Citation
Westminster Church of the Nazarene

Material Information

Title:
Westminster Church of the Nazarene
Creator:
Smith, James A
Language:
English
Physical Description:
40 unnumbered leaves : illustrations (some color), charts, map, color photographs, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Church buildings -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Westminster ( lcsh )
Church buildings ( fast )
Colorado -- Westminster ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
Academic theses. ( lcgft )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )
Academic theses ( lcgft )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 40).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
by James A. Smith.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
13770866 ( OCLC )
ocm13770866
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1986 .S634 ( lcc )

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Full Text
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WESTMINSTER CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
An architectural thesis presented to the College of Design and
Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture.
by
James A. Smith
Spring 1986


The Thesis of James A. Smith is approved.
Committee Chairman
Clarence Haviland Principal Advisor
University of Colorado at Denver Date:
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INDEX
Statement ........................................... 1
Introduction ........................................ 2
Goals and objectives ................................ 4
Site analysis ....................................... 5
Code analysis ...................................... 11
Functional requirements ............................ 16
Space requirements ................................. 23
Drawings ........................................... 24
Conclusion ......................................... 39
Bibliography
40


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STATEMENT
The image of church is very different for each person. For those that attend regularly, church is where one encounters their first social structure outside the immediate family. They may be dedicated, christened, baptized, married and a funeral service administered for them all in the church. Those that attend occasionally may be involved in a special Easter or Christmas program themselves or with their children. Others may never enter a church at all.
For those that attend regularly they will become socially active beginning in the nursery. As they grow older they will be involved in plays and choirs. They may become a Christian themselves through a conversion process as outlined in the Bible and administered by each particular denomination. They are taught the guidelines of wholesome living and given pointers on how to deal with the unexpected and stressful situations that may be encountered during one's lifetime. Counseling is available to help them through troubled times that may affect the individual or the family as a whole.
A great social bond may develop between individuals and families that extends beyond the wall of the church building out into the community.
Spiritually the church is a symbolic place to go to and express, by physical presence, that one submits to the idea that there is a supreme being. A closer spiritual bond may be encouraged by the church and developed by the individual. This spiritual bond may be encouraged for different reasons. One reason may be due to the interpretation of the Bible by that particular denomination. Another could be a desire to spend eternity or the afterlife in a heavenly or godly place as defined by the Bible or the denomination. And a reason could be the fear of spending eternity or the afterlife in a hell or fearful existence.
So the church does many things for many people. This program will strive to make the facilities warm and inviting for social and spiritual functions It will also strive to make the spiritual area, auditorium, overpowering but soothing to state that we are significant but small compared to God.
The building on the hill should be recognized as a church from a distance.


INTRODUCTION
RELIGIOUS HISTORY
Man has worshipped some form of god throughout his existance. Altars made of rough stones were the first recorded places of worship in the old testament. The ten commandments were given to Moses on tablets of stone and were placed inside the ark of the covenant. The ark of the covenant with the tablets were later put in a tabernacle or holy place. The tabernacle was the center of the Nomadic community of the Israelites.
The church has been the hub of the community for many years and in older communities this is still true. Early American churches were usually small and served the community as a whole for several functions. These main functions were church services, school and community or townhall functions.
NAZARENE CHURCH HISTORY
In 1895 the denomination of the Church of The Nazarene was founded in Los Angeles, California, by Phineas Bresee, a former Methodist minister in Los Angeles. In the beginning Bresee founded and supervised many churches and in 1907 these churches united with the Association of Pentecostal Churches of America. In 1908 the recently formed Pentecostal Church of the Nazarene joined the Holiness Church of Christ, an organization of Southern Holiness churches. Later the denomination took on the name "The Church of The Nazarene".
The denomination presently comprises about one third of the Holiness movement with just under 400,000 members around the world. There are many Nazarene churches in the metropolitan Denver area.
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2


LOCAL CHURCH HISTORY
Bill M. Sullivan and approximately thirty dedicated people formed the Westminster Church of The Nazarene in July, 1957. Numerical and financial growth has been steady. Average attendance of 185 is 180% of the theoretical capacity of the present facilities.
THE PROJECT
The project has been modified from a real project undertaken by Clarence E. Haviland, Architect, in 1977. The facilities he designed were occupied by the church in 1978. Mr. Haviland's project was designed for a sanctuary capacity of 350 with flexible space expandable to a capacity of 500.
Mr. Haviland's design also included a daycare center.
To simplify the project some modifications have been made. The capacity will be 400 instead of 350 expandable to 500. The daycare center has been eliminated. The main east portion of the property will be used instead of the west portion. I am considering the west property as excess and may or may not be used by the church in the future.


GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
NEEDS
The project is to provide a new sanctuary, Sunday school and fellowship space that will meet the existing and future growth needs of the church family unit through the decade. There is room on the site for future growth.
FUNCTION
The main function of the church is to provide for the spiritual and physical needs of the people. Aesthetically the building should be appealing and comfortable to the young and old. Ideological or spiritual elements of the Christian faith should be expressed in the design and furnishings of the santuary.
An altar, which has ample room for seekers and workers, should be provided in the sanctuary. An altar signifies the universal need of salvation and the reality of a personal sacrificial experience. A cross also signifies the universal need of salvation and is a reminder of God's supreme revelation to man. The sacraments of the Lord's supper and baptism also are to be present in the sanctuary. The Lord's supper is represented by the communion table. Baptism is represented by a baptistry for immersion or a baptismal bowl. The baptistry is not necessarily visible when not in use.
SERVICES
The main religious services are Sunday morning, Sunday evening, and Wednesday evening. Additional services, departmental and administrative meetings occur when needed. Sunday school is normally the first service on Sunday morning. The Bible is read and discussed during this time. The second service of Sunday morning is usually the primary service of the church. During this time the main emphasis is the objective worship of God. The atmosphere is one of reverence and thoughtfulness. This service has the largest attendance and is composed of young people and adults. Children through eleven will be provided for elsewhere through a total children's ministry program. The Sunday evening service has a greater emphasis on Christian fellowship and the Christian experience. Wednesday evening emphasizes the subjective sharing of the Christian experience.
4


NORTH
SITE PLAN
SCALE


SITE ANALYSIS
SITE
The site is located west of Federal Boulevard on the north side of 104th Avenue and the east side of King Street in Westminster, Colorado.
The property contains seven and five tenths (7.5) acres with one thousand fifty-six (1056) feet along 104th Avenue and three hundred (300) feet along King Street. The eastern four (4) acres will be for church use and the western three (3) acres near King Street will be for future development. The remaining five tenths (0.5) acres will be required for the widening of 104th Avenue.
VIEW
The desireable views are to the north counterclockwise to the southwest. The mountain views are from the northwest to the southwest.
SURROUNDINGS
The site, presently, has no buildings nearby. The closest structure is a circular ground level water-tank on the south side of 104th Avenue. The design will not relate to this watertank. A residential area is on King Street adjacent to 104th Avenue.
CLIMATE
Denver basically has an arid climate with cold winters and hot dry summers. In arid climates high daytime and low night-time temperatures occur. Night-time temperatures are normally comfortable. The area is characterized by low precipitation (15 inches annual average) and abundant sunshine. Temperature maximums reach below 0 F in winter and above 90 F in summer which is the daily mean maximum temperature (hottest month). The area experiences only rare occurrences of violent winds and weather.
The large fluctuation of daily temperatures is due to intensive solar radiation during the day with strong outgoing radiation at night. The loss of heat during the night is due to clear skies. Such conditions bring about a need to reduce or delay solar and convective heat gains during the day. This can be done by masonry construction, reflective surface colors or shading. At night thermal mass may be cooled by night-sky radiation or ventilation. Reducing solar radiation on east west facing windows or walls may be accomplished by shading devices or vegetation. Maximum solar absorption can be accomplished by the use of dark surfaces and minimal solar absorption can be accomplished by using light or polished surfaces. Portions of the climate (temperature and wind) data were taken from the "Thesis for Design of Fixed Base Operator Facility", Spring 1985, by A. Michael Voigt.
6


WIND
User comfort and building economy can be enhanced when the forces of wind are recognized. For example, the orientation and velocity of prevailing winds may suggest the need for protection. Or proper fenestration orientation and size may enhance the natural cooling effects of a summer breeze.
5
Wind Roses show the percentage of time the wind blew from the 16 compass points or was calm.
Temperature
"An important determinant of annual fuel use is the number of degree-days at the geographic location of the building. For any one 24-hour day, the number of degree-days is the difference between 65 F and the mean outdoor temperature for the day."
Avg. Winter Degree Days
Station_____________Temperature_______Yearly Total
Denver Airport 37.6 6283
7


Fuel consumption calculations include:
Calculated hourly heat loss of the building Degree-days annually Average winter temperature Heating value per unit of fuel Efficiency of heating system
The amount of humidity in the outside air is an important variable in determining the type of cooling system that can be utilized in a building.
Outside Design Conditions for Denver
Summer Daily
Dry Bulb Range
Temperature _____
Summer Wet Bulb Temperature
95
H
40
Precipitation
The design storm describes the largest quantity of water that may be deposited upon the site during a certain length of time. It is used to calculate the amount of surface runoff on the site and from this the amount of water to be temporarily stored on the site as required by local regulations.
Adams County prescribes 6.1 in./hr. for 5 minutes time duration.
3 —
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M O
Normal Monthly Total Precipitation


The amount of rainfall through the year presents no unusual design constraints.
Snow loads are used in structural design to design main structural members.
Adams county requirements - 30 lbs./sq. ft., horizontal projection
15----
Mean Monthly Total Snowfall
The amount of snowfall through the year suggests that areas will have to be provided for the temporary storage of snow from paved outdoor circulation areas.
SOLAR
Latitude is used as an aid in calculating the amount of overhang or recess in shading devices.
Latitude = 39°47'10"
9


Percentage of sunshine vs. cloudy days suggests the applicability of daylighting design for the building.
BUILDING ARRANGEMENT
The building should be sited to best utilize the view, sunlight and the slope of the site. The site slopes down to the northwest at approximately six (6) percent. Attention must be given to minimizing the effects of the prevailing wind and north exposure, during the winter months while optimizing solar gain. Special consideration will be given to access by the handicapped.
SITE REQUIREMENTS
A structure with a capacity for four hundred (400) persons. Parking for one hundred fifty (150) automobiles.
Required driveways and walks for proper access.
Exterior recreation areas for volleyball/basketball court and softball field if possible.
Exterior lighting as required for traffic, vehicular and pedestrian, for site security and beautification.
Decorative and climatic landscaping.


CODE ANALYSIS
CITY OF WESTMINSTER ZONING REGULATIONS
Maximum building height 35 feet
Minimum perimeter setback 25 feet
Maximum building stories 3
Maximum site coverage by building 25 7.
Maximum site coverage by building and pavement 80 7.
Minimum undestructed open space 20 7.
OCCUPANCY (TABLE 5-A)
Type A2 Church building
Type B2 Educational space
Type B2 Office space
FIRE RESISTANCE OF EXTERIOR WALLS (TABLE 5-A)
Type A2 2 hours less than 10'
1 hour elsewhere
Type B2 1 hour less than 20'
OPENINGS IN EXTERIOR WALLS
Type A2 & B2 Not permitted less
than 5 1
Protected less than 10'
REQUIRED SEPARATION
Type A2-Type B2 1 hour separation
11


BASIC ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA FOR ONE STORY BUILDINGS TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION (TABLE 5-C)
A2 Type I fire resistive Unlimited
Type II fire resistive 29,900 S.F.
Type II and III one hour 13,500 S.F.
Type IV heavy timber 13,500 S.F.
Type V one hour 10,500 S.F.
B2 Type I fire resistive Unlimited
Type II fire resistive 39,900 S.F.
Type II & III one hour 18,000 S.F.
Type IV heavy timber 18,000 S.F.
Type V one hour 14,000 S.F.
ALLOWABLE AREA INCREASES (SECTION 506.3)
Floor areas may be increased at a rate of five (5) percent for each foot by which the minimum width exceeds twenty (20) feet. Increases shall not exceed one hundred (100) percent.
MAXIMUM BUILDING HEIGHT IN STORIES (TABLE 5-10)
A2 Type I fire resistive Unlimited
Type II fire resistive 4
one hour 2
Type III one hour 2
Type IV heavy timber 2
Type V one hour 2
B2 All types allow at least 2 stories
Note: Local requirements permit three stories
or thirty five (35) feet maximum.
12


WATER CLOSET ACCESS (SECTION 511a)
Each stool located in a clear space not less than 30 inches in width.
Clear space in front not less than 24 inches.
HANDICAPPED WATER CLOSET (ONE REQUIRED FOR EACH SEX)
Doorways-Unobstructed width greater than 32 inches.
Clear space each side of door in closed position is 44 inches minimum.
Clear space within toilet room to inscribe a circle with a diameter not less than 60 inches (doors may encroach not more than 12 inches).
Clear space in front of stool 42 inches wide and 48 inches long minimum.
WATER CLOSETS REQUIRED Elementary schools (SECTION 805)
Water closets boys 1:100
girls 1:35
Urinals boys 1:30
LAVATORIES
One lavatory for each two water closets or urinals. WATER FOUNTAINS
One with spout within 33 inches of the floor.
One outside each group of male/female toilets per church request.
13


LIGHT, VENTILATION AND SANITATION (SECTION 605)
Glazed openings not less than one tenth of the total floor area.
Natural ventilation by openable exterior openings with an area not less than one twentieth of the total floor area (unless artificial light and a mechanically operated ventilation system is provided).
Operable toilet windows at least 3 sq. ft. in area (unless ventilation fan is provided).
MINIMUM ACCESS AND EGRESS REQUIREMENTS (TABLE 33-A)
A-2 (church)
B-2 (education)
(office)
Maximum distance to exi
2 exits minimum occupant load factor 7 SF
access by ramp required
2 exits minimum occupant load factor 20 SF
access by ramp required
1 exit minimum occupant load factor 100 SF
access by ramp required s is 150 feet (Sect.3303)
Width of exits:
Sanctuary
Educational
Office
Minimum corridor width
400/50=8 feet total 400/50=8 feet total 6/50=0.12<32 inches wide minimum is 44 inches
Stairs:
Width is 44 inches minimum
Rise is 4 inches minimum and 7.5 inches maximum Run is 10 inches minimum
No more than 12 feet vertically between landings Ramps:
Width as required by stairs
Slope is 1:12 maximum (egress and access)
Slope is 1:8 maximum all others
Slope is 1:5 maximum assembly room with fixed seats Landing at top not less than 5 feet Intermediate landing at each 5 feet of rise


SEATING (3316)
Standard-12 inches from the back of one seat to the most forward projection of the seat immediately behind it, measured vertically.
Continental seating - spacing of unoccupied seats shall provide a clear width between rows of seats. Automatic, or self-rising seats, may be measured in the seat up position. Other seats shall be measured in the seat down position.
18 inches for 1-18 seats
20 inches for 19-35 seats
21 inches for 36-45 seats
22 inches for 46-59 seats
24 inches for 60 seats or more
Exit doors along each side aisle of the row of seats at the rate of one pair for each five rows of seats
Each pair of exit doors shall provide a minimum clear width of 66 inches discharging into a foyer, lobby or the exterior of the building.
MAIN EXIT (3317)
Main exit shall accommodate one half of the total occupant load.
Sanctuary 1/2x400/50=4 feet minimum
Side exits are required each side and must
accommodate 1/3x400/50=2.67 feet total minimum
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MATRIX
»
VESTIBULE
SANCTUARY
HAT.T.
ADULT CLASSROOM(FELLOWSHIP)
ADULT CLASSROOMS YOUNG ADULT CLASSROOMS SENIOR HIGH CLASSROOMS JUNIOR HIGH CLASSROOMS JUNIOR CLASSROOMS MIDDLER CLASSROOMS PRIMARY CLASSROOMS KINDERGARTEN NURSERY
PASTOR'S OFFICE
ASSOCIATE'S OFFICE (CHOIR DIRECTOR)
ASSOCIATE'S OFFICE (YOUTH DIRECTOR)
RECEPTIONIST
WORK ROOM
OFFICE HALL
LIBRARY
MEETING ROOM(FELLOWSHIP)
KITCHEN
FELLOWSHIP (ADULT CLASSROOM) FELLOWSHIP (MEETING ROOM)
FELLOWSHIP (JUNIOR/MIDDLER/PRIMARY
CHOIR ROOM
CUSTODIAN CLOSET
MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ROOM
MAINTENANCE ROOM
EXTERIOR EXITS
1 - Primary Relationship
2 - Secondary Relationship
O - No, or Negative, Relationship
• - Shared Space
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FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS
SANCTUARY
The sanctuary is to accommodate 360 people in the congregation plus 40 people in the choir, for a total of 400 people. There is to be access from the vestibule. Access is also required for the platform or choir loft from another space in the building. Seating is to be a padded pew type with continental spacing. The layout of the sanctuary is to include consideration for piano, organ, choir and a small instrumental group. The instrumental group could be on or near the platform. The platform should be adaptable to special services such as Christmas plays, choirs, instrumental groups, etc. Windows are to be held to a minimum and can be stained glass. The floor is to be fully carpeted. Walls and ceilings should be of materials that will provide good acoustical qualities and performance. A motor operated projection screen is to be provided to allow for audio-visual presentations. The screen is to be concealed from view. Dimmers are to be provided for the lighting.
VESTIBULE
A vestibule is to be provided between the main entrance and sanctuary entrances. The vestibule is to be sufficient to provide the proper flow of traffic into the sanctuary. The vestibule is also to be used as a place to socialize after the service. Coat racks are to be provided in the vestibule equivalent to seventy five (75) percent of seating capacity on the basis of five (5) coats per lineal foot. Coat racks may be in the vestibule or an adjoining hall.
EDUCATION
Space has been provided in age groupings. Education space requirements vary considerably over short periods of time (five(5)years). Therefore, partitions within age level groupings are to be constructed that can be moveable or removeable without major renovation.


Grouping of educational spaces are as follows:
Nursery:
Divide the nursery into three equal spaces for crib, toddler and two year old groups. The nursery should be located on the same level and be close to the sanctuary vestibule and also be included in the Sunday school space. The nursery suite contains a toilet, drinking fountain, sink and diaper changing counter.
Kindergarten:
The kindergarten should be designed as one open space of nine hundred (900) square feet. The kindergarten area provides space for furniture groupings of thirty six (36) chairs in assembly arrangements and four (4) areas of table and chair arrangements of nine (9) each. Site dividers, used as mobile chalkboards, and tackboard units (furnished by the church) will divide table areas from each other.
Primary:
Same as kindergarten with seven hundred sixty (760) square feet of space and assembly arrangement for three hundred eighty (380) square feet, and three (3) table/chair areas of approximately thirteen (13) each.
Middler:
Same as primary.
Junior:
Same as primary.
The kindergarten, primary, middler and junior areas should be adjacent to each other. This area could double as a fellowship area. The kitchen could be near this area.
Junior High:
The junior high area will be divided into three classroom spaces of one hundred seventy (170) square feet each to accommodate approximately eleven (11) pupils each. A minimum of four (4) linear feet of chalkboard and four (4) linear feet of tackboard should be provided in each classroom.
19


Senior High:
Same as junior high Young Adult:
Young adult will be provided in adult space arrangement.
Adult:
The adult area will be divided into six (6) classroom spaces of approximately two hundred thirty-six (236) square feet each to accommodate one hundred forty-two (142) people. Two classrooms will be used by young adults. This space will double as a fellowship hall.
OFFICE SUITE
The office suite should be located on the same level and be close to the vestibule. The main entrance is to be from the corridor into the reception area. Circulation of the office suite is through the reception area into a central hall. If possible the suite should have a secondary exit.
The Pastor and associates offices should be located on an exterior wall and have an exterior window. Provide restroom facilities within the office area or nearby.
The workroom should be accessible from the central hall and include a counter top, layout space, base cabinets and a small sink. Additional floor space is to be provided for shelving and reproduction equipment.
LIBRARY:
The library is to be near the educational unit and provide approximately one hundred (100) linear feet of shelving. The library is primarily for browsing and checking out books. There will be no space for reading in the library. The library should be approximately one hundred twenty (120) square feet.
20


MEETING ROOM
The meeting room should be located close to the office suite and adult classrooms. Entrance should be provided through the public hall. A base cabinet, counter top and sink will provide facilities for small fellowship functions.
FELLOWSHIP
Large fellowship functions will occur in adult classroom space. The kitchen should be adjacent to this space. Small fellowship functions can be held in the primary/middler/junior education space.
Fellowship would include such functions as class parties, teen parties, ladies fellowship group, missionary dinners, staff meetings, board meetings, etc.
KITCHEN
The kitchen should contain two (2) residential ranges with exhaust hoods, two (2) residential refrigerators, a built-in undercounter residential dishwasher, wall cabinets, an extra-large double sink and a passthrough window to the classroom area. The kitchen should have access from the classroom and public hall.
CUSTODIAN CLOSET
A custodian closet should be provided on each level if multi-level design is utilized. A janitor's sink with mop rack above and full height shelving should be ' provided on the wall.
MAINTENANCE ROOM
A room within the building should be assigned for the exclusive use of exterior maintenance and equipment storage. It should be located away from the main entrance and it should have a pair of doors leading from the exterior.
21


MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ROOM(S)
A mechanical equipment space should be provided for heating, air conditioning, telephone and domestic hot water equipment.
In the design of the building consideration should be given to daylighting, solar hot water heating, and solar heating if practical.
22


SPACE REQUIREMENTS
I
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SPACE
SF/
CAPACITY OCCUPANT NET SF
CHURCH SPACE:
Sanctuary (including choir) 400 EDUCATIONAL SPACES:
Nursery (Age 0-3) 40
Kindergarten (Age 4-5) 36
Primary (Age 6-7) 38
Middler (Age 8-10) 38
Junior (Age 11-12) 38
Junior high (Age 13-15) 34
Senior high (Age 16-18) 34
Young Adult (Age 19-30) 42
Adult Library (Age over 30) 100
Total educational spaces 400
OFFICE SPACES:
Pastor
Associates (Choir and
youth director) 2
Reception
Work & Storage
Meeting room
Toilet
Total office spaces SUMMARY:
Sanctuary Educational space Office
total net area
Circulation, toilets & mechanics TOTAL GROSS AREA
3800
25 1000
25 900
20 760
20 760
20 760
15 510
15 510
10 420
10 1000
— 120
6740
180
120 240
200 180 400 20
1220
3800
6740
1220
11760
spaces 6040
17800
23


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CONCLUSION
There always seems to be something more that could be done when the drawings are taken from the drafting board and out to the printer for final printing. Such is the case with this project.
The Sanctuary and patio areas could be looked at more closely. Colors could be selected. More attention could be shown to the model. And on and on until the project is complete and no more changes can be made. But as in a real project, one must stop somewhere. And where I stopped was, I believe, where I should have because presentation drawings should not be complete and should not go beyond the design development stage. I have checked all the pieces and they fit. Now if the project could continue, construction documents would bring out those missing pieces and unresolved questions. That phase of the project we will get as on-the-job training in an office and on the site.
The solution works well with the program. Oh, I am sure that other solutions could work as well or even better. But this solution is mine. I have walked the building inside and out in my dreams and I like what I see. And what I see has to be conveyed through the drawings to others.
In looking through the drawings, I hope you see what I see.
39


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BIBLIOGRAPHY
The Holy Bible, New International Version; New York
International Bible Society, The Zondervan Corporation, Grand Rapids, Michigan, copyright 1978.
Uniform Building Code-1985 Edition; International
Conference of Building Officials, 5360 South Workman Millroad, Whittier, California.
Westminster Church of The Nazarene-Architectural
Program; Clarence E. Haviland, Architect, Wheatridge, Colorado-1977.
The Architect's Guide to Facility Programming; Mickey
A. Palmer, American Institute of Architects, Washington, D.C. & New York.
The Passive Solar Energy Book; Edward Mazria, Rodale Press, Emmaus, Pennsylvania, copyright 1977.
IES Lighting Handbook (Application & Reference) Vols.
I & 11-1981; Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, Waverly Press, Inc., Baltimore, MD. Architectural Handbook; Alfred M. Kemper, John Wiley & sons, New York, copyright 1979.
Church Building Sourcebook; C. Ray Bowman-Editorial
Coordinator, Dept, of Home Missions, Church of The Nazarene, Beacon Hill Press, Kansas City, Missouri, copyright 1979.
Better Buildings for Nazarene Sunday Schools; Dept.
of Church Schools, Church of The Nazarene, Beacon Hill Press, Kansas City, Missouri.


Full Text

PAGE 1

WESTMINSTER CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE An architectural thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture. by James A. Smith Spring 1986

PAGE 2

The Thesis of James A. Smith is approved. Committee Chairman Clarence Haviland Principal Advisor University of Colorado at Denver Date:

PAGE 3

I J• I I ' ... N1 , Dl .. , • j.':"" E Xi I

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INDEX Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Goals and objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Site analysis 5 Code analysis ..................................... 11 Functional requirements ........................... 16 Space requirements ................................ 23 Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Conclusion ........................................ 39 Bibliography ...................................... 40

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s T A T E M E N T

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STATEMENT The image of church is very different for each person. For those that attend regularly, church is where one encounters their first social structure outside the immediate family. They may be dedicated, christened, baptized, married and a funeral service administered for them all in the church. Those that attend occasionally may be involved in a special Easter or Christmas program themselves or with their children. Others may never enter a church at all. For those that attend regularly they will become socially active beginning in the nursery. As they grow older they will be involved in plays and choirs. They may become a Christian them-selves through a conversion process as outlined in the Bible and administered by each particular denomination. They are taught the guidelines of wholesome living and given pointers on how to deal with the unexpected and stressful situations that may be encountered during one's lifetime. Counseling is available to help them through troubled times that may affect the individual or the family as a whole. A great social bond may develop between individuals and families that extends beyond the wall of the church building out into the community. Spiritually the church is a symbolic place to go to and express, by physical presence, that one submits to the idea that there is a supreme being. A closer spiritual bond may be encouraged by the church and developed by the individual. This spiritual bond may be encouraged for different reasons. One reason may be due to the interpretation of the Bible by that particular denomination. Another could be a desire to spend eternity or the afterlife in a heavenly or godly place as defined by the Bible or the denomination. And a reason could be the fear of spending eternity or the afterlife in a hell or fearful existence. So the church does many things for many people. This program will strive to make the facilities warm and inviting for social and spiritual functions. It will also strive to make the spiritual area, auditorium, overpowering but soothing to state that we are significant but small compared to God. The building on the hill should be recognized as a church from a distance. l

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HITRODUCTIOH RELIGIOUS HISTORY Man has worshipped some form of god throughout his existance. Altars made of rough stones were the first recorded places of worship in the old testament. The ten commandments were given to Moses on tablets of stone and were placed inside the ark of the covenant. The ark of the covenant with the tablets were later put in a tabernacle or holy place. The tabernacle was the center of the Nomadic community of the Israelites. The church has been the hub of the community for many years and in older communities this is still true. Early American churches were usually small and served the community as a whole for several functions. These main functions were church services, school and community or townhall functions. NAZARENE CHURCH HISTORY In 1895 the denomination of the Church of The Nazarene was founded in Los Angeles, California, by Phineas Bresee, a former Methodist minister in Los Angeles. In the beginning Bresee founded and supervised many churches and in 1907 these churches united with the Association of Pentecostal Churches of America. In 1908 the recently formed Pentecostal Church of the Nazarene joined the Holiness Church of Christ, an organization of Southern Holiness churches. Later the denomination took on the name "The Church of The Nazarene". The denomination presently comprises about one third of the Holiness movement with just under 400,000 members around the world. There are many Nazarene churches in the metropolitan Denver area. 2

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LOCAL CHURCH HISTORY Bill M. Sullivan and approximately thirty dedicated people formed the Westminster Church of The Nazarene in July, 1957. Numerical and financial growth has been steady. Average attendance of 185 is 180% of the theoretical capacity of the present facilities. THE PROJECT The project has been modified from a real project undertaken by Clarence E. Haviland, Architect, in 1977. The facilities he designed were occupied by the church in 1978. Mr. Haviland's project was designed for a sanctuary capacity of 350 with flexible space expandable to a capacity of 500. Mr. Haviland's design also included a daycare center. To simplify the project some modifications have been made. The capacity will be 400 instead of 350 expandable to 500. The daycare center has been eliminated. The main east portion of the property will be used instead of the west portion. I am considering the west property as excess and may or may not be used by the church in the future. 3

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GOALS AND OBJECTIVES NEEDS The project is to provide a new sanctuary, Sunday school and fellowship space that will meet the existing and future growth needs of the church family unit through the decade. There is room on the site for future growth. FUNCTION The main function of the church is to provide for the spiritual and physical needs of the people. Aesthetically the building should be appealing and comfortable to the young and old. Ideological or spiritual elements of the Christian faith should be expressed in the design and furnishings of the santuary. An altar, which has ample room for seekers and workers, should be provided in the sanctuary. An altar signifies the universal need of salvation and the reality of a personal sacrificial experience. A cross also signifies the universal need of salvation and is a reminder of God's supreme revelation to man. The sacraments of the Lord's supper and baptism also are to be present in the sanctuary. The Lord's supper is represented by the communion table. Baptism is represented by a baptistry for immersion or a baptismal bowl. The baptistry is not necessarily visible when not in use. SERVICES The main religious services are Sunday morning, Sunday evening, and Wednesday evening. Additional services, departmental and administrative meetings occur when needed. Sunday school is normally the first service on Sunday morning. The Bible is read and discussed during this time. The second service of Sunday morning is usually the primary service of the church. During this time the main emphasis is the objective worship of God. The atmosphere is one of reverence and thoughtfulness. This service has the largest attendance and is composed of young people and adults. Children through eleven will be provided for elsewhere through a total children's ministry program. The Sunday evening service has a greater emphasis on christian fellowship and the christian experience. Wednesday evening emphasizes the subjective sharing of the christian experience. 4

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,, I :. .. ., I : ' ol.\' W, 112th AVENUE Ill ::1: "'II m m :II 0 6 m :II z ,.. W, 104th AVENUE VICINITY PLAN SITE PLAN SCALE

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SITE ANALYSIS SITE The site is located west of Federal Boulevard on the north side of 104th Avenue and the east side of King Street in Westminster, Colorado. The property contains seven and five tenths (7.5) acres with one thousand fifty-six (1056) feet along 104th Avenue and three hundred (300) feet along King Street. The eastern four (4) acres will be for church use and the western three (3) acres near King Street will be for future development. The remaining five tenths (0.5) acres will be required for the widening of 104th Avenue. VIEW The desireable views are to the north counterclockwise to the southwest. The mountain views are from the northwest to the southwest. SURROUNDINGS The site, presently, has no buildings nearby. The closest structure is a circular ground level watertank on the south side of 104th Avenue. The design will not relate to this watertank. A residential area is on King Street adjacent to 104th Avenue. CLIMATE Denver basically has an arid climate with cold winters and hot dry summers. In arid climates high daytime and low night-time temperatures occur. Night-time temperatures are normally comfortable. The area is characterized by low precipitation (15 inches annual average) and abundant sunshine. Temperature maximums reach below 0F in winter and above 90F in summer which is the daily mean maximum temperature (hottest month). The area experiences only rare occurrences of violent winds and weather. The large fluctuation of daily temperatures is due to intensive solar radiation during the day with strong outgoing radiation at night. The loss of heat during the night is due to clear skies. Such conditions bring about a need to reduce or delay solar and convective heat gains during the day. This can be done by masonry construction, reflective surface colors or shading. At night thermal mass may be cooled by night-sky radiation or ventilation. Reducing solar radiation on east west facing windows or walls may be accomplished by shading devices or vegetation. Maximum solar absorption can be accomplished by the use of dark surfaces and minimal solar absorption can be accomplished by using light or polished surfaces. Portions of the climate (temperature and wind) data were taken from the "Thesis for Design of Fixed Base Operator Facility", Spring 1985, by A. Michael Voigt. 6

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WIND User comfort and building economy can be enhanced when the forces of wind are recognized. For example, the orientation and velocity of prevailing winds may suggest the need for protection. Or proper fenestration orientation and size may enhance the natural cooling effects of a summer breeze. to 20 I I e. 5 Wind Roses show the percentage of time the wind blew from the 16 compass points or was calm. Temperature "An important determinant of annual fuel use is the number of degree-days at the geographic location of the building. For any one 24-hour day, the number of degree-days is the difference 0 between 65 F and the mean outdoor temperature for the day." Station Denver Airport Avg. Winter Temperature 37.6 Degree Days Yearly Total 6283 7

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Fuel consumption calculations include: Calculated hourly heat loss of the building Degree-days annually Average winter temperature Heating value per unit of fuel Efficiency of heating system The amount of humidity in the outside air is an important variable in determining the type of cooling system that can be utilized in a building. Outside Design Conditions for Denver Summer Dry Bulb Temperature 95 Precipitation Daily Range H Summer Wet Bulb Temperature 40 The design storm describes the largest quantity of water that may be deposited upon the site during a certain length of time. It is used to calculate the amount of surface runoff on the site and from this the amount of water to be temporarily stored on the site as required by local regulations. Adams County prescribes 6.1 in./hr. for 5 minutes time duration. 3-DDoo 5 0 0 Normal Monthly Total Precipitation 8

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The amount of rainfall through the year presents no unusual design constraints. Snow loads are used in structural design to design main structural members. Adams county requirements30 lbs./sq. ft., horizontal projection 15to-D oD J F J J 5 0 Mean Monthly Total Snowfall 0 0 The amount of snowfall through the year suggests that areas will have to be provided for the temporary storage of snow from paved outdoor circulation areas. SOLAR Latitude is used as an aid in calculating the amount of overhang or recess in shading devices. Latitude= 39'10" 9-

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Percentage of sunshine vs. cloudy days suggests the applicability of daylighting design for the building. BUILDING ARRANGEMENT The building should be sited to best utilize the view, sunlight and the slope of the site. The site slopes down to the northwest at approximately six (6) percent. Attention must be given to minimizing the effects of the prevailing wind and north exposure, during the winter months, while optimizing solar gain. Special consideration will be given to access by the handicapped. SITE REQUIREMENTS A structure with a capacity for four hundred (400) persons. Parking for one hundred fifty (150) automobiles. Required driveways and walks for proper access. Exterior recreation areas for volleyball/basketball court and softball field if possible. Exterior lighting as required for traffic, vehicular and pedestrian, for site security and beautification. Decorative and climatic landscaping. 10

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CODE ANALYSIS C.ITY OF WESTMINSTER ZONING REGULATIONS Maximum building height Minimum perimeter setback Maximum building stories Maximum site coverage by building Maximum site coverage by building and pavement Minimum undestructed open space OCCUPANCY (TABLE 5-A) Type A2 Type B2 Type B2 Church building Educational space Office space FIRE RESISTANCE OF EXTERIOR WALLS (TABLE 5-A) Type A2 Type B2 OPENINGS IR EXTERIOR WALLS Type A2 & B2 REQUIRED SEPARATION Type A2-Type B2 2 hours less than 10' 1 hour elsewhere 1 hour less than 20' Not permitted less than 5' Protected less than 10' 1 hour separation 35 feet 25 feet 3 25 % 80 % 20 % 11

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BASIC ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA FOR ONE STORY BUILDINGS TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION (TABLE 5-C) A2 Type I fire resistive Unlimited Type II fire resistive 29,900 S.F. Type II and III one hour 13,500 S.F. Type IV heavy timber 13,500 S.F. Type v one hour 10,500 S.F. B2 Type I fire resistive Unlimited Type II fire resistive 39,900 S.F. Type II &III one hour 18,000 S.F. Type IV heavy timber 18,000 S.F. Type V one hour 14,000 S.F. ALLOWABLE AREA INCREASES (SECTION 506.3) Floor areas may be increased at a rate of five (5) percent for each foot by which the minimum width exceeds twenty (20) feet. Increases shall not exceed one hundred (100) percent. MAXIMUM BUILDING HEIGHT IN STORIES (TABLE 5-10) A2 Type I fire resistive Unlimited Type II fire resistive 4 one hour 2 Type III one hour 2 Type IV heavy timber 2 Type V one hour 2 B2 All types allow at least 2 stories Note: Local requirements permit three stories or thirty five (35) feet maximum. 12

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WATER CLOSET ACCESS (SECTION 5lla) Each stool located in a clear space not less than 30 inches in width. Clear space in front not less than 24 inches. HANDICAPPED WATER CLOSET (ONE REQUIRED FOB. EACH SEX) Doorways-Unobstructed width greater than 32 inches. Clear space each side of door in closed position is 44 inches minimum. Clear space within toilet room to inscribe a circle with a diameter not less than 60 inches (doors may encroach not more than 12 inches). Clear space in front of stool 42 inches wide and 48 inches long minimum. WATER CLOSETS REQUIRED (SECTION 805) Elementary schools Water closets boys 1:100 girls 1:35 Urinals boys 1:30 LAVATORIES One lavatory for each two water closets or urinals. WATER FOUNTAINS One with spout within 33 inches of the floor. One outside each group of male/female toilets per church request. 13

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LIGHT, VENTILATION AND SANITATION (SECTION 605) Glazed openings not less than one tenth of the total floor area. Natural ventilation by openable exterior openings with an area not less than one twentieth of the total floor area (unless artificial light and a mechanically operated ventilation system is provided). Operable toilet windows at least 3 sq. ft. in area (unless ventilation fan is provided). MINIMUM ACCESS AND EGRESS REQUIREMENTS (TABLE 33-A) A-2 (church) 2 exits minimum occupant load factor 7 SF B-2 (education) (office) access by ramp required 2 exits minimum occupant load factor 20 SF access by ramp required 1 exit minimum occupant load factor 100 SF access by ramp required Maximum distance to exits is 150 feet (Sect.3303) Width of exits: Sanctuary Educational Office 400/50=8 feet total 400/50=8 feet total 6/50=0.12(32 inches wide minimum Minimum corridor width is 44 inches Stairs: Width is 44 inches minimum Rise is 4 inches minimum and 7.5 inches maximum Run is 10 inches minimum No more than 12 feet vertically between landings Ramps: Width as required by stairs Slope is 1:12 maximum (egress and access) Slope is 1:8 maximum all others Slope is 1:5 maximum assembly room with fixed seats Landing at top not less than 5 feet Intermediate landing at each 5 feet of rise 14

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SEATING (3316) Standard-12 inches from the back of one seat to the most forward projection of the seat immediately behind it, measured vertically. Continental seating -spacing of unoccupied seats shall provide a clear width between rows of seats. Automatic, or self-rising seats, may be measured in the seat up position. Other seats shall be measured in the seat down position. 18 inches for 1-18 seats 20 inches for 19-35 seats 21 inches for 36-45 seats 22 inches for 46-59 seats 24 inches for 60 seats or more Exit doors along each side aisle of the row of seats at the rate of one pair for each five rows of seats Each pair of exit doors shall provide a m1n1mum clear width of 66 inches discharging into a foyer, lobby or the exterior of the building. MAIN EXIT (3317) Main exit shall accommodate one half of the total occupant load. Sanctuary l/2x400/50=4 feet minimum Side exits are required each side and must accommodate l/3x400/50=2.67 feet total minimum 15

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-..

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• MATRIX VESTIBULE SANCTUARY HALL ADULT CLASSROOM(FELLOWSHIP) ADULT CLASSROOMS YOUNG ADULT CLASSROOMS SENIOR HIGH CLASSROOMS JUNIOR HIGH CLASSROOMS JUNIOR CLASSROOMS KIDDLER CLASSROOMS PRIMARY CLASSROOMS KINDERGARTEN NURSERY PASTOR 1 S OFFICE ASSOCIATE 1 S OFFICE (CHOIR DIRECTOR) ASSOCIATE 1 S OFFICE (YOUTH DIRECTOR) RECEPTIONIST WORK ROOK OFFICE HALL LIBRARY MEETING ROOM(FELLOWSHIP) KITCHEN FELLOWSHIP (ADULT CLASSROOM) FELLOWSHIP (MEETING ROOK) FELLOWSHIP (JUNIOR/KIDDLER/PRIKARY CHOIR ROOK CUSTODIAN CLOSET MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ROOK MAINTENANCE ROOK EXTERIOR EXITS 1 -Primary Relationship 2 -Secondary Relationship 0 -No, or Negative, Relationship • Shared Space 17

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FUNCTIONAL REQUIRKMKNTS The sanctuary is to accommodate 360 people in the congregation plus 40 people in the choir, for a total of 400 people. There is to be access from the vestibule. Access is also required for the platform or choir loft from another space in the building. Seating is to be a padded pew type with continental spacing. The layout of the sanctuary is to include consideration for piano, organ, choir and a small instrumental group. The instrumental group could be on or near the platform. The platform should be adaptable to special services such as Christmas plays, choirs, instrumental groups, etc. Windows are to be held to a minimum and can be stained glass. The floor is to be fully carpeted. Walls and ceilings should be of materials that will provide good acoustical qualities and performance. A motor operated projection screen is to be provided to allow for audio-visual presentations. The screen is to be concealed from view. Dimmers are to be provided for the lighting. VESTIBULE A vestibule is to be provided between the main entrance and sanctuary entrances. The vestibule is to be sufficient to provide the proper flow of traffic into the sanctuary. The vestibule is also to be used as a place to socialize after the service. Coat racks are to be provided in the vestibule equivalent to seventy five (75) percent of seating capacity on the basis of five (5) coats per lineal foot. Coat racks may be in the vestibule or an adjoining hall. EDUCATION Space has been provided in age groupings. Education space requirements vary considerably over short periods of time (five(5)years). Therefore, partitions within age level groupings are to be constructed that can be moveable or removeable without major renovation. 18

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Grouping of educational spaces are as follows: Nursery: Divide the nursery into three equal spaces for crib, toddler and two year old groups. The nursery should be located on the same level and be close to the sanctuary vestibule and also be included in the Sunday school space. The nursery suite contains a toilet, drinking fountain, sink and diaper changing counter. Kindergarten: The kindergarten should be designed as one open space of nine hundred (900) square feet. The kindergarten area provides space for furniture groupings of thirty six (36) chairs in assembly arrangements and four (4) areas of table and chair arrangements of nine (9) each. Site dividers, used as mobile chalkboards, and tackboard units (furnished by the church) will divide table areas from each other. Primary: Same as kindergarten with seven hundred sixty (760) square feet of space and assembly arrangement for three hundred eighty (380) square feet, and three (3) table/chair areas of approximately thirteen (13) each. Middler: Same as primary. Junior: Same as primary. The kindergarten, primary, middler and junior areas should be adjacent to each other. This area could double as a fellowship area. The kitchen could be near this area. Junior High: The junior high area will be divided into three classroom spaces of one hundred seventy (170) square feet each to accommodate approximately eleven (11) pupils each. A minimum of four (4) linear feet of chalkboard and four (4) linear feet of tackboard should be provided in each classroom. 19

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Senior High: Same as junior high Young Adult: Young adult will be provided in adult space arrangement. Adult: The adult area will be divided into six (6) classroom spaces of approximately two hundred thirty-six (236) square feet each to accommodate one hundred forty-two (142) people. Two classrooms will be used by young adults. This space will double as a fellowship hall. OFFICE SUITE The office suite should be located on the same level and be close to the vestibule. The main entrance is to be from the corridor into the reception area. Circulation of the office suite is through the reception area into a central hall. If possible the suite should have a secondary exit. The Pastor and associates offices should be located on an exterior wall and have an exterior window. Provide restroom facilities within the office area or nearby. The workroom should be accessible from the central hall and include a counter top, layout space, base cabinets and a small sink. Additional floor space is to be provided for shelving and reproduction equipment. LIBRARY: The library is to be near the educational unit and provide approximately one hundred (100) linear feet of shelving. The library is primarily for browsing and checking out books. There will be no space for reading in the library. The library should be approximately one hundred twenty (120) square feet. 20

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MEETING ROOM The meeting room should be located close to the office suite and adult classrooms. Entrance should be provided through the public hall. A base cabinet, counter top and sink will provide facilities for small fellowship functions. FELLOWSHIP Large fellowship functions will occur in adult classroom space. The kitchen should be adjacent to this space. Small fellowship functions can be held in the primary/middler/junior education space. Fellowship would include such functions as class parties, teen parties, ladies fellowship group, missionary dinners, staff meetings, board meetings, etc. KITCHEN The kitchen should contain two (2) residential ranges with exhaust hoods, two (2) residential refrigerators, a built-in undercounter residential dishwasher, wall cabinets, an extra-large double sink and a passthrough window to the classroom area. The kitchen should have access from the classroom and public hall. CUSTODIAN CLOSET A custodian closet should be provided on each level if multi-level design is utilized. A janitor's sink with mop rack above and full height shelving should be provided on the wall. MAINTENANCE ROOM A room within the building should be assigned for the exclusive use of exterior maintenance and equipment storage. It should be located away from the main entrance and it should have a pair of doors leading from the exterior. 21

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MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ROOM(S) A mechanical equipment space should be provided for heating, air conditioning, telephone and domestic hot water equipment. In the design of the building consideration should be given to daylighting, solar hot water heating, and solar heating if practical. 22

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• SPACE REQUIREMENTS SPACE CAPACITY CHURCH SPACE: Sanctuary (including choir) 400 EDUCATIONAL SPACES: --------------------Nursery (Age 0-3) 40 Kindergarten (Age 4-5) 36 Primary (Age 6-7) 38 Middler (Age 8-10) 38 Junior (Age 11-12) 38 Junior high (Age 13-15) 34 Senior high (Age 16-18) 34 Young Adult (Age 19-30) 42 Adult (Age over 30) 100 Library Total educational spaces 400 Pastor Associates (Choir and youth director) Reception Work & Storage Meeting room Toilet Total office spaces SUMMARY: Sanctuary Educational space Office total net area 2 Circulation, toilets & mechanical spaces TOTAL GROSS AREA SF/ OCCUPANT 25 25 20 20 20 15 15 10 10 120 NET SF 3800 1000 900 760 760 760 510 510 420 1000 120 6740 180 240 200 180 400 20 1220 3800 6740 1220 11760 6040 17800 23

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D R A w I N G s

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1: .. .. I I I ,... __ . 'ZJ__ . __ war_-.SDErOGlJil!tL._. __ SITE PLAN !lc.A.LI l••tc' -----------------------------------WESTMINSTER CHURCH of the NAZARERE 7YA't' , ..

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-------WESTMINSTER CHURCH of the NAZARENE

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., 12] ' I ' GROUND FLOOR PLAN E9 WESTMINSTER CHURCH of the NAZARENE 711&AT1-

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• ffi j ! [ e a EI El 8 8 EI r:I WEST E1..EV A T10N '.,._ __ .,._ a a o u Iii m e a a ; m e m a EAST ELEVATION ----EJ El mm m m m a a --EI B 8 m m B m m ---==------------------==-----------'-"=--NORTM ELEVATION WESTMINSTER CHURCH of the NAZARENE ..............

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m lltl 0 0 0 0 SOUTH ELEVATION . ...,. D ::J a 0 D 0 SECTION B .. SECTlOH A SECllON C + i WESTMINSTER CHURCH ot lhB NAZARENE .-.........

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\ I II . I -z 7' "\ I .----;--s-::-' (p .; ---.. g 0 -0 0 a G G> ,_ () .. 1.--... : ') 0 Q I () -0 . @) I !\L-: . (>.. i . 0 0 I!) o-I 0 a 0, at:: I

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.\. ) lr,_ ' ' 4----+--I : 1 --I --I ' l j . I r-r-1-r-t-fI .. I I I I I i I I 1"'1 I I I Jr " [I 1 /' I"' , ..... f---n .. <.. z.J.O -------------.. --.. ' tt r-----=.=--==.= ::_ ==: --I \ I .. ....,, " "' "' .... I I I ' ..... ... , "'' I \ i -, I ! \ i ! , I i t. J :_ I t-., I I ": "' "' ""' I l ! I ... I I : . I , ; \ I ! \ \ I I '1, l I : ' \ i i \ 1 I I ' -._. .IL ---1-.. (4<1 -------I I lJj I I r--. !f---1 ( t---=-.-: I J-----.o.: I r--• I t--' ! 1--( 1----""'/, I

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I I -c 0 N c L u s I 0 N

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CONCLUSION There always seems to be something more that could be done when the drawings are taken from the drafting board and out to the printer for final printing. Such is the case with this project. The Sanctuary and patio areas could be looked at more closely. Colors could be selected. More attention could be shown to the model. And on and on until the project is complete and no more changes can be made. But as in a real project, one must stop somewhere. And where I stopped was, I believe, where I should have because presentation drawings should not be complete and should not go beyond the design development stage. I have checked all the pieces and they fit. Now if the project could continue, construction documents would bring out those missing pieces and unresolved questions. That phase of the project we will get as on-the-job training in an office and on the site. The solution works well with the program. Oh, I am sure that other solutions could work as well or even better. But this solution is mine. I have walked the building inside and out in my dreams and I like what I see. And what I see has to be conveyed through the drawings to others. In looking through the drawings, I hope you see what I see. 39

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B I B L I 0 G R A F H 'V

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BIBLIOGRAPHY The Holy Bible, New International Version; New York International Bible Society, The Zondervan Corporation, Grand Rapids, Michigan, copyright 1978. Uniform Building Code-1985 Edition; International Conference of Building Officials, 5360 South Workman Millroad, Whittier, California. Westminster Church of The Nazarene-Architectural Program; Clarence E. Haviland, Architect, Wheatridge, Colorado-1977. The Architect's Guide to Facility Programming; Mickey A. Palmer, American Institute of Architects, Washington, D.C. & New York. The Passive Solar Energy Book; Edward Mazria, Rodale Press, Emmaus, Pennsylvania, copyright 1977. IES Lighting Handbook (Application & Reference) Vols. I & II-1981; Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, Waverly Press, Inc., Baltimore, MD. Architectural Handbook; Alfred M. Kemper, John Wiley & sons, New York, copyright 1979. Church Building Sourcebook; C. Ray Bowman-Editorial Coordinator, Dept. of Home Missions, Church of The Nazarene, Beacon Hill Press, Kansas City, Missouri, copyright 1979. Better Buildings for Nazarene Sunday Schools; Dept. of Church Schools, Church of The Nazarene, Beacon Hill Press, Kansas City, Missouri. 40