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Catalog, Metropolitan State College of Denver, 2000-2001

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Catalog, Metropolitan State College of Denver, 2000-2001
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Metropolitan State College of Denver
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Metropolitan State College of Denver
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Auraria Library
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AURARIA LIBRARY
UlflVOl TflDOflS?
Auraria Campus


Campus Locations


MAJORS AND PROGRAMS
BUSINESS Page
Accounting...........................82
Computer Information Systems ........83
Economics............................89
Finance..............................84
Management...........................86
Marketing............................87
HUMANITIES
Art .................................98
English ............................109
Journalism..........................122
Modern Languages....................132
Music Education.....................136
Music Performance...................137
Philosophy .........................139
Spanish.............................150
Speech Communication ...............151
PUBLIC SERVICE PROFESSIONS
Criminal Justice and Criminology....170
Health Care Management..............189
Hospitality, Meeting and Travel
Administration ..................191
Human Performance and Sport.........196
Human Services .....................204
Leisure Studies.....................213
Nursing.............................216
SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
Biology............................101
Chemistry...........................104
Computer Science....................107
Environmental Science ..............114
Land Use............................125
Mathematics.........................127
Meteorology........................131
Physics ............................140
SOCIAL SCIENCES Page
African American Studies .............96
Anthropology..........................97
Behavioral Science ...................100
Chicano Studies .....................106
History ..............................120
Political Science ...................141
Psychology............................144
Social Work..........................146
Sociology ...........................148
Women's Studies......................156
TECHNOLOGY
Aviation Management..................162
Aviation Technology..................164
Civil Engineering Technology ........169
Electrical Engineering Technology ....185
Industrial Design.....................212
Industrial and Technical Studies .....209
Mechanical Engineering Technology....214
Surveying and Mapping ...............219
Technical Communications ............221
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Individualized Degree Program.....10, 46
Pre-Dental.......................101, 104
Pre-Law..........................104, 142
Pre-Med ........................101, 104
Pre-Veterinarian ...............101, 104
Teacher Licensure....................172
THE METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE of DENVER
Campus Box 16 P.O. Box 173362 Denver, CO 80217-3362


WELCOME
The Metropolitan State College of Denver
This catalog contains comprehensive information about The Metropolitan State College of Denver, the degrees and programs it offers, and the requirements that must be satisfied before receiving a degree. This publication describes admissions and registration procedures, as well as services offered by the college. General information on tuition and fees, financial aid packages and procedures are also covered.
Possible changes of the information in this catalog.
The programs, policies, statements and procedures contained in this publication are subject to change or correction by the college without prior notice. The Metropolitan State College of Denver reserves the right to withdraw courses; revise the academic calendar; or change curriculum, graduation procedures, requirements and policies that apply to students at any time. Changes will become effective whenever the proper authorities so determine. This publication is not intended to be a contract between the student and The Metropolitan State College of Denver. However, students are bound by the policies, procedures, standards and requirements stated herein, so Ipng as they are in effect.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS 3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
(See alphabetical index for specific topics)
The College ..................................................................5
Academic Calendar.............................................................7
Degrees and Programs......................................................... 8
Basic Degree Requirements....................................................12
Admissions...................................................................16
Enrollment ..................................................................23
Registration.................................................................23
Tuition and Fees............................................................ 24
Financial Aid ...............................................................27
Services and Programs for Students...........................................31
Student Life ............................................................... 38
Alternative Credit Options...................................................41
Special Academic Programs ...................................................46
General Studies Program.................................................... 49
Additional Graduation Requirements (Multicultural and Senior Experience).....57
Academic Policies and Procedures ............................................61
Student Rights and Responsibilities..........................................67
School of Business ..........................................................77
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences.........................................95
School of Professional Studies..............................................159
Course Descriptions ...................................................... 227
Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado ............................... 413
Officers of Administration..................................................413
Faculty ...........................................j.......................417
Alphabetical Index .........................................................428
Auraria Campus Map...........................................Inside Front Cover
Extended Campus Location Map ................................Inside Back Cover
Photography: Sidney Brock, Tom Cherrey, Kim Cook, Dave Neligh, Terry Shapiro Produced by: The Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of College Communications 2000


GENERAL INFORMATION 5
GENERAL INFORMATION
The College
The Metropolitan State College of Denver is the largest public four-year college in the United States. The college offers arts and sciences, professional and business courses and programs to a diverse student population. Excellence in teaching and learning is MSCDs primary objective.
The college's mission is to provide high-quality, accessible, enriching education that prepares students for successful careers, postgraduate education and lifelong learning in a multicultural, global and technological society. The college fulfills its mission by working in partnership with the community at large and by fostering an atmosphere of scholarly inquiry, creative activity and mutual respect within a diverse campus community.
More than thirty years ago, the state legislature created MSCD as Colorado's urban "College of Opportunity." Since then it has occupied an important niche in the state's system of higher education, because, by statute, it was designed to be unique.
MSCD is required to serve adult students. First-time college students who are 20 years of age or older and hold a GED or high school diploma are automatically admitted to MSCD, irrespective of their academic record.
MSCD is required to serve traditional-aged students of all levels of achievement and potential. As a result, the college enrolls a rich mix of recent high school graduates, many with excellent grades and test scores and others with more modest achievement.
MSCD is required to be accessible to all citizens. That is why tuition has been and remains among the lowest in the state.
The colleges role and mission are rooted in a commitment to excellence in teaching and learning. MSCD graduates praise faculty for their attention to teaching and willingness to help students succeed. According to a survey of college and university alumni conducted for the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE), MSCD alumni ranked the college number one in meeting their educational goals. In fact, 99 percent of the colleges graduates said MSCDs programs and curriculum met their goals.
The college awards bachelor of science, bachelor of arts and bachelor of fine arts degrees. Students can choose from 49 majors and 70 minors offered through three schools: Business; Letters, Arts and Sciences; and Professional Studies. Programs range from the traditional disciplines, such as history and biology, to contemporary fields of study, such as Chicano studies and health care management. The college offers several bachelors degree programs unique in Colorado, including aviation management, health care management, land use, meteorology, and surveying and mapping. Students may also design their own degree through the Individualized Degree Program.
Students
As an urban college committed to serving the local community, MSCD attracts students from a diverse mixture of age groups, socioeconomic classes, ethnic backgrounds and lifestyles. The colleges curriculum and philosophy reflect that diversity and enrich the urban experience.
Current enrollment is 17,307. Students range in age from 17 to 70 with a median age of 24. Ethnic minorities make up 24 percent of the students.
About 55 percent of students are enrolled full-time and 80 percent work full-or part-time. Sixteen percent are traditional students, beginning college before age 20, while 84 percent represent nontraditional age groups. Ninety-five percent of students reside in the six counties of the Denver metropolitan area:
Adams 12% Denver 31%
Arapahoe 19% Douglas 5%
Boulder 3% Jefferson 25%
Faculty
MSCD has nearly 400 full-time faculty. Professors are master teachers, recruited and evaluated for their ability to teach and engage students. All classes are taught by academic instructors. As a culturally diverse team of academicians, 34 percent of full-time faculty are women and 20 percent represent ethnic minorities.


6 GENERAL INFORMATION
The MSCD faculty is among the most productive in the state. In 1996, the CCHE reported that each full-time faculty member was responsible for teaching 21.5 credit hours, which is at least 9 credit hours more than the number taught at Colorados two largest universities.
The college also brings real-world education into the classroom by hiring part-time faculty who work in the Denver metropolitan community and use their expertise and experience in the arts, business, communications, law, politics, the sciences and technology in their teaching.
The Campuses
The Metropolitan State College of Denver is located at the Auraria Higher Education Center, a 127-acre campus in downtown Denver at Speer Boulevard and West Colfax Avenue. The Community College of Denver and the University of Colorado at Denver share the facilities with MSCD.
The campus includes more than one million square feet of space for classrooms, laboratories and offices. Some administrative offices are located in restored Victorian homes in Denver's historic Ninth Street Park located on the Auraria site. The campus also features a child care center, a comprehensive library housing 731,000 volumes, and one of the most unusual student union facilities in the country in the historic Bavarian-style Tivoli Brewery Building. Excellent physical fitness facilities include a block-long physical education/events center with a swimming pool, weight room, game courts, dance studios and event seating for 3,000.
The Auraria Higher Education Centers proximity to downtown Denver enables students and faculty to use the community as a learning laboratory and to connect classroom theory to the cultural, economic, social, and political practices of the city.
The college also has two satellite campus sites operated by the Extended Campus Program. Metro South, located at 5660 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard in Arapahoe County, serves the south, southeast, and southwest metropolitan areas. Metro North, located at 11990 Grant Street in Adams County, serves the north, northeast, and northwest areas. Each site is located 14 miles from the Auraria campus along the 1-25 corridor.
A variety of courses are offered during the evenings and on Saturdays on the Auraria campus and at Metro South and Metro North. Twenty-four degree programs can be completed entirely by taking courses scheduled during the evenings and weekends. MSCD offers classes in traditional formats as well as telecourses, online courses and correspondence courses. General information about these programs can be obtained from the Office of Admissions or the Academic Advising Center. The Class Schedule clearly identifies all evening and weekend courses.


GENERAL INFORMATION 7
2000-2001 ACADEMIC CALENDAR
2000 Fall Semester
Orientation* .....................................
Registration .....................................
Classes start.....................................
Labor Day (campus closed) ........................
Thanksgiving Day (campus closed)..................
Friday after Thanksgiving (campus open, no classes) .
Classes end.......................................
Final exams begin.................................
Final exams end...................................
Commencement (tentative**)........................
2001 Spring Semester
Orientation* .....................................
Registration......................................
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (campus open, no classes)
Classes start ....................................
Spring Break......................................
Classes end.......................................
Final exams begin ................................
Final exams end ..................................
Commencement (tentative**) .......................
...........April 18-August 19
... j.....April 17-August 19
...........Monday, August 21
........Monday, September 4
. .. [. .Thursday, November 23
.........Friday, November 24
........Saturday, December 9
.. L. .Monday, December 11
.......Saturday, December 16
.. j .Sunday, December 17
. .Mid-November-January 16 ... .Mid-November-January 16
..........Monday, January 15
.. ......Tuesday, January 16
Monday-Saturday, March 19-24
..............Saturday, May 5
..............Monday, May 7
.... |.......Saturday, May 12
.... .........Sunday, May 13
2001 Summer Semester
Orientation and registration ...................
Memorial Day (campus closed) ...................
Classes start...................................
Independence Day (campus closed)................
Classes end.....................................
2001 Fall Semester
Orientation and registration ...................
Classes start...................................
Labor Day (campus closed) ......................
Thanksgiving Day (campus closed)................
Friday after Thanksgiving (campus open, no classes)
Classes end.....................................
Final exams start...............................
Final exams end ................................
Monday-Friday, May 21-25
.........Monday, May 28
.........Tuesday, May 29
l......Wednesday, July 4
......Saturday, August 4
Monday-Friday, August 13-17
..........Monday, August 20
.......Monday, September 3
.....Thursday, November 22
....... .Friday, November 23
.......Saturday, December 8
.. j. . .Monday, December 10
......Saturday, December 15
*For orientation call 303-556-3559
**Call 303-556-6226 to confirm time and location.


8 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
The Metropolitan State College of Denver is organized into three schools. The schools are listed below with the majors and minors offered by each. The curriculum requirements for each of the programs are described in the Catalog in the special sections prepared by each school. Programs marked with an asterisk (*) do not require completion of a minor.
Major Minor Degree
School of Business
Accounting*............................................X........x.........B.S.
Computer Information Systems*..........................X........x.........B.S.
Economics .............................................X........x.........B.A.
Finance*...............................................X........x.........B.S.
General Business................................................x
International Business .........................................x
Management*............................................X........x.........B.S.
Marketing*.............................................X........x.........B.S.
Real Estate ....................................................x
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
African American Studies...............................X........x.........B.A.
Anthropology...........................................X........x.........B.A.
Art* ..................................................X........x ... .B.F.A.
Behavioral Science.....................................X..................B.A.
Biology................................................X........x . .B.A./B.S.
Chemistry..............................................X........x . .B.A./B.S.
Chicano Studies .......................................X........x.........B.A.
Computer Science.......................................X........x.........B.S.
Criminalistics .................................................x
English................................................X........x.........B.A.
Environmental Science*.................................X B.S.
Environmental Studies...........................................x
French..........................................................x
Geography.......................................................x
Geology.........................................................x
German..........................................................x
History................................................X........x.........B.A.
Interdisciplinary Legal Studies.................................x
Journalism ............................................X........x.........B.A.
Language and Linguistics .......................................x
Land Use ..............................................X.............B.A./B.S.
Mathematics............................................X........x . .B.A./B.S.
Meteorology............................................X........x.........B.S.
Modem Languages*.......................................X..................B.A.
Music ..........................................................x .B.A./B.M.
Music Education*.......................................X..................B.A.
Native American Studies.........................................x
Philosophy ............................................X........x.........B.A.
Physics................................................X........x . .B.A./B.S.
Political Science......................................X........x.........B.A.
Psychology.............................................X........x.........B.A.
Public Administration ..........................................x
Public Relations................................................x
Social Work* ..........................................X B.S.
Sociology..............................................X........x.........B.A.
Spanish................................................X........x.........B.A.
Speech Communications..................................X........x.........B.A.
Theoretical Physics ............................................x
Urban Studies ..................................................x
Womens Studies (Institute for Womens Studies
and Services).................................................x


DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 9
Major
School of Professional Studies
Airframe and Power Plant Mechanics .............
Aviation Management.............................
Aviation Technology ............................
Bilingual/Bicultural Education..................
Civil Engineering Technology+ .................
Criminal Justice and Criminology*..............
Early Childhood Education ......................
Electrical Engineering Technology+.............
Gerontology.....................................
Health and Safety ..............................
Health Care Management (upper-division)........
Holistic Health & Wellness Education Multi-Minor Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration* .
Hotel Administration............................
Human Performance and Sport....................
Human Services* ...............................
Industrial Design* ............................
Industrial and Technical Studies...............
Leisure Studies................................
Mechanical Engineering Technology-*- ..........
Meeting Administration..........................
Nursing (upper-division for RNs)*..............
Parent Education................................
Private Pilot...................................
Reading.........................................
Restaurant Administration.......................
Special Education/Gifted Education..............
Surveying and Mapping .........................
Teacher Licensing: Early Childhood, Elementary, Special Education, K-12, and Secondary
Technical Communications.......................
Travel Administration ..........................
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
.X
X
X
X
Minor Degree
. .x
. .x........B.S.
.............B.S.
. .x
.............B.S.
. .x........B.S.
. .x
. .x........B.S.
. .x .X
. .x........B.S.
. .x
.............B.A.
. .x
...x.........B.A.
. .x........B.S.
.............B.A.
. .x........B.S.
. .x........B.A.
. .x........B.S.
. .x
.............B.S.
. .x .x .X .X .X
...x.........B.S.
x.........B.A.
,x
Other
Individualized Degree Program........................X........x .B.A./B.S
+Concentration may replace the minor.


10 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
Individualized Degree Program
The Individualized Degree Program offers students the opportunity to design a major or a minor to meet their specific educational goals when those goals cannot be met by majors and minors currently offered by MSCD. Each student works closely with an advisor in the Center for Individualized Learning and a faculty mentor to design a coherent program of study to meet the students specific educational objectives. Each student's proposed program shall be approved by the department chair from which the majority of credit is drawn and by the dean of the appropriate School. All requirements for any bachelor's degree from the college apply. Either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree in Individualized Studies may be sought. Specific information and assistance is available from the Center for Individualized Learning at 303-556-8342, Central Classroom 106. See page 46 of this Catalog for more information.
Accreditations/Approvals
The Metropolitan State College of Denver is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (30 North LaSalle St., Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602-2504, 1-800-621-7440). Individual academic programs within the following areas are accredited or approved by the following agencies:
Program Accounting** Accreditation/Approval Agency Colorado State Board of Accountancy
Aerospace Science** Council on Aviation Accreditation
Center for Addiction Studies** Colorado Department of Health
Chemistry** American Chemical Society
Civil Engineering Technology* Electrical Engineering Technology* Mechanical Engineering Technology* Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. Ill Market Place, Suite 1050; Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 Phone: 410-347-7700 Fax: 410-625-2238 www.abet.org
Health Care Management** Association of University Programs in Health Administration 730 11th Street, NW, 4th Floor Washington, D.C. 20001-4510 Phone: 202-638-1448 Fax: 202-638-3429 www.AUPHA.org: email: AUPHA@AUPHA.org
Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies* National Park Association/American Association for Leisure and Recreation
Human Services** Council for Standards in Human Services Education
Music* National Association of Schools of Music
Nursing* National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) 61 Broadway; New York, New York 10006 212-363-5555 Ext. 153
Social Work* Council on Social Work Education
Teacher Education* National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education; Colorado Department of Education
Accreditation ** Approval


DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 11
Certificates of Completion
Certificate programs provide opportunities to successfully complete a series of five to eight academic credit courses that focus on a particular area of career interest. Each certificate program is designed to stand alone or merge with your degree program major or minor. The certificate title and date of award will appear on your transcript. The certificate program is coordinated by the Office of Extended Education, 303-741-6394.
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS AVAILABLE:
School of Business Personal Financial Planning Real Estate
Noncredit Financial Planning
Noncredit International Trade
Network Specialist in Information Systems
Programmer/Analyst in Information Systems
Database Analyst
User Support Specialist
School of Letters. Arts and Sciences
German Translation
Basic Competency in German
Basic Competency in French
Basic Competency in Spanish
Spanish Translation Program
Public Administration
Career and Personal Development
Gerontology (Liberal Arts Orientation)
School of Professional Studies
Gerontology (Professional Services Orientation)
International Technical Writing
Multimedia Production
Corporate Video Production
Technical Writing and Editing
High Risk Youth
Coaching
Activities Assistant for Older Adults
Recreation Assistant
Aquatics Assistant
Extended Day Activities Aide
Conditioning Specialist
Officiating
Literacy Instructor


12 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
BASIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Students are responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to their program contained in this Catalog and elsewhere. The final responsibility for completing the requirements for a degree rests with the students and it is recommended that they seek advice. Students should never assume that they have approval to deviate from a stated requirement without a properly signed statement to that effect.
Requirements for All Bachelor's Degrees
To earn a bachelor of science, a bachelor of arts, or a bachelor of fine arts degree, a student must satisfy the following minimum requirements, plus any others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
Complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher for all coursework.
Complete at least 40 semester hours in upper-division courses (3000- and 4000-level courses).
Complete all General Studies requirements listed for the degree and major.
Complete a three-hour Multicultural course requirement.
Complete a three-hour Senior Experience course requirement. This course must be taken at MSCD.
Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 30 semester hours. With certain exceptions (see the Degrees and Programs section on page 8 of this Catalog), complete a minor consisting of at least 18 semester hours. If a student completes two majors, the second major satisfies the minor requirement. Completing two concentrations under one major does not constitute the completion of two majors. Completion of two majors does not result in two degrees or diplomas. Coursework used to meet requirements for one major or minor may not be used to meet requirements for another major or minor. Students may not major and minor in the same discipline and are encouraged to obtain verification from an advisor if uncertainty exists.
Complete all special requirements of a department and school.
Achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in all MSCD courses that satisfy the requirements for the major, and for all MSCD courses that satisfy requirements for a minor. Students should check with an advisor for special GPA program requirements.
File an Application for Graduation with the Office of the Registrar by the deadline stipulated in the Class Schedule.
Academic residency (classroom credit) requirements:
Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at MSCD, including the last 12 semester hours applicable to the degree.
Complete at least 8 upper-division (3000- and 4000-level courses) semester hours of the major and 3 upper-division semester hours of the minor at MSCD (classroom credit).
Students should be aware that University of Colorado at Denver pooled courses and courses taken interinstitutionally or at one of the other state colleges will not satisfy academic residence requirements at MSCD.
Credit limitations
No more than 30 semester hours of omnibus-numbered courses may be applied toward graduation requirements (see page 227 of this Catalog).
No more than 30 semester hours taken by extension and/or correspondence may be applied toward a bachelor's degree.



DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 13
No more than 4 semester hours in human performance and leisure activity or varsity sports courses will be counted toward a bachelor's degree for students who are not majoring in human performance, sport and leisure studies.
No more than 7 semester hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a bachelor's degree for students who are not majoring in music.
Requirements for a Second Degree
For an additional bachelor's degree, students must comply with the following:
The first bachelor's degree must be recognized by MSCD.
General Studies will be considered complete unless deficiencies exist according to the major department.
Students must complete all requirements for a new major with a minimum of eight MSCD classroom upper-division semester hours in the major department.
Students do not need to complete a minor unless specifically required by the major department for the contemplated degree.
Students must satisfy the Multicultural and Senior Experience course requirements for the second degree.
Students must spend at least two additional semesters in residence.
A minimum of 30 semester hours of MSCD classroom credit after the awarding of the previous degree.
Credit limitations for a bachelor's degree also apply to the second degree.
An Application for Graduation must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar by the deadline stipulated in the Class Schedule.


14 GENERAL STUDIES
THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM
Philosophy of the General Studies Program
The Metropolitan State College of Denver seeks to prepare its graduates for a lifetime of learning, which, in our changing and complex society, requires focused expertise (such as that provided by a major area of study) and the ability to communicate with and learn from experts in other fields. Undergraduate education fosters the critical thinking necessary for the exploration of unfamiliar disciplines and for the synthesis of learning and exposes students to the richness and variety of the intellectual universe.
General Studies Information
Students must use a single catalog to meet all degree requirements, including those in the General Studies, major and minor. Some changes in General Studies requirements have been made retroactive. As a consequence, many General Studies requirements and policies described in this Catalog may be followed by students using earlier catalogs.
General Studies Goals
The General Studies Program is designed to help graduates achieve the following competencies:
MSCD students should be able to:
1. write and speak with clarity;
2. read and listen critically;
3. draw conclusions from quantitative data;
4. recognize faulty reasoning;
5. organize ideas; and
6. communicate with experts in other disciplines and learn from them.
MSCD students should:
7. have an open attitude toward different approaches to problems
8. have an informed awareness of the principal human achievements in history, arts and letters, society, and science, and
9. be introduced to the basic methods, knowledge, problems or attitudes characteristic of a field.
Structure of the General Studies Program
The General Studies Program is structured to foster the development of skills and to encourage students to use their mastery of skills to explore knowledge in a variety of disciplines. The General Studies Program provides two levels of experience:
Level ISkills
Level I courses provide students with the basic skills of reading and listening critically, recognizing faulty reasoning, drawing conclusions from quantitative data, organizing ideas and writing and speaking with clarity.
Level II-Breadth of Knowledge
Level II courses introduce students to the basic methods, knowledge, problems or attitudes characteristic of a field, encourage in students an open attitude toward different approaches to problems, enable students to communicate with experts in other disciplines and learn from them and cultivate in students an informed awareness of the principal achievements in history, arts and letters, social science, and science. In addition, in Level II courses students will continue to develop their skills in language and mathematics.
Distribution and Credit Requirements
To complete their General Studies Program, students must take approved courses that fulfill the following distribution and credit requirements:
Category
Level I*
Composition. Mathematics. Communications
Semester Hours
............6
.............3
.............3


GENERAL STUDIES 15
Level II**
Historical............................................................................3
Arts and Letters......................................................................6
Social Sciences.......................................................................6
Natural Sciences......................................................................6
Total***.............................................................................33
*A transfer course or courses of at least 2 semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level 1 course requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Level I course.
**One-hour deviations in the Level II categories may be allowed.
***A student's completed General Studies Program must contain at least 33 semester hours.
Basic Rules:
Only approved courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies requirements. A listing of these courses begins on page 49 of this Catalog and is indicated by course in the Course Descriptions section of this Catalog. General College Requirements brochures contain all approved general studies, multicultural and senior experience courses. The brochure is updated three times per year and is available from academic departments, the Academic Advising Center and Academic Affairs.
General Studies courses need not be counted toward General Studies requirements. They may be taken as electives or to satisfy requirements in the major or degree program.
Departments or programs may specify, by prefix and number, some General Studies courses in addition to courses required for the major or a professional credential.
Courses taken using the pass-fail option cannot be counted for General Studies.
Note: More details on the General Studies requirements can be found on pages 49-60.


16 ADMISSIONS
ADMISSIONS
Admission Requirements
The college uses two categories for classifying applicants: those who are younger than 20 and those who are 20 or older. Based on the college's modified open admission system, each category has its own admission requirements and procedures.
Students maintain the status of continuing student while absent from the college for less than one year; however, following two full semesters of absence, students should call the Office of Admissions to determine whether an updated application for re-admission will be required. For more information, see Admission of Previously Enrolled Students (page 18).
Application Deadline
Applications complete with all required credentials will be accepted through the first week of classes. However, for the best possible selection of courses, students are advised to apply early.
Applicants Younger Than 20
Applicants who are younger than 20 on September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall semester, or February 15 for the spring semester, will be classified as traditional applicants. They will be considered for admission using the requirements described below.
Freshmen (first-time college students):
The college will admit students who are likely to successfully complete an academic program and who meet state requirements for the college as established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE).
Applicants who do not meet the stated admission requirements will be considered on an individual basis that includes a careful review of all credentials, including letters of recommendation and a personal interview.
Applicants who have not graduated from high school but have received the Colorado General Educational Development (GED) certificate or its equivalent will be accepted. ACT or SAT test results are not required with a GED.
Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions from the high school or testing agency:
=> ACT or SAT test results
=> high school transcript with GPA and class rank
This information may be submitted at the end of the sixth, seventh, or eighth semester of high school, but no later than four weeks before the expected term of enrollment. An official, final transcript with date of graduation is required no later than the fourth week of the term of enrollment. Students should request the transcript and verify that the high school transcript with date of graduation has been mailed by the high school and has been received by the Office of Admissions.
Applicants who have submitted a complete application by the deadline and who have a 76 index (see chart on page 22) or higher, will be admitted. Students who have lower than a 76 index will be considered on an individual basis.
College Transfers:
Applicants with 30 or more transferable semester hours completed with at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA will be offered admission. Students with fewer than 30 hours will be considered on an individual basis, based on high school GPA, ACT or SAT scores and college work completed.
Applicants who have less than a cumulative 2.0 grade point average from all colleges and universities attended will be considered on an individual basis that includes a careful review of all credentials, including letters of recommendation and a personal interview.


ADMISSIONS 17
Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions from the high school, testing agency and/or college or university:
=> ACT or SAT test results
=> high school transcript with GPA and class rank
=> transcript from each college or university attended or currently attending
These credentials should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes. All required credentials must be received before a final admission decision can be made.
Applicants 20 Years of Age or Older
Applicants who are 20 or older on September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall semester, or February 15 for the spring semester, will be considered for admission using the requirements described below for a first-time college student or a college transfer student:
Freshmen (first-time college students):
Applicants will be admitted to the college upon indicating on the application for admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have received a General Educational Development (GED) certificate.
By signing the application for admission, degree-seeking applicants are certifying that they will request either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test scores be sent to the Office of Admissions. Degree-seeking students will not be permitted to register for a second semester until this credential is received.
The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but is highly recommended for advising purposes.
College Transfers:
Applicants will be admitted to the college, regardless of their cumulative college GPA, if they indicate on their application for admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have received a General Educational Development (GED) certificate.
By signing the application for admission, degree-seeking applicants are certifying that they will request that either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test scores be sent directly to the Office of Admissions. In place of these credentials, college transcripts showing completion of 30 or more semester credit hours with grades of C or better will be accepted. College transfer students should request to have college transcripts sent directly to the Office of Admissions for transfer credit purposes. Degree-seeking applicants are required to have all college and university transcripts on file to receive a complete transfer evaluation.
The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but is highly recommended for advising purposes.
Application Instructions
Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they are received each semester. All credentials received by the college become the property of MSCD and will not be returned to the student. It is the responsibility of the applicant to notify the Office of Admissions of any changes to the application for admission prior to the first day of classes. If changes are not reported to the Office of Admissions, the registration process could be delayed for subsequent semesters. Failure to report academic changes may result in rejection, dismissal and/or loss of credit. International (visa) applicants should refer to the Admission of International Students section on page 19 in this Catalog.
To apply for admission:
Applications are available from The Metropolitan State College of Denver, Office of Admissions, Campus Box 16, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, 303-556-3058 or online at www.mscd.edu.
A $25 nonrefundable application fee ($40 for international applicants) is required with the application for admission. Re-admit applicants are not required to submit an application fee.


18 ADMISSIONS
Submit a completed application and application fee directly to the Office of Admissions. The application and all required credentials (see Admission Requirements) should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes.
It is the student's responsibility to request that all required credentials be mailed directly from the issuing institution or agency to the Office of Admissions. Hand-carried documents will not be accepted.
Although an applicant's record may be summarized on one transcript, an official transcript from each institution attended is required.
The application for admission and all credentials received by the college will be kept on file for three semesters. After that time the file will no longer be maintained for students who do not enroll. Applicants wishing to attend MSCD must begin the admission process again.
Admission of Previously Enrolled Students
Re-admit students are defined as individuals who have previously enrolled and have received a grade or grade notation at the college.
Re-admit students who have not been in attendance at MSCD for one or more years should:
submit a completed application for admission; and check the re-admission box on the top of the application under Application Status. No application fee is required for re-admission.
ensure that the application and any required credentials are received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
submit transcripts from institutions attended since last attending MSCD.
Students who are returning after nine years of absence from the college are required to resubmit all credentials.
Admission of Nondegree Students
The nondegree student classification meets the needs of students 20 years of age or older who wish to take college courses but who do not currently intend to work toward a baccalaureate degree at MSCD. With the exception of high school students who have completed the approval process, nondegree students must have a high school diploma or its equivalent to qualify for admission.
Nondegree students may change to degree status by completing a Change of Status Form and submitting all required transcripts to the Office of Admissions.
Admission Notification
Students are notified by mail as soon as decisions are made. Once admitted, students will be mailed instructions regarding course registration and other relevant information. No tuition deposit is required.
Students denied admission may appeal the decision by submitting a letter of appeal to the Director of Admissions along with new and compelling academic information, letters of recommendation and other supportive documentation.
Additional Admission Programs Summer Semester Only
Applicants younger than 20 years of age who have graduated from high school or have received a General Educational Development (GED) certificate and are applying for the summer semester, and who do not wish to continue after the summer semester, may be admitted under a provisional status. These applicants are not required to submit admission credentials. Please check the appropriate box under the MSCD Plans section on the Application for Admission. Applicants for the summer semester who wish to continue for the fall or spring semester must meet stated admission requirements before the semester begins.


ADMISSIONS 19
High School Concurrent Enrollment Programs (High School Students Only)
High School Student Education and Enrichment Program
The Student Education and Enrichment (SEE) program is The Metropolitan State College of Denver's High School Concurrent Enrollment Program for college-ready students. SEE is designed to supplement a student's existing education through early participation in college-level classes. This advanced program should not be interpreted as an alternative to high school completion but is, instead, a cooperative college/high school effort to provide educational enrichment and early college attendance to qualified high school students. SEE students must meet the following criteria:
Current enrollment in a Colorado high school as a junior or senior
Able to benefit from specialized or accelerated classes
Demonstrated ability to do college-level work
To apply for admission the student must, with approval from the appropriate high school authority, submit an admission application with the required $25 application fee accompanied by the following documents:
Recommendation from a high school counselor or administrator describing how the student will benefit from early college attendance
Written parental approval
Official high school transcript
Upon receipt of these documents, the students record is reviewed and the admission decision is made. However, if additional or supporting information is needed, the student may be required to have an interview with an admissions counselor. The admission decision will be based on the students academic preparation and past performance, recommendation of the high school official, and the students personal motivation and readiness for a traditional college experience.
Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program
The Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program (PSEOP) is a sponsorship program enacted by state law in 1988 that provides juniors and seniors in high school the opportunity to take college classes for both high school and college credit. The program is intended to provide high school students with an optional learning environment.
This program allows a high school student to register for college classes, in most cases up to six semester credit hours (or two courses). These courses may be used for both high school and college credit. To participate in the program, students must first seek approval from their high school and school district. The district determines the number of credit hours the student may take and makes the financial arrangements. The student is responsible for payment of all tuition and fees by the college payment deadline before the semester begins. Specific deadlines and further information relative to this program and the application process may be obtained by calling the Office of Admissions at 303-556-3058.
Meritus at MSCD (Senior Program)
Individuals 60 or older, who do not wish to earn credit, are invited to attend tuition-free classes of their choice on a space-available basis. The Meritus program is designed to give special encouragement and assistance to retired citizens to continue their personal educational growth in a stimulating and friendly campus setting. For information and to enroll call the Center for Individualized Learning at 303-556-8342, Central Classroom 106.
Admission of International Students
All students who declare a country of citizenship other than the U.S. on their applications for admission must contact the Office of Admissions.
Applicants who are U.S. resident aliens (including refugees and political asylum) will be required to (1) submit a minimum of an official high school transcript/diploma that is determined equivalent to high school graduation in the U.S., and (2) complete an immigrant advising interview to ensure that their English language skills are sufficient for admission to the college.


20 ADMISSIONS
Applicants who are on any type of temporary visas are required to submit the International Student Application which can be obtained from the Office of Admissions or online at our web site: www.mscd.edu.
Applicants on temporary visas are required to submit (1) a minimum of an official high school tran-script/diploma that is determined equivalent to high school graduation in the U.S., (2) English language proficiency documentation, normally in the form of an acceptable TOEFL (Test of English as a Second Language) score, and (3) financial support documentation to cover the costs of attending the college for one academic year including living expenses (this is only required of potential students on F-l and J-l visas). Detailed information regarding all requirements and admission procedures of international students can be obtained from the Office of Admissions and on the International Student Application form.
Transfer Credit Evaluation
A transfer credit evaluation is performed for admitted degree-seeking students after official transcripts are received by the Office of Admissions. Within approximately four weeks, students receive two copies of the transfer credit evaluation, one of which should be taken to the major and minor departments for advice on how credits might apply to their programs.
Transfer credits will be accepted under the following guidelines:
Credit must have been earned at an institution of higher education holding full regional accreditation.
Grades earned must be a C- or better. Courses with D, F or similar grades will not be accepted in transfer. A summary of transfer credit from each institution will be indicated on the MSCD academic record. Neither transfer course grades nor previous grade point averages will be indicated or affect the MSCD grade point average.
Course content must be similar to those courses offered at MSCD.
A maximum of 64 semester hours from two-year institutions will be applied toward an MSCD degree. A maximum of 90 semester hours of credit will be applied toward an MSCD degree for acceptable work completed at a four-year institution or a combination of two- and four-year institutions.
Transferable courses are accepted at the same level, i.e., lower-division or upper-division, at which they were offered at the previous institution. For example, all transferred community college courses will apply to the MSCD degree as lower-division credit.
Students who have earned an A.A. or A.S. degree will receive junior standing at MSCD, provided all courses included in the degree carry a grade of C- or better and, based on the course-by-course evaluation, otherwise meet minimum MSCD transfer credit standards. Students may need to complete additional MSCD lower-division requirements.
Applicants having completed the Colorado community college core curriculum, as certified on their community college transcript, are considered to have satisfied The Metropolitan State College of Denver's minimum General Studies requirements. However, additional specific lower-division courses may be required for certain degree programs.
Once transfer credits are evaluated, the total number of these credits applicable to a degree will not be reduced unless the student repeats already-awarded transfer credit at MSCD, or interrupts MSCD enrollment for three or more consecutive semesters and readmits to the college under more restrictive transfer credit evaluation policies.
In accordance with policies established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education to address student disputes regarding student transfer between Colorado public institutions, MSCD has instituted procedures for resolving transfer credit disputes. These procedures are available from Transfer Services in the Office of Admissions.
Questions pertaining to transfer credit evaluation should be referred to the Office of Transfer Services, Central Classroom Building, room 103, 303-556-3774.
Preparatory Course Credit Policy
No preparatory courses are applicable toward an MSCD degree after spring 1993. For details, please see an advisor in the Academic Advising Center.


Transfer Services
The Office of Transfer Services offers assistance to students transferring from other institutions. Specific services include preliminary and/or official transcript evaluation, educational planning, transition to academic departments and resolution of transfer problems. Transfer counselors are available by appointments and for walk-ins; evening appointments are available. Transfer Services works closely with Transcript Evaluation to provide students information about their transfer credits and how those credits may be applied. Questions pertaining to transfer credit evaluation should be referred to the Office of Transfer Services, Central Classroom Building, Room 103, 303-556-3774.


22 ADMISSIONS
Freshman Admission Eligibility Index
How to read this chart:
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ENROLLMENT/REGISTRATION 23
ENROLLMENT
New Student Orientation
New Student Orientation offers a mandatory orientation program fpr all first-time college students and transfer students under 20. Transfer students 20 and older, as well as parents and non-degree seeking students, are strongly encouraged to attend orientation sessions. The year-round sessions cater to the specific needs of first-time college students, transfer students, women, and parents of traditional age freshmen. Sessions are scheduled on different days and at various times to accommodate the needs of our diverse commuter populations. Sessions are also offered at the North and South campuses to provide further flexibility. Orientation sessions cover a variety of topics including degree planning, academic concerns, students' rights and responsibilities, student support programs, commuter issues and an opportunity to ask and discuss individual questions. Students are provided with a packet of valuable information which includes a catalog, student handbook, general requirements brochure and critical information from many of the student support programs and services. Orientation is invaluable in laying a solid foundation for students' future academic success. Approximately 4,000 students and parents are served by this program each year. For further information see the Class Schedule or call 303-556-6931.
Reading, Writing and Mathematics Placement Examinations
All first-time college students are required to take a series of three exams before registering for their first-semester classes. The exams measure college entry-level skills in reading, writing and mathematics, and the scores are used to help advisors and students select appropriate courses. For additional information call 303-556-3677.
Academic Advising
At MSCD students are provided multiple sources of academic advising support. Continuing students with declared majors receive advising assistance from their academic departments. New students and students without declared majors receive advising support from the Academic Advising Center, CN 104. Services available to students in the Center include the following: assistance with course selection, scheduling and registration; help with long-term degree planning; identification of degree enhancement strategies; and ongoing developmental advising, including assistance with the major-minor selection process, adjustment to college, etc. For additional information call 303-556-3680.
REGISTRATION
All continuing students in good standing and all accepted applicants at the college are eligible to register each semester.
Students are responsible for ensuring that there is a correct and up-to-date address and phone number on file with the college. Address changes may be made with the Registrar's Office, through MSCDs Web site, (www.mscd.edu), by writing or faxing (303-556-3999) the address and phone number change to the Registrars Office.
A student may register for classes in several ways. Information on the registration procedure and registration dates is published in the Class Schedule, which is mailed to all continuing and new students.
Concurrent Enrollment
Students who find it necessary to register at MSCD and another college at the same time should check with MSCD Transfer Services (CN 103) concerning the acceptance and application of transfer credits.
Interinstitutional Registration
Students enrolled at MSCD may register for courses at Arapahoe Community College, Community College of Denver and Red Rocks Community College. Courses taken at these institutions in no way alter existing MSCD degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requirements subject to specific approval by MSCD. Students should be aware that courses taken interinstitutionally will be counted as part of the 64 semester hours from community colleges applicable to an MSCD degree. Interinstitutional credits will not satisfy academic residence requirements at MSCD. In the event a conflict arises between the policies/procedures of MSCD and one of the colleges listed above, the most restrictive policy prevails. Students are advised to confer with department chairs and/or coordinators of academic advising before registering interinstitutionally.


24 ENROLLMENT/REGISTRATION
Consortium Registration
Adams State College, Mesa State College and Western State College together with Metropolitan State College of Denver form a system of state colleges. Each member institution can provide any student in good standing with the materials needed to enroll temporarily in any other member institution without incurring additional matriculation costs. Information concerning tuition is available at the host institution. The process of enrolling as a system student should begin at least one month prior to the beginning of the registration period at the host institution. Information concerning current procedures for enrolling in courses at these other institutions is available from the Registrars Office.
Enrollment Status
The enrollment status of a student in the interinstitutional registration or consortium registration programs is determined by the student's status at the home institution (institution where the student is seeking a degree). Students should ascertain before enrolling at an institution that desired courses will satisfy degree requirements at the home institution.
Course Audit Policy
Students may audit a class with the permission of the instructor and if seating is available. Academic credit is not awarded for an audited course. The cost for auditing a course is based on regular tuition as published in the current Class Schedule. Audit approval forms are available in deans and academic department offices.
Changes in Registration
Enrolled students may adjust schedules by dropping and/or adding classes. See the current Class Schedule for complete information concerning dropping and/or adding classes and the tuition and fee refund schedule.
Students who reduce their course load after the 12th day of classes and before the beginning of the fifth week will receive an "NC" notation for each course they have dropped. A NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Registrar's Office.
Students reducing their course load between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of classes during fall and spring semesters may receive an "NC" notation for each course, provided faculty approval is granted. Additional restrictions regarding assigning the "NC" notation may be set by each school, department and/or faculty member for the period between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of the semester (or proportional time frame). Students are advised to seek faculty signatures well before the deadline. A NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Registrar's Office. See the sections on grades, notations, course load and class attendance in this Catalog.
Proportional time frames are applied for part-of-term courses, workshops and summer terms. Procedures for adding or dropping a part-of-term course after the course has begun are described in the current Class Schedule.
TUITION AND FEES I\iition Classification
A student is classified as an in-state or out-of-state student for tuition purposes at the time of admission. This classification is based upon information supplied by the student on the application for admission and is made in accordance with the Colorado Tuition Classification Law, CRS S23-7-101 et seq. (1973), as amended. Once determined, a student's tuition classification status remains unchanged unless satisfactory evidence that a change should be made is presented. A Petition for In-State Tuition Classification Form and the evidence requested should be submitted to the Registrar's Office if a student believes she or he is entitled to in-state status.
The tuition classification statute requires that in order to qualify for in-state status, a student (or the parents or legal guardian of the student in the case of students under 23 years of age who are not emancipated) must have been domiciled in Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the first day of the semester for which such classification is sought.


ENROLLMENT/REGISTRATION 25
Domicile for tuition purposes requires two inseparable elements: (1) a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado with no intent to be domiciled elsewhere. Some examples of connections with the state that provide objective evidence of intent are: (1) payment of Colorado state income tax as a Colorado resident, (2) permanent employment in Colorado, (3) ownership of residential real property in Colorado, (4) compliance with laws imposing a mandatory duty on any domiciliary of the state, such as the drivers license law and the vehicle registration law and (5) registration to vote. Other factors unique to the individual can also be used to demonstrate the requisite intent.
Any questions regarding the tuition classification law should be directed to an admissions officer at the college. In order to qualify for in-state status for a particular semester, the student must prove that domicile began not later than one year prior to the first day of classes for that semester. The dates for qualifying and for submitting petitions are published in the Class Schedule each semester.
Tuition and College Service Fees
The Board of Trustees of The State Colleges in Colorado, the governing board of the college, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees for any semester without notice.
Tuition and college service fees are determined by the trustees shortly before the beginning of each academic year. Information regarding tuition and fees is published in the current Class Schedule. Tuition and fees are payable at the time of registration.
Standard Fees
An application fee is required of all applicants for admission to the college. This fee is nonrefundable and will not be applied to tuition.
Application fee.............................................................$25
International student application fee.......................................$40
Matriculation fee...........................................................$25
Special fees
Returned check charge.......................................................$17
TUition Adjustments
Please see the Class Schedule for the current semester.
Student Health Insurance
All students taking 10 credit hours or more in the fall or spring semester or eight credit hours or more in the summer semester are required to participate in the college-sponsored student health insurance coverage unless proof can be provided that a student has comparable and valid outside health insurance coverage.*
Full-time students are automatically billed for student health insurance on their tuition bill under the insurance heading. Students who have outside insurance coverage are responsible for completing a waiver form by the deadline indicated in each semester's Class Schedule in order to have the insurance charge removed from their tuition bill (deadline changes from semester to semester). Waiver forms will not be accepted after the deadline listed in each semesters Class Schedule. It is the student's responsibility to become familiar with the college's policies and to adhere to the deadlines listed. No refunds will occur after the waiver deadline. Waiver forms and insurance brochures are available at either the Student Health Insurance Office located in the Student Health Center (PL 150) or the Student Accounts Office (CN 110). Waiver forms are also printed in each Class Schedule and available from the SHC website at http://www.msced.edu/student/resources/health/.
Health insurance waiver forms are valid for only one year. Continuing students must complete a waiver form ANNUALLY prior to each fall semester. Students with a break in academic enrollment, and those who begin classes in the spring or summer, must complete a waiver form by the appropriate deadline (listed in the Class Schedule) for the semester they enroll and every fall semester thereafter.
Waiver form information will be mailed to the home address of all full-time students prior to the semester of enrollment.


26 ENROLLMENT/REGISTRATION
Students who request a waiver form to provide proof of valid outside health insurance must:
Complete the student health insurance waiver form.
Attach a copy of a valid health insurance card to the waiver form. Note: copy both the front and back side of your insurance card on to a separate sheet of paper.
Submit the waiver form by the deadline indicated in each semester's Class Schedule (deadline changes from semester to semester).
All covered services at the Student Health Center are paid at 100 percent with no payment at the time of service, no deductible and no need for claim forms. The pre-existing condition exclusion clause is waived for services performed. Please see the current Student Health Insurance Brochure for a summary of the plan benefits, requirements and exclusions. Brochures can be obtained at the Student Health Center.
Dependents of a student participating in the student health insurance program are also eligible for optional insurance coverage. Adult dependents (18 and up) may use the Student Health Center (SHC) after they pay the semesterly SHC fee. Dependents 17 years old or younger are not eligible for services at the SHC. Please call the insurance office for information regarding pediatric care. In addition, students enrolled during the spring semester are given the option of purchasing summer health insurance without attending classes, provided that payment is received by the deadline listed in the summer Class Schedule. Graduating students have the option to purchase from one to six months of continuing coverage. Students with questions regarding student health insurance should contact the Student Insurance Office.
*lndividual insurance plans that are not required to meet state and federal benefit mandates are not considered comparable and consequently will not be considered proof of comparable coverage. Effective August 1, 1998, the "Colorado Resident Discount Program" will NOT be accepted as proof of comparable outside health insurance coverage for waiver purposes. This special program is not considered health insurance and was not designed by the state legislature for this purpose.
Student Health Insurance
Voluntary Program for Part-Time Students
Based on the mandatory insurance requirement which the college has adopted, the Student Insurance Carrier has permitted the college to offer the following Voluntary Health Insurance Program to part-time students. This program is exclusively for part-time students taking 6-9 credit hours in the fall and/or spring semester(s) and 6-7 credit hours during the summer semester. Students taking more or less credit hours than indicated above are NOT eligible for this voluntary program.
The Voluntary Plan has the same deadlines (as listed in the Class Schedule), plan design, cost and benefit levels as does the mandatory insurance plan referenced in the previous section. Part-time students interested in the voluntary option should contact the Student Insurance Office at 303-556-3873 for application details.
Student Dental Insurance
Voluntary Program for all Students
Voluntary Dental Insurance is available to all students taking one credit hour or more. Information and application forms can be obtained at the Student Insurance Office in the Student Heaith Center (PL 150).


FINANCIAL AID 27
FINANCIAL AID
The MSCD financial aid program provides assistance and advice to students who would be unable to pursue their education at the college without such help. Scholarships, grants, loans and part-time employment are available singly or in various combinations to meet the difference between what the student and the student's family could reasonably be expected to provide and the expected cost of attending MSCD.
Estimated Expenses
The 2000-2001 academic year expenses will be as follows:
Resident Nonresident
Tuition and Fees $2,975 . $8,575
Room and Board 7,560 . 7,560
Books and Supplies . 720 . 720
Transportation 1,485 . 1,485
Miscellaneous 1.380 . 1,380
Total $14,120 .. $19,720
Tuition and fees are set by The State Colleges in Colorado and are subject to change without notice. All students are placed on a single-person budget. Additional allowances may be made for students with day-care costs for dependent children and for expenses related to disabilities not paid by another agency (P.L. 99-498).
Eligibility and Need
To qualify for financial aid, a student must be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen; be registered with Selective Service (if required); have financial need; be degree-, licensure-, or certificate-seeking; be making satisfactory academic progress; and not be in default on a federal education loan or owe a repayment on a federal grant.
Application Procedures
Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year to determine financial aid eligibility. Entering college freshmen should obtain application forms from their high schools or from MSCDs Office of Financial Aid. Most students who completed a 2000-01 FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA will receive a PIN (personal identification number) from the Federal Processor between November, 2000 and January, 2001. This PIN is used for completing the 2001-02 Renewal FAFSA online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. For quicker processing, we strongly recommend that returning, transferring and entering students complete their FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA on the Web at: www.fafsa.ed.gov.
Students should complete and submit the FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA to the federal processor as early as possible (after January 1st), preferable no later than mid-February, and submit all requested documents to the MSCD Office of Financial Aid by April 12th.
Detailed information concerning application procedures is provided in the Financial Aid Handbook and Scholarship Guide available in the MSCD Office of Financial Aid.
Financial Aid Programs
The amount of funds made available to students depends on the maximum award allowed by regulation of each program, the student's established financial need, duration of the student's enrollment, and funds allocated to the college by the state and federal governments.
Grants
Grants are gift money from the federal or state government and do hot have to be repaid.
Federal Pell Grants are federal funds and awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a bachelor's degree and who are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens. The amount of the award is based on each student's financial eligibility and the number of hours for which the student is enrolled. The amount of Federal Pell grant awards for the 2000-01 academic year will range from $400 to $3,300 for those students who qualify. Full-time, half-time, or less than half-time students may qualify for a Federal Pell Grant.


28 FINANCIAL AID
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are federal funds awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a bachelor's degree and are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens. This grant is awarded to students who demonstrate exceptional need. The amount of FSEOG awards range from $100 to $600 per fall and spring semesters.
Colorado State Grants (CSG) are state funds awarded to Colorado residents with demonstrated financial need. Eligible students have no prior bachelor's degree, are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens, and are enrolled full- or part-time (at least six credit hours for the fall and spring semesters) at MSCD. The amount of the CSG award ranges from $50 to $600 per fall and spring semesters.
Colorado Student Incentive Grants (CSIG) are a combination of federal and state funds awarded by the same criteria as CSG.
Scholarships
Students must be enrolled at least half-time, be degree-, certificate- or licensure-seeking, be making satisfactory academic progress, and not be in default on a federal education loan or owe a repayment on a federal grant to receive a scholarship.
Presidential Scholarships: These scholarships include four-year scholarships for entering high school students and two-year scholarships for transfer students. This scholarship covers up to the cost of tuition and mandatory fees per semester for up to 15 credits.
Colorado Scholars Awards: Scholarships of up to $500 per semester, not exceeding the cost of resident tuition and mandatory fees per academic year, are available through the academic departments. Recipients must be Colorado residents. Interested students should contact their departments for applications.
Athletic Scholarships: MSCD has a limited number of athletic scholarships. Applications and additional information are available from the MSCD Intercollegiate Athletics Office.
Private Scholarships: Students should refer to the MSCD Financial Aid Handbook and Scholarship Guide for information regarding scholarships and the free online scholarship search.
Receipt of a scholarship may affect a student's financial aid award because students receiving federal and/or state aid are limited in the maximum amount of aid which can be received. A student whose full need has been met by other types of financial aid prior to receipt of a scholarship will have that aid reduced by the amount of the scholarship. If the student's full eligibility has not been met, the scholarship will be allowed to satisfy the unmet need. Each student's situation is treated individually. All scholarships are based on the student's continued eligibility and available funding.
Loans
Federal Perkins Loans are long-term federal loans that are awarded based on the student's need and MSCD's available funds. Federal Perkins Loan can range from $100 to $1,500 per semester. Repayment of the loan begins nine months after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled in at least six credit hours each semester. The interest rate is 5 percent and interest begins to accrue at repayment. All first-time borrowers at MSCD are required to attend a Perkins Loan Entrance Interview before loan funds can be released to them.
Federal Family Education Loans (FFEL) include Federal Stafford Loans, unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans, and Federal PLUS Loans, which help students and/or their parents to borrow funds to help meet educational expenses. To borrow these funds, students and/or their parents must complete and submit, in addition to the FAFSA, a separate lender application to the MSCD Office of Financial Aid. Loan applications may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid or the lender of the student's choice. Students must be enrolled at least six credit hours each semester and be degree-, certificate- or licensure-seeking. Interest rates vary depending on the type of loan and the date the student borrows the first Federal Family Education Loan. For further information on interest rates, check with the MSCD Office of Financial Aid or the lender. First time borrowers at MSCD are required to attend a Loan Entrance Interview before loans funds can be released to them.
Federal Stafford Loans: Eligibility for the Federal Stafford Loan is based on the student's need as determined by the MSCD Office of Financial Aid. The annual loan limits are $2,625 for freshmen, $3,500 for sophomores and $5,500 for all other undergraduates. Interest does not begin to accrue until


FINANCIAL AID 29
six months after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled in school at least half-time (six credit hours per semester).
Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans: These loans have many of the same terms and conditions as the Federal Stafford Loan. The main difference is that the students are responsible for the interest that accrues while they are in school and during the six-month grace period after they graduate or cease to be enrolled in at least six credit hours. Students who do not qualify1 for a Federal Stafford Loan, based on need, may qualify for the unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan. Contact the MSCD Office of Financial Aid concerning annual loan limits.
Federal PLUS Loans: These loans are available to parents of dependent students. Applications are available from the MSCD Office of Financial Aid or from lenders that participate in the program. Applications must first be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid for processing. At MSCD, parents of dependent students may borrow up to the cost of education minus the amount of financial aid received by the student from other sources each year.
Please refer to the MSCD Financial Aid Handbook and Scholarship Guide for more detailed information regarding loans.
College Work-Study
The State of Colorado, the federal government and MSCD provide part-time employment programs for students. The maximum work-study award is $2,500 per semester. The maximum hours a student may work is 30 hours per week while classes are in session and 40 hours per week between semesters. Students must be enrolled in at least six credit hours per semester to receive a work-study award. The majority of all work-study awards are need-based, however, there are a limited number of positions offered directly through various departments/offices on campus that are no-need awards.
The Financial Aid Package
Once student eligibility is determined, an aid package is developed based on the availability of funds and the eligibility of the applicant. To facilitate financial aid packaging requirements, applicants must obtain all requested information and forms from designated sources and submit them to the MSCD Office of Financial Aid before the established deadline.
Award Notification
After the Office of Financial Aid has determined the type and amount of aid for which a student qualifies (aid package), the student is mailed an Award Notification. The Award Notification and enclosed information stipulate the conditions of each award.
Disbursement Procedures:
Awards are based on full-time enrollment. If a student is enrolled for less than 12 credit hours each semester, the award may be reduced/prorated. The final award adjustment occurs on census date (about the 12th day of school each fall and spring semester and the 8th day of the summer semester).
Grants, Scholarships and Student Loans: All financial aid awards (with the exception of out-of-state loan checks, consortium checks and some scholarship funds) are disbursed into the student's account. The Business Office deducts any outstanding balance owed, including current tuition and fees, and issues a check for the remaining funds. This check is either mailed to the student or the student can pick it up at the Cashiers Office. This check can be used to purchase books and pay other educationally related expenses.
Parent Loans: Federal PLUS checks are mailed from lenders to MSCD's Office of Financial Aid. Eligibility is verified and then the check is mailed to the parent borrower.
Work Study: Work-study earnings are paid bi-weekly and are treated as wages earned. Outstanding balances owed to MSCD are not deducted from these earnings; however, students are strongly advised to pay any outstanding balance as soon as a work-study check is received.
Please refer to the MSCD Financial Aid Handbook and Scholarship Guide for information regarding pro-ration of aid disbursements.


30 FINANCIAL AID
Repayment Policy
Students who receive financial aid and withdraw from MSCD prior to completion of a term may be required to repay a portion of financial aid and scholarships. All required financial aid repayments must be made to MSCD before the end of the current academic year or before additional Title IV funds can be disbursed to the student, whichever occurs first. Repayment is made to the MSCD Business Office. Please refer to the Class Schedule for more specific information.
Financial Aid as a Form of Payment
Please refer to the current Class Schedule for information regarding payment of tuition and fees with awarded aid.


SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 31
SERVICES AND PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS
Academic Advising
At MSCD students are provided multiple sources of academic advising support. Continuing students with declared majors receive advising assistance from their academic departments. New students and students without declared majors receive advising support from the Academic Advising Center, CN 104. Services available to students in the Center include the following: assistance with course selection, scheduling and registration; help with long-term degree planning; identification of degree enhancement strategies; and ongoing developmental advising, including assistance with the major-minor selection process, adjustment to college, etc. For additional information call 303-556-3680.
Alumni Relations
Located in the Administration Building, the Office of Alumni Relations works with the College, the Alumni Association and the MSCD Foundation, Inc., to provide services and support to all alumni and students. Services include: career development, health insurance programs, discount internet, MSCD credit card, alumni directory and numerous volunteer/mentoring opportunities.
The Alumni Association, Inc., is committed to advancing the College's welfare by creating and maintaining a spirit of fellowship and goodwill among all alumni and to encourage alumni involvement with the College. The MSCD Alumni Association's mission is to work in concert with the College, the Foundation and others to:
Elevate and enhance the reputation of the College
Inspire alumni to leverage their pride in their MSCD experience
Establish mentoring opportunities to help others soar and expand their horizons.
Inquire about participation with the Alumni Association, the ASK (Alumni Sharing Knowledge) Real-World Career Counseling Program, the ADVANCE Admissions Recruitment Program or other programs to connect with the College and MSCD alumni. If you are interested in linking up with a Metropolitan State College of Denver alumnus/a in your degree area, or are interested in one of the Alumni Relations programs, contact the Alumni Relations Office at 303-556-8320 or visit our web site at: www.mscd.edu/alumni.htm.
Auraria Campus Police and Security
The Campus Police and Security Division is fully certified and authorized to provide police services to the Auraria campus and is proud to maintain its reputation as one of the safest in the state.
In addition to a police chief and 20 full time officers, the Campus Police and Security Division employs state certified security officers and communication personnel. Officers patrol the campus 24 hours per day, seven days per week, on foot, bicycles or golf carts, and in patrol cars.
The Campus Police and Security Division also provides additional services to the campus community such as vehicle unlocks, crime prevention programs, emergency responses, and environmental health and safety.
The Campus Police and Security Division is located at 1201 Fifth Street. Routine calls 303-556-3271; EMERGENCY CALLS 911 (or use one of the many emergency phones located around campus).
Auraria Child Care Center
The center provides high quality early childhood care and education to the children of students, staff and faculty. A discovery, child-oriented approach is provided by a professional teaching staff to children ages 12 months to 6 years. Preregistration is required. Please call 303-556-3188 for information.
Auraria Parking and Transportation Services
Parking Services Department
Daily Fee Parking: (in-and-out privileges in Lot E only): daily fees range from $1.50 to $10.00. Several lots are unattended and require purchasing a receipt from the vending machine. Make sure the parking receipt is placed face-up on the drivers side of the dashboard. Receipts are valid only on the day and in the lot where purchased and are not transferable from one vehicle to another. For easy entrance/exit to the Parking and Transportation Centre and lots D and K, a reusable debit card can be purchased for $ 1.00 and a cash value can be encoded on its magnetic strip. Debit cards are available on the second floor next to the ATM machine in the Tivoli Student Union and on the first floor of the Parking and Transportation Centre.


32 SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS
Permit Parking: Parking permits are available on a semester basis. They go on sale on the first day of registration. Contact the Parking Office at 303-556-2000 for more information.
Motorist Assistance Program: Personnel will help jump-start dead batteries and assist in changing tires. Jumper cables, bumper jacks, tire tools and gasoline cans are also available at no cost to campus parkers. Call 303-556-2000 for assistance. The Parking Services Department is located at 777 Lawrence Way (first floor of the parking garage). Hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Handivan Services: The wheelchair-accessible handivan provides free on-campus transportation for students, faculty and staff from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Monday -Thursday and from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Friday.
Nightrider: The Nightrider is a free security escort service for any campus parking lot. Service is available from dusk to 10:00 p.m., Monday-Thursday during fall and spring semesters.
Career Services
The Office of Career Services helps students and alumni in developing, evaluating and implementing career plans. Specific services include Career Assessment Workshops; Employer Forums/Employer Workshops addressing resume writing, job search strategies and interviewing skills; and Career Connections, which offers candidates and employers a high tech resource to connect MSCD seniors and alumni candidates to entry level employment.
Career fairs and seminars are sponsored jointly during the fall and spring terms with employers, student groups, faculty and a consortia of colleges and universities.
The Career Library houses print and electronic resources including directories and employer profiles, job vacancies, salary surveys, job profiles and graduate school information. The Colorado Career Information System (COCIS) offers occupational information based on employment characteristics of Colorado and the nation. A touch screen computer kiosk provides a direct link to federal job opportunities as identified by the United States Department of Personnel Management.
For assistance, call 303-556-3664 or access the Website http://clem.mscd.edu/~career
Center for the Visual Arts
Located off campus in the heart of LoDo, the Center for the Visual Arts was created in 1990 by Metro to serve the college and the Rocky Mountain region. Open all year, the Center organizes and hosts exhibitions of culturally diverse artists of national and international significance, which would otherwise be unavailable to the college community and state populace. Past exhibitions have included works by Picasso, Ansel Adams, Romare Bearden and the diverse art of Haiti, West Africa, Australia and Japan. The Center hosts Metro's Senior Thesis exhibition featuring the works of the college's most outstanding art students every year and a biannual exhibition of the Metro art faculty.
Education and community outreach is an important facet of the Center with more than 6,000 students and 21,000 members of the general public visiting the Center each year. Visitors can take advantage of the many lectures, tours and workshops available in conjunction with the exhibitions. An outreach program, providing art workshops and activities for Denver's at-risk youth is another element of the Center's education program and commitment to community involvement. Work-study positions, internships and volunteer opportunities are only a few ways that Metro students can become involved at the Center. The Metropolitan State College of Denver Center for the Visual Arts is located at 1734 Wazee Street, Denver, CO 80202; Telephone: 303-294-5207, Fax: 303-294-5210; www.mscd.edu/news/cva.
Child Development Center
The Child Development Center provides exemplary, on-campus children's programs. During the fall and spring semesters, the center offers pre-school programs; in the summer it provides a Summer Enrichment Program for elementary age children. Available to the Auraria campus and to the Denver community, these programs are part of the college's teacher education program.
The classrooms are under the direction of master teachers who are trained and experienced in either early childhood or elementary education. The master teachers plan an age-appropriate program to provide quality learning experiences that meet the developmental needs of the children. MSCD teacher education students also work in the classroom providing a high adult/child ratio with opportunities for small groups and individual attention.


SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 33
The preschool program is accredited by the National Academy for Early Childhood Education. There are two preschool classes available: 8:30-11:30 a.m. for children 2 1/2 to 4 years old and 12:30-3:30 p.m. for children 4 to 6 years old. There is also one hour of child care available before and after each preschool class.
The Summer Enrichment Program is academic in content, but recognizes children's needs for fun and different learning experiences in summer. There are two classrooms: one for children entering first or second grade in the fall and one for children entering third or fourth grade in the fall. There is a Day Program from 8:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. and an Extended Program from 7 to 8:30 a.m. and from 4:15 to 6 p.m. Call 303-556-2759 for more information.
Combined Computer Access Center
The Combined Computer Access Center (CCAC) assists and trains students with disabilities to minimize the impact of their disabilities, while accessing the computer keyboard and monitor. The goal of the CCAC is to help students with disabilities achieve academic goals, attain vocational goals and improve employability through the use of adaptive technology. The CCAC serves students with all types of disabilities, including, but not limited to: blindness, low vision, hearing impairments, learning disabilities, neurological disabilities and orthopedic disabilities. The Combined Computer Access Center is located in the Auraria Library, room 115, 303-556-6252. (See Disability Support Services.)
Counseling Center
The Counseling Center is a full service, accredited center staffed by professionals who offer a wide array of services at no charge to the MSCD campus community. The center is fully accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services. All records are strictly confidential. Services include:
Individual Counseling: The center offers short-term counseling on personal, relationship and educational concerns during one-to-one sessions; sessions are free to MSCD students. Students will be interviewed to assess their needs when they first visit the center. An appointment is not necessary for an initial meeting; students may drop in anytime between 9-11:30 a.m. or 1-3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Psychiatric services are available by referral to the Student Health Service at reasonable charge for students. Other referrals may be made to off-campus resources if it is determined to be in the best interest of the student.
Workshops and Group Sessions: Group sessions are open to all MSCD students. Workshops are open to students, faculty and staff. Topics typically include: test anxiety, assertiveness, parenting, self-esteem, relationships, family issues, support groups and a variety of multicultural issues. A brochure of new topics is available at the center at the beginning of each semester.
Peer Education Program: A peer educator is an upper-division student who is trained in helping skills and who can address personal and college concerns of students enrolled in the First-Year Program. The peer educator acts as a resource to students and can assist students with strategies to sometimes lengthy college procedures such as financial and registration problems. In addition, peer educators are involved in several Awareness Week campaigns on events such as National Collegiate Alcohol and Drug Awareness Week and Safe Spring Break. Students interested in being a peer educator should contact the center.
Consultation: Staff members at the center are available for free consultation to MSCD faculty, staff and student groups or clubs. Consultations can be one-to-one or meetings with a department, unit or club. Common topics of consultation include: diversity, communication, conflict, etc.
Diversity Services: The center offers individual and group counseling, workshops, lectures, consultation to departments and individuals on the issues of race, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities and more.
The Counseling Center is located in the Tivoli, Suite 651, and is open 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Additional information can be obtained by calling 303-556-3132.
Disability Support Services
Advocacy and support services are provided through the Office of Disability Support Services located in room 177 of the Arts Building. Services include but are not limited to: priority registration, assistance in identifying notetakers, alternative testing, access to assistive technology, referrals to outside service


34 SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS
agencies, sign language interpreters and assistance with any general needs or concerns. Students with special needs are encouraged to utilize these services. For assistance or information, please call 303-556-8387 (voice) or 303-556-8484 (TDD). (See Combined Computer Access Center.)
Extended Campus
Degree programs and fully accredited courses, as well as orientation and assessment testing, are offered at two convenient locations in the Denver metro area: Metro South, 5660 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard, Englewood, 303-721-1313 and Metro North, 11990 Grant Street, Northglenn, 303-450-5111. Extended Campus offers evening, weekend and accelerated classes. In addition, it offers a variety of formats including telecourses, online courses and correspondence courses. Extended Campus schedules are available each semester.
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans Student Services at Auraria
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans (GLBT) Student Services is open to all Auraria students as a resource for exploring sexual orientation issues. This program offers a variety of support, education and advocacy services for the entire campus community:
support for members of the campus community who may have questions about their own sexual orientation or that of a friend or family member
advocacy for students experiencing discrimination or harassment based on a real or perceived gay, lesbian, bisexual or trans identity
speakers for events, workshops and classes on various aspects of sexual orientation
training programs and workshops about combatting homophobia and working with the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered communities more effectively
resource library for research papers, personal reading and off-campus resource information
programs such as Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans Awareness Month and other forums providing information and dialogue about gay, lesbian, bisexual and trans issues
The GLBT Student Services office is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 311, and is staffed by a director with the support of student employees and volunteers. Input and involvement from the entire campus community is welcomed. For additional information call 303-556-6333.
High School Upward Bound
This program is designed to generate the skills and motivation necessary for success in and beyond high school for youths who are low-income and first-generation college-bound students. The program provides intensive academic instruction during the school year, as well as a six-week summer session. A full range of academic skill preparation in reading, writing and mathematics is part of a comprehensive counseling and enrichment program. This program develops creative thinking, effective expression and positive attitudes toward learning. The students are recruited at the beginning of their sophomore year in high school from five target-area high schools located in Denver County (East, Lincoln, Manual, North and West High Schools).
Immigrant Services/English as a Second Language Program
The English as a Second Language program provides assistance to students for whom English is a second language. The program provides assessment, tutoring, intensive academic and personal advising, and assistance with financial aid forms. The program also refers students with limited English proficiency to the appropriate curricula and monitors student progress. For more information call 303-556-4048.
Institute for International and Intercultural Education
The college provides assistance to visiting faculty and international students. Important information and counseling is offered on visas, school transfers, work permission, housing, banking, and cultural and academic adaptation. The office also provides assistance to students who wish to arrange individualized study-abroad opportunities. The institute organizes numerous conferences and lectures on international issues throughout the year.


SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 35
The institute also provides information on cross-disciplinary individualized degree major and minor programs in international studies, international courses offered by various departments, and intercul-tural courses. For information, contact the director of International and Intercultural Education at 303-556-4004.
Metro North and Metro South
Please see Extended Campus on page 34 of this Catalog.
Student Development Center
The mission of the Student Development Center is to significantly improve the academic achievements of students by providing comprehensive and individualized services that will lead to improved student retention and increased graduation rates. The center manages the following programs: Academic Success Program, Summer Bridge Program and the Tutoring Program. The office is located in the St. Francis Center, second floor, 303-556-4737.
Student Finance Resource Center (SFRC)
The Student Finance Resource Center offers the following:
financial planning
individual budgeting sessions
student travel
emergency student loans
The SFRC is committed to providing students with the means to solve temporary and long-term financial problems by guiding and educating them on personal finances (i.e., budgeting, financial planning, emergency funding and travel). The Student Travel Program offers financial assistance for clubs, student organizations, and individual students presenting papers at conferences and events within the domestic United States.
Student Health Center
All MSCD students are entitled to medical services at the Health Center. Student health insurance is NOT required to use the Health Center. Physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners and medical assistants staff the facility. Students will be asked to complete a sign-in sheet and show a current semester ID card each time they check in.
Services include treatment of illness and injuries, lab testing, medications, physicals, annual GYN exams, sexually transmitted disease information/testing, birth control information/services, minor surgery, cholesterol screening, immunizations, HIV testing, blood pressure checks, casting, suturing and X-ray. Payment is required at the time of service except for students who participate in the Student Health Insurance Program.
Walk-in services begin at 8 a.m., Monday Friday. Access is on a first-come, first-served basis. Walk-in access varies daily, contingent upon when all patient slots have been filled; thus, the daily closure time for walk-in care is variable. Patients are encouraged to check in as early as possible. The Student Health Center is located in the Plaza Building, room 150, on the lower level. Brochures with additional information are available at the Health Center or go to our website at http://www.mscd.edu/ student/ resources/health/. For further details call 303-556-2525.
Student Intervention Services
Student Intervention Services (SIS) monitors and tracks three cohorts of the student population at MSCD. SIS assists and serves all students who are admitted by the alternative admissions process. Our goal is to assist the student to be successful by providing comprehensive and individualized services that will lead to improved student retention. The second cohort of students tracked are the students whose cumulative GPA has fallen below a 2.0 for one, two or three semesters. Students are notified by mail of their status, and encumbrances are placed on their registration. SIS also coordinates the Early Warning System, providing mid-term grade assessments, support and referral services to students. For those students who are in academic difficulty, SIS provides an in-depth strategy for success including assistance with graduation plans, scheduling, advising and referrals. The office is located in Central Classroom Building, Room 102, 303-556-4048.


36 SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS
Student Legal Services at Auraria
Student Legal Services at Auraria is a student-fee funded program that serves registered students from The Metropolitan State College of Denver, the University of Colorado at Denver and the Community College of Denver. The program is staffed by licensed attorneys who assist students with landlord-tenant problems, criminal prosecutions, traffic/DUI cases and family/domestic issues. Specifically, the attorneys engage in a problem-solving process with the student to develop and explore various legal strategies and options. If a case requires legal representation and/or is beyond the expertise of the program's attorneys, the office will provide to the student information about community resources that may provide legal representation either on a no-cost or low-cost basis, depending upon the substantive area and the availability of attorneys. Because the programs budget only allows for 30 hours per week of the attorneys time, the office should be contacted to ensure an office visit or phone interview. Please note: this office is unable to advise on issues arising between students or involving any of the three institutions as this creates a conflict of interest. The attorneys can neither represent the student nor make a court appearance on the student's behalf. The office is not staffed to respond to emergencies. More information is available at the Tivoli Student Union, room 311, or call 303-556-6061.
Student Support Services Program
The Student Support Services program is designed to improve the retention and graduation rates of first generation, low income students and students with disabilities. Students enrolled in the program receive tutoring, personal counseling, academic advising, assistance in obtaining financial aid and opportunities to participate in cultural enrichment activities. The program also provides support services including educational and graduate school workshops, computer assisted instruction and basic skills instruction in reading, writing, math and science. The program administers two scholarship programs and houses a computer lab for participants use. The Student Support Services office is located in the Arts Building, room 177 (in September 2000 the office will move to Central Classroom 201). For more information call 303-556-4722.
Summer Bridge Program
The Summer Bridge Program, managed by the Student Development Center, facilitates the transition and prepares first-time college students for their freshman year at The Metropolitan State College of Denver. The program provides an opportunity for students to get a head start on their college education and become familiar with the college experience on the Auraria Campus. Students receive a scholarship for tuition and fees for two college-level courses. Additionally, students have an opportunity to participate in enrichment workshops and activities that further encourage their connection to MSCD. The goal of the Summer Bridge Program is to provide students with the tools and strategies that will maximize their chances for academic success and personal growth and development. The office is located in the St. Francis Center on the second floor, 303-556-4023.
The Spring International Language Center at Auraria
Intensive English classes at the Spring International Center focus on all language skills: grammar, reading, writing and listening/speaking, in addition to special electives that students can choose each term, such as TOEFL preparation, vocabulary building and pronunciation. Five nine-week terms are offered throughout the year to enable students to complete their English study quickly. Students are placed at one of the six levels, with standardized evaluation tests at the completion of each level. Spring International Language Center is located on the fourth floor of the Tivoli Student Union, Room 454. For more information call 303-534-1616.
Tivoli Student Union
As one component of Student Auxiliary Services that includes the Auraria Child Care Center, Auraria Book Center, Campus Computers, Auraria Reprographics, Clicks Office Supply and four copying centers, the Tivoli Student Union serves as the heart of campus culture, services and social activity at Auraria.
The Tivoli Student Union conveniently houses the offices of Student Life/Activities and Student Government for the Community College of Denver, The Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the University of Colorado at Denver. Additionally, offices for Metro Athletics, UCD Career Counseling, Spring International Language Center, MSCD Counseling Services, MSCD New Student Orientation


SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 37
office, Student Legal Services at Auraria, all three school newspapers, Tivoli Tickets (TicketMaster), ClubHub, student ID program, Auraria Book Center, Campus Computers, two credit unions, student study lounges, a number of specialty shops, atrium food court, restaurants and Sigis Pool Hall and Arcade.are located in the Tivoli Student Union. For information phone 303-556-6330.
Tivoli Conference Services, located in room 325, will help you with obtaining conference and meeting space in the Tivoli as well as outdoor table rentals. Telephone 303-556-2755 for more information.
Tutoring Program
The Tutoring Program, managed by the Student Development Center, provides free tutoring assistance to all students enrolled at the Metropolitan State College of Denver in an effort to promote academic success. The program is structured to accommodate the needs of culturally diverse students. Students may be referred to the Tutoring Program by an instructor or can seek assistance on their own. Trained peer tutors will help students reach their educational goals. Group and individualized tutoring is available. The office is located in the St. Francis Center on the second floor, 303-556-8472.
Veterans Services
The Veterans Services Office assists students in procuring their GI Bill entitlement. The Veterans Services Office acts as the liaison between the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs and the veteran/depen-dent student. Different VA classifications provide different types of entitlement. Student veterans/dependents may be eligible for tutorial assistance, VA work-study, advance payment, emergency student loans, etc. The office also certifies and tracks the academic progress of entitled veterans. If there are any questions or problems regarding eligibility, payment, tutoring, etc., please speak with a representative in CN 105 or call 303-556-2993.
Veterans Upward Bound
Veterans Upward Bound is a federally funded program designed to identify, recruit and motivate veterans to pursue their personal career goals through higher education.
Veterans Upward Bound provides refresher courses and tutorial help so that survival in academic or vocational/technical programs is maximized. This is accomplished during a 12-week semester. Ancillary services such as career counseling, financial aid advisement, college counseling and job placement are also provided for participants.
Women's Services
The Institute for Women's Studies and Services is committed to the empowerment of women through education. To help students have a positive college experience, women's services provides referrals to campus and community resources, information about scholarships, assistance with the process of entering MSCD, advocacy services for students dealing with harassment or discrimination, and programs and events that focus on issues of particular concern to women. The institute houses a small library with a variety of books and other resource materials on women's experiences, histories and contributions to society. Students who need assistance should make an appointment with the associate director of the Institute for Women's Studies and Services.
Writing Center
The Writing Center staff of composition instructors and trained writing tutors is committed to working with students in developing their writing abilities. Tutors help students identify problem areas and provide instruction on how to eliminate them. Through one-on-one instruction, tutors teach students to generate, organize, and develop ideas; to revise and edit with confidence; and to handle issues of format and documentation. For more information contact the Writing Center at 303-556-6070.


38 STUDENT LIFE
STUDENT LIFE
The Office of Student Life offers students a wide range of services and programs designed to enhance classroom experiences and encourage campus involvement. Services include Judicial Affairs, Student Problem Action Network (SPAN); Student Activities; student clubs and organizations; Student Publications; Counseling Center; Campus Recreation; Student Health Center; Student Legal Services at Auraria; Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Trans Student Services; Student Government Assembly (SGA), New Student Orientation and the Student Finance Resource Center. These student-fee-funded programs exist to provide a diverse range of experiences in leadership development and programs that encourage cultural, recreational, educational, and social interaction. The Office of Student Life is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 311. Our web site is http://clem.mscd.edu/~studlife/.
Student Affairs Board (SAB) The Student Affairs Board enables students to have a continuous voice in the use and allocation of their student fees. The SAB is comprised of student, faculty and administrative representatives.
Student Problem Action Network (SPAN) The SPAN Program helps students resolve problems on campus. This program involves trained advisors who can assist students in defining their problem, formulate a strategy of reaching a solution, and inform them about the institutional process for resolving the issue. This program is part of the judicial affairs area and is staffed by volunteer faculty and campus personnel. For additional information, please refer to the Student Handbook or come to the Tivoli, room 311.
Student Activities
The Office of Student Activities provides opportunities for student development and growth through a variety of programs that link students' academic lives with their lives outside the classroom. Student Activities' programs are educational, cultural, social and recreational, and give students an opportunity to enhance their social responsibility and leadership skills.
Student Activities has four distinct functions to help students get connected and involved in campus life: programs, events and co-curricular opportunities; student organization services; Metro Cool (service learning); and leadership education. These functions are designed to:
1. enlighten, stimulate and entertain the campus community,
2. promote student self-worth and dignity,
3. develop self-confidence,
4. help students become better prepared for life-long learning and increased organizational and social complexity,
5. teach students fiscal responsibility,
6. provide developmental experiences for students to help them take responsibility for program and service delivery, and
7. teach responsible citizenship and an ethic that encourages responsible social action.
The office is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 305, 303-556-2595. Office hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Student Government Assembly
Through channels of advocacy and outreach with faculty and administration, the Student Government Assembly (SGA) members work with and on behalf of individual students and the MSCD student population as a whole to ensure that students voices are heard and that the best interest of all students is considered. SGA members are committed to enhancing opportunities for student involvement and success in their campus life. The SGA office is located in the Tivoli Student Union, suite 307, 303-556-3312.


STUDENT LIFE 39
Student Publications
The student newspaper, The Metropolitan, is published by the Office of Student Publications, Tivoli Student Union, room 313, 303-556-8361. The newspaper offers students the opportunity to explore fields such as journalism, advertising sales, marketing, graphic arts, publishing, photography, business and accounting through work experiences. The Metropolitan is written and produced by and for MSCD students. It is published weekly during the fall and spring semesters and monthly during the summer semester. Students interested in working on the paper should contact the student editor at 303-556-2507.
Metrosphere is the annual student literary and arts publication. It contains poetry, fiction, nonfiction, art, photography and graphics. It is written, composed and produced entirely by students. Submissions are accepted during the fall semester. Copies are distributed free to students in the spring semester. For more information, contact the student editor at 303-556-3940.
The office also produces the Student Handbook and provides graphic art services at reduced costs to on-campus offices, departments, organizations and individuals.
MSCD's Board of Publications is the advisory board to the editors of Metrosphere and The Metropolitan. The board appoints the editors from applicants each spring for the following academic year and deals with complaints or questions regarding content. The board is composed of five students, three administrators, and three faculty members and meets monthly during the fall and spring semesters.
Campus Recreation
The Campus Recreation at Auraria program is among the most affordable ways that students have found to enjoy themselves, and it is among the best recreation programs offered in Colorado. The program is composed of the Drop-In Program (informal recreation), Intramurals, Club Sports, Outdoor Adventure and the Physically Challenged Program. Student membership is free with a current, validated student ID.
The Drop-in Program provides group and individual activities for students, faculty, staff, alumni and guests. Facilities include four basketball courts, 12 tennis courts, volleyball courts, a 25-yard indoor pool, eight handball/racquetball courts, two squash courts, a weightroom, a fitness center, a dance studio, a baseball field, softball fields and a track. In addition, Campus Recreation offers high- and low-impact aerobics, step aerobics and aqua aerobics daily. The Drop-in Program also offers a new instructional component, Healthy Lifestyles, which consists of a variety of noncredit instructional workshops, clinics and seminars. Check the Drop-in Program schedule in room 108 of the Physical Education Building or call 303-556-3210 for a listing of available times.
The Intramural Program consists of individual and team activities open to all students, faculty and staff members. The emphasis of the program is on participation, sportsmanship and social interaction. Whenever possible, competitive and recreational divisions are offered to ensure participation for all ability levels. Activities include flag football, basketball, floor hockey, volleyball, racquetball and squash leagues, as well as tennis and golf tournaments.
Club Sports provides students, faculty and staff members the opportunity to develop their individual athletic abilities in an organized group setting. The present clubs, which are all student initiated, include aikido, fencing, mens lacrosse, men and women's rugby, men's volleyball, coed waterpolo, badminton, ski/snowbashers and tai chi.
Outdoor Adventure provides the opportunity to experience the beauty and challenge of nature through organized trips. The program provides outdoor recreational experiences emphasizing skill acquisition, social interaction, environmental awareness and safety. Some of the many adventures offered are biking, canoeing, cross-country skiing, downhill skiing, family-fun outings, hiking, ice climbing, kayaking/rafting, naturalist outings, rock climbing and sailing. The program also provides rental equipment, including camping and hiking gear, canoes, cross-country skis, mountain bikes and roller blades. The office is located in the basement of the Events Center.
The Physically Challenged Program offers a variety of sporting, recreational, and fitness opportunities for students with physical or learning limitations. The adaptive programs/services encompass one-on-one or group sessions that assist in using the recreational facility. Information on planned group activities or individual help sessions is available in the Events Center, room 108, 303-556-3210.


40 STUDENT LIFE
Intercollegiate Athletics
The intercollegiate athletics program plays an integral role in campus life at The Metropolitan State College of Denver. MSCD offers 10 intercollegiate sports programs: baseball, men's basketball, women's basketball, men's soccer, women's soccer, men's swimming and diving, women's swimming and diving, men's tennis, women's tennis and women's volleyball.
The teams, nicknamed the Roadrunners, compete at the Division II level of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The Roadrunners are members of the 14-member Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference (RMAC), which was founded in 1909 and features modest-sized schools with limited athletic budgets.
Scholarships are available for each of the 10 intercollegiate sports. They are disbursed by individual coaches on the basis of merit, athletic ability and team needs. Scholarships are awarded on a yearly basis.
The Intercollegiate Athletics Office is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 355, 303-556-8300.


ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS 41
ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS
CREDIT FOR PRIOR LEARNING OPTIONS
Successful completion of special examinations, completion of a prior learning portfolio, or assessment of nonaccredited training programs through published guides, may be used to award credit or may permit placement in advanced courses. A student may earn up to 60 semester hours of credit toward degree requirements using prior learning credit options. This type of approved credit will be posted to the student's record after the completion of 8 semester hours of residency credit. Prior learning credit may not be used toward the last 12 semester hours of a degree program, does not substitute for residency requirements, and cannot be used to challenge prerequisite courses for courses already completed. Students are advised that letter grades are not assigned for such credit, and some institutions may not accept transfer credits that do not include letter grades. Additional information is available from the offices indicated in each section below and from the Center for Individualized Learning, Central Classroom 106, 303-556-8342.
Advanced Placement Examinations
Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate advanced placement examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, may have official AP scores submitted directly to the Office of Admissions for consideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate department chair, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted. (See following chart.)
Course Credit Awards For Advanced Placement Exams
AP SCORE 2 3 4 5
Biology BIO 1080-3 & BIO 1090-1 BIO 1080-3 & BIO 1090-1 BIO 1080-3 & BIO 1090-1
Chemistry CHE 1800-4 CHE 1800-4 CHE 1810-4 CHE 1850-2 CHE 1800-4 CHE 1810-4 CHE 1850-2
Computer Science (A) CSI 1300-4 CSI 1300-4
Computer Science (AB) CSI 1300-4 CSI 1300-4 CSI 2300-4 CSI 1300-4 CSI 2300-4
Economics (macro) ECO 2010-3 ECO 2010-3 ECO 2010-3
Economics (micro) ECO 2020-3 ECO 2020-3 ECO 2020-3
English (Comp & Lit) ENG 1010-3 ENG 1100-3 ENG 1010-3 ENG 1020-3 ENG 1100-3 ENG 1010-3 ENG 1020-3 ENG 1100-3
English (Lang & Comp) ENG 1010-3 ENG 1010-3 ENG 1020-3 ENG 1010-3 ENG 1020-3
Govt & Politics (U.S.) PSC 1010-3 PSC 1010-3 PSC 1010-3
Govt & Politics (comparative) PSC 1020-3 PSC 1020-3 PSC 1020-3
History (European) HIS 1010-3 HIS 1010-3 HIS 1020-3 HIS 1010-3 HIS 1020-3
History (American) HIS 1210-3 HIS 1210-3 HIS 1220-3 HIS 1210-3 HIS 1220-3
Math (Calc AB) MTH 1400-4 MTH 1410-4 MTH 1410-4


42 ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS
AP SCORE 2 3 4 5
Math (Calc BC) MTH 1400-4 MTH 1410-4 MTH 2410-4 MTH 1410-4 MTH 2410-4
Physics (B) PHY 2010-4 PHY 2030-1 PHY 2020-4 PHY 2040-1 PHY 2010-4 PHY 2030-1 PHY 2020-4 PHY 2040-1 PHY 2010-4 PHY 2030-1 PHY 2020-4 PHY 2040-1
Physics (C-Mechanics) PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1
Physics (C-Magnetism, Elec.) PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2331-4 PHY 2341-1 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2331-4 PHY 2341-1 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2331-4 PHY 2341-1
Psychology PSY 1001-3 PSY 1001-3 PSY 1001-3
Spanish Language SPA 1020-5 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2310-3 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2310-3 SPA 2320-3
Spanish Literature SPA 1020-5 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2310-3 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2310-3
German Language GER 1020-5 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2310-3 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2310-3 GER 2320-3
German Literature GER 1020-5 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2310-3 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2310-3 GER 2320-3
French Language FRE 2110-3 FRE 2010-3 FRE 2110-3 FRE 2010-3 FRE 2020-3 FRE 2110-3
French Literature FRE 2110-3 FRE 2110-3 FRE 2110-3 FRE 3010-3
Statistics MTH 1210-4 MTH 1210-4 MTH 1210-4
International Baccalaureate
MSCD recognizes the greater potential for success of international baccalaureate students. Accordingly, academic departments may award credit for demonstrated proficiency on a case-by-case basis. Students who have international baccalaureate results at the higher level may have an official transcript sent directly to the Office of Admissions for consideration for college credit.
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
CLEP consists of two series of examinations: the general examinations and the subject examinations. They are designed to evaluate nonaccredited college-level learning in order to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge.
The general examination series includes five separate examinations covering the areas of English composition, humanities, natural sciences, mathematics and social science/history. Based on the results of these examinations, the college may award up to a maximum of 24 semester hours of credit in the freshman General Studies requirement areas. Thus, the successful student may test out of many of the traditional courses required during the freshman year. MSCD does not allow CLEP credit for ENG 1020, the Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research and Documentation course.
The subject examination series consists of more than 45 examinations that apply to specific college courses. MSCD allows credit for some of these examinations. Thirty (30) semester hours of credit also may be awarded under this series, making a total of 54 semester hours of credit obtainable under a combination of the two series of examinations.


ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS 43
Credit obtained under CLEP at another institution will be re-evaluated according to MSCD CLEP policies.
Contact the coordinator at 303-556-3677 for complete information about this program before registering to take any of these exams.
Attainment Examinations
Any student may take attainment examinations in some departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation, entitles students to substitute their own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the course.
Departmental Course Examinations
In special cases, a department may grant students credit toward graduation for college courses that they request and pass special college examinations. Under this provision, a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be awarded by the college. A fee of $15 per semester credit hour will be charged.
Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a regular course offered by the college (omnibus-numbered courses are excluded). The credit granted will be for the corresponding course, provided the student has no previous collegiate enrollment for a similar course and the credit is applicable toward the student's graduation requirements. Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department chair no later than the third week of classes in a semester. Permission for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recommendation of the department chair.
No application for credit by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degree-seeking curriculum in the college. Credit by examination will not be approved for a student who is within 12 classroom semester hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for a course that a student has been officially enrolled at MSCD or at another institution, whether or not the course has been completed and a grade awarded. Credit by examination cannot be obtained for college courses attended as a listener, visitor or auditor.
If a student has completed a more advanced course than the course for which examination credit is desired, permission to take the exam will be granted if approved by the appropriate department chair and dean. If a student has already completed a sequence of courses, no examination credit can be given for courses lower in number than the highest-numbered course taken by the student. If a student has registered for a higher-numbered course in a sequence, the exam for the lower-numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester. Exceptions must be appealed to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions following endorsement of the department chair or dean. Examinations cannot be taken to raise grades, to remove failures or to remove "NC," "SP" or "I" notations. Credit by examination is not applicable toward academic residence requirements.
Examination for credit will be taken at a time specified by the department after the special examination fee has been paid. No examination for credit in a college course may be repeated. A grade equivalent to "A or "B" must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credit so earned for the course will be recorded without grade reference on the student's permanent record. Credits in courses for which credit is earned by examination are not considered in computing college grade point averages. Credit by examination will be posted after a student has completed 8 semester hours of credit at MSCD and after an evaluation of all possible transfer credits has been completed.
Portfolio Assessment
Students may apply for credit for college-level learning gained through experience by preparing and submitting a prior learning portfolio. Credit is awarded on the basis of a careful assessment of the prior learning portfolio by faculty in the department from which credit is sought. Portfolio assessment is available in many, but not all, academic departments.
The portfolio is developed with the assistance of the Center for Individualized Learning, Central Classroom 106, 303-556-8342. Portfolio assessment may be used to apply for credit for specific courses listed in the Catalog; credit is not available for courses which are considered omnibus courses. Applicants for credit through portfolio assessment will generally be required to take EDS 2680-1, The Portfolio Development Workshop.


44 ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS
A fee of one-half the part-time student tuition is charged for credit awarded through portfolio assessment; $40 of the total fee is due prior to the assessment of the portfolio by faculty. The remainder of the fee is due if and when credit is awarded. Policies which govern credit for prior learning options apply to credit awarded through the portfolio process.
Contact the Center for Individualized Learning for assistance and further information at 303-556-8342, Central Classroom 106. Information sessions about portfolio assessment and other credit for prior learning options are held on a regular basis by the Center for Individualized Learning.
Credit for Military Training and Other Training Programs
Military training and other training programs that have been assessed for college credit by the American Council on Education will be evaluated by the Office of Admissions for transfer credit at MSCD. For formal military training, copies of training certificates and a copy of the DD-214 should be submitted to the Office of Admissions. For other training, official ACE transcripts should be submitted. Credit limit is 30 semester hours.
Cooperative Education
The Cooperative Education Internship Center places students in work experiences related to their academic major. The purpose of the internships is to integrate academic training with actual work experience. This combination allows students to make realistic career decisions, gain valuable work experience, obtain recommendations for graduate school and earn money to help defray college expenses.
Students work in large corporations, small businesses, government and nonprofit agencies throughout the metropolitan area. Most co-op students are paid by their employers, but in those professional fields where co-op salaries are not available, volunteer internship placements are offered to help students gain essential work experience.
Co-op internship placements are available in most academic majors and minors. Students must complete 30 semester hours of college coursework with a minimum 2.50 GPA and have a declared major to be eligible for registration with co-op. No fees are charged to the student or employer for participation in the program, and each student's interests and job requirements are discussed individually with a professional coordinator.
Students may choose from three different work schedules based on the academic calendar. The alternating plan provides full-time periods of work every other semester with intervening semesters spent in full-time study. The parallel schedule places students in a job while they simultaneously attend school. These positions are usually part-time. The short term/summer plan allows students to elect a work experience that lasts for no more than one semester.
The college awards academic credit for supervised cooperative education placements. Students must complete a credit application, available from the co-op office, and this application must be approved by a faculty member from the department in which credit is to be granted. No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward MSCD degree requirements. Credit earned for the co-op education work experiences are not applicable toward General Studies requirements. Additional departmental restrictions may apply to certain majors.
Service-Learning
The Service-Learning Program combines classroom experience with service to the metropolitan community. Participating students receive credit for appropriate public service, which is beneficial to the community and expands student horizons in intellectually and personally meaningful ways.
Emerging from a wide variety of disciplines, service-learning courses are structured by faculty to weave service into community-based and government agencies, with classroom reflection and analysis of the learning offered through these experiences. The courses are also designed to address real needs in our multicultural world, such as homelessness, at-risk youth, domestic violence, the environment, culture and the arts, and mental illness. Agencies that have provided service opportunities include Fort Logan Mental Health Center, the Denver Commission on Aging, Big Sisters, the Colorado Historical Society, the Rape Assistance and Awareness Program, and numerous elementary and high schools, senior centers, and nursing homes.


ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS 49
Service-learning credit is available in most academic majors and minors. Prerequisites and other requirements vary with each department. To learn how to participate in this program, including discussions of placement options, students should contact or visit the Service-Learning Program office to schedule an interview.


16 SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
The First Year Program
The First-Year Program is designed to unify and coordinate college efforts to help entering students achieve a successful first year. The program provides intensive advising, course selection guidance and academic monitoring throughout the first year, as well as coordinating academic support services for first year students. Additionally, the program offers a First-Year Seminar course, XXX 1190, which provides appropriate readings and written work enabling students to discuss and write about current issues including the value of higher education. A-ll first-time MSCD students may enroll in the First-Year Seminar course and other appropriate courses as determined by assessment at entry. The program furnishes an environment where problem solving, creativity and peer interaction are encouraged. For additional information call 303-556-8447.
The Honors Program
The Honors Program provides the academic progress for highly motivated students with broad academic interests. The program provides honors sections of General Studies courses and unique interdisciplinary courses. Honors courses are small in order to encourage class participation and a close relationship between students and faculty. Honors classes are designed to promote independent thought and creative inquiry. The director of the Honors Program and the honors faculty provide academic advising and serve as mentors to students as they consider their post-graduate goals. The ultimate mission of the Honors Program is to create a community of scholars. It sponsors an Honors Club, an annual Honors Conference, and study-abroad courses which allow students to explore ideas outside the classroom. Students who complete 27 semester hours of honors courses including a thesis will receive an honors designation on their transcript.
An Honors application form may be obtained from the Honors Program director. Since the Honors Program participates in the Colorado Scholarship Program, students admitted to the Honors Program are eligible to apply for a scholarship. Additional information on the Honors Program is available by calling 303-556-4865 or by inquiring in Central Classroom Building, Room 101B.
Required Honors Core Semester Hours
HON 2750 The Legacy of Arts and Letters I*...........................3
HON 2760 The Legacy of Arts and Letters II*..........................3
HON 2950 The Art of Critical Thinking*..............................3
HON 3800 Revolutions and Social Change I*............................3
HON 3810 Revolutions and Social Change II*...........................3
HON 3850 American Culture I*........................................3
HON 3860 American Culture II*.......................................3
HON 4920 Senior Honors Seminar......................................3
HON 4950 Senior Honors Thesis.......................................3
Total Hours for Honors Core.........................................27
*Approved General Studies courses.
Individualized Studies Program
The Individualized Degree Program (IDP) offers students the opportunity to design and propose a major, extended major or minor to meet specific educational goals when other majors or minors listed in the Catalog cannot meet the student's educational objectives. Either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree may be sought. Students must have a GPA of 2.5 before an IDP program may be approved. Each student will work with an advisor in the Center for Individualized Learning and with a faculty mentor to develop a proposal for an Individualized Degree Program. A practicing professional in the student's field of study may also be invited to serve as a community consultant to assist the student and the faculty in the development of the program of study. Because careful and thoughtful planning is essential to designing a coherent and congruent program of study, students are encouraged to begin developing their IDP proposals early in their enrollment at MSCD.
Interested students should contact the Center for Individualized Learning, Central Classroom 106, 303-556-8342, for assistance and for complete information regarding the policies and procedures for the development and approval of an Individualized Degree Program. Information sessions are held throughout the year.


SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Each Individualized Degree Program will be approved by the department chair from the academic department from which the majority of credit is drawn, the appropriate dean and the director of the Center for Individualized Learning.
All requirements that apply to any bachelor's degree from MSCD apply to Individualized Studies.
A grade of C must be earned in each course included in the student's IDP major or minor.
The title for each student's program will be Individualized Studies with a concentration in_.
IDP majors may not include courses in Level II General Studies that have the same prefix as the department from which the majority of credit is drawn for their major.
No more than 30 hours of credit out of the total of 120 credit hours may be included in the students degree plan from the School of Business.
Each IDP major and minor must include courses that have not yet been completed at the time the proposal is approved. See each IDP option below for the specific number of credits that must be completed after the proposal is approved by the department chair.
Proposals may be submitted for:
An IDP MAJOR, which requires a minimum of 40 credit hours, including 21 hours of upper-division credit. Fifteen (15) hours must be completed after the proposal is approved by the department chair. A minor chosen from the Catalog is required.
An IDP MINOR, which requires a minimum of 20 credit hours, including 6 hours of upper-division credit. Six (6) hours must be completed after the proposal is approved by the department chair. A major chosen from the Catalog is required.
An EXTENDED MAJOR may be proposed when the student's field of study requires more in-depth study or courses from multiple disciplines that cannot be accommodated in an IDP major. An Extended IDP major requires a minimum of 60 credit hours, including 27 hours of upper-division credit. Twenty-one (21) hours must be completed after the proposal is approved by the department chair. No minor is required.
Institute for International and Intercultural Education
The Metropolitan State College of Denver is committed to providing all students with a strong educational foundation that enhances their understanding of the total human experience and enables them to maximize their potential for growth and development in a rapidly changing world. Through the programs of the Institute for International and Intercultural Education, students and faculty have opportunities to develop and participate in activities designed to promote a greater understanding and expertise in global issues. The Institute also seeks to maintain a positive environment that enhances the learning experiences of international students attending MSCD. The Institute is located in the Rectory Building, room 204, and can be reached at 303-556-4004. The following programs reflect the mission of the Institute.
Individualized Degree Program
Students interested in pursuing an interdisciplinary major or a minor in international studies may do so under the Individualized Degree Program (IDP). The IDP allows students, in close consultation with and approval of a faculty mentor, to design a course of study that best meets their needs. Students may choose from a wide range of courses dealing with international topics that are regularly offered to complete a major or minor. Contact the Institute for International and Intercultural Education at 303-556-4004 or the Center for Individualized Learning at 303-556-8342, Central Classroom 106.
Study-Abroad Courses
The Institute coordinates a variety of short-term and semester-long study abroad courses each year. During the past several years, these courses have been held in Mexico, England, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Central America, Russia and Egypt. These courses are generally directed by full-time MSCD faculty, are two to five weeks in duration and are available to eligible students. Assistance is provided to students who choose to participate in study abroad courses offered by other U.S. or foreign universities.


48 SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
The college operates two semester abroad programs in Guadalajara, Mexico and London, England. These are offered in cooperation with the University of Guadalajara and the American Institute for Foreign Study/Richmond College partnership. Students must be in good academic standing in order to participate in these programs.
Contact the Institute for information regarding the latest offerings.
Resource Center
The Institute maintains a resource bank of information on:
a multitude of study-abroad programs offered by other universities and organizations
international internship opportunities
graduate programs in international studies
faculty seminars and conferences
internationalization of curricula
international employment opportunities International Student Services
The Institute provides a variety of services to international students attending MSCD. These include counseling on visas, school transfers, work permission and housing; conducting academic and cultural orientation sessions; assisting with immigration issues; providing information to embassies and sponsors; advising on academic issues; and organizing social and cultural events.
Faculty Services
The Institute places a high priority on enabling interested faculty to enhance their international experiences and, consequently, enrich their curricula. The faculty are regularly informed of professional development seminars, international conferences, exchange opportunities and fellowships. International faculty teaching at MSCD are given assistance with immigration and related matters in accordance with college policies.
Special Events
The Institute regularly organizes conferences, seminars and lecture series to promote intellectual discourses on issues affecting the contemporary world.
Community Connections
The Institute maintains links with numerous local and national organizations and professional associations dealing with international, educational, economic, social and cultural activities with a view to strengthen college-community partnerships and to remain current with the latest developments in the area of international education.
Language and Culture Institute
The Language and Culture Institute was established in 1976 to organize study and travel abroad. The institute currently operates a summer program in Mexico, a summer intensive language institute in Germany, and a winter study and travel program in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and in Central America. The institute offers credit through the Modem Languages Department.


GENERAL STUDIES 49
THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM
Philosophy of the General Studies Program
The Metropolitan State College of Denver seeks to prepare its graduates for a lifetime of learning, which, in our changing and complex society, requires focused expertise (such as that provided by a major area of study) and the ability to communicate with and learn from experts in other fields. Undergraduate education fosters the critical thinking necessary for the exploration of unfamiliar disciplines and for the synthesis of learning, and exposes students to the richness and variety of the intellectual universe.
General Studies Information
Students must use a single catalog to meet all degree requirements, including those in the General Studies, major and minor. Some changes in General Studies requirements have been made retroactive. As a consequence, many General Studies requirements and policies described in this Catalog may be followed by students using earlier catalogs.
General Studies Goals
The General Studies Program is designed to help graduates achieve the following competencies:
MSCD students should be able to:
1. Write and speak with clarity;
2. Read and listen critically;
3. Draw conclusions from quantitative data;
4. Recognize faulty reasoning;
5. Organize ideas; and
6. Communicate with experts in other disciplines and learn from them.
MSCD students should:
7. Have an open attitude toward different approaches to problems;
8. Have an informed awareness of the principal human achievements in history, arts and letters, society, and science; and
9. Be introduced to the basic methods, knowledge, problems or attitudes characteristic of a field.
Structure of the General Studies Program
The General Studies Program is structured to foster the development of skills and to encourage students to use their mastery of skills to explore knowledge in a variety of disciplines. The General Studies Program provides two levels of experience:
Level ISkills
Level I courses provide students with the basic skills of reading and listening critically, recognizing faulty reasoning, drawing conclusions from quantitative data, organizing ideas, and writing and speaking with clarity.
Level II-Breadth of Knowledge
Level II courses introduce students to the basic methods, knowledge, problems or attitudes characteristic of a field, encourage in students an open attitude toward different approaches to problems, enable students to communicate with experts in other disciplines and learn from them, and cultivate in students an informed awareness of the principal achievements in history, arts and letters, social science, and science. In addition, in Level II courses students will continue to develop their skills in language and mathematics.
Distribution and Credit Requirements
To complete their General Studies Program, students must take approved courses that fulfill the following distribution and credit requirements:
Category
Level I*
Composition. Mathematics. Communications
Semester Hours
.............6
.............3
.............3


50 GENERAL STUDIES
Level II**
Historical.............................................................................3
Arts and Letters.......................................................................6
Social Sciences........................................................................6
Natural Sciences.......................................................................6
Total***..............................................................................33
*A transfer course or courses of at least 2 semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level l course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Level l course.
**One-hour deviations in the Level II categories may be allowed.
***A student's completed General Studies Program must contain at least 33 semester hours.
Basic Rules:
Only approved courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies requirements. A current listing of these courses is published in this section, in the General College Requirements brochure, and in the Course Descriptions section of this Catalog.
General Studies courses need not be counted toward General Studies requirements. They may be taken as electives or to satisfy requirements in the major or degree program.
Departments or programs may specify, by prefix and number, some General Studies courses in addition to courses required for the major or a professional credential.
Courses taken using the pass-fail option cannot be counted for General Studies.
LEVEL I REQUIREMENTS: COMPOSITION, MATHEMATICS AND COMMUNICATION
Freshman Assessment: Reading, Writing and Mathematics Placement Exams
First-time college students are required to complete the reading, writing and mathematics placement examinations (see Assessment Requirements section). Examination results serve as the basis for academic advising. To increase their opportunity for success, students may be required to take courses below the level of the first-year courses offered by MSCD. Students should be aware, however, that no credit is given for courses that are below the college level.
Placement Test Prerequisites
Students must have a passing score on the appropriate placement test before they will be allowed to register for Level I General Studies courses in English, mathematics and reading. Exceptions will be made for students who have earned at least a grade of C in the community college course specified by the department. The Assessment Center administers the placement tests. Students should consult an advisor
in the Advising Center for guidance in selecting the appropriate Level I courses.
COMPOSITION REQUIRED COURSES (minimum 6 semester hours)
ENG 1010 Freshman Composition: The Essay......................3
ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research & Documentation .. .3
Rules: Composition Requirement
Students must complete the ENG 1010 requirement within their first 30 semester hours at MSCD and the ENG 1020 requirement within their first 60 semester hours. These requirements may be postponed only if approved in writing by the English Department.
Students must demonstrate the adequacy of their writing skills in the placement exam before enrolling in ENG 1010. Those students whose writing skills are inadequate will be counseled on how to improve those skills. Students may be required to complete additional coursework.
Students will have satisfied the Level I composition requirements if they:
=> satisfactorily complete ENG 1010 and 1020, or
pass a CLEP or AP examination approved by the English Department (ENG 1010 only), or transfer equivalent courses.


GENERAL STUDIES 51
MATHEMATICS (minimum 3 semester hours)*
MTH 1080 Mathematical Modes of Thought J.......................3
MTH1110 College Algebra .....................................4
MTH 1210 Introduction to Statistics..j...........................4
MTH 1310 Finite Mathematics for the Management & Social Sciences.4
MTH 1610 Mathematical Concepts for Teacher^ in Presecondary Schools .4
Rules: Mathematics Requirement
Students will take the mathematics placement exam to determine their abilities to calculate with fractions, decimals and percents, and to know and use elementary geometrical formulas. Those whose skills are inadequate are required to complete college arithmetic coursework before enrolling in a Level I mathematics course. Some courses have additional requirements.
Students must complete the Level I mathematics requirement within their first 30 semester hours at MSCD. This requirement may be postponed on an individual basis if the postponement is approved in writing by the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department.
Students will have satisfied the Level I mathematics requirements if they:
4>pass a mathematics course that has been approved for Level I mathematics credit (see courses listed above), or
Opass a CLEP or AP examination approved by the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department, or
^successfully complete a mathematics course for which a Level I mathematics course is a prerequisite, or
^transfer an equivalent course.
*A transfer course or courses of at least 2 semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level 1 course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency is determined by the department offering the Level I course.
COMMUNICATIONS (minimum 3 semester hours)*
FRE 1020 Elementary French II................................... 5
GER 1020 Elementary German II...........1.........................5
HON 2950 The Art of Critical Thinking ............................3
PHI 1110 Language, Logic & Persuasion ............................3
RDG 1510 Cognitive Strategies for Analytical Reading .............3
SPA 1020 Elementary Spanish II..........|.........................5
SPE 1010 Public Speaking ........................................ 3
SPE 1610/EDU 1610/ American Sign Language I ...i..........................3
MDL 1610
SPE 1710 Interpersonal Communication .............................3
Rules: Communication Requirement
Students must complete the required Level I communication course within their first 30 semester hours at MSCD.
Students will have satisfied the Level I communication requirements if they:
Opass an approved Level I communication course (listed above), or
Opass a CLEP or AP examination approved by a department offering a Level I communication course, or
4>transfer an equivalent course, or
^transfer a second semester, four- or five-semester hour foreign language course or a more advanced language course that is taught in a language not offered at MSCD, or


52 GENERAL STUDIES
Opass or transfer an advanced foreign language course that is taught in the foreign language and that has MSCDs FRE 1020, GER 1020 and SPA 1020 or equivalent coursework, or more advanced coursework as a prerequisite, or
^pass or transfer an advanced public speaking course for which MSCDs SPE 1010 or a comparable course is a prerequisite.
Students who have satisfied the communications requirement using the advanced foreign language course or the advanced public speaking course must place that course in the Level I communications requirement slot. Level II General Studies courses used to satisfy the Level I communications requirements cannot also be counted in the Level II category.
*A transfer course or courses of at least 2 semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level 1 course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency is determined by the department offering the Level l course.
LEVEL II REQUIREMENTS
Courses approved to satisfy the Level II requirement are distributed among four categories. The categories, together with the minimum number of semester hours a student must accumulate to satisfy this requirement, are given below. One-hour deviations in the General Studies Level II categories may be allowed, provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses.
Level II Categories
Historical .............................................3
Arts and Letters .......................................6
Social Science..........................................6
Natural Science.........................................6
Rules: Level II Requirement
Prerequisites: Level II General Studies courses have at least the following prerequisites or corequisites, and some courses have additional prerequisites (see the Course Descriptions section in this Catalog).
Historical and Arts and Letters:
^Courses numbered 1000 to 1990: minimum performance standard scores on reading and writing preassessment placement tests
^Courses numbered 2000 to 2990: satisfaction of the Level I mathematics course requirement and either ENG 1010 or the Level I communication course requirement
^Courses numbered 3000 and above: satisfaction of all Level I General Studies course requirements
Natural Science and Social Science:
^Courses numbered 1000 to 1990: minimum performance standards scores on the reading, writing and mathematics preassessment placement tests
^Courses numbered 2000 to 2990: satisfaction of the Level I mathematics course requirement and either ENG 1010 or the Level I communication course requirement
^Courses numbered 3000 and above: satisfaction of all Level I course requirements
Students may not use courses having the same prefix as their major discipline or crosslisted with their major discipline to satisfy the Level II requirements.
Students may use courses having the same prefix as their minor discipline or crosslisted with their minor discipline to satisfy General Studies requirements. However, a minimum of 18 credits must be used only in the minor and not for General Studies. Deviations from the Catalog requirements require approval of the minor department, and some departments require that more than 18 credits be used only in the minor. Please contact the minor department for additional information.
Students may not apply more than 8 semester hours of credit with the same course prefix to the Level II requirements.


GENERAL STUDIES 53
Students may use either prefix for a crosslisted course, i.e., one designated XXX (YYY). They must select the prefix they wish to use at registration; the selection may not be changed later.
History majors must take three extra semester hours at Level II in the social science, arts and letters, or natural sciences categories in lieu of the three hours in the historical category.
History majors may not use courses that are crosslisted with history courses for General Studies.
HISTORICAL (minimum 3 semester hours)*
Historical courses aim to impart a broad knowledge of history with emphasis upon the major forces, persons and events that have shaped the modern world.
The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies, Multicultural and Senior Experience requirements. However, other courses may have been approved for such use after the publication of this Catalog. For up-to-date information, contact the Advising Center.
FRE 3550 HIS 1000 HIS 1010 HIS 1020 HIS 1110 HIS 1210 HIS 1220 HIS 1250
HIS 1650/WMS 1650 me HIS 1910/CHS 1010
me HIS 1920/CHS 1020
me HIS 1930/NAS 1930
me HIS 1940/AAS 1130
HIS 2010
me HIS 2950/AAS 2130
HIS 3030 HIS 3060 me HIS 3090 HIS 3120 HIS 3140 HIS 3310 HIS 3320 me HIS 3590 HIS 3700 HIS 3740 HIS 3810
HIS 4110/HON 3850 HIS 4120/HON 3860
French Historical Perspectives...............................3
American Civilization........................................3
Western Civilization to 1715.................................3
Western Civilization since 1715 .............................3
Colorado History I ..........................................3
American History to 1865 ....................................3
American History since 1865 .................................3
China, Japan, Korea since 1800 ..............................3
Women in U.S. History........................................3
History of Meso-America: Pre-Columbian & Colonial Periods .3
History of the Chicano in the Southwest: 1810 to Present.....3
History of Indigenous/Hispanic Americans ....................3
Survey of African History....................................3
Contemporary World History ..................................3
West African Civilizations ..................................3
Ancient Orient & Greece......................................3
Rome and the Caesars.........................................3
Native Americans in American History.........................3
Medieval History ............................................3
Renaissance & Reformation ...................................3
England to 1714 .............................................3
England since 1714...........................................3
American Immigration History ................................3
Modem China..................................................3
Modern Japan ................................................3
Latin America: Republics ....................................3
American Culture I............J.............................3
American Culture II ..........J.............................3
History majors must take three extra semester hours at Level II in the Social Sciences, Arts & Letters, or Natural Science categories in lieu of the three hours in the Historical category. History majors may not use courses that are crosslisted with history courses for General Studies.
*A one-hour deviation in the General Studies historical requirement may be allowed, provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses.
Please note: me indicates that the course is also approved as a multicultural course.


54 GENERAL STUDIES
ARTS & LETTERS (Minimum 6 semester hours)*
Arts & Letters courses impart a broad knowledge of important works and major schools of thought from at least two centuries. They also provide a foundation for critical evaluation within the discipline.
The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies, Multicultural and Senior Experience requirements. However, other courses may have been approved for such use after the publication of this Catalog. For up-to-date information, contact the Advising Center.
me AAS 3240/ENG 3240 African American Literature ....................................3
ART 1040 Art Appreciation Survey.........................................3
me ART 3090 Art & Cultural Heritage.........................................3
ART 3950/WMS 3950 Womens Art/Womens Issues .....................................3
ENG 1100 Introduction to Literature .....................................3
ENG 1110 Introduction to Fiction.........................................3
ENG 1120 Introduction to Drama...........................................3
ENG 1310 Introduction to Shakespeare ....................................3
ENG 3030 Semantics ......................................................3
me ENG 3240/AAS 3240 African American Literature ....................................3
ENG 3420 English Bible as Literature ....................................3
ENG 3430 Classical Mythology ............................................3
ENG 3460 Childrens Literature...........................................3
FRE 3110 Survey of French Literature I ..................................3
FRE3120 Survey of French Literature II..................................3
GER 3200 German Culture & Civilization...................................3
HON 2750 The Legacy of Arts & Letters I..................................3
HON 2760 The Legacy of Arts & Letters II ................................3
MUS 1000 Introduction to Music ..........................................3
me MUS 2020 Jazz Styles-Americas Music.....................................3
me MUS 3000 Musics of America ..............................................3
MUS 3040 Music & the Arts................................................3
me MUS 3050 Musics of the World ............................................3
PHI 1010 Introduction to Philosophy .....................................3
PHI 1030 Ethics .........................................................3
PHI 3000 History of Greek Philosophy.....................................3
PHI 3020 History of Modern Philosophy ...................................3
PHI 3360 Business Ethics.................................................3
PSC 3050 Political Theory................................................3
RDG 3060 Critical Reading/Thinking.......................................3
SPA 3200 Culture & Civilization of Spain.................................3
SPA 3210 Spanish-American Culture & Civilization.........................3
SPA 3220 Folklore & Culture of the Mexican Southwest.....................3
SPE 2770/WMS 2770 Gender & Communication..........................................3
SPE 3080 Great American Speakers ........................................3
SPE 3740 Psychology of Communication ....................................3
me SPE 3760 Cultural Influences on Communication............................3
THE 2210 Introduction to Theatre ........................................3
WMS 2770/SPE 2770 Gender & Communication..........................................3
WMS3510 Feminist Theory ................................................3
WMS 3950/ART 3950 Womens Art/Womens Issues ....................................3
*A one-hour deviation in the General Studies arts and letters requirement may be allowed, provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses.
Please note: me indicates that the course is also approved as a multicultural course.


GENERAL STUDIES 5
SOCIAL SCIENCES (Minimum 6 semester hours)*
Social Science courses aim to explore the formation, behavior and interaction of various social, cultural, political or economic groups and institutions.
The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies, Multicultural and Senior Experience requirements. However, other courses may have been approved for such use after the publication of this Catalog. For up-to-date information, contact the Advising Center.
me AAS 1010 Introduction to African-American Studies...................3
me AAS 2100/CHS 2100/ Women of Color.............................................3
ICS 2100/NAS 2100/WMS 2100
me AAS 2200/PSC 2200 Politics & Black People.......L...........................3
me AAS 3300/SOC 3140 The Black Community ..........|...........................3
AAS 3550/SOC 3440 The Black Family ..........................................3
ACC 1010 Accounting for Non-Business Majors ........................3
ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology......................3
me ANT 2330 Cross-Cultural Communication...............................3
me ANT 3310 Ethnography of North American Indians......................3
me ANT 3480 Cultural Diversity in Health & Illness.....................3
me CHS 1000 Introduction to Chicano Studies............................3
me CHS 2100/AAS 2100/ Women of Color.............................................3
ICS 2100/NAS 2100/WMS 2100
me CHS 3100/SOC 3130 The Chicano Community .....................................3
CHS 3210/SOC 3470 The Chicano Family ........................................3
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro..............................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro .. L.........................3
EDS 3200 Educational Psychology Applied to Teaching ................3
FIN 2250 Personal Money Management..................................3
FRE 3560 Contemporary Socio-Cultural Issues.........................3
GEG 1000 World Regional Geography...................................3
GEG 1300 Introduction to Human Geography ...........................3
GEG 2020 Geography of Colorado......................................3
me GEG 3300/NAS 3300/ Land Use, Culture & Conflict...............................3
PSC 3300
HES 1050 Dynamics of Health ........................................3
HES 2000 Health Politics & Policy ..................................3
HES 2180 AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome .................3
HIS 3660 Recent U.S., 1945-1970s ..................................3
me HMT 1850 Multicultural/Multinational Cultural Adjustment/Readjustment ...3
HON 3800 Revolutions & Social Change I..............................3
HON 3810 Revolutions & Social Change II ............................3
HPS 2720 Fundamentals of Coaching ..................................2
me HSP 3490 Multicultural Issues in Human Services.....................4
me ICS 1000 Introduction to Asian American Studies ....................3
me ICS 2100/AAS 2100/ Women of Color.............................................3
CHS 2100/NAS 2100/WMS 2100
ITS 2810 Technology, Society & You .................................3
JRN 1010 Introduction to Journalism & Mass Media....................3
LES 4730 Sociology of Athletics in American Society ................3
MKT 2040 Managerial Communications..................................3
me NAS 1000 Introduction to Native American Studies....................3
me NAS 2100/AAS 2100/ Women of Color.............................................3
CHS 2100/ICS 2100/WMS 2100
me NAS 3200/PSC 3200 Native American Politics...................................3
me NAS 3300/GEG 3300/ Land Use, Culture & Conflict...............................3
PSC 3300


56 GENERAL STUDIES
PSC 1010 American National Government ...............................3
PSC 1020 Political Systems & Ideas ..................................3
PSC 2100 Political Socialization ....................................3
me PSC 2200/AAS 2200 Politics & Black People.....................................3
PSC 3120 American Constitutional Law ................................3
me PSC 3200/NAS 3200 Native American Politics....................................3
me PSC 3300/GEG 3300/ Land Use, Culture & Conflict................................3
NAS 3300
PSC 3630 Latin American Politics.....................................3
PSY 1001 Introductory Psychology.....................................3
PS Y 1800 Developmental Educational Psychology .......................4
PSY 2160 Personality & Adjustment....................................3
PSY 2210 Psychology of Human Development.............................3
PSY 3250 Child Psychology ...........................................3
PSY 3260 Psychology of Adolescence...................................3
SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociology ..................................3
me SOC 1040 Introduction to Social Gerontology .........................3
SOC 2010 Current Social Issues.......................................3
me SOC 3130/CHS 3100 The Chicano Community ......................................3
me SOC 3140/AAS 3300 The Black Community ........................................3
me SOC 3220/WMS 3220 Race, Gender & Ethnic Groups................................3
SOC 3440/AAS 3550 The Black Family ...........................................3
SOC 3470/CHS 3210 The Chicano Family .........................................3
SWK 1010 Introduction to Social Welfare & Social Work ...............3
WMS 1001 Introduction: Woman in Transition ..........................3
me WMS 2100/AAS 2100/ Women of Color..............................................3
CHS 2100/ICS 2100/NAS 2100
me WMS 3220/SOC 3220 Race, Gender & Ethnic Groups................................3
*A one-hour deviation in the General Studies arts and letters requirement may be allowed, provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses.
Please note: me" indicates that the course is also approved as a multicultural course.
NATURAL SCIENCE (Minimum 6 semester hours)*
Natural Science courses provide an opportunity for students to experience the systematic formulation and testing of hypotheses and to learn the importance of accurate observation and measurement. Students will differentiate among fact, speculation, evidence, inference, belief, theory, law and generalization.
The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies, Multicultural and Senior Experience requirements. However, other courses may have been approved for such use after the publication of this Catalog. For up-to-date information, contact the Advising Center.
ANT 1010 Physical Anthropology & Prehistory..........................3
AST 1040/AST 1040sp Introduction to Astronomy .................................3
AST 3040 Modem Cosmology.............................................3
BIO 1000/BIO lOOOsp Human Biology for Non-Majors ...............................3
BIO 1010/BIO lOlOsp Ecology for Non-Majors......................................3
BIO 1080/BIO 1080sp* General Introduction to Biology ...........................3
BIO 1090* General Introduction to Biology Laboratory .................1
BIO 3300 Advanced Human Biology for Non-Majors.......................3
BIO 3530/HES 3810 Physiology of Aging for Non-Biology Majors..................3
BIO 3550 Urban Ecology ..............................................4
CHE 1010 Chemistry & Society.........................................3
CHE 1100 Principles of Chemistry.....................................5


GENERAL STUDIES 57
CHE 1850 & either
CHE 1800 or 1810** General Chemistry I or II ..........J.............................6
CHE 3100 Organic Chemistry I .........................................4
CHE 3120 Organic Chemistry I Lab......................................2
GEG 1100 Introduction to Physical Geography...........................3
GEG 1200 Introduction to Environmental Sciences ......................3
GEG 1400 World Resources............................................. 3
GEL 1010 General Geology..............................................4
GEL 1020 Geology of Colorado..........................................3
GEL 1030 Historical Geology .............j............................4
GEL 1150 Oceanography.................................................3
GEL 1510 Geology of Red Rocks Park & Vicinity.........................1
GEL 1520 Garden of the Gods-Front Range Geology.......................2
GEL 3510 Advanced Geology of Red Rocks Park & Vicinity ...............1
GEL 3520 Advanced Garden of the Gods-Front Range Geology .............2
HES 2040 Introduction to Nutrition.......J............................3
HES 2150 Alternative Therapies for Health & Healing ..................3
HES 3450 Dynamics of Disease.............J............................3
HES 3810/BIO 3530 Physiology of Aging for Non-Biology Majors...................3
HON 2800 History of Science...........................................3
HON 2810 Development of Experimental Science .........................3
HPS 3300 Anatomical Kinesiology ........J.............................3
HPS 3340 Physiology of Exercise ......................................3
MET 3550 Rockets & Stars A Space Trek ..............................3
MTR 1400 Introduction to Meteorology . j.......................3
MTR 3500 Hazardous Weather............................................3
PHY 1000/PHY lOOOsp Introduction to Physics ....................................4
PHY 1250 Physics of Aviation..........................................6
PHY 2010/PHY 2030 College Physics I & Laboratory...............................5
PHY 2020/PHY 2040 College Physics II & Laboratory..............................5
PHY 2311/PHY 2321 General Physics I & Laboratory ..............................5
PHY 2331/PHY 2341 General Physics II & Laboratory..............................5
PHY 3620 Sound & Music................................................3
SCI 2610 Integrated Natural Science I ................................3
SCI 2620 Integrated Natural Science II .... 1.........................3
*In order to receive General Studies credit, both BIO 1080 and 1090 must be successfully completed.
Successful completion of CHE 1850 and either CHE 1800 or 1810 will result in 6 hours Natural Science General Studies credit. Successful completion of all three courses will result in 10 hours of General Studies credit. CHE 1800 is a prerequisite for CHE 1850. CHE 1850 has a corequisite of CHE 1810.
*A one-hour deviation in the General Studies natural science requirement may be allowed, provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses.
Please note: me indicates that the course is also approved as a multicultural course.
Additional Graduation Requirements Multicultural and Senior Experience Course Requirements
In addition to completing the General Studies requirements, a student must complete a three-hour Multicultural course and a three-hour Senior Experience course, or selection of courses, to be awarded a bachelors degree from MSCD. The Multicultural class does not require three hours as a separate category and can be taken in the major, minor or as an elective. The rules pertaining to those requirements and the courses that will satisfy those requirements are described below.


58 GENERAL STUDIES
MULTICULTURAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENT (Minimum 3 semester hours)
Multicultural courses are designed to increase students appreciation and awareness of the American culture and the diverse cultures which contribute to it. Multicultural educational offerings examine the interactions of values and beliefs, traditions, identities and cultural contributions of women and racial and ethnic groups in the United States: African American, Asian American, Hispanic American and Native American. Students may use the course to satisfy General Studies, major or minor requirements if the course is approved for that use. If the course is used for General Studies, the Level II General Studies restrictions remain in effect, e.g., no courses with the major prefix may be used.
A one-hour deviation in the Multicultural requirement will be allowed for courses judged to be similar in content to an existing Multicultural course. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Multicultural course.
AAS 1010 Introduction to African American Studies....................3
AAS 1130/HIS 1940 Survey of African History...................................3
AAS 2130/HIS 2950 West African Civilizations .................................3
AAS 2200/PSC 2200 Politics & Black People.....................................3
AAS 3240/ENG 3240 African American Literature.................................3
AAS 3300/SOC 3140 The Black Community ........................................3
ANT 2330 Cross-Cultural Communication................................3
ANT 3310 Ethnography of North American Indians.......................3
ANT 3480 Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness....................3
ART 3090 Art & Cultural Heritage.....................................3
CHS 1000 Introduction to Chicano Studies.............................3
CHS 1010/HIS 1910 History of Meso-America: Pre-Columbian & Colonial Periods .3
CHS 1020/HIS 1920 History of the Chicano in the Southwest: 1810 to Present....3
CHS 3100/SOC 3130 The Chicano Community ......................................3
CHS 3200/CJC 3720 Chicanos and the Law........................................3
EDS 3110 Processes of Educ.in Multicultural Urban Secondary Schools ....3
EDU 3100 Social Foundations and Multicultural Education .............5
ENG 2240 Native American Literatures ................................3
GEG 3300/NAS 3300 Land Use, Culture & Conflict................................3
PSC 3300
HIS 1930/NAS 1930 History of Indigenous/Hispanic Americans ...................3
HIS 3090 Native Americans in American History........................3
HIS 3590 American Immigration History ...............................3
HMT 1850 Multicultural/Multinational Cultural Adjustment/Readjustment .3
HSP 3490 Multicultural Issues in Human Services......................4
ICS 1000 Introduction to Asian American Studies .....................3
MGT 4830 Workforce Diversity ........................................3
MUS 2020 Jazz Styles-Americas Music.................................3
MUS 3000 Musics of America ..........................................3
MUS 3050 Musics of the World ........................................3
NAS 1000 Introduction to Native American Studies.....................3
NAS 3200/PSC 3200 Native American Politics....................................3
PSY 3170 Multicultural Service Learning .............................3
SED 3000 Diversity, Disability and Education.........................3
SOC 1040 Introduction to Social Gerontology .........................3
SOC 3220/WMS 3220 Race, Gender & Ethnic Groups................................3
SPE 3760 Cultural Influences on Communication........................3
XXX 1190 *First Year Seminar ........................................3
WMS 2100/AAS 2100/ Women of Color..................................................3
CHS 2100/NAS 2100/ICS 2100
Variable course prefixes, e.g., ANT, CJC, ENG, PSC, RDG, SOC, SPE, WMS.


GENERAL STUDIES 59
SENIOR EXPERIENCE GRADUATION REQUIREMENT (minimum 3 semester hours)
The Senior Experience course provides a culmination of the undergraduate experience, allowing students to synthesize their learning, using critical analysis and logical thinking. Students may use the course to satisfy major or minor requirements if the course is approved for that use. Students should consult with their advisor and check prerequisites. Students must complete a Senior Experience course at the end of the undergraduate program and must take the course or courses at MSCD. Senior Experience courses have the following minimal prerequisites: satisfaction of all Level I and Level II General Studies course requirements and senior standing. In some cases students may need to take two courses to satisfy the requirement.
ART 4010 Modem Art History: Theory & Criticism .......................3
ART 4750 Senior Experience Studio: Portfolio Development & Thesis Show3
BIO 4510 Microbial Ecology............................................3
BIO 4540 Plant Ecology ...............................................4
BIO 4850 Evolution ...................................................3
CHE 4950 Senior Experience in Chemistry ..............................3
CHS 4850 Research Experience Chicano Studies...................... 3
CJC 4650 Ethics for the Criminal Justice Professional.................3
COM 4410 Budgeting & Planning for Audio-Visual Productions ...........3
COM 4790 Senior Seminar in Technical Comm ............................3
CSI4260 Software Engineering Practices...............................4
ECO 4600 History of Economic Thought..................................3
EDS 4290 Student Teach & Seminar Secondary.......................6,8,12
EDU 4190 Student Teach & Seminar: Elementary K-6..............6,8,10,12
EDU 4380 Teaching Practicum in Preprimary Early Childhood Education .3-6
EDU 4390 Student Teaching & Seminar: Early Childhood Education .. .6,8,10
EDU 4690 Professional Practicum.........j...........................1-6
EET 4100 Senior Project...............................................1
EET4110 Senior Project II ...........................................2
ENG 4520 Advanced Writing.............................................3
ENG 4610 Theories & Tech in Literary Criticism........................3
ENG 4640 Teaching English, 7-12.......................................3
ENG 4660 Teaching Literature & Language, K-6..........................3
FRE 4520 Modem French Theater.........................................3
FRE 4530 The French Novel ............................................3
GEG 4890 Advanced GIS Laboratory........J.............................3
GEG 4960 Global Environmental Challenges..............................3
GEL 4960 Environmental Field Studies ... J............................3
GER 4200 Major German Authors...........J.............................3
GER 4400 German for Business II.........J.............................3
GER 4410 Advanced Translation Techniques..............................3
HCM4510 Health Care Management Practicum.............................6
HES 4520 Internship in Gerontology .................................3-6
HIS 4820 Senior Seminar ..............................................3
HMT 4040 Senior Hospitality Research Experience I ....................2
HMT 4400 Senior Hospitality Research Experience II....................2
HPS 4600 Organization, Admin, of Human Performance & Sports Prog......3
HPS 4870 Internship for Athletic Training .1.........................10
HPS 4880 Internship for Adult Fitness Major..........................10
HPS 4890 Internship for Human Performance ...........................10
HSP4790 Professional Internship .......|............................12
ITS 4960 Professional Industrial Internship ..........................4
JRN 4500 Ethical & Legal Issues in Journalism.........................3
LES 4890 Internship for Leisure Studies .. L.........................12
MET 4010 Advanced Manufacturing Technology............................3
MET 4070 Computer Aided Design .......................................3
me MGT 4830 Workforce Diversity .........................................3


60 GENERAL STUDIES
MGT 4950 Strategic Management........................................3
MTH 4210 Probability Theory .........................................4
MTH 4220 Stochastic Processes .......................................4
MTH 4410 Advanced Calculus 1.........................................4
MTH 4480 Numerical Analysis I........................................4
MTH 4640 History of Mathematics......................................4
MTR 4600 Senior Research Seminar.....................................3
MUS 4110 Analysis of Music...........................................2
MUS 4340 Secondary School Music Methods & Materials..................2
MUS 4390 Supervised Field Experience.................................1
MUS 4510 Advanced Conducting.........................................2
MUS 4740 Performance VIII ...........................................4
MUS 4790 Senior Recital .............................................1
MUS 4950 Senior Project..............................................3
NUR 4850 Nursing Process: Application ...............................3
PHI 4100 Senior Seminar..............................................3
PHY 4620 Computational Physics II ...................................2
PHY 4721 Advanced Physics Laboratory II .............................2
PHY 4920 Physics Senior Seminar......................................1
PSC 4020 Special Studies ............................................3
PSY 4510 History & Systems of Psychology.............................3
RDG 4600 Practicum in Literacy Enhancement ..........................3
SED4490 Special Education Student Teaching and Seminar ..........6-12
SOC 4600 Advanced Research in the Social Sciences ...................3
SOC 4710 Applied Sociology...........................................3
SPA 4200 Spanish-American Essay: 19th & 20th Centuries...............3
SPA 4310 History of the Spanish Language.............................3
SPE 4090 Classical Rhetoric..........................................3
SPE4120 Freedom of Speech...........................................3
SPE 4490 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life ...........3
SPE 4500 Clinical Methods in Communication Disorders.................3
SPE 4790 Communication Theory Building and Research Methodology ... .3
SWK4810 Professional Field Experience II ...........................5
THE 4200 Readers Theatre............................................3
WMS 4750 Senior Seminar..............................................3
me This course will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement.
Assessment Examinations and Other Activities
In their senior year, students may be required to participate in an assessment of their general education.
The faculty has determined educational goals or outcomes that it wants graduates to achieve. A copy of
those goals and the methods by which their achievements are measured can be obtained from the department offices.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 61
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Semester Hours Credit
Course credit is based on units designed as semester hours. One semester hour or one base contact hour equals a minimum of 750 minutes; this translates to a minimum of 15, 50-minute class hours per semester. Time required for class preparation is not a consideration in the calculation of course credit. A three-credit hour course will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class. Omnibus courses involving laboratory work give one semester hour of credit for each two, three or four hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week. Internships require a minimum of 2,250 minutes for each hour of credit.
Course Load
The average course load per 16-week semester is 15 or 16 semester hours. Students who are academically strong may take up to 18 semester hours during fall and spring semesters and up to 12 semester hours during the summer semester. During fall and spring semesters, students with cumulative MSCD grade point averages (GPAs) of 3.25 or higher may take 19 or 20 semester hours and those students with GPAs of 3.50 or higher may take 21 semester hours for fall and spring semester or 14 semester hours for the summer semester. Students must have completed at least 15 semester hours at MSCD. Authorization for overloads for students without these qualifications must be obtained from the student's major department chair and appropriate dean. Forms are available in the department or deans' offices.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned: freshmen fewer than 30; sophomores 30 or more, but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more, but fewer than 90; seniors 90 or more.
Selection of Catalog for Requirements
Students must use a single MSCD catalog to meet all their degree requirements, including the General Studies, major and minor requirements. Students must select a Catalog in effect while they are enrolled at MSCD unless they are transferring from a regionally accredited Colorado community college, provided that the Catalog contains their complete program of study. Students not enrolling for three consecutive semesters or more are governed by the Catalog in effect upon their return. For effective dates of Catalogs, students should consult their academic advisors. All degree programs must adhere to overriding current policies at MSCD.
Students transferring from a regionally accredited Colorado community college may complete degree requirements using an MSCD Catalog in effect while enrolled at the community college, subject to the following conditions:
The Catalog selected does not predate the current catalog by more than three years.
The Catalog selected may have been in use at any time from the time the student was continually enrolled* at a regionally accredited Colorado community college to the semester for which the student is enrolling in MSCD.
Continuous enrollment is defined as not interrupting enrollment for three or more consecutive semesters (one calendar year); summer is counted as a semester. Continuous enrollment must be maintained from the period of the designated MSCD Catalog to the point of MSCD degree completion.
Declaring a Major
Applicants to The Metropolitan State College of Denver may indicate their intended major on the MSCD Application for Admission. Non-degree-seeking students who wish to declare a major must first change to degree-seeking status by completing a Change of Status form with the Registrar's Office.
Changing a Major
Degree-seeking students who wish to change a major must complete a Declaration/Change of Major form, which is available from the major department or from the Academic Advising Center.


62 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Graduation
Degree-seeking students formally declare their degree candidacy by filing an Application for Graduation with the Office of the Registrar just prior to their anticipated semester of graduation, but no later than the deadline stipulated in the Class Schedule. The Application for Graduation should be filed only by students who intend to complete all degree requirements by the end of the upcoming semester and should be filed in consultation with the students major department. If a student does not graduate, they must re-submit another Application for Graduation for the semester they intend to graduate.
Diplomas and Commencement
Students who have met all requirements for graduation are granted diplomas at the end of the semester for which they are degree candidates. Diplomas may be withheld because of indebtedness to the college. Completion of two majors does not result in two degrees or diplomas. A formal commencement ceremony is held at the end of the spring and fall semesters. For commencement information, call 303-556-6226.
Transcripts of Records
An official transcript is a certified copy of a student's permanent academic record. Except for faxed transcripts, there is no charge. Transcripts will be released by the Registrars Office upon formal written request by the student. Transcripts will also be issued to firms and employers if written authorization is received from the student. Requests should include the student's full legal name as recorded while attending MSCD, student identification number, last term of attendance, number of copies desired, and to whom and where transcripts are to be sent. Transcripts may be withheld because of indebtedness to the college or for other appropriate reasons. Transcripts from other institutions that are on file in the Registrar's Office will be issued upon signed request by the student. A charge of $5 per request is assessed for this service. Students from other institutions taking MSCD courses under the state college system or interinstitutional registration programs must request transcripts from their home institution.
Honors and Awards
The college annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadership and service to the college and community, excellence in scholastic achievement, and outstanding personal character and integrity. Recognition of students includes:
The President's Award (one senior); the Special Service Award for Academic Affairs (one senior) and for Student Services (one senior); Outstanding Student Awards (seniors from each school); Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges (seniors); American Association of University Women (AAUW) Award (senior woman). Other awards include Special Service Award for Exceptionally Challenged Students, Student Government Assembly Award, Charles W. Fisher Award and the Colorado Engineering Council Award.
Information and applications for these awards are available in Central Classroom Building, room 313. Awards are presented at the annual banquet the night before graduation.
In addition to annual awards, students with outstanding academic achievements are recognized by being named on the college's Honor Lists. The President's Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.85 or higher. The Provosts Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative GPA of between 3.50 and 3.84, inclusively. Computation will occur initially when the student has completed between 30 and 60 hours at MSCD, then again between 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours. Posting of the award occurs after the student receives his/her semester grade report. Questions should be directed to the Office of Academic Affairs at 303-556-3907.
Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability in their baccalaureate degree while attending MSCD. Honors designations are determined according to the following criteria:
Summa Cum Laude Top five percent of graduates within each school with cumulative MSCD
GPA of no less than 3.65.
Magna Cum Laude Next five percent of graduates within each school with cumulative
MSCD GPA of no less than 3.65.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 63
Cum Laude Next five percent of graduates within each school with cumulative
MSCD GPA of no less than 3.65.
To determine each honors category, GPAs for the previous spring semester graduates arc arrayed in rank order. This rank ordering is then used to determine the honors recipients among the following fall, spring and summer graduates.
To qualify for graduation honor recognition, a student must have completed a minimum of 50 semester hours of classroom credit at MSCD prior to the term of graduation.
Courses completed during the term of graduation and transfer credits are not considered when determining honors.
Honors designations are added to the student's official academic record; no other notification will be sent. For additional information regarding graduation honors, contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 303-556-3907.
Grades and Notations
Grades
Alphabetical grades and status symbols are as follows:
A Superior.........................4 quality points per semester hour attempted
B Above Average ....................3 quality points per semester hour attempted
C Average..........................2 quality points per semester hour attempted
D Below Average but Passing........1 quality point per semester hour attempted
F Failure..........................0 quality points per semester hour attempted
Notations
AP - Advanced Placement
CC - Continuing Correspondence Course
CL - CLEP
EX - Credit by Exam
I- Incomplete
NC - No Credit
NR Not Reported. No grade was reported by the faculty by the deadline to submit grades. Student must see faculty for an explanation or assignment of grade. Courses taken through interinstitutional registration are normally assigned the "NR notation until grades are received and posted to the academic record. Students who receive a NR notation on their final grade report may be severely impacted. Financial aid, employment status, veterans status and probation/suspension depend on students receiving all their grades.
P - Pass
PL - Portfolio Assessment
PP - PEP Exam
S Satisfactory (limited to student teaching and HPS/LES 4870/4880/4890 internships) SA - Study Abroad credit
SN - Study Abroad no credit
The I notation may be assigned when a student who has attended the majority of the class sessions was unable to take the final examination and/or did not complete all class assignments due to unusual circumstances (such as hospitalization). Incomplete work denoted by the Incomplete I notation must be completed within one calendar year or earlier, at the discretion of the faculty member. If the incomplete work is not completed within one calendar year, the I notation will change to an F. Graduating seniors may not graduate with an I on their MSCD academic record. The I notation may not be given for a self-paced course. Students must not re-enroll for the class in which they receive an I. The I is not a substitute for a NC or an F.
The No Credit (NC) notation is not a grade. It may indicate withdrawal from the course or course repetition. The NC notation may also be used in self-paced courses to indicate that the student and/or the faculty have decided to extend the student's exposure to the course to increase the stu-


64 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
dent's proficiency. In this case, to earn credit the student must re-register for and pay tuition and fees for the course in a subsequent term. (The NC should not be confused with dropping a course during the first 12 days of the fall or spring term [8 for the summer term]. Dropping a course means that the course does not appear on the students academic record.)
The following minimal standards are required throughout the college and are a part of all school, departmental or individual faculty policies. The standards are for full 15-week terms. Pro-rated time lines are available for other parts-of-term as well as the summer semester.
The NC notation is available to students in all instances through the fourth week of classes for fall and spring terms.
Students reducing their course load between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of classes during fall and spring semesters may receive an NC notation for each course, provided faculty approval is granted.
Additional restrictions regarding assigning the NC notation may be set by each school, department, and/or faculty member for the period between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of the semester (or proportional time frame).
Student requests for an NC notation in a given course will not be granted after the tenth week of the fall and spring semesters. The I notation may be used during this period, provided the conditions specified above, under the I notation, apply.
Proportional time frames are applied for part-of-term courses, weekend courses, workshops and summer terms.
A written policy statement describing the use of the NC notation will be given to each student for each class in which the student enrolls.
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student's absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize the student's success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
Quality Points
The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of semester hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received. The cumulative GPA is calculated by dividing the total by the number of semester hours attempted.
To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of semester hours attempted in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements. The following notations have no effect on the GPA: AP, CC, CL, EX, I, NC, NR, P, PL, PP, S, SA, SN.
Pass-Fail Option
The pass-fail option encourages students to broaden their educational experience by taking courses outside their major and minor fields. The pass notation has no effect on the GPA; the fail notation is equivalent to the grade of "F."
Students who have completed at least one MSCD course with at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA may choose to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass-fail basis rather than by letter grade. The pass-fail option may be used for general elective credit only. Major, minor, General Studies and other courses required for a degree or for teacher licensure, may not be taken on a pass-fail basis. Self-paced courses may not be taken under the pass-fail option. Maximum graduation credit for these pass-fail courses is 18 semester hours, earned in no more than six courses, limited to one course per semester or module.
Students must declare interest in the pass-fail option no later than the 12th day of classes for fall and spring, the eighth day of classes for summer or the second day of classes for parts-of-term of any semester (see the current Class Schedule for specific deadlines) by contacting the Office of the Registrar.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 65
The instructor will assign and record the pass-fail grade on a final grade list that identifies students electing and eligible for pass-fail grading. Students who request the option who are later declared ineligible will receive notification from the Registrar's Office during the semester. They will be assigned a regular letter grade in the course. Once approved, the request for the pass-fail option is irrevocable.
Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a pass notation is given. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work should determine whether the institution of their choice will accept the credit before registering for courses under the pass-fail option.
Repeated Courses (Last Grade Stands)
A student may repeat any course taken at MSCD regardless of the original grade earned. Only the credit and the grade for the last attempt of the course will remain on the student's official academic record. The grade(s) for the prior attempt(s) will be changed to the NC notation. The courses must carry the same title, course number and semester hours. To effect such a change, the student must reregister and pay tuition for the course in question, complete the course with a letter grade and complete the Last Grade Stands form in the Registrar's Office. Otherwise, the grade change will be made administratively at the time of degree evaluation. Credit duplication involving transfer, interinstitutional or state college system courses may result in transfer credit being disallowed (see number four below). A failing course grade assigned as a result of academic dishonesty is considered a permanent "F" and is not subject to this policy. A student may not repeat a course after the award of a MSCD degree to make use of this policy.
l.In all cases except for grades assigned for academic dishonesty, the grades of all but the last entry of the particular course will be changed to a NC (no credit) notation. The NC notation does not affect the credit total and grade point average.
2. The determination of course equivalency will be made by the Office of the Registrar.
3. If the student does not request that the previous grade(s) of a course be changed to a NC after the course is repeated, the changes will be made at the time of graduation evaluation.
4. The same policy is applied when a course taken at another institution and transferred to MSCD is later repeated at MSCD. The transferred credit is then revoked.
5. An exception to this policy occurs when a student takes a course at MSCD, then repeats the course at another institution and returns to or is still in attendance at MSCD. In this case, since the course is not repeated on the MSCD records, the MSCD course will not be changed to a NC, but rather, the transfer credit will be disallowed.
6. The last grade stands policy applies only to MSCD courses. Courses taken under the interinsti-tutional/consortium or pooled programs do not qualify for consideration under this policy. However, this policy does apply to a UCD course if repeated through the MSCD/UCD pooled program.
7. Courses repeated prior to the summer quarter of 1971 are not affected by this last grade stands policy. A grade in a course taken prior to the summer quarter, 1971 and repeated after summer 1971 may be changed to a NC notation.
Student Grade Appeal Procedure
If students have reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course, they must make their request for a change before the end of the second week of the semester following the completion of the course (the following fall semester in the case of the spring semester). The Grade Appeal Guidelines can be obtained from the students' respective deans. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate a grade appeal within the time limit, and to follow the procedures specified for grade appeals in the Student Rights and Responsibilities section of the current Student Handbook. The handbook may be obtained from the Office of Student Services. All decisions of the Grade Appeal Committee will be reviewed by the associate vice president for academic affairs.


66 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Warning/Probation/Suspension Policy
Academic Satisfactory Progress/Good Standing
A student is deemed to be making satisfactory progress toward his or her academic goal if the student maintains a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher. This student is deemed to be in academic good standing with the institution. However, other academic standards may apply to specific programs. A student must satisfy those other academic standards in order to be deemed in academic good standing with that program. See information on the program of interest to determine specific standards for that program.
Academic Warning Status
A student in good standing whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 will be on academic warning status with the institution during his or her next semester. A student will be removed from this warning status and returned to good standing if he or she achieves a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of his or her semester on warning status. More restrictive standards may apply to certain programs or schools. See information on the program of interest.
Academic Probation
A student who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of his or her semester on warning status will be put on academic probation with the institution during his or her next semester at MSCD. A student will be on academic probation as long as he or she has a cumulative GPA below 2.0, but is making progress toward good standing as explained below and has not been on academic probation for more than three semesters. Other conditions may apply to given programs or schools. See information on the program of interest.
A student is removed from academic probation and is in good standing the semester after achieving a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0.
During any semester that a student is on academic probation, the student must make progress toward good standing with the institution by taking all of the following actions:
achieve a semester GPA of 2.2 or higher
register and complete a minimum of 3 but no more than 12 semester hours (3 to 6 semester hours for summer semester)
take required activities as negotiated with the director of Student Intervention Services (may include certain classes, repeated courses, tutoring or other activities)
While on academic probation, a student may pre-register for the first semester following the academic warning status semester, but is prohibited from pre-registering any other semester. For subsequent academic probation status semesters, a GPA of at least 2.2 must be verified prior to registration.
Academic Suspension
A student on academic probation not making progress toward good standing will be prohibited from registering for one calendar year from the date of suspension. Appeal of suspension for this reason will be submitted to the director of Student Intervention Services. The director of Student Intervention Services will then deliver the appeal materials to the Student Academic Review Committee, which will review the appeal and notify the student of its decision. A student may appeal a suspension only two times in his or her academic career at the college.
A student making progress toward good standing, whose cumulative GPA remains below a 2.0 after three or more semesters on probation, will have his or her academic progress reviewed each semester by the Student Academic Review Committee. The committee will determine whether the student should be placed on suspension. In both cases, the decision of the Student Academic Review Committee is final.
Any student returning to the college after the one-calendar-year suspension must reapply and will be readmitted on academic probation with the institution. For these students, all probation rules outlined above will apply.
A student who is suspended for a second time will be re-admitted only if he or she has successfully completed an associate degree program from a community college after suspension from MSCD or can demonstrate to the Student Academic Review Committee that chances for successful completion of an educational program are greatly improved.
Contact Student Intervention Services at 303-556-4048 for further information.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 6
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Policies and Procedures
Generally, the policies and procedures contained in this Catalog must be followed by students officially enrolling for the 2000 fall semester and the 2001 spring and summer semesters.
The procedures and/or policies contained in this section are subject to change as the College deems necessary. If you have a problem, please check with the appropriate office to confirm the policies and/or procedures you need to follow.
Exceptions (B.A.S.E.)
Students may appeal to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions (B.A.S.E.) to request a variance from college academic requirements. Valid reasons for variances must accompany all petitions, and the petitions must be signed by the appropriate dean and department chair. For more information, contact the Office of Academic Affairs.
Academic Honesty
Students have a responsibility to maintain standards of academic ethics and honesty. Cases of cheating or plagiarism are handled within the policies of Academic Affairs in accordance with procedures outlined in the MSCD Student Handbook.
Conduct of Students
MSCD policy provides students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. The Student Handbook contains standards of conduct to which students are expected to adhere. Information regarding students' rights and responsibilities, including the student due process procedure (the procedural rights provided to students at MSCD before disciplinary action is imposed) is available in Central Classroom Building, room 313.
Respect for Rights of Others
The student assumes certain obligations of performance and behavior while attending. Based on this premise, reasonable policies, procedures and regulations have been developed to guarantee each student's opportunity to learn and to protect the fundamental rights of others, students neither gain nor lose any of the rights and responsibilities of other citizens by virtue of their student status.
As members of an academic community, students are expected to conduct themselves in a mature and responsible manner. Students should try at all times to promote a sense of cooperation and civility within the College and work to build an atmosphere which will be most conducive to the goals of higher education within the institution.
Students, while within College facilities or while participating in College-sponsored activities (on-campus and/or off-campus), are expected to comply with College rules and regulations and with the regulations of off-campus sites.
Freedom of Speech
Students shall have the right to assemble, to select speakers and guests, and to discuss issues of their choice. An invitation to a speaker shall not imply endorsement of the speaker's views by either the student organization or the College.
Information about student views, beliefs and political associations shall not be used to the detriment of students and their institutional standing.
The right of peaceful protest is granted within the College community. The College retains the right to assure the safety of individuals, the protection of property, and the continuity of the educational process.
The student press shall be free of censorship and shall provide editorial freedom. The editors and managers shall not be arbitrarily suspended because of student, faculty, administration, alumni, or community disapproval of editorial policy or content.
All student communications shall explicitly state on the editorial page or in broadcast that the opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the College and/or members of the College.


68 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Academic Rights
Students have the right to:
1. be informed of course expectations and requirements.
2. be evaluated fairly on the basis of academic performance.
3. participate in free and open discussion, inquiry, and expression, both in the classroom and in conference.
4. receive competent instruction and advisement.
5. expect protection against professors improper disclosure of students' personal information, views, beliefs, and political associations when such information has become known as a result of professors' instructions, advisement or counsel.
6. expect protection, through established procedures, against prejudicial or capricious evaluation.
7. assess the value of a course to make suggestions as to its direction and to evaluate both the instructor and the instruction they have received.
8. have input in College policy-making, which may include, but shall not be limited to, course scheduling distribution of night and day classes, calendar arrangements, library policy and development, grading systems, course development, and curriculum.
9. expect instructors to conduct themselves professionally in the classroom in accordance with College policies and directives.
10. expect instructors to maintain office hours as required by College policy.
11. expect reasonable academic assistance from the appropriate department.
12. be informed of academic standards expected of them in the classroom through a printed syllabus and course outline. Academic standards shall include, but not be limited to, class attendance requirements, objectives to be achieved, and the grading criteria that will be applied to a particular course of study.
Academic Responsibilities
Students have the responsibility to:
1. inquire about course or degree requirements if they do not understand them or are in doubt about them.
2. maintain the standards of academic performance established for individual courses and for programs of study.
3. learn the content of any course of study.
4. act in accordance with commonly accepted standards of academic conduct. If disruptive behavior occurs in a classroom, an instructor has authority to ask the student to leave the classroom. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist, the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Campus Police and/or the appropriate Dean's office.
5. maintain academic ethics and academic honesty.
6. pay the tuition and fees and be officially registered in order to attend a class.
7. initiate an investigation by contacting the department chair if they believe their academic rights have been violated.
Academic Dishonesty
Academic dishonesty is a serious offense at the College because it diminishes the quality of scholarship and the learning experience for everyone on campus. An act of academic dishonesty may lead to such penalties as reduction of grade, probation, suspension, or expulsion. Examples of academic dishonesty include:
Cheating: The term "cheating" includes, but is not limited to: (1) use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests or examinations; (2) dependence upon the aid or sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; or (3) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of the College faculty, staff, or other students.
Fabrication: Intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any information, data, or citation in an academic exercise.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 69
Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: Intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to commit an act of academic dishonesty.
Plagiarism: The term "plagiarism" includes, but is not limited to, the use by paraphrase or direct quotations, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency that may or may not be engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials.
Procedures
Academic dishonesty may result in institutional sanctions. Institutional sanctions, however, do not limit the individual faculty member's academic freedom and the right to maintain academic integrity in the learning environment by assigning a grade or grade notation for an assignment, exercise, test, and for the course.
In all cases of academic dishonesty, the instructor shall make an initial academic judgment about the student's grade on that work in that course and shall report such incidents within fifteen (15) working days to the student and to the judicial officer responsible for the administration of the College judicial system. The judicial officer has the discretion to consult with the faculty member and the Office of Academic Affairs to determine whether or not institutional sanctions should be invoked. In addition to institutional sanctions listed in the college judicial policies, a failing course grade assigned as a result of academic dishonesty is considered a permanent "F" and is not subject to the College's "Last Grade Stands" policy unless it is altered pursuant to the College grade appeal procedures.
College judicial policies pertaining to academic dishonesty are part of the Student Conduct Code published below. Members of the faculty have the right and responsibility, when they report acts of academic dishonesty to the College judicial officer, to file charges against such student(s. and ask that institutional sanctions be applied. At his or her discretion, the judicial officer may recommend and impose sanctions in any reported case of academic misconduct against a student.
Should institutional sanctions be recommended in cases of academic dishonesty, the judicial officer shall check with the Office of Academic Affairs to determine if the student has any record of prior offenses involving academic misconduct. Students accused of academic dishonesty have the right, under the judicial policies of the Student Conduct Code, to request a hearing to consider the charges made against them.
Student Conduct Code
The code is not intended to replace existing procedures related to:
discrimination or sexual harassment
grade appeals
requests for exceptions to academic policies
appeals for tuition and fee reduction
disputes relative to financial-aid awards
in-state tuition classification
For any other matters that are not included above, contact the Office of Student Life. It is a resource for accurate information and advocacy on behalf of the students of the College. Student Life personnel can advise and assist students with unusual circumstances, or with problems not addressed in the Student Handbook or College Catalog.
Article I: Definitions
1. The term "College means The Metropolitan State College of Denver.
2. The term "student includes all persons taking courses at the College, both full-time and part time, pursuing undergraduate or professional studies.
3. The term "faculty member" means any person hired by the College to conduct classroom activities.
4. The term "College official" includes any person employed by the College performing assigned administrative, or professional responsibilities.


70 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
5. The term "member of the College" includes any person who is a student, faculty member, College official, or any other person employed by the College.
6. The term "College or campus premises includes all land, buildings, facilities, and other property in the possession of or owned, used, or controlled by the Auraria Higher Education Center including the adjacent streets and sidewalks, and also includes extended campus locations.
7. The term "organization" means any number of persons who have complied with the formal requirements for College recognition.
8. The title of "judicial officer" is that person designated by the College President to be responsible for the administration of the Student Conduct Code.
9. The term "judicial advisor" means a College official authorized on a case by case basis by the judicial officer to impose sanctions upon students found to have violated the Student Conduct Code. The judicial officer may authorize a judicial advisor to serve simultaneously as a judicial advisor and the sole member or one of the members of a judicial body. Nothing shall prevent the judicial officer from authorizing the same judicial advisor to impose sanctions in all cases.
10. The term "judicial body" means any person or persons authorized and identified by the Dean of Student Life to determine whether a student has violated the Student Conduct Code and to recommend imposition of sanctions.
11. The term "shall" is used in the imperative sense.
12. The term "may" is used in the permissive sense.
13. The term "policy" is defined as the written regulations of the College as found in, but not limited to, the Student Conduct Code, Students Rights and Responsibilities Handbook, catalogs, and class schedules.
14. The term "cheating" includes, but is not limited to:
a. use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests, or examinations;
b. dependence upon the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; or
c. the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic materials belonging to a member of the College faculty, staff, or other students.
15. The term "fabrication" is the intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any information, data, or citation in an academic exercise.
16. "Facilitating academic dishonesty" means intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to commit an act of academic dishonesty.
17. The term "plagiarism" includes, but is not limited to, the use by paraphrase or direct quotations, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency that may or may not be engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials.
18. The term "working days" refers to the number of days specified for each step of the procedure and does not include Saturdays, Sundays, holidays, or days when the College is not in session and holding classes.
Article II: Judicial Authority
1. The judicial officer shall determine the composition of judicial bodies and determine which judicial body or judicial advisor shall be authorized to hear each case.
2. The judicial officer shall appoint a chair to the judicial body for each case.
3. The judicial officer may develop policies for the administration of the judicial program and procedural rules for the conduct of hearings that are not inconsistent with provisions of the Student Conduct Code.
4. Decisions made by a judicial body and/or judicial advisor shall be final, pending the normal appeal process.
5. The judicial officer may extend time limits for good cause demonstrated in writing.
Article III: Proscribed Conduct
A. Jurisdiction of the College
Generally, College jurisdiction and discipline shall be limited to conduct which occurs on the Auraria
Higher Education Center premises, while a student is participating in college-sponsored activities, or
which adversely affects the College community and/or the pursuit of its objectives.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 71
B. Conduct-Rules and Regulations
Any student found to have committed the following misconduct isjsubject to the disciplinary sanctions outlined in Article TV:
1. Acts of dishonesty including but not limited to, the following:
a. cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty;
b. furnishing false information to any College official, faculty member, or office;
c. forgery, alteration, or misuse of a College document, record, or instrument of identification;
d. tampering with the election of any College recognized student organization; or
e. assisting anyone in the commission of any acts stated above.
2. Disruption or obstruction of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary proceedings, other College activities including its public relations functions on or off campus or other authorized non-College activities when the act occurs on College premises.
3. Physical abuse, verbal abuse, threats, intimidation, harassment, coercion and/or other conduct which threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person.
4. Attempted or actual theft of and/or damage to property of the College or property of a member of the College community or AHEC or other personal or public property.
5. Hazing, defined as an act which endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student, or which
destroys or removes public or private property for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in a group or organization. Hazing can be further defined as any action that produces physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, or ridicule.
Activities including the following are defined as hazing and are strictly forbidden:
a. paddling
b. causing excessive fatigue
c. physical shock
d. morally degrading/humiliating game
e. public stunts
f. activities which interfere with academic work/success
g. dangerous, offensive behavior
h. activities which interfere with the policies and regulations of the Office of Student Activities, UCD, CCD, or AHEC
i. activities that engage in discrimination, whether racial or gender based
j. stranding pledges far from campus, "road-tripping''
k. forced calisthenics
l. forced consumption of food, beverages, or alcohol
m. exposure to extreme weather conditions
Engaging in such activities may result in the withdrawal of College recognition, and thus privileges and services, by the Office of Student Activities. Questions concerning this policy should be referred to the Director of Student Activities.
6. Failure to comply with directions of College officials or the Auraria Campus Police acting in performance of their duties and/or failure to identify oneself to these persons when requested to do so.
7. Unauthorized possession, duplication, or use of keys to any campus premises, or unauthorized entry to, or use of, campus premises.
8. Violation of published College policies, rules, or regulations.
9. Violation of federal, state, or local law on College premises or at College-sponsored or supervised activities.
10. Use, possession, or distribution of narcotics or other controlled substances except as expressly permitted by law.
11. Use, possession, or distribution of alcoholic beverages except as expressly permitted by the law and College regulation, or public intoxication.


72 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
12. Illegal or unauthorized possession of firearms, explosives, other weapons, or dangerous chemicals on College premises.
13. Participation in campus demonstrations which disrupt the normal operations of the College (or other parts of the campus) or infringe on the rights of other members of the Campus community; leading or inciting others to disrupt schedules and/or normal activities within any campus building or area; intentional obstruction which unreasonably interferes with freedom of movement on campus, either pedestrian or vehicular.
14. Obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or vehicular traffic on College premises or at College sponsored or supervised functions.
15. Abetting or procuring another person to breach the peace on College premises or at functions sponsored by or participated in by the College.
16. Any activity involving computing facilities which knowingly interferes with someone else's academic freedom or the institutions goals or policies.
17. Abuse of the judicial system including, but not limited to:
a. failure to obey the summons of a judicial body or College official
b. falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information before a judicial body
c. disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a judicial proceeding
d. institution of a judicial proceeding knowingly without cause
e. attempting to discourage an individual's proper participation in, or use of, the judicial system
f. attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a judicial body prior to, and/or during the course of, the judicial proceeding
g. harassment-verbal or physical-and/or intimidation of a member of a judicial body prior to, during, and/or after a judicial proceeding
h. failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the Student Conduct Code
i. influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the judicial system
18. Intentionally obstructing or delaying a police officer, fire fighter, security officer, or College official in performance of his/her duty.
19. Turning in a false bomb alarm or fire alarm or misusing fire safety equipment.
20. Leaving children unattended or unsupervised on campus grounds. This can constitute child abuse or child neglect (as outlined in the State of Colorado Child Protection Act of 1975). Children may be permitted in the classroom with the instructor's permission and the understanding that the childs presence is not disruptive.
21. Influencing or attempting to influence the academic process through explicit or implied sexual behavior,bribery, or threats.
22. Failing to comply with contractual obligations with the College.
23. Furnishing false information or academic credentials with the intent to deceive or mislead when applying for admission to the College or for any of its programs and services.
Violation of Law and Student Code of Conduct
Students who exhibit unusual and/or unacceptable forms of behavior on campus premises can be requested to leave by Auraria Campus Police. In addition to or in lieu of that, faculty members may refer students to the Counseling Center. The Dean of Student Life may administratively withdraw students exhibiting severe behavioral problems.
College disciplinary proceedings may be instituted against a student charged with violation of a law which is also a violation of this Student Conduct Code. For example, if both violations result from the same factual situation without regard to the pendency of civil litigation in court or criminal arrest and prosecution, proceedings under this Student Conduct Code may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings off-campus.
Judicial Process
See Article IV in the Student Handbook or the Dean of Student Life for complete information.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 73
Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination based on sex. It is prohibited by law and College policy. In the educational context, sexual harassment is defined as any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:
a. submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's status in a course, program, activity, or educational evaluation
b. submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for educational decisions affecting that individual
c. such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's academic performance or educational experience, or of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational environment
Charges of sexual harassment can be based on a wide variety of behaviors, such as repeated derogatory sexual remarks, negotiation for sexual favors as a quid pro quo for grades or recommendations, or threatened or actual sexual assault. These and similar behaviors seriously undermine the teaching and learning environment and can be grounds for disciplinary action. Sexual harassment should be reported to the Office of Equal Opportunity at (303)556-2939. Sexual assaults should be reported to the Auraria Campus Police at (303)556-3271.
Written policies addressing these issues in greater detail are available from the Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action in Central Classroom (CN) 315 or call (303)556-2939.
Amorous Relationships Involving Student and College Employees
College policy strongly discourages employees of the College from becoming involved in relationships of a romantic nature with students they supervise, either in a faculty-student or supervisor-subordinate situation. If such relationships exist, they must be disclosed to the College and the conflicts of interest that result must be avoided. For example, an instructor is not allowed to issue a grade to someone with whom s/he is involved in an amorous relationship, and a supervisor can not hire or evaluate someone s/he is dating. Because of the professional difficulties associated with amorous relationships, faculty and staff should avoid them entirely.
Students are strongly discouraged from seeking relationships of a romantic nature with College faculty or staff. Also, students who persist in making unwelcome sexual advances to a faculty member or college employee risk violation of College policy prohibiting sexual harassment.
Class Attendance
Attendance during the first week of class is required. It contributes greatly to teaching and learning. Some departments determine a students enrollment in a course based upon attendance during the first week of class. Consult the Class Schedule and the department for more information about the attendance policy for the class that you are attending. Students who drop classes are financially responsible for those classes in accordance with the withdrawal/refund policies stated in the Class Schedule each semester.
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student's absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course. If students anticipate a prolonged absence, they should contact their instructors. If they find that they cannot communicate with the instructor, they should contact the chair of that department, who will inform the instructor of the reasons for the anticipated absence. Whenever an instructor determines that a students absences are interfering with academic progress, the instructor may submit a letter to the department chair informing that office of the situation.
Students at MSCD who, because of their sincerely held religious beliefs, are unable to attend classes, take examinations, participate in graded activities or submit graded assignments on particular days shall, without penalty, be excused from such classes and be given a meaningful opportunity to make up such examinations and graded activities or assignments provided that proper notice and procedures are followed. The policies and procedures designed to excuse class attendance on religious holidays are covered in the Student Rights and Responsibilities section of the MSCD Student Handbook.


74 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Final Examinations
It is the general policy of the college to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, with the possible exception of seminar courses or special projects.
Equal Opportunity and Americans with Disabilities Act
The Metropolitan State College of Denver is an equal opportunity employer; applications from minorities and women are particularly invited. The Metropolitan State College of Denver does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, sex, age, sexual orientation or disability in admissions or access to, or treatment or employment in, its educational programs or activities. Inquiries concerning the college grievance procedures may be directed to the designated MSCD officials. Inquiries concerning Title VI and Title IX may be referred to Dr. Percy Morehouse, Jr., MSCD Office of Equal Opportunity, Campus Box 63, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, 303-556-2939. Inquiries concerning the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or 504 may be referred to Ms. Helen Fleming, Faculty and Staff ADA Coordinator, MSCD, Campus Box 47, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, 303-556-8514; Mr. Kelly Espinoza, Student ADA Coordinator, MSCD, Campus Box 23, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, 303-556-3908; Mr. Dick Feuerbom, ADA Coordinator, AHEC, Campus Box 001, P.O. Box 173361, Denver, CO 80217-3361, 303-556-8376; or Ms. Karen Rosenchein, Manager. Otherwise, all inquiries may be referred to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1244 Speer Boulevard, Denver, CO 80204, 303-844-3723.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Student Rights
The Metropolitan State College of Denver maintains educational records for each student who has enrolled at the college. A copy of the college's policy on student educational records may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar, Central Classroom Building, room 105. Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), 20 USC 1232g, and the implementing regulations published at 34 CFR part 99, each eligible student has the right to:
1. Inspect and review his/her educational records;
2. Request the amendment of the student's education records to ensure that they are not inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the student's privacy or other rights;
3. Consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's educational records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent (see Nondisclosure and Exceptions); and
4. File a complaint under 34 CFR 99.64, concerning alleged failures by the college to comply with the requirements of FERPA, with the Family Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202-4605.
Procedure for Inspecting and Reviewing Educational Records
Students may inspect and review their education records upon a written request submitted to the Registrar, Central Classroom, Room 105, or by mail to Campus Box 84, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, Colorado 80217-3362.
A. The request shall identify as precisely as possible the record or records the student wishes to inspect.
B. The record custodian or an appropriate staff person shall make the arrangements for access as promptly as possible and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. Access must be given in 45 days or less from the receipt of the request.
C. When a record contains information about more than one student, the student may inspect and review only the records which relate to that student.
Procedure for Amending Educational Records
A student may make a written request to amend a record.
1. In the request, the student should identify the part of the record to be changed and specify why the student believes it is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the students privacy or other rights.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 75
2. The Metropolitan State College of Denver shall comply with the request or notify the student that the college will not comply with the request and advise the student of the student's right to a hearing to challenge the information believed to be inaccurate, misleading or in violation of the students rights.
3. Upon written request, The Metropolitan State College of Denver will arrange for a hearing, and notify the student, reasonably in advance, of the date, place and time of the hearing.
4. The hearing will be conducted by a hearing officer who is a disinterested party, but who may be an official of the institution. The student shall be afforded a full and fair opportunity to present evidence relevant to the issues raised in the original request to amend the student's education records. The student may be assisted by one or more individuals, including an attorney.
5. The Metropolitan State College of Denver will prepare a written decision based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing. The decision will include a summary of the evidence presented and the reasons for the decision.
6. If The Metropolitan State College of Denver decides that the challenged information is not inaccurate, misleading or in violation of the students right of privacy or other right, it will notify the student that the student has a right to place in the record a statement commenting on the challenged information and/or a statement setting forth reasons for disagreeing with the decision.
7. The statement will be maintained as part of the student's education records as long as the contested portion is maintained. If The Metropolitan State College of Denver decides that the information is inaccurate, misleading or in violation of the student's rights, it will amend the record and notify the student, in writing, that the record has been amended.
Nondisclosure and Exceptions
Pursuant to FERPA, the college will not disclose a student's education records without the written consent of the student except to college officials with legitimate educational interests, to officials at other institutions in which the student seeks to enroll, in connection with providing financial aid to the student, to accrediting agencies in carrying out their functions, to federal, state or local authorities auditing or evaluating the college's compliance with education programs, to consultants conducting studies on behalf of the college, in compliance with a judicial order or subpoena, and in connection with a health or safety emergency involving the student. However, the college may release directory information without the prior written consent of the student unless within ten (10) calendar days after the first scheduled class day of each term, an enrolled student has notified the colleges Office of the Registrar in writing that any or all types of directory information shall not be disclosed without the consent of the student. A request for nondisclosure will remain in effect until the student is no longer enrolled or cancels the request for nondisclosure.
A school official is a person employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position; or a person elected to the Board of Trustees; or a person employed by or under contract to the college to perform a special task, such as attorney, auditor or consultant; or a student or other person serving on an official college committee or assisting a school official in performing the official's professional duties and responsibilities. A legitimate educational interest is the need of a school official to review educational records in order to fulfill that official's professional duties and responsibilities.
Directory Information
The Metropolitan State College of Denver has designated the following categories of personally identifiable information on students as directory information under section 438(a)(5)(B) of FERPA:
-name, address and telephone number
-e-mail address
-date and place of birth
-student classification
-major and minor fields of study
-participation in officially recognized activities and sports
-weight and height of members of athletic teams
-dates of attendance at the college
-degrees and awards received
-last educational institution attended


76 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
The Student Right-to-Know Act and the Campus Security Act
Campus Crime Information
During 1997, 1998 and 1999, the following crimes were committed on campus at the Auraria Higher Education Center, serving the University of Colorado at Denver, The Metropolitan State College of Denver and the Community College of Denver:
Reported Criminal Offenses on Campus
Offense 1999 1998 1997
Murder 0 0 0
Sex Offenses;Forcible 1' 1' 0
Sex Offenses ;Non-Forcible 0 0 0
Robbery 2 0 4
Aggravated Assault 2 7 3
Burglary 11 6 13
Vehicle Theft 13 16 31
Hate Crimes 0 23 0
Arson 3 2 1
Manslaughter 0 0 0
Reported Criminal Offenses at Satellite Campuses
Offense 1999 1998 1997
Burglary 4 6 2
Vehicle Theft 2 2 0
Arson 0 0 1
Number of arrests for the following Crimes on Campus
Arrests 1999 1998 1997
Liquor Law Violations4 3 05 12
Drug Abuse Violations 47 41 36
Weapons Possession 2 66 14
[ forcible fondling
2one offense, two victims; business and individual 3one offense, two victim;, ethnic intimidation 4excludes DUI arrests
5zero reported for 1998 to avoid double reporting in conjunction with drug abuse violation arrests 6includes arrests made for more serious offenses that involved use of a weapon information provided to Auraria Campus Police and Security by the Denver police


77
The School of Business
We educate Denvers business work force.


78 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
School of Business
The School of Business offers students a variety of educational opportunities that either lead to a bachelors degree or provide opportunities for non-degree seeking students to gain additional undergraduate education through our extensive course offerings and certificate programs. The school offers two degrees in six majors:
Bachelor of Science Degree Programs
Accounting
Computer Information Systems
Finance
Management
Marketing
Bachelor of Arts Degree Program
Economics
In addition, we offer an international business concentration for business majors and a total of eight minors designed primarily for non-business majors.
The school provides convenient access to instruction through traditional classroom sessions and innovative online delivery, at both the main Auraria campus and Metro South campus, during the day, evenings and weekends. The school consists of 67 full-time faculty, more than 50 part-time faculty and 11 full-time staff. Over 2800 students major in business and economics. Students can take advantage of on-the-job training through cooperative education placements, internships and independent study coursework. The school's mission statement reflects our efforts to provide students with the best possible education we can offer:
The School of Business at The Metropolitan State College of Denver delivers high quality, accessible undergraduate business education in the metropolitan Denver area appropriate to a diverse student population and modified open admission standards. We prepare students for careers, graduate education and lifelong learning in a society characterized by technological advancements and globalization.
The primary purpose of the School of Business is the pursuit of excellence in teaching and learning. We nurture learning through individual attention to students. The faculty of the School of Business engages in professional development activities that enhance instruction and contribute to scholarship and applied research. Our faculty provide service to the institution, the professions and the community at large.
The various educational opportunities available through the School of Business are listed below. Each program is described in detail in the remainder of this catalog section. Course descriptions and prerequisites are found beginning on page 227 of this Catalog.
Bachelor of Science Degree
Accounting
Computer Information Systems
Finance
Management
Marketing
Bachelor of Arts Degree
Economics
Emphasis Area for Business Majors
International Business
Minors
Accounting
Computer Information Systems
Economics
Finance
General Business
International Business
Management
Marketing
Real Estate
Certificate Programs for Credit
Database Analyst
Network Specialist in Information Systems
Personal Financial Planning
Programmer/Analyst in Information Systems
Real Estate
User Support Specialist Non-Credit Certificates
Financial Planning
International Trade Other Program Offerings
Business Outreach
Small Business Institute
US WEST Center for Business Success


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 7
If you have any questions about the offerings, academic policies and practices, or admission requirements, contact the dean of the School of Business or the chair of the appropriate department.
Business Outreach and World Trade Center Educational Services
Business Outreach provides public classes and customized in-house training on a variety of practical business topics. Concentrations include personal financial planning, introduction to securities markets, specialized software applications and union leadership. A full program of "hands-on" international business classes is offered through the World Trade Center Educational Services. Contact the Business Outreach office for additional information.
Small Business Institute
The Small Business Institute offers a practical opportunity that supplements academic studies with real case studies. The Small Business Institute employs senior-level students, under faculty supervision, to provide business counseling and technical assistance to small business clients in the community. Contact the Finance Department for additional information.
The US WEST Center for Business Success serves as a problem-solving resource for businesses in the region while providing hands-on learning opportunities for business students. Junior and senior-level business majors will be selected to participate in the center based on their academic records, work experience and demonstrated leadership potential. Contact the School of Business dean's office for information.
School of Business Prerequisite and Attendance Policy
All School of Business students are expected to know and fulfill all prerequisite requirements. The School of Business reserves the right to disenroll students who do not meet prerequisite requirements or who fail to meet expected course attendance policies.
Bachelor of Science Degree Programs
Students may earn a bachelor of science degree in accounting, computer information systems, finance, management or marketing. The learning objectives of tht business program provide students with the opportunity to:
1. obtain, understand and apply information from the liberal arts, sciences, business and discipline-specific courses to organizational issues and situations.
2. explain how ethical, legal, political, regulatory, social, global, environmental and technological issues influence business decisions.
3. analyze a business problem by incorporating diverse perspectives.
4. apply foundation business knowledge and skills to develop competent decisions in the areas of accounting, economics, finance, information systems, management and marketing.
5. communicate effectively the problem alternatives considered, a recommended solution, and an implementation strategy in oral, written and electronic form.
6. demonstrate knowledge and skills to meet career needs.
7. exhibit an appreciation for extra-curricular activities and continuous, life-long learning.
The degree requires completion of coursework in general studies, the core business disciplines, a major, and electives. A minor is not required.
Mailing Address
Deans Office
School of Business
Metropolitan State College of Denver
Campus Box 13
P.O. Box 173362
Denver, Colorado 80217-3362
MSCD Website: www.mscd.edu
Important Telephone Numbers
Deans Office: 303-556-3245
Accounting: 303-556-3181
Computer Information Systems: 303-556-2857
Economics: 303-556-3217
Finance: 303-556-3776
Management: 303-556-3247
Marketing: 303-556-3182
Business Outreach: 303-592-5364
US WEST Center for Business Success


80 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Admission and Academic Status Requirements
Students may declare a business major at any time by contacting the deans office or a department faculty advisor and completing the "Major Declaration Form." Students are encouraged to declare as early as possible to ensure accurate advising on business program requirements.
Prior to enrolling in an upper-division business course, declared business majors must have:
a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00;
completed all Level I and II General Studies requirements for business;
completed all lower-division courses in the business core; and
completed at least 60 credit hours overall (junior standing).
Business majors will be placed on academic warning if their GPA falls below 2.0. If the GPA remains below 2.0 after one semester on probation, students will be dropped as business majors.
Business Program Residency Requirements
For all bachelor of science degrees in the School of Business, at least 50 percent of the business credit hours received for the business degree must be earned in residence at MSCD.
To earn a Bachelors degree in business, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business coursework at MSCD. This 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, CMS, FIN, MGT and MKT except ACC 1010, CMS 1010, CMS 2300, CMS 3300, CMS 3320, CMS 3340, and FIN 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division semester hours in the major at MSCD.
Business Degree Program Planning
Some important things to remember as you plan your business studies:
All degree-seeking students must meet the colleges requirements for all bachelor's degrees outlined in the general information section of this Catalog.
During the first 60 credit hours, business majors should complete their General Studies Levels I and II courses and the 2000-level business core courses.
The college requires at least 40 credit hours of upper-division courses (3000 or 4000 level). Consult with an advisor to ensure that your specific degree program meets this requirement.
If a student pursuing a degree other than a bachelor of science from the School of Business wishes to enroll in business courses beyond 30 hours, the student must declare a major with the School of Business. The 30 hours excludes up to 9 credit hours in economics and the following courses: ACC 1010, CMS 1010, CMS 2300, CMS 3300, CMS 3320, CMS 3340, or FIN 2250.
A minor is not required for students whose major is accounting, computer information systems, finance, management or marketing.
ACC 1010, CMS 1010, and FIN 2250 may not be applied to the 120 hours required for a bachelor of science degree in the School of Business.
Bachelor of Science Degree Program Requirements
All candidates for a bachelor of science degree in accounting, computer information systems, finance, management and marketing must satisfy the general studies requirements and business core course requirements described in the following two sections. For programs leading to a bachelor of science, the
basic structure of each program is:
General Studies (Level I and Level II)......................................................43
Business Core...............................................................................33
Major in School of Business.................................................................24
Electives*..................................................................................20
Total Hours (minimum).......................................................................120
*The School of Business requires 20 credit hours of electives, no more than 9 of which may be business electives.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 81
General Studies
The academic foundation for a successful business career or graduate work is a broad liberal arts education. The college requires 33 credit hours of General Studies. The School of Business requires 10 additional specific hours of General Studies (ECO 2010, ECO 2020, and four hours of mathematics), for a total of 43 credit hours.
General Studies Required by the School of Business Semester Hours
General Studies Level I Composition
ENG 1010 Freshman Composition: The Essay.....................J...........................3
ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research and Documentation...................3
Mathematics
MTH 1310* Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences...................4
MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences..............................3
Communications
SPE 1010 Public Speaking..............................................................3
*Nole: MTH 1110 or MTH 1400, with graphing calculator experience strongly recommended, is acceptable for transfer students or students changing their major. Consult with Mathematical and Computer Sciences department on substitutions.
General Studies Level II Historical Studies
HIS _________ (American history course recommended)........................................3
Arts and Letters PHI 1030 Ethics
-or-
PHI 3360 Business Ethics..............................................................3
____ ______ (Check General Studies guide for Level II Arts and Letters elective).........3
Social Sciences
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro................................................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro................................................3
PSY 1001 Introductory Psychology
-or-
SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociology....................................................3
PSC 1010 American National Government
-or-
PSC 1020 Political Systems and Ideas..................................................3
Natural Sciences
____ ______ (Check General Studies guide for Level II Natural Sciences elective).........3
____ ______ (Check General Studies guide for Level II Natural Sciences elective).........3
Total of Required and Elective General Studies Credit Hours..............................43
Business Core
All business majors require foundation coursework in all significant areas of business theory and practice. The following courses are required for all majors in accounting, computer information systems, finance, management and marketing.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I...................................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II.......................L..........................3
CMS 2010 Computer Applications for Business................I..........................3
CMS 2300 Business Statistics...............................1..........................3
MKT 2040 Managerial Communications....................................................3
MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business I..............................................3
MGT 3000 Organizational Management....................................................3
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing......................................................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance................................1..........................3
CMS 3340 Advanced Business Statistics.................................................3
MGT 4950 Strategic Management..............................J..........................3
Total Hours Required in Business Core....................................................33
The following sections describe the scope of the degree program, course requirements, career opportunities, and competencies for career success in each degree program.


82 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Accounting Degree Program
The accounting program prepares students for entry into careers in public accounting, industry, tax and the government sector, as well as graduate education and lifelong learning. The field of accounting is moving rapidly toward a greater emphasis in the areas of information systems, management consulting and organizational change. Accountants can obtain a variety of professional certifications, including certified public accountant, certified internal auditor, certified fraud examiner, certified information systems auditor and certified management accountant. Each professional certification program includes rigorous education, examination, experience and ethics requirements.
Mission Statement:
The Accounting Department at MSCD provides high quality, accessible, enriching undergraduate accounting education in an urban setting appropriate to a diverse student population enrolled under modified open admission standards. We prepare students for careers, graduate education, and lifelong learning in a global and technological society. The department is committed to ethical values, continuous improvement and mutual respect within a diverse campus community.
The Accounting Department pursues excellence in teaching and learning as its primary purpose. Intellectual contributions in accounting and related fields that enhance teaching and learning and contribute to scholarship through both applied research and other avenues of professional development are secondary though fundamental to the mission of the Accounting Department. Service to MSCD, the accounting profession, and the community and society in general is also secondary albeit fundamental to the mission of the Accounting Department.
Successful accounting students possess these skills and attributes:
ability to organize, analyze, and interpret numerical data;
strategic and critical thinking skills;
proficiency in oral and written communications with ability to explain complex financial data to others;
ability to apply current technology;
knowledge of financial and economic history, practices, and trends;
ability to work collaboratively as well as independently;
understanding of the methods for creating, leading, and managing change in organizations.
Accounting Major for Bachelor of Science*
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACC 3090 Income Tax I................................................................3
ACC 3300 Introduction to Accounting Systems..........................................3
ACC 3400 Cost Accounting.............................................................3
ACC 3510 Intermediate Accounting I...................................................3
ACC 3520 Intermediate Accounting II..................................................3
Subtotal................................................................................15
Plus 9 hours from the following courses including at least one 4000 level course:
ACC 3100 Income Tax II...............................................................3
ACC 3110 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)......................................3
ACC 3200 Governmental Accounting.....................................................3
ACC 3410 Cost Accounting II..........................................................3
ACC 4090 Tax Procedure and Research..................................................3
ACC 4100 Tax Planning................................................................3
ACC 4200 Auditing....................................................................3
ACC 4300 Advanced Auditing...........................................................3
ACC 4510 Advanced Accounting.........................................................3
ACC 4520 Mergers and Acquisitions....................................................3
Total Hours Required for Accounting Major...............................................24
*Students must have a minimum of 90 hours of non-accounting coursework for the bachelor's degree.
Students interested in becoming certified public accountants should be aware of the Colorado State Board of Accountancy's 150-hour requirement (effective 2002). MSCD offers classes that meet all aspects of the Accountancy Board's requirements.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 83
To earn a Bachelors degree in accounting, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business coursework at MSCD. This 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, CMS, FIN, MGT and MKT except ACC 1010, CMS 1010, CMS 2300, CMS 3300, CMS 3320, CMS 3340, and FIN 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division semester hours in the major at MSCD.
Students should consult an accounting faculty advisor to develop an appropriate academic program. A wide variety of internship opportunities are available through the Cooperative Education Office.
Computer Information Systems Degree Program
With a degree in the rapidly expanding area of information systems in the business world, students can look forward to challenging careers in computer information systems or using their computer information systems knowledge within any other area of business.
Mission Statement:
The Computer Information Systems Department delivers high quality, accessible undergraduate business information systems education to a diverse student population. We prepare students to analyze, design, develop and use business applications utilizing contemporary technology. We provide a balance between fundamental information systems concepts and the application of these concepts from a future-oriented perspective.
The Computer Information Systems Department provides undergraduate major, minor and professional preparation programs in information systems. We offer service courses in information systems and business statistics to School of Business students, and applied computer courses to students college-wide.
The Computer Information Systems Department faculty pursues excellence in teaching and learning as its primary purpose. We nurture learning through individual attention to students. The faculty aggressively engages in professional development activity that enhances instruction and contributes to scholarship and applied research. We provide service to the institution, the profession and the community at large.
Students majoring in computer information systems are encouraged to select advanced courses that best meet their needs in specific areas, such as systems analysis, design, and development; programming; data base management; data communications and networks; or management of information systems. Advising for these areas is available from the department chair and individual faculty members.
Skills related to computer information systems include:
ability to think logically, thoroughly, and concentrate intensely
sound detail orientation and organizational skills
ability to work well under pressure
capacity to work well independently and as part of a team
capability to analyze problems and make appropriate decisions
proficiency in precise analytical reasoning
aptitude to master new computer languages and methodologies
sensitivity to multiple perspectives
curiosity and enthusiasm
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
CMS 2110 Business Problem Solving: A Structured Programming Approach..................3
CMS 3060 File Design and Data Base Management.........|............................3
CMS 3230 Telecommunications Systems....................L...........................3
Programming Language Group
(includes CMS 3110, CMS 3130, CMS 3145, CMS 3180, CMS 3190, and CMS 3260).............3
CMS 4050 Systems Analysis and Design...................\...........................3
Computer Information Systems Capstone Group
(includes CMS 4060, CMS 4070, CMS 4280 and CMS 4410)..................................3
Upper-division CMS Electives..........................................................6
Total Hours Required for CMS Major....................................................24


84 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
To earn a Bachelors degree in computer information systems, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business coursework at MSCD. This 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, CMS, FIN, MGT and MKT except ACC 1010, CMS 1010, CMS 2300, CMS 3300, CMS 3320, CMS 3340, and FIN 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division semester hours in the major at MSCD.
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS AVAILABLE:
NETWORK SPECIALIST IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS
This certificate will prepare a student for an entry-level position in network support, network administration, network design, and network sales.
CMS 3220 Analysis of Hardware, Software and User Interfaces for Microcomputer Platforms .3
CMS 3230 Telecommunication Systems ....................................................3
CMS 3280 LAN and WAN Systems for Business .............................................3
CMS 3290 Micro User Operating Systems..................................................3
CMS 4280 Network Installation and Administration ......................................3
PROGRAMMER/ANALYST IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS
This certificate will prepare a student for an entry-level position as a business application programmer,
programmer/analyst, or junior systems analyst.
CMS 2010 Computer Applications for Business....................................3
CMS 2110 Business Problem Solving: A Structured Programming Approach ..........3
CMS 3050 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design...............................3
CMS 3130 Business Applications in C and UNIX ..................................3
CMS 3260 Systems Development with GUI Development Tools........................3
DATABASE ANALYST
This certificate will prepare a student for an entry-level position as a database programmer or database
analyst.
CMS 2010 Computer Applications for Business....................................3
CMS 2110 Business Problem Solving: A Structured Programming Approach ..........3
CMS 3050 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design...........................3
CMS 3060 File Design and Database Management ..................................3
CMS 4060 Advanced Database Systems ............................................3
USER SUPPORT SPECIALIST
This certificate will prepare a student for an entry-level position as a help desk/support center special-
ist. It will also prepare an end-user to become the departmental hardware/software expert.
CMS 1080 The World Wide Web, the Internet and Beyond..................................3
CMS 2010 Computer Applications for Business...........................................3
CMS 3220 Analysis of Hardware, Software and User Interfaces for Microcomputer Platforms .3
CMS 3270 Micro Based Software ........................................................3
CMS 3290 Micro User Operating Systems.................................................3
Economics Degree Program
MSCDs economics program is not a business program and economics majors do not have the same requirements as other majors in the School of Business. For example, economics majors do not need to take the business core nor the special General Studies required of business majors. Graduates will receive a bachelors of arts degree instead of a bachelor of science degree. Consequently, the economics major requirements are not described in this section but can be found on page 89 of this Catalog.
Finance Degree Program
The finance program prepares students for careers that concentrate on the process of managing the funds of individuals, businesses and governments. Career opportunities are available in the fields of managerial finance and the financial services industry. The field of managerial finance deals with managing the financial affairs of businesses and governments and includes such activities as budgeting, financial forecasting, cash management, credit administration, investment analysis and funds management. Careers in the financial services industry include positions in banks, savings and loans, other financial institutions, brokerage firms, insurance companies and real estate. The most dramatic increase in career opportunities is in personal financial planning, where professionals are needed to provide advice to consumers on the management of their personal financial affairs.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 8
The pursuit of excellence in teaching and learning is foremost in the mission statement of the Department of Finance.
Mission Statement:
The Finance Department of the School of Business at Metropolitan State College of Denver delivers high quality, accessible undergraduate business and personal finance education in the metropolitan Denver area appropriate to a diverse student population and modified open admission standards. We prepare students for careers, graduate education and lifelong learning in a society characterized by technological advancements and globalization.
The primary purpose of the Finance Department is the pursuit of excellence in teaching and learning. We nurture learning through individual attention to students. The faculty of the Finance Department engages in professional development activities that enhance instruction and contribute to scholarship and applied research. Our faculty provide service to the institution, the professions and the community at large.
The Finance Department is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP) Board Registered Program. Students successfully completing the required financial planning courses are eligible to take the national certified financial planner examination.
Success in the field of finance is related to these skills:
ability to organize, analyze and interpret numerical data
sound decision-making abilities
aptitude for accurate detail
proficiency in oral and written communications with ability to explain complex financial transactions and data to others
knowledge of economics and accounting in addition to finance
Finance Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
FIN 3010 Financial Markets and Institutions........................................................3
FIN 3600 Investments............................................L...............................3
FIN 3850 Intermediate Finance...................................L...............................3
FIN 4950 Financial Strategies and Policies.........................................................3
Subtotal..........................................................................................12
Approved Electives*...............................................................................12
Total Hours Required for Finance Major**..........................................................24
*Upper-division finance electives fsix must be 4000-level) selected in consultation with and approved by the Finance Department.
**A minimum grade of C is required for courses in the major.
To earn a Bachelors degree in finance, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business coursework at MSCD. This 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, CMS, FIN, MGT and MKT except ACC 1010, CMS 1010, CMS 2300, CMS 3300, CMS 3320, CMS 3340, and FIN 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division semester hours in the major at MSCD.
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS AVAILABLE:
PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING
ACC 3090 Income Tax I .........................................................3
FIN 3150 Personal Financial Planning (optional) ...............................3
FIN 3600 Investments ..........................................................3
FIN 3420 Principles of Insurance.............................................. 3
FIN 3450 Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits ............................3
FIN 4400 Estate Planning.......................................................3
Successful completion of these courses also meets the Certified Financial Board of Standards education requirement to become a CFP. For prerequisites and more information call the Finance Department, 303-556-3776.


86 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
REAL ESTATE
FIN 3800 Real Estate Practice and Law* ...........................................3
FIN 3810 Advanced Real Estate Practice and Law**..................................3
FIN 3830 Applications in Real Estate Practice** ..................................3
FIN 4840 Real Estate Appraisal....................................................3
FIN 4850 Commercial and Investment Real Estate....................................3
* Meets Colorado Real Estate Commission Requirements for salesperson license.
** Meets Colorado Real Estate Commission Requirements for broker license.
For prerequisites and more information call the Finance Department, 303-556-6998.
Noncredit FINANCIAL PLANNING FPI Financial Planning Fundamentals FPII Understanding Risk and Insurance FPIII Investment Alternatives FPIV Effective Tax Planning FPV Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits FPVI Estate Planning
Approved by Certified Financial Planning Board of Standards/Approved by Colorado Insurance
Commission for Continuing Education Credit
For prerequisites and more information call Business Outreach, 303-592-5362.
Noncredit INTERNATIONAL TRADE
CIT 1000 Introduction to World Trade
err 2000 Developing an International Business Strategy
CIT 2100 Export Marketing and Promotion
CIT 2200 Cross-Cultural Communications
CIT 2300 Export Finance and Payment Methods
CIT 2400 Business Law for International Trade
CIT 2500 Importing Decisions
CIT 2800 International Transportation and Logistics
For prerequisites and more information call Business Outreach, 303-592-5362.
Management Degree Program
The management program prepares students to pursue a career in human resource management, operations management, entrepreneurship or general management. Effective managers are necessary for organizations to compete in today's global economy. The program consists of required courses that build a conceptual foundation for identifying and solving managerial problems. In addition to acquiring knowledge about business and management, students will develop special skills that are necessary to be an effective manager.
The commitment of the Department of Management is voiced in its mission statement:
Our mission is to provide our diverse body of students with a high quality management and business law education. We believe that teaching and learning in a context of inquisitive, mutually respectful interaction between faculty and students is essential. Through such facilitated interaction, students develop the knowledge and skills necessary for the process of professional management in a competitive world.
We will direct our individual and joint research efforts in relevant areas of applications of manage-ment/legal theory, instructional techniques and the continuous improvement of course content. The faculty recognizes the importance of providing service to our stakeholders.
Necessary skills the manager should have include:
proficiency in planning, organizing, leading and controlling activities
utilization of problem solving methodology to identify and define organizational problems, devise solutions and implement the solution to achieve desired outcomes
highly developed interpersonal skills
an ability to communicate clearly and persuasively
use of sound methods for making decisions
innovative thinking, self-reliance, creative independent analysis and sensitivity to social and ethical values


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 87
Management Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGT 3020 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship....................................... 3
MGT 3220 Legal Environment of Business II.........................................3
MGT 3530 Human Resources Management...............................................3
MGT 3550 Manufacturing and Service Management.....................................3
MGT 3820 International Business.............................1...........................3
MGT 4530 Organizational Behavior............................j...........................3
Subtotal...............................................................................18
Plus 6 hours from the following courses:
MGT 3210 Commercial and Corporate Law.............................................3
MGT 4000 Management Decision Analysis.............................................3
MGT 4020 Entrepreneurial Creativity...............................................3
MGT 4050 Purchasing and Contract Management.......................................3
MGT 4420 Entrepreneurial Business Planning........................................3
MGT 4550 Project Management............................i..........................3
MGT 4610 Labor/Employee Relations......................l..........................3
MGT 4620 Appraisal and Compensation...............................................3
MGT 4640 Employee Training and Development........................................3
MGT 4650 Managing Productivity.........................J..........................3
MGT 4830 Workforce Diversity......................................................3
Total Elective Hours....................................................................6
Total Hours Required for Management Major..............................................24
To earn a Bachelors degree in management, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business coursework at MSCD. This 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, CMS, FIN, MGT and MKT except ACC 1010, CMS 1010, CMS 2300, CMS 3300, CMS 3320, CMS 3340, and FIN 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division semester hours in the major at MSCD.
Marketing Degree Program
The marketing program prepares students for career opportunities in such dynamic areas as sales management, distribution, advertising, marketing research, retailing and marketing management.
Mission statement:
Students Strive to give our students a first rate education in marketing and business communication (that compares favorably to other business programs in the U.S.). To enhance their respect for and excitement for learning that is consistent with the objectives of the School of Business and The Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Research/Publication Maintain a research/publication record that is consistent with curricular needs, technological advancements and meets the challenges of globalization while allowing us to contribute to the knowledge-base of our discipline.
Service Actively participate in various School of Business and MSCD committee activities, regional and national professional organizations and provide our services and expertise to the Denver and regional business community.
In addition to the departments well-rounded selection of courses, the curriculum offers students a combination of conceptual and applied learning experiences. Through the development of marketing plans, advertising campaigns and marketing research studies, students have the opportunity to work with Den-ver-area businesses on current marketing issues and problems. Students are also exposed to a variety of marketing speakers from the business community. Internship positions are available for marketing students through the Cooperative Education Office.
Marketing careers are challenging and rewarding in a field requiring an in-depth knowledge of products, services and modem information technology. Marketing is a people-oriented profession encompassing both for-profit companies and non-profit organizations. Since today's competition is creating a greater demand for marketing and promotional efforts, the growth rate of the field is expected to increase into the new millennium. People who are successful in marketing are creative, highly motivated, flexible and decisive. They also possess the ability to communicate persuasively both in speaking and writing.


88 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Marketing Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Semester Hours
MKT 3010 Marketing Research..........................................................3
MKT 3310 Consumer Behavior..........................................................3
MKT 3710 International Marketing.......................................................3
MKT 4560 Marketing Strategy..........................................................3
Marketing Electives*........................................................................12
Total Hours Required for Marketing Major....................................................24
*Business communication courses can be used as business electives, but not as marketing electives.
To earn a Bachelors degree in marketing, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business coursework at MSCD. This 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, CMS, FIN, MGT and MKT except ACC 1010, CMS 1010, CMS 2300, CMS 3300, CMS 3320, CMS 3340, and FIN 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division semester hours in the major at MSCD.
International Business Concentration for business majors only
Students majoring in accounting, computer information systems, finance, management or marketing may elect to complete an International Business Concentration (IBC). The concentration provides students the opportunity to expand their knowledge of the rapidly changing global business, legal and cultural environment. Graduates with an IBE increase their career choices and will be better prepared to help area businesses compete in an increasingly international market place.
In addition to the major degree program requirements, the concentration includes 18-22 hours in international courses: a 12 hour core and six hours of approved international electives. Some students pursuing an IBE may need more than 120 semester hours of credit to graduate. Interested students should seek an advisor in their major department or dean's office as early in their degree program as possible. Each department has a semester-by-semester planning guide available to assist students in
course choices and sequencing.
International Business Concentration
Required Core Semester Hours
MGT 3820 International Business..........................................................3
ECO 3550 The International Economy.......................................................3
MKT 3710 International Marketing.........................................................3
FIN 3100 International Money and Finance*................................................3
Total Required course hours....................................................................12
Plus 6 hours from the following courses Semester Hours
ECO 4450 International Trade and Finance.................................................3
FIN 4100 International Financial Management..............................................3
ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology...........................................3
ANT 2330 Cross-Cultural Communication*...................................................3
ANT 3300 Exploring World Cultures^.......................................................3
GEG 1000 World Regional Geography........................................................3
HIS 2010 Contemporary World History......................................................3
HIS 3350 Countries/Regions of the World..................................................3
PSC 3030 Introduction to International Relations.........................................3
PSC 3320 International Law^..............................................................3
PSC 3600 Comparative Politics Area Studies...............................................3
Intemship/Directed Study**.....................................................................3
Total semester hours...........................................................................6
-or-
One full academic year of study of any one foreign language-..................................6-10
Total credit hours.............................................................................18-22
*The Finance Department recommends that students take this course after they have completed ECO 3550 and MGT 3820.
^fulfills the multicultural requirement ^prerequisite: ANT 1310 ^prerequisite: PSC 3030


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 89
^three hours maximum and must have significant academic/directed study component and meet all approved School of Business guidelines for internships.
Foreign language competency gained through other than college credit will be assessed by the Brigham Young University Competency and Placement Examination (CAPE). Contact the assefsment/testing center for further details, 303-556-3677.
Bachelor of Arts
Economics Degree Program
The Department of Economics is a non-business degree program housed in the School of Business offering a traditional bachelors of arts degree. Economics is the scientific study of the allocation of scarce or limited resources among competing uses. The study of economics provides specialized and general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions. The bachelor of arts degree program gives students a fundamental knowledge of domestic and foreign economies and the quantitative tools necessary for independent analytical research and thought. Specialized courses develop the students ability to apply the tools of economic theory and analysis to a broad range of social, political, and economic issues. Such training is essential for graduates who wish to qualify for positions as professional economists and provides an excellent background for students interested in law school or graduate programs in economics, finance or business.
Our mission statement reflects our commitment.
The Department of Economics at The Metropolitan State College of Denver delivers a high-quality, accessible bachelor of arts program in economics while also providing significant service to the college, the School of Business, and the community by providing accessible and quality general studies courses in the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. We prepare students for lifelong learning in a complex free civil society; for graduate or professional education in economics, business and legal studies or the law; and for careers in a broad range of private and public activities.
The Department of Economics pursues excellence in teaching and learning as its primary purpose. The faculty of the department engages in scholarly activity that contributes to the literature in applied and basic economic research and other professional activity that enhances quality instruction.
While most positions as a professional economist require graduate training, for someone with a bachelors degree employment opportunities are available in national and international business; federal, state and local government; and various nonprofit organizations. In the field of economics, the following competencies are useful:
ability to precisely examine, analyze, and interpret data
sound decision-making abilities
proficiency in oral and written communications
knowledge of economic theory, history, practices and trends
ability to operate and use information derived from computers
knowledge of statistical procedures
interest in economic and political trends
Economics Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
ECO 2010 Principle of Economics Macro.......................L......................3
ECO 2020 Principle of Economics Micro.......................L......................3
ECO 3010 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory...........................................3
ECO 3020 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory......................................... 3
ECO 3150 Econometrics................................................................3
ECO 4600 History of Economic Thought (Senior Experience)......i......................3
Subtotal..........................................................1.....................18
Approved Electives (upper division economics courses)...................................18
Total Hours of Economics required for Economics Major...................................36


90 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Additional requirements:
MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences..................................3
or
MTH 1410 Calculus 1.......................................................................4
(recommended for students interested in graduate work in economics)
Subtotal..............................................................................39-40
Selected Minor (minimum).................................................................18
General Studies (minimum)................................................................33
Multicultural requirement*................................................................3
Electives.............................................................................26-27
Total Hours Required for Bachelor of Arts in Economics..................................120
*Check with an advisor in the Department of Economics regarding electives and the multicultural requirement.
Minors in the School of Business
The School of Business offers nine minors in business and economics. Most minors require 18 credit hours plus prerequisites, if any. These minors (with the exception of economics) are designed primarily for non-business majors. A student may not take more than 30 credit hours in the School of Business without declaring a business major. The acceptance of transfer credits will be governed by standards and policies of the School of Business and its departments.
Students should choose a minor that will help them in their chosen career. The general business minor should be declared after consultation with the associate dean. Other minors should be declared with the help of a faculty advisor or department chair of the appropriate department.
Accounting Minor
The accounting minor offers students a broad-based education in accounting, emphasizing a particular field within this discipline, such as financial accounting, managerial accounting, tax accounting, or governmental accounting.
The Accounting Department requires 60 credit hours (junior standing) before taking upper-division accounting courses. At least 12 hours of accounting courses in the minor must be completed in resi-
dency at MSCD.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting 1.......................................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II......................................................3
ACC 3090 Income Tax I.....................................................................3
ACC 3510 Intermediate Accounting I........................................................3
Approved Electives*...........................................................................6
Total Hours Required for Accounting Minor....................................................18
*A student may select any courses in the accounting program or curriculum provided they are approved by the Accounting Department advisor.
Computer Information Systems Minor
This minor will provide a basic understanding of the concepts, current methodology, and rapid changes in the design, development, and use of computer-oriented systems for businesses and organizations.
Required Courses Semester Hours
CMS 2010 Computer Applications for Business.......................................3
CMS 2110 Business Problem Solving: A Structured Programming Approach
-or-
CMS 3270 Microbased Software............................................................3
CMS 3050 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design..............................3
CMS 3060 File Design and Data Base Management.....................................3
Approved CMS 3000-Level Electives*......................................................6
Total Hours Required for CMS Minor......................................................18
*Approved electives are selected in consultation with and approved by a Computer Information Systems Department advisor.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 91
Economics Minor
The economics minor provides students with an opportunity to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions, as well as the quantitative tools necessary for analytical research and thought.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro......................I........................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro...............................................3
Approved Electives *........................................L........................12
Total Hours Required for Economics Minor.............................................18
*Approved electives are upper-division economics courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Economics Department.
Finance Minors
The Finance Department offers two minors: the finance minor and the real estate minor.
Finance Minor
This minor offers a broad-based education in finance, emphasizing a particular field within this discipline, such as personal financial planning, investments, managerial finance, financial institutions, or international finance.
For the finance minor, the student must have completed ACC 2010 and ACC 2020 (or the equivalent) and ECO 2010 and ECO 2020, which may be applied to the students General Studies or elective requirements as applicable. The Finance Department requires 60 credit hours (junior standing) prior to taking upper-division finance courses. A minimum grade of C is required in all finance minor courses. At least 12 hours of finance courses must be completed in residency at MSCD to satisfy the requirements of the minor.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FIN 3010 Financial Markets and Institutions....................I.......................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance....................................J.......................3
FIN 3600 Investments.................................................................3
Approved Electives*............................................J.......................9
Total Hours Required for Finance Minor...............................................18
*A student may select any courses in the finance program or curriculum provided they are approved by a Finance Department advisor.
Real Estate Minor
The minor prepares students for opportunities in real estate, as well as for personal financial affairs dealing with this field.
For the real estate minor, the student must have completed ACC 2010 and ACC 2020 (or the equivalent) and ECO 2010, which may be applied to the students General Studies or elective requirements as applicable. The Finance Department requires 60 credit hours (junior standing) prior to taking upper-division finance courses. A minimum grade of C is required in all finance minor courses. At least 12 hours of finance courses in the minor must be completed in residency at MSCD.
Completion of FIN 3800, FIN 3810, and FIN 3830 fulfills the educational requirement for the Colorado
Real Estate Brokers License.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FIN 3800 Real Estate Practice and Law..................................................3
FIN 3810 Advanced Real Estate Practice and Law................i........................3
FIN 3830 Applications in Real Estate Practice.................,........................3
FIN 4840 Real Estate Appraisal................................J........................3
FIN 4850 Commercial and Investment Real Estate.........................................3
Approved Elective*..........................................................................3
Total Hours Required for Real Estate Minor..................................................18
Approved Electives
FIN 2250 Personal Money Management.....................................................3
FIN 3010 Financial Markets and Institutions.........................j.....................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance.........................................1.....................3
FIN 3420 Principles of Insurance.......................................................3
FIN 3600 Investments...................................................................3
ECO 4500 Business and Economic Forecasting.............................................3


92 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
General Business Minor
Students minoring in general business must take ECO 2010 and ECO 2020. These hours may be part of the students General Studies requirements. In addition to the required 24 credit hours below, students may take up to 6 additional credit hours within a specific business discipline for a total not to exceed 30 credit hours within the School of Business. If a student wishes to enroll in business courses beyond
30 hours, the student must declare a major with the School of Business.
Prerequisites credits may be applied to General Studies Semester Hours
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics Macro..............................................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics Micro..............................................3
MTH 1310 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences....................3
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I...................................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II..................................................3
CMS 2010 Principles of Information Systems............................................3
CMS 2300 Business Statistics..........................................................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance...........................................................3
MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business I..............................................3
MGT 3000 Organizational Management....................................................3
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing......................................................3
Minimum Total Hours Required for General Business Minor
(not to exceed 30 credit hours).............................................................24
International Business Minor
This minor is intended for non-business majors so that they may add some study in business from an international perspective to their degree programs.
The Associate Dean of the School of Business is the principal advisor for this minor.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACC 1010 Accounting for Non-Business Majors*..............................................3
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro*...................................................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro*...................................................3
MGT 3820 International Business...........................................................3
Subtotal........................................................................................12
Choose at least 6 hours from:
MGT 3000 Organizational Management........................................................3
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing..........................................................3
FIN 3010 Financial Markets and Institutions...............................................3
Subtotal.........................................................................................6
Choose at least 6 hours from:
ECO 3550 The International Economy........................................................3
FIN 3100 International Money and Finance..................................................3
MKT 3710 International Marketing**........................................................3
Subtotal.........................................................................................6
Total Hours Required for International Business Minor...........................................24
*This course has been approved for General Studies, Level II, Social Sciences, credit.
**MKT 3000 is a prerequisite
Management Minor
The management minor prepares individuals for the important tasks of supervising others, working in teams and taking on additional responsibilities in their field of interest.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGT 3000 Organizational Management....................................................3
MGT 3530 Human Resources Management...................................................3
MGT 3550 Manufacturing and Service Management.........................................3
MGT 3820 International Business.......................................................3
MGT 4530 Organizational Behavior......................................................3
Approved Management Elective*............................................................3
Total Hours Required for Management Minor................................................18
*Approved electives are selected in consultation with and approved by a Management Department advisor.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 93
Marketing Minor
The marketing minor provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of business and sufficient familiarity with marketing skills to work in a business environment.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing..................................................3
MKT 3010 Marketing Research.......................................................3
MKT 2040 Managerial Communications................................................3
MKT 3310 Consumer Behavior........................................................3
MKT 4520 Seminar in Marketing Management..........................................3
Approved Electives*.....................................................................3
Total Hours Required for Marketing Minor................................................18
*Approved electives are selected in consultation with and approved by a Marketing Department advisor.


The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Tradition and Imagination^ Provides a high quality liberal arts education designed to meet the educational needs of the urban student.


96 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
The mission of the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences is to provide a place of teaching and learning that honors both tradition and imagination, one that respects the past and prepares people to be successful participants and leaders in the present as they help to shape the future.
The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences offers programs of study in humanities and in social, natural, and mathematical sciences. The programs prepare students for careers, graduate work, and lifelong learning.
The school offers more than 30 major and minor programs through 18 departments and the Institute for Womens Studies and Services. The faculty teach the majority of the General Studies Program and help prepare students to be teachers. In addition, they arrange internships and other applied educational experiences in state and local agencies, business, industry, and the media.
Through centers and a special program, the school advances educational and social goals:
The Family Center provides a wide range of education, training, and research on policies related to family issues.
The Center for Mathematics, Science and Environmental Education leads the effort to reform science and mathematics education in Colorado. The center contributes to systemic change in education by building cooperative programs with other colleges and universities, public schools, and the Colorado Department of Education. The center is the focal point for the Colorado Alliance for Science, a statewide alliance. The Center also develops programs and services for students from underrepresented groups in the areas of mathematics, science and environmental education. Currently, the center is a site for the Colorado Alliance for Minority Participation (CO-AMP) and offers tutoring and mentoring services to these students. The Colorado Alliance for Science, a statewide alliance of universities, offers assistance and support to students and teachers to strengthen the communitys interest in science and mathematics.
The Golda Meir Center for Political Leadership is a nonpartisan, educational project designed to foster greater public understanding of the role and meaning of leadership at all levels of civic life, from community affairs to international relations.
African American Studies Department
The African American Studies Department offers a range of courses in African American studies that present the dimension of the black experience in this country. These courses encompass and afford a comprehensive understanding of the African heritage. They present African links and potential; contributions of black people in the growth and development of the United States; black culture and lifestyles; the black community; political activity and potential; religious development and importance; community service and resource assistance; and prognosis and potential for social change. The courses may apply in the General Studies requirements and as electives for graduation.
Students are urged to consult with the faculty in the African American Studies Department about new courses now being designed, as well as special offerings.
The major in African American studies, which leads to a bachelor of arts degree, and the minor program must be planned in consultation with an advisor in the African American Studies Department.
Students desiring secondary licensure in social studies should see the section on the teacher education program.
African American Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
AAS 1010 Introduction to African American Studies......................................3
AAS 1130 Survey of African History (HIS 1940)..........................................3
AAS 2000 Social Movements and the Black Experience (SOC 2000)..........................3
AAS 3300 The Black Community (SOC 3140)................................................3
AAS 3700 Psychology of Racism and Group Prejudice (PSY 3700)...........................3
AAS 4850 Research Seminar in African American Studies..................................3
Subtotal..................................................................................18


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 97
Select one from the following:
MUS 2010 Topics in Ethnic Music: Variable Title..........................................3
ART 3040 African Art.....................................................................3
AAS 3240 African American Literature (ENG 3240)..........................................3
Subtotal.......................................................................................3
Electives*.....................................................1.............................18
Total........................................................................................ 39
*Elective hours in African American studies courses are selected in consultation with the advisor.
Minor in African American Studies
Required Courses Semester Hours
AAS 1010 Introduction to African American Studies........................................3
AAS 2000 Social Movements and Black Experience (SOC 2000)................................3
Total..........................................................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours is required in African American courses, 3 hours of which must be an African course, selected in consultation with and approved by the African American studies advisor assigned to the student. Total hours for the minor are 21.
Assessment Test
During the final semester, students majoring in African American studies will be required to take a comprehensive assessment test.
Anthropology Program
Anthropology is the exploration of human diversity. The combination of cultural, archaeological, and biological perspectives offer a viewpoint that is unique in studying the problems related to the survival and well-being of the human species. From the living and vanished cultures of Colorado to those of New Guinea or South America, anthropology can be applied to assist our understanding of human differences. Contact the Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work Department for information.
Anthropology Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Semester Hours
ANT 1010 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory............................................3
ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology...........................................3
ANT 2100 Human Evolution.................................................................3
ANT 2330 Cross-Cultural Communication....................................................3
ANT 2640 Archaeology.....................................................................3
Subtotal.......................................................................................15
Electives......................................................................................21
Total..........................................................................................36
At least 12 upper-division semester hours in anthropology must be completed at MSCD by students majoring in the field.
Students desiring teacher licensure in social studies should see an advisor in the Secondary Education Department.
Minor in Anthropology
The minor provides an opportunity for students to bring a unique anthropological perspective to their already chosen area of interest. Anyone having to deal with human or cultural differences would benefit from selecting a focus in cross-cultural contact, archaeology, or human diversity.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ANT 1010 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory.............................................3
ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology.............................................3
Subtotal.........................................................................................6
Electives.......................................................................................15
Total...........................................................................................21
At least 6 upper-division semester hours must be completed at MSCD.


98 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES
Art Department
The Art Department offers a full range of studio art courses in the areas of fine arts (drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, video, and sculpture); design (communication design and computer imaging); and crafts (ceramics, metalwork, jewelry making, and art furniture) leading to the bachelor of fine arts degree; art history (studies emphasize contemporary, modem, ancient, and non-Westem art) leading to the bachelor of fine arts degree; and licensure in art education.
Goals
Undergraduate studies in art and design prepare students to function in a variety of artistic roles. In order to achieve these goals, instruction should prepare students to:
read the nonverbal language of art and design
develop responses to visual phenomena and organize perceptions and conceptualizations both rationally and intuitively
become familiar with and develop competence in a number of art and design techniques
become familiar with major achievements in the history of art, including the works and intentions of leading artists in the past and present and demonstrate the way art reflects cultural values
evaluate developments in the history of art
understand and evaluate contemporary thinking about art and design
make valid assessments of quality in design projects and works of art
Art Major for Bachelor of Fine Arts
Core Requirements for All Studio Art Majors Semester Hours
ART 1100 Basic Drawing 1..........................................................3
ART 1110 Basic Drawing II.........................................................3
ART 1200 Design Processes and Concepts I..........................................3
ART 1210 Design Processes and Concepts II.........................................3
ART 2010 Survey of Modem Art: Impressionism through Abstract Expressionism........3
ART 2020 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present.................3
Total...............................................................................18
Senior Experience Requirements for Studio Art Majors
ART 4010 Modem Art History: Theory and Criticism..................................3
ART 4750 Senior Experience Studio: Portfolio Development and Thesis Show..........3
Total.................................................................................6
Students choose one of the four areas of concentration: fine arts, design, crafts, or art history.
Fine Arts Concentration....................................................................21
15 hours in area of concentration in: drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, or photography (within the 21 above)
Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas:
Design............................................................................6 or 9
Crafts............................................................................6 or 9
ART 2000 World Art Prior to 1880..................................................3
Art History (upper-division)*.........................................................3
Design Concentration.......................................................................21
15 hours in area of concentration in: advertising design or computer graphics (within the 21 above) Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas:
Crafts............................................................................6 or 9
Fine Arts.........................................................................6 or 9
ART 2000 World Art Prior to 1880..................................................3
Art History (upper-division)*.........................................................3
Crafts Concentration ......................................................................21
15 hours in area of concentration in: ceramics, jewelry, or art furniture (within the 21 above).
Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas:
Design............................................................................6 or 9
Fine Arts.........................................................................6 or 9
ART 2000 World Art Prior to 1880..................................................3
Art History (upper-division)*.........................................................3
Total for Studio Art Majors..........................................................66


SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 99
*ART 3090 is not applicable as upper division An History credit, but may be taken for the multicultural
requirement.
(A minimum of 33 upper-division art hours required.)
A minor for art majors is optional.
Art History Concentration
Core Requirements for All Art History Majors Semester Hours
ART 1100 Basic Drawing 1.............................................................3
ART 1110 Basic Drawing II............................................................3
ART 1200 Design Processes and Concepts I.............................................3
ART 1210 Design Processes and Concepts II............................................3
ART 2010 Survey of Modem Art: Impressionism through Abstract Expressionism...........3
ART 2020 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present.............................3
Total.....................................................................................18
Senior Experience Requirement for Art History Majors
ART 4010 Modem Art History: Theory and Criticism.....................................3
Total......................................................................................3
*Art History (required)...................................................................15
ART 2000 World Art Prior to 1880.....................................................3
Fine Arts**...........................................................................3 or 6
Design**..............................................................................3 or 6
Crafts**...................................................j..........................3 or 6
Art Electives..............................................................................6
Total.....................................................................................60
*ART 3090 is not applicable as upper division Art History credit, but may be taken for the multicultural requirement.
**15 hours are required among these three categories.
(A minimum of 27 upper-division art hours required.)
Minor requirements for art majors are optional.
Art Licensure: K-12
Teacher licensure for art majors is available through the Art Department. An art major is required.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ART 3380 Introduction to Art Education......................................................4
EDS 3110 Processes of Education in Multicultural Urban Secondary Schools...................3
EDS 3120 Field Experience in Multicultural Urban Secondary Schools.........................3
EDS 3200 The Adolescent as a Learner.......................................................3
EDS 3210 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom Management..............................3
EDS 3220 Field Experience in Teaching, Materials Construction, and Classroom Management... 3
SED 3600 The Exceptional Learner in the Classroom..........................................3
RDG 3280 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content Areas...............................4
ART 4380 Art Methods/Materials: K-12........................................................4
EDU 4190* Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary K-6.......................................8
EDS 4290* Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary (6-12).....................................8
ART 4390 Integrating the Arts for Gifted and Talented......................................3
Total.........................................................................................49
*Student teaching is composed of daily full-time work during 16 weeks, split 8 and 8 weeks between elementary and secondary levels.
In addition to field experiences included in required coursework, students must present evidence of having completed at least 200 hours of work with children. This may be accomplished through a variety of community organizations and institutional activities. Students should plan their volunteer work in consultation with the art education advisor.
Students who seek licensure must pass a public speaking course (SPE 1010) with a grade of B or better, or obtain a waiver. Students with a degree in Art may obtain a waiver. Students must also achieve satisfactory scores on the state licensure examination.
Teacher education programs are currently undergoing review and may be modified during 2000-2002. Students seeking teacher licensure should read the teacher licensure sections of this Catalog, pages 172-173, and they should stay in regular contact with their advisors.


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CONNECTING YOU TO A REAL FUTURE 2000/2001

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AURARIA LIBRARY I U18701 9800857 Auraria Campus

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Campus Locations 120th St Colfax t ::r: b: 0 z Englewood .. N .. a: .; Metro State North c .. l5 Northglenn 1 -70 Downtown Denver I-2S State Capitol Metro State South -<>o0 Triad Plaza North Building Orchard Rd. l5

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BUSINESS Pag e SOCIAL SCIENCES Pag e Accounting ..... ... .......................... .... .... ... 82 African American Studies ........ .............. .. 96 Computer Information Systems .............. 83 Anthropology .......................................... 97 Economics ................................................ 89 Behavioral Science ................................ 100 Finance ........ ................ ... ...... ................. 8 4 Chicano Studies .................................... 1 06 Management ....... ... .. ......... .... ........... .... 86 History .................... ... ........ .... ............... 120 Marketing .......... ...................... ................ 87 Political Science ........... .... .................... 141 Psychology ...................................... ...... 144 HUMANITIES Soci a l Work ............................................ 146 Art .......................................................... 98 Sociology .............................................. 148 English .......... ........... .... ........................ 109 Women's Studies .................................... 156 Journalism .............................................. 122 Modern Languages .......... .... .................. 132 TECHNOLOGY Music Education .................................... 136 Aviati on Management .............. .... .......... 162 M usic Performance ................................ 137 Aviation Technology .............................. 164 Philosophy ......................................... ... 139 Civil Engineering Technology ................ 169 Spanish ........... ... ........... ........................ 150 Electrical Engineering Technology ........ 185 Speech Communication ................ ... ..... 151 Industrial Design .................................... 212 Industrial and Technic a l Studies ............ 209 PUBLIC SERVICE PROFESSIONS Mechanical Engineering Technology ...... 214 Criminal Justice and Criminology .......... 170 Surveying and Mapping ........................ 219 Health Care Management ...................... 1 89 Technical Communications .................... 221 Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration .............................. .... 19 1 SPECIAL PROGRAMS Human Performance a nd Sport .............. 19 6 Individualized Deg re e Program .......... 1 0 46 Human Services .................................... 204 Pre Dental ............ ......... ................ 1 01, 104 Leisure Studies ..... ................................ 213 Pre L aw .... .................... ................ 104, 142 Nursing ................................ .. ................ 216 Pre-Med ................ ....................... 1 01, 104 Pre Veterinarian ............................ 1 01, 104 SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS T eacher Licensure .............. ...... .............. 172 Biology ........................................ .......... 101 Chemistry ........... ..................... .... ....... 1 04 Computer Science .................................. 1 07 Environmental Sci ence ...................... .... 114 Land Use ................................................ 125 Mathemat ics ............ .... ................... 127 HSCD C A T 1'1'19 TO 2000 HSCD CA 0 3 /1 9 /99 1 111111111 111111111 1 1111111111 Meteorology .......................................... 131 Physics .................................................. 140 DEPT 9786900145072 7155 $3.00 THE METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE of DENVER Camp u s Box 1 6 P.O. llox 173362 Denver. CO 802 1 7-3362

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WELCOME The Metropolitan State College of Denver This catalog contains comprehensive information about The Metropolitan State College of Denver, the degrees and programs it offers, and the requirement that must be satisfied before receiving a degree. This publication describes admissions and registration procedures as well as services offered by the college General information on tuition and fees financial aid packages and procedures are also covered Possible changes of the information in this catalog. The programs, policies, s t a t ements and procedures contained in this publication a r e subjec t to change or co rr ection by the college without prior notice. The Metropolitan State College of D enver reserves the right to withdraw cou r ses; revise the academic calendar; or change c urric ulum g raduati on procedures requirements and policies that apply to s tud en t s at any time. Changes will become effec tive whenever the proper authorities so determine. This publication is not intend ed to be a co ntra ct between the student and The Metropolitan Stat e College of D enver. H owever, students are bound by the policies, procedures, standards and requirements stated herein, so lpng as they are in effect.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS (See alphabetica l ind ex for specific topics) The College ...................................................... 5 Academic Calendar ................................................. 7 Degrees and Programs ............................................... 8 Ba ic Degree Requirements .......................................... 12 Admissions ...................................................... 16 Enrollment ...................................................... 23 Registration ................... ................................... 23 Tuition and Fee s .................................................. 24 Financial Aid .................................................... 27 Services and Programs for Student .................................... 31 Student Life ..................................................... 38 Alternative Credit Options .......................................... .41 Special Academic Programs ............... ......................... .46 General Studies Program ................... ........................ .49 Additional Graduation Requirement s (Multicultural and Senior Experience) ..... 57 Academic Policies and Procedures .................................... 61 Student Right s and Responsibilitie s .................................... 67 School of Bu siness ................................................ 77 School of Letters, Art and Science ................................... 95 School of Profe ssio nal Studies ...................................... 159 Cour e Descriptions .............................................. 227 Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado ............................ .413 Officers of Administration ......................................... .413 Faculty ....................................................... .417 Alphabetical Index .............................................. .428 Auraria Campus Map .................................. Inside Front Cover Extended Campu Location Map .................. ....... Inside Back Cover Photo grap h y: Sidney Brock, Tom Cherrey, Kim Cook Dave Nelig h Terry Shapiro Produced by: The Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of College Communications2000

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GENERAL INFORMATION 5 GENERAL INFORMATION THE COLLEGE The Metropolitan State College of Denver is the large t public four-year college in the United States. The college offers arts and sciences, professional and bu iness courses and programs to a diverse stu dent population. Excellence in teaching and learnin g is MSCD's primary objective. The college's mission is to provide high-quality, accessible, enriching education that prepares students for successful careers, postgraduate education and lifelong learning in a multicultural, g l obal and tech nological society. The college fulfills it s mission by working in partnership with the community at large and by fostering an atmosphere of sc holarly inquiry, creative activity and mutual respect within a diverse campus commu nity. More than thirty years ago, the state legislature created MSCD as Colorado 's urban "College of Oppor tunity." Since then it has occupied an important niche in the state's system of higher education, because, by statute, it was designed to be unique MSCD is required to serve adult students. Fir s t-time college students who are 20 year of age or older and hold a GED or high school diploma are automatically admitted to MSCD irre spective of their academic record MSCD is required to erve traditional-aged students of all levels of achievement and potential. As a result the college enrolls a rich mix of recent high school graduates, many with exce llent grade s and test scores and others with more modest achievement. MSCD is required to be acces ible to all citizens. That is why tuition has been and remains among the l owest in the s tate. The co llege's role and mission are rooted in a commitment to excellence in teaching and l earning. MSCD graduates prai e faculty for their attention to teaching and willingness to help stude nt s s ucceed According to a survey of college and university alumni conducted for the Co l orado Commi sion on Higher Education ( CCHE), MSCD alumni ranked the college number one in meeting their educational goals. ln fact 99 percent of the college's graduates said MSCD's programs and curriculum met their goals. The college awards bachelor of science, bachelor of arts and bachelor of fine arts degrees. Students can choose from 49 majors and 70 minor offered through three schools: Business ; Letters, Arts and Sci ence ; and Professional Studies. Program range from the traditional di ciplines, such as history and biology to contemporary fields of tudy uch as Chicano st udies and health care management. The col lege offers several bachelor's degree programs unique in Colorado, including aviation management, health care management land use meteorology, and surveying and mapping. Students may also design their own degree through the Individualized Degree Program. STUDENTS As an urban college committed to serving the local community, MSCD attracts students from a diverse mixture of age groups, soc ioeconomic classes, ethnic backgrounds and lifestyles The college's cur riculum and philosophy reflect that diversity and enrich the urban experience. Current enrollment is 17,307. Students range in age from 17 to 7b with a median age of 24. Ethnic minorities make up 24 percent of the students. About 55 percent of stude nt s are enrolled full-time and 80 percent work full-or part-time. Sixteen per cent are traditional students, beginning college before age 20, while 84 percent represent nontraditional age groups. Ninety-five percent of s tudents reside in the six counties of the Denver metropolitan area: Adams ............... 12% Denver .............. 31% Arapahoe ............. 19% Douglas ............ 5 % Boulder ............... 3% Jefferson ............. 25% FACULTY MSCD has nearly 400 full-time faculty. Professor are master teachers recruited and evaluated for their ability to teach and engage students. All classes are taught by academic instructors. As a culturally diverse team of academicians, 34 percent of full-time faculty are women and 20 percent represent ethnic minorities.

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6 GENERAL INFORMATION The MSCD facu l ty is among the mo t product i ve in the tate. ln 1996, the CCI-IE re ported that each f ull-time faculty member was responsible for teaching 21.5 cre dit hours which i at l east 9 credit hour s more than the number taught at Colo r ado' two large t universities. The college al o brings real-world education into the classroom b y hiring part time faculty who work in the D enver metropolitan communit y and use their expertise a nd ex p erience in the arts bus ine ss, com munications, l aw, p o liti cs, the sc i ence and t echno l ogy in their tea c hin g. THE CAMPUSES The Metropolitan State College of Denver is l ocated at the Auraria Higher E duc a tion Center, a 1 27-acre campus in d ow nt own Denver a t Speer Boulevard and West Co lf ax Avenue. The Community College of Denver and the Univer s ity of Colorado at Denver s h are the faci liti es w i th MSCD. The campu inc lud e more than one million square feet of space for classroom labor a torie s and offices. Some admini t r ative office are located in re sto red Vic t orian homes in Den ver's hi s toric inth Street P ar k l ocate d on the A ur aria site. The campus a! o features a child care ce nter a co mprehen s ive library hou sing 73 1 000 vol ume s, and one of the mo s t unu s ual student union fac iliti es in the country in the historic Bavarians tyle Tivoli Brewery Building. Exce llent physical fitnes facilities i n c lud e a block-long phy ical ed u cation/events center wit h a swimming p oo l weight roo m game co urts, dance tudios and even t seati n g for 3,000 The A ur aria Hig her Education Ce:nter's proximity to downtown Denv e r e nable s s tudent s and faculty to use the community as a l earni n g l aboratory a nd to connect classroom theory to the c ultur a l economic, social, and p olitical practices of the city. The co lle ge a l so has two atellite campus s it es operated b y the Extended Campus Pro g ram Metro South l ocated at 5660 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard in Arapahoe County, e rve s the so uth outhea t, and outhwest metropolitan areas. Metro North, l ocated at 11990 Grant Street in Adam Co unty se rv es the north northeast and northwest areas. Each site i s located 14 miles from the Auraria cam pus along the I-25 corridor. A var iet y of courses are offered durin g the eve nin gs and on Saturd ays o n the Auraria campus and at Metro South and Metro North. Twenty-four degree programs ca n be co mplet e d enti rely by taking courses sc h edu l ed during the eve nin gs and weekends. MSC D offers clas e in traditiona l fonnats as well as t e l ecourses, online co ur ses a nd cor r es pond ence co ur ses. Gen eral inform a tion about these pro grams can be obtained from th e Offi ce of Admissions or the Ac ademic Adv isin g Center The Class S c hedule c le ar l y ide ntifi es all evening and weekend courses.

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GENERAL INFORMATION 7 2000-2001 ACADEMIC CAIJENDAR 2000 FALL SEMESTER Orientation* ............................................ April 18-August 19 Regi stration ............................................ April 17-Augu s t 19 Classes start ............................................ Monday, August 21 Labor D ay (cam pus closed) ..................... ......... Monday, September 4 Thanksgiving Day (cam pu s closed) ...... ................. Thursday, November 23 Friday after Thanksgiving (campus open, no classes) ............ Friday, November 24 Classes end ........................................... Saturday, December 9 Final exams begin ..................................... Monday, December II Final exams end ...................................... Saturday, December 16 Commencement (tentative**) ............................. Sunday, December 17 2001 SPRING SEMESTER Orientation ...................................... Mid-November-January 16 Re g istration ....................................... Mid-NovemberJ anuary 16 Martin Luther King, Jr. D ay (campus open, no classes) ... ...... .. Monday, January 15 Classes start ..................... ..... ................. Tuesday, January 16 Spring Break .................................. Monday-Saturday March 19-24 C l asses end ...... ............................ ............ Saturday May 5 Final exams begin ....................................... Monday May 7 Final exams en d .......................................... Saturday, May 12 Commencement (te ntati ve**) .......... ....................... Sunday, May 13 2001 SUMMER SEMESTER Orientation and registratio n ........ ......... ....... Monday -F riday May 21-25 Memorial Day (campus closed) ....................... ........ Monday, May 28 Classes start .............................................. T u esday, May 29 Independen ce Day (cam pu s closed) ........................... Wedne day July 4 Classes end ........ .................................... Saturday, August 4 2001 FALL SEMESTER Orientation a nd registration ........................ Monday-Friday, August 13-17 Classes start ............................................ Monday, August 20 Labor Day (camp u s closed) .............................. Monday, September 3 Thank sgiving Day (campus c l osed) ....................... Thursday, November 22 Friday after Thanksgiving (campus open, no cia es) ............ Friday, November 23 Classes end .......................................... Saturday, December 8 Final exams start ...................................... Monday December 10 Final exams end ..................................... Saturday, De cember 15 *Fo r or i entation cal l 303-556-3559 **Cal l 303-556-6226 to confirm time and l ocation.

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8 DEGREESANDPROGRAMS D EGREES AND PROGRAMS The Metropolitan State College of Den ver i s organized into thre e schools. The sc h oo l s are liste d below with the major s and minor s offered by each. Th e curriculum requirement s for each of the program s are d esc ribed in the Catalog in the special sec tion s pr e pared by each sc hool. Pro g ram s marked with an aste risk (*) d o not require comp l etion of a minor Major Minor Degree Sc hool of Busine ss Acco u nting ................... ..... . ....... .X ....... x .... B S Computer Inform atio n S ystems* ..................... X ..... x ...... B S Economics .................................... .X ....... x ... .. B .A. Finance ...................................... X ....... x ...... B.S. General Bu s ine ss ... .................. ................. x Intern a tional Bu s ine ss ........ .......... .. ................ x Mana geme nt ................. ............. . .X ....... x ...... B.S Marketing ..................................... X ...... x ...... B S Real Estate ............ ................................. x S chool of Letters A rts and Sci e n ces Africa n American Studie ................. ....... .X ...... x ...... B.A. Anthropology .... ............................ X ...... x ...... B .A. Art ..................... ................... .X ....... x ... B .F. A B e h avio ral S c ience .... .......................... .X ........... B.A. Biol ogy ............................ ....... .X ....... x .. B A /B S. Chemistry .............. ...................... .X .... x .. B .A. /B S Chicano Studie s ............ ................... .X ....... x ...... B .A. Co .ml?ute.r ........ ..... ............... .X ....... x .... B S CrurunaltstJcs .................... ................... .... x English ............................... . .... .X ....... x ...... B .A. Environmental S c ien ce* .......................... .X ... .. ......... B S Environmental Studie s ..................................... x French ............. .............................. ..... x Geography ....... ......... ..................... ...... x Geology ...... ...... .... ............. .............. x German ...................... ..... ....... ............ x History ...................... ................. .X ....... x ...... B .A. Interdi sci plinary Legal Studi es .............. ................. x J o urna l i s m ....................... ............ .X ....... x ...... B .A. Language and Li n g u istic s ............ ...................... x Land Use ..................................... .X .......... B.A. /B S Mathematics .................................... X ....... x .. B .A. /B S Meteorology .................................... X ....... x ...... B S Modern Languages ......... ..................... X .............. B .A. Mu sic ........... ..... .......... ..................... x B .A. /B.M Music Education* ................................ X ..... . .... B A Native American Studi es .................................. x Ph iloso ph y .................. ................... X ....... x ...... B .A. Phy s i cs ........................................ X ...... x .. B A /B.S Po l it i cal Science ............. .......... ....... X ....... x ...... B .A. P syc h o l ogy ... .................................. X ..... x ...... B A Public Administration ..................................... x Publi c Re l ations ......................................... x Social Work .................................. .X .............. B S. Sociology ...... ............................... X ... . x ...... B A Sp anis h ...................... ......... ...... .X ....... x ...... B A Speech Communications ................... ........ X ....... x ...... B A. Theoretical Ph ysics ....................................... x Urban Studies .......................................... x Women's Studies ( In s titut e for Wom e n's Studie and Services) .......................................... x

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DEGREESANDPROGRAMS 9 Major Minor De g ree School of Professional Studies Airframe and P ower Pla nt M ec hanic s ......................... x Aviation M a n agement ............................ .X ....... x ...... B .S. Aviation Technology ............................ .X .............. B S. Bilingual/Bicultural Education ............................... x Civil Engineering Technology+ .......... ..... .... .X ... .......... B.S CriminalJu tice and Criminology .............. .... .X .... x ...... B S Earl y Childhood Education ...... ........................ x Electrical Engi neerin g Technology+ ................. .X ....... x ..... B .S. Gerontology ........................................... x H ealth and Safety ................... .................... x Health Care Managem e nt ( upper-divi ion ) ............ .X ....... x ...... B S. Holi stic Health & Wellne ss Education Multi-Minor ............... x Ho s p itality Meeting and Travel Admini s tration ........ X .............. B .A Hot el Administration ........... ......................... x Hum an Performanc e a nd Sport .............. ........ X ....... x ..... B .A. Human Services* ................................ X ....... x ...... B .S. Indu strial De s ign .............................. .X .............. B .A. Indu strial and Te chnica l Studies .................... .X ....... x ..... B .S. L e i s ur e Studies ....... .... ....................... X ....... x ..... B .A. Mechani cal Engineerin g Technology+ ................ X ....... x ..... B S. Meetin g Administration .................................... x Nursing ( upper-di v i sio n for RN s)* ............... ... X ............ B.S. Parent Education ................. ...................... x Private Pil ot ... .......................................... x R eading ................................................ x R es taur a nt Administration .................................. x Special Education/Gifted Education ..... ....... .............. x Surveying and Mappin g ........................... X ....... x ...... B S Teacher Licensing : Ear l y Childhood E l ementary, Spe c ial Education, K -12, and Secondary Techni cal Communications ......................... X ....... x ...... B .A. Travel Administration .................... ..... .... .... x Other Individu alized D egree Program ............. ..... . X ....... x .. B A./B S +Concentration ma y r eplace the minor.

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10 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS Individualized Degree Program The Individualized Degree Program offers stu dent s the opportunity to design a major or a minor to meet their s pecific educational goals when those goals cannot be met b y major and minor s currently offered by MSCD. Each tudent works clo ely with an advisor in the Center for Individua l ized Learning and a faculty mentor to design a coherent program of study to meet the student's s pecifi c educational objec tives. Eac h stude nt proposed program s hall be approved by the department chair from which the majority of cred i t is drawn and by the dean of the appropriate Sc h ool. All requirement s for any bache lor's degree from the co lle ge app l y Either a bache l or of arts or a bachelor of science degree in Individ ualized Studies may be ought. Specific information and assistance i available from the Center for Indi vidualized Learning at 303-556-8342 Central Clas room 106. See page 46 of thi Catalog for more information Accreditations/ Approvals The Metropolitan State College of Denver is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Sc h oo l s (30 North LaSalle St., Suite 2400, Chicago IL 60602-2504 1-800-621-7440). Individual academic program s within the following areas are accredited or approved by the following agencies: lt'rol!ram Accre dita Jon/Aoorova Al!encv !Accounting** Colorado State Board of Accountancy !Aerospace Scien ce** Council on Aviation Accreditation renter for Addiction Srudie s** Colorado Department of Health !chemistry** American Chemical Society E n gineering Technology Te c hnology Accreditation Commis s ion of the AccreditaEngineering Technology* tion Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc !Mechanical Engineering Technology* Ill Market Place, Suite 1050; Baltimore MD 21202-40 12 Phone: 410-347-7700 Fax: 410-625-2238 www.abet.or !Health Care Management** Association of University Programs in Health Admini tration 730 II th Stre e t NW 4th Aoor Wa s hington, D .C. 20001-4510 Phone : 202-638-1448 Fax: 202-638-3429 www.AUPHA.ore: email: AUPHA @AU PHA .o re !Human Perf ormance, Spon and Lei s ure Studies* National Park A ssociation/A merican Association for Leisure and Recreation !Human Services Council for Standard s in Human Services Education !Music National Association of Schoo l s of Mus ic !Nursing* National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) 61 Broadway ; New York New York 10006 212-363-5555 Ext. 153 l'>ocial Work Council on Social W ork Education Education National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education; Colorado Depanment of Education Accreditation **Approval

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I I DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 11 I Certificates of Completion Certificate pro gram provide opportunities t o successfully comp l ete a series of five to eight aca d emic c redit co ur ses that focus o n a particular area of career interest. Each certificate program i s designed to stan d alone or m erge with your degree program major or minor. The certificate title and date of award wiU appear on your transcript. The certificate program i coordinated by the Office of Extended Educa tion 303-74 1-6394 CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS AVAILABLE: SCHOOL OF B SI ESS Perso nal Finan c i a l Pl a nn ing R eal Estate Noncredit Fin a n cial Planning Noncredit Intern ational Trade etwork Spedalist in Information Systems Programmer/A n aly tin information Systems D ata b ase An a l yst User Support Spe c i alist SCHOOL OF LETIERS. ARTS AND S CIE CES German Tran s l ation B asic Competency in German B asic Competency in French B asic Competency in Spanish Spani s h Tran s lation Pr ogram Publi c Admini stration Career a nd P e r sona l Development G e r ontology (Liberal Arts Orientation ) Geronto l ogy ( Pr ofe siona l Services Orientation) International Technical Writing Multimedia Production Corporate Video Production Technical Writing and Editing High Risk Youth Coaching Activities Assistant for Older Adu lt s Recreation Assistant Aquatics Assistant Extended Day Activities Aide Condition in g Specialist Officiating Literacy Instructor

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12 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS BASIC D E GRE E REQ U IRE MEN T S Students are re pon ible for full knowledge of the provisions a nd regulations pertaining to their pro gram co ntain ed in this Catalog and e l sewhere The final responsibility for co mpl eti n g the req uir e me nts for a d egree rests with the students and it is recommended that they seek advice. Students sho uld never ass um e th at they have approval to deviate from a s tat ed require m e nt without a prop erly signe d s tatem ent t o tha t effect. REQ UIREMENTS FOR ALL BACHELOR'S DEGREES To earn a bach elor of science, a bachelor of ar t s, or a bachelor of fine art degree a student must sat isfy th e followin g minimum requirement plus any others st ipulated for the degree for whic h a s tude n t is a candidate. Complete a minimum of 120 emester hours with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher for all co ur sework. Complete at l east 40 seme ter hour in upper-division courses ( 3000and 4000-level co ur ses) Complete all Gener a l Studies requirements listed for the de gree and m a j or. Complete a three-hour Multicultural course requirement. Complete a three-hour Senior Experie n ce course requirement. Thi course must be taken at MSCD. Complete o n e s ubject major consisti n g of not less tha n 30 seme ter hour s With certai n exceptio n s ( ee the Degrees and Prog r ams section o n p age 8 of this Catalog), comp l ete a min or consis tin g of at l east 18 emester h ours. lf a stude nt comp l etes t wo majors, the second m ajor ati fies the minor requirement. Completing two concentrations under one major does n o t constitute the completion of two majors. Completion of two major doe not re ult in two de grees o r diplomas. Coursework used t o meet require m ents for one major or minor may not b e u sed to m eet r equireme nts for anot h e r major or minor. Students may not major and minor in the same discipline a nd are encou ra ged to obtain verification from an advisor if uncerta inty exists. Complete all special requirements of a department and sc h ool. Achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or hig h er in all MSCD course that satisfy the require m ents for the major, and for all MSC D courses that satisfy requirements for a minor. Stu dent s s h o uld c he ck with a n ad v i sor for spec i a l GPA program requirements File an Application for Graduation with the Office of th e Registrar by the deadline stipulated in th e C l ass Schedule Academic r eside n cy (cl assroom cre dit ) r equirements: Complete a minimum of 30 semeste r h ours of classroom credit a t MSCD, including the l as t 12 seme ter h o u rs a ppli cab l e to the d egree Complete a t lea st 8 upper-divi ion (3000 and 4000l evel cour es) se m es t er hours of the major and 3 upper-division semester hours of the minor at MSCD (c l assroom credit). Students should be aware that University of Colorado at Denver pooled cour es and course taken interinstitutionally or at one of the o th er state colleges will not sati fy aca d emic re ide n ce requirements at MSCD. CREDIT LIMITATIONS No more than 30 se m ester h our of omnibus-numbered cour e may b e applied toward gra du ation requirements (see page 227 of this Catalog). No more than 30 semester hour take n by extension and/or corresponde nce may be applied toward a b ac h e l or's d egree

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DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 13 No more than 4 semester hours in human performance and leisure activity or var ity sports cour e will be counted toward a bachelor 's degree for st udent s who are not majoring in human performance sport and leisure stu dies. No more than 7 semester hours in music ensemble course$ will be counted toward a bachelor's degree for students who are not majoring in music R E Q UIREMENTS F OR A S EC O ND D EGREE For an additional bachelor 's degree students mus t co mply with the following: The flfst bachelor's degree mus t be recognized by MSCD. General Studies will be con idered complete unless deficiencie s exist according to the major department. Student s must complete all requirements for a new major with a minimum of eight MSCD classroom upper-divi s ion semes ter hour s in the major department. Students do not need to complete a minor unle ss specifically required by the major department for the contemplated degree. Student must satisfy the Multicu l tural and Senior Experience course requirements for the second degree Student mus t spend at lea s t two additional emesters in residence. A minimum of 30 semester hour s of MSCD classroom credit after the awarding of the previous degree Credit limitations for a bachelor 's degree also apply to the seco nd degree. An Application for Graduation must be s ubmitted to the Office of the Regi strar by the dead line tipulated in the Cia s Schedule.

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14 GENERAL STUDIES THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM PHILO SOPHY OF THE G ENE RAL S TUDIES PROGRAM The Metropolitan State College of Den ver seeks to prepare its graduates for a lifetime of learni ng, which, in our c hangin g and co mpl ex soc ie ty, requires focused expertise (such as that provid ed by a m ajor area of stu d y) and the ability to communic ate with and l earn from experts in other fie lds. Undergraduate edu cation fosters the critica l thinking necessary for the exploratio n of unfamiliar disci plin es and for the syn thesis of l earning and exposes stude nt s to the richnes s and var iety of the inte llectual universe. General Studies Information Students mu t u e a ingle catalog to meet all degree requirements incl udin g tho e in the General Studies major and minor. Some changes in General Studie s requirements have been made retroactive. As a conseq u ence, many General Studies requirement s and policies described in this Catalog may be followed by tudent using ear lier catalogs. General Studies Goals The General Studi es Program is designed to he l p graduates ac hieve the fo llowin g competencies : MSCD s tudent s s hould be able to: I. write and speak with clarity; 2. read and listen critically; 3. draw conclusions from quantitative data ; 4. r ecognize faulty reasoning ; 5. organize idea s; and 6. communicate with experts in other di ciplines and lear n from them MSCD students s h ould: 7 hav e an open attitude tow ard different approaches to problems 8. h ave an informed awareness of the principal human achievements in history arts and letters, society, and sc ience, and 9. be introduced to the basic method s, knowledge, prob l e m s or attitudes c har acteristic of a field Structure of the General Studie s Program The Genera l Studie Pro gram i s structured to foster the development of skills and to encourage students to use their mastery of kills to explore knowledge in a variety of disciplines. The General Studies Pro gram provide s two le ve l s of experience: Level 1-Skill s Level I courses provide stu dent s with the basic skill of reading and listening critically reco gniz in g faulty reasoning, drawing conclusions from quantitative data organizing ideas and writing and s peaking with clarity Level 11-Breadth of Knowledge Leve l ll co u rses introduce students to the basic methods, know l edge, problems or attitudes characteristic of a field, encourage in stu dent s an open attit ud e toward differe nt approaches to problem enab l e stu d ents to co mmunic a t e with experts in other disciplines and l earn from the m and c ultivate in stu d e nts an i nformed aware ne ss of the principal achievements in his tory arts and letters, social cience, and scie nce In addi tion, in Level II courses stu d e nts will contin u e to d evelop their ski ll s in language and mathematics. Distribution and Credit Requirements To complete their General Studies Program, stu d ents must take approved cour es that fulfill the fol lowing distribution and credit requirements: Category Semester Hours Level I Composition .............................. ... ......................... 6 Mathematic .................................... .... ........ ........... 3 Communications ....................................................... 3

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. GENERAL STUDIES 15 Level IJ** Historical ........ ......................................... .... ...... 3 Arts and Letters ................ ............. ........................... 6 Social Sciences ......................................... ............. 6 Natural Sciences ......................................... .......... . 6 Total*** .......................................... ... ............... 33 *A transfer course or courses of at Least 2 semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Levell course. **One-hour deviations in the Levell! categories ma y be allowed. ***A student's completed General Studies Program must co ntain at least 33 semester hours Basic Rules: Only approved courses may be u sed to satisfy the General Studies requirements A listing of these courses begins on page 49 of thi Catalog and is indicated by course in the Course Description s section of this Catalog. General College Requirements brochures contain all approved general studies, multicultural and senior expe rience courses The brochure is updated three times per year and is available from academic department the Academic Advising Center and Academic Affairs. General Studies courses need not be counted toward General Studies requirements. They may be taken as electives or to satisfy requirements in the major or degree program. Departm ents or programs may specify, by prefix and number some General Studies courses in addition to courses required for the major or a professional credential. Courses taken using the pass-fail option cannot be cou n ted for General Studies. Note: Mor e details on the General Studies requirements can be found on pages 49-60.

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16 ADMISSIONS ADMISSIONS ADMISSION REQUIRE MENTS The college u ses two categories for classifying applicants: those who are younger than 20 and those who are 20 or older. B ased on the college's modified open admission system, each category ba s it own admi sio n requirement s and procedures Students maintain the tatus of continuing stu d e nt while absent from the college for l ess than one year; however foiJowin g two full semesters of ab e n ce, students s hould call the Office of Admissions t o determine whether an upd ated application for re-admission will be r equired. For more information, see Admi sio n of Previously Enrolled Students (page 18). APPLICATIO N D EADLINE Applications complete with all required credentia l s will be acce pted through the fir t week of classes. However for the be t possible se l ection of co ur se students are advised to app l y ear ly. APPLICANTS YOUNGER THAN 20 App l icants who are younger than 20 on September 15 for eit h er the ummer semester or the fall semes ter, or February 15 for the spri n g emes t e r will be c la ssif i ed as trad itional applica nts. They will be conside r ed for admission usin g the requirements described below Freshmen ( first-time college students): The college will admit students who are likely to successfuiJy complete an academic program and who meet state requirements for the college as establi bed by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE). Applic ants who do not meet the stated admission req uirem e nts will b e co n idered on an indi vidual basi that includes a careful rev i ew of all credentials, including lett ers of recommenda tion and a personal interview Appli cants who h ave not grad u ated from high schoo l but hav e r eceive d the Colorado General Ed u catio n a l Development ( GED ) ce rtificate or its e quivalent w ill be accepted. ACT or SAT t es t results are not required with aGED. Applicant must request that the following informatio n be mailed directly to the Offic e of Admissions from the high school or testing agency: => ACT or SAT test results => hig h choo l transcript with GPA and class rank This information may be s ubmitt ed at the end of the s ixth seventh, or eighth emester of high sc hool but no later than four week before the expected term of enroll m ent. An official, final tran crip t with date of graduation is r equired no later than the fourth week of the term of enroll ment. Students s hould request the transcript and verify tha t the high school tran cript with date of graduation ha s been mailed by the hig h schoo l and ha s been received by t h e Office of Admi sio ns. Applicants who have s ubmitted a co mplete applica tion by the deadline and who ha ve a 76 ind ex (see c hart on page 22) or higher will be admitte d Students who ha ve lower than a 76 index will be cons ider ed on an individual ba is. College Transfers: Applicants with 30 or more transferable semester hours completed wit h at lea s t a 2.0 cumu l a tive GPA will be offered admi sion. Student with fewer than 30 hours will be consi dered on an individual basis based on high school GPA ACT or SAT cores and college work com pleted Applic ant who have less than a c umulati ve 2.0 gra de point average from all colleges and uni versities attende d will be considered on an individual ba sis that includes a carefu l review of all c r edentials, inc luding letters of recommendation and a per so n a l interview.

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ADMISSIONS 17 Applicants must request that the following information be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions from the high school, testing agency and/or oollege or university: ACT or SAT test results high school transcript with GPA and class rank I transcript from each college or university attended or currently attending These credentials should be received at least four weeks l prior to the fust day of classes. All required credentials must be received before a final admission decision can be made. APPLICANTS 20 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER Applicants who are 20 or older on September 15 for either the summer semester or the fall semester, or February 15 for the spring semester will be considered for admission using the requirements described below for a first-time college student or a college tran s fer student: Freshmen (first-time college students): Applicants will be admitted to the college upon indicating on the application for admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have received a General Educational Devel opment (OED) certificate By signing the application for admission, degree-seeking applicants are certifying that they will request either a high school transcript with date of graduation or OED test scores be sent to the Office of Admissions Degree-seeking students will not be permitted to register for a second semester until this credential is received. The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but is highly recommended for advising purposes College Transfers: Applicants will be admitted to the college, regardless of their cumulative college OPA if they indicate on their application for admission that they havt1 graduated from high school or that they have received a General Educational Development (GED) certificate By signing the application for admission, degree-seeking applicants are certifying that they will request that either a high school transcript with date of graduation or OED test scores be sent directly to the Office of Admissions. In place of these credentials, college transcripts showing completion of 30 or more semester credit hours with grades of "C" or better will be accepted. College transfer students should request to have college transcripts sent directly to the Office of Admissions for transfer credit purposes. Degree-seeking applicants are required to have all college and university transcripts on file to receive a complete transfer evaluation. The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but is highly recommended for advising purposes. APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they are received each semester. All credentials received by the college become the property of MSCD and will not be returned to the stu dent. It is the responsibility of the applicant to notify the Office of Admissions of any changes to the application for admission prior to the first day of classes. If changes are not reported to the Office of Admissions, the registration process could be delayed for subsequent semesters. Failure to report acad emic changes may result in rejection, dismissal and/or loss of credit. International (visa) applicants should refer to the Admission of International Students section on page 19 in this Catalog. To apply for admission: I Applications are available from The Metropolitan State College of Denver, Office of Admissions, Campus Box 16, P.O. Box 173362 Denver CO 303-556-3058 or online at www .mscd.edu. A $25 nonrefundable application fee ($40 for international applicants) is required with the application for admission. Re-admit applicants are not required to submit an application fee.

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18 ADMISSIONS Submit a completed application and app l ication fee directly to the Office of Admiss i ons. The application and all required credentials (see Admi sion Requirements) should be received at l east four weeks prior to the fir s t day of c l asse s It is the student's responsibi lit y to request that all required credentials be mailed directly from the issuing institution or agency to the Office of Admiss i ons. Hand-carried documents will not be accepted. Although an applicant's record may be summarized o n one transcript an official transcript from each institution attended is required. The application for admission and all credential s received by the college will be kep t on file for three semesters. After that time the file will no longer be maintai ned for students who do n ot enroll. Applicants wishi n g to attend MSCD must begin the admiss ion proce s again. Admission of Previously Enrolled Students Re-admit students are defined as individuals who have previous l y enrolled and have received a grade or grade n otation at the college Re-admit students who have not been in attendance at MSCD for one or more years sho uld : submit a comp l eted application for admission ; and check the re-admission box on the top of the application under Application Status. No application fee is required for re admission. ensure that the application and any required credentia l s are received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is s ought. s ubmi t transcripts from institution s attended since last attending MSCD Stude nt s who are returning after nine years of absence from the college are required to resubmit all cre dentials. Admission of Nondegree Students The nondegree student classification meets the needs of students 20 year s of age or older w ho wish to take college courses but who do not currently intend to work toward a baccalaureate degree at MSCD. With the exception of high school students who have comp l eted the approva l process nondegree stu dents must have a high school diploma or its equivalent to qualify for admission. Nondegree students m ay c han ge to degree status by completing a Change of Status Form and s ub mit ting all requir ed transcripts to the Office of Admissions Admission Notification Students are notified by mail as soo n as decisions are made. Once admitted, st ud ents will be mailed instr uction s regarding cou r se registration and ot her relevant information. No tuition depo it is r equi red Students deni ed admission may appea l the decision by submitti n g a Jetter of appeal to the Director of Admissions along with new and compe lling academic information, J etter of recommendation and ot her supportive documentation. ADDITIONAL ADMISSION PROGRAMS Summer Semester Only Applicants younger than 20 years of age who h ave graduated from high choo l or ha ve receive d a Gen eral Educational Development (OED) certificate and are applyi n g for the summer semester, and who do not wish to contin ue after the s ummer semester, may be admitted und er a provisional status. These appli cants are not required to s ubmit admission crede ntial s Please c h eck the appropr i ate box under the MSCD Plans sectio n on the Application for Admission. Applicants fo r the summer se me ster who wish to con tinue for the fall or spring semester must meet stated admissio n requirements before the semester begins.

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ADMISSIONS 19 High School C o ncurrent E n r ollm e n t Programs (Hig h School Stu dents Only) HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT EDUCATION AND E RlCHME T PROGRAM The Student Education and Enrichment (SEE) pro gram is The Metropolitan State College of Denver 's High School Concurrent Enrollment Program for college-ready student SEE is designed to supplement a tudent's ex.isting education through early participation in college-level c la sses. This advanced pro gram should not be interpreted as an alternative to high school completion but is, inst ea d a cooperative college/high sc hool effort to provide educational enrichment and early college attendance to qualified high school tudents. SEE students must meet the following criteria : Current enrollment in a Colorado high school as a junior or senior Able to benefit from specialized or accelerated c la sses Demonstrated ability to do college-level work To apply for admission the student must, with approval from the appropriate high sc hool authority submit an admission application with the required $25 application fee accompanied by the following documents : Recommendation from a high school counselor or administrator describing how the student will benefit from early college attendance Written parental approval Official high sc hool tran sc ript Upon receipt of the e documents, the student's r ecor d is reviewed and the admission decision is made However, if additional or supporting information i s needed, the s tudent may be required to have an interview with an admissions counselor. The admission decision will be based on the tudent's acad emic preparation and past performance, recomm e ndation of the high chool official, and the student's personal motivation and readine ss for a traditional college experie nce P OST SECONDARY ENROLLME T OPTIONS PROGRAM The Post-Secondary Enrollment Option s Program ( PSEOP ) is a spo n orship program enacted by state law in 1988 that provides juniors and se niors in high sc hool the opportunity to take college classes for both high school and college credit. The program is intended to provide high school tudents with an optional learning environment. Thi s program allows a high chool stu dent to regi ter for college classes, in most cases up to six se mester credit hours (o r two courses). These course may be u sed for both high school and college credit. To participate in the program, st udents must first eek approval from their high chool and school district. The district determines the number of credit hour s the student may take and make s the finan cial arrangements. The s tudent i s respo n si ble for payment of all tuition and fees by the college payment deadline before the semester begins. Specific deadlines and further information relative to this program and the application process may be obtained by calling the Office of Admissions at 303-556-3058. Me ritu s a t MSC D (Senio r Program) Individuals 60 or older, who do not wi h to earn credit, are invited to atte nd tuition-free clas es of t h eir choice on a space-available basis. The Meritus program is de s igned to give special encouragement and assistance to retired citizens to continue their per onal educational growth in a stimulating and friendly campus setting For information and to enroll call the Center for Individualized Learning at 303-5568342 Central Classroom I 06. A DMISS IO N O F INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS All students who declare a country of citizenship other than the U.S. on their applications for admission must contact the Office of Admis s ions. Applicants who are U .S. resident aliens ( including refugees and political asylum) will be required to (1) submit a minimum of an official high sc hool transcript/diploma that is determined equivalent to high school graduation in the U.S., and (2) complete an immigrant advising interview to en s ure that their Eng lish language skills are sufficient for admission to the college.

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20 ADMISSIONS Applicants who are on any type of temporary visas are required to submit the "International Student Applicatio n which can be obtained from the Office of Admis ions or online at our web site: www.mscd.edu. Applicants on temporary visas are r equired to s ubmit (I) a minimum of an official high sc hool tran script/d iplom a that is determined equivalen t to hig h school graduation in the U.S., (2) English language proficiency documentation, normally in the form of an acceptable TOEFL (Test of English as a Second Language) score, and (3) financial support documentation to cover the costs of attending the college for one academic year including livin g expenses (this is only required of potential students on F-1 and J-1 visas). Detailed information regarding all requirements an d admission procedures of international stu dents ca n be obtained from the Office of Admissions and on the Int ernatio nal Student App lication form. Transfer Credit Evaluation A transfer credit evaluation is performed for admitted degree-seeking stude nt s after official transcripts are received by the Office of Admissions Within approximate l y four weeks, students receive two copies of the transfer credit evaluation, one of which shou ld be t aken to the major and minor depart ments for advice on how credits might apply to their programs Transfer credits will be accepted under the following guidelines: Credit must have been earned at an ins titution of higher educatio n holding full regional accreditation. Grades earned must be a C" or better. Courses with "D," "F' or sim ilar grades will not be accepted in transfer. A summary of transfer credit from each institutio n will be indicated on the MSCD academic record Neither transfer course grades n or previous grade point averages will be indicated or affect the MSCD gra d e point average. Course con t ent must be simi l ar to those courses offered at MSCD A maximum of 64 semester hours from two-year institutions will be ap plied toward an MSCD degree A maximum of 90 semester hours of credit will be applied toward an MSCD degree for acceptab l e work completed at a four -year ins titution or a combination of twoand four-year institutions. Transferable courses are accepted at the same level, i.e. lower-division or upper-division, at which they were offered at the previous institution. For example, all transferred community college courses will app l y to the MSCD degree as l ower-division cre dit. Students who have earned an A.A. or A .S. degree will receive junior standing at MSCD, pro vided all courses included in the degree carry a gra de of C" or better and, based on the course-by-course evaluation, otherwise meet minimum MSCD transfer credit sta ndards. Stu dent s may need to comp l ete additiona l MSCD lower-division requirements. Applicants having completed the Colorado community college core curriculum as certifie d on their community college transcript, are considered to have satisfied The Metropolitan State College of Denver's minimum General Studies requirements. However, additio nal specific lower -division courses may be required for certain d egree programs Once transfer credits are evaluated, the total number of the se credits applicable to a degree will not be reduced unless the student repeats already-awarded transfer credit at MSCD or inter rupts MSCD enrollment for three or more consecutive semesters and readmit s to the college under more restrictive tran fer credit evaluation policies. In accordance with policies established by the Colora do Commission on Higher Education to address stu dent disputes regarding s tud e nt transfer between Colorado public in st itutions, MSCD has instituted procedures for resolving transfer credit disputes. These procedures are available from Transfer Services in the Office of Admissions Questions pertaining to transfer credit evaluation shou ld be referred to the Office of Transfer Services, Central Classroom Building, room 103, 303-556-3774. Preparatory Course Credit Policy No preparatory courses are applicable toward an MSCD degree after spring 1993. For details please see an advisor in the Academic Advising Center.

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ADMISSIONS 21 Transfer Services The Office of Transfer Services offer assistance to students transferring from other ins titutions Spe cific services include preliminary and/or official transcript evaluation educational planning transition to academic departments and resolution of tran sfe r prob l ems Tran fer co unselors are available by appointments and for walk-ins; eve nin g ap p ointments are avai l ab l e. Transfer Services works c lo se l y with Transcript Evaluatio n to provide tudents information about the ir tra n sfer c r edits and how those c r edits may be applied. Question s pertaining to transfer credit evaluation s hould be referred to the Office of Tran sfer Services, Central Classroom Building Room 103,303-556-3774.

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'DftScti LO HI ACT SJcr SJcr 400 SilO II roo tllO n t!lO 660 13 610 no 14 130 130 1.5 740 1150 16 110 lllO 17 830 8SO 18 8110 19 910 930 :J) 940 990 ll 1000 IO:Jl Z! lOll 10.!11 :l3 lOOl 1000 :l4 1090 li:Jl :IS llll :l6 1110 71 tiOO till lB 040 010 29 tiiiJ 1310 ll = 1310 31 i3IIJ 1410 3l 14:Jl 1.510 ll 1.5:Jl 1.510 1600 1600 1600 34 3S )l 1.1 40 43 44 48 49 51 S4 ss -'1 jg 6S 61 (II 11 13 115 18 81 84 III 91 l.l 41 44 45 49 .!II Sl ss S6 jg 66 ell 10 1l 14 11 19 Ill 8S 88 9l 1 3 4l 45 46 .!II 51 S3 S6 Sl 61 (II 11 13 15 18 IIJ 83 85 89 93 1 4 44 47 48 Sl S3 ss -'1 jg 8l 8S 88 9 1 9S 1 5 46 49 .!II S4 ss Sl 8l 84 III 93 '7/ 1 .6 1.1 48 .!II 51 S3 Sl S4 S6 -'1 Sl jg jg 81 81 83 84 85 85 88 89 91 9l 94 9S '7/ 99 IDI IDI:H SCHOOL AVl!IIACB ss S6 -'1 S6 S/ 6 1 61 19 1011131511119 IIJ 8l 11 n 1 4 r1i5 18 Ill 81 83 81 83 84 85 81 83 8S 85 88 18 IIJ 8l 84 85 III 89 11JIIl8485888991 m Ill 84 85 88 93 83 84 86 88 9l 93 9S 8S 85 88 9l 94 9S '7/ 88 89 9193 95 '7/ 981DO 9193 95 '7/ 991DOIDl 93 94 !>5 98 IDO IDl ID3 lOS !>5 '7/ 99 IDI 103 IDS 106 108 99 100 IDl 104 106 108 ID9 Ill 103 104 106 108 110 Ill ll3 us l.6 6S ell (II 80 83 84 III 89 9l 94 !>5 98 101 ID3 106 109 lU 116 l 7 61 10 81 8l 8S 85 89 91 9l 94 !>5 98 100 ID3 IDS W8 Ill 114 118 l.8 l 9 ell 10 11 13 19 19 81 Ill 84 83 8S 85 88 III 89 9l 9l 94 93 95 9S '7/ '7/ 99 99 IDI WI 103 W4 106 W6 ID8 109 lll Ill 114 w 111 119 til IIJ Ill 8S 85 Ill 93 95 !>5 98 100 IDl ID4 ID1 ID9 Ill liS 118 til 8l 84 III 88 91 9l 95 '7/ 98 100 IOl )()! 106 109 Ill 114 111 no tl4 18 8l 83 8S 88 89 9l 93 !>5 98 99 101 103 lOS 107 110 Ill Ill 118 til tiS 3.3 115 19 IIJ 84 8S III 91 94 95 98 100 101 103 IDS 107 109 Ill 114 111 no tl3 ::J7 3 4 18 8 1 8l 86 III 89 9l 93 !>5 '7/ IDO IDl ID3 IDS ID1 ID9 lll 114 116 119 til tiS tl9 3 5 19 Ill 83 III 88 93 94 '7/ 98 WI W3 W4 106 W8 110 Ill liS 111 no tl3 tl6 130 3 6 3.7 8 1 83 84 85 8S III 89 91 9l 9l 94 9S '7/ !>5 98 99 IDI 100 IDl ID3 IDS IDS ID7 106 ID8 108 110 uo m Ill 114 114 116 111 119 119 til til tl4 tiS tl1 tl8 130 13l 134 3.8 8S 81! 89 93 94 !>5 99 100 W3 W4 W1 109 110 m 114 116 118 til tl3 tl6 tl9 13l 136 3 9 88 91 9l !>5 '7/ 99 IDl ID3 106 ID1 110 Ill 113 w 117 119 til tl4 tl6 tl9 13l 135 139 !>5 '7/ 98 100 lDl ID4 ID6 ID8 109 lll 113 111 no u s 111 118 no 01 tl3 tl4 tl6 01 tl9 130 m 134 135 131 139 141 144 100 m 106 108 m m m w ID JD.! ID 109 lll ll3 W m D 1')101.rs:c cnislenhn'1(ib.Jt.ge:mrthll\64 \ID.tskt\willbe l CUtbf-<::IV> "'&> 8 "' -l @ 8 .'0::::1 0 0. ...... > s-n "' -l (") "' ::r o Q "' 'Tlo a ::I 3 5'-goer 7 ::;:; "' 0 5. ::I c: "' 3 0: .!" ...... (") "' ::r "' "' ::I ::1 c: 0. 3 '< cro !!: s; 5'-::r "' (") ::r 0 "' =I (") "' ::r -d 8 0 -"' "' 0. -l"' 2":'0 "' 0 s "' z > e: 0 ::r "' -.. t".1 t"' t= N N )> 0 3: Cii en 0 z en

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ENROLLMENT/REGISTRATION 23 ENROLLMENT New Student Orientation New Student Orientation offers a mandatory orientation program for all flfst-time college students and transfer students under 20. Transfer students 20 and older, as well as parents and non-degree seeking students, are strongly encouraged to attend orientation sessions. li'he year-round sessions cater to the specific needs of first-time college students, transfer students, women, and parents of traditional age freshmen Sessions are scheduled on different days and at various times to accommodate the needs of our diverse commuter populations. Sessions are also offered at the North and South campuses to pro vide further flexibility. Orientation sessions cover a variety of topics including degree planning, acad emic concerns, tudents rights and respon ibilities student support programs commuter issues and an opportunity to ask and discuss individual questions Students are provided with a packet of valuable information which inc lud es a catalog student handbook general requirements brochure and critical information from many of the student upport programs and service Orientation is invaluable in laying a solid foundation for students' future academic success. Approximately 4,000 students and parents are erved by this program each year. For further information see the Class Schedule or call 303-556-693 I. Reading, Writing and Mathematics Placement Examinations All flfst time college students are required to take a series of three exams before registering for their ftrst-semester classes. The exams meas ure college entry-level skills in reading, writing and mathe matics, and the scores are used to help advisors and students select appropriate courses For additional information call 303-556-3677 Academic Advising At MSCD students are provided multiple sources of academic advising support. Continuing students with declared majors receive advising as istance from their academic departments. New students and students without declared majors receive advising support from the Academic Advising Center CN I 04 Services available to students in the Center include the following : as istance with course selection, scheduling and registration; help with long-term degree planning ; identification of degree enhancement strategies; and ongoing developmental advising, including assistance with the major-minor selection process, adjustment to college etc. For additional information call 303-556-3680. REGISTRATION All continuing students in good standing and all accepted applicants at the college are eligible to reg ister each semester. Students are responsible for ensuring that there is a correct and up-to-date addre s and phone number on file with the college. Address changes may be made with the Registrar s Office, through MSCD's Web site (www.mscd.edu) by writing or faxing (303-556 3999) the address and phone number change to the Registrar s Office. A student may register for classes in several ways. Inf ormation on the registration procedure and regis tration dates is published in the Class Schedule which is mailed to all continuing and new students. Concurrent Enrollment Students who find it necessary to register at MSCD and another college at the same time should check with MSCD Transfer Services (CN 103) concerning the acceptance and appl i cation of transfer credits. Interinstitutional Registration Students enrolled at MSCD may register for courses at Arapahoe Community College, Community Col lege of Denver and Red Rocks Community College Courses taken at these institutions in no way alter exi ting MSCD degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requirements subject to specific approval by MSCD Students should be aware that courses taken interinstitutionally will be counted as part of the 64 semester hours from community colleges applicable to an MSCD degree. Interinstitu tional credits will not satisfy academic residence requirements at MSCD ln the event a conflict arises between the policies/procedures of MSCD and one of the colleges listed above the most restrictive policy prevails. Students are advised to confer with department chairs and/or coordinators of academic advising before registering interin stitutionally.

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24 ENROLLMENT/REGISTRATION Consortium Registration Adams State College, Mesa State College and Western State College together with Metropolitan State College of Denver form a system of state colleges Each member institution can provide any stude nt in good sta nding with the materials needed to enroll temporarily in any other member institution without incurring additional matriculation costs. Information concerni n g tuition is available at the host institu tion. The process of enrolling as a system student should begin at least one month prior to the begin ning of the registration period at the host institution. Information concerning current procedures for enrolli n g in courses at the se other institutions is available from the Regi s trar's Office. Enrollment Status The enrollment s tatu s of a student in the interi n s titutional registration or co n sortium registration pro grams i s determin ed by the student's status at the home institution (institutio n where the st udent is seeking a degree) Students sho uld ascertain before enrolling at an institution that desired courses will satisfy degree requirements at the home institutio n Course Audit Policy Students may audit a class with the permi ss ion of the instructor and if seating i s available. Academic credit is not awarded for an audited course The cost for audit in g a course is based on regular tuition as published in the current Class Schedule. Audit approval for m s are available in deans' and academic department offices. Changes in Registration Enrolled st udent s may adjust schedules by dropping and/or adding classes. See the current Class Schedule for complete information concerning dropping and/or adding classes and the tuition and fee refund sc hedul e. Students who reduce their course load after the 12th day of classes and before the b eginning of the fifth week will receive an "NC" notation for each course they have dropped A NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Regi s trar's Office Students reducin g their course lo ad between the beginning of the fLfth and the end of the tenth week of classes during fall and spring semester may receive an NC" notation for each course provided faculty approva l i s granted. Additional restrictions regarding assigning the "NC" notation may be set by each schoo l department and/or faculty memb er for the peri od between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of the semester (or proportional time frame). Students are a dvi sed to seek faculty sig natures well before the deadline. A NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Reg istrar 's Office See the sections on grades notations course load and class attendance in this Catalog. Proportional time frames are applied for part -ofterm courses workshops and s urnrner terms. Procedure s for adding or droppin g a part-of-term course afte r the course has begun are described in the current Class Schedule. TUITION AND FEES Thition Classification A s tudent is classified as an in-state or out-of-state student for tuition purposes at the time of admission. This classification is b ased upon inform atio n supplied by the st udent on the application for admission and is m ade in accordance with the Colorado Tuition Classificatio n Law CRS S23-7-101 et seq (1973), as amended. Once determined, a student's tuition classification status remains un changed unle ss satis factory evidence that a change sho uld be made is presented A Petition for In-State Tuition Classifica tion Form and the evidence requested should be submitted to the Re gistrar's Office if a st udent believes she or he i s entitled to in-state status. The tuition classification stat ut e require s that in order to qualify for ins tate status, a stude nt (o r the par ents or legal guardian of the student in the case of students under 23 years of age who are not ema nci pated) must have been domiciled in Colorado for one year or more immediate l y preceding the fust day of the semester for which such classification is sought.

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ENROLLMENT/REGISTRATION 25 Domicile for tuition purposes requires two insepar ab l e elements: ( I ) a perm a nent place of h a bitation in Colorado and (2) intent to rem a in in Colorado with no int ent to be domiciled e l sew h ere. Some exam ple of connection with the s tate that provide objective evide nce of intent are: ( 1 ) paym ent of Colorado s tate income tax as a Colorado reside nt (2) permanent employment in Colorado, (3) ow ner hip of re s idential real property in Colorado (4) compliance with laws impo ing a mandatory duty on any domi ciliary of the sta te s uch as the drivers license law and the vehicle registration l aw and (5) regi s tration to vote. Other factors unique to the individual can al o be used t o demon s trate the requisite intent. Any questions regardi n g the tuition classificatio n l aw should be dire c ted to an admissions officer at the co llege In order to qualify for in-tate s tatus for a particular semester, the stu dent must prove that domi ci le began not later than o n e year prior to the first day of classes for that semes ter. The date s for quali fying and for s ub mitting petition s are published in the Class Schedul e each se mester. Tuition and College Service Fees The B oard of Trus t ees of Th e State Colleges in Co l orado, the governing board of the college, reserves the rig ht to a l ter any or all tuition and fees for any emeste r wit h out notice. Tuition and college serv ice fees are determined by the trustees s h ortly before the beginnin g of each aca demic year. Information regardi n g tuition a nd fees i s publi s h e d in t h e curre n t Class Schedule. Tuition a n d fees are payable at the time of regi s trati on. Standard Fees An app licati o n fee is required of all applicants for admission to the college. This fee is nonrefundable and will not be applied to tuition App l ication fee ........... .................................... $25 International student application fee ................... ............ $40 Matriculation fee ............................................... $25 Special fee s Returned check charge ......................................... $17 Tuition Adjustments Plea se see the Class Schedule for the current semester. STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE All st udents taking 10 credit hour s or more in the fall or spr ing semester or eight credit hour s or more in the summer se me ste r are required to participate in the co llegespo n sored s tudent health ins urance coverage unle ss proof can be provided that a student h as co mparable and valid outside health ins urance coverage.* Full-time students are automatically billed for student health insurance on their tuition bill under the insura n ce heading Students w h o have outside ins urance coverage are responsib l e for completing a waiver form by the deadline ind ica t ed in eac h semester's Class Schedule in order to have the in u rance charge removed from their tuition bill ( deadline changes from se m es ter to se me s ter). Waiver forms will not be accepted after the deadline listed in each semester's Class Schedule. It is the st udent 's responsibility to become familiar w ith the college's policies and t9 ad h ere to the deadlines listed. No refunds will occur after the waiver deadline W aiver forms a nd insurance brochures are available at either the Student Health Insuranc e Offic e located in the Student Health Center (PL 150 ) or the Student Accoun t s Office ( CN l 10). Waiver forms are also printed in each Class Schedule and avai l ab l e from the SHC website at http ://www.msced.edu/s tudentlr eso ur ces!health!. H ealth in s urance waiver forms are valid for only one year. Continuing students must complete a waiver form ANNUALLY prior to each fall semester. Studen t s with a break in academic enro llm ent, and those w h o begin c l asses in the spring or s umm er must comp l ete a waiver form by the approp r ia t e deadline (listed in the Class Schedule) for the semes ter they enroll and every fall semester thereafter. Waiver form information will be mailed to the home address of all full-time student prior to the semeste r of enrollment

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26 ENROLLMENT/REGISTRATION Students who request a waiver form to provide proof of valid o ut side health insurance mu t: Complete the s tudent health insurance waiver form. Attach a copy of a valid h ealth insura n ce card to the waiver form. Note: copy both the f r ont and b ack side of yo ur insurance card o n t o a separa t e s h eet of paper. Submit the waiver form b y the deadli n e ind icated in eac h semester's Class Schedule (deadline changes from se m ester to semester). All covered services at the Student Health Ce nter are paid at I 00 p ercent with no pa yme nt at the time of serv i ce, n o deductible and n o ne e d for c laim forms The pre-exi s ting conditio n exclusion clau e i s waived for serv ic es performed. Please see the current Student Health Ins uran ce Brochure for a summary of the plan benefits requirements and exclusions. Brochure can be obtained at the Student Health Center. Dependent of a tudent parti c ip a tin g in the s tudent health insurance p rogram areal o eligible for o pti onal in urance coverage Adult d ependents (18 and up ) may use the Student Health Center ( SHC) after they pay the se m ester l y SHC fee D ependents 17 year old or younger are not eligible for service at the SHC. Please call the insurance office for informatio n r egarding pediatric care. In add i tion, students e nr olled during the s prin g se m ester are given the option of purchas ing s umm er health in uran ce without atte ndin g clas es provid ed that paym e nt i s received b y the deadline listed in the s umm er Class Sc h ed ule. Graduatin g s tudents h ave the optio n to pur c h a e from one t o six m onths of co ntinuin g coverage. Students with questions regardin g student health insu r a n ce s hould contact the Stud ent Insurance Office I ndiv i d ual insurance plans that are not required t o meet state and federal benefit mandates a r e not co nsidered comparable and consequently wi ll not be consi dered proof of co mparabl e coverage. Effec tive August], 1998, the Colorado R esident Dis coum Pro g ram" will NOT be accepted as proof of com parable outside health insurance coverage for waiver purposes. This special program is not conside red health insurance and was not designed by the state legislature for this purpose STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE Vo luntar y Program for Part-Time Students Based on the mandatory insurance requirement which the college ha s adopted, the Student Insurance Carrier ha permitted the college to offer the following Volunt ary Health In s ur ance Program to part time students This pr ogram i s exclusively for part time stu d ents taking 6-9 c r edit h o ur in the fall and/o r s prin g semeste r (s) and 6-7 cre dit hours during the s ummer semester. Students taking more o r J ess credit hour s than indicated a b ove are NOT eligible for this vo lunt ary p r ogram. The Voluntary Plan h as the same d eadline (as listed in the Class S c h edule), plan design, cost and b enefit le ve l s as d oe the mandatory ins u rance plan referenced in the previou ection. Part -time stu d ent inte r ested in the voluntary option s hould contact the Student Insurance Office at 303-556-3873 for applicatio n details. STUDENT DENTAL INSURANCE Voluntary Program for all Students Voluntary D ental Ins uran ce is available to al l student taking o n e credit hour or more. Information and applicatio n forms ca n be obtai ned at the Student Insurance Office in the Student Heaith Center ( PL 150)

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FINANCIAL AID 27 FINANCIAL AID The MSCD financial aid program provides assistance and advice to tudents w h o would be unable to pursue their education at the college without such help Scholarships, grants, loans and part-time employ ment are available ingly or in various combinations to meet the difference between what the student and the studen t's family could reasonably be expected to provide and the expected cost of attending MSCD ESTIMATED EXPENSES The 2000-2001 academic year expenses will be as follows: Resident N onre s ident Ttlition and Fees .......... $2,975 .......... $8,575 Room and B oard ......... 7,560 ........... 7,560 Books and Supplies .......... 720 ............. 720 Transportation ............. I ,485 ........... I ,485 Miscellaneou s ............. .l..J..8Q .......... .l..J..8Q Total $14, 120 ......... $19,720 Tuition and fees are set by The State Colleges in Colorado and are s ubject to change without notice All stu dents are pl aced o n a sing l e-person budget. Additional allowances may be m ade for students with day-care costs for d ependent chi ldr en and for expenses rel ated to disabilities n ot paid by another age ncy (P.L. 99498). ELIGffiiLITY AND NEED To qualify for financial aid, a student must be a U.S. citizen or e l igible noncitize n ; be registered with Selective Service (if required ); have financial need ; be degree-, licen s ure, or certificate-seeking; be m aki n g satisfactory academic pro g r ess; and not b e in default o n a federal educatio n loan or owe a repay ment o n a federal grant. APPLICATION PROCEDURES Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (F AFSA ) each year to determi n e financial aid eligibility. En t ering col!ege freshmen s hould obtain application forms from their high sc ho o l s or from MSCD's Office of Financial Aid. Most students who comp l eted a 2000-0 1 FAFSA o r R enewal FAFSA will receive a PIN (pe rsonal identification numb er) from the Federal Processor between November, 2000 and J anuary, 2001. This PIN is u sed for completing the 2001-02 Renewal FAFSA online a t www.fafsa.ed.gov. For quicker proce ss ing we strongly recommend that returning transferring and entering students complete their FAFSA or R enewal FAFSA on the Web at: www.fafsa.ed.gov. Students s hould complete and s ubmit the FAFSA or R enewal FAFSA to the federal processor as ear l y as pos s ible (after January 1st), preferable no later than mid-February and s ubmit all requested docu ments to the MSCD Office of Financial Aid by April 12th. Detailed information concerning application procedures is provided in the Financial Aid Handbook and Scholarship Guid e available in the MSCD Office of Fin a ncial Ai.d. FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS The amount of fund s made availab l e to s tudents depend s on the maximum award allowed by regulation of each program the student's establi hed financial need duration of the s tudent 's enrollment, and funds allocated t o the college by the state and federal governments. Grants Grants are gift money from the federal or state government and do n ot have to be repaid. Federal Pell Grants are fede ral funds and awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a bachelor's degree and who are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens. The amount of the award is b ased on each student's financial eligibility and the number of hours for which the student is enro lled The amount of Federal Pell g r ant awards for the 2000-0 I aca demic year will range from $400 to $3,300 for those s tud e nt s who qualify. Full-time, half-time, or less than half-time tudents may qualify for a Federal Pell Grant.

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28 FINANCIAL AID Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are federal funds awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a bachelor's degree and are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens. This grant is awarded to students who demonstrate exceptional need. The amount of FSEOG awards range from $100 to $600 per fall and spring semesters Colorado State Grants (CSG) are state funds awarded to Co l orado residents with demonstrated finan cial need. Eligible students have no prior bachelor's degree, are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens, and are enrolled fullor part-time (at least six credit hours for the fall and spring semesters) at MSCD. The amount of the CSG award ranges from $50 to $600 per fal l and spring semesters Colorado Student Incentive Grants (CSIG) are a combination of federal and state funds awarded by the same criteria as CSG. Scholarships Students must be enrolled at least half-time be degree, certificateor licensure-seeking, be making sat isfactory academic progress, and not be in defau lt on a federal education loan or owe a repayment on a federal grant to receive a scho lar ship. Presidential Scholarships: These scholarships include four-year scholarships for entering high school students and two-year scholars hip s for transfer students. This scholarsh i p covers up to the cost of tuition and mandatory fees per semester for up to 15 credits. Colorado Scholars Awards: Scholarships of up to $500 per semester, not exceeding the cost of resi dent tuition and mandatory fees per academic year are available through the academic departments. Recipients must be Colorado residents. Interested students should contact their departments for appl i cations. Athletic Scholarships: MSCD has a limited number of athletic scholarships. Applications and addi tional information are available from the MSCD Intercollegiate Athletic Office. Private Scholarships: Students should refer to the MSCD Financial Aid Handbook and S c holarship Guide for information regarding scholarships and the free online scholarship search. Receipt of a scho lar s hip may affect a student's financial aid award because s tud ents receiving federal and/or s tat e aid are limited in the maximum amount of aid which can be received. A student whose full need has been met by other types of fmancia l aid prior to receipt of a scholarship will have that aid reduced by the amo unt of the sc holar ship. If the student s full eligibility has not been met, the scholar ship will be allowed to satisfy the unmet need. Each student's situation is treated individually. All scho lar ship s are based on the student's contin u ed eligibility and available funding. Loans Federal Perkins Loans are long-term federa l loans that are awarded based on the student's need and MSCD's available funds. Federal Perkins Loan can range from $100 to $1, 500 per semester. Repay ment of the loan begins nine months after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled in at least six credit hours each semester. The interest rate is 5 percent and interest begins to accrue at repayment. All first-time borrowers at MSCD are required to attend a Perkins Loan Entrance Interview before loan funds can be released to them. Federal Family Education Loans (FFEL) include Federa l Stafford Loa ns, unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans, and Federal PLUS Loans whi ch help students and/or their parents to borrow f und s to help meet educational expenses. To borrow these funds students and/or their parents must complete and submit, in addition to the FAFSA, a separate l ender application to the MSCD Office of Financial Aid. Loan ap plic ations may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid or the lender of the student's choice. Students must be enrolled at least six credit hours eac h semester and be degree-, certificateor licensure-seeking Interest rates vary depending on the type of l oan and the date the student borrows the first Federal Family Education Loan. For further information on interest rates, check with the MSCD Office of Financial Aid or the lender. First tim e borrowers a t MSCD are required to attend a Loan Entrance Intervi ew before loans funds can be released to them. Federal Stafford Loans: Eligibility for the Federal Stafford Loan i s based on the student's need as determined by the MSCD Office of Financial Aid The annu a l l oan limits are $2,625 for freshmen, $3,500 for sophomores and $5, 500 for all other und ergraduates. Interest does not begin to accrue until

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FINANCIAL AID 29 six months after the st udent graduates or cease to be enrolled in school at least half-time (six credit hours per semester). Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans : These l oans have many of the same terms and conditions as the Federal Stafford Loan. The main difference is that the students are responsible for the interest that accrues while they are in sc hool and during the six-month grace period after they grad u ate or cease to be enrolled in at least six c redit h ou rs. Students who do not qualify' for a Federal Stafford Loan, based on need, may qualify for the unsub sidized Federal Stafford Loan. Contact the MSCD Office of Finan cial Aid co ncernin g annual loan limits. Federal PLUS Loans: These loans are available to parents of dependent students. Applications are available from the MSCD Office of Financial Aid or from lenders that participate in the program. Appli cations must first be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid for processing. At MSCD parents of dependent students may borrow up to the cost of education minus the amount of financial aid received by the student from other so ur ces each year. Please refer to the MSCD Finan c ial Aid Handbook and Scholarship Guid e for more detailed informa tion regarding loans. COLLEGE WORK-STUDY The State of Colorado, the federal government and MSCD provide part-time employment programs for st udents. The maximum work-study award is $2,500 per semester. The maximum hours a student may work is 30 hours per week while c l asses are in session and 40 hour s per week between semesters Stu dents must be e nr olled in at lea s t six cred it hours per semes t er to receive a work -s tudy award The majority of all work-study awards are need-based however there are a limited number of po s itions offered directly through vario u s departments/offices on campus that are no need awards. THE FINANCIAL Am PACKAGE On ce stude n t eligibility is determined an aid package is developed based on the availability of funds and the elig ibility of the applicant. To facilitate financial aid packaging requirements applicants must obtain all requested information and forms from designated sources and submit them to the MSCD Office of Financial Aid before the establis h ed deadline. AWARD NOTIFICATION After the Office of Financial Aid has d ete rmin ed the type and amo unt of aid for which a student qual ifies (aid package) the student is mailed an Award Notification. The Award Notification and enc l osed information stipulate the conditions of each award. Disbursement Procedures: Awards are based on full-time enrollment. If a student is enrolled for less than 12 credit hours each semester, the award may be reduced/prorated. The final award adju tment occurs on census date (about the 12th day of school each fall and s pring semester and the 8th day of the summer semester). Grants, Scholarships and Student Loans: AJI financial aid awards (with the exception of out of-state loan checks, consortium checks and some scholarship funds ) are disbursed into the stu dent's account. The Business Office deducts any outstanding balan ce owed, including c urrent tuition and fees, and issues a c h eck for the remaining funds. This check is e ither mailed to the student o r the student can pick it up at the Cashier's Office. This check can be used to purchase books and pay other e du cationally related expenses. Parent Loans: Federal PLUS checks are mailed from lenders to MSCD's Office of Financial Aid. Eligibility is verified and then the check is mailed to the parent borrower. Work Study: Work-study earnings are paid bi-weekly and are treated as wages earned. Out standing balance owed to MSCD are not deducted from these earnings; however students are strongly advised to pay any outstand in g balance as soon as a work-study check i received. Please refer to the MSCD Finan cia l Aid Handbook and Scholarship Guide for information regarding pro-ration of aid disbur ements

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30 FINANCIAL AID REPAYMENT POLICY Students who receive financial aid and withdraw from MSCD prior to comp l etion of a term may be required to repay a portion of financial aid and scholarships All required frnancial aid repayments must be made to MSCD before the end of the current academic year or before additional Title IV funds can be disbursed to the stude nt whichever occurs first. Repayment is made to the MSCD Business Office. Please refer to the Class Schedule for more specific information. FINANCIAL AID AS A FORM OF PAYMENT Please refer to the current Class Schedule for inf ormation regarding payment of tuition and fees with awarded aid

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. SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 31 SERVICES AND PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS ACAD EMIC ADVISING At MSCD students are provided multiple so urce s of academic advi ing upport Continuing st udent with declared major s receive advising assistance from their aca demic departments New s tudents and students without declared major s receive advising s upport from the Academic Advising Center, CN I 04. Services available to students in the Center include the followi ng: assistance with course selection, scheduling and registration; help with long term degree planning; identification of degree enhance ment strategies; and ongoing developmental advising, including assistance with the major-minor selection process, adjustment to college etc. For additional information call 303-556-3680. ALUMNI RELATIONS Located in the Administration Building the Office of Alumni Relation s works with the College, the Alumni Association and the MSCD Foundation Inc., to provide services and s upport to all alumni and students. Services include : career development health insurance programs, discount internet MSCD credit card, a lumni directory and numerou s vo lun teer/mentoring opportunities. The Alumni As ociatio n Inc., i s committed to advancing the College 's welfare by creating and main taining a spirit of fellowship and goodwill among all alumni and to encourage alumni involvement with the College. The MSCD Alumni Association's mis ion is to work in concert with the College the Foun dation and others to : Elevate and enhance the reputation of the College Ins pire alumni to leverage their pride in their MSCD experience Establish mentoring opportunitie to help others soar and expand their horizons. Inquire about participation with the Alumni A ssoc iation the ASK (Alumni Sharing Knowledge) Real World Career Coun se ling Program the ADVANCE Admissions Recruitment Program or other pro grams to connect with the College and MSCD alumni If you are interested in linking up with a Met ropolitan State College of Denver alumnus/a in your degree area, or are interested in one of the Alumni Relation programs contact the Alumni Relation s Office at 303-556-8320 or visit our web site at: www.mscd .e du/alumni htrn. AURARIA CAMPUS POLICE AND SECURITY The Campu s Police and Security Divi sio n i s fully certified and authorized to provide police se rvices to the Auraria campus and is proud to maintain its reputation as one of the afest in the s tate In addition to a police chief and 20 full time officers, the Campus Police and S ec urity Division employs state certified sec urity officers and communication personnel. Officer s patrol the campus 24 hours per day seve n day s per week on foot bicycle s or golf carts, and in patrol cars. The Campus Poli ce a nd Security Divi sio n also provides additional services to the campus community such as vehicle unlocks crime prevention programs, emergency re s pon ses, and environmental health and safety. The Campus Poli ce and Security Divi s ion i s located at 120 I Fifth Street. Routine calls303-556-327 1 ; EMERGENCY CALLS -911 (or use one of the many emergency phones located around campus). AURARIA CHILD CARE CENTER The center provides high quality early childhood care and educatidn to the children of students, staff and faculty A discovery, child-oriented app r oach i s provided by a professional teaching s taff to chi l dren ages 12 months to 6 years. Preregistration i s required. Please call 303 556-3188 for information. AURARIA PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION SERVICES Parking Services Department Daily Fee Parking: ( in-and-out privileges in Lot E only): daily fee range from $1.50 to $10.00. Sev eral lots are unattended and require purchasing a receipt from the vending machine Make sure the parking receipt i s placed face-up on the driver's side of the dashboard Receipts are valid only on the day and in the lot where purcha se d and are not transferable from one vehicle to a nother For easy entrance/exit to the Parking and Transportation Centre and lot s D and K a reusable debit card can be pur chased for $1.00 and a cas h value can be encoded on it s magnetic s trip. Debit cards are available on the second floor next to the ATM machine in the Tivoli Student Union and on the first floor of the Parking and Tran s portation Centre

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32 SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS Permit Parking: Parking permit are available on a semester basis. They go on sale on the fust day of registration Contact the Parking Office at 303-556-2000 for more information. Motorist Assistance P rogram: Personnel will help jump-start dead batteries and a i t in changing tires. Jumper cables bumper jacks tire tools and gasoline cans are also available at no cost to camp u s parkers Call 303-556-2000 for assistance. The Parking Services Department is located at 777 Lawrence Way (first floor of the parking garage). Hours are from 7:30a.m. to 5:30p.m. Monday-Friday. Ha ndi v an Services: The wheelchair-accessib l e handivan provides free on-campus tran portatio n for students, faculty and taff from 7:00a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Mo nday-Thursday and fTom 7:00 a .m. to 6:00 p.m. on Friday. Nig htrid e r : The ightrider is a free ecurity escort service for a n y campus parking lot. Service is avail able from dusk to 10:00 p.m., Monday-Thursday during fa!J and spring semesters CAREER SER VICES The Office of Career Services helps student and alumni in developing, evaluating and implementing career plans Specific service include Career As es s ment Workshops; Employer Forums/Employer Workshops addressing resume writing, job earch strategies and interviewing kills; and Career Con nection which offers candidates and employers a high tec h resource to connect MSCD senior and alumni candidate to entry level employment. Career fairs and seminars are spo n sored joint l y during the fall a n d spring term w ith employe rs, stude nt groups, faculty and a consortia of college s and universities. The Career Library houses print and electronic resources including directories and employer profiles, job vacancie salary surveys, job profile s and graduate school information. The Colorado Career Infor mation System (COCIS) offers occupational information based on employment characteristics of Col orado and the nation. A touch screen computer kio s k provides a direct link to federal job opportunities a identified by the United States Department of Per s onnel Management. For a sistance call 303-556-3664 or acce ss the Web s ite http://clem.m cd.edu/-career CENTER FO R THE V I SUAL A RTS Located off campus in the heart of LoDo, the Center for the V i sual Arts was created in 1990 by Metro to serve the college and the Rocky Mountain region. Open all year the Center organizes and hosts exhi bitions of cultura!Jy diverse artists of national a n d internationa l significance. wh i ch wou l d otherwise be unavailab l e to the college community and state populace Past exhibitions have included works by Picasso, An el Adams Romare Bearden and the diver e art of Haiti West Africa Australia and Japan. The Center hosts Metro s Senior Thesis exhibition featuring the works of the college's most outstandi n g art tudents e very year and a biannual exhibition of the Metro art faculty. Education and community outreach is an important facet of the Center with more than 6,000 tudents and 21,000 member of the general publi c visiting the Center each year. Visitors can take advantage of the many lectures, tour and workshops available in conjunction with the exhibitions. An outreach pro gram, providing art workshops and activities for Den v er s at-risk youth is another element of the Cen ter's ed u cation program and commitment to community invo l vement. Work-study positions, internships and vo l unteer opportunities are only a few ways that Metro students can become involved at the Center. The Metropolitan State College of Denver Center for the Vis ual Arts is located at 1734 Wazee Street, Denve r CO 80202; Telephone: 303-294-5207 Fax : 303-294-5210 ; www.mscd edu/news/cva. CHILD DEVELOPMENT C ENTE R The Chi l d Development Center provide exemplary on-campus children s programs During the fa!J and spring semester the center offers pre-school programs; in the summer it provides a Summer Enrichment Program for elementary age children. Available to the Auraria campu and to the Denver community, these programs are part of the college s teacher education program. The classrooms are under the direction of mas ter teachers who are trained and experienced in either early childhood or elementary education The ma s ter teachers p lan an age-appropriate progTam to pro vide q u a l ity l earning experiences that meet the developmental needs of the c h ildren. MSCD teac h e r education s tudents also work in the clas s room providing a hig h adult/child ratio with opportunities for small gro u ps and individual attention.

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SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 33 The preschool program is accredited by the National Academy for Early Cnildhood Education. There are two preschool classes available: 8:30-11:30 a.m. for children 2 1/2 to 4 years old and 12:30-3:30 p.m for children 4 to 6 years old. There is also one hour of child care available before and after each preschool class. The Summer Enrichment Program is academic in content, but recognizes children's need for fun and different learning experiences in summer. There are two classrooms: one for children entering first or second grade in the fall and one for children entering third or fourth grade in the fall. There is a Day Program from 8:30a.m. to 4:15p.m. and an Extended Program from 7 to 8:30a.m. and from 4 :15 to 6 p.m. Call 303-556-2759 for more information. COMBINED COMPUTE R ACCESS CENTER The Combined Computer Access Center (CCAC) assists and trains students with disabilitie to mini mize the impact of their disabilities while accessing the computer keyboard and monitor. The goal of the CCAC is to help students with disa bilitie s ac hie ve academic goals, anain vocational goals and improve employability tllrough the use of adaptive technology. The CCAC serves students with all types of disabi l ities including, but not limited to: blindness low vision, hearing impairments learning disabilities neurological disabilities and orthopedic disabilities. The Combined Computer Acce s Center is located in the Auraria Library room 115, 303-556-6252. (See Disability Support Services.) COUNSELING CENTER The Counseling Center is a full service, accredited center staffed by professionals who offer a wide array of services at no charge to the MSCD campus community. The center is fully accredited by the [nternational Association of Counseling Services All records are strictly confidential. Service include : Individual Counseling: The center offers short-term counseling on personal, relationship and edu cational concerns during one-to-one sessions; sessions are free to MSCD students. Students will be interviewed to assess their needs when they first visit the center. An appointment is not necesary for an initial meeting; student may drop in anytime between 9-11:30 a.m. or 1-3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Psychiatric service are available by referral to the Student Health Ser vice at reasonable charge for students. Other referrals may be made to off-campus resources if it is determined to be in the best i nterest of the student. Workshops and Group Sessions: Group sessions are open to all MSCD students. Workshops are open to students, faculty and staff. Topics typically include: test anxiety, assertiveness, parenting, self-esteem, relationships, family issues, support groups and a variety of multicultural issues A brochure of new topics is available at the center at the beginning of each semester. Peer Education Program: A peer educator i an upper division st udent who i trained in helping skills and who can address personal and college concerns of students enrolled in the FirstYear Program. The peer educator acts as a resource to s tudents and can assist students with strateg ies to so metimes lengthy college procedures such as financial and registration problems In addition, peer educators are involved in seve ral Awareness Week campaigns on events such as National Collegiate Alcohol and Drug Awarene s Week and Safe Spring Break. Students interested in being a peer educator should contact the center. Consultation : Staff members at the center are available for free consultation to MSCD faculty, staff and student groups or clubs. Consultations can be one-to-one or meeting s with a department, unit or club. Common topics of consultation include: diversity, communication, conflict, etc. Diversity Services: The center offers individual and group counseling, workshops, lectures con sultation to departments and individuals on the issues of race gender, sexual orientation, disabil ities and more. The Counseling Center is located in the Tivoli Suite 651, and is open 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Additional information ca n be obtained by calling 303-556-3132. DISABILITY SUPPO R T SERVICES Advocacy and support services are provided tllrough the Office of Disability Support Services located in room 177 of the Arts Building. Services include but are not limited to: priority registration assistance in identifying notetakers, alternative testing, access to assistive technology referrals to outside service

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34 SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS agencies, s i gn language interpreters and assistance with any ge n eral need s or concerns. Students with spec ial needs are encouraged to utilize these services. For assistance or information, please call 303556-8387 (vo ic e) or 303-556-8484 (T DD). (See Combined Computer Access Center .) EXTENDED CAMPUS D egree program s and fully accre dited co ur ses, as well as orientation and assessment testing are offered at two convenient locations in the Den ver metro area: Metro So uth 5660 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard Englewood, 303-721-1313 and Metro North, 11990 Grant Stree t Northglenn, 303-450-5111. Extended Campus offers evening weekend and accelerated classes. In addition, it offers a variety of formats including tele courses, online courses and co rre s ponden ce co ur es Extended Campu s schedules are availab le each se me ster. GAY, LESBIAN, BISEXUAL, TRANS STUDENT SERVICES AT AURARIA Gay Lesbian, Bisex ual Trans ( GLBT ) Student Servic es is open to all Auraria students as a resource for ex ploring sexual orientation issues. Thi s program offers a var i e t y of s upport education and advocacy services for the entire campus community: support for member s of the campus community who may ha ve question s about their own sexual orientation or that of a friend or family member advocacy for s tudent s experiencing discrimin a tion or hara ss ment ba se d on a rea l or perceived ga y l es bian bisex ual or trans identity speakers for events, workshops and c l asses on various as pect s of sexual orientation training program s and workshops about com batting homophobi a and working with the gay, l esbian bise x ual a nd transgendered communities more effectively resource library for researc h p a pers, personal reading and off-camp u s res ource information program s s uch as Gay Lesbia n Bisexual, Tran s Aware n ess Month and other forums providing inform atio n and dialogue about gay, l esbian, bisexual and tran s i ssues The GLBT Student S e rvices office i s l ocate d in the Tivoli Student Union room 311, a nd i s staffed by a director with the s upport of s tudent employees and volunteers Input and involvement from the entire campus community i s welcomed For a dditional inform atio n call 303-556-6333. HIGH SCHOOL UPWARD BOUND This program is de s igned to generate the skills and moti vatio n necessary for s u ccess in a nd beyond high sc hool for youths who are low -income and first-generation college-bound students. The program pro vides intensive academic instruction during the s chool year as well as a six-week summer session. A full range of academic skill preparation in reading writing and mathematics i s part of a com prehen sive co unseling and enrichment program Thi s program develop s creative thinking, effective ex pre ion and po s itive attitudes toward learning Th e s tudents are re crui ted at the beginning of their sop homor e year in high sc hool from five target-area hig h sc hool s located in Denver County (East, Lincoln Manual, North and We st Hig h School s). IMMIGRANT SERVICES/ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE PROGRAM The E n glish as a Se co nd L a ngua ge program provide s assista n ce to s tudent s for whom English is a seco nd language. The program pro v id es assess ment tutor in g, inten sive academic and personal a dvi s ing and assistance with fin anc i a l aid forms. The program als o refer s s tudent s with limited English proficiency to the app ropri ate c urri cula a nd monitor s s tudent progre ss. For more inform atio n call 303556-4048 INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL AND INTERCULTURAL EDUCATION The co lle ge provides assistance to visiting fac ult y and international students. Important information and co un s eling i s offered on visas, sc hool transfers, work permissio n hou s ing banking, and c ultural and academic adaptation. The office also pro v ides assi s tance to s tudents who wish to arrange individualized s tudy-abroad opportunities. The institute organizes numerou s co nfer ences and l ectures o n intern atio nal issues throughout the year.

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SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 35 The institute also provide s information on cross-d i scip linary ind i:vidualized degree major and minor programs in international studies, international courses offered by various departments, and intercul tural courses For information contact the director of lnternational and lntercultural Education at 303556-4004. METRO NORTH AND METRO SOUTH Please see Extended Campus on page 34 of this Catalog. STUDENT DEVELOPMENT CENTER The mission of the Student Development Center is to significantly improve the academic achievements of students by providing comprehen ive and individualized services that will lead to improved student retention and increased graduation rates. The center manages the following programs : Academic Suc cess Program, Summer Bridge Program and the Tutoring Program. The office i s located in the St. Francis Center second floor, 303-556-4737 STUDENT FINANCE RESOURCE CENTER (SFRC) The Student Finance Resource Center offers the following: financial planning individual budgeting sessions student travel emergency student loan s The SFRC is committed to providing students with tlte means to solve temporary and long-term finan cial problems by guiding and educating them on personal finances (i.e., budgeting financial planning emerge n cy funding and travel) The Student Travel Program offers financial assistance for clubs, stu dent organizations, and individual students presenting papers at conferences and events within the domestic United States. STUDENT HEALTH CENTER All MSCD students are entitled to medical services at the Health Center. Student health insurance is NOT required to use the Health Center. Physicians physician assistants nurse practitioners and med ical assistants staff the faci]jty. Students will be asked to comp lete a sign-in shee t and show a current emester ID card each time they check in. Services include treatment of illness and injuries lab testing, medications, physical s, annual GYN exams, sexually transmitted disease information/testing, birth control information/services, minor surgery, cholesterol scree ning immunizations, HIV testing, blood pressure checks, casting, suturing and X-ray. Payment is required at the time of service except for students who participate in the Student H ealth Insurance Program. Walk-in services begin at 8 a.m. Monday-Friday. Access is on a first -co me first-served basis. Walk in access varies daily contingent upon when all patient s l ots have been filled; thus, the daily closure time for walk-in care is variable. Patients are encouraged to check in as early as possible The Student Health Center is located in the Plaza Building room 150 on the lower level. Brochures with additional information are available at the Health Center or go to our website at http://www.mscd.edu/ student/ resources/health/. For further detail s cal l 303-556-2525. STUDENT INTERVENTION SERVICES Student Intervention Services (SIS) monitors and tracks three cohorts of the student population at MSCD. SIS assists and erves all students who are admitted by the alternative admissions' process. Our goal is to assist the student to be successful by providing comprehensive and individuali zed serv ice s that will le ad to improved student retention. The second co hort of students tracked are the students whose cumulative GPA has fallen below a 2.0 for one, two or three semesters. Students are notified by mail of their status, and encumbrances are placed on their registration. SIS also coordinates the Early Warning System providing mid-term grade assessments, support and referral services to students. For those stu dent s who are in academic difficulty, SIS provide an in-depth strategy for success including a sista nce with graduation plans, scheduling, advising and referrals. The office is l ocated in Central Classroom Building Room 102, 303-556-4048.

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36 SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES AT AURARIA Student Legal Services at Auraria is a student-fee funded program that serves registered students from The Metropolitan State College of Denver, the University of Colorado at Denver and the Community College of Denver. The program is staffed by licensed attorneys who assist students with landlord tenant problems criminal prosecutions traffic/DUI cases and family/domest i c issues. Specifically, the attorneys engage in a problem-solving process with the student to develop and explore various legal strategies and options. If a case requires legal representation and/or is beyond the expertise of the pro gram's attorneys, the office will provide to the student informatio n about comm unity resources that may provide le gal representation either on a no -cos t or l ow-cost basis, depending upon the s ub sta ntive area and the availability of attorneys. Because the program's budget on l y allows for 30 hour s per week of the attorneys' time, the office should be contacted to ensure an office visit or phone interview. Please note : this office is unable to advise o n issue s arising between students or involving any of the three institu tions as this creates a conflict of interest. The attorneys can n ei ther represent the student nor make a court appearance on the student's behalf The office is not staffed to respond to emergencies. More information is available at the Tivoli Student Union, room 311, or call 303-556-6061. STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES PROGRAM The Student Support Services program is designed to improve the retention and graduatio n rates of first generation, low income students and students with disabilities. Students enro lled in the program receive tutoring, personal counseling, academic adv ising, assistance in obtaining financial aid and opportunities to participate in cultural enrichment activities. The program also provides support services including educational and graduate schoo l workshops, co mput er assisted instruction and ba sic skills instruction in reading, writing math a nd science. The program administers two scholarship programs and hou ses a computer lab for participants' use The Student Support Services office is located in the Arts Building room 177 (in September 2000 the office will move to Central Classroom 201). For more information call 303-556-4722 SUMMER BRIDGE PROGRAM The Surnrner Bridge Program, man aged by the Student Development Center, facilitates the transition and prepares first-time college students for their freshman year at The Metropolitan State College of Denver. The program provides an opportunity for students to ge t a head start on their college education and become familiar with the college experience on the Auraria Campus Students receive a sc holar ship for tuition and fees for two college-level courses. Additionally, s tudents have an opportunity to partic ipate in enrichment workshops and activities tbat further encourage their connection to MSCD. The goal of the Summer Bridge Program is to provide students with the tools and strategies that will maximize their c han ces for academic success and personal growth and development. The office is l ocated in the St. Francis Center on the second floor, 303-556-4023. THE SPRING INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE CENTER AT AURARIA Intensive English classes at the Spring International Center focus on all l a nguag e skills: grarnrnar, reading, writing and listening/speaking in addition to spec ial electives that students can c hoose each term, such as TOEFL preparation, vocabulary building and pronunciation Five nine-week terms are offered throughout the year to enable st udents to complete their English study quickly Students are placed at o n e of the six l evels, with standardized evaluation tests at the completio n of each level. Spring International Language Center is located on the fourth floor of the Tivoli Student Union Room 454. For more information call 303-534-1616 TIVOLI STUDENT UNION As one component of Student Auxiliary Serv i ces that includes tbe Auraria Child Care Center, Auraria Book Center, Campus Computers Auraria Reprographics Clicks Office Supp l y and four copying cen ters, the Tivoli Student Union serves as the heart of campus culture, services and social activity at Auraria The Tivoli Student Union conveniently houses the offices of Student Life/Activities and Student Gov ernment for the Community College of Denver The Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Uni versity of Color a do at Denver. Additionally, offices for Metro Athletics, UCD Career Counseling, Spring International Language Center MSCD Coun seli ng Services MSCD New Student Orientation

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' SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 37 office, Student Legal Services at Auraria, all three school newspapers Tivoli Tickets (TicketMas ter), ClubHub, student ID program, Auraria Book Center Campus Computers two credit unions student study lounges a number of specialty s hops atrium food court, restaurants and Sigi' s Pool Hall and Arcade are located in the Tivoli Student Union. For information phone 303-556-6330. Tivoli Conference Services, located in room 325, will help you with obtaining conference and meeting s pace in the Tivoli as well as outdoor table rentals. Telephone 303 556-2755 for more information. TUTORING PROGRAM The Tutoring Program managed by the Student Development Center provides free tutoring assistance to all students enrolled at the Metropolitan State College of Denver in an effort to promote academic success. The program is structured to accommodate the needs of cu lturall y diverse students. Students may be referr ed to the Tutoring Program by an instructor or can seek assistance on their own. Trained peer tutors will h elp students reach their educational goals. Group and individualized tutoring is avail able. The office is located in the St. Francis Center on the second floor 303-556-8472. VETERANS SERVICES The Veterans Servi ces Office assists s tudents in procuring their Gl Bill entitlement. The Veterans Ser vices Office acts as the liaison between the U.S Department of Veteran Affairs and the veteran/depen dent st udent Different VA clas ifications provide different types of entitlement. Student veterans/dependents may be eligible for tutorial assistance, VA work-study, advance payment, emer gency student loans etc. The office al o certifies and tracks the academic progress of entitled veterans. If there are any questions or problem s regarding eligibility, payment tutoring, etc., please speak with a representative inC 105 or call 303-556-2993. VETERANS UPWARD BOUND Veterans Upward Bound is a federally funded program designed to identify, recruit and motivate vet erans to pursue their personal career goals through higher education. Veterans Upward Bound provides refresher courses and tutorial h elp so that survival in academic or vocationaUtechnica l programs is maximized. This is accomplished during a 12-week semester. Ancil lary serv ice s such as career counseUng, financial aid ad vi ement, college counseling and job placement are also provided for participants WOMEN'S SERVICES The Institute for Women's Studie s and Services is commined to the empowerment of women through education. To help students have a positive college experience, women's services provides referrals to campus and community resources information about scholarships, assistance with the process of entering MSCD advocacy services for s tudents dealing with har assment or discrimination and pro grams and events that focus on issues of particular concern to women. The institute houses a small library with a variety of books and other resource material s on women's experiences, histories and con tributions to society. Students who need assistance should make an appointment with the associate director of the Institute for Women's Studies and Services. WRITING CENTER The Writing Center staff of composition ins tructors and trained writing tutors is committed to working with students in developing their writing abilitie Tutors help students identify problem areas and pro vide instruction on how to eliminate them Through one-on-one instruction tutors teach students to gen erate, organize, and develop ideas ; to revise and edit with confidence; and to handle issues of format and documentation. For more information contact the Writing Center at 303-556-6070.

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38 STUDENT LIFE STUDENT LIFE The Office of Student Life offers student a wide range of services and programs designed to enhance classroom experiences and encourage campus involvement. Services include Judicial Affair Student Problem Action Network (SPAN); Student Activities; tudent ciubs and organizations; Student Publi cations; Counseling Center; Campus Recreation ; Student Health Center; Student Legal Services at Auraria; Gay Lesbian, Bisexual and Trans Student Service s; Student Government Assembly (SGA) New Student Orientation and the Student Finance Re sou rce Center. These student-fee-funded programs exist to provide a diver e range of experience in leader hip development and programs that encourage cultural, recreational educational, and ocia l int eraction The Office of Student Life is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 311. Our web site is http ://clem .mscd.edu/tudlife/. Student Affairs Board (SAB) The Student Affair s Board enab l es stude nts to have a continuous voice in the u se and allocation of their student fees. The SAB is comprised of student, faculty ancl adminis trative repre se ntatives. Student Problem Action Network (SPAN) The SPAN Program help s stude nts re so lve problems on campus. This program involves trained advisors who can assist st udent in defining their problem for mulate a strategy of reaching a solution, and inform them a bout the institutional proce s for resolving the iss ue. This program is part of the judicial affair area and i s staffed by volunteer facu lty and campus personnel. For additional information please refer to the Student Handbook or come to the Tivoli room 311. STUDENT ACTIVITIES The Office of Student Activities provide opportunities for s tudent development and growth through a variety of program s that link students' academic live s wit.h their Jive s outside the classroom. Student Activities' program s are ed u cational, cultural, social and recreational and give students an opport unity to enha n ce their socia l responsibility and leadership skills. Student Activities has four distinct functions to help students get connected and involved in campus life: programs, events and co-curricular opportunities; student organization ervices; Metro Cool (serv ice learning); and leader hip education. These function are designed to: I. enlighten, stimulate and entertain the campus commu nity 2. promote s tudent elf-worth and dignity, 3. develop elf-confidence, 4. help s tudent s become better prep ared for l ife-long learning and increa se d organizational and ocial complexity, 5. teach students fisca.l responsibility 6. provide developmental experiences for student to help them take responsibility for program and service delivery, and 7. teach re s ponsible citizenship and an ethic that encourages respon s ible ocial action. The office is located in the Tivoli Student U nion room 305, 303-556-2595. Office hour s are 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday. STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSEMBLY Through channels of advocacy and outreach with faculty and administration, the Student Government Assemb l y (SGA) members work with and on behalf of individua l students and the MSCD tudent pop ulation as a whole to ensure that tudent voices are heard and that the be t intere st of all tudents i s considered. SGA members are committed to enhancing opportunities for s tudent involvement and suc cess in their campus life. The SGA office is located in the Tivoli Student Unio n suite 307 303-5563312.

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STUDENT LIFE 39 STUDENT PUBLICATIONS The student new spaper, The Metropolitan. is publi h ed by the Office of Student Publications Tivoli Student Union, room 313, 303-556-8361. The n ewspa p er offers students the opportunity to explore fields s u c h as journalism, advertising sa l es, mark eti ng, gra phic arts 1 publishing photogr a phy business and accounting throu g h work experiences. The M e tr opolitan. is written and produced by and for MSCD s tudent s It is published weekly during the fall and sp rin g se mester s and monthly during the summer semester. Students interested in working on the paper s hould co nt act the s tudent editor at 303-556-2507. M et rosph e r e is the annual student literary and arts publication. It contains poetry, fiction, nonfiction art, photography and graphics. It i s written, compo ed and produced entirely by s tudents. Submissions are acce pted during the fall semester. Copies are di tributed free to s tudent s in the s pring semes ter. For more information contact the student editor at 303-556-3940. The office also produces the Student Handb ook and provides graphic art serv ice s at reduced costs to on campus offices, departments, organizations a nd individuals. MSCD's Board of Publication s is the advisory board to the e ditors of M etrosphere and The Metropol itml. The board appoints the editors from applicant each spri ng for the following academic year and deals with complaints or questions regarding content. The board i s composed of five st udents three administrators, and three faculty member s and meet s monthly during the fall and spring se mesters. CAMPUS RECREATION The Campus Recreation at Auraria program is among the mos t affordable ways that students have found to enjoy them se lves and it i s among the best recreation programs offered in Colorado The program is composed of the Drop-In Program (informal recreatio n), lntrarnurals, Club Sports Outdoor Adventure and the Physically Challenged Program Student member s hip is free with a current, validated student ID The Drop-in Program provide s group and individual activities for students, faculty staff, alumni and guests. Facilities include four ba sket b all co urts, 1 2 tenni s courts, volleyball courts, a 25-yard indoor pool eight handball/racquetball courts, two qu as h courts, a weightroom a fitness center, a dance s tudio a b ase ball field, sof tball fields and a track In a ddition Campus Recreation offers high and low impact aerobics, step aerobics and aqua aerobic d a ily The Drop-in Program also offers a new instruc tional component, Healthy Lifestyles which consi t s of a variety of noncredit instructional workshops clinics and seminars Check the Drop-in Program sc hedule in room 108 of the Phy s ical Education Building or call 303-556-3210 for a listi ng of available times The Intramural Program consists of individual and team activities open to all students, faculty and staff members. The emphasis of the program is on participation, sportsmanship and social interaction. When ever possible, competitive and recreatio nal divisions are offered to ensure participation for all ability levels. Activities include flag football, basketball, floor hockey, volleyball, r acq uetball and s qua h le ag ue s, as well as tennis and golf tournaments Club Sports provides students, faculty and staff memb e r s the opportunity to develop their individual athletic abilities in an organized group etting The pre sent clubs, which are all student initiated include aikido, fencing, men 's lacrosse men and women's rugby men 's volleyball, coed waterpolo, badminton, ski/snowbashers and tai chi. Outdoor Adventure provides the opportunity to experience the beauty and challenge of nature through organized trips The program provide s outdoor recreational experiences emphasizing skill acquisition, social interaction environmental awareness and safety. Some of the many adventures offered are biking, canoeing, cross-country skiing, downhill s kiin g, family-fun outings, hiking ice clim bing, kayaking/rafting naturalist outings, rock climbing and sa iling The program also provides rental eq uip ment, including camping and hiking gear, canoes, cross-co untry skis, mountain bike s and roller blades. The office is located in the ba se ment of the Events Center. The Phy s i cally Challenged Program offers a variety of s porting recreational and fitness opportunities for students with physical or learning limitations The adaptive programs/ se rvice s encompass one-on one or group sess ions that assist in u s ing the recreational facility. Information on planned group activ ities or individual help sessions is available in the Events Center, room 108, 303-556-3210.

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40 STUDENT LIFE INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS The intercoUegia t e athletic program plays an int egral role in campus lif e at Th e Metropolitan State Col l ege of D e n ver. MSCD offers I 0 int ercollegiate p orts programs: b aseba ll m e n's b aske tb all, women's b asket b all, men's socce r wo m e n's soccer, me n's sw immin g a nd divin g, women's wimrnin g and diving, men's t enni women's tennis and women s volley b all. The teams nicknamed the R oa drunn e rs, com p e t e at the Di v i s ion ll l eve l of the National Collegiate Ath letic Association (NCAA). The R oadrunners a r e m ember of the 1 4m e mb er Ro cky Mountain Athletic Confere n ce (RMAC) whic h was found ed in 1 909 and feat ure s mode st-s i ze d sc ho o l s w ith limit e d a th letic bud gets. Scholarships are available for eac h of the 10 int e r collegia t e s port s They are dis bur sed b y individual coaches o n the basis of merit, athletic abi lit y a n d t eam needs. Sch o l ar hips a r e awarde d o n a yearly basis. The Int e r co U egiate Athletics Office is located in the Tivoli Student Union roo m 355 303-556-8300.

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' ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS 41 I ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS CREDIT FOR PRIOR LEARNING OPTIONS Successful completion of special examinations, comp l etion of a prior learning portfolio, or assessment of nonaccredited training programs through published guides, may be used to award credit or may permit placement in advanced courses. A s tudent may earn up to 60 semester hours of credit toward degree r eq uir eme nt s u sing prior l earning credit op tions. This type of approved credit will be posted to th e stude nt' s record after the comp l etion of 8 semester hours of re sidency credit. Prior l earning cred i t may not be u sed toward the l ast 12 semester hours of a degree program, does not substitute for resi dency requirement and cannot be used to challenge prerequisite courses for cour es a lr eady com pleted. Students are advised that l et ter grades are not assigned for such credit, and some institutions may not accept transfer c redit s that do not include letter grades. Additional information is available from the office indicated in each section below and from the Center for Individualized Learning, Cen tral Classroom 106, 303-556-8342. ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS Students who have performed satisfactorily in special collegel eve l courses whi l e in high schoo l and who have passed appropria te advanced placement exami nati o n s conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, may have official AP scores submitted direct l y to the Office of Admissions for co n siderat ion for college credit. This office, in consu lt a tion with the appropriate department c hair d etermi n es the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted. (See following c hart .) Course Credit Awards For Advance d Placement Exams AP SCORE 2 3 4 5 Biology Chemistry Computer Science (A) Computer Science (AB) Eco nomi cs (macro) Economics (micro) English (Comp & Lit) Engli h (Lan g & Comp) Gov't & Po l itics (U.S.) Gov't & Politics (comparative) History (European) History (American) Math (Ca l c AB) BIO 1 080-3 & B10 1090-1 CHE 1800-4 CSI 1 300-4 ECO 2010-3 ECO 2020-3 ENG 1 010-3 ENG 1100-3 ENG 1010-3 PSC 1010-3 PSC 1020-3 HIS 1010-3 HIS 1210-3 MTH 1 400-4 B10 1080-3 BIO 1080-3 & B10 1090-1 & BIO 1090-1 CHE 1800-4 CHE 1800-4 CHE 1810-4 CHE 1810-4 CHE 1850-2 CHE 1850-2 CSI 1300-4 CS I 1 300-4 CSI 1300-4 CS I 1300-4 CSI 2300-4 CS12300-4 ECO 2010-3 ECO 2010-3 ECO 2020-3 ECO 2020-3 E G 1 010-3 ENG 1010-3 ENG 1020-3 ENG 1020-3 ENG 1100-3 ENG 1100-3 1010-3 ENG 1010-3 E G 1020-3 ENG 1020-3 PSC 1010-3 PSC 1 0 1 0-3 PSC 1 020-3 PSC 1 020-3 HIS 1010-3 HIS 1010-3 HIS 1020-3 HIS 1020-3 HIS 1 210-3 HIS 1210-3 HIS 1 220-3 HIS 1220-3 MTH 1410-4 MTH 1410-4

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42 ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS APSCORE Math (Calc BC) Physics (B) Phys i cs (C-Mec h anics) Physics (C-Magneti m Elec.) P syc hology Spanish Language Spani h L1terature German Language German Literature Frenc h Lang u age Frenc h Literature Stati tics 2 3 MTH 1400 -4 PHY 2010-4 PHY 2030-I PHY 2020-4 PHY 2040-1 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1 PHY 23114 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2331-4 PHY 2341-1 PSY 1001-3 SPA 1020-5 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 1020-5 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2 1 20-3 GER 1020-5 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 1020-5 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 FRE 2110-3 FRE 2110-3 MTH 1210-4 INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE 4 5 MTH 1410-4 MTH 1410-4 MTH 2410-4 MTH 2410-4 PHY 2010-4 PHY 2010-4 PHY 2030-1 PHY 2030-1 PHY 2020-4 PHY 2020-4 PHY 2040-1 PHY 20401 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1 PHY 232 1-1 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321 1 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2331-4 PHY 233 1 -4 PHY 2341-1 PHY 234 1-1 PSY 1001-3 PSY 1001-3 SPA 2110-3 SPA2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2310-3 SPA 2310-3 SPA 2320-3 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2310-3 SPA 2310-3 GER 2110-3 GER 2 1 10-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2310-3 GER 2310-3 GER 2320-3 GER 2110-3 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2310-3 GER 2310-3 GER 2320-3 FRE 2010-3 FRE 20 1 0-3 FRE 2110-3 FRE 2020-3 FRE 2 110-3 FRE 2110-3 FRE 211 0-3 FRE 30 1 0-3 MTH 1210-4 MTH 1210-4 MSCD recognize s the greater potential for succe of internat i o nal baccalaureate s tudents. Accordingly, academic departments may award credit for demon trated profic i e n cy on a case-by-case ba is. Students who have international baccalaureate results a t the higher level may have an official transcript se nt directly to the Office of Admissions for consideration for college credit. COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) CLEP co n s i sts of two eries of examinations: the general examinations and the subject examinatio n s They are designed to eval u ate nonaccredited collegel evel learning in order to award credit for s uccessful demontration of thi knowledge The genera l examination se ries include five se parate examinations covering the areas of Engli h com position, hum anities, natural sciences, mathematic and social science/history. Based on the re s ults of the e examinations, the college may award up t o a maximum of 24 se mester hour s of credit in the freshman General Studies requirement area Thu the successful student may test out of many of the traditiona l cour es required during the freshman year. MSCD doe s not a llow CLEP credit for ENG 1020, the Fre s hman Composition: Analysis, Research and Documentation cour e. The ubject examination eries consists of more than 45 exami n ation that app l y to spec ific college cour es MSCD allows credit for some of these examinations. Thirty (30) semeste r hours of credit also may be awarded u n der this se ries, making a total of 54 emester h ours of credit obtainab l e under a combination of the two er i es of exami n ations.

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ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS 43 Credit obtained under CLEP at another institution will be re-evaluated according to MSCD CLEP policit:S. Contact the coordinator at 303-556-3677 for complete information about thi s program before r e gis tering to take any of these exams ATTAINMENT EXAMINATIONS Any student may take attainment examinations in some departments for the purpose of waiving s pecific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation, entitles students to substitute their own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the cour se. DEPARTMENTAL COURSE EXAMINATIONS In pecial case a department may grant students credit toward graduation for college courses that they request and pa s pecial college examination Under this pro v ision, a maximum of 30 emester hours of credit may be awarded by the college A fee of $15 per semester credit hour will be charged Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a regular course offered by the college (omnibus-numbered courses are excluded). The credit granted will be for the corresponding course pro vided the student has no previous collegiate enrollment for o. similar course and the credJt is applicable toward the student s graduation requirements. Evidence of work justifying an examination for c1edit must be presented to the department chair no later than the third week of classes in a emester. Permis sion for such exarnination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recommendation of the department chair. o application for credit by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degree-seeking curriculum in the college. Credit by examination will not be approved for a student who is within 12 classroom semester hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for a course that a student has been officially enrolled at MSCD or at another institution, whether or not the course has been completed and a grade awarded. Credit by examination cannot be obtained for college courses attended as a listener vis itor or auditor. If a student has completed a more advanced course than the course for which examination credit is desired, permission to take the exam will be granted if approved by the appropriate department chair and dean. If a student has already comp l eted a equence of courses, no examination credit can be given for courses lower in number than the highest numbered course taken by the student. If a student has reg istered for a higher-numbered course in a sequence the exam for the lower-numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester. Exceptions must be appealed to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions following endor ement of the department chair or dean Examinations cannot be taken to raise grades to remove failures or to remove NC, SP" or "I" notations. Credit by examination is not applicable toward academic residence requirements Examination for credit will be taken at a time specified by the department after the s pecial examination fee has been paid o examination for credit in a college course may be repeated A grade equivalent to A or B must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit but credit so earned for the course will be recorded without grade reference on the student's permanent record Credits in courses for which credit is earned by examination are not considered in computing college grade point averages. Credit by examination will be posted after a student has completed 8 semester hours of credit at MSCD and after an evaluation of all possible transfer credits has been completed. PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT Students may apply for credit for college-level learning gained through experience by preparing and submitting a prior learning portfolio Credit is awarded on the basi of a careful assessment of the prior learning portfolio by faculty in the department from which credit is sought. Portfolio asses ment is available in many but not all, academic department The portfolio is developed with the assistance of the Center for Individualized Learning, Central Class room 106, 303-556-8342. Portfolio asses ment may be used to apply for credit for specific courses listed in the Catalog; credit is not available for courses which are considered omnibus courses. Appli cants for credit through portfolio asses ment will generally be required to take EDS 2680-1, The Pen folio Development Workshop

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44 ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS A fee of one-half the part-time student tuition is charged for c redit awarded through portfolio a sess ment ; $40 of the total fee is du e prior to the assessment of the portf olio by faculty. The remainder of the fee i s du e if and when credit is awarded. Policie s wh i c h govern credi t for prior learnin g options apply to credit awarded through the portfolio process. Contact the Center for Individuali zed Learning for as istance and further information at 303-556-8342, Central Classroom I 06 Information sessions a bout portfolio assessment and other cred it for prior learning options are h eld on a regular basis by th e Center for Individuali zed Learning. CREDIT FOR MILITARY TRAINING AND OTHER TRAINING PROGRAMS Military training and other training programs that h ave been assessed for college credit by the Amer ican Council on Education will be evaluated by the Office of Admissions for transfer credit at MSCD. For formal military training, copies of training certificates and a copy of the DD -214 should be sub mitted to th e Office of Admissions. For other uaining officia l ACE transcripts should be subm itted. Credit l imit i s 30 se m ester hours. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION The Cooperative Education Internship Center places students in work experiences related to their aca demic major. The purpo e of the internships i to integrate academic training with actual work experi ence. This combination allows students to make reali tic career decisions gain valuable work experi ence, obtain recommendations for graduate sc hool and earn money to help defray co!Jege expenses. Students work in large corporations, small businesse s, government and nonprofit agencies throughout the metropolitan area. Most co-op sUidents are paid by their emp lo yers, but in tho se professional fields where co-op salaries are not avai l ab l e, volunteer intern hip placements are offered to help st udent s gai n essential work experience. Co-op intern ship placements are avai l able in mo st academic major s and minors. Students must com plete 30 se m ester hour s of college coursework with a minimum 2.50 GPA and hav e a declared major to be eligible for registration with co-op No fee are charged to the Uldent or employer for participa tion in the program and each sUident's interests and job requirements are discussed individual l y with a profess ion a l coordinator Students may choose from three different work schedule based on the academic calendar. The alter nating plan provides full-time periods of work every other emester with intervening se mesters pent in full-time study. The parallel schedule places students in a job while they simultaneously attend school. These position s are usually part-time. The short term/ s ummer plan allow s students to elect a work expe rie nce that la sts for no mor e than o ne semester. The college awards academic credit for supervised cooperative education placements. Students must comp lete a credit application, available from the co-op office, and this applicatio n must be approved by a facu lt y member from the departm ent in which c r edit is to be g rant ed. No more than 15 emester hour s of coo perati ve education cre dit will be applied toward MSCD degr ee require m ent Credit earned for the co-op education work experiences are not applicable toward General Studies requirements. Addi tional departmental restrictions may apply to certain majors. SERVICELEARNING The Service-Learning Program combine clas room experience with service to the metropolitan com munity. Parti cipating tudents receive credit for appropriate public service, w hich is beneficial to the commu nity and expands student horizons in intellectually and per sonally meaningful ways. Emerg ing from a wide variety of disciplines, se rvi ce-learning co ur ses are tructured by facu lty to weave service into community-based and government agencies with c l assroom reflection and analy is of the learning offered through these experiences. The courses are also designed to addre ss real needs in our multicultural wor ld, suc h as homelessness, at -ri k youth, domestic violence, the environment, cu lture and the arts, and mental illn ess. Agencies that have provided serv ice opportunities include Fort Logan Mental Health Center the Denver Commis s ion on Aging Big Sisters the Colorado Hi torical Society, the R ape A istance and Awareness Program and numerous e l ementary and high schools, se nior cen ters and nur sing homes.

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I ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS 4 I Service-learning credi t is available in most academic major and minor Prerequisites and other requirements vary with eac h department. To l earn how to in thi program including discus sions of placement optio n s, student s hould contact or visit the Service Learning Program office to schedule an interview

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SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS THE FIRST YEA R PROGRAM The FirstYear Program is designed to unify and coordinate college efforts to h e lp entering stude nt s achieve a successful ftr s t year. The program provide inten sive advising, cour e se l ection guida n ce and academic monitoring throughout the first year, as well as coordinating academ i c support services for ftr t year students. Additionally, the program offers a FirstYear Seminar cour e, XXX l 190 which provides appropriat e readings and written work enabling stu dents to di cuss and write about current issues including the value of higher education. A-ll ftrst-tirne MSCD stude nt may enro!J in the First Year Seminar cour e and other appropriate cou r ses a determined by asses ment at entry. The program furnishes an environment where problem so lving creativity and peer interaction are encouraged. For additio n a l inform ation call 303-556-8447. THE HONOR S PROGRAM Tne Honors Program provides the academic progress for highly motivated st udent s with broad acad emic interests The program provide honor s section of General Studies co ur se an d unique interdisci plinary courses. Honor s courses are small in orde r to encourage class participation and a clo e rela tion hip between tuden t and faculty. H onor c l asses are designed to promote independent thought and creative inquiry. The director of the Honors Program and the honor s faculty provide academic advis ing and serve as mentor to s tudents as they conside r their po !-grad uat e goals. The ultim ate mi sion of the Honor s Program is to create a community of scholars. It ponsors an Honor s Club, an annual Honors Conference, and tudy-abroad course which allow st udent to explore ideas outside the classroom. Students who complete 27 semester hour s of honor cour e including a thesis will receive an honors de s ignation on their transcript. An Honors application form may be obtained from th e H onors Program director. Since the Honors Pro g ram participates in the Colorado Scholarship Program stude nt s admitted to the Hon ors Pro g ram are eligible to a ppl y for a sc holar ship. Additional information on the Hon ors Program is available by cal ling 303-556-4865 or by inquiring in Central Classroom Building, Room IOIB Required Honors Core Semester Hours HON 2750 The Legacy of Arts and Letters I ........................ 3 HON 2760 The Legacy of Arts and Letters II ...................... 3 HON 2950 The Art of Critical Thinking .......................... 3 HON 3800 Revolutions and Social Change I ........................ 3 HON 3810 R evolutions and Social Change II ........ ............... 3 HON 3850 American Culture I .................. ........... ... 3 HON 3860 American Culture II ................................ 3 HON 4920 Senior Honors Seminar ........ .................... .... 3 HON 4950 Senior Honor s Thesi ............................... 3 Total H ours for Honors Cor e ................................... 27 Approved General Studies co urs es. INDIVIDUALIZED STUDIES PROGRAM The Indiv idu alized Degr ee Pro gram (ID P ) offe r s students the opportunity to design and p r opose a major exten d ed major or minor to meet specific ed u cational goa l s when other majors or minors lis ted in the Catalog cannot meet the student's educational o bjectives Either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of sc ience de gree may be sought. Student s mu s t have a GPA of 2.5 before an IDP program may be approved. Each s tudent will work with an adv i sor i n the Center for Ind ividualized Learning and with a faculty mentor to develop a proposal for an Indi v idu alized Degree Pr ogram. A practicin g profe ss ional in the stu dent' s field of stu dy may also be inv ited to se rve as a community cons ult ant to ass i st the s tu dent and the faculty in the d eve lopm ent of the program of s tudy. Be cause careful and thoughtfu l plan ning is esse ntial to designing a coherent and co n gruent program of study, tudents are encouraged to begin deve l oping their IDP propo sals early in t h eir enrollment at MSCD Interested students hould co nta ct the Center for Individualized L earning, Central Clas room 106 303556-8342, for assistance and for complete information regarding the policies and procedures for the development and approval of an Individualized Degree Program. Inf ormatio n sess ion s are h eld throughout the year.

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. SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Each Individualized Degree Program will be approved by the department chair from the academic department from which the majority of credit is drawn, the appropriate dean and the director of the Center for Individualized Learning. All r equirements that apply to any bachelor s degree from tytSCD apply to Individualized Studies. A grade of C must be earned in each course included in the student's IDP major or minor. The title for each st ud ent's program will be I ndividuali z ed Studies with a concentration in ___ IDP majors may not include cour es in Level n General Studies that have the same prefix as the department from which the majority of credit i drawn for their major. No more than 30 hours of credit out of the total of 120 credit hour may be included in the stu dent's degree plan from the School of Business. Each IDP major and minor must include course that have not yet been completed at the time the proposal is approved. See each IDP option below for the pecific number of credits that must be completed after the proposal i approved by the department chair. Proposals may be ubmitted for : An IDP MAJOR which requires a minimum of 40 credit hour s, including 21 hour of upper-divi sion credit. Fifteen ( 1 5) hour mu t be completed after the proposal is approved by the department chair. A minor chosen from the Catalog is required An IDP MINOR, which require a minimum of 20 credit hour including 6 hours of upper-divi sion credit. Six (6) hours mu t be completed after the proposal is approved by the department chair. A major chose n from the Catalog is required. An EXTENDED MAJOR may be proposed when the student's field of study requires more in depth study or courses from multiple disciplines that cannot be accommodated in an lOP major. An Extended IDP major requires a minimum of 60 credit hours including 27 hours of upper-divi sion credit. Twenty-one (21) hours must be completed after the proposal is approved by the depart ment chair. No minor i s required. INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL AND INTERCULTURAL EDUCATION The Metropolitan State College of Denver is committed to providing all students with a strong educa tional foundation that enhances their understanding of the total human experience and enables them to maximize their potential for growth and development in a rapidly changing world. Through the pro grams of the Institute for International and Intercultural Education students and faculty have opportu nities to develop and participate in activities designed to promote a greater understanding and expertise in global i ssues. The Institute also eek to maintain a positive environment that enhances the learning exper ien ces of international students attending MSCD. The Institute is located in the Rectory Building, room 204, and can be reached at 303-556-4004 The following programs reflect the mission of the In ti tute. INDIVIDUALIZED DEGREE PROGRAM Students interested in pursuing an interdisciplinary major or a minor in international studies may do so und er the Individualized Degree Program (IDP). The lOP allows students, in close con ultation with and approval of a faculty mentor, to de s ign a course of study that be t meets their needs. Students may choose from a wide range of courses dealing with international topics that are regularly offered to com plete a major or minor. Contact the In titute for International and Intercultural Education at 303-5564004 or the Center for Individualized Learning at 303-556-8342, Central Classroom 106 STUDY-ABROAD COURSES The Institute coordinates a variety of short-term and semester-long study abroad cou r ses eac h year. During the past several years, these courses have been held in Mexico, England Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Central America, Russia and Egypt. These courses are generally directed by full-time MSCD faculty, are two to five week in duration and are available to eligible students As i tance is provided to students who choose to participate in rudy abroad courses offered by other U.S. or foreign universities.

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48 SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS The college operates two semester abroad programs in Guada l a j ara, Mexico a n d London Eng l and. These are offered in cooperation with the Unive r sity of Guadalajara and the Ame r ican Institute for For eign Study/Richmond College partner s hip. Students must be in good academic standing in order to par ticipate in these programs Contact the Institute for information regarding the latest offerings. REsOURCE CENTER The Institute maintain a re ource bank of information on: a multitude of s tudy-abroad programs offered by other universitie s and organization international internship opportunitie s graduate programs in international rudies facu l ty seminars and conferences internationa l ization of curricula i nternational emp l oyment opportunities INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES The Institute provides a variety of services to international students auending MSCD The e include coun eling on visas school transfers, work permission and housing; conducting academic and cultural orientatio n sessions; assi ling with immigration issues ; providing i n formation to embassies a n d spon sors ; advising on academic issues; and organizing social and cu l tural event FACULTY SERYlCES The In titute place s a high priority on enabling intere ted faculty to enhance their international experi ences and, consequently, enrich their curricula. The faculty are regularly informed of profess i onal develop m e n t seminars international conferences exchange opportu n ities and fellowships. International faculty teac h ing at MSCD are given assistance wit h immigration and re l ated matte r s in accordance w ith college policies. SPECIAL EVENTS The Institute regularly organizes conferences, seminar and lect u re serie to promote intellectual dis cour es on issues affecting the contemporary wor ld. COMMUNITY Co NECTIONS The Institute maintains links with numerous local and national organizations and professional associa tions dealing with international educational economic, social and cultural activities with a view to strengthe n college-community partnerships and to remain current with the latest development in the area of international education LANGUAGE AND CULTURE INSTITUTE The Lang u age and Cu l ture Institute was e tablished in I 976 to o r ganize rudy a n d travel abroad. The institute currently operate a summer program in Mexico a summer intensive lang u age in titute in Ger many, and a winter s tudy and travel program in Mexico Yucatan Penin ula and in Central America. The institute offer s credit through the Modern Language s Department.

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THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM PmLOSOPHY O F THE G ENE RA L STUD IES PROGRA M GENERAL STUDIES 49 The M etro politan State College of D e nver eeks to pr epare its graduates for a lifetime of learning whic h in our changing and comp l ex soc iety require s focused expe rtise (such a that provided by a majo r area of s tud y) and the ab ilit y to communicate with a n d learn from experts in other fie l d Undergradua t e edu cation foste r s the critical thinking neces sary for the exp l oration of unfami l iar disc i p l i n es and for the sy n the sis of l earni ng, and exposes s tud en t s to the richnes s an d variety of the intellectual unive r se. General Studie s Information Stud en t s mus t u e a sing l e catalog to mee t all degr ee requ i rement s, including t h o se in the Gene ral Studie s, m ajor and minor. Some changes in Gen eral Studies requirement s hav e been mad e retroactive As a co n se quen ce, many General Studie s requirement s and policie s d esc ribed in this Catalog may be followed by stude nt s u s ing earlier catalogs. General Studie s Goal s The General Studie Program i s de sig ned to help grad uat es achieve the following competencies: MSCD s tudent s s h o uld be able to: 1. Write and s peak with clarity; 2 Re ad and listen critically; 3. Dr aw co nclu ions from quantitative data ; 4. Re cognize faulty r easoning ; 5. Organiz e ideas; a n d 6. Communi cate with experts in o th er di sc ipline s a nd learn from them MSCD s tude n t s hould: 7. H ave an open atti t ude toward diffe r ent approaches to prob l ems; 8. H ave an informed awarene ss of the principa l human achievement s i n h isto r y arts and l ette rs, soc iety and sc ience ; and 9. Be introduced to the b asic methods knowledge, problems or attitudes c haracteri stic of a field. Structure of the General Studies Program The General Studie Program i s struc tured to foster the de ve lopment of skills and to encourage st u dent s to u se their m as tery of kills to explore knowledge in a variety of di sc iplines. The General Studie s P ro gram provides two l eve l s of experience: Lev e l 1-Skill s Level I co u r ses provide students with the ba s i c s kill s of read ing and list ening cr itically, re cog ni zing faulty reasonin g, drawing conc l u s ion s from qu a ntit a tive data organizing idea s, and writi n g a n d speaki n g with c l arity. Leve l IT-Breadth of Know l e dge Level lJ courses introduce s tudents to the b as i c method knowledge, problem or a ttitude s characteristic of a field, encourage in s tudent s an open attit u de toward different approaches to problem s, enable stu d ent s t o comm u n i cate with experts in other discipl i n es and learn from them and cultivate i n stude nt s an informed awareness of the prin c ipal achievements in his tory arts and letters soc i a l sc ience and sc i e n ce. In addition in Level IT courses st udent s will continue to develop their skills in langu age and mathematics Distribution and Credit Requirements To complete their General Studie s Program s tudent s must take approved co ur es that ful fill the fol lowing dis tribution a nd c redit requirements: Cat ego r y Se mest e r H o ur s Levell* Compo ition ........................................................... 6 Mat h ematics ..................................... ...................... 3 Commun ication s ...... . . ........................................ 3

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50 GENERAL STUDIES Level U** His tori cal ................... ..... .................................... 3 Art s and Letter s ............. ........................... ........ .... 6 Social Science ...... . . ......................................... 6 Natural S c ience s .... ........ ....... .................................. 6 Total *** ........ . ...... ........................................... 33 A transfe r cou rs e o r co ur ses of at l e ast 2 se mest e r hour s judged to b e s imilar in skill d eve lopm e nt and con tent to a L evell co ur se will s ati sfy an indi v idual Level l c ours e requirement. Equivalency will be determined b y the d epar tm e nt offe rin g the Level l course. **One-hour deviations in the Levell/ categories may be allowed. ***A student's com pl e t ed G e n era l Studi es Pr ogram must contain at l east 33 semester h ou r s Basic Rules: Only a pproved courses ma y be u sed to atisfy the General Studie s requ irements. A curre nt Lis tin g of the se co ur ses i s publi s h ed in this sect ion in the G ene r al College R e quir e m e nt s brochure, and in th e Cour se De sc riptions sec tion of this Catal og. General Studie s cour es n ee d not b e co unt ed toward General Studies requirements. Th ey may be t ake n as e l ec tive s or to sati fy requirements in the m ajor o r d eg ree pro g ram. D e p artments or program may spec ify, b y prefix and numb er, orne Gen e ral Studie s co ur ses in addition to co ur es r equired for the major or a profe s ional crede ntial Cour ses taken u s ing th e p a s-fa il option cannot be co unted for General Studies. LEVEL I REQUIREMENTS: COMPOSITION, MATHEMATICS AND COMMUNICATION FREsHMAN ASSESSMENT: READING WRITING AND MATHEMATICS PLACEMENT EXAMS Firsttime college s tudents are required to co mplet e th e r ea ding writing and math e m atics placement ex amination s (se e Asse s ment Requir e ments sec tion). Examination r es ult s erve as the ba i for acad e mic ad v i ing To increa se their o pportunit y for s ucce ss, student s ma y be req uir e d to take cou r es b e low the l eve l of the first-year courses offered by MSCD Student s s h o uld be aware, however that no cred it i s give n for co ur s es th at are below the college l evel. Placement Test Prerequisites Students mus t have a pa ssing sco r e on the appropriate plac eme nt te t before they will be allowed to r eg i s ter for L eve l I General Studie s co ur ses in English, mathematics and r ea ding Exceptions wiJI b e made for stu dent s who h ave ear n ed at l ea t a grade of C in th e co mmunit y c ollege co ur se s pecified b y the department. The A ssess ment Center administers the pla ce m e nt t ests. Students s hould co n s ult an adv i sor in the Advi s ing Cent e r for g uid a n ce in se lecting the a ppropri a te L eve l I courses. COMPOSITION REQUIRED COURSES ( minimum 6 se me s ter h ours) ENG 1 010 Freshman Composition: The Essay ........................ 3 ENG I 020 Freshman Compo ilion: Analy i Research & D ocumentation ... 3 RULES: COMPO ITION REQUREME T Students mus t comp l ete the ENG 1010 requirem e nt wit hin their f1rst 30 se m ester hour s a t MSCD and the ENG 1020 requirement w ithin their fir s t 60 se me ste r hours. Th e e requirements m a y be po s tpon e d only if a pproved in wr it ing by the Englis h D epart ment. Students mu s t d e monstr ate the adequacy of their wri tin g s kill s in the pla ceme nt exam b e for e e nr o llin g in ENG 1010 Tho e tud e nt s w h o e writing s kill s a r e inadequate will be coun e l ed on h ow to improve tho se skills. Stud e nt s m ay be r eq uired to co mpl e t e additi o nal co ur sewo rk. Student s will h ave sa tisfied the Level I co mposition requirement if they: sa tisfa c torily c omplet e ENG 1010 and 1020 or p a sa CLEP or AP examination a ppro ved b y the Englis h D epartme nt (ENG 1010 on l y) or tr a n sfer equival e nt courses.

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GENERAL STUDIES 51 MATHEMATICS (mi nimum 3 erne ter hours) MTH I 080 Mathematical Modes of Thought . .... ....... ..... .... 3 MTH 1110 College Algebra ................ ... ........ ....... .4 MTH 1210 Intr oduc tion to Statistics ....... ....... ................ .4 MTH 1310 MTH 1610 Finite Mathematic s for the Management & Social Sciences ..... .4 Mathematical Concept s for Teachers in Presecondary School .. .4 RULES: MATHEMAT ICS REQUJR EME T Students will take the mathematic s placement exam to determine their abi liti e to calculate with fractions decimal s and p ercent s, a nd to know and use elementary geometrical formula Tho e w h o e skills are inadequate are required to compl ete college arithmetic cour sewo rk b efore enrolling in a Leve l I mathematic s cour se. Some courses have additiona l requirements Students mu t co mplet e the Level I mathematic s requirement within their ftrSt 30 seme ter hour s at MSCD. This requirement may be postponed on an individual basis if the po tponement i approved in writing b y the Mathematical and Compute r Science Departm e nt Students will have sati fied the Leve l I math ematics requirement if they: Qpa a mathematic s course tha t ha s been approved for Level I mathematics credit (see cour ses li t ed a b ove), or Qpass a CLEP or AP examinatio n approved by the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department, or Qsucces fully compl ete a mathematics cour se for whic h a Level I mathematics course i s a prerequi ite, or Qrransfer an equivalent cour e. *A transfer cou r se or courses of at least 2 semes t er hours judged to be similar in skill development and conten t to a Levell course will satisfy an individual Level l course requirement Equivalen cy is deter mined by the department offering the Lev ell course. COMMUNICATIONS (minimum 3 seme s ter h ours) FRE I 020 E l e m e ntary French Il . ......... ....... . ...... ... 5 GER I 020 Elementary German I! .................................. 5 HON 2950 The Art of Critical Thinking ............................. 3 PHJ 1110 Language Logic & P ersuasion ........................... 3 RDG 1510 Cognitive Strategies for Analytical R eading .............. 3 SPA 1020 Elementary Spani h I! .................................. 5 SPE 1010 Public Speaking .............. . .................. 3 SPE 1610/EDU 1610/ American Sign Language I ............................ 3 MDL 1 6 1 0 SPE 1 710 Int erpersona l Communication ............................ 3 RULES: COMM ICATIO R EQUIREMENT Student s must compl e t e the required Level I communication course within their first 30 seme s ter hour at MSCD. Students will have satisfied the Level I communicatio n requirements if th ey: Qpass an ap proved Level I communi cation cour se (listed a bov e), or Qpas a CLEP or AP examinatio n approved by a department offering a Level I communi ca tion cour e, or Qtransfer an equivalent cou r e, o r Qtransfer a seco nd semes t er, four-or five-seme ter hour foreign language course or a more advanced l a nguage cour e that is t a u g ht in a language n o t offered a t MSCD, or

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52 GENERAL STUDIES or tran fer an advanced foreign language course that i s taught in the foreign language and that has MSCD FRE 1020, GER 1020 and SPA 1020 or equivalent coursework or more advanced co ur sework as a prerequisite or or transfer an advanced public s peaking course for which MSCD's SPE 1010 or a comparable course i s a prerequisite. Students who h ave sat i sfie d the comm uni cat ion s requirement u sing the adva n ced foreign lan g uage cour e or the advanced public peaking cour s e mu s t place that co ur e in the Level I comm unicati ons requirement s lot. Level II General Studie s cour s es used to atisfy the Level I communications require ments cannot al s o be counted in the Level II category A transf e r c our se or c ourses of at least 2 se mester hours judged to b e s imilar in skill development and co nt e nt to a Levell c ours e will sati sfy an indi v idual Levell c ours e r e quir e ment Equi v alen cy i s deter min e d b y th e d e partm e nt offerin g the Lev ell c ourse. LEVEL II REQUIREMENTS Cour es approved to sati sfy the Level II requirement are di trib ut ed among four categories. Thecategorie s, together with the minimum number of erne ter hour a tudent mu t accumulate to sati sfy this requireme nt are give n below. One h our deviation s in the General Studie Level II categories may be allowed provided the stude nt has completed at l east 33 s emester hour s of General Studies co ur ses LEVEL II CATEGORIES Historical .. ... .............. .............. 3 Arts and Letters ......... ............. ..... ...... 6 Social Science ... ............... ............. 6 a tural Science ...... .... .................... 6 R LES: LEVEL II REQUIREME T Prerequisites: Level II General Studies co ur ses have at lea s t the following prerequisites or corequisites and some cour s e s have additional prerequi s ites ( ee the Course De scriptions sec tion in thi s Catalog). Historical and Arts and Letter s : e s numbered 1000 to 1990: minimum performance standard scores on reading and writing prea s sessment placement te t s numbered 2000 to 2990: ati s faction of the Level I mathematic s course require ment and either ENG 1010 or the Level I commun i cation cour s e requirement numbered 3000 and abo ve: satisfaction of all Level l General Studie cour e requirement s Natural Science and Social Science: e s numbered 1000 to I 990 : minimum performance standards score s on the reading writing and mathematic prea s e s ment placement tests numbered 2000 to 2990 : satisfaction of the Level I mathematics course require ment and either ENG 1010 or the Level I commun i cat ion cour s e requirement numbered 3000 a nd above : ati sfac tion of all Level I cour e requirement s Student s may not u e cour s e s havin g the same prefix as their major discip lin e or crosslisted with their major discipline to sati sfy the L e ve l II requirements. Students ma y u s e cour e s h a ving the same prefix as their minor di cipline or cro sli s ted with their minor di cipline to sati sfy General Studies requirements. However a minimum of 18 cred it must be u s ed only in the minor and not for General Studies. Deviations from the Cat alog requirement s require approval of the minor departme nt and some departments require that more than I 8 cr e dit s be u s ed only in th e minor Plea e contact the minor department for addi tional information. Stude nt s may not app l y more than 8 semester hours of cred it with the sa me course prefix to the Level Il requirements

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GENERAL STUDIES 53 Stude nt s may use ei ther prefix for a c r osslis ted cour e, i e., o n e d e ignated XXX (YYY). They mus t se lect the prefix th ey w i sh to use a t r egistration; th e e l ectio n may n o t b e c h anged lat e r Hi tory maj ors must tak e three extra semester h our a t Level U in th e social sc i e n ce, arts a nd letter or natural scie nces categories in lieu of the three hours in the historical category. Hi to r y majors may not u se courses th at are cross lis ted with his tory cour ses for General Studies HISTORICAL (MlNIMUM 3 SEMESTER HOURS) Hi storical courses aim to impart a broad k nowledge of his tory with emphasis upon the major fo r ces, persons and even ts that have s h aped the modern world. The fo llowin g cour ses may b e used to sati sfy th e G e neral Studi es, Multi c ultural and S e nior Exp e ri e nce req uirement However, other courses m ay have been approved for such use after the publication of thi s Catalog. For up-to-date information contact the Advising Cent er. FRE 3550 HI S 1000 HIS 1 010 HlS 1020 HIS 1110 HlS 1210 HIS 1220 HTS 1250 HIS 1 650/WMS 1650 me HIS 1910/CHS 1010 me HIS 1920/CHS 1020 me HlS 1930/NAS 1930 me HIS 1 940/AAS 1130 HIS 2010 me HlS 2950/AAS 2130 HlS 3030 HlS 3060 me HI S 3090 HIS 3120 HIS 3140 HIS 331 0 HI S 3320 me HIS 3590 HlS 3700 HIS 3740 HI S 3810 HIS 4 1 10/HO 3850 HIS 4120/HON 3860 French Histor i ca l P e r s pectives ............................ 3 American Civilization ....................... .......... 3 We s tern C iviliza t ion to 1715 ............... ........ ..... 3 W e tern C ivilization since 1715 .......................... 3 Co l orado His tor y I .................................... 3 American His tory to 1865 ............................... 3 American Hi tory since 1 865 ...... ............ ........ 3 China, Japan Korea since 1800 ........................... 3 Women in U.S. His tory ...................... . . ... 3 History of Me o-America: Pre-Columbian & Co l onial P eriods .. .3 Hi s tory of the Chicano in the Southwe st: 1810 to Pr e ent ..... 3 His tory of Ind i ge n o u s /Hi spa nic American s ......... ....... .3 Survey of African His tory ............................ 3 Contemporary World His t ory ............................ 3 We t African Civilizations .............................. 3 Ancient Orient & Gree ce ................................ 3 R ome and the Caesars .................................. 3 Native Americans in America n Hi tory ............ ........ 3 Medieval Hi tory ............................... ..... 3 Renai ssa nce & Reform atio n ................... .......... 3 E n g l and to 1 7 1 4 ................................... 3 England since 1714 .............................. ...... 3 American Immigration History .................. ...... 3 Modern China ............. ......................... 3 Modern J apan ............................... .... 3 Latin America: R epublics ............................... 3 American Cu l ture I .................................... 3 American Culture II .............. .................. 3 Histo r y m ajo r s mu s t take thre e extr a semester hours at Level II in th e Social Sciences, Arts & Lett e r s, or Natural Science categor ies in lieu of t h e three hours in t h e His torical category. Hi story majors m ay not use cour es that are crosslisted with history cour es for General Studies. A one-hour deviation in th e General Studie hi s torical requirement may be allowed, p rovided the s tu dent h as completed a t least 33 se mester hours of General S tudies courses. Plea se note: me indicates that the course is also approved as a multicultural cour se

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54 GENERAL STUDIES ARTS & LETTERS (MINIMuM 6 SEMESTER HOURS)* Arts & Let ter s cours es impart a bro a d knowledge of impo rtant works and major s c h ool s of thou g h t from at least two centuri es. They also pro v id e a foundation fo r critical evaluation within the di sc i pline. The follow i n g courses may be used to satisfy the G e ner a l Studies, Multicultural a n d S enior Experience req uirements. However, other cou r ses m ay hav e been approved for s uch use after the pu bli catio n of this Catalog For up to-d a te inform ation, contact th e Advising C e nt er. me AAS 3240/ENG 3240 ART 1 040 me ART 3090 ART 3950/WMS 3950 ENG 1100 ENG 1110 ENG 1 1 20 ENG 1 310 ENG 3 0 30 me ENG 3240/AAS 324 0 ENG 3420 ENG 3430 ENG 3 460 FRE3110 FRE 3120 GER 3200 HON 2750 HON 2760 MUS 1000 me MUS 2020 me MUS 3000 MUS 3040 me MUS 3050 PHI 1010 PHII030 PHI3000 PHI302 0 PHI 3360 PSC 3050 RD G 3060 SPA 3200 SPA 3210 SPA 3220 SPE 2770 /WMS 277 0 SPE 3080 SPE 3740 me SPE 3 760 T H E 2210 WMS 2770/S P E 2770 WMS 35 10 WMS 3950/ART 39 50 African American Literature .. ........................... 3 Art Appreciation Surv ey ................................ 3 Art & Cultural H eri ta ge ................................. 3 Women's Art/Wom e n's I ss u es .............. ............ 3 Intr o duction to Lit e ratur e .......... .................... 3 Introduction to Fiction ...................... ....... ..... 3 Introdu ction to Drama ...... ...... ................... .3 Introducti on to Shakespeare ....... ..... .... ............ 3 S e m antics ........ .............. .................... 3 African Ameri ca n Lit e ratur e .... ....................... 3 English Bibl e as Lit erat ure .............................. 3 Classical Mythology .............. ......... ............ 3 Children's Lit e ratur e .................................. 3 Survey of French Lit e r a tur e I .... .... .................... 3 Surve y of French Literatur e ll .................. ......... 3 German Cultur e & Civilizatio n .................. ....... 3 The Legacy of Art s & Letter I .......... ............. 3 Th e Legacy of Art s & L e tter s 11 ......... .... ..... 3 Introduction t o Mu s i c ......... ......... ........... 3 J azz Styl es-America's Mu s i ................. ............ 3 Mu sics of America .................................... 3 Mu s i c & the Art s .... ..... ... ......................... 3 Mu s i cs of the World ................................... 3 Introdu ctio n to Phil o o ph y .............................. 3 Ethics ..................... ........................ 3 His tory o f Gr ee k Philo so ph y ............. . ......... 3 His tory of Mod ern Phi l osophy ........................... 3 Bu s ine ss Ethics ....................................... 3 Politi ca l Theory .................................. ..... 3 Criti cal Re a ding/Thinking ............................... 3 Culture & Civilization of Sp ai n ............. ........... 3 Spanish-American Culture & Civilization ................... 3 Folklore & Culture of the Mexican South wes t ................ 3 Gend e r & Communi cation ............................... 3 Gre a t American Sp eakers ............................... 3 P syc h o logy of Communicat io n ........................... 3 Cultural Influ e n ces on Communication ....... ............. 3 Introduction to Theatre ........ . ............. ........ 3 Gender & Communi ca tion ............................... 3 Feminist Th eory ............................... ..... 3 W o men's Art/Wom e n's I ssues .......................... .3 A oneh o u r deviation in the General Studies arts and l e tter s req uirement may be allowed, provided the student ba s completed at leas t 33 semester hours of General Studies courses. P lease no te: "me" i n dicates t ha t t h e course is also approve d a s a multicul tu r al c ou rse.

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GENERAL STUDIES 5 SOCIAL SCIENCES (MINIMUM 6 SEMESTER HOURS)* Social Science courses aim to explore the formation, behavior and intera ctio n of variou s social, cu ltu ral, political or eco nomic gro up s and in stitutio ns. The following courses may be u sed to satisfy the General Studie Multicultural and Senior Experi ence req u irements. However other cour ses may have been appro ved for s uch u se after the pub l ication of this Catalog For up to date information co nt act the Advi s in g Center. me AAS I 010 Introduction to African-American Studies ................... 3 me AAS 2 100 /C HS 2100/ Women of Color . ...................... . . ... 3 lCS 2100/NAS 2100/WMS 2100 me AAS 2200/PSC 2200 me AAS 3300/SOC 3140 AAS 3550/SOC 3440 ACC 1010 ANT 1310 me ANT2330 me ANT3310 me ANT3480 me CHS 1000 Politic s & Black P eople ......................... ....... 3 The Black Community .... ............ ................. 3 The Black Family .... .......................... ...... 3 Accounting for Non-Business Majors ...................... 3 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ...................... 3 Cross-Cultural Communication ........................... 3 Ethnography of North American Indi a n s .................. 3 Cultural Diversity in Health & Illness ...................... 3 Introduction to Chicano Studies ........................... 3 me CHS 2100/AAS 2100/ Women of Color ....................... .............. 3 res 2100/NAS 2100/WMS 2100 me CHS 3100/SOC 3130 The Chicano Community .... .............. ............ 3 CHS 3210/SOC 3470 The Chicano Family .................... ...... ......... 3 ECO 2010 Prin ciples of Economics-Macro . ........ ............... 3 ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro ............. ............. 3 EDS 3200 Educational P sychology Applied to Teaching ................ 3 FIN 2250 P e r sonal Money Management ......... ...... ........... 3 FRE 3560 Contemporary Socio-Cultural I ssues ....................... 3 GEG 1000 World R egiona l Geography .............................. 3 GEG 1300 Introdu ctio n to Hum a n Geography ............... ......... 3 GEG 2020 Geo graphy of Co l orado ......... ....................... 3 me GEG 3300/NAS 3300/ Land Use Culture & Conflict .............. ..... ....... 3 PSC 3300 HES 1050 HES 2000 HES 2180 HIS 3660 me HMT 1850 HON 3800 HO 3810 HPS 2720 me HSP 3490 Dynamics of Health ........... ....................... 3 Health Politics & Policy ............................... 3 AIDS : Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome ...... ..... .3 R ecent U.S., 1945 1970's ............................... 3 Multicultural/Multinational Cultural Adjustment/Readjustment 3 Revolution & Social Change I .............. .......... 3 R evolutions & Social Change II .. ........................ 3 Fundamentals of Coaching .............................. 2 Multicultural I s ues in Human Services ..................... 4 me lCS 1000 Introdu ctio n to Asian American St udi es .................... 3 me res 2100/AAS 2100/ W omen of Color ......... . ....................... 3 CHS 2100/NAS 2100/WMS 2100 ITS 2810 Technology Society & You ..... ............... ....... 3 JRN 1010 Intr oduction to J ournalism & Ma ss Media ................... 3 LES 4730 Sociology of Athletics in American Society ... .............. 3 MKT 2040 Managerial Communications ................. . ...... 3 me NAS 1000 Intr oduction to Native American Studies .................... 3 me NAS 2100/AAS 2 100/ Women of Color ... ........................ .... .... 3 CHS 2100/lCS 2 100/WMS 2100 me NAS 3200/PSC 3200 Native American Politic s ................................ 3 me NAS 3300/GEG 3300/ Land Use, Culture & Conflict ....... ...... ...... ....... 3 PSC 3300

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56 GENERAL STUDIES PSC 1 010 PSC 1 020 PSC 2100 me PSC 2200/AAS 2200 PSC 3120 me PSC 3200/NAS 3200 me PSC 3300/GEG 330 0 / NAS 3300 PSC 3630 PSY 1001 PSY 1800 PSY 2160 PSY 2210 PSY 3250 PSY 3260 soc 1010 me SOC 1040 soc 2010 me SOC3130/CHS3100 me SOC 3140/AAS 3300 me SOC 3220/WMS 3220 SOC 3440/AAS 3550 SOC 3470/CHS 3210 SWK 1010 American ational Government ................... ....... 3 Political Sys tem s & Ideas .................... .......... 3 Political Socialization .................................. 3 P o litics & Black People ... ...... ...................... 3 American Const ituti onal Law ........... ................ 3 Native American P olitics ...... ........................ 3 Land Use, Cult ur e & Conflict ............. .............. 3 Latin American Politi cs ....... .......................... 3 Introductory P syc h o l ogy ................................ 3 Developmental Educational P syc h o l ogy .... .............. 4 Per sonali ty & Adjustment ..... ......................... 3 Psycho l ogy of Human D eve l o pment ..................... 3 Child P sychology ..................................... 3 P sychology of Adole cence ..... ... ..................... 3 Introduction to So c iology .............................. 3 Introduction to So cial Geronto l ogy ........................ 3 Current Social I ssues ............. ....... .............. 3 The Chicano Community .......................... .... 3 The Bl ack Community ................... ............. .3 R ace, Gender & Ethnic Groups ......... ....... .......... 3 The B lack Family ...... ............................... 3 The Chicano Fami l y ... ...... ... ... .................. 3 Introduction to Social Welfare & Social Work ............... 3 WMS 1001 Introduction : Woman in Transitio n ... .................. 3 me WMS 2100/AAS 2100/ Women of Color ................ ...................... 3 CHS 2100/ICS 2100/NAS 2 1 00 me WMS 3220/SOC 3220 R ace, Gend er & Ethnic Groups ........................... 3 A oneh ou r deviation in th e G eneral Studie s art and letter requirement may b e aUowed provided the stude nt h as completed at l east 33 semester h ou r s of General Studies co ur ses. Please 11ote: "me" i11dicates that the course is also appro ve d as a multicultura l course NATURAL SCIENCE (MINIMUM 6 SEMESTER HOU RS)* Natur al Science cour ses provide an opportunity for tudents t o experience the sys t ematic formulation and testing of hypotheses and t o learn the importance of accu rate observation a nd measurement. Stu dents will di fferentiate amo n g fact, s p eculation, ev id ence, inference belief theory l aw an d general ization. The following courses may be used to satisfy the General Studie s, Multicultural and Senior Experience requirement s. H owever, other courses may h ave been a ppro ved for suc h u e after the publi catio n of this Catalog. For up-to-date information contact the Advisi n g C e nt er. ANT 1 010 AST I 040/ AST I 040sp AST 3040 BIO 1 000/BJO IOOOsp BIO 1 0 1 0/BIO I OIOsp BIO 1 080/BIO 1080 sp* BIO 1090 810 3300 BIO 3530/HES 3810 BIO 3550 CHE 1010 CHE 1100 Physi cal Anthropo l ogy & Prehistory ............ ........... 3 Introduction to Astronomy ...................... .... . 3 Modern Cosmo l ogy .......... ........................ 3 Human Biology for Non-Majo r s .......................... 3 Eco l ogy for Non -Majors .............. . .............. 3 General Introduction to Biology ................. ......... 3 General Introduction to Biology Laboratory ................. I Advanced Human B iology for Non -Majors .................. 3 Ph ysiology of Aging for Non-Bio l ogy Majors ............... 3 Urban Ecology ....................................... 4 C h emistry & Soc i ety ................................... 3 Principle s of C h emistry ............... ................. 5

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CHE 1850 & either CHE 1800 or 1810** CHE 3 100 CHE 3 1 20 GEG 1100 GEG 1 200 GEG 1400 GEL 1010 GEL 1020 GEL 1030 GEL 1150 GEL 1510 GEL 1520 GEL 3510 GEL 3520 HES 2040 HES 2150 HES 3450 HES 38 1 0/BIO 3530 HON 2800 HO N 2810 HPS 3300 HPS 3340 MET3550 MTR 1400 MTR 3500 PHY 1000/PHY IOOOsp PHY 1 250 PHY 20 I 0/P HY 2030 PHY 2020/PHY 2040 PHY 23 11/PHY 232 1 PHY 2331/P H Y 234 1 PHY 3620 SC I 2610 SCI 2620 I GENERAL STUDIES 57 General Chemistry I or IT ..................... ........ 6 Organic Chemistry I .................................. .4 Organic Chemi stry I L ab ..... .......................... 2 Introductio n to Physical Geogra ph y ........................ 3 Introd u ctio n to E n vironmenta l Science .......... ......... 3 World R eso ur ces .......................... ..... ..... 3 General Geo l ogy .................................... 4 Geology of Colorado ...... ........................... 3 His torical Geology .................................... 4 Oceanography ........................................ 3 Geology of R ed R ock P ark & Vicinity ..... ............... I Garden of the Gods-Front R ange Geology ................... 2 Advanced Geology of Red R ocks Park & Vicinity ............ I Advanced Garden of the Gods-Front R ange Geology ..... . 2 Intr oduction to Nutrition ................................ 3 Alternative Ther apies for Health & Healing ................. 3 Dynamics of Disease .................................. 3 Ph ys i o l ogy of Aging for No n-Bi ology M ajors ................ 3 Hi story of Science ..................................... 3 Development of Experimenta l Sci ence ..................... 3 Anatomical Kin esio l ogy ................................ 3 Ph ysiology of Exercise ................................. 3 Rockets & Star s A Space Trek ............. ...... ..... 3 Intr oductio n to Meteorology .................. .......... 3 H azardous Weather .................................... 3 Intr oduction to Physics ............. ........ .......... 4 Ph ys i cs of Aviation .................................... 6 College Physics I & Laboratory ............. ............. 5 College Physic s U & Laboratory .......................... 5 General Physics I & Laboratory .......................... 5 General Physics II & Laboratory .......................... 5 Sound & Music .............. ............ .......... .3 Inte grated Natural Science I ..................... .... 3 Int egrated Natural cience II ........... ................. 3 In ord e r to recei ve General Studies credit, both BIO 1080 and 1090 mu t be s uccessfully completed. ** Successful compl etion of CHE 1850 and either CHE 1800 o r 1810 will result in 6 hours atural Science General Studies c redit. Successful compl etion of all three courses will result in I 0 hours of Gener a l Studies credit. CHE 1800 is a prerequisite for CHE 1 850. CHE 1850 ha s a corequisi t e o f CHE 1810. *A one-hour de via ti o n in the G e neral Studies n atural science requirement may be allowed provided the s tud e nt ha s complete d a t lea t 33 semester hours of General Studies courses Please note: "me" indicates that the course is also approved as a multicultural course. ADDITIONAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Mu lticultural and Senior Experience Course Requirements ln ad dition to compl e tin g the G e neral Studies requirem e nt s, a s tud e nt mu st complet e a three-hour Mul ticultural course and a three-hour Senior Experience course, or se l ection of courses, to be awarded a bachelor's degree from MSCD. The Multicultural class does not require three h ours as a separate cate gory and can be take n in the m ajo r minor o r as an e l ective. The rules pertaining to those requir ements and the courses th at will satisfy those requirement s are desc ribed below.

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58 GENERAL STUDIES MULTICULTURAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENT (MINIMUM 3 SEMESTER HOURS) Multicultural cour es are designed to increa e students' appreciation and awareness of the American culture and the diverse cu lture s which contrib ut e to it. Multicu l t u ral educationa l offerings examine the interactions of values and beliefs, tradition identities and cultural contributio n s of women and r acial and ethnic groups in the United States: African American, As ia n American, Hispanic American and Native American. Students may use the course to satisfy General Studies, major or minor requirements if the course is approved for that use. If the course is used fo r General Studies, the Level II General Studies restriction remain in effect, e.g., no courses with the major prefix may be used. A one-hour deviation in the Multicultural requirement will be allowed for cour es judged to be similar in content to an existing Multicultural course. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Multicultural course. AAS 1010 Introduction to African American Studie ................... 3 AAS 1130/HIS 1940 Survey of African History ....... ........................ 3 AAS 2130/HIS 2950 West African Civilization s .............................. 3 AAS 2200/PSC 2200 Politics & Black P eop le .... ................... ......... 3 AAS 3240/ENG 3240 African American Liter ature ............................. 3 AAS 3300/SOC 3140 The Black Community ................... ............. 3 ANT 2330 Cross-Cu l tural Communication ........................... 3 ANT 3310 Ethnography of North American Indian s .................... 3 ANT 3480 Cultural Diversity in Health and Illnes s ................. .... 3 ART 3090 Art & Cultural H eritage ................................. 3 CHS 1000 Introduction to Chicano Studie s ........................... 3 CHS 1010/HIS 1910 CHS I 020/HIS 1920 CHS 3100/SOC 3130 CHS 3200/CJC 3720 EDS 3110 EDU 3100 ENG 2240 GEG 3300/NAS 3300 PSC 3300 HIS 1930/NAS 1930 HIS 3090 HIS 3590 HMT 1850 HSP 3490 ICS 1000 MGT4830 MUS 2020 MUS 3000 MUS 3050 His tory of Meso-Americ a : Pre -Co lumbi an & Colonial Period s ... 3 History of the Chicano in the Southwe st: 1810 to Present ....... 3 The Chicano Communit y ...... ......... ............. 3 Chicanos and the L aw ...................... ........... 3 Processe s of Ed u c.in Multicultural Urban Secondary School s .... 3 Social Foundations and Multicultural Education ............. .5 Native American Literatures .......................... ... 3 Land U se, Culture & Conflict ............................ 3 His tory of Indigenous/Hi s pani c Americans ....... .......... 3 Native Americans in American History ..................... 3 American Immigration His tory .......................... .3 Multicultural/Multinati onal Cultural Adju trnent!Readju tment ... 3 Multicultural Issues in Human Service ..................... 4 Introduction to Asian American Studies .................... 3 Workforce Diversity ................................... 3 Jazz Styles America's Music .......................... 3 Musics of America .......... .......... .... ....... 3 Mu ics of the World ................................... 3 NAS 1000 Introduction to Native American Studie s .................... 3 NAS 3200/PSC 3200 Native American Politics .................... .......... .. 3 PSY 3170 Multicultural Service Learning .... ...................... 3 SED 3000 Diversity Disability and Education .. ..................... 3 SOC 1040 Introduction to Social Gerontology ........................ 3 SOC 3220/WMS 3220 Race Gender & Ethnic Group s ........................... 3 SPE 3760 Cultura l Influences on Communication ..................... 3 XXX 1190 First Year Seminar ................................... 3 WMS 2100/AAS 2100/ Women of Color ........................ ............ 3 CHS 2100/NAS 2100/ICS 2100 Variable cour e prefixes e.g. ANT, CJC, ENG, PSC, RDG, SOC, SPE, WMS.

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I I GENERAL STUDIES 5 SENIO R EXPERIENCE GRADUATION REQUIREMENT minimum 3 semester hour s) I The Senior Experience course provides a culmination of the undergraduate experience, allowing s tudents to synthesize their learning u s ing critical analysis and logical thlnking. Students may use the course to satisfy major or minor requ irements if the course i s approved for that u se Students should consult with their adviso r and check prerequisites Students mu t complete a Senior Experience co ur se at the end of the undergraduate program and must take the course or courses at MSCD. Senior Experience cour ses have the following minimal prerequisites: satisfaction of all Leve l I and Level ll General Studies course requirement s and enior standing. ln some ca e s tudent s may need to take two cour es to satisfy the requirement. m e ART 4010 ART4750 BIO 4510 BIO 4540 BIO 4850 CHE4950 CHS 4850 CJC 4650 COM 4410 COM 4790 CSI 4260 ECO 4600 EDS 4290 EDU 4190 EDU 4380 EDU 4390 EDU 4690 EET4100 EET41 10 E G 4520 ENG 4610 E G 4640 ENG 4660 FRE 45 2 0 FRE4530 GEG 4890 GEG 4960 GEL4960 GER 4200 GER4400 GER 4410 HCM 4510 HES 4520 HJS 4820 HMT4040 HMT4400 HPS 4600 HPS 4870 HPS 4880 HPS 4890 HSP 4790 ITS 4960 1RN 4500 LES 4890 MET4010 MET4070 MGT4830 Modem Art Hi t ory: Theory & Criticism ................... 3 Senior Experience Studio : Portfolio Developm ent & The s i s Show3 Mic robial Ecology ..................................... 3 Plant Ecology .... .... ............................. .4 Evolution ........................................... 3 S e nior Experience in Chemistry ................. .... .... 3 Re earch Experien ce Chicano Studie s ..... ............ 3 Ethics for the Criminal Justi ce Pr ofess ional ....... ......... 3 Budgeting & Plannin g for AudioVisual Produ ctions .......... 3 Senior Seminar in Technical Comm ......... .......... 3 Software Engineering Practices ........................... 4 His tory of Economic Thought ............................ 3 Stud e!ll Teach & Seminar Secondary ....... ........... 6,8, 12 Student Teach & eminar: Elementary K-6 ............ 6,8,10, 12 Teaching Pra cticum in Preprimary Early Childhood Education .3-6 Student Teaching & Seminar: Early Childhood Education ... 6,8, I 0 Profe ssional Practicum ......... .... ..... ............. 1-6 Senior Project ......................... ............... I Senior Project ll .... ..... .. ..... ... ...... ............ 2 Advanced Writing .................... ................ 3 Theories & T ec h in Literary Criticism .... ........... ..... 3 Teaching English, 7-12 ................................. 3 Teaching Literatur e & Language, K -6 ...................... 3 Modem French Theater ................................. 3 The French Novel ............................. ..... 3 Advanced GIS Laboratory .............................. 3 Global Environmental Challenges .... .......... ..... 3 Environmental Field Studies ............................. 3 M ajor German Authors ................... ............. 3 G erma n for Bus ine s ll ................................. 3 Advanced Tran s lation Technique ......................... 3 H ealth Care Management Pr acticum .................... 6 Intern s hip in Gerontology ............................. 3-6 Senior Seminar . .... ... ..... ........ ......... 3 Senior Ho s pitality Research Experience I ... ............... 2 Senior Hospita lity Re search Experience ll .................. 2 Or ganiza tion Admin. of Human Perf ormance & SportS Prog .... 3 Intern shi p for Athletic Training .......................... I 0 Int ernship for Adult Fitness Major ........................ I 0 Intern s hip for Human Performance .... ................ I 0 Profe ssio nal Intern shi p ................................ 12 Profe s ionallndustrial Intern s hip ........................ .4 Ethical & Legal I ss ue s in Journali sm ....................... 3 Intern ship for Leisure Studie .......... ............... 1 2 Advanced Manufacturing Technology .............. ...... 3 Computer Aided D esign ................................ 3 Workforce Diver ity ................................... 3

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60 GENERAL S TUDIES MGT4950 MTH4210 MTH 4220 MT H 4410 MTH 4480 MTH4640 MTR4600 MUS 4110 MUS 4340 MUS 4390 MUS 4510 MUS 4740 MUS 4790 MUS 4950 NU R 4850 PHJ 4100 PHY 4620 PHY 4721 PHY 4920 PSC 4020 PSY 4510 RDG 4600 SED 4490 soc 4600 soc 4710 SPA 4200 SPA 4310 SPE 4090 SPE 4120 SPE 4490 SPE 4500 SPE 4790 SWK48!0 THE4200 WMS 4750 Strategic Management .......... .................... ... 3 Probability Theory ................................... 4 Stocha tic Proce es .......... ................ ........ 4 Advanced Calc ulu s I .................................. 4 Numerical A n a ly sis I ... ............................... 4 History of Mathematics .............. ................... 4 Senior R e earch Seminar ................ ................ 3 Analy sis of Mu sic ...... ................... . ........ 2 Secondary School Mu sic Methods & Material s .............. 2 Supervi sed Field Exp e rience ............................. I Advanced Conducting ................... ............... 2 Performance Vill ............... .................... .4 Senior R ecital .............. ......................... I Senior Pr oject ....................................... .3 Nursing P rocess : Application ............................ 3 Senior Seminar ......................... ............. .3 Computationa l Ph ysic II ............................... 2 Advanced Ph ys i cs Laboratory II ........... ............... 2 Ph ys i cs Senior Seminar ......... .................... ... I Special Studie s ....................................... 3 Hi s tory & Systems of P sycho logy ......................... 3 Practicum in L i teracy Enhancement .................... ... 3 Special Education Student Teachi n g and Seminar .. ........ 61 2 Advanced R esearch in the Socia l Scienc es .................. 3 Applied Sociology ..................................... 3 Spani s h -American Essay: 19th & 2 0th Centurie s .............. 3 History of the Spa n ish Language ................. ........ 3 Classical Rhetori c ..................... ................ 3 Freedom of Spee ch .................................... 3 Effects of Radio Tel evision on Contemporary Life ............ 3 Clinical Method in Communicat i o n Di so rders ............... 3 Communication Theory Buildin g and R esearch Methodology .... 3 Profe ss ional Field Experience ll .......................... 5 Reader' s Theatre ... ......... ........... ............. 3 Senior Seminar ....................................... 3 me -Thi s course will also satisfy the Multicultural requirement. ASSESSMENT EXAMINATIONS AND OTHE R A CT I V IT IES In their enior year, s tudents may be required to participate in a n asses ment of their general education The faculty h as determined educational goals o r outcomes that it wants graduates t o achieve. A cop y of those goal s and the methods b y which their achievements are measured can be obt a ined from the department office

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 61 ACA D EMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES SEMESTER HoURS CREDIT Course credit i s based on units designed as semes t er hours. One se mester hour or one ba se contact hour equals a minimum of 750 minutes; this translates to a minimum of 15, 50-minute c la ss hours per se mester. Time required for class preparation is not a consideration in the calcu l atio n of course c redit. A three-credit hour course will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of c lass. Omnibus courses involving laboratory work give one semester hour of credit for each two, three or four hours of cheduled work in the l a boratory during a week. (nternships require a minimum of 2 250 minutes for each hour of credit. COURSE LOAD The average co ur e load per 16-week semes ter i 15 or 16 emester hours. Students who are aca demi cally strong may take up to 1 8 emester hours during fall and s pring semesters and up to 12 semes ter hours during the summer semester. During fall and pring se me sters, students with cumulative MSCD grade poi nt averages (G PAs) of3.25 or higher may take 19 or 20 se mester ho u rs and those students with GPA s of 3.50 o r higher may take 2 1 se mester h ours for fall and spri n g semes ter o r 14 semester hour s for the summer semester. Students must have completed at lea st 15 semester hour at MSCD Autho rization for overloads for students without these qualifications mus t be obtained from the stu dent's major department chair and appropriate dean. Forms are available in the department or deans offices. STUDENT CLASSIFICATION Students are classified according to the number of semester hour s of credit earned: freshmen fewer than 30; so phomore s 30 or more, but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more but fewer tha n 90; seniors 90 or more SELECTION OF CATALOG FOR REQUIREMENTS Students must u se a s ingle MSCD catalog to meet all their degre e requirements, including the General Studies, major and minor requirement Student s must select a Catalog in effect while the y are enrolled at MSCD unl e the y are tran sfe rring from a regionally accredited Co l orado community college, pro vided that the Catalog co ntain s their comp lete pro gram of st udy Students not enrolling for three con secutive seme ters or more are governed by the Catalog in effec t upon their return. For effective dates of Catalogs, students s hould con ult their academic advisors All d egree programs must a dhere to over riding current policies at MSCD. Students transferring from a regionally accredited Colorado community college may complete degree requirements u ing an MSCD Catalog in effect while enrolled at rhe community college s ubj ect to the following conditions : The Catalog selecte d does not predate the c urrent cata l og by more than three years The Cat a l og se l ected may h ave been in u e at any time frbm the time the s tudent wa co ntinu ally enrolled* at a regionally accredited Colorado comm u nity college to the seme ter for which the student is enro llin g in MSCD. Continuo u s enrollment is defined as not interrupting enrollment for three or more consecutive se me s ter s (o ne calendar year); s umm er is co unted as a emester. Co nt inuo u s enrollment must b e maintained from the period of the designated MSCD Catalog to the point of MSCD degree completion DECLARING A MAJOR Applicants to The Metropolitan State College of D enver may indicate their intended major on the MSCD Application for Admission. Non-degree-seeki n g s tudents w h o w i sh to declare a major mus t fir s t c h ange to degree seeking status by co mpleting a Ch ange of Status form with the Registrar's Office CHANGING A MAJOR Degr ee-seeking students who wish to change a major must co mpl ete a Declaration/Change of Major form whic h i s available from the major department or from the Academic Adv i sing Center

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62 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES GRADUATION Degreeeeking student formally declare their degree candidacy by filing an Application for Gradua tion with the Office of the Registrar just prior to their anticipated semester of graduation, but no later than the deadline stip ulat ed in the Class Schedule The Application for Graduation sho uld be filed only by tudent who intend to complete all degree requirements by the end of the upcoming semester and hould be filed in consultation with the student s major department. If a student does not grad uat e, they must re-submit another Application for Graduation for the semes ter they intend to graduate. DIPLOMAS AND COMMENCEMENT Students who have met all requirements for graduation are gra nt ed diplomas at the end of the semester for which they are degree candidates. Diplomas may be with h eld becau e of indebtedness to the col lege. Completion of two major does not re ult in two degrees or diplomas. A formal commencement ceremo n y i s held at the end of the spring and fall semesters. For commenceme nt inf ormation, call 303556-6226. TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS An official transcript is a certi fled copy of a tudent's permanent academic record. Except for faxed tran scripts, there is no charge. Transcript will be released by the Registrar's Office upon formal written request by the tudent. Transcript will also be i s u ed to finns and employer if written authorizat ion is received from the tudent. Reque ts should include the student' full legal name as recorded whi l e atte ndin g MSCD student identification number, l ast term of attendance, number of copies des i red, and to whom and where transcripts are to be sent. Transcripts may b e withheld because of indebtedness to the college or for other appropriate reasons. Transcripts from other institution that are on file in the Registrar's Office will be issu ed up on s i gne d request by the s tud ent. A c har ge of $5 per r equest i s as essed for this ervice. Students from other institutions taking MSCD courses und er the state college system or interinstitutional registration programs must request transcripts from th eir home institution. HONORS AND AWARDS The college annually recognizes students who s how outsta nding le adershi p and service to the college and community, excellence in scholastic achievement and outstanding personal character and integrity. Recognition of students includes: The President s Award (one senior) ; the Special Service Award for Academic Affairs (one se nior ) and for Student Services (one senior); Outstanding Student Awards (seniors from each school); Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and College (sen ior s); American Association of University Women (AAUW) Award (senior woman) Other awards include Special Service Award for Exception ally Chal l enged Students, Student Government Assembly Award, Charles W. Fisher Award and the Colorado E n gineering Council Award lnformation and applications for these awards are available in Central Cia sroo m Building, room 313. Awards are pre ented at the ar.nual banquet the night before graduation. In add i tion to annual awards, students with outsta ndin g academic achievements are recognized by being named on the college's Honor Li ts. The President's Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of comp utation ha ve ac hie ved a cu mulative GPA of 3 .85 or higher. Th e Pro vost's Honor List carries the nam es of students who at the time of computa tion h ave achieve d a cumulative GPA of between 3.50 and 3.84, inclusively Computation will occur initially when the student has completed betwee n 30 and 60 h ours a t MSCD th en again betw een 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours. Po ring of the award occurs after the student receive his/her seme ter grade report. Que tions hould be directed to the Office of Academic Affairs at 303-556-3907. Graduation honors are awarded to tudents who have demonstrated superior academic abiLity in their baccalaureate degree while attending MSCD. Honors de ignation are determined according to the fol lowing c riteria : Summa Cum Laude Top five percent of graduates wit hin each choo l with cumulative MSCD GPA of no l ess than 3.65. Magna Cum Laude Next five percent of graduates within eac h school with cumulative MSCD GPA of no l ess than 3.6 5

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 63 Cum Laude Next five percent of graduates within each c h oo l with cum ulativ e MSCD GPA of n o less than 3.65. To determine each honor's category, GPAs for the previous spring semester graduates are arrayed in rank order. This rank ordering is then used to determine the honors recip ients among the following fall, spring and summer graduates. To qualify for graduation honor recognition, a student must have completed a minimum of 50 semester hours of clas room credit at MSCD prior to the term of graduation. Courses completed during the term of graduation and transfer credits are not considered when determining honors. Honors designations are added to the student's official academic record ; no other notification will be sent. For add itional information regarding graduation honors, contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 303-556-3907 GRADES AND NOTATIONS Grades Alphabetical grades and status ymbols are a follows: A-Superior ................... .4 quality points per semester hour attempted B Above Average .... ......... 3 quality points per semester hour attempted C-Average ............ ......... 2 quality points per semester hour attempted D-B elow Average but P assing ...... I qua lit y point per semester hour attempted F-Failure ...................... 0 quality points p er semester hour attempted Notations APCC CLEXINC-RP PL PPS SA SNAdvanced Placement Continuing Correspondence Course CLEP Credit by Exam Incomplete No Credit ot Reported. No grade was reported by the faculty by the deadline to ubmit grades. Student must see faculty for an explanation or assignment of grade. Courses taken through inte rin stitutional registration are normally assigned the "NR" notation until grades are rec eived and posted to the academic record Students who receive a "NR" notatio n o n their final grade r eport may be severely impacted. Financial aid, em ploy ment status, veteran status and probation/suspen ion depend on students receiving all their grades Pa ss Portfolio Assessment PEP Exam Satisfactory (limited to student teaching and HPSILES 4870/4880/4890 internships) Study Abroad-credit Study Abroad n o credit The I notation may be assigned whe n a student who has attended the majority of the class ses sio n s was unable to take the final exa mination a nd/ or did not complete all class ass i gnments due to unu s u a l circum tances (su c h as hospitalization) Incomplete work denoted by the In co mplet e "I" notation must be completed within o n e calendar year or earlier a t the discretion of the faculty member. If the incomplete work is not comp l eted within one calendar year, the I notation will change to a n F." Graduating senio r s ma y not graduate with a n "I" on their MSCD aca d emic r ecor d The "I" notation may not be given for a se lf paced cou rse. Students mus t not re-enroll for the class in which they receive an "I." The I is not a substitu t e for a "NC" or an "F." The No Credit ( C) notation i not a grade It may indicate withdrawal f rom the co ur se or co ur se repetition. Th e C" not at ion may also b e u sed in e lf -paced cour es t o indi cate that the st udent and/or the faculty have decided to ex t end the student's exposure to the cou r se to increase the stu-

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64 POLICIES AND PROC E DURES dent' s profici e n cy. In thi s case, to earn credit the stude nt must re register for a nd pay tuition a nd fees for the cour e in a s ub seq uent term. ( Th e NC s h ould not b e co n fuse d with "dro ppin g" a co urse during the first 1 2 days of the fall or spri n g term [8 for the s umm er tem1]. Droppin g a co ur se m ea n s that th e cou r se d oes not ap p ear o n the s tudent's academ i c re cord.) The following minimal stan dard s are required thr o u g h out the college and are a part of all choo l d e p art mental or individu a l faculty p olic i es. Th e sta ndard s are for full ISweek terms Pro -rated time lin e are avai lab l e for other part s-ofterm as well as the s umm e r semes ter. The NC" notation is availab l e to s tud ents i n all in tan ces through th e fourth week of c l asses for fall and s prin g t erms Stud e nt s redu ci n g th eir co ur se l oad b etwee n the beginning of the fifth and the end of th e tenth week of classe s during fall a nd spri n g se m e ter s may r eceive an" C" notation for each co ur se, provid ed fac ult y a ppro val i s g rant ed. Addition a l re triction s regarding ass i g nin g the "NC" not atio n may b e set by eac h sc hool, department a nd/or faculty m e mb e r for the period between the beginning of t h e fifth and the end of the tenth week of the semeste r (or pr oportio n a l tim e frame). Stud e nt requ e t s for an NC not atio n in a g i ve n co ur e will not be g r a nt e d after the tenth week of the fall and s pring se me s t e rs. Th e I notation may be u ed during this p erio d provided the conditions p ecifie d above und e r the notation a pply Proporti o n a l tim e frames are applied for part-of term course weekend courses, workshops and ummer t erms. A written policy s t a t ement describing the u se of the NC" notation will be given to eac h s tu dent for eac h c l ass in whic h the s tudent enrolls Student s are ex p ec ted to attend all sess ion s of courses for which th ey are r eg i s t e r e d Each instructor determines when a s tud e nt's absences h ave reached a point at which th ey jeopardize the s tud ent's s uc cess in a course. When a b sences become excess i ve, the student may r eceive a failing g r ade for the co ur se Q UALITY P OINTS Th e number of quality point s awar ded for a co ur se i s d etermi n e d b y multipl ying the number of semes ter hours for that co ur se b y the qu a lit y point va lue of the grade r ece ived The cu mul ative GPA is calcula ted by dividing the t ota l by the numb e r of se m este r h ou r s attemp t ed. To be e l igible for a degree a candidate mus t have a minimum numb e r of quality po i nt s e qual to twice the numb e r of semeste r hour s a tt e mpt ed in a dditi o n to meeting other prescribed r eq uir e m e nts. The fol lowing not ations have no effect on the GPA : AP CC, CL, EX, I NC, R P PL PP S, SA S PASS-FAIL O PTION The pas sfail option e n courages student to broaden their ed u ca tion a l experie n ce by taking cou r ses out side their m ajo r a nd min o r field The p ass notation h as no effec t on the GPA; th e fail notation is equivalent to the grade of F ." Student s who have completed at l eas t one MSCD co ur se w ith at leas t a 2.0 c umul a tiv e GPA may c hoo se t o b e eva l uat e d f o r a ce rtain co ur se on a p ass-fai l b asis rather tha n b y l ette r grade The p ass-fail option may be u se d for general e l ective c r e dit only M ajor, minor Gener a l Studies and other co ur ses r e quired for a degre e or for teacher lice n ur e, m ay not be taken on a pass-fail ba is. Self p ace d co ur ses m ay not be taken under the pa ssfail option Maximum gra du atio n credit for the se pa ss-fai l co ur ses i s 18 se me s ter hour s, earned in no m o r e than six co ur ses, limited to one co ur se p e r se m es t e r or modul e. Student s mus t declare intere t in th e pas -fai l option n o later tha n the 12th d ay of classes for fall and s pring t h e eighth day of cla sses for s ummer or the second day of c la sses for part s-ofterm of any se mester ( ee the c urr e nt Cla ss S c h ed ul e for s p ec ific d ead line s ) b y contac ting th e Office of the Registrar.

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 65 The instr uct or will assign and record the pass-fail grade on a fi9al grade list that identifies tudents electing and eligible for pass-fail grading. Student s who request the option who are later declared inel igible w ill receive notification from the Registrar's Office during fue seme ter. They will be assigned a regular l etter grade in the course. Once approved, the request for the pa s-fail option is irrevocab le. Some institutions do not accept credits for co u rses in which a pass notation is given Therefore stude nt s who plan to transfer or take grad u ate work shou l d determine w heth er the institut i o n of their choice w ill accept the c r edit before registering for courses und er the pass-fail option. REPEATED COURSES ( LAST GRADE STANDS) A student may repeat any course taken at MSCD regardless of the original grade earned. Only the credit and the grade for the last attempt of the course will remain on the student's official academic record. The grade(s) for the prior attempt(s) will be changed to the "NC notation The courses mu s t carry the same title, co ur se number and semester hours To effect s uch a c h ange, the student must reregi s ter and pay tuition for the co urse in question comp l ete the course with a l etter grade and complete the Last Grade Stands form in the R egistrar's Office Otherwi se, the grade change will be made administratively at the time of degree eval uati on Credit duplication invol ving transfer, interin titutional or state college system co ur es may re s ult in transfer credit being disa llowed (see number four below). A fail ing co ur se grade ass i g n ed as a result of academic di hone s ty is considered a perm a nent "F" and is not subject to this policy. A student may n ot repeat a cour e after the award of a MSCD degree to make use of thi s policy. LIn all ca es except for grades as igned for academic dishonesty, the grades of all but the last entry of the particular cour e will be changed to a "NC" ( no credit) notation The C notation does not affect the credit total and grade point ave rage 2. The determination of course equiva l e n cy will be made by the Office of the R egistrar. 3.lf th e student does not r equest that the previou s grade(s) of a co urse be c h anged to a NC afte r the course i s repeated, the changes will be made at the time of graduation evaluation. 4. The same policy is applied when a cour e taken at another institution and tran sfe rred to MSCD is lat er repeated at MSCD. The transferred credit is then revoked 5 An exception to this poli cy occur whe n a st udent takes a course at MSCD, then repeats the co ur se at another institution and returns to or i still in attendance at MSCD. [n this case sin ce the course is not repeated on the MSCD record the MSCD cour e will not be changed to a "N C ," but rather, the transfer credit will be di allowed. 6. The last grade stands policy applies only t o MSCD courses. Course taken under the interinsti tutional/con ortium or pooled" programs do not qualify for consideratio n und er this policy. Howev er, th i s policy do es app l y to a UC D co ur se if repeated thr o u gh the MSCD/UCD poo l e d program ? Cour se repeated prior to the ummer quarter of 1971 are not affected by thi s las t grade stands policy. A grade in a cour e taken prior to the summer quarter 1971 and repeated after summer 1971 may be changed to a "N C notation STUDENT GRAD E APPEAL PROC E DURE I f s tudents h ave re ason to question the validity of a grade received in a cou rse they must make their reque t for a change before the end of the secon d week of the semeste r following the completion of the course (t h e following fall semester in the case of the spring semester) The Grade Appeal Guideli n es can be obta in ed from the stud ents' re spective deans. I t is the r esponsibility of the s tudent to init i ate a g r ade a pp ea l within the time limit and to follow the procedures specified for g r ade appeals in the Stu d e nt Rig hts and R espo n s ibiliti es section of the current Student H andbook. The h a n dbook may be o b tained from the Office of Student Services. All de cis ions of the Grade Appea l Committee will b e reviewed by the associate v ice president for academic affairs.

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66 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES WARNING/PROBATION/SUSPENSION POLICY Academic Satisfactory Progres /Good Standing A st udent i s deemed to be making satisfactory pro gress toward his or her aca demic goal if the student maintains a cumulative GPA of2.0 or higher. Thi s student is deemed to be in academic good standing with the institution However other academic sta ndard s may app l y to pecific programs. A s tudent mus t atisfy those other academic standard in order to be deemed in academic good s tandin g with that pro gram. See information on the pro g ram of interest to determine specific sta ndards for that program. Academic Warning Status A student in good standing whose cumulative GPA fall s below 2.0 will be on academic warning status with the institution during his or her ne xt semes ter. A student will be r emove d from thi s warning status and returned to good s tanding if h e or he achieves a c umulative GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of his or h e r se mester on warning status. More restrictive s t a ndard s may apply to certain program s or schools. See information on the program of interest. Academic Probation A st udent who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of a t l eas t 2.0 at the end of his or her se me ste r on warning sta tus will be put on academic probation with the institution during his or her next se mester at MSCD. A student will be on academic probation as l ong as he or she has a cumulative GPA below 2.0 but is maldng progress toward good tanding as explained below and has not been on academic proba tion for more than three se mesters. Other co ndition s may apply to given programs or sc hools. See infor m atio n on the pro gra m of interest. A stude nt is r emoved from academic probation and i in goo d s t a ndin g the semes ter after achieving a c umulative GPA of at least 2.0. During any semester that a student i s on academic probation, the student must make progre ss toward goo d sta ndin g with the institution by taking all of the following actions: achieve a se mest e r GPA of 2.2 or higher regi ster and complete a minimum of 3 but no more than 1 2 emester hours (3 to 6 se mester hour s for summer semes ter ) take required activities as negotiated with the director of Student Int erventio n Services (may include certai n classes repeated courses, tutoring or other activities) While o n academic probation, a s tudent may pre -reg i s ter for the first seme ter following the academic warning status seme ter but i s prohibited from pre-regi tering any other semes ter. For ubse quent aca demic probation status semesters, a GPA of at least 2.2 must be verified prior to regi stration. Academic Suspension A s tudent on academic probation not making pro gre toward good standin g will be prohibited from registering for one cale nd ar year from the d a te of u spe n sion. Appeal of s u s pen s i o n for thi s reason will b e ubmitted to the director of Student Intervention Services The director of Student Intervention Ser vices wiJI then deliver the appeal material s to the Student Academic Review Committee which wiJI review the appeal and notify the student of its decision. A st udent may a ppeal a su pen ion only two times in his or her academic career at the college A tudent making progress toward good sta nding, whose c umulative GPA remains below a 2.0 after three or mor e se me s ters on probation will have his or her academic progress reviewed each emester by the Student Academic Review Committee. The committee will determine whether the student should be placed on s u spe n sion. In both case the decision of the Student Academic Review Committee is fmal. Any s tudent returning to the college after the one-calendar-year suspension must r eapply and will be re a dmitted on academic probation with the ins titution. For these students, all probation rules o utlin ed above will apply A student who i s suspended for a second time will be re-admitted only if he or she has success fully completed an associate degree program from a community college after sus pension from MSCD or can demonstrate to the Student Academic Review Committee that chances for suc cessful completion of an educational program are greatly improved. Contact Student Intervention Services a t 303-556-4048 for further information.

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 6 STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Generally the policie s and procedure s contained in thi s Catalog must be followed by student officially enro llin g for the 2000 fall semester and the 2001 spring and summer semesters. The pr oced ur es a nd/ or policies contained in this section are to change as the College deems n ec essary. If you h ave a problem, plea e check with the appropriate office to confirm the policie s and/or procedures you need to follow. EXCEPTIONS (B.A.S.E.) Students may appeal to the Board of Academic Standard s Exceptions ( B .A. S .E.) to request a varia nc e from college academic requirements. Valid rea ons for varia nce s must accompany all petitions, and the petition mu t be igned by the appropriate dean and department chair. For more information, co nta c t the Office of Academic Affairs. ACADEMIC HONESTY Student have a respon si bility to maintain tandard of academic ethics and hone ty. Ca es of cheating or plagiarism are handled within the policie s of Academic Affairs in accordance with procedure s out lined in the MSCD Swdent Handb ook. CONDUCT OF STUDENTS MSCD policy provides s tudent the largest degree of freedom con istent with good work and orderly conduct. The Student Handbook contains tandard of conduct to which s tudent s are expected to adhere. Information regarding student rights and res pon si bilitie including the s tudent due proce procedure ( the procedural right s provided to tudents at MSCD before disciplinary action i s imposed ) i available in Central Classroom Building, room 313 Respect for Rights of Other s The student assumes certai n obligations of performance and behavior while attending. Ba sed on this premi se, reasonable policies, procedures a nd regulation s have been developed to guarantee each stu dent 's opportunity to learn and to protect the fundamental rig ht s of others, students neither gain nor l ose any of the rights and responsibilitie of other citizens by vi rtue of their student s tatus As members of an academic community, students are expected to conduct themselves in a mature and re sponsib l e manner. Students s hould try at all times to promote a sense of cooperation and civ ilit y within the College and work to build an atmosphere which will be most conducive to the goals o f higher education within the institution. Students, while within College facilities or while participating in College-sponsored activities (on camp u s and/or off-campus) are expected to comply with College rule s and regulations and with the reg ulations of offcampus sites. Freedom of Speech Students s hall ha ve the right to assemble to select speakers and gue ts, and to di c u ss i ue s of their choice. An invitation to a speaker s hall not imply endorsement of the s peaker's views by either the stu dent organization or the College Information abo ut student views beliefs and political a sociations shall not be used to the detriment of s tudent s and their institutional standing. The right of peaceful protest is granted within the College community. The College retains the right to assure the safety of individuals, the protection of property, and the continuity of the ed u cational process The s tudent press s h all be free of censorship a nd shall provide editorial freedom. The editors and man age r s shall not be arbitrari ly uspended because of student, faculty, administration, alumni, or commu nity disapproval of editorial policy or content. All student communicatio n s s h all expl i citly sta t e on the editoria l page or in broadcast that the opinions ex pres ed are not nece ssarily those of the College and/or member s of the College.

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68 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Aca demic Rights Students have the right to: 1. be informed of course expectations and requirements. 2. be evaluated fair l y on the basis of academ i c performance. 3 participate in free and open di sc ussion inquiry, and ex pre ssion, both in th e classroom and in co nf erence 4 receive competent instruction and advisement. 5 expect protection against professors improper di clos ure of students' personal information views, beliefs and political associations w h en s uch informat i on has become known as a re su lt of professors' instructions adv i s ement or counsel. 6 expect protection, through established procedures, agains t pr ejudicia l or ca pri cious evaluation. 7. assess the value of a cour e to make suggestions as to it s direction and to evaluate both the instructor and the instruction they have received 8 have input in College policy-making, which may include, but hall not b e limited to course sche duling distribution of night and day classes calendar arrang e ments library policy and devel opment grading syste ms cour e development, and curric ulu m. 9. expect instructors to conduct themselves pro fessionally in the classroo m i n accordance with Coll ege policies and directives. 10. expect instructor s to maintain office hours as required by College policy. 11. expect reasonable academic assistance from the appropria t e department 12. be informed of academic standards expected of them i n the classroom through a printed syllabus a nd course outline. Academic standards shall include but not be l imi t ed to, class attendance requirements objectives to be achieved, and the grading criteria that will b e applied to a partic ular course of study. Ac ademic Responsibilities Students have the respon ibility to : I inquire about course or degree requirement s if they do not understand them or are in doubt about them. 2 maintain the standards of academic performa n ce established for individual courses and for programs of s tudy. 3. learn the content of any course of study. 4. act in accordance with commonly accepted s tandard of aca d emic co nduct. If disruptive behavior occ u r s in a classroom, an instructor has authority to ask the student to leave the cia sroom. Should s u ch disorderly or dis.ruptive conduct persist the instructor shoul d report the matter to Auraria Campus Police and/or the appropriate Dean's office. 5. maintain academic ethics and academic honesty 6. pay the tuition and fees and be officially regis t ered in order to a ttend a c lass. 7 initiate an investigation by contacting the department chair if they believe their academic rights have been violated. Academic Dishonesty Academic dishonesty is a serio us offense at the College because it dimini s he s the quality of sc holar s hip and the learning experience for everyone on campu An act of academic dishonesty may lead to such penalties as reduction of grade, probation, suspe n s ion or expuls ion. Examp l es of academic di s h onesty include: The term "cheating" includes, but is not limi ted to: ( I ) use of any unauthorized as istance in taking quizze tests or examination ; (2) dependence upon the aid o r ources beyond those au thorized by the i n structor in writing paper preparing r eports, solving probl ems, or carrying ou t other assign ments; or (3) the acquisition, without permission of te s ts o r other academic material belo n ging to a member of the College fac ul ty, staff, or other students. Fabrica tion : Intentional and un a uthorized falsification or inve nti on of any i nform atio n data, or c it a tion i n an academic exercise

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 69 Facilitating Academic Dis hon esty: intentionally or knowingly helping or attem ptin g to help another to commit an act of academic dishonesty. Plagiarism : The term "plagiarism" includes, but i not limited to, the use by paraphrase or direct quo tations, of the published or unpubli hed work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency that may or may not be engaged in the selling of term papers or ot h er academic materials. PROCE DURES Academic dishonesty may result in institutional sanctions. institutional sanctions, however do not limit the individual faculty member's academic freedom and the right to maintain academic integrity in the learning environment by assigning a grade or grade notation for an a signment, exercise test and for the course. ln all cases of academic dishonesty the instructor shall make an initial academic j ud gme nt about the student s grade on that work in that cour e and shall report such incidents within fifteen (15) working days to the student and to the judicial officer respon ible for the admini tration of the College judicial system. The judicial officer has the di cretion to con ult with the faculty member and the Office of Aca demic Affairs to determine whether or not institutional anctions should be invoked. In addition to insti tutional sanctions li ted in the college judicial policies a failing course grade assigned as a result of aca demic dishonesty is considered a permanent "F" and is not subject to the College's L ast Grade Stands" policy unless it is altered pursuant to the College grade appeal procedures. College judicial policies pertaining to academic ill honesty are part of the Student Conduct Code publi hed below. Members of the faculty have the right and responsibility, when they report act of acad emic dishonesty to the College judicial officer, to file charges against such student(s. and ask that insti tutional sanctio n s be applied. At his or her discretion, the judicial officer may recommend and impose anctions in any reported case of academic misconduct against a student. Should institutional sanctions be recommended in cases of academic dishonesty, the judicial officer shall check with the Office of Academic Affairs to determine i f the student has any record of prior offen es involving academic misconduct. Students accu ed of academic dishonesty have the righ t under the judicial policies of the Student Conduct Code, to request a hearing to consider the charges made against them. Student Conduct Code The code is not intended to replace existing procedures related to: discrimination or sexual harassment grade appeals requests for exceptions to academic policies appeals for tuition and fee reduction disputes relative to financial-aid awards in-state tuition classification For any other matter that are not included above contact the Office of Student Life. It is are ource for accurate information and advocacy on behalf of the students of the College. Student Life personne l can advise and assist students with unusual circumstance or with problems not addressed in the Student Handbook or College Catalog. ARTICLE 1: D EFINITIONS I. The term "College" means The Metropolitan State College of Denver. 2. The term "student" includes all person s taking cour e s at the College both fuU-time and part time, pursuing undergraduate or profe sional tudies. 3. The term faculty member means any person hired by the College to conduct classroom activities. 4. The term "College offtcial includes any per on employed by the College performing assigned admin istrative, or professional responsibilities.

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70 POLICI E S AND PROC E DURES 5. The term "me mber of the College includes any per on who is a st udent, faculty member College offi cial, or any other per on employed by the College. 6. The term "College or campus premises" includes all land, buil dings, facilities, and other property in the possession of or owned, used, or controlled by the Auraria Higher Education Center including the adja cent streets and sidewalks, and also includes extended campus locations. 7. The term "organization" means any number of persons who have complied with the formal require ments for College recognition. 8. The title of "judicial officer" is that person designated by the College President to be responsible for the admini tration of the Student Conduct Code. 9. The term "judicial advisor" means a College official authorized on a ca e by case basi s by the judicial officer to impo e anctions upon stude nts found to have violated the Student Conduct Code The judi cial officer may authorize a judicial advisor to serve simultaneously as a judicial advisor and the sole member or one of the members of a judicial body. Nothing shall prevent the judicial officer from authorizing the same judicial advisor to impose sanctions in all cases. l 0. The term "judicial body" mean any person or per sons authorized and identified by the Dean of Student Life to determine whether a student ha s violated the Student Conduct Code and to recommend imposi tion of sanctions. 11. The term "s hall i s used in the imperative sense. 12. The term "may" i used in the permissive sense 13. The term "po licy is defined as the written regulations of the College as found in, but not limited to the Student Conduct Code, Student Rights and Re pon ibilities Handbook catalog and clas chedules. 14. The terr.J cheating" includes, but is not limited to: a. u se of any unauthorized a sistance in taking quizzes tests or examinations; b. dependence upon the aid of sources beyond tho e authorized by the instructor in writing paper preparing reports solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; or c. the acquisition, without permission of te sts or other academic materials be l onging to a member of the College faculty, staff, or other students. 15. The term "fabrication" is the intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any infor mation, data, or citation in an academic exercise. 16. "Facilitating academic dishonesty means intentionally o r knowingly he l ping or attempting to help another to commit an act of academic di s hone sty 17. The term "plagiarism" includes, but i not limited to, the use by paraphrase or direct quotations, of the publi hed or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment. It also includes the unacknowledged u e of material s prepared by another person or agency that may or may not be engaged in the se lling of term papers or other academic materials. 18. T h e term "working days" refers to the number of days specified for eac h step of the p roced ure and does not include Saturdays Sundays, holidays, or days when the College is not in session and hol d ing classe ARTICLE II: JUDICIAL AUTHORITY I. The judicial officer s hall determine the composition of judicial bodies and determine which judicial body or judicial advisor shall be authorized to hear each case. 2. The judicial officer shall appoint a chair to the judicial body for each case. 3. The judicial officer may develop policies for the administration of tlle judicial program and procedural rules for the conduct of hearing that are not incon istent with provision s of the Student Conduct Code. 4. Decision made by a judicial body and/or judicial advisor shall be final, pending the normal appeal process 5. T h e judicial officer may extend time limits for good cause demonstrated in wr iting. ARTICLE lli: PROSCRIBED COND CT A. Juri diction of the College Generally College jurisdiction and discipline shall be limited to conduct which occur on the Auraria Higher Education Center premises, while a student is participating in college-sponsored activities, or which adversely affects t h e College commun ity and/or the purs u i t of its objec t ives.

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 71 B. Conduct-Rules and Regulations Any student found to have committed the following misconduct is subject to the disciplinary sanct i ons outlined in Article IV: I. Acts of dishonesty including but not limited to, the following: a. cheating plagiarism, or other form s of academic dishonesty; b. furnishing false information to any College official, faculty member or office; c. forgery, alteration, or misuse of a College document, record or instrument of identification; d. tampering with the election of any College recognized student organization; or e. assisting anyone in the commission of any acts stated above. 2. Disruption or obstruction of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary proceedings other College activities including its public relations functions on or off campus or other authorized non-College activities when the act occurs on College premi ses 3. Physical abuse, verbal abuse, threats, intimidation, harassment coercion and/or other conduct which threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person 4. Attempted or actual theft of and/or damage to property of the College or property of a member of the College community or AHEC or other personal or public property. 5. Hazing, defined as an act which endangers the mental or physical health or sa fety of a student, or which destroys or removes public or private property for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in a group or organization. Hazing can be further defmed as any action that produces physical discomfort, embarrassment, harass ment or ridicule Activities including the following are defined as hazing and are strictly forbidden: a. paddling b. ca u sing excessive fatigue c. physical shock d. morally degrading/humiliating game e. public stunts f. activities which interfere with academic work/success g. dangerous, offensive behavior h. activities which interfere with the po l icies and regulation s of the Office of Student Activities UCD, CCD,orAHEC i. activities that engage in disc rimination, whether racial or gender ba sed j. stranding pledges far from campus "road-tripping" k. forced calisthenics I. forced consumption of food bever ages, or alcohol m. exposure to extreme weather conditions Engaging in such activities may result in the withdrawal of College recognition and thu s privileges and services, by the Office of Student Activities. Questions concerning this policy should be referred to the Director of Student Activities. 6. Failure to comply with directions of College officials or the Auraria Campus Police acting in perfor mance of their duties and/or failure to identify oneself to these persons when requested to do so. 7. Unauthorized possession, duplication or use of keys to any campus premises, or unauthorized entry to, or use of, campus premises. 8. Violation of published College policies, rules or regulations. 9. Violation of federal, state, or local law on College premises or at College-sponsored or supervised activ ities. 10. Use, possession, or distribution of narcotics or other controlled substances except as expressly per mitted by law ll. Use, possession or distribution of alcoholic beverages except as expressly permitted by the law and College regulation, or public intoxication

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72 POLICIE S AND PROCEDURES 12. Illegal or unauthorized possession of firearms, explosives, other weapons, or dangerous chemicals on College premi ses. 13. Participation in campus demonstration s which disrupt the normal operations of the College (or other parts of the campus) or infringe on the rights of other members of the Campus community; leading or inciting others to disrupt schedules and/or normal activities w i thin any camp u s building or area; inten tional obstruction which unreasonably interfere s with free dom of movement on campus, either pedes trian or vehicular. I 4 Obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or vehicular traffic on College premises or at College spon sored or s upervised functions. 15. Abetting or procuring another person to breach the peace on College premises or at functions s ponsored by or participated in by the College. 16. Any activity involving computing facilities which knowingly interferes with someone else's academic freedom or the institution's goals or policies. 17. Abuse of the judicia l system i ncluding but not limited to: a failure to obey the summons of a judicia l body or College official b. falsification dis tortion or misrepre se ntation of informat i o n before a judicial body c disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a judicial proceeding d. institution of a judicial proceeding knowingly without cause e. attempting to discourage an individual's proper participation in, or u se of, the judicial system f. attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a judicial body prior to, and/or during the course of, the judicial proceeding g. haras sment-ve rbal or physical -a nd/or intimidation of a member of a judicial body prior to, during, and/or after a judicial proceeding h. failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the Student Conduct Code i. influencin g or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the judicial sys tem 18. Intentionall y obstructing or delaying a police officer, fire fighte r security officer, or College official in performance of his /her duty. 19. Turnin g in a false bomb alarm or flre alarm or misusing frre safety equipment. 20. Leaving children unattended or unsupervised on campus grounds. This can constitute child abuse or child neglect (as outlined in the State of Colorado Child Protection Act of 1975). Children may be per mitted in the classroom with the instructor's permi ssio n and the under s tanding that the child's presence is not disruptive. 21. Influencing or attempting to influence the academic process through explicit or implied sexua l behavior ,br ibery or threats. 22. Failing to comp l y with contractual obligat i ons with the College. 23. F u rnishing fal se information or academic credentials with the intent to deceive or mislead when applying for admission to the College or for any of its programs and services. VIOLATION OF LAW AND STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT Students who exhibit unusual and/or unacceptable forms of behavior on campus premi es can be requested to leave by Auraria Campus Police. In addition to or in l i eu of that facu lty members may refe r students to the Counseling Center. The Dean of Student Life may administrative l y withdraw students exhibiting severe behavioral problems. College disciplinary proceedings may be instituted against a stu dent charged with violation of a law which is also a violation of this Student Conduct Code. For example, if both v i o l ations result from the same factual situation without regard to the pe n dency of civil liti gation in cou rt or criminal arrest and prosecution, proceedings under this Student Conduct Code may be carried out prior to s im u ltaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings off-campus. JUDICIAL PROCESS See Article IV in the Student Handbook or the Dean of Studen t Life for complete information.

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' POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 73 SEXUAL IIARASSME T Se x ual hara ss ment i a form of di sc rimination based on sex. It i s prohibited by l aw an d College policy. In the educational context, sex ual hara ssme nt i s defined as any unwel come sex ual advance, request for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sex ual natur e when: a. submission to suc h co nduct i s made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individ ual's status in a course, program, activity, or educational evaluation b s ubmi ssion to or rejection of such co nduct is used as the basi s for educational decisions affecti n g that individual c. uch conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's academic performance or educational experience, or of creating an intimid ating, hostile, or offensive educa tional environment Charges of sexual harassment can be based on a wide variety of behaviors s uch as repeated derogatory sexual remarks, negotiation for sex ual favors as a quid pro quo for grades or recommendations, or threatened or actual exual assault. These and si milar behaviors serious ly undermine the teaching and learning environment and can be grounds for disciplinary action Sexual har assme nt hould be reported to the Office of Equal Opportunit y at (303)556-2939 Sexual assaults should be reported to the Auraria Campu s Police at (303) 556-3271. Written policies addressing the se issues in greater detail are available from the Office of Equal Oppor tunity and Affumative Action in Central Classroom (CN) 315 or call (303)556-2939. AMOROUS RELATIO SHIPS INVOLVING STUDE T AND COLLEGE EMPLOYEES Coll ege policy strongly discourages employees of the College from becoming involved in relationships of a romantic nature with students they s upervi se, either in a faculty-student or s upervi s or-subordinate s ituation. If such relationship exist, they must be disclosed to the College and the conflicts of interest that re s ult must be avoided. For example, an instructor i s not allowed to i ss ue a grade to someo ne with whom slhe is involved in an amorous relation s hip and a supervisor can not hire or evaluate so meone slhe i dating. Becau se of the professional difficultie s assoc iated with amorous rel ationships, faculty and staff s hould avoid them entirely. Student s are strongly discouraged from seeking relation s hips of a romantic n ature with College faculty or staff. Also students who persist in making unw elcome sexual advances to a faculty member or col lege employee risk v iolation of College policy prohibiting sex u a l har assment. CLASS ATTENDANCE Attendance during the first week of class is required. It contributes greatly to teaching and learning. Some departments determine a stude nt's enrollment in a co ur se based upon attendance during the first week of class Consult the Clas s Schedule and the department for more information about the atten dance poli cy for the class that you are attending. Students who drop c l asses are financially re spo n sib le for tho se classes in accordance with the withdrawal/refund policie s s tated in the Class Schedule each semester. Students are expected to attend all sessions of cour e for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student's absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize s ucce s in a course When absences become exce ss ive the st udent may re ceive a failing grade for the course If st udent anticipate a prolon ged absence they s h o uld contact their instructors. If they find that they canno t com municate with the instru ctor they s hould co ntact the chai r of that department who will inform th e instructor of the rea ons for the anticipated absence Whe never an instr u c tor determine s that a st udent' s absences are interfering with academic progre ss, the ins tructor may s ubmit a letter to the department chair informing that office of the situation. Student s at MSCD who be cause of their since rely h eld religious beliefs, are unable to attend classes, take examinations, participate in graded activities or s ubmit graded assignments on particular days shall, without penalty, be excused from such classes and be given a meaningful opportunity to make up suc h examinations and graded activities or as ignments provided that proper noti ce and procedures are followed The policie s and procedures de sig ned to excuse class attendance on religiou s holiday s are covered in the Student Rights and Responsibilitie s sectio n of the MSCD Student H andbook.

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74 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FINAL EXAMINATIONS ft is the ge neral policy of the college to require final examinations of all s tudents in all courses in which they are registered for credit, with the possible exception of se minar courses or special projects. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AND AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT The Metropolitan State College of Denver i s a n equal opport unity employer; a ppli cations from minorities and women are particularly invited. The Metropolita n State College of Denver doe s not discriminate on the basis of race, co lor creed, national origin, sex, age, sexual orientation or di ability in admissions or acce to, or treatment or employment in its educational programs or activitie Inquiries concerning the college grievance procedure s may be directed to the de s ignated MSCD offi cials. Inquiries concerning Title Vl and Title IX m ay be referred to Dr. Percy Morehouse Jr. MSCD Office of Equal Opportunity, Campus Box 63, P .O. Box 173362, Denv er, CO 80217-3362,303-5562939. Inquirie s concerning the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or 504 may be referred to Ms. Helen Fleming, Faculty and Staff ADA Coordinator, MSCD, Campus Box 47, P.O Box 173362 Denver CO 80217-3362, 303-556-8514; Mr. Kelly Espinoza, Student ADA Coordinator MSCD, Campus Box 23, P .O. Box 173362 Denver CO 80217-3362, 303-556-3908; Mr. Dick Feuerborn, ADA Coordinator, AHEC, Campus Bo x 001, P .O. Box 173361, Den ver, CO 80217-3361 303-5568376; or Ms. Karen Ro enchein, Manager Otherwise all inquiries may be referred to the Office for Civil Right s, U.S. Department of Education 1244 Speer Boulevard, Denver CO 80204, 303-8443723 FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRivACY ACT Student Rights The Metropolitan State College of Denver maintain educational re cords for each tudent who has enrolled at the college. A copy of the college's policy on tudent educational records may be obtained from the Offic e of the Regi s trar, Central Classroom Building room I 05. Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), 20 USC 1232g, and the implementing regulations published at 34 CFR part 99, each eligible s tudent has the right to: I. In s pect and review hi s /her educational records; 2. Requ est the amendment of the st udent 's education records to ensure that they are not inaccu rate misleading or otherwi e in violation of the stude nt's privacy or other rights; 3. Con sen t to disclosures of per onally identifiable information contai ned in the s tudent 's educa tional records, except to the extent that FERPA a uthorize s di closure without consent ( ee Nondisclosure and Exception s); and 4. File a complaint under 34 CFR 99 64, concerning alleged failure by the college to comply with the requirements of FERPA, with the Family Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, S .W., Wa shington, D.C. 20202-4605. PROCEDURE FOR INSPECTING AND REVIEWING EDUCA TIO AL RECORDS Students may inspect and review their education records upon a written request s ubmitted to the Reg i trar Central Classroom, Room 105, or by mail to Campu Box 84, P.O. Box 173362 Denver Col orado 80217-3362. A. The request s hall identify as precisely as possible the record or records the student wishes to in pect. B. The record custodian or an appro priate staff person s hall make the arrangements for access as promptly as pos s ible and notify the s tudent of the time and place where the records may be inspected. Acce ss mus t be given in 45 day s or less from the r eceipt of the request. C. When a record contains information about mor e than one tudent, the s tudent may inspect and review only the records which relate to that student. PROCEDURE FOR AMENDING EDUCATIONAL RECORDS A st udent may make a written request to amend a r ecord. 1 In the request, the s tudent hould identify the part of the record to be changed and specify why the student believes it is inaccurate misleading, or in viola tion of the s tudent's privacy or other rights.

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 75 2. The Metropolitan State College of Denver shall comply with the request or n otify the 5tudent that th e college will not comp l y with the request and advise the student of the student' right to a h earing to challenge the information believed to be inaccurate rni leading or in violation of the tudent s rights. 3. Upon written request The Metropolitan State College of Denver will arrange for a hearing and notify the s tudent, reasonably in advance, of the d a te place and time of the hearing 4 The hearing will be conducted by a hearir.g officer who is a disintere ted party but who may be an official of the institution The student shall be afforded a full and fair opportunity to pre se nt evidence relevant to the issues raised in the original request to amend the student's educa tion records The student may be assisted by one or more individual including a n a ttorney. 5 The Metropolitan State College of Denver will prepare a written decision ba ed solely on th e ev id ence presented at the hearing. Th<: deci s ion will include a summary of the evidence pre sented and the reasons for the decision 6 If The Metropolitan State College of Denver decides that the challenged information is not inac c ur ate mi leading or in violation of the tudent 's right of privacy or other right it wiJJ notify the student that the student has a right to place in the record a s tatement commenting on the chal lenged information and/or a tatement etting forth reasons for disagreeing with the decision. 7. The statement will be maintained as part of the student's education records as long as the con tested portion is maintained. If The Metropolitan State College of Denver decides that the information i s inaccurate misleading or in violation of the student's rights, it will amend the record and notify the s tudent in writing, that the record ha s been amended. NONDISCLOSURE AND EXCEPTIONS Pur s u ant to FERP A the co lle ge will not disclose a s tudent's education records without the written con se nt of the student except to college officia l s with l egitimate educational interests to officials at other in titutions in which the student seeks to enroll, in connection with providing financial aid to the stu dent, to accrediting agencies in carrying out their functions, to federal, state or local authoritie auditing or evaluating the college's compliance with education programs, to consultants conducting tudies on behalf of the college, in compliance with a judicial order or subpoena, and in connection with a health or safety emergency involving the student. However, the college may release directory information without the prior written consent of the st udent unles within ten ( lO) cal endar days after the first sc hed uled class day of each term, an enrolled student ha notified the college's Office of the Registrar in writing that any or all types of directory information s hall not be di sc lo se d without the consent of the student. A reque t for nondisclo ure will remain in effect until the s tudent is no longer enrolled or can cel the request for nondisclo s ure A sc hool official i a person employed by the college in an admjnistrative, upervisory, academic or research or s upp ort staff position ; or a person e l ected to the Boru;d of Trustees; or a person em ployed by or under contract to the college to perform a special task, such as attorney, auditor or consultant; or a tudent or other person serving on an official college committee or a sisting a school official in per forming the official s professional duties and re pon ibilities. A legitimate educational interest i the need of a school official to review educational record in order to fulfill that official's profes s ional dutie s and re s pon sibilitie DIRECTORY INFORMATION The Metropolitan College of Denver ha s de i gna ted the following categories of per onally iden tifiable information on student a directory information under section 438(a)(5)(B) of FERPA: -name, addres and telephone number -e-mail address -date and place of birth -student classification -major and minor fields of tudy -participation in officially recognized activities and sports -weight and height of members of athletic team -dates of attendance at the college -degrees and awards received -last educational institution attended

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76 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES THE STUDENT RIGHT-TO-KNOW ACT A ND THE CAMPU S SECURITY AcT Campus Crime Information During 1 997, 1998 a nd 1999, the followi n g crimes wer e co mmitt ed o n cam pu a t the Auraria Hi g h e r Educa tion C en t er, s e r ving the Unive r s it y of C o l ora d o at De n ve r The Metro p o lit a n Sta t e College o f D e nver and the C o mmunity C ollege of D e n ve r : REPORT E D CRIMINAL OFFENSES 0 CAMPUS REI'ORTED CRIMINAL OFFENSES A T SATELLITE CAMPUSES7 Off e nse 1999 1998 1997 Offense 1999 1998 1997 Murde r 0 0 0 Bur g l ary 4 6 2 Sex Offe n s es;For c ible I' I I 0 V e h ic l e Theft 2 2 0 Sex Offenses;Non-Forcible 0 0 0 Ar o n 0 0 I Robbery 2 2 0 4 Agg r ava t e d Assault 2 7 3 N UMBER OF ARRESTS FOR T H E FOLLOWI G CRIMES ON Burgl ary II 6 13 Vehicle Theft 13 16 3 1 Hat e Cri m e s 0 2 3 0 Arso n 3 2 I Mans l a u g ht er 0 0 0 lfo r c ibl e fondlin g 2o n e offe nse, tw o v i c tim s ; bu s in e ss and indi v idual 1o ne offe n se tw o v i c tim;, e t hni c intimid a ti o n 4ex cludes D U I arr es t s CAMPUS Arres ts 1999 1998 Liqu o r Law V iolations 3 0 5 Drug Ab u s e Violati ons 47 4 1 W ea pon s P osses s ion 2 6 6 5ze r o r epo n ed f o r 1 998 t o a v oid doubl e r e porting in co njun c ti o n w ith dru g abu se vio l at i o n arr es t s 6incl u d e s a rr e s t s mad e for mor e ser i o us offe n se s t h a t in vo lved use of a w e apon 7informa t io n prov id e d to Aura r ia Campu s P o li c e and S ec uri ty b y the D enver poli ce 1997 12 36 1 4

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The School of Business We educate Denver's business work force. 7i

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78 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS School of Business The School of Bu siness offers s tud ents a varie t y of educational opportunities tha t e ith e r l ead to a bach e lor's degr ee or provide opport uniti es for n o n-degree seeking s tudent s to gai n a dditional under gra duate educatio n through our ex ten sive co ur se offe ring s and certific ate programs. The c hool offers two degrees in s i x majors : Bachelor of Science Degree Programs Accounting Computer lnfonnation System Finance Management Marketing Bachelor of Arts Degree Program Eco n omics In ad dition we offer a n i nt e rnational business concentra t io n for busin ess m ajo r s and a total of eight minors de s i gned prim arily for non -b u siness maj ors The sc hool pr ovides co nveni e nt access to instr uc tion th roug h trad iti onal c l ass room sess ion s and inno vative online delivery, at both the main Auraria cam pu and Metro South campus, during the day evening and weekends. The sc hool co n i t of 67 f ull -time facu lt y, mor e tha n 50 part-time faculty and II full-time taff. Over 2800 s tudent s major in bu ine sand eco nomi cs. Student can take advantage of o n -the-jo b tr aining through coo p erative educat i o n pl ace m e nt s, int erns hip s and independent s tud y coursework The schoo l 's mission tatement reflects our effort to pr ovide stu d e nt s with the b e t po ss i ble educa tion we can offer : The School of Busine ss at Th e M etropoli t an State College of Den ver deliver hig h quality, accessi ble und e r gradua t e business e duc atio n in the m etropolitan Den ver area a ppropriat e t o a diverse s tu dent popul atio n and modified o p e n admi s i on s tand ard W e pr e p are s tud e nt for caree rs, g raduate education and lifelong learnin g in a socie t y c har acterized by techn olog i ca l advancements and g lob a liz a tion The primary purpose of the School of Bu siness i s th e pur s uit of excellence in teachin g and learning. We nurtur e l earni n g through individual attention to tudents. The faculty of the S chool of Bu s iness engages in professional d eve lopm e nt activitie that enhance ins truction and contribute t o sc holar s hip an d applied r esearch. Our faculty provide se r v ice t o the institution the profes ions and th e co mmu nity at l arge. The vario u s educatio n a l opportunities availab l e thr o u g h the School of Bu iness are lis t ed b e low Each program is d e cribed in detail in the remainder of this catalog sec tion Cour e de criptions and pr ere q ui ites are found beginning on p age 227 of thi s Catalog Bachelor of Science Degree Accounting Computer Inf ormation Systems Fin a n ce Management Marketing Bachelor of Arts Degree Economics Emphasi s Area for Business MaJors International Business Minors Accounting Computer Inf ormation Systems Economics Finance General Busine s s Internat i ona l Bu ine ss Management Marketing RealE tate Certificate Programs for Credit D a t a b ase Analyst Network Specialist in Info rma tion Sys t e m s P ersonal Financia l Planning Programmer/ Analyst in lnfor-manon Systems Real E tate User Support Specialist Non-Credit Certificates Financial Planning + International Trade Other Program Offerings Bu iness Outr eac h Small Busin ess Ins titute US WEST Center for Bu s ines s Success

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 7 If yo u h ave any que s tions about the offe rin gs, aca demi c po L ic i es and practices, o r admission requ ir e ments contact th e dean of th e School of Bu si n ess or the chair of the appropriate department. Mailing Addr D ean's Office School of Business Metropolitan S t ate College of Denver Campus Box 13 P.O. Box 173362 Denver Colorado 80217-3362 MSCD Web site: www.mscd.edu Important Telephone Numbers Dean' s Office : 303-556-3245 Accounting: 303556-3181 Computer Information Systems: 303-556-2857 Economics: 303556-3217 Finance: 303-556-3776 Management 303-556-3247 Marketing: 303-556-3182 Busines Outreach : 303-592-5364 Business Outreach and World Trade Center Educational Services Bu s ines s Outrea c h provides public classes and customized in-hou e training on a variety of practical busine ss topics. Concentrations include personal financial planning, introduction to sec urities markets, spec i alized software appl i cations and union leader s hip A full program of "ha nd s-on" internationa l busi n ess classes i s offered through the World Trade Center Educational Servic es Contact the Busine ss Out r each office for additio n a l information. Small Business Institute The Small Busin ess In titute offers a practical opportunity that supplement academic tudie with real ca e stu dies The Small Bu si ne ss In stitute employ se nior-level stu d e nt under faculty s upervi s ion to provide bus ines s counseling a n d technical ass i s tance to sma ll bu siness clie nt s in the community. Con tact the Finance Department for additiona l inform atio n US WEST Center for Business Success The US WEST Ce n ter for Bu si nes s Success serve as a problem-solving re ource for businesses in the re g ion while providing hand s-on learning opportunities for business tudents. Junior and enior-Jeve l busi n ess majors will be selected to participate in the center bas e d on their academic records, work experie n ce and demonstrated l eadership potential Co nt act the School of Busines s dean's office for inform atio n School of Business Prerequisite and Attendance Policy All School of Bu ine s students are expected to know and fulfill all prerequisite requirements. The School of Bu sine s re se rves the right to disenroll s tudents who do not meet prerequi ite requirements or who fail to me et expected course attendance policie Bachelor of Science Degree Programs Students may earn a bachelor of science degree in accounting, computer information systems, finance, management or marketing The learning objectives of tht: bu s ine s program provide st udent with the oppo r tunity to: I. obtain, und er tand and apply i n formation from the liberal arts, sciences, bu siness and di cipline s p ecific cour es to o r gan i zational issues and situations. 2. exp lain how ethical, legal political regulatory socia l globa l environmen tal and t ec hnological issue s influence business decisions. 3 a nalyze a bu ines s problem by incorporating diver e perspectives 4. apply foundation business knowledge and skills to develop competent decisions in the areas of accounting, econom i cs finance, information syste ms, managem en t and marketing. 5 cornrn uni cate effective l y the problem alternatives co nsidered a recommended solutio n and an implementation stra tegy in oral, written and e l ectronic form. 6. demon s trate knowledge and skills to meet career n eeds 7. exhibit an appreciation for extra-curric ular activities and continuous, life-long learnin g. Th e degree require s completion of co ur sewo rk in ge neral tudies, th e co r e business disc iplin e a major and electives. A minor is not requir ed.

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80 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Admission and Academic Status Requirements Students ma y declare a bu iness major at any time b y contacti n g the dean's office or a department fac ulty adv i or and comp l eting the "Major Declaration Form." Student are enco ur aged to declare as ear l y a pos ible t o en ure accurate adv i ing on bu ine s program requirement s Prior to e nr o llin g in an upper-division bu s ine s co ur se, declared bu sine s majors mu s t have : a c umulati ve GPA of at l eas t 2 00 ; comple ted all Level I and II General Studies requirements for busin ess; comple t e d a ll lower-division co ur s e in the bu siness c ore ; a nd comp l e t ed at lea t 60 cred it hour s overall (junior tanding). Busines majors will be placed on academic warning if their GPA falls below 2.0. If the GPA remains below 2 0 after one erne ter on probation s tudent s will be drop p ed a s business major s Business Program Residency Requirements Fo r all b ac h elor of science degrees in the School of Bu ine s s, a t l ea t 50 percent of the bu iness cre dit hour r ece i ved for the business degree mu t be earned in re idence at MSCD To earn a B ac h e l o r s degree in busine a stu d ent mus t succe s sfu ll y comp l ete 30 o r more c r ed it hour s of busine s cour ework at MSCD Thi 30h o ur r e side ncy requirement ca n be met by co mpletin g any busines co ur ses with the prefix ACC CMS FIN, MGT and MKT except ACC 1010 CMS 1010 CMS 2300 CMS 3300 CMS 3320 CMS 3340 and FrN 2250. A tudent mu t comp l e t e at l east eig ht (8) upper-div i sion semeste r hours in the major at MSCD. Business Degree Program Planning Some important thin g s to remember a s you plan yo u r bu iness tudi es: All degree-seeking tudents mus t meet the college 's requ ir ement for all bachelor degrees out lined in the general information ection of thi s Catal og. Durin g the fir s t 60 credit hour s, bu ine ss m ajors hould complete their General Studies Levels I and n co ur se s a nd the 2000 l evel bu s iness core course s The college r eq uir es a t l ea s t 40 credit h o ur s of upperdivision co ur se s (3000 or 4000 l eve l). Con s ult with an a dvis or to e n sure that your pecific degree program meets thi s r equireme nt. If a s tudent pursuing a degree other th a n a bachelor of sc i e nce from the School of Bu sines wis h es to enroll in business cour s e beyond 30 hour s, the s tud ent mu t declare a major with the School of Bu s ine The 30 hour excludes up t o 9 credit hours in economics and the followin g cours es : ACC 1010 CMS 1010 CMS 2300 CMS 3300, CMS 3320 CMS 3340 or FIN 2250 A minor i s not required for student s whose major i acco untin g compu t er inform atio n yste m s, finance, management or marketing. ACC 1010 CMS 1010 and FIN 2250 may not b e applie d to the 120 hour required for a bachelor of science degree in the School of Busine s s Bachelor of Science Degree Program Requirements All can didat es for a ba c h e l or of scie n ce degree in accounti n g comp ut e r information sys tems, finance, management and marketing must s ati sfy the general s tudies r equirements an d busin ess core cour se requirements described in the following two s ections. For prog r a m s l eading t o a bachelor of c i ence the basic structure of eac h program i : Gen e ral Studi e (Level l and Leve l II) ..................... ....................... 4 3 Bus ine ss Core ............................ ......... ..................... ........ 33 Major in S c hool o f Bu iness ............. ......... .......... ......... .... 24 Ele c tives* ............................ ................................ .... 2 0 Total H o ur s ( minimum ) .... ............ .... ..... ..... . ... ............... 1 2 0 *The S c h o ol o f Bus in ess r e quir es 20 c r e dit hours of e l ec tives no more than 9 of whi c h ma y b e busi ne ss el ec tives.

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 81 General Studies The aca d emic foundation for a s uccessful busine s caree r o r graduate wo r k is a b road lib eral arts edu catio n The co lle ge requires 33 c r edi t hour s of General Studies. Th e School of Bu in ess requires 1 0 additional specific hours of General Studie (EC O 20 I 0 ECO 2020, and four hours of mathematic ), for a total of 43 credit h o urs. G ENERAL S TUD I ES REQ UIRED BY THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Gener a l Studies L evell Seme s t e r Hour s Com p os ition ENG 1010 ENG 1020 Freshman Compo s ition: The E ssa y ....................................... 3 Fre s hman Compo s ition: Analysis, R e searc h and D ocume ntation .... ......... 3 Mathematics MTH 131 0 Finite Mathematic s for the Management and Social Sciences .... ...... ......... 4 MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences ................ ....... 3 Communicati ons SP E I 010 Public Speakin g . .... ...... . ...... ..................... 3 *No t e : MTH I JJO o r MTH 14 00, with g raphing ca l c ulat o r expe rien ce strongly re co mmended is accep tabl e for transfer students o r slllden t s c han ging th e ir maj o r Con s ult with Math e mnti c al and Computer S cie n ces depart m e nt on s ubstitutions. G e n era l Studies Level ll Hi s torical Studi es HIS ( American history co ur se r ec ommended ) ................. ............... 3 Arts and Letters PHI 1030 Ethics --
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82 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ACCOUNTING DEGRE E PROGRAM The acco unti ng program prepares s tudent s for entry into caree r s in public accounting, industry, tax and the government ector, as well as graduate education and lifelong learning The field of accounting is moving rapidly toward a greater emphasis in the areas of information sy tern s, management consulting and organizational change. Accountants can obtain a variety of profe siona l certifications, including certified public accountant, ce rtified internal a udit o r certified fraud exami n er, certified information sys tems a udit or and certified management accountant. Each professional certification program includes rigorous ed u cation, examination, experience and ethics requirements. Mis s ion Statement: The Accounting D e partment at MSCD provides high quality accessi ble, enriching undergraduate accounting education in an urban etting appropriate to a diverse st udent population enrolled under modified open admi sion standard We prepare s tudent for careers, grad u ate education, and life long l earning in a global and technological soc i ety. The department is committed to ethical values, co ntinu ous improvement and mutual re s pect within a diverse campus community. The Accounting Department pur s ue s excelle n ce in teaching and learning as its primary purpose Intellectual contributions in accounting and r e l ated fields that enhance teaching and learning and co ntribut e to cholarship through both applied re search and other avenue of profes s ional develop ment are seco ndary though fundamental to the mis sio n of the Accounting Department. Service to MSCD the accounting profe ss ion and the community and society in genera l i s al so seco ndary albei t fundamental to the mission of the Accounting Department. Successfu l accounting st udent s po sses these s kills and attrib ut es: ability to organize, analyze and interpret numerical data ; strateg i c and critica l thinking kills; proficiency in oral and written communications with abi lit y to explain complex fmancial data to o thers; ability to apply current technology ; knowledge of financial and economic hi s tory, practice s, and trends; ability to work co llaboratively as well as independently ; understanding of the methods for creating, l eading, a nd managing change in organizations. Acco unting Major for Bachelor of Science Requir e d Courses Seme ste r Hour s ACC 3090 Income Tax I ............................... ..................... 3 ACC 3300 Introduction to Accounting Systems ........... ...................... 3 ACC 3400 Cost Accounting ................. ...... .... ......................... 3 ACC 3510 Intermediate Acco unting I ................... ..................... 3 ACC 3520 intermediate Accounting [] ..... ......... ..... ..... ....... ............ 3 Subtotal ............................................................. ......... I 5 Plu s 9 hours from the following cour es includ ing at least one 4000 level course: ACC 3100 Income Tax IJ .................. .................................. 3 ACC 3110 Volunteer Income Tax Assista n ce (VITA) ................... ......... 3 ACC 3200 Governmental Accounting ............. .... ......................... 3 ACC 3410 Cost Accounting n ................................................... 3 ACC 4090 Tax Proc e dur e and R esearc h ....................................... 3 ACC 4 I 00 Tax Planning ..................................................... 3 ACC 4200 Auditing ................... ...... ........ ................ .... 3 ACC 4300 Advanced Auditing .. ........... ..................................... 3 ACC 4510 Advanced A cco untin g ..................... ........................ 3 ACC 4520 Mer gers and Acquisitions ........................................... 3 Total H ours R equired for A cco umin g Major ........................................... 24 Stud e nt s must ha ve a minimum of 90 hours of non-accouming coursework for the ba che lor' s degree. Students intere s ted in becoming certified public accounta nt s h ould be aware of the Colorado State Board of Accountancy's 150-hour requirement (effective 2002) MSCD offers c l asse that meet all a pects of the Accountancy Board' s requir e ments

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I I SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 83 To earn a Bachelor's degree in accounting, a student must successf ull y comp lete 30 or more credit hour of bu ine scour ework at MSCD This 30 hour re idency requirement can be met by completing any business cour e with the prefix ACC, CMS FIN MGT and MKT except ACC 1010 CMS 1010 CMS 2300 CMS 3300 CMS 3320, CMS 3340, and FIN 2250 A tudent must comp l ete at least eig h t (8) upper-division seme ter hours in the major at MSCD Students should con ult an accounting facu l ty advi o r to develop an appropria t e academic program. A wide var i ety of internship opportunitie are availab l e throu g h the Cooperative Education Office COMP UTE R INFORMATION SYSTEMS D EGREE PROGRAM With a degree in the rapidly expanding area of information system in the busine s world, students can look forward to challenging careers in computer information system or u ing their computer informa tion system s knowledge within any other area of busine s. Mi sion Statement: The Computer lnformation Sy tern Department delivers high quality acce s ible und ergraduate business information system education to a di verse st udent population. We prepare tudent s to ana lyze, design, develop and u e busine application utilizing contemporary technology We provide a balance between fundamental information s ystem s concepts a nd the application of the e concepts from a future-oriented per spect ive. The Computer in formation System s Department provides undergraduate major, minor and profes sional preparation programs in information systems. We offer service cour es in information ystems and busi n es s statistics to School of Bu iness stude nt s and applied computer courses to studen t s col lege-wide The Computer Information Sy tern Department faculty pursues excellence in teaching and learning a its primary purpose. We nurture l earning through individual attention to stude nts. The faculty aggres ively engages in profes ional development activity that enhances instruction and contribute to cholarship and applied re earch. We provide service to the institution the profes s ion and the com munity at large. Students majoring in computer information ystem are encouraged to select advanced co ur ses that best meet their needs in pecific areas, such as system analysis, design, and development; programming; data ba se management; data communications and network ; or management of information systems. Advis ing for these areas is avai l able from the department chair and individual facu lt y members. Skills related to computer information system inc lude: abi lit y to think logically, thoroughly and concentrate intensely ound detail orientation and organizational kills abi lit y to work well under pressure capacity to work well independently and a part of a team capabi lit y to ana l yze problems and make appropriate decisions proficiency in preci e analytical reasoning aptitude to master new computer languages and methodologie s ensitiviry to multiple per pectives curiosity and enthusiasm Major for Bachelor of Science Required Cour s e s Seme s ter Hour s CMS 2110 Bus ines s Problem Solving: A Stru c tured Programming Approach ............... 3 CMS 3060 File Design and Data Ba e Management. ............................... ... 3 CMS 3 2 30 Telecommunication Sy tern ........ ................................... 3 Programming Language Group ( include s CMS 3110, CMS 3130, CMS 3145, CMS 3180, CMS 3190 and CMS 3260) ......... 3 CMS 4050 Sys tems Analy sis and Design ..................................... ..... 3 Computer Inf ormation System Cap s tone Group ( includ e s CMS 4060, CMS 4070, CMS 4280 and CMS 44 1 0) ...... . ..... ....... 3 Upper-division CMS Elective s ................... ...... ............ ........ . 6 T o tal H o ur s R e quired f o r CMS Maj o r .............. ............... ....... ... 24

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84 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS To earn a Ba che l o r' s d egree in comp u te r information syste ms, a s tud ent must s u ccessfully complete 30 or more cred i t hours of business coursework at MSCD This 30hour re si dency requir emen t can be met by comp l eting any business courses with the pr efix ACC, CMS, FIN, MGT and MKT except ACC 1010, CMS 1010 CMS 2300 CMS 3300, CM S 3320, CMS 334 0 and FIN 2250. A student mus t com plete at l east eight (8) upp er -di vision semeste r h ours in the major at MSCD. CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS A VATI..ABLE: NETW ORK SPECIALIST IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS This ce rt ificate will pr epare a student for an e ntry-l evel po s ition in network s upport net wo rk adminis tratio n n e tw ork design and network sales. CMS 3220 Analysi s of H a rdware Software and User Interface s for Microcomp ut er Platforms .. 3 CMS 3230 Tele comm uni cation Systems .......................... ................. 3 CMS 3280 LAN and WAN Systems for Busin ess ........... o o o o o 3 CMS 3290 Micro User Operating Sy terns 0 o o o o o o 3 CMS 4280 etwork Installation and Administration ........ o o o 3 PROGRAMMER/AN ALYST IN INFORMAT ION SYSTEMS This certificate will prepare a st udent for an entry-level po s ition as a business ap pli catio n programmer, programmer/analyst, or junior syste ms analyst. CMS 2010 Computer Applications for Busine s ......................... o .3 CMS 2110 Business Problem Solving : A Structured Programming Approach ............... 3 CMS 3050 Fundamental s of Systems Analysis and Design ............ .... o 3 CMS 3 1 30 Business Applications inC and UNIX ............. o 3 CMS 3260 Systems Development with GU l Devel opment Tools ........... o 3 DATABASE ANALYST This ce rtifi cate will pr epare a student for an entryl evel positio n as a database programmer or databa se analyst. CMS 2010 CMS 2110 CMS 3050 CMS 3060 CMS 4060 Computer Applications for Business .... ................................. .3 Busi n ess Problem Solving: A Structured Programming Approac h .... ........... 3 Fundamentals of Systems Ana l y i s and De s ign ... .......................... .3 File De sign and Database Management ........ o o 3 Advanced Dat abase Systems .. .......... 0 o 3 USE R SUPPORT SPECIALIST This certificate will prepare a student for an e n try level positio n as a help desk/support ce nter spec ial ist. It will also prepare an e nd-u ser t o become the departmenta l h ardware/software expert. CMS 1080 The World Wide Web, the Internet and Beyond ........................... 3 CMS 2010 Computer Applications for Business ...................................... 3 CMS 3220 Analysis of Hardware Software and U er Interfaces for Microcomputer Platforms .3 CMS 3270 Micro Ba sed Software ................................................ 3 CMS 3290 Micro User Operating Systems ... 0 .3 ECONOMICS DEGRE E PROGRAM MSCD's economics progran1 i s not a bu ine s program and economics majors do not ha ve th e s ame requirements as othe r majors in the School of Busin e For example, eco nomic s major s do not need to take the business core nor the pecial General Studie s require d of business majors. Graduat es will receive a b achelors of arts degree instead of a bachelor of science degree. Consequently, the econom ics major requir eme nt s are not described in this ection but can b e found o n pa ge 89 of thi s Cat alog. FINANCE DEGREE PROGRAM The finance program pr epares stude nt s for careers that co n ce ntr a t e on the proce ss of managing the fund s of individuals, businesses and governments. Caree r opportu niti es are available in the fields of manage rial finance and the financial services i n dustry. The field of managerial finan ce deal s with managing the financial affairs of busin esses a nd governments and includes s u c h activities as budgeting, financial fore casting, cas h management cre d it administrat ion investment analysis and funds management. Careers in the fin ancial services industry include positions in banks, s avings and loans, other fin a ncial institu tions, brokerage firms, insurance companies and real estate. The most dramatic inc rea se in caree r o ppor tunities is in personal financial planning where pr ofes ionals are n eeded to pro v ide advice to consumers on the management of their personal financia l affair

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 8 The pursuit of excellence in teaching and learning i s foremost in the mission statement of the Depart ment of Finance. Mission Statement: The Finance Department of the School of Business at Metropolitan State College of Denver deliv ers high quality, accessib le undergraduate business and personal fmance educatio n in the metropol itan Denver area appropriate to a diverse studen t population and modified open admissio n standards. We prepare students for careers, graduate education and lif e lon g learning in a soc i ety character i zed by technological advancements and globalization The primary purpose of the Finance Department is the pursuit of excellence in teaching and learn ing We nurture learning through individual attention to students. The faculty of the Finance Depart ment engages in professional development activitie s that enhance instruction and contribute to schol arship and applied research. Our faculty pro v ide s ervice to the institution the professions and the community at large The Finance Department is a Certified Financial Planner ( CFP ) Board Registered Program Student s successfully completing the required financial planning courses are eligible to take the national certi fied financial planner examination. Success in the field of fmance is related to the e s kills : ability to organize, analyze and interpret numerical data s ound decision-making abilitie s aptitude for accurate detail proficiency in oral and written communications with ability to explain complex financial transac tions and data to others knowledge of economics and accounting in addition to finance Finance Major for Bachelor of Science Required Courses Sem es ter Hour s FIN 3010 Financial Market s and Ins titution s . . . . . . ...... 3 FIN 3600 Investments . . . . . . . . . . . ........ 3 FIN 3850 Intermediate Finance ... ...... .... ..... ... ............. ....... 3 FIN 4950 Financial Strategie s and Policie s .......... ..... ......... . ......... 3 Subtotal . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. ..... .... 12 Approved Electives* .. ... ............. .................................. ........ 12 T o tal H ours R e quir e d for Finan ce Major** ....... ....... ...................... 24 Upper-di v i s i o n finan c e el ec ti ves (six mu s t b e 4000 l eve l ) se l ec ted in co n s ultati o n w ith and approve d b y th e Finan ce D e partm e nt. **A minimum g rad e o f C i s r e quir e d for co ur ses in th e maj o r To earn a Bachelor's degree in finance a s tudent mus t successfully complete 30 or more credit hour s of business coursework at MSCD Thi s 30-hour res idency requirement can be met by completing any busine s s cour s es with the prefix ACC CMS FIN MGT and MKTexcept ACC 1010, CMS 1010, CMS 2300, CMS 3300 CMS 3320, CMS 3340, and FIN 2250. A student must complete at lea t eight (8) upper-division semester hours in the major at MSCD CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS AVAILABLE: PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING ACC 3090 Income Tax I ..................... .... ......... . .... ...... 3 FIN 3 150 Per s onal Financial Plannin g ( opti o n a l ) ........ ................ .......... 3 FIN 3600 Investment s ............................ .... ... ....... ... .... 3 FIN 3420 Principles of Insur a n ce . . . . . . . . .......... 3 FIN 3450 Retirement Pla nnin g and Empl oyee Benefit s . . . . . . 3 FIN 4400 Estate Planning ... .............. ...... ............... ............. 3 Successful completion of these courses also meets the Certified Financial Board of Standards educa tion requirement to become a CFP. For prerequi s ite s and more information call the Finance Depart ment, 303-556-3776.

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86 S CHOO L O F BUSINESS REAL ESTATE FIN 3800 Real Estate Practice and Law* .......................................... 3 FIN 381 0 Advanced Real Estate Practice and Lawu ...... ........................... 3 FIN 3830 Applications in Real Estate Practice** .......... .......................... 3 FIN 4840 Real Estate Appraisal ................................................ .3 FIN 4850 Commercial and Investment R ea l Estate ................................. .3 Meets Colorado Real Estate Commission Requi rement s for salesperson license. ** Meets Colorado Real Estate Commission Requirements for broker license. For prerequisites and more information call the Finance Department, 303-556-6998. Noncredit FINANCIAL PLANNING FPI Financial Planning Fundamentals FPU Understanding Risk and Insurance FPill Investment Alternatives FPIV Effective Tax Planning FPV Retirement Planning and Employee Benefit FPVI Estate Planning Approved by Certified Financial Plannin g Board of Standards/Approved by Colorado Insurance Commission for Continuing Education Credit For prerequi s ites and more information call Busine ss Outreach, 303-592-5362. Noncredit INTERNATIONAL TRADE CIT 1000 Introduction to World Trade CIT 2000 Developing an International Busine Strategy CIT 2100 Export Marketing and Promotion CIT 2200 Cross-Cultural Communications CIT 2300 Export Finance and Payment Methods CIT 2400 Business Law for Intern ational Trade CIT 2500 Importing Deci sions CIT 2800 International Transportation and Logistics For prerequisites and more information call Bu sines Outreach, 303-592-5362. MANAGEMENT D EGREE PROGRAM The management program prepares st ud e nts to pursue a career i n human reso urce management opera tions management, entrepreneurship or general management. Effective managers are necessary for organizations to compete in today 's global economy. The program consists of required courses that build a conceptual foundation for identifying and so lving managerial problems. In addition to acquiring knowledge about business and management st udent s will develop special ski lls that are nece sary to be an effective manager. The commitment of the Department of Management is voiced in it s mi ion tatement: Our mission is to provide our diverse body of students with a high quality management and bu iness law education. We believe that teaching and learning in a context of inqui itive mutually respectful interaction between faculty and students is essential. Through such facilitated interaction, students deve l op the knowledge and skills neces sary for the process of profe ssio nal management in a com petitive world. We will dire c t our individual and joint research efforts in relevant areas of applications of manage ment/legal theory, instructional technique s and the contin uous improvement of course content. The faculty recognizes the importance of providing service to our stakeho lders. Necessary skills the manager sho uld have i nclude: proficiency in planning organizing, leading and controlling activities utilization of problem solving methodology to identify and define organizational problems, devise solutions and implement the solution to achieve de ired outcomes highly developed interpersonal skills an ability to communicate clearly and per suasively use of sound methods for making deci sio n s innovative thinking self-reliance, creative indep endent ana l ysis and sensitivity to social and ethi cal values

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 87 Management Major for Bach e lor of Scienc e Required Cours e Seme s ter Hour s MGT 3 0 2 0 Fundam e ntal s of Entr e preneur s hip ..................................... 3 MGT 3220 Legal En v ironment of Bu s ines s II ............................. .... .... 3 MGT 3 5 3 0 Human Resourc es Man a gem ent ........... .... .... .............. 3 MGT 3550 Manufacturing and Service Management .............. . ................ 3 MGT 3820 Int e rnational Bus iness. . . ....... .... . ...... 3 MGT 4530 Or g ani z ational B e havior ........ ... .. ... .... .............. ........ 3 Subt o tal ........... ..................... ......................... ...... 1 8 Plu s 6 h o u rs f rom the following c our ses: MGT 3210 Commer c ial and C o rporate Law .... .... . .... ................... 3 MGT 4000 Management Deci ion Analy s i s ........ ........ .... .................... 3 MGT 4020 Entrepren e urial Cr eativ it y ............ ................................ 3 MGT 4050 Pur c ha s ing and C o ntr ac t Management .................................. 3 MGT 4420 Entrepren e urial Bu s ine ss Plannin g .................................. .... 3 MGT 4550 Proj ec t Management. ... ......... ......... ................. 3 MGT 4 610 Labor/Employe e Relation s .............. ..................... ....... 3 MGT 4620 Appraisal and Compen arion ...... .... .... .......................... 3 MGT 4640 Empl o yee Trainin g and Development. ................ .................. .. 3 MGT 4650 M a naging Producti v ity .......................... ... .................. 3 MGT 4830 Workforce Diver s ity ... ........................................... 3 T ota l El ec tive H o ur s .......................... .... ...... ... ............... 6 T o tal H o ur s R e quir e d for M a na ge m e nt Maj o r .............. ..... ............. ... 24 To earn a Bachelor degree in management, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credi t hour s of busines s cour ework at MSCD. This 30 hour residency requirement can be met by comp l eting any busines s course s with the prefix ACC CMS FIN, MGT and MKT except ACC lOLO, CMS lOLO, CMS 2300, CMS 3300, CMS 3320 CMS 3340 and FIN 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division emester hours in the major at MSCD MAR KETING D EGREE PROGRAM The marketing program prepares students for career opportunities in s uch dynamic areas a ales man agement distribution advertising marketing research retailing and marketing management. Mission statement: Stude n ts Strive to give our s tudent a f,rst rate education in marketing and business communica tion (that compares favorably to other bu ine programs in the U.S ) To enhance their respect for and excitement for learning that i s consistent with the objectives of the School of Busines and The Metropolitan State College of Denver. Research/Publi cation Maintain a research/publication record that is consi s tent with curricular needs technological advancement s and meets the challenge s of globalization while allowing us to contribute to the knowledge-base of our discipli n e Se r vice Actively participate in various School of Business and MSCD committee activities, regional and national profe s sional organizations and provide our ervices and expertise to the Den ver and regional busines community In addition to the department s well-rounded selection of courses, the curriculum offers students a com bination of conceptual and applied learning experience s Through the development of marketing plans advertising campaign s and marketing research studies, students have the op p ortunity to wor k w ith D e n ver-area busines s e s on current marketing i s sues and problem s Students are als o expo ed to a variety of marketing speaker s from the business community. Internship positions are available for marketing stu dent through the Cooperative Education Office. Marketing career are challenging and rewarding in a field requiring an in-depth knowledge of prod ucts service s and modem information technology Marketing is a people-oriented profession encom passing both for-profit companies and non-profit organization Since today s competition is creating a greater demand for marketing and promotional efforts, the growth rate of the field is expected to increase into the new millennium. People who are succe sful in marketing are creative, highly moti vated, flexible and decisive. They al o po ses the ability to communicate per ua ively both in speak ing and writing.

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88 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS M arketin g M ajor for Bachelor of Sci e n ce Required Cour e s Semester Hours MKT 30 I 0 Marketin g Re earch ................................................ 3 MKT 3310 Con s umer Behavior ........... ...... ........... ............. .... 3 MKT 3710 I n ternational Marketin g ..... ............................ ........... 3 MKT 4560 Marketing Str a tegy ..... ................................ ........ 3 Marketing Electives* ..... ................... .... .... .................. .... 12 T o tal H ours R e quir e d for Mark e tin g Major .... ...................................... 24 Busines s co mmuni c ation co urs es c an b e u se d a s bu siness e l ec tiv e s but n o t a s marketin g e l ec tives To earn a Bache l or's degree in marketing, a stu d ent must successfully comple t e 30 or more credit ho ur s of business cour s ework at MSCD. This 30-hour r esidency requirement can be met by completing any bus iness course s with the prefix ACC, CMS, FIN MGT and MKTexcept ACC 1010, CMS 1010, CMS 2300 CMS 3300 CMS 3320 CMS 3340 and FIN 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division s emester hour s in the major at MSCD. INTERNATIO NAL B USINESS CONCENTRAT IO N FOR BUSINE SS MAJOR S O NLY Students majoring in accounting, computer information systems, finance management or marketing may elect to complete an International Business Concentration (IBC) The concentration provides stu dents the opport u nity to expand their know l edge of the rapid l y c h anging g l obal b u siness l egal and cul tural environment. Graduates with an IBE increase their career choices and w ill be better prepared to help area busines es compete in an increasing l y international market place. In addition to the major degree program requirement s, the concentration includes 18-22 hours in international cour s e s : a 12 hou r core and six hour s of approved international electives. Some students pursuing an IBE may need more than 120 se m ester hour of c r ed i t to graduate. Interested students s hould seek an advisor in their major departme n t or dean's office as early i n their degree program as possible. Each department has a seme s ter-by-semester planning guide availab l e to assist students in course choices and sequencing I n ternational Bu s ine ss Con ce ntration Required Core Seme s ter Hours MGT 3820 Internationa l Bus ine ss. . . . . ...... .... ... ... . ...... 3 ECO 3550 The International Economy .......... ............. ............ ... 3 MKT 3710 Int e rn a tional Marketing ............ ............. .... .......... ... 3 FIN 3100 Int e rnational Mone y and Finance .. .. ... ..... ...... ...... ........... 3 T o tal R e quir e d course h o urs .......... ..... ........... ......... .............. 12 Plus 6 hours from the followin g co u rs es Seme s ter Hour s ECO 4450 International Trade and Finance ....... ....... .... .................. 3 FIN 4100 International Financial Management ..... ............ .......... ..... 3 ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthroyology ....................... ............. 3 A T 2330 Cro s-Cultural Commurucauon .................... .... .... ......... 3 ANT 3300 Exploring World Culture s 2 .................................. .......... 3 GEG 1000 World Regional Geo graphy ... .... . ..... .... .............. 3 HIS 20 1 0 Contemporary World His tory ........... ..... ...... .... ............. 3 HIS 3350 Countries/Regions of the Wor l d ...... ............. ............ ..... 3 PSC 3030 Introduction to Intern a tional Relation s ......... .... ...................... 3 PSC 3320 Int e rnational Law 3 ............. ...... ............... .......... .... 3 PSC 3600 Comparative Politi c Area Studi es ....... ...... ..... ............ .... 3 Internship/Dire c t e d Study4 ............. ...... ......... ......... ... ..... 3 Total s emest e r h o urs. . . . ...... .... ....... .... .... . ....... 6 -or One full a cademi c year of s tudy of an y on e foreign langu ageS ....... . .... . ........ 6-10 Total credit hour s ................................. .......................... . 18-22 *The Finan ce D e partm e nt r eco mmend s tha t stud e nts take thi s c ours e after th ey have co mpleted ECO 3550 and MGT 3820 lfulfi//s th e multi c ultural r e quirem e nt 2pre r e qui s it e: ANT 1310 ]pre r e qui s it e : PSC 3 0 3 0

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 89 4three hours maximum and must have s i g nifi ca nt a c ademic/dire c t e d s tud y qomp o n e nt and m ee t all appr o v e d S c h o ol of BtiSiness g uid e line s f o r int e rnships. 5 For e ign language comp e ten cy gained thr o u g h othe r than c o ll ege c r e dit wil) b e ass esse d b y the Bri g ham Y oung Uni v ersity C o mpetency and Pla c ement Examin a ti o n (CAPE). C omac t the a s s e s s ment/t es tin g c emer f o r further d e rails 303 -556-3677 Bachelor of Arts E C O NOMICS D EGREE PROGRAM The Department of Economics i s a non-business degree program housed in the School of Business offering a traditional bachelors of arts degree Economics is the scientific study of the allocatio n of scarce or l imited re ources among competing uses. The study of economics prov i de pecialized and general know l edge of the operation of economic systems and institutions. The bachelor of arts degree program give student a fundamental knowledge of domestic and foreign economies and the quantita tive tools necessary for independent analytical research and thought. Specialized co u rses develop the student s ab i lity to apply the too l s of economic theory and analysi s to a broad range of social political, and economic issue Such training is e sential for graduates who wish to qualify for positions a s profe sional economists and provides an excellent background for students interested in law school or graduate programs in economic finance or bus i ness Our mission statement reflects o u r commitment. The Department of Economic at The Metropolitan State College of Denver delivers a high quality, accessib l e bachelor of arts program in economics while also providing significant erv ice to the co l lege the School of Business, and the community by providing acces s ible and quality general s tud ies courses in the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. We prepare s tudents for life l ong learning in a complex free civil society; for graduate or professional education in economics, business and legal studie s or the J aw ; and for careers in a broad range of private and public activi tie s The Department of Economics pursues excellence in teaching and learning a s its primary purpose The facu l ty of the department e n gages in scholar l y activity that contribute s to the literature in applied and basic eco n omic re s earch and other professional activity that enhance s quality ins truction. While most positions a a professional economist require graduate training, for someone with a bache lor's degree employment opportunities are avai l able in national and international busi n ess ; federal state and local government ; and variou s no n profit organizations. In the field of economic s, the following competencie s are useful : ability to precisely examine analyze, and interpret data so und decision-making abilities proficiency in oral and written communications know l edge of economic theory, history practices and trend s ability to operate and u s e information derived from computer knowledge of statistical procedures in t erest i n eco n omic and pol i tical trend Economics Major for Bachelor of A rts Required Course s Seme s ter Hour s ECO 2010 Principle of Economics -Macro......... . . . ............ 3 ECO 2020 Principle of Economics Micro . ... ... ........ -. .......... ... 3 ECO 30 I 0 lntermediate Microe c onomi c Theory ........ ....... . ........ ........ 3 ECO 3020 Intermediate Ma c roe c onomi c Theory ..... ..................... ...... 3 ECO 3 150 Econometric s .... ....................................... ......... 3 ECO 4600 His tory of Economic Thought ( Senior Experi e n ce). . ......... .... 3 Subt o tal . . . . . . ............... -. . ........... 1 8 Appro v ed Elective s ( upper division economic s cour s es) ......... ..... -. . 1 8 Total H o ur s of E c onomi cs r e quir e d f o r E co n o mi cs M a j o r ..... ............ ........... ... 3 6

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90 SCHOO L OF BUSIN ESS Additional requirement s: MTH 1320 Calculu for the Management and Social Sciences ........................... 3 or MTH 1410 Calculus I. ... ........................ .......... ................. 4 (recommended for swdents interested in graduate work in econom i cs) Subtotal .................................................................... 39-40 Selected Minor (minimum) .............................................. ...... ... 18 General Studies (minimum) .......... ...................................... ...... 33 Multicultural requirement ........................................ ............... 3 E l ectives ............................... .................................... 26-27 Total H ours R equired for Bachelor of Arts in Economi cs ................................ 120 *C he ck with an advisor in the Departm ent of Economi cs regarding electives and the multicultural requirement. MINORS IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS The School of Bus ine ss offe r s nine minors in bu sines and eco nomi cs. Most min ors require 18 c r e dit hours plu s prerequisites if a ny. These minors (with the exceptio n of economics) are designed primar ily for non-bu si n e s majors A student may not take more than 30 credit hours in th e School of Busi ne ss without dec larin g a bu s ine ss m ajor. T h e acceptance of transfer credits will b e governed by sta n dards and policies of the School of B usines a nd i ts departments. Student s s h oul d c hoose a minor that will help them in their c ho sen career. Th e general busine ss minor s hould be declared after consu lt atio n with the associate dean. Other minors s h ou ld be declared with the help of a fac ulty a d vi or o r d e partment c h air of the appropriate department. ACCOUNTING MINOR The accounting minor offers stu d ents a broad-based educatio n in accounting, emphasizing a particular fie ld within thi s di sc ipl i n e, s u c h as financial accounting, managerial acco unting, tax accounting, o r gov ernmental acco untin g. The Accounting D epartment require s 60 credit hour s (junior standing) before taking upper-division accou ntin g courses. At l east 1 2 hour s of accounting co ur ses in the minor must be completed in resi dency a t MSCD. Required Cour es Semester H ours ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I ............................................. 3 ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting ll ............................................. 3 ACC 3090 Income Tax I ............... ..... .................................. 3 ACC 3510 Intermediate Accounting I ............................................. 3 Approved E l ectives ...... ..................................................... 6 T ota l H ours R equ ired for Accounting Mi11or .. ......................................... 18 *A student ma y select any courses in the accounting program o r c urri cul um provided they are approved by the Accounting Departm ent advisor COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS Mr OR Thi s minor will pro vi de a ba ic und erstan ding of the concept s, c urrent methodology and rapid c han ges in the d esign, d evelopment and use of comp ut e r -oriented sys tems for bu ines es and organizations. R equired Courses Semester Hours CMS 2010 Computer Applications for Busines ................................. ... 3 CMS 2110 Bu ines Problem Solving: A Structured Programmin g Approach -
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 91 Eco OMlCS MINOR The economic s minor provide s s tuden ts with a n o pp o rtunity to ac quir e a g en e ral knowl e dge of th e oper ation of economi c s y s tem s and ins titution s, as well as the qu a ntit ative to o l s n ec e ss ary f o r analyti cal r e s earch and thought. Required C o ur ses S e m es t e r H o ur s E CO 2 010 Prin ciples of Eco nomi csM ac r o ............ ...... ............ .... ... 3 E CO 2 0 2 0 Principles of Eco n o m ics-Mic r o .............. ... ............. .... ... 3 Approved Elec tiv es ..................................... ..... ................. 1 2 T o t a l H ours R eq ui red fo r E cono m ics Min o r .......... .............................. 1 8 *Ap p r oved e l ec ti ves a r e upp e r -d i vis i o n eco n o m ics cou r ses se l ec T e d i n con s ult aTio n w ith an d approved by the E co n o m ics D epa rtm enT. Finance Minors The Finance Department o ff er s two minor : th e fin a n ce min o r a nd the re a l es t a te minor. FINANCE MINOR Thi s minor offer s a broad-ba s ed education in finance emphasi zing a particular field within this di sc i pline s uch a per son a l fin a ncial planning inve trnent s, m a na g eri a l finan c e fina n c ial ins titution s, or intern atio nal fina n c e For the finance minor the s tudent mu s t h a ve c ompl e t e d ACC 2010 and ACC 2020 ( or the e quivalent ) and ECO 2010 a nd ECO 2020 which may be appli e d to th e s tudent's Gen e r a l Studie s or electi v e requirement s as appli cable The Finance Department require s 60 credit hour (junior s tandin g) pri o r to taking upper divi s ion financ e cour s e A minimum gr ad e of C i s r e quired in all finance minor cour s es. At l e a s t 12 hours o f finance cour s e s mu s t be c ompl e ted in re s idency at MSCD to satisfy the require ments of th e minor. Required C o ur ses S e m es t e r H o ur s FIN 3010 Finan c ial M ar k ets a nd Ins tituti o n s . . . . . ........ .... 3 Fl 3300 M a n ageria l Finan ce .............................. ......... .... ... 3 FIN 3600 Inves tm ents .... ..... .... .... .... ................... ......... 3 Appr ov ed Electives* ................... ....................................... 9 T o tal H o ur s R e quir e d fo r Fina n ce Min o r ............................................. 1 8 A stud e nt 1nay se l ec t a n y co ur ses in th e fin a n ce p r ogra m o r c u rr i culum provi d ed they a r e a ppr ove d by a Fina n ce D e p armre nt adv i so r REAL ESTATE MINOR The minor prepare s s tudents for o pportuniti e s in r ea l e s tate as well a s for per s onal financial affair s dealing with thi s field For the real e tate minor the student mus t have c ompleted ACC 2010 a nd ACC 20 2 0 (o r the equiv a lent) and ECO 2010 which ma y be appli e d to the s tudent General Studie s or ele ctiv e requirement s as applicable The Finance Department require s 60 credit hour s (junior s tanding ) prior to takin g upper divi ion finan c e c our s es. A minimum gr ade of C i s required in all fina n c e minor c our ses. At lea s t 12 hours of finan c e cour s e s in the minor must b e compl e ted in re s iden c y at MSCD. Completion of FIN 3800 FIN 3810 and FIN 3830 fulfill s the educational requirement for the Colorado Real Estate Brokers License. Required C o urse S e m es t e r H o ur s FIN 3 800 R eal E s tat e Pr actic e and Law ................. ........................ 3 FIN 3810 A d v an ce d Re a l E s tat e Pr a cti c e and L aw ............... .......... .... ... 3 FIN 383 0 A ppli catio n s i n R ea l Es t ate Pra ctice ............... ......... .............. 3 FIN 4 8 40 R eal Esta t e Appr aisal .... .... ..................................... 3 FIN 4 8 50 C omme rci a l and Inves tm ent R eal Esta t e .................. .... ........... 3 Approved Elective . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 3 T oral H ours R e quir e d f o r R ea l E s t a t e M i n o r ............. . ........................ 1 8 Appro ved Electives FIN 2 2 5 0 P e r so nal M o n ey Man age m e nt. ......... ............. .................. 3 FIN 30 1 0 F i nan c ial Mar kets and Ins tituti o n s ............................... .... 3 FIN 3300 M a n ag erial Fin ance ............................. ................... 3 FIN 3 4 20 Prin c ipl es of Ins u rance ................................................ 3 FIN 3600 Inve s tment s . . . .................... ........... ... 3 ECO 4500 Bus ine ss and Eco n o m ic F o r e c a ling. ............................ 3

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92 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS GENERAL BUSINESS MINOR Students minoring in general bu s ines s must take ECO 2010 and ECO 2020. These hour s may be part of the student's General Studies requirements. ln addition to the required 24 credit hour s b elow, stu dents may take up to 6 additional credit hour s withi n a spec ific business di sci pline for a total not to exceed 30 credit hour s within the School of Busines s lf a s tudent wishes to enroll in bus ine ss co urses be yond 30 hours the s tudent must declare a major with the School of Busine s. Prerequisit es credits may b e applied to General Studie s Semester Hour s ECO 20 I 0 Principle s of Economics Macro ..................... ................. 3 ECO 2020 Prin cip l es of Economics Micro ......................................... 3 MTH 1 310 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences ................... 3 Required Courses Semester Hour s ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I .............................. .......... 3 ACC 2020 Prin ciples of Accounting II .................................. .... ....... 3 CMS 20 I 0 Prin ciples of Inf ormation Systems ............... ........................ 3 CMS 2300 Bus ine ss Statistics ................................ ... ............... 3 FlN 3300 Managerial Finance ..... ............. ................................ 3 MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Bu iness I ............. .......................... 3 MGT 3000 Or ga ni za tion a l Management ................................... ......... 3 MKT 3000 Principle s of Marketing ............................................... 3 Minimum Total H ours R equired for General Busines s Minor (not t o exceed 30 c redit hours) ..... ......... ..... .............................. 24 INTERNA TIO AL B USINESS MJ: OR This minor i s intended for non bu siness majors so that they may add so me s tud y in bu ine s from an intern a tional perspective to their degre e programs. The Associate Dean of the School of Bus ine ss i s the principal advisor for thi s minor. Required Courses Seme ter Hour s ACC I 010 Accounting for Non-Bu iness M ajors* .................................... 3 ECO 20 I 0 Principle of Economics-Macro* ..................................... 3 ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro .............. .......................... 3 MGT 3820 International Busin ess .................................... .......... 3 Subtotal ................................................................. .... 12 Choose at lea t 6 hours from: MGT 3000 Or gartiza tional Management ............................................ 3 MKT 3000 Principles of Marketin g ............................................ 3 FlN 3010 Financial Mark ets and In stit uti ons ............................... ....... 3 Subtotal . . . . . . .... ...... ..... ..... ................. 6 Choose at l eas t 6 hour from: ECO 3550 The International Economy ..... ..................... ... ... ............ 3 FlN 3100 International Money and Finance ..................................... 3 MKT 3710 International Marketing** .............................................. 3 Subtotal ............................................ ........................... 6 Total H ours R equired for International Business Minor .................................. 24 This course has been approved for General Studies Level II, So c ial Sciences c r edi t **MKT 3000 is a prerequisite MANAGEMENT MlNOR The management minor prepare individua l s for the important tasks of upervising others, working in team s and t aking on ad ditional re spon ibilities in their field of intere st. Required Courses Semester Hour s MGT 3000 Organizational Management ....... .................................. 3 MGT 3530 Human Re our ces Management .... ...... ............................ 3 MGT 3550 Manufacturing and Service Man agement ................................. 3 MGT 3820 International Bu siness ................................. ........... 3 MGT 4530 Organizational B ehavior ............................................... 3 Approved Management E l ective .................................................... 3 Total Hour s R eq uir ed for Man agement Minor ............................... ........... 18 *Approved electives are selected in cons ultation with and approved b y a Management D epa rtm ent adv i so r

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 93 MARKETING MINOR The marketing minor provides students with the opportunity to develop a n understanding of busine ss and s ufficient familiarity with marketing kill s to work in a bu ine ss environment. Required Cour ses Seme s ter Hour s MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing . . . . . . ... ............. 3 MKT 3010 Marketing R esearch . . . . . . . . ...... ... 3 MKT 2040 Managerial Communi cations .................... ................. 3 MKT 3310 Consumer Beha vior ................. ............................. 3 MKT 4520 Seminar in Marketin g Management ......... . ........................ 3 Approved Electives *. . . . . . .................................... 3 Total H ours R equired for Mark e tin g Minor .......... .................... ....... ...... 18 Approved elective s a re se le cted in consu ltati o n with and approved by a Mark e ting D epartment advisor.

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The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences Tradition and Imagination Provides a high quality liberal arts education designed to meet the educational needs of the urban student. 95

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96 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES School of Letters, Arts and Sciences The miss ion of the S c hool of L etters Arts and Sciences i t o provide a place of teaching and learning that honor both tradition and ima g inati o n one tha t r espec t s the past and prepares people to be s u c cessfu l parti c ipant s and l eaders in the pr ese nt as they h elp to s hape t h e f utu re The S c hool of Letters Arts and Sciences offe r programs of s tud y in humanities and in socia l natural, and mathem at i ca l scie nces. The pro gram prepare s tud e nt s for careers, gradua t e work, and Life lon g l earni ng. The sc hool offers more than 30 major and minor pr ogram s through 18 departments and the In stit ut e for Women s Studies and Services .The faculty teach the majority of the General Studie s Program and h elp prepare students to be teache r s In addition, they arrange interns hip s and other applied educ a tional expe riences in tate and l ocal age n c i es bus ine s, indu stry and the m edia. Through centers and a spec i a l program the sc h ool advance s e ducati onal and soc i a l goa ls: T h e Family Center pr ov id es a wide range of edu c ation traini n g and research on policies related t o family is u es. The Center for M a th ematics, S cie n ce a nd E n vironmental Education l ea d s the effort to r efo rm sci e n ce and m a thematic s education i n Co l orado The cent er co ntribut es to ystemic c han ge in e du ca tion b y buildin g coo perative pr og ram s w i t h ot h e r colleges and uni ve r s ities, public c h oo l s, and the Color ado Department of Education. T h e ce nt er is the foca l p oint for the Colorado Alliance for S c i ence, a statew ide a llianc e. The Center a l so develops program s and se r v i ces for stude nt s from underrepr ese nted gro up s in the area of math e m atics, sc i ence a nd e n v ir on m e nt a l educa tion. Cur rently the ce nt e r is a s ite for the Colorado Alliance for Min ority Participation ( CO-AMP) and offe r s tut oring and mentoring services to the e s tudents. The Colorado Alliance for Science a statewide alliance of univer itie offe r a si tance and support to s tudents and teachers t o s tr e n g th en th e co mmuni ty s int e r e tin sc i ence and mathematics. Th e Gold a Meir Center for P olit i cal Leader hip i s a nonpartisan, educational project designed t o fo t er g r eater public und e r sta ndin g of the ro l e and me a ning of leader s hip at all level s of civic l ife, fro m community affairs to international relations. AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES DEPARTMENT The Af rican American Studie s D e p artment offer a r a n ge of co ur ses in Africa n American s tudi es that present the dim e n s i on of the bla ck ex p erience in this country. The se cou r ses e n comp a and afford a com preh e n s i ve under s t a ndin g of the African h e rita ge. They present African link s and potential; co ntri butions of black peopl e in the growth and d eve l opment of the U nit ed St a t es ; bla c k c ultur e and life sty l es; the black community ; political activity and pot ential ; religious development and importance ; commu nity service and resource assistance; and prognosi s and potential for social c han ge The courses m ay apply in the General Studi es requir ements and as elective for graduation Studen t s a r e ur ged to co n sult with the faculty in the Africa n A m erican Studies D epartment a bout new co ur ses no w being des i g n e d as well as specia l offering The major in African Amer ic an st udi es, which l ead to a bachelor of art degree and the minor pro gram mus t be planned in consultation with an a dvi so r in the African American Studi e s Department. Stude nt s d esiri n g sec ondary lice n s ur e in soc i a l s tudi es s h o uld see the section o n the teache r ed u cation program African American Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts R equired Courses Seme s t e r H ou r s AAS 1010 Intr od u ction to Afri can American Studi es ........... ....... ............. 3 AAS 1130 Survey of African His tory (HIS 1 940 ) ................... .............. 3 AAS 2000 Social Mo v ements and the Black E x perience ( SOC 2000 ) ......... .......... 3 AAS 3 3 00 The Bl ack Communit y ( SOC 3140 ) .............................. ........ 3 AAS 3700 P sych o l ogy of Raci s m and Group Prejudice (PSY 3700 ) ........... .... .... 3 AAS 4850 R e s earc h Seminar in Africa n American Stud .ies ............................ 3 Subto t al . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 97 Select one from the following: MUS 2010 Topic s in Ethni c Mu s i c : Variable Titl e ....... .......................... 3 ART 3040 Africa n Art ........ .......... . ..... 1 3 AAS 3240 African American Literature ( ENG 3 240) . ...... ........... ........ 3 Sub t otal . ........ ....................... ........ ................... ....... 3 E l ectives .. ......... .. .......... ..... . ........ . .... . .... ..... 1 8 T o tal ............. ............... . ............ ........ . .... . 3 9 El ec tive h o ur s in Afri c an Am e ri c an s tudi es co ur ses are se l ec t e d in co n s ult a ti o n w ith the a d v i so r MINOR IN AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES R equired Course Sem es ter H ours AAS 1010 I ntroduction to African American Studie s .... ............................ 3 AAS 2000 Soci a l Movements a nd Bla c k Experi e nce ( SOC 2 000 ) .... .... . ... .... 3 T o tal ............................... ...................... .............. 6 Electives A minimum of 15 additi o nal e rne ter bour i r e quir e d in Afri c an Am eric an c o ur s es, 3 h o ur s of whi c h must be an Afri ca n cour e s elected in c on s ultation with and appr ove d b y the Afri c an Am eric an s tudie s adv i sor assigned t o the student. Total hour s for the min o r ar e 2 1 Asses s ment Tes t During the final s em es ter, s tudent s majorin g in African American s tudi es will be required to take a com prehen s ive a ss e ss m e nt test. ANTHROPOLOGY PROGRAM Anthropology i the exp l oratio n of human diver ity. The co mbin ation of cu ltur a l archaeolog i ca l and bio l ogical per spectives offe r a viewpoint tha t i s uniqu e in studying the problems related to the s ur v i va l and well-being of the hum a n s pe cies Fro m the living an d vanis h ed c ultur es of Co l orado to tho se of New Guinea or South America anthropology can be applied to assist our under s tanding of human dif ferences. Contact the Sociology Anthropology and Social Work Department for information Anthropology Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Course s S e m es ter Hour s ANT I 0 I 0 Phy s ical Anthropology and Prehi s tory ...... 3 ANT 1 310 I ntrod u ction t o Cultural A nth ropolo g y .................. 3 ANT 2100 Hum a n Evo l ution ........ ........................................... 3 ANT 2330 Cr oss -Cu lt ural C o mmuni c ati o n .......................................... 3 ANT 2640 Ar c haeo l ogy ....... ........ ............ .... . ......... ..... 3 Subt o tal .................. ........ ......... ........... .... .......... 15 El ec ti ves .................... .................. ............... .... ........ 21 T o t al . ........ .... .................................................. 36 At least 1 2 upp e r -divisio n semes t er h ou r s in anthropology must be completed at MSCD by stude nt s majoring in the field Students d esiring teacher licensure in socia l s tudi e s s hould see an a dvi sor in the Secondary Ed u catio n D epartment. MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY The minor provide s an op p ort unit y for s tudent to bring a unique anthropologica l per s pective to t h eir a lr eady c ho se n area of inte r est. Anyone having t o deal with human or cultura l differences would b e n e fit f r om se l ecting a focu s in cro s s-cu ltural co nt act archaeology or human diversity. Required Cour es Sem es ter Hour s ANT I 010 Phy s ical Anthropol ogy a nd Pr ehis t ory ................... . ........... 3 ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthrop o l ogy . . . . ........ 3 Subt o tal ......................................................... ...... ....... 6 El ec ti ve s ....... ... .... .............. 15 T o tal ....... ..... ...... ........... .......... ..... ... . . 2 1 At l eas t 6 upp e r -divisio n se m es t er hours must be completed at MSCD

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98 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES ART D E P A RTMENT The Art Department offers a full range of stu dio art co ur ses in the areas of fine arts (drawing, painting, printmaking, photography v id eo and sculpture); de ign (co mmunication de ign and comp ut er imag ing) ; and c rafts (ce ramics, metalwork jewelry making and art furnit ur e) leading to the bachelor of fine arts degree; art hi tory (s tudie s emp h asize contem por ary, modern, ancient and non Western art) l ead ing to the ba c h elor of fine arts degree ; and licensure in art ed u catio n Goals Undergra du ate studies in art and d esign prepare student to funct ion in a variety of artistic role In order to ac hieve the e goals, instruction s hould prepare students to: read the n onverbal lan g u age of art and design develop re pon ses to visual phenomena and organize perceptions and co n ceptualizations both ratio nall y and intuitively become familiar with and d eve lop compe t e n ce in a number of art and design techniques beco m e familiar wit h m ajor achieveme nt s in the history of art, including the works an d i nt e n tions of leadin g artists in the past and present and demonstrate t h e way art reflects cultural values evaluate developments in the history of art understand and evaluate co ntemporary th inkin g abou t art and design make valid assess ments of quality in d es ign projects and work s of art Art Major for Bachelor of Fine Arts Core R equirements for All Studio Art M ajors Seme s ter Hours ART 11 00 Ba sic Drawing I ..................................................... 3 ART 1 110 Basic Drawing II .......................... ......................... 3 ART 1200 De s i g n Proce sses and Concepts I ................................... .... 3 ART 1210 De ign Proces ses and Con ce pts II ..... ...... ...... ....................... 3 ART 20 I 0 Survey of Modem Art: lrnpre ss ioni m through Abstract Expression i s m .......... 3 ART 2020 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Pre se nt. ........................... 3 T otal. ...................................................................... 18 Senior Experience Requirement for Studio An Majors ART 40 I 0 Modem Art Hi s tory : Theory and Critici sm ........................ ......... 3 ART 4750 Senior Experience Studio: Ponfo lio Development and The s i s Show .............. 3 Tota l .................................................................. ....... 6 Stude nts choose one of the four areas of conce n tration: fine ans, design crafts, or an his tory FINE ARTS CONCENTRATIO ....................................... 21 15 hour s in area of concentration in: drawing, painting, sc ulpture, printrnalcing, or photography (wi thin the 21 above) Se l ect a co mbination of 15 hours from the following two areas: Design ........... ............................. ........................ 6 or 9 Crafts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 or 9 ART 2000 World Art Prior to 1880 .......... ......................... ....... 3 Art His tory ( upper-division)* ..... ... ....... ............. .......................... 3 DESIGN CONCE TRATION .......................................... 2 1 15 h o urs in area of co ncentrati o n in: advertising d esign or comp uter graphics (wi thin the 2 1 above) Se l ec t a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas: Craf t s ...... ................................................................ 6 or 9 Fine Ans ............. ....... ............................................... 6 or 9 ART 2000 World Art Prior to 1880 ....... ...... ....... ............... ...... 3 Art History (upper-div i sion)* ................................................ 3 CRAFrs Co CENT RATIO ................... ...................... 21 15 hou rs in area of concentration in: ceramics, jewelry, or an furniture (withi n the 21 above). Select a combination of 15 hours from the following two areas: Desig n ..................................................................... 6 or 9 Fine Ans ................................................. ............ .... 6 or 9 ART 2000 World Art Pri or to 1880 .......... ................................. 3 Art Hi story (uppe r -divis ion)* ..... ............................................... 3 Total for Studio Art Major s .................................................. 66

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SCHOOL OF LETI'ERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 99 *ART 3090 is not applicable as llpper division Art History credit, bm may be taken for the multicultural reqllirement. (A minimum of 33 upper divi s i o n art hours required.) A minor for art m ajors i s optio n al. Art History Concentration Core Requiremen ts for All An History Majors Semester H o ur s ART 1100 B asic Draw ing I .................... ................................. 3 ART 1110 B asic Dr awi ng II .................................................... 3 ART 1200 D esig n Pr ocesses and Concepts 1 ...................... ....... ......... 3 ART 1210 D esig n Proce sses and Concepts II ............................. .... .... 3 ART 2010 Survey of Modem An: Impre ss ioni s m throu g h Abstract Expressionism ........... 3 ART 2020 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Pre se nt. ........................... 3 Total ........................................ .... ........... ............. 1 8 Senior Experience Requir e m ent for An History Majors ART 4010 Modem An History: Theory and Criticism ..... ........................... 3 Total........................ ........ .... ............................... 3 *An Hi s tory ( required ) ......................................................... 15 ART 2000 W o rld Art Prior to 1880 .......... ..................................... 3 Fin e Arts** ..................................................... .... ....... 3 o r 6 D esig n ** ............................................................... 3 o r 6 Crafts* .................................................................... 3 or 6 Art Electives ................................................................... 6 Total ......................................................................... 60 ART 3090 is not applicable as llpper division Art History c r edit, bm may be taken for the mlllticultural r equi r ement. **1 5 hours are required among these three catego ries. (A minimum of 27 upper divi s ion art hour s required.) Minor requirements for art maj ors are op tional. ART LICE SURE : K -12 T eac her licensure for art major s i s available through the Art Department. An art major is required Required Cou rse Seme s ter H ou r s ART 3380 Introdu c tion to An Education ........................................... 4 EDS 3110 Proce sses of Education in Multic u ltur a l Urban Secondar y Schools ............... 3 EDS 3 I 20 Field Experience in Multi c ultural Urban Secondary School ................... 3 EDS 3200 The Adolescent as a Leamer. ............... ......... . ............. 3 EDS 3210 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom Management ................... 3 EDS 3220 Field Experience in Teaching, Materials Construction and Classroom Management ... 3 SED 3600 The Exceptional Leamer in the Classroom ................................ 3 RDG 3280 Teaching of R ea ding and Writin g in the Content Areas ....................... 4 ART 4380 An Methods/Materials: K -12 ...... ............... ...... ................ 4 EDU 4190 Student Teaching and Seminar : E l ementary K-6 .......................... 8 EDS 4290* Stud e nt Teaching and Seminar : Secondary (6-12) ........................ 8 ART 4390 Int eg rating the Arts for Gift ed and Talented ....................... ...... 3 Total. ....................................................................... 49 Student teaching is composed of daily fulltime work during 16 weeks, split 8 and 8 weeks between elementary and secondary levels. In addition to field experiences included in required cour ework s tudent s must p r esent evidence of h av ing comp l eted at lea t 200 h ours of work with chi l dren This may be accomplished through a va r iety of community organizations a n d i n stitutional activities. Student s s hould plan their volunteer work i n con s ultation with the art education advisor. Student s who seek licensure mus t p ass a public speaki n g course ( SPE 1010 ) with a grade of "B" or bet ter or obtain a waiver. Student with a degree in Art may o btain a waiver. Students must a! o ac hieve satisfac tory scores on the state licen s ure examination. Teacher education programs are currently u n dergoin g review a n d ma y be modified during 2000-2002. Students seeking teacher lice n sure shou l d read the teacher lice n sure sec tions of this Catalog, pages 1 72-173, and they should stay i n regu l ar contact with their advisors.

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100 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCI E NCES MINOR IN ART R eq uir e d Courses S e m e t e r Hou rs A RT 1100 B as i c Drawin g I . . . . . . ............. 3 ART 1110 B as i c Dr a win g 11 ................... ....... ........................ 3 ART 1 200 D es i g n Pr oce sses and C o n ce pt I ............ ............................ 3 AR T 1 210 D e i g n Pr oce es and Co n ce pt s U ........................... ......... 3 ART 2 0 I 0 Surv e y of Mod e m Art: Impr es i oni m thr o u g h Ab s tract E x pr ess ioni s m ..... ..... 3 ART 202 0 Surve y o f C o nt empo r ary A n : 1960 to the Pr ese nt. .............. .... .... ... 3 Subt o ta l ............................................. ......................... 18 Electiv e s ....................................................................... 9 Minimum of thr ee c redit h o urs o f upper di vis i o n s tud io co u rse and three c r e dit hour s of upper di v i s ion an his t o ry c our se T o tal ............... ......... .... ....... ....... .......................... 2 7 B EHAVI O RAL SCIENCE PROGRAM Major f o r Bac h e lo r of Arts Thi s i s a dis tributed major offering tudents a s tru c tur e d o v erview of the s ocial sciences. Thi s program empha s izes breadth of co v erage with a focus in an a r ea elected by the tudent This major i particu larly applicable for student s intere s ted in te ac her lic en ure at the elementary and s econdary leve l s Teacher ed ucation programs are currently undergoing review and may be modified d uring 2000-2002 Students seekin g teacher licensure hould read the teacher lic ens ure section of this Catalo g, pages I 72 17 3, and t h ey s hould s tay in regular conta c t with their a dvi s ors. Th e s tudent mus t h ave preliminary a ppro val o f the ele c ted program by an advi sor from the Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work D e partment. A minimum of 12 upper d iv i s ion hour s in the major must b e tak e n at MSCD Required Co ur ses S e m e t e r Hour s ANT 1 310 Intr odu c tion to Cultural Anthropology ......................... ......... 3 ECO 2010 Prin c ipl es of Eco n omics-M ac r o ......... ................ .............. 3 HIS 1 220 Am erica n His tory ince 1 8 6 5 ...................................... 3 PSC 1010 Am erican N atio nal G ove rnm ent ........... ................. ............. 3 PSY I 00 I Introduct o ry P sy chol ogy ........................... ................ 3 SOC I 0 10 Introduction t o S ociology ...... .......................... ......... 3 Subt o tal ............ ..... .................... .................. ........... 18 ELECfE D Focus In additio n to the introductory cours e each s tud e nt mu s t s elect 12 hour in one of the following social s ci e n ce di ciplines: anthropology e conomic his tory political science p s ychology or s o c iology A m i n i mum of 9 upper-divi s ion hour s mus t be se l ec ted with the approv a l of an a dvi s or. Sub t o t a l ........................................................... .......... 1 2 GENERAL ELECflVES An additional 1 2 hour s must be ele c ted from an y of the discipline s out s ide of the elected focus. Cour s e s may be elected from anthropolo g y e conomics, hi s tory political s cience psychology or soci ology At l ea s t 9 of the s e hour mus t b e upper-divi s ion No more than 6 hour s may be taken in any one di sc ipline S ubt o tal ....... ... ..................... ....... ... ... ....................... 1 2 T o t a l . ........ ...... ................................ ...... . ... ...... 42 GENERAL STUDIES REQU IREMENTS The s tudent i s e x p ec ted to c omplete all Gen e r a l Studi e r e quirement s a rat e d in thi s Catalog The stu d e nt may u e up to 6 hour s from the requir e d c our ses f o r th e behavioral s cienc e m ajor to complete the s o c ial c ience c omponent. SENJOR EXPERlE CE S e le c tion of a S enio r Experien ce c our se w ill var y acco rding to the s tudent's needs Student s s eeking te a ch e r lic e n s ur e mus t s elect s tudent t eac hing. Other s tud e n ts m a y s elect the c apston e cour s e in their f oc u or the applied anthropol ogy cour s e c urr e ntly b eing d ev eloped b y th e department. Student s de s iring t e acher lic en s ure s hould see a n a dvi or i n the teacher edu c ation pro g ram No minor is offered

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 101 BIOLOGY D E PARTMENT The Bi o l ogy Department offers two majors, the bachelor of sc ience in biology and the bachelor of art s in biology Whil e it i s not n ecessary to declare a within the se majors, a student may choose to emp h asize botany medical techno l ogy microbiology o r zoology. Supportive courses a so ciated with paramedical s tudi e and criminalistics as well as general co ur ses for enrichment of the non science student's background are offered by the department. Students seeki n g sec ondary licens ur e in sc ience s h ould see a n advisor in the teacher ed ucati on pro g ram as well as the Bi o l ogy Departm ent. Teacher education programs are currently und e r going review and may be m odified during 2000-2002. Students seeking teacher licensure s hould read the teacher l icen s ure sections of thi s Catalog, pa ges 172173, a nd they s h ould s t ay in r egu lar contact with their adv isors. Students int erested in preparation for medical sc h ool or other health profession s s hould co nta ct the Biology D epartment for specialized advising. A senior exit exam administered and requir ed b y the department, must be taken during the se me s ter of anticipated g r aduation. The Biolo gy D epartment main office i s l ocated in Science Building room 213 303 556 32 1 3 A biology min or is offered to student with related major or a special interest in the field. GUIDELINES FOR FrELD EXPERIENCEfl TERNSHJP/PRACTI CUM/WORKSHOP/COOPERATIVE EDUCATIO N COURSES o more than fou r semeste r credit hour s with the following co ur se number s will be applied toward the 40 se mester hours of biology courses required for graduation : BIO 2888, 2980, 2990, 3970 3980, 4888 4980, an d 4990. H owever, the a dditional credits with the above course numbers may be applied toward ge neral e l ective hours. SENIOR EXPE RIENC E FOR BIOLOGY MAJORS A s tudent majorin g in bio lo gy may ful fill the Senior Experie n ce r equirement with any course a pproved for the purpo se by the General Studies Committee Any biology cour se approved by the General Stud ies Committee and the Biolo gy Department for Senior Experience credit m ay be counted toward the Senior Experience requirement or toward a biology major/biology minor but not both Biology Major for Bachelor of Science Required Course s Seme ter H o ur s BIO I 080 General Introdu ctio n to Biology . ..................................... 3 BIO I 090 General Intr od u ction to Bio l ogy Laboratory .................. ......... .... I BIO 3600 General Genetic s ......... ..................... ....... . ...... 4 Sele ct two of the following: BIO 2100 General Botany. ..... . ... ................. .......... 5 BIO 2200 General Zoology ......................... .... ........ . .... ....... 5 BIO 2400 Gener a l Micr obio l ogy ................ .... ........ .................... 4 Sele c t one of the following : BIO 3550 U rban Ecology . . . . ...... ............ ............. 4 BIO 4540 Plant Ecology ............................... .......... .... ..... 4 BIO 4550 Anima l Ecology ............................... . ... ............. 4 Subt o tal ... ....... ...... .... . ......... .......................... .... 2122 Elective s Biology course elected from the 2000, 3000-, and 4000l evel series, and a pprov ed by faculty advisors in the Biology Department, must be completed to bring the total of biolog y courses approved for the major to 40 seme ter h o u rs. At lea s t 2 1 -22 se me ste r hours mus t be from the 3000and 4000-leve l course s of the Biology Departm ent. Elective s .......... ................ . ... .... ............... ......... ... 18-19 T o tal ................................. .... ................................ 40 R eq uired Non-biology Courses One year of college general chemistry, o n e semes ter o f upper -division organic chemi s try one s emester of upper-di visio n biochemistry and one year of math e mati cs s tarting with MTH Ill 0 are requi ite s for the ba che lor of sc ience m ajo r in biol ogy

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102 SCHOOL OF L E TTER S, ARTS & SCIENCES Biology Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses Semester Hours BIO 1080 General Introduction to Bi ology . ............ ................. . 3 BIO I 090 General Introduction to Biology Laboratory ....... .......... ... ..... .... I BIO 3600 General Geneti c ....... ............. . ..... ....... ......... 4 Select two of the following: BIO 2100 General Botany ... ............ ........... ........ ...... ... .... ..... 5 BIO 2200 General Zoology . .... ...... ............. ........... ...... ... ... 5 BIO 2400 General Microbiology ... ...................... .......... ............. 4 Select one of the following: BIO 3550 Urban Ecology .......... ............. . .... ........... .... ...... 4 Bro 4540 Plant Eco l ogy ........ ..... ...... ....... ......................... 4 BIO 4550 Anima l Ecology ............. ............................... ..... 4 Subtotal .......... ................................... ......... ............. 21-22 Electives Biology courses selected from the 2000, 3000 and 4000-level se rie s, and approved by faculty advi s ors in the Biology Department, mu t be completed to bring the total of biology courses approved for the major to 40 semester hours At leas t 21-22 seme s ter hours must be from the 3000and 4000-level cour es of the Biology Department Electives ..... .... ...... ..... .......... .................... ..... ....... 18-19 Total .................... .... ..... ............. . . ........ .. ......... 40 Required Non-biology Course One year of general chemistry (equivalent to the pre s ent cour s es CHE 1100 and CHE 2100 ). BOTANY CONCE TRATION Requirements for either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degr ee i n bio l ogy must be atis fied, and the 40 h ours of biology cour es must include BIO 2100 and BIO 4540 and 15 se m es ter hours from the following botany e l ectives:* E l ective Courses Semester Hour s BIO 3 1 40 Plant Phys i ology ... ........ ............ . ............... ... ...... 5 BIO 3150 Plant Hormone ..................... ........... .............. ... 2 BIO 3160 Plant Anatomy and Morphology ........ ............. .............. 4 BIO 3180 VascularPlantTaxonomy .......... .... ............................... 4 BIO 4120 Algology .... .... ...... ...... ... ...................... ......... 4 BIO 4160 Mycology ... ........ ............... . .... ........... ... . .... 4 BIO 4850 Evo luti on ........... ... .................. .................. ...... 3 Subto t al . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 8 1 0 30 1 0 and 810 3050 are both applicable to the .fields of botany, mi c robiolog y and z oology and are recommended as additional ele c ti v es for all thr e e areas o f c on c entration. MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CO CE TRATION Students must satisfy the requirements listed for the bachelor of science degree in biology including BIO 2400. Students mus t a l so take BIO 3350, BIO 4440, and BIO 4450 Additional hour s must be taken from the courses listed below to complete the 20 hour s of upper-divi sio n co u r ses and a total of 40 erne ter credit hours in biolo gy E l ective Courses Semester Hour s BIO 3210 Histology ........ ....... ........ ..... ............ ....... ......... 4 BIO 3270 Parasitology ......... ............ ............ ............. 4 BIO 3360 Animal Physiology ............. .............. ........ .......... 4 BIO 4160 Mycology ................. . ..... ......... .... ......... ...... 4 Subtotal ...... . ................................ .............. ........... 16 iNTERNSHIP Completio n of a medical technology internship at a n approve d school of medica l te c hnology R eq uir ed Non-biology Courses The student must sati sfy the requirements listed for non-biology course s for the b ache l or of s cie n ce major and complete the requir ements for a minor in chemi s try M.ICROB I OLOGY CONCENTRA TIO Students must satisfy the requirements listed for the bachelor of science major in biology inc l uding BIO 2400. Student s must also take BIO 3350, BIO 4400, BIO 4450, and BIO 4470. Additional hours from the co ur ses lis t e d be l ow or a ppropriate omnibus co ur se as selected by the student and app r oved

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 103 by the microbiology faculty must be taken to comp lete the 20 hour of upper-divi ion courses and a total of 40 se mester hour s in biology.* Elective Course Semester H ours BIO 3270 Parasito l ogy . . . . . . . . . . ........... 4 BIO 4120 Algology ................................... .......... ......... 4 BIO 4160 Mycology ......................... .......... .......... ........ 4 BIO 4440 Virology ........................................................... 3 *B/0 30/0 and B/0 3050 are both applicable t o the .fields of botany, microbiology, and zoology and are recommended as additional electives for all three conce ntrations Required Non-biology Courses The student must satisfy the requirements listed for non-biology cou r e for the bachel or of science major includin g one course in biostatistics or ca l culus and a computer scie nce course to fulfill the required one year of college mathematics. In addition, the studen t must complete CHE 3000, CHE 3010, CHE 4320 and one year of college phy s ics. ZOOLOGY Co CE TRA TIO Students must satisfy the requirements for the bachelor of sc ience degree in biology and must include in the 40 semester hour s of biology courses 810 2200 and 810 4550 and IS se mester hour s from the following list of zoology electives: Elective Courses Semester Hour s BIO 3210 Histology ........................... .............. ............. 4 BIO 3220 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy ...... ................................. 5 BIO 3250 Arthropod Zoology ................................................... 4 BIO 3270 Parasitology ............................................ .... .... 4 BIO 3340 Endocrinology ...................................... ..... .......... 3 BIO 3360 Animal Phy siology ............................ ..................... 4 BIO 4250 Entomology ........................................................ 4 BIO 4270 Herpetology . . . . . . . . . . 3 B I O 4280 Ornithology .......... .............................................. 4 BIO 4290 Mammalogy. . . . . . . . . ........... 3 BIO 4810 Vertebrate Embryology .............................. ....... ....... 4 Subtotal ....... ...................................................... ......... 15 *B/0 30/0 and B/0 3050 are both applicable to the .fields of botany, mi c robiology, and zoo log y and are r ecommended as additional electives for all thr ee co ncentrations. MINOR IN BIOLOGY Required Courses Semester Hour s BIO 1080 General Introduction to Biology ........................................ 3 BIO 1090 General Introduction to Biology Laboratory ...................... .......... I Select two of the following: BIO 2100 General Botany .... ................................................ 5 BIO 2200 General Zoology .......................... ........................... 5 BIO 2400 General Microbiology ................. .... ........................ 4 BIO 2310,2320 Human Anatomy and Human Physiology I and n ......................... 8 Select one of the following: BIO 3550 Urban Ecology .................... .................................. 4 BIO 3600 General Genetics .................................................. .. 4 BIO 4540 Plant Ecology .................... ................................. 4 BIO 4550 Animal Ecology ......... .............................. ........... 4 Subtotal .......................................... ................... 17-21 Electives Biology courses from the 2000-, 3000-, and 4000-level series, approved by the Biolog y Department, must be completed to bring the t otal of biology courses approved for the minor to 24 semeste r hours. Total ........ ............................................................... 24

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104 SCHOOL O F LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES CHEMISTRY DEPA R TMENT The Chemistry Department i s approved by the American Chemical Society and offer eve r a l degree programs: the bachelor of sc ience in c hemi stry; ba c h e lo r of sc ience in chemi try criminalistic concen tration; and the bachelor of arts in chemistry. Minors in chem istry and crirni na l i s tic s are also available. Student who plan to pursue a career in c h emistry after grad uation or plan to a ttend graduate c hool in chemistry should choose the bachelor of sc ience in c h emistry program The bachelor of arts in chem istry program i s designed for students who plan a career in a field related to c hemistry but who do not intend to attend grad u ate sc hool in chemistry. Th e bachelor of arts option, which requir es fewer hours may be e pe cia!Jy attractive to tho e wishing a econd major or to tho e tudent desiring seco ndary educatio n licensure. Teacher education programs are currently underg oing review and may be modified during 2000-2002. Students seeking t eac h er licensure hould read the teacher licen sure ectio n s of thi s Catalog, pag e 1 72-173, and they s hould tay in regular co nt ac t with their adv i so rs. Criminalistic is the cientific investigation, identificati on, and comparison of phy s ical evidence for crim in a l or civil co urt proceedings. Criminalists must b e trained in many di ciplines inc luding chem istry bio l ogy, law e n fo rcement phy s ics, and m a them atic The four-year cr i min a li stic curriculum le ads to a bach e lor of sc ien ce degree and include a h alf-time intern ship in a criminali tics laboratory during the senior year. Student s in the criminalistics program are encourage d to com plete all the requirements for a degree in chemi try ap proved b y the American Chemi ca l Society while completing the cri mina l i stics degree program Graduate s of the pro gram are prepared for emp l oyment in criminal i stics and ha ve comple ted the requirement for admission to g raduate sc hool in chemistry or criminal istics, medical school, dental sc hool or law sc hool. For further information about the crimi nali tic program s, st udents hould contact the Chemistry Department. Student seeking seco ndary ed ucation lice n ure in science hou l d see an advi or in the te ac her education program for requirements. The follow ing cour es constitute the ba sic co re a n d are r e quired i n all chemistry degree pro gra m except for the minor in c h emistry. Ba sic Core Semester Hour s CHE 1800 General Chemi stry I .... ..................... ............ .... ....... 4 CHE 1810 General Chemistry lJ ..................... .......................... 4 CHE 1 850 General Chemistry Laboratory ......................................... 2 CHE 3000 Analytical Chemistry ............................................... 3 CHE 3010 Analytical Chemi try Laboratory ............................. ..... .... 2 CHE 3100 Org a nic Chemi stry I ........... ... .................................... 4 CHE 3110 Organic Chemistry lJ ............ .......................... 3 CHE 3120 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory .............................. .......... 2 CHE 3130 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory ............... ........... ......... 2 Total ................................ ..... .... .... ......... ....... .. 26 C h e mi s tr y Major for B ac h e l or of S ci e n ce Required Course s Semester Hours Basic Core ......................... .............................. ........... 26 Additional Required Chemi try Cour es: CHE 3250 Phy s ical Chemi stry l. ... .. .. ............................. ......... .... 4 CHE 3260 Physical Chemistry II ...................................... .......... 4 CHE 3280 Phy s ical Chemistry I Laboratory ............. ................. ...... 2 CHE 3290 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory .......... ....... ........ ........... 2 Subtotal ............. ......................................... ............... 12 Electives A minimum of 10 semes t er hours in upper div i sion chemistry co urse s selected in co n s ultati on with and approved by the Chemistry Department is required ................................... 10 Total H ours R e quired ......................................................... 48 Required Ancillary Courses for B ache lor of Science MTH 1410 Calculus!. ........................................... .............. 4 MTH 2410 Calculus II .............................. ......................... 4

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I I SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 105 MTH 2420 PHY 2311 Calcul u s III .................................................... . 4 General Physi cs I -andPHY 2331 Ge neral Physi cs II -or PHY 2010 College Ph ysics I -andPHY 2020 College Physics II ..... .............. ...... ....................... 8 Subtotal ...... ................. ....... . .............................. 2 0 American Chemical Society Approval T o me e t American Chemical Society d eg ree criteria the following cour ses mus t be completed: CHE 2300 lno rgani c Ch emi try . . . . . . . . . . 3 CHE 3400 Chemical Lit e ratur e Search .................. ...... ............. I CHE 4100 In s trumental Analysi ........................ ....................... 3 CHE 4110 ln s trumental Analysis Lab ....................... ................... 2 CHE 4300 Advanced In organic Chemistry ............. .......................... 3 Subtotal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 E l ectives An additional 6 c r edi t hour of upper divi s ion l eve l e l ec tive s are required Electives s h ould be selec ted in co n s ultation with the Chemi try D e partment. Th e following co ur es may be a ppropriate: CHE 4010, CHE 4020 and CHE 4320 .................... ...... ..................... 6 T o tal ....... ........................................... . .................. 56 CRIMINAusncs CoN CENTRA TIO Student electi n g thi s program of s tud y must co mpl ete the basic c h emi try core (2 6 h ours) in a ddition to the following required courses. Th e requ i rement of a minor i s waived for st udent s in thi program. R equired Cour ses Sem este r H o ur s Basic Core ...................................... ...... ...... . .... ...... 26 Additional R equired Chemi stry Cou rse : CHE 3 190 Survey of Phy s ical Chem i stry ............... ...... . ...... ......... 4 CHE 3200 Survey o f Phy sica l Chemistry L aboratory .................................. I CHE 4100 lns trumental Analysis ........................................ ...... 3 CHE 4110 In s trumental Analysi s Labora t ory ..... ... ..... ..... ..... ........... 2 CHE 4310 Bi oc hemi s try I . . . . . . . . .................. 4 CHE 4350 Biochemistry Labor a t ory .... .......... .................... ....... I R eq uired Criminali s tics Courses : CHE 3700 Criminalis tic s I ........ .... .... ........ .... ........... .......... 4 CHE CHE CHE 3710 4700 4710 Criminali stics II ........................ ...................... 4 Criminalistic s I Int ern h i p ................... ........................... 7 Criminali stics IIlntem hip ........ ......... ......................... 7 R equired Criminal Ju stice Course : C J C I 010 Introduction to the Crimina l Ju s tic e S ys tem .................... ......... 3 C J C 2100 Sub tantiv e Criminal L aw ...................................... ........ 3 CJC 2120 Evidence and Courtroom Pr oced ur es . ..... ..... ...... ......... ... 3 CJC 3120 Constitutional Law ................................................. 3 Required Ancillary Courses: B I O 1080 General lntroduction to Biology .... ................. .... ......... 3 BIO 1090 General Intr od ucti on to Biolo gy Lab oratory . . . . . . . I BIO 2400 G e neral Microbi ology .................... ............................ 4 BIO 3600 General Ge neti cs ...... .......................................... 4 MTH 1 210 Introdu c tion t o St atistics .................................... . ....... 4 MTH 1410 Calculus I ............ ............................................. 4 PHY 20 I 0 College Phys i cs I and PHY 2030 College Phys i c I Laboratory -orPHY 2311 General Ph ys i cs I and PHY 232 1 Ge neral Physi cs I Laboratory ..................... ............. ........ 5 T o tal ......................... ... ............ .... ... ............. . ... 100

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106 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Course s Seme ter Hour B a ic Chemistry Core ............ ................................................ 26 Additional Required Chemistry Courses: CHE 3190 Survey of Phy s ical Chemi stry .......... ....................... ........ 4 CHE 3200 Survey of Phy ical Ch e mistry Laboratory .... ......................... 1 Electives A minimum of 6 upper divisi o n se m es ter h o ur s in c hemi stry co urse s se l ected in co nsultation with and app r oved by the Chemistry Departm e nt is required Subtotal ....................................................... ............ 6 Required Ancillary Cour ses MTH 1410 Calculu s I. ......................................................... 4 PHY 2010 College Phy s i cs I ......... ............................... ......... 4 T o tal Ancilla ry Cour ses R equired ......... .............. .... ................... 8 T o tal ................................................................. .... 45 MINOR IN CHEMISTRY Students completing the basic chemi try co re (26 hours ) qualify for a minor in chemistry Students may elect to ubstitute 5 semes ter hour s in other upper-divi sion chem i stry course for CHE 3110 and CHE 3130. Core Seme s ter Hour s CHE 1800 General Chemi s try I ................ ................................. 4 CHE I 810 G e neral Chemistry IT ..... ........ ......... ........................ 4 CHE 1850 General Chemi s try Lab o r a tory ................ ............ ............. 2 CHE 3000 Analytical Chemi stry ............................... ................. 3 CHE 3010 Analytical Chemi stry Laboratory ........................................ 2 CHE 3 1 00 Organic Chemi stry I .............. .................................. 4 CHE 3110 Organic Chemi s try II ....................... ....................... 3 CHE 3120 Organic Chemi stry I Laboratory ................................... ...... 2 CHE 3 1 30 Organi c Chemi stry II Laboratory .................... ................ 2 Total ......................................................................... 26 MINOR IN CRIMJNALISTICS Required Course s Seme ster H ours CHE 1100 Prin cip le s of Chemi stry ...................... ... .......... ........ 5 CHE 2700 Introdu c tion to Criminali s tic s ......... ......................... ........ 4 CHE 2750 Arson and Explo ive s ............. ................................. 3 CHE 2760 Field Testing and Laborat ory Analy s i s of Drug s ................. ........... I CHE 3600 Crime Sce ne Inve stigat ion I ............................ .............. 4 CHE 3610 Crim e Scene Investigatio n ll . .... . ................... .... .... 4 CJC 2120 Evidence and Courtroom Procedur e ...... ...................... ..... 3 Total .... .................................................................... 24 CmCANO STUDIES DEPARTMENT The Chicano Studies Department offers a bachelor of arts degree in Chicano st udies. The Chicano and other Hispanic historica l experiences are used as point s of departure toward ex panding awareness of the multicultu r a l world and the contributions of Chicano The program i designed to assi t in the prepa ration of sc h olar s as well as human ervice provider Chicano Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts The requirement s include core courses in the major, ba i c knowledge of the Spanish language plus approved electives. Required Course s Seme s ter H ours CHS 1000 Introduction to Chicano Studies .......... ....................... ....... 3 CHS 1010 History of Meso America : Pre Columbian and Colonial P e riod ( HlS 1910) .... 3 CHS 1020 History of the Chicano in the Southwe st: M exico and U .S. P eriods (HIS 1920 ) ..... 3 CHS 2010 Survey of Chicano Literature ( ENG 2410) ...... ............... .... ....... 3 CHS 3100 Th e Chicano Community ( SOC 3 1 30) ................................ 3 CHS 4850 Re earch Experience in Chi cano Studi es ....................... ............ 3 Subtotal .................... . .... ................... ....... ............. 18

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SCHOOL OF LETIERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 107 Language Requir ements SPA I 010 Elementary Spani s h I ... ...... .................................. 5 SPA 1020 Elementary Spani s h 11 . . . .................... 5 SPA 2110 Intermediate Spani s h -<>r-SPA 2120 Spani s h R eading and Conversation ............... .... ................... 3 Subtotal . . . ...... .... ............ ............. ... . ..... 13 Approved Electives .. ............................................ ....... ........ 9 Total ........................ ...................................... .... .... 40 A minimum of 9 semes ter hours of electives in Chicano st udi es s elected in consultation with the depart ment chair is required. MINOR IN CHICANO STUDIES The minor can be designed to provide the student with course experiences that are relevant to occupa tional and educational goals. Students in consu l tation with a faculty advisor in Chicano studies, will develop individual minors that reflect the best possible e lectiv e curricula and ensure that a relevant emphasis is maintained Total hour s for the minor are 21. Required Courses Semester Hours CHS 1000 Introduction to Chicano Studie s ......................................... 3 CHS 1010 History of Meso-America: Pre Columbian and Colonial Period s ... .............. 3 CHS 1020 History of the Chicano in the Southwest: Mexican and U.S. Periods .... ..... 3 CHS 2010 Survey of Chicano Literature ................. .............. ............ 3 Total .... .... ............................................................. 12 Electives A minimum of 9 semester hour s of electives is required to complete the minor. The courses are to be selected in consultation with a Chicano s tudies faculty advisor. A sessment Test During the final semester, st udents majoring in Chicano s tudie will be required to tak e a comprehen sive assessment test. COMPUTER S CIENCE IN THE MATHEMATICAL AND COMPUTER SCIENCES D E P A RTMENT The Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department offers a bachelor of science degree in computer scie nce The department offers a computer cience minor which complements s uch majors as mathe matics engineering techno l ogy, the other sciences and economics All s tudent s who are co n s idering a major or minor in computer scie nce are expected to consult with faculty for advising. The computer science major offers the theory and application of computer scie nce which includes pro gramming, data and ftle structures, database, networking architecture and software engineering. N on-Major Course s in C omputer Science The department offers cour e as Computer Science Studies (CSS) that do not count toward a major in computer sc ience Some of the courses count toward majo r s in other programs. The Computer Science Studies courses are on topics appropriate to computer sc ience but focused toward current, particular expertise. Major in Computer Scienc e for Bach e lor of Sci e n ce The department offers a complete degree program in computer cience that adheres to the nationally recognized standards set by the Computer Sciences Accreditation Board. Students are encouraged to contact the department for further details (303-556-3208). The Senior Experience cour e in computer sc ience is CSI 4260. The CSI program includes a required mathematic s minor. A grade of "C" or bet ter is required in all CSI cour es included in the major as well as in all courses included in the required mathematics minor. Required Core Courses Sem es ter Hours CSI 1300 Computer Science I ....................................... . . 4 CSI 2300 Computer Science 2 ............. . ................................. 4 CSI 2400 Computer Organization and As s embiy Language ........................ ... 4 CSI 3100 Discrete Mathematics ................................................. 4 CS1 3210 Principles of Progr amming Languages ........ ............................ 4 CSJ 3300 Foundations of File Structures .... ......... ............ .............. 4 Subtotal ..................................................... ............ .. 24 CS I 1300 is a core course aiUi part of the MTH minor.

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108 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Required Advanced Courses CSI 4250 Software Enginee rin g Principles .................. ....................... 4 CS I 4260 Software Enginee rin g Pr actices ............. . . ........... 4 Choose two co ur ses from: CS I 3060 Compute r Architecture and Sys tem s Programming .................. .... ... 4 CSI 3310 Fundamentals of D a t a b ase Systems .... .... ................ ............ 4 CSI 4300 Adva n ced Data Str u c tur es and Algo rithm Analys i s .... ...................... 4 A minimum of 8 add itional c r edit h ours se l ec t e d from upper d ivision CSI courses ............... 8 Subto t al .............................................. .......... ............ 24 R e quired Ancillary Courses COM 2610 Introduction to T ec hnic a l Writin g ..... .................................. 3 EET 2310 Digital L ogic and T e l ecommunicatio n s ................. ...... ............. 4 PHl 3360 Bu si n es Ethics ................................................ 3 Subtotal ........... .......................................... ........ ........ 10 PHI 1 030, Ethics may be substituted for PHI 3360. MA THEMA ncs MINOR (REQUIRED FOR THE CoMPUTER Scm CE MAJOR)* MTH 1410 Calculus I. ......................................................... 4 MTH 2140** Computational Matrix Algebra ...................................... 2 MTH 2410 Calculus IT .................................................... .... 4 MTH 3210 Pr obab ilit y and Statistics (Calculus-based ) ......... ........... .... ........ 4 Two co ur ses c h osen from: MTH 3220 D esign of Experime nts . ........... .......................... 4 MTH 3250 Optimization T ech niqu es I ........ ............. .... .... ........... 4 MTH 4480 Numer i cal Analysi I ................................................ 4 Subtota l ...................................................................... 22 CSI 1 300 i s parr of the mathematics minor. **MTH 3140 ma y be substi tut ed fo r MTH 2 140 A ddition a l Cour se R e q uir ement ENG I 0 10* Freshma n Compo s iti o n : Th e Essay. . . . . ........... 3 ENG 1020* Freshman Composition: Analysis, R esearch and D oc um e n tatio n ................ 3 SPE I 0 10* Public Speaking ..................................................... 3 PHY 2311-234 1 Ge n eral Physi cs I Lab I General Phy sic ll Lab li -or -CHE 1 800 CHE 181 0, CHE 1 850* Ge n era l Chemistry I II and L a b o r atory ................ I 0 XXX XXX* Level ll General Studies-Historical ..... ............................ 3 XXX XXX* Leve l li Ge n eral St udies-Arts and Letter .... ........................ 3 XXX XXX Level ll Gen e r a l St udies-Social Sciences .................... ... .... .... 6 Six additional hours from the areas of communication, hi torical arts and letters, a nd/or soc ial sc i ences ....................................................................... 6 Unrestric t ed Electives ... .......................................................... 3 Subtotal ...................................................................... 40 These courses, a l ong wi th MTH 1 410 and PHI 3360, coulll as Ge n e ral Studies co ur ses. The Mult icultural graduat i on r equ irement of 3 c r e dit hours must a l so be satisfied. Total ........................................................................ 120 MINOR IN COMPUTER Scm CE A g rad e of C" o r bette r i s required in eac h course included in the minor. Required Courses S e me ste r H o ur s CS I 1 300 Computer Science I .................................... ............. 4 CSI 2300 Computer S cience 2 .............. ........................ ....... 4 ELECTIVES A minimum of 1 2 semeste r h o ur s c h osen from CSI 2400 and upper-division CSI co ur ses ..... ... 12 Total ......................................................................... 2 0 EARTH AND ATMOSPHERI C SCIEN CES D EPARTMENT The Earth and Atmo s pheri c Sci e n ce Departm ent is composed of thr ee separa te disciplines: geogra phy, geo l ogy, and m e t eoro logy The department offer a ba c h e lor o f ar t s or ba c h e lor of sc i e n ce degre e in l and u se and bachelor of science degree in mete o rol ogy and environ m e ntal cience The bachelor of scie nc e degree i s r ecommended for those s tud ents de s iring a stro n ge r ba ckground i n the physical and quantita tive aspec t s of the environment.

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 109 Minor pro grams are avai labl e in geography, geology, and meteorology Students working toward teacher licen ure in either science or socia l studie may take courses in geology, geograp hy, or meteorology. Stu dent s interested in earth s pace scie n ce may develop an lndividua.J;ized Degree Program major through the Center for Individualized Learning 303-556-8342, Central Classroom 106 Environmental Science The environmental scie n ce major is de i g ned as an entry-level major for MSCD students as well as for student transferring as juniors from the communi t y colleges wlth backgrounds in hazardous materials technology or water quality or a degree in Environmental and Safety Technology All st udents are required to complete a unified core. In addition s tudents may choose from five options (co ncentrations ) depending on their areas of interest. The mu l tidisciplinary co ncentr ation provides student with a bro ad based environmental science background whereas the other empha es in hazardous materials water quality environmental chemistry, and ecological restoration are more s pecialized. No minor is required (See Environmental Science on page 114.) Land Use The land use major is very broad in cope and can be used for a number of career objective and grad uate sc hool programs. Opportunitie s exist in such areas as plan,ning cartograp hy, geographic informa tion systems (GIS), air photo and satellite imagery interpretation, environmental and re so urce manage ment travel and transportation mining and mineral resources, residential and industrial development recreational land use, population analy i and a variety of other interrelated fields. Thi s program pro vides a so lid foundation for continued study at the graduate level. (See Land Use o n page 125.) Meteorology Meteorology i s the scie nce of the atmosp here. Modem meteorologist s are involved in weather observ ing, forecasting, research, and dissemination of weather information to the public Meteorologists a l so study g lobal weather and climate, and investigate the influence that human beings exert on Earth' cli mate. The forecasting l abo r atory includes a computerized observing ration, daily weather map sate l lite ima ge and access to the national weather database The bachelor of science degree in meteorology follows American Meteorological Society recommendations for undergraduate programs. Students sho uld contact a meteorology faculty member to discus degree programs career opportun ities, and graduate sc hool optio ns. (See Meteorology on page 131.) ENGLISH D EPARTMENT Role and Mission Statement: Department of Engli h faculty s har e a heritage in which langua ge, writing, literature and the art of teaching are valued as cornerstones of a liberal education. Repr esenting distinct s pecializations we form a community of reader s and writers who pursue the study of humane letters for both aesthetic and practical reasons. The English Department provides studen t s from across the college with cour es that fulfill the Level I General Studies requirement in English composition: English 1010 (Freshman Composition : The Essay) and English 1020 (F re shman Compo ition: Research, Analy sis, and Documentation). The department also teaches liter ature and linguistics courses that meet the Level II General Studies require ment in Arts and Letters. Thus in keeping with the liberal arts tradition of general education, the depart ment promotes both the basic intellectual skills of critical reading and writing and the kind of under s tanding of the human condition that comes from the experience and apprec i ation of literature. For st udent s majoring or minoring in English, the program provides a foundation in literature, langua ge, writing, and teaching Thus students' command of written language their ability to analyze concepts and their broad understanding of human nature and social realities will enable them to be competitive in a variety of fields including education, busine ss and civil service or, with appropriate graduate work, in profession s such as l aw and higher education. English department fac ult y members develop professionally in a variety of ways appropriate to their discipline s, from maintaining currency in the c urri cula they teach and the in tructional technology they employ to scholarly and creative work leading to variou forms of publication and pre entation. They serve the college and community by volunteering in sc hools or other organizations concerned with the written word and by s harin g with their fellow citizens the insight s of teacher-scholars educated in the tradition of the liberal arts. The English Department offers instruction in literature, writing, language and lingui tics and in ele mentary and secondary English education. Courses in each area appeal to students in every school of

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110 SCHOOL OF LETTERS ARTS & SCI E NC E S the college who wish to read and und ers t a nd representative lit e rature s of the world; to exami ne the prin cip l e underlying how language works; and to c ulti vate their writing kill The department invites st udent s i n other disc ipline s to se l ect English cou r ses to enhan ce their general education. Stud e nt s may a l o c h oose an E n glis h major or minor from areas listed below. Students who are consideri n g a major or minor in the E n glis h Departm e nt are ex pected to co n ult with faculty for ad v i ing. Stud ents in e l e m entary or secondary lic e n s ure pro grams s hou l d consult with advi sors in the appropriate ed u cation department as well. The E n g lish major may choose a co n ce ntr ation in one of the following : lit e r a tur e wr itin g e leme n tary sc hool teachin g, l ea din g to licen s ur e secondary s c ho o l teaching, l ea din g to lice n sure The Engli h minor may c ho ose a conce n tratio n in one of the followin g : lan guage a nd lin g ui stics literature writing Th e English D epartment asses e s the major in d es i g nat e d Senior Experience courses P o rtfolios of papers a s i g ned through these co ur es will b e read b y members of the fac ulty. Senior Experience course s hould n ot be taken until the st udent s final year of s tudy B eca u e the e course may not be offered every e me s ter st udents hould disc u ss c h e dulin g with Engli sh D epart ment advisors. Further information is available in the Engli h D e p artment office E n g li s h Ma jor for Bach e lor of Arts LITERATURE CONCE TRATIO The E n gHsh m a j o r Hte r at ur e concentration, e ncomp asses a range of American, Briti s h and world lit erature. The program provide s a strong foundation of courses i n literatur e and l a n guage, s eq u e n ced to cultivate a se n se of Hterary devel opm ent and foster an increasing familiarity with major works a nd writer s, cri tical theory lit e rary terminology andre earch materials Because o f their comma nd of the writte n langua ge their a bility to deal with ideas and conce pt s as well as facts and their br oa der under standi n g of hum an nature and social re alities, lit erat ur e majors are valued in many fields including academe, the l aw and the world of business Required Courses Sem ester Hour s ENG 2100 Intr oductio n t o Literary Studies ................. . .... ............ 3 ENG 22 2 0 American Literature: Civil War to Pres ent ................ ............... 3 ENG 3 1 00 Studie s in Chaucer Shakespeare and Milton ............... ................ 3 ENG 3440 Myth, Sy mbol and Allu s ion In Literature ...... .... .............. ....... 3 ENG 4610 Literary Critici s m ( Senior Experience c ourse ) ......... ... .... ... ........ 3 Subtotal ... ........................................................ ......... 15 Three of the e co ur e s : ENG 2110 World Literature : B eginni n g s t o 1600 .................................... 3 ENG 2120 World Literature : 17th Century t o Pr esent ..... .......................... 3 ENG 22l0 American Lit erature: B eg innings thr ough Civil War .... ...... ... ........... 3 EN G 2310 B ritis h Lit erature : Beginnings to 1785 ................................. 3 ENG 2330 Briti h Literature : 1785 to Present ........... .............. ........... 3 Subtotal ..................................... ........................ ......... 9 One o f these courses : ENG 20 I 0 The Natur e of Language ......... .... ................................. 3 EN G 3020 Hi s t ory of the Eng lish Language ................................ .... 3 ENG 3030 Semantics ... .......... ....... ...... .... ......... .................. 3 ENG 3040 Morphology and Syntax ......... ................................... 3 Subt o tal ........................................................ .... . ..... 3 Six Electives ( at least 5 course s must be upper division): Development cou r s e .............. ........................... .... .... ..... .... 3 Period co ur e .................................................. ........... 3 Majo r author course ..................... ........................ . ........... 3 Writing course ............ ..... .... ................ ....... .............. 3

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I SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 111 Literature course ................................ .... ..... ..................... 3 Elective at the 2000 or above level ............ ....... .......... .............. 3 Subtotal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 18 Total ........................... . .............. 1 ........... 45 ELEME TARY SCHOOL TEACHING Co CE TRATION The elementary school teaching concentration in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Education licensure program prepares future teachers of e l ementary education to understand and teach the diverse subject matter required for licensure The program will provide stu dents with a strong foundation in literature and literary genres; a olid perspective on the English lan guage, inc ludin g its history structure, an d constituents ; and both theory and practice in compos ition language arts, communication and teaching methodology It also addresses the need to prepare teach ers to teach multicultural literature accommodate cultural and ethnic diversity in language and writing, and communicate effectively with a diverse population of s tudents Teacher education program s are currently undergoing review and may be modified during 2000-2002. Students seeki ng teacher licen s ure hould read the teacher licensure ections of thi s Catalog page 172-173, and they sho uld stay in regular contact with their advisors. Required Courses Semester Hour s Lit era ture Core Courses ENG 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies ..................... ............ ..... 3 ENG 2220 American Literature: Civi l War t o Present ................................. 3 ENG 3100 Studies in Chaucer, Shakespeare and Milton ....... ........................ 3 ENG 3440 Myth Symbol and Allu ion in Literature ............. .............. . 3 ENG 3460 Children's Literature .................................................. 3 Subtotal ................................................................ IS Language/Lingui s tics Core Course s ENG 2010 TheNatureofLanguage ............................................... 3 ENG 3020 Hi story of the Engli s h Language ......................................... 3 Subtotal ......................................................... ............ 6 Writing/Composition Course ENG 2500 Art and Craft of Writing .............................................. 3 -orENG 2520 Introdu c tion to Creative Writin g ............ ......... ...... ........... 3 ENG 3510 Advanced Compo ition ....... .............................. ........ 3 Subtotal .................. ............ .... ......... ...... .......... ....... 6 Language Arts Core Courses ENG 4650 Teaching Composition in Elementary Schools .............................. 3 ENG 4660 Teaching Literature and Language : K-6 ( Senior Experience cour se) ............ 3 RDG 3130* Literacy Instruction in Grades K-6 ......................... ............ 5 Subtotal ..................................................................... 6 English Elective s Two upper-divi sio n Engli h courses se lected in consu lt ation with and approved by a designated English advisor. ................................................................ 6 Toto! ......................................................................... 39 RDG 3130 meers the reading r equiremen ts for Colorado State licensure but is ca rri ed under the stu dent s professioT!al education r equirements. SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHING CONCENTRATION The secondary education concentration in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Education licensure program prepares future r econdary teachers of Engli h to under stand and teach the diver se ubject matter required for licensure This program equips tudents with a wide variety of language principles and skills ; practical experience in deve l oping and teaching the processes of writing; sound knowledge of approaches to literature and literary genres; periods and authors (including a special focus on young adult literature); and an under s tanding of communication and media as u se d in English studies. In addition to meeting specified state and departmental require ments, this program offers students the opportunity to develop further specialization in writing, lan guage, or liter ature to complement the major. Teacher education program are currently undergoing review and may be modified during 2000-2002. Student s seeking teacher licensure hould read the teacher Licensure sections of this Catalog pages 172-173, and they should stay in regular contact with their advisors.

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112 SCHOOL OF LETTERS ARTS & SCIENCES Required Courses Semester Hours I. Literature Core ENG 2100 Introduction to Literary Studie s ...... ......................... ........ 3 E G 2210 American L iterat ur e: Beginning s throu gh the Civil War .............. ... .... 3 -Qr ENG 2220 American Lit erature: Civil War to Pr esen t ...... ... ............... .... ... 3 ENG 3100 Stud i es in Chaucer S hak espea r e and Milt o n .............................. 3 ENG 3440 Myth, Symbol and Allu s i o n in Lit e r a tur e .......... ...................... 3 EN G 3470 Y ou ng Adult Literature ................................... .... .... 3 T o tal. . ............. ........................ ...................... ....... 15 II. Lan guage Core ENG 2010 The Nature of Langu age ...... .............................. .......... 3 ENG 3020 History of the Engli s h Language ... ...................................... 3 T otal ............................. .......................................... 6 III. Compo s iti on Core ENG 2500 The Art and Craft of Writing .................. ............... .......... 3 ENG 3510 Advanced Compo s ition ................... ... ........................ 3 T o tal ............... ................................................ .... 6 IV. Teaching Engli s h Core ENG 3620 Teaching Composition 7-12 ................................. ....... 3 ENG 4600 Teaching Liter a ture and Communi ca tion. 7 1 2 .............. .......... 3 ENG 4640 Tea c hing Engli h 7-12 ( S e nior Experience course) . ................... 3 T ota l. ...................................................... ...... ....... 9 V Upper Level Elective s Three upper-di vision English courses at l east two of which mus t be lit erature courses, e l ected in cons ultati on with and approved by a de s i g nated Englis h advi or ............................. 9 Total ............................................................. ........... 45 WRITING CONCE TRA TION The writing concentration major provide s extensive st udy practice and opportunity for performance in various mode s and ge nre s of writing as well as a foundation in the appreciation of the l.iterary heritage in English. The program immer ses tudents in re adi ng writing, a n d langu age and h elps prepare them for gra duate sc hool or vocation while c l early pla cing them in the tradit i on of the lib eral arts R eq uir e d Courses Seme s ter H o ur I. Lit e r ature Courses Lower-Division Literature Cour ses 2000-Jevel including ENG 2100 .......... .......................... ..... . .... 9 Three hou rs mus t e mpha s ize modem literatur e Uppe r -Division Literature Cour se : 3000-Level and/or 4000-Level .......... ........................ .................. 9 Semes t e r H ou rs of Lit e rature R eq uir ed ............................................. 1 8 II. Language and Lingui s tic s Cour e Select one in consu l tation with a faculty advi sor, from the depanment's offerings. Semester H ours of Lan g ua ge and Lin g ui s ti cs R eq uir ed .......... .......................... 3 ill. Writin g Cour ses Entry Cour se: ENG 2500 Th e Art and Craft of Writing .... .... ...... ......................... 3 Subtotal .............. ............................... ......................... 3 Writing Elective s ( ln cons ult ation with an Engli s h advisor s elect four-three must be 3000-level) JRN 1100 B eginni ng Rep orti n g ....... . ................... .......... ...... 3 ENG 2520 Intr od u ctio n to Creative Writin g ................................ ........ 3 COM 2610 Introduction t o T ec hnical Writing .... ........... ... ............... ... 3 ENG 3510 Advanced Compo ition .. ....... ..... .. . ............... ....... 3 ENG 352A Creative Writin g Workshop: Po etry ..................... ................. 3 ENG 352 B Creative Writin g W o rk s h op: Fiction ......... ....................... 3 ENG 352C Creative Writin g Workshop : Dr ama .......................... ....... 3 ENG 3530 Technique s of Crit ical Writin g .................. ." ..... .................. 3 ENG 3980 Engli s h Cooperative Educatio n .......................................... 3 Subto tal ................................................................... I 2

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 113 Specialized Writing Courses ENG 3820 Writing Studio (m u s t be repeated for credit under two distinct titles) .... ..... 6 Subtotal .............. ........................................................ 6 Senior Experience Cour s e ENG 4520 Advan c ed Writing ............. ..... ................................. 3 T o tal Semester H ours of Writin g R equired ........................................... 24 T o tal Seme s ter H o urs R equired ................................................... 45 ENGLISH MINOR WRITING Co CENTRATIO The writing concentration minor provide s study, practice and opportunity for performance in vario u mode s and genres of writing as well as a foundation in the appreciation of the literary heritage in EngHsh. The program involves st udents in reading writing and language and helps prepare them for grad uate sc hool or vocation while clearly placing them in the tradition of the liberal art Students must me et with a writing faculty advisor in order to under tand prerequisites and se lect proper courses. I. Literature Course Lower-Division Literature Courses: 2000-Level, Including ENG 2100 .................................................... 6 Upper-Division Literature Course : 3000-Level or 4000-Level. .................................................... ... .. 3 Subtotal .... ............................................................. 9 II. Language and Linguistic Course: Select one in consultation with a faculty a dvi sor, from departmenfs offerings. Semester H ours of Language and Linguistic s R equired ........ ... . . .......... .... 3 llJ. Writin g Cour se: Entry Course : ENG 2500 The Art and Craft of Writing ................ .......... ........... 3 Subtotal ....... ................................................................ 3 Writing Electives (se lect three-two must be 3000-leve l ) JRN 1100 B egi nning R e porting . . ........................ .......... 3 ENG 2520 Introduction to Creative Writin g .... . ....... ......... .............. 3 COM 2610 Introduction to Technical Writin g .................... . .... ......... 3 ENG 3510 Advanced Composition................... . ................. ..... 3 ENG 352B Creative Writing Work s hop : Fiction ........ ........ ................ 3 ENG 352A Creative Writing Workshop : Poetry ...................................... 3 ENG 352C Creative Writing Workshop : Dr ama ..... .... ............................. 3 ENG 3530 T ech niqu es of Critical Writing ....... ...... ........ ..... ..... ..... 3 ENG 3820 Writing Studio ........... ......... ...... ........ ............. 3 Subtotal ............................................................... ........ 9 Semester H ours o f Writing R equired .................. ............ ................ 12 Total Semester H ours R e quired ............................. ....................... 24 LITERATURE CONCENTRATION The English minor with concentration in Literature serves students who seek to develop skills in read ing writing, and thinking about literary texts. The program i s designed both for students interested in reading diverse text from many ages, cult ur e, and genres and for st ud ents who wish to focus on a sin gle age, culture or genre, for example, dramatic Literature Cour e hould be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor in the Department of English. l. Introduct ory Course : Seme s ter Hour ENG 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies ......................................... 3 11. Tw o courses from the following : ENG 2110 World Literature : Beginnin gs to 1600 ....................... ............. 3 ENG 2120 World Liter ature: 17th Century to Present ................ . .... ...... 3 ENG 2210 American Lit e rature : Beginnings through Civil War .......................... 3 ENG 2220 American Literature : Civil War to Pre s ent ...................... ........... 3 ENG 2310 British Literature: Beginnings to 1785 ...... ............ ............ ... 3 ENG 2330 British Literature: 1785 to Present ............. .............. .......... 3 Subtotal. ....... ..... .... ............ ........ ... .......... ...... .......... 6

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114 SCHOOL O F L E TTERS ARTS & SCI E NC E S ill. Any period course (ENG 311A, ENG 3 118 ENG 311C, ENG 3110, ENG 311E, ENG 311F, ENG 311G) -{)rAny development course ( Choose one course from ENG 3210, ENG 3230, ENG 3240 ENG 3310 ENG 3330, ENG 3400 or ENG 3410) Subtotal ...... . ........ ... ... .................. ........ ....... ...... 3 JV. Departmental Electives One course at the 2000-level or above ........................................... .... 3 Two litera ture co u rse at the 3000 l eve l or above ............................... ..... 6 One 4000-level Hterature or Hterary critici m c our s e ................................... 3 Subtotal .. ........................................................... ........ 12 Total Semester H ours R equired ..................................................... 24 Note : Thi s min o r replaces both the lit era ture concentra ti o n and the dramatic lit e rature concentration of the 1994-95 Catalog. LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS MINOR The language and linguistics minor offers concepts about theories of, and analytical techniques in nat ural language It represents an intellectual discipline in it self and s imultaneou s ly serves the interests of future teachers stu d e nts of literature and writing, and other s who have a continuing fascination with lan guage as language The minor i s especially complementary for major s in anthropology, English, foreign language teaching modern l anguages, philo so phy, p syc holo gy, sociology, speec h communication and tec hnical communication The minor require s students to engage in vigorous, progressively more explicit and precise anal ysis and sy nthesi s as the y exami ne facts and fallacies abou t the miracle of language. Required Core Courses S eme ter Hour s ENG 2010 The Nature of Langu age .......... ....................... .............. 3 Any four of the following six courses, cho e n in consu l tation and with an a pproved departmental adv i sor ENG 30 20 History of the English Language ........................... ........ .... 3 ENG 3030 Semantics ............................... ....... .................. 3 ENG 3040 Morphology and Syntax ................. ....... .................... 3 ENG 3050 Language and Society .................................. ............... 3 ENG 3060 Modem Lan g u age Theory .......................................... 3 ENG 40 I 0 Studies in Lin guistics ( Variable Topi c ) ................................ 3 Subtotal ............... ............. ................... ..................... 1 2 Int e rdisciplinary e lective courses. Any two courses cho e n in co n s ultation wit h and approved by depart mental advisor. ANT 2330 Cross-Cultural Communication ................................... .... 3 COM 3310 International Techni cal Communication .................. ................ 3 ENG 4010 Studies in Lin guistics (Variab l e Topic s) ....................... .... ..... 3 ENG 4990 Internship ................. ......................... .............. 3 PHI 1 11 0 Language Logic and P ersuas ion ....................................... 3 PHI 3120 Philo so phy of Language ................... ..... ....... ........... .... 3 PSY 3570 Cognitive P syc holo gy ................................... ...... ....... 3 SED 4200 Language De velopmen t and Learning Di sabiHties ................ ........ 3 SPA 3150 Spanish Phon etics: Theory and Pr actice ................................... 3 SPA 4310 Hi tory of the Spani h Language ............. ............ ............... 3 SPE 3520 Language Acquisition ...................... ........................ 3 SPE 3540 Phonetic s and Language Sample Analy i ................................ 3 SPE 3740 P s ychology of Communication ....................................... 3 SPE 3760 Cultural Influen ces o n Communication .......................... ....... 3 WMS 2770 Gender and C ommunication ............................................ 3 ( SPE 2770 ) Subtotal ................. ................ ............... .... ............... 6 Total S e m es t er H ours R equ ired ..................................................... 21 ENVIRON MENTAL S CIENCE The environmental science major i s de igned as an entry-level major for MSCD students as well as for students transferring a s juniors from the community colleges with backgrounds in hazardou s materials technology or water quality or a degre e in Environmental and Safety T ec hnology. All s tudents are required to complete a unified core. [n addition, s tudent s may choo e from five option (e mphase s) depending on their areas of intere st. The multidi sc iplinary co nce n tration provides students with a broad ba sed environmental sc ience background whereas the other emphases in hazardo u s materials water

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 115 quality, environmental chemi try, and ecological re toration are more pecialized. o minor is required Interested students should go to the Department of Earth and Attospheric Sciences (Science 231) to be assigned a n advisor and to pick up advising and career option s eet Environmental Science Major for Bachelor of cience Core Requirements for all Environmental Science Emphase Semester Hours B!O 1080 General Introduction to Biology .... ................. ............... 3 BIO I 090 General Introduction to Biology Laboratory ......................... ...... I CET 3320 Environmental Impact Statements ...................................... 3 COM 3670 Writing for the Environmenta l Industry (Prerequisite : COM 2610 or permission of ins tructor) ...... ...... ........ 3 GEG 1200 Introduction to Environmental Science .............. .... ......... ...... 3 GEG 1220 Map Use .......... ............................................. 2 GEG 4200 Environmental Policy and Pla nning ......... .......................... ... 3 MTH 1210 Introduction to Statistic ................................. .......... 4 MTH 3240 Environmental Stati tics ............................................... 4 Subtotal ............................................. ...... ................. 26 Students must select one of the following Senior Experience cour es : BIO 4510 Microbial Ecology ........ ...... ...... .... ........ ............... 3 B l O 4540 Plant Ecolo g y ...... ........... ... . ............................ 4 CHE 4950 Senior Experience in Chemi s try ... ............. ........................ 3 GEG 4960 Global Environmental Challenge s ...................................... 3 GEL 4960 Environmental Field Studie s ...................................... .... 3 Subtotal ....................................................................... 3 Students must elect one of the following Internships (minimum 3 credit hours) : BIO 4990 Intern hip in Biology . ........... ......... ................... ... 3 CHE 4650 Chemistry Work Experience/Cooperative Education ............... .... ... 4 GEG 4950 Intern s hip in Land Use ................................. ........ .... 3 GEL 4950 Internship in Geology .............. ............... ................... 3 Subtotal .............. ............................... ..... ... ................ 3 Total Cor e R e quirem e nt s ......................... ....... . .................. 32 Req u ired General Studies Course MT H 1110 College Algebra ( General Studies-Level !-Mathematics) ........... ... ... .... 4 CHE I 800 Genera l Chemistry l ( Gener a l Studie s -Level ll Natural Science ) ........... ..... 4 GEL 1010 Gener a l Geology ( General Studie s -Level llNatural Science ) ............. . 4 Total G e neral Studi es co ur ses (see G e n e ral Requir e m enrs Bro c hure ) ................... .... 36 ( Studenr s w ho have not had a co mput e r co ur se will b e r e quir e d t o tak e CSJ/010) M ULT IDIS C IP LINA R Y Co CE TRA TIO Students are required to se l ect courses in Biology Chemistry Geography, Geology Mathematics, and Meteoro l ogy, as weU as elective course in con u l tation with a discipline advisor totaling a minimum of 42 hour Environmental Science Core ....................................... ................ 32 Biology ( 9 hour minimum ) BIO 2100 General Botan y ............. ........ ........ .................... 5 BIO 2200 General Zoology ............................................ ........ 5 BIO 2400 General Microbiolog y ... ............ .... .... . .................. 4 BIO 3140 Plant Physiology ...... ............ ........ ............. .............. 5 BIO 3180 Vascular Plant Taxonomy ....... ... . ............................. 4 BIO 3360 Animal Phy iology .............. ......................... ...... . 4 BIO 3550 Urban Ecology ................. . ................................. 4 BIO 4120 Algology ............. ...... ..................... . .......... 4 BIO 4450 Pathogenic Microbiology ........... ............ ............. ..... 5 BIO 4510 Microbial Ecology ......... . .................... ... ............ 3 BIO 4540 Plant Ecology .................................. .... ............. 4 B l O 4550 Animal Ecology ............... .... .... ........ .......... .... .... 4 Subtotal ...... .... .............................. . ................. 9 Chemistry ( 9 hour s minimum ) CHE 1810 General Chemistry n ( required ) ........ ......................... ..... 4 CHE 1850 Ge neral Chemi s try Laboratory ( recommended ) ........ .... ............. 2 CHE 3050 Env ironmental Chemi s try ................ ...... ................ .... 3 CHE 3100 Organic Chemi try I .... .............. ..... ..... ................ 4

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116 SCHOOL OF LETTERS ARTS & SCIENCES CHE 3 1 I 0 Organic Chemistry U ........................................ ......... 3 CHE 3120 Organic Chemistry Laboratory ........................... ........ ...... 2 CHE 3130 Organic Chemistry Laboratory il ........ ................................ 2 CHE 3890 Science and Public Policy: Variab l e Topics ............................... l-3 Subto t al ................ .......................................... ............ 9 Geography (9 hours minimum) GEG 1 230 W ea ther and Climate ............................... ...... ....... 3 GEG 1400 World Re so ur ces .................................................. 3 GEG 2250 Introduction t o Geographic Information Systems ...... ....... .............. 3 GEG 3400 Water R esou r ces ............................. ..................... 3 GEG 3620 Population R esources, and Land U se ..................................... 3 GEG 4840 Remote Sensing .................................................... 3 GEG 4850 Advanced Geograpttic Information Systems ...................... .......... 3 GEG 4888 Workshop on Environmental I ss ue s (ad vi or approved) ...... .............. 3 GEG 4900 Environmental Seminar (adviso r approved) ... ... .... .................. 3 Subtotal ............. ................................................... .... 9 Geology (9 hours minimum) GEL 3 1 20 Advanced Geomorphology ..... ........... .......................... 4 GEL 3 1 50 Hydrogeology ..... ..................................... ........ 3 GEL 3420 Soil R eso ur ces ...................... .................. .............. 4 GEL 3440 Energy and Mineral R esources ............................. ............ 4 GEL 3540 Advanced Geologic and Environmental Hazards-Denver and Vicinity ............ 2 GEL 4000 Environmental Geology (req u ired) ...................................... 3 GEL 40 I 0 Environmental H azards and Planning ..................................... 3 GEL 4150 Hydrology ....................................................... 3 Subtotal .............................................................. ..... 9 Mathematics (3 hours minimum ) MTH 1120 College Trigonometry ..................... ,, ....... .... ...... .. 3 MTH 1400 Precalculus Mathematic s ................... ......... ................ 4 MTH 1410 Calc ulu s l (ttigh l y recommended) .... ................ ................... 4 MTH 2410 Calculus il ................................................. ........ 4 Sub t otal ....................... ................................................ 3 Meteorology (3 hour minimum ) MTR 1 400 Introduction to Meteorology -o r GEG 1 230 Weather and Climate .......... ...................... ....... .... 3 MTR 3400 Synoptic Meteorology .............. .................. ............... 4 Subtotal ................................. ....................... ........... 3 Total Multidisciplinary Courses ..................... ............................. 42 General Studies ......................... .......... .......... ... ............ 36 Electives .................................................................... 10 Total for Multidisciplinary Conce/1/ration ................................. ......... 120 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS CONCE TRA TIO Environmental Science Core ......................... ........ ............... 32 Ad diti onal Required Courses Semester Hours CHE 1 8 1 0 General Che mistry U ...... .......... ...... ......................... 4 C HE 1 850 General Chemistry Laboratory ......................................... 2 C HE 3050 Environmental Chemi stry ......... .......... ............. ........... 3 CHE 3100 Organic Chemistry I ....... ................................. ..... 4 CHE 3 1 20 Organic Chemi stry Laboratory I ........................................ 2 GEL 3420 Soil R esources ......................... ...... ............... ... 4 GE L 3540 Advanced Geologic and Environmental H azardsDenver and Vicinity* ........... 2 GEL 4000 Environmental Geology ............................................... 3 EST 132 Environmen t al H ealth and Safety (OSHA) ................................. 3 (offe red at Arapahoe Front Range and Red Rocks Community Colleges) Subto tal .................................................................. ... 27 COMMUNITY COLLEGE ELECTIVES (select at least 15 hours): Arapahoe Community College EST 107 Hazardous Materials Emergency R esponse Operations ........................ 3 EST I 12 Chemistry of Hazardou s Materials ....................................... 3

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 117 EST 211 Pollution Prevention ........ .................................... ..... 3 EST 231 Site Remediation ................. ................................ 3 EST 235 Field In trumentation ...................... ...... ....... . ....... 3 EST 241 Environmental Sampling ....................... ......... ........... 3 EST 261 RCRA Compliance ........ .......... ....... . ......... ........... 3 EST 265 Environmental Auditing ..... ................ . ................... 3 EST 268 Site Ass ess ment .......................................... ...... ..... 3 EST 270 Risk Assessment. ................................................. 3 EST 280 Environmental Compli a nce ................ ..... ........................ 3 EST 295 En v ironmental Management ............................. ........... 3 Front Range Community College EST 107 Emergency R esponse Operation s Level ................................... 3 EST 21 1 Pollution Prevention ........................................... ... 3 EST 221 OSHA H ealth and Safety Update ... ...... .... .................. . l EST 231 Site R emediation ......................................... .......... 3 EST 241 Environmental Sampling ......... . ....... ...... ...... ...... ... 4 EST 261 RCRA Compliance ................................. ................. 3 EST 265 Enviro nm e n tal Audits ........... ...................................... 3 EST 268 Site Assessment . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 EST 270 Risk As sess ment. .......................... ............. ............ 3 Red Rocks Community College EST 1 07 Hazardous Material s Operation s ....................................... 3 EST 112 Chemistry of Hazardou Material s ..................................... 3 EST 211 Pollution Prevention ........ ............. ............... .... ..... 3 EST 241 Environmental Sampling .............................. .... ...... .... 4 EST 261 RCRA Compliance .......... ......... ..... . ..................... 3 EST 265 Environmental Auditing . ............... .............. ........ 3 EST 268 Site As sess ment ....... ...... ..... ................................. 3 EST 270 Risk Asse ss ment. ... ............... .... ........................... 3 EST 280 Environmental Compliance ................................... .......... 3 EST 295 Environmental Mana ge ment .... ........... ....... ............... ..... 3 Subtotal of electives from Community Colleges ....................... ................ 15 El ec tives from Community College or MSCD ...................................... 10 General Studie s ......... ...................................................... 36 Total for H azardo us M a t e rial s Concentration ............... ............... ......... 120 WATER Q UALITY CONCE TRA TION Environmental Science Core .................... ........ ......... .... ... ......... 32 Additional Required Courses Semes ter Hour s CHE 1810 General Chemistry II . ................ 1 4 CHE 1850 General Chemistry Laboratory ............. ............ .......... 2 CHE 3050 Environmental Chemi s try ................. ............... ..... ..... 3 CHE 31 00 Organic Chemistry I. ....... ............. .. . .. .. ........... 4 CHE 3120 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1 ........................................ 2 GEG 1230 Weather and Climate -orMTR GEL GEL EST 1400 Introduction to Meteorology ....... ................ ...... .......... 3 3150 H ydrogeo l ogy ........ .... ................ .................... 3 4150 Hydrology .......................................... .............. 3 132 Environmental Health and Safet y ( OSHA ) ......... ..................... 3 (offered at Arapahoe Front R ange and Red R ocks Community Colleges ) Subtotal ............................ ......................................... 27 Red Rocks Community College (select 13 hour from the following courses): WQM 100 Introduction to W a ter Quality Mana ge ment ....................... ......... 3 WQM 119 Basic Water Quality Analysis ....... ........ .......................... 4 WQM 121 Environmental Sampling and Volume Management ....................... ... 3 WQM 210 Advanced Water Quality Analy s i ................................... ... 4 WQM 216 Biological and B acteriolog ical W a ter Quality Analy i s ..... ................. 4 Subtotal ............... ........ .... ............................ ............ 1 3

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118 SCHOOL OF LETTERS ARTS & SCIENCES Select 1 2 hour s from the following cour s e s BIO 2100 General Botany ......................... ...... ....... ............. 5 BIO 2400 General Microbi o l ogy ................ ..... .................... 4 BIO 3550 Urban Ecolo g y .... ....... ................ ................. .... 4 BIO 4120 Algology ................ .................................... 4 BIO 4510 Microbial Ecology .................... ..... ......... ........ ...... 3 CET 3330 Environmental Technology Processes ......... ...... ...... ............ 3 GEG 3400 Water Resourc es ..................... ....... .......... ...... ....... 3 GEL 3420 Soil Resource s ...................................... ............ 4 Subt o tal .... ........................ .............. ......... .. ............. 12 General Studi es .... .... ........... .................. .......... ........... 36 T o tal for Warer Qualiry Con ce ntration .............................................. 1 2 0 ECOLOG I CAL REsTORATION CONCENTRATION Environmental Science Core .... .......... ............ ....................... 32 Additional Required Courses Seme s ter Hour s CHE 1810 G e neral Chemi s try ll ................................................ 4 CHE 1850 G e neral Chemi s try Laboratory ....................... .................. 2 ECO 3450 Environmental Economi cs .......................................... 3 GEG 4900 Environmental Seminar ( advi sor a pproved ) ..... .................. ..... 3 GEL 34 2 0 Soi l Resource s .... ........................ ... ........... . ...... 4 GEL 3540 Advanced Geologi c and Environmental Hazard sDenver and Vic inity ... ........ 2 GEL 4000 Environmental Geology ........................ ...... ............... 3 GEL 4010 Environmental Hazard s and Pla nning ..................................... 3 PSC 3230 Environmental PoHtic ............................................. ... 3 Subtotal ............. .... ............ ... ........ ......... ................... 27 Elec tiv es (select 25 hours from the following list): BIO 2100 General Botany ...... ...... .................. ................... 5 BIO 2200 General Zoology ..... ........................... ..... ........ 5 BIO 2400 General Microbiology ............................................ ... 4 BIO 3140 Plant Physiology ......... ............... .......... ... ... .... 5 BIO 3180 Vascular Plant Taxonomy .... ........... . ............. ........ 4 BIO 3360 Animal Physiology .......... .......... .............. ... ...... 4 BIO 3550 Urban Ecology ........................ ..................... ....... 4 BIO 4120 Algology .............................. ..... .... .......... ...... 4 BIO 4510 Microbial Ecology ..... ................... ........... ....... .... 3 BIO 4540 Plant Ecology ...................................... ............ 4 GEG/GEL Topic s course s .... ................................................. 5 Subroral of e l ecrives ............................. . ..... ............... 25 Genera l Studies ...... ............... .. ..... .... .... ...... .... ............. 36 Toralfor E colog i c al Restorati o n C o n ce ntrari o n ...................................... 1 2 0 ENVIRONME TAL CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATIO Environmental Science Core ...................................................... 32 Additional Required Courses Seme s ter Hour s BIO 2400 General Microbiology .... .... ..... ............... ...... ............ 4 BIO 4510 Microbial Ecology ............................ .............. .... 3 CHE 1810 General C h emi try II ............. ... ............... ........... .... 4 CHE 1850 General Chemistry Laboratory .................... ......... ............ 2 CHE 3000 Analytical Chemi s try ................................................ 3 CHE 3010 Analytical Chemistry Labora tory ........... ............ ............. 2 CHE 3050 Environmental Chemi s try ........................................... 3 CHE 3100 Organic Chemi s try I. ...................................... .... . 4 CHE 3120 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. ........ ....... .................. ..... 2 CHE 4150 Instrumentation and Analysis in the Occupational Environment ................ 4 CHE 4200 Evaluation and Control of Air QuaHty ................ ............ ...... 3 GEL 3420 Soil Re s ource s ............................. ......................... 4 GEL 4000 Envi r onmental Geolo gy ..... ...... .................................. 3 EST 132 Environmental Health and Safety ( OSHA ) ....... ..... .... .............. 3 ( offered at Arapahoe Front Range and Red Rock s Community Colleges) Subtotal ............... ............................................. .......... 44

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 119 I General Studi es ........... ........... ........................................... 36 Electives ............... .................................................. 8 ............ ......... ................ 120 Required Course Seme s ter Hours GEG 4900 Environmental Seminar (advisor approved) ................................ 3 Se l ect 6 hour s from the following list: BIO 1010 Ecology for Non-Majors ............................................... 3 BIO I 080 General Introduction to Biology ......................................... 3 BlO 1090 General Introduction to Biology Laboratory ..... ...... ......... ...... I CHE 1010 Chemistry and Society ............................................. 3 CHE I 800 Chemistry I. ........................................................ 4 GEG 1200 Introduction to Environmental Science .................................. 3 Subtotal ............................................ ........................... 6 Select 6 hours from the following list: ECO 3450 Environmental Economics .................... ...... ................ 3 HIS 3880 American Environmental His tory .................... ......... ........... 3 PSC 3230 Environmental Politics ...................... ......................... 3 PSY 3550 Environmental Psychology ............................................ 3 Subtotal ....................................................................... 6 Select 6 hour s of electives ( including any cour ses listed above or below) : BIO 3550 Urban Ecology ...................................................... 4 CET 3320 Environmental Impact Statements ........................................ 3 CHE 3890 Science and Public Policy: Variable Topic s .. ... ................. ........ 1 -3 COM 3660 Variable Topics in Indu s trial and Technical Communications .................. 3 GEG 1400 World Resource s ................................................... 3 GEG 3400 Water Re so urces .................................................... 3 GEG 4200 Environmental Policy and Planning ............... ...................... 3 URS 3000 World Patterns of Urbanization ......................................... 3 Any environmental topics course (a d visor approved) ......................... 3 Subtotal ................................... .................... ............... 6 Total for Environmental Studies Minor ............................................... 21 Gerontology Minor Educational Goals and Outcomes Upon completion of the gerontology minor, the student will be able to: Core Exit B ehaviors examine sociolog ical psychological and biologi cal/ physiological theories of aging. describe the underlying biological/physiologic a l processes associated with aging and the challenges th ese pre sent. de sc ribe the effects of ethics, economics and policy decisions have on the biological/physiological, socio logical, p syc hological and cultural aspects of aging and the resulting challenges. inve s tigate the changes occurring in society resulting from aging population apply aging theories ethics, economic conditions and ag ing related policy deci ions to a practical experi ence involving the aged or services for the aged. Orientation Exit Behavior (based 011 orientation area selected by the studell/) Liberal Arts examine attitudes toward older cu lturally diverse people to discover ways that aging i s portrayed Profe ss ional Practice provide direct se rvice s to older culturally diverse people and their families, administer and plan program s and services or work to modify ocial institution and policies. Students must complete all of the following core course requirements and at l ea t nine (9) credit hour s from either the liberal arts orientation or the professional se rvice s orientation. R equired Core Courses Semester Hours HES 3810 -orB!O PSY soc 3530 3270 1040 Physiology of Aging for Non Biology Majors .............................. 3 Adulthood and Aging ........................................ ........ 3 Introduction to Social Gerontology . . . . . .......... 3

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120 SCHOOL OF LETTERS ARTS & SCIENCES HES 4520 Int erns hip in Gerontology .................. ........ ............... 3 6 Subtotal ............. .................. ......... ............................ 1 2-15 The f i rst three (3) required core courses mus t be taken prior to selecting cou r ses from an area of or i entation. HES 4520 ( Internship in Gerontology ) m u s t be taken the l ast semester of minor course work. It may be taken with one other approved course from the orientation option You must contact the gerontology advisor the emester before you plan to regi s ter for t his course. Students mus t select a minimum of nine (9) credit hour s from one of the following orientations. these courses mus t be approved by the gerontology advisor in the Department of Health Professions. LmERAL A RTS 0 RIE TATION LES 2330 Ad voc acy Lei s ure and the Aging Adult ..... ...... ......... ............. 3 PSY 2270 Death and D ying .................................................... 3 SOC 3040 Contemporary I s ues in Gerontology .................................. 3 SOC 3 1 00 D eat h and Dyin g .................................................... 3 SPE 4760 Communication a nd the Elderly .................. ..................... 3 P ROFESSIONAL SERVICES O RIENTATION HCM 3020 Management Principles in Health Care ...... ... ...................... ... 3 HES 3100 utrition and Aging ....... ....................... ................. 3 HSL 1420 Activity and Fitness Programs for the Elderly .... ........................... 2 LES 2330 Advocacy, Leisure and the Aging Adult ................................... 3 LES 3070 Health and Movement Problem s in the Aging Adult ............ .............. 3 PSY 2270 Death and Dying ................ .......... ................. ... 3 SWK 3020 Ca se M a nag ement in Social Work Practice ................................. 4 SWK 3030 Social Work with the Aging .................................... ... 4 Total hours for G e r o ntolog y Minor ..................... ...... ..................... 21 Students may se lect a gerontology topic s course or an independe n t study course that deals with agi n g if it is appropriate for their se lected orientation and approved by the gerontology advisor HisTOR Y DEPAR TMENT Major for Bach e lor of Arts Required C o ur es Semester Hours HJS 1010 Western Civilization to 1715 ............. ................... ........ 3 HJS 1020 Western Civilization s ince 1715 ................... ...... ............ 3 HJS 1210 American Hi s tory to 1865 ... ..... ................................... 3 HJS 1 220 American His tory sin ce 1865 ............... ....... ..................... 3 HJS 4820 Senior Seminar ... ............................................. ...... 3 Total. .................. ..... .... .................. ................... 15 Electives A minimum of 23 additional semes ter hour s in hi tory is required, 18 of which mus t be upper-division. o more than 4 seme ter hours in HIS 3890 readings courses may be counted toward the major with out prior written approval from the departm ent. Course Distr ibution In the minimum of 23 a dditional semester hour requir ed, st udents mu t include at least 3 emester hour s in each of the broad areas of his tory : United States European, Developing World Grade Ave r age Student majoring in history must maintain at lea t a 2.0 averag e i n their hi tory courses. Advising History maj ors s hould con u lt with a departm ental ad vi or to se lect the courses in other discip l ines that complement their area of concentration in the major MINOR IN HisTOR Y There are thre e different concentrations available to st udent eeking a history minor: regular history con centration, American We s t history concentration, 20th-century s tud i es history co n ce n tration.

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 121 REGULA R HI TOR Y C ONCENTRATION Required C o urse S e meste r H o ur s HIS 1010 W es t ern Civil izatio n t o 1 7 1 5 . . . . .. . .. ........... 3 HIS I 020 W estern Civilizatio n since 1 7 1 5 .................. ....... ............ .... 3 HIS 1 2 1 0 A m erica n His t ory t o 1865 . ................................... ..... 3 HI S 1 220 A m erican His t ory s i n ce 1 86 5 . ..................... .......... . 3 T o tal....... . . . . . . . . . . . . .... .. ..... 1 2 E l ectives A minimum of 9 a dditi o nal se mester h o ur s in hi t ory is r e quir e d. Th e h o ur s mu t be up pe r di v i s ion a nd s hould be e le c t e d i n con s ult atio n w ith a departm e nt al a c v i sor. N o m o r e th a n 2 erne t e r h o ur s in I-llS 3890 re a din gs co ur s e s ma y be count ed t o ward th e min o r w ithout pri o r writt e n a ppro v al fro m th e d e part ment. AMERICA W EST HISTO R Y C o CE TRATJO R e quir e d Cour es Semest er H ours H I S 1100 A m erica n W es t. .... ........ ..... . . . . ......... . . 3 HIS Ill 0 Col o r a d o His t ory I . . .......... ..... . ........ .... .... 3 HIS 1 2 1 0 A m erican His t ory t o 1 865 ............ ... ............... ............ 3 HIS 1 220 A m erican History since 1 8 65 . . ............ . ........ ........ 3 T o tal.............. .... . ....... . .... .......... .... . 1 2 Electiv e s A min imum of 9 a ddi t i o nal his t o ry semes ter h o ur s tr ea tin g the American West i s r e qui re d al l of whi c h mu s t be upper di v i i o n TWE TIETH -CE TURY STUD IES HISTO R Y CONCENTRATIO R equired Course s Seme s ter H ours HIS 1220 A m erica n H is t o r y si nce 1 86 5 .... ... .......... . . . ........ .. 3 HIS 201 0 Contempo rary W or l d History .......... .... ........................... 3 T o t a l .... ...... ... ... ......... .................. ................. .... 6 E lectives: A minimum of 1 5 add it i o nal ho u r s tr e atin g 2 0th ce ntury his t o r y i s requ i red 9 o f which mu s t be upp e r di v i s ion Gra d e A ve r age Stude nt s minorin g in hi s to ry mu s t main tain a 2.0 ave r age in their hi story cou rse SECO D A R Y SCH OOL EDUCATIO LICE SURE rN SOClAL SCIE CES Stud e nt s m ajo rin g in hi s tory m ay combin e th e ir m ajo r with o th e r cou r s es in t h e soc ia l c i e n ces a nd i n educatio n t o earn second ary e ducatio n Licen s ur e. The r eq uir e ments of this program are i n cl ud e d und e r the Secondary E ducation Department sec tion of thi s Cat a log. T e a c h e r e du catio n p rogr a m s ar e c urr e ntl y und e r going review an d m ay be mo difi e d du r i ng 2000-2002. Students seekin g teach e r licen s ur e s h o uld r e ad th e teac h e r l ice n s ur e sec t io n s o f thi s Cat a l og page s 1 72173 and t hey s hould s tay i n regu l ar contac t with th e ir a d v i s ors PRELAW COURSES Several hi tory co ur ses ar e of parti c ular imp o rt ance t o legal s tudies. These in c lud e HIS 1 210, HIS 1 22 0 HIS 3460, a nd HIS 3680. Stud e nt s int e rest e d in pre law course s are urged to co nta c t th e department a dvi s or. MINOR rN INTERDISCIJ>LrNARY L EGAL STUDIES The in t erdi sc iplin ary le g al s tudie s mino r i s des i g n e d t o s h o w s tud e nt s how th e v ari o u s di c ipline i n the humanities a nd soc ial sc ie nces tre a t qu e tion of law an d jus ti ce. The i nt e rdisciplinary lega l s tudies minor i s n o t a pr e law pre paratory program o r p ar a legal t r a ining It s goal i s t o cross di c iplin es so th a t s tudent s can und e r t an d how the huma niti es a nd soc ial s c ie nces illumin a t e th e principl es practi ces, a n d po l icie s of th e law. Require d Cour s e s S e m e s t e r H ours C J C 2000 Int rodu ctio n t o Lega l Studie ............. .... . ... ... ...... .... 3 ENG 3700 Lit e r ature and the Law ........... ........... ..... ....... ...... ... 3 HIS 3680 The Court in Crisi s. . . . . . ... ........ 3 PHJ 3430 Phi l osophy of Law ... . ................... . ................. 3 PSC 3120 America n Con stit utional Law ...... . .... . .... ................ 3 S O C 3 5 50 Socio l ogy of Law ................ . ................ ........ 3 xxx xxx Seminar i n Legal T opic s (inte rdis cip l i naryt eamtaught cour s e ) ...... .... .... 3 S u b t o tal . . . . . . . ... ....... ....... ... ............. 21

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122 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENC E S Students will se lect one law-related course from the courses listed below or approved by the interdisci plinary l ega l studies minor advi s or: MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Bu siness I ........ ................. .......... 3 MGT 3220 Legal Environment of Business ll .......... ........................... 3 CJC 2100 Substantive Criminal Law ............................................. 3 HIS 3460 The Constitution and the New Nation 1787 1848 ................. .......... 3 SOC 3500 Criminology ... ........................... ....................... 3 WMS 3310 Women and the Law ............................................. .... 3 Total ............................................ ....................... ... 24 Ho li s tic He a lt h and WeUness Educat ion Mult i -Minor The holistic health and well ness education multi-minor offers an area of concentration for stu dents who recognize the increased emphasis on wellness in several profe sional fields and/or for health conscious individuals who wi h to establish a self-enhancement program. The multi minor is de s igned to com p l ement a m ajor chose n by a student that i s relevant to the student's career goals. For additional infor mation p l ease contact the Health Professions Department at 303-556-3130 South C l assroom 226. The multi-minor compri es 21 hour of st udy: Required Cour es Seme s t er Hour s HES 1050 Dynamic s of Health .................... ..................... ...... 3 HES 2040 Introduction to Nutrition ... ....................................... .... 3 HES 2750 Introd u ction to Ho l i s tic Health ........... ...... ......... ....... .... 3 HPS 1640 Phy s ica l Fitne s Techniques and Program s ................................. 2 HSW 3750 Holistic Health and High L eve l Wellne s ............................... 4 PHI 3220 Personal Knowled ge and Pr ofess ion a l Growth ................... .......... 3 Electives ........................................ .............................. 3 Total ....... ................................ .................. ................ 21 Practical experience is an integral part of this minor and Individuali ze d D eg ree Program Student s are urged to e nhan ce their education throu g h fieldwork. This can be achieved through practicums, int em s hips, and cooperative e du cation offerings in one of the above listed departments or b y u s in g these elec tive hours. JOURNALISM D EPARTMENT Journalism Ma jor for B ac h e lo r of Arts The Journalism Department prepares students for careers in news and information media by providing them with a sound ed u cation in the basic s of journalism and/or public rel atio ns. The department has one of the stro n gest journalism teaching staffs in the state. All full-time and part-time faculty have worked in the jou rnalism and/or public relation s fields. The Journa l ism Department is one of two journalism sc hool s in the country to offer an internship pro gram that allows st udents to get hands-on experience in political reporting The Capitol R eporter is open to upper-division stude n ts, who spend an entire semester covering t h e Colorado l egislature for credit. The edito r is a full-time staff member and the weekly newspaper is highly regarded by legislator s, l ob byist and the college community. Proficiency i n standard written Engli h is a prerequi ite for all joumali m cour e Students are required to comp l ete ENG 1010 before taking any journalism cour e beyond JRN 1010. Proficiency in typing is required for all course beyond JRN 1010. A list of s u ggested courses t h at hould be taken for General Stud i es has be e n estab l ished by the depart ment. Stu de nts should a l so select an advisor immediately to begin planning their cour se of s tudy Students may not select both a major and minor from the Journalism Department. Students may also take an assessment test toward the end of their studies to en ure they have reached the proficie n cy level nece sary to pur ue a career in journalism or public relations. The Jo urn a li sm Departme n t offers a journalism major with three empha es n ews/editoria l photo journalism, and public relations-and minors in print journalism and public relations

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' OF LET TERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 123 Journalism Major for Bachelor of Arts Cor e Cour s e s for J o urn alis m M a j o r an d Minors S e m es t e r H ours JRN 1010 Introdu c tion to Journ alis m and M ass Medi a ..... 1 .. .. 3 JRN 1100 B e ginning R e portin g and N e w s Writin g ........ .... ..... ............. 3 JRN 1200 B eg inning N e w s Editin g .................... j ...................... ... 3 JRN 2 100 Int ermedia t e R e portin g and N e w s Writin g ...... .................... ... 3 JRN 4 500 E th ica l and Legal Is u es in J o urn alis m .................................... 3 S ubt o t a l ...... ...... ... ..... ....................................... ..... 15 NEWS/EDITORIAL CONCENTRATION J o urnali s m C o r e ........................ ........................ ............... 15 Required C o urse s JRN 2200 Int e rmediat e New s Editin g ................ .... ...... ................. 3 One o r m o re o f the following: JRN 3 100 Publi ca tion Pra cticum ................................ .... ........... 3 JRN 3980 C oo per ative Educatio n ......... .................................. 3 JRN 4150 Th e Capitol Report e r : Writing/R e portin g ..................... .... ...... 6 JRN 4160 Th e C a pitol R e port e r : Editing/D es i g n ................... ....... . .... 3 And three of the f o llowing ( each c o ur se i s one c redit hour ) : JRN 3500 Topi cs in Journal is m ....................... ........................ 3 S ubt o tal ...... .... .... ...................................................... 9-12 Electives JRN 3150 Co nt e mpor ary Issu es ................... ................. ........... 3 JRN 3 400 F eature Articl e Writ i n g for N e w s p ape r s .... ......................... 3 JRN 3600 Pho tojournali s m I ....................................... ........... 3 JRN 4100 Advanc ed Reportin g .................................... ... ..... ...... 3 JRN 4 2 00 Prin c ipl es of New s p a per and M agazi n e D es i g n ................... .......... 3 JRN 4400 F ea tur e Articl e Writin g for M agazines ... ..... .......................... 3 JRN 4 600 Photoj ournalis m Il ... ................... ........................... 3 S ubt o t al. ........................ .... ................................... 12-15 T o t a l h ours r equired ...................................................... .... 3 9 PHOTOJOURNALISM CON CENTRA TIO J o urnali s m Core ....... .... ....... .... ......... ......... .... ........ 15 Required C o urs es ART 1 2 00 D es i g n Pr ocess e s and C o n ce pts I ... ...... ............................. 3 ART 2 2 00 B egi nnin g Pho t ography .................. ............................ 3 JRN 2200 Int erme diate N e w s Ed iti n g ......... ...... .... ...... ............ 3 JRN 3 600 Photojournalism I .................... ........ .... . .... . .... 3 JRN 4600 Pho t o j o urnali s m Il ................................................... 3 Subt o t a l ....... .......................................................... 15 Elective s ART 3200 Interm edia t e Photo g r a phy ............................................. 3 ART 3230 C o l o r Pho to g r a phy .............................. ..................... 3 ART 3410 C o mput e r Graphi cs .............................. .................... 3 JRN 3100 Publi c ati o n Pra cticum .............................................. 3 JRN 3 150 C o nt e mporary Issu es .......... ... .. ...... . .... .... ......... 3 JRN 3400 Fe a ture Article Writ i n g for N ews paper s ................................... 3 JRN 3500 T opics in J o urnal is m ..................... .......... .... .......... I JRN 4100 Adv anc e d Reportin g ....................... .............. ......... 3 JRN 415 0 Th e C apito l Report e r : W r iting/R eportin g ................. ............... 6 JRN 4 160 Th e C a p i t o l R e port e r : Editing/D e i g n ..................................... 3 JRN 4 200 Prin ciples of ews p ape r and M agaz i ne D esig n .............................. 3 JRN 44 00 F eat ur e Arti cle W riti n g f o r M agazi n es .................... ............. 3 Subt o tal ............................................ .......................... 9 T o t a l ......... ...................... ,, .............. .... . ......... .... 39 P UBLIC RELATIONS CONCENTRATION Journali s m C o r e ......................... .... . .............................. 15 Required C o u rses JRN 2700 Fundam e ntal s o f Publi c R e l atio n s ....................................... 3 JRN 37 00 Publi c Rel atio n s W riti n g ................................. .... ........ 3

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124 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES JRN 3980 Cooperative Education ..................... .......................... 3 JRN 4700 Publi c R e l ations Strategic Planning ..................................... 3 MKT 3000 Principles of Marketin g ........................ .... .................. 3 SPE 3440 Television Pr oduction ................................... .... ...... 3 SPE 3100 Bu s iness and Profe s ional Speaking ......... .......................... 3 SPE 4100 Techniques of Per s uasion .......... .............. .................. 3 Subroral ..... ...................... ............... .......... ......... 24 E l ec tive s COM 2420 Basic Corporate Vid eotape Production .......... .......... ........... 3 CO M 2430 Introduction to Technical Media .... .................................... 3 COM 2460 Pre se ntation Gr aphics ..................................... .......... 3 COM 3440 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Tel evisio n .......................... 3 JRN 3400 Fea ture Article Writing for Newspapers ................................... 3 JRN 3500 Topi cs in Journalism ........................ ....................... I JRN 3550 Print Medi a Advertising Sales ............. ........................... 3 JRN 3600 Photojournali m I ......... ......................................... 3 MKT 3110 Advertisi n g Management ...................................... ........ 3 MKT 3120 Promotional Strategy ..................................... ........... 3 SPE 1700 Communication Theory .... ................. ....................... 3 SPE 2400 Intr od u ctio n t o R adio a n d Televi sio n Bro adcasti ng ........................... 3 SPE 3130 Co nf e r ence Leadership ... ....................................... 3 S PE 3430 R adioTe l evision Announcing ....... .......................... ....... 3 SPE 3450 B roadcast Journ alism: Radio ............................. ... ......... 3 SPE 3480 Workshop in Radio Production ................. ....... ................ 3 SPE 3740 P sycho l ogy of Communication ................ .......................... 3 SPE 4450 Bro a dcast J ournali m : Television ......... ............................... 3 SPE 4480 Seminar Pr acticum in Broadcasting ................................ ...... 3 SPE 4490 Effects of R adio-Te l evision on Contemporary Life ........................... 3 Sub/olal .... ....... ........... ............................ ......... ......... 6 Toral .................. ... .............. ...... ......... ............. 45 JOURNALISM MINOR SEMESTER HOURS Journalism Core ............................................................. 15 R eq uired Course s JRN 2200 Int ermedia t e News Editing .............................. .............. 3 JRN 3500 Topics in J ournalism .............. ................................... I Subror al ........................... .... ........................... .......... 4 Electives JRN 31 00 Publication Pra cticum ............................................ ..... 3 JRN 3150 Contemporary Iss ues ................... .... ........................ 3 JRN 3400 Feature Article Writing for New s paper . .............. ... ............ 3 JRN 3600 Photojournalism I ...... ................ .... .............. ......... 3 JRN 4 1 00 Advanced R eporting ............................................... 3 JRN 4200 Principles of Newspaper and Magazine De sign .............................. 3 JRN 4400 Feature Art icle Writing for Magazine ...... ........................... 3 JRN 4600 Pho t ojournalism II ................................................. 3 Subroral ............. ................ ............ ...................... ...... 6 Toral ....................................................................... 25 P UBLIC RELATIONS MINOR SEMESTE R HOURS Journali m Core .... .................. ....................... .................. 15 Required Cour se JRN 2700 Fundame ntal s of Publi c R e l ations ....................... ................ 3 JRN 3700 Publi c Rel ations Writin g .. ..... ........................................ 3 JRN 3 9 80 Cooperative Education ..................... ...... ......... ............ 3 JRN 4700 Publi c R e lati ons Strategic Planning ............ .... .... ....... ......... 3 Subroral .............................................. ........... .......... 12 Tor a l .................................................................. 27

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' SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 125 L AND USE PRO GRAM The land use major is very broad in scope and can be used for a rumber of career objectives and grad uate sc h oo l programs. Opportunities exi t in uch areas a s plann l ng, cartography, geographic informa tion systems (GIS) air p h oto and satellite imagery interpretation, environmental and resource manage ment, trave l and transportation mining and mineral resources r sidential and indu s trial development recreational land use population analysi and a variety of other interrelated fields This program pro vides a so l id foundation for continued s tudy at the graduate level. Contact the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department for additional inform a tion Land Use Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Core S emes ter H o ur s MTH 1210 Introduction to Stati s tics. . . . . . . . ..... ... 4 GEG 1220 Map U s e ............................................... ............ 2 Choo s e one from each of the following s et s : GEG 1000 World Regional Geography ............. ........ ..................... 3 GEG 1300 Introduction to Human Geography . ...... ...... ................ ... 3 GEG 1100 Introd u ction to Physic a l Geography ........ ........... .............. 3 GEL 1010 Genera l Geo l ogy ..... .... .... .... ............ .... . .... 4 GEG 2250 Introd u ction to Geographic I nformation Sys tem s ............... ............ 3 GEG 3210 Introduction to Cartography .................................. .... ..... 4 GEG 3610 Principle s of Land U s e Plannin g ......................... ............ 3 GEL 4010 Environmental Hazard s and Plannin g .... . .... .... ..... ....... .. ... 3 GEG 4950 Internship in Geography .... ...... . ........... . . ........... 2 GEL 4950 Intern s hip in Geology ................................................. 2 Senior Experience GEG 4960 Global Environmental Ch a lleng e ....................................... 3 GEL 4960 Environmental Field Studie s ............. ......... ..................... 3 C o re T o t a l ......................................... ................ .... 23-25 C o n ce ntrati o n T o tal . ............ ......................... ............. 19-21 Land Use Maj o r T o tal .................................................. ..... 4 2-46 R E Q UIRE D CONCENT RATIO N FOR THE LAND USE MAJOR l n additio n to the required l and use core, each student must comp l ete one of the concentrations l isted below. Within the concentration, student s must complete a s et of required courses plus electives E l ec tives are chosen in consu l tation with a departmental advisor and are designed to provide an integrated and well-p l anned pattern of courses related to the tudent' s educational and career goal s URBAN LAND U SE CONCE TRATIO Requ ired Course s Sem e t e r Hour s GEG 3360 Geography of Economic Activity .... ....... .... ...... .... .... .... 3 GEG 3600 Urban Geography ........ ........ ..... . . .......... ..... 3 GEG 4610 Urban and Regional Pla nning ...... ................... .................. 3 URS 4500 Cities of the Futur e .................. ......................... ..... 3 Urban Land U s e Electives ........... ................................ ......... ... 7 Subt o tal ....... ....... . .... .... . ................................... 19 Choose a minimum of 7 semester h ours o f e l ec tive c r e dit in con s ultatio n w ith a d e partm e ntal adv i sor. G E O G RAPIDC INFORMA TIO N S YSTEMS CONCENTRA TIO Required Courses S e me ter Hours GEG 2250 Introduction t o GIS -{)r GEG 3210 Cartography ............................................. ........ 4 ( whiche v er cour s e was not tak e n a s part of the co r e) GEG 3220 Intermediate Cartograph y .... .......................... ......... ...... 3 GEG 3250 Computer Cartogr a phy ................... ...... .... ............... 3 GEG 4850 Advanced Geographi c Informati o n System ... ...... ...................... 3 CSS I 010 Introduction to Computer S c ien c e ............. . . ... .. .............. 3 Ge o graphic Inf ormatio n Sy s tem s Ele ctiv es* ....... ...... ........... .............. 6 Subt o tal .................................................... ....... .... 21 Cho ose a minimum o f 6 se m e st e r h o ur s o f e l ec tive c r e d i t in co nsultati o n w ith a d epanme ntal a d v i so r

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126 SCHOOL O F LETTERS ARTS & SCIENCES ENVIRONME T AND RESOURCES CONCENTRATIO N Required Course Sem es ter H ours GEG 1200 Introduction to Environmental Science .................................... 3 GEG 1400 World R esources .................................... ............... 3 GEG 4840 Remote Sensing ...... ...... ... ............................ ....... 3 EC O 3450 Environmental Economics ................ ........................... 3 Environment and R esources Electives* ................................................ 7 Subtotal ........... ............................. ........................... 19 *C hoos e a minimum of 7 hour s of elective c r e dit in consu ltation with a departmental advisor. GEOLOGY Co CENTRA TIO Required Course Seme ter Hours GEL 3120 Advanced Geomorpholog y ............................................. 4 GEL 3420 Soil Resource s ........................... ......................... 4 GEL 3440 E n e r gy and Mineral R esources .............. .......................... 4 GEL 4000 Enviro nmental Geology .............................................. 3 Geology Electiv es* .............................................................. 5 Sub t o t al ................................................ .... ................. 20 Note: students se l ec ting this co n centra ti o n will be required to minor in geology. Choose a minimum of 5 semester hours of e l ec tive credit, in co nsultati o n wirh a deparmumral advisor. REQUIRE D MINOR Except for the geology concentration, the field of tudy se l ected as a minor is at the option of the stu dent. Land Use Major for B ac h e lor of Scie n ce To fulfill the requir e ments for the b ac h e lor of sc ienc e with a major in land u e, a student mu t complete the requir e ments a lis t e d above under the b a che l or of a rts ; however the studen t mus t minor in o n e of the sc i e n ces, or scie n ce-o riented field s as approved by the Earth a n d Atmospheric Scienc es Department. MINOR IN GEOLOGY Required Core Seme s ter H ours GEL I 0 I 0 General Geology .................................................... 4 Any I 000-level GEL Co ur se ..................................... ........... 3-4 GEL 3050 Mineralogy and P etrology .................. ........ .... .............. 4 GEL 3060 Stratigraphy and Structure .......................................... .. 4 Additional 3000or 4000-level GEL Courses ............... ...... ..................... 8 Total ...................................................................... 23-24 MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY Required Cour e Seme s ter Hours GEG 1120 Orienteering ....... . ............... ........................... I GEG 1 220 Map U se ................................................ ....... 2 GEG 1300 Introduction to Human Geography ...................................... 3 GEG 1230 Weather and Climate -or MTR 1400 Introduction to Meteorology ............................................ 3 Subroral ........................................................ .......... 9 Structured E1ecti ve A minimum of 1 3 additional hour s must be e l ec ted in conulta tion with a department a d v i so r At l eas t one course mu s t be se l ected from eac h of the following groups to satisfy this require ment. Physical GEG 1100 GEG 1 240 GEL 1010 Introd u ction to Physical Geography ............ ......................... 3 Landforms of the United States ............ ............................ 3 General Ge ology ................... ................................ 4 R eso urc es and Environment GEG 1 200 Introduction to Environmental Scienc e ......... ..... ..................... 3 GEG 1400 World Re sources ......................................... .......... 3 GEG 3400 Water R esources ..................................................... 3 GEL 3420 Soil R esources ...................................................... 4 GEL 3440 Energy and Mineral Resources ...................... ..... ............ 4

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 127 Spatial Analysis and Planning GEG 3600 Urban Geography ........... ..... .................................. 3 GEG 3610 Prin c iple s of Land Use Planning ..... .......... ....... ..... .... ........ 3 GEG 3620 Population, Resource s and Land Use ........... ...... ................. 3 GEG 3630 Tr a n sporta tion Planning and Land Use ............... ................... 3 GEG 4620 R esi dential Land Use Pattern s ............... ...... .................... 3 Urban Studies Regional Geography GEG 1000 World Regional Geography ................................... ......... 3 GEG 2020 Geography of Colorado ............... . .......................... 3 GEG 21 00 Geography of Latin America ........................... ......... . 2 GEG 2200 Geography of the United States. . . . ............. .......... 3 GEG 3000 Historical Geography of the United States .... ............................ 3 Field study in either geography or geology ........... .......... ...................... I Subtotal ... ...... ......................... .............................. 13 Total ................ ................ .... .......................... .......... 22 MATHEMATI CAL A ND COMPUTE R S CIENCES D E P ARTMEN T The Mathe m atical and Co m puter Sciences Department offers bache l o r of arts and b ache l or of sc i ence degrees in mathematics and a bachelor of science degree in computer science. The department offers both a mathematics and computer science minor both of which complement such majors as engineer ing techno l ogy the other sciences, and economic In addition, the minor program in computer science complements the mathematics major. See Computer Science on page 107 of this Catalog. In addition to the general mathematics major the department offers a mathematics major in five con centrations encompassing a variety of significant mathematical ideas These concentrations give the s tudent background for graduate schoo l in theoretical mathematics, as well as background for both gradu ate school and employment in mathematically related fields including applied mathematics scientific computing, probability and statistics, and mathematic s education. The degree program in computer sci ence adheres to nationally recognized standards and provide student with a more technical altemati ve to the mathematics concentration in computer cience. All students who are considering a major or minor in mathematics or computer science are expected to consult with faculty for advising Major in Mathematic s for Bachelor of Ar ts or Bachelor of S cience The Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences offers coursework leading to the bachelor of art or bachelor of science degree. The student may choose either degree. A degree in mathematics is useful in a variety of profes ional fields including, among many other business economics, comp u ter science, government, education, technology, a n d science Stude nts are i n vited to consu l t with the department concerning career options. All majors in mathematics are required to complete the following basic core of courses (with a required minimum grade of "C" in each of the e cour es) The department trongly recommends that student interested i n the applied mathematics concentration take sections of calculus using Mathematica. Basic Mathematic s Core Semester Hours MTH 1410 Calculus I. .................................... ........ ........... 4 MTH 2410* Calculus ll ..... ..................................................... 4 MTH 2420* Calculus Ill ................ ................................ .... 4 MT H 3100 Introduction to Mathematical Proof ....................................... 3 Total ... .. ............. .............................. ....... . ............. 15 Some sections of this cou r se have a Marhemarica component. For mathematics majors except tho e in mathematics education, there is a one-hour project-oriented cour eat the senior level that synthe izes the material in the major Each major is also required to take a Senior Experience course and to comp l ete a minor. The following mathematics courses have been approve d as Senior Experience courses: MTH 4210, MTH 44 1 0, MTH 4480 a n d MTH 4640 The student may choo e to complete a mathematic major in one of the following concentrations: General Applied Mathematic Computer Scien ce Mathematics Education Probability and Statistics Theoretical Mathematics The requirements for each are as follows.

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128 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES GENERAL CONCE TRATION Required Courses Semester Hour s Ba s i c Core ..................................................... ..... ......... 15 One of the following thr ee co urses: CSJ 1 300 Computer S c ien ce I .............................. ................... 4 CSS 1 247 Introd u ction to Pro gramming: Visual Basic ............... ..... .......... 4 MTH 1 510 Comp ut er Pro g ramming : FORTRAN ........ ..... .................. ..... 4 MTH 4390 Mathematic s Senior Seminar .................. .... ..................... I Subtotal ...................................................................... 20 A minimum of 20 credi t hour c ho en from MTH 2 140*, or any upp er-divisio n mathem atics co ur ses. The 20 c r edit h ou r s m u s t include at least 1 8 upper -division hours a t l east one Senior Experien ce course in mathemati cs, and one of the f ollow ing seq u ences: MTH 3110 and MTH 3140* OR MTH 3210 and MTH 3220 OR MTH 3420 and MTH 3440 OR MT H 4210 and MTH 4220 OR MT H 4410 and MTH 4420 OR MTH 4480 and MTH 4490 Subtotal ............ ................... ............................... 20 Total ................. ..................................................... 40 *No c r edit i s allowed for MTH 2140 if MTH 3 14 0 is also taken. APPLIED MATHEMATICS CONCENTRATION The co n ce ntr ation in applied m a them a tic s i s de s i g n e d to meet the n eeds of the s cientifi c, technica l and com put e r-b ased eco n o m y and to pr e p are the s tudent for graduate stu dy. The department h as m ade every effort to h ave s tate-of the-art technologies a nd practi ces avai labl e for tudent u se a nd stro ngly r ecom mend s that s tudent i nt e r ested in thi conce n tration take sec tions of calculu using Mathematica. A grade of C or better i s required in each course included in the major Required Courses Sem ester H ours Bas i c C ore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 1 5 MTH 1510 Comp ut er Pro gra mming : FO RTRA N ............................ ....... 4 MT H 3140 Line ar A l gebra ............. ..... ...... .......................... 4 MTH 3210 Probabilit y and Statistics ......................................... 4 MT H 3420 D iffere ntial Equation ........................ .......... .............. 4 MTH 3440 Partial Diff erential Equations ............................... ....... 4 MT H 4480 Numerica l Analysi I ..... ............ ............ ................ 4 MT H 4490 N u merica l Ana lysi ll ................................................. 4 MT H 4590 Applied Mathemati cs Senior Seminar ................................... I Total ........................................................ ......... .... 44 It is rec ommended that s tudents take one o r more o f the following co ur ses in a ddition to the require ments: MTH 3220, MTH 3250, MTH 3470, MTH 4210, MTH 44 1 0 MTH 4420, and MTH 4450. COMPUTER SCIE CE Co CE TRA TION Thi co n centration is d esig n ed for the s tud ent who wants to co mbin e app l ied mathem atics or s t a ti stics with co mput er c i ence The r equired compute r scie n ce minor includes the core co ur ses for the co mputer scie nce major. A grade of C or better i s r equired in each course include d in the major and in the required computer sc ience min or Required Cour ses Sem ester Hour Core .................. ......... .................................. ...... 15 MT H 3140 Lin ear Algebr a ............................................. .... 4 MTH 3210 Prob abi lity and Statistics .......................................... 4 MTH 3420 Differ e nti a l Equation s ........................... ................... 4 MT H 4480 Numerica l Analy s i s I .......... ........... ............ ............ 4 Subto t al . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 6 Two of the following courses: MT H 3220 D es i g n o f Experiments ......................... .................... 4 MTH 3440 Partial Differential Equations .... ...... ............ .................. 4 MTH 4210 Probability Theory ................................................... 4 MT H 4220 Stochastic Proce ses ............................................... 4 MT H 4490 Numerical Analy is ll ................................................. 4 Sub t otal ........ ................ ...................................... .... 8

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 129 One of the following courses: MTH 4290 Senior Statistics P roject ............................................ I MTH 4390 Mathematics Sertior Serrtin ar ................ .......................... I MTH 4590 AppHed M athematics Senior Seminar ..... . ..................... I Sub t otal ............... ....... ................... ...... ................ I Total .................................................... ....... ............ 40 CoMPUTER Scm cE MI oR (REQUIRED FOR THE CoMP TER Scrn CE Co CENTRA TIO ) R eq uir ed Courses Semester H ours CSI 1300 Computer Science I ....................... .......................... 4 CSI 2300 Computer Science 2 ............................................ 4 CSI 2400 Compu t er Orgartization and As embly Language .......................... 4 CS I 3100 Di crete Mathematics ............................................. .... 4 CS I 3300 Foundation of File Snucture s . ............................... 4 One of the following cour es: CSJ 4250 Software Engineering Principles. . ............................. 4 CSI 4300 Adva n ced D ata Snuctures and Algorithm Ana l y i s ...... .................... 4 Total H ours R equired for Minor .................. . ......................... 24 MATHEMATICS EDUCATION CONCENTRATION Th e co ncentr a tion in mathematics education is for the preparation of classroom teachers of mathemat ics. Students seeking teacher licensure in mathematics must satisfy the professional education program requirements of the college for pre-service secondary mathematics teachers in addition to all of the mathematics major requir e ments. Content co mp etency must b e s h own for mathematics co ur se credit that is t e n or more years old. A grade of "C" or better i s required in all cou r ses inc lud ed in th e m a jor. Teacher education program s are currently under going review and m ay b e modified durin g 2000-2002. Stud e nt s seeki ng teacher lic e n s ure s hould r ea d the teacher licen s ur e sections of thi s Catalog pages 1 72-173, and they should stay in regular contact with their advisors. Required Course s Basic Core Semester Hours ..... 15 One of the following three cour es: CS J 1300 Computer Science I . . . . .............. 4 CSS 1247 Introdu ctio n t o Pro gramming: Visual Basic ...................... .......... 4 MTH 1510 Computer Pr ogramrrting: FORTRA .................................... 4 Subtotal ................................................... .............. .... 4 MTH 3110 Abstract Algebra I ............... .................................... 3 MTH 3140 Linear Algebra. . . . . . . . . . ........... 4 MTH 3210 Probability and Statistics .............................................. 4 MTH 3470 Introdu c tion t o Disc r ete Mathematics and Modeling .......................... 3 MTH 3650 Foundations of Geometry .............................................. 3 MTH 4600 Seminar in Problem Solving ............. ............................. I MTH 4640 History of Mathematics . ..................................... 4 Total ..... ................................. 4 1 PROFESSIONAL Eo CA TIO SEQUENCE IN SECO DARY MATHEMATICS (TO COMPLE ME T THE MATHEMATICS EDUCATIO CO CE TRATION) Students seeking teaching licensure mu s t tak e the following sy qu e nc e of co ur ses and be admitted to the tea c her ed u cation pro gra m (see page 180 ) Students should pay particu l ar attention to corequi s ite s and prerequi s it es. R equired Courses Semester H ours EDS 3110a Proce sses of Education in Multicultural Urban Secondary School ........ ..... 3 EDS 3120a Field Experiences in Multicultural Urban Secondary Schools ................... 3 EDS 3200 Educati onal P syc hology Applied to Teaching. . . . . ........ 3 EDS 32 1 ob Secondary School Curriculum and C l assroom Management .................... 3 EDS 3222b Field Experience in Mathematics Teaching Materials Consnuction, and EDS EDT MTL MTL 4290d 3610c 3620 3630b C l assroom M a n agement . . . . ........... ..... 2 Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary 71 2 ... .......... ............... 8 Introduction to Education Technology .................................... 2 Mathematics of the Secondary Curriculum .... ................. ............ 4 Teaching Secondary Mathema t ics ........................... . ... ... 3

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130 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES MTL 3638b Secondary Mathem atics Field E xperie n ce ............................... 2 MTL 4698d Secondary Mathem atics Student T eac hing ........... .......... ...... 4 RDG 3280 Teaching of Re a din g and Writing in the Content Are a ........................ 4 SED 3600 Th e Exception a l Leamer in the C l assroom .............. ........... . 3 Tota l ............................................................ .... ........ 44 a The se two courses must be tak e n co n c urr e ntly. b These four courses must be tak e n concurrently. c Although EDT 3610 is requir e d it is expected that Math e matics Edu ca tion majors will test out of this class by demonstrating the ex pe c ted outcomes. d Thes e two co ur ses must be tak en co n c urr e ntl y PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS CONCENTRATIO The co ncentrati on in probabilit y and statistics s tresses the app lication of the principle s and methods of statistics and probability in the biological phy ical, a nd social sciences and e ngin eering. This concen tration also pr e pare s the st ud ent for graduate s tudy. A grade of C or better is requir ed in all courses included in the major. Required Course Seme s ter Hours Basic Core ....................................... . ..... .... ............. 15 MTH 1510 Computer Pr ogramming: FORTRAN ....................... ..... 4 MTH 2140 Comp ut at ional Matrix Algebra ................................ . .... 2 MTH 3210 Probability and Statisti cs ...... ................. .............. 4 MTH 3220 De s i g n of Experiments ..... ............... .... ........ ............... 4 MTH 3250 Optimization Technique s I ............................................ 4 MTH 4 210 Prob a bility Theory .................................................. 4 Subto t al ............. ....... .... . ........................................ 22 One of the following two course : MTH 4 220 Stocha s tic Proce ses ..... ......................... ............ 4 MTH 42 30 Applied and Computation a l Statistics ..................................... 4 Subtotal ............................................ ................... ...... 4 MTH 4290 Senior Stati stics Proje c t ... .... ................ .... ...... ............ I T o tal ............................................ ............................ 42 MTH 3140 may b e s ubstituted for MTH 2140 THEORETICAL MATHEMATICS CONCENTRATION The concentration in theoretical mathemati cs prepare s the s tudent for further specialized st udy at the graduate lev e l a weU as being adaptab l e to po ition s in bus iness industry and government. A grade of C or better i s required in all courses included in the major Required Courses Sem es ter Hours Core ........................................ .... .... ............. .. ........ 15 MTH 2530 Introduction to Mathem a tica ........................................ ... 2 MTH 3110 Abstract Algebr a I ................. ........... ....................... 3 MTH 3140 Linear Algebra ................ ............ ...... .............. .. 4 MTH 4390 Mathematic s Senior Seminar ............... .... ........ ... ...... ...... I MTH 4410 Advanced Calculu s l. ...... ....... ............ .... ......... ....... 4 MTH 4420 Advanced Calculu s 11 ........... ........................... ......... 3 A minimum of 7 credit h o ur s chosen from a ny upp er-division mathemati cs co ur ses .............. 7 Total ...................................................... ................ 39 MINOR IN MATHEMATICS* Required Core Sem es t e r H ours MTH 1410 Calculu s I. ................... ......... ............... .... .... 4 MTH 2410 Calcul u s 11 ....... ... ...................................... 4 One of the following courses: CSI 1300 Computer Scienc e I ....................... .......................... 4 CSS 1247 Introduction to Programming : Vis ual Ba s i c ...... .... .... ....... . 4 MTH 1510 Computer Programming: FORTRAN ............... .... ............... 4 Subtotal .................... .............................................. 12

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! SCHOOL OF LETrERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 131 ELECf!VES A minim u m of 10 hours at least 7 of which must be upper-divis'on. These 10 hours may incl u de MTH 2420, any upper-division mathematics course, or any course ap roved by the Mathematical and Com puter Sciences Department. Electives ................... ....................... ... .................... 10 Total ......................................................................... 22 *Note: A major that requires a minor in mathematics ca11 specify the cqurses for such a minor and the total hours required may exceed the 22 hour total listed above. Please consu lt the li lings included with those majors. METEOROL OGY PROGRAM Meteorology is the science of the atmosphere. Modem meteorologists are involved in weather observ ing, forecasting research, and dissemination of weather information to the public. Meteorologists also study global weather and climate, and investigate the influence that human beings exert on Earth's cli mate The forecasting laboratory includes a computerized observing station, daily weather maps satel lite images, and access to the natio nal weather database The bachelor of science degree in meteorology follows American Meteoro l ogical Society recommendations for undergraduate programs. Stu d e nts should contact a meteoro l ogy faculty member to discuss degree programs, career opportunities, and graduate school options. Contact the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department for additional infor mation. Meteorolog y M ajor for Bach e lor o f S ci e nce Required Courses Semester Hours MTR 2400 Introduction of Atmospheric Science ................................... 4 MTR 2410 Weather Ob serv ing Sy s tems ............................................ 3 MTR 3400 Synoptic Meteorology ...................................... ....... 4 MTR 3430 Atmospheric Thermodynamics ................ ........................ .. 3 MTR 3440 Physical Meteorology ................... . ......................... 3 MTR 3450 Dynamic Meteorology ................. ..................... ......... 3 MTR 4400 Advanced Synoptic Meteoro l ogy ........................................ 3 MTR 4440 Climatology ........................................................ 3 MTR 4500 Mesometeorology .................................................... 3 MTR 4600 Senior Research Seminar ............... ........... ................ 3 Elective Meteorology Courses ............ . ....................................... 8 Subtotal ......................................... t ....................... 40 Required Mathematics Minor MTH 1410 Calculus I ........................................................ 4 MTH 1510 Computer Programming : FORTRAN ..................................... 4 -orCSI 1300 Computer Science l .................................................. 4 MTH 2410 Calculus II.. ... ...... .... ...... . ................... 4 MTH 2420 Calculus III ......... ............................................. 4 MTH 3210 Probability and Statistics .............................................. 4 MTH 3420 Differential Equations ................................................. 4 Subtotal ......................................... ............................. 24 Additional Course Requirements ENG I 0 lO Freshman Composition: The Essay. . ............. 3 ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research and Documentation ................ 3 PHY 2311, 2321 General Physics I and Lab ................................ ........ 5 PHY 2331, 2341 General Physics II and Lab. . . ... .......................... 5 CHE 1800 General Chemistry I ......................... . .... ..... ......... 4 Level I Communications .................... ...... ..... .......................... 3 Level II Art s and Letters ................................ .......................... 6 Level II Historical ................................ ... ....................... 3 Level II Social Science ............ .... ......................................... 6 Subtotal ............................................... ...................... 38 Approved Electives . .................. ...... ............................ 18 Toea/ ....................................................................... 120 *Students must consu lt a faculty advisor r ega rdin g General Studies requirements.

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132 S C HOOL O F L ETTE RS, ARTS & SCIENC E S MINOR IN METEOROLOGY Required Courses Seme s ter Hour s MTR 2400 Introduction to Atmospheric Science . ..................... 4 MTR 2410 Weather Ob s erving Systems ............... ......... ......... ...... 3 MTR 3400 Synoptic Meteorology ....................... .............. ....... 4 Approved Electives .................. .. ......... ............. ..... ........... 9 Total ....... ...... ....... .... ................. ............................ 20 MODERN LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT The Modern Languages Department offers major programs in Spanish and modern languages; minor programs i n French German, and Spanish; and teacher education program s in Spanish and modern lan guages. Co u rses in other foreign languages and in occupationa l or professional fields are offered in order to meet student and community needs. In addition, the department administers several ed u cation programs abroad, as well as certificate program s in bas ic French, German and Spanish studies and Spanish translation. (For a major in Spanish, see page 150 of this Catalog.) Registration for courses is in accordance with previous preparation. Consequently, students should reg ister for foreign language courses as follows: No previous st udy, or les s than one year in high school1010 ; students with one year in high school who feel their background is weak-1 010 ; one semester in college-1020; one year in college-2110 and/or 2310 for German and Spanis h a n d 2010 for Fre n ch; two years in high school-2110 and/or 2310 for German and Spanish and 2010 for French or l020, if needed; three years in high school or one and one-half years in college-2120 and/or 2320 for German and Spanish and 2020 for French ; or 2110 and/or 2310 for German and Spanish a n d 2010 for French, if needed; four years in high school or two years in college-3000-leve1 courses, or 2120 and/or 2320 for German and Spanish and 2020 for French if needed The above regulations may not be applicable if students have had no professional instruction in their chosen foreign language within the past two years Students can also test if they feel that they have insufficient preparation for the required level or are not s ure of t h at level. Elementary courses do not apply toward the major or minor requirements. Students seeking elementary and secondary credentials in French, German, or Spanish must satisfy the teacher education program of MSCD in addition to all of the major requirements They must also demonstrate sufficient mastery of the target language or languages through an appropriate proficiency exam. Mo d e rn Lang ua ges Major for Bac h e lo r o f Arts The com p osite modern language s major involves a minimum of 60 hours in any two modern lan guages. Students pur s uing a modern language major do not ne ed a minor. For the language emphasized either French German or Spanish, students must complete a minimum of 42 hours of coursework at the 2000 level or above. No more than 12 hour s may be taken at the 2000 le vel. (Students preparing for teacher licensure may include the three (3) credits of MDL 4960Teach ing Foreig n Languages in the Secondary Schools in the 42 hours if they so desire ) To complete the 60 hour requirement students mus t take at least 18 hours at the 2000 l evel or above in a second language Students are advised into intermediate and advanced classes in each language on the basis of individual background and need. The minimum 18 hours in the second language must be taken as follows: Fre n ch FRE 20 I 0 Intermediate French I ....... ..... ........ .. ........ ......... 3 FRE 2020 Intermediate French Il ........... ...... ...... ..................... .... 3 FRE 2110 French Readin g and Conver sa tion ................ ....... ......... 3 FRE 3010 Introduction to Advanced French Studies ...... ....... .......... ...... 3 French electives ( upper division ) . . . . .............. .......... ....... 6 Subtotal .... ................... .......................... .... ... .......... 18 German GER 2110 German Reading and Conversation .... ....... ..... .... ..... .... 3 GER 2120 Germ a n Civilization .... ............................... ....... .... 3 GER 2310 German Vocabulary Buildin g and Grammar ..................... ........ 3 GER 2320 German Composition and Free Writing ......... .................. .... 3 German electives ( upp e r division) ........................... ,, .......... ,, ...... 6 Subtotal ........................... ......... ....... ......... ....... ...... 1 8

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SCHOOL OF LETfERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 133 Spanish SPA 2110 Intermediate Spani s h .... ................ .......................... 3 SPA 2120 Spanish Readin g and Conversation.... . . . . . ............. 3 SPA 2310 Spanish G r a mmar an d Composition I .... .... ......... .. ... . 3 SPA 2320 Spanish Grammar and Composition [[ ............ .... .... ........... 3 Spanish electives ( upper division). . . . . . . . . ......... 6 Subtotal ....... .... ...................... ..................... ..... ......... 18 The remaining hours to complete the 60 hour required must be tak en with departmental approval. TEACHER LICE SURE Teacher education programs are currently undergoing review and may be mod ified during 2000-2002. Studen t s seeki n g teacher licens ur e s h ould r ead the teac h er lice n sure sections of thi s Catalog, pages 1 72-173, and they sho uld stay in regular contac t with thei r advisors. For students seeking teacher licensure in modern languages (French German Spanish ), the courses in one of the following co ncentration s are req u ired in addition to tbe a bove requirements FRE CH CONCENTRA TION FOR T EACHE R LICE SURE FRE FRE FRE FRE 2010 2020 2110 3010 Intermediat e French 1 .......................... .............. 3 Intermedi ate French U ............................. . ........... ... 3 Frenc h R eading and Conversation . .............................. 3 Introduction to Advanced French Studies ................ ................ 3 FRE 3110 Survey of French Literature I ........................... .... .... ..... 3 FRE 3120 Survey of French Literature 11 ..................... .......... .... . 3 FRE 3150 French Phoneti cs: Theory and Practice ................. ............... 3 FRE 3310 Advanced French Compo ition and Grammar .... ... .... ............... 3 FRE 3320 Advanced Conversation ......................................... ..... 3 FRE 3550 French His torical Perspectives ....................................... 3 FRE 3560 Contemporary Sociocultural I ssues ............................ ..... . 3 MDL 4960 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools .... .............. 3 Any 2 of the following: FRE 4520 Modem French Theater ............................................... 3 FRE 4530 The French Novel. ................ .............. ................... 3 FRE 4750 Senior Seminar in French Studies ........................................ 3 Tot al. ........................ . ...... .. .. .. 42 GERMAN Co CE TRATION FOR TEACHER LICENSURE GER 2 110 German Reading and Conversation. . . .... .................... 3 GER 2120 German Civilization ................... ......... .................... 3 GER 2310 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar ............................. ... 3 GER 2320 German Composition and Free Writing .................................. 3 GER 3150 German Phonetic :Theory and Pr actice ......... .... ............. .... 3 GER 3210 Survey of German Literat ur e 1 ............ .............................. 3 GER 3220 Survey of German Literature II .......................................... 3 GE R 3230 Contemporary German Writer s ...................................... .. .. 3 GER 3300 Advanced German Grammar ........................................... 3 GER 4200 Major German Authors. . . .......................... . ....... 3 GER 4210 Advanced Conversation: Present-day Germany. . . ........ ... 3 German Electives .............................................. ................ 6 MDL 4960 T eac hing Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools . .............. 3 Total.. . . . . . . . . . . . ..... ............. 42 SPA ISH Co CENTRATION FOR T EAC HER LICENSURE SPA 2110 SPA 2120 SPA 2310 SPA 2320 SPA 3110 SPA 3140 SPA 3 150 SPA 3200 -orIntermediate Sparti h ................................................. 3 Spanish R eading and Conversation ..................................... 3 Spanish Grammar and Compo ition I ................... .............. 3 Spanish Grammar and Composition II .................................... 3 Advanced Conversation ........................ .... . .............. 3 Advanced Composition ................................................ 3 Spanis h Phonetics: Theory and Pr actice .............. . . ........... 3 Culture and Civilization of Spain SPA 3210 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization -orSPA 3220 Folklore and Culture of the Mexi can Southwest .......... ................ 3

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134 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES SPA 3250 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spani s h ...... ........................... 3 SPA 3400 Survey of Spanish Lit era ture I -or SPA 3410 SPA 4010 SPA 4020 SPA 4110 Survey of Spanish Liter atu re II ....... .................................. 3 Advanced Spani s h Writing and Grammar I. .... ............................ 3 Advanced Spani s h Writing and Grammar II .......................... ...... 3 Contemporary Spanish Literature -or SPA 4120 Contem p o r ary Latin-American Literature ................ ................ 3 MDL 4960 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary Schools ...................... 3 Total .................................................................... 42 MINOR lN FRENCH Required Courses Semester Hour s FRE 2010 Intermediate French I ............................... .................. 3 FRE 2020 Intermediate French IT ................................................ 3 FRE 2110 French Reading and Conver ation ................................... 3 FRE 30 I 0 Introduction to Advanced French Studies ........................ ........ 3 FRE 3110 Survey of French Literature I -orFRE 3120 FRE 3550 -orSurvey of French Literature U French His torical Perspective s .................. .... .................... 3 FRE 3560 Contemporary Sociocultural I ssues ... ... ....................... ........ 3 French Ele ctives ............................................. ................... 3 Total ..................................... ................................... 21 Must be a course otthe 3000 or 4000-level. MINoR lN GERMAN Required Cour es Semester Hour s GER 2110* German Reading a nd Conversation ..................................... 3 GER 2120* German Civilization ............. .................................... 3 GER 2310* German Vocabulary Buildin g and Grammar ................................ 3 GER 2320* German Composition and Free Writing ................................... 3 Subtotal ................................................... ...... ........... 12 Se l ect I o f the following literature courses: GER 3210** Survey of German Literature I .............................. ............ 3 GER 3220* Survey of German Liter ature U ............................. ........... 3 GER 3230** Contemporary German Writers .... .................................... 3 Subtotal .... .................. ... ............. . .... ................... 3 Select 2 of the following skills cour es: GER 30 I 0 ThirdYear German Conversation ........................................ 3 GER 3300 Advanced German Grammar .................................. ....... 3 GER 3400 German for Bu sines I ................................... ............ 3 GER 3410 Translation Technique for c i entific Materials ............................. 3 Subtotal ....................................................................... 6 Total ............. .... ...................................... .............. 21 Hi g her l evel course may be substituted with departmental approval. ** Fourth -year course ma y be substituted with departmental approval CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS AVAILABLE: GERMAN TRANSLATION PROGRAM GER 3300 Advanced German Gramm ar .......................................... 3 GER 3400 German for Busines I ............................................... 3 GER 3410 Translation Techniques for Scientific Materials ..................... ..... ... 3 GER 4020 Advanced German Compo ition ...................................... 3 GER 4410 Advanced Tran s lation Te c hnique s ............................... ....... 3 For prerequisites and more information call Dr. Gudrun Clay 303-556-2909 SPANISH TRANSLATION PROGRAM SPA 3140 Advanced Compo sition ................................................ 3 SPA 3330 Spanish Social and Commercial Correspondence ............................ 2 Three courses customized t o fit the concentration area of the s tude n t ......................... 9 For prerequisites and more inform ation call Dr. Conway Olmsted, 303-556-2908.

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 135 I BASIC COMPETENCY l.N FRE CH FRE 1010 Elementary French I ..................... ....... . ................ 5 FRE l 020 Elementary French ll ...................... .............. .......... 5 FRE 20 I 0 Int erme diate French I ................................................. 3 FRE 2020 Intermediat e French ll ................................................ 3 FRE 2 I I 0 French R eading and Conver s ation .................................... 3 For more information call Dr. Ann William sGa scon or Alain D Ranwe z, 303-556 -3 011. BASIC COMPETENCY IN GERMAN GER 1010 Elementary German I ................. ...... .......................... 5 GER I 020 Elementary German ll .... ........................................... 5 GER 2110 German Reading and Conver sa tion ................................. 3 GER 2120 German Civilization ..................... ............................ 3 GER 2310 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar ....... ......... .............. 3 For more information call Dr. Gudrun Clay 303-556-2909 BASIC COMPETE CY IN SPANISH SPA 1010 Elementary Spanish I .... ........... .......... .... .............. 5 SPA 1020 Elementary Spani s h [J ........................... ....... 5 SPA 21 10 Int e rmediate Spani s h ........................ ............... ....... 3 SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conver sa tion ..... ........ .................. ..... 3 SPA 2310 Spanish Grammar and Compo s ition I .................................. ... 3 SPA 2320 Spani s h Grammar and Compo s ition 11 ..................... .............. 3 For more : nformation call Dr. Conway Olm ted, 303-556 2908. MUSIC DEPARTMENT The Metropolitan State College of Denver is an accredited ins titutional member of the National Asso ciation of School of Mu ic. The Music Department offers a bachelor of arts degree in music, a bache lor of arts degree in music education a bachelor of music degree in music performance, and a minor in music The course requirements for the bachelor of arts degree in music may be obtained from the Department of Mu ic The department also offers courses specifically designed for non music students wishing to en han ce their general understanding and enjoyment of mu ic. Musically talented s tudents from all areas of the college are encouraged to participate in the wide variety of l arge and s mall music ensembles, includin g band, orchestra choir, and chamber mu ic. The majors in music education and music performance are profe ss ional degree program s designed for tudents wi hing to prepare themselves for career as music teacher s or performers All st udents major ing in mu sic, mu ic education, or music performance must have a "C" or above in all co ur es required for the major. Students pur s uing the se major s are not required to co mplete a minor for graduation. The music education degree program prepares s tudents for careers teaching instrumental and/or choral music at levels K -12. To be admitted to this program students must pass the Music Education Entrance Examination By taking an additional 16 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree (EDU 4190 and EDS 4290), the stu dent becomes eligible for K 12 licen s ure in the State of Colorado With these addi tional 16 hour s, this degree program is approved by the Col orado State Department of Education and ha s full accreditation by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. Student seeki n g teaching credentia l s in music must pas s the Music Education Comprehensive Examination and must a l so satisfy all applicable requirement s of the teacher education and licen s ure programs in the School of Profe sional Studies. The music performance degree program prepare s st udents for further graduate study or for careers as performers or private studio teacher s. To be admitted to this program students must demonstrate the capability of developing a high level of mu i cia n s hip in performance by pa ss ing the Musi c Performance Audition upon completion of MUS 1720, Private In structio n ll. Funher information, including examination policie s, procedures, and requirements i provided in the departmental publication titled Advising [nf ormation. All music majors and minor hould familiarize themselves with thi s publication. New and transfer s tudents wishing to major or minor in music s hould be prepared to take placement examinations in the areas of music theory and music history and to perform an audition in their primary Operformance area For placement and a udition ap pointments contact the Mu s i c Department at l east two weeks prior t o the beginning of the se me s ter.

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136 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Teacher education programs are currently undergoing review and may be modified during 2000-2002. Students eeking teacher lice n sure should read the teacher lic ens ure sections of this Catalog, pages 172173 and they should stay in regular contact with their advi ors Music Education Major for Bachelor of Arts Core Requ irements for all Music Education Major s Semester Hour s MUS 1110 Music Theory I. . ............. ............ .............. . 3 MUS 1120 M u ic Theory Lab I ................. .......... . ........ ..... l MUS 1130 Music Theory II .... ........ ....... ...... .... .... ..... ........ 3 MUS 1140 Mu sic Theory Lab II .......... ..................... .... ............. l MUS 2110 Music Theory ill ............................ ........................ 3 MUS 2120 Music Theory Lab ill ... ... .... ................. .... ........... l MUS 2130 Music Theory IV .... ........................... ....... ... ........ 3 MUS 2140 Music Theory Lab IV ..... ...... ......... .......... ............. I MUS 1210 European Music Liter a ture ..... ............. ................... 3 MUS 1220 World Mus ic Literature .............. ..... .......... .. ...... ........ 3 MUS 3210 Mu sic History I .............. ...................................... 3 MUS 3220 Mu ic History II ..................................... ........ ....... 3 MUS 1710 Private Instructi o n I ( Primary Performance Area) ..... .................. 2 MUS 1720 Private Instruction II (Primary Performan ce Area) ............... .......... 2 MUS 2710 Private Instruction ill (Primary Performance Area) ................. ....... ... 2 MUS 2720 Private Instruction rv (Primary Performance Area) .................. .... 2 MUS 3710 Private Instruction V (Primary Perfom1ance Area) ....... .................... 2 MUS 3720 Private Instruction VI (Primary Performance Area) .......... ............ ... 2 MUS 161A Cla s s Voice I ......... ........................ .......... ........ I MUS 161B Class Piano I ...... .......................... .................. I MUS 162B* Clas Piano II ...... . ................... .... ...... ........... I MUS 261B Class Piano ill .. ...... ..... .... .......... .... ............. . I MUS 262B Cia s Piano IV .... .................................. .............. 1 Note: Studem s whose p rim ary perfo rman ce ar e a is pian o m ay elect anoth e r ar e a of s tud y in pla c e of cla s s piano ; h o wev er, the y still must pa ss the Piano Pr o fici e n cy Examination b e f o r e enrollin g in MUS 3520 or MUS 3530. Se l ect 1 0 hour s from the following:** MUS 2810** Ensem ble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I MUS 3810** Ense mble .............. ....... ............................. ...... I **No te: Ensembles must be chosen from thos e appropriat e t o the studem s c once ntration: choral majors must enroll in at least 8 hours of c h o ral e ns e mbl es and ins trumental maj ors must enroll ill at l e a s t 8 hours of ins trum e ntal ensembl es. Stud e nt s maj o rin g in mu s i c e ducation must e nr o ll in a11 en se mbl e dur ing e a c h se m es t e r of full time r e sid e n ce exce pt whe n s tud e nt t e a c hing MUS 3150 Ins trumental and Choral S c oring and Arr a n ging .................. ....... .. .. 3 MUS 3410 String Techniqu es and Material s ...................... ............... ... 2 MUS 3420 Guitar Techniques and Material s ................................ 2 MUS 3450 Bra s Techniques and Materi a l s .......... ........................ .... 2 MUS 3460 Percussion Technique and Materials ........... .... ................... 2 MUS 3510 Basic Conducting ............................... .... ................ 2 MUS 4330 Elementary School Mu ic Methods and Material s .... . ....... ........... 2 MUS 4390 Supervised Field Experience : MUS 4330 ..... ........ ...... ........ ... I MUS 4340 Secondary School Music Method s and Materials .... ....................... 2 MUS 4390 Supervised Field Experience: MUS 4340 .................... . ..... ..... I RDG 3280 Teaching of Reading and Writing in the Content A r eas ...... ............ 4 EDU 3 1 00 Social Foundations and Multicultural Education .......... ... .......... .... 5 EDS 3200 Educational Psycholo g y AppHed to Teaching ...... .... ..... ........... 3 SED 3600 The Exceptional Learner in the C l as s room ...................... .... .... 3 Total.... ................................. .... . ....... ........ ...... 89 ln addition to the above core requirement mu i c education majors mu t select o n e of the following emphases: CHORAL CONCENTRATION MUS 1400 Vocal Dicti on ....................................... .... ........ 3 MUS 3520 Choral Conducting and Literatur e .... ............ ........ . 3 MUS 4420 Vocal P edagogy ... .................................................. 3 Tota l . .... .... ........ .... .......... .... .... .... ...... ....... .... 9

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' SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 137 INSTRUMENTAL CONCE TRATION MUS 3430 Woodwind T ec hniqu es and Mat erials . . . . . . . .... 2 MUS 3480 Marching B a nd Techniques and M a terial s . . . . . . 2 MUS 3 5 30 Ins trumental Conducting and Lit e rature ..... .............. ........... 3 T o t a l.. ....... ........... ...... ....... J ... ... ..... .... .... 7 Music Performance Major for Bachelor of Music Core R eq uir ement for all Mus i c P erformance M ajors S e me s t e r Hour s MUS 1110 Mu sic Th eory I. . . . ........... 3 MUS 1120 Mu s ic Theor y Lab I ....... . . . ......... ....... I MUS 1130 Mu sic Theory ll ....... . ..... . ........ . .............. 3 MUS 1140 Music The ory Lab IT. . . . . . . . I MUS 2110 Music Theory ill .......... . ....... ....... ................. 3 MUS 2 1 2 0 Music Theory Lab ill............ ..... ......... ....... .. I MUS 2 1 3 0 Music Theory IV ........................ ...... ... ................... 3 MUS 2 140 Music Theory L a b TV ........................... ....... ............ I MUS 1210 European Music Liter a ture ..... . ..... ........ ............. ..... 3 MUS 1220 World Mu s i c Literature .......................................... 3 MUS 3210 Music Hi story I .... ..................... ................... ... ...... 3 MUS 3220 Music His tory IT .... . ..... . . .... .... ....... 3 MUS 1710 Private Instruction I ( Primary P erformance Area) ..... . . ............. 2 MUS 1720 Private Ins tr u ction IT ( Primary Performance Area) ...................... ... 2 MUS 2730 Performance III (Primary P erformance Area ) . ................ ..... 4 MUS 2740 Performance rv ( Primary Perf ormance Area) ............................... 4 MUS 3730 P e rformance V (Primary Performanc e Area) ............................. 4 MUS 3740 Performance VI (Primary Performance Area) ... .... . . ...... ..... 4 MUS 4730 P e rformance Vll (Primary Performan ce Area) ..... ..... ....... .... 4 MUS 4740 P erformance Vill (Primary Perf ormance Area) .... .... ........... ... ..... 4 Se l ect two hours from the following: MUS 161 A Cla ss Voice I (Seco ndary Perform a n ce Area) . . . . . . . I MUS 162A Class Voice IT ( Secondary P erformance Area) ............ ......... .... ..... I MUS 161B Cl ass Piano I ( Secondary Performance Area) ................. ............. I MUS 162 B Class Pia no U (Secondary P erformance Area).. ...................... I MUS 161K Cl ass G u itar I ( Secondary Perform ance Area ) ......... .................... I MUS 162K* Clas s Guitar ll ( Secondary P erformance Area) .............................. I MUS 171 0 Private In s tru ctio n I ( Seco nd ary P erformance Area ) .......................... 2 *Mu st b e Cla ss Piano I and II unl ess s tudent is ab l e to pas s the Pri vate I nstruct i on Auditi o n in piano. Exception : Stud e nt s e l ec tin g th e organ co nc e ntrati o n mu s t rake Cla ss Voice I and /I unl ess they are able to pas s the Pri v at e Instruction Audition in voice. Se l ect 1 2 hour s from the following : MUS 2810 ** En s emble .......................................................... I MUS 3810** En se mble ........................... .......... .................... I **Ens e mbl es must be c h osen from those appr o priat e to the stu d ent's co n ce ntration. Swde nts maj oring in music p e rforman ce mu s t enroll in an e n semble durin g eac h s eme s t e r of fulltime r esidence. MUS 3510 Ba sic Condu c ting ... . . ......... ............................. 2 MUS 4790 Senior R ecital . ..... ............... ..................... ...... I Total..................................................... ... ... 73 ln addition to the above core requirement all music perf o rmance major s mus t s elect one of the follow ing emphases : VOICE CONCENTRATION MUS 1400 Vocal Diction ...................... ........... ....... . ..... 3 MUS 4420 Vocal Pedagogy ......... . .... ............................. .... 3 Total..................... .......... ..... ........ ...... ........ ...... . 6 PIANO Co CENTRA TION MUS 3100 Counterpoint................................ ... .... . ..... 3 MUS 4410 Piano Pedagogy ...... ....... ... ....................... ............ 3 Total ....... ....... .......................................................... 6 ORGAN CoNcE TRA TION MUS 3100 Counterpoint. .... ....... . . . ............................... 3 MUS 3520 Choral Conducting and Liter a tur e .................... .................... 3 Total. . . . . . . .. .......... .... .............. . . 6

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138 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES GUITAR CONCENTRATION MUS 3100 Counterpoint. .................................. ............. .... ... 3 MUS 3150 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging ................ ............ 3 Total .... ..................................................................... 6 WOODWIND, B RASS, STRING OR P E R CUSSION CONCENTRATION MUS 3150 In str u mental and Chora l Scoring and Arranging .................. ........... 3 MUS 3530 Instrumenta l Conducting and Literature ................................. 3 Total .......... ............................................................ 6 MINOR IN MUSI C Requ ir ed Courses Seme s ter H o urs MUS Ill 0 Music Theory I. .......................................... 3 MUS 1120 Music Theory Lab I .................................................. I MUS 1130 Music Theory IT .......................................... 3 MUS 1140 Music Theory Lab IT ........................... ... ... 1 MUS 2110 Music Theory ill .... .... ............................................ 3 MUS 2120 Music Theory Lab ill ...... ......................................... I MUS 1 210 European Music Literature ............................................. 3 MUS 1220 World M u sic Literature ........................................... . 3 MUS 1 710 Private Instruction I (Primary Perform a nce Area) ................ ......... 2 MUS 1 720 Private Instruction IT ( Primary Perfonnance Area) ...... ................ 2 Upper-Division Elective in Music Theory, History Literature, or Pedagogy ................... 3 Select two hours from the following: MUS 2810 Ensemble ................... ............. .......... . .......... I MUS 2810 Ensemb l e ................ ........... .................... ........ 1 Total ......................................................................... 27 N ATIVE A ME RICAN S TUDIES MINOR This is a min or intended fo r t h ose stude nts interested i n s tudying Native Americans with specific focus in history culture politics and current i ssues of i n d i genous peoples w i thin the U n i t ed States. T h e minor provides a n opportunity for students to bring a unique multidisc i p l inary perspective t o their already cho sen area of i n terest. The minor is offered by the Political Science Department (see page 141). Required Courses Seme ster Hours NAS 1000 Introd u ction to Native American Studies .... ............................ 3 NAS 3200 Native American Politic s .. .. ................. ... ... ............... 3 (PSC 3200 ) Subtotal ..................................................................... 6 Choose three of the following courses: ANT 3310 Ethnog raph y of North American Indian s ........................ ....... 3 ANT 3610 Archaeo l ogy of North America .......................................... 3 ENG 2240 Native American Literatures ........................................... 3 HIS 3090 Native Americans in American His t ory .................................. 3 NAS 3300 Land Use, C u lture and Conflict ....... .... ...... .................... 3 ( GEGIPSC 3300) Subtotal ...................... ................................ ... . ......... 9 Choose two of the following courses: ANT 3340 Native Americans in His torical Perspective .............................. 3 ANT 3660 Ancie n t American Civi l izations .............. ...................... ..... 3 ART 3090 Art and Cultural Heritag e ............... ........................... 3 NAS 1930 History of Indigenou s /Hispanic Americans ....... ........................ 3 (HIS 1 930) NAS 2100 Women ofCo1or. .............................................. 3 (AAS/C H SIICS/WMS 2 1 00) Subto t al .............................. ................. ........... ....... .... 6 Tota l fo r minor ........ ........................................... ............ 21 In additio n t o the courses listed, there may be other classes offere d u nder the variable t opic omni bu s or in terns h i p h eading that are appropr i ate for this m in or Suc h classes m ay be substi tut ed for co u rses lis t ed above in a n y of the categories by t h e faculty membe r coordinati n g t h e minor withi n the Political Sci ence Departme nt. The same i s true for cla sses tran s ferred from other institutions

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 139 PEiaO SOPHY DEPARTMENT Philosophical que tions are of the most enduring interest becau e they are fundamental to our intellec tual and practical concerns As a critical investigation into the a1 sumptions and implications associated with ali d i sciplines, philosophy is interdiscip l inary in cbaracter. However, this type of inquiry requires technical concepts and methods, so it takes on the character of a specialized discipline. Philosophical inquiry is an interaction between speculative and critical thought recognizing no pre-established limit s in it interests or it critical examinations. Therefore philosophy a a s tudy program enlarges the tu dent s horizons of ideas throughout the variou disciplines in the coUege, while providing the critical skills necessary to analyze and synthe ize these ideas. It encourage s students to explore creatively the full range of phi l osophica l options, to cons i der alternate points of view, and to delve into profound i ues. Becau e of the subject matter, attitudes and methods employed in philosophy, the student wiU be much better prepared for leadership in personal life, civic responsibilities and pursuit of a career. In addition to offering a variety of courses for students who are planning to take only one or two cour e s in philosophy the department offer two programs, bot!> of which feature flexibility and individualized training : A major for students seeking a solid general training/background that can serve either as a basi for g r aduate tudies in such varied areas as philosophy the humanities law medicine b u sine ss, and urban planning and development or a s a basis for a career in which the s pecialized training required is provided by the employer, s uch as careers in corporate management government, pol itics, banking or education. A minor for students who have already chosen a career and s eek to complement their specialized training/background with the opportunitie s afforded by philo sophy to increase their career option s and generally to increase the quality of their lives Students who either major or minor in philosophy are encouraged to take University of Colorado at Denver courses that contribute to the requirements or the balance of their philo sophy experience These s tudents should consult the chair of the Philo sophy Department at MSCD when planning to take Uni versity of Colorado at Den v er courses Philosoph y M ajor for Bach e lor o f A r ts Required Course S e me s ter Hour s PHI 1440 Logic..... . . . . . . ...... . ....... .... 3 PHI 3000 History of Greek Philo s ophy ......... .... .......... .......... ..... 3 PHI 3020 His tory of Modem Philo s ophy .................... ......... ............ 3 PHI 4100 Senior Seminar ...... .............................. ......... . ... 3 T o tal .... .... .................. .. .. ... ............. . . ..... ........... 12 Additional Cour s e Subje c t Areas Required Lower-Divi s ion: Introductory Cour s es ...... ................ .... ...... .... . ................. 6 Upper-Division : Metaphysic s and/or Epi s temology ....... .......... .... . ......... ........... .... 3 Ethic s and/or Social Philo sophy ............................................... .... 3 One philosophic a l problem one philo s opher or one philo s ophi cal movement .................. 3 One course rel a ting philo s oph y to another field, s u c h a s religion art, science or his tory ........ 3 Total. .................... . ............................................. 18 Additional Electives at Any Level (selected in con s ultation with and a pproved b y the Philosophy Department ) ................. 6 Total .... ........ ...................................................... ... ... 36 MINOR IN PHILOSOPHY Required Course s S e me s ter Hour s PHI l 0 lO Introduction to Philo s oph y ......... ....... ... .......................... 3 PHI 1030 Ethi cs .... .......................................... .... . 3 PHI ll lO Langu a ge Logic and Per s u as ion ........... .... ..... .............. 3 Total ....................... ........... .... ................. .... ........... 9 Electives A minimum of ll additional seme ter hours of which 7 are upper-divi s ion course s in philo ophy s elected in c onsultation with and approved by the Philo s ophy Department to make a total of 20 s eme s ter hours

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140 SCH O OL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES PHYSICS D E PARTMENT The Physics D epartme nt offers coursework leading to a bache l or of science and to a bachelor of arts degree Minors in physics and theoretical physics are al o offered. Undergraduates preparing for work in ind ustry or for graduate st u dy sho uld take the bachelor of science in phy s ics. Students preparing to teach seco nd ary schoo l physic s s hould take the b ac h elor of arts in physics in addition t o sati fying the requireme nt s for licensure in science Teacher ed u cation programs are current l y und ergoing review and may be modified during 2000-2002 Students seeking teacher licensure hould read the teacher licen sure sectio n s of this Catalog pages 172-1 73, and they hould stay in regular contact with their adviso rs. The Physics D epartment is tau ght jointly by the facultie s of MSCD and the University of Colorado at Denver. MSCD students will receive in truction from the facu lt y of both in s titutio ns. The Phy s i cs D epartme nt a l so offer s co ur s es in astro n omy whi ch are designed primaril y a ge neral inter est co ur ses. Physics Major for Bachelor of Arts Requ i red Courses Seme s ter Hour PHY 2311 General Phy ics I ................... ................................ 4 PHY 2331 General Physics ll ............................................. ..... 4 PHY 2321 General Physics I Laboratory ..... ....... ............................. I PHY 2341 Genera l Phy s ics ll Laboratory . . . . . . . I PHY 2811 Modern Phy ics . ..... ............. ...... . .... ...... 3 PHY 2820 C l assica l Physic s .................... ............... .... ....... 3 PHY 3211 Analytical Mechanic s ................. ...... .............. .......... 4 PHY 3810 Quantum Mechanic s .................. ......... ........... .......... 3 Subto t al ..... ............ ...................... ................ ........... 2 3 Required Option ( Select A or B ) Optio n A: PHY 3711 PHY 4721 PHY 4920 Option B : Phy s ics Laboratory I. ... .... . . . .... . . . ... 2 Advanced Physic s ll Laboratory .......... ............ .............. 2 Phy sics Sertior Seminar . .... ... ... ...... ................... I PHY 4610 Computational Phy sics I. .... . ..... ..... ............ ............ 2 PHY 4620 Computational Phy s i c s TI ...... .......... .. ... ............... ...... 2 PHY 4920 Physics Sertior Seminar ... ...... ............. .... .... ....... ... I Subtota l . ........... ............ .... ..... ... ... .. .............. ....... 5 Electives A minimum of 10 additio n al semester hour s of upper divi s ion phy s ics cour s e s e lected in c onsu ltati on with and app r oved by the Phy sics Department. ........ .................... ... lO Total .. .. .. ... ............. ... ..... ................ .... ................ ... 38 A one-year sequ e n c e of PHY 2010 PHY 2020 PHY 2 0 3 0 P H Y 2040 may b e s ubst ituted for the PHY231 IPHY 2331-PHY 2321-PHY 2341 requirem e m s with the c o ns e nt o f th e Phy s i cs D epamne nt. Studems are urged t o tak e one y ear o f ge neral c h emi s try and o n e year of e l ec tr o nics. The s e cour s e s s lwuld be chosen in c o nsult a tion with th e stud e nt's advisor in the Phys i cs Depa111ne nt Physics Major for Bachelor of Science Req uir ed Courses Semester Hour s PHY 23 ll General Physics I ............. ........ ............................... 4 PHY 2331 Genera l Physic 11 ... .... .... ........... ........ ........... ........ 4 PHY 2321 General Physic s I Labora t ory ....... . ......................... .... I PHY 2341 General Physi c s ll Laboratory ......... .................. .............. I PHY 2811 Modern Physic s ..................... ............ .... ............ 3 PHY 2820 Class i cal Phy ics . . . . . ... ...... ............ 3 PHY 3211 Analytica l Mechanic s ...... ............ ......... .................. 4 PHY 3331 Electricity and Magnetism ................. ...... ........ ...... 4 PHY 3411 Thermal Physics. . . . . .... ........ ..... ........ 3 PHY 3711 Phy s ics Laboratory I. .... .... ............. .......................... 2 PHY 3810 Quantum Mechani cs I. ................ .......................... .... 3 PHY 4810 Atomic and Molecular Structure...... ........ ... ... . ....... 3

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 141 Required Option (Selec t A or B ) Option A: PHY 4711 PHY PHY 4721 4920 Option B : PHY 4610 PHY 4620 PHY 4920 Electives Advanced Phy ic I Laboratory ........... I ........................... 2 Advanced Physic s [J Laboratory. . . . . . . . .... 2 Physics Senior Seminar ............................................... I Computational Phy ics I ......... ............... ...................... 2 Computational Phy sics 11 ...................... . ..... .............. 2 Physic s Senior Seminar ............................. ............ ... I A minimum of 8 additional semester hour s in upper-divi sion phy sics courses mus t be se lect ed in consultation with and approved by the Phy s ics Department. ................................ 8 Total .... .... ........... .................................................... 48 A one-year sequence of PHY 2010 PHY 2020-PHY 2030-PHy 2040 ma y be substituted for the PHY 2311 PHY2331 PHY 2321PHY 2341 requir e m e nts with the co nsent of th e Physic s D e pamnent. The studem is urged to take one year of general c h e mi s t ry and one year of electronics. It is reco mmend e d that students take PHY 3 110 and PHY 3 1 20 as electives unless the swdent is also a math major. Thes e courses sho uld be chosen in cons ultati on with the s tud ent's advisor in the Phy sics Departmem. MINOR IN PHYSICS Required Course Seme ter Hour s PHY 2311 General Physi cs I ............ ............. .......... ......... 4 PHY 2331 General Ph ysic il . . ........................... ......... 4 PHY 2321 General Physics I Laboratory ........................................... I PHY 2341 General Phy sics II Laboratory .................................. ...... l PHY 2811 Modem Phy sics ..................................................... 3 PHY 2820 Classica l Physics . . . . . . . .................... 3 A minimum of 8 additional semester hours in upper -d ivision phy sics courses must be se l ected in con ult ation and approved by the Physics Department ................... .... .... ........ 8 T otal ........................... .......... ...... ............. ........ ........ 24 A one-year sequence of PHY 2010-PHY 2020-PHY 2030-PHY 2040 ma y b e substituted for the PHY 2311PHY 2331 PHY 2321PHY 2341 r e quirements with the consent of the Phys i cs D e partment. MINOR IN THEORETICAL P HYSICS Students en terin g this program are expected to have facility in using ordinary differential equations vector calc ulu s, and linear algebra. These skills are normally acquired in MTH 2420, MTH 3140 and MTH 3420 or in PHY 3110 and PHY 3 1 20. With the consent of the Physic s Department stude nt s with strong backgrounds in physics may elect not to complete PHY 2311 and PHY 2331 and may s ubstitute 8 semester credit hour of approved phy sics electives. Required Courses S e mester Hours PHY 2311 General Phy sics I . . . . . . . . . . .... 4 PHY 2331 General Phy sics il .......................... .... ........ ......... 4 PHY 3211 Analytical Mechanic s ............................... ..... .......... 4 PHY 3331 Electricity and Magneti s m . . . . . . . . . 4 PHY 3411 Th e rmal Ph ysics. . ........................... .......... 3 PHY 4610 Computational Phy sics I. ............................... .... ......... .. 2 PHY 4630 Continuum Physic . . . . . ............ 0 0 0 3 T otal. 0...... .... 0 .................... .................... 24 POLITICAL S CIENCE DEPA R TMENT The study of political scie nce is mainly the s tudy of governments: their social and economic environ ments, h ow they are organized, how and why they decide upon and carry out policies, and how nation states interact on the world scene. It also includes the study of political ideas and values, past a n d preent, citizen behavior, and recent trends in methods of research and analysis aimed at enlargi n g our know l edge of politica l processes. In this sen e, the Political Science Department provides students with the perspective and background necessary to understand the complex and often co nfusing reality of politics.

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142 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES To focus that search for und erstanding, eac h political science major will select a concentration e ith er in American p olitics or internationaJ/comparative politics. Course listings for each area are avai l a bl e in the department office The department al o houses the college's public administration pro gram and urban studie minor pr o gram. Prelaw The Political Science D e partm ent a l so offe r s prelaw advising to all s tud ents at the college regardless of a stude n t's major field of study. If yo u are thinking of applying to l aw sc hool or would like mor e informatio n on the LSAT or l aw sc h oo l please co n tact the college's prelaw ad v i so r in the d e partment. Political Science Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses Seme ter Hour s PSC 1010 American National Go vernment ......................................... 3 PSC I 020 Politi ca l Systems and Ide as. . . .............. .................. 3 PSC 2020 Conducting Political Analysi s -orPSY 2310 Introduction to Stati s tic s for Social and Beh aviora l Sciences ................... 3 PSC 3050 Political Theory ...... ... ......... .............. ....... ......... 3 P SC 4020 Specia l St u d i es (Se nior Exper i ence) ............ ....... ....... ........... 3 Sub t otal ........................................... ........................ 1 5 Electives A minim u m of 21 ad ditional seme ter hour s of political cience m u s t be completed A t least 1 8 of these 21 hour s must be upper-division cour e (3000and 4000-leve l ) an d must be approved by the depar t ment. Generally s tudents may apply only 12 hour s of c redit in nonclassroom courses t oward the major as a pprov ed electives Subtotal ......... ............................................... ... ....... ... 21 Total .......................................... ................... ......... 36 Course Distribution and A r ea Concentration Of the 21 e l ective hours in political scie n ce, 12 must be in the s tud e nt s primary area of tudy: Ameri can politics or internatio n aJ/comparative po l itics. A minimum of 3 hour mu t be drawn from the r emaining area of co n ce ntr ation and 6 hours can be se l ected at the s tudent's di c r e tion POLITICAL SCIENCE MINOR Requi r ed Courses Semest e r H ours PSC 1 010 American National Government ... ... ....... ......... ...... ........... 3 PSC I 020 Political Systems and I deas ........................................ ..... 3 PSC 3050 Political Theory ..................................................... 3 Subtotal ........................................................... .... ..... 9 Electives A minimum of 12 additio nal semester hours are required in political science cour es At le ast 9 of these 12 hours mu st be in upper-division courses (3000and 4000-level) and must be approved by the depan ment. Generally students may apply o nl y 6 hour s of credi t in nonclassroom courses toward the major as approved e l ectives. Subtotal .................... .... ....... ............................... 12 Total .. ..................... ......................................... ........ 2 1 PuBLIC ADMINlSTRA TION MINOR Publi c admini stration is the st ud y of governme nt a l organizations, their management, and how gove rn ment policies are formu l ated and carried out. The Political Science D epartment offers a mino r in pub lic adrnini tration avai l ab l e to student intere s ted in a career in government service, to stu dents pre e mpl oyed in government who wi h to increase their sk.i!Js and job status, and to students plan ning to take p ostgrad u ate work in public administration Required Courses Sem ester Hour s Basic course required for all public administration minors : PSC 1010 American National Government ......................................... 3 PSC 3020 Introduction to Publi c Administration ... ........... ....................... 3 Two of the following co ur ses: PSC 3220 Public Poli cy ......................... .............................. 3 PSC 3240 Intergovernmental R elations ........ .... ................... ........... 3 PSC 3260 Politics of Bud geting ............. .............. ........ ...... ... 3 PSC 3280 Public P e r sonnel Administratio n ........................................ 3

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 143 ACC 3200 Governmental Accounting ............................... ........... 3 One of the following cour s es : CMS 2010 Principles of Information Syst e m ............ . ....... ........... 3 MTH 1210 Introd u ction to Stati s tic s ................ ....... ..... ............ 4 Internship PSC 4120 or Substitute Course (minimum ) .......... ......................... 3 Total ...................................................................... 18-19 A governmental internship will be required of all students for a minimum of one semester and a mini mum of three semester hours This requirement may be waived for students with at least one calendar year of adrnini trative work experience in a government agency It is recommended that p u blic administratio n minors also take a course in both pub lic speaking and in technical writing. Also avai l able to students i a program of cour es leading to a recognition of completion award i n pub lic admini tration presented by the Political Science Department. Students may earn the award by suc cessfully comp l eting a selection of cour es amounting to 2 1 semester hours Contact the Politica l Sci ence Department for details Inte rnship s In addition to chedu l ed classes politica l science students are encouraged to enroll for at least o n e off campus internship Students may receive credit for practical work experience in various areas of gov ernme n t service Placement in a governmental position may be initiated by the student, Coope r ative Education, o r the Political Science Depart m ent. Interested students should contac t the Political Science Department for details Courses w ith Vari able To pics Not listed among the regular courses are a variety of topics course and self-paced courses that are offered each semester and give the student a greater variety of choice Please be sure to check the cur rent Class Sche dule foe these classes which can be repeated for credit under different title s Was hin g ton D.C Program During the s u mmer session, the departmen t offers a special program in Washington, D.C. aimed at pro viding students with a unique perspective on the nation s political s ystem The program combines on campus meeting and relevant readings with a module held in Wa hington. Please contact the depart ment abo u t this program Also the department works with students interes t ed in an internship in Was h .ing t on, D C., during s u mmer, fall, o r spring semesters. G olda Meir Cente r for Political L e ad e r s hip The Go l da Meir Center for Political Leadership i connected to the historic Golda Meir House on the Auraria campus. The center is organized and operat e d throug h the Political Science Department. T h e center's purpo e is to develop programs that examine the role of leaders and leadership at all levels of the po l itical proce s; blend together theoretical and applied politics ; and emphasize voices and per spectives that expand the bou n daries of traditional leaders hip analysis CERTIF I CATE PROGRAM AVAILABLE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION PSC 1010 America n National Governm e nt ........ ......... . .................. 3 PSC 3000 American State and Local Government. ....................... .......... 3 PSC 3020 Introduction to Public Admini s tr a tion ..... ...... ...................... 3 PSC 3260 Politics of Budgeting ........................................ ...... 3 PSC 3280 Public Per s onnel Administration .. ...... ....... .......... ..... .... 3 Elective Requirements (Choose two of the following ) PSC 3160 Readings in Political Science and Public Administration ....... ......... 1-3 PSC 3220 Public Poli c y ... ............................. .... .............. . 3 PSC 3240 Intergovernmental Relation s ...... ..... ......... . ........ ....... 3 For additional requirement s call Dr. John Regnell 303 556-3220 or Dr. Norman Provizer 303-5563157. URBAN S Tunms MINOR (see page 156 of this C atalog )

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144 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES P SYC HOLO GY DEPARTMENT P ychology Departm ent tudent outcome goals: Upon completion of a d egree program in psychology s tudents will be able to: Demonstrate a know l edge of the major his tori cal co ntribution s and themes, basic principles, c u r rent i ss u es, and e merging deve l opments in p syc h ology Co mmuni cate know l e d ge of the field of p syc h o l ogy both o r ally and in writi n g, the l a tt e r follow ing the American P sychologica l A ssoc iation g uid elines Re l a te p sychological prin ciples and methodology to the problem and issues in other discipli n es. Conduct indep ende n t l y a b as i c Literature searc h on a give n problem in p syc h o l ogy a nd integrate thi new inform a tion int o a co h erent under stan din g of the ba s ic i ss ues relati n g to this prob l em. App l y the fund ame ntal s of re earcn methodology and s tatistical analysis to the interpretatio n and eval uation of re se arch reports. Expre ss an appreciatio n for the value of psycholo g ic a l knowledge in improvi ng our world a nd for indiv i dual differ e nces and univer sa l commonalties in human experience. Th e major or minor program i s to be planned in co n s ult atio n with an a dvi s or from the P syc holog y D epartme nt b y the beginning of the junior year or upon tr a nsfer into the department. Major for Bachelor of Arts R e quired Cour e Sem es ter H ours PSY 1001 Introductory P syc holo gy ...... ..................... .................... 3 PSY 2310 Introdu ctio n to Stati tic for Social a nd Behavi o r a l Scien ces ................. 3 PSY 2320 Inf ere ntial Stati stics .................................................. 3 PSY 3310 P syc hological R esearc h Method s I .......................... . .... 3 PSY 3320 P syc hological Re earc h Method s n .. ........................ .. .. .... 3 PSY 4510 His tory and Sys t e m s of P syc hology .......... ....... ................ 3 Sub t o tal ...................... ........................... ................. 1 8 In addition s tud e nt s mus t choose one co ur se from eac h ca t egory: Social PSY PSY PSY PSY 2150 2410 3050 3470 Experimental PSY 3570 PSY 3590 PSY 4300 PSY 4310 PSY 4 390 Cross-Cu ltural P syc h o l ogy .... ...................... ............... 3 Social P sychology ............ .... .... ....... . ............... 3 P sychol ogy of Gender .... ......................................... 3 P sychol ogy of Viol e n ce and Aggr e sion .... .... ....... .... ............. 3 Cognitive P sychology ...... . ..................................... 3 Th eories of Moti vatio n ........ ................. ... ............. ...... 3 Sensation and Perc eption .................... ........... .... ........ 3 Phys iolog i cal P syc hology ........................ ....... ............... 3 P ychol ogy of L ea rnin g .......... ......... ......................... 3 Clinical!Pe r so n ali t y PSY 2160 P erso nality and Adjustment ............................................ 3 PSY 3000 Theories of P erso nality . ................. ......................... 3 PSY 3 1 00 P yc hol ogy of Counseling ................ ............................. 3 PSY 3620 Abnon n a l P syc holo gy ....... .............................. ......... 3 Deve l opme ntal PSY 2210 P syc hology of Hum a n D eve lopment. ........................ ............ 3 PSY 3250 Child P syc hol ogy ................................................... 3 PSY 3260 P sychology of Adolescence ....... .......... ........................ 3 PSY 3270 Adulthood and Agi n g ................................ ............ 3 Subtotal .............. ................................... ........... 1 2 Tota l ............... ......................................................... 30 Electives: A minimum of 15 additional se me s ter hour s in p syc hology course se lected in co n s ultation with and a ppr oved b y a P syc h ology Department advisor making a t otal of 45 hour s in p syc h o l ogy. o more than 9 of these hours may be PSY 29 50 courses, and no m o re than 6 of the e hour may be PSY 4980. Th e maximum number of hour in p syc h ology a s tud ent may count toward a b achelor of arts d egre e is 60. Subtota l .................. ..... . ............................ ........ 15 Total H ours R equired for the M ajor ............................ .................. 45

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 145 Additional R eq uir eme nt 810 I 000 Human Biolo gy for Non-Major s ........................................ 3 -or -I 8 1 0 1080 General In t rodu ctio n t o B iology... . . ....... ........... 3 8 1 0 1090 Genera l I ntrodu ctio n to B i o l ogy L abora tory. ..... ......... ...... I or equivalent This additional requirement ma y be applied toward General Studi e the minor or de gree e l ect i ves. Students co n idering a dvan ce d degrees s hould b e aware that in addition to co ur ewo rk in the areas li t ed above, grad uat e progr a ms ofte n have s p ecific undergraduate co ur se prerequi ites. R e quired or recommended co ur es depending on the graduate program, include Theorie s of Per so nality Abnormal P syc hology P syc hology of Learning Child P syc h o l ogy Phy s iolo g ical P syc holo gy, lndu stria l P syc hol ogy, Sen satio n and P e rcepti on, Co operat i ve Education in P syc h o l ogy, Teac hin g of P sycho l ogy, and Adva nced Stati tics Theref ore, stude nt s s hould consu lt with a P syc holo gy D epartment advisor to choose appropriate psychology electives. Students intere ted in the ge r ontology concentration mu t se lect a minimum of 3 0 hour s (see li t under So ciol o gy Department gerontology concen t ration ) in a ddit ion to the 30 hours of required co u r ses for the p sy cholo gy major Thi s must be done in consultation with and approved by a P syc holo g y Depart m e nt advisor. The ge ronto l ogy concentration ma y b e a pplied in lie u of the 15 e l ective hour s in the psy chology m ajor a nd the minor requirement. Student s may not co unt the same co ur e twi ce toward meet ing requirem ent in both the m ajo r and the gerontology concentration; different co ur es must be c ho en t o co mp l ete the majo r ho u rs and the gerontology h o urs. Student s de irin g seco ndary licen ure in social s tudi es s hou l d co nta c t an a d visor in the S eco ndary Edu catio n D epartme nt. The psyc holo gy co n ce ntrati o n requires PSY 1001, PSY 3260, and ix a dditi o n a l hour of elective (three upper-di visio n ); PSY 22 1 0 or PSY 2410 i s u gges t ed. (Please see page 1 8 1 of thi Catalog for r equired courses.) Teacher e du catio n pro g ram s are currently under going review and m ay be modifi ed during 2000-2002. Student s seeki n g teacher licens ure should read the teacher lice n su r e sec tion s of thi s Catalog, page s 172-173 and the y s hou l d stay in reg ular contact with their a dvi so rs. In meeting the req uir e ment s for the p syc holo gy major ( de sc ribed above), tran f e r st udents mu t take a minimum of 15 seme ter hour s of p ychology co ur sewo rk at MSCD of which a t l east 9 must be upper divi s ion credits. Transfe r s t u dent s must h ave comp l eted both se m es ter s of a two -se mester i n troductor y psyc h o l ogy co ur se fo r equivalence to exist. Thre e hour s will co unt toward the major or minor ; thr ee, as e l ect i ves to g raduate. NOTE: The P sychology D epa rtm ent does not count CLEP credit t oward th e total number of se m ester hours required for the major o r minor ; extra coursework is necessary to make up the difference. The P syc hol ogy D epartment do es not accept correspondence s tud y cou rses toward the total number of semes t er h ours required for a major or minor. H owever, both CLEP and cor r espondence st ud y cre d i t can co unt t oward th e degree. Students w h o wish to use psycholog y courses to fulfill General Studi es co llege degree requirements or an interdisciplinary major o r minor must earn additional hours to ful fill the total hours for e ith er the major or minor in ps yc hology. Th e only exce pti ons are: PSY 4510 Hi s t ory and Systems of Ps ychology, which may be used as a Senior Experience wit h out being replaced in the major o r min or; and PSY 3170 Multi c ultural Service L ea rning, which may b e u sed to meet the Multicu ltural r equ ir e m en t without b eing replaced in the major o r minor Plea se co n s ult w ith an advisor. MINOR I PSYCHOLOGY Required Cour ses Semester H o ur s PSY 1001 Intr o du ctory P syc h o l ogy . ........... ............................... 3 PSY 4510 History a nd Systems of P syc h ology ......................... .... ....... 3 In addition to th ese tw o r eq uir ed courses, s tud ents must take at l east one cour se eac h from any two of th e four categories listed on the previous page und e r : Social, Experimental, CLinical/Per so nality, and D evelopmental Subtotal ...... ............ .... ............................ ............... 6 ELECTIVE COURSES In addition to the required co u rses, s tud e nt s mus t take 12 se m ester h o urs of PSY co u r es c hosen from those lis ted under the major o r other department offerings .................. ..... . 12 Total H o ur s R eq uired for the Minor ............ ....... .......................... 24

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146 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES No more than 6 semester hours may be PSY 2950 variable topi cs cou r ses, no more than 3 semester hours may be PSY 3970 Practicum, and at least two elective in psychology (6 semester hours) taken at MSCD must be upp er-div i sion. See also the NOTE in the preceding Psychology Department section. HOLISTIC HEALTH AND WELLNESS EDUCATION MULTI-MINOR The multi-minor may be arra n ged through the Psychology Department and includes the required courses listed under the holistic health and well ness education multi-minor on page 122 of this Catalog. THE SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM Major for Bachelor of Science Social work is a professiona l practice The primary educational goal of the major i s preparation for beginning level socia l work practice in socia l agencies. In addition, the social work major provides an appropriate foundation for graduates who plan to pur ue the advanced degree in social work (M.S.W.). Contact the Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work Department for additio n a l information Statement of Program Rationale and Mission The soc ial work program at MSCD is committed to educating and training socia l work professionals in generalist social work practice so that they may provide direct and indirect services to minority and majority c li e nts. The focus of the program is on urb a n problems that often affect oppressed minorities repre sen ting people of color (African American, Hi s panic, Nat i ve American Asian American) and other diverse popul ations (women and children gays and le sbia n s, the dev elop mentally delayed a nd the aging). The pro gram is committed to helping tho se indi viduals in need and working toward changing the socia l economic and political co ntext that often fosters painful and s ocially unjust human co nd i tion s The needs of metropolitan Denver and other urban areas warrant a generalist perspective in which stu dents are a ble to identify the destructive impact of negative interactions between individuals and sys tems in their environment. Such interactions often have detrimental effects on the social functio nin g of individual s, fan1ilie s, groups, organizations, communities and larger systems. Through professional foundation courses and electives stude nt s acquire skills, know l edge, values and ethics require d for beginning social work practice Clients are see n as partn ers in the proce ss of working toward mutually agreed upon goals rooted in generalist practice Using problem-so l ving methods aimed at individual and group empowerment, the impact of historic and current negative val uations of diver se, populations at risk may s lowl y be mitigated. Goals of the Social Work Program The goals of the social work program reflect the urban mission of MSCD and the purposes of the social work profession : l. To prepare students for generalist social work practice with diverse urban populations at risk includ ing individual s, families, groups organizations, communities and larger systems. 2. To prepare students for entry level professional practice in social agencies that addre s the needs of diverse, urban populations 3 To provide students with the knowledge and s kills for unde r s tanding the dynamic nature of social problems, social policies, soc ial agencies and socia l change in the context of the urban environment as an evo l ving ecological system. 4. To provide an ethical foundation to g uid e students in beginning and continued profes si onal soc ial work practice in keeping with soc ial work values. 5 To prepare graduates to further develop their potential for life-long learning and continued professio nal growth and development. Individualized Minor Individualized minors are available in social work that will complement a variety of health care, edu cation and criminal justice majors Contact the Center for Individ ualized Learning 303-556-8342, Cen tral Classroom 106 for more information. Accreditation The social work program is accredited with the Council on Social Work Education The social work program received initial accreditation in February 1997 Students who graduate from an accredited

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' I SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 147 undergraduate social work program may apply for advanced stan d ing (where available) in social work graduate p rograms ( M S.W.). This often means that studen t s may complete their M.S.W degree in one yea r instead of two years. Required Courses Seme ster Hours lntrodu ctory soc ial work co ur ses (re quired before app l ying to tbe ocial work program): SWK 1 010 Introdu ctio n to Social Welfare and Social Work ........... ................. 3 SWK 1020 Introdu c tion to Agency Experience ...................................... l Professional foundation courses (required after students have been accepted into the social work pro g r am): SWK 3050 Human Beh avior and tbe Social Environment! ............................. 3 SWK 3060 Human Beh av i o r and tbe Social Environment II ............................. 3 SWK 3410 Genera l ist Practice I ..................................... .......... 4 SWK 3780 Social Welfare Policy ............................... .... .......... .. 3 SWK 3790 Research in Social Work ........................ . .................. 4 SWK 4010 Generalist Practice IT ............................................. 4 SWK 4250 Exploring Current Social Work I ss ues : Variable Topi cs ..................... 3 SWK 4410 Advanced Cross-Cultural Social Work I ss ue s ............................... 4 SWK 4790 Profe ss ional Field Experience I ....................................... 5 SWK 4810 Profe ss ional Field Experience II ................ ......... .... ............ 5 SWK 4850 Inte grative Seminar .................................... ........ .... 3 Subtotal .............................. ...................... ........ .... 45 Electives Nine credit hours from the following are required. Students may take tbe e courses before (witb pennission of tbe instructor) or after tbey have been accepted into tbe socia l work program SWK 2020 Social Work witb Women. . . . . . . . . . .. 3 SWK 3010 Socia l Work Services for Children and Adolescents ................. ......... 4 SWK 3020 Case Management in Social Work Practice ............. . .............. 4 SWK 3030 Socia l Work w itb tbe Aging ..... ................ . .... ............ 4 SWK 3100 Child Welfare and tbe Law ............................................. 3 SWK 3150 Social Work and Child Maltreatment ..................................... 3 SWK 3200 Social Work witb Urban Farrtilies ...... ............................... 3 SWK 3450 Mutual Aid Groups in Social Work ...................................... 3 Subtotal ................................................................... 9 Toral ...................................................................... 54 Case Management: The Social Work Program and tbe Human Services Department ha ve developed a joint program on topic s in case management and developmental di$abilitie s The purpose of tbe program i s to prepare s tudent s to perform tbe rol es and functions of a case manager. An award of completion i s granted t o individuals who complete tbe required courses. For mor e information call 303-556-4464. Liberal Arts Perspec tive Courses Social work majors are required to take tbe following courses outside tbe social work program in prepa ration for tbe major: SPE 1010 Public Speaking -orS P E 1 710 ANT 1 310 PSC 1010 PSY 1001 soc 1010 BIO 1000 -orInterpersonal Communication Introduction to Cu l tural Anthropology American National Gov errunent Introd u ctory P sycho logy Introdu ctio n to Sociology Human Biol ogy for Non-Majors BIO 2310 Human Anatomy and Physiology MTH 1 210 Introdu ction t o Statistics Many of tbe above courses will also fulfill General Studies req u irements for g raduation Multicultural Requirement Social Work major s are requi r ed to take two multicultural classes outside the social work program. Both classes mus t foc u s on one specific ethnic minority (Africa n American, Hispanic Native Amer i can, or Asian American). One mu t be upp er-division For a list of approved multicultural co urses p l ease co n tact the soc i a l wo rk program at 303-556-4464.

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148 SCHOOL OF LETTERS ARTS & SCIENCES Admiss i o n to the Soci al W o rk Program Students should declare soc ial work as their major when they enter MSCD. To complete the major, stu dents must apply to the social work program for acceptance. Students should have completed or be enrolled i n the liberal arts perspective courses and the introduc t ory social work courses when app l ying to the socia l work program. Students are accepted once a year. Applications are available February 1 and are due March I of each year Students begin t h e required professional foundation courses in the fall semes t er only. Students may not begin the professional foundation courses i n the spring semester. Life Ex p er i ence Cre d it There is no credit given for college level learning gained through life experience that may be used toward the social work major SOCIOLOGY Socio l ogy is the study of society in all of its forms, from individ u als to large orga n izations. The soci ology major emphasizes the applied aspects of the fiel d of sociology. Applied sociology is the use of sociolog ical theory and method s to analyze and so lve practica l problem s and issues that exist in the everyday social world. This mean s a student majoring in sociology will be able to apply what t h ey have learned in a variety of work-related settings or to go on to graduate'school. Contact the Sociology Anthropology and Social Work Department for additional infor m ation A major in sociology req u ires that st u dents take and pass 36 hour s in sociology, with a minim u m of a C in a ll sociology courses taken. The student major ing in soc i o l ogy will take 1 5 required h o u rs and 21 elective hours for a tota l of 36 hours i n the discipline S o ci olog y M ajor for B a c he lor o f Ar t s Required Courses Seme ster Hour s SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociology................. .................... 3 SOC 3320 Sociological Theory : Past and Pre sent ......................... . ....... 3 SOC 3590 Social Statistics ..................................................... 3 SOC 3600 Researc h in the Social Scien ces . . .... ... ...... ................. 3 SOC 4600 Advanced Research in the Social Scien ces ................ .... ...... ... 3 -Qrsoc 4710 Applied Sociology..... .. .................... ................... .. 3 T o tal. ........ ..... .................................. ........... ....... 15 ELECTIVES A minimum of 21 additional semester hours in socio l ogy is req u ired to comp l ete the major. Students may choose as electives a n y additional courses offered in socio l ogy At least 1 2 upper-division se m es ter hours i n sociology m u s t be comp l eted at MSCD by students majoring in socio l ogy. The department recommends that the student's choice of electives be made in consu lt ation with an advisor. ELECTIVES: APPLtED S OCIOLOGY The major focu s of the sociology major is applied sociology. T h e focus in applied sociology extends the applied per s pective of the departme n t that begins with the required courses i n the major A p plied courses e m phasize the practice of sociology and the application of sociology to real social i ss u es Classes in t his area emphasize practical skills, know l edge, and theories that the soc i ologist can u se out side of the academic environment. Applied socio l ogy includes fie l dwork in government, business, n on profits a n d other organizations and agencies. Cour es that are specifically desig n ed to meet these cri teria are listed below SOC 3090 Urban Sociology SOC 3160 Industry, W ork and Occupations SOC 38 I 0 Population Issues SOC 4200 Social Stratification and Inequality SOC 4210 Structure and Dynamics of Modern Organi zations SOC 4220 Society and the Environment SOC 4300 Social Change SOC 4600 Advanced Resear c h in the Soci a l Science s SOC 4710 Applied Sociology

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 149 ELECTIVES : G ENERAL SOCI OLOGY A s an alternative to the applied ociology focu the s tud e nt may choose in tead to create a program of 2 1 elective hour th a t me e t their own needs and intere s ts. Some po ible areas of concentration are li ted in the section on sociology minor below. Student s s h ou l d however fee l free to create their own li t of clas es that meet the n ecessity of taking 2 1 e le ctive hours in soc iolo gy. It i s recommend ed that the st udent build an area of co n ce ntration with the h elp of a socio log y advisor. GERONTOLOGY Co CENTRA TION Gerontol ogy d ea l s with the ca u ses and co n se qu e nces-biological p yc hologic a l and social-of aging. Drawin g from m a n y field of academic s tudy, thi s co n ce ntration prepare s the tudent for profe s ional a nd paraprofe ss ional careers in human se rvice s for the aging population To co mplete th e gero ntol ogy co ncentration a stude nt se l ec t s (in addition to the 15 hour of required co ur ses in the ociology majo r ) in co n ultation with and approved by the Sociology, Anthropology a nd Social Work Department a minimum of 45 hour s from the following lis t of courses. The gerontology conce ntration may be applied in lieu o f the 21 elective hours in the soc iolo gy major and the minor requirement. R equired Cour es Sem es ter H o ur s SOC I 040 Introdu ctio n to Social Gerontology .... . .... .... ....................... 3 SOC 3040 Contemporary I ssues in Gerontology .... ........................ 3 SOC 3090 Urban Sociology ..... ................ ............ ................ 3 SOC 3100 Death and D ying ..................... ........................ 3 SOC 3240 P ove rt y in America ........................ ...... .................... 3 SOC 3410 The Family in Transition ..................................... .... .... 3 SOC 3800 H ea lth and H ealers ......................................... ...... 3 SOC 3810 P opu l atio n I ssues . ............. .................... .............. 3 SOC 3830 Mental Disorders .................................................... 3 SOC 4700 Advanced Field Int ernship ........... .... ............... ............. 3 SWK 3030 Social W ork with the Agin g . ..... ... ................... 4 PSY 2160 P e r so n a lity and Adjustment ... .... ............ ..................... 3 PSY 2210 P yc h o l ogy of Human D eve l op m ent. .................................... 3 PSY 2270 D eath and Dying ........ ........................................... 3 P SY 3270 Ad ulthood and Aging ............................... ... ........... 3 PSY 3980 Cooperative Education : P syc h o l ogy ....................... .............. 3 HES 1050 Dynamics of H ealth . . ............................ 3 HES 2040 Introdu ction t o Nutrition ...... ......... ............................. 3 SPE 4760 Communication and the Elderly .................................... ..... 3 A minimum of 45 hours from the cou r ses lis ted above is required ...... .................. 45 MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY Required Course SOC I 010 Introdu c tion t o Sociology ................................... .......... 3 A minimum of 15 ad dition a l se me s ter hours in socio l ogy co ur ses, se l ecte d in consultation with a depart m e nt advisor is required bringing the t o tal to 1 8 emester houn; At l eas t 6 upper-di visio n hour s of the minor mu s t be completed at MSCD Areas of concentration are offered as s uggestion s for students who wi h to explore a particular ubdi cipline of socio lo gy in greater depth The cour es in eac h concentration focu on the i s ue s, theorie s, and re earch in a s p ec ific area of soc iology. SUGGESTED AREAS OF CONCENTRATION FOR A M INOR l SOCIOLOGY THE URBAN COMMUNITY R eq uired Courses Semester Hour s SOC 3090 Urban Sociology .... ..................... ......................... 3 SOC 3130 The Chicano Community ............................................. 3 SOC 3140 The Bl ack Community ........................... ................ 3 SOC 3220 R ace, Gender and Ethnic Gr oups ... ............ ........... .......... 3 SOC 3810 Population I ss ue s ........................... . ..................... 3

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150 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES SOCIAL D EVIANCE SOC 2010 Current Soci a l Issu es ............................................... 3 SOC 2 500 Devi ant Beh av ior in Society .................... ................... .... 3 SOC 3500 Criminolog y ..................... .............. ... ............. 3 SOC 3510 Juvenile Delinquen cy ...................... ........... ............. 3 SOC 3550 Sociology of Law ............. ......... ...................... ... 3 SOC 3 830 Mental Dis order s ...... . ........ ....................... .... 3 THE FAMILY SOC 3400 Childhood and Adolescent Soci alization ................................... 3 SOC 3 410 Th e Family in Tran s iti o n .............................................. 3 SOC 3440 Th e Bla c k F a mily .... ........... .......... ...................... 3 SOC 3460 S oc iology of Se x uality .... .................................... ... 3 SOC 3470 Th e Chicano Family ............. .......... ....................... 3 MEDICINE AND HEALTH SOC I 040 Introduction to Social Gerontolo gy ....................................... 3 SOC 3040 Contemporary I ss u es in Gerontology ............ ......... ......... ..... 3 SOC 3 I 00 D eath a nd Dyin g ...... ....... ........... ................ ........ 3 SOC 3800 Health and Healer s ......... .. ...................................... 3 SOC 3830 M e ntal Disorders .................... ...... ...................... 3 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION SOC 3220 R ace, Gender and Ethnic Gr oups ...................................... 3 SOC 3240 Poverty in America .......................... ......................... 3 SOC 3430 S oc iology of Gender Role s ....... .... ................................ 3 SOC 4200 S ocial Stratification and Inequ a lity ....................................... 3 SPANISH PROGRAM Spanish i part of the Modem Languages Department. For more information see page 132 of this Cat alog. Registration for cour es i s in accordance with previous preparation. Con equent 1 y st udents s hould reg ister for foreign language cour es as follows: No previous tudy or le s than one year in high c hool-1 0 10 ; st udents with one year in high schoo l who feel their background is weak-! 0 10; one semes ter in college--1020 ; one year in col:ege-21 10 and/or 2310 for German and Spanish and 2010 for French ; two years in high c hool-211 0 and/or 23 1 0 for German and Spanish and 20 I 0 for French or I 020 if needed ; three years in high school or one and one-half years in college-2120 and/or 2320 for German and Spanish and 2020 for French ; or 2 1 10 and/or 2310 for German and Spanish and 20 I 0 for French if needed; four year s in high school or two years in college--3000l evel courses or 2120 and/or 2320 for German and Spanish a nd 2020 for French if needed The above regulation s may not be applicable if s tudent s have had no profes ional instr uction in their c hosen foreign langua ge within the past two years. Stud e nt s ca n also te t if they fee l that they h ave insufficient preparation for the required l eve l or are not s ure of that level. Ele m e nt ary courses do not apply toward the major or minor requirements. Students seeking elementary and secondary credential in French German, or Spani h mu t satisfy the teacher ed ucation program of MSCD in addition to all of the major requirement They must a l so demonstrate s ufficient mastery of the target language or languages through an app r opriate proficiency exam. Teacher education program s are currently undergoing review and may be modified du.ing 20002002 Students seeking teacher licen s ure should read the teacher licensure s ections of thi s Catalog, pages 172 173, and they s h ould stay in regular contact with thei r advisors. Spanish Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Cour ses Seme ter Hour SPA 2110 Intermed i ate Spani s h .............................................. 3 SPA 2 1 20 Spani s h R eading and Conv ersa tion ... ...... ,, ................. ......... 3 SPA 2310 Sp anis h Grammar and Compo s ition I. ......... ........................... 3 SPA 2320 Sp anis h Grammar and Compo ition II ........... ......................... 3 SPA 3110 Adv a n ce d Con versatio n ......................................... 3 SPA 3140 Advanced Composition .............................. .................. 3 SPA 3150 Spani h Phon e tics: Theory and Pr actice ................................... 3

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I I I SCHOOL OF LETTERS ARTS & SCIENCES 151 SPA 3200 Culture and Civilization of Spain --{)r-SPA 3210 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization --{)[-SPA SPA SPA 3220 3250 3400 --{)rSPA 3410 SPA 3510 SPA 4010 SPA 4020 SPA 4110 --{)rFolklore and Culture of the Mexi c an Southwe t .. ... . ................... 3 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spani h ................................ 3 Survey of Spanish Literature I Survey of Spanish Literature II ................................ ..... . 3 Masterpieces of Latin American Literature ................................. 3 Advanced Spani s h Writing and Grammar I. .. ... ...... ....... ...... ....... 3 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar ll ............................... 3 Contemporary Spani s h Literature SPA 4120 Contemporary Latin American Literature .................................. 3 MDL 4960 Teaching Foreign Language s in the Secondary Schools ....................... 3 Spanish Elective s** ..................... ...... ................... ........... 3 Total *** ........ . ............ .............................................. 48 Required onl y whe n seeking a teach e r li ce nse. **Mus t be advanced courses and taken with department approval. *** Onl y 42 semeste r credit hours for Those noT seeking Teac her licensure. MINOR IN SPANISH Required Courses Semester Hour s SPA 2110 Intermedi ate Spanish ........ ......... .... .................... 3 SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conversation ..... . .... ........................ 3 SPA 2310 Spanish Grammar and Composition I ......... ........................... 3 SPA 2320 Spanish Grammar and Compo ilion IJ .................. . ......... 3 SPA 3110 Advanced Conversation .......................... . .............. 3 SPA 3200 Culture and Civilization of Spain --{) r -SPA 3210 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization -{)[-SPA 3220 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwe s t ... ..... ........ .......... 3 SPA 3250 introduction to Literary Studie in Spanish .............. . .............. 3 Total ... ........... ........................................................ 21 SPEECH COMMUNICATION DEPARTMENT Communication is one of the most important human qualities and proficiency in any one of the areas of speech communication opens up man y careers to the graduate. For instance in Broadcastingffelecommunications, a graduate might aspire to careers in radio te l evi sion, cab l e and film as talent, writer, producer director or a spec i alist in promotion, public affairs sa l es and marketing management, production engineering, advertising, public information in business industry and government. A concentration in Communication Disorders provides sound background for stude nt s pursuing careers in education vocational rehabilitation and health care. Graduates have the prerequisite coursework to pursue a master' s degree in speech-language pathology or audiology which opens doors to careers in schoo l s, ho s pitals community clinics, rehabilitation centers and private practice Graduates in Rhetoric and Public Address have achieved uccess in law industrial and organizational communication, educational administration public relations s peech writing for political figures, teach ing, public relations and theology Profe ssio nal and educational theatre occupation are open to graduates in Theatre with pecialties in stagec raft, sou nd engineering, sc riptwriting, directing and acting. Communication Theory prepare s s tudents for work as human resource speci alists employee managers, public relation s specialists, personal relationship consultants, and is an excellent preparation for gradu ate studies in socia l sc ience research program Organizational Communication prepares students for work in consulting, training and confere n ce plan ning. Thi s concentration pre ents lucrative and satisfying careers to speech communication graduates Job opportunities are available in education, government, bus iness and industry as well a private prac tice as a consultant.

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152 SCHOOL OF LETTERS ARTS & SCIENCES A concentration in Secondary Teacher Education i appropriate for tudents planning to teach peech/drama at the econdary level. A concentration in Early Childhood/Elementary Teacher Educa tion provides sound background for s tudent s eeking licen s ure in early childhood or elementary ed u ca tion Sp e ech Communication Ma jor for Bach e lor of Arts Core courses are req u ired for all concentrations. A senior experience course i required for all s tudent s in eac h concentration and will be se l ec t ed in con s u l tation with a department faculty advi or. Elective cour s es within each concentration will be s elected in consultation with an advisor approved by the Speech Communication Department. Independent study topic cour e s, and experiential education cour s es such a s practicums and internship s may be taken in ea c h of the program area s. Total minimum erne ter hour s for a major in s pee c h communication: 42. (Exception : 36 hours for majors taking Early Childhood/Elementary Teacher Education concentration eeking Licensure.) R e quired B asic C ore Course s S e m e ter Hours SPE 1010 Publi c Speakin g ..... .... .... ............................. ....... 3 THE 32 00 Or a l Interpretation .......................... ................... ... 3 SPE 3740 P s ychology o f Communi c ation .......... ............. ................ 3 T o tal ... .................................................................. 9 BROADCA TING Co CENTRA TIO Required Co urses Sem es ter Hours B as i c Cor e ....... .... ............................................. ........ 9 SPE 2 400 Introduction to R a dio and T e l ev i sion Broad cas ting .............. ......... 3 SPE 34 3 0 Radio-Televi s ion Announ cing ............................ .... ....... 3 SPE 3 440 T elev i s ion Produ ctio n ...... ...... ...... ................ ... ......... 3 SPE 3450 Bro a d c ast J ourn a H m : Radi o -orSPE 4450 Broadca s t Journ alism: Tel evis ion ...................................... 3 SPE 34 8 0 Work s hop in Radio Produ ctio n .......................................... 3 SPE 4480 Seminar Pra cticum in Broadc as tin g ...... ............. ........ ...... 3 TLC 2490 Internship i n Radio-Televi sionFilm -Ma s Communication s -orSPE 2980 C oo perative Educa tion for Spee c h Communi c ation ........... ......... 1-6 TLC 3490 Adv a n c ed Inte rns h i p in RadioT e l ev i s i o n Film -Mass C o mmuni ca tion s -orSPE 3980 Cooperative Educ a tion for Spee c h Communi ca tion .................... ... .1-15 Subt o tal ............................................. .................... 29-42 Due to intern s hip opportunitie s, orne tud ents m ay co mpl e t e m o re than 4 2 hours. Elec tive Courses S e me s ter Hours SPE 3300 Voice Science : Phonetic s and Voic e and Dic tion ............ ............. 3 SPE 3470 Evolution of Cinem atics as Art .......... ... ..... .......... ........... .. 3 SPE 4490 Eff ects of Radio T elev i s i o n o n Contemporary Life .......................... 3 T o t a l .......................... ............... ....... ..................... 4 2 COMMU ICA TIO THEOR Y CONCENTRATION Required Cour s e s Seme s ter Hour s Basi c Core ............................................. ....... .... ........ 9 SPE 1700 Communic a tion Th e ory ................................... .......... 3 SPE I 7 I 0 lnterper onal Communication .... .......................... .... . 3 SPE 21 I 0 Disc u s sion Method s ............. ............. ........................ 3 SPE 2720 o n verbal Communi ca tion ....................................... 3 Subtotal ..... .................................... ................. ....... 2 I Ele ctive Course s SPE I 730 Li ling and Int e rvi e wing Communic a tion Skill s ............... ......... 3 SPE 27 I 0 Team and Group Communi c ation ...................................... 3 SPE 27 3 0 Communication and Conffict ............... ........................... 3 SPE 30 I 0 Advanced Publi c Speakin g ......................................... 3 SPE 2770 Gender and Communication .... ........... ... .......... ............ 3 SPE 3 I 70 Interpersonal Ne g otiation . ... .............. .... . ............. 3 SPE 3 760 Cultu ral influence o n C o mmuni ca tion ................................. 3

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I SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 153 SPE 3770 F a mily Communic atio n ................ ... ...... ......... ............ 3 SPE 4100 Technique s of Per s u as i o n .................................. .......... 3 SPE 4700 Communication and the Train er .................................. ...... 3 SPE 4760 Communication and the Elderl y ............. i ........................... 3 SPE 4790 Communication Th eory Buildin g and R esearc h Methodolo gy ................... 3 Subtotal ..................................................................... 2 I T o tal r e quired for major .......................................................... 4 2 0RGANIZA TIONAL COMMUNICATION Co CENTRA TIO Required Courses Seme ster H o ur s Ba sic Core ........................................... .............. . ...... 9 SPE 1700 Com muni cation Th eory .............. ....... ...... ......... ........ 3 SPE 3100 Bu s ines s and Profe s ional Speakin g ............. .... ....... ..... .... 3 SPE 3110 Organi za tional Leadership ...... ..... ............ ... ..... . ....... 3 Subtotal ................ ................................................... I 8 Elective Cour ses SPE I 710 Interpersonal Communication ..................... ......... .......... 3 SPE I 730 Lis tening and Interviewing Communi ca tion Skill s .......................... 3 SPE 2110 Discussion Method s .. ... . ......................................... 3 SPE 2160 Organizational Communication Th eo r y ................................... 3 SPE 2710 Team and Group Communic atio n ................................. ....... 3 SPE 2720 Nonverbal Communication ................................... ... ... 3 SPE 2730 Communication and Conflict ................ ..... .......... ..... . 3 SPE 30 I 0 Advanced Publi c Speakin g ................. ................ .......... 3 SPE 3130 Conferenc e L eaders hip ............ ....... ...... ......... ............. 3 SPE 3170 Interper so nal egotiation ............................................. 3 SPE 3760 Cultura l Influ ences on Communication .................................... 3 SPE 4 I 00 Techniqu es of P ers u asio n .......................... . .... .......... 3 SPE 4160 Advanced Organi zatio n a l Communi catio n ....... ....................... 3 SPE 4700 Communica tion and the Train e r ... .. ...... . ......................... 3 SPE 4790 Communication The ory Buildin g and R e earc h Method o l ogy ................... 3 Subtotal ........... ........................................................... 24 T o tal required for maj o r ........... ..................................... . .... 42 PUBLI C ADDRESS AND R HETORIC Co CE TRATION Required Cour es Seme ste r Hours Basic Core . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......... 9 SPE 3090 Argumentation and Advocacy. . . . . ............... ........ 3 SPE 40 80 Rhetorical Criticism of Publi c Addr ess ................................ 3 SPE 4090 Classical Rhet oric . ....... ............. > 3 SPE 4100 T ec hniqu es of P e r suasio n .............................................. 3 Subt o tal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 I Elective Cour ses SPE 2110 Dis cus s ion Method s . ............................................ 3 SPE 3010 Advanced Public Speaking .................................. .... ...... 3 SPE 3050 Intercollegiate Foren s ics. . . . . . . . . . . I SPE 3080 Great American Speaker .............................................. 3 SPE 3090 Argumentation and Advocacy ....... ..................... . ....... 3 SPE 3100 Busines s and Profe ss ional Speakin g .............. ..................... 3 SPE 3160 Communica tion in Politi cs . ... ..................................... 3 SPE 4050 Advanced Int ercollegiate For en ics ................... ................... 2 SPE 4080 Rhetorical Criticism of Publi c Address ........................ ........... 3 SPE 4120 Freedom of Spe ec h ................................................... 3 Subtotal .... ........ .................................... 21 T o tal required for major ............................... ........ .... ............ 4 2 COMMUNICATIO DISORDERS CONCENTRATIO Required C o ur ses ........... ......... ............................... Seme s ter Hour s Ba sic Core .... . ................................ ..... ...................... 9 SPE 2530 Voice Scien ce : Path ology and T echnology ................................. 3 SPE 3500 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and H ea(ing Me c hanism ............ ... 3 SPE 350 I Anatomy and Phy siology of the Spe ec h and H earing M ec h anis m Lab ............ I SPE 3520 Languag e Acqui sitio n ..... .... ......................... ............ 3

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154 SCHOOL OF LETTERS ARTS & SCIENCES SPE 3540 Phonetics and Language Sample Analysis ...... ......................... 3 SPE 3580 Speech Disorders: Articulation and Stuttering ................... ............ 3 SPE 3600 Audiology I ............................................ .......... 3 SPE 3620 Aura l Rehabilitation .................................................. 3 SPE 4510 Language Disorders ........................................ ...... 3 Subto t al ..................................... ............................... 34 E l ective Courses (8 hour s required) SPE 1500 Introduction to Communication Disorder s .... ...................... ..... 3 SPE 1610 American Sign Language I ........................................... 3 SPE 1620 American Sign Language II ............................................ 3 SPE 3300 Voice Science : Phonetics and Voice and Dic tion ........................... 3 SPE 3570 Diagnostic Pr ocedure in Communication Di orders .......................... 3 SPE 3590 Classroom Intervention for Communication Disorders ........................ 3 SPE 3610 Audiology II ........................................... ............ 2 SPE 4500 Clinical Method in Communication Di orders ................... ........... 3 SPE 4550 Clinical Pra cticum and Seminar in Communication Disorders ................. 2-6 SPE 4570 Medical Aspects of Communication Disorders .............................. 2 Subtotal ...................................................................... 8 Total required for major ....................................................... 42 THEATRE CONCENT RA TIO Required Courses Semester Hours Basic Core ............................ ............................ ......... 9 ENG 1120 Introduction to Drama -or-ENG 2100 Introduction to Literary Studie s .............................. ........... 3 THE 2210 Introduction to Theatre ............................. .................. 3 THE 2220 Techniques of Acting I ......... .................. ................... 3 THE 2240 Introduction to Stagecraft ............. .... .......................... 3 THE 3220 Stage Movem ent. ............................... . . ............ 3 THE 3280 Stage Directing .......... ..................................... ... 3 Subtotal ............................................. .................... 27 Elective Courses THE 2200 Creative Dr amatics for the Classroom Teacher ...................... ...... 3 THE 2230 Techniques of Acting II ................................... ....... .... 3 THE 2990 Beginning Intern hip in Theatre ........................................ 3 THE 3230 Acting Ill: Style s of Acting ............................... ............. 3 THE 3240 Theatre lmpr ovi ation Technique s ....................................... 3 THE 3250 Introduction to Scenic Design and Theatre Lighting ..................... ..... 3 THE 4200 Reader's Theatre .................................................. 3 THE 4260 Theatre: Pr acticum I .......... ....................................... I THE 4270 Theatre : Practicum ll ................................................. 2 THE 4900 Advanced Int ern hip in Theatre ......................................... 3 ( I n addition to the courses listed above, other Theatre courses, including internships, may be used as electives after consultation with a theatre advisor.) Subtotal .............................................. ........................ 15 Total ........................................................................ 42 S ECO DARY T EACHE R EDUCATION CONCENTRATION Required Courses Semester Hours Basic Core ......................................... ........ .............. 9 SPE 2110 Discussion Methods ................................................. 3 THE 2210 Introduction t o Theatre ................................................ 3 THE 2220 Techniques of Acting l ................................ ........... 3 THE 2240 Introduction to Stagecraft ................................ ............ 3 SPE 2400 Introductio n to R adio and Television Broadca ling ......................... 3 SPE 30 I 0 Adva n ced Publi c Speaking ..................................... ....... 3 SPE 3090 Argumentation and Advocacy ................................... ........ 3 THE 3280 Stage Dire cting ..................................................... 3 SPE 3300 Voice Science : Phonetics and Voice and Diction ................ ............ 3 SPE 3590 Classroom I ntervention for Communication Disorders ........................ 3 SPE 3800 Instructional Methods for Speech Teachers and C r eative Speech ............... 3 SPE 4100 Techniques of Persuasion .............................................. 3 Total required for major ......................... ................................ 45

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 155 Students seeking secondary licensure in speech edu c ation mus t s tisfy the teacher education program requirements in addition to all of the major requirement s A minor in another academic area i s recommended Completiol'lj of cr e dit hours in Engli s h to meet NCA TE standards is advised Consult a Speech Department advisdr for inform a tion. Teacher education programs are currently undergoing review and may be modified during 2000-2002. Student seeking teacher licensure should read the teacher licensure ections of thi Catalo g page 172173, and the y s h ould stay in regular contact with their advisors. EARLY CHILDHOOD/ELEME TA R Y TEACHER EDUCATION Co CENTRATIO Required Course s Seme s ter Hour s Basic Core . . . . . . . . ....................... ... ... 9 SPE 1710 Interpersonal Communication ......................................... 3 THE 2200 Creative Dramatic for the Class room Teacher .................... ........ 3 SPE 3520 Language A c quisiti o n ................ .................. ......... 3 SPE 3770 Family Communi c ation -orSPE 4490 Effects of R a dioTelevi s ion on Cont e mporary Life ............. ............ 3 SPE 3590 Classroom Int ervention for Communication Disorder s -or-SED 4200 Langua g e Development and Learnin g Di sa bilitie s ......... ...... ........ 3 Subt o tal ...... ......................................................... .... 24 Recommended Elective Cour es ENG 20 I 0 The Natur e of Language. ....... .... ........ . ........... .... 3 THE 2220 Technique s of Acting I . . ..... ...... .................... 3 SPE 2730 Communication and Conmct .... ....... ..... ............ ............. 3 SPE 2770 Gender and Communication .. ......... ......... .... .... ............ 3 SPE 3760 Cultural Influ ences on Communi c ation ................................. 3 RDG 3140 Whole Language Integration Acro s the Curri c ulum ...................... . 2 THE 4200 Reader's Theatre ......... ................ ........ ................ 3 Subtotal ....................... .... .... . . ........................... .... 12 Total requir e d f o r major .............. ........................................ 36 Students who do not obtain aU required licensure co ursework at MSCD mus t take a n additional 6 cred its (to include a senior experience cour e) for a 42 hour major. The student i responsible for obtaining advising regarding licen sure coursework from the Department of Early Childhood Elementary and Spe cial Education. Licensure c our s ework must be s ubmitted and approved on the s tudent s g raduation agreement. Teacher education programs are currently under going review and may be modified during 2000-2002. Students eeking teacher licen ure should read the teacher licensure ections of this Catalog, pages 172 173 and they should stay in regular contact with their advisors. SPEEC H COMMUNICATION MINOR All speec h comm uni catio n minor are required to take a minimum of 24 hours including the core (SPE I 010, THE 3200, and SPE 3740 ) Hours taken beyond the core are to be determined in con s ultation with a speec h communication advisor. Telecommunications Telecommunications i one of the most beneficial intern hip program for speech communication tu dents in broadca sting. Under the auspices of the Speech Communication Department, the s tudent i s afforded t h e opportunity to gain hands-on experience through current internships in radio, television, and film, provided by indu try, government, busine s s, public, and commercial telecommunications cen ters The tudent may begin this program upon the completion of 6 hours in broadcasting telecommu nications courses at MSCD Students sho uld contact the advisor in broadcasting for details re l ative t o eligibility and placement in the telecommunications internships. Telecommunications internships are offered every semester during each of the module s as well as on a full semester basis

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156 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Urba n Studies Minor The Urba n Studie s minor i s m a n aged b y the Politi cal Science Dep artment West Classroom 1 36, 303556-3220. Minors for both the bache l or of science d egree a nd the bachelor of arts degree are available. The minor can be d esigned to provide th e stude nt w ith course experiences th at are mo s t r e l evant to the s tudent's occ up a tio nal and e ducational goals. Students, in co n su ltation with the department offering related co ur ses and the s tudent urban s tudi es faculty adv i sor, wil l deve l op indi vid ua l minors that will reflect the be t possible e l ective curriculum, and will e n s ur e that a n urb a n concentration i s maintained Req uir ed Cour e Seme s ter Hour s URS 1000 Intr od u ction to Urban S tudi es ... .... ..... .............. ... ............ 3 URS 2000 An Ins ide Look at U rb an I nstitutions ................... . ... ........ 3 CO M 2610 Intr od u ctio n to Technical Writing .......... ............... ........... ... 3 Subtotal . . ........ ..... .......................................... 9 12 add i tional s eme s ter hours are required to complete the min or. The ele ctiv e c our s es are to be elec ted in co n s u ltation with a U RS facu lty advi s or. Electives ..................... .... . ...... ............... .... .... 12 Total ... .... ............ ..................................... .... ......... 2 1 INSTITUTE FOR WOMEN'S STUDIES AND SERVICES The ln titute for Women s Studi e and Services offer a range of academic cou r ses, both interdiscipli nary and in the discipline that study the diversity of women's lives and ex p erie n ces in the U.S and elsew h e re. Stud e nt m ay e l ec t t o minor in women st udi es or may choose an i ndi v idu alized degree pro gra m major or minor. Several women s tudi es co u r es are offe red for General Studie co u r e credit or in fulfillm ent of the Multic ult ural g raduation requir e m e nt Stude nt s seeking lice n s ur e as eco ndary edu catio n teac h ers in the soc ial sciences may selec t from a number of women's st udie s courses in ful fill ing their requir ements. Also offered are coo p e r ative ed ucation int erns hip s in business, governme nt and comm unity o r ganizat ion W ome n s tudi es, valuin g a diver e curric ulum fosters the inclus i o n of materia l o n all women, m e n of color and ethni c minorit i es in co ur e througho ut the college. It identifies a nd encourage facu l ty, a dmini trativ e, and profe ss ional mentoring of women stude nt s and facilitates collaborative int e rdi sci plin ary re searc h on women. The in titute a l so provides s upp ort erv i ces for all female s tudents whether or not they e l ect women's tudies co ur ses These se r v ice s include a d vis in g, inform ation, and referral ; work hops, co n fere n ces an d eminars; a n ews l etter; r eso ur ces u c h as The Communiry R esource and Action Guide and The Schol arship Sea r c h and a s mall mul timed i a libr ary co nt ai nin g books, p e riod ica ls, manu scripts video tape s and a udio t apes, a nd new s p a per a rticle s focu sed on women s iss ues. Inf ormatio n and applicatio n mate rials for a num ber of sc hol a rship s a r e avai l ab l e thr o u gh the institute, among t h em the P ame l a Mclnt yre M arc um Scholar s hip c h olarship fro m evera l loca l br a n ches of the American A ssociation of U niver sity Women and the Executive Women International Scholarship. During the academic year, th e institute co n venes the int e rdi sciplinary Fro nt R ange Feminist Sc h o l ars Colloqu ium bringing t oge ther fac ulty g r ad uate stude nts, and ind e p e ndent c h o lar s from the metrop o l itan area to s h are researc h c ur ric ulum devel opme nt and appli ca tion s of femini t sc holar s hip The institute a l so e n gages i n coo pera tive venture s with wome n's organizations in e ducati o n business governme nt and th e comm unity, for examp l e, the Colorado Women s Age n da and the Colorado Coa liti on for Women's History. Final l y to enco ur age and recognize excellence, the in titute spon or Outstanding Women Awards annually in the pring. Wome n 's Studies Individualized Degree Program The ob j ectives of both the ind ivid ua lized m ajo r and the minor include h eig ht e n e d awareness for women them e l ves; review of the c ultu ral patt e rn that defin e women; s tud y of the his to r i cal achieveme nt s of wome n in a ll d i ciplines; and exp l oration of emergi n g n eed and opportunities for women. Em ph as i s i s on both personal a nd profe ss i onal growt h These objective are met withi n the co nt ext of the n ew sc h o l ar hip on women, inc ludin g women of co l o r ethnic minority wo men l e bians wo men with di abil iti es, and inte rnati onal wo m en

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 157 Through the Center for Individualized Learning students may construct an individualized interdiscipli nary major combining work in women's studies with work in otHer disciplines. Student s hould consult the director of the Ln titute of Women' Studies and Services and the director of the Center for Indi vid ualized Learning to initiate planning The wome n's studies degree program is appro priate for any student, particularly those w ho plan to work specifically with female populations Faculty stro ngly recommend a cooperative education intern s hip. A women's studie s degree m ay be combi ned effectively with courses in management organ izational development p syc hology, history, Engli s h education social work nur sing, human se rvices, l aw enforcement, advertising, public relation s, marketing finance, and other fie l ds appropriate to the student's interest. Students gain a sensitivity to women's i ss ue s and are thu s prepared to work with both genera l and female populations in a variety of areas. Employment opportunities for women's s tudie s tudent may be found in managing women's re so urce centers, rape crisis programs, and battered women' s s helters. Student s might also work in community counse lin g and consu lting or d eve lop workshops or specia l programming for women in business and industry. Graduate are also employed in banking and as executives in profe ss ional associations. Stu dents who plan to work in higher education, law or medicine may find a women's s tudie s degree a u se ful base for graduate or professional study. MINOR Also interdi ciplinary, the women s s tudies minor uses faculty experti se from many different depart ments. Faculty s trongly recommend a cooperative education internship A women's studies minor i appropriate for s tudents in education guidance and counseling, law enforcement human ervices business management advertis ing public relations communication, lib eral arts, and the behavioral and social scie n ces Men are welcome and e n couraged to study the c holarship that focu ses on women. They may find from such stu d y a conceptual framework that will enable them to better understand appreciate, work, and live with women. Required Courses Sem es t er Hour s WMS 1001 Introduction : Woman in Tran ition ......................... .......... ... 3 WMS 1650 W omen in United State s History ......................................... 3 WMS 3310 Women and the Law ........ .... . . .... ................ . .... 3 WMS 351 0 Feminist Theory ........ ....... .................................. 3 WMS 4750 Senior Seminar ...................................................... 3 Electi ves ...................... ............ ... ............................. 9 Total ..... ........ . ............... ................ . .... ......... 24 In addition t o the core cour es, 9 semester hour s of electives acceptable to or taught through women' s studies are required bringing the total number of erne ter hour credits for a women's tudies minor to 24. These cour es, some of which are interdisciplinary, are se lect e d in consulta tion with the women s st udie s faculty and are approved by the institute. Core cour es are supplemented each semester by top ics, c urr ent issues and clu ster courses (WMS 3420, WMS 3440 WMS 3450 WMS 3460, WMS 3670, and WMS 4250) ; in addition, students sho uld check the curren t Class Schedule for other relevant offer ings. Appropriate electives are often listed in other departments and cross-Listed with women's s tudi es. For example students may take WMS 1650 ( HIS 1650) for either women's studies credit or for credit in history. Similar offerings are available in humanities fine arts and soc ial and behavioral sciences. Students s hould check the Class Schedule each erne ter for appropriate cross-listed cour es. Students are urged to get advising early in their co ur se of st udy and to plan their programs with care, as some cou r ses are offered only once each year. CERTIFICATE PROGRAM AVAILABLE: CAREER AND P E RSONAL DEVELOPMENT WMS 234A Time Management .............................. ..... ............... I WMS 2348 Stre ss Management. .... ..................................... I WMS 234C Self-Es t eem ............................................ ........... I WMS 2340 A ss ertivene ss ............ ...... ..................... ........... I WMS 234F Sex Hara ment!Discrimination ....................................... I WMS 2340 Career Evaluation Workshop ................................... ...... I WMS/SPE 2770 Gender and Communication .............. .... ....................... 3 For more information cal l Ms. Barb Omdahl, 303-741-6394

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The School of Professional Studies Provides students with the knowledge, skill, and performance competencies needed to successfully enter a chosen profession. 159

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160 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES School of Professional Studies The School of P rofess ion a l Studi e s offers various d egree and lice n sure program th at prepare tud e nt for success in specific careers whi l e providing a broad ed u cationa l background for career an d life enhancement. The academic programs comprise three area of study : teacher e du cation tec hnolo gy, a nd public service professions. The sc h ool include s 10 academic d e partm e nt s a nd variou a dmini stra tive units. Th e r e are m ore t h an 250 fulla nd part tim e faculty administrator a nd s upp ort personne l in the School of Profes ional Studie who are committed to helping tu dent attain their career goal s PROGRAMS: Public Service Professions Criminal Ju tice and Crimino l ogy ...... .............................. page 170 H ealth P rofe ions ........... ... .... .................. ........... page 189 H o pitality Meeting and Travel Administr a tion ................... ..... page 191 Hum an Performance Sport and Leisure Studie ........... ...... ........ page J 96 Hum an Services ..... .......... . .............. .............. page 204 Center for Addiction Studie s Cente r for High Ri sk Youth Center f or Nonprofit Organization Administrat i o n Teacher Education Early Childhood Elementary a nd Specia l Ed u cation ...................... page 1 75 Child Devel opment Center (for in formatio n call 303 556 6228) Reading . ......... ............. .............. .... .... ..... page 218 Sec ondary Ed u cation ..... ....... .... . ....... .... . ..... page 180 Clinic a l Services (for infor m ation ca ll 303-556-2652) T eacher for Colorado ( for information call 303-556 5352 ) Technology Aviation Management and Av iati on Technology ........ ...... ........... page 162 Civil Engineeri n g Technology .......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 page 169 Surveying a nd Mapping . .... 0 0 0 page 219 Electrical E n g ineerin g Technology ........... .... ...... . 0 0 0 0 page 1 85 Indu strial a nd Techn ical Studies .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 page 209 M echanical Engin eering Techn o l ogy 0 0 0 0 0 page 2 1 4 Technical Comm un jcation .............. ........... ........ ........ page 22 1 AEROSPACE SCIENCE DEPARTMENT Colorado i s o n e of the nation s important aero pace center Military ins tallati o ns, major aero p ace indu tries in creased interest in private and corporate flying an d the air l ine that serve Denver provide many employment opportunitie The local Federal Aviation Admini tration (FAA ) and other gove rn ment office are excelle nt ource of informatio n Becau e of this pr oximity tudents have the op por tunity to v i it the e fac iliti es and to take courses that are taught by personnel fro m th e vario u s organi zation The bachelor degree programs de cribed below have been carefu ll y planned to meet the need s of the s tudent and the industry All of the technical co ur es have been developed i n cooperatio n with th e FAA and pr o pective e mpl oyers Students w h o h ave comp l e t e d these co ur es ar e e l ig ibl e t o tak e a variety of FAA examinatio n s l eading t o certification. The avia tion management degree program prepare s graduates to e nter admini trative po itio n s w ithin the vario u s segments of the aviation indu try The program is accredited by the Council of Aviation Accreditat ion Airframe a nd powerplant (A&P) cour e are not offered b y MSCD. H owever tudent s holding a valid FAA airfra m e and powerp lant certificate from a recognized Part 147 school may apply for 25 h ours of credit toward a bachelor of science degree provided that c erta in validation paper s are presented with the application and a co mpr e h en ive exam is passed. The department include the World Indoor Airport (WIA) a unique flight simulation l aboratory The WIA i s a n int egrated flight and air traffic contro l s imulator lab with fixed ba e o p e r ator and flight ser vice sta tion se r vices avai l able A crew r eso ur ce management Jab a nd stu d e nt co mput er tutorial lab mak e up the other compone nt s of the WIA.

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I SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 161 Bachelor o f S cien ce in Aer o s pac e Sci e nc e The Aerospace Science Department offers baccalaureate degree programs with majors in the following areas : Av iati on Managemen t (AMG) General Aviation/ Air Carrier Concentration (AMG5) Airway Science Management Concentration (AMG2) Airway S cie nce Maintenance Management Concentration ( AMG4 ) MiNORS A vi t i o n Technol ogy (A TV) Air Carrier/General Aviation Concentration (A TV I) Aircraft Systems Management Concentration (ATV2) Airframe and Powerplant Me chanics ( APL) Pri va te Pil ot ( PRP ) Aviation Management (AMG) Aviation Technology (ATV) These programs combine a thorough practical, and technical training background with a general col lege education to prepare the graduate for a wide variety of careers in the aerospace indu try. The e four-year bache l or degree programs have been developed in the two-plu -two concept (a bache l or of science degree program built upon an associate of applied science two-year degree). This concept makes it easy for a commu n ity/junior college graduate in an aerospace program to transfer to MSCD and earn a bachelor of science degree in the college aviation program. In order to be awarded the bach elor of science degree, the student must meet the college's general requirements for the bache lor's degree listed in this Catalog under Requirements for All Bachelor' D egrees. FAA A ppro v ed Ground S chool MSCD's Aerospace Science Department is a fully certified and FAA-approved ground chool for the private, instrument commercial and flight and ground in tructor FAA certificates and rating Veterans Admini tration flight students s hould ee the Aerospace Science Department chair for information on approved flight training program s F light C our ses Flight training is arranged by the student. Students must receive perm is ion from the Aerospace Sc i ence Department before enrolling in flight courses. The cost of flight training is in addition to regular tuition and college se rvices fees. This cost varies depending upon how frequently the student is able to fly dur ing the semester and how much time i s required to become proficient. The college instructor helps the student achieve an understanding of the relationship of flight theory to flight practice in order to acquire the know l edge required to meet FAA certification standards. Students receiving Financial Aid assistance who are taking flight training for credit mu t make arrange ments with the flight training schools contracted by The Metropolitan State College of Denver. Students not receiving Financial Aid assistance can obtain their FAA flight certificates from any approved FAA training program and submit the certificates in order to graduate. Because MSCD does not currently have contracts with V A-approved flight schools, s tudents receiving VA benefits cannot receive any academic credit for the flight training courses. C redi t b y Ex amination Pro ce dur es The basic provision for obtaining credit-by-examination (a maximum of 30 semester hour s of credit) is outlined in this Catalog under Academic Information. The following procedures are established by the Aerospace Science Department to implement this provision: Students entering MSCD for the first time must apply for credit by examination during the fir t three week of the first semester. All examinations must be completed within the first eme ter. Students will not be approved to take an examination for a course with a lower number than any course they have taken previou sly. Students who are registered for but have not completed a higher-numbered course must comp l ete the examination for the lower-numbered course within the first three weeks of the semester. Examinations will not be graded during the summer session. Cour es authorized for credit by examination and the appropriate FAA license or rating follow:

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162 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES FAA Cou rs e Cert i ficate Titl e Require d Sem este r Hours AES 1100 Aviatio n F undamenta l s P rivate ......... .............. ... ... 6 AES 1800 Commerciallln s trument Ground Commercia l/In strument ................. 6 AES 3000 Aircraft S ystems and Propul s ion Flight Engineer ....................... 3 AES 3530 Aerody n amics Flig h t E n gineer .................. ... 3 AES 4040 Aircraf t P erformance Flight Engin eer .................... .... 3 AES 4500 Fl i g ht Multi-Engi n e Mul ti-Engine .................... .... I AES 4510 Flight I n struc t or Flight Instruc t o r .................... ... I AES 4520 Flight Instructo r -I n trum ent Flight I nstruc t o r ........................ I AES 4530 Flight instructor-Multi-Engi n e Flight I nstr u c t or Multi ............ ....... 1 AES 4550 Flight H e l icopter H elicopte r ............................. I AES 4570 Airline Tran port P i l ot ATP Ratin g . . . .......... 1 AES 4580 Turboje t F l igh t E n gineer Flight Engi neer ........................ 4 Ba c helor o f Science D egree in Aer o s pa ce Scie nc e S t ud ents s e eki n g a b ac h e lor of scie n ce degree w ith a m ajor i n ae r os p ace cie n ce h ave five o ption thr ee in av i a tio n m anage m e nt (AMG ) a n d two in av i atio n t echno l ogy (ATY ). All mus t c ompl e t e t h e 3 4 h our s o f G e n e ral Stud ie s p ec i f i e d b y the Aeros p ace S cie n ce D e partme nt. The Aer os p ace S cie n ce D e par t m e nt H andboo k available in the A u rar i a B ook Ce n ter, li t tbe re quir e d G e n e ral Stud i e s co ur se and a s u g ges t ed c our se eq u ence for eac h m a j or. I f your m a j o r i s in Ae r os p ace S cie n ce, yo u mus t rec eiv e a t l e as t a g r a d e of C in all A E S pro g ram c our es Th e pr ogra m r e quirem e nt s for eac h m a jor fo llow : Ge ner a l Studies Requ i r e d Co ur ses S e m este r H o ur s Leve l I Composition : ENG 1 010 and ENG 1020 ........................... ..... ............ .. 6 Mathe m atic : MTH 1110 or l'ytTH 131 0 or MTH 1 400 or MTH 1 4 1 0 ....................... 4 Communications: S P E 1 010 ................. ....................................... 3 Leve l II His t orical : Approved E l ective ............... ........................... ............. 3 Arts & Letters : Approved E l ectives ................................................ 6 Socia l Sciences : ECO 20 1 0 and ECO 2020 .............................. . ........... 6 Natural Sci ences: PHY J 250 ............................ ... ................ .... 6 Gen e r a l Studies Tota l .......................... . .... ........................ 34 Aviation Ma na ge m ent (AMG ) G e n e r a l Aviation/Air Carrier Concentration (AMOS) ................................. 88 Airway Science Manage m ent Con centration (AMG2) ................................... 86 Airway Scie n ce Maintenance Management Conce n tration (AMG4) ........... ............ 88 (includes 25 se mest e r h ours for A&P certifica te) Avia tion Techno lo gy (ATV) Air C arrier/General Avi ation Conce n tration (ATV I)* ............................ ... .. 86 (inclu des n o n -AES m i n o r or 1 8 h o u rs of AES approved e l ectives) Airc r aft Sys t ems Ma n age m ent Concentratio n (ATV2)** .............................. . 87 A TV I majors must have an FAA commercial pi l ot certificate wit h an instrument rat i ng and the FAA adva n ce d ground ins t r u c tor ce r tifica t e or ce rt ified flight ins t ructo r certificate to rece ive t he bachelo r of sci ence d egree. ATV2 majors must h ave an FAA co m mer c ial pilot ce rtifi c ate w ith instrumem and mu l t i-eng i ne r at in gs a nd the FAA certified fli ght instructor and in s trument flight i n structor ce r tificates to receive t h e bachelo r of sc i e n ce deg r ee. Avi a tion M anag e ment (AMG) M ajor for Bachelor o f S cienc e GENERAL AVIATION/AIR CARRIER MANAGEME T CONCENTRATION (AV1-AMG5) Re quir e d Co u rses S e m ester H o ur s AE S 1 1 00 Avi atio n Fundamenta l s ......................... ..... .............. 6 AES 1 400 Avi atio n W eat h e r .......................................... ........ 3 AES 2220 F l ight Dis p a t cher/Load Planning ............... ....................... ... 3 AES 3220 Aviatio n Law and Risk M a nagem ent ...... ........... .............. 3 AES 3230 A i rline Manage m ent ..................................... ............ 3 AES 3240 Air l ine Plann ing ..................................................... 3 AES 3850 Human Factor and Phy i o logy of F light ................................. 3 AES 4200 A irpor t P lanning .............................................. ....... 3 AES 4210 Airport M anagement. ......................................... .... 3

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 163 AES 4 230 Ge neral a nd Business Av i atio n O pe r atio n s .............................. 3 AES 4240 A ir Cargo ................. ......... .............................. 3 AE S 48 7 0 Av i atio n S afety Pr ogram M a n age m ent . . . . . ........ 3 AES 49 1 0 Av i atio n M a n age m e nt Proble m s and J ob Targeti n g . . . . ........ 3 COM 4790 S enio r S eminar i n T ec hni cal Co m municatio n s .............................. 3 Subt olal ............................... ............ ....... ................... 45 Additio n al R eq u ired C ourses PSY 1 00 1 intr od u ctio n t o P syc h o l ogy ................. .............. ............ 3 MTH 1 2 1 0 i ntrod u ctio n t o S tatis t ics ................... 1 ........................ 4 C OM 2610 I ntrod u ction to Technical W riti n g o r S PE 3 1 00 Bu siness and P rofessio n a l S peaki n g ...... ... ...................... 3 Subt ota l . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 1 0 Plu s a minim u m of 6 semes t e r h o urs of a ppr oved AE S courses ............................. 6 Ge n e ral Studi es for all AES m ajors ................................. . ............ 34 XXX E l ec tiv es* ...................................... .................. 9 Mino r i n the Sc h oo l of Business or ap p roved b usin ess elect i ves ............................ 1 8 Tot a l............................. ..... . .............. ..... ..... 1 22 *Nine se m es t e r h o u rs of e l ec t ives (approve d by th e AES d eparTme nt ) inCludin g a n a p p r ove d CM S co ur se (if n o o r h e r C M S co ur ses are in r h e p r ogram o r if co m pu T e r profic i e n cy is no r de m o n stra Ted to the C M S d epar t men t ) AIRWA Y S CIE CE MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION (AV2-AMG2) R e quired Cou rses S e m es t e r Hou r s AE S I I 00 Av i atio n F und amenta l s ................................................ 6 AE S 3220 Av i atio n Law a n d Risk M a n ageme n t ..... ................ ........ . 3 AES 3230 A irlin e M anagement. . . . . . ..... ...... ......... 3 AE S 3240 Airline Pla nnin g .................................... ............ ..... 3 AE S 3850 H uman F ac t o r s and Physi o l ogy of Flight ................................. 3 AES 4200 Airpo rt Plan n ing ........ ............... ........................... 3 AES 4210 A i rport M a n agement.. ........ . . . . . ....... . . 3 AES 4230 Ge n e ral and Business A v i atio n O pera tion s ....... .......................... 3 AES 4240 Air C argo .......................................................... 3 AES 4870 Aviatio n Safe t y P rogram M anagement .................................... 3 AES 49 1 0 Aviatio n M anage m ent Pr oble m s and J ob Tar ge tin g ........... . . ..... 3 COM 4 790 Sen i o r S eminar in T echnica l Co mmun icatio n s .... . ..... . . .... 3 Sub r ota / ........................................................ .............. 39 Plu s a m inim u m of 9 se m es t e r h ours of approved AES co ur se ... ...... ....... ........ 9 Ge n e r a l Sturli es f o r all AES M a j o r s . . ... . .... 34 Additi o n a l R eq uire d Co ur ses (6 h o ur s minimum ) PS Y I 00 I lntrodu ction to P syc h o l ogy . . .......... ........... 3 MTH 1 2 1 0 ln tro d u c tion t o S t atis t ics . . ........... ................. 4 MT H 1320 Cal c ulu s f o r the M a n age ment and S oc i a l Sc i e n ces* ............ .. ............ 3 C OM 26 1 0 i ntr oductio n to T echnica l Writin g -or SPE 3 1 00 Business and P rofess i o n a l Speaking ...... . ..... ........ .......... 3 Sub to t al . . . . . . . ................................... 1 3 Man ag em ent MGT 3000 Prin ciple of M anagement .................. ....... ...... .... ..... 3 MGT 3 5 30 Hum a n R es our ce M a n age m e nt ... ...................................... 3 MGT 4000 M anage m ent De cisio n A n alys i s .......... ..... ..... ..................... 3 MGT 4530 O r ganizational B ehavio r. . . . ............................ 3 MGT 4610 La b o r/Empl oyee R elatio n ........................................... 3 MGT E l ective (3000/ 4 000l eve l). . . . . ........... 3 S u b t otal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8 C o mput er informatio n S ys t ems C MS 20 I 0 P rin ciples of lnfom1a tion Sys t ems .................................... 3 C MS 3270 Micro B ase d S o f tware ..................... ............ ...... ........ 3 CMS A p proved Elective (CMS 2110, CM S 3060, CMS 3230) .............................. 3 S u b r otal . . . . . . . . ............. . .......... 9 T o t a l H ours R eq ui re d . . . . . . . . . . ....... 1 22 *No te: Pr e r eq ui s i te for MTH 1320 is MTH 1 3 1 0 o r MTH 1110 or MTH 1400; M T H 1 4 1 0 may be s u bs titut e dforMTH 1320.

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164 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Avi ation M anagement (AM G ) M ajor for Ba c helor of Scie nc e AIRWAY Scm CE MAINTE A CE MANAGEME T Co CE TRATI O (AV4-AMG4)* *This is an approved FAA airwa y science concemra tion Req u ired Courses Seme ste r Hours Airfra m e and Powerp lant Certificate ................................. ............ 25 AES 1 100 Aviatio n Fundam e ntal s ............... .... ......................... 6 AES 2150 Avionics for Aviator ............ .................... : ............ 3 AES 3220 Aviation Law and Ri k Management .................................... 3 AES 4140 DC-10 Systems ........................................ ....... ...... 4 AES 4870 Aviation S afety P rogram Management ............. ...... .............. 3 AES 4910 Aviation Man age ment Problems and J ob Targeting ........................ 3 COM 4790 Senior Seminar in Technical Communication .............................. 3 Subto t al .................................................................. ... 50 Plus a minimum of 6 se me ster hours se lected from the following: AES 3230 Airline Management. ............................................ . 3 AES 3240 Airline Planning .................................................. 3 AES 3850 Human Factor s and Phy iology of Flight .................................. 3 AES 3870 Aircraft Accident In vestigation .................................... 3 AES 3980 Cooperative Education ................................. . .... ..... 6 Subtotal ................ ............................ ............. ...... 6 General Studies for All AES M ajo r s ....................... ........................ 34 Additional R equired Course (8 hour minimum ) CHE 1100 Principles of Chemi s try .... ............................... .......... 5 MTH 1210 Introduction to Statistic s ..... ......................................... 4 -or-MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social S c ience .......................... 3 Subtotal .................... .... .... .... ................................. 8-9 Management MGT 3000 MGT 3530 MGT 4000 MGT 4530 MGT 4610 -or Principles of Man age ment .......... ................................ 3 Human Resour ce M a n agement .......................... .... ........... 3 Man age ment De cisio n Ana lysi ........... ................. .... ....... 3 Organizational B e h avior ............................. .... .... ........ 3 Labor/Employee Rel a tion s MGT Elective (3000 /4000-level ) .... ....................... ....... . ............. 3 Sub t o tal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Com put er Information System s CMS 20 I 0 P rinciples of I nformation Sy s tem s ...................................... 3 CMS 3270 Micro Based Software .............................................. 3 CMS Appro ved Elective ( CMS 2110, CMS 3060. or CMS 3230) ................. . .... ... 3 Subtotal ...... ...... ........... ............................................... 9 T o tal H ours Required ......................... .............................. 122-123 A v iation Technology (ATV) Major for Bachelor of Science A IR CARRIER/GENERA L AVIATI O CONCENTRATIO (ATl-ATV l ) Required Courses Semester Hour AES I I 00 Aviation Fundam enta l s .... .... ........ ........... ........ .... 6 AES 1400 Aviation We ather ................ ................................. 3 AES 1710 Single Engine Flight Simulation I. .................... ................. 3 -orAES 1760 AES 1800 AES 2710 AES 3000 AES 3460 AES 3530 Single Engine Flight Simulation U ........... ................. ....... ... 3 Commercial/In s trument Ground .............................. ........... 6 Instru ment Flight Simulation I ...... .................................. 3 Aircraft Sy stems and Propul s i on ............. ........................... 3 Weather for Aircr ews ............ .... ..... .... ...................... 3 Aerodynamics .......................... .... ....................... 3

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 165 AES 3710 Multi En g ine Flight Simulation I ...... . .......... .... ............ 3 -<>r-AES 4710 Turbo Prop Flight Simul a tion ................ ....... .................. 3 AES 3850 AES 4040 Human Factors and Phy s iology of Flight ................................. 3 Aircraft Performan ce ................... l ...... .... ............. 3 AES 4370 Advan ced Navig atio n S ys tem ............... .......................... 3 AES 4860 Aviation Safety ...................................................... 3 AES 4910 Aviation Management Problem s and Job Targeting .......................... 3 COM 2610 Introduction to Techni ca l Writin g ........................................ 3 COM 4790 Senior Seminar in Te c hnical Communications ............... ............. 3 Advanced Ground ln s tructor Cenific ate .............. ..... . ......... 0 Professional Pilot Docume n tation . . ........................ 0 Subtotal ....................................................... ....... ..... 54 Plus a minimum of 15 s emester hours selec ted f rom the following: MTH 1320 Cal c ulu s for the M anage ment and Social S c ience s ....... .................... 3 AES 2050 Aviation History and Future Dev e lopment . . . . . . . .. 3 AES 2200 Fundamental s of Air Traffic Control. ..... .... .... . .............. 3 AES 2220 Flight Dispatcher/Load P l a nning. . . .... 3 AES 2330 Precisio n Flight Team. . . . ........ ............ 3 AES 3220 Aviation Law and Risk Man agement .......... .................. ... 3 AES 3230 Airline Management . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 AES 3240 Airline Planning . . . . . ..................... 3 AES 3550 FAA Ins tructor Certification Ground . . . . ...... 3 AES 3870 Aircraft Accident Inve s tigation . .............. ............. .... ....... 3 AES 3980 Cooperative Education ....................................... ..... 6 AES 4130 FJjght Engineer Dutie s and R esponsibilities ................... . ......... 4 AES 4140 DC-10 Systems .............................. . . .............. 4 AES Approved upper divi s ion elective . . .... .......................... 3 CMS 2010 Prin ciples of Inf ormation Sy s tem s .................... ....... ... .. ..... 3 CMS 3270 Micr o B ase d Software ........... ..................................... 3 Subtotal ..... ....................................... ......................... 15 R equired if no co mputer courses are included in the program (or if co mputer proficien cy has not been demonstrated to the CMS department ) Ge n eral Studies for All AES Major s . .................. . ......... ........... 34 Minor or Approved Electives from outside Aero s p ace Science ..... ... ... ............ ... .. 18 Total H ours R e quired ....... . ............ .............................. 121 Aviation Technology C ATV) Major for Bachelor of Science AmCRAFT SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION (AT2-ATV2) R eq uir ed Courses Semester H o ur s AES 1100 Aviation Fundamentals...... .............. . ..................... 6 AES 1400 Aviation W eather . .... ............................ 3 AES 1710 Sin g le Engine Flight Simu lati on I..... . .............. ...... 3 -<>r-AES 1760 Singl e Engine Flight Simulation L1 ... ................................ 3 AES 1800 Commercial/lnstrument Ground ......................................... 6 AES 2150 Avionic for A v iator s .... .............. ........... ....... ........ .. 3 AES 2200 Fundamentals of Air Traffic Control. .................................. 3 AES 2710 Ins trument Flight Simul atio n I ............ .................. ............ 3 AES 3000 Aircraft Sy s tem s and Propul sio n ................... ............. ...... 3 AES 3220 Aviation Law and Risk Man age ment . . . . . ......... 3 AES 3460 W eathe r f o r Aircrews ........ ........... .... .... .............. 3 AES 3530 Aerodynamics ..................... ............................. 3 AES 4040 Air c raft Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 AES 4370 Advanced Navigation Syst ems .......................... .............. 3 AES 4860 Avi a tion Safety .......................................... ........... 3 AES 4910 Aviation Management Problem s and J o b Targeting .......................... 3 AES 3710 Multi Engine Flight Simulation I .................. .......... .......... 3 -<>r-AES 4710 Turbo Prop Flight Simulation ....... ........... ... ...................... 3 COM 2610 Introduction t o Tec hnical Writing. . ................ 3

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166 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES COM 4790 S e nior Seminar in T ec hnical Communication s .............................. 3 Profe ss ional Pilot Docum e ntation ......................... ............ 0 Multi -E ngine CFI CFII D oc umentati o n ....................... .... ........ 0 Subtotal ........................ ......................... ............... 60 General Studi es for All AES Maj o r s ...................... ................... ..... 34 Addit i o nal Required Courses MTH 1120 Co lle ge Trigonometry ................. ... ....... .............. . .... 3 -or-MTH 1 320 Calculus for the Management and Soci a l Sci e nce s . ....................... 3 MTH 121 0 Introduction to Stati stics ........................... ............. . ... 4 PSY 1001 Introduction to P syc hology ....... ......... ..................... . 3 Subtotal ............ ............................................. . ....... 10 M a n agement MGT 3000 Principle s of Management ......................................... 3 MGT 4530 Organiza tional Behavior .................... .............. ........... 3 MGT Elective (3000/4000-level ) ..................................................... 3 Subtotal ............................................. ........... ............. 9 Computer Informa tion Sy s tems CMS 20 I 0 Principles of Information Systems ...................................... 3 CMS 3270 Micro B ased Softwar e ...................... ........................ 3 CMS Approv e d Elective (CMS 2110, CMS 3060 CMS 3230) ........................ . 3 Subto tal ................................................ ................ .... 9 T o tal H ours R eq uir e d ...................................................... 122 MINORS De sig ned to afford majors in other discipline the opportunjty to develop an understanding of the aero s pace world AES majors may not e l ect the AMG or ATV mjnors. Exception: ATl-ATVI majors may minor in Airframe and Powerpl ant Mechanic (APL). AVIATION MANAGEMENT MINOR (AMG) Required Cour s es Seme ter Hour s AES 1100 Aviatio n Fund a m e ntal s ................ ....... ......................... 6 AES 3220 Aviation Law and Ris k Mana ge m ent ................... ................. 3 Subtota l ............... ........ ......................... ............... ...... 9 Plus 1 2 hour s elected from: AES 3000 Aircraft System s and Propul s ion ................ .............. ........... 3 AES 3230 Airline M a n ? gement. ................................................. 3 AES 3240 Airline Plannin g ............... ...................................... 3 AES 3850 Human Factor s and Phy s iol ogy of Flight ................................ 3 AES 4200 Airport Plannin g ............................................... 3 AES 4210 Airport Management. .. .............................................. 3 AES 4230 General and Busine ss Aviation Operatio n s ........ ...................... 3 AES 4240 Air Cargo ......................................................... 3 AES 4870 Aviation Safety Pr og ram M anage ment ............ ............ .......... 3 AES 4910 Aviation Manag eme nt Probl e m s/ J o b Tar geti n g .... ........................ 3 Subtotal .................. ................................. ................ 12 Total ............................................. ....... ... ............... 2 1 AIRFRAME AND POWERPLANT MECHANICS MINOR (APL) Requ i red Courses Semester Hour Comp l etion of an FAA approved Part 147 Airfram e and Pow e rplant progr a m with appropriate co llege c redit hour s a warded ....................................................... 25 Plus: AES 4 230 General and Bus ine ss Aviatio n Oper atio n s .. .... ... .................. 3 AES 4870 Aviation Saf e t y Program Managem ent ................................... 3 Total.......................... ..................................... ....... 31 PRIVATE PILOT MINOR (PRP)* Required Courses Semester Hour s AES I I 00 Aviation Fundamental s ................. .... ........ ........ . 6 AES 1400 Aviation Weather .... .... .... ......... ......... .............. ..... 3 AES 1 710 Single Engine Flight Simulation I. ...... ..... . ........ ..... .... 3

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' SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 167 Private Pilot Documentation ........................................................ 0 AES 2710 Instrument Flight Simulation I ... . .......... ....... .............. 3 AES 3850 Human Factor s and Physiolo gy of Flig ht ....................... ........... 3 Plu s one of the two following cou r ses : AES 3000 Aircraft System s and Propu l s i on ........................................ 3 AES 4040 Airc r aft P e rformance . . . ................................. 3 Total. .... ......... ...... .................................................. 2 1 **All private pilot minors must possess at l eas t an FAA pri vate pilot certifica te. AVIATION TECHNOLOGY MINOR (ATV)* Required Courses Semes ter Hour s AES 1100 Aviation Fundamentals . ............................ ..... 6 AES 1400 Aviation W ea ther ..... ... ............................... 3 AES 1 800 Instrument/Commercial Ground . ............................... 6 AES 3000 Aircraft Systems and Propul s ion ......................................... 3 AES 3460 Weather for Aircrews ......................... .... ........ ......... 3 AES 3850 Hum a n Factor s and Phy sio l ogy of Flight . . . . . . . 3 AES 4860 Aviation Safety (o r approved elective for AV4 majors ) ... . .... ............ 3 AES XXXX Professional Pilot D ocumentation ...... ............... .... ..... .... 0 Total .. ... ......... .... .... .... ...... ...... .... .... ........ . .... 27 Must have FAA Commercial/Instrument to graduate. Credit For Airframe and Powerplant Certificate Students seeking credit for their A&P certificate must provide a copy of their certificate, a copy of the certifica te of completion from the sc hool where it was obtained, and beginning and ending date s of A&P sc hool attendance. Student s must also take three pa ss/fail examinations through the Aerospace Science Department There will be no extra tuition charge for the 25 credits, which can be a pplied to a s tudent' s tra n script. Credit i s not automatically given for the A&P certific ate. Student s will be allowed to test as fo llows: G e neral test-5 credit hours-pa ss/fai l (Students can proceed to eit her of the next two examina tions only if the general test is passed .) Airframe-10 cre dit hour s Powerplant-10 c r edit hour s The maximum amount of c redit s th a t ca n be earned i s 25 Credit will be g iven individually for exami nations two and three. If a s tud e nt fails either the airframe examination or the powerplant exami n ation, the department will determine which additional cou r ses should be taken and a maximum of 15 credits will be applied to ward th e maj o r degree AIR FORCE ROTC Air Force ROTC ( UC-B) Folsom Stadium, 218 University of Colorado at Boulder Boulder, Colorado 80309 303-492-8351 U .S. Air Force ROTC offer s everal programs leading to a commission in the U.S. Air Force upon receipt of at least a baccalaureate d egree STANDARD FOUR YEAR PROGRAM This program is in three parts: the Genera] Military Course (GMC) for lower-division students ; the Pro fess ional Officer Course (POC) for upper di v i s ion students; and the Leaders hip Laboratory (LLAB), attended by all cadets. Completion of the GMC i s a prerequisi1e for entry into the POC. Compl etio n of a four-week summer training course is required prior to commissioning. MODIFIED TwoYEAR PROGRAM Thi s program is offered to full-time, regularly e nrolled degree It requires at le as t two years of full-time college ( under g raduate or graduate level or a combination). Those se l ected for this program must complete a six-wee k field-training program during the surnrner months as a prerequi s ite for entry into the POC the following fall se me s ter.

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168 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES LEADERSHIP LAB All AFROTC cadets must attend LLAB ( one and one-half hours per week). The l aboratory involves a study of Air Force customs and courtesies drills and ceremonies, career opportunities and the life and work of an Air Force junior officer. OTHER AFROTC PROGRAMS Other programs are frequently available based o n current Air Force needs. Any AFROTC staff mem ber in Boulder at 303-492-8351 can discuss the best alternatives Interested students should make ini tial contact as early as possible because selection is on a competitive basis There is no obligation until a formal co ntr act is entered. AIR FORCE COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM Students participating in Air Force ROTC may be eligible to compete for Air Force ROTC college scholarships. Students selected for this program are placed on scholarships that pay tuition book allowances nonrefundable educational fees and a subsistence of $ 1 50 per month tax-free. All cadets enrolled in the POC receive a $150 per month subsistence during the regular academic year. Twoand three-year scholarships are available to both men and women in all academic disciplines In add iti on there are s pe cial programs for minority students. FLIGHT OPPOR TUNITIES Prior to entering the fourth year of the AFROTC program qualified AFROTC students can compete for pilot allocations. Cadets are eligible to fly with the Civil Air Patrol as ROTC members USAF MEDICAL PROGRAMS Qualified pre-med or nursing students can compete for pre-med or nursing scholarships and programs. These scho l ar hips and programs can lead to a rewarding career as an Air Force officer, serving as a doctor or nurse AFROTC COURSE CREDIT AFROTC courses are worth 1 6 credit hours toward g r aduation. REGISTRATION Students who wish to register for AFROTC classes sign up for them through the normal course regis tration process. AFROTC classes begin with the APR prefix. Military Science (Army ROTC) Army ROTC (UC-B) University of Colorado at Boulder Campus Box 370 Boulder, Co l orado 80309 (303) 492-6495 The United States Army offers a variety of scholarships and programs leading to a commis ion as a sec ond lieutenant in the Army after receipt of a baccalaureate or graduate degree Students from Denver area colleges attend classes at the Auraria Campus and at the Co lor ado School of Mines in Golden STANDARD FoUR-YEAR PROGRAM The Basic Course taken during the Freshman and Sophomore years is designed to introduce students to the Army. A variety of subjects such as first aid land navigation and military his tory are covered. Junior and Senior students participate in Advanced Course classes and focus on leadership, Army doc trine, and the transition from student/cadet to Lieutenant. All stu d ents participate in a leadership l abo ratory one day per week Completion of a six-week summer camp, usually between the Junior and Senior years is required. TWO YEAR PROGRAM Under this program students may enter the Advanced Course during their Junior year without partici pating in the Basic Course They receive credit for the Basic Course by attending a five-week summer camp between their Sophomore and Junior year or receive credit for prior military experience.

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 169 ARMY ROTC SCHOLA R SHIP PROGRAM The Army currently offe r s two three and four-year sc holarship opportunities, ba se d on individual qual ifications. ln addition to tuition and fee assistance, s tud e nts are eligible for a book s tip e nd and $150 per month subsistence payment s durin g the school year. ARMY ROTC COURSE CREDIT Army ROTC serves as elective c r e dit in most d e partments. Exact co urse credit for Anny ROTC classes will be determined by your indi v idual academic advisor. REGISTRATION Students de s iring to register for Army ROTC s hould co ntact the re c ruitin g officer at CU Boulder at 303-492-3549 for more detai l CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM The s pecializ e d fields within civil engineering te c hn o logy include program s in civil engineering tech n o logy draftin g, a nd surveying. The s urveying pro g ram i s a se parate s peciali ze d four -year program The individual curriculum requir e ment s are lis ted se parately Civil engineerin g technology graduates apply engineering principle s in performin g many of the ta sks neces sary for the planning and construction of highwa ys, bui l dings, railroads, brid ges, re servo irs, dams, irrigation works, water systems, airports, and other s tructures. ln planning for a construction project they may participate in estimatin g costs, preparin g s pecifica t ion s for materials, and in s urvey i ng, draft ing, and de s ign work. During the construction pha se, they work closely with the contractor a nd the s uperintendent in sc heduling field layout, con s truction activities and the in s pection of the work for conformity to s pecifi catio ns. In r ece nt years, a m a j o r work area for civil and environmental engineering techno l ogy h as involved environmental problems. Thi s include s de s ign and construction of water s up ply facilities, de s ign of wa s tewater collection and treatment facilitie s The development of environ mental impact s tudies and environmenta l impact s tatements are also included Student s mu s t me e t the following c urriculum requirements for the various degree s, min o rs, and con ce ntration s For every CET a nd SUR course, a minimum g r a de of "C" i s required before a s tudent can progress. For Surveyin g an d Mapping, pl ease see p age 219 of thi s Catalog. C i vil Enginee ring T e chnolog y Major for Bach e lor of Sci e nce The four-year b ac helor of science degree i s awarded upon completion of the required courses and a con s truction or structures concentration. This pro g ram i s accredited by the Tec hnolog y Accreditation Com mis s i on of the Accreditation Board for Engineerin g and Technology Required Technical Studies Semester Ho u r s CET 1100 Civil Technol ogy . . . . . . . . ............. 3 CET 1 200 Technical Drawing I ....................... ........................... 3 CET 1 210 T echnical Dr awing II............................... ......... 3 CET 2100 Structural D rawing .. ... ............................................. 4 CET 2150 M ec hanic s !-Statics ..................................... ... .... .... 3 CET 3100 Constr u ction Methods ................................................. 3 CET 3120 Engineering Economy .................. ............................ 3 CET 3130 Mechanics of Mate rial s . .......................... ....... 3 CET 3140 Mechanics of Materials-Laboratory ............. ..... ........... ...... I CET 3 1 60 M ec hani cs ll-Dynamics ............. .................... ........ 3 CET 3 170 Introducti o n to Structural Analysis . ...... . .................. 3 CET 3180 Fluid Mechanics I. . ... . ................................... 3 CET 3190 Fluid M echanics II.................. ............. ......... ....... 3 CET 3330 Env ironm ental T ech nology Processes ........ .... . ................... 3 CET 4130 Soils Mec h anics . ..... ....................... . 3 COM 2610 Introdu ction t o Technical Writin g ... .................................... 3 EET 2340 Technical Prog r amming Applications ......................... .... ...... 3 MET 3110 Thermodynamics . ..... ..... ............. ..... 3 SUR 1520 Co nstruction Surveying . . . ........ ............. ....... 4 Approved T echnica l Elective . . . ..... ...................... ........... 2 Subt o tal ............................... .......................... .......... 59

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170 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Additio nal R eq uirement s CHE II 00 Prin ciples of Chemistry ..................................... ......... 5 ECO 2010 Principle s of Economics-Macro -<>r-ECO 2020 Principle s of Economics-Micro ..... ...... ....... ...................... 3 MT H 1 400 Pr ec alculus M a them a tic s .......... ........ ........ .... ......... 4 MTH 1 4 1 0 Calculus I. .................................................. ...... 4 MT H 2410 Calcul u s U ............................................. ...... .... 4 PHY 2311 and 2321 General Ph ysics 1/General Physics Laboratory I ....... .... ........... 5 PHY 2331 a nd 234 1 General Phy sics II/General Physics Labora tory 11 ..... .............. 5 SPE 1 010 Publi c SpeaiUng. . .......... ............. .............. 3 T o tal ............ .............. .............. .... ...... ...... ............. 33 STRUCTURES CONCENTRATIO N R eq uired T ec hnical Studies CET 4120 Concrete De sig n I. .......... ............ ............................ 3 CET 4140 Concrete D esign II ................. .... .... ........................ 3 CET 4400 Steel De sig n I. ...... .... . .......... ............................ 3 CET 441 0 Steel D esig n II ...................................................... 3 CET 4450 Timber Desi g n ...................................................... 3 App roved Upper-division Technica l Elective .................. ........................ 3 Total ......... .................... .... ........ .......................... 1 8 CONSTRUCTION CONCENTRA T ION Required Technical Studies SUR 2530 R o ute Surveying ......................... ........... ................. 4 CET 3110 Construction Estimating .............................................. 3 CET 4120 Concrete D esig n I. ....... ...................................... 3 CET 4400 Steel D es i gn I. ............. ............................ .... ......... 3 CET 4570 Constr u ction Law ........................... ..................... 3 Approve d Uppe r -divisio n Technical E l ective .......... .... ................ ....... ...... 3 Tota l ............................... .......................... ... ........ 1 9 CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND CRIMINOLOGY DEPARTMENT The prese nt and future needs of U.S. society require greater numbers of highly ed ucated people i n crim inal justice agencies at all l evels of government. Crimin a l justice employer s demand applica nt s who ha ve had profe ssio nal ed u cation T h ere is considerab l e interest among crimina l justice practitioners to increase profe ssio n al i s m thr o ugh edu cat ion The c urri cu lum prov ide s quality crim inal jus tice e duc ation and prepares s tud ents interested in the s tud y of police l aw enfo r cemen t probation and parole co rr ec tions, j u venile age n cy work c riminal j ustice a dmini s tr atio n and priv ate/co rporate sec urity Co ur se offerings within these professional fie ld s are re l ated to othe r programs at the college, including human services, busine ss and the socia l sc i ences. Criminal Justice and Criminology Major for Bachelor of Science The b ac he l or of sc i e n ce in criminal ju s tice and crim in o l ogy is designed to provide pro fessiona l co ur ses as well as a broad general e duc atio n Th e curric ulum i s s tru c tured for the st udent seeking either pr ese r vice or in-service education. Recognizing that m a n y people w h o are intere s ted in s u c h educatio n are already empl oyed in some form of c riminal j u stice work, and that man y people have comple t ed co ur se work at the community college l eve l the department ha s de ve loped a four-year program that provides compre hen s i ve fundamental s ub jects in the ftrst two years (lowe r -div i sion) and a d vanced, s pecialized or a dmini s trati ve subjec t s in the seco nd two years ( upper -div ision) The curric ulum is s tructured to facilitate transfer from two-year police sc ien ce/cr irnin a l justice programs. T h e department h as a n artic ulatio n ag r ee ment with the Colorado Community Colle ge Sy s tem. The articu l a tion agreement sta t es that if a transfe r student h as completed the total ba s i c r eq uir ements at any accredite d Colorado co mmunit y college, Metrop o lit a n State College of Den ve r will consider the s tudent's Genera l Studie s requirement s comp l ete d Stud ents mus t meet the college's requirement s for the b ac helor's de gree including G eneral Studies they s h ould cons ult with a fac ulty advi so r r egarding General Studie s cour ses and the se l ection of crimi nal justi ce e l ectives. The department recommends the following General Studies courses: BIO 1000 Human Biolo gy for Non Majors; PSY 1001, Introductory P syc hology ; and SOC lOlO lntroduction t o So cio l ogy A min or is not r e quir ed.

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 171 Criminal Ju s tice and Criminology M ajor for Ba c h e lor o f S ci e nc e Required Courses Semester Hours CJC 1010 Introduct i on to the Criminal Ju s tice System ................................ 3 CJC 1100 Evolutionary Legal Concepts in Criminal Ju stice .............. . ......... 3 CJC 2100 Substantive Criminal Law .................................. .... ....... 3 CJC 2120 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures .................. .................. 3 CJC 2140 Criminal Pr ocedure .................. ............ .................. 3 CJC 3120 Constitutional Law for Criminal Ju stice Profes s ional s ........................ 3 CJC 3200 Criminal Ju stice Admini trative Beha vior. ................................. 3 CJC 3350 Seminar in Delinquen cy Causation Prevention and Control -orCJC 3400 Criminal Behavior and Criminal Careers .................................. 3 CJC 3410 Criminal Ju Lice and the Social Structure . . . . ........... 3 CJC 4300 The American Corre c tional System ............. ........... ............ 3 CJC 4650 Ethic s for the Criminal Ju stice Professional .............................. 3 Subtotal ................ .... ...................................... ........ 33 Required Elective s C J C .............. ......................................................... 18 Social Science** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 Subtotal .......................... ................... ........................ 30 Ele c ti ves selec t e d in co nsultati o n with and approved b y th e d epar tment advisor allow for development of e mphasi s or specialty areas certificate pro g r ams or general d eg r ee plan Int erns hip c r e dit ma y app l y t o thi s e l ec tiv e ar ea but no more than 6 semester hours ar e allowed Soc ial science incl ud es the followin g di sc iplines: anthropo l ogy, economics, history p o liti ca l sc i ence, psy c h o l ogy and socio logy. General Studie s ...................................... ........................... 33 Other elective ......................... .... ........ ............................ 24 Required cour ses and required elective s ......................................... .. .. 63 Total .......... ................. ....................................... 120 There is n o minor requi r ed for the CJC major. MINOR I CRIMINA L JUSTICE AND C RIMINOLOGY CJC 1010 Introduction to the Criminal Ju stice System ............................. 3 CJC 1100 Evolutionary Legal Concept s in Criminal Justice ......................... ... 3 CJC 4650 Ethics for the Criminal Just i ce Profe ssiona l ................................ 3 CJC Electives s elected in consu ltation with and approved by the department advisor, at lea s t 4 hours of which must be upper divi s ion. . . ................. 9 Total................. . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 EDUCATION The underlying theme of the teacher education program is The Teacher as a Deci sio n Maker in Diver se Contexts. Students program s include General Studies majors and minors in academic disciplines and teacher licensure coursework. All courses and field experiences expose student to a wide variety of content theories, models, and practice that will develop deci ion-making skills a teacher and enable teacher ca n d i dates to work with a wide range of student in a b oad s pectrum of settings As they enter teachi n g, graduates will h ave the knowledge to te ac h state and natio nal standards in the various co n tent area and to demon s trate skill in all professional licensure stan dard s for teachers. Coursework a n d expe riences are guided by the following: The practice of effective, de c i s ion making teachers are gro unded in philo sop hical belief s, re earch, and theory. Decision-making teachers must be life l ong learner s who recognize the need s of a diverse and changing society T h e integration and app l ication of knowledge from geneya l education, academic s pecia l ization and professional studies contribute to the developme n t of effective teachers. Effective teachers are best prepared through extensive participation in a variety of teaching mod e l s and in a range of clinical and field experiences. Decision-making teachers effective l y u e reflective and critical thinking to tran s late theory into practice

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172 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES The teac her education program is the professional education area of the Professional Education Unit (PEU), consisting of faculty in the Schools of Prof essional Studies; Letters Arts and Sciences; and Business. The program i s fully accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Edu cation and the Colorado Departm ent of Education. The teacher education program prepares s tudent s to teach Academic departments in the Schoo l of Let ters, Arts and Sciences, the School of Bu si ne ss and in the School of Professiona l Studie s prepare students with the content knowledge to teach The D epartment of Early Childhood, Elementary and Spe cial Education and the Second ary Education D epartment offer teacher education courses, clinical expe riences and student teaching. The Readin g program offe r s requir ed professional cou r ses for stu dents in early childhood education, e l ementary education, and secondary education. The Re a ding pro gram also offers a minor. The comp letion of a licen sure program, in addition to the comp letion of a bachelor's degre e in an approved major, prepares students to app l y to the Colorado Department of Edu cation for teacher licensure at designated grade le vels. The particular seque nce of education courses to be taken is determined by the level at which a st udent wishes to teach The education courses may be taken along with the bachelor's degree program or after the degree program ha s been completed. Licensure i s granted by the Colorado Department of Educa tion based on recommendation by the director of the Office of Clinical Services, approval of appropri ate documents and payment of assessment fees Students receive endorsements in the level and/or sub ject area in which they are qualified to teach. The teacher educat ion program also provides outreach to inservice teach ers, including first-year assistance, mentor training, and summe r workshops. Note: Every degr ee-seeking student must meet all requirements of the bachelor's degree program, including an approved major, a minor (in most cases), and the college's General Studies program as outlined in this Catalog under the chosen major. There is a list of approved majors or s ubject area endorsements to choose from (see below). PLEASE CONSULT WITH A FACULTY ADVISOR FOR GUIDANCE IN THE APPROPRIATE SELECTION OF A MAJOR A MINOR AND GENERAL STUDIES COURSES NOTICE TO PROSPECTIVE AND CURRENTLY-ENROLLED STUDENTS WHO PLAN TO ENROLL IN A TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAM Pursuant to Senate BiLl 99-154 which was enacted as law on Jun e I 1999, every institution of higher education in Colorado, including Metropolitan State College of Denver is revising its teacher prepara tion programs to meet new statutory and regulatory r equireme nt s The new requirements app l y to the following teacher preparation programs at MSCD: EARLY CHILDHOOD LICENSURE with the following majors: English History Mathematics Chicano Studies African American Studies Behavioral Science ELEMENTARY LICENSURE with the foLlowing majors: English Sociology History Mathematics Spanish Chicano Studies African American Studies Behavioral Science Environmental Science Speech Communicat ion Speech Communication Biology Land Use SECONDARY LICENSURE with the following endorsements using the major(s) indi cate d : Endorsement in English: English Endorsement in Mathematics: Mathematics Endorseme nt in Science: Biolo gy or Physics or Land Use or Environmental Science Endorsement in Foreign Language: Spanish or Modem L a nguages Endorsement in Speech: Speech Communication Endorsement in Social Studies: History or Political Science or African American Studies or Chicano Studies or Behavioral Science Endorsement in Technology Education: Industrial & Technical Studies SPECIAL EDUCATION LICENSURE See department advisor for information regarding approved majors.

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 173 K-12 LICENSURE with the following endorsements using the major indicated: Endorsement in Art: Art J Endorsement in Music: Mu sic Education Endorsement in Physical Education: Human Performance and Sport (Includes licensure for K-6 a nd 712) OTHER ENDORSEMENT: Bilingual (E n glis h or Spanish major) The State B oard of Ed u ca t ion and the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE) will review all teac h er preparation programs in Colorado between July I, 2000 and July I 200 I to determine i f they meet the n ew requirements. Any teacher preparation program that fails to do so will not be app r oved and may b e discontinued by the CCHE. Major programs will n o t be discontinued as part of this review. Because Metropolitan State College of De n ver s revised teacher preparation program curricula we r e not finalized at t h e time this Catalog went to press and because MSCD cannot guarantee that its t eacher preparation programs will b e ap p roved by the CCHE prospecti ve and enrolled s tudents are hereb y notified that any of the above-listed teacher pr e paration program s ma y be discontinued by the CCHE on Jul y 1 2001. Students who are enrolled at MSCD and admitted to one of the above-listed teac h er preparation programs prior to July I 200 I will be permitted to comp l ete the program to which they were admitted altho u g h some course requirements may b6 modified after they are admitted to the program. If a teacher preparation program is di continued, st u dents in that program must comp l ete the teac h er preparation prog r am's requirements no later than June 30 2005 to be el i gib l e for lice n sure as teac h ers Otherwise, to be e l igible for licensure as teachers, students must enroll in and comp l ete an app r oved teacher educatio n program at MSCD or another institution. Discontinuation of a teacher preparation program with specific majors and min o r s does not mean that the major a n d minor programs will be disco ntinued. Students may still receive their bachelor\ degree in the m ajo r and minor they were pursuing. Students planning to enroll in a teacher education pro gram or seeking teacher licensure are urged to maintain regular contact with both their major advisor and their teacher preparation advisor to learn of the s tatu s of their MSCD t ea cher prepa ration program. PROVISIO AL ADMISSION A provisional admission card w ill be issued to all entering students in the appropriate educatio n depart ment office or in the initial education class in which they are enrolled. With provisional admiss i o n stu dents are assigned an ed u cation advisor to consult during the first semester and who will remai n their adv i sor throughout the program. Also duri n g t h e first semester, student s should begin to deve l op a pro gram plan and begin their teac h er candidate p ortfolio. Stude nt s should also begin working with an advi sor in their major area. Provisional admiss i on is va lid for one s emester only. After provisional a dmi s sion h as expir ed formal a dmi ssion requirements must be met. FORMAL ADMISSION B y the e nd of their ftrst se m es t e r in the professional teacher preparation sequence, students mus t m eet the following requirements for formal admission to the program. Studen t s may not take addit i onal teacher educatio n courses until they mee t these requirements. All reguirements for formal admiss i on must be met before the ftrst day of the seco n d semester of professional education cla s ses. Facu lty advi sors are available to provide ad d itional explanation of requirements listed. Stud e nt must have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 on their most recent 30 erne ter h o ur s of co ur sewo rk completed a t a regionally acc r edited institution of high er education. Early c hildh ood licensure ca ndid ates w h o h ave not accrued 30 h o ur s of college credit must have a min imum of 12 semeste r h o ur s of college work. Student must demonstrate compete n ce in oral express i on. Students seeki n g bachelor's de g r ees s hould pr esent ev id e n ce tha t they passed a collegel eve l public speaking course w ith a g rad e of "B" or above. Stude nt s w h o earn a "C" may take an o r a l examination. Students w h o have b ac h e lor's degrees but did not complete a pub lic speaking co ur se with a grade of B or above may take a n ora l examinatio n Students must complete and verify 50 clock hours of uccessful experie n ce working with c hildr en or yo uth of the age they intend to teach Students must sub mit the applicatio n for admis s ion to the teacher education program to the appro pri a t e education department office wit h the appropriate adv i sors' authorizi n g signat u res a nd copies of tr a n scripts of all college work.

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174 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Students must show evidence of a negative tuberculosis test within the past year. Students must obtain a formal admission card from the appropr i ate educatio n department office to present to all education instructors to verify that initial requirements have been met. Students must take the PLACE basic skills test. Transfer students may request consideration of education co ur ses less than 7 years old that are a close match to MSCD's professional courses. Students sho uld see an ed u catio n advisor to assess whic h courses taken previously may be applied to teacher licensure. A st udent who has taken a licensure course at another institution must have l eft that institution in good standing and be eligible to return to that licensure program. Documentation of attendance at advising orientation for ear l y childhood, elementary and special ed u cation programs. Secondary education students must provide evidence of a n initial meeting wit h a major adv i sor. Completion of worker's compensation form and applicatio n for card Initiation of CBI fmgerprint clearance (form and money order or certified check). Eligibility for Student Teaching Prior to app l ying to student teach all teacher education s tudents must pass the PLACE basic skills test. The test includes reading comprehension mathematics, and a writing sample. Test registration materi als for the PLACE offered only four times a year in Colorado, are available from the teacher education department offices. Students must take the basic ski ll s test during their first semester in a professional education class. Registration must be sent about six weeks prior to the exam. Notification of scores on the exam is received about six weeks after the exam. (Student Teaching : 303-556-2652) Students begin the student teaching application process by atten din g the Pre-Student Teaching Appli cation Orientation the semes ter prior to the semester of student teaching. The orientation is held the fir t Friday of the fall and sp rin g semesters. The application deadline is the third Friday of September (for spring semester assignme nts) or the third Friday of February (for fall semester assignments). Summer semeste r student teaching is BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT and due the third Friday in February. All students must: Successfully com plete all other college programs and degree r equirements. Successfully comp l ete and document 200 hours of experience with youth of the age group the stu dent is prep aring to teach This service may be with any yo uth group such as the Boy Scouts Girl Scou ts, sports teams, church groups, and ed u cation programs at partner sc hools. Experience may be paid or volunteer. Have a mi. nimum GPA of 2.75 in all coursework or a 3.0 GPA on the last 45 credit hours Successfully comp let e all professional courses required for licensure with a grade of "C" or better. Professional courses include professional education courses and all content major courses Have a physical examination report including tuberculosis clearance on file with the Student Health Services Office. Have approval of the appropriate screening committee, if applicable Submit verification that the teacher candidate portfolio has been prepared and the program plan approved for student teaching by the student's education advisor. Pass the basic skills PLACE test. Comp l ete at least 20 credit hours in residence at MSCD prior to student teaching. In add ition secondary and K-12 students must: Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 for all courses r equired in the major and all courses in teacher edu cation. Comp l ete all s ubject area courses in the st udent's teaching area required by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools Have complete evaluations from pre-student teaching field experiences. Have approval from a committee in the major in those department s in which a major/secondary educatio n agreement is in place

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I I Recommendation for Licensure SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 175 To be recommended for licen ure to the Colorado Department of Education, s tudent s must: Comp l ete student teaching and seminar with a "sa tisfactocy evaluation. Complete all requirements for a bachelor's degree in the student's major a rea. Complete all requirements in the professional education s equence Provide verification from the college s up ervisor of tudent teaching that they have comple t ed and pre ented their teac h er candidate portfolio at one of the student t eachi n g eminar essions. Submit evaluations of the student teachin g experience from the cooperating teach er and the col lege supervi or. Before teacher candidates apply to the Color a do Department of Education for licen s ure they must have pas ed the last three of four PLACE a sessmen t s : Liberal Arts and Sciences, Professional Knowledge, and Content Area EARLY CHILDHOOD, ELEMENTARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT Program revision s are under consideration to comply with new state s tandards. Check with the depart ment for late update s (303-556-6228). The D e partment of Early Childhood Elementary and Special Education offer profe ss ional preparation for teaching and education-related careers. Thi department prepares tudents to apply to the Colorado Department of Education for provi ional teacher licensure and endor ement to teach in public sc hool s in Colorado in three areas: early childhood (preschoo l through third grade), elementary ( K-6th grade) and special education, moderate need : teacher I (ages 5 through 21). Minor s are available in early childhood education, special education, bilingual education with e ndor sement) and parent education. Course s and workshops are offered to meet Colorado D epart ment of Education requirements for renewal of teacher lice n ses and Colorado Department of Human Services group leader and director qualifications. A pro gra m for lice n sure in K-6 phy s ical education is also avai lable PROFESSIONAL EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION LICE SURE SEQUENCE The Early Childhood Licensure Program prepare student to teach pre chool through grade three Through the sequence of cour es and field experience, the s tudent sa ti sfies all of Colorado's academic standards for licen ure in early childhood education. Students should contact the Department of Early Childhood Elementary and Special Education for information on approved academic majors and spe cific general studies requirements for lice n s ure R eq uired Cour ses Seme s ter Hours EDU 2340 Urban Early Childhood Educ at i o n ....................................... 3 EDU 2350 Urban Early Childhood Educati o n Field Experience ....... .. ... ........ 2 EDU 2360 Expressive Arts for the Young Child . . ...... ............ 2 EDU 3350 Documentation A ssess ment and De c i sion Making for Early Childhood .... ....... 3 EDU 3370 Language Arts and Social Studi e Methods for Early Childhood ................ 3 EDU 3640 Basic Te c hniques of In truction A es ment and Man agement ................. 3 EDU 4310 Parents as Partner s in Education ........... .............. ............ 3 EDU 4330 Science Health and Mathematic s for the Young Child ....................... 2 EDU 4370 Planning a Developmentally Appropriate Early Qlildhood Classroom ....... ..... 3 EDU 4390 Studem Tea ching and Seminar: Early Childhood (Preschool through Third G rade) (6, 8, 10 credits) ................... ................................ I 0 RDG 3120 Developing Print Liter acy : Pr esc h ool-Grade 3 ............................ 4 SED 3600 The Exceptional Leamer in the Classroom ............................... 3 T o tal ............................................................... ........ 41 *These two courses must be taken concurrently. Highly recommended cour e: EDT 3610 introduction to Educational Technology ............ . .... ............ 1-3 EARLY CHILDHOOD ADMINISTRATION Students who wish to administer early childhood pro g ram s mus t meet the Colorado Department of Human Service s qualifications by taking the early c hildhood minor plus additional cour es s pecified by the Colorado Department of Human Services, as s hown b e low. Student s do not have to be admitted to the t eac h er lic ensure program to take this sequence of courses, nor do they have to be d eg ree -s eeking

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176 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Required Courses Semester Hour Early Childhood Education Minor ( ee page 178) ..... ...... 22-25 Additional R equired Cour ses for Admini s tration EDU 3340 Admini s tr ation of Early Childhood Pro grams .................... ....... 4 EDU 4310 Parents as P anner in Education -orsoc HES PSY PSY 1010 2040 1001 1 800 Introduction to Sociology ................... ... .... ................ 3 Introdu c tion to Nutrition ................................. ........ .... 3 Introductory P syc hology ....................................... ..... 3 Developmental Educational P syc holo gy ( prerequisite to all 3000 and 4000-level early c hildhood education co ur ses) ....... ................... 4 T o tal ..................... ....... ................. ....................... Note : Stud e nt s seeking onl y dir ec tor qualifications ma y take onl y those co urses requir e d b y th e Col orado D e partm ent of Human S erv ices. Colorad o Departm e nt of Human S erv i ces r eg ulations ma y be c han ged. Consult with the Early Childhood/Elem e ntary Education D epar t ment for additional infomzation. Highly R ecommended Course: HPS 2060 Emergency Re c ue/Fir s t Respo nder and CPR ............................... 3 PROFESS IO AL ELEMENTARY EDUCATIO LICENSURE SEQUE CE The E l e mentary Licensure Program prepares studen t s to teach the m u lti discip linary curriculum i n e l e mentary c lassrooms kindergarten throu g h sixth grade. Through the sequence of courses and fie l d expe riences, the student sati fie s all of the State of Colorado's academic s t andards for licen s ur e. Students bould contact th e Department of Early Childhood, Elementary and S pecial Education fo r information on approved academic majors a nd s pecific gen e r a l studies requirement s for licen sure Information meetings for new and prospective students are held on a weekly basi Call 303-556-6228 to receive a li t of meetings times a nd places. Required Courses Semester Hours EDT 361 0* Introdu ctio n to Educa tional Technology ......................... ....... 2-3 EDU 3100 Social F oundations and Multicultural Education ............ .... ....... 5 EDU 3640 Basi c Techrtiques of Ins truction Assessment and M a n agement . ........ 3 EDU 3650 Elementary Instruction, Ass ess ment and Manage ment Internship ................ l EDU 3750 Integr a ting Expressive Arts and Phy ica l A ctivity in the Elem e ntary Classroom ..... 3 EDU 4100 Integrated Method s of T eac hin g L a n g u age Arts & the Social Studies: K-6 ......... 4 EDU 4105 Integrated Elem entary Language Arts and Social Studie s Interns hip .............. I EDU 4120 Integrated M ethods of Teaching Scien ce and Mathemati cs: K -6. . ......... 4 EDU 4125 Int egrate d Elementar y Math and Scie n ce Interns hip ........ ................ I EDU 4190 Student T eaching and Seminar: Elementary K-6 .................. ....... I 0 RDG 3 1 30 Literacy Instruction in Grade s K-6 .................... .................. 5 SED 3600 The Exceptional Learner i n the Clas s r oo m .............. ................... 3 T o tal ........................... ................. ........................ 42-43 Elementary Education li ce n sure st udents taking EDT 3610 nuts! register for 2 or 3 cred it hours Thr ee credit hours shou ld b e electe d by li ce nsure students who wish to pursue advanced conten t area or g rade-l eve l t ec hnolo gy skills. ENDORSEMENT IN BOTH EARLY CHILDHOOD AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATIO Students may receive endorsement in both early chi ldhood a nd e lementary education b y fulfi llin g the requirements for th e minor in early childhood education ( ee page 178 ) and the additiona l requirements as s p eci fied below: Required Cour es S emester Hour Early Childhood Education Minor ............................... ............... 22-25 Addi tion a l R e quir e ments An acce pt able major Gene ral Studie s co ursework and co ur sework in the elemen t ary education profes s iona l sequence, whic h f ulfill s e l e m entary lic e n sure requirements ENG 3460 C hildr e n 's Lit erature .............................. .................... 3 RDG 3120 D eve l oping Print Literacy : Presc hool Third Grade .......................... 4 An a dditi onal 6 semes t er hours of s tudent t eaching at the early c hildh ood l eve l ............... 6 Total ............................................... .................... 35-38

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' SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 177 SPEClAL EDUC A TION MODERATE NEEDS: TEACHE R I LtcE SURE The Spe c i a l Edu cation L i censure program prepar es teachers to work with stude nts with mild/mo d e r a t e n eeds a t th e K-12 (ages 5-2 1 ) l evel. Through the seq uence of co ur ses and fie l d experiences, a stude nt comp l eti n g thi s program sati sfies all of Color ado's aca demic tandards for licensure. Students s h o uld contact the Early Chi ldh ood Elementary and Special Education Department for information o n approved academic majors and specific general studies requirements for licensure. Required Courses Semester Hour s SED 3000 Diver ity, Disab ility and Education . . . . . ..... 3 RDG 3 1 30 Literacy Instruction in Grades K-6..... ...... 5 -orRDG 3280 T eac hin g of Re ading an d Writin g in the Content Areas . . . ...... 4 SED 3600 The Exceptional Learner in the Clas s room ................................. 3 EDT 3610 Introduction to Educational Technology .................. .......... 1-3 SED 3700 Educatio nal Exceptionality and Hum an Growth .......... ................ 3 SED 3800 Teaching Students with Learning and Behavior Disorders .............. 3 SED 3850 Diag n osis and Evaluation of Exceptional Students .... ....................... 3 SED 4000 Collaborative Practices in Special Education . ................. 3 SED 4200 Lang u age D eve lopm e m and Learrting Disabilitie ... ........................ 3 SED 4250 Classroom Mana geme nt for Exceptional Students ............................ 3 SED 4430 Assessment and Instruction Pr acticum : Elementary Education .................. 4 SED 4440 Asses s ment and Instruction P racticum: Secondary Education ................... 4 SED 4490 Special Education Student Teaching and Seminar .................... . 6-12 Total ............ .... ............ ...... .................. .............. 43-52 MINORS The minor that a teacher education s tud e nt chooses fulfill s the requirements fo r th e bachelor's de gree pro g r am. No minor i required as part of the tea c her educatio n program. However the followi n g minors are offered by the Department of Early Childhood, Elementary and Special Education: early c hildh ood education, special education/gifted education parent education and bilingual/bicultural education. The R eading program offers the reading minor To atisfy the minor requirements for the bachelor's degree program a student may choo e o n e of the se minors or one of the other minors describ ed in thi Cata log Students are a dvised t o take a minor th at is a l so a teaching field Secondary licensure s tudents may pur s u e the se two pr ofessio n a l min ors: specia l educatio n/gift e d ed u cat i o n and r eading BLLINGUAIJBICULTURAL EDUCATION MINOR The teacher education program offers a minor in biling u al/bicultural education, an interdiscip lin ary program s ponsored by the Chicano Studie s, Early Childhood Elementary and Special Educatio n Mod ern Languages Departments, and Reading pro gram. The principal objective of the bilingua l/bicultural minor i s t o pr epare fut ur e teachers to meet the need s of all s tudents, part i cu l ar l y th e lingui s tically dif fere nt s tud ent. Among other goa ls, this min o r prepares t eac h e r s t o cond u c t all phases of c l assroom instruction in a bilin gual and bicultural se ttin g and to ens ur e tbe development of En gli h l a n g u age lit eracy. In the developmental seq uence the minor provide s th e potential teac h er with a backg r o und of MeJtican heritage and an under s tandin g of present-day His panic/Chic ano culture. Proficiency in the Spanish l anguage is required of all student befor e they comp l ete the minor. Thi s pro ficie n cy prep ares the teacher to understand and further deve lo{> the native tongue of bilingua l children while offeri n g a ecood l ang u age to ma n y ot h er children. Ln addition the minor provides the s tud e nt with s uffi c ient c lini ca l and academic experie n ces and reso ur ce to develop, impl e m ent, a nd evaluate curricular meth od tec hniqu es, and material s in the bilingual(bicultural c l assroom. The practicum in bilingual/bicultural e ducation i s required. R equired Courses and Recommended Sequence Semester Hour s CHS I 020 His tory of the Chicano in the Southwe st: Mexi co and U.S. Period s 3 CHS 3300 Education of Chicano Children . . . . . . . . 3 EDU 3510 Perspectives in Bilin gual/Bic ultural Education ...... ....................... 4 EDU 4510 Deve l opment of Methods and M aterials for t h e Bilin g u al/Bic ultura l C l assroo m .... 4 EDU 4990 Student T eac hin g and Seminar ( Bilin g ual ) -Qr-EDU 4520** Practicum in Bilingual/Bicultural Education. .................. 3-6 RDG 3530 Technique of Teaching R eading to Non-English Speakers ..................... 2 RDG 3580 Reading in the Bilingual/Bicultural Clas room .............................. 3 SPA 3100 Spani s h Terminology for the Bilin gual Classroom ........................... 3

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178 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES One of the following cour es SPA 3110 Advanced Conversation .... .............. ...... ................. .... 3 SPA 3150 Spanish Phonetic : Theory and Pra ctice ...................... ............ 3 SPA 3220 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwe s t ............................. 3 Total. ....... ....................... ...... .................. ....... 28-31 Required for bilingual endorsement. **Required for students seeking minor only. PREPARAT ION REQUIREMENTS Language Proficiency: Proficiency in oral and written Spanish is determined by a committee composed of Spani h-peaking members of the Modern Language Chicano Studie and Early Childhood Ele mentary and Special Education Department The fourkiU exam is one of the a e sment that is used as the proficiency measure. Students who fail to achieve a atisfactory core on the proficiency exami nation are required to take sufficient Spanish cia ses to enable them to pa the proficiency examination. The follow ing cour e are designed to help student meet the proficiency requirements before the com pletion of the bilinguallbicultural minor: SPA 1010 Elementary Spanish I ................................................ 5 SPA 1020 Elementary Spanish ll ............................................... 5 SPA 2110 Intermediate Spani s h ..... .......... .......................... ....... 3 SPA 2120 Spanish Reading and Conversation ... .................................. 3 EARLY C HI LDHOOD EDUCATION MINOR The minor i n Early Childhood Education will be of interest to those students w h o are pur uin g ele mentary l icen ure and are most interested in grades K 3 and are p l anning career as directors or work ers in preschool settings or intend to pur sue graduate studie in special education, psychology social work or other related fields with a focus on working with young children. Required Courses Seme ter Hour EDU 2340 Urban Early Childhood Education ..................... ................ 3 EDU 2350* Urban Early Childhood Education Field Experience .......................... 2 EDU 2360 Expressive Arts for the Young Child ...... ............................... 2 EDU 3350 Documentation Assessment and Deci ion Making for Early Childhood ........... 3 EDU 3370 Language Arts and Social Studies Methods for Early Childhood ................ 3 EDU 43 I 0 Parent as Partner s in Education ......................................... 3 EDU 4370** Pla nning a Devel opme ntally Appropriate Early Childhood Clas room ....... .... 3 EDU 4380** Teaching Practicum in Pr e -Primary Early Childhood Education ............... 3-6 Subtotal ....................................................... ............ 22-25 *T hese two courses must be taken concurrently. **These two courses must be taken concurrently. Note: PSY 1800 Developmental Educational Psyc holo gy is a prerequisite to all 3000and 4000-leve/ early childhood education courses. Additional Requirements for Added Endorsement ( dual licensure) An acceptable major, General Studies cour ework and cour ework in the elementary education profes sional sequence that fulfill elementary licensure requirement RDG 3120 Developing Print Literacy: Preschool Grade 3 ................. .......... 4 E G 3460 Children's Literature ................................... ............. 3 An add i tional 6 semester hour s of student teaching at the early chi l dhood level ............... .. 6 Total ............................................. ...................... 35-38 S PECIAL E D UCATI O N MINOR The minor in special education is de igned to prepare teachers, physical educators, counselor and pro fessionals to work with exceptional students in educational, therapeutic, and recreational settings. The minor may a l so lead to a graduate program in special education. Students who pursue thi area of study may choo e to pursue the standard minor (wnich i 18 hour of credit), or MSCDIUCD compo ite pro gram (whic h is 24 hours of credit from MSCD plus an additional 18 hour of UCD graduate c r ed i t), which leads to Teacher I endorsement. A program for licensure in special education and for dual licen sure i being piloted. Contact the Department of Early Childhood, Elementary and Special Education for information 303-556-6228.

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SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 179 SPECIAL EDUCATION Co CENTRA TION I Choo s e one of the following two program s ( MSCD or MSCDIUCD Teacher 1). MSCD SED 3600 The Exceptional Leamer in the Cla ss room .. .................. ... 3 PLUS a minimum of 15 hours from the following program : SED 3700 Educational Exceptionality a nd Human Growth ............................ 3 SED 3800 Teac hing Stud e n ts wi th Learning and Beh av ior D isor d ers ..................... 3 SED 3850 Diag no s i s and Evaluation of Excepti o nal Students .... ..... . ... .... 3 SED 4000 CoUaborative Pra ctices in Special Education .......... . . . ........ 3 SED 4200 Language D eve lopm e nt and Learnin g Di sa biliti es ...................... . 3 SED 4250 Cl ass room M a n age m ent for Exceptional Students . . . . ... 3 Total . ........................................ .... ......... ......... 1 8 MSCD/UCD TEACHER I SED 3600 The Exceptional Leamer in th e Classroom .............................. ... 3 SED 3700 Educational Excepti o nal.ity and Human Growth ............................. 3 SED 3800 Teaching Students with Leam.ing a nd B e h avio r Di sorders ..................... 3 SED 3850 Diagno s i s a nd Evaluation of Exceptional Students .......................... 3 SED 4000 CoUa borative Practices in Speci al Education ...... ........... ......... 3 SED 4250 Classroom Managem e nt for E xce pti o nal Students ........................... 3 SED 4490 Special Edu ca tion Student Teachin g a nd Seminar ........................ 6-1 2 T o tal H ours R equ ir e d . . . ................................. 24 PLUS additional UCD cour ses PARENT EDUCATIO MINOR The parent education minor is for s tudents e nterin g profession s involved with c hildr en and families. It provides the nece ssary knowledge and skills for workin g with parents. Also, the program add r esses a need identified in the community for people with s pecific prel?aration for the role of parent educator. Many agencies offer or are interested in offering parent educat ion programs yet no peciiic preparation for that role ha been available Thi minor is de s igned to make the field of parent education more cred ible by providing s tudents with ed u cation for that rol e and to g i ve students a se t of s kill s that are increa ingly in demand The minor i s seen as particularly appropriate for students entering family and child-relate d fields including education health care management human services, criminal jus tice (especially juvenile jus tice ) nursing and nurse pra ctit ioner programs psycholo gy, soci o logy social welfare, speec h and wom en's s tudie P eople entering these fields may be in a po s ition to develop and conduc t p arent education programs ; a minor in parent education s hould serve them well in the e mployment market Other field s might also provide opportunities to use this background Parent education happen s in settings rangin g from churches to industry and is not limited to educational settings in the u s ual se n se. The parent education minor encompasses three areas of preparation One se t of classes i s intended to give students ba ic information nece ss ary for effecti ve parenting (c hild d eve lopm ent, parenting tech niques family management and health care) The second facet of the program giv es s tudents the skills necessary for developing and conducting parent education programs s uch as group techniques and pro gram dev e lopment. The third component of the program entail actual field experience worki n g in par ent education programs. Thi s experience is incorporated into a number of ch!s es and is the central com ponent of the final course in the minor A field placement i s required in the last se me s ter. Placement opportunities include parent education in ho sp it a l s, social s ervice agencies, public and priv ate schools, and busine ss and indu s try. Students work closely with a parent education program advisor to en s ure an appropriate field placement. For more information 303-556-2759. Required Cour s e s Semester Hour s PAR 2050 Introduction to Parent Educatio n . . ................................ 3 PSY 1800 D eve lopmental Educational P syc h o logy o rPSY 2210 P syc holog y of Hum a n D eve l opment -orPSY HSP PSY PAR 3250 2040 2240 3070 Child P syc h o logy ..... ............ ................... ........ ... 3-4 F a mily Fun c tion D ys function and The r a py . . .................. 4 Pare nting Tec hniqu es .................................. .............. 3 Working with the Contemporary Famil y .................................. 3

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180 SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONA L STUDIES HES 3070 Parental Health Care I s ues ................................ .......... 3 EDU 4070 Designing and I mplementing P rogram for Ad ult L earners ..... ............. 3 PAR 4890 Parent Education Field Placement. ...................... ................. 3 Total ...................................................................... 25-26 Minimum hour s req uired for the minor are 25-26 ( d ependi n g on co ur es e l ec ted). If th e parent educa tion minor is combined with a major in the Education Hum an Servi ces, Nursing, or Ps yc hology Depart ments the co mbined t o t a l seme ter h ours for the m ajor and minor mu t be 60 hours. Su c h a pro g r am mu t include all courses requir ed for the major and tho e listed her e as req uired for tbe parent educa tion minor. Approval b y both departments w ill be n ecessary for s uch a co mbined program. Note: For des cr iptions of o th er co urses included in the minor, see appropriate department listings: EDU-Education ; HES-Hea.lth Services; HSP Hum an Services; NUR Nursing; PSY-P sychology; SOC So cio logy; WMS -Women's Studies Rea din g, pl ease see pa ge 218 o f t hi s C a talog SECONDARY EDUCATION D EPARTMENT LICENSURE IN SECONDARY AND K-12 EDUCATION The Secondary Education D epartme nt offers professional pr e par ation for teachin g a nd ed ucation r e l ated car ee r s in co llab o ration with the R ea din g pro g r a m and various m ajo r department s. This depart ment prepares students t o a ppl y to the Colorado D epartme nt of Education for prov i s ional teacher licen s ur e to t eac h in secondary sc h oo l s (7-12 grades) with en dor e me n t s in: English lndu trial Arts Mathematic s Modem Langua ges (French, Spani h German) Physi ca l Education Science Social Studies Spanjsh Speech Th e Secondary Education D e partm e nt 303556 6227, al o offe r a K -12 pr ofessiona l teachi n g seque n ce in collaboratio n with three m ajor departments. These K 1 2 seque n ces prepar e st u dents to app l y for K 1 2 provisional l icensure w ith endorsements in art, mu s i c, or physica l education. All econdary and K-12 s tud ent must have two advisors, o n e in seco nd ary ed ucation a nd one in their major area All but two of the 12 majors a secondary educatio n s tud e nt can c hoo se from are fou n d in tbi Catalog under the major department. Two of the major scie n ce and ocial s tudi es do not match a major found in this Catalog so they are o utlin ed in thi ectio n SECONDA R Y PROFESS I ONAL EDUCATION SEQUENCE An addi tion a l program in middle-level ed u catio n i s being proposed, as i a new seco ndar y majo r in busin ess. Check with the Secondary Education D e p artme nt for further information. In a dditio n to a major in one of the above a r ea and a minor as required, stude nt s mu t comp l e te the following profe s sional co ur se p rogram: Requ ired C o ur es Seme ste r Hour E DS 311 0 P roce ses of Education in Multicultural Urban Secondary choo l ............. 3 EDS 3 1 20* Field Ex p eriences in Multicultural Urban Secon d ary School s ................ 3 E DS 3200 Educational P syc hology Applied to Teachlng .......................... 3 EDS 3210** Secondary School Curric ulum and C l ass room M a n agement .................. 3 EDS 3220* Field Experience in Teaclting Material s Construc tion and Classroo m Mana gement ... 3 EDT 3610* ** Introduction to Educational Technology ................................ 1-3 RDG 3280 Teaching of Readin g and Writing in the Content Area .................... ... 4 SED 3600 The Exceptional Learner in the Classroom .............. ....... ....... 3 (or physical education majo r s may tak e HPS 4620, Adaptive Hum an Performan ce an d SportS Activities) Methods of Teaching the Major. . . ......... ............. ... 3 Subtotal .................. .......................... ........ ........... 26-28

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I I SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 181 Teaching Practi ce EDS 4290 **** Student T eac hin g an d Seminar: S eco nd ary 7-12 ............. ............ 12 (av ail able umm e r t erm only with pecial arran ge m e nts )