Citation
Hood Museum of Art

Material Information

Title:
Hood Museum of Art
Creator:
Smith, Evelyn Cole
Language:
English
Physical Description:
111 leaves : illustrations, charts, maps, photographs (1 color) ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Art museums -- Designs and plans -- New Hampshire -- Hanover ( lcsh )
Art museums ( fast )
Museums ( fast )
New Hampshire -- Hanover ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
Academic theses. ( lcgft )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )
Academic theses ( lcgft )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 108-111).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Evelyn Cole Smith.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
12101985 ( OCLC )
ocm12101985
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1983 .S632 ( lcc )

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Full Text
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Major Pedestrian Minor Pedestrian Vehicular
CIRCULATION
23
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SUN AND WIND
March_________|\]/___________________________Sept.
24


Rl
/
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X/.///A Existing Parking Facilities
PARKING
25


ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
AURARiA LIBRARY
ARCHIVES
LD
1190
A72
1983
S632
HOOD MUSEUM
OF


SUNVIKUlViVlLIM I ML ULOiui>
AURAR1A LIBRARY
HOOD
MUSEUM
OF
ART
Evelyn Cole Smith Master of Architecture Thesis Project Spring 1983 College of Design & Planning University of Colorado/Denver


Dedicated to my family and friends for their love, encouragement and support.


PREFACE
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
INTRODUCTION
Director's Statement Historical Background Architectural Context
SITE
Location Map Climate Description Site Selection Criteria Site Analysis Site Context
GENERAL ISSUES AND CONSIDERATIONS PROGRAM
Spatial Needs Spatial Requirements Matrix of Adjacencies Requirement Charts
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
1
2
4
5
6
15
16 17
20
27
32
35 37 76 a
77


Table of Contents (Continued)
APPENDIX
Climate Data Design Inferences Solar Charts Code Analysis Cost Estimate BIBLIOGRAPHY PROBLEM STATEMENT
DESIGN SOLUTION
87
90
92
93 106 108 113


PREFACE
I have chosen the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College as my thesis project for several reasons, not the least of which is the fact that I consider it a challenging problem. In some ways, I view this project as the literal and figurative piece de resistance of my architectural education at the University of Colorado.
Perhaps more so than other building types, the museum epitomizes the concept of architecture as a functional craft and an expressive art. Not only does the museum serve as a repository of cultural artifacts, but itself embodies society's aesthetic values. Historically, the museum building has been a monument to culture's highest ideals, aspirations and visions of human achievement.
In this spirit, I intend that the culmination of my graduate studies draw from the essence of the museum, expressing creativity, exhibiting achievement and reflecting an accumulated wealth of knowledge.
1


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
James Childress Architect
Moore, Grover, Harper Essex, Connecticut
Francine Haber
Professor of Architectural History College of Design & Planning University of Colorado at Denver
Paul Heath
Professor of Architecture College of Design <5c Planning University of Colorado at Denver
Warren Kieding Architect
Engle/Kieding Design Associates Denver, Colorado
Robert Kindig Professor of Architecture College of Design & Planning University of Colorado at Denver
Gary Long
Professor of Architecture College of Design & Planning University of Colorado at Denver
Chester Nagle Professor of Architecture College of Design & Planning University of Colorado at Denver
2


INTRODUCTION


DIRECTORS STATEMENT
Dartmouth College has planned a museum of fine arts since the late 1950's, when Hopkins Center for the Performing Arts was built to the designs of Wallace Harrison. Because of budgetary pressures at that time, it was necessary to compress the spaces planned for the gallery functions. In 1978, however, a substantial gift to be used for construction of a museum was provided by Harvey Hood, a devoted trustee and an alumnus of the Class of 1918.
Other friends and alumni made major gifts and a building committee was formed . . . Design criteria centered on a building that would clearly speak to its own era, announcing itself as a structure of the last quarter of the twentieth century, while at the same time being in harmony with the nineteenth-century flavor of the Dartmouth campus.
There were no existing museums we found exemplary and looked to as models. This is by no means an indictment of previous museum architecture but a recognition that there are strengths and weaknesses associated with all designs. Careful examination of other museums reinforced our initial belief that flexibility of operation was the key component in developing our program, for our collection is very much one in process, which will grow and evolve over the next decades.
- Richard Stuart Teitz
4


HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
Vox Clamantis in Deserto (A voice crying in the wilderness)
Dartmouth College was founded in 1769 by Eleazar Wheelock as a school for "Indians and the children of pagans". A charter from King George III gave Dartmouth claim to what is now northern New England. Gradually, Dartmouth's real estate holdings have been given to the New Hampshire legislature or sold.
Dartmouth is a non-sectarian liberal arts college which became coeducational in 1972. It is now in the process of becoming a small university with the inclusion of graduate degree programs in business administration, engineering and medicine.
Eighty percent of the students live in dormitories on campus, the remainder residing in fraternities and off-campus housing. As a result, activity nodes such as Hopkins Center are an important part of daily life.
It has been said that the portrait of 1801 graduate Daniel Webster, which graces almost every lounge, may be a more important unifying theme for the college than its architecture. There are over 100 buildings of varying age and style on the 175-acre campus which dominates the small, progressive town of Hanover (population 8,000).
5


DARTMOUTH
COLLEGE
PkOft'NG G*«»Gt


ARCHITECTURAL CONTEXT
Dartmouth Hall
Rollins Chapel
7
Ok


College Hall
Webster Hall
8


Robinson Hall
Topliff Hall
9



Baker Library
Memorial Field Entrance
10


Webster Hall
Heating Plant
11


12



New Hampshire Hall

Screen Wall
13


SITE


15


CLIMATE
Hanover is situated on the Western border of New Hampshire, at an altitude of approximately 500 feet above sea level. Its surroundings next to the Connecticut River are hilly, with many small lakes and ponds. The countryside is generously wooded, mostly second growth, as former agricultural land has lain idle.
Northwesterly winds are prevalent, bringing cold dry air during the winter and cool, dry air in the summer. The greater strength of the southerly winds during the warmest months results in a flow of air from the southwest or west-southwest in July and August. The overall movement is from the west or west-northwest during the transition months of June and September, and is northwesterly the rest of the year. The speed of the wind varies little from month to month, averaging 8 m.p.h. in July and 10 m.p.h. in December. Easterly winds usually accompany the rains of summer and the snows of winter.
The daily temperature ranges from an average minimum of 10°F to an average maximum of 31°F in the middle of January, the coldest part of winter. Near the end of July, the warmest part of the year, the average range is from daily lows of about 57°F to high temperatures near 83°F. Very hot summer weather is infrequent. During any month, temperatures above the average maxima or below the normal minima may be observed. The average date for experiencing the last freezing temperature in the spring is May 17, and the average date of autumn frost is September 24. The lowest temperature of a winter can be expected to be in the range of 10°F to 25°F below zero and to occur between December 31 and February 11 most seasons.
The average amount of precipitation varies little from the warmer half of the year to the colder half. The more significant rains and heavier snowfalls are associated with easterly, and especially, northeasterly winds. The seasonal snowfall ordinarily amounts to a total of 40 to 80 inches, and snow cover normally lasts from mid-December to the end of March, although bare ground is not rare in the winter.
16


The choice of an appropriate site for the museum is to be based on several criteria as outlined below. Some criteria relate specifically to the goals and objectives of the building committee, while other criteria are based on pragmatic considerations.
. The Hood gift for construction of the museum stipulates that the museum present a strong visual image to the main green.
. In order to coordinate activities, facilities and staff, it is prefereed that the museum be contiguous to Hopkins Center for the Performing Arts.
. The museum should be oriented toward major student circulation paths so as to promote exposure to the arts and the theory of learning by osmosis.
. The museum should be easily accessible and visible to the public as it will be, in part, a publicly supported regional cultural center.
. The museum, while presenting a strong visual image and unique identity, should minimally impact the quality of the existing architecture.
. Adequacy and efficiency of parking facilities is necessary to maximize public accessibility.
. An appropriate area for service loading and unloading activities should be considered so that this
function does not interfere with established vehicular traffic patterns, or negatively impact the character of the existing streetscape.
17


DARTMOUTH
SITE SELECTION PLAN


SITE SELECTION CRITERIA SITE A SITE B SITE C SITE D

ADJACENCY TO GREEN •
CONTIGUOUS TO HOPKINS • • •
ORIENTED TO EXISTING CIRCULATION • • • •
ACCESSIBLE TO PUBLIC • • •
ADEQUATE LAND AREA • • •
MINIMAL ARCHITECTURAL IMPACT • •
ADJACENT TO PARKING FACILITIES • • •
ACCESSIBLE TO SERVICE VEHICLES • •
• pass Fail Total 4 7 4 6
Site B meets all of the site selection criteria except direct adjacency to the Green. Since the potential to front the Green exists, Site B will become the site for the Hood Museum.
19


SITE CONTEXT
The site is bounded on the East by Clement Hall, the administrative offices of the Physical Plant . . .
. . . and to the Southeast by Rogers, which stores maintenance equipment.
20


To the South lies Brewster Hall, dormitory for music majors.
a
The sinuous wall of the Hopkins administrative offices forms the Northwest border of the site.
21


To the North, the site is bordered by Wilson Hall, with the Green in the background.
The Southwest view is of the Hopkins administrative offices, the courtyard/cafe and Spaulding Auditorium in the background.
22


-n
Hanover Inn
The
Green
J Spaulding
Hopkins Center
Auditorium
Wiison
Clement
SCALE r=iOO'
W NORTH
26


PEDESTRIAN ACCESS
From Wheelock Street, the pedestrian glimpses the site between Wilson Hall, on the left, and Hopkins Center for the Performing Arts, on the right.
A pedestrian walk connects Lebanon Street, to the south, with Wheelock Street and the Green beyond as it passes between Hopkins Center and the museum site.
27
'HI


VEHICULAR ACCESS
The service entry to the Physical Plant is adjacent to the northeast site boundary.
The parking lot off Lebanon Street abuts the southeast corner of the Hood site.
28


Hanover Inn
J Spaulding
Hopkins Center
Auditorium
Wilson
Clement
Rogers
The
Green
TOPOGRAPHY AND VEGETATION
NORTH
no


ADJACENT ARCHITECTURAL STYLE
Ecclectic Romanesque Wilson Hall is built of red brick on a granite base, accented with pink stone lintels, sills and trim, and roofed in slate.
Hopkins Center by Wallace Harrison features precase concrete vaults and skylights which pop out of rectilinear, brick veneered masses.
30


GENERAL ISSUES AND CONSIDERATIONS


GENERAL ISSUES AND CONSIDERATIONS
THE COLLECTION
. It is assumed that the permanent collection will grow dramatically and perhaps change in character over time.
. It is unknown in which areas the collection will grow the most
GALLERY CIRCULATION AND USE
. There will be two types of galleries:
changing exhibition and permanent exhibition.
. Changing exhibits will be used for special
shows of six to eight week duration and will be most heavily visited by the public.
. The changing exhibition galleries should be easily served by major circulation (elevators and lobbies).
. Changing galleries may be arranged in two
ways:
as a "hook" to draw public into the museum and through permanent exhibition spaces
as a separate group apart from the permanent exhibits and adjacent to the main lobbies to reduce the length of travel
32


HOOD EXPANSION
Provisions for future expansion of exhibition space in an orderly manner must be considered.
convert Hood museum storage to exhibition and offices, and become reliant on remote storage
convert work areas to exhibition and offices, etc.
reserve a portion of the site (several structural bays) for new construction
Remote storage provides for collection expansion but not exhibition expansion.
SIZE/AREA RELATIONSHIPS
. The ratio of exhibition (gallery) space to
gross building area is 1:3 (0.33)
. The ratio of in-Hood storage to gallery
floor area is 1:4 (0.25)
. The ratio of total storage (including re
mote storage) to exhibition floor area is 7:12 (0.58)
33


TECHNICAL
PROGRAM


SPACE NEEDS
GALLERIES 12,000 sf
permanent exhibition 8,000 sf
changing exhibition 4,000 sf
AUDITORIUM 2,150 sf
250 seats 2,000 sf
projection room 150 sf
OBJECT STORAGE 3,100 sf
painting sculture/other three dimensional 1,250 sf
objects 1,050 sf
drawings/print 475 sf
textile, etc. 250 sf
vault 75 sf
STUDY 800 sf
study room 500 sf
seminar room 300 sf
WORKSPACES 2,900 sf
loading dock receiving/temporary storage/ 350 sf
examination room 550 sf
construction 500 sf
matting/framing 300 sf
pedestal/crate storage 100 sf
exhibition prep and design photography/restoration/conser- 400 sf
vation/darkroom 700 sf
Continued
35


OFFICES 2,350 sf
director 350 sf
fine art curator 200 sf
primitive art/anthropology
curator 200 sf
ass't curator/exhibition
coordinator 250 sf
curatorial/research staff
(expansion) (3) 400 sf
registrars (2) 100 sf
registrar files 100 sf
admin, ass't (fine art) 100 sf
admin, ass't (PA/anthropology) 100 sf
secretary/receptionist 200 sf
conference room 300 sf
copy room 50 sf
UTILITY ROOMS 2,050 sf
mechanical rooms 1,000 sf
toilets (public and staff) 850 sf
janitor closets 100 sf
miscellaneous storage 100 sf
SPECIAL ROOMS 650 sf
retail shop 400 sf
catering (kitchen) area 100 sf
coats 150 sf
orientation room/lounge/alumni
gallery (§1,000 sf from circulation —
NET AREA TOTAL 26,000 sf
(assignable square feet)
GROSS AREA FACTOR 6,500 sf
(23% of net area to allow for
structure and circulation; also
see orientation room above)
TOTAL GROSS BUILDING AREA 32,500 sf
36


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
GALLERIES
PERMANENT EXHIBITS
Flexible exhibition space to show the permanent collection and enable use for a variety of shows from the permanent collection and occasional changing exhibitions. Do not design to house specific pieces or parts of the collection.
Continuous with changing exhibition galleries, access from work spaces by elevator (no steps), next to special rooms: retail, toilets, coats, catering and orientation room.
Size: 4,000 s.f. total - divide into 4 galleries
Flexibility: Yes, but less critical
than changing exhibition
Ideal Proportions: 2-1
Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0", with panels
to increase height to 12'-0"
Expansion: yes
Ceiling Height: 12,-0"-16'-0"
movable "boxes" EQUIPMENT:
37


GALLERIES
CHANGING EXHIBITS
PURPOSE: Exhibition space for traveling shows, special exhibits from permanent alumni collection and outside sources. Used for openings and receptions.
RELATIONSHIPS: Continuous with permanent exhibition space. Accessible from work spaces by elevator (no steps). Adjacent to special rooms: retail toilets, coats, catering and orientation room.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 8,000 s.f. total - divide into Flexibility: critical 8 to 10 galleries Ideal Proportions: vary Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0", with removable transom panels to increase height to 12'-0" Expansion: Yes Ceiling Height: 16'-0"
FURNITURE: movable "boxes" EQUIPMENT:
38


AUDITORIUM
SEATING AREA
PURPOSE: Priority use by the museum and the Film Studies Department. Lecture hall for the arts and classroom to be used in conjunction with openings and receptions. To seat 250 occupants.
RELATIONSHIPS: Adjacent to Hood vestibule or separate entrance mandatory. Direct access from Hopkins Center.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 2,000 s.f. Flexibility: possible to break scale of large space into smaller spaces Ideal Proportions: as required by seating Doorways: 6'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 20'-0" x 30'-0"
FURNITURE: standard upholstered EQUIPMENT: podium, projection screens, fixed seating with integral chalkboard writing tablets
39


AUDITORIUM
PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
PROJECTION ROOM
For projection of film and slides into auditorium area, as well as storage of projection equipment and control of auditorium lighting and sound.
Adjacent to auditorium with access independent of auditorium entrance.
Size: 150 s.f.
Ideal Proportions: none Expansion: no
Flexibility: no Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'0"-10'-Q"
countertop and EQUIPMENT: 35mm projector: 15'w x 32"
storage shelves 16mm projector: 18"w x 13"
(provide min. 2'-0" clearance between projectors)
40


OBJECT STORAGE
PAINTINGS
PURPOSE: Area in storage room assigned to rack storage of paintings, with access to general storage area. Table for sorting and temporary holding of objects.
RELATIONSHIPS: Mandatory adjacency to temporary storage/receiving room and work rooms, as well as to study and seminar rooms. Desireable adjacency to offices and registrar.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 1,250 s.f. Flexibility: no Ideal Proportions: 36' x 35' Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0", with panels to increase height to 12'-0" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 15'-0"
FURNITURE: work table 3'-0" x 6'-0" EQUIPMENT: racks: 10' x 10' min. (a) 16" o.c., with bottom guides, double
loaded corridor
41


OBJECT STORAGE
THREE-DIMENSIONAL
PURPOSE: Storage of objects, including primitive art collections, sculpture and furniture. Use of common table for sorting and temporary holding.
RELATIONSHIPS: Mandatory adjacency to temporary storage/receiving room and work areas, as well as study and seminar rooms. Desireable adjacency to offices.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 1,050 s.f. Flexibility: no fixed shelving Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0", with panels to increase height to 12'-0" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 15'-0"
FURNITURE: common object storage EQUIPMENT: fixed shelves: 24"d x 36" o.c.
adjustable shelves: 12"d bins
42


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
OBJECT STORAGE
DRAWING AND PRINT
Storage of drawings, prints and photographs. Use of common table for sorting and temporary holding.
Mandatory adjacency to temporary storage/receiving room and other work areas, as well as to study and seminar rooms.
Size: 475 s.f. Flexibility: yes - no fixed storage
Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 4'-0" x 6'-8"
Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 15'-0"
layout table: 3'-0" x 6'-0" EQUIPMENT: bins: 36"d x 24"w x 30", 36", 48"h
adjustable shelves for flat storage flat files file cabinets custom-made drawers
43


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
For storage of costume collection.
OBJECT STORAGE
TEXTILES
Mandatory adjacency to temporary storage/receiving room andwork areas, as well as study and seminar rooms. Desireable adjacency to offices and costume studio in Hopkins Center.
Size: 250 s.f.
Ideal Proportions: none Expansion: no
Flexibility: no fixed storage Doorways: 4'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 15'-0"
common object storage EQUIPMENT: shelving
table
clothes rods
44


OBJECT STORAGE
VAULT
PURPOSE: For storage of silver collection and objects of great value.
RELATIONSHIPS: Mandatory adjacency to temporary storage/receiving room and work area. Desireable adjacency to offices.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 75 s.f. Flexibility: no fixed storage Ideal Proportions: Doorways: special 3'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0"
FURNITURE: layout table EQUIPMENT: adjustable shelving
drawers
45


STUDY
PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
STUDY ROOM
Room for the study of art objects taken from storage by faculty, students and the public under the supervision of the registrars. To function as a lecture type classroom and to be used in conjunction with class study of work on display in the gallery spaces.
Mandatory adjacency to storage and seminar room. Desireable adjacency to registrar's office, lobbies and galleries.
Size: 500 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no
Flexibility: possibly with seminar room Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8"
Ceiling Height: 10,-0"-12'-0"
30 chairs with EQUIPMENT:
writing tablets
flat drawer file storage
picture rail: one wall length
Projection screen Blackboard Projection booth:
3'-0" x 4'-0" outside sound insulated door, 14" wide shelf with storage below
46


STUDY
PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
SEMINAR ROOM
Room for the study of art objects from storage by faculty, students and the public, controlled by the registrars. To function as a round table type classroom in conjunction with class study of work on display in the gallery spaces.
Mandatory adjacency to storage and seminar room. Desireable adjacency to registrars office, lobbies and galleries.
Size: 300 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no
Flexibility: with study room Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 10'-0"-12'-0"
table: 3'-0" x 12'-0" EQUIPMENT: picture rail on one wall
chairs: 20 blackboard
projection booth: same as study room
47


WORK SPACES
LOADING DOCK
PURPOSE: An enclosed loading dock will provide secure, climate controlled storage of truck contents during delivery and loading. Maximum truck size is 8' x 50"; usual deliveries by 8' x 20' semi.
RELATIONSHIPS: Mandatory adjacency to street and receiving/examination room.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 350 s.f. Flexibility: none Ideal Proportions: 12' x 24' Doorways: overhead door to exterior 10' x 14', 8' x 8' door to interior with panels for 12' x 12' opening. Expansion: no Ceiling Height: truck height: 12'
FURNITURE: EQUIPMENT: bumpers
48


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
WORK SPACES
RECEIVING/EXAMINATION/STORAGE
For receiving and cateloging incoming objects. General holding and sorting room for packing objects in transit between departments of the museum and between work spaces.
Mandatory adjacency to loading dock, object storage and freight elevator.
Size: 550 s.f. Flexibility:
Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0"
Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 15'-0"
registrar's desk EQUIPMENT: adjustable shelving
table: 5' x 8' bins for uncrated 2D
rolls of packing material on wall: 5 (a) 6'-0" long x 3'-0" diam.
packing material cabinet: 2'-0" x 4'-0" x 4'-0"
hopper for packing peanuts: 3'-0" x 3'-0" x 3'-0"
49


WORK SPACES
PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
CONSTRUCTION
Room for the construction and repairs of exhibits, partitions, crates and pedestals. Also for painting parts of exhibits and frames.
Mandatory adjacency to receiving/examination and freight elevator. Desireable adjacency to work spaces and object storage.
Size: 500 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion:
Flexibility:
Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0" Ceiling Height: 15'-0"
Pantry room 1: lockable EQUIPMENT: table saw
shelving for tool and hardware storage
Pantry room 2: fireproof, vented, metal cabinet 9'-0" L x 2'-0" W. 2'-6" x 6'-0" countertop
band saw
work bench: 36" wide
lumber storage: long stock plywood
50


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
WORK SPACES
MATTING/FRAMING
Room for matting and framing of exhibit art work. Removal of frames from objects going to storage. Generally a "clean room".
Mandatory adjacency to receiving/examination and freight elevator. Desireable adjacency to work spaces and storage.
Size: 300 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion:
Flexibility:
Doorways: 6'-0" x 8'-0" Ceiling Height: 12'-0"-15'-0"
"L" shaped work table: EQUIPMENT* sink
4'-0" W
countertop: frame cutter, paper cutter, dry mounting
adjustable shelves
frame stock storage: 10'-0" long
flat storage: 32" x 40" x lO'-O" h
glass cutter on wall: 5'-0" x 5'-0"
51


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
WORK SPACES
PEDESTAL/CRATE STORAGE
For storage of packing crates, bulk amounts of packing supplies and pedestals for exhibitions.
Mandatory adjacency to receiving/examination, construction and freight elevator.
Size: 100 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no
Flexibility: none Doorways: 6'-0" x 8'-0" Ceiling Height: 15'-0"
EQUIPMENT:
52


WORK SPACES
PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN
Room to simulate gallery space to design and prepare for gallery installation of an exhibit.
Adjacent to construction and freight elevator. Desireable adjacency to assistant curator and exhibition curator.
Size: 400 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no
Flexibility: no Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0" Ceiling Height: 15'-0"
drafting table EQUIPMENT: library shelving: fixed 13" o.c. x 12" d
Modeling table
53


WORK SPACES
PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
PHOTGRAPHY/RESTORATION/CONSERVATION
For copywork and general photography. For restoration and conservation of collection on a part-time basis. For minor repair of 2D and 3D work.
Adjacent to freight elevator. Desireable relationship to office, receiving/examination room.
Size: 700 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no
Flexibility: no Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0" Ceiling Height: 10'-0"-15'-0"
countertop EQUIPMENT: darkroom: sink, counter
drying room chemical storage
54


OFFICES
DIRECTOR
PURPOSE: Private office.
RELATIONSHIPS: Adjacent to offices and conference room. Desireable relationship to Hopkins administration.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 350 s.f. Flexibility: Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: yes Ceiling Height: 10'-0"
FURNITURE: desk: 3'0" x 5'-0", chair EQUIPMENT: bookshelves chairs: 4 side chairs file storage table light table
projection
55


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
Private office.
OFFICES
FINE ART CURATOR
Adjacent to offices and conference room.
Flexibility:
Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: lO'-O"
Size: 200 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes
desk: 3'-0" x 5'-0", chair
chairs: 2
table
EQUIPMENT: bookshelves file cabinets light table projection
56


OFFICES
PRIMITIVE ART CURATOR
PURPOSE: Private office.
RELATIONSHIPS: Adjacent to offices and conference room.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 200 s.f. Flexibility: Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: yes Ceiling Height: 10'-0"
FURNITURE: desk: 3'-0" x 5'-0", chair EQUIPMENT: bookshelves chairs: 2 file storage table light table projection
57


OFFICES
PURPOSE: ASSISTANT CURATOR/EXHIBITION COORDINATOR Private office.
RELATIONSHIPS: Adjacent to offices and conference room. Desireable adjacency to exhibition prep and design, and work spaces.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 150 s.f. Flexibility: no Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6-8" Expansion: yes Ceiling Height: lO'-O"
FURNITURE: desk: 2'-6" x 3’-0", chair EQUIPMENT: bookshelves chair file storage drafting table
58


OFFICES
CURATORIAL RESEARCH STAFF
PURPOSE: Private office. Large space for future expansion to add three people and offices in
research capacities.
RELATIONSHIPS: Adjacent to offices and conference room.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 400 s.f. Flexibility: yes
Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'
Expansion: yes Ceiling Height: 10'-0
FURNITURE: desks EQUIPMENT: file cabinets
chairs book shelves
light table


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
OFFICES
REGISTRARS
Private offices where staff catalogs the museum collection and traveling exhibitions. Activities include general record keeping, control of slide collection and future microfilmed records, supervision of public and college access to the collection.
Adjacent to registrar's files and offices. Desireable relationship to receiving/examina-tion.
Size: 200 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes
Flexibility:
Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0"
desks: 2 (aj 2'-6" x 5'-0", chair
chairs
typing shelves
EQUIPMENT: bookshelves slide index
60


OFFICES
PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
REGISTRAR FILES
Storage of records and catalogs for staff and public use, controlled and supervised by registrars.
Adjacent to registrar's office and administrative offices.
Size: 100 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes
Flexibility: yes Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10,-0"
chairs
EQUIPMENT: 9 files: 2'-6" d x 13" x 5'-0" h -provide for expansion
61


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
OFFICES
FINE ARTS ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
Private office - assistant to the curator of fine arts.
Adjacent to offices, conference room and curator's office.
Size: 100 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes
Flexibility: yes Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0"
desk: 2'-6" x 5'-0", chair
chairs
typing shelf
EQUIPMENT: bookshelves file cabinets light table
62


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
OFFICES
PRIMITIVE ARTS ADMINISTATIVE ASSISTANT
Private office - assistant to the curator of primitive arts.
Adjacent to offices, conference room and curator's office.
Size: 100 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes
Flexibility: resizing possible Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0"
desk: 2'-6" x 5'-0", chair EQUIPMENT: bookshelves typing shelf file storage
side chair
63


OFFICES
SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST
PURPOSE: Room for museum staff reception and waiting area, as well as clerical work area.
RELATIONSHIPS: Access control location to all offices.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 200 s.f. Flexibility: Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: yes Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0"
FURNITURE: desks: 2 (a) 2'-6" x 5'-0", EQUIPMENT: water fountain c^a*rs file cabinets typing shelves , ... 3 bookshelves side chairs coat storage work table , , . food nook
64


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
OFFICES
CONFERENCE ROOM
General conference room for Hood administration meetings.
Direct access to director's office, offices.
Size: 300 s.f. Flexibility:
Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 4'-0" x 6'-8"
Expansion: yes Ceiling Height: 10'-0"-12'-0"
conference table 12 chairs
EQUIPMENT: bookshelves projections blackboard
65


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
OFFICES
COPY ROOM
Room used by museum staff for making paper copies and for storage of required paper materials.
Adjacent to secretary/reception and offices.
Flexibility: resizing possible Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'-0"
Size: 50 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes
countertop: 2'-0" x length EQUIPMENT: copy machine of room with cabinet
storage below shelf storage
trash basket
66


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
UTILITY ROOMS
MECHANICAL
Central mechanical room for entire museum, control of all systems from this room. Controlled and supervised by the Building and Grounds Department.
Adjacent to service entrance, separate exterior entrance.
Size: 1,000 s.f. Flexibility: no
Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0", with panels to
increase opening to 12'-0" x 12'-0"
Expansion: yes Ceiling Height: 15'-0"
desk and chair EQUIPMENT: HVAC equipment
electrical panels telephone panels security system controls fire protection controls
67


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
UTILITY ROOMS
TOILETS
Toilet rooms located for staff and public; two each for men and women, minimum. Handicap access to lobby toilets.
Two at central lobby. Two adjacent to offices and accessible from work areas. Desireable to have additional one adjacent to work areas.
Size: 850 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no
Flexibility: no Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 10'-0"-12'-0"
countertop: 2'-0" side EQUIPMENT: urinals
toilet stalls handicap toilets sinks
hand drivers waste baskets
68


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
UTILITY ROOMS
JANITOR CLOSETS
For cleaning and maintenance purposes at each floor ((a) 30 s.f.).
Adjacent to general circulation spaces.
Flexibility: no
Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'-0"
Size: 100 s.f.
Ideal Proportions: 5' x 6' Expansion: no
EQUIPMENT: stop sink shelves metal cabinet waste container
69


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
UTILITY ROOMS
MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE
General shelf, counter and floor storage for museum (lightbulbs, etc.).
Adjacent to offices.
Size: 100 s.f. Flexibility: yes - variety of storage
units for undetermined uses
Ideal Proportions: 7' x 14' Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8"
Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 10'-0"
countertop
EQUIPMENT: shelves
cabinets wastebaskets
70


SPECIAL ROOMS
RETAIL SHOP
PURPOSE: To sell museum related objects.
RELATIONSHIPS: Adjacent to lobby and major circulation spaces.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 400 s.f. Flexibility: Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 6'-0" x 6-8" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 10'-0" +
FURNITURE: display cases EQUIPMENT: cabinets
magazine racks cash registers
71


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
SPECIAL ROOMS
CATERING/SERVING KITCHEN
Space for heating and preparing food and drink for openings and meetings. Food and drink is brought in on carts from vehicle or Hanover Inn and served from setup tables in the lobby or gallery spaces. No serving from kitchen.
Corridor or elevator access; relates to lobby and gallery spaces.
Size: 100 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no
Flexibility: no Doorways: 4'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 10'-0"
countertop: 2'-0"-"U" shaped EQUIPMENT: in room with cabinets below and overhead
sink with garbage disposal dishwasher refrigerator steam table
warming oven coffee urns
72


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
SPECIAL ROOMS
COATS
Storage room for coats, cameras, umbrellas, parcels. Check type system for valuables.
Adjacent to lobby and central control desk.
Size: 150 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes
Flexibility: no Doorways: counter Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0"
counter with EQUIPMENT: °oat racks: 2'-0" w x maximum
shelves below length possible with hat shelf above
lockers
umbrella rack
73


PURPOSE:
RELATIONSHIPS:
REQUIREMENTS:
FURNITURE:
SPECIAL ROOMS
ORIENTATION/LOUNGE/ALUMNI EXHIBITION
Relaxation - comfortable, homey, club-like atmosphere. Orientation - reception for large groups. Exhibition - exhibit of loaned Alumni art or of new acquisitions.
Adjacent to lobby.
Size: 1,000 s.f. Ideal Proportions:
Expansion: no
Flexibility: yes
Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0", with panels to increase opening to 12'-0" x 12'-0"
Ceiling Height: 10'-0"-15'-0"
lounge chairs EQUIPMENT: magazine rack
low tables
74


CIRCULATION SPACES
LOBBY
PURPOSE: General circulation from vestibule to main floor public areas - shop, coatroom, toilets, elevators, stairs, auditorium and galleries.
RELATIONSHIPS: Mandatory relationship to the vestibule, shop, coatroom, toilets, stairs and elevator. Desireable relationship to the auditorium and galleries.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 500 s.f. Flexibility: none Ideal Proportions: none Doorways: 6-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: not critical
FURNITURE: seating EQUIPMENT: drinking fountains security reception desk pay phone
cigarette receptacles
75


CIRCULATION SPACES
VESTIBULE
PURPOSE: Airlock shock absorber between Hood's environmental control and outdoors or other buildings.
RELATIONSHIPS: Mandatory relationship to outdoors, Hopkins Center circulation and lobby. Desireable relationship to the auditorium.
REQUIREMENTS: Size: 200 s.f. Flexibility: no Ideal Proportions: none Doorways: 6'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: not critical
FURNITURE: EQUIPMENT: boot scrapers
76


PERMANENT EXHIBITION GALLERY CHANGING EXHIBITION GALLERY
AUDITORIUM______________________
PROJECTION ROOM_________________
PAINTING STORAGE
SCULPTURE STORAGE_____________
DRAWING/PRINT STORAGE___________
TEXTILE STORAGE_________________
VAULT___________________________
STUDY ROOM______________________
SEMINAR ROOM____________________
LOADING DOCK____________________
RECEIVING/EXAMINATION ROOM______
CONSTRUCTION ROOM ______________
MATTING/FRAMING ________________
PEDESTAL/CRATE STORAGE__________
EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN______
PHOTOGRAPHY AND CONSERVATION
DIRECTOR________________________
FINE ART CURATOR
PRIMITIVE ART CURATOR___________
ASSISTANT CURATOR_______________
CURATORIAL RESEARCH STAFF_______
REGISTRAR_______________________
REGISTRAR FILES_________________
F. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT P. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST
CONFERENCE ROOM_________________
COPY ROOM___________________
MECHANICAL______________________
TOILETS (PUBLIC AND STAFF)______
JANITOR CLOSETS ________________
MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE_______
RETAIL SHOP_________________~
CATERING/KITCHEN AREA
COATS___________________________
ORIENTATION ROOM/ALUMNI GALLERY
ADJACENCY MATRIX
• MANDATORY ADJACENCY ® DESIREABLE ADJACENCY
76 a


ZONE REQUIREMENTS 4 A <$7 /00 i /$>/<>/ w Co/ /
MECHANICAL ROOM •
PERMANENT EXHIBITION GALLERY •
CHANGING EXHIBITION GALLERY •
AUDITORIUM •
PROJECTION ROOM •
PAINTING STORAGE •
SCULPTURE STORAGE •
DRAWING/PRINT STORAGE •
TEXTILE STORAGE •
VAULT •
STUDY ROOM •
SEMINAR ROOM •
RECEIVING/EXAMINATION ROOM •
CONSTRUCTION •
MATTING/FRAMING •
EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN •
PHOTOGRAPHY/CONSERVATION •
DIRECTOR •
FINE ART CURATOR •
PRIMITIVE ART CURATOR •
ASSISTANT CURATOR •
CURATORIAL RESEARCH STAFF •
REGISTRAR • •
REGISTRAR FILES •
F. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT •
P. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT •
SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST •
CONFERENCE ROOM •
COPY ROOM •
TOILETS •
MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE •
RETAIL SHOP •
CATERING/KITCHEN AREA •
ORIENTATION ROOM •
77


DUST CONTROL
. All spaces where objects will be exhibited,
stored, framed or processed should be provided with dust control considerations.
. The HVAC system should be provided with
an electrostatic filter system.
. Careful attention should be paid to fin-
ishes in spaces where objects are processed or exhibited.
ACOUSTICAL CONTROL
. Control sound transmission to offices and
workspaces.
. Control sound absorbtion in copy/machine
rooms, construction spaces.
. The auditorium will be designed to provide
proper acoustics for voice transmission and clarity. This compromises proper acoustics for music. Ceiling should be flat shape with hard surface. Side walls to be slightly absorbant and irregularly shaped.
LIGHTING
Natural light
not in galleries
provide in public circulation areas provide in offices and conservation areas.
Artificial light
CONTROL SYSTEMS
78


/ /&A

N// y
LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS /f v 67 O/ a./ 0/
Y4 */< y <* V
MECHANICAL ROOM •
PERMANENT EXHIBITION GALLERY • •
CHANGING EXHIBITION GALLERY • •
AUDITORIUM • • •
PROJECTION ROOM • •
PAINTING STORAGE • •
SCULPTURE STORAGE •
DRAWING/PRINT STORAGE •
TEXTILE STORAGE •
VAULT •
STUDY ROOM • • •
SEMINAR ROOM • • •
RECEIVING/EXAMINATION ROOM • •
CONSTRUCTION • •
MATTING/FRAMING • •
EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN • •
PHOTOGRAPHY/CONSERVATION • •
DIRECTOR • •
FINE ART CURATOR • •
PRIMITIVE ART CURATOR • •
ASSISTANT CURATOR • •
CURATORIAL RESEARCH STAFF • •
REGISTRAR • •
REGISTRAR FILES • •
F. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • •
P. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • •
SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST • •
CONFERENCE ROOM • • •
COPY ROOM •
TOILETS •
MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE •
RETAIL SHOP • •
CATERING/KITCHEN AREA • •
ORIENTATION ROOM • •
79


ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL
Environmental control will be provided in three ways:
normal
gallery
special
The normal system will provide for a temperature range of 62-78°F with 40-60% relative humidity, year round. These areas will require less, or no, control of the central system than the gallery or special areas.
The gallery system will be carefully controlled to provide a constant temperature range of 68-72°F with constant relative humidity of 45%. This system is to cover all spaces intended for object exhibition, storage, framing or other processing.
The special system will provide for high or low demand spaces, such as vestibules, and special requirements for venting, such as the loading dock.
In general, the HVAC system/architec-tural design should work to avoid rapid variations in temperature and relative humidity.
80


ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL REQUIREMENTS 4 fe /a v/7, y co yd V /
MECHANICAL ROOM •
PERMANENT EXHIBITION GALLERY •
CHANGING EXHIBITION GALLERY •
AUDITORIUM •
PROJECTION ROOM •
PAINTING STORAGE •
SCULPTURE STORAGE •
DRAWING/PRINT STORAGE •
TEXTILE STORAGE •
VAULT •
STUDY ROOM •
SEMINAR ROOM •
RECEIVING/EX AMI NATION ROOM •
CONSTRUCTION • •
MATTING/FRAMING •
EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN • •
PHOTOGRAPHY/CONSERVATION •
DIRECTOR •
FINE ART CURATOR •
PRIMITIVE ART CURATOR •
ASSISTANT CURATOR •
CURATORIAL RESEARCH STAFF •
REGISTRAR •
REGISTRAR FILES •
F. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT •
P. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT •
SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST •
CONFERENCE ROOM •
COPY ROOM •
TOILETS •
MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE •
RETAIL SHOP •
CATERING/KITCHEN AREA •
ORIENTATION ROOM •
81


FIRE CONTROL
Fire control may be provided using one or several of four basic systems:
special
electronic
sprinkler
Special systems include CO2 and Halon, compressed gases which fill a room when the electronic system so orders. People can survive only one minute in a CO2 filled room. People do survive in a Halon filled room. Halon is very expensive.
Electronic detection will be provided in all spaces. This includes smoke detectors connected to central alarm panel with audible alarms and strobe lights.
Water sprinklers may be required in public access ways but should not be used in gallery spaces, object storage areas.
82


/Jg7 FIRE PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS /M&if
/V/kt /co Y
MECHANICAL ROOM • •
PERMANENT EXHIBITION GALLERY • •
CHANGING EXHIBITION GALLERY • •
AUDITORIUM • •
PROJECTION ROOM • •
PAINTING STORAGE •
SCULPTURE STORAGE • •
DRAWING/PRINT STORAGE • •
TEXTILE STORAGE • •
VAULT • •
STUDY ROOM •
SEMINAR ROOM •
RECEIVING/EXAMINATION ROOM •
CONSTRUCTION • •
MATTING/FRAMING •
EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN •
PHOTOGRAPHY/CONSERVATION •
DIRECTOR •
FINE ART CURATOR •
PRIMITIVE ART CURATOR •
ASSISTANT CURATOR •
CURATORIAL RESEARCH STAFF •
REGISTRAR • j
REGISTRAR FILES •
F. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT •
P. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT •
SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST •
CONFERENCE ROOM •
COPY ROOM •
TOILETS •
MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE • •
RETAIL SHOP •
CATERING/KITCHEN AREA • •
ORIENTATION ROOM •
83


Security will be provided in three ways: guards mechanical electronic
Guards will be on duty whenever the museum or a portion of it is open. One guard will be located at the main secur-ity/reception desk. An additional guard for each floor will randomly move through the galleries.
Mechanical security includes locked doorways, which in conjunction with the building floor plan arrangement, permits only staff access. For the purpose of security, all non-administrative staff are considered "public" users, whether actually public, student or faculty.
Electronic "motion detectors" will be provided for security when the building or space is closed/unoccupied. All spaces will be so equipped except for the vestibule, lobbies, stairs, toilets and auditorium.
Occasional visual supervision such as location of the museum shop next to the main entrance, is not to be relied on for security.
84


SECURITY REQUIREMENTS /c 4 fA V *3 °/i iA / v/ / i/ if
MECHANICAL ROOM •
PERMANENT EXHIBITION GALLERY • • •
CHANGING EXHIBITION GALLERY • • •
AUDITORIUM •
PROJECTION ROOM • •
PAINTING STORAGE • •
SCULPTURE STORAGE • •
DRAWING/PRINT STORAGE • •
TEXTILE STORAGE •
VAULT • •
STUDY ROOM • •
SEMINAR ROOM • •
RECEIVING/EXAMINATION ROOM * •
CONSTRUCTION • •
MATTING/FRAMING • •
EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN • •
PHOTOGRAPH Y/CONSERVATION •
DIRECTOR • •
FINE ART CURATOR • •
PRIMITIVE ART CURATOR * •
ASSISTANT CURATOR • •
CURATORIAL RESEARCH STAFF • •
REGISTRAR • •
REGISTRAR FILES • •
F. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • •
P. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • •
SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST • •
CONFERENCE ROOM • •
COPY ROOM • •
TOILETS •
MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE •
RETAIL SHOP • • •
CATERING/KITCHEN AREA •
ORIENTATION ROOM • * •
85


APPENDIX


CLIMATE DATA
Location f-lsnover, Ajeuo hUrYipshire
Longitude 72*17' W
Latitude
5oo abo\ftS -sea level
Altitude
AIR TEMPERATURE *F
J F M A M J J A S 0 N D ligh AMT.
Monthly mean max. 31.4 33.6 41.5 53.9 68.7 77. t 82.1 79.0 71.3 60.6 46.8 34.6 82.1 46.5
Monthly mean min. 1(3,8 12.0 22.4 32.8 46.6 62.7 37.9 55.6 48.0 37.5 28.1 16.2 lo.a 71.3
Monthly mean range 20, b Zl.5 19.1 21.1 25.1 24.4 24.2 23.4 Z3.3 23.1 18.7 18.4 Low AMR1
RELATIVE HUMIDITY %
Monthly mean max. a.m. 14 75 18 75 83 9o 91 9i 92 87 85 81
Monthly mean min. p.m. 59 68 56 45 48 52 54 57 53 £>! 65
Average <26.5 67 60.5 72.6 7/.5 7Z.5 74.5 70 73 73
Humidity Group 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Humidity group: 1 If average RH: below 30% 2 30-50% 3 .50-70% 4 above 70%
RAIN AND WIND
Rainfall, inches 2.1 2.5 Z.8 2.9 3.0 3.4 3.1 23 3.0 2.7 4o 3.3 36.3
Tota^ L
Wind Prevailing NW MW NW NW MW MW MW MW MW MW MW MW
Wind, Secondary NN NW NW MW NW WNW SW WNW NW NW MW
J F M A M J J A S 0 N D
87


Comfort limits Day Night
Humid, grou )3 66-79 54-66
4 64-75 54-64
DIAGNOSIS: °F
J F M A M J J A s 0 N D
Monthly mean max. 314 41.5 559 68.7 77.1 92.| 79/0 71.3 60. fa 4fa.8 M.fa 46.5
Day Comfort: Upper 7? 79 79 79 79 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 VMT
Lower 6Co 66 6>6 66 66 64 64 64 64 64 64 M
Monthly mean min. 10.8 12.0 zz.4 32.8 43.6 5Z.7 57.9 55.(0 48.0 37.5 28.1 16.2
Night Comfort: Upper 66 66 66 66 66 (A 64 64 64 64 64 64
Lower 54 54 54 54 54 54 54 54 54 54 54 54
Thermal Stress: Day c £ £ o o H- a c c.
Night c. <0 c (0 <0 o o c. c
INDICATORS
Humid: HI st / 2
112 V V y y 4
H3 o
Arid: A1 o
A2 o
A3 7 4 4 V y V y y y 1C
Totals
Applicable when: Meaning: Indicator Iherma Strei ;s Rainfall Humidity Group Monthly Mean Range
Dav Night
Air Movement Essential HI H 4
11 2,3 Less than50
Air Movement Desirable H2 0 4
Rain Protection H3 over 8"
Thermal Capacity A1 1,2,3, More than50
Outdoor Sleeping A2 H 1,2
H 0 1,2 More than50
Protection from cold A3 C
88


HI H2 H3 A1 A2 A3
z 4 O o O to
Indicator
Totals
Layout
3-10 J 1 Orientation N & S; Long Axis E & W

11-1; 5-12 V
0-4 2 Compact Courtyard Planning
Spacing
11-1 > 3 Open spacing for breeze penetration
2-10 7 4 As 3, protection from hot & cold wii
0,1 5 Compact lay-out
Air Movement
3-12 1 6 Rooms single banked, permanent provision tor air movement
1,2 0-5
6-12 7 Double banked rooms, Temporary Provision for air movement
0 2-1:
0,1 8 No Air movement required
Openings
0,1 0 9 Large openings, 40-80%
ii,i; : 0,1 10 Very small openings, 10-20%
Any other si 11 Medium openings, 20-40%
Walls
0-2 V 12 Light walls, short time-lag
3-12 13 Heavy external & internal walls
Roofs
0-5 si 14 Light, insulated roofs
6-12 15 Heavy roofs, over 8 Hr. time lag
Rain Protection
3-12 16 Protection from heavy rain
R9


Keep heat in and cold out
. share common walls
. small openings
. insulate with earth
Avoid infiltration and convective heat loss
. long sloped roof to divert winds
. insulating attic space
. evergreen trees as north wind break
. airlock entries on north
. earth berming to deflect winds
. protect north side entries with evergreen
planting
. orient buffer spaces on north side
. orient heat generating spaces centrally . compact floor plan to minimize perimeter
DESIGN INFERENCES
^ a
>
. feizt n r-f â–¡ â–¡ n
* [un a

90


Utilize winter sun
. east/west orientation
. orient living spaces on south
. allow sun to penetrate interior spaces
. provide southern sunspace to store heat
gain
Protect against summer sun
. reflective roof surfaces
. provide shading devices on south
plant deciduous trees on south to provide shade and channel summer breezes
91


SOLAR CHART
44° NL
1111111111 rrrr.nrr i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i rin"l90°
-----------------------------------------------------80°
92
Altitude Angles


CODE ANALYSIS
APPLICABLE CODE: ZONING ORDINANCE, TOWN OF HANOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE PLANNING ZONE: INSTITUTION Section 204.4
Objective: The chief present land use in this district, and the use that can be expected in the future, is institutional. This use has certain peculiar needs that best can be met by identifying it as a special district. In addition to the normal institutional uses in this area, certain complementary and support facilities are desirable as Special Exceptions. Because of the specialized nature of these institutions, these support and complementary land uses involve a selective list of residential, commercial and public uses which are desirable in such a district providing the necessary safeguards are incorporated. It is the intent of this provision to permit or allow institutions to use their land for uses related to the purposes of the institution.
Area and Dimensions
Lot Size: The minimum lot size shall be 60,000 square feet, and the minimum lot width shall be 150 feet, except that if the lot is contiguous to other land in the same owenrship, there shall be no minimum lot area or width.
Yard Dimensions: For buildings on lots adjoining residential districts, the minimum side and rear yards adjoining the districts shall be 75 feet. The required front yard shall be 20 feet. In all other cases, there shall be no side or rear area requirements.
Maximum Height: Sixty feet, except the maximum height shall be 35 feet within 150 feet of a residential district. In cases where the land slopes downward from the street, the building height measured on any face other than the front shall represent no more than one additional story, and in any case shall not exceed 75 feet.
93


APPLICABLE CODE: 1979 UNIFORM BUILDING CODE
SCOPE: NEW CONSTRUCTION
OCCUPANCY GROUPING, PERMITTED AREA AND HEIGHT Occupancy Type(s) from Table 5A:
A-2: Any building or portion of a building having an assembly room with an occupant load of less than 1000 and a stage.
B-2: Wholesale and retail stores, office buildings, drinking and dining establishments having an occupant load of less than 100, printing plants, municipal police and fire stations, factories and workshops using material not highly flammable or combustible, storage and sales rooms for combustible goods, paint stores without bulk handling.
Buildings or portions of buildings having rooms used for educational purposes, beyond the 12th grade with less than 50 occupants in any room.
Occupancy Separation Requirements from Table 5B:
One hour fire separation required between occupancy groups A-2 and B-2.
Allowable Construction Types
Type I: Fire resistive construction; unlimited square footage.
Type II: Fire resistive construction; 29,900 allowable square footage.
94


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Southwest Summer Winds SUN AND WIND 24

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ARCHIVES LD 1190 A72 1983 8632 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN ARI . HOOD MUSEUM OF ART

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t.l'l1 V fKVNWlt:.l'riMl:'" v ..... , U'l ... AURA lA LIBRARY HOOD MUSEUM OF ART Eve lyn Col e Master of T hesis Project Spring 1983 College of Design & Planning __________ University of Colorado /Denver

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Dedicated to my family and friends for their love, encouragement and support.

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PREFACE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS INTRODUCTION SITE Director's Statement Historical Background Architectural Context Location Map Climate Description Site Selection Criteria Site Analysis Site Context GENERAL ISSUES AND CONSIDERATIONS PROGRAM Spatial Needs Spatial Requirements Matrix of Adjacencies Requirement Charts TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 2 4 5 6 15 16 17 20 27 32 35 37 76a 77

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Table of Contents (Continued) APPENDIX Climate Data 87 Design Inferences 90 Solar Charts 92 Code Analysis 93 Cost Estimate 106 BIBLIOGRAPHY 108 PROBLEM STATEMENT 113 DESIGN SOLUTION

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PREFACE I have chosen the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College as my thesis project for several reasons, not the least of which is the fact that I consider it a challenging problem. In some ways, I view this project as the literal and figurative piece de resistance of my architectural education at the University of Colorado. Perhaps more so than other building types, the museum epitomizes the concept of architecture as a functional craft and an expressive art. Not only does the museum serve as a repository of cultural artifacts, but itself embodies society's aesthetic values. Historically, the museum building has been a monument to culture's highest ideals, aspirations and visions of human achievement. In this spirit, I intend that the culmination of my graduate studies draw from the essence of the museum, expressing creativity, exhibiting achievement and reflecting an accumulated wealth of knowledge.

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS James Childress Architect Moore, Grover, Harper Essex, Connecticut Francine Haber Professor of Architectural History College of Design & Planning University of Colorado at Denver Paul Heath Professor of Architecture College of Design & Planning University of Colorado at Denver Warren Kieding Architect Engle/Kieding Design Associates Denver, Colorado Robert Kindig Professor of Architecture College of Design & Planning University of Colorado at Denver Gary Long Professor of Architecture College of Design & Planning University of Colorado at Denver Chester Nagle Professor of Architecture College of Design & Planning University of Colorado at Denver 2

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INTRODUCTION

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I DIRECTORS STATEMENT Dartmouth College has planned a museum of fine arts since the late 1950's, when Hopkins Center for the Perform-ing Arts was built to the designs of Wallace Harrison. Because of budgetary pressures at that time, it was necessary to compress the spaces planned for the gallery functions. In 1978, however, a substantial gift to be used for construction of a museum was provided by Harvey Hood, a devoted trustee and an alumnus of the Class of 1918. Other friends and alumni made major gifts and a building committee was formed ••• Design criteria centered on a building that would clearly speak to its own era, announcing itself as a structure of the last quarter of the twentieth century, while at the same time being in harmony with the nineteenth-century flavor of the Dartmouth campus. There were no existing museums we found exemplary and looked to as models. This is by no means an indictment of previous museum architecture but a recognition that there are strengths and weaknesses associated with all designs. Careful examination of other museums reinforced our initial belief that flexibility of operation was the key component in developing our program, for our collection is very much one in process, which will grow and evolve over the next decades. -Richard Stuart T eitz 4

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HISTORICAL BACKGROUND Vox Clamantis in Deserto (A voice crying in the wilderness) Dartmouth College was founded in 1769 by Eleazar Wheelock as a school for "Indians and the children of pagans". A charter from King George III gave Dartmouth claim to what is now northern New England. Gradually, Dartmouth's real estate holdings have been given to the New Hampshire legislature or sold. Dartmouth is a non-sectarian liberal arts college which became coeducational in 1972. It is now in the process of becoming a small university with the inclusion of graduate degree programs in business administration, engineering and medicine. Eighty percent of the students live in dormitories on campus, the remainder residing in fraternities and off-campus housing. As a result, activity nodes such as Hopkins Center are an important part of daily life. It has been said that the portrait of 1801 graduate Daniel Webster, which graces almost every lounge, may be a more important unifying theme for the college than its architecture. There are over 100 buildings of varying age and style on the 175-acre campus which dominates the small, progressive town of Hanover (population 8,000). 5

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DARTMOUTH COLLEGE <\NOYER NEW HAMP S HIR E RIV(R ClUSTt.A . • . -

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ARCHITECTURAL CONTEXT Dartmouth Hall Rollins Chapel 7

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.College Hall Webster Hall 8

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Rob ins on Hall Topliff Hall

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Baker library Memorial Field Entrance 10

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Webster Hall Heating Plant ,, ., , , ... .... .. , • ._., ............... , , 'S,, ............. ,,,. _ .. ... ........ ""'"' -"' .. -.:, .. .. ,, ........ 11

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Hopkins Center The Green 12

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New Hampshire Hall Screen Wall 13

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SITE

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/., _v-'_,.r-.'1 I \ ( \ . ( ' yr --.-1 . \ ) MONTP IER. r \ HA. OVER_Ac \ '1 . . . ( . . I 1 ) . r, . > NE1 YOR _ 1 . TRE /) . PHILADELPHIA .. ? L . ---J'o q 410 ap a1o 1bo SCALE OF MILES LOCATION MAP 15

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CLIMATE Hanover is situated on the Western border of New Hampshire, at an altitude of approximately 500 feet above sea level. Its surroundings next to the Connecticut River are hilly, with many small lakes and ponds. The countryside is generously wooded, mostly second growth, as former agricultural land has lain idle. Northwesterly winds are prevalent, bringing cold dry air during the winter and cool, dry air in the summer. The greater strength of the southerly winds during the warmest months results in a flow of air from the southwest or west-southwest in July and August. The overall movement is from the west or west-northwest during the transition months of June and September, and is northwesterly the rest of the year. The speed of the wind varies little from month to month, averaging 8 m.p.h. in July and 10 m.p.h. in December. Easterly winds usually accompany the rains of summer and the snows of winter. The daily temperature ranges from an average minimum of 10F to an average maximum of 31 F in the middle of January, the coldest part of winter. Near the end of Jul6, the warmest part of the year, the average range is from daily lows of about 57F to high temperatures near 83 F. Very hot summer weather is infrequent. During any month, temperatures above the average maxima or below the normal minima may be observed. The average date for experienci ng the last freezing temperature in the spring is May 17, and the average date of autumn frost is September 24. The lowest temperature of a winter can be expected to be in the range of 10F to 25F below zero and to occur between December 31 and February 11 most seasons. The average amount of precipitation varies little from the warmer half of the year to the colde r half. The more significant rains and heavier snowfalls are associated with easterly, and especially, northeasterly winds. The seasonal snowfall ordinarily amounts to a total of 40 to 80 inches, and snow cover normally lasts from midDecember to the end of March, although bare ground is not rare in the winter. 16

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The choice of an appropriate site for the museum is to be based on several criteria as outlined below. Some criteria relate specifically to the goals and objectives of the building committee, while other criteria are based on pragmatic considerations. The Hood gift for construction of the museum stipulates that the museum present a strong visual image to the main green. In order to coordinate activities, facilities and staff, it is prefereed that the museum be contiguous to Hopkins Center for the Performing Arts. The museum should be oriented toward major student circulation paths so as to promote exposure to the arts and the theory of learning by osmosis. The museum should be easily accessible and visible to the public as it will be, in part, a publicly supported regional cultural center. The museum, while presenting a strong visual image and unique identity, should minimally impact the quality of the existing architecture. Adequacy and efficiency of parking facilities is necessary to maximize public accessibility. An appropriate area for service loading and unloading activities should be considered so that this function does not interfere with established vehicular traffic patterns, or negatively impact the character of the existing streetscape. 17

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DARTMOUTH SITE SELECTION PLAN COLLEGE ANOVER NEW HAMPSHIRE • T til .:; . .•. . . . '.

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SITE SITE SITE SITE SITE SELECTION CRITERIA A 8 c D ADJACENCY TO GREEN • CONTIGUOUS TO HOPKINS • • • ORIENTED TO EXISTING CIRCULATION • • • • ACCESSIBLE TO PUBLIC • • • ADEQUATE LAND AREA • • • MINIMAL ARCHITECTURAL IMPACT • • ADJACENT TO PARKING FACILITI E S • • • ACCESSIBLE TO SERVICE VEHICLES • • e Pass Total 4 Fail 7 4 6 Site B meets all of the site selection criteria except direct adjacency to the Green. Since the potential to front the Green exists, Site B will become the site for the Hood Museum. 19

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SITE CONTEXT The site is bounded on the East by Clement Hall, the administrative offices of the Physical Plant .•• • • • and to the Southeast by Rogers, which stores maintenance ment. 20

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To the South lies Brewster Hall, a dormitory for music majors. The sinuous wall of the Hopkins administrative offices forms the Northwest border of the s ite. 21

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To the North, the site is bordered by Wilson Hall, with the Green in the background. The Southwest view is of the Hopkins administrative offices, the courtyard/cafe and Spaulding Auditorium in the background. 22

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Ell Jl • SCALE 1'' = 100 ' . : : : : ,•. _.: : . :. . . . ... : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . : : . . : : . : . : . : : . The Green CJ NORTH 26

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PEDESTRIAN ACCESS From Wheelock Street, the pedestrian glimpses the site between Wil son Hall, on the left, and Hopkins Center for the Performing Arts, on the right. A pedestrian walk connects Lebanon Street, to the south, with Wheelock Street and the Green beyond as it passes between Hopkins Center and the museum site. 27

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VEHICULAR ACCESS The service entry to the Physical Plant is adjacent to the northeast site boundary. The parking lot off Lebanon Street abuts the southeast corner of the Hood site. 28

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• • lEd II o SCALE 1'' =100' TOPOGRAPHY AND VEGETATION The Green '1 0

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ADJACENT ARCHITECTURAL STYLE Ecclectic Romanesque Wilson Hall is built of red brick on a granite base, accented with pink stone lintels, sills and trim, and roofed in slate. Hopkins Center by Wallace Harrison features precase concrete vaults and skylights which pop out of rectilinear, brick veneered masses. 30

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GENERAL ISSUES AND CONSIDERATIONS

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GENERAL ISSUES AND CONSIDERATIONS THE COLLECTION It is assumed that the permanent collection will grow dramatically and perhaps change in character over time. It is unknown in which areas the collection will grow the most GALLERY CIRCULATION AND USE There will be two types of galleries: changing exhibition and permanent exhibition. Changing exhibits will be used for special shows of six to eight week duration and will be most heavily visited by the public. The changing exhibiti on galle r ies should be easily served by major circulation (elevators and lobbies). Changi ng galleries may be arra ng e d in two ways: a s a ''hook" to draw publi c into the museum and through permanent exhib ition spaces as a s eparate group apart from the permanent exhibits and adjacent to the mai n lobbies to reduce the l ength of t ravel 32

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HOOD EXPANSION Provisions for future expansion of exhibition space in an orderly manner must be considered. convert Hood museum storage to exhibition and offices, and become reliant on remote storage convert work areas to exhibition and offices, etc. reserve a portion of the site (several structural bays) for new construction Remote storage provides for collection expansion but not exhibition expansion. SIZE/ AREA RELATIONSHIPS The ratio of exhibition (galle ry) space to gross building area is 1:3 (0 . 33) The ratio of in-Hood storage to gallery floor area is 1:4 (0.25) The ratio of total storage (including re mote storage) to exhibition floor area is 7:12 (0.58) 33

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

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SPACE NEEDS GALLERIES 122000 sf permanent exhibition 8,000 sf changing exhibition 4,000 sf AUDITORIUM 22150 sf 250 seats 2,000 sf projection room 150 sf OBJECT STORAGE 32100 sf painting 1,250 sf sculture/other three dimensional objects 1,050 sf drawings/print 475 sf textile, etc. 250 sf vault 75 sf STUDY 800 sf study room 500 sf seminar room 300 sf WORKSPACES 22900 sf loading dock 350 sf receiving/temporary storage/ examination room 550 sf construction 500 sf matting/framing 300 sf pedestal/crate storage 100 sf exhibition prep and design 400 sf photography /restoration/conser-vation/darkroom 700 sf Continued 35

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OFFICES 21350 sf director 350 sf fine art curator 200 sf primitive art/anthropology curator 200 sf ass't curator/exhibition coordinator 250 sf curatorial/research staff (expansion) (3) 400 sf registrars (2) 100 sf registrar files 100 sf admin. ass't (fine art) 100 sf admin. ass't CPA/anthropology) 100 sf secretary /receptionist 200 sf conference room 300 sf copy room 50 sf UTILITY ROOMS 21050 sf mechanical rooms 1,000 sf toilets (public and staff) 850 sf janitor closets 100 sf miscellaneous storage 100 sf SPECIAL ROOMS 650 sf retail shop 400 sf catering (kitchen) area 100 sf coats 150 sf orientation room/lounge/alumni gallery @1,000 sf from circulation NET AREA TOTAL 261000 sf (assignable square feet) GROSS AREA FACTOR 62500 sf (25% of net area to allow for structure and circulation; also see orientation room above) TOTAL GROSS BUILDING AREA 322500 sf 36

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: GALLERIES PERMANENT EXHIBITS Flexible exhibition space to show the permanent collection and enable use for a variety of shows from the permanent collection and occasional changing exhibitions. Do not design to house speci fie pieces or parts of the collection. Continuous with changing exhibition galleries, access from work spaces by elevator (no steps), next to special rooms: retail, toilets, coats, catering and orientation room. Size: 4,000 s.f. totaldivide into 4 galleries Ideal Proportions: Z-1 Expansion: yes movable "boxes" EQUIPMENT: Flexibility: Yes, but less critical than changing exhibition Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0", with panels to increase height to 12'-0" Ceiling Height: 12'-0"-16'-0" 37

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: GALLERIES CHANGING EXHIBITS Exhibition space for traveling shows, special exhibits from permanent alumni collection and outside sources. Used for openings and receptions. Continuous with permanent exhibition space. Accessible from work spaces by elevator (no steps). Adjacent to special rooms: retail toilets, coats, catering and orientation room. Size: 8,000 s. f. total divide into 8 to 10 galleries Ideal Proportions: vary Expansion: Yes movable "boxes" EQUIPMENT: Flexibility: critical Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0", with removable transom panels to increase height to 12'-0" Ceiling Height: 16'-0" 38

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: AUDITORIUM SEATING AREA Priority use by the museum and the Film Studies Department. Lecture hall for the arts and classroom to be used in conjunction with openings and receptions. To seat 250 occupants. Adjacent to Hood vestibule or separate entrance mandatory. Direct access from Hopkins Center. Size: 2,000 s. f. Ideal Proportions: as required by seating Expansion: no standard upholstered fixed seating with integral writing tablets EQUIPMENT: Flexibility: possible to break scale of large space into smaller spaces Doorways: 6'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 20'-0" x 30'-0" podium, projection screens, chalkboard 39

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: AUDITORIUM PROJECTION ROO For projection of film and slides into auditorium area, as well as storage of projection equipment and control of auditorium lighting and sound. Adjacent to auditorium with access independent of auditorium entrance. Size: 150 s. f. Ideal Proportions: none Expansion: no countertop and storage shelves Flexibility: no Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'0" -10'-0" EQUIPMENT: 35mm projector: 15'w x 32" 16mm projector: 18"w x 13" ( prov i de min. 2' -0" clearance between projectors) 40

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OBJECT STORAGE PAINTINGS Area in storage room assigned to rack storage of paintings, with access to general storage area. Table for sorting and temporary holding of objects. Mandatory adjacency to temporary storage/receiving room and work rooms, as well as to study and seminar rooms. Desireable adjacency to offices and registrar. Size: 1,250 s.f. Ideal Proportions: 36' x 35' Expansion: no work table 3'-0" x 6'-0" Flexibility: no Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0", with panels to increase height to 12'-0" Ceiling Height: 15'-0" EQUIPMENT: racks: 10' x 10' min. @) 16" o.c., with bottom guides, double loaded corridor 41

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OBJECT STORAGE THREE-DIMENSIONAL Storage of objects, including primitive art collections, sculpture and furniture. Use of common table for sorting and temporary holding. Mandatory adjacency to temporary storage/receiving room and work areas, as well as study and seminar rooms. Desireable adjacency to offices. Size: 1,050 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no common object storage Flexibility: no fixed shelving Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0", with panels to increase height to 12'-0" Ceiling Height: 15'-0" EQUIPMENT: fixed shelves: 24"d x 36" o.c. adjustable shelves: 12"d bins 42

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OBJECT STORAGE DRAWING AND PRINT Storage of drawings, prints and photographs. Use of common table for sorting and temporary holding. Mandatory adjacency to temporary storage/receiving room and other work areas, as well as to study and seminar rooms. Size: 475 s.f. Flexibility: yes no fixed storage Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 4'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 15'-0" layout table: 3'-0" x 6'-0" EQUIPMENT: bins: 36"d x 24"w x 30", 36", 48"h adjustable shelves for flat storage flat files file cabinets custom-made drawers 43

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OBJECT STORAGE TEXTILES For storage of costume collection. Mandatory adjacency to temporary storage/receiving room andwork areas, as well as study and seminar rooms. Desireable adjacency to offices and costume studio in Hopkins Center. Size: 250 s. f. Ideal Proportions: none Expansion: no common object storage table Flexibility: no fixed storage Doorways: 4'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 15'-0" EQUIPMENT: shelving clothes rods 44

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OBJECT STORAGE VAULT For storage of silver collection and objects of great value. Mandatory adjacency to temporary storage/receiving room and work area. Desireable adjacency to offices. Size: 75 s. f. Flexibility: no fixed storage Ideal Proportions: Doorways: special 3'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0" layout table EQUIPMENT: adjustable shelving drawers 45

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: STUDY STUDY ROOM Room for the study of art objects taken from storage by faculty, students and the public under the supervision of the registrars. To function as a lecture type classroom and to be used in conjunction with class study of work on display in the gallery spaces. Mandatory adjacency to storage and seminar room. Desireable adjacency to registrar's office, lobbies and galleries. Size: 500 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no 30 chairs with writing tablets flat drawer file storage picture rail: one wall length Flexibility: possibly with seminar room Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 10'-0"-12'-0" EQUIPMENT: Projection screen Blackboard Projection booth: 3'-0" x 4'-0" outside sound insulated door, 14" wide shelf with storage below 46

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: STUDY SEMINAR ROOM Room for the study of art objects from storage by faculty, students and the public, controlled by the registrars. To function as a round table type classroom in conjunction with class study of work on display in the gallery spaces. Mandatory adjacency to storage and seminar room. Desireable adjacency to registrars office, lobbies and galleries. Size: 300 s. f. Flexibility: with study room Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 10'-0"-12'-0" table: 3'-0" x 12'-0" EQUIPMENT: picture rail on one wall chairs: 20 blackboard projection booth: same as study room 47

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: WORK SPACES LOADING DOCK An enclosed loading dock will provide secure, climate controlled storage of truck contents during delivery and loading. Maximum truck size i s 8' x 50"; usual deliveries by 8' x 20' semi. Mandatory adjacency to street and receiving/examination room. Size: 350 s.f. Ideal Proportions: 12' x 24' Expansion: no Flexibility: none Doorways: overhead door to exterior 10' x 14', 8' x 8' door to interior with panels for 12' x 12' opening. Ceiling Height: truck height: 12' EQUIPMENT: bumpers 48

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: WORK. SPACES RECEIVING/EXAMINATION/STORAGE For receiving and cateloging incoming objects. General holding and sorting room for packing objects in transit between departments of the museum and between work spaces. Mandatory adjacency to loading dock, object storage and freight elevator. Size: 550 s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no registrar's desk table: 5' x 8' Flexibility: Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0" Ceiling Height: 15'-0" EQUIPMENT: adjustable shelving bins for uncrated 20 rolls of packing material on wall: 5 @ 6'-0" long x 3'-0" diam. packing material cabinet: 2'-0" x 4'-0" x 4'-0" hopper for packing peanuts: 3'-0" x 3'-0" x 3'-0" 49

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: WORK SPACES CONSTRUCTION Room for the construction and repairs of exhibits, partitions, crates and pedestals. Also for painting parts of exhibits and frames. Mandatory adjacency to receiving/examination and freight elevator. Desireable adjacency to work spaces and object storage. Size: 500 s. f. Flexibility: Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0" Expansion: Ceiling Height: 15'-0" Pantry room 1: lockable shelving for tool and hardware storage EQUIPMENT: table saw Pantry room 2: fireproof, vented, metal cabinet 9'-0" L x 2'-0" W. 2'-6" x 6'-0" countertop band saw work bench: 36" wide lumber storage: long stock plywood 50

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: WORK SPACES MATTING/FRAMING Room for matting and framing of e xhibit art work. Removal of frames from objects going to storage. Generally a "clean room". Mandatory adjacency to receiving/examination and freight elevator. Desireable adjacency to work spaces and storage. Size: 300s.f. Flexibility: Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 6'-0" x 8'-0" Expansion: Ceiling Height: 12'-0"-15'-0" EQUIPMENT: sink "L" shaped work table: 4'-0" w countertop: frame cutter, paper cutter, dry mounting adjustable shelves frame stock storage: 10'-0" long fla t storage: 32" x 40" x 10'-0" h glass cutter on wall: 5'-0" x 5'-0" 51

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: WORK SPACES PEDESTAL/CRATE STORAGE For storage of packing crates, bulk amounts of packing supplies and pedestals for exhibitions. Mandatory adjacency to receiving/examination, construction and freight elevator. Size: 100 s. f. Flexibility: none Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 6'-0" x 8'-0" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 15'-0" EQUIPMENT: 52

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: WORK SPACES EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN Room to simulate gallery space to design and prepare for gallery installation of an exhibit. Adjacent to construction and freight elevator. Desireable adjacency to assistant curator and exhibition curator. Size: 400 s. f. Flexibility: no Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 15'-0" drafting table EQUIPMENT: library shelving: fixed 13" o.c. x 12" d Modeling table 53

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: WORK SPACES PHOTGRAPHY /RESTORATION/CONSERVATION For copywork and general photography. For restoration and conservation of collection on a part-time basis. For minor repair of 20 and 30 work. Adjacent to freight elevator. Desireable relationship to office, receiving/examination room. Size: 700 s. f. Flexibility: no Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: 10'-0"-15'-0" countertop EQUIPMENT: darkroom: sink, counter drying room chemical storage 54

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OFFICES DIRECTOR Private office. Adjacent to offices and conference room. Desireable relationship to Hopkins administration. Size: 350 s.f. Flexibility: Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: yes Ceiling Height: 10'-0" desk: 3'0" x 5'-0", chair EQUIPMENT: bookshelves chairs: 4 side chairs file storage table light table projection 55

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OFFICES FINE ART CURATOR Private office. Adjacent to offices and conference room. Size: 200 s.f. Flexibility: Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: yes Ceiling Height: 10'-0" desk: 3'-0" x 5'-0", chair chairs: 2 EQUIPMENT: bookshelves table file cabinets light table projection 56

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OFFICES PRIMITIVE ART CURATOR Private office. Adjacent to offices and conference room. Size: 200 s.f. Flexibility: Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: yes Ceiling Height: 10'-0" desk: 3'-0" x 5'-0", chair chairs: 2 EQUIPMENT: bookshelves table file storage light table projection 57

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OFFICES ASSISTANT CURATOR/EXHIBITION COORDINATOR Private office. Adjacent to offices and conference room. Desireable adjacency to exhibition prep and design, and work spaces. Size: 150 s. f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes desk: 2'-6" x 3'-0", chair chair drafti ng table Flexibility: no Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 10'-0" EQUIPMENT: bookshelves file storage 58

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OFFICES CURATORIAL RESEARCH STAFF Private office. Large space for future expansion to add three people and offices in research capacities. Adjacent to offices and conference room. Size: 400s.f. Flexibility: yes Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: yes Ceiling Height: 10'-0" desks EQUIPMENT: file cabinets chairs book shelves light table 59

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OFFICES REGISTRARS Private offices where staff catalogs the museum collection and traveling exhibitions. Activities include general record keeping, control of slide collection and future microfilmed records, supervision of public and college access to the collection. Adjacent to registrar's files and offices. Desireable relationship to receiving/examination. Size: 200s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes desks: 2 @ 2'-6" x 5'-0", chair chairs typing shelves Flexibility: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0" EQUIPMENT: bookshelves slide index 60

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OFFICES REGISTRAR FILES Storage of records and catalogs for staff and public use, controlled and supervised by registrars. Adjacent to registrar's office and administrative offices. Size: 100 s. f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes chairs Flexibility: yes Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0" EQUIPMENT: 8 files: 2'-6" d x 15" x 5'-0" h -provide for expansion 61

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OFFICES FINE ARTS ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Private office -assistant to the curator of fine arts. Adjacent to offices, conference room and curator's office. Size: 100 s. f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes desk: 2'-6" x 5'-0", chair chairs typing shelf Flexibility: yes Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0" EQUIPMENT: bookshelves file cabinets light table 62

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OFFICES PRIMITIVE ARTS ADMINISTA TIVE ASSISTANT Private office -assistant to the curator of primitive arts. Adjacent to offices, conference room and curator's office. Size: 100 s. f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes desk: 2'-6" x 5'-0", chair typing shelf side chair Flexibility: resizing possible Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0" EQUIPMENT: bookshelves file storage 63

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OFFICES SECRETARY /RECEPTIONIST Room for museum staff reception and waiting area, as well as clerical work area. Access control location to all offices. Size: 200 s. f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes desks: 2 @ 2'-6" x 5'-0", chairs typing shelves side chairs work table Flexibility: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0" EQUIPMENT: water fountain file cabinets bookshelves coat storage food nook 64

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OFFICES CONFERENCE ROOM General conference room for Hood administration meetings. Direct access to director's office, offices. Size: 300s.f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes Flexibility: Doorways: 4'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 10'-0"-12'-0" conference table 12 chairs EQUIPMENT: bookshelves projections blackboard 65

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: OFFICES COPY ROOM Room used by museum staff for making paper copies and for storage of required paper materials. Adjacent to secretary/reception and offices. Size: 50 s.f. Flexibility: resizing possible Ideal Proportions: Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: yes Ceiling Height: 8'-0" countertop: 2'-0" x length of room with cabinet storage below EQUIPMENT: copy machine shelf storage trash basket 66

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: UTILITY ROOMS MECHANICAL Central mechanical room for entire museum. control of all systems from this room. Controlled and supervised by the Building and Grounds Department. Adjacent to service entrance, separate exterior entrance. Size: 1,000 s. f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes desk and chair Flexibility: no Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0", with panels to increase opening to 12'-0" x 12'-0" Ceiling Height: 15'-0" EQUIPMENT: HVAC equipment electrical panels telephone panels security system controls fire protection controls 67

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: UTILITY ROOMS TOILETS Toilet rooms located for staff and public; two each for men and women, minimum. Handicap access to lobby toilets. Two at central lobby. Two adjacent to offices and accessible from work areas. Desireable to have additional one adjacent to work areas. Size: 850 s. f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no countertop: 2'-0" side Flexibility: no Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 10'-0"-12'-0" EQUIPMENT: urinals toilet stalls handicap toilets sinks hand drivers waste baskets 68

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: UTILITY ROOMS JANITOR CLOSETS , For cleaning and maintenance purposes at each floor(@ 30 s.f.). Adjacent to general circulation spaces. Size: 100 s.f. Ideal Proportions: 5' x 6' Expansion: no Flexibility: no Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 8'-0" EQUIPMENT: stop sink shelves metal cabinet waste container 69

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: UTILITY ROOMS MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE General shelf, counter and floor storage for museum (lightbulbs, etc.). Adjacent to offices. Size: 100s.f. Ideal Proportions: 7' x 14' Expansion: no countertop Flexibility: yes-variety of storage units for undetermined uses Doorways: 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 10'-0" EQUIPMENT: shelves cabinets wastebaskets 70

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: To sell museum related objects. Adjacent to lobby and major circulation spaces. Size: 400 s. f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no SPECIAL ROOMS RETAIL SHOP Flexibility: Doorways: 6'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 10'-0" + display cases EQUIPMENT: cabinets magazine racks cash registers 71

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: SPECIAL ROOMS CATERING/SERVING KITCHEN Space for heating and preparing food and drink for openings and meetings. Food and drink is brought in on carts from vehicle or Hanover Inn and served from setup tables in the lobby or gallery spaces. No serving from kitchen. Corridor or elevator access; relates to lobby and gallery spaces. Size: 100 s. f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no countertop: 2'-0"-"U" shaped EQUIPMENT: in room with cabinets below and overhead Flexibility: no Doorways: 4'-0" x 6'-8" Ceiling Height: 10'-0" sink with garbage disposal dishwasher refrigerator steam table warming oven coffee urns 72

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: SPECIAL ROOMS COATS Storage room for coats, cameras, umbrellas, parcels. Check type system for valuables. Adjacent to lobby and central control desk. Size: 150 s. f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: yes counter with shelves below EQUIPMENT: Flexibility: no Doorways: counter Ceiling Height: 8'-0"-10'-0" coat racks: 2'-0" w x maximum length possible with hat shelf above lockers umbrella rack 73

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: SPECIAL ROOMS ORIENTATION/LOUNGE/ ALUMNI EXHIBITION Relaxation comfortable, homey, club-like atmosphere. Orientation -reception for large groups. Exhibition -exhibit of loaned Alumni art or of new acquisitions. Adjacent to lobby. Size: 1,000 s. f. Ideal Proportions: Expansion: no lounge chairs low tables Flexibility: yes Doorways: 8'-0" x 8'-0", with panels to increase opening to 12'-0" X 121-011 Ceiling Height: 10'-0"-15'-0" EQUIPMENT: magazine rack 74

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: CIRCULATION SPACES LOBBY General circulation from vestibule to main floor public areas shop, coatroom, toilets, elevators, stairs, auditorium and galleries. Mandatory relationship to the vestibule, shop, coatroom, toilets, stairs and elevator. Desireable relationship to the auditorium and galleries. Size: 500s.f. Flexibility: none Ideal Proportions: none Doorways: 6'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: not critical seating EQUIPMENT: drinking fountains security reception desk pay phone cigarette receptacles 75

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PURPOSE: RELATIONSHIPS: REQUIREMENTS: FURNITURE: CIRCULATION SPACES VESTIBULE Airlock shock absorber between Hood's environmental control and outdoors or other buildings. Mandatory relationship to outdoors, Hopkins Center circulation and lobby. Desire able relationship to the auditorium. Size: 200 s.f. Flexibility: no Ideal Proportions: none Doorways: 6'-0" x 6'-8" Expansion: no Ceiling Height: not critical EQUIPMENT: boot scrapers 76

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ADJACENCY MATRIX e MANDATORY ADJACENCY DESIREABLE ADJACENCY 76a

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ZONE REQUIREMENTS () ;::) '" fl. MECHANICAL ROOM • PERMANENT EXHIBITION GALLERY • CHANGING EXHIBITION GALLERY • AUDITORIUM • PROJECTION ROOM • PAINTING STORAGE • SCULPTURE STORAGE • ORA WING/PRINT STORAGE • TEXTILE STORAGE • VAULT • --STUDY ROOM • SEMINAR ROOM • RECEIVING/EXAMINATION ROOM • CONSTRUCTION • MATTING/FRAMING • EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN • PHOTOGRAPHY /CONSERVATION • DIRECTOR • FINE ART CURATOR • PRIMITIVE ART CURATOR • ASSISTANT CURATOR • CURATORIAL RESEARCH STAFF • REGISTRAR • • REGISTRAR FILES • F . A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIST A NT • P. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST • CONFERENCE ROOM • COPY ROOM • TOILETS • MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE • RETAIL SHOP • CATERING/KITCHEN AREA • ORIENTATION ROOM • 77

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DUST CONTROL All spaces where objects will be exhibited, stored, framed or processed should be provided with dust control considerations. The HVAC system should be provided with an electrostatic filter system. Careful attention should be paid to finishes in spaces where objects are processed or exhibited. ACOUSTICAL CONTROL LIGHTING Control sound transmission to offices and workspaces. Control sound absorbtion in copy/machine rooms, construction spaces. The auditorium will be designed to provide proper acoustics for voice transmission and clarity. This compromises proper acoustics for music. Ceiling should be flat shape with hard surface. Side walls to be slightly absorbant and irregularly shaped. Natural light not in galleries provide in public circulation areas provide in offices and conservation areas. Artificial light CONTROL SYSTEMS 78

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() LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS MECHANICAL ROOM • PERMANENT EXHIBITION GALLERY • • CHANGING EXHIBITION GALLERY • • AUDITORIUM • • • PROJECTION ROOM • • PAINTING STORAGE • • SCULPTURE STORAGE • ORA WING/PRINT STORAGE • TEXTILE STORAGE • VAULT • STUDY ROOM • • • SEMINAR ROOM • • • RECEIVING/EXAMINATION ROOM • • CONSTRUCTION • • MATTING/FRAMING • • EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN • • PHOTOGRAPHY/CONSERVATION • • DIRECTOR • • FINE ART CURATOR • • PRIMITIVE ART CURATOR • • ASSISTANT CURATOR • • CURATORIAL RESEARCH STAFF • • REGISTRAR • • REGISTRAR FILES • • F. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • • P. _l..:._ADMINISTRA TIVE _ _A.$SISTANT • • SECRETARY /RECEPTIONIST • • CONFERENCE ROOM • • • COPY ROOM • TOILETS • MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE • RETAIL SHOP • • CATERING/KITCHEN AREA • • ORIENTATION ROOM • • 79

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ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL Environmental control will be provided in three ways: normal gallery special The normal system will provide for a temperature range of 62-78F with 40-60% relative humidity, year round. These areas will require less, or no, control of the central system than the gallery or special areas. The gallery system will be carefully controlled to provide a constant temperature range of 68-72F with constant relative humidity of 45%. This system is to cover all spaces intended for object exhibition, storage, framing or other processing. The special system will provide for high or low demand spaces, such as vestibules, and special requirements for venting, such as the loading dock. In general, the HVAC system/architectural design should work to avoid rapid variations in temperature and relative humidity. 80

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ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL REQUIREMENTS a "' C!l."f: 4-MECHANICAL ROOM • PERMANENT EXHIBITION GALLERY • CHANGING EXHIBITION GALLERY • AUDITORIUM • PROJECTION ROOM • PAINTING STORAGE • SCULPTURE STORAGE • DRAWING/PRINT STORAGE • TEXTILE STORAGE • VAULT • STUDY ROOM • SEMINAR ROOM • RECEIVING/EXAMINATION ROOM • CONSTRUCTION • • MATTING/FRAMING • EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN • • --PHOTOGRAPHY/CONSERVATION • DIRECTOR • FINE ART CURATOR • PRIMITIVE ART CURATOR • ASSISTANT CURATOR • CURATORIAL RESEARCH STAFF • REGISTRAR • REGISTRAR FILES • F. A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • P. A . ADMINIST8ATIVE ASISTANT • SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST • CONFERENCE ROOM • COPY ROOM • TOILETS • MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE • RETAIL SHOP • CATERING/KITCHEN AREA • ORIENTATION ROOM • 81

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FIRE CONTROL Fire control may be provided using one or several of four basic systems: special electronic sprinkler Special systems include C02 and Halon, compressed gases which fill a room when the electronic system so orders. People can survive only one minute in a C02 filled room. People do survive in a Halon filled room. Halon is very expensive. Electronic detection will be provided in all spaces. This includes smoke detectors connected to central alarm panel with audible alarms and strobe lights. Water sprinklers may be required in public access ways but should not be used in gallery spaces, object storage areas. 82

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() 4/.o FIRE PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS MECHANICAL ROOM • • PERMANENT EXHIBITION GALLERY • • CHANGING EXHIBITION GALLERY • • AUDITORIUM • • PROJECTION ROOM . , . PAINTING STORAGE . . . SCULPTURE STORAGE • • DRAWING/PRINT STORAGE • • TEXTILE STORAGE • • VAULT • • STUDY ROOM • SEMINAR ROOM • RECEIVING/EXAMINATION ROOM • CONSTRUCTION • • MATTING/FRAMING . -EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN • PHOTOGRAPHY /CONSERVATION • DIRECTOR • FINE ART CURATOR • PRIMITIVE ART CURATOR • ASSISTANT CURATOR • CURATORIAL RE SEARCH STAFF • -REGISTRAR . i I REGISTRAR FILES • F . A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • P . A. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • S ECRETARY /RECEPTIONIST • CONFERENCE ROOM • COPY ROOM • TOILETS • MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE • • RETAIL SHOP • CATERING/KITCHEN AREA • • ORIENTATION ROOM • 83

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SECURITY Security will be provided in three ways: guards mechanical electronic Guards will be on duty whenever the museum or a portion of it is open. One guard will be located at the main security/reception desk. An additional guard for each floor will randomly move through the galleries. Mechanical security includes locked doorways, which in conjunction with the building floor plan arrangement, permits only staff access. For the purpose of security, all non-administrative staff are considered "public" users, whether actually public, student or faculty. Electronic "motion detectors" will be provided for security when the building or space is closed/unoccupied. All spaces will be so equipped except for the vestibule, lobbies, stairs, toilets and auditorium. Occasional visual superv1s10n such as location of the museum shop next to the main entrance, is not to be relied on for security. 84

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SECURITY REQUIREMENTS MECHANICAL ROOM ---------------t---+--::-e -+---t PERMANENT EXHIBITION GALLERY e e e CHANGING EXHIBITION GALLERY e e e AUDITORIUM e PROJECTION ROOM e e PAINTING STORAGE e e SCULPTURE STORAGE e e DRAWING/PRINT STORAGE e e TEXTILE STORAGE • VAULT e e STUDY ROOM e e SEMINAR ROOM e e RECEIVING IE X AM IN A T:....:.I-=-O..:....:N:........:....:R...:::O-=O:....:.;M:.:..._ ________ CONSTRUCTION e e MATTING/FRAMING e e EXHIBITION PREP AND DESIGN e e PHOTOGRAPHY/CONSERVATION e FINE ART CURATOR e e PRIMITIVE ART CURA T _ O _ R ___________ ASSISTANT CURATOR e e CURATORIAL RESEARCH STAFF e e REGISTRAR e e REGISTRAR FILES e e F. A . ADM IN ISTR A TIVE ASS 1ST 1--___:_P ADM I NIS TRA TIV E ASSIST A....:....:N-=-T-'----------+--+--+----l SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST e e CONFERENCE ROOM e e COPY ROOM e e TOILETS e MISCELLANEOUS STORAGE e RETAIL SHOP e e e CATERING/KITCHEN AREA e ORIENTATION ROOM e • e 8 5

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APPENDIX

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AIR TEMPERATURE • p mean max . Monthly mean mtn. Monthly mean range RELATIVE HUMIDITY % Monthly mean max. a.m. Monthly mean min. p.m. Average Humidity Group RAIN AND WIND Rainfall, inches Wind Prevailing Hind, Secondary CLIMATE DATA Location Longitude 1z•n•vJ Latitude N Altitude SOC fed-\eve\ J F M A M J J A s 0 N D AMT 41.S 17.1 SZ.I 79.0 71.? 34.fD 82.1 16.8 12.0 22. 4 6'2.7 '31.9 48.0 31.S 28.1 , ... 2 10.8 71.? 20,, z1.-; 19.1 21.1 2S. 1 24. 4 24.2 23."{ 23.1 18.1 \8. 1 Low AMR 7.-:f 15 18 1S 83 91 91 92 ?;] 8S 81 S9 ss 4& 48 S5 52 '54 51 S>o '=>7 fA) 7'Z.S 1/.'S ?Z.t: 74.ti:: ?0 13 73 3 3 3 '3 4 4 4 4 -4 4 1 Humidity group: 1 If average RH: below 30 % NW NW NW N'N NW NW J F H NW N W A 2 3 4 NW NW M NW vmw J NW Nw NW sw WNW J A s 30-50% 50-70% above 70 % NW NW IJW NW Nw NW 0 N D Total 87

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Comfort limits Day Night Humid . grou p3 66-79 54 66 4 64-75 54-64 DIAGNOSIS: F J F M A M J J A s 0 N D Monthly mean max. 31. 1 33. S f/8.7 T/ . 1 9Z. I Day Comfort: Upper 19 19 19 79 19 lS 7'5 76 lS 1t:> 15 Lower "" '-A b4 Honthly mean min. 10. 8 12.0 zz . ..j 3Z. B 5Z. 7 57. 9 56.(1) "f8.0 37.', ?8. 1 Night Comfort: Upper tlo feb h4 fd4 Lower 54 54 54 54 54 54 54 Eft Thermal Stress: Day c. G. G C> 0 H-++ 0 c. c. c. Night c.. c. c. c. c. c, 0 0 c. G G c. INDICATORS Humid: H1 J I z. H2 " J J J H3 0 Arid: A1 0 A2 0 A3 J J J " J " J J J 10 Totals Applicable when : rhPrm.
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I Hl H2 H3 A1 A2 A3 2 4 0 0 0 /0 Indicator Totals Layout 0-10 Orientation N & S; Long Axis E & W p-12 J 1 111 0 4 2 Compac t Courtyard Planning Spacing 111 3 Open spacing for breeze penetration 2 10 J 4 As 3 , protection from hot & cold wi d 0' 1 5 Compact lay-out Air Movement 3-12 Rooms single banked, permanent 0 5 J 6 provision tor air movement 1 ' 2 6 12 Double banked rooms , Tempo rary 2 1 7 Provision for air movement 0 0' 1 8 No Air movement required Opening s 0' 1 0 9 Large openings, 40 80 % 11 '1 0,1 10 Very small openings, .10-20% Any other J 11 Medium openings, 20-4 0 % Walls 0-2 J 12 Light walls, short time-lag 3 12 13 Heavy external & int erna l walls Roofs 0-5 J 14 Light, insulated roofs 6 12 15 Heavy roofs, over 8 Hr. time lag Rain Protection I. 16 I Protection from heavy rain RQ

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Keep heat in and cold out share common walls small openings insulate with earth Avoid infiltration and convective heat loss long sloped roof to divert winds insulating attic space evergreen trees as north wind break airlock entries on north earth berming to deflect winds protect north side entries with evergreen planting orient buffer spaces on north side orient heat generating spaces centrally compact floor plan to minimize perimeter DESIGN INFERENCES 0 0 0 oacr 90

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Utilize winter sun east/west orientation orient living spaces on south allow sun to penetrate interior spaces provide southern sunspace to store heat gain Protect against summer sun reflective roof surfaces provide shading devices on south plant deciduous trees on south to provide shade and channel summer breezes -(! ft 'I II r. I II II _J,_u_h_tL'.L--1L-Jt. 91

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SOLAR CHART 5 Bearing Angles o south so West 92

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CODE ANALYSIS APPLICABLE CODE: ZONING ORDINANCE, TOWN OF HANOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE PLANNING ZONE: INSTITUTION Section 204.4 Objective: The chief present land use in this district, and the use that can be expected in the future, is institutional. This use has certain peculiar needs that best can be met by identifying it as a special district. In addition to the normal institutional uses in this area, certain complementary and support facilities are desirable as Special Exceptions. Because of the specialized nature of these institutions, these support and complementary land uses involve a selective list of residential, commercial and public uses which are desirable in such a district providing the necessary safeguards are incorporated. It is the intent of this provision to permit or allow institutions to use their land for uses related to the purposes of the institution. Area and Dimensions Lot Size: Yard The minimum lot size shall be 60,000 square feet, and the minimum lot width shall be 150 feet, except that if the lot is contiguous to other land in the same owenrship, there shall be no minimum lot area or width. Dimensions: For buildings on lots adjoining residential districts, the minimum side and rear yards adjoining the districts shall be 75 feet. The required front yard shall be 20 feet. In all other cases, there shall be no side or rear area requirements. Maximum Height: Sixty feet, except the maximum height shall be 35 feet within 150 feet of a residential district. In cases where the land slopes downward from the street, the building height measured on any face other than the front shall represent no more than one additional story, and in any case shall not exceed 75 feet. 93

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APPLICABLE CODE: 1979 UNIFORM BUILDING CODE SCOPE: NEW CONSTRUCTION OCCUPANCY GROUPING, PERMITTED AREA AND HEIGHT Occupancy Type(s) from Table 5A: A-2: Any building or portion of a building having an assembly room with an occupant load of less than 1000 and a stage. B-2: Wholesale and retail stores, office buildings, drinking and dining establishments having an occupant load of less than 100, printing plants, municipal police and fire stations, factories and workshops using material not highly flammable or combustible, storage and sales rooms for combustible goods, paint stores without bulk handling. Buildings or portions of buildings having rooms used for educational purposes, beyond the 12th grade with less than 50 occupants in any room. Occupancy Separation Requirements from Table 5B: One hour fire separation required between occupancy groups A-2 and B-2. Allowable Construction Types Type 1: Fire resistive construction; unlimited square footage. , Type II: Fire resistive construction; 29,900 allowable square footage. 94

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STRUCTURAL DESIGN COMPONENTS (Chapter 23) Use or Occupancy Category Description Assembly Areas1 Fixed Seating and Auditoriums Movable Seating and Other Areas Stage Areas and Enclosed Platforms Exit Facilities 2 Offices Schools Classrooms Light Storage Heavy Stores Retail Concen-Uniform trated Load Load 50 0 100 0 125 0 100 0 50 2000 40 1000 125 250 75 2000 1 Assembly areas include such occupancies as dance halls, drill rooms, gymnasiums, playgrounds, plazas, terraces and similar occupancies which are generally accessible to the public. 2 Exit facilities shall include such uses as corridors serving an occupant load of 10 or more persons, exterior exit balconies, stairways, fire escapes and similar uses. 3 Individual stair treads shall be designed to support a 300-pound concentrated load placed in a position which would cause maximum stress. Stair stringers may be designed for the uniform load set forth in the table. 95

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Building Height from Table 5-D A-2: Type I Fire Resistive, unlimited height in stories, unlimited maximum height in feet. Type II Fire Resistive, maximum 4 stories in height, maximum 160' height in feet. B-2: Type I Fire Resistive, unlimited height in stories, unlimited maximum height in feet. Type II Fire Resistive, maximum 12 stories in height, maximum 160' in height. LOCATION ON PROPERTY Fire Resistance of Exterior Walls (Table 5A) Two hours less than 10 feet; one hour elsewhere. Openings in Exterior Walls Not permitted less than 5 feet, protected less than 10 feet. OCCUPANT LOAD Number of Occupants (Table 33A) Auditorium Exhibit Offices Other Mechanical S.F. of = 22000 285 122000 = BOO 22350 24 92500 95 S. F. /Occupant 7 = 15 100 = 100 = 2 Exits Required Over: 50 50 30 50 2 Exits Handicap Access: Yes Yes Yes No No 96

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DETAILED OCCUPANCY REQUIREMENTS EXITS (3302) Required Exits: Width: Arrangement Distance: In all occupancies, floors above the first story having an occupant load of more than 10 s lall have not less than two exits The number of exits required from any story of a building shall be determined by using the occupant load of that story, plus the percentages of the occupant loads of floors which exit through the level under consideration as follows: 1. Fifty percent of the occupant load in the first adjacent story above (and the first adjacent story below, when a story below exits through the level under consideration). 2. Twenty-five percent of the occupant load in the story immediately beyond the first adjacent story. For purposes of this section, basements or cellars and occupied roofs shall be provided with exits as required for stories. Floors above the second story, basements and cellars used for other than service of the building shall have not less than two exits. The total width of exits in feet shall be not less than the total occupant load served, divi Jed by 50. Such width of exits shall be divided approximately equally among the separate exits. The total exit width required from any story of a building shall be determined by using the occupant load of that story, plus the percentages of the occupant loads of floors which exit through the level under consideration. If only two exits are required, they shall be placed a distance apart equal to riot less than one half of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be served, measured in a straight line between exits. Where three or more exits are requind, they shall be arranged a reasonable distance apart so that if one becomes blocked, the oth3rs will be available. The maximum distance of travel from any point to an exterior exit door, horizontal exit, exit passageway, or an enclosed stairway in a building not equipped with an automatic fire extinguishing system throughout, shall not exceed 150 feet, or 200 feet in a building equipped w ith an automatic fire extinguishing system through. These distances may be increased 100 feet when the last 150 feet is within a corridor. 97

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Through Adjoining Areas: DOORS (3303) Width and Height: CORRIDORS (3304) Width: Height: Access to Exits: Exits from a room may open into an adjoining or intervening room or area, provided such adjoining room is accessory to the area served and provides a direct means of egress to an exit corridor, exit stairway, exterior exit, horizontal exit, exterior exit balcony or exit passageway. Exception: Exits are not to pass through kitchens, storerooms, restrooms, closets or spaces used for similar purposes. F ayers, lobbies and reception rooms constructed as required for corridors shall not be construed as intervening rooms. Exit doors shall swing in the direction of exit travel when serving any hazardous area or when serving an occupant load of 50 or more. Every required exit doorway shall be of a size as to permit the installation of a door not less than 3 feet in width and not less than 6 feet 8 inches in height. When installed in exit doorways, exit doors shall be capable of opening at least 90 degrees and shall be so mounted that the clear width of the exitway is not less than 32 inches. No leaf of an exit door shall exceed 4 feet in width. Every corridor shall be not less in width than 44 inches. Corridors and exterior exit balconies shall have a clear height of not less than 7 feet, measured to the lowest projection from the ceiling. When more than one exit is required, they shall be so arranged that it is possible to go in either direction from any point in a corridor to a separate exit, except for dead ends not exceeding 20 feet in length. 98

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Construction: Openings: STAIRWAYS (3305) Width: Landings: Handrails: Walls of corridors serving an occupant load of 30 or more shall be of not less than one-hour fire resistive construction, and the ceilings shall be not less than that required for a one-hour fire resistive floor or roof system. Doors shall be maintained self closing or shall be automatic closing. Other interior openings shall be fixed and protected by approved !-inch thick wired glass, installed in steel frames. The total area of all openings shall not exceed 25 percent of the area of the corridor wall of the room which it is separating from the corridor. Stairways serving an occupant load of more than 50 shall not be less in width than 44 inches. Stairways serving an occupant load of 50 or less may be 36 inches wide. Private stairways serving an occupant load of less than 10 may be 30 inches wide. Every landing shall have a dimension measured in the direction of travel equal to the width of the stairway. Such dimension need not exceed 4 feet when the stair has a straight run. There shall be not more than 12 feet vertically between landings. Stairways shall have handrails on each side, and every stairway required to be more than 88 inches in width shall be provided with not less than one intermediate handrail for each 88 inches of required width. Intermediate handrails shall be spaced approximately equal within the entire width of the stairway. Handrails shall be placed not less than 30 inches, nor more than 34 inches above the nosing of treads. They shall be continuous the full length of the stairs, and except for private stairways, at least one handrail shall extend not less than 6 inches bey and the top and bottom risers. Guardrails: Guardrails shall be not less than 42 inches in height. Open guardrail and stair railings shall have intermediate rails or an ornamental pattern such that a sphere 9 inches in diameter cannot pass through. 99

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Construction: RAMPS (3306) Width: Slope: Stairs and stair platforms shall be constructed of reinforced concrete, iron or steel with treads and risers of concrete, iron or steel. Brick, marble, tile or other hard noncombustible materials may be used for the finish of such treads and risers. All required interior stairways which extend to the top floor in any building four or more stories in height shall have provided at the highest point of the stair shaft an approved hatch openable to the exterior not less than 16 square feet in area, with a minimum dimension of 2 feet. Exterior stairways shall not project into yards where protection of openings is required. In every building four or more stories in height, one stairway shall extend to the roof surface, unless the roof has a slope greater than four in twelve. Every required stairwya shall have a headroom clearance of not less than 6 feet 6 inches. Such clearances shall be established by measuring vertically from a plane parallel and tangent to the stairway tread nosing to the soffit above at all points. Width of ramps shall be as required for stairways. Ramps required by Table 33-A shall not exceed a slope of one vertical to 12 horizontal. The slope of other ramps shall not exceed one vertical to 8 horizontal. When provided with fixed seating, the main floor of the assembly room of a Group A, Division 2 occupancy may have a slope not to exceed 1 vertical to 5 horizontal. 100

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Land i ngs: Construction: HORIZONTAL EXIT (3307) EXIT ENCLO SURES (3308) Construction: Openings: Extent: Ramps having slopes greater than 1 vertical to 15 horizontal shall ahve landings at the top and bottom, and at least one intermediate landing shall be provided for each 5 feet of rise. Top landings and intermediate shall have a dimension measured in the direction of ramp run of not less than 5 feet. Landings at the bottom of ramps shall have a dimension in the direction of ramp run of not less than 6 feet. Doors in any position shall not reduce the minimum dimension of the landing to less than 42 inches and shall not reduce the required width by more than 3! inches when fully open. Ramps shall be constructed as for stairways. The surface of ramps shall be roughened or shall be of nonslip materials. A horizontal exit shall lead into a floor area having capacity for an occupant load not less than the occupant load served by such exit. The capacity shall be determined by allowing 3 square feet of net clear floor area per ambulatory occupant and 30 square feet per nonambulatory occupant. The area into which the horizontal exit leads shall be provided with exits other than additional exits as required by Section 3302. Every interior stairway, ramp or escalator shall be enclosed as specified in this section. Enclosu.re walls shall be of not less than two-hour fire resistive construction in buildings more than four stories in height and shall be of not less than one-hour fire resistive construction elsewhere. There shall be no openings into exit enclosures, except exit doorways and openings in exterior walls. Stairway and ramp enclosures shall include landings and parts of floors connecting stairway flights and shall also include a corridor on the ground floor leading from the stairway to the exterior of the building. Enclosed corridors or passageways are not required from unenclosed stairways. 101

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Barriers: SMOKEPROOF ENCLOSURES (3309) EXIT COURTS (3310) Width: Construction: AISLES (3313) Width: A stairway in an exit enclosure shall not continue below the grade level exit, unless an approved barrier is provided at the ground floor level to prevent persons from accidentally continuing into the basement. There shall be no enclosed usable space under stairways in an exit enclosure, nor shall the open space under such stairways be used for any purpose. A smokeproof enclosure shall consist of a vestibule and continuous stairway enclosed from the highest point to the lowest point by walls of two-hour fire resistive construction. Where a floor of any story is located more than 75 feet above the highest grade, one of the required exits shall be a smokeproof enclosure. Every exit court shall discharge into a public way or exit passageway. Exit court minimum widths shall be determined in accordance with provisions of Section 3302 based on tributary occupant load, and such required width shall be unobstructed to a height of 7 feet. The minimum exit court width shall not be less than 44 inches. Where an exit court serving a building or portion thereof having an occupant load of more than 10 is less than 10 feet in width, the exit court walls shall be a minimum of one-hour fire resistive construction for a distance of 10 feet above the floor of the court, and all openings therein shall be protected by a fire assembly having a fire protection rating of not less than three-fourths hour. Every portion of every building in which are installed seats, tables, merchandise, equipment or similar materials shall be provided with aisles leading to an exit. Every aisle shall be not less than 3 feet wide if serving only one side, and not less than 3 feet 6 inches wide if serving both sides. Such minimum widths shall be measured at the point farthest from an exit, cross aisle or foyer, and shall be increased by 1! inches for every 5 feet in length toward the exit, cross aisle or foyer. 102

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Distance: Spacing: Cross Aisles: Vomitories: Slope: Steps: In areas occupied by seats and in Group A occupancies without seats, the line of travel to an exit door by an aisle shall be not more than 150 feet. Such travel distance may be increased to 200 feet if the building is provided with an approved automatic sprinkler system. With standard seating, aisles shall be so located that there will not be more than six intervening seats between any seat and nearest aisle. With continental seating, the number of intervening seats may be increased to 29 where exit doors are provided along each side aisle of the row of seats at the rate of one pair of exit doors for every five rows of seats. Such exit doors shall provide a minimum clear width of 66 inches. Aisles shall terminate in a cross aisle, foyer or exit. The width of the cross aisle shall not be less than the sum of the required width of the widest aisle, plus 50 percent of the total required width of the remaining aisles leading thereto. In Group A occupancy, aisles shall not provide a dead end greater than 20 feet in length. Vomitories connecting the foyer or main exit with the cross aisles shall not have a total width not less than the sum of the required width of the widest aisle leading thereto, plus 50 percent of the total required width of the remaining aisles leading thereto. The slope portion of aisles shall not exceed 1 foot fall in 8 feet, except as permitted by Section 3306. Steps shall not be used in an aisle when change in elevation can be achieved by a slope conforming to Section 3313. No single step or riser shall be used in any aisle. Where steps are used in an aisle, such steps shall extend across the full width of the aisle and shall be illuminated. Treads and risers in such steps shall conform to Section 3305. 103

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SEAT SPACING (3314) With standard seating, the spacing of rows of seats shall provide space of not less than 12 inches from the back of one seat to the front of the most forward projection of the seat immediately behind it, as measured horizontally between vertical planes. With continental seating, the spacing of rows of unoccupied seats shall provide a clear width, measured horizontally as follows (automatic or self rising seats shall be measured in a seat-up position; other seats shall be measured in the seat-down position): Eighteen inches clear for rows of 18 seats or less. Twenty inches clear for rows of 35 seats or less. Twenty-one inches clear for rows of 45 seats or less. Twenty-two inches clear for rows of 46 seats or more. RECOMMENDED DESIGN FOR HANDICAP ACCESS Door Size: Ramps: Toilets: Doors shall have a clear opening of no less than 36 inches when open and shall be operable by a single effort. The floor inside and outside of each doorway shall be level for a distance of 5 feet from the door in the direction of the door swing and shall extend 2 foot beyond each side of the door. Ramps to or within a building shall have a slope not exceeding 2 foot rise in 12 feet run (8%). Ramps shall be straight with any change in direction accomplished at level landings. Bottom landings shall be 6 feet deep, and top landing shall be 5 feet deep. Minimum ramp width shall be 2 foot 10 inches. At least one stall in each major restroom should be wide enough to accommodate a wheelchair, minimum handicap stall dimension to be not less than 3 feet by 6 feet. A clear space within the toilet room of sufficient size to inscribe a circle with a diameter not less than 60 inches. Doors in any pos ition may encroach into this space by not more than 12 inches. 104

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Parking Area: Elevators: Parking spaces, marked for the use of the handicapped, should be provided near building entrances to eliminate wheeling or walking beh i nd parked cars. Parking spaces should have level access from the parking area to the building entrance. Standard handicapped parking space shall be 12 feet by 19 feet. Provide an elevator for the handicapped at public levels of buildings. 105

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Hood Museum of Art Size: 32,500 S.F. Gross Cost Range: $120 to $130 Per Square Foot of Gross Building Area Average Cost: $125/S.F. Gross Building Cost Sitework and Landscaping Allowance Furnishings Allowance Subtotal Architect's Fee @ 8.5% Programming and Master Planning Fee • Project Contingency @ 5% Total Project Cost • • COST ANALYSIS $4,230,000 4,065,000 3,900,000 250,000 150,000 4,630,000 4,465,000 4,300,000 393,550 379,525 365,500 100,000 300,000 5,423,550 5,244,525 5,065,500 High Average Low High Average Low High Average Low High Average Low 106

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

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BIBLIOGRAPHY BOOKS AlA Research Corporation, Regional Guidelines for Building Passive Energy Conserving Homes, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. Brawne, Michael, The New Museums: Architecture and Display, New York, Frederick Praeger, 1966 Coleman, Lawrence Vail, Museum Buildings, Washington, D.C., American Association of Museums, 1950. Colorado Commission on Higher Education, Architectural Barriers Study, Boulder, 1974. International Conference of Building Officials, Uniform Building Code, Whittier, California, 1979 Edition. Pena, William, Problem Seeking; An Architectural Programming Primer, Boston, Cahners Books International, 1977. Searing, Helen, New American Art Museums, New York, Whitney Museum of Art, 1982. Tobias, Andrew, The Ivy League Guidebook, New York, MacMillan Company, 1969. 108

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PERIODICALS AlA Journal Vol. II, 1923 April, 1965 January, 1965 March, 1981 Art in America October, 1946 Winter, 1958-59 July/ August, 1971 Architectural Forum April, 1952 December, 1960 September, 1971 March 1972 Art News October, 1975 Natural Lighting of Art Galleries, p. 223-226 Lighting by Grapius, p. 58 Natural Light, p. 60-64 Walker Art Museum, p. 68-73 Issue on Museum Trends The Form of Space for Art Special Museum Issue Guggenheim Museum Perfect Professional Museum Museums for Learning Academic Wing at University of Pennsylvania What Should a Museum Building Be? 109

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Architectural Record August, 1915 December, 1919 December, 1929 January, 1940 December, 1948 April, 1963 August, 1963 June, 1969 July, 1972 September, 1981 Pencil Points September, 1938 September, 1939 Progressive Architecture October, 1959 July, 1964 September, 1964 December, 1967 Glare in Museum Galleries A Study in Museum Planning Planning the Art Museum Light and Atmosphere Museum Lighting Rose Museum at Brandeis An Art Gallery for a University Campus Building Type Study -Museums Museums for Today Museum Architecture Lighting Modern Displays for Works of Art Lighting and Wiring Techniques at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Spaces for Art Exhibits Lighting Founder s Room at MOMA 110

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December, 1969 March, 1975 May, 1978 Theme: Today's Museum-Theater or Mausoleum Issue devoted to museums and their role in society New Museums 111

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+--------,---------DESIGN SOLUTION

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ALYSIS ------Ch

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LSECOND