Citation
Art ranch

Material Information

Title:
Art ranch
Creator:
Smith, Sybil Gillett
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
approximately 100 leaves : illustrations (including 1 color), charts, maps, plans ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Artist colonies -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Boulder County ( lcsh )
Spiritual retreats -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Boulder County ( lcsh )
Artist colonies ( fast )
Spiritual retreats ( fast )
Colorado -- Boulder County ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Sybil Gillett Smith.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
15582651 ( OCLC )
ocm15582651
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1986 .S63 ( lcc )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
'dLaEjlGlvn CLARE FORSTER • 815 SPRUCE STREET BOULDER CO 80302
•• %
One day we were collecting shells on a Kauai beach, grasping at anything shiny and smooth as we stood in the breaking waves. There was only a second or1 two to find what we wanted before whatever it was would be lost to us in the turbulence.
Incredibly, George grasped and found a small ceramic face looking back at him. A worn fragment from, we believe, a Japanese funerary vessel, the concave side had a pale green glaze and the figure of a crane.
The odds of this happening are not even worth thinking about unless you've been reading as I have, and thinking about, an article in the New Age Journal,(April), about what is called the chaos theory. Apparently, there are predictable patterns in chaos, in turbulence. for example, even though smoke from no two cigarettes will spread in quite the same way after going straight up for' a bit, there are patterns in the variation.
I've always been interested in chance versus the predictable and the chaos theory developed by physicist Mitchell Feigenbaum,based on work of biologist Robert May ^
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explains some things,while what lies behind most of it is still a mystery that has been avoided by scientists until recently.
After1 a certain point, a smooth,fluid flow will fluctuate between high and low variables and will then double in variability at points that are now observed and regular—"as immutable as pi"—with mathematical constants that show up over' and over . "Many of the seemingly haphazard phenomena of the world may turn out to be more ordered than we suspect...tiny variations at the start of a process can result in vastly different outcomes.“
Physicist Alvin Saperstein at Wayne State University is applying the chaos theory to war1. "He's designed a mathematical model to analyze the arms races preceding World War' II. Like water1 pouring from a tap, an arms buildup seems to shift from a smooth, predictable flow to dangerous, unpredictable turbulence once a certain threshold is reached. He believes improved models could someday warn us when an arms race is on the verge of period-doubling its way into war'", writes Doug Stewart in thr *New Age' article, (adding that for now conditions between the U.S. and Soviet Union would fall within the model's stable region). The article continues: * Beneath the nut.~ and bolts of all this research, however1, lurk deeper metaphysical questions: If we can learn to observe and analyze the minute interactions that keep the world in motion, might we one day learn to predict all their outcomes? And even if we could never1 muster- the technical wherewithal to do so, is it enough to know that it's theor-
etically possible? Would this mean the future is predestined?"
The knowledge that right now there is in space a "dirty snowball" or' a "sick black potato" ,according to different scientists' descriptions,ten miles long by six miles wide cruising on course,and called by us Halley's Comet,is to me uncanny. What if you were there ? I remind myself that any place can be thought of that way, as a possible place to be. On earth I may think,'Right at this very moment someone is walking along the street in front of the house I grew up in at 59 E. 92nd St. in New York. Someone snorkeling at Hpnauma Bay in Hawai is looking at the very same fist /~S) by a certain rock that we used to watch.And this I must now add: Right at this moment * <»elephants are in the caves in Kenya in the dark, scraping salt from the cave roof as
y they have done for thousands of year's, learning from their1 elder's from generation to
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generation a treacherous track where a misstep means being trapped fatally in the
r 1} (-7 ;7 ft’*., darkness. I add this image of a place it is possible to be because I have seen an
infrared film of the elephants in the cave that I could never forget. Periodically cave roof fell and a new route had to be learned, the old one modified, and new dangers existed. Pattern and chaos.
thi
But there's a lot more to it and here is where I think things get really interestin According to this same article in New Age, up until this century questions of chaos were seen as"neither mysterious nor random, just complicated".The physics of Newton gave us a "universe like a billiard table. A higher1 being may have created the balls and set them in motion, but thereafter the balls bounced around on their- own." Now >, with quantum theory in physics,”the elementary particles of the universe are not ' billiard balls at all. They are concepts, concepts inextricably tied to their observers; what we see depends on how we look. Werner Heisenberg's famous uncertainty principle stated that we can never be sure of the exact position and motion of a subatomic particle any more than we can measure the air' pressure of a single molecule The best we can do is assign probabilities. According to the quantum thinker's,no one can predict a precise future by looking at the present.The world's basic par-tides interact too mysteriously. 'The deeper we penetrate,' said physicist Max Bom,'the more restless becomes the universe; all is rushing about and vibrating in a wild dance.'"


And that is how it feels to me, being part of the turbulence,however small a part. The idea of controlling any part of existence is mainly illusion. What we think we see is highly selective, and as a result our- creative work is based on fragmentary moments and sights. When George caught in his hand the tiny ceramic face, as he stood in the wildness of the waves, there was as much significance in that find as anything else . Then the foam turns in on itself and an entirely new set of possibilities is presented.
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'The brick wall dissolves. The house draws in its little balconies one by aae, then turns, and floats away. Everything floats away. Harmony and meaning vanish.The world irks me again with its variegated void.1 (Nabokov's short story,'The Leonardo')
From another Nabakov short story,'Torpid Smoke' about a poet:'..puerile, perishable poems, which, by the time the next were printed, would have been certain to wither as had withered one after the other all the previous ones written down in the black exercise book; but no matter: at this moment I trust the ravishing promises of the still breathing, still revolving verse, my face is wet with tears, my heart is bursting with happiness, and I know that this happiness is the greatest thing existing on earth.'
'We all have drastic impulses, but they get cancelled out by other impulses. So we really live in a kind of semi-radiant muddle.'(John Updike, Denver Post interview)
'The most effective art is that which looks at the present,and into the future and the past, and makes it possible for the idiosyncracies of one person's experience to coalesce into a statement that resonates within all of us. Through the ages, whatever the material, whatever the focus,this has been the art; that worked,that succeeded in making contact.' (.Fessenden Review' summer '85,article on photographer- Larry Clark)
Wendell Berry on photographer- Ralph Eugene Meatyard: 'More than that of any other- art-ist I know, this work alerts me to the fact that we have arrived here at this moment by ways that are mostly unknown to us...Sooner or later he is apt to produce evidence that you are not where you think you are..These pictures can serve as spiritual landmarks in the pilgrimage to the earth that each one of us under-takes alone.'(F.Review)
'Billboards in any ar-t are the first thing one sees..Once you get past the billboard then you can see into the past, the present, and the future.'(photographer Meatyard from the same article in the Fessenden Review)
I've said before that Clarion is on a computer list of New Age publications and gets its own mail. After missing the Tarrytown Letter- I'm pleased to know about the Fessenden Review that was sent to me. A non-profit,tax exempt corp. publishes it with two pur-poses:'To better prepare the citizens of the world for- survival and,indeed,the possibilities of innate joy as they move towards the twenty-fir-st century..The second purpose is fomented by direct financial aid to individuals and organizations whose main pur-pose is to assist humanity in achieving dignity,selfworth, and hope as we participate in this bizarre spectacle we call life.' That's my kind of magazine! It consists of reviews, information and commentary.$10 for a 2-year subscription.Address Box 7272, San Diego, CA,92107-
My thanks to Louise Neaderland, director of ISCA,for selling my book 'I Think Sow' to the Cleveland Ar-t Institute. The book is presently in a group show at Sarah Lawrence College.
'Ar-t in essence celebrates life and gives us our measure.'(Malamud,who died recently)
'.Ar-t..is something one never can consciously strive for-, as the very appearance of striving defeats it. Let the artist..just attend to the rudiments of his craft, and if he is a genius the result will be art in spite of himself.' (George Warren)
"He said that the? difference between the male and female modes of thought were easily illustrated by the thoughts of a boy and girl.sitting on a park bench, looking at the- full moon, the boy thinks of the universe, its immensity and mystery; the girl thinks,'I must wash my hair.'"(quote from imaginary Freudian.famous. New York psychiatrist)..."For a woman everything is personal; no idea is of any inte: est to her by itself, but must be translated into her- own experience; in works of art she always sees her own life, or her daydreams."(quote from imaginarv women's magazine circa 194$.Alice Munt-o.Lives of Girls and Women)
'Children as Teachers of Peace' is a program directed by Dr.Jerry Jampolsky and Diane Cirincione with 40 children traveling to Moscow and Leningrad in May. Through Ellin Todd who will be going with her daughter, George is sending a banner and several of his 'feather banners' for- this very wor-thwhile expedition involving Soviet and U.S. children.
This month Geraldine Br-ussel showed her- work at the Boulder Brewing Co.
In May Helen Ragheb will show her water-colors on handmade paper at Denver's Reiss Gallery.
'Painting became a business. The painters became like factories, their product was the new—something new for- each season. Most of it nowadays is like newspaper headlines. That's what the galleries seem to want—it creates a big splash,but then it doesn't mean anything.TTie work can be quite competent technically,but it's dead.You don't feel the artist's hand.It's all superficial.It's launching bandwagonsand chasii after them.Nobody is concerned about feeling anymore,about the journey.'(Shapinsky)


archives
LD
1190
A72
1986
S637
TECTURE Si PLANING# RAR1A UBRARY ^


U16700 5605544


The Thesis of Syb
il Gillett Smith
IS APPROVED-
Com^ttee~ThaTr^
PrTncTpaTTdvisor
University of Colorado at Denver
Fall 1986


ART RANCH
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in Partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture
Sybil Gillett Smith
Fall 1986


























-




DEDICATION
For Dianne who stole four Valium tablets
FROM HER MOTHER AND MADE THIS THESIS POSSIBLE-


I


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction
Project Summary Design Approach
Site
Location
Legal Description Regional Map Area Map Site Map Site Analysis
Environmental Factors Soils
Plant Life Wildlife
Climate
Implications
Tables of Supporting Data Program
Space Requirements Design Issues Programing
Zoning
Codes
Conclusion
Drawings
Bibliography


Table of Contents -- continued
Appendix
Artists' Resumes


INTRODUCTION


Artists work day and night Connections are very important-
Clare Forster
I PUT EVERYTHING IN A BOX, CARRY IT TO A PLACE AND WORK FROM THERE-----
I CREATE MY TOOLS-
George Peters
I WORK IN SOUTH AND EAST LIGHT- I NEED THE CHANGEABILITY-
John Matlack
There are many misconceptions about artists-—the artist is an urban
PERSON, NATURE IS INSPIRING-
I WAS WORKING ON SOMETHING SO PERSONAL, SO UNFORMED, THAT I DIDN'T WANT ANYONE CLOSE TO ME TO SEE IT-
George Woodman
For a sculptor, a place to conceive on paper-
Bill Vielehr


INTRODUCTION
Project Summary
Art Ranch is an artist's colony which provides periods of
TEMPERED ISOLATION FOR VISUAL ARTISTS- IT IS CALLED "RANCH" BECAUSE OF ITS LOCATION AND BECAUSE THE LAND IS GRAZED- THE RANCH IS RUN BY A FOUNDATION ESTABLISHED BY THE ESTATE OF A SUCCESSFUL ARTIST- INTERESTED ARTISTS APPLY FOR A VISIT WITH A LETTER DESCRIBING THEIR PAST WORK AND THE PROJECT THEY WISH TO FOCUS ON DURING THEIR STAY-
The length of time an artist might stay varies from one month to
A YEAR. No PROVISION HAS BEEN MADE FOR THE ACCOMMODATION OF THE ARTIST'S FAMILY SO IT IS ANTICIPATED THAT MOST PEOPLE WILL STAY FOR THREE MONTHS OR LESS-
Artists are provided with a bedroom and bath with adjacent studio- Breakfast and dinner are served in the main building but
ATTENDANCE IS NOT REQUIRED- THERE IS NO FORMAL PROGRAM
WHATSOEVER---THE ARTISTS ARE FREE TO INTERACT OR TO ISOLATE
THEMSELVES AS THEY PLEASE-
Specialized equipment will not be provided so it is assumed that
THE ARTISTS WILL CONFINE THEMSELVES TO DRAWING, PAINTING AND PLANNING PROJECTS-
Design Approach
I HAVE CHOSEN TO DESIGN AN ARTISTS' COLONY BECAUSE IT IS A FUNCTION FLEXIBLE ENOUGH TO ALLOW ME TO EXPLORE WHAT I BELIEVE TO BE MORE THAN A PERSONAL PERVERSITY- I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN FASCINATED BY THE ARCHITECTURE OF ROMANTIC CLASSICIST ETIENNE-
Louis Boullee, by the purity and formality of his buildings and,
QUITE HONESTLY, BY THEIR UNEXPECTEDNESS, MUCH AS I AM DRAWN TO
Ant Farm's Cadillac Ranch and Christo's Running Fence Project-Their "look again" quality creates something more-


I BELIEVE THAT THERE ARE MOMENTS IN ARCHITECTURE WHEN THE OBVIOUS AND "APPROPRIATE" SOLUTION IS NOT ENOUGH- THE OBVIOUS SOLUTION TO CLIMATIC CONDITIONS ON THE SITE I HAVE CHOSEN, ON THE PLAINS
south of Boulder, would be an organic earth bermed structure-This would be a nondisruptive response to the landscape- On many
LEVELS THIS WOULD BE AN APPROPRIATE RESPONSE; BUT LACKING THE
"something more", that is architecture. Of Boullee and Ledoux, J.-C- Legmagny in the introduction to Visionary Architects says "Their wish was to touch the soul through-•-architecture that
SPEAKS---AN ARCHITECTURE THAT WOULD MAKE EACH BUILDING EXPRESS
ITS CHARACTER AND FUNCTION-" (VISIONARY ARCHITECTURE, P- 14) I FEEL THAT THE CONCEPT OF SPEAKING ARCHITECTURE IS PARTICULARLY APT FOR THE DESIGN OF AN ARTISTS' COLONY-
Ledoux and Boullee's drawings depict, in most cases, their
BUILDINGS IN FORMAL GARDENS OR SIMPLY ON FLAT GROUND- IN FURTHER PERVERSITY, FOR HENRY-RUSSELL HITCHCOCK HAS POINTED OUT THAT THE "PICTURESQUE••-HAD A SOLVENT, AND EVENTUALLY DESTRUCTIVE, EFFECT ON THE DOMINANT ROMANTIC CLASSICAL STYLE-" (ARCH ITECTURE;19TH and 20th Centuries, p- 105); it is my contention that a
PICTURESQUE COMPOSITION OF FORMS IS APPROPRIATE HERE •
Picturesque in the sense of placing buildings in a natural
SETTING AS UNDISTURBED AS POSSIBLE-
Because my primary interest is in responding to the landscape
WITH A COMPOSITION OF FORMS WHICH, IN A NONLITERAL SENSE, SPEAK OF THEIR FUNCTION, I ANTICIPATE A REVERSAL OF THE USUAL APPROACH TO ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN IN WHICH, AS WAS THE CASE WITH McKlM,
Mead and White's Low House, interior plan will be to some extent
DICTATED BY EXTERNAL FORM-
In SHORT, I STRIVE FOR A SOLUTION WHICH SHELTERS ARTISTS AND FOSTERS THEIR ART WHILE SPEAKING OF ART AND RECALLING THE LANDSCAPE WHICH, AGAIN, SPEAKS OF ART-




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LOCATION MAP




SITE MAP
SCALE 1:400


SITE
Location
Art Ranch is located south of the city of Boulder near the
INTERSECTION OF ROUTE 93 AND ROUTE 128- SEE MAPS FOR EXACT Location-
Latitude: 40°N Longitude: 105°W Altitude: 5800 ft Legal Description
NE 1/2 NE 1/4 of Section 33 Township 1 S Range 70 W 80 AC NW 1/4 of Section 34 Township 1 S Range 70 W 160 AC
Total 740 AC
Background
This isolated and starkly beautiful site is currently used as
GRAZING FOR CATTLE- THERE IS SOME EVIDENCE OF PAST MINING FOR CLAY AND COAL BUT ALL PITS HAVE BEEN FILLED AND THE DISTURBANCE IS BARELY NOT I CABLE• LAND ADJACENT TO THE SITE HAS RECENTLY BEEN AQUIRED BY THE ClTY OF BOULDER'S OPEN SPACE
Program- A gravel mine to the northeast is part of the city's
AQUISITION AND WILL BE RECLAIMED- To THE SOUTH IS THE WIND
Energy Research Division of SERI- With these exceptions, all
SURROUNDING LAND, NEARLY AS FAR AS THE EYE CAN SEE, IS BEING GRAZED-
Site Analysis Views
The high points on this site have uninterupted long views
IN EVERY DIRECTION, WITH 180° OF DRAMATIC MOUNTAIN VIEWS AND THE REST OF NEARLY UNTOUCHED PLAINS- THERE ARE GOOD VIEWS OF THE BED OF COAL CREEK FROM MUCH OF THE SITE-
Short views consist of nothing more than the roll of the
LAND, THE ONLY NOTICABLE VEGETATION IS A FEW CLUMPS OF
Yucca- Orientation for both short and long views, mountains AND PLAINS, WILL BE AN IMPORTANT DESIGN CONSIDERATION -


ACCESS TO THE
IS SITE AND
Solar Access
Neither trees '
SITE-WIND
As DISCU MUST BE Dl
Erosion Hazard Due to over Factors) in t
IMPORTANT TO K


\A^
SITE ANALYSIS
SCALE 1:400


ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS


SOILS MAP
0^O\A Lfc?£ **- C&tXtW V OC7WX» <2*dl«/rr'
SCALE 1:20,000

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS
Soils
The following information has been abstracted from a 1975 soil survey of Boulder County-
NdD - Nederland Very Cobbly Sandy Loam, 1-12 percent slopes This is a deep soil that is found on old high terraces and
ALLUVIAL FANS- IT DEVELOPED IN LOAMY ALLUVIUM THAT CONTAINS COBBLESTONE. THE A HORIZON IS FROM 3 TO 6 INCHES THICK AND IS A DARK BROWN VERY COBBLY SANDY LOAM- THE B HORIZON CAN BE UP TO 20 INCHES DEEP AND THE C HORIZON CAN EXTEND 40 INCHES BELOW THAT- THROUGHOUT THE SOIL, COBBLE AND GRAVEL ACCOUNT FOR 50 TO 70 PERCENT OF THE VOLUME-
This is a well-drained soil that has a moderate permeability- Available water capacity is moderate- Roots can
PENETRATE UP TO 60 INCHES DEEP- RUNOFF IS SLOW TO MEDIUM AND EROSIONAL HAZARD IS SLIGHT- THIS SOIL IS .NOT SUITED TO TREE GROWTH-
Te-Terrace Escarpments
These are undifferentiated shallow soils with cobbles and
STONES ON THE SURFACE- THEY ARE ON THE SIDE SLOPES OF OLD OUTWASH FANS- IN MANY INSTANCES, ALL THAT EXISTS IS A THIN LAYER OF COBBLESTONE OVER SHALE OR SANDSTONE- BECAUSE OF THIS SHALLOWNESS, PLANTS HAVE A HARD TIME ESTABLISHING THEMSELVES- WITHOUT PLANTS, THE SOIL TENDS TO BE UNSTABLE-
Runoff generally is rapid- These two factors create an
EROSION HAZARD- THIS SOIL IS SUITED EITHER FOR CULTIVATION OR FOR TREE GROWTH-
SeE - Samsil - Shingle complex, 5 to 25 percent slopes
Approximately 40% Samsil clay and 40% Shingle soils make up
THIS COMPLEX- THE SOIL PROFILE FOR SAMSIL CONSISTS OF AN A HORIZON, 3 TO 8 INCHES DEEP, IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWED BY THE CLAY AND CALCAREOUS CLAY SHALE C HORIZON- THE SHINGLE
Series is a loam soil- The top 0 to 4 inches is a pale-


BROWN LOAM AND A C HORIZON OF 4 TO 12 INCHES- BEDROCK IS NORMALLY AT 10 TO 20 INCHES FOR BOTH THESE SOILS-
This is a shallow, well-drained complex- Rooting depth can
VARY GREATLY FROM 20 TO 60 INCHES- PERMEABILITY IS MODERATE- RUNOFF IS RAPID AND EROSIONAL HAZARD IS HIGH-
This soil is not suited to tree growth- It is suited to
PRAIRIE GRASSES SUCH AS WHEATGRASS AND BLUE GRAMA-
- Niwot Series
This soil is found on stream terraces and bottom lands,
SUPERIMPOSED OVER SAND AND GRAVEL- THE SURFACE LAYER RANGES FROM 10 TO 20 INCHES AND CONSISTS OF A SANDY CLAY LOAM OR A LIGHT CLAY LOAM- IMMEDIATELY BELOW THIS IS THE SAND AND GRAVEL LAYER, WHICH CAN EXTEND UP TO 60 INCHES-
Because of this soils proximity to Coal Creek, the water
TABLE LEVEL CAN BE AS HIGH AS 6“8" BELOW THE SURFACE- HOWEVER, BECAUSE OF THE EXTREME SEASONAL VARIATIONS IN THE FLOW OF THIS EPHEMEREAL STREAM, IT IS NOT THE PREDOMINENT CONDITION- IT IS A MODERATELY PERMEABLE SOIL.WITH ONLY A SLIGHT EROSION HAZARD- BECUASE THE AVAILABLE WATER CAPACITY IS LOW TO MODERATE, IT IS BEST SUITED FOR USE AS A PASTURE MEDOW AND GRAVEL PIT SITES- ADAPTED GRASSES MOST SUITABLE FOR SEEDING ARE INTERMEDIATE AND TALL WHEATGRASS, AND TALL FESCUE- THIS SOIL IS NOT SUITABLE FOR TREE GROWTH-
i - Nunn Clay Loam - 1 to 3 percent slopes
This is a deep soil formed on terraces and valley side
SLOPES IN LOAMY ALLUVIUM- THE A HORIZON IS 6 - 14 INCHES OF DARK GRAYISH BROWN CLAY LOAM- THE B2T HORIZON IS 4 - 15 INCHES THICK AND HAS A CALCIUM CARBONATE ACCUMULATION 14 -30 INCHES BELOW THE SURFACE- THE C HORIZON IS A VERY PALE BROWN CLAY LOAM- THE SAND AND GRAVEL SUBSTATUM IS USUALLY AT A DEPTH OF 40 TO 60 INCHES-
This is a well-drained soil with slow permeability, and a
HIGH AVAILABLE WATER CAPACITY- RUNOFF IS SLOW AND THE EROSION HAZARD IS SLIGHT- THE EFFECTIVE ROOTING DEPTH CAN


BE 60 INCHES OR MORE- ALTHOUGH MANY TREES ARE SUITED FOR THIS SOIL, NONE ARE PRESENT AT THIS LOCATION-
KuD - Kutch Clay Loam, 3 to 9 percent slopes
Kutch clay loam makes up a small area in the southern half
OF THIS PROPERTY- IT IS GENERALLY FORMED ON UPLANDS AND VALLEY SIDES IN CLAYEY RESIDIUM- IT HAS A SLOW PERMEABILITY AND TENDS TO BE MODERATELY DEEP- ROOTS CAN PENETRATE TO A DEPTH OF 20 TO 90 INCHES- THE TOP 7 INCHES IS A THICK CLAY LOAM, FOLLOWED BY 15 INCHES OF BROWN CLAY- THE C HORIZON CONSISTS OF ABOUT 8 INCHES OF CALCAREOUS CLAY, AND THEN LAYERS OF SHALE- GRAVEL AND COBBLESTONE ARE ON THE
surface- This soil is being used as pasture-


Plant Life
Plant community structure, as represented in the following
TABLE, WAS DETERMINED BY A LINE TRANSECT CONDUCTED NEAR COAL
Creek on property adjacent to this site to the north east. It
IS ASSUMED THAT THE PLANT COMMUNITY ON THE SITE IS VERY SIMILAR- This information was compiled by Impact Environmental Consultants for a 1982 gravel mining permit- A more extensive
FLORAL INVENTORY HAS BEEN CONDUCTED AT THE NEARBY ROCKY FLATS PROPERTY; NO RARE OR ENDANGERED SPECIES WERE DISCOVERED-


PLANT SPECIES AND GROUND COVER
Approximate 1 of Ground
Common Name Scientific Name Covered by Each Species
Spotted Blazingstar Liatris punctata 1%
Mesa Gentian Pneumonanthe affinis 1 %
Diffuse Starthistle Centaurea diffusa 1 1
Pasture Sagebrush Artemisia frigida 5%
Prairie Sagebrush Artemisia ludoviciana 31
Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus 21
Western Wheatgrass Agropyron smithii 101
Blue Grama Boutelous gracilis 20%
Big Bluestem Andropogon gerardii 5%
Hairy Goldenaster Heterotheca villosa 31
JUNEGRASS Kieleria macrantha 5%
Broom Ragwort Senecio spartioides 51
Wrinkled Prickleypear Opunitia compressa 21
Tall Wild-buckwheat Eriogonum alatum 51
Yucca Yucca glauca 11
Bare earth 151
Other vegetation (Mostly FLOWERS OF THE FAMILY 161
Compositae- Could not be further identified due to
ABSENCE OF FLORAL PARTS [SURVEY WAS IN LATE FALL]-)


Wildlife
Typical wildlife species inhabiting this area include shrew,
GOPHER, DEER MOUSE, COYOTE, SQUIRREL, COTTONTAIL, MULE DEER, TOADS, BULL SNAKE, RED“TAI LED HAWK, MORNING DOVE, PHEASANT, OWL AND VARIOUS SONG BIRDS (VARRA COMPANIES, JENKINS SITE
application- January 13, 1986). Only meadow larks have been
IN EVIDENCE ON SITE VISITS TO DATE-


CLIMATE


CLIMATE
Summary
Average Yearly Temperature Average Relative Humidity Average Yearly Precipitation
49 • 7°F 49 • S7o
11 -7 INCHES
Degree Days Heating Cooling
6202 748 72 l
Percent of Possible Sunshine/year
This area of the country is blessed with a generally pleasant
CL I MATE MILD, SUNNY AND SEMI“ARID• SUNSHINE PREDOMINATES
DUE TO THE DISTANCE FROM MOISTURE SOURCES AND MOUNTAIN BARRIERS- Extremes of temperature are usually of short duration-In the summer afternoons, cloud formation tempers heat build
UP; WHILE IN WINTER THE SUN WARMS THE DAYLIGHT HOURS- HIGH WINDS CAN BE A PROBLEM IN WINTER AND SPRING- (SEE FOLLOWING DATA FROM NOAA AND SERI FOR SPECIFICS)


7 MPH 81 MPH
Wind
Average Yearly Speed Maximum Speed
The Wind Energy Research Center, a division of SERI (Solar Energy Research Institute) is located a mile south and 150 FEET ABOVE THIS SITE- THEIR DATA FOR 1983 AND 1989 INDICATES THAT THE HIGH WINDS OF WINTER AND SPRING COME MAINLY FROM THE NORTH- The SUMMER WINDS ARE LIGHT TO MODERATE (0-19 MPH) AND COME FROM THE NORTH OR SOUTH- In JULY OF 1983, FOR EXAMPLE, THERE WAS 600 HOURS OF LIGHT TO MODERATE WIND, ALMOST EXCLUSIVELY, FROM THE NORTH- (SPECIFIC DATA AVAILABLE ON REQUEST FROM SERI)


Implications
Passive Solar-Design
Climate and excellent exposure on the site indicate that
PASSIVE SOLAR DESIGN SHOULD BE A CONSIDERATION IN THE DESIGN SOLUTION- SOUTH FACING GLAZING FOR HEAT GAIN AND THERMAL MASS FOR HEAT STORAGE SHOULD REDUCE HEATING COSTS-
For summer cooling locate openings for summer breeze
PENETRATION, SHADE GLAZING AND USE REFLECTIVE OR LIGHT COLORED EXTERIOR SURFACES- SUNNY OUTDOOR AREAS ARE DESIRABLE FOR WINTER MONTHS WHILE SHADE IS DESIRABLE FOR
summer- There is little natural shade on this site-Wind
Structures should be designed to withstand high winds-Entrances should be protected from the wind- It may be
NECESSARY TO SHUTTER SOME GLAZING- WIND SHELTERED OUTDOOR AREAS ARE DESIRABLE-


SUNSHINE PRECIPITATION TEMPERATURE
ISSN 0198-7682
1984
LOCAL CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA
ANNUAL SUMMARY WITH COMPARATIVE DATA
DENVER,
COLORADO
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Sr*Tt% 0< *
Daily Data
CELSIUS
E-
z
m
ui
W
cz
o
DJ
Q
cn
Z
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CJ
CE
U
CL
I I II INI I I I i I I ITT'IVl I l l I I I I IT nrnri I I I I I I I I rTTT'TTf'TTI I I II I I I I I I I I
10 20 30 10 20 28 10 20 30 10 20 30 10 20 30 10 20 30 10 20 30 10 20 30 10 20 30 10 20 30 10 20 30 10 20 30
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
TEMPERATURE DEPICTS NORMAL MAXIMUM. NORMAL MINIMUM AND ACTUAL DAILY HIGH AND LOW VALUES (FAHRENHEIT) PRECIPITATION IS MEASURED IN INCHES. SCALE IS NON-UNEAR SUNSHINE IS PERCENT OF THE POSSIBLE SUNSHINE
I CERTIFY THAT THIS IS AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, AND IS COMPILED FROM RECORDS ON FILE AT THE NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER, ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA, 2880T
noaa
NATIONAL OCEANIC ANO
ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION
NATIONAL NATIONAL
ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE. DATA CLIMATIC DATA CENTER ANO INFORMATION SERVICE ASHEVILLE NORTH CAROL INA

OIRECTOR
national climatic oata center


METEOROLOGICAL DATA FOR 1984
DENVER. COLORADO
LATITUDE: 39°45'N LO NGITUDE: 104 °‘ JAN|FEB 52* W MAR ELEVAT APR ION: FT MAY (grd ) JUNE 5283 1 JULY ns I ) 52 AUG 32 TI SEP ME ZONE OCT : MOUNT NOV AIN WB DEC AN: 23062 YEAR
TEMPERATURE °F: Averages
"Da i 1y Max i mum 39.0 45.4 48.5 53.5 73.9 80.3 89.0 84.5 74.1 55.1 54.3 45.7 61 .9
"DaI 1y Mini mum 15.5 22.7 25.8 31 .0 46.0 52.7 60.7 59.1 47.2 34.4 25.0 19.9 36.7
-Mon th 1 y 27.3 34.1 37.2 42.3 60.0 66.5 74.9 71.8 60.7 44 8 39.7 32.8 49.3
-Mon th1y Dewp t . 13.0 17.1 22.0 25.2 36.6 44.3 50.2 52.2 39.1 31 .4 19.3 16.7 30.6
Ex tremes
-Hi ghes t 58 64 70 75 90 94 97 90 91 76 76 68 97
-Date 5 1 14 17 23 29 21 29 10 1 1 2 7 JUL 21
-Lowes t -19 9 10 23 34 41 55 53 29 21 12 4 -19
-Date 18 28 5 4 8 10 1 30 28 17 27 14 JAN 18
DEGREE DAYS BASE 65 °F:
Heat i ng 1163 889 854 673 183 51 0 1 183 622 753 990 6362
Coo 1 i ng 0 0 0 0 33 104 315 218 60 0 0 0 730
X OF POSSIBLE SUNSHINE 70 69 58 61 72 62 71 68 67 55 64 73 66
AVG. SKY COVER (tenths)
Sunr i se - Sunse t 4.2 4.4 6.9 6.1 5.8 5.0 4.7 5.1 4.6 5.6 5.8 4.1 5.2
Midnight - Midnight 3.8 4,0 6.0 5.7 5.5 4,7 4.9 5.1 4.5 5.3 4.9 4.4 4.9
NUMBER OF DAYS: Sunrise to Sunset
~C1 ear 15 13 5 7 6 10 -13 8 14 10 8 17 126
-Par t1y Cloudy 7 9 1 1 9 16 14 12 14 7 9 12 7 127
~C1oudy 9 7 15 14 9 6 6 9 9 12 10 7 113
Precipitation
.01 inches or more 4 5 10 12 4 12 12 13 7 9 3 5 96
Snow, Ice pellets
1.0 inches or more 1 3 5 3 0 0 0 0 1 4 2 1 20
Thunders torms 0 0 0 4 5 13 10 12 3 0 1 0 48
Heavy Fog, visibility
1/4 mile or 1 ess 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 6
Temperature °F -Maxi mum
90° and above 0 0 0 0 1 2 14 1 3 0 0 0 21
32° and be 1ow 8 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 19
-Mini mum
32° and below 31 29 29 21 0 0 0 0 4 18 28 27 187
0° and be 1ow 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
AVG. STATION PRESS, (mb) 837.8 833.7 833.4 831.7 835.6 835.8 839.1 839.8 838.5 834.7 834.1 832.7 835.6
RELATIVE HUMIDITY (X)
Hour 05 65 64 70 70 65 72 69 74 71 77 67 70 70
Hour 17 ILocal Tlmel 48 41 48 46 34 36 35 42 40 56 35 47 42
54 47 49 45 31 35 34 45 36 53 38 51 43
Hour 23 63 65 66 66 56 62 56 65 60 71 59 64 63
PRECIPITATION (inches): Water Equ i va1en t
-Total 0.18 0.81 1 . 19 2.42 0.65 1.26 2.11 3.20 0.47 3.47 0.27 0.46 16.49
-Greatest (24 hrs) 0.12 0.39 0.58 1 .08 0.46 0.35 1 .01 1.00 0.39 1.22 0.23 0.30 1.22
-Date 13-14 14 22-23 20-21 6 PM- 1 30-31 12 27-28 4- 5 25-26 13-14 OCT 4- 5
Snow,Ice pellets
-Total 3.4 7.9 12.0 16.8 T 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.2 13.1 2.3 5.0 65.7
-Greatest (24 hrs) -Date 2.4 13-14 3.6 25-26 6.0 22-23 12.3 20-21 T 7 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.9 27-28 9.2 15-16 2.3 25-26 3.0 13-14 12.3 APR 20-21
WIND: Resu1 tan t
-0 i rec t i on ( ! ! ) 172 082 121 360 140 136 154 187 162 118 227 210 158
-Speed Imph) 1 .8 0.3 1 .3 3.2 2.3 1 .2 1 .4 2.3 1.9 0.8 1 .4 1 .2 0.9
Average Speed (mph ) 7.0 9.2 8.7 10.6 8.9 7.9 7.2 6.5 6.9 â–  6.2 7.4 7.2 7.8
Fastest Obs. 1 Min.
-Di rec t i on ( ! ! ) 01 01 29 01 31 18 36 08 21 36 30 30 31
“Speed (mph) 24 36 31 32 40 30 30 29 21 30 30 31 40
-Oate 29 14 7 2 12 19 22 12 23 16 4 21 MAY 12
PEAK GUST
“di rec t i on ( ! ! ) N N w NW SE S NE W w N NW NW w
-Soeed Imph) 38 51 39 52 48 43 45 39 56 40 44 47 56
-Date 29 14 14 11 14 19 19 31 21 16 4 21 SEP 21
I!!) See Reference Notes on Page SB
Page 2


PRECIPITATION i inches)
DENVER. COLORADO
YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC ANNUAL
1 955 0.23 C . 85 1.14 0.48 2.47 1 . 39 2 99 2,41 2 72 0.66 0.56 0.15 16.05
1 95b 0 39 0.77 0.89 0.72 2.36 0 44 4.17 1 83 0.01 0.27 1 . 25 0.62 13.72
1 957 C . 32 0.73 1 . 09 4.13 7.31 1 . 09 1 . 29 2.03 0.42 2.62 0.49 0.06 21.58
1958 0 . 73 1 . 00 1 . 48 1 . 73 4.4b 1 . 47 3.50 1.17 1.51 0.37 0.74 0.64 18.80
1 959 1 . 24 1.31 2.85 1 . 35 3 . 33 0.44 0.83 0.25 1 . 82 2.4fc 0.40 0.26 16.54
1 960 n 77 1 . 66 0.89 2.56 2.27 0.63 1.31 0.06 0.38 2.48 0.49 1 . 50 14.98
1 98 1 0.07 0.66 2.51 1 . 06 4.12 1.11 1 . 60 1.21 4.67 0.77 0.93 0.30 19.01
1 962 1 . 33 1 . 05 0.52 1.10 0.84 1 . 52 0.54 0 46 0.19 0.05 0.88 0.17 8.45
1 963 0.71 0.21 1 42 0.03 0.68 3.59 0.55 2.52 1 . 25 0.31 0.45 0.51 12.23
1 9&4 C . 26 1 . 04 1 . 38 1 . 25 2.53 0.82 0.72 0.27 0.41 0.18 0.88 0.40 10.14
1 965 1 . 00 1 . 27 1 . 20 1 . 05 1 . 82 4.14 6.41 1 . 06 2.58 0.45 0.36 0.53 21.87
1 966 0.30 1 . 28 0.32 1 . 46 0.34 1.41 1 . 04 2.06 1.15 0.96 0.32 0.17 10.81
l 9b 7 0 84 0.39 0.79 3.95 4.77 4 . b9 3.25 0 83 0.60 1.13 1.01 1 . Ob 23.31
1 968 0.51 0.74 0.85 2.39 0.71 0.50 1 . 34 2.53 0.59 0.75 0.71 0.51 12.13
1 969 0.17 0.43 1.10 1 . 33 6.12 2.99 1.81 0.79 1 .67 4.17 0.62 0.32 21.52.
1 970 0.10 0.01 1 . 34 0.97 0.64 3.83 1 .67 0.54 2.47 0.88 1.19 0.09 13.73
1 971 0.35 0.78 0.53 1 . 98 1 . 34 0.23 1 . 20 0 85 2.85 0.44 0.16 0.25 10.96
1 972 0.36 0.44 0.50 3.52 0.49 2.94 0.63 2.71 2.07 0.82 1 . 69 0.70 16 87
1 973 1 . 31 0.16 1 . 76 3 . 73 5.06 0.20 2.47 1 . 28 2.85 0.47 0.83 2.84 22.96
1 974 1 . 03 0.82 1 . 32 2.28 0.06 2.01 2.34 0.16 0.98 1 . 68 1 .06 0.29 14.03
1 975 0.23 0.37 1.19 1.14 2.80 2.11 2.78 2.00 0.24 0.30 1 . 88 0.47 15.51
1 976 0.19 0.54 1 . 34 1 . 27 1 . 34 0.63 2.31 2.50 1 . 88 0.93 0.32 0.16 13.41
1 977 0.16 0.27 1 . 24 2.13 0.34 1 . 02 2.98 1 . 00 0.10 0.48 0.59 0.03 10.34
1 978 0.27 0.27 1 . 07 1 . 82 3.46 1.17 0.54 0.26 0.07 1 . 45 0.50 0.82 11.70
1 979 0.34 0.42 1 . 25 1.41 3.53 2.39 0.81 5.85 0.36 1 .28 1 . 66 1 . 06 20.36
1 980 0.64 0.45 1.15 2.54 2.73 0.09 2.93 1 . 65 0.63 0.10 0.66 0.10 13.67
1 981 0.29 0.35 2.27 1 .01 3.76 0.63 0.90 1.16 0.35 0.79 0.42 0.66 12.59
1982 0.32 0.09 0.18 0.34 3.48 2.26 0.92 1.16 1 . 38 1.51 0.47 2.34 14.45
1 983 0.15 0.07 4.56 2.10 3.62 2.65 1 . 75 1.51 0.13 0.39 2.63 0.63 20.19
1 984 0.18 0.81 1.19 2.42 0.65 1 . 26 2.11 3.20 0.47 3.47 0.27 0.46 16.49
Record
Mean 0.46 0.57 1.14 1 . 99 2.41 1 . 49 1 . 70 1 . 44 1 . 09 1 . 02 0.68 0.63 14.60
See Reference Notes on Page bB. Page 4A
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE (deg. F) Denver, Colorado
YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC ANNUAL
1 955 27.2 27 . 1 36.5 50.1 59.0 64.0 75.5 73 . 1 63.9 54.0 36.2 35.4 50.2
1 956 34.0 27.7 40.1 45.5 60.9 73.4 72.2 69.7 65.5 55.9 37.2 35.7 51.5
1 957 25.8 40.7 39.1 41.4 53.9 65.9 73.5 72.6 61.4 51.4 36.8 39 . b 50.2
1 958 32.9 37.4 32.8 44 . b 61.7 68 . 1 70.3 73.6 b4.4 53.9 40.6 35.8 51 . 4
1 959 30.0 30.2 37.6 45.6 56.2 70.9 72.6 73.0 61.1 48.1 37.6 36.5 50.0
#1960 27.6 24.8 38.1 50.5 57.2 68.3 73.2 73.4 65.0 52.0 39.5 26.5 49.7
1 9b 1 31.7 35.2 38.9 46.0 55.7 66.1 71.5 72.2 56.3 50.0 34.7 27.7 48.9
1962 19.5 29.9 34.6 50.3 59.8 65.5 72.9 72.5 62.4 53.4 41.3 33.8 49.7
1 963 19.1 37.3 37.3 50.0 60.9 66.7 74.8 68.7 65.9 57.9 41.7 28.5 50.8
1 964 30.6 27.4 33.0 46.6 58.8 65.0 75.8 70.4 62.5 52.7 40.0 33.2 49.7
1 965 35.0 27.4 29.0 51.2 57.1 63.9 72.7 70.2 55.7 55.1 43.3 35.0 49.6
1 966 28.6 28.4 42.5 44 . b 58.7 64.6 7b . 9 70.8 65.0 52.2 41.5 31 . 9 50.5
1 967 34.0 35 . 1 42.9 48.2 52.6 60.6 69.1 68.2 62.1 52.5 40.5 26 5 49.4
1 968 29.7 34.2 40.6 43.0 53.9 67.8 71 . 7 68 . 1 60.9 51 . 9 35.7 28.9 48.9
1 9b9 35.0 35.4 32.2 52.2 59.3 61 . 5 74-. 7 73.9 64.5 39.0 39.1 32.5 49.9
1 970 30.6 38.6 33.5 43.7 58.8 65.2 72.0 73.9 59.5 45.9 39.1 33.3 49.5
1 971 32.1 30.6 38.5 47.8 54.2 69.0 70.6 72.8 57.5 49.4 39.1 31.9 49.5
1 972 30.5 36.2 44.8 48.5 57.0 68.3 70.2 71.0 62 . 1 52.1 32.9 24.9 49.9
1 973 27.3 35.5 39.9 43.2 55.6 67.5 71.0 73.5 59.9 54.5 39.5 31.6 49.9
1974 23.7 35.2 43.2 47.9 61.6 68.4 74.7 69.5 59.4 52.4 38.0 31.2 50.5
1 975 31.7 30.6 37.3 44.1 54.3 64.3 72.7 70.8 59.5 53.2 36.8 37.5 49.4
1 97b 32.3 39.3 37.1 49.2 56.7 66.3 75.3 70.2 61.8 48.4 39.5 35.5 51 . 0
1977 29.2 38.0 39.9 51.1 60.7 71.9 74.3 70.2 bb . b 53.3 40.3 35.1 52.5
1978 25.8 31.4 43.3 50.3 54.4 66.9 74.7 69.6 65.0 53.1 37.8 24.6 49.7
1979 18.0 34.2 40.5 49.1 54.8 65.8 73.7 69.5 66.3 53.8 33.3 34.5 49.5
1 980 26.0 34.5 38.0 47.7 57.1 71.9 76.4 73.2 65.8 52.4 41.9 41.2 52.2
1 981 37.3 36.2 41.2 56.4 57.1 70.4 75.9 72.0 68.2 52.6 45.9 35.8 54 . 1
1 982 30.3 32.0 41.1 47.4 55.1 63.1 72.7 73 . 1 61.7 49.0 35.7 30.9 49.3
1 983 31.9 36.6 36.2 41.0 51 . 4 62.8 73 . 3 74.4 64.9 52.7 37.0 17.5 48.3
1 984 27.3 34 . 1 37.2 42.3 60.0 66.5 74.9 71.8 60.7 44.8 39.7 32.8 49.3
Record 50.2
Mean 30.0 32.9 38.7 47.5 56.7 66.7 72.8 71.3 62.8 51.5 39.5 32.3
Max 42.7 45.4 51 . 2 60.2 69.4 80.5 86.6 85.0 77.0 65.4 52.6 44.9 63.4
Min 17.3 20.4 26.1 34 . 8 43.9 52.8 58.9 57.7 48.6 37.6 26.5 19.6 37.0
See Reference Notes on Page bB.
Page 4B


HEATING DEGREE DAYS' Base 65 deg. F
DENVER. COLORADO
SEASON JULY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE TOTAL
1955-56 O 2 1 2 S 336 858 9 1 1 955 10 7 2 764 58 1 14 3 0^ 5748
1956-57 1 20 s s 277 829 90 1 1 206 674 795 701 333 74 5877
1957-58 0 C 1 4 1 420 838 782 986 765 990 606 1 38 36 5702
1958-59 1 4 4 1 06 342 724 898 108 1 968 84 1 572 273 25 5848
1959-60 o 6 1 9 1 5 1 8 81 5 876 115 1 1159 827 4 34 245 38 6260
#1960-61 7 1 3 90 396 759 118 7 1 026 828 804 560 2 8 8 65 6034
1961-62 1 4 O 273 459 902 1150 14 11 976 934 437 1 75 72 6803
1962-63 0 1 9 1 1 2 352 703 96 1 14 17 768 848 4 4 2 1 56 50 5828
1963-64 6 7 29 229 690 1125 1 059 1082 982 545 230 72 6056
1964-65 0 1 6 1 23 375 743 98 1 92 1 104 4 1 1 08 4 1 1 245 63 6030
1965-66 6 7 296 302 645 924 1 1 22 10 17 691 604 204 82 5900
1966-67 O 9 6 1 39 1 699 10 18 954 832 6 79 498 388 1 35 5664
1967-68 4 1 6 1 08 389 729 1186 1086 885 75 1 655 34 3 38 6 1 90
1968-69 1 0 35 1 45 399 87 1 1114 925 82 1 1 O 1 1 378 204 1 4 4 6057
1969-70 2 O 56 80 1 769 998 106 1 734 969 632 200 78 6300
1970-71 0 O 1 98 584 770 977 10 18 958 8 1 7 508 329 25 6 1 84
1971-72 24 0 273 4 79 77 1 10 19 1 063 832 62 1 486 246 4 58 1 8
1972-73 42 1 5 1 07 397 9 6 C 1239 1162 820 7 7 1 64 6 290 56 6505
1973-74 8 O 1 66 32 1 758 1029 1277 83 1 67 1 507 1 37 67 5772
1974-75 0 9 1 99 38 1 803 1 043 1 024 957 852 62 1 332 85 6306
1975-76 o 4 1 95 363 840 843 1 006 740 859 469 254 64 5637
1976-77 0 7 1 42 509 759 907 1105 749 7 7 1 4 1 4 1 37 O 5500
1977-78 2 1 4 38 358 737 920 1 206 936 665 435 335 87 5733
1978-79 o 20 96 366 81 1 1245 1 450 854 75 1 473 3 1 3 8 1 6460
1979-80 0 20 58 347 94 1 939 1 204 876 828 5 1 4 247 9 5983
1980-81 o 4 56 386 683 73 1 853 801 727 260 243 26 4 7 70
1981-82 o 1 2 1 9 375 570 898 107 1 9 1 8 733 522 306 92 551 6
1982-83 3 0 1 5 1 487 875 1 050 10 17 789 885 7 1 2 4 1 9 1 29 65 1 7
1983-84 3 0 87 372 833 1469 1163 889 854 673 1 83 5 1 6577
1984-85 0 1 1 83 622 753 990
See Reference Notes on Page SB. Page 5A
COOLING DEGREE DAYS Base 65 deg. F
DENVER, COLORADO
YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC TOTAL
1969 0 O 0 O 35 * 44 3 1 2 284 46 O 0 0 72 1
1970 0 0 0 â–  0 1 6 93 222 282 40 0 0 0 653
197 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 49 203 248 53 0 0 O 653
1972 0 0 0 0 6 1 1 0 2 1 O 207 28 1 O 0 562
1973 0 0 0 0 2 1 38 1 99 270 2 1 1 0 0 63 1
18 74 0 0 0 0 36 1 76 307 1 57 39 0 0 0 7 1 5
1975 0 0 0 0 3 69 246 1 92 39 5 0 0 554
19 76 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 2 324 1 76 52 0 0 0 667
19 7 7 0 0 0 2 1 1 2 1 4 297 1 82 93 0 0 0 799
1978 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 52 308 1 7 1 1 03 2 0 0 748
1979 0 0 0 O 2 1 1 2 275 1 63 1 02 7 0 0 661
1980 0 0 0 2 1 0 224 358 263 88 1 0 0 946
198 1 0 0 0 7 6 1 95 346 236 1 21 1 0 0 9 1 2
1982 0 0 0 0 6 42 247 257 59 0 0 0 6 1 1
1983 0 0 0 0 7 69 264 30 1 9 1 0 0 0 732
1984 0 0 0 0 33 1 04 3 1 5 2 1 8 60 0 0 0 730
e Notes on Page SB.
Page 5 B
See
Re fenenc


SNOWFALL (inches)
DENVER, COLORADO
SEASON JULY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE TOTAL
1955-56 0.0 0.0 0.0 4 . 1 7.3 2.9 6.3 10.5 13.0 3 . 7 T 0.0 47.8
1956-57 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.6 21.3 6.3 5.3 1 . 6 8.9 25.5 8 8 0.0 78.3
1957-58 0.0 0.0 T 3.9 3.0 0.8 8.9 12.0 14.4 14.1 0.0 0.0 57.1
1958-59 0.0 0.0 T 2.6 9.7 7 . 7 17.4 17.5 26.8 17.6 T 0.0 99.3
1959-60 0.0 0.0 12.9 11.8 5.3 2.7 10.7 18.3 9.0 9.3 T 0.0 80.0
1960-61 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.6 5.1 17.8 1 . 0 7.9 29.2 8.6 6.4 0.0 80.6
1961-62 0.0 0.0 5.8 6.2 11.4 3.8 17.2 11.3 6.8 10.0 0.0 0.0 72.5
1962-63 0.0 0.0 0.7 0.0 5.0 1 . 2 9 . 1 2 . 1 18.0 0.2 0.0 0.0 36.3
1963-64 0.0 0.0 0.0 1 .1 3.5 5.9 2.6 12.7 18.4 12.1 1 . 0 0.0 57.3
1964-65 0.0 0.0 0.0 T 6.0 4.4 13.2 17.1 14.9 0.3 T 0.0 55.9
1965-66 0.0 0.0 5.5 0.0 5.5 5.6 3.6 14.6 2.8 6.4 2.9 0.0 46.9
1966-67 0.0 0.0 T 8.3 3.0 1 . 9 9.9 4.4 6 6 3.6 3.0 0.0 40.7
1967-68 0.0 0.0 0.0 1 . 7 9.4 13.1 3.0 7 . 3 9.2 15.1 T 0.0 58.8
1968-69 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 5.8 6.9 2.8 4.2 13.2 T o o 0.0 33.3
1969-70 0.0 0.0 0.0 31.2 5.1 3.1 0.9 0.3 20.5 4.7 T 0.0 65.8
1970-71 0.0 0.0 4.6 5.9 9.2 0.9 8.6 11.9 9.6 6.0 T 0.0 56.7
1971-72 0.0 0.0 17.2 3 . 1 1 . 4 8.4 10.9 9 . 1 7 . 1 17.2 0.0 0.0 74.4
1972-73 0.0 0.0 0.0 9.7 19.4 9.8 12.1 3.0 15.1 24.8 1 . 0 0.0 94.9
1973-74 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.3 9.3 30.8 8.2 10.3 12.8 17.8 0.0 T 91 .5
1974-75 0.0 0.0 1 . 8 1 . 0 11.9 2. 1 3.6 4,0 14.3 10.9 6 . 1 0.0 55.7
1975-76 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.7 15.2 7 . 3 3.2 6.4 18.7 1 .2 0.0 0.0 54.7
1976-77 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.2 4.5 3 . 1 2.4 3 . 1 9.6 4.7 0.0 0.0 34.6
1977-78 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.3 4 . 1 0.7 5.5 6.2 8.6 4.6 13.5 0.0 46.5
1978-79 0.0 0.0 T 2.7 6.9 14.2 9 . 1 5.8 18.2 8.1 8.2 0.0 73.2
1979-80 0.0 0.0 o o 2.7 22.3 16.5 12.3 9.6 12.1 10.0 T 0.0 85.5
1980-81 0.0 0.0 0.0 1 .5 7 . 1 1 . 2 4 . 1 4 . 3 24.0 2.9 T 0.0 45 . 1
1981-82 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.8 3 . 3 9.9 4.8 1 . 8 2 . 1 2.0 T 0.0 26.7
1982-83 0.0 0.0 0.0 1 . 2 1 . 8 27 . 1 1 . 3 0.8 30.5 11.3 7.6 0.0 81.6
1983-84 0.0 0.0 T T 29.3 11.5 3.4 7,9 12.0 16.8 T 0.0 80.9
1984-85 0.0 0.0 5.2 13.1 2.3 5.0
Record Mean 0.0 0.0 1 . 6 3.7 8 . 1 7.0 7.7 7.4 13.1 9.3 1 . 9 o o 59.8
See Reference Notes on Page SB. Page feA
REFERENCE NOTES Denver. Colorado
GENERAL EXCEPTIONS
T - TRACE AMOUNT.
BLANK ENTRIES DENOTE MISSING/UNREPORTED OATA. PAGE 3
f INDICATES A STATION OR INSTRUMENT RELOCATION. 1. FASTEST MILE WINDS ARE THROUGH AUGUST 1981.
SEE STATION LOCATION TABLE ON PAGE 8.
SPECIFIC PAGE 2
PM - INCLUOES LAST OAT OF PREVIOUS MONTH PAGE 3
(a) - LENGTH OF RECORO IN YEARS, ALTHOUGH INDIVIDUAL MONTHS MAY BE MISSING.
* LESS THAN .05
NORMALS - BASED ON THE 1551-1580 RECORD PERIOD.
EXTREMES - DATES ARE THE MOST RECENT OCCURRENCE HIND DIR.- NUMERALS SHOH TENS OF DEGRESS CLOCKHISE FROM TRUE NORTH, ’00" INDICATES CALM.
RESULTANT DIRECTIONS ARE GIVEN TO HHOLE DEGREES.
PAGES 4A, 4B, 6A
RECORD MEANS ARE FOR ENTIRE PERIOD OF RECORD,
REGARDLESS OF LOCATION
Pago &B


STATION LOCATION
DENVER, COLORAX
• o u
1 I s
Latitude
Nor th
Longitude
West
Elevation above
Sea
level
E ;
I :
: •
; i l
s ' 1
:
I IS*
t i*;
I !.!
5 j =;
S ; < -
1 Tvpe M« AMOS T-ALTOB
One or more locations
16th (formerly C Street) & Larimer Streets
Woodward Building on Market (formerly Holiday Street) between 15th 6. 16th Streets
McClintock Block 16th Street
Broadwell Block on Larimer Street
Tabor Block, 16th 6 Larimer Streets
Patterson & Thomas Block 17th 6 Curtis Streets
Club Building
1700 Block on Arapahoe
Street
U. S. Post Office 16th & Arapahoe Streets
Boston Building 17th 6 Champa Streets
New Post Office Building 19th 6 Stout Streets
Administration Building Stapleton Airfield
WB-FAA Building Stapleton Airfield t
t Stapleton Int'l AP (Effective 10/1/64)
W. B. Forecast Office ft Stapleton International Airport
tt Weather Service Fcst Office
(Effective 1970)
Weather Service Fcst Office
Stapleton International Airport
11/1859
11/10/71
3/15/73
11/30/75
7/1/77
6/13/81
12/1/87
5/1/91
10/1/95
12/8/04
1/29/16
9/15/31
6/25/47
5/7/69
1/20/82
3/15/73
11/30/75
7/1/77
6/13/81
12/1/87
5/1/91
10/1/95
12/8/04
1/29/16
Present
6/25/47
5/7/69
350' ESE 200’ ENE 200' WSW 1100’ ESE 375' N
600' SW 800* E 1000' ENE
NA
0.3 mi.NW
39° 45' 39° 45'
105® 00' 105® 00'
39 o
39°
39®
39°
39®
39®
39®
39®
39®
39°
105®
105*
105*
105*
105*
105*
105*
105®
104®
104®
104° 52'
5177
5212
5214
5214
5204
5218 5229
5214
5219 5221
5292
15283
136
M72
J20
♦32 #32
I
45 | 44 73 72
86 , 86
NA
d98
I 48 52
♦ 50 60 86 79
97
74
119
98
c
42
5
J5
Voluntary observers, broken record.
Estimated.
♦ - Estimated.
a - Effective 6/13/96. b - Effective 3/1/10.
c - Removed 4/1/50. d - Installed 4/1/50.
e - Installed 3/31/50.
f - Effective 2/1/57.
g - Effective 7/8/60. Fastest mile
data from 40' prior to 7/12/60.
h - Conrnissioned 5200' ESE of therm-mometer site 8/1/60.
1 - Effective 8/1/60.
J - Not moved 5/7/69.
SUBSCRIPTION:
Price and ordering information available through: National Climatic Data Center, Federal Building, Asheville, North Carolina 28801
USCOW-NOAA-ASHEVILLE - 18 50
US. DEPARIMENI OF COMMERCE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNIIT EMPLOYER
NATIONAL CLIMATIC OAIA CENTER
federal building
ASHEVILLE, N.C. 28801
POSTAGE AND FEES PAID U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE COM 210
FIRST CLASS


DENVER SOLAR CHART


HEATING DEGREE DAYS, BASE 65* F COOLING DEGREE DAYS
HEATING AND COOLING CHART, DENVER, COLORADO
NORMAL HEATING DEGREE DAYS NORMAL COOLING DEGREE DAYS —----- SUN ANGLE
DATA SOURCE: U S. WEATHER BUREAU 1941-1970, DENVER
SUN ANGLE,


PROGRAM


Interview with Maggie Gilboy -- A RECENT YADDO GUEST — November 18, 1986
S • S •: Where did you stay?
M-G-: In a small house with two other THREE MINUTES WALK FROM MY STUDIO- PEOPLE- It WAS ABOUT
S-S- : What was your studio like?
M-G-: It was huge -- about 25x35 feet- It STOVE- WAS HEATED BY A WOOD
S-S-: Natural light?
M-G-: There were skylights to the north- WAS CONTROLLED BY CURTAINS- Glare from the view windows
S-S- : HOW MANY GUESTS WERE THERE?
M-G-: Twelve -- the main house was closed FOR THE WINTER-
S-S- : What about meals?
M-G- : Dinner was served in the main dining room but you could have a TRAY IN YOUR ROOM- A COMMUNAL BREAKFAST WAS SERVED FROM 8:00 TO 9:00 AND LUNCH BAGS AND THERMOSES WERE DISTRIBUTED THEN-
S-S-: What was it like being there?
M-G- : The isolation was very uncomfortable but very productive -- I LONG TO RETURN- I FOUND MY OWN WORK PATTERN WITHOUT OTHER PEOPLE AROUND- I EXPERIENCED A BURST OF ENERGY- I COULD EXPERIMENT BECAUSE OF THE SENSE OF PRIVACY- No ONE CAN VISIT YOUR STUDIO UNINVITED- IT WAS AN EMOTIONAL SHOCK, A TIME OF


SELF-EXAMINATION. THE ENVIRONMENT WAS CONDUCIVE TO CONCENTRATION- I'VE HEARD THAT IN THE SUMMER THERE IS A DISTRACTING, COUNTRY CLUB ATMOSPHERE-
S-S-: Did you have your car with you?
M-G•: No- It was good that it was an effort to get into Saratoga-
It was a 20 minute walk or you could ride in and be dropped off
FOR AN HOUR AND PICKED UP- I WENT TO TOWN TWICE IN A MONTH-
Car owners were distracted by requests for rides to town or the
AIRPORT-
S-S-: Was there a television?
M*G-: Oh, no! but one woman had one with a three-inch screen with
HER.
S-S-: Was there a library?
(1 • G-: Yes- It had a great selection of periodicals-S-S-: Did anyone show their work?
M-G-: A PLAY WRITE ASKED PEOPLE TO ACT OUT A SCENE SHE WAS WORKING
ON-
S-S-: Were you provided with any special facilities? a dark room? sculptor's tools?
M-G-: No, BUT SPATIAL NEEDS WERE ACCOMMODATED- YOU STATE THE PROJECT
YOU INTEND TO WORK ON IN YOUR APPLICATION- I BROUGHT WHAT I THOUGHT I WOULD NEED- At TIMES I HAD TO MAKE DO WHICH WASN'T BAD-


PROGRAM
Space Requirements
Main Building/Ranch House Resident Apartment
Bedroom 150 sq ft
Bath 50 sq ft
Studio/L-R- 400 SQ FT
Kitchen
Dining Room
Lounge/Gallery
Library
Workout Room
Video Room
Entry
Laundry
Storage
HVAC
Circulation a 15%
Optional Lap Pool & Sun Space
Out Buildings/Studios a 10 units Studio/Bedroom/Living Area Bath
Pullman Kitchen Storage
Horse Barn/Storage Garage Gross Sq Ft
600 SQ FT
500
50
25
25
200 SQ FT
300 SQ FT
600 SQ FT
200 SQ FT
200 SQ FT
100 SQ FT
100 SQ FT
50 SQ FT
200 SQ FT
50 SQ FT
2W0 SQ FT
420 SQ FT
3220 SQ FT
1500 SQ FT
W7W SQ FT
6000 SQ FT
500 SQ FT
11200 SQ FT


Design Issues
Plan
Connections are very important between individual studios
AND THE MAIN BUILDING AND BETWEEN THE STUDIOS THEMSELVES-
It is thru pedestrian paths and the orientation of entry
POINTS THAT THE NECESSARY BALANCE OF COMMUNITY AND PRIVACY WILL BE ACHIEVED-
Form
I HAVE CHOSEN TO DESIGN AN ART COLONY BECAUSE ONE IS FREED OF PRECONCEIVED NOTIONS OF BUILDING TYPE- FORMS WILL BE GENERATED IN RESPONSE TO THE LANDSCAPE AND TESTED WITH THE CONCEPT OF "SPEAKING ARCHITECTURE" AND WITH LEDOUX'S DICTUM
that "Everything that is not indispensable tires the eye,
DISTURBS THOUGHT AND ADDS NOTHING TO THE CONCEPTION-"
(Visionary Architecture, p- 67)
Materials
In the interest of contrast it is anticipated that materials WILL NOT BE OF THE SORT USUALLY THOUGHT OF AS "ORGANIC-"
Color
Architectural colour is a relational, developmental SYSTEM WHICH IS CLEARLY LINKED TO THE SPECIFIC CHARACTER OF EACH DESIGN PROGRAMME-
Particularly, industrial buildings are a natural
SUBJECT FOR A CHROMATIC STATEMENT FOR INDUSTRIAL ZONES OFTEN OCCUPY VAST AREAS OF SPACE AND ARE REMOVED FROM THE TRADITIONAL CONTEXT-
Jean-Philippe Lenclos (Color for Architects, p- 77)


SPACE TYPE: WM&g
FUNCTION: ALI AlHq > PI^PlAt' £, Dl^s^le^ioH Or%/0¥Y-
USERS: A^
ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS:
P?Pt==£?Pi=S PlH^2- C&CM^CH U&
HAv-^qiMq erUPic?
IMPPtOMPTU ^bHPVP7 3 V\^C^3^b\G\\^
WAlL- PLA^SeP? “TCP ^Ttup p£>P- ^HvPPPAfloU
APlIAopHPIPP? — tMi^p P^OM C^HH&sT WITH
Ae> KlAHV O'XW&e- ^?PAlpp? A^ wyb
e?gp PM-L-VAt5
OBJECTIVES:
SQUARE FOOTAGE:
upahqp N A-r -rvte
£*>r t^p«?


SPACE TYPE: ¥-Mc\\ \\Oc%£&. D\HlVA ^^\AUZ-lHq USERS: All
Vl'c^AL- oo\AyA^ot\ V. ^7TtXf\(D^ _^l

Vi^JAu <^HRe=cti£>H "to ^xd\p\c?^ o imVitiH^

SQUARE FOOTAGE:


SPACE TYPE: FAHcU Woo
FUNCTION: hi ^AL- f^FAFATloH
USERS: ^IP^HT - AL^9 C^B&V Afti^T^ eXT^HT
ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS:
AlT^fehl A^ A R-AsB F£>F- ee^lAUZ-INCj ^Meri MeA>
H££fc^b Pae»U^ R9P- f^OV—
Ipl^ MEAu^ ^ (ZtXOV-K^ f&p- vAVcMJB^ AHt? ^AlAoK^b
C^V^w^y’
OBJECTIVES:
£//V£: CA^AU, ^ha'M F££UHq
gAe^ "T£? tzxcex-' \V-WOtP d> &£\Ao\/& \VAe^r ee
SQUARE FOOTAGE:
A bc-JA<^K(SlE^


SPACE TYPE: s/WD&O 1
FUNCTION: ^sl\Xy&&
USERS: AU-
ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS:
TV
OBJECTIVES:
tHI^ \V- HP VIEW/
- uxlHqe ecir ppw/A^/
SQUARE FOOTAGE:


SPACE TYPE: t-l^|
FUNCTION: , tz^LA^ATI^H
USERS: ALU
ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS:
OBJECTIVES:
VI&W 'WodUO && Hlag: — i~0t\q Vi£\V
HiqHT f^Atz-r L^aHQg
M^FTTAiMe?
SQUARE FOOTAGE:


SPACE TYPE: uAp
FUNCTION: )
USERS: AL-L-ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS:
FLA
OBJECTIVES:
"TI4I*& ^HcUUP AUlQH-MIW1MAU ^^PAiPATt^H FWH ^ar t->&ov-
PlKlMC, £, V<9P-F-£?zJT F£C?M CWXTP^A'Z.ig
THl^ e>pAa^
F&F- IK1KKAL- WIWPO\V^; INl^HAU V)£V^
SQUARE FOOTAGE:

<5i

^s>
£>
HT^>

pat r?%?u-


SPACE TYPE: MT ¥^>0\A
FUNCTION: CeOCAk^A ZlNCj
USERS: ALU
ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS:
^VlHq M/^FVlHP <&T^p\Y^-
f VPtAT £L^P
VI^V TO t?iFI^9H
- LAP ffcOU , ^zo^M
OBJECTIVES:
V^HTILATIOW
SQUARE FOOTAGE:


SPACE TYPE: \\o PAP-H
FUNCTION: }
USERS: T^^li^HT;
ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS:
HAV
£ ^rTA
OBJECTIVES:
SQUARE FOOTAGE:


SPACE TYPE: ^iXXP\0 *4 - lO M\T<&
FUNCTION: U£jHT PPgP, GO'r'r&£ MA44 , &&&?- ^XiO^C^: y CL£M\
USERS: /vlF^l^T ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS:
hte?r fuate? , )-m^H cah
OBJECTIVES:
09HPA^T
ID
\VAuU \V
SQUARE FOOTAGE:


SPACE TYPE: c$Tl\C>\0//-i V■H£j -)0aH\T^
FUNCTION: \V<9PPlMq ^ AT-l^lHq
USERS: APH^T
ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS:
P>Pt? , TA^UP, CHAIF^
|_AP^£ TA^US- P?9P- PPAVlUCj
^P-fcSESH^ ~TD PAPTITIOK
OBJECTIVES:
VAF-lEnV c?P MC,HT
RJP'Uc^
£H V. OtfX'pcc*?^ fd&UC £ PPIVAT^ OcXt>ooV-e?'FtC&
\V HmH p*UlLt?iH£j 4 £?TttEP- ^p\cA\p\c^
PP)VAT£ .'
• pd^T-lC-
SQUARE FOOTAGE:


SPACE TYPE: e’ATHlWM - \o
FUNCTION:
USERS: P^^IP>EHT ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS:
OBJECTIVES:
MuiiMAL-
~XO
w/al-u V. ~t<9 minimize F^JHg?)Nq
SQUARE FOOTAGE: €*? ^.p.


ZONING


ZONING
Agricultural
35 AC PER SINGLE FAMILY UNIT Requirements
A RESIDENTIAL NON“URBAN P•U-D- REQUIRES 17 1/2 AC PER UNIT-SPECIAL USE REVIEW FOR A GUEST RANCH WOULD REQUIRE 35 AC OR
more- Seventy-five percent of the property must remain in
AGRICULTURAL USE---GRAZED IN THIS CASE-
Special Use Review
Special use review would be based on:
1) Water—might have to buy water rights for a
COMMERCIAL WELL
2) Septic Permit---over 2000 gallons would requipe a
SPECIAL USE PERMIT
3) Access
A) COMPATABILITY WITH SURROUNDING USES
Approval
Due to the generous acreage involved (240 AC) ready approval
IS ANTICIPATED-




BUILDING CODE SEARCH
Project Name: Art Ranch Location: South of Boulder, Colorado Application Code Name: Universal Building Code Date: 1982
ITEM REFERENCE
FIRE ZONE: RURAL
OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATION: R-l (R-3 applies Chapter 12
IF STUDIOS ARE FREE STANDING) TABLE 5~A
PRINCIPAL OCCUPANCY: convents & monasteries?
(actually a guest ranch)
OCCUPANCY SEPARATIONS REQUIRED:
STORAGE/LAUNDRY TO MAIN = 1 HOURS FIRE RESISTIVE
CONSTRUCTION TYPE: V Table 5-C, 5-D
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA: Sections 505, 506, 507
10,500 SQ FT IF V ONE-HOUR TABLE 5~C
If adjacent to open area on two or more sides: Sec 506-1
N-A.
If over one story: Sec 505 b-
Total twice what permitted in 5-C
If sprinklered: Sec 506-3C
Tripled in 1 story Doubled in multi-story


MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE HEIGHT:
Secs 505, 506, 507 Table 5-D
Feet: 50 ft if V one-hour Stories: 3 if V one-hour
FIRE RESISTANCE OF EXTERIOR WALL (see occupancy type
AND CONSTRUCTION TYPE):
1 HR LESS THAN 5 FT - R-l
OPENINGS IN EXTERIOR WALLS (see occupancy type and
CONSTRUCTION TYPE):
NOT PERMITTED LESS THAN 5 FT - R~1
WINDOWS REQUIRED IN ROOMS:
WINDOW AREA: 10% OF FLOOR AREA (MIN- 10 SQ FT)
FOR GUEST ROOMS,
i -- DORMITORIES AND HABITABLE ROOMS 1 1/2 SQ FT NATURAL VENTILATION REQUIRED FOR BATHROOMS WATER CLOSETS LAUNDRY & SIMILAR ROOMS
ENCLOSED OR SEMI"ENCLOSED COURTS " SIZE REQUIRED:
MINIMUM CEILING HEIGHTS IN ROOMS:
7 FT 6 IN IN HABITABLE SPACES
7 FT 0 IN IN KITCHENS, HALLS, BATHROOMS & TOILET COMPARTMENTS
MINIMUM FLOOR AREA OF ROOMS:
NOT LESS THAN 70 SQ FT EXCEPT FOR KITCHENS
Table 5-A Table 5-A Sec 1205 a
Sec 1206 c Sec 1207
Sec 1207 a


FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS: Exterior bearing walls Interior bearing walls
Table 43-A Tables 43-A, 43-B
Tables 43-A, 43-B Table 43-A Table 43-B
Exterior non-bearing walls
Structural frame Permanent partitions Vertical openings Floors Roofs
Table 43-C Table 43-C
Exterior doors
Inner court walls
Mezzanine floors (area allowed)
Roof coverings Boiler room enclosure
STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS: Table 43-A
Framework Stairs Floors Roofs
Partitions
EXITS:
Occupancy load - bases (square feet/occupant)
Table 33-A (p•570)
Occupancy type R-l Basis 15 sq ft /occupant
Actual load Sec 3302(a)!-
Number of exits required
1
Sec 3303
Minimum width of exits
Sec 3303(b)
Exit separation arrangement
Sec 3303(c)


Maximum allowable travel distance 150 FT TO EXIT Sec 3303(d)
WITH SPRINKLERS 200 FT
Allowable exit sequence THRU 1 ADJOINING ROOM Sec 3303(e)
Exit doors:
Minimum width 3 FT Sec 3304
Maximum leaf width 4 FT Sec 3304(E)
Width required for number of OCCUPANTS Sec 3303(b)
Exit corridors:
Minimum allowable width 44 IN Sec 3305
Required to have exit at each yes END OF CORRIDOR? Sec Sec 3305(b) 3305(c)
Dead end corridors allowed? NOT TO EXCEED 20 FT Maximum length
Wall fire resistance required 1 HR F-R. FOR OCCUPANCY OF 10 or MORE Sec 3305(G)
Doors and frames fire resistance required
YES WHERE 1 F-R- REQUIRED FOR HALL


STAIRS:
Minimum width
44 IN OCC- LOAD OF 50
36 IN OCC- LOAD OF 49
30 IN OCC- LOAD OF 10
Maximum riser allowed 7 1/2 in
Minimum tread allowed 10 IN
Exception 8 in rise/9 in tread
Are winders allowed?
Yes
Landings Minimum size
WIDTH OF STAIR
Maximum size required
4 FT
Maximum vertical distance between landings 12 FT VERTICALLY
Minimum vertical distance between landings
Required height of rails
30-34 IN ABOVE NOSE OF TREAD
Handrails
11/4-2 IN CROSS SECTIONAL DIMENSION 1 1/2 IN FROM WALL
Required at each side yes
Sec 3306
Sec 3306(c)
Sec 3306(j)


Intermediate rails required at stairs
Maximum width between int- rails a 88 in
Exceptions applicable
44 IN WIDE OR LESS CAN HAVE 1 RAIL
Height above nosing 30-34 in
Balusters required
SUCH THAT A SPHERE 6 IN IN DIAMETER CANNOT SEC 1711
PASS THRU
Ramps:
Maximum slope
12% FOR HANDICAP LANDINGS AT TOP AND BOTTOM
AND FOR EACH 5 FT OF RISE SEC 3307


CONCLUSION


CONCLUSION
AS STATED IN THE INTRODUCTION, MY PRIMARY INTEREST IN THIS THESIS PROJECT WAS IN RESPONDING TO A PARTICULAR LANDSCAPE WITH A COMPOSITION OF GEOMETRIC FORMS- "FORMS" SOON BECAME "FORM", A DECISION DICTATED BY THE NATURE OF THE LANDSCAPE AND BY CONSIDERATIONS OF VISUAL IMPACT- THE SITE IS VERY EXPOSED AND SUFFERS OCCASIONAL BOUTS OF EXTREME WEATHER---IT WOULD BE POSSIBLE TO FREEZE TO DEATH OR BLOW AWAY WALKING BETWEEN BUILDINGS- The landscape is very bold and remarkable for its
LACK OF DISTRUPTIVE ELEMENTS----TREES, BUILDINGS- TO SCATTER
SMALL BUILDINGS ABOUT WOULD HAVE DILUTED THE LANDSCAPE'S FORCE; AND THE SCALE OF THOSE BUILDINGS WOULD HAVE CREATED A VERY MINOR AND UNFOCUSED BUILDING STATEMENT- A SINGLE FORM PRESERVED THE IMPACT OF THE LANDSCAPE WHILE ENHANCING THE BUILDING STATEMENT-
After several false starts I recognized the shallow pyramid as
THE BUILDING FORM- THE PYRAMID'S RELATIONSHIP TO THE LANDSCAPE WAS TOO PERFECT TO BE IGNORED (SEE SITE SECTION UNDER DRAWINGS)-
The volume of the pyramid and its slope are nearly equivalent to
THE HILLTOP WHICH IT REPLACES----IT RECALLS THE LANDFORM-
The pyramid is an especially wonderful shape---stable yet pointed. Historically the pyramids were tombs for or temples to THE GODS- More importantly, the pyramid is thought of as a focus
OF ENERGY AND THAT SPEAKS OF THE FUNCTION OF THE BUILDING- ART COLONIES OF THIS SORT PROVIDE FOR THE ARTIST'S BASIC NEEDS, FREE HIM FROM ORDINARY DISTRACTIONS, AND ALLOW HIM TO FOCUS HIS ENERGIES ON HIS ART- REMARKABLE INCREASES IN PRODUCTIVITY OFTEN RESULT-
The plan of the building was, of course, controlled by the
NECESSITY OF HOLDING THE EDGES OF THE PYRAMIDAL FORM- THE AREAS AT THE PERIMETER THAT DID NOT HAVE SUFFICIENT HEADROOM TO BE ENCLOSED BECAME PRIVATE PATIOS- THE BAND OF REASONABLE CEILING HEIGHT BECAME THE STUDIOS AND LIVING SPACES- THE AREA WITHIN THAT BAND BECAME THE ESSENTIAL SHELTERED COURTYARD- IT WAS PAINFUL TO WATCH THE PURITY OF FORM WHICH I STARTED WITH CUT AWAY TO ACCOMODATE FUNCTION BUT WONDERFUL TO FIND THAT THE FORM


DICTATED A PLAN OF SIMPLICITY, CLARITY AND GRACE NOT USUALLY FOUND IN BUBBLE DIAGRAM DICTATED BUILDINGS- PERHAPS FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION" IS A DICTUM REQUIRING SOME EXAMINATION-


DRAWINGS


SITE PLAN - 240 ac
SCALE 1 IN 200 FT


PARTIAL SITE PLAN * 20 ac
SCALE I IN «0 f


EAST/WEST PARTIAL SITE SECTION
SCALE 1 IN 40 FT




SECTION BB
SCALE 1/8 IN 1 FT


SOUTHEAST ELEVATION
SCALE 1/8 IN 1 FT
SCALE 1/8 IN
FT


-u. 4-
ELEVATION
GARAGE - 10 CARS
SCALE 1 /8 IN: 1 FT


LIVING/DINING AREA


oiams ivoidAi




BIBLIOGRAPHY


BIBLIOGRAPHY
Books, Reports, Articles
Hitchcock, Henry-Russell- Architecture: 19th and 20th Centuries, 1977-
Impact Environmental Consultants- "Varra Companies Jenkins Mine Site-" February, 1982-
"Jenkins Site Application of Mined Land Reclamation Permit in Boulder County-" January, 1986
Kahn, Louis, Dominique De Menil, et al- Visionary Architects, 1968-
Mazria, Edward- Jjie Passive Solar Energy Book, 1979-
Peppiatt, Michael and Alice Bellony-Rewald- Imaginations Chamber, 1982 -
Denver Planning Department- Planning for Climate and Solar Energy, ____-
Porter, Tom and Byron Mikellides- Color For Architecture, 1976-
Porter, Tom- Architectural Color, 1982-
USDA Soil Conservation Service- Soil Survey of Boulder County Area, Colorado, 1975-


Interviews
Vaidas Daukantas Sculptor, Installations
Clare Forster Painter, Xerographer
Maggie Gilboy Painter
John Matlack Painter, Landscape
Greg Oxenfeld Landuse and Planning Boulder County
George Peters Sculptor, Installations
Bill Vielehr Sculptor, Castings
Delani Wheeler Assistant Director Parks and Open Space
George Woodman Painter, Colorist


APPENDIX


MEDIA
STUDY
SOLO
EXHIBITIONS
GROUP
EXHIBITIONS
INTERNATIONAL
JURIED
EXHIBITIONS
NATIONAL
JURIED
EXHIBITIONS
CLARE CHANLER FORSTER 815 Spruce Street Boulder, Colorado 80302 (303) 449-3002
Xerography
Art Students League, New York City National Academy School of Design, New York City American University of Beirut, (Chicago Art Institute Instructor)
Bridge Gallery, Boulder, Public Library Photocraft Gallery, Boulder
Printmaking Council of New Jersey International Society of Copier Artists Show
Institute for Design and Experimental Art, Sacramento, CA, International Bookworks, curator Judith Hoffberg, "Editions and Additions"
Arizona State University, "Editions and Additions,"
Loretto Heights College, Denver, "12 Colorado Artists"
Downtown Gallery, Honolulu, Hawaii
Following Sea Gallery, Honolulu
Dorothy Matthews Gallery, Philomath, Oregon
Rare Discoveries Gallery, Dallas, Texas
Sebastian Moore Gallery, Denver, "Craft New Directions"
Grant Street Art Center, Denver, Women's Invitational Hartnett Gallery, University of Rochester, ISCAGRAPHICS Astoria 10-22-38, University of Maryland, Baltimore County Contemporary Arts Center, Honolulu, Collaborations Colorado Gallery of the Arts, Arapahoe Community College Cohen Gallery, Denver
New York Public Library, Donnell Branch, ISCA Show Newark Public Library, ISCA Show
Editions and Additions, University of California, Riverside Sarah Lawrence College, ISCA show, bookart
Young Artists of the Middle East, Near East College Assoc. Women in Design International, award in theatrical design Women in Design International, award in paperart/printmaking Electrostatics International, Cleveland, Ohio
Sixth National Small Works Exhibition, Prescott-Groos Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico Ariel Gallery, SoHo, New York, juror Rose Slivka National Paperworks, Las Vegas Art Museum All on Paper, A.A.0. Gallery, Buffalo, NY Copycat Show, Franklin Furnace Gallery, New York, NY Marietta College Crafts National, Marietta, Ohio Toys Designed by Artists, Arkansas Art Center Miniature Painters, Sculptors, Gravers, Washington, D.C.
30th Annual Drawing and Small Sculpture Show, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana
Alternatives 1986 Traveling Exhibition, Ohio University College of Fine Arts
16th National Works on Paper Exhibition, Minot State College, North Dakota.


REGIONAL
JURIED
EXHIBITIONS
WORKS IN THE COLLECTION OF
ADDITIONAL BOOKART WORK
SLIDE
LECTURES
PANEL MEMBER
•Own Your Own Art', Sangre de Cristo Arts Center, Pueblo, Colorado, jurors Michael Crane, David Turner 'Arts '85', Boulder Center for the Visual Arts, juror Jane Fudge
Colorado Artist Craftsmen '85, Arvada Center, juror Lois Moran
Boulder Center for the Visual Arts, All Boulder '85 Crafts Biennial '84, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Colorado '83, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Five-state, Contemporary Realism, Leslie Levy Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona Fiber Hawaii, juror Arturo Sandoval Sculpture Hawaii, juror Bruce Beasley
Hawaii Craftsmen, jurors five consecutive years: Dorothy
Garwood, James Melchert, Paul Smith, Helen Drutt, Rose Slivka Artists of Hawaii, juror Mary Beebe, director, Portland Center of Visual Arts
Artists of Hawaii, juror Wayne Thiebaud, UC, Davis Hawaii Artists League, juror Patterson Sims, Whitney Museum Xerographies, Honolulu
Honolulu Printmakers, juror Arthur Secunda Honolulu Printmakers, juror Ulfert Wilke Art in City Buildings, Honolulu Honolulu Printmakers Limited Size, ('78-'82)
Hawaii Craftsmen Traveling Exhibitions, ('78, '80, ’82)
Hawaii Artists League, New Directions
Cleveland Institute of Art
Patterson Sims, Associate Curator, Whitney Museum
Judith Hoffberg, curator bookart, publisher Umbrella
Sackner Archives of Concrete and Visual Poetry
Boston Museum of Fine Arts Library
Honolulu Academy of Arts
Contemporary Arts Center, Honolulu
Hawaii State Foundation on Culture & the Arts
Xerox Corporation, Honolulu
Castle and Cooke, Inc., Honolulu
City and County of Hawaii
Flora Biddle, Chairman Whitney Museum Board of Directors University of California Santa Barbara Library Deloitte, Haskins, Sells
CODEX '85, Denver
B. Cushman Xerography Calendar '84, San Francisco
Printed Matter, New York, NY
Franklin Furnace Archives, New York, NY
Iolani School, Kaimuki Library, Kauai Community College
'Dialogue in Design' Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hawaii Craftsmen
'Insights Into Creativity' Front Range, Arapahoe Community College
JUROR
Form and Fiber II, City Hall, Honolulu


JOHN W. MATLACK 1357 93rd Avenue Oakland, California 94603 (415) 635-7198
Born
March 11, 1946: Santa Monica, California Education * •
University of California, Berkeley: M.A. Painting, 1985 University of California, Santa Barbara: Tutorial, 1970
Experience
• 1984: Moved to California to attend Graduate School at UC Berkeley.
• May - June 1983: Christo's "Surrounded Islands" Project;
Miami, Florida. Sculptor's assistant.
• September 1981 - July 1982: Lived and worked in New York
at Canal Street Studio.
• 1978 - 1981: Painted part time, full time partner in Boulder,
Colorado restuarant, which was sold in June 1981.
• August - September 1976: Christo's "Running Fence" Project
Sonoma County, California. Sculptor's assistant.
• 1975 - 1978: Bill Williamson, Design Detail
Santa Barbara, California and Honolulu, Hawaii.
Various graphic and architectural detail projects.
• 1974: Acquired downtown studio in Boulder, Colorado.
• July 1982: Christo's "Valley Curtain" Project
Rifle, Colorado. Sculptor's assistant.
• June 1970: Graduated from the University of California, Santa Barbara.
• June 1968: Acquired cabin on Magnolia Road, west of Boulder, Colorado.
• 1964 - 1968: National Park Service, Yellowstone National Park;
Back Country Patrolman. It was during this period that I developed an intense interest in landscape and mapping.
1


JOHN W. MATLACK (415) 635-7198
One Person Exhibitions
Colorado Showcase, Boulder Center for the Visual Arts - July 1983. "Aerial Xerography," Womanspace Gallery, Boulder - 1977.
Group Exhibitions
Berkeley Art Center Annual - January 1986: Jurors' Award
"Techno-Fear, Techno-Bliss," University of Santa Clara - February 1986.
"Berkeley at Davis,” UC Davis - March 1985.
"Art and Technology," University of Colorado - October 1985.
"Miniature Golf," Pirate Gallery, Denver - June 1984 "Arts ’81," Boulder Center for the Visual Arts - 1981.
"Arts ’79," Boulder Arts Center - 1979.
Aspen Arts Festival, Aspen Foundation for the Arts & Humanities - 1978, 1974
"20/20 Colorado/New Mexico," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center - 1975 "New Directions," Henderson Museum, University of Colorado - 1976 All Colorado Show,- Denver Art Museum - 1977, 1976, 1975, 1974 Boulder Art Festival - 1974: Jurors' Award Denver Center for the Contemporary Arts - 1973
Publications
Sculpture in the Park, Centerfold Map, Boulder Center for the Visual Arts Boulder, Colorado 1983
"Christo Island Art Draws Applause From a Boulder Volunteer,"
Boulder Daily Camera, May 29, 1983
A California Landscape, J. Matlack and Jeff Lovelace Scrimshaw Press. Berkeley 1970
Reviews
"East Gallery Show is Energetic and Satisfying," Art Review,
Boulder Center for the Visual Arts. August 1983
"Three Artists Exhibit at BCVA Hits Once & Misses Twice," Boulder Dialy Camera
July 31, 1983
"Only Artist, Recluse, Live on Downtown Mall," Boulder Daily Camera August 8, 1982
"A Developing Art Form,” Rocky Mountain News Sunday Magazine December 19, 1976
Films
"Running Fence," Maysles Brothers, New York 1977 "Colorado Artists," KRMA-TV, Channel 6, Denver 1976
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•innri w
'ViaLiable I l MJO-'/iHrt
Selected Collections
• Mr. & Mrs. Jim Chivian-Cobb, New York
• Ms. Katie Goodrich, Santa Barbara
• Mr. & Mrs. Ken Maytag, Santa Barbara
• Mr. Bill Williamson, Santa Barbara
• Ms. Charlene Pidgeon, Santa Barbara
• Ms. Francoise Brun-Cottan, Beverly Hills
• Mr. & Mrs. Jack Shoemaker, Berkeley
• Mr. & Mrs. Calvin Ireys, Berkeley
• Ms. Diane Tremaine, San Francisco
• Mr. & Mrs. M.F. Seeburg, Bozeman
• Mr. Wink Davis, Bozeman
• Mr. & Mrs. Dennis O'Leary, Boise
• Ms. Missy Thorne, Aspen
• Mr. Dana Russell, Aspen
• Dr. & Mrs. Mack Taylor, Portland
• Mr. & Mrs. Paul Snyder, Boulder
• Mr. Andrew Joel, Boulder
• Ms. Victoria Chapman Moore, Boulder
• Ms. Diane Steinman, Boulder
• Mr. Jim Kissel, Boulder
• Mr. Petur Williams, Boulder
• Dr. Julie Carpenter, Boulder
• Ms. Maggie Williams, Boulder
• Mr. Joe Martinez, Boulder
• Ms. Betty Weems, Boulder
• Mr. Michael Muirhead, Boulder
• Mr. & Mrs. William de la Cruz, Boulder


GEORGE ALLEN PETERS
815 Spruce Street Boulder, Colorado 80302
(303) 449-3002
EDUCATION
1967 - 1969 Fullerton College, California
1969 - 1971 Art Center College of Design, Los Angeles
1972 Aegina Art Center, Aegina, Greece
EXHIBITIONS
1984 "Environmental Installation", University of Hawaii Art Gallery,
Honolulu - invitational
Installations: "Feather Flags", "Ice Tent", "1000 Breaths, 1000 Prayers" Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, Arvada, CO - invitational "Crafts/S4", Colorado Springs Biennial, Colorado Springs Art Center -juried
"Sculpture in the Park #6", "Tree Talk", Boulder Center for the Visual Arts, Colorado - juried
"Colorado Artist-Craftsmen", Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution Washington D.C. - invitational
1983 "Hieroglyphics", collaboration with the Nancy Spanier Dance Theatre, set design
"Ice and Air Show," Lake George, New York - invitational "Sculpture in the Park #5," "Rain Room," Boulder Center for the Visual Arts, Colorado - juried
1982 "Space Sails," American Banner Exhibition, Midland, Michigan - juried
"Sky Sculpture," Hand & the Spirit Crafts Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona -one man show
"Oahu Invitational," Following Sea, Waikiki, Hawaii 1981 "Air Show," Contemporary Arts Center, Honolulu - one man show "Oahu Invitational," Following Sea, Waikiki, Hawaii
"Collaborations/Artists and Writers," Contemporary Arts Center, Honolulu, Hawaii - invitational
"Mayors City Hall Show," Honolulu - invitational Hawaii Craftsmen's Annual Show - juried 1980 Marietta Crafts National, Marietta College, Ohio - juried "Sculpture Syntaxis," Amfac Gallery, Honolulu - juried Hawaii Craftsmen's Annual Show, Honolulu - juried
"10-22-38 Astoria," xerographic show, University of Baltimore - invitational "Sky Fills the Heart," works in blue and white, Joseloff Gallery, Hartford, Connecticut - invitational
"Exits and Entrances," Hawaii Artists League member show - featured artist. "Winds and Strings," kite show, Guilford Handcraft Center Gallery, Guilford, Connecticut - juried
1979 "Colors and Kites," joint show with painter, Clare Forster, Downtown Gallery, Honolulu
"Xerographies," Honolulu - juried
"Rutgers National Drawing," Rutgers University, New Jersey - juried 1978 "Men Look at Women," Contemporary Arts Center, Honolulu - invitational 1977 "Kites, Clouds & Curtains," environmental theatre, Foundry, Honolulu -one man show
"Art Hawaii Showcase," Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hawaii - juried
1976


AWARDS - Cont'd
"Xerographies," 1979 - juror's award "Space Sails," 1982 - juror's award
MEMBER
Hawaii Artists League, Board Member - 1980 Hawaii Craftsmen, First Vice President - 1981
JUROR
"College Art '82," Hawaii - 1982
Having been involved with the static forms of drawing and painting, I've been drawn more towards participatory works. Bringing ideas together with relationship, movement and visual play and making it simple and beautiful has been a constant challenge for me. An arrangement of stones, or string, for instance, or a gradual disintegration of a created work can excite something in me that I don't fully understand. Still, the movement is towards knowledge and understanding of something basic in ourselves and the role of change and movement is vitally connected to our growth. Everything changes from one thing to its opposite in a manner of degree. Try to see that movement and change and quickly write it, draw it or follow it.


BILL VIELEHR
B.F.A. from Colorado State University, 1969
Selected Exhibitions
1970 - One man $how, Gallery 1309 - Boulder, Colorado
1970 - Governor's Conference Annual Exhibition for Art# 1 Humanities -Aspen, Colorado
1970 - First Annual Colorado Art & Environment Exhibit, American Medical Center - Denver, Colorado
1970 - Artist's Choice, Friends of Contemporary Art - Denver, Colorado
1971 - One man show, Gilman Galleries - Chicago, Illinois
1972 - Twelfth Midwest Biennial, Joslyn Art Museum - Omaha, Nebraska
1973 - One man show, Gilman Galleries - Chicago, Illinois 1973 - One man show, Henkle Gallery - Houston, Texas
1973 - One man show, Allrich Galleries - San Francisco, California
1974 - Annual.Midwest Biennial, Joslyn Art Museum - Omaha, Nebraska
1975 - One man show, Colorado State University - Fort Collins, Colorado 1975 - One man show, Attitudes Gallery - Denver, Colorado
1975 - Allrich Galleries - San Francisco, California
1976 - One man show, Heartlihg Gallery - Boulder, Colorado
1977 - One man show, Heartling Gallery - Boulder, Colorado
1977 - Boulder Center for the Visual Arts - Boulder, Colorado
1978 - Sebastian Moore Gallery - Denver, Colorado
1973 - Boulder Center for the Visual Arts - Boulder, Colorado
1973 - Boulder Cross Section, Colorado State Univ. - Fort Collins, Co.
1977 - Britton Gallery - Littleton, Colorado
1979 - Studio Show - Boulder, Colorado
1979 - Boulder Visual Arts Center - Boulder, Colorado
1979 - Sebastian Moore Gallery - Denver, Colorado
1980 - Second Annual North American Sculpture Exhibit, Foothills Art
Center - Golden, Colorado
1980 - Shidoni Summer Show, Shidoni Gallery - Tesuque, New Mexico
1980 - Sebastian Moore Gallery - Denver, Colorado
1981 - Shidoni Summer Show, Shidoni Gallery - Tesuque, New Mexico
1982 - Boulder Sculpture Symposium - Boulder, Colorado
1983 - Denver Botanic Gardens "Sculpture in the Gardens" - Denver, Co. 1983 - Dedication of Sculpture Garden Exhibit, Atwell Gallery -
Colorado Springs, Colorado
1983 - "Arts *83", Boulder Center for the Visual Arts - Boulder, Co.
1983 - Form at Fiddles Green, Greenwood Plaza - Denver, Colorado
1984 - Bridge Show - Boulder Public Library, Boulder, Colorado
1984 - Art Yard - Denver, Colorado
1985 - Take Stock in Denver Art, winter & fall - Denver, Colorado 1985 - Colorado 3D Show - Arvada Art Center - Arvada, Colorado 1985 - Art Yard - Denver, Colorado
1985 - Sculpture in the Park #7 - Boulder, Colorado
1986 - Visiting Artist Show, Boulder Arts & Crafts Co-op, Boulder, Co.
1


Awards and Prizes
1974 - Purchase Award from the Colorado Designer Craftsmen Exhibit 1981 - Grant from the City of Boulder for compeletion of a sculpture 1985 - Grant for "Sculpture in the Park #7", City of Boulder
Selected Collections
Digital - Colorado Springs, Colorado Prudential Bache, Park Place - Boulder, Colorado Cherry Creek Plaza - Denver, Colorado
MaceRich of California for Crossroads Mall - Boulder, Colorado Embarcadero Square - SanFrancisco, California Northern Illinois University - DeKalb, Illinois Playboy Enterprises - Chicago, Illinois Byer Museum of the Arts - Evanston, Illinois
Related Experiences
* Visiting Artists Sculpture Workshop, Jefferson County Schools 1971, 1972, 1978
* Sculpture Workshop, Colorado State University - Fort Collins, Colorado, 1973
* Curator and Coordinator for Sculpture in the Park, Boulder, Colorado 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1985
* Curator and Coordinator for the Annual Vail Outdoor Sculpture Exhibit, Vail, Colorado 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982
* Curator and Coordinator for Boulder Sculpture Symposium, 1982
* Acting Director of FORM, Inc., Contemporary Sculpture 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1936
2


BILL VIELEHR
My early sculptures, done during the late sixties through the late seventies, were an attempt to use the human figure as a pure visual form. I would take the figure and fragment it into single sections of the anatomy and, using the human form in a totally realistic way, I would try to present it in an abstracted and out of context manner, therefore try to unemotionalize the viewing of the human form. In 1978 I curated and coordinated Boulder's first Sculpture in the Park show and became intensely interested in large scale work. I continued to curate the park show through #7 in 1985. During this time I began to pursue my current interest which is to somehow make the human form relative to large scale contemporary sculpture without making a soldier on horseback. I have been using high reflectivity of surface to bring about an interaction between the viewer and the sculptures. The works are often free standing walls or wall works which sometimes incorporate the life size human figure, often in the negative form, or fading in and out of the work. This is a direct attempt to humanize physically large
scale contemporary sculpture.




FORMs
FORM at Fiddlers Green
Fiddler’s Green Amphitheater 6350 S. Ulster Greenwood Plaza E. Orchard and 125
As the title implies there is FORM at Fiddler’s Green. Not only the terrific earth sculptured amphitheater but nine metal, wood, and stone contemporary sculptures placed around the amphitheater. These works by FORM sculptors complement and contrast the theater environment. Thanks to the sponsorship of John Madden Co. these works will remain throughout the season enhancing the theater and making a particularly exciting visual impact during the many scheduled events.
FORM Inc. thanks John Madden Co. and Cynthia Madden-Leitner, director of the Museum of Outdoor Arts, for their continued support of the arts in the Metro area. Not only in their exciting Museum of Outdoor Arts, but also for the sponsorship of this exhibit.
Other FORM Exhibits Shows — Boulder, 1981 Vail, 1981
Colorado Springs, 1983 Denver Botanic Gardens, 1983 Fiddler’s Green, 1984
FORM Sponsored Exhibits
Boulder Park Show #4, #5, #6, Boulder Central Park
The 1984 show, July 13th - Sept., includes four FORM artists
Art Yard. 1239 Pearl, Denver, CO Open by appointment
For price list, contact John Madden Co.. 7800 E. Orchard, Suite 300, Englewood. CO 80111 or FORM, Inc., 2888 Bluff Street, Suite 447, Boulder, CO 80301.
Exhibiting FORM Member Artists
1. William R. Vielehr Title - Wall Figure Media - Cast Aluminum Size - 5’6" x 5'6" x 2'
2. Doug Wilson Title - Untitled Media - Steel
Size - 18' x 8' x 8'
3. Carl Reed
Title - Broken Ring
Media - Cedar, Oak and Steel
Size - ll'x 10' x 20'
4. Robert Mangold Title - Anemotive S. P.
Media - Painted Steel Size - I0'6" x 12'
5. Jerry Wingren
Title - Cut and Fold It 15
Media - Machined, Fitted Aluminum
Size - 8' x 8' x 24'
6. Jeff Nelsen
Title - Lateral Twist Media - Steel
7. Frank Swanson
Title - Spat ial Reverse Media - Colorosa Travertine Size - 7' x 7' x 20'
8. Jeff Nelsen
Title - Stacked Angles Media - Steel Size - 10' x 20' x 25'
9. Mike Molliconi
Title - Subliminal Phase Access Media - Steel Size - 14' x 5' x 4‘A'
1. Vielehr
2. Wilson
3. Reed
4. Mangold
5. Wingren
6. Nelsen
7. Swanson
8. Nelsen
9. Molliconi
The amphitheater will be open daily for public viewing of the sculptures and the theater.


GEORGE E. WOODMAN
Personal
Born 1932; grew up in New England. Married 1953 to Elizabeth Abrahams. Two children. Professor, former Chairman, Department of Fine Arts, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado.
Educat i on
Phillips Exeter Academy, 1950. Harvard University, A.B. Cum Laude with Honors in Philosophy 195^. Boston Museum School, Evening School 1952-53- University of New Mexico, M.A. in Fine Arts 1956.
Awards
National Endowment for the Arts Award 1967. University of Colorado Faculty Fellowships, 1 96 5 “66 ; 1 973 ~7^+; 1 980-81 .
Selected Exhibitions, Asterisk (* *) indicates one-person exhibit.
1385 Exuberant Abstraction, 1,1 Broadway, N.Y.C.
Curated by Peter Frank.
1985 New Image Haber-Theodore Gallery, New York City * 1 98A Insta11 at ion, Bevier Gallery, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York
1983 Criss-Cross en la Ciudad de Mexico, Galeria Pecanins,
Mex i co City, D.F.
1983 Paperworks, Haber-Theodore Gallery, New York, New York
*1983 The Alfred Screens, Nelson-Fosdick Gallery, New York State College of Ceramics, Alfred, New York
*1983 Paintings and Screens, Haber-Theodore Gallery, New York, New York
*1982 Paper Tilings, Viterbo College, LaCrosse, Wisconsin
*1982 Paintings and Paper Tile Installation, Haber-Theodore Gallery, New York, New York
* *1982 Pattern, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C.


1982
1982
*1981
1981
1981
1981
*1981
*1981
1980
1980
1979
*1979
1979
*1979
1979
1979
1978
*1978
1978
1978
1977
Three Art i sts, Spark Gallery, Denver, Colorado
Part i t i ons, Pratt Manhattan Center Gallery, New York,
New York
Watercolors, Had 1er-Rodriguez Gallery, New York, New York
Rigors, Patrick Gallery, Austin, Texas
Criss-Cross at Yellowstone, Yellowstone Art Center,
Bi11ings , Montana
19 Americans, Guggenheim Museum, New York, New York
I nsta11 at i on , Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio
George Woodman, Boulder Center for the Visual Arts
Departures in Pattern, Hadler-Rodriguez Gallery, New York, New York
Systemic Painting, Hansen Gallery, New York, New York
Spark Gallery, Denver, Colorado (with Andrew Libertone)
Three Tile Pi eces (installation), Claremore College, Claremore, Oklahoma. Funded by Oklahoma Arts Council
Corporate Exhibition, Nabisco, New York, New York.
Curated by Alexander F. Mil liken Gallery
Sixteen Permutations/Nine Modules, Bridge Gallery,
Boulder Public Library, Boulder, Colorado
Criss-Cross Pattern Exhibition (installation), New York, New York
C.C. Pattern Project, Boulder Center for the Visual Arts. Funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts
American Artists, U.S. Consulate, Milan, Italy
Jasper Gallery, Denver, Colorado
Raku, Womens Inter-Art Gallery, New York, New York Collaboration with E. Woodman)
Fifth Colorado, Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado George and Betty Woodman, U.S.I.S. Gallery, Milan, Italy


-3-
1977 Patterning and Decoration, curated by Holly Solomon, catalog essay by Amy Goldin. Museum of the American Foundation for the Arts, Miami, Florida
1977 Preparatory Notes: Thinking Drawings, 80 Washington Square East Galle.y, New York University, New York
1977 Aspen Arts Festival, Aspen, Colorado
1977 ARC, Anonima, Criss-Cross, Art Research Center, Kansas City, Mi ssour i
*1976 Art Gallery, Nicholls State University, Thibodeaux,
Lou i s i ana
*1976 Edge Gallery, Bou1der , Co 1orado
*1975 Joseph Magnin Gallery, Denver, Colorado
197^ Incontro Verifica, Galleria Sincron, Brescia, Italy
197^ Galleria la Piramide, Firenze, Italy *197^ Hill's Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico *1973 Mostra Personale, Galleria Sincron, Brescia, Italy *1973 University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, Colorado
1973 18th National Print Exhibition, Brooklyn Museum,
Brooklyn, New York
"The Art of Living," N. McKean, New York Magazine, April 6, 1981 (Color photo)
"A Glorious Mess," John Ashbury, Newsweek, March 1981. (Color photo)
"New Work: George Woodman," B. Col lings, Arts Magazine, May 1981, Pags. 26, 27
"George Woodman: Wateredors," Review by Ellen Lubell, Art in America, Summer 1981
"George Woodman," Irene Clurman, Arts Magazine, April 1982 v "New Ways With Tile," Metropoli s, September 1982
Selected Bibliography
"Paper Tilings by George Woodman," Cata1ogue, Wayne State University Galleries. 1982, 2k pages


Full Text

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CLARE FORSTER 815 SPRUCESTREET BOuLDER CO 80302 .... .. ,,. ,, u -.. _. () :;, ..... . ''•. c 0 . . ,; .. .. . :. -. .. . . .. . . . ,, .. ... $J . . . .. . .. i• '\ I 1:\', . ..... . . \ . .. •• ;;::.: !.' •:\ ..... , .. . :; a ... .. ': : ....... " (;;, ,.., \\ ::: .... ::-.. r \ ... , ... :. .. ,.,_. ...... (.• .. ... . '/ ...... . I '• 'I ,, I' ' .. : :!., • .• ocJ c) '\.1' .• • A "-, O••• • • • '•. ' : . tlarch One day we were collecting shells on a Kauai beach, grasping at anything shiny and smooth as we stood in the breaking waves. There was only a second or two to find what we wanted before whatever it was would be lost to us in the turbulence. Incredibly, George grasped and found a small ceramic face looking back him. A worn fragment from, we believe, a Japanese funerary vessel, the concave s1.de had a pale green glaze and the figure of a crane. The odds of this happening are not even worth thinking about unless you've been reading as I have, and thinking about, an article in the 'New Age Journal', (April),. o.bout what cis called the chaos theory. Apparently, there are predictable patterns 1.n chaos, in turbulence. f-or example, even though smoke from no two cigarettes will spread in quite the same way after going straight up for a bit, there are patterns in the variation. I 1 ve always been interested in chance versus the predictable and the chaos theory developed by physicist rtri.tchell Feigenbaum, based on work of biologist Rober t r-.;ay, explains some things,while what lies behind most of it is still a mystery that has been avoided by scientists until recently. After a certain point, a smooth, fluid flow will fluctuate between high and low variables and will then double in variability at points that are now observed and regular--11as irrarutable as pi11--with mathematical constants that show up over and ov er . "Many of the seemingly haphazard phenomena of the world may turn out to be rnore ordered than we suspect ... tiny variations at the start of a pr ocess can result in vastly different outcomes. u Physicist Alvin Saperstein at Wayne State University is applying the chaos theory to war. designed a mathematical model to analyze the arms races preceding World War II. Like water pouring from a tap, an arms buildup seems to shift from a smooth, predictable flow to dangerous, unpredictable turbulence once a certain threshold is reached. He believes improved models could someday warn us when an arms race is on the verge of period-doubling its way into war", writes Doug Stewart in thf 'New Age' article, (adding that for now conditions between the U.S. and Soviet Union would fall within t.&'"l.e model's stable r egion). Tiie article Beneath the nut. and bolts of all this research, however, lurk deeper metaphysical quest ions: If we can learn to observe and analyze t!'le minute interactions that keep the world in motion, might we one day learn to predict all their outcomes? And even if we could nev er llU.lSter the technical wherewithal to do so, is it enough to know that it's theoretically possible? Would this mean the future is predestined? '' The knowledge that right now there is in space a "dirty snowball" or a 'sick black __ , according to different scientists' descriptions, ten miles long by six miles wide cruising on course ,and called by us Halley's Comet, is to me uncanny. \'Jhat if •••• .,. ,,. .• } : , ... >.j you were there ? I remind myself that any place can be thought of that way, as a /c,.&: possible place to be. On earth I may think, 'Right at this very moment someone is •••• 1 walking along the street in front of the house I grew up in at 59 E. 92nd St. in ..... • New York. Someone snorkeling at Bay in Hawai is looking at the very same fisr ,:,t.... a certain r oc k that we used to watch.And this I rrust now add: Right at this moment .:-::.:._,_/ #,;=-elephants are in the caves in Kenya in the dark, scraping salt from the cave roof as / r they done for thousands of years' learning from their elders from generation to / / generat1.on a treacherous track where a misstep means being trapped fatally in the rk r;1 t :.... darkness. I add this .image of a place it is possible to be because I have seen an (".: ...... V\.l.:. •• :f) infrared film of the elephants in the cave that I could never forget. Periodically th• 1,• if .. \\ I '••:• • .......... . .. . ... ... ... . ... :, cave roof fell and a new route had to be learned, the old one modified, and new dangers existed. Pattern and chaos. But s a lot more to it and here is where I think things get really interestin Accord.ing to this same article in 'New Age; up until this CP-ntwy quest ions of chaos were seen as" neither mysterious nor r a ndom , just complicated '1 • 'ihe physics of Newto n gave us a '' universf! like a billiard table. A highe r being may have created the balls and set them in mot ion, but therf!after the balls bounced around on their own." Now with quantum theory in physics," t h e elementary part icles of the universe are not billiard balls a t all. They are concepts, concepts inextricably tied to their observ ers; what we see depends on how we look. Werner Heisenberg's famous uncerta1nty principle stated that we can never be sure of the exact position and motion of a subatomic particle any more than we can measure the air pressure of a single molecule The best we can do is assign probabilities. According to the quantum thinkers,no one can predict a precise future by loo: <.ing at the present • T:&e 'VJOrld' s basic particles interact too mysteriously. 'The deeper we penetrate, ' said physicist Max Bor:-n, 'the more restless becomes the universe; all is rushing about and vibrating i n a wild dance.'" ..:' .:'::,. .. .--:'' . ,,..-' .;.•: r; ... , . .,. -..... • / . •' . • I \ .... . . , • ."'\, .... •• .. /!'I,., .•• :; f;r ,. ""' '.. . . . . . . .. . . ... .. ... ... :' .. ( .... . .',-::.::-.:. . . .... . : . . . • ' • I , •• , • ' , -. -. • • •: .,. • J . I ' \ . ..... :cj' .:.: ... :.:•l• / ..... •) [ • • • • •• • • ' • , • ._,r "'" ..... • • " •••• • • • '--•• I. .) Jlr. / ... . . • t •' ,• :' ' •• ••• • • , ' • • • • :-: I • ; '. . .. •" ... =. , .. : ... .) . -........ ..... ....•• , ........ . • f • l' . . !:: .,'.'1. ... , ...... .. ._.#

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--that is how it_feels to me, part of the turbulence,however small a part. :"' • .. •• • The of any part of is mainly illusion. What we think we .•••1 see is highly selective, and as a result ow creative work is based on fragmentary moments and sights. \men George caught in his hand the tiny cer.amic face, as he :. .. '":) E stood. in the wildness of the waves, as nuch in that find as L4 ,::-: else . Then the foam turns 1n on and an ent1rely new set of possibil: 1 _.;.: """ ... 1t1es presented. . ... . . ,Jt I ' S )\ .... } :, /Q,,l L. ... ( . , ... ': ...... Not +rue. 'The brick wall dissolves. The house draws in its little balconies one by.aae, then turns, and floats away. Everything floats away. Harmony and meaning vanish.The world irks me again with its variegated void.' (Nabokov's short story, 'The Leonardo') From another Nabakov short story,'Torpid Smoke' about a poet:' •. puerile, perishable poems, which, by the time the next were printed, would have been certain to wither as had withered one after the other all the previous ones written down in the black exercise book; but no matter: at this moment I trust the ravishing promises of the still breathing, still revolving verse, my face is wet with tears, my heart is bursting with happiness, and I know that this happiness is the greatest thing existing on earth.' 'We ali have drastic impulses, but they get cancelled out by other impulses. So we really live in a kind of semi-radiant nn.1ddle . ' (John Updike, Denver Post interview) 'The most effective art is that which looks at the present,and into the future and the past, and makes it possible for the idiosyncracies of one person's experience to coalesce into a statement that resonates within all of us. Through the ages, whatever the material, whatever the focus,this has been the art that workeg,that succeeded in making contact. ' l fessenden Review; swnner '8 5, article on photographer Larry Clark) Wendell Berry on photographer Ralph Eugene Meatyard: 'More than that of any other artist I know, this work alerts me to the fact that we have arrived here at this moment by ways that are mostly unknown to us ... Sooner or later he is apt to produce evidence that you are not where you think you are .. These pictures can serve as spiritual landmarks in the pilgrimage to the earth that each one of us undertakes alone. ' (F. Review) 'Billboards in any art are the first thing one sees .. Once you get past the billboard then you can see into the past, the present, and the futwe. ' (photographer Meat yard from the same article in the Fessenden Review) I've said before that Clarion is on a computer list of New Age publications and gets its own mail. After missing the Tarrytown Letter I'm pleased to know about the Fessenden Review that was sent to me. A non-profit,tax exempt publishes it with two 'To better prepare the citizens of the world for survival and,indeed,the possibilities of innate joy as they move towards the twenty-first centw'Y .. The second is fomented by direct financial aid to individuals and organizations whose main purpose is to assist humanity in achieving dignity,selfworth, and hope as we participate in this bizarre spectacle we call life.' That's my kind of magazine! It consists of reviews, information and corrmentary. $10 for a 2-year subscription. Address Box 7272, San Diego, CA,92107. tvty thanks to Louise Neaderland, director of ISCA,for selling my book 'I Think Sow' to the Cleveland Art Institute. The book is presently in a group show at Sarah Lawrence College . 'Art in essence celebrates life and gives us ow measure.' (Malann.ld,who died recently) 'Art .. is something one never can consciously strive for, as the very appearance of striving defeats it. Let the artist .. just attend to the rudiments of his craft, and if he is a genius the result will be art in spite of himself.' (George.Warren) "He said that the bet\veen the male and f emale m o des ot' thought w e r e easily illustrated Dy the thoughts of a boy and girl, sitting o n a park b e n ch. look i n g Cit the full moon. the boy thinl-:s of the tJiliv e r ,-,e, i.ts iJrunensity and myst e ry; the g:irl thinks, 'I must wash m y hair.' "(quote fr n m imaginary Freudian,famous, York psychiatr-i . .;;t) .•• "For a woman ever'Ything is personal; no idea is of any inte r est to h e r b y itself, but nn.1st translated into her own experience; in wor k s of arl ,.;ile a I way s . .;;ees h P r own l i tf:. o r h e r daydreant">. " (quote fro m imaginar-v women's m al.!'azine circa 1 9 4 8.Alice of Gir l s and Wome n ) . .:.;".> 'Children as Teachers of Peace' is a program directed b y Dr.Jerry Jampolsky and Cirincione with 40 children traveling to Moscow and Leningrad in May. Through Ellin Todd who will be going with her daughter, George is sending a banner and several of his 'feather banners' for this very worthwhile expedition involvin Soviet and U.s. =-----c = nliuren. ::.-: : This month Geraldine Brussel showed her work at the Boulder Brewing Co. . . . 0 In May Helen Ragheb will show her watercolors o n handmade paper at Denver's Reiss • =)j • Gallery . .. .. . . . , . ...... 'Painting became a business. The painters became like factories. their product was the new--something new for each season. Most of it nowadays is like newspaper headlines. That's what the galleries seem to want--it creates a big splash,but then it doesn't mean anything . 'l11e work can be quite competent technically, but it's dead. You don't feel the artist's hand.It's all superficial.It's launching bandwagonsand chasir after them.Nobody is concerned about feeling anymore,about the journey.' (Shapinsky)

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ARCHIVES LD 1190 A72 1986 8637

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I U18700 5805544 I I

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THE THESIS OF SYBIL GILLETT SMITH IS APPROVED --------------, COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN _..--.---.... PRINCIPAL ADVISOR ' ----UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER FALL 1986

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•• ART RANCH AN ARCHITECTURAL .THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING, UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE SYBIL GILLETT SMITH FALL 1986

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A--t-f LD 1/qD 'Ft-72 Sb37 c.l ...

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DEDICATION FOR DIANNE WHO STOLE FOUR VALIUM TABLETS FROM HER MOTHER AND MADE THIS THESIS POSSIBLE

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I I

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TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION PROJECT SUMMARY DESIGN APPROACH SITE LOCATION LEGAL DESCRIPTION REGIONAL MAP AREA MAP SITE MAP SITE ANALYSIS ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS SOILS PLANT LIFE WILDLIFE CLIMATE IMPLICATIONS TABLES O F SUPPORTING DATA PROGRAM SPACE REQUIREMENTS DESIGN ISSUES PROGRAMING ZONING CODES CONCLUSION DRAWINGS BIBLIOGRAPHY

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TABLE OF CONTENTS --CONTINUED APPENDIX ARTISTS' RESUMES

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INTRODUCTION -

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ARTISTS WORK DAY AND NIGHT CONNECTIONS ARE VERY IMPORTANT CLARE FORSTER I PUT EVERYTHING IN A BOX, CARRY IT TO A PLACE AND WORK FROM THERE--I CREATE MY TOOLS GEORGE PETERS I WORK IN SOUTH AND EAST LIGHT I NEED THE CHANGEABILITY JOHN MATLACK THERE ARE MANY MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT ARTISTs---THE ARTIST IS AN URBAN PERSON, NATURE IS INSPIRING I WAS WORKING ON SOMETHING SO PERSONAL, SO UNFORMED, THAr I DIDN'T WANT ANYONE CLOSE TO ME TO SEE IT GEORGE WOODMAN FOR A SCULPTOR, A PLACE TO CONCEIVE ON PAPER BILL VIELEHR

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INTRODUCTION PROJECT SUMMARY ART RANCH IS AN ARTIST'S COLONY WHICH PROVIDES PERIODS OF TEMPERED ISOLATION FOR VISUAL ARTISTS IT IS CALLED "RANCH" BECAUSE OF ITS LOCATION AND BECAUSE THE LAND IS GRAZED THE RANCH IS RUN BY A FOUNDATION ESTABLISHED BY THE ESTATE OF A SUCCESSFUL ARTIST INTERESTED ARTISTS APPLY FOR A VISIT WITH A LETTER DESCRIBING THEIR PAST WORK AND THE PROJECT THEY WISH TO FOCUS ON DURING THEIR STAY THE LENGTH OF TIME AN ARTIST MIGHT STAY VARIES FROM ONE MONTH TO A YEAR No PROVISION HAS BEEN MADE FOR THE ACCOMMODATION OF THE ARTIST'S FAMILY SO IT IS ANTICIPATED THAT MOST PEOPLE WILL STAY FOR THREE MONTHS OR LESS ARTISTS ARE PROVIDED WITH A BEDROOM AND BATH WITH ADJACENT STUDIO BREAKFAST AND DINNER ARE SERVED IN THE MAIN BUILDING BUT ATTENDANCE IS NOT REQUIRED THERE IS NO FORMAL PROGRAM WHATSOEVER---THE ARTISTS ARE FREE TO INTERACT OR TO ISOLATE THEMSELVES AS THEY PLEASE SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT WILL NOT BE PROVIDED SO IT IS ASSUMED THAT THE ARTISTS WILL CONFINE THEMSELVES TO DRAWING, PAINTING AND PLANNING PROJECTS DESIGN APPROACH I HAVE CHOSEN TO DESIGN AN ARTISTS' COLONY BECAUSE IT IS A FUNCTION FLEXIBLE ENOUGH TO ALLOW ME TO EXPLORE WHAT I BELIEVE TO BE MORE THAN A PERSONAL PERVERSITY I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN FASCINATED BY THE ARCHITECTURE OF ROMANTIC CLASSICIST ETIENNE LOUIS BOULLEE, BY THE PURITY AND FORMALITY OF HIS BUILDINGS AND, QUITE HONESTLY, BY THEIR UNEXPECTEDNESS, MUCH AS I AM DRAWN TO ANT FARM'S CADILLAC RANCH AND CHRISTO'S RUNNING FENCE PROJECT THEIR "LOOK AGAIN" QUALITY CREATES SOMETHING MORE

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I BELIEVE THAT THERE ARE MOMENTS IN ARCHITECTURE WHEN THE OBVIOUS AND uAPPROPRIATEu SOLUTION IS NOT ENOUGH THE OBVIOUS SOLUTION TO CLIMATIC CONDITIONS ON THE SITE I HAVE CHOSEN, ON THE PLAINS SOUTH OF BOULDER, WOULD BE AN ORGANIC EARTH BERMED STRUCTURE THIS WOULD BE A NONDISRUPTIVE RESPONSE TO THE LANDSCAPE ON MANY LEVELS THIS WOULD BE AN APPROPRIATE RESPONSEi BUT LACKING THE uSOMETHING MOREn, THAT IS ARCHITECTURE OF BOULLEE AND LEDOUX, J.-C. LEGMAGNY IN THE INTRODUCTION TO VISIONARY ARCHITECTS SAYS uTHEIR WISH WAS TO TOUCH THE SOUL THROUGHARCHITECTURE THAT SPEAKS---AN ARCHITECTURE THAT WOULD MAKE EACH BUILDING EXPRESS ITS CHARACTER AND FUNCTIONu (VISIONARY ARCHITECTURE, p. 14) I FEEL THAT THE CONCEPT OF SPEAKING ARCHITECTURE IS PARTICULARLY APT FOR THE DESIGN OF AN ARTISTS' COLONY LEDOUX AND BOULLEE'S DRAWINGS DEPICT, IN MOST CASES, THEIR BUILDINGS IN FORMAL GARDENS OR SIMPLY ON FLAT GROUND IN FURTHER PERVERSITY, FOR HENRY-RUSSELL HITCHCOCK HAS POINTED OUT THAT THE uPICTURESQUEHAD A SOLVENT, AND EVENTUALLY DESTRUCTIVE, EFFECT ON THE DOMINANT ROMANTIC CLASSICAL STYLEu (ARCHITECTURE:l9TH AND 20TH CENTURIES, P 105)i IT IS MY CONTENTION THAT A PICTURESQUE COMPOSITION OF FORMS IS APPROPRIATE HERE PICTURESQUE IN THE SENSE OF PLACING BUILDINGS IN A NATURAL SETTING AS UNDISTURBED AS POSSIBLE BECAUSE MY PRIMARY INTEREST IS IN RESPONDING TO THE LANDSCAPE WITH A COMPOSITION OF FORMS WHICH, IN A NONLITERAL SENSE, SPEAK OF THEIR FUNCTION, I ANTICIPATE A REVERSAL OF THE USUAL APPROACH TO ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN IN WHICH, AS WAS THE CASE WITH MCKIM, MEAD AND WHITE'S LOW HOUSE, INTERIOR PLAN WILL BE TO SOME EXTENT DICTATED BY EXTERNAL FORM IN SHORT, I STRIVE FOR A SOLUTION WHICH SHELTERS ARTISTS AND FOSTERS THEIR ART WHILE SPEAKING OF ART AND RECALLING THE LANDSCAPE WHICH, AGAIN, SPEAKS OF ART

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\0 TO d-rAH LOCATION MAP r ij I I l I t I • 1 Rus h ,., NTS I' ,, I I I

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) (r I) VICINITY MAP SCALE 1:20,000

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SITE MAP

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SITE LOCATION ART RANCH IS LOCATED SOUTH OF THE CITY OF BOULDER NEAR THE INTERSECTION OF ROUTE 93 AND ROUTE 128. SEE MAPS FOR EXACT LOCATION LATITUDE: 40N LONGITUDE: 105W ALTITUDE: 5800 FT LEGAL DESCRIPTION NE 1/2 NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33 TOWNSHIP 1 S RANGE 70 W NW 1/4 OF SECTION 34 TOWNSHIP 1 S RANGE 70 W TOTAL BACKGROUND 80 AC 160 AC 240 AC THIS ISOLATED AND STARKLY BEAUTIFUL SITE IS CURRENTLY USED AS GRAZING FOR CATTLE THERE IS SOME EVIDENCE OF PAST MINING FOR CLAY AND COAL BUT ALL PITS HAVE BEEN FILLED AND THE DISTURBANCE IS BARELY NOTICABLE LAND ADJACENT TO THE SITE HAS RECENTLY BEEN AQUIRED BY THE CITY OF BOULDER'S OPEN SPACE PROGRAM A GRAVEL MINE TO THE NORTHEAST IS PART OF THE CITY'S AQUISITION AND WILL BE RECLAIMED To THE SOUTH IS THE WIND ENERGY RESEARCH DIVISION OF SERI. WITH THESE EXCEPTIONS, ALL SURROUNDING LAND, NEARLY AS FAR AS THE EYE CAN SEE, IS BEING GRAZED SITE ANALYSIS VIEWS THE HIGH POINTS ON THIS SITE HAVE UNINTERUPTED LONG VIEWS IN EVERY DIRECTION, WITH 180 OF DRAMATIC MOUNTAIN VIEWS AND THE REST OF NEARLY UNTOUCHED PLAINS THERE ARE GOOD VIEWS OF THE BED OF COAL CREEK FROM MUCH OF THE SITE SHORT VIEWS CONSIST OF NOTHING MORE THAN THE ROLL OF THE LAND, THE ONLY NOTICABLE VEGETATION IS A FEW CLUMPS OF YUCCA ORIENTATION FOR BOTH SHORT AND LONG VIEWS, MOUNTAINS AND PLAINS, WILL BE AN IMPORTANT DESIGN CONSIDERATION

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SOLAR ACCESS NEITHER TREES SITE WIND As DISCu MUST BE Dl EROSION HAZARD DUE TO OVER () FACTORS) IN T IMPORTANT TO K c TO THE SITE AND /

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SITE ANALYSIS SCALE 1 :400

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ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS .

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SOILS MAP SCALE 1 :20,000

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ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS SOILS THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN ABSTRACTED FROM A 1975 SOIL SURVEY OF BOULDER COUNTY NDD -NEDERLAND VERY COBBLY SANDY LOAM, 1 -12 PERCENT SLOPES THIS IS A DEEP SOIL THAT IS FOUND ON OLD HIGH TERRACES AND ALLUVIAL FANS IT DEVELOPED IN LOAMY ALLUVIUM THAT CONTAINS COBBLESTONE THE A HORIZON IS FROM 3 TO 6 INCHES THICK AND IS A DARK BROWN VERY COBBLY SANDY LOAM THE B HORIZON CAN BE UP TO 20 INCHES DEEP AND THE C HORIZON CAN EXTEND 40 INCHES BELOW THAT THROUGHOUT THE SOIL, COBBLE AND GRAVEL ACCOUNT FOR 50 TO 70 PERCENT OF THE VOLUME THIS IS A WELL-DRAINED SOIL THAT HAS A MODERATE PERMEABIL ITY AVAILABLE WATER CAPACITY IS MODERATE ROOTS CAN PENETRATE UP TO 60 INCHES DEEP RUNOFF IS SLOW TO MEDIUM AND EROSIONAL HAZARD IS SLIGHT THIS SOIL IS .NOT SUITED TO TREE GROWTH TE-TERRACE ESCARPMENTS THESE ARE UNDIFFERENTIATED SHALLOW SOILS WITH COBBLES AND STONES ON THE SURFACE THEY ARE ON THE SIDE SLOPES OF OLD OUTWASH FANS IN MANY INSTANCES, ALL THAT EXISTS IS A THIN LAYER OF COBBLESTONE OVER SHALE OR SANDSTONE BECAUSE OF THIS SHALLOWNESS, PLANTS HAVE A HARD TIME ESTABLISHING THEMSELVES WITHOUT PLANTS, THE SOIL TENDS TO BE UNSTABLE RUNOFF GENERALLY IS RAPID THESE TWO FACTORS CREATE AN EROSION HAZARD THIS SOIL IS SUITED EITHER FOR CULTIVATION OR FOR TREE GROWTH SEE -SAMSIL -SHINGLE COMPLEX, 5 TO 25 PERCENT SLOPES APPROXIMATELY 40% SAMSIL CLAY AND 40% SHINGLE SOILS MAKE UP THIS COMPLEX THE SOIL PROFILE FOR SAMSIL CONSISTS OF AN A HORIZON, 3 TO 8 INCHES DEEP, IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWED BY THE CLAY AND CALCAREOUS CLAY SHALE C HORIZON THE SHINGLE SERIES IS A LOAM SOIL THE TOP 0 TO 4 INCHES IS A PALE-

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BROWN LOAM AND A C HORIZON OF 4 TO 12 INCHES BEDROCK IS NORMALLY AT 10 TO 20 INCHES FOR BOTH THESE SOILS THIS IS A SHALLOW, WELL-DRAINED COMPLEX ROOTING DEPTH CAN VARY GREATLY FROM 20 TO 60 INCHES PERMEABILITY IS MODERATE RUNOFF IS RAPID AND EROSIONAL HAZARD IS HIGH THIS SOIL IS NOT SUITED TO TREE GROWTH IT IS SUITED TO PRAIRIE GRASSES SUCH AS WHEATGRASS AND BLUE GRAMA NH NIWOT SERIES THIS SOIL IS FOUND ON STREAM TERRACES AND BOTTOM LANDS, SUPERIMPOSED OVER SAND AND GRAVEL THE SURFACE LAYER RANGES FROM 10 TO 20 INCHES AND CONSISTS OF A SANDY CLAY LOAM OR A LIGHT CLAY LOAM IMMEDIATELY BELOW THIS IS THE SAND AND GRAVEL LAYER, WHICH CAN EXTEND UP TO 60 INCHES BECAUSE OF THIS SOILS PROXIMITY TO COAL CREEK, THE WATER TABLE LEVEL CAN BE AS HIGH AS 6-8" BELOW THE SURFACE How EVER, BECAUSE OF THE EXTREME SEASONAL VARIATIONS IN THE FLOW OF THIS EPHEMEREAL STREAM, IT IS NOT THE PREDOMINENT CONDITION IT IS A MODERATELY PERMEABLE SOIL .WITH ONLY A SLIG H T EROSION HAZARD BECUASE THE AVAILABLE WATER CAPACITY IS LOW TO MODERATE, IT IS BEST SUITED FOR USE AS A PASTURE MEDOW AND GRAVEL PIT SITES ADAPTED GRASSES MOST SUITABLE FOR SEEDING ARE INTERMEDIATE AND TALL WHEATGRASS, AND TALL FESCUE THIS SOIL IS NOT SUITABLE FOR TREE GROWTH NuB -NUNN CLAY LOAM -1 TO 3 PERCENT SLOPES THIS IS A DEEP SOIL FORMED ON TERRACES AND VALLEY SIDE SLOPES IN LOAMY ALLUVIUM THE A HORIZON IS 6 14 INCHES OF DARK GRAYISH BROWN CLAY LOAM THE B2T HORIZON IS 4 15 INCHES THICK AND HAS A CALCIUM CARBONATE ACCUMULATION 14 30 INCHES BELOW THE SURFACE THE C HORIZON IS A VERY PALE BROWN CLAY LOAM THE SAND AND GRAVEL SUBSTATUM IS USUALLY AT A DEPTH OF 40 TO 60 INCHES THIS IS A WELL-DRAINE D SOIL WITH SLOW PERMEABILITY, AND A HIGH AVAILABLE WATER CAPACITY RUNOF F IS SLOW AND THE EROSION HAZARD IS SLIGHT THE EFFECTIVE ROOTING DEPTH CAN

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BE 60 INCHES OR MORE ALTHOUGH MANY TREES ARE SUITED FOR THIS SOIL, NONE ARE PRESENT AT THIS LOCATION KuD -KUTCH CLAY LOAM, 3 TO 9 PERCENT SLOPES KUTCH CLAY LOAM MAKES UP A SMALL AREA IN THE SOUTHERN HALF OF THIS PROPERTY IT IS GENERALLY FORMED ON UPLANDS AND VALLEY SIDES IN CLAYEY RESIDIUM IT HAS A SLOW PERMEABILITY AND TENDS TO BE MODERATELY DEEP ROOTS CAN PENETRATE TO A DEPTH OF 20 TO 40 INCHES THE TOP 7 INCHES IS A THICK CLAY LOAM, FOLLOWED BY 15 INCHES OF BROWN CLAY THE C HORIZON CONSISTS OF ABOUT 8 INCHES OF CALCAREOUS CLAY, AND THEN LAYERS OF SHALE GRAVEL AND COBBLESTONE ARE ON THE SURFACE THIS SOIL IS BEING USED AS PASTURE

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PLANT LIFE PLANT COMMUNITY STRUCTURE, AS REPRESENTED IN THE FOLLOWING TABLE, WAS DETERMINED BY A LINE TRANSECT CONDUCTED NEAR COAL CREEK ON PROPERTY ADJACENT TO THIS SITE TO THE NORTH EAST IT IS ASSUMED THAT THE PLANT COMMUNITY ON THE SITE IS VERY SIMILAR THIS INFORMATION WAS COMPILED BY IMPACT ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS FOR A 1982 GRAVEL MINING PERMIT A MORE EXTENSIVE FLORAL INVENTORY HAS BEEN CONDUCTED AT THE NEARBY ROCKY FLATS PROPERTYi NO RARE OR ENDANGERED SPECIES WERE DISCOVERED

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PLANT SPECIES AND GROUND COVER APPROXIMATE % OF GROUND COMMON NAME SCIENTIFIC NAME COVERED BY EACH SPECIES SPOTTED BLAZINGSTAR MESA GENTIAN DIFFUSE STARTHISTLE PASTURE SAGEBRUSH PRAIRIE SAGEBRUSH GREAT MULLEIN WESTERN WHEATGRASS BLUE GRAMA BIG BLUESTEM HAIRY GOLDENASTER JUNEGRASS BROOM RAGWORT WRINKLED PRICKLEYPEAR TALL WILD-BUCKWHEAT YuccA LIATRIS PUNCTATA PNEUMONANTHE AFFINIS CENTAUREA DIFFUSA ARTEMISIA FRIGIDA ARTEMISIA LUDOVICIANA VERBASCUM THAPSUS AGROPYRON SMITHII BOUTELOUS GRACILIS ANDROPOGON GERARDI! HETEROTHECA VILLOSA KIELERIA MACRANTHA SENECIO SPARTIOIDES 0PUNITIA COMPRESSA ERIOGONUM ALATUM YUCCA GLAUCA 1% 1% 1% 5% 3% 2% 10% 20% 5% 3% 5% 5% 2% 5% 1% BARE EARTH 15% OTHER VEGETATION (MOSTLY FLOWERS OF THE FAMILY 16% COMPOSITAE COULD NOT BE FURTHER IDENTIFIED DUE TO ABSENCE OF FLORAL PARTS [SURVEY WAS IN LATE FALL].)

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WILDLIFE TYPICAL WILDLIFE SPECIES INHABITING THIS AREA INCLUDE SHREW1 DEER MULE BULL RED-TAILED MORNING DOVE1 OWL AND VARIOUS SONG BIRDS (YARRA JENKINS SITE APPLICATION JANUARY 1986). ONLY MEADOW LARKS HAVE BEEN IN EVIDENCE ON SITE VISITS TO DATE

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_

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CLIMATE SUMMARY AVERAGE YEARLY TEMPERATURE AVERAGE RELATIVE HUMIDITY AVERAGE YEARLY PRECIPITATION DEGREE DAYS HEATING COOLING PERCENT OF POSSIBLE SUNSHINE/YEAR 49.7F 49.5% 11 INCHES 6202 748 72 % THIS AREA OF THE COUNTRY IS BLESSED WITH A GENERALLY PLEASANT CLIMATE---MILD, SUNNY AND SEMI-ARID SUNSHINE PREDOMINATES DUE TO THE DISTANCE FROM MOISTURE SOURCES AND MOUNTAIN BAR RIERS EXTREMES OF TEMPERATURE ARE USUALLY OF SHORT DURATION IN THE SUMMER AFTERNOONS, CLOUD FORMATION TEMPERS HEAT BUILD UPj WHILE IN WINTER THE SUN WARMS THE DAYLIGHT HOURS HIGH WINDS CAN BE A PROBLEM IN WINTER AND SPRING (SEE FOLLOWING DATA FROM NOAA AND SERI FOR SPECIFICS)

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WIND AVERAGE YEARLY SPEED MAXIMUM SPEED 7 MPH 81 MPH THE WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER, A DIVISION OF SERI (SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH INSTITUTE) IS LOCATED A MILE SOUTH AND 150 FEET ABOVE THIS SITE THEIR DATA FOR 1983 AND 1984 INDICATES THAT THE HIGH WINDS OF WINTER AND SPRING COME MAINLY FROM THE NORTH THE SUMMER WINDS ARE LIGHT TO MODERATE (0-14 MPH) AND COME FROM THE NORTH OR SOUTH IN JULY OF 1983, FOR EXAMPLE, THERE WAS 600 HOURS OF LIGHT TO MODERATE WIND, ALMOST EXCLU SIVELY, FROM THE NORTH (SPECIFIC DATA AVAILABLE ON REQUEST FROM SERI)

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IMPLICATIONS PASSIVE SOLAR-DESIGN CLIMATE AND EXCELLENT EXPOSURE ON THE SITE INDICATE THAT PASSIVE SOLAR DESIGN SHOULD BE A CONSIDERATION IN THE DESIGN SOLUTION SOUTH FACING GLAZING FOR HEAT GAIN AND THERMAL MASS FOR HEAT STORAGE SHOULD REDUCE HEATING COSTS FOR SUMMER COOLING LOCATE OPENINGS FOR SUMMER BREEZE PENETRATION, SHADE GLAZING AND USE REFLECTIVE OR LIGHT COLORED EXTERIOR SURFACES SUNNY OUTDOOR AREAS ARE DESIRABLE FOR WINTER MONTHS WHILE SHADE IS DESIRABLE FOR SUMMER THERE IS LITTLE NATURAL SHADE ON THIS SITE WIND STRUCTURES SHOULD BE DESIGNED TO WITHSTAND HIGH WINDS ENTRANCES SHOULD BE PROTECTED FROM THE WIND IT MAY BE NECESSARY TO SHUTTE R SOME GLAZING WIND SHELTERED OUTDOOR AREAS ARE DESIRABLE

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ISSN 0 198 -7682 DATA LOCAL CLIMATOLOGICAL 1984 ANNUAL S UMMARY WITH COMPARATIVE DATA E w w 0:: z :::::> w E-et: < :r: 0:: < C:... w 0... C/l :a w w w et: E-0 w Cl z 0 E----. a.. C/) 100 95 90 85 80 75 70 65 60 55 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 5 -10 -15 -20 3 .00 2 .00 1.00 0 .5 0 0 .20 0 . 10 0 .05 0 .02 0 . 01 0 .00 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 DENVER , C OLORADO Daily Data -.--------------------------------------------------------------------------, CELSIUS 36 32 28 24 20 16 12 8 4 0 4 8 -12 -16 -20 -24 10 20 30 10 2028 10 20 30 10 20 30 10 20 3 0 10 20 30 1 0 2 0 30 10 20 3 0 1 0 2 0 30 10 20 30 10 20 30 1 0 20 3 0 J A FE B MAR A PR MAY JUN J U L AU G SEP O C T N O V DEC ---------------------------------------------------1 ---------------------------------T-----------------------------: --------+-+--------------1 ---------r-------------r-ht----+------------+---1 --------. r-. --------c---.. -,.-----+--+--1 ------... . --....... -.. . -= fF=--=:=t ::: i:= : : : : = : ::::::: 1r I I II I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II Ill 10 20 30 10 2 0 2 8 10 20 3 0 1 0 20 30 10 2 0 3 0 10 20 30 1 0 20 3 0 10 20 3 0 1 0 2 0 30 1 0 2 0 3 0 10 20 30 1 0 20 3 0 10 20 30 10 2 0 2 8 10 20 30 1 0 20 30 10 20 3 0 10 20 30 10 2 0 3 0 10 20 3 0 1 0 2 0 30 10 20 3 0 1 0 20 30 10 2 0 3 0 TEM PERAT URE DEPI CTS NORMAL MAXIMUM . NORMAL M INIM U M AND ACTUAL DAILY HIGH AND LOW VALUES { FAHRENHEIT) PRECIPITATION IS MEASURED IN IN CHES . SCALE IS ONUN EAR SUNSHINE I S PER CENT OF THE POSSIBLE SUNS HINE I CERTIFY THAT THIS IS AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC AOHINISTRATION, AND IS COMPILED FROM RECORDS O N FILE AT THE NATIONAL CLIMATIC O ATA CENIER, ASHEVIL E, ORTH CAROLINA, 28801 NATIONAL n 0 a a OCEANIC AND A RATION NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SAIELLI E. AlA INfORMAl ION SERVICE NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER ASHEVILLE NORTH cAROLINA DIRECTOR NATIONAL CLIMATIC D ATA Eq

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DATA FOR 1984 DENVER. COLORADO LONGITUDE: 10-l 052' >I ELEVATION: FT lgrdl 5283 lms l l 5332 TIME ZONE: MOUNTAIN 230&2 JAN FEB TEMPERATURE F: Averages -Oa; ly Maximum 39.0 45. 4 -Oa i I y i n i um 15. 5 22. 7 -Monthly 27.3 34. 1 -Month l y Dewpt. 13.0 1 7. 1 Extremes -Highest 58 &4 -Date 5 1 -Lo"est -19 'l -Date 8 28 DEGREE D AYS BASE &5 F: Heating 11 &3 889 Coo I i ng 0 0 I. OF POSSIBLE SUNSHINE 70 &9 AVG. SKY COVER I tenths I Sunrise Sunset 4 . 2 4 , 4 M idnight M idn i ght 3 8 4 . 0 NUMBER O F DAYS: Sunrise to Sunset -Clear 15 13 -Part I y C I oudy 7 9 -Cloudy 9 7 Pr ec i p i tat ion . 0 1 inches or more 4 5 Sno" , Ice pe II ets 1 .0 inch -.s or more 1 3 Thunderstorms 0 0 Heavy Fog, " i s i b iIi t y 1 / 4 m i I e or less 0 0 Temperature OF -Max imum 'l0 and above 0 0 32 and be l o " 8 4 -Mi n imum 32 and be lo " 31 29 0 and be lo " 5 0 AVG. STA TION PRES S . lmbl 837 . 8 833 . 7 RELATIVE HUMIDITY l X I Hour OS 65 &4 Hour 11 !Local T ime I 48 4 1 Hour 17 54 47 Hour 23 &3 &5 PRECIPITATION I inches}: >later Equiv a lent -Total 0 .18 0.81 -Greatest 124 hrsl 0 .12 0.39 -Dat e 13-14 1 4 Sno", le e pellets -Total 3 . 4 7 . 9 -Greatest 124 hrs} 2.4 3 . 6 -Date 13-14 25-26 WINO: Resu I tan t -Directi on I!! l 172 082 -Spe e d I mph} 1 . 8 0.3 Average Speed lmphl Fastest O bs . 1 M in. 7.0 9 . 2 -Directi on I!! l 01 01 -Spe e d lmphl 24 36 -Date 29 14 PEAK GUST -d irection II!} N N -Sp ee d I mph I 38 I -Dat e 29 MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG 48. 5 53 . 5 73. 9 80. 3 89. 0 84 . 5 25. 8 31 .0 4&. 0 52.7 &0.7 59. 1 37.2 42.3 &0. 0 &&. 5 74. 9 71. 8 22. 0 25.2 3& b 44. 3 5 0 . 2 52. 2 70 75 90 94 97 90 14 17 23 29 21 29 10 23 34 41 55 53 5 4 8 1 0 1 30 854 &73 183 51 0 1 0 0 33 104 315 218 58 &1 72 &2 71 &8 & . 9 b. 1 5 . 8 5 . 0 4 .7 5.1 & .0 5. 7 5.5 4 . 7 4 . 9 5 . 1 5 7 b 10 .13 8 11 'l 16 14 12 14 15 14 9 b b 9 10 12 4 12 12 13 5 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 5 13 1 0 12 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 14 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 29 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 833.4 831. 7 835 . & 835.8 839. 1 839 . 8 70 70 65 72 69 74 4 8 4& 34 36 35 42 49 45 31 35 34 45 6& &6 56 & 2 56 & 5 1 . 19 2 .42 0 .&5 1 . 2& 2.11 3 .20 0 .58 1 . 0 8 0.4& 0 .35 1 .01 1 .00 22-23 20-21 6 PH-1 30-31 12 12. 0 16. 8 T 0 . 0 0 . 0 0 . 0 & . 0 12. 3 T 0.0 0.0 0.0 22-23 20-21 7 121 360 140 136 154 187 1 . 3 3 . 2 2 . 3 1 . 2 1 . 4 2.3 8 .7 10. 6 8 . 9 7.9 7 . 2 6 . 5 2'3 01 31 18 36 0 8 31 32 40 30 30 29 7 2 12 19 22 12 w NW SE s NE I ., 3'3 52 48 43 45 39 4 11 1 4 19 I 19 31 (I I I S ee R e f erence Notes on Page 68 Page 2 SEP OCT NOV DEC YEAR 74. 1 55 . 1 54. 3 45. 7 b 1 . 9 4 7 .2 34 . 4 25. 0 19. 9 3&.7 &0. 7 44 .8 39.7 32. 8 49. 3 39. 1 31 . 4 19. 3 1&.7 30. & 91 7& 7& &8 97 10 11 2 7 JUL 21 29 21 12 4 -19 28 17 27 14 JAN 18 183 &22 753 990 &362 6 0 0 0 0 730 67 55 &4 73 &6 4.& 5 . 6 5 .8 4 . 1 5 . 2 4.5 5 . 3 4 .9 4 . 4 4 . 9 14 10 8 17 126 7 9 12 7 127 'l 12 10 7 113 7 9 3 5 % 1 4 2 1 20 3 0 1 0 48 0 1 0 4 6 3 0 0 0 21 0 1 0 4 19 4 18 28 27 187 0 0 0 0 5 838 . 5 834. 7 834 . 1 832.7 835. & 71 77 67 70 70 4 0 56 35 4 7 42 36 5 3 38 51 43 6 0 71 59 6 4 63 0. 4 7 3 . 4 7 0 .27 0 .46 1 & .49 0 .39 1 . 22 0 .23 0 .30 1 . 22 27-28 45 2 5 -26 13-1 4 OCT 4 5 5 . 2 13. 1 2 . 3 5.0 65.7 4 .9 9.2 2 . 3 3.0 1 2 . 3 27-28 15-16 25-26 13-14 APR 20-21 162 118 227 210 158 1. 9 0 . 8 1 . 4 1 . 2 0 . 9 6 . 9 6 . 2 7 . 4 7 . 2 7.8 21 36 30 30 31 21 30 30 31 40 23 16 4 21 HAY 12 w N NW N W w 56 40 44 47 56 21 16 4 21 SEP 21

PAGE 37

l)l)l' ... ,, .. ' ' 1'10\ ) , l., t: . 1 1 . \ 1 n c !1 e ::=: DE\\'ER. COLORADO YEAR JAN FEB MAR i APR MAY JUNE JULy I A U G I SEP OCT I NOV D E C JANNUAL 1955 23 I c 85 1 14 0 . 48 2 .47 I .3'3 2 . '?'3 2 . 4 1 2 . 72 O .bb 0 . 5b 0. 1 5 1i0. 0 5 ''35b 0 3'3 0 . 77 0 .8'3 0 . 72 2 .3b 0 . 44 4 . 1 7 83 0.0 0 .27 1. 25 O.b2 3 .72 '357 I c 32 0 . 73 ; .0'3 4 . 1 3 7.31 1 . 0'3 1 . 29 2 .03 0.42 2.b2 0. 4'3 O .Ob 21 .58 1'358 c ,3 i .00 1 . 48 1 .73 4 .4b 1 . 4 7 3.50 1 . 1 7 1 . 5 1 0.37 0.74 O.b4 18.80 ":15'3 1. 2-l 1 . 31 2 .85 1 35 3.33 0 . 44 0.83 0. 2 5 1 . 82 2 .4b 0 . 40 0 .2b 1b.54 '3bC 0. I' 1 .bb 0 . 8 9 2.% 2 . 2 7 0 .b3 1 . 3 0 . O b 0.38 2 .4b 0 . 4'3 1 .50 14 .'38 1'Jb 0 .07 0 .bb 2 .51 1 . O b 4 .12 1 . 11 1 .E>O 1 .21 4 .b7 0. 77 0.'33 0 . 30 1'3 .01 1'3b2 1 .33 1 .05 0 .52 1 . 10 0.84 1 .52 0. 54 0 4b 0. 1 '3 0.05 O .b8 0 . 1 7 8 .45 ''3a3 c , 1 0 . 21 1 42 0 .03 O .b8 3 . 5'3 0. 55 2 .52 1. 25 0.31 0 . 45 0 . 51 2 . 2 3 ''lo.: . .,. .... 1 . 0 4 1 .38 1. 25 2.53 0 . 82 0. 72 0 .27 0. 41 0 . 1 8 0.88 0. 40 10. 1 4 1'3[,5 .00 1 .27 1 .20 1 . 05 1 . 82 4 . 14 b . 41 1 . O b 2 .58 0 . 45 0.3b 0 .53 21.87 1'lbb C.3 0 1 .28 0 . 32 1 . 4b 0 . 3 4 1 .41 1 .04 2 O b 1 . 1 5 0. '3b 0 .32 0 . 1 7 10.81 l'la7 I 0.84 0 3'3 0 . 7'3 3. '35 4.77 4 .b'3 3.25 0 . 83 0 .bO 1 . 13 1 . 01 1 .Ob 23.31 ''lb8 C.51 0.74 0 .85 2.3'3 0. 71 0.50 1. 34 2.53 0.5'3 0. 75 0.71 0.51 12. 1 3 ''30'3 I 0 . 17 0 .43 1 .10 1. 33 b . 12 2.'3'3 1 . 81 0. 7'3 1 . b 7 4 . 17 O .b2 0 .32 21.52. '370 I 0. I) 0 .01 1 .34 0.'37 O .b4 3 .83 1 . b 7 0 .54 2 .47 0 .88 1 .1'3 0 .0'3 1 3 .73 '37 0 35 0 . 78 0 .53 1 . '38 1 . 34 0 23 1 . 20 0 .85 2 .85 0.44 0. 1 b 0 25 0.'3b '372 C.3b 0 .44 0 .50 3.52 0 . 4'3 2 . '34 O.b3 2 . 71 2 07 0 .82 1. b'3 0 .70 lb.87 ''373 I . . 31 0. 1 b 1 .7b 3 . 73 5 .0b 0 .20 2 .47 1 .28 2.85 0 .47 0.83 2 .84 22. '3b 1'374 1 .03 0.82 1 .32 2 .28 O.Ob 2 . 01 2 .34 0 . 1 b 0.'38 1 . b8 1 . Ob 0 . 2'3 14.0 3 1'375 0 .23 0 .37 1 . 1 g 1 . 1 4 2.80 2 . 11 2 . 7 8 2 .00 0 . 24 0.30 1. 88 0 .47 15.51 1'37[, 0 . 1 '3 0 .54 1 . 3 4 1 . 27 1 . 34 O .b3 2 .31 2 .50 1 .88 0.'33 0.32 0 . 1b 1 3 .41 1'377 0 . 1 b 0 .27 1 .24 2. 13 0.34 1 . 02 2.'38 1 .00 0. 10 0 .48 0 .5'3 0 .03 10.34 1'378 0 .27 0.27 1 .07 1 . 82 3 .4b 1 . 1 7 0 .54 0 . 2 b 0 .07 1 . 45 0 .50 0 .82 11.70 1'37'3 0.34 0.42 1 .25 1 . 41 3 .53 2 . 3'3 0 .81 5 .85 0. 3b 1 . 28 1 . bb 1 . O b 20.3b '380 O .b4 0 .45 1. 15 2 .54 2 . 7 3 0.0'3 2.'33 1 .b5 0. b3 0. 10 O.bb 0 . 10 13.b7 1'381 0 . 2'3 0.35 2.27 1 . 01 3 .7b O.b3 0.'30 1 . 1 b 0. 35 0 . 7'3 0 .42 O.bb 12.5'3 1'382 0 .32 0.0'3 0. 18 0.34 3 .48 2 .2b 0 . '32 1 . 1 b 1 .38 1 . 51 0 .47 2 .34 14.45 '383 0 . 5 0 .07 4 .5b 2. 10 3 .b2 2 .b5 1 . 75 1 .51 0.13 0 .3'3 2.b3 O.b3 20. 1'3 '384 0 . 1 8 0 .81 1 . 1 '3 2 .42 O.b5 1. 2b 2 . 1 1 3 . 20 0 .47 3 .47 0 .27 0.4b 1b. 4'3 Record Mean 0 .4b 0.57 1 . 14 1 . '3'3 2 .41 1 . 4'3 1 . 70 1 . 44 1. 0'3 1. 0 2 O .b8 0 . b3 14.b0 See Reference Notes on Page &B. Page 4A AVERAGE TEMPE R ATURE (deg. F) DENVER. COLORAD O YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC ANNUAL 1'355 27. 2 27. 1 3b. 5 50. 1 5'3. 0 b4.0 75.5 73.1 b3.'3 54. 0 3b.2 35.4 50.2 1'35b 34. 0 27.7 40. 1 45.5 b0.'3 73. 4 72.2 b'3. 7 b5.5 55.'3 37. 2 35.7 51.5 1'357 25. 8 40.7 3'3 . 1 41. 4 53.'3 b5.'3 73.5 72 . b b1. 4 51.4 3b. 8 3'3.b 50. 2 1'358 32.'3 37. 4 32. 8 44. b b1. 7 b8. 1 70. 3 73. b b4.4 53.'3 40. b 35.8 51. 4 1'35'3 30. 0 30. 2 37. b 45. b 5b.2 70.'3 72.b 73.0 b1. 1 48. 1 37. b 3b. 5 50. 0 #1'3b0 27. b 24. 8 38. 1 50. 5 57. 2 b8. 3 73.2 73.4 b5.0 52. 0 3'3. 5 2b.5 4'3. 7 1'3b1 31.7 35. 2 38.'3 4b.O 55.7 bb. 1 71. 5 72.2 5b.3 50.0 34. 7 27.7 48.'3 1'3b2 1'3.5 2'3 .'3 34.b 50.3 5'3.8 b5. 5 72.'3 72.5 b2.4 53.4 41. 3 33.8 4'3 . 7 1'3b3 1'3.1 37. 3 37. 3 50. 0 b0.'3 bb. 7 7 4 . 8 b8. 7 b5.'3 57.'3 41. 7 28.5 50. 8 1'3b4 30. b 27.4 33. 0 4b.b 58.8 b5. 0 75.8 70. 4 b2.5 52. 7 40. 0 33.2 4'3.7 1'3b5 35.0 27.4 2'3. 0 51. 2 57. 1 b3.'3 72. 7 70. 2 55. 7 55. 1 43. 3 35.0 4'3.b 1'3bb 2 8 . b 28. 4 42. 5 44.b 58. 7 b4. b 7b .'3 70.8 b5 . 0 52. 2 41. 5 31. '3 50. 5 1'3b7 3 4.0 3 5 . 1 42.'3 48. 2 52.b bO. b b'3. 1 b8. 2 b2. 1 52. 5 40. 5 2b. 5 4'3.4 1'3b8 2'3.7 3 4 . 2 40. b 43.0 53.'3 b7. 8 71 . 7 b8. 1 bO. '3 51. '3 35. 7 28.'3 48.'3 1 '3b'3 35. 0 35. 4 32. 2 52. 2 5'3. 3 b1. 5 7 4' . 7 73.'3 b 4.5 3'3. 0 3'3 . 1 32.5 4'3 .'3 1'370 30. & 38. & 33. 5 43. 7 58.8 &5.2 72 .0 73.'3 5'3. 5 45.'3 3'3. 1 33 . 3 4'3. 5 1'371 32. 1 30.b 38. 5 47.8 54. 2 b'3 . 0 70. b 72. 8 57.5 4'3, 4 3'3. 1 31 .'3 4'3 . 5 1'372 30. 5 3b. 2 44.8 48. 5 57. 0 &8.3 70.2 71. 0 b2. 1 52. 1 32.'3 24 .'3 4'3.'3 1'37 3 27. 3 35. 5 3'3.'3 43. 2 55. b &7 . 5 71. 0 7 3 . 5 5'3.'3 54.5 3'3. 5 31 .b 4'3.'3 1'374 23.7 35. 2 43. 2 47.'3 b1. b b8. 4 74.7 b'3 . 5 5'3.4 52. 4 38. 0 31 . 2 50.5 '375 31 . 7 30.& 37. 3 44. 1 54. 3 b4. 3 72.7 70.8 5'3. 5 53. 2 3& . 8 37. 5 4'3.4 1'37& 32. 3 3'3 . 3 37.1 4'3. 2 5b.7 bb. 3 7 5 . 3 70.2 b1. 8 48.4 3'3. 5 35. 5 51.0 1'377 2'3 . 2 38.0 3'3 .'3 51. 1 b0. 7 71 . '3 7 4 . 3 70.2 ob. b 53.3 40. 3 35. 1 52.5 1 '37 8 25.8 31. 4 43. 3 50. 3 54. 4 bb.'3 74.7 b'3. b &5 . 0 53. 1 37. 8 24.b 4'3. 7 1 '37'3 18.0 34.2 40. 5 4'3. 1 54. 8 &5 . 8 73.7 &'3. 5 bb.3 53.8 33.3 34.5 4'3.5 1'380 2b. O 34.5 38. 0 47.7 57. 1 71 . '3 7&.4 73.2 &5.8 52.4 41. '3 4 1 . 2 52.2 1'381 37. 3 3b.2 41. 2 5b. 4 57. 1 70. 4 75.'3 72. 0 &8.2 52. b 45.'3 35.8 54. 1 1'382 30. 3 32.0 41. 1 47.4 55.1 b3. 1 72.7 73. 1 b1 . 7 4'3. 0 35.7 30.'3 4'3 . 3 1'383 31. '3 3b. b 3b. 2 41. 0 51 . 4 &2 . 8 73.3 74. 4 b4.'3 52. 7 37. 0 17.5 48. 3 1'384 27. 3 34. 1 37. 2 42.3 bO.O bb. 5 74.'3 71 . 8 b0. 7 44.8 3'3. 7 32.8 4'3 . 3 Record Mean 30. 0 32.'3 38. 7 47. 5 5b. 7 bb. 7 72.8 71 . 3 b2.8 51. 5 3'3 . 5 32.3 50. 2 ax 42.7 45.4 51.2 b0. 2 b'3.4 80.5 8b. b 85 . 0 77. 0 &5 . 4 52. b 44.'3 b3. 4 M i n I 1 7 . 3 20.4 2b. 1 34. 8 43.'3 52. 8 58.'3 57. 7 48. b 37. b 2b. 5 1'3.b 37. 0 See Reference Notes on Page &B. Page 48

PAGE 38

IIL:,\TI\ (; DCG RCC 0 .-'\Y:::: !3ase:-6:5 deg F' DE'<\ ' ER. COLORADO SEASON ,JULY A U G SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE TOTAL 1'3:>5 5 6 0 2 '26 3 3;:, 8:>8 '3 1 1 '35 5 1072 764 581 1 4 3 0 5748 1'35 6 5 7 1 20 bb 277 82'3 '301 1206 674 7'35 701 333 7 4 587 7 ''357-58 0 c 1 4 1 4 2 0 838 782 '386 765 '3'30 6 0 6 1 38 36 5 702 1'358-5'3 1 4 4 1 0 6 342 7 2 4 8'38 1 081 '368 841 5 7 2 273 25 5848 1'35'3-60 0 6 1 '3 1 5 1 8 815 876 11 1 5 1 1 1 5 '3 827 434 245 38 6260 ::''360-61 7 1 3 '30 3'36 75'3 1 1 8 7 1026 828 8 0 4 560 2C:OC:O 65 6034 ''36 1-62 1 4 0 273 45'3 '302 1 50 1 4 1 1 '376 '334 437 175 7 2 6803 1'362-63 0 1 '3 1 1 2 352 703 '361 1 4 7 768 848 442 156 5 0 5828 1'36 3 -64 b 7 2'3 22'3 6'30 1125 105'3 1082 '382 545 230 7 2 6056 "'364-6 5 0 1 6 123 375 743 '381 '321 1044 1108 4 1 1 245 63 6030 1'3656 6 b 7 2'36 302 645 '32 4 1 1 22 1 01 7 6'31 6 0 4 204 82 5'300 1'366-67 0 '3 61 3'31 6 '3'3 1 01 8 '354 832 6 7 '3 4'38 388 35 5664 1'367-68 4 1 b 0 8 38'3 72'3 1 186 1086 885 751 6 5 5 343 38 6 1'30 "'3b86C) 0 35 1 4 5 3'3'3 8 7 1 1 1 1 4 '325 821 1 0 1 1 3 7 8 204 144 6057 1C)6'3-70 2 0 5 6 801 76'3 gge 1061 734 '36'3 632 200 7 8 6300 1'37 0 -71 0 0 1'38 584 770 '377 1 01 8 '358 817 508 32'3 25 6 184 '371 7 2 24 0 2 7 3 47'3 771 1 0 1 '3 1063 832 621 486 246 4 5 8 1 8 C)7 2 -73 42 1 5 107 3'37 '360 123'3 1162 820 771 646 2'30 56 6 5 0 5 1'373-74 8 0 166 321 758 102'3 1277 831 6 7 1 507 137 6 7 5772 1'374-75 0 g 1'3'3 381 8 0 3 1043 1024 '357 852 621 332 85 6306 1'375 7 6 0 4 1'35 363 840 843 1006 740 85'3 46'3 254 64 5637 ;'3767 7 0 7 142 50'3 75'3 '307 1 1 05 74'3 771 4 1 4 137 0 5500 1'3777 8 2 1 4 38 358 737 '320 1206 '336 665 435 335 87 5 733 1'378-7'3 0 20 '36 3bb 8 1 1 1245 1450 854 751 4 7 3 313 8 1 6460 1'37'3-80 0 2 0 58 347 '341 '33'3 1204 876 828 514 247 '3 5'383 1'380-81 0 4 56 386 683 731 853 801 727 260 243 26 4770 1'38 1-82 0 1 2 1 g 375 570 8'38 1 0 71 '318 733 522 306 '32 5516 1'382-83 3 0 1 51 487 875 1050 1 01 7 78'3 885 7 1 2 41'3 12'3 6517 1'383-84 3 0 87 372 833 146'3 1163 88'3 854 6 7 3 183 51 6577 1'384-85 0 1 183 622 753 '3'30 See Notes Page SB. Page 5A COOL! G DEGREE DAYS Base 65 deg. F DENVER , COLORADO YEA R JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC TOTAL 1'36'3 0 0 0 0 35 . 4 4 3 1 2 284 46 0 0 0 721 1'370 0 0 0 0 1 6 '33 222 282 40 0 0 0 653 1'371 0 0 0 0 0 14'3 203 248 53 0 0 0 653 1'372 0 0 0 0 6 1 1 0 2 1 0 207 28 1 0 0 562 1'373 0 0 0 0 2 138 1 '3'3 270 21 1 0 0 631 1'374 0 0 0 0 36 176 307 157 3'3 0 0 0 715 1'37 5 0 0 0 0 3 b'3 246 1'32 3'3 5 0 0 554 1'376 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 2 324 176 52 0 0 0 667 1'377 0 0 0 2 1 1 2 1 4 2'37 182 '33 0 0 0 7'3'3 1'378 0 0 0 0 1 2 152 308 1 7 1 103 2 0 0 748 1'37'3 0 0 0 0 2 1 12 275 163 102 7 0 0 661 1'380 0 0 0 2 1 0 224 358 263 88 1 0 0 '346 1'38 1 0 0 0 7 6 1'35 346 236 1 21 1 0 0 '312 1'382 0 0 0 0 6 42 247 257 5'3 0 0 0 6 1 1 1'383 0 0 0 0 7 6'3 264 301 '31 0 0 0 732 1'384 0 0 0 0 33 1 0 4 3 1 5 218 60 0 0 0 730 See Notes Page SB. Page 58

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Sl'\OWFALL (inches) DENVER. COLORADO SEASON1 JULY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR 1'3S5-5& 0 . 0 0 .0 0.0 4 . 1 7.3 2 .'3 & . 3 10.5 13.0 1'3S&-S7 0 . 0 0 .0 0 0 0 . & 2 1 . 3 & . 3 5 . 3 . & 8 .'3 . '357-58 0.0 0 .0 T 3 .'3 3.0 0 . 8 8 .'3 12.0 14. 4 '358-S'3 0 0 0 .0 T 2.& '3. 7 7 . 7 1 7 . 4 17. 5 2& . 8 1'35'3-&0 0.0 0. 0 12.'3 11.8 5 . 3 2 . 7 10. 7 18. 3 '3.0 1'3&0 & 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 4 . & 5 . 1 1 7 . 8 1 .0 7 .'3 2'3 . 2 1%1 -&2 0 .0 0 .0 5 . 8 & . 2 11 . 4 3 . 8 1 7 .2 1 1 . 3 & . 8 1'3&2-&3 0 .0 0.0 0. 7 0 .0 5 .0 1 . 2 '3. 1 2 . 1 18. 0 1'3&3-&4 0 .0 0.0 0. 0 1 . 1 3 . 5 5 . '3 2.& 12 . 7 18. 4 1'3&4-&5 0 .0 0.0 0. 0 T & . 0 4 4 13. 2 1 7 . 1 14.'3 %5-&& 0 .0 0.0 5 . 5 0 . 0 5 . 5 5 . & 3 . & 1 4 . & 2 . 8 %&-&7 0 . 0 0.0 T 8 . 3 3 .0 1 .'3 '3 .'3 4 4 & . & %7-&8 0 .0 0.0 0.0 1 . 7 '3. 4 13. 1 3 .0 7 . 3 '3. 2 1%8-&'3 0.0 0.0 0 . 0 0.4 5 . 8 &.'3 2 . 8 4 . 2 13. 2 1'3&'3-70 0.0 0.0 0 . 0 31. 2 5 . 1 3 . 1 0.'3 0 . 3 20. 5 1'37071 J . 0 0 . 0 4 . & 5 .'3 '3 . 2 0 .'3 8 . & 11 .'3 '3. & '37 -72 0 .0 0 .0 1 7 . 2 3 . 1 1 4 8 . 4 10.'3 '3. 1 7 . 1 1'372-73 0 . 0 0.0 0 . 0 '3. 7 1'3. 4 '3 8 12. 1 3.0 15. 1 1'373-7 4 0 . 0 0.0 0. 0 2 . 3 '3. 3 30.8 8 . 2 10. 3 12. 8 1'374-75 0 . 0 0.0 1 . 8 1 . 0 11 .'3 2 . 1 3 . & 4 . 0 14. 3 1'375-7& 0 .0 0 .0 0 . 0 2 . 7 15 .2 7 . 3 3 . 2 &. 4 18. 7 1 '37&-77 0 . 0 0 . 0 0 . 0 7 . 2 4 . 5 3 . 1 2 . 4 3 . 1 '3. & 1 '377-78 0 . 0 0 .0 0.0 3 . 3 4 . 1 0 . 7 5 . 5 & . 2 8 . & '378-7'3 0 . 0 0 . 0 T 2 . 7 & .'3 14. 2 '3. 1 5 . 8 18. 2 1'37'3-80 0.0 0 . 0 0.0 2 . 7 22. 3 1&. 5 12. 3 '3 . & 12. 1 1'380-81 0 . 0 0 . 0 0.0 1. 5 7 . 1 1 . 2 4 . 1 4 . 3 24. 0 1'381-82 0.0 0 .0 0.0 2 . 8 3.3 '3.'3 4 . 8 1 . 8 2 . 1 1'382-83 0 . 0 0 .0 0 . 0 1 . 2 1 . 8 27. 1 1 . 3 0.8 30. 5 1'383-84 0.0 0 . 0 T T 2'3.3 11 . 5 3 . 4 7 .'3 12. 0 1'384-85 0 . 0 0.0 5 . 2 1 3 . 1 2 . 3 5.0 Record Mean 0 . 0 0 . 0 1 . & 3 . 7 8 . 1 7 . 0 7 . 7 7 . 4 13. 1 See Reference Notes on Page &B. REFERE NCE NOTES GENERAL T TRACE AMOUNT. B LANK ENTRIES DENOTE MISSING / UNREPORTED DATA . Page &A DENVER. COLORADO EXCEPTIONS PAGE 3 APR MAY JUNE 3 . 7 T 0 . 0 25 . 5 8 . 8 0.0 14. 1 0 . 0 0.0 1 7 .& T 0 . 0 '3. 3 T 0.0 8 . & & . 4 0.0 10.0 0.0 0 . 0 0.2 0.0 0 . 0 12. 1 1 . 0 0 . 0 0.3 T 0 . 0 & . 4 2 .'3 0 . 0 3 . & 3 . 0 0 . 0 15. 1 T 0 .0 T 0 . 0 0 . 0 4.7 T 0 . 0 &.0 T 0 . 0 17.2 0 . 0 0.0 24. 8 1 . 0 0.0 17. 8 0 . 0 T 10.'3 & . 1 0 . 0 1 . 2 0.0 0 . 0 4 . 7 0 . 0 0 . 0 4 . & 13. 5 0.0 8 . 1 8 . 2 0 . 0 10.0 T 0 . 0 2 .'3 T 0 . 0 2.0 T 0 .0 11. 3 7.& 0 .0 1&.8 T 0 . 0 '3. 3 1 .'3 0 . 0 I INDICATES A STATION OR INSTRUMENT RELOCATION. 1 . FASTEST MILE W I NOS ARE THROUGH AUGUST 1q91. SEE S TATION LOCATION TABLE ON PAGE B . SPECI FIC PAGE 2 PM INCLUDES L AST DAY OF PREVIOUS M O N T H PAGE 3 t a l LENGTH OF RECORD I N YEARS, ALTHOUGH !NOIV!OUAL M O NTHS MAY BE M ISSING . • LESS THAN . 05 NORMALS BASED O N THE 1q 51-1q90 RECORD PERIOD. EXTREMES OATES ARE THE MOST RECENT OCCURRENCE W INO OIR. N U MERALS S H O W TENS OF OEGRESS CLOCKWIS E FRO M T R U E NORTH ao INDICATES CALM. R ESULTANT DIRECTIO N S ARE GIVEN TO WHOLE DEGREES. PAGES 4A, 4B, &A RECORD MEANS ARE FOR ENTIRE PERIOD OF RECORD. REG ARDLESS O F LOCATION Page &8 TOTAL 4 7 . 8 78. 3 57 . 1 '3'3 . 3 80. 0 80 . & 72 . 5 3&. 3 57.3 55.'3 4&.'3 40.7 58.8 33. 3 &5 . 8 5&. 7 74. 4 '34 .'3 '31. 5 55. 7 54. 7 34.& 4& . 5 73. 2 85. 5 45. 1 2&. 7 81 . & 80.'3 5'3. 8

PAGE 40

Loc•tton L'OP:=.\":"!::; On c o r . o r e toea t ions IT\" c __ 6 < h ( f or.;erlv C S treet) S treet s oodwar d Bui.lding o n w M s 1 1 arket (for-o:erly Holida y t reet) lSth & 6th Streets cCltntock B lock 6 t h Street roa d w ell Block on .ar im er" Street T L abor Block, 16t h 6.. a r imer Street s a n e n o n a. Thom a s B lock 7th & C urtis Street s lub Bui 700 Block on Arapahoe treec . S. P ost O f !te e 6th E. Arap ahoe Str-eets oscon Su i Ldin g 7th 6o C h.ampa Str-eets e w Pose O!Hce Building 9 t h & S tout S t r-ee t s lRPORT _, __ A s dmini.stracton !lu1Lding taplecon A i rfie l d fAA Building . liB s tapleto n Airfield t " s Stapleton Inc' l AP (Effective 10/l /64) . e. f orecaat Office tr tapleton lntemationat i.rport t We a cher Servic e f'cs t Offic e (Effective 1970) w eather Servic e f est Office taplecon tnc emational Ait"p O r t E c E c ] l! 1i "i a a . g e .;; ., (:) ;i! a ll/185 9 12/1873 NA ll/ 10/71 3/15/73 NA 3/15/73 ll/30/75 " 'N'J 11/30/75 7/1/77 350' ESE 7/l/77 6 / 13 /81 200' 6/13/8 12/l/87 200' \J S \J 12/1/87 5/l/91 1100' ESE 5/1/91 10/l /95 375' N L O / l /95 12 / 8/04 600' S\J 12 / 8/04 1/29 / 16 800' E l / 29/1! Pre sen c 10 00' ENE 9 / 15/31 6 / 25/47 NA 6 /25/4 5 / 7 / 69 0 .) ml.N\1 5/7/ 69 1 /20/82 l.7 mi.ES E 1 / 20/821 Presen< t mi. N STATION LOCATION E levatlo n "bove s .. Ground I . i ' I c 0 Latltud• Loc.qltude . s r. E • i . N o r t h West " , A I 1 g' il :;. a I . ' it ;; r:. 0. 00. "" ,:: I I I 39. 4 5 ' 1 0 1 • 00' 5 177 5 1 •20 •20 3 9 • LOS" 00' 521 2 7 1 37 I 36 39 4 5 ' 105" 00' 07 0 •321 f)2 39. 45' 105" 00' 5 214 80 45 44 39" 45' 105" 00 ' 5204 1 0 9 73 72 39. 45. 105" 00' 52 1 8 1 103 86 1 10: 39" .!.5' 105" 00' 5229 121 LOS 97 39" 45' Los• 00' 5214 151 83 83 74 a 7 9 a 79 39" 45' 105" 00' 5219 136 1 2 9 1 2 8 119 :bl72 39" 45' 105 " 00' 5221 ll3 1 0 6 1 0 8 ,.... 98 c c 39" 46' 104" 53 ' 5292 59 46 46 39 " 46' 104" 53' 5292 72 6 6 ,.... 4 15283 g 2 0 el9 f40 39 45' 104" 52' 5283 J 20 5 5 22 4 39" 46' 104• 5 2 I 5282 33 5 5 25 4 I . I . "' . c . j g' I "' I .;; c 2' i .; I ' "' I I 4 8 5 2 •so 60 86 7 9 9 7 74 ll9 N A 98 NA d 9 8 c 5 42 6 5 NA hi 4 4 j l 4 4 5 c I I I jill , , , ..... I I No\ No\ NA N A I Of.'lVE:R .. • f Y I)t' 'M"7':\\IOS T • A t;TOB R e•a rks Volunt a r y observers, b roken record. I -Estimated. # -E stimated, a -Effective 6/13/96. b -Effective ) / L /10. c • Rea10ved 4 / l / SO. d -Installed 4 / l /50. . -Installed 3/31/50. f -Effective 2 / l /57. ' • Effective 7/8/60. fa1test mil data from 401 prior to 7/12/6 h • C0tm1isst.oned 5200' ESE o f the momecer lite 8 /1/60. i Effective 8/1/60. J • Not moved S/7/69, . o. Prtc-.• •nd orderin g availabl,e Soational Oat:& federal A s h e ville , N orth 28801 U . S or NATI ONAL DATA CENTER rEOE R A L BUILDING ASHEVILLE, N ( 2BB01 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNI IY EMPLOYER USCOMH-NOM -ASHEVILLE 1850 DQSTAGE AND FEES PAID U.S . DEPART ENT OF CO ERCE COM :no -FIRST CLASS

PAGE 41

DENVER so LAR CHART I s

PAGE 42

; HEATING J'.ND COOLING CHART, DENVER, 0 "' "' a:
PAGE 43

PROGRAM .

PAGE 44

INTERVIEW WITH MAGGIE GILBOY A RECENT YADDO GUEST NOVEMBER 18, 1986 S-S: WHERE DID YOU STAY? M-G: IN A SMALL HOUSE WITH TWO OTHER PEOPLE IT WAS ABOUT THREE MINUTES WALK FROM MY STUDIO S.S.: WHAT WAS YOUR STUDIO LIKE? M.G.: IT WAS HUGE-ABOUT 25x35 FEET IT WAS HEATED BY A WOOD STOVE S.S.: NATURAL LIGHT? M.G.: THERE WERE SKYLIGHTS TO THE NORTH GLARE FROM THE VIEW WINDOWS WAS CONTROLLED BY CURTAINS S.S.: How MANY GUESTS WERE THERE? M-G: TWELVE--THE MAIN HOUSE WAS CLOSED FOR THE WINTER S-S: WHAT ABOUT MEALS? M.G.: DINNER WAS SERVED IN THE MAIN DINING ROOM BUT YOU COULD HAVE A TRAY IN YOUR ROOM A COMMUNAL BREAKFAST WAS SERVED FROM 8:00 TO 9:00 AND LUNCH BAGS AND THERMOSES WERE DISTRIBUTED THEN S-S: WHAT WAS IT LIKE BEING THERE? M.G.: THE ISOLATION WAS VERY UNCOMFORTABLE BUT VERY PRODUCTIVE --I LONG TO RETURN I FOUND MY OWN WORK PATTERN WITHOUT OTHER PEOPLE AROUND I EXPERIENCED A BURST OF ENERGY I COULD EXPERIMENT BECAUSE OF THE SENSE OF PRIVACY No ONE CAN VISIT YOUR STUDIO UNINVITED IT WAS AN EMOTIONAL SHOCK, A TIME OF

PAGE 45

SELF-EXAMINATION THE ENVIRONMENT WAS CONDUCIVE TO CONCENTRATION I'VE HEARD THAT IN THE SUMMER THERE IS A DISTRACTING, COUNTRY CLUB ATMOSPHERE S.S.: DID YOU HAVE YOUR CAR WITH YOU? M.G.: No. IT WAS GOOD THAT IT WAS AN EFFORT TO GET INTO SARATOGA IT WAS A 20 MINUTE WALK OR YOU COULD RIDE IN AND BE DROPPED OFF FOR AN HOUR AND PICKED UP I WENT TO TOWN TWICE IN A MONTH CAR OWNERS WERE DISTRACTED BY REQUESTS FOR RIDES TO TOWN OR THE AIRPORT S.S.: WAS THERE A TELEVISION? MG: 0H, NO! BUT ONE WOMAN HAD ONE WITH A THREE-INCH SCREEN WITH HER S-S: WAS THERE A LIBRARY? M.G.: YES IT HAD A GREAT SELECTION OF PERIODICALS S.S.: DID ANYONE SHOW THEIR WORK? M.G.: A PLAY WRITE ASKED PEOPLE TO ACT OUT A SCENE SHE WAS WORKING ON S.S.: WERE YOU PROVIDED WITH ANY SPECIAL FACILITIES? A DARK ROOM? M-G: SCULPTOR'S TOOLS? No, BUT SPATIAL NEEDS YOU INTEND TO WORK ON THOUGHT I WOULD NEED BAD WERE ACCOMMODATED You STATE THE PROJECT IN YOUR APPLICATION I BROUGHT WHAT I AT TIMES I HAD TO MAKE DO WHICH WASN'T

PAGE 46

PROGRAM SPACE REQUIREMENTS MAIN BUILDING/RANCH HOUSE RESIDENT APARTMENT 600 SQ FT BEDROOM 150 SQ FT BATH 50 SQ FT STUDIO/L.R. 400 SQ FT KITCHEN 200 SQ FT DINING RooM 300 SQ FT LOUNGE/GALLERY 600 SQ FT LIBRARY 200 SQ FT WORKOUT RooM 200 SQ FT VIDEO ROOM 100 SQ FT ENTRY 100 SQ FT LAUNDRY 50 SQ FT STORAGE 200 SQ FT HVAC . 50 SQ FT 2800 SQ FT CIRCULATION Ol 15% 420 SQ FT 3220 SQ FT OPTIONAL LAP POOL & SUN SPACE 1500 SQ FT 4720 SQ FT OUT BUILDINGS/STUDIOS Ol 10 UNITS 6000 SQ FT STUDIO/BEDROOM/LIVING AREA 500 BATH 50 PULLMAN KITCHEN 25 STORAGE 25 HORSE BARN/STORAGE GARAGE 500 SQ FT GROSS SQ FT 11200 SQ FT

PAGE 47

DESIGN ISSUES PLAN CONNECTIONS ARE VERY IMPORTANT BETWEEN INDIVIDUAL STUDIOS AND THE MAIN BUILDING AND BETWEEN THE STUDIOS THEMSELVES IT IS THRU PEDESTRIAN PATHS AND THE ORIENTATION OF ENTRY POINTS THAT THE NECESSARY BALANCE OF COMMUNITY AND PRIVACY WILL BE ACHIEVED FORM I HAVE CHOSEN TO DESIGN AN ART COLONY BECAUSE ONE IS FREED OF PRECONCEIVED NOTIONS OF BUILDING TYPE FORMS WILL BE GENERATED IN RESPONSE TO THE LANDSCAPE AND TESTED WITH THE CONCEPT OF "SPEAKING ARCHITECTURE" AND WITH LEDOUX'S DICTUM THAT "EVERYTHING THAT IS NOT INDISPENSABLE TIRES THE EYE, DISTURBS THOUGHT AND ADDS NOTHING TO THE CONCEPTION" (VISIONARY ARCHITECTURE, P 67) MATERIALS IN THE INTEREST OF CONTRAST IT IS ANTICIPATED THAT MATER IALS WILL NOT BE OF THE SORT USUALLY THOUGHT OF AS "ORGANIC" COLOR ARCHITECTURAL COLOUR IS A RELATIONAL, DEVELOP MENTAL SYSTEM WHICH IS CLEARLY LINKED TO THE SPECIFIC CHARACTER OF EACH DESIGN PROGRAMME PARTICULARLY, INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS ARE A NATURAL SUBJECT FOR A CHROMATIC STATEMENT FOR INDUSTRIAL ZONES OFTEN OCCUPY VAST AREAS OF SPACE AND ARE REMOVED FROM THE TRADITIONAL CONTEXT JEAN-PHILIPPE LENCLOS (COLOR FOR ARCHITECTS, P 77)

PAGE 48

FUNCTION: 6 ) . USERS: A 1.-LACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS: I -eec.hPG rPDM 0fulPIO I M hHtAV0 c$ OBJECTIVES: "VAL-l-0Pk,t; IV \-\.b.-1--k; AP-I \0 TH 10 f2t:::Ovt tOH-D--ll...D C.Ol-\t-\EX::,T \Vl-n1 A0 "Yjo t--Ct \--\.&.1-l-\V,t...y \HE: J....Odt--\(1r:::. IC::? A.-r """f'lit;: SQUARE FOOTAGE:

PAGE 49

SPACE TY.PE: O\t-\H-\C1 t?roM FUNCTION: b\ H\ t-lc1 > 00G\AL-1 Z:,Jt--ler USERS: AL-L-COHt-h::=L,IIOH \V. ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS: 1 IO AL-L-OBJECTIVES: CDt-H-h::='l:::-rlat-l IV coo IV -PPoV\C.?laN rotz-A,L-PINIHcr La:Jt-lc,e.) Hlc..\-H::::\4) SQUARE FOOTAGE: 0

PAGE 50

ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS: J?ti&HE:H A0 A tbN Pdr?l-lC.. r:otz. f!t?Ot? IH--rlSHDE:t::> FDFF 16 M f3./>..t-0 010 tz/<1E:' ft/t:Z-AHb OBJECTIVES: yJVE IH t==OtzMAL 0tlt/clt..t? 1D \V. WOo e 'YA01E I SQUARE FOOTAGE:

PAGE 51

SPACE TY.PE: VIOeD 12-ooM FUNCTION: IV ) VI t/t;;O USERS: AUACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS: 0T L.J OY ) f?-t;L) .. :f. --rv OBJECTIVES: 1H10 ,y. I--to V'II;\V exl-r SQUARE FOOTAGE:

PAGE 52

SPACE TY.PE: i-1 FUN C T I 0 N : 01 cJ t7't" ) \I ot-\ USERS: ALt.-ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS: J..-/ f? tz-Y -r OBJECTIVES: V/&.\V \VOLJ/,0 J.-.DtlCr VIt;;;\V M lC,HI 1-0cJ HCtt:: SQUARE FOOTAGE:

PAGE 53

SPACE TY.PE: L-,b.P \?OOl.USERS: AL-LACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS: OBJECTIVES: IH-10 . .lL.D A Hlql+ CE;IL-INyt;:;p 0'P/:>c,e" I H A.L-N Ddl L.0.-4t--k;E:.) 01 N I NCr t? -0\-\o:..!L...D OH J SQUARE FOOTAGE: KitS.

PAGE 54

SPACE TY.PE: Odl JZOOM FUNCTION: 00Cl.b-L-\ Z:lNct USERS: .A-1.-L-ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS: lZDVI HCi NE-t::L.% OBJECTIVES: CtCOo -ro FFZDM -L-AP f'Wl-, SQUARE FOOTAGE:

PAGE 55

SPACE T Y.P E : }-\0 E?,b42-.M FUNCTION: J USERS: ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS: HhY z evx COlhL-L0 OBJECTIVES: SQUARE FOOTAGE:

PAGE 56

SPACE TY.PE: -looH\\0 FUNCTION: l-lCfHI > CL&:.A.ti USERS: A \Z-1"10T ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS: IOfZ-) 1-br 'PL-.-f... Tt=? ) 0\ H -) c ,A.\-\ OBJECTIVES: COt-1 p ,b.& -r 1V c LEAH C.OMt-1?H \VAL-L-\V SQUARE FOOTAGE:

PAGE 57

FUNCTION: > 0D:/IP...l-I.Z.tHCr USERS: AP1\0l ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS: > TP...r?L-E::., GH.&.IP-0 roP--ID f'p.,fz:Tl\ION. -Fa/M OBJECTIVES: W . Ptz-lv'ATC:: P-I SQUARE FOOTAGE: .

PAGE 58

SPACE TY.PE: 0T cJt/lO ?All-\ M JO e-&HIT0 FUNCTION: USERS: ACTIVITIES/FURNISHINGS: OBJECTIVES: MIHIMAt--ro CoMt-'l?t-\ \VAL-L-'\V. &t-IICHEH TO MlHI H l :z:.e: SQUARE' FOOTAGE: &O.F.

PAGE 59

ZONING .

PAGE 60

ZONING AGRICULTURAL 35 AC PER SINGLE FAMILY UNIT REQUIREMENTS A RESIDENTIAL NON-URBAN p.u.D. REQUIRES 17 1/2 AC PER UNIT A SPECIAL USE REVIEW FOR A GUEST RANCH WOULD REQUIRE 35 AC OR MORE SEVENTY-FIVE PERCENT OF THE PROPERTY MUST REMAIN IN AGRICULTURAL USE---GRAZED IN THIS CASE SPECIAL USE REVIEW SPECIAL USE REVIEW WOULD BE BASED ON: 1) WATER---MIGHT HAVE TO BUY WATER RIGHTS FOR A COMMERCIAL WELL 2) SEPTIC PERMIT---OVER 2000 GALLONS WOULD REQUIP.E A SPECIAL USE PERMIT 3) ACCESS 4) COMPATABILITY WITH SURROUNDING USES APPROVAL DUE TO THE GENEROUS ACREAGE INVOLVED (240 AC) READY APPROVAL IS ANTICIPATED

PAGE 61

.

PAGE 62

BUILDING CODE SEARCH PROJECT NAME: ART RANCH LOCATION: SOUTH OF BOULDER, COLORADO APPLICATION CODE NAME: UNIVERSAL BUILDING CODE DATE: 1982 . ITEM REFERENCE FIRE ZONE: RURAL OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATION: R-1 CR-3 APPLIES IF STUDIOS ARE FREE STANDING) PRINCIPAL OCCUPANCY: CONVENTS & MONASTERIES? (ACTUALLY A GUEST RANCH) OCCUPANCY SEPARATIONS REQUIRED: CHAPTER 12 TABLE 5-A STORAGE/LAUNDRY TO MAIN = 1 HOURS FIRE RESISTIVE CONSTRUCTION TYPE: V MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA: 10,500 SQ FT IF V ONE-HOUR IF ADJACENT TO OPEN AREA ON N.A. IF OVER ONE STORY: TWO OR MORE TOTAL TWICE WHAT PERMITTED IN 5-C IF SPRINKLERED: TRIPLED IN 1 STORY DOUBLED IN MULTI-STORY TABLE 5-C, 5-D SECTIONS 505, 506, 507 TABLE 5-C SIDES: SEC 506-1 SEC 505 B SEC 506-3C

PAGE 63

MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE HEIGHT: FEET: 50 FT IF V ONE-HOUR STORIES: 3 IF V ONE-HOUR SEes 505, 506, 507 TABLE 5-D FIRE RESISTANCE OF EXTERIOR WALL (SEE OCCUPANCY TYPE TABLE 5-A AND CONSTRUCTION TYPE): 1 HR LESS THAN 5 FT R-1 OPENINGS IN EXTERIOR WALLS (SEE OCCUPANCY TYPE AND TABLE 5-A CONSTRUCTION TYPE): NOT PERMITTED LESS THAN 5 FT R-1 WINDOWS REQUIRED IN ROOMS: SEc 1205 A WINDOW AREA: 10% OF FLOOR AREA (MIN 10 SQ FT) FOR GUEST ROOMS, # -DORMITORIES AND HABITABLE ROOMS 1 1/2 SQ FT NATURAL VENTILATION REQUIRED FOR BATHROOMS WATER CLOSETS LAUNDRY & SIMILAR ROOMS ENCLOSED OR SEMI-ENCLOSED COURTS SIZE REQUIRED: SEC 1206 C MINIMUM CEILING HEIGHTS IN ROOMS: 7 FT 6 IN IN HABITABLE SPACES SEC 1207 7 FT 0 IN IN KITCHENS, HALLS, BATHROOMS & TOILET COMPARTMENTS MINIMUM FLOOR AREA OF ROOMS: NOT LESS THAN 70 SQ FT EXCEPT FOR KITCHENS SEC 1207 A

PAGE 64

FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS: EXTERIOR BEARING WALLS INTERIOR BEARING WALLS EXTERIOR NON-BEARING WALLS STRUCTURAL FRAME PERMANENT PARTITIONS VERTICAL OPENINGS FLOORS ROOFS EXTERIOR DOORS INNER COURT WALLS MEZZANINE FLOORS (AREA ALLOWED) ROOF COVERINGS BOILER ROOM ENCLOSURE STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS: FRAMEWORK STAIRS FLOORS ROOFS PARTITIONS EXITS: TABLE 43-A TABLES 43-A. 43-B TABLES 43-A. 43-B TABLE 43-A TABLE 43-B TABLE 43-C TABLE 43-C TABLE 43-A OCCUPANCY LOAD BASES (SQUARE FEET/OCCUPANT) TABLE 33-A (p.570) OCCUPANCY TYPE R-1 BASIS 15 SQ FT /OCCUPANT NUMBER OF EXITS REQUIRED 1 MINIMUM WIDTH OF EXITS EXIT SEPARATION ARRANGEMENT ACTUAL LOAD SEC 3302(A)1. SEC 3303 SEC 3303(B) SEC 3303(c)

PAGE 65

MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE TRAVEL DISTANCE TO EXIT 150 FT WITH SPRINKLERS 200 FT ALLOWABLE EXIT SEQUENCE THRU 1 ADJOINING ROOM EXIT DOORS: MINIMUM WIDTH 3 FT MAXIMUM LEAF WIDTH 4 FT WIDTH REQUIRED FOR NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS EXIT CORRIDORS: MINIMUM ALLOWABLE WIDTH 44 IN REQUIRED TO HAVE EXIT AT EACH END OF CORRIDOR? YES DEAD END CORRIDORS ALLOWED? MAXIMUM LENGTH NOT TO EXCEED 20 FT WALL FIRE RESISTANCE REQUIRED 1 HR F-R FOR OCCUPANCY OF 10 OR MORE DOORS AND FRAMES FIRE RESISTANCE REQUIRED YES WHERE 1 F.R. REQUIRED FOR HALL SEC 3303(D) SEC 3303(E) SEC 3304 SEC 3304(E) SEC 3303(B) SEC 3305 SEC 3305(B) SEC 3305(c) SEC 3305(G)

PAGE 66

STAIRS: MINIMUM WIDTH 44 IN 36 IN 30 IN OCC LOAD OF 50 OCC LOAD OF 49 OCC LOAD OF 10 MAXIMUM RISER ALLOWED 7 1/2 IN MINIMUM TREAD ALLOWED 10 IN EXCEPTION 8 IN RISE/9 IN TREAD ARE WINDERS ALLOWED? YES LANDINGS MINIMUM SIZE WIDTH OF STAIR MAXIMUM SIZE REQUIRED 4 FT MAXIMUM VERTICAL DISTANCE BETWEEN LANDINGS 12 FT VERTICALLY MINIMUM VERTICAL DISTANCE BETWEEN LANDINGS REQUIRED HEIGHT OF RAILS 30-34 IN ABOVE NOSE OF TREAD HANDRAILS 1 1/4 -2 IN CROSS SECTIONAL DIMENSION 1 1/2 IN FROM WALL REQUIRED AT EACH SID E YES SEC 3306 SEC 3306(c) SEC 3306(J)

PAGE 67

INTERMEDIATE RAILS REQUIRED AT STAIRS MAXIMUM WIDTH BETWEEN INT RAILS @ 88 IN EXCEPTIONS APPLICABLE 44 IN WIDE OR LESS CAN HAVE 1 RAIL HEIGHT ABOVE NOSING 30-34 IN BALUSTERS REQUIRED SUCH THAT A SPHERE 6 IN IN DIAMETER CANNOT PASS THRU RAMPS: MAXIMUM SLOPE 12% FOR HANDICAP LANDINGS AT TOP AND BOTTOM AND FOR EACH 5 FT OF RISE SEC 1711 SEC 3307

PAGE 68

CONCLUSION .

PAGE 69

CONCLUSION As STATED IN THE INTRODUCTION, MY PRIMARY INTEREST IN THIS THESIS PROJECT WAS IN RESPONDING TO A PARTICULAR LANDSCAPE WITH A COMPOSITION OF GEOMETRIC FORMS nFORMSn SOON BECAME nFORMn, A DECISION DICTATED BY THE NATURE OF THE LANDSCAPE AND BY CONSIDERATIONS OF VISUAL IMPACT THE SITE IS VERY EXPOSED AND SUFFERS OCCASIONAL BOUTS OF EXTREME WEATHER---IT WOULD BE POSSIBLE TO FREEZE TO DEATH OR BLOW AWAY WALKING BETWEEN BUILDINGS THE LANDSCAPE IS VERY BOLD AND REMARKABLE FOR ITS LACK OF DISTRUPTIVE ELEMENTS---TREES, BUILDINGS To SCATTER SMALL BUILDINGS ABOUT WOULD HAVE DILUTED THE LANDSCAPE'S FORCEi AND THE SCALE OF THOSE BUILDINGS WOULD HAVE CREATED A VERY MINOR AND UNFOCUSED BUILDING STATEMENT A SINGLE FORM PRESERVED THE IMPACT OF THE LANDSCAPE WHILE ENHANCING THE BUILDING STATEMENT AFTER SEVERAL FALSE STARTS I RECOGNIZED THE SHALLOW PYRAMID AS THE BUILDING FORM THE PYRAMID'S RELATIONSHIP TO THE LANDSCAPE WAS TOO PERFECT TO BE IGNORED (SEE SITE SECTION UNDER DRAWINGS). THE VOLUME OF THE PYRAMID AND ITS SLOPE ARE NEARLY EQUIVALENT TO THE HILLTOP WHICH IT REPLACEs---IT RECALLS THE LANDFORM THE PYRAMID IS AN ESPECIALLY WONDERFUL SHAPE---STABLE YET POINTED HISTORICALLY THE PYRAMIDS WERE TOMBS FOR OR TEMPLES TO THE GODS MORE IMPORTANTLY, THE PYRAMID IS THOUGHT OF AS A FOCUS OF ENERGY AND THAT SPEAKS OF THE FUNCTION OF THE BUILDING ART COLONIES OF THIS SORT PROVIDE FOR THE ARTIST'S BASIC NEEDS, FREE HIM FROM ORDINARY DISTRACTIONS, AND ALLOW HIM TO FOCUS HIS ENERGIES ON HIS ART REMARKABLE INCREASES IN PRODUCTIVITY OFTEN RESULT THE PLAN OF THE BUILDING WAS, OF COURSE, CONTROLLED BY THE NECESSITY OF HOLDING THE EDGES OF THE PYRAMIDAL FORM THE AREAS AT THE PERIMETER THAT DID NOT HAVE SUFFICIENT HEADROOM TO BE ENCLOSED BECAME PRIVATE PATIOS THE BAND OF REASONABLE CEILING HEIGHT BECAME THE STUDIOS AND LIVING SPACES THE AREA WITHIN THAT BAND BECAME THE ESSENTIAL SHELTERED COURTYARD IT WAS PAINFUL TO WATCH THE PURIT Y OF FORM WHICH I STARTE D WITH CUT AWAY TO ACCOMODATE FUNCTION BUT WONDERFUL TO FIND THAT THE FORM

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DICTATED A PLAN OF SIMPLICITY, CLARITY AND GRACE NOT USUALLY FOUND IN BUBBLE DIAGRAM DICTATED BUILDINGS PERHAPS "FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION" IS A DICTUM REQUIRING SOME EXAMINATION

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.

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SITE PLAN 240 Ac SCALE 1 IN : 200 FT

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/ \ PARTIAL SITE sc" ' ''" ••" PLAN 20 AC \ \ \ \ \ ""' \ \ \ .... '-_.// __/

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EAST/WEST PARTIAL SITE SECTION SCALE 1 IN 4 0 rT

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PLAN I \ '-, 'iC I I '"' I fl J

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SECTION AA SCALE 1 / 8 IN I rr I Ill SECTION 88 SCALE 118 IN I FT

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SOUTHEAST ELEVATION SCALE 118 IN I FT NORTHWEST ELEVATION SCALE 116 I N I FT

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PLAN SECTIONS .. ---) • " •• \f\11/ ' i :,1 • • ' • ••• . :-ELEVATION GARAGE 10 CARS SCALE 1 / 8 IN 1 F T

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LIVING/DINING AREA

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I • , •• I .:• . ". . : • : TYPICAL STUDIO

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PRIMARY STRUCT SCALE 1 /16 IN 1 FT URE 6J

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BIBLIOGRAPHY .

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I BIBLIOGRAPHY BOOKS, REPORTS, ARTICLES HITCHCOCK, HENRY-RUSSELL ARCHITECTURE: 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES, 1977. IMPACT ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS "YARRA COMPANIES JENKINS MINE SITE" FEBRUARY, 1982. "JENKINS SITE APPLICATION OF MINED LAND RECLAMATION PERMIT IN BOULDER COUNTY " JANUARY, 1986 KAHN, LOUIS, DOMINIQUE DE MENIL, ET AL VISIONARY ARCHITECTS, 1968. MAZRIA, EDWARD THE PASSIVE SOLAR ENERGY BOOK, 1979. PEPPIATT, MICHAEL AND ALICE BELLONY-REWALD IMAGINATIONS CHAMBER, 1982. DENVER PLANNING DEPARTMENT PLANNING FOR CLIMATE AND SOLAR ENERGY, PORTER, TOM AND BYRON MIKELLIDES COLOR FOR ARCHITECTURE, 1976. PORTER, TOM ARCHITECTURAL COLOR, 1982. USDA SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE SOIL SURVEY OF BOULDER COUNTY AREA, COLORADO, 1975.

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I INTERVIEWS VAIDAS DAUKANTAS SCULPTOR, INSTALLATIONS CLARE FORSTER PAINTER, XEROGRAPHER MAGGIE GILBOY PAINTER JOHN MATLACK PAINTER, LANDSCAPE GREG OXENFELD LANDUSE AND PLANNING BOULDER COUNTY GEORGE PETERS SCULPTOR, INSTALLATIONS BILL VIELEHR SCULPTOR, CASTINGS DELANI WHEELER ASSISTANT DIRECTOR PARKS AND OPEN SPACE GEORGE WOODMAN PAINTER, COLORIST

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APPENDIX

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MEDIA STUDY SOLO EXHIBITIONS GROUP EXHIBITIONS INTERNATIONAL JURIED EXHIBITIONS NATIONAL JURIED EXHIBITIONS Xerography CLARE CHANLER FORSTER 815 Spruce Street Boulder, Colorado 80302 (303) 449-3002 -Art Students League, New York City National Academy School of Design, American University of Beirut, New York City (Chicago Art Institute Instructor) Bridge Gallery, Boulder, Public Library Photocraft Gallery, Boulder Printmaking Council of New Jersey International Society of Copier Artists Show Institute for Design and Experimental Art, Sacramento, CA, International Bookworks, curator Judith Hoffberg, "Editions and Additions" Arizona State University , "Editions and Additions," Loretto Heights College, Denver, "12 Colorado Artists" Downtown Gallery, Honolulu, Hawaii Following Sea Gallery, Honolulu Dorothy Matthews Gallery, Philomath, Oregon Rare Discoveries Gallery, Dallas, Texas Sebastian Moore Gallery, Denver, "Craft New Directions" Grant Street Art Center, Denver, Women's Invitational Hartnett Gallery, University of Rochester, ISCAGRAPHICS Astoria 10-22-38, University of Maryland, Baltimore County Contemporary Arts Center, Honolulu, Collaborations Colorado Gallery of the Arts, Arapahoe Community College Cohen Gallery, Denver New York Public Library, Donnell Branch, ISCA Show Newark Public Library, ISCA Show Editions and Additions, University of California, Riverside Sarah Lawrence College, ISCA show, bookart Young Artists of the Middle East, Near East College Assoc. Women in Design International, award in theatrical design Women in Design International, award in paperart/printmaking Electrostatics International, Cleveland, Ohio Sixth National Small Works Exhibition, Prescott-Groos Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico Ariel Gallery, SoHo, New York, juror Rose Slivka National Paperworks, Las Vegas Art Museum All on Paper, A.A.o. Gallery, Buffalo, NY Copycat Show, Franklin Furnace Gallery, New York, NY Marietta College Crafts National, Marietta, Ohio Toys Designed by Artists, Arkansas Art Center Miniature Painters, Sculptors, Gravers, Washington, D.C. 30th Annual Drawing and Small Sculpture Show, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana Alternatives 1986 Traveling Exhibition, Ohio University College of Fine Arts 16th National Works on Paper Exhibition, Minot State College, North Dakota.

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REGIONAL JURIED EXHIBITIONS 'Own Your Own Art', Sangre de Cristo Arts Center, Pueblo, Colorado, jurors Mi chae 1 Crane, David Turner 'Arts 185', Boulder Center for the Visual Arts, juror Jane Fudge Colorado Artist Craftsmen '85, Arvada Center, juror Lois Moran Boulder Center for the Visual Arts, All Boulder 185 Crafts Biennial , Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Colorado '83, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Five-state, Contemporary Realism, Leslie Levy Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona Fiber Hawaii, juror Arturo Sandoval Sculpture Hawaii, juror Bruce Beasley Hawaii Craftsmen, jurors five consecutive years: Dorothy Garwood, James Melchert, Paul Smith, Helen Drutt, Rose Slivka Artists of Hawaii, juror Mary Beebe, director, Portland Center of Visual Arts Artists of Hawaii, juror Wayne Thiebaud, UC, Davis Hawaii Artists League, juror Patterson Sims, Whitney Museum Xerographies, Honolulu Honolulu Printmakers, juror Arthur Secunda Honolulu Printmakers, juror Ulfert Wilke Art in City Buildings, Honolulu Honolulu Printmakers Limited Size, ('78-'82) Hawaii Craftsmen Traveling Exhibitions, ('78, '80, 182) Hawaii Artists League, New Directions WORKS IN THE Cleveland Institute of Art COLLECTION OF Patterson Sims, Associate Curator, Whitney Museum Judith Hoffberg, curator bookart, publisher Umbrella Sackner Archives of Concrete and Visual Poetry Boston Museum of Fine Arts Library ADDITIONAL BOOKART WORK SLIDE LECTURES PANEL MEMBER JUROR Honolulu Academy of Arts Contemporary Arts Center, Honolulu Hawaii State Foundation on Culture & the Arts Xerox Corporation, Honolulu Castle and Cooke, Inc., Honolulu City and County of Hawaii Flora Biddle, Chairman Whitney Museum Board of Directors University of California Santa Barbara Library Deloitte, Haskins, Sells CODEX 185, Denver B. Cushman Xerography Calendar , San Francisco Printed Matter, New York, NY Franklin Furnace Archives, New York, NY Iolani School, Kaimuki Library, Kauai Community College 'Dialogue in Design' Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hawaii Craftsmen 'Insights Into Creativity' Front Range, Arapahoe Community College Form and Fiber II, City Hall, Honolulu

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JOHN W. MATLACK 1357 93rd Avenue Oakland, California 94603 (415) 635-7198 -Born March 11, 1946: Santa Monica, California Education University of California, Berkeley: M.A. Painting, 1985 University of California, Santa Barbara: Tutorial, 1970 Experience • • • 1984: Moved to California to attend Graduate School at UC Berkeley . May -June 1983: Miami, Florida. Christo's "Surrounded Islands" Project; Sculptor's assistant. September 1981 -July 1982: Lived and worked in New York at Canal Street Studio. • 1978 -1981: Painted part time, full time partner in Boulder, Colorado restuarant, which was sold in June 1981. • August -September 1976: Christo's "Running Fence 11 Project Sonoma County, California. Sculptor's assistant. • 1975 -1978: Bill Williamson, Design Detail Santa Barbara, California and Honolulu, Hawaii. Various graphic and architectural detail projects. • 1974: Acquired downtown studio in Boulder, Colorado. • July 1982: Christo's "Valley Curtain" Project Rifle, Colorado. Sculptor's assistant. • June 1970: Graduated from the University of California, Santa Barbara. • June 1968: Acquired cabin on }.1agnolia Road, west of Boulder, Colo r ado. = • 1964 -1968: National Park Service, Yellowstone National Park; Back Country Patrolman. It was during this period that I developed an intense interest in landscape and mapping. 1

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JOHN W. MATLACK (415) 635-7198 One Person Exhibitions Colorado Showcase, Boulder Center for the Visual Arts -July 1983. "Aerial Xerography," Womanspace Gallery, Boulder-1977. Group Exhibitions Berkeley Art Center Annual -January 1986: Jurors' Award "Techno-Fear, Techno-Bliss," University of Santa Clara -February 1986. "Berkeley at Davis," UC Davis -March 1985. "Art and Technology," University of Colorado October 1985 . "Miniature Golf," Pirate Gallery, Denver-June 1984 "Arts '81," Boulder Center for the Visual Arts 1981. "Arts '79," Boulder Arts Center 1979. Aspen Arts Festival, Aspen Foundation for the Arts & Humanities -1978, 1974 "20/20 Colorado/New Mexico," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center 1975 "New Directions," Henderson Museum, University of Colorado 1976 All Colorado Show,-Denver Art Museum -1977, 1976, 1975, 1974 Boulder Art Festival 1974: Jurors' Award Denver Center for the Contemporary Arts 1973 Publications Sculpture in the Park, Centerfold Map, Boulder Center for the Visual Arts Boulder, Colorado 1983 "Christo Island Art Draws Applause From a Boulder Volunteer," Boulder Daily Camera, May 29, 1983 A California Landscape, J. Matlack and Jeff Lovelace Scrimshaw Press. Berkeley 1970 Reviews "East Gallery Show is Energetic and Satisfying," Art Review, Boulder Center for the Visual Arts. August 1983 "Three Artists Exhibit at BCVA Hits Once & Misses Twice," Boulder Dialy Camera July 31, 1983 "Only Artist, Recluse, Live on Downtown Mall," Boulder Daily Camera August 8, 1982 "A Developing Art Form," Rocky Mountain News Sunday Magazine December 19, 1976 Films "Running Fence," Maysles Brothers, New York 1977 "Colorado Artists," KRMA-TV, Channel 6, Denver 1976 2

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Selected Collections • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Mr. & Mrs. Jim Chivian-Cobb, New York Ms. Katie Goodrich, Santa Barbara Mr. & Mrs. Ken Maytag, Santa B a r bara Mr. Bill Williamson, Santa Barbara Ms . Charlene Pidgeon, Santa Barbara Ms. Francoise Brun-Cottan, Beverly Hills Mr. & Mrs. Jack Shoemaker, Berkeley Mr. & Mrs. Calvin Ireys, Berkeley Ms . Diane Tremaine, San Francisco Mr. & Mrs. M.F. Seeburg, Bozeman Mr. Wink Davis, Bozeman Mr. & Mrs. Denni s O'Leary, Boise Ms . Missy Thorne, Aspen Mr. Dana Russell, Aspen Dr. & Mrs. Mack Taylor, Portland Mr. & Mrs. Paul Snyder, Boulder Mr. Andrew Joel, Boulder Ms. Victori a Chapman Moore, Boulder Ms. Diane Steinman, Boulder Mr. Jim I
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GEORGE AllEN PETERS 815 Spruce Street Boulder, Colorado 80302 (303) 449-3002 EDUCATION 1967 -1969 1969 -1971 1972 Fullerton College, California Art Center College of Design, Los Angeles Aegina Art Center, Aegina, Greece EXHIBITIONS 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 "Environmental Installation", University of Hawaii Art Gallery, Honolulu -invitational Installations: "Feather Flags", "Ice Tent", "1000 Breaths, 1000 Prayers" Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, Arvada, CO -invitational "Crafts/84", Colorado Springs Biennial, Colorado Springs Art Center juri ed "Sculpture in the Park #6", "Tree Talk", Boulder Center for the Visual Arts, Colorado -juried "Colorado Artist-Craftsmen", Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution washington D.C. -invitational "Hieroglyphics", collaboration with the Nancy Spanier Dance Theatre, set design "Ice and Air Show," Lake George, New York -invitational "Sculpture in the Park #5," "Rain Room," Boulder Center for the Visual Arts, Colorado -juried "Space Sails," American Banner Exhibition, Midland, Michigan -juried "Sky Sculpture," Hand & the Spirit Crafts Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona -one man show "Oahu Invitational," Following Sea, Waikiki, Hawaii "Air Show," Contemporary Arts Center, Honolulu -one man show "Oahu Invitational," Following Sea, Waikiki, Hawaii "Collaborations/Artists and Writers," Contemporary Arts Center, Honolulu, Hawaii -invitational "Mayors City Hall Show," Honolulu -invitational Hawaii Craftsmen's Annual Show -juried Marietta Crafts National, Marietta College, Ohio -juried "Sculpture Syntaxis," Amfac Gallery, Honolulu -juried Hawaii Craftsmen's Annual Show, Honolulu -juried "10-22-38 Astoria," xerographic show, University of Baltimore -invitational "Sky Fills the Heart," works in blue and white, Joseloff Gallery, Hartford, Connecticut -invitational "Exits and Entrances," Hawaii Artists League member show featured artist. "Winds and Strings," kite show, Guilford Handcraft Center Gallery, Guilford, Connecticut -juried "Colors and Kites : " joint show with painter, Clare Forster, Downtown Gallery, Honolulu "Xerographies," Honolulu -juried "Rutgers National Drawing," Rutgers University, New Jersey -juried "Men Look at Women," Contemporary Arts Center, Honolulu -invitational "Kites, Clouds & Curtains," environmental theatre, Foundry, Honolulu -one man show "Art Hawaii Showcase," Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hawaii -juried

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AWARDS Cont•d 11Xerographics, .. 1979 juror•s award 11Space Sails,11 1982 juror•s award MEMBER Hawaii Artists League, Board Member -1980 Hawaii Craftsmen, First Vice President -1981 JUROR 11College Art 182,11 Hawaii-1982 -Having been involved with the static forms of drawing and painting, J•ve been drawn more towards participatory works. Bringing ideas together with relationship, movement and visual play and making it simple and beautiful has been a constant challenge for me. An arrangement of stones, or string, for instance, or a gradual disintegration of a created work can excite something in me that I don•t fully understand. Still, the movement is towards knowledge and understanding of something basic in ourselves and the role of change and movement is vitally connected to our growth. Everything changes from one thing to its opposite in a manner of degree. Try to see that movement and change and quickly write it, draw it or follow it.

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.. BILL VIELEHR B.F.A. from Colorado State University, 1969 Selected 1970 man $how, Gallery 1309 -Boulder, Colorado 1970 Governorls Annual Exhibition for • Humanities -Aspen, Colorado 1970 -First Annuql Colorado Art & Environment Exhibit, American Medical -Denver, Colorado 1970 -Artist's ehoice, Friends of Contemporary Art -Denver, Colorado 1971 One man show, Gilman Galleries Illinois 1972-Twelfth Midwest Biennial, Joslyn Art Museum-Omaha, Nebraska 1973 One man show, Gilman Galleries Chicago, Illinois 1973 One man show, Henkle Gallery -Houston, Texas 1973 One man show, Allrich -San Francisco, California 1974 -Annual _Midwest Bierinial, Joslyn Art Museum-Omaha, Nebraska 1975 One man show, Colorado S tate University -Fort Collins, Colorado 1975 One man show, Attitudes Gallery -Denver, Colorado 1975 -Allrich Galleries -San Francisco, California 1976 One man show, Gallery -Boulder, Colorado 1977 One man show, Heartling Gallery -Boulder, Colorado 1977 -Boulder Center for the Visual Arts -Boulder, Colorado 1978 -Sebastian Moore Gallery -Denver, Colorado 1978 -Boulder Center for the Visual Arts -Boulder, Colorado 1978 -Boulder Cross Section, Colorado State Univ. -Fort Collins, Co. 1977 -Britton Gallery -Littleton, Colorado 1979 -Studio Show -Boulder, Colorado 1979 -Boulder Visual Arts Center -Boulder, Colorado 1979 -Sebastian Moore Gallery -Denver, Colorado 1980 -Second Annual North American Sculpture Exhibit, Foothills Art Center -Golden, Colorado 1980 -Shidoni Summer Show, Shidoni Gallery -Tesuque, New Mexico 1980 -Sebastian Moore Gallery -Denver, Colorado 1981 -Shidoni Summer Show, Shidoni Gallery -Tesuque, New Mexico 1982 -Boulder Sculpture Symposium -Boulder, Colorado 1983 -Denver Botanic Gardens "Sculpture in the Gardens" -Denver, Co. 1983 -Dedication of Sculpture Garden Exhibit, Atwell Gallery -Colorado Springs, Colorado 1983 -"Arts '83", Boulder Center for the Visual Arts -Boulder, Co. 1983 -Form at Fiddles Green, Greenwood Plaza -Denver, Colorado 1984 Bridge Show -Boulder Public Library, Boulder, Colorado 1984 -Art Yard -Denver, Colorado 1985 -Take Stock in Denver Art, winter & fall -Denver, Colorado 1985 -Colorado 3D Show -Arvada Art Center -Arvada, Colorado 1985 -Art Yard -Denver, Colorado 1985 -Sculpture in the Park #7 -Boulder, Colorado 1986 Visiting Artist Show, Boulder Arts & Crafts Co-op, Boulder, Co.

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Awards and Prizes 1974 Purchase Award from the Colorado Designer Craftsmen Exhibit 1981 -Grant from the City of Boulder for compeletion of a sculpture 1985 -Grant for "Sculpture in the Park #7", City of Boulder Selected Collections Digital Colorado Springs, Colorado Prudential Bache, Park Place -Boulder, Colorado Cherry Creek Plaza -Denver, Colorado MaceRich of California for Crossroads Mall -Boulder, Colorado Embarcadero Square -SanFrancisco, California Northern Illinois University -DeKalb, Illinois Playboy Enterprises Chicago, Illinois Byer Museum of the Arts -Evanston, Illinois Related Experiences * Visiting Artists Sculpture Yorkshop, Jefferson County Schools 1971, 1972, 1978 * Sculpture Yorkshop, Colorado State University -Fort Collins, Colorado, 1973 * Curator and Coordinator for Sculpture in the Park, Boulder, Colorado 1979, 1980, 1981' 1983, 1984, 1985 * Curato r and Coordinator for the Annual Vail Outdoor Sculpture Exhibit, Vail, Colorado 1979, 1980, 1981, 1952 * Curator and Coordinator for Boulder Sculpture Symposium, 1982 * Acting Director of FORM, Inc., Contemporary Sculpture 1981, 1982, 1983,1984,1985,1986 2

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.. BILL VIELEHR My early sculptures, done during the late sixties through the late seventies, were an attempt to use the human figure as a pure visual form. I would take the figure and fragment it into single sections of the anatomy and, using the human form in a totally real i stic way, I woul d trY. to present i t in an abstracted and out of context manner, therefore try to un-emotionalize the viewing of the human form. In 1978 I curated and coordina t e d Boulder's firs t Sculpture in the Park show and became intensely interested in large scale work. I continued t o curate the par k show through #7 in 1985. D u r i n g this time I began to pursue my current interest which is to somehow make the huma n form relative to large scale contemporary sculpture without making a soldier on horseback. I have been using high reflectivity of surface to bring about an interaction between the viewer and the sculptures. The works are often free standing walls or wall works which sometimes incorporate the life size human figure, often in the negative form, or fading in and out of the work. This is a direct attempt to humanize physically large scale contemporary sculpture.

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FORM at Fiddlers Green Fiddler's Green Amphitheater 6350 S. Ulster Greenwood Plaza E . Orcha r d and 125 A s the t i tle implies there is FORM at Fiddler 's Gre en . ot onl y the terrifi c earth sculptured a mphi t h eater but n i n e met a l , wood , and s tone co nt emporary sculp t ure s place d around the amphitheater. These work by FORM sculptors complement a nd contras t the theater environment. Thanks to th e sponsors h i p of John Madden Co. these wo rk s w ill r e main t h r o ugh o ut t h e season enhancing the theater a nd making a parti c ularly exciting v isual im p ac t duri n g the many sc eduled e vents . FORM In c . thanks J ohn Madden C o . and C y nthia Madde nL eit n e r , director of th e Muse um of Outdoor Art s, for t h eir contin u e d support of the a rt s i n the Metro area. ot o nl y in their exciting Museum o f Outdoor Ar t s, but al so for the spons orship of this exhibit. Exhibi t in g FOR M Member Artis t s I . William R . Vielehr Title-Wall Fi g ure Media-Ca s t Alu m inum Size 5'6 " x 5'6 " x 2 ' 2 . Dou g Wils o n Title Untitle d Med ia-St eel Size I 8 ' x 8' x 8' J . Carl R ee d Titl e -Bro k e n R i n g Media -Cedar. Oak and S t eel Siz e I I ' x 10' x 2 0 ' 4. R o bert M a ngold Title-A n e m o t i ve S . P . M e di a P ai n t ed Stee l Size10' 6" x 1 2 ' 5 . Jerr y W i ngren T itle-Cut and F o ld # / 5 Media-Machined . Fi tt ed Aluminum Size 8 ' x 8' x 24' 6 . Jeff e lsen Title -Lateral T w ist Media -Steel 7 . Fra nk S w a n so n T i tle -Spad a/ R ev er se Media-C oloros a T r a v ertine Si z e 7' x 7' x 2 0 ' 8 . Jef f Ne l se n Ti tleS tacked A n g l es M e d ia -S te e l Size10' x 2 0 ' x 25' 9 . Mike Molliconi Title-Sub liminal Pha se A ccess Med i a -S t ee l Size -1 4 ' 5' x 4\l.z' Other FORM E x h i bit s Shows Boulder, I 9 8 I Vail , 1981 Colorado Spri n gs . 198 3 D enve r B otanic Gardens, 1983 Fi d d ler' s G re e n . 1 984 FORM S p o n so r e d Ex hibit s B o uld e r P a rk S h ow # 4 , #5, #6 . B o uld e r Centra l P a r k The 1 98 4 h ow . J ul y 13th Se pt., i n cl ud es fou r FORM a rt ists Art Yar d. 1 239 P earl , D e nver . CO Open b y a ppointment F o r p r ice J is t , contact J o hn Madden Co .. 780 0 E . O rc h a rd , S u i te 3 00 , Engle wood . CO 8 0 I I I o r FORM, In c ., 2888 Bluff S treet , S u i te 447, Bould e r . C O 80301. I . 2. 3 . 4 . 5 . 6 . 7. 8. 9 . V iele h r W i l so n R ee d E Mangold N + S Wing ren Nelse n Swan so n Nelsen w M ollico n i T h e amphithea ter will be o pen dai l y for public v iew i n g o f th e scu l ptu r e s a nd the theater.

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. { GEORGE E. WOODMAN Personal Born 1932; grew up in New England. Married 1953 to Elizabeth Abrahams. Two children. Professor, former Chairman, Department of Fine Arts, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado. Education Phillips Exeter Academy, 1950. Harvard University, A.B. Cum Laude with Honors in Philosophy 1954. Boston Museum School, Evening School 1952-53. University of New Mexico, M.A. in Fine Arts 1956. Awards National Endowment for the Arts Award 1967. University of Colorado Faculty Fellowships, 1965-66; 1973-74; 1980-81. Selected E xhibitions, Asterisk (*) indicates one-person exhibit. 1983 1<1982 ) *198 2 Exuberant Abstraction, 111 Broadway , N.Y.C. Curated by Peter Fr ank . New I m age Haber -Th eodore Gallery , New York Cit y Installation, Bevier Gallery, R ochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York Criss-Cross en la Ciudad de Mexico, Galeri a Pecanins , Mexico City, D.F. Paperworks, Haber-Theodore Gallery, New York, New York The Alfred Screens, Nelson-Fosdick Gallery, New York State Col lege of Ceramics, Alfred, New York Paintings and Screens, Haber-Theodore Gallery, New Y ork, New York Paper Til ings, Viterbo College, LaCrosse, Wisconsin Paintings and Paper Tile Installation, Haber-Theodore Gallery, New York, New York Pattern, Nat ional Acade m y of Sciences, Washington, D.C.

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) -21982 Three Artists, Spark Gallery, Denver, Colorado 1982 Partitions, Pratt Manhattan Center Gallery, New York , New York *1981 Watercolors, Hadler-Rodriguez Gallery, New York, New York 1981 Rigors, Patrick Gallery, Austin, Texas 1981 Criss-Cross at Yellowstone, Yellowstone Art Center, Bi 11 ings, Montana 1981 19 Americans, Museum, New York, New York *1981 Installation, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohi o *1981 George Woodman, Boulder Center for the Visual Arts 1980 Departures in Pattern, Hadler-Rodriguez Gallery, New York, New York 1980 Systemic Painting, Hansen Gallery, New York, New York 1979 Spark Gallery, Denver, Colorado (with Andrew Libertone) * 1979 Three Tile Pieces (installation), Claremore Col lege, Claremore, Oklahoma. Funded by Oklahoma Arts Counc i 1 1979 Corporate Exhibition, Nabisco, New York, New York. Curated by Alexander F. Mil 1 iken Gallery * 1979 Sixteen Permutations/Ni ne Modules, Bridge Gallery, Boulder Public Library , Boulder, Colorado 1979 Criss-Cross Pattern Exhibition (installation), New York, New York 1979 C.C. Pattern Project, Boulder Center for the Visual Arts. Funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts 1978 American Artists, U.S. Consulate, Milan, Italy * 1978 Jasper Gallery, Denver, Colorado 1978 Raku, Womens Inter-Art Gallery, New York, New York COTTaboration with E. Woodman) 1978 Fifth Colorado, Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado 1977 Georae and Betty Woodman, U.S. I.S. Gallery, Milan, Italy

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-3-1977 Patterning and Decoration, curated by Holly S o l omon, catalog essay by Amy Goldin. Museum of the America n Foundation for tht Arts, Miami, Florida 1977 Preparatory Notes: Thinking Drawings, 80 Washington Square East Galle.y, New York University, New York 1977 Aspen Arts Fe5tival, Aspen, Colorado 1977 ARC, Anonima, Criss-Cross, Art Research Center, Kansas City, Missouri * 1976 Art Gallery, Nicholls State University, Thibodeaux, Louisiana *1976 Edge Gallery, Boulder,Colorado * 1975 Joseph Magnin Gallery, Denver, Colorado 1974 lncontro Verifica, Galleria Sincron, Brescia, Italy 1974 Galleria Ia Piramide, Firenze, Italy * 1974 Hi 11 's Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico *197 3 Mostra Personale, Galleria Sincron, Brescia, Italy *1973 University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, Colorado 1973 18th National Print Exhibition, Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York Selected Bibliography "Th e Art of Living," N. McKean, New York Magazine, April 6, 1981 (Color photo) "A Glorious Mess," John Ashbury, Newsweek , March 1981. (Color photo) "New Work: George Woodman," B. Collings, Arts Magazine, May 1981, Pags. 26, 27 "George Woodman: Watercolors," Review by Ellen Lubel 1, Art in America, Summer 1981 "George Woodman," Irene Clurman, Arts Magazine, Apri 1 1982 ) "New Ways With Tile," Metropolis, September 1982 "Paper Til ings by George Woodman," Catalogue, Wayne State Univers ity Galleries. 1982, 24 pages

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Commissions -411Partitions,11 Catalogue, Essay by John Perrault. Department of Exhibitions, Pratt Institute, 1982 1119 Americans: Emerging Artists,11 Catalogue, Essay by Peter Frank. Solomon Guggenheim Museum, 1981 110ne +One,'' Catalogue, Essays by Donald Kuspit and Melin da Wortz, Boca Raton Museum of Arts, 1984 11Uptown, It's Couples,11 Grace Glueck, New York Times, Feb. 17, 1984 1981 John Hilson residence, Connecticut. Three wal 1 panels for formal dining room 1984 (Completion) Delevan-College Station of Light Rail Transit System. Ceramic tile mural 11' x 72' 1984 Screen printed fabric. Commissioned by Art Designed for Living 198 3 198 5 P r e 1 i m i n a r y p 1 ann i n g for t i 1 e mu r a 1 r n U n i ted S t a t e s Embass y Complex, Damascus, Syria. In r o ar:e s s . 1 g8 5 Ceram i c Tile R e na issan ce S t atio n. Work in Collections Detroit Downtow n People Mover. I n P rogr ess. Solomon Guggenheim Museum, New York, New York; Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado; AMACO Corporation, Denver, Colorado; Currier Gallery, Manchest er, New Hampshire; Salt Lake Art Center, Salt Lake City, Utah; Finch College Museum, New York, New York; Coca-Cola Corporation, New York, New York; Singer Corporation, New York, New York; Lamont Gallery, Exeter, New Hampshire ; University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico; Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado Lecturer or Visiting Artist Mid-West Col lege Art Conference, Milwaukee, Wisconsin Yellowstone Art Center, Bil 1 ings, Montana Viterbo College, LaCrosse, Wisconsin Hamel ine University, Minneapolis, Minnesota Rhode School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island School of Visual Arts, New York, New York Scripps Col lege, Claremont, California Alfred University, Alfred, New York Schenectedy Art Museum, Schenectedy, New York University.bf Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana

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-s-University of Georgia: Studies Abroad, Cortona, Italy Hornsey Col lege of Art, London, England Fort Wright College, Spokane, Washington Nicholls State University, Thibodeaux, Louisiana Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado Ceramic Symposium, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York Artists Talk on Art, New York, New York Claremore College, Claremore, Oklahoma N.C.E.C.A., of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan New York State College of Ceramics, Alfred, New York Nova Scotia College of Art, Halifax, N.S., Canada Herron Art Institute, Indianapolis, Indiana Banff Art Center, Canada )