano Studies ......................................... 3 CHS 1010 His tory of Meso-America: Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods (HlS 1910 ) .... 3 CHS 1 020 History of the Chicano in the Southwest: 1810 to Present (HJS 1920 ) ............. 3 CHS 20 I 0 Survey of Chicano Literature (ENG 241 0 ) ................................. 3 CHS 3100 The Chicano Community (SOC 3130) ........ .......................... 3 CHS 4 50 Re earch Experience in Chicano Studies ................... .............. 3 Subtota l ..................................................................... 18 Language Requirements SPA 1010 Elementary Spani s h I ...... ....................................... 5 SPA 1020 Elementary Spanish Il ............................................ 5 SPA 2110 Intermediate Spanish -{)r-SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conversation.............. ................ 3 Subtotal . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 13 Approved E l ectives ............................................................... 9 Total .......... ................... ............................................ 40 A minimum of 9 se mester hours of electives in Chicano studies selec t ed in consultation with the depart ment chair is required.

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76 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Minor in C hicano Stu die s The minor can be designed t o provid e the student with course experiences that are relevant to occupa tional and edu cat i onal goals. Student s, in co n sultation with a faculty adviser in Chicano studies, will develop individual min ors that reflect the b est possible e l ec t ive curricula and ensure that a relevant emphasis is maintained Total h our for the minor are 21. Required Courses emester Hours CHS 1000 Introduction to Chicano St udi es ............. ........................ ... 3 CHS I 010 History of Meso-Am erica: Pre-Columbian and Co l onial Periods .......... ....... 3 CHS I 020 Hi s tory of the Chicano in the Southw est: Mexican and United Stat es Periods ....... 3 CHS 2 010 Survey of Chicano Literature ........................................... 3 Toral ...................................... ................................... 1 2 E lecti ves A minimum of 9 se me ste r hour s of elec tive s i s required to complete the minor. The courses are to be se lected in consultation with a Chicano s tudie s faculty adviser. Assessment Test During the final semester, s tud ents majoring in Chicano st udi es will be required to tak e a comp rehen sive assessment test. EARTH AND ATMOSPHERI C SCIENCES D EPARTMENT The Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department is compo e d of three separate disciplines: geography, geology, and meteorology. The department offer s a bachelor of a rt s or bachelor of scie nce degree in l and u se and a bachelor of sc ience degree in meteoro l ogy. The bachelor of science degre e i s recommended for those s tudent s de s iring a stro n ge r background in the phy s ical and quantitative aspects of the environment. Minor program s are availab l e in geography, geo l ogy and meteorology. Student s working toward teacher licen ure in either science or social st udie s may tak e courses in geo l ogy geogra phy, or met eo rolo gy Stu dent s i nt erested in environme ntal science or earth space scie nc e may deve l op an Individuali zed Degree Program major through Adult Learning Services. Land Use The land use major is very broad in scope and can be u se d for a num ber of caree r objectives and grad uate chool programs Opportunitie s exist in s u ch areas as planning cartograp hy, geographic informa tion systems ( GIS), air photo and satellite imagery interpretatio n e nvironmental and resource manage ment trave l a nd transportatio n mining an d mineral resources, r esident ial and industrial d eve l opment, recreational land u se, populat i o n analysis, and a variety of other interrelated fields. This program pro vides a solid foundation for continued s tudy a t the graduate level. Land Use Major for Bachelor of Science Required Core Semester Hours MTH 1210 Introduction to Statistics ............................. ................. 4 GEG 1220 Map Use ......... ................................... ............ 2 Choose one from each of the following sets: GEG 1000 World Regional Geography GEG 1300 Introduction to Human Geography ...... ................................ 3 GEG 1100 Introduction to Phy s ical Geography GEG 1010 General Geo l ogy .................................................... 4 GEG 2250 Introdu ctio n to Geographic lnforn1ati on Systems GEG 3210 Introduction to Cartography .......................................... 4 GEG 3610 Principle s of Land Use GEL 4010 Environmenta l Hazards and Planning .................................... 3 GEG 4950 Internship in Geo grap h y GEL 4950 Intern s hip in Geology ............................................. 2 Se nior Experience GEG 4960 Global Environmental Challenges GEL 4960 Environmenta l Field Studies ............................................ 3 Core T o t al ............................................. ...... .............. 23-25 Area of Emphasis Toea/. ..... ................ .......................... ... 19-21 Land Use Major Toral ........... ........................................... 42-46

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SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Required A rea s of Em pha s i s for th e Land Use Major ln addition to the r eq uir ed l and u se core eac h student must comple t e one of the areas of emp h asis listed below. Within the area of em ph asis, students must complete a set of required course plus electives. Electives are c ho sen in consultation with a departmental adviser a nd are designed to provide an inte grated and well-p l anned pattern of courses r e lat ed to the s tudent' s educational and career goals. rban Land Use E mpha sis Semester Hours GEG 3360 Geography of Economic Activity . . . . . . .... .... 3 GEG 3600 Urba n Geog raphy ................................................... 3 GEG 4610 U rban and Regional Planning ........................................ 3 URS 4500 Cities of the Future ............................ ....... ................ 3 Urban Land Use Electives* ................ ................................... 7 Subtotal ......... ........ ........... . .................................. 1 9 *Choose a minimum of7 semester h o ur s of e l ec ti ve credi t in cons ultation with a departmental adviser. Geographic Information Systems E mpha sis GEG 2250 Introduction to GIS -<>r-Se m ester Hours GEG 3210 Canography ........... . .... .......... .... ..................... 4 (whichever course was not t aken as pan of the core) GEG 3220 Intermediate Canography ............................................. 3 GEG 3250 Computer Canography ...................................... . ...... 3 GEG 4850 Advanced Geographic Inf ormation Systems ........... ......... ......... 3 CS1 1010 lntroduction t o Computer Science ........................................ 3 Geographic Inform ation System s Electives ................................ ......... 6 Subtotal .................................................................... 21 *C h oose a minimum of 6 semes t er h o ur s of elective credit in cons ultati o n with a departmental adviser. Environment and Re so urce s Emphasis Se me s t e r Hours GEG 1200 lntroduction to Environmental Science ................................... 3 GEG 1 400 World R e o urces .............. ...... ........................... 3 GEG 4840 Remote Sensing ............. ............. ....... ............... .. 3 ECO 3450 Environmental Economics ........................ ........ ......... 3 Environment and Resources Electives ....... ...... .................. ...... ....... 7 Subtotal .................... .... ......... .............................. 19 *C h oose a minimum of7 h ou r s of elective credi t in consu ltati on with a departmental adviser. Geology Emphas i s Se mester Hours GEL 3120 Advanced Geomorphology. . . . ................... 4 GEL 3420 Soil Resources .................... ....... ....................... 4 GEL 3440 Energy and Mineral R eso urces ............................. ....... 4 GEL 4000 Environmental Geolog y ................ ......... ...................... 3 Geology E l ectives*. . . . . . . . . . . ............... 5 Subtotal ................... ................................. ............... 20 Note: students selecting this area of emphasis w ill be r eq uired to minor in geology *Choose a minimum of 5 se m este r hours of elec tive credit, in consu ltation with a departmental adviser. Required Minor Except for the geology area of emphasis the field of study e l ec ted a a minor i s at the option of the student. Land Use Major for Bachelor of Arts To fulfill the requir ement for the bachelor of c ien ce with a major in land use a student must comp lete the requirements as Jjsted above und er the bachelor of arts; however the studen t must minor in o n e of the sciences, or sc i e n ce-oriente d fields as approved by the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department. Minor in Geolog y R eq uired Co r e Se mester Hours GEL 1 010 General Geology ........ ................... ....................... 4 Any IOOO-leve1 GEL Co urse. . . . . . . . . . . ... ...... 3-4 GEL 2010 Rocks and Minerals ............. ......... ........................... 4 GEL 2020 The Stratigraphy and Structure of the Eanh . . . . . ...... 4 Any 3000or 4000-leve1 GEL Courses....................................... . ... 8 T o tal .......................................... . ........ ...... . ..... 23-24

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78 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Minor in Geography Required Courses Semester Hours GEG 1120 Orienteering ................ ...................................... I GEG 1220 Map Use .......................................................... 2 GEG 1 3 00 Introduction to Human Geography ............................. ....... 3 GEG 1230 Weather and Climate -{)r MTR 1 400 Intr oductio n to M eteorology ...................... ..................... 3 Sub t o t a l ... ............... ........................................... .... .... 9 Structured Electives A minimum of 13 additio nal hou rs must be se l ec t ed in cons ult atio n with a department advi er. At lea s t one co u rse mu s t be se l ecte d from each of the follo wing gro up s to sa tisfy this req uirem e nt. Physica l GEG LLOO GEG 1240 GEL 1010 Intr od u c tion to Ph ysica l Geog r aphy .......... .... ....................... 3 Landfom1s of the United States ........................................ 3 General Geology ......................... ......................... 4 Resources and Environment GEG 1200 Introdu ctio n to Environmenta l Sci e n ce ................................... 3 GEG 1400 World R eso ur ces ............................... .... ............. 3 GEG 3 400 W a t e r R eso ur ces ........................................ ............. 3 GEL 3420 Soil R eso ur ces ...... .......................... .... .............. 4 GEL 344 0 Energy and Min e ral R eso ur ces ........ ...... ........................ 4 patial Analysis and Planning GEG 3600 U rb an Geography ....................... ......................... 3 GEG 3610 Prin ciples of Land Use ............................................... 3 GEG 3620 P o pul atio n R eso ur ces and L and Use ................................. 3 GEG 363 0 Tran s p o rt ation Plannin g a nd Land U se ....... ....................... ..... 3 GEG 4620 Land Use: R eside nti a l. ............................................ 3 rban tudies Regional Geography GEG 1000 Worl d R egio n a l Geography ........................................... 3 GEG 2020 Geography of Col orado ............................................ 3 GEG 2 1 00 Geogra ph y of Latin America ........................... ................ 2 GEG 2200 Geography of the United Sta t es .......................................... 3 GEG 3000 Hi t orica l Geography of the Unite d State s ................................. 3 F i eld s tudy in e ither geog raphy or geology ......................................... .... I Subtotal . . . . . . . . ........ ..... ............. 13 T o t a l ............................................... ... .............. .... .... 22 Meteorology M e t e orology i s the cience of the a tmo sphe r e Modem meteo r ologists are involved in weather observ ing, foreca s ting re earch, and disse mination of weather infonnation to the public. Meteorologi s t s a lso st udy global weather and clima t e, and investigate the influence that human beings exert on Earth's c li mate. The forecasting laboratory include s a co mput erize d observin g s tation dai l y w e ather maps, sa tel lit e images, and access to the n a tional weather databa e. The bach e l or of sc ience degree in meteorology follows American Meteorological Soci ety recomm e ndation s for und e r g raduat e programs. Student s should contact a m e teorology faculty member to disc u s degr ee program c ar ee r opportunities, and graduate s chool option s

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Meteorology Major for Bachelor of Science Required Course Semes t e r Hours MTR 1400 Intr oduction to Met eorology ............................................ 3 MTR 1420 Introdu ction to M e teorolo gy Lab ........................................ I MTR 2410 M e t eorological Ins trumentation .................... ................... 3 MTR 3400 Synoptic Meteoro l ogy I ... .......... ..................... ....... 4 MTR 3 410 Synoptic M eteorology II. .......................... .................. 4 MTR 3 430 Dyn amic Meteorology I ................ .............. ......... ....... 3 MTR 3440 Physical Meteorology ............... ........ ........ ........ ...... 3 MTR 3 450 Dynamic Meteoro l ogy II .......... ........ ........ ........ ....... 3 MTR 4410 Numerical Weather Pr ediction ................. ........ .......... ..... 3 MTR 4420 lndu trial M e teorology ............. ........... ... ....... ...... 3 MTR 4440 C lim ato l ogy ...... ......... .......... ...... . ........ ....... 3 Elective Met eorology Courses ....................................................... 7 Subt o tal ................................... ................. ................ 40 Additional Course Requirements* ENG I 010 Fre s hman Composition: Th e Essay ....................................... 3 ENG I 020 Freshman Compo s ition: Analysis Research, and Docum e ntation ................ 3 MTH 1210 Introdu ction to Stati s tic s ........... .................................. 4 MTH 1410 Calculu s I. ........................ ........ ................. ..... 4 MTH 1510 Computer Programming: FORTRA ................... .......... .... 4 MTH 2410 Calculus IT .......... .............. ...... .... ............ ... 4 PHY 2311 2321 General Physic s I and Lab ........................... .............. 5 PHY 2331,2341 General Physics ll and Lab .................. ............ .... ... 5 CHE 1800 Gener a l Chemistry I ........... ....... .... ......................... 4 Level I Communication s ................... .................................. 3 Level n Arts and Leners ..... .............. .... .................................... 6 Level II Historical. ............. ........................... .......... .... . 3 Level J! Social Sci e n ce . .......................... ..................... ... 6 Subt o tal ...................................................................... 54 An Approved Minor ............................................................. 20 Approved E l ectives ... ...... ...... .......... .............. ......... .......... 1 2 T o tal ........................ ....... ........ ..... ........... .......... 1 26 *S tudent s mu s t co nsult a faculry advi se r regarding Gen e ral S tudies r e quir e m e m s Minor in Meteorology Require d Courses Se me ste r Hours MTR 1400 Introdu ctio n to Met eorology ..... .......... .... ....... ............. 3 MTR 1420 Introdu ction to Meteorology Lab ............... .... ......... ........ I MTR 3400 Synoptic Meteoro l ogy I ........................................ ... .... 4 MTR 3410 Synoptic Meteorology ............................. .......... ....... 4 Approved Electives ......................... ................... ............. ... 8 Total .... .......... .... .... ............ ................................... 20 ENGLISH DEPARTMENT The Engli h Department offers instruction in literature, writing, lan guage and linguistics and in ele ment ary and econdary English education. Courses in each area appeal to tudents in every school of the college who wis h to read and und erstand representative literatures of the wor ld; to examine the prin ciples und erlying how language works; and to cultivate their wr itin g skill The department invites st udent s in other disc iplines to se lect English courses to enhance their genera l ed u cation. Student s may a l so choose an English major or minor from areas lis ted below. Students who are co n s i dering a major or minor in the English Department are expected to co n sult with faculty for advising Stud e nts in elementary or seco ndary licen ure program s s hould consult with advis ers in the appropriate education department a s well.

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80 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Th e English m a jor m ay c h oose an emp h as i s in o n e of the following: lit era tur e writing e l e m e ntar y sc hool t eac hin g, l eadi n g to l i ce n s ur e secondary sc hool t eac hin g, l ea din g to lic e n s ur e Th e En glis h minor m ay c hoo se an e mpha s i in one of the followin g : l a n g uage and lin guist i cs lit e r at ur e writing The Englis h D e partm e nt asse ses the major in d es i g n a t e d Senior Experience course Portfolios of pap e r s a ss i g ned throu g h the se co ur ses will b e r ead b y m e mb e r s of the fac ulty S enior E x perience courses s hould not b e taken until the stude nt' final yea r of s tudy. B eca u se th ese cour es m ay not be offered eve r y se m es t e r s tudent s s hould discuss sc h edu lin g with English D e p a rtment a dvi se rs. Further information is ava il able in the En glis h D epar tm en t office. English Major for Bachelor of Arts Literature Emphasis The En glis h major lit e ratur e e mph asis, e n co mpa sse a ran ge of Am erica n British, and world litera ture. The pro g ram provid es a s tr o n g foundati o n of co ur ses in literature and l a n guage, se qu e nced to c ultivate a se n se of lit e rar y d eve lopm e nt and fosters an increasing familiarity wit h major work s and writers, c ritica l theory, liter ary t e rmin o l ogy, and research m a t eria ls. B eca u se of th ei r co mmand of the written l an g uage, their a bilit y to deal w ith ideas and co n ce pt s as well as fac ts, and th e ir broad e r under stan ding of human n a tur e and socia l realities, l i t era tur e major s are value d in many fields includin g academe, th e l aw, and the world of bu iness Required Courses Semester Hours ENG 2 1 00 Introdu ctio n t o Lite r ary Stud i es . ... .................. 3 ENG 3100 Studies in C hau ce r Shakespeare and Milton ................................ 3 ENG 3440 Myth S y mb o l an d A llu sio n ln Lit erat ure ................... ......... ... 3 ENG 4610 L i t erary C riti c i s m ( Senior Exp erie n ce course) .............. .... .... ... 3 S u btotal ............................................................ ......... 1 2 Four of these courses, one of whic h mus t be ENG 2220: ENG 2110 W orld Lit erat ure: B eginnings t o 1 600 ....................... .... ........ 3 ENG 2 1 20 W o rld Literature: 17th Ce ntur y t o Pre ent ................ ....... ........ 3 ENG 2210 American Literature: B eg innin gs thr o u g h C i vil W a r .......................... 3 ENG 2220 American Lit e r a ture: C i vil War to Pr esent . ......................... 3 ENG 2310 Briti s h Lit e r a ture: B egitmings t o 1 785 ........................... ..... .... 3 ENG 2330 Briti h Literature: 1785 to Pr esent . . . ......... ..... .......... 3 Subto t al ............................................. ........................ 1 2 One of these co ur ses: ENG 20 I 0 Th e a ture of Lan g u age ....... .... .................................... 3 ENG 2020 S y t erns of E n glis h Gra mm ar ........... .... ............... ........... 3 ENG 3 020 His tor y of the English Language ..... .... ........................... 3 ENG 3 0 30 Semantics . . ................................ ........... 3 S ubt o tal ....................................................................... 3 E l ectives: ln additio n 1 8 h o ur s of Engljsh co ur ses a t lea st 1 5 of w h k h mus t be upper di v i s ion: f o ur upper-di vis i o n lit era tur e co ur ses tha t include a t l east one deve l o pm e nt o n e period, a nd o n e m ajor a uth ors co ur se; one E nglish upper-division writin g co ur se; a n d two E n glis h e l ectives. Sub t o t al . . . . . . ............................. ........... 1 8 T o t al ..................... ......................... ......... . ...... .... 45 Elementary Schoo l Teaching Emphasis Th e e l e m e nt ary sc ho o l t eac hing e mph asis in English, offe r e d in co njun ctio n with the Colorado State D e p ar tm e nt of Education lice n s ur e program, pr e p a r es future teachers of e l e ment a ry ed u ca tion to under stand and t each the diver e s ubj ec t m atte r r e quir e d for l ice n s ur e. The program will pro v ide s tudent s with a stro ng foundatio n in lit era tur e and lit era r y genr es; a so lid per pective on th e En gli h l a ngua ge, including it s history, struc tur e, a nd co n stitue nt ; and both theory and practice in composition, language art co mmun ica tion and t eac hin g methodology It a l so addresses the n eed to prepar e t eac h e r s to teach multicultural lit e r a tur e, acco mmodat e c ultur a l and e thni c divers it y in l ang uage a nd writing, and com municate e ffecti ve l y w ith a dive r e popul atio n of s tud ents.

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Required Courses Se me ster Hours Literature Core Courses E G 2100 lntroduction t o Literary Studies ......................................... 3 E G 2220 American Literature : Civil War to Pre sent ... .................. ............ 3 ENG 3100 Studie s in Chaucer Shakespeare and Milton .... .......... .............. 3 E G 3440 M yt h S ymbo l and Allu s i o n in Literat ur e ... .............. ........... 3 S ubt o tal .......... ...... ........................................... 1 2 Language / L in guist i cs Co re Courses ENG 20 lO The ature of L a n g u age ........ .... ........... . . . . . 3 ENG 3020 His t ory of the Engli s h Language ....... ...... Subt o tal ...................................... Writing/Compo ition Courses E G 2500 Art and Craft of Writin g ... -<>r.. ..... 3 ...... ..... .......... 6 ... ......... ..... 3 E G E G 2520 3510 Introduction to Creative Writin g. . ............................ 3 Advanced Compo sition ................ .......... ..................... 3 Subtotal ......... .... .. ........... 6 La n guage Arts Core Courses E G 3460 Children s Literature...... ................ ....................... 3 ENG 4650 Teaching Composition in Elementary School s . ....................... 3 ENG 4660 Teaching Literature and Lan g uage: K-6 ( Senior Experience co ur se) ... .......... 3 RDG 3130 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School: K-6 ....... .... ....... ........ Sub t o tal ............ ...................................... ................... 9 Englis h E l ectives Two upper-division English co urse s sel ected in consultation with and approved by a des ignated English adviser. . ...................... ...... .................. ........ 6 Recommended E l ectives Writi n g ENG 3520 E G 3530 La n guage ENG 3010 E G 3030 Literature Creative Writin g W orks h o p (prerequisite: ENG 2520) ...... ......... ... .. 3 Techniques of Critical Writin g . . . . . . . .... 3 Modem English Language Studies (prerequisite: ENG 2010) ................... 3 Semantics (pre requi site: E G 20 I 0 ) ...................................... 3 E G 3240 African Ame rican Literature ........ .... ............................... 3 ENG 3420 The English Bible as Litera tur e .......................... 3 E G 3430 Classical Mytholog y .... . .......... .... .......................... 3 E G 3470 Young Adult Lit era ture . . . . . . . . .... ..... .... 3 ENG 3490 Chicano Folklore of the Southwest ....................................... 3 Tara/.......... .......... .... . . . ....... 39 RDG 3130 me ers the r e adin g r e quir e m e nts fo r Colorado Stat e lice n s ure bw i s c arried under the stu d e n!' s 42-sem es t er-ho ur pr o fe ss i o nal ed u ca ti on requirements Secondary Schoo l Teaching Emphasis The secondary education emphasi s in English, offered in conjunction with th e Colorado State Depart ment of Education licen sure program, prepares future secondary teachers of English to understand and teach the diverse ubject matter required for licensure. This program equips students with a wide vari ety of language principles and skills; practical experience in developing and tea c hing th e processes of writing; sound knowledge of approaches to literature and literary genres; periods and authors ( includ ing a special focus on young adult literature ); and a n unders t anding of communication and media as used in English s tudies. In addition to meeting specified state a nd departmental requirements, thi s pro gram offers students the opportunity to develop further s peci alization in writing, language, or lit e rature to complement the major.

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82 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Required Cour es Semes ter Hours I. Literature Co r e E G 2100 Intr oduc tion to Literary Studie s .......................... .... ........ 3 ENG 2210 American Lit e r ature: B egi nnin gs through the Civil W ar ....................... 3 -or-ENG 2220 America n Lit erature: Civi l War to Present ............................... 3 E G 3100 Studies in C h aucer Shakespeare and Milton ............. .................. 3 ENG 3440 Myth, Symbol and Allusion in Lit erature ................ ................ 3 E G 3470 Young Adult Literature .......................................... ... 3 Total ......... ......................................... ..................... 15 11. Language Co r e ENG 2010 The Nature of Language ............................. ................. 3 E G 3020 H istory of the Engli h Language ......................................... 3 Total .... ......................................... ............................ 6 ill. Co mpo s ition Co r e ENG 2500 Th e Art and Craft of Writing .... .......... ............................ 3 ENG 3510 Advanced Compo ition ......... ........ ............................... 3 T o tal ...................................................................... 6 IV. Teaching E n glis h Co r e ENG 3620 Teaching Compo ition 7-12 ................ ........................ 3 ENG 4600 Teaching Liter at ur e and Communication, 7-12 .............................. 3 E G 4640 Teaching English 7-12 (Se nior Experience course) ......................... 3 Total .......................................................................... 9 V. Upper Level E l ec tives Three u pper-division Eng l is h courses at least two of whic h mus t be literature co ur ses, se l ected in co nsultation w ith and approved by a designated English adviser ............................. 9 T o tal ............................ ............... ............. .............. 45 NOTE: Students with a bachelor of arrs in English from an a cc redited institution who are seeki n g Eng li sh li censure will receive credit for Se c ti ons I and V, in addition to any courses in Sections II l/1 and I V for which the y hav e ex isting c redit s. Transfer questions should be referred to the English D epartmelll. Writing E mphasi s The writing emphasis major provide extensive tudy practice and opportunity fo r performance in var iou s m odes and genres of writing as wel l as a found atio n in the appreciation of the lit e rary h e rita ge in English. The program immerse s s tudent s in reading wri ting, and lan guage a nd h e lps prepare them for g raduat e sc hool or vocation while clearly placing them in the tradition of the liberal arts. R equire d Courses Semes ter Hours I. Literature Courses Lower-Division Literature Co ur ses 2000-leve l including ENG 2 1 00 ...................................... . ...... .... 9 Three hours must emphasize mod em literature Upper-Division Literature Co u rses: 3000-Level and/or 4000-Leve l ...................................................... 9 Semester H ours of Literature R equired ............. ........................ ......... 18 11. Language and Linguistics Course Sel ec t one in consultation with a faculty adviser from the department's offerings. Semester H o ur s of Language and Linguistics R equired .................................... 3 ill. Writi n g Courses Entry Course: E G 2500 The Art and Craft of Writing ........................................... 3 Subtotal ........ ............................ ..................... ............ 3

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Writin g E l ectives (In consultation with an Engli h adviser, se l ec t four three must be 3000l eve l ) JRN II 00 Be ginning R eporti n g .................................................. 3 ENG 2520 Introduction t o C r eative Writin g ........................................ 3 COM 2610 Introdu ctio n to Te chnical Writing ........................................ 3 E G 3510 Advanced Composition ............................................... 3 ENG 352B Creative Writing Work s hop: Fiction ............ .......................... 3 E G 352A Creative Writin g Workshop: P oetry .............................. ...... 3 E G 352C Creative Writing Work s hop: Drama .......... ........ ....... ........ 3 ENG 3530 Te c hniques of Critical Writin g ............. ............................. 3 E G 3980 Engli h Co-op Education .............................................. 3 Subtotal ...... ................. .......... ....................... .... 1 2 Specialized Writing Courses E G 3820 Writing Studio ( mu s t be r epea ted for credit und e r two dis tin c t titl es) .... ..... 6 Subtotal ..................................................... ............... 6 enio r Ex p e ri ence Course ENG 4520 Advanced Writing ............................ ....................... 3 Total Semester H ours of Writing R equired ............................................ 24 Total Semester H ours R equired ................................................ 45 English Minor Writing E mpha sis The writing emphasis minor provides s tudy practice and opportunity for performance in variou modes and genre of writing as well as a foundation in the appreciation of the literary heritage in English. The pro g ram involves studen t in reading writing, a nd l a n guage, and helps prepare them for graduate sc hool or vocation, while clearly placing them in the tradition of the liberal arts. Student must m eet with a writing faculty adviser in order to understand pr erequisi t es and select proper cour es. I. Literature Co u rse Lower-Divi ion Lit e rature Courses: 2000-Level, Including E G 2100 .......................................... ........ 6 Upper-Division Literature Co ur se: 3000-Leve l or 4000-Level. ........................................................ 3 Subtotal ....................... .............................................. 9 n. Language and Linguistics Course: Select one, in co n s ultati on with a faculty advise r from department's offe rin gs. Semester H ours of Language and Lin g ui s t ics R e quir ed ........................... ........ 3 ill. Writing Course: Entry Co ur se: E G 2500 The Art and Craft of Writing . . ..... ..................... 3 Subtotal ...................... ....... .......... .............. ........ ...... 3 Writing E l ec ti ves (select three two must be 3000l evel) JRN I I 00 Beginning Reporting ... ........... ... ................................ 3 ENG 2520 Introdu c tion to Creative Writin g ............. ......... ................. 3 COM 2610 Intr oduction to Te c hnical Writin g ........................................ 3 E G 3510 Advance d Compo ilion ................................... .......... 3 ENG 3528 Creative Writing Work s hop : Fiction ...................... .... ..... ...... 3 ENG 3 52A Creative Writing Work hop: Poetry ................................ .... 3 E G 352C Creative Writing Work shop: Drama ........................ ............. 3 ENG 3530 Technique s of Critica l Writing ......................................... 3 E G 3820 Writin g Studio .......................................... ............ 3 Subto tal ................ .... ................................ ........... ... .. 9 Semester H o ur s of Writing R eq uir ed .................... . .... . ................ 1 2 Total Semester H ours R equired ........... ............. ....... .... ............. 24 Literatur e Emphasis The English minor with emphasis in literature serves s tud e nt s who see k to develop skills in reading, writing and thinking about literary texts The program i s de s ign e d both for students interested in r ea d ing diverse texts from many age s, culture, and genres and for s tudent s who wish to focu on a s ingle age, culture or genre for example, dramati c literature Course sho uld be se l ected in consu l tation with a faculty ad vi er in th e D epartment of Engli sh.

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8 4 S C HOOL O F LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES I. Introductory Course: Seme ter H ours E G 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies ...................... ................... 3 II Two cour es from the follo w ing: E G 2110 World Literature: Beginnings to 1600 ..................................... 3 ENG 2120 World Literatur e: 17th Century t o Pr esent ................................. 3 ENG 2210 American Literatur e: Beginning s throu gh Civil War ........................ 3 ENG 2220 American Lite r a tur e: Civil War t o Pre ent ..................... ...... ...... 3 ENG 2310 Briti s h Literature: Be ginnings to 1 785 ................................ .. 3 E G 2330 Briti s h Liter a tur e: 1785 to Pr ese nt ......................... ............. 3 Subtotal ......... ...................................... .................. 6 III. A n y p eriod course Any development course (C hoo e one course from ENG 3 110 ENG 32 1 0, E G 3230, E G 3240, E G 3310, ENG 3330, E G 3400 orE G 3410) Subtota l ................... .......... ...... .... ....................... 3 IV. Departmental Electives One course a t th e 2000-leve l or above .......................... ....................... 3 Two lit erature courses at the 3000-level or above .............................. .... 6 O n e 4000-level literatu r e or lit e rary critic i s m co ur se .................... ............. .... 3 Subtotal ....................................... ............................ 1 2 Total Semester H ours R eq u ired ..................................................... 24 Note: This minor repla ces both the literature emphasis and the dramatic li t era/lire emphasis of the 1994-95 Catalog. Language and Linguistic s Minor The language and linguistics minor offers co ncepts about, theor i es of, and analytical t ec hniqu es in nat ural language It r epresents an intellectual discipline in itself and sim ultan eo u s l y serves the intere t s of future teachers tudents of Literature and writi n g, and others w ho h ave a co ntinuin g fascination with lan guage as l anguage The minor is especially co mpl ementary for m ajors in anthropology, English, foreign l ang u age teaching modem l ang u age p hil oso phy, p syc hology socio l ogy, peech co mmuni catio n and technical communication. The minor require s s tudents to e ngage in vigorous pro gressive l y more explic it and preci se ana l ysi and sy nthe s i s as they exa min e fact an d fallacies about the mira c l e of langu age. Required Core Cours e s Semester Hours ENG 20 1 0 Th e Nature of Lan guage ..................................... .... 3 A n y four of the following s i x courses, c hosen in co n sultatio n and w ith a n app ro ve d depanmemal a dvi se r ENG 3020 History of th e English Language .... .................................. 3 E G 3030 Semantics ......................................................... 3 E G 3040 Morphology and Syntax ............................................... 3 E G 3050 Language and Society ............................................. 3 E G 3060 Modem Language Theory ................ .............................. 3 ENG 40 1 0 S tu dies in Lingui stics (Varia bl e T op i cs) ....... ............. ............. 3 S u btotal ......... ............................................................ 12 Interdi sc iplinar y elective co ur ses Any two co ur e c ho en in co n ult alio n with and app r oved by depart menta l advi er. ANT 2330 COM 3310 ENG 4010 E G 4990 PHI 1110 PHI 3 120 PSY 3570 SED 4200 SPA 3150 SPA 43 1 0 SPE 3520 SPE 3540 SPE 3740 SPE 3760 WMS 2770 ( SPE 2770) Cross-Cult u ral Communication ...................................... 3 Int ernatio nal T echnical Communication .................................. 3 Studies in Lin guistics (Varia ble Topi cs) ........ .......................... 3 Int erns hip .............................. .......... ................ 3 Language Logi c, and Persuasion ... ..................................... 3 Philo sop hy of Language ............................................ 3 Cognitive P syc holo gy ........................................ ........ 3 Language D eve l opment and Learning Di abil iti e .... ..................... 3 Spanish Phoneti cs : Theory and Pr actice ................... .......... .... 3 Hi story of the Spanish Lang u age ...... ............................... 3 Language Acquisition .............. ........ ...... ........... ... 3 Phonelic and Language Sample Analyses ................................ 3 P sychology of Communication .................................. ........ 3 Cultural Influence on Comm uni ca tion ................................ 3 Gender and Communicatio n ...... ....... ........... .................. 3 Subtotal .. ........................................................ ... ..... 6 Total Seme s ter Hours R eq uired ............ ........ ..................... ........... 21

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HISTORY D E P A R TMEN T Major for Bachelor of Arts SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 8 R e quir e d Courses Sem ester Hours HlS 1010 Western Civil i zation to 1 715 . ...... ......... ......... .... .... 3 HJS 1020 Western C ivilization since 1715 ........... ............... ......... ..... 3 HJS 1210 American His tory to 1865........................ . . 3 HJS 1220 American History s ince 1865 .......................... ........ . . 3 HJS 4820 Senior Seminar ..... ................................... ........ 3 Total ................ ...... ....... ....................................... 15 E l e cti ves A m inimum of 23 additiona l semester hours in history is required, 1 8 of which must be upper-divis i on. No more tha n 4 semester ho urs i n HIS 3890 read i ngs courses may be counted toward the major wit h out prior written approval from the department. C our se Dis tributi o n In the minim u m of 23 additiona l semester ho u rs required, stude nts must include at l east 3 se mester hours in eac h of the broad areas of history: Un i ted State s, European, Developing World. G rade Average Students majo r ing in history m u st maintain at l east a 2 0 average in their his tory courses. A d v i sing H i s t ory majors should consult wit h a departmental adviser to se lect the courses in other disci plines tha t complement t h eir area of conce n tration in the major. Minor in Hi s tor y There are three different areas of emphasis avai l ab l e t o students seeki n g a history minor: regular histo r y area of emphasis, American West history area of emphasi 20th-century s tudie history area of e mphasis. Regular Hi story E mph asis R eq u i r e d Courses Semest er H o u rs HIS 1 010 Western Civilization to 1715 . . . . . . . 3 HIS 1020 Wes tern Civilization since 1715 ........................................ 3 HIS 121 0 American History to 1865 ..... .... ..... ........................... 3 HIS 1 220 American H i s t ory s ince 1865 .......................................... 3 Total .... ............................................................. 1 2 Electives A minimum of 9 additional semeste r hours in h i story is required. The hours must be upper-division and s h ou l d be se l ec t ed in consultatio n wit h a departme ntal advi ser. No more than 2 semester hour in HIS 3890 readings cou r ses may be counted toward the minor without prior written approval from the department. A meric a n Wes t Hist ory E mph as i s R eq uir e d Courses Sem ester Hou rs HlS 1100 American Wes t. ...... ........ ..... ........... ...... .......... 3 HJS 1 1 1 0 Colorado History I ................................................... 3 HIS 1210 American His tory to 1865 ......................... ..... ........... 3 HJS 1220 American History since 1865 .............. ........................... 3 Total ..... ............ .......................... ........... ........ ... 12 Electives A minimum of 9 additional histo r y semester hours treatin g the American W est is required, all of which m u st be upper-div i sion. Tw enti e thCentury S tudies His t o r y E mph asis R e quir e d Courses Sem ester Hou rs HIS 1 220 American History since 1865 . . . . . . ................. 3 HIS 2010 Contemporary World History... . . . . . . . . 3 Total .................. ............. . ................................... 6 E lectives A minimum of 15 additional hours treating 20th-century history is required 9 of which must be upper d i vision.

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86 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Grad e Average Students minoring in hi s tory mu st m a intain a 2 0 average in their hi sto ry courses. Seconda r y School Education L i ce n s ure in Social Sciences Students majoring in history may combine the ir major with other cour ses in the social science s and in ed ucation to earn secondary education licen s ure Th e requirements of this program are incl u ded unde r the Secondary Education D epart m ent sectio n of thi Catalog. Prelaw Cour ses Several history cour e are of particular importance to legal stu die s. The e include HIS 1210 HIS 1220, HIS 3460 and HIS 3680. Students interested in prelaw courses are ur ged to contact the department adviser. M in o r in I nt e rdi s ciplin a r y Lega l St udies The interdi ciplinary legal s tudie s minor is designed to show students how the various di sci p l ines in the humanities and soc ial sc i e nce s treat question s of law and j u s tice. The interdisciplinary l egal studies minor i s not a prelaw preparatory program or paralegal training Il goal i to eros di sc iplines so that s tudent s can under tand how the humaniti es and social cie nce s illuminat e the principle practices and policies of the law. R equi red Cou rses Seme t e r H o ur s HIS 3680 The Court in Crisis ..................................... ........... 3 PHI 3430 Philosophy of Law ...................................... ............ 3 SOC 3550 Sociology of Law .... .... ........ ........... ........................ 3 ENG 3700 Literature and the Law ........................... .................... 3 PSC 3120 American Constitutional Law ........................................... 3 CJC I ntroductory Course (see Criminal Justice and Criminology D epartment chair) .............. 3 xxx xxx Seminar in Legal Topics (interdisciplinaryteam-taught course) ............... 3 Total ...................... .... .... ......................................... 21 Students will sel ect one law-related course from the courses lis ted below or approved by the interdi sci plinary legal studies minor adviser: MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business I .................... ................... 3 MGT 3220 Legal Environment of Business ll ............... ........ .............. 3 CJC 2100 Substantive Criminal Law ........ ...... .............................. 3 HIS 3460 The Con titution and the ew ation, 17871848 ............... ............. 3 SOC 3500 Criminology ........................................... ... ......... 3 WMS 3310 Women and the Law ...... ............................... ........... 3 Total ................................... ........... .... ................. 24 JOURNALISM D EPA RTMENT Journ alis m Majo r for B ac h e lor of Arts The Journalism Departm e nt prepares studen t s for careers in n ews and information media by providing them with a sound education in the ba sics of jou rnali s m and/or p u blic relatio n The department ha s o n e of the trongest journali m tea c hing taffs in the s tat e. All full-time and part-time faculty have worked in the journalism and/or pub lic rel ation s fields. The Journali s m Department is one of two journa l i s m chools i n the country to offer an intern hip pro gram that allows students to get hand s-on experienc e in political reporting The Capitol R eporter is open to upper division students, who spend an e ntir e semester covering the Colorado l egis l ature for credit. The editor is a full-time staff member and the weekly newspaper is highly regarded by l egis lator s, lob byist s, and the college community. Proficiency in s tandard written Engli his a prerequi ite for all jou rnalism cour ses. Stud e nt s are required to complete ENG I 010 before takin g any journa l i s m course b eyo nd JRN lO 10. Proficiency in typing is req u ired for aJI courses beyond JRN 1010. A lis t of s ugge s ted courses that s hould be taken for General Studie s ha s been established by the depart ment. Students s hould also se lect an advise r immediately to begin planning their course of study Students may not sel ec t both a major and minor from the Journalism D e partment. Students will be required to take a joumali m profici ency test upon completion of JRN 2 100, Interme diate Reporting and News Writing and/or JRN 2200, Intermed i ate ews Editing Students must pass the te s t before they will be allowed to tak e upper-divi sio n courses in their major or minor. P r e r equis it es are enforced.

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 8 Students will also take an assessme nt tes t toward the end of the ir studies to ensure they have reached th e proficiency l evel necessary to pur s u e a caree r in journali s m or public relations. The Journalism Department offers a journalism major with three efTiphases new s/e ditorial pho t o journalism, and public relations and minor s in print journalism and public r ela tions. Journalism Major for Bachelor of Arts Core C ourses f or J ournalis m Major and Minors Semes ter Hours JRN 1010 Intr oduction to Journalism and Mass Media .... o o o . . 3 JRN 1100 B eginning Reportin g and News Writin g ...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 3 JRN 1200 B e ginning News Editing ... ...... ..... 0 0 0 0. 0 0 0 3 JRN 2100 Interm ediate Reportin g and News Writing ... 0 0 0 3 JRN 4500 Ethical and Legal I ss ue s in Journalis m ........ 0 o 0 0 o o o o o 3 Subto t a l ... .... . .... .... ........ ............ o o o o 15 News/Editorial Emphasis Journalism Cor e ................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 Required Courses JRN 2200 Intermediate News Editing ...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 3 One or more of the followi ng : JRN 3100 Publication Pra cticum. ......... 0 0 0 0 o o 3 JRN 3980 Cooperative Education ... .. .............. o o o o 3 JRN 4150 The Capito l Reporter : Writing/Reporting ...... o o o o 6 JRN 4160 The Capito l Report er: Editing/Design ... . 0 0 o o 3 And three of the following (each course i s o ne credit hour): JRN 3500 Topics in Journ alism ....... .... .................. 0 o 3 Subtotal .................. .......... 0 0 o o o 9-12 E lectives JRN 3150 C o ntemporary Issue s ..... ..... ... . 0 o o 3 JRN 3400 Feature Article Writing for Newspaper s ............... o o o o 3 JRN 3600 Phot ojoumalis m I .............................. . . ... o o 3 JRN 4100 Advanced Reportin g ..... .... .... . .... ..... 0 0 0 0 o 3 JRN 4200 Prin ciples of News paper and Magazine Des i g n .......... o o o o 3 JRN 4400 Feature Article Writing for Magazine s ......... o o o 3 JRN 4600 Photojournalism II . . . . o o 3 Subtotal..... . . . 0 0 0 0... o o o o 12-15 Total .... ........ .... .... .......... o o o o o o o 36-42 Photojournalism Emphasis Journ alis m Core ....... ...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o o o o 15 Requir e d Courses ART 1200 D esign Proce sses and Con cepts I ... ..... 0 0 0 0 0 o o 3 ART 2200 Beginning P h o t ograp h y . ............. o o o o 3 JRN 2200 Intermediate News Editing ..... o o o o o o o 3 JRN 3600 Pho t ojournalism I ............ o o o o o o o o o o 3 JRN 4600 Phot ojournalis m II ... o o o o o o o 3 Subtota l .... ........ .............. 0 o o o o o o 15 E lective s ART 3200 Interm ediate Photograph y ... 0 0 o o o o o o 3 ART 3230 Color Photography ............ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o o 3 ART 3410 Computer G r aphic s . .... 0 o o o o o o 3 JRN 3100 Publicat ion Practicum .......... o o o o o o o 3 JRN 3150 Contemporary Issu es ....... .......... 0 0 0 o o o 3 JRN 3400 Featur e Article Writing for Newspaper s .... o o o o o 3 JRN 3500 Topic s in Journali s m . .... . 0 o o o o I JRN 4100 Advan ce d Reportin g .................. 0 0 0 0 0. 0 0 0 3 JRN 4150 The Capito l R eporte r : Writing/Reporting .... o o o o o 6 JRN 4160 The Capito l Report e r : Editing/Design ................ o o o o 3 JRN 4200 Prin ciples of New s paper and Magazine D es i g n . .... 0 o o 3 JRN 4400 Feature Article Writing f o r Magazine s ............ o o o 3 Subtotal . . . . . . ... 0 o o o 9 T ota l ...... ..... 0 o o o. o o o o o o o 39

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88 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Public Relation s Emphas i s Journali sm Core .................. ............ .... ..... .... .......... ....... 1 5 Required Courses JRN 2700 Fundamental s of Publi c R e l atio n s .... ................. ................ 3 JRN 3700 Publi c R e l atio n s Writin g ............................................... 3 JRN 3980 Cooperative Ed u cation ............................................... 3 JRN 4700 Public R e l ations Strategic Plannin g ........... .... .......... . ..... 3 MKT 3000 Prin c ipl es of Marketing ............................ ....... ...... 3 SPE 3440 T elevision Production ...... ............. ............. ................ 3 SPE 3100 Bu siness and Professional Speaki n g ....... ......... . ........ ..... 3 SPE 4100 Techniques of P e r suasion ............... ............................... 3 Subtotal .................................................................. 24 E l ectives COM 2420 COM 2430 COM 2460 COM 3440 JRN 3400 JRN 3500 JRN 3550 JRN 3600 MKT 3110 MKT 3120 SPE 1 700 SPE 2400 SPE 3130 SPE 3430 SPE 3450 SPE 3480 SPE 3740 SPE 4450 SPE 4480 SPE 4490 Subtotal .... Basic Corporate Videotape Production .................................. 3 lntroduction to Technical Media ................ ........... ............. 3 Presentation Graphic ................................................ 3 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Televi ion ............................. 3 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers ........... .............. ......... 3 Topic in Joumali m ............................. .................... I Print Media Advertising Sales ......................................... 3 Ph otojo urnali s m I .................................................... 3 Advertising Management .............................................. 3 Promotio nal Strategy ................................................. 3 Communication Th eory . .......................... .... ............. 3 lntr oductio n to R adio and Television Broad cas ting .... ....... ............... 3 Conference Leadership .................. .... ....... .... ....... ..... 3 R adio-Te l ev i sio n Announcing .............. ....................... 3 Broadcast Journalism: Radio .............. ............................ 3 W orks hop in R a dio Production .......................................... 3 Psychology of Communicat i o n ......................................... 3 B roadcas t J o urn alism: Telev i s i on ............ .......................... 3 Seminar Pra ctic um in Broadcasting ..................... .......... .... 3 Effects of Radio Televi sio n o n Contempora r y Life ........................... 3 ........................................................... 6 Total ............ .............................................. . ........ 45 Jo urnali sm Minor Semester Hours J o urn alism Core ............................ ..... .... ....................... 1 5 Required Courses JRN 2200 Intermediate News Editing ........ .... ..... ........ .................. 3 JRN 3500 Topic s in Journali sm .................................................. I Subtotal .............. ...... ..................................... .... 4 E l ectives JRN 3100 Publication Pr ac ticum ................................................. 3 JRN 3150 Contempo r ary I ss ue s ....................... .... ...... ........ ..... 3 JRN 3400 Feature A rticl e Writing fo r Newspaper s ..... ............ ................. 3 JRN 3600 Photojournali s m I ...................................... ............. 3 JRN 4100 Advance d R e p orting ................... ......... ........... ......... 3 JR N 4200 Principles of New s paper and M agazine Design .............................. 3 JRN 4400 Feature Article Writin g for Magazine s ......... ..... ...... .............. 3 JRN 4600 Ph o t ojo urnali s m 11 ...................... .... ................. ........ 3 Subtotal ....................................... ...... ......... .... . 6 Total ............ ............................ ............... .......... .... 25

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SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 8 Public Relation s Minor Se m es t e r H ours J o urn alis m Core ...... ....... ..... ...... ........... .... ........ .... 15 R equi r e d Courses JRN 2700 Fund a m e nt a l s of P ublic R e l atio n s ..... . ...... . . .... .... . 3 JRN 3700 Public R e lati o n s Writ i n g . . . . . . . . ... 3 JRN 3980 Coope r a tiv e Edu ca t io n ................. .............. .... ......... 3 JRN 4700 Public R e l atio n s S tra t egic Plan nin g ........... ... ....... ........ ...... 3 S u bto t a l 1 2 T o tal . . .... ....... ...... .......... 27 MATH E M ATICAL AND COMP TER S CIE CES D E P A RTM ENT Th e Mathe m atica l a n d Com put e r Sc i e n ces Departm e nt offer s bac h e l o r o f art and bach e l o r of c i e n c e d egrees in mat h e m atics a nd a ba c h e l o r of sc i e n ce d e gr ee in c omp u t e r c i e n ce. Th e d e partm e nt o ffe r s both a math e mati cs and co mpu t er sc i e n ce minor b o th of whic h c ompl e m e nt u c h m a j o r a e n ginee r ing t ec hnolo gy, t h e oth e r sci e n c es a n d ec on o mic L n ad ditio n th e min o r pr ogra m in c omput e r s c i e nc e co mp l e m e nt s the math e matics m a jor. Ln additi o n t o the ge n e ral m a t h e m atics m a j o r t h e d e p a rtm e nt offe r s a m a th e m atics m a j o r in five are a s of e mph as i s e n co mp assi n g a v ari e t y o f s i gnifica nt mathem atica l idea s Th ese areas o f e mph as i s g i ve the s tud e nt b ac k g ro und f o r g r a d u at e sc h ool in th eo r etica l m athe m atics, a s well as b ac k g ro und for b oth g rad u a t e sc hool a n d emp l oy m e nt in m a t h e m atically r e l a t e d fie ld s includin g a ppli e d mat h e mati cs, scie ntific c omputin g, probabilit y and statis t i cs, and m athe m atics e d u catio n T h e degr ee pr og ram i n comput e r sc i e n ce adh e r e to n a tion ally r ec o gnize d s tan d ar d s an d pro v i de s tud e nt s w ith a m o r e t ec hni cal alternative t o th e m a th e m atics e mph a i s in c o m put e r scie n ce. All students who are considering a major or minor in m athematics o r computer s ci e n ce are ex pected to consult with facult y for a d v i s in g Major in Mathematic s for Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of S cience T h e D e p artme n t of M athe m a tica l a n d C omp u t e r S c i e nc es o ff e r s co ur se work lea din g t o the b ach e l o r of arts o r b ac h e l or o f sc i e n ce d e gree Th e s tudent ma y c ho ose e ith e r degr ee Th e stude nt m ay c ho ose t o c omp l e t e a m athe m a t i cs maj o r in o n e o f the following e mph as i s area s : ge n e r a l a pplied math e m atics co mput e r sc i e n ce m a th e m a tic s e du catio n prob a bilit y and s tati stics th eo r etic al math e m atics A d egree in mat h e m atics i s u sefu l in a va ri e ty of pr o f ess ion a l fiel d s includin g am on g m a n y oth e r b u s i n ess, ec on o m i cs, co mput e r s cien ce gove rnm e nt e du ca t io n t ec hno l ogy and sc i e n ce Stud e nt s a r e i nvit e d to c o n sult wit h the d e p a rtm e nt c on c erning c areer p o t e ntia ls. All m a j o r s in math e m atic ar e r e quir e d t o co mp l e t e the f oll owing ba s i c c or e of c our ses (w i th a r eq uir e d minimum g rad e o f C i n e ac h of these c our ses). Th e d e p a rtm e nt s t r o n g l y r ecommends t hat s tud e nt s int e r es t e d in th e app l ied m athe mat i cs e mph as i s tak e se c t i o n s o f c alc ulu s u sing M athe m atica B asi c Mathe m a ti cs Cor e Se m es t e r H ours MTH 1 410* Ca l culus I o r MT H 1 450 Calc ulu s a nd M athe m atica I ............... ......... 4 MT H 24 1 0 Calc ulu 11 o r MTH 2400 Calc ulu s and M at h emati c a n .... . .... .... .. .... 4 MTH 2420 Calc ulu s tn o r MTH 2450 Calc ulus and M athe m atica fll . . . ........ 4 M TH 3 1 00 I n trod u c t i o n t o M athe m a t i cal P roo f s . ... .. ...... . ......... ........ 3 T o tal.. . . ........ ...... .... .... 1 5 S o m e sec t i o n s o f thi s co ur s e h ave a Math e mari c a c o mp o n e nt

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90 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES For math e mati cs majors, exce pt tho se in math e mati cs educa tion there is a one-hour co ur se that synthes i zes the material in the major Each major i s also r eq uir e d to tak e a Senior Experience co ur se and to co mp l e te a minor Th e followin g math e m atics co u rses have been ap proved as Senior Experience co ur ses: MTH 4210 MTH 4410 and MTH 4480 The r equire m e nt s for eac h a r e as follows : Ge n e ral Emphasis Required Courses Semeste r Hour s B as i c Core .................................................... ............. 15 MTH 4390 Mathematics Seminar ......................... .... .................. I Subtotal ........................... ........................................... 16 A minimum of24 c red.it h o ur s c h ose n fro m MTH 1510, MTH 2 1 40 *, or any upper-di vision mathematics co ur ses. Th e 24 c redit h o u rs mus t include a t l eas t 20 upper-division hour s, a t lea s t one Senior Expe rience course in mathem a tics and one of the following seq uences: MTH 3110MTH 3140; MTH 3210MTH 3220; MTH 3420MTH 3440; MTH 4210MTH 4220; MTH 4410MTH 4420; and MTH 4480-4490 T ota l .................... .......... . ...................................... 40 *No c r edit is allowed far MTH 2 140 ifMTH 3140 is also taken. T Applie d Mathematics Emphasi Th e emp h a i s in applied math e mati cs i desig n ed to me e t the n eeds of the scie ntifi c t ec hni ca l and c om puter b ased eco nom y and to pr epare the s tud ent for gra duate study. The department ha s mad e eve ry effo rt to h ave s tate of the art t ec hnolo g i es and pr actices ava ilable for st udent u se and tron g l y r ecommends tha t s tudent s int eres t ed in thi s e mphasi s t ake sectio n s of calculus u sing Mathem atica. Required Courses Se m es ter Hour s Basi c Core ..................................................... .... .......... 15 MTH 1 510 Co mput er Pr ogran1ming : FORTRAN ... ............................... 4 MTH 3140 Linear A l ge br a .............. ......... .... ......... ........... 4 MTH 3210 Probability and Statistic s ...... .................................... .... 4 MTH 3420 Diff ere n tial Equation s ............................... .............. 4 MTH 3440 P artia l Diff e r entia l Equ ations ............... ........................... 4 MTH 4480 Numerical Analysis I .......................................... .... 4 MTH 4490 umericaJ Analysis 11 ................................ ...... .... 4 MTH 4590 Applied Math e matic s Senior Seminar ........... ......................... I ............... ........ ......................... .................... 44 It is recommended that students t ake o n e o r more of the followi n g courses in addition to the r eq u ire ments: MTH 3220, MTH 3250, MTH 3470, MTH 4210, MTH 4410, MTH 4420, and MTH 4450. Computer Science Emphasis Thi s e mph asis is d es i g n e d for the s tud e nt who want s t o co mbine applied mathemati cs or s tati stics w ith com puter sc i ence. The required comp ut er sc ien ce minor includes the core co ur ses for the co mput er sci e n ce major. Required Co u r es Semester Hour s Core .................................. ................................. 15 MTH 3140 Linear A l gebra .......................................... ............ 4 MTH 3210 Probability and Statistics ........................................... 4 MTH 3420 Differential Equation s .............................. ....... ......... 4 MTH 4480 Numerical Ana l ysis I ............................... ................ 4 Two of the following co ur ses: MTH 3220 Design of Experiments ................................ ............... 4 MTH 3440 Panial Diff erentia l Equations ........................ ........... ..... 4 MTH 4210 Pr obabili t y Theory ...... ........ .... .... .......... ................... 4 MTH 4220 Stochastic Pr ocesses ...................................... .... .... 4 MTH 4490 umericaJ Ana l ysis fl ......................... ......... ........ 4 One of the following courses: MTH 4290 Senior Statistics Project ........... .......... .......................... I MTH 4390 Mathematics Senior Seminar .................. ............ ....... I MTH 4590 Applied Mathematic s Senior Seminar ........... .............. .......... I Total .............. ............................................. .......... 40

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 9 Computer Science M inor ( r equire d ) R equire d Courses Se m e te r Hours CSI 1300 Introdu ctio n to Structured Programming ................ ................... 4 CSI 2300 Advan ce d Pro grammi n g and Data Structure .............................. 4 CSI 2400 Computer Organi zation and Assembly Language ............................ 4 CSI 3100 Disc r ete Mathemati cs ...................... ................. ........ 4 CSI 3300 Foundations of File Structures .......... ................................ 4 One of the following co ur ses: CSI 4250 Software Engineering Prin ciples .......................... ............... 4 CSI 4300 Advanced Dat a Stru c ture s and Algorithm Analysis .......................... 4 Total H ours R e quired for Min o r .................................................... 24 Mathe m a ti cs Educati o n Emphas i s The emphasis in mathematics education i s for the preparation of classroom teachers of mathematics. Student s eeking teacher licensure in mathematics mu st satisfy the teacher education program r e qui r e ment s of the college in addition to all of the mathematics major requir emen t s. Content compete ncy must be s hown for math ematics course credit that is 10 or more years old. R equire d Cou rses Semester Hours B asic Core ........ ... ... ......................... ............................. 15 CSJ 2610 Computer Pro gramming f o r Educators .......................... ......... 4 MTH 311 0 Abstract Algebra I ......... ..... ......... ................. ..... .... 3 MTH 3140 Linear Algebra ...................................................... 4 MTH 3210 Pr obability and Stati s tic s .............................................. 4 MTH 3600 History of Mathematic s .... ....... . .... ............... ........ 3 MTH 3610 Method of Teaching Mathematic s .................... .................. 3 MTH 3650 Foundations of Geometry .............................................. 3 A Senior Experience course in mathem atics* ............... ........................ 4 T o tal ........ ..... .... ........ ......................... .................... 43 *E DS 4290 or EDU 4190 ma y b e s ubstitured Proba bilit y a nd S t a ti s t ics Emphas i s The emphasis in probability and tatistic tresses the application of the principles and methods of s ta tistics and probabi l ity in th e bio l ogical physical and social scienc es and enginee ring. This emphasis also prepare s the st udent for graduate study. R eq u i r e d Courses Semester Hours Basi c Core .. .. ................... ................ ... ... ............. ...... 15 MTH 1510 Computer Progr amming: FORTRA ........ ............................. 4 MTH 2140 Computatio nal Matrix Alge bra ............. ........................... 2 MTH 3210 Prob ab ility and Statistic s .... ....................... ............... .... 4 MTH 3220 De sign of Experiments ...................... .......... ...... .... 4 MTH 3250 Optimization T echniques I ........................ ..................... 4 MTH 4210 Prob a bility Theory ...................................... ............. 4 MTH 4220 Stochastic P roc esses . . . ........................ ....... 4 MTH 4290 Senior Statisti cs Project .... .................................. ..... I T o tal ................... .................................................... 42 MTH 3 1 40 ma y b e subs tituted for MTH 2 140. Theoretica l Mathe m atic Emphasis The emphasis in theoretical m a t hematic s pr e pare the tud e nt for further specialized study at the gra d uate leve l as well as being adaptable for preparation for po s itions in bus ine ss, industry and governme nt. R equired Cou rses Semester Hours Core . . . . . . ................ ...................... 15 MTH 3110 Abstract A l gebra I .......... ................................... .... 3 MTH 3140 Linear Algebra ..... .. ............................................ ... 4 MTH 4390 Mathematics Senior Seminar ........................................... I MTH 4410 Advanced Calculu s I. ........................................... ...... 4 MTH 4420 Advan ce d Calculu s II ................................................. 3 A minimum of 7 c redit hours c h osen from a ny upper -division mathematic s courses . ......... 7 T o tal ... ............................... ..................................... 37 .

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92 SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Minor in Mathematics Required Co re Semeste r Hours MTH 1410 C a lculu s I or MTH 1 450 Calculus and M a thematical ........................ 4 MTH 1510 Computer Programming: FORTRA --
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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 9 A dditional Course R eq uirem e nt s E G 1010* Freshman Composition : The Essay ....... .............. ....... ........ 3 ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Researc h and Documentation ................ 3 SPE 1010* Fundamentals of Publi c Speaking ...................................... 3 PHY 2311-2341 General Phy sics I Lab I General Physics ll Lab ll ..................... 10 -{)fCHE 1 800, CHE 1810 CHE 1850 General Chemistry!, II, and Labor a tory .................. 10 XXX XXX Level II General Studies-His toric a l .................................... 3 XXX XXX Level !I Genera l Studies-Arts and Letters. ....................... 3 XXX XXX* Level 11 General Studies-Social Sciences. . . ................... 6 Six additional hours from the areas of co mmunication his torical, arts and lette rs, and/or social sc ience s ....................................................................... 6 Unrestricted Elective ............................................................. 3 Subtotal ... ..... ........................ .......................... ...... 40 The se co urs es, along with MTH 1410 or MTH 145 0 and PHI 3360, coum as General Studies courses. The Multiculwral gradua ti on requiremelll of 3 cre dit h o ur s must a l so be satisfied. Total ........... ............ ........... ....... ........ .......... .... 120 Minor in Computer Science Required Courses Semester Hours CSl 1300 Introduction to Structured Pro g ramming. . . . . ........ 4 CSI 2300 Advanced Pr ogramming and Data Stru c tur es ............................... 4 ELECTIVE S A minimum of 12 seme ter hours cho en from CS! 2400 and upper divi i on CSl co ur ses ......... 12 Total ......................................................................... 20 MODE R N LANGUAGES DEPAR TMENT The Modem Lan g u ages D epartment offers major programs in Spani s h and modem l anguages; minor programs in French, German, and Spanish ; and teacher educatio n programs in Spani s h and modem lan gu ages. Courses in other foreign l anguages and in occupational or profe ss ional fields are offered in order to meet student and community needs. In addition, the department administers several education programs abroad, a s well as certificate programs in b asic French, German and Spanish studie s and Spani sh translation Regi stratio n for courses i in accordance with pr evious preparation. Consequently stude nt s s hould reg i s ter for foreign l a n guage co urse s as follows: No previou s s tudy or l ess than one year in high school1010; students with one year in high school who feel their background i s weak-1010; one se me s ter in college-1020; one year in college-211 0 and/or 2310 for German and Spanish and 20 I 0 for French; two years in high school-2110 and/or 2310 for German and Spanish and 2010 for French or 1020 if need ed; three years in high sc hool or one and one-half years in co llege-2120 and/or 2320 for German and Spanish and 2020 for French; or 2110 and/or 2310 for German and Spani s h and 20 I 0 for French if needed ; four years in high sc hool or two years in college-3000-l evel cour ses, or 2120 and/or 2320 for German and Spanish and 2020 for French if n eeded. The above r egulations may not be applicable if students have had no profe ss ional in truction in their chosen foreign language within the past two years. Students ca n a! o t est if they feel that they have insuffi cie nt preparation for the required level or are not s ure of that l evel. Elementary cour es do not apply toward the major or minor r equirement Student s see king elementary and seco nd ary credentials in French, German, or Spani h must atisfy t h e teach er education program of MSCD in addition to all of the major requirements. They mu t also demon strate sufficient mastery of the target languag e or languages through an appropriate proficiency exam.

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94 SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Spanish Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses Semester Hours SPA 2110 Intermediate Spani h ........................... ... .... ............. 3 SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conversation .... ........................ ......... 3 SPA 2310 Spanish Grammar and Composition l .............. ..................... 3 SPA 2320 Spanish Grammar and Composition IT ..................... ........ ... 3 SPA 3!10 Advanced Conversation .............................................. 3 SPA 3140 Advanced Composition ............................................ 3 SPA 3150* Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice ................................. 3 SPA 3200 Culture and Civilization of Spain -orSPA 3210 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization -orSPA 3220 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest ...... ...................... 3 SPA 3250 Introduction to Literary Studie s in Spani s h ................................. 3 SPA 3400 Survey of Spanish Literature I -orSPA 3410 Survey of Spanish Literature II ............................. .... ...... 3 SPA 3510 Masterpieces of Latin American Literature ....... ................ .......... 3 SPA 4010 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I. ................................ 3 SPA 4020 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar ll ................. ............... 3 SPA 4110 Contemporary Spanish Lit.erature -orSPA 4120 Contemporary Latin American Literature .............. ................ 3 MDL 4960 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools ...................... 3 Spanish Electives** ... .................... ............... .... ............ .... 3 T o ta l *** ................................... ............ .... .... ....... ...... 48 R eq uired o nl y when seeking a t eacher li ce nse **Must b e advan ce d co urses and tak e n with department approva l *** Only 42 semester c r e dit hour s for those n o t seeking r eac h e r licensure. Minor in Spanish Required Courses Se mester Hours SPA 2110 Intermediat e Spani s h .............. ......................... ......... 3 SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conversation .................................... 3 SPA 2310 Spanish Grammar and Composition I ...... ........... .................... 3 SPA 2320 Spanish Grammar and Composition U ........................ ........ 3 SPA 3110 Advanced Conver sa tion ........................ ....... .............. 3 SPA 3200 Culture and Civilization of Spain -orSPA 3210 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization -orSPA 3220 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest ...................... ....... 3 SPA 3250 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spani s h ... ......... ......... .......... 3 T otal ........................................................................ 21 Minor in French R equired Courses Semester Hours FRE 2010 Intermediate French I ................ .............................. 3 FRE 2020 Intermediate French II ............ .... ..... ......... ......... ... 3 F R E 2110 French Readin g and Conversatio n ...................... ...... ....... 3 FRE 30 I 0 Introduction to Advanced Fre nch Studie ........... .............. ...... 3 FRE 3110 Survey of French Literature I -or-FRE FRE 3120 3550 -orSurvey of French Literature II .......... ......... ....... ............ 3 French Historical Per s pectives FRE 3560 Contemporary Sociocultural I ssues ..................................... 3 French Electives* ....................................... ............. ............ 3 Total ..... .................................... .......................... 21 Mu s t b e a co urs e at the 3000o r 4000-level.

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SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 9 Minor in German R equired Courses Se mester Hours GER 2110 German R eading and Conver sa tion ...................................... 3 GER 2120 German Civilization .................................................. 3 GER 2310 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar ................................ 3 GER 2320* German Compo s iti on and Free Writing ......... ......... ... ...... ........ 3 Subtota l ......... ...................................... ................ ... 12 Select I of the following literature courses: GER 321 0** Survey of German Literature I ................. .......... .... ... 3 GER 3220** Survey of German Literature II .................... ................... 3 GER 3230* Contemporary German Writer s .......................................... 3 GER 351 0** Les ing, Goethe and Schiller .................. ............. ... ....... 3 Subtota l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 3 Sele c t 2 of the following skills cour es: GER 30 I 0 Third Year G erman Conver ario n ...................................... 3 GER 3310 Ad v anced German Composition and Grammar .............................. 3 GER 3400 German for Bu siness .............. .......... .............. ........ 3 GER 3410 Tran s lation Technique s for Scientific Mat eria l s ............................ 3 Subtotal ............................... ...... ........ .... ....... ......... 6 Total ................................................... .... ........... ...... 2 1 H ighe r-l eve l course may be subs titut ed with departmental approval. **F o urth-year co ur se ma y be substitwed with departmental approval Modern Language s Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses The co mposite modem language's major involves a minimum of 48 hour s in any two modem langu ages, at lea s t 1 2 hours in each. Student s are advised into interm edia te and advanced classes in each langua ge on the basis of individual background and need. Th e minimum 12 hour s in each of the two chosen l a n guages must be taken as follows: Spanish SPA 2 110 lnt ermediate Spanish ........... ............. ........................ 3 SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conversation ..... ............................... 3 SPA 2310 Spani s h Grammar and Compos ition I ...... ............................. 3 SPA 2320 Sp a ni h Grammar and Composition II ................................. 3 Subtotal . . . . . . ............... .................... 1 2 French FRE 2010 Int e rmediate French I . ............. ................. .......... 3 FRE 2020 Intermediate French n ............................................ .. 3 FRE 21 I 0 French Reading and Conversation .......... .... .......... ............ 3 FRE 30 I 0 Introduction to Advan ce d French Studies . . . . . . . 3 Subtotal .......................................... .... .................... 1 2 German GER 2110 German Reading and Conversation ........ . ....................... 3 GER 2120 German Civi l ization ........ ............... .......... ...... . 3 GER 2310 G erman Vocabulary Buildin g and Grammar ................................ 3 GER 2320 German Com p osition and Free Writing ................................... 3 Subtotal ...................... .... .......... ....... ...................... 1 2 The remaining hours to complete the 48 hours required must be taken with d epartmenta l approval. For those seeking teacher lic e n s ur e in modern l a n guages (French, German, Spani s h ), all of the courses in one of the following areas of e mph asi are required 0 .

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96 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Fre nch Emphasis FRE 20 1 0 ln tem1ediate French I ........................ .......... ............. 3 FRE 2020 interm edia t e F r ench n ..................... .......... ............... 3 FRE 2110 Fr e n c h Readin g and Conversatio n ..................................... 3 FRE 3010 Intr o duction to Advanced Fre n c h Studi es .................................. 3 FRE 3110 S u rvey of Fr e n c h Lit e r at ur e I ................................ .... .... 3 FRE 3120 Survey of French Lit e r at ur e ll ............... ................ .......... 3 FRE 3150 Frenc h Phon etics: Th eo r y and Practice ............... .... .............. 3 FRE 3310 Advanced F r e n c h Composition and Grammar .... ........... .............. 3 FRE 3320 Advanced Conversation ...... ....... .................................. 3 FRE 3550 French His t o ric a l P e r spec tives ... .............. .... ....... ............. 3 FRE 3560 Contemporary Sociocultural I ss u es. . . . . . . . . 3 MDL 4960 Teaching Foreign L ang u ages in the Secondary Sc h ools . . . . 3 Any 2 of the following: FRE 4 5 20 M o d e m French Theater ............................................... 3 FRE 4530 The F r e n c h Novel ........................... .... .... ...... ...... 3 F R E 4750 Senior Seminar in French Studies ... .......... ..... .... ....... ......... 3 T o tal ............................... ............. ............ ............... 42 Ger man Emphas i s GER 2110 Ge rman Readin g and Conve r sation ...................................... 3 GER 2120 German Civilization .................................... .... ......... 3 GER 2310 Gem1an Vocabulary Buildin g and Grammar ................ ............ 3 GE R 2320 German Composition and Free Writin g .... ...... ............... ......... 3 GER 3150 German Phon etics : Th eory and Practice . ........................ 3 GER 3210 Survey of Ge rman Lit e r a ture I ...................... ........ ............ 3 GER 3220 Surve y o f Ge nnan Lit e ratur e II ........................... ..... .......... 3 GER 3230 Co nt e mporar y German Writer s .................................... .... 3 GER 331 0 Advanced Ger m a n Composit i on and Grammar. . ........ ........ 3 GER 351 0 Le ssing, Go e the and S c hill e r ....... .... ................... .......... 3 GER 4110 The Germa n Nove l of the 19th and Early 20th Ce nturi es -orGE R 4120 German Drama of the 19th a nd 2 0th Centuries ................ ...... . ... 3 GER 4210 Advanced Co nver sation: Pre se nt-day Germany. .................... 3 German Electives ................................................................ 3 MDL 4960 T eac hin g For e i gn L ang u ages in the Secondary S c h oo l s .............. ....... 3 T ota l ................... .... ............................ ........ ...... ...... 42 Spanis h Emphas i s SPA 2110 int ermed iat e Spani s h ..................................... ........ .. 3 SPA 2120 Spanish Re a din g a nd Conve r sat i o n ....................................... 3 SPA 2310 Spanish Grammar and Compos ition I .... .......... .......... .......... 3 SPA 2320 Spanish Grammar and Composition II . . . . . ............. 3 SPA 3 110 Advanced Conversation . . . . . . . . .............. 3 SPA 3 140 Advanced Composition.................. ...... ...... 3 SPA 3150 Sp anis h Phonetics: Theory and Pr actice . . . . ............ 3 SPA 3200 Cult ur e and Civilizat ion of Sp ain -orSPA 3210 Spani s h-Am erican Culture and Civilization -orSPA 3220 Folk l o r e and Culture of the Mexi ca n Southwes t ....... ...... ................ 3 SPA 3250 introdu c tion to Lit e rar y Stud i es in Sp anis h ............. ................... 3 SPA 3400 Survey of Spani s h Lit era ture I -orSPA 3410 Survey of Spani s h Lit era tur e II. ..... .... ....... . ....... .... 3 SPA 4010 Advanced Span i s h Writin g and Grammar I . . ........... 3 SPA 4020 Advanced Spanish Writin g and Grammar II ................................ 3 SPA 4110 Co nt empora r y Spani s h Literatur e -orSPA 4120 Contemporary Latin-American Lit e r a tur e ............................... 3 MDL 4960 Teaching Foreign Lan g u ages in the S eco ndary Sc h ools ...... ............... 3 Total. .................................. ................................ 42

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 9 MUSI C D E P A RT MENT The Metropo l i t a n S t ate College of Denver is an accredited ins tit u t i dna l member of the National Asso ciation of Sc h ools of Music. The Music Department offers majors in music education and music per formance, and a minor in music. The department also offers courses specifically designed for non-music students wishing to enhance their general understanding and enjoyment of music Musically talented st udents from all areas of the college are e n couraged to participate in the wide var i ety of large and small music e n sembles, includ in g band orchestra, choir, and chamber music. The majo r s in music education and music performance are professional degree program s designed for students wis h ing to prepare themse l ves for careers as music teac h ers or performers. Student s pur s uing the se majors are not required to complete a minor for graduation. The mus ic ed u cation degree program prepare s s tudents for careers teaching in s trumental and/or choral m u s i c at leve l s K-12. To be admitted to this program, students mus t pass the Mu sic Education Entrance Examination. B y taking an additiona l 16 se mes t er hour s beyond the bachelor's degree (EDU 4190 a n d EDS 4290), the student become eligible for K 12 licen s ure in the State of Colorado. With the e addi t io n a l 16 h o ur s this degree p r ogram is approved by the Colorado State D epartment of Edu ca tion and has full accreditation by the ational Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education Student eeking teaching credentials in music mu st pass the Mu ic Education Comprehen ive Examination and must also satisfy all applicab l e requirements of the teacher education and licen s ure programs in the School of Professional Studies. The music performance degree p r ogram prepares students for furt h er graduate st udy or for careers as performers o r private studio teachers. To be admitted to thi s program, stude nts must demonstrate the ca p ability of d eve l oping a hig h l eve l of musicianship in performance by passing the Music Performance Audition upon completion of MUS 1720 Private Instruction ll Further information, including examination po l icies procedure s, and requir eme nts, is provided in the departmenta l publication titled Advi s ing Wormation All music majors and minors should familiarize themselves with thi s publication. New and transfer students wishi n g to major or minor in music s h ould be prepared to take placement examinations in the area s of mus ic theory and music his tory and to perform an audition in their primary performance area For placement and a u dition appointments, contact the Mu s ic Department at le as t two weeks prior to the beginning of the se me s ter. Music Education Major for Bachelor of Arts Core R e quir e m e n ts for all Mu s i c E du cat i on Ma j o r s Se mest er H o urs MUS 1 1 10 Mu sic Theory I. ............. .... ......... ...................... 3 MUS I 1 20 Mu sic Theory Lab I ............................. . ................ I MUS 1 130 Mu ic Theory 11 .................................................... 3 MUS 1 140 Mu ic Theory Lab ll ................................................. I MUS 2110 Mu sic Theory Ill .......... .... . .......... .................. 3 MUS 2120 Mu sic Theory Lab ill ........ .... ............... ................ I MUS 2 1 30 Mus ic Theory IV ........................ ...................... ..... 3 MUS 2140 Musi c Theory Lab IV ...... . . ............................. ..... I MUS 1210 Mu ic Literature I. ......... ........... ............................... 3 MUS 1 220 Mu s i c Literature ll ................................................... 3 MUS 3210 Mu ic History I .................................................... 3 MUS 3220 Mu sic History ll .................................................. 3 MUS 1 7 1 0 Privat e ln truc t ion I (Primary Perfonnan ce Area) ................ ........... 2 MUS 1720 Private Ins truction ll (Primary Performanc e Area) ........................... 2 MUS 2710 Priv a te In truction ill (Primary Performan ce Area) ....... .................... 2 MUS 2720 Priv a te Instruction I V (Primary Performan ce Area) ........................ 2 MUS 3710 Private Instruction V (Primary Performanc e Area) .................... .... 2 MUS 3720 Private Instruction VI (Primary Performan ce Area) .......................... 2 MUS 161 A Clas s Voice I .................................................... I MUS 161B Class Piano I ............. ............. ................. ... ... ... I MUS 162B Class Piano ll .... ................. ............................... I MUS 26 1 B Cia s Piano Til ...................................................... I MUS 262B* Class Piano IV ...................................................... I *Note: Students whose primary pelformance area is piano ma y elect another area of swdy in place of class piano; how ever, they s till mu s t pass the Pian o Pr oficiency Examination before enro llin g in MUS 3520 o r MUS 3530.

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98 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Select 10 hours from the following:** MUS 2810*" E n emb l e .................................. ....................... I MUS 3810** En emb l e ... ......... .... .................... ........ .... ...... I **Note: Ensembles must be chosen from those appropriate to the studem' s area of emphasis: c h ora l majors must enroll in at l eas t 8 hours of chora l ensembles and instrumemal majors must enroll in at l eas t 8 h ours of instrumemal ensembles. Students majoring in music education must enroll in an ense m b l e durin g each semester of full-time residence except when s tud e nt teaching. MUS 3 1 50 Ins trum enta l and C h ora l Sco rin g and Arra n gi n g .............. ............. 3 MUS 3410 String Techniques a nd Material s ..................................... o 2 MUS 3420 Guitar Technique and Materials ...... 0 0 2 MUS 3450 Bra ss Techniques and Material ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 MUS 3460 Percu ss ion Techniques and Materials ......... ............. 0 2 MUS 3510 Ba sic Conducting 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 MUS 4330 Elementary School Music Method and Materia l s ... 0 0 0 0 2 MUS 4390 Supervised Field Experience: MUS 4330 0 0 0 I MUS 4340 Secondary School Music Methods and Materials ....................... 0 0 2 MUS 4390 Supervised Field Experience: MUS 4340 ................... 0 I RDG 3280 Teaching of Readin g and Writing in the Content Areas ....................... 4 E D U 2120 Elementary Education in United States ...................... 0 0 3 E D U 2640 Urban and Multicultural Education .......................... 0 3 EDS 3200 Ed u catio n al P syc hology Applied to Teaching .. 0 0 0 3 SED 3600 The Exceptio n a l Leamer in the C l assroom .......... 0 0 0 0 0 0. 3 T ota l ........................ 0 0 90 ln addition to the above core r eq uirement music education majors must se lect one of the following emp h ases : C horal Emphasis MUS 1400 Vocal Diction ..................... 0 0 0 3 MUS 3520 Choral Cond u c tin g and Litera tur e .. 0 0 0 3 MUS 4420 Vocal Pedagogy ............... 0 0 0 0 3 Total ..................................... 0 9 In trumental E mpha sis MUS 3430 Woodwind Techniques and Material s ............................. 0 2 MUS 3480 Marching Band Techniques and M a terial s ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 MUS 3530 In s trum e nt a l Co ndu c t ing and Literature ....... ..... 0 3 Total ................ ............................ 0 0 0 7 Music Performance Major for Bachelor of Arts Core Requireme nt for all M u ic Performance Major emester H ours MUS 1110 Music Theory I. ......................... ............................ 3 MUS 1120 Music Theory Lab I ...... o o o o I MUS 1130 Music Theory I] ........ .................... 0 3 MUS 1140 Music Theory Lab n ...... o 0 o o o o o o I MUS 2110 Music Theory Ill .................. 0 3 MUS 2120 Music Theory Lab[)] ................................................ I MUS 2130 Music Theory IV ................. 0 0 3 MUS 2140 Music Th eory Lab IV. 0 0 0. 0 I MUS 1210 Music Literature I. ....... o 0 0. o o o o o 3 MUS 1 220 Music Literat ure II ................................................. 3 MUS 3210 Music History I ..... 0 o 3 MUS 3220 Music History ri ............................... o o o 3 MUS 1710 Private Instru c tion I (Pri mary P erformance Area) ....... ....... ........... 2 MUS 1720 Private Instruction II ( Primary Perform ance Area) .............. ... 0 0 2 MUS 2730 Performance Ill (Primary Performance Area) ............ ................. 4 MUS 2740 P erformance IV (Primary Perform a nce Area) ...... ...................... 4 MUS 3730 P erformance V ( Pr imary Performance Area) ...................... o 4 MUS 3740 Performance VI (Primary P erformance Area) ........................... 0 4 MUS 4730 Performance Vll (Primary Performanc e Area) .................... ........ 4 MUS 4740 Performance Vfll (Primary Performan ce Area) ........... o 4

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 9 Selec t two hour s from the following: MUS 1610 Clas s In !ruction I ( Secondary Performan ce Area) . ..................... I MUS 1 620 Clas s Instruction U (Secondary Performance Area) .......................... I MUS 171 o Private Instruction I ( Secondary Performance Area) .......................... 2 Select 1 2 hours from the following: MUS 281 o u Ense mble .................................. L ................. I MUS 3810 Ensemble ........................................................ I MUS 35 1 0 Ba ic Cond u c ting ............................ ...................... 2 MUS 4790 Senior Recital ....................................................... I Total ....................................................................... 73 *Must be Class Pian o I and II unle ss student is able t o pass the Private l nstmction Audition in piano. Exception: Students e l ec ting the organ emphasis must take Class Voice I and II unl ess they ar e able to pass the Pri vate Instructio n Audition in voice. Ensembles must be chose n from those appropriate to the student's area of emphasis. Swden ts major ing in music peiformance must e nr o ll in an e nsembl e during each se m es t er of full-time residence. In addition to the above core r eq u irement, all music performance major s must elect one of the follow ing emp ha ses: Voice Emphasis MUS 1400 Vocal Diction ........ ......... ...................................... 3 MUS 4420 Vocal Pedagogy ...................... ......................... 3 Total .......................................................................... 6 Piano E mpha s i s MUS 3 100 Counterpoint .............................. .................... 3 MUS 4410 Piano Pedagogy ..................................................... 3 Total ............................................. ...... .................... 6 Organ E mphasi s MUS 3 1 00 Counterpoint. ....................................................... 3 MUS 3520 Choral Cond u c tin g and Literature ................................... 3 T ota l .................................................. ............... ...... 6 Guitar E mpha s i s MUS 3100 Counterpoin t ................................................... 3 MUS 3 150 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging ..................... ........ 3 T otal .................................................. ....................... 6 Woodwind Bra ss, String or Percussion E mpha s i s MUS 3 1 50 Instrumental a n d Choral Scoring and Arranging ........... ................. 3 MUS 3530 Instrumental Conducting and Literature ................................. 3 T otal....... .............................. .................. .......... 6 Minor in Music R equire d Courses emester Hours MUS Ill 0 Music Theory I ...................................................... 3 MUS 1120 Music Theory Lab I .................. ....... ..................... I MUS I 1 30 Mu sic Theory II ....................... ... ................... .... 3 MUS 1140 Mu s ic Theory Lab U ......................... ....................... I MUS 2 110 Music Theory IT! ... ............ ........ ...................... 3 MUS 2120 Mu sic Theory Lab Ill .............. .......... ....................... I MUS 1 210 Mu ic Literatu r e I. .................... . ... ..... ........ 3 MUS 1 220 Mu sic Literature H .. ......................... ...................... 3 MUS 1 7 1 0 Private Instructio n I .............. ............ ...................... 2 MUS 1720 Privat e Ins truction II ....................... ....... ......... ... 2 Select two h ou r s from the following: MUS 28 1 0 Ensemble ................. ..... ................................. I MUS 2810 Ensemble ........... .................................... ........ I Upper -Di vision Elective in Music Theory His tory, Literature or Pedagogy ........ ........... 3 T ota l .................................. . .................................. 27

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100 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES PHILOSOPH Y DEPARTMENT Philosophical que s tion s are of the most enduring intere s t beca u se they are fundamental to our intellec tual and practical concern s As a critical investigation into the assumption s and impl ication s assoc i ated with all disciplines, phi l osophy is interdi s ciplinary in character. However, thi type of inquiry requires technica l concept s and methods so it take s on the character of a specialized discipline Philosophical inquiry is an interaction between speculative and critical thought, recognizing no pre e tab l ished limits in its int erests or its critical exami n ation Therefore philosop h y as a stu dy pro gram enlar ges the s tu dent's h orizon s of ideas throughout the vario u s disciplines in the college, whi l e providing the critical s kills neces s ary to ana l yze and synthesize these ideas. It enco ura ges students to explo r e c r eative ly the full range of philosophical options to consider alternate points of view and to delve into profound is s ues. Because of the subject matter, attitudes and methods e mplo yed in phi l o ophy the stude nt will be much better prepared for l eadership in per s onal lif e, c ivic responsibilities, and pur uit of a career. In addition to offering a variety of cour s es for student s who are planning to take on l y one or two courses in phi l osophy the department offers two programs, both of which featur e flexibility and individualized training: A major for s tudents seeking a s olid genera l training/background that can serve eithe r as a ba s i s for graduate studies in such varied area s as philo ophy, the humanities l aw medicine bu s iness, and urb an planning and development or a s a basis for a career in which the specialized training required is provided by the emp lo yer, suc h as careers in corporate management, gove rnm e nt pol itic banking, or education. A minor for tudent s w ho h ave a lr eady chosen a caree r and seek to comp l ement their spec iali ze d training/background with the opportunities afforded by phi l osophy to increase their career options and generally to increase the quality of th eir lives. Student s who either major or minor in philosophy are enco ur aged to take Univer ity of Colorado a t Denver course s that contribute to the requirement s or the ba l a nce of their philosophy experience These s tudents should consult the chair of the Philosophy Department at MSCD whe n planning to take Uni ver s ity of Colorado at Denver cour s e s Philosophy Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses Seme ter Hours PHI 1440 Logic ........ .... ....... . ....... .............. . ..... .... 3 PHI 3000 History of Greek Philo s ophy ....... .... . ..... ..... . ......... 3 PHI 3020 His t ory of Modern Philo ophy . ..... ...... . ..... ............... 3 PHI 4100 Senior Seminar ........................... ............... . ....... 3 T otal ............................ ......... ............................ 12 A ddition al Course Subject Areas R eq uired Lower -Div i s ion : Introdu c tory Cours es ................................ . ......... ........... ... 6 Upper Divi s ion : M e taph ys i cs and/or Epis temology ........ .. ... ........... .......... .............. 3 Ethic s and / or Social Philosophy .............................. ................ ..... 3 One philo s ophi cal problem one philo so pher, or one philo s ophical movement ............... 3 On e c our se r e lating philo ophy to a nother field, s u c h as r elig ion art s cien ce, or his tory .......... 3 T o tal ........ ................... ........... .......... . ...... ........... 1 8 Addition a l Elec tive s at Any L evel (se l ec t ed in c on ultation with and approv e d by the Philo s ophy Department ) .......... ....... 6 T o tal................ .... ....... ..... ...... .... .... ................. 36 Minor in Philosophy Required Cour es Semester Hours PHJ I 0 10 Introduction to Philo s oph y .............. ..... ........... ........... 3 PHI 103 0 Ethic s ... ..... ................. .... ....... ...... .............. 3 PHJ 1110 Language, Logic and P e r s u a sion ......... ..... .... .... . .... ........ 3 T o tal .............. ............... ................. ....................... 9 E l ectives A minimum of II additional s eme ter hours of which 7 are upper-d ivis ion c ourses in philo s ophy se lected in co n s ult a tion with and approved by the Philo s ophy Department to make a total of 20 seme s ter hours.

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 10 PHYSICS D E P ARTMENT The Phy sics D epartment offers cour ework leading to a ba c helor o sc ien ce and to a bac helor of art degree. Minors in physic s and theoretical physics are also offered. ndergr a duate s preparin g for work in indu try or for graduate s tudy s hould take the bachel o r of sc ience in phy ics Student s pr e paring to teach seco ndary s chool phy sics shoul d take the bachelor of arts in phy sics in addition to satisfy ing the requir e ment s for l i ce n s ure in science. S ee the Secondary Edu ca tion Departm e nt sec tion for details T h e Phy sics D epartment i s taug h t joint l y by the faculties of MSCD and the University of Colorado a t Denv er. MSCD s tudent s will receive ins tru c tion from the f ac ult y of both ins titutions. The Phy sics D epartment a l s o offer courses i n a s tronomy whic h are de signed primarily as ge nera l inter es t co ur se Physics Major for Bachelor of Arts R eq uired Cour es Se m es t e r Hour PHY 23 1 1 General Phy s i cs l . ................................................ 4 PHY 233 I General Phys i cs II ................................................... 4 PHY 232 1 General Phys i cs I Laboratory ...................................... I PHY 234 1 General Physi cs II Laboratory .................................... ...... I PHY 2811 Modem Physics .......... ............. .......................... 3 PHY 28 20 Classical Phy s i cs ........... .... ...... ........................... 3 PHY 3211 Analytical Mech anics ................ ............... .......... ...... 4 PHY 38 10 Quantum M ec hani cs ...... .......... ....... ............... ........ 3 Require d O pti on ( Se l ect A o r B ) Option A: PHY 3711 PHY 472 1 PHY 4920 Option B : PHY 4610 PHY 4620 PHY 4920 E l ectives Physics Laboratory I. ................ ................................ 2 Advanced Phy sics ll Labora t ory ....................................... 2 Physics Senior Seminar ......................... ..... ............ .... I Computational Phy sics I ..................... .................... .. .. 2 Computational Phy ic ll .................... . .................... 2 Physics Senior Seminar .... . ....... .............................. I A minimum of 1 0 additiona l semester hours of upper-division physics co u rses se lected in co n s ultati o n with and approved by the Physics Departm ent. .... .... ....... ... ........ I 0 Total .................................. ........ ........................... 38 A one-yea r sequence of PHY 20 / 0o n s ult ation with and approved by the Physics D epartment ...... 1 0 Total .................................. ............ .......................... 38 A one-year sequence of PHY 20 1 0 PHY 2020 PHY 2030 PHY 2040 ma y be subs titut ed fo r the PHY 23 1 1 PHY 2331PHY 2321PHY 2341 requiremellls with the consellf of the Phys i cs Departm ent. Students are urged to take one year of genera l chem i s tr y and one year of e le c tr onics These co urses should be c hosen in co nsultation with the student's advise r in the Ph ysics Departmetll Physics Major for Bachelor of S cien c e R eq u i r e d Courses Se m es ter H ours PHY 2311 General Phys i cs I .................................. ................. 4 PHY 233 1 General Ph ys i cs ll ............... ........................ . .... 4 PHY 232 1 General Physics I Labora t ory ........... ...... ....................... I PHY 234 1 General Phys i cs ll Laboratory ........................ ..... ............. I PHY 2811 Modem Ph ys i cs ........... ..... . .......................... 3 PHY 2820 Classical Phys i cs ......... ......................................... 3 PHY 3211 Analytical Me c hanic s ........ ........ ......................... .... 4 PHY 333 1 E l ectricity and Magnetism .... .......................... .... ......... 4 PHY 3411 Thermal Physics ......................... ......................... 3 PHY 3711 Physics Laboratory I. . .... ......................... .............. 2 PHY 38 1 0 Quantum Mechanics l. ............ ... ................ ................ 3 PHY 4810 Atomic and Molecular Structure ....................................... 3

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102 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Required Option ( elect A or B ) Option A : PHY 4711 PHY 4721 PHY 4920 Option B : PHY 4610 PHY 4620 PHY 4920 Elect ive Advanced Physic s I Laboratory .......................... o o o o o 2 Advanced Physic U Laboratory ..... o 0 o o o o o 2 Phy sics Senior Seminar 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 o o I Com put ational Physics I ........... 0 0 o o o 2 Com put atio n a l Physics II ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Physics Sertior S em inar .......... 0 0 o o o I A minimum of 8 additional semester hours in up per-division physic s courses mu s t be se l ected in co n s ult ation with a nd approved by the Phy sics D e partment. ................................ 8 T o tal ......................................................................... 48 A one-year sequence of PHY 2010-PHY 2020-PHY 2030-PHY 2040 may be s ub s tiwted for the PH Y 2311 PHY 233 1 PHY 2321 PHY 2341 requirements with the co ns ent of the Phys i cs D epart m e nt Th e s tu dent is urged to take o ne yea r of ge n era l c h emi s tr y and one yea r of e l ectronics. lr is r eco mm ende d rhar st ud e nt s rake PHY 3/10 and PHY 3120 as e l ec ti ves unl ess rhe swdenr is a l so a math maj o r These co ur ses s h ou ld b e c h ose n in co nsultat io n with th e sflldenr' s adviser in the Physics D eparrmenr. Mino r in Physics Required Cou r ses emeste r Hours PHY 2311 Gen e ral Physics I ............... 0 0 0 4 PHY 233 1 Genera l Phy s i cs II .......................... 0 0 o o o 4 PHY 2321 General Phy s i c 1 Laboratory ....... 0 0 0 0 I PHY 234 1 G e neral Physics U Laboratory ....... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 PHY 2811 Modem Physics .... ....... . ......... ................ 0 3 PHY 2820 C l assica l Phy s i cs ..... ............................................... 3 A minimum of 8 additional se me s t er hours in upper-division physic s co ur ses mus t be se lect ed in cons ult ation and a pproved b y the Phys i cs D e partment .... ............................... 8 T o tal ........................................................................ 24 A o n e-year sequence of PHY 2010-PHY 2020PHY 2030P H Y 2040 ma y b e s ub sri rwed for th e PHY 2311PHY 233 1 PHY 232 1 PHY 234 1 r eq uir emems with th e consent of the Ph ysics D ep arrm em

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 Minor in Theoretical Ph y sics Students en t ering this program are expected to have facility in ordinary diffe r ential equations, vector cal c u l u s, and l inear a lgebr a These skills are normally acquired in MTH 2420, MTH 3140, and MTH 3420 or in PHY 3110 and PHY 3120. With tJ:te consent of the Phys i cs Department, st uden ts with s trong backgrounds in phys i cs may elect n o t to complete PHY 2311 and P HY 2331 and may substitute 8 semester credit hours of approved physics e l ectives. R equire d Courses Se m es t e r H o urs PHY 2311 General Phy s i c l .................................................... 4 PHY 2331 General P h ysics D ..... ... .................................. 4 PHY 3211 Analytical Mechanics ............... .................................. 4 PHY 3331 Electricity and Magnetism ....... ........ ........................... 4 PHY 3411 Thermal Physic s ................. .......... ......................... 3 PHY 4610 Computationa l Physic s 1 ............................................... 2 PHY 4630 Continuum Phy sics .................... ............................... 3 Total ............ ..... ...................................................... 24 POLIT I CA L SCIE CE D E PARTMENT The study of politica l science is mainly the stu dy of government s: their social an d econ omic enviro n ments how they are organized, how and why they decide upon and carry out policie and how nation states interact o n the world scene. It also incl u des the study of political ideas and va lu es, past and pre sent, citize n be h avior, and rece nt trend s in me t hods of re se arc h and analysis aimed at enlarging o u r knowledge of political processes. In this ense, the Political Science Departme n t provides s tudents with the perspective and backgro un d nece ssary to understand the complex and often confusing reality of politic To focus t h a t search for unde r standing, each political science major will se lect an area of emphas i s either in A m erican pol i tics or international/comparative politics. Course l i stings for each area are avai l able in the department office. The departmental o hou es th e college's public administration and urban tudies program Prela w The Politica l Science Departm e n t also offers p r elaw advising to all students at the college, regard l ess of a student's major field of study. If you are thinking of applying to law chool or would like more information on t h e LSAT or law schoo l s, please contact the college's prelaw adviser in the departme nt. Political Science Major for Bachelor of Art s R eq uir e d Courses Se m es ter H ours PSC 1 010 American National Government ......................................... 3 PSC I 020 Political Sys t ems and Ideas .... ..................................... 3 PSC 2020 Conducting Political Analysis --or -PSY 231 0 Introductio n t o S t atistics for Socia l and Behaviora l Science s ..... ..... 3 PSC 3050 Politi cal Theory ..................................................... 3 PSC 4020 Special Studie s ( Senior Experience) .................................. 3 Subtota l ............ .... ....... ........ ...... . ........................ 15 E l ect i ves A minim u m of 21 additional semester hour s of pobtical science must be completed. At lea s t 18 of the se 21 ho ur s m u st be upper div i sion courses (3000 and 4000-level) and mus t be approved by the depart ment. Generally, students may apply only 1 2 hours of credit in nonclas s room co urse s toward the major as a pproved electives. Subtotal ............. ....................... .... ....................... 18 Total ..................... ...... ... .......................................... 36 Course Dis tribution a nd A rea C onc entration Of the 21 e l ective hour s in pol itical science 12 must be in the student's primary area of tudy: Ameri can politics o r international/comparative politi c A minimum of 3 hours must be drawn from the r emaining area of concentratio n and 6 hours can be se l ected at th e s tudent's d i scretio n

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104 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Political Science M inor R eq uir e d Co u rses Semester Hours PSC 1010 American National Government .......... ........................ 3 PSC 1020 Political System s and Ideas ... .......................................... 3 PSC 3050 Politi ca l Theory .......................... ........ ................ 3 Subtotal .......... ....... ........................ ........................... 9 E lectiv es A minimum of 12 additional semester hou.rs are required in political science courses. At leas t 9 of these 12 h o ur s must be in upper-division co urse s (3000 and 4000-leve l ) and must be approved by the depart ment. Generally tudents may apply only 6 hours of credit in nonclassroom co ur ses toward the major as approved electives. Subtotal ................................................................... 12 Total ................ ....... ...... .................................... ....... 21 Public Administration Minor Public administration i the study of governmental organizations, their management, and how govern ment policies are formulated and carried out. The Political Science Department offer a minor in public administration available to tudent intere ted in a caree r in government serv ice to students presently employed in government who wi h to increa se their skills and job tatus, and to s tudents plan ning to t ake po tgraduate work in public admi ni stration Requir ed Cour es Semes ter Hou rs Basic courses required for all pubHc administration min ors: PSC 1010 American National Government .................................... .... 3 PSC 3020 lntroduction to Public Administration ..................... ................ 3 Two of the following courses: PSC 3220 Public Policy ................................ ....................... 3 PSC 3240 In tergovernmental R e l ations ....................................... 3 PSC 3260 Politics of Budgeting ...................................... .......... 3 PSC 3280 Publi c Personnel Administration .......................... ..... ... 3 ACC 3200 Governmental Accounting ............................... .............. 3 One of the following courses: CMS 2010 Principle s of lnformation Systems ............ ............... ........... 3 MT H 1210 Introduction to Statistics ........................... ............... 4 lnt e m s h ip PSC 4 1 20 or Substitute Course (mi nimum ) ............ ..... ................. 3 T o tal ..... ...... .... ....... ............... ............................ 18-19 A governmental internship will be required of all tudents for a minimum of one seme ter and a minimum of three semester hours. This requirement may be waived for student with at lea s t one calendar year of a dmini strative work experience in a government agency. It is recommended that public administration minors al o take a cour e in both public speakin g and in technica l writing. AI o availab l e to students is a program of courses leading to a recognition of completion award in pub lic adminis tr ation presented by th e Political Science Department. Student may earn the award by suc cessfully completing a selection of cour es amou ntin g to 26 erne ter hour Cont act the Political Science Department for details. Major and Minor in Urban Studies Please see the Urban Studies sect i o n of this Catalog. Internships In addition to scheduled classes, political science s tudent s are encouraged to enroll for at lea s t one offcampu s intern s hip Students may receive credit for practical work experience in various areas of government se rvic e. Placement in a governmental position may be initiated by the student Cooperative Educati o n or the Politi cal Science Department. Int e r ested s tudents shou l d contact the Political Science Department for detail Courses with Variable Topics Not lis ted among the regular course are a variety of topics courses and se lf-paced courses that are offered each semester and give the student a greater variety of choice. Please be sure to check the current Class Schedule for these classes, which can be repeat ed for credit under different titl es.

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 Washington D.C., Program Durin g the s umm e r essio n the d epartme nt offers a specia l prog r a m in Wa s hin g ton D.C. a imed at pro viding s tud ents with a uniqu e p e r s p ective o n the nation 's political sys tem Th e program combines on ca mpu s m ee tin gs and r e l evant reading with a modul e h eld in Wa s hin g ton Please contact the depart ment a bout thi s progr am. A l so, the department works with s tudent s int e r es t e d in an intern s hip in W as hin g ton D.C., durin g s umm e r fall or s prin g se m es t e rs. Golda Meir Center for Political Leader hip Th e Gold a Meir Center for Politi ca l L eade r s hip i s connected to the his tori c Golda Meir Hou se on the Aur aria campus. The ce nt e r i s organized and operated through the Polit ical S c ience Department. The ce nter's purpo se i s to develop pro g rams tha t examine the rol e of l eaders a nd leader s hip at all l eve l s of the political proc es ; ble nd togethe r theo r e tical and applied politi cs; and e mpha ize voices and per spectives that expand the boundari es of traditional l ea d e r s hip analy s i Urban Studies Program Please see an ad vi er in the Political Sci e n ce D e partment for updated c han ges being made for this program A bach e lor of arts or a bache l or of cience degree with a major in urban st udie s i s offered The bache lor of sc ience d eg r ee i s r eco mm ended for tho se s tud e nt s d e iring a s tronger background in quantitative aspect s of urb a n s tudies Cour ewo rk i jointly off e r ed by MSCD and the Univer ity of Col o r a do at D e n ve r ; the major i s offe r e d at MSCD Th e emphasis o f this program i s an interdi ciplinary approac h to l e arning. To s upport thi approach, six areas of e mpha s i are off e r e d within the major : l oca l government/urban planning. hou ing patt erns a nd a ltern a t ives. cu ltur a l lif esty l es. transportation and co mmuni ca tion nonprofit organization admini tration bus ine ss, man age m e nt and urbani za tion. Urban Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts Th e requirement s t o tal 46 se m es ter hour s a nd inc lude: 25-27 hour s of core co ur ses. 9 h o ur s se l ected from eac h of four areas of pr ocess. 2 hour s in an a r ea of e mpha s i s t o be se l ec ted by the s tudent. 6 ad ditional h ours for a b ac h e l or of scie n ce d eg r ee. Urban s tudies' ma jors who do not w i s h to pursue a minor in some othe r disc ipline will be r e quired to take at l east 14 e m es t e r hour s, fo r a total of 60 se m es ter h ours. Th e 14 se me s t er hour s mus t be se l ec t ed in consultatio n with a facul t y a dvi ser. Th e r e are diff e r ent r eq uir e m ents for the n o nprofit business administration business mana ge m ent, and urbani zation e mpha ses. Required Cour ses Semester Hour s URS I 000 Introductio n t o U rb a n Studies. . . . . . . . ...... 3 URS 2000 An ln side Look at Urban In s titution s ........... ................. ..... 3 URS 3000 World P a tt e rn s of U rb anizatio n . ............................ 3 URS 3800 Applied U rban R esearc h Methods ...................................... 3 URS 4890 lnterdi c iplinary Seminar ............ .......... ............ ....... 4 URS 4990* Int ernship in U rb an Studies ... .................................... .... 3 Advanced writing course, whic h m ay be taken from n o npr ofit busi n ess a dmini tration, E n glis h or communications* ...................................................... 3-4 Statistics which may be taken from economi cs geography, mathe m atics, p syc hology or sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... 3-4 Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-27 *No npr ofit o r gonizarion admin i s trati on students may elect to fulfi ll these requirements within tile non profi t o r ga ni z ation adminis tr ation area of e mphasis A total of 9 hours s hould be select ed from th e following areas o f processes on pr ofi t organization adminis tr ation s tudents wiU take one course from t wo areas for a total of at l eas t 6 hour s. Subs tituti o n s for these courses s h o uld be arranged through an adviser for urban s tudi es.

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106 SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Urban S p atia l Structuring Proce sses URS 3100 lnt emal Structure of the City ...................... .................... 3 URS 3510 Community Development and Planning ....... .......................... 3 URS 4000 Urban Simulation/Game ............................................... 4 GEG 2040 Geography of Denver .................................... ........ 3 GEG 3600 Urban Geography ................................... ............ 3 GEG 4610 Urban and Regional Planning .......................................... 3 Urban Political Processes URS 2100 An Analysis of Urban Boundaries ........................... ......... 3 URS 3500 Emerging Urban PoHtical Systems ........................... ............ 3 URS 4000 Urban Simulation/Game ............................................ 4 PSC 3000 American State and Local Government. ........................ ......... 3 PSC 3020 Introduction to Publi c Administration ................................ 3 SOC 3710 Politic s and Power ........................................ ....... 3 Urban Economic Processes ECO 20 10 Principles of Econontics-Macro ........... ......... .................... 3 ECO 2020 Prin ci ples of Economics-Micro ................................... 3 ECO 3300 State and Local Finance ....................................... ........ 3 ECO 3350 Urban Economic Analysis .......................................... 3 ECO 3400 Tran s portation Economics ............ ............................... 3 ECO 3450 Environmental Economics ........................................... 3 SOC 3240 Poverty in America .................................................. 3 Urban Social Processe s GEG 1300 Geographic Analy s i s of Current Social I ssues ... ........................ 3 GEG 3620 Popul a tion, Resource s, and Land Use ..................................... 3 GEG 4620 Land U e: Residential ............ .................................. 3 SOC 3090 Urban Sociology ............................... ........... ........... 3 SOC 3240 Poverty in America ............................................. 3 T o tal .......................................................................... 9 Areas of Emphasis In each of the first four following areas of emphasis, the tudent selects a minimum of 12 hours w ith a minimum of 6 in urban s tudies. The student may take any co mbinat ion of interdisciplinary courses related to the area of emphasis to be selected in co nsult ation w ith an adviser. One of the co ur ses should be a skills course related to the area of emphasis. Local Government-Urban Planning Emph asis Thi s area of emphasis concentrates on the basic conceptual and theoretical plarming processes as they relate to and actually appear in urban governme nt occupation and profes s ions. The area of emphasis is de s igned for students seeking e ntr y into gove rnm e nt occupations or seeking advanced study in public administration or urban planning beyond the bachelor 's degree Required Course Semester Hours URS 2500 ew Front Range Communities ......................................... 3 URS 2890 Urban Problems: Topics ........ ....................................... 1-3 URS 3510 Comm unit y Developm e nt and Plannin g ............................... 3 URS 3890 R ead ing s in Urban Studies ...... ...... .... ........................... 1-3 URS 4000 Urban Simulation/Game ................... ........ .................. 1-4 URS 4100 Urban Environmental Perception .......... ........................... 3 URS 4500 Citie s of the Future ......................... ... ........... .... . 3 URS 4510 Community Involvement Methods .................................... 3 URS 4710 Th e Urban Elderly: Pri so ners of Space ............................... 3 Housing Patterns and Alternatives Emphasis This area of emphasis concentrates on the assembly and development of residential land the nature of public and private programs to provide housing and the maintenance, and rebui l ding of n eig hborhoods. A broad rang e of topics includes the evolution of publi c interventio n in housing and residential renewal the conflict between phy ical and human criteria in housing dec i sions and constraints on the public's ability to deal with hou ing issues Completion of thi s area of e mpha sis provides a foundation for grad uate work and/or employment with a wide range of public and private hou s ing agencies

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SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 R eq uired Courses Semester Hours URS 1 7 1 0 Introdu c t ion to Denver e i g hborhood s ........ . .... . .... ........ . 3 URS 2300 Introduction to Urban H o u ing Problems . . ..... ..... ...... . 3 URS 2500 ew Front Range C o mmuniti es ........................................ 3 URS 289 0 Urba n Pr oble ms: T opics ........ ........ . ........ ............... 1-3 URS 3300 H o u sing: Issues and Polic i es ........................................... 3 URS 3890 Readings in U rban Studi es .... . ........ . .... ...... ......... 1-3 URS 4 000 Urban Simul atio n / G a m e ................. ............... ........... ... 1-4 URS 4500 Citi es o f the Futur e .................... ............. ................. 3 MGT 3000 Organizationa l M anagement ................ ............................ 3 FIN 3 800 Real Est at e Practice and Law .................... ...................... 3 Cultural Lifestyles Emphasi s Thi s area of emphas i s conce ntrate s on th e impa c t s on th e urban landscape of th e lifestyles of v ariou s culture s, whether ethnic r a cia l chronolog i c al religiou s, economic, or gender. The consequences of the s e impact s ar e v i e w e d as among th e mos t s ignificant d e t e rminant s of urban s tructure form function and s oci a l intera c tion The s tud e nt i s provid e d with s pecialized trainin g a nd e xperience for e ntry into profes ion s with publi c o r priv a te a ge n c ies th a t d e al directl y w ith th es e group s w ithin a plur alisti c urban en v ironment. Required Course Sem ester Hours URS 2500 ew Front R ange Communities ........................ ......... .... 3 URS 3710 Ethnic Gr oups in Unite d States Cities ......... .......... ......... .... 3 URS 3 8 9 0 Readings in Urba n Studi es ............................... ............ 1-3 URS 4000 Urban Simulation /Game . . . . ..................... 1-4 URS 4 t 00 Urba n Environmenta l P erce ption . ........... .................... 3 URS 4710 The Urban Elderly : P riso n ers o f Space ............ ...... ...... ..... . 3 Transportation and Communication Emphas i s The tran portation-communication area o f emphas i s h as three basi c acad e mi c focu s e s: ( I ) t o a id s tu dents in refining their perception s of th e variou s network s th a t e x i s t in th e urban s etting ; ( 2 ) t o provide tool s and technique s to analyze these n e twork s ; and (3) to in c rea e the s tud ents' under s tanding that tr a nsportation and communication are int e rdep e ndent with s uch fact o r s a s land u s e politic s, and demography. Completion of thi s area of emphasi s provide s a foundat i on for a profes sional career or f ur ther g raduat e training. R eq uired Courses Semes ter Hours URS 228 0 Introdu ctio n t o Tran s port atio n Systems ......... ............ .... .... 3 URS 289 0 Urban Pr oble ms: T o pics ..... ........ . .... ......... ........ 1-3 URS 3280 Tran s port ation: Is u e and P olicies ...................................... 3 URS 3890 Readings in Urban Studi e ..... ...................................... 1-3 URS 4000 Urban Simulation / G a m e ......................... ........ ..... ....... 1-4 URS 4500 Cities o f the Futur e ........ .... . .... ..... .... ....... ........ 3 Nonprofit Organization Administration Emphasis The onprofit Organi z ation (NPO) Admini s tration emphas i s combines class room th e ory and practica l experience in a compre h e n s ive format. Stude nts form a l cl assroom experi e nces are supplement e d by at leas t 2 0 hour s per week during two e mesters in placem ent e x perien ces All fie ldwork i s carefully upervi s ed and s tudent progress will be measured ag ain s t l e arning obj ectives c ooperati v el y d e v e lop e d for eac h cours e b y th e s tudent a gen c y s upervi sor, a nd th e college coordinator o r fac ult y m e mber. Thi ar e a of emphasi s i s des i g n e d to pro v ide an educ ation a l program for a very s pecifi c a dmini s trative level in nonprofit a g encies and organization s The directive s kill s includ e development and mana g ement of volunteer program s, fundraising propos al writin g, program and human resourc e dev e lopm e nt. Required Courses Sem ester Hours URS R e quir e d Cor e C ourses. . . . . . . . . . . . ....... 1 6 S e l ected Electives ................................................................ 7 OA Emphasi s ........... ...... ... . . ........ ............. .......... 2 0 HSP 20 I 0 Principles o f onpr ofit Admini s trati o n .................. . ............. 4 HSP 3210 Orga nizatio n a l Stability of onprofit Organizatio n ........................... 4 HSP 3610 Finan c i a l Account a bilit y and Organizat i o n a l Control o f PO' ................. 4 HSP 4020 Fundrai sing and Proposal Writin g f o r NPO's ........ . ............... 4 HSP 4310 Human Res our c e D eve l opment in NPO' s ........ ................ ........ 4 T o tal .............. .... . .... .... .... ..... ............ ..... ... .. 43

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108 SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Bu s in ess, Man age m ent a nd Urba n izat i o n Empha i s This area of emphasis tre ses the interrelationships between the private bus iness sector and the public policy and urban designers and decision maker Public ector/private sector/po l icy makers' coopera tion, or the lack thereof, in the future, will have a direct effect on urban lifestyle. Issues covered are the roles of busine s and urban government in the overall process of urbanization; the functions of manag ing bu ines s and managing government; the importance of sales tax revenues to both business and gov ernment; and with le s governmental employment in the futu r e, the changes that are in store for small and medi u m-sized bu si nesses. Thi s area of e m p h asis is directed toward the s tudent eeking an under graduate major in management or administration of government organizations at the local, state, or fed eral level or in management positions in private indu stry. R e quir ed Cour ses Semeste r H o u rs URS Core ......................................................... ........ 25-27 Bu ine s, Management, Urbanization Emphasis .............. ......................... 21 MGT XXX (any MSCD introduction to b u siness cour e) .............................. 3 MGT 2500 Small Busine ss Mana ge ment ......................................... 3 MGT 3000 Organizational Management ..................... ..................... 3 MKT 3000 Prin cip l es of Marketing ............................ ............. 3 Six hours to be se l ected from: ECO 3500 Man age rial Economics .... ...................................... ..... 3 MGT 4530 Organizational B e h avior ............................................. 3 MKT 3010 Marketing Re search ........................................ ........ 3 MKT 3110 Advenising Management ........................................... 3 MKT 3300 Marketing of Services ................................... ......... 3 MKT 3310 Cons u mer Behavior .................................... ......... 3 ACC 3080 Small Business Taxation ......... ............................. ........ 3 Urba n S tudies Ma jor f or B ac h e l or o f Scie nce The req u irement for the major in urban tudies l eading to the bachelor of cience degree includes at least 6 semester hour s in addition to the bachelor of arts degree The 6 hour mu t be taken from the follow ing list of cour es: CMS 2010 Prin ciples of Information Sy tern s ........... .... ...................... 3 CMS 2230 Word Proc essing ................. ................................. 3 CMS 3120 BASIC Programming and Graphics for Computers .......................... 3 MTH I 310 Finite Mathemati cs for the Ma n agement and Soc i a l S c ien ces .... ............... 4 Ur b a n S tudies M in o r Minors for both the bachelor of cience degree and the bache l or of arts degree are available. The minor can be designed to provide the s tudent with cour e experiences that are most rel evant to the student's occupational and educational goal Students, in consultation with the department offering related course and the student' urban st u dies faculty adviser will develop individual minor that will reflect the best po s ible e l ective curriculum, and will ensure that an urban emphasis i maintained. R e quir ed Cour ses Semest e r H o ur s URS I 000 Introduction to Urban Studies ......... ........................ ......... 3 URS 2000 An Inside Look a t Urban Institutions .................................. 3 COM 2610 Introduction to Technical Writing ............. ......... .................. 3 Sub/Oral ....................................................................... 9 12 a ddition a l semeste r hours are required to complete the minor. The elective courses are t o be se lected in consultation with a URS faculty adviser Electives ........................ .............. .......................... I 2 Toral ...... .................. ......................................... 21

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, SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT P ychology D e partm e n t s tudent outcome goa ls: Upon co mpletion of a degree program in p sy chology stude nts will be ab l e to: D e mon s tr a te a knowledge of the m a jor his toric a l contributions and the m es, ba sic prin ciples, cur r ent issues, an d e m e r ging d eve l opme nt s in p sychology. Communicate knowledge of the field of p sychology both orally and in wri tin g, the l a tt e r follow ing the American P syc holo g i ca l A soc i a tion g uid elines. Re lat e p syc hol ogical prin cip l es and methodology t o the probl e ms and i u es in other di ciplines. Conduct independently a b asic literature earch on a give n probl em in psychology and integrate thi s new inf o rmation into a co h e rent und e r tandin g of the ba i c issues relating to thi s problem. Apply the fundam e ntal s of r esearch methodology and s tatistical a n alysi t o the int e rpr e t atio n and evaluation of r e earc h r e po rts. E x pre s an appreciation for the value of p syc hologi cal know l e dg e in improving our world a nd for individual diff ere n ces and univ ersa l commonalties in human experie n ce. Th e major or minor program i s to be planned in co n sultatio n with an advise r f rom the P syc hology D epartmen t by the beginning of the junior ye ar or upon tran f e r into the department. Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses Semester Hours PSY 1001 Intr oductory P syc hology......... ..... .... .... ............. ...... 3 PSY 2310 Introduction t o Stati stics for Social and B ehaviora l S ciences ............ ...... 3 PSY 2320 Inferential Statis tics ..................................... ........... 3 PSY 3310 P sychological R es ear ch Methods I ............ ...... ................ 3 PSY 3320 P syc hological R esearch Methods II ...................................... 3 PSY 4510 H istory and Systems of P syc hology .................................. 3 Subtotal ..................................................... .... .......... 18 In a dditi o n students must c h oose one course from each category: Social PSY PSY PSY PSY 2150 2410 3050 3470 Experi ment a l PSY 3570 PSY 3590 PSY 4300 PSY 431 0 PSY 4390 Cross-Cultural P syc hology ........................ ....... .... ....... 3 Social P syc h o l ogy .......... ........................... ............. 3 P sychology of Gender ................................................ 3 P syc hology of Violence and Aggression ...... ............................ 3 Cognitive P syc h ology ................................... .... . .... 3 Theories of Motivation ............................................... 3 Sensation and P e r ception ................. ............................ 3 Phy s iological P syc h ology .............................................. 3 P sycho logy of Learning ...... ......... ......... ........... . .... 3 Clin i ca l /Per so n ality PSY 2 1 60 Per so nality and A dju stment ........ ........... ...... . ...... .... 3 PSY 3000 Theories of P ersonality ..... . ....... ........ ..................... .. 3 PSY 3100 P syc hology of Coun seling ........ .......... ............. ...... 3 PSY 3620 Abnormal P syc h o l ogy .... ...... . .................... . .... 3 Developmental PSY 221 0 P syc hology of Human Dev e l opme nt. ................................. ... 3 PSY 3250 Child Psycholog y . ............ . ........ ...................... 3 PSY 3260 P syc hology of Adole scence ............................................ 3 PSY 3270 Adulthood and Aging .............. ........................ ....... 3 S ubtotal .......................................... ........................ 12 To t al ..................................................................... 30 Electives: A minimum of 1 5 a dditional emes t er h ours in p syc hology course se l ec ted in co n s ultation with and approved by a P sychology Department adviser, making a total of 45 hours in p syc holo gy. o more than 9 of the se hours may be PSY 2950 co ur es, and no more than 6 of these hour s ma y be PSY 4980. Th e m aximum number of hour s in psyc h o l ogy a student may count toward a bac h e lor of arts degree i s 60. Subto tal ................................................................. IS Tota l H o u rs R eq uired for the Maj or .............................................. 45

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1 1 0 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Additional R equire m ent B!O 1 000 Hum a n Biolo gy for on-Majors ............ ...... ......... .... . .... 3 -orB!O 1080 Ge n eral Introduction to Biology ....... ... ............. ................ 4 or e qui valent Thi s additional requir e ment may be applied toward General S tudi e the minor or degre e e l ectives. Students considering adva n ced d egrees sho u l d b e aware that, in additio n to co ur sework in th e areas lis t e d a bov e, gra duat e programs often ha ve s p ecific und e r g radu a t e co ur se pr e r e qui s ites. Requir e d or recommended course depending on the gra du a t e program include Theorie s of P e r sonality, Abnormal P syc holo gy, P yc h ology of Learning, Child P sychology, Physiolo gica l P syc holo gy, [ndustrial P ychol ogy, Sen sation and P e r cep tion Cooperative Educ ation in P sychology, Teaching of P syc holo gy, and Advanced Statistics. Therefore s tudent s s hould cons ult wit h a P syc holo gy D epar tm ent advi er to choose ap pr opriate p syc hology e l ective Students int erested in the ge rontolo gy area of e mpha s i s must se l ec t a minimum of 30 hour s (see lis t under Sociology D epartment, gerontology area of emphasis) in addition to the 30 hours of required co ur se for the psychology m a jor This mu t be done in co n s ultati o n with and a ppr oved by a P syc hol ogy D e partm en t adviser. Th e ge ront ology em ph a is ma y be applied in lieu of the 15 e l ec tive hour s in the psychology major and the minor require ment. Student s may not count the rune co ur e twi ce t owar d meeting r e qui remen t s in both the major and the gerontology e mph a is; different course s mus t be cho se n t o complete the major hour s and the gero ntol ogy hour s Students de s iring sec ondary lice n sure in social studies s hould contact an advise r in the S ec ondary Edu cation Departm ent. Th e p syc hol ogy emphasis r e quir es PSY 1001, PSY 3260, and s i x a dditional hour s of e l ectives ( thr ee upp e r division ); PSY 2210 or PSY 2410 i s s u ggested. (P l ease see page s XXX of thi s Catalog for required co urses. ) [n meeting the r eq uir e m e nt s for the p syc h ology m ajo r (descr ibed above ), tran s f e r s tud e nt s must take a minimum of 1 5 seme t e r h o ur s of psychology coursework a t MSCD of which a t l east 9 must be upp e r divi ion c r edits. Transfer s tud e nt s mus t h ave co mpl e t ed both semesters of a two-semester introductory p syc holo gy course for equiva l ence to exist. Three hour s will count towar d the m ajor or minor; thr ee, as electives to gradua t e. NOTE: The P syc h o l ogy D eparm1e nt does not co um CLEP cre dit t oward the total number of semester hours requir ed for the major or minor ; extra co ur sewo rk is n ecessary to make up the diff e r ence. The P syc h o l ogy D epartment does not accept co rr es p o nd ence stud y co ur ses t owa rd the total number of semes ter h ours requi r e d for a maj o r or minor. H owever, bot h CLEP and co rrespond ence s tud y c redit can cou nt to ward the degree. Students who w ish. to use psycho l ogy co ur ses to fulfill G ene ral Studies requirements or an interdisciplinary major or min or must ea rn additional h o urs to fulfill the t o tal h o urs for e ither the major or minor in ps yc hol ogy. The o nl y exce ption is PSY 4510, Hi story and S yste ms of P sychology, whic h ma y be used as a Senior Experience w ith o ut bein g replaced in the major o r minor. Pl ease co nsult with an adviser. Holistic H ealth and Wellness E d uca ti o n Multi-Mi n o r The multi-minor may be arrang e d through the P sycho l ogy D e partm ent and includes the r eq uir e d co ur ses list ed und e r the holi stic h ealt h and we lln ess ed u catio n multi minor on page XXX of this Cata l og. Minor in P sycho l ogy Req u ired Courses Semester Hours PSY I 00 I Introductory P syc h o l ogy ............... ............................... 3 PSY 4510 His tory and S y terns of P syc hology ........ ....................... ..... 3 In addit i on to the se two r equi red co ur es st udent s mus t take at l eas t one course fro m any two of the four ca t egories l.is ted on the pr ev iou s page und e r : Social Expe r imental Clinical/Pe r sona lit y, a n d Developm ental. Subtotal ......... ...... ... ................................................... 6

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 ELECTIVE COURSES In add ition to the requir e d co u rses, s tudent s mu s t tak e 12 emes t e r h o ur s of PSY cour ses chose n from tho se li sted under the major or other department offerings .... .' .... ........... ......... 12 Total Hour s R equired for the Minor .............. ................................... 24 o more than 6 semester hour s ma y be PSY 2950 variable topics co ur es, no more than 3 se mester hour s may be PSY 3970 Practicum and a t lea t two e l ec t ives in psychology (6 semes ter hours ) taken at MSCD must be up per-division. See also the OTE in the preceding P syc h o l ogy Department sect ion SOC IOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOC IAL WORK DEPA R TMENT Sociology Sociology i s the study of ociety in all of its forms, from individ u als to large organizations. The soc i ology major e mph asizes the a ppli ed aspects of the field of soc iology. Applied s ociology is the use of socio lo gica l th eory and methods to analyze and so l ve practica l problem s and iss u es that exist in the everyday soc ial wo rld This m eans a student majoring in soc i o l ogy will be able to apply what they have l earned in a variety of workr e lat ed settings or to go on to grad uat e sc hool. A m ajo r in sociology requires tha t students take a nd p ass 36 ho ur s in soc i ology, w ith a minimum of a "C" in all soc iology courses t aken The s tudent m ajoring in soc iolo gy will take 1 5 required hours a n d 21 elective hour s, for a total of 36 hour s in the discipline. Sociology Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses Semester Hours SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociolo gy . . ..... .......... ............... 3 SOC 3320 Sociologica l Theory : Pas t and Pre se nt .................................... 3 SOC 3590 Social Statistics ......................................... ........ 3 SOC 3600 R e earch in th e Social Sciences ......................................... 3 SOC 4600 Advanced R esearc h in the Social S ciences ............ ..................... 3 -{)rsoc 47 1 0 Applied Soc i o l ogy ........................................ ........... 3 Total. ........ ............................................................... 15 ELECTIVES A minimum of 2 1 additiona l e m ester hours in socio l ogy is req u ired t o comple t e th e m ajor. Studen t s may choose as e l ectives any addit i onal courses offered in socio lo gy. At least 12 upper-division se me s ter hour in sociology must be completed at MSCD by students majoring in socio l ogy. The departme nt recommends that the tudent's choice of electives be made in co n s ult ation with an adviser. ELEC TIVES: APPLIED SOCIOLOGY The major focus of the soc i o l ogy major is applied soc iology The focus in applied sociology exte nd s the applied perspective of the department that begins with the required courses i n the major. Applied co ur es e mpha size the prac tic e of sociology and the applicatio n of sociology to real soc ial iss u es Cl asses in thi s area emp h as i ze practical skills, knowledge and theori es that the soc i o l ogist can u e o ut side of the academic environ m e nt. Applied soc iolo gy includes fie ld work in gove rnm e nt, business non profits, a nd other organizatio n s a nd agencies. Cour ses that are specifically designed to meet these cri t e ria are listed below soc soc soc soc soc soc soc soc soc 3090 3160 38 1 0 4200 4210 4220 4300 4600 4710 Urban Socio l ogy Industry Work and Occupations Population I ss u es Social Strat i fication and Inequali t y Structure and D ynamics of Modem Organizations Society and the Environment Social Change Advanced R esearch in the Soc ial Sci ences Applied Socio l ogy

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112 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES ELECTIVES: GE E RAL SOCIOLOGY As an alternative to the applied sociology foc u s, the student may choose in tead to create a program of 21 elective hours that meets their own needs and interests. Some po s sib l e areas of concentratio n are li ted in the ection on ociology minor s below Student s s hould h owever fee l free to create their own list of classes that m ee t the ne cessity of takin g 2 1 e l ective hour s in socio l ogy. It i s recommended that the student build an area of concentration with the help of a ocio l ogy adviser. GERO TOLOGY EMPHAS I S Gerontology deal s with the causes and conseq u e n ces-biological psy c hological, and social-of aging Drawing from many fiel ds of academic s tudy this area of emp h asis prepares the st udent for prof ess ional and paraprofessional careers in human s ervices for the aging population. To comple t e the gerontology area of emphasis a student selects (in addition to the 15 hours of required courses in the socio l ogy major) in consultation with and approved by the Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work Department, a minimum of 45 h o ur s from the following list of co ur ses The ge rontolo gy area of e mpha sis may be applied in lieu of the 2 1 e l ective ho urs in the socio lo gy major a nd th e minor requirement. R equire d Courses Semeste r H ours SOC 1040 introduction to Gerontology ....... .... ...... ..... ............ .... 3 SOC 3040 Contemporary Issue in Gerontology ......................... . .... 3 SOC 3090 Urban Sociology ... ....... ........................ ....... ........ 3 SOC 3 100 Death and D ying ........................ ...... ..... .............. 3 SOC 3 240 Poverty in Americ a ............... ............................... 3 SOC 3410 The Family in Tran s ition ........................... ..... ............. 3 SOC 3800 Health and H ea ler s ....... ............................. ......... 3 SOC 3810 Population I ss u es ......... .......... . ...... ....... ... . . 3 SOC 3 8 3 0 Mental Disord e r s ................................. .... ........... 3 SOC 4 700 Advanc ed Field intern hip ...... ................. .......... ........... 3 SWK 3030 Soc ial Work with the Aging .... ..... ........ ...... .... .... ..... 4 PSY 2160 P e r s onality and Adju stme nt ...... . ...... ......... ........... ... 3 PSY 2210 P s y c hology of Human D e velopment. ........................ ...... ..... 3 PSY 2270 Death and Dying ........................ ........ .... ............ 3 PSY 32 70 Adulthood and A ging ................... ..................... 0 0 0 0 3 PSY 3 9 8 0 Cooperative Education : P s ychology 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 HES 1 050 Dynamics of H ealth 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 HES 2040 introdu c tion t o utrition .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SPE 4760 Communication and the Elderl y ............... 0 0 0 0 3 A minimum of 45 hour s from the course s lis t e d a bove i s r e quir e d .... 0 0 0 45 Minor in Sociology Required Course SOC 1010 introdu ctio n to Soci olog y 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 A minimum of 15 add ition a l semes t er hours in socio l ogy cour es, selected in co n sultation with a depart ment adv i e r is required bringing the total to 1 8 seme s ter hours. At least 6 upper-division h our of the minor must be completed a t MSCD. Area s of concentr a tion are offered a s s uggestions for s tudent s who wis h to explore a particular subdis cipline of ociology in greater depth. The cour s e in each concentration focus on the i u es, theories, and r esearc h in a specific a r ea of s ocio l ogy. Suggested Areas of Co n centration for a M inor in Sociology The Urban Community Semester Hours SOC 3 090 U rban S oc iology ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SOC 313 0 The C h icano Community .............. 0 0 0 0 3 SOC 3140 Th e Bla c k Communit y 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SOC 3220 Race, Gender, and Ethni c Group s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 SOC 3810 Population Issu es 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

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Social D e viance soc 20 1 0 soc 2500 soc 3500 soc 3510 soc 3550 soc 3830 The Family soc 3400 soc 3410 soc 3440 soc 3460 soc 3470 SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 Current Soc ial I ssues .... ..... .... ..... ....... ..... ............. 3 Deviant Behavior in Society ........................................ .... 3 Criminology .......... ....................... .......... .... .... ... 3 Juvenile Delinquen cy ............ ......... .......... .......... ..... 3 Sociology of Law ........................ .................... . .... 3 Mental Disorders ................................................... 3 Childhood and Adolescent Socialization ......... ......................... 3 The Family in Transition ................... ................ ........ 3 The Black Family ........ .................. ...................... 3 Sociology of Sexuality . . . . . ............ ........... 3 The Chicano Family ....... ................... .. ............. ........ 3 Medicine and Health SOC 1040 Introduction to Gerontology ................. ......................... 3 SOC 3040 Contemporary Issu es in Gerontology ... ..................... .... ........ 3 SOC 31 00 Death and Dying .............. ..................................... 3 SOC 3800 Health and Healers ...... ........... ............ ..... .......... 3 SOC 3830 Mental Dis orders ................................................... 3 Socia l Stratific atio n SOC 3220 Race, Gender and Ethnic Group ........ ..................... ........... 3 SOC 3240 Poverty in America ..................... ........... ............... 3 SOC 3430 Sociology of Gender Role s .... ......... ..... ... ......... ........... .... 3 SOC 4200 Social Stratification and Inequality . ....... .... ........... ...... .... 3 A nthropolog y Anthropology i s the exploration of human diversity. The comb ination of cultural archaeological, and biologica l perspectives offer a viewpoint tha t is unique in st udying the problems r elate d to the s urvival and well-being of the human species. From th e living and vanished cultures of Colorado to tho se of New Guinea or South America a nthr opology can be applied to assist our under stand ing of human differ ences Anthropology Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses Semester Hours ANT 1010 Physical Anthropology and Prehi s tory ................................... 3 ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ........................... ....... 3 ANT 2100 Human Evolution............ . .. ................. .... .... 3 ANT 2330 Cross-Cultural Communi ca tion .................... ..................... 3 ANT 2640 Archaeology ..................................................... 3 Subto t al ...................................................................... 15 El ec tives . .... ...... .... . . . ................................... ... 2 1 T o tal. .......... ............ .... .... ..................... ..... .......... 3 6 At lea st 12 upper-division semester hours in anthropology must be completed at MSCD by st udent s majoring in the field. Students desiring teacher licensure in ocial s tudi es sho uld see a n adviser in the Secondary Educa tion Department. Minor in Anthropology The minor provide s an opport unit y for st udent s to bring a uniq u e anthropological perspective to their already chosen area of interest. Anyone having to deal with human or cultural difference s would benefit from se l ec tin g a focus in cross-cultural contact archaeology, or hum a n diver ity. R eq uired Courses Semester Hours ANT 10 10 Physical Anthropology and Pr ehis tory ........................... ......... 3 ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthropolog y .................................... 3 Subtotal ............................................ ................. .... .... 6 Elec ti ves ...... ............... ............ ................................. 15 Total ............ .................................................... ...... 2 1 At least 6 u pper-divi sio n se m es t er hour s must be completed at MSCD

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114 S C HOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Behaviora l Scie nce Majo r for Bache l o r of Arts This is a distributed major, offering students a structured overview of the social sciences. This program emp has i zes breadth of coverage with a focus in an area selec ted by the st udent. This major is p articu larly applicable for stude nt s interested in teacher l icen sure a t the e l ementary and seco ndary l evels. The stude nt must have preliminary approval of the se l ected pro gram by an adviser from the Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work Departm ent. A minimum of 12 upper -div i sio n hour s in the major must be taken a t MSCD Required Courses Semester H o u rs ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthropo l ogy .......... ...... ............... 3 ECO 2010 Principle s of Economics-Macro ... ................ ............ ...... 3 HIS 1 220 American History since 1865 ....... ... ... .......... ......... .... .... 3 PSC 1 010 American National Government ............. .......................... 3 PSY I 00 I Introductory Psychology ........... . .......... ............. ... .. 3 SOC I 010 Introduction t o Sociology ................ ......... .......... .......... 3 Subt o tal ......................... .... .......... ............................ 18 ELECTE D FOCU S In add ition to the introductory course, eac h student must se le c t 1 2 hour s in one of the following social science disciplines : anthropology, economics, his tory politica l sc ien ce psychology, or ocio l ogy. A minimum of 9 upper-division hour mu t be se l ec t ed with the approval of an a dvi ser. Subt o tal ..... ................ ........ .... ................ ................... 12 GENERAL ELEC TIVES An additional 12 hours must b e selec t ed from any of the disciplines outside of the elected focus. Cour ses may be se l ec t ed from anthropology, econom ic s, history, political sc i e n ce, psychology, or soc iology At l east 9 of these hours mu t be upper-division. o mor e than 6 hour s may be taken in any one discipline. Subt owl ............................................... . ................. 12 Total ........................ ........................... ..................... 4 2 GE ERAL STUDIES REQ IREMENT The s tudent i expec ted to co mpl ete all General Studi es requirements a sta t e d in thi s Catalog. The s tu dent may u se up to 6 hours from the required course for the behavioral science major to co mplete the socia l sci e nce component. SE lOR EXPERIE CE Selection of a Senior Experience co ur se will vary according to the studen t needs. Students see king teacher lic e n s ur e must se l ec t student t eac hing Other student may se l ect the capstone co ur e in their focus or the applied a nthropolo gy co ur e cu rrentl y bein g deve l oped by the department. Stud ents d es irin g teacher licen s ur e s hould see an adviser in the teacher education program. o minor i s offered Socia l Wo r k Major for Bache lor of Scie nce Social work is a professional pr actice. The primary educatio n a l goal of the major is pr e paration for beginning l eve l social work pr actice in social age n c i es. In a ddition the socia l work major provides an appropriate foundation for graduates who plan to p u r sue advanced degr ees in soc ial work The ociai work major prepares students for ge n e rali s t practice with minority or m ajority client The focus of the program i on the n eeds and tr e ngth s of oppressed u rban populatio ns, e thni c minorities, and other diverse groups. Majors acq u ire the knowledge skill values, and et hics required for general ist practice with individuals, groups, communities, and larger sys t ems. Theoretica l knowledg e and field work ex perience s provide preparation for social work with diverse population s in a variety of settings, such as c hild welfare mental health, correctio n s, gerontological socia l wo rk health public welfare, domestic violence, and d eve lopm e nt a l disabilitie Stud e nt s who major in social work are not req u ired to comp let e a minor.

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 1 Individualized Minor Individualized m inors are avai l ab l e in socia l work, which will omplement a variety of h ealth care majors. Acc r editation The social work major is fully accredited with the Council on Social Work Education For more infor mation co nta ct the social work program office a t (303) 556-6162 or ( 303 ) 556-4464. Require d Courses Se m es ter Hours SWK 1010 Introduction to Social W e lfare and Social Work ............................. 3 SWK 1020 Introduction to Agency Experience ........... ........................... I SWK 2050 Human Behavior and the Socia l Environment I ................ ........... 3 SWK 2060 Human Behavior and the Social Environment ll ............. ............... 3 SWK 3410 Introduction t o Generali s t Practice .............. 0 0 4 SWK 3780 Social Welfare Policy ................... ............................ 3 SWK 3790 Research in Social Work .............................. 0 0 4 SWK 4010 Advanced Social Work Practice ...................... .... . ........ 4 SWK 4250 Exploring Current Social Work I ssues ....................... 0 0 3 SWK 4410 Advanced Cro sCultural Social Work I ss ues ........................... 4 SWK 4790 Profe ssionallntems hip I ...................... 0 0 5 SWK 4810 Professional Internship ll .............................................. 5 SWK 4850 Integrative Seminar ........ 0 0 0 0 3 Subtotal ........................... 0 0 45 E l ec tive s Select nin e hours from the following: SWK 2020 Social Work with Women ............................ 0 0 0 0 3 SWK 3010 Social Work Services for Children and Adole sce nts ... 0 4 SWK 3020 Case Management in Social Work Practice ......... 0 4 SWK 3030 Social Work with the Aging ..................... 0 0 4 SWK 3450 Mutual Aid Groups in Social W ork ............................... 0 0 3 SWK 4800 Work s hop (Variable Topics) ............ 0 4 SWK 4900 Seminar (Variable Topics ) ............................................. 4 Subto tal .............................. o 0 0 o 9 T o tal .............. ....................................................... 54 Case Management: The soc ial work major and the Human Services Department have d eveloped a joint program in case management and developmenta l disabilities. The purpo se of the program i s to prepare s tudents to perform the role s and functions of a case manag er. An award of completion i granted to indi viduals who complete the required courses. For more information call (303) 556-6162. Liberal Arts Foundation and Basic Skill R equire m e n ts Social work majors are required to take the following courses outside the socia l work program in prepa ration for the major : SPE 1010 Public Speaking -
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116 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES SPEECH COMMUNICATION DEPARTMENT Proficiency in one of the areas of speec h open s up many careers t o the gra du ate. For in st ance, in mass communication, radio, television, and film, a graduate might a pire to careers in on-air operatio n s, mass media ideas, promotion public affairs, or radio-te l ev i sio n sales Graduates mig ht become con s ultan ts in advertising or specialists in instructional or edu cational televi ion or in the public br oa dcastin g serv i ce. Careers are open as broadcasting spec i alists in public r e lation s, public informat i o n business, industry, and gove rnm ent. An emph asis in s peech pathology/audiology provide s so und background for s tudents purs uin g caree r s in educat ion, vocatio nal r e habilitation, and health care. Graduates in communi cation disorders have the prerequi ite cour ework t o pursue a rna ter's degree in speec h pathology or a udi ology, which open s door to careers in chools, hos pital s, community c l inics, rehabilitation centers, a nd private pra c t ice. Graduates in rhetoric and public addre have achieved s u ccess in law industrial, and o rgani zational communication, ed u catio n a l administration, public relation s, peech writing for political figures, t eac h ing public relation s, and theology. Profess ional and e ducational theater occupatio n s are open to thea t e r graduates with specialties in stage c r aft, o und engineering, sc riptwriting directing a nd acting. Communication s Theory and Organizational Communication: Communication consulting/traini n g and confe r e nce plannin g both present lu crative and satisfy ing caree r s t o speec h gra duat es s pecializing in the e areas of communication. Job opportunitie are available in education, government, bu s in ess, and indu stry, as well as privat e practice as a cons ultant. Speech Communication Major for Bachelor of Ar ts Core co ur ses are required for all areas of e mph asis. Independent s tudy topic courses and experiential educat ion courses s u c h as practicums and internships m ay be taken in each of the program areas. Additional semeste r hours in s peech cour ses will be electe d in cons ultation with the a dvi se r an d a pproved by the Speech Communication Department. Total minimum semester hour s for a major in s peech communica tion: 42. Required Cor e Courses Semes t e r Hours SPE I 0 lO Public Speakin g ................................................ ... 3 SPE 3200 Oral Interpr etation: Pro e and Poetry .................. ...... ... ..... 3 SPE 3740 Psychology of Communication ................ ................ .......... 3 Total ............................................................. .... 9 Broadcasting Emph asis Required Courses Semest e r Hours SPE 2400 introdu ctio n to Radio and Televi s i on Broadcasting ..... ..................... 3 SPE 3430 R a dio -Te levi sio n Announcing .................................... .... 3 SPE 3440 Tel evision Production ............................................. ... 3 SPE 3450 Broadcast Journalism: Radio -<>r -SPE 4450 Broadcast J ournalism: T e l evision ............. ........................... 3 SPE 3480 Workshop in Radio Productio n ................... .......... ...... ..... 3 SPE 4480 Seminar Practicum in Broadcasting ......... .............. .... .... ...... 3 TLC 2490 Beginning lnternship in Radio TV, Film and Mass Communications -<>rSPE 2980 TLC 3490 -<>rCooperative Education for Speech Communic ation .................. .. ...... 1-6 Advanced Intern ship in Radio, TV, Film, and Mass Communic atio n s SPE 3980 Cooperative Education for Speec h Communicatio n .......................... 1 -15 Total .................................. ......... ...... ................ ... 20-39 Communication Theory Emphasis Required Cour es Semester Hours SPE 1700 Communication Theory ...... ..................... .................... 3 SPE 1 7 1 0 interpersonal Communication: The individual as a Communicator ............... 3 SPE 21l0 Discussi on M ethods .......... ....................................... 3 SPE 2720 onverbal Communicat ion ..................... ...................... 3 Total .................. .... ....... .......... ........... ................... 12

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SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Organi za tional Com munication E mpha s i s Required Courses Se m es t e r Hours SPE 1 700 Commun i cat ion Th eory .......... ......... .... ..... ........... .... 3 SPE 3100 Business and Profe ssio n a l Spealdng . . . . . . .......... 3 SPE 3110 Strategies of Organizational L ea d e r s hip ................................... 3 Total .......................................................................... 9 Publi c Address a nd Rh eto ric E mph as i s R e quired Courses Se m ester Hours SPE 3090 Argumen t ation and Advocacy ....................................... ... 3 SPE 4080 Rhe t orical Criticism of Publi c Address .................................... 3 SPE 4090 Classica l Rhetoric . . ...... ......... ...... .......... ......... 3 SPE 4100 Techniq u es of P ers u asion .... ...... ........ .... ..... ............. 3 Total ......................................................................... 12 Co mmunication Disorders E mph as i s R e quired Courses Se m es t e r Hours SPE 3500 Anatomy a n d Physio l ogy of the Spe ec h and H earing M echanism ......... .... 3 SPE 3520 Language Acq u isition ... . ............... ......... .............. 3 SPE 3530 Voice Scie n ce : Path o l ogy and Te c hnology .......... ...................... 3 SPE 3540 Phoneti cs and Lan g u age Samp l e Analyses ... ........................... 3 SPE 3580 Speech Disorde rs: Articulatio n and Stuttering ........ .............. ........ 3 SPE 3600 Audiology I ................... .................................... 3 SPE 3620 Aural R e h abilitation ...... .... .................. ................. 3 SPE 4510 Language Disorders .... . ......... ......... ........... ........ 3 Total ................................................................ ......... 24 Theater E mphasi s R equire d Courses Se m ester H ours ENG 1120 Introdu c tion t o Dr ama --Qr ENG 2100 Introdu c tion t o Literary Studies ......................... ................ 3 SPE 2210 lntroduction t o The atre ............................................. 3 SPE 2220 Techniques in Acting I .............................. ..... ............. 3 SPE 2240 Introduction t o St agecraft .............. .... .... ....................... 3 SPE 3220 Stage Move m e nt. .......... ....................... ............. 3 SPE 3280 Stage Directin g ...................................................... 3 Total ....................................................................... 18 Speech Education Em pha s i s R e quired Courses Se me ster Hours SPE 1010 Public Speaking ......................... .. .......................... 3 SPE 3200 Oral Int erpretatio n : Prose and P oetry . . . . . . . .... 3 SPE 3740 Psycho l ogy of Communication .......................................... 3 Total. ............ .................... ........................................ 9 Secondary Teacher E ducation Program in Speec h Com munication Arts R equire d Courses Se m ester Hours SPE 211 0 Discussion Method s . . . . . . . . . .......... 3 SPE 2210 Introduction to Theatre .................... .......... ........... 3 SPE 2220 Techniq u es of Acting I ........ ..... ................................... 3 SPE 2240 Introduction to S t agecraft . . . . ...................... 3 SPE 2400 Introduction to R adio and T e l evision Broad c asting .... ...................... 3 SPE 30 I 0 Advanced Publi c Speaking ............................................ 3 S P E 3090 Argumentat ion and Advocacy ......... ... 1 .... 3 SPE 3280 Stage Directin g I .................................................. 3 SPE 3300 Voice Science : Phonetics and V oice and Dic tion ............. .............. 3 SPE 3590 Classroom Int ervention for Communication Disorder s ....................... 3 SPE 3800 Instructio na l M ethods for Speech Teacher s and Creative Speech .. ......... .. ... 3 SPE 4100 Techniques of P ersuasion ................................. ............ 3

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118 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES ELECTrVES FOR THE SECONDARY TEAC H E R Eo CAT IO N PROGRAM A minimum of six semes t e r hours in speech courses is recommended in cons ultation with and approved by the Speech Communication Department. These six hour s are to be selected from the following List: SPE 3050 Intercollegiate Foren ics ................................ .............. I SPE 3080 Great American Speaker ........................................ ...... 3 SPE 3220 Stage Movement. .................................................... 3 SPE 3500 Anatomy and Phy sio log y of the Spe ec h and Hearing Mechani s m ................ 3 SPE 3600 Audiology I ... ............................. ....................... 3 SPE 4080 Rhetorical Criticism of Public Address ...... .... ........................ 3 SPE 4200 Reader' s Theater .................................................... 3 SPE 4260 Theater : Practicum I ................................................. I SPE 4490 Effec t s of R adio-Television on Contemporary Life ........................... 3 Subtotal ................................. ................................... 6 Total Minimum H o urs R eq uir ed .................................................... 48 Students seeking econdary licensure in peech education must satisfy the MSCD teacher education pro gram in addition to aU of the major requirements. Speech Communication Minor All peech communication minors are required to take a minimum of 24 hour including the co re ( SPE 1010 SPE 3200, and SPE 3740). Hour s taken be yond the core are to b e determined in consultation with a speec h co mmunic a tion adviser. Telecommunications Telecommunications is one of the most beneficial int ernship programs for co mmuni cation s tudent s in broadcasting. Under the auspices ofiJ:he Sp eec h Communication Departm ent, th e s tudent i s afforded the opportunity to gain hand -on experie n ce through c urr ent internships in radio, television, and film, pro vided by indu stry, government, business, public, and comme r cia l t e l ecommunicat ion s cente rs. The s tu dent may begin this program upon the completion of 6 hours in broadcasting-telecommunications courses at MSCD Student s hould co nt act the advi ser in broadcasting for details r e lati ve to e ligibility and placement in the tel ecom muni catio n s intern s hips. Telecommunications intem shi p are offered every se mester during each of the modules as well a on a full-se me ster basis. INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL AND INTERCULTURAL EDUCATION MSCD provide ass i s tanc e t o visiting faculty and int ernational s tudents. Important counseling i s offe r ed on v i as, school transfers, work permi sion, housing, banking, and cultural and academic adaptation. The office a l so provides assi tance to tudents who wish to arrange indi vidualized study-abroa d oppor tunities. The institute organizes numerou s confere n ces and lectures on internatio n a l i ssues throughout the year. The institute also provides inform a tion on a crossdisciplin ary indiv i dualized degre e program and minor in international studie international courses offered by various departments, and s tudyabroad courses. For information, co ntact the dir ecto r of International and Intercu l tural Education at (303) 556-4004. INSTITUTE FOR WOMEN'S STUDIES AND SERVICES The Instit ut e for Women 's Studies and Services offers a range of academic courses both int erdisc ipli nary and in the disciplines, which study the diversity of wo men's liv es and ex perience s in the U.S. and elsewhere. Stud e nt s may e l ec t to minor in women's st udie s or may choose an individualized degree pro gram or minor. Several women's st udi es courses are offered for Gen eral Studies co ur se credit or in ful fillment of the Multi c ultural g raduati on requirement. Students seeking licensure as secondary e ducation teac h e r of the socia l scienc es may se l ect from a number of wome n 's s tudies co ur ses in fulfillin g th e ir requiremen ts. AI o offered are cooperative ed u cation internships in bu s ines government, and com munit y organizations. Women's s tudi es, valuing a diverse c urri c ulum fosters the inclusion of material o n all women, men of color, and e thni c minoritie s in co ur ses throughout the college. It ide ntifie s and encourages fac ult y administrative and professional mentoring of women students and facilitates collaborative int e rdi sc i plinary r ese arch on wo m e n

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 11 The institute also provides s upport services for all female students whether or not they elect women s studies courses. These services include advising, information, and ref erral; works hops, conferences, and seminars; a newsletter; resources such as the Women's Action Gu.lde and The Scholarship Search and a small multimedia library containing books, periodicals, manu cri ts, videotapes and audio tapes, and newspaper files focusing on women's i sues. Information and application materials for a number of scholarships are available through the in titute, among them the P ame l a Mclntyre-Marcum Scholarship scholarships from several local bran che of the American Association of University Women, and the Executive Women International Scholarship. During the academic year, the institute convenes the inter discip linary Front Rang e Feminist Scholars Colloquium, bringing together facu lty, graduate stude nt s, and indepe ndent scho l ars from the metropolitan area to share research curriculum development, and applications of feminist scholarship. The institute also engages in cooperative ventures with wome n 's organizations in education business, government, and the community, for example, the Colorado Wom en s Agenda, and the Colorado Coalition for Women's History. Finally, to enco ur age and recogn i ze excellence, the institute sponsors Outstanding Wom en Awards annually in the sp rin g. Women s Studie s Indi v idualized Degree Program Through the Office of Adult Learning Services students may construct an individualized interdi s cipli nary major combining work in women s tudies with work in other di ciplines. Student should consult the director of the Institute of Women s Studies and Service and the director of Adult Learning Ser vices to initiate planning The women s stu die s individuali zed degree program i s appropriate for any student, particularly those who plan to work specifically with fema le populations. Faculty s trongly rec ommend a cooperative education intern hip. A women's studies degree ca n be combined effectively with courses in management, organizational development, psychology, history, English education, social work, nursing, human s ervices, law enforcement adverti ing public relation marketing, finance, and other fields app ropri ate to the stu dent s interest. Students gai n a sensitivity to women' i ues and are thu s prepared to work with both general and female populatio n s in a variety of areas Employment opportunities for women s studies students may be found in managing women s resource centers, rape cri i programs, and battered women's helter Student might also work in community coun eling and co n sulting or develop workshop or specia l programming for women in business and industry Graduat e are also e mploy ed in banking and as exec utiv es in professiona l association s Stu dents who plan to work in hi g h er education law, or medicine may find a women s s tudies degree a useful base for graduate or professional study. Minor Also interdisciplinary the women's studies minor uses faculty expertise from many different depart ments. Faculty strongly recommends a coope rativ e education int ernship. The objectives of both the individualized major and minor includ e heighte n e d awareness for women themse l ves; review of the cul tural patterns that define women; study of the his torical achieve ment s of women in all disciplines; and exploratio n of emerging needs and opportunities for women. Emphasis i s on both personal and profes sional growth. These objectives are met within the context of the new scholar hip on women including women of co l or ethnic minority women lesbians, women wit h disabilitie s, and international women. The courses are appropriate for students in education guidance and counseling, l aw enforceme nt human serv ice s bu iness management advertising public relations communica tion liberal arts and the behaviora l and social sc i e n ces. Men are welcome and encouraged to s tudy the scholarsnip that focuses on women. They may find from such s tudy a conceptual framework that will enable them to better under s tand, appreciate, work, and live with women. R eq uir e d Courses Semest er Hours WMS 1001 Introduction: Woman in Trans ition .......................... ..... ..... 3 WMS 1650 Women in United Stat es His tory ....... ...... .............. ............ 3 WMS 3310 Women and the Law ............ ..... ............ ........... . 3 WMS 3510 Femini s t Theory ........................... ....... ........... 3 WMS 4750 Senior Seminar .......... .................................... ..... 3 Ele c tives .................................... .... ....... ....... ... .......... 9 Total ....... . ........ ....... . .................... ....... ..... ......... 24

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120 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES ELECTfVES In addition to the core courses, 9 emester hour of e lective s acceptable to or taught through women's studies are required bringing the total number of semester hour credits for a women's studie minor to 24. These courses, some of which are interdisciplinary, are selected in consultation with the women's studies faculty and are approved by the institute Cor e courses are s upplemented each semester by topic current issue and cluster cour es ( WMS 3420, WMS 3440, WMS 3450, WMS 3460, WMS 3670, and WMS 4250); in addition, tudents s hould check the current Class Schedule for other relevant offer ings. Appropriate elective are often listed in other departments and cross-listed with women's studies. For examp l e, students may take WMS 1650 (HIS 1650 ) for either women's s tudies credit or for credit in history. Similar offerings a re available in humanitie s, fine arts, and social and behavioral science Studen t s s h ould check the Class Schedule each emester for appropriate cross-listed courses. Students are urged to get advising early in their course of study and to plan their programs with care, as some courses are offered only once each year.

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 12 The School of ProjeJJional StufJieJ provide-1 dttWenLI and performance competencie-1 needed to ducceddjully enter a cboden proje.Jdion. + . . . . . . .

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122 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES School of Professional Studies The S c hool of Profe s ional Studies offer variou d egree and Licensure programs that prepare s tud ent for s u ccess in p ecific caree r s while providing a broad e ducational ba ckg round for career and life enhance ment. The aca d emic programs compri e thr ee areas of s tudy: teacher education, te c hnology and public service professions The school include 12 aca d emic d epartment and various a dmini s tra tive units. There are more than 250 fulland part time facu lty a dmini strato r s, and s upport per so nnel in the School of Professional Studies who are com m itted to helping student attain their caree r goa l s AEROSPACE SCIENCE DEPARTMENT Colorado is one of the nation s important aerospace centers. Military in tallations, major aeros pa ce industries, increased interest in private and corporate flying, a nd the airlines tha t se r ve D e nv e r provid e many e mplo yment oppo rtunit ies. The l oca l Federal Aviation Admini stratio n (FAA) and other govern ment offices are excellent so ur ces of information. B ecause of thi s proximity stude nts hav e th e oppor tunity to visit these facilities and to tak e co ur ses that are t a u g ht by personnel from the various or g ani zatio ns. The bachelor degree programs described b e l ow have be e n carefully planned to m ee t the need s of the student and the industry. All of t h e technical courses have been developed in coope ration with the FAA and prospective employers Students w h o have comp l eted the e cou r ses are eligible to take a variety of FAA examinations l eadi n g to certification. The avia tion management d egree program prepares graduates to e nt er administrative positions within the vario u s segments of the aviation indu s try. The program i s accredited by the Council of Aviation Accreditation. Airframe a n d powerplant (A&P) courses are not offered by MSCD. However s tud ents holding a va lid FAA a irfr a m e and pow e rplant ce rtifi cate from a recognized Pan 147 schoo l may apply for 25 hour s of credit toward a bachelor of science degree, provided that ce rt ain valid atio n paper are pr ese nted with the applicat ion and a comp r ehensive exam is pa sed. The department includes the World Indoor Airport (WlA), a uniqu e flight si mul atio n laboratory. The WIA is an integrated flight and a ir traffic contro l simu l ator lab with Fixed Base Operat or and Flight S er vice Station serv ice s avai l able A Crew R eso ur ce Management lab and s tudent co mput e r tutorial lab make up the other components of the WIA. Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Science Programs The Ae r ospace Science D epartment offers baccalaureate degree programs with m ajors in t he following areas: Aviatio n Management (AMG) Airway Sci e nce Management Emphasi s (A V2) Airway Scienc e Maintenance Management Emphasis (AV4 ) Minors Avi ation Technology (ATV) Air Carrier/General Aviation Emphas i s (AT I) Aircraft System s Management Emphasis (A T2) Airf ram e and Powerplant Mechanics (APL) Private Pil ot (PRP) Aviation Management (AMG) Aviation Technology (ATV) These program s combi n e a thorough, practical, and technical training background with a gene ral col lege ed u cation to prepare the graduate for a wide variety of careers in the aeros pa ce industry. Th ese four year b achelor degree programs h ave been developed in the two-plus-two concept (a bachelor of science degree program built upon an associate of applied sc ienc e two-yea r degr ee). This co n ce pt makes it ea y for a comm uni ty/junior college graduate in an ae rosp ace program to transfer to MSCD and ear n a bachelor of scie nc e degree in the college's aviation program. In order to be awarded the b achelor of sc ien ce degree, the st ud e nt mus t meet the co llege's general requirements for the bac h e lor's degree lis ted in this Catalog under Req uir ements for All B ac h e lor 's D egrees.

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 FAAA ppro v ed G r o und S chool MSCD's Aero pace Science Departm ent is a fully certified and FAA-approved ground chool for the private, instrument, commercia l and flight and ground instructo r FAA certificates a n d ra t ings. Veterans Admini tration flight tudents should see the Aero space Science D epartment chair for information on approved flight training programs. Fli ght Cours e s Flight training is arranged by the tudent. Students mu st receive permi ss ion from the Aerospace Science Department befo r e enrolling in fligh t courses. The cost of flight training is in addition to regular tui tion and college services fees. This co t varie depending upon how frequently the st udent i s able to fly dur ing the emester and how much tim e is r eq uired to become proficient. The college instr uctor helps t h e student achieve an under tanding of th e r e lationship of flight theory to flight practice in order to acqu ire the knowledge required to meet FAA certification s tandards. Stud e nt s receiving Financial Aid assistance who are takin g fligh t training for credit mus t make arrange ment s with the flight training schools contracted by The Metropolitan State College of Denver Student s not receiving Financial Aid assi tance can obtain the ir FAA flight certificates from any approved FAA training program and s ubmit the certificates in order to graduate. Because MSCD doe s not c urr e ntly h ave contracts with V A-approved flight sc hools student receiving VA benefits cannot receive a n y academic credit for the flight training co ur ses. C redit b y Ex amination Pro cedures The ba sic provi s ion for obtai n ing credit-by-examination (a maximum of 30 semes ter hour s of credit) i s ou t lined in thi s Catalog under Academic Information The following pro ced ur es are es tabli s hed by the Aero s pace Science Department to implement thi s provi s ion : Stude nts e n tering MSCD for the first time mu t apply for credit b y exam ination durin g the firs t three week s of the fir t semester. All exa mination s must be completed within the first semes ter. Stude nt s will not be a pproved to take an examination for a co u rse with a lower number than any c our se they hav e taken p r eviou ly. Students who are re g iste r ed for but have n ot completed a hig h er-numbered course must comp l ete the examination for the l ower-numbered course within the fir t thre e weeks of the se me s ter. Examinations will not be graded during the summer sess ion. Courses authorized for credit by exam ination and the appropriate FAA license or rating follow: FAA Certifica t e Semester Course Title R equired Hours AES 1100 Aviation Fundamentals Private . ................... 6 AES 1 800 Commerc ial/In s trum ent Ground Comme r cia l/In s trum ent ................. 6 AES 3000 Aircraft System and Propul s ion Flight Engineer ......................... 3 AES 3530 Aerodynamics Flight Engineer ......... ............... 3 AES 4040 Aircraft P e rforman ce Flight Engineer ............. ......... 3 AES 4500 Flight Multi-Engine Multi-Engine ......................... I AES 4510 Flight Instructor Flight Instructor ........................ I AES 4520 Flight In tructor -lnstrument Flight Instructor .............. ..... ..... I AES 4530 Flightlnstructor-Multi-Engine Flight Ins tructor Multi ................... I AES 4550 Flight H e licopter H elicopter. ............................ I AES 4570 Airline Transport Pilot A TP Rating ........................... I AES 4580 Turbojet Flight Engineer Flight Engineer ......................... 4

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124 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES BACHELOR OF S C I ENCE DEGR EE IN AEROSPACE SCIENCE PROGRAM S Stud ents see kin g a b ac h e l o r of sc i e n ce degr ee with a m a j o r in ae r o s pa ce c i e nce h ave four option s two in a viation manag e m e nt (AMG ) and two in aviation techno l ogy (ATV ). All mus t complete the 34 h o ur s of Gene r a l Studies pecified b y the Aero s pa c e Sc i ence Department. The A e r os pace S c i e n c e Department H a ndb oo k available in the Auraria Book C e nter li t s the r e quir e d Gen eral Stud i es cour s e s and a s ug ges t e d cour s e se qu e nc e for eac h m a jor. Th e program requir e me nt s for ea ch m ajor foUow: Semester Hours Ge n e r a l Studi es .................... .... .......... ........ ................... 3 4 Avia ti o n Manageme nt (AMG) A irway S c i e n ce M anage m ent E mph a i s ( A V 2) ......................... . ...... 86 Airway S c i e n ce M a int e nan ce Man age m ent Emph as i s ( AV4) ..... .................... 88 (inc lud e 25 se m es t e r h o ur s f o r A&P certifica t e) Av iation Tec hn o l ogy ( ATV ) Air Carr i e r / Ge n e r a l A v i atio n Emph as i s ( A Tl)* ........... ........................ 8 6 ( includ es n o n -AES min o r o r 1 8 h o u rs of AES app rove d e l ec tiv es) Air craft S ys t e m s M a n age m ent E mph as i s (A T2)** .................................. 87 *AT/ m ajors m u s t h ave a n F AA co m me r cia l pil o t certificate w ith an i n s t ru me/11 r atin g and the FAA a d v an ce d g r ound in s t ruc tor ce rt ifica t e or certified flig h t ins tru c tor certifica t e t o r ece ive the bac h e l o r of science d eg r ee. **AT2 m ajors mus t h ave a n F AA co mm ercia l p i l o t ce r tifica t e w ith ins trum e m a nd multi-en gine ra tin gs a nd th e F AA ce rtifi e d fligh t i n s t r u c t or an d ins t rume nt fli g ht ins t r u c tor ce rtifi c at es t o rece ive the ba c h e l o r o f scie n ce deg r ee. Aviation Management (AMG) Major for Bachelor of Science AIRWAY SCIEN C E MA AGEME T EMPHASI S (A V2) *Co un c il on Avia t io n Accred it a ti o n Approved Emp h as i s R equire d Cou rses Semester Hours AES 1 1 00 Av i atio n Fund amenta l s ................ ............ .... ........... 6 AES 3220 Avi atio n Law and Ris k M anage m e nt ... .................................. 3 A E S 3230 Airlin e M a n age m ent ...... ........... ................................. 3 AES 3240 Air une Planni n g ........................................... ......... 3 AE S 3850 Human F ac t ors and Physi o l ogy o f Flight ............... . ......... ... 3 AES 4 200 Airport P l a nnin g ........... .... ..................... ........ 3 AE S 4 210 Airpo rt Man age m ent. ...... ............. .............. ... ........ 3 AE S 4 23 0 FBO and Air c r aft M ar k e tin g ..................... ............. ........ 3 A ES 4 2 40 A ir Car g o ................................. ........ .... ......... 3 AE S 4870 Aviatio n S a f e t y Pr ogra m M anage m ent ....................... ........... .. 3 AE S 4 9 1 0 Avi atio n M anage m ent Pr oble m s and J o b T arge tin g ............ . ......... 3 COM 4790 S enio r S e min ar in Te c hni ca l C ommuni catio n s .............. . ....... 3 Sub t o t a l ...................................................... .............. 39 Plus a minimum o f 12 seme ter h o u r s se l ected from the followi ng: AES 2200 Fund a m e nt a l o f Air Traffic C o ntrol. ............. ....................... 3 AE S 2220 Flight Dis p a t c h e r /Loa d P l a nnin g ...................... .... ...... ....... 3 AE S 3870 Ai r c raft Accident Investigatio n .... ......... ......................... 3 AE S 398 0 Coope rative Educa tion .............. ................................ 6 AE S App roved U pper Divi s i o n E l ective ..... .......... ...... ....................... 3 Subto tal ...... .............................................................. 1 2 G e n eral Studi es for all AE S M ajors ................................................ 34 A dditional R equire d Course s ( 6 hours minimum ) PSY I 001 Introdu c t i o n t o P syc h o l ogy .............. .... .......... .... ........ 3 MTH 1 2 1 0 Introdu ctio n t o St atistics ..................................... .... ... 4 -or -MTH 1 320 Calc ulu s f o r the M anage m ent and S oc i a l S cie n ces ... ...................... 3 and C OM 2610 Introdu ctio n t o T echnica l Writin g -or SP E 3 1 00 Busin ess and Prof ess i o nal Spe aki n g ................................. ... 3 S u b t o tal ........................ .......... .... ........ ..................... 9-1 0

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Management MGT 3000 Prin cip l es of Man agemen t .................. ........................ 3 MGT 3530 Human Resource Manage m ent ............. . I .............. ...... 3 MGT 4000 Management Decision Analysi s .... ............. ....... .............. 3 MGT 4530 Organizational B ehavior ............. ................................ 3 MGT 4610 Labor/E mploy ee R elations ........ .................. ....... ...... 3 MGT Elective (3000/4000 -level ) .................................................... 3 Subtota l ........................................... ......................... 18 Computer Scie nce CMS 20 I 0 Prin c iples of Inf ormation Sy s tem s ................... .................... 3 CMS 3270 Micro B ased Software ............................................... 3 CMS Approved Elective (CMS 2110 CMS 3 060 CMS 3230) ............................. 3 Subtota l .............. ..................... ................................... 9 T ota l H ou rs R equired ..................... ............... .............. 121-122 Aviation Management (AMG) Major for Bachelor of Science AIRWAY S CIENCE MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT EMPHASIS (AV4)* *This is an approved FAA airway scie n ce e mpha s is. Required Courses Se m ester H ours Airframe and Powerplant Certificate ......................................... ... 25 AES 1100 Avi ation Fundam e ntal s .... .............. ........... .................. 6 AES 2150 Avionics for Aviator s ........................... ............ ........ 3 AES 3220 Aviation Law and Risk Management ..................................... 3 AES 4130 Flight Engineer Dutie s and R espo n s ibilitie s . .... .................... 4 AES 4140 DC-10 Sys tems...... . . ............ . .... .......... 4 AES 4150 Tran s pon Category Air c r aft System s .......... .... ........ .............. 2 AES 4870 Avi ation Safety P rogram Management .................................... 3 AES 49 1 0 Aviation Man agement Problems and Job Tar geting .......................... 3 COM 4790 Seni o r Seminar in Te chnical Communi cations ............... ..... .... . 3 Subtota l ........ ............ ....... ....... ... ...... ............. .... ... 56 Plu s a minimum of 6 se mester h ours se l ecte d from the f o llowin g: AES 3230 Airline Management. . . ..... ................ ..... 3 AES 3240 Airline Pla nnin g ..................................................... 3 AES 3850 Human Factors and Physiology of Flight .................................. 3 AES 3870 Airc raft Accident Investiga tion ............................ ............. 3 AES 3980 Cooper ative Educatio n ................................. . ........ 6 Subtota l ................................... ..... ............................... 6 Gen eral Studie s for All AES M ajors ..... .... . . ... . . . ........ 34 Additional Requir e d Course (8 hours minimum ) CHE 1100 Prin cip l es of Chemi s try .... ............................... .... 5 MTH 1210 lntroduction to St atistics ............................................... 4 -or -MTH 1 320 Calculu for the Manag ement and Social Sciences ........................... 3 Subto t al. . . . . . . . ..................................... 8-9 Management MGT 3000 MGT 3530 MGT 4000 MGT 4530 MGT 4610 -or Principl es of Management ............................... ........... 3 Human Resou rce Mana ge m ent ................................... ....... 3 Manage ment D ecision Analysis ..................... ..... ........... 3 Or gartiza tional B e h avior .......................................... .... 3 Labo r/Employ ee R elations MGT E l ective (3000/4000l eve l ) ........ ............ ......................... 3 Subtotal ......... ......................... . ......................... 15 Computer Science CMS 20 1 0 Principles o f Information Sy s tem s ................ ....... .... .......... 3 CMS 3270 Micro Based Softwar e ................................................ 3 CMS Approved Elective (CMS 2 1 1 0 CMS 3060, or CMS 3230) ............ ..... ........ 3 Subtota l ...................................................... ........... 9 Total H ours R equired ...... .................... ......... ........ ........... 127-128

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126 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Av iation T ec hnolo gy (A TV) Major for B ac h e lor of Scie n ce AIR CARRJERfGE ERAL AVJATIO EMPHAS I S (ATl) R equire d Courses Se m este r H ours AES II 00 Aviation Fundamentals ..................... ..... .................. 6 AES 1400 AES 1710 -Qr-AES 1760 AES 1800 AES 2710 AES 3000 AES 3460 AES 3530 AES 3710 -Qr-AES 4710 AES 3850 AES 4040 AES 4370 AES 4860 AES 4910 COM 4790 Subtotal . Aviation Weather ............. ... .................................... 3 Single Engine Flight Simulation I .......... ........................... 3 Single Engine Flight Simulation II ....................................... 3 Commercial/lnSLTument Ground ....................................... 6 Instrument Flight Simulation I ............................. ........... 3 Aircraft System and Propul sio n ........................... ............. 3 We athe r for Aircrews ........................ ......................... 3 Aerodynamics ........................ ............................. 3 Multi Engine Flight Simulation 1 ................ ......... .............. 3 Turbo Prop Flight Simulation ........................................... 3 Human Factor and Physiology of Flight ......... ... ................ 3 Aircraft Perfom1an ce ................................... ........... .. 3 Advanced Navigation Systems ........................................ 3 Aviation Safety .................................................... 3 Aviation Man age ment Problem s and Job Targeting ....... ..... .......... 3 Senior Seminar in Technical Communication s . ........... . ......... 3 Advanced Ground Instructor Certificate .................................. 0 Profe ss ional Pilot D oc umentation ............................. ........... 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Plu s a minimu m of 18 semester h ou r s se l ecte d from t h e follow in g: MT H 1 320 Calculus for the Managem ent a n d Soci a l Sciences ........................... 3 AES 2200 Fundamentals of Air Traffic Control ...................................... 3 AES 2220 Flight Dispatc h er/Load Planning ................ ........................ 3 AES 2330 Precision Right Team .............. ................................ 3 AES 3220 Aviation Law and R isk Management .................................... 3 AES 3230 Airline Management .............................................. 3 AES 3240 Airline P l anning ..................................................... 3 AES 3550 FAA Ins tructor Certification--Ground ............................ ... 3 AES 3870 Aircraft Accident Investigation ......................................... 3 AES 3980 Cooperative Education ........................ ....................... 6 AES 4130 Flight Engineer Duties and Re ponsibilities ................................ 4 AES 4140 DC-10 Systems ...................................................... 4 AES Approved u pper-divi s ion elective ........................................ 3 CMS 20 I 0* Prin c iple s of Information Sy s tem s ....................................... 3 CMS 3270 Micro B ased Software .............................. ............. ... 3 Subtotal ........... .......................................................... 18 Required if no compurer courses are included in the program (or if co mputer profi c ien cy has not been demonstrat e d to the CMS department). Genera l Studie s for All AES Major ....................... ... ....................... 34 Minor or Approved Elec t ive s from outside Aerospace Science ...... ....................... 1 8 Total H ours R eq uired ..................... .................................. 121

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I SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 12 Aviation Technolog y ( A TV) Major for Bachelor of Science AIRC R A FT SYS T EMS M ANAGE M EN T EMPHASI S (AT2)* Required Courses Se m es t e r H o u r s AES 1100 A viatio n Fundamental s .................. ....... . .... ............ 6 AES 1 400 Aviation We a ther ................ .... ...... .................... 3 AES 1 710 Single E n g ine Flight Simul at i o n I ................. . ................... 3 --QrAES 1 760 AES 1800 AES 2150 AES 2200 AES 271 0 AES 3000 AES 3220 AES 3460 AES 3530 AES 4040 AES 4370 AES 4860 AES 4910 AES 3710 --Qr AES 4 7 1 0 COM 4790 Sin g l e Engi n e F l i ght Simulatio n IJ ..... .... ...... ....................... 3 Comm e rcial/ln s trum ent Ground .... ................................ 6 Avionic for Avi a tors .... . ... .............................. ... 3 Fundamental s of Air Traffi c Contro l ............... ...... .............. 3 Ins trument F ligh t Simul a tion I ..................... .... ............... 3 Air c raft Sys t e m s and Propul sion ........... ..................... ........ 3 Aviation Law and Ris k Manage m ent ..... ................ .......... 3 W ea ther for Aircr ews .................. ......... ... ... ......... 3 A e rodynamic s ................. ... ...... .... .................... 3 Air cra ft P e rformanc e ................................................. 3 Advan ce d Navi ga tion S ys t e m s ...... ................................ 3 Aviation Sa f ety ........ . . . ................. ......... ... 3 Avi a tion Man agement Probl ems and Job Tar ge tin g . . . . . 3 Multi -E n g i n e Flight Simul a tion I . . . . . . . ... 3 Turbo Prop Fligh t Simul at ion . . . . . . . . 3 Senior Se min a r in Te c hnic a l Commu n ications .... .......................... 3 Pr ofess iona l Pil o t D ocume ntation ...... ........................ ..... 0 MultiE n gine, CF I CFIJ D oc umentation ...... ........... . . ....... 0 Subtotal ....................................... ... ........................... 57 General Studie for All AES Majors ...... ..... ........ ........ ................... 34 A dditional R equire d Courses MTH 1120 Colle ge Tri g onom etry ........................................ .... .... 3 MTH 1 2 1 0 Introd u c tio n to S t atistics .............................. .......... ....... 4 MTH 1 320 Cal c ulu s for t he Man age ment and S oc i a l Science ... ........ .............. 3 PSY 100 I I ntr od u c tio n toP ychology ....... . ............................... 3 Subtotal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 1 3 Manage ment MGT 3000 Principle s of Manage m ent . .... . ............................. 3 MGT 4530 Or ganiza tio n a l Be h avior ............................. ................ 3 MGT E l ec t ive (3000/4 000l eve l ) ............................. .... ..... .......... 3 Subtotal ........................................ ......................... ..... 9 Compute r S ci e n ce CMS 20 I 0 Prin ciples of I nform a tion Sy s te m s ..... .... . ................ ...... 3 CMS 3270 Micro B ase d Softwar e ............ ...... .......................... 3 CMS A ppr oved Elec tive ( C M S 2110, CMS 3 060 CMS 3230) .............................. 3 Subtota l ..... ........... . ............................ .... ....... ....... 9 T o tal H o ur s R equired ......................... .... ..................... . 1 22 Thi s is an approved FAA aitway scie n ce e mpha s i s Minors D esigned t o afford major s i n other disc iplines the opportunity t o d eve l op a n under s t a ndin g of th e aero space wo rld. AES major s m ay n ot elect the AMG or ATV min o rs. Exception: AT J major s may minor i n Airfra m e a n d P owerp l a nt M ec h anics (APL)

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128 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Aviati on Management Minor (AMG) Required Courses Semester Hours AES 1100 Aviation Fund a mental s ............................................... 6 AES 3220 Aviatjon Law and Risk Management ..................... ............ 3 Subtotal ... ............ .... .... ............................ ........ ........ 9 Plus 12 hours se l ected from: AES 3000 Aircraft Sy s t ems and Propul sio n ........... .............. .............. 3 AES 3230 Airline Management ..................... .......................... 3 AES 3240 Airline Planning ..................................................... 3 AES 3850 Human Factors and Phy sio logy of Flight .............................. 3 AES 4200 Airport Planning ........................ ............................ 3 AES 4210 Airport Management .......... . ...... .............. ............ 3 AES 4230 FBO And rurcraft Marketing ............ .................. ........ 3 AES 4240 Air Cargo .......................................................... 3 AES 4870 Aviation Saf e t y Program Management ................................... 3 AES 4910 Aviation Management Problems/Job Targeting ........... .................. 3 Subtotal .......... ............................................................ 12 Total. ........................................................................ 21 T Airfra me and Powerplant Mechanics Minor (APL) Required Courses Semeste r H ours Comp l etion of an FAA-approved Part 147 Airframe and Powerplant program with appropriate college credit hour s awarded ..................... ................................. 25 Plu s: AES 4230 FBO and Aircraft Marketing .............. ............................ 3 AES 4870 Aviation Safety Program Management ....................... ........... 3 T o tal ................. ........................................ .... ......... 31 Private Pilo t Mi nor (P RP )** Required Courses Semeste r H ours AES 1100 Aviation Fundamentals .................................. ..... ......... 6 AES 1400 Aviation Weather .................. .............. . .......... 3 AES 1710 Single Engine Flight Simulation I. ....................................... 3 Private Pilot Documentation ............................... ......................... 0 AES 2710 Instrument Flight Simulation I ..................... ........ .... .... 3 AES 3850 Human Factors and Phy s iology of Flight .... ..... ......................... 3 Plus one of the two following courses : AES 3000 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion ......................................... 3 AES 4040 Aircraf t Performance ............................... .............. 3 Total ................................................................ ......... 2 1 **A ll private pilot minors must possess at l eas t an FAA private pilot certificate. Aviat ion Technology Minor (ATV)* Required Courses Semester Hours AES II 00 Aviation Fundamental s .............................................. 6 AES 1400 Aviation Weather ....................... .......... ....... ...... 3 AES 1800 Ins trument/Commercial Ground ........................................ 6 AES 1970 Professional Pilot Document a tion ........................ ............ 0 AES 3000 Amraft Sy tern s and Propul s ion ................................... ..... 3 AES 3460 Weather for Aircrews ................................................ 3 AES 3850 Human Factors and Phy sio logy of Flight ............ ................... 3 AES 4860 Aviation Saf ety (or approved elective for AY4 majors) ...................... 3 Total ........................ ................................................. 27 Must have FAA Commercial/ I nstrument t o grad uate.

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 I Credit For Airframe and Powerplant Certificate Students seeking credit for their A&P certificate must provide a copy of their certificate, a copy of the certificate of completion from the school where it wa obtained, and beginning and ending dates of A&P school atte ndan ce. Students must al o take three pas s/ fail examina tion s through the Aero s pace Science Dep artment. There will be no extra tuition charge for the 25 credits, which ca n be applied to a student's transcript. Credit is not automatically given for the A&P certificate. Students will be allowed to test as follows: Genera l t es t-S credit hours-pas /fail (Stud ents can proceed to either of the next two examina tions only if the general t es t is pa ssed ) Airframe-tO credit hours Powerp lant-10 credit hour s The maximum amount of credits that can be earned is 25. Credit will be given individually for exami nations two and three lf a student fails either the airframe examination or the powerplant examination, the department will determine which additiona l courses should be taken, and a maximum of 15 credits will be app lied toward the major degree. CRIMINAL J STICE AND CRIMINOLOGY D EPARTMENT The pre ent and future needs of U.S. soc iety require greater numbers of highly educated people in crim inal justice agencies at all levels of government. In creasingly, potential employers demand applicants who have had professional ed u cation. There is considerable interest in the criminal justice system to increase professionali m through education The present curriculum not only provides a solid founda tion in police-related areas but a l so prepares stu dent s who are interested in further study in the area of probation and parole, correction juvenile agency work, c r iminal justice administration, and private/corporate security. Course offerings within the se professional fields are related to the human ser vices program, public administra tion urban studies, and commercia l enterprises. Justice and Criminology Major for Bachelor of Science The bachelor of science in cri minal justice and criminology is designed to provide professional co ur es, a well as a broad general ed ucation The curric ulum is str uctured for the student eeking either preser vice or in-service education. Recognizing that many people who are intere s ted in such education are already emp l oyed in some form of criminal ju tice work, and that many people have completed co urs e work at the community college l evel, the department ha s developed a four-year program that provides comprehens i ve fundamental s ubje c t s in the first t wo years (lower-divi ion ) and emp h asizes s ubjects of an advanced, specialized, and administrative nature in the second two years ( upper-division). The cur riculum is s tructured to facilitate tran sfe r from two-year police sc i e n ce/criminal justice program The d e partm e nt h as an articulation agreement with the Colorado Com munit y College System. The articu la tion agreement states that if a transfer student has completed the total general education requirement s at any accred ited Colorado community college, MSCD will co n sider the s tudent 's General Studies requirements completed. A minor in business management political science, psychology, sociology, or urban studies i s s trongly recommended, but others are accepted. An individualized degree minor may also be designed to mee t the tudent 's area of interest. Stud ents must meet the college's requirement for the bachelor 's degree including General Studies, and s hould co n s ult with a faculty adviser regarding General Studies co ur ses, the se lection of a criminal jus tice area of e mpha sis, and the min or. AREAS OF STUDY The Criminal Ju stice and Criminology Department offers a bache"! or of science degree with a choice of five areas of emphasis. These areas of emphasis recognize growing specialization within the crimina l justice system and the expand in g information base in the fields of law enforceme nt co rr ections, yo uth advocacy, criminal justice administration, and corporate sec urity The areas also acknowledge the edu cational and profe ssional needs of the criminal j u stice and crimino l ogy s tudent by providing common learnin g expe rien ces through core courses required for all area of emphasis in criminal ju st ice and criminology.

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130 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Criminal Justice and Criminology Major for Bachelor of Science CRIMINAL JUSTICE CORE Required Courses for All Areas of Emphasis Semester Hours C J C 1010 Intr od u ction to th e Criminal Ju s tic e Sy tern ................................ 3 CJC II 00 Evolutionary Legal Concepts in Criminal Justice ... ......................... 3 CJC 2100 Subs t ant ive Criminal Law ........ ...................................... 3 CJC 4650 E thics for the Crimina l J u tice Profe ss ional ............................... 3 Total ............................. .. .......................................... 12 In aU areas of emp hasi s, s tudent s mu t comp l ete a minimum of 18 upper -divisio n emester hours. Area of Emphasis 1: Law Enforcement/Public Safety This e mph asis i s designed for tho e s tud e nt s w h o seek aca d emic preparatio n for caree r s within J aw enfo r ce m e nt age n c i es at the local s tate or national l evel. Required Courses in A ddition to Co re Se m ester Hours CJC 2120 Evidence and Cou rtroom Procedures ..................................... 3 C J C 2140 Criminal Procedure ................................................. 3 CJC 3120 Constitutional Law .................................... ............. 3 Total ........................................................................ 9 t Plu s 18 hours se l ec ted from the following: C J C 2150 Municipa l Law ..................................... ............. 3 CJC 2200 Law Enforcement Operations ........................................... 3 CJC 3140 Juveni l e Law ....................................................... 3 C J C 3200 Crim inal Ju stice Administrative B e h avior. ........ ....................... 3 C J C 3350 Seminar in D e linquen cy Causation, Pr eve ntion and Control .................... 3 C JC 3400 Crimina l B e havior a nd Crimina l Careers .................................. 3 CJC 3410 Crimina l Ju stice and t h e Socia l Structure ......................... ......... 3 C J C 3500 Criminal lnve stiga tion ... ...... .......................... ............ 3 CJC 3700 Civil Law for Criminal J ustice Administration ............ .................. 3 C J C 4400 Criminal Ju stice Planning, Policy Analysis, Eval u ation and Budgeting Systems ..... 3 CJC 4410 Special Topics in Law Enforcement ........................ .............. 3 Tota l ........................................................................ 1 8 Area of Emphasis II: Corrections, Probation and Parole A dministration This e mpha si i s designed for those s tud e nt seeki n g academic pr eparation for career s withi n the adult correctio n sy tern s at the community or in titutional level. Required Courses in Addition to Co r e Semester Hours C J C 2140 Crimi nal Procedure ................................ ................. 3 CJC 3120 Cons tituti onal Law ............................ ....................... 3 CJC 3280 Classification and Treatment of the Offender ............................ 3 Total .................................................. ........................ 9 Plu s a minimum of 20 hours from the following : C J C 2120 Evidence and Courtroom Procedure ...................... ... ........... 3 C J C 3140 Juvenile Law ............................... ......... ....... ........ 3 CJC 3200 Criminal Jus tice Administrative B e havior ................................. 3 C J C 3290 Probation and Parole .................................................. 3 C JC 3340 Cou n eling Skills for Corrections P ersonne l ................. ....... ....... 3 CJC 3400 Criminal Behavior and Criminal Careers .............................. 3 C J C 4300 Penolo gy .............................................. ............ 3 CJC 4310 Correctio n a l Law .................................................... 3 C J C 4400 Criminal Justice P l anning, Poli cy Analysis, Eval u at i on and Budgeting System ..... 3 CJC 4420 Pra cticum in Corrections .............................................. 5 CJC 4620 Specia l Topi c in Corrections Administration ............................ 3 Tota l ............ ....... ...... : ...... ................................ ..... 20

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 A r ea of Emphas i s ill: Youth A d vocacy/De linqu e n cy Con t r o l Thi emphasis is de s igned for tho se who wish t o pr e par e and enhance career skills for s p ec ializatio n i n youth advocacy and delinquency control. Student s transferring an a socia t e d eg ree from a criminal jus tice program are e ncouraged b u t not required to complete a min o r R equire d Courses in A dditi o n to Cor e Se m es ter H o urs CJC 3 1 20 Constitutional Law ................................................... 3 CJC 3 1 40 Juvenil e Law ........... .................................. ...... 3 CJC 3350 Seminar in Delinquency Causation, Prevention and Control .................... 3 CJC 3400 Criminal Behavior and Criminal Careers .................................. 3 CJC 3450 B e h av ior D e velopment and Treatment Plan s ....................... .... ... 3 CJC 4660 Youth Advocacy Initi atives ..... ............ ... ................... 1-15 PSY 3250 Child P syc holo gy .................................................... 3 PSY 3260 P sycho l ogy of Adolescence ....................... ................... 3 Total ...................................................................... 22-36 Note : PSY 3250 and 3260 have prerequisites. A r ea o f Emphas i s I V: Criminal Jus ti ce A dmini stra ti o n and Manage m e n t This empha i s is de s igned t o enhance the career skills of studen t s preparing for specialization in cr im inal justice management and administration. Stu dents tran ferring an a ociate degree from a cri minal ju stice program are encouraged, but not required t o complete a minor. Require d Courses in A dditi o n t o Core Se m es t e r Hou rs CJC 3 1 20 Cons1i1utional L aw ................................................... 3 CJC 3200 Criminal Ju s tice Administrative Beha vio r .................................. 3 CJC 3700 Civil Law for Criminal Ju s1ice Administration ... ..... .... ....... ....... 3 CJC 4400 Criminal Ju s tice Plannin g, Poli cy Analysis Evaluation and Bud ge tin g Sys1ems ..... 3 CJC 4670 R esearch Seminar in Criminal J u slice Administration ......................... 5 Total. ........................................................................ 17 P lu s 12 hours se l ecte d fr o m t h e f ollow i ng : CJC 3100 Logi c and !he Law .................................... .............. 3 CJC 3140 Juvenile Law ....................................................... 3 CJC 3250 Criminal Justice D elivery of Services and Deci i onM aki n g .................... 3 CJC 4100 Advanced Jurisprudence .............................................. 3 CJC 4430 Comparative Criminal Ju rice ................... ..... . ..... ....... 3 CJC 4610 Special Topic s in Criminal Ju s tic e Ad mini tration ........................... 3 Total ............................................. ......................... 12 A rea o f Emphas i s V: Priva t e Se cu r i ty A dmini stra t io n and Manage m e n t Thi area is desig n ed for s tude nt s eeking professional ca reer s in the d i ver e areas of private or corpo rate sec urity R equire d Cou rses in A dditi o n t o Core Se m es t e r Hours ACC 20 10 Prin cip l es of Accounting I . . .. .. . .. .. . . . ..... 3 CJC 20 I 0 Introdu ctio n 10 Privat e Security ...... .......... ............... . ... 3 CJC 2120 Evidence and Courtroom Pr oced ur e ................................ ... 3 CJC 2140 Criminal Proc e dur e .... ......................................... 3 CJC 3120 Constitutional Law .... ........... .............. .................. 3 CJC 3200 Criminal J u tice Admini trative Behavior .......................... . ... 3 CJC 3410 Criminal Ju tice and the Social Structure ................................ 3 CJC 3700 Civil Law for Criminal Justice Administration .... ...... ................... 3 CJC 3850 Corporate Security Managemenc ............................... ........ 3 CJC 4750 Crime Prevencion and Loss Reducrion ......................... .... ... 3 CMS 20 I 0 Prin ciples of Inform ation Systems ... ... ...... . ..................... 3 Total ........................................................................ 33 M in o r in Criminal J u s ti ce a nd Cri m in o l ogy CJC 101 0 Introduction 10 th e Criminal Ju s tice Sys1em ......... ....................... 3 CJC 1100 Evolutionary Le ga l Concepts in Criminal Justice ...................... . 3 CJC 4650 Elhics for t h e Criminal Ju rice P r ofessional ........ ....................... 3 CJC Electives selec ted in consultation with and approved by the departrnenc adviser, a t leas t 4 hour s of whi ch mus t be upper divi s ion . . ..................... 9 Total ........................................................ ................ 18 +

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132 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES EDUCATION The underlying them e of the teacher educatio n program is The Teacher as a Decision Maker in Diverse Contexts. Students' program s include Gen e ral Studie s, major s and minor s in academic di sc ipline s, and t eac her licensure coursework. All c our ses and field expe rience s expo e s tudent s to a wide variety of conte nt theories, model s, and practice that will develop deci s ion making kill s as teacher and e nabl e t eac h e r c andidate s to work with a wid e range of s tudent s in a broad spec trum of se ttings. A they enter t eac hing gradua t es will have the knowledge and kill to teach to s t ate and national s tandards in the var ious conte nt area and to demon s trate profe s ion a l s t andar d s for teach e r Cour ework and experiences are guided by th e following: The pr actices of effective, deci s ion-making t eac her s are g rounded in philo so phical beliefs re sea rch and theory D ecis ion-making t eac h ers mus t be lif e lon g l earners who recognize the need of a diver e and changing s oci ety. Th e integration and application of knowledge from general education, academic s pecializ a tion and prof ess ion a l studies co ntribut e to the developm e nt of effective teachers. Effective t eac her s are best prepar e d through extensive participation in a variety of teaching mod e l s and in a range of clinical and field ex perien ces Deci s ion -maki ng te ac her s eff ec tiv e ly u se r eflective and c riti ca l thinking to translate theory into practice. The t eac h er e du ca tion progr a m i s the prof ess ional e ducation area of the Profes s ion a J Education Unit ( PEU ), con i ting of faculty in th e S c hool s of Prof ess ional Studi es; Lett e r Art s and Sciences; and Bu si n ess. Th e progr a m i s fully acc r e dit e d by the National Council for the Ac c reditation of Teacher Edu cation and the Colorado Departm e nt of Education. The t eac her e du ca tion pro g ram pr e par es st udent s to t eac h Academic d e partment in the School of Let ters, Arts and Sciences a nd in the School of Prof e s ional Studie s pr epare tudent s with the content knowledge to t each. The Ear l y Childhood and Elem e ntar y Education Department and the Secondary Education D e partment offer t eac h e r education co ur es, c lini ca l experience and s tudent t e aching. Th e R ea din g D e partm e nt offers r e quir ed prof ess ional co ur se in ear l y c hildhood educa tion e l e mentary edu ca tion and seco ndary education. The comp l etion of a Lice n s ur e pro gram, in addition to the completion of a ba c helor's degree in an a pproved major pr e par e s tudent s to apply to the Colorado D e partment of Education for t eac her l icens ur e a t de s i g nated g r ade l eve ls. Th e particular se quen ce of ed u cation cour ses to be taken i s determined by the l evel at whic h a st udent wis he s to teach. Th e e du ca tion co ur ses may be taken a l o n g wit h the ba c helor's degre e program or after th e de g ree progr a m h as been co mpleted Lice n s ur e i granted by the Colorado D epartment of Educa tion, based on r eco mmendation by the dir ec tor of the O ffice of Clinical Service s, approval of appropri ate documents, and paym e nt of assess m e nt fees. Students re ce i ve e ndor eme nt in th e le ve l and/or sub jec t area in whi c h they are qualifi e d to t eac h Th e t eac h er educa tion program also provid e outreach to in-ervice t eac h e r including first -year as i t a n ce, m e ntor trai nin g, and other s umm e r workshops. ote: Every d egree-see king s tud e nt mu t m ee t aU requirem ent of the bach e lor degre e program includ ing an approved m a jor a minor (in mo t cases), and the co llege's General Studie s program as outlined in thi s Catalog under the chosen major. Th e r e i s a li t of approved majors or s ubject area endorseme nt s to c hoo se from (see be l ow). PLEASE CONSULT WITH A FACULTY ADVISER FOR GUIDANCE IN THE APPROPRIATE SELECTION OF A MAJOR, A MINOR AND GENERAL STUDIES COURSES

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 APPROVED MAJORS FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Anthropology Art Behavioral Science Biology Chemistry English Hi s tory Journali sm Mathematics Modern Languages (F ren ch German Spanish) Music Education Philosophy Phy sics P olitical Science P sycho l ogy Sociology Spanish Speech Communication Human Development (transfer s tud e nt s) SUBJECT AREA ENDORSEMENTS FOR SECO DARY ED CATION English Industrial Arts Mathematics K-12 ENDORSEME TS Art Music Phy sica l Education Modern Languages (French, Gern1an, Spanish) Ph ysical Education Science Social Studies Spanish Speech RECOMMENDED MINORS FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATIO Bilingual/Bicultural Early Childhood Education Special Education/Gifted Education Parent Education R eadi ng RECOMME DED MINORS FOR SECONDARY EDUCATIO Reading Special Education/Gifted Education Any minor in a s ubject co mmonly t a ught in middle and high sc hool. Support for the teacher education area is provided by the following: The Office of Clinical Services serves to integrate the laboratory experiences in the professional education programs. R equests for observations, r e earch project s and stud ies, and tutoring po s i tions at the e l ementary, middle, and high sc h oo l levels are coordinated through thi office using diverse off-campu s etti n gs. The main function of the office i s plac e ment and monitoring of stu dent teachers. Also recommendations for licensure are made by the director of the office upon pro gram completion. The Child Development Center is a preschool laboratory that serves as a training fac ility for st u dents enrolled in early chi ldh ood and other educational programs. The ce nter provide s a etting for college students to observe and participate in an ongoing educational program for young childre n Laboratory and other partner schools are a cooperative endeavor of MSCD and se lected pub l i c scho ols with the purpose of working toward a mutuall y benefic ial collaboration, or a imultaneous renewal of K-12 choo l s a nd higher education Thi s is accomplished by providing more effective educat i on for the K-12 pupil s and the rude nt in the teacher education programs providing pro fessiona l development and collaborative opportunitie s for both faculties, and e n gaging in inquiry into the best instructiona l practic es. MSCD ha s been an active participant in John Goodlad's ationa l etwork for Educational Renewal, and the Colorado Partnership for Educational Renewal, which promote teacher se lf-reflection chool renewal, and prof ess ional development. The Education Re ource Ce nter s upport students and facu lt y in the teacher ed u cation prog r ams with a state-of-the-art computer laboratory a udi o-vi ual re so ur ces, and other material s for co urse work and field experiences. The center is stocked with Pentium personal co mputers s tate -ofthe art Macintosh comp uter s, and a multimedia computer s tation. Teacher candida t es can mak e u se of re ources and equipment in th e center throughout their teacher prepar atio n program and for one year afte r they complete the teacher l icens ur e program at MSCD. The cen t er i s the s ite of g u es t lectures, workshops, se minars, and meetings within the PEU

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134 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES ADMISSIO TO THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Students seek ing to comp l ete the t eac her preparation program must move through four significant "gates" int ended to monitor stude nt progress: pro visional admission ; formal admission; elig ibili ty for s tudent teaching; and ins titutional recommendation for teache r licensure Certain requirement s con nected with each of these gates are described be l ow. Students who wish to e nt er the teacher educat ion program must apply for provisional admission for one se mester. After one semester of enro llm ent in any education c i a s, students mus t qualify for and receive forma l admission and be issued a formal adm i ss ion ca rd Requirement are es tabli shed by The Metro politan State College of Denver in keeping w ith guidelines provided by the Co l orado Department of Educatio n R equireme nt s are ubj ect t o modification, so s tudents should cons ult with a faculty adviser to confirm the current requirements. It i s r eco mmended that students who want to teach at the econdary or K-12 ed uc ation level decide on a major and tak e several co ur se in their major before entering th e teacher ed u cation program. To s tudy early childhood administra tion students do not have to be admit ted to the teacher education program or be degreeeeking. Provisional A dmi ss ion A provisional admission card will be i ss ued to all entering s tudent s in the appro pri ate educatio n depart ment office or in the initial education c l ass in which they are enrolled. With provisional admission, stu dents are assigned an ed u cation adviser to cons ult during the first se mester a nd who will remain their adviser throughout the program Also, during the first semester, students s hould b egin to develop a pro gram plan and begin their teacher candidate portfolio. Secondary and K -12 ed u cation stude nt s sho uld also begin working with an adviser in their major area. Provi s ional admi ss ion is valid for one semeste r only Af t e r provisional adm i ss ion has expired, formal admiss ion requirements mu st be met. For mal Admission By the end of their fir s t semester in the professional teacher preparation seq u e nc e, students mu st m ee t the following requireme nt s for fom1al admission to the program. Students may not take additiona l teacher ed uca tion co ur ses until they meet the se requirements All requirements for formal a dmi ssion must be met before the first day of the second se me s t er of professional educatio n c l asses. Facu l ty advis ers are available to provide additional explanation of requirement s listed. Students mu s t have a minimum grade point average ( GPA) of 2.5 on their most recent 30 seme ter hours of coursework comp l eted at a regionally accredi ted institution of higher educa tion Early chi ldho od licensure candidates who have not accrued 30 hours of college c r edit mu t have a min imum of 1 2 semeste r h ours of college work. Students mu s t demonstrate competence in oral ex pre ss ion. Students seeki n g bachelor's degrees s hould pr ese nt evidence that they pa sed a college-leve l publi c spe aking cour se with a grade of B" or above Students who earn a "C" may take an oral examination. Students who h ave bache lor' s degrees but did n ot complete a public speaking cou r se w ith a grade of"B" or above may tak e an oral examinatio n Stu dents must comp l ete and verify 50 clock hour s of s uccessful experience working w i th children or youth of the age they intend to teach. Students must s ubmit the application for admission to the teacher educa tion pro gram to the appro priate education department office with the appropriate advisers' authorizing signatures and copies of tran scripts of all college work. Students must show evidence of a negative tuberculosis test within the past year. S tud e nt s must obtain a formal admissio n ca rd from the ap propriat e ed u ca ti o n department offi ce to present to all ed u ca tion in tructor s to verify that initial requirements have be e n met. Students must take the PLACE bas ic skills t est. T r a n sfe r stude nt s may r equest co n sidera tion of educatio n co ur ses l ess than I 0 years old t h a t are a close match to MSCD 's profe ss ional courses. Stud e nt s s hould see an ed u cation advi er to assess wh i c h courses taken previou s l y may be applied to teacher licensure.

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 ELIGIDILITY FOR STUDENT TEACHING Prior to applying to student teach a ll teacher ed u cation studen t s pass the PLACE basic skil l s test. The t est includes reading comp r e h ension, mathematics, and a writing sample. Test registration materi a l s for the PLACE offered only three times a year in Colorado, available from the teacher ed u ca tion department offices Students must take the basic skil l s test durin g their first se m ester in a profesional ed ucation class. Registration must be se nt about six weeks prior to the exam. otification of co r es on the exam is r eceived about six weeks after the exam. Students m ust complete a formal application to the Office of C l inical Services no later than t h e following dates: For fall semester stude nt teaching-the third Friday in February. For spri n g emester stud ent teaching-the third Friday in September. For s ummer semester st udent teaching BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT the third Friday in Feb ruary. All students m u st: Successfully complete all other college pro gra m s and degree r equirements. Successfully complete and document 200 hour of experience with youth of the age group the stu dent i s pr e parin g to teach. This service may be with any youth group s uch as the B oy Scouts, Girl Scouts, sports team c hur c h group and education program at partner schoo ls. Experience ma y be paid or volunteer. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 in all co ur sework. Successfully complete all professional co ur ses required for lic e n sure with a grade of C or better. Have a phy s ical examination r eport including tuberculosis c l earance on file with the Student Health Service s Office. Have a pproval of the a ppropri ate sc reening committee, if applicable. Submit verification that the teacher can did ate portfolio has been prepared and the progran1 plan approved for s tudent teaching by the st udent's education advi er. Pass the ba ic skills PLACE te t. In addition, secondary and K-12 tudents must: Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 for all courses required in the major and all co ur ses in teacher edu catio n Complete all s ubject area cour e in the student's t eac hing area required b y the orth Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Have comp l ete evaluatio n s from pretudent teaching field experiences. Have approval from a co mmitt ee in the m ajor in tho se department s in whic h a major/secondary ed ucation agreement is in pla ce R ECOMMENDATION FOR LICENSURE To be recommended for licensure to the Colorado Department of Education, stud ents must: Complete student teaching and seminar with a "satisfactory" review. Complete all requirements for a bachelor's d egree in the s tud ent's major area. Complete all requirements in the professional education seq u ence. Provide verific a tion from the college s upervi or of stude nt teaching that they hav e complete d and presented their teacher candidate portfolio at one of the student teaching se minar se ions. Submit evaluations of the s tud ent teaching experience from the coopera tin g teacher and the col lege s upervi sor. Before teacher candida t es apply to the Colorado Department of Education for licensure, they must have p assed the last three of four PLACE assessments: Lib era l Art s and Sciences Professional Knowledge and Content Area. .

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136 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES LICENSURE SEQUENCES EARLY CHILDHOOD AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION D E PARTMENT Program r ev i sions are under consideration to comply with new s tat e standards. C h eck with the d e part me nt for l ate updates. The Early Childhood and Elemen t ary Education D epar tment offers profe ss ional preparat i on for teaching and education-related career This d e partment prepares s tud e nt s to app l y t o the Co l orado D epartment of Education for provisional teacher licens ur e and endorsement to teach in public sc hools in Colorado at two l eve ls: early c hildhood (presc hool through third grade) and e l emen tary ( K-6th grade) Minor s are available in early childhood ed u cation, pecia l e duc ation/gif t ed ed u ca tion biling u a l/bi cult ural e ducation with endorse ment and parent education. Course and works h ops are offered to meet Co l o r ado Departm ent of Education requirements for renewal of t eac h er licenses and Colorado D e partm ent of Human Servic e group l eader and dir ec t or qualificatio n s A program for licen s ure in K-6 phy sical education i a l so available. Professional Earl y C hildh ood Education Licensure Seq uenc e R equired Courses Semester Hours EDU 2340 Urban Early Childhood Education .................. ..................... 3 EDU 2350 Urban Early Childhood Education Field Expe r ience .......................... 2 EDU 2360 Expre s ive Art s for the Young Child ............................... ...... 2 E D U 3350 Assessment and Measurement in t h e Early Chi ldhood Classroom ................ 3 EDU 3370 Language Arts and Social Studie s Curricula for Ear l y Childhood Education ........ 3 EDU 3640 Curric ulum and Mana gement: Pre -primary-6 ............................... 4 EDU 4310 Parents as Panners in Education ......................................... 3 E D U 4330 Science and Mathematics for the Young Child .............................. 2 EDU 4370 Planning a D eve l opmentally Appropriate Early C hildh ood Classroom ....... .... 3 E D U 4390 Studen t Teaching and Seminar: Early Childhood .......... ................ 1 0 RDG 3120 D eve l oping Print Literacy: Preschool Third Grade .......... ................ 4 SED 3600 Th e Exceptional Learner in the Classroom ................................. 3 Total ............... ........................................................ 42 These two cours es mu s t be tak en conc urr e ntl y. Highly recomm e nded course: EDT 36 10 Introduction to Educational Technology EARLY CmLDHooo ADMI ISTRATION Students who wish to administer early child h ood program s must meet the Co l orado D e partment of Human Service s qualifications by taking the early childhood minor plus additio nal courses pecified by the Co lorado D epartment of Human Services, as s hown below. Students do not have to be admitted to th e teac h er licen ur e program to take thi se quence of course nor do they have to be degree-seeking. R equired Courses Semester Hours Ear l y Childhood Education Minor ( ee page XXX ) .............. ....................... 22-25 A ddition al Required Course for A dministrati o n EDU 3340 Administration of Early Childhood Program s ...... ......... ............... 4 EDU 4310 Par ents as Partners in Education -{)rsoc HES PSY PSY 1 010 2040 1010 1800 Introduction to Sociology ..... ......................................... 3 Introduction t o Nutrition .................................. .... ........ 3 Introdu c t ory Psycho l ogy ............................................... 3 D eve l opmental Educational Psychology (prerequis ite t o all 3000and 4000l eve l ear l y c hildh ood education courses) ........................... 4 Total ............................... ....................... ............... 39-42 Note: Students seeki n g only dir ec tor qualifications may tak e o nl y thos e co ur ses required b y th e Colorado Department of Human Servi ces. Colorado Department of Hum an Servi ces regulations ma y be c hang ed. Consu lt with the Ear l y Childh ood/E l ementary Education D epartme nt for additional informati on. Highly Re commende d Course: HPS 2060 Emergency Resc ue/First Responder and CPR ..... ...... ........... ........ 3

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 13 ELEMENTARY ED CAT IO N PROGRAM Professional E l ementary Education and Licensure equence Required Cour es Se m ester Hours EDU 2120 Elementary Edu catio n in the United State s ................................. 3 HPS 2 1 30 Activities and H ea lth for the Elementary Child ........................... 3 E DU 2640 Urban and Multi c ultural Education ......................... ........ .... 3 RDG 3 1 30 Teaching Readin g in the Elemen t ary S choo l : K--{) ......................... 4 SED 3600 The Except ional Leamer in the Cia s r oom ......................... ...... 3 EDT 3610 Intr oductio n to Educational Technology .......... ...................... 1-3 EDU 3640 Curricu lum and Management: Pre primary-{) .............................. 4 E D U 4 1 00 Language Art s and Social Studies Curriculum : Pre-prim ary-{) .................. 4 EDU 4120 Science and Math Curric ulum : Pre primary-{) .............................. 4 E D U 4 1 90 Student Teaching and Seminar: E l ementary K--{) ............ ............. I 0 E D U XXX Upper-divisio n EDU Course (Ex pr ess ive Arts) ........................... 2 Tota l ................................. .................................... 4 1-43 *Elementary Ed u cation li cens ur e students tak in g EDT 3610 must register for 2 or 3 c r ed it h ours. One credi t hour is offered only for early childhood educa t ion li cens ure st ud ents. Thre e credit hours sho uld be elected by licensure students w h o wish t o pursue advanced co ment area or g r ade-/eve / t ec hn o l ogy skills. E NDORS EME TIN BOT H EARLY CHlLDHOOD A D ELEMENTARY ED CATI O Students may rec eive en dor ement in both ear l y childh ood a nd e l eme nt ary e ducation by fulfilling the requir e ment s for th e minor in ear l y c hildhood educ ation (see page 1 38) a nd the additional r equire ment s as specified b e l ow: Required Courses: Se me ster Hours Early C hildhood Education Min o r ....... ...................................... 22-25 A dditional Requirements: An acce pt able major Genera l Studies coursework, and coursewo rk in the elementary ed u cation profes s ional se quen ce, which fulfills e l e m en t ary licensure r equiremen ts. ENG 3460 Children Lit e r ature .................................................. 3 RDG 3120 D eveloping Print Literacy: Presc h oo l Third Grade . ....... ............. 4 An a dditi o nal 6 semester h o ur s of tudent teachi n g a t the ear l y c hildh ood l eve l ................. 6 T o tal ............... ............. ....................................... 35-38 MINORS Th e minor that a teacher ed u ca tion tudent c hoo ses fulfills the requir eme nt s for the bachelor degree pro g ram o minor is required a p art of the t eac h e r e ducation program. How eve r the following minors are offered b y the Early C hildh ood and Eleme ntar y Educatio n Departm en t : e arly c hildho od e du catio n special e du ca tion/ gifted ed u cation, p a r e nt ed u cation, a nd bilingual/bicultur a l e ducation. Th e R ea ding D epartme nt off e r s the r ea ding min or To satisfy th e minor requirement s for the bac h e l or s degree pro g ram, a stude nt ma y choose on e of these minor s or one of the oth e r minor de sc ribed in thi s Catalog. Students are advi sed to tak e a minor that is al o a teaching field. Second ary lice n s ur e students may pur s ue th ese two prof essio nal minors: specia l e ducation/ g ift ed e ducation and r ea ding. Bilingual/Bicultural Education Minor The te ac h e r ed u cation program offers a minor in bilin g u al /bicu l tur a l e du ca tion, an interdi sc ip lin ary pro gra m s pon so red b y the Chicano Studies, Early Childhood and Elementary Ed u cation Modem L a n g u ages and R eading D e partments. The principal object i ve of the bilin gual/bic ultural min or i to pre par e future tea c h e r s t o co nduct all phases of classroom instructio n in a bilingual a nd bicultur a l etting. In th e d eve lop mental seq u e n ce, the minor provides the potentia l t eache r with a b ackgro und of Mexican h eritage a nd an und erstand ing of pr e en t -day Hi s p anic/C hicano c ultur e. Profi cie n cy in th e Spani h l a ngu age is required of all s tud ents before they co mplet e the minor. Thi s pro ficiency pr e p ares th e t eac h e r to und er tand and furth e r d eve l op the n ative tongue of bilin gual c hildr e n whil e offe rin g a secon d l ang u age to many other c hildr e n In addition th e minor provid es the s tudent with s ufficient clinical and aca d emic experie nc es and resources t o dev elo p imp l e m e nt a nd eva luat e c urri c ular m e thod t ec hnique a nd materials in th e bilin g u a l/bicul tu ral c l ass room. Th e pr ac ticum in bilingu a l/bicultural education i s r eq uir ed.

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138 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Required Courses and Recommended Sequence Semester Hours CHS 1020 Hi s tory of the Chi cano in the Southw est : Mexico and U S P e riod s ....... ... . 3 CHS 3300 Education of Chicano Children ...... ....................... ............ 3 EDU 3510 Perspective s in Bilingual/Bi c ultural Edu c ation ................... .... ...... 3 E D U 4510 Development of M e thod s and Material s for the Bilingual/Bicultural Clas room .... 4 EDU 4990 Student Teaching and Seminar (Bilin g ual ) -or-EDU 4520** Practicum in Bilin g ual/Bi c ultural Education ................... ........... 3-6 RDG 3530 T ec hniques of Teaching Reading to on-Engli s h Speakers ..................... 2 RDG 3580 Reading in the Bilingual/Bicultural Cla s sroom ............. ............... 3 SPA 3100 Spani s h Terminology for the Bilingual Cl ass room ......................... 3 One of the following courses: SPA 3110 Advanc e d Conversation ................... ... ....................... 3 SPA 3150 Spani s h Phonetics: Theory and Practice ..... ........ ... ..... ...... 3 SPA 3220 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwe s t .... ..................... 3 Total .................................... ............................... 27 30 Requir e d for bilin g ual endo r se m e nt. **Requir e d for s tud e nts seekin g min o r o nl y PREPARATIO REQUIREME TS: Language Proficiency : Proficiency in oral and w ritt en Spanish is determined by a committee composed of Spanish speaking members of the Modern Languages Chicano Studie s, and Early Childhood and Ele mentary Education Department s. The four-skill s exan1 i s used as the proficiency measure Students who fail to achieve a satisfactory score on the proficiency examinatio n are required to take sufficie nt Spanish classes to enable them to pass the proficiency examination The following cour es are de s igned to help tudents me et the proficiency requirements before the completion of the bilingual/bicultural minor: SPA 1010 Ele mentary Spani s h J ................. ........................... 5 SPA 1020 Elementary Spani s h II ........... ..................... ......... 5 SPA 2110 Intermediate Spani s h .......... .... ... ... .......... ............ 3 SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conver s ation ... ............... .... .... .......... 3 Early C hildhood E ducation Minor Required Cour es Semester Hours EDU 2340 Urban Ear l y Childhood Education ................... ...... ........ 3 EDU 2350 Urban Ear l y Chi ldh ood Education Field Experience ... .... ................... 2 E DU 2360 Expressive Arts for the Young Child ..................................... 2 EDU 3350 A ss e s sment and Measurement in the Earl y Childhood Clas s room ...... .... ..... 3 EDU 3370 Language Arts and Social Studie s Curricul a for Early Childhood Education .... .... 3 EDU 4310 Parents a s Partners in Edu c ation ... ... .................. .... ........... 3 E DU 4370** Planning a Developmentally App r opriate Early C hildh ood Clas room ... ...... ... 3 EDU 4380** Te a ching Practicum in Pre-primary Early Childhood Educ a tion ...... ....... 3 Total .............................................. .............. ........... 22 Thes e tw o co ur ses must b e tak e n co n c urr e ntl y. **The s e tw o c ourse s mu s t b e tak e n co n c urr e ntl y. Note : PSY I 8 00 D eve lopmental Edu c ati o nal Ps yc h o l ogy i s a pr e r equisite t o all 3000and 4000-l e vel ear l y c hildh oo d e du c ati o n c o urses. Highly Recommended Course: E DU 4360 Cultural Influen c e on the Socialization of Children .......................... 4 Additio nal R equireme nt s: An accep t able major General Studie s coursework and coursework in the elementary education profe sional seq u ence that fulfills elementary licensure requirements. RDG 3120 Developing Print Lit e racy : Pre s chool Third Grad e .... ...................... 4 ENG 3460 Children s Literature ........... .............................. ...... ... 3 An additional 6 seme s ter hours of s tudent teaching at the e a rly chi ldh ood level ........ . ..... 6 T o tal ............... ................... ...... ..... ...... ... ........ ...... 35-39

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Special Education/Gifted Education Minor Th e minors in s peci a l educat i on and g ifted ed u cation are designed to prepare teac hers, physica l ed u ca tor s, counse lors, and profe ss ional s to work w ith exceptional s tudents in educationa l therapeutic, a nd recreational settings. The minor may also l ea d to a graduate program in special ed u ca tion or gifted ed u catio n Student s w h o pur s ue thi s area of tudy ma y choose to the s tandard minor ( whi c h is 1 8 hour s of cred it ) or MSCD/UCD compo ite program ( which i s 24 hour s of c redit from MSCD, plus an additional 18 h ours of UC D g raduat e cred it ), which l eads to Teacher I e ndor se ment. SPEC IAL E D UCATIO EMPHASI S Choo e o n e of the following programs: MSCD SED 3600 The Exceptio n al Leamer in the C l ass r oom .......... ...................... 3 PLUS a minimum of 15 hours from the fo llowin g prog ram: SED 3380 Teaching Stud e nts with Learning and B e h avio r Disorders .... ... .............. 3 SED 3400 Educational Exceptionality and Hum an Growth ............................. 3 SED 3410 Diag n osis and Evaluation of Exceptional Students ............ .............. 3 SED 3430 Field Experience in Special Ed u ca t ion ............................ .... .... 3 SED 3440 Collaborat i ve Pr actices in Spe c ial Education ............................. 3 SED 3490 Education of the L earning Di able d ......................... ............. 3 SED 4200 Lan g u age D evelopment and Learnin g Disabi liti es ........ .............. 3 S E D 4250 Classroom Management for Exceptional Students ... ............ ........... 3 Total. . ....... ................................... ................... I 8 MSCD/ UC D Teacher I SED 3600 The Exceptio n al Leamer in th e C i a s r oo m ..................... ...... .... 3 SED 3 38 0 Teachin g Student s with Learning and B e ha v i o r Dis order s ..................... 3 SED 3400 Educationa l Exceptionality and Hum an Growth ............................. 3 SED 3410 Diagnosis and Evaluation of Exceptional Students ........................... 3 SED 3440 Collaborative Practice in Speci a l Education ............................... 3 SED 4250 Classroom Man ageme nt for Exceptional Students ... ............ ........... 3 SED 4500 Spe c ial Education Stud ent Teac hin g and Seminar ... .... ..... ........... 6 Total H ours R equired ............................................................ 24 PLUS additional UCD courses Gifted Education Emphas i s SED 3600 The Exceptional Leamer in the Classroom ................................. 3 S e le c t one course (3 hour s) from th e specia l ed u cation curricul um plu s the following se qu ence ..... 3 ART 4 3 90 Int eg r a tin g the Art s for Gifted and T a l e nt ed ................................ 3 EDU 3460 Introdu ctio n to th e Education of th e Gifted and Talented ...................... 3 EDU 4420 Methods and M a t erial for Teaching th e Gifted .... .......... .... . 3 EDU 4430 Field Experience in Gifted and Tal ented ................................... I EDU 4440 Teaching Thinkin g Skills t o th e Gift e d ..... ......... ........ .......... 2 Total. ............................. ....................................... 1 8 PARE T EDUCATION MIN OR The parent education minor i s for student e nterin g profe ss ions i n volv e d with children and famil i es It provide s the n ecessary know l e d ge and kill s for working with parents. Also, the program addresses a need ide ntified in the community for people with s p ecific preparation for the rol e of parent e ducator. Many agencie s offer or are int e re s ted in offer in g par e nt educatio n pro grams, yet no s pecific preparat i o n for that ro l e ha s been availab le. This minor is de s igned to mak e the field of p a rent ed u cation more c red ible by providing students wit h education for that rol e and to give s tudent s a se t of s kill s that are increasingly in de m and. The minor i s see n as particu l arly appropria t e for tud e nt s e nt ering familya nd c hild relat e d fields, including ed u cation health car e mana ge ment hum an services, cr iminal ju tice (es p ecially juveni l e justice), nur ing a n d nur se practitioner programs psychology, soc iology soc ial welfare speech, and wom en's st udies. P eople enteri n g these field s may b e in a po s ition to develop and co ndu c t parent educat ion programs ; a min or in parent e du cation s hould serve th e m well in the e mployment market. Other fiel d s might a l so pro vide opport uniti e to u e thi s background Par e nt ed u cation h a ppen s in ettings ranging from churche s to indu try an d i s not limited to educational ettings in the usual se n se

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140 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES The parent education minor encompasses three areas of preparation. One se t of classes i s intended to give students basic information nece sary for effective parenti n g (child deve l opment, parenting tech niques family management, health care ) The second facet of the program gives students the skills nec essary for developing and conducting parent education programs such as group techniques and program develop m ent. The thir d component of the program entails act u a l field experience working in parent edu cation programs. This experience is incorporated into a number of classes and i s the central component of the final course in the minor. A field placement is required in the last semester. Placement opportu nities include parent education in h o pitals, socia l service agencies public and private sc hool s, and business a nd industry. Students work closely with a parent education program advi er to e n s ur e an appropria t e field placement. Required Courses Semester Hours PAR 2050 Introduction to Parent Education ....... .......... .............. .... .... 3 PSY 1800 Developmental Educ a tional P sy chology -orPSY 2210 P s ychology of Human Development -orPSY 3250 Child P s ychology ........ ....... ... ... .. ............ ......... 3--4 HSP 2040 Family Function Dys function and Therapy .......... .................. 4 PSY 2240 Parenting Technique s ........... .... ......................... ...... 3 PAR 3070 Working with the Contemporary Family ....... .... ........ ............ ... 3 HES 3070 Parental Health Care I s sue s . . ... ............ ............ ........ 3 EDU 4070 Des igning and Implementing Program s for Adult Learners ............ ........ 3 PAR 4890 Parent Education Fie ld Placement. ............... ......... ............... 3 Tara/ ................. ...................... ............. ........ ...... 25-26 Minimum hour s required for the minor are 25-26 (depending on courses elec t ed). If the parent educa tion minor i s combined with a major in the Education, Human Services ur ing, or Psychology Depart ments, the combined total semester hour for the major and minor must be 60 hours. Such a program mu t includ e all courses r equired for the major and those listed h ere a required for the parent educa tion minor. Approval by both departments will be necessary for s u ch a combined program. N ote: For des c riptions of oth e r c our ses included in the minor see appropriate department listings: EDU-Educ ati o n ; HES-Hea/th Servi ces; HSP-Human S e rvi c es; NUR-Nursing; PSY-Psyc holog y; SOC-Sociology; WMS-Women s Studies Parent Education Program This program is being co n idered for conversion to a certifica t e program. Please check w ith the depart ment or an adviser. Prerequisites: A degree (B.A., B.S. M.A., M.S.) in a field such as child deve lopment, educatio n human services nur sing psychology, or social we l fare. Required Courses Semester Hours EDU 4070 De igning and ln1plementing Programs for Adult Learner s ..................... 3 HES 3070 Parental Health Care I sues ............ ... ................ ....... ...... 3 HSP 2040 Fami l y Function, Dys function and Therapy .... .... .. ............ .... 4 PAR 3070 Working with the Contemporary Fami l y ..... ........ ..................... 3 PAR 2050 Introduction to Parent Education ................ .............. ......... 3 PAR 4890 Parent Education Field Placement. ........ .................. ......... 3 PSY 2240 Parenting Technique s .......................... ........ ............. 3 Total .. ................. .......... ............. ............. ......... ... 22 S u ggested Electives AAS 3550 The Black Family ........ ....... . .... .... ................... 3 CHS 2210 The Chicano Family ... ............................... ......... .... 3 HSP 1040 Applied Behavior Analysis ...... ......... .......... ......... .... ... 4 HSP 2040 Family Function, Dysfunction and Therapy ....................... . 4 PAR 4800 Special Topic in Parent Education . ... ... ......... .... .... .......... 3 PSY 3260 Psychology of Adole cence .. ........... ......... ............. ..... 3 SED 3440 Collaborative Practices in Special Education .......... ............. ... 3 SOC 3410 The Fan1il y in Transition ................. .... . ............... 3 SWK 1040 Human Behavior and the Social Environment. ........ ... .... . ........ 4 SWK 1 050 Family Social Service s ......................................... .... 4 SWK 3010 Social Work Service s for Childr e n and Adole s cent s ........................ 4 WMS 1001 Introduction: Woman in Transition ... ... ... . ..... .... ........ ....... 3

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 SECONDARY ED CATION DEPARTMENT LI E SUR E IN SECO J DARY A D K-12 EDUCATIO I The Secondary Education Department offers profe ss ional preparation for teaching and educat ion related care e r s in collaboration with the R ea din g D epartmen t a11d various major departments. Thi s departm e nt prepare stud e nt s to a pply t o the Colorado Department of Education for provisional teacher li ce n su r e to t each in second ary sc ho ols (7-1 2 g r ades) with endo r se m ents in: Englis h Modem Language s Social Studies Industrial Arts (French, Spanish, German) Spanish Mathematic s Physi ca l Education Speech Science The S eco ndary Education Department a l so offers a K 1 2 professional teaching se qu e n ce in colla bor a tion with thr ee m ajor departments. These K-12 seq u e n ce prepare s tud e nt s to a ppl y for K -12 provi sional lice n ur e with endorse ment s in art mu s i c, or ph ysical e du catio n All seco ndary and K-12 s tudent s mu st have two a d vise r s, o n e in seco nd ary ed uc a tion and one in their major area. All but two of the 1 2 m ajors a seco ndary educatio n stud e nt can choose from are found in this Catalog under the major dep artment. Two of the majors, sc i e nce and socia l st udi es, do not match a m ajo r found in thi s Cata l og, so the y are ou tlin ed in this sectio n SE C ONDARY PRO FESSIO AL ED CATIO SEQUENCE An addi tional program in middl e-level education is being proposed as is a new secondary major in bu s in ess. Ch ec k with the S eco nd ary Education D epartment for further informatio n In additio n to a major in one of th e above area a nd a minor as r eq uir ed, s tudents must complete th e following profes sional cour se program: Required Courses Se m e ter Hours EDS 3110* Processes of Education in Multi c ultural Urban Secondary School s ............. 3 EDS 3 1 20* Field Experiences in Multic ultu ral Urban Secondary Schools ................. 3 EDS 3200 Educatio n a l P sychology Applied to Teaching .......... .............. .... 3 EDS 3210** Secondary S c h oo l Curricu lum and Classroom Management. .................. 3 EDS 3220** Field Experience in Teaching, Materials Construction, and Classroom Management ... 3 E D T 3610*** Introduction to Educational Technology ................................ 1-3 RDG 3280 Teaching of R eading and Writing in the Content Area ........... ............ 4 SE D 3600 The Exce ption a l Leamer in the C l assroom ................................ 3 (or physica l ed u cation m ajors may take HPS 4620, Adaptive Human Performance and Sport Activ iti es) =>=> =>=> M e thods of Teaching the Major ........................................ 3 Subtotal. ................................................................... 26-28 Teaching Practice EDS 4290**** Studen t Teaching and Seminar: Se co ndary 7-12 .......................... 12 (avai lable s umm er term on l y with special arrange m ents) Total .................. ....... ..... ... ............... ......... .......... 38-40 *These two courses must be taken concur r ent l y **These two courses must b e t aken concur r e ntly Math t eacher ca ndidat es must take MTH 3610 co n curre ntly with EDS 3210 and EDS 3220 during the semester before studelllteaching ***Secondary Education and K-12 licensure students taking EDT 3610 must register for 2 or 3 credit hours One credi t hour i s offered only for ea rly c hildh ood ed u ca tion li censure students. **** Only s tu dems who are preparin g for K-121icenses or for two subject areas are all owed to take 6 or 8 cre dit hours. K-12 licensure studems take EDS 4290-8 and EDU 4190-8 R ECOMME D E D S E Q E CE Th e following co ur se of s tud y i s s u ggested fo r those students in sec ond ary ed u ca tion who h ave a bac h elor's o r hig h e r degree and who are primarily co mpl eting licensure courses at MSCD. Completion of th e program takes a minimum of three semes ters. Semester I EDS 3110 EDS 3120 EDS 3200 Semester Hours Proc esses of Educ atio n in Multicu ltu ral Urban Secondary Schools ............... 3 Field Experiences in Multicult ural Urban Secondary Schools ................... 3 Educatio nal P syc hology App l ied t o Teaching ............................... 3 '

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142 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Seme s t e r I or II (to be t ake n as offered or as these courses fit int o t he s tudent's sc h edu l e) E D T 36 1 0 Intr odu c tion to Educational Tec hn o l ogy ...... ........................... 1-3 RDG 3280 Teaching of Reading and Writing i n the Content Area ..................... 4 SED 3600 The Exceptiona l Leamer in the C l as room ................................. 3 Semester II E D S 3210** Seco n dary Sc h ool C u rriculum a n d C l assroo m Man age m en t .................... 3 E D S 3220** Fie l d Experience in Teaching, Material s Con s tr u ction and Cl as room Managem e nt. 3 Met h od s of Teaching the Major ......................................... 3 Note: All of the ab ove lis ted co ur ses are pr e r e qui sites for s tud emteac hing. Seme s t e r m E D S 4290 Student Teac h ing a n d Se m i n ar : Seco n dary 7-1 2 ............................ 1 2 S eco ndar y Education and K-1 2 li ce n s ure student takin g EDT 3610 mu s t register for 2 o r 3 credit h o urs. On e c r edi t h o ur is offered o nl y for ear l y c hildh ood educa ti o n li ce n s ur e s tudents Thr ee c redit h o ur s should be e l ec ted by li ce nsur e s tud e nts who wish t o pursue advanced co m e m ar e a of g rade-lev e l tec h no l ogy skills **Mat h t eac her ca ndidates must take MTH 361 0 co n c urr ent l y w it h EDS 3210 and EDS 3220 during the semester before stude/1/teach i ng. S C I E N CE AND SOC I A L STUDIES L I CE SUR E P R O G RAMS Sc i e n ce Li ce n sure P rogram T h e pro gra m inclu des a m a j o r i n o n e a r ea of c i e n ce, an empha i s in a second area and a a mpl i n g f r o m ad diti o n a l areas o f sc i e n ce and m athe m atics. Th e pr ogram satisfies b oth majo r and min o r re quir e m e nts, so no f ur t h e r mino r is re qu ired. Major S econdar y sci e n ce lice n s ur e s tud e nts mus t co mp l e t e a n academic m ajor i n o n e o f the following a r eas: B io l ogy Earth-Atmospheric Scien ce Chemi try Phy s ics Please co n s u l t wit h t h e Seco n dary Educatio n D epartment o r yo ur major d epartment for a lis t of approve d a n d /o r re quired co ur ses and for informatio n a b o u t l ice n s u r e in yo ur m a jor. S cie n c e Areas of Empha s i s In add iti on t o their major, stu dents m u s t comp l e t e one of the following teachi n g a r eas of em ph as is: B i o lo g y Seme t e r Ho u r s BI O 1 080 Ge n era l Introduc t ion t o B iology .... ..... ........ ...... . . .... .... 4 BIO 2100 Genera l Botany .............................. ...................... 5 BIO 2200 Genera l Zoo l ogy ....................... ............................ 5 BLO 3550 Urban Eco l ogy ........................ ........................... 4 -or B I O 3600 Ge n era l Ge n etic s ......... ...... ....... ................ ...... .... 4 Subto t al ......... ............................................................ 18 C h e mistry Sem es t e r Hou r s (S tud e n ts wanting G e neral Swdi es c r edi t from CHE 1800 mu st take co mpani o n co ur se CHE 1850.) C H E 1 800 Genera l C h em i s t ry I ....... ... ...... ................... . ......... 4 C H E 1 810 Ge n era l C h emistry[] ............... ... .. ............... ......... 4 C H E 1 850 Genera l C h emistry Lab ................... ........................ 2 C H E 3000 Analytica l C h emi s try ......... .... .... ...... . ...... .............. 3 C H E 30 I 0 Analytica l Chemi s try Laboratory ............ ........................ 2 C H E 3 1 00 O r ga ni c C h emistry I ................ . .... ............... ........ 4 C H E 3 1 20 Organic C h e m istry Labora t ory I .............. ....... .... ....... .. .. 2 Subt o t a l ..... ........................ ............. ................. ........ 21 Computer Scie n ce CS I I 300* Introductio n to Structured Programmi n g ........ .......... .............. 4 C SI 2300 A d vanced Pr ogramming an d D a t a Str u cture s .................. ...... 4 CS I 3300 Foundatio n s of File Structure s ................................... .... 4 P l u 9 additiona l hours of CS I courses ........................ .................. .... 9 Subto t a l .............................. . ................................. 2 1 Pr e r e quisit es for CS I 1300 are CS I 1010 and MTH 1110 or e quiva l ents. Earth Science S em es t e r Hou r s

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 AST 1040 Introduction to Astronomy ........................ ............. ...... 3 GEG 1 000 World R egional Geography ............. ....... ..................... 3 GEG 1230 W eathe r a nd C lim ate .................... ... 1 3 GEG 1240 Landfo rm s ............................ ......................... 3 GEL 1010 General Geology ......... .......... ....... ........................ 4 GEL 1030 Historica l Geo l ogy ............................................... 4 Subroral ...................................................................... 20 Mathematics Semester Hours CS I 1 300 Introduction to Structured Pro g r amming ......... ......................... 4 MT H 1410 Calculus I ........................................................ 4 MTH 24 1 0 Calculus Il ............................ .................... ......... 4 MTH 31 00 Introduction t o Mathematical Proof ................ ......... ......... 3 MTH 3610 Methods of T eac hin g Mat h e mati cs .......... . ........ . .... . 3 Plus 3 additional hours to b e se lected from: MTH 3 110 Abstract A l gebra .......................... ............ . ......... 3 MTH 32 I 0 Probability and Statistics .............................................. 4 MTH 3600 History of Math ematics .............................................. 3 MTH 3650 Foundatio n s of Geometry ....................................... ...... 3 SubTOtal. . ............................................ ................... 21-22 Physics Se m e ster Hours PHY 2310 General Phy sics I ......... .............. ......................... 4 PHY 2320 General Ph ys i cs Laboratory I .............. ................. ............ I PHY 2330 General Ph ys i cs Il ................................................ 4 PHY 2340 General Ph ysics Laboratory Il ...... ... ... ................ ............. I Plus 8 Additional Hours in Physics ........................... ........... .......... 8 Subtotal .................... ...... ...... ............ ... ...... ...... I 8 General Requirem ents Choo se at l ea t one co ur se from eac h of the following areas (specific cour es are r eq uired for orn e major ). Som e of these sc ienc e and m a thematic s co ur ses may be f ulfill ed in the aca d emic major t eac h ing area of e m p h as is, Ge n e ral Studi es, or e l ective co ur ses. Phy s i cs maj o r s sho uld also t ake one elec tronic s c our se Biology Semester Hours BIO 1080 General Introdu ction t o Biology (suggested) ............................. 4 C hemi st ry* CHE I 100 Principles of C h emi try (s ugges t ed) -or CHE 1 800 General C h emistry I (suggeste d ) ............... ..... ................... 4-5 Bi ology maj ors cons ult with the Bi ology Deparrmem for chemis try requirements for bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree. Co mputer s A compu ter course app r oved by your advise r ....................................... 3-4 Earth Science AST I 040* Introduction to Astronomy (s u ggested) -or GEG 1 000 World R eg i o nal Geography (s u ggested) -or-GEL 1010 General Geology (suggested) ................ .............. ...... . 3-4 *AST 1 040 required/or p h ysics maj ors. E n v ironmental Studie s Varies (See an adviser for recommendations for specific courses.) .............. .......... 3-4 Physics PHY 2010 College Ph ysics I -or PHY 23 1 0 General Ph ysics I ...................... ............................ 4 PHY 2320 General Ph ys i cs Laboratory .................................... ........ 5

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144 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Math e m atics Biol ogy major s mu st t a ke: MTH I II 0 College Algebra ........... .................................. ...... 4 MTH 1120 College Trigonometry .. ... .................... ........ ................ 3 -or-MTH 1400 Pr e-Ca lculu s Mathematics .... ...... ..... ............................. 4 C h e mi s t ry, p h ysics*, and earth scie n ce m a j o r s must take: MTH 1410 Calculus I ....................................................... 4 *Physics majors must also take MTH 2410, MTH 2420, and MTH 3420. S ci e n ce R equire d Course SCI 3950 Methods of Teaching Science ......................................... 3 Socia l Studies Lice n s ure Program The program includes a major in one area of social science, a seco n d area of e m p h asis, an d a sampling from every social/behaviora l sc ience The program meets both m ajor and minor requirements; an addi tional minor is not required Maj o r Students m u st comp l ete an academic major at MSCD in one of t h e following areas: African American Studies Anthropology B e havioral Science Chlcano Studies Economics Geography His tory Politi cal Sci ence P syc hology Sociology The Lice n s ure Prog r am for Social Stud i es has c h anged dramat i cal ly. Please c h eck with t h e Seco n dary Education Department for updated information and for a list of approved and/or required courses for licensure and with the major department for major requirements. Socia l S tudi es A r ea of Emphas i s Students must al so comp l e t e one of the fol lowi n g teac h ing areas of e m phasis. History mu s t be s elect e d u nless th e academi c m a j o r i s hist o ry. H isto r y Se m es t e r H ours HIS 1010 W es tern Civilization to 1715 ........................................... 3 HlS I 020 Western Civilization since 1715 .............. ........... ............. 3 HlS 1210 American History to 1865 ................................ ..... 3 HlS 1220 American Hi s t ory si nce 1865 .................... ...................... 3 onW estern IUs tory .................. ..... ................. ...................... 3 3 hour s of additional upper-divi sion history course (selected in con s u l tation with the department) .... 3 Subtotal ........................................................ ............. 18 Af ri ca n America n Studies AAS I 010 Introduction to African American Studies ............. .................... 3 AAS 2000 Social Movement and the Black Experience ................................ 3 6 additional hours in African American Studies, 3 upper-di vis ion (se l ected in co n s ultation with a faculty adviser; African American His tory recomme n ded ) ....... 6 Subtotal .............................................................. ...... 12 Anthro p o l ogy ANT I 010 Physical Anthropology and Prehi s tory ................................... 3 ANT 1 310 Introductio n to Cultural Anthropo l ogy ............................... .... 3 6 additional upper -div i sion hou rs in anthropology ............................ .......... 6 Subtotal ................................................................. 12 C hican o Stu dies CHS I 000 Introduction to Chicano Studies ......................................... 3 CHS 1010 His tory of M eso-A merica: Pre -Co l umbian and Co l o n ial Period s ... ... .......... 3 CHS 1020 History of the Chicano in the Southwest: M exico and U.S. Period ............. 3 3 addit i onal upper-divi sion hour s in Chicano s tudi es ..................................... 3 Subtotal ............................................. ....................... 12 Eco n omics ECO 20 I 0 Princ i p l es of Economics (Macro) ........... ......... .......... 3 ECO 2020 Principle s of Economics (Micro) ................................ ........ 3 12 a dditional upper-divi ion hour s in econo mic s ........................................ 12

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Subto t al ............................ ................. . .. . ... .. . 18 Geography GEG 1 230 GEG 1 300 GEG 1400 W eathe r and Climate . . . . . . ....................... 3 introdu ctio n t o Human Geography ....................................... 3 World Resources ......... ...................................... . 3 3 additional upper-division h ours ... ... ......... .... ........... ......... .... ... 3 Subtotal .............. ......... .................. ..... .......... . ..... 12 Political Scie n ce PSC 1010 America n National Governmen t ........................................ 3 PSC I 020 Political System s and Ideas ................................. ..... ...... 3 PSC 3000 American State and Local Government. ... ............................. 3 PSC 3050 Politi cal Theory .................................................... 3 Subtotal ...... ....... .............................................. 12 Psychology PSY 1001 lntrod u c t ory P ychology ............ .................. ............ 3 PSY 3260 P ychology of Adolescence ........................................... 3 6 add itional hour s of e l ectives, 3 upper-djvision (se l ected in consultatio n with the department; PSY 2210 and 24 1 0 suggested) ... ........ .... 6 Sub t otal ............................... ........ .................. .......... 12 Socio log y soc 1010 soc 3600 introduction to Sociolog y .... . ...... .... . ................. 3 Re searc h in Social Sciences ... .................... ............ ... 3 6 additio n a l h o u rs of e le ctives, 3 upper-div i sion ................... ............... ....... 6 Subtotal ... .......... ....................................................... 12 General Requirem ents HIS 40 I 0 Methods of Teachin g Socia l Science: Secondary School. ...................... 3 Select one cour e from eac h of th e following areas A s ingle course m ay be used for credit in two areas if content i s app ropri ate; e.g., geography and int ernational st udies. Some courses may be satisfie d in th e academic major area of e mph as i s, General Studies o r elective coursework. African American Studies* Anthropology C hic a n o Studie s Economjcs Gender Studje s Geography** lnt ernational Studj es P olitical Science Psychology Sociolo gy African Ameri can Hi story or other course dealing with the African American expe rien ce in the United States. ** GEG 1000 W o rld R eg i o nal Geo g raph y, or GEG 1400 W o rld R esources s u gges ted. Th ese c r edits ca n be taken as parr of G e neral Studies GEG 1400 will fulfill the imernational s tudi es r e quir e m e nt ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY D EPA RTM ENT Civil Engineering Technology The speciali ze d fields within c ivil e n ginee rin g technology include programs in c ivil engineering te c h n o l ogy, drafti n g and urveying. The s urveying program i s a separate, spec ializ e d four-year program. The individual c urri cul um requirements are listed separately. Civil e n ginee ring technology gradua tes app l y e n gineering principle s in perfonning many of the ta sks neces ary for th e planning and construction of highways, buildings, railroad s, bridges re servo ir s, dams irrigation work s, water syste m s, airports, and o ther structures. In planning for a construction project they ma y p a rti c ip ate in estim a tin g costs, preparing pecifications for material s, and in surveying, draft ing and des ign work. Durin g th e construc tion pha se, they work closel y wi th the contractor and th e s uperintendent in sched ulin g field layout, constru ction activities, and th e inspection of the work for conformity to specificatio n s. ln recent years, a major work area for civil and environmenta. l e ngineer ing t ec hnology ha s involved e nvir onmental problem s Thi s include s desi g n and construction of water suppl y facil iti es, des ign of wastewater collectio n and treatment facilitie s, de i g n of air pollution contro l facilities, and design of so lid and toxic was te -dispo al faci liti es. The development of environment a l impa c t s tudi es and envir onmental impact reports i s also inc lud e d S tudents mu st meet the following curriculum requirement for th e various degrees, minors, and areas of emph asis For every CE and SUR course requiring prerequi s it es, a minimum grade of "C" i s r equired for a ll of

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146 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES tho e pr e requi si t e co ur ses. CIVIL E Gl EERING TECHNOLOGY MAJOR FOR BACHELOR OF S CIE CE The four-year bachelor of s cience degr ee i s awarded upon co mpl etion of the requir ed co ur ses and a e nvironmental s tructures, or s urv eyi n g area of e mph asis or an a ppro ved minor. Thi s program i s accred ited by the Technology Accr edit a tion Commis sion of the Acc r editation Board for Eng ine e rin g and Techno l ogy. Requir e d Tec hni ca l Studi es Se m es t e r Hours CEN 1100 Civi l T ec hnol ogy .... .............. ................................ 3 CEN 1 200 Tec hn ica l D rawi n g I. ........................... . ................. 3 CEN 1 210 T echnica l Drawing IT ... .... .............. ............ .............. 3 CEN 2 1 00 Stru c tural Drawing .......................... ...................... 4 CE 2150 Mechanics !-Statics .................. .............................. 3 CE 3100 Con s tru c tion Method s ...... ...................................... 3 CEN 3 1 20 Enginee ring Eco n o my ......................................... ....... 3 CEN 3130 M ec hanic s of M aterials ............... ...................... ....... 3 CEN 3140 M ec han ics of Mat eria l L a bor a t ory ............. .......... ..... ...... I CEN 3 1 60 Mechanics IID ynamics ....................... ..................... 3 CEN 3 1 70 Introduction to Stru ct ural Analy sis ... ............ ....................... 3 Y CEN 3 1 80 Fluid M ec hani cs I. ................................................... 3 CEN 3 1 90 Fluid M ec h anics )] ................................................. 3 CEN 4130 Soil s M ec h anics ............. .... ................. .... ............. 3 CE 4600 Senior Seminar ..................................................... 3 COM 2610 Introdu c tion to T ec hnical Writin g ..... ........ ......... .............. 3 CSI I 020 BASI C Compu t er Pr ogra mmin g . . ............................ 2 MET 3110 Th e rmodynami cs I ............................ ....................... 3 SUR 1 5 1 0 Surv eying I. ....................................................... 4 SUR 2520 Surveying II ..................... ........................ ...... ... 4 Approved Uppe r-divi s i o n Te chnica l E l ective ....................................... 2 Subtotal ...................................................................... 6 2 A ddition al R eq uir eme n ts CHE 1 800 Genera l C h emistry I .................................................. 4 ECO 20 I 0 Principles of Economics-Macro -or ECO 2 0 20 1110 1120 1 410 24 1 0 Principl es of Economics-Micr o ........................................ 3 College Algebra ................................................. 4 College Trigonom etry ... ................................... . ....... 3 Calcu lu s I . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Calculus II ........ .... ............................ .............. 4 MTH MTH MTH MTH PHY 20 I 0 and 203 0 College Physi cs 1/Colle ge Physics L a boratory I -or PHY 2310 and 2320 G e n eral Physic /General Physics Laboratory I ................ ....... 5 PHY 2020 and 2040 College Physics II/College Physics Labora t ory II -or PHY 2330 and 2340 General Physi cs II/Genera l Physics Labora tory II ....... ........... 5 SPE I 010 Fund a m e n ta l s of Spe ec h Communi ca t ion ........................ ......... 3 Total ......................................................................... 35 Environmental Area of Emphas i s Required Tec hni ca l S tudi es CEN 3320 Environme ntal Impact St a tem ents ................... ............... ... 3 CE 3330 Environmental Technology Proc es es .......... ............. ........... 3 CEN 4500 W a t e r Supply and Trea tment ................................. ........ 3 CEN 4510 Wast ewa t e r Treatment and Disposa l ..................................... 3 MTR 1 400 Introdu ction to M e t eoro l ogy .... ............... ............. .......... 3 A pprov ed Upper-div i i o n T echnical Elective ........................................... 3

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Total ............... ...... ....... ................ ....... .... 18 Structures Area of Emphasis Required Technical Studies CE 4120 Concrete Design I. . . . . . . .... .................... 3 CEN 4140 Concrete D es i gn TI. . . . . . . . ..................... 3 CEN 3330 Environmental Techn ology Proc esses ... ....... .... ...................... 3 CE 4400 Steel De s ign I ............................. ......................... 3 CE 4410 Steel D es ign n . ........ ........................................ 3 Approved Upper-division Tec hni cal E l ective ............. ... ........................ 3 Total . ................................................ ..... ............ 1 8 Engineering and Land Surveying Area of Emphasis Required Technical Studies SUR 2530 R oute Surveyin g ... .................................... 4 SUR 2620 Survey Drafting ..................................................... 3 SUR 3540 B o undary Law I ...................... ................. .... ....... 3 SUR 4530 Site Plannin g ........ ......... .... ........... ...... ............ 3 SUR 4540 B oundary Law II .......... ........ ............................... 3 Surveying Elective ................................................. .......... 3-4 Total .................... ........ ........................................ 19-20 Control Surveying and Mapping Area of Emphasis Required Technical Studies SUR 2620 Survey Draftin g . . . . . . .................... 3 SUR 2650 Photogrammetry I. ................................... ............... 3 SUR 3620 Cartographic Surveys ................................................. 3 SUR 3660 Land Information S ys t ems ............................................. 3 SUR 4530 Site Plannin g ............. ........................................ 3 SUR 4740 Geodetic and Special Surveys ......................................... 4 Total ........................................ .... .......... ................. 19 MlNOR lN CIVIL ENGINEER! G TECHNOLOGY Required Technical Studies CE I 100 Civi l Technolo gy ................................ ......... ........ 3 CEN 1 200 Technica l Drawin g I .............................................. ... 3 CEN 2150 Mechanics !-St atics ......... ......... .............................. 3 CE 3 I 00 Constructio n Methods ............................................... 3 SUR 1510 Surveying I. ... ...... ............ ............ .... .... ...... 4 Approved Lower-division T ec hni cal Elective .... ........ ................. ......... 3 App ro ved U pper -divisio n T echnical Elective ........................................... 3 Total ... .... ............ .................................................... 22 MlNOR IN DRAFTI NG ENG! EE RlN G TECHNOLOGY Required Technical tudies CEN 1200 Technical Dr awing I. ..... .............. ............................. 3 CEN 1 210 Technical Drawing II ...... ........ ............................ 3 CEN 2210 Architect ural Drawin g ............................................... 3 CE 3200 Advanced Technical Drawing ............. ..................... ........ 3 App r oved Lower-divisio n Te c hnical Elective ........................................... 3 Approved Upper-division T ec hni ca l Elective ................... .............. ....... 3 Total ........................................................................ 18 Surveying and Mapping Th e bachelor of science program in s urv ey ing and mappin g i the only one of its kind in Colorado and the region. It prepar es g raduate s for r eg i s tration as prof ess ional l a nd urv eyo r s but i s bro a d e nough to prepare them for caree r s in other area s of urv eyi n g and mapping or for grad uate s tud y Graduates are in profe ss ion al-level positions with the Bureau of Land Management a nd othe r federal sta t e, and loc a l governmen t agencies, utilitie s, and pri vate companies. Several h ave become presi d ents of their ocieties (Profe ss ional Land Surveyors of Colorado and the Colorado Section of the America n Congress o n Sur veying and Mappin g). A relatively ne w employment a r ea for gradu ates i s in land inf ormation sys tems (s toring information o n land parcel s, public utiliti es, natural resource etc., in c omput e r sys t e m s for recordkeeping and planning purp oses). For every CEN and SUR course requiring pr e r equisites, a minimum grade of C i s r e quir ed for all of

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148 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES those prer equisite courses. SUR VEY! G AND MAPPI G MAJOR FOR B ACHELO R OF SCIE CE R equired Techn i ca l Stu dies Se m e t e r Hours CEN 1200 Technical Dr awi n g I. ............................... ...... ............ 3 GEG 4 840 R e mot e S e n sing .................................................. 3 GEL 1010 Gen e ral Geology .... ............................................. 4 SUR 1510 Surveying I. ..................................................... ... 4 SUR 2520 Surv eying II ..................................................... 4 SUR 2530 Rout e Surveyin g ........ .. .................. . .................... 4 SUR 2550 Surveyin g Computation s .... .. ... ... .............................. 3 SUR 262 0 Surv ey Draftin g ............................. ....................... 3 SUR 2650 Photogram m etry I. ................................. .................. 3 SUR 2710 Astronomy for Surv eyors ............................................. 2 SUR 3540 Bound ary Law f ..... .......... ............................... 3 SUR 3620 Cartographic Sur veys ............. ............ ........................ 3 SUR 3660 Land Information Systems ........................... . ......... 3 SUR 3760 Surveying D ata Adjustment ............................... ............ 3 SUR 4480 Geodesy ................ .... ......... .................. ....... 3 SUR 4530 Site Pla nnin g ............... .............. .................... 3 SUR 4540 Boundar y L aw n .............................................. ...... 3 SUR 4650 Photog r ammetry II .................................... ............. 3 SUR 4740 Geodetic and Special Surveys ......................................... 4 S ubt o tal ................................................................... 6 1 Addition a l Course R eq ui re m ents COM 2610 Introdu c tion to T ec hnical Writin g ..................................... 3 E G 1010 Freshman Compo ition: Th e Essay ....................... ... ............ 3 ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis R esearch, an d Documentation ................ 3 MGT 3000 Or ga niz a tion a l Man agemen t ......................... ................... 3 MTH 1 400 Pre-C alc u l us M athe mati cs ............................................ 4 PHY 2310 General Phy s i cs I ............... ........ . .......... ............. 4 PHY 2320 Ge n eral Phy sics Laboratory I ........... ................................ I PHY 2330 General Phy s i cs ll ................................................. 4 PHY 2340 Ge n eral P h ysics Laboratory ll ................................ .......... I SPE 1 010 Fundamental s of Publi c Speaking .............................. ........ 3 Soc i a l /Behavioral Electives .......................................... ............. 9 Arts and Letters Electives ......................... ................... ..... ... ..... 6 Subtotal ............................. ....................... .... ......... 44 Approved Te c hnic a l E l ectives .......... ...................................... 4 R equire d Math Mino r MTH 1410 Calculu I ............. ...................... ............ ........... 4 MTH I 5 I 0 Computer Pr og ramming: FORTRAN ...... .......................... 4 MTH 2140 Matrix Algebra ......... .... .... ....................... . ...... 2 MT H 2410 Calcu l u s !I ......................................................... 4 MTH 3210 Prob abil i t y and Stati stics .................................. .......... 4 Approved Math Elective ( minimum 2 credi t h o u rs) ................................. ..... 2 S ubt o tal .......................................................... ........ 20 Total ............................................... .................. ...... 130 G E E RAL STUDIES R EQ IR EMENTS The Level I mathematic requirement do not appl y to the urveying and mappin g program because it includes a mat h minor and SUR 3760. At leas t one elective m u s t be 3000or 4000-level. At lea t rwo technical e lective credit mu t be used to complete the math minor. M INO R IN S U R VEYING R equire d Tec hni ca l Studi es S eme s t e r Hours SUR 1510 Surveying I. ........................... . ....................... 4 SUR 2520 Surv ey ing ll ........................... ....... ................... 4 SUR 2620 Surv ey Draftin g ....................................... .... ........ 3 SUR 2650 Pbotogr a mm etry I. .................................................. 3 SUR 2710 Astronomy for Surv eyo r s ........................... .......... ......... 2 SUR 3620 Cartographic Surv ey ............. ................................ 3 SUR 4650 Photo gra mmetry Il .................................................. 3

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Total... ............ . . . . . . ................................ 22 Electrical Engineering Technology Graduates are emp l oyed in a variety of posit ion s in th e followi n g 1fun c tional areas : Research and Development Technical activities in r esea rch and development are primarily dir ec ted t oward obtaining new infomla t io n and new know l edge of the field. Th e eng in eeri n g technologist i s a member of the research team Specifi c work ma y involve the d eve lopm e nt and co n st ruction of protot ypes, tes t and eva luat i on of e quipment or other activities n ecessary to r ende r t echnical s upport to a research proj ect. Manufacturing A gradua t e employed in a manufacturin g faci l ity mig ht be involv ed in act u a l manufacturing fa bric a tion t e t, prototype de ve lopment calibration and qualit y co ntrol. ln so m e cases, s tud e nts m ay b eco m e involved in sales or management. Services Servi ce e n gineering h a become a field of its own. Activities in this area involve the u e of co mput e rs, communica tion s, instru mentation n ew produc t d eve l opment and electrical and e l ec tr o ni c yste m s Design Some gra duate s de ign applica tion -orien t e d e l ectronic eq uipment and sys tems. Th e EET curric ulum provid e a found atio n in math e mati cs and sc ienc e, as well as a thorou gh treatment of the char acteristics of e l ec tric circuits an d e l ec troni c d ev i ce ln thi s four year program, spec iali zatio n m ay be achieve d by se lection of an area of emphasis in co mputer s co mmunication s (includin g sa t e llit e, fiber optics, microwave, and l ase r ), co ntrol sy t erns (in cludin g roboti cs) and power (i ncluding so lar energy) Electrical Engineering Technology Major for Bachelor of Science B eca u se this program em pha s iz es a ppli catio n s of theory, s tudents are required t o tak e conc urr e nt l a bo ratory co ur ses. In th e EET 1000 series of co ur ses, tud e nt s who drop or change t o "No Cred i t" in the theory/labo r atory cour e mu s t mak e the sa m e c han ge in the co mpanion laboratory/theory course. Thi s pro gra m i s accredit ed b y th e Techn o l ogy Acc r edi tati o n Co mmissi on of the Acc r e ditation Board for En ginee ring and Tec hnology (ABET). Th e bache l or of science d egree i s awarde d upon comp l etio n of the co ur se s lis t e d below. (St udent s hould c ontact the d epartme nt for recent c han ges to thi s major.) Required Technical Courses Sem es ter Hours EE T II 00 Circuits I ......................... ................... ............. 4 EET II 10 Circuits I L aboratory ...... ......... ........................... I EET I 120 Circuits fl ... .......... ............................... ..... ....... 4 EE T 1130 Circuits !I L abora tory ........... ... ........ . . ........... 2 EET 2140 Electronic s I ... .............. . ........ .... ..... ........ .... 4 EE T 2150 Electronics II ............. ... ... ............... . .......... ... 4 EET 2320 Digital Circuits I. .... . ....... ................... ......... . 3 EET 2340 Technica l Pr ogramming Application s ..... .... ........................ 2 EE T 2350 Advanced T ec hni cal Pr ogram min g ... . . ...... .... ..... ...... ... 3 EET 3110 Circ u i t Ana l ys i s with Lap l ace .... ........ ...... ...................... 4 EET 3 120 Advanced Analog Electronics ............... ......... ....... . .... 4 EE T 3330 Digital C ir c u its II ... .............. . ......... ........... . 3 EET 3360 M icroproces ors . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3 Analog a nd Digital Communicati ons .............. . ............... 3 Control System s Analy s i s ...... .... .' ............ ................ ...... 3 EET 3620 EET 37 1 0 EET 4100 S e nior Pr o j ec t I. ..... ...... ..... .... .... . .... ......... I EET 4110 Senior Projec t !I ... . ............ .......... ......... .... . 2 MET 3060 Statics and Dyn amic s ... ...... .................. .... ................ 4 MET 3110 Thermodynamic s .... . .... ...... .... .... . .................... 3 XXX XXX Uppe r -d i v i s i o n EET Elective s ( MJS 4010 a nd MlS 4020 ma y be subs tituted) . ... 6

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ISO SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Sub t o tal ................................................................... 63 Add iti onal Course Requirements CHE 1 800 G e n era l Chemistry I ...................... ........ .................. 4 COM 2610 Introduction t o T echnica l Writing ....................................... 3 ENG 1010* Fr eshman Composition: The E say .................. .... ................. 3 E G I 020 Freshman Composition : Analysis R esearc h and Documentation ................ 3 MTH 1400 Pr e-Calculus M ath (MTH I J 10 or MTH 1120 may be substi tut ed) ............... 4 MTH 1410 Calculus I ........... ................................... .......... 4 MTH 2410 Calculus ll ......................................................... 4 PHY 23 I 0 Genera l Phy sics I .................................................. .. 4 PHY 2320* General Phy sics L abora t ory I ........................... ............. I PHY 2330 G e neral Phys i cs II ............. .... ................ ............... 4 PHY 2340* General Physics Laboratory ll .... ......... ...................... I SPE I 0 10* Fundamentals of Speech Co mmuni catio n ................................. 3 XXX XXX L eve l ll Gen eral Studies-Historical ................... ... .. ........... 3 XXX XXX Level 11 Gen era l Studie -Arts a nd Leners .......................... ....... 6 XXX XXX L evel[] Gen e r a l Studies-Social S c i e n ce ........... ....................... 6 Subtotal ............................... ....................................... 53 *These courses co unt as G ene ral Studies co urses. The Multi c ultural requirement of 3 credits may be app li ed t o any Levell/ ca tegory or taken as addi ti o nal hours. AREAS OF EMPHA I S (C HOO SE 0 E AREA 0 LY) Compute r s Requ i red Courses Semester Hours EET 4320 Digital Filters . ....... ............. .......................... 3 EET 4330 D ata Communications .......................... .................... 3 EET 4340 Int e rf ace Te c hniqu es ................................................. 3 EET 4370 Microcontrollers ......................................... ........ 3 XXX XXX Upper -divi s ion EET Electives ................................ .......... 6 Subtotal ............ ................ ................. ...... . . ........ J 8 Comm unic ations Required Courses EET 3630 Electromagnetic Fields .................... ........... ............ 3 EET 3640 Communications Laboratory ....... ......... ............... .......... 3 EET 3670 M eas urem e nt s for Communications Syst ems ............................. 3 EET 4330 D a t a Communications ......................... .................... ... 3 EET 4620 Advanced Communication Systems .............................. . 3 EET 4640 Communication Cir c uit Desig n ........................................ 3 Subtota l .................................................................. .. 1 8 Control Systems Required Cou r es EET 3420 E l ec tric P owe r Dis tribution ............ .... ............................ 3 EET 3720 Control Systems Laboratory ....... ................................... I EET 3730 Pro cess Control S y t erns .............................................. 2 EET 3740 Programmable Logic Con tr ollers ... ................................... 2 EET 4330 Data Communications ............................................. 3 EET 4 340 Inte rface T ec hniqu es .... ........ .... .... .......................... 3 EET 4 710 Digital Control S yste m s Desig n ..................................... 4 S ubt ota l .............................................. .... .................... 1 8 Po wer Required Courses EET 34 I 0 E l ectr i c Machin es ....... ..... ...................................... 3 EET 3420 Electric P ower Distribution ............................................ 3 EET 3430 Power Generation Using S o l ar Energy ............................... 3 EET 3720 Control S yste m s Laboratory ................ ........ .................. I EET 3730 Pr ocess Control Sy terns ........ .............................. ..... 2 EET 3740 Pro g rammabl e Logic Controllers .... ........ ........................ 2 MET 3 1 20 Heat Tran s fer ................................................... ... 2 XXX XXX Uppe r-division EET Ele c tiv es .................................. ..... 2 S u b t o tal ........ .......................................................... I 8

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Required Teclmical Courses . . . . . . . . ................. . 63 Additional Courses ..... ...... ......... ........ .... .................. . 53 Area of Emphasis ......... . ...................... I. ....................... 18 T o tal .............. ........ ............... ..... ........................ . 134 **In select c a s es a min o r in ano ther departme/11 ma y b e s ub s tituted f o r are a o f emphasis w ith pri o r approval of the c hair o f the Engine erin g Tec hnolog y and Industrial Studi es D e partment. MINOR IN ELECTRICAL ENGI EERING TEC HNOLOGY Required Courses Semester Hours EET 2000 Electronic Circuit and Machines .......... ........... .................. 3 (The sequence EET 1100 EET 1110, EET 1120 EET 1130 m a y be ubstituted ) EET 2320 Digital Circuit s I. ............... ................ ...... . ......... 3 (EET 2310 may be s ubstituted for computer s cience majors. ) EET 2340 Technica l Programming Application s ........ ............. ............. 2 ( CSI 1300,2220 CMS 2110, MTH 1510, or MET 3210 may be subs t ituted. ) EET 30 I 0 Industrial Electrortics . . . . . . . . . . ..... 4 (The s eque n ce EET 2140 and EET 2150 may be sub s tituted. ) EET 3330 Digital Circuit s II ...... ........ .... ..... . ..... ............... 3 EET 3360 Microprocessors ................ ........ .... .... ............. . 3 Total ................ ... ................ ........ l ............. ....... 18 Mechanical Engineering Technology The day and evening program is continually upgraded to reflect state-of-the art technology while meet ing the needs of industry and e mpl oyers of the MET graduates. An advisory committee, which includes employers, graduates, and s tudent s of the program, meets with faculty and administrators to review c urriculum st udent and faculty recruitm ent, program needs progress, problems and probable solutions, labor atory eq uipm ent, faci lities, and to assist in the placement of graduates The committee assures a hig h level of community aware n es and support of the program. Graduates enter the enginee rin g profe ion as engineering technologists. About 1 5 percent choose to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (F.E.) examination foUowing graduatio n to begin the six-year process, as a minimum to become a registered professional engineer. The latter is often required for forensic (expert witness) and/o r consulting work, when the health and safety of the general public are involved. A smaller percentage at t end graduate sc hool. The majority obtain gainful e mplo yme nt in a variety of indu stries ranging f rom large aerospace companies to small manufacturing and custom d esign businesses. Job titles rang e from technician and enginee rin g technologist to engineer. The MET program offers the bachelor of scie nc e degree, which i s accredite d by the Technology Accreditation Commission (TAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The educational approach is hand s-on with 63 percent of the co u tses requiring laboratory work in addi tion to lectures. It i struct ur e d with two distinct areas of emphas is: manufacturing and mechanical. Stu dents are required to take a four-hour as e sment examination prior to graduation. The written exam is given in the Senior Experience course in eac h e mph asis. MECHANICAL E GINEERING TECHNOLOGY MAJOR FOR BAC H ELO R OF SCIENCE Required Technical Courses Semester Hours MET 1 000 Materials and Manufacturing Technology ........... ...... .............. 3 MET 1010 Manufacturing Proce se s ............................ ... ....... ... .. 3 MET 1 310 Principles of Quality As s urance ...... . .............. ........ .... 3 MET 2200 Materials of Engineering .......... . .......... ........ . .... .... 3 MET 2210 Mechanical Drawing ... ....... .... ............... ..... .............. 3 MET 2220 Computer Aided Drafting for Engineering T ec hnology ....................... 3 MET 30 1 0 Fluid Flow I ...... ............ . .... ................. . ... 3 MET 3060 Static s and Dynami cs ...... .............. ............... . ....... 4 MET 3070 Machine Design ......... .......... ................. ........ 3 MET 3080 Static s Laboratory ...... ... .. ............ ......................... I MET 3090 Dynamics Laboratory ..... ........................ .... .... ........ I MET 31 10 Thermodynamic s I .............. . ......... ..... . ............ 3 MET 3210 Introduction to Computer Aided Engineering .... . ............. ..... 4 MET 3410 Geometric Dimen s iorting and Tolerancing ............ .................. 3 ME:r 4000 Project Engineering ........... ......... .... ...... ... ......... 3 Subtotal ......... ................................. ................ ........ 43

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152 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES A dditi o n a l Tec hnic a l Co u rse R equire m e nt s: Se m es t e r H ours CEN 1 200 Technica l Dr awi n g 1 (o r equival ent exper i e n ce) ............................ 3 CEN 3 1 30 M ec hani cs o f M ate r ials ............................................. 3 CEN 3 1 4 0 M ec hani cs o f M a t eria l s L a bor a t ory ......................... ......... .... l E ET 2000 E l ec tri c C ir c uit s a n d M ac hin es ............... .................... 3 EET 30 I 0 Indu s tri a l E l ec tr onic ......................................... ..... 4 Subr o c a l ..................................... ... ....... ........ .... 14 A dditi o n a l Cours e R equire m e n ts : CHE 1 800* Ge n e r a l C h emistry I ..................... ............. . ........ 4 COM 26 1 0 In tr odu ctio n to T echnical W r i ting ....... .............. ........ ........ 3 ECO 20 1 0* Prin ciples o f Eco n omics-Ma c r o ..................................... 3 E G 1 010* F reshma n Co m pos i tion: Th e Essay ....................................... 3 ENG 1 020* Fr es hman Co mpo ilio n : A n aly i s, R esearc h and D ocumentatio n ............... 3 MTH 1400* Pr e Ca l c ulu s M athe m atics ( MTH Ill, 112 m ay be s ubst i tut e d ) ................. 4 MTH 1 410* Calc ulu s I. ......................................................... 4 M TH 2410* C alc ulu s Il .................. ...................... ......... .... 4 PHY 20 1 0* College Phys i cs I ....................... . .... ................. 4 PHY 2020* College Physics n .......................... ..................... .. .. 4 PHY 2 030* C ollege Physi c I Labora t ory ............ . ....... .......... ....... I PHY 2040* C oll ege Phys i cs II Labora t ory ......................... ............ I PHJ 1030* Ethi cs ........... .................................................. 3 SP E 1 010* Fundam e n ta l s o f S peec h Co mmuni catio n .................................. 3 XXX XXX* L e v e l Il Ge n era l Stu d ies-His t o r i c a l ....... ......... . ........... . 3 XXX XXX* Leve l II Ge n e ral S tudies-Art s and Letters ................................ 3 XXX XXX L eve l ll Ge n e r a l StudiesS oc i a l S c i e n ce .................... .............. 3 *So m e of these cou rses m ay be used co sarisfy Genera l Srudies, incl uding rhe 3 credir h o u r Mulricullllral requi r e melll. AREAS OF E MPHAS I S (CH OOSE ONE AREA OF EMPH A S I ) Ma nufacturin g MET 3000 Manu fac turin g A n a l ys i s ........................... .... ....... ... ... 4 MET 3 1 00 /C Co mputer Pr ogramming ....................................... 3 MET 325 0 T oo l D es i g n and Pr od u c tion T oo l i n g ......................... ........... 3 MET 3300 S tatis tic a l Pr ocess C o ntr o l .................. ................. ..... .... 3 MET 3330 R obot i cs f o r Manu fac tur ing ................ ................ ......... 3 MET 40 10** A d v an ce d M an u fac tur i n g T echno l ogy .................................. 3 MET 4080 Co mput er-A i ded M anufac turin g ......................................... 3 S u b roral ............. ....................................................... 22 Mec h anica l MET 3020 Flui d F l ow II ..................................................... 3 MET 3 1 20 H ea t T ransfer ............................ .......................... 2 ME T 3140 H ea t T ransfe r Laboratory ................ ......... ..... . .......... I ME T 331 0 Th ermody n a m ics II ................................... .............. 3 MET 3320 Ins trum entatio n Labo r a t ory ............. .............. . ...... ..... ... 3 ME T 4 070* Co mput er-A i ded D e i g n .. ... ....................................... 3 MET 4 280 A d vanc ed E n e r gy T echno l ogy ........ .................... ............ 3 XXX XXX U p per -di v i s i o n MET E l ective .......................................... 3 Subroral . ........................ ........................................ 2 1 T ara/ ....... ........................................................ 1 3 1 132 **S enio r Experience courses. Me chanical E n g ineerin g Technolo gy Min o r R equire m e n ts MET I 000 Mat e r ia l s and Manufacturing Techno l ogy ................................. 3 MET 1010 Manuf acturing Pr ocesses ............. .............................. 3 MET 1 310 Prin cipl es of Qua lit y Ass uran ce ......... .... ............ ........... 3 MET 2200 M a t eria l s of E ngin ee rin g ............................................ 3 U pper-di visio n ME T E l ectives ................. ...... .... ........................ 6 Total ........................................... ...... ... . ....... .... ... 1 8

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SCHOOL O F PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 HEALTH PROFESSIONS DEPARTMENT The purpo es of the programs in the Health Prof essions Department are to stimu l a t e the personal and professional development of health care wo rk ers, to stimulate awareness of health care trends and i sue and to prepare health care professionals to cope with the future problems of h ealth care deUvery in a rapidly changing society. The Health Prof essions Department offers two baccalaureate majors: a bachelor of science degree with a major in nursing and a bachelor of science d eg r ee with a major in health care management and coo r dinates two interdi ciplinary minors (Holistic Health and Wellness Education and Gerontology) Health services courses are offered for non-health majors and health majors. Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in all courses required for the major (HCM NUR prefix and all required s upport courses) in order to progress thr ough the programs. Cour es w ith grade s of les than "C" will need to be repeated in order for the stude nt to take any other cour es for which the first co ur se i s a prerequisite Students de iring to enter programs in the Health Professions Department eek academic advising from a faculty member in the department prior to reg i stra tion for classes. Students are responsible for keep ing themselves informed of the l ate t program changes. Current program materials are available in the Health Professions Department. Health Care Management The college' undergraduate degree program in health care management prepares students for direct entry into management within the health care field. By combining cour es in health care management with other discipline such as marketing, computer information system and management cience accounting, and economics the program gives s tud ents a strong foundation in management a it specif ically relates to health care Health managers are employed in a variety of facilities and organization : hospitals; nursing homes; health departments; educationa l institutions; health maintenance organizations ; wellness programs; industrial health programs; the insurance industry; and governmental agencies at local, state, a nd national level All general requirements of the college for a bachelor of science degree must be met prior to grad u ation Educational Goals and Outcome s The baccalaureate health care m a na gement program has estab l ished the following outcomes for all graduates. The health care management graduate: Effectively manages health delivery systems, maximizing quality and quantity of services and human r esources in the face of limited fiscal support. Views health delivery as h aving multiple int erdependent components withi n an environmental context. initiates and effectively manages change in a rapidly evolving health care environment. Identifies the effects of l aw on the role of managers in health delivery systems and the challenge of managing within a legal and ethical framework. Use research and information science methodologies to solve management problems in health delivery sy terns Applies basic econom i c and fiscal principles in the management of health delivery sy terns. Accepts accountability for continued learning by acquiring knowledge and skills that meet the changing needs of se lf c l ient, management, and society. Assess ment Methodology The stude nt's administrative perf o rman ce will be evaluated during the interns hip experience ( HCM 4510, Health Care Management Internship), based on previously agreed-upon objectives. The program exit evaluation will be a combined effort of the tudent, a faculty member and preceptor .

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154 SCHOOL O F PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Hea l t h Care Management Major for Bache l or of Science R equired Courses S eme s t e r Ho u r s H C M 3010 H ealth Care O r ganization ............... ......... ...................... 3 HCM 3020 Management Princip l es in Hea l t h Care ............................... 3 HCM 3030 Hea lth Care Jurisprudence .......................... ................... 3 H C M 3300 Management I ssues a n d Healt h P o l icy ................... .... ......... 3 H CM 4020 Human Reso u rce Managemen t in Health Care ............... . ....... . 3 HCM 4030 Financial Management in Health Care ................ .................. 3 H CM 4040 Health Care Economics ............................................... 3 HCM 4500 Health Care Management Prel ntemsltip ... .............. ............. 2 HCM 4510 Health Care Management Intern s hip .................. .... .... ......... 6 T oral ........................................................................ 29 R equired Support Courses ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I ............................................ 3 ECO 2020 Princip l e of Economics-Micro ....................................... 3 MKT 3000 Princip l es of Marketing ... ........................... .... ....... ... 3 Approved Statistics Course .................................................. ..... 3 Ap p roved Research Cour se ....................................................... 3 Approved Compu t e r Co u rse ......................... ......................... 3 Total .......... .................................................. ............ 47 MINOR The stude nt selects a mino r w ith approva l of the faculty. S tud e nts who have an assoc i ate deg r ee in a health occ up ation may s ub stitute u p to 24 h o ur of selected, a ppr oved assoc i ate d egree m a j o r c our ses in place of a minor toward the bache l or's deg r ee. Health car e manageme n t m ajors who desire to work in inst ituti ons provid in g car e to t h e elderly are enco u raged to take t h e gero ntol ogica l se rvices min or. MINOR IN H EALT H CAR E M ANAGEMENT R e q ui r e d Courses Se m ester Ho u r s HCM 3010 Hea lth Care Organization ........................................... .. 3 HCM 3020 Management Principl es in Health Care .............. ..................... 3 HCM 3030 Health Care Jurisprudence ..... ...... ............................ .... 3 HCM 4020 Human Resource Management in Health Care ........................ ... 3 HCM 4030 Financial Management in Health Care -or-HCM 4040 Health Car e Economic .............................................. 3 Subtotal .................................... ............................... IS R equired Support Cour ses ACC 2010 Princip l es of Accounting 1 ................................. ..... 3 Approved Computer Course ............................................ ............ 3 Total .......................... ............................................. 21

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Health E duc ation Services Thi s gro up of courses is designed to meet specia l needs of non-health major s as well a health major E ffort is mad e to pr ovide s tud e nt wit h co nt e nt r e l evant to indiv i dual need s Students mu s t co n s ult a faculty advise r in the s elect i o n of appropriate General Studies co ur ses HES 1050 HES 2000 HES 2040 HES 2150 HES 2180 HES 3070 HES 3080 HES 3 1 00 HES 3200 HES 3450 HES 3500 HES 3600 HES 3800 HES 3820 D ynamics of H ealth ( meets soc i a l science s General requir e ment ) .... . 3 Health Politic s and Policy ( meets s ocial s c iences general s tudie s requirement ) .... 3 I ntroduction to utrition ( meets natural s c iences general s tudies requi r ement ) ...... 3 Alternative Therapie s for H ea lth and H ealing ( meet s natural sciences General Studie s requirement) .................. . 3 AIDS : Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome ( me e ts socia l s ci e n c e s G e nera l Studi es r e quirement ) .............. ........ 3 Parental H ealth Care I ss u e ..... . ...... . ..... . ....... . . 3 Maternal and C hil d utrition .... ...... ..... .... . . ....... ...... 3 utrition and Agin g . ............. ........ . ..... . ........ 3 utrition and Sport s Perfonnance ........................................ 3 Dynamics of Disea s e ( meets natural s cien c e s geneni l studie requirement) ......... 3 Intermediate utrition ........... . .............. ...... .......... 3 Ethical D ecis ion Making in Health Car e . .... ........ .... 3 Clinical Pathophy iology ...... . .......... . ............. ..... 4 Health Care Coun s eling .... ...................................... 3 Required in h o li s ti c h e alth and we i/n ess e du c ati o n multi-m i n or. N o t e : The holisti c h e alth and wei/n ess e du c ation multi-min o r ma y b e arran ge d thro u g h the H e alth Pr o f e ssio n s D e partm e nt and includes the r e quired co ur ses li s t e d und e r the h o li s t ic h e alth and we i/n ess e du c ation mu lti -min o r o n pa ge 15 7 o f thi s Cata l og. Nursing The purposes of the Baccalaureate R egistered Nurse P rogra m a r e to provide the diploma and assoc iat e d eg r ee nurse grad u a t e with a broad ed u catio n a l b ase for improvement of nursing pr actices preparation for meeting futur e h eal th care n eed of soc iety, preparation for grad u ate ed u cation in nur ing, and opportunity for continuous pe r so nal growth and p rofes ional development. EDUCATIONAL GOALS A D OUTCO MES Th e B acca laur eate R egi tered ur e Program h as establi s hed the following exit be h aviors for all g r ad uat es : The stude nt will be able to: D e mon s tr ate through nur sing practice, a perception of individu a l s as living, open s ystems influ ence d b y th eir biological p sychologica l socio l ogical an d c ultural enviro nm ent a s they s trive for hi g h l e v e l well n e U e discriminatory judgment in applyi n g th e nursing proce s s of assessi n g, a nal yzing, planning implementing, and evalua tin g t o help cl i e nt s prevent illnes s and maintain a nd pr omo t e high-level well ne ss. Colla bor ate with clie nt s and interdi scip lin ary team s both a a con s umer and as a provider of care, triving to achieve o p t imum h ea lth care deliv ery within a n ethical framework. Act as a r eso ur ce pe r so n in a variety of e ttin gs Act as a c h a n ge age nt when c h ange is ind i ca t ed. Assume respon s ibility for c l inical teaching t o promote high-level w e llne ss D e mon s tr ate a yste m atic approach t o th e in vestigation of health care problems and u se the r es ult of c hol ar l y r esea r c h to prom o t e high-leve l wellness. Accept acco unt abil ity for clinical practice and continued learning by ac quirin g knowledge a nd skills that m eet th e c hangin g n eeds of se lf clie nt s professional nur sing, and so c i e t y

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156 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES ADMI SION R EQUI R EME TS In order to qualify for admission to the Baccalaureate Registered Nur e Program the student must: Be a graduate from an associate degree or diploma nursing progr am in the United States. Be currently lic ensed as a r egistered nurse in Colorado Be certified in Basic Cardiac Life Support. Have proof of current immunizations for diphtheria, tetanus polio MMR (meas l es, mumps, rubella) and hepatiti s B. Have proof of negative tuberculosis screening (PPD or Mantoux or negative che t x-ray). Carry indi vidua l /personal nurses' malpractice/liability insurance in the amount of $ 1 ,000,000/ $3,000,000. Be advised by fac ulty in the nursing program Have copies of all transcripts on file in the Department of Health Professions. Have copy of transcript evaluation from MSCD on file in the D epartment of H ealth Professions. Have completed 30 seme ter hours of college-level coursework (exc lusive of previous nursing co ur ses) that include s ENG 1010 E G 1020 a psychology course, a soc iolo gy cour e and 6 seme ter hour of natural scie nce cour es. Students lacking these credits are encouraged to take the College Leve l Examination Program (CLEP) examinations or required support courses. Have recent clinica l experience (1,000 hours in the past thr ee years or an approved refresher cour e in the past three years). If the tudent has graduated within three years of entering the nurs ing progr am, additional clinical experience i s not needed. Qualify for the Colorado Statewide ursing Articulation Model/Agr ee ment by one of the following: a. Graduate from a nursing school in the United States b. Graduate from a non -U.S. nur sing program and successful completion of ACT PEP examinations (Proficiency Examination Program) prior to ente rin g NUR 3110. A passing sco re of 45 must be achieved on the following examinations: Adult Nursing (# 554); Maternal and Child Nursing, Associate Level (#453); and P sychiatric/Menta l Health ursing (#503). The exami nations need to be retaken if the student has not enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program within three years of taking the ACT PEPs. The examination may be repeated until a passing score is obtained. Twenty-four semester hour s credit are awarded upon completion of the three examinations and eight semester hours in residence at MSCD ACT PEP information is avail ab l e from a nursing adviser in the Department of Health Prof essions The nursing program offers day and evening c l asses to accommodate working professionals. Because of the rigorous demand of this program students are urged to carefully con ider home and work oblig ations when establishing their academic workload. All tudents must receive academic advisi n g in the department prior to initial enrollment in any UR prefix course Student are e n couraged to arrange meetings with their aca demic adviser on an as-needed ba sis, which shall not be less than once eac h year. Students are strongly ur ged to see k academic advising by a nursing faculty advise r prior to registration each se mester. REQUIREME TS FOR GRADUATION minimum of 120 credit hours all college requirement for General Studie s, Multicultural, and Senior Experience all required support courses all required nursing courses

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Nursing Major for Bachelor of Science R equired Courses Semester Hours NUR 3 110 Tran iti o n s in ursin g ........................... . ............. 3 NUR 3550 Le a d e r s hip ......... ........ ........ ........................... 3 NUR 3700 Asses m e nt. ....................................................... 4 NUR 3 8 50 C lini cal Te ac hin g M ethods . . . . . . ... .... .... 3 UR 4 200 R esearc h ...................................... .......... .......... 3 NUR 4400 Community Health ur sing . ..... ...... ...... ........... . 4 NUR 4410 C ommunity H e alth u rsing : A ppli cat i o n ..... ............................. 5 NUR 4 8 50 urs in g Pr ocess : App)j catio n .............. ........ ................... 5 T ota l ............................. .... ............ ..................... 30 Required Support Courses HCM 3030 H ea lth Car e Juri s prud e n ce ......................................... 3 HCM 4040 H ealth Care Eco n omics ............................................... 3 HES 3 600 Ethi ca l D ec i s i o n M ald n g in Health Care ........ ............. . .... .... 3 HES 38 00 C linkal Pathoph y io l ogy .................................... .......... 4 HES 38 20 H ea lth Care Co u nse lin g . .......... ....................... 3 Approved Computer C ourse ..................... .................................. 3 A pproved Stati tics Co ur se ....................................................... 3-4 T o tal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 25-26 Prerequisite Low e r divi s ion nursin g c r e dit per the Color a do St a t ewide Articula tion M ode l ....... ........ 24 ursing Electives NUR 3 510 u rs in g Dia g no s i ..................... .......... . .......... I NUR 388 0 N urs e Pra ctice A c t s ......... .... .............. ................... 3 NUR 41 00 Criti cal Car e ur sing ... ........................................... 4 NUR 4760 Nur sing Theorie s . . ................................ .... .... 2 HOLIST I C H EALTH A 0 WELL ES EDU C ATION MULTI-Mr OR The holi s tic h ealth and we i !ne s s e ducation multiminor o ff e r s an ar ea of co ncentration for s tud e nt s who recognize the increa e d empha i s on weUnes in se v e r a l pr o f ess ion a l fie l ds a nd /o r for h ea lth co n sc iou s individual s who wis h to e s tabli s h a se lf-enhanc e ment pr o gram. The multi minor i s d es igned to com plement a major cho s en by a s tudent tha t i s relevant to th e s tud e nt's c ar ee r goals. The multimin or compri ses 2 1 hour s of s tudy : R equire d Cour es Semester Hours HES 1050 Dyn amics of He alth ..................... ............................. 3 HES 2 040 Introdu c tion to utriri o n ............................................. 3 HPS 164 0 Ph ys i ca l Fitn es T ec hniqu es and Pr og r a m s . ...... ..................... 2 HSW 3750 H olistic H e alth and Hig h -Le v e l W e lln ess ................................ 4 PHI 3 22 0 P erso n al Knowled ge and Prof essio n a l Growth ... ..... ................... 3 PSY 2 750 Introdu c tion to H olisti c H ealth ......................................... 3 E l ec tiv es* ................................. ........... .......... .... . .... 3 T o t a l . ............ ............. ........... ..... ...................... 2 1 Pra c ti c al experience is an int egral pa rt of t hi s min o r and Ind i v i d u alize d D egree P rog r am. Students are ur ge d t o e nh a n ce t heir e du c ati on t h rough fie l dwork. This can be ac hi eved through p r ac t icums, intern s hip s, and coo p e rat ive e du c ati o n offerings i n o n e o f the above li s t e d d epa rt me nt s or by u s in g t hese elec tive h o ur s. GERONTOLOGICAL SERVICES MINOR Thi s interdisciplin a ry minor empha s i zes the knowl e d ge and s kill s tha t e ntr y-le v e l prof ess i o n a l s u s e in working with older a dult s, and the man age ment of r es our ces tha t ar e pr ovi d e d in this r a pidl y ex pand ing field of s ervic e. Thi s applied, interdi sc iplin ary c urri c ulum c ompl e m e nt s a v ari e t y o f aca d e mic m ajor and prof es ion a lly oriented pr o gr a m s on ca mpu Th e min o r r eq uir es that a pr ac ticum or field experience involving older ad ult s, be tak e n a fte r all co r e co ur ses hav e be e n c ompl e t e d unless s u c h a requir e ment h a s be e n m e t e ith e r by the m ajor or thr o u g h pr ev i o u s experie n ce

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158 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Req uired Courses* Semeste r Hours HES 4520 Internship in Gerontolog y .................................. ..... .... 3 HCM 3020 Management Principles in H ealth Care .... ........... ....... . ..... 3 LES 2330 Advocacy Leisure and the Agin g Adult ................................. 3 PSY 3270 Adulthood and Aging .............. ...... ................... .... . 3 SOC I 040 Introd u ction to Gerontolo g y .... ......... .............. .... . 3 SPE 4760 Communication and the Elderly .......................... ...... ...... 3 SWK 3030 Social Work with the Aging ........ ............... .................. 4 T o tal ...... ............ ........ ......... . .... . .............. 22 E l ec ti ves: pon a d v i se m ent, the followin g courses ma y b e take n to s ubstitute for previou s l y taken core courses or for specific career objectives. LES 30 7 0 Health and Mov e ment Probl ems in the A g ing Adult .... .......... ........... 3 PSY 2270 Death and Dying .... ........................ ........... ....... 3 SOC 3 040 Contemporary l s ue in Gerontology ........ ..... ... .. ...... ... .... 3 SW K 3020 Ca se Manag e m ent in S ocial Work Pr a cti ce .. ... .... ........ ................ 4 *The s e requir e m e nt s ar e b e in g r evise d S ee the d e partm e nt c hair for curr e nt g uid e l i n e s. Ho PITALITY, MEETING AND TRAV E L ADMINISTRATION D E P A R TMENT Major for Bachelor of Arts The Hospi t a lit y Meeting a nd Travel Administration Departm e nt pro vides a flexible and individualized interdiscip lin ary major program l eading to a bachelor of ar1S degree and fo ur minor programs. Student are offered areas of emphasi s in hotel, meeting, rest a urant or trave l a dmini s tr atio n Each area of emph as i s is designed t o provide student s wi th th e theoretica l knowledge a n d practical experie nce needed for employment in these rapidly expanding indu s tries. To be awarded a degree, th e st udent must compl e t e the MSCD General Studies r equirement s. Students must co n s ul t wit h facu lt y a d v i sers for selectio n of approved G e n e ral Studies co ur ses. ln additio n to meeting degree requirement s including the Genera l Studies requi r e m ents, the HMTA s tu dent must: Maintain a grade point average of 2 25. D e mon strate a typing pr oficie ncy of 35 wp m Prese nt CPR and first aid certification. D e mon strate a basic competence in a foreign l anguage. Pre s e nt verificat i o n of I ,200 c l ock hours of o n the-job ex p erie nce in the HMT A area of empha sis. These may be secured through paid job experience coop erative ed ucatio n externs hip s, or a combination of th e three. o more than nine emes ter hour s in cooperativ e education w ill be accep t ed, and these hours mu s t contain s pecific descripti o n s of the job duties performed. Travel student s must present certificatio n of 40 clock hours of computer reservation training. Complete a grad u ation agreement and have it approved b y th e adviser no later than th e third e m es t e r of enroll m e nt (seco nd semes ter fortran fer stude nt s) in the HMTA program. *Compete n c e to be c ertified by the Mod e m Language D e partment as havin g the equivalenc e of or taking S PAJFR E 1110 o r SPAJFR E 1120 (or othe r approved language) and earning a grade of C or better. HMT A Core ( R equire d of all H MTA Majors) Semeste r Hours ANT 2330 Cro ss -Cu lt ural Communi c ation .... ....... ............ ... ...... ... 3 CMS I 0 10* Introd u ction to Computers ....... ............. ............... ......... 3 HMT I 020 Pri nciples of Hotel/Restaurant Admini str a tion ........... ...... .... ... 3 HMT 1 030 Principles of Meet i ng}Trave l Admini s tration .. ... ......................... 3 HMT I 090 Job Search Strategie ........ ... ... .... ......... ..... . ...... 2 HMT 4650 Hosp itality Emp l oye e Res ource Development ....... ... ........ .... ...... 3 MGT 3000 Organizationa l Management ........ . ........ ............. .... 3 SPE 3740 P s ychology of Communication .... .......... ........ ............ ..... .. 3 T o tal ... ......... ... ............ ... ..................... ............. ........ 23 Or equi v al e nt appr ove d b y HMTAfac ult y ad v i se r

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Hot e l A dmini s tration Emphas i s R eq ui re d Courses I SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 ACC 2010 Prin c iple s of Accounting I ................. ......................... 3 HMT 2560 Hotel Financial Ac c ounting ... ...... ................................... 3 HMT 3510 Hot e l Administration I ................. ..................... .... ... 3 HMT 3520 Hotel Administration n ........... ...... ........... ........ .. .. 3 HMT 3560 Hotel/Re staura nt Law ................... ........ ......... ...... ....... 3 HMT 3570 Ho pitality Marketing ...................... .... ...... ...... ....... 3 HMT 3600 B everage Control ................................................. 3 HMT 3650 Hospitality Property Management. ..................................... 3 HMT 3660 Re taurant Adm ini stratio n I ............. 0 0 0 0 0 3 HMT 4660 Training and Developm e nt in Hos pitality ......... 0 3 Subtotal ........................... ......................... 0 30 Plu s a minimum o f three courses se l ecte d f rom th e f ollowing: HMT 1610 Kitche n Procedure s and Production I .. .......... 0. 0 0 0. 0 4 HMT 1 620 Kitchen Pro ce dure s and Production 11 . .... . ........................ 4 HMT 2000 Extemship I ............................... 0 0 3 HMT 2500 Applied Hotel/Restaurant Operation s ..................................... 2 HMT 2760 M ee ting Adm i ni s tration I ..... . ........ ........................... 3 HMT 3610 Enology : The Study of Wine .............. ...... 0 3 HMT 3670 Res taurant Admini stration n ...... ............................ ......... 3 HMT 3750 Promotional Materials: Analysis and D es ign ................................ 3 HMT 4000 Extemship ll ......... ............ .... .......................... 3 HMT 4010 Extemship ITI .... . ..... .......... o o. o o I HMT 4500 Hospit a lity S ales ............................ ... 0 0 0 3 HMT 4590 Seminar in H otel Administration ................... 0 0 0 2 HMT 4730 Principle s of Negoti a tion ................ 0 0 0 3 HMT 4790 Seminar in Meetin g (Variable Topi cs) .......... .......................... 2 Subtotal ......................... ................. 0, 0 0 8-11 Total ............................. ........................................ 38-4 1 R estaurant A dministr a tion E mph as i s R equire d Courses ACC 2010 Prin cip l es of Accounting I ........................................... 3 HMT 1 610 Kit che n Procedure s and Produc tion I .... ... 0 0 4 HMT 1 620 K itc hen Procedur e and Production ll .......... 0 0 4 HMT 2650 Restauran t Financial Accounting .... ..... 0 0 3 HMT 3560 H o tel/Restaurant Law ........... 0 3 HMT 3570 Ho pitality Marketin g ................................................. 3 HMT 3600 Beverage Co n tro l ............................................... 3 HMT 36 1 0 Enology: T h e Study of Wine .... . 0 0 0 0 0 3 HMT 3650 Ho pitality Property Management. .... . ... ........ . ...... .... 3 HMT 3660 Resta urant Administration I ................ 0 0 0 3 HMT 3670 R e taurant Admini stration IT ................................... o 3 HMT 4660 Training and Development in Hos pit a lit y ................................. 3 Total .......................... . . ...... . 0 0 0 0 38 Meetin g Admini stratio n E mph as i s R equire d Courses ACC 20 I 0 Prin ciples of Accounting I .................. .. ........... ... 0 3 HMT 2760 Meeting Administration I . . ......................... .... ........ 3 HMT 3750 Promotion Mat erials: Analysis and Desi gn .... .............. . 3 HMT 3760 M eeting Admi n i stra tion II ... ................................ 0 3 HMT 4790 Seminar in Meeting : Variable Topi cs ..... ...... .......... . 0 2 JRN 2840 Fundamenta l s of Public R e l at i o n s ............... ................. 0 3 MKT 3000 Principles of Mark eting .... ... .. 0 0 3 Subt o tal ............................................... ........... ...... .... 20 Ele c tives : I t is s tr o n gl y re co mmend ed that m ee tin g administration students use their e l ec ti ves and a minor to secure an area o f spec iali zario n in the me e tin g fie ld .

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50 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Category I (Se lect 3 hours plus MGT 4000-3 Organizational Decision Making) ECO 2020 Principle s of Economics-Micro ........................................ 3 ECO 3150 Econometrics ............................. ......................... 3 ECO 3 500 Mana ge rial Economics ......... .. ...................... ............... 3 MGT 2210 Le gal Environment of Bu iness I .......................... ... ......... 3 MKT 3110 Adverti ing .......................... ...... ............. ...... ...... 3 MKT 3120 Promotional Strat egy ..................... ........................ 3 MKT 3 160 Sal es Man age m ent ......... .......... ................. ............ 3 MKT 3710 Int ernatio nal Marketing .................................. ... ... 3 MGT 4000-3 Organizational D ec i s ion Making ........ ... ................ .............. 3 Subtotal .................................................................... 6 Category ll (Se lect 6 h ours) COM 2430 Introduction to Tec hni cal Media ........................ ................ 3 HMT 3780 Leadership by Objecti ves .............................................. 3 HMT 4720 M ee ting Law ....... .... .... ................. ........... ......... ... 3 HMT 4730 Principl es of N egot iation ... ............................... .......... 3 Subrotal ........................................................... ........ 6 C ategor y lll (Se l ect 6 hours) HMT 18 10 B asic Ticketing and Reserva tion Procedure s ................. ..... ........ 4 HMT 2 500 Applied Hot e l/Re stauran t Operation s .................... .............. 2 HMT 3510 Hotel Administration I .... ....................... ..................... 3 HMT 3 5 20 Hotel Administration II ............................................ 3 HMT 3660 Re s taurant Admini s tration I ............................ ........ ........ 3 HMT 3 670 Res taurant Administration II ................... ....... ............... 3 HMT 4810 Tour M a n age m en t .......................................... ......... 4 Subtotal ............... .................................................... 6 T o tal ......................................................................... 38 Travel A dm inistratio n Emphasis Required Cour es Semester Hours HMT 1 810 B asic Ticketing and Re se rvation s Procedur es ................. ......... ..... 4 HMT 1 820 Travel R e ference and Case Studie s ............... ...... ............... 2 HMT 1 830 Cruise D e velopm e nt, Mark e ting and S a l es .................. ............... 4 HMT 2840 Tour Operation s .............................................. ..... 4 HMT 2860 Touri s m ......................................................... 2 HMT 3850 Financial Manag e m ent in the Travel Industry .......... ............... .. .. 4 HMT 3860 Incentive Travel ................................ ................ 2 HMT 4810 Tour Manag e ment ................................................. 4 HMT 4820 Marketing in the Travel Indu s try ................................... 4 HMT 4830 Corporate Trav e l Man age m ent ............................. .... ..... 2 HMT 4840 Trave l Indu s try Managem ent .............................. ............ 4 HMT 4890 Seminar in Travel : Variabl e Topics ..... ... .. ... ..... .... ............ 2 Subtotal ........................................................... .... ....... 38 Select two hours of credit in a travel specialization from the categori es below: Air Travel S p ecia lizati o n HMT 3830 Infti g ht Servic es .. .................................................. 2 HMT 3840 Airpon Service s ................................................... .. 3 HMT 4850 Airli n e Sale s ........................ ............................... 2 Travel Agency Specialization HMT 2850 Travel Agen cy Accounting ............ ........................... .... 3 Corporate Travel S p ec i alization HMT 3890 Cases in Corporate Travel Managem ent .............. .................... 2 T o tal ............. ...................................... ............... 40-41 MI ORS The Hospitality Meeting and Travel Administration D epart ment offer s minors in all four areas of emphasis. Student s are expected to know any prerequisites for courses in other departments.

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Noncourse Requirement s : 300 clock hour s of on-the-job experience CPR and first-aid certification Ba s i c competence in a foreign language Typing proficiency of 35 wpm Trav e l students-verification of 40 clock hours of comp uter reservation training by a qualified reservation trainer or mana ger. Hotel Administration Minor Required Courses Semester Hours HMT I 020 Principles of Hotel/Restaurant Administration ... ................ ....... 3 HMT 351 0 Hotel Admini tration I ................................................ 3 HMT 3520 Hotel Administration 0 ..................... ....................... 3 HMT 3560 Hotel/Restaurant Law ................................................. 3 HMT 3570 Hospitality Marketing .... ............. ............................. 3 HMT 3660 Restaurant Administration I .... . ........ ........................... 3 HMT 4650 Hos pitality Emp l oyee Resource Development ............................. 3 HMT Electives (ap proved by faculty adviser) ........................................... 3 Total .... ....... ........ ................................................. 24 Re staurant Administration Minor R eq uir e d Courses HMT 1020 Principles of Hot el/Restaurant Administration .............................. 3 HMT 1 610 Kitchen Procedures and Production I ..................................... 4 HMT 1620 Kitchen Pr ocedures and Production n .................................. .. 4 HMT 3560 Hotel/Restaurant Law ............................. ............. ....... 3 HMT 3570 Hospitality Marketing . . . . . . . ......... 3 HMT 3600 Beverage Control ........... ......................................... 3 HMT 3660 Restaurant Administration I ............ .............................. 3 HMT 3670 R estauran t Administration 0 ............................ ................ 3 HMT 4650 Hospitality Employee Reso urce Development .................... ......... 3 Total ..................................................................... 29 Meeting Administration Minor Required Courses HMT 1 020 Principles of Hotel/Restaurant Administration ............................. 3 HMT 1 810 Basic Ticketing and Reservations Procedure s ............................... 4 HMT 2760 Meeting Administration I ............................. ................ 3 HMT 3750 Promotion Materials: Analysis and Design ................................ 3 HMT 3760 Meeting Administration II ...................................... .... ... 3 HMT 3780 Leadership b y Objectives .......................................... 3 HMT 4720 Meeting Law ......................................... ...... ........ 3 HMT 4730 Principles of egotiation ... ....... ....... ....................... 3 Total. ................................................................. 25 Travel A dmini s tration Minor Required Courses HMT 1810 Basic Ticketing and Rese rvations Pr ocedures ..................... ......... 4 HMT 1 820 Travel Refe r ences and Case Stud i es ..................................... 2 HMT 1830 Cruise Development Marketing and Sales ................................. 4 HMT 2840 Tour Operations ........................ .. ... .... .................... 4 HMT 3750 Promotional Material s : Analy s i s and Desig n ......................... ...... 3 HMT 3850 Financial Management in the Travel lndu try ... ............ ............... 4 HMT 4810 Tour Management .................................................. 4 HMT 4820 Marketing in the Travel Industry .............. ...................... 4 HMT 4 830 Corporate Travel Management .......................................... 2 HMT 4890 Seminar in Travel : Variable Topic ... ..... ........ ..... ................ Total .............................. ...... ................................... 33

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162 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES HUMAN P ERFORMANCE, SPORT AND LElSURE STUDlES DEPARTMENT The Hum a n P erf ormance, Sport and Lei s ure Studies Department offers coursework leading to a b ach elor of arts degree Students preparing for work in indu try or for graduate st udy can choose one of the human p erforma n ce and s port empha is areas (adult fitness and exercise s cience ath l etic training, or sport a nd allied fields), or one of the lei ure study emphasis areas (leisure ervice management or ther ape uti c recreation) Tho e students preparing to teach in a public or private schoo l can choose eit her the eleme ntary seco ndary K-12 secondary physical educatio n/athl etic training, or seco ndary phys i cal educatio n/coaching emphasis Students seeking teaching licenses in phy s ical education must satisfy the teacher licen s ure program requirements in addition to all the requirements of the Hum a n P erformance, Sport and Lei s ure Studies Department. Requirements for formal admission to the teac her lice nsure programs as listed und e r the teacher education programs section of thi Catalog, mu t also be met. Students should contac t the Early Childhood and Elementary Educ a tion Department or the Secondary Education Department for infor mation regarding teacher licensure admis ions. Additiona l requirement: A grade of "C" or better i s required for all HPSL courses taken in any major/minor emphasis areas. 'f Human Performance and Sport Major for Bachelor of Arts ELEMENTARY PHYSI CAL EDUCATIO EMPHASIS Professio n al Activity Courses Basic Skills ( all of the following) Semester H ours HPS 1620 Fundamentals of Mo vement ............... ............................ 2 HPS 1640 Phy sica l Fitne ss ................ ................................. 2 HSL lSOQ Tumbling ................................ ........ ..... ............ 2 Team Sports (four of the following) HSL ISO! Volleyball. .................................. ...... ................. 2 HSL !SOB Ba ketball. ..................................................... 2 HSL !SOP Soccer/Speedball ................................................ ... 2 HSL !SOY Football/Fl ag Football .... ...... .................. .................. 2 HSL !SOU Softball ........... .......................... ................... 2 HSL ISOR Field Hock ey/F loor Hock ey ........................... ................ 2 M i scellaneous ( two of the following) HSL !SOL Square and Folk Dan ce ... ........ ............ 0 0 0 2 HSL I50D Track and Field ... 0 0 0 0 2 HSL 150X Wrestling .......................................................... 2 HSL 1500 Lifeguard Training .................... 0 2 HSL lSOK Racq uetball and Handball.. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0. 0 0 2 Additional Elementary Activity Cour es HPS 2SOO Activitie s for the Young Child 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 HPS 2S20 Rhythm s for the Young Child ......... 0 0 0. 2 HPS 2S80 Movement Education 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Subtotal 0 0 0 0 0 26 Theory Classes (all of the followi ng) HPS 1600 Introduction to Human P erfo rmanc e and Sports ........ 0 0 2 HPS 3300 Anatomical Kine s iology .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 HPS 3340 Phy s iology of Exercise ...................... 0 0 3 HPS 3460 Evaluation and Me as urem e nt in Human Performance Spon and Leis ur e Studie s 0 0 3 HPS 3SOO Method s of Teachin g Human Performance and Spon s for Cltildren 0 0 0 0 3 HPS 4SOO P syc h o l ogy of Motor Learning ...................................... ... 3 HPS 4600 Organi za tion Administration of Human Perfom1an ce and Spons Program s 0 0 3 Approved Ele c tive s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Subtotal 0 0 0 0 0 23 Total Minimum H o urs for Major. 0 0 0 0 0. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 49 Note: A current First R esponder and CPR for the Pr ofessional Reswer card is required. S tud ents may take HPS 2060 or co mplet e a First R esponder and CPR for the Profe ssional Res c uer co ur ses from the American Red Cr oss.

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 16 Students seeki n g teacher licensure in phys ical education ( K--6) take the followin g additional courses: Phys ical Education Licensure (K-{)) 1 Sem es ter H ours EDT 31 I 0 Introdu c tion to Educational Tec hn o l ogy . . . . ........ 2 EDU 2120 Elem e ntary Edu ca tion in the United St a te s ....... ......................... 3 EDU 3 1 20 Curriculum and Management: Preprimary-6 ................................ 4 EDU 4190 Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary K-{) ......................... I 0 HPS 4620 Adaptive Human P erformance and Sports Activitie s ................. ......... 3 PSY 1 800 D eve lopmental Educational P ychology ...... ........................ 4 RDG 3130 Teaching Re a ding in the Elementary School: K-{) ............... ............ 4 T o tal. ...................................................................... 30 S ECONDARY PHY CAL EDUCATIO EMPHASIS Profe ssi onal Activity Courses Secondary physical ed u catio n m ajors mus t present proof of proficie n cy in 15 different activities. A to t a l of 32 cre dits wil l be counted toward completion of the major req uir ements Student mu s t present proof of proficiency by r eceiv ing a g r ade of C or better in Human Performance Spon and L e i sure courses The curricu lum i s being revised Plea e check w ith the d e partment. Basic Skills { all of the following) HPS 1620 Fundamentals of Movement .................. ...... .................. 2 HPS 1640 Physical Fitness ..................................................... 2 HPS 1660 Swimming .............. ........................... ..... ...... 2 HSL 150Q Tumblin g ........................ .......... ........... ....... 2 Team Sports ( 4 of the following ) HSL 1 50B Basketball. ........................................ . ..... ...... 2 HSL 150R Field Hockey/Floor Hockey . . . . . . . . 2 HSL 150V Football/F l ag Football ............. .............................. 2 HSL 150P Soccer/Speedball .................. ..... ...... ..................... 2 HSL 150U Softball. ................................... ...................... 2 HSL 1 50! Volleyball ...................................................... 2 Individual Sports ( 5 of the followin g) HS L 1500 Lifeguard Training ................ ..... .... ........ .............. 2 HSL 150W Archery and Badminton ............ . .... .... ................ 2 HSL 150F Golf ............................................................. 2 HSL 1 50A Gymnastic s ........................................................ 2 HS L I 50S P e r sonal Defen se ............................ ..... ........ ....... 2 HSL 1 50K Racquetball and Handb all ................... ........................... 2 HSL I SOT Tenni s ............. . . ...... ......................... ....... 2 HSL 150D Track and F i e l d ... . ..................... ................... 2 Miscella n eous (3 of the following ) HSL 1 50Y Ballroom Dancing ..... ................ . ...................... 2 HSL 150G I mprovisation and Choreography ...... ................... ............... 2 HSL !SOL Square a nd Folk Danc e ..................... ................. ....... 2 HSL 150E Weight Training ................................................... 2 HSL I SOX Wrestlin g . .............................. ... ............. 2 Subtota l ...... .......................... ....... ........ . ...... .... 32 Theory Courses { all o f the following ) HPS 1 600 Introdu ctio n to Hum an Perf orm anc e and Sports ... .......................... 2 HPS 3300 Anatomi cal Kine iology . . . . . .................... 3 HPS 3320 Biomechanics .... . .............................................. 3 HPS 3340 Phy s iolo g y of Exercis e ................................................ 3 HPS 3400 Method of Teaching Human Perfonnan ce and Spons for the Adolescent and Young Adult ................................... ....... 3 HPS 3460 Evaluation and Mea s urement in Hum an P e rformance, Spon and Lei s ure Studi es .... 3 HPS 4600 Organization Admini s tration of Hum an Performance a nd Spon Program s ......... 3 Approved Electives. . . . . . . . . . . .... ...... 3 Subtotal .......... .................................................... .... ... 23 T o tal Minimum H o ur s for Major . ..... .............. .......................... 55 Note: A c urrem First Re s pond e r and CPR for the Pr ofess i ona l R eswer card is required Student s may tak e HPS 2 060 o r co mpl ete a First R esponde r and CPR for the Pr ofess i onal R esc u e r co ur ses from th e Ameri can R ed Cross.

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164 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Stude nt s seeking teacher licensure in s econdary phy s ica l e ducati on must take the following a ddi tional courses: Secondary Physical Education Licen sure Semeste r Hours EDS 3110 Pr ocesses of Edu catio n i n Multicultur a l U rb a n S econdary S c h o ol s ... ............ 3 EDS 3 1 2 0 F i eld E x perien ces in Multi c ultural Urb an S ec ondary S c h o ol s ... ............... 3 E DS 3200 Edu catio n a l P syc h o l ogy A ppli e d t o T eachi n g ............................... 3 EDS 32 1 0 S econdary Sc h oo l C urri c ulum and C l assroo m M a na ge m e nt .................... 3 EDS 322 0 Field Experi e n ce in T e a c hing, M a t erials Co n truc tion and Cl ass room Man age m ent ... 3 EDS 4290 Student T eaching and Se min a r : S econdary (7-1 2) .......................... 1 2 E DT 3610 Intr od ucti o n t o Edu catio n a l T echno l ogy ...................... ......... 1-3 HPS 4620 A d a p t ive Human P e rf o m1an ce and Spon s Activities ............... ........ 3 RDG 3280 T eac h i n g of R ea din g and Wr i tin g i n the Content Ar eas ....................... 4 Tota l .... ...................................... ........................ 35-37 K-12 PHYSICAL EDU CATIO N EMPHA SI S Stud e nt s mus t be profi c i ent i n 16 differ e nt activities se l ec ted from th e ca t e gorie s below A tot a l of 3 2 c r e d i t s will be co unted t ow ard co mpl etio n of the m ajo r r e quirem e nt Stud e nt s mu s t p rese nt proof o f proficien cy b y r ece i ving a gr ad e of "C" o r be tt e r in hum an pe rform ance and s port s an d l ei ur e c our ses Professional Act i vity Courses Basic Skills ( all of th e following ) HHPS 1 620 Fund a m e nt a l s of M ove m ent ............ .... .......... ................ 2 HPS 1 640 Physi ca l F i tness ................................................. 2 HPS 1 660 Swimmi n g ................................... ..................... 2 HSL 1 50Q T umblin g ............... ....................................... 2 Team Sports ( 4 of the following ) HSL I SOB B a ke tb a ll. .............................................. .... ... 2 HSL 1 50 R Fie l d Hock ey/F l oo r H ockey .............. .... ... ................... 2 HSL 1 50 V Football/Flag Foo tb all .............................. .......... ...... 2 HSL I SOP S occe r / S peed b all ................................ ........ ........ 2 HSL I SOU So f tb a ll. .... .................. .... ......... ...... ... ...... ... 2 HSL 1501 V olleyb a ll. ............................. . .... ................ 2 Individual Sports ( 5 of th e following) HSL 1 50 0 L ifeg u ar d T r ai nin g ... ............................... ............ 2 HSL I SOW Arc h ery and Badm into n ............ ............................... ... 2 HSL 1 50F G o l f ................................... ...................... 2 HSL 1 50A G ymnastics ......................................................... 2 HSL 50S P ersona l D efe n se ............................................. 2 HSL 1 50 K R acq u e tb all and H andball ......... ............................... ... .. 2 HSL !SOT T ennis ............................................. .............. 2 HSL I SOD T rac k and Fie l d ........................... . ..... ............... 2 M i scellaneous ( 3 of the following ) HSL I SOY B a llr oo m D a n cing .................................... ............. 2 HSL 1 50G Impr ov i satio n and C h oreography .... .... ... ...... .................... 2 HSL 1 50 1 R epe n ory C h oreography ............................... ............. 2 HSL I SOL S q u are and Folk D a n ce ......................................... 2 HSL 1 50E W e i ght Train ing .......... ......... ... ... ................ ......... 2 HSL I SOX W res tlin g .......... ............ .......... ... ....... ...... ... 2 S ubtot o l ............................................. .... ................... 32 T heor y Classes HPS 1 600 Intr od u ctio n t o Huma n P erformance and Spon s ..... ...... .... ........ 2 HPS 2500 A c tiviti es f o r the Y oung C h ild ........................... ..... .......... 3 HPS 2520 Rhy thm s for the Youn g C hild ......... ........ . .... ............. 2 HPS 2580 Move m ent Educatio n ................................................. 3 HPS 2780 Care and Pr eve nti o n of Athl etic Injuri es ......................... ........ 3 HPS 3300 Ana t o mical Kines i o l ogy .. ....................... .... . .... ......... 3 HPS 3320 Bio m ec h a nics ...................................................... 3 HPS 3340 Physi o l ogy of Exe r c i se .......... .... ....... ... ..................... 3 HPS 3400 M et h ods of Teac hin g Huma n P e rf o rm ance and Spon for the A d o l escen t and Young Adu lt. .................................... .. .. 3 HPS 3460 Eval u atio n a n d M eas ur ement in Human P erformance, Spon and Le i s ur e S tudies .... 3

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 HPS 3500 M ethods of Teaching Human P erfom1ance and Sports for Children .............. 3 HPS 3990 Fie l d Experience in Human Performan ce an d Sport ... ........... ......... 2 HPS 4500 P syc hology of M o t or Learning ..... ............... ................ 3 HPS 4600 Or ganiza tion, Administration of Huma n P erfo rman ce and Sport P rog r a m s ........ 3 Subtota l .................................................... ................. 39 Total Minimum H OI
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166 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Pl u s 9 hours selected from the following: HES 2040 Introdu c tion t o utrition. . . . .... ...................... 3 H SP 1 470 Addictive Experien ces: Sex Dru gs R ock and R oll. ......................... 3 HPS 2720 F und ame nt als of Coaching ............................................ 2 HPS 3990 Fie l d Experie n ce in Hum an P e rfom1ance and Sport s ...................... 1-3 LES 3710 Administration of Intramura l Sport s and Student R ec r eation ................... 2 LES 4730 S oc iology of Athleti cs in American S ociety ................. ............. 3 Sub t o tal ............... ...... ........... .................. ..... ......... 9 H o ur s C oac hin g ............. ........ ..... .................................... 20 H ours S eco nda ry Hum an P erfor man ce and Sp ort Maj or .................................. 55 Total Minimum H o urs for Major .......... ....................................... ... 75 Note: T eaching li ce n s ur e r eq uir e mem would b e the same os the secondary physical ed u ca ti o n li ce nse C o mpl etion of this pr og ram e liminat es the r eq uir e m e nt of a min o r Sport a nd A lli e d Fie ld s Areas of Emphasis R equired Courses Se me s ter Hours HPS 1 600 Introdu c tion to Hum a n P e rforman ce and Sports ..................... ........ 2 HPS 2060 Emergency Re sc u e/First R es p onde r and CPR (o r valid American R e d Cross Card) 3 HP S 3300 Anatomi ca l Kin es iolo gy .......... ....... ... ...................... 3 HPS 3320 Bio m ec hani cs ....................................................... 3 HPS 3340 Ph ys iolo gy of Exerci e ....................................... ..... 3 HPS 3620 Trend s and I ss u es in Hum a n P e rform ance a nd Sport s ...... ................... 2 HSL 1 500 Pr ofessio nal Activitie s (se l ec t any 1 2 credits) ........... ..... .... ........ 12 LES 4730 Sociology of Athletic s in Ame rican S oc iety ................................ 3 A ppr oved E l ectives* ....................................................... ..... 13 T o tal ........................................................................ 44 *To b e se le cted in accordance w ith swde m s im e nded caree r o bje c ti ves. Must b e pr eplanned with an adviser in the Human P e rforman ce, Sp ort and L e i s u r e Studies D e p artment and approved b y the d e part melll c hair. Athletic Training Area of Emph asis This e mph as i s area i s d es i g n e d for those primarily int e r este d in at h leti c training at the high sc hool co l lege or pro fes s ional l eve l a n d i s co mpl e m e ntar y t o a lli ed fiel d s (e g., biology) R equired Courses Se m este r Hours BIO 23 1 0 Human Anatomy and Ph ysio l ogy I ............ ................. ......... 4 BIO 2320 Human Anat o m y and Ph ys iolo gy 11 ...................... .... ....... 4 HES 2040 I ntroduction to utrition ............. ........ ....................... 3 HPS 1 640 Ph y ic a l Fitn ess T echniq ue s and Pro grams ............................ 2 HPS 2060 Eme r ge n cy Re sc u e/F ir s t R es pond e r and CPR ........... ................... 3 HPS 2780 Care and Pr eve n tio n of Athletic Inju rie s ................................ 3 HPS 3000 Health P rogram s in Hum an P e rf o rman ce and Sport ... ...................... 3 HPS 3300 Anatomical Kin es i o l ogy ....... ................ ....................... 3 HPS 3320 Biom ec hani cs .................................................. 3 HPS 3340 Phy s i o l ogy of Exerci se ... ....... ............... .................. ... 3 HPS 3820 M ec h an i s m s of A thl etic Inju ry ............ ............................ 3 HPS 3840 Eval uation Procedures in Athletic Training ............................ . 3 HPS 3860 The r apeutic Modalitie s in Sport s M edicine ............................... 3 HPS 3990 Field Experien ce in Hum an P e rformanc e and Sport s .......................... I HPS 3990 Field Experience in Hum an P erfo rman ce and Sports ................ ...... 2 HPS 4600 Orga ni zat ion Admini s tration of Hum an P erform anc e and Sports Program s ........ 3 HPS 4660 Legal Liability for Phy sica l Ed u cator Coaches and Ad m ini tra t ors ........ ..... 3 HPS 4760 Th erapeutic R eha bil i t atio n in Sports Medicin e .............................. 3 HPS 4870 Int erns hip ...................... .... .... ............... ..... .... I 0 PSY 2160 P e r s o nality and Adj u stment ............................................ 3 T o tal ......................................... .... .............. . ..... .... 65 Compl e ti on of thi s program eliminates the need for a minor.

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SCHOOL O F PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 To b e a cce pt e d int o th e prog r a m s tud e n ts mu s t : have a declared major in human performance and sports with an athletic training emphasis h ave completed a mi n imum of 15 se m es ter hour s a t MSCD have completed these prerequisite co ur ses: HPS 2060--Emergency R e cue/F ir s t R esponder and CPR, or equivalent B I O 2310/2320---Human Anatomy and Phys iology I a n d II or acceptable t ransfe r course maintain a GPA of 2 .75 To qualify for the A TA certification exam inati o n s tudent s must co mplet e I 500 volu nte e r hours of work wit h a ce rtified athle t ic trai n er ( not requ i red for graduation). A dult Fitness and Exe rcise Scie nc e E mph as i s Adu lt fit n ess a n d exercise sc i e n ce i s an em p has i program for tho se seeking an e n trance i nto the a dul t fitness profe ss ion or those who have aspirations in the