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Catalog, Metropolitan State College of Denver, 2008-2009

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Catalog, Metropolitan State College of Denver, 2008-2009
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Metropolitan State College of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Metropolitan State College of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Metropolitan State University of Denver
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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AURARIA LIBRARY
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Auraria Campus
Campus parking is available in lots A-N and R. Tivoli Lot is visitor's parking.
CAMPUS BUILDINGS
AD.............Administration Building
AR.............Arts Building
AU.............Auraria Library and
Media Center (now LM)
ELC............Auraria Early Learning Center
CC.............Children's College
CN.............Central Classroom Building
CU.............University of Colorado
at Denver Building
EG.............Emmanuel Gallery
FA.............Facilities Annex (was PS)
FM.............Facilities Management
GM.............Golda Meir House
KC.............Kenneth King Center
LW.............Lawrence Street Center
LM.............Auraria Library and
Media Center (was AU)
NC.............North Classroom Building
NP.............Ninth Street Park
PD.............Printing Distribution Center
PE.............PE/Events Center
PL.............Plaza Building (Health Center)
PS.............Public Safety (now FA)
PTC............Parking and Transportation
Centre Offices
RO.............Rectory Offices (St. Cajetan's)
SA.............St. Cajetan's Center
SE.............St. Elizabeth's Church
SF.............St. Francis
Conference Center
SI.............Science Building
SO.............South Classroom Building
SS.............Seventh Street Building
TE.............Technology Building
TAPS...........Tivoli Auraria
Parking Structure ^
TEN............Tennis Courts
TV.............Tivoli Student Union
WC.............West Classroom Building


Campus Locations
Apply early at any of Metro State's three convenient campuses.
Aurarla Campus 303-556-3058 Central Classroom Bldg.,
Room 108
Mailing Address:
Campus Box 16 P.0.80x 173362 Denver, CO 80217-3362
Metro North 303-450-5111 11990 Grant Street Suite 102
Northglenn, CO 80233
Metro South 303-721-1313
5660 Greenwood Plaza Blvd. Suite L100 Englewood, CO 80111
Online Courses 303-556-5227
http://clem.mscd.edu/-options Central Classroom, Room 220-H Auraria Campus
For an admission application and
telephone registration instructions please refer to the
index.
www.mscd.edu
Northglenn
Metropolitan State College of Denver is an Equal Access/Equal Opportunity Institution.


m g t r o
majors
and
programs
Metropolitan State College of Denver
OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS
Campus Box 16 P.O. Box 173362 Denver, CO 80217-3362
www•mscd■edu
state
BUSINESS Page
Accounting.......................................79
Computer Information Systems.....................83
Economics........................................96
Finance .........................................87
Management.......................................91
Marketing .......................................93
HUMANITIES
Art.............................................108
English.........................................132
Journalism......................................152
Modern Languages................................170
Music...........................................176
Music Education ............................181,346
Philosophy......................................186
Speech Communication ...........................205
Theatre.........................................211
PUBLIC SERVICE PROFESSIONS
Criminal Justice and Criminology................233
Health Care Management .........................242
Hospitality, Tourism and Events.................246
Human Performance and Sport.....................251
Human Services..................................258
Nursing ........................................273
Nutrition.......................................276
Recreation Professions..........................280
SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
Biology.........................................119
Chemistry.......................................121
Computer Science................................127
Environmental Science...........................139
Land Use ...................................... 156
Mathematics.....................................163
Meteorology.....................................169
Physics.........................................188
SOCIAL SCIENCES
African and African American Studies ...........106
Anthropology ...................................107
Behavioral Science..............................118
Chicana/Chicano Studies.........................126
History.........................................144
Human Development.....................................148 *
Political Science ..............................189
Psychology......................................192
Social Work.....................................194
Sociology.......................................202
Women’s Studies.................................215
TECHNOLOGY
Aviation Management.............................219
Aviation Technology ............................223
Civil Engineering Technology....................231
Electrical Engineering Technology...............236
Industrial Design ..............................264
Mechanical Engineering Technology...............270
Surveying and Mapping ..........................282
Technical Communications .......................286
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Honors...........................................49
Individualized Degree Program.............10,50,53
Special Education ..............................352
Teacher Education...............................298


Welcome
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE 0/DENVER
This Catalog contains comprehensive information about Metropolitan State College of Denver, the degrees and programs it offers, and the requirements a student must satisfy before receiving a degree.
This publication describes admissions and registration procedures, as well as services offered by the College.
General information on tuition and fees, financial aid packages and procedures are also covered.
Information in this Catalog is subject to change For general College information go to MSCD’s web site (www.mscd.edu).
The programs, policies, statements and procedures contained in this publication are subject to change or correction by the College without prior notice. Metropolitan State College of Denver reserves the right to withdraw courses; revise the academic calendar; or change curriculum, graduation procedures, requirements and policies that apply to students at any time. Changes will become effective whenever the proper authorities so determine. This publication is not intended to be a contract between the student and Metropolitan State College of Denver. However, students are bound by the policies, procedures, standards and requirements stated herein,
so long as they are in effect.


TABLE OF CONTENTS 3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
(See alphabetical index for specific topics)
The College and Mission Statement.........................................5
Academic Calendar.........................................................7
Degrees and Programs......................................................8
Basic Degree Requirements................................................12
Admissions...............................................................16
Enrollment...............................................................23
Registration.............................................................23
Tuition and Fees.........................................................26
Financial Aid............................................................27
Services and Programs for Students..................................... 31
Student Life.............................................................38
Alternative Credit Options...............................................41
Special Academic Programs................................................49
General Studies Program..................................................53
Additional Graduation Requirements (Multicultural and Senior Experience) .. 59
Academic Policies and Procedures.........................................61
Student Rights and Responsibilities......................................69
School of Business.......................................................77
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences....................................105
School of Professional Studies..........................................217
Teacher Education.......................................................298
Course Descriptions.....................................................259
Board of Trustees-Metropolitan State College of Denver..................598
Officers of Administration..............................................598
Faculty.................................................................601
Alphabetical Index......................................................614
Auraria Campus Map........................................Inside Front Cover
Extended Campus Location Map..............................Inside Back Cover
Produced by: The Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of College Communications —2008


GENERAL INFORMATION 5
GENERAL INFORMATION THE COLLEGE
Metropolitan State College of Denver is a comprehensive, baccalaureate-degree granting, urban college that offers arts and sciences, professional, and business courses and programs to a diverse student population in an atmosphere of mutual respect. Excellence in teaching and learning is Metro State’s primary objective.
The mission of Metro State is to provide a high-quality, accessible, enriching education that prepares students for successful careers, post-graduate education, and lifelong learning in a multicultural, global, and technological society. To fulfill its mission, Metro States diverse college community engages the community at large in scholarly inquiry, creative activity, and the application of knowledge.
With its modified open admissions policy, the College welcomes students from all walks of life and circumstances, including all levels of academic preparation consistent with statutory guidelines, all conditions of economic and income status, all ages, and all ethnic and cultural backgrounds. In addition to degreeseeking students, non-degree students seeking opportunities for continuing education are welcomed.
• Metro State is required to serve adult students. Students who are 20 years of age or older and hold a GED or high school diploma are automatically admitted to Metro State, irrespective of their academic record.
• Metro State is required to serve traditional-age students of all levels of achievement and potential. As a result, the College enrolls a rich mix of recent high school graduates and transfer students, many with excellent grades and test scores and others with more modest achievements.
• Metro State is required to be accessible to all citizens. That is why with its tuition remaining among the lowest in the state, Metro State is Colorado’s best value in education.
The College is a teaching institution where excellence in teaching and learning is accorded the highest priority. Student success, supported in a collegial atmosphere of academic freedom, is of paramount importance, and all members of the college community seek to inspire students to strive for the highest level of achievement. The College endeavors to provide students with an education that enhances the quality of their lives, and enables them to be well-educated, critically thinking citizens who contribute and participate in meaningful ways in community and civic life.
The College awards bachelor of science, bachelor of arts, bachelor of fine arts, bachelor of music and bachelor of music education degrees. Students can choose from 52 majors and 82 minors offered through three schools: Business; Letters, Arts and Sciences; and Professional Studies. Programs range from the traditional disciplines, such as history and biology, to contemporary fields of study, such as Chicano studies and health care management. The College offers several bachelor’s degree programs unique in Colorado, including aviation management, health care management, land use, meteorology, surveying and mapping, and integrated therapeutic practices. Students may also design their own degree through the Individualized Degree Program.
Students
As an urban college committed to serving the local community, Metro State attracts students from a diverse mixture of age groups, socioeconomic classes, ethnic backgrounds and lifestyles. The College’s curriculum and philosophy reflect that diversity and enrich the urban experience.
Current enrollment is 21,453. Students range in age from 15 to 73 with a median age of 23. Students of color make up 24 percent of the student population.
About sixty percent of students are enrolled full time. Sixty percent are 24 years old or younger. Ninety-two percent of students reside in the seven county area of the Denver metropolitan area:
Adams 12% Denver 26%
Arapahoe 21% Douglas 9%
Boulder 4% Jefferson 17%
Broomfield 3%


6 GENERAL INFORMATION
Faculty
Metro State has nearly 500 full-time faculty. Professors are recruited and evaluated for their ability to teach and engage students. All classes are taught by academic instructors. As a culturally diverse team of academicians, 45 percent of full-time faculty are women, and 19 percent represent ethnic minorities.
The College also brings real-world education into the classroom by hiring adjunct faculty who work in the Denver metropolitan community and use their expertise and experience in the arts, business, communication, law, politics, the sciences and technology in their teaching.
The Campuses
Metropolitan State College of Denver is located at the Auraria Higher Education Center, a 127-acre campus in downtown Denver at Speer Boulevard and West Colfax Avenue. The Community College of Denver and the University of Colorado Denver share the facilities with Metro State.
The campus includes more than one million square feet of space for classrooms, laboratories and offices. Some administrative offices are located in restored Victorian homes in Denvers historic Ninth Street Park located on the Auraria site. The campus also features a child care center; a comprehensive, 184,000 square-foot library designed by Helmut Jahn of CF Murphy, which won an award from the American Institute of Architects; and one of the most unusual student union facilities in the country in the historic Bavarian-style Tivoli Brewery Building. Excellent physical fitness facilities include a block-long physical education/events center with a swimming pool, weight room, game courts, dance studios, a climbing wall, and event seating for 3,000.
The Auraria Higher Education Centers proximity to downtown Denver enables students and faculty to use the community as a learning laboratory and to connect classroom theory to the cultural, economic, social, and political practices of the city.
The College also has two satellite campus sites operated by the Extended Campus Program. Metro South, located at 5660 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard in Arapahoe County, serves the south, southeast, and southwest metropolitan areas. Metro North, located at 11990 Grant Street in Adams County, serves the north, northeast, and northwest areas. Each site is located 14 miles from the Auraria campus along the 1-25 corridor.
A variety of courses are offered during the evenings and on Saturdays on the Auraria campus and at Metro South and Metro North. At least 16 degree programs can be completed by taking a combination of courses scheduled during the evenings, weekends and online. Metro State offers classes in traditional formats as well as telecourses, online courses and correspondence courses. General information about these programs can be obtained from the Office of Admissions or the Academic Advising Center.
Distance Education Options
Metro State offers several options for distance education: online courses, hybrid courses (online/class-room combination), telecourses and correspondence courses.
Online education (online and hybrid) is the fastest-growing distance education option at Metro State with almost 5,000 students registering for one or more online courses during the Fall 2007 semester. Metro State’s online courses tend to be small and highly interactive for both instructors and students. A student can complete General Studies Requirements online. For information about completing a major, minor, or certificate online, please contact the appropriate academic department. Please check with academic advisors and visit the Metro State Web site for more specific information about the online learning environment, recommended computer equipment, and other online services that are offered by the College (www.mscd.edu).
2+2 Coordinated Degree Program
The Metropolitan State College of Denver and Front Range Community College have created a program that will allow students to complete a bachelor’s degree at the Front Range Community College Campus. The 2+2 Coordinated Degree Program combines the convenience of the community college with the resources of a large urban four-year college and is located on the FRCC Westminster Campus.


GENERAL INFORMATION 7
The 2+2 Coordinated Degree Program consists of:
• Two years at Front Range Community College (60 hours)
• Two years enrolled as a Metro State student, taking Metro State classes
Currently the 2+2 Coordinated Degree Program offers two major programs:
• Major in Management
• Major in Marketing
Other programs are under development. For more information, visit the Metro State Academic Advising page at www.mscd.edu/~advising/infomaj.htm. Alternatively, go to the Front Range Advising Center and make an appointment with Mr. Dave Cisneros to fill out a Priority Admissions Application. The application fee is $25.
Students should apply for financial aid awards through Metropolitan State College of Denver for courses taken under the 2+2 Coordinated Degree Program. A student must be admitted to the 2+2 Program and registered for Metro State courses offered on the FRCC campus to be eligible for financial aid at Metro State.
2008-2009 ACADEMIC CALENDAR
2008 Fall Semester
Registration ......................................................April-August 18
Orientation* ......................................................April-August 18
Classes start ..................................................Monday, August 11
Campus Closed-Democratic National Convention. .Saturday, August 23 - Friday, August 29
Application for Graduation Deadline.............................Friday, August 22
Labor Day (campus closed)....................................Monday, September 1
Monday —Wednesday before Thanksgiving (campus open, no classes)....November 24-26
Thanksgiving Day (campus closed)...........................Thursday, November 27
Friday after Thanksgiving (campus open, no classes)..........Friday, November 28
Classes end .................................................Saturday, December 6
Final exams begin............................................Monday, December 8
Final exams end............................................Saturday, December 13
Commencement.................................................Sunday, December 14
2009 Spring Semester
Registration ........................................
Orientation* ........................................
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (campus open, no classes)
Classes start .......................................
Application for Graduation Deadline..................
Spring Break ........................................
Classes end .........................................
Final exams begin....................................
Final exams end......................................
Commencement (tentative**)...........................
........November-January 16
........November-January 16
...........Monday, January 19
..........Tuesday, January 20
...........Friday, January 30
Monday—Sunday, March 16-22
.............Saturday, May 9
..............Monday, May 11
............Saturday, May 16
..............Sunday, May 17
2009 Summer Semester
Registration .......................................................April-May 24
Orientation* .......................................................April-May 24
Memorial Day (campus closed)......................................Monday, May 25
Classes start ......................................................Tuesday, May 26
Application for Graduation Deadline.................................Friday, June 5
Independence Day (campus closed)....................................Friday, July 3
Classes end ......................................................Saturday, August 1


8 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
2009 Fall Semester
Registration ......................................................April-August 14
Orientation* ......................................................April-August 14
Classes start ................................................Monday, August 17
Application for Graduation Deadline................................Friday, August 28
Labor Day (campus closed).....................................Monday, September 7
Monday—Wednesday before Thanksgiving (campus open, no classes) ... November 23-25
Thanksgiving Day (campus closed)............................Thursday, November 26
Friday after Thanksgiving (campus open, no classes)...........Friday, November 27
Classes end ..................................................Saturday, December 5
Final exams start.............................................Monday, December 7
Final exams end.............................................Saturday, December 12
Commencement (tentative**)..................................Sunday, December 13
*For information, call 303-556-6931.
**Call 303-556-6226 to confirm time and location for commencement.
DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
Metropolitan State College of Denver is organized into three schools. The schools are listed below with the majors and minors offered by each. The curriculum requirements for each of the programs are described in the Catalog in the special sections prepared by each school.
Major Minor Degree
School of Business
Accounting.............................................X........x........B.S.
Computer Information Systems...........................X........x........B.S.
Economics..............................................X........x........B.A.
Finance................................................X........x........B.S.
Financial Services..............................................x
General Business................................................x
International Business..........................................x
Management.............................................X........x........B.S.
Marketing..............................................X........x........B.S.
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
African and African-American Studies...................X........x........B.A.
Anthropology...........................................X........x........B.A.
Art....................................................X..........B.F.A./B.A.
Art History, Theory and Criticism...............................x
Behavioral Science.....................................X.................B.A.
Biology................................................X........x.. . .B.A./B.S.
Chemistry..............................................X........x... .B.A./B.S.
Chicano Studies........................................X........x........B.A.
Cinema Studies..................................................x
Computer Science.......................................X........x........B.S.
Criminalistics..................................................x
Digital Media...................................................x
English................................................X........x........B.A.
Environmental Science..................................X.................B.S.
Environmental Studies...........................................x
Family Support in Social Work...................................x
French..........................................................x
Geography.......................................................x
Geographic Information Systems..................................x
Geology.........................................................x
German..........................................................x
Gerontology.....................................................x
History................................................X........x........B.A.


DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 9
Major
Human Development......................................X..
Interdisciplinary Legal Studies............................
Journalism.............................................X..
Language and Linguistics...................................
Land Use...............................................X..
Mathematics............................................X..
Meteorology............................................X..
Modern Languages Option I (French, German, Spanish)... X..
Modern Languages Option II.............................X..
Music..................................................X..
Music Education........................................X..
Native American Studies....................................
Parent Education...........................................
Philosophy.............................................X..
Photojournalism............................................
Physics................................................X..
Political Science......................................X..
Psychology.............................................X..
Public Administration......................................
Public Relations...........................................
Religious Studies..........................................
Social Work............................................X..
Sociology..............................................X..
Spanish....................................................
Speech Communication...................................X..
Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences.........................
Studio Art.................................................
Training and Organizational Development....................
Theatre................................................X..
Women’s Studies (Institute for Womens Studies and Services)..........................
School of Professional Studies
Airframe and Powerplant Mechanics........................
Aviation Management.....................................X
Aviation Technology.....................................X
Bilingual/Biculturcd Education...........................
Civil Engineering Technology*...........................X
Criminal Justice and Criminology........................X
Digital Media............................................
Early Childhood Education................................
Eating Disorders.........................................
Electrical Engineering Technology*......................X
Elementary Education.....................................
Gerontology..............................................
Health and Safety........................................
Health Care Management..................................X
Hospitality, Tourism, and Events........................X
Hotel....................................................
Human Nutrition - Dietetics.............................X
Human Performance and Sport.............................X
Human Services..........................................X
Industrial Design.......................................X
Integrated Therapeutic Practices........................X
Linguistically Diverse Education.........................
Mechanical Engineering Technology*......................X
Network Communications...................................
Nursing (upper-division for RNs)........................X
Nutrition...............................................X
Parent Education.........................................
Minor Degree ...........B.A.
x.........B.A.
.....B.A./B.S.
x... .B.A./B.S.
x.........B.S.
..........B.A.
..........B.A.
x.. .B.A./B.M. ......B.M.E.
x........B.A.
x... .B.A./B.S.
x.........B.A.
x.........B.A.
x
..........B.S.
x.........B.A.
x.........B.A.
x
x
X. .B.A./B.F.A.
x
X.........B.S.
x.........B.S.
x
...........B.S.
x..........B.S.
x
X
X
X..........B.S.
X
X
X
x..........B.S.
...........B.A.
x
...........B.S.
x..........B.A.
x..........B.S.
...........B.S.
x..........B.S.
x
X..........B.S.
x
...........B.S.
x..........B.S.


10 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
Major Minor Degree
Pre-Healthcare...................................................x
Private Pilot....................................................x
Recreation Professions.................................X..................B.S.
Recreation Services*.............................................x
Restaurant.......................................................x
Secondary Education..............................................x
Special Education.......................................X........x........B.A.
Special Events...................................................x
Surveying and Mapping...................................X........x........B.S.
Technical Communication.................................X........x........B.S.
Training and Organizational Development..........................x
Tourism..........................................................x
Other
Individualized Degree Program1..........................X........x... .B.A./B.S.
Teacher Licensing: Early Childhood, Elementary,
Special Education, K-12, and Secondary.........................Licensure only
^Concentration may replace the minor, 'see pages 53 of this Catalog
Individualized Degree Program
The Individualized Degree Program (IDP) offers students the opportunity to design specific, interdisciplinary degree programs to meet educational goals not met by other majors or minors at the College. Some examples of areas of study include: International Studies, Child & Family Advocacy, Web Development, Emergency Services Management, Creative Arts for the Elderly, Cultural Resource Management, Nonprofit Administration in Urban Communities, Environmental Studies and Public Administration, and Computer Security.
More information about the program is available on page 53 of this catalog, from the Center for Individualized Learning (St. Francis Center, 2nd floor, room 10, 303-556-8342) and at www.mscd.edu/~cil/.
Accreditations / Approvals
Metropolitan State College of Denver is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (30 North LaSalle St., Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602-2504, 1-800-621-7440). Individual academic programs within the following areas are accredited or approved by the following agencies:
Program Accreditation/Approval Agency
Accounting** Colorado State Board of Accountancy
Adult Fitness/Exercise Science*** American College of Sports Medicine
Athletic Training Education Program* Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) 35 East Whacker Dr., Suite 1970 Chicago, IL 60601 (312)553-9355 www.caahep.org
Aviation & Aerospace Science** Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA)
Center for Addiction Studies* International Coalition for Addiction Studies Education (INCASE)
Chemistry** American Chemical Society
Civil Engineering Technology* Electrical Engineering Technology* Mechanical Engineering Technology* Accredited by the Technology Commission of ABET 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 Telephone: 410-347-7700
Computer Science* Accredited by the Computing Commission of ABET 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 Phone:410-347-7700)
Drug, Alcohol, Addictive Behavior Counselor** Colorado Department of Health - Center for Addiction Studies


DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 11
Surveying and Mapping* Accredited by the Applied Science Commission of ABET 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 Phone:410-347-7700
Criminalistics Program in Chemistry** Forensic Science Education Program Accreditation Commission
Health Care Management** Association of University Programs in Health Administration 730 11th Street, NW 4th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001-4510 Phone: 202-638-1448 Fax: 202-638-3429 www.aupha.org email: aupha@aupha.org
Recreation Professions* National Recreation and Park Association
Human Services** Council for Standards in Human Services Education
Art* Industrial Design* National Association of Schools of Art and Design 11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21, Reston, VA Phone:703-437-0700 Fax:703-437-6312
Music* National Association of Schools of Music
Nursing* National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) 61 Broadway, 33rd Floor, New York, NY 10006 Phone: 212-363-5555, Ext. 153
Social Work* Council on Social Work Education
Teacher Education* National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education; Colorado Department of Education
* Accreditation / **Approval / ***Endorsed
Certificates of Completion
Certificate programs provide opportunities to successfully complete a series of five to eight academic credit courses that focus on a particular area of career interest. Each certificate program is designed to stand alone or merge with your degree program major or minor. The certificate title and date of award will appear on your transcript. The certificate program is coordinated by the Office of Academic Affairs, 303-556-2442.
Students must complete each course in the certificate program with a grade of “C” or better. The courses cannot be taken pass/fail.
School of Business
Database Analyst..................................................................90
End User Support Specialist.......................................................91
International Business..............................................................
Network Specialist in Information Systems.........................................90
Noncredit Financial Planning......................................................95
Personal Financial Planning.......................................................95
Programmer/Analyst in Information Systems.........................................90
Web Developer in Information Systems .............................................91
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Advanced Software Engineering Techniques.........................................131
Basic Competency in French......................................................175
Basic Competency in German......................................................175
Basic Competency in Spanish.....................................................175
Career and Personal Development..................................................216
Family Support in Social Work (seven concentrations available)...................199
Geographic Information Systems (GIS).............................................162
Geotechnology Systems (GTS)......................................................163


12 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
German Translation..................................................................174
Gerontology (Liberal Arts Orientation)..............................................204
Public Administration...............................................................191
Spanish Translation.................................................................176
Speech-Language Pathology Assistant.................................................210
Speech, Hearing, Language Sciences (Leveling Certificate)...........................211
School of Professional Studies
Airport Management..................................................................227
Corporate Video Production..........................................................294
Electrical Engineering Technology...................................................237
Engineering Fundamentals............................................................238
Gerontology (Professional Services Orientation).....................................240
High Risk Youth Studies.............................................................262
Multimedia Production...............................................................293
Network Communications..............................................................236
Nonprofit Organization Administration...............................................263
Space Commercialization.............................................................229
Surveying Certificates:
Cadastral Surveying...........................................................286
Engineering/Construction Surveying............................................285
Land Surveying................................................................285
Surveying Management..........................................................286
Precise Surveying.............................................................284
Technical Writing and Editing.......................................................294
BASIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Students are responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to their program contained in this Catalog and elsewhere. Students have final responsibility for completing the requirements for a degree and are urged to seek advising. Students should never assume that they have approval to deviate from a stated requirement without a properly signed statement to that effect. Please refer to the Academic Policies and Procedures section in this Catalog.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL BACHELOR’S DEGREES
To earn a bachelor of science, a bachelor of arts, bachelor of music education, or a bachelor of fine arts degree, a student must satisfy the following minimum requirements, plus any others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate. Please refer to the Academic Policies and Procedures section in this Catalog.
• Complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher for all course work.
• Complete at least 40 semester hours in upper-division courses (3000- and 4000-level courses).
• Complete all General Studies requirements listed for the degree and major.
• Complete a three-hour Multicultural course requirement.
• Complete a three-hour Senior Experience course requirement. This course must be taken at Metro State.
• Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 30 semester hours. With certain exceptions (see the Degrees and Programs section on page 8 of this Catalog), complete a minor consisting of at least 18 semester hours. If a student completes two majors, the second major satisfies the minor requirement. Completing two concentrations under one major does not constitute the completion of two majors. Completion of two majors does not result in two degrees or diplomas. Coursework used to meet requirements for one major or minor may not be used to meet requirements for another major or minor. Students may not major and minor in the same discipline and are encouraged to obtain verification from an advisor if uncertainty exists.
• Complete all special requirements of a department and school.


DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 13
• Achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in all Metro State courses that satisfy the requirements for the major, and for all Metro State courses that satisfy requirements for a minor. Students should check with an advisor for special GPA program requirements.
• File an Application for Graduation with the Office of the Registrar by the following deadlines: Fall 2008—August 22,2008; Spring 2009—January 30,2009; Summer 2009—June 5, 2009.
• Academic residency (classroom credit) requirements:
- Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of academic credit at Metro State, including the last 12 semester hours applicable to the degree.
- Complete at least 8 upper-division (3000- and 4000-level courses) semester hours of the major and 3 upper-division semester hours of the minor at Metro State (classroom credit).
- Students should be aware that University of Colorado Denver pooled courses will not satisfy academic residence requirements at Metro State. Physics (PHY) courses are excluded from this restriction. To use an Metro State-UCD pooled course for the last 12 hours residency requirement a student must (1) complete a minimum of 30 hours credit at Metro State prior to graduation and (2) obtain permission from the major or minor department prior to taking a pooled course for use to meet a requirement in the major or minor program.
Credit Limitations
• No more than 30 semester hours of omnibus-numbered courses may be applied toward graduation requirements, except for music.
• No more than 30 semester hours taken by correspondence may be applied toward a bachelor’s degree.
• No more than 4 semester hours in human performance and leisure activity (HPL) or varsity sports (ATH) courses will be counted toward a bachelor’s degree for students who are not majoring in Human Performance and Sport.
• No more than 7 semester hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a bachelor’s degree for students who are not majoring in music.
Student Bill of Rights
The General Assembly implemented the Student Bill of Rights (C.R.S. 23-1-125) to assure that students enrolled in public institutions of higher education have the following rights:
1. Students should be able to complete their baccalaureate programs in no more than one hundred twenty credit hours unless there are additional degree requirements recognized by the commission;
2. A student can sign a four-year graduation agreement that formalizes a plan for that student to obtain a degree in four years, unless there are additional degree requirements recognized by the commission. Students interested in signing a four-year agreement must be admitted to Metro State by July 1, must work with the Advising Center during July, and register for 15 credits approved by the Advising Center by July 30. Students should go to the Advising Center for details.
3. Students have a right to clear and concise information concerning which courses must be completed successfully to complete their degrees;
4. Students have a right to know which courses are transferable among the state’s public two-year and four-year institutions of higher education;
5. Students, upon successful completion of core general education courses, should have those courses satisfy the core course requirements of all Colorado public institutions of higher education;
6. Students have a right to know if courses from one or more public higher education institutions satisfy the students’ degree requirements;
7. A student’s credit for the completion of the core requirements and core courses shall not expire for ten years from the date of initial enrollment and shall be transferable.
REQUIREMENTS FOR A SECOND DEGREE
For an additional bachelor’s degree, students must comply with the following:
• The first bachelor’s degree must be recognized by Metropolitan State College of Denver.
• General Studies will be considered complete unless deficiencies exist according to the major department.


14 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
• Students must complete all requirements for a new major with a minimum of eight Metro State academic upper-division semester hours in the major department.
• Students do not need to complete a minor unless specifically required by the major department for the contemplated degree.
• Students must satisfy the Multicultural and Senior Experience course requirements for the second degree.
• Students must spend at least two additional semesters in residence.
• Students must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of Metro State classroom credit after the awarding of the previous degree.
• Credit limitations for a bachelor’s degree also apply to the second degree. (See College Opportunity Fund under Tuition & Fees for specific limitations.)
• An Application for Graduation must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar by the deadline stipulated on Metro State’s Web site under Academic Calendar (www.mscd.edu/ academic/acal.htm).
GRADUATION CHECKLIST
• Review the Requirements for All Bachelor Degrees.
• Review the Academic Policies and Procedures (pertaining to CAPP, Graduation, Diplomas and Commencement, and Honors and Awards).
• Obtain a CAPP Compliance Report from their major department.
• If necessary, correct any discrepancies on CAPP report.
• File an Application for Graduation by the deadline for the term of graduation (www.mscd.edu/ academic/acal.htm).
• Ensure correct address is on file with the Office of the Registrar.
THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM
Philosophy of the General Studies Program
Metropolitan State College of Denver seeks to prepare its graduates for a lifetime of learning, which, in our changing and complex society, requires focused expertise (such as that provided by a major area of study) and the ability to communicate with and learn from experts in other fields. Undergraduate education fosters the critical thinking necessary for the exploration of unfamiliar disciplines and for the synthesis of learning and exposes students to the richness and variety of the intellectual universe.
General Studies Information
Students must use a single catalog to meet all degree requirements, including those in the General Studies, major and minor. As a consequence, many General Studies requirements and policies described in this Catalog may be followed by students using earlier catalogs.
State Guaranteed General Education Courses
Certain General Studies courses are approved as state guaranteed general education courses. This designation means that the course is transferable to general education or to electives at all Colorado public institutions. There are restrictions on the number of courses that can be taken, and some majors require specific general education courses. For details, go to page 54 of this Catalog, consult an advisor in your major or go to highered.colorado.gov/Academics/Transfers.
General Studies Goals
The General Studies Program is designed to help graduates achieve the following competencies. Students at Metropolitan State College of Denver should be able to:
• write and speak with clarity;
• read and listen critically;
• draw conclusions from quantitative data;
• recognize faulty reasoning;
• organize ideas; and
• communicate and learn from experts in other disciplines.


GENERAL STUDIES
1
Metro State students should:
• have an open attitude toward different approaches to problems;
• have an informed awareness of the principal human achievements in history, arts and letters, society, and science;
• and be introduced to the basic methods, knowledge, problems or attitudes characteristic of a field.
Structure of the General Studies Program
The General Studies Program is structured to foster the development of skills and to encourage students to use their mastery of skills to explore knowledge in a variety of disciplines. The General Studies Program provides two levels of experience:
Level I—Skills
Level I courses provide students with the basic skills of reading and listening critically, recognizing faulty reasoning, drawing conclusions from quantitative data, organizing ideas, and writing and speaking with clarity.
Level II-Breadth of Knowledge
Level II courses introduce students to the basic methods, knowledge, problems or attitudes characteristic of a field: encourage in students an open attitude toward different approaches to problems, enable students to communicate with experts in other disciplines and learn from them and cultivate in students an informed awareness of the principal achievements in history, arts and letters, social science and science. In addition, in Level II courses students will continue to develop their skills in language and mathematics.
Distribution and Credit Requirements of the General Studies Program
To complete their General Studies Program, students must take approved courses that fulfill the following distribution and credit requirements:
CATEGORY ... Level I*
Composition ..
Mathematics
Communications
SEMESTER HOURS
.............6
..............3
..............3
Level II*’
Historical ....................................................................................3
Arts and Letters...............................................................................6
Social Sciences................................................................................6
Natural Science................................................................................6
Total***......................................................................................33
*A transfer course or courses judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level 1 course requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Level I course.
**One-hour deviations in the Level II categories may be allowed.
***Except for Mathematics majors and minors, a students completed General Studies Program must contain at least 33 semester hours.
Basic Rules of the General Studies Program
• Only approved courses may be used to satisfy the General Studies requirements. A listing of these courses can be found in the Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements which contains all approved General Studies, Multicultural and Senior Experience courses. The document is available online and from academic departments, the Academic Advising Center and Academic Affairs (CN 318). This document also indicates which of the courses are approved as state guaranteed general education courses.


16 ADMISSIONS
• General Studies courses need not be counted toward General Studies requirements. They may be taken as electives or to satisfy requirements in the major or degree program.
• Departments or programs may specify, by prefix and number, some General Studies courses in addition to courses required for the major or a professional credential. Check with your departmental advisor.
ADMISSIONS
Admission Requirements
The College uses two categories for classifying applicants: those who are 19 years old or younger and those who are 20 or older. Based on the Colleges modified open admission system, each category has its own admission requirements and procedures.
Metro State students who have not attended the College for three consecutive semesters need to submit an application for readmission. For more information, see Admission of Previously Enrolled Students on page 19 of this Catalog.
Application Deadline
To find out the application deadline for your intended term of enrollment, please visit www.mscd.edu/ admissions.htm. For the best possible selection of courses, students are advised to apply early. Refer to page 7 of this Catalog for important dates.
APPLICANTS 19 YEARS OLD OR YOUNGER
Applicants who are 19 years old or younger on September 15 for either summer semester or fall semester, or on February 15 for spring semester, will be classified as traditional applicants. They will be considered for admission using the requirements described below. Note: to be eligible for admission, students must be at least 16 years old on the first day of the semester and must have either graduated from high school or received a General Education Development (GED) certificate.
Freshmen (first-time college students)
• Applicants with Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE) index scores of 76 or greater will be considered for admission. In addition, the graduating class of 2008 will also need to fulfill the Higher Education Admission Requirements. For a list of these requirements (www.state.co.us/ cche/academic/admissions.html) and a CCHE index chart, see page 17 of this catalog. Those with index scores below 85 are strongly encouraged to submit letters of recommendation and a personal statement, and must complete their application files by the posted Admissions Review deadline. Otherwise, they will be considered for the following term.
• Metro State guarantees admission to applicants with a CCHE index score of 85 or greater, an ACT English subscore of 18 or above and a reading subscore of 17 or above (or an SAT critical reading of 440 or above), and who have fulfilled the Higher Education Admission Requirements, and who apply by the published application deadline.
• Applicants must request that the following credentials be mailed directly to the Office of Admis
sions from the high school or testing agency before an admission decision can be made:
• ACT or SAT test results
• Official high school transcript with GPA and class rank
• This information may be submitted at the end of the sixth, seventh, or eighth semester of high school. An official, final transcript with date of graduation is required no later than the fourth week of the term of enrollment. Students should request the transcript and verify that the high school record with date of graduation has been received by the Office of Admissions. Degreeseeking students will not be permitted to register for a second semester until after this official credential is received.


SAT 400- 490 500- 540 550- 600 610- 680 690 740 750- 790 800- 830 840- 870 880- 920 930- 960 970- 1000 1010- 1040 1050- 1070 1080 1110 1120- 1150 1160 1190 1200 1230 1240- 1270 1280- 1300 1310- 1340 1350- 1390 1400- 1430 1440 1480 1490 1540 1550- 1590 1600
HS Rank ACT HSGPA 11 or Below 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
0-1 0.0-1.3 45 47 49 51 53 55 57 59 61 63 65 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 93 95 97
2-3 1.4-1.5 49 51 53 55 57 59 61 63 65 67 69 72 74 76 73 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 97 99 101
4 1.6 51 53 55 57 59 61 63 65 67 69 71 74 78 8C 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 % 99 101 103
5-6 1.7 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 75 81 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 100 102 104
7-8 1.8 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 77 79 8! 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 102 104 106
9-10 1.9 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 79 8! 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 101 104 106 108
11-12 2.0 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 /6 78 SI 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 101 103 106 108 110
13-15 2.1 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 101 103 105 108 110 112
16-18 2.2 61 63 65 67 69 71 73 75 77 79 81 81 86 88 90 92 94 % 98 100 102 104 106 109 111 113
19-22 2.3 63 65 67 69 71 73 75 77 79 81 83 86 88 90 92 94 % 98 100 102 104 106 108 111 113 115
23-26 2.4 65 67 69 71 73 75 79 81 83 85 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 108 110 113 115 117
27-30 2.5 67 69 n 73 75 77 79 81 83 85 87 90 92 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 108 110 112 115 117 119
31-34 69 71 73 75 77 79 81 83 85 87 89 92 94 % 98 100 102 104 106 108 110 112 114 117 119 121
35-38 2.7 70 72 74 ; n, 78 80 87 84 86 88 90 93 95 97 99 101 103 105 107 109 111 113 115 118 120 122
39-43 2.8 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 95 97 99 101 103 105 107 109 111 113 115 117 120 122 124
44-48 2.9 74 76 78 8-0 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 97 99 101 103 105 107 109 111 113 115 117 119 122 124 126
49-53 3.0 76 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 % 99 101 103 105 107 109 111 113 115 117 119 121 124 126 128
54-58 3.1 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 % 98 101 103 105 107 109 111 113 115 117 119 121 123 126 128 130
59-62 3.2 79 81 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 102 104 106 108 110 112 114 116 118 120 122 124 127 129 131
63-67 3.3 81 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 101 104 106 108 110 112 114 116 118 120 122 124 126 129 131 133
68-72 3.4 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 101 103 106 108 110 112 114 116 118 120 122 124 126 128 131 133 135
73-76 3.5 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 101 103 105 108 110 112 114 116 118 120 122 124 126 128 130 133 135 137
77-81 3.6 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 101 103 105 107 110 112 114 116 118 120 122 124 126 128 130 132 135 137 139
82-85 3.7 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 108 111 113 115 117 119 121 123 125 127 129 131 133 136 138 140
86-89 3.8 90 92 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 108 110 113 115 117 119 121 123 125 127 129 131 133 135 138 140 142
90-92 3.9 92 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 108 110 112 115 117 119 121 123 125 127 129 131 133 135 137 140 142 144
93-100 4.0 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 108 110 112 114 117 119 121 123 125 127 129 131 133 135 137 139 142 144 146
Source: Colorado Commission on Higher Education
How to read this chart
Find your high school class percentile rank and grade point average on the left. Choose the number closest to the bottom of the chart. Line up that number with your SAT or ACT score along the top and locate the corresponding number on the chart. This is your index score.
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If your score is less than 85 but is 76 or greater, admission will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
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If your index score is 85 or greater, and you have an ACT English subscore of 18 or above and a reading subscore of 17 or above (or an SAT verbal score of 440 or above), you an guaranteed admission
Freshman Admission Eligibility Index for Applicants 19 Years Old or Younger


18 ADMISSIONS
• Applicants who have not graduated from high school but have passed and received the Colorado General Educational Development (GED) certificate or its equivalent will be accepted, as long as they also meet the Higher Education Admissions Requirements. ACT or SAT test results are not required with a GED. Official GED certificates must be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions by the issuing agency before an applicant can be accepted.
College Transfers
• Applicants with 30 or more transferable semester hours completed with at least a 2.3 cumulative GPA will be offered admission. Students with fewer than 30 hours will be considered on an individual basis, based on high school GPA, ACT or SAT scores and college work completed.
• Applicants who have less than a cumulative 2.3 GPA from all colleges and universities attended will be considered on an individual basis that includes a careful review of all credentials. Letters of recommendation and a personal statement are strongly recommended. Such applicants must complete their application files by the posted Admissions Review deadline. Otherwise, they will be considered for the following term.
• Applicants must request that the following credentials be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions from the high school, testing agency and/or college or university:
• ACT or SAT test results
• Official high school transcript with GPA and class rank
• Official transcript from each college or university attended or currently attending
• All required credentials must be received before a final admission decision can be made.
APPLICANTS 20 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER
Applicants who are 20 or older on September 15 for either summer semester or fall semester, or on February 15 for spring semester, will be considered for admission using the requirements described below.
Freshmen (first-time college students)
• Applicants will be admitted to Metro State upon indicating on the Application for Admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have passed and received a Colorado General Educational Development (GED) certificate or the equivalent. GEDs issued through the military will be considered on an individual basis.
• By signing the Application for Admission, degree-seeking applicants are certifying that they will request either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test scores be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions. Degree-seeking students will not be permitted to register for a second semester until this official credential is received.
• The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but, if taken within five years of the semester start date, is highly recommended for advising and course placement purposes.
College Transfers
• Applicants will be admitted to Metro State, regardless of their cumulative college GPA, if they indicate on the Application for Admission that they have graduated from high school or that they have passed and received a Colorado General Educational Development (GED) certificate or its equivalent.
• By signing the Application for Admission, degree-seeking applicants are certifying that they will request that either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test scores be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions. In place of these credentials, official college transcripts showing completion of 30 or more transferable semester credit hours with grades of “C” or better will be accepted. College transfer students should request to have college transcripts mailed directly to the Office of Admissions for transfer credit evaluation. Degree-seeking applicants are required to have all college and university transcripts on file to receive a complete evaluation.
• The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but, if taken within five years of the semester start date, is highly recommended for advising and course placement purposes.


ADMISSIONS 19
APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS
Applications for Admission are considered in the order in which they are received each semester. All credentials received by the College become the property of Metro State and will not be returned to the student. It is the responsibility of the applicant to notify the Office of Admissions of any changes to the application prior to the first day of classes. If changes are not reported to the Office of Admissions, the registration process could be delayed for subsequent semesters. Failure to report academic changes may result in rejection, dismissal and/or loss of credit. International (visa) applicants should refer to the Admission of International Students section on page 21 of this Catalog.
To apply for admission:
• Applications can be submitted online at www.mscd.edu or are available from Metro State, Office of Admissions, Campus Box 16, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, Central Classroom Building, 1st floor, 303-556-3058.
• A $25 nonrefundable application fee ($40 for international applicants) is required with the Application for Admission. Readmit applicants are not required to submit an application fee.
• It is the student’s responsibility to request that all required official credentials be mailed directly from the issuing institution or agency to the Office of Admissions. Hand-carried documents will not be accepted.
• Although an applicants college record may be summarized on one transcript, an official transcript from each institution attended is required.
• For information on obtaining records and receiving credit for Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) and military training or other training, see Alternative Credit Options on page 41 of the Catalog.
• The Application for Admission and all credentials received by the College will be valid for two semesters beyond the term of application. After this time the files will no longer be maintained for applicants who do not complete their application, and for applicants who were accepted but did not enroll. Applicants wishing to attend MSCD after this period must submit a new application, application credentials that were not submitted and are outstanding, and the $25 application fee.
• Applicants will be notified in writing of their application status within 2-3 weeks.
Admission of Previously Enrolled Students (Readmit Students)
Readmit students are defined as individuals who have previously enrolled and have received a grade or grade notation at the College but have not been in attendance at Metro State for three consecutive semesters, including summer. Readmit students should:
• Submit a completed Application for Admission. No application fee is required for readmission.
• Submit transcripts from institutions attended since last attending Metro State (if degree-seeking). If the student was not previously degree-seeking, then the student must submit transcripts from all institutions attended.
Readmit students who originally attended Metro State prior to 1998 are required to resubmit all credentials. In addition, all students who have not submitted final, official high school transcripts or an official GED report must also submit these credentials.
Admission of Nondegree Students
The nondegree student classification meets the needs of students 20 years of age or older who wish to take college courses but who do not currently intend to work toward a baccalaureate degree at Metro State. With the exception of high school students who have completed the approval process, nondegree students must have graduated from high school or received a GED to qualify for admission.
Nondegree students are not eligible for financial aid, nor will any college transcripts submitted be evaluated for transfer credit. Students may change to degree-seeking status by completing a Status Change Request form and requesting that all required official credentials be mailed directly from the issuing institution or agency to the Office of Admissions.
Admission Notification
Once admitted, students will be mailed instructions regarding course registration and other relevant information. All incoming students new to Metro State are required to attend an orientation session.


20 ADMISSIONS
After orientation, first-time college students and transfer students 19 years old or younger are also required to meet with an academic advisor. Depending upon a student’s performance on the ACT or SAT, assessment tests may also be required. No tuition deposit is required.
Students denied admission may appeal the decision by submitting a letter of appeal to the Office of Admissions, along with new and compelling academic information, letters of recommendation and other supportive documentation.
ADDITIONAL ADMISSION PROGRAMS
Summer Only
Applicants 19 years old or younger who have graduated from high school or have received a General Educational Development (GED) certificate and are applying for the summer semester may be admitted under a provisional status. These applicants are not required to submit admission credentials and are not eligible for financial aid. Summer Only students who wish to continue for the fall or spring semester must meet stated admission requirements and submit a Status Change Request form to be considered.
High School Concurrent Enrollment Programs Postsecondary Enrollment Options and Fast Track Programs
The Postsecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) and Fast Track are sponsorship programs enacted by state law in 1988 that provide high school juniors and seniors with the opportunity to take college classes for both high school and college credit. These programs are intended to provide high school students with an alternative learning environment.
To participate, students must first seek approval from their high school and school district. The district determines the number of credit hours the student may take and makes the financial arrangements. PSEO students are responsible for payment of all tuition and fees by the College deadline. They are later reimbursed by their school districts for tuition (not fees) for up to two courses per semester, providing that they successfully complete these classes with grades of C or better. Fast Track students are not limited to two courses, and the school districts pay tuition (not fees) at the time they register. To apply to the PSEO or Fast Track Program, a student must submit the following:
• High School Concurrent Enrollment form, including student, parent, school district and college administrator signatures
• Completed Metro State admission application with the required $25 application fee
Upon receipt of these documents, the student will be admitted into the PSEO or Fast Track Program. ACT scores, SAT scores or assessment tests are required to access many classes.
Student Education and Enrichment Program
The Student Education and Enrichment (SEE) Program is designed to supplement a student’s existing education through early participation in college-level classes. This advanced program should not be interpreted as an alternative to high school completion but is, instead, a cooperative college/high school effort to provide educational enrichment and early college attendance to qualified Colorado high school juniors and seniors. Students who participate in the SEE Program are fully responsible for tuition and fees.
To apply for admission through the SEE Program, the student must submit the following documents:
• High School Concurrent Enrollment form, including student, parent, school district and college administrator signatures
• Completed Metro State admission application with the required $25 application fee
Upon receipt of these documents, the student will be admitted into the SEE Program. ACT scores, SAT scores or assessment tests are required to access many classes.
Western Undergraduate Exchange
Through the Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE), students in western states (AK, AZ, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, NM, ND, OR, SD, UT, WA, WY) may enroll in many out-of-state two-year and four-year


ADMISSIONS 21
college programs at a reduced tuition level: 150 percent of the institution’s regular resident tuition. WUE tuition is considerably less than non-resident tuition.
At Metro State College, WUE students pay 150 percent of the student’s share of Colorado resident tuition plus mandatory fees. In addition, WUE students, being non-residents, are not eligible for the state contribution to tuition, otherwise known as the College Opportunity Fund (COF) stipend. Thus, WUE participants must pay the stipend amount in addition to WUE tuition and fees.
To be eligible for WUE tuition, a student must certify each semester that he or she is a resident of a state other than Colorado. So long as the student continues to certify WUE eligibility, the student cannot be considered a Colorado resident. WUE students who change their residence to Colorado lose their WUE eligibility the following semester, but do not become eligible for in-state tuition rates until one year after establishing Colorado domicile. Because students under 23 are deemed to have the domicile of their parents, the WUE student seeking to change domicile to Colorado must show either: a change of the parents’ residence; or, a change in the student’s residence after emancipation from the parents. Refer to the Tuition Classification section of the Catalog for more information about the factors considered in demonstrating Colorado residency, or contact the Tuition Classification Officer in the Office of the Registrar.
The following Metro State College majors are open to WUE students on a space-available basis: Behavioral Sciences, Civil Engineering Technology, Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, Foreign Languages and Literatures-General, Health Care Management, History-General, Hospitality Restaurant Management, Human Performance Composite; Meteorology; Nursing/Registered Nurse (RN, ASN, BSN, MSN); Political Science and Government-General; Psychology; Social Work; and Surveying and Mapping. Qualified students must apply and be admitted to Metro State College and must submit a WUE New Student Participation Form to the Office of Admissions. This form and more information, including information on WUE tuition, fees, and COF may be obtained at www.mscd.edu/enroll/admissions/paths/wiche or by contacting the Office of Admissions at the Central Classroom Building, 1st floor, 303-556-3058.
Metro Meritus
Individuals 60 or older who do not wish to earn credit are invited to attend tuition-free classes of their choice on a space-available basis. Metro Meritus encourages participants to continue their personal educational growth in a stimulating and friendly campus setting. For more information, contact the Center for Individualized Learning in the St. Francis Center, 2nd floor, 303-556-8342. Application forms are also available at www.mscd.edu/~cil.
Admission of International Students
All students who declare a country of citizenship other than the U.S. on the Application for Admission must contact the Office of Admissions.
Applicants who are U.S. Resident Aliens (including refugees and political asylees) will be required to (1) submit a minimum of an official high school transcript/diploma that is determined equivalent to high school graduation in the U.S., and (2) complete an immigrant advising interview to ensure that their English language skills are sufficient for admission to the College.
Applicants who are on any type of temporary visa are required to submit the International Application for Admission, which can be obtained from the Office of Admissions or online at www.mscd.edu/ admissions.
Applicants on temporary visas are required to submit (1) a minimum of an official high school transcript/diploma that is determined equivalent to high school graduation in the U.S., (2) English language proficiency documentation, normally in the form of an acceptable TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score, and (3) documents demonstrating sufficient financial support to cover the costs of attending the College for one academic year, including living expenses (this is only required of potential students on F-l visas). Detailed information regarding all requirements and admission procedures for international students can be obtained from the Office of Admissions and on the International Application for Admission.


22 ADMISSIONS
TRANSFER CREDIT EVALUATION
A transfer credit evaluation is performed for admitted degree-seeking students after official transcripts are received by the Office of Admissions. Within approximately four weeks, students receive two copies of the transfer credit evaluation, one of which should be taken to the major and minor departments for advice on how credits might apply to degree programs.
Transfer credits are accepted under the following guidelines:
• Credit must have been earned at an institution of higher education holding full regional accreditation.
• Metro State accepts up to 64 semester hours from two-year institutions and up to 90 semester hours from four-year institutions or a combination of two-year and four-year institutions.
• Grades earned must be a “C-” or better. Courses with “D,” “F” or similar grades are not transferable. Also, courses graded with C.E.U.s (Continuing Education Units) will not be accepted. A summary of transfer credit from each institution is indicated on the Metro State academic record. Neither transfer course grades nor previous grade point averages are indicated or affect the Metro State grade point average.
• Course content must be similar to that of Metro State courses.
• No preparatory or remedial courses are applicable toward an Metro State degree.
• Students who have earned an A.A. or A.S. degree from a Colorado community college will receive junior standing at Metro State, provided all courses included in the degree carry a grade of “C” or better and based on the course-by-course evaluation, otherwise meet minimum Metro State transfer credit standards. Students may need to complete additional Metro State lower-division requirements.
• Applicants having completed the Colorado community college core curriculum, as certified on their community college transcripts, are considered to have satisfied Metro States minimum General Studies requirements. However, additional specific lower-division courses may be required for certain degree programs.
• Once transfer credits are evaluated, the total number of these credits applicable to a degree will not be reduced unless the student repeats already-awarded transfer credit at Metro State or interrupts Metro State enrollment for three or more consecutive semesters and readmits to the College under more restrictive transfer credit evaluation policies.
• In accordance with policies established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education regarding students transferring between Colorado public institutions, Metro State has instituted procedures for resolving transfer credit disputes. Questions regarding these procedures may be directed to Cristina Martinez in the Office of Admissions at 303-556-3984.
Transfer Services
The Office of Transfer Services offers assistance to students transferring from other institutions to Metro State. Specific services provided include the following:
• Assistance with admission requirements and the application process;
• Weekly visits to local community colleges in the Denver metro area;
• Visits to other Colorado community colleges once or twice annually;
• Guidance on selecting appropriate transferable courses;
• Preliminary transcript evaluation;
• Transfer student scholarship information;
• Referral assistance to academic departments;
• Resolution of transfer course issues.
Transfer counselors are available by appointment and for walk-in counseling. Counselors work closely with transcript evaluators to provide students with information about transfer credits and how those credits may be applied to their degree programs. Questions pertaining to a student’s official transfer credit evaluation should be referred to the transfer evaluator responsible for the evaluation. That person’s name and telephone number are found on the letter that accompanies the evaluation sent to the student. General questions regarding a transfer evaluation or preliminary evaluation should be referred to the Office of Transfer Services, Central Classroom Building, Room 106, 303-556-3774, or transferquestions@mscd.edu.


ADMISSIONS 23
ENROLLMENT
New Student Orientation
Orientation is a required pre-enrollment step for ALL degree-seeking students at Metro State. The mission of New Student Orientation (NSO) is to facilitate the transition of entering students by helping them learn about and connect with the campus community. A variety of sessions are offered to accommodate the needs of our diverse commuter population, including specialized sessions for first-time college students, transfer students, and adult students returning to college. In addition, transfer students over the age of 20 can complete their orientation requirement through an online orientation course. During orientation, incoming students have the opportunity to interact with current Metro State students and staff while they receive valuable information about academic advising, general studies requirements, the registration process, and financial aid. Student Orientation Leaders also share some of their own tips for college survival, including how to utilize campus resources and how to get involved in campus activities. For further information about orientation, visit the NSO Website at www.mscd. edu/~nso or call 303-556-6931.
Reading, Writing and Mathematics Assessment Examinations
If the ACT or SAT has been taken, some assessment tests may be waived if the following scores are met or exceeded: an ACT subscore at or above 18 in English (SAT verbal of 440), 19 in Math (SAT math of 460) or 17 in Reading (SAT verbal of 430). For additional information on English or Reading, call 303-556-3677. For additional information regarding mathematics placement, visit the Metro State Web site at www.mscd.edu/testing/mscd_new/home_page.htm or obtain a hard copy of the Mathematics Group Learning Program brochure from the Academic Advising Center. Degree-seeking students who are diagnosed as needing remedial course work have at their disposal basic skills courses offered through the Community College of Denver. Students are responsible for completing remedial course work no later than the end of their freshman year (i.e., within the first 30 semester hours matriculated as a college student).
Academic Advising
At Metro State students are provided multiple sources of academic advising support. Continuing students with declared majors receive advising assistance from their academic departments. New students and students without declared majors receive advising support from the Academic Advising center. Services available to students in the center include the following: assistance with course selection, scheduling and registration; help with long-term degree planning; identification of degree enhancement strategies; and ongoing developmental advising, including assistance with the major-minor selection process, adjustment to college, etc. For additional information call 303-556-3680.
REGISTRATION
All continuing students in good standing and all accepted applicants at the College are eligible to register each semester.
Students are responsible for ensuring that there is a correct and up-to-date address and phone number on file with the College. Address changes may be made with the Registrars Office through MetroCon-nect (metroconnect.mscd.edu), or by writing or faxing (303-556-3999) the address and phone number change to the Registrars Office.
Information on the registration procedure, registration dates, and student responsibilities and obligations related to registration is available on MetroConnect (metroconnect.mscd.edu).
Students Not Officially Registered in a Class
For Students
Students must be officially registered for classes in accordance with College rules and regulations. Officially registered means that students have been accepted for admission by the college, are eligible


24 ENROLLMENT AND REGISTRATION
to register for classes, and that the Course Reference Number (CRN) for the class is entered on the student’s registration record maintained by the Office of the Registrar. The deadline to register for a full-semester class is the census date for that semester. For fall and spring semesters the census date is the 12th business day of the semester; for summer semester the census date is the 8th business day of the semester. These deadlines are available on the Web for each semester at www.mscd.edu/academic/ acal.htm There are pro-rated deadlines for part-of-term classes. It is students’ responsibility not to attend a class if they are not officially registered.
For Faculty
According to CCHE policy, as noted in CCHE document “FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT (FTE) REPORTING GUIDELINES and PROCEDURES, June 2002”, individuals may not attend a class if they are not officially registered for the class. The deadline to register for a full-semester class is the census date for that semester. For fall and spring semesters the census date is the 12th business day of the semester; for summer semester the census date is the 8th business day of the semester. These deadlines are available on the Web for each semester at www.mscd.edu/academic/acal.htm. There are pro-rated deadlines for part-of-term classes. Faculty must refer students who are not registered by the census date to the Office of the Registrar to discuss their registration options. Faculty should allow the student to return to the class only upon showing proof of registration from the Office of the Registrar. Faculty must ensure that all students in their classes are listed on their E-Rosters. Faculty can check their E-Rosters anytime before and during the semester to determine whether a student is registered for the class.
Concurrent Enrollment
Students who find it necessary to register at Metro State and another college at the same time should check with Metro State Transfer Services concerning the acceptance and application of transfer credits.
Pooled Registration
Metro State and the University of Colorado Denver have formed a common pool of courses available to students at each institution. For the pool, Metro State offers courses through the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences, through the Economics Department in the School of Business and through the Technical Communication and Human Performance and Sport departments in the School of Professional Studies. UCD offers courses through the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and College of Arts and Media.
Students must register for pooled courses through their home institution. Students at Metro State;
• Must comply with all Metro State policies, procedures and deadlines when registering for, withdrawing from or dropping UCD pooled courses;
• May not be placed on a wait list for any UCD pooled course.
• Must comply with UCD course prerequisites.
For students at Metro State, UCD pooled course titles and grades will appear on the Metro State transcript and will count in the GPA and hours toward graduation; however, UCD pooled courses will not satisfy academic residence requirements for degrees from Metro State. This restriction applies to the residence requirements of the overall degree (30 semester hours minimum), the major (8 upper-division semester hours minimum), and the minor (3 upper-division semester hours minimum). This restriction does not apply to Physics (PHY) courses.
Metro State/UCD Nonpooled Courses
Students wishing to register for UCD courses not listed in the common pool must follow concurrent registration procedures:
• Complete a UCD admission application.
• Register and pay for UCD courses at UCD.
• Request that official transcripts from UCD be sent to Metro State at the end of the semester. Students are advised:
• to consult with their academic advisor at Metro State to determine transferability of courses.
• to consult with Metro State’s Financial Aid Office if receiving aid.


ENROLLMENT AND REGISTRATION
25
Interinstitutional Registration
Students enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver may register for courses at the Community College of Denver. Courses taken at this institution in no way alter existing Metro State degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requirements subject to specific approval by Metro State. Students should be aware that courses taken interinstitutionally will be counted as part of the 64 semester hours from community colleges applicable to an Metro State degree. Interinstitutional credits will not satisfy academic residence requirements at Metro State. In the event a conflict arises between the policies/pro-cedures of Metro State and the college listed above, the most restrictive policy prevails. Students are advised to confer with department chairs and/or coordinators of academic advising before registering interinstitutionally. The enrollment status of a student in the interinstitutional registration program is determined by the student’s status at the home institution (institution where the student is seeking a degree). Students should ascertain before enrolling at an institution that desired courses will satisfy degree requirements at the home institution.
Course Audit Policy
Students may audit a class with the permission of the instructor, if space is available. Academic credit is not awarded for an audited course and no academic record is maintained. The cost for auditing a course is based on regular tuition. The Tuition and Fees Table is available on Metro States Web site (www.mscd. edu/enroll/admissions). Audit approval forms are available in deans’ and academic department offices.
Changes in Registration
Enrolled students may adjust schedules by dropping and/or adding classes. Complete information concerning dropping and/or adding classes and the tuition and fee refund schedule can be found on Metro-Connect (metroconnect.mscd.edu).
Students who reduce their course load after the twelfth day of classes and before the beginning of the fifth week will receive an “NC” notation for each course they have dropped. A NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted or requested online through MetroConnect by the deadline to the Registrar’s Office.
Students reducing their course load between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of classes during fall and spring semesters may receive an “NC” notation for each course, provided faculty approval is granted. Additional restrictions regarding assigning the “NC” notation may be set by each school, department and/or faculty member for the period between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of the semester (or proportional time frame). Students are advised to seek faculty signatures well before the deadline. An NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Registrar’s Office. See the sections on grades, notations, course load and class attendance in this Catalog.
Proportional time frames are applied for part-of-term courses, workshops and summer terms. Procedures for adding or dropping a part-of-term course after the course has begun are described on Metro-Connect (metroconnect.mscd.edu).
Registration Status
The College generally defines full-time status as being registered for 12 semester hours in fall and/or spring semesters, eight semester hours in the summer. However, to complete a degree in four years or eight semesters, students need to take at least 15 hours a semester. Similarly, half-time is generally defined as six semester hours, fall and spring and four semester hours for summer. Less than half-time is the other term used, which is generally defined as less than six semester hours in the fall and spring and less than four semester hours in the summer. However, for financial aid purposes 12 semester hours is also the full-time standard in the summer. (See page 27 of this Catalog). To be eligible for health insurance coverage automatically, the numbers are 10 semester hours in the fall and spring and eight semester hours in the summer. (See page 27 of this Catalog). You can order an enrollment verification on MetroConnect (metroconnect.mscd.edu).


26 TUITION AND FEES
TUITION AND FEES
Tuition Classification
A student is classified as an in-state or out-of-state student for tuition purposes at the time of admission. This classification is based upon information supplied by the student on the application for admission and is made in accordance with the Colorado Tuition Classification Law, CRS S23-7-101 et seq. (1973), as amended. Once determined, a students tuition classification status remains unchanged unless satisfactory evidence that a change should be made is presented. A Petition for In-State Tuition Classification Form and the evidence requested must be submitted to the Registrars Office if a student believes she or he is entitled to in-state status.
The tuition classification statute requires that in order to qualify for in-state status, a student (or the parents or legal guardian of the student in the case of students under 23 years of age who are not emancipated) must have been domiciled in Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the first day of the semester for which such classification is sought.
Domicile for tuition purposes requires two inseparable elements: (1) a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado with no intent to be domiciled elsewhere. Some examples of connections with the state that provide objective evidence of intent are: (1) payment of Colorado state income tax as a Colorado resident, (2) permanent employment in Colorado, (3) ownership of residential real property in Colorado, (4) compliance with laws imposing a mandatory duty on any domiciliary of the state, such as the drivers’ license law and the vehicle registration law and (5) registration to vote. Other factors unique to the individual can also be used to demonstrate the requisite intent.
Any questions regarding the tuition classification law should be directed to an admissions officer at the College. In order to qualify for in-state status for a particular semester, the student must prove that domicile began not later than one year prior to the first day of classes for that semester. The dates for qualifying and for submitting petitions are available under Academic Calendar on Metro State’s Web site (www.mscd.edu/academic/acal.htm).
College Opportunity Fund (COF)
Every eligible Colorado resident who will be a student must sign up for the College Opportunity Fund (COF) in order to authorize payment of the state’s contribution toward tuition at any public college or university in the state of Colorado that the student plans to attend, such as Metropolitan State College of Denver.
These funds, called “stipends,” will be applied to a student’s college account each semester and are available for up to 145 credit hours of college-level undergraduate study. The actual value of the stipend will be determined by the Colorado Legislature each year.
Students must apply online for the stipend at www.CollegeInColorado.org. Then, each semester they must authorize the use of the stipend during registration.
The COF application requires students to submit only their legal name, date of birth, Social Security Number, and Driver’s License Number only once in a student’s lifetime. The application must be completed before the stipend can be credited to a student’s tuition and fee bill.
What happens if a student does not sign up? That student will not be eligible for the stipend and will be responsible for paying the total in-state tuition - both the student’s share and the state’s share.
Eligibility: In-state, undergraduate students will be eligible for the stipend regardless of age, income or financial aid status. Students who are seeking a second bachelor’s degree or post-baccalaureate degree credits are eligible to use the stipend for up to 30 credit hours.
For more information, visit the College’s Q&A section on COF at: www.mscd.edu/news/cof.
Tuition and College Service Fees
The Board of Trustees, the governing board of the College, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees for any semester without notice.


TUITION AND FEES 21
Tuition and college service fees are determined by the trustees shortly before the beginning of each academic year. Information regarding tuition and fees can be found by going to the Tuition and Fees Table on Metro State’s Web site (www.mscd.edu/admissions/tuition.pdf).
Standard Fees
An application fee is required of all applicants for admission to the College. This fee is nonrefundable
and will not be applied to tuition.
Application fee...........................................................................$25
International student application fee......................................................$40
Matriculation fee..........................................................................$50
Special fees
Returned check charge......................................................................$17
Student Health Insurance
All students taking ten (10) credit hours or more in the Fall or Spring semester or eight (8) credit hours or more in the Summer semester are required to participate in the College-sponsored Student Flealth Insurance Program, unless proof of outside health insurance is provided by the waiver deadline that meets the standards set by the College. Please note that the Colorado Indigent Care Program (CICP) will NOT be accepted as proof of insurance since this program is not considered insurance by the State Legislature.
Students are automatically billed for Student Health Insurance on their tuition bill. Students are informed of the College’s health insurance requirement when they attempt to register for classes. Registration screens cannot be accessed until a student reads the details associated with this requirement.
Beginning with Summer and Fall 2008 registration, all students will be sent an automatic e-mail message after they acknowledge that they have read the insurance information provided during registration. Students who have outside health insurance coverage are then responsible for following the waiver instructions contained in the e-mail message and for submitting an electronic waiver form by the deadline listed. A waiver form is attached to each e-mail message and the College minimum waiver standards are outlined. Please note that waiver forms will not be accepted after the published waiver deadline.
Health insurance waivers are valid for one (1) academic year (an academic year includes Fall, Spring and Summer semesters annually.) Continuing students must complete a waiver form ANNUALLY prior to each Fall semester. Students with a break in academic enrollment and those who begin classes in the Spring or Summer must complete a waiver form by the appropriate deadline for the semester in which they enroll and every Fall semester thereafter.
Students who participate in the student health insurance program during the Spring semester of any academic year are eligible to purchase Summer semester coverage without taking classes during the Summer semester. However, in order to obtain the same low rate offered during the Fall and Spring semesters, Summer semester coverage must be purchased in advance by January 31st. Please contact the Student Health Insurance Office at 303-556-3873 for further details.
Student Dental Insurance Voluntary Program for all Students
Voluntary Dental Insurance is available to students taking one credit hour or more. Information and application forms can be obtained at the Student Insurance Office in the Health Center at Auraria (PL 150).
FINANCIAL AID
The Metropolitan State College of Denver financial aid program provides assistance and advice to students who would be unable to pursue their education at the College without such help. Scholarships, grants, loans and part-time employment are available singly or in various combinations to meet the


28 FINANCIAL AID
difference between what the student and the students family could reasonably be expected to provide and the expected cost of attending Metro State.
Estimated Expenses
The 2008-2009 academic year expenses are as follows for a student not living with parents:
Resident Nonresident
Tuition and Fees $4,477.... $12,577
Room and Board 8,090 ... 8,090
Books and Supplies .... 1,698 ... 1,698
Transportation 1,215 ... 1,215
Miscellaneous 1 200 ... 1.200
Total $16,680 ... $24,780
Tuition and fees are set by Metro State and the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and are subject to change without notice. All students are placed on a single-person budget. Additional allowances may be made for students with day-care costs for dependent children. Budgets are based on fulltime enrollment of 12 credit hours.
Eligibility and Need
To qualify for financial aid, a student must be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen; be registered with Selective Service (if required); have financial need; be degree-, licensure-, or certificate-seeking; be making satisfactory academic progress; and not be in default on a federal education loan or owe a repayment on a federal grant.
Application Procedures
Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year to determine financial aid eligibility. For quicker processing, we strongly recommend that returning, transferring and entering students complete their FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA on the Web at: www.fafsa.ed.gov. Metro States Title IV School Code is: 001360.
Students should complete and submit the FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA to the federal processor as early as possible (after January 1st), preferably no later than mid-February, and submit all requested documents to the Metro State Office of Financial Aid by March 12th.
Detailed information concerning application procedures is provided on our Web site at: www.mscd. edu/financialaid.
Financial Aid Programs
The amount of funds made available to students depends on the maximum award allowed by regulation of each program, the student’s established financial need, duration of the students enrollment, and funds allocated to the College by the state and federal governments.
Grants
Grants are gift money from the federal or state government and do not have to be repaid.
Federal Pell Grants are federal funds and awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a bachelor’s degree and who are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens. The amount of the award is based on each student’s financial eligibility and the number of hours for which the student is enrolled.
The amount of Federal Pell Grant awards for the 2008-09 academic year will range from $400 to $4,310 for those students who qualify. Full-time, half-time, or less than half-time students may qualify for a Federal Pell Grant.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are federal funds awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a bachelor’s degree and are U.S. citizens or eligible


FINANCIAL AID 29
non-citizens. This grant is awarded to students who demonstrate exceptional need. The amount of FSEOG awards range from $100 to $300 per Fall and Spring semesters.
Colorado College Responsibility Grants (CCRG) are state funds awarded to Colorado residents with demonstrated financial need. Eligible students have no prior bachelor’s degree, are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens, and are enrolled full- or part-time (at least six credit hours for the Fall and Spring semesters) at Metro State. The amounts of the CSG award ranges from $100 to $500 per Fall and Spring semesters.
Colorado Leveraging Educational Assistance program (CLEAP) are a combination of federal and state funds awarded by the same criteria as CCRG. The amount of the CLEAP award is $200 per semester.
Scholarships
Metropolitan State College of Denver offers numerous scholarship opportunities for both incoming and continuing students. By submitting the Metropolitan State College of Denver Scholarship Application by March 1st “Priority Consideration Deadline” each year, you will automatically be considered for all Metro State scholarships for which you are eligible for the next academic year. The Metro State Scholarship Application is available for online submission at: www.mscd.edu/enroll/fmancialaid. A printable version of the application is also available for download at this location.
Students must be enrolled at least half-time, be degree-, certificate- or licensure-seeking, be making satisfactory academic progress, and not be in default on a federal education loan or owe a repayment on a federal or state grant to receive a scholarship.
Athletic Scholarships: Metro State has a limited number of athletic scholarships. For additional information, contact the Metro State Intercollegiate Athletics Office (303-556-8300).
Private Scholarships: Students should refer to the Metro State scholarship Web site (www.mscd.edu/ enroll/financialaid) for information regarding scholarships and to access free online scholarship searches.
Receipt of a scholarship may affect a student’s financial aid award because students receiving federal and/or state aid are limited in the maximum amount and type of aid that can be received. A student whose full need has been met by other types of financial aid prior to receipt of a scholarship will have that aid reduced by the amount of the scholarship. If the student’s full eligibility has not been met, the scholarship will be allowed to satisfy the unmet need. Each student’s situation is treated individually. All scholarships are based on the student’s continued eligibility and available funding.
Loans
Federal Perkins Loans are long-term federal loans that are awarded based on the student’s need and Metro State’s available funds. Federal Perkins Loans can range from $100 to $1,500 per semester. Repayment of the loan begins nine months after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled in at least six credit hours each semester. The interest rate is 5 percent and interest begins to accrue at repayment. All first-time borrowers at Metro State are required to perform a Perkins Loan Entrance Interview over the Web before loan funds can be released to them.
Federal Family Education Loans (FFEL) include Federal Stafford Loans, unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans, and Federal PLUS Loans, which help students and/or their parents to borrow funds to help meet educational expenses. To borrow these funds, students and/or their parents must complete and submit, in addition to the FAFSA, a separate lender application to the Metro State Office of Financial Aid. Students must be enrolled at least six credit hours each semester and be degree-, certificate- or licensure-seeking and be making Satisfactory progress with a complete file. Interest rates vary depending on the type of loan and the date the student borrows the first Federal Family Education Loan. For further information on interest rates, check the Metro State Financial Aid Web site as they vary each year. First time borrowers at Metro State are required to perform a Loan Entrance Interview over the Web before loans funds can be released to them. For additional loan information please visit our Web site. You will find details of how to apply annual limits and lenders.


30 FINANCIAL AID
Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans: are based on the students need as determined by the Metro State Office of Financial Aid. Interest does not begin to accrue until six months after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled in school at least half time (six credit hours per semester).
Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans: These loans have many of the same terms and conditions as the Federal Stafford Loan. The main difference is that the students are responsible for the interest that accrues while they are in school and during the six-month grace period after they graduate or cease to be enrolled in at least six credit hours.
Federal PLUS Loans: These loans are available to parents of dependent students. Applications are available from the Metro State Office of Financial Aid. Applications must first be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid for processing. At Metro State, parents of dependent students may borrow up to the cost of education minus the amount of financial aid received by the student from other sources each year.
Please refer to the Metro State Financial Aid Web site (www.mscd.edu/financialaid) for more detailed information regarding loans.
College Work-Study
The State of Colorado, the federal government and Metro State provide part-time employment programs for students. The maximum work-study award is $2,500 per semester. The maximum hours a student may work is 30 hours per week while classes are in session and 40 hours per week between semesters. Students must be enrolled in at least six credit hours per semester to receive a work-study award. The majority of all work-study awards are need-based, however, there are a limited number of positions that are no-need awards.
The Financial Aid Package
Once student eligibility is determined, an aid package is developed based on the availability of funds and the eligibility of the applicant. To facilitate financial aid packaging requirements, applicants must obtain all requested information and forms from designated sources and submit them to the Metro State Office of Financial Aid before the established deadline.
Award Notification
After the Office of Financial Aid has determined the type and amount of aid for which a student qualifies (aid package), the student is emailed an Award Notification.
Disbursement Procedures:
• Awards are based on full-time enrollment. If a student is enrolled for less than 12 credit hours each semester, the award may be reduced/prorated. The final award adjustment occurs on census date (about the 12th day of school each fall and spring semester and the 8th day of the summer semester).
• Grants, Scholarships and Student Loans: All financial aid awards (with the exception of out-of-state loan checks, consortium checks and some scholarship funds) are disbursed into the student’s account. The Business Office deducts any outstanding balance owed, including current tuition and fees, and issues a check for the remaining funds. This check is either mailed to the student or the student can pick it up at the Cashier’s Office. This check can be used to purchase books and pay other educationally related expenses.
• Parent Loans: Federal PLUS funds are electronically submitted or mailed from lenders to Metro State’s Office of Financial Aid. Eligibility is verified and then the check is mailed to the parent borrower unless the parent authorizes the student to receive the refund.
• Work Study: Work-study earnings are paid biweekly and are treated as wages earned. Outstanding balances owed to Metro State are not deducted from these earnings; however, students are strongly advised to pay any outstanding balance as soon as a work-study check is received.
Please refer to the Metro State Web site (www.mscd.edu) for information regarding proration of aid disbursements.


SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 31
Repayment Policy
Students who receive financial aid and withdraw officially or unofficially from Metro State prior to completion of a term may be required to repay a portion of financial aid and scholarships. All required financial aid repayments must be made to Metro State before the end of the current academic year or before additional Title IV funds can be disbursed to the student, whichever occurs first. Repayment is made to the Metro State Business Office. Please go to Metro State’s Web site (www.mscd.edu) for more specific information.
Financial Aid as a Form of Payment
Please refer to Metro State’s Web site (www.mscd.edu) for information regarding payment of tuition and fees with awarded aid.
SERVICES AND PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS
Academic Advising
At Metro State, students are provided multiple sources of academic advising support. Continuing students with declared majors receive advising assistance from their academic departments. New students and students without declared majors receive advising support from the Academic Advising Center, CN 104. Services available to students in the center include the following: assistance with course selection, scheduling and registration; help with long-term degree planning; identification of degree enhancement strategies; and ongoing developmental advising, including assistance with the major-minor selection process, adjustment to college, etc. For additional information call 303-556-3680.
Alumni Relations
The Office of Alumni Relations and Alumni Association is located at 1059 Ninth Street Park. It’s primary mission is “To cultivate relationships, motivate participation and create opportunities for a continuous connection with the College, its alumni and the community.” The Alumni Office connects alumni to students and the college community through events, volunteer opportunities, mentoring programs, alumni chapters and annual giving opportunities with the purpose of maintaining and renewing personal relationships established during student days. Several alumni programs and services are offered including: discounted insurance programs and career development resources, loan consolidation, credit union membership and free online transcripts. In addition, the Alumni Office sells the Metro State collegiate license plates that benefit student scholarships and alumni programs. The alumni association also provides student scholarships annually.
For a detailed list of programs, services and upcoming alumni events, visit www.mscd.edu/~alumni or contact the office directly at 303-556-8320.
Auraria Campus Police Department
The Auraria Campus Police Department is fully certified and authorized to provide police services to the Auraria campus and is proud to maintain its reputation as one of the safest campuses in the state.
In addition to a police chief and 22 full time police officers, the Auraria Campus Police Department employs security guards and communication personnel. Officers patrol the campus 24 hours a day, seven days a week, on foot, bicycles, golf carts, and in patrol cars.
The Auraria Campus Police Department also provides additional services to the campus community such as vehicle unlocks, crime prevention programs, emergency responses, and fingerprinting.
The Auraria Campus Police Department is located at 1201 Fifth Street. Routine calls-303-556-5000; EMERGENCY CALLS-911 (or use one of the emergency phones located around campus).


32 SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS
Auraria Early Learning Center
The center provides high quality early childhood care and education to the children of students, staff and faculty. A discovery, child-oriented approach is provided by professional teaching staff to children ages 12 months to 6 years. Preregistration is required. Please call 303-556-3188 for information.
Auraria Parking and Transportation Services Parking Services Department
Daily Fee Parking: (in-and-out privileges in Lot E only): daily fees range from $1.50 to $10.00. Several lots are unattended and require purchasing a receipt from the vending machine. Make sure the parking receipt is placed face-up on the driver’s side of the dashboard. Receipts are valid only on the day and for the lot where purchased and are not transferable from one vehicle to another. With an Auraria I.D., parking is available in the Tivoli lot for a maximum fee of $5.00.
Permit Parking: Parking permits are available on a semester basis. They go on sale on the first day of registration, the Monday prior to the start of the semester. Contact the Parking Office at 303-556-2000 for more information.
Motorist Assistance Program: Personnel will help jump-start dead batteries and assist in changing tires. Jumper cables, bumper jacks, tire tools and gasoline cans are also available at no cost to campus parkers. Call 303-556-2000 for assistance. The Parking Services Department is located at 777 Lawrence Way (first floor of the parking centre). Hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Handivan Services: The wheelchair-accessible handivan provides free on-campus transportation for students, faculty and staff from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Monday-Thursday and from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Friday. Call 303-556-2001 for information.
Nightrider: The Nightrider is a free security escort service for any campus parking lot. Service is available from dusk to 10:00 p.m., Monday-Thursday during fall and spring semesters. Call 303-556-2001 for information.
Career Services
Tivoli (TIV) Room 215, 303-556-3664, www.mscd.edu/~career
Career Services offers assistance to students and alumni in the following areas:
• Career counseling and career assessments - Individuals are assisted in clarifying their career interests and personality strengths as they relate to college majors and the world of work. Videotaped mock interviews are available as well.
• Career events - Fairs and seminars are held throughout the fall and spring semesters. These events provide an opportunity to network with prospective employers and identify career opportunities. Information is available through the Career Services Web site, www.mscd.edu/~career. Click on the Events link.
• Job Postings - A customized online employment service for students and alumni. Post resumes and other job search documents and search through current full-time, part-time and internship postings for entry-level positions listed by employers specifically targeting Metro State.
• Career workshops - These workshops provide information about resume writing, job search strategies, interviewing skills, image management and graduate school.
• Career library - The library includes print and electronic resources, job vacancies, salary surveys, graduate school information, and various career research resources. Consult with Career Services staff and learn to utilize an extensive set of electronic resources for career planning, searchable job databases, and other job search tools.
• eChoices Discover programs - These online programs are comprehensive and posses easy-to-use databases that provide information on occupations, colleges, financial aid resources, individualized career planning, and career assessments.
• www.mscd.edu/~career - Our Web site has a wealth of information about jobs and careers.


SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 33
Center for Visual Art
Located off-campus in the heart of LoDo, the Center for Visual Art (CVA) was created in 1990 by Metro State to serve the College and the Rocky Mountain region. Open all year, CVA organizes and hosts diverse exhibitions including artists of national and international significance, which otherwise would be unavailable to the College community and state populace. CVA is a cornerstone of the N.A.S.A.D. accredited art department. Past exhibitions have included works by Sandy Skoglund, Picasso, Alfred Stieglitz, Romare Bearden. CVA hosts Metro States BFA Thesis exhibitions featuring the works of the College’s graduating art students and a biannual exhibition of the Metro art faculty.
Education and community outreach are important facets of CVA. Students, including the Art Department’s 1000 majors/minors and 12,000+ members of the general public, visit CVA each year. Visitors take advantage of the many lectures, tours and workshops available in conjunction with the exhibitions. Outreach programs, providing art workshops and activities for Denver’s at-risk youth are another element of CVA’s education program and commitment to the community. Work-study positions, internships and volunteer opportunities are only a few ways that Metro students can become involved at CVA. Metropolitan State College of Denver’s Center for Visual Art is located at 1734 Wazee Street, Denver, CO 80202; Telephone; 303-294-5207, Fax: 303-294-5210; www.mscd.edu/news/cva.
Counseling Center
The Counseling Center staff provides services to currently enrolled Metropolitan State College students at no additional charge beyond student fees. The staff is ethnically and culturally diverse. Services include personal therapy, support groups, stress management, and crisis intervention. The center also coordinates an active Peer Education Program. Students may request an appointment for their first visit in advance. Follow-up appointments are made to accommodate class schedules. The staff also provides consultations to faculty, staff, and student groups upon request. Faculty are encouraged to invite Counseling Center staff to address mental health issues in their classes. The center is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Mon-day-Friday. and is located in Tivoli 651. For additional information call 303-556-3132.
Access Center for Disability Accommodations and Adaptive Technology
Providing equal opportunity is an important and shared responsibility at Metro State. The Access Center shares this responsibility by assisting students with documented disabilities in reaching their academic potential. Our office strives to accomplish this by providing qualified students with disabilities reasonable academic accommodations as mandated under ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.
Disability categories served by our office include: ADD/ADHD, Systematic Illness, Deaf/HOH, Learning, Cognitive, Psychological, Vision, and Physical.
Students requesting an accommodation need to contact the Access Center and arrange an intake interview. Students need to provide appropriate documentation that describes their diagnosed disability and current functional limitations. Accommodations and/or services for which the student may be eligible will be based on the provided documentation. Examples of accommodations and services include: extended exam time, peer note-takers, interpreters, alternative text, priority registration and disability counseling and advocacy.
The Access Center provides eligible students with access to some of the latest adaptive technology. Approved students will receive training and access to a variety of hardware and software products in our computer lab area. Software available for use includes JAWS, Dragon Naturally Speaking, Zoom-Text and TextFlelp Read & Write.
The Access Center is located in the Auraria Library, Suite 116. For further information, call 303-556-8387 or access the Web site at www.mscd.edu/~access.
Extended Campus
Fully accredited courses are offered at two convenient locations in the Denver metro area: Metro South, 5660 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard, Greenwood Village, 303-721-1313 and Metro North, 11990 Grant Street, Northglenn, 303-450-5111. Extended Campus offers evening, weekend and accelerated


34 SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS
classes in a variety of formats including telecourses, correspondence courses, and other distance learning options. Extended Campus schedules are available each semester.
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Services at Auraria
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender (GLBT) Student Services is open to all Auraria students as a resource for exploring issues of sexual orientation and gender identity. This program offers a variety of support, education and advocacy services for the entire campus community:
• Support for those who may have questions about sexual orientation and gender identity;
• Advocacy for students experiencing discrimination or harassment based on a real or perceived gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender identity;
• Speakers bureau for classes and events on various aspects of sexual orientation, gender identity and related issues;
• Training programs and workshops about combating homophobia, transphobia, working with GLBT individuals, and sensitivity considerations;
• Library of books, videos and resource files available for research and leisure;
• Sponsored events; educational, academic, and social; such as National Coming Out Day Celebration, GLBT Awareness Month keynote speaker, World AIDS Day, Transgender Day of Remembrance and many other forums providing information and dialogue about GLBT issues.
The GLBT Student Services office is located in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 213, and is staffed by a director with the support of student employees and volunteers. Input and involvement from the entire campus community is welcome. For additional information call 303-556-6333, visit www.mscd. edu/~glbtss or email info@glbtss.org.
Health Center at Auraria
AH Metro State students have access to medical services at the Health Center. Student health insurance is NOT required in order to use the Health Center. Physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners and medical assistants staff the facility. Students will be asked to complete a sign-in sheet and show a current semester ID card each time they check in.
Services include treatment of illness and injuries, lab testing, medications, physicals, health maintenance exams, sexually transmitted disease information/testing, birth control information/services, minor surgery, cholesterol screening, immunizations, HIV testing, blood pressure checks, casting, suturing and X-ray. Payment is required at the time of service except for students who participate in the Student Health Insurance Program. Plan exceptions or co-pays may apply.
Scheduled and walk-in appointments are available. Walk-in services begin at 7:50 a.m., Monday-Fri-day. Walk in access varies daily, contingent upon when all patient slots have been filled; thus, the daily closure time for walk-in care is variable. Patients are encouraged to call for an appointment or walk in as early as possible. The Health Center at Auraria is located in the Plaza Building, Room 150, on the lower level. Brochures with additional information are available at the Health Center or go to our Web site at www.mscd.edu/student/resources/health/. For further details call 303-556-2525.
High School Upward Bound
This program is designed to generate the skills and motivation necessary for success in and beyond high school for youths who are low-income and first-generation college-bound students. The program provides intensive academic instruction during the school year, as well as a six-week summer session. A full range of academic skill preparation in reading, writing, and mathematics is part of a comprehensive counseling and enrichment program. Upon completion of their high school studies, program participants are enrolled in the Upward Bound Bridge Program, prior to pursuing their full-time postsecondary studies at an institution of their choice and ability. This program develops creative thinking, effective expression and positive attitudes toward learning. The students are recruited at the beginning of their sophomore year in high school from five target-area high schools located in Denver County (East, Lincoln, Manual, North, and West High School). For additional information call 303-556-2812.


SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 35
Immigrant Services Program
The Immigrant Services Program provides assistance to students whose first language is not English. The program offers intensive academic and personal advising, assessment, tutoring, assisting with the financial aid application process, and monitoring student progress. Because the program does not offer ESL classes, students with limited English proficiency are referred to the appropriate curricula. For more information call 303-556-3676.
Information Technology
Information Technology at Metropolitan State College of Denver provides students with the opportunity to use the most current technology either on campus or from home. Metropolitan State College of Denver offers more than 30 computer laboratories for use by all current students. The software in laboratories ranges from word processing and computer graphics to the most current engineering software. Information on the location and operating hours of student labs is available in the current class schedule or at www.mscd.edu/~infotech/complabs/hours.htm. Metro State students needing adaptive equipment or additional assistance with technology due to a disability can visit the Access Center, Library Room 116. The computer lab currently has software to assist students with hearing, learning, visual and orthopedic disabilities. Further information is available at www.mscd.edu/~access; 303-556-8387 (Access Center).
The Metro State Homepage (www.mscd.edu) provides many online services for students including:
• online registration
• online admissions
• orientation and assessment
• financial aid
• records
• course catalog
• class schedules
Responsible Use Policy
Before students receive e-mail accounts, they are required to read and agree to the Responsible Use of Technology Resources Policy. This policy is in place to protect all students, faculty, and staff, as well as the stability of the computing environment. It is important to be familiar with the terms of the Responsible Use Policy as misuse of computing resources may include suspension of computing privileges, referral to an appropriate authority on campus and referral to a law enforcement agency. Disciplinary action by the College may include suspension, expulsion and requirements to make financial restitution. The policy is listed in the student handbook and online at www.mscd.edu/infotech/policies/itpolicy2.htm.
Information Technology at Metro State is committed to providing students with the best possible computing service on campus and from home. Assistance is available in the student labs or through the Metro State Center for Technology Services at 1-877-35ASKIT (1-877-352-7548) or at www.mscd.edu/ AskIT.
International Student Services
Metro State provides a variety of services to international students attending Metro State. These include counseling on visas, school transfers, work permission and housing; conducting academic and cultural orientation sessions; assisting with immigration issues; providing information to embassies and sponsors; advising on academic issues; and organizing social and cultural events. International students should contact the Academic Advising Center. Please see International and Intercultural Education on page 52 of this Catalog.
Metro Bridge Program
The Metro Bridge Programs mission is to facilitate the successful transition of high school graduates as they enter Metro State and to increase the academic preparedness, retention, and graduation of participants in the intensive summer program. Program participants develop through academic and social learning communities that unite students from diverse cultural and social backgrounds in an


36 SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS
environment that promotes academic excellence and collegiality. Students receive a scholarship for the summer program, earn college credit, and participate in enrichment workshops and activities that enhance their summer experience, transition, and connection to Metropolitan State College of Denver. The office is located in Central Classroom Building, Room 102. For information call 303-556-4023.
Metro North and Metro South
Please see The Campuses on page 6 of this Catalog.
Short-Term Emergency Student Loan Program
The Short-Term Emergency Student Loan Program offers short-term (30-day) interest-free loans to eligible Metro State College students of up to $210.00 per loan; with a maximum of two loans per term. Applications are available at the Scholarship Center in the Central Classroom, room 120, Monday-Fri-day from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Qualifying criteria, procedures for submission and online applications are available through our Web site (www.mscd.edu/financialaid/types/shortterm.shtml); or contact the Short-Term Loan office in the Scholarship Center at 303-352-4247.
Student Travel Program
The Student Travel Program is pleased to offer funding opportunities up to $2,000 to qualified student groups and up to $650 for qualified individual students to help facilitate their attendance at educational conferences nationwide. (Individual students may only be considered when they have been invited to give poster presentations, conference workshops or papers, or they have some other significant role in the conference.) Expenses for transportation, conference registration, and lodging may be considered for funding from Student Travel. Students must formally apply for this funding at least two months prior to the event, along with their faculty or administrative advisor who has agreed to attend the conference with them. Detailed information about student eligibility, procedures for applying, the proposal due dates, other qualifying criteria and the online application are available on our Web site at www.mscd. edu/~travel. More information is also available in Tivoli 305, or call 303-556-5026 or 303-556-2595.
Student Intervention Services
Student Intervention Services (SIS) administers and enforces the Academic Standing Policy by working closely with Academic Affairs. SIS works with many academically struggling students whose cumulative GPA is below 2.0, and with Re-admit students whose cumulative GPA is below 2.0. Students are assisted with developing an individualized success strategy which may include assistance with advising, scheduling, and referrals to appropriate services. SIS also reviews and makes decisions on Suspension Appeals for Academically Suspended students wanting to remain enrolled at the College. Students identified as needing our services are notified by e-mail and an academic hold is placed on their registration until they meet with a SIS staff member. SIS also administers the Academic Alert Program which provides staff and faculty with mid-term grades to assist students as early as possible in the semester.
Student Success Program
The Student Success Programs (SSP) goal is to assist provisionally admitted students with comprehensive and individualized services to successfully transition them into Metro State. The structured services and programming that SSP offers are peer advising, academic monitoring, and referral to other campus services. These efforts are to positively affect retention and graduation rates, and for the students to help themselves through college. Students admitted under this provision will be contacted after they have attended orientation, taken the assessment tests, and registered for class. The office is located in the Central Classroom Building 102, 303-556-4023.
Federal TRIO Student Support Services Program
The Federal TRIO Student Support Services program is designed to improve the retention and graduation rates of first generation, low-income students and students with disabilities at Metro State. Students enrolled in the program receive tutoring, personal counseling, academic advising, assistance in obtaining financial aid, and opportunities to participate in cultural activities. The program also provides educational and graduate school workshops, computer-assisted instruction and basic skills instruction in


SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 37
reading, writing, and mathematics. The Office of Student Support Services is located in Central Classroom 101. For more information call 303-556-4722.
The Spring International Language Center at Auraria
Intensive English classes at the Spring International Language Center focus on all language skills: grammar, reading, writing and listening/speaking, in addition to special electives that students can choose each term, such as TOEFL preparation, vocabulary building and pronunciation. Five nine-week terms are offered throughout the year to enable students to complete their English study quickly. Students are placed at one of the six levels, with assessment of learner outcomes at the completion of each level. Spring International Language Center is located on the fourth floor of the Tivoli Student Union, Room 454. For more information call 303-534-1616.
Tivoli Student Union
The Tivoli Student Union, managed by Student Auxiliary Services, is the heart of campus service and social activities. The Student Union houses Student Government, Activities and Life offices as well as the newspaper offices for Metro State, the Community College of Denver, and the University of Colorado Denver. Other Metro State offices located here include the Tutoring Center, e.den Student Computer Lab, the Counseling Center, New Student Orientation, Testing and Assessment, and the UCD Career Counseling Center. You will also find the tri-institutional office of the GLBT at the Student Union.
Additional student services at the Tivoli Student Union include the Auraria Campus Bookstore, Campus Computers, the Club Hub, Clicks! Copy Center, Conference Services, and the ID Program and Commuter Resource Center. Conference Services, located in Tivoli 325, will help you make arrangements for meeting space in the Tivoli, St. Francis, St. Cajetan’s and the P.E. Event Center, as well as outdoor table rentals.
If you want a break or a quiet place to study, the Tivoli Student Union is just the place. With a wide variety of food venues you will find a place to suit your appetite, schedule and budget. If you would rather retreat, you can watch TV in the Roger Braun Student Lounge, play a game of pool at Sigi’s Pool Hall and Arcade, meet a study group in the multicultural lounge or study in total silence in the Garage Quiet Study Lounge.
For more information about the Tivoli Student Union, call 303-556-6330.
Tutoring Program
The Tutoring Program provides free tutoring assistance to all students enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver in an effort to promote academic success. The Tutoring Center promotes an environment that is welcoming to the diverse student body of Metro State by providing professionally trained tutors who are competent in subject material and areas such as diversity, learning styles, and communication. You can either schedule a session with a tutor or you can simply drop in during our group tutoring times. The office is located in the Tivoli 124 and online at www.mscd.edu/~tutoring.
Veterans Services
The Veterans Services Office assists students in obtaining their GI Bill education entitlement. The Veterans Services Office acts as the liaison between the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs and the veteran/ dependent student. Different VA classifications provide different types of entitlement. Student veterans/ dependents maybe eligible for tutorial assistance, VA work-study, advance payment, emergency student loans, etc. The office also certifies and tracks the academic progress of entitled veterans. If there are any questions or problems regarding eligibility, payment, tutoring, etc., please speak with a representative in CN 203 or call 303-556-2993.
Federal TRIO Veterans Upward Bound
The primary mission of the Veterans Upward Bound Program is to provide eligible military veterans with academic skills refresher training through a core curriculum of subjects that prepares them to learn as well as succeed at the postsecondary educational level. VUB participants are also informed of various support services that are available to all students on nearly every college campus. Upon sue-


38 STUDENT LIFE
cessful completion of the VUB Program, veteran participants are not only familiar with the services and resources that would be available to them as college students, but more importantly they possess a renewed confidence in their academic abilities — a vital asset that is necessary for success in college.
Women’s Services
The Institute for Women’s Studies and Services is committed to the empowerment of women through education. To help students have a positive college experience, women’s services provides referrals to campus and community resources, information about scholarships, assistance with the process of entering Metro State College, advocacy services for students dealing with harassment or discrimination, and programs and events that focus on issues of particular concern to women. The institute houses a small library with a variety of books and other resource materials on women’s experiences, histories and contributions to society. Call 303-556-8441 or stop by 1033 Ninth Street Park for more information.
Writing Center
The Writing Center staff of composition instructors and trained writing tutors is committed to working with students in developing their writing abilities. Tutors help students identify problem areas and provide instruction on how to eliminate them. Through one-on-one instruction, tutors teach students to generate, organize, and develop ideas; to revise and edit with confidence; and to handle issues of format and documentation. For more information contact the Writing Center at 303-556-6070.
STUDENT LIFE
The Office of Student Life offers students a wide range of services and programs designed to enhance classroom experiences and encourage campus involvement. These co-curricular programs include educational, cultural, recreational and social interaction as well as unique opportunities for leadership development. To learn more about these services, visit our offices located in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 311 or call 303-556-3559. The Web site is www.mscd.edu/~studlife.
In addition, the Office of Student Life also administers the following programs:
Student Affairs Board (SAB) - The Student Affairs Board enables students to have continuous representation in the use and allocation of their student affairs fees. The SAB is comprised of student government representatives, faculty senate representatives and administrative representatives.
Student Problem Action Network (SPAN) - The SPAN Program is a network of volunteer advisors who help students resolve problems they may be experiencing with faculty, staff or other students in the Metro State classroom or workplace. Advisors are there to: help sort out the facts in a given situation, identify specific issues and concerns, recognize the perspective of others involved in a situation, articulate options for resolution, formulate strategies for resolving the situation, help navigate campus systems and advise the student on how to implement the chosen strategy.
Outstanding Student and Who’s Who Awards - The Office of Student Life partners with academic departments and hosts the annual college-wide Outstanding Student Awards and the selection of nominees for Who’s Who in American Universities and Colleges.
Judicial Affairs
The responsibility of the Office of Judicial Affairs is to administer the discipline system for Metro State. Metro State’s Standards of Conduct clearly state the College’s expectations for student behavior. For additional information, refer to the Student Handbook or visit the Tivoli, Room 311. Information is also available on our Web site at: www.mscd.edu/~judicial.
Student Activities
Tivoli Student Union (TV) 305, (303) 556-2595, studentactivities.mscd.edu
The Office of Student Activities enriches students’ college experiences by helping them “Get Involved & Learn More” about campus life through dynamic activities such as events, co-curricular opportunities, student organizations, leadership education and Metro COOL.


STUDENT LIFE 3
Programs, events and co-curricular opportunities help to stimulate, educate, challenge and entertain the student body. Through co-sponsorships with other universities, student organizations and academic departments, Student Activities facilitates bringing prominent national and local figures and stimulating experiences to the students. Specific programs include the following:
Distinguished Lecture Series
This series hosts locally, regionally and internationally recognized speakers who inspire students to think critically about current issues and events.
Student Organization Services
Metro Student Organizations provide a variety of programs that are stimulating and invigorating — enhancing students’ co-curricular and extracurricular experiences. Student Organization Services can assist in helping students find the right organization or in creating a new one. We have more than 100 registered student organizations at Metro State.
Leadership
Join other students in exploring leadership through workshops, seminars, speakers and conferences. These programs are designed to give you tools to create change in your community. Over 300 students participate in one of our leadership programs each year.
Metro COOL
Metro COOL is a campus-wide program offering ongoing and one-time volunteer opportunities. Students can match up with local agencies looking for volunteers with our online database through the Student Activities Web site. Metro COOL also sponsors monthly service events designed to make immediate impact on a community while connecting Metro students to one another. Make an impact on your community today!
Student Technological Services
Student Technological Services is on the front line creating interactive, technologically stimulating and highly dynamic digital media. Through our efforts, the campus broadcasts events live across the Internet. By archiving videos of campus events for future release and Internet viewing, we are able to provide a wider outreach to those who are interested in campus archives. Student Technological Services also maintains and develops an online Discussion Forum for campus involvement, and creates interactive resource CDs and DVDs for a full service online activities office.
Laptop Lease
This exciting program provides students with an opportunity to lease an Apple” laptop for a semester at an affordable price. These laptops are the latest in technology, offering the ability to compute anywhere on campus via Wi-Fi access. Enjoy the ability to write your term paper at home or under the old oak tree in the park.
Student Government Assembly
Metropolitan State College Student Government Assembly is an elected body that exists to represent and act in the interests of the students. Student Government Assembly (SGA) works to create opportunities for student involvement and success through its programs, and works to sustain and improve them each year. The SGA includes three additional elected representatives: the Board of Trustees Student Representative and the two representatives to the Student Advisory Committee to the Auraria Board (SACAB). Together the assembly works to ensure that students’ voices are heard and represented in all levels of the College’s administration. The SGA offices are located in the Tivoli 307, phone number 303-556-3312. Our Web site is www.mscd.edu/~sga.
Student Media
The Office of Student Media, located in Tivoli 313, produces a variety of student-operated media designed to keep the campus informed and entertained. The office’s diverse staff of students produces a weekly newspaper, The Metropolitan-, a weekly video newscast, The Met Report; a Web-based radio station, Met Radio; an annual literary and arts magazine, Metrosphere; and the annual Student Handbook.


40 STUDENT LIFE
The Metropolitan offers students the opportunity to explore such fields as reporting, photography, Web page design, graphic arts, marketing and advertising through work experience. The Metropolitan and its Web site, The Met Online (www.mscd.edu/~themet), are produced entirely by Metro State students and are published weekly during the fall and spring and monthly during the summer.
The Emmy Award-winning Met Report can be seen weekly on Comcast Channel 54 or on the Internet at metreport.mscd.edu. The newscast keeps students informed on campus happenings and Denver news.
Met Radio offers diverse, student-produced programming through its Webcast at metradio.mscd.edu or at FM 88.3 in the Tivoli.
Metrosphere, Metro State’s annual literary and arts magazine, is published each spring and features poetry, fiction, non-fiction, art and photography. Submissions for the student-produced magazine are accepted during the fall semester. Copies are distributed free to students and are available in Tivoli 313. Metrosphere can be found online at www.mscd.edu/~msphere.
The Student Handbook is a complete guide to navigating Metro State. Published each year, the handbook offers information on everything from e-mail accounts to financial aid, as well as a section on academic and campus policies. It also is online at: handbook.mscd.edu.
Students interested in working for the Office of Student Media should visit Tivoli 313 and fill out an application, or call 303-556-2507.
Campus Recreation
The Campus Recreation at Auraria program is among the most affordable ways that students have found to enjoy themselves, and it is among the best recreation programs offered in Colorado. The program is composed of the Drop-In Program (informal recreation), Intramurals, Outdoor Adventure, Personal Training, and the Physically Challenged Program. Student membership is free with a current, validated student ID.
The Drop-in Program provides group and individual activities for students, faculty, staff, alumni and guests. Facilities include three basketball courts, 6 tennis courts, volleyball courts, a 25-yard indoor pool, two handball/racquetball courts, one squash court, a fitness center, a dance studio, and a climbing wall. In addition, Campus Recreation offers a myriad of group fitness classes in step, hi-hop, muscle sculpting, cardio salsa, indoor cycling, abs & back, water fitness and more. The Drop-in Program also offers a new instructional component, Get Fit Clinics, which consists of a variety of noncredit instructional workshops, clinics and seminars. Check the Drop-in Program schedule in Room 108 of the Physical Education Building or call 303-556-3210 for a listing of available times.
The Intramural Program consists of individual and team activities open to all students, faculty and staff members. The emphasis of the program is on participation, sportsmanship and social interaction. Whenever possible, competitive and recreational divisions are offered to ensure participation for all ability levels. Activities include flag football, basketball, floor hockey, volleyball, dodge ball and racquetball leagues, as well as tennis tournaments.
Outdoor Adventure provides the opportunity to experience the beauty and challenge of nature through organized trips. The program provides outdoor recreational experiences emphasizing skill acquisition, social interaction, environmental awareness, and safety. Some of the many adventures offered are biking, canoeing, cross-country skiing, downhill skiing, family-fun outings, hiking, ice climbing, kayaking/ raffing, naturalist outings, rock climbing, indoor climbing, and sailing. The program also provides rental equipment, including camping and hiking gear, canoes, and cross-country skis. The office is located in the basement of the Events Center.
The Physically Challenged Program offers a variety of sporting, recreational, and fitness opportunities for students with physical or learning limitations. The adaptive programs/services encompass one-on-one or group sessions that assist in using the recreation equipment and facilities. Information on planned group activities or individual help sessions is available in the Events Center, Room 108, 303-556-3210.


ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS 41
Intercollegiate Athletics
The Intercollegiate Athletics program plays an integral role in campus life at The Metropolitan State College of Denver. Metro State offers 12 intercollegiate sports programs: baseball, men’s basketball, womens basketball, men’s cross country, women’s cross country, men’s soccer, women’s soccer, men’s swimming and diving, women’s swimming and diving, men’s tennis, women’s tennis and women’s volleyball.
The teams, nicknamed the Roadrunners, compete at the Division II level of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The Roadrunners are members of the 14-member Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference (RMAC), which was founded in 1909 and features modest-sized schools with limited athletic budgets.
Scholarships are available for each of the 12 intercollegiate sports. They are distributed by individual coaches on the basis of merit, athletic ability and team needs. Scholarships are awarded on a yearly basis. The Intercollegiate Athletics Office is located in the Administration Building, Suite 560RR, 303-556-8300.
ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS
Credit for Prior Learning
Successful completion of national examinations, departmental examinations, or a prior learning portfolio, or assessment of nonaccredited training programs through published guides may be used to award credit or may permit placement in advanced courses. A student may earn up to 60 semester hours of credit toward degree requirements using prior learning credit options. This credit will be posted to the student’s record after the completion of 8 semester hours of residency credit at Metro State. Prior learning credit may not be used toward the last 12 semester hours of a degree program, does not substitute for residency requirements, and cannot be used to challenge prerequisite courses for courses already completed. Students are advised that letter grades are not assigned for such credit, and some institutions may not accept transfer credits that do not include letter grades. Additional information is available from the offices indicated in each section below.
Advanced Placement Examinations
Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate Advanced Placement (AP) examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board may have official scores submitted directly to the Office of Admissions for consideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate department chair, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted. AP credit is awarded after the completion of 8 credit hours at Metro State (see following chart). Students should contact www.colleg-eboard.com or 888-225-5427 to request official AP scores; Metro State’s AP code is 4505.
COURSE CREDIT AWARDS FOR ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAMS
AP SCORE 2 3 4 5
Biology BIO 1080-3 & BIO 1090-1 BIO 1080-3 & BIO 1090-1 BIO 1080-3 & BIO 1090-1
Chemistry CHE 1800-4 CHE 1800-4 CHE 1810-4 CHE 1850-2 CHE 1800-4 CHE 1810-4 CHE 1850-2
Computer Science (A) CS 1050-4 CS 1050-4
Computer Science (AB) CS 1050-4 CS 1050-4 CS 2050-4 CS 1050-4 CS 2050-4
Economics (Macro) ECO 2010-3 ECO 2010-3 ECO 2010-3
Economics (Micro) ECO 2020-3 ECO 2020-3 ECO 2020-3


42 ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS
English (Comp & Lit) ENG 1010-3 ENG 1100-3 ENG 1010-3 ENG 1020-3 ENG 1100-3 ENG 1010-3 ENG 1020-3 ENG 1100-3
English (Lang & Comp) ENG 1010-3 ENG 1010-3 ENG 1020-3 ENG 1010-3 ENG 1020-3
Gov’t & Politics (US.) PSC 1010-3 PSC 1010-3 PSC 1010-3
Geography- Human GEG 1300-3 GEG 1300-3 GEG 1300-3
Environmental Science ENV 1200-3 ENV1200-3 ENV1200-3
French Language FRE 2110-3 FRE 2010-3 FRE 2110-3 FRE 2010-3 FRE 2020-3 FRE 2110-3
French Literature FRE 2110-3 FRE 2110-3 FRE 2110-3 FRE 3010-3
German Language GER 1020-5 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2310-3 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2310-3 GER 2320-3
German Literature GER 1020-5 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2310-3 GER 2110-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2310-3 GER 2320-3
History (American) HIS 1210-3 HIS 1210-3 HIS 1220-3 HIS 1210-3 HIS 1220-3
History (European) HIS 1010-3 HIS 1010-3 HIS 1020-3 HIS 1010-3 HIS 1020-3
History (World) HIS 1030-3 HIS 1030-3 HIS 1040-3 HIS 1030-3 HIS 1040-3
Math (Calc AB) MTH 1400-4 MTH 1410-4 MTH 1410-4
Math (Calc BC) MTH 1400-4 MTH 1410-4 MTH 2410-4 MTH 1410-4 MTH 2410-4
Physics (B) PHY 2010-4 PHY 2030-1 PHY 2020-4 PHY 2040-1 PHY 2010-4 PHY 2030-1 PHY 2020-4 PHY 2040-1 PHY 2010-4 PHY 2030-1 PHY 2020-4 PHY 2040-1
Physics (C-Mechanics) PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1
Physics (C-Magnetism, Elec) PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2331-4 PHY 2341-1 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2331-4 PHY 2341-1 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2331-4 PHY 2341-1
Psychology PSY1001-3 PSY1001-3
Spanish Language SPA 1020-5 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2310-3 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2310-3 SPA 2320-3
Spanish Literature SPA 1020-5 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2310-3 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2310-3
Statistics MTH 1210-4 MTH 1210-4 MTH 1210-4


ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS 43
International Baccalaureate
Metro State recognizes the high level of achievement that the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program represents. Students who complete the IB Diploma Program and the IB examinations are guaranteed admission to the College and are eligible to receive credit and advanced placement standing. To receive credit, a student must receive at least a score of four (4) on each IB examination and call 212-696-4464 to request that official scores be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions from the IB organization. For specific equivalencies, see the table below. Please contact the Office of Admissions at 303-556-3058 for more information. Students should consult with the appropriate department for further advising and with their major departments about acceptance of credits toward their majors.
INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE TRANSFER CREDIT AWARD
IB Exam Level of Exam Metro State Equivalence Semester Metro State General
Exam Score Hours Studies Area
Anthropology Higher 4 thru 7 ANT 1310 w/ 3 hrs 6 Social Sciences
elective
Standard 4 thru 7 Anthropology elective 3 Social Sciences
Art-Design A Higher 4 thru 7 ART 1200 w/ 3 hrs elective 6
Standard 4 thru 7 ART 1200-3 3
Art-Visual Higher 4 thru 7 Art elective 6
Standard 4 thru 7 Art elective 3
Biology Higher 5 thru 7 BIO 1080-3, BIO 1090-1 w 2 hrs 6 Natural Sciences
elective
Higher 4 Biology elective 6
Standard 4 thru 7 BIO 1000-3 3 Natural Sciences
Chemistry Higher 4 thru 7 CHE 1100-4, CHE 1150-1 w/ 1 6 Natural Sciences
hr elective
Standard 4 thru 7 CHE 1010-3 3 Natural Sciences
Computer Science Higher 4 thru 7 CMS 1010-3 w/ 3 hrs elective 6
Standard 4 thru 7 CMS 1010-3 3
Dance Higher 4 thru 7 Theatre elective 3
Economics Higher 4 thru 7 ECO 2010-3 w/ 3 hrs elective 6 Social Sciences
Standard 4 thru 7 Economics elective 3 Social Science
English (A-1) Higher 4 thru 7 ENG 1010-3, ENG 1100-3 6 Composition - 3
Foreign Lang (Al) Higher 4 thru 7 FRE 3110-3 & FRE 3320-3 or 6
French, German, GER 3010-3 & GER 3210-3 or
Spanish SPA 3110-3 & SPA 3250-3
Standard 4 thru 7 FRE, GER, SPA 1010-5,1020-5 10 Communications
Foreign Lang (B) Higher 4 thru 7 FRE 2010-3 & FRE 2020-3 or GER 2110-3 & GER 2120-3 or 6
SPA 2110-3 & SPA 2120-3
Standard 4 thru 7 FRE, GER, SPA 1010-5, 1020-5 10 Communications
Geography Higher 4 thru 7 ENV 1200-3 w/ 3 hrs elective 6 Natural Sciences
(Environmental Sys) Standard 4 thru 7 Environmental elective 3 Natural Sciences
History of Africa Higher 4 thru 7 History elective 6 Historical
Standard 4 thru 7 History elective 3 Historical
History of Americas Higher 4 thru 7 History elective 6 Historical
Standard 4 thru 7 History elective 3 Historical
History of Europe Higher 4 thru 7 HIS 1010-3, HIS 1020-3 6 Historical
Standard 4 thru 7 HIS 1010-3 3 Historical
Japanese Higher 4 thru 7 Modern Languages elective 6
Standard 4 thru 7 Modern Languages elective 3
Latin Higher 4 thru 7 Modern Languages elective 6
Standard 4 thru 7 Modern Languages elective 3
Mathematics* Standard 4 thru 7 MTH 1110-4 4 Mathematics


44 ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS
Mathematics* Higher 5 thru 7 MTH 1410-4 4 Mathematics
Higher 4 MTH 1400-4 4 Mathematics
Math Methods* Standard 5 thru 7 MTH 1110-4 4 Mathematics
Standard 4 Mathematics elective 3 Mathematics
Math Studies* Standard 4 thru 7 Mathematics elective 3 Mathematics
Physics Higher 4 thru 7 PHY 2010-4, PHY 2020-4, PHY 2030-1, PHY 2040-1 10 Natural Sciences
Standard 4 thru 7 PHY 1000-4 4 Natural Sciences
Psychology Higher 4 thru 7 PSY 1001-3 w/ 3 hrs elective 6 Social Sciences
Standard 4 thru 7 Psychology elective 3 Social Sciences
Russian Higher 4 thru 7 Modern Languages elective 6
Standard 4 thru 7 Modern Languages elective 3
Theater Higher 4 thru 7 THE 2210-3 w/ 3 hrs elective 6 Arts & Letters
Standard 4 thru 7 Theater elective 3 Arts & Letters
*See Math Department for further advising.
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) consists of a series of national standardized examinations. They are designed to evaluate nonaccredited college-level learning in order to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge. Based on the results of one or more of the CLEP examinations that are accepted at Metro State, the College may award up to 30 credits toward the General Studies requirements. Thus, students may test out of many of the traditional courses required during the freshman year. Students are advised to check with their major departments for information on specific General Studies requirements that may not be met through the use of CLEP examinations.
Metro State does not allow CLEP to be used for ENG 1020, Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research and Documentation.
No more than 60 credits may be earned through all the approved CLEP examinations.
• Credit earned through the English composition with essay, humanities, natural sciences, social sciences/history, and college mathematics examinations may be applied only to General Studies requirements. Credit earned through the other approved examinations may apply to any requirements unless otherwise stated.
• Credit earned will be entered on the student’s transcript with the title of the examination(s) and without reference to any specific Metro State course(s). CLEP examinations are recorded without reference to a letter grade and are not figured into the student’s GPA. Credit earned through CLEP examinations does not count toward residency credit requirements and therefore may not be awarded as part of the last 12 credit hours applicable to a degree.
• Credit earned through CLEP examinations will not be recorded on the student’s permanent record until the student has earned 8 hours in residency credit at Metro State. Students may take CLEP examinations prior to meeting the 8 credit hour residency requirement, in which case the scores will be maintained in the student’s record and appropriate credit awarded when the 8 credit hour residency requirement is met.
• In order to have CLEP examination or military examination (DANTES) results evaluated, the student should have a copy of the official score report sent to, Metropolitan State College of Denver, Office of Admissions, Campus Box 16, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362. To request an official CLEP score report, contact www.collegeboard.com/clep or 800-257-9558. Metro State’s CLEP code is 4505. DANTES test scores can be obtained by calling 850-452-1063.
• All CLEP examinations will be subject to the statement of policy in place at the time the scores are submitted, not the policy in place at the time the examination was taken.
• Credit awarded through CLEP examinations at other colleges or universities will be re-evaluated at Metro State according to the Metro State policy in place at the time the test scores are submitted. Students are advised to have an official copy of their score(s) sent to the College in order to have that credit evaluated.


ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS 45
• Metro State will not grant credit for a CLEP examination if, prior to the semester the exam is taken, a student has completed, or was enrolled in, college courses equivalent to or more advanced than the subject material of the exam. Credit will not be recorded on a students permanent record until all official transcripts from other regionally accredited colleges and universities attended by the student have been received and evaluated by the Office of Admissions.
• Any exception to these policies must be approved through the Board on Academic Standards Exceptions (BASE). Information about filing an appeal through BASE is available from the student’s dean’s office.
• Failure to achieve the required score(s) listed will not be entered on the permanent record. However, a copy of the CLEP score report will be retained in the student’s file.
• Any examination may be repeated six months after the date of the previous examination.
For advising assistance with CLEP examinations and information about departmental credit by examination and portfolio assessment, students may contact the Center for Individualized Learning, St. Francis Center, 2nd floor, Room 10, 303-556-8342. Additional information about the content and format of CLEP examinations is available through the College Board Web site at www.collegeboard.com/clep. Examinations may be taken through the Community College of Denver Test Center, 303-556-3810, South Classroom 223. Other official testing centers can be found through the College Board Web site listed above.
CLFP EXAMINATION STANDARDS
CLEP Exam Minimum Score for MSCD Credit MSCD Credit MSCD General Studies No Credit for Prior Enrollment2
American Government 56 3 Social Sciences PSC1010
American Literature 55 3 * ENG 2210,2220
Analysis and Interpretation of Literature1 60 3 Arts & Letters ENG 1100,1110, 1120
English Composition with Essay 50 3 Freshmen Composition ENG 1010'
English Literature 55 3 * ENG 2310,2330
French Language 50 10 Communications FRE 1010,1020
French Language 62 16 Communications FRE 1010,1020,2010, 2110
General Biology 57 3 Natural Sciences BIO 1000
Calculus 54 3 Mathematics MTH 1410
College Algebra 54 3 Mathematics MTH 11104
College Mathematics 50 3 Mathematics MTH 1080
General Chemistry 63 4 * CHE 1800
General Chemistry 69 8 * CHE 1800,1810
German Language 50 10 Communications GER 1010, 1020
German Language 63 16 Communications GER 1010,1020,2110, 2310
History of the US I 50 3 Historical HIS 1210
History of the US II 50 3 Historical HIS 1220


46 ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS
CLEP EXAMINATION STANDARDS
CLEP Exam Minimum Score for MSCD Credit MSCD Credit MSCD General Studies No Credit for Prior Enrollment2
Humanities 50 6 Arts & Letters ART 1040, MUS 1000, ENG 1100,1110 or ENG 1120
Human Growth and Development3 50 3 * PSY 2210
Precalculus 54 3 Math MTH 1400
Introductory Psychology1,3 50 3 * PSY 1001
Introduction to Educational Psychology 50 3 * PSY 1001
Introductory Sociology' 58 3 Social Sciences SOC 1010
Information Systems and Computer Applications 66 3 * CMS 1010, CSS 1010
Principles of Macroeconomics1 62 3 Social Sciences ECO 2010
Principles of Marketing 62 3 * MKT 3000
Principles of Microeconomics 61 3 Social Sciences ECO 2020
Principles of Management 50 3 * MGT 3000
Natural Sciences1 50 6 Natural Sciences BIO 1000, AST 1040, CHE 1010, GEL 1010, PHY 1000
Social Science and History1 50 6 Social Sciences ECO 2010, HIS 1000, PSC 1010, PSY 1001, SOC 1010
Spanish Language 50 10 Communications SPA 1010,1020
Spanish Language 66 16 Communications SPA 1010,1020,2110, 2120
Western Civilization 50 3 Historical HIS 1020
Western Civilization II 50 3 Historical HIS 1020
' Does not meet general education requirements
1 Although the examinations are essentially independent, where there is overlap, credit may be obtained by
completing only one of the two overlapping examinations.
2 If during or subsequent to the semester the exam is taken, the student earns credit in any course(s) in col-
umn 5, accepted at Metro State, the credit value of the course(s) will be subtracted from the corresponding CLEP credit previously awarded.
3 Introductory Psychology may be applied to a psychology major or minor.
4 Students wishing to take Calculus I at Metro State must first pass Metro State’s departmental calculus placement exam.
Examination scores are based on standards set by NTE/ETS and in consultation with the appropriate department chairperson.


ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS 4/1
Attainment Examinations
Any student may take attainment examinations in some departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although it does not reduce the number of credits required for graduation, entitles students to substitute their own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the course.
Departmental Credit by Examination
A department may grant a student credit for college courses for which the student requests and passes appropriate examinations. The charge for each credit hour requested is one-half the student’s portion of in-state tuition for one credit hour, and must be paid prior to taking the examination. A maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be awarded through departmental credit by examination. Credit through departmental examination is based on knowledge equivalent to a regular course offered by the College. Omnibus-numbered courses are excluded. Permission for departmental credit by examination must be obtained in advance from the instructor giving the examination, the department chair and the appropriate dean.
To earn credit by examination, a student must be currently enrolled in good standing in a degree or certificate program at the College. Credit by examination may not be counted as part of the last 12 credit hours of a degree program unless it is approved by the Board on Academic Standards Exceptions (BASE). Applications for submitting a request to BASE are available in the dean’s offices in each school.
If a student has registered for a higher numbered course in a sequence, the exam for a prerequisite for that higher-numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester. Credit by examination for a course which is a prerequisite for a course already completed will not be granted unless approved by BASE.
Examinations cannot be taken to raise grades, to remove failures, or to remove “NC,” “SP,” “I,” or “CC” notations. Credit by examination is not applicable toward academic residency requirements. Credit by examination cannot be obtained for a course in which a student has been enrolled at Metro State or at another regionally accredited college or university unless approved by BASE. Credit by examination will not be granted for courses attended as a listener, visitor or auditor.
Examinations for credit will be taken at a time specified by the department. A grade equivalent to “A” or “B” must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credits so earned for the course will be recorded without a grade on the student’s permanent record and are not considered in computing college grade point averages.
The hours granted for credit by exam are not included as a part of the student’s semester enrollment. The credit will appear on the transcript for the semester in which the examination was taken, but the hours do not count as part of the student’s total enrollment for the purposes of financial aid or any other purpose predicated on total hours of enrollment for a given semester.
Credit by examination will be posted after a student has completed eight semester hours of credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver and after an evaluation of all transfer credit has been completed. The application form will be maintained in the student’s file. No record of failures on such examinations will be entered on the student’s permanent record. Departmental examinations attempted for course credit under these guidelines may not be repeated.
Applications for departmental credit by examination are available at the Center for Individualized Learning (303-556-8342) and from the Office of the Registrar (Central Classroom 105).
Portfolio Assessment
Students may apply for credit for college-level learning gained through experience by preparing and submitting a prior learning portfolio. Credit is awarded on the basis of a careful assessment of the prior learning portfolio by faculty in the department from which credit is sought. Portfolio assessment is available in many, but not all, academic departments. To earn credit, a student must be a continuing student enrolled in good standing in a degree or certificate program.


48 ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS
The portfolio is developed with the assistance of the Center for Individualized Learning, 303-556-8342. Portfolio assessment may be used to apply for credit for specific courses listed in the Catalog. Students may also apply for credit for omnibus courses through portfolio assessment with the permission of the appropriate academic department. Applicants for credit through portfolio assessment will generally be required to take EDS 2680-1, The Portfolio Development Workshop, which is offered as a correspondence course.
Policies that govern credit for prior learning options apply to credit awarded through the portfolio process. The charge for each credit hour assessed is one-half the student’s portion of in-state tuition for one credit hour. The assessment charge is payable prior to evaluation of the portfolio by faculty for academic credit.
Contact the Center for Individualized Learning for assistance and further information (St. Francis Center, 2nd floor, Room 10, 303-556-8342). Information sessions about portfolio assessment and other credit for prior learning options are held on a regular basis. Information is available on our Web site: www.mscd.edu/~cil/.
Credit for Military Training and Other Training Programs
Military training and other educational programs, including DANTES, that have been assessed for college credit by the American Council on Education (ACE) will be evaluated by the Office of Admissions for transfer credit at Metro State. For formal military training, copies of training certificates and a copy of the DD-214 or DD-295 should be submitted to the Office of Admissions. In addition, students with Army training should request that an official AARTS transcript be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions by calling 866-297-4427; those with Air Force training should request an official Community College of the Air Force transcript by calling 334-953-2794. Students with training from the Navy or Marines should request an official SMART transcript by calling 877-253-7122. For all other training, request official ACE transcripts by calling 202-939-9434. Credit limit is 30 semester hours.
Cooperative Education
The Cooperative Education Internship Center places students in work experiences related to their academic major and minor. The purpose of the internships is to integrate academic training with actual work experience. This combination allows students to make realistic career decisions, gain valuable work experience, obtain recommendations for graduate school, and earn money to help defray college expenses.
Students work in large corporations, small businesses, government and nonprofit agencies throughout the metropolitan area. Most co-op students are paid by their employers, but in those professional fields where co-op salaries are not available, volunteer internship placements are offered to help students gain essential work experience. Please see the programs described below.
Co-op internship placements are available in most academic majors and minors. Students must complete 30 semester hours of college course work with a minimum 2.50 GPA and have a declared major to be eligible for registration with co-op. No fees are charged to the student or employer for participation in the program, and each student’s interests and job requirements are discussed individually with a professional coordinator.
Students may choose from three different work schedules based on the academic calendar. The alternating plan provides full-time periods of work every other semester with intervening semesters spent in fulltime study. The parallel schedule places students in a job while they simultaneously attend school. These positions are usually part-time. The short term/summer plan allows students to elect a work experience that lasts for no more than one semester.
The College awards academic credit for supervised cooperative education placements. Students must complete a credit application, available from the co-op office, and this application must be approved by a faculty member from the department in which credit is to be granted. No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward Metro State degree requirements. Credit earned for the co-op education work experiences are not applicable toward General Studies requirements. Additional departmental restrictions may apply to certain majors. Visit our Web site for additional information: www.mscd.edu/~cooped.


SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 4!
Service-Learning
The Service-Learning Program combines classroom experience with service to the metropolitan community and increases student appreciation of civic engagement. Participating students receive credit for appropriate public service, which is beneficial to the community and expands student horizons in intellectually and personally meaningful ways.
Emerging from a wide variety of disciplines, service-learning courses are structured by faculty to weave service into community-based and government agencies, with classroom reflection and analysis of the learning offered through these experiences. The courses are also designed to address real needs in our multicultural world, such as homelessness, at-risk youth, domestic violence, the environment, culture and the arts, and mental illness. Agencies that have provided service opportunities include Fort Logan Mental Health Center, the Denver Commission on Aging, Big Sisters, the Colorado Historical Society, the Rape Assistance and Awareness Program, numerous elementary and high schools, and senior centers and nursing homes.
Service-learning credit is available in most academic majors and minors. Prerequisites and other requirements vary with each department. To learn how to participate in this program, including discussions of placement options, students should contact or visit the Service-Learning Program office to schedule an interview: 1045 Ninth Street Park; 303-556-3290.
Mentoring Program
Mentoring internships offer students intensive work experiences with mentors in business or industry. Students earn credit in the major or the minor for the learning that takes place in these unpaid positions that provide opportunities for initial work experience in various competitive fields under the guidance of established professionals. The mentors provide interns with resume enhancing experience and often help the students with decision making. Students should contact or visit our office to schedule an interview: 1045 Ninth Street Park; 303-556-3290.
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
The Honors Program
The Honors Program provides an academic program for highly motivated students with broad academic interests. The program provides honors sections of General Studies courses, interdisciplinary courses and courses within the majors and minors.
Honors courses are small in order to encourage class participation and enhance the relationship between students and faculty members. Honors classes are designed to promote independent thought and creative inquiry. The Director of the Honors Program and the Honors faculty provide academic advising and serve as mentors to students as they consider their post-graduate goals. The Honors Program serves as a Learning Community at Metro State. The program encourages Service Learning, sponsors an annual Honors Conference, and offers study-abroad courses which allow students to explore ideas outside the classroom. A student who completes 24 semester hours of honors courses, including the Senior Thesis, will receive honors recognition on his/her transcript. Students admitted to the Honors Program are eligible to apply for an Honors Scholarship.
All students are welcome to apply to the Honors Program. An Honors application form may be obtained from the Honors Program Director or the Honors Web site. Additional information on the Honors Program is available by calling 303-556-4865/ 303-352-4183, by visiting West Classroom 147, or
by seeing www.mscd.edu/~honors.
REQUIRED COURSES ..................................................SEMESTER HOURS
HON 2750 The Legacy of Arts and Letters I.......................................3
HON 2760 The Legacy of Arts and Letters II.....................................3
HON 4950 Senior Honors Thesis...................................................3
Subtotal.......................................................................... 9


50 SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Track I: The General Studies focus of this track provides students with a strong foundation of knowl-
edge and creative inquiry valuable for students in majors across the college.
Required Courses.............................................................................9
Honors General Studies courses..............................................................12
Honors Electives ............................................................................3
Total Hours Required........................................................................24
Track II: This track includes courses in the major and/or minor, allowing flexibility for those students entering the Honors program with all or most of their General Studies fulfilled.
Required Courses.............................................................................9
Honors Electives ...........................................................................15
Total Hours Required........................................................................24
Individualized Degree Program
As a large, urban, undergraduate institution of higher education, Metropolitan State College of Denver has a commitment to respond to specific educational goals of a diverse student population. The Individualized Degree Program enables the College to meet that commitment in three ways:
• It offers students the opportunity to collaborate with faculty to design an individualized major, extended major or minor to meet their own specific educational goals when other majors or minors listed in the catalog do not.
• The IDP serves as an incubator for faculty to use to develop new academic programs to meet emerging needs in the community and workplace. The IDP as incubator provides faculty with the opportunity to track demand and to experiment with the relevant curriculum prior to submitting the new program for review through the established curriculum approval process.
• A specific IDP concentration may be offered where there is a need for an interdisciplinary major or minor which does not fall within the purview of existing academic departments. An interdisciplinary core not to exceed 50% of the minimum credit hours required provides the foundation upon which the student and faculty mentor build an IDP program to meet the students educational goals.
Each student works with an advisor in the Center for Individualized Learning and with a faculty mentor to develop a proposal for his/her degree program. A practicing professional in the student’s field of study may also be invited to serve as a community consultant to assist the student and the faculty in the development of the program of study. Because careful and thoughtful planning is essential to designing a coherent and congruent program of study, students are encouraged to begin their proposals early in their enrollment at Metro State. IDP proposals must be submitted no later than the semester prior to the semester the student intends to graduate.
Either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree in Individualized Studies may be sought.
Interested students should contact the Center for Individualized Learning, 303-556-8342, for assistance and for complete information regarding the policies and procedures for the development and approval of an Individualized Studies major or minor. Information sessions are the first step in the process, and are held throughout the year.
Each Individualized Studies major or minor is approved by the faculty mentor, Center advisor, department chair from the academic department from which the majority of credit is drawn, the appropriate dean, and the director of the Center for Individualized Learning.
• All requirements that apply to any bachelors degree apply to Individualized Studies.
• A grade of “C” must be earned in each course included in the student’s major or minor, and students must have a GPA of 2.5 before an Individualized Studies program may be approved.
• The title for each student’s program will be Individualized Studies with an emphasis in_.
• Majors may not include courses in Level II General Studies and may not include courses with the same prefix as the department from which the majority of credit is drawn for their major, or courses cross listed with that discipline.
• No more than 30 hours of credit from the School of Business may be included in the student’s degree plan. In some cases this limit may be exceeded with the approval of the appropriate department chair and dean of the School of Business.


SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 51
• Each Individualized Studies major or minor must include courses that have not yet been completed at the time the proposal is approved. See each IDP option below for the specific number of credits that must be completed after the proposal is approved by the department chair.
Proposals may be submitted for:
• An Individualized Studies standard MAJOR, which requires a minimum of 40 credit hours, including 21 hours of upper-division credit. Fifteen (15) hours must be completed after the proposal is approved by the department chair. A minor chosen from the Catalog is required.
• An Individualized Studies MINOR, which requires a minimum of 20 credit hours, including 6 hours of upper-division credit. Six (6) hours must be completed after the proposal is approved by the department chair. A major chosen from the Catalog is required.
• An Individualized Studies EXTENDED MAJOR may be proposed when the student’s field of study requires more in-depth study or courses from multiple disciplines that cannot be accommodated in an IDP major. An extended major requires a minimum of 60 credit hours, including 27 hours of upper-division credit Twenty-one (21) hours must be completed after the proposal is approved by the department chair. No minor is required.
International Studies Concentration in IDP
Students wishing to pursue a major in international studies may do so by choosing the Individualized Degree Program (IDP) International Studies Concentration. This concentration requires core courses in the field of international studies and provides the flexibility for each student to select courses from across the College to develop a coherent academic program that meets the student’s own specific educational goals within the broader area of International Studies.
Through the International Studies Concentration students gain an understanding of international and intercultural relations and dynamics, and gain the skills and knowledge necessary for their specific chosen careers as those careers exist within an international context. The program also provides preparation for a graduate program in international studies, and students may include prerequisites for other graduate programs of their choice.
Students may choose to develop a proposal for an IDP major or an IDP extended major. Each is developed in consultation with a faculty mentor and the Center for Individualized Learning and must be approved by the faculty mentor, appropriate department chair, appropriate dean, Center advisor and the Center director. Students in this program follow the basic requirements and process for all IDP majors. The process for developing the IDP proposal and selecting the remaining courses is outlined on page 53 of this Catalog and is available at www.mscd.edu/~cil.
A minimum of one year of study of a modern language other than English is required and students are strongly encouraged to complete at least two years of study in the same language. Students who are already proficient in a language other than English as demonstrated by successful completion of an approved proficiency examination will be exempt from the requirement. Students are advised to research the possible entry language requirements of any graduate programs in which they might be interested and plan their programs accordingly.
An appropriate study abroad or a local or regional experience with an international focus is required as a part of the individual student’s proposal.
Prerequisites
These courses can be used to satisfy General Studies requirements. As for all IDPs, courses with the same prefix as the department from which the majority of credit is drawn for the major (or cross listed with that discipline) may not be included in Level II General Studies.
COURSES .............................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ECO 2010 Principles of Macroeconomics.............................................3
-or-
ECO 1040 A Citizen’s Guide to Economics...........................................3
PSC 1020 Political Systems and Ideas..............................................3


52 SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
International Studies Concentration Core
REQUIRED COURSES.....................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology.....................................3
ANT 2330 Cross-Cultural Communications............................................3
- or-
ANT 3300 Exploring World Cultures: Variable Topics.................................3
GEG 1000 World Regional Geography..................................................3
HIS 1040 World History since 1500..................................................3
- or -
HIS 2010 Contemporary World History................................................3
PSC 3030 Introduction to International Relations...................................3
PSC 3340 International Political Economy...........................................3
-or-
ECO 3550 Global Economics and International Trade..................................3
Total for Core....................................................................... 18
The senior experience may be selected from approved senior experiences listed in the College Catalog Addendum online. If no approved senior experience is appropriate for the student’s program, a senior level course, internship or independent study that meets the criteria for senior experiences may be chosen with approval of the faculty mentor, chair, Center director and dean. Approval of a senior experience is not a separate process but is considered in the review and approval of the student’s major proposal.
Some courses in the core may be applied to General Studies requirements. In that case, students will choose other courses in collaboration with their advisors so that the total number of credit hours in the major reflect the requirements for an IDP major or IDP extended major as listed below.
An IDP major requires a minimum of 40 credit hours (including the core), 21 of which must be upper division. Fifteen hours must be left to complete when the proposal is approved. A minor from the Catalog which will complement the student’s proposed major is required. Minors from the School of Letters, Arts, and Sciences; the School of Business, or the School of Professional Studies are all appropriate, depending on the individual student’s interests and future plans.
An IDP extended major requires a minimum of 60 credit hours (including the core), 27 of which must be upper division. Twenty-one hours must be left to complete when the proposal is approved. A minor is not required for the extended major, but students will choose other related coursework appropriate to their specific goals to meet the requirements for the IDP extended major.
Reece Learning Communities
Metropolitan State College of Denver has created a comprehensive first-year experience for provisionally admitted students via the Reece Learning Communities (RLC). Students in the RLC will be enrolled in courses specifically designed to be learning communities. One of the courses that all students will be required to complete, within a RLC, will be the Freshmen Success Course (FSC). This course would help first-year students adjust to the college, develop a better understanding of the learning process, and acquire essential academic success skills. The FSC will also include presentations by staff from academic affairs and student services regarding programs, resources and other support services currently provided at Metro. Students enrolled in the RLC will be provided with academic support via several approaches including tutoring, supplemental instructors, and peer educators.
INTERNATIONAL & INTERCULTURAL EDUCATION
Metropolitan State College of Denver is committed to providing all students with a strong educational foundation that enhances their understanding of the total human experience. Through the following programs, students and faculty have opportunities to develop and participate in activities designed to promote a greater understanding and expertise in global issues. Metro State seeks to maintain a positive environment that enhances the learning experiences of international students.


SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 5:
Individualized Degree Program
Students interested in pursuing an interdisciplinary major or a minor in international studies may do so through the Individualized Degree Program (IDP) concentration in International Studies. Students, in collaboration with a faculty mentor and the Center for Individualized Learning design a course of study that best meets their needs. In addition to a core curriculum of 18 hours, students choose from a wide range of courses dealing with international topics that are regularly offered to complete a major or minor. Contact the Center for Individualized Learning at 303-556-8342 or see www.mscd.edu/~cil.
Study Abroad Courses
Metro State offers a variety of short-term and semester-long study abroad courses each year. During the past several years, these courses have been held in Mexico, England, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Central America, Russia, and Egypt. These courses are generally directed by full-time Metro State faculty, are two to five weeks in duration and are available to eligible students. Assistance is provided to students who choose to participate in study abroad courses offered by other U.S. or foreign universities.
The College operates two semester-abroad programs in Guadalajara and London. These are offered in cooperation with the University of Guadalajara and the American Institute for Foreign Study/Richmond College partnership. Students must be in good academic standing in order to participate in these programs.
Contact the Office of International Studies (303-556-2545) for information regarding the latest offerings.
International Student Services
Metro State provides a variety of services to international students attending the College. These include counseling on visas, school transfers, work permission and housing; conducting academic and cultural orientation sessions; assisting with immigration issues; providing information to embassies and sponsors; advising on academic issues; and organizing social and cultural events. International students should contact the Academic Advising Center.
Special Events
Metro State regularly organizes conferences, seminars, and lecture series to promote intellectual discourse on issues affecting the contemporary world.
Community Connections
Metro State maintains links with numerous local and national organizations and professional associations dealing with international, educational, economic, social, and cultural activities with a view to strengthen college-community partnerships and to remain current with the latest developments in the area of international education.
Language and Culture Institute
The Language and Culture Institute was established in 1976 to organize study and travel abroad. The institute currently operates a summer program in Mexico and a winter study and travel program in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula and in Central America. The institute offers credit through the Modern Languages Department.
THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM
Philosophy of the General Studies Program
Metropolitan State College of Denver seeks to prepare its graduates for a lifetime of learning, which, in our changing and complex society, requires focused expertise (such as that provided by a major area of study) and the ability to communicate with and learn from experts in other fields. Undergraduate education fosters the critical thinking necessary for the exploration of unfamiliar disciplines, for the synthesis of learning, and for exposing students to the richness and variety of the intellectual universe.


54 GENERAL STUDIES
State Guaranteed General Education Courses
Some of Metro State’s General Studies courses are approved as state guaranteed general education courses. This designation means that the course is transferable to general education or to electives at all Colorado public institutions and all undergraduate degree programs. General Studies courses not identified as guaranteed state transfer are also eligible for transfer to other institutions of higher education. Even if a state guaranteed course is selected, students need to select their General Studies courses with care. There is a Colorado core framework that restricts the number of state guaranteed courses that can be taken and applied to general education. In addition, certain statewide articulation agreements require specific General Studies courses. The six credits of composition, ENG 1010 and ENG 1020, will be acceptable anywhere in the state. With the exception of the sciences, students are advised to take only one state guaranteed course in each category below to maximize applicability for general education at another institution. For details go to www.state.co.us/cche/gened/gtpathways/index.pdf. State guaranteed general education courses are designated with a GT for Guaranteed Transfer. The rest of the code indicates the part of the core to which the course may apply.
GT-AH1 Arts and Expression
GT-AH2 Literature and Humanities
GT-AH3 Ways of Thinking
GT-AH4 Foreign Languages
GT-COl Introductory Writing
GT-C02 Intermediate Writing
GT-C03 Advanced Writing
GT-HI1 History
GT-MA1 Mathematics
GT-SC1 Natural and Physical Sciences (with laboratory)
GT-SC2 Natural and Physical Sciences (without laboratory)
GT-SS1 Economic or Political Systems
GT-SS2 Geography
GT-SS3 Human Behavior, Culture or Social Frameworks
General Studies Information
Students must use a single catalog to meet all degree requirements, including those in the General Studies, major and minor. Some changes in General Studies requirements have been made retroactive. As a consequence, many General Studies requirements and policies described in this Catalog may be followed by students using earlier catalogs.
General Studies Goals
The General Studies Program is designed to help graduates achieve the following competencies. Metro State students should be able to:
1. Write and speak with clarity;
2. Read and listen critically;
3. Draw conclusions from quantitative data;
4. Recognize faulty reasoning;
5. Organize ideas; and
6. Communicate with experts in other disciplines and learn from them.
Metro State students should:
1. Have an open attitude toward different approaches to problems;
2. Have an informed awareness of the principal human achievements in history, arts and letters, society, and science; and
3. Be introduced to the basic methods, knowledge, problems or attitudes characteristic of a field.
Structure of the General Studies Program
The General Studies Program is structured to foster the development of skills and to encourage students to use their mastery of skills to explore knowledge in a variety of disciplines. The General Studies Program provides two levels of experience:


GENERAL STUDIES 55
Level I: To provide students with the basic skills of language, mathematics, communications and critical thought. These include the skills of recognizing faulty reasoning, of reading and listening critically, of drawing conclusions from quantitative data, of organizing ideas, and of writing and speaking with clarity.
Level II: To provide the breadth characteristic of education, encourage an open attitude toward different approaches to problems, and cultivate informed awareness of the principal human achievements in history, arts and letters, society, and science. An educated person is one who is familiar with history, with the fine arts, with varied cultures, and with the scientific method. Level II courses should introduce the student to the basic methods, knowledge, problems, or attitudes characteristic of a field. Upper, as well as lower division courses should be available for Level II credit. In addition to meeting these criteria, Level II courses will provide opportunity for further development of Level I skills. Level II requirements shall be subdivided into four categories: Historical, Arts and Letters, Social Sciences, and the Natural Science.
Distribution and Credit Requirements
To complete their General Studies Program, students must take approved courses that fulfill the following distribution and credit requirements:
Level I*
Category......
Composition
Mathematics
Communications
Semester Hours
.............6
..............3
..............3
Level IF*
Category.......
Historical Arts and Letters Social Sciences . Natural Sciences Total***.......
.Semester Hours
..............3
.............6
.............6
.............6
..............33
*A transfer course or courses judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the Level I course.
**One-hour deviations in the Level II categories may be allowed.
***A student’s completed General Studies Program must contain at least 33 semester hours.
Basic Rules:
• The only courses that can be used to satisfy the General Studies approved requirements are those courses designated as General Studies Courses. Those courses are listed in the Catalog and the Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements (www.mscd.edu/academic/catalog/index.htm).
• Students may not use courses having the same prefix as their major or courses crosslisted with their major to satisfy their General Studies Level II requirements. (See below for specific requirements for History majors.) General Studies courses may be taken as electives or to satisfy requirements in the major; that is, General Studies courses do not have to be counted toward the General Studies requirements.
• History majors will take three extra credit hours at Level II in either Arts and Letters, Social Sciences, or Natural Science in lieu of the three hours in the Historical category. Thus, History majors still have a total of 33 hours in General Studies. A History major may not use crosslisted courses in the Historical category, or courses crosslisted with a history course in any General Studies category.
• Courses taken using the pass/fail option cannot be used for General Studies credit.
• Lower division credit for biology courses of anatomy, physiology, and micro-biology, in which the student earned a grade of “C” or better, may be substituted for the Level II lower division natural science general studies requirement for all students with a nursing major.


56 GENERAL STUDIES
• Students majoring in Human Performance and Sports will use BIO 1080-4, BIO-1090-1, BIO 2310-4, and BIO 2320-4 to satisfy the General Studies Level II Natural Science requirement. Students must take all four courses to meet the requirement. A student in HPS who switches to a different major will have to satisfy the Level II Natural Science requirements with the approved courses or alternatives specified in the Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements (www. mscd.edu/academic/catalog/index.htm).
LEVEL I REQUIREMENTS
COMPOSITION, MATHEMATICS AND COMMUNICATION
Freshman Assessment: Reading, Writing and Mathematics Placement Exams
First-time college students are required to complete the reading, writing, and mathematics placement examinations (see Reading, Writing and Mathematics Placement Examinations). Examination results serve as the basis for academic advising. To increase their opportunity for success, students may be required to take courses below the level of the first-year courses offered by Metro State. Degree-seeking students who are diagnosed as needing remedial course work have at their disposal basic skills courses offered through the Community College of Denver. Students are responsible for completing remedial course work no later than the end of the freshman year (i.e., within the first 30 semester hours matriculated as a college student). Students should be aware, however, that no credit is given for courses that are below the college level.
Placement Test Prerequisites
Students must have a passing score on the appropriate placement test before they will be allowed to register for Level I General Studies courses in English, mathematics and reading. Exceptions will be made for students who have earned at least a grade of at least “C” in the community college course specified by the department. The Assessment Center administers the placement tests. Students should consult an advisor in the Advising Center for guidance in selecting the appropriate Level I courses.
Composition Required Courses (minimum 6 semester hours)
REQUIRED COURSES.............................................SEMESTER HOURS
ENG 1010 (GT-COl) Freshman Composition: The Essay...........................3
ENG 1020 (GT-C02) Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research & Documentation.3
Note: “GT-” indicates a State Guaranteed general education course.
Rules: Composition Requirement
• Those students whose writing skills are inadequate will be required to complete developmental coursework in composition before enrolling for English 1010.
• Students must complete the English 1010 requirement within their first 30 hours at Metro State and the English 1020 requirement within the first 60 hours. These requirements may be postponed on an individual basis if the postponement is approved by the Department of English.
• Required English composition courses shall be at the freshman level.
• Students shall be considered to have satisfied the Level I English course requirement and credit will be granted if they:
• pass ENG 1010 and ENG 1020, or
• pass a CLEP or AP test approved by the Department of English, or
• transfer an equivalent course (see Rules Applying to Transfer Students above).
Mathematics (minimum 3 semester hours)
Required Courses....................................................Semester Hours
MTH 1080 (GT-MA1) Mathematical Modes of Thought.................................3
MTH 1110 (GT-MA1) College Algebra...............................................4


GENERAL STUDIES 57
MTH 1210 (GT-MA1) Introduction to Statistics..................................4
MTH 1310 (GT-MA1) Finite Mathematics for the Management & Social Sciences.....4
MTH 1610 (GT-MA1) Integrated Mathematics I....................................3
Rules: Mathematics Requirement
• Students will take a preassessment placement test to determine their abilities to solve elementary algebra problems and to know and use elementary geometrical formulas. Those students whose skills are inadequate will be required to complete developmental mathematics coursework before enrolling in any mathematics course. Students should be aware that developmental courses are not taught at Metro State and no transfer credit will be given for such coursework.
• Students must complete the Level I mathematics requirement within their first 30 hours at Metro State. This requirement may be postponed on an individual basis if the postponement is approved by the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department.
• Students shall be considered to have satisfied the Level I mathematics course requirement and credit will be granted if they:
• pass a mathematics course that has been approved for Level I mathematics credit (see courses listed above), or
• a CLEP or AP examination approved by the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department, or
• successfully complete a mathematics course for which a Level I mathematics course is a prerequisite, or
• transfer an equivalent course, or
• complete a mathematics major or minor.
*A transfer course or courses judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency is determined by the department offering the Level I course.
Communications (minimum 3 semester hours)*
Required Courses...........................................................Semester Hours
FRE 1020 Elementary French II......................................................5
GER 1020 Elementary German II......................................................5
HON 2950 The Art of Critical Thinking..............................................3
PHI 1110 Language, Logic & Persuasion..............................................3
RDG 1510 Cognitive Strategies for Analytical Reading...............................3
SPA 1020 Elementary Spanish II.....................................................5
SPE 1010 Public Speaking...........................................................3
SLHS 1620 American Sign Language II (MDL 1620)......................................3
SPE 1710 Interpersonal Communication...............................................3
’A transfer course or courses of at least 2 semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency is determined by the department offering the Level I course.
Rules: Communications Requirement
• Students must complete the required Level I communications course within their first 30 hours at Metropolitan State College of Denver.
• Students shall be considered to have satisfied the Level I communications course requirement and credit will be granted if they:
• pass an approved Level I communications course, or
• pass a departmental test or a CLEP or AP test approved by a department offering an approved Level I communications course, or
• transfer an equivalent course
• pass or transfer an advanced public speaking course for which Metro State’s SPE 1010 or a comparable course is a prerequisite
• transfer a second semester, four or five semester hour foreign language course or a more advanced language course that is taught in a language not offered at Metro State, or


58 GENERAL STUDIES
• pass or transfer an advanced foreign language course that is taught in the foreign language and that has Metro State’s FRE 1020, GER 1020, and SPA 1010 or equivalent course work, or more advanced course as a prerequisite.
Students who have satisfied the communications requirement using the advanced foreign language course or the advanced public speaking course must place that course in the Level I communications requirement slot. Level II General Studies courses used to satisfy the Level I communications requirements cannot also be counted in the Level II category.
LEVEL II REQUIREMENTS
Courses approved to satisfy the Level II requirement are distributed among four categories. The categories, together with the minimum number of semester hours a student must accumulate to satisfy this requirement, are given below. One hour deviations in the General Studies Level II categories may be allowed, provided the students completed General Studies program contains at least 33 credit hours.
Level II Categories
Historical .....................................................................................3
Arts and Letters................................................................................6
Social Science .................................................................................6
Natural Science.................................................................................6
Rules: Level II Requirement
Prerequisites: Level II General Studies courses have at least the following prerequisites or corequisites, and some courses have additional prerequisites (see the Course Descriptions section in this Catalog). A one-hour deviation in each of the requirement listed below may be allowed, provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses.
Historical and Arts and Letters:
• Courses numbered 1000 to 1990: minimum performance standard scores on reading and writing preassessment placement tests
• Courses numbered 2000 to 2990: satisfaction of ENG 1010 and the Level I communication requirement
• Courses numbered 3000 and above: satisfaction of all Level I General Studies course requirements
Natural Science and Social Sciences:
• Courses numbered 1000 to 1990: minimum performance standards scores on the reading, writing and mathematics preassessment placement tests.
• Courses numbered 2000 to 2990: satisfaction of the Level I mathematics course requirement and either ENG 1010 or the Level I communication course requirement.
• Courses numbered 3000 and above: satisfaction of all Level I course requirements.
• Students may not use courses having the same prefix as their major discipline or crosslisted with their major discipline to satisfy the Level II requirements.
• Students may use courses having the same prefix as their minor discipline or crosslisted with their minor discipline to satisfy General Studies requirements. However, a minimum of 18 credits must be used only in the minor and not for General Studies. Deviations from the Catalog requirements require approval of the minor department, and some departments require that more than 18 credits be used only in the minor. Please contact the minor department for additional information.
• Students may use either prefix for a crosslisted course, i.e., one designated XXX (YYY). They must select the prefix they wish to use at registration; the selection may not be changed later.
• History majors must take three extra semester hours at Level II in the Social Science, Arts and Letters, or Natural Sciences categories in lieu of the three hours in the historical category.
• History majors may not use courses that are crosslisted with history courses for General Studies.


GENERAL STUDIES 5
HISTORICAL (minimum 3 semester hours)*
History majors must take three extra semester hours at Level II in the Social Sciences, Arts & Letters, or Natural Science categories in lieu of the three hours in the Historical category. History majors may not use courses that are crosslisted with history courses for General Studies.
ARTS & LETTERS (minimum 6 semester hours)*
Arts & Letters courses impart a broad knowledge of important works and major schools of thought from at least two centuries. They also provide a foundation for critical evaluation within the discipline.
SOCIAL SCIENCES (minimum 6 semester hours)*
Social Sciences courses aim to explore the formation, behavior and interaction of various social, cultural, political or economic groups and institutions.
NATURAL SCIENCE (minimum 6 semester hours)*
Natural Science courses provide an opportunity for students to experience the systematic formulation and testing of hypotheses and to learn the importance of accurate observation and measurement. Students will differentiate among fact, speculation, evidence, inference, belief, theory, law and generalization.
In order to receive General Studies credit, both BIO 1080 and 1090 or Bio 1081 and 1091, must be successfully completed. This is true also for State Guaranteed General Education credit.
CHE 1100 and CHE 1150 must be successfully completed to receive General Studies credit.
Successful completion of CHE 1850 and either CHE 1800 or 1810 will result in 6 hours Natural Science General Studies credit. Successful completion of all three courses will result in 10 hours of General Studies credit. CHE 1800 is a prerequisite for CHE 1850. CHE 1850 has a corequisite of CHE 1810.
’‘A one-hour deviation in the General Studies requirement in each the above categories may be allowed, provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses.
ADDITIONAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Multicultural and Senior Experience Course Requirements
In addition to completing the General Studies requirements, a student must complete a three-hour Multicultural course and a three-hour Senior Experience course, or selection of courses, to be awarded a bachelors degree from Metro State. The Multicultural course does not require three hours as a separate category and can be taken in the major, minor or as an elective. The rules pertaining to those requirements and the courses that will satisfy those requirements are described below.
Multicultural Graduation Requirements (minimum 3 semester hours)
Multicultural course required content and course materials are designed to increase students’ awareness and appreciation of cultural diversity in the United States. Multicultural education coursework examines the interactions of values, beliefs, traditions, identities, and contributions of one or more of the following four groups of color in the United States: African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and Native American, which may include the characteristics of gender, sexual orientation, age, or disability within these groups.
At the conclusion of a multicultural course, students will be able to:
• Define factors that lead to the formation and continuation of one or more of the four groups of color in United States society.
• Present the customs, behavioral patterns, and identities of one or more of the four groups of color in United States society.
• Delineate the effects of bias, prejudices, and discrimination on one or more of the four groups of color in United States society.


60 GENERAL STUDIES
• Describe the cultural similarities, commonalities, and differences within or among one or more of the four groups of color in United States society.
• Communicate how the acceptance and inclusion of all groups of color enriches lives and increases the creativity and performance of everyone in United States society.
Multicultural Graduation Designation Course Work:
Multicultural courses that are approved for the College’s graduation requirement are listed in the Course Description section of this Catalog. This designation is noted in parenthesis at the end of each course description as “multicultural.” Please Note: All multicultural courses are under review by the Multicultural Curriculum Review Committee. Some courses have the stipulation “Multicultural removal 2008-09.” Consult with your academic advisor about which multicultural course applies to your degree.
Transferability of Multicultural Credits
Transfer credits to meet the multicultural requirement will be accepted under the following guidelines:
• Transferable courses taken at an accredited institution to meet a multicultural or similar diversity requirement will satisfy the Metro State multicultural requirement.
• Transferable courses equivalent to an existing multicultural course will satisfy the Metro State multicultural requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the course. Once a course has been approved by a department, it will be given the status of an approved transferable multicultural course.
• If a transferable course is interdisciplinary, Metro State transfer evaluators will consult with the department(s) where the majority of the course content resides.
• A one-hour deviation in the multicultural requirement will be allowed for courses judged to be similar in content to an existing Metro State multicultural course. Equivalency will be determined by the department offering the multicultural course.
• Full credit or a one-hour deviation in the multicultural requirement will be allowed when the transferable course meets Metro State’s multicultural definition and course criteria, although a similar course is not taught at Metro State.
• If transferable courses do not clearly meet Metro State’s multicultural definition, transfer evaluators may request an opinion from the Faculty Senate Curriculum Committee and/or the Multicultural Curriculum Review Committee.
Senior Year Assessment Examinations and Other Activities
In their senior year, students may be required to participate in an assessment of their education. The faculty has determined educational goals or outcomes that it wants graduates to achieve. A copy of those goals and the methods by which their achievements are measured can be obtained from the department offices.
Senior Experience Graduation Requirements (Minimum 3 Semester Hours)
The Senior Experience course provides a culmination of the undergraduate experience, allowing students to synthesize their learning, using critical analysis and logical thinking. Students may use the course to satisfy major or minor requirements if the course is approved for that use. Students should consult with their advisor and check prerequisites. Students must complete a Senior Experience course at the end of the undergraduate program and must take the course or courses at Metro State. Senior Experience courses include “senior standing” as a prerequisite in addition to other prerequisites designated by the department. In some cases students may need to take two courses to satisfy the requirement.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 61
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Semester Hours Credit
Course credit is based on units designated as semester hours. One semester hour or one base contact hour equals a minimum of 750 minutes; this translates to a minimum of fifteen, 50-minute class hours per semester. Time required for class preparation is not a consideration in the calculation of course credit. A three semester hour course will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class. Omnibus courses involving laboratory work give one semester hour of credit for each two, three or four hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week, depending on the course. Internships require a minimum of 2,250 minutes for each hour of credit.
Course Load
The average course load per 16-week semester is 15 or 16 semester hours. Students who are academically strong may take up to 18 semester hours during fall and spring semesters and up to 12 semester hours during the summer semester. During fall and spring semesters, students with cumulative Metro State grade point averages (GPAs) of 3.25 or higher may take 19 or 20 semester hours and those students with GPAs of 3.50 or higher may take 21 semester hours for fall and spring semester or 14 semester hours for the summer semester. Students must have completed at least 15 semester hours at Metro State. Authorization for overloads for students without these qualifications must be obtained from the student’s major department chair and appropriate dean. Forms are available from the department, deans’ offices, or online.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned: freshmen fewer than 30; sophomores 30 or more, but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more, but fewer than 90; seniors 90 or more.
Declaring/Changing a Major
Applicants to Metropolitan State College of Denver may indicate their intended major on the Metro State Application for Admission. Degree-seeking students who wish to change a major must complete a Declaration/Change of Major form, which is available from the major department or from the Academic Advising Center. Non-degree-seeking students who wish to declare a major must first change to degree-seeking status by completing a Change of Status form with the Admissions Office.
Curriculum, Advising and Program Planning (CAPP)
CAPP produces a Compliance Report that is an advising tool to be used by students and their advisors throughout the students’ academic career at Metro State. Students with declared majors and/or minors should discuss their progress toward completion of their major (minor) program with their faculty advisor. They should have a CAPP Compliance Report run no later than the start of the senior year. CAPP Compliance Reports can be run in the student’s major department or by logging on to MetroConnect (metroconnect.mscd.edu). Approved adjustments to the CAPP Compliance Report should be submitted as soon as possible by the department to the Office of the Registrar. Degree-seeking students must apply for degree candidacy by completing an Application for Graduation in the Office of the Registrar at the start of their final semester.
Selection of Catalog for Degree Requirements
Students must use a single Metro State catalog to meet all their degree requirements, including the General Studies, major and minor requirements. Students must select a degree catalog in effect while they are enrolled at Metro State unless they are transferring from a regionally accredited Colorado community college, provided that the degree catalog contains their complete program of study. Students not enrolling for three consecutive semesters or more, including summer, are governed by the catalog in effect upon their return. For effective dates of catalogs, students should consult their academic advisors. All degree programs must adhere to overriding current policies at Metro State. Students transferring from a regionally accredited Colorado community college may complete degree requirements using


62 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
a Metro State catalog in effect while enrolled at the community college, subject to the following conditions:
• The degree catalog selected does not predate the current catalog by more than three years.
• The degree catalog selected may have been in use at any time from the time the student was continually enrolled* at a regionally accredited Colorado community college to the semester for which the student is enrolling in Metro State.
• The degree catalog clause applies except for overriding college or state policy, except where specific programs otherwise require. Consult the pages describing your program for these requirements.
‘Continuous enrollment is defined as not interrupting enrollment for three or more consecutive semesters (one calendar year); summer is counted as a semester. Continuous enrollment must be maintained from the period of the designated Metro State catalog to the point of Metro State degree completion.
Graduation Procedures
Degree-seeking students formally declare their degree candidacy by filing an Application for Graduation with the Office of the Registrar just prior to their anticipated semester of graduation, but no later than the deadline stipulated in the Academic Calendar section of this Catalog and on Metro State’s Web site (www.mscd.edu/academic/acal.htm). The Application for Graduation should be filed only by students who intend to complete all degree requirements by the end of the upcoming semester and should be filed in consultation with the students major department. If a student does not graduate, another Application for Graduation must be submitted for a subsequent semester.
Students who anticipate completing all degree requirements within the next two semesters should review the following sections of this Catalog: Requirements for All Bachelor Degrees; Academic Policies and Procedures (pertaining to Curriculum, Advising and Program Planning [CAPP], Graduation, Diplomas and Commencement, and Honors and Awards).
After students have completed 90 earned credit hours at Metro State, including approved transfer credits, they should obtain a CAPP Compliance Report by requesting one from their major department or by logging on to metroconnect.mscd.edu. After reviewing the CAPP report with their faculty advisor (major and minor), if any adjustments are needed, the department will submit an adjustment form to the Office of the Registrar. Once adjustments are made, an updated Compliance Report will be mailed to the student.
Application for Graduation: File an Application for Graduation with the Office of the Registrar by the following deadlines: for Fall 2008 graduation, file by August 22, 2008; for Spring 2009 graduation, file by January 30, 2009; and for Summer 2009 graduation, file by June 5,2009. Students should file an Application for Graduation only if they will complete all degree requirements that semester.
After submitting the Application for Graduation, students will have their academic records reviewed for completion of all degree requirements. All degree applicants will be mailed a CAPP Compliance Report indicating their graduation status and any discrepancies that exist. Students will be given a deadline by which to explain these discrepancies to the graduation office. Students will not be eligible as candidates for graduation if they do not comply with this deadline. As candidates for graduation, students will receive information about the final steps in the graduation process and the commencement ceremony. Students should ensure that their current address is on file with the Office of the Registrar through their MetroConnect e-mail account.
There are commencement ceremonies at the end of the fall and spring semesters. Graduates are encouraged to attend one of the two ceremonies. The commencement program lists candidates, degree, and degree honors, if any. Although there is no commencement ceremony in the summer, students can still graduate. Summer candidates are asked to attend the fall commencement ceremony. Their names, degrees and honors, if any, will appear only in the fall commencement program. Check Metro State’s Web site for complete, up-to-date information about commencement at www.mscd.edu/student/commencement/.
Diplomas are issued approximately three weeks after the semester ends. Students may pick up their diplomas or make arrangements for them to be mailed. Information will be sent from the Office of the Registrar to graduating students about these arrangements.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 63
Transcripts with the posted degree will also be available approximately three weeks after the semester ends. Students may request transcripts as early as the middle of their last semester and indicate that it is to be held until the degree is posted. There is no charge for transcripts. Transcripts may be requested in person at the Office of the Registrar, CN 105, by fax at 303-556-3999, or via the Web at the Registrar’s homepage www.mscd.edu/enroll/registrar under transcripts. Diplomas and transcripts will NOT be issued if money is owed to the College. If you owe any money to the College, please contact the Office of Student Accounts, 303-556-6188, to arrange payment.
Diplomas and Commencement
Students who have met all requirements for graduation are granted diplomas at the end of the semester for which they are degree candidates. Diplomas may be withheld because of indebtedness to the College. Completion of two majors does not result in two degrees or diplomas. A formal commencement ceremony is held at the end of the spring and fall semesters. Summer graduates are invited to attend the following fall commencement. For commencement information call 303-556-6226, or at www.mscd.edu.
Transcript of Records
An official transcript is a certified copy of a student’s permanent academic record. There is no charge for transcripts. You can order transcripts by logging on to MetroConnect (metroconnect.mscd.edu). There is a charge for faxed transcripts. Transcripts will be released by the Registrar’s Office upon formal written request by the student. Transcripts will also be issued to firms and employers if written authorization is received from the student. Requests should include the student’s full legal name as recorded while attending Metro State, student identification number, last term of attendance, number of copies desired, and to whom and where transcripts are to be sent. Transcripts may be withheld because of indebtedness to the College or for other appropriate reasons. Copies of transcripts from other institutions that are on file in the Registrar’s Office will be issued upon signed request by the student. Students from other institutions taking Metro State courses under the state college system or interinstitutional registration programs must request transcripts from their home institution.
Falsified Transcripts and Diplomas
Altering, modifying, tampering with, or in any way falsifying an official Metropolitan State College of Denver transcript or diploma is a crime. The College has implemented multiple measures to detect such conduct. To protect the integrity and value of a Metro State degree, the Attorney General will vigorously prosecute, through the criminal justice system, those who commit these crimes.
In addition, students found responsible for falsifying an official Metro State transcript or diploma will face a College judicial hearing and appropriate sanctions may be imposed, including suspension, dismissal, and loss of credit, which could affect the student’s permanent record.
Honors and Awards
The College annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadership and service to the College and community, excellence in scholastic achievement, and outstanding personal character and integrity. Due to wide variation in definition and interpretation of class rank, by policy the College does not rank its students or graduates. Recognition of students includes: The President’s Award (one senior); the Special Service Award for Academic Affairs (one senior) and for Student Services (one senior); Outstanding Student Awards (seniors from each school); Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges (seniors); American Association of University Women (AAUW) Award (senior woman). Other awards include Special Service Award for Exceptionally Challenged Students, Student Government Assembly Award, Charles W. Fisher Award and the Colorado Engineering Council Award.
Information and applications for these awards is available in Central Classroom 313. Awards are presented at the annual banquet the night before graduation.
In addition to annual awards, students with outstanding academic achievements are recognized by being named on the College’s Honor Lists. The President’s Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.85 or higher. The Provost’s Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative


64 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
GPA of between 3.50 and 3.84, inclusively. Computation will occur initially when the student has completed between 30 and 60 hours at Metro State, then again between 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours. Honors will only be computed three times in a students academic life at the College. Questions should be directed to the Office of Academic Affairs at 303-556-3040.
Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability in their baccalaureate degree while attending Metro State. Honors designations are determined according to the following criteria:
• Summa Cum Laude Top five percent of graduates within each school with cumulative Metro
State GPA of no less than 3.65.
• Magna Cum Laude Next five percent of graduates within each school with cumulative Metro
State GPA of no less than 3.65.
• Cum Laude Next five percent of graduates within each school with cumulative Metro
State GPA of no less than 3.65.
• To determine each Honors category, GPAs for the previous spring semester graduates are arrayed in rank order. This rank ordering is then used to determine the honors recipients among the following fall, spring and summer graduates.
• To qualify for graduation honor recognition, a student must have completed a minimum of 50 semester hours of academic credit at Metro State prior to the term of graduation.
• Courses completed during the term of graduation and transfer credits are not considered when determining honors.
Honors designations are added to the students official academic record; no other notification will be sent. For additional information regarding graduation honors, contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 303-556-3040.
Grades and Notations
Faculty MUST assign a grade. Every student on the E-Grade worksheet must be given a grade or grade notation. The appropriate grade and grade notations will appear in the grade drop-down box for each student. Faculty members may NOT leave the E-Grade box blank. The Registrar’s Office will remind faculty of this through e-mails prior to grading at the end of each semester.
Grades
Alphabetical grades and status symbols are as follows
A — Superior ................................4
B — Above Average............................3
C — Average .................................2
D — Below Average but Passing................1
F — Failure .................................0
(Grade)* — Preparatory.......................0
Notations
AP — Advanced Placement CC — Continuing Correspondence Course CL — College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
EX — Credit by Exam
I — Incomplete (incompletes will change to an “F” if not completed in 3 semesters, including summer)
NC — No Credit
NR — Not Reported. No grade was reported by the faculty by the deadline to submit grades. Student must see faculty for an explanation or assignment of grade. Courses taken through interinstitutional registration are normally assigned the “NR” notation until grades are received and posted to the academic record. Students who receive a “NR” notation on their final grade report may be severely impacted. Financial aid, enrollment status, veterans’ status and probation/suspension depend on students receiving all their grades.
quality points per semester hour attempted quality points per semester hour attempted quality points per semester hour attempted quality point per semester hour attempted quality points per semester hour attempted quality points per semester hour attempted


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 6
P — Pass
PL — Portfolio Assessment PP — PEP Exam
S — Satisfactory (limited to internships, practicums, field experience courses and workshops)
SA — Study Abroad
SE — Satisfactory/Education or Music Recital Attendance (limited to ECE 4390, EDS 4290, EDU 4190, EDU 4590, SED 4190 and SED 4500; MUS 0020)
SN — Study Abroad - no credit U — Unsatisfactory (equals “F” and computed in GPA)
UE — Unsatisfactory/Education or Music Recital Attendance (equals “F” and computed in GPA)
I (Incomplete)
The Incomplete (I) notation may be assigned when a student, who was achieving satisfactory progress in a course and who had completed most class assignments, is unable to take the final examination and/ or did not complete all class assignments due to unusual circumstances such as hospitalization. Incomplete work denoted by the Incomplete “I” notation must be completed within one calendar year or earlier, at the discretion of the faculty member. If the incomplete work is not completed within one year, the “I” notation will convert to an “F.”
Students must have completed at least 75% of the course work to qualify for consideration for an Incomplete. The student must be passing the course in order to be granted an Incomplete.
Determination of eligibility does not guarantee that an Incomplete will be granted. Students who do meet the qualifications may request an Incomplete from the faculty member who is teaching the course. The decision to grant an Incomplete is up to the faculty member and department discretion.
If an Incomplete is granted, the student and instructor should fill out and sign an Incomplete Agreement form in order to clarify what the student needs to do to complete the course.
Graduating seniors may not graduate with an “I” on their Metro State academic record if:
• The course in which the “I” was assigned is required for graduation, or
• a “D” or “F” assigned for that course would result in an overall GPA less than 2.00.
The “I” notation may not be given for a self-paced course. If a student does not complete a self-paced course within the semester s/he enrolled in the course, s/he must re-enroll in the course in order to complete it.
If a student receives an “I” in an online class, the instructor should contact Instructional Technology who will add the student to the online course roster so that the student will be able to logon to the course. This must be done by the instructor each semester the student continues to work on the course.
In order for an “I” to be changed to a letter grade, the incomplete work must be completed for the course for which the student originally registered. The student should NOT re-enroll for the same course unless his/her intent is to retake the entire course. In this case, the student will pay tuition and fees.
NC/Withdrawal (No Credit)
The No Credit (NC) notation is not a grade. It may indicate withdrawal from the course or course repetition. (The “NC” should not be confused with a schedule change during the first 12 days of the fall or spring term [8 days for the summer term]. During this period a student may drop a course, and it will not appear on the student’s academic record.)
The “NC” notation may be used in self-paced courses to indicate that the student has not completed the self-paced course(s) and requires additional time to increase the students proficiency. In this case, to earn credit the student must re-register for and pay tuition and fees for the course in a subsequent term. Deadlines as described in this section apply.
• The following minimal standards shall be required throughout the College and shall be a part of all school, department, and individual faculty policies. The following is for full term classes for fall and spring semesters. Specific NC deadlines for full term classes for fall, spring, and summer


66 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
semesters are published in that terms class schedule. Prorated deadlines are available from the Office of the Registrar and the Student Accounts Office for “part-of-term” classes. “Part-of-term” classes are those classes which have start and/or end dates different from those of full-term classes. The “NC” notation is available to students for full term classes in all instances from the 12th day of the term through the fourth week of classes for fall and spring semesters. The period during which students may request an NC without the faculty member’s signature will be established for summer part-of-term and weekend courses based on percentages of the term. Deadlines for weekend and “part-of-term” classes are available from the Office of the Registrar and from the Student Accounts Office. The deadline for requesting an NC without faculty approval for full-term classes is published in the class schedule for each term. Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a students absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize the student’s success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course. If attendance is a part of the grading criteria, that policy should be included in the individual faculty member’s class policies and outline and distributed to students on the first day of class.
• During this period, students may request an NC ONLY online at MetroConnect.
• Students reducing their course load between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of full term classes during fall and spring semesters may receive an “NC” notation for each course provided faculty approval is granted and indicated on the request form by the faculty member’s signature or the department chair’s signature in the case of the absence of the faculty member who is the instructor of record. NC request forms with the instructor’s signature for full term classes are due to the Office of the Registrar by the deadline noted in the class schedule for any given term. Part-of-term NC deadlines are available from the Office of the Registrar or the Office of Student Accounts.
• Additional restrictions regarding assigning the “NC” notation may be set by each school, department, and/or faculty member for the period between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of the semester (or proportional time frame). Such additional restrictions MUST be included in the instructor’s class outline and policies which are distributed to all students on the first day of class.
• Student requests for an “NC” notation in a given course will not be granted after the tenth week of the fall and spring semester or after the published date for summer term for full-term classes (or after the part-of-term deadlines for requesting an NC with the signature of the faculty member) unless the request is approved by the faculty member, the department chair and the dean. The “I” notation may be used during this period, provided the conditions specified in the “I” explanation above apply.
• Proportional time frames are applied for part-of-term courses, weekend courses, workshops and summer terms. These deadlines are available from the Office of the Registrar or the Office of Student Accounts. Deadlines for full-term summer classes are published in the class schedule.
• A written policy statement describing the use of the “NC” notation will be given by the faculty member to each student for each class in which the student enrolls.
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student’s absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize the student’s success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course. If attendance is a part of the grading criteria, that policy should be included in the individual faculty member’s class policies and outline and distributed to students on the first day of class.
Students who withdraw from a course or courses because of the death of an immediate family member, serious illness or medical emergency, or employment changes beyond the control of the student may file a Tuition and Fees Appeal Form through the Office of Student Accounts. In these cases, the student is still required to obtain an NC for each course s/he is withdrawing from according to the guidelines above. If the student is incapacitated and unable to contact his/her instructor(s), the student or her/his representative, may contact the Office of the Registrar, the academic department chair, or the dean for assistance in contacting the faculty and requesting withdrawal as indicated by the NC notation.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 67
Computing Grade Point Average/ Quality Points
The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of semester hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received. The cumulative GPA is calculated by dividing the total number of quality points by the number of semester hours attempted.
To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of semester hours attempted in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements. The following notations have no effect on the GPA: AP, CC, CL, EX, I, NC, NR, P, PL, PP, S, S#, SA, SE, SN, U#.
Pass-Fail Option
The pass/fail option encourages students to venture out of their major and minor fields and thereby broaden their educational experience. A student must declare interest in the pass/fail option no later than the 12th day of classes for fall and spring, the eighth day of classes for summer or the second day of classes for parts-of-term of any semester (see the Academic Calendar on Metro States Web site (www. mscd.edu/academic/acal.htm) for specific deadlines) by contacting the Office of the Registrar and completing the Request for Pass/Fail Option. Once approved, the request for the pass/fail option is irrevocable. A student who requests the option and later is declared ineligible will receive written notification from the Office of the Registrar.
Students who have completed at least one Metro State course with at least a 2.00 cumulative GPA may choose to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass/fail basis rather than by a letter grade. Major, minor, General Studies and other courses required for a degree and courses for teacher licensure may NOT be taken on a pass/fail basis. Self-paced courses may NOT be taken under the pass/fail option. Maximum graduation credit for pass/fail courses is 18 credit hours earned in no more than six courses and limited to one course per semester or part-of-term. Course work must be graded to determine if it is pass or fail.
The “pass” grade (P) has no effect on the GPA; the “fail” grade is equivalent to the grade of “F.” The “pass” grade (P) is equivalent to the grade of D or better. Pass/fail courses are under the same “NC” guidelines and deadlines as other courses in the institution whether those guidelines and deadlines are established college wide or by individual schools or departments
The instructor will assign and record the pass/fail grade on the final grade list that identifies students electing and eligible for pass/fail grading. Some institutions do not accept credit in transfer for courses in which a “pass” grade is given. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work should determine whether the institution of their choice would accept the credit before registering for courses under the pass/fail option. Additionally, it is the students responsibility to ensure that the course is not in their major, minor or General Studies.
Repeated Courses (Last Grade Stands)
A student may repeat certain courses taken at Metropolitan State College of Denver regardless of the original grade earned. Only the credit and the grade for the last attempt of the course will remain on the students official academic record. The grade(s) for all prior attempts will be changed to the “NC” notation unless a permanent F has been assigned. Repeated courses must carry the same title, course number and semester hours. To effect the grade change, the student must re-register and pay the full tuition for the class in question, complete the class earning a letter grade, and complete the Last Grade Stands form in the Office of the Registrar. Otherwise, the grade change will be made administratively prior to graduation. Credit duplication involving transfer, interinstitutional, or state college system courses may be treated differently from the above procedures (see below). A FAILING COURSE GRADE ASSIGNED AS A RESULT OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY IS CONSIDERED A PERMANENT “F” AND CANNOT BE CONSIDERED UNDER THIS POLICY. A student may not repeat a course and request “last grade stands” after the completion of an Metro State degree that includes the course in question. Specifically:
• In certain cases, except for grades assigned for academic dishonesty, the grades of all but the last entry of the particular course will be changed to an “NC” (no credit, withdrawal) notation. The NC notation does not affect the credit total and GPA.


68 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
• The determination of course equivalency will be made by the Office of the Registrar in consultation with the academic department.
• If the student does not request that the previous grade(s) of a course be changed to an “NC” after the course is repeated, the grade change will be made administratively prior to graduation. The Last Grade Stands Policy cannot be used after the student graduates from the College for courses taken prior to the date the degree is awarded.
• Students who have earned a degree at Metro State and subsequently take additional courses or work toward a second degree may use last grade stands for courses for which the original enrollment is after the first degree is awarded.
• The same policy is applied when a course taken at another institution and transferred to Metro State is later repeated at Metro State. The transferred credit is then revoked.
• An exception to this policy occurs when a student takes a course at Metro State, then repeats the course at another institution and returns to or is still in attendance at Metro State. In this case, since the course is not repeated on the Metro State records, the Metro State course will not be changed to an “NC,” but rather, the transfer credit will be disallowed.
• The Last Grade Stands policy applies only to Metro State courses. Courses taken under the Interinstitutional/Consortium or “pooled” programs do not qualify for consideration under this policy. However, this policy does apply to a UCD course if repeated through the Metro State/ UCD-pooled program.
• Courses repeated prior to the summer quarter of 1971 are not affected by this Last Grade Stands policy. A grade in a course taken prior to the summer quarter, 1971 and repeated after summer, 1971 may be changed to an “NC” notation with the use of the grade exception form.
Student Grade Appeal Procedure
If students have reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course, they must make their request for a change before the end of the fourth week of the semester following the completion of the course (the following fall semester in the case of the spring semester). The Grade Appeal Guidelines can be obtained from the students’ respective deans. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate a grade appeal within the time limit, and to follow the procedures specified for grade appeals in the current Student Handbook. The handbook may be obtained from the Office of Student Services. All decisions of the Grade Appeal Committee are final.
WARNING/PROBATION/SUSPENSION POLICY Academic Satisfactory Progress/Good Standing
A student is deemed to be making satisfactory progress toward his or her academic goal if the student maintains a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher. This student is deemed to be in academic good standing with the institution. However, other academic standards may apply to specific programs. A student must satisfy those other academic standards in order to be deemed in academic good standing with that program. See information on the program of interest to determine specific standards for that program.
Academic Warning Status
A student in good standing whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 will be on academic warning status with the institution during his or her next semester. A student will be removed from this warning status and returned to good standing if he or she achieves a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of his or her semester on warning status. More restrictive standards may apply to certain programs or schools. See information on the program of interest.
Academic Probation
A student who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of his or her semester on warning status will be put on academic probation with the institution during his or her next semester at Metro State. A student will be on academic probation as long as he or she has a cumulative GPA below 2.0, but is making progress toward good standing as explained below and has not been on academic


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 69
probation for more than three semesters. Other conditions may apply to given programs or schools. See information on the program of interest.
A student is removed from academic probation and is in good standing the semester after achieving a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0.
During any semester that a student is on academic probation, the student must make progress toward good standing with the institution by taking all of the following actions:
• achieve a semester GPA of 2.2 or higher
• register and complete a minimum of 3 but no more than 12 semester hours (3 to 6 semester hours for summer semester)
• take required activities as negotiated with the director of Student Intervention Services (may include certain classes, repeated courses, tutoring or other activities)
While on academic probation, a student may pre-register for the first semester following the academic warning status semester, but is prohibited from pre-registering any other semester. For subsequent academic probation status semesters, a GPA of at least 2.2 must be verified prior to registration.
Academic Suspension
A student on academic probation not making progress toward good standing will be prohibited from registering for one calendar year from the date of suspension. Appeal of suspension for this reason will be submitted to the director of Student Intervention Services. The director of Student Intervention Services will then deliver the appeal materials to the Student Academic Review Committee, which will review the appeal and notify the student of its decision. A student may appeal a suspension only two times in his or her academic career at the College.
A student making progress toward good standing, whose cumulative GPA remains below a 2.0 after three or more semesters on probation, will have his or her academic progress reviewed each semester by the Student Academic Review Committee. The committee will determine whether the student should be placed on suspension. In both cases, the decision of the Student Academic Review Committee is final.
Any student returning to the College after the one-calendar-year suspension must reapply and will be re-admitted on academic probation with the institution. For these students, all probation rules outlined above will apply.
A student who is suspended for a second time will be re-admitted only if he or she has successfully completed an associate degree program from a community college after suspension from Metro State or can demonstrate to the Student Academic Review Committee that chances for successful completion of an educational program are greatly improved.
Contact Student Intervention Services at 303-556-4048 for further information.
WITHDRAWAL/EMERGENCY
Students who must withdraw from all classes during a semester due to a serious personal or medical emergency should contact the Student Accounts Office, CN 110, 303-556-6188 for assistance and information on emergency withdrawal procedures.
Students who must withdraw from all classes during a semester due to a military or state call to action should contact Veterans’ Services, CN 105 or call 303-556-2993, for assistance.
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Policies and Procedures
Generally, the policies and procedures contained in this College Catalog must be followed by students currently enrolled for the 2008 fall semester and the 2009 spring and summer semesters.


70 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
The procedures and policies contained in this section are subject to change, as the College deems necessary, If you have a concern, please check with the appropriate office. An abbreviated version of the policies and procedures are contained in this section. For the complete Students Rights and Responsibilities, you may access the Web at www.mscd.edu/policies to confirm the policies and/or procedures you need to follow.
Exceptions (BASE)
Students may appeal to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions (BASE) to request a variance from College academic requirements. Valid reasons for variances must accompany all petitions, and the petitions must be signed by the appropriate dean and department chair. For more information, contact the Office of Academic Affairs, 303-556-3040 and www.mscd.edu/~aa/student.
Academic Honesty
Students have a responsibility to maintain standards of academic ethics and honesty. Cases of cheating or plagiarism are handled within the policies of Academic Affairs in accordance with procedures outlined in the Metro State Student Handbook.
Conduct of Students
Metro State policy provides students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. The Student Handbook contains standards of conduct to which students are expected to adhere. Information regarding students’ rights and responsibilities, including the student due process procedure (the procedural rights provided to students at Metro State before disciplinary action is imposed), is available in Tivoli311, Central Classroom 313, orviatheWebatwww.mscd.edu/policies.
Student Conduct Code
The Student Conduct Code is not intended to replace existing procedures related to:
• Discrimination or sexual harassment
• Grade appeals
• Requests for exceptions to academic policies
• Appeals for tuition and fee reduction
• Disputes relative to financial aid awards
• Instate tuition classification
For any other matter not included above, contact the Office of Student Life, as a resource for accurate information and advocacy on behalf of the students of the College. Student Life personnel can advise and assist students with unusual circumstances, or with problems not addressed in the Student Handbook or College Catalog, for example.
Respect for Rights of Others
The student assumes certain obligations of performance and behavior while attending Metro State. Based on this premise, reasonable policies, procedures and regulations have been developed to guarantee each student’s opportunity to learn and to protect the fundamental rights of others. Metro State students neither gain nor lose any of the rights and responsibilities of other citizens by virtue of their student status.
As members of an academic community, students are expected to conduct themselves in a mature and responsible manner. Students should try at all times to promote a sense of cooperation and civility within the College and work to build an atmosphere that will be most conducive to the goals of higher education within the institution.
Students, while within College facilities or while participating in College sponsored activities (on-cam-pus and/or off-campus), are expected to comply with College rules and regulations and with the regulations of off-campus sites.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 71
Freedom of Speech
Students shall have the right to assemble, to select speakers and guests, and to discuss issues of their choice. An invitation to a speaker shall not imply endorsement of the speakers views by either the student organization or the College.
Information about student views, beliefs, and political associations shall not be used to the detriment of students and their institutional standing.
The right of peaceful protest is granted within the College community. The College retains the right to assure the safety of individuals, the protection of property, and the continuity of the educational process.
The student press shall be free of censorship and shall provide editorial freedom. The editors and managers shall not be arbitrarily suspended because of student, faculty, administration, alumni, or community disapproval of editorial policy or content.
All student communications shall explicitly state on the editorial page or in broadcast that the opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the College and/or members of the College.
Academic Rights
Students have the right to:
• Be informed of course expectations and requirements.
• Be evaluated fairly on the basis of academic performance.
• Participate in free and open discussion, inquiry and expression, both in the classroom and in conference.
• Receive competent instruction and advisement.
• Expect protection against professors’ improper disclosure of students’ personal information, views, beliefs, and political associations when such information has become known as a result of professors’ instructions, advisement, or counsel.
• Expect protection, through established procedures, against prejudicial or capricious evaluation.
• Assess the value of a course to make suggestions as to its direction and to evaluate both the instructor and the instruction they have received.
• Have input in College policy-making, which may include, but shall not be limited to, course scheduling distribution of night and day classes, calendar arrangements, library policy and development, grading systems, course development, and curriculum.
• Expect instructors to conduct themselves professionally in the classroom in accordance with College policies and directives.
• Expect instructors to maintain office hours as required by College policy.
• Expect reasonable academic assistance from the appropriate department.
• Be informed of academic standards expected of them in the classroom through a syllabus and/ or course outline. Academic standards shall include, but not be limited to, classroom civility, class attendance requirements, objectives to be achieved, and the grading criteria that will be applied to a particular course of study.
Academic Responsibilities
Students have the responsibility to:
1. Inquire about course or degree requirements if they do not understand them or are in doubt about them.
2. Maintain the standards of academic performance established for individual courses and for programs of study.
3. Learn the content of any course of study.
4. Act in accordance with commonly accepted standards of academic conduct. If disruptive behavior occurs in a classroom, an instructor has authority to ask the student to leave the classroom for one class session and then report it to the Student Judicial Officer. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist, the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Campus Police, the Student Judicial Officer, and the appropriate Department Chair and Dean’s office.
5. Maintain academic ethics and academic honesty.
6. Pay the tuition and fees and be officially registered in order to attend a class.
7. Initiate an investigation by contacting the department chair if they believe their academic rights have been violated.


72 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Academic Misconduct
Academic dishonesty or misconduct is a serious offense at the College because it diminishes the quality of scholarship and the learning experience for everyone on campus. In order to encourage and foster academic excellence, the College expects students to conduct themselves in accordance with certain generally accepted norms of scholarship and professional behavior. Because of this expectation, the College does not condone any form of academic misconduct.
Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to: plagiarism, cheating, fabrication, multiple submissions, collaboration, or facilitation of academic dishonesty, or knowingly or recklessly furnishing false information to the College. Academic misconduct is an unacceptable activity in scholarship, and is in conflict with academic and professional ethics and morals. Consequently, students who are found to have engaged in some form of academic misconduct may be subject to:
1. Reduction in grade, including a zero or an “F” or permanent “F” on the work in question.
2. Other academic penalties as outlined in the professor’s course requirements and expectations, and/ or syllabus.
3. Disciplinary action and/or other sanctions that will be determined on the basis of the seriousness of the offense.
4. Any combination thereof.
Generally, a student’s intentions will not be the primary consideration in the determination of whether academic misconduct has occurred. A student’s intentions will usually be considered only during the process of deciding on the appropriate sanctions or penalties.
Definitions of academic misconduct include, but are not limited to:
Plagiarism is the act of appropriating another’s work. This includes, but is not limited to the following:
1. The written, artistic, or musical composition of another; or the ideas, language, or symbols of same and passing them off as the product of one’s own work.
2. The lifting of a substantial or essential portion of another’s work.
3. The unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency, including Web sites, that may or may not be engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic material.
Cheating is the act of using or attempting to use, in examination or other academic work or material, information, or study aids which are not permitted by the instructor. Cheating includes, but is not limited to:
1. Using books, notes, or calculators, or copying from or conversing with others during an examination.
2. Having someone else do research, write papers, or take examinations.
3. Doing research, writing papers, or taking examinations for someone else.
4. Possession, use, or distribution of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of the college faculty, staff, or other students.
Fabrication is the invention or falsification of material or its source and its use as an authority in academic work. Fabrication includes, but is not limited to:
1 Inventing the data for a scientific experiment.
2. Inventing the title and author of a publication in order to use the invented publication as a source.
3. Knowingly attributing material to an incorrect source.
Academic Dishonesty Procedures, Student Conduct Code and Judicial Process
Refer to the most current Student Handbook in the Office of Student Life for complete information. You may also access it via the Web at: handbook.mscd.edu/index2.html. Additional information is also available on the Judicial Affairs Website at: www.mscd.edu/~judicial/.
Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination based on sex. It is prohibited by law and College policy. In the educational context, sexual harassment is defined as any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 7;
a. submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s status in a course, program, activity, or educational evaluation
b. submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for educational decisions affecting that individual
c. such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s academic performance or educational experience, or of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive educational environment
Charges of sexual harassment can be based on a wide variety of behaviors, such as repeated derogatory sexual remarks, negotiation for sexual favors as a quid pro quo for grades or recommendations or threatened or actual sexual assault. These and similar behaviors seriously undermine the teaching and learning environment and can be grounds for disciplinary action. Sexual harassment should be reported to the Office of Equal Opportunity at 303-556-4746. Sexual assaults should be reported to the Auraria Campus Police at 303-556-3271.
Written policies addressing these issues in greater detail are available from the Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action in Central Classroom (CN) 315 or call 303-556-4746.
Amorous Relationships Involving Students and College Employees
Members of the College community, whether faculty members or administrative staff, put academic and professional trust and ethics at risk when they engage in amorous romantic/sexual relationships with people whose academic and/or professional benefits and opportunities are, or appear to be, subject to their authority, supervision or influence. Accordingly, the College prohibits such relationships, as well as any attempt to initiate or engage in such relationships. Any faculty member or administrator who engages in, or attempts to engage in, an amorous relationship with a student or subordinate shall report any such relationship or attempt to the EEO Officer.
Sexual harassment of an employee or student will lead to disciplinary action. In the case of an employee, such discipline may include termination. In case of students, such discipline may include expulsion.
Class Attendance
Attendance during the first week of class is required. It contributes greatly to teaching and learning. Some departments determine a student’s enrollment in a course based upon attendance during the first week of class. Consult the department for more information about the attendance policy for the class that you are attending. Students who drop classes are financially responsible for those classes in accordance with the withdrawal/refund policies stated on the Web class schedule on Metroconnect (metro-connect.mscd.edu).
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student’s absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course. If students anticipate a prolonged absence, they should contact their instructors. If they find that they cannot communicate with the instructor, they should contact the chair of that department, who will inform the instructor of the reasons for the anticipated absence. Whenever an instructor determines that a student’s absences are interfering with academic progress, the instructor may submit a letter to the department chair informing that office of the situation.
Students at Metro State who, because of their sincerely held religious beliefs, are unable to attend classes, take examinations, participate in graded activities or submit graded assignments on particular days shall, without penalty, be excused from such classes and be given a meaningful opportunity to make up such examinations and graded activities or assignments provided that proper notice and procedures are followed. The policies and procedures designed to excuse class attendance on religious holidays are covered in the Metro State Student Handbook.
Final Examinations
It is the general policy of the College to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, with the possible exception of seminar courses or special projects.


74 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Equal Opportunity and Americans with Disabilities Act
Metropolitan State College of Denver is an equal opportunity employer; applications from minorities and women are particularly invited. Metropolitan State College of Denver does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, sex, age, sexual orientation or disability in admissions or access to, or treatment or employment in, its educational programs or activities. Inquiries concerning the College grievance procedures may be directed to the designated Metro State officials. Inquiries concerning Title VI and Title IX may be referred to Dr. Percy Morehouse, Jr., Metro State Office of Equal Opportunity, Campus Box 63, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, 303-556-4746. Inquiries concerning the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or 504 may be referred to Ms. Kirsten Moore, Faculty and Staff ADA Coordinator, Metro State, Campus Box 47, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, 303-556-8514; Mr. Steve Monaco, Student ADA Coordinator, 303-556-3881; Mr. Greg Sullivan, Director Access Center, Metro State, Campus Box 56, P.O. Box 173361, Denver, CO 80217-3361, 303-556-8387. Otherwise, all inquiries may be referred to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1244 Speer Boulevard, Denver, CO 80204, 303-844-3723.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
Student Rights
Metropolitan State College of Denver maintains educational records for each student who has enrolled at the College. A copy of the College’s policy on student educational records may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar, Central Classroom Building, Room 105. Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), 20 USC 1232g, and the implementing regulations published at 34 CFR part 99, each eligible student has the right to:
1. Inspect and review his/her educational records;
2. Request the amendment of the student’s education records to ensure that they are not inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy or other rights;
3. Consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s educational records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent (see Nondisclosure and Exceptions); and
4. File a complaint under 34 CFR 99.64, concerning alleged failures by the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA, with the Family Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202-4605.
Procedure for Inspecting and Reviewing Educational Records
Students may inspect and review their education records upon a written request submitted to the Registrar, Central Classroom, Room 105, or by mail to Campus Box 84, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, Colorado 80217-3362.
1. The request shall identify as precisely as possible the record or records the student wishes to inspect.
2. The record custodian or an appropriate staff person shall make the arrangements for access as promptly as possible and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. Access must be given within 45 days from the receipt of the request.
3. When a record contains information about more than one student, the student may inspect and review only the records that relate to that student.
Procedure for Amending Educational Records
A student may make a written request to amend a record.
1. In the request, the student should identify the part of the record to be changed and specify why the student believes it is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student’s privacy or other rights.
2 Metropolitan State College of Denver shall comply with the request or notify the student that the College will not comply with the request and advise the student of the student’s right to a hearing to challenge the information believed to be inaccurate, misleading or in violation of the student’s rights.
3. Upon written request, Metropolitan State College of Denver will arrange for a hearing, and notify the student, reasonably in advance, of the date, place, and time of the hearing.


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 75
4. The hearing will be conducted by a hearing officer who is a disinterested party, but who may be an official of the institution. The student shall be afforded a full and fair opportunity to present evidence relevant to the issues raised in the original request to amend the students education records. The student may be assisted by one or more individuals, including an attorney.
5. Metropolitan State College of Denver will prepare a written decision based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing. The decision will include a summary of the evidence presented and the reasons for the decision.
6. If Metropolitan State College of Denver decides that the challenged information is not inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student’s right of privacy or other right, it will notify the student that the student has a right to place in the record a statement commenting on the challenged information and/or a statement setting forth reasons for disagreeing with the decision.
7. The statement will be maintained as part of the students education records as long as the contested portion is maintained. If Metropolitan State College of Denver decides that the information is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the students rights, it will amend the record and notify the student, in writing, that the record has been amended.
Nondisclosure and Exceptions
Pursuant to FERPA, the College will not disclose a student’s education records without the written consent of the student except to College officials with legitimate educational interests, to officials at other institutions in which the student seeks to enroll; in connection with providing financial aid to the student; to accrediting agencies in carrying out their functions; to federal, state or local authorities auditing or evaluating the College’s compliance with education programs; to consultants conducting studies on behalf of the College; in compliance with a judicial order or subpoena; and in connection with a health or safety emergency involving the student. However, the College may release directory information without the prior written consent of the student unless within ten (10) calendar days after the first scheduled class day of each term, an enrolled student has notified the College’s Office of the Registrar in writing that any or all types of directory information shall not be disclosed without the consent of the student. A request for nondisclosure will remain in effect until the student is no longer enrolled or cancels the request for nondisclosure.
A school official is a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position; or a person elected to the Board of Trustees; or a person employed by or under contract to the College to perform a special task, such as attorney, auditor or consultant; or a student or other person serving on an official College committee or assisting a school official in performing the official’s professional duties and responsibilities. A legitimate educational interest is the need of a school official to review educational records in order to fulfill that official’s professional duties and responsibilities.
Directory Information
The Metropolitan State College of Denver has designated the following categories of personally identifiable information on students as directory information under section 438(a)(5)(B) of FERPA:
• name, address and telephone number
• student classification
• major and minor fields of study
• participation in officially recognized activities and sports
• weight and height of members of athletic teams
• dates of attendance at the College
• degrees and awards received
• last educational institution attended
Graduation Rate, The Student Right-to-Know Act and Campus Security Act
This report was prepared by the Office of Institutional Research at Metropolitan State College of Denver to comply with the federal Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990. Our latest six-year graduation rate, for the 2000 cohort of first-time, full-time students is 22.4%.


76 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
CAMPUS CRIME INFORMATION
Auraria Campus CLERY Statistical Report
Campus and Public Property
CRIMINAL OFFENSES On Campus Public Property
2002 2003 2004 2002 2003 2004
Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0 0
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 1 1 0 7 5 1
Aggravated Assault 3 5 2 2 5 2
Motor Vehicle Theft 15 9 12 9 4 6
Arson 0 1 0 0 2 0
*The reason for the marked increase is due to the definition provided in the “Handbook for Campus Crime Reporting" published by the US Dept of Education/2005 stating “If lawful entry cannot be proven, classify as a burglary.” Many of these crimes were previously classified as a theft which is a non-reportable offense for CLERY
HATE CRIMES On Campus Public Property
2002 2003 2004 2002 2003 2004
Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offense 0 0 0 0 0 0
Non-Forcible Sex Offences 0 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other Crimes Involving Bodily Injury 0 0 0 0 0 0

ARRESTS On Campus Public Property
2002 2003 2004 2002 2003 2004
Liquor Law Violations 0 6 0 0 60** 10
Drug Law Violations 13 16 9 6 26 13**
Illegal Weapons Possession 2 1 1 2 5 !**
**The reason for the marked decrease is due to the definition provided in the “Handbook for Campus Crime Reporting” published by the US Dept ofEducation/2005 stating “All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus." be included; essentially, sidewalk, street, sidewalk. The Auraria Campus was previously over-reporting the statistics.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 77
the
School of Business
hJe educate Denver's business workforce-
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE of DENVER


78 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
The School of Business offers students a variety of educational opportunities that either lead to a bachelor’s degree or provide opportunities for non-degree seeking students to gain additional undergraduate education through our extensive course offerings and certificate programs.
The school provides convenient access to instruction through traditional classroom sessions and innovative online delivery, at the main Auraria campus, both Metro South and Metro North campus, during the day, evenings, and weekends. The school consists of 67 full-time faculty, more than 50 part-time faculty, and 8 full-time staff. Over 3500 students major in business and economics. Students can take advantage of on-the-job training through cooperative education placements, internships, and independent study course work.
Students may declare a major in the School of Business during the admission process, or at any time thereafter by contacting a department faculty advisor and completing the “Major Declaration Form”. Students are encouraged to declare as early as possible to ensure accurate advising on degree program requirements.
Mission
The school’s mission statement reflects our efforts to provide students with the best possible education we can offer:
Our mission is to develop undergraduate students into effective business professionals by preparing students for careers and lifelong learning with an awareness of ethics, technological advancements, and globalization.
We facilitate learning through excellence in teaching by maintaining currency in the disciplines, using appropriate pedagogy, and providing individual attention to students.
We deliver a quality, accessible undergraduate business education in the metropolitan Denver area to a diverse student population.
The school offers degrees in six majors:
Bachelors of Science Degree Programs
• Accounting
• Computer Information Systems
• Finance (General Finance, Financial Services)
• Management
• Marketing
Bachelors of Arts Degree Program
• Economics
In addition, we offer an International Business Concentration for business majors and a total of nine minors designed for non-business majors.
The various educational opportunities available through the School of Business are listed on the next page. Course descriptions and prerequisites are found beginning on page 359 of this Catalog.
If you have any questions about the offerings, academic policies and practices, or admission requirements, contact the dean of the School of Business or the chair of the appropriate department.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS PREREQUISITE AND ATTENDANCE POLICY
All students are expected to know and fulfill all current prerequisite requirements. The School of Business reserves the right to disenroll students who do not meet current prerequisite requirements or who fail to meet expected course attendance policies. (See Class Attendance Section.) In addition to meeting specific course prerequisites, the following general requirements also apply:


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS T
Prior to attending an upper-division course offered in the School of Business Bachelors of Science programs (Accounting, Computer Information Systems, Finance, Management, Marketing), all students must have:
• completed all Level I General Studies requirements;
• completed at least 60 credit hours overall (junior standing);
• declared a major in any discipline or be of non-degree seeking status.
Bachelors of Science Degree Programs
Students may earn a Bachelors of Science degree in accounting, computer information systems, finance, management, or marketing. The degree requires completion of course work in general studies, the core business disciplines and requirements, a major, and electives. A minor is not required.
Business Program Residency Requirements
To earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Business, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business course work at Metro State. This 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, CIS, FIN, MGT and MKT except CIS 1010, CIS 2300, CIS 3300, CIS 3320, CIS 3340, and FIN 2250.
Business Degree Program Planning
Some important things to remember as you plan your business studies:
• All degree-seeking students must meet the College’s requirements for all bachelor’s degrees outlined in the general information section of this Catalog.
• During the first 60 credit hours, business majors should complete their General Studies Levels I and II courses and the 2000-level business core courses.
• The College requires at least 40 credit hours of upper-division courses (3000 or 4000 level). Consult with an advisor to ensure that your specific degree program meets this requirement.
• If a student pursuing a degree other than a Bachelors of Science from the School of Business wishes to enroll in business courses beyond 30 hours, the student must declare a major with the School of Business. The 30 hours excludes up to 9 credit hours in economics and the following courses: CIS 1010, CIS 2300, CIS 3300, CIS 3320, CIS 3340, or FIN 2250.
• A minor is not required for students whose major is accounting, computer information systems, finance, management or marketing.
The following sections describe the scope of the degree program, course requirements, career opportunities, and competencies for career success in each degree program.
ACCOUNTING DEGREE PROGRAM
The accounting program prepares students for entry into careers in public accounting, industry, tax, and the government sector, as well as graduate education and lifelong learning. The field of accounting is moving rapidly toward a greater emphasis in the areas of information systems, management consulting, and leadership in organizational change. Accountants can obtain a variety of professional certifications, including Certified Public Accountant, Certified Internal Auditor, Certified Fraud Examiner, Certified Information Systems Auditor, and Certified Management Accountant. Each professional certification program includes rigorous education, examination, experience, and ethics requirements.
Mission:
The Accounting Department at Metro State College provides high quality, accessible, enriching undergraduate accounting education in an urban setting appropriate to a diverse student population enrolled under modified open admission standards. We prepare students for careers, graduate education, and lifelong learning in a global and technological society. The department is committed to ethical values, continuous improvement, and mutual respect within a diverse campus community.
The Accounting Department pursues excellence in teaching and learning as its primary purpose. Intellectual contributions in accounting and related fields that enhance teaching and


80 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
learning and contribute to scholarship through both applied research and other avenues of professional development are secondary though fundamental to the mission of the Accounting Department. Service to Metro State College, the accounting profession, and the community and society in general is also secondary albeit fundamental to the mission of the Accounting Department.
Successful accounting students possess these skills and attributes:
• ability to organize, analyze, and interpret numerical data;
• strategic and critical thinking skills;
• proficiency in oral and written communications with the ability to explain complex financial data to others;
• ability to apply current technology;
• knowledge of financial and economic history, practices, and trends;
• ability to work collaboratively as well as independently;
• understanding of the methods for creating, leading, and managing change in organizations.
Students majoring in accounting and interested in pursuing an International Business concentration should see an advisor.
Program Requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting
All candidates for a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting must satisfy the General Studies requirements, the business core course requirements, and the Accounting Department requirements described
in the following sections.
COURSES ...........................................................SEMESTER HOURS
General Studies (Level I and Level II)*...........................................34
Accounting Department Requirements..............................................3-18
Business Core ....................................................................33
Accounting Major Requirements.....................................................24
Unrestricted Electives*........................................................12-27
Total Hours (minimum)............................................................120
*The College’s multicultural requirement may be satisfied by taking an approved multicultural course in the general studies or the unrestricted electives portion of the program requirements.
Note: Unrestricted Elective credits may vary. Total unrestricted electives must be sufficient for the student to meet the required college minimum of 120 credit hours. Typically the unrestricted elective credits will vary between 12 and 27 credit hours. These hours may be used to meet requirements/ or a minor or a concentration. Per college policy, no more than 4 semester hours in human performance and sports activity (HPL) or varsity sports (ATH) and no more than 7 semester hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward the degree.
General Studies
The academic foundation for a successful business career or graduate work is a broad liberal arts education.
GENERAL STUDIES COURSES......................................SEMESTER HOURS
Check the Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements for approved courses and the Accounting Department Requirements listed below.
Total Hours for General Studies..............................................33
Multicultural Requirement
The College’s multicultural requirement is satisfied by taking an approved multicultural course listed in the Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements.
Accounting Department Requirements
In addition to foundation coursework in business theory and practice, all Accounting majors should have learning experiences that develop and support communication abilities, quantitative and analyti-


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 81
cal skills, an understanding of the domestic and global economic environment, an appreciation of the American political process, and an understanding of a business professional’s ethical as well as legal responsibility in organizations and society. To meet these objectives, the following courses are required
for all majors in Accounting.
REQUIRED COURSES..................................................SEMESTER HOURS
SPE 1010 Public Speaking1.......................................................3
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro2.........................................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro2.........................................3
PSC 1010 American National Government2..........................................3
MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences3......................3
Ethics Requirement
PHI 3360 Business Ethics4.......................................................4
-or-
ACC 4440 Accounting Ethics and Professionalism5.................................3
Total Hours for the Accounting Department Requirements..........................3-18
‘May be used to meet the General Studies Level I Communications requirement.
2May be used to meet the General Studies Level II Social Sciences requirements.
3The prerequisite for this course, MTH 1110 or MTH 1310 or MTH 1400, may be used to meet the General Studies Levell Mathematics requirement. MTH 1410, MTH 2410 or MTH 2420 may be substituted for MTH 1320.
4May be used to meet the General Studies Level II Arts and Letters requirement.
5May be used as an Accounting elective or an unrestricted elective if PHI 3360, Business Ethics, is taken.
Business Core
All Business majors require foundation course work in all significant areas of business theory and practice. The following courses are required for all majors in Accounting. A grade of “C” or better must be earned in each business core course to have that course count toward the Bachelors of Science degree in
Accounting.
REQUIRED COURSES......................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting....................................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II.................................................3
CIS 2010 Computer Applications for Business..........................................3
CIS 2300 Business Statistics.........................................................3
CIS 3340 Advanced Business Statistics................................................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance..........................................................3
MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business 1.............................................3
MGT 3000 Organizational Management...................................................3
MGT 4950 Strategic Management (meets the Senior Experience requirement)..............3
MKT 2040 Business Communication......................................................3
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing.....................................................3
Total Hours for the Business Core.......................................................33
Accounting Major Requirements
Accounting majors should have learning experiences that focus on the development, measurement, analysis, validation, and communication of financial and other information. The following courses are
required for all majors in Accounting.
REQUIRED COURSES..................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ACC 3090 Income Tax 1...........................................................3
ACC 3300 Accounting Information Systems.........................................3
ACC 3400 Cost Accounting........................................................3
ACC 3510 Intermediate Accounting................................................3
ACC 3520 Intermediate Accounting II.............................................3
Subtotal...........................................................................15


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Plus 9 hours from the following courses including at least one 4000 level course:
ACC 3100 Income Tax II.............................................................3
ACC 3110 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)...................................3
ACC 3200 Governmental Accounting..................................................3
ACC 3410 Advanced Cost Accounting.................................................3
ACC 3750 International Accounting.................................................3
ACC 4090 Tax Procedure and Research...............................................3
ACC 4100 Tax Planning.............................................................3
ACC 4200 Auditing and Attestation.................................................3
ACC 4300 Advanced Auditing........................................................3
ACC 4440 Accounting Ethics and Professionalism....................................3
ACC 4510 Advanced Accounting.......................................................3
ACC 4520 Mergers and Acquisitions.................................................3
ACC 4650 Fraud: Issues in Accounting and Auditing.................................3
Subtotal..............................................................................9
Total Hours for the Accounting Major Requirements.....................................24
Students interested in becoming Certified Public Accountants (CPA) should be aware that they must take ACC 4200, Auditing and Attestation, and that the majority of states (Colorado is not included) require 150 semester hours of education to sit for the uniform CPA examination. MSCD offers classes that satisfy both the ISO-hour requirement and Colorado’s “education in lieu of experience” option for certification.
To earn a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business course work at MSCD, including the last 12 hours applicable to the degree, and completion of at least 40 hours of upper-division courses. The 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, CIS, FIN, MGT, and MKT except CIS 1010, CIS 2300, CIS 3300, CIS 3320, CIS 3340, and FIN 22S0. A student must complete at least 12 upper-division semester hours in Accounting at MSCD.
Students should consult an Accounting faculty advisor to develop an appropriate academic program. A wide variety of internship opportunities are available through the Cooperative Education Office.
Certificate in Accounting
The Certificate in Accounting is offered by the department for students with prior degrees who want to meet the educational requirements to sit for the CPA examination in Colorado. The basic requirements for this certificate program include:
• A previous baccalaureate degree.
• Prerequisite and/or corequisite requirements of twenty-one credit hours of courses in other areas of business. These areas include, but are not limited to, business communication, business law, computer information systems, economics, finance, management, marketing, and statistics. No more than six hours may be in anyone of the areas.
• Proof that transfer courses meet the education requirements of the Colorado State Board of Accountancy.
• Twenty-seven credit hours of accounting courses with a grade of “C” or better. At least twenty-one credit hours must upper-division courses.
• Successfully complete a minimum of eighteen credit hours of accounting courses at MSCD while enrolled in the Certificate program.
Certificate Requirements
A candidate for the Certificate in Accounting must satisfy the following course requirements:
REQUIRED COURSES.......................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I..................................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II.................................................3
ACC 3510 Intermediate Accounting 1...................................................3
ACC 3520 Intermediate Accounting II..................................................3
ACC 4200 Auditing and Attestation........................................................3
Subtotal................................................................................15


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Plus 12 hours from the following courses:
ACC 3090 Income Tax 1............................................................3
ACC 3100 Income Tax II...........................................................3
ACC 3110 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)..................................3
ACC 3200 Governmental Accounting.................................................3
ACC 3300 Accounting Information Systems..........................................3
ACC 3400 Cost Accounting.........................................................3
ACC 3410 Advanced Cost Accounting................................................3
ACC 3750 International Accounting................................................3
ACC 4090 Tax Procedure and Research..............................................3
ACC 4100 Tax Planning............................................................3
ACC 4300 Advanced Auditing.......................................................3
ACC 4440 Accounting Ethics and Professionalism...................................3
ACC 4510 Advanced Accounting.....................................................3
ACC 4520 Mergers and Acquisitions................................................3
ACC 4650 Fraud: Issues in Accounting and Auditing................................3
Subtotal.............................................................................12
Total Hours for the Accounting Certificate Requirements..............................27
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEGREE PROGRAM
With a degree in the rapidly expanding area of information systems in the business world, students can look forward to challenging careers in computer information systems.
Mission Statement:
The Computer Information Systems Department delivers high quality, accessible undergraduate business information systems education to a diverse student population. We prepare students to analyze, design, develop, and use business applications utilizing contemporary technology. We provide a balance between fundamental information systems concepts and the application of these concepts from a future-oriented perspective.
The Computer Information Systems Department provides undergraduate major, minor, and certificate programs in information systems. We offer service courses in information systems and quantitative methods to School of Business students, and applied computer courses to students college-wide.
The Computer Information Systems Department faculty pursues excellence in teaching and learning as its primary purpose. We provide degree and career planning assistance. We nurture learning through individual attention to students. The faculty aggressively engage in professional development activities to enhance instruction and contribute to scholarship and applied research, and engage in pursuit of currency in Information Systems. The faculty integrate current technology into the curriculum and provide service to the institution, the profession and the community at large.
Successful students in the Computer Information Systems program will be able to demonstrate skills and competencies in the following areas:
• Computer Information Systems theory and concepts and their application to the functional areas of business;
• Project management tools and techniques as they apply to Information Systems projects;
• Programming processes including planning, writing, testing, executing and debugging;
• Database design, development and management;
• Telecommunications and networking systems;
• Web-based systems;
• Operating systems;
• Knowledge of how to create and utilize team approaches to problem solving;
• Advanced knowledge in an Information Systems area;
• Ability to support the delivery and management of information systems.


84 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Students majoring in computer information systems are encouraged to select advanced courses that best meet their needs in areas such as systems analysis, design, and development; programming; database management/administration; data communications; networks/network administration; electronic commerce; web site development/administration; and management of information systems. Advising for these areas is available from the department chair and individual faculty members.
Students pursuing a bachelors degree in Computer Information Systems are required to participate in assessment activities at both the department and school levels during their senior year.
Students majoring in Computer Information Systems and interested in pursuing an International Business Concentration should see an advisor.
Computer Information Systems Major for Bachelors of Science
All candidates for a Bachelors of Science degree in computer information systems must satisfy the General Studies requirements, the business core course requirements, the School of Business requirements, and the major requirements described in the following sections. The basic structure of the computer
information systems program is:
Required Courses........................................................Semester Hours
General Studies (Level I and Level II)................................................34
Business Core ........................................................................33
School of Business requirements........................................................9
Major in Computer Information Systems.................................................27
Unrestricted Electives*...............................................................17
Total Hours (minimum)................................................................120
*The College’s multicultural requirement may be satisfied by taking an approved multicultural course in general studies or electives portion of the degree requirement.
NOTE: Unrestricted Elective credits may vary. Total unrestricted electives must be sufficient for student to meet the College’s minimum required 120 credit hours.
General Studies
The academic foundation for a successful business career or graduate work is a broad liberal arts education.
General Studies Level I
REQUIRED COURSES..................................................SEMESTER HOURS
Composition
ENG 1010 Freshman Composition: The Essay.....................................3
ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, and Documentation.........3
Mathematics
MTH 1310* Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences............4
Communications
SPE 1010 Public Speaking......................................................3
*Note: MTH 1110 or MTH 1400, with graphing calculator experience strongly recommended, is acceptable for transfer students or students changing their major. Consult with the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department on substitutions.
General Studies Level II Historical Studies
HIS ____ (American history course recommended)........................................3
Arts and Letters
PHI 1030 Ethics ....................................................................3
-or-
PHI 3360 Business Ethics............................................................3
Level II Arts and Letters elective (refer to Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements)... 3


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 85
Social Sciences
PSY 1001* Introductory Psychology....................................................3
-or-
SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociology...................................................3
PSC 1010 American National Government................................................3
-or-
PSC 1020 Political Systems and Ideas.................................................3
Natural Sciences
Level II Natural Sciences electives (refer to Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements).. 6 Total of Required and Elective General Studies.....................................34
* Note: PSY 8000 is acceptable for transfer students.
Business Core
All business majors require foundation course work in all significant areas of business theory and practice. The following courses are required for all majors in computer information systems. A grade of “C” or better must be earned in each business core course to have that course count toward the Bachelors of
Science degree in computer information systems.
REQUIRED COURSES......................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I...............................................3
CIS 2010 Computer Applications for Business.......................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II..............................................3
MKT 2040 Business Communication...................................................3
MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business 1..........................................3
CIS 2300 Business Statistics......................................................3
MGT 3000 Organizational Management................................................3
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing..................................................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance.......................................................3
CIS 3340 Advanced Business Statistics.............................................3
MGT 4950 Strategic Management.....................................................3
Total Hours Required in Business Core..................................................33
School of Business Requirements
REQUIRED COURSES.........................................SEMESTER HOURS
MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences...........3
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro.............................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro.............................3
Total Hours for School of Business Requirement.........................9
Computer Information Systems Major Requirements
REQUIRED COURSES...................................................SEMESTER HOURS
CIS 2110 Structure Problem Solving in Information Systems........................3
CIS 3050 Fundamentals of System Analysis and Design..............................3
CIS 3060 Database Management Systems.............................................3
CIS 3230 Telecommunications Systems and Networking...............................3
CIS 3145 Business Application Development with Visual Basic......................3
CIS 4050 Systems Analysis and Design.............................................3
Computer Information Systems Capstone Group
(any 4000-level CIS course excluding CIS 4050)........................3
Upper-division CIS Electives.......................................................6
Total Hours Required for Computer Information Systems Major........................27
To earn a Bachelor’s degree in computer information systems, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business course work at MSCD. This 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, CIS, FIN, MGT and MKT except


86 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
CIS 1010, CIS 2300, CIS 3300, CIS 3320, CIS 3340, and FIN 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division semester hours in Computer Information Systems at MSCD.
Certificate Programs
Students must complete each course in the certificate program with a grade of “C” or better. The courses cannot be taken pass/fail.
Database Analyst*
This certificate will prepare a student for an entry-level position as a database programmer or database
analyst.
REQUIRED COURSES...................................................SEMESTER HOURS
CIS 2110 Structured Problem Solving in Information Systems.......................3
Any one course from the CIS Programming Language Group:
CIS 3130 Business Applications in C and UNIX.....................................3
CIS 3145 Business Application Development with Visual Basic......................3
CIS 3180 Business Applications in OOP: C++.......................................3
CIS 3190 Business Application and Web Applet Design with Java....................3
CIS 3260 Information Systems Development with GUI Development Tools..............3
-plus-
CIS 3060 Database Management Systems.............................................3
CIS 4060 Advanced Database Management Systems....................................3
CIS 4260 Database Administration.................................................3
*This certificate has a prerequisite course of CIS 2010 which may be waived with appropriate work experience or course work.
End User Support Specialist*
This certificate will prepare a student for an entry-level position as a help desk/support center specialist. It will also prepare an end-user to become the departmental hardware/software expert.
REQUIRED COURSES...................................................SEMESTER HOURS
CIS 2110 Structured Problem Solving in Information Systems.....................3
CIS 3030 Business Web Page Development.........................................3
CIS 3220 Analysis of Hardware, Software and User Interfaces
for Microcomputer Platforms..........................................3
CIS 3270 Advanced Computer Applications for Business...........................3
CIS 3290 Operating Systems for End Users.......................................3
*This certificate has a prerequisite course of CIS 2010 which may be waived with appropriate work experience or course work.
Network Specialist in Information Systems*
This certificate will prepare a student for an entry-level position in network support, network adminis-
tration, network design, and network sales.
REQUIRED COURSES...................................................SEMESTER HOURS
CIS 3220 Analysis of Hardware, Software and User Interfaces
for Microcomputer Platforms............................................3
CIS 3230 Telecommunication Systems and Networking..............................3
CIS 3280 LAN and WAN Systems for Business......................................3
CIS 3290 Operating Systems for End Users.......................................3
CIS 4280 Network Installation and Administration...............................3
*This certificate has prerequisite courses of CIS 2010 and CIS 2110 which may be waived with appropriate work experience or course work.


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Programmer/Analyst in Information Systems*
This certificate will prepare a student for an entry-level position as a business application programmer, programmer/analyst, or junior systems analyst.
REQUIRED COURSES............................
CIS 3050 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design -or-
CIS 4050 Systems Analysis and Design**......
CIS 3060 Database Management Systems........
Three courses from the following:
CIS 3030 Business Web Page Development.............................................3
CIS 3130 Business Applications in C and UNIX.......................................3
CIS 3145 Business Application Development with Visual Basic.........................3
CIS 3180 Business Applications in OOP: C++..........................................3
CIS 3190 Business Application and Web Applet Design with Java......................3
CIS 3260 Information Systems Development with GUI Development Tools..............3
*This certificate has prerequisite courses of CIS 2010 and CIS 2110 which may be waived with appropriate work experience or course work.
“CIS 4050 has a prerequisite course of CIS 3230.
SEMESTER HOURS
3
3
Web Developer in Information Systems*
This certificate will prepare a student to design and develop Web pages, to use an appropriate scripting language to generate dynamic Web content, to integrate Web solutions into the organization’s informa-
tion system, and to design and perform Web site administration tasks.
REQUIRED COURSES...................................................SEMESTER HOURS
CIS 3030 Business Web Page Development.........................................3
CIS 3060 Database Management Systems...........................................3
CIS 3145 Business Application Development with Visual Basic....................3
-or-
CIS 3190 Business Application and Web Applet Design with Java..................3
CIS 3230 Telecommunication Systems and Networking..............................3
CIS 4030 Web Site Administration...............................................3
*This certificate has prerequisite courses of CIS 2010 and CIS 2110 which may be waived with appropriate work experience or course work.
ECONOMICS DEGREE PROGRAM
MSCD’s economics program is not a business program and economics majors do not have the same requirements as other majors in the School of Business. For example, economics majors do not need to take the business core nor the special General Studies required of business majors. Graduates will receive a bachelors of arts degree instead of a bachelors of science degree. Consequently, the economics major requirements are not described in this section but can be found on page 96 of this Catalog.
FINANCE DEGREE PROGRAM
The finance program prepares students for careers that concentrate on the process of managing the funds of individuals, businesses, and governments. Career opportunities are available in the fields of managerial finance, personal financial planning, and the financial services industry. The field of managerial finance deals with managing the financial affairs of businesses and governments and includes such activities as budgeting, financial forecasting, cash management, credit administration, investment analysis, and funds management. Careers in the financial services industry include positions in banks, savings and loans, other financial institutions, brokerage firms, insurance companies, and real estate. The most dramatic increase in career opportunities is in personal financial planning, where professionals are needed to provide advice to consumers on the management of their personal financial affairs.


88 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
The Finance Department is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) Board of Standards Registered Program. Students successfully completing the required financial planning courses are eligible to take the national Certified Financial Planner examination.
The pursuit of excellence in teaching and learning is foremost in the mission statement of the Department of Finance.
Mission:
The Finance Department of the School of Business at Metropolitan State College of Denver delivers high quality, accessible undergraduate business and personal finance education in the metropolitan Denver area appropriate to a diverse student population and modified open admission standards. We prepare students for careers, graduate education and lifelong learning in a society characterized by technological advancements and globalization.
The primary purpose of the Finance Department is the pursuit of excellence in teaching and learning. We nurture learning through individual attention to students. The faculty of the Finance Department engages in professional development activities that enhance instruction and contribute to scholarship and applied research. Our faculty provide service to the institution, the professions and the community at large.
Finance Major for Bachelors of Science
All candidates for a bachelors of science degree in Finance must satisfy the General Studies requirements, the business core course requirements, the School of Business requirements and the major requirements described in the following sections. The basic structure of the Finance program is:
REQUIRED COURSES...................................................SEMESTER HOURS
General Studies (Level I and Level II).............................................34
Business Core .....................................................................33
School of Business requirements.....................................................9
Major in Finance...................................................................24
Unrestricted Electives*............................................................20
Total Hours (minimum).............................................................120
*The College’s multicultural requirement may be satisfied by taking an approved multicultural course in general studies or electives portion of the degree requirement.
NOTE: Unrestricted Elective credits may vary. Total unrestricted electives must be sufficient for student to meet the College’s minimum required 120 credit hours.
General Studies
The academic foundation for a successful business career or graduate work is a broad liberal arts education.
General Studies Level I Composition
ENG 1010 Freshman Composition: The Essay.....................................3
ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, and Documentation.........3
Mathematics
MTH 1310* Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences..........4
Communications
SPE 1010 Public Speaking.....................................................3
*Note: MTH 1110 or MTH 1400, with graphing calculator experience strongly recommended, is acceptable for transfer students or students changing their major. Consult with the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department on substitutions.
General Studies Level II Historical Studies
HIS _______ (American history course recommended)
3


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Arts and Letters
PHI 1030 Ethics .....................................................................3
-or-
PHI 3360 Business Ethics.............................................................3
Level II Arts and Letters elective (refer to Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements)... 3 Social Sciences
PSY 1001* Introductory Psychology....................................................3
-or-
SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociology...................................................3
PSC 1010 American National Government................................................3
-or-
PSC 1020 Political Systems and Ideas.................................................3
Natural Sciences
Level II Natural Sciences electives (refer to Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements).. 6
Total of Required and Elective General Studies...........................................34
* Note: PSY 8000 is acceptable for transfer students.
Business Core
All business majors require foundation course work in all significant areas of business theory and practice. The following courses are required for all majors in finance. A grade of “C” or better must be earned in each business core course to have that course count toward the bachelors of science degree in finance.
REQUIRED COURSES......................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I...............................................3
CIS 2010 Computer Applications for Business.......................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II..............................................3
MKT 2040 Business Communication...................................................3
MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business 1..........................................3
CIS 2300 Business Statistics......................................................3
MGT 3000 Organizational Management................................................3
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing..................................................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance.......................................................3
CIS 3340 Advanced Business Statistics.............................................3
MGT 4950 Strategic Management (Senior Experience Course)..........................3
Total Hours Required in Business Core..................................................33
School of Business Requirements
REQUIRED COURSES.........................................SEMESTER HOURS
MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences...........3
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro.............................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro.............................3
Total Hours for School of Business Requirement.........................9
Finance Major Requirements
Finance majors must pursue a concentration depending on their interest within the Finance area. A minimum grade of “C” is required for courses in the major.
Finance Common Core
REQUIRED COURSES...................................................SEMESTER HOURS
FIN 3010 Financial Markets and Institutions.....................................3
FIN 3150 Personal Financial Planning............................................3
FIN 3600 Investments............................................................3
FIN 3850 Intermediate Finance...................................................3
Subtotal...........................................................................12


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General Finance Concentration
REQUIRED COURSES.................................................
Finance Common Core..............................................
FIN 4950 Financial Strategies and Policies.......................
Subtotal.........................................................
Approved Electives*..............................................
Total Hours Required for Finance Major with a General Finance Concentration,
SEMESTER HOURS
.............12
...............3
..............15
...............9
..............24
*Upper-division finance electives (three credit hours must be 4000-level) selected in consultation with and approved by the Finance Department.
Financial Services Concentration
REQUIRED COURSES...............................SEMESTER HOURS
Finance Common Core....................................................................12
FIN 4600 Security Analysis and Portfolio Management.....................................3
Subtotal...............................................................................15
Approved Electives’.....................................................................9
Total Hours Required for Finance Major with a Financial Services Concentration........24
’Upper-division finance electives (three credit hours must be 4000-level) selected in consultation with and approved by the Finance Department.
To earn a bachelor’s degree in Finance, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business course work at MSCD. This 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, CIS, FIN, MGT and MKT except CIS 1010, CIS 2300, CIS 3300, CIS 3320, CIS 3340, and FIN 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division semester hours in Finance at MSCD.
Certificate Programs
Students must complete each course in the certificate program with a grade of “C” or better. The courses cannot be taken pass/fail.
Personal Financial Planning
REQUIRED COURSES.................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ACC 3090 Income Tax 1.........................................................3
FIN 3150 Personal Financial Planning..........................................3
FIN 3420 Principles of Insurance..............................................3
FIN 3450 Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits............................3
FIN 3600 Investments*.........................................................3
FIN 4400 Estate Planning......................................................3
This course has prerequisites. See catalog course description.
Successful completion of these courses also meets the Certified Financial Planner (CFP*) Board of Standards education requirement to take the national Certified Financial Planner examination. For prerequisites and more information call the Finance Department, 303-556-3126.
Noncredit Financial Planning
FPI Financial Planning Fundamentals
FPII Understanding Risk and Insurance
FPIII Investment Alternatives
FPIV Effective Tax Planning
FPV Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits
FPVI Estate Planning


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Approved by Certified Financial Planner (CFP*) Board of Standards/Approved by Colorado Insurance Commission for Continuing Education credit. For prerequisites and more information call the Finance Department, 303-556-6998 or 303-556-3776.
MANAGEMENT DEGREE PROGRAM
The management program prepares students to pursue a career in human resource management, operations management, entrepreneurship, or general management. Effective managers are necessary for organizations to compete in today’s global economy. The program consists of required courses that build a conceptual foundation for identifying and solving managerial problems. In addition to acquiring knowledge about business and management, students will develop special skills that are necessary to be an effective manager.
The commitment of the Department of Management is voiced in its mission statement:
Our mission is to prepare management students with the knowledge and skills necessary to manage and lead organizations. This is done within the context of globalization and an appreciation for diversity.
In order to gain excellence in learning, students:
1. take courses in business law, entrepreneurship, human resources, production operations, and management
2. gain skills in communication, critical thinking, and problem based learning, and an appreciation for lifelong learning.
In order to maintain excellence in teaching and advising, faculty members engage in:
1. professional development activities that enhance the application of management and legal theory, instructional techniques and resources, and continuous improvement of course content.
2. advising that relates to the program of study, careers, graduate school, and lifelong learning.
3. providing service to the profession, community, and institution.
4. embracing individuality, diversity, and the creativity that comes from multiple perspectives.
Necessary skills the manager should have include:
• proficiency in planning, organizing, leading and controlling activities;
• utilization of problem solving methodology to identify and define organizational problems, devise solutions, and implement the solution to achieve desired outcomes;
• highly developed interpersonal skills;
• an ability to communicate clearly and persuasively;
• use of sound methods for making decisions;
• innovative thinking, self-reliance, creative independent analysis, and sensitivity to social and ethical values.
Students majoring in management and interested in pursuing an International Business concentration should see an advisor.
Management Major for Bachelors of Science
All candidates for a Bachelors of Science degree in Management must satisfy the General Studies requirements, the business core course requirements, the School of Business requirements and the major requirements described in the following sections. The basic structure of the Management program is:
REQUIRED COURSES................................................SEMESTER HOURS
General Studies (Level I and Level II).........................................34
Business Core .................................................................33
School of Business requirements.................................................9
Major in Management............................................................24


92 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Unrestricted Electives*............................................................20
Total Hours (minimum)..............................................................120
*The College’s multicultural requirement may be satisfied by taking an approved multicultural course in general studies or electives portion of the degree requirement. The School of Business does offer one of these courses, MGT 4830 Workforce Diversity.
NOTE: Unrestricted Elective credits may vary. Total unrestricted electives must be sufficient for student to meet the College’s minimum required 120 credit hours.
General Studies
The academic foundation for a successful business career or graduate work is a broad liberal arts education.
General Studies Level I Composition
ENG 1010 Freshman Composition: The Essay.....................................3
ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, and Documentation.........3
Mathematics
MTH 1310* Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences..........4
Communications
SPE 1010 Public Speaking.....................................................3
*Note: MTH 1110 or MTH 1400, with graphing calculator experience strongly recommended, is acceptable for transfer students or students changing their major. Consult with the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department on substitutions.
General Studies Level II Historical Studies
HIS _________ (American history course recommended)....................................3
Arts and Letters
PHI 1030 Ethics .......................................................................
-or-
PHI 3360 Business Ethics............................................................3
Level II Arts and Letters elective (refer to Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements)... 3 Social Sciences
PSY 1001 Introductory Psychology....................................................3
-or-
SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociology..................................................3
PSC 1010 American National Government...............................................3
-or-
PSC 1020 Political Systems and Ideas................................................3
Natural Sciences
Level II Natural Sciences electives (refer to Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements).. 6 Total of Required and Elective General Studies...................................34
Business Core
All business majors require foundation course work in all significant areas of business theory and practice. The following courses are required for all majors in management. A grade of “C” or better must be earned in each business core course to have that course count toward the Bachelors of Science degree in management.
REQUIRED COURSES.....................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I..............................................3
CIS 2010 Computer Applications for Business......................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II.............................................3
MKT 2040 Business Communication..................................................3
MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business 1.........................................3
CIS 2300 Business Statistics.....................................................3
MGT 3000 Organizational Management...............................................3


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 9«
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing...................................................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance........................................................3
CIS 3340 Advanced Business Statistics..............................................3
MGT 4950 Strategic Management......................................................3
Total Hours Required in Business Core....................................................33
School of Business Requirements
REQUIRED COURSES.........................................SEMESTER HOURS
MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences...........3
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro.............................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro.............................3
Total Hours for School of Business Requirement.........................9
Management Major Requirements
REQUIRED COURSES..................................................SEMESTER HOURS
MGT 3020 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship...................................3
MGT 3220 Legal Environment of Business II...................................3
MGT 3530 Human Resources Management.........................................3
MGT 3550 Manufacturing and Service Management...............................3
MGT 3820 International Business.............................................3
MGT 4530 Organizational Behavior............................................3
Subtotal.........................................................................18
Plus 6 hours from the following courses:
MGT 3210 Commercial and Corporate Law.......................................3
MGT 4000 Management Decision Analysis.......................................3
MGT 4020 Entrepreneurial Creativity.........................................3
MGT 4050 Purchasing and Supply Chain Management.............................3
MGT 4420 Entrepreneurial Business Planning..................................3
MGT 4550 Project Management.................................................3
MGT 4610 Labor/Employee Relations...........................................3
MGT 4620 Appraisal and Compensation.........................................3
MGT 4640 Employee Training and Development..................................3
MGT 4650 Managing Productivity..............................................3
MGT 4830 Workforce Diversity................................................3
Total Elective Hours..............................................................6
Total Hours Required for Management Major........................................24
To earn a bachelors degree in Management, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business course work at MSCD. This 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, CIS, FIN, MGT, and MKT except CIS 1010, CIS 2300, CIS 3300, CIS 3320, CIS 3340, and FIN 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division semester hours in Management at MSCD.
MARKETING DEGREE PROGRAM
The Marketing program prepares students for career opportunities in such dynamic areas as sales management, distribution, advertising, marketing research, retailing, and marketing management.
Mission:
Students—Strive to give our students a first rate education in marketing and business communication (that compares favorably to other business programs in the U.S.). To enhance their respect for and excitement for learning that is consistent with the objectives of the School of Business and Metropolitan State College of Denver.


94 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Research/Publication—Maintain a research/publication record that is consistent with curricular needs, technological advancements and meets the challenges of globalization while allowing us to contribute to the knowledge-base of our discipline.
Service—Actively participate in various School of Business and MSCD committee activities, regional and national professional organizations and provide our services and expertise to the Denver and regional business community.
In addition to the departments well-rounded selection of courses, the curriculum offers students a combination of conceptual and applied learning experiences. Through the development of marketing plans, advertising campaigns and marketing research studies, students have the opportunity to work with Denver-area businesses on current marketing issues and problems. Students are also exposed to a variety of marketing speakers from the business community. Internship positions are available for marketing students through the Cooperative Education Office.
Marketing careers are challenging and rewarding in a field requiring an in-depth knowledge of products, services and modern information technology. Marketing is a people-oriented profession encompassing both for-profit companies and non-profit organizations. Since today’s competition is creating a greater demand for marketing and promotional efforts, the growth rate of the field is expected to increase in the future. People who are successful in marketing are creative, highly motivated, flexible, and decisive. They also possess the ability to communicate persuasively both in speaking and writing.
Students majoring in marketing and interested in pursuing an International Business concentration should see an advisor.
Marketing Major for Bachelors of Science
All candidates for a Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing must satisfy the General Studies requirements, the business core course requirements, the School of Business requirements, and the Marketing major requirements described in the following sections. The basic structure of the Marketing program is:
REQUIRED COURSES...................................................SEMESTER HOURS
General Studies (Level I and Level II).............................................34
Business Core .....................................................................33
School of Business requirements.....................................................9
Major in Marketing.................................................................24
Unrestricted Electives*............................................................20
Total Hours (minimum).............................................................120
*The Colleges multicultural requirement may be satisfied by taking an approved multicultural course in general studies or electives portion of the degree requirement.
NOTE: Unrestricted Elective credits may vary. Total unrestricted electives must be sufficient for student to meet the College’s minimum required 120 credit hours.
General Studies
The academic foundation for a successful business career or graduate work is a broad liberal arts education.
General Studies Level I Composition
ENG 1010 Freshman Composition: The Essay.....................................3
ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, and Documentation.........3
Mathematics
MTH 1310* Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences..........4
Communications
SPE 1010 Public Speaking.....................................................3
*Note: MTH 1110 or MTH 1400, with graphing calculator experience strongly recommended, is acceptable for transfer students or students changing their major. Consult with the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department on substitutions.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 95
General Studies Level II Historical Studies
HIS _________ (American history course recommended)....................................3
Arts and Letters
PHI 1030 Ethics .....................................................................3
-or-
PHI 3360 Business Ethics............................................................3
Level II Arts and Letters elective (refer to Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements)... 3 Social Sciences
PSY 1001* Introductory Psychology...................................................3
-or-
SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociology..................................................3
PSC 1010 American National Government...............................................3
-or-
PSC 1020 Political Systems and ideas................................................3
Natural Sciences
Level II Natural Sciences electives (refer to Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements).. 6
Total of Required and Elective General Studies.........................................34
* Note: PSY 8000 is acceptable for transfer students.
Business Core
All business majors require foundation course work in all significant areas of business theory and practice. The following courses are required for all majors in marketing. A grade of “C” or better must be earned in each business core course to have that course count toward the bachelors of science degree in
marketing.
REQUIRED COURSES......................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I...............................................3
CIS 2010 Computer Applications for Business.......................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II..............................................3
MKT 2040 Business Communication...................................................3
MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business 1..........................................3
CIS 2300 Business Statistics......................................................3
MGT 3000 Organizational Management................................................3
MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing..................................................3
FIN 3300 Managerial Finance.......................................................3
CIS 3340 Advanced Business Statistics.............................................3
MGT 4950 Strategic Management.....................................................3
Total Hours Required in Business Core.................................................33
School of Business Requirements
REQUIRED COURSES.........................................SEMESTER HOURS
MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences...........3
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro.............................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro.............................3
Total Hours for School of Business Requirement.........................9
Marketing Major Requirements
REQUIRED COURSES....................................................SEMESTER HOURS
MKT 3010 Marketing Research....................................................3
MKT 3310 Consumer Behavior.....................................................3
MKT 3710 International Marketing...............................................3
MKT 4560 Marketing Strategy....................................................3
Marketing Electives*...............................................................12
Total Hours Required for Marketing Major...........................................24


96 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
To earn a bachelor’s degree in Marketing, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business course work at MSCD. This 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, CIS, FIN, MGT, and MKT except CIS 1010, CIS 2300, CIS 3300, CIS 3320, CIS 3340, and FIN 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division semester hours in Marketing at MSCD.
ECONOMICS DEGREE PROGRAM
Bachelors of Arts
The Department of Economics is a non-business degree program housed in the School of Business offering a traditional bachelors of arts degree. Economics is the scientific study of the allocation of scarce or limited resources among competing uses. The study of economics provides specialized and general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions. The bachelors of arts degree program gives students a fundamental knowledge of domestic and foreign economies and the quantitative tools necessary for independent analytical research and thought. Specialized courses develop the student’s ability to apply the tools of economic theory and analysis to a broad range of social, political, and economic issues. Such training is essential for graduates who wish to qualify for positions as professional economists and provides an excellent background for students interested in law school or graduate programs in economics, finance, or business.
Our mission statement reflects our commitment.
The Department of Economics at the Metropolitan State College of Denver delivers a high-quality, accessible bachelors of arts program in economics while also providing significant service to the College, the School of Business, and the community by providing accessible and quality general studies courses in the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. We prepare students for lifelong learning in a complex free civil society; for graduate or professional education in economics, business and legal studies or the law; and for careers in a broad range of private and public activities.
The Department of Economics pursues excellence in teaching and learning as its primary purpose. The faculty of the department engages in scholarly activity that contributes to the literature in applied and basic economic research and other professional activity that enhances quality instruction.
While most positions as a professional economist require graduate training, for someone with a bachelor’s degree employment opportunities are available in national and international business; federal, state and local government; and various nonprofit organizations. In the field of economics, the following competencies are useful:
• ability to examine, analyze, and interpret data;
• sound decision-making abilities;
• proficiency in oral and written communications;
• knowledge of economic theory, history, practices, and trends;
• ability to operate and use information derived from computers;
• knowledge of statistical procedures;
• interest in economic and political trends.
Economics Major for Bachelors of Arts
REQUIRED COURSES.............................................SEMESTER HOURS
ECO 2010 Principle of Economics-Macro...................................3
ECO 2020 Principle of Economics-Micro...................................3
ECO 3010 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory..............................3
ECO 3020 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory..............................3
ECO 3150 Econometrics...................................................3
ECO 4600 History of Economic Thought (Senior Experience)................3
Subtotal...................................................................18


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 97
Approved Electives (upper division economics courses)................................18
Total Hours of Economics required for Economics Major..................................36
Additional requirements:
MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences................................3
-or-
MTH 1410* Calculus I....................................................................4
*(recommended for students interested in graduate work in economics)
Subtotal............................................................................39-40
Selected Minor (minimum)...............................................................18
General Studies (minimum)..............................................................33
Multicultural requirement*..............................................................3
Electives** ........................................................................26-27
Total Hours Required for Bachelors of Arts in Economics...............................120
**Check with an advisor in the Department of Economics regarding electives and the multicultural requirement.
Economics with Secondary Social Studies Licensure:
In addition to the required Social Science core the Economics major includes advanced courses in Economics, Econometrics, and History of Economic Thought.
General Studies
REQUIRED COURSES....................................................SEMESTER HOURS
MTH 1310 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences
(Substitutes for MTH 1610)...........................................4
General Studies Total ............................................................25
Additional Licensure Requirement for Secondary Social Sciences
HIS 4010 Methods of Teaching Social Sciences...................................3
Economics Core:
COURSES ............................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro.........................................3
ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro ........................................3
ECO 3010 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory.....................................3
ECO 3020 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory.....................................3
ECO 3150 Econometrics .........................................................3
ECO 4600 History of Economic Thought (Senior Experience).......................3
MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences ......................3
-or-
MTH 1410 Calculus .............................................................4
Economics Core Total............................................................21 -22
Electives: (12 upper division Economics courses)
REQUIRED COURSES....................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ECO 3200 Economic History of the U.S...........................................3
ECO xxxx Selected in consultation with an advisor..............................3
ECO xxxx Selected in consultation with an advisor..............................3
ECO xxxx Selected in consultation with an advisor..............................3
Electives Total required..........................................................12
*Note: The standard Economics major requires 18 hours of electives. GEG 3000 and PSC 3030, which are required for Secondary Social Studies, will be accepted towards the major replacing two Economics electives.


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Additional Course Requirements for Secondary Social Studies History
REQUIRED COURSES......................................................SEMESTER HOURS
HIS 1010 Western Civilization to 1715 or 1603....................................3
-or-
HIS 1030 World History to 1500 ..................................................3
HIS 1210 American History to 1865 ...............................................3
HIS 1220 American History since 1865 ............................................3
HIS 1040 World History since 1500 ...............................................3
History Total.......................................................................12
Political Science
REQUIRED COURSES..................................................... SEMESTER HOURS
PSC 1010 American National Government............................................3
PSC 1020 Political Systems and Ideas ............................................3
PSC 3030 Introduction to International Relations (major elective) ...............3
Political Science Total..............................................................9
Geography
REQUIRED COURSES..................................................... SEMESTER HOURS
GEG 1920 Concepts and Connections in Geography ..................................3
GEG 3000 Historical Geography of the U.S. (major elective).......................3
Geography Total......................................................................6
Behavioral Sciences
REQUIRED COURSES..................................................... SEMESTER HOURS
ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ..................................3
Behavioral Science Total.............................................................3
Additional Required Courses Total ..................................................30
Major total......................................................................33-34
General Studies Total ..............................................................25
Licensure Total (Includes HIS 4010).................................................37
Grand Total....................................................................125-126
Minors in the School of Business
The School of Business offers nine minors in business and economics. Most minors require 18 credit hours plus prerequisites, if any. These minors (with the exception of economics) are designed primarily for non-business majors. A student may not take more than 30 credit hours in the School of Business without declaring a business major. The acceptance of transfer credits will be governed by standards and policies of the School of Business and its departments.
Students should choose a minor that will help them in their chosen career. The general business minor should be declared after consultation with the associate dean. Other minors should be declared with the help of a faculty advisor or department chair of the appropriate department.
Accounting Minor
The accounting minor offers students a broad-based education in accounting, emphasizing a particular field within this discipline, such as financial accounting, managerial accounting, tax accounting, or governmental accounting.
The Accounting Department requires 60 credit hours (junior standing) before taking upper-division accounting courses. At least 12 hours of accounting courses in the minor must be completed in residency
at MSCD.
REQUIRED COURSES.................................................SEMESTER HOURS
ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I..............................................3
ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II.............................................3


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Campus parkinQ is available i n lois I N and R . T ivoli lot is visitor's parkinQ. PT parkin9 QaraQe. PARKING FEES liSTED IRE DillY RITES. AD . . ......... Administration Building AR . . . . . Arts Building AU . . . . . . Aurarla Library and Media Center (now LM) ELC.. . . . ... Auraria Early Learning Center CC... . . . . . . Children's College CN .. Central Classroom Building CU ... University of Colorado at Denver Building EG ......... . . . Emmanuel Gallery FA .......•.... Facil i ties Annex (was PSI FM . . . .. facilit ies Management GM ........... Golda Melr House KC.. . . . .... Kenneth King Center LW , . . .. Lawrence Street Center Auraria Campus CAMPUS BUILDINGS LM ........... Auraria Library and Media Center (was AU) NC ........... North Classroom Building NP ........... Ninth Street Park PD ............ Printing Distribution Center PE ............ PE/Events Center PL. ... Plaza Building (Health Center) PS......... . . Public Safety (now FA) PTC .......... Parking and Transportation Centre Offices RO ........... Rectory Offices !St . Cajetan's) SA . . SE. ... St. Cajetan's Center . .. St. Elizabeth's Church SF ............ St. Francis Conference Center 51 ............ Science Building SO. South Classroom Building SS...... . . . Seventh Street Building TE ............ Technology Building TAPS ...... Tivoli Aura ria Parking Structure TEN . . Tennis Courts TV. . . . .. Tivoli Student Union WC ........... West Classroom Building

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Campus Locations Apply early at any of Metro State's three convenient campuses. Auraria Campus 303-556-3058 Central Classroom Bldg., Room 10B Mailing Address: Campus Box 16 P .O. Box 173362 Denver, CO 80217-3362 Metro North 303-450-5111 11990 Grant Street Suite 102 Northglenn, CO 80233 Metro South 303-721-1313 5660 Greenwood Plaza Blvd. Suite LIDO Englewood, CO 80111 Online Courses 303-556-5227 http:/ /clem. mscd .edu/ -options Central Classroom, Room 220-H Auraria Campus For an admission application and telephone registration instructions please refer to the index. www.mscd.edu t I .... Q: 0 z 120th St. Englewood Metro South Triad North Building Metro North Northgl enn 1 70 Orchard Rd. Metropolitan State College of Denver is an Equal Access /E qual Opportunity Institution.

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m e t r 0 majors and programs Metropolitan State College of Denver OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS Campus Box l6 P . O . Box l 7 336 2 Denver, CO 802 l 7 3362 www.mscd-edu HSCO CAT 2008 TO 21119 HSCO CA 05IZOI08 1 111111111 11111111111111111 111 nFPT 7155 s t a t e BUSINESS Page Accounting... . • . . . . . . . . 79 Computer Informatio n Systems .•..•• , .. , ...•....... 83 Economics .. .. . . .. .. .. . . . . .. .. ............ 96 F inance ...................................... 87 Management... . .. .. .. .. • .. . • . .. .. .. • .. .. .. . . . 91 Marketing .. . .. .. • .. .. .......................... 93 HUMANITIES Art ............................................ 108 English . .. . .. .. .. .. . .. ........................ 132 Journalism........ .. ........................ 152 Modern Languages . . .......................... 170 Music ........................................ 176 MUSIC Education .. . . ................ 181,346 Philosophy .................................. 186 Speech Communicati o n .. .. .. • • • . .. • .. . .. .. . .. 205 Theatre.... .. .. .. . ................ 211 PUBLIC SERVICE PROFESSIONS Criminal Justice and Cnmmology . . . . . . • . . . • . . . . . . 233 Health Care Management .. .. .. . . .. ............. 242 Hospitality, Tourism and Events .......•............ 246 Human Performance and Sport •.•....••........... 251 Human Services .. .. .. . ........................ 258 Nursing . .. .. .. .. .. . . . ....................... 273 Nutrition ........................................ 276 Recreation Professions .......................... 280 SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS B i o logy........ .. .. . . .. ................... 119 Chemistry . . . • .. .. .. . .. • . 121 Computer Science . .. . 127 Environmental Science .......................... 139 Land Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . 156 Mathematics .................................... 163 Meteorology .................................... 169 Physics ......................................... 188 SOCIAL SCIENCES African and African American Stud1es ............. 106 Anthropology .. .. . • .. . . .. .. .. . .. ............ 107 Behavioral Science . . .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 118 Chic ana/Chicano Stud1es . .. • .. . .. .. .. • .. .... 126 History. . .. .. .. .. . .. . .. . .. . .. • .. .. .. .. • .. . . 144 Human Development ........................... 148 Political Sc1ence .. . • .. . .. .. . • . .. .. . 189 Psychology ........... , ... , ..................... 192 Social Work ..................................... 194 Sociology .. .. .. . .. .. .. . . . .. .. .................. 202 Women' s Studies .. • .. • .. .. .. ................... 215 TECHNOLOGY Aviation Management ............................ 219 Aviation Technology . .. .. .. .. .. ................. 223 Civi l Engineering Technology . . . . . ..... , ...•..... 231 Electrical Engineering Technology ......•........• 236 lndustnal Design .. . .. .. .. • .. .. .. . 264 Mechanical Engineenng Technology........... . 270 Surveymg and Mappmg . .. .. .. ......... , .. . 282 Technica l Communicalions ...•••.•.•..•.........• 286 SPECIAL PROGRAMS Honors ........................................ 49 Individualized Degree Program . . •....••.... 1 0 , 50, 53 Special Education . .. .. .. . .. . . .. .. .. .. . . .. .... 352 Teacher Education ............................... 298

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Welcome METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE of DENVER This Catalog contain comprehensive information about Metropolitan State College of Denver, the degree and programs it offers, and the requirements a st ud ent must satisfy before receiving a degree . This publication describes admissions and registration procedures, as well as services offered by the College. General information on tuition and fees, financ i a l aid packages and procedure s are a l so covered . Information in this Catalog is subject to change For general College information go to MSCD's web site (www.mscd.edu). The programs, policies, statements and procedures contained in this publication are sub ject to c hang e or cor rection by the College without prior notice. Metropolitan State College of Denver reserves the right to withdraw courses; revise the academic calendar; or change curriculum, graduation procedures, requirements and policies that apply to students at any time. Changes will become effective whenever the proper authorities so determine. This publication is not intended to be a contract between the student and Metropolitan State College of Denver. However, students are bound by the policies, procedures , standards and requirements stated herein, so long as they are in effect.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS (See alphabetica l index for specific topics) The College and Mission Statement .... ................................... 5 Academic Calendar ...................................................... 7 Degrees and Programs ................................................... 8 Basic Degree Requirements .......................................... .... 12 Admissions .................................................... ........ 16 Enrollment ........................................................... . 23 Registration ........................................................... 23 Tuition and Fees ....................................................... 26 Financial Aid .......................................................... 27 Services and Programs for Students ................. ..................... 31 Student Life ....................................................... . . . . 38 Alternative Credit Options .............................................. 41 Special Academic Programs ............................................. 49 General Studies Program ................................................ 53 Additional Graduation Requirements (Multicultural and Senior Ex perience) .. 59 Academic Policies and Procedures ........................................ 61 Student Rights and Responsibilities .. .. .................................. 69 School of Business ................. ................................ .... 77 School of Letters, Arts and Sciences ..................................... 105 School of Professional Studies .......................................... 217 Teacher Education .................................................... 298 Course Descriptions ................................................... 259 Board of Trustees -Metropolitan State College of Denver ................... 598 Officers of Administration . ............................................ 598 Faculty .............................................................. 601 Alphabetical Index .......... . ..................... . . .................. 614 Auraria Campus Map .................................... .Inside Front Cover Extended Campus Location Map ........................... Inside Back Cover Produ ced by: The Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of College Communications -2008

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.-1 GENERAL INFORMATION 5 ' ., !,.l . ." •-' ;-!:. • e .r GENERAL INFORMATION THE COLLEGE Metropolitan State College of Denver is a comprehensive , baccalaureate degree granting , urban college that offers arts and sciences, professional, and business courses and programs to a diverse student popu lation in an atmosphere of mutual respect. Excellence in teaching and learning is Metro State ' s primary objective. The mission of Metro State is to provide a high quality, accessible , enriching education that prepares students for successful careers, post-graduate education, and lifelong learning in a multicultural, global, and techno logical society To fulfill its mission , Metro State's diverse college community engages the community at large in scholarly inquiry , creative activity, and the application of knowledge. With its modified open admissions policy , the College welcomes students from all walks of life and cir cumstances, including all levels of academic preparation consistent with statutory guidelines, all conditions of economic and income status, all ages, and all ethnic and cultural backgrounds. In addition to degree seeking students, non-degree students seeking opportunities for continuing education are welcomed . • Metro State is required to serve adult students. Students who are 20 years of age or older and hold a GED or high school diploma are automatically admitted to Metro State, irrespective of their aca demic record. • Metro State is required to serve traditional-age students of all levels of achievement and potential. As a result, the College enrolls a rich mix of recent high school graduates and transfer students, many with excellent grades and test scores and others with more modest achievements. • Metro State is required to be accessible to all citizens. That is why with its tuition remaining among the lowest in the state , Metro State is Colorado ' s best value in education . The College is a teaching institution where excellence in teaching and learning is accorded the highest priority . Student success, supported in a collegial atmosphere of academic freedom, is of paramount importance, and all members of the college community seek to inspire students to strive for the highest level of achievement. The College endeavors to provide students with an education that enhances the quality of their lives , and enables them to be well-educated, critically thinking citizens who contribute and participate in meaningful ways in community and civic life. The College awards bachelor of science , bachelor of arts , bachelor of fine arts, bachelor of music and bachelor of music education degrees. Students can choose from 52 majors and 82 minors offered through three schools : Business; Letters, Arts and Sciences; and Professional Studies. Programs range from the traditional disciplines, such as history and biology, to contemporary fields of study , such as Chicano studies and health care management. The College offers several bachelor's degree programs unique in Colorado, including aviation management, health care management, land use, meteorol ogy, surveying and mapping, and integrated therapeutic practices. Students may also design their own degree through the Individualized Degree Program. Student s As an urban college committed to serving the local community, Metro State attracts students from a diverse mixture of age groups, socioeconomic classes, ethnic backgrounds and lifesty les. The College ' s curriculum and philosophy reflect that diversity and enrich the urban experience. Current enrollment is 21,453 . Students range in age from IS to 73 with a median age of23. Students of color make up 24 percent of the student populat ion. About sixty percent of students are enrolled full time. Sixty percent are 24 years old or younger. Ninety two percent of students reside in the seven county area of the Denver metropolitan area: Adams ................. 12% Denver ................. 26% Arapahoe .... . .......... 21% Douglas ................. 9% Boulder ........... . . . ... 4 % jefferson . .............. 17% Broomfield ... _ .......... 3 %

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6 GENERAL INFORMATION F aculty Metro State has n early 500 full tim e fac ulty. Prof essors are recruited and eva lu ate d for their ability to teach and engage stu d ents. All classes are taught by academic instructors. As a c ultu rally diverse team of academicians, 45 percent of full-time facu lty are women, an d 19 percent represent ethnic minorities. The College also brings real world education into the classroom by hiring adj un ct faculty w h o work in the Denver metropolitan community and use their expert i se and experience in the arts, business, com munication , law, politics, the scie nces and tec hnolog y in their tea c hing. T he C a mpuse s Metropolitan State Co lleg e of Denver is loc a t ed at the Aura ri a Higher E du ca t ion Center, a 127-acre campus in downtown Denver at Speer Boulevard and West Co lf ax Avenu e . The Commun ity College of Denve r a nd the University of Co lorad o Denver s h a r e the facili tie s with Metro S t a te. T h e campus includes more than one million sq u a r e feet of s pace for classrooms, l abora tories and offices . Some administrative offices a re located in res tor ed Vic toria n hom es in Denver's historic Ninth Street Park loc ated on the A urari a site. T h e cam pus a l so features a c hild care center; a comprehens ive, 184,000 square-foot library d esigne d b y Helmut J ahn of CF Murp hy, which won an award from the American Inst it ute of Archi t ects; a nd one of the most unusual t ud ent union facilities in the co untr y in the hi storic Bava rian -sty le T ivoli Brewer y Building. Excellent physical fit n ess facilities include a block-long physical educa tion /events cen ter with a swimmi ng pool, weight room , game courts, d a nce studios, a climbing wall, a nd event seating for 3 , 000. The A ur aria Higher Educatio n Cente r's proximity to downtown Denver enab l es students and faculty to use th e community as a learning laboratory and to connect classroom theory to the cultural, economic, socia l , and political practices of the city. The Co lle ge also h as two sate llite campus s ite s operated by th e Extended Campus Program. Metro Sout h , l ocated at 5660 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard in A r apahoe County, ser ves the south, southeast, and south west metropoli t an a r eas . Met r o North, located at 11990 Grant Street in Adams County, serves the north , northeast, an d n o rth west areas. Each site is located 1 4 mile s from th e Auraria campus along the I-25 corridor . A variety of courses are offered during the eve nings and on Saturdays on the Auraria cam pus and at Metro South and Metro North. At least 16 degr ee programs can be comp l e t e d by taking a com binati on of courses schedu l ed during the evenings, weekend and on line. Metro State offers classes in traditional formats as well as telecourses, online co ur ses and correspo nd ence courses. General informa tion about these prog rams can b e ob t ained from the Office of Admissio n s or the Acad e mi c Advising Ce nter. Distance Education Options Metro State offe r s several options for distance ed u cation: o nline co ur ses, hybrid courses (online/class room combination), t e lecour ses and corres pond ence courses. Online e du cation (online and h ybrid) is the fastest -g rowing di stance educa tion option at Metro State wit h a l mo st 5,000 s tudent s reg istering for one or more on lin e courses during th e Fall 2007 semester. Metro State's o nline courses tend to be s mal l and hi ghly interactive for both ins tru ctors an d stu dents. A stude nt can complete General Studies Requirements online. For in formation a bout comp l eting a major, minor, or certificate o nline, please contact th e appropriate aca d emic departme nt. Please check with aca demic advisors and v i sit the Metro State Web site for more specific information about the online learn ing envi r onment, recommended computer equipment, and oth er online se rvices that are offered by the College (www.mscd.edu) . 2 + 2 Coordinated Degree Program The Metropolitan State College of Denver and F r ont Range Community College have created a program that will allow studen t s to complete a bachelor's degree at the Front Range Community College Cam pus. The 2+2 Coo rdin a ted Degree Pro gra m combine s the con venience of th e community college wit h the resour ces of a l arge urban four -y ear college and i s l oca t e d on the FRCC Westminster Cam pus.

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GENERAL INFORMATION 7 The 2+2 Coo rdin a ted Degree Pro gram consis t s of: • Two years a t Front Range Community College {60 h ours) • Two years enrolled as a Metro S tate s tudent , tak ing Metro State classes Currently the 2+2 Coo rdinated De g ree Program offers two major programs: • Major in Management • Major in Marketing Other programs are under development. For more information, visit the Metro S t a t e Academic Adv ising p age a t www . mscd.edu/-advising/infomaj.htm. Alte rn atively, go t o the Front Range Advising Ce n ter a nd make an a ppointm e nt with Mr. Dave C i s nero s to fill o ut a Pr i ority A dmission s Application. The application fee i s $25. Students s hould app l y for financial aid awar d s throu g h Metropo litan State College of Denver for courses t aken under the 2+2 Coordin ated Degree Program . A student mus t be adm itt ed t o the 2+2 Program and regi s tered for Metro Sta te courses offered on th e FRCC campus to be eligible for financia l aid at Metro Sta te. 2008-2009 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2008 Fall Semes t er Regis tration .................... ................................. April August 18 Orientation * .... . ............................................... . April August 18 C l asses s t ar t .................................................. Monday , August 11 Cam pus Closed-Democ r a tic National Co n vention .. Saturday, August 23-F riday, August 29 Application for Gradua tion Deadline ..... . . ...... ................... F riday, August 22 Labor Da y (camp us closed) .......................... .......... . Monday , September 1 Monday-Wednesday b efo r e T hanksgivin g (campus o pen , no classes ) ...... Novemb er 24-26 Tha nksgi ving D ay (cam pu s closed) . ........................... Thursday, November 27 Friday after Thanksgiving (camp u s ope n , n o classes) ................ Friday, November 28 Classes end ......................... ...... ................. Satur day, December 6 Final exams begin ............................................. Monday, December 8 Final exams e nd .............................................. Satu rday, D ecember 13 Commencement .............................................. S unday, December 14 2 0 09 Spri n g Semester Registration .... ...... ...... . . ...................... ........ Nove mb erj a nu ary 16 Orientation * . . .............................................. ovember-january 16 Martin Luther King , jr . Day (cam pu s ope n , no cla sses) ............... Monday , j anuary 19 Classes start .. ............. .... ............................... Tuesday, january 20 Application for Graduation Deadline .............................. . Friday, january 30 Spring Break ....................................... Monday-Sunday, March 1 6-22 Classes end . .................................................... Sat urday, May 9 Final exams begin ........................... ....................... Monday, May I I Final exams end ...... . . ...... ................. ...... .... . ..... . ... Saturday, May 16 Com m e n cement (te ntative**) ........................................ S unday, May 17 2009 Summer Semester Registration ....................................................... April-May 24 Orientation * ....................................................... April-May 24 Memorial Day (camp u s closed) .... ...... . . ......................... Monday, May 25 C l asses s t art ....... . ................................... .......... T uesday, May 26 Applica ti o n for Graduatio n D ead lin e ................................... Friday , june 5 Independence Day (ca mpu s close d ) ............. . ..... .................. Friday, july 3 C l asses end ............. . ........... ......... .. ............... Saturday, August I

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8 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 2009 Fall emester Regi s tration .......... . . .... .............. . ...................... April-A ugust 14 O r ientation • ......... ....................... ........ ............. April-August 14 C l asses s tart ............. ................... .................. Monday, August 1 7 Application for Graduation Deadline . ................ ............... Friday, Aug u s t 28 Labor Day (campus clo se d ) ....... . ............................. Monday, September 7 Mo n day-Wednesday before Thanksg i ving (campus ope n , no classes ) ... Novembe r 23-25 T h anksgiving Day (camp u s closed ) ............................ Thur s day, November 26 Frida y after Thanksgiving (campus o pen, no classes) . ............... Friday, November 27 C l asse s end ........................ . . ...................... Saturday, D ecember 5 Final exams start . ......................... ......... .......... . Monday, December 7 Final exams end .............................................. Satu r day, D ece mb e r 12 Commencement ( tentative••) ................................... Sunday, December 13 •For information , call303-556-6931. .. Call 303 -5 56-6226 to confir m time and location for commencem e nt. DEGREES AND PROGRAMS Metro p olitan State College of Denver is organ i zed into three schools. The schools are listed b e l ow with the m a jors and m inors offered by each. T h e c urriculum req uirements for each of the programs are d esc ribed in th e Catalog in the special sec tions prepared by each school. Major Minor Degree School of Business Acco unting .......................................... X ........ x ........ B.S. Co mputer Inform a tion Systems ........... .............. X ........ x.. ....... B.S. Econo mic s ..................................... ...... X ........ x ........ B.A. Finance ... ........................................... X ........ x ........ B.S. Financial Servi ces ..... .......................................... x Gene ral Business ...... . ................... ...................... x International Busine ss ........................................... x Management ................... ...................... X ........ x ........ B .S. Marketing ........ .............. ... ...... ............ X ........ x ........ B.S. School of Letters, Arts and Sciences Af rican and African-American Studies ....... . . ......... X ........ x ........ B.A. Anthropology . ....... ................................ X ........ x ........ B.A. Art ...................................... . . .......... X ... ........ B . F.A./B .A. Art History, Theo r y and C riticism ................................ x Behavioral Science .............................. .. .... X ................. B .A. Biology .............................................. X ........ x .... B . A./B.S. C hemistry ........................................... X ........ x .... B . A./B.S . Chicano Studies ................. ..................... X ........ x ....... . B . A . C inema Studies .. ............................................... x Co mputer Science .................................... X ........ x ........ B.S. Criminalistics ............. . . .................................. . x Digital Media ........ . . . . ........ ............................... x E ng l i s h ............. ........................ ......... X ........ x ... .... . B . A . Enviro nmental Science ................................ X ....... .......... B.S. Envi ronmental Studies ......... .................................. x Family Support in Social Work .......... .............. ........... x Fre nch ...................... ........... ........ ................ x Geography ... .................................................. x Geographic Inform ation Systems ... . ......... ..................... x Geology .................... ....................... •........... x German ................... ................... . ................ x Geronto l ogy .................................................... x History .............................................. X ........ x ........ B.A.

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.. , DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 9 Major M inor Degree Human Development .................................. X ................. B.A. Interdisciplinary Legal Studies .................................... x Journalism ........................................... X ........ x ........ B.A. Language and Lingui tics ........ ............ .................... x Land Use ...................... ............ ...... .... X ............. B . A./B.S. Mathematics ......................................... X . ....... x .... B.A./B .S. Meteorology ......................................... X ........ x ..... . . . B.S. Modern Languages Option I (French , German, Spanish) ... X ................. B.A. Modern Languages Option II . .......................... X ................. B.A. Music ............................................... X ........ x ... B.A./B.M . M u sic Education .................................. .... X .............. B.M.E . Native American Studies ......................................... x Parent Education ............................................... x Philo sop h y .... ....... . ............................... X ..... . . . x ........ B.A. Photojournalism ........................................ ........ x Physics ......................... ..................... X . ....... x .... B.A./B.S. Political Science ...................................... X ........ x. ...... . B.A. Psychology ........................................... X ........ x ....... . B.A. Public Administration ........................................... x Public Rel ations ...... ..................................... ..... x Religious Studies .......................................... . ..... x Social Work ......................................... . X ................ . B .S. Sociology .................................. .......... X .. ...... x ........ B.A. Spanish ........................................................ x Speech Communication ............................... X ....... . x ..... ... B.A. Speech, Language, He aring Sciences ... ............................ x Studio Art ................................... .................. x Training and Organizational Development ......................... x Theatre . ............................................. X ........ x .. B.A./B.F.A. Women's Studies (Institute for Women's Studies and Service ) ................................................. x School of Professional Studies Airframe a nd Powerplant Mecha nic s .............................. x Aviation Management ................................. X ........ x ........ B.S. Aviation Techno l ogy . . ....... ......................... X ........ x ........ B.S. Bilingual/Bicultural Education . ......... ................. . . ..... .. x Civil Engineering Technology .......... . . . ............. X ............ ..... B.S. Criminal Justice and Crimino logy ....................... X ........ x ........ B.S. Digital Media ................................................... x Early Childhood Education ...................................... x Eating Disorders ................................................ x E l ectrical Enginee rin g Technology ...................... X ........ x ........ B.S. Elementary Education ...... ................... . ................. x Gerontol ogy .................. ............................ ...... x Health and Safety ............................................... x Health Care Ma n agement ........ . ..................... X . ....... x ........ B.S. Hospitality , Tour i sm, and Even t s ........................ X ................. B.A. Hotel ................... ..................... ..... . ............ x Human Nutrition Dietetics ........................... X ................. B .S. Human Performance and Sport ......................... X ........ x ........ B.A. Human Services ...................................... X ........ x . . ...... B.S. Industrial Design ...... ................. .............. X .... . ...... ...... B.S. Integrated Therapeutic Prac tices ........................ X ........ x ........ B.S. Linguistically Diverse Educatio n .................................. x Mechanical Engineering Techno logy .................... X ........ x ........ B.S. Network Communications ........... . ........................... x Nursing ( upper-division for RNs) ....................... X ................. B.S. Nutrition ............................................ X ........ x . .... ... B . S . Parent Educatio n ............................................... x

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10 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS Major Minor Degree PreHealth care ................................................. x Private Pilot .................... . . .............................. x Recreation Profe ss ion s ................................. X ................. B.S. Recreation Services * ............................................. x Restaurant ..................................................... x Secondary Education ................................. ........... x Special Education ..................................... X ........ x. .... ... B.A. Special Eve nts ......................................... ......... x Surveying and Mapping ..... ........................... X ........ x ........ B.S. Technical Communica tion . .................. . ......... X ........ x ........ B.S. Training and Organizational Development . . ........ ... ............ x Touri m .................................................. .... . x Other Individualized Degree Program ' ........................ X ........ x .... B.A./B.S. Teache r Licensing: Early C hildh ood, E le mentary, S p ecia l Education, K-12, a nd Secondary ......................... .. Licensure only • Concentration may replace the minor. 'see pages 53 of this Catalog Indi v iduali z ed Degree Program The Indiv idu alized Degree Program (IDP) offe r s students th e opportunity to d esign specific, interdis ciplinary d egree programs to meet ed uc atio nal goals not met b y other majors or mino rs at the College. Some exa mpl es of areas of study include : International S tudies , Child & Family Advocacy, Web De ve l opment, Emergency Se r v ice s Management, Creative Arts for the Elderly, Cultural R esource Management, Nonprofit Administration in Urban Communities, Env ironmental Studies and Publi c Adminis tration , and Computer Sec u rity . More i nformati o n about the progra m i s availa b l e on page 53 of thi s cata log , from the Center for Indi vid ualized Learning (St. Fra n cis Center , 2nd floor, room 10, 3 0 3-556-8342) and at www.msc d.eduf cilf. Accreditations I Appro v als Me tropolitan State College of Denver is accre dit e d by The Higher Learning Commissio n an d is a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (30 North LaSalle St., S ui te 2400, C hi cago, IL 60602 -2504, 1 -8 00 -62 1 -7 440). Indi v idu a l academic programs within the following areas are accred ited or approved by th e following agencies : P rogram Accr editat i o n/ Approval Agency Accounting•• Co l o r ado State Board of Accountancy A dult Fitness /Exe rcise Science*** A m e rican College of Sports Medici ne Athletic Training Educatio n Pr ogram• Co mmission on Accreditation of Allied H ealth Edu catio n Prog ram s (CAAHEP) 35 East Whacke r Dr., Suite 197 0 C h icago, IL 60601 {312) 5539355 www.caahep.org Aviation & Aer ospace Science .. Fed e r a l Aviation Adm i n s tr ation (FAA) Ce nt e r for Addiction Studies• International Coali tion for Addiction St udies Edu cation (INCASE) C h emis try** American C h emica l Socie t y Civil E n gineering Techno logy* Accredited b y the Techno l ogy Co mmission of ABET Elec tri al Engineering Techn o l ofo': 111 Market Place , S uite 1 050, Balti m ore, MD 21202-40 1 2 Mech a nical Engineeri n g Techno ogy* Telep h o ne: 410-34 7-7700 Co mput e r Science • Accr edi t e d by the Co mputin g Commission of ABET Ill Market P l ace, S uite 1050, Baltimore, MD 2 1 202-4012 Phone:410-347-7700) D rug, Alcohol, Addictive Behavior Co l orado Departme nt of Health Center for Addictio n Studies Co unsel or• •

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DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 11 Sur veyi n g and Mapping * Accred it ed by th e Applied Scie nc e Commi sio n of ABET Ill Market Place , Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 Phone: 410-347-7700 Cr iminali s tic s Program in C h e mi s try** Fore n sic Science E ducation Pr og ram Accreditation Co mmi ss ion Health Ca re Management** Associat i on of University Program s in Health Adminis tr ation 730 11th S treet, NW 4 th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 4510 Phone: 202-638-1448 Fax: 202-638-3429 www.aupha.org e mail : aupha@aupha.org Recreati o n Professions• National Recreation and Park Association Human Services .. Co uncil for Standards in Human Services E ducation Art* National Assoc i ation of Schools of Ar t a nd Design Industrial Design • 11250 Rog e r Bacon Drive , Suite 21, Res to n , VA P h o n e:703-437-0700 Fax: 703-437 6312 Mus ic* Nat ional Associ ation of Sch oo l s of Music N ursing* Natio nal League f o r N ur sing Accrediting Co mmissi on (NLNAC) 61 Broadway, 33rd Floor, New York , NY 1000 6 Phone:212-363-5555 , Ext. 153 Social Work* Co uncil o n Social Work Educati o n Teacher E ducation • a tional Co uncil for Accreditation of Teac h er Education; Col orado Department of Ed u cation *Accreditation I *"Approval I ***Endorsed Certificates of Completion Certificate programs provide opportunities to s u ccessfully compl ete a se r ies of five to e i g ht academic cre dit courses that focu s on a particular area o f career intere t. Each certificate program is designed to stand alone or merge with your degree program major or minor. The certificate title and date of award will appear on your transcript. T h e certificate program is coor din ated by the Office of Academic Affairs, 303-556-2442. Students must compl ete each course in the certificat e program with a grade of"C" or better. The courses cannot be taken pass /fail. School of Business Database Analyst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . • . . . ............................ 90 E nd User S upp or t pecialist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................ 91 International B u s in ess ................. ....... . ........ ............................... . Netwo rk peciali s t in Information System s ...... . ................ ................ ...... 90 onc r e dit Fi n ancial Planning ........................................................ 95 Persona l Financial Planning .................... .........................•....•....... 95 Pr og ramm e r /A nalyst in Info r mation Syste m s ............................... ............ 90 Web D eve l o p er in Informat i on Syst e m s .............. .....• . . ...... ................ . . . 91 School of Letters, Arts and Sciences Adva n ced Sof tware Enginee rin g Techniques.... . . . ...... . . . . ....................... 131 Basic Co mpet ency in F rench ..................•................................... . . 175 Basic Compe t e n cy in Ge rman ......................................•.........•...... 175 B asic Compe t e n cy in Spanish ............ ..... ...... . ............................... 175 Ca reer and Personal Development . . . . . . . . . . . . .................. . ..... . .......... 216 Family Support in Social Work (seve n conce ntr ations available) ............. ............. 199 Geog raphi c Informati on Systems (GIS) ........ . . ............. . .....•................. 162 Geotec hn o l ogy Systems (GTS) ...................................... _ .........•...... 163

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12 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS German T ran s l atio n ............................................... . . . . .... . . ....... 174 Gerontol ogy ( Liberal Arts Ori e nt atio n ) ..................................... . . . ....... 204 Public A dmini tr a tion ............. ................................................. 1 9 1 Spanish Tra n s l atio n .................................................. .............. 176 Spee ch-Language Pathology Assistant ............................................. . . . 210 Speech , H earing, Language Sciences (Leve ling Certificate) .............................. 211 School of Professional Studies Airp o rt Management ............................................................... 227 Corp ora t e Video Produ ction ........................................................ 294 E l ectrical Enginee rin g Technology ... ................... ........... .................. 237 Engineering Fundam e ntal s ....... , .................... .............................. 238 Gerontology (Profe ssiona l Services Orientation) ......... ................ .............. 240 High Ris k Youth Studies . . ............... . . ......................................... 262 M u ltimedia Pr o du c tion ............................ ................................. 293 Network Comm unic atio n s ................ .........•................................ 236 Nonpr ofit Organization Admjnistration ..... . .................... . . . .................. 263 Space Comme rcialization . .......... ............................................. . . . 229 Surveying Certificates: Cadastral S ur veying ........................... . ............ . . . .......... .. .. 286 Engineering /Co n str u ctio n Surveying . ............. .... ........ ........ .... .... 285 Land urveyin g . ............... ..... ........................................ 285 Surveying Management ........................... . .... . . ................... . 286 Precise urveyin g . ..................................•....................... 284 Technical Writing and Editing ....... ................... ............................. 294 BASIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Student s are r es p o nsible for f ull knowledge of the prov i sio n s and regulatio ns pertaining to their pro gram contained in this Catalog a nd elsew h e re. Students have final responsibility for completing the requirements for a degree and are urged to seek advis ing. Students shoul d n eve r assume that they h ave ap proval to deviate from a sta t ed r equirement without a properly s i g n ed sta t ement to th a t effect. P l ease refer to th e Academic Policie s a nd Procedures sect ion in this Catalog. REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL BACHELOR'S DEGREES To earn a bachelor of science, a bachelor o f arts, bachelor of music education, or a bachelor of fine arts degree, a student mus t satisfy the following minim um requirements , plus a n y oth ers st ipul ated for the degree for which a student is a candidate. Please refer t o the Academic Policies and Procedures section in this Catalog. • Complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative GPA of2.0 or higher for al l course wo rk. • Complete at l eas t 40 semester hours in upp e r -divisio n c ourses (30 00 an d 4000-level courses). • Complete all General St udi es requhements listed for the degr ee and major. • Compl ete a threehour Multi c ultural co urse requirement. • Compl ete a three hour Senior Exper i e nc e co u rse r equirement. T hi s course must be taken at Metro State . • Complete one subject m ajo r co n sisting of not less than 3 0 semester hours. With certai n exce p tions (s ee th e Degrees and Program s sectio n on page 8 of this Catalog), compl e te a minor co n sis tin g of at least 18 semes ter hours. I f a student co mpl etes two major s, the seco nd m ajor satisfies the mino r requirement. Compl eting two conc e ntrations under o ne major does not constitute the co mpletion of two major . Compl etion of two majors does n o t resu l t in two degrees or dipl omas. Coursewo rk used to meet requirements for one major or minor may not be used to meet requirements for another major or minor. St ud ents may not m ajor and minor in the same dis cip l ine and a r e e n cou r aged to obtain verifi cation from an adv isor if uncertainty exists . • Complete all specia l requirem ents of a department and sc h ool.

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DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 13 • Achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in all Metro State courses that satisfy the requirement for th e major, and for all Metro State courses that sat i sfy require m ents for a minor. Students sho u l d check with an advisor for special GPA program requirements. • File an Application for Graduation with the Office of the Registrar by the following deadlines: Fall 2008-August 22, 2008; Spring 2009-Janu ary 30, 2009; Summer 2009-June 5, 2009. • Academic residen cy (classroom credit) requirements: Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of academic credit at Metro State, including the last 12 semes t er hours applicable to the degree. Co mp lete at least 8 upper-division (3000and 4000l evel courses) semes t er hours of th e major and 3 upper-division semester hours of the minor a t Metro State (classroom credit). St ud ents should be aware that University of Colorado Denver pooled courses will not satisfy academic residence requirements at Metro State. Physics (PHY) courses are excluded f rom this restriction . To use an Metro State-UCD pooled course for the last 12 hours residenc y requirement a student must (1) complete a minimum of 30 hours credit at Metro State prior to graduation and (2) obtain permission from the major or minor department prior to taking a pooled course for use to meet a requirement in the major or minor program. Credit Limitat i on s • No more than 30 semes t er hours of omnibu s-numbered courses may be applied toward grad uation requirements , except for music. o more than 30 semester hours taken b y correspondence may be applied toward a bachelor's degree. • No more than 4 semes ter h ours in human performance and leisure activity (HP L ) or varsity sports (ATH) courses will be co unt ed toward a bachelor's degree for students who are not majoring in Human P erformance a nd Sport. • No more than 7 semes ter hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a bachelo r's degree for students who are not majoring in music. Student Bill of R i ght s T h e General Assembly implemented the Student Bill of Rights (C.R.S. 23-1 125) to assure that students enrolled in publi c institutions of hi g h er educat i on have the following rights: 1. Stude nt s s h ould be abl e to complete their baccalaur eate programs in no more than one hundred twenty credit hours unless there are additional degree requirements recognized by the commission; 2 . A student can sign a four-year graduation agreement tha t formalizes a plan for that studen t to obtain a degree in four years, unless there are additional degree requirements recognized by the commission. Students interested in signing a four-year ag reement must be admitted to Metro State by july 1 , must work with the Advising Center during july , and register for IS credits a pproved by the Advising Center by july 30. Students shou l d go to the Advising Center for details. 3. Students have a right to clear and concise information concerning which co ur ses must be com pleted s ucc ess fully to comp l ete their degrees; 4. Students have a right to know which co u rses are transferable among the s tate' s public two-year and four-year institutions of higher education; 5 . Students, upon successful completion of core general ed ucation courses, sho uld have those courses satisfy the core course requirement s of all Co l orado public institutions of higher education; 6. Studen t s have a right t o know if courses from one or more public higher educat i on institut i ons satisfy the s tud ents' degree r equirements; 7. A student's credit for th e completion of th e core requirements and core co u rses shall not expire for ten years from the date of initial enrollment and shall be transferable. R E QUIR EMENTS F OR A SEC OND DEGREE For an additiona l bachelor's degree , s tudents must comply with the following: • The fir st bachelor's degree mu st be recog ni zed by Metropolitan State College of Denver. • General Studies will be considered complete unless deficiencies exist accordi ng to the major department.

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14 DEGREES AND PROGRAMS • Students must complete all requirements for a new major with a minimum of eight Metro State academic upper division semester hours in the major department . • Students do not need to complete a minor unless specifically required by the major department for the contemplated degree. • Students must satisfy the Multicultural and Senior Experience course requirements for the second degree. • Students must spend at least two additional semesters in resid ence. • S tu dents must comp l ete a minimum of30 semester hours of Metro State classroom credit after th e awarding of t h e prev i ous degree. • Credit limitations for a bachelor's degree also apply to the second degree. (See Co llege Opportu nity Fund under Tuition & Fees for s pecific limitations.) • An Application for Graduation must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar b y the deadline stipulated on Metro State's Web s it e under Academic Calendar (www.mscd.edu/ academic/acal.htm). GRADUATION CHECKLIST • Review the Requirement s for All Bachelor Degrees . • Review the Academic Policies and Procedures (pe rtaining to CAPP, Graduation, Diplomas and Commencement, and Honors and Awards). • Obtain a CAPP Compliance Report from their major department. • If necessary , correct any discrepancies on CAPP report. • File an Application for Graduation by the deadline for the term of graduation (www. mscd.edu/ academic/acal.htm). • Ensure correct address is on file with the Office of the Registrar . THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM Philosoph y of the General Studies Prog r am Metropolitan State College of Denver seeks to prepare its graduates for a lifetime oflearning, which, in our changing and complex society, requires focused expert ise (such as that provided by a major area of study) and the ability to communicate with and learn from experts in other fields. Undergraduate educa tion fosters the cri t ical t hinking n ecessary for th e exp l orat i o n of u nfamiliar d i sc i plines and for the syn thesis of l earning and exposes students to the richness and variety of the intellectual universe. General Studies Information Students must use a single catalog to meet all degree requirements, including those in the General Stud ies, major and minor. As a consequence, many General Studies requirements and policies described in this Catalog may be followed by students using ear l ier catalogs. State Guaranteed General E ducation Courses Certain General Studies cour ses are approved as state guaranteed general education courses. This des ignatio n means that the course is transferable to gene ral education or to electives at all Colorado public institu ti o ns. There are restrictions on the num b e r of courses th at can be taken, and some majors require specific general education courses. For details, go to page 54 of this Catalog, consult an advisor in your major or go to highered . colorado.gov / Academics/Transfers. General Studies Goals The General Studies Program is designed to help graduates achieve the follow i ng competencies. Stu dents a t Metropolitan S t ate College of Denve r shoul d be ab l e to: • wr ite and speak with clarity; • read and listen critically; • draw conclusions from quantit ative data; • recognize faulty reason i ng ; • organize ideas; and • communicate and l earn from experts in other disciplines.

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GENERAL STUDIES 1 Metro State students sho uld : • have an open atti t ude towar d different approac hes t o problems; • ha ve an informed awareness of the principal human achievemen t s in history , arts and letters , soci ety, and scienc e ; • and be introduced to the basic methods , know l edge, problems or attitudes characteristic of a field. Structure of the General Studies Program The General Studies Program is structured to foster the development of skills an d to encourage students t o use th eir mastery of skills to explore knowledge i n a variety of disc i plines. The General Studies Pro g r am provides two levels of experience: Lev el I -Skill s Level I courses provide students with the basic skills of reading and listening c ritically, recognizing faulty reasoning , drawing conclusions from quantitative data , organizing ideas, and writing and speaking with clarity . Leve l II-Bre adth o f Kno w l e d ge Level II co urses introduce students to the basic methods , knowledge, problem s or attitudes characteristic of a field: encourage in stude nts an open attitu d e toward different approaches to problems , enable stu dents to communicate with experts in other disciplines and learn from them and cultivate in stu dent s an informed awareness of the principal achievements in hi s tory, arts and letters, social science and science. In ad dition, in Level II courses students will contin u e to develop their skills in language and mathematics . Distribution and Credit Requirements of the General Studies Program To complete their General Studies Progr a m , students must take approved courses that fulfill the follow ing distribution and credit requirements: CATEGORY L e ve l l * Composition Mathema tics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEMESTER HOURS ...................... . ............................................... 6 ................... . ...................... ............................ 3 Comm unicati o n s .......................... .......................................... 3 L e ve l II** Historical . ..................... .... ............................................ 3 Arts and Letter s ....................................... . ............ . . ............... 6 Social Sciences ...................................................................... 6 Natural Science ...... ............................. ...... ........... .................. 6 Total*** ......................... .......... . ............. .. . ................. ...... 33 *A transfer course or courses judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Levell course will satisfy an indi vidual Levell course requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the depart ment offering the Level I course. **One-hour deviations in the L evel II categories may be allowed. ***Except for Mathematics majors and minors, a student's completed General Studies Program must contain at least 33 semester hours. Basic Rules of the General Studies Program • Only approved courses may be used to satisfy th e General Studies requirements. A listing of these courses can be found in the Catalog Addendum : General College R equire ments which contain all approved General Studies, Multicultural and Senior Experience courses. The document is available online and from academ i c departments , the Academic Advis i ng Center and Academic Affairs (CN 318). Th i s document also i ndicates whic h of the courses are approved as s tate guaranteed general education courses.

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16 ADMISSIONS • General Studies courses need not be counted toward General Studies requirements. They may be taken as electives or to satisfy requirements in the major or degree program. • Departments or programs may specify , by prefix and number, some General Studies courses in addition to courses required for the major or a professional credential. Check with your depart mental advisor . ADMISSIONS Admission Requirements The College uses two categories for classifying applicants: those who are 19 years old or younger and those w h o are 20 or older . Based on the College ' s modified open admission system , each category has its own admission requirements and procedures . Metro State students who have not attended the College for three consecutive semesters need to submit an app l ication for readmission . For more information , see Admission of Previously Enrolled Students on page 19 of this Catalog. Application Deadline To find out the application deadline for your intended term of enrollment, p l ease visit www.m scd.edu/ adm issi ons.htm. For th e best poss i ble selection of courses, s t udents are advised to app l y ear ly. Refer to page 7 of this Catalog for important dates. APPLICANTS 19 YEARS O L D OR Y OUNGER Applicants who are 19 years old or younger on September 15 for either summer semester or fall semes ter, or on February 15 for spring semester , will be classified as traditional applicants . They will be con sidered for admission using the requirements described below. Note: to be eligible for admission, stu dents m u st be at least 16 years old on the first day of the semester and must have either graduated from high chool or received a General Education Development ( GED) certificate . Freshmen (first time college s tudents) • Applicants with Co l orado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE) index scores of76 or greater will be considered for admission . In addi t ion, the grad u a ti ng class of 2008 will also need to fulfill the Higher Education Admission Requirements. For a list of these requirements (www.state . co.us/ cche/academic / admissions.html) and a CCHE index chart, see page 17 of this catalog. Those with index scores below 85 are strongly encouraged to submit letters of recommendation and a personal statement , and must complete their application fLies by the posted Admissions Review deadline. Otherwise, they will be considered for th e following term. • Metro State g u a rant ees a dmi ssion to applicant s with a CCHE index score of 85 or greater, an ACT English subscore of 18 or above and a reading subscore of 17 or above (or an AT critical reading of 440 or above), and who have fulfilled the Higher Education Admission Requirements, and who app l y by the published application deadline . • Applicants must request that the following credentials be mailed directly to the Office of Admis s i o n s from the h i gh school or testi n g agency before an adm i ssion decision can be made: • ACT or SAT test results • Official high scl10ol transcript with GPA and class rank • This information may be submitted at the end of the sixth, seventh, or eighth semester of high school. An official, final transcript with date of graduation is required no later than the fourth week of the term of enrollment. Students should request the transcript and verify that the high school record with date of graduation has been received by the Office of Admissions. Degree seeking students will not be permitted to register for a second semester until after this official cre dent ial is received.

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SAT 4()()-490 ACT 1 1 or ""H"'s"'R a n""k'!"H _ S ,_ G ,., P A " B e l ow 0..1 0 . 0 1.3 2-3 1.4-1.5 4 1.6 5 6 1.7 7 8 1.8 )II 9-10 1.9 S6 1112 2.0 t..R 13 -15 2 . 1 16-18 2 .2 61 19-22 2.3 tl) 2326 2.-4 65 27-30 2.5 67 3134 2.6 1>9 35 38 2.7 39-43 2 . 8 44-48 2 .9 49-53 3.0 3 . 1 59-62 3.2 63-67 3 . 3 68-72 3.4 73 -76 3 . 5 85 77-81 3.6 87 82 85 3 . 7 88 86-89 3 . 8 90 90-92 3.9 92 93-100 4.0 94 soo540 12 67 69 i1 87 89 90 92 94 96 How to read this chart 550-600 13 87 89 91 92 94 96 98 610-680 1 4 87 89 91 93 94 96 98 100 690740 1 5 ,, 57 87 89 91 93 95 96 98 100 102 750-790 16 " 59 61 62 64 66 66 86 88 89 91 93 9S 97 98 100 102 104 Find your h1gh school class percen11le rank and grade po1nt average on the leh. Choose the number closest to the bottom of the chart. L1ne up that number With your SAT or ACT score along the top and locate the corresponding number on the chart. Th1s is your index score. soo-830 1 7 S1 61 ... iO 88 90 91 93 95 97 99 100 102 104 106 840-87 0 1 8 59 86 88 90 92 93 95 97 99 101 102 104 106 108 D 880-92 0 1 9 61 6S 67 ( 6'l 87 89 90 92 94 96 98 99 101 103 lOS 107 108 110 112 114 1010-1050. 10801120-1160-12001040 1 07 0 111 0 1150 1190 1230 22 23 86 24 87 88 2S 89 90 26 27 8S 8S 87 87 89 89 91 91 92 93 94 88 90 92 94 96 88 90 92 94 96 98 90 92 94 96 98 100 91 94 96 98 100 102 m 9S w 99 95 97 99 101 103 lOS 92 99 lOS 99 101 103 105 107 109 101 103 lOS 107 109 Ill 102 104 106 108 110 112 104 106 108 110 112 114 106 108 110 112 114 116 108 110 Ill 114 116 118 110 112 114 116 118 120 111 113 \IS Jl7 119 Ill 113 115 117 119 121 123 115 117 119 121 123 125 117 119 121 123 125 127 If your score is less than 85 but is 76 or greater, admission will be cons1dered on a case-by case basis. 1240-1270 2 8 1 86 87 89 91 93 9S 96 98 100 102 104 lOS 107 109 111 113 114 116 118 120 122 123 125 127 129 1280-1300 29 86 88 89 91 93 9S 97 98 100 102 104 106 107 109 111 113 11S 116 118 120 122 124 12S 127 129 131 D 131013501340 1390 3 0 31 86 88 90 90 92 91 93 93 95 95 97 97 99 99 101 100 102 102 104 104 106 106 108 108 110 109 ill l\1 113 113 115 115 117 117 119 118 120 120 Ill 122 124 124 126 126 128 127 129 129 131 131 133 133 135 1400-1430 32 88 92 94 9S 97 99 101 103 104 106 108 110 112 113 11S 117 119 1)1 122 124 126 128 130 131 133 13S 137 1440-1 480 33 90 94 96 97 99 101 103 lOS 106 108 110 II/ 114 liS 117 119 121 123 174 126 128 130 132 133 13S 137 139 1490-1540 3 4 93 97 99 100 102 104 106 108 109 Ill Ill liS 117 118 120 122 124 126 m 129 131 133 llS 136 138 140 142 155().. 1600 1590 35 36 95 97 99 101 101 103 102 1()4 104 106 106 108 108 110 110 112 Ill 113 113 115 115 117 117 119 119 121 120 122 1.12 124 124 \}6 1.26 128 128 130 129 131 131 133 133 135 135 137 137 139 138 140 140 142 142 \44 144 146 If your index score i s 85 or grealer, and you have an ACT English subscore of 18 or above and a read1ng subscore of 17 or above (or an SAT verbal score of 440 or above), you are guaranteed admission .

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18 ADMISSIONS • Applicants who have not graduated f r o m high school but have passe d and receive d the Col o r a d o General Educatio n al Deve lopment (GED) certificate o r i ts eq u ivalent will b e accep t e d , as l o ng as they also meet the Higher Education A d missions Requi r ements. ACT o r SAT test resul t s are no t req u ired with a GED. Official GED cer t ificates must be m a il ed directly to the Office of Admissio n s by the issuing agency before an applicant can be accepted. College Transfers • Applicants with 30 or more transferab l e semester hours completed w i t h at l east a 2 . 3 c u m u l ati ve GPA will be offered admission. Students with fewer than 30 hours will b e considered on an i n d i vidual basis , based on high school GPA, ACT or SAT sco r es and college wo r k comple t ed. • Applicants who have less than a cumulative 2.3 GPA from all colleges a n d universiti es a ttended will be considered on an individual basis that includes a careful review of all credentials. Le tt ers of recommendation and a personal statement are stron g l y recommen ded. Such ap plicant s m ust co m plete t heir ap pli cation ftles by t h e p osted Admiss i o n s Review deadline. Other w i se, they w ill be considered for the following term. • Applicants must request that the following credentials be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions from the high school, testing agency and/or college or university: • ACT or SAT test results • Official high school transcript with GPA and class r a n k • Officia l transcript from each college or university atte n ded or currentl y atte n ding • All required credentials must be received before a final admission decisio n can be made. APPLICA N TS 20 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER Appl i ca nt s who are 20 o r o lder on Septembe r 1 5 for either summer semester o r f all semeste r , or on Fe b ruary 15 for spring semester, will be considered for admission u sing the req u ire m ents describe d b e low. F reshmen (first-time college students) • Applicants will be admitted to Metro State upon indicati n g on the Application for A d m i ssio n that they have graduated from high school or that they have p assed and rece i ved a Colorad o General Educationa l Deve lopmen t (GE D ) ce r tificate or the equiva l ent. GEDs i ss ued throu g h t h e military will be considered on an individual basis. • By signing the Application for Admission, degree-seeking applicants a r e certifying that t h ey will request either a high school transc r ipt with date of graduation or GE D t est sco r es be m ailed directly to the Office of Admissions. Degree -see king stud ents will not be p ermitted to r eg i ste r for a second semester until this official credential is received. • The ACT or SAT is not required for admi ss ion but, if ta k e n within five years of the se m es ter s tart date, is highly recommended for advising and course p l ace m en t purposes . College Transfers • Applicants will be admitted to Metro State, regardless of their cumulative college GPA, if th ey indicate on the Applica t ion for Admission th a t t h ey have g r aduated from hi g h sc hool o r tha t they h ave passed and receive d a Colorado General Ed u cational Deve lopment (GE D ) ce r tificate or i t s equi va lent. • By s igning the Application for Admiss i o n , degree -see ki n g applicants are certifying t h at they w ill request that either a high school transcript with date of graduation or GED test sco r es be m ai led directly to the Office of Admissions. In place of these credentials, official college transcripts show ing completion of 30 or more transferab l e semester cred i t hours with gra d es of "C" or b ette r w ill be accepted. College tran sfer stu dents s h o uld request to h ave college t ra n scripts maile d dir ec tl y t o the Office of Admissions for transfer credit evaluation. Degree -see king a p plicants are re q u i re d t o have all college and univer s ity transcripts on file to receive a complete evaluation. • The ACT or SAT is not required for admission but, if taken within five years of the semester sta r t date, is highly recommended for advising an d course place m ent purposes.

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APPLICATION INSTRUC T IONS Applications for Admission are considered in the order in which they are received each se m ester. All credentials received by the College become the property of Metro State and will not be returned to the student. It is the responsibility of the applicant to notify the Office of Admissions of any changes to the application prior to the fir t day of classes. If changes are not reported to the Office of Admissions, the registration process could be delayed for subsequent semesters . Failure to report academic changes may result in rejection , dismissal and/or loss of credit. International (visa ) applicants should refer to the Admission of International Students section on page 21 of this Catalog. To apply for admission: • Appl i cations can be submitted online at www.mscd.edu or are available from Metro State, Office of Admissions, Campus Box 16 , P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, Central Classroom Build ing, 1st floor, 303-556-3058. • A $25 nonrefundable application fee ($40 for international applicants) is required with the Applica tion for Admission. Readmit applicants are not required to submit an application fee. • It is the student's responsibility to request that all required official credentials be mailed directly from the i ssuing institution or agency to the Office of Admissions. Hand-carried documents will not be accepted. • Although an applicant's college record may be summarized on one transcript, an official transcript from each institution attended is required. • For information on obtaining records and receiving c redit for Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (!B), the College-Leve l Examination Program (CLEP) and military training or other training, see Alternative Credit Options on page 41 of the Catalog. • The Application for Admission and all credentials received by the College will be valid for two semesters beyond the term of application. After this time the ftles will no longer be maintained for applicants who do not complete their application, and for applicants who were accepted but did not enroll. Applicants wishing to attend MSCD after this period must submit a new application , appli cation credentials that were not submitted and are outstanding, and the $25 application fee. • Applicants will be notified in writing of their application status within 2-3 weeks. Admission of Previously Enrolled Students (Readmit Students) Readmit students are defined as indi viduals who have previously enrolled and have recei ve d a grade or grade notation at the College but have not been in attendance at Metro State for three consecutive semes ters, including summer. Readmit students should: • Submit a completed Application for Admission. No application fee is required for readmission. • Submit transcripts from institutions attended since la s t attending Metro State (if degree -seeki ng). If the student was not previously degree -s eeking, then the student must submit transcript s from all institutions attended. Readmit students who originally attended Metro State prior to 1998 are required to resubmit all creden tials. In addition, all students who have not submitt ed final, official high school transcripts or an official GED report must also submit these credentials. Admission of Non degree Students The nondegree student classification meets the needs of students 20 years of age or older who wish to take college courses but who do not currently intend to work toward a baccalaureate degree at Metro State. With the exception of high school student s who have completed the approval process, nondegree students must have graduated from high schoo l or received aGED to qualify for admission. Nondegree students are not eligible for financial aid, nor will any college transcripts submitted be evalu ated for transfer credit. Students may change to degree -seeki ng status by completing a Status Change Request form and requesting that aH required official credentials be mailed directly from the issuing institution or agency to the Office of Admissions. Admission Notification Once admitted, students will be mailed instructions regarding course registration and other relevant information. All incoming students new to Metro State are required to attend an orientation session.

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20 ADMISSIONS After ori entation, first-time college s tud e nts and transfer students 19 ye ars old or younger are a l so r e quired to meet with an academic advisor. Depending upon a s tud ent's p e rform ance on the ACT or SAT, assessment tests may also be required. No tuition deposit is requ ired. Students denied admission may appea l the d ecision by submitting a l etter of appeal to the Office of Admi ss i ons, along with ne w and compellin g academic information, l e tt e r s of recommendation and othe r supportive documentation. ADDITIONAL ADMISSION PROGRAMS Summer Only Applicants 19 years old or younger who have graduated from high school or have received a General E duc a tional Development (GE D ) certifica t e and are app l ying for th e summer semester m ay be admitted under a provisional sta tus. These applican t s are not requ ired t o submit admi ssion cre dentials and are not e ligibl e for fmancial a id . Summer Only stud ents who wis h to continue for t h e fall or s pring semester must m ee t stated admiss ion requirements and s ubmit a Sta tu s C hang e Request form to be conside red . High School Concurrent Enrollment Programs Postsecondary Enrollment Options and Fast Track Programs The Postsecondary Enrollment Options ( PSEO ) and Fast Track are spon so r ship program s enacted b y sta t e l aw in 198 8 that pro v id e high school j uni o r s an d se ni ors with the opportunity to take college classes for both high sc hool and college cre dit. These progra m s are intended to provide high sc h ool s tu dents with an alternat i ve learn ing environment. To p a rticip ate, stud e nt s must fust seek approval f rom their high school an d school district. The district determines the number of credit hours the s tudent may take and makes the financial arrangements. PSEO students are responsible for payment of aU tuition and fees by the College deadline. They are l ater reimbursed by their sc h ool di s trict s for tuition (no t fees) for up to two courses per se mester, providing that th ey successfully complete the se classes with grades of Cor better . Fas t Track students are not lim ited to tw o courses, and th e schoo l districts pay tuition (not fees ) at the time the y r eg i s t e r . To apply to the PSE O or Fast Track Program , a student must s ubmit the following: • Hi gh School Co n current Enrollment form , including s tud e nt , paren t , sc h ool dis t r i ct and college administrator s i g n a ture s • Co mpl e t ed Metro State admission app lication with the req u ired $25 ap plic a t ion fee Upon receipt of th ese documen ts, the student will be admitted int o the PSEO or Fast Track Prog r am. ACT scores, SAT scores or assessment tests a r e r equired to access many classes. Student Education and Enrichment Program T he Student Education an d Enrichment (SEE) Pro g r am is designed to supplement a student's existing educa tion through early parti cipat ion in co llege -level classes . This adva nced program shou l d not be interp r e t ed as a n a lt e rnative to high schoo l comp l etion but is, in s t ead, a co operativ e college/ h ig h sc ho o l effo rt t o p rovide e du catio nal enrichment an d early co llege atte nd ance to qualified Colora do h ig h sc hool j uniors and se ni o rs. Students who participate in the EE Program are fully responsible for tuition and fees. To apply for admiss ion through the SEE Progra m , th e student must s ubmit the following documents: • Hi gh Schoo l Co n curre nt Enrollment form , including s tudent, parent, sc h ool di s trict and college ad minist rator signat ure s • Co mpl eted Metro State admission application with the required $25 applica tion fee Upon r eceipt of these documents, the stude nt will be admitte d into the SEE Program . ACT scores, SAT scores or assessment tests are required to access many classes. Western Undergraduate Exchange Through the Western Undergraduate Excha ng e (WUE), students in wes t ern s t ates (AK, AZ, CO, HI, !D , MT, NV , NM, ND, OR , SD, UT, WA, WY) m ay e nroll in many outof-sta t e two -yea r a nd fou r-year

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.• ...... r, . • -,, .. . . ADMISSIONS 21 '' . : . . ' ., . college programs at a reduced tuition level: ISO percent of the institution's regular resident tuition. WUE tuition is considerably les than non-resident tuition. At Metro State College, WUE students pay ISO percent of the student' s share of Colorado resident tuition plus mandatory fees. In additi on, WUE students, being non -residents, are not eligible for the state contribution to tuition, otherwise known as the College Opportunity Fund (COF) stipend. Thus, WUE participants must pay the stipend amount in addition to WUE tuition and fees. To be eligible for WUE tuition, a student must certify each semester that he or she is a resident of a sta te other than Colorado. So long as the student continues to certify WUE eligibility, the student cannot be considered a Colorado resident. WUE students who change their residence to Colorado lose their WUE eligibility the following semester, but do not become eligible for in-state tuition rates until one year after establishing Colorado domicile . Because students under 23 are deemed to have the domicile of their parents, the WUE student seeking to change domicile to Colorado must show either: a change of the parents' residence; or, a change in the student's residence after emancipation from the parents. Refer to the Tuition Classification section of th e Catalog for more information about the factors considere d in demonstrating Colorado residency, or contact the Tuition Classification Officer in the Office of the Registrar. The following Metro State College majors are open to WUE students on a space-available basis: Behav ioral Sciences, Civil Engineering Technology, Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, Foreign Languages and Literatures-General, Health Care Management, History-General , Hospitality Restaurant Management, Human Performance Composite; Meteorology; Nursing/Registered N ur se (RN, ASN, BSN, MSN) ; Polit ical Science and Government-General; Psychology; Social Work; and Surveying and Mapping. Quali fied students must apply and be admitted to Metro State College and must submit a WUE New Studen t Participation Form to the Office of Admissions . This form and more information , including informa tion on WUE tuition , fees, and COF may be obtained at www.mscd.edu/enroll/admissions/paths/wiche or by contacting the Office of Admissions at the Central C lassroom Building , lst floor, 303-556-3058. Metro Meritus Individuals 60 or older who do not wish to earn credit are invited to attend tuition-free classes of their choice on a space-available basis. Metro Meritus encourages participants to continue their personal edu cational growth in a stimulating and friendly campus setting. For more information, contact the Ce nter for Individualized Learning in the St. Francis Center, 2nd floor, 303-556-8342 . Application forms a re also available at www.mscd.edu/ cil. Admission of International Students All students who declare a country of citizenship other than the U .. on the Application for Admiss i o n must contact the Office of Admi sions. Applicants who are U.S. Resident Aliens (including refugees and political asylees) will be required to (I) submit a minimum of an off i cial high school transcript/diploma that is determined equivalent to high school graduation in the U.S. , and (2) complete an immigrant advising interview to ensure that their English language skills are sufficient for admission to the College. Applicants who are on any type of temporary v i sa are required to submit the International App l ica tion for Admission, which can be obtained from the Office of Admissions or online at www .m scd.edu/ admissions. Applicants on temporary visas are required to submit (I) a minimum of an officia l high school tran sc ript / diploma that is determined equivalent to high school graduation in the U.S., (2) English language proficiency documentation, normall y in the form of an acceptable TOEFL (Te t of English as a Foreign Language) score, and (3) documents demonstrating sufficient financial support to cover the co ts of attending the College for one academic year, including living expenses (this is only required of potential students on F-1 visas). Detailed information regarding all requirements and a dmission procedures for international students can be obtained from the Office of Admissions and on the International Applica tion for Admission.

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22 ADMISSIONS TRANSFER CREDIT EVALUATION A transfer credit evaluation is performed for admitted degree-seeking stu dents after officia l transcripts are received by the Office of Admissions. Within approximate l y four weeks, students receive two copies of the tran sfer credit evaluation, one of which should be taken to the major and minor departments for advice on how credits might apply to degree programs. Transfer credits are accepted und er the following guidelines: • C r edit must have been ear n ed at an institution of higher ed u cation holding full regional accreditation. • Metro State accep t s up to 64 semester hours from twoyear ins tituti ons and up to 90 semes t er hours from four year institutions or a combination of twoyear and four-year institutions. • Grades earned must be a " C -" or better. Courses with " D; ' " F " or similar grades are not trans ferable. Also, courses graded with C.E.U.s (Conti nuing Education Units) will not be accepted. A summary of transfer credit from each institution is indicated on the Metro State academic record . Neither transfer course grades nor previous grade point averages are indicated or affect the Metro State grade point average. • Course content must be similar to that of Metro State cou rses. • No preparatory or remedial cour es are applicable toward an Metro State degree. • Students who have earned an A.A . or A.S. degree from a Colorado community college will receive junior standing at Metro State, provided all cour es included in the degree carry a grade of "C" or b etter and based on the course-by-course evaluation, o ther wise meet minimum Metro State trans fer credit standa rds. Students may need to comp l ete addit ional Metro State l ower-divis i on require ments. • Applicants having comp l eted the Colorado community college core curricul um, as certified on their community college transcripts , are considered to have satisfied Metro State ' s minimum Gen eral Studies requirements. However , additional specific lower-division courses ma y be required for certain degree programs. • Once transfer credits are evaluated , the total number of these credits applicable to a degree will not be redu ced unless the student repeats already-awarded transfer credit at Metro State or interrupts Metro State enrollment for three or more consecutive semesters and readmits to the College under more restrictive transfer credit evaluation policies. • In accordance with policies established by the Colorado Commissi o n on Higher Education regarding students transferring between Colorado public in stitutions, Metro Sta t e has instituted procedures for reso l ving transfer credit disputes . Ques tion s regarding these procedures may be directed to Cristina Martinez in the Office of Admissions at 303 556 3984. Transfer Services The Office of Transfer Services offers assistance to students transferring from other institutions to Metro S t ate. Specific services provided include the following: • Assistance with admission requirements and the application process ; • Weekly visits to local community colleges in the Denver metro area; • Visits to other Colorado community colleges once or twice annually; • Guidance on selecting appropriate transferable courses; • Preliminary transcript evaluation; • Transfer st ud ent scholar s hip information; • Referral ass i s t a nce to academic departments; • Resolution of transfer course issues. Transfer counselors are available by appointment and for walk-in counseling. Counselors work closely with transcript evaluators to provide students with information about transfer credits and how those credits may be applied to their degree programs. Questions pertaining to a student' s official trans fer credit evaluation should be referred to the transfer eval uator responsible for the evaluation. That person's name and telephone number are found on the letter that accompanies the evaluation sent to the student. General questions regarding a transfer evaluation or preliminary evaluation should be referred to the Office of Transfer Services, Central Classroom Building , Room 106, 303-556-3774, or transferquestions@msc d.edu .

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ADMISSIONS 23 ENROLLMENT New Student Orientation Orientation is a required pre -e nrollment step for ALL degree -see king students at Metro State. The mis sion of New Student Orientation ( SO) is to facilitate the transition of entering students b y helping them learn about and connect with the campus community. A variety of sessions are offered to accom modate the needs of our diverse commuter population, including specialized sessions for first -ti me col lege students, transfer students, and adult students returning to college . In addition, transfer stu dents over the age of 20 can complete their orientat ion requirement through a n online orientation course. During orientation, incoming s tudents have the opportunity to interact with current Metro State students and staff while they receive va luable information about academic advising, general studies requirements, the registration process, and financ ial aid. Student Orientation Leaders also share some of their own tips for college survival, including how to utilize campus re so urces and how to get involved in campus activities. For further information about orientation, visit the SO Website at www.mscd. edu/-nso or call303-556 -6931. Reading, Writing and Math e matics A s se s sment E x aminations If the ACT or SAT ha s been taken , some assessment tests may be waived if the following scores are met or exceeded: an ACT subscore at or above 18 in English (SAT verbal of 440), 19 in Math (SAT math of 460) or 1 7 in Reading (SAT verbal of 430). For additiona l information on English or Reading, call 303-556-3677. For additional information regarding mathematics placement, visit the Metro State Web site at www.mscd.edu /tes ting / mscd _new/ home_page . htm or obtain a hard copy of the Mathemat ics Group Learning Program brochure from the Academic Advising Center. Degree-seeking students who are diagnosed as needing remedial course work have at their disposal basic skills courses offered through the Community College of Denver. Students are responsible for completing remedial course work no later than the end of their freshman year ( i .e., within the first 30 semester hours matriculated as a college student). Academic Advising At Metro State students are provided multiple ources of academic advising support. Continuing stu dents with declared majors receive advising assistance from their academic departments . New students and s tudents \vithout declared major receive advising support from the Academic Advising center. Ser vices available to students in the center include the following: assistance with co urse selection, schedul ing and registration ; help with long term degree planning ; identification of degree enhancement strate gies; and ongoing developmental advising, including assistance with the major minor selection process, adjustment to college, etc. For additional information call 303-556-3680. REGISTRATION All co ntinuing students in good s tanding and all accepted applicants at the College are eligible to regis ter each semester. Students are responsible for ensuring that there is a correct and up to date address and phone number on fLie with the College. Address changes may be made with the Registrar's Office through MetroCon nect ( metroconnect.mscd.edu) , or by writing or faxing (303-556-3999) the address and phone number change to the Registrar ' s Office. Inform at ion on the registration procedure, registration dates , and student responsibilities and obliga tions related to regi s tration is available on MetroConnect (me tro co nnect.mscd .ed u). Students Not Officially Registered in a Cl a ss F or S tud e nt s Students must be officially registered for classes in accordance with College rules and regulations . Offi c iall y registered means that student have been accepted for admission b y the college, are eligible

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24 ENROLLMENT AND REGISTRATION to register for classes, and that the Course Reference Number (C RN) for the class is entered on the student's registration record maintained by the Office of the Registrar . The deadline to register for a full-semester class is the census date for that semester. For fall and spring semesters the census date is the 12th business day of the semester; for summer semester the census date is the 8th business day of the semester. These deadlines are available on the Web for each semester at www.mscd . edu/academic/ acal. htm There are pro-rated deadlines for part-of-term classes. It is students' responsibility not to atten d a class if they are not official l y registered. For Faculty According to CCHE policy, as noted in CCHE document "FULLTIME EQUIVALENT (FTE) REPORT ING GUIDELINES and PROCEDURES , Jun e 2002", individuals may not atten d a class if they are not officially regi tered for the class. The deadline to register for a full -se mester class is the census date for that em ester. For fall and spring emesters the census date i s the 12th business day of the semester; for summer semester the census date is the 8th business day of the semester. These deadlines are available on the Web for each semester at www.mscd.edu/academic/acal.htm. There are pro-rated deadlines for part -ofterm classes. Faculty must refer students who are not registered by the census date to the Office of the R egistrar to discuss their registration options . Faculty should allow the student to return to the class only upon showing proof of registration from the Office of the Registrar. Faculty must ensure that all students in their classes are listed on their E-Rosters. Faculty can c heck their E-Rosters a nytime before and during the semester to determine whether a stude nt is registered for the class. Concurrent Enrollment Students who find it neces sary to register at Metro State and another co llege at the same time shou ld check with Metro State Transfer Services concerning the accep tanc e and app lic ation of transfer credits. Pooled Registration Metro State and the University of Colorado Denver have formed a common pool of courses available to students at each institution. For the pool , Metro State offers courses through the School of Letters , Arts and Sciences, through the Economics Department in the School of Business and through the Technical Com muni cation and Human Performance and Sport departments in the Schoo l of Profess i onal Stud i es . UCD offers courses through the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and College of Arts a nd Media. Students must register for pooled courses through their home institution. Students at Met r o State: • Must comply with all Metro State policies , procedures and deadlines when registering for, with drawin g from or dropping UCD pooled courses; • May not be placed on a wait list for any UCD pooled course. • Must comply with UCD course prerequisites. For students at Metro State , UCD pooled course title s and grades will appear on the Metro Sta te tran script and will count in the GPA and hours toward graduation; however , UCD pooled courses will not satisfy academic residence requirements for degrees from Metro State . This restriction applies to the residence requirements of the overall degree (30 semester hours minimum), the major (8 upper-division semester hours minimum), and the minor (3 upper division semester hours minimum). This restric tion does not apply to Physics (PHY) courses. Metro State/UCD Nonpooled Courses Students wishing to register for UCD courses not listed in the common poo l must follow concurrent registration procedures: • Complete a UCD admission application. • Register and pay for UCD cour es at UCD. • Request that official transcripts from UCD be sent to Metro State at the end of the semes ter . Students are advised: • to consult with their academic advisor at Metro State to determine transferability of courses. • to consult with Metro State's Financial Aid Office if rece iving aid.

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Interinstitutional Regi s tration Students enrolled at Metropolitan State College of Denver may register for courses at the Community College of Denver. Courses taken at this institution in no way alter existing Metro State degree require ments , but may apply toward degree requirements subject to specific approval by Metro State . Students sho uld be aware that courses taken interinstitutionally will be counted as part of the 64 semester hours from community colleges applicable to an Me tro State degree. Interinstitutional credits will not sat i sfy academic residence requirements at Metro State. In the event a conflict arises between the policies/pro cedures of Metro State and the college listed above, the most restrictive policy prevails. Students are advised to confer with department chairs and/or coordinators of academic advising before registering interinstitutionally. The enrollment status of a student in the interinstitutional registration program is determined by the student's status at the home in titution (institution where the student is seeking a degree). Students should ascertain before enrolling at an institution that desired courses will satisfy degree requirements at the home in titution. Course Audit Policy Students may audit a class with the permission of the instructor, if space is available. Academic credit is not awarded for an audited cour e and no academic record is maintained . The cost for auditing a course i s ba sed on regular tuition. T he Tuition and Fees Table is available on Metro State's Web site (www.mscd . edu/enroll/admissions). Audit approval forms are available in deans' and academic department offices. Changes in Registration Enrolled students may adjust schedules by dropping and /or adding classes. Complete information con cerning dropping and/or adding classes and the tuition and fee refund schedule can be found on Metro Connect (metroconnect.mscd . edu). Students who r educe their course load after the twelfth day of classes and before the beginning of the fifth week will receive an "NC" notation for each course they have dropped. A NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted or requested online through MetroConnect by the deadline to the Registrar ' s Office. Students reducing their course l oad between the beginning of the fifth and the end of th e tenth week of classes during fall and spring semesters may receive an " C " notation for each course, provided faculty approval is granted. Additiona l restrictions regarding assigning the" C " notation may be set by each schoo l , department and/or faculty member for the period between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of the se m ester (or proportional time frame). Students are advised to seek faculty signatures well before the deadline. An NC / Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Registrar's Office. See the sectio n s on g r ades , notations , course load and class attendance in this Catalog . Proportional tim e frames are applied for part-of-term cour es, workshops and summer terms. Proce dure s for adding or dropping a part of-term course after the course has begun are described on Metro Connect (met roc onnect.mscd.edu). Registration Status The College generally defines full-time status as being registered for 12 semester hours in fall and/or spring semesters, eight semes ter hours in the summer. However, to complete a degree in four yea r s or eight semesters, students need to take at least 15 hours a semester. Similarly, halftime is generally defined as six semester hours , fall and spring and four semester hours for summer. Less than half time is the other term used, which is generally defined as less th a n six semester hours in the fall and spring and less than four semester hours in the summer . However, for fmancial aid purposes 12 semester hours is also the full-time standard in the summer. (See page 27 of this Catalog) . To be eligible for health insurance coverage automatically, the numbers are 10 seme ter hours in the fall and spring and eig h t semester hours in the summer. (See page 27 of this Catalog). You can order an enrollment verification on MetroConnect (metroconnect. m scd.edu).

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26 TUI TION AND FEES TUITION AND FEES Tuition Classification A student is classified as an in-state or out of-state student for tuition purposes at the time of admission. This classification is based upon information supplied by the student on the application for admission and is made in accordance with the Colorado Thition Classification Law , CRS S237-101 et seq . ( 1973), as a m ended. Once d ete rmin ed, a student's tuition classificatio n status remains unchanged unless sat i s factory evidence that a change should be made is pre ented . A Petition for I n State Tuition Classifica tion Form and the evidence requested must be submitted to the Registrar ' s Office if a student believes she or he is entitled to in-state status. The tuition classification statute requires that in order to qualify for in-sta t e status , a student (o r the parents or legal guardian of the student in the case of students under 23 years of age who are not eman cipated) must have been domiciled in Colorado for one y ear or more immediately preceding the flist day of the semester for which such classification is sought. Domicile for tuition purposes require two inseparable elements: ( 1 ) a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado with no intent to be domiciled elsewhere. Some exam ple of connections with the state that provide objective evidence of intent are: ( 1) payment of Co l orado s t a t e income tax as a Co lor ado resident, (2) permanent emp l oyment in Co lor ado, (3) ownership of resi dentia l real property in Colorado , ( 4) compliance with Jaws imposing a mandatory duty on any domi ciliary of the state, such as the drivers ' license Jaw and the vehicle registration law and (5) registration to vote . Other factors unique to the individual can also be u ed to demonstrate the requisite intent. Any questions regarding the tuition classification law hould be directed to an admissions officer at the College. In order to qualify for in state status for a particular semester, the student must prove that domicile began not later than one year prior to the first day of cia es for that semester. The dates for qualifying and for submitting petitions are available under Academic Calendar on Metro State ' s Web site (www.mscd .edu/academk/ acal.htm) . College Opportunity Fund ( COF) Ever y e l igible Co l orado resident who will be a student must sign up for the College Opportuni ty Fund (COF) in order to aut h orize payment of the state's contribut i on toward tui ti on at any p u blic college or university in the state of Colorado that the student plans to attend , s uch a Metropolitan State College of Denver . These funds , called " stipends ; will be applied to a student ' s college ac count each semeste r an d are avail able for up to 145 credit h ours of college level undergraduate study. The actual value of the stipend will be determined by the Colorado Legisiature each year . Students must apply onlin e for the stipend at www.CollegelnColorado.org. Then , each semester they must a u thorize the use of the stipend during registration . The COF application requires students to submit only their legal name , date of birth , ocial Security Number, and Driver ' s License Number only once in a stude n t ' s lifetime. The application must be completed before the stipend can be credited to a student ' s tuit ion and fee bill. What happens if a student does not sign up? That student will not be eligi bl e for the stipend and will be responsible for paying the total in -st ate tuition both the student ' s share and the state's share . E ligibili ty: ln-state, undergraduate students will be eligible for the stipend regardles of age , income or financial aid status . Students who are eeking a second bachelor ' s degree or post baccalaureate degree credits are eligible to use the tipend for up to 30 credit hours. For more information, visit the College's Q&A section on C OF at: www.msc d . edu/news/cof. Tuition and College Service Fees The Board of Trustees, th e governing board of the College , reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees for any semes ter without notice .

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<' TUITION AND FEES 2 Tuition and college service fees are determined by th e trustees s hortl y b efore the beginning of each aca demic year, Information regarding tuition and fees can be found by going to the Tuiti on and Fees Table on Metro State's Web site (www,mscd.edu/admissions/tuition.pdf). Standard Fees An applica tion fee is required of all applicants for admission to the College, This fee i s nonrefundable and will not be applied to tuition, Application fee . , ... . . ..................... . ....................................... $25 International student application fee ................... . . ............ .... ............. $40 Matriculation fee ............... ................................................... $50 Special fees Returned check charge ........... ..... .... ......................................... $17 Student Health Insurance All students taking ten (10) credit hours or more in the Fall or Spring semester o r eight (8) credit hours or more in the Summer semester are requi r ed to participate in the College-sponsored Student Hea lt h Insurance Program, unless proof of outside health insurance is provided by th e waiver deadline that meets the standards set by the College. Please note that the Colorado I ndigent Car e Program (C I C P ) will NOT be accep t ed as proof of insurance since this program i s not considered insurance by the S tat e Legislature. Students are automatically billed for Student Health Insurance on tl1eir tuition bill. Students are in formed of the College's health insurance requirement when they attempt to register for cla sses. Reg is tration screens cannot be accessed until a student reads the details associated with this r equirement. Beginning w ith Summer and Fall 2008 registration , all students will b e se nt an a ut omatic e-mail m es sage after they acknowledge that they have read the insurance information provided during registra tion. Stu d ents who have outside health insurance coverage are then respo nsible for foLlowi ng the waiver instructions contained in the e-mail message and for submitting an elect r onic waiver form by the dead line li ted. A waiver form is attached t o eac h e-mail m essage and the CoLlege mininmm waiver s tandard s are outlined. Please note that waiver forms will not be accepted after the published waiver deadline . Health ins uran ce waivers are valid for one (l) academic year (a n academic year includes Fall, Sp ring and Summe r semesters ann u aLly.) Continuing s tud e nt s must complete a waiver form ANNUALLY pr ior to each Fall semeste r . Students with a b r eak i n aca d emic enrollmen t and those who begin cia ses in th e Spring or Summer must comp l ete a waiver form by the appropriate deadline for the semester in which they enroll and every Fall semester thereaft er. Students who participate in the student health insurance program during the Spring semester of a n y aca d emic year are elig i ble to purchase Summer semes ter coverage w ithout taking classes during the Summer semes ter. However, in order to obtain the same low r a t e offered during th e Fall and Sp ring semesters, Summer semester coverage must be purchased in advance by january 31st. Please contact the Student Health Insurance Office at 303-556-3873 for further de t ails. Student Dental Insurance Voluntary Program for all Students Volunt ary De ntal In surance is available to stude nt s takin g o n e cre dit h o ur or more . Inform atio n and appli cation forms can be obtained at ilie Student Insurance Office in the Healili Ce nter at Auraria (PL 150). FINANCIAL AID The Metropol itan State College of Denver f in a ncial a id program provides assis t a n ce a nd advice to student who would be unable to pursue ilieir education at ilie College without suc h help . Scholarships, grants , loans and part-time employment are ava ilable singly or in va riou s comb i n ations to meet the

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28 FINANCIAL AID difference between what the student and the stud ent ' s family cou ld reasonab l y be expecte d to provide an d the expected cost of attending Metro State. Estimated Expenses The 2008-2009 aca d e mic year expenses are as follow s for a student not living with p arent : Resi dent Nonresident Tui tion and Fees .............. 4,477 . . .......... $ 12,577 Room and Board ............ 8,090 ............. 8,090 Books and Supplies .......... 1 ,698 ............. 1,698 Transportation .............. 1 ,215 ............. 1,215 Misc ellaneo u s ............... .L2QQ ..... ........ UQ.Q Total $16,680 ........... 24,780 Tuition a nd fees are set b y Metro tate and the Colorado Commission on Higher Ed u cat ion and a re su bject to change wit hout notice . All stude nt s are placed on a sin gle-perso n bud get. Additio n a l allow ances ma y be made for students with day-care cos t s for dependent childre n . B ud ge t s are based on f ull t ime e nrollm ent of 12 cre dit h ours . Eligibility and Need To qua l ify for financia l aid, a student m u s t b e a U.S. c itizen or eligible nonciti zen; be registered with Selective Service ( if required); have financial n eed; be degree-, licen sure, or ce rti ficate-seeki ng ; be mak ing sati sfactory academic progre ss; and not be in default on a fed eral educatio n lo an or owe a repayment on a federal gran t . Application Procedures Student s must comple te the F ree Application for Federal Stude n t Aid (FAFSA) each year to determine fma ncial aid e ligibility. For quicker processing, we strongl y recommend that r eturning, transferring and entering s tud ents complete their FAFSA or R enewal FAFSA on the Web at: www.fafsa.ed.gov . Metro State's Title IV Schoo l Code is: 001360. S tudents s hould comp l ete and submit the FAFSA or R e newal FAFSA to the federal processor as early as possib l e (after januar y 1 s t ), pref e rabl y no l a t er than mid Feb ru ary , and s ubmit all requeste d documents to the Metr o State Office of Financial Aid by March 12th . D e tailed information concerning app l icat ion procedures is pro vided on our Web s ite at: www.msc d . edu!financialaid. Financial Aid Programs T he amount of funds made available t o stu d ents depends on the maximum award allowe d by regula t io n of each program, the student's es t ablis h ed financial need, duration of the s tud ent's enro llm e nt, and funds a U ocated to the Co lle ge b y the state and federal govern ments. Grants Grants are gift mone y fro m th e federal or state governmen t a nd do not h ave to be r epaid. Federal P ell Grant s a r e feder a l funds an d awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet received a ba c helor's d eg r ee and who are U.S. citizens o r eligible no n -ci tiz ens. The amount of the award i s based on eac h studen t' s financial eligibility and the number of hours for whic h the s tud ent is enro lled . The amount of Fed eral Pel! Grant awards for the 2008-09 academic year will range from $400 to $4,310 for those students who qualify. Full time, half time , or less than half-time students may qualify for a Federa l Pel! G r ant. Fed era l S u pple m e nt a l Educational Opport u nity Grants (FSEOG) are federal funds awarded to undergr a duat e s tudents who have not yet received a bache lor' s d egree and a r e U.S. citize n s or eligible

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_ . FINANCIAL AID 29 ' . . non -ci tizens . This grant i s awarded to students who demonstrate exce pti o n a l n ee d . The a mount of FSEOG awar d s r ange from $100 t o $300 per Fall and Spring semesters. Colorado C oll ege R esponsi bili ty Gran ts (CCR G) are state funds awarded to Colorado residents with d emons trated financial n ee d . E ligibl e s tud e nt s h ave n o prior bachelor's degree, are U.S. c iti zens or e li gible n on-citizens , and are enrolled full-or parttime (at least s i x credit hours for the Fall a nd Spring se m es ters) at Metro State. The a m ounts of the CSG award ranges from $100 to $500 per Fall and Spring se me s t e rs. C olorado Lev eragin g Educa tional Ass istan ce program (CLEAP) are a combination of federal and state funds awa rd e d by the same cri t er i a as CCRG. The amount of the CLEAP awar d i s $200 per seme s ter. Scholarships Metropolitan State College of D enver offers numerous scholarship opportunities for both incoming and continuing s t u dents. B y s ubmitt ing the Metropo l itan Sta t e College of Denver Sc h o l a r ship Applicat ion by March 1st " Priority Consi d eration Deadline " each year, you will automatically be considered for all Metro S tate sc ho l ars hips for which you are eligib l e for the next aca demic year. The Metro S ta te Scho l ar ship Applicat ion i s available for online submission at: www.mscd.ed u /enroll/financialaid. A printab l e ver s i o n of t h e application is also availab l e for download a t this location . Students mu s t be enrolled a t lea s t h a l f-time, be d egree-, certificate-or licensures eeking , be making sat i sfac t ory academic progress , and not be in defa ult on a federal education loan or owe a repayment o n a federal or s t a te grant t o receive a sc h o l arship. Athl etic Sc hol a r ships: Metro State has a limited number of athle ti c scholarships. For additional infor mation, co ntact the Metro Sta t e Int e r collegiate Athletics Office (30 3-556-8300). Priva t e Sc h o l a r s h i ps: Studen t s s hould r efer to th e Metro State scho lar s hip Web sit e (www.mscd.ed u / en r oll/fin ancialaid ) for information regarding scholarships and to access free online scho l ar hip earches. R eceipt of a sc h o l arship may affec t a student' s financial aid award because students recei v ing federal and/or sta t e aid are limited in the m aximum amo u nt and type of aid th a t can be received. A st ud e nt whose full need has been met by other types of financial aid prior to receipt of a scholar hip will have th a t aid reduced b y the amo u nt of th e sc h o l ars hip. If the st ud e nt's full elig ibility has not been met, the scho l arship wiJI be alJowed to sa ti sfy the unmet need . Each student's situation is treated individually. All scho lar s hips are ba se d on the student's continued eligibility and availab l e funding. Loans Federal Perkins Loans are long-term federal loans that are awa rd ed based on the stud ent's need and Metro Sta te's availa ble funds. Federal Perkins Loans can range from $100 to $1,500 per semester. Repay ment of the loan begins nine m onths after the student g r aduates or ceases to be enrolled in at least s i x credit hours each se mest er. T he int e r est rate is 5 p e r cent and interest b egins to accr ue a t r epayment. All first-time b orrowers at Metro State are required to perform a Perkins Loan Entrance Inter view over the W e b b efore l oan fund s ca n be released t o them. Fe d e r a l Family Education Loans (FFEL) includ e Fede ral Staffo rd Loans, un subsi dized F e d eral Staffor d Loans , an d Federal PLUS Loans, wh i ch help students and/or their parent s to borrow funds to help meet educational expenses. To borrow th ese funds , s tud en t s and/or th ei r parents must complete and su b mit , in ad diti on to the FAFSA, a separate lende r a pplication to the Metro State Office of Financial Aid. Student s mu s t be e nroll ed at l east six credit hours each semester and be degree, certificate-or licen sure-seeking a nd be making Satisfac tory progress with a complete file. Interest rates vary depending o n the type of lo a n a nd the date the s tud e nt borrows the first Federal Family Educatio n Loan. For further inform ation o n int erest ra t es, c h eck the Metro S tat e Financial Aid Web site as they vary each year. Firs t tim e borrowers at Metro State are required to perform a Loan E n t ran ce Inter v iew ove r the Web befo r e l oans funds ca n b e released t o them . For additional l oan information please visit our Web s ite. You will find d etails of ho w t o apply an nual limits and lenders.

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30 FINANCIAL AID Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans: are based on the student's need as determined by the Metro State Office of Financial Aid. Interest does not begin to accrue until six months after the studen t graduates or ceases to be enrolled in school at l east half time (six credit hours per semester). Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans : These loans have many of the same term s and conditions as the Federal Stafford Loan. The main difference is that the students are respo nsibl e for the interest that accrues while they a r e in sch oo l and during the six-month grace period after they graduate or cease to be enrolled in at least six credit hours. Federal PLUS Loa ns : These lo ans are ava ilabl e to parents of dependent students. App l ications are avail abl e from the Metro State Office of Financial Aid . Applicat i o n s must fust be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid for processing . At Metro State, parents of dependent students may borrow up to the cos t of education minus the amount of fmancial aid received by the student from other sources each year. Please refer to the Metro State Financial Aid Web s ite (www.mscd.edu/financialaid) for more detailed information regarding loans . College Work-Study The State of Colorado, the federal governmen t and Metro State provide p art-time employment pro grams for students. The maximum work-st ud y award is $2,500 per semes ter. The maximum hours a st udent may work is 30 hours per week while classes are in session and 40 hours per week between semes ter s . Students must be enrolled in at least six credit hour s per semes ter to receive a work-study award. The majority of all work-study awards are need based , however, there are a limited number of positions that are no need awards. The Financial Aid Package Once student eligibility is determined, an aid package is developed based on the availability of funds and the eligibility of the applicant. To facilitate financial aid packaging requirements, applicants must obtain all requested information and forms from design a ted sources and submit them to the Metro State Office of Financial Aid before the established deadline. Award Notification After the Office of Financial Aid has determined the type a nd amount of aid for which a student quali fies (aid package) , the student is emailed an Award Notification. Disbursement Procedures: • Awards are based on full time enrollment. If a stude nt is enrolled for l ess than 12 credi t hours each semester, the award may be reduced / prorated. The final award a dju stment occurs on cen sus date (a bout the 12th day of school each fall and sp ring semester and the 8th day of the sum mer semester). • Grants, Scholarships and Student Loans: All financial aid awards (with the exception of out-of state loan checks, consortium checks and so me scholarship funds) are disbursed into the student's account. The Business Office deducts any outstanding balance owed, including current tuition and fees, and issues a check for the remaining funds. This c h eck is either mailed to the student or the student can pick it up at the Cashier's Office. This check can be used to purchase books and pay other educationally related expenses . • Parent Loans : Federal PLUS funds are electronically s ubmi tted or mailed from l enders to Metro State's Office of Financial Aid . Eligibility is verified and then the check is mail e d to the parent bor rower unless the parent authorizes the s tudent to receive the refund. • Work Study: Work-study earnings are paid biweekly and are treated as wages earned. Outstanding balances owed to Metro State are not deducted from these earnings; however , students are strongly advised to pay any outstanding balance as soon as a work-study check is r eceived . Plea e r efer to the Metro State Web site (www.mscd.e du) for information regarding proration of aid disburse ments.

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Repayment Polic y Students w ho receive financial ai d an d withdraw officially or un officially from Metro State prior t o completion of a term may be requir ed to repay a p ortion of financial aid and sc holarships. All require d financial a id repayments must be made to Metro State b efo r e the e nd of the curren t academic yea r or before addition a l Title I V funds can be disbursed to the student, whichever occurs first . Repayment i s made to the Metro State Business Office. Plea se go t o Metro State's Web site (www.mscd.edu) for more specific information . Financial Aid as a Form o f Pay ment Please refer to Metro State's Web site (www.msc d.edu ) for information regarding payment of tuition an d fees with awarded aid. SERVICES AND PROGRAMS F OR STUDE N T S Academic Advising At Metro State, student s a r e pr ovi d ed multiple sources of academic advising su pport. Continuing st u den t s with declared majors receive advising ass i s t ance from their academic departments. New students and students without declared majors rec eive a d vising support from the Academic A d v i sing Center, CN 104. Ser vices available to st ud ents in the cente r include the following: assistance with course selection, scheduling and registr atio n ; help with long-t e rm degree planning; identification of degree enhanceme nt s trategi es; and ongoing de velop ment a l advising, including assista nce with the major-minor selection process, adjustment to college, e tc. For additio n a l information call 303-556-3680. Alumni Relations The Office of Alumni Relations and Alumni Assoc i ation is located at 1059 Ninth Street Park. It's pri mary mis sio n i s "To cultivate r e l ationshi ps, motivate participation a nd c r eate opport unities for a conti n uous con ne c tion with the College, it s alumni and th e community:' The Alumni Office connects alum ni to students and the college co mmuni ty through eve nts, voluntee r opportunities, mentoring programs, alumni cha pter s and annual giving opportuniti es with the purpose of maintaining and renewing per sona l relationship s established duri n g student days. Severa l alumni programs and services are offered including: discounted insurance programs and career developmen t resources, loan consolidation, credit u nio n membership and f ree online tr anscripts. In addition , th e Alumni Office sells th e Me tro Sta t e co l legiate license pl ates that benefit student scho lar s hip s and alumni programs. The a lu mni associatio n also provide s s tudent scho l ars hip s annually . For a detailed list of programs, services and upcoming alumni events, visit www.mscd.edu/-alumni or contact the office dir ectly a t 303-556-8320. Auraria Campus Police Departm e nt The Aura ria Campus P olice Depar t ment is fully certified and a uthori zed to provide police services to the Auraria campus and is proud to maintain i t s reputation as one of the safest campuses in the state. In addition to a poli ce chief an d 22 full time p olice officers, the Auraria Campus Police Dep artment employs security guards a nd communication p e r sonnel. Officers p a trol the campus 24 hours a day, seven days a week , on foot, bicycles , golf carts, and in patrol cars. The Auraria Campus P olice Department a l so provides additiona l se r vices to the campus communit y such as vehicle unlocks , crime prevention programs , emergency respon ses, and fingerpr int ing. The Auraria Campus Police Dep artme nt is l ocate d at 1201 Fift h S tr eet. Routine calls-303-556-500 0 ; EMERGENCY CALLS-911 (or use one of the emergency phones located around campus).

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32 SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS Auraria E arly Learning C e nter The center provides high quali ty early ch ildhood car e an d education to th e children of students, staff a nd faculty . A discovery, child-ori ented ap p roach is prov ided by professional t eaching s t aff to children ages 12 months to 6 years. Prer eg i stration is r eq uir ed. Please call 303-556-3 188 for information. Auraria Parking and Tran s port a tio n S erv ice s Parking Services Department D a il y Fee P arking: ( in-and-out pri vileges in Lot E only): daily fees range from $1.50 to $10.00. Several lot s are unatt e nded and require purch asing a r eceipt from the vending machine. Make s ur e the parking receip t is placed face-up on the driv er's side of the dashboard. Receipts are va lid onl y on the day and for the lot w here purchased and are not transferable from one vehicle to another. W ith a n Auraria l.D., parking i s available in the Tivoli lot for a maximum fee of $5.00 . Permit Parkin g : Parking perm i t s are ava ilabl e on a semeste r basis. They go on sale on the first day of registr a tion , the Monday prior to the start of the semes ter. Contact the Parki n g Office at 303-556-2000 for more information. Mo t o ri s t Ass i s t a n ce Prog r a m : Personnel will help jump-start dead batteries and ass i s t in changing tires. j u mper cables, bumper jacks , tire tools and gaso lin e cans are also availabl e at no cost to campus parkers. Call 303-556-2000 for assistance . The Parkin g Servi ces Departm e nt i s l ocate d at 777 Lawrence Way (first floor of the parking cen tre). Hours are from 7:30 a .m. to 5:30p.m . Monday-Friday. Handiva n Se r v ic es : The wheelchair-accessible h and ivan provides free on -ca mpu s transportation for students, faculty and staff from 7 :00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Monday-Thu r sday and f r om 7:00a.m. to 6:00 p . m . on Friday . Call 303-556-2001 for informat i o n . i ghtrider: The i g htrider is a free security escort service for any campus parking lot. Service i s avail able f rom dusk to 10:00 p .m., Monday-Thu r day during fall and spring semesters. Call 3 0 3-556-2 001 for information. Career Services Tivoli (TIV) Room 215 , 303-556-3664, www . m scd.edu/-ca reer Career Servi ces offe r s assistance to s tud e nt s and alumni in th e following areas: • Career co unseling and caree r assessments Individuals a r e assisted in clarifying their career inte r ests and personality strengths as they relate to college maj ors and the world of work. Videotaped mo ck interviews are availab l e as well. • Career events -Fairs and seminars are held throughout the fall and spring semesters. These even t s provide an opportunit y to network with prospective employers and identify career opportunities. Information is available through the Career Servic e s Web site, www.mscd.edu/-career. Click on the Events link . • job PostingsA customized online employment serv ice for students and alumni. Post resumes and other job sea rch documents an d sea r c h through current full time, p art-time and internship posting s for entry-level po s ition s liste d by e mpl oyers specifically targeting Metro State. • Career workshops-These work s h o p s provid e in formati on a bout resume writing, job search s t rat eg i es, interv i ewing skills, image management and gra d u ate school. • Career library The libr ary includes print and e l ectro nic resources, job vacancies, salary surveys, graduate c hool information, and various career research resources. Co n ult with Ca reer Services staff an d learn to utiliz e a n extensive set of electronic r esources for caree r planning , sea rchable job dat abases, and other jo b search tools. • eC h oices Discover programs -These online programs are comprehensive and posses easy-to-use datab ases that pro vi de information on occupations, co lle ges, financia l aid resources , individual ized caree r planning, and career assess m en ts. • www.mscd.edu/-careerOur Web sit e has a wealth of inform ation about jobs a nd careers.

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Center for Visual Art Located off-campus in the heart of LoDo, the Center for Visual Art (CVA) was created in 1990 by Metro State to serve the College and the Rocky Mountain region. Open all year, CVA organizes and hosts diverse exhibi tion s including artists of national and international significance, which otherwise would be unavailable to the College community and state populace. CVA is a cornerstone of the N.A . S . A.D. accredited art department. Past exhibitions have included works by Sandy Skoglund, Picasso, Alfred Stieg l itz, Romare Bearden. CVA hosts Metro S tat e ' s BFA Thesis exhibitions featuring th e works of the College ' s graduating art students and a biannual exhibition of the Metro art faculty. Education and community outreach are important facets of CVA. Students, including the Art Depart ment's 1000 major /minors and 12, 000+ members of the general public, visit CVA each year. Visitors take advantage of the many lectures, tours and workshops available in conju11ction with the exhibitions. Outreach programs , providing art workshops and activities for Denver ' s at risk youth are another element of CVJI:s education program and commitment to the community. Work-study positions, intern ship and volunteer opportunities are only a few ways that Metro students can become involved at CVA. Metropolitan State College of Denver's Center for Visual Art is located at 1734 Wazee Street, Denver, CO 80202; Telephone: 303-294-5207 , Fax: 303-294-5210 ; www .m scd.edu/news/cva. Counseling Center The Coun eling Center staff provides services to currently enrolled Metropolitan State College students at no additional charge beyond student fees. The staff is ethnically a nd culturally diverse . Services include personal therapy, support groups, stress management, and crisis intervention . The cente r also coordinates an active Peer Education Program. Students may request an appointment for their first visit in advance. Follow-up appointments are made to accommodate class schedules. The taff also provides consultations to faculty, staff, and student groups upon request. Faculty are encouraged to invite Counseling Center staff to address mental health issues in their classes . The center is open from 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m . Mon day Friday. and is l ocated in Tivoli 651. For additional information call303-556-3132 . Access Center for Disability Accommodations and Adaptive Technology Providing equal opportunity is an important and shared responsibility at Metro State . The Access Center shares this responsibility by assisting students with documented disabilities in reaching their academic potential. Our office strives to accomplish this by providing qualified students with disabilities reason able academic accommodations as mandated under ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Disability categories served by our office include: ADD/ ADHD , Systematic Illness, Deaf/HOH, Learn ing, Cognitive, Psychological, Vision , and Physical. Students requesting an accommodation need to contact the Access Ce nter and arrange an intake inter view . Students need to provide appropriate documentation that describes their diagnosed disability and current functional limitations. Accommodations and /or services for which the student may be eligi ble will be based on the provided documentation. Examples of accommodations and services include: extended exam time, peer note-takers, interpreters, alternative text, priority registration and disability counseling and advocacy. The Access Center provides eligible students with access to some of the latest adaptive technology. Approved students will receive training and access to a variety of hardware and software products in our computer lab area. Software available for use includes jAWS , Dragon Naturally Speaking , ZoomTex t and TextHelp Read & Write. The Access Center is located in the Auraria Library, Suite 116 . For further information, call 303 5568387 or access the Web site at www.mscd.edu/ access. Extended Campus Fully accred ited courses are offered at two convenient locations in the Denver metro area: Metro South, 5660 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard, Greenwood Village, 303-721 1313 and Metro North , 11990 Grant Street, No rt hglenn, 303-450-5111. Extended Campus offers evening, weekend and accelera t ed

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34 SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS classes in a variety of formats including tel ecourses, correspo nd ence courses, and other distance learn ing options . Extended Campus schedules are available each semester. Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Services at Auraria Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender (GLBT) tudent Services is open to all Auraria students as a resource for exploring issues of sexual orientation and gender identity . This program offers a var i ety of support, education and advocacy services for the entire cam pu s community: • S up port for those w ho may have questio n s a b out sexua l orientation and gender identity; • Advocacy for students experiencing discrimination o r harassment based on a real or perceived gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender identity; • S p eakers bureau for classes and even t s o n various as pect s of sexua l ori entation, gender identity an d r elated issues; • Training programs and workshops abo ut combating homophobia, transphobia, working with GLBT individuals, and sensitivity consi d erations; • Library of books, v ide os and r esource files availab l e for r esearch an d l e i s ure; • S p onsore d even ts; educational, academic, a nd socia l ; s uch as Nat i o nal Coming Out Day Ce lebra tion , GLBT Awar eness Month keyno t e speaker , Worl d AIDS Day, Transgender Day of Remem b r ance and many other forums providing in formation and dialogue about GLBT issues. T h e GLBT St udent Services offi ce is located in the Tivoli Student Un ion, Room 213, and i s staffed by a director with the support of student employees and volunt eers. Input and invo lvem en t from the entire campus community is welcome. For additional information call 303-556 6333, visit www.mscd. edu/ g lbtss or email info@glbtss.org. Health Center at Auraria All Metro State studen t s have access to medical services at the Health Center. Student health insurance is NOT required in orde r t o use the Health Center. Phy icia ns , physician ass i s t ants, nurse practitioners and medical assista nt s s taff t he facility. Studen t s will be aske d t o comple t e a s i gn-in shee t an d show a current semester lD card each time they check in. Services include treatment of illness and injuries, lab testing, m edications, physicals, health maintenance exams , sexually transmitte d disease inf ormatio n /testing, birt h con trol information/services, minor sur gery, cholesterol screening, immunizations, HIV testing, blood pressure checks, casting, sut uring an d X-ray. Payment is required at the time of service except for students who participate in the Student Health Insurance Program. Plan exceptions or co-pays may apply. Sch edule d and walk-in a pp oin tm e nt s are avaUable. Walk -in services begin a t 7:50a.m., Mo nd ay-Friday. Walk in access varie s daily, continge nt upon when all patient s l ots have b een filled; thus , the dail y closure time for walk -in care is variable. Patients are encourage d to call for a n appointment or walk in as early as possible . The Health Center at Aura ria is located in the Plaza Building, Room 150, on the lower level. Brochures with ad diti onal information are availab l e a t th e Health Ce nter or go t o our W e b s it e a t www.mscd.edu/student / resources/health/ . For further detai l s call 303-556-2525. High School Upward Bound This program is designed to generate the skills and motivation necessary for success in and beyond high school for youths who are low-income a nd first-generation college-bound students. The program provides intensive academic instruction during the schoo l yea r , as well as a six-week summer sess ion . A full range of academic skill preparation in r eading, writing, a nd mathematics is p art of a compre hen s ive co unselin g and enrichment program. Upon completion of t heir high school st ud ies, program partici pants are enrolled in the Upward Bound Bridge Program , prior to pursuing their full-time postsecond ary studies at an in titu t ion of their choice and ability. This program develops creative thinking, effec tive ex p ression and po s itive attitudes toward l earning. The students are recruit ed at the beg inni ng of their so ph omore year in high school from five target-area high schools located in Denver Co un ty (East, Linco ln , Manual , North, and West High School). For additional information call303556-2812.

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SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS 35 Immigrant Ser vic es Program The Immigrant Services Program provides assistance to students whose first language is not English. The program offers intensive academic and personal advising, assessment, tutoring, assisting with the financial aid application process, and monitoring student progress . Because the program does not offer ESL classes , students with limited English proficiency are referred to the appropriate curricula. For more information call 303-556-3676 . Information Technology Information Technology at Metropolitan State College of Denver provides students with the opportu nity to use the most current technology either on campus or from home. Metropolitan State College of Denver offers more than 30 computer laboratories for use by all current students . The software in labo ratories ranges from word processing and compu t er graphics to the most current engineering software . Information on the location and operating hours of student labs is available in the current class schedule or at www.mscd.edu/ infotech/complabs/hours.htrn. Metro State students needing adaptive equipment or additional assistance with technology due to a d i sability can visit the Access Center, Library Room 116. The computer lab currently has software to assist students with hearing, learning, visual and ortho pedic disabilities. Further information is available at www.mscd.edu/ access; 303-556 8387 (Access Cente r). The Metro State Homepage (www . mscd.edu) provides many online services for students including: • online registration • online admissions • orientation and assessment • fmancial aid • records • course cata l og • class schedules Responsible Use Policy Before students receive e-mail accounts , they are required to read and agree to the Responsible Use of Technology Resources Policy. This policy is in place to protect all students, faculty, and staff, as well as the stability of the computing environment. It is important to be familiar with the terms of the Responsible Use Policy as misuse of computing resources may include suspensio n of computing privileges, referral to an appropriate authority on campus and referral to a law enforcement agency. Disciplinary action by the College may include suspension, expulsion and requirements to make financial restitution. The policy is listed in the student handbook and online at www . mscd.ed u /info t ec h /policies/itpolicy2.htrn. Information Technology at Metro State is committed to providing students with the best possible com puting service on campus and from home. Assistance is available in the student labs or through the Metro State Cen t er for Techno l ogy Services at l-877-35ASKIT (1-877-352-7548) or at www.mscd.edu/ AsklT. International Student Services Metro State provides a variety of services to interna t ional students atten d ing Metro State. These include counseling on visas, school transfers, work permission and housing; conducting academic and cultural orientation sessions; assisting with immigration issues; providing information to embassies and spon sors; advising on academic issues; and organizing social and cultu ral events. International students should contact the Academic Advising Center. Please see Internat i onal and Intercultural Education on page 52 of this Catalog. Metro Bridge Program The Metro Bridge Program ' s mission is to facilitate the successful transition of high school graduates as they enter Metro State and to increase the academic preparedness , retention, and graduation of participants in the intensive summer program. Program partic i pan t s develop through academic an d social learning communities that unite students from diverse cultural and social backgrounds in an

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36 SERVICES & PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS environment that promotes academic exce llenc e and co llegiality. Students receive a scho l ars hip for the summer program , earn college credit, and participate in enrichment workshops and activities that enhance their summer experience, transition , and connectio n to Metropolitan State College of Denver. The office is located in Central lassroom Building , Room 102. For information call 303-556-4023. Metro North and Metro South Please see The Campuses on page 6 of this Catalog. ShortTerm E mergency Student Loan Program The Short Term Emergency Student Loan Progran1 offers s h ort-term (30-day) i nterest-free loans to eli gible Metro State College st ud ents of up to $210.00 per loan; with a maxim um of two loans per term. Applications are available at the Scholarsh ip Center in the Central Classroo m , room 120, Monday-Fri day from 8 a.m. to 5 p . m. Qualifying criteria, procedures for submission and online applications are available through our Web s it e (www. mscd.edu/financialaid /types/shortterm.shtml); or contact the Short Term Loan office in the cholarship Center at 303-352-4247. Student Travel Program The Student Travel Program is pleased to offer funding opportunities up to $2,000 to qualified student groups and up to $650 for qualified individual students to he lp facilitate their attendance at educat i onal conferences nationwide. (Individual students may only be considered when they have been invited to give poster presentations, conference workshops or papers, or they have some other significant role in the conference .) Expenses for transportation, conference registration, and lodgin g may b e considered for funding from Student Travel. Students must formally app l y for this funding at l east two months prior to the event, along with their faculty or administrative advisor who has agreed to attend the conference with them. Detailed information about student eligibility, procedures for applying , the proposal due dates, other qualifying criteria and the online application are available on our Web site at www.mscd. edu/-travel. More information is also availab l e in Tivoli 305, or call 303-556-5 0 26 or 303 556 2595. Student Inter vention Services Stu dent Intervention Services (SIS) administers and enforces th e Academic S t anding Policy by working close l y with Academic Affairs. SIS works with many academ icall y strugg ling students whose cumul ative GPA is below 2.0, and with Re-admit students whose cumulative GPA is below 2.0. Students are assisted with developing an individualized success strategy which may include assistance with advising, sched ul ing, and referrals to appropriate services. SIS also reviews a nd make decisio n s on Suspension Appeals for Academically Suspended students wanting to remain enro lled at the College . Students identified as needing our services are notified by e-mail and an academic hold is placed on their registration until they meet with a SIS staff member. SIS also administers the Academic Alert Program which provides staff and faculty with mid term grades to assist students as early as possible in th e semeste r . Student Success Program The Student Success Program's (SSP) goal is to assist provis i onally admitte d student s with comprehen sive and individualized services to successfully transition them into Metro State. The s tructured serv i ces and programming that SSP offers are peer a dvi sing, acade mic monitoring, and referral to other cam pus services. These efforts are to positively affect retention and graduation rates, and for the students to help themselves through college. Students admitted under this provision will be contacted after they have attende d orientation, taken the assessment tests, and regi tered for class. The office is located in the Cen tral C la ssroom Building 102, 303-556-4023. Federal TRIO Student Support Services Program The Federal TRIO tudent Support Services program is designed to improve the retention a nd gradua tion rates of first generation , low income students and stude nts with disabilities at Metro State. Students enrolled in the program receive tutoring , personal counse ling , academic a d v ising, a sista nce in obtain ing financial aid, and opportunities to participate in cultura] activities. The program also provides edu ca tional and graduate sc hool workshops , computer -ass isted instru ction a nd basic ski lls inst ru ction in

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reading , writing, and mathematics. The Office of Student Support Serv i ces is lo cated in Centra l Class room 101. For more informat ion call 303-556-4722. The Spring International Language Center at Auraria Intensive English classes at the pring International Language Center focus on all langu age skills: grammar, reading , writing and listening/speaking, in addition to special electives that students can choose each term, such as TOEFL preparation, vocabulary building and pronunciation. Five nine-week terms are offered throughout the year to enable students to complete their English study quickly. Students are placed at one of the six levels, with assessment of learner outcomes at the compl etion of each level. Spring International Language Center is located on the fourth floor of the Tivoli Student Union , Room 454 . For more information call 303 -5341616. Tivoli Student Union The Tivoli Student Union, managed by Student Auxiliary Services, is the h eart of campus se r vice an d social activities . The Student Union houses Student Government, Activities and Life offices as well as the newspaper offices for Metro State, the Community College of Denver, and th e University of Colorado Denver. Other Metro State offices located here include the Tutoring Center, e.den Student Computer Lab , the Counseling enter, New Student Orientat ion, Testing and Assessment, a n d the UCD Ca reer Counseling Center. You will also find the tri-institutional office of the GLBT at the Student Union. Additional student services at the Tivoli Student Union include the Auraria Campus Bookstore, Campus omputers, the Club Hub, Clicks! Copy Center, Conference Service s, and the ID Program and Commuter Resource Center . Conference Se r vices, located in Tivoli 325, wil l h elp you make arr angements for meeting space in the Tivoli, St. Francis, St. Cajetan's and the P.E. Event Center, as well as outdoor table rentals. If you want a break or a quiet place to study, the Tivoli Student Union i s just the place . With a wide variety of food venue you will fmd a place to suit your appetite, schedule and budget. If you would rather retreat, you can watch TV in the Roger Braun Student Lounge, play a game of pool at Sigi's Poo l Hall and Arcade, meet a study group in the multicultural lounge or study in total silence in the Garage Quiet Study Lounge . For more information about the Tivoli Student Union, call 303-556-6330. Tutoring Program The Tutoring Program provides free tutoring assistance to all students enrolled at Met r opolitan Sta te College of Denver in an effort to promote academic success. The Tutoring Center promotes an environ ment that is welcoming to the d i verse student body of Metro State b y providing p r ofessionally trai n e d tutors who are competent in subject material and areas s uch as diversity, learning styles, and communication. You can either schedule a session with a tutor or yo u can simply drop in during our group tutor ing time s . The office is located in the Tivoli 124 and online at www.mscd.edu/-tutoring. Veterans Services The Veterans ervices Office assists students in obtaining their G J Bill education entitlement. The Vet erans Services Office acts as the liai son between tl1e U.S. Departme n t of Veteran Affairs and the vetera n / dependent student. Different VA classifications provide different types of entitlement. Student veterans/ dependents may be eligible for tutorial assistance, VA work-study, advance payment, emergency student l oans, etc. The office also certifies and tra cks the aca d emic progress of entit l ed vete r a ns. I f there are any questions or problems regarding eligibility, payment, tutoring, etc. , please speak with a representative in CN 203 or call 303-556-2993. Federal TRIO Veterans Upward Bound The primary mission of the Veterans Upward Bound Program is to provide eligi ble military veterans with academic skills refresher training through a core curriculum of subjects that prepares them to learn as well as succeed at the p ostsecondary ed u cational l evel. VUB participants a r e also informed o f various support services that are available to all students on nearly every college campus. Upon sue-

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38 STUDENT LIFE cessful completion of the VUB Program, veteran participa nt s are not on l y familiar with the services a nd reso u rces t h at would be availabl e to th e m as college s tud e n ts, b u t more import antly th ey possess a renewed confidence in their academic abilit ies a vital asse t that is necessary for success in college. Women , s Services The Institute for Women's Studies and Ser vices is committed to the empowerment of women through education. To help st u de n ts have a positive college experie nce, women's ser vices provides referrals to cam p u s and comm uni ty reso u rces, informa t io n about scho l ars h ips, assis t ance with the process of en t er ing Metro State College, advocacy services f o r students dea lin g with harassme nt or d i scrimination, and programs and events that focus on issues of particular concern to women. The institute houses a small library with a variety of books and other resource materials on women ' s experiences, histories and con tributions to society. Call303 556-844l or stop by 1033 Ninth Street Park for more information. Writing Center The Writing Center staff of composition instructors and traine d writing tutors is committed to working with students in developing their writing a bili ties. Tutors he l p students identify problem areas and pro vide instruction on how to eliminate them. Through one-on-one instruction, tutors teach students to generate, organize, and develop ideas ; to revise and edit with confidence ; and to handle issues of format and documentation. For more information contact the Wr i t i ng Center at 303-556-6070 . STUDENT LIFE The Office of Student Life offers students a wide range of services and programs designed to enhance classroom experiences and encourage campus involvement. These co curricular programs include educational, cultural, recreational and socia l interaction as well as unique opportunities for leadership development. To learn more about these services, visit our offices located in th e Tivoli Student Union , Room 311 or call303-556-3559. The Web site is www.mscd.edu/-studlife. In addition, the Office of Student Life also administers the following programs: S tud e nt Aff ai r s Board (SA B ) -The Stude nt Affairs Board e n a b les stude nts to have contin u ous r epre senta t ion in the use and allocation of their s tud ent affairs fees. The SAB is comp r i sed of student govern ment representatives, faculty senate represen t atives and adm i nistrative representatives . S tud e nt P r obl em Act i o n Ne t w or k (SPAN) -The SPAN Program is a network of volunteer advisors who he l p students resolve problems they may be experiencing with faculty, staff or other students in the Metro State classroom or workplace. Advisors are there to: h elp sort out the facts in a given situation, identify specific issues a n d concerns, recog ni ze the perspective of others invo l ved in a situat i o n , artic u late o pti ons for reso luti o n , for mul ate strategies for reso l ving tl1e s it uation, h e l p n aviga t e cam pu s syst e m s and adv ise the student on how to implemen t the chosen stra tegy. Outstandi ng S tudent and W ho's Who Award s -The Office of Student Life partners with academic departments and hosts the annual college-wide Outstanding Student Awards and the selection of nomi nees for Who ' s Who in American Universities and Colleges. Judicial Affairs The responsibility of the Office of Judicial Affairs is to admin i ster the discipline system for Metro State. Metro State's Standards of Conduct clearly state the College's expectations for student behavior . For additional information, refer to the Student Handbook or visit the Tivoli, Room 311. Information is also available on our Web site at: www . ms c d.edu/-judicial . Student Activities Tivoli Stu dent Union (TV) 305, (303) 5562595, studentactivities.mscd.edu The Office of Student Activities enriches students' college experiences by he l ping them "Ge t Involved & Learn More " about campus life through dy n amic activities such as events, cocurricular opportunities, stude n t organizations, leadership edu cation and Metro COOL.

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STUDENT LIFE 3 Programs, events and co-curricular opportunities help to stimulate, educate, challenge and entertain the student body. Through co-sponsorships with other universities, student organizations and academic departments, Student Activities facilitates bringing prominent national and local figures and stimulat i ng expe r iences t o the students. Spec ific programs include the follow ing: Distinguis h e d Lecture Series This series hosts locally , regionally and internationally recognized speakers who inspire students to think critically about current issue s and events. Student Organization Se r vices Metro Student Organizations provide a variety of programs that are stimulating and invigorating enhancing students' co-curricu l ar and extracurricular experiences. Student Organization Services can assist in helping students find the right organization or in creating a new one. We have more than I 00 registered student organizations at Metro State. Leadership join other students in exploring l eadership through workshops, seminars, speakers and conferences. These programs are designed to give you tools to create change in your community . Over 300 stu dents participate in one of our leadership programs each year. Metro COOL Metro COOL is a campus-wide program offering ongoing and one-time volunteer opportunities. Stu dents can match up with local agencies looking for volunteers with our online database through the Stu dent Activities Web site. Metro COOL also s ponsors monthly service events designed to make immedi ate impact on a community while connecting Metro students to one another. Make an impact on you r community today! Student Technological Services tudent Technological ervices is on the front line c reating interactive , technologically stimulating and highly dynamic digital media . Through our efforts, the campus broadcasts events live across the Inter net. By archiving videos of campus events for future release and Internet viewing, we are able to provide a wider outreach to those who are interested in campu s archives. Student Techno l ogical Services also maintains and develops an online Discussion Forum for cam pus involvem e nt , and creates interactive resource CDs and DVDs for a full service online activities office. Laptop Lease This exciting program provides students with an opportunity to lease an laptop for a semester at an affordable price. These l a ptops are the latest in technology, offering the ability to compute anywhere on campus via Wi-Fi access. Enjoy the ability to write your term paper at home or under the old oak tree in the park. Student Government Assembly Metropolitan State College Student Government Assembly is an elected body that exist to represent and act in the interests of the students. Student Government Assembly (SGA) works to create oppor tunities for student involvement and success through its programs, and works to su tain and improve them each year. The SGA includes three additional elected representatives: the Board of Trustees Stu dent Representative and the two representatives to the Student Advisory Committee to the Auraria Board (SACAB). Together the assembly works to ensure that students' voices are heard and represented in all level of the College's administration. The SGA offices are located in the Tivoli 307, phone number 303-556-3312. Our Web site is www.mscd.edu/-sga. Student Media The Office of S tudent Media, lo cated in Tivoli 313, produces a variety of student-operated med i a designed to keep the campus informed and entertained. The office' diverse staff of students produces a weekly newspaper, The Metropolitan; a weekly video newscast, The Met Report ; a Web based radio sta tion, Met Radio; an annual literary and arts magazine, Metrosphere; and the annual Student Handbook .

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40 STUDENT LIFE The Metropolitan offe r s students the opportuni ty to explore s uch fields as reporting, photography, Web page design, graphic arts, marketing and advertising through work experie nce. The Metropolitan and it s Web site, The Met Online (www . mscd.edu/-themet), are p rod uced ent ir ely by M etro S t a t e stude n ts and a r e p u b l ished weekly during the fall and spring a nd monthly durin g the s ummer. The Em my Award-winning Met Report can be seen weekly on Corneas! Channe l 54 or on the Internet at metreport.mscd.edu. The newscast keeps students informed on campus happenings and Denver n ews. Met Radio offers diverse , student-prod u ced pr og ramming throu g h its Webcast at metrad i o.m sc d . edu or at FM 88.3 in the Tivoli. Metrosphere, Metro State's annual literary and arts magazine, is published each spring and feature poetry, fictio n , n on-fict ion , a rt a nd photography. Submi ions for the stu d e nt pr oduce d m agaz in e are acce pt e d during the fall semester. Cop i es are distributed f r ee to students a nd a r e available in T i voli 313. Metrosphere can be found online at www.mscd.edu/-msphe re. The Student Handbook is a complete guide to navigating Metro State. Publis h ed each year, the handbook offers information on everything from e-mail accoun t s to financial a id , as well as a sec tion on acade mi c and campus policies. It also is online at: handbook.mscd.edu . Students interested in worki n g for the Offi ce of Student Media should vis it Tiv oli 313 an d f ill out an application , or call 3 0 3-556-2507. Campus Rec r ea tion The Campus Recreation at Aura ria program is among the most affordable ways that stu d en t s h ave found to enjoy t h emse l ves, and it i s amo n g th e best recreat i on programs offered in Co l orado . The program i s composed of the DropIn Program (informa l recreation), lntramurals, Outdoor Adventure, Personal Training. and the Physically Challenged Program. Student membership is free with a current, validated stu d ent !D. T h e Drop in Program provide s group and indi vidual activ it ies for studen ts, faculty, staff, alumni an d g u ests. Facilities includ e thr ee basketball co urts, 6 tennis cou rts, volleyball co urts, a 25-yar d indoor pool, two handball/racquetball courts, one squash co urt , a fitness center , a dance s tudio, and a climbing wall. In add ition , Campus R ecreation offers a myriad of group fitness classes in ste p , h i hop , muscl e scu lpting, car di o sa l sa, indoor cycling, abs & back , water fitness and more. The Drop-in Program also offers a new instruc tional component, Get Fit Clinics, which con ists of a variety of noncredit instruc tional work sho ps, clinics and seminars . Check the Drop-in Program sched ule in Room 108 of the Physical E du cation Building o r call 303-556-3210 for a listing of available times . The Intramural Program consists of individual and team activities open to all students, faculty and staff members. The emphasis of the program is on participation, sportsmans hip and social interaction. Whenever possible, competitive and recreat i onal di visions are offered to ens ur e p articipatio n for all abil ity l evels. Activities include flag football, basketball, floor hockey, volleybal l , dodge ball and racquetball leagues, as well as tennis tournaments. Outdoor Adventure provides the opportunity to experience the beauty and c hall enge of nature through organized trips . The program provides outdoo r recreational experiences e mpha s i z i ng skill acquisition, social int eraction, enviro nm ental awareness, and safety. Some of the many adventures offere d are bik ing, canoeing , cross-co untr y skiing, downhill skiing, family-fun outings, hiking, ice climb ing, kayaking/ r afting, n aturalist outings, r ock climbing , indoor climbing , and sailing . The program a l so provides r e ntal eq uipm e nt , including camp in g and hiking gear, canoes, and cross-country skis. The office i s located in the basement of the Events Center. The Physically Challe n ge d Program offers a variety of sporting, recreational, and fitness oppor tunities for s tudent s with physical or learning limitations. The adaptive programs/s e rvices e nc ompass one-on-one or grou p sessions that ass i st in using the recreation e quipment an d facilities. Information on planned group activit i es or individual help sessions i s available in the Events Center, Room 108, 303-556-3210.

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Intercollegiate Athletics The Intercollegiate Athletics program plays an integral role in campus life at The Metropolitan State Co l lege of Denver . Metro tate offers 12 intercollegiate sports programs: baseball, men's basketball , women's basketball, men's cross country, women's cross country, men's soccer, women's soccer, men's swimming and diving, women ' s swimming and diving , men's tennis , women's tennis and women's volleyball. The teams, nickn ame d the Roadrunners , compete at the Division II level of the National Collegiate Ath letic Association (NCAA). The Roadrunners are members of the 14-member Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference (RMAC), which was founded in 1909 and features modest -s ized schoo l s with l imited ath letic budgets. Scholarships are available for each of the 12 intercoll egiate sports. They are distributed by individual coaches on the basis of merit, athletic ability and team needs. Scholarships are awarded on a yearly basis. The Intercollegiate Athletics Office is located in the Administration Building , Suite 560RR, 303556-8300. ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS Credit for Prior Learning Successful completion of national examinations, department a l examinations, or a prior learning portfo lio , or assessment of nonaccredited training programs through published guides may be used to award credit or may permit placement in advanced courses. A student may earn up to 60 semester hours of credit toward degree requirements using prior learning credit options. This credit will be posted to t h e student's record after the comp l etion of 8 semester hours of residency credit at Metro State . Prior learn ing credit may not be used toward the last 12 semester hours of a degree program , does not substitute for residency requirements , and cannot be used to challenge prerequisite courses for courses already completed. Students are advised that l ette r grades are not assigned for such credit, and some institutions may not accept transfer credits that do not include letter grades. Additional information is available from the offices indicated in each section below. Advanced Placement E x amination s Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate Advanced Placement (AP) examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board may have official scores submitted directly to the Office of Admissions for consid eration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate department chair, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted . AP credit is awarded after the completion of 8 credit hours at Metro State (see following chart). Students should contact www.colleg eboard .co m or 888-225-5427 to request official AP scores; Metro State's AP code is 4505 . C O U R SE C REDI T AWAR DS FOR A D VANCE D PLACEMENT EXAMS APSCORE 2 3 4 5 Biology BIO 1080 3 BIO 1080 3 BIO 1080 -3 & BIO 1090-1 & BIO 1090-1 & BIO 1090-1 Chemistry CHE 1800 -4 CHE 1800 -4 CHE 1800-4 CHE 1810 -4 CHE 1810-4 CHE 1850 2 CHE 1850-2 Computer cs 1050 -4 cs 1050 -4 Science (A) Computer cs 1050 -4 cs 1050 -4 cs 1050-4 Science (AB) cs 2050-4 cs 2050-4 Economics ECO 2010-3 ECO 2010-3 ECO 2010-3 (Macro) Economics ECO 2020-3 ECO 2020-3 ECO 2020-3 (Micro)

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42 ALTERNATIVE CRE DIT OPT I ONS English ENG 1010-3 ENG 1010-3 ENG 1010-3 (Comp & Lit) ENG 1100 3 E G 1020-3 E G 1020-3 ENG 1100 3 ENG 1100-3 English ENG 1010-3 ENG 1010-3 ENG 1010-3 (Lang & Comp) ENG 1020-3 ENG 1020 3 Gov ' t & Politic s PSC 1010 -3 PSC 1010-3 PSC 1010-3 (U.S.) Geography-Human GEG 1300-3 GEG 1300 3 GEG 1300 3 Environmental ENV 1200-3 ENV1200-3 ENV1200 3 Science French FRE 2 110 -3 FRE 2010-3 FRE 2010-3 Language FRE 2110-3 FRE 2020-3 FR3 French Literature FRE 2110-3 FRE 2 110-3 FRE 2110-3 FRE 3010-3 German GER 1020-5 GER2110-3 GER 2110-3 GER 2110 3 Language GER 2120-3 GER2120-3 GER2120-3 GER 2310-3 GER23103 GER2320-3 German GER 1020-5 GER 2110-3 GER2110-3 GER 2110-3 Literature GER 2120-3 GER 2120-3 GER 2120 3 GER2310-3 GER2310-3 GER 2320 3 History HIS 1210-3 1210-3 HIS 1210-3 (American) HI 1220-3 HIS 1220-3 History HIS 1010 3 HIS 1010-3 HIS 1010-3 (E uropean ) HIS 1020-3 HIS 1020 3 Histo1HIS 1030 3 HIS 1030-3 HIS 1030-3 (Worl ) HIS 1040-3 HIS 1040 3 Math (Calc AB) MTH 1400-4 MTH 1410-4 MTH 1410 4 Math (Calc BC) MTH 1400 4 MTH 1410-4 MTH 1410 4 MTH 2410-4 MTH 2410 4 Physics (B) PHY 2010-4 PHY 2010-4 PHY 2010 4 PHY 2030 1 PHY 2030-1 PHY2030-1 PHY2020-4 PHY 2020-4 PHY 2020-4 PHY 2040-1 PHY 20401 PHY20401 Physics PHY2311 4 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2311-4 (CMechanics ) PHY 2321-1 PHY 2321-1 PHY 2321-1 Physics PHY 2311-4 PHY 2311-4 PHY 2311-4 ( CMagnetism , PHY 2321 1 PHY 2 321-1 PHY2321-I Elec) PHY 2331-4 PHY 2331 -4 PHY2331 4 PHY 2341 1 PHY 2341-1 PHY 2341-1 Psychology PSY 1001-3 PSY 1001-3 Spanish SPA 1020-5 SPA 2110 3 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2110-3 Language SPA 2120 3 SPA 2 1 20-3 SPA 2120 3 SPA 2310-3 SPA 2310 -3 SPA 2320-3 Spanis h SPA 1020-5 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2110-3 SPA 2110-3 Literature SPA 2120 -3 SPA 2120-3 SPA 2120 3 SPA 2310-3 SPA 2310 3 Statistics MTH 1210 4 MTH 1210-4 MTH 1210 4

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ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS 43 Inte r national B a ccalaureate Met ro Sta t e recogn izes the hig h level of ach i eve m e n t th a t t h e I nt e rn atio nal Baccala ur eate (I B) Dip l o m a P rog ram represents. Stude nt s who complete th e IB Di p loma Prog ram an d the IB examinations are guaranteed a d mission to the College and are elig i b l e to receive c r edi t and advanced placement stand ing. To receive cre d i t , a stude n t mus t rece ive at l east a sco r e of four (4) on each IB examination and call 2 1 2-696-4464 t o r equest th a t official sco res be m ailed di r ectly to th e Office of Admi ssio n s from the I B organization. For specific equivalencies, see the t ab l e below . Please co n tact the Office of Admissions at 303-556-3058 for more i n formation. Stu d ents s h o u ld consult wit h the appropria t e department for f urth er ad vising a nd with the i r m ajo r depa r tments a b o u t acceptance of credi t s towar d their majors. INTE R NA TIONAL B ACCA L AU RE A T E T RAN SFE R CRE D IT AWARD lB Exam Le vel of Exam M etro S t a t e Equiv alence Seme s t e r Metro S t ate G e n e ra l Exa m Score Hours Studies A r e a Anthropology Higher 4 thru 7 ANT 1310 w/3 hrs 6 Social ciences elective Standard 4 thru 7 Anthropology elective 3 Social Sciences Art-Design A Higher 4 thru 7 ART 1200 w/ 3 hrs elective 6 Standard 4 thru 7 ART 1200 -3 3 Art-Visual Higher 4 thru 7 Art elective 6 Standard 4 thru 7 Art e l ec tive 3 Biology Higher 5 thru 7 B I O I 080-3, B l O I 0901 w 2 hrs 6 Natural Sciences elective Higher 4 Biol ogy elective 6 Standard 4 thru 7 BIO 1000-3 3 Natural Sciences Chemistry Higher 4 thru 7 CHE 1100 -4, CHE 1150-1 w/1 6 atural ciences hr elective Standard 4 thru 7 CHE 1010 -3 3 Natural Sciences Computer Science Higher 4 thru 7 CMS 1 010-3 w/3 hrs elective 6 Standard 4 thru 7 CMS 1010 -3 3 Dance Higher 4 thru 7 Th eatre elective 3 Eco nomks Highe r 4 thru 7 ECO 20 1 0 -3 w/3 hrs e l ect ive 6 Soc i al Sciences Standard 4 thru 7 Econo m ics elective 3 Social Science English (A-I) Higher 4 thru 7 ENG 1010-3 , ENG 1100 3 6 Composition -3 Lang (AI) Higher 4 thru 7 FRE 3110 -3 & FRE 3320-3 or 6 Frenc , German, GER 3010-3 & GER 3210-3 or Spanish SPA 3110-3 & SPA 3250-3 Standard 4 thru 7 FRE, GER . SPA 1010-5, 1020-5 10 Communications Foreign Lan g (B) Higher 4 th ru 7 FRE 201 0 -3 & FRE 2020-3 or 6 GER 2110-3 & GER 2120 or SPA 2 1 1 0-3 & SPA 2120-3 Standard 4 thru 7 FRE, GER, SPA 1010 -5, 1020-5 10 Communications Geography Higher 4 thru 7 ENV 1 200-3 w/3 hrs e l ect ive 6 Natural Sciences (Environme nt a l Sys) S t anda r d 4 thru 7 E n vironmental elective 3 Natural Sciences History of Africa Higher 4 th ru 7 H is tory elective 6 Historical Standard 4 thru 7 History elective 3 Historical Hi t ory of Americas Higher 4 thru 7 Histor y elective 6 Historical Standard 4 thru 7 History elective 3 Historical Hist ory of Europe Higher 4 thru 7 H I S 1010 -3, HIS 1020-3 6 Historical Standard 4 thru 7 H I S 1010 -3 3 Historical japanese Higher 4 thru 7 Modern Language s elective 6 Standard 4 thru 7 Mo dern Languages e l ective 3 Latin Higher 4 thru 7 Mo d ern Languages e l ect ive 6 Standard 4 thru 7 Mo d e rn Languages elect ive 3 Mathematics* Standard 4 thru 7 MTH 1110 4 4 Mathematics

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44 ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS M athematics' Higher 5 thru 7 MTH 14104 4 Mathemati c s Higher 4 MTH 14004 4 Mathematics Math Methods* Standard 5 thru 7 MTH 11104 4 Mathematic s Standard 4 Mathematics elective 3 Mathem a tics Math Studies' Standard 4 thru 7 Math e m atics e lective 3 M a t h e matics Physics Higher 4 thru 7 PHY 20 I 0 4 , PHY 20204 , 1 0 Natura l Sciences PHY 2030-1, PHY 2040 1 Standard 4 thru 7 PHY 10004 4 Natural S ciences Psychology Higher 4 thru 7 P Y 1001-3 w / 3 hrs elective 6 ocial Sciences Standard 4 thru 7 Psychology elect i v e 3 Social Sciences Russian Higher 4thru7 Modern L a n g ua g e s electiv e 6 Standard 4thru7 Modern Lang uage s electi v e 3 Theater Higher 4 thru 7 THE 2210 3 w / 3 hrs e lectiv e 6 Art s & Letters Standard 4 thru 7 Theat e r elective 3 Art s & L e tters •see Math D e partm ent for furthe r a dv i sing. College-Level Examination Program ( CLEP) The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) consists of a series of national standardized examinations. They are designed to evaluate nonaccredited college -level learning in order to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge. Based on the results of one or more of the CLEP examinations that are accepted at Metro State, the College may award up to 30 credits toward the General Studies require ments. Thus, students may test out of many of the traditional courses required during the freshman year. Students are advised to check with their major departments for informa t ion on specific General Studies requirement that may not be met through the use ofCLEP examinations. Metro S t ate does not allow CLEP to be used for ENG 1020 , Freshman C omposition : Analysis , Research and Documentation. o more than 60 credits ma y be earned through all the approved CLEP examinations. • Cre dit earned t h ro u gh the English composition with essay, humaniti es, natura l sciences, social sciences/history, and college mathematics examin a tions may be applied only to General Studies requirements. Credit earned through the other approved e xaminations may appl y to any require ments unless otherwise stated. • C r e d it earned will b e e n tered on the st u de nt's transcri pt w i th the title of th e exam i na t io n (s) a n d wit h out reference to any specific Metro State course(s) . CLEP examinations are recorded with out reference to a letter grade and are not figured into the student ' s GPA. Credit earned through CLEP examinations d oes not count toward residency credit requiremen t s and therefore may not b e awarded as p a r t of the last 12 credit h o ur s app l icab l e t o a degree. • Cre d it earned throug h CLEP examinations will not be recorded on the student's permanent record until the student has earned 8 hours in re s idenc y credit at Metro State . Students may take CLEP examinations prio r to meeting the 8 credit hour residency requirement , in which case the scores will b e maintai n e d in the t u de nt's record and appropria t e credit awarded when the 8 credit hour res i dency requirement is met. • In order to have CLEP examination or military examination (DA TES) result s evaluated , the stu dent should have a copy of the official score report sent to, Metropolitan State College of Denver, Office of Admissions, Campus Box 16, P.O. Box 173362 , Denver , CO 80217 3362. To request an off i cial CLEP score report , contact www.collegeboard.com / clep or 800 257 9558 . Metro State ' s CLEP code is 4505. DANTES test scores can be obtained by calling 8 5 0-452 -1063. • All CLEP exami n atio n s will be subject to the statement of polic y in place at the time the scores are s ub mitted, not the policy in place at the time the examinat i on was taken. • Credit awarded t h rough CLEP examinations at other colleges or universities will be re evaluated at Metro State according to the Metro State policy in place at the time the tes t scores are s ubmitted. Students are advised to have an official copy of their s core(s) sent to the College in order to have that credit evaluated.

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• Metro State will not grant credit for a CLEP examination if, prior to the semester the exam is taken, a stude nt ha s completed, or was enrolled in , college courses equivalent to or more advanced than the subject material of the exam. Credit will not be recorded on a student' s permanent record until all official transcripts from other regionally accredited colleges and universities attended by the student have been received and evaluated by the Office of Admissions. • Any exception to these policies must be approved through the Board on Academic Standards Exceptions (BASE). Information about filing an appeal through BASE is available from the student's dean's office. • Failure to achieve the required score(s) listed will not be entered on the permanent record. How ever, a copy of the CLEP score report will be retained in the student's ftle. • Any examination may be repeated six months after the date of the previous examination. For advising assistance with CLEP examinations and information about departmental credit by exami nation and portfolio assessment, students may contact the Center for Individualized Learning, St. Fran cis Center, 2nd floor, Room 10, 303-556-8342. Additional information about the content and format of CLEP examinations is available through the College Board Web site at www.collegeboard . com/clep. Examinations may be taken through the Community College of Denver Test Center, 303-556-3810, South Classroom 223. Other official testing centers can be found through the College Board Web site l i sted above . CLEP EXAMINATION STANDARDS CLEPExam Minimum MSCD MSCD Gene r a l No Credit for Prior Score for Credit Studies Enro llment ' MSCD Credit American Government 56 3 Social Sciences PSC 1010 American Literature 55 3 . ENG 2210,2220 Analysis and lnterpreta 60 3 Arts & Letters ENG 1100,1110,1120 tion of Literature ' En81ish Composition 50 3 Freshmen E G 1010' wi 1 Essay Composition E n glish Literature 55 3 . ENG 2310 , 2330 French Language 50 10 Communications FRE 10 LO, 1020 French Language 62 16 Communications FRE 1010, 1020, 2010, 2110 General Biology 57 3 Natural Sciences BIO 1000 Calculus 54 3 Mathematics MTH 1410 College Algebra 54 3 Mat h emat ics MTH 1110 ' College Mathematics so 3 Mathematics MTH 1080 General Chemistry 63 4 . CHE 1800 General Chemistry 69 8 . CHE 1800, 1810 German Language 50 10 Communication GER 1010, 1020 German Language 63 16 Communications GER 1010,1020,2110 , 2310 History of th e US I 50 3 Historical HIS 1210 History of the US II so 3 His torical HIS 1220

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46 ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS CLEP EXAMINATION STAND A RDS CLE PExam Minimum MSCD MSCD G eneral No Credit fo r Prior Score for Credit Studies Enrollment' MSCD Credit Humanities 50 6 Arts & Letters ART 1040, MUS 1000 , ENG 1 100, 1110 or ENG ll20 Human Growth and 50 3 • PSY 2210 Deve l o pm ent ' Precalculus 54 3 Math MTH 1 400 Introd u ctory 50 3 . PSY 1001 Psyc h o l ogy '' Introd u ction to Educa 50 3 . PSY 1001 tiona! Psychology Introd u ctory Sociology' 58 3 Socia l Sciences soc 1010 Information Systems and 66 3 • CMS 1010 , CSS 1010 Computer Applications Princip les of 62 3 Socia l Sciences ECO 2010 Macroeconomics' Princip les of Marketing 62 3 . MKT3000 Princi p i e of 6 1 3 Socia l Sciences ECO 2020 Microeconomics Principles of 50 3 . MGT 3000 Manage m ent atural Sciences ' 50 6 Nat ural Sciences BIO 1000, AST 1040, C HE 1010, GEL 1010, PHY 1000 Socia l Science and 50 6 Social Sciences ECO 2010, HIS 1000, History' PSC 1010 , PSY 1001, soc 1010 Spa ni s h Language 50 10 Co mmun ications SPA 1010 , 1020 Spanish Language 66 16 Co mmuni cations SPA 1010 , 1020,2110, 2120 Wes t e rn i vilizatio n 50 3 Historical HIS 1020 Western Civilization II 50 3 Historical HI S 1020 Doe s n ot me et gen e ral educat i o n requirements 1 Alt h o u gh the exam ination s are essential l y ind ependent, where ther e is ove rlap , c r edit may be obtained b y completing only one of the two overlapping examinations. 'If during or subseque nt to the semester the exam is taken, the s tud ent earns credit in any co ur se(s) in co l umn 5, accepted at Metro State, the credit value of the co urse(s) will be s ubtracted from th e correspo nd ing CLEP cr e dit previo u s l y awarded . 3 Introductor y P ych ology may be applied to a psychology major or minor. ' Student s wishing to tak e Calculus I at Metro State must first pas s Metro State's departmental calcu lu s p l acement exam. Exam in ation sco re s are based on s tandards set by NTE/ETS and in consultation w ith the ap propriate depart ment c h a ir per so n .

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' .. , . ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS 4 . . . -. .._ . ( ,. " -. .. Attainment Ex aminations Any student may take attainment examinations in some departments for the purpose of waiving spe cific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination , although it does not reduce the number of credits required for graduation, entitles students to substitute their own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the course. Departmental Credit b y E x amination A department may grant a student credit for college courses for which the student reque sts and passes appropriate examinations. The charge for each credit hour requested is one-half the student's portion of in-state tuition for one credit h our, and must be paid prior to taking the examination. A maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be awarded through departmental credit by examination. Credit through departmental examination is based on knowledge equivalent to a regular course offered by the College. Omnibus-numbered courses are excluded. Permission for departmental credit by examination must be obtained in advance from the instructor giving the examination, the department chair and th e appro priate dean . To earn credit by examination, a student must be currently enrolled in good standing i11 a degree or cer tificate program at the College. Credit by examination may not be counted as part of the last 12 credit hours of a degree program unless it is approved by the Board on Academic Standards Exceptions (BASE). App l ications for submitting a request to BASE are available in the dean's offices in each schooL If a student h as registered for a higher numbered course in a sequence, t h e exam for a prerequisite for that higher-numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester. Credit by examination for a course which is a prerequisite for a course already completed will not be g ranted unless approved by BASE. Examinations cannot be taken to raise grades, to remove failures, or to remove " NC ;' "SP;' ''!; 'or " CC" notations. Credit by examination is not applicable toward academic residenc y requirements. C redit by examination cannot be obtained for a course in which a student has been enrolled at Metro State or at another regionally accredited college or university unless approved by BASE. Credit by examination will not be granted for courses attended as a listener , visitor or auditor. Examinatio n s for credit will be taken at a time specified by the department. A grade equival e nt to"!\' or "B" must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credits so earned for the course will be recorded without a grade on the s tudent's permanent record and are not considered in comput ing college grade point averages. The hours granted for credit by exam are not included as a part of the student ' s semester enrollment. The credit will appear on the transcript for the semester in which the examination was taken, but the hours do not count as part of the student's tota l enrollment for the purposes of financial aid or any other purpose predicated on total hours of enrollment for a given semester. Credit by examination will be posted after a student has comp l eted eight semester hours of credit at Metropolitan State College of Denver and after an evaluation of all transfer credit has been completed. The applicatio n form will be m a i n t ained in the student's ftle . No record of failures on such examinations will be ente r ed on the student's permanent record. Departmental examinations attempted for co u rse credit under these guidelines may not be repeated. Applications for departmental credit by examination are available at the Center for Individualized Learning {303-556-8342) and from the Office of the Registrar (Central Classroom lOS). Portfolio Asse s sment Students may apply for credit for college-level learning gained through experience by preparing and submitting a p r ior learning portfolio. Credit is awarded on the basis of a careful assessment of the prior learning portfolio by faculty in the department from which credit is sought. Portfolio assessment is available in many , but not all, academic departments. To earn credit, a student must be a continuing st u dent enrolle d in good stan din g in a degree o r certificate program .

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48 ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPT I ONS The portfolio is deve l oped with th e assistance of the Cen ter for Individuali z ed Learning , 303-556-8342. Portfolio assessment may be u se d to apply for credit for s pecific courses listed in the Catalog. Studen t s ma y also appl y for credit for omnibus courses th rough portfolio assessme nt with the p e rmi ss ion of the appropriate academic department. Applicants for credi t through portfolio assessment wiJI generally be required to take E D S 268 0 1, T he Portfolio Development Workshop, whic h i s offered as a correspon dence course. Po l icies that govern credit for prior l ear ning options apply to c redit awarded through the portfolio pro cess. T h e charge for each credit h our assesse d i s one-half the student's portion of in-state tuition for one credit hour. The assessment cha rg e is pa yab l e prior to evaluation of the portfolio b y faculty for academic credit. Co ntact the Cente r for Individu alized Learning for assista n ce and further information (St. Francis Cen ter , 2n d floor , Room LO, 303-556-8342). Inform atio n sessions about portfolio assessment and other cred it for prior learning options are held on a r eg ul a r bas is . Information i s available on our Web site: www.mscd.edu/-cil/. Credit for Military Training and Oth er T r a ining Program s Military training and other educational programs, including DAN TES, that have b een assesse d for co l lege cre d it b y the American Council on E ducation (ACE) will b e eva luat e d by the Office of Admis sions for transfer cre dit a t Metro S t a t e . For f o rmal military training, cop i es of trainin g certificates and a co p y of the DD 2 1 4 or DD-295 should be s ubmitt ed to the Office of Adm i ss ions. In addi tion , students with Army training s hould requ est that an official AARTS transcript be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions by calli n g 866-297-4427; those w ith Air Force training should request an official Communi ty College of the Air Force transcript by calli n g 334-953-2794 . Students w ith trainin g from the Navy or Mar i n es should r e quest an official SMART tran sc ript by calling 877 253-7 122. For all other training , request official ACE tran sc ript s by ca llin g 202-939 9434 . C r e dit l imit is 30 em ester hours. Cooperative E ducation The Cooperative Education Internship Cente r places students in work experiences r elate d to their aca demic major and minor. The purpose of the intern ships is to in t egrate acade mic training with actual work exper i e nce. This combination al l ows s tud e nts to m ake realistic career d ecis ions . gain valuab l e work experie nce , obtain r eco mm e ndation s for graduate s cho ol, and earn mon ey t o help defra y college expenses. Students work in l a rg e corporations, small busin esses, government and nonprofit agencies throughout the metrop olita n area. Most co-op tudents are paid by their employers, but in th ose professional fields where co-o p salaries a r e not availab le, volun t eer internship placements are offe r e d t o help st udents gain esse n t ia l work experience. Plea se see th e programs described below . Co-o p i n tern s hip plac e m e nts are availab l e in mo s t academic major s a nd minors. tudent s must complete 30 semester hours of co llege course work wi th a minimum 2.50 GPA and have a declared major to be eligib l e for registration witl1 co-op. No fees are charged to the s tudent or emp loyer for participation i n the program, and eac h student's interests and job requirements are dis c u ssed individually with a professional coordi n ator. Stude nts ma y c hoose f r om three different work sc h e dul es b ase d on tl1e aca dem i c calendar . The alternat ing plan pro vides full-time periods of work eve r y other emeste r with intervening semeste r s s pent in fulltime study. The parallel sc hedule places stude nts in a job whi l e th ey simultaneo usl y attend school. These positions are u sual l y part-time. T h e short t e rm/summer plan a llows stude nts to elect a work experience that lasts for no more than one semester. The Colleg e awa rds academic credit for s upervi se d coope r a t i ve education p l acements. Stud ents mus t comp l ete a credit application, available from th e co-op office, and this application must be approved by a facu l ty member from the d epartment in which credit is to b e granted. No more than 1 5 se mester hours of cooperative e duc a tion credit will be applied toward Metro State d eg ree requirements. Credit earne d for the co-op e duc a tion work experi ences are not a pp l icabl e toward General Studies require ments. Additi onal departmental r estrictions may app l y t o ce rtain m ajors. Visit our Web site for addi tional information: www.mscd . edu/ cooped.

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Service Learning The Service-Learning Program combines classroom exper ience with service to the metropolitan com munity and increases s tud en t appreciation of civic engagement. Participating students receive credit for appropriate public service, which is beneficial to the community and expands student horizons in intel l ectually and personally meaningful ways. Emerging from a wide variety of disciplines , service-learning courses are structured by faculty to weave service into community-based and government agenc i es, with classroom reflection and ana lysis of the learning offered through these experiences. The courses are also designed to address real needs in our multicultural world, such as homelessness , at-risk youth, domestic violence, the environment, culture and the arts , and mental illness. Agencies that have provided service opportunities include Fort Logan Mental Health Center, the Denver Commission on Aging, Big Sisters, the Colorado Historical Society, the Rape Assistance and Awareness Program, numerous elementary and high schools, and senior cen ters and nursing homes. Service -learning credit is available in most academic majors and minors. Prerequisites and other requirements vary with each department. To l earn how to parti cipate in this program, including dis cussions of placement options , students should contact or visit the ServiceLearning Program office to schedule an interview: 1045 Ninth Street Park; 303-556-3290. Mentoring Program Mentoring internships offer students intensive work experiences with mentors in business or industry . Students earn credit in the major or the minor for the learning that takes place in these unpaid positions that provide opportunities for initial work experience in various competitive fields under the guidance of established professionals. The mentors provide interns with resume enhancing experience and ofte n help the s tud ents with decision making. Stude nt s should contact or visit our office to schedule an inter view: 1045 Ninth Street Park ; 303-556-3290. SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS The Honors Program The Honors Program provide an academic program for highly motivated students with broad aca demic intere sts. The program provides honors sections of General Studies courses, interdisciplinary courses and courses within the majors and minors. Honors courses are small in order to encourage class participation and enhance the relationship betwee n students and faculty members. Honors classes are designed to promote independent thought and cre ative inquiry. The Director of the Honors Program and the Honors faculty provide academic advis in g and se r ve as mentors to students as they consider their po t -g raduate goals. The Honors Program serves as a Learning Community at Metro State. The program encourages Service Learning , sponsors an annual Honors Conference, and offers study-abroad courses which allow students to explore ideas outside the classroom. A student who compl etes 24 semes ter hours of honors courses, including the Senior Thesis, will receive honors recognition on his /her transcript . Students admitt ed to the Honors Program a re eligible to apply for an Honors Sc holar ship. All students are welcome to apply to the Honors Program. An Honors application form may be obtained from the Honors Program Director or the Honors Web ite. Additiona l information on the Honors Program is available by calling 303-556-4865/303-352-4183, by visiting West Classroom 147, or by seeing www . m sc d.edu/-honors. REQU IRED COURSES . . . . . . . . . ..................... SEMESTER HOURS HON 2750 The Legacy of Arts and Letters I . . . ................................ 3 HON 2760 The Legacy of Arts and Letters II .......... ............................... 3 HON 4950 Senior Hon ors Thesi ....................... ....................... 3 ubtotal .. . ...••.......•........ ... ... . .•......... 9

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50 SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Track I: The General Studies focus of this track provides students with a strong foundation of knowl edge and creative inquiry valuable for st udents in m ajors across the college. R e quired Co urses . ......................... ... ............... ........................ 9 Honors General St udies courses ... . ........... ...... ...... . . .... . . ..... ............... 12 Honors Electives ........ .......... ........ .... . . ....... ............................. 3 Total Hours Required ........................... ............... ...................... 24 Track II: This track includes courses in the major and/or minor, allowing flexibility for those studen t s entering the Honors program with all or most of their General Studies fulftlled. Required Courses ............. .... ................................................... 9 Honors Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Total Hours Require d ......... . . ...... . . . . . ...... . . . . . ....... . . . ............ . . ....... 24 Individualized Degree Program As a large , urban, undergraduate in titution of higher educa tion , Metropolitan State Co llege of Denver has a commitment to respond to specific educational goals of a diverse stude nt population. The Indi vidualized Degree Program enables the College to meet that commitment in three ways: • It offers students the opportunity to collaborate with faculty to design an individualized major, extended major or minor to meet their own specific ed u cational goa l s when other majors or minor s listed in the catalog do not. • The IDP serves as an incubator for faculty to use to develop new aca demi c programs to meet emerging needs in the community and workplace. The IDP as i11cubator provides faculty with the opportunity to track demand and to experiment with the relevant curriculum prior to submitting th e new program for review through the established c urriculum approval proc ess. • A specific IDP concentration may be offered where there is a need for an interdisciplinary major or minor which does not fall within the purview of exist i ng academic departments. An interdis ciplinary core not to exceed 50% of the minimum cred it hours required provides the foundation upon which the student and faculty mentor build an IDP program to meet the stude nts educa tional goals . Each student works with an advisor in the Center for Individualized Learning and with a faculty men tor to develop a proposal for his/her degree program. A practicing professional i n the student' s field of study ma y also be invited to serve as a commu nity consul t an t to assist the stude nt and the faculty in the development of the program of study. Because careful and thoughtful planning i s essential to designing a cohere nt and congruen t program of study, students are encouraged to begin th eir proposals early in their enrollment at Metro State. IDP proposals must be submitted no later than the semester prior to the semeste r the student intends to graduate. Eithe r a bach elo r of a rt s or a bachelor of science degree in Individualized Studies may be sought . Interested students sho uld contact the Center for Indi vidua lized Learning, 303-556-8342, for assistance and for complete information regarding the policies and procedure for the development and approval of an Individualized Studies major or minor. Information sessions are the first step in the process, and are held throughout the year. Eac h Individuali zed Studies major or minor is approved by the faculty mentor, Center a dvisor, depart ment chair from the academic department from which the majority of c r e dit is drawn, the appropriate dean, and the director of the Center for Individualized Learning. • All requirements that apply to any bachelor's degree apply to Individualized Studies. • A grade of " C" must be earned in each course included in the student's major or minor, and stu dents must have a GPA of2.5 before an Individualized St udies program may be approved. • The titl e for eac h student's program will be Indi vidualize d Studies with an emphasis in __ . • Majors may not include courses in Level II General S tudies and may not include courses with the same preflX as the department from which the majority of credit is drawn for their major, or courses cross listed with that discipline. • No more than 30 hours of credit from the School of Business may be included in the student's degree plan. In some cases this limit may be exceeded with the approva l of the appropriate depart ment chair and dean of tl1e Schoo l of Business.

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• Each Individualized Studies major or minor mu t include courses that have not yet been com pleted at the time the proposal is approved . See each IDP option below for the specific number of c r edi t s that must be comple t ed after the proposal is approved by the department chair. Proposals may b e submitted for : • An Individualized Studies standard MAJOR, which requires a minimum of 40 credit hours, includ ing 21 hours of upperdivision credit. Fifteen (IS) hours must be completed after the proposal is app r oved b y the department chair. A minor c h osen from the Catalog is required . • An Individualized Studies MI OR, which requires a minimum of 20 credit hours, including 6 hours of upper-division credit. Six (6) hours must be completed after the proposal is approved by the department chair. A major chosen from the atalog i s required. • An Individualized Stud i es EXTENDED MAJOR may be proposed when the student's field of study requires more in-depth study or courses from multiple disciplines that cannot be accommodated in an IDP major. An extended major requires a minimum of 60 credit hours, including 27 hours of upper-division credit Twenty-one (21) hours must be completed after the proposal is approved by the department chair. No minor is required. International Studies Concentration in IDP Students wishing to pursue a major in international studies may do so by choosing the Individualized Degree Program (IDP) International Studies Concentration. This concentration requires core courses in the fiel d of international s tudi es and provides th e flexibility for each student to select courses from across the College to develop a coherent academic program that meets the student's own specific educa tional goals within the broader area of International Studies . Through the Internationa.l Studies Concentration students gain an understanding of international and intercultural relat i ons and dyn amics , and gain th e skil l s and know l edge necessary for their specific cho sen careers as those careers exist within an international context. The program also provides prepara tion for a graduate program in international studies, and students may include prerequisites for other graduate p r ograms of their choice. Students may c h oose to deve lop a proposal for an IDP major or an IDP extended major. Each is devel oped in consultation with a faculty mentor and the Center for Individualized Learning and must be approved by the faculty mentor, appropriate department chair, appropriate dean, Center advisor and the Center director. St ud ents in thi s program follow the basic requirements and process for all IDP majors. The process for developing the IDP proposal and selecting the remaining courses is outlined on page 53 of this Catalog and is available at www.mscd.edu/ -cil. A minimum of one year of st ud y of a modern language other than English is required and students are strongly encour aged to compl e t e at least two yea r s of study in the same language . Students who a re already proficient in a language other than English as demonstrated by successful completion of an appr oved proficiency examination will be exempt from the requirement. Students are advised to research the possible entry l anguage requirements of any graduate programs in which they might be interested a nd plan their prog r ams accordingly. An appropriate study abroad or a local or regional experience with an international focus is required as a part of the individual student's proposal. Prerequisites These courses can be used t o sat i sfy Genera l S tudies requirements. A for ail IDPs , courses with the sam e prefiX as the department from wh ich the majority of credit is drawn for the major (or cross listed with that discipline) may not be included in Level II General Studies. COURSE .................................................... . SEMESTER HOUR S ECO 2010 Principles of Macroeconomics ............................................ 3 -orECO 1040 A Citizen's Guide to Economics .................................... . ...... 3 PSC l 020 Politi ca.! Systems and Ideas ....................... ....................... 3

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52 SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Interna tion al S tudi es Con ce n tra t i o n Core REQUIRED COURSES ........................................... ... SEMESTER HOURS ANT 1310 Introduction to ultural Anthropology .................................... 3 ANT 2330 Cross-Cultural Commun i cations ...................... ................... 3 orANT 3300 GEG 1000 H I S 1040 or HIS 2010 PSC 3030 PSC 3340 orExploring World Cultures: Variable Topics ................................. 3 World Regional Geography ........ ...................................... 3 World History since 1500 ......... ...... . . ............. .................. 3 Contemporary World History ............. . ........•..................... 3 Introduction to International Relation s ...... ............ . ........... ..... . 3 International Political Economy .......... . ........... .................... 3 ECO 3550 Global Economics and Int erna tional Trade . ................................ 3 Total for Core . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 18 The senior experience may be selected from approved senio r experiences listed in the College Catalog Addendum online. lf no approved senior experience is appropr i ate for the stu dent's program, a senior leve l course, internship or independent study that meets the criteria for senior experiences may be cho sen wit h approval of t h e faculty mentor, chair, Center director a n d dean. Approval of a sen ior expe r ience is not a separate process but is considered in t h e review and approval of the st u dent's major proposal. Some courses in the core may be applied to General Studies r equirements. In that case, stude n ts will choose other courses in collaboration with the ir advisors so t h at the tota l nu m ber of credit h o ur s in the major reflect the requirements for an IDP major or IDP exte nd ed major as lis t e d below . An IDP major requires a minimum of 40 credit hours (incl uding the core), 21 of which must be upper division. Fifteen hours must be left to complete when the proposal is approved. A minor from the Cata log which will complement the student' s proposed major is re q uired. Mino r s from the Schoo l of Let ters, Arts, and Sciences; the School of Business, or the Schoo l of Professiona l St u dies are all appropriate, depending on the individual student's interests and future plans. An lOP extended major requires a minimum of 60 credit ho ur s (including the co r e), 27 of w hi c h must be upper divi s ion. Twenty-one hours must be l eft to complete w h en the proposal is ap p roved. A m inor is not required for the extended major, but students will choose other related coursework appropr i ate to their specific goals to meet the requirements for the IDP extended major. Reece Learning Communities Metropolitan State College of Denver has created a comprehensive first-year experience for prov i s i o n ally admitted students via the Reece Learning Communities (RLC). Students in t h e RLC wil l be enrolle d in courses specifically designed to be learning communities. O n e of the courses that all s tu den t s will b e required to complete, within a RLC, will be the Freshmen S u ccess Course (FSC). T his course would help first year students adju t to the college, develop a better understanding of the learning process, and acquire essential academic success skills. The FSC will also include presentations by staff from aca demic affairs and student services regarding programs, re ou r ces and oth e r s upport services curr e ntl y provided at Metro . Students e nrolled in the RLC will be prov i ded with aca d e mic support v i a severa l approaches including tutoring, upplementa l instructors, and peer educators. INTERNATIONAL & INTERCULTURAL EDUCATION Metropolitan State College of Denver is committed to providing all students with a strong educational foundat ion that enhances their understanding of the total hum an experience. T h roug h the follow in g program , students and faculty have opportunities to develo p a n d participate in ac t ivit i es d es i g n e d to promo t e a greater understanding and expert i se in g l obal issues. Metro State see k s t o maintai n a pos itive environment that enhances the learning experiences of international students.

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Indi v iduali zed Deg r ee Prog r am Students interested in pursuing an interdisciplinary major or a minor in international studies may do so through the Individualized Degree Program (IDP) concentration in International Studies. Students, in collaboration with a faculty mentor and the Center for Individualized Learning design a course of study that best meets their needs. In addition to a core curriculum of 18 hours , students choo e from a wide range of courses dealing with international topics that are regularly offered to complete a major or minor. Co ntact the Center for Individualized Learning at 303-556-8342 or see www.mscd.edu/-cil. Stud y Abroad Courses Metro State offers a variety of short-term and semester-long study abroad courses eac h year. During the past several yea rs , these courses have been held in Mexico , England, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Cen tral America, Russia , and Egypt. These courses are generally directed by full-time Metro State facu lty, are two to five weeks in duration and are available to eligible students. Assistance is provided to student who choose to participate in study abroad courses offered by other U.S. or foreign universities . The College operates two semester-abroad programs in Guadalajara and London. These are offered in coo peration with the University of Guadalajara and the American Institute for Foreign Study/Richmond College partnership. Students must be in good academic standing in order to participate in these pro grams. Contact the Office of International Studies (303-556-2545) for information regarding the latest offer ings. Int er national Student Ser v ice s Metro State provides a variety of services to international students attending the College. These include counseling on visas, school transfers, work permission and housing; conducting academic and cultura l orientation sessions; assisting with immigration issues ; providing information to embassies and spon sors; advising on academic issues; and organizing social and c ultural events. International students should co ntact the Academic Advising Center. Special Events Metro State regularly organizes conferences, seminars, and lecture series to promote intellectual dis course on issues affecting the contemporary world. Community Connection s Metro State maintain s links with numerous local and national organizations and professional associa tions dealing with international, educational, economic, social, and cu l tural activit i es with a view to strengthen college-community partnerships and to remain current with the latest developments in the area of international education. Language and Culture Institute The Language and Culture Institute was established in 1976 to organize study and travel abroad. The institute currently operates a summer program in Mexico and a w i n ter tudy a n d travel program in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and in Central America. The institute offers credit thro u gh the Modern Lan guages Department. THE GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM Philo s ophy o f the General Studies Program Metropolitan State College of Denver seeks to prep are its graduates for a lifetime of learning , which, in our changing and comp lex society, requires focused expertise (such as that provided by a major area of study) and the ability to commu nicate with and l earn from exper t s in other fields. Undergraduate e du cation fosters the critical thinking necessary for the exploration of unfamiliar discip l ines, for the synt hesis oflearning, and for exposing students to the richness and variety of the intellectual u niverse.

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54 GENERAL STUDIES Stat e G uarante e d Gene r al E ducation Cour s e s Some of Metro State 's General S tudi es courses are approve d as state g u aranteed general education courses. This des i g n a tion means th at the course is transfera bl e to general educat ion or to electi ves a t aU Col o r ado public ins t itutions and all u nd e rgr aduate degree pr ograms. General Studies courses not identified as g uara nt ee d s tat e t ransfe r a re also eligible for transfer to other ins titution s of higher educa tion. Even if a ta t e g u a r a nte ed course is selecte d , students need to select their General Studies courses with care. T h e r e is a Co lorad o co re framework th a t restricts the number of s t a te guaranteed courses that can be taken and applied to gene ral educat i on . In addition, ce rt ain statewi d e articulation agreements require spec ific Gene ral S tudi es courses. The six credits of composition, E G 1010 and ENG 1020 , will be acce ptabl e anyw h e r e in the s t a te. With the exception of the scie n ces, stud e nt s are a d v i se d to take on l y one state guaranteed course in each category below to maximize applicab ili ty for general education at ano th e r i n s titu tio n . Fo r detail s go to www.state .co.us/cche/gened/gtpathways/ i nde x.pdf. State guaran teed general ed u ca tion courses are designated w ith a GT for Guaranteed Tra n sfer. The r es t of the code indicate th e part of the co r e t o which th e co ur se ma y app ly. GTAHl GT-AH2 GT-AH3 GT-AH4 GT-COl GT-C02 GT-C03 GT-Hll GT-MAl GT-SCl GT-SC2 GT-SSl GT-SS2 GT-SS3 Arts and Express i on Literature and Humanities Ways of T h i nkin g For e i g n Languages Intr od uc t ory WritiJ1g Intermediate W r iting Advanced Writin g History Mathematics at ural and Physical Sciences (with laboratory) atural and Physical Sciences (without laboratory) Econ omic o r Political Syst e m s Geograp h y Human Behavior, Culture or Social Framewo rk s Ge n er a l S tu die s Information Stude nt s mu st use a s ingle catalog to meet ali d eg r ee requireme nts, includin g tho se in the General Stud ies, major and minor. Some changes in General Studies req uir e m ents have been made retroactive. As a co n se q u ence, many General S tudie s r equire ment s and policies d esc rib e d in t h i s Catalog may be fol lowed b y st ud ents u si n g ea rli er catalogs . G ener a l S tu dies Goals The General St udi es Program i s d es ign ed to help graduates ac hie ve the follow ing co mp ete ncies. Metro State st ud e nt s s h o uld b e able to: l. Wri t e and speak with clarity; 2. Rea d an d listen c rit i cally ; 3. Draw conclusions from quantitative data; 4. Recognize faulty r easoni ng; 5 . Organize ideas ; a nd 6 . Communicate with experts in other disciplines and learn from them . Metro Sta t e students s hould: l. Have an open attitu d e towar d different approaches to prob l ems; 2. Have an informe d awareness of the principal human ac hi evements in hi sto ry, arts and l etters, society, and science; and 3. B e int rodu ced to the basi c m et hods, knowledge, problems or attitudes c harac t eristic of a field. Stru ctu r e o f the Ge n e r al Studies Progr a m The General Studies Program is s tru ctured to foster the development of skills a nd to encourage s tudent s to use their mastery of skill s to exp lor e knowledge in a variety of disciplines. The General S tudie s Pro gram provid es two levels of experience:

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, GENERAL STUDIES 55 Leve l 1 : To provide tudents with the basic skills of language , mathematics , communications and criti cal thought. These include the ski lls of recognizing faulty reasoning, of reading and listening critically, of drawing conclusions from quantitative data, of organizing ideas , and of writing and speaking with clarity . Level II: To provide the breadth characteristic of education , encourage an open attitude toward differ ent approaches to problems, and c ulti vate informed awareness of the principal human achievements in history, arts and letters , society, and science. An educated person is one who is fan1iliar with his tory, with the fine arts, with varied cul tures , and with the scientific method. Leve l II courses hou l d introduce the student to the ba sic methods , knowledge, problems , or attitudes characteristic of a field. Upper , as we!J as lower division courses should be available for Level II credit. In addition to meeting th ese criteria, Level II courses will provide opportunity for further deve lopment of Level I skills. Level II requirements shal l be s ubdivided int o four ca t egories: Hi sto ric a l , Arts and Letters , Social Sciences , and the Natural Science. Distribution and Credit Requirements To comp l ete their General Studies Program, stu d ents must take approved courses that fulfill the follow ing di s tribution and credit requirements : Leve l I * Category ............................................................. Semester Hours Composition ...................................................................... 6 Mathematics ..... ......................... . .................................... ... 3 Com munic ations ........ ........................ ................. ...... . .... . ....... 3 Leve l II* * Category. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Semester Hour s Historical ....................................................... .... ....... 3 Arts and Letters .................................... ................................. 6 Social Sciences ................................................................. ..... 6 atural Science ..................................................................... 6 Total*** ......... . . ... ... .... .... . ... ......................................... n •A transfer course or courses judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency will be determined by the depart ment offering the Level I course. **Onehour deviations in the Level 11 categories may be allowed. ***A student's completed General Studies Program must contain at least 33 semester hours. Basic Rules: • The only courses that ca n be u sed to satisfy the General Studies approved requi r ements are those courses designated as General Studies Courses. Those co urse s are listed in the Catalog and t he Catalog Addendum: General College R e quirements (www. mscd . edu/academic/ca talo g/index .htm). • Students m ay not use courses having the same prefix as their major or courses crosslisted with their ma jo r to satisfy their General Studies Level II requirements. (See below for specific require ments for Hi s tory majors.) General Studies courses may b e tak e n as electives or to satisfy require ments in the major; that is, General Studies courses do not have to be counted toward the Ge ne r a l Studies requirements. • History maj ors will take three extra credit hours at Level II in either Arts an d Letters , Socia l Sci ences, or Natural Science in lieu of the three hours in the Historical category. Thus , History majors still have a total of 33 hours in General Studies. A Hi story major may not u se crosslisted courses in the Historical category, or courses crossliste d with a history course in any General St udies category. • Courses taken using the pass /fail option cannot be used for General Studies credit. • Lower division credit for biology courses of anatomy, physiology, and micro-biology, in which the student earned a grade of "C" or better , may be substituted for the Level II lower division natural science general studies req u irement for all students with a nursing ma jor.

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56 GENERAL STUDIES • Students majoring in Human Performance and Sports will use BIO 10 80-4, BI0-1090-l, BIO 2310-4, and BIO 2320-4 to satisfy the General Studies Level II Natural cience requirement. S tu dents must take all four courses to meet the requirement. A student in HPS who switches to a d iffe r ent major will have to satisfy the Level II Natural Science requirements w ith the approved courses or alt ernatives specified in the Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements (www. m scd.edu/academic/catalog/index.htm) . LEVEL I REQUIREMENTS COMPOSITION , MATH EMAT ICS AND CO MMU NICA TION Freshman Assessment: Read in g , W r iti n g and M athematics Placement E x ams First tim e co llege student s are required to compl ete the reading , writing, an d mathematics p lacement examinations (see Reading , Writing and Mathematics Placement Examinati ons). Exam in a t ion results e rv e as th e basis for academic advising . To increase their opportunity for success, st ud ents may be required to take courses below the l evel of the first-year courses offered by Metro State. Degree -seeking students who are diagnosed as needing remedial course work have at their disposal basic skills courses offe r e d through t h e Community College of Denver. Stude nt s are responsible for completin g remedial course work no l ater than the end of the freshman year (i.e., within the first 3 0 semes t e r hours m a tricu l a t ed as a college student). Students should be aware, however, that no credit is given for courses that are below th e college level. Placement Test Prerequis ites St uden t s must have a passin g score on t h e appropriate placement test before the y will be allowed t o reg ister for Level I Ge n eral Studies courses in E n glish , mathematics and reading. Except i o n s will be made for tudents w h o h ave earned at least a grade of at least "C" in the communi ty college course specified by the department. T he Assessment Cent e r administers the placement tests . St ud ents sho u l d consult an advisor in the A d vising Cente r for guidance in se l ecting the appropriate Leve l I cour es. Composition Required Cour s e s (min imum 6 s emester hours) REQUIRED COURSES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EMESTER HOURS ENG 10!0 (GT-C0 1 ) Fres h man Composition: The Essay . ............................ 3 ENG 1020 (GT-C02) Freshman Composition: Ana lysis, Researc h & Doc u m entatio n ..... 3 Note: " GT-" indicates a State Guaranteed general education course. Rules: Composition Requirement • T hose students whose writing skills are inadequate w ill be required to complete d evelopmental coursework in composition before enrolling for English 10 !0. • Stud ents mus t co mpl e t e the Engl ish 1010 requirement within their first 30 hours at M e t ro State and the Englis h 1020 requirement within the fir t 60 h ours. These requirements m ay be pos t poned on an individ ual basis if the postponement is app r oved by the Department of English. • Requir e d E n g l i s h compos ition courses shal l be at the fres hm an l evel. • Students shall be considered to have satisfied the Leve l I English course requirement and credit will be grante d if t h ey: • passE G 1010 and ENG 1020 , or • pass a CLEP or AP test approved by the Department of English, or • transfer an eq ui valent course (see Rule s Applying to Transfer Stu d ents above). Mathematics (minimum 3 s eme st e r h o ur s ) Requir ed Courses .. . .................................................. Semeste r Hours MTH 1080 (GT-MA1) Mathematical Mode of Thoug ht. .............................. 3 MTH 1110 (GT-MAl) College Algebra....... . ............................. .... 4

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MTH 1210 (GT-MA1) Introduction to Statistics ................... . .. .. 4 MTH 1310 (GT MA1) Finite Mathematics for the Management & Social Sciences . ........ 4 MTH 1610 (GT MAI) Integrated Mathematics I ..................................... 3 Rule s : Mathematics Requirement • Students will take a preassessment placement test to determi ne their abilities to solve elementary algebra problems and to know and use elementary geometrical formulas. Those students whose skills are inadequate will be required to complete developmental mathematics coursework befo r e enrolling in any mathematics cour e. Students should be aware that developmental courses are not ta ught at Metro State and no transfer credit will be given for such coursework. • Students m u st complete the Level l mathematics requirement within their fust 30 hours at Metro State. This requirement may be postponed on an individua l basis if the po tpo nement is approve d by the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department. • Students shall be considered to have satisfied the Level I mathematics course requirement and credit will be granted if they: • pass a mathematics course that has been approved for Levell mathematics credit (see courses listed above), or • a CLEP or AP examination approved by the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Depart ment, or • successfully complete a mathematics course for which a Level I mathematics course is a pre requisite , or • transfer an equivalent course, or • complete a mathematics major or minor. *A transfer course or courses judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency is determined by the department offering the Level I course. Communications (minimum 3 semester hours) * Required Courses ..................................................... Semester Hours FRE 1020 Elementary French Il ................................................... 5 GER 1020 Elementary German Il .................................................. 5 HON 2950 The Art of Critical Thinking ............................................ . 3 PHI 1110 RDG 1510 Language, Logic & Persuasion ............................................ 3 Cognitive Strategies for Analytical Reading ....................... ......... 3 SPA 1020 Elementary Spanish 11. .......................•....•....•....... . .•...... 5 PE 1010 Public Speaking ...... ....... .............. . ............................ 3 SLHS 1620 American Sign Language Il {MDL 1620) . ...... ............. ............... 3 SPE 17l0 Interpersonal Communication ............... . ................. 3 *A transfer course or courses of at least 2 semester hours judged to be similar in skill development and content to a Level I course will satisfy an individual Level I course requirement. Equivalency is determined by the department offering the Level 1 course. Rules: Communication s Requiremen t • Students must complete the required Level I communications course within their first 30 hours at Metropo l itan State College of Denver. • Students shall be considered to have satisfied the Levell communications course requirement an d credit will be granted if they: • pass an approved Level l communications course, or • pass a departmental tes t or a CLEP or AP test approved by a department offering an approve d Level I communications course, or • transfer an equivalent course • pass or transfer an a d vanced public speaking course for which Metro State's SPE 1010 or a comparable course is a prerequisite • transfer a second semester, four or five semester hour foreign language course or a more advanced language course that is taught in a language not offered at Metro State, or

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58 GENERAL STUDIES • pass or transfer an advanced foreign language course that is taught in the foreign language and that has Metro State ' s FRE 1020, GER 1020, and SPA 1010 or equivalent course work, or more advanced course as a prerequisite. Students who have atisfied the communications requirement using the advanced foreign language course or the advanced public speaking cour e must place that course in the Level I communications requirement slot. Level II General Studies courses used to satisfy the Level I communications require ments cannot also be counted in the Level II category . LEVEL II REQUIREMENTS Courses approved to satisfy the Level II requirement are distributed among four categories. The catego ries, together with the minimum number of semester hours a student must accumulate to satisfy this requirement , are given below . One hour deviations in the General tudies Level II categories may be allowed, provided the student's completed General Studies program contains at least 33 credit hours. Level II Categories Historical ....................... ...... . ........................................ 3 Arts and Letter s .................................. . . .................. ........ . ...... 6 Social Science ............................................... .............. ......... 6 Natural Science ........... ...... ................. ... ............................ . .... 6 Rules: L eve l II Requir e m ent P r erequisites: Level II General Studies courses have at least the following prerequisites or coreq u i sites, and some courses have additional prerequisites (see the Course Descriptions section in this Catalog). A one-hour deviation in each of the requirement listed below may be allowed, provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses . Historical and Arts and Lett e rs : • Courses numbered 1000 to 1990: minimum performance standard scores on reading and writing preassessment p l acement tests • Courses numbered 2000 to 2990: satisfaction of ENG 1010 and the Level I communication require ment • Courses numbered 3000 and above: satisfaction of all Levell General Studies course requirements Natural Science and Socia l S ci ence s : • Courses numbered 1000 to 1990: minimum performance standards scores on the reading, writing a n d mathematics preassessment placement tests. • Courses numbered 2000 to 2990: satisfaction of the Level I mathematics course requirement and either E G 1010 or the Level I communication course requirement. • Courses numbered 3000 and above: satisfaction of all Level I course requirements. • St u dents m ay not use courses having the same prefix as their major discipline or crosslisted with t h eir m aj o r discip l ine to satisfy the Level II requirements . • Students may use courses having the san1e prefix as their minor discipline or crosslisted with their minor discipline to satisfy General Studies requirements. However, a minimum of 18 credits must be used only in the minor and not for General Studies. Deviations from the Catalog requirements require approval of the minor department, and some departments require that more than 18 credits be used only in the minor. Please contact the minor department for additional information. • Students may use either prefix for a crosslisted course , i.e., one designated XXX (YYY). They must sel ect the prefix they wish to use at registration ; the selection may not be changed later . • History majors must take three extra semester hours a t Level II in the Social Science, Arts and Let ters, or Natural Sciences categories in lieu of the three hours in the historical category. • History majors may not use courses that are crosslisted with hi tory courses for General Studies.

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HISTORICAL (minimum 3 semester hours) * History majors must take three extra semester hours at Level II in the Social Sciences , Arts & Letters , or Natural Sci ence categories in lieu of the three hours in the Historical category. History majors may not use courses that are crosslisted with history courses for General Studies. ARTS & LETTERS (minimum 6 semester hours} * Arts & Letters courses impart a broad knowledge of important works and major schools of thought from at least two centuries. They also provide a foundation for critical evaluation within the discipline . SOCIAL SCIENCES (minimum 6 semester hours) * Social Sciences courses aim to explore the formation , behavior and interaction of various social, cul tural, political or economic groups and institutions. NATURAL SCIENCE (minimum 6 s emester hours} * Natural Scie nce courses provide a n opportunity for students to experience the systematic formulation and testing of hypotheses and to learn the importance of accurate observation and measurement. Stu dents will differentiate among fact , speculation , evidence , inference , belief , theory, law and generaliza tion. In order to receive General Studies credit , both BIO 1080 and 1090 or Bio 1081 and 1091, must be suc cessfully co m p l eted. This is true a l so for State Guaranteed Genera l Education credit. CHE 1100 and CHE 1150 m u st be successfully comp l eted to receive General Studies credit. Successful completion ofCHE 1850 and either CHE 1800 or 1810 will result in 6 hours atural Sci ence General Studies credit. Successful completion of all three courses will result in 10 hours of General Studies cred it. CHE 1800 is a prerequis ite for CHE 1850. CHE 1850 has a corequis it e ofCHE 1810. • A one-hou r dev i ation in the Gene ral Studies req u irement in eac h the above categories may be allowed , provided the student has completed at least 33 semester hours of General Studies courses. ADDITIONAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Multicultural and Senior Experience Course Requirements In addition to completing the General Studies requirements , a student must complete a three-hour M u l ticultural course and a three-hour Senior Experience course , or selection of courses , to be awarded a bachelor ' s d egree from Metro S t ate. The Multicultural course does not require three hours as a separate category and can be taken in the major, minor or as an elective . T h e r u les pertaining to tho e requ i re ments and the courses that will satisfy those requirements are described below . Multicultural Gradu a tion Requirements (minimum 3 s emest e r hours ) M ult icu l t ur a l co ur se required co ntent and co u rse materials are designed to increase students' aware ness and app r eciation of cultural diversity in the United tates. Multicultural educat ion coursework examines the i nteractions of values, beliefs, t r aditions , identities, and contributions of one or more of the following four groups of color in the United States: African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, an d Native American, which may include the characteristics of gender, sexual orientation , age, or disability within these groups. A t the conclus ion of a multicu l tural course, students will be able to: • Define factors that lead to the formation and continuation of one or more of the four groups of color in United States society. • Prese n t the customs , behavioral patterns, an d identities of one or more of the four groups of co l or in Unite d Sta tes society. • Delineate the effects of bias, prejudices , and discrimin a t i on on one or more of the four groups of color in United States society.

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60 GENERAL STUDIES • Describe the cultu r a l similarities, commonalities, and differen ces within or among one or more of the four g r oups of co lor in United States society. • Communicate h ow the acceptance and inclusion of a U groups of color enriches lives and increases the creativity a nd performance of everyone in United S tates society . Multicultural Graduation Designation Course Work: Mu lti c u ltura l courses that are approved for th e College ' s grad uati on requireme nt are Us ted in th e Cou rse Description sec t ion of thi s Catalog. Th i s designation is note d in parenthesis at the en d of each course description as " multicultural. " Please Note: All multi cul tural courses are under review by the Multi cultura l C u rric ulum Rev i ew Commi ttee. Some courses h ave the stip ulation "M ulticultural removal 2008-09." Consu lt with you r aca demic adv isor abo ut which multi c ultural co urse applies to your degree. Transferability of Multicultural Credits Transfe r c r edits to mee t the multicultural requirement will be accepted under the following guidelines: • Tran sfe r a ble courses tak e n at an accre dit e d ins titu tion to m eet a m ulti c ultural or simi l a r diversity req uir ement will satisfy the Metro State multicultural requirement. • Transferable courses equivalent to an existing multicultural course will satisfy the Metro State multi c ultu ra l req uirem ent. E quivalency will be determined b y the department offering the course. Once a course has been approved by a department , it will be given the sta tu s of an ap proved trans ferable multicultural course. • If a transferable co ur se is interdisciplinary , Metro State t ransfer evalua tor s will cons ult with the d epartment(s) where th e majority of the course content resides. • A one-hour deviation in the multicultur a l r equirement will be a llowed for courses judged to be si mil ar in con t e nt to an exis tin g Metro State multicultural course . Eq uival ency will be d etermi n ed b y th e department offering the multicultural course. • Full credit or a one-hour deviation in the multicultura l requirement will be allowe d when the tran sferable co u rse meets Metro State's multicultural de finition and course crite ri a, altho u gh a s imil ar co u rse is n o t taught a t Metro S t a te. • I f transferab l e cou r ses do not clearly me et Metro State's multicultural definition , transfer evalua tor s may request an opinion f r om the Faculty Senate C urri c ulum Committee and /or th e M ulti cul tural Curriculum Review Committee . Senior Year Assessment Examinations and Other Activities In their senior yea r , student may be required to p articipate in an assessment of their education . The fac ulty has determined ed u cational goals or outcomes that it wants graduates to ac hieve. A copy of those goa l s a nd the m e th ods b y wh i c h th e ir ach i eve m e nts are meas ur ed can be obta ined from the department offices. Senior Experience Graduation Requirements (Minimum 3 Semester Hours) The Senior Experience course provides a c ulmination of the undergraduate expe ri e n ce, allowing stude nt s to synthesize their l earning, using critical analysis an d logical thinking . S tud ents may u se the course to satisfy major or minor requirements if the course is approved for th at use . Stu d e nts should co n s ult with their adv i so r a nd c h eck prerequisites. Students must complete a Senior Ex pe rie n ce co u rse at the end of the undergraduate program and must take the course or courses at Metro Sta te. Senior Experie n ce courses incl ud e "se nior standing " as a prerequisite in addition to other prerequisites desig nated by the department. In some cases students may need to take two co u rses to satisfy th e require ment.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Semester Hours Credit Course credit is based on units designated as semester hours. One semester hour or one base contact hour equals a minimum of 750 minutes ; this translates to a minimum of fifteen , 50-minute class hours per emes t er. Time req uir ed for class preparation is not a consideration in the calculation of course credit. A three semester hour course will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class. Omnibus courses involving l aboratory work give one semester hour of credit for each two , three or four ho urs of sc h eduled work in the l aboratory during a week , depending on the course. Internships require a minimum of2,250 minutes for each hour of credit. Course Load The average course load per 16-week semester is 15 or 16 semester hours. Students who are academi cally strong may take up to 18 semester hours during fall and spring semesters and up to 12 semes ter hours during the summer semester. During fall and spring semesters, students with cumulative Metro State grade point averages (GPAs) of 3.25 or higher may take 19 or 20 semester hours and those students with GPAs of 3 . 50 or higher may take 21 semester hours for fall and spring semes ter or 14 semester hours for the summer semester. Students must have completed at least 15 s emester hours at Metro State . Authorization for overloads for st ud ents wit h o u t these qualifications must be obtained from the student' s major department chair and appropriate dean. Forms are av a ilable from the department, dean s' offices, or online. Student Classification Students are classified accordi n g to the number of semester hours of credit earned: freshmen fewer than 30; sophomo r es 30 or more, but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more , but fewe r than 90; seniors 90 or more . Declaring/Changing a Major Applicants to Metropolitan State College of Denver may indicate their intended major on the Metro State Application for Admission. Degree seeking students who wish to change a major must comp l ete a Declaration/Change of Majo r form, which is available from the major department or from the Aca demic Advis in g Center. Non-degree seeking students who wish to declare a major must fir t change to degree-seeking s t atus by comp l e tin g a Change of S t atus form with the Admissions Office. Curriculum, Advising and Program Planning (CAPP) CAPP produces a Compliance Report that is an advising t ool to be used by students and their advisors throughout the students ' academic career at Metro State. Students with declared majors and /or minors should discuss their progress toward completion of their major ( minor) program with their faculty advi sor. They shou l d have a CAPP Compliance Report run no later than the start of the senior year . CAPP Compliance Reports can be run in the student' s major department or by logging on to MetroConnect (metroconnect. m scd . edu). Approved adjustmen t s to the CAPP Compliance Report should be submit ted as soon as pos sible by the dep artment to the Office of the Registrar. Degree-seeking students must apply for degree candidacy by completing an Application for Graduation in the Office of the Registrar at the start of their fmal semes ter. Selection of Catalog for Degree Requirements Students m ust use a single Metro State catalog to meet all their degree requirements, i ncluding the Gen eral Stu di es, major and minor requirements. Students must select a degree catalog in effect while they are enrolled at Metro State unl ess they are transfe rrin g from a regionaJJy accredited Col orado community college , provided that the degree catalog contains their complete program of study . Students not enrolling for th ree consec utive semesters or more , including summer, are governed by the catalog in effect upon their return. For effective dates of cata l ogs, students should consult their academic advisors. All degree programs must adhere to overriding current policies at Metro State . Students transferring from a re gio nall y accredited Color ado community college may complete degree requirements using

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6 2 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES a Metro State catalog in effect while enrolled at the community college, subject to the following condi tions: • The degree catalog selected does not predate the curren t catalog by more than three years. • The degree catalog seiected may have been in use at any time from the time the student was con tinually enrolled* at a regionally accredited Colorado community college to the semester for which the student is enrolling in Metro State . • The degree catalog clause applies except for overriding college or state policy, except where specific progr ams otherwise require. Consult th e pages describi n g your program for these r equ ir ements . * Continuous enrollme nt is defined as not interrupting enrollment for three or more consecutive semes ters (one calendar year) ; summer is counted as a semester. Continuous enrollment must be maintained from the period of the designated Metro State catalog to the point of Metro State degree completion. Gradu a t ion Procedures Degree-seeking students formally declare their degree candidacy by ftling an Application for Gradua tion with the Office of the Registrar just prior to their anticipated semester of graduation, but no later than the deadline stipulated in the Academic Calendar section of this Catalog and on Metro State's Web site (www.mscd.edu/aca demic /aca l.htm). The Application for Graduation should be fLied only by stu dents who intend to complete all degree requirements b y the end of the upcoming seme ter a n d shou l d be filed in consu l tation with the student's major department. If a stude n t does not g r aduate, anoth er Application for Graduation must be submitted for a su bsequent semester. Students who anticipate completing all degree requirements within the next two semesters should review th e following sections of this Catalog: Requirements for All Bachelor Degrees ; Academic Poli cies and Procedures (pertaining to Curriculum, Advising and Program Planning [CAPP], Grad u ation , Diplomas and Com mencement, and Honors and Awards). Afte r students have completed 90 earned credit hour s at Metro State, including approved transfer credi ts, they should obtain a CAPP Compliance Report by requesting one from their major department or by log ging on to metroconnect.mscd.edu. After reviewing the CAPP report with their faculty advisor (major and minor), if any adjustments are needed , the department will submit an adjustmen t form to the Offlce of the Registrar. Once adjustments are made, an updated Compliance Report will be mailed to the student. App lication for Graduation: File an Application for Graduat i on with the Office of the Regis t rar by the following deadlines: for Fall 2008 graduation, ftle by August 22, 2008; for Spring 2009 graduation, ftle by January 30, 2009; and for Summer 2009 graduation, ftle by June 5, 2009. Students should ftle an Applica tion for Graduation only if the y will complete all degree requirements that se mester . After submitting the Application for Graduation, students will have their academic records reviewed for comp l etion of all degree requirements. All degree applicants will be mailed a CAPP Compliance Report indica ting their graduation status and any discrepancie s that exist. Students will be given a deadl ine by which to explain these discrepancies to the graduation office. Students will not be eligible as candidates for graduation if they do not comply with this deadline. As candidates for graduation, students wil l receive information about the final steps in the graduation proces s and the commencemen t ceremony. Stu dents should ens ure that their current address i s on file with the Office of the Registrar through their MetroConnect e-mail account. T here are commencement ceremonies at the end of the fall and spring semesters. Graduates are encour age d to attend one of the two ceremonies. The commenceme n t program lists candidates, degree, and degree h onors, i f any. Although there is no commencement ceremony in the summer, students can still graduate. Summer candidates are asked to attend the fall commencement ceremony. Their names , degrees and honors, if any, will appear only in the fall commencement program. Check Metro State's Web site for comp l ete, up -todate information about commencement at www.mscd.edu /s tudent/commencement/. Diplomas are issued approximately three weeks after the semester ends. Students may pick u p their diplomas or make arrangements for them to be mailed. Information will be sent from the Office of the Registrar to graduating students about these arrangements.

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Transcripts with the posted de gree will also be available approxima t ely three weeks after the semes ter ends. Students ma y r eq u es t transcripts as early as the middl e of their last semester and indicate that it i s to be held until the d egree is posted. There is no charge for transc ripts. Transcripts may be requested in per son a t the Offi ce of th e Registrar, C 105, by fax at 303-556-3999, or v i a the Web at the Registrar's homepage www.mscd.edu/enroll/registrar under tra n scripts. Diplomas and transcripts w ill NOT be issued if money is owed t o the College. If you owe any money to the College, please contact the Office of Student Accounts, 303-556-6188, to arrange payment. Diplomas and Commencem e nt Students who have met all requir emen t s for graduation are g r anted diplomas at the end of the semes ter for which they are degree ca ndid a t es . Diplomas may b e with h e ld because of indebtedness to the College. Co mpl etio n of two majors does n o t result in two d egrees or diplomas. A formal comme ncem ent ce remon y is h eld at the en d of the spring and fall semesters. Summer graduates are invited to atte nd the following fall commencement. For commencement informat i on call 303 556-6226, or at www.mscd.edu. Transcript of Records An official transcript i s a certified copy of a student ' s permanent academic reco r d. There is no charge for tran sc ripts. You can order trans c ript s b y lo ggi n g on to Me t roCo nn ect (metrocon n ect.mscd . edu). There is a charge for faxed transcripts. T r anscripts will be r e l eased by the Registrar ' s Office upon formal writ ten request b y the student. Transcripts will also be issued to fums an d employers if written authoriza tion i s received from th e st ude nt. Reque s t s s h o uld includ e the student' s full legal name as recorded while a ttendin g Metro State , studen t identification number, last term of attendance , number of copies desired, and to whom and where transcripts are to be se nt. Tran cripts may be with h eld because of indebtedness to th e Colleg e o r for other ap propri a t e reasons. Copi es of transcripts from other institutions that are on ftle in the Registrar ' s Office will be issued upon signed reques t by the student. Students from other instituti ons takin g Metro Sta te courses under the state college system or interinstitutional registration programs mu s t requ es t transcripts from their home institution . Falsified Transcripts and D i ploma s Altering, modifying, tampering with, or in any way falsifying an official Metropolitan State College of Denver tra nscript or di p l o m a is a crime. T h e College has impl eme nted multiple measures t o detect s uch con duct. To protect the integrity and value of a Metro State degree, the Attorney General will vigorous l y pro sec ute, through the crimina l justice system, those who commit th ese crimes. I n addition, students found responsible for fal s i fying an official Metro State transcr ipt or diploma will face a College judi c i a l hearing a nd ap pr opriate sanctions may b e imposed, including s u spension, dis missal, an d lo ss of cred it , whic h could affect the student ' s permanent record. Honors and A w ard s T he College annually recognizes students who s h ow ou t standing l eadership and serv i ce t o the College and comm unity, excellence in sc h o lastic achievemen t , and outstan din g personal c h a ra cter and integr ity. Due to wide variation in definition and interpretation of class rank. by policy the College does not rank its student s or g radu ates. Recognition of studen ts includes: The President's Award (one sen i o r); the S pe cia l Servic e Award for Academic Affairs (one se ni or) and for Stude nt Services (one senior); Out sta nd ing Student Awards (se ni ors from each schoo l); Who's Who Among Students i n American Univers iti es a nd Colleges (sen ior s); Ame rican Association of University Women (AAUW) Award (sen ior woma n). Other awards includ e Spec ial Service Award for Exceptionally Challenged Students, Student Govern ment Assemb l y Award, C h ar les W. Fisher Award and the Colorado Engineering Counci l Award. Information and applications for these awa rd s is available in Ce ntral C l ass room 3 13. Awards a r e pre se nte d at the annual banquet the night before gra du ation. In addition to annua l awards, students with outstanding aca d e mi c ac hievements are reco g ni ze d by b e in g named on th e College ' s Honor Lists. The President ' s Honor List carries the n ames of student s w h o , at t he time of computation, have achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.85 o r higher. The Provost's Hon o r List carries the names of stu d ents who, at the time of com putation , have ach iev ed a cumulat ive

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64 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES GPA of between 3.50 and 3.84, inclusively. Computation wil l occur ini ti ally when the student has compl eted between 30 and 60 hours at Metro State, then again between 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours. Honors will only be computed three t imes in a student' s academic life a t the College. Questions s h o uld be direc ted to the Office of Aca d e mi c Affairs at 3 0 3-556-3040. Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability in their baccalaureate degree w hile attending Metro State. Honors designation s are determined accord in g to the follow in g cr it eria: • Summa Cum Laude Top five percent of graduat es within each sc hool with cumul a ti ve Metro State GPA of no l ess than 3.65. • Magna Cum Laude Next five percent of graduates wit h in each school with cumulati ve Me t ro State GPA of no l ess than 3.65. • Cum Laude Nex t five percent of graduates w ithin each school with cumulative Me t ro State GPA of no less than 3.65. • To determine eac h Honors category, GPAs for the previou s sp ring semester grad u ates are arrayed in rank order. T hi s rank ordering i s the n u sed to d e termine the honors recipients among the following fal l , spring and s ummer graduates . • To qualify for graduation honor recognition, a s tud e nt mu s t have comp l eted a minimum of 50 semester hours of academic credit at Metro State prior to the t erm of graduation . • Courses comp l ete d during the term of graduation and tr ans fer cred it s are not considered when determining honors. Honors d es i g na tions are added to the student's official academic record ; no other notification will be sent. For additional inform ation regarding graduation honor s, contact the Office of Academ i c Affai r s at 303-556-3040. Grades and Notations Facu l ty MUST assign a grade. Every stude nt on theE-Grade worksheet must b e given a grade or grade notation. T h e appropria te grade and grade notations will ap pear in the gra d e drop-down b ox for each student. Faculty members may NOT l eave theE-Grade box blank. The Registrar's Office will remind facu lty of this through em ails prior to grading at the end of each semester. Grades Alph abetical grades and status symbols are as follows: AS up erio r ................................ 4 qua lit y point s per semeste r hour attem pt e d B Above Average ............................ 3 qua lity point s per semes t er hour atte mpt e d C-Average ... ............................. 2 quality point s per semester hour attem pt ed D -Bel ow Average but Pa ing . ................ 1 quality p o int per semes t er hour attempted F -Failur e ................................ 0 quality point per semester hour attem pt ed (Grade)•-Pr e parator y ........................ 0 quality point s per semes t er h ou r atte mpt e d Notations APAdva nced Placem e nt CC Continuing Cor r esponde nce Course CL-College Level Examina t ion Program (CLEP) EX C r edit by Exam I -Incomple t e (incomp l etes will c h ange t o an "F" if n o t comp l eted in 3 sem esters, including s umm er) C-o Credit R ot Reported. o grade was reported by the faculty by the deadline t o submit g r ades. Stud e nt mus t see faculty for an exp l a n ation or assig nm ent of grade. Courses taken thr o u gh interinstit uti ona l regi stra tion are norm ally assig n e d th e "NR" n o tati o n until grades are received a nd post ed to the academic record. Stude nt s who receive a "N R " notation o n th e ir final grade report may be severely impacted . Financial aid, enro llm ent s tatus, vetera ns' s t atus and p r obation/suspension depend on st udents receiving all their grades.

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P-Pass PL Portfolio Assessment PP-PEP Exam S -atisfactory (limited to internships , practicums, field experience courses and workshops) SA Study Abroad SE-Sati factory/Education or Music Recital Attendance ( limited to ECE 4390, EDS 4290, EDU 4190, EDU 4590, SED 4190 and SED 4500; MUS 0020) SN Study Abroad no credit UUnsatisfactory (equals "F" and computed in GPA) UEUnsatisfactory/Education or Music Recital Attendance (equa l s "F" and computed in GPA) I (Incomplete) The In comp lete (I) notation may be assigned when a student, who was achieving satisfactory progress in a course an d who had completed most class assignments, is unable to take the final examination and/ or did not complete all class assignments due t o unusual circumstances such as hospitalization . Incom plete work denoted by the Incomplete " ! " notation must be completed within one calenda r year or ear lier , at the discretion of the faculty member. If the incomplet e work is not completed within one year, the ' '!' ' notation will convert to an "F." Students must have completed at least 75% of the course work to qualify for conside ration for an Incom plete. T he student must be passing the course in order to be granted an Incomplete. Determination of eligibility does not guarantee that an Incomplete will be granted. Students who do meet the qualifi cations may request an Incomplete from the facu lty member who is t eac hin g the course. The decision to grant an Incomplete i s up to the faculty member and department discretion . If an Incomplete is granted, the student and instructor should fill out and sign an Incomplete Agree ment form in order to clarify what th e student needs to do to comp let e the course. Graduating seniors may not grad uat e with an"! " on their Metro S tat e academic record if: • The course in which the " ! " was assigned is required for graduation, or • a " D " or " F" assigned for that course would result in an overall GPA less than 2.00. The "I" notation may not be given for a se l f-pace d course. If a student does not complete a self-paced course within the semesters/he enrolled in the course, s/he must re -e nroll in the course in order to complete it. If a student receives an''!" in an online class , the instructor sho uld contact Instructional Technology who will add the student to the online course roster so that the student will be able to logon to th e course. This must be done by the instructor each semester the student continues to work on the course. In order for an 'T' to be changed to a letter grade, the incomplete work must be completed for the cou r se for which the student originally registered . The s tudent should NOT re -e nroll for the same course unless his /her intent is to retake the entire course. In thi s case, th e student will pa y tuition and fees. NC/Withdrawal (No Credit) The No Credit (NC) notation is not a grade. It may indicate withdrawal from th e course or course rep etition. (The "NC" should not be confused with a sch e dule change during the first 12 days of the fall or spring term [8 days for the summer term]. During this period a student may drop a course, and it will not appear on the student's academic r eco rd.) The "NC" notation may be used in self paced courses to indicate that the student has not completed the se lf-p aced course(s) and requires additional time to incr ease the student's proficiency . In this case, to earn credi t the student must re-register for and pay tuition and fees for the cour e in a subsequent term. Deadlines as described in thi s section a pply. • The following minimal standards s hall be required throughout the College and s hall be a part of all school, department, and individual faculty policies. The following is for full term classes for fall and s prin g semesters. Specific NC deadlines for full term classes for fall, spring, and summer

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66 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES semesters are published in that term' s class schedule. Prorated deadline are available from the Office of the Registrar and the Student Accounts Office for " part-of-term" classes . "Part-of-term" classes are those classes which have start and/or end dates different from those of full-term classes. The " NC " notation is available to students for full term classes in all instances from the 12th day of the term through the fourth week of classes for fall and spring semesters. The period during which students may request an C without the faculty member's signature will be established for summer part -ofterm and weekend courses based on percentages of the term . Deadlines for weekend and " par t -ofterm" classes are available from the Office of the Registrar and from the Student Accounts Office. T h e d ea dline for r e que s tin g an NC witho ut facu lty approva l for full term classes is published in the class schedu l e for each t erm. Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student's absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize the student's success in a course . When absences become excessive, the tudent may re ceive a failing grade for the course. lf attendance is a part of the grading criteria, that policy should be included in the individual faculty member' s class policies and outline and distributed to students on the first day of class. • Durin g this period, students may request an NC ONLY online at MetroConnect. • Students reducing their course load between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of full term classes during fall and spring semesters may receive an " NC " notation for each course provided faculty approval is granted and i ndicated on the request form by the faculty mem ber's signature or the department chair ' s signature in tl1e case of the absence of the faculty member who is the instructor of record. NC request forms with the instructor' s signature for full term classes are due to the Office of the Registrar by the deadline noted in t h e class schedu l e for any given term. Part-of term NC deadlines are available from the Office of the Registrar or the Office of Student Accounts. • Additional restrictions regarding assigning the " NC" notation may be se t by each school, depart ment , and / or faculty member for the period between the beginning of the fifth and the end of the tenth week of the semester (or proportional time frame) . Such additional restrictions MUST be included in the instructor ' s class outline and policies wh i ch are distributed to all students on the first day of class. • Stud ent requests for an "NC" notation in a given course will not be granted after the tenth week of the fall and spr ing semester or after the publi shed date for summer term for full-term classes (o r after the part of-term deadlines for requesting an NC w ith the signature of the facu l ty member) unl ess the request i s approved by the facu l ty member, the department c h air and the dean. The 'T' notation may be used during this period , provided the conditions specified in the 'T' explanation above apply. • Proportional time frames are applied for part -ofterm courses, weekend courses, workshops and summer terms . These deadlines are available from the Office of the Registrar or the Office of Stu dent Accounts. Deadlines for fullterm summer classes are published in the class schedu le. • A written policy statement describing the us e of the "NC" notation will be given by the faculty member to each student for each class in which the student enrolls. Students are expected to atten d all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student's absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize the student's suc cess in a course . When absences become excessive , the s tudent may receive a failing grade for the course. If attendance i s a part of the grading criteria, that policy s hould be included in the individual faculty mem b e r's class policies an d outline and distributed to studen t s on tl1e first day of class . Students who withdraw from a course or courses because of the d eath of an immediate family member, serious illness or medical emergency, or employment changes beyond the control of the student may file a Tuition and Fees Appeal Form through the Office of Student Accounts. In these cases , the student is still required to obtain an NC for each courses/ he is withdrawing from according to the guidelines above. If the student is incapacitated and unable to contact his/her instructor(s), the student or her/his representative, may contact the Office of the Registrar, the aca demi c department chair , or the dean for assistance in contacti ng the faculty and requesting withdrawal as indicated by the NC notation.

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Computing G r ad e Point A v e r age/ Quality Point s The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of semes ter hours for that course by the quality point valu e of the grade received . The c umul ative GPA is calc u l ated b y dividing th e total number of quality points by the numbe r of semester hours attempted. To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must have a minimum number of quality points eq u al to twice the number of semester hours attempted in add iti o n to meeting o ther prescribed requ irements. The foll owing notations h ave no effect on the GPA: AP, CC, CL, EX, I , NC, NR, P, PL, PP, S, S#, SA, SE, SN, U#. P a ssF ail Option The pass/fail option encourages s tud ents to venture out of their m ajo r and minor fields and thereby broaden their ed u cationa l experience. A student must declare interest in the pass/fail option no later than the 12th day of classes for fall and spring, the eighth day of clas es for summer o r the second day of classes for p arts-of-term of an y se m este r (see the Academic Cal e nd ar on Metro State's Web site (www . mscd.edu/academic/acal . htm) for s p ecific d ea dlines) b y contacting the Office of th e Registrar and com pleting the R eques t for Pass/Fail Option. Once approved, the request for the pass/fail option is irrevo cable. A stu d ent w h o requests the option and l ater is declared ineligible will receive written notificatio n from the Office of the Registrar. Students w ho h ave complete d a t l eas t o n e Metro State course with a t l eas t a 2.00 cumulative GPA may choose to be evaluated for a certain course o n a pass/fail basis rather than by a letter grade. Major, minor, Ge neral Studies and other courses requ i red for a degree a nd courses for teach e r licensure may NOT be taken o n a pass/fai l basis. Self-paced courses may NOT be taken under the pass/fail opti o n . Maximum g r a duati on credit for pass/fail courses i s 18 cred it hour s ea rned in no more than six courses and limited to one cou r se per semes ter or part-of-term. Course work must be graded to determine if it is p ass or fail. The "pass" grade (P) has no effect on the GPA; the "fail " grade i s eq ui valent to the grade of ''f:' The "pass" g r ade (P) i s equivalent t o the grade of D o r better. Pass/fail courses are under th e same "NC" guidelines and d eadlines as other co ur ses in the in sti tuti on whether those guide line s and deadlines are established college wide or by individual sc hools or departments The instructor will assig n a nd reco rd the pass/fail g r ade on th e final gra d e list that id e ntifi es stude nt s e l ecting and elig ibl e for pass/fail gra ding. Some instituti ons do not accept credi t in transfer for courses in w hi c h a " pa s "grad e is g iven . Therefore, s tudent s who plan to transfer or take graduate work sho uld determine w h ether the institut ion of their choice wo uld accept the credit before registering for courses und e r th e pass/fail op tion. A dditi ona lly, it is the s tudent's responsibility to e n sure that the course is not in their major, minor or Genera l Studi es . Repea te d Cour s e s ( Last Grade Stands) A s tudent m ay r epeat certain courses taken a t Metropolitan S t a te Colle ge of Denver regardless of th e ori ginal gra d e earned. Only the credit and the gra d e for the last attempt of the course will remain on the student's official academic record. The gra d e(s) for all prior attempts will be changed to the "NC" nota tion unl ess a perman ent F has b ee n assigned. Repeated courses must carry the same title, course number and semester h o urs . To effect th e g rade change, the student must re-register and pay the full tuition for the class in qu estion, complete the class earning a letter grade, and complete the Last Grade Stands form in the Office of the Registrar . Oth erw i se, the gra de change will be made a dmini st r ative l y prior to gra du ation. Cred it duplication invo l ving transfer, interinstitutional, or sta t e college syste m co ur ses may b e treated differently from the a bove procedures (see below) . A FAILING COURSE GRADE ASSIGNED AS A RESULT OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY IS CONSIDERED A PERMANENT " F " AND CANNOT B E CONS ID ERED UNDER THIS POLICY. A s tud ent may not repeat a co ur se a nd request " l ast grade stands" after the completion of an Metro State degree that includes the cou r se i n question . Spe cifically: In cert ain case s, except for grade assigned for academic dishonesty, the grades of all but the last entry of the particular course will be c h a nged t o an "NC" (no credit, withdrawal) notation . The NC notation does not affect the credit total and GPA.

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68 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The determination of course equivalency will be made by the Office of th e Registrar in consulta tion with the academic department. If the student does not request that the previous grade(s) of a course be c hanged to an "NC" after the course is repeated , the grade change will be made administratively prior to graduation. The Last Grade Stands Policy cannot be used after the student graduates from the Co llege for courses taken prior to the date the degree is awarded. Students who have earned a degree at Metro State a nd subsequently take addi tion a l courses or work toward a second degree may use last grade stands for courses for which the original enroll ment is after the first degree is awarded. The san1e policy is applied when a course taken at another institutio n and transferred to Metro State is later repeated at Metro State. The transferred credit is then revoked. An exception to this policy occurs when a student takes a course at Metro State, then repeats the course at another institution and returns to or is still in attendance at Metro State. In thi s case, since the course is not repeated on the Metro State r ecords, the Metr o State co urse will not be changed to an "NC:' but rather, the transfer credit will b e disallowed. The Last Grade Stands policy applies only to Met ro State courses . Courses taken under the Interinstitutional/Consortium or " pooled" programs do not qualify for considerat ion under this policy. However, this policy does apply to a UCD course if repeated throu gh the Metro State/ UCD-pooled program. Courses repeated prior to the summer quarter of 197 1 are not affected by this Last Grade Stands policy. A grade in a course taken prior to the summer quarter, 1971 a nd repeated after swnmer, 1971 may be changed to an "NC " notation with the use of the grade exception form. Student Grade Appeal Procedure If students have reason to question the validity of a grade received in a co ur se, they must m ake their request for a change before the end of the fourth week of the semester follow ing the complet i on of the course (the following fall semester in the case of the spring semester). The G r ade Appeal Guidelines can be obtained from the students ' respective deans. It is the responsibility of the student t o initiate a grade appeal within the time limit, and to follow t h e procedures specified for g r ade appea ls in the current Student Handbook. The handbook may be ob t ained from the Office of Student Services. All decisions of the Grade Appeal Committee are final. WARNING/PROBATION/SUSPENSION POLICY Academic Satisfactory Progress/Good Standing A student is deemed to be making satisfac tory progress toward his or her aca d emic goa l if th e s tudent maintains a cumu lative GPA of 2.0 or higher. This student is deemed to be in academic good standing with the institution . However, other academic standards may apply to specific programs. A s tud e nt must satisfy those other academic standards in order to be deeme d in academic good stan ding with that pro gram. See information on the program of interest to determine specific standards for that program. Academic Warning Status A student in good s t anding whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 will be on academic warning status with the ins titut ion during his or her next semester. A student wiJI be removed fro m this warn ing status and returned to good standing if he or she achieves a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of hi s or her semester on warning status. More restrictive standards may apply to certa in pro grams or schools. See information on the program of interest. Academic Probation A student who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of his or her semes ter on warn ing sta tu s will be put on academic prob ation w it h the institution during hi s or her next semester at Metro State. A student will be on academic probation as long as he or she has a cumulati ve GPA b e low 2 .0, but is making progress toward good standing as expla in ed below and ha s not been on academic

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' • I\ ' • ''"' .. , ' ... fQI,.ICIES ANP 69 • .I , i .... . '••' ... '-" , probation for more than three semesters. Other conditions may apply to given program or schools. See information on the program of interest. A student is removed from academic probation and is in good standing the semester after achievi n g a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0. During any semester that a student is on academic probation , the student must make progress toward good standing with the institution by taking all of the following actions: • achieve a semester GPA of2.2 or higher • register and complete a minimum of 3 b ut no more than 12 semester hours (3 to 6 semester ho urs for summer semester) • take required activities as negotiated with the director of Student Intervention Services (may include certain classes, repeated courses, tutoring or other activities) While on academic probation, a student may pre-register for the first semester following the acade mic warning status semester , but is prohibited from pre-regi tering any other emester. For subsequent aca demic probation status semesters, a GPA of at least 2.2 must be verified prior to registration. Academic Suspension A student on academic probation not making progress toward good s tand ing will be prohibited from registering for one calendar year from the date of suspension. Appeal of suspension for this reason will be submitted to the director of Student Intervention Services. The director of Studen t Intervention Services will then deliver the appeal materials to the Student Academic Review Committee, which will review the appeal and notify the student of its decision. A student may appeal a suspension only two times in his or her academic career at the College. A student making progress toward good standing, whose cumul ative GPA remains below a 2.0 after three or more semesters on probation, will have his or her academic progre s reviewed each semester by the Student Academic Review Committee. The committee will determine whether the stud ent shou ld be placed on suspension. In both ca es , the decision of the Student Academic Review Committee is final. Any stude nt returning to the College after the one-calendar-year suspension must reapply and will be re admitted on academic probation with the institution. For these students, all probation rules outlined above will apply. A student who is s u spended for a second time will be re-admitted only if he or she has successfully com pleted an associate degree program from a community college afte r suspension from Metro State or can demonstrate t o the Stud ent Academic Review Committee that chances for successf ul comp l etion of an educational program are greatly improved. Contact Student Intervention Services at 303-556-4048 for further information. WITHDRAWAL/EMERGENCY Students who must withdraw from all classes during a semester due to a serious personal or medical emergency should contact the Student Accoun ts Office, C 110, 303 556 6188 for assi tance and infor mation on emergency withdrawal procedures. Studen t s who m u st withdraw from all classes during a semester due to a military or state call to action should contact Veterans ' Services, C I OS or call 303-556 2993, for assistance . STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Policies and Procedures Generally , the policies and procedures contained in this College Catalog must be followed by students currently enro lled for the 2008 fall semester and the 2009 spring a nd summer semesters.

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70 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The procedures and policies contained in this section are su b ject to change, as the College deems neces sary. If you have a concern, please check with the appropriate office. An abbreviated version of the poli cies and procedures are contained in this section. For the complete Students Rights and Responsibilities , you may access the Web at www.mscd.edu/policies to confirm the policies and/or procedures you need to follow. Exc eption s (BASE) Stude nts may appea l to the Board of Academic Standards Exce p tions (BASE) to request a var i ance from College academic req u irements. Valid reasons for variances must accompany all petitions, and the pe titions must be signed by the appropriate dean and departmen t chair. For more information, contact the Office of Academic Affairs, 303-556-3040 and www . mscd.ed u /-aa/student. Aca de m ic Hone sty Students have a responsibility to maintain standards of academic ethics and honesty. Cases of cheating or plagiarism are handled within the policies of Academic Affairs in accordance with procedures out lined in the Metro State Student Handbook. C ondu ct o f Studen t s Metro State policy provides students the l argest degree of freedom cons istent with good work and orderly conduct. The Student Handbook contains standards of conduct to which students are expected to adhere . Information regarding students' rights and respo n s i bilities, inclu di ng the student due pro cess procedure (the procedural rights provided to students a t Metro State before disciplinary action is imposed), is available in Tivoli3ll, Central Classroom 313, orvia the Webatwww.mscd.edu/policies. S t u dent C onduct Cod e The Student Conduct Code is not intended to replace existing procedures related to: • Discrimination or sexual harassment • Grade appeals • Requests for exceptions to academic policies • Appeals for tuition and fee reduction • D i sputes re l ative to financial aid awards • Instate tuition classification For any other matter not included above, contact the Office of Student Life, as a resource for accurate information and advocacy on behalf of the students of the College . Student Life personnel can advise and assi t students with unusual circumstances, or with problems not addressed in the Student Handbook or College Catalog, for example. Res p e c t fo r Rights of Others The student assumes certain obligations of performance and behavior while attending Metro Sta te. Based on this premise, reasonable policies , procedures and regulations have been developed to gua r antee each student ' s opportunity to learn and to protect the f u ndamental r i g ht s of others. Metro Sta t e students neither gain nor lose any of the rights and respo n s ibi lities of other citizens by v i r t ue of the i r student status. As members of an academic community , students are expected to conduct themselves in a mature and responsible manner. Students should try at all times to promote a sense of cooperation and civility within the College and work to build an atmosphere that will be most conducive to the goals of higher education within the institution. Students , while within College facilities or while participating in College sponsored activities (on-cam pus and/or off-campus), are expected to comply with College rules and regulations and with the regula tions of off campus sites.

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Freedom of Spe ech Students shall have the right to assemble, to select speakers and guests , and to discuss issues of their choice. An invitation to a speaker shall not imply endorsement of the speaker ' s views by either the stu dent organization or the College . Information about student views , beliefs, and political associations shall not be used to the detriment of students and their institutional standing. The right of peaceful protest is granted within the College community . The College retains the right to assure the safety of individuals, the protection of property , and the continuity of the educational process. The student press shall be free of censorship and shall provide editorial freedom . The editors and man agers shall not be arbitrarily suspended because of student , faculty, administration , alumni , or commu nity disapproval of editorial policy or content. All student communications shall explicitly state on the editorial page or in broadcast that the opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the College and/or members of the College . Academic Right s Students have the right to: • Be informed of course expectations and requirements. • Be evaluated fairly on the basis of academic performance. • Participate in free and open discussion, inquiry and expression, both in the classroom and in conference. • Receive competent instruction and advisement. • Expect protection against professors ' improper disclosure of students' personal information, views, beliefs, and political associations when such information has become known as a result of professors' instructions, advisement , or counsel. • Expect protection, through established procedures, against prejudicial or capricious evaluation. • Assess the value of a course to make suggestions as to its direction and to evaluate both the instruc tor and the instruction they have received. • Have input in College policy-making, which may include, but shall not be limited to , course sched uling distrib u t i on of night and day classes, calendar arrangements , library policy and developmen t , grading systems , course development, and curriculum . • Expect instructors to conduct themselves professionally in the classroom in accordance with College policies and directives. • Expect instructors to maintain office hours as required by College policy. • Expect reasonable academic assistance from the appropriate department. • Be informed of academic standards expected of them in the classroom through a syllabus and / or course outline. Academic standards shall include , but not be limited to , classroom civility, class attendance requirements, objectives to be achieved , and the grading criteria that will be applied to a particular course of study. Academic Respon si bilitie s Students have the responsibility to: l.lnquire about course or degree requirements if they do not under tand them or are in doubt about them. 2. Maintain the standards of academic performance e s tablished for individual courses and for programs of study . 3. Learn the content of any course of study. 4. Act in accordance with commonly accepted standards of academic condu ct. If disruptive behavior occur i n a classroom, an instructor has authority to ask the student to leave the clas room for one class ses ion and then report it to the Student judicial Officer . Should su c h disorderly or disrup tive conduct persi t, the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Campus Police, the Student Judicial Officer, and the appropriate Department Ch a ir and Dean ' s office. 5 . Maintain academic ethics and academic honesty . 6. Pay the tuition and fees and be officially registered in order to attend a class. 7. Initiate an investigation by contacting the department chair if they believe their academic rights have been violated .

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72 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Acad em ic M i sconduct Academic dishonesty or misconduct is a seriou offense at the College because it diminishes the qual ity of scholarship and the learning experience for everyone on campus. In order to encourage and fos ter academic excellence, the College expects students to conduct themselves in accordance with certa i n generally accepted norms of scholarship and professional behavior. Because of this expectation, the Col lege does not condone any form of academic misconduct. Academ i c misconduct includes, but is not limi t ed to: plagiar i sm, cheating, fabr i cation, m ult ip l e s ub m issions, collaboration , or facilitation of academic dishonesty, or knowingly or recklessly furnis h ing fal se information to the College . Academic misconduct is an unacceptable activity in scholarship, and is in conflict with academic and professional ethics and mora ls. Consequently, s tu dents who are found t o have engaged in ome form of academic misconduct may be subject to: l. Reduction in grade , including a zero or an " F " or permanent " F " on the work in question. 2. Other academic penalties as outlined in the professor ' s course requirements and expectations, and/ or syllabus. 3. Disciplinary action and /or other sanctions that will be determined on the basis of the seriousness of the offense. 4 . Any combination thereof. Generally , a student's intentions will not be the primary cons i deration in the determination of whether academic misconduct has occurred. A student' s intentions will usually be considered only durin g th e process of deciding on the appropriate sanctions or penalties. Definitions of academic misconduct include, but are not limited to: P lag iari s m is the act of appropriating another ' s work. This includes, but is not limited to the following: 1. The written , artistic, or musical composition of another; or the ideas, language, or symbo l s of same and passing them off as the product of one' s own work . 2. The lifting of a substantial or essential portion of another ' s work. 3. The unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency , including Web sites, tl1at may or may not be engaged in the selling of term papers or otl1er academic material. C heatin g is the act of using or attempting to use, in examination or other academic work or mate rial, infor mation, or study aids which are not permitted by the instructo r . Cheating i ncludes, but i s not lin1ite d to: 1 . Using books, notes, or calculators , or copying from or conversing with otl1 e r s du ring an examination . 2. Having someone else do research , write papers , or take examinations. 3. Doing research, writing papers , or taking examinations for someone else. 4. Posse sion , u e , or distribution of tests or other academic material be l onging to a member of the coLleg e faculty , staff , or other students . Fabrica t ion is the invention or falsification of material or its source and its use as an authority in aca demic work. Fabrication includes, but is not limited to: 1 Inventing the data for a scientific experiment . 2. Inventing the titl e and author of a publication in order to use the invented publication as a source. 3. K n owingl y attributing material to an incorrect source . Acad e mic Dishonesty Procedure s , Student Conduct Code and Judicial Proces s Refer to the most current Student Handbook in the Office of Student Life for complete informa t io n . You may also acce sit via the Web at: handbook . mscd .edu/index2.html. Additional information is also available on the Judicial Affairs Website a t : www.mscd .edu/-judicial/. Sexual Harassment Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination based on sex . It is prohibited by law and College policy . In the educational context, sexual harassment is defined as any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sex u a l favors , or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when :

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a. submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an indi vid ual's status in a course, program, activity , or educational evaluation b. submi ss i on to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for educational decisions affect ing that indi vidua l c . such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual' academic performance or educational experience, or of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive edu cat ional environmen t C h arges o f sex ual h arassment can be based on a wide variety of behaviors, such as repeated deroga t ory sex ual remarks, negotiation for sexual favors as a quid pro quo for grades or recommendations or threa tened or actual sex u a l assault. These and similar behaviors serious l y undermine the teaching an d l earni ng e n v ironment and can be grounds for disciplinary action. Sexual harassment s h ould be reporte d to the Office of Equal Opportunity at 303-556-4746. Sexual assaults should be reported to the Auraria Campus Police at 303 556 -3271. Written policies addressing these issues in greater detail are available from the Office of Equal Opportu nity and Affirm ative Action in Central Classroom (CN) 315 or call 303-556-4746. Amorous Relationships Involving Students and College Employees Members of the College community, whether faculty members or administrative staff, put academic and professional trust a nd e thic s a t risk when th ey engage in amoro u s romantic/sexual relationships with people whose academic and /or professional benefits and opportunities are, or appear to be, su b ject to their authority, supervis i o n or influence. Accordingly, the College prohibits s u ch relationships, as well as a n y at temp t to initiate or engage in such relationsh i ps. Any faculty member or administrator who engages in , or attempts to engage in, an a m orous relationship with a student or subordinate sha ll report any such relationship or attempt to the EEO Officer. Sexual harassment of an emp l oyee or student will lead to disciplinary action. In the case of an employee, suc h discipline may include termination. In case of students, such discipline may include expulsion. Class Attendance Attendance during the first week of class is re q uired. It contributes greatly to teaching and learning. Some d e partm e nt s d ete rmin e a s tu dent ' s e nrollm e nt in a co u rse based upon atte ndan ce during the first week of class . Consult the department for more information about the attendance policy for the class th a t yo u are a tt e nding. Stude nt s who drop classes are financially r esponsible for those classes i n accor dance with the withdrawal / refund policies stated on the Web class schedule on Metroconnect (metro connect.mscd.edu). Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor d etermines when a student's absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the cour e. If students ant icip ate a prolonged absence, they should contact their instructors . If they fmd that they cannot communicate w ith the instructor, they should con t act the chair of that department, who will inform th e instructor of the r easons for the anticipated abse nce. Whenever an instructor determines that a studen t's ab e n ces are interf ering wit h academic progress, the instructor ma y submit a Jetter t o the department chair informing th at office of the sit u ation. S tudent s at Metro S t ate who , because of their s inc e r ely held religious beliefs, are unable to attend classes, take examinations , participate in graded activities or submit graded assignments on particular days shall, without penalty, be excused from such classes and be given a meaningful opportunity to make up uch exam in ations and graded activities or assignments provided that proper notice and procedures are followed . The policies and procedures desig n ed to excuse class attendance on religious holidays are cove r ed in th e Metro State Student Handbook. Final Examinations It i s the gene r a l policy of the College to require final examinatio n s of all students in all courses in w hich they are r eg i stered for credit , wit h the possible exception of semina r courses or special projects.

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74 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Equal Opportunity and Americans with Disabilities Act Metropolitan State College of Denver is an equal opportunity employer; applications from min o ritie s and women are particularly invited. Metropolitan State College of Denver does not discriminate on the basis of r ace, color, creed, national origin, sex, age, sex ual orientation or disability in admissions or access to, or treatment or employment in, its educational programs or act ivities. Inquiries concern ing the College grievance procedures may be directed to the designated Metro State officia ls. Inquiries concerning Title VI and Title IX may be referred to Dr. Percy Moreho u se, Jr., Metro State Office of Equal Opportunity , Campus Box 63, P.O. Box 173362, Denver , CO 80217-3362, 303-556-4746.lnq ui ries concerning the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or 504 may be referred to Ms. Kirsten Moore, Faculty and Staff ADA Coordinator, Metro State, Ca mpu s Box 47, P .O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362, 303-556-8514; Mr. Steve Monaco, Student ADA Coordinator, 303-556-3881; Mr. Greg Sul livan, Director Access Center, Metro State, Campus Box 56, P.O. Box 173361, Denver, CO 80217-3361, 303-556-8387. Otherwise, all inquiries may be ref erre d to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1244 Speer Boulevard , Denver, CO 80204,303-844-3723. Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Student Rights Metropolitan State College of Denver maintains educational records for each student who has enrolle d at the College. A copy of the College's policy on student ed uc a tional records may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar , Central Classroom Building , Room 105. Under the Family Educationa l Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), 20 USC 1232g , and the impl ementing regu l ations published at 34 CFR part 99, each eligibl e student has the right to: l. Inspect and review his/her educational records; 2. Request the amendment of the stude nt's education records to ensure that they are not inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in vio lation of the student's privac y or other rights; 3 . Consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's ed uca tional records, except to the extent that FERPA au thorizes disclosure without consen t (see Non disclosure and Exceptions); and 4. File a compla int under 34 CFR 99.64, concerning alleged failures by the College to comp ly with the requirements of FERPA, with the Family Complia nc e Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D .C. 20202-4605. Procedure for Inspecting and Reviewing Educational Records Stude nt s may inspect and r eview their education r ecords upon a written reques t s ubmitt ed to th e Registrar, Central Classroom, Room 105, or b y mail to Campus Box 84, P.O. Box 173362, Denver , Co l orado 80217-3362 . l. The request shall identify as precisely as possible the record or records the student wishes to in spect. 2 . The record custodian or an appropriate staff person shall make the arrangements for access as promptly as possible and notify the student of the tim e and place where the records may be inspected . Access must be given within 45 days from the receipt of the request. 3. When a record contains inform atio n about more than one student, the student may inspect and review only the records th a t relate to that student. Procedure for Amending Educational Records A stude nt ma y make a written request to amend a record. I. In tl1e request, the student should identify the part of the record to be changed and specify why the stu dent believe s it is inaccurate , misleading, or in violation of th e student's privacy or other rights. 2 Metropolitan State College of Denver shall comply wit h the request or notify the student that the College will not comply with the reque s t and advise the student of the st udent ' s right to a hearing t o challenge the information believ ed to be inaccurate, misleading or in violation of the student's rights. 3 . Upon written request, Metropolitan State College of Denver will arrange for a hearing, and notify the student, reasonably in advance, of the date, place, a nd time of the hearing.

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4. The hearing will be conducted by a hearing officer who is a disinterested party, but who may be an official of the institution . The studen t shall be afforded a full and fair opportunity to present evidence relevant to the issues raised in the original request to amend the student' s education records. The student may be assisted by one or more individuals, including an attorney. 5 . Metropolitan State College of Denver will prepare a written decision based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing. The decision will include a summary of the evidence presented and the reasons for the decision. 6. If Metropolitan State Co lleg e of Denver decides that the challenged information i not inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student's right of privacy or other right, it will notify the student that the student has a right to place in the record a statement commenting on the challenged infor mation and/or a statement setting forth reasons for disagreeing with the decision. 7 . The statement will be maintained as part of the student's education records as long as the con tested portion is maintained. If Metropolitan State College of Denver decides that the informa tion is inaccurate , misleading, or in viola tion of the student's rights, it will amend the record and notify the student, in writing, that the record has been amended . Nondisclosure and Exceptions Pursuant to FERPA, the College will not disclose a st ud ent's education records without the written con sent of the student except to College officials with l egitimate educational interests, to officials at other institutions in which the student seeks to enroll; in connection with providing financial aid to the stu dent ; to accrediting agencies in carrying out their functions; to federal, state or local authorities audit ing or evaluating the College's compliance with education programs ; to consultants conducting studies on behalf of the College; in compliance with a judicial order or subpoena; and in connection with a health or safety emergency involving the student. However , the College may release directory informa tion without the prior written consent of the student unless within ten (10) calendar days after the first scheduled class day of each term , an enrolled s tudent has notified the College's Office of the Registrar in writing that any or all types of directory information shall not be disclosed without the consent of the student. A request for nondisclosure will remain in effect until the student is no longer enrolled or cancels the request for nondisclosure. A school official is a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research , or support staff position; or a person elected to the Board of Trustees; or a person employed by or under contract to the College to perform a special task, such as attorney, auditor or consultant; or a student or other person serving on an officia l College committee or ass isting a school official in performing the official's professional duties and responsibilities. A legitimate educational int erest is the need of a scho o l official to review educational records in o r der to fulfill that official's professional duties and responsibilities. Directory Information The Metropolitan State College of Denver has de signa t ed the follo wing categories of personally identifi able information on students as directory information under section 438{a)(S)(B) ofFERPA: • name, address and telephone number • student classification • major and minor fields of study • participation in officially recognized activities and sports • weight and height of members of athletic teams • dates of attendance at the College • degrees and awards received • last educational institution attended Graduation Rate, The Student Right to-Know Act and Campus Security Act This report was prepared by the Office oflnstituti ona l Resea rch at Metropolitan State College of Denver to comply with the federal St udent Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990. Our latest six-year graduation rate, for the 2000 cohort of first-time, full time students is 22.4%.

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76 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CAMPUS CRIME INFORMATION Auraria Campus CLERY Statistical Report Campus and Public Property CRIMINAL OFFENSES On Campus Public Property 2002 20 0 3 2004 2002 2003 20 0 4 M u r d e r and Non-Negligent Mans l a u ghter 0 0 0 0 0 0 Neg lig e nt Manslaug ht e r 0 0 0 0 0 0 Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0 0 Robb e r y I I 0 7 5 1 Aggravated Assault 3 5 2 2 5 2 Mot o r Vehicle T h eft 1 5 9 12 9 4 6 Arso n 0 1 0 0 2 0 *Th e reason for the marked increase is due to the definition provided in the "Handbook for Campus Crime Reporting " publi shed by the US Dept of Education/2005 stating " I f lawful entry cannot be proven, classify as a burglary." Many of these crimes were prev iously classified as a theft which is a n o n-reportabl e offense for CLERY HATE CRIMES On Campus Public Property 2002 2 00 3 2004 2002 2003 2004 Mur d e r a nd Non-Negligen t Mans l aughter 0 0 0 0 0 0 Negligen t Manslaugh t er 0 0 0 0 0 0 Forcibl e Sex Offense 0 0 0 0 0 0 No n Forcible Sex Offences 0 0 0 0 0 0 Robbe r y 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0 0 B urglar y 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mot o r Vehicle Thef t 0 0 0 0 0 0 Arso n 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other C rimes Invo l ving Bodily Inju ry 0 0 0 0 0 0 ARRESTS On Campus Public Property 2002 2003 2004 2 00 2 2003 2 00 4 Liquor Law V i o l ations 0 6 0 0 60** 1 0 Dr u g Law Viol at i o n s 13 1 6 9 6 26 13** Illega l W eapo n s P ossess i o n 2 I I 2 5 1** **The reason for the marked decrease is due to the d efinition provided in the "Handbook for Campus C rime Reporting " published by the US Dept of Education/2005 stating "All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewa lks, and parking facilities, that is within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus . " be included; essentially, sidewalk, street, sidewalk . The Auraria Campus was previously over-reporting the statistics.

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the School of Business We educate Denver's business workforce.

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78 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS The School of Business offers students a variety of educationa l opportunities that either lead to a bach elor's degree or provide opportunities for non-degree seeking students to gain additional unde r graduate education through our extensive course offerings and certifica t e p r ograms. The school provides convenient access to instruction through traditional classroom sessions and inno vative o nli ne delive ry, at t h e main Auraria cam pus, both Met ro South and Metro North campus, during the day, evenings, and weekends. The school co n sists of 67 full-time faculty, more than 50 part-time faculty, and 8 full-time staff. Over 3500 students major in b u siness and economics. Students can take advantage of on-the-job training through cooperative education placements, internships, and indepen dent study course work. Studen t s ma y declare a major in the School of Business duri n g the admission process, or at any time thereaf t e r by contacting a departmen t faculty advisor and completing the "Major Declaration Form". Students are encouraged to declare as early as possible to ens u re accurate advising on degree program requirements. Miss ion The school's mission statement reflects our efforts to provide students with the best possible education we can offer: Our mission is to develop undergraduate students into effective business professionals by preparin g students for careers and lifelong learning with an awareness of ethics, technological advancements, and globalization. We facilitate learning through excellence in teaching by maintaining currency in the disciplines, using appropriate pedagogy, and providing individual attention to students. We deliver a quality, accessible und ergraduate business education in the metropolitan Denver area to a diverse student population. The school offers degrees in six majors: Bachelors of Science Degree Programs • Accounting • Computer Information Systems • Finance (General Finance, Financial Services) • Management • Marketing Bachelors of Arts Degree Program • Economics In addition, we offer an International Business Concentration for business majors and a total of nine minors designed for non-business majors. The var i o u s educationa l opportunities availab l e t hrough the Sch ool of Busi n ess are listed on t h e next page. Course descriptions and prerequisites are found beginni n g on page 359 of this Catalog. If you have any questions about the offerings, academic policies and practices, or admission require ments, contact the dean of the School of Business or the chair of the appropriate department. SCHOOL O F BUSINESS PREREQUISITE AND ATTEN DANCE POLICY All st u dents are expected to know and fulfill all current prerequisite requireme nts. The School of Busi ness reserves the right to disenroll students who do not meet current prerequisite requirements or who fail to meet expected cou r se attendance policies. (See Class Attendance Section . ) In addition to meeting specific course prerequ i sites, the following general requirements also apply:

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L... .. -; : ' . SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 7 ,.., ...._ ' . . . -' . Prior to attending an upper-division course offered in the School of Busine ss Bachelors of Science pro grams (A ccounting , Computer Information Systems, Finance, Management, Marketing), all students must have: • co mpleted all Level I General Studies requirements; • completed at lea s t 60 credit hours overall (junior standing}; • declared a major in any discipline or be of non-degree seeki ng s tatus. Bachelors o f Sci e nce Degree Programs Students may earn a Bachelors of Science degree in accounting, computer information systems , finance, management, or marketing. The degree requires completion of course work in general studies, the core bu s ines s disciplines and requirements , a major , and e l ectives. A minor is not required. Business Program Residenc y Requirements To earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Business , a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of business course work at Metro State. T his 30hour residency requiremen t can be met by com pleting any business co urses with the preftx ACC, CIS, FIN, MGT and MKT except CIS 1010, CIS 2300, CIS 3300, CIS 3320, CIS 3340, and FIN 2250. Business Degree Program Planning Some important things to remember as you plan your business s tudies: • All degree-seeking students must meet the College ' s requirements for all bachelor's degrees out lined in the general information section of this Catalog. • During the first 60 credit hours, business majors should complete their General Studies Levels I and II courses and the 2000-level business core courses. • The College requires at least 40 credit hours of upper division courses (3000 or 4000 level). Con sult with an advisor to ensure that your specific degr ee program meets this requirement. • If a student pursuing a degree other than a Bachelors of cience from the School of Business wishes to enroll in business courses beyond 30 hours , the student must declare a major with the School of Business . The 30 hours excludes up to 9 credit hour in economics and the following courses: CIS 1010, CIS 2300, CIS 3300, CIS 3320, CIS 3340 , or FI 2250. • A minor is not required for students whose major is accounting, computer information syste ms , finance, management or marketing . The following sections describe the scope of the degree program, course requirements , career opportu nities , and competencies for career success in each degree program. ACCOUNTING DEGREE PROGRAM The accounting program prepares students for entry into careers in public accounting, industry, tax, and the government sec t or, as well as graduate education and lifelong learning . The field of accounting is moving rapidly toward a greater emphasis in the areas of information systems, management consulting, and leadership in organizational change. Accountants can obtain a variety of professional certifications, including Certified Public Accountant, Certified Internal Auditor, Certified Fraud Examiner, Certified Information Systems Auditor, and Certified Management Accountant. Each professional certification program include s rigorous education, examination, experience, and ethics requirements. Mission: The Accounting Department at Metro State College provides high quality , accessible, enr ich ing undergraduate accounting educa tion in an urban setting appropriate to a diverse stu dent population enro lled under modified open admission standards. We prepare students for careers, graduate educatio n , and lifelong learning in a global and technological society. The department is committ ed to ethical values , continuous improvement, and mutual respect within a diverse campus community. The Accounting D epartment pursues excellence in t eac hing and learning as its primary pur pose . Int ellectual con tribution s in accounting and related fields that enha nce t eaching and

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80 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS learning and contribute to scholarship through both applied research and other avenues of professional development are secondary though fundamental to the mission of the Accounting Departm e nt. Service to Metro State College, the accounting profession, and the community and society in general is also seconda r y albeit fundamental to the mission of the Accounting Departm ent. uccessful accounting students posses s the se skills and attributes: • ability to organize, a n alyze, and interpret numerical data; • st rat egic and critical thinking skills; • proficiency in oral and written communications with the ability to exp l ain complex financial data to others; • abil ity to apply current technology ; • knowledge of financial and economic history, practices, and trends; • ab ility to work collaboratively as well as independently ; • understanding of the methods for creating, leading , a nd managing change in organizations. Students majoring in accounting and interested in pursuing an International Business concentration should see an advisor. Program Requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting All can didates for a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting must satisfy the General Stud i es require ments, the business core course requirements, and the Accou ntin g Department requirements described in the following sec tions . COURSES .......... SEMESTER HOURS General Studies (Level I and Level II) * ................. ................................ 34 Accounting Department Requir e ment s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..................... 3-1 8 Busines s Co r e ...................... .............................. . ................ 33 Accounting Major R e quirement s. .......................... . ................ . . 24 Unrestricted Electives* ......................... _ ................................ 12 27 Total Hours (minimum) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......................... 120 *The College's multicultural requirement may be satisfied by taking an approved multicult tlral course in the general studies or the unrestricted electives portion of the program requirements. Note: Unrestricted Elective credits may vary. Total11nrestricted electives mus t b e sufficient for the s tudent to meet the required college minimum of 120 credit hours. Typically the unrestricted e lective credit s will vary between 1 2 and 27 credit hours. These hours may be used to meet requirements / or a minor or a concentration. Per college policy, no more tlran 4 semester hours in human perfor mance and sports activity (HPL) or varsity sports (ATH) and no more than 7 semest e r hour s in music ensemble courses will be counted toward the degree. General Studie s The academic foundation for a successful business career or graduate work is a broad liberal arts educa tion. GENERAL STUDIES COURSES ................................. SEMESTER HOURS Check the Catalog Addendum: General College R equi r eme nts for approved courses and the Accounting Department Requir e m e nts listed below. Total Hours for General Studies . . . . . .......... . . . ...•..............•....... 33 Multic ultu ral Requirement The College's multicultural requirement is satisfied by taking an approved multicultural course listed in the Catalog Addendum: General College Requir ements. Acco untin g Departmen t Requirements ln addi tion to foundation coursework in busine ss theory and practice, all Accounting majors should have learning experiences that develop and support com munication abilities, quantitative and analyti-

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cal skills, an understanding of the domestic and global economic environment, an appreciation of the American politica l process, and an understandin g of a business professional's ethical as well as lega l responsibility in organizations and society . To meet these objectives, the following courses are required for all majors in Accounting. REQUIRED COURSES... . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .................. SEMESTER HOURS SPE 1010 Public Speaking ' . . . . . . . . ........................................ 3 ECO 2010 Principles of EconomicsMacro ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... 3 ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro ' ....... . .................................. 3 PSC 1010 American National Government ' ............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ethics Requirement PHI 3360 Business Ethics' .................. . . ............................ 4 -orACC 4440 Accounting Ethics and Professionalism ' . . . .............. 3 Total Hours for the Accounting Department Requirements .............................. 3 -18 1 May be used to meet the General Studies Level I Communications requirement. 2May be used to meet the General Studies L evel II Social Sciences requirements. 'The prerequisit e for this course, MTH 1110 or MTH 1310 or MTH 1400, may be used to meet the General Studies Levell Mathematics requirement. MTH 1410, MTH 2410 or MTH 2420 may be sub stituted for MTH 1320. 'May be used to meet the General Studies Level II Arts and Letters reqtlirement. ' May be used as an Accounting elective or an unrestricted elective if PHI 3360, Business Ethics, is taken. Business Core All Business majors require foundation course work in all significant areas of business theory and prac tice . The following courses are required for all majors in Accounting. A grade of"C" or better must be earned in each business core course to have that course count toward the Bachelors of Science degree in Accounting. REQUIRED COURSES ................ ....... . ............ .......... SEMESTER HOURS ACC 201 0 Principles of Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 3 ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II .............................................. 3 CIS 20 I 0 Comp ut er Applications for Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......... 3 CIS 2300 Business Statistics ...................................................... 3 CIS 3340 Advanced Bu iness Statistics ............................................. 3 FIN 3300 Managerial Finance ....................................... . . . ......... .. 3 MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business I. ............................... . ......... 3 MGT 3000 Organizational Management . ............................................ 3 MGT 4950 Strategic Management (meets the Senior Expe rience requirement) ............ 3 MKT 2040 Business Communication.. . . . . ...................................... 3 MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing ................................................. 3 Total Hour s for the Business Core. . ..............•.............................. 33 Accounting Major Requirements Accounting majors should h ave learning experiences that foc u s on the development, measurement, analysis, validation, and communication of financial and other information. The following courses are required for all majors in Accounting. REQUIRED COURSES . . ................. . ........ .................. SEMESTER HOURS ACC 3090 Income Tax!............. . ............................... 3 ACC 3300 Accounting Information Systems ..................................... .... 3 ACC 3400 Cost Acco untin g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......... 3 ACC 3510 Intermediate Accounting .............................................. .. 3 ACC 3520 Intermediate Accounting II .............................................. 3 Subtotal ........................................................................... 15

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82 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Plus 9 hours from the following courses including at least one 4000 level course: ACC 3100 Income Tax 11 .......................................................... 3 ACC 3110 Volunteer Income Tax Assi tance (VITA) .............................. .... 3 ACC 3200 Governmental Accounting ............................................... 3 ACC 3410 Advanced Cost Accounting .............................................. 3 ACC 3750 International Accounting ............ .................................... 3 ACC 4090 Tax Procedure and Research ........ ..................................... 3 AC 4100 Tax P l anning .......................................... . ................ 3 ACC 4200 Auditing and Attestation ................................................ 3 ACC 4300 Advanced A u diting ................................................ ..... 3 A C 4440 Accounting Ethks and Professionalism .................................... 3 ACC 4510 Advanced Accounting .................................... ............... 3 ACC 4520 Mergers and Acquisitions ................................................ 3 ACC 4650 Fraud: Issues in Accounting and Auditing ..... ......... .................... 3 Subtotal. ............................................................•.............. 9 Total Hours for the Accounting Major Requirements ...................................... 24 Studen t s interested in becoming Certified Public Accountants (CPA) should be aware that they must take ACC 4200, Audit in g and Attestation, a nd t h at the majority of states (Co lorado is not included ) re quir e 150 semes ter hours of education to sit for the uniform CPA examina t ion. MSCD offers classes that satisfy both the ISOhour requirement and Colorado's "ed ucation in lieu of exper i ence" optio n for certification. To earn a Bachelor's degree in Accounting, a student must s uccessfull y comp l ete 30 or more credit hours of business course work at MSCD, including the last 12 hours applicable to the degree, and completion of at l east 40 hours of upper -division courses. The 30-hour residency requirement can be met by com pleting any business courses with the prefix ACC, CIS, FIN, MGT, and MKT except CIS 1010, CIS 2300, CIS 3300, CIS 3320 , CIS 3340, and FIN 22SO. A student must complete at least 12 upper-division semes ter hours in Accounting at MSCD. Students should consult a n Accounting fac ulty advisor to develop an appropriate academic program. A wide variety of internship opportunities are available through the Cooperative Education Office. Certificate in Accounting The Certificate in Accounting is offered by the departmen t for students with prior degrees who want to meet the educational requirements to sit for the CPA examination in Colorado. The basic requirements for this certificate program include: • A pr evio us baccalaureate degree. • Prerequisite and/or corequisite requirements of twenty-one credit hours of courses in other areas of business. These areas include, but are not limited to, business communication, business law, com puter information systems, economics, finance, management, marketing, and statistics. No m ore than six hours may be in anyone of the areas . • Proof that transfer courses meet the education requirements of the Colorado State Board of Accountancy. • Twenty seven cred it h ou r s of accounting co ur ses wit h a g r ade of "C" or better. At least twenty-one c r e dit hours must u pper-division co ur ses . • SuccessfuUy comple t e a minimum of eig hteen credit hours of accounting courses at MSCD w hil e enrolled in the Certificate program. Certificate Requir e ments A candidate for the Certificate in Accounting must satisfy the following course requirements: REQUIRED COURSES ............................................ SEMESTER HOURS ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I ............................................... 3 ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II .............................................. 3 ACC 3510 Intermediate Accounting I .......................... . . ................... 3 ACC 3520 Intermediate Accounting 11 ................ .............................. 3 ACC 4200 Auditing and Attestation ......... . ...................................... 3 Subtotal ...................... ........................ ........ .......... ........... 15

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Plus 12 hour s from the following courses: ACC 3090 Income Tax l. .......................................................... 3 ACC 3100 Income Tax II. ......................................................... 3 ACC 3110 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) .......... ........................ 3 ACC 3200 Governmental Accounting ..... .................. . ....................... 3 ACC 3300 Accounting Inf ormation System . . . . . . . . . .......................... 3 ACC 3400 Cos t Accounting ....................................................... 3 ACC 3410 Advanced o t Accounting .............................................. 3 ACC 3750 Internationa l Accounting ................................................ 3 ACC 4090 Tax Procedure and Research .................. ........................... 3 ACC 4100 Tax Planning ........................................................... 3 ACC 4300 Advanced Auditing ..................................................... 3 ACC 4440 Accounting Ethics and Profess i onalism ........... . .................. ...... 3 ACC 4510 Advanced Accounting ................................................... 3 ACC 4520 Mergers and Acquisitions ................................................ 3 ACC 4650 Fraud: I ssues in Accounting and Auditing .................................. 3 Subtotal ........................................................................... 12 Total Hours for the Accounting Certificate Requirements ................................... 27 COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEGREE PROGRAM With a degree in the rapidly expanding area of inform ation systems in the business world, students can look forward to challenging careers in comput e r information systems. Mission Statement: The Computer Information Systems Department delivers high quality, accessible undergrad uate business information systems education to a diverse student population. We prepare stude nt s to analyze, design, develop, and use business applications utilizing contemporary technology. We provide a balance between fundamental information system s concepts and the application of these concepts from a future-oriented perspective. The Computer Information Systems Department provides undergraduate major, minor, and certificate programs in information systems. We offer service courses in information systems and quantitative methods to School of Business students, and applied computer courses to students college-wide. T h e Computer Information Systems Department faculty pursues excellence in teaching and learning as its primary purpose. We provide degree and career planning assistance. We nur ture l earning through individual attention to students . The faculty aggressively engage in professional development activities to enhance instruction and contribute to scholarship and applied research, and engage in pursuit of currency in Information Systems. The faculty inte grate current technology into the curriculum and provide service to the irJstitution, the profes sian and the community at large. S u ccessfu l students in th e Computer Information Systems program will be ab l e to demonstrate skills and competencies in the following areas: • Compu ter Information Systems theory and concepts and their application to the functional areas of business; • Project management too l s and techniques as they apply to Information Systems projects; • Programming processes includin g planning, writing, testing, executing and debugging; • Database design , development and management; • Telecommunications a nd n etworking systems; • Web-based systems; • Operati ng systems; • Knowledge of how t o crea te and utilize team approaches to problem solving; • Advanced knowledge in an Information Systems area; • Ability to support the delivery and management of information systems.

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84 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Students majoring in computer information systems are enco urag ed to s elect advanced courses that best meet their needs in areas such as systems a nal ysis, de s ign , and development; programming; database management/administration; data communications; networ ks /network administration; e l ectronic com merce; web site d evelopment/adminis tration ; a nd m a nagement of information systems. Advising for these areas i s ava ilabl e from the department chair a nd indivi dual faculty members . Stu dents pursuin g a bachelor's degre e in Compute r Information Systems are required to participate in assessment activities at both the depa rtment and school levels during their se nior year. Stu dents maj o rin g in Computer Informati o n Systems and interested in pursu in g an International Busi ness Co n centration s hould see an advisor . Computer Information Systems Major for Bachelors of Science All ca ndidates for a B ac helors of Science degree in computer inform ation systems mu s t sa tisfy the Gen e ral St udi es requirements , the bu siness core course r eq uirements, th e School of Business r e quirem e nts, an d the maj o r requirement s described in the follo wing sec ti ons. The basic structure of the computer informa tion syste m s program is: Required Co urses ... . .............................................. Semester Hours General Studies (Level I and Level II) ...... . ............ ....... . ....................... 3 4 Business Core ................................................................ . .... 33 School of Business requirements ............. . . . . . ..................................... 9 Major in Comp uter Inf or mati o n System s .........................•.................... . 27 Unrestricted Electives* ..................................... . ...................... . . . 1 7 Total Hours (minimum) ............. .................. . ............. ..... ....... . . . 120 *The College's multicultura l requirement may b e satisfied by taking an approved multicultural course in general studies o r electives portion of the degree requirement. NOTE : Unrestricted Elective credits may vary. Total unrestr i c t e d electives must be sufficient for student to meet the College's minimum required 120 c redit hours. General Studies The aca demic founda tion for a s uc cessful business ca reer or gradu a t e work is a broad liberal arts ed uca tion. Ge neral Studie s L eve l I REQUIRED COURSES ... ..•.............................. ........ SEMESTER HOURS Composition ENG 1010 ENG 1 020 F r esh man Co mp ositio n : The Essay ..................... . ................ .. 3 Freshman Co mpositio n : Analysis , Researc h , and Documentatio n ............. 3 Mathematic s MTH 1310 * Finite M at h e matics for the Manag e ment and Social Sciences ...... ........ . . . 4 Communications SPE 1010 Public Speaking ........ ......... . . ................................. .... 3 *Note: MTH 1110 or MTH 1400, with graphin g c alculator exp erience strongly r ecommende d , i s acceptable for transfer students or students changing their major . Consult with the Mathematical and Computer Sciences D e partm ent on substitutions. General Studies Level II Historical Studies HIS (America n history course recomm ended) .................................. 3 Arts and Letters PHI 1030 Ethic s .... . . . . . . ........ ........................... ................... 3 -or PHI 3360 Business E thic s ......................................................... 3 Level II Arts and Letters elective (refe r t o Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements) ... 3

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Social Scie n ces PSY 1001• Introdu c tor y Psychology ..........•..................................... 3 o r SOC 10 lO Introdu c tion to Sociol ogy . . . . . ................. . . . . ........ . 3 PSC 1010 American Na tional Gove rnment. .... .................. . . . . . .... . . . ....... 3 -orPSC 1020 P o litical Systems and Ide as ...... ......................................... 3 Natural Sciences Level II atural Scien ces electives (refer t o C atalog Addendum: General College R e quir ements) . . 6 Total of R e quired and Elective G e neral S tudies ................. . ....... . ................. 34 • Note: PSY 8000 is acceptable for transfer s tudents. Business Core All business majors require foundation course work in all significa nt a r eas of business theory and prac tice. The following courses are required for al l majors in computer information systems. A grade of" C " o r better mus t be earned in eac h business core co u rs e to have that course count toward th e Bachelors of Science degree in computer information systems. REQUIRED COURSES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . . ......•........... SEMESTER HOURS ACC 2010 Princip les of Acco unting l... . .......... . ............................ 3 C I S 20 I 0 o mputer Applicati o n s f o r B u s ine ss .......... ....•....•.................. 3 ACC 2020 Principles of Accountin g ri . . . ................................... ........ 3 MKT 2040 Busines Communication ........................................ ........ 3 MGT 2210 Legal Env ir on m ent of Bus iness I. ....................................... .. 3 CIS 2300 Business S t at i stics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............................... 3 MGT 3000 Organizat i ona l Management . ............. ................... ....... ... .. 3 MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing ...................................•. ........•... 3 FIN 3300 Managerial Finance . .................................................... 3 CIS 3340 Advanced B usin ess S t at i stics . . . . . .......................... 3 MGT 4950 S trat egic Management .............................. ........ ............. 3 Total Hours Requir e d in Business Core ................................•................. 33 School of Business Requirements REQUIRED COURSES........ . ... SEMESTER HOURS MTH 1320 Calculu s for the Management and Social Sciences ..... . ......... .... ........ 3 ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro ......................... ............ 3 ECO 2020 Principles of Eco n omicsMicro ...................... ...... . .......... .... 3 Total Hours for School of Business Requirement ................................... . . . . .... 9 Computer Information Systems Major Requirements REQUIRED COURSES.... . ... . ............ SEMESTER HOURS CIS 2110 Structure Prob l em Solving in In formation System s .......................... 3 CIS 3 050 Fun dam e nt a l s of System Ana l ysis and Design . . . . . . . . . . . ................ 3 CIS 3060 Database Management Systems. . . . . . . . ................................ 3 I S 3230 Telecom muni catio n s Syste m s a nd e tw orking ................... ... . ....... 3 CIS 3145 Business A ppli cat i on Devel o pm e nt with Visua l Basic ........................ 3 CIS 4050 Systems Analy s i s and Desig n ............................................. 3 Co mputer Inform a tion Systems Ca p s ton e Group (any 4000l eve l CIS co ur se excl udin g C I S 405 0) ..... . . ..................... 3 Upperdivi s i o n CIS E lectives . .... . . .......................................... . . ....... 6 Total Hours Required for Computer Information Systems Major ................... . . . . . . .... 27 To earn a Bachelor' s degree in computer information systems, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of b u s ines s course work at MSCD. This 30 -hour re sidency requirement ca n be met by completing any business courses with the prefix ACC, C IS , F I , MGT and MKT except

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86 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS CIS 1010 , CIS 2300, CIS 3300 , CIS 3320, CIS 3340 , and FIN 2250. A student must complete at lea st eight (8) upper-divi sion semester hours in Computer Inform ation Systems at MSCD. Certificate Programs Students must complete each co urse in the certificate program with a grade of "C" or better. The courses cannot be taken pas /fail. Database Analyst * This cer tifi cate will prepare a student for an entrylevel position as a database programmer or database analyst. REQUIRED COURSES .................................................. SEMESTER HOURS C I S 21 I 0 Struc tur ed Problem Solving in Informati o n Systems ......................... 3 Any one course from th e CIS Programming Language Group : CIS 3130 B u siness Applications in C and U IX ...... . .............................. 3 C I S 3145 Business Application Development with Visual Basic ........................ 3 CIS 3180 Business Applications in OOP : ++ . ...................................... 3 C I S 3190 Business App l icat ion a nd Web Applet Desig n with java .................. . . . . 3 C I S 3260 Information Syst ems Development wit h GU I Devel opme nt Tools ............ . 3 CIS CIS I S -plus3060 4060 4260 Database Management Systems ........................................... 3 Advance d Database Manageme n t Systems ................................. 3 Database Adm ini st r atio n ................. . . ............................. 3 *This certificate has a prerequisit e course of CIS 2010 which may be waived with appropriate work experience or course work. End User Support Specialist * T hi s cer tific ate will prepare a student for an entryleve l positio n as a help desk/support center s peci a list. It wil l also prepare an end-u se r to become the departmental hardware/software expert. REQUIRED COURSES ... . . . ........... ................... . . . . . . . ....... SEMESTER HOURS C I S 21JO Structur e d Problem Sol ving in Information Systems ......... ................ 3 CIS 3030 Business Web Page Development ...... ................................... 3 CIS 3220 Ana l ysis of H a rd ware, Software and User Interfaces for Microcomputer Platforms ................ . ......... .................. 3 CIS 3270 Advanced Computer Application for Business ............................. 3 CIS 3290 Operating Systems for End Users ................................ ..... . ... 3 *This certificate has a prerequisite course of CIS 20 I 0 which may be waived with appropriate work experience or course work. Network Specialist in Information Systems* This certifi cate will prepare a student for a n entry-level positio n in network support, network adminis tration, network de ign, and n etwork sa les. REQUIRED COURSES ...................... ......... . . ..... .......... . SEME TER HOURS Cl 3220 Analysis of Hardware, Software and User Int erfaces for Microcomputer Platforms ........................•............... .... 3 CIS 3230 Tel ecommunication yste m s and etworki ng .............................. 3 IS 3280 LA and WAN Systems for Business . ....................... .. ........... . 3 CIS 3290 Ope r a ting Systems for End User ......... ................................ 3 CIS 4280 Network In sta U ation and Administration .................................. 3 *This certificate has prerequisit e courses of C I S 2010 and CIS 2110 which may be waived with appropriate work experience or course work.

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Programmer/ Analyst in Information Systems * This certificate will prepare a student for an entry-level position as a business application programmer, programmer/analyst, or junior systems analyst. REQUIRED COURSES......... . ............................... SEMESTER HOURS CIS 3050 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design -or CIS 4050 Systems Analysis and Design'* ........................................... 3 CIS 3060 Database Management Systems ............................... ............ 3 Three courses from the following: CIS 3030 Business Web Page Development ......................................... 3 CIS 3130 Business Applications inC and UNIX ....... . ............................. 3 CIS 3145 Business Application Development with Visual Basic ........................ 3 CIS 3180 Business Applications in OOP: C++ ....................................... 3 CIS 3190 Business Application and Web Appl et Design with java ...................... 3 CIS 3260 Information Systems Development with GUI Development Tools ............. 3 •This certificate has prerequisite courses of CIS 20 I 0 and CIS 2 I I 0 which may be waived with appropriate work experience or course work . .. CIS 4050 has a prerequisite course of CIS 3230. Web Developer in Information Systems * This certificate will prepare a student to design and develop Web pages, to use an appropriate scripting language to generate dynamic Web content, to integrate Web solutions into the organization's informa tion system , and to design a nd perform Web site administration tasks . REQUIRED COURSES.. . .......... ...... SEMESTER HOURS CIS 3030 Bu iness Web Page Development . . . . ........ . . ...................... 3 CIS 3060 Database Management Systems ....... .................................... 3 CIS 3145 Business Application Development with Visual Basic ................ ........ 3 -or CIS 3190 Business Application and Web Applet Design with java. . . . . . ............ 3 CIS 3230 Telecommunication Systems and etworking ....................... ....... 3 CIS 4030 Web Site Administration ................................................ 3 'This certificate has prerequisite courses of CIS 20 I 0 and CIS 2110 which may be waived with appropriate work experience or course work. ECONOMICS DEGREE PROGRAM MSCD's economics program is not a business program and economics majors do not have the same requirements as other majors in the School of Business. For example, economics majors do not need to take the business core nor the special General Studies required of business majors. Graduates will receive a bachelors of arts degree instead of a bachelors of science degree. Consequently, the economics major requirements are not described in this sec tion but can be found on page 96 of this Catalog. FINANCE DEGREE PROGRAM The finance program prepares students for careers that conce ntrate on the process of managing the funds of individuals, businesses, and governments. Career opportunities are available in the fields of managerial finance , personal financial planning, and the fmancial services industry. The field of managerial finance deals with managing the financial affairs of businesses and governments and incl udes such activit i es as budgeting, financial forecasting, cash management, credit admini stration, investment analysis, and funds management. Careers in the financial services ind ustry include positions in banks, savings and lo ans, other financial institutions, brokerage firms, insurance companies, and real esta te. The most dramatic increase in career opportunities is in personal financial planning , where profession als are needed to provide advice to consumers on the management of their persona l financial affairs.

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88 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS T h e Fin a n ce Department i s a Certified Fina n c ial Planner (CF P * ) Board of S tandards Regis t e r ed P r o g ram. S tudents successf ull y completing the requ ired financ i a l planning cour ses are eligib l e to t ake th e na tio na l Certifie d F in a n cial P lanner examina t io n . T h e purs u i t of excelle nce i n teaching and learni n g is foremost in the missio n s tatement of the D epa rt men t of Finance. M i ss ion : The Finance Depart ment of the School of Business at M etropolitan Stat e College of Denver delivers high quality, accessible undergraduate business and personal finance education in the metropolitan Denver area appropriate to a diverse stu dent population and modified open admission standards. We prepare studen t s for careers, graduate educat i o n a n d lifelong learni n g in a society charact erized by technological advancements and globalizatio n . T h e primary purpose of the Finance Department is the pursuit of excellence in teaching and learn ing. We nu rtur e learning throug h ind iv i dual atte n t ion to studen t s . The faculty of the Finance Departme n t engages i n professi ona l developme n t activities that enh ance inst ruction a n d contribute to scholarshi p and applied research. Our faculty provide service to the institu t ion, the professions and the community at large. Finance Major for B a chelo rs of Scien ce Al l ca ndi dates for a bachelors of science degree in Finance m u st atisfy the General Studies require ments, the b u siness co r e course requirements, t h e School of Business requirements and t h e major require m en t s describe d in th e follow in g sec t io ns. The basic structure of the F in a n ce prog r a m is: REQUIRED COURSES .................................................. SEMESTER HOURS Gen e ral S t udies (Leve l I and Level II) .................................................. 34 B u siness Core ..................................................................... 33 Sch oo l of B u siness r eq uir ements . . . . ..... . . . . ........... . . .......... . .................. 9 Majo r i n Fina nce ..... . . . ................ . ..... . ...... .............. ................. 24 U nr estr i cted E l ectives" ....... .... ................................................... 20 Total Hours (minimum) .... ......................................... . ............... 1 20 "The College's multicultural requirement may be satisfied by taking an approved multicultural course in general studies or e lectives portion of the degree requirement. NOTE: Unrestricted E lective credits may vary. Total unrestricted electives must be sufficient for stu dent to meet the College's minimum required 120 credit hours. General Studi es The academic f oundatio n for a s u c c essfu l b u s in ess career or g radu ate wo r k i s a b road lib e r al art s educa ti o n . Gene ral Studies L e ve l I Compos i tion ENG 1010 F reshm an Compositio n : T h e Essay ........................................ 3 ENG 1 020 F resh man Composition: Analysis, Research, a n d Documentation ............. 3 Mathematics MT H 1310 " Finite Math ematic for the Management and Socia l ciences . . . .............. 4 Communications S P E 1010 Pub lic Speaking ............. ........... . . ........... . . ............. .... 3 "Note: MTH 1110 or MTH 1400, with graphing calculator experience strongl y recommended, is acceptable for transfer students or stude nts changing their major. Consult w i t h the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department on substitutions. General Studies Leve l II His tori cal S tudi e s HI S (A m e rican h istory course reco mm ended) ......................... ......... 3

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' .. . . : , . SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 8 .. • • > .,.. "-I .. Arts a n d Letters PI-U 1030 Ethics ... 3 -orPHI 3360 Business Ethics .... . .......................................... 3 Level II Arts and Letters e l ect ive (refer to Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements) ... 3 Social Scie n ces PSY 1001 * Introductor y P syc h o log y ........ ........................................ 3 -orSOC 1010 Introduction to Socio l ogy ........ . .......................... ........ .... 3 PSC 1010 Ameri can ational Government..... . . ..... . . .............. . .. ...... 3 -or P C 1020 Political Sys t ems and Ide as ................................. .............. 3 Natural Sciences Level II Natural Sciences e l ectives (refe r to Catalog Addendum: G eneral College Requi r ements) . . 6 Total of Required and E lective G eneral Studies ....... . ......... . . . ......... . ............. 34 *Note: PSY 8000 is acceptable for transfer students . Business Core All business majors require foundation course work in aU significant areas of business theory and prac tice. The following courses are required for all majors in fmance. A grade of"C" or better must be earned i n each business core course to have that course count toward the bachelors of science degree in finance. REQUIRED COURSES .................................................. SEMESTER HOURS ACC 20 1 0 Principles of Accoun t ing I .................... ......................... .. 3 CIS 20 1 0 Computer Applications for Business . . . . . . .........•................ 3 ACC 2020 Prin c iples of Accounting II ............... ............................... 3 MKT 2040 Business Communica t ion ................................................ 3 MGT 2210 Legal Environmen t of Business I ............ . . . . .......................... 3 C I S 2300 Business S t atistics . . .....................•.............................. 3 MGT 3000 Organizatio nal Management ................. ... ......................... 3 MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing ........•.............•.........•........ ....... . 3 FIN 3300 Manageria l F in ance ....................... ............. .... . . ........... 3 C I S 3340 Advanced Busine ss Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... 3 MGT 4950 Strategic Management (Se nior Exper i ence Course) .. ........................ 3 Total Hour s Requir e d in Business Core . . . . . ......... ..............•........•. . .....•.... 33 School of Bu s ine ss Requ i rement s REQUIRED COURSES . . . ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... SEMESTER H OURS MTH 1 320 Calculus for the Managemen t and Socia l Sciences ........................... 3 ECO 2010 Principles of EconomicsMacro . . . .................. ...... . .... 3 ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Mic ro. . ...... ......... . ......•.. .... 3 Total Hours for School of Business R equireme nt ........................................... 9 Finance Major Requirements Finance majors must pursue a concentra tion d e p ending on their interes t within the Finance area. A minimum grad e of "C" is required for courses in the major. Finance Common Core REQUIRED COURSES . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEMESTER HOUR S F I N 3 010 Financia l Markets and Institutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FIN 3 1 50 Pers o nal Fina ncial Planning .. ............ ... . .......................... . . 3 FI N 3600 In vestments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... . ............... 3 F I N 3850 Interme diate F in ance ............... ....... ............................. 3 Subtot a l .. . .••...............•.... 1 2

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90 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS General Finance Concentration REQUIRED COURSES ......................... ........ . ............ SEMESTER HOURS Financ e Co mm o n Core ............................... . .............................. 12 FIN 4950 Financial Strategies and Policies ................................... . ...... 3 Subtotal .......... ................................................................ . 15 Approved Electives• .... . ............................................................. 9 Total Hours Required for Finance Major with a General Finance Concentration ............... . 24 *Upper-division finance electives (three credit hours must be 4000-level) selected in consultation with and approved by the Finance Department . Financial Services Concentration REQUIRED COU RSES . .... . . . ...................................•...... SEME TER HOURS Finance Co mm on Co r e . ........................................... . . . ............... 12 FI 4600 Security An a lysis and Portfolio Managemen t ............................... 3 Subtotal ........................................................................... 15 Approved E lectives• ..................................................... ............. 9 Total Hours Required for Finance Major with a Financial Services Concentrat ion .... . ......... 24 *Upp e r division financ e e l ectives ( thr ee cre dit h ou r s must b e 4000-leve l ) se lect ed in cons ult at i o n wit h and approved by th e Finance Department. To earn a b ac h e l o r's degr ee in Finan ce, a st ud e nt must s u ccessfully complete 30 or more credit h o ur s of bu siness co urse work at MSCD. This 30h o ur res idenc y r eq uir e ment ca n b e met b y com plet in g any busine s courses w ith the prefiX ACC , CIS, F I • MGT and MKT except CIS 1 010, CIS 2300, C I S 3300, CIS 3320, CIS 3340, and FIN 2250. A s tud ent must co mplet e at least eight (8) upp er-division se mest er h o ur s in Finance at MSCD. Certificate Programs Students must complete each course in the ce rtifi cate program with a grade of"C" o r bette r . The course cannot be taken pass/fail . Personal Financial Planning REQUIRED COURSES ...................•..........•.......•........... SEMESTER HOURS ACC 3 090 Incom e Tax I. .................................. . ....... . . . ............. 3 FIN 3!50 FIN 3420 FIN 3450 F I N 3600 F I N 4400 Personal Financial Plan nin g .... .......................................... 3 Principles of Insurance .................................................. 3 Retirement Planning and E mpl oyee Benefits ........................... . ... 3 Investment s• .............................. .....•....................... 3 Estate Plannin g .... . ................................................... 3 This course has prerequisites. See catalog course description. Successful completion of these courses als o meets the Certifi ed Financial Planner (CFP• ) Board of Standards education requirement to t ake the national Certified Fin ancial Planner examinatio n. For pre req ui s it es and mor e information call the Finance Department, 303-556-3I26. Noncredit Financial Planning FPI Financial Planning Fundamentals FPII Understanding Risk and In s urance FP III Investment A lt ernatives FP IV Effective Tax P lanning FPV R etirement Planning and Empl oyee Benefits FPVI Estate Planning

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. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 9 Approved by Certified Financial Planner (CF P • ) Board of Standards/ Approved by Colorado Insurance Commission for Continuing Education credit. For prerequisites and more information call the Finance Department, 303-556-6998 or 303-556-3776. MANAGEMENT DEGREE PROGRAM The management program prepares students to pursue a career in human resource management, operations management , entrepreneur hip, or general management. Effective managers are necessary for organizations to compete in today's global economy. The program consists of required courses that build a conceptual foundation for identifying and solving managerial problems. In addition to acquiring knowledge about bu siness and man agement, s tudents will develop special skills that are necessary to be an effective manager . The commitment of the Department of Management is voiced in it s mission statement: Our mission is to prepare management students with the knowledge and skills necessary to man age and lead organizations. This is done within the context of globalization and an appreciation for diversity. ln order to gain excellence in learning, students : 1. take courses in business law, entrepreneurship, human resources, production operations, and management 2 . gain skills in communication , critical thinking , and problem based learning , and an apprecia tion for lifelong learning. In order to maintain excellence in teaching and advising, faculty members engage in: 1 . professional development activities that enhance the application of management and legal the-ory , instructional techniques and resources, and continuous improvement of course content. 2. advising that relates to the program of study , careers, graduate school, and lifelong learning. 3. providing service to the profession, community, and institution. 4. embracing individuality , diversity , and the creativity that comes from multiple perspective s . Necessary skills the manager should have include: • proficiency in planning, organizing, leading and controlling activities ; • utilization of problem solving methodology to identify and defi11e organizational problems, devise solutions, and implement the solution to achieve desired outcomes; • highly developed interpersonal skills; • an ability to communicate clearly and persuasively; • us e of sound methods for making decisions; • innovative thinking, self-reliance, creative independent analysis, and sensitivity to social and ethical values. Students majoring in management and interested in pursuing an International Business concentration should see an advisor . Management M ajor for Bachelors of Science All candidates for a Bachelors of Science degree in Management must satisfy the General Studies requirem e nts, the business core course requirements , the School of Business requirements and the major requirements de scr ibed in the following sections. The basic struc ture of the Management program is: REQUIRED COURSES . . . ......... ............. SEMESTER HOURS Genera l Studies (Level I and Level II) ........ .......................................... 34 Business Core ......................................... ..... ......... . ............. 33 Schoo l of Business requirements ........... ........... ................. . ............... 9 Major in Management .......................................................... . .... 24

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92 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Unrestricted E l ec ti ves• ...... . ......... ... ........................................... 20 Tota l Hours (minimum ) . . . .......... . ............................... . . ........ 120 *The College's multicultural requirement may be satisfied by taking an approved multicultural course in general studies or elec tives portion of the degree requirem ent. The School of Business does offer one of these courses, MGT 4830 Workforce Diversity. NOTE: Unrestricted Elective credits may vary. Total unrestricted electives must be sufficient for stu dent to meet the College's minimum required 120 credit hours. Genera l S tudie s The academic foundation for a s u ccessful business career or gradua t e work is a broad liberal arts education. Gener al Studies Level I Com position ENG 1010 Freshman Compositi on: T h e Essay ........................................ 3 ENG 1020 F r eshma n Comp osit i on: A n a lysis, Research, and Documentation ............. 3 Mathematics MTH 1310 * F in i t e Mathematic for t h e Managem ent a nd Social Sciences ....... .......... 4 Communicatio ns SPE 1010 Public Speaking ... ........ . .......... .......................... . ...... . 3 *Note: MTH 1110 or MTH 1 400, with graphing calculato r experience strongly recommen d e d , is acceptable for transfer students or students changing their major. Consult wit h the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department on substitutions. Ge n eral Studies Level II His t orical S tu dies H I S (American history course recommended) ......................... ...... . . . 3 Arts and Lett e r s PHI 1030 E thi cs ......... . . •..... ..................... . .... . .................... . -or-PHI 3360 Business E th ics .............................. ........................... 3 L eve l II Arts and Letters e l ec t ive (refer to Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements) ... 3 S o cial Sciences PSY 100 l Introdu c tory Psychology ................ . .... ........................... 3 -or-soc !010 PSC 1010 -or-Introduction to Socio l ogy ............. . ................................. 3 American Nationa l Government. .................... . . . . . ................ 3 PSC 1020 Political Syste m s and Ideas ... . ........................................... 3 Natur al Sci e nces L eve l II Natu r a l Scie nc es electives (refer t o Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements) . . 6 Total of Required ar1d Elective General Studies ................... . . . ......... ............ 34 Bus in ess C o re All business majors r equire founda tion course work in all sig nificant areas of business theory and practice. The following courses are requir e d for all majors in management. A grade of"C" or better must be earned in eac h busin ess core course to have that course count toward the Bachelors of Science d egree in management. REQ UIRED COURSES ..... ....................... ............. . . . . . . . . . SEMESTER HOURS ACC 2010 Principl es of Acco un ting I ...... . ........................................ 3 CIS 2010 Computer Applicatio n s for Business ........................ .......... .... 3 ACC 2020 Principle s of Accounting II ................................. . ............ 3 MKT 2040 Business Communication . . ............................................. . 3 MGT 2210 Legal E nvir onment of Business I .......................................... 3 CIS 2300 Bus in ess S t a ti stics ........................... . ..... ..................... 3 MGT 3000 Organizational Management ............. ..... ..................... ..... . 3

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MKT 3000 FIN 3300 CIS 3340 Principles of Marketing ............................................. ... . 3 Manageria l Finance .............................. ... .................... 3 Advanced Busines s Statistics ........... ......................... . ...... .. 3 MGT 4950 Strategic Management. .................................................. 3 Total Hours Required in Business Core .................................... . ............. 33 School of Business Requirements REQU IR ED COURSES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . ... SEMESTER HOURS MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences ........................... 3 ECO 201 0 Principles of Economics-Mac ro............. . .......................... 3 ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro ........................................... 3 Total Hours for School of Business Requirement ........................................... 9 Management Major Requirements REQUIRED COURSES... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......•............. SEMESTER HOURS MGT 3020 Fundamental of Entrepreneurship ....................................... 3 MGT 3220 Legal Environment of Business II .......................•................. 3 MGT 3530 Human Resourc es Management ...... ... ......................... .. ...... 3 MGT 3550 Manufacturing and Service Management . ... .............................. 3 MGT 3820 International Business. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................................ 3 MGT 4530 Organizational Behavior. .............. .................................. 3 Subtotal .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Plus 6 hours from the following courses: MGT 321 0 Commercial and Corporate Law . . ........................................ 3 MGT 4000 Management Decision Analysis .......................................... 3 MGT 4020 Entrepreneurial Creativity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 MGT 4050 Purchasing and S uppl y C hain Management ................................ 3 MGT 4420 Entrepreneurial Busine s Planning... . . ............................. 3 MGT 4550 Project Management ................... .... ............................. 3 MGT 4610 Labor/Emp l oyee Relations.. . ................................... 3 MGT 4620 Appraisal and Co mpensation . . . . . . ....... ....... . . ........ ........... 3 MGT 4640 Employee Training and Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 3 MGT 4650 Managing Produ ctiv i ty . ..................... ............................ 3 MGT 4830 Workforce Dive rsity ... .................................. . .............. 3 Total Elective Hours...... . . . . .......... . . . . ........................... 6 Total Hours Required for Management Major ............................................ 24 To earn a bachelor's degree in Management, a student must successfull y complete 30 or more credit hours of business course work at MSCD. This 30-hour residency requirement can be met by completing any busi ness courses wit h the prefix ACC, CIS, FIN, MGT, and MKT except CIS 1010, CIS 2300, CIS 3300, CIS 3320, CIS 3340, and Fl 2250. A student must complete at least eight (8) upper-division semester hour s in Management at MSCD. MARKETING DEGREE PROGRAM The Marketing program prepares students for career opportunities in such dynamic areas as sales management, distribution, advertis ing, marketing research , retajljng , a nd marketing management. Mission: Studen t s-Striv e to give our students a first rate education in marketing and business communication (that compares favorably to other business programs in the U.S.). To enhance their respect for and excitement for learning that is consistent with the objectives of the School of Business and Metropolitan State College of Denver.

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94 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Research/Publication-Maintain a research/ publication record that is consistent with curricu lar needs, technological advancements and meets the challenges of globalization while allowing us to contribute to tl1e knowledge-base of our discipline. Service -Actively participate in various School of Business and MSCD committe e activities, regional and national professional organizations and provide our services and expertise to the D enver and regional business community. In addition to the department's well-rounded selection of courses, the curriculum offers students a combination of conceptual and applied learning experiences. Through the de ve lopm en t of marketing plans, advertising campaigns and marketi n g research studi es, student s have the opportunity to work wit h Denver-ar ea bus i nesses on cu r rent marke tin g issues a nd problems. Students are also exposed to a variety of marketing speakers from the business community. Int ernship positions are ava il a ble for mar keting students through the Cooperative Education Office. Marketing careers are challenging and rewarding in a field requiring an in-depth knowledge of products , se r vices and modern information technology. Ma rk eting i s a p eop l e-orie nted profess ion encompassing both for-p r ofit companies and non-profit organizations. S in ce today's co mpetition is creating a greater demand for marketing and promotional efforts, the growth rate of the field i s expected to increase in the future. People who are successful in marketing are creative, highly motivated, flexible, an d decisive. They a l so possess the ability to communicate persuasively both in speaking and writing. Students majoring in marketing and interested in pursuing an International Business concentration sho uld see an advisor . Marketing Major for Bachelors of Science All candidates for a Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing must satisfy th e General Studies require ments, the business core course requirements, the School of Business requirements, and the Marketing major requirements described in the following sections. The ba sic stru cture of the Marketing program is: REQUIRED COURSES .................................................. SEMESTER HOURS General Studies (Level I and Level II} ........... ....................................... 34 Business Core ................................................ ..................... 33 School of Bus iness r equiremen t s .................................... ................... 9 Major in Marketing ................................................................. 24 Unrestricted Electives• ............................................... ............... 20 Total Hours (minimum) ............................................................ 120 *The College's multicultural r equirement may be satisfied by taking an approved multicultural course in general studies or electives portion of the degree requirement. NOTE: Unrestricted Elective credits may vary. Total unrestricted electives mt1st be s u fficient for s tud e nt to meet the College's minimum required 1 20 credit hours. General Studies The academic fow1dat i on for a successful business career or gra duat e work is a broad lib eral arts edu cation. General Studies Level I Composition ENG 1010 ENG 1020 Mathemati cs Freshm an Com position: The Essay ........................................ 3 Fresh man Composition: Ana lysis, Resea r c h , and Docume ntati on ............. 3 MTH 1310' Finite Mathematics for the Management an d Social Sciences . ................ 4 Communicatio n s SPE 1010 Public Speaking ........................................................ 3 *Note: MTH 1110 or MTH 1400 , with graphing calculator experience strongly recommended, is acceptable for transfer students or students changing their major. Consult with the Mathemat ical and Computer Sciences Department on substitutions.

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General Studies Level II Historical Studies HI (American his tory course recommended) ....... ........................... 3 Arts and Letters PHI 1 030 E thics . .. ........................................................ 3 -o r PH l 3360 Business E thics ............................... .......................... 3 Level II Arts a nd Letters e l ective (refer to Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements) ... 3 Social Sciences PSY 1001* Introductory Psychology ................................................ 3 -or-SOC 1010 Introdu ctio n to Socio l ogy ............................................... 3 PSC 1010 American National Governme nt .......................................... 3 -or-PSC I 0 20 Political Systems and ideas ............................................... 3 Natural Science s Level II Natura l Scie n ces e l ect ives (refer to Catalog Addendum: General College Requirements) .. 6 Total of Required and Elective General Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. 34 • Note: PSY 8000 is acceptabl e for transfer students . Business Core All busi11ess majors require foundation course work i n all s ignificant areas of business theor y and prac ti ce. The following courses are required for a ll majors in marketing. A grade of"C" or better must be earned in each business core course to have th a t course count toward th e bachel o r s of science degree in marketing. REQUIRED COURSES . ....................... . ......................... SEMESTER HOURS ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting l ............................................... 3 CI 2010 Computer Applications for Bus in ess .............. ........................ 3 ACC 2020 Principles of Accounting II .........................•....•....•...... .... 3 MKT 2040 Business Commun ication ................................................ 3 MGT 2210 Legal E nvironm e nt of Business I .......................................... 3 CIS 2300 Business Statistics ...................................... . . ..... 3 MGT 3000 O r ganizational Management . . ..... . ............................ ......... 3 MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing ................................................. 3 FI 3300 Manager i a l Finance ..................................................... 3 C I S 3340 Advanced B u siness Statistics ................................... .......... 3 MGT 4950 Strategic Management. ............................................. ..... 3 Total Hours Required in Business Core .................................................. 33 School of Business Requirements REQU IRED COURSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EM ESTER HOURS MTH 1320 Calculus for th e Management and Social Sciences . .......................... 3 ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Mac r o . ......................................... 3 ECO 202 0 Principles o f Eco n omics-Mic r o ........................................... 3 Total Hour s for School of Business Requirement ........................................... 9 Marketing Major Requirement s REQUIRED COURSES. . ......... . ..... . . .................... EM ESTER HOURS MKT 30 1 0 Ma r keting Research . ......... ........................................... 3 MKT 331 0 Consumer Beh avior ................................................... . 3 MKT 37 1 0 International Marketing ................................................. 3 MKT 4560 Marketing S tr ategy ..................................................... 3 Marketi n g Electives • ................................................................ 12 Total Hours Required for Marketing Major . . . . ....... . . . .... . . . ................ . ........ 24

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96 SCHOO L OF BUSINESS To earn a bachelor's degree in Marketing, a student must successfully complete 30 or more credit hours of bus in ess course work at MSCD. This 30-hour residency requirement ca n be met by comp l eting any business courses with the prefix ACC, CIS, FIN, MGT, and MKT except CIS 1010 , CI 2300, CIS 3300, CI 3320, CIS 3340, and FIN 2250 . A student must complete at least eight (8) upper division semester hours in Marketing at MSCD. ECONOMICS DEGREE PROGRAM Bachelors of Arts The Department of Economics is a non-business degree program housed in the Schoo l of Business offering a traditional bachelors of arts degree. Economics is the scientific study of the allocation of scarce or limited resources among competing uses. The study of economics provides specialized and general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions. The bachelors of a rt s degree program gives students a fundamental knowledge of domestic and foreign economies and the quantita tive tools necessary for independent analytical research and th o ught. Specialized courses develop the s tudent's ability to app l y the tools of econo mic th eory and ana l ysis to a broad range of social, political , and economic issues. Such training is essential for graduates who wish to qualify for positions as profes siona l economists and provides an excellent background for students interested in law school or gradu ate programs in economics, fi11ance, or business. Our mission statement reflects our commitment. The Department of Economics at the Metropolitan State College of Denver delivers a highquality, accessible bachelors of arts program in economics while also providing significant service to the College, the School of Business, and the community by providing accessible and quality general studies courses in the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. We prepare students for lifelong learning in a complex free civil society; for graduate or professional education in economics, business and legal studies or the law; and for careers in a broad range of private and public activities. The Department of Economics pursues excellence in teaching and learning as its primary pur pose. The faculty of the department engages in scholarly activity that contributes to the literature in applied and basic economi c research and other professional activity t hat enhances quality instruction. While mo st pos ition s as a professional economist require g r a du a t e training, for someone with a bachelor's degree employment opportunities are ava ilable in national and international business ; federal, state and local government; and various nonprofit organizations. In the field of economics, the following competen cies are u seful: • ab ili ty to examine, ana l yze, and interpret data ; • so und decision making abili ties; • profici ency in oral and written communications; • kl10wledge of economic theory , history , practices, and trends ; • ability to operate and use information derived from computers; • kl1owledge of statist i ca l procedures ; • interest in economic and political trends . Economics Major for Bachelors of Arts REQUIRED COURSES ..........................................•..•.... SEMESTER HOURS ECO 2010 Principle of Economics-Macro ........................................... 3 ECO 2020 Principle of Economic -Micro ................ ........................... 3 ECO 3010 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory ..................................... 3 ECO 3020 Interm edia t e Macroeconomic T h eory ................ . .... .... . .......... . 3 ECO 3150 Econ ometrics .......................................................... 3 ECO 4600 History of Economic Thought (Senior Experience) .......................... 3 Subtotal. ............................................. ............ . .. . . . . . ..... . ... 1 8

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' . . , ... SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 97 ... Approved E lect ives (upper d i vision economics course s) ............•..................... 18 Total Hours of Economics required for Economics Major . ........ . . . ....... . .... . . . ....... . 36 Additiona l requirements: MTH 1320 Calc ulus for t h e Management and Social Sciences. . ....................... 3 orMTH 1410 * Calc ulu s I ............................................................ . 4 •( recommended for students interested in graduate work in economics) Subtotal. . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . ............ . . . ..................... 39-40 Selected Minor (minim um } .......................................................... 18 Genera l Stu dies (minimum} .................. ........................................ 33 Multicu lt ura l requirement*. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 Electives** ..................................... . .... ......... . .... . ......... 26-27 Total Hours Required for Bachelors of Arts in Economics ........ .......................... 120 "'Check with an advisor in the Department of Economics regarding electives and the multicultural requirement. Economics with Secondary Social Studies Licensure: In addition to the required Social Science core the Economics major includes advanced courses in Eco nomics, Econometrics , and History of Economic Thought. Ge n e r a l Studies REQUIRED COURSES . .......... . .................................. SEMESTER HOURS MTH 1 310 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Science (Substitutes for MTH 1610) . . . ............................. 4 General tudies Total .... . ...................... 25 Additional Lic e n sure R equire m ent for Seconda r y Social Scie n ces HIS 4010 Methods of Teaching Social Sciences... . ..................... 3 Economics Core: COURSES ..................................................... SEMESTER HOURS ECO 2010 Principles of Economics Macro .................. ........................ 3 ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-Micro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..•... 3 ECO 3010 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory ....... . ............................. 3 ECO 3020 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory . ..... ...... . ...............•........ 3 ECO 3 150 Econometrics . . . . . . . . . ........ ..................................... 3 ECO 4600 History of Eco n o mic Though t (Sen i o r Experie n ce) ...................... .... 3 MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences .......................... 3 -or-MTH 1 410 Calculus Economics Core Total ..... ........................................................ . 4 . ................................... 21-22 E l ec t iv es: (12 u p p e r di v is ion Economics courses} REQU I RED COURSES ..................................•........... SEMESTER HOURS ECO 3200 Economic History of the U. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3 ECO xxxx Selected in consultation with an ad vi or . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ECO xxxx Selected in consultation with an advisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ECO xxxx Selected in consultation with an advisor ............... . ................. . . 3 Electives Total required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...................... 12 "Note: The standard Economics major requires 18 hours of electives. GEG 3000 and PSC 3030, which are required for Secondary Social Studies, will be accepted towards the major replacing two Economics electives.

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98 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Additional Course Requirement s for Seco nd ary Social S tudies History REQUIRED COURSES ....................................•............. SEMESTER HOURS HIS 1010 Western C ivilization t o 1 7 1 5 o r 1603 ...................................... 3 -or HI S 1030 World History t o 1500 .. ................................................ 3 HIS 1210 American History to 1865 ............................................... 3 HIS 1220 American History s inc e 1865 ...................................... .... . . 3 HIS 1040 World History since 1500 ................................ ............... 3 History Total . ....... .... ..... . .................................. ....... . . . . .•...... 1 2 Political Science REQUIRED COURSES... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEMESTER HOURS PSC 1010 American ational Gove rnm e nt .................. . ...................... 3 PSC 1020 Political Systems and Ideas .................................... . ......... 3 PSC 3030 Introduction to Int e rnational Relatio n s ( major e lective) ..................... 3 Political Science Total. ................................................•............ ... 9 Geography REQUIRED COURSES.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEMESTER HOURS GEG 1920 Co ncept s and Connectio n s in Geography ... .............................. 3 GEG 3000 Historical Geog r ap h y of the U.S. (major e l ect ive) ........................... 3 Geography Total. ................................ . . . .... . . . . .... ..... . ............... 6 Beh avioral Sciences REQUIRED COURSES.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEMESTER HOURS A T 1310 Intr o ducti o n t o C ultural Anthropology ...... .......................... ... 3 Behavioral Science Total .............................................................. 3 Additional Required Courses Total .. .................................................. 30 Major total . . . ............ .. .. ...............•.................................. 33-34 General St11dies Total . .................. ............................................ 25 Licensure Total (Includes HIS 4010) ......................•...... •...................... 37 Grand Total .... . ...........................•.... ... . ......................... 125126 Minors in the School of Business T h e Scho ol of Business offers nine minors in busin ess an d economics. Most minors r equire 18 credit h o urs plus prerequisites, if any . These minors (with the exceptio n of economics) are designed primarily for nonbusine ss majors. A student may not take more than 30 credit hours in the School of Business withou t declaring a business major. The acceptance of transfer credits will b e governed by standards and policies of the Schoo l of Business an d its departments. tudents s h ould choose a minor that will help them in their c ho sen career. T he general business minor sho uld be declared after consultation with th e associate dean. Othe r minors s hould be declared with the help of a faculty advisor or dep a rtment chair of the appropriat e department. Accounting Minor The accounting minor offers students a broad ba se d e du ca tion in acco unting , emphasizing a particular field within thi s discipline, such as financial accounting, managerial acco unting , tax accounting, or gov ernmental account ing . The Accounting Department requires 60 credit hours (junior standing) before t aking upper-division acco unting courses. At least 12 hours of accounting courses in the minor must be completed in residency atMSCD. REQUIRED COURSES ..... . . . . . . . . . ....... , ............ ... , .......... . . SEMESTER HOURS AC 2010 Principle s of Accounting I ................................. .............. 3 A CC 2020 Principle s of Accounting II .........................•.................... 3

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ACC 3090 Income Tax I. ............... . .......................................... 3 ACC 3510 Intermediate Accounting I................... . ........................ 3 Approved Electives•.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....................... 6 Total Hours Required for Accounting Minor ............................................. 18 'A stude11t may select any courses in the accounting program or curriculum provided they are approved by the Accounting Department advisor. Computer Informa tion Syst e ms Minor This minor will provide a basic understand ing of the concepts, cur rent methodology, and rapid changes in the desig n , developmen t , and u se of computer-orie n ted systems for businesses and o r ganizations. REQUIRED COURSES.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................. SEMESTER HOURS CIS 201 0 Compu t e r Applications for B u siness ...................................... 3 CIS 2110 Structured Prob l em Solving in I nformation Syst ems ............. . ........... 3 CIS 3060 Da t abase Man agement Syste m s ........................................... 3 CIS Upper Division Electives• . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Total Hours Required for Computer Information Systems Minor. . . . . . . . . . 18 •Electives are selected in consultation with and approved by a Computer I nformation Systems Department advisor. E conomics M ino r The economics minor provides students wit h an opportunity to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutio ns, as well as the quantitative tools necessary for analytical researc h and t h ought. REQUIRED COURSES..... . . . . ......................... ........... . SEMESTER HOURS ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Mac r o . .... ................ . .................... 3 ECO 2020 Principles of Econo m ics-Micro ... .......... ........ . .................... 3 Appr ove d E l ectives • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Total Hours Required for Economics Minor. . . . . . . ................... 18 •Approved electives are upper-division economics courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Economics Department. Gen e ral Fina n ce M inor T his minor offers a broadbased education in general finance . A particular field may be emphasized wit h in this discip l ine, such as i n vestments, m a n ageria l finance, financial instit u tions, or international finance. A s t u dent desiring a s t rong emph asis s h ould a l so cons ider th e fmancial services minor. For the general finance min o r , the student must h ave completed ACC 2010 (o r the equivalent) and ECO 2010 and ECO 2020, which may be applied t o th e stu dent's General Studies or elect i ve requirements as applica ble. T he Finance Departmen t require 6 0 credi t hours (juni o r standin g) p r ior t o taking upper d ivis ion fin a n ce courses. A m inim u m grade of"C" i s requi r e d in all fin a n ce minor courses. At leas t 1 2 hours of fin a n ce courses m u s t be completed in residency at MSCD to satisfy the requi rements of the minor. REQUIRED COURSES.. . ......................... SEMESTER HOURS FIN 3010 Financia l Market s and Institut i ons .............................. ......... . 3 Fl 3300 Managerial Finance ...................... . .................. ............ 3 FI 3600 Investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... 3 Approved E l ectives• .................................... . ........................ . .... 9 Total Hours Required for General Finance Minor ................... . ........ . ............ 18 'A student may select any courses in the finance program or c urriculum provided they are approved by a Finance Department advisor.

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100 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Financial Services Minor This minor offers a focused education in the fmancial services area emphasizing a particular fie l d within this di scipline, such as personal financial p lanning, inv estments, and financia l i nstitutions. The Finance Department require 60 credit hours (junior standing) prior t o taking upper-division finance courses. A minimum grade of"C" is required in a U finance minor courses. At least 12 hour s of finance courses must be completed in residency at MSCD to satisfy the requirements of the minor. REQUIRED COURSES.... . ............................. SEMESTER HOURS ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I .................................... ..... ...... 3 F I N 2250 Personal Money Manageme nt ........................................... 3 -or-FIN 3150 Personal Financial Planning .............................................. 3 FIN 3450 Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits ............................ ... 3 Upper-division e l ectives• ............................................................. 9 Total Hours Required for Financial Services Minor ...................•....... . ........... . 18 Suggested Fina nce Electives for Minors: FIN 3010 Financial Market and Institution s ........................................ 3 FIN 3320 E ntr epreneurial Finance .............•.. ......•.......................... 3 FI 3420 Principles of Insurance ........................ .......................... 3 FIN 3600 Investment •• .......................................................... 3 FIN 3800 Real Estate Practice and Law .... . ...... . ................................. 3 FIN 4400 Estat e Planning ........................................................ 3 FIN 4600 Security Analysis and Portfolio Managemen t•• . ............................ 3 MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing .. .............................. ................. 3 *Students should select three (3) elective courses in consultation with their Finance Department advi sor. **FIN 3600 has a prerequisit e of FIN 3300; FIN 4600 has FIN 3600 as a prerequisite. General Busines s Minor Student s minoring in general business must take ECO 2010, ECO 2020, and MTH 1310. These h ours may be part of the student's General Studies requirements. In addition to the required 24 credit hours below, students may take up to 6 additional credit hours within a specific business discipline for a t otal not to exceed 30 credit hours within the School of Business. I f a student wis h es to enroll i n bus in ess courses beyond 30 hours, the student must declare a major with the School of Business . Prerequi site credits ma y be applie d to Genera l Studies REQUIRED COURSES .................................................. SEMESTER HOURS ECO 2010 Princip l es of Economics-Macro . .......................... . ....... . ..... . 3 ECO 2020 Principles of Economics-M i cro .......................................... 3 MTH 1310 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Science ........ ......... 4 MTH 1320 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences ........................... 3 COURSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......... SEMESTER HOURS ACC 2010 Principles of Accounting I .............. ................................. 3 A 2020 Principles of Accounting II .............................................. 3 C I S 2010 Principles of Information System .............. .......................... 3 CIS 2300 Business Statistics ................................ ................. ..... 3 FIN 3300 Managerial Finance ..................................................... 3 MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business I ...... ... . . . . . . ....................... .... 3 MGT 3000 Organizational Management ............................................. 3 MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................ 3 Minimum Total Hours R e quired for General Business Minor (not to exceed 30 credit hours) ................................•....................... 24

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Internation a l Bu s ine s s Minor This minor i s intended for non-business majors who wan t to ad d some s tud y of business from an inter n ational perspective t o their degree programs. An International Busin ess Minor will g iv e non-business students an overview of the fun ctions of companies and provide the m information about doing business in an international context. Business majors wishing to add an interna tional compon e nt t o their degree should con t act an Internatio nal Business advisor for more information. Courses u se d for a major or a minor other than th e International Bus in ess Minor or u sed to satisfy Gen eral St udi es requirements cann o t be used for th e Internatio n a l B u s i n ess M inor. Contact an Interna tional B u si n ess Advisor for more information . REQUIRED COURSES .............................................. EM ESTER HOURS MGT 1000 Introduction to Business .. . . . .......... ........................... 3 MGT 3820 International Business ' ..... .......................... .......... ... . 3 Select 3 co u rses with no more th an 1 course in a single prefix: (It is recommend ed that stu d e nt s complete MGT 1000 prior to taking a n y of these courses.) ACC 2010 Principles of Accounti ng I' .......................................... . .... 3 ECO 2010 Princip les of Econ omic -Macro'' ..... ............................ . . . ... 3 ECO 2020 Princip les of Economics Micro ' ' ................. ...... ................. 3 FT 3010 Financial Markets and Institutions'' ........ . . .... ............. ........... 3 F l 3320 Entrepreneur ial Finance' ................................................ 3 MGT 3000 Organizatio n a l Management'' ...... ........ . .. ...................... 3 MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...................... . 3 Subtota l . . . ......................................................................... 9 Sel ec t 3 courses: (It is recommended that students complete MGT 3820 prior to taking any of these courses.) ACC 3750 Internat i onal Accounting' ............................................... 3 ECO 3550 Global Econ omics and Internatio nal Trade ' . ..... . . .................... .... 3 FIN 3100 International Money and Finance ' 8 ..•...••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 3 MGT 3230 International Business Law'. . . . ............................. 3 MKT 371 0 International Marketing .. '0 ... . • . • .•...••.... •.........•. . . .•.•..•... . . . . 3 Subtotal ..... .. .... 9 Total Hours R equired for International Business Minor . ......... . . . . . . . ....... ....... . . . . . 24 Prerequisites 1 At least j unior tanding 2 Satisfaction of Genera l St udi es Level I mathematics requi r ement 3 ENG 1010 or satisfactio n of General Stud ies Levell communic a ti ons requirement 4 ACC 2010 with a g r a d e of"C" or better , ECO 2010, and ECO 2 0 20 5 Satisfaction of the Ge n eral St udi es Leve l I composition and communications r equirements 6 ACC 3510 or FIN 3100 ' ECO 2010 or ECO 2020 8 ECO 2010 and ECO 2020 9 MGT2210 ' 0 MKT 2 0 40 and MKT 30 00 Management Minor T h e management minor prepares individuals for the important t asks of s up erv i si ng others, worki n g i n teams , and taking on additional responsibilities in their field of interest. REQUIRED OURSES... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . SEMESTER HOURS MGT 3000 Organizat i o n a l Management. . . . . . . 3 MGT 3530 Hum a n Resou rces Manageme nt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 3 MGT 3550 Manufact urin g and Service Management ... . ......... . .................... 3 MGT 3820 Internationa l Business ................................................... 3 MGT 4530 Organizat i o n a l B e havior ................................................. 3

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102 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Choose 3 hours from: MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business I. ......................................... 3 MGT 2500 Small B u siness Management ............................................. 3 MGT 3020 Fundamentals of Entrepre neur ship ...... ................................. 3 MGT 4000 Management Decision Analysis .................................. . ....... 3 MGT 4610 Labor/Emp l oyee Relations ........................... .................... 3 MGT 4620 Appraisal and Compensation ............................................. 3 MGT 4640 Emp l oyee Training Deve l op m ent . . ...................................... . 3 MGT 4830 Workforce Diversity" ................. ........ ........................ .. 3 Total Hours Required for Management Minor ............................................ 1 8 *This course has been approved as a Multicultural and Senior Experience course. It is recommended that in order to achieve a broader understanding of busi n ess, non-business major students minoring in management should consider taking as a general elective MGT 1000 Introduction to B u siness. Marketing Minor The Marketing minor provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of business and sufficient familiarity with marketing skill to work in a business environment. REQUIRED COURSES ...................... . ...... ... .... . ............. SEMESTER HOURS MKT 2040 Business Communica tion ...........................•.................... 3 MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing ................................................. 3 MKT 3310 Consume r Behavior .................................................... 3 MKT 4520 Sem inar in Marketing Management. ...................................... 3 Approved Electives• ............................ .................•................... . 6 Total Hours Required for Marketing Minor .......... . . .................................. 18 *Approved electives are selected in consultation with ar1d approved by a Marketing Department advisor. Concentrati ons in the School of Business International Business Concentration for Busin ess Majors Onl y The International Business Concentration provides students majoring in one of the business disc i plines with the opportunity to expand their knowledge of the rapidly changing global business, legal and cul tural e nvironm ent. In addition to the major degree program requirements, the concentration requires 18 to 22 hours in international courses: a 12 hour core and six hours of approved international electives. Some st udents pursuing an International Business Concentration may need more than 120 semester hours of credit to graduate. Intere sted students should contact an International Business advisor as early in their degree progra m as possible. Coursework used to meet the requirements for the concen tration may not be used to meet the require ments for a major. Some courses in the International Business Concentration program have pre-requi sites which must be satisfied. These prerequisites do not count towards the concentration. REQUIRED COURSES . . . ........... . . . . . ..................... . .... . . . . . SEMESTER HOURS ECO 3550 Global Economics and International Trade ................. ................ 3 FIN 3100 International Money and Finance . ........................................ 3 MGT 3820 International Business ......................................... ...• . . . ... 3 MKT 3710 International Marketing ..................... . ........................... 3 Subtotal ......... ..................... . . .•.............•........... . . 12 Plus 6 hours from tl1e following courses: ACC 3750 International Accounting ............. ................................... 3 ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultura l Anthropology .................. . ................. 3 ANT 2330 C ros s-C ultural Commun ication ' .......................................... 3

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A T 3300 ECO 4450 GEG 1000 HIS 3350 MGT 3230 PSC 3030 Exp l oring World Cultures: Variab l e Topics ................................ . 3 International Macroeconomics ........................................... 3 World Regional Geography .............................................. 3 Countrie / Regions of the World: Variable Topics ................•........... 3 International Business Law .............................................. 3 Introduction to International Relation s .................................... 3 PSC 3320 International Law ...................................................... 3 PSC 3600 Comparative Politics Area Studies: Variable Topics .......................... 3 Approved International Internship / Directed Study . . . . . . ............ , ............ 3 Approved Business Study Abroad . . . . . . . . . . . ............... . ............ . .......... . 3 One full academic year of st ud y of anyone foreign language .......................... . . . 6-10 Total credit hours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . ....... 18-22 ' This course is required for Manageme nt majors. See a Management advisor to ider1tijy an appro priate substitute course. 'This course is required for Marketing majors. See a Marketing advisor to identify an appropriate substitute course. 3 This course fulfills the multicultural requirement. ' Cannot be a job the student is currently doing. Must be approved by School of Business Dean. 5 Foreign language compe t ency gained through other than college credit will be assessed by the Brigham Young University Competency and Placement Examination (CAPE). Contact the Assessment and Testing Center for further details, 303-556-3677. Certificate Programs in the School of Business International Business Certificate The International Business Certificate offers business majors an opportunity to add an international component to their degree program. It provides basic information to students to help them gain entry into international business positions. The International Business Certificate is also appropriate for non-degree students seeking to ga in knowledge of international business. ( ote: Please see an International Business Advisor for more infor mation.) The lnternational Business Certifi cate will provide both business student and non-degree seeking s tu dents detailed information about the functions of business that p l ay an important r o le in the internation a l business arena. Students must complete each course in the certific ate program with a grade of"C" or better. The courses cannot be taken pass/fail. Some courses in he certificate program h ave prerequisites which must be sat isfied. These prerequisites do not count towards the certificate. Required classes: 6 credit hours MGT 3820 Internatio nal Business ................................................... 3 ECO 3550 Global Economics and International Trade' ............................... . 3 Subtotal. ........................................................................... 9 Select 9 credit hours from the following MGT 3230 International Business Law' ... ................... . .......... ... . ........ . 3 FIN 3100 International Money and Finance' ....................................... . 3 MKT 3710 International Marketing ................................................. 3 ACC 3750 International Accounting ' ............ ........................ , .......... 3 ECO 4450 International Macroeconomics' .......................................... 3 Subtotal. ........................................................................... 9

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104 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS S el ec t 6 c r e dit hours from t h e foll o win g : A p p r oved bu s ines s study abroad ... ........................•.................. . . . ...... 3 Ap p r oved inte rn a t io nal bus in ess int e rn ship ' ...... ..................................•.... 3 For eign Language ...............................• ........•...•.........•............. 3 Subtot a l ............................................•.. ............................. 6 Total Credit Ho11rs Requir ed. . ... .... ........•.......•.....•.... ...••...... 2 1 1 Course has pre-r e quisites whic h mu s t b e satisfied 1 Cannot be a jo b the s tud ent is currently doing. Must be approved by SCOB D ean.

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of Letters, Sciences Provides a high-quality, liberal arts education designed to meet the educational needs of the urban student. METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE of DENVER

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106 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES The miss ion of the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences is to provide a place of teaching and learning that honors both tradition and imagination, one that respects the past and prepares peop le to be suc cessful participants and leader s in the present a s they help to shape the future . The School of Letters, Arts and Science s offers programs o f s tudy in humanities and in social, natural , and mathematical scienc e s . The programs prep ar e students for careers , graduate w ork , and lifelong learning . The school offers more than 30 major and minor programs through 19 d e partments and the Institute for Women's Studies and Services . The faculty teach the majority of the General Studies Program and help prepare stude nts to be teachers. In addition, they arrange internships and o th er applied ed u cational experiences in state and local agencies , business, industry, and the media . Through centers, the school advances educational and social goals: • The Family Center provide a wide range of education, training, and research on policies related to fam ily i ssues. • T h e Center for Mathematics, Science and Environmental Education leads the effort to reform science and mathematics education in Colorado. The Center contributes to systemic change in education by building cooperative programs with other colleges and un i vers i ties, public school s , and the Col orado Department of Education . The Center is the focal point for the Colorado Alliance for Science, a st a tewide alliance. The Center also develops programs and services for students from underrepresented groups in the areas of mathematics, science and environmental education. Currently, the Center is a site for the Colorado Alliance for Minority Participation (CO AMP) and offer tutoring and mentoring services to these stud e nts. The Colorado Alliance for Science , a statewide alliance of universities , offers assistance and support to students and teachers to strengthen the coiTIJnwlity's interest in science and mathematics . • The Golda Meir Center for Political Leadership is a nonpart i san, educational p r oject des i gned to foster greater public understanding of the role and meaning ofleadership at all levels of civic life, from commu n ity affairs to international r e lations. AFRICAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES DEPARTMENT The African and African American Studies Department offe r s a range of co u rses in African and Afri can A m e ri can St u dies that pres ent the dimension of the black experience in th i s country and i n Africa . These courses encompass and afford a comprehens ive understanding of the African heritage. They present African links and potential ; contribution s of black people in the growth and development of the United Sta t es ; black cul tu re and lifesty l es; the b l ack community; politica l activity and potential; religious development and importance; community service and resou r ce assistance ; a n d prognosis an d poten tial for social change. Some courses may apply in the General Studies requirements and as electives for graduation. Students seeking s econdary education licensure with a social s tudies endorsement must sat isfy the t eacher ed u cation program of MSCD in addition to all of the major req u i rements. The major in African American Studies , which leads to a bachelor of arts degree, and the minor program must be plan n ed in consultation witl1 the chair of th e African and Afr i can Ameri can Stud ies Department. Before declaring African Ame r ican Studies as a major , the student must consult with the African and African Ameri can Studies Department chair . Students seeking s econdary education licen sure must consult with an advisor in African and Afri c an American Studies and one in Secondary Education . African American Studies Major for B a chelor of Arts REQUIRED COURSES.... . . . ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................. SEM E S TE R HOURS AAS 1010 Introducti o n to African Ameri can S tud i e s . .......... . ..................... 3 AAS 1130 urvey of African History (HIS 1940 ) ..................................... 3 AAS 2000 ocial Movem e nts and the Black Experi e nc e (SOC 2 000 ) ........ . . . . ......... 3 AAS 3 300 T he Black Co mmunity (SOC 3 140 ) ....................... ....• . ...•...... 3 AAS 3 7 00 P s ychology of Group Prejudice ( CHS/PSY/WMS 3 7 00 ) ............ .... . ..... 3 AAS 4850 Researc h Seminar in African American S tudie s ............................. 3 Subtotal . . .......... . . . . ........... ....................... . . . ...................... 18

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elect one from the following : AAS 331 0 African Art (ARTH 3310 ) ............ . . . .................. ...... . ....... 3 AAS 3330 Egyptian Art (ARTH 3330) .. . . . .. . . ................................ . . 3 AAS 3240 African American Literature (ENG 3240 ) ................ . . . . .......... . . . . 3 Subtotal. . . ........ .... . . ....... . ... ... . . ................................... ........ 3 E lectives • 1 8 Total ................................................................... . ......... 39 * Elective hours in African and Afri c an Americ an Studi e s cours e s ar e select e d in c onsultati o n w i th th e advisor . African American Studies Major with Teacher Licensure , page 348 Minor in Mrican American Studies REQUIRE D CO URSE S . .......................................... . ...... SEMESTER HOU R S AAS 1010 Introduction to Afric an American Studie s ...................... ........... 3 AAS 2000 Social M o vements and the Black Experienc e ( SOC 2000 ) ..... . .......... ..... 3 Total ........ ................ . . ..... . . . . . . . . . ....... . ........ ............... . ..... . 6 Electives A minimum of 15 additio nal semester hours is required in African American courses , 3 hours of which must be an African course, selected in consultation with and approved by the African and African American Studies advisor assigned to the student. To tal hours for the minor are 21. Assessme nt Test During the fmal semester , s tudents ma j oring in Afric a n American Studies will be required to take a comprehensive assessment test. ANTHROPOLOGY PROGRAM Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Behavioral Science s Anthropology is the exploration of human diversity . The combination of cultural , archaeological, a nd biological perspectives offer a viewpoint that is unique in studying the problems related to the survival and well being of the human species. From the l iving and vanis h ed cultures of Colorado to those of ew Guinea or South America , anthropology can be applied to assist our unders tanding of human dif ferences . Contact the Sociology , Anthropology and Beha v ioral Sciences Department for information . Anthropology Major for Bachelor of Arts REQUIRED COURSE .................................................. SEMESTE R HOURS A T 1010 Physical A nthr opolo g y and Prehistor y ..... . ............................... 3 ANT 1310 Intr o duction to Cu l tural Anthropo l ogy ............ ......... ....... .... .... 3 ANT 2100 Human Evolut ion .............................................. ........ 3 ANT 2330 C ross-Cu ltural Communication ........................... . . . ..... ....... 3 ANT 2640 Ar c haeolog y ........ .... . ..................... .... . ............ ... . . ... 3 Subtotal.......... ... . . . . . . ............................. . .... . ............ . . . .... IS Electives .................................................•.......... ............ . . . 2 1 Total . . .................... .............. ..... ........ . . .......................... 3 6 At least 12 upper-division semester hours in anthropology must be completed at MSCD by students majoring in the field . Minor in Anthropology The minor pr ovides an opportuni ty for studen t s t o bring a unique anthropological perspective to t h eir already chosen area of interest. Anyone having to deal with human or cultural diffe r ences would benefit from elect i ng a focus in cross c ultu ral contact, archaeology . or human diversity.

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108 SCHOOL OF LETTERS , ARTS & SCIENCES REQUIRED COUR ES .............. ... . ............... . ................ SEME TER HOUR ANT 1010 Physical Anthropology and Prehi s t ory ............... . ......... . . .......... 3 A T 1 310 Intr o duction to C ultur a l Anthropology ..... ...........• .............. ..... 3 Subtotal .............. .............................................................. 6 Electives ............................. 0 ...... 0 •••••• 0 ...... 0 ....................... • 1 5 Total . .......................................................... 0 .. ............ ... 2 1 At least 6 upperdivision semester hours mu s t be completed at MSCD. ART DEPARTMENT The Art Department offers a full range of studio art courses in th e concentrations of art education, ceramics, communication design , digital a rt, drawing , jewelry de s ign and meta lsmithing, painting, pho tograp hy, printmaking , or sc ulpture l eading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art d egree. T h e Bachelor of A rts in Art degree is offered with a concentration in art history , theor y and criticism. Coursework lead ing to licensure in art education is availab l e for those with a n existing bache l o r ' s d eg re e . The Art M ajo r i s a ccredited b y the Nation a l Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASA D). GOALS Undergraduate studie s in art prepare students to function in a varie t y of artistic roles. In order to ac hieve these goals, instruction should pre pare students to: • read the nonverbal l anguage of art • develop responses to vis u a l ph enomena and organize perceptio n s an d conceptualizations both rationall y and intuitively • become familiar with and de ve lop competence in a number of art and design t ec hniques • become familiar with m ajo r achievements in the history of art, including the works and intention s of l eading artis ts in th e past and present • demonstrate the way art reflects cultural values • ev aluate development s in the histor y of art • unders tand and evaluate contemporary thinking about art • make valid assessme nt s of quality in design project s and works of art Note: Art students will be expected to purchase tools a nd s uppli es app ropriate to the media in which they are w o rking . ln addition, all art courses h ave a p rog r am fee for consumable mat erials and/o r mod eling fees. Art Major for Bachelor of Fine Arts Studio Art Concentrations Foundation R equire ment s COURSES • • .. • • • • • • • • .. • • • • ... .............. o ............ SEMESTER HOU R S ARTH 1600 World Art 1: Art bef ore 1 200 ..... o •••• 0 •••• 0 ••• o •••• o ••• • • ••••••••••••••• 3 ARTH 1700 World Art II: Art since 1 200 ..... 0 •••• 0 •••• 0 ••• 0 •••• 0 •••• 0 ••• 0 •••• 0 •••••• 3 ART 1101 Two Dimensi onal De sign ... .......... 0 0 ••• 0 ••• 0 •••• 0 • ••• 0 •••••••• 0 •••••• 3 ART 1141 Drawin g I .......................... 0 •••• o ••• o •••• o •••••••• o • •••••••••• 3 ART 1501 Three Dim e n s ion a l D esig n ..... 0 0 ••• 0 •••• 0 ••• 0 ••••••••• 0 ••• 0 0 ••• 0 0 •••••• 3 ART 1541 Drawing IT -or -ART 153 1 Introducti o n t o Digital Art and Design -o r I N D 147 0 Perspective Drawing ..................... 0 ••• 0 0 •• 0 • •••••••• 0 0 •••• 0 •••••• 3 (see b elow for the correct choice for your concentration) Total, Foundation R e quir ements ....................................................... 18 Foundation courses are prerequi s ite s for courses within the s tudio co nc e ntration . Check eac h course d esc ription for s pecific prerequisites or co requisites.

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Also r e quired for a U s t u d io art majors: OURSES . . . . . . . . . . . .... . ............ ......................... SEMESTER HOURS A R T H 3080 Art of the 20t h and 2 1 st Centuries ................................. . . . .... 3 ARTH 4480 Art Theo r y and Criticism......... . . .......................... 3 A R T 210 I o l o r T h eo r y an d Prac t ice ............................................... 3 Total. . .............................. . .............................. . ......... . . . 9 A lette r g r a d e o f "C" or better i s re q uired in eac h foundat ion course, each of the courses listed above, a nd each co u rse s p ecifical l y r e qui re d for a concentra t ion . S tud e n ts must c hoose one of t h e f ollow i ng a r eas of concentration: ceramics, co mmunication d es i g n , di g it a l art, draw in g, jewe lr y d e si g n and m e t a l s mi th in g, painting, p h otography, p r int m aki n g, or sc ulp ture . (T he art e d ucati o n co n c entration i s lis t e d se p a r a t ely.) P l ease see the sectio n s b e l ow f o r co n cen tratio n -s pec ific requirem en ts. Co ur ses f o r the Co ncentr a t i on. . . . . . .................. .... ..... . ... 51 Total for the Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Gen eral S tud ies. . . . . . . ................................... 33 E lectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 9 Total for the Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 A m i n i mum of 33 upper-div ision art hours required, 40 upper-division hours total for the degree. A minor is optional for art majors. ART H 3300 may be taken for the multicultural requirement. It is required for some concentrations. Ceramic s Concentration Cer amics s tud ents m u st t ake A R T 1541 Drawi n g II as part of t h e ir fou ndation coursework. T h e f ollowin g cou r ses a r e r e qui re d for the concentration: COUR SES ARTH 3XXX ART 2611 ART 2691 ART 3211 ART 321 5 A R T 3291 A R T 36ll ART 361 5 A R T 4 211 A R T 4 611 ART 4 701 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......... . ...... SEMESTER HOURS Up p e r D i v i s i o n A r t History E l ective (see list p. 116)........ . .... ........ 3 Ce r amics l................ . ................... . . . ......... 3 culpt ur e I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............ 3 Ce r amics II. . . ......................... ......................... 3 Mold Makin g f o r Ceramics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......... 3 Sculptur e II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................................ ..... 3 Cera m ics III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Low Fir e Cer a mics .......... . ........... ....................... 3 Cer am ics I V . . . ....... ........................ . ... 3 Ce r a mics V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Senior Exp erie nce St udio: P ortfo H o Develop m e nt a n d T h esis Exhibit (Senior Exp er i ence) . . ....... ......................................... . 3 ThW.............. ......... . . . . .... . ............... . . ... 33 C h oos e 1 8 h o urs art o r art his t o r y e l ectives ....... . . ......................... 18 Cerami cs studen ts may a ppl y !NO 147 0 P e rspective D r aw i ng to t heir art o r a r t history e l e ctives. Total for the Concentration ........ . . . . . . . .........................•.................. 51 Communication Des ign Concentr a tion Communic ati o n D esig n stud e nt s mus t t ake A R T 1531 Introducti o n to D i gital A rt and Design as a foun d a ti o n course. S tudent s mus t h ave a s uitabl e l aptop compu te r befo r e proceeding wit h ART 3225 a n d s ub seq u e nt courses. See a d v i so r for spec i ficat i o ns. T h e f ollowi n g cou r ses a r e re q uired for t h e co n centration: ........ . ..... SEMESTER HOURS Histo r y of Co m mun i catio n D e ign .. . ...................... 3 COUR SES A R T H 3690 A R T H 3880 Unders t a ndin g Visual Lang u age. . . ......... . ....................... 3

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110 SCHOOL OF LETTERS , ARTS & SCIENCES ART 2222 ART 2225 ART 2625 ART 267 1 -orVisual Thinking ... ........................ ..........•.................. 3 Typography I .......•........•......................................... 3 Typography II .......................................................... 3 Photography I ART 3321 Illustration for Communication Designers .....•....•........•....•........ 3 ART 3222 Design Research Methods ............................................... 3 ART 3225 Typography III .............................•........................... 3 ART 3623 Identity and Systems Design ................. ........................... . 3 ART 3625 Narrative Design ................ ..............................•........ 3 ART 4225 Concepts in Motion ..................................................... 3 ART 4625 Co mmunication Design Internship ....................................... 3 ART 4721 Communication Design Senior Experience: Portfolio Development (Senior Experience) ........ .............. .............................. 3 Total .................. . ........................................ .................. 39 Choose 12 hours art or art history electives ............................................. 12 Some recommendations for electives include ART 3980 Cooperative Education Internship, ART 4222 Dimensional Design, ART 4223 Community-Based Design, ART 4327 Illustration II, ART 4842 Directed Studies in Communication Design, and courses in photography, digital art, and printmaking. Total for the Concentration ........................................................... 51 Digital Art Concentration Digital Art students must take ART 153I Introduction to Digital Art and Design as a foundation course. The following cou r ses are required for the concentration: COURSES ......................................................... SEMESTER HOURS ARTH 3880 Understanding Visual Language .......................................... 3 ARTH3XXX Upper Division Art Histor y Elective (see lis t p. 116) ...........•....•........ 3 ART 2222 Visual Thinking ........................................................ 3 ART 2237 Co n s tructing the Digital Image .......... .....•..................•........ 3 ART 3235 Video Art ..........................................•.................. 3 ART 3631 Interactive Multimedia Art .... , . ........•...•....•........•....•........ 3 ART 3635 Web Art I ............................................................. 3 ART 4235 Web Art II .............................•.. . . ............. .............. 3 ART 4631 Digital Art Portfolio . .................... ............................... 3 ART 4701 Senior Experience Studio: P or tfolio Development and Thesis Exhibit (Senior Experience) .................................................... 3 Total ..................................... . .......... ............................. 30 Choose a sequence of three courses from an y other studio concentration .................... 9 Choo e 12 hours art or art history electives ........... . . . . .............................. 12 Recommended: ART 3980 Cooperative Education Internship, ART 4601 Installation Art, ART 4843 Directed Studies in Digital Art. Total for the Concentration ...................................•......•..... ........... 51 Drawing Concentration Drawing students must take ART 1541 Drawing II as a foundation course. The following courses are required for the concentration: COURSES ......................................................... SEMESTER HOURS ARTH3XXX ART 2644 ART 3241 ART 3641 Upper Division Art History Elective (see list p . 116) ......................... 3 Life Drawing 1 ...............................................•......... 3 Drawing Ill ............................................................ 3 Drawing IV ............................................................ 3

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Choose 9 h ours from: ART 3244 Life Drawing II ..................................................•...... 3 A R T 3644 Drawing the Human Head ................................. . . . ............ 3 ART 4241 Drawing V ............................................. . . . . . . . . ....... 3 ART 4 244 Life Drawing III ........................•....•.........•................ 3 ART 464 1 Drawing VI. .............................................. ............. 3 Plu sART 4701 Senio r Expe ri e n ce S tudio: Portfolio Develop m ent and Thesis Exhib it (Senior Expe rien ce) . . ..................... ..................... ...... . 3 Total . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........•........... . ............... . . . 24 Choose I S hours from painting and printmaking .......................... .... ......... . IS Choo e 3 h o ur s from sc ulpture, ceramics, o r jewelry design and met a l smithing . .............. 3 Choose 9 hours art or art history electives . . . ........... .................... ............. 9 Total for th e Concentration . . .............. . . . . . . . . . . ..... ................... ........ . 51 Jewe lr y De s ign and Metalsmithing Conc e ntr a tion Jewelr y Design and Metalsmithing students may take IND 1470 Perspective Drawing or ART IS41 Drawing II as part of their foundation coursework. The following courses are required for the concentration: COURSES ........................... .... ........ . ........ SEMESTER HOURS ARTH 3XXX ART 26S1 ART 2691 ART 32S1 ART 3293 ART 36S1 ART 42S1 ART 46S 1 ART 36S3 -orART 36SS -o r ART 36S7 -o r Upper Division Art History Elective (see lis t p. 116) . ......... ..... .......... 3 jewelr y Design and Metalsmithing I. .............................. ........ 3 Sculpture I . . ..... . . . . . . ............................................... 3 jewe lr y Design and Metalsmithing ll ...................................... 3 Functio nal Sculpture ...... . . . .......... ..... . ........................... 3 Jewelry Design and Metalsmithing III ..................•... . .............. 3 jewelry Design and Metalsmithing IV ..................................... 3 jewelry De sign and Meta l sm ithin g V ...................• . . . . .....•........ 3 Casting for jewelers and Metalsmiths Enameli ng for jeweler s and Metalsmith s Textile Technique s in Metal ART 484S D i rected Studies in jewelry Design and Met a l s mithin g ....................... 3 ART 4701 Senior Expe rienc e St udio: Portfolio Development and Thesis Exh ibit (Senior Experience) ....... . . . ........ . ................................ 3 Total .................... . ......... . . . ............•......•........•......•.... . . . . 30 C hoose 6 hours f r om: ART 2611 Ce ramics I. .............. ...... ........................................ 3 ART 3291 Sculpture II ............................................................ 3 ART 329S Gla sworking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . .......... 3 ART 3S01 Mixed Media Exploration 1 ............................ .................. 3 I D 1200 Introducti on t o Gen e ral Metals: Cold Meta l s .......•....................... 2 IND 1 220 Introduc tion to Gen e ral Metals: Hot Metals ............... ........... ...... 2 Total......... . ..... . . . . . . . .......... . .. .... . ............................... 6 C h oo se 1 S hours art o r a rt hist ory e lective s ........................... ....... . ... ....... IS Recommend e d : additio n a l cour ses from the list above, ART 3980 Cooperative Educati on Int ern ship, ART 4801 Studio Ass i s tant ship . Total for th e Concentration ............................................... ...•...... . . 5 1 Painting Conc e ntration Painting students mus t take ART 1541 Drawing II as a foundation course. The following courses are required for the concentration: C OURSE S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEMESTER H OURS ARTH 3XXX Upper Division Art Hi s tory Ele ctive (see list p. 116) ........................ 3

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112 SCHOOL OF LETTERS , ARTS & SCIENCES ART 2661 Painting I. ........................................................... . . 3 ART 3261 Painting II ............ . ... ... .......................................... 3 ART 3661 Painting fii ............................................................ 3 ART 4261 Painting I V ..................................... . ...................... 3 ART 466 1 Painting V ................. . ........................................... 3 ART 470 1 Senior Experience Studio: Portfolio Deve l opment and Thesis Exhibit (Seni o r Experie n ce) . ................................................... 3 Total ............................................................................. 21 Choose 15 h o ur s from drawing, life draw ing, figure painting , printmaking a nd watermedia ... 1 5 Choose 1 5 h o ur s ar t o r ar t his to r y e l ectives .......... ................................... 15 Total for the Concentration . . .......... ............ . . ..................•.............. 51 Photograph y Concen trat i on Photography students must take ART 1531 Introduction to Digital Art and Design as a foundation co urse. The following cou r ses are required for the concentration: COURSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................. SEMESTER HOURS ARTH 3300 A rt and Cultural Heritage ............................................... 3 ARTH 3790 History of Photography ................................. ... . ............ 3 ARTH3XXX Up p er Division A rt ffistory E l ect ive (see list p . 116) ......................... 3 ART 2237 Constructing the Digital Image ........................................... 3 ART 2671 Photography I. ......................................................... 3 ART 3271 Photography II: Black and White ......................................... 3 ART 3671 Photography III: Color. ....... ........ .................................. 3 ART 4271 Photography IV : Theory and Practice ..................................... 3 ART 4671 Photography V: Portfolio .................... . ........................... 3 ART 4701 Senior Experience St udio: Portfolio Developme nt and Thesis Exhib it (Senior Experience) ............... . . ..................... 3 Total ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 0 C h oose a se quence of three courses from any other s tudio co nc entration .................... 9 C h oose 12 hours art or ar t history e l ectives . . . . . . ............................ 12 Suggestions: ART 3980 Cooperative Education Internship, ART 4873 Photography Assistant s hip . Total for the Concentration ....................................... ........... . . . . ..... 51 P r intm aking Conc ent ratio n Printmaking students must take both ART 1541 Drawing II an d ART !53! Introduction to Digital Art and Design. ART 1531 will be counted in the concentration. The following courses are required for the concentration: COU RSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... SEMESTER HOURS ARTH 3XXX Uppe r Division Art History E l ective (see list p. 116) ......................... 3 ART 1531 I ntrodu ction to Digita l Art and Design .................................... 3 ART 2237 Co nstructin g the Digital Image .......... . ...................•............ 3 ART 2681 Printmaking! .......................................................... 3 Selec t 2 courses (6 h ours) from: ART 328 1 Printmaking II: Lithography ....•........................................ 3 ART ART ART ART ART -o r 3283 -o r 3285 Plus:3681 4281 4681 Printmaking II: Intaglio ....•...•.........•.............•................ 3 Printmaking II: Scree nprintin g ............... ............................ 3 Printmaking fii ............ ............................... ... .......... 3 Printmaking IV ..................................•....• . ............... 3 Printmaking V ...................................•..................... 3

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ART 4701 Senio r Expe rien ce S tudio: Portfolio Development and Thesis Exhib it (Senior Experi e n ce) .................................................... 3 Select 2 courses (6 h ou rs) of upp e r divisi o n drawing co ur ses . . ........ .... ......... . ..... . . 6 Total ............................................................................. 36 C h oose 3 h ou r s from sc ulpture , ceramics, or jewelr y d esign and m eta l smithing ....... . . . . . . . . 3 Choose 12 hours art or ar t history electives ................ ....... . ..................... 12 Suggested: ART 3287 Monotype Printmaking, ART 3301 The Artist's Book Total for the Concentration . • ••••••••••••••••••••••••• 0 0 •••• 0 ••••• 51 Sculpture Concentration Sculpture stude nts may t ake eith e r ART 1 54 1 Drawing II or IND 14 70 Perspecti ve Drawing as a foun dation course. Students must a ls o take ART 1531 Introduction to Digital Art and Design w h ich wil l be counted in th e concentr at i o n . The following courses a re require d for the concentra tion : COURSES ...... ...... SEMESTER HOUR S ARTH3XXX Upper Div i sion Art His tory E l ective (see list p. 116) ......................... 3 ART 1531 Introduction to Digital Art and Design ....... ............................. 3 ART 2691 Sculpture I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 ART 2611 Ceramics I................... . . . ................. ...... 3 ART 2651 jewelry Design and Metalsmi thin g I. ............. 3 ART 3291 Sculp tur e II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...................... 3 ART 3293 Functional Sculpture.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 3 ART 369 1 Sculptur e III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 ART 4291 Scu l pture IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 ART 4691 . ... 3 ART 4701 Senior Exp er i ence S tudio: Portfolio Deve l opme nt and Thesis Exhib it (Senior Experience) .................................................... 3 Total ........ 0 00 0. 0 •••••• 0 ••••• 0 ••••• 0 ••• 0 ••••• 0 ••••••• 0 ••••• 00 0 •• 0 ... 0. 0. 0 ..... 0.33 C h oose a seq u e n ce of three courses f r om any o th e r studio concentrati on . . .................. 9 C h oose 9 hour art or art h istory e l ectives. Recom m ended: ART 1300 Intr oduction to Woodworking , ART 3295 Glassworking, ART 3301 The Artist's Book, ART 460 1 Installation Ar t , ART 4849 Dir ected S tudi es in Sculpture ......... 9 Total for the Concentration ........ . . . ................................................ 51 Art E ducation Concentration Specif i c Ge n e r a l Studies Requ irements see your advisor for d e t ails COURSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... SEMESTER HOURS EDS 3110 P r ocesse of Educatio n in Multicultural Urba n Seco nd ary Schools (Socia l Scien ce) ........ . . .............................................. 3 EDS 3200 Educa tiona l Psych o l ogy Applied to Teaching (Socia l Science) ................. 3 MTH 1610 Integrated Math ema tic s l ( M a th ) ........................ ............. 3 PE 1010 Public Speaking (Communication) ........................................ 3 Gene ral St udi es for Art Education students ............................................. 33 Art Ed ucation stude nt s mus t take ART 1 53 1 Introduction t o Digital Art and Design as a foundation course. Course s f o r the Con centration in Art Ed ucati o n ART H 3080 Art of th e 20th and 21st Cen turi e .......•................................ 3 ART H 3300 Art and C ultural Heritage . ............. .............. ................... 3 ARTH 4480 Art T he o r y and Criticis m ................................................ 3 ART 2101 Colo r Theor y and Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. 3 ART 2611 Ce r a mic s I. . .................... . . ........... .... . ......... .......... 3 ART 265 1 jewelry D es i g n and Metalsmithing I. ...................................... 3 ART 2661 Painting I................ . ................................... . .... 3 ART 2671 Photog r a ph y I. ........................................ ................. 3

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114 SCHOOL OF L E TTERS, ART S & SCIENCES ART 2681 Pri n tmaking I. ......................................... ................ 3 A R T 269 1 Sculpt ure I ...... . . ...... .... ........... . ........... . . ................. 3 A R T 360 1 I nt r o du ctio n to Art Edu ca ti on ...............................•........... . 4 A R T 3605 T h e I n clusive Music and Art C l assroom ................... . . . . .... . ....... 2 A R T 4201 A rt Methods K-1 2 ...................................................... 4 A R T 4701 Sen io r Experience Studio: Portfo lio Develop m ent and Thesis Exhibit (Se n ior Expe ri e n ce) ..... .................................... ........... 3 ART 4703* S tud ent Teac hin g a n d Sem i n ar: E l e m entary K-6 ............. . . . ............ 6 ART 4704* S tud e nt Teac hin g a n d Sem i n ar: Secondary 7-1 2 ............. . .............. 6 E D S 3120 Fiel d Exper i e n ces in Mu lti cult ural Urban Seco n dary Schoo l s ................ . 2 RDG 3280 Teac h ing Lite r acy Skill Deve lopment in t h e Co n ten t Areas ... . .... ........... 4 A l etter grade of "C" o r better is required in each foundation cou rse, each of t h e cour s e s lis t e d above, and eac h course specifically r e quired for a n emphasis. Emphasi s area-see be l ow ................................................. ...... 1 2 t o 1 5 Total, Art Education Concentration courses ........................................ 73 to 76 Total for the Art major with Art Education Concentration ..................•......... 9 1 to 94 Tot a l for the degree ........................................................... 124 to 1 27 C h o o se a n e m p h as i s a r ea from those listed below: Ce r a m ics A R T 3211 ART 3611 Ceramics II . ........................... . . . .............. .... . . ......... 3 Ceramics III .....................................•.............. ... . . . . 3 ART 4211 Ce r a mi cs I V . . .............. . ......................... ................ . 3 A R T 4611 Ce r a mic s V . . . . ..... , .............•.................... . . .......... , . . . 3 Total ...... .... ............ . . ................................. ................ . . . . 1 2 Digit al Art ART 2222 A R T 2237 A R T 3235 ART 3635 Vis ual Thinking . . ........................ . .•............. . .......... ... 3 Co nstru c t ing t h e Digi tal Im age . . . ...•....•........•....•........•........ 3 Video Art . . ........................................................... 3 Web Art ! ................. . . ........................... . ..... . . ....... 3 A R T 463 1 D igit a l A r t Por tfolio .................................................... 3 Tot a l .......................................•.......•......•..............•....... 1 5 D r awing ART 1541 Drawi n g II ............................................................ 3 ART 3241 Draw i ng III ................................•.. ...... ...... ........... .. 3 ART 3641 D r aw in g IV ............................................................ 3 ART 424 1 Draw in g V . . ................................... ....................... 3 ART 4641 Drawi n g VI. ... , ...................... ............................ ..... 3 Total ................ . ........•................................................... 1 5 J ewe l ry Design a n d Me t alsmithing ART 3251 Jewe l ry Des i g n an d Met a l s m i th i n g IT ..... ............... . .............. . . . 3 ART 3651 Jewe l ry De ign and Meta l smi thi ng Ill .................................... . 3 ART 4251 Jewe l ry Design and Me t a l smithing I V ..................................... 3 ART 4651 Jewe lr y De ign and Meta l smith i ng V .................................... . . 3 Tot a l.......... . ....................................................... . . . . 1 2 Paintin g ART 2666 AR T 3261 ART 3661 ART 4261 Watennedia I ...... . ............. .............................. .... . . . . 3 Paintin g II ............................................................. 3 Paint in g l1I ......................•.........•......................•... . 3 Pain t in g I V ......... . ...... .......... . ..............•............. , .... 3

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. . .. ARTS & . SCI . ENCES 11 ... .. ,-... .)!, .. ... .. ... ," ART 4661 Painting V ............ .......... ... . ... 3 ... 15 Total Photography ART 2237 Construc t ing the Digital Image .......... ............................. .... 3 ART 3271 Photography II: Black and White.. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. .. . ........... 3 ART 3671 Photography Ill: Color. ................................................. 3 ART 4271 P h o tography IV: Theo r y and Practice ......... ............................ 3 ART 467 1 P h otograp h y V: Portfolio ................................................ 3 Total . . ................................................... ......... 15 Printmaking Select 2 courses (6 hours) f r om: ART 3281 Printmaking II: Lithography ..... .... . .... . ............. ................. 3 -o r ART 3283 Printmaki n g II: l.n taglio ................................................. 3 -orART 3285 Printmaking II: creenprinting .... . . ................. . ................. .. 3 plusART 3681 Printmaking Ill ........................................................ 3 ART 4281 Printmaking IV ........................................................ 3 ART 468 1 P r intmaki n g V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... ....... ...................... 3 Total ................................... . . .... . 15 Sculpture ART 3291 ART 369 1 ART 4291 ART 4691 Total ... Sculpt ure [] ............................................................ 3 Sculpt ure III ............... . ........................................... 3 Sculpture IV ......................... .................................. 3 Sculpt ure V . ........................................................... 3 . ................. . . . ................................................. /2 *Student teaching is composed of daily full-time work during 16 weeks, split 8 and 8 weeks between elementary and secondary levels. ART 4703 is dual listed with EDU 4/90; ART 4704 is dual-listed with EDS 4290. Studetrts must also achieve satisfactory scores on the s tate licensure examination. See your advisor for more information. Students seeking teacher licensure should read the teacher licensure sections of this Catalog and stay in regular contact with their advisors. Art Licensure Only: K-12 Coursewor k i n teacher licensure is available through the Art Department. An existing BFA in a studio area is re qui red. Students seeki n g licensure w ith a degree in Art other than a BFA may need to take a dditional coursework to meet licensure requirements. Licensure students must take MTH 1610 Inte grated Mat hematics I and mus t m eet all requirements for post-baccalaureate candidates. Students must a lso ac hi eve satisfactory scor es o n the s t ate li ce n sure examination . See your advisor for more informa tion. S tudents seeking teac hing licensure shoul d read the teacher licensure section of this Catalog, and they should stay in regular contact with their advisors. REQUIRED COURSES.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . . SEMESTER HOURS ART 3601 Introduct i on to Art Education................ . ................. 4 ART 3605 The Incl u s ive Music and Ar t C l assroom ................................... 2 ART 420 1 Art Metho d s K-12......... . .......................... 4 ART 4703' Student Teac h ing and eminar: Elementary K-6 ............. . .............. 6 ART 4704* Student Teac h i n g and emjnar: Secondary 7-12 ............................ 6 EDS 3 110 Proce ses of Education in Multicultural Urban Secondary Schools ............. 3 EDS 3120 Field Experiences in Multicultural Urban Secondary Schools ............ ..... 2

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116 SCHOOL OF LETTERS , ARTS & SCIENCES EDS 3200 Educational Psychology Applied to Teaching ...... ......................... 3 RDG 3280 Teaching Literacy Skill Development in the Content Areas . . ..... ............ 4 Total ............ .... .... .......................................... . .............. 34 *Student teaching is composed of daily full-time work during /6 weeks, split 8weeks and 8 weeks between elementary and secondary levels. ART 4703 is dual-listed with EDU 4I90 ; ART 4704 is dual-listed with EDS 4290. Recomm ended : ARTH 3300 Art and C ultural H e rit age .................................. . . . ........ . . 3 ART 1531 Introduction to Digital Art and Design .................................... 3 (ART I 531 is required for students who did not take an equivalent course as part of their degree.) Art Major for Bachelor of Arts Art History, Theory and Crit icism Concentration FOUNDATION REQU I REMENTS .......... . ............ . ..... . . . . ...... SEMESTER H OURS ARTH 1600 World Art I : Art before 1200 ............................................. 3 ARTH 1700 World Art II: Art since 1200 ............................................. 3 ART 1101 TwoDimensional Design ..................•............................. 3 ART 1141 Drawing! ............................................................. 3 ART 1501 Three Dimensional Design ................•............................. 3 ART 1531 Introduction to Digital Art and Design .... ...... .......................... 3 Total Foundation Require ments . . ......... . .................................... ....... I 8 Foundation courses must be completed before proceeding. A lette r grade of "C" or better is required in each foundation course and each course specifically required for the concentration. ARTH 3080 Art of the 20th and 21st Centuries ............................ . . .... ...... 3 Choose two of the following: ART 1541 Drawi n g II ................•...•................................•...... 3 ART 2222 Visua l Th i nking .............................................. ......... 3 ART 2237 Constructing th e Digital image ......................•........•....•...... 3 ART 2611 Cera mics I. ............................................................ 3 ART 2651 Jewelr y Design and Metalsmithing I. ...................................... 3 ART 2661 Painting I. ........................................................ . .... 3 ART 2671 Photography I. ......................................................... 3 ART 2681 Printmaking I. ......................................................... 3 ART 2691 Sculpture I ......•........•....•....•........•....... . ................. 3 Total. ........... . ..........................................•............. . 9 Art History electives: Choose 7 courses (21 hours) from the follow in g or fro m approved omnibus a rt history courses (ARTH 39XX or ARTH 49XX). A t least 3 courses (9 hours) mus t b e in the hi story of art prior to 1900 (see advisor). ARTH 3300 Art & Cultural Heritage" ...................... .......................... 3 ARTH 3310 African Art ............................................................ 3 ARTH 3330 Egyptia n Art. ... . . ........................................•. ........... 3 ARTH 3340 Asian Art .............................................................. 3 ARTH 3360 Co nt e mp orary Chicana/o Art* ..............................•....•....... 3 ARTH 3380 Women's Art/Women's Issues • ................ ............................ 3 ARTH 3520 T h e Medieval Art ist: Variabl e Topics** .................................... 3 ARTH 3530 The Renaissance Art ist: Variable Topics** .................................. 3 ARTH 3540 The Baroque Artist: Variable Topics** .................... . . ... .. .......... 3 ARTH 3660 Art No u veau ... ................ . ......................•...•....•....... 3 ARTH 3670 History of Art between World Wars ............................ .......... . 3 ARTH 3690 History of Communicatio n Design .........•...•. . . . . ..................... 3 ARTH 3790 History of Photography ................................................. 3

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ARTH 3880 U nder s ta n ding Visual Language ................. ........... .............. 3 ARTH 38 90 Co nt e mporary Print History ............................................. 3 ARTH 421 0 S it e Specific S tudies in Art H i sto ry: Variable Topics**. . . ............. 3 ARTH 441 0 Art H i sto r y and It Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ................... 3 ARTH 4510 Exhibiting the A rt Object...................... .. . ......... 3 Total , Art History electives.. . ... . ..................... .•............. . . . . . .... 21 ARTH 4480 A rt T heory and C r i tici s m .................... . ........................... 3 ARTH 4700 Senior T hesis in Art History (Senior Experience) ...... . .... . ............... 3 Total for the major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . . . ......... . 54 General Studies ........................................ . . ...... . ........ .... ........ 33 Two semesters of the same for e i gn language*** ........................... . . . ...... .. .. 6-10 E l ectives ....................................................... . 23-27 Total for the degree.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............ .... . .... . . . 120 A m i n imum of27 upper division a r t his t o r y hours requi r e d . A m inimum of 40 upperdivi sion hours total are req u ired for the degree. *Neithe r ARTH 3300, ARTH 3360, nor ARTH 3380 may be used as the sole art histor y elective for a studio art con cent ration. ARTH 3300 may b e used to mee t the multicultural requirement. **Title and course numbers for variable topics courses will be distin c t for each offering, for example ARTH 352B Medieval Artisans and Craftsmen. A s tudent may take up to three distinc t offerings und e r each variable topics desgination, for example, ARTH 353A The Renaissance Artist: Bosch and Bruegel; ARTH 353B The R enaissance Artist: Leonard o and Michelangelo; and ARTH 353C Court Art and R enaissance Women may all be appilied t o the requirements. ***Students who entered college with fluency in a language (or languages) othe r than English are encourage d to s tud y a language with which they are unfam iliar. Stud ents with a good high school background in a foreign language may take int ermedia t e or a dvanced courses in that language, or study a new language. The second semester of cert ain foreign languages may be applied to the Gen eral Studies requirement. Note: four semesters of French or German are r e quired for e n trance int o most graduate programs i n art history, theory and c riti c ism. B oth Frenc h and German are required for e ntrance into Ph.D. programs in art history, and doctoral research o ften requires resear c h in at least one additi onal lan guage. Min or s are op tion al fo r a ll art ma j or s. Minor in Studio Ar t REQU I RED COURSES.... . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . ........... SEMESTER H OURS ARTH 1600 World Ar t 1: Art before 1200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....................... 3 ART H 1700 World A rt II: Art s ince 1 2 00 . . . . . ..... . ............ .......... 3 ART 1101 Two D i mensional D es ign .................. .............................. 3 ART 114I Drawing ! . .... . . . ............................................. 3 ART 1501 T hre e Dim ensional Design . . . . . . ..... ........... ........... ... ..... 3 ART 1531 Introduction to Digital Art and D e ign -o r ART 1541 Drawing II ............................................................ 3 A letter gra d e of"C" or better i s required in each of the courses lis t ed above. S tudio Art Electives ( M inim um of s i x upper divi s i o n a rt hours r equired) ..... . . .. .. 9 Total ......................................... ............. . 27 Minor in Art H i s tory , Th e o ry a nd Criticism REQU I RED COURSES.............. . . . . . . . . . . . . ................. SEMESTER H OURS ARTH I 600 World Art l : Art b efo r e 1200 ............................................. 3 ARTH 1 7 00 World Art II: Art s ince 1200 .......... .............•.....•............... 3 ARTH 3 080 Art of th e 20t h and 21st Ce nturies..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. 3 A l ette r grade of"C" or better is required in each of the courses lis ted above.

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118 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Art history electives (see list p. 119) .......................................... . . ....... 1 2 Minimum of nine upper division art history hours required Total ............................................................... .... .......... 21 DIGITAL MEDIA MINOR, SEE PAGES 129 AND 239 OF THIS CATALOG. BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE PROGRAM Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Behavioral Science Major for Bachelor of Arts This is a distributed major, offering s tud ents a stru ctured overview of the social sciences. This program emphasizes breadth of coverage with a focus in an area selected by the student. This major is particu larly applicable for students interested in teacher licensure at the elementary and secondary levels . The st udent must have pre liminary approval of the selected program by an advisor from the Sociology, Anthropology and Behavioral Science Department. A minimum of 12 upper-division hours in the major must be tak en at MSCD. REQUIRED COURSES .................................................. SEMESTER HOURS ANT 1310 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology . ................................... 3 ECO 2010 Principles of Economics-Macro .......................................... 3 HIS 1220 American History since 1865 .............................. . ...... . ...... . 3 PSC 1010 American National Government. ......................................... 3 PSY 1001 Introductory Psychology .................... ......... .... .... .... ....... 3 SO 1010 Introduction t o Socio l ogy ................................. .............. 3 Subtotal .......................................................•. ............. ..... 18 Elected Focus In a dditi on to the introductory course, each student must sel ect 12 hours in one of the follow ing social science disciplines : anthropology, economics, history , political science, psychology , or sociology. A minimum of9 upper division hour must be selected with the approval of an advisor. Subtotal ... .................•.......... ...... . . .........•.....................•.... 12 General E l ectives An additionall2 hours must be selected from any of the disciplines outside of the elected focus . Courses may be sel ected from anthropology, economics, history , political science, psychology , or sociology. At least 9 of these hours must be upper division. No more than 6 hours may be taken in any one discipline. Subtotal ............................................. . ............................. 12 Total ........................ . .... . . . . . ...... .......... . . . . . ...................... 42 General S tudi es Requirements The student is expected to complete all General Studies requirements a sta ted in this Catalog. The stu dent may use up to 6 hours from the required courses for the behavioral science major to comp let e the social science component. Senio r Experie nc e Selection of a Senior Experience cour e will vary according to the student's needs. Students seeking teacher licen sure must select student teaching. Other students ma y elect the capstone course in their focus or the applied anthropology co ur s e currently being developed b y the department. Students desiring teacher licensure should see an advisor in the teacher education program . No minor i s offered. Behavioral Science Major with Teacher Licensure, pages 309, 319 and 349

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BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT The Biology Department offe r s two majors, the bachelor of scie nce in biology and the bachelor of arts in biology. Supportive courses associated with param edical studies and criminalistics, as well as genera l courses for enrichment of the nonscience student's background, are offered by the department. Students seeking teacher licensure, either elementary or secondary, should see an advisor in the Biology Department as well as in the t eacher education program . Stude n ts interested in prepar ation for medical school or other h ea lth professions should contact the Biology Department for specialized advising. A senior exit exam, administered and required by the department, must be taken during the semester of anticipated graduation. The Biology Department main office is located in Science Building, Room 213, 303-556-3213. A biology minor is offered to stu dents with r e l ated majors o r a special inter est in the field. Guideli n es for Field Experience!Internship/Practicum/Workshop/Cooperative Educa tion Courses o more than four semester credit hours with the following course numbers will be applied toward the 40 semester hours of biology courses required for graduation: BIO 2888, 2980, 2990, 3970,3980, 4888, 4980, and 4990. However , the additional credits with the above course numbers may be applied toward general elect i ve hours. Biology Major for Bachelor of Science REQUIRED COURSES ..................................... . ...•........ SEMESTER HOURS BIO I 080 General Biology I ...................................................... 3 BIO 1 090 General B i o l ogy Laboratory T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1 BTO 1081 Genera l Biology U ........... . ................................. 3 BTO 1091 General Biolog y Laboratory II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B!O 3600 General Genetics ....................................................... 4 Select two of these options: Op t ion 1 : BIO 2100 Gen era l Bot any . ................................................... 5 Optio n 2: B!O 2400 Gen e ral Microbio l ogy . . . . . . . . ............................. 5 Option 3: Both B!O 231 0 and BIO 2320 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II ............ 8 Option 4: BIO 3050 Cell and Molecular Biology ........................................ . 4 Option 5: Either BlO 3200 Invertebrate Zoology or BIO 3260 Vertebrate Zoology ............ .4 Select one of the following : BIO 451 0 Microbial Ecology .......................... . . . ......................... 4 BIO 4540 Plant Eco logy ......................................................... . 4 B!O 4550 Animal Ecology ........................................................ 4 Subtotal ................................................. ....................... 2429 E lective s Biology co ur ses sel ecte d from the 2000-, 3000-, and 4000level ser ies, and approved by faculty adv i sors in the Biology Department, must be comp l eted to bring the total of biology courses approved for the major to 40 semes ter hours. Electives .................... . .............................. .................... 11-16 At l east 21 semester hours of the major (in cluding genetics, eco l ogy and upper-division elec tives) mus t be from the 3000and 4000-leve l courses of the B i ology Department. Total (minimum) ..... .......................................... . ...... . ........... .40 Required Non-Biology Courses One year of college genera l chemjstry with lab, one semester of upper-division organic chemis try with lab, one semester of upper -division biochemistry , and o n e year of mathematics starting with MTH 1 110 or above, a r e r equisites for the bachelor of science major in biology. CHE 3110 (Organic Chemistry II) and CHE 3130 (O rgani c C hemistr y !I Laboratory) may be substi tuted for the upper divi s i o n biochemistry req u irement with permission of a Biology Department academic advisor.

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120 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Biology Major for Bachelor of Arts REQUIRED COURSES .................................................. SEMESTER HOURS BIO 1080 Genera l Biology I ...................................................... 3 BIO 1090 Genera l B i o l ogy Laboratory I ...................................... ...... 1 BIO 1081 General Biology II ..................................•.............•..... 3 B!O 1091 General B i o l ogy Laborato r y II ............. ............................... 1 BlO 3600 Ge n era l Genet ics ............................. ......................... 4 Se l ect two of these options: Opti o n 1: BIO 2100 General Botany .......................................... . . ........ 5 Option 2: BlO 2400 Genera l Microbiology ............................................... 5 Opt i on 3 : Both BIO 2310 and B!O 232 0 Human Anatomy a nd Physi o logy l a nd Il .... ........ 8 Option 4: BIO 3050 Cell and Molecular Biology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... .4 Option 5: E ith er BlO 3200 In ver t e br a t e Zoo l ogy o r BlO 326 0 Vertebrate Z oology. . . .... .... . .4 Select one of the following: BlO 4510 Microbial Eco l ogy ...................................................... 4 BIO 4540 Plant Ecology ............................ . ............................. 4 BlO 4550 Animal Ecology ............................ ............................ 4 Subtotal ............................................................ ............ 24-29 E lectives Biology courses selec t ed from the 2000-, 3000-, and 4000-level series, and a pproved b y facu l ty advi so r s in th e Biol ogy Department, must be compl e t ed to bring the t o tal of bio l ogy courses approved for th e major t o 40 semester h ou r s . Electives . . . . . . . . ............................................................. 11-16 At lea st 21 se m ester hours of the major (in cludin g ge netics , eco lo gy and upper-div ision elec tives) must be from the 3000and 4000-leve l courses of the Biology Department. Total (minimum) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Required on-Biology Courses One year of genera l chemistry (equival e nt to the pre ent co ur ses C H E 1100 and C HE 2 100) . Medical Techn olo gy Concentration Students must satisfy the requirements li s ted for th e b ac helor of science major in biol ogy, including BIO 24 00 . Students must also take BIO 3350, BIO 4440, and BIO 4450. Additional hours must be taken from the co urse s list e d below to complete a minimum of 2 1 hours of upperdivision courses and a minimum of 40 se m ester credit hours in biology. ELECTIVE COURSES .................................................. SEMESTER HOURS B!O 3050 Cell and Molecular Biology .............................................. 4 BIO 3210 His t o logy ................. ............................................ 4 BIO 3270 Pa r asitology . ....... .......•............................... ............ 4 BlO 3360 Animal Physiology ........................................ .... ......... 4 BlO 4160 Mycology ............................................................. 4 Interns hip Co mpl e t ion of a m e dical technology int e rn s hip at an approved school of medical t echnology. Required on-Biology Courses T h e s tud ent must sati fy the require m en t s lis t ed for non bio l ogy co ur ses for the bachel o r of s cience m ajor in biology and complete the r eq uir emen t s for a minor in chemistry. CeU and Molecular Concentra tion Students must satisfy the requirements for a bachelor of science major in biology and must include BIO 24 00, BIO 3050, and BIO 4510. This concentration requires a total of at lea st 43 semester hours of biology courses including BIO 273 Methods in Cell Biology and Imm unology and BIO 274 Nucleic Acid Techniques and Molecular Cloning, which must be s uc cess fully completed at the Community College of Aurora, and at least 10 semester hours from the following list of e le ctives:

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ELECTIVE COUR ES ................... , . . .. SEMESTER HOURS BIO 3210 His tology .............................................................. 4 BIO 3270 Parasitology ........................................................... 4 BIO 3340 E nd oc rin o l ogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BIO 3350 Immun o l ogy ............ ........... ........................ ........... 4 BIO 3400 Mic r ob i a l P h ysio l ogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ .... 4 B!O 4050 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biol ogy ..... ................................ 4 BIO 4060 Ce llul a r and Molecular Biol ogy Labo r ato r y ................................ 2 B IO 4440 Vir o l ogy . . . . . . . . . . ............................................ ... 3 BIO 4450 Pathogenic Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................ ........... . 5 BIO 4470 Microbial Ge n et ics . . . . . . . . ........... ................. , ....... . . ... 4 BIO 3980 /4 980 Internship/Independent S tu dy .............................. .......... 2 S u btota l (min im um) ............................ ........... . . . . . . . ..... ............. 10 Req u i . red Non-Biology Courses The s tudent mu s t satisfy the r eq uirem ents lis t e d for n o nbi o log y co urs es for th e bachel o r of sci ence majo r in bio l ogy and comp let e the r equireme nt s for a minor or seco nd major in c h emis try. Biolo gy Major with Teac her Licensure, page 344 Minor i n Biolo gy REQUIRED COURSES... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEMESTER HOURS BIO 1 080 General Biolog y I . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. .. . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . ....... 3 BIO 1090 Ge n era l Bio l ogy Labo ratory! ........................... ................. I BIO 108 1 General Biol ogy II ....................................... ...... ......... 3 BIO 1091 Gene r a l B i ol ogy Labora t o r y II . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 1 Select one of th ese optio ns: Option 1 : B!O 2100 Ge n e ral Botany............................. ........... . .. 5 Optio n 2 : BIO 2400 Ge neral Microbi o l ogy ....................................... ....... 5 Option 3: Both BIO 2310 and BIO 2320 Human Ana t omy and Physio l ogy I and II. ........... 8 Select one of the following : BIO 3050 Cell and Molecular Biology .............................................. 4 BIO 3200 Invertebra t e Zoo l ogy ............ .... ........ . ............... . .......... 4 BIO 3260 Ver t ebra t e Zoo l ogy .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 4 BIO 3600 Ge n e ral Ge netic s .......... ................ ..................... . . ...... 4 BIO 4510 Microbial Ecology ................................................ ... ... 4 BIO 4540 Plant Ecology ....................... . . ............. .................... 4 BIO 4550 Animal Ecol ogy. . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 4 Subto tal. . ...... . . . .......... . ............................... . . . . . . . . ...... 1 7-20 Electives Biology co ur ses from the 2000-, 3000-, an d 4000 l evel series, approved b y the B i o l ogy Dep a rt m e nt, mu st b e co mpleted t o bring the t o tal o f bio l ogy co urse s ap pr oved for t h e minor to 24 se m este r h o ur s . Total ( minimum ) .................................. ........ ......................... 24 CHEMISTR Y DEPARTMENT The Chemistry Department Program i s app roved b y th e A meri ca n C h e mi cal Society and offe r s seve ral degree programs : the bachelor of science in chemis tr y; b ac helor of sc i ence in c hemistry criminalistics con centration ; a nd th e bach e lor of arts in chemistry. Minors in chemistry an d crimi nalistics are also ava ilab l e . St ud ents who plan to pursue a career in chemis t ry after graduation or plan to attend graduate school in chemistry s hould choose the bachelor of science in c h emistry program. The bache lor of arts in chemistry program is designed for student s who plan a career in a fie l d related to chemistry, but who do n o t intend to attend grad u a t e school in c hemistry. The bac h e lor of arts option , which requires fewer hours, may be especially attractive to those wish in g a second m ajor or to those s tudents d esi ring secondary ed u cation licensure.

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122 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Criminalistics is the scientific investigation, identification , and comparison of physical evidence for crimi nal or civil court proceedings. Criminalists must be trained in many disciplines including chemistry, biol ogy, l aw enforcement, physics, and mathematics . The four-year criminalistics curriculum leads to a bach elor of science degree and includes a half time internship in a criminali tics laboratory during the senior year. Stud ents in the criminalistics program are encouraged to complete all the requirements for a degree in chemistry approved by the American Chemical Society while completing the criminalistics degree program. Graduates of the program are prepared for employment in criminalistics and have completed the requirements for admission to graduate school in chemistry or criminalistics, medical school, dental schoo l , or law school. For further information abo ut the criminalistics programs, students should contact the Che mistry Depart ment. Students seeking secondary educatio n licensure in science should see a n advisor in the teacher edu cation progran1 for requirements. The following courses constitute the basic core and are required in all chem istry degree programs excep t for the minor in chemistry. BASI C CORE .................................................... SEMESTER HOURS CHE 1800 General Chemistry I ........... ......................................... 4 CHE 1810 General Chemistry ll ............................... .................... 4 CHE 1850 General Chemistry Laboratory ........................................... 2 CHE 3000 Analytical Chemistry ................................................... 3 CHE 3010 Analytical C h emistry Laboratory ......................................... 2 CHE 3100 Organic Chemistry 1 .................................................... 4 CHE 3110 Organic Chemistry II . . .................................... . . ........... 3 CHE 3120 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory ................ . ..................... .... 2 HE 3130 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory ......................................... 2 Total ............... . . ...... . ............. ..............•......................... 26 Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Science REQUIRED COURSES .................................................. SEMESTER HOURS Basic Core ................................................................. . ... 26 Addilional Required Chemistry Courses C HE 3250 Physical Chemi try I ............ ........................•........ ....... 4 CHE 3260 Physical Chemistry II ............. ........... . .......................... 4 HE 3280 Physical C h em i stry I Laboratory ........................................... 2 CHE 3290 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory ............. ............................ 2 Subtotal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................. ........... 1 2 Electives A minimum of 10 semester hours in upper division chemistry courses selected in cons ulta tion with and approved by the Chemistry Department is required . The se nior experience in Chemistry (CHE 4950) does not count as an elective . Student may take any senior experience approved by the College: E lectives ................ , ................................................ .... 10 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............... ............... .48 Requir e d Ancillary Courses for Bachelor of Science MTH 1410 Calculus I . ............................................................ 4 MTH 2410 Calculus II ................ ......... . ......... ......................... 4 MTH 2420 Calc ulu s III ............................................................ 4 PHY 2311 General Physic I and PHY 2331 Genera l Physics II -orPHY 2010 College Physics I and PH Y 2020 College Physics II .........•........•....... 8 Subtotal. .......................... . . . . . .....................................•..... 20 Total required courses ...... ........•.......................... . _ .................... 68

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A dditional Course R eq uirem ents ENG 10 lO Freshman Composition: The Essay" .............. . ......... . . . . . .... , . .... 3 E G 1020 Freshman Composition: Ana lysis, Research, and Doc umen tation• ............ 3 XXX XXX Level I Gene ral tudies Comm u nications • .............................. . . 3 XXX XXX Level II General S t udies Historical• ..................................... 3 XXX XXX Level II General Studies Arts and Letters• ..................... . . ......... 6 XXX XXX Level II General Studies -Socia l Scie n ces• ................................. 6 XXX XXX Multicultu ral Graduation Requ i rement .................................... 3 Senior Experience .................................... , .... , .... , .... , . ............... 3 Subtotal . ..................................................................... 27-30 Total ......................................................... . . ....... 95-98 A minor and a total of 120 semester hours a r e also required • These courses along with MTH 141 0 co unt as Gene ral S tud ies courses. In ord er t o use the Physics co u rses to meet the Natural Sciences General Studies req u irement PHY 2321 o r 2030 must be taken. Chemistry Major for ACS Certified Bachelor of Science REQUIRED COURSES ......................................... . ........ SEMESTER HOURS BASIC CORE ............ 26 A dditional R equired C hemi s try Cours e s CHE 3250 Physical C h emistry I .................................................... 4 CHE 3260 Physical C h emistry II ...................... . .... , ....................... 4 CHE 3280 Physical Chemistry Labora t o r y I.. . .............................................. 2 CHE 3290 Physical C h emistry Laborato r y II ......................................... 2 CHE 2300 Inorganic Chemistry .................................................... 3 CHE 4!00 Instrume ntal Analysis .................. .......... ..... ......... ......... 3 CHE 4110 Instrume ntal Analysis Labora t ory ........... ............................. 2 CHE 4300 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry ........................................... 3 CHE 4310 Biochemistry I ................................................ , . ....... 4 Subtotal ................................................. . ........................ 27 E l ec ti ves An addi t ional 3 credit hours of upper division chemistry electives are required a n d should be selected in consultation with the Chemistry Department. The senio r experience i n C h emistry (CHE 4950) does not co u nt as an elective . S tud ents may take a n y senior experience approved by the College. The following courses may be appropriate electives: CHE 4010, CHE 4020, CHE 4320, and CHE 4350 ................................. . ..... . 3 Total Chemistry courses ............................. . . . .............................. 56 R e quired A n c illary Courses for th e ACS C ertifi e d B a ch elor of Science in C hemi s t ry MTH 1410 Calculus l ............................................................. 4 MTH 2410 Calculus II ........................................................... . 4 MTH 2420 Calculus Ill .... ....... .. ............................................... 4 PHY 20 I 0/2030 College P hysics I and Labora t ory PHY 2020/2040 College Physics II and Laboratory ..................................... 10 -orPHY 2311/2321 General Physics I and Laboratory PHY 2331/2341 Genera l P h ysics II and Labo r ato r y .................................... 10 Total Ancillary Courses . .................... ................................... 22 Additional course require ments for t h e ACS Certified B.S. are the same as for the B . S in Chemistry (General Studies, Multicultu ral, Senior Experience). See above. Subtota l... . ..................................................... ..... 27-30 Total ..... ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .........•............. 105-108 A minor a n d a total of 120 semester hou rs areal o required

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124 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Criminali s tics Concentration The req uirement of a minor is waived for students in this program. Student s e lecting this program of study mus t choose either Option A or B . The Senior Experience course for this concentration i s CHE 4710. The requirement of a minor is waived for students in this program. REQUIRED COURSES ...................................... . . . . ....... . SEMESTE R HOU R S Basic C h e mi s try Co r e ............................................................... 26 Additional Required Chemistry Cou rses: CHE 4100 Ins trument a l Analysis ............................................ . . . .... 3 C H E 4110 Instrument a l Ana l ysis Laborato r y . .................................. ..... 2 C H E 4310 Biochem i s try I ..................................................... . ... 4 C H E 4350 Biochemistry Laboratory .................................... ............ I Subtotal ........ . ................................................................. . 10 Required Criminalistics Courses: C HE 2710 Intr oductio n to CriminaHstics .............. . ........................ . . . . . 3 C HE 3700 C riminalistic s l. .......................... ... ........................... 4 CHE 3710 Cri minali stics II .......... .......... .............................. . ..... 4 C H E 4710 C rimin alis tic s Int e rn s hip II ........................ . . . . . ............. .... 3 Subtotal .......................... . ...................... . ......... ................ 1 4 R equired Physical Chemistry Options (Select A or B ): Option A: H E 3190 C H E 3200 C HE 4700 Survey of Physical C hemi s tr y ................................... ......... 4 Survey of Physi cal C hemi s tr y Laborat o r y ........... ..... . . ............ .... I C riminali stics Int e rn s hip I ............................................... 5 Subtotal. .......................................................................... 10 Option B: C H E 3250 Phy s ical C h emis tr y I . . ..... ............................................. 4 C HE 3280 Physica l Chem i s try I L a b o rator y .. ....................... . ................ 2 H E 3260 Physical Chem i st r y II .................................... . .......... . ... 4 HE 3290 Phy s ical C h e m i s try II Laboratory ......................................... 2 MTH 2410 Calcul u s II ....................... .... . ................................ 4 MTH 2420 Ca lculu s lii ...................... . . .................................... 4 Subtotal .... . . . . .... . . . . . ................... .... . . ....... . . . . ....... . .............. 20 Required Ancillary Courses: BIO I 080 Gene ral Biology r • .......................... . ..................... ..... . 3 B I O 1090 Genera l Biology Laborator y r • .......... .... . ............ ........... . . .... I B I O 3050 Cell a nd Mol e cular Biology ............ . . . . .... .... . .................. ... 4 BIO 3600 Ge neral Genetics ....................................... , ............... 4 CJC 1010 Introduction t o the C riminal Jus tice System • ............ ............. . .... . 3 C)C 2120 Evide n ce and Co urtro o m Pro ce dur e or C)C 2140 Crim inal Procedure ..................................................... 3 MTH 1 210 Intr o ducti on to Statistics• or MTH 3210 Probability and S t atistic ................................................ 4 MTH 1410 Calcu lu s I ....... ............. ..... ..... . . . ............................ 4 PHI I 030 Ethics* ................................................................ 3 PHY 2010-2040 * College Physics I and Laboratory, Co llege P hysics II and Laboratory o r PHY 2311 2341' G e neral Physics I and Labo rat o ry, Genera l Physi cs II a nd Labo rat o r y . . . . 10 Subtotal ........................................................................... 39

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Additional Course R equireme n ts E G 1010 F reshma n Co mp ositio n : T h e Essay* ....................................... 3 ENG 1020 F reshma n Compositio n : A n a lysis, Resear c h , a nd Doc u mentatio n • ............ 3 XXX XXX Leve l I Ge n e ral S tudi esCo mmunicatio n s• ................................ 3 XXX XXX Level II Ge ner a l S tudies-His t orical • ...................................... 3 XXX XXX Level II Ge n e ra! S tudies Arts a nd Lett ers• ................................ 3 XXX XXX Levell! G en e r a l S tudies-Socia l Scie n ces• ................................. 3 XXX XXX Multic ultur a l G r a du a t ion Requ iremen t*' . ................ . . .... . .......... 3 Subt otal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . ....... . . . . . . ..... 18-21 Tot a l fo r O pt ion A . ........ . .................................................. .... . 120 Tot a l fo r O ption B ............................................................. 1 27-130 *These courses alo n g with th e required a n cillary cour ses P H Y 20 10,2030, 2020, 2040 or PHY 2311, 2 3 21, 23 3 1,23 4 1 , C]C 1010 , MTH 1410, a nd PHI 1030 count as Gen eral Stu di es courses. •• Some L eve l II Gen e ral Studies courses sati sfy the multicultu ral g raduat ion r equire m e n t If s u c h a cours e h as b ee n c hosen b y a stude n t se l ecting Opti o n A, th e n 3 c redit hou rs of unrest r icted elec ti ves a re r equire d. Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Arts REQUIRED COURSES ..... . . ................... SEMESTER HOURS B asic C h emistry Cor e ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Additional Required Chemistry Courses: C H E 3190 S u rvey o f Ph ysical C h em i s t ry ............................................ 4 C H E 3 200 Survey of Physical C h e mistr y Lab oratory .................................. I E l ec ti v e s A minimum o f 6 upp e r divi s ion sem es t e r h o ur s in c h emist r y co ur ses se l ec t ed in consultation with and appro ve d by th e C h emis try Depar tm e nt i s req u ired. T h e senior experience in Chemistry (C H E 4 9 5 0 ) d oes n o t c o unt a s a n e lective. S tud e nt s may t ake a n y senior expe r ience approved by t h e college . Subtotal . . . . ..... . . . . . . . ............................................................ 6 R equired A n c illary Courses MT H 1 410 Calc ulu s I .................•.........•.........•. ...•..........•....... 4 PHY 2 010 College Physics I ....................................................... 4 Total Ancilla r y Courses R e quired ......... . . . ..........................•................ 8 Total ............................................................................. 45 Chemistry Major with Teacher Licens ure , page 345 Minor in Chemistry Student s co mpleting th e b asic c h e mi stry co r e (26 h ours) qu alify for a mino r in chemistry. S tud e nt s may e l ec t to s ub s titut e 5 sem e st e r h ours in othe r up pe r di vis i o n ch e mi stry courses for CHE 3 I 10 a n d CHE 3130. CORE .. SEMESTER HOURS C H E 1 800 Ge n eral C h emistry I ........................ . ........................... 4 C H E 1810 Ge n e r a l h e mi stry II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................... 4 C H E 185 0 Gene r a l C h emis t ry Labo r ato r y .................. . ........................ 2 C H E 3 000 Ana l ytica l C h emistr y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . 3 C H E 3 010 Analyt ical C h emistr y Labo r ato ry. . ........................... 2 CHE 3 1 0 0 O rganic C h e mi stry I . . .......................................... 4 C H E 3110 O r gan i c C hemi st r y II ................•....................•.. . .•........ 3 C H E 3 1 2 0 O r ganic C h emist r y I Labo r a t o r y ....... ............................. . ..... 2 C H E 3 1 30 O r gan i c C hemi s tr y 11 Labo rat o ry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . .............. 2 Total .............. . ............. . .... . ........................................... 26

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126 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIE NC E S Minor in Crim i nalistics REQUIRED COURSES ............................................. . SEMESTER HOURS CHE 1100 Princip les of Chemistry" ................................................ 4 CHE 1150 Principles of Chemistry Laboratory ....................................... I CHE 2710 Introduction to Criminalistics ............................ ....... . ....... . 3 CHE 2711 Introduction to Criminalistics Laboratory ................................. I CHE 2750 Arson and Explosives ................................................... 3 CHE 2760 Field Testing and Laboratory Analysis of Drugs ............................. I CHE 3600 Crime Scene Investigation I .................................. .......... .. 4 CHE 3610 Crime Scene Investigation II ............................................. 4 C) 2120 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures ..................................... 3 Total ............................................................................. 24 *CHE 1800 General Chemistry 1 may be substituted for CHE 1100 Principles of Chemistry. **CHE 1850 General Chemistry Lab may be substituted for CHE 1150 Principles of Chemistry Laboratory. CHICANA AND CHICANO STUDIE S D E PARTM ENT The Chicana and Chicano Studies Department offers a bache lor of arts deg r ee i n Chicano St u d i es p lu s a minor. The Chicana/o and other Latino his t orical experiences are used as points of departur e towa rd expanding awareness of the multicu l tural world and the co n tr i butions of Chicanas/os. The prog r a m i s designed to assist in the preparation of scho l ars, human service providers, a n d teac h ers. Students have the following options for majoring i n Chicano Studies: major for the bache lor of arts; a nd major for the bachelor of arts with teacher licensure in secondary social studies. Students ca n also earn a minor in Chicano Studies. Chicano Studies Major for Bac h elor of Arts The requirements include core courses in the major, basic knowl edge of t h e Spanish l a n g u age, p lu s approved electives. REQUIRED COURSES .................................................. SEMESTER HOURS CHS 1000 Introduction to Chicana/o Studies ........................................ 3 CHS 1010 History of Meso-An1erica: Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods (HIS 1910) .... 3 CHS 1020 History of the Chicana/o in the Southwest: 1 810 to Pr esen t (H I S 1920) ......... 3 CHS 2010 SurveyofChicana/o Literature (ENG 2410) ................................ 3 CHS 3100 The Chicana/o Community (SOC 3130) ......................... . ........ . 3 CHS 4850 Research Experience in Chicana/o tudies .............................. ... 3 Subtotal. . ........... . .................. ......................•.................... 18 Language Requirements SPA 1010 E l ementary Spani hI ................................................... 5 SPA 1020 Elementary Spanish II ............................. ..................... . 5 SPA 2110 Spanish Reading and Conversation I -orSPA 2120 Span i sh Reading and Conversation II ...............•..................... 3 Subtotal ............. . ................................•............................ 13 Approved Electives• ............................. .... . . ............................... 9 Total ................................................................ ............ .40 *Nine (9) semester hour s of e lectives in Chicana/o Studies are required and must be selected in consultation with the department chair. Students pursing secondary licensure must take the required Gen eral Stud i es courses and the eco ndary education sequence. See the Department of Teac her Ed u ca ti o n for f u r ther informa t ion. S econdary Soci al S t udie s Teac h e r Lic e nsure Concentration: p a ge 351

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Minor in Chicano Studies The minor can be designed to provide the student with course experiences that a r e relevant to occ u pational and educational goals. Students , in consultation with a faculty a dvi sor in Chicana/ o Studies, will develop indi vidua l minors that reflect the best possible elective curr icula and ens ur e tha t a rel evan t concentrat ion is maintained. Total hours for the minor are 21. REQUIRED COURSES.. . . . . . . . . . . . ......... . . ....... ..... SEMESTER HO URS CHS I 000 Introduction t o Chicana / o Studies ..... . . . .... ............... ........... . . 3 C H S 1 0 1 0 History of Meso-America: Pre-Co l umbian and C o l onial Period s ... ...... . .... 3 CHS 1020 History of the Chicana / o in the Southwe st: 1810 t o Pre s ent. .................. 3 CHS 201 0 Survey of Chi cana / o Literature . ................... . . .... ............ ..... 3 E l ectives• .... . .............. . ...... . . .......... . . ..... . .... ............ 9 Total...... . . . ......... . ... . ...... . .... .............. . . . .......... . . . .... . 2 1 *El ec tiv es: A minimum of9 semester hours of electives is required to compl ete the minor. The cou r ses are to be se l ected in consultation with a Chicana/o Studies faculty advisor. COMPUTER SCIENCE Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences The Mathematical and Comput er Sc i ences Department offers a bachelor of science degree in computer sc i e nc e . The d epa rtment offers a computer science minor which complemen t s s u c h majors as math ematics, engi n eering technology. the other sciences, and economics. All students who are considering a m ajo r or minor in comp uter sc i e n ce are expected to consu l t with faculty for advising . The com puter sc i e n ce major offe r s the theory and application of comp uter science which includes pro gramming, d a ta s tru ctures , dat abase, networking , architecture, and software enginee ring. Non-Major Courses in Computer Science T he department offers courses as Comput e r Scie n ce S tudi es (CSS) th a t do not count tow ard a major in computer scie n ce. Some of the cou r se count toward majors in othe r programs. The Computer Science Studies co urs es a re o n topics appro priat e to computer science bu t focused toward curren t , particu l ar experti se. Major in Computer Science for Bachelor of Science The dep a rtment offers a comp let e degree program in computer science that follows the guidelines of th e Computing Curricula 200 I for Computer Science, a joint undertaking of the Computer Society of the In s titute for E l ectrical and E l ec troni c Engineers ( IEEE-CS) and the Association for Computing Machin ery (ACM) . Students are enco ur aged to contact the department for further det a ils (303 556 3208) . The pro g ram is accredited by the CAG Commission of ABET , I I 1 Marke t Place , Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-40 12, t e lephone 410-347 7700 . The Sen ior Experience course in computer scie n ce i s CS 4260. The CS progra m includ es a r equired mathematics minor. A grade of "C " or better is required in all CS courses included in the major as well as in all co u rse s included in the required math ematics minor. Please n ote th at the CS pr eftx replaces the old pr efix of CSI. REQUIRED C ORE COURSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E M ESTE R HOURS CS 1050 C omputer Science 1 * .... ..... ........ . ........... . .... . . . . . . . ........ .. 4 cs 2050 C omputer Science 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......... . . ..... . ........... 4 cs 2400 C omputer Organizati o n and Assembly Language ........ . ................. . 4 cs 3050 omputer Science 3 ............................. . .............. . . . . . ... 4 cs 321 0 Principles of Programming Languages ... ......... .... _ . . . .... ........... . . 4 cs 3240 Introduction to the T heor y of Comput a tion ............ ... . . .............. 2 cs 3600 Operating Systems ........ .......................................... . . . 4 cs 3700 Computer Networks . . . . . . . . . ........... ... ......... .... .... . . ...... 4 cs 3800 Fundamentals of R e lational Database System s ... . . . . . .................. .... 2 cs 4050 A l gorithms and Algorithm Ana lysis ................ . . .................... 4

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128 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES CS 4250 Software E ngin eering Principles ............. ............................. 4 CS 4260 Software Engineering Practices ........................................... 4 Subtotal ..................................................................... ..... 44 *CS 1050 is a required course and part of the m athematics minor. A minimum of 6 additional credit hours selected from upper division CS courses or MTH 4480. Subtotal for the major (including CS 1050)................................. . . ......... 50 Required Ancillary Courses SPE 1010 PubLic Speaking ...................................... .................. 3 COM 2610 Introduction to Technical Writing .................... .... . ............... 3 PHY 2311-2341 Genera l Physics I and Laboratory, General Physics 11 a nd Laboratory -orCHE 1800 , CHE 1 8 1 0 , CHE 1 850 Genera l Chemist r y I , Jr, and Laboratory orB I O 1080-1091 • General Biology land Laboratory , Ge n era l Biology II and Labo rat o ry. 10-12 EET 2310 Digital Circ uit s l . ................... ................................... 4 PHI 3370 Co mputer, Ethics, and Society ........................................... 3 Subtotal. ............................................. ....................•..... 23-25 . *BJO 1081 has a Pre!Core quisite ofCHE 1100 or CHE 1800 Mathematics Minor ( Required for the Co mputer Science Major) • COURSES .................. . ................................ SEMESTER HOURS MTH 1410 Calculus I ............................................................... 4 MTH 2140 Computational Matrix Algebra •• ............. . . . . ....... . .................. 2 MTH 2410 Calculus II .............................................................. 4 MTH 3100 Introduction to Math ematica l Proofs .............. .......................... 3 MTH 3210 Probability and Statistics (Calcu lu s-based) ................................... 4 MTH 3220 Design of Experim ents ................................. . . ..... . ........... 4 Subtotal (not including CS 1050, 4 hours) .................................. . . ........ ... 21 • CS 1050 is part of the mathematics minor. •• MTH 3140 may be substituted for MTH 2140. Additio nal Course Requirements E G 1010 Freshman Composition: The Essay* ........ ............ . .... ............. 3 ENG 1020 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, and Documentation* ........... 3 XXX XXX Level II General Studie s Historical * .................... ... ... . ........... 3 XXX XXX Level II Genera l Studies Arts and Letters • ........................... ... .. 3 XXX XXX Level II General Studies Social Sciences• ... . ............................. 6 Three additional hours from the areas of communication, historical , arts and letter s, and/or social sciences ................................................................ 3 Unrestricted Electives ......... ........................................... ........... 3-5 Subtotal ....................................................................... 24-26 *These courses along with CHE 1800, 1810, 1850 or PHY 2311 ,2321,2331, 2341 or BIO 1080, 1090, 1081, 1091, PHI 3370, and SPE 1010, count as General Studies courses. The Multicultural gradua tion requirement of 3 credit hours must also b e satisfied . Total ............................................................................ 120 As an alternative to the B.S. degree program, the Department works with the Center for Individualized Learning to provide students with programs customized to their educational needs . Currently we have guideline s for degrees in computer game development, immersive technologies, and computer crime and security.

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MINOR IN COMP U T E R SCI E NC E A grade of"C" or better is required in each course included in the minor. REQUIRED CORE COURSES ...................................... . SEMESTER HOURS CS I 050 Computer Science l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..................... 4 CS 2050 Computer Science 2 ............................... ..................... 4 Electives A m i nim u m of 12 semester ho urs chosen from CS 2400' and upper division CS courses .... 1 2 Total............... . ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . 20 *EET 2310 is a prerequisite for CS 2400 Certificate Program Available Students m ust complete each course in the certificate program with a grade of"C" or better. The courses cannot be taken pass/fail. Advanced Software Engineering Techniques This certificate will prepare students as software engineering professionals specializing in software team l eadership. Background to begin certificate: experience in software deve lopment and know l edge of the software engineering princip l es taught in CS 4250. CS 4281 Software Requirement s ........................ ............... ......... . . 3 CS 4282 Software Development Management .................................... .. 3 CS 4283 Software Testing and Quality Assurance ................................... 3 CS 4284 Software Product Engineering ............................................ 3 CS 4285 Best Practices in Software Development ................................... 3 Total . . . . ........ . . . ...... . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . 15 DIGITAL MEDIA Departments of Art, Communication Arts and Sciences, and Technical Communications and Media Production Digital Media Minor The Digita l Media Minor includes courses from the departments of Ar t , Communi ca t ion Arts and Sci ences , an d Technical Communications and Media Production. This minor cons i sts of24 hours, six of which must be upper division. This minor is designed to provide skills that will increase employment opportunit ies in the field of digital media communication. In addition to required core courses, s tu d en t s c h oose one of the following concentrations: motion media, interact i ve me dia, conten t design o r still media. T h e motio n media concentration deals wit h televisio n and corporate "vid eo production. Stu dent s in inte r active media wo r k with computer graphics, interact ive applications a n d Web-based media production . The content design concentration focuses on the design of the message from the visual a n d written pers p ective. Still-med i a s t udents explore with photography, photojournal ism, and computer i maging. Cour ses that are recommended to fu lfill the General Stu d i es Levell! A r ts & Letters requ i rement are: ARTH 1500 or ARTH 2100 or LAS 2850. Students shou l d contact an advisor to plan a co ur se of study for their particular minor. If a student has taken anyone of the required courses as part of yo u r major, another course in the minor must be substituted for it. Courses used for a major or a minor other than the Digital Med i a Minor or use d t o sat i sfy Gener a l Studies requirements cannot be used for the Digital Media Minor. Prerequisites for the courses u sed for the Digital Media Minor must be satisfied. Students with a major in journalism with the Photo journalism concentration may not use the still media concentration of the Digital Media Minor as t h e i r minor-see p age 234 of the curre n t catalog.

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130 SCHOO L OF LETTERS , ARTS & SCIENCES REQUIRED COURSES ............................... . .........•........ SEMESTER HOURS ART 1101 Two-Dimensional Design ................................................ 3 ART 1 53 1 Introduction to Digital Art and Design .................................... 3 COM 2430 Introduction to Media Pro du ction .......................... . ............. 3 }RN 1010 Introduction to journalism and Mass Media . ............•....•....•........ 3 Required Core Total ................................................................. 12 Choose three courses from one of the fou r concentrations. In addition, choose one course from a n y of the four concentrations. At least two courses must be upper division. Courses cannot be used to meet both the requirements of this minor and the requirements ofa major in Al i , Journalism, Speec h Com munication, or Technical Communication and Media Production. Still Media Concentration COURSES ART 1271 ART 2222 ART 2237 JRN 2600 JRN 3600 JRN 4600 )RN 4890 ...................... . .............. ........ .......... SEMESTER HOURS Basic Photography Methods ........................................ ..... 3 V i s ual Thinking ........................................................ 3 Constru cting the Digital I mage ............................ , .............. 3 Introduction to Photojournalism .................•....................... 3 Photojournalism l (ART 3290) ......................................•.... 3 Photojournalism II (ART 4290) ................. ......................... 3 Social Documentary .................................................... 3 Interactive Media Concentration COURSES ART 2237 ART 3235 ART 3631 ART 3635 COM 2450 COM 2470 COM 2480 COM 3450 COM 4450 .................................................... SEMESTER HOURS Constructing th e Digital Imag e ............... ............................ 3 Video Art ............. . . ...................................... . ....... 3 Interactive Multimedia Art. ....... , ....... . ....... ...•.... , ....•......... 3 Web Artl ................ . ...................................... ...... 3 Basic Multimedia Production ...................•........................ 3 Basic DVD Authoring .. ........................... ................. ..... 3 Introduction to Computer An im ation ....... . . ...• ........................ 3 Intermediate Mu l timediafWcb Production .................. . . . . .....•..... 3 Advanced Multimedia/DVD Production ................................... 3 Motion Media Concentratio n COUR ES ART 3235 COM 2400 COM 3400 COM 4401 COM 2420 COM 3420 COM 4420 OM 4430 COM 4480 SPE 3430 SPE 3440 PE 4440 .................... . .................................... SEMESTER HOURS Video Art (prerequisite ART 2237) ......•...•............................. 3 Basic Nonlinear Video E diting .... ....................................... 3 Int ermediate Nonlinear Video Editing ..... ..•............. , ............... 3 Advanced No nlinear Video Editing .... ................... , .............. . 3 Basic Single Camera Video Production .................................... 3 Intermediate Single Camera Video Production ..............•....•.......... 3 Advanced ing l e Camera Video Production ...............•................ 3 Lighting and Directing for Video .........................•....•....•.... . 3 Motion Graph i cs for Video ....................•....•....•........ , ...... 3 Radio Television Announcing .........•.................................. 3 Tel ev i sion Production ................... . . . ........ , .................... 3 Advanced Television Production ........... , .............................. 3 Content Design Concentration COURSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . .. . . EM ESTER HOURS COM 2800 Introduction to Audio Production ........................................ 3 COM 3440 Sc riptwritiin g for V id eo ........ . ..................... ... ................ 3 COM 3470 Writing for Interactive Media ....•....•........•....•....•....•........ .. 3 OM 3570 Tec hn ology Based Training ............................................. . 3 COM 3630 Designing Technical Publications ......................................... 3 JRN 1100 Beginn in g Reporting .................................................... 3

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JRN 1200 SPE 4450 Beginning Editing ...... . . . . . . . . . ............ .................. ........ . 3 Broadcast journalism: Television ....... . ......... . ...................... . 3 Requi red Core Courses ...................................... . ....................... 12 Concentration Courses ...... ......................................................... 9 Elective Course . ....... ......................... . .................. ............ . ..... 3 Total for Minor in Digital Media (6 hours upper division r e quir ed) ........................ . . 24 EARTH AND ATMOSPHERI C SCIENCE S DEPARTMENT The Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department (EAS) is composed of disciplines in : environmental science, geography, geology, meteorology, geographic information systems, and integrated natural sci ence. The department offers degrees in enviro n mental science , land use and meteoro l ogy , providing students with a strong background in the physical and quantitative aspects of the environment. Students will receive a bachelor of science degree except when their focused area of interest in land use is urban land use planning (bachelor of arts degree). Each student must have an EAS faculty advisor . Visit Quick Facts at the department Web site (www .mscd.edu/-eas). Minor programs are available in geography, geology, me t eoro l ogy, environmental studies, and geographic information systems. Students working toward teac h er licensure in either science or social studies may take courses in geology, geography, or meteorology. Students working t oward secondary science teacher licensure in environmental science must consult an EAS environmental science faculty advisor. Environmental Science The environmental science major is an extended major (no minor required) designed as an entry-level major for MSCD students as well as for students transferring at the junior level from the community colleges with a background in water quality. Students may choose from five options (concentrations) depending on their areas of i nterest. The multidisciplinary concentration provides students with a b r oad-based environmental science background, whereas the concentrations in ecological restoration, env i ronmental chemistry , and water quality are more specialized. The environmental science option for secondary science teacher licensure is the remaining concentration available to students. All concentra tions , except for environmental science for teacher licensure, require a unified core. (See Environmental Scie n ce on page 139 of this Catalog.) Land Use The land use major is an extended major (no minor required) that combines general planning courses with a focused area of study, including environment and resources, geographic information systems, geology, or urban land use planning, linked by the vital thread of land use management. It also equips students with a dynamic foundation for understanding issues and solving problems that confront the community and environment. The program is broad in scope and can be applied to a number of career objectives a n d graduate schoo l programs . Opportunities exist in s u ch areas as cartography, environment and resource management, environmental science, geographic information systems, geology , mining and mineral resources , planning , population analysis, recreational land use , remote sensing , residential and industrial development , transportation , and a variety of other interrelated fields. (See La n d Use on page 156 of this Catalog.) Meteorology Meteorology is the science of the atmosphere. Meteorologists are employed in operational meteorology, meteorological research, applied meteorology , and the media . The Meteorology Computer Laboratory provides access to real-time weather data and analysis software supported by the UNIDATA Program . The bachelor of science degree conforms to the American Meteoro l ogical Society and National Weather Service recommendations for an undergraduate meteorology degree. A mathematics minor is a requirement of the meteorology major. Students should contact a meteorology faculty member to discuss degree programs, career opportunities , and graduate school options. (See Meteoro l ogy on page 169 of this Catalog.)

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132 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Role and Mission: Department of English faculty share a heritage in which language, writing, literature, and the art of teach in g are valued as cornerstones of a liberal education. Representing distinct speciaHzat ions , we form a community of readers and writers who pursue the study of humane letters for both aesthetic and prac tical reasons. The English Department provides students from across the College with courses that fulftll the L evell Genera l Studie s requirement in English composition: English 1010 Freshman Composition: The Essay and English 1020 Freshman Composition: Research, Analy sis, and Documentation. The department also teaches literature and linguistics courses that meet the Level IT General Studies requirement in Arts and Letters. Thus, in keeping with the liberal arts tradition of gene ral education, the department promotes both the basic intellectual skills of critical reading a nd writing and the kind of understanding of the human condition that comes from the experience and appreciation of literature. For stu d ents majoring or minoring in English , the program provides a found ation in lit erature, l an guage, writing, and teaching. Thus students' command of written language, their ab ilit y to analyze conce pts, and their broad understanding of human nature and social realities will e nable them to be compet iti ve in a variety of fields, including ed uc ation , business, and civil service or, with appropriate graduate work, in professions such as law and h igher education . Eng lish department faculty members deve l op professionally i n a variety of ways appropriate to th eir disciplines, from maintaining currency in the curricula they teach and the instructional technology they employ to scho l arly and creative work leading to various forms of publication and presentation . They se rve the College and community by vo lunt eering in schools or other organizations concerned with the written word and by sharing with their fellow citizens the insights of teacher-scholars educated in the tradition of the liberal arts. The E n glish Department offers instruction in literature, writing, language a nd linguistics and in ele mentary and secondary English education . Course s in each area appeal to students in every school of the College who wish to read and understand representative literatures of the world; to examine the princip l es underlying how language works; and to cultivate their writing skills . The department invites students in other disciplines to select English courses to enhance their general educa tion . Students may also choose an E ngli sh major or minor from areas lis t ed below. Students who are considering a major or minor in the Englis h Department are expected to consult with facu lty for advising. Students in elementary or secondary licensure programs s h ould co nsult with advi sors in the appropriate education department as well. The English major may choose a concentration in one of the following: • lit erature • writing • e l ementary school teaching , leading to licensure • secondary schoo l teaching, l eading t o Licensure The English minor may choose a concentration in one of the following: • language and linguistics • liter ature • writing The English Department assesses the major in designated Senior Experie nce courses. Portfolios of papers assigned through these courses will be read by members of the faculty . Senior Expe rience courses should not be taken until th e student's final year of study. Because these courses may not be offered every semester, students should discuss sche duling with English Department a dvi sors. English Major for Bachelor of Arts Literatur e Concentration The English major , l iteratu r e concentration, encompasses a range of American, British, and world lit erature . The program provides a strong foundation of cou rses in lit erat ur e a nd l anguage , sequence d t o

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SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 133 cu l tivate a sense of literary development, and fosters an increas in g familiarity with major works and writers, critic al theory, literary terminology, and research materi a ls. Because of their command of the written language , their ability t o deal with ideas and concepts as well as facts, and their bro ader understanding of human nature and social realities , literature majors are valued in many fiel ds, including aca deme, the law, and the world of business. REQUIRED COURSES...... . . . . . . . . . . . .... SEMESTER HOURS E G 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . ................. 3 ENG 2220 American Literature : Civil War to Present. . . . . . . ........... , ........... 3 ENG 3 100 C haucer, Shakespeare and Milton... . . ...................... 3 ENG 3440 Myth, Symbol, and Allusion in Literature .................................. 3 ENG 461 0 Literary Criticism: Theory an d Practice (Senior Experience course) ........... 3 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... 15 Three of these courses: E G 2110 World Literature: Beginnings to 1600 .... , .................................. 3 ENG 2120 World Literature: 1600 to Present. ........................................ 3 ENG 221 0 American Liter ature: Beginnings through the Civil War ...................... 3 ENG 2220 American Literature: Civil War to Present .................................. 3 ENG 231 0 British Liter ature: Beginnings to 1785 ..................................... 3 ENG 2330 British Literature: 1785 to Present ......................................... 3 Subtotal. ................................................. .......................... 9 Seven E l ectives: (at least 6 courses must be upper division) Development course (Englis h literature cou rse with "Deve lopment " in title) .................. 3 Period course (an y 311X) ............................................................. 3 Major Author course (ENG 413X or ENG 4310 orE G 4320) .............................. 3 Writing course (2000-leve l or above) .................................................... 3 Literature course ..................................................................... 3 Linguistics course .................................................................... 3 E lective at the 2000-level or above ...................................................... 3 Subtotal ........................... ........................ .................. 21 Total Semester Hours Required ........................................................ 45 Elementary School Teaching Concentration The element a r y school tea ching concentration in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Educa t ion licensure program, prepares future teachers of elementary education to understand and teach th e diverse subject matter required for licensure. The program will provide stu dents with a strong foundation in literature and literar y genres; a solid perspective on the English lan guage, including its history, structure, and constituents; and both theory and practice in composition, language arts, communication, and teaching methodology . It also addresses the need to prepare teach ers to teach multicultural literature, accommodate cultura l and ethnic diversity in langu age and writi ng, and communi cate effectively with a diverse population of students. REQUIRED COURSES .................................... . . ... ... . SEMESTE R HOURS Literature Core Courses ENG 2100 Introduction to Liter a ry Stud ies . . . . . . . . . . ......................... 3 ENG 2220 American Literature: Civil War to Present. ................................. 3 E G 3100 Chaucer, S hakespeare , Milton ................................. . .......... 3 E G 3440 Myth, Symbol , and Allusion in Literature . ................................. 3 ENG 3461 Child ren's Literature: T heory and Practice ................................. 3 Subtotal ................................................................ ........... 15 Language/Linguistics Core Courses ENG 201 0 The Nature of Language ................................................. 3 ENG 3020 History of the English Language .... ...................................... 3 Subtotal. ........................................................................... 6

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134 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Writing/Composition Courses ENG 2500 Art and Craft of Writing ................................................. 3 ENG 3510 Advanced Com position ................................................. 3 Subtotal ............................... . . ......... .................................. 6 Language Arts Core Courses ENG 4650 Teaching Composition in th e Elementary School K-6 ....... ................ 3 ENG 4660 Teaching Literature and Language K-6 (Senior Experience course) ............ 3 RDG 3110 Foundations of Literacy Instruction in Grades P-6• ......................... 3 Subtotal. ... .....................................................•.................. 6 English Electives Two upper -divis ion English courses selected in consultation with and approved by a designated English advisor ........................................................ 6 Total ........................................... . ............. .................... 39 •RDG 3110 meets part of the reading requirements for Colorado State licensure and is counted under the student's professional education requirements. Secondary School Teaching Concentration The secondary education concentration in English, offere d in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Education licensure program, prepares future secondary teachers of English to under stand and teach the diverse subject matter required for licensure. This program equips students with a wide variety of language principles and ski Us; practical experience in developing and teaching the pro cesses of writing; sound knowledge of approaches to literature and literary genres; periods a nd authors (including a special focus on young adult literature); and an understanding of communication and media as used in English studies. In addition to meeting specified state and departmental requirements, this program offers students the opportunity to develop further specializatio n in writing, language, or literature to complement the major. Literature Core ENG 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies ....... ...................................... 3 ENG 2210 American Literature: Beginnings through the Civil War ........................ 3 -or-ENG 2220 Amer i can Lite r ature: Civil War to Pre sent. ................................. 3 ENG 3100 C haucer, Shakespeare, Milton ........... ................................. 3 ENG 3440 Myt h , Symbol, and Allus i on in Literature ...........•...................... 3 ENG 3470 Young Adult Literature ............................•..................... 3 Total ............................................................................. 15 Language Core ENG 2010 The Nat ur e of Language ................................................. 3 ENG 3020 History of the English Lan guage ...... .................................... 3 Total ....... ...............................................•.......... ............. 6 Composition Core ENG 2500 Art and Craft of Writing ................................................. 3 ENG 3510 Advanced Composition .... .... ....... .................................. 3 Total ....................................................•......................... 6 Teaching English Core ENG 4600 Teaching Literature and Communication, 7-12 .... ......................... 3 E G 4620 Teaching Composition, 7-12 ............................................. 3 E G 4640 Teaching English, 7-12 (Senior Experience course) ... ....................... 3 Total . ........ . ......... ........................................•.................. 9 Upper Level Electives Three upper division English courses, at least two of which mu t be literature courses, sel ected in consultation with and approved by a designated English advisor ........... .. 9 Total ........................................................................... . . 45

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Writing Concentr a tion The writing concentration major provides extens ive study, practice, and opportunity for performance in various modes and genres of writing a s well as a foundation in the appreci a tion of the liter a r y heritage in English. The program immerses students in reading , w riting, and l angua g e and help s pre pare them for graduate school or vocation while cle arly placing them in the tradition o f the liberal arts. Literature Cour se Lower Division Literature Cour s es: 2000-Level , including ENG 2100 .............................................. ......... 9 UpperDivision Literature Courses : 3000 Level or 4 000 Level ............................................................. 9 Subtotal . . ........... .............................................................. 1 8 Language and Linguistic s Course: Select one , in con s ultation with a faculty advisor, fro m d e p a rtment's offerings. S e mester Hours of Languag e and Linguistic s Requir e d ....................... . . .... ......... 3 Writing Course: E ntry Cour s e : E G 2500 Art and Craft of Writing ..... . ............. . . ............................ 3 Subtotal. ..... . ........ .... . . . . ......... . . . ............... .......................... 3 Writing Electives: (select four three mu s t be 3000 level) JRN 1100 B e ginning Reporting .......................... .................... . . .... 3 COM 2610 Intr o duction to Tec hnical Writin g . . . . ....... . . ..... . . .... . .............. 3 ENG 2520 Intr o du c tion to Cr e ative Writing ..... . . ......... . ............... . ........ 3 E G 3510 Adv anced Comp os iti o n . ...... ................ . . ........... . ............ 3 E G 352A C reative Writing Work s h o p : Poetry ........ .................. ............. 3 E G 3528 C reati v e Writing Workshop: Fictio n . ...........•............. . ........ .... 3 E G 352C C r e ative Writing Workshop: Dram a ........ ...... ....... . .... ............. 3 ENG 3530 T e chniques of C ritic a l Writing ..... ............................. ...•...... 3 ENG 3980 E ngli s h Cooperativ e Educ a tion ............... ..................... ...... . 3 Subtotal. . . ........ . . ................ ............................ . ......... ........ 1 2 Specialized Writing C ourses ENG 3820 Writing Studio: Variable T opics • ... ... .... .................. .............. 6 • mu s t b e r e p e at e d fo r cre dit und e r two d i stin c t titles Subtotal . ................ . . . . . . . . ....... . . . .... . ....... . . ....... ........... ..... ... . 6 Senior Experience Course ENG 4520 Advan ced Writing . .................. .......................... .. ......... 3 Total Semeste r Hour s of Writing Requir e d . . . ... . . . ............. ................. . . . . 24 Total Semester Hour s Requir e d . . . . . . . . . .......... . ....................... . . .... . ...... 45 Cinema Studies Minor A minor in Cinema Studies consists o f seven courses : a n introduction to the study o f cinema, two cours es on disciplinar y aspects of cinema , and four course s on particular cinema topics in context. Students learn to think and write criticall y about cinem a as a significant form o f culture . Courses t aken to meet a re q uirement for this minor may not also be counted toward a m a jor. C OURSE ........... . . .... . . ................ . ........ SEMESTER HOU R ENG 2860 Introduction to C in e ma S tudi e s ............................. . ........ 3 Select two courses on disciplinary aspects of cinema , from th e following : ENG 3450 His tor y of Cinema ....... . . . ............................................ 3 SPE 3490 C inema as Communicati o n .................... . . . ....................... 3 SPA 3600 Latin American Cinema . . . ..... .................................. . ...... 3

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136 SCHOOL OF LETTERS , ARTS & SCIENCES ARTH 3780 Cinema as Visual Art ............. ... ... , ........ , . ........... . ......... 3 ENG 4670 C inema Theory and Criticism .......... . . ............... ................ . 3 Subtotal ...... . ..................................................... .......•..... ... 6 Four different variatio n s of courses on cinema in context (two of each course): E G 3750 Cinema Genre: Variable Topics (two different topics) ........................ 6 -and-ENG 4631 C inema Director: Variable Topics (two different topic ) . ....... ............ . . 6 Subtotal ............. ........................................... ............... . . . . 12 Total Semest e r Hours Required .................................•............ . ......... 21 English Min o r Wri ting Concentration The writing concentration minor provides study. practice, and opportunity for performance in various modes and genres of writing as well as a foundation in the appreciation of the lit erary heritage in English. The program involves students in reading . writing. and language. and helps prepare them for graduate sc hool or vocation, while clearly placing them in the tradition of the liberal arts. Students must meet with a writing faculty advisor in order to under stand prerequisites and se lect proper courses. Literature Course COURSES ................... . ............................... SEMESTER HOURS Lower-Divi ion Literature Courses: 2000-Level, including ENG 2100.................... ..... . ..................... 6 Upper-Division Literature Co urse: 3000-Level or 4000-Level .......................................... . .................. 3 Subtotal .... .... . . ........................................•.. ....................... 9 Language and Linguistics Course: Select one, in consultation with a faculty advisor, from department's offerings. Semester Hours of Language and Linguistics Required ..........................•........... 3 Entry Writing Course: ENG 2500 Art and Craf t of Writing ................................................. 3 Subtotal ........................ . .........................................•......... 3 Writing Electives (select three two must be 3000-level) COM 2610 Introduction to Technical Writing .......... ........................ . . .... 3 ENG 2520 Introduction to Creative Writing ............ ............................. 3 ENG 3510 Advanced Composition .............................. ................... 3 ENG 352A C reative Writing Workshop: Poetry .................................. ..... 3 ENG 352B Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction ...................................... . 3 ENG 352C Creative Writing Workshop: Drama ....................................... 3 ENG 3530 Techniques of C ritical Writing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ENG 3820 Writing Studio: Variable Topics ........................................... 3 )RN 1100 Beginning Reporting . ................................................... 3 Subtotal ....................... ............•.............•........... . .............. 9 Semester Hours of Writing Required .............•...................................... 12 Total Semester Hours Required ........................................................ 24 Literatur e Concentrati on The English minor with concentration in literatur e serves studen ts who seek to develop skills i n read ing, w riting. and thinking about literary texts. The program i s designed both for students interested in reading diverse texts from many ages, culture. and genres an d for students who wish to focus on a single age, culture or genre , for example. dramatic literature.

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Cour e hould be elected in consultation with a faculty advisor in the Department of E nglish . Introductory Course: COUR ES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . EM ESTER HOUR ENG 2100 Introduction to Literary tudie .......................................... 3 Two courses from the following: ENG 2110 World Literature: Beginnings to 1600....... . ........................ 3 E G 2120 World Literature: 1 600 to Present ........................................ . 3 ENG 2210 American Literature : Beginn ings through the C ivil War . ..................... 3 ENG 2220 American Literature: Civil War to Present. ................................. 3 ENG 2310 British Literature: Beginnings to 1785 ..................................... 3 ENG 2330 British Literature: 1785 to Present. .................................... 0 ••• 3 Subtotal .......................................... 0 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 6 Any period cour e (E G 311X) -or-Any development course (Englis h liter ature course 'vith "Development" in title or ENG 3240) Subtotal ..................................................... ............. 0 ••••••••• 3 Departmental E l ectives One cou rse at the 2000level or above ...................... 0 ••••••• 0 •••••••••••••••• 0 ••• 3 Two lit e ratur e courses at the 3000-level or above ......................................... 6 One 4000-levelliterature or literar y critici m course ...................... 0 ••••• 0. 0 ••••••• 3 Subtotal. 0 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 12 Total Semester Hours Required ..................... 0 ••••••••• 0 •••• 0 0 ••••••• 0 ••• 0 • ••••• 24 Language and Linguistics Minor The language and linguistics minor offers concepts about, theories of, and analytical techniques in natural language. It repre ents an intellectual discipline in itself and simultaneously serves the interests of future teacher, tudents of literature and writing, and others who have a continuing fascination with language as language. T h e minor is especial.ly complementary for major in anthropology, English, foreign language teaching, modern l a nguages, philosophy, psychology, ociology, speech communication, and technica l communi cation. The minor requir es students to engage in vigoro us, progressively more explicit a nd pre cise analysis and synthesis as they examine facts and fallacies abo ut the miracl e of language. There are two concentrat i ons in the Language/Linguistics minor, one focusing prin1aril y on liJ1guistics (Linguistics Con centration) and the other including a 3-semester language component (Language Concentration}. Lingui stics Concentration REQUIRED CORE COURSES ........................................... EMESTER HOURS E G 20 I 0 The ature of Language ................................................. 3 Any four of the following chosen in consultation and with and approved by a departmental advisor . ENG 3020 History of the Engl i sh Language ...................................... 0 ••• 3 ENG 3030 Semantics ......................................................... 0 ••• 3 ENG 3040 Morpho l ogy and Syntax . ......... 0 •••• 0 •••• 0 • ••• 0 •••• 0 • ••• 0 •••• 0 •••• 0 ••• 3 E G 3050 Language and Society ...... 0 • • • • • • • • • ••• 0 •••• 0 •••• 0 ••••••••• 0 ••• 3 E G 3060 Modern Language Theory .. o ••• 00 .... 00 ••• 00 ••• o ••• 00 ......... 00 •• 00 .... 3 E G 3070 Old English . ........................................................... 3 E G 4010 tudies in Linguistics: Variable Topics• . .............................. ..... 3 Subtotal. ............. . .......................................... 0 ................• 12 'may be repeated for credit under different topics

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138 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Interdisciplinary elective courses. Any two courses chosen in consultation with and approved by departmental advisor. ANT 2330 Cro -Cultural Comm unicati o n .......................................... 3 -orSPE 3740 Psyc h o l ogy of Communication ....................................• ...... 3 -orSPE 3760 Cu ltural Influences on Communication ... ................................ 3 COM 3310 International Technical Communications .................... .............. 3 ENG 4010 Studies in Linguistics: Variable Topics * ................... ................. 3 ENG 4990 Internship * ............................................................ 3 PRE 3150 French Phonetics: Theory and Pra ctice .....•..................•........... 3 GER 3150 German Phonetics: Theory and Practice ........ ..... ...................... 3 GER 3300 Advanced German Grammar .....................................•...... 3 PHI 1110 Language, Logic, and Persuasion ............. . .... ........................ 3 PHI 1440 Symbolic Logic .......................................... ............... 3 PHI 3120 Philosophy of Language .............. ..... ........... . .................. 3 PSY 4570 Cognit ive P syc hology ................................................... 3 SPA 3150 Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice ................................... 3 SPA 4310 History of the Spanish Language ...................................... .... 3 SLHS 2890 Lang u age Acquisition ..................................... .............. 3 SLHS 3540 Phonetics and Language Sample Analysis .............................. .... 3 SPE 3740 Psycho l ogy of Communication ................... ................ ........ 3 SPE/WMS 2770 Gender and Com munication ............................................ 3 Subtotal. . . .......................................................... . .............. 6 •may be repeated for credit under different topics ••must be set up with Linguistics and Language advisor and approved by curriculum chair and department chair in advance. Total Semester Hours Required ............. . ...... •...... •......................... . . . 21 Lang uage Conce ntration REQUIRED CORE COURSE ............. . ............................. SEMESTER HOUR S ENG 2010 The Nature of Language .......... . ..................................... . 3 Any three of the following six courses, chosen in consultation and with and approved by a departmental advisor. ENG 3020 History of the English Lan guage ........................ .................. 3 ENG 3030 Semantics . ............................................................ 3 ENG 3040 Morphology and Syntax .... ....... ....................... ............... 3 ENG 3050 Language and Society ........ . . ....• ................................... . 3 ENG 3060 Modern Language Theory ............................................... 3 ENG 3070 Old English .......................................................... . . 3 ENG 4010 Studies in Linguistics: Variab l e Topics* ...... . ............................. 3 Subtotal. .......... . . ..................................... . ......................... 9 •may be repeated for credit under different topics At l east three semesters of a singl e language for a total o f at least 13 cre dits , chosen in con sultation with and approved by departmental advisors, in the case of a transfer student, at least two semesters must include grammar. PRE 1010 and 1020 Elementary French I and II .......•................... ............ 10 PRE 2110 French Reading and Conversation .................................. ...... 3 -o r GER 1010 and 1020 Elementary German T and II ...................................... 10 GER 2110 German Reading and Co mprehensi on ..................................... 3 -or-GER 2310 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar ..... ....... . . ................. 3 -o r SPA 1010 and 1020 Elementary Spanish I and II. ...................................... 10

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SPA 2110 Int e rmediate Spanish ..... .................................. . ........... 3 -orSPA 2110 Spanish Grammar and Composition I. ....... . . . . ......................... 3 Subtotal. ................................................. ......................... 13 Total Semester Hours Required ..........•................•.......•.................... 25 C E RTIFICAT E PROGRAM I N CINEM A STUDIES To earn a certificate in Cinema Studies , students must complete the courses indicated below , each with a grade of Cor better ( they may not be taken pass/fail). l. Two required courses on cinema Semester Hours ENG 2860 Introduction to Cinema tudies ..... ..................................... 3 ENG 3450 His tory of Cinema ...................................................... 3 Subtotal ................................ . ........................................... 6 II. Three different courses on aspects of cinema (the variable t opics course may not be repeated for certification credit), selected from the following: SPE 3470 C inema as Co mmuni catio n .............................................. 3 SPA 3600 Latin Ame r ican Cinema ............. . ................................... 3 E G 3750 Cinema Genre : Variable Topics .......... . ............ ............ ........ 3 ARTH 3780 Cinema As V i s u a l Art ... ...................................... . ......... 3 ENG 4631 C inema Direct or: Variable Topics . . . . ....... . ........ ... ..... ..... 3 ENG 4670 C in e ma Theory and Cr iticism ...................................... ...... 3 Subtotal. .............. . ............................ ............................... . 9 Total Semester Hours Required ........... . ............... . . . . . .......... . . . . . . . . . .... . 15 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences The environmental science major is an extended major (no minor required ) designed as an entry-level major for MSCD students as well as for students transferring as j u niors from the community colleges with backgroun d s in water q u ality. I n addition, stu dents may choose from concentr at i ons depending o n their areas of i nterest. The multidisc i plinary co n centration prov i des students with a broad-based envi ronmental science backgro u nd, whereas the concentrations in water quality , environmental chemistry, and ecological restoration are more specialized. The environmen tal science option for secondary sc i ence teacher licensure is the remaining concentration available to students. All concentrations, except for environmental science for teacher licensure , require a unified core. Interested students should go to the Department of Earth and Atmos pheric Sciences (Science 231) to be as s igned an advisor and to pick up advising and career option sheets. Students interested in teacher licen s ure in secondary sc ience should consult an advisor in environmental s cience and teacher educ a tion (see the teacher education portion of this Catalog) . Environmental Science Major for Bachelor of Science Core Req u irements for E n vironmental Sci e n ce Concentratio n s (except for Seco n dary Sci ence Teacher Licensure) COURSES ...................... ............................. SEMESTER HOURS BIO 1080 General introdu ction to Biology . ...... . . ................................ 3 BIO 1090 General Introdu ctio n to Biology Labo r a t ory ..... ..... ...................... I CET 3320 Enviro nmental Impact Statements ................• ......... .............. 3 COM 3670 Writing for the Environmental Industr y ................................... 3 ENV 1200 Intr o du c tion t o Enviro nmenta l Science. . ... ............................ 3 ENV 4200 Environmental Policy a nd Planning ........................... . .... . ..... . 3 GEG 1220 Map Use .... ............ ............................ ......... ..... .... 2 MTH 1210 Intr o duction to Statistics .......... ...... . ............................... 4 MTH 3240 E nvironme n ta l Statistics ........ .................... . .............. ...... 4 Subtotal.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 26

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140 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES St u dent s mu s t s e lect on e o f th e f ollow ing S enio r Ex p erie n c e cour se : B I O 4510 Microbia l Ec o l ogy ...... . . . ............................................ . 4 B I O 454 0 P l a nt Eco l ogy .... . ...... . . . . . . .........•.............•. . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 4 C HE 4950 Sen i o r Exp erie nce in C h e mistr y ......... . . . ................ .............. 3 E NV 4960 G l o bal E nvironm enta l C hal l enge ............•....•....•....•....•...... . 3 ENV 4970 E n vironme nt a l Field S tudi es ............. . . . ............................ . 3 Sub total ........................................... . . . .............................. 3 Stud e nt s mu s t select on e of t h e follow i n g I n t ern s hip s ( min imu m 3 c r e dit h o u r s) : B I O 4990 Int e rnship i n Bio l ogy ..................... . ....... ..............•..... . . 3 C HE 4650 C h e mi stry W o rk Exp erie n ce/Coo p e r ative E du c ati o n ....... . . . .... ....... . . . 4 GEG 4950 In t e rn s hip in L a nd Use . ...............................•....•....•...... . 3 GEL 4950 Int e rn s hip in Geo l ogy ......... .......... . ........•...................... 3 S ubt o t a l .......................... . .... ......... . . . . •.... . . •...............•........ 3 Total Core R equirem e nt s ....................... . . . .... ................ .............. 32 Requi r e d Ge n e ral S t ud i e s Co ur es MTH 1110 Colle g e Algebra (Ge n e ral S tudi es-Leve l ! Math e m at i cs) ... .......... ......... 4 C H E 1 8 0 0 Ge n eral C h e mi t ry I (Ge n e ral S tudies-Level II-Na tur a l Scie n ce) .....•........ 4 GEL 1 010 Ph y ica l Geo l ogy (Ge n e ral S tu dies-Leve l IIa tural Scie n ce) . . . .............. 4 T otal General S tudies courses (see College Add e n dum : General College Requir e m e nts) . ........ . 36 (Stu de nt s who have n o t had a comput e r c o urse will be requir e d to take CSS 1010/C l S 1010.) Multidisciplinar y Concentration Stude n t s a r e required to sel ect courses i n Bio logy, C h e m istry, Geogr aphy, Geol o gy, Math e m a t ics , and Me t eorology, as well a s e le c tive courses in cons ult a t ion with a disci plin e a d v isor t o talin g a minimum of 42 hours . E nvironme nt a l S cience Co r e ........................... . . . . . .............. . . ....... ... 32 Biol o gy (9 h ours minimum ) C OURSES .......................... . . . .......... . . ................ SEMESTER H OU R S B I O 1081 B I O 1 09 1 BIO 2 1 00 B I O 240 0 BIO 3200 -o r Ge n e r a l B i o l ogy II ( mu s t t a k e with B I O 1 09 1 ) .............................. 3 Ge n e ral Bio l ogy II Labo r a to r y (mus t take w it h BIO 1081) ......•....•........ I Gen e ral B o t a n y ........................................................ 5 G e n e r a l M i c r obio l ogy ........•....•....•...•....•....• . . ............. ... 5 Inverte brat e Zoo l ogy ..................... ................... . ........... 4 BIO 3260 Verteb r ate Zoo l ogy ......... ...................... . . .................... 4 BIO 3 140 P l ant Physi o l ogy ..... ................. . . . . .......... ........... . .... ... 5 BlO 3 1 80 Vascu l a r Plant Taxo n o m y ................... ....... . ..................... 4 B I O 336 0 Anima l P hysi o l ogy ....... ..........................•................... 4 B I O 355 0 Urban Eco l o g y ......................................................... 4 BIO 4450 P a th o g e nic Micr obio l ogy ........... . .......... ................... . ...... 5 BIO 451 0 Micr o b ial E co l ogy .................................... .................. 4 BIO 454 0 P l a nt E c o l ogy ..................... . . . .... . ............................. 4 B I O 4550 Anim a l Eco l ogy . . . ....•.........•....•...•....•....•.............•..... 4 S ubtotal ......................... .... .... ..... .... . ............ ...... . . . . . .... . . . . . 9 C h e m i s t ry (9 h o u r s min imum ) C OURSES ......... . ................................... ... ........ . SEMESTER H OU R S C H E 1 8 1 0 Ge n e r a l C h e mi s tr y II ( r e q u i r e d ) ............ . ............................. 4 C H E 1850 C H E 2100 C HE 3 0 5 0 C HE 3100 C HE 3110 C HE 3 1 20 C HE 3 1 30 C HE 3890 S ubtota l ...... G e n e r a l C h e mi stry L a b o r a tory ( r ecomme nd e d ) . . .... . . . . ................. . 2 Intr o ducti o n t o O r ga nic a nd Bio l og i ca l C h emis tr y ........ . . ................ 5 E n v i r o nm en t a l h e m is try ... ........... . .... . . ......... . •... . . ........ . . 3 Organic C h emistry I .............. ................•...... . .... .......... 4 Org anic C h e mi try II ................•............................•..... 3 Org anic C h e mi stry Lab o r a tor y I ........ .............• . .................. . 2 Org ani c C h e m istry Lab o r a tor y II ....................•.................... 2 Scie nc e and P ubli c P olicy: Vari able Topics ........ . . ........ . ............. 1 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

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Geogra p h y (9 h ou r s minimwn) COURSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................. SEMESTER HOURS ENV 1 400 World Resources ............................... . ....................... 3 ENV 3400 Water Res ources ......................... ....... ........................ 3 ENV 3620 Population, Resources, and Land Use . .... ................................. 3 ENV 4410 Water L aw ............................................. ................ 3 ENV 4420 Wetlands .................................................... .......... 3 ENV Habitat Pla n ning . . . ........................................... 2 GEG 4888 Workshop on E nvir o nm en tal Issu e (ad v i o r ap p r oved) ........... . . . ........ 3 GEG 4900 Enviro nmental Seminar (a dvi so r approved) .... ................. . .......... 3 GIS 2250 Introduction t o Geographic Info rm ation Syste m s ............•....•....... . . 3 GIS 4840 Rem ote Sensing ............... ............................. . . .......... 3 GIS 4850 Advanced Geographic Information Sy terns . ............................... 3 GIS 4860 Applications of ARC/ I FO to atural Resources Man age m ent ............... 3 Subtotal. ............................. . ............ . . . . . ..... . ...................... 9 Geology { 9 h o ur s minimum) COURSES ........ . . . . .... .......... . .............................. SEMESTER HOURS ENV 3540 Advanced Geologic and E n v ironm en tal Hazards-Denver and V icinity ......... 2 ENV 4000 E n v ironmental Geology (re quired ) ............................ ............ 3 ENV 40 1 0 Environmen tal Hazard s a nd Plann i n g .................. ................... 3 GEL 3120 Advanced Geom o rph o l ogy .........................•...... ..... ......... 4 GEL 3150 Hydro g eolog y ............. ..........•.........•.........•.............. 3 GEL 3420 Soil Reso urce s ........ . ................................................ 4 GEL 3440 Ene r gy and Mineral Resources .... ...................•.........•........ . 4 GEL 4150 H ydro l ogy ................... .......................................... 3 Subtotal. ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...•.......................... 9 Mathemati cs {3 h ou r min imum) COURSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EM ESTER HOURS MTH 1120 College Trigonometry ................................................... 3 MTH 1 400 Precalculus Mathematics .......................... ...................... 4 MTH 1 410 Ca lculus I (recommended for students consi dering graduate chool) .......... 4 MTH 24 1 0 alculus II ......................................... . .................. 4 Subtotal.................... . ....•.......•................ . ......... 3 Meteorology (3 hours minimum) COURSES . . . . . . . .. . . ..................................... SEMESTER HOURS MTR 1400 Weather and C limat e ........................................... . ..... . . . 3 M T R 2400 Intr o duction to Atmosphe r ic Scie n ce (recommen ded) ....................... 4 M T R 3 1 00 Air P o llut i on ....................................... . ........ . . . . . . . .... 3 MTR 3400 ynop tic Meteorology .... ........... . ........ . . ......................... 4 Subtotal............................ . ............................. ......... ....... 3 Total Multidi sciplinary Courses .....•...............•.......•.............. . ..... ..... 42 Genera l Studies ................... ....... .............. . ................ ........... . 36 Additional E l ectives ...................................... ........................... I 0 Total for Multidisciplinar y Concentration .............................................. /20 Water Quality Concentration COURSES .......................... ...... ...... . SEMESTER HOURS Environmental Science Co r e .........................•....•....•.... . .... 32 Additional R e quir ed Courses : CHE 1 8 1 0 General C hemi stry II . . . . . .. ................................... 4 CHE 1850 Gene r a l C h e mi try Labo r a t o ry... . . . . . . . . . . . .......................... 2 CHE 3050 Envi r onmenta l C h emis tr y ............•........ .......................... 3 C HE 3100 Organic C h em i s tr y I ......................................•....•........ 4 C HE 3120 Organic Chemistry Laboratory l. ............ ................... .......... 2 GEL 3150 H ydrogeo l ogy ........................ ..... ..................... ........ 3

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142 SCHOOL OF LEITERS , ARTS & SCIENCES GEL 4150 Hydrology ............................•........•....•. . ...........•.... 3 MTR 2400 Introduction to Atmospheric Science ...................................... 4 OSHA Envirorunental Health and Safety (OSHA 40-hour course)• .................. 3 Subtotal .......................................................................... 28 *Offered as continuing education courses at Front Range and Red Rocks Community Colleges Red Rocks Community College Required Cour es COURSE ...... . ............................................ ..... . SEMESTER HOURS WQM 100 Introduction to Water QuaHty Management. .......•....................... 3 WQM 119 Basic Water Quality Analysis .......... ............................. . ..... 4 WQM 121 Envirorunental Sampling and Volume Measurement. ...................•.... 3 WQM 216 Biological and Bacteriological Water Quality Analysis ....................... 4 Subtotal. ... ....................................................................... 14 Se lect 10 hours from the following courses BIO 2400 General Microbiology ................................................... 5 BIO 3550 Urban Ecology ...................•...•....•....•....•...•.............. 4 BIO 4510 Microbial Ecology ..................................................... 4 CET 3330 Environmental Technology Processes ......................•....•......... 3 ENV 3400 Water Resources ........................................................ 3 GEL 3420 Soil Resources ....................................... . ................. 4 MTR 3100 Air Pollution ......... . ......... ......... . ............... . . ............. 3 WQM 105 Specific Calc ula tions for Wat er Quality Management (RRCC) ......•......... 4 WQM 200 Hydraulics for Water Quality Management (RRCC) ......................... 4 Subtotal ........................................................•.......•.......... I 0 General Studie ..................................................................... 36 Total for Water Quality Concentration ................•..............•... . ............. 120 Eco logical Restorati on Concentration COURSES ...................... . . ........... . . . ....... SEMESTER HOURS Environmental Science Core ................... ....................................... 32 Additional Required Courses: CHE 1810 General Chemistry II .................................................. . 4 CHE 1850 General Chemistry Laboratory ........•.................... . . . . .......... 2 ECO 3450 Environmental Economics ............................................... 3 ENV 3540 Advanced Geologic and Environmental Hazards-Denver and Vicinity ......... 2 ENV 4000 Environmental Geology ................................................. 3 ENV 4010 Environmental Hazards and Planning .....................•............... 3 ENV 49XX Environmental Seminar (advisor approved) . . . ............................. 3 GEL 3420 Soil Resources ........ ............ ..................................... 4 PSC 3230 Environmental Politic .....•....•........•....•....•.........•.......... 3 Subtotal .......................................................................... 27 Electives (select at least 25 hours from the follo,ving list): BIO 1081 General Biology II (must take with BIO 1091) .............................. 3 BIO 1091 General Biology 1! Laboratory (must take wit h BIO 1081) ....•........•...... 1 BIO 2100 General Botany ..................................................... ... 5 B!O 2400 General Microbiology ........ ......................•...•.........•...... 5 BIO 3200 Invertebrate Zoology .................................................... 4 -o r BIO 3260 Vertebrate Zoology .................................................... . 4 BIO 3140 P l ant Physiology .. ..................................................... 5 B!O 3180 Vascular Plant Taxonomy ...............................•................ 4 BIO 3360 Animal Physiology ...........................•......................... 4 BIO 3550 Urban Ecology ......................................................... 4 BIO 4510 Mkrobial Ecology ............................ .......................... 4 BIO 4540 Plant Ecology ......................•................................... 4

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GEG/GE L Top ics co ur ses (ad viso r ap pr ove d ) ............................ .......... 2-3 Subtotal . ..................................... . . ................................... 25 General Studies ..................................•..........•..............•........ 36 Total for Ecological Restoration Concentration . . ............ . . . . ...................... . . 120 E nvironmental Ch emis tr y Concentration COURSES . .....................................•......... . ........ EME TER HOURS Envir onmental Science Core .............................. . ...... . ......... . . . . ........ .... 32 Additio n a l Required Co urses: 810 2400 General Microbiology ..........•....•....•....•....•.........•....•..... 5 810 4510 Microbial Ecology ............................... 0 0 ..................... 4 CHE 1 810 General Chemistry II ............................................. o ..... 4 CHE 1 850 General C hemi stry Lab ora t ory ......................... 0 ................. 2 CHE 3000 Analytical C h e mi stry .............. o •••••••••••••• o •••• o •••••••••••••••• 3 C H E 3010 Analytical C h e mi stry Laboratory ........ 0 ..... 0 ............. 0 ............ 2 C H 3050 E n viro nmental C h emistry ... . 0 0 • ••••••••••••• 0 •••••••••••••••••••••••••• 3 CHE 3100 Organic C h e mi stry I .............. o ••••• o • • • 0 •• •• o ••• o o ••• • o o ••••••••••• 4 CHE 3120 Organic C h e mi t ry Labora t ory I. ....................................... . . 2 ENV 4000 Environme ntal Geology ........... o •••• • 0 •••• •••• o •••• o •••••••••• o ••• ••• 3 GEL 3420 Soil R eso urc es ................... 0 ••••••••••••••••••••••••• 0 ••••••••••• 4 MTR 3100 Air Pollution ......................... 0 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 3 0 HA Environm ental Health and Safety (OSHA 40-ho ur cour e) ................... 3 (offered as conti nuing education courses at Front Range and Red Rocks Community Colleges) Subtotal . ................... ............... ....................................... 42 General St udies ........................... 0 ••••••• 0 •• 0 •• •••••••••••••• •••••••••••• • • 36 Elective 10 Total for Environmental Chemistry Concentration ...... . . ......... ........... 0 •••••••••• 120 E nvironm e ntal S c ience M a jor with Tea cher Lic e n s ure , page 34 6 . Environmental Studies Minor REQUIRED COURSE ..........................................•.. o ••••• SEMESTER HOUR ENV 49XX E nvironmental Seminar (ad v i o r a ppr oved) . . .................. ... 0 ••••••• 0 3 Sel ec t 6 h o ur from the following 1i t: 810 1010 Ecology for on-Majors ................................................. 3 BIO 1080 Ge n eral Introduction to Biol ogy ......................................... . 3 BIO 1090 Ge n e r a l I ntrodu ctio n to Biology Laboratory .......................... ...... I CHE 1010 Chemistry and Society ........... ............................... o ....... 3 CHE 1 800 General C hemistr y I ................ 0 •••••••• 0 ••••••••••••••••••••• ••••• 4 ENV 1200 Introduction to E nvir onme nt a l Sci e nce ....... 0 •••• 0 ••••••••• 0 ••••••••••••• 3 Subtotal ......... 0 •••••••••••• •••••••••••••••• • •••••• • ••••••••••••••••••• • • • • ••••••• 6 Selec t 6 hours from the following list: ECO 3450 Enviro nmental Economics ........... o o ••••••••••••••• ••••• 0 • • 0 ••••••• 0 •• 3 HIS 388 0 American Environmental His t ory ...... ...................... o •••••••••••• 3 P C 3 168 Readings in Publ ic Administration 1 ..... 0 ....... 0 ..... 0 •••••• 0 0 ••••••• 0 0 0 3 PSC 3230 Environmental Politics .... 0 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 3 PSY 3550 Environmen tal Psychology ............................................... 3 Subtotal . .......................... . ....... . ... .............................. . . . .... 6 Select 6 h our BIO 3550 CET 3320 CHE 3890 COM 3660 E V 1400 ENV 3400 of electives (including any courses listed above or below): Urban Ecology ......................................................... 4 Environ mental Impact Stateme nt s ............... o •••••••••••••••••••••••• 3 cience and Public Policy: Variabl e Topics ......... ....................... 1-3 Variable Topics in Indu strial and Technical Co mmuni cations . .......•....... . 3 World Resources ............................................. o • ••• o • ••• 3 Wat er R eso urces .......... o ••••• o ••••• 0 • •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 3

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144 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES ENV 4200 MTR 3100 Environmental Policy and P l anning .... . .................................. 3 Air Pollution ................. .......................................... 3 XXX XXXX Any environmental topics course (advisor approved) ........................ 3 Subtotal .... . ............................................... ........................ 6 Total for Environmental Studies Minor ..........•........ ............................ . . 21 GERONTOLOGY PROGRAMS Severa l options currently exist for students interested in Gerontology. These include the following: • Gero ntol ogy Minor in the Department of Health Professions, page 245 • Gero ntol ogy Major v i a the Individualized Degree Program, page 155 • Human Development major with Applied T rack Gerontology in the Department of Psycho l ogy , page 155 • Social Work Major with Aging Concentration in the Department of Social Work, page 204 • Sociology Major with Gerontology Concentration in the Department of Anthropology , Sociology and Behavioral Sciences, page 210 HISTORY DEPARTMENT History Major for Bachelor of Arts The History major must choose between a General Conce ntration and a Secondary Education Concentration. The General Concentration requires the completion of a minor in anot her discipline i11 order to graduate. The econdary Education Concentration is intended for individuals who are in the Second ary Education ocial Studies Licensure Program. These individuals are required to take other specific courses listed under Teacher Education in this Catalog. Both concentrations within the major require a minimum of 42 semester hours including 15 hours of core courses and an additional27 hours in courses primarily selected from three different categories. AU students should check with a departmental advisor in order to make a proper selection of courses. CORE COURSES ............ . .......................... ..... . . . . ....... SEMESTER HOURS HIS 1010 Western Civilization to 1603 ............................................. 3 -o r HIS 1030 World History to 1500 ..... .................................... ......... 3 HIS 1020 Western Civilization since 1603 .......................................... 3 -o r HIS I 040 World History since 1500 ......... ....................................... 3 HIS 1210 American History to 1865 ................................. .............. 3 HIS 1220 American History since 1 865 ............................................. 3 HIS 4820 Senior Seminar. .................................................. . ..... 3 Subtotal ....... . . . .... .......................... . ....... . .......................... 15 In add ition to the required courses (15 hours) students also need to take at lea s t three courses {9 h ours) from Category I , a t least two courses (6 hours) from Category II, and at least two courses {6 hours) from Category III . The remaining two courses (6 hours) may be taken from any of these three categories, or they may b e selected from among any of the other courses offered by the History Department. All history majors must take at l east one course devoted to world history, Latin An1er i can hi s tory, Asian his tory, or African history. Students should see a n advisor in the Histor y Department for a list of courses that meet thi s requirement Category I : American History Chronological Sequence (select at lea st three courses) HIS 3410 American Colonial History ............................... ... ............. 3 HIS 3430 American Revolution and Early ational Period, 1 763-1848 .................. 3 HI 3520 Civil War and Reconstruction ............................................ 3 HIS 3540 Emergence of Modern U.S. , 1877-1920 ........ ............................ 3 HI 3640 U.S. World War I through World War II ................. .................. 3 HIS 3660 R ecent U.S., 1945-1990s .......... ....................................... 3 Subtotal .......................................... . .................. ............... 9

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Cat ego r y II: E u ro p ea n H is t o r y Chro n o logi ca l Seque n ce (se l ec t a t l eas t two cou rses) HIS 3 0 3 1 A n cie nt G r eece. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HIS 3 0 60 Rom e a nd th e Caesa r s .......... ............. . ......... . . . . .............. 3 HIS 3 120 Medieval Hi sto r y ........................................................ 3 HIS 3 1 40 Ren a i ssa n ce a n d Refor m atio n ................................. . ........... 3 HIS 3200 Ear l y Mo d e rn Europe , 16481 789 .............. ........................... 3 HIS 3230 ine t ee nth Ce n tury Europe .............................................. .3 HI S 3260 Twe n t i e th Ce ntur y E ur ope, 1 9 1 4-2000 . .... .................. .............. 3 Subt o tal...... . ...... . . . .... ....................................... .... . . . . . . . 6 Ca t ego r y HI S HIS HIS HI S H I S HIS HI S HIS HIS I II : Enrichment Courses (s ele c t a t lea s t two courses) 1110 Co l o r ado Hi s to r y I ............... . . ................... . . ......... ...... 3 1 250 C h ma, J a p a n , Korea s in ce 1 8 0 0 ... . ............ .............. ............. 3 1650 Wome n in U.S. His to ry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . ....... .............. 3 I 92 0 H isto r y o f th e Chica n a/o in th e Sou th wes t : 1 8 1 0 to P r ese nt ................... 3 1 940 S u rvey of Afr ican H istory ................................................ 3 3090 a t ive A m ericans in Ame r ica n Histo r y ......... .............. . ............ 3 32 1 0 F r enc h R evo luti o n and Na p o leon ............ . ...... .......... . . ....... ... 3 3240 I m peria l Russia ... ........... ............. ............................. 3 3280 R u sia sin ce 1 9 1 7 ......................... ....... ......... .............. 3 HI S 3 2 90 Naz i Ge rm a n y ......... ..... ................... ..... . . . . ..... ..... ..... 3 H I S 3 310 E n g l an d to 1 7 1 4 ........................................................ 3 HIS 3320 Eng l a nd since 1 7 1 4 . . . . . ...........•...................•....•....... 3 H I S 357 0 African Am erican Hist o r y I ..................... ......................... 3 HIS 3580 African A m erica n His t ory II ...•....•....•...•.....•............ 3 HIS 3590 American I m mig r ation H i sto r y ............ .............................. 3 HIS 37 0 0 Mode rn C hin a ......................................................... 3 HIS 3740 Modern j a p an ...................... ........................ . ........... 3 HIS 3770 World of l s lan1 .................... .................. . ......... ......... 3 HIS 3830 T h e Mexican R evo luti o n ....... . ............................... . ........ 3 Subtotal............................. . ............. . ......... . . ...... . ......... . . . 6 Core co ur ses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IS Ca t eg o r y l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Ca t eg or y II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................ ......... ... 6 Ca t ego r y lii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................................... 6 E l ec tive s ......... ................................... .......................... 6 Total .... ..... ...... ............................................................. .42 Grad e Average in Hi story S tu dents m ajo r i n g in h isto r y must maintru n a t le as t a 2 . 0 average in t h e i r history co u rses. Secondary Education Con c entration The Secondary Educa ti o n Concentra ti o n is intende d for indiv idua ls who are in t h e Secondary E d u cation S ocial Studies Lice n sure Program. T h es e indiv idu a l s are r equire d to t ake othe r s p ecific cours e s listed under Teach e r Educa tion in thi s Catalog. CORE COU RSES ....................................................... SEMESTER HOU R S HIS 1 010 Wes t ern Civilizat io n to 1 603 ............................................. 3 -orH I S 1 030 World His to r y to 1 500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 HIS 1040 World H i s tory since 1 500 .............................. ................... 3 HIS 1 210 America n History to 1865 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................. .... 3 H I S 1 220 America n His t o r y since 1 865 . . . .... . . .... . . ......................... 3 HIS 40 1 0 Meth ods of Teaching Social Science ....................................... 3 Subtota l .......... . ......... . ........................... . . ....... . . . . . ......... 15 I n addition t o th e core courses ( I S hours) students a lso n ee d t o t ake th e three cours es l i s t e d in Catego r y I (9 hours), a t least two cour ses (6 h ours) f ro m Cat ego r y ll, and at least two courses (6 hours) from

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146 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Category III. The remaining elective courses (6 hours) may be taken from e ither Category II or III, or they ma y be selected from among any of the other courses offe r e d by the History Department. Category I : American History Chronological Sequence HIS 3430 American Revolution and Early National Period, 1763-1848 .................. 3 HIS 3520 Civil War and Reconstruction . . .......................................... 3 HIS 3660 Recent U.S., 1945-1990s ................................. ................ 3 Subtotal.............................................................. . ...... ... 9 Catego ry II : European History C h ronological Sequence (se l ect a t least two co u rses) HIS 3031 Ancient Greece ......................................................... 3 HIS 3060 Rome and the Caesars . . ............ . .................. .... .............. 3 HIS 3120 Medieval History .......................................... , ............ 3 HIS 3140 Renaissance and Reformation .......... ................ . . ................ 3 HI S 3200 Ear l y Modern Europe, 16481789 ............................... .......... 3 HIS 3230 Nineteenth Century Europe ........................ .................. . ... 3 HIS 3260 Twentieth Century Europe, 1914-2000 .................................... 3 Subtotal. .................. ............ .............. . ................... . ..... . . . . . 6 Catego r y H I S HIS HIS HIS HIS HIS HIS HIS HIS Ill: Enr i chment Courses (select at le ast three courses) 1110 Co l o r ado His tory I ........................... .......... . ............... 3 1250 Chi na, japan, Korea since 1800 ..... . ..................................... 3 1650 Women in U.S. History ..................... . ............................ 3 1920 History of the Chicana/o in the Southwest: 1810 to Present. .................. 3 1940 S urvey of African History . ............ ................................... 3 3090 Native American s in American Histor y ... . ............ .................... 3 3210 French Revolution and Napo l eon ......................................... 3 3240 Impe rial Russia ......................................... ................ 3 3280 Russia since 1917 ....................................................... 3 HIS 3290 Nazi Germany ......................................... . . ........ . . . . . . 3 HIS 3310 E n g l and to 1714 ........................................................ 3 HIS 3320 Engl and since 1 7 1 4 ........... .......................................... 3 HIS 3410 American Colonia l Histo ry .............. . ................................ 3 HIS 3540 Emergence of Modern U.S., 1877-1920 ..................... ................ 3 HIS 3570 African American History I .............................................. 3 HIS 3580 African American History II.. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . .. . .. . . . . .3 HIS 3590 American Immigration H i s t o r y ........... . ......................... . .... 3 HIS 3640 U.S. World War I through World War II ...... ..... ................... . .... 3 HIS 3700 Modern China ..................................... ... . ................ 3 HIS 3740 Modern japan ................................... ....................... 3 HIS 3770 World of Islam ......................................................... 3 HIS 3830 T h e Mexican Revolution ... ........................................ .. ... 3 Subtotal ......................... . .................................................. 9 Core courses ................................ . .................................... 15 Category I ...................... ..... , ............. , .................. ..... , .... 9 Cat egory II ....................... .................................. . ............ 6 Categor y III ......................................... .................... ......... 6 E lective .......................... ............................................ 3 Total . . .... ..... ............ , ............. , . ...... , ............................... 42 Grade Average Students majoring in history must maintain a t least a 2.0 average in their histo r y courses. Minor in History There are three different concentrations ava ilable to students seeking a history minor: regular history conce ntration , American West history concentration, 20th-century studies history concentra ti on. Al l three req u ire HIS 1220, w hich will also count t oward the CoUege's general stud i es requirements.

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Regular Histor y Concentration REQUIRED COURSES ....... ........................................... SEMESTER HOURS HIS 1010 Western Civilization to 1603 . ............................................ 3 -o r HIS 1030 World History to 1500 ................................................. . 3 HIS 1020 Western Civilization since 1603 .......................................... 3 -o r HIS 1040 World Histo r y since 1500 ................................................ 3 HIS 1210 AmericanHistoryto1865 ............................................... 3 HIS 1220 American History since 1865 ............................................. 3 Total ........ . .................................................................... 12 E l ectives A minimum of9 additional semester hours in history is required. The hours must be upper division and should be selected in consultation with a departmental advisor. No more than 2 semester hours in HIS 3890 readings courses may be counted toward the minor without prior written approval from the department. A merican West History Concentration REQUIRED COURSES.. . . . ....... .................... SEMESTER HOURS HIS 1100 American West ......................................................... 3 HIS 1110 Colorado History I ............ . ................... ..................... 3 HIS 1210 American History to 1865 ............................................... 3 HIS 1220 American History since 1865 ............................................. 3 Total ............................................................................ 12 Elect i ves A minimum of9 additional history semester hours treating the American West is required , all of whi ch must be uppe r divi ion . Twentieth -Century Studie s History Concentration REQUIRED COUR ES............ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... . . SEMESTER HOUR HIS 1220 American History ince 1865 ...... . .............. . ....................... 3 HIS 1 040 World History since 1500 ................................................ 3 Total . . . ................................................................ . ........ . 6 E l ec ti ves A minimum of IS additional h ours treating 20th-century history is required, 9 of which must be upper-division. Minor in Interdisciplinary Legal Studies Pre-law Courses Several history courses are of particular importance to legal studies. These include HIS 1210, HIS 1220 , and HIS 3680. S tudents interes ted in prelaw cou rses a r e urged to contact the department advisor. Minor The interdisciplinary legal studies minor is designed to show students how the various disciplines in the humani ties and social sciences treat questions oflaw and justice. The interdisciplinary legal studies minor is not a prelaw preparatory program or paralegal training. Its goal is to cross disciplines so that students can understand how the humanities and social sciences illuminate the principles, practices, and policies of the law . REQUIRED COURSES .................................................. SEMESTER HOURS C}C 2000 Introduction to Legal Studies ............................................. 3 ENG 3700 Literature and the Law ... . ..... .............. ........................... 3 HIS 3680 PHI 3430 PSC 3120 The Court in Crisis ........ ............................... .............. 3 Philosophy of Law ...................................................... 3 American Constitutional Law ............................................ 3

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148 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES SOC 3550 Sociology of Law . . ................................. .................... 3 XXX XXXX Seminar in Legal Topics (interdisciplinaryt eam-taught course) . . ............ 3 Subtotal ........................................................................... 21 Students will select one law -re lated course from the courses listed below or approved by the interdisciplinary legal studies minor advisor: C)C 2100 S ubstantive Cr iminal Law . . . . .......... . ................... ............. 3 MGT 2210 Legal Environment of Business I. ......... . . .............................. 3 MGT 3220 Legal Environment of Business II ......... . ............................... 3 SOC 3500 C riminology .......... . . . . ... ... . ........... . . ......................... 3 WMS 3310 Women and the Law .................................................... 3 Total ........................................•.................................... 24 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT Department of Psychology This interdisciplinary major in human development will provide students with a focus on the entire life span and in depth knowledge about theory , research , and ap pli cation in human development. Students will participate in field experience to make connections between theory , research , and practice. The major has five sepa rate tracks , serving the needs of students seeking early ch ildh ood educat ion teacher licensure (early c hildhood education track) or elementry ed u cation licensure (elementary e du catio n track), students i nterested in gerontology or planning other careers working with children and adults (applied tr ack and geronto l ogy track) , and students who wish to pur sue graduate study (gra du a t e schoo l track) . Upon completion of a degree in Human Development at the Metropolitan State College of Denver, stu dents will be able to: • Demonstrate an understanding of the major theories , basic principles , current issues , and emerging concepts in the field. Students will be able to d emonstrate knowledge of biological , cognitive, social, emotional, an d contextual aspects of human development and the interre lation s among them. • Demonstrate the ability to think critica ll y about human de velopment, includin g being able to identify similari ties, differences, and connections amo ng human deve lopment theories and per spectives. • Demon trate knowledge of the processes of cognitive development , including the development of logical and abstract thought , memory, mathematical understanding , scientific thinking, and lit eracy skills , and how those processes change over time. • Demonstrate the ability to relate theories and methodo l ogies from human development to prob lem and issues in other di ciplines, such as biology, socio l ogy, and nutritio n and health. • Demonstrate the ability to communicate knowledge of the field of human development both o rall y and in writing, the latter following the American Psychological Association guidelines. • Demonstrate the ability to conduct indepe ndentl y a comprehensive literature review that critically evaluates an area of research in human developm ent. Students will also be able to demonstrate an under standing of and the ability to apply knowledge of research methodo l ogy and stat istics to the interpretation and evaluation of research . • Understand the ways in which culture a nd society (bo th national and g l oba l ) imp act deve l opment, including tl1e roles of the family, the peer g r o up, school, an d the media . S tud ents will a l so be a ble to di scuss the roles of ethnicity , race, and gender and issues in social relationships such as aggres sio n and cooperation. • Prepare for successful careers in their c hosen concentra tion , as follows: • Graduate Schoo l Track: Students take courses in statistics and research methods to help them prepare to enter a graduate program in human development, psychology , or a related field. • Applied Track: Students take courses that a re gea red toward worki n g with diverse popula tions of children and fan1ilies to prepare them for working with social service agencies . • Gerontology Track: Students' coursework is focuse d on understanding various issues relate d to aging to prepare them for careers in the geronto l ogy field.

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ARTS & SCIENCES 14 • Early Childhood Ed u cation and Elementary Educat ion: Students ' coursework prepares them to work with c hildre n as a classroom teacher . Human Development Major for Bachelor of Arts REQU I RED COMMO C ORE . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . .... . .... ... .... .... . . SEMESTER HOURS BIO 1000 Human Biology for o n -Majo r s ' ...................... ............. ...... 3 PSY I 00 I Introdu c t ory Psych o log y ..... . .......................................... 3 PSY 3280 Dev e lopmenta l R esea rch Methods . . . . . . . . ............................ 3 PSY 334 0 Cogni tive Devel op m e nt and Learning ..................................... 3 PSY 4960 Senio r Thesis in Human Development b ........................ ........... . 3 SOC 1010 Intr od uction t o Socio logy" . . ..... ......... ....................... . . . ..... 3 Subtotal..... . . ........................................... . .... . . . . . ..... . . 1 8 ' Students may not count BIO 1000 and S O C 1010 for both the HD major and General Studies Level if. If these classes are counted toward General Studies II, two additi onal courses must be selected from the list of electives under the Applied Track or from courses i n the required distribution, not already used . b Meets college senior experience r eq uirem e nts. Required Distribution: In add i tio n , s tu dent s must c h oose one course from each ca tegory . NOTE: Each s t udent must also se l ect a tra ck, and in the early childhood education, elementary ed u ca tion , and gerontol ogy tracks, specific courses from the following categories are required (see tracks below). D e ve lopmenta l Founda tion s PSY 1800 Develop m en t a l Educationa l Psycholog y .................... . ...... . . . ..... 3 PSY 3250 Child Psychology ................ . ....... ... ......... ................... 3 PSY 2270 Death and Dying ( OC 3100) . ........................................... 3 Deve lopmental Br eadth PSY 3240 Infancy ............................................................... 3 PSY 3260 Psychology of Adolescence ............................................... 3 PSY 3270 Adulthood and Aging ................. . ........................ ......... 3 H e alth I ss u es HES 3070 UT 2 040 Parental Health Care Issues ..................... . . ....................... 3 Introd u c tion t o N utri tio n ....... ......... ................................ 3 S ocial Influenc es SOC 3410 T h e Family in T ran sition . ...... .... . ....... ............................. 3 SOC 1040 Introduction to Social Gerontology ....................................... 3 SWK 2100 Introduction to Family Social Work ................ ....................... 3 C ultural Contex t ECE 4360 C ultur a l Influence o n the Socialization of C hildren .......................... 3 RECR 2330 Advocacy, Leisure, and th e Aging Adult ................................... 3 SOC 3400 C hildh oo d and Adolescent Socializat i o n .......... ................ . ........ 3 Subtotal .... . ................................................ ....... .... . • .... 33 Additional Requir eme nts (dependent up o n the tr ack) ............ ......................... 9 Total for the Major ................................................................. .42 Students m u s t choose one of the following five t racks . All student s mus t have 15 u pper-divi s ion hours in the major, and tran sfer s tudents must complete at lea st IS hours of the m ajo r a t MSC D. Graduate School T rack REQUIRED COURSES ................... . . . ........................... SEMESTER HOURS Comm on Core .......... . ....... ...... . ......... .................. ... . .. ............ 18 Required Distribution . . . . . . ................... ........ ......................•.... IS PSY 2310 Introduction t o Statistics for Socia l and Behavioral Sciences • ........ ....... . ...... 3 PSY 2320 Inferential Statistics .... ...3

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150 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES PSY 3310 Psychological Research Meihods I ............ . ............. ..........•........ 3 Total for Major with Graduate School Track ............................................. 42 • Students who have taken MTH 1210 or its equivalent in transfer before deciding to major in human development may substitute it for PSY 2310. However. MTH 1210 cannot be used both in the major and to satisfy the Level I General Studies mathematics requirement. Applied Track REQUIRED COURSES ..... . .............•....................... ...... . SEMESTER HOUR Common Core ..................................................................... 18 Required Distribution ............................................................... 15 In addition, students must take nine semester hours from the following list or from courses in the required distribution list not already used. Students may not use the same courses to count for the major and for the minor or General Stu dies. COURSES .......... ............ . ............ . ..•.............. SEMESTER HOURS AAS 3550 BIO 3530 CHS 3210 ECE 3340 EDU 4310 HPS 4500 HSP 1010 NUT 3100 PAR 2050 PAR 3070 PSY 2310 PSY 3400 soc 3040 soc 3220 soc 3420 SLHS 2890 SWK 3030 SWK 3100 The Black Family ......... ......... ....... .................................. . 3 Physiology of Aging for Non-Biology Majors (HES 3810) ......................... 3 The Chicano Family ................................ ......................... 3 Administration of Early Childhood Programs .......................... ........ . 4 Parents as Partners in Education .............................................. . 3 Motor Learning and Development ............................ ................. 3 Introduction to Human Services and Community Resources ...................... 3 Nutrition and Aging ......................................................... 3 Introduction to Parent Edu cation ..........................•................... 3 Working with the Contemporary Family .....................•................. 3 Introduction to tatistics for Social and Behavio ral Sciences ' ...................... 3 Psycho l ogy of Exceptional C hildr en .............................. . .... . ..... . . . 3 Contemporary Issues in Gerontology ...........•........•..................... 3 Race, Gender and Ethnic Groups .............................................. 3 Education in a C hanging Society ......................•....................... 3 Language Acquisition. . . . . . ............................................ 3 Social Work with the Aging. . ............ ...... .......................... 4 Ch ild Welfare and the Law.... . ............................................ 3 SWK 3200 Social Work with U rb an Families ................................... , . ......... 3 SWK 3300 Social Work wilh Parents with Developmental Disabilitie s ...............•........ I Subtotal ............................................................................ 9 Total for Major with Applied Track .... ............... ..... . . ....................... 42-45 'S tudents who have taken MTH 1210 or its equivalent in transfer before deciding to major in human development may substitute it for PSY 2310. Howeve r , MTH 1210 cannot be used both in the major and to satisfy the Level I General Studies mathematics requirement. Students who are interested in a particular concentration within the applied track (e.g., a particular age emphasis, cultural or family issues, problems of development) should see a human development advisor in the Department of Psychology for course se lection . It is permissible to select all electives from the same department. Applied Track-Gerontology REQUIRED COURSES.......................... . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . • . . . . . . EMESTER HOUR Common Core .......................... . . ......................................... 18 R equired Distribution as follows: Developmental Foundation s PSY 2270 Death and Dying -orSOC 3100 Death and Dying ......... . .........................•................... 3 Developmental Breadth PSY 3270 Adulthood and Aging ............•....•.............•...... .... ......... 3

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 151 H ealt h Issue s NUT 2040 Introduction t o utrition ................................. . .............. 3 S ocial Influenc es SOC 1040 Introduction to Socia l Gerontology ....................................... 3 C ultural Contex t RECR 2330 Advocacy, Leisure, and th e Aging Adult ................................... 3 Subtotal ........................................................................... 33 In addition, students must take nine semeste r hours from the following list of courses. tudents may not use the same courses to count for the major a nd for the minor or for General Studies. Students in the Applied Track Gerontology may not ha ve a gerontology minor. COU RSES ............... . . . ...... ................. . . . ............. SEMESTER HOURS BIO 3530 Physiology o f Aging for o n Biology Majors (HES 381 0) .... ................ 3 PSY 2310 Intr o du c tion t o Statistics for Social and Behavioral Sciences • .. ............... 3 UT 3100 utrition and Aging .................................................... 3 or SOC 3040 Contem por ary Issues in Geronto l ogy -or SWK 3030 Socia l Work with the Aging ................................. ........... .3-4 Total for Major with Applied Track-Gerontology ...................................... 42-43 • Students who have taken MTH 1 210 or its equiva lent in transfer before deciding to major in human devel opment may substitute it for PSY 2310. However, MTH 1210 cannot b e used both in the major and to satisfy tire L evel l Getreral Studies mathematics requirement . Early Childhood Education Track REQUIRED COUR ES ...................................... ............ SEMESTER HOURS Common Core ......... ......... . . ............. . ................................... 18 Requir e d Distributi on as follows: D evelopme ntal Founda tion s PSY 1800 Developmental Edu cationa l Psychology . ............ . . . ........ ... ........ 3 Devel opme ntal Br eadth PSY 3240 Infancy . . ......•....•...... ............. . ............................ . 3 H e alth Issues HES 3070 Par e nt a l Health are Iss u e -or NUT 2040 Introduction to utrition ........................ . S ocial Influences ...................... 3 SOC 3410 The Family in T r ansition ................................................ 3 Cultu r al Context ECE 4360 C u l tural Infl u ence on the Socialization of C hild r e n ' ......................... 3 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....•.... . . ..... ..... . 33 •Mee ts college multicultura l requirement. In addition , students mus t take 9-10 hours from the following list. Students may not use the same courses to count for th e major and for the minor or Gen eral Studies. ECE 3340 Administration of Early Chi ldh ood Programs ....... ..... .................. 4 EDU 4310 Parents as Partn e r s in Educat i on. . . . ................................... 3 HPS 4500 Motor Learning and Development ........... . ............................ 3 PSY 2310 Intr o du c tio n t o Stati tics for Social and Beh avio ral Scie n ces' ................. 3 PSY 3400 P sychology of Exceptio nal C hildren .............. .......... . ........... ... 3 SLHS 2890 Language Acquisition ................................................... 3 Total for Major with Ele m e ntar y Education Track ....... .......... . . . ................. 42-43

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152 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 'S tudents who have taken MTH 1210 or its equivalent in transfer before deciding to major in human development may s ubstitut e it for P SY 2310. However, MTH 1 2 1 0 cannot be used both in the major and to satisfy the Level I General Studies mathematics r e quirement . Stude nt s pursuing teacher licensure shou ld consult with a n advisor in the Teacher Educat i on Depart ment for the cu rr en t licensure requirements of the Colorado Department of E duc ation. Elementary Education Track REQUIRED COURSES.. . ... . . . . ........ . . ...... ... . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . SEMESTER HOURS Co mm on Core ................................................. . ................... 18 Requir e d Distributio n as follows: Developmental Foundatio n s PSY 1800 Developmental Educational Psychology ................................... 3 Develop m enta l Breadth PSY 3250 C hild P sycho l ogy ............... ................................ ........ 3 Health Issue s HES 3070 Paren t a l Health Care Issues or NUT 2040 Introduction t o N utriti o n ........................ ........................ 3 Social Influence s S O C 3410 T h e Family in T r ansition .................... . ............. .... .... . ..... 3 C ultu ral Context Elective approved by Hum an Development advisor .......................... ............. 3 The following three courses are also req u ired: PSY 231 0 Intr o du ction to Statistics for Social and Behavioral Science • .................. 3 SLHS 2890 Language Acquisition . ................... ... ....... . ................ .... 3 HPS 4500 Moto r Learning and Devel opment ................. . . . . ..... .............. 3 Total for Major with E l ementar y Education Track ... ...... ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ .... . 42 ' S t udents who have taken MTH 1210 or its equivalent in transfer before deciding to major i n human development may substit ut e it for PSY 2310. However, MTH 1210 cannot be used both in the major a nd to satisfy the Level I General Studies mathematics r e quirement . &May use an approved substitute . Stu dents pursuing teacher li censure shoul d consult with an a d visor in the Teacher Education Depart ment for th e current licen sure requirements of the Colorado Department of E du cation . INTERDISCIPLINARY L EGAL STUDIES MINOR, SEE PAGE 147 For Prelaw advising see Political Science Department, for the Int erdisciplina r y Legal Studies Minor see the Histor y Dep artme nt. JOURNALISM PROGRAM Department of Communication Arts and Sciences The Journali sm program prepares students for careers in n ews and information media by providing them with a soun d ed uc at ion in the basics of journalism an d/or public relations. The program has one of the s tron gest journalis m teaching staffs in th e state . All full tim e and p art-tim e facu lty have worked in the journalism and/or publi c relations fields. Proficienc y in stan dard written E n g li sh is a prerequi site for all journalism courses. Students are required to co mpl ete ENG 1010 before t aki n g a n y jo urnali sm courses beyond JRN 1010 . Stu d e nt s should se lect a n adv isor early in their course of s t ud y . St ud en t s may not select both a major and minor from th e j ournalism program. The Journ alism program will provide students with a li s t of

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. SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 15 suggested General Studies courses to help them gain a broad base of knowledge necessar y for working in news and information media . To make journalism graduat es more marketable in our mul ticultural society, journalism majors a r e required to take four semester s of one foreign language or prove their proficiency in a language other than English. The Journalism Department offers a major with four concentrationsmagazines , news/editorial , p h o tojournalism and public relations -and minors in news / editorial , photojournalism and public relations. Journalism Major for Bachelor of Arts Core co ur ses requir ed for all conce n trations in the Journali sm major: COURSES .... . .... . ..... . . . .................. ....... .... ......... . SEMESTER HOURS ]RN 1010 Introduction t o Journalism and Mass Media ................................ 3 JRN 1200 Beginning Editing ...................................................... 3 )RN 2210 Beginning Layout and Design .............. . ............................. 3 JRN 4500 Ethica l and Legal I ssues in journali s m ..................................... 3 Subtotal ..................................... . ............ ....... ...... . . . . . . . ..... 12 Magazines Concentration COURSES SEMESTER ... . ... . . . ..... .......... HOUR S journalism Core .................................................................... 12 Required Courses: jRN 1100 Beginning Reporting............................ . .............. 3 jRN 2100 Intermediate Reporting ...................................... ........... 3 JRN 3900 Magazine Design ....................................................... 3 JRN 3970 Magazine Editing ................................................ ....... 3 JRN 3984 Cooperative Education: Magazines ....................................... . 3 jRN 4400 Feature Ar ticl e Writing for Magazines .................................... . 3 JRN 4450 Magazine Production ................................................... 3 Subtotal .......................................................................... . 21 Elective Courses Select at lea st 3 hours : jRN 1600 Survey of Photojournalism ............................................... 3 jRN 1700 Survey of Public Relations ...................... ......................... 3 jRN 2980 Cooperative Edu cation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 )R 3100 Publication Practicum .......................... .................. ...... 3 )RN 3 1 50 Contempo r ary Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....................... 3 JRN 3500 Topics in journalism: Variable Topics ...................................... 1 jRN 3600 Photojournalis m I . . . . . ........................... 3 )RN 4100 Investigative Reporting . ........... ............................... ....... 3 }RN 4210 Advanced Layout and Design ............................................ 3 ]RN 4600 Photojournalism II ....... ............. . . . ......... ..................... 3 JRN 4890 Social Documentary. . . . . . . . . • . . . . ............................ 3 Subtotal... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Total .................................................. . . ......................... 36 News/Editorial Concentration COURSES ........................................ . ... SEMESTER HOURS journalism Core ............. . . ........ . 12 Required Courses: JRN 1100 Beginning Reporting. . . . . . . . . . . . . ............................ 3 JRN 2 100 Intermediate Reporting ........ ... .......................... . ... ........ 3 )RN 3200 Intermediate Editing ................................................... . 3 )RN 398 1 Cooperative Education: News/Ed itorial. . .................................. 3 (JRN 3981 may be taken more than once with permission of the dep artment chai r ) Subtotal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ ......•.... 12

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154 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES Sel ect at lea s t 1 2 hours: JRN 1600 S ur vey of Photoj o urnali s m ............................................... 3 JRN 1 700 S ur vey of Public Relati o n s . .......•....•........•........•....•....•..... 3 JRN 2980 Cooperative Education ....................•... . ...... . . ................. 3 JRN 3100 Publication Practi cum ....... . . . ..........•....•....•........•....•..... 3 J RN 3 1 50 Contempo r ary Issues . ... ... . . ........................................ .. 3 JRN 3400 Feat ur e Articl e Writing for ewspapers .... . .•....•. . ..... . . . ........•..... 3 jRN 3500 Topic s in journalism ............... ......... . . . ..... .............. .... . . I )RN 3600 Photojournalism I ........................•.............•........... .... 3 jRN 4100 Investigative R e portin g . ....... .... ... ...... .......... ........ ........... 3 jRN 4210 Adva n ced Layout and Desi g n ................ . ............. . .......•.... . 3 )RN 4400 Fea ture Article Writing for Magazines ..................... ... .... ........ . 3 jRN 4600 Photojournalism II ................................. .................... 3 JRN 4890 Social Documentary .................................................. . . 3 Subtotal ........................................................................... 12 Total .......... . ........................................................ . .... ... .. 36 Photojournalism Concentration Students who major in journalism with a Photojournalism concentration may not use the still media co ncentration of the Di gi tal Media as their minor. COURSES . ................................................•....... SEMESTER HOURS journ alism Core ............................... ..................................... 12 Required Co urses: A R T 1271 Basic Photograph y Methods (o r equiva l ent beginnin g pho to g r aphy course) ..... 3 jRN 1100 Beginning Reportin g .... .............. .... . . . .......... ................. 3 jRN 2100 Intermediate Repo rting . ......... ..... .................................. 3 jR 2600 Introduction to Ph o t ojo urnali s m ......................... ............... . 3 jRN 3600 Photoj o urnalism I .......................•.............•....•....•...... 3 jRN 4600 Photojournali s m II ..................................................... 3 )RN 3982 Coo p e rative Edu cation: Photojournalism .................................. 3 (JRN 3982 may b e taken more than once wit h permission o f th e d e partment c h a ir ) Subtotal ........ ...... ...... . . . . . ................................ .................. 21 Select at l eas t 3 h ours: ART 1101 1\"o Dimensional Design ................. .............................. . 3 ART 267 1 Photography I. ......................................................... 3 ART 3271 Photograp h y II : Black a nd White ......................................... 3 ART 3235 Video Art . . ...................................... ..................... 3 JRN 1700 urvey o f Public Relati o n s .....•..................•........•............. 3 jRN 3 100 Publication Pra c ticum .................................................. 3 jRN 3150 Con t e mp orary Issues . ........•.......................•... . . . ........... 3 jRN 3200 Intermediate Editing ........................... ...... . .................. 3 jR 3400 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers ........................ . .......... . 3 JRN 3500 Topics in journalis m ........................•........................... I JRN 210 Adva n ced Layout and Desig n . ........................ . . ................ . 3 jRN 4400 Feature Article Writing for Maga z ine s ...... ............................... 3 jRN 4890 Socia l Documentar y ...................•.. ......•...... . . ..........• .... 3 Subtotal .............................. ... ......................................... .. 3 Total ..................................... ......... . ................. ............ . 36 Public Relations Concentration COUR ES ..................................•...................... SEMESTER HOURS journali s m Co r e ..........................•....•........ . ....•...................... 1 2 R eq uir ed Courses: jRN 1110 Media Writ ing ................ ......................................... 3 j RN 2700 F undam entals of Public R e l ations ...... .•....•....•........•....•....•.... 3 jRN 370 0 Publi c Relation s Writing ................. ........................... . . . . . 3 jRN 3983 Coo perative Edu cation: Public Relations ...........•............... ........ 3

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(JRN 3983 may be taken more than once with permission of the department chair) )RN 4700 Publi c Rel ations Stra t egic Planning . . . . . . . . . . . ...................... 3 MKT 3000 Principles of Marketing ................................................. 3 SPE 3100 Business and Professional Speaking..................... . . . ....... . . . 3 SPE 3440 Television Production ................................................... 3 SPE 4100 Techniques of Persuasion ........•..............•....•....•.............. 3 Subtotal .......................................... . ................................ 27 Select at least 3 hours: COM 2420 Basic Sing l e amera Video Production ........ . ...........•............... 3 COM 2430 Introduction to Media Production ............. ..... ............. . . . . ..... 3 COM 2460 Presentation Graphics . . . . . . ..............•....•.........•............... 3 COM 3440 Scriptwriting for Video .................................................. 3 JRN 1600 Survey of Photojournalism . . .............................•............... 3 JRN 2600 Introduction to Photojournali m . ........... . ............................ 3 JRN 3200 Intermediate Editing . ...................................•....•....•..... 3 JRN 3400 Feature Article Writin g for Newspapers . ................................... 3 JRN 4210 Advanced Layout and Design .......................•....•....•.......... 3 )RN 4400 Feature Article Writing for Magazines ..... ................................ 3 MKT 3110 Advertising Management ......................•................... ...... 3 MKT 3 1 20 Promotional trategy ........................................... ........ 3 SPE 1700 Communication Theory ............ .... ...........................•..... 3 SPE 2400 Introduction to Radio and Television Broadcasting ................. ...... ... 3 SPE 3130 Conference Leadership .................................................. 3 SPE 3430 Radio-Television Announcing ............................................ 3 SPE 3450 Broadcast journalism: Radio .............• ....•....•................... . . 3 SPE 3480 Workshop in Radio Production ........................................... 3 SPE 3740 Psychology of Communication ......•.........•........... .. ......•...... 3 SPE 4450 Broadcast j ournalism: Televis ion ......................................... 3 SPE 4480 Seminar Practicum in Broadcasting ....................................... 3 Subtotal. ................................ . . .............. .............. . . . ......... 3 Total ...............•......................•........... . . ....... . . ............. . . .42 Journalism Minor Students who major in journalism with a Photojournalism concentration may not u se the s t ill media concentration of the Digital Media as their minor. COURSES .................. . ...... . . ...... ........................ SEMESTER HOURS JRN 1010 Introduction to journali s m a nd Mass Media ....... ......................... 3 JRN 1100 Beginning Reporting ............................................ ........ 3 )RN 1200 Beginning Editing ...................................................... 3 JRN 2100 Intermediate Reporting ...... ...... ............ . ........................ 3 jRN 3981 Cooperative Education: ews/Editorial. . ...........•....•................. 3 )RN 4500 Ethical and Legal Issues in journalism ..................................... 3 Total ............................................................................. 18 Photojournalism Minor COURSES .............................................. . .......... SEMESTER HOURS JRN 1010 Introduction to journalism and Mass Media . ............................... 3 JR l!OO Beginning Reporting ..................................•................. 3 )RN 1200 Beginning E ditin g ...................................................... 3 JRN 2600 Introduction to Photojournalism ........ ................................. 3 )RN 3600 Photojournalism I ...................................................... 3 )RN 3982 Cooperative Edu cation: Photojournali m . ..... ............................ 3 JRN 4500 Ethical and Legal Issue s in journalism ..................................... 3 Total ............................................................................. 21

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156 SCHOOL OF LETTERS , ARTS & SCIENCES Public Relations Minor COURSES )RN 1010 )RN 1110 )RN 1200 )RN 2700 )RN 3700 )RN 3983 .................... . ......... SEMESTER HOURS Introd u ction to J ournalism and Mass Media ......... . ......... ............. 3 Media Writing .................................................. ....... 3 Beginning Editing ...................................................... 3 Fundamentals of Public Rel ations ........... ............................ . . 3 Public R e lation s Writing ................................................. 3 Cooperative Educat i on: Public Relation s ................................... 3 (JRN 3983 ma y be taken more than once wit h p e rmissi on of the department chai r ) )RN 4500 Ethical and Legal Issues in journali sm ..................................... 3 )RN 4700 Public Relations Strategic Pla nning ................... . . ............ ...... 3 Total ................................ ... .............................• . . . . ...•... . 24 DIGITAL MEDI A MINOR , SEE PAGE S 1 29 AND 234. LAND USE PROGRAM Department of Earth and Atmospheric Science s The l a n d use major is a 65 hour extended major (no minor required) that combines gene r a l planning courses with a focused area of study (concentration), includ i ng environment and resources, geographic infor m ation systems, geology , or urban land use planning, linked by the vita l thread of land use manageme nt. Students will receive a bachelor of science degree except when their concentration is urban land u se planning in which case the student will receive a bac h elor of arts degree . The major e q uips stu dents w i th a dynami c foundation for understandi ng issues and solving problems that confront the co m muni ty and environment, making them highly competitive in the job market. The program is broad in scope a n d can be applied to a number of career objectives a n d graduate school programs. Opportunities exist in such areas as cartography, environment and resource management, environmental science, geograp h ic information systems, geo l ogy, mining and mineral r esources, p lanni ng , population analy sis, recreational land use, remote sensing, res i dential and industrial developme n t, transportation, and a variety of other interrelated fie l ds. Because the land use degree is an extended major , it does not require a m in or. E a c h s tud e nt must ha ve a d epartme nt adv i sor a nd cons ul t w i th h is/ h er a d v i s or r egar ding c our s e w ork to av oid pr e r e qui site p r o bl ems. The fou r concentrat ion areas have a common 16-hour required core: REQUIRED CORE . . . . . SEMESTER HOURS GEG 1220 Map Use ........................................................... ... 2 GEG 1610 Introdu c tion to Planning ................................................ 1 GEL 1010 Physical Geology ....................................................... 4 GEG 4950 Internship in Land Use -OrGEL 4950 I n t ernship in Geo l ogy .......... . . . . . . . ........... . . ..................... 2 GIS 2250 Introdu ctio n to Geographic Inform atio n Systems * .................•........ 3 MTH 1 210 Introduction to Statistics ........ . . ......... . ............................ 4 Required Core Total .......................... ....................................... 16 • Course has prerequisites of CIS 1010 or CSS 1010 or permission of instru ctor. Land Use Major for Bachelor of Scien c e Environment and R es ource s Conc e ntration REQUIRED COURSES ...... . . ...... . . . ..... . . . .......... .............. . SEMESTER HOURS R eq u ired Core . . ................................................................... 16 CET 3320 Environmental Impact Statemen t s ........................................ 3 ENV 1200 Introdu c tion to E nvironmental Science ........ ............................ 3 ENV 1400 World Resources .................................................. ..... 3 ENV 3400 Water Reso urces .......... ................................... . . .... . .... 3

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ENV 4000 Environme ntal Geology .................................. . .............. 3 ENV 4010 E nvir o nmental Ha zar d s and P l an n ing . . . .......•....•.........•....... 3 ENV 4200 Environme nt a l Polic y and Planning ... .................................... 3 ENV 4430 Habitat Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................... 2 ENV 4960 Global Environmental C hallenges (Sen i or Expe rien ce) -o r ENV 4970 Environmen tal Field Studies (Senior Experi e nce) ........•.................. 3 GEL 3 1 50 Hydrogeology ........................... ............................ ... 3 GEL 3420 Soil Resources ... .............................................•........ 4 GEL 3440 Energy and Mineral R e ources .... .... ................................... 4 Subtotal ........................................................................... 37 Electives ( Select a minimum of 12 credit hours) COM 3670 Writing for the Environmenta l Indu s tr y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......... 3 ECO 3450 Environ mental Economics ....... . .............•................... 3 ENV 4410 Water Law ...............................................• . ............ 3 ENV 4420 Wetlands .............................................................. 3 GE G 3610 Principles of Land Use Planning ....................................... ... 3 GEL 3540 Advanced Geologic and E nvironment a l Hazards-Denver a nd Vicinity ......... 2 GEL 4150 Hydrology ................... ............ .............................. 3 GIS 4840 Remote Sensin g (recommended) ............................... .......... 3 GIS 4850 Advanced Ge og raphic Information Sy t erns ................................ 3 GIS 4860 Applications of ARC/I FO to atural Resources Management (reco mmend ed). 3 Subtotal . ....... ....... U Total for major...... . . . . ...... . . . ...... . ..................... . ... .... . . ...... 65 Geology Concentration REQUIRED COURSES ........ ........................ . . . ............... SEMESTER HOUR S R e quired Core . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... . . . ......... 16 ENV 4000 E nvironmental Geology ................................................. 3 ENV 4010 E nvironmental Hazard s and Planning .............•........... .......... .. 3 ENV 4970 Environmen tal Field tudies (Senior Experie nce) . ................ . ......... 3 GEL 1030 Hi s torical Geo l ogy .......................... ..................•........ . 4 GEL 3050 Mineralogy and Petrolo gy ............................................... 4 GEL 3060 Stratigraphy and Structure .......•.........• . .............•. . ............ 4 GEL 3120 Advanced Geomorph ology .............. ........................... ..... 4 GEL 3150 Hydrogeology............................................. . .... . 3 GEL 3420 Soil Reso urces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 4 GEL 3440 Energy and Minera l Reso urces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 GEL 4150 Hydrology .............. ............................................... 3 G I S 4860 Applications of ARC/l NFO to Natural R esources Management ............... 3 Subtotal .......................................................................... .42 Electives (Se lect a minimu m of7 credit hours) ENV 1 400 World Resources .......................... ............................. 3 E V 3400 Water Resources ........................................................ 3 ENV 3540 Advanced Geologic and E nvironment a l H azar ds-Denv e r a nd Vici nity ......... 2 GEL 1020 Geology of Colorado ................ .................................... 3 GEL 1150 Oceanogra ph y .................................... . . . ...•.............. 3 GEL 3510 Advanced Geology of R ed Rocks Park and Vici nity ....... ........ ... ........ I GEL 3520 Advanced Garden of the Gods-Front Rang e Geo l ogy ........................ 2 GEL 3530 Advanced Geology of the Col o rad o Plat eau ................................ 2 GEL 3550 Advanced Geology of the Great Sand Dunes Na tional Monument ... . . ........ 2 GEL 3560 Advanced Canoeing the C anyon Country . . ................................ 2 GEL 3570 Advanced Geol ogy of the Flattops Volcanic Wilderness Area ................. 2 GEL 3580 Advanced Geo l ogy of the Wheeler Geologic Area ........................... 2 GEL 390X Advanced Topic s in Geology . ........................................... 1-3

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158 SCHOOL OF LETTERS , A RTS & SCI E NCES GIS 1710 Terrestrial Navigation ..... ........................................... . . . 2 GIS 4850 Advanced Geograp hic I nformat ion Systems ( r ecommended) ....... . ......... 3 Subtotal. ............................................................... ....... ..... 7 Total for major .................................................... . . . .............. 65 G eographic Inf ormation Sy s tems ( GIS) Concen t ration The GIS Concentration provides students with the theoreti cal knowledge and technical training to deve lop proficiency i n Geograph i c Information Systems (GI S), remote sens i ng, G l obal Pos i t i o nin g Sys tems (GPS), cartograph y and database systems in order to d efine and solve pro blems in the management, conservation, and improvement of natural and man-mad e environments. Students must com plete each course with a grade of" C " or better. The course cannot be taken pass/fail. REQUIRED PREREQUISITE COURSE• . . . ............................... SEMESTER HOURS MTH llOOorMTH 1400orMTH 1410 ............. ................................... 4 *This course satisfies the General Studies Level I Mathematics requiremen t REQUIRED COURSES ........ ................... . ..... . ............... SEMESTER HOURS Land Use Core ............................................................. . I 5 -16 GEG 3610 Principles of Land Use P lanning ...... . ............................... 3 GIS 2710 G l obal Positioning Systems ............................... . . . ............ 2 GIS 3250 Car t ography .................................................. ....... . . 3 GIS 4840 Remote Sensing ...................................... .... .... .......... 3 GIS 4850 Spatial Modeling in Raster ..... ... . ..................... . . ............... 4 G I S 4860 GIS Applications ...................................................... . 4 GIS 4870 Spatial Datab ases ............................................... ..... . . 3 GIS 4890 Advanced GIS Project (Senior Experience) ....................... o •••••••• 3 Subtotal. ..................................................................... . 40 -41 Electives-select courses from the following list for a total of at least 46 c r edit hours GIS 4880 C urrent Topics in GIS: Variable Topics .................................. 1-6 MTH 3240 E nvironmental Statistics . . . ..................•........................... 4 CSS 1247 Introduction to Programming: Vis ual Basic ............. . .................. 4 Required GIS Concentration Courses Total .... ............... . .......... . . .............. 46 Because GIS is an application tool , students a r e required to specialize i n a n a r ea of interest. A stu dent can select one of the following interest areas (Environment, Meteoro l ogy, Planning, Resources) or design one with the approval of a department ad vi or or selec t a minor in Computer Science (School of Letters , Arts and Sciences) ; Computer Information Systems, General Business , International B u siness , Market i ng (School of Business ), or Criminal Justice and Crimi nology ( School of Professiona l Studies) . Selec t a minimum of 19 credit h ours f rom o n e o f t h e followin g a r eas. A reas of Interest Env iro n m e nt ENV 1200 ENV 3540 ENV 4000 ENV 4010 ENV 4200 ENV 4420 Introduction to Environmental Science (REQUIRED ............ . ... ...... 3 Advanced Geo l ogic and Envi r onmental Haza r ds Denver and Vicinity ....... 2 E nvironmenta l Geology • (REQUIRED) ............... . ... .............. 3 Environmental Hazar ds and P l anning ....... o •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 3 Environmental Policy and Planning .................................. .... 3 Wetlands ........... ....................................... . .......... 3 ENV 4430 Habitat Plannin g ........ .......................................................... 3 ENV 4960 Globa l Environmental C h al l e nges ............................. . . . ........ 3 ENV 4970 Environmental Field Studies ............................................. 3 GEG 4XXX Advanced Seminars , Topics, or Work s hops in Geography . . . . ..........•. . 1 3 GEL 3150 Hydrogeology • .......... . ....................... ..................... 3 GEL 4150 H y drology ................. ............................................ 3 Subtotal ...................................................... ........... . ...... . . 19 • Prerequis it e is GEL 1010

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Meteorology MTR 2400 Introducti o n to A t mospheric Sci e n ce (REQU IRED .......................... 4 MTR 24 1 0 Weather Observing Systems .............................................. 3 MTR 3 10 0 Air Poll ution . ........................•..............•.......... ...... . 3 MTR 3400 Synoptic Me t eorology (REQU I RED ....................................... 4 MTR 3410 Weather Ana l ysis Techniques ... ................................. . ....... 2 MTR 3420 Radar and Sat elli t e Meteoro logy' ........ .... . . ............. .............. 3 MTR 3500 H azardo u s Weather .......................................•............ 3 MTR 42 1 0 Fo r ecasti n g Laboratory I. ................................................ 2 MTR 4440 Climatology ........................................................... 3 MTR 4500 Mesometeo r ology ...................................•.................. 3 Subtot a l ..... . . . . ...... . .......................................................... 19 • Addit i onal prerequisite : MTH 1 120 or MTH 1400 Planning ENV 1 200 I n t ro du ct i o n t o E n vironme ntal Science (REQUIRED ........................ 3 ENV 3620 Populatio n , Resources , and Land Use ...................................... 3 ENV 4200 Environme n ta l Policy and Planning . .............•.........•....•....•... 3 ENV 4430 Hab i tat P lannin g ....................................................... 3 GEG 1300 I ntroduction to Human Geography ................ ........•.....•... •.... 3 GEG 3000 H i storical Geog r aphy of the U.S ........................................... 3 GEG 3600 Urban Geogr aphy ........................•....•....•....•....•......... 3 GEG 3610 Principles of Land Use Planning .......................................... 3 GEG 363 0 Transpor t a t io n Planni n g and Land Use ...........•....•.........•......... 3 GEG 46 1 0 Urban an d Regional Planning ............................................ 3 GEG 4710 Legal Aspec t s of Land Use ............................................... 3 PSC 3020 Introductio n to Public Administration• .................................... 3 Subtotal ............................................................ . ...•......... 1 9 • Prerequ is i tes are PSC I 0 lO or PSC I 020 or permission of instructor Resources ENV 1 400 World Resources (REQUIRED . ...........•... ........................... 3 ENV 3400 Wate r Reso ur ces ....................................................... 3 ENV 3620 Population Resources, and Land Use ...................................... 3 ENV 4960 Global Envi ronmental Challe n ges ........................................ 3 GEG 130 0 Introducti o n t o Human Geogra ph y ..................•.................... 3 GEL 3150 Hydrogeology' ..........................•.............................. 3 GEL 3420 Soil Resources .......................................................... 4 GEL 3440 Energy and Mineral Resources ........................................... 4 GEL 4150 H ydro l ogy ............................................................. 3 Subtotal 19 • Prerequisite is GEL 1010 •• Prerequisites are GEL 3050 and GEL 3120 Genera l S tu d i es• .................................................................... 34 Land Use Core and Requi r ed GIS Concentration Courses ................... ............. 46 Area of Inte r est . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Unrestricte d E l ectives • . . . . ..... . ...... . ................ . . ........................... 21 Total for Land Use Major, G I S Concentration .................................•......... 120 •the 3 hour Multicultural requirement must be satisfied Land Use Major for Bachelo r of Arts Urban Land Use Planning Concentration REQUIRED COURSES ............... ................................... SEMESTER HOURS Requ ir e d Cor e ................................................•.................... 1 6 ENV 1 200 Introductio n to E n vironmenta l Scie n ce ......... ........................... 3

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160 SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES ENV 3620 Population, Resources , and Land Use ............... ... .................... 3 ENV 4200 Env ironmental Policy and P lannin g ....................................... 3 ENV 4430 Habitat Planning ....................................................... 2 ENV 4960 G l o b a l Environmental C hall e n ges (Senior Exp e rien ce) ...................... 3 GEG 1300 Introdu ction to Human Geography .... . . . . . . . . ........................... 3 GEG 2300 Geographic Analysis of Social Issues ...... .... . . .......................... 3 GEG 3360 Geograp h y of Eco n omic Acti v i ty .................. . ...................... 3 GEG 3600 U rb an Geog raph y ......................................... . ......... ... 3 GEG 3610 Principles of Lan d Use Planning ............•....•.............•...... . ... 3 GEG 3630 Trans p ortation Planning an d Land Use ....... ......................... .... 3 GEG 4610 Urban and Regional P lannin g .......... ....•....•.............•........ . . 3 GEG 4620 Residential Land Use Patterns ....................... . .................... 3 GEG 4640 Recreational Land Use Patt e rn s ....................................•...... 3 G I S 4860 Applications of ARC /INF O to Natural Resources Management ............... 3 " E l ectives (Se lect a minimum of 5 credit h ours) COURSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......................... SEMESTER HO U R S ENV 4000 Env ironm en tal Geo l ogy ...................•....•........................ 3 ENV 4010 Environmental Hazards and P l anning ..................................... 3 ENV 4420 Wetlands .....................................•........•....•....•..... 3 GEG 3300 L and Use, Culture and Co nfli c t (Mult icu l t u ral) ............................. 3 GEG 3920 Directed S tud y in Land Use .....................•.............•....•..... 3 GEG 4710 Legal Asp ects of Land Use .................................. ............. 3 GEG 488X A d vanced Wo rk shops in Geography . . . .................................. 1-3 GEG 490X A dv anced Top ics o r Semi n a r s in Geography . .................... .......... 1-3 Subtotal ................ .............. . .... . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . .• . ........ . . . ........ 5 Total for major ................. . ............... . . ............... . . . . .............. . 65 Geography Minor REQUIRED CORE ................................ . ....... . . ........... SEMESTER HOURS GEG 1120 Ori enteering ................. . ....................•.................... 1 GEG 1220 Map Use ....... ....................................................... 2 GEG 1300 introduction to Human Geog r aphy .................•.........•........ ... 3 MTR 1 400 Weather and C lim ate . ................................ ................... 3 Subtotal. .... . ...... . ............................................................... 9 Structured Electives A m inimum of l3 additional elective hours are required, including a minimum of six hours of upper di v ision credit that must be selected in consultation with a department advi s or to a void prerequi site pro b lems . These e l ectives must be selected from the following five groups, and a t least one course must b e selected from each grou p to satisfy this requirement. Physical COURSES GEG liDO GEL 1010 ....... . ...... ....................................... SEMESTER HOURS Introduction to Physical Geography ....................................... 3 Physical Geo l ogy ....................................................... 4 Resourc es and E nvironm ent COURSES ENV 1200 ENV 1 400 ENV 3400 ENV 4000 GEL 3420 GEL 3440 . . . ...................................................... SEMESTER HOURS Introduction to Environmental Science .................................... 3 World Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . • . . . . • . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Wate r R eso ur ces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 E n v i ronmen t a l Geo l ogy ..... .... ........•. ........... . , . ............... . 3 Soil Resources ......................................................... 4 E nergy and Mineral Resources ........................................... 4

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Spa tial Analysis and Planning COURSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................... ........... SEMESTER HOURS ENV 3620 P op ulation , R eso urces, and Land Use .......... ... ......................... 3 ENV 4010 Environmental Hazards and Planning .......................•............. 3 ENV 4200 Environmental Policy a nd Planning ............ . ....... .................. . 3 E V 4430 Habitat Planning ....................................................... 2 GEG 2300 Geographic Analysis of Socia l Iss ues ...................................... 3 GEG 3600 Urban Geog r ap h y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 3 GEG 3610 Principles of Land Use Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 GEG 3630 Transportation P l anning and Land Use. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... 3 GEG 4610 Urban and Regional Planning ............................................ 3 GEG 4620 Residential Land Use Patterns ................. ..................... ...... 3 G EG 4640 Recreational Land Use Patterns . ............ .............................. 3 GEG 471 0 Legal Aspects of Land Use.. ................. . ...................... 3 GEG 4XXX Advanced Geography Seminars, Topics or Workshops .............•....... .13 GIS 2250 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems .............. . ............ 3 GIS 4850 Advanced Geographic Informat i o n Systems ...................... .......... 3 GIS 4860 AppHcations of ARC/I FO to Natural Resources Management .......... ..... 3 R egio nal Geography COURSES ................................................. SEMESTER HOURS GEG 1000 GEG 2020 GEG 3000 GEG 3520 GEL 1 020 World Regional Geography ............................... ............... 3 Geography of o l orado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . ................ 3 Historical Geography of the U.S ........................................... 3 Regional Geography: Variab l e Topics ..................................... 2-3 Geology of Colorado ........ . ..... ...................................... 3 Field-Lecture Course COURSES ....... .......... ... ....... SEMESTER HOURS Either a geography or geo l ogy field -lec ture co urse....................... . ....... 1-2 Elective subtotal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-16 Geography Minor Total .......................................................... . 22-25 Geology Minor REQUIRED CORE.................... . . . . .. ............. ....... SEMESTER HOURS GEL 1010 Physical Geo l ogy . . ............................................. . . . ..... 4 GEL 1030 tlistorical Geology ... . . .... . .......•...................•..........•..... 4 GEL 3050 Mineralogy and Petrology .. ..... ... .......................... ........... 4 GEL 3060 Stratigra ph y and Str ucture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Subtotal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ ..... .......... . . . .... .............. 16 Electives A minimum o f eight additional hours of upper-division credit must be selected from the following list in consultation with a department advisor to avoid prerequisite problems. A maximum of four credit hours of the minor may be selected from the upper-div ision field-lecture cour ses. COURSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ SEMESTER HOURS E V 4000 Environmenta l Geology ...... ......... ........ . ................. ........ 3 ENV 4010 Environme ntal Hazards an d Planning ......... . .............. ............. 3 ENV 4970 Environmen tal Field Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 GEL 3120 Advanced Geomorphology ........................................ . ..... 4 GEL 3150 Hydrogeology ....................•....................•.....•....•..... 3 GEL 3420 Soil Resources ...................... . .................................. 4 GEL 3440 Ene rgy and Mineral Resources .................................. . . ....... 4 GEL 35XX Various Advanced Geology F ield -Lect ure cou r ses (a limit of four hours of field-lecture co urse s can be counted toward the minor) ..................... 1 -2

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162 SCHOOL OF LEITERS, ARTS & SCIENCES GEL 390X Advanced Topics in Geology ............................................ l 3 GEL 4150 Hydrology .............. ............................................... 3 Subtotal.... .... . ................................................................ 8 Geology Minor total. ........... ..... . . . . . . ............................. . ............ 24 Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Minor Stude nt s must comp l ete each co ur se with a grade of "C" or better. The courses cannot be taken pass /fa il . REQUIRED CORE COURSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... SEMESTER HOURS GEG 1220 Map Use .......... ...... .............................................. 2 G I S 2250 Introduction to Geographic Inf ormatio n Syst ems ' .......................... 3 GIS 3250 Cartography 2 • .••••••.••••••••.•••••••••...•••••••••••••••••••••••••••. 3 GIS 4850 S p atial Modeling in Raster 3 •..• .••••••••••..••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 3 -or GIS 4860 GIS Applications ....................................................... 4 Subtotal. ............................................•.... ......... .•.......•...... 12 Electivesse lect at lea s t 8 a dditional hours G I S 2710 G l obal Posi tioning System s .............................................. 2 GI 4840 Remote Sensing 3 . . .•... . ..........•....••..•..•••••••••••.••••••.••.••. 3 GIS 4850 Spatial Modeling in Raster 3 •••.•..•••.•.•••••.•••••.••••••..••••.•.. . .... 4 GI 4860 GIS Applications . . ...... ............................................. .. 4 GI 4870 Spatia l Databases . .... . . ......................... ................... . . . 3 GI 4880 C urr ent Topics in GIS: Variabl e Topics .................... ................ 2 GIS 4890 Advanced GIS Project (Senior Experience) .............................. . . . 3 Total for GIS Minor . . . . ........................................................... . . . 0 1 Course has prerequisite of CIS 1010 or CSS 1010 or permission of instructor 2 Additional Prerequisite: MTH 1210 3 Additional Prerequisites: MTH 1110 or MTH 1400 or MTH 1410 CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS AVAILABLE Students must co mplete each co ur se in a certificate program with a grade of "C" or better . T h e courses cannot b e t aken pas s/fail. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Thi s is a profess ional l eve l certification program that serves working professionals and stu d ents inter este d in d eve loping proficien cy i n GIS scie nces. GIS e ducation has become an integra l part of many acade mi c disciplines and professions. , includ i ng natural resources, env ironmental science, geography . geology. planning . a n thropo l ogy. civil enginee r ing. surveying. criminal justice, business , biology, health sciences, social scie n ces, and others. In order to develop a high level of proficiency, the GIS course require m ents for the GIS Certificate are si mil ar to those of the GIS Concentration Core for Land Use Majors. All stud ents must t ake th e prer e quisite courses or provide evide n ce of equiva l ent training an d rece i ve a n officia l waiver from the in structor. All students seeking GIS certification must maintain a GPA of 3.0 o r above in the certificate progr a m because G I S t echno l ogy and its applications require a hi g h d eg ree of discip lin e and commitment. REQUIRED COURSES .................................................. SEMESTER HOURS GIS 2250 Introduction to Geographic Inform ation Systems' ....... . ..... .. ........... 3 GIS 3250 Cartograp h y ' ..................... . . ................................... 3 G I S 4840 Remote Sensing ' ....... ......................................... ....... 3 G I S 4850 Spatia l Modeling in Raster• ................ .............................. 4 G I S 4860 GIS Applications ..... .......• .......................................... 4 GIS 4870 Spatial Databases ...................................................... 3 GIS 4890 Advanced GIS Proje c t. . ................................................. 3 Total Credits for Certificate . . . . .......................... . .... .... ........... ......... 23

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SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS & SCIENCES 163 1 Prerequisites: CIS 1010 or CSS 1010 or permission of instructor; MTH 1210 recommended 2 Additional prerequisite: MTH 1210 ' Additional prerequisites: GEG 1220 and either MTH 11 IO or MTH 1400 or MTH 14IO 4 Additional prerequisites: MTH I I 10 or MTH I400 or MTH I410 Geotechnology S y stems (GTS ) The Geotechnology Systems Certificate (GTS) will provide students and industry personnel with the n ecessary theoretical knowledge and technical and application skills needed to app l y geo l ogic computer software and cartography to support geologists in their decision-making processes. Further, this cer tificate is designed for industry personnel who work with the management and exploitation of natural resources, such as petroleum and water resources, as well as for degree-seeking students interested in environmental science, geology, land use planning, and related fiel ds. Increa sing operating costs and decreasing budgets for hiring professional geologists, geophysicists, and petroleum engineers has produced a demand for mid level persons trained in petroleum technology. Usi ng the latest computer methods , these geotechnicians or "geo t ec hs" typically perform data searches, generate maps and cross sections, gather and organize well data, and perform numerous other tasks in support of exploration and development efforts. By some estimates, the combination of a geolog i st with a geotechnician will result in a synergy that produces more than twice the output of either working alone. The r esult is a significant increase in productivity. A dmi ssions Requi rements: 1. There are no special admission requirements for students seeking GTS certifica tion. 2. All students must take the prerequisite courses or provide evi d ence to the inst r uctor that they have equiva l ent training before they can enroll in certificate courses. Some courses in the certificate are prerequisites to other courses in the certificate. Prerequi si te courses that are not listed as courses required for the certificate are: GEL 1010-4, Physical Geology; CIS/CSS 1010-3, Introduction to Computers; GEG 1220-2, Map Use; and GIS 2250-3, Introduction to Geographic Information Sys tems. C omp leti on R e quir e m ents: All students seeking GTS cert i fication must maintain a 3.0 or above in the certificate program. Geotech nology and its applications require a high degree of discipline and commitment. The courses required for the certificate are very challenging with regard to the theoretical and practical subjects. They require a significant amount oftime devoted to hands-on and laboratory exercises. Student successfully com pleting this certificate can take pride in their accomplishment. REQUIRED COURSES . . ... ............. ................................ SEMESTER HOURS GEL 1030 Historical Geology ........................ .......... .................... 4 GEL 2700 Introduction to Petroleum Technology .......................... .......... 3 GEL 2710 Computer Applications in Earth Sciences .................................. 3 GEL 3060 Stratigraphy and tructure ............................................... 4 GEL 3700 Integrated Geotechnology ..... .......................................... 3 GEL 3710 Earth Sciences Data Management ......................................... 3 GEL 4700 Subsurface Geology ..................................................... 3 GIS 3250 Com puter Cartography .................. , ............................... 3 Total Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . 26 MATHEMATICAL AND COMPUTER SCIENCES DEPARTMENT The Mathematical and Compu ter Sciences Department offers bachelor of arts and bachelor of scie n ce degrees in mathematics and a bache lor of science degree in computer science. The department offers both a mathematics and com puter science minor , both of which complement such majors as enginee r ing technology, the other sciences, and economics . In addition , the minor program in computer science complements the mathematics major . See Computer Science on page 127 of this Catalog.

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164 SCHOOL OF LETTERS , ARTS & SCIENCES In addition to the general mathematics major , the department offers a mathematics major in five con centra tion s enco mp ass ing a var i ety of sig nifi cant mathematical ideas. These co n cent r ations give the stu dent background for graduate school in theoretical mathematics, as well as background for both gradu ate sc h ool and employment in mathematically related fields including applie d mathematics, s cientific comp uting. probability and statistics , and mathematics educat ion . The degree program in com puter sci e n ce a dh eres to nationally recognized standards and provides s tud ents with a m ore tec hnical alternative to the mathematics concentration in comp uter science. All s tud ents who a r e considering a m ajor or minor in math e mat ics or comp uter sc i e nce are ex pected to co n sult with faculty for advising. A ll course and test sco r e pre r equ isites for 1000 l eve l MTH courses must b e fiv e or fewer years old. Major in Mathematics for Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science T h e Department of Mathematical and Computer Science offers course work l eading to the bach e lor of arts or b achelor of science degree . The dis tin ction between the B.S. and B.A. in mathematic s is based on th e n ature of the coursework taken outside mathematics. I n general, a B.S. in Mathematical Sciences is awa rd e d if there is substantive coursework taken outside the major co u r es resulting in : 1. reinforcement of th e major and/or 2 . comp l ementa r y knowledge to the major obtaine d in either co mputer sci ence or a n area of natural science. With this as the basis, th e Mathematica l Sciences major i s distin gu i s hed in the follo wing way: a B.S. is awarde d if the minor is in a natural sc ien ce , comp ut e r science, o r e ngin ee r ing technology; and a B.A. is awarded if the minor i s in another a r ea. A degree in mathematics i s useful in a var i ety of professio n a l fields includi ng, amon g many other s, b u s ine ss, econom ics, computer scie n ce , government, ed u cat ion, t echno l ogy, a nd scie n ce . S tud ents are invite d to consult with the department concerning career op tions. All majors in mathematics are required to complete the followi n g basic core of courses (wi th a required minimum grade of " C" in each of these courses). The department strongly recommends that students i nter ested in the applied mathematics concentration take sect i o n s of calculus u s i ng Mathematica. BASI C MATHEMATICS CORE ............... . . . . .... . . . . ......... . ... .. SEMESTER HOURS MTH 1410 Calculus J • ........................................ . ... ......... ...... . 4 MTH 241 o • Calculus II' ...... . ............. . ................................ . ...... 4 MTH 2420 Calculus III ................................ ................ . . .......... 4 MTH 3100 Intr o du ctio n t o Mathematica l P roof s ... ......... ............................ 3 Total .... . . . ..................... . ...................... . ................ . ........ 15 • som e sections of this course hav e a Mathe mati c a c omponent . .. All sections of this course have a Mathematica component. For m athematics majors, except those in mathematics educat ion , there is a o ne-hour project-oriented course at the senior l eve l th at synt h esizes th e material in the major. Each major i s also required to take a Se nio r Experience course and t o comp l e t e a minor. The following mathematics courses have been approved as Senio r Ex perien ce courses : MT H 4210, MTH 4410 , MTH 448 0 , and MTH 4640. The course MTH 3240 does not count toward a mathematic major o r a math ematic minor. The st ud ent may c h oose to comp l e t e a mathematics major in on e of the following conce ntrations : General Applied Mathem a ti cs Com pute r Science Mathem atics Edu c ation Probability and Statistics Theoretical Ma thematic s General Concentration The gen e ral concentra ti on in mathematics is designed to meet the needs of s tud ents with diverse math ematica l interests or background, since it allow s considerable flexibility amon g upper di v i sio n course choices. A grade of"C" or better is required in each course included in the major. REQUIRED COURSES ..... ............. ............. . . . . . . . ............ SEMESTER HOURS Basic Core . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 5 One of the following three courses : CS 1050 Comp ut er Science I .... ............ . ............•................... ... 4 CSS 1247 Intr o du ction t o Programming: Visual